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Full text of "History and genealogy of Fenwick's colony"

THE LIBRARY 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

LOS ANGELES 



f.JV 




"^'-'^--^ J '^iiiuCC "T^-»*W-7C<__ 




THOMAS SHOURDS. 
Born 1805. 



H I S T O R % I*** 



AND 



GENEALOGY OF 



rENWICK'8 COLONY 



BY 



THOMAS SHOURDS, 



OF SALEM COUNTY. 



ISRIDGETON, N. J.! 

GEORGE E. NIXO^, PUBLISHER. 

1876. 






Entered according to Act of Congress, in tlie year 1S7G, by 

Thomas Shoukds and George F. Nixox, 

In the Office of tlic Librarian of Congress, at Wasliington, D. C. 






INTKODUCTORY. 

The enrliest attempts at settlement l)y tlie Europeans on the 
shores of the Dehaware may l)e traeed to the second decade of 
the seventeenth century. In 1621 a charter was o-ranted to the 
West India Company by the United Netlierlands, whose pur- 
pose was to transport cok)nists to these new Territories, and es- 
tablish trade and commercial intercourse therewith. In 1623 
Captain Cornelius Jacobson May, under the patronage of the 
l)ef ore-named company, made a voyage to America, and sailed 
up the Delaware river as far as the mouth of Great Timber 
creek, a few miles l)elow the present site of Philadelphia, and 
erected a trading post, Avliich was called Fort Nassau. The 
Swedes and Finns soon followed, as in 1638 Queen Christiana 
gave her countenance to the sending of a Colony to the same 
rivei', and where a settlement was made. Passing over the 
grant made by Charles I., king of England, to Edmund Ploy- 
don, in 1631-, of certain territories in America, and the attempts 
of the New Haven Colony, under Captain Nathaniel Turner, in 
16-l:(>, to effect a settlement on the eastern shore of the river, 
the English emigrants holding the right of government, and 
title to the soil, under the conveyance made by the second 
Cliarles to tlie Duke of York, 1664, were the next to establish a 
Colony on the banks of the before-named river. The many 
political changes, arising from the wars and internal commo- 
tions of the homo government, added much to the attendant 
troubles of the colonists, but at no time were they entirely lost 
sight of, or their nationality oblitei'ated. Tlie language, the 
customs, and the religions of each were distinctly preserved for 
several generations, and even at this day have not entirely 
disappeared. 

The Dutch were the least successful in" establishing tliemselves 
here, for the reason, doubtless, that much greater attractions lay 
about New Amsterdam, and the many ditticulties in which they 
were involved by the dissentions across the sea. The Swedes 
and Films, yitdding generally to the condition of things around 
them, and avoiding as nnu-h as possible any participation in 
1 



FENWICK S COLONY. 



(jiiarrels between the Dutch and English, soon made a settk'nient 
on the eastern cr Ne^' Jersey side of the Dehiware river ; most 
of wliieh can be traced with some degree of accuracy. In a 
letter from William Penn, then living in Philadelphia, lie says : 
"The first planters were Dutch, and soon after the Swedes and 
Finns. The Dutch applied themselves to traffic, and the Swedes 
and Finns to husbandry. The Dutch have a meeting place for 
religious worship at New Castle, and the Swedes one at Chris- 
tiana, one at Tinicum and one at Wicaco, "within half a mile of 
this town. The Swedes inhabit the freshes of the river Dela- 
ware. There is no need of giving any description of them who 
are better known in England than here, but they are a plain, 
strong and industrious people, yet have not made much progress 
in the culture or propagation of fruit trees, as if they desired 
rather to have money than plenty or traffic. But I presume the 
Indians made them the more careless by furnishing them with 
the means of profit, to-wit : all kinds of furs for rum and such 
strong liquors. They kindly received me as did the English, 
who were few before the people concerned with me came among 
them. I must needs commend their respect to authority and 
kind behavior to the English. They do not degenerate from 
their old friendship between both kingdoms, as they are a peo- 
ple, physical and strong of body, so have they line children, and 
almost every house is full ; it is rare to find one of them M-ithout 
three or four boys, and as many girls ; some of them have six, 
seven and eight sons, and I must do them justice to say I see 
few young men more sober and industrious." On the 'New Jer- 
sey shore they had settled near Salem, on Raccoon creek, wdiere 
Swedesboro now^ stands, at the mouth of Woodbury creek, and 
other places on the navigation. 

John Fenwick, on his arrival to this country, found much of 
his territory occupied by the Swedes and Finns and Hollanders, 
but he settled amicaljly with them l)y conhrniing their title to 
the land they held in possession. Deeds for the Finnstown tract 
and the Boughtown tract and other like conveyances appears on 
record, and are curious documents in their way. Those settled 
on Raccoon Creek had made their homes on either side of the 
stream, and extending several miles aloug the same, with a 
Church at Swedesboro. This Colony assumed such ])roportions 
that the attention of travelers and historians were attracted to 
it, and many detached sketches of their mode of living, their 
political arrangement, their success as farmers, dealers in furs 
and skins, may be found in the old books. Near the mouth of 
Woodburv Creek a few fauiilies of Swedes had their farms and 



fiErDJU,N26 194g 



FENWICK S COLONY. 



fisliei'ies, but tliis settlement alwaj's remained small, and was 
eventiiall_y overgrown bj tlie English, avIio established a Friends' 
Meeting there, and occnpied most of tlie land in that region. At 
the outlet of Fennsiaukin Creek into the Delaware river at one 
time stood a small stockade called Fort Eriwonock, surrounded 
by a few Swedes and Fiims. This, like the Colony at Wood- 
bury Creek, soon lost its identity, and the grants of land there- 
abouts, as made by the proprietors of West Kew Jersey, took 
precedence of any previous title to the same, saving always the 
Indian ownership, ^vhich was recognii^ed and ccnnpensated for 
previous to location. The more jiarticularity is given to the 
description of these localities and names of such as resided 
there, for the reason that many of the emigrant's families 
l)ecame the ancestors of the present inhabitants living in West 
Jersey and scattered through the different States of the Union. 
The use of surnames was not general among the Swedes and 
Finns for se\'eral years after tlie arrival and settlement of the 
English under John Fenwick and William Penn. The custom 
was overcome only by intermarriage with and the rigid usage of 
the English in this regard, and has rendered it impossible to 
follow the lines of families which took that direction. The 
transposition of names, the alteration in spelling, as well as 
Christain and surnames, is another source of confusion and leads 
to endless difficulties in geneological research. Among the 
Indians ; names were never hereditary, and one generation could 
not trace its lines of blood through that of another by this 
means. When any name could be found it was so utterly 
unpronouncable and beyond tlie possibility of being spelled, that 
our ancestors in despair abandoned all attempts at reconciling 
the one language Avitli the other. 

As early as the year 1G8-1-, the proper authorities of Salem 
County were at nnich pains to secure a translation of the 
language used by the Aborigines, and have the same on record 
in one of the court's books of the Bailiwick, evidence of their 
purpose to carry out a desirable object, and of how little was 
accomplished thereby. These impediments are encountered by 
the genealogist and antiquarian at every step, nudging dark his 
pathway, and his 2>i"0gress in some degree uncertain. In 
following the movements of the lirst English emigrants, the 
inquiry very naturally arises why their places of settlement 
were selected, as they were in this wilderness country, and the 
causes that contributed such action. The cluirts of the new 
world were defectiv^e, and knowledge of this particular section, 
in like degree limited. These people were not surrounded witli 



FFNWICK S COLONY. 



prestige of any monied corporation, or backed l)_v the roj-al 
])eroo:ative to assist them in this undertaking-. The l>reakingup 
of their lionsehold was an end of all claims to an inheritance in 
their native land. The persecutions they had passed through, 
and tlie uncertainty of any change for the better, banished all 
hopes of justice and tolerance for them. Wliatever may have 
been their attachments, or however bitter the feeling incident to 
separation from friends and home ; no hope of return softened 
their grief or assauged their sorrow. Witli all their earthly 
goods (limited among the most fortunate,) their families and 
such of their associates as would make the venture, left the 
shores of England never to return. Their departure was not 
surrounded with any pleasant associations, neither had their 
approach to the land of their adoption any anticipated welcome. 
Privations and dangers met them at every step, but no means 
were at hand whereby they could escape. They only knew that 
the Delaware river was the western l)onndary of New Jersey, 
but the most desirable localities whereat to make their settle- 
ment no one had given them any information. The natives, 
they looked upon as savages in a literal sense, and dreaded the 
necsssity of any intercourse with them ; regarding the wild 
l)3asts of the forest witli less fear, and more easily controlled. 
Under these circumstances did our ancestors turn their ship 
from the ocean into Delaware bay and ascend the river, ignorant 
of where should be their abiding place. 

John Fenwick, with his children, his associates and si'rvants, 
in the little ship Grithti, Captain Griffith master, sailed up the 
bay, al)0ut fifty miles along the eastern shore from Cape May, 
and anchored opposite the old Swede's fort, Elsborg, near the 
moutli of Assamliocking river, on the 23d of September, 1675, 
old style. The day following they ascended the Assamliocking 
river, now Salem, about three miles, and landed on the south 
side of the river on a point of land pleasantly located, that 
being, at the present computation of time, the fifth day of Octo- 
ber, 1675. We can readily imagine tliat their minds were 
turned to the author of their being in adoration and praise for 
their safe arrival to their newly adopted country, after a long 
and tedious voyage in crossing the Atlantic of more than two 
montlis and a half. Fenwick soon determined on laying out a 
town at the place where tliey landed ; it being one of those 
pleasant autumnal days which are common in this latitude at 
that season of the year. lie gave it the name of Salem, which 
signifies peace, and wliich name it still bears, it being the first 
Euii'lisli tnwn on the Eastern shore of tlie Delaware. The next 



FENWICK S COLONY, 



in order of time was tlie ship Kent, bringing tlie London and 
Yorksliire commissioners and many families, intending to oc- 
cupy the hmds of West New Jersey. For some reasons never 
exphiined the ship passed only abont twenty miles higher np the 
river than where the Griftin anchored, and the passengers went 
on shore near the month of Raccoon creek, and where a settle- 
ment of Swedes were fonnd. The destination of the commis- 
sioners and many of the emigrants was Yegon's Island, now 
Bnrlington City, which point was reached after mnch trouble 
and delay. The reason the passengers l)y this ship went so far 
up tlie river is explained l)y this fact that where Burlington now 
stands, as early as the year 166S, a Hollander named Peter 
Yegon built a house of entertainment for travelers. No other 
settlement to that time had been sustained on the river front 
al)ove the mouth of Raccoon creek until this point was reached, 
and, as a consequence, no discretion was left the commissioners 
if they sought comf(n*table lodgings. The sale of rum l)v Peter 
to the Indians ended in a drunken riot, in which he was driven 
away from the house, and forced to abandon the place. George 
Fox and his companion, Richard Lippincott, was of them who 
rested in the empty dwx^ling one night on their road from New 
England to Virginia, which occurrence he mentions in his jour- 
nal. These are well settled historical facts, and accounts for 
the procedure on the part of the commissioners, and also 
explains the name attached to the island l)efore the arrival of 
the English. Several emigrant ships folloAved, and proceeded 
at once to Burlington, where the people landed and soon found 
homes in the neighborhood. The Newton settlers chartered a 
vessel for their special use, the ship Adventure, and sailed from 
Dublin harbor. With them they brought all their worldly 
goods, and some implements of husbandry, and arriving in the 
winter season, they only proceeded as far as Salem, where they 
remained through the cold weather. Their purpose was to set- 
tle on the Irish tenth, lying Ijetween Oldman's and Pennsahaw- 
ken creek, and which they examined at once to carry out that 
object. This was two years before William Penn first visited 
America. A settlement was made on a stream falling into the 
river Delaware opposite, and a short distance below the city of 
Philadelphia, which they called Newton creek, and the same 
name given to the location chosen. Why this place was pitched 
upon, and M-hence the name adopted does not appear. This 
settlement became allied with the Salem settlement more than 
any other along the Delaware river ; marriages were frequent 
among the inliabitants of the two locations'^ The prominent 



fenwick's colony. 



cause of this, I presume, was that very early after the arrival of 
Fenwick's colony, and the one at Newton, Friends organized a 
yearly and quarterly meeting, com])osed of members of both 
localities, and likewise those of Burlington. The early emi- 
grants, finding in the Aborigines excellent neighbors and relia- 
ble associates, the relations brought about marriages between the 
emigrants and natives, involving the genealogy of a number of 
families in the Salem tenth, and likewise all West Jersey. It 
is always to be regretted that so little pains has been taken to 
trace the Indian blood, distributed in these latter generations, 
and although much diluted, occasionally crops out, in feature or 
form. Although, black hair, dark skin, and exact, graceful 
form, may not always be taken as coming from this line, yet the 
presumption is a fair one, that the parents of such ^\^th several 
removes, were of this people, and the manor born. Like the 
Swedes and Finns, however, their customs in regard to names 
rendered it impossible to follow families in the ascending line, 
and through neglect, much has been lost in the other direction. 
In wa'iting the history and also genealogy of ancient families 
of Fenw^ick colony, I have been assisted by a number of persons 
who have kindly loaned me their family records. Among the 
most conspicuous is Charles E. Sheppard, of Bridgeton, a 
voung practicing lawyer, of much promise, who has a talent for 
antiquarian researches. Gideon D. Scull, the eldest son of 
David Scull, of Philadelphia ; Gideon has resided in England 
for a number of years, a man of literature, has turned attention 
extensively to the history and genealogy of his native land, and 
has furnished me with several valuable charts of families, 
which otherwise would have been difficult to olitain witli such 
correctness in any other way. I am particularly indebted to 
my valued friend and antiquarian, John Clement, of Haddon- 
lield, who lias furnished me with much valuable information in 
regard to the families and early history of West New Jersey. 
Without such assistance it would be impractable for any one 
after a lapse of two centuries to follow the ancient families to 
the present time with much degree of accuracy. 



JOHN FENWICK. 

Jolm Fen wick, the proprietor of the one-tenth of West New 
Jersey, was horn in Nortliuniherhmd connty, at Stanton Manor, 
in Ent;-hin(l, in tlie year 1618. He was the second son of Wm. 
Fen wick, and in the year KUO lie became a niemljer of the 
chnrcli of Enghmch In tlie year 1(M5 he was a stndent of law 
at Grey's Inn, in London. ISoon after he was made captain of 
(Javahy by Cromwell ; he takin<>; sucli active part against the 
crown, it has been the opinion of many, that it was the primary 
canse, after Charles II ascended the throne, that there was so 
little favor sliown him in the affairs of the colony. Abont the 
year 1648 he married Elizal)eth Covert, of the county of Sapoy. 
The Coverts as well as the Fenwicks w^ere ancient families, and 
they can l)e traced back in English history as early as the 12th 
century. He had tln-ee cliildren by Elizal)eth Covert, all daugh- 
ters ; Elizabeth, Anne and Priscilla Fenwick. His second wife 
was Mary Burdet, the daugliter of Sir Walter Burdet, but there 
was no children by that connection. In 1665 he and liis wife 
Elizabetli became nieml)ers of the society of Friends. He, like 
many others of that religious faith and other descendants, were 
imprisoned for conscience sake. About that time Lord Berkley 
offered West New Jersey for sale. Tliere appeared to liave 
been an understanding between Edward Billinger and John 
Fenwick, for John Fenwick to purchase thewliole of West New 
Jersey, and Fenwick to have the one-tenth of the wliole. The 
deed was given l)y Berkley in the year 1673, and the con- 
sideration money mentioned in the deed was soon after tlie 
purchase by mutual understanding. The land comprising Salem 
and Cumberland counties, as now divided, were set off as Fen- 
wick's tentli. He immediately afterwards made preparations to 
emigrate and take possession of tlie lands in West New Jersey, 
in America, and lield out inducements for others to emigrate 
\vith Idm. There Avas a large number accepted tlie invitation, 
])rincipally members of liis own religious faith. Many of them 
purchased land and paid liim for it before tliey end)arked, wliich 
afterwards ga\(' rise t<> many (blhculties betwccii tliciii and llic 



10 -lOHN FEJSrWKJK. 



proprietor, because their lauds ^\•ere uot surveyed to tlieui as 
soon as tliev desired. The foHowiuo; are the names of some of 
the prmcipal persons who embarked with Jolm Fenwiek : John 
Pledger, Samuel Nicholson, James Nevil, Edward AYade, Rol)- 
ert Wade, Sanniel Wade, Robert Windliain, Richard Hancock, 
and their families, and several others. There were several sin- 
iJ-le men, Samuel Hedge, Jr., Isaac Smart, and others. The 
servants that hired in England to persons above mentioned, and 
likewise to John Fenwiek and his two son-in-laws, were Robert 
Turner, Gewas Bywater, Wm. Wilkinson, Joseph Worth, Jo- 
seph AVare, Michael Eaton, Eleanor Gree^'e, Nathaniel Cliamb- 
less, his son, Nathaniel Chaml)less, Jr., Mark Reeve, Edward 
Webb, Elizabeth AVaiters. Smith, in his history of New Jer- 
sey, says in many instances the servants became more conspic- 
uous members of civil and religious society than their employ- 
ers. I myself, in tracing families, lind the remark to be correct. 
Fenwick's immediate family that came with him were his 
his daughter Elizabeth and her husband, John Adams, his 
daughter Anne Fenwiek, who married Samuel Hedge, Jr., the 
spring following, and his youngest daughter, Priscilla, whose 
husl)and was Edward Champney. His wife, Mary Fenwiek, 
did not accompany him to his new home in the wilderness, for 
some cause that has never been explained. The letters passed 
between them manifested a sincere and filial attachment, and 
they continued to correspond while life remained. They em- 
l)arked from London in ship Griffith, Robert Griffith being 
master, on the 23d of the 9th month. They arrived at the 
montli of Assamhockin, and ascended the stream about three 
miles, and landed at a point of land at a place Fenwiek and his 
friends that were with him thought it a suitable location for a 
town. He gave it the name of New Salem, because he remark- 
ed to one of his intimate friends the name signifies Peace, but 
it did not prove so to him, as the sequel of his history will show. 
He, like his great friend and benefactor, AVilliani Peim, and 
also Roger Williams, found in settling colonies that there were 
more thorns than roses. 

As soon as it was practical )le aftin* they landed, the proprie- 
tor ht^ld a council with the ludian chiefs that lived witlun the 
compass of Salem county, and purchased all their lands of them, 
thereby securing perpetual peace with the natives, and the same 
kind of a treaty was made with them by Billenge or his agents 
for the remainder of AVest Jersey. They reserved certain rights 
for themselves — trapping, fishing, and the privilege of cutting- 
certain kinds of wood for the purpose of making baskets, also 



JOHN FEN WICK. 11 



ill making: their canoes and otlier things. The treaty was faith- 
fully fuliilled. Ahout fifty years ago, the few remaining Indi- 
ans in this State made application to the New Jersey Legislature 
to sell all their riglits and privileges they held in the State, 
which was accepted by the Legislature, and they w^ere paid the 
price they asked. They then removed to the State of New York 
to dwell with the Mohawks and other scattering tribes that re- 
mained in that State. 

John Fenwdck, after his arrival here, issued a proclamation 
granting civil and religious liberty to all persons who should 
settle within his province. In the year 1676, he turned his 
attention to providing homes for his children, and accordingly 
directed Richard Hancock, his surveyor, to lay out and survey 
two thousand acres in Upper Mannington for Samuel Hedge, 
Jr., and his wife Anne. The said land was called Iledgeiield. 
He also directed him to survey two thousand acres for his son- 
in-law, Edward Champney, and his wife Priscilla, which land 
was bounded on the west by John Smith's land, on the north Ijy 
James Nevel's farm, and Allow^ays creek on the south. To Jiis 
son-in-law, John Adams and his wife Elizal)etli, he gave all that 
tract of land located in what is now called Penn's Neck. It is 
known at the present day as the Sapaney. Fenwick built him- 
self a iiouse in tlie town of Salem on what he called Ivy Point. 
From said house he was forcibly taken in tlie middle of the 
night by a party of men from New Castle and taken to that 
town, and from tlience sent to New York, and there imprisoned 
l>y an order of Clovernor Andross, under pretence tliat he was 
infringing upon the rights of that State, wliich they claimed to 
own to the eastern shore of Delaware river. After he was re- 
leased, he for some time neglected to attend meetings. Accord- 
ingly Salem Monthly Meeting, held the 6th of tlie 8d month, 
1678, appointed Pichard Guy and Christopher White to visit 
.lohn Fenwick to iiKpiire of him whether he owned the truth 
that lie formerly possessed, and if he owned it to desire him to 
come to the next monthly meeting, if not, return his answer to 
the next meeting. At the next meeting, the Friends that were 
appointed to visit Fenwick on acconnt of his non-attendance of 
meetings, reported they had an interview with him, and he in- 
formed tliem that he loved the truth he formerly possessed, and 
that an answer to a letter he had received from George White- 
head, a distinguished Friend in London, he wished to be for- 
warded to the meeting. The contents of the letter, I believe, 
were never preserved, but the proceedings of the meeting shows 
plainly that difficulties existed l)etween him and some of the 



12 JOHN FEN WICK. 



members of his own society; wliieh was at fault, they or him, no 
one can tell to a certainty at the present day. After two or three 
years more of perplexities and trouble in endeavoring to estab- 
lish a government in the colony, he wisely abandoned it by sell- 
ing all the lands he had in the Salem tenth, (reserving (»ne 
]iundred and fifty thousand acres for himself and family,) to 
Governor Wm. Penn. The deed was given the 23d day of 
March, 1682. From that time the whole of West Jersey w^as 
under one government. The Legislature met at Burlington, 
and Samuel Jennings, of that place, was elected Deputy Go\'- 
ernor at the first Legislature afterwards. John Fen wick M'as 
elected one of the members of that body from Salem county, 
in the fall of 1683, but being unwell, he left his home in Salem 
and went to Samuel Hedge's, his son-in-law, in UiDper Manning- 
ton, there to be cared for by his favorite daughter, Anne Hedge, 
in his last days, for he died a short time afterwards at an age of 
65 years. He requested before his death to l)e buried in the 
Sharp's family burying-ground, which was complied with. Tlie 
said ground was formerly a part of the Salem County Alms- 
house farm, but now belongs to Elmer Reeve. If the ground 
could be designated Avliere the grave-yard was, although the 
exact spot where Fenwick lays could not, it would be a grateful 
deed for his descendents and the citizens of this c<.)unty to assist 
in erecting a inonument to his memory there on the spot where 
the grave-yard was, for gratitude for favors received is one of 
the noblest traits of mankind. liis will, made not long before 
his death, shows no alienation on liis part toward the niem]>ers 
of his own religious society, for lie leaves his friend, William 
Penn, one of his executors, and also trustee for his three oldest 
grandsons, Fenwick Adams, Samuel Hedge and Jolm Chani])- 
ney. His other three executors were Quakers, Samuel Hedge, 
John Smith, of Smithtield, and Richard Tindnll, of Pcnirs Neck. 
Tlie last named was his surveyor. 

John Adams married Fenwick's oldest daughter Elizal)eth 
wliilst in England. They liad tln-ee children born in that coun- 
try, Elizabeth, Fenwick aud Mai-y Adams. Soon after their 
arrival in this country lie built a house on Ivy Point, near the 
one that Fenwick luiilt, both of wliich were located a few rods 
west of Market street, on a rising ground near where Thomas 
T. Ililliard's lime kiln is built. They were standing tliere about 
lifty years ago, and there Jolm Adams and liis wife Elizabetli 
ended their days, which event took place prior to 1700. Fen- 
M'ick Adams, their son, married and settled on his parent's prop- 
crtv in Penn's Neck. William Adnms was his a-randson and he 



JOHN FENWICK. 13 



liad one graiid-daiigliter whose name was Susannah, and she mar- 
ried a man Ijy tlie name of Townsend, a native of Cape May 
county. Tliey liad two daughters, Susannah and Sarali. Sus- 
annah married Thomas Hartly, of Elsinhorough, wlio lived and 
owned wliere William Morrison lives at the present time. — 
Thomas and his wife had four children named Elizabeth, born 
in the year 1765 ; Susannah, born 17T2 ; Sarah, l)orn 1774 ; 
and Thomas, born 1775. Sarah Townsend married William 
Nicholson, of Mannington, in 1773. Tliey had seven children 
— Rachel, Milicent, Samuel, William, Daniel and Ann. The 
two first mentioned died young. William married Elizabeth 
Thompson, daughter of Joshua Thompson, of Alloways creek. 
Daniel married Mary Chandlers. Sarah had two husbands, the 
first Chambless Allen, the second Amos Peasley. Ann married 
George M. Ward. 

The first wife of the late Benjamin Griscom, of Salem, was 
Susan Adams, a direct descendant of Fenwick Adams. Benja- 
min and his wife Susan had five children, named Sarah, Andrew, 
Benjamin, John and Mary. Edward Champncy and Priscilla 
his wife had two children born in England, John and Mary 
Champneys, also a son born in this county, Edward Ohampney, 
Jr. ' I am inclined to think that John Ohampney married and 
died a young man. Edward Ohampney, Jr., as late as 1720, 
sold large tracts of land (l)eing part of the 2,000 acre allotment 
that his grandfatlier, John Fenwick, deeded to his father and 
mother) to Abel Nicholson and others. The Tylers became the 
possessors of a large part of the said allotment, either by 
marriage or purchase. Samuel Hedge 2d was the son of Samuel 
Hedge, a merchant and citizen in London. To be a citizen at 
that period required a person of wealth and influence to have 
tlie privilege of voting for members of Parliament. It was the 
opinion of some persons that there Avas an attachment formed 
l)etween Samuel Hedge 2d and Anne, the daughter of John 
Fenwick, whilst living in tlieir native land. Perhaps on that 
account he was M'illing to leave his father's home wliere wealtli 
and comforts abounded, to seek his fortune and happiness in 
the wilds of America. By so doing he verified tlie lines of tlie 
poet when he said : " Love is mightier than all."" They were 
married at New Salem, in the spring of 167G, and soon after- 
wards went and lived in Upper Mannington on a tract of land 
containing 2,000 acres that Fenwick deeded them in the 11th 
mo. of the same year. It was called the Hedgefield tract. 
Samuel and his wife remained there until 1685; he being one 
of liis father-in-law's executors, and having been appointed by 



14: JOHN FENWICK. 



Fenwick to carry out liis plans in laying out streets in Salem 
and Coliansey. He built a brick liouse on Bra<lway street, 
wliere they resided until their death. The old mansion was 
i-emoved a few years ago by the late Wm. F. Miller, and he 
l)uilt one of more modern architecture on the site of tlie old 
one. The property is now owned and occupied by M. P. Grey. 
Samuel Hedge and his wife Anne, died sometime between 
the year 1694 and 169T, leaving one son, Samuel Hedge 3d, 
and he married Rebecca Pyle. They had four children — 
Samuel F. Hedge 4th, John Hedge, who died a minor, "William 
Hedge, who died 1729, leaving his estate to his mother, and 
Nathan Hedge, who died 8th mo., 1735. The latter, by his 
will, bequeathed to his mother, (whom he also made his execu- 
trix) the greater part of his estate. Her name at the time was 
Rebecca Cox. Samuel Hedge 3d died 3d of the 11th mo., 1709, 
His widow Rebecca Hedge, married Daniel Cox, of Burlington, 
1712. Samuel F. Hedge 4tli, went to Greenwich to reside, and 
went into partnership in the mercantile business with Nicholas 
Gibbon. Sometime after the death of Nicholas Gibbon, Samuel 
married his Avidow, whose maiden name was Anne Grant, the 
daugliter of Alexander Grant. She had three children b}' her 
iirst husband, Nicholas, Grant and Jane Gibbon. S;unuel F. 
Hedge 4th, and his wife, Anne, had two children, Samuel 
Hedge 5th, and one daughter, Rebecca Hedge. She was born 
1st of the 2d mo., 1728, and her brother Samuel in 1726. In 
1728 Samuel F. Hedge deeded one acre of ground on the south 
side of Market street to the Episcopal church. In 1733 he died, 
having made his will in 1732, leaving his wife, Anne Hedge, 
executrix. He devised to his widow a lot of eight acres in 
Salem, located on the south side of Market street ; also sixteen 
acres of woodland adjoining the first mentioned lot. The wood- 
land was Ijounded on the south l)y Nathan Hedge's land. He 
also bequeatlied to her a lot of meadow on Fenwick creek, of 
four acres, together with one thousand acres of Fenwick's Grove 
out of 1,900 acres surveyed to him. The whole tract originally 
contained 15,000 and was located in Upper Mannington, run- 
ning from Mannington creek to Salem creek. It incbuled the 
lands owned l)y the Bassett family at the present time, and 
extended to Salem creek, and was bounded on the south by tlie 
Hedgeiield tract. In 1735 Benjamin Acton, a practical sur- 
veyor at that time, was employed to survey and set off the one 
tliousand acres to the widow. The l)alance of the 1,900 acres 
he devised to his son Sanmel Hedge 5tli. After the death of 
Anne Hedge, the widow of Samuel Hedge, she left the property 



JOHN FEJSrWICK. 15 



in Salem that she received from her second husband, to Grant 
Gibbon and Jane Gibbon, the children by her first husband 
Nicholas Gibbon. Robert Johnson, Sr., married Jane, and she 
Avas the mother of Robert G. Johnson. Alx)ut the year 1758 
there was a division of the town lots on tlie soutli side of Mar- 
ket street, between Samuel IIedi!;e 5th and Roljert Jolmson, Sr. 
Rebecca Hedge, Samuel F. Hedge's daughter, married Giles 
Smith. He was born the 18th of 2d mo., 1719, and was the 
son of Samuel Smith, of Mannington, who lived on and owned 
the southern portion of Hedgelield. Giles and his wife Rel)ecca 
had one son whose name was Clnistopher Smith. Christoplier 
married Rebecca Hancok in 1675. They had live children — 
Rebecca was born in 1766, Elizabeth was born 1768, John Smith 
was born 1770; he married the daughter of Benjamin Smith, 
and left one son wliose name was Samuel. Susanna Smith was 
born 1771; she married Jol) Ware of Alloways Creek, and left 
no children. Esther Smith Avas born 1771, and married Robert 
Moore of Easton, Maryland. Samuel Hedge 5th married Han- 
nah Woodnutt of Mannington, daughter of Joseph and Rachel 
Woodnutt. She was born in 1729. Samuel and his wife Rachel 
resided in Salem in the old family mansion on Bradway street. 
They had three children — Rebecca, born 20th of 1st mo., 1751, 
Joseph W. Hedge, born 1756, and Samuel Hedge 6th, born 
1758. In 1770, Rebecca Hedge, daughter of Samuel and Rachel 
Hedge, married Thomas Thompson, of Salem. He was born 
in 1715, and was the son of Thomas Tliompson, and grandson 
of Andrew Thompson of Elsinborough. Josepli W. Hedge 
and his brother Samuel Hedge, Jr., died in 1790, at the family 
mansion in Salem, within a short time of each other, with an 
epidemic fever that was prevailing at that time. Neither of 
them was ever married, and consequently their large real estate 
was heired by their sister, Rebecca Thompson. Tliomas 
Thompson and his wife Rebecca had seven children. Their 
names were Ann, Hannah, Hedge, Mary, Rebecca, Jane, and 
Rachel. They lived and owned where the First Baptist church 
now stands, and they lived together happily nearly sixty years. 
Thomas died in his eighty-second year. His widow survived five 
or six years after his death, Jind was in her eighty-lirst year at 
the time of her deatli. Neither of them were members of the 
Society of Friends but professors, and regularly attended all of 
their meetings of divine worship. Tliey were buried in tlie 
Friends' burying-ground at Salem, with their ancestors. Fenwick 
Archer, their grandson, as soon as the Society permitted it, 
much to his credit, had their graves done up, and his great 



16 JOHN FENWICK. 



uncles' graves, Josepli and Samuel Hedge, and his great-grand- 
mother's, Hannah W. Hedge, and a small monument with their 
names and ages cut upon them jilaced at the head of each. 

Ann Thompson, daughter of Thomas and R.el)ecca Tliompson, 
married John Firtli. They had four children — Elizabeth, 
Thomas, John and Samuel Firtli. 

Hannah Thompson's first husband was Jolm Anderson. They 
had one daughter, Rebecca Anderson. Hannah's second hus- 
band was Leonard Sayres, a native of Cuml>erland county, but 
at that time his home was in Cincinnati, Ohio. Hedge Tliomp- 
son, Thomas' son, married Mary Ann Parrott, daughter of 
Richard Parrott. Iled^e and Mary Ann, his wife, had live 
children — Richanl P., Thomas, Joseph H., Rebecca and Mary. 
Richard P. married Maria Hancock; Thomas married AVilliam 
Johnson's daughter; Dr. Joseph H. married Rebecca Kelly, and 
Mary married Samuel Starr, an Episcopal minister. Rebecca, 
youngest daughter of Thomas and Rebecca, married John Holme 
of Elsinborough. She left one daughter, Reliecca Holme, who 
married Gleorge W. Garrison. Jaue Thompson mari-ied Jolm 
Smith, of Mannington, son of Hill Smith. Their children were 
Ann, Hill, and Thomas T. Smith. Ann married George W. 
Garrison, being his second wife, and Thomas T. married 
Elizabeth Hancock, daughter of Joseph Hancock. 

Rachel Thompson the youngest daughter of Thomas and 
Rebecca Thompson, married Dr. Benjamin Archer ; they had 
one son, Fenwick Archer. Mary Thompson, tliird daughter of 
Thomas and Rebecca Thompson, died single. 

Within a few years there has been different opinions respect- 
ing the property in the town of Salem, held by the county. 
Some persons have contended the land was given for a particu- 
lar purpose, while others thought it was given to the county 
without reservation, and held that the representatives of the 
people of the county had a right to sell or rent any part of the 
ground, as they should tliink would 1)e for the interest of the 
county. Samuel Hedge was left to carry out the wishes and 
designs in the town of Salem, and also in the town of Cohansey, 
of his father-in-law, John Fenwick. After the death of Fen- 
wick all the land on the south side of Bridge street, now Mai-- 
ket street, extending from Broadway to Fenwick creek, Samuel 
Hedge and his wife, Anne, became the owners. The following 
is an order I find in Ricluird TindalTs book of surveys, eigh- 
teenth page. A wan-ant given 7th of 11th mo., 1(588. 

"A warrant to Richard Tindall, Surveyor-general for the 
county of Salem, and to John Woolidge, his deputy, to lay out 



JOHN FEJSfWICK. 



17 



one atTc of land in Salem town, given l)y John Fcmvick to erect 
a Court House and Prison." 

Agreeable to the M'ords of the warrant, it was certainly given 
fur a particular use — to erect a Court House and Prison on — 
and if the inhabitants of the county should in some future time 
remove the said buildings from the said ground, it is reasonable 
to supi:)Ose that the property woidd revert Inick to the heirs of 
the donor. 

Erick Yearness and Henry Neilson arrived in this country as 
early as 1640, and located themseh^es at the first fast land 
above the mouth of what is now known as Salem creek. They, 
like tlieir neighbors the Swedes, believing the Indians to be the 
rightful owners of the soil, purchased a large tract of land of 
tlie Indian chiefs and gave it the name of Finn's town point. 
AVhen John Fenwick arrived in this county, in 1695, he claimed 
the lands that tlie Finns and Swedes were located upon. They 
sul:>mitted to his authority, and in the year 1676 Kichard Han- 
cock, Fenwick's surveyor, laid off one thousand acres of said 
land and marsh for Erick Yearness, also a tract of the same 
size for Henry Neilson, and gave them a proprietary deed for 
the same. In the year 1688, by the request of Stephen Year- 
ness, son of Erick, James ISTevell gave Richard Tindall an order 
to re-survey the said tract at Finn's town point, and if there 
should not be the full quantity to report to him at his office in 
Salem within three months from date that the order was given. 
T have no records to follow the family of Erick Yearness fur- 
ther than his son, Stephen Yearness. Tradition informs us 
tliat Edmund Giblxni married a young woman, OMnier of a large 
tract of land at Finn's point, who was a lineal descendant of 
Stephen Yearness. I believe Edmund and Avifc left four chil- 
dren ; three sons and one daughter. 



ACTON FAMILY. 

Benjamin. Aeton, ucuording to the records, was one of the 
prominent young men in the settlement of Fenwick Colony. 
There is no record in what year he arrived at New Salem; 
circumstances make it probable he came to America in company 
with Christopher White, Henry Jennings, "William Hancock and 
their families and servants, together with a number of other 
emigrants. Tliey embarked in the ship Kent, from London, 
(rregor}" l)eing master, and landed at New Salem 23d of sixth 
month, 1G7'7. Soon after that time Benjamin is mentioned in 
public affairs of the Colony. Doubtless he had a good education; 
was a land surveyor by trade, and also a tanner and currier. 
He purchased a lot of sixteen acres of John Fenwick, on 
Fenwick street, now called East Broadway ; on that lot he built 
iind made it his home, and carried on the tanning business 
during the remainder of his life. His worth and ability was 
early appreciated by the Society of Friends, of which he was a 
consistent member. As early as 1682 he and another Friend 
were appointed to repair and build an addition to the house that 
the Society purchased of Samuel and Ann Nicholson, so tliat 
the said house should be large enough in which to hold a Yearly 
Meeting. When the town of New Salem was incorporated in 
1695, Benjamin Acton was chosen recorder. In laying out a 
puldic highway, in 1705, from Salem to Maurice River, lie was 
one of the commissioners and surveyors; also, in 1709, to lay 
out a public highway from Salem by the Avay of John Hancock's 
new bridge to the town of Greenwich. Jolm Mason and Bar- 
tholomew Wyatt, Sr., were the other Uvo commissioners. There 
Avas another ancient highway laid out in 1706. It connnenced 
at tlie upper end of Avhat is known as Yorkc street at tills time, 
tlirough Elsinboro, crossed Ambclburv Swamp, continued on near 
wliere the present road is to the brick mansion belonging to tlic 
late Iledroe Morris, and Benjamin Acton, Walter Ileiglistin and 
tfohn Mason were the commissioners. According to the records, 
Benjamin was principally employed by private landholders to do 
their surveying. Richnrd Tindall being surve^^or general, imd 




BENJAMIN ACTON. 
Born 1814. 



ACTON FAMILY. 19 



John Woolidge, of Salem, liis deputy, tliey did all the surveying 
for the proprietor Avhile he lived; after his death they were em- 
ployed hy the executors of Fenwick, and subsequently by James 
Nevcll, William Penn's agent. After the death of N^evell and 
Richard Tindall, James Logan, tlie faithful friend of William 
Penn, became the principal agent of Penn's heirs, and he 
employed Benjamin Acton and Thomas Miles, of Penn's Neck, 
to do the surveying for the heirs of Penn in Salem tenth. 
Benjamin Acton received an order from James Logan, of 
Pennsylvania (it being near the close of a long and useful life), 
to re-survey one thousand acres of land, lying on the south side 
of Gravelly run, it being one of the branches of Stoe creek, 
where the present village of Jericho is. The order was given 
Ijy the urgent request of Samuel Deeming, of Maryland, who 
had previously sold the said land to John Brick, Benjamin 
Acton made his return on the 13th of 9th month, 1729. He 
stated in his report that the said land was now re-surveyed, with 
the assistance of John Brick and his two sons; that it proved 
more chargeable than he expected. Signed by me, Benjamin 
Acton, surve3'or of Fenwick Colony and Salem Tenth. He 
married about 1688 or '9. Tlie following are the names of his 
children: Elizabeth, the daughter of Benjamin and Christianna 
Acton, was born at Salem, 26th of 12tli month, 1690; Mary, 
born ITth of 10th month, 1692; Benjamim Acton, Jr., the 19th 
of 8th month, 1695 ; Lydia, 21:th of 11th month, 169T'; Joshua, 
9th of 7th month, 1700. Benjamin, in his old age, built himself 
a b]-ick dwelling house on his lot on Fenwick street in 1727, 
which is still standing; its roof is wdiat is called hip, resembling 
very much the French or Mansard roof, which is common in 
this generation. The ancient dwelling is o"\\aied at this time by 
Joseph Test. Benjamin Acton, Jr., in 1729, built himself a 
much larger dwelling than that of his father's on the same lot of 
ground. The said house was remodeled by the late George 
Llumsey, but the ancient walls remain. This property, in the 
last generation, was owned by the Gibbs family. Elizal)eth, the 
eldest daughter of Benjamin and Christianna Acton, born 26th 
(if 12th month, 1690, married Francis Reynolds, 10th month, 
1712. Mary Acton, their second daughter, born 17th of 10th 
month, 1692, married William Willis, in 1715. Benjamin Acton, 
Jr., married Elizabeth Hill, the widow of Thomas Hill, in 1727. 
Her daughter, Sarah Hill, by her lirst husband, married John 
Smith, of Amble])ury, the grandson of tlie emigrant. John and 
his wife had two sons — Ricliard Smith, born 10th of 11th month, 
l7lo, married Rachel Dennis, of Bacon's Neck, in 1762; tliey 



20 ACTON FAMILY. 



liad several daugliters. Hili Smith, the second sou, horn 15th 
of ith month, 1745, married Ann Nicholson, daughter of John 
Kicholson. They lived most of their time in Manningtou, on 
the Tide Mill farm, devised to her by her uncle, James Mason. 
Tliey had two sons — Hill and John Smitli. The latter married 
Eliza, daughter of Israel Brown. John Smith married Jane, 
the daughter of Thomas and Rebecca Hedge Thompson, of 
Salem. Sarah Hill Smith's second husband was Aaron Bradway, 
of Elsinboro; she was his second wife. (Aaron was the grand- 
son of Edward Bradway, the emigrant.) Aaron and his wife 
had one son, Thomas Hill Bradway; he inherited the sixteen 
acre lot at the foot of Broadway street, Salem, which was 
purchased by Edward Bradway of John Eenwick, in England, 
1674. Thomas H. Bradway repau-ed the old brick mansion 
built by his ancestor, Edward Bradway, in 1691 ; the building 
luxd long been neglected, there being no windows or doors 
remaining. At the beginning of the present century it was 
further iitted up, and a piazza made in front of it l)y Jolm S. 
Wood, the son-in-law of Thomas H. Bradway. 

Benjamin Acton, Jr. and his wife Elizabeth Hill lived in the 
large brick mansion built in 1729, wliich is still standing. He 
was tanner by trade, and occupied the yard that was devised to 
him by his father. Benjamin had live children, as follows : 
John, born 31st of 8th month, 1728 ; Joseph, born 30th of 
9th month., 1730 ; Benjamin, born 15th of 9th month, 1733 ; 
he died in infancy ; the second Benjamin, born 28th of 12th 
month, 1735 ; and Samuel, born 31st of 6th month, 1738. It 
is probable that some of tlie children died young. Jolm Acton, 
the eldest son, succeeded his father in tlie tanning business, and 
married about the year 1752 or '53. There is no account to 
show that John and his wife had more than one child — Clement 
Acton. John Acton's second wife was Mary Oakford, of 
Alloways Creek, the grand-daughter of Charles Oakford, and 
sister of Aaron Oakford, of Darby, Pa. John and his wife, 
Mary Oakford Acton, had several childi-en, as follows : Samuel, 
.Jolm, (who afterwards became a'sea captain, and traded from 
Philadelphia to West Indies ; he never married) ; Elizabeth, 
(who married John Hancock, their descendants being quite 
immerous in Alloways Creek township at this time) ; Barbara, 
(who married Ephraim, the son of Jesse Carll ; their family 
genealogy has been written) ; Susan, (who married Samuel Hall, 
of Delaware); and Joseph Acton. 

Clement Hall, the second son of Judge William Hall, who 
('iniurat(Ml to New Jersev in 1677, was born at Salem, 30th of 



ACTON FAMILY. 21 



6 til month, 1706. He inherited purt of the sixteen acre lot pur- 
chased by William Hall, lying between Samnel Nicholson's lot 
and Edward Bradway's. Clement Hall died comparatively a 
young man. He and his wife, Sarah Hall, had two children, 
Ann and William. Ann married John Mason, of Elsinborough, 
the son of Thomas and grand-son of John Mason, the emigrant. 
John and his wife Ann had one daughter, Sarah H. Mason, 
born 1763. She married Elgar Brown, by whom she had four 
children, Ann, Elisha, Israel and John M. Brown. Sarah, the 
widow of Clement Hall, built a large brick dwelling, which is 
now owned by Morris Hall, who resides there. Sarah kept a 
store in the dwelling for many years. Her son, William Ilall, 
married Ilamiah Brinton, of Chester county, Pa., a sister of 
Caleb Brinton. The Brinton famil}' is one of the oldest in 
Chester county, and at one time was considered the largest 
landholders in that section of Pennsylvania. 

William Hall located on quite an extensive tract of land in 
the State of Delaware, near St. Georges Creek, Kew Castle 
county, and there he lived. He and his wife, Hannah B. Hall, 
had four children, Mary, Hannah, Clement and Sarah Hall. 
Hannah married Clement Acton, of Salem, son of John Acton. 
Clement Hall, their son, married Ann Darrah, who was a 
widow at the time of their marriage. Her first husband's 
name was Darrah, a cousin. Clement Hall lived but a short 
time after their marriage, leaving no children. His widow 
afterwards married Col. Edward Hall, of Mannington, she 
being several years his junior ; she had no children by any 
three of her husbands. She was the daughter of Lydia Darrah, 
of Philadelphia, of Revolutionary memory. 

The youngest daughter of William and Hannah Brinton 
Hall was Sarah Hall, born 6th of 12th month, 1768, married 
Samuel, the eldest son of John and Mary Oakford Acton, born 
10th of 11th month, 1764. WiUiam Hall married his second 
wife, and by her he had one son, Samuel Hall, who, when he grew 
to manhood, came to Salem county and subsequently married 
Susan, the youngest daughter of John and Maiy O. Act(»n ; 
tliey had several children. Clement and Hannah H. Acton had 
two children, Benjamin and Hannah. Clement's second wife 
was Hannah, the daughter of James M. and Margaret Wood- 
nutt, of Mannington, born 16th of 1st month, 1780. By that 
union there were two cliildren, Margaret and Clement Acton. 
Benjamin, the eldest son of Clement Acton, married Sarah 
Wyatt, daughter of Bichard and Elizabeth W. Miller, of Man- 
nington. They had ten children : Richard Miller Acton, horn 



ACTOJSr FAMILY. 



■ith of 2d montji, 1810; Clement Acton, Lorn 8tli of 1st month, 
I8I0 ; he died young ; Benjamin Acton, born in the 9th month, 
1814; Hannah T. Acton, bom 10th of 2d month, 1816 ; Eliza- 
l)etli Acton, born 28th of 10th month, 1818 ; Charlotte Acton, 
born 9th of Tth month, 1821 ; Casper Wistar Acton, born 18th 
of 10th month, 1823 ; Letitia Acton, born ITtli of 7th month, 
1825 , Sarah Wyatt Acton, born 3d of 9t]i month, 1827; Catli- 
erine, born 22d of 5th month, 1829. 

Hannah H., the daughter of Clement Acton, was twice mar- 
ried; her lirst husband was John, the son of Job and Grace 
Tliompson AVare, of Alloways Creek. They had three chil- 
dren, Clement A., William and Catharine Ware. Her second 
linsband was Dr. Charles Swing, by whom she had five children. 
CJiarles, the present meml^er of the Legislature from the upper 
district, John, Hannah, Abigail and Margaret Swing. Marga- 
ret, the daughter of Clement and Hannah Woodnutt Acton, 
married Dr. John Griscom, a resident of Philadelphia. He 
was the son of William and Ann Stewart Griscom, of Salem, 
and grand-son of William and Rachel Denn Griscom. The 
latter was the son of Andrew and Susannah Griscom, born the 
10th of 11th month, 1747. There was an error made, when I 
wrote the Davis family. It was Tobias Griscom, instead of 
Andrew, the father of Andrew and William Griscom, the latter 
married Sarah Davis, the eldest daughter of David Davis, and 
was born in Salem county 30tli of 1st month, 1715. Soon 
after their marriage they moved to the neighborhood of Haddon- 
iield. Tobias, I am inclined to believe, was the son of Andrew 
Griscom, the emigrant. Dr. John and his wife Margaret Acton 
Griscom have two sons and one daughter ; Clement is the old- 
est son. Clement Acton, tlie son of Clement and Hannah W. 
Acton, left Salem many years ago and went to Cincinnati, Ohio, 
he and his cousin, Thomas Woodnutt, carried on the mercantile 
business in that city at the old stand of tlieir uncle, William 
Woodnutt, for a number of years. 

Richard Miller Acton, the eldest son of Benjamin and Sarah 
Wyatt Acton, born 4tli of 2d month, 1810, was apprenticed to 
learn the currier business in Wilmington, Delaware. He subse- 
(juently carried on the business in Salem for scN'eral years. He 
lias i)een entrusted to do considerable public business to general 
satisfaction. At one time he was much interested in the public 
schools in the city of Salem, and represented his county in the 
Senate of New Jersey. He has recently been appointed one 
of the Trustees of tlie State Normal Scliool. He married 
Hannah, the daughter of Thomas and Haimali H. Mason, for- 



ACTON FAMILV. 23 



merly of Elsinborougli. They have had three children. Tlie 
eldest, Mary Mason Acton, born 29tli of 1st month, 1836, mar- 
ried "William C, the son of William F. and Mary Reeve, of 
Allowaystown. Sarah M. Acton, born 14th of 11th montli, 
1837, died in 1851. Richard W. Acton, born 26th of 6th 
month, 1853, died in 1851. Benjamin, the third son of Benja- 
min and Sarah W. Acton, born in the 9th montli, 1811, was for 
a number of years one of the principal g-rain merchants in the 
city of Salem, his place of business being at the foot of Market 
street. In his younger days he was an active politician, and 
represented this county in the Senate of the State. A number 
of years since he relinquished the mercantile business, and soon 
after was chosen one of the officers of the Salem J^ational 
Banking Company. At the present and for a number of years 
he has held the responsible office of cashier of that institution. 
His wife is Sarah Jane, the daughter of Sheppard and Ann 
Blackwood. They have had several children : Thomas W., 
Franklin Miller, Elizabeth, Louisa J,, and Charles H. Acton. 
Thomas W. lived to maturity and died unmarried. Elizabetli 
married Dr. B. 4- Waddington, the son of James AVaddington ; 
she did not live long after that event, leaving no issue. Tlie 
surviving children, Franklin M., Louisa J. and Charles IL, are 
unmarried. 

Hannah Thompson Acton, the eldest daughter of Benjamin 
and Sarah W. Acton, born 10th month, 2d, 1816, married 
Samuel P., the son of William and Mary R. Carpenter, of Man- 
nington. She is deceased, leaving several children. John R. 
Carpenter, the eldest son, married Mary, daughter of Joseph and 
Elizabeth Thompson ; they have issue. Sarah Carj^enter mar- 
ried Richard, the son of William F. and Mary Reeve. S. 
Preston Carpenter married Reljecca, daughter of Elisha and 
Hannah Ann ]3assett, of Mannington. A\^illiam Carpenter is 
unmarried. 

Elizabetli Wyatt Acton, born 2St]i of 10th month, 1818, 
married Franklin, the son of William F. and Estlier Miller, of 
Mannington. Franklin and liis wife died young, leaving one 
daughter Hetty Miller, who sul)se(piently mai-ried ])aA-i(l E. 
Havis, of Pilesgrove. Charlotte, the daughter of Benjamin 
and Sarali W. Acton, l)orn 9th of Tth montli, 1821, married 
Ricliard, the son of Clayton and Mary S. Wistar, of Mamiing- 
tou. Tliey liave tln-ee cliildren, Clayton, Richard and Elizal^etli. 
Clayton married Rebecca, daughter of Andrew and Mary 
Thompson. Elizabetli married Richard 'JMnnnpson, of JNlitu- 
iiington. Richard, Jr. is unmarried. 



24: ACTON FAMILY. 



Casper "Wister Acton, born 18th of lOtli niontli, 1823, inur- 
ried Hacliel, dan2;liter of Thomas and Sarah J. Goodwin, for- 
merly of Elsinhorough. Tliey liave had eiglit chikh-en — Richard 
]\I., Ilannali, Henry, George, Catharine, Wyatt, Morris and 
Thomas, the last deceased. 

Letitia, daughter of Benjamin and Sarah W. Acton, 1)()rn 
17th of 7tli month, 1825, married John, the son of Clayton 
and Mary S. Wistar. Thej died young, leaving one son, John 
Wister, ^yho is engaged in the iron and implement business in 
Salem. 

Sarah Wyatt Acton, horn 3d of 9th month, 1827, married 
Emmor, the son of William and Letitia Heeye ; she is his second 
wife. 

Catharine, the youngest daughter of Benjamin and Sarah W. 
Acton, born 22d of 6th month, 1829, is deceased. 

Samuel, the son of John and Mary Oakford Acton, born lOtli 
of 11th month, 170-4, learned the tanner's trade of liis father. 
He married Sarah, the youngest daughter of William and 
Hannah Brinton Hall, residents of Delaware. Samuel and his 
half-brother, Clement Acton, were engaged in the mercantile 
business for some time in Salem, occupying the Thomas Thomp- 
son store, on Fenwick street, but afterwards known as the George 
W. Garrison's. After the two brothers concluded to abandon 
the business, Samuel purchased tlie tan yards that belonged to 
John Ward, at Haddoniield, which has been represented to IvAve 
been greatly out of order, and he spent a considerable sum upon 
it for repairs. He died suddenly about 1800 or 1801, leaying a 
widow and a family of children with limited means. The wddow 
soon after remoyed to Salem Avith her young children, and Ayith 
all her difficulties she neyer despaired, but persevered to keep 
her children together until they -svere old enough to learn trades, 
so as to enable them to provide for themselves, always having a 
watchful care over their morals. She died at the liome of her 
daughter, Mary A. ]jassett, in Maunington, in 1852, in the 84th 
year of her age, having survived her husband more than half ;i 
century. She lived to see her children not only in good outward 
circumstances, but considered among the wealthy inhabitants of 
Salem county — confirming the saying of tlic wise king of Israel: 
''I never know tlie i-ightoous forsaken or their cliildren bego;in«: 
l»read." 

Clement, the eldest son of Samuel and Sai'ah J I. Acton, Ixu-n 
al)Out 1790, learned tlie trade of a hatter of Caleb AVood, of 
Salem, and followed the business for some time after lie became 
of age, at the old shop located on Market street, wliere David 



ACTON FAMILY. 25 



Smith fonnerly carried on tlic hatting liusiness. Ho soon 
;il>an(loned his trade and ])ecanie a trader in fur; purchased 
Lirgely for a liriri in New York iov a few years, after which lie 
changed liis business and kept a hnnber yard. He built a large 
steam saw mill which was located on Penn street, near Fenwick 
creek, and carried it on, together with his lumber yard, for 
several years with profit, until the mill Avas burned. During 
that time he purchased the old dilapidated building near the 
centre of the town, on Market street, where the late John Denn, 
of Manning-ton, formerly lived and carried on the hatting 
l)usiness. Clement, soon after he purchased the property, 
removed the old dwelling and built a large brick building large 
enough for a commodious dwelling and store ; there he and the 
l-ite Thomas Cattell kept a hardware store for a mimber of years. 
Clement was twice married ; his first wife Avas Mary, the daughter 
of Jol> and Ruth Thompson Bacon, of Cumberland county; she 
died a young woman without leaving any children ; his second 
wife was Sarah, the daughter of Owen and Elizabeth Jones, of 
Port Elizabeth. They had three children — Elizabeth J., Clement 
and Sarah Hall Acton. Clement is deceased. Their son, 
Clement Acton, married Martha Ann Wills, of Burlington 
county; he did not live long after his marriage, leaving a AvidoAV 
and one daughter, Helen Acton. Mary, the daughter of Samuel 
and Sarah Hall Acton, was born 10th of 8th month, 1798. She 
learned the tailoring trade and followed it until she married 
Benjamin Thompson, the son of Joseph and Mary Allen Bassett, 
of Mannington. Benjamin and his wife had four children — 
Sarah H., Rachel, Maria and Richard Bassett; the two last 
mentioned were twins. Benjamin died a few years ago. Mary 
A., his widow, is still living, at the advanced age of seventy-seven 
years. Clement A., the eldest son of Benjamin and Mary O. 
Bassett, born in 1829, died when he was seven years of age. 
Sarah H., the daughter of Benjamin and Mary Oakford Bassett, 
born the 20th of 11th month, 1831, married Barclay, the son of 
Andrew and Martha Griscom. They have four children — Walter 
D., Clei^ient B., Richawl and Henry Griscom. Rachel A., daugli- 
ter of Benjamin and Mary O. Bassett, l)ornllth of lltli month, 
l8o4r, married Collins, the son of Sanmel Allen, of Gloucester 
county; they have two chikh-en — Sanuiel and Edgar Allen. 
Maria and Richard Bassett, children of Benjamin and Mary O. 
Bassett, were born 22d of 8th montli, ISoT. Maria married 
Henry M., the son of George and Margaret Rumsey, of Salem ; 
they liave three children — Margaret, George and Mary Rumsey. 
Richard Bassett married Annie, the daughter of Jonathan and 
4 



26 ACTON FAMILY, 



Lvdia Grier; there arc two cliildren Ly this union, Benjumin A. 
and George G. Bassett. Isaac Oakford Acton, the second son 
of Samuel and Sarah H. Acton, learned the trade of blacksmith 
in Pennsylvania ; not long after he became of age he connnenced 
the business in Salem, Ids shop being on East Griffith street. 
By industry and close application to business, he accunudated a 
considerable fortune in a few years. His iirst purchase was on 
Broadwa}'" street; the house and land formerly belonged to 
Thomas Good^vin. Isaac soon afterward removed to the old 
brick dwelling, and l>uilt a large three-story brick building for 
dwelling and store; he there kept an iron store for some years. 
He afterwards took a lot fronting on West Griffith street, being- 
part of the Nicholson lot, belonging to Salem Monthly Meeting 
of Friends, and erected a large iron foundiy, which is carried 
on by him at this time. Isaac married Lucy Ann, the daughter 
of Jonathan and Temperance Bilderback, of Mannington ; they 
had three sons — Edward, AVilliam and Clement Acton. Edward 
married Mary, the daughter of Jonathan and Mary Woodnutt, 
of Mannington. Edward volunteered in the army at the time 
of the Rebellion, and there died, leaving three children — Walter 
W., Isaac Oalcford, and Jonathan W. Acton. William Acton, 
the son of Isaac and Lucy Ann Acton, married Mary, the 
daughter of James and Elizabeth Andrews; they have several 
cliildren. Clement, the youngest son of Isaac and Lucy A. 
Acton, married Beulali, the daughter of John and Beulah Tyler, 
of Greenwich; Beulah is deceased, leaving one child — Lucy 
Ann Acton. Samuel, the youngest son of Samuel and Sarah 
H. Acton, born about 1801, learned the trade of a house 
carpenter, and followed his business for several years. He 
afterwards followed pumpmaking ; he, like his two elder brothers, 
was uncommonly industrious, and applied himself closely to his 
1 (usiness, and has accumulated a competency. His wife is Mary 
Jane, the daughter of Jonatlian and Temperance Bilderback; 
they had one daugliter — Sarah Jane Acton, who married Sanuiel, 
the son of Caleb and Ann Thompson Lippincott, of Mannington ; 
slie died a comparatively young woman, le*a^■ing two cliiUlrer. — 
Mary O. and Sarah J. Lippincott. Joseph, the youngest son of 
John and Mary Oakford Acton, nuirried Grace, the daughter of 
Peter Ambler, of Mannington; they had two sons — Joseph and 
Peter Ambler Acton. The latter was a school teacher, and died 
a young man, innnarried. His eldest brother, Joseph, learned 
the trade of wheelwrigliting. He married Rebecca, the datighter 
of James Brad^vay, of Alloways Creek; they had two children 
— William and Sarah Ann Acton. William follows the same 



ACTON FA>nLT. 27 



trade as liis grandfather, Joseph Acton, being that of a shoe- 
maker. He has heen Uvice married; his first wife was Mary, 
the daughter of Jolm Bailey, late of Salem. They had tkree 
children — Charles, Rebecca, and Enuna Acton. His second 
wife was the ^\ddow of Henry Colgin, daughter of Jolm Riley. 
Sarah Ann, the daughter of Joseph and Rebecca B. Acton, 
married John Raphine; slie is deceased, and left tlie following- 
named children — Mary Jane, Josephine, Hannah, William, 
Charles, Fannv, and Elizaljetli Rapliine. 



ABBOTT FAMILY. 

George Abbott and bis two brotbers, Jobn and Tbomas, and 
tbeir sister, Mary Abbott, emigrated from Engbmd, to tlie State 
of Connecticut, in tlie year 1690. George left New England 
witli bis wife Mary, and his sister, Mary Abbott, and located 
tliemselves in tlie toAvnsbip of Elsinborongh, Salem connty, 
New Jersey. In the year 1G96, George Abbott purchased of 
Joseph, the second son of Samuel Nicholson, the emigrant, 136 
acres of land, with buildings, out-buildings, and appurtenances 
thereunto belonging ; it being Samuel Nicholson's country seat. 
It was located on the north side of Monmouth river, now 
Allowaj^s creek, it l)eing the lowest farm on the north side of 
said river, to which was added various pieces and parcels of lands, 
in succeeding years purchased of the Nicholson family. In 
1704, George Abbott removed the Nicholson mansion, built a 
brick dwelling, and in 1724 an addition, also of brick ; this 
house is still standing, in good repair. It remained in the 
Aljbott family to the fiftli generation, a period of 150 years. 
The said property is now owned hy Andrew Smith Reeve. 

The children of George and Mary Abbott were Benjamin, 
horn 2d of 1st month, 1700 ; Hannah, born 30th of 9th month, 
1702 ; George Abbott, Jr., born 13th of lOtli month, 1704 ; 
Sarah Al)bott, horn 16tli of 2d month, 1709; Samuel C, born 
20th of 6th month, 1712, and Mary Abl)ott, born 26tli of 8tli 
month, 1714. 

George, the parent of those children, died in the year 1729 ; 
liis will, now in possession of the family, l)eing admitted to pro- 
bate in that year, devising bis real estate to his son Sanuiel 
Abbott. His personal property equally between his two 
daughters, Hannah and Bebecca Abl)ott. Mary, liis widow, 
survived liim eight years. I have no doubt that Benjamin, 
George, Sarah and Mary died young and unmarried, as the will 
of their fatlier makes no mention of them in 1729. 

Hannah, I presume, died mnnarried. Rel)ecca, the daughter 
of George and Mary Al)bott, married a man by the name of 
Howell ; lie l)clonged to tlie ancient Howell family, of Glouces- 



ABBOTT FAMILY. 29 



ter county. By the M'ill made l»y Mary, widow of George 
Al)l)()tt, in IT-iT, her property is devised to her two children, 
Sanniel Abbott and Reljecea Howell; from this I infer, that 
lier daughter had died previously, leaving no issue. Mary 
A])bott, sister of George Abbott, who emigrated ^nth him from 
tlie State of Connecticut, married William Tyler, Jr., who 
emigrated from England witli his father in 1685 ; he was liorn 
5tirof 7th month, 1680. 

William and Mary Abbott Tyler, had six children. AYilliam 
Tyler, 3d, born in 1712 ; Edith Tyler, born in 1714 ; Rebecca 
Tyler, born in 1716 ; Mary Tyler, born in 1718 ; James Tyler, 
born in 1720 ; Samuel Tyler, born in 1723 ; [See the geneal- 
ogy of the Tyler family and Thompson and Allen family.] 
AVilliam Tyler, Jr., made his will in 1732 and died the fol- 
lowing year. Mary Al.)bott Tyler, widow of AVilliam, snrvived 
liim several years, afterwards married Kobert Townsend, of 
Cape May, in 1735 ; by this marriage she had one daughter, 
Rany Townsend, and she subsequently married a man by the 
name of Stites. The Stites' are one of the ancient families of 
Cape May county. After the death of Robert Townsend, his 
widow returned t(j Salem county, and lived with her Tyler 
(•hildren ; the time of her death is not given. I have mentioned 
lieretofore, that family l)urying grounds in the Urst settlement 
of this country was common ; tlie Abljott family had theirs ; it 
was a few rods east of their old mansion in Elsinborougli ; it, 
like many others of the kind, has been passed over by the 
plough, and no trace of the once honored spot is discoverable. 
Samuel, the sixth child of George and Mary Abl)ott, was born 
20t]i of 6th month, 1712 ; he was the only male descendant ; 
married Hannah Foster, born 21st of lOtli month, 1715, 
daughter of Josiah and Amy Foster, of Burlington county, 
New Jerse}^, in the year 1733. 

Samuel and Hannah F. Abbott had tln-ee cliildren — George 
Abl)ott, their eldest son, born 29th of 11th month, 1734; 
William Abbott, their second son, born -Ith of ith month, 1737 ; 
and Rel)ecca, the daughter, Avas born 26th of lltli month, 1740. 
Samuel, tlieir father, departed this life 25th of the 11th month, 
1760, at the age of forty-eight years, of cancer of the face. 
In a volume of Memorial of Ministers and tlie Distinguished 
Members of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting, that lived during 
tlie last century, I find the following account of Samuel Abbott, 
although he died comparatively a young man. It shows how 
highly he was appreciated by his fellow members and others: 
" He was born of believing parents, who carefully educated 



30 ABBOTT FAMILY, 



" liiui in the way of truth, hiboring in the al)ility afforded them 
" to bring up in the nui'ture and admonition of the Lord. Ilis 
" father dying when lie was still young, the care of providing 
"for the family fell upon him. In the responsible station to 
"which he was thus raised, he endeavored to act with great 
" watchfullness, in uprightness and integrity. His orderly, 
" consistent walkiug amongst men, gained him a good report, 
" and by his obedience to the inspeaking word of Divine grace 
" he obtained the favor of his heavenly Father, As he contin- 
" ued faithful to the manifestations of truth, a further increase 
" of the day spring from on high was granted him, and about 
" the twenty-second year of his age a gift of gospel ministry 
" was committed to his charge. He was led by his beloved 
" friends to travel in the different neighboring provinces in the 
" work of the gospel, and in love to the souls of his fellow 
" creatures, and good accounts of his labors in the churches 
" abroad were received by his friends at home. His death took 
" place 25th of 11th month, 1760, as one entering into a sweet 
" sleep." Hannah, his widow, married Samuel Nicholson, of 
Elsinborougli, she being his second wife, in 1763. She died 
in the year 1793, aged seventy-eight years. 

Josiah and Amy Foster, parents of the above named Hannah 
Abbott, were residents, as before stated, of Burlington county. 
They had a large family of daughters, who married in tlie 
families of the Abbotts, Keeves, Newbolds, Millers, and 
Whites, and others, whose descendants now in 1S76, distantly 
connected, are very numerous in Philadelphia and New Jersey. 
Josiah Foster died 1st of 9th month, 1770, aged eighty-eiglit 
years. Ann', his widow, died 15th of 8th month, 1783, aged 
ninety-eight years, three months and eleven days. 

George, son of Sanniel and Hannah F. Abbott, born 29tli of 
11th mouth, 1731, the family have no knowledge of, other than 
that he signed two marriage certificates recorded in tlie Salem 
Monthly Meeting of Friends, in the year 1756 and 1758. The 
presumption therefore is, that he never married, and that he 
died before his father, at about the age of twenty-four years, 
as he is not mentioned in the will of his father, which is dated 
8th month, 1759, nor does his nauie appear on any record 
after the year 1758. 

William, the second son of Samuel and Hannah F. Abbott, 
was born 4th of the 4tli month, 1737, married Rebecca, the 
daughter of William Tyler 3d, and Elizal)eth, his wife; Rebecca 
was born 18th of the 2d month, 1713, and they were married 
2d of the 2d month, 1763. They had three children — Sanmel, 



ABBOTT FAMILY. . 31 



born 27tli of lltli month, lt63; George was born 27tli of 9tli 
month, 1765, and Josiah Abbott born 23d of 9th montli, 1768. 
William Abbott, their father, after an active life as a farmer, died 
in the 1st month, 1800, in the sixty-third year of his age, devising 
])V will dated 1st of 12th month, 1799, the old homestead farm 
of the family, in Elsinborongh, to his eldest son, Samnel Abbott ; 
George Al)l)ott, his second son, a farm whicth he pnrchased of 
Christianna Miller, in the township of Mannington; to his son, 
Josiah Abljott, the plantation purchased of Mark Miller and 
Banjamin Wynhook; the said farm is located in Mannington, 
near Salem. Rebecca, his widow, survived him about six years, 
and died 28tli of 7th month, 1806, aged about sixty-four years. 
Rebecca, the daughter of Samuel and Hannah Foster Abbott, 
l)orn 26th of 11th month, 1710, married Joseph, the son of John 
Brick, Jr., and Ann Nicholson Brick, of Gravelly Run, Cumber- 
land county, 17th of 12th month, 1760. Soon after their 
marriage they settled on a farm in the township of Elsinborongh, 
that was left to his wife by her father, Samuel Abbott, who had 
purchased it in 1756 of Thomas and Sarah Morris Good^^'iu. 
Joseph and Rebecca Abljott Brick had three children — Ann, 
Hannah, and Samuel Abbott Brick. Rebecca A. Brick, wife rf 
Joseph Brick, departed this life 16th of the 11th montli, 1780, 
aged thirty-nine years. Ann Brick, their eldest daughter, married 
Joseph, son of Clement and Margaret Hall, of Elsinborongh. 
[See genealogy of Hall family.] Hannah Brick, daughter of 
Joseph and Rebecca A. Brick, married Anthony Keasby, of 
Salem. Samnel Abbott Brick married Ann Smart, daughter of 
Isaac and Ann Smart, of Elsinborongh. Samuel, the eldest son 
of AVilliam and Rebecca Al)bott, born 27th of 11th month, 1763, 
married Marcia Gill, daughter of John and Amy Gill, of 
Iladdonlield, N. J. They were married 21th of 11th month, 
1791. Their children were "William Abbott, born 22d of 8th 
montli, 1792; Rebecca Abbott, born 29tli of 7th month, 1791; 
and Hannah AlJjott, l)orn 3d of 4th montli, 1796 ; Sarah, the 
fourth child, born 1797, died in infancy. William Abljott, son 
of Samuel and Marcia Abl)ott, married Rachel Denn, daughter 
of James Denn, of Alloways Creek ; by her had live children — 
Ami, Hannah, John, Mary, and Amy Abbott. After the death 
of William's wife, Rachel, he married Martha Reeve, of Cum- 
l)erland county; they had no issue. William died 20th of the Itli 
month, 1835, in his forty-second year. Rebecca, the second child 
of Samuel and Marcia Al)l)ott, married Andrew, the eldest son of 
Joshua and RebeccaA. Thompson, of Elsinborongh. They were 
married 1st of 4th month, 1818. She died in 1821, aged twentv- 



32 ABBOTT FAMILY. 



se\'en years, leavinc; one daugliter, Ilaniiali Ann Thompson, wlio 
sub.se(]uently niarriod Elislia, son of Elisha and Mary Nicholson 
Bassett, of Mannington. Hannah, the daughter of Sanniel and 
Mareia Abl)ott, married Jedediah T., son of David and Rebecca 
Allen, of Mannington ; she was his second wife. They had 
issue, two children — Hannah and Chambless Allen. Their 
mother survived her husband several years; she died 25th of 12th 
month, 1866, aged seventy-one years. Marcia, first wife of Samuel 
Abbott, died 2d of the 1st month, 1798, aged thirty-four years. 
Samuel Abbott's second wife was Martha Ogden ; married 1st of 
lOtli month, 1809. She was the daughter of Sanniel and Mary 
Ann Ogden, of Pilesgrove. She was born 2d of the 2d month, 
1779. They had five children — Mary Ann Abl)ott, born 20th 
of the lOtii month, 1810; Lydia Abbott, born 21st of the 1st 
month, 1813 ; Samuel, born 14th of the 3d month, 1815 ; George, 
born I3tli of 7th month, 1817; Martha Abbott, born 4th of 4t]i 
month, 1811. Samuel Abbott was an active and successful 
agriculturist, and accumulated a fortune. He died 14tli of 4th 
month, 1835, in the seventy-second year of his age. In the division 
of his estate, he gave his son, George Abbott, the old homestead in 
Elsinborongh ; the same property was purchased by George 
Abbott, the emigrant, in 1696. Samuel Abbott's widow died 4th 
of the 5th month, 1848, in her seventieth year. George Abbott, 
son of William and Rebecca Abbott, was born 27th of the 9th 
month, 1765. He married Mary Redman, of Haddonfield. 
George, soon after his marriage, sold the farm devised to him 
l)y his father, William Abbott, and removed to the city of 
Philadelphia, and pursued the business of a druggist. He died at 
Haddonheld, N. J., 15th of 11th month, 1831, aged sixty-seven 
years. His wife, Mary, died also at Haddonfield, a short time 
before her husband. They had five children, who attained tJieir 
majority. First their daughter, Rebecca. R. Abbott, born 2(1 
day of the 5th month, 1798. She married Josiah Holmes, and 
died without issue 6th of 4th month, 1824. 

William, sou of George and Mary R. Abbott, l)orn 8tli of 
8th month, 1800, died at Philadelphia, unmarried, 29th of 
12th month, 1867. Samuel W., son of George and Mary R. 
Al)l)ott, born 18tli <»f loth month, 18(»7, married Helen Lam- 
bei't, of Lanil»ertvillo, New Jersey, and died without issue at 
Philadelpliia, 27th of 2d month, 1868. Janu'S, son of George 
and Mary R. Abbott, born 29th of 3d month, 1811, went to 
Philadelphia in 1830, there married Caroline Montelius, 21st 
of 12th month, 1837. Redman, son of George and Mary R. 
Abbott, born 28th of 10th month, 1813, went to Philadelphia, 



ABBOTT FAMILY. 33 



there married Susan F. Leamini;, of Cape May county. Will- 
iam, son of George and Mary R. Ablwtt, of the lirm of Wood 
c^ Abl)ott, of Philadelphia, was a successful merchant. Ho 
never married, and died in 1868, in his sixty-seventh year, 
leaving a large estate. James Abbott, fourth child of George 
and Mary Abbott, and his wife, Caroline Montelins Abbott, 
liave six children — Montelins, Francis R., Mary H., Harry 
James, William J., and Helen D. Abl)ott. Redman, son of 
George and Mary R. Al>l)ott, and his Avifc Susan, have three 
children — Ellen F., William Louis, and Gertrude xibl)ott. All 
four of George Abbott's sons were merchants in the city of 
Philadelphia. 

Josiah, the third son of William and Rebecca Al)bott, was 
l)orn 23d of 9t]i month, 1768. He married a young woman by 
the name of Wilson. Soon after liis marriage he removed to 
the city of Richmond, Ya., and carried on the hatting business; 
having at Salem served an apprenticeship to that trade. Josiah 
and his wife had two children, Josiah and Adaline Abbott; 
they were born al)out the years 1792 to 1794. Josiah Abbott, 
Ji-., studied law and practiced for some years; he married and 
left three children, one son and two daughters. Josiah died in 
1850, leaving a widow. His sister, Adaline Abbott, married 
Thomas H. Drew, of Richmond. They had children. 

Mary Ann Abbott, eldest daughter of Samuel and Martha 
AlJjott, was born 20th of 10th month, 1810, departed this life 
10th of 1st month, 1841, in the thirty-fourth year of her age. 
Lydia, the second daughter of Samuel and Martha Abbott, 
l)orn 21st of 1st month, 1813, and died 14tli of 6th month, 

1845, aged thirty-three years. Martha Abbott the youngest 
daughter of Sanniel and Martha Abbott, born 4th of 4th 
month, 1819, married Samuel S. Willets 6th of 10th month, 
1841, of Haddonlield, ISTew Jersey ; she departed this life 13th 
of 7th month, 1845, aged twenty-six years, leaving one son, 
Sanmel A. Willets, who subsequently married Al)by Evans, 
(huigliter of Josiah and Hannah Evans, of Haddonlield. Sam- 
uel, the eldest son of Sanmel and Martha Ogden Abl)ott, born 
14th of 3d month, 1815, married Sarali Wistar 6th of 5th month, 

1846, eldest daughter of Casper and Rebecca Wistar. He Avas 
born 20tli of 6t;h month, 1818. Tlieir children are as follows: 
Mary Ann Abl)ott, ])orn 24th of 9th montli, 1847 ; their son 
Casper AV. Abbott, born 6th of 12th montli, 1848, died aged ten 
uionths. Sanmel Al)l)ott, 4tli, was l)orn 28th of 7th month, 1851. 
Rebecca and Catharine Abbott's twins were born 26tli of 2d 
month, 1853. Mary Ann, the eldest daughter of Samuel and 

5 



34: ABBOTT FAMILY, 



Sarah W. Al)l(ott married, -itli of l^tli luontli, 18Y2, Josiali, 
son of Clayton and Martha Wistar, hite of Mannington. 
Samuel and his wife Sarah W. Abhott owns and resides in tlie 
township of Mannington on the homestead of his father. 

George, the second son of Samuel and Martha Ahbott, Itorn 
13tli of Tth month, 1817, married Kuth S. Baker, Dth of the 
10th month, 1845, daugliter of George W. and Ruth Baker, of 
Kew Bedford, Mass. Their children were Henry B. Abbott, 
l)orn 5th of 8th month, 1846 ; Charles T. Abbot, born 12tli of 
4th month, 1848; George Abbott, 5th, born 11th of 9th month, 
1849; William Abbott,l)orn 2d of 9th month, 1852, and died 
30th of the 12th month, 1862, aged eleven years. Joseph B. 
Abbott, son of George and Ruth Abbott, born 26th of 2d 
month, 1857, and died 30fh of the 1st month, 1863, aged six 
years. William Abbott, sixth son of George and Ruth Abbott, 
born 13th of 2d month, 1868. George, the son of George and 
Ruth Abbott, married Elizabeth Lippincott, 9th of 10th month, 
1872, daughter of Aquila and Sarah Lippincott. They have one 
son, Edward S. Abbott, born 2d of 9th month, 1873. George, 
the son of Samuel and Martha Abbott, sold the old homestead 
of the Abbott's, located in the township of Elsinborough. Said 
property was devised to liim by his father. George purchased 
a. valuable property in Mannington (it formerly Ijelonged to 
Whittin Cripps), and resides thereon. 




EDWARD BRADWAY HOUSE. 



Salem, N. J. 



Built 1691. 



BEADWAY FAMILY. 

Edward Bradway and liis wife Mary Bradway, and their three 
cliildren — Mary, WiUiam and Snsannah Bradway, togetlier with 
their three servants — WilHam Groon, Thomas Buekel, and 
John Allen, embarked from London in the 3d month, in the year 
1677, in the ship called the Kent. They landed at Salem, in 
West IS'ew Jersey, in the 7th month following. There is no 
doubt but that Edward Bradway had considerable means. When 
he came to this country he had purchased one town lot and one 
thousand acres of land of the proprietor before Fenwick embarked 
for this country. As early as 1676 the street now known as 
Broadw^ay was laid out and called Wharf street, and several town 
lots were laid out and surveyed on said street; one for Edward 
Bradway before his arrival, containing sixteen acres, commencing 
near the public wharf at the creek, and running up the street a 
certain distance, and from the line of said street a northerly 
course to Fenwick creek. In the year 1691 Edward Bradway 
built on liis town lot a large brick house which is still standing, 
iov size and appearance surpassing any house T)uilt prior to that 
date, and for many years afterward, in Salem. I think it far 
excels in size and architecture the two houses built in Philadel- 
])]iia al)out the same period — one built by William Penn in 
Leatita court, and the other built l>_y Sanmel Carpenter on Second 
street, corner of Norris alley. The Governor of this State 
resided in tlie Bradway house some time after the death of 
Edward Bradway; hence it went under the name of the Gov- 
ernor's house for many years afterwards. It is still owned by 
one of the lineal descendants of Edward Bradway, lieing tlie 
seventh generation. 

In 1093 the town of Salem was incorporated into a borougli, 
and tlie authorities of the town changed the name of Wharf 
street to Bradway street, in honor of Edward Bradway. Edward 
had two children born in Salem — Sarah and Hannah Bradway. 
His allotment of hmd that Richard Hancock surveyed foi' liim 
in 1676, ])y order of John FenAvick, was located on the south 
side of AlloM'ays creek, joining Clu-isto])her AVhite on the west 



36 BRADWAY FAMILY. 



and Wm. Malstiff's land on the east, running 800 rods, startino; 
from the creek, course south thirtj-one degrees, east until it 
reached Henry Salter's 10,000 acre tract. Mary Bradway, the 
eldest daugliter of Edward Bradway, married William Cooper 
in 1687, who was a Ijlacksmitli, and was the iirst that folloA\'ed 
tliat business in Salem. Tliey had three children l)orn in Salem 
— Mary Avas born in 1688, Sarah in 1690, and Hannah in 1692. 
Edward Bradway, about the year before his death, deeded 300 
acres of land to his daughter, Mary Cooper, being part of liis 
allotment in Alloways Creek. He mentioned in his deed of 
conveyance the natural affection he had for ]iis daughter Mary 
Cooper, and gave her 300 acres of land, and then describes tlie 
boundaries. She was to pay for consideration, if demanded, one 
ear of Indian corn on the first day of the 9th month, c-ach and 
every year forever. One of the largest l)ranches of Alloways 
creek runs by the property; hence the name of Cooper's creek 
was given it. About eighty years ago the grandson of William 
and Mary Cooper, whose name was Benjamin Cooper, came from 
Gloucester and resided on tlie property a few years, and then 
sold it to different persons and returned to his native county. 
William and Mary Cooper, soon after the death of her father, 
which event took place, I think, in 1693, j)urchased a large tract 
of land in the county of Gloucester, where the city of Camden 
now stands, and removed from Salem to that place in 1694. 
They had two sons ])orn at that place — William and Edward 
Cooper. 

William Bradway, the oldest son of Edward Bradway, married, 
in 1691, Elizabeth White, the eldest daughter of Christoplier 
Wldte. She was born in London in 1669, and liadfour children 
— Edward, the oldest, was born in 1692; William, their second 
scm, died young; Jonathan, tlie youngest son, was born 1699; 
and their daughter Elizabeth was born in 1701. She married 
the son of Fenwick Adams, of Penn's Neck. Hannah Bradway, 
the youngest daugliter of Edward Bradway, Sr., was born in 
1681. She married Joseph Stretcli, wlio had lately arrived in 
tliis country from England. Tliey were married in 1701, and 
from them sprung tlie large family of that name in this county. 
Edward Bradway, the oldest son of William Bradway, became 
the owner of the property in Salem on Bradway street, and was 
married about the year 1720. It appears lie died a young man, 
leaving one son named Aaron Bradway, who, in 17-1:5 or '16, 
inarried a young woman that owned one-half of Middle Neck in 
Elsinborough. Joshua Waddington now lives on and owns part 
of said pr()})erty, Aaron and his wife Sarah liad two cliildren 



HEADWAY FAMILY 



37 



— Josluia and Sarali Bradwav. Joslnia always remained single, 
and after the death of his fathei- — his mother having died when 
lie ^vas qnite young — he inherited all her real estate. His sister, 
Sarah Bradwav, married Jonathaii Waddington, of Alloways 
Creek. Jonathan Waddington and his Avife had six children, all 
of them sons, named as follows: William, Aaron, Robert, Thomas, 
Jonathan and Edward AVaddington. Aaron Bradway's second 
wife was Sarah Smith, widow of John Smitli, who was the grand- 
son of John Smith of Aml)lel»ury. Aaron and his wife Sarah 
liad one son named Thomas Bradwav. Aaron Bradway's third 
wife was widow Rolph, and hy her he had one danghter named 
Hannah R. Bradwav, who afterwards became the wife of David 
Bradway, of Alloways Creek. 

Thomas Bradway became the owner of his father's real 
estate in Salem on Bradway street by will. His wife was 
Isabella Dnnlap, and I believe they had three children. The 
oldest was Sarali Ann, who married John S. Wood of Cumber- 
land county ; Thomas Bradway and Eliza Bradway. William 
Bradway, Jr., the son of William Bradway, never married and 
died young. Jonathan Bradway's first wife was Mary Daniels, 
the daughter of James Daniels, Sr. They had three children 
— AVilliam the oldest, born in 1728 ; Rachel and Jonathan 
Bradway. His second wife was Susanna Oakford, the daughter 
of Charles Oakford, Jr. They had three children — Edward 
born in 1741; Saraband Kathan Bradway. AVilliam, the old- 
est son of Jonathan Bradway, and his wife Sarali, had three 
children — Adna, the oldest, died a minor ; William and Mary 
Bradw^ay. The latter became the wife of John Thompson of 
Elsinborough, and was the grand-mother of the present William 
Thompson of that township. AVilliam Bradway, Jr.'s, wife was 
Mary Ware, the daughter of John and Elizabeth AVare. They 
had live children. The oldest was Sarah, who married Elisha 
Stretch, and their children were Mary, Joshua, William, Ann 
and Job Stretch. Anna Bradway married James Stewart, Jr. 
Two children were born to them — Hannah and Mary Stewart. 
Hannah died a young woman, and Mary married AVilliam 
Clriscom. 

William Bradway, the oldest son of Jonathan Bradway, was 
l)orn in 1728, and married Sarah Hancock ; they had three 
children — Admy, William and Mary Bradway. Mary's husband 
was John Thompson, of Elsinborough. They were the grand- 
parents of the present William, Joseph and Casper Thompscm. 
William Bradway, Jr., married Mary Ware, daughter of John 
and Elizabeth Ware, and they had five children — Sarah, Anna, 



38 BRADWAY FAMILY. 



Rachel, Ezra and John. Sarali, their oldest daughter's 1ms- 
l)and was Elisha Stretch. They were the parents of Mary, 
Joshua, William, Aim and Job Stretch. Ann Bradwaj mar- 
I'ied James Stewart. Their children were Hannah and Maiy 
Stewart. The latter was William Griscom's first wife. Anna's 
second husband was Samnel Fogg, and they had one son, the 
present William Fogg, who resides at Salem. Racliel Brad- 
way's first Imsband was Joseph Stewart, the son of Samuel 
Stewart, of Salem towTiship. Their children were Mary, Anna 
and Lydia Stewart. Rachel's second Imsband was David Gris- 
com, who was a teacher of Clermont Boarding School, near 
Philadelphia, for several years. There were two children, 
Rachel and David. Ezra Brad way married Mary Denn, daughter 
of James Denn, of Alloways Creek. They had five children, 
all of them being sons — William, John, George, Mark and 
Charles. John Bradway's first wife was Hannah Pancoast, 
daughter of John and Sarah Pancoast; and his second wife 
was Clarissa Hancock. They had one son John, who is cashier 
of the Woodbury Bank. 

Jonathan Bradway's second son's name was Jonathan, and 
he married Elizabeth Stewart, the daughter of John and Mary 
Stewart. Their children were John, Mark and Thomas Brad- 
way, The last mentioned died young. John married and 
removed to the State of Ohio. Mark Bradway married the 
daughter of Thomas Hartley, and they had one son named 
Thomas H. His second wife was Martha Denn, and had one son 
nained Mark Bradway, who was a merchant for several years at 
Hancock's Bridge. Thomas H. Bradway was by occupation a 
tailor, and did a very extensive business in that line for many 
years. His house and shop were located on Fenwick street, 
Salem, where William Holtz built his large brick dwelling. 
Thomas' wife was Rachel Worthington, daughter of David 
and Jail Worthington. Thomas subsequently purchased a 
large farm in East Notingham township, Chester County, Pa., 
and removed there. The farm was nmch reduced wlien he 
bouglit it, but by his industry and good management it proved 
to be a profitable investment. He li^'ed to a great age. Most 
of liis children reside thereat the present time. Rachel Brad- 
way, the daughter of Jonathan, married Samuel Hancock. 
There were tnree children, Rebecca, Prudence and Samuel. 
R(>be(H;a's first Imsband was Samuel Padgett ; lier second, Bar- 
zilla Jeffres. Prudence Hancock's husband was Thomas Rob- 
erts. He was a merchant and a practical surveyor at Hancock's 
Bridge during the greater part of Ids life. Few men had more 



BRADWAY FAMILY. 3^ 



friends and less enemies at the time of their death than lie. 
Those living there at that time testify that they never Avitnessed 
such a large concourse of people of all denominations as 
attended his funeral, showing that his friends and neighbors 
duly appreciated his goodness of character, and were desirous 
to pay their last respects to him on this earth. He left two 
children, Samuel and Sarah. 

Samiiel Hancock, Jr. married Hannah Pancoast, daughter of 
Edward Pancoast, of Gloucester county. They had six chil- 
th"en, named Pachel, Clarissa, Beulali, Joseph, Edward and 
Samuel. Rachel lived past middle age and died single. Clar- 
issa married John Bradway. Beulah w^as the first wife of 
David Ogden, late of Woodbury. Joseph married Susan 
Bacon of Philadelphia, and was for several years a member of 
the Pennsylvania Legislature, and now is one of tlie Inspectors 
of Buildings for the city of Philadelphia. Edward Hancock 
married Susan Thompson, daughter of William Thompson, of 
tins county. Samuel Hancock's wife w^as Charlotte Gillinglumi. 
He is by occupation a lumber merchant, and is considered to 
have more than ordinary talents. He was a member of tlie city 
(touncil for several years, and now holds tlie responsible office of 
City Comptroller for the city of Philadelphia. 

Edward Bradway, the oldest son of Jonathan Bradway l)y his 
second wdfe, Susanna Oakford, was born in 1741, and married 
Elizabeth Waddington. Tliey had six children — David, Han- 
nah, Edward, Waddington, Elizabeth and Adna. His second 
Avife was Susanna Barbour. David Bradway's iirst wife and 
mother of his children was Hannah Bradway, the daughter of 
Aaron Bradway. Waddington Bradway's first wife was Mary 
Bates, and their children Avere Edward, Elizabeth and Phebe. 
His second wife was Hannah Stretch, the daughter of Jonathan 
and Elizabeth Stretch. They had two children — Jonathan and 
Mercy Bradway. Jonathan, their son, married Dorcas, daughter 
of Andrew and Sarah Griscom. They have several children. 
Mercy Bradway married Jacob Ridgway. Mercy is deceased, 
leaving two children — Kesiah and Waddington B. Ridgway. 
Kesiali is deceased. Waddington married Anna, the daughter of 
John and Rebecca Powell. Waddington and his w'ife have 
several children — one daughter and four suns. His third Avife 
Avas Hannah Bainer, the daughter of Elisha and Lydia, Bainer, 
of Cape May. Tlieir children Avere Waddington, Hamiali, Isaac, 
Lydia, Susan and Josiah. 

Adna BradAvay's first wife Avas Sarah Baker, tlie daugliter of 
Esther Baker. She OAAmed the property where Quinton Harris 



40 BKADWAY FAMILY. 



now owns and lives. His second wife was Lydia Bainer, daughter 
of Elislia and Lydia Bainer. Their chiklren were Sarah, Elisha, 
Adna, Jacob, Edward, Lydia, Jonathan and Elizabeth. Sarah 
Bradway, daughter of Jonathan, married William AcUims, of 
Penn's Neck. They had two cliildren — Susanna and John 
Adams. Jolni died young. Susanna was the lirst wife of the 
late Benjamin Griscom, of Salem. Sarah's second husband was 
Richard Ware, who owned the property in Quaker Neck where 
Josiali Wistar lives. Thev had two children — Sarah and Eliza- 
Ijetli Ware. 

The AVa(l(lingt(in family were closely coimected with part of 
the Bradway's. William AV^addiiigton arrived in this country 
from England in 1695. He soon afterwards purcliased a tract 
of land of Edward AV^adc, l)eing tlie S(^ut]iern portion of his 
allotment adjoining Anna Salter's line on that property, and 
1)uilt there and made it his permanent liome. He had one son, 
Jonathan Waddington, who married a1)out tlie year 1728, ^uld 
lived on his patrimonial estate. He and liis wife had four 
children — Hannah, Jonathan, Elizabeth, and Jane. Hannah, 
the oldest daughter, married Walker Beesley. Their chihhvn 
were Walker, Hannali, Benjamin, Mary and Abner. Walker 
was killed at the massacre of Hancock's Bridge during the 
Revolutionary war in 1778. Hannah Beesley married her (;ousin 
John Beesley. Tliey had two children, Walker and David. 
Mary Beesley was the wife of Peter Townsend, late of Manning- 
ton. Benjamin died young; and Abner Beesley married Mary 
Mason, daugliter of John Mason. 

Elizabeth Waddington's Imsband was Edward Bradway. Jane 
Waddington married Edward Keasl)y, Jr. She was his second 
wife. They had one daughter, Sarah Keasbey, whose husband 
was John Pancoast, son of Edward Pancoast. They resided for 
some time after they were married on tlie farm that was left to 
her Ijy her father below the village of Canton. Richard L'elan 
noAv owns it. After a few years they sold it and purchased a 
farm of Josiah Reeve, which farm is owned at the present time 
by Luke S. Eogg. After the death of Jane Keasby they sold 
the property and renu)ved to Mullica Hill, and there ended their 
days. Their children were Hannah, Achsah, -lohn, Israel, Jane, 
David, and Aaron. 

The father of Jonathan AVaddington, ."xl, died 1760, by cir- 
cumstant^es not (H)nnnon in this country. On the evening of 
18th of 'Sd month, 1760, the wind being south, it commenced 
snowing and at sunrise the luwt UKn-ning it was clear, and the 
snow was three feet deep on the level. 1 have been informed 



BRADWAY FAMILY. 41 



1)7 persons living at the time, that it required great exertions on 
the part of those owning sheep to extricate them from under 
the snow. Jonathan Waddington, Jr.. in endeavoring to save 
]iis sheep, caught a \iolent cold and died three or four days 
afterwards. At liis death there was but one infant son by the 
UMme of Waddington in this county. Watson, in his Annals of 
Philadelphia, mentions the account of the same fall of snow I 
liave alluded to. It was the greatest that history gives any 
account of since the first European settlement. 

TJie family of Cooj)ers have scattered in nearly all the States 
of tlie Union, I think ; nearly all of them are descendants of 
William and Margaret Cooper, of Coltsliill, in the county of 
Stafford, England ; tlie following are the names of their chil- 
dren : William, the son of William and Margaret Cooper, was 
1)orn at Coltsliill, 26th day of 9th month, 1660 ; Hannah, 
daughter of the same parents, born 21st of 9th inontli, 1662 ; 
Joseph, the son of William and Margaret Cooper, born 22d of 
Tth month, 1666 ; James Cooper, son of William and Margaret 
Cooper, born 3d of the 10th month, 1670; Daniel Cooper, son 
of the same parents, born 2Tth of 1st month, 1673. William 
Cooper and wife emigrated with their children in 1682 ; he 
settled in Burlington county. The eldest son, William Cooper, 
was by trade a blacksmith. He settled at Salem about 1684. 
He married Mary, the daughter of Edward Bradway. They 
subsequently moved to Gloucester, wliere the city of Camden is; 
lie died in 1691, leaving one son and two daughters. He left 
his father, William Cooper, and his father-in-law, Edward 
Bradway, executors in his will. Joseph Cooper, son of William 
and Margaret Cooper, married Jjjdm Riggs, in 1688. Daniel 
Cooper married Abigail Wood, in 1693 ; his second wife was 
Sarah Spicer, daughter of Samuel Spicer; they were married in 
1695 ; she was the sister of Jacob Spicer. Hannali, the daughter 
of William and Margaret Cooper, married, in 1704, John 
Wolston. 

6 



BRICK FAMILY. 

John Brick was m iiati\'e of England; lie emigrated to Fen- 
■\vick Colony previons to 1680, and pnrcliased a large tract of 
land on tlie sontli side of the town branch of Stoe Creek, called 
Gravelly Run; the village of Jericho is on the original tract of 
land. Samuel Demming, of Maryland, bought tlie land of Jolni 
Fenwick in 1679 ; he, Demming, sold the said land to John Brick, 
Sr., about 1690. The land was reserved by Benjamin Acton 
in 1729. John had several children; the oldest was John; 
there was Joshua, who located himself in the neighl)orhood of 
Maurice river; he Avas the father of the late Joshua Brick of 
Port Elizabeth. Richard Brick, the third son of John, purchased 
a tract of five hundred acres in tlie township of Mannington ; it 
lay adjoining to the Hedgefield tract. lie M'as a large farmer; 
likewise carried on the tanning and currying business A'ery 
extensively. He left one son, John Brick ; I think he never 
married. At his death his real estate was purchased by his 
cousin, Joshua Brick, at Port Elizabeth, and Isaac Townsend of 
the same place, and they conveyed to the late Jesse Boyd. 
Samuel Brick, the youngest son of John Brick, Sr., married 
and left issue. His son Samuel lived for a number of years on 
his cousin John Brick's estate, in Mannington, and followed the 
tanning business to some extent, and also farming. He was the 
father of Josiah Brick, of Upper Penns Neck. The eldest son 
of John Brick, Jr., inherited all of his father's real estate at 
(Iravelly Run; he became a conspicuous and influential person 
in the colony, was one of the Judges of Salem courts for many 
vears. At the division of the county, the commissioners thought 
of making the branch of Stoe Creek, where Seeley mill is 
located on, the boundary line, but John Brick used his great 
influence, for them to make the Gravelly run the line, thereby 
throwing his property in the new county of Cumberland, which 
he deserved. He married Ann, the daughter of Abel and Mary 
Tyler Nicholson, of Elsinborough, in 1729. She was l)orn 15th 
of lltli month, 1707. They commenced life together at Cohansey. 
Thev had eiglit children! The oldest, Mary, born 10th of 2d 



BRICK FAMILY. 43 



jnontli, 1730; Elizabetli, Jolm, Joseph, Ann, Hannali, Rutli and 
Jane, born lOtli of 1st month, 1743. John Brick, the father of 
the l)efore mentioned children, died the 23d of the 1st month, 
1758, and his widow, Ann N. Brick, in 1778, at tlie age of 
nearly seventy-two years. Previous to his death Jolm Brick 
purchased a consideraljle quantity of land in Alloways Creek 
tr)Viaiship, lying on the south side of Alloways creek. Part of a 
neck of land called Beesley Neck, which he devised to his second 
son, Josepli Brick, wlio married Rebecca Abbott, the daughter of 
Samuel Abbott, of Elsinboro, about the year 1758. Joseph and 
liis wife resided for a short time on his property at Alloways 
Creek, subsecpiently removed to Elsinboro on a farm that was 
left to Ids wife by her father, Samuel Abbott, who had purchased 
it, a sliort time previous to his death, of Thomas and Sarali 
(Toodwin, it being part of Lewis Morris' estate. Joseph and his 
wife Pel)ecca had tln-ee children — Ann, Hannah, and Sanmel. 
Ilis wife, Rebecca, died IGth of the lltli month, 1780, aged thirty- 
nine years. His second wife was Martha Reeve, daughter of 
Joseph Reeve, Jr., and Milicent, his wife. Their home was on the 
south side of Cohansey, opposite the town of Greenwich, Cumber- 
land county. By her he had two sons — Joseph and Jolm. Ann 
Brick, his oldest daughter, married Joseph Hall, son of Clement 
Hall. Hannah Brick married Anthony Keasbey, of Salem, I 
think he was the son of Matthew Keasbey. Anthony and his 
wife had eight children — Rebecca, Matthew, Edward, Prudence, 
Hannah, Artemesia, Anthony and Ann. Samuel Brick, the 
eldest son of Joseph, married Anna Smart, daughter of Isaac 
and Ann Smart, of Elsinboro, and had live children — Deborah, 
Rebecca, Ann, Samuel and Joseph. The last two were twins, 
and after they arrived at some age went to Philadelphia to learn 
trades. I think they are both deceased at the present time. 
Deborah always remained single, and lived to an old age. 
Rebecca married Paul Hubbs, a native of Pilesgrove, but at the 
time of his marriage was a resident of Philadelphia. He was 
the son of Charles and Rebecca Hubbs, of Woodstown. Ann, 
the youngest daughter of Samuel and Ann Brick, married John 
Stevenson, Jr., son of Jolm Stevenson, of Mannington. John 
and his wife, a short time after their marriage, removed to the 
State of New York, His wife died not long afterwards, leaving 
one or two children, Mary, the eldest daughter of John, Jr,, 
and Ann IST. Brick, born 10th of the 2d month, 1730, married 
Natlianiel Hall, of Mannington. Elizabeth Brick, the daughter 
of John, Jr., and Ann N. Brick, Avas l)orn 4th of the 7th month, 
1732. She married, in 1753, Jolm Reeve, of Cohansey. Ann 



44: BRICK FAMILY. 



Brick, the daiigliter of the before mentioned parents, was born 
23d of 1st montli, 1738. She married Joseph Clement, of 
Haddontield, in 1761. Ruth Brick, daughter of John and Ann 
K. Brick, was born 1st of the 10th month, 1742, married 
Benjamin Reeve, of Phihidelphia, in 1761. He was a clock and 
watchmaker, and carried on that business in that city. He was 
the youngest son of Joseph and Eleanor Reeve, of Cohansey ; 
was born 2d of 7th month, 1737. Joseph, the eldest son of 
Joseph and Martha Reeve Brick, married Elizaljeth Smith, 
daughter of David Smith, a resident of Mannington. He was a 
native of Egg Harbor. His wife was the daughter of Jonathan 
and Mary Shourds Pettit. They removed to Salem county when 
they were al)Out middle age. Joseph and his wife, Eliz{d)eth 
Brick, had three or four sons and one daughter. His two oldest, 
I have been informed, learned the brick laying business. They 
subsequently became ci\Til engineers, Samnel following his 
business in the city of Philadelphia, and was quite successful in 
his calling. Joseph, his brother, removed to Brooklyn, State of 
New York, and amassed a fortune in his adopted city. He is 
now deceased, leaving a widow but no children living at the 
time of his death. Samnel married; he and his wife have 
several children. They reside on Arch street, Philadelphia. 
John, the son of Joseph and Martha R. Brick, was a tanner and 
currier by trade; his place of business was in Church alley; the 
firm was known as Brick & Eldridge. They carried on their 
business very extensively forty yeais ago or more. John 
married; they had one daughter, and she married Clinton 
Clement, of Salem. She did not live long afterwards, dying 
leaving no issue. John died recently in the city of Camden, and 
was brought to Salem and buried in the Friends' graveyard, 
where his relatives lay. 




WILLIAM BASSETT. 
Born 1803. 



BASSETT FAMILY. 

The family of the Bassetts came from England in the .sliip 
Fortinin 1621, and settled near Boston, Massachnsetts. Their 
names were "William and Josepli Bassett; many of their descend- 
ants remain about Lynn, Massachusetts, and in Rliode Island 
and Connecticut. One of the family, William Bassett, came 
from Lynn, Massacluisetts, in the year 1691, and settled near 
Salem, IST. J., with his three sons, Zebedee, Elisha, and William. 
Zebedee, the eldest, subsequently settled in tlie State of Dela- 
ware, and was the ancestor of the Bassett branch in that State; 
He was born about 1680, married, left two children — Daniel 
and Rebecca Bassett. Daniel married a young woman l)y tlie 
name of Lawrence. They had live children; their names were 
Daniel, Zebedee, Elisha, Sarah, and Amy. There is no account 
of any one of these children marrying, excepting Daniel, who 
was born 5th of 9th month, 1722; he married Mary Lippincott. 
They had two children — Daniel and Mary Bassett. Daniel's 
second wife was Sarah Linch, of Pilesgrove; they were married 
in 1760; they had four children — Hannah, SaraJi, Nathan, and 
Elizabeth. Daniel Bassett, the son of Daniel and Mary Lippin- 
cott Bassett, married Mary, the daughter of Gideon and JucHth 
Scull, of Egg Harbor ; they had three children — Gideon, Daniel 
and Mary. Gideon, their eldest son, died in 1779, aged two 
years and a half. Dcmiel had live children by his second wife — 
Hannah, Elizabeth, Mariv, Ebenezer and Ruth Bassett. Nathan, 
the son of Daniel, married Sarah Saunders, had twelve children 
— Hannah, Ann, Elizabeth, Del)orah, Josiah, Mary, Sarah, 
Beulah, Mark, Rachel. Elisha Bassett, second son of William 
Bassett, the emigrant, born about 1682, was about ten years old 
when he came with his father to Salem. In 1705 he was elected 
a consta])le for the town of Salem, and continued in that office 
eight years. He married Abigail Elizabeth Davis, daughter of 
John and Dorothea Davis, of Pilesgrove; they had "thirteen 
children. Sarah, the oldest, born in 1719, married Thomas 
Smith, of Mannington, in 1710 ; they had three sons — William, 
David, and Thomas Smith. [See genealogy of Smith family.] 



4f) BASSETT FAMILY. 



Her second lmsl)and was Charles Fogg, of Alloways Creek; tliere 
were four cliildren — Sarah, Rachel, Charles, and Aaron Fogg. 
Elizabeth Bassett, the second danghter of Elislia and Elizabeth 
Bassett, was born 2od of 2d month, 1720. She married Thomas 
Davis; they had ten cliildren — Abigail, Elisha, Sarah, Isaac, 
John, Charles, Elinor, and Elizabeth. Elisha married Hester 
Scott; had five children. Josiah, the son of Elisha Davis, 
mirried Ruth Brad way ; they had six children — Ann, Edward, 
Albert, William, Hester, and Hannah Davis. Elisha Bassett, 
Jr., son of Elisha and Elizabeth Bassett, was born 15th of 12th 
month, 1822. He married Mary, the danghter of Joseph 
AV^oodnntt, of Mannington ; they had six cliildren — Josepli and 
Rachel both died young; Sarah, the third child, was born 10th 
of 8tli month, 1759. SJie married Joseph Fettit. son of Jonathan 
and Mary Shourds Fettit, of Tuckinton. Joseph and Sarah B. 
Fettit's children were Woodnutt, Jonathan, and Mary Fettit. 
Hmnah, the second daughter of Elisha and Mary AVoodnntt 
Bassett, married John Roberts, of Haddontield; tliey had two 
sons — Jacob and David Roberts. Joseph, the son of Elisha 
Bassett, Jr., and Mary, his wife, was born 26th of Cth month, 
1765. He married Mary, the daughter of David and Rebecca 
Allen, of Mannington; they had nine children — Elisha, Joseph, 
David, Hannah, Rebecca, Samuel, Benjamin, William, and Mary 
Bassett. Davis, the son of Elislia and Elizabeth Bassett, was 
born 1726; married Mary El well, of Fhiladelphia; they had six 
children. Samuel,^ the son of Elisha and Elizabeth Bassett, was 
born in 1728 ; he married Ann, the daughter of Lewis and Sarah 
Morris, of Elsinborough; they had six children. Grace, the 
eldest, was born 16th of the 3d month, 1756; William was born 
4tli of the 2d month, 1758 ; Samuel was born oOtli of the 8tli 
month, 1760; Morris was born 30tli of Itli month, 1763; Davis 
was born 3d of tlie 8tli month, 1765; Ann Bassett was born 5th 
of 1st month, 1767. 

Rebecca, tlie daughter of Elisha and Elizabeth Bassett, mar- 
ried J(jlin Fage. TJiey had nine (ihildreti — William, the son 
of Elisha Bassett, was born in 1733, married Fliebe Coppeth- 
waite ; their eldest daughter, Mary, was born 18th of 9tli 
month, 1762 ; Abigail was born 16th of 9th month, 1766. 
Mary Bassett, the chiugliter of AVilliam, married Isaac Snow- 
den. They had six children. Rachel, the daughter of Elisha 
andx^bigail E. Bassett, born about 1736, married Andrew Miller. 
Isaac Bassett, the youngest son of Elisha Bassett,was Viorn in 1738, 
married Deborah, tlie daughter of Zaclieus and Deborah Dunn. 
She was boj-n 6th of 4th month, 1715 ; they had three chil- 



BAS8ETT FAMILY. 47 



dren — Deborali, born 3d month, 1T65. She snbseqnently was 
a recommended minister. Abigail, the second dangliter of 
Daniel and Deborah Bassett, married Joseph Erwin, M. D. 
Isaac Bassett lived to a great age, about ninety -six years. His 
father, Elisha Bassett, born in Massaclmsetts in 1082, died in 
Salem comity, 1786, aged one hundred and four years. His 
■wife, Abigail Elizabeth Davis, born on Long Island, 1698, 
being sixteen years younger than her husband. Slie died 
agreeable to Salem monthly record 30th of the 12th montli, 
1770, aged seventy-two years. 

Elisha, the oldest son of Joseph and Mary T. Bassett, Ijurn 
26tli of 1st month, 1778, married Mary, the daughter of Dar- 
kin and Esther Nicholson, of Elsinborough. They had eight 
children — David, Josiali, Elizal)eth, Elisha, Edward, John T., 
Albert and Mary ; the latter died young. Elisha's second wife 
was Mary, the widow of Samuel Lippincott, of Gloucester 
county. She was the daughter of Thomas Clark of the same 
place. They are both deceased, leaving no issue. David Bas- 
sett, his eldest son, married Mary, the daughter of Evi Smitli. 
Josiah Bassett died young. Elizal^etli Bassett married Biddle 
Haiues. Elisha Bassett's wife was Hannah Ann, daugljter of 
Andrew and Rebecca Abbott Thompson. Tliey have issue. 
Edward Hicks Bassett's wife is Hannah, daughter of Evi 
Smith; they have issue. John Thompson Bassett married 
Susan Humphreys ; they have two daugliters. Albert Bassett 
married Mary Shoemaker. Joseph and David Bassett were 
twins. Joseph's first M'ifc was Lydia, daughter of Jonas and 
Elizabeth Ereedland, of Quaker Neck. They had four daughters, 
Elizabeth, Hannah, Lydia and Sarali. Their eldest daughter, 
Elizabeth, married AVilliam G. Woodnutt, and has several 
children. Hannah Bassett married William, the son of Burtis 
Barbour ; they have issue. 

Sarah Bassett, the tliird daughter of Joseph, married Edward, 
the son of Samuel and Pliebe Hall, formerly of Manningtou. 
They have issue. Lydia Bassett, the youngest, married John 
Zerns, of Pennsylvania. They have two children, William and 
Elizabeth. Josepli Bassett's second M-ife was Sarah, daughter 
of Morris and Lydia Hall, of Elsiuljorough. They had one son, 
Morris Bassett. Joseph's third wife was Anu, the widow of 
Caleb Lippincott. They are both deceased, leaving no issue. 
Few men left liehind them a more enviable cliarac^ter than 
Josepli Bassett for his industry, integrity and upright dealino-s 
with his fellow-men . David Bassett, his brother, married Vasliti 
Davis, of Pilesgrove. They had five children — Joseph, William, 



48 BASSETT FAMILY. 



IlHiiiiali, Davis and Samuel ; I tliink three of them died 
uninarried. Hannah married Samuel P. Allen, a native of 
Gloucester ; they have children. Davis Bassett married 
Martha Lippincott ; they had one daughter, Martha Yasliti 
Bassett. David's second wife M'as Ilammh, daughter of Wood- 
nutt Petti t. She lived but a short time, lea\'ing no issue. 
David's third wife W'^as Ann Packer ; she survived her husband 
several years. By tliat union there was no offsj^ring. Hannah, 
daughter of Jose^^h Bassett, Sr., married Jonathan, son of 
Samuel and Amy Pettit Cawley ; she lived but a short time, 
leaving one daughter. Amy, who subsequently married Charles, 
son of Samuel Lippincott, of Pilesgrove. 

Rebecca, the second daughter of Joseph and Mary Bassett, 
married Casper, son of John and Charlotte I^ewbold Wistar, 
of Mannington. Their children were named Sarah, Joseph, 
Charlotte, Mary, Bartholomew, Casper, Catherine, Rebecca, 
Joseph and John. I think five of them died young — Joseph, 
Charlotte, Bartholomew, Hannah and John. Sarali married 
Samuel Abbott, of Mannington ; they have issue. Mary Wis- 
tar's husband is Casper, son of John and Esther Thompson, 
formerly of Elsinl)orougli; they have two children — Bebecca 
and Casper Thompson. The wife of Casper Wistar, Jr., is 
Emma, the daughter of Aaron Fogg. Catliarine AVistar mar- 
ried Job Bacon, of Cumberland county. Joseph Wistar's wife 
is Anne, the daughter of James Brown. 

Samuel, the son of Joseph Bassett, Sr., married Mary Ann, 
daughter of George Craft, formerly of Gloucester county. 
There M'ere several children. Amanda Bassett married Jolm 
Snowdon ; her second husband was a Baj^tist clergyman named 
Cornell. Rebecca married Richard Ware. Benjamin Bassett 
married Mary, the daughter of Sanniel and Sarali Acton; 
they had five children — Clement, Sarah Ann, Rachel, Richard 
and Maria ; Clement died young. Sarah Ann married Bar- 
clay, son of Andrew Griscom ; they have issue. Rachel Bas- 
sett married Collins, son of Sauuiel Allen ; tliey have issue. 
Richard Bassett's wife is Anne, daughter of Jonathan Grier. 
Maria Bassett married Henry M. Rumsey. 

William, the youngest son of Joseph and Mary Bassett, l»orn 
in 1S0;{, married Abigail, daugliter of Stacy Hazleton, of Mul- 
lica Hill, Gloucester county. 1'Iiey had eight cliildren — Stacy, 
Joseph, Charles, Sarah Ann, Clara, Wilbam Irving, Thomas 
F. and Fenwick. 

Mary, the youngest daughter of Joseph and Mary Bassett, 
born in 1800, married George Craft, Jr., of Gloucester county. 



BASSETT FAMILY. 49 



(Teoi-«i;L' and his wife are l^otli deceased, leaving four cliildreii — 
Edwin, Beulali, Mary and George. Edwin's wife is Eliza1)etli, 
daugliter of Aaron Gaskill, of Philadelphia. They have issue. 
Beulah Craft married Josepli Garret-son ; they have t\vo chil- 
dren. Mar}' Craft's husband is Foster Flagg. There are three 
children — Lydia, Maria and George. George, the youngest, 
married iVnn Jessup ; they liave one daughter, Ann Craft. 
There ai-e l)ut two living of the large family of cliildren of 
Joseph and Mary Bassett at this time, Rehecca AV^istar and 
William Bassett. " 
7 



VARLL FAMILV. 

The Carll family is a lHri!;e and infiueiitial one in Salem and 
Cnml)erland counties. EpLraim Carll emigrated from Germany 
to this country about the year 1720, and subsequently married 
and left two sons — Jesse Carll, the eldest, was born in 1733, 
and his second son, Pldneas, in 1735. The latter subse(|uently 
married and removed to Cumljerland county, near Cohansey 
I^eck. lie and his wife had a large family of children, and 
their descendants are very numerous. The wife of the late 
Edmund Davis, of Bridgeton, was one of them. Jesse Carll, 
l)orn in 1733, married Grace Hancock, in 1756; she was the 
daughter of Edward Hancock, the son of John and Maj-y 
Chambless Hancock. The latter reached America in 1680, in 
company with her mother, Elizabeth Chambless, who came to 
meet her husband, Nathaniel Chambless, who had emigrated to 
this country in 1675, in company Avith John FenAvick. Jesse 
Carll lived on a small farm containing about sixty acres of 
upland, and a quantity of meadow which his wife Grace had 
inherited from her fatlier. (The ]:»roperty was recently owned 
by George M. Ward.) They had twelve chikh-en — Hannah, 
Elizabeth, Lydia, Grace, Ephraim, Sarah (who died young). 
Prudence, Jesse, William, John, Sarali, and Martha. Jesse 
Carll, their father, died in 1806, and his wife in 1808. J^oth 
of them were buried in Friends' graveyard, on tlio north side of 
Monmouth river, where his wife's ancestors were intcr)-ed. By 
industry and economy, qualities characteristic of the Gernums, 
they accuuudated a large personal estate, and supported a large 
family of children in a comfortable manner. It Jias been related 
that John Wood, the father of the late John S. Wood, having 
purcliased one of the large tracts of timbei- land near his Jericho 
property, needed a consideral)le sum of money to meet his 
payments. Having been imsuccessful in effecting a loan from 
those whom he believed most likely to have money, he was 
advised to apply to Jesse Carll. Wood replied that he had little 
hope of getting it from that quarter, inasmucli as Carll had a 
large family to support upon the income derived from the small 



CARLL FAMILY. 51 



property owned l)y his wife. He, however, applied to Jesse 
Oarll for tlie loan, and upon being asked the amount of money 
he wished, replied : " Three hundred pounds.'^'' "I can accommo- 
date you with tliat sum," said Carll, "and more if you wish," 
and he accordingly counted out to him the required amount in 
gold and silver coin, whicli he had laid away in his own house, 
as was the custom with those who had money in those days 
])efore banks were established. Such a practice at the present 
day would be very hazardous, notwithstanding the boasted 
advancement of the present generation in civilization and 
(Jhristianity. After this event, John Wood was frequently 
known to remark that when he needed money it was his rule 
not to apply to those who made the greatest display, but to those 
of industrious and economical hal)its, who made no ostentatious 
show. 

Hannah, the eldest child of Jesse and Grace Carll, l)orn 2'l:th 
of 8th month, 1757, died a young woman, unmarried. Elizabetli, 
nnother daughter, born 17th of 11th month, 1758, married Abner 
F'itzpatrick, whose grandfather emigrated to this country from 
the north of Ireland ; they now spell the name Patrick. Elizabetli 
arul lier husband had six children — Mary, Phineas, Abner, 
Jesse, Samuel and Elizabeth. Lydia, the daughter of Jesse and 
(Irace Carll, born 14th of 12th month, 1760, married Edward 
Iveasbey 3d, son of Bradway Keasbey. Their children were 
Sarah, Prudence, Grace, Joseph, Elizabeth, and Edward. Grace, 
the daughter of Jesse and Gra(;e Carll, born in 1762, married 
Thomas Ware, of Cumberland. They had four children — 
Asbury, Jacob, Hannah, and Lydia. Ephraim, the eldest son 
of Jesse and Grace Carll, l)orn 17th of 11th month, 1764, 
married Barbara, the daughter of Joseph and Sarah Acton, 
(Joseph was the son of Benjamin Acton, Jr., and grandson of 
Benjamin Acton, M'ho emigrated to ]>[ew Jersey from England 
about the year 1690.) Ephraim and his wife, Barbara, had 
eight children — Edward H., Joseph A., Hannah, William, 
Ephraim, Grace, Jesse, and Mar}^ Ephraim Carll, Sr., died 
in 1803, and was buried in tlie same graveyard in which his 
])arents were interred. Sarah, the daughter of Jesse and Grace 
Carll, born in 1766, died a minor. 

Prudence Carll, the daughter of Jesse and Grace, born lltli 
of 5th month, 1768, married Bradway Stretch, and had one 
daughter — Martha Stretch. Jesse, son of Jesse and Grace 
Carll, was born 14tli of 12th month, 1760, and his wife was 
Mary, the daughter of Edward Hancock, Jr. He and his wife 
lived and owned the property that belonged to her father and 



52 CAELL FAMILY. 



graiidfatlier, formerly part of William Hancock's allotment 
of 1,000 acres, Ixniglit by him of John Fenwicik, and snr- 
veyed to him by Richard Hancock in 1676, At the death of 
AVilliam Hancock, which took place in 1679, he devised all his 
landed estate to his widow, Isabella Hancock. In 1681 she 
sold 500 acres to John Maddox, an eminent Quaker, who emi- 
grated to this country in 1680. In the year 1700, John Maddox 
sold that part of the property lying next to Monmouth river, 
to Jeremiah Powell, of Salem, and the southern portion adjoin- 
ing the Salter tract, to John Hancock, the son-in-law of 
Nathaniel Chambless. Jesse and his M'ife, Mary Carll, had five 
cliildren — Rebecca, Elizaljetli* Sarah, Lydia and William Carll. 
William, the son of Jesse and Grace Carll, born in 1773, died 
a minor. John, the son of Jesse and Grace Carll, born in 
1775, died a young man, unmarried. Sarah, the daughter of 
Jesse and Grace Carll, 1)orn 15th of 7th month, 1778, married 
Job Sheppard; they had two sons — John and AVilliam Sheppard. 
Martha, the j^oungest child of Jesse and Grace Carll, born 
15th of 8th month, 1780, married William AVaddington, the 
oldest son of Jonathan, Jr., and Sarah Waddington, William 
and his wife had six children — Anna, Sarah, William, Martha, 
Hannah and Jesse Carll Waddington. Mary, the daughter of 
Abner and Elizal)eth Patrick, married AVashington Smith, the 
son of Captain William Smith, of Revolutionary memory. 
Captain Smith commanded a company of the American Militia, 
which led the advance when the British troops quartered at 
Judge Smith's house, on the north side of Quinton's Bridge, 
were attacked by order of Coh^nels Hand and Holme. He 
was forced to retreat however, there being a greater number of 
the enemy's troops in aml)uscade than his commander antici- 
pated ; but he accomplished his retreat with credit, and to the 
satisfaction of his superior officers. His horse was shot and 
killed mider hiiTi during the engagement. AVashington and his 
wife Mar}^ Smith had ten children — Maiy Ann, Peter, Eliza- 
l)eth, John P., Abner, Lucetta, Phineas, Martha, Lydia and 
AVashington Smith. Peter Smith married Elizabeth, the 
daughter of James Elliott; they have issue. Samuel Smith, 
his son, married Priscilla, the daughter of Sanniel Kelley; she 
died young. His second wife was Lydia, the daughter of 
David and Elizabeth Finley; they had issue. Ephraim, the 
son of Peter and Elizabeth Smith, married Hannah, daughter 
of Luke S. Fogg and Ann his wife. Ephraim and his wife 
have issue. Peter, the S(»n of Peter and Eli/ahctli Smith, mar- 
ried Ellen, daughter of James and Rachel Baker; they have 



CARLL FAMILY, 53 



issue. Thomas Jefferson Smith is a plivsician, and resides at 
Bridgeton. 

Elizabeth, the second dangliter of AVashington and Marv 
Sinitli, married Oliver Smith ; they ^vere hrst consins. Thev 
Irid three daughters — ArtJialinda, Sarah Elizabeth and Ann. 
Arthalinda died a young woman nnmari-ied ; Sarah Elizabeth 
married William, the son of Abner and Hannah Patrick; Ann, 
the youngest, married Philip Y. Keen. Tlie wife of John P., 
tlie second son of Washington and Mary Smitli, was Hannah, 
daughter of Joseph Allen. John and his family removed to 
tlie State of Illinois many years ago, and both he and his wife 
are deceased at this time, leaving four sons — Joseph A., Benja- 
min, Washington and Phineas. Abner, the son of Washington 
and Mary Smith, married Mary Ann, the daughter of Natlianiel 
and Susan Stretch. Aljner died several years ago, leaving a 
widow and one daughter, Susan Smith, who married Charles, 
tlie son of George Hires, Sr., of Salem. Lucetta, the daughter 
of Washington and Mary Smith, married Richard, the son of 
Thomas Mulford. They have four children — Pliebe, Ann 
Maria, Mary and Martha. Phebe Mulford is Luke S. Fogg's 
second wife ; they have no issue. Ann Maria Mulford married 
Ilichard, the son of Benjamin and Susan Irelan, she being his 
second wife ; they have issue. His first was Phebe, daughter 
of Jesse and Mary Carll ; she died leaving one daughter, Phebe, 
since deceased. Mary Mulford's husl)and is A, Smith Reeves, 
son of Charles and Mary Reeves; they have issue. Martha 
Mulford married George A. Githens ; they have issue. — 
Phineas, the son of Washington and Mary Smith, married 
Margaret, the daughter of Daniel Green ; she died young, 
leaving one son, Phineas Smith, Jr. Phineas' second M'ife was 
Pliebe Sally ; they have one daughter — Margaret Smitli. — 
Martha, the daughter of Washington and Mary Smith, married 
Abner, the eldest son of Jesse and Ann Patrick. Abner and 
his wife had one daughter, Elizabeth, Avho subsequently married 
George Hires, Jr. Lydia, the youngest daughter of Wasldiiii;- 
ton and Mary Smith, married John Mills. They have a laro;e 
family of children — Martha, who married Elias Hicks Powell, 
tlie son of John and Rebecca Powell; Joel, liucetta, Albert, 
Chambless, Mary, Filmore, Kate, Washington and Thomas 
Mills. The wife of Wasliington, the youngest son of Washiii<>- 
ton and Mary Smith, was Hamiah Sack. They reside in Kansas, 
and have four children — Elizabeth, Mary Ann, Hannah and 
Phineas. 

William, the son of Oliver Smitli, who was a son of Captain 



54 OARLL FAMILY. 



William Smith, was twice married. His first wife was tlie 
(laughter of Ephraim Carll, Sr. His second wife was Rebecca 
Fiiiley, daughter of John Finley ; they liad four children — 
Mary, the oldest, married Samuel Patrick ; they had one son, 
Winfield S., who married the daughter of Peter Harris ; Mary 
died young. Rebecca, the second daughter of William Smith, 
married Sanniel Patrick, his second wife, and who was a sister 
of his first wife ; they have issue. Hannah S., daughter of 
AVilliani and Rebecca Smith, married Anthony English, the 
son of David S. English, formerly Sheriff of Salem county. 
Both died young, leaving three children ; their names were 
William S., David S., and Charles Leslie. Charles Leslie 
Smith, son of William and Rebecca Finley, married the 
daughter of Daniel and Pliebe Hood ; they have had two 
cliildren — Elmer H., and William. James Smith, the son of 
Oliver Smith, married Sarah, tlie daugliter of Edward and 
Prudence Waddington. James is deceased, leaving three sons 
— Edward W., Oliver and Keasbey Smith ; all tln-ee of them 
are married. Edward, the eldest, married Anna, the daughter 
of Lewis Fox ; they have children. Oliver, the second son of 
James Smith, married Hannah, the daughter of Joseph H. and 
Rachel A. Fogg; they have two children. Keasbey Smith, 
married the daughter of Job Thorp ; they have children. 

Ahner, the son of Abner and Elizabeth Carll Patrick, was 
born the Sd of 2d month, 1788. There was a singular consan- 
guinity in his marriage which does not often occur. His first 
wife was Barbara Carll, the widow of his uncle, Epln"aim Carll. 
There was no issue by tliat connection, and she died many years 
before him. His second wife was Hannah, the widow of liis 
l)rother, Samuel Patrick, and the daughter of his first wife, she 
being the daughter of Ephraim and Barl)ara Acton Carll. Abner 
and Hannah Patrick had four cliildren — Elizal»eth, l)orn in 1822 ; 
Margaret, born in 1825; William, l)orn in 1827; and Hannah, 
l)orn in 1831. Elizabeth Patrick married Lewis, the son of 
William Fox ; they had three children — Anna, the eldest, married 
Edward, the son of James and Sarah Smith; they have issue. 
FLmnah, the second daughter, married Josiah, the son of Richard 
Dubois; they have cliildren. Abner, tlie son of Lewis and 
EUzabeth Fox, married Amanda Giberson; they have issue. 
Mary Ann, the daughter of Abner and Hannah Patrick, married 
Robert, the son of James Butcher. By that union there were 
four children — Elizabeth, James, Hannah and Arthalinda. 
Elizabeth married Robert, the son of Job Griscoin. Jjimes 
Butcher's wife is Lydia, the daughter of Peter and Mary C. 



CAKLL FAMILY. 



Harris; they have issue. Hannah, daughter of Aluier and 
Hannah Patrick, married Benjamin (). Rolnnson, the son of 
William Robinson, Sr.; they have issue. Abner Patrick, the 
father of the above mentioned children, die<l in 1834, aged about 
forty -four years; his widow, Hannah Carll Patrick, daughter of 
Ephraim Carll, Sr., departed tliis life in 1859, aged sixty-four 
years and a few months. 

Edward, the eldest son of Ephraim and Barbara Carll, died 
when he was about fifteen years old, and William Carll, the 
second son, departed this life in 1807, aged al)out eleven years. 
Ephraim Carll, son of Ephraim and Bar])ara, born 30th of 8th 
month, 1798, married Elizal>eth, the daughter of John Finley, 
of Stoe Neck; they had three daughters. The oldest, Rebecca, 
married William Plunnner, Jr.; they have several children. 
Elizabeth, their eldest daughter, married (Teorge Hires, Jr., she 
Ijeing his second wife. Sarah, tlieir second daughter, married 
George R. Morrison, the son of W^illiam and Mary Ann Morrison. 
George and his wife liave issue. The other children of William 
Plummer are Rebecca, William and Loren. Barbara, Ephraim 
Carll's second daughter, married James Butcher, Jr.; they ha\'e 
tAvo children — Hannah and Isabella. The latter died young. 
Hannah, their eldest daughter, married Edward, the son of 
Joseph and Mar}^ Bro^ii ; they liave issue. James Butcher, Jr., 
came to an untimely death by a kick from his horse. Subsequently 
his -widow, Barbara C. Butcher, married Charles, the son of 
EdAvard and Catharine Fogg. Charles and his wife have issue. 
Elizal)etli, the daughter of Ephraim and Elizabeth Carll, married 
William, tlie son of Jonathan House, of Upper Alloways Creek; 
they have issue. Ephraim CarlFs second wife was Mary Ann, 
the eldest daughter of Washington and Maiy Smith, by whom 
lie liad six children, M'ho are now living — Edward, Jessie, Lewis, 
George, William Henry, and Charles. Edward Carll, their 
eldest son, married Phebe, the daughter of Reuben Sayres ; they 
have three children — Mary Ann, Milton, and Sarah. 

Jesse P., the son of Epln-aim and Mary Ann Carll, man-ied 
Phe1)e, tlie daughter of David and Elizabeth Finley. Jesse and 
his wife had three children — Rosanna, James W., and Isabella 
Carll; his second wife is Lucetta, the daughter of John and 
Lydia Mills; they have issue. Lewis, the son of Ephraim and 
Mary Ann Carll, married Arthalinda, the widow of Henry Clav 
Miller; she is the daughter of James Baker. Lewis S. and his 
wife have four children — Luke S., Lucius, Henry M., and Lucy 
Carll. George C, the son of Ephraim and Mary Ann Carll, is 
a physician, and resides in the (bounty of Cape May. His wiie 



56 CARLL FAMILY. 



if, Maggie, tlio daugliter of Jonas Miller, of that county. George 
and his wife have issue. William Ileniy Carll married Elizaheth, 
the daugliter of Charles and Mary Ilee\'es; thej have children. 
Charles, the youngest son of Ephraim and Mary Ann Carll, 
married Louisa Githens, the daughter of George Githeus, Sr. 
She is deceased, leaving one daughter — Anna (t. Carll. Grace, 
the daughter of Ephraim and Barl)ara Carll, was horn 10th day 
of 10th month, 1800; she married AYilliam Mulford, of Roads- 
town, Cundjerland county; their cliildren are Mary Eliza])eth, 
George, and Ephraim Mulford. Jesse, the son of Ephraim and 
Barbara Carll, was l)orn 20tli of ] st month, 1803, and married 
Mary, the daughter of Sylvanus Sheppard ; there are live 
children — Ephraim, Mary, William, Sylvanus, and Hannah Ann 
Carll. Sylvanus "svas drowned in Alloways creek before lie was 
of age, whilst going with his father to lish for shad in Delaware 
bay. Ephraim, the son of Jesse and Mary Carll, married 
Prudence, tlie daughter of David and Elizaljeth Finley; they 
had four children — Sylvanus, Wintield, Laura, and Mary. Mai-y, 
the daugliter of Jesse and Mary Carll, married Peter, the son 
of Benjamin and Martha Harris; they have four children — 
Lydia, Hannah Ann, Mary Elizabeth, and Benjamin. Lydia 
married James Butcher, the son of Robert Butcher. The 
husband of Hannah Ann is W. Wintield, the son of Samuel 
Patrick. William, the son of Jesse and Mary Carll, married 
Mary, the daughter of William Harmer, of Greenwich. His 
second wife ^vas Harriet Applegate ; they had one son — A¥illiam. 
Hannah Ann, the youngest daughter of Jesse and Mary Carll, 
died a young Avoman, unmarrie(l. 

Sarah, the daughter of Edward and Lydia Keasljey, married 
Aaron Waddington, the son of Jonathan and Sarah Wadding- 
ton; they had issue — Sarah Ann, I^ydia, Joshua, Bradway and 
Jane Waddington. Sarah Ann Waddington, married John 
Hill, of Salem, son of Vining Hill, of Lower Penns Neck ; 
they have issue — Sarah, Ellen and John. Lydia, d^ulghter of 
Aaron and Sarah Waddington, married Jonathan, the son of 
Samuel and Jerusha White, of Pilesgrox'e ; her hus])and is 
deceased, leaving one daughter — Gertrude. Joshua, the son of 
Aaron and Sarah Waddington, married Anna Yanneman ; they 
have issue — Pauline, Luella, Ernest, Sarah, Florence, Laura and 
Jane. Bradway Waddington married Mary, the daughter of 
Samuel and Jerusha White ; they had two cliildren — Adelaide 
and Frank. Jane Waddington married James Fonda; she is 
deceased, leaving one cliild — Adelaide Fonda. 



CHAMBLESS FAMILY. 

Nathaniel Cliamljless, and liis son Nathaniel, eml^arked for 
this country in the year 1675. They were servants of Edward 
Wade. About 1680 he purchased 250 acres of land of his 
former employer, being a part of the allotment Edward Wade 
1)0Ught of J(jhn Fen wick l>efore he embarked for this country. 
In 1681, his wife Elizal)eth and daughter Mary emliarked from 
L<)ndon in the ship Henry, and landed at Elsinborough in the 
7th uKjnth of the same year. Soon after liis wife ciinie they 
settled on his })i-()perty in Alloways Creek. He about that time 
l)ought 250 aci'cs more, adjoining his lirst purchase, of Joseph 
AVade. Botli com])rised tlie greater part of what is now called 
Alloways Creek Neck. In 1688 their daugliter Mary married 
Jolui Hancock, who emigrated to this country in 1679. He 
was a native of England. John and his wife had nine children. 
Their eldest son, John HanccK-k, was born 10th of 1st montli, 
1690, in Alloways Creek Neck. The names of their other 
children were William, Elizabeth, Mary, Sarah, Nathaniel, 
Edward, Joseph and Grace. Some persons suppose that they 
were of the same family of Hancock's as those hy that name 
who resided in Elsinborough and Hancock's Bridge. There is 
no evidence that any rehxtionship existed. Notwithstanding 
Nathaniel Chambless and his son Nathaniel were servants when 
they lirst came to this country, ])j industry and by maintaining 
high moral character, Ijoth became eminent men in religious 
and civil society in the early settlement of Fenwick Colony. 

Nathaniel Chambless, Sr., was left executor of the great 
estate of his intimate friend, Rudoc Morris, of Elsinborough, 
who died in 1701, and also guardian of his minor children. 
Several other of like trusts he was chosen to do, sliowing 
conclusively that the men who lived in that generation had 
implicit confidence in his ability and integrity. There is no 
record that he and his wife ever had but two children — Natlianiel, 
and Mary, who married John Hancock. I tliink he died about 
1710. They formerly spelled their name Cliamness, l)ut the 
family a generation or two afterwards changed it to Chambless. 



58 CHAMBLESS FAMILY. 



He deeded, before liis death, 100 acres of laud to liis daughter, 
Mary Hancock ; the residue of liis real estate to his son, 
Nathaniel Chambless. 

James Chambless, son of Nathaniel and Eleanor Chambless, 
was born 22d of the 1st month, 1689. Mary was born in 1692. 
Elizabeth M'as born in ITOO. Hamiah was l)oru in 1702. 
Nathaniel Chambless, 3d, was born in 1705. Rebecca Chaml)less, 
the daughter of James Chambless, was born 3d of 11th month, 
1716. Slie afterwards married Jeclediah Allen, son of Ephraim 
Allen. Soon afterwards Jedediah purchased, I believe, John 
Rolpli's estate in Mannington. It contained 500 acres, and was 
located on the south side of Mannington creek, adjoining Jol) 
Ridgway's land. Jedediah and his wife, Rel>ecca, had three 
sons — Jedediah, David and Chambless. The latter's occupation 
was that of a tailor, and he lived the greater part of his life in 
the city of Philadelphia. The land in Mannington was divided 
e(|ually between the two oldest sons, Jedediah and David. 

James Chambless, Jr., son of James and Mary Chaml)less, 
was born 29th of 1st month, 1721. About the year 1742 he 
married Mary Fetters. They had three daughters named Sarah, 
Mary and Rebecca. Sarah's husband was William Smith, the 
oldest son of Thomas Smith, of Mamiington. Mary Chambless' 
husband was David Smith, the brother of William, They lived 
in the town of Salem, where he followed his trade, being a 
hatter, and continued in that business until his death. Nathaniel 
Chamliless, 3d, married Susan Oakford, the daughter of Wade 
Oakford, in 1725. They had one daughter named Sarah 
Chambless. When about eighteen years old, she marriedWilliam 
Hancock, the son of John Hancock, the man who was instru- 
mental in having a bridge built across Alloways creek as early 
as 1720 — hence the name of the Bridge. The village derives 
its name from him. He was a large landholder at the time of 
his death. He had 500 acres that he inherited from his mother, 
Isabella Hancock, being one-half of William Hancock's allotment 
tliat he purchased of John Fen wick in the springof 1675, before 
he came to this country. John Hancock purchased in 1720 of 
James Thompson, of Elsinborough, 250 acres. (3n said property 
was the family burying ground of the Thompson family, and by 
tradition John Hancock himself was buried there, and his son 
William, and his wife, Sarah Chambless Hancock, were likewise 
interred tliere. It afterwards went under the name of tlie 
Hancock burying ground. The Thompson family, after the 
second generation, buried at Salem. A good fence made of 
boards enclosed the graveyard within the memory of many per- 



CHAMBLESS FAMILY. 59 



sons living at the present time. I beKeve within a few years 
past the fence has been removed, and the plongh has passed over 
the remains of some of the foremost emigrants in pomt of 
intelligence and moral worth that settled in West Jersey. But 
that graveyard is not an exception ; all ancient family grave- 
yards that I know of in this comity have shared the same fate. 
The Sharp's, Bradway's, Stretch's, Oakford's, and Abbott's — all 
of those families had family graveyards towards the close of the 
17th century, not a vestige of which remains at the present day. 
John Hancock also purchased a large tract of land in Penn's 
Neck. All his real estate his son William inherited at his 
death. AVilliam Hancock and his wife, Sarali Chambless 
Hancock, had but one child, named Sarah. She afterwards 
became the wife of Thomas Sinnickson, of Penn's Neck. Soon 
after tlieir marriage they became residents of the town of Salem. 
Thomas' occupation Avas that of a merchant. They left no 
children. I have frequently been asked: "Where is the Cham- 
bless family at the present time ? " The answer is : "The name 
is lost on account of the last two of the male line. James 
Chambless, Jr., and Nathaniel Chambless, 3d, having no sons; 
their childi'en were daughters. Tlieir descendants are the Smiths, 
Aliens, Bassetts, Foggs, and many other families that I could 
name." William Hancock, in 1755, deeded a half-acre of ground 
in the village of Hancock's Bridge to the Society of Friends to 
build a meeting house upon, it being a more convenient location 
than where the old house stood. The house was accordingly 
built the year following ; it was of brick, and is still standing in 
a good state of preservation. All accounts of him justify the 
opinion that he was a man of more than ordinary mental al)ilities. 
His father gave liim more school education than was common 
at tliat time. His wealth and learning enabled him to have a 
great influence in the county. He was a member of the Colonial 
Legislature for twenty years in succession. His first wife dying 
before she arrived at middle age, he in his old age married Sarah 
Thompson, daughter of Joshua Thompson, of Elshil)orough. She 
was many years younger than himself. During the Revolutionary 
war part of the American militia quartered in his house at 
Hancock's Bridge. In the 3d month, 1778, one of the most 
cruel and murderous massacres of the war occurred at that house; 
William Hancock liimself received a mortal wound. His l)rother- 
in-law, Joshua Thompson, the same day took him to his liouse, 
about half a mile from the scene of carnage, and tliere he died 
of his wounds in a short time, leaving a young widow, and one 
son by his last wife. The son's name was Jo] in Hancock, who, 



CO CHAMBLESS FAMILY. 



at the death of his father, was about five years of age. John, 
when he arrived to manhood, married Eleanor Yorke, an amiable 
and interesting young woman, daughter of Andrew Yorke, of 
Salem, John and his wife had four children. Sarah Hancock 
was the oldest; she married Morris Hancock, of Elsinborough. 
Henrietta married Lewis P. Smith, formerly of Bucks county, 
Pennsylvania. Thomas Yorke Hancock married Rachel Nichol- 
son, daughter of William Nicholson, a native of Mannington. 
Maria Hancock married Richard Parrot Tliompson, of Salem, 
son of Hedge Thompson. 



CATTELL FAMILY. 

William Cattell, it is generally thought, came from Shrews- 
Iniry, East Jersey, and settled at Salem about the year 1747. 
His occupation was that of a merchant. He and liis wife had 
two children, as recorded in the monthly meeting books of Salem. 
Elijah, the son of William and Ann Cattell, was born 27t]i of 
7th month, 1751. Mary Cattell, daughter of the same parents, 
was born 24th of 9th month, 1757. Ehjah, it appears, was a 
clerk for his father until tlie latter's death ; tlieir place of business 
was at tlie corner of Market and Broadway street. After the 
deatli of Elijah's father (William Cattell), Elijah Cattell and 
William Parrott entered into partnersliip. During tlie war of 
the American Revolution, Elijah left the Society of Friends, of 
wliicih he w^as born a member, and took an active part against 
the mother country; he was considered as ardent a patriot as 
there was in the town of Salem. He married Hannah Ware, 
she being a descendant of one of the oldest families of the Colony. 
Tliei-e were four children — Ann, Margaret, Thomas W., and 
Maria Cattell. Ann Cattell, the eldest, married William 
Mnlford, a native of G-reenwich, at that time a resident of Salein ; 
they liad several children. [See Mulford family.] Margaret, 
(langhter of Elijah and Hannah W. Cattell, married David 
Williams, of Salem; they had issue — Robert, Anna, and Sarah 
Williams. Maria, the youngest daughter of Elijah and Hannah 
W. Cattell, never married, and the only one of their children 
living. 

Thomas Ware Cattell, son of Elijah and Hannah W. Cattell, 
was born in 1790. He possessed an amiable disposition, aiul 
an uncommon active mind; was above ordinary men in mathe- 
matics. His fellow citizens of Salem had full confidence in liis 
integrity and ability as a calculator, therefore he was elected 
Assessor of Taxes, which office he held for upwards of twentv 
years. He was engaged in the mercantile business, nearly all 
of his long and useful life ; was a partner at one time with his 
brother-in-law, William Mulford, a good business man, on 
Market street. Afterward, he and the late Clement Acton kept 



62 CATTELL FAMILY. 



a liardware store and lumber yard for many years. Thomas, 
after tlie iirm dissolved, confined himself exclusively to the 
hardware store, and so continued until near the close of his life. 
His death occurred in 1867, being seventy-seven years old. He 
was a great loss to tlie public, as well as to his immediate family; 
also to the Presbyterian clmrch, of which he had been, the latter 
part of his life, an active and consistent member. Thomas, 
wlien a young man, married Kesiah, the daughter of Alexander 
and Esther Gilmore, of Lower Penn's Neck. She died several 
years before her husband. They had seven children — Alexander 
(t., Elijah, Esther, Thomas, Sarah, William and Samuel Cattell. 
Alexander Gilmore Cattell, the eldest son of Thomas and 
Keziah Cattell, was born in 2d month, 1816. He has been a 
merchant from early life, first in his native town of Salem, 
afterwards he and his brother Elijah Cattell went into tlie 
grain business on Delaware avenue, in the city of Philadelphia. 
Tliey at once took a leading part in that especial trade in that 
city. Alexander in early life, took an active part in the public 
affairs in liis native county and State, being affable, and pleasing 
in liis address, wdiich he inherited from his father, also a ready 
debator in public assemblies. These qualifications soon made 
him conspi(;uous. When the inhabitants of the State of New 
Jersey believed the time had come to have a new Constitution, 
Alexander C Cattell, though a young man, was chosen one of 
the members of the Convention to frame a new one, so as to 
submit it to the voters of the State for their adoption, or 
]-ejection. He at once became an active member from the 
southern section of the State. He brought forward a section 
in which he was anxious to be incorporated in the new Consti- 
tution, and abvocated it with much ability. That was the 
l)ieimial session of the State Legislature, but it was rejected by 
the Convention. If it had become a part of the Constitution, 
it would have been a great saving to the State in a pecuniary 
way, besides a great deal of useless legislating. He was subse- 
quently elected a member of the State Legislature, and after- 
wards chosen a member of the United States Senate, in which 
lie served one term. During the latter ])art of it his health 
gave way, but upon becoming convalescent, he was sent by the 
United States Government on an important mission to England, 
respecting the finances of the country. After he removed to 
Philadelphia, he took an active part in the commercial affairs 
of that city ; was one of the first that originated the Corn 
Exchange j>ank, and was elected President of that institution. 
He mari-ied when young, Eliza Gilmore, a lady of refinement. 



OAITELL FAMILY. 63 



daughter of Samuel Gilmore, of Lower Penn's Neck ; she 
l>eing his cousin ; she has l)een deceased three or four years, 
leaving no issue. Alexander and EHjah Cattell have each built 
liandsome residences in Mercliant\'ille, Camden County, where 
tliey reside. 

Elijah Cattell, second son of Thomas W. and Kesiah Cattell, 
married Catharine Hardy of Philadelphia ; tliey have three 
children — Margaretta, Alexander and Edward Cattell ; his 
occupation I have already mentioned in his l)rother Alexander's 
history. Esther, the oldest daughter of Thomas and Kesiah 
Cattell, married Joseph Fithian, M. D., a resident of Wood- 
hnrj, Gloucester county. He is a native of Cumberland 
county ; they have two daughters — Josephine and Sallie Fithian. 

Thomas, the third son of Thomas W. and Kesiah Cattell, 
married Anna Ashburner ; tliey have seven children — Jane, 
Hetty, Mary, liillie, Sallie, Willie and Fannie Cattell. Thomas 
Cattell, Jr. as likewise all of Thomas W. Cattell's children, 
had the talent they inherited from the Cattell and Gilmore 
families, that of a(;quiring school learning readily ; far superior 
to the majority of students. He is one of the Professors of 
Lincoln University, located in Chester county, Pa. 

Sarah, the second daughter of Thomas and Kesiah Cattell, 
married Henry B. Ware, of Salem, son of Bacon and Anna J. 
Rumsey Ware. Henry was educated at West Point. After 
he was through with his studies was elected Clerk of Salem 
Bank ; continued in that office until his uncle George Pumsey's 
death ; he was then elected Cashier, in the place of his uncle, 
which office he filled with credit until his physical health became 
\ery much impaired and he resigned, but was continued one of 
the Directors until his death. Henry and his wife, Sallie Cat- 
tell Ware, had three children — Anna, Thomas and Alexander 
Ware. Sallie, his widow, is still living and holds the office of 
Postmistress at Salem at the present time. 

William, the fourth son of Thomas W. and Kesiah Cattell, 
married Lizzie McKeen ; they have two children — James and 
Harry Cattell. William holds the important office of President 
of Lafayette College, at Easton, Pa. Samuel, the youngest 
son of Tliomas and Kesiah Cattell, married Henrietta Malliard ; 
they have ten children — William, Thomas, Samuel, Kesiah, 
Elijali, Henrietta, Barron, Josephine, Joseph and Frank Cat- 
tell. 



COLES FAMILY. 

The family of Coles, it appears was an ancient family of 
England ; one of them liecame a meml)er of the Society of 
Friends ; to avoid religions prosecution, he emigrated to West 
New Jersey and purchased a large tract of land in Evesham 
township, Burlington county. Samuel Cole, the eldest son 
married, had two or three daughters. Martha, the eldest, mar- 
ried David, the son of Judge David Davis, of Pilesgroxe, 
Salem county. Samuel's daughter Mary, married a Newbold. 
David and Martha C. Davis had three children — Jacob, Joseph 
and Martha Davis. Samuel Cole made his will in the year 
1772, leaving a large real and personal estate, after providing 
lil^erally for his widow, Mary Cole, he devises the greater 
part of his estate to his grand-children, Jacob, Joseph and 
Martha Davis, also to his daughter Mary Newbold's children, 
and likewise a legacy or two to his nephew Thomas Coles, eldest 
daughter Mary Coles fifty pounds, and he also directs his 
executors, his son-in-law David Davis and his friend Abraham 
Allen, to pay fifty pounds to Haddonfield Preparative Meeting 
of Friends. 

About 1750 Thomas' nephew, Sanmel Cole, left Evesham 
and located in Gloucester county, at a place since known as 
Coles Mills. He soon afterwards married Alice Collins ; tliey 
had eight children, their names were : Mary, Hannah, Thomas, 
Samuel, Kiml:»le, Joseph, Hope and Alice Coles, all of whom 
grew up, married and had issue. Mary, the eldest daughter of 
Thomas Coles, married Jonathan Collins, by whom she had 
seven children, whose names were: Alice, Benjamin, Sanmel, 
Mercy, Elizabeth, Jonathan and Thomas. Hannali, the second 
child of Thomas and Alice Coles, married Peter Strang ; they 
resided in the immediate neighborhood and raised ten children 
— Thomas, Sarah, Alice, Margaret, Peter, Charles, John, 
Deborah, Hannah and David. Tliomas, the third child of 
Thomas and Alice Coles, married Martha Stiles ; they raised 
twelve children — Thomas, William, Bartholomew, Elizabeth, 
Martha, Ann, Samuel, Joseph, Alice, Mary, Ephraim and Sarah. 



(JOLES FAMILY. 65 



He came in possession of the mill property which consisted of 
uljout 2,U0U acres of land on which lie lived until 1808,M'hen he 
l)ought a mill property on Oldman's creek at what is noAv 
known as IIarrison^'ille. He then moved to that place with 
his large family of children, where he was engaged in the lumber 
l)usiness until his death, which occurred in the year 182G. Sam- 
uel, the fourth child of Thomas and Alice Coles, married Elizabeth, 
the daughter of Joseph Pimm; they had three children — 
Joshua, Sarah and Samuel. Kimble, the fifth child of Thomas 
and Alice C(jles, married Kesiah, the daughter of John Lippin- 
ci)tt, of Evesham, Burlington county ; tliey had children — 
Mai'ia, Eliza, Jidianna, John, Benjamin, Charles and Harriet, 
floseph, the sixth child married Margaret Scott, of Bilesgrove, 
and settled on a farm near what is known as Richman's Mills, 
where they raised five children, whose names are: Elizabeth, 
Joseph, Margaret, Sarah and Esther. Hope, the seventh child, 
married Abijah Collins, and raised five chihlren — Joseph, Isaac, 
Abijah, William and Hannah. Alice, the eighth and youngest 
child, married Israel Locke, of Repaupo, (irloucester county, 
1)ut afterward mo\ed to Pilesgrove, Salem county, where they 
raised eight children — Thomas, Susan, Hannah, Elizabeth, Har- 
riet, Alice, Martha and Sanniel. 

Alice, the eldest child of Mary and Jonathan Collins, nuirried 
John Peterson, of Pilesgrove. Benjamin and Sarah never 
married. Mercy, the fourth child, married Jesse Lenard, from 
near Blackwoodtown, Gloucester county, but left no issue. 
Elizal)et]i is living in Philadelphia, not married. Jonathan never 
uuirried, is living in Philadelphia. Tliomas, the seventh and 
youngest child of Mary and Jonathan Collins, died near Eldridge 
Hill, in Pilesgrove, and left two cliildren — Mary and Alice; they 
live in Pliiladelphia. 

Thom;is, the eldest child of Jlannali and Peter String, nuii-ried 
Hannah Albertson, with whom he removed to Ohio in 1815. 
Sarah, the second child, never married. Alice married Alexander 
S(-ott; they lived near to Coles' mill, and raised six children — 
AVilliam, Esther, Hannah, John, Peter, and Thomas Scott. 
Margaret nuirried Joseph Morgan, of BlackwoodtoAvn, Gloucester 
county; they had children, but lost tliem when young. Peter, 
the fifth child of Hanmdi and Peter String, first nuirried Eliza- 
beth Pinnn, and was the father of four children — Martha,Thomas, 
Josepii, and AVilliam. After her death he married Sarah, the 
widow of Ephraim Garwood, of Pilesgrove. He lived to an 
advanced age. The sixth cliihl, Charles, nuirried Rlioda Peterson. 
He was a fanner and lived at wliat is now known as Springtown, 
9 



66 COLKS FAMILY. 



and raised tliree cliildren, M'liose uaine.s are Amos, Charles, and 
tStacy String. John String", the seventh child of Hannah and 
Peter String, married Amelia Stiles; they had children — 
Hudson, Margaret, Peter, and Thomas String. Del)orah, the 
eighth child, married a man hy the name of Clark, and moved 
to Oliio soon after. Hannah married George Stiles. David, 
the tenth and yomigest child, married Dehorali, tiie daughter of 
Mica j ah Conover, and moved to Illinois. 

Thomas, the oldest child of Thomas and Martha Cole?, 
married Rachel Birch, and raised eight cliildren — Ricliard, 
Samuel, Eplu'aim, Asa, Martha, Deborah, Alice, and Thomas 
Coles. He died in the year 1822, where his l)rotlier iiartholomew 
now lives. AVilliam, the second child of Thomas and Martha 
Coles, married Ilel:»ecca, daughter of Sanmel Morgan, of Piles- 
grove. He lived on the farm now occupied by his son, Riclnnan 
Coles, until his death, which occurred in 1862. They raised 
seven children, wliose names are Samuel M., Thomas, Rel)ecca, 
William, Martlia, Riclnnan, and 1>. Fraidvlin Coles. Bartholo- 
mew, the third (;hild, married Aima Agister, and raised nine 
children — Harris, Thomas, Uz, William, Bartholomew, Chalkley, 
Joseph, Stacy, and Ira Coles. He is still living, and is oxev 
ninety years of age. I A'isited this aged man recently, and found 
him quite healthy. He told me he cut, during last winter, "Hfty 
loads of wood. Elizabeth, the fourth child, mai-ried Elijah 
Horner, bj whom she had eight children, whose names were 
Susau, Martha, Eliza, Caroline, Alice, George, Mary Anna, and 
Elma. He was a farmer, and lived near Mullica Hill, Gloucester 
county. Martha, the Hfth child, married Edward Pancoast, of 
Pilesgro\e. She died in a few years, and left one son — Stacy, 
Avho died young. Ann, the sixth child, lirst married Joseph 
Lippincott, and by him had three children — Joshua, Thomas, 
and Lydia. Slie afterwards married John Ilowey, and had one 
child — Sarah Ann. Sanmel, the seventh child of Thomas and 
Martha Coles, married Marianna Morgan, of Blackwoodtown, 
Gloucester county, to which place they moved, and raised three 
children — Elizabeth Ann, Joseph, and Thornas Coles. Joseph, 
the eighth child, married Margaret, daughter of Samuel Morgan, 
of Pilesgrove, l)ut died in a few years after, leaving one child 
— Martha Ann Coles. Alice, the ninth child, married William 
Garwood, of Mullica Hill, Gloucester county; had one child — 
John Garwood, and died soon after. Mary, the tenth c-hild, 
married Israel Kirl)v, and raised six children — Eli, Ann, Richard, 
Tliomas, Mary, and Charlotte Ivirl)v. Ephraim, the eleventh 
child, first married Lydia, daughter of Isaac and Tracy Ridgway, 



COLES FAMILY. 67 



who died witliont cliildreii. He then married Rebecca Lippin- 
cott, and raised eleven chikiren, whose names were Lydia, 
Hannah, Eliza, Lippincott, Emily, Aaron, Charles, Ephraim, 
Joseph, Rehecca, and Francis. He is still living, near Woods- 
town. Sarah, the twelfth and youngest child of Thomas and 
Martha Coles, married Nathan Gaunt and raised four children, 
whose names are Joseph, Nathan, Sarah, and Alvin Gaunt. 

Josliua, son of Sanuiel and Elizabeth Coles, married, l)ut 
raised no cliildren. Sarah, their second child, married Daniel 
Harker, she had three children — Elizabetli, Benjamin and 
Samuel. Samuel, their youngest child, married Anna Ivirby ; 
lie died young, leaving one child — Elmer K. Coles. Maria, 
daughter of Kindle and Kesiah Coles, married William Cassady, 
and raised six children, whose names are Lippincott, Mariah, 
Beulah, Elmina, William and Edward. Eliza, the second child 
of Kindle and Kesiah, married William Jones, by whom she 
liad one son — Hiram Jones ; she afterwards married Daniel J. 
Packer, of Woodbury, and had three cliildren — Daniel J., 
Edw'ard and Benjamin. Elizabeth, tlie eldest cliild of Josepli 
and Margaret Coles, married Cornelius DuBois, and raised ten 
children — Jjenjamin, Mary, Joseph, William, John, Elizabeth, 
Ccjrnelius, Elwood, Edward and Samuel. Joseph, the only son 
married Rachel Ri<-hman, and have six cliildren — Martha Jane, 
Henry, Preston, Mary Ella, Resigna and Harriet. Margaret 
married Joseph Harker, and liad two children — James and 
Amy. Sarah married Matthew Rippe; tliey moved to Indiana 
ill 1853. Estliei-, the youngest cliild of Joseph and Margaret 
(Joles, married Samuel Dickinson, and died, leaving one chikl — 
Joseph Dickinson. 

Susan, daugiiter of Israel and Alice Locke, married Anion 
Peterson, Ity whom slie had six children — Stacy, Joseph, Hannah, 
Thomas, Anion, and Martha. She lives in Woodstown. Elizabeth 
married Josiali Smith; she is deceased, leaving several children 
living in the vicinity of Salem. Alice married Joseph Morgan, 
(she is deceased,) and raised four children, three of whom are 
living — Samuel R., Joseph, and Israel Morgan. Samuel Locke 
married Abigail, daughter of Moses Richman; he died without 
issue. Martha married Zaccheus Bassett; she lives near Dare- 
town, and has children. 

Samuel Coles, son of Thomas and Rachel Coles, married 
Henrietta Dilks. He by profession is a miller, but lives retired 
at Mullica Hill, Gloucester county. Xo children. Ephraim 
married Pliebe, daughter of John Dsivis; their (children's names 
are Mary, Ann, Lydia, Charles, and Isabella. IL; is also a 



fiS COLES FAMILY. 



miller, and lives at Dickinson's Mills, near Woodstowiu His 
son Charles is associated with liim, Charles has been Collector 
of Pilesgrove township for some years. Asa married Patience 
Hnrff, of Hurffville, Gloncester county. He is a farmer, and 
lives near Harrisonville ; has six cliildren — Anna, George, 
Charles, Mary, Rebecca, and Asa. Martha married Josiali 
Duffield, and lives near Sharpstown, Salem county; has tliree 
children — James, Benjamin, and Caroline. 

Sanmel M., the eldest son of William and Rebecca Coles, 
never married, but lives with his motlier at Harrisonville. — 
Thomas R. Coles, tirst married Charlotte Watson, who had 
four children — Charles, Samuel, Henry and Marianna ; his 
second wife is Lydia, daughter of John Duell and widow of 
Stacy Coles ; he is a farmer and lives near Paulding's Station, 
West Jersey Railroad. Rebecca, married Isaac C. Stevenson, 
they live at Wenonah, Gloucester county, and have two children 
— Charles and Saralu William M: Coles, married Lydia, 
daughter of Samuel Duell ; he is a farmer living in Pilesgrove, 
and has five children — Ida, Cooper, Ella, Emma and Clarkson 
Coles, Martha married William Moore, they liave four children. 
Richman married Lydia, daughter of Mark Horner ; he is also 
a farmer living on the homestead farm, and has two cliildren — 
Ellen and Susanna ; Richman is now a member of the Legisla- 
ture of New Jersey. B. F. Coles, the youngest child of 
William and Rebecca Coles, married Katurali, daughter of S. 
II. Weatherby ; he is a mercliant and lives at Englislitown, 
Monmouth county. 

Harris, oldest son of Bartholomew Coles, nuirried Mary 
Ilurff. He is deceased, leaving several cliildren. Thomas, the 
second son, died a young man. Us, the third son, tirst mariled 
Hannali Ballenger, and afterwards nuirried Mary Ballenger. He 
is a farmer, living near Daretown, Salem county, and has tive 
children — Jane, Isaac, Anna, Mary, and Sarah Coles. AVilliam, 
tlie fourth son, married Louisa Whitaker. He was a farmer, 
and died recently, leaving two children — William and Nancy 
Coles. Bartholomew, the fourtli son of Bartholomew and Anna 
Coles, married Rebecca, the daughter of Malachi Hornei-, of 
Gloucester county. He is also a farmer, living near Whig Lane, 
in Upper Pittsgrove, and has six children — Anna, Edward, 
Eleanor, Martlia Amy, George, and Stacy Coles. Chalkley 
Coles, tirst married IMartha Ann, daugliter of Josej^h and Mar- 
garet Coles; Ills pi'csent wife is Elizal)eth, (bmghter of James 
and Marianna H(n-ner ; tliey liave but one chihl living — Maggie, 
.btseph (^oles tirst married E]i/.al)etli, daugliter of Asa Moore; 



COLKS FAMILY. (\9 



afterwards married Postreina Groff; tliey have three children 
by his first wife ; he is a farmer and lives in Gloucester county. 
Stacy Coles married Lydia, daughter of John Dnell ; he died 
and left one son — John D. Coles. Ira, ninth and youngest son 
of Bartholomew and Anna Coles, married Martha Ann Adcock; 
tliey have no children ; he is a farmer and lives where liis father 
has lived for nearly sixty years. 

Joseph, the oldest son of Samuel and Mariam Coles, married 
Harriet Bateman, of Blackwoodtown ; he is a farmer and has 

no cliildren. Thomas Coles first married Sarah . Slie 

died and left two children ; he then married Eliza Kirkbride; 
slie also died and left one child. Thomas lives at Blackwood- 
tijwn. Lydia, the oldest child (.)f Epln-aim and Rebecca Coles, 
married George Carter ; she died and left several children. 
Hannah Coles married Richard Springer, of Bridgeport ; she 
is living a widow with several children. Eliza Coles married 
John Bishop ; they have a farm near Elmer, on which they live 
witli tln-ee children. Lippincott Coles married Mary Duell and 
liave two children. Charles Coles is married and lives in 
Indiana. Aaron Coles married Ella, daughter of Barclay 
Edwards ; has no children. Epliraim Coles married Mary Ann 
Kirby ; he was killed by the exphjsion of a steam engine ; left 
no children. Joseph Coles married a daughter of Josepli and 
Racliel Coles. Rebecca married Henry Coles and have chil- 
dren. Francis Coles married William, son of George Avis; he 
is a miller and lives at IJaretowu. 



DAVIS FAMILY. 

John Davis emigrated from Wales and settled in Long Island, 
lie married Dorotliea Hogbin, an English woman of large 
wealth. He ])elonged to the sect called Singing Quakers, 
worshiped daily on a stump, and was very pious and consistent. 
He lived to the extreme old age of one hundred years. A 
number of years before liis death, he moved with his family to 
Pilesgrove township, Salem county, near wliere Woodstown is 
now located, about 1705. His eldest son, Isaac, came to I^ew Jer- 
sey hrst; John soon after, with his family, also came. The 
latter and all liis family subsefpiently became members of 
Friends' Meeting. Isaac, his eldest son, married and had one 
son, who was shot by accident or otlierwise, not mentioned in 
tlie record; he also had two or tln-ee daughters. The names of 
.[(Jni Davis' other cliildren were Jolm, David, Malachi, Abigail, 
Hannah, and Elizabeth; all born on Long Island. David Davis, 
the tliird son, became the most prominent of any of his sons, 
and his descendants are the most mmierous. He was appointed, 
bv the Legislature, a Justice of the Peace; an office at that time 
conferred only on those who had qualifications for tlie position, 
intellectiudly and morally. David was subsequently appointed 
Judge of Salem county Courts, and was one of the foiu- Friends 
who assisted in organizing Pilesgrove Meeting, about 1724 or 5, 
previous to winch time Friends in Pilesgrove were members of 
Salem Meeting. He certainh^ was a man who left his foot- 
})rints on the sands of time. His wife was Dorothea Cousins, 
l»orn in England, 19th of 11th month, 1693, and lived to the 
age of ninety-six years. David Davis, at the time of his death, 
was sixty years of age. David owned a large tract of land near 
lb(> Presbyterian church of Pittsgrove. He built himself a large 
brick house on his property, which is still standing, and lie 
)-esided there until his death. Thomas Chalkley writes that in 
1740 he had a religious meeting at the house of David Davis, 
and l)enches were brought from a neighboi'ing meeting house. 
I presume it was the Presbyterian church, which was near by, 
and at that time was ])uilt of lou's. He further states that the 



DAVIS FAMILV. 71 



meeting m'hs large, and the people were orderly. Da\id and 
Dorothea Davis had seven children — Sarah, Mercy, Aniy,Hannali, 
David, l)orn 31st of 10th month, 1730; Abigail, born 20t]i of 
inh montli, 1732; and Jacolj, Ijorn 22d of 4th montli, 1734-. 
Sarah, the eldest daughter, married William, the son of Andrew 
Griscom; they had two daughters — Hannah and De1)orah. 
Hannah Griscom married a Clement; tliey had two daughters 
— Elizabeth and Sarah. Elizabeth Clement married James B. 
Cooper; they had one daughter — Hannali Cooper. Delxirah 
Griscom married John Stewart, of Cuml)erland county, the son 
of John {ind Mary AV^ade Stewart, of Alloways Creek. She was 
his second wife, and surxived her husband many years. Mercy, 
the daughter of David and Dorothea Davis, married Thomas 
Redman, of Haddonfield, 1)eing his second wife. 

Amy, the daughter of David and Dorotliea Davis, nuirried 
John Gill, of Haddonlield ; tliey had six children. Mary, their 
eldest daughter, married a Koberts ; Elizabeth Gill married 
a Burroughs ; they had issue. Amy Gill married a Willis ; 
they had one daughter — Elizabeth Willis, who married Benja- 
min Coopei". Mercy Gill, the fourth daughter, married Samuel 
Al)l)ott, of Elsinboro, Salem county, the son of William 
Aljbott ; they had three children — William, Rebecca and Han- 
nah. Sarah Gill married a Whital, at Red Bank. John Gill, 
the son of John and Amy Gill, married Ann Smith; they had 
one son — John Gill, Jr., his wife is Sarah Hopkins ; John is 
President of the National State Bank, Camden. Hannah 
Davis, the daughter of David and Dorothea Davis, married 
Richard AV^ood 2d ; he was the son of Richard and Priscilla 
Wood, was born 18th of 1st month, 1728, in Salem, now^ Cum- 
berland (county. A¥lien he was married, some say, he resided 
in Philadelphia, at which place he learned the coopering busi- 
ness, but he lived the greater part of his life in the town of 
Greenwich, where he foUow^ed his trade, and at that place their 
two children were born. Richard, the son of Richard and 
Hannali D. Wood, was born 2d of 7th month, 1755, and James, 
the son of the same parents, was born 30th of 8th month, 17()5. 
Richard Wood, son of Richard and Hannah Davis AV^ood, mar- 
ried and had one son — David Wood, who died single. Richard's 
second wife was Elizabeth Bacon, the daughter of Job and 
Mary Stewart Bacon, the latter was the second wife of Richard 
Wood 2d, George Bacon Wood, M. D., was the eldest son of 
Ricliard and Elizabeth B. Wood; he married Caroline Halm, 
who died, leaving no issue. Richard Davis Wood, the second 
son of Richard and Elizabeth B. Wood, married Julianna 



i'J DAVIS FAMILY. 

V^ 

Rcindolpli, of Pliiladelpliia ; lie is deeeasefl, leavinj^ seven chil- 
dren — Richard, Edward, Randolph, Julia, Mary, Georo;e B., 
Stewart and Walter Wood. Charles, tlie third son of Richard 
and Elizaheth B. Wood, married a Randolph, and at his death 
left five children — Elizabeth, George B., Naomi, Minnie and 
Francis AVood. Horatio C, the son of Richard and Elizabeth 
B. Wood, married Eliza1)eth Bacon ; their children were Rich- 
ard, Horatio, M. D., John, George G., James, Mary Ann and 
Elizal)eth AV^ood. Horatio's second wife was Abigail Evans, 
dangliter of William Evans, they have one son — William Evans 
Wood. 

Hannah Davis Wood, daughter of Ricluird and Elizal)eth B. 
AVood, married David Scnll, she being his second wife. Ann 
Eliza!)etli, the youngest daughter of the above parents, married 
John E., the son of J(jhn and Mary M. Shepjiard. She died 
young, leaving one son — George W. Sheppard. James, the son 
of Richard and Hannah Davis Wood, married Ruth CUement. 
He resided in Bhiladelphia, and was a merchant, and being suc- 
cessful in business, he acquired a (competency and retired to 
Haddonfield. James and his wife had five children, of whom 
Richard C. Wood, their eldest son, Rebecca and Sanniel are 
dead, the latter died young and single. Hannah Ann Wood 
married Isaac Tyson, of Baltimore. They had five children — 
Richard W., Jesse, Isaac, James and Hannah Ann Tyson. 
James, the youngest son of James and Ruth Wood, married Jane 
Hicks. 

David, the son of David and Dorothea Davis, l)orn 1730, like 
his father, was a large land-holder. His wife was Martha Cole, 
l»y whom he had several chikh'en. Joseph, their son married 
Mary Haines, and they had two daughters — Martha and Anna 
Davis. Martha's husband was William Folwell; they had one son 
— Joseph D. Folwell. Anna married David, the son of John and 
Sarah Pancoast. They are l)oth living at this time in Woods- 
town, and have several children. David, the son of David and 
Martha Cole Davis, married a Haines ; they had issue. Martha, 
their daughter, married Andrew Griscom, the son of Benjamin 
Griscom, of Salem ; they had six children. Anna, the daughter 
of David and Mary Davis, married Allen Fenimore. Joseph 
Davis, the son of David, married a Collins. The second son of 
David and Mary H. Davis is named David Davis. Jacob, the 
son of David and Martha C. Davis, married Elizabeth Coulson; 
there were four children by that marriage. David C. Davis 
married Mary Engle, daughter of Asa Engle ; they had several 
children. David is deceased, Mary C. Davis died single. 



DAVIS FAMILY. 73 



Jacol), the son of Jacob and Elizal)etli Davis, niarried a Lippin- 
cott. Hannah Davis married Jonathan D. Smith ; they ha\'c 
issue. 

Mary Davis niarried William Rogers, and their children ^v•ere 
Rachel, Joseph, and Grace Rogers. David Rogers married 
Lydia Evans; Grace Rogers married Thomas Ballinger; Rachel 
Rogers married Zebedee Willis. Jacob, the son of Jacob and 
Dorothea Davis, born in 1734, married Esther Wilkins, of 
Evesham, who was liorn 1736. Jacob and Esther were married 
at Woodstown, 21st of otli month, 1761, and had seven children 
— Hannah, the eldest, born 30th of 4th month, 1762, died in 
1765 ; David Davis, their son, born 19th of 8th month, 1763 ; 
Jacob Davis, Jr., born 5th of 6th month, 1765, died 1767; 
Thomas Davis was born 13th of 3d month, 1768 ; Josiah Davis, 
born 21th of 10th month, 1770, died 1776 ; James Davis, born 
21st of 2d month, 1773, died 1776 ; Esther Davis was born 18th 
of 5th month, 1778. Esther Davis, their mother, died 8th of 
3d month, 1785, aged abont fifty-nine years. Jacob Davis 
remarried Mary Stratton 10th of 8th month, 1792, and she died 
3d of 2d moiitii, 1809. Jacob died in 11th month, 1820, aged 
eighty-six years and four months. Eew men have left behind 
them as pure and unl)lemished a character as he. Esther, the 
daughter of Jacob and Esther Davis, born 1778, married Joshua 
Lippincott, in 1800. I tliink he was the son of Joshua Lippin- 
C(»tt and grandson of Freedom Lippincott. They had two 
daughters — Beulah and Lydia Lippincott ; the latter suljsequently 
married David Scull. David, the son of Jacob and Esther 
Davis, born 1763, married Hannah Scull, sister of Gideon Scull. 
David and his wife Hannah had two sons and one daughter; 
l)oth of the sons died young, and their daughter, Hannah Scull, 
niarried George Hollingshead, and had one son and three 
daughters, as follows: David S. Hollingshead, who is in the 
mercantile business at Woodstown; Mary, who died a few years 
ago; Martha and Margaret Hollingshead, who are also both 
deceased. Da\i(l Davis' second wife was Abigail Ilowey. They 
had one son, Dr. David M. Davis, who married Sallie Ann Smith, 
daughter of James and Hannah A. Smith, formerly of Manning- 
ton. James, her father, is now living in Salem, at a very 
advanced age. Dr. David M. and Sallie Ann Davis have eight 
cliildren. Thomas, the son of Jacolj and Esther W. Davis, born 
1768, married Esther Ogden, in 1796, and 1)y her had ten 
children — Samuel, the eldest, died 3^oung ; Martlia died single ; 
Mary Ann Da\-is married William Johns, of Woodbury, who 
(lied, leaving no issue l)y lier; Jacob married Sarali Ami, daugh- 
10 



74 DAV18 FAMILY, 



ter of Samuel Nicliolson, of Manning-ton. Tliey had three 
c]iild]"en — AVilliam, Martha, and Hannah ])avis. Josiah, the 
son of Thomas and Esther J)avis, married MaryMulford; they 
had. four chiWren — James, William M., Joseph, and Thomas 
Davis; the latter is deceased. Thomas W., the son of Tliomas 
and Esther Davis, married Phebe Townsend, of Philadelphia. 
They had five children — Joseph T,, Esther, Tliomas, Robert, 
and Henry Davis. Estlier, the daughter of Thomas and Esther 
Davis, died single. There were Richard W. and Sarah Davis; 
the latter married William Waleott, and they had tme daughter 
— Francis] D. Waleott. 



DUBOIS FAMILY. 

Lewis Dubois, wlio emigrated to America, was born aljout 
the year 1630, and settled up tlie North river, in Ulster county, 
X. Y., wliere a number of his countrymen had also come to 
escape religious persecution. They were called Huguenots, 
being followers of Calvin. The great persecution, amounting 
almost to extermination of the Protestants, is genertdly referred 
to tlie revocation of the edict of Nantes, which took place in 
1685, in the reign of Louis XIV. Lew^is Dubois married 
Catharine Blancon; she was born at Manheim, in Germany, 
w^liere he had gone to escape persecution. It appears, by the 
record of him after their marriage, tliey returned to France 
again, and in that country their son, Abraham Dubois, was born 
in 1638 ; soon after that event they left Strasburg for this 
country, and settled in Ulster county. Their son, Jacob 
Dubois, was born in 1662. About the year 1711- Jacob had 
lieard there was a large quantity of good land for sale in the 
southern part of New Jersey. He left his native county in 
New York and moved to this State to view the lands he heard 
so much of. Daniel Cox, of Burlington, after he married 
Rebecca Hedge, the widow of Samuel Hedge, Jr., came in 
possession of a large quantity of good land in Fen wick's tenth. 
He owned large tracts of land in what is now Pittsgrove town- 
ship. Jacob and his sister, John and Isaac Yanmeter, pur- 
chased 3,000 acres of the said Daniel Cox, of this tract. Tlie 
tliree last persons in the year 1716 conveyed 1,200 acres to 
Jacob Dubois as his portion. There is no account of Jacob 
Dubois ever liv^ing in New Jersey, but he divided the property 
Iks ])Ought of Daniel Cox among four of his sons. Barrett 
Dubois, one of his sons, settled at Pittsgrove soon after his father 
liad purcliased the land in said township. It appears he was 
married in the State of New York previous to his coming to 
Salem county ; lie had eight children. Catharine, their daughter, 
was born in 1716 ; Jacob in 1719 ; tlie latter married Jaiiite 
Newkirk in 1717; he was a ])rominent church member of the 
Presbyterian society, aiul was a deacon mid oiu^ of the trustees 



76 DinoiS FAMrLY. 



to whom tlie deed was given for the ground to erect the church 
building upon. Lewis, the third son of Jacob Dubois, was 
born at Ilurly, in Ulster county, N. Y., in 1695. His wife was 
Mai'garet Janson; tliey were married in 1720. He emigrated to 
AVest Jersey in company witli ids brotlier Barrett, and soon 
after became the possessor of real estate amounting to 1,091 
acres; his first purcliase was in 1726 of 350 acres in Alio ways 
Creek township, having bought it of Joshua Wright. It was 
the land that William llall bought of James Wasse, of London, 
in 1706, being part of the Wasse tract of 5,000 acres that lay 
on the borders of the head water of Allowa^'s creek. Lewis 
and his wdfe were among the first members of the large and 
influential congregation of Pittsgrove in 1742, at the time of 
the flrst organization of the Presbyterian society at that place. 
At that time he sold to the trustees of the clnn-ch two acres of 
land for forty shillings, to erect a church l)uilding upon for tlie 
use of said society, and in 1761 he sold flfty acres of land for 
a parsonage for seventy-iive pounds proclamation money, in 
addition to the fifty acres the society purchased in 1744 of 
Abraliam Newkirk. One of Jacob Dubois, Sr.'s sons emigrated 
about the time his brother came to this county to Lancaster 
county. Pa., and made it his permanent home and one of his 
grand-sons became an eminent Pi-esbyterian minister. Jacol) 
Dubois, son of Lewis, had eight children; his oldest son, Joliu, 
married Sarah Dubois, grand-daughter of Barrett Dubois ; 
Mary, their oldest daughter, married William Pobinson, of 
Lower Penn's Neck ; tliey had six children — Benjamin, 
William, Rebecca, Margaret, Noah and John. The two last 
mentioned died single. Benjamin married, I have been told, 
and left two children. William and his wife left six children — 
AVilliam, Noah, James, Mary, John and Benjamin. Rebecca, 
the oldest daughter, married a man by tlie name of Patterson. 
I have no knowledge whether she left any children. Mai-garet 
Robinson's husband was Samuel Copner, the son of Josepli 
Copner, of Penn's Neck. The Copner's were an ancient family 
of that township, together with tlie Dunn family and several 
others, were the prominent meml)ers of the Presbyterian 
church, located near Pennsville. For some cause I never ha^'e 
learned, he left the church of which he was a member tlie 
greater part of his life, and joined the Friends' Society, and 
near the close of his life made a will, and devised one-half of 
his homestead farm to the Society of Friends ; he left two child- 
ren — Samuel, and one daughter, who niari'ied a. Simiickson; she 
left two chiiih-en — Cynice Siiiuickson and the late Ann Simpson. 



rUBOIS FAMILY. 



Benjamin Dubois married Mary Kobinson, sister of AVm. 
Robinson, Sr., and had six sons and two daughters. All of 
them, after their father's death, removed to one of tlie Western 
states. Solomon Dubois, the youngest son of Jacob Dubois, 
was a native of Pittsgrove; he purchased lands in Alloways 
Creek townsliip, and married the daughter of Itichard Moore; 
they had five children, four daughters and one son; their names 
were Martha, Mary, Susan, Kebecca, and Richard Dubois. 
Martlia married Benjamin Ireland; she died young, leaving one 
daughter — Ann. She married a person by the name of Corlis; 
they had no children. Mary, second daughter of Solomon, died 
single. Susan Dubois, daughter of Solomon, married Nathaniel, 
the son of David Stretc^h. Susan died, leaving one daughter — 
Mary Ann Stretch. Rebecca Dubois died single. Richard 
Dubois, son of Solomon, married Sarah, daughter of Ephraim 
Sayre; she died, leaving one daughter — Ann Dubois. She 
married Joseph Fogg; she is deceased, leaving issue. Richard's 
second wife was Hannah Ann, daughter of Thomas Sayre; they 
had four sons — Solomon, Tliomas, Richard, and Josiah Dubois. 
Solomon, the eldest, married Kesiali Bowen; they had three 
children — William, Elizabeth, and Ruth Dubois. Solomon, the 
father of the above mentioned children, was killed by a mowing 
machine while he was mowing. Thomas, the son of Ricliard 
and Hannah Ann Dubois, married Elizabeth Stretch; they had 
one daughter — Hannah Ann Dubois. Thomas' second wife is 
Sarah Jane, daughter of John W. and Sarah Ann Maskell ; they 
have no issue. Richard Dul)ois, Jr., married Elizabeth, the 
daughter of Thomas Mulford; they have four children — Luella, 
Hannah, Rachel, and Oakford Dubois. Josiah Dubois, youngest 
son of Richard, married Hannah, daughter of Lewis Fox; they 
have three children — Mary Jane, Anna S., and Tliomas S. 
Dubois. Richard Dubois, Sr.'s, third wife is Mary Decroy; 
they have no issue. Solomon Dubois' second wdfe was widow 
Hedley; they liad one son, Jacob Dubois, who subsequently 
married Ann Patterson; they had two cliildren — John and 



Emeline. Jacob's second wife was Charlotte F, Miller; they 
liad issue, two cliildren — Mary and Cliaides Diil)()is. Mary 
(kM-eased. 



ELAVELL FAMILY. 

The Elwell family of this county, particularly those who 
liave resided in the township of Pittsgrove, have had a large 
influence ])oth in religious and civil society. Jacob Elwell, tlie 
emigrant, was born in England, in tlie year 1700. He settled 
in Pilesgrove township soon after he arrived in this country ; he 
married Catharine Dubois, whose parents were French Hugeu- 
nots and had left France on account of religious persecution, and 
settled in Canada on Lake Ticondersigo. She and her mother 
were captured by the Indians, and recaptured by her father, 
wlio followed the trial after three days of great anxiety and 
toil, which we can easily imagine, the party in pursuit succeeded in 
killing two of the Indians. Soon after that event, Jacob Elwell 
removed from Canada with his family to Salem county, and 
soon afterwards purchased land of Daniel Cox, of Burlington, 
in Pilesgrove township, and settled there. Catharine Dubois, 
his daughter was at that time about twelve years old. Jacob 
and his wife, Catharine Dubois Elwell, had five children — 
David, Sanuiel, Jonathan, Rhoda and Rachel Elwell. David, 
their eldest son, married, had Hvg children, their names were 
Jacob, Cornelius, David, Yoiimacea and Mary Elwell. Samuel, 
son of Jacob and Catharine D. Elwell, married Amelia Morgan ; 
they had five (-hildren — Sanuiel, Mary, Sarah, Amelia and Sarah 
Elwell. Jonathan, son of Jacob and Catliarine Dubois, 
married Peggy Summerill, daughter of William Summerill, 
tlie emigrant ; they had six children — William, Jacob, Jona- 
than, Catharine, Rachel and Sarah Elwell. Rhoda Elwell, 
daughter of Jacob and Catharine D. Elwell, married Henry 
Riclimond ; they had three children — Jacob, Henry and Isaac 
Riclimond; they all died minors. After her first husband's 
death, Rlioda married William Ray ; they had two children — 
Bigee and Henrietta. Rhoda's tliird husband was Josiah 
Paullin ; there were two children — William and Mary Paullin. 
William, the son of Josiah and Rhoda Paullin, died recently 
aged about eiglity-two years. I have no kuowledg^t^ of his 
familv. Mai'v married. Racliel, the daui^hter of Jacob and 



ELWELL FAMILY. 79 



Catliarine Dubois, married James Hutchinson ; tliey had no 
issue. James turned a tory in the war of tlie Kevohition, and 
Avas compelled to leave the country, leaving his wife in charge 
of his mother. He lived hut a short time afterwards; liis widow 
subsequently married Jonathan Sneighin. 

Samuel, son of Samuel and Amelia Elwell, married Maiy 
Johnson, [See Johnson family.] Mary Elwell married Isaac 
Johnson, youngest son of John Johnson. [See Johnson fam- 
ily.] Sarah, the daughter of Samuel and Amelia M. Elwell, 
married Charles Chambers; they had issue — Charles, James 
and Richard Chand)ers. Amelia, the daughter of Samuel and 
Amelia Elwell, married Andrew Urion ; the}' had four cliildren 
— Samuel, Elizabeth, Amelia and Sarah ITrion. Samuel Urion, 
their son, is now a resident of Lower Penn's Neck, and a 
large land owner, and is considered one of the best agriculturists 
in that section of the country; he married Sarah, the daughter 
of the late Elisha Wheaton. Sarah, daughter of Andrew and 
Amelia Urion, married Asa Reeves; they have issue. Amelia, 
daughter of 'Andrew and Amelia Urion, married William 
Brown ; they have children. Elizabeth, daughter of Andrew 
and Amelia E. Urion, married Joseph Ree\es ; they have issue. 
Catharine Elwell, daughter of Jonathan Elwell, married Gar- 
rett Newkirk ; there were three children — Margaret, Garrett 
and Matthew Newkirk ; all three of those in after life became 
eminent citizens. Garrett and Matthew are successful mer- 
chants. Margaret equally as nmch so as her brotliers, as a bonnet 
maker. 

I shtdl conclude this short and reliable history of Jacol) 
Elwell and his wife, Catharine Dubois ; for many of his descend- 
ants I have alluded to heretofore in the genealogy of other 
families. Jacol) Elwell, the emigrant, died in Pittsgrove town- 
ship, aged se\'enty-three years ; his widow, Catharine Dubois 
Elwell, in 1798, far advanced in years. As far as I have 
learned, both of those aged ]wrsons left an enviable i'e]:)utation 
and numerous descendants. 



GUY FAMILY. 

Richard Guv and his wife, Bridget Gu}', were ainuiig tlie 
first emigrants to Fen wick's Cokmy, His occupation in his 
native country was that of a cheesemonger; he resided in the 
parish of Stepny, London, in Middlesex. He purchased one 
thousand acres of hmd in what is now known as Elsinhoro. 
The deed and receipt for the hmd was dated in the 9th month, 
1676; the purchase money was ten pounds. The said land was 
located bounding on Delaware river, extending from the old 
Swede's fort to the present mouth of Salem creek. He was not, 
however, a resident of the county l)ut a few years. And on tlic 
same day he likewise bought of Fen wick, for liis friend Thomas 
Pyle, a citizen and upholsterer of the (dty of London, ten 
thousand acres of land, for whicli he paid fifty pounds sterling. 
The following is the receipt of John Fenwick for said land: 

'' Received on thirteenth day of the third month, called May, 
" one thousand, six liundred and seventy and five, of and from 
'' Richard Guy, of the parisli of Stepny, of the county of 
" Middlesex, (chessemonger), the full sum of fifty pounds 
" sterling, mentioned and expressed in a Deed, bearing even 
" date herewitli, and made for me John Fenwick, late of Bin- 
'' field, in the county of Berks, within the kingdom of England, 
" Esq., and early Proprietor of the Province of New Cessavia, 
"■ or Kew Jersey, in America, to the said Richard Guy. 
" Witnesseth present : 

"Peter Hoff, By me, Fenwk^k. 

" Samuel Nicholsox, 
" Richard Morgan, 
" John Smith, 
" Edw^ard Champney, 
" Edward Wade, 
" Thomas Anderson, 
" Edmund Warner, 
" Richard Noble, 
" James Gardfildser." 
The said land was surveyed by Ricliard Nobh> in 1076, and 



JOHN FENWICK'S RECEIPT 

TO 

RICHARD GUY, 

FOR 

Ten Thousand Acres of Land, for his friend, Thomas Pyle. 



Received, the one and thirtieth day of the Third Month, 
called May, One thousand six hundred seventy and five, of 
and from Richard Guy, of the Parish of Stepney, ahas Stebun- 
heath, in the County of Middlesex, Cheesemonger, the full 
sum of ffifty pounds Sterling, which is the same sum of ffifty 
pounds mentioned and expressed in a certain Deed Poll bear- 
ing even date herewith, and made from me, John Fenwick, 
late of Binfeild, in the County of Berks, within the Kingdom 
of England, Esquire, and cheif proprietor of the one moyetie 
or halfe part of the Tract of Land within the Province of New 
Cesaria or New Jersey, in America, to the said Richard Guy. 










^a. 



, ..-, s;^^ 



GUY FAMILY. 81 



was located in the upper part of Salem tentli, where tlie 
township of Pilesgrove is now. 

About 1690 Richard Guy and George Deacon removed with 
tlieir families to tiie county of Burlington. Kichard died in a 
short time afterwards, leavdng a widow, who survived him a 
number of years. George Deacon lived until 1722, leaving 
childi-en. Some of his descendants are still living in that county 
at the present time. 
11 



GOODWIN FAMILY. 

Jolni Goodwin was tlie son of Jolni and Catharine Goodwin, 
of the parish of St. Buttolph, in Algate, London. He was 
born 25th of 10th month, 1680, and emigrated to Pennsylvania 
in 1701. From thence, the foUowing year, lie removed to 
Salem, and in 1705 he married Susannah Smith, the oldest 
daughter of John Smith, of Smithfield ; they had four children 
— John, Mary, Thomas and AVilliam Goodwin ; the two oldest 
died young. Thomas Goodwin was born in 1721, and nuirried 
Sarah Morris, the daughter of Lewis Morris, of Elsinborongh, 
in the year 1713. Thomas and liis wife lived on her proj^erty 
that she inherited from her father in Elsinborongh until 1656, 
when they sold it to Sanniel Abbott, and purchased the property 
in the town of Salem of John Mason. The said property was 
located on Broadway street, and in the spring of 1757 they 
removed to Salem, and here ended their days. In the lOtli 
month, 1765, Sarah Goodwin, wife of Thomas Goodwin died, 
ao'ed forty-one years, leaving no children. Thomas GoodM'in's 
second wife was Sarah Smith wdio lived but a few years after 
her marriage, and departed this life in the year 1783. Thomas 
remained single for twenty years, and in 1803 he died, 
aged nearly eighty-two years, lea^dng his estate to his 
great nephews and nieces. William Goodwin, the young- 
est son of John and Susannah Goodwin, was born in 1723, 
and in 1714 he married Mary Morris, second daughter of Lewis 
Morris ; they lived in Elsinborongh on her share of her 
father's estate ; they had tive children — John, Lewis, Susannah, 
Mary and William Goodwin. John Goodwin, their oldest son, 
was born in 1745, and in the year 1772 he married Sarah Hall, 
daughter of Clement and Margaret Hall. It was one of the 
first marriages that took place at the present Friends' meeting 
house in Salem. John Goodwin's wife lived but a short time 
after they were married, leaving no children. Mary Goodwin, 
the mother of John Goodwin, died in 1776, and consequently 
the property belonged to him after his father's death. John 
did not survive his mother but a few years, making a will and 



GOODWIN FAMILY. 83 



leaving his right of the real estate to his nephew, AVilliani 
Goodwin, the son of Lewis Goodwin. 

Lewis Goodwin, the second son of William and Mary Good- 
win, married Rebecca Zanes, of Salem, danghter of Susan 
Zanes ; they had two children — John and Susan Goodwin. 
John married Abigail Carpenter and had three children — Lewis, 
AVilliam and Thomas Goodwin. Lewds Goodwin's second wife 
was Rachel Nicholson, the daughter of William Nicholson, of 
JMannington, and they had three children — William, Thomas 
and Morris Goodwin. William, the oldest son, married Iluldah 
Townsend, daughter of Daniel Towmsend, of Cape May. 
Thomas Goodwin married Sarah Jeiferis, daughter of Joshua 
Jeiferis. Morris Goodwin married Sarah Smith. Susannah 
Goodwin, oldest daugliter of William and Mary GoodAvin, was 
Ijorn in 1750, and in 1773 she married John Mason, the son of 
Thomas Mason, and grand-son of John Mason. He was a 
widower when he married Susannah Goodwin, his first wife 
was Ann Hall, daugliter of William Hall, Jr.. They lived 
and owned on Broadway street in Salem, which j)roperty 
is now owne'd by Morris Hall. John Mason and Ann his 
wife liad one daugliter named Sarah, and she married Ed- 
gar Brown. John Mason and his wife Susannah had six 
children — William, Mary, Ann, Thomas, Elizabeth and John 
G. Mason. Their oldest son, William, died in 1776. Mary 
Mason married Abner Beesley and had four children — Mary, 
William, Benjamin and Thomas Beesley. Her second lius- 
1)aiid was Job Ware, ^vho had two children — Job and Elijah 
AVare. Ann Mason was born in 1778, and married Joseph 
Thompson, son of Joshua Thompson ; they had four children 
— Susan, the oldest, married Joseph Pancoast. Elizabeth, 
tlieir second daugliter died in her fifteenth year. Sarah Thomp- 
son married Thomas Shourds. Ann Thompson married Tliomas 
Eogg. Thomas Mason, their second son, was born 1780. 
About the year 1812 he married Hannah Hancock, daugliter of 
Joseph Hancock ; he and his wife lived but a short time after 
they were married, leaving one child — Hannah Mason, and she 
married Richard M. Acton. Elizabeth Mason was born in 
1782, and she died single in the twenty-fourth year of her age. 
John Goodwin Mason was born in 1785 ; he never married, and 
died in 1839 in the fifty-hfth year of his age. John Mason, 
their father, died about 1787 ; his widow, "Susannah Mason, 
married Joshua Thompson and had two children — William and 
Joshua Thompson. William Goodwin, Jr., was born in 1758, 
and married Elizabeth Woodimtt, of Mannington; he and li 



84 GOODWIN FAMILY. 



wife liad six cliildren — Prudence, the oldest, married Atkinson 
Conrad. Mary Goodwin married Jonathan AV^oodnntt. Racliel 
Goodwin married Preston C. Woodnutt. Sarali Goodwin mar- 
ried Henry Dennis, her second Inisband was Jonathan Wood- 
nutt. Elizabeth and Al)igail Goodwin always remained single ; 
they were remarkable for their kind and sympathetic feelings, 
always willing to assist the poor and afflicted, going and looking 
after them in the abodes of poverty, and administering to their 
wants as far as their circumstances w^ould allow ; they continued 
in their noble deeds of philanthropliy until old age and as long 
as bodily strength permitted them to do it. It seemed that the 
spirit of tlie immortal Howard had des(;ended upon them. 



HAXCOCK FAMILY. 

William Hancock, Sr., came from England to this county in 
the year 1677, with his wife, Isabella Hancock, and two sons, 
John and William Hancock. He took possession soon after his 
arrival of allotment of land on the south side of Allowajs Creek, 
containing 1,000 acres. The said land was surve^^ed by Richard 
Hancock, by order of John Fenwick, in 1676. William Han- 
cock died and left his estate to his widow, Isabella, who, the 
year following, sold one half of the allotment to John Maddox. 
She survived about ten years after her husband. In her will 
she devised her real estate to her oldest son, John Hancock, and 
lier personal estate to William Hancock ; and he purchased 500 
acres of land in Elsinborougli, adjoining lands of John Mason on 
the south, Samuel Nicholson on the east, Rudoc Morris' land on 
the west, and by Isaac Smart's land on the north. In 1705 he 
built a large brick house; it stood until within a few years ago, 
and then it was torn down b}^ Richard Grier, the present OM'ner 
of the property, and a large frame house erected on the site of 
the old one. I believe William Hancock married Sarah Stafford. 
Their son, Thomas Hancock, was born 5th of the 12th month, 
1714. William Hancock held the office of Justice of tiie Peace 
for many years, and he died about the year 1710. His son, 
Thomas Hancock, married and had two sons — William and 
Tliomas Hancock. At their father's death the landed estate 
was divided equally between them. William Hancock, son of 
Thomas, married Hannah Fogg, daughter of Charles Fogg, in 
the year 1770. William Hancock, their son, was born Itn day 
of the 7th month, 1771; he died a minor. John Hancock was 
born the 21th day of Ith month, 1773; Elizabeth Flancock was 
born the 17th of the 7th month, 1776. John died in 1794, and 
made a will, leaving his estate to his cousin, William Hancock, 
son of Tiiomas Hancock. Thomas Hancock married Mary 
Goodwin, daughter of AVilliam Goodwin; they had live children 
— Thomas Hancock, Jr., AV^illiam, Morris, Sarah, and Elizabeth 
Hancock. 

John Hancock, tlie eldest son of William and Isabella Han- 



86 HANCOCK FAMILY. 



cock, inlierited by his motlier 500 acres of land on the south sid£ 
of Alloways creek, where the viHage of Hancock's Bridge is now 
located. All accounts we have of him go to show that he was 
a man of great energy in relation to business. He added largely 
to his estate. In the year 1708 he built a bridge across Allo- 
ways creek. I have no douljt he was assisted by the public in 
the work. It was know^l for many years as John Hancock's 
bridge. In 1709 there were commissioners appointed by the 
Court to lay out a public highw^ay from the town of Salem, by 
the way of John Hancock's new bridge, to the town of Green- 
wich. John died about 1725, leaving one son — AVilliam Han- 
cock, and lie came in possession of one of the largest landed 
estates in the county ; his lands lay mostly in Alloways Creek, 
Elsinborougli, and Penn's Neck. William married Sarah, the 
daughter of Nathaniel Chambless, Jr., of Alloways Creek. In 
the year 178'1 , William Hancock built himself a large and 
substantial brick dwelling, which is still standing, in good repair. 
It is an historical house, on account of the horrible massacre 
which took place in it by the British soldiers on the American 
militia, wdio were cpiartered in it in 1778. William Hancock, 
then an old man, received a mortal wound, and died in a short 
time afterwards at the house of his brother-in-law, Joshua 
Thompson, about half a mile farther clown the creek. William 
had one daughter by liis first wife, Sarah Cliambless — Sarah 
Hancock. She married Thomas Sinnickson, of Salem, son of 
Andrew Sinnickson, of Penn's Neck. Thomas and his wife left 
no issue. His second wife was Sarah, the daughter of Joshua 
and Sarah Thompson, of Elsinborough ; they had one son — 
John Hancock, who married Eleanor York, daughter of Andrew 
York, of Salem; they had several children; four of them lived 
to grow up, and had families — Sarah, who married Morris 
Hancock, son of Thomas Hancock, of Elsinborough; Henrietta 
married Lewis P. Smith; Thomas Y. Hancock married Rachel, 
daughter of AVilliam and Elizabeth Nicholson; Maria married 
Ricliard P. Thompson, son of Hedge and Mary Ann Thompson, 
of Salem. William Hancock done a hu-ge amount of public 
business, was a member of the Colonial Legislature for twenty 
years in succession, and lield tlie office of Judge and Justice at 
the time of liis death. 



OBEDIAH HOLMES FAMILY. 

The Holmes family, of the comity of Cumberland, are an 
ancient and numerous family. At this late day it is almost 
impossible to follow the various branches with any degree of 
certainty, therefore I will endeavor to confine my remarks to 
those branches who have kept a correct record of tlieir ancestors. 
It appears that Obediah Holmes, Sr., was born 1606, at Preston, 
Lancashire, England, and at the age of thirty-three he emigrated 
to America, landing at Boston in 1639. He located at Salem, 
in the State of Massachusetts, and most probably married soon 
after that event. He was a Baptist clergyman of no ordinary 
intellect, and for the doctrines he so aljly and po"^^erfully enun- 
ciated, he was arraigned in 1650, and tried by a court of the 
rigid Puritans of that day, and was condemned to be puljlicly 
whipped, together with a number of Friends or Quakers, who 
likewise held religious opinions, which they regarded as heresy. 
I have no donl)t the Puritans, in their blind zeal, believed such 
religious doctrines were detrimental to the peace and happiness 
of their commonwealtli. Soon after that event, Obediah Holmes 
removed, with his family, to Newport, Rhode Island, where 
religious liberty was granted by just and liberal laws, made and 
enacted by Roger Williams. He died at Ne\\'port, 15tli of 10th 
month, 1682, aged seventy-six years. There is no mention at 
what time his M'ife's death occurred, but I think it M'as previous 
to his. They had eight children, most of whom siirvived their 
parents ; some married in New England, one or more settled on 
Long Island. Two of their sons, Obediah and Jonathan, came 
to New Jersey and purchased a tract of land of the Indians, 
amounting to 1,600 acres, located near where Middletown now 
is, in Monmoutli county. The two brothers were constituent 
members of the Baptist church at MiddletoM^i, which church is 
said to be the iirst of that denomination constructed in the State. 
Obediah, however, remained in Monmoutli county but a sliort 
period, and removed and settled within Fenwick's Colony, in 
the Cohansey precinct, on the south side of the river, in Shrews- 
bury Neck, in 1685. He was one of the nine Baptists that 



OBEUIAH HOLMES FAMILY. 



assisted in organizing the iirst Baptist cliurcli in South Jersey, 
in 1690. It does not appear that he was ever ordained a reguhir 
clergyman, but he occasionally preached. He possessed, h^- 
nature, a legal mind, and the early inhabitants of that section 
of country soon appreciated, his business capacities, and when 
the Salem courts were regularly established, in the early part of 
tlie reign of Queen Anne, he and. Thomas Killingsworth were 
appointed Judges, and John Mason, Samuel Hedge, and Joseph 
Sayre, from Cohansey, were the Justices. 

Obediali Holmes, Jr., married, a young woman Ijy the name 
of Cole ; they had four children — two sons and two daughters. 
The eldest daughter married a young person by the name of 
Love, his second daughter married a person by the name of 
Parvin. Botli the Love's and the Parvin's are among the first 
families that settled in Cumberland county. Obediah's eldest 
son, Samuel Holmes, was drowned when a Voung man ; liis 
youngest son, Jonathan Holmes, married and died young, leaving 
one son — Jonathan Holmes. The death of Jonathan Holmes, 
Sr., occurred 8th of 9th month, 1715. Jonathan Holmes, Jr., 
in 1729, married Anna Dominick, of Long Island ; they had 
eiglit children — Mary, born 16th of 10th month, 1731 ; Susanna, 
born 3d of 11th month; Jonathan, born 14th of 4th month, 
1735 ; Eunice, born 9tli of 5th month, 1736 ; Phebe, born 23d 
of 2d month, 1738; Anna, born 23d of 10th month, 1739; 
Abijah, born 3d of 4tli month, 1741 ; and Rachel, born 14th of 
of 1st month, 1750. All of these died minors, excepting 
Abijah and PlielK\ Jonathan and Ann Holmes were memljcrs 
of the Presbyterian church, at Greenwich, and Jonathan Avas a 
large contributor towards l)uilding the old brick meeting house 
at that place, in 1735. He was, also, one of the elders of the 
church, and continued to be, I presume, up to the time of his 
death, and he assisted in purchasing the parsonage in 1749 for 
the church. His remains lie, as also those of his son, Aljijah, 
in the ancient cemetery of that place. Phebe Holmes, the 
daughter of Jonathan and Ann Ilolmes, born 1738, married 
Dr. Samuel Ward ; her second husband was Moses Bloomfield, 
the father of Governor Bloomtield, of tliis State. Abijah 
Holmes, son of Jonathan and Ann Ilolmes, born 3d of 4th 
month, 1741, married Rachel Seeley, the daughter of Ephraim 
and Hannah Seeley, on the 18th of 5th month, 1767. They 
had five children — Sarah, born 1st of 5th month, 1771 ; Mary, 
born 29th of 3d month, 1774; Jonathan, born, 10th of 9t]i 
month, 1776 ; John, boi-n 3d of 8th month, 1778 ; and Ephraim 
Holmes, born 13th of 7th month, 1780. These children were 



OBEDIAH HOLMES FAMILY. 



all minors at the time of their parents' death. Abijah, their 
father departed this life 6th of 3d month, 1785, and their 
mother, Rachel Seeley Holmes, 8th of 1st month, 1789. 

Jonathan, the son of Abijah and Rachel S. Holmes, ])orn 
10th of 9th month, 1776, was married l^hree times. His first 
wife was Ljdia Watson, born 11th month, 1776, and died 19th 
(jf 9th month, 1799, and was buried in tlie old graveyard of the 
Baptists, near Sheppard's mill. She left one son — Abijah 
Holmes, wlio is living, and is far advanced in years, and resides 
i:i the city of Camden. Jonathan's widow, Clarissa Holmes, is 
living in the city of Bridgeton, aged eiglity-nine years. They 
have one son, living in the town. 

John, the son of Abijali and Rachel Holmes, born 3d of 8th 
month, 1778, ^vas married twice. By his first wife he had a son — 
Alfred Holmes, who lives at this time in Lower Hopewell town- 
ship, Cumberland county. John's second wife was aBowen; by 
her he had three children; their son John Holmes lives at or 
near Bowentown. 

Ephraim, the son of Abijah and Hannah S. Holmes, was born 
13tli of 7th montli, 1780, and married Harriet Potter Bowen, 
13tli of 4th month, 1813; she was the daughter of David and 
Jane Potter Bowen. Ephraim and his wife had five cliildren — 
Edward B., the first son, born 29th of 7th month, 1815, married 
Julia Dillingham, and died in New York 17th of 2d month, 
1858, leaving a widow and one son. Ephraim, the second son, 
born 11th of 7th montli, 1817, is at this time a practicing phy- 
sician, and resides in the town of Greenwich. Mary P., the 
third child, born 20th of 9th month, 1819, married Charles M. 
Lawrence, and died 26th of 10th month, 1865, leaving three 
children, two of whom are married. Her husband is still living 
at Port Jervis, New York, and is a physician. David B. Holmes,' 
the fourtli child, l)orn 5tli of 8th month, 1833, married Caroline 
Elizabeth Gil>bon, daughter of Charles Gil)bon ; David and his 
wife reside at Schuylkill Haven, Pa.; they have three children. 
Harriet Bowen Holmes, the youngest child of Ephraim and 
Harriet P. Bowen, !)orn 6th of 7th montli, 1825, died 31st of 
8th month, 1850; she never married. Eijhraim Holmes, the 
father, died 28th of 5th month, 1818, and was buried in the 
Presbyterian graveyard at Greenwich. His wife, Harriet Potter 
Holmes, survived him twenty years, her death taking place 2d 
of 4th month, 1868, aged seventy-eiglit years. 

Many persons think that the family of Holmes in Cuml)erland 
and that of Salem are of one family. I think tliere is no 
relationship existing between them. They spell their names 
12 



90 OBEDIAH HOLMES FAMILY, 



(liffereutly ; the Salem (county family ^vrite tlieir's Holme, M'liile 
Obediali Avrote his name Holmes, ami it is so recorded in the 
Salem Court records, and I believe all his descendants write 
their names the same way. Further, Obediah Holmes, Sr., 
landed at Boston more than forty years before Thomas Holme, 
tlie surveyor-general for William Penn, and John Holme, (I 
presume they were relatives,) arri\'ed from England to tlie 
province of Pennsylvania. History informs us that John Holme 
Avas one of the first Baptists in that province; that was a few 
years before he came to Salem county to live. 



HOLME FAMILY. 

John Holme, emigrated from England, and settled in Pliila- 
delpliia, soon after the city was fonnded by William Penn. It 
appears he liad a family — wife and two sons ; one of his sons 
l)ought a large tract of land within the county of Philadelphia 
and settled thereon; the place is known at this day as Ilolmes- 
Ijurg. His brother, Jolm Holme, purchased a large tract of 
land in Salem county, situated in Monmouth precinct, and set- 
tled thereon; that being in 1698 ; he was one of the first that 
belonged to the Babtist ]-eligious association, that lived near the 
town of Salem ; he died the early part of eighteenth century, 
leaving one son — John Holme, who subsequently married; he 
liad two sons and one daughter ; one of his daughters, Eliza- 
beth Holme, married Joseph, the son of Joseph Fogg, the 
emigrant ; they had nine children — David, Ebenezer, Cliarles, 
Hannah, Ann, Elizabeth Holmes, Isaac and Rebecca Fogg. 
Jolm Holme, the eldest son of John Holme 2d, inherited the 
liomestead of his father's, located near Allowaysto\vn, erected a 
Hour mill, known for many years as Holme's Mill. The said 
mill and land was sul)sequently owned l)y Josiah M. Reeves 
and brothers. Jolm Holme was at one time Judge of the 
Salem courts, and an ardent patriot in the days of the American 
Revolution. Benjamin H(jlme, the youngest son of John 
Holme 2d, was born about 1730 ; his first wife was Jane, the 
(huighter of Daniel Smith, Jr., who regided near the village of 
(iuiuton's Bridge; about the year 1762 lie purchased what was 
knowh as the I)avid Morris estate, it being large and valual)le, 
in tlie townsliip of Elsinborough, of John Hart, ho being lialf 
l)i'(.)t]ier of David Morris. Benjamin's first wife, Jane Smith, 
(bed young, leaving no issue ; he subsequently married Esther 
(ribbon, whose maiden name was Seeley ; her first husl^and was 
Jolm Gibbon, son of Leonard Gibbon. Jolm volunteered in 
the army, and was taken prisoner and died in one of the prison 
ships of the British, near Kew York. Benjamin and his wife, 
Esther Holme, had two children — John G. and Jane Holme. 
Benjamin Holme was a historical man and a staunch Whig, in 



92 HOLME FAMILY', 



the American devolution, and was appointed a Colonel of the 
American Militia, of the lower connties, operating with Colonel 
Hand, of Cape May ; by so doing liis buildings in Elsinborough 
were ])urned, hy order of Colonel Manhood, tlie Britisli com- 
mander. After peace was restored he rebuilt his buildings and 
lived to an advanced age, much respected l)y his neighbors and 
friends. John G. Holme, son of Benjamin and Esther Holme, 
married Rebecca, the daughter of Tliomas and Kebecca Tliomp- 
son, of Salem ; slie died leaving one daughter — Rebecca Holme, 
who subsequently married George W. Garrison. John G. 
Holme's second wife was Margaret, daughter of Clement and 
Rebecca K. Hall, of Elsinborough. John and Margaret Holme 
liad three children — Benjamin, Jane and Caroline Holme. By 
tills marriage of John Holme to Margaret Hall, (they having 
issue) was the means of restoring the large landed estate Colo- 
nel Holme bought of Jolm Hart, to the Morris family again. 
Margaret was tlie fifth generation in lineal descent from Rudoc 
Morris. Benjamin, son of John G. and Margaret Holme, 
married Elizabeth, the daughter of Henry and Ann Smith 
Dennis, of Salem ; tlieir children living are Caroline, John, 
Henry, Lucy, Franklin and Jane Holme. John, the son of 
Benjamin and Elizabeth Holme, married Lena, daughter of 
James Woolman, of Pilesgrove ; they have issue. J ane, 
daughter of John G. and Margaretta Holme, married John, tlie 
son of Morris and Lvdia Hall, of Elsinborough. John is 
deceased, leaving no issue ; liis widow, Jane Hall, resides in 
Salem. Caroline, daughter of John and Margaret Holme, 
died when she was about ten years of age. Jane, daughter of 
Colonel Benjamin Holme and liis wife Esther, married a man 
by tlie name of Harris, who resided at S\vedesl)oro, Glou- 
cester county ; she died about a yeai' after marriage, leaving no 
issue. 




CLEMENT HALL. 
Born 1819. 



HALL FxVMILY. 

In 1677 William Hall emigrated to this country in company 
with John and Andrew Thompson, and their families. They 
landed at Elsinborough the 22d of 12th month, the same year. 
Before they sailed from Dublin, William Hall hired with John 
Thompson for a number of years, and soon after his servitude 
expired he removed to the town of Salem, and kept a small store. 
In 1688 he married Elizabeth Pyle, daughter of Thomas Pyle, 
who was a large landholder in the upper part of Eenwick's 
tenth; one tract alone, bordering on Oldman's creek, contained 
10,000 acres. When the different townships were laid off they 
named the township where he lived, and most of his real estate 
lay, Pylesgrove; then the largest township in tliis county, con- 
taining 87,000 acres. It is belie^'ed William Hall came in pos- 
session of considerable property, botli real and personal, by his 
wife. Following are the names of William and Elizabeth Hall's 
children, and the dates of births: Sarah was born 2Sth of the 
2d month, 1689; Hannali in 1692; Elizabeth in 1694; Arm in 
1699. Soon after the birth of Ann his wife, Elizabeth, died. 
His second wife was Sarah Clement of the county of Gloucester; 
they had three children — William Hall, Jr., born 22d of the 
8th month, 1701; their second son, Clement, was born in 1706; 
and Nathaniel in 1709; who, when he arrived at the age of 
twenty-one, left this county and went and resided in the State 
of Delaware. Clement, I presmne, died youngs jir hv^ Aact -^ o ■ 

AVilliam Hall was appointed, by the AVest Jersey Ifegislatiire, 
a Judge of the Court for Salem county about the year 1709, to 
take the place of Thomas Xillingsworth. It is to be regretted 
tliat a fuller accomit of the last named individual has not been 
written and handed down for the benefit of posterity. Accord- 
ing to the limited accomits we have of him he was, undoubtedly, 
more than an ordinary scholar, for that time, and a man in wdiose 
judgment and integrity the first emigi-ants to this country had 
implicit confidence. He was one of the first Baptists that came 
to this county, and a clergyman of that religious denomination. 
William Hall was Judge as late as 1710, and the ureatest land- 



94: HALL FAMILY, 



holder in tlie county of Salem, owning one hundredth part of 
Fenwick's tenth. His possessions in the town of Salem were 
(considerable ; he owned one lot extending from Broadway street 
to Fenwiok creek, bounded on the south ]:)y Friend's property 
of sixteen acres, deeded to them by Sanmel Nicholson, in 1681 ; 
on the west by Edward Bradway's lot ; also on the opposite 
side of the same street another lot of land, bounded on the west 
by the public fair grounds, on the south and east by Samuel and 
Anne Hedge's land. Certainly he was a self-made man; no 
doubt his natural talents were above the common men. By his 
industry and good judgment he became one of the foremost men 
of the Colony. The time of his death I have no positive means 
to determine; most probably about 1718. I do not remember 
ever having seen an account of him in tlie pul)lic records after 
that time. 

Soon after his death, his widow, Sarah Hall, being his execu- 
tor, sold hirge tracts of land in ^^arious parts of the county 
wliich the records show. His tract of 1,000 acres in upper 
Mannington was left to his oldest son, William Hall, Jr., 
together with the greater part of his real estate in the town of 
Salem. The said William Hall, Jr., on the 20th day of ninth 
month, 1723, married Elizabeth Smith, the grand-daughter of 
Jolm Smith, of Amblebury. They had seven children — 
Clement, their oldest child, was born 15th of 12th month, 1723; 
their daughter, Sarah, in 1727 ; Susan, in 1728 ; Nathaniel, in 
1730; Elizabeth, hi 1735 ; Mary, in 1737 ; and their youngest 
S(Hi, Edward, in 1710. William Hall built himself a large brick 
house about tlie year 1725, on his property in upper Mannington, 
and at tliat place he and his wife lived and spent their days. 
The house still stands, and is owned by Samuel L. J. Miller, one 
of tlieir lineal descendants. There is an ancient family bible of 
Joliu Smith's that he brought with him from England in 1(575. 
It was printed with ancient type in England, in 1631. Persons 
not accustomed to seeing such ancient printing would find it 
dithcult to read it. The book is in a good state of preservation, 
and belongs to one of tlie Hall family at this time. I hope 
some one of the family will prize it sutliciently to preserve it 
for future generations as a momento of ancient times. In one of 
the margins Elizabeth Smith Hall in 1730 wrote : " This day 
John Smith is 106 years old." He was her grandfather. In 
looking over the records of Salem Monthly Meeting, I find that 
he was the son of John Smith, born in the county of Norfolk, 
20th day of 4th month, 1623. The account shows that there 
wore instances of longevity then as well as at the present day. 



HALL FAMILY. 95 



William Hall, Jr., made his will in 1750, in Avliicli lie devises 
jiis real estate in Salem to his eldest son, Clement Hall, and his 
property in Mannington, to his two youngest sons, Xathaiiiel 
and Edward Hall. Clement Hall, the son of William Hall, 
Jr., married Margaret Morris, of Elsinborongh, ajjout the year 
1748. Tliere were seven children — Ann, Sarah, Clement, John, 
Joseph, Morris and Margaret, the last mentioned died when she 
Avas quite young. The oldest daughter married John Goodwin, 
She lived but a short time after her marriage, leaving no child- 
ren. Sarah Hall's husband was Dr. Tliomas Rowen, of Salem. 
They had three children — Sarah Rowen, the late Dr. Thomas 
Rowen, and Elizaljeth Rowen. Sarah married Charles Penrose, 
of Philadelphia. Dr. Rowen's wife was Hetty Sinnickson, the 
daughter of John Sinnickson, of Lower Penn's Neck. They 
are both deceased at this time, leaving no children. Clement 
Hall's wife was Reljecca Kay, a native of Gloucester county. 
Clement and his wife had seven children, named resj^ectively 
Ann^ Margaret, Morris, Prudence, Sarah, Deborah and Rebecca. 
Aim Hall married Samuel Nicholson Thompson. They had 
six children — Samuel, Joshua, Clement, Charles, Isaac and Ann 
Thompson. 

Margaret Hall's husband was John Holme, of Elsinborongh; 
she was his second wife ; there were three children — Benjamin, 
Jane and Caroline. 'Benjamin's wife was Elizabeth Dennis, 
the daughter of Henry Dennis, of Salem. Benjamin is now 
deceased, leaving a widow and six children — Caroline, John, 
Henry, Louisa, Franklin and Jane. Caroline died young. 
Morris Hall married Elizabeth Woodnutt, the daughter of 
James Woodnutt, of Mannington ; there were four children — 
Margaret, Hannah, Rebecca and James Hall. Prudence Hall, 
when far advanced in life, married Joseph Ogden, of Wood- 
bury ; they are both deceased now, leaving no cliildren. Sarah 
Hail died at middle age; she never married. Deborah Hall 
married Samuel D. Ligham, of Pennsylvania, being his second 
wife. Samuel and his wife are both deceased, leaving three 
c;hildren — William, Rebecca and Mary Ingham. Rebec^-a Hall 
married John Sinnickson, the son of Andrew Sinnickson, and 
was his second wife ; they had three children — Howard, Clem- 
ent and Mary Sinnickson. 

John Hall, the second son of Clement and Margaret Hall, 
married and lived in Salem on the property that was left him 
by his father. It M'as purchased by one of the Norris family. 
Joseph Corliss bought the old mansion. The Hall property 
formerly extended to the town meadow. John was a merchant 



96 HALL FAMILY. 



?n i died a young man; wlietlier he left any children I never 
heard. 

Josepli HalFs wife was Ann. Brick, the daughter of Joseph 
and Rebecca Brick, of Elsinborough. Joseph Brick was from 
an ancient and respectable family at Cohansey, the son of John 
and Ann Brick, and was born 24:th of 3d month, 1735 ; soon 
after he was of age he married Rebecca Abbott, the daughter 
of Sanuiel Abbott, of Elsinborough ; they commenced life on 
the farm that her father purchased of Tiiomas and Sarali Good- 
win, in 1756 ; the farm is tlie one that William B. Carpenter 
now owiis and lives on, Josepli and Rebecca Brick had tln-ee 
children — Ann, Hannah, (wlio is tlie wife of Anthony Keasbey, 
of Salem), and one son, Samuel Brick. 

Joseph Hall and liis wife had nine children, named respect- 
ively Samuel, William, Margaret, Rebacca, Martha, Ann, 
Edward, James and Hannah. Samuel married Sarah Ware, 
daughter of Jacub Ware ; he died young and left one son — 
Josepli Hall, wli(^ now resides at or near Dunkirk, in the State 
of New York. William's wife was Hannah Hall, daughter of 
Jarvis Hall, of Mannington ; l)oth are deceased at the present 
time, leaving three or four children. Margaret Hall married 
John Denn, Sr., and the names of her children I mentioned in 
a former number of the Denn genealogy. Rebecca married 
David Ware, of Lower Penn's Keck, son of Jacob Ware ; her 
husband has been deceased many years ; she died recently, 
quite aged ; she possessed good mental abilities, and an uncom- 
mon quiet disposition in all of her trials through life — for she 
had many — and through them all she always manifested a quiet 
an 1 evenness ofdisposition, which endeared her to her immediate 
family and likewise to a large circle of relatives and friends. 
Ann Hall married David Hall, the son of ]V^ orris Hall ; they 
were first cousins ; they soon afterwards removed to the State 
of New York and made it their permanent home. David has 
been deceased for some time. I liave heard his M'idow is still 
living ; they had several children. Martha Hall, their afflicted 
daughter, was born blind and always remained so ; she lived to 
an old age, and died a few years ago. Edward Hairs wife was 
the daughter of David Lloyd, (jf Lower Penn's Neck ; they 
left their native county soon after they were married, and Mere 
for a time at Pittsliurgh, Pa. James Hall was a currier by 
occupation, and resided for some time in the city of Philadel- 
phia. Hannah Hall, their youngest daughter, accompanied her 
sister Ann and husband when they Avent to tlie State of New 
York ; she afterwards became the wife of Judge Orton, of that 



HALL FAMILY. 



97 



State. Joseph Hall, the father of the above named children, 
died in the prime of his life ; he had imcommon physical 
strength, which was characteristic in the Hall family, and he 
was likewise endowed with uncommon natural abilities; his 
death occurred about the time John Wistar died. 

Daniel Garrison, who had been Surrogate for a number of 
years, and w^as considered to be a good judge of the acquire- 
ments of the leading men at that time in the county of Salem, 
was asked which of the two men, John Wistar or Joseph Hall, 
possessed the greatest natural abilities. His reply was, "If 
Joseph Hall had the school education John Wistar possessed, he 
would have been his equal, if not his superior." Joseph's widow 
survived him several years. 

Morris, the youngest son of Clement and Margaret Hall, was 
l)orn in 1762.*^ He learned the wheel wrighting trade, but did 
not follow it when he became of age, but worked as a journey- 
man house carpenter with Jonas Freidland, and while building 
a large dwelling house for that eminent philanthropist, Gal)riel 
Davis, in Bacon's Neck, Greenwich township, they became 
acquainted with two young women — Elizabeth and Lydia Potts, 
daughters of John Potts, who lived in the same township. 
Subsequently Jonas married Elizabeth, and Morris, Lydia Potts. 
The length of time Morris worked at his trade after he was 
married, I have no knowledge of, but not long before he went 
to farming. He and his wife had live children — Clement, David, 
Sarah, John, and Lewis Hall. Clement Hall's wife was Sarah 
Hancock, daughter of Thomas and Mary Hancock, of Elsinboro. 
Their children were mentioned in the Hancock family. David's 
wife was Ann Hall, daughter of Joseph Hall ; they w^ere cousins. 
Sarah Hall married Joseph Bassett, of Mannington. She left 
one son, Morris Bassett. John Hall's wife was Jane Holme, 
daughter of John and Margaret Holme. John's death occurred 
several years ago. His widow resides in Salem. Lewis Hall 
left his native State and located himself, I think, in the western 
part of Pennsylvania, at first. Where he made his permanent 
home, I have never heard. He is now deceased. 

Clement and Margaret Hall, parents of the above mentioned 
children, lived and died in tlie township of Elsinboro, at the 
old residence of Margaret's ancestors, situated near the river 
shore. The property was purchased of Richard Guy l)y Samuel 
Carpenter, of PhiladeljDliia, for a countrj' seat, and built a brick 
house about the year 1690, and in 1694 he sold it to Rudoc 
Morris. The ju'oj^erty is still held l)y one of his descendants. 
Clement Hall, Sr., died about the year 1772. In his will he left 
13 



1)8 HALL FAMILY. 



liis real estate in Salem to Lis son, John Hall, and his danghtcr, 
Sarah. His wife survived him several years, and in 1782 she 
made her will, leaving onedialf of her plantation to her oldest 
son, Clement Hall, and the fishery at Fort Point eqnally between 
Clement and her second son, John Hall. At John Hall's death 
his share of the fishery was sold. Darkin Nicholson, living near 
the month of Salem creek, was the purchaser, and at his death 
the Hall family bought his right. It is evident that the Morris 
and Hall families had full jurisdiction over the fishery along that 
shore for more than one hundred and fifty years, notwithstanding 
the neighboring State of Delaware undertakes to claim to Iom' 
water mark along the Jersey shore. If their claim is good and 
valid now, it was certainly good at that early period, when the 
owners of the soil along the Jersey shore held undisputed pos- 
session of the fisheries, and frequently rented them to persons 
belonging to this and other States; fisheries being all within the 
bounds of the twelve-mile circuit. 

Margaret Hall willed one-half of her plantation to her two 
youngest sons, Joseph and Morris Hall. Joseph subsequently 
sold his share, and purchased part of Middle Neck, of Isaac and 
Nathan Smart — he and his Avife Avere joint owners; it was on 
this property where what is called the Elsinborough grape Avas 
first discovered. The Smart family, very soon after they 
l)Ought the land of Femvick, turned their attention to cultivating 
grapes; they imported several varieties of English grapes. 
Soon after they discovered a grape different entirely from any 
they ever saw growing among their foreign grapes ; they sup- 
posed it was a seedling, and gave it the name of the Smart 
grape. The late Morris Hall informed me that was the tradi- 
tional account of the grape ; he was born in the township and 
his mother before him, and all he ever heard or saw from those 
much older than himself, came to the conclusion it Avas not a 
native of the toAoiship, but it originated in the Smart vineyard, 
on said property ; since their death it has been sold to other 
persons. Morris Hall purchased a farm adjoining his brother's, 
of the administrator of Jolm Hancock, of Hancock's Bridge, 
whose grand-father purchased it of James Thompson. Morris 
and his wife both died there; after Morris' death (for he lived 
many years after his wife was deceased) the farm went to his 
son, John Hall, and his daughter, Sarah Bassett. The home- 
stead is owned at this time by his grand-son, Clement Hall. 

Nathaniel and Edward Hall, as has been previously stated, 
l)ecame the owner of their father's homestead estate in upper 
Manninijton. Edward was the owner of the old family man- 



HALL FAMILY. .99 



si on and a large tract of land adjoining. jSTatliauiers share was 
the western part of the Hall's allotment ; the greater part of 
said land is now owned by Edward H. Bassett. He built him- 
self a commodious brick house about the year 1756, and soon 
afterwards married Ann, the eldest daughter of Judge John 
and Ann Nicholson Brick, of Gravelly Run. He died in 1784, 
aged fifty-four years, leaving five childi-en — "William, born in 
1758 ; Ann in 1760; Elizabeth in 1763 ; John in 1765, and his 
youngest son Josiah in 1767. Josiah was a clock and watch 
maker by trade ; he followed it in the to^^ii of Salem and was 
for several years Clerk of the county of Salem; his wife was 
Elizabeth Smith ; he owned and lived where Joseph Test now 
resides and owns ; he left no children ; his wife survived him 
several years. Nathaniel left his plantation equally between his 
two eldest sons — William and John Hall. William was the 
owner of the homestead ; he married soon after he became of 
age and had ten children — William, Josiah, Hannah, Mary, 
Martha, Nathan, Ann, Achsah, Samuel and Horatio. John 
Hall, when he was far advanced in years, married Phebe 
Edwards, a young woman of Pilesgrove ; she lived but a short 
time after they were married, leaving one son. Soon after tliat 
event he removed to Salem, where lie died, in a few years, with 
a cancer in his face. His son died within a short time after 
his father ; his estate, which was consideral^le, was divided 
among his relatives. 

Elizaljeth, daughter of Nathaniel Hall, married Samuel Nich- 
olson, Jr., the son of the eminent philantliropist, Samuel 
Nicholson, of Elsinborough. They lived on his father's property 
in the township of Mannington. After the death of liis father 
lie became the owner; it now is part of the estate of Joseph 
Stretcli, who lately died. They had five children — Jolm, who 
married a yoimg woman by the name of Beesley; they left one 
daughter — Catharine Nicliolson. Ann married Daniel Smith ; 
Elizabeth died single; Samuel married a woman by the name of 
Paullin; Josiah, their youngest son, married Pacliel Hall, 
daughter of Jarvis Hall. He died many years ago, leaving a 
widow, who is living in Salem at this time, and I believe three 
cliildren, two sons and one daughter. 

Edward Hall, the youngest son of William Hall, Jr., was 
considered above mediocrity in physical and mental al)ilities. 
His affability and pleasing address secured him many friends 
among a large circle of acquaintances. His first wife was a 
Willis, and by her he liad one son — Howell. At the commence- 
ment of tlie Itevolutionary war lie abandoned the religious society 



lOO HALL FAMILY. 



of wliicli he and liis ancestors were members, and enlisted in tlie 
army. There are many anecdotes of his sayings and doings 
wliile he was in the service of his country. I will mention two 
wliic'h are well authenticated hy tradition: The army under 
Colonel Hand was at Cohansey Bridge, which is now Bridgeton. 
Edward, on his way down to join it, met his intimate friend, 
John Reeve, about his own age, who was a public minister, on 
liis way to attend Salem quarterly meeting. After the usual 
salutation, John remarked, "Edward, I notice thee is dressed in 
soldier's clothes." '"I am," replied Hall, after consideration; 
"I came to the conclusion it would be rii>:ht for me to ho-ht for 
my country." John then replied : "If thee tliinks it is right, it 
may be thy duty. I hope God will be with thee. I bid thee 
good-by." They then separated and did not meet again until 
tlie war was ended. Soon after he went to the army he was 
made a Colonel in the West Jersey militia. It was the practice 
in those days among some of the tanners when they had a 
quantity of leather on hand, to take a load down among the 
inhabitants along the sea shore and trade it for raw hides. 
Sanuiel Austin told me of one of his adventures during the war. 
He left his home in Mannington with a load of leatlier, which 
lie had frequently done before, and proceeded to Egg Harbor 
with it. There was at that time several vessels belonging to 
England anchored in the bay, one of them having a quantity of 
boxes of tea aboard. The officer told him he would excliange 
a few Ijoxes of tea for leather. The love of great gain, whicli 
is pi'edominant in the human family, made him yield to the 
temptation. Thinking lie could evade the authorities, he covered 
up tiie tea with some hides he purchased, and started for home. 
Inadvertently he came by tlie way of Bridgeton, wliere the 
American army was quartered, and was soon stopped by some 
of the soldiers to search his load. He declared his innocence, 
but they told him their orders were to search all wagons tliat 
came from the seashore, and began to throw off his hides. At 
that juncture, Colonel Hall came out of the tavern and saw 
Austin, and then told the men to put his load on again, and 
said: "He is a neighbor of mine, and a true patriot." He then 
called Austin in to take a drink with him before he proceeded 
on his journey. Samuel told me it was the first and last time 
he ever undertook to traffic in contraband goods, and always 
felt grateful to Colonel Hall, although lie did it ignorantly, for 
his timely interference, as it prevented him from losing his team 
and load, and likely his life. 

Edward Hall's second wafe was the widow of David Stretch, 



HALL FAMILY. 101 



of Lower Allowaj^s Creek. Soon after lie left liis native home 
in Mannington, and went to reside on the farm that his wife 
had a life-riglit in, being formerly the Christopher White estate, 
near Hancock's Ih'idge. They had two children — Mary and 
Edward Hall, Jr. After her death he returned to the old 
family residence in Mannington, In a few years afterward he 
married his third wife, Ann Darrah, of Philadelphia, the 
daughter of the celebrated Lydia Darrah, who risked her life 
in informing General Washington of the contemplated attack 
of the Englisli army, during the severe winter that the American 
army was at Valley Forge. I need not state the particulars of 
her patriotic adventure. I trust most of the American readers 
have seen the full account of it themselves. His last wife 
survived him many years. I knew her well ; she w^as intelligent 
and interesting conversationist. She lived the latter part of her 
days with her husband's grand-daughter, Hetty Miller. She 
had one brother, Joseph Darrah, who was a captain in the navy. 
His home was at New Castle, Delaware. In 1825 his sister, 
Ann Hall, employed me to take over to his daughter a consid- 
able sum of money. Their father I think was deceased at that 
time. Their residence was located on one of the principal 
streets of the town. Howell Hall, the eldest son of Colonel 
Hall, inherited the family mansion and a large portion of the 
land belonging to it. The balance of the land was divided 
l)etween Mary and Edward. Mary became the owner of the 
greater part of the estate, her two brothers leaving no childi'en. 
Her husband was Samuel L. James. They had six children 
— Clara, James, Hetty, Caroline, Samuel and Edward James. 
Clara was the first wife of David Reeves, of Bridgeton. They 
subsequently removed to Pluenixville, Pennsylvania. Hetty's 
lirst husl)and was Josiali Miller, of Mannington; Caroline 
married Rol)ert Buck, of Bridgeton. Their three sons, James, 
Samuel and Edward emigrated to one of the Western States. 
In all generations there are noble and intellectual women, 
who are cal(;ulated to make their foot-prints upon the sands of 
time. Among such Avas Sarah Clement Hall, of Salem ; slic 
descended from an ancient and respectaljle family, of England ; 
her grand-father, Gregory Clement, was a citizen of London, 
and also a member of Parliament ; Wfis one t)f the Judges in 
the trial of Charles I, King of England. About 1G70 his son 
James, and his wife, Jane Clement, emigrated to this country 
and settled on Long Island ; their children were James, born 
1670, who subsecjuently married Sarah Hinchman ; Sarah 
Clement, born 1072, she married Judge William Hall, slie 



102 HALL FAMILY. 



being liis second wife ; Tliomas, born 16T4 ; John, born 1676 ; 
Jacob, born 1678, married Ann Harrison ; Joseph, born 1681; 
Mercy, born 1683, married Joseph Bates ; Samuel, borii 1685, 
and Nathaniel Clement, born 1687. William and Sarah C. 
Hall had three sons — William, Clement and J^athaniel, who 
are the ancestors of the Halls in the county of Salem. After 
the death of her husband it devolved upon Sarah to settle his 
large estate, and as far as the record appears she did it 
admirably. 

Aaron Learning, tlie ancestor of the large family of that 
name in Cape May, came from Connecticut when about sixteen 
years of age, and lived at Salem for a short period of time ; he 
was poor and friendless, but soon found a friend in Sarah, the 
the wife of William Hall ; he became a member of the Society 
of Friends. Aaron's son, in his account of his father, says 
that Sarah Plall was a lawyer of good ability for those times, 
and had a large collection of books, and being very rich took 
delight in my father on account of his sprightly wit and 
genius, and liis uncommon fondness for the law which he read 
in her library. 



RICHARD JOHNSON FAMILY. 

The ship " Josepli uud Benjamm," Captain Matthew Paine, 
master, anchored at Fort Elsborg, on the 13tli of March, 1675. 
Hypohte Lafetra, John Pledger and his wife, Elizabeth, with 
their son, Joseph Pledger, aged three years, John Butcher and 
Richard Johnson, landed in Elsinborongh. Afterwards the 
ship and other passengers proceeded further up the Delaware. 
Lafetra, a French Hugeunot, left his native country on account 
of religious persecution, having imbibed the doctrinces of 
George Fox, became a zealous Friend, and assisted in organizing 
Salem monthly meetings, in June, 1676. He and John Pledger 
bought of the proprietor, John Fenwick, 6000 acres of land in 
the same year. The land was located in Mannington, including 
what is now known as Quaker Neck, both branches of Fenwick 
creek; its southern boundary was a small stream called Mill 
creek, until it nearly reached AUoways creek. On part of the 
tract on the north of Pledger creek, John Pledger, Jr., erected 
himself a large brick dwelling in 1728, which is still standing, 
and owned by Elisha Bassett. John Pledger, Jr., was born at 
Salem, 27th of 9th month, 1680. Hypolite Lafetra sold his 
share of the 6000 acres to Jeremiah Powell and several others. 
Of the land that lies between the two streams, some 2000 
acres, Benjamin Wyncook, an Englishman, became the owner ; 
whether Lafetra left heirs is unknown at this time, and if he 
did they were daughters, and the name of the emigrant is lost 
in this county. John Butcher, it has been stated, was a cavalry 
ofKcer in Cromwell's army. Like Fenwick, he became convinced 
of the doctrine of George Fox, and eventually became a mem- 
ber of the Society of Friends. His son, Thomas Butcher, 
located a large tract of land in Cohansey precinct, lying between 
the Gibbon's and Wood's land, now in Cuml)erland county, in 
Stoe Creek township. The late James Butcher, of Alloways 
Creek, was a lineal descendant, as was also John Butcher, of 
Salem, and Richard M. Acton's wife, on her mother's side. 
The tirst wife of Willirfm Griscom, of Woodbury, was a 
descendant of one of the oldest branches on the male line, and 
inherited a large share of the Butcher estate. 



104 KICHARD JOHNSON FAMILY. 



Ricliard Jolmson was a young man of marked ability and 
rendered great assistance to the proprietor ; he came from the 
county of Surry, England, and married Mary Grover, 25th 
of 6th month, 1682, at Salem. The following named persons 
signed their marriage certificate : James iTevell, his wife, 
Creseda Nevell, John Wilkenson, Cecilia Morgan, Ellen Rob- 
inson, Margaret Haselwood, Thomas Jolmson, cousin of Kichard, 
George Haselwood, John Maddox and Henry Jennings. Kich- 
ard was one of the Burgesses of the town of Salem after it was 
incorporated as a borough in 1693, and was one of the Judges 
of the Salem Courts and a Justice of the Quarter Sessions, as 
also an influential member of the Salem monthly meeting of 
Friends, and took an active part in building the flrst brick 
meeting house in their ancient graveyard in 1699, wliicli was 
completed in 1700 ; lie paid fifteen pounds towards its erection. 
There was a subscription for the purpose of aiding poor Friends, 
in 1697, that belonged to Salem meeting, for which he gave 
twelve shillings; his place of residence was on Fen wick street 
where Rumsey's stores are now, the dwelling being built of 
brick with a hip or mansard roof. William Parrott purchased 
tlie property in 1788 or '90. William soon after removed the 
ancient dwelling and erected in its stead a large substantial two 
story brick dwelling, one of the first private dwellings in the 
city. In the year 1707, when men were chosen for their worth 
and ability, Richard Johnson, William Hall, Bartholomew Wyatt, 
Sr., and John Thompson, were elected to represent the Salem 
tenth in the State Legislature of New Jersey, which held its 
sessions at South Amboy and Burlington alternately. Richard 
was a large landholder in the town of Salem and other parts of 
the county; he owned five hundred acres of land on the south 
side of Alloways creek. Thomas Jones Yorke, of Salem, 
Samuel Kelty and the Hires' are the owners of the greater part 
of it at this time. Richard and Mary Grover Jolmson had 
three children — Robert, Elizabeth and Ann. Richard Johnson 
died 1st month, 1719, aged seventy years ; his wife, Mary G. 
Johnson, died in 1714 ; they were buried in the Friends' grave- 
yard at Salem. Robert Johnson, their son, married Margaret, 
tlie widow of Joseph Sayres, in 1717 ; they had three children 
— Roljei-t, Mary and Ann ; he died 13th of 12th month, 1728, 
aged thirty-four years ; his widow, Margaret Johnson, died in 
1730, aged thirty-seven years. Elizabeth, the daughter of 
Richard and Mary Johnson, married John Pierson, being his 
second wife ; he was the father of John Pierson, pastor of St. 
John's Episcopal church, in Salem, by his first wife. Elizabeth 



KICHARD JOHNSOISr FAMILY. lO 



Johnson Pierson died 5th of 5th month, 1720, leavmg one 
daiigliter — Ehzabetli Pierson. 

Anna Johnson, tlie danghter of Richard and Mary CI. John- 
son, born 1687, married Alexander Grant, of Salem, in 1714, 
who arrived from England a few years before ; his place of 
residence was located on the w^est side of Market street, then 
known as Bridge street ; the ancient house is still standing and 
is o\\'ned by Anna G. Hnbljell, one of his lineal descendants. 
Alexander and his wife, Anna Johnson Grant, had two chil- 
dren — Anna and Barbara Grant, the latter died single. Anna 
Grant, the eldest danghter, married Samuel Fen^dck Hedge, 
the great grand-son of John Fenwick, and soon after their 
marriage removed to Greenwich. Samuel F. Hedge and Nich- 
olas Gibbon were in tlie mercantile business together at that 
place. Samuel and his wife, Anna G. Fenwick, had three 
children — Samuel, Rebecca and another daughter, who died in 
infancy. Samuel F. Hedge died in 1731, making his will a 
short time previous, in which he devised a large landed estate 
to his widow, Anna G. Fen^\dck ; she afterwards married 
Nicholos Gibbon, \sdio was a partner in the mercantile l.)usiness 
with her first husband. Nicholas and Anna G. Gibbon had 
hve children — Nicholas, Grant, Jane, Ann and Franci'?. Jane 
became the wife of Robert Johnson, Jr., which I shall allude 
to more fully in another place. Ann married Judge Edward 
Weatherby, by whom she had one son, who died young. 
Robert Johnson, Jr., whose father died when he was young, 
lived sometime with his uncle, John Pledger, Jr., in Manning- 
ton, to learn the farming business ; he married Margaret Mor- 
gan, of Chester county, now Delaware. (The romance respecting 
tlie marriage alluded to in the Sinnickson family genealogy.) 
Her parents were consistent members of the Society of Friends 
and she lierself always adhered to the same religious society. 
The Morgans, Brintons, Palmers and Wades were among the 
first Quaker families who emigrated and settled in the province 
of Pennsylvania ; they trace their ancestors to the time that 
William Penn landed at Chester in 1682, excepting Rol)ert 
Wade, who emigrated with his brother Edward and Sanuiel 
Wade in company with John Fenwick. Robert purchased 
lands of the proprietor in the Salem tenth, but soon afterwards 
sold the said lands and removed to Upland, now Chester, in 
1678, and bought 500 acres of land on the soutli side of Chester 
creek. Robert Johnson, Jr., and Margaret Morgan were mar- 
ried 18th of 12th month, 1752, at Marcus Hook; she died 
young, at the age of twenty-three years and seven months, Icav- 
14 ^ 



106 KICHARD JOHNSON FAMILY. 



iiig one child — Margaret Jolmson, born 2cl of Stli month, 1750. 
I think Maroi;aret Mori-'an Johnson always retained her riii'ht 
among Friends, her hnsband, therefore, had her l)uried in the 
Friends' ancient gra^'eyard in Salem, and directed a small nuir- 
l)le stone to be placed at the head of her grave ^vith her name 
upon it, it being the lirst of the kind that was ever used in the 
yard. I have no doubt he was actuated by the noblest motives 
to mark the spot where the object of his iirst love lay moulder- 
ing in the mother earth. Margaret, their daughter, sul)sequently 
married Andrew Sinnickson, of Penn's jNfeck, 26th of 5th 
month, 1779, the son of Andrew Sniaker, of tlie same town- 
ship. Andrew and Margaret I. Sinnickson had one daughter, 
Mary, and two sons — Thomas and John. Margaret Jolmson 
Siimickson died 4:th of lltli month, 1792, aged tliirty-six years 
and three months ; was 1)uried in the Swedes church yard at 
Penn's Neck. Robert Johnson, Jr.'s second wife was Jane 
Gibbon, daughter of Mcholas and Ann Gibbon; they were 
married 3d of 11th month, 1767, and had one son— Robert 
Gibbon Jolmson, born 23d of 7th month, 1771. Robert Jolm- 
son, Jr., died 28th of 12th month, 1796, aged sixty-nine years; 
his widow, Jane Gibbon Jolmson, died 16th of 8tli month, 
1815, aged seventy-nine years and three months. Mary, the 
daughter of Robert Jolmson, Sr. and Margaret Sayre Johnson, 
married John Pledger, of Mannington; they had issue, one 
son and a daughter. Joseph Pledger, their son, after he arri\'ed 
at tlie age of twenty-one left his native county and settled in 
Korth Carolina. Catharine Pledger, their daughter, married 
John Ewing. Ann, the youngest daughter of Robert and 
Margaret Sayre Johnson, was married three times ; lier first 
husband's name was Hale, it does not appear tliere was any 
cliildren by this marriage ; her second husband "was named 
Scoggin, I think, a l)rother to Jacob Scoggin, who married tlie 
daughter of William Tyler, od; they had one daughter, Avho 
subsequently married a man by the name of Smith, and had 
issue, one son — Scoggin Smith. Ann Johnson's third husband 
was John Beesley, and tliey lived on and owned the projxM-ty 
that her grand-father, Ricluvrd Jolmson, bought of the projH'ie- 
tor,located on the south side of Alloways creek, not far from 
Quinton's Bridge ; they had one son whose name was Jolmson 
Beesley, Ann survived all three of her husbands, and in her 
old age she went under the name of Nanny Beesley, and Avas 
considered very skillful in curing many diseases with herbs ; 
her son, Jolmson ]jeesley, nuirried and had one daughter, who 
subsequently married Jolm, the eldest son of Samuel Nicholson, 



EICIIAKD JOHNSON FAMILY. lOT 



of Maunino-toii. John Nicholson and liis wife had one dano-hter 
— Catliarine, who married Job Stretch, the son of Elisha and 
Sarah Brad way Stretch, of Allowajs Creek; Job and Catharine 
Stretch had two or three children. Marj, one of their daughters, 
married John P. Moore, a native of Cumberland, but now a 
resident of the city of Salem, and keeps a hardware store on 
Market street. 

Nicholas and Leonard Gibbon were the sons of Arthur and 
Jane Gil^lion, of Gravesend, county of Kent, England. — 
Arthur became possessed of 5,500 acres of land in Cohansey 
precinct, now Cumberland county, lying in Greenwich and 
Hopewell townships. A few years after, Nicholas married Ann 
G., the widow of Samuel Fenwick Hedge, and they left Green- 
wich and moved to Salem. He continued in the mercantile 
business in that town, was Collector of the Port, and Surrogate 
of the county of Salem, as also Colonel, and had command of 
all the militia in the low^er counties. The place of their 
residence was on Market street, in the house devised to his wife 
l)y lier father, Alexander Grant. Nicholas died 2d of 2d month, 
1758, aged hfty-five years and three months. His wife, Ann 
G. Gibbon, died 24:tli of 3d month, 1760, aged fifty-seven 
years. Their eldest son. Nicholas, born 5th of 11th month^ 
1732, and died 7th of 1st month, 1748, aged sixteen years. 
Grant Gibbon, the second son, Ijorn 28th of 11th month, 1734, 
was engaged in the mercantile business ; was Surrogate of the 
county, and Judge and Justice, and Collector of the Port of 
Salem after his father's deatli. He was a man of culture and 
very prepossessing in his mannei's, which made him very popular 
with tiie people. He was a warm j^atiiot, and a sympathizer in 
all tlic measures of the American Revolution. On tlic 13th of 
loth moiitli, 1781, a meeting was held in the county of Salem, 
in wjdch tJie inhabitants unanimously proffered their sympathy 
to their fellow citizens in Boston suffering under the oppression 
of General Gage. At that meeting they proposed raising 
inoney to alleviate the distressed condition of the people of 
t'lat city, and it was resolved that Grant Gibbon, one in wliom 
the pulilic had entii'e confidence in his integrity and patriotism, 
take tlie l)urthen and trouble in soliciting money fer their relief 
from the people. He cheerfully undertook this task, and collect- 
ed the sum of £157 3s 2d, whicli vras speedily forwarded to 
the Siitfei-ing poor in Boston. Grant Gibbon died comparatively 
a young man, which event occurred 27th of ()th month, 1770, 
aged forty-one years, being about seven daj's before the Decla- 
ration of Independance was signed in Philadelphia. Jane 



108 RICHARD JOHNSON FAMUA'. 



Gil)l)on, his eldest sister, born 15tli of 5tli month, 17;J8, married 
llohert Johnson, Jr.; Ann, the dunghter of Nicliolas and Ann 
Gibbon, was born 29th of 4th month, 1741 ; and Francis, the 
youngest son of Nichohis and Ann Gibbon, was born 14th of 
5th month, 1744, and died lltli of 1st month, 1788, aged 
forty-tln-ec years. 

TJiomas Carney, born in Irehmd in 1709, emigrated to this 
country early in life, and subsequently married Hannah, the 
daughter of John Procter, of Penn's I^eck. He was a large 
laudliolder. His lands were located along the Delaware river, 
and extended easterly to Game creek. Thomas, the son of 
Thomas and Hannah Carney, was born in 1740. Peter Carney, 
their second son, was born in 1742. James, the third son, was 
born in 1748, and died in the 1st month, 1776, aged about 
twenty-eight years. John, the fourth son, was born in 1760, 
and died in 1774, aged about fourteen years. Sarah Carney, 
tlieir daughter, married George Clark. Naomi, the second 
daughter of Thomas and Hannah Carney, married John Sum- 
merill, of Penn's Neck. Mary Carney, the youngest daughter, 
was thrice married ; her iirst husband was Henry James, by 
whom she had one son — Henry ; lier second husband was John 
Page ; and her third, Joseph Stout. Thomas Carney, the 
father of the above mentioned children, died in the 5th month, 
1784, aged seventy-live years ; and his amiable wife departed 
this life in 2d month, 1778, aged about sixty-three years. They 
were buried in the old Episcopal churcli yard at Church Landing 
in Penn's Neck, and several of their children lie mouldering 
tliere in their mother earth. When quite young, I heard several 
aged people sj)eak of the Ijenevolence of Hannah Carney. By 
tradition, she was in the practice of getting her husband to 
slaughter a fattening bullock occasionally in the winter. Then 
slie, with a boy to drive for her, with a pair of oxen and a cart 
tilled with meat and Hour, (there were no spring wagons in Salem 
tentli in those days,) she would go into the woods of Obisqua- 
hasset among the poor and laboring classes wlio lived in small 
log dwellings, and there on a cold Nortli American winter day, 
she would dispense to them both flour and meat according to 
their necessities. And above all, she was enabled, by the 
Ivindness of her manners and expressions, to encourage the 
despondent and administer by kind words to the sicik and 
altticted among them. Surely she had her reward, when she 
returned to her home in the evening, of feeling in lier own 
mind that slie had endeavored to do something to alleviate tlic 
suffering of lier fellow beings. On reflecting upon tlie character 



RICHARD JOHNSON FAMILY. 109 



of Hannah Carney, tlie sayings of David, the sweet psahner of 
Israel, arrested my attention : " Blessed are those that consid- 
" eretli the poor, for the Lord will deliver them in time of 
" trouljle." Peter, the second son of Thomas and Hannah 
Carney, married the daughter of Jonathan Rol)erts, of Man- 
nington ; they had issue, two daughters — Elizabeth and 
Margaret Carney. Elizaljeth died single, and Margaret married 
John Tuft. They liad one son — Sinnickson Tuft, who died 
single, in his twenty-second year. Thomas Carney, Jr., the 
oldest son of Thomas and Hannah Carney, married Mary, 
daugliter of Abel Harris ; they had three children — Ruth, 
Harris and Hannah Carney. Ruth was born in the 5th montli, 
1773, and married Benjamin, son of Whitten Cripps, of Man- 
nington. Whitten Cripps descended from an ancient family on 
liis father's and mother's sides. He married Martha Huddy, in 
1759, which took place in the Friends' meeting house that 
stood in the grave yard at Salem. There were two children — 
Mary, who married Peter Andrews, and Benjamin Cripps. 
Whitten took his name from his grandfather, James Whitten, 
who located on the fai-ni in Maimington, long known as the 
" John Denn Farm." Benjamin and Ruth Carney Cripps had 
one son — Thomas Carney Cripps, who died aged about tweh'e 
years. Ruth Carney Cripps, wife of Benjamin, died 17tli of 
2(1 month, 1791, aged twenty-one years. Harris Carney, son of 
Thomas and Mary Carney, died young. 

Al)el Harris, the father of Mary Carney, died in 17S9. He 
made his will in 1779, and devised £100 to tlie Episcopal 
church in Pemi's Neck, and also the interest of £ir>0 to tlie 
township of Alloways Creek, for the scliooling of chihh-en. 

Hannah, tlie youngest daughter of Thomas and Mary 11. 
Carney, was born 27th of 7th month, 1780 ; she married 
Robert Gibl)on Jolmson, on tlie 19th of 6th month, 1798. 
Robert and his wife had four children — Jane Gibbon Jolmson, 
born in 1800 ; she died young. Mary Jane Johnson, their 
second daughter, born in 1805, died in infancy. Ann Gibbon 
Johnson, their third daughter, married Ferdinand AV. Hubbell, 
Esq., of Philadelphia, a lawyer of (considerable eminence of 
that city; he has been deceased several years. They had four 
children — Robert Johnson, Ann L. Johnson, and Helena. 
Robert Carney Johnson, the son of Robert Gibbon and Hannah 
Johnson, married Julia Harrison, the daughter of the late 
Josiah Harrison, Es(i., of Salem. Robert C. lives and owns the 
pahitial dwelling where his father formerl}" lived, on Market 
street, in Salem. Robert and his wife had two children — 



110 RICHARD JOHNSON FAMILY. 



Hobert Harrison, wlio died in infancy, and Henry Johnson. 
Hannah Carney Johnson died wlien her son, Robert, was an 
infant. Robert Gibbon Johnson's second wife was Juliana 
Elizabeth, danghter of Paul and Esther Zantzinger, of Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania. They were married in 1813; she died 
in 1851, aged seventy-three years. There was no issue. Robert 
Gibbon Johnson and his wife, Hannah Carney Johnson, had 
the largest and most valualjle real estate of modern tunes, in 
Salem county. Robert inherited a large estate from his ances- 
tors, and his wife became the owner of the great and valuable 
estate of Thomas Carney, consisting of several farms, most of 
tliem located in Upper Penn's iSTeck, Robert, like his uncle. 
Grant Gibbon, was pleasing in his address; held in his time 
several important offices, was a member of the State Legislature 
two or three times, and was one of tlie Judges of Salem Courts 
for several years. In his old age he wrote a history of Salem 
county, whicli was published in 1839; it is often referred to at 
the present time. He at one time informed me that he intended 
writing and giving a more general history of the settlement of 
this Colony ; but death intervened before he had an opportunity 
to accomplisli it. He died 3d of 10th montli, 1850, aged 
seventv-nine vears. 



joins' JOHNSON FAMILY. 

The name of Jolin.son lias Ijeen familiar in the comity of 
Salem since the lirst riettlemout bj the Europeans. The Swedish 
family by the name of Jonanson, located on the eastern shore of 
the Delaware, now Penn's Neck, in 1640, but was soon merged 
to Johnson. The first English einigrant that bore the name was 
Richard and his cousin, Thomas Johnson, who came and located 
in Fenwick's tenth a few months before the proprietor. John 
Johnson, who was not any way connected, as far as appears, to 
the before mentioned, emigrated with his wife, Jane Suayberry 
Johnson, to Salem county from Ireland, about 1756. John had 
considerable means at his disposal, and he located a large tract 
of land in the township of Pilesgrove, now Pittsgrove, and 
settled thereon. John and his wife had eight children — James, 
John, Rebecca, Samuel, Phebe,William, Mary and Isaac. John, 
the father of these children, departed this life the 31st of 3d 
month, 1803, aged seventy-one years. His widow, Jane S. 
Johnson, died 28th of 6tli month, 1825, aged ninety-two years 
and eight months. 

James, the eldest son of John and Jane Johnson, was born 
31st of 10th month, 1757. Soon after the Avar of the American 
Revolution commenced, he entered the Colonial army, and was 
at the battle of Red Bank. He married Christiana Swing, of 
Pittsgrove, 28th of 2d month, 1781. The year that James 
rented the large and pi'oductive farm in Mannington, that for- 
merly belonged to Bartholomew Wyatt, 3d, of William Carpen- 
ter, son-in-law of Wyatt, I have no means of ascertaining. He 
continued to reside on the Wyatt farm until the Spring o^f 1809, 
when having previously purchased ^'aluable real estate in Lower 
Penn's Neck, located a short distance from tlie town of Salem. 
James with his family settled there in the year mentioned. James 
and Christiana had sixteen children; six of them died young, 
and his wife, Christiana, died 19th of 3d month, 1825, aged sixty 
years and four months. James died 9th of 2d month, 1837, in 
his eightietli year. He, in his time, possessed pliysical and 
mental alnlities above the average of mankind, and also unconi- 



112 JOHN JOHNSON FAMILY. 



mon energy, conil)ined with a sound and comprehensive mind, 
lie was one of the most successful agriculturists in the county 
of Salem in his day. Although it appears his parents were 
members of the Presbyterian Church, he was himself a deacon 
and a consistent member of the Baptist Church of Salem up to 
the time of his death. 

Ruth, daugliter of James and Christiana Johuson, was born 
1st of 12th month, 1781 ; slie married John Redstrake, in 
1807, and tliey had six children — Mary, Ann, James J., 
Edward, Jane, Ruth and Isabella. Mary Ann married William, 
son of William Hall, of Mannington ; they had issue. James 
Johnson, son of John and Rutli Redstrake, has l)een twice 
married, his first wife was the daughter of Edmund Gibbon, of 
Penn's Necic ; she died young, leaving no issue ; his second 
wife was named Brown, a native of Greenwich, Cumber- 
land county. Edward, the second son of Jolui and Ruth Red- 
strake, married a person by the name of Stout, and his children 
are Mary Jane and John. John, son of Edward, married 
Elizaljeth, daughter of Micliael Allen. Jane, daughter of John 
and Jane Redstrealv, married Tliomas Gibbon ; they liave 
issue, one son — Thomas Gibbon, Jr. Ruth, tlie daughter of 
John and Ruth J. Redstrake, married a man by the name of 
Jefferson, of Delaware; they had issue, two sons. Isabella 
Redstrake married a person by the name of Murphy ; they 
have issue. Sarali, daughter of James and Christiana John- 
son, was born lltli of 6th month, 1783, married Jonathan, son 
of Jolm Lindzey, of Upper Alloways Creek, in 1803 ; they 
had issue — William, Ruth, John, Mary and James. William 
went to one of the Southern States, Jolm married Ilannali, 
the daughter of James and Hannali Butcher, of Alloways 
Creek. Jolm is deceased, leaving four children — James, 
Charles, John and Sarah Lindzey. Mary, the daughter of 
Jonathan and Sarah Lindsey, married Lawrence Hoover Boon, 
of Salem ; tliey have two daughters — Sarali and Maria Jose- 
phine. Josephine married Alljert II. Slape, a lawyer and 
Prosecutor of the Pleas for Salem and Atlantic counties. 
William, son of James and Christiana Johnson, was born 12th 
of lOtli month, 1788, married in 1810, Margaret Laml)sou, a 
direct descendant of Thomas Lambson, who emigrated from 
England, and located land and settled thereon in 1690, in the 
township of Penn's Neck. William and Margaret Johnson 
liad thirteen children — Isabella, Rebecca, Christiana, Mary 
Jane, James S., William, Ephraim, Edward, John, Margaret, 
Robert, Eerdinand and Charles. Isabella, daughter of William 



JOHN JOHNSON FAMILY. 113 



unci Margaret Jolmson, married William Meveling, of Mary- 
land ; they have issue. Rebecca, the daughter of William and 
Margaret Johnson, married Thomas, son of Dr. Hedge and 
Mary Ann Thompson, of Salem. Thomas is deceased, leaving 
a widow and two children — Hedge and Isabella P. Thompson. 
Hedge married Achsah, daughter of Isaac and Achsah Hall 
Peterson, of Salem ; his ^^^fe is deceased, leaving no issue. 
Rebecca Johnson Thompson, Avidow of Thomas, resides with 
her son in the State of Maryland. Isabella Thompson, their 
daughter, married Charles Watson, of Philadelphia; she died 
without issue. 

Christiana, daughter of William Johnson, married George 
Kelton, and reside near Haddonfield, Camden county ; they have 
six children. James S., son of William and Margaret Jolmson, 
resides in Penn's Neck, on the homestead of his father. He 
married Sarah, daughter of John and Hannah Lindzey, 11th of 
10th month, 1854; they have issue, three sons. William, 
Ephraim, Edward, and John Jolmson, sons of William and 
Margaret, are deceased. Margaret, daughter of William and 
Margaret Johnsofi, married James, son of John and Lydia 
Flanagan, late of Philadelphia. James and his wife are living 
in Philadelphia, and have issue. — Mary and William. Charles 
and Rol;)ert Jolmson, sons of William, remain single. Abraham, 
son of James and Christiana Johnson, born 19tli of 7th month, 
1792, married Mary Conaroe, of Salem. They moved to the 
western part of New York, and both are deceased ; they died in 
Buffalo, and left two daughters. Mary, daughter of James and 
Christiana Johnson, born 23d of 5th month, 1790, married 
Joseph Dennis, in 1810; he was a bricklayer by trade, and a 
native of Greenwich, Cuml^erland county. They moved to the 
State of New York, and both are deceased, leaving four children. 
One of their daughters married Dr. Smith, of Chicago, Illinois. 
Rebecca, daughter of James and Christiana Jolmson, born 8th 
of 10th month, 1794, married Edward, son of Henry Mulford, 
of Lower Alloways Creek ; they moved and settled near Fredonia, 
New York; from thence they moved and settled near Chicago, 
Illinois; Rebecca is deceased, leaving three children — James, 
Edward, and Anna Mulford. James and Edward married, and 
are deceased; they left issue. Anna, their sister, is married, 
but has no issue. Edward Mulford, Sr., is living, at an advanced 
age, near the city of Chicago, and possesses a princely fortune. 
John, the son of James and Christiana Johnson, born 14th of 
2d month, 1796, followed the sea in early life, was the captain 
of theship Josephine, trading from Philadelpliiji to New Orleans 
15 



114 JOHN JOHNSON FAMILY. 



for a number of years. When lie was past middle age lie left 
the seas and settled on the farm that his father left to him in 
Fenn's ISTeck. His wife was Elizabeth, daughter of John M. 
and Ann Sinnickson, of Salem ; they had issue, one son. John 
and his wife, and their minor son, are deceased. Ann, daughter 
of James and Christiana Johnson, was born Ttli of 7tli month, 
1802; married Jonathan, son of John Mulford, of Alloways 
Creek, in 1826 ; they have five children, named Christiana, 
Amanda, James, John, and Anna Mulford. Christiana, their 
oldest daughter, is married, and resides in Boston, Massachusetts. 
Lydia, daughter of James Johnson, born in 1801, married James 
M. Challis, a Baptist clergyman, in 1823 ; she is deceased, leaving 
live children — Joseph, William, Luther L., George, and Emma 
Challis. Joseph, son of James and Lydia Challis, is married, 
and lives at Frankford, Fa.; has issue. William Challis is a 
])hysician, is married, and has issue. George, son of James and 
Lydia Challis, is married, and has children. Emma, daughter 
of James and Lydia Challis, married Richard Frobasco; they 
are living in Talbot county, Maryland. Luther, William, and 
George Challis are among the first inhabitants of the city of 
Atchison, Kansas, and all three! are reputed to be very wealthy. 
Rachel, daughter of James and Christiana Johnson, born 21st 
of Itli month, 1805, married Josiah Hall in 1821; they moved 
to Cecil county, Maryland, and had two children — James and 
Christiana Hall. Josiah and his wife, Rachel J. Hall, are 
deceased, leaving a large and valuable estate. 

John, son of John and Jane Johnson, of Fittsgrove, born 
1st of 10th month, 1759, married Elizabeth, daughter of Corne- 
lius Dubois, in 1783; they had twelve cliildren. Cornelius 
Johnson, their eldest son, born 12tli of 6tli month, 1781, married 
Elizabeth Yick. John, son of John and Elizabeth D. Johnson, 
])orn 7tli of 1th month, 1788, married Rebecca Jones. Jane, 
daughter of John Elizabeth Johnson, born 13th of 3d month, 
1690, married Robert, son of Samuel Dubois. Ann, daughter 
of John and Elizabeth Johnson, born 5th of 5th month, 1792, 
nvxcY married. David, son of John Johnson, born 8th of 5th 
mouth, 1795, married Hannah, daughter of David Dickinson. 
Benjamin, son of John and Elizal)etli Johnson, born lltli of Itli 
montli, 1799, married Maria, daughter of AVilliain Mayliew. 
Robert, son of John Johnson, born 28th of Itli month, 1801, 
remains unmarried. Elizabeth, daughter of John and Elizabeth 
Johnson, born 2d of Itli month, 1807, married Enoch, son of 
David Mayliew. Three of John and Elizabeth Dubois Johnson's 
children died young. Cornelius, John's eldest son, and Elizabeth 



JOHN JOHNSON FAMILY. 115 



Yick, ]iis wife, had six children. Cornelius, the eldest, died a 
young man. Margaret, the daughter, married, but her husl^and's 
name is not mentioned. James Johnson, anotlier son, is not 
married. William married Ann, the daughter of Jacob Hitch- 
ner. John and Rebecca Johnson had three children — Caroline, 
Ruth Ann, and Hiram Johnson. Ruth Ann Johnson married 
Cobert Iredell ; they had issue. Hiram Johnson married Sarah 
Nixon, daughter of Martia Nixon. Robert Dubois and Jane 
Johnson, daughter of John, had twelve children — Mary Ann, 
Ruth, Alfred, Susan, Elizal)etli, Belinda, John, Frank, Charles, 
Enoch, Elnia, and Amy. Susan, daughter of Robert Dubois, 
married Albert Leurz; they had issue. Elizabeth Dubois mar- 
ried Benjamin Lamb; they had children. Belinda Dubois 
married Frederick Fox ; they have issue. Frank Dul)ois married, 
his wife's name not known; they had children. Charles Dubois 
married; they had issue. David Johnson, son of John and 
Elizabeth Dubois Johnson, married Hannah Dickinson ; had five 
cliildren; their names are Emeline, Edward, Mirah, John, and 
Elizabeth Johnson. Emeline, the eldest, married John Venal; 
they had issue. Edward married Rhoda S. E. Taylor; they 
have children. Mirah married John, son of Isaac Mayliew; 
tliey had issue. John, son of David Jolinson, married Sarah 
Campbell; they have issue. Elizabeth Ann Johnson married 
Alfred Rice ; they had issue. Rebecca, daughter of John and 
Jane Johnson, was twice married; her first husband was Benja- 
min Harding; he died, leaving no issue. Her second husband 
was Hugli Maguire; they had three children — Ann, Jane, and 
Alinda Maguire. Jane Maguire married Isaac Wood ; she is 
deceased, leaving no children. Ann Maguire married a person 
by the name of Cripps; he died, leaving no issue. Alinda 
Maguire is still living, unmarried. Phebe, daughter of John 
and Jane Johnson, married John Stewart ; they moved in the 
State of Delaware ; they are both deceased, leaving issue. Mary 
Johnson, daughter of John and Jane, married Samuel Elwell; 
they moved to the State of Indiana in 1817; tliey had three 
cliildren — Isaac, Elizal)eth, and Rel)ecca; all are deceased, 
leaving issue. 

William, the son of John and Jane Johnson, married Eliza- 
beth Maguire ; they had two children — Hugh and Lucretia ; 
they left tlieir native State, and moved to the State of New 
York. Samuel, the son of John and Jane Jolnison, was twice 
married ; Ids first wife was Nancy McClung, by wliom he liad 
five children — Isaac, Samuel, Elizabeth, Mary and one who 
(bed 3'oung ; liis second M'ife was Sarah Martin, by wliom he 



116 JOHN JOHNSON FAMILY. 



had eight children — Nancy, Sarali Ann, Samuel, Josiah, Char- 
lotte, Ruth, George and Martha. Isaac, son of Samuel and 
Nancy Johnson, was horn 20th of 7th month, 17S7, and mar- 
ried Catharine, daughter of Eleazar Mayliew; she was horn 
lOtli of 7th month, 1789. Eleazar Mayhew was a land sur- 
veyor and conveyancer, and had six sons and one daughter — 
Catharine, John, Stanford, William, Eleazar, Isaac and Elaw 
Mayhew. The latter was a physician. Eleazar's family are all 
deceased at the present time; they all married excepting Elea- 
zar Mayhew, Jr., and left issue ; he himself was a large land 
Jiolder at the time of his death. Isaac and Catharine Mayhew 
Johnson had seven children, namely — John, Kebecca, Sallie, 
Harrison, Nancy, Samuel and Doctor Mayhew, Catharine, 
wife of Isaac Johnson, departed this life SOtli of 4:th montli, 
1858, aged about sixty-nine years. Isaac is still living in his 
eighty-uintli year, and enjoys excellent health, both physical and 
mental, for one of his age ; he has been an uncommon active 
man, and has done a large amount of public business, having 
been Sheriff of Salem county a number of years ago. 

John, the son of Isaac and Catharine Johnson, left his 
native country and went to Indiana and there settled, and mar- 
ried Mary Ann Shuster; they have seven children. Rebecca, 
daughter of Isaac and Catharine M. Johnson, married Garrett 
Frickett ; they have six children. Sallie, daughter of Isaac 
and Catharine M. Johnson, married Edmund Dubois ; they 
have twelve children. Harrison, son of Isaac and Catharine 
M. Johnson, married Emma, daughter of Moses Richman, 
Esq. ; they had seven children, five of whom are still living. 
Nancy, daughter of Isaac and Catliarine M. Jolmson, married 
Isaac Newkirk ; they had six children, three of whom are 
deceased. Samuel, son of Isaac and Catharine M. Johnson, 
married Susan Hitchner ; they had nine children, eight of them 
are still living. Mayliew Johnson, M. D., the youngest son of 
Isaac and Catharine M. Jolmson, lias been twice married; his 
first wife was Isabella Tyngle, l)y whom he had tln-ee children ; 
]iis second wife was Lizzie Norton, by whom he has three chil- 
dren. Mayhew Johnson, M. D., resides witli his family at 
Ponnsgrove, in which section of the county ho lias {piite an 
extensive medical practice. 

Sarah Ann, eldest daughter of Sanniel Jolmson by his 
second wife of Sarah Martin Jolmson, married a person by the 
name of Reynolds ; they had issue. Samuel and Isaiah, sons 
of Samuel and Sarah M. Johnson, are both deceased leaving 
no issue. Charlotte, daughter of Samuel and Sarah M. John- 



JOHN JOHNSON FAMILY. IIT 



son, married Henry Carroll ; tliej had issue. Ruth, dang] iter 
of Samuel and Sarah M. Johnson, married a person by the 
name of Taylor ; they had children. George, son of Samuel 
and Sarah M. Johnson, left Salem county and settled in the 
State of Georgia. Martha, the youngest daughter of Samuel 
and Sarah M. Johnson, is still living, but never married. 

Isaac, the youngest son of John and Jane Jolmson, born 21st 
of 7th month, 1772, married Mary Elwell, born 23d of 5th 
month, 1778; they were married 24th of 6th month, 1795, 
and had twelve children, named Harriet, Elizabeth, Isaac, 
Amelia, Mary, Sarah, John, Samuel, Emma Ann, William, 
Benjamin F., and James. Isaac Jolmson, the father of the 
before mentioned children, died 5tli of 1st month, 1852, aged 
about eighty years. His widow departed this life 18th of 9th 
month, 1862, aged eighty-four years, three months and twenty- 
six days. Harriet, daughter of Isaac and Mary Jolmson, l)orn 
3d of 10th month, 1796, married William Newkirk. Their 
children were Mary, Isaac J., and Redma. Elizabeth, daughter 
of Isaac and Mary Johnson, born 18th of 4th month, 1798, 
married Isaac Abbott ; they had issue — Martha and Mary. 
Elizal)eth, their mother, died in 1871. Isaac, son of Isaac 
and Mary Johnson, born 1st of lOtli month, 1799, married 
Rachel Dubois ; they had twelve children — Rebecca, Josepli, 
Thomas, Isaac, Elizabeth, Hester, Adaline, Christiana, Mary, 
Martha, Matilda and Emma. Their father, Isaac Johnson, 
departed tliis life 1st of 10th month, 1874, Amelia, daugliter 
of Isaac and Mary Johnson, born 26th of lOtli month, 1801, 
married Daniel Clark ; they iiad seven children — David, Mary 
Jane, Harriet, Amelia, Isaac J., Charles and Daniel. Mary, 
daughter of Isaac and Mary Johnson, born 15th of 3d month, 
1804, married Samuel Dubois ; they had seven children — 
Rebecca, Adaline, Louis, Jane, Eliza, Emeline and Johnson. 
Their father, Samuel Dubois, died in 1872. Sarah, daughter 
of Isaac and Mary Johnson, born 18th of Sth month, 1805, 
married Henry Elwell ; they had issue, seven children — Samuel, 
Mary, William, Franklin, Charlotte, Eliza and Borden, John, 
son of Isaac and Mary Johnson, born 5th of 3d month, 1810, 
married Elizabeth Merrick ; their children were Mary, Isaac, 
William, Clinton, Alonza and Larrie. Their father died in 
1864. Samuel, son of Isaac and Mary Johnson, born 19th of 
5th month, 1812, died in 1870. Emma Ann, daughter of Isaac 
and Mary Jolmson, born 29tli of 9th montli, 1814, married 
Ewalt Richman ; they have nine children — Charles, Isaac J., 
Henry, Wilbert, Clayton, Johnson, Harriet, Sarali and Anna. 



118 JOHN JOHNSON FAMILY. 



Benjamin F., son of Isaac and Mary Jolnison, born 15tli of 
6tli month, 1818, married Anna Mickle ; they liave two chikh'eu 
— Woodburn and Ella. James, son of Isaac and Mary Jonnson, 
born 21st of 2d month, 1820, married Sarah Stull ; they have 
issne — Caroline and Ella. Isaac Johnson, the father of the 
before mentioned children, was an uncommonly active business 
man ; he was heard to say when a young man, he was determined 
to possess more broad acres of land than his father owned at 
the time of his death, all of which he realized, and more. He 
was the owner of a large tract of excellent land not far from 
Daretown, containing upwards of 600 acres, together witli 
large quantities of land in other sections, and the owner of one 
or two flour mills at the time of his death. Besides attending 
to his own business, which was extensive, he transacted much 
public l)usiness, and was Sheriff of the county of Salem at one 
time. 



JENNINGS FAMILY. 

Henry Jennings was a prominent member of Salem Monthly 
Meeting of Friends, soon after its organization. He Avas the 
son of William and Mary Jennings, born the 21st of Tth month, 
164:2, in the county of Surrey, England. Henry and his wife, 
Margaret Jennings, embarked for America in the ship Kent, 
Captain Gregor}^, and landed at New Salem 23d of 6th montli, 
1677. In 1682, Jolm Adams, son-in-law of John Fenwick, sold 
Henry Jennings 200 acres of land. He likewise purchased a 
considerable tract of land in Cohansey precinct, it being near 
the town of Cohansey, (now Greenwich). Henry and his wife 
removed from Salem and located in the city of Philadelphia, 
about the year 1700, and at that place they ended their days. 
He was a tailor by trade, and followed it in that city. He died 
in 1706, and made his will the year previous; and, not having 
any children, he devised most of his estate to his uncle, Isaac 
Jennings, of London, and to the daughter of Isaac, Margaret 
Jennings, his cousin. 

Some persons have supposed that Henry and Samuel Jennings 
were brothers. If they were relatives it was not nearer than 
cousins. Samuel Jennings emigrated from Coles Hill, in Buck- 
inghamshire, England, and located at Burlington, N. J., in 1680. 
Soon after his arrival he built himself a large brick d^'ellino-, 
which stood on the banks of the Delaware. In his house the 
Yearly Meeting of Friends of Pennsylvania and West New 
Jersey were held several years. The time-honored house was 
removed about ten years since. He was a reconnnended minister 
some four or live years before he left his native land, and M^as 
highly appreciated as such in that Kingdom. Soon after his 
arrival, Edward Byllings, the Propritary Governor, appointed 
him his deputy, in which capacity he served up to 1683, when 
he was chosen Governor for one year by the Assembly of New 
Jersey, and continued so up to the time of his removal to Phila- 
dt^lphia, in 1692. His abilities were highly appreciated by 
William Penn. Soon after he moved to the Province he was 
appointed to the Commission of Peace, in the city of his adoption. 



120 JENNINGS FAMILY. 



Al)ont that time the controversy with George Keitli arose, in 
which Samuel Jennings was much engaged on belialf of tlie 
Society. In the early part of 1694 he sailed for London, as a 
respondent on the appeal of Keith, to the London Yearly 
Meeting, in which body he ably vindicated the cause of his 
American brethren from the aspersions of their detractors. 
Soon after his return from England he removed to Burlington, 
the place of his former residence. In 1702 the crown of Eng- 
land, to which the government of New Jersey had l)een trans- 
ferred by tiie proprietors, appointed him one of the procinial 
council; and in 1707, the year preceding his death, he filled the 
office of Speaker of the Assembly, in which position he distin- 
guished himself l)y a bold and fearless opposition to the arbitrary 
misrule of the bigoted Lord Cornbury. 

Edward Hyde was the son of the Earl of Claridon, and was 
one of the first officers wlio deserted the army of King James. 
King William, in gratitude for his services, appointed him 
Governor of New York and New Jersey, in 1702, and conferred 
on him the title of Lord Cornl)ury, an office he was entirely 
unfit for hj nature and education; he l)eing a bigoted belliger- 
ent, and arbitrary in his disposition, not seeming to understand 
the wants of tlie colonists; all which incapacitated him for an 
executive officer. The inhabitants of tlie colony of New York, 
as well as tliose of New Jersey, became wearied of his misgov- 
ernment, and accordingly they determined to send an appeal to 
Queen Anne for her to remove the Governor. Samuel Jennings 
had the credit of writing the address, which was forwarded to 
the home government, and by so doing he incurred the great 
displeasure of CornV)ury, who is reported to have said "Jennings 
was the most impudent man he ever knew." However, it had 
the desired effect, and Lord Cornbury was recalled in 1708, the 
year of Samuel Jenning's deatli. Proud, the historian, wrote 
that "Samuel Jennings was worthy of memory, and endowed 
with both spiritual and temporal wisdom; was suppressor of 
vice and encourager of virtue." He was one of those rare 
individuals in wliom was concentrated a ^^ariety of qualifications 
and mental endowments^ by which, under the sanctifying power 
of truth, he was made eminently useful to his fellow men, both 
in Ins ministerial and civil capacity. He did more than any of 
his cutemporaries in organizing the civdl go\'ernment of West 
Jersey. At his deatli lie left no sons to perpetuate his name, 
but three daughters. 

Sarali Jennings, his eldest daughter, married Edward Pen- 
nington, in 1699 ; lie was the youngest son of Isaac Penning- 



JENNINGS FAMILY. 121 



ton, an eminent citizen of London, a man of literature, who 
wrote extensively in defence of Quakerism. Edward's mother, 
when Isaac married her, was a widow of Sir William Sprignett, 
a military officer. William left one daughter — Guielma Maria 
Sprignett, who afterwards was the first wife of William Penn ; 
there were two children — William and Letiti Penn. Tlie 
second wife of William Penn was Hannah Callowhill ; they 
had two sons. John, the only American child of William 
Penn, was born in Philadelphia, in the house that Samuel Car- 
penter built, on Second street, corner of Norris alley. The 
secomd child by his second wife was Richard Penn. Edward 
Pennington was a half-brother of Guielma Penn ; he was a 
Surveyor-General of the province of Pennsylvania up to the 
time of his death, which event took place in 1701, two years 
after his marriage, leaving one son — Isaac Pennington. Ann 
Jennings, the second daughter of Samuel, married William 
Stevenson, in 1706, and the third daughter, Mercy, married 
John Stevenson, the brother of William, in the same year. 
Thomas, another brother, married Sarah, the widow of Edward 
Pennington. John Stevenson, the great grand-son of Samuel 
Jennings, emigrated from Burlington county to Upper Pemf s 
Neck about seventy or eighty years hence, but remained there a 
few years ; he afterwards removed to the township of Manning- 
ton, on the Wyatt farm, when the late James Johnson left and 
moved on his farm, in Penn's Neck. John's wife was Emily 
Newbold, a member of the ancient family of that name in 
Burlington county. John and Emily Stevenson had several 
children — William, Mary, Daniel, Charles, Jolm and Emily 
Stevenson. Mary married Clayton, the son of John and Charlotte 
Wistar ; they had two sons — John and Pichard Wistar. Daniel 
Stevenson married Ilannali, daughter of John Adams. Charles 
Stevenson married Rachel, the eldest daughter of Samuel and 
Margaret Ililliard. Jolm Stevenson, Jr. married Ann, daughter 
of Samuel and Ann Brick, of Elsinboro. 
16 



KEASBEY FAMILY. 

Edward Keasbey, lirst of tlie Keasbey family in this county, 
emigrated from England about the year 1694, and settlod in 
the town of New Salem. He was then a young man. I think 
it probable that he was a member of the Society of Friends 
l)eforo he left his native land, and came here to avoid religious 
persecution. Soon after his arrival he took an active part in 
the affairs of the religious meetings of the Society, to which he 
appeared to be so ardently attached. He gave the sum of 
twenty dollars towards erecting the brick meeting house in the 
grave yard on Broadway street. The house was completed in 
1701. On 26th of 11th month, 1701, he married EHzabeth, 
widow of Isaac Smart, of Elsinborough. She was the daughter 
of Andrew and Isabella Thompson, and was born near Du])lin, 
Ireland, loth of 8th month, 1666. Edward and his wife, 
Elizabeth T. Keasbey, had four children — Mary, the eldest, born 
11th of 3d month, 1703 ; Edward, Matthew and Susanna. 
Matthew Keasbey, born in 1706, married, and had a large family 
of children, most of whom were daughters, and consequently at 
this late period the record of them is lost. Edward Keasbey, 
Jr., eldest son of Edward and Elizabeth T., was born in 1705, 
and subsequently married Elizabeth, the daughter of Edward 
Brad way, Jr., and grand-daughter of the emigrant of that name. 
Edward and Elizabeth B. Keasbey had three children — 
Edward, Mary and Bradway. Edward Keasbey 3d, was born 
1726, and afterwards nuu-ried Prudence, the daugliter of 
Edward and Temperance Quinton. 

Edward Quinton was the son of Tol)ias Quinton, who emi- 
grated from England and purchased lands on the south side of 
Alloways creek, where the village of Quinton is now located. 
He died al)0ut the year 1705, leaving one son — Edward. Tem- 
])erance Quinton was the daughter of Daniel, the son of Jolni 
Suiitli, of Almesbury (it is now spelled Amebury). Daniel 
Smitli was born near Norfolk, England, 10th of 12th montli, 
1660. He came to tliis country with his father, in company 
with John Fenwick, the proprietor, in 1675, ;ind subsequently 



KEASBEY FAMILY. 123 



purchased of liim 1,000 acres of laud on tlio nortli side of 
Allowajs creek, opposite the present viUage of Quinton. At 
the schism in the Society of Friends, made by George Keith, 
Daniel Smith became an active partisan with the Keithites, as 
they were called, and when Keith returned to England many of 
his followers became members of the Baptist religious association. 
Daniel Smith became a Baptist, and most of his family^did like- 
wise, except his eldest son John, who still adhered to the Society 
of his ancestors. John Smith left three sons — John, Benjamin, 
and James. The latter became an eminent merchant in Phila- 
delphia, his^ partner being the late Jacob Ridgway. James was 
much the senior of his partner, and retired from business a 
num])er of years before his death. He ended his days in the 
city of Burlington. 

Edward Quinton died in 1756, and his wife Temperance 
departed this life in 1775, aged seventy-live years. Edward 
and Prudence Q. Keasbey had ten children — Edward, Elizabeth, 
Matthew, Sarah, Lewis, Phebe, Prudence, Edward the second, 
Samuel and Anthony. Several of these cliildren died in infancy. 
After the death of Prudence Q. Keasbey, Edward married Sarah 
Quinton, sister of his first wife, by wdiom he had six children — 
Temperance, Delniz C, Jesse, Rachel, Kizzie and Jane. The 
father of the above mentioned cliildren died in 1779, aged iifty- 
four years. 

Matthew, the son of Edward and Prudence Keasbe}^, was 
born in 1719, and lived to grow to manhood, when he went to 
sea and was drowned. Lewis, his brother, born 1752, married 
Sarah Grinnell ; he left issue. Anthony, the youngest son of 
Edward and Prudence Keasbey, born in 1758, married Hannah, 
the daughter of Joseph and Rebecca Abbott Brick, of Elsin- 
borough. Anthony and his wife had eight children — Rebecca, 
Prudence, Matthew^, Edward Quinton, Hannah, Anthony, Arte- 
mesia, and Ann. Rebecca, their eldest child, married Dr. 
Charles Hannah ; she left no issue. Prudence died at middle 
age, unmarried. Matthew married Ann, the daughter of Michael 
Fisher, of Woodbury; they had six children — Rebecca, Caroline, 
Cliarles, Quinton, John, and Elizabeth. Dr. Edward Q. Keasbey 
married a young woman by the name of Aertson. They had 
four children — Anthony, Helen, Anna, and Edward. 

Hannah, the daughter of Anthony and Hannali Keasbev, 
married Thomas, the son of I^r. James and Ruth Vanmeter, of 
Salem. Hannah is deceased, leaving Uvo daughters — Artemesia 
and Martha. Anthony, the yoinigest son of Anthony aiul 
Hannah Keasbey, sold his patrimonial estate to his brother, Dr. 



12-± KEASBEY FAMILY, 



Edward Q. Keasbey, and went to one of the Southern States. 
Arteniesia died a yonng Avoman, nnniarried. Ann, the young- 
est daughter of Anthony and Ilannali B. Keasbey, married 
James M. Hannah. They had three children — Charles Gilbert, 
Cornelia, and Percival. Anthony, the father of the above men- 
tioned children, died in the early part of tliis century, leaving 
one of the largest landed estates of that period. His wife sur- 
vived him several years. 

Temperance, the eldest daughter of Edward and Sarah 
Keasbey, married Judge John Smith, who resided near the 
village of Quinton. They had one son — Edward K..Smitli,who 
was a surveyor of land for some years, and afterwards was 
elected Sheriff. He married the daughter of Andrew Sinnickson, 
of Salem. He and his family subsequently removed to one of 
the Western States. Delzin, the eldest son of Edward and Sarah 
Keasbey, was a hatter, and followed his trade in Salem for a 
number of years. His residence was in the ancient brick house 
of the Keasbey's situated at the upjDcr end of East Broadway. 
It is still standing. 

Delzin Keasbey's wife was Kachel Smitli. Jesse, the second 
son of Edward and Sarah Quinton Keasbey, married the 
daughter of Thomas Rowen, Sr., of Salem, sister of the late 
Dr. Thomas Kowen. Jesse and his wife had two children — 
John and Ann Keasbey. Kachel, the daughter of Edward 
and Sarah Q. Keasbey, married Leonard Gibbon, the son of 
John and Esther Gibbon, who was born 15th of 11th month, 
1766 ; they resided near Roadstown, Cumberland county. John 
was the son of Leonard, who, with liis brother, Nicholas Gib- 
bon, emigrated from England in the fore part of the last cen- 
tury ; they purchased 6,000 acres of land at or near the town 
of Coliansey, now Greenwich ; they likewise organized the first 
Episcopal church in that town, and the first of that persuasion 
in that section of Fenw^ick's Colony. The house of worship 
was removed many years ago, and there is nothing remaining 
to mark the place where it stood but a few tomb stones in tlie 
vacant lot near l)y. John Gil^bon's wife was Esther, the 
daughter of Ephraim Seeley. (The Seeleys are one of the oldest 
families that settled at what Avas then c:dled the Coliansey 
precinct, now Cumberland county.) She had several children 
l)y her iirst husband. Edmund Gibbon married a .young- 
woman in Penn's Neck who had large possessions' on Finn's 
Point that she inherited from her ancestors ; they had several 
children — Grant, Tliomas, Charles and one daughter, who 
was the iirst wife of James J. Itedstrake, of Salem ; he was 



KEASBPJY FAMILY. 125 



at that time a resident of Pemrs Neck, his native place. 

Esther Seeley's second husband was Colonel Benjamin Holme; 
she was his second wife, (his first being Jane, tlic daughter of 
Daniel Smith ; she was killed a few years after her marriage hj 
a horse, and left no children. Robert Johnson, in his history 
of Salem county, said her maiden name was Smart; he was 
informed incorrectly). Benjamin and his wife Esther had two 
children — John and Jane Holme. John's first wife was 
Rebecca Thompson, of Salem ; his second wife was Margaret, 
daughter of Clement Hall, of Elsinborough ; their children 
have been mentioned before. Jane, the daughter of Benjamin 
and Esther Holme, married William Harris, a resident of 
Swedesboro, Gloucester county ; she lived but a short time after 
her marriage. There is some difference of opinion whether tlie 
Holme family of Salem county are descendants of Obediah 
Holme, who settled at Cohansey in the early settlement of the 
English colony, and was one of the Judges of Salem county 
for several years ; his descendants are numerous in Cumberland 
county at the present day, and the most reliable information in 
my possession is that they are a different family and no way 
connected ; their names are different ; one is Holmes and the 
Salem county family spell their names Holme. The ancestor 
of the latter, John Holme, emigrated to and settled in Phila- 
delphia at an early period ; he had two sons born in that city ; 
the eldest son when married went to reside on lands his fathei' 
bought of William Penn, where Holmesburg is lociated; it being 
not far from Philadelphia. The j^ounger son, John Holme, 
came to this county in 1698, and purchased a large tract of 
land in what is now Upper Alloways Creek; he had two sons 
and one daughter — John, Benjamin and Elizabeth Holme. 
The latter in 1737 married Joseph Fogg, of Fogg's Landing, 
(he Avas the son of Joseph Fogg, the tirst emigrant to this 
county by that name.) Joseph and his wife had ten childi-en — 
David, Ebenezer, Charles, Hannah, Ann, Elizal)etli, Holmes, 
Isaac, Rebecca and Ann Fogg. John Holme, the eldest son, 
inherited most of his father's real estate near Allowaystown ; 
he, like his brother Benjamin, was a zealous Whig during the 
American Revolution, but I think he was never in the rnilitaiy 
service. The Holme family were one of the earliest families 
of the Baptist Society that was organized near Salem. 

Leonard Gibbon and his Avife Rachel K. had eleven children 
— Mary, Harriet, Eliza, Mason Seeley, Francis, Robert G., 
Edward K., Anthony, Leonard, Quinton and Sarah Gibbon. 
Eliza, tlie eldest daughter of Leonard and Rac-hel Gib])t)n, 



126 KEA8BEY FAMILY. 



man-ied Jeremiali Parvin, of Deerfield township, Cumberland 
county ; tliev liad issue, two sons and one daughter — Leonard, 
(31iver and Harriet ; they are all living. Mason Seeley Gibbon, 
tlie eldest son of Leonard and Rachel Gibbon, married Mary 
Brooks, tlie daughter of James Brooks, of Roadstown. Mason 
and his wife had six children — Caroline, Robert, James, Wil- 
liam Henry, Leonard and Eliza Gibbon ; I think they are all 
living, excepting Leonard. Edward K. Gibbon married twice ; 
he removed to one of the Western States, and had one daughter. 
Anthony Iveasbey Gibbon also went to one of the Western 
States, and there married, and had issue, one son, who is still 
living. Quinton Gibbon, the youngest son of Leonard and 
Rachel Gibbon, is a physician in the city of Salem ; his residence 
is on Market street. Quinton married Sarah, the daughter of 
Morris and Sarah Han(;ook ; both of her parents were the 
lineal descendants of William and Isabella Hancock, wlio 
emiy-rated from Eno-hind to this county in 1677, and settled on 
his allotment of land, containing 1,000 acres, that he purchased 
of John Fen wick two years previous. Tlie land lay on the 
south side of Monmouth river, wliere the village of Hancock's 
Bridge now stands. Dr. Gibbon and his wife liave one daugh- 
1 3r — Henrietta Gibbon. Sarah A. Gibbon, daughter of Leonard 
a'.id Sarah Gibbon, lives in Salem, with her brother, Dr. Quinton 
Gibl)on ; she is unmarried. Leonard Gibbon, tlie father of the 
above mentioned children, died wlien most of his children were 
minors; Racliel, his widow, died in Salem IStli montli, 1S51, 
aged nearly seventy-eight years. 

Bradway Iveasbey, the son of Edward 2d, fuid EHzabeth 
Bradway Keasbey, was born in 1730 ; he married and settled 
on part of James Daniels, Sr., estate, but whether he purchased 
the property of one of the Daniels*' family or not, I have no 
definite knowledge. Neal Daniels emigrated from Ireland to 
this country in 1681, and purchased a tract of land of Annie 
Salter, in the forks of Stoe Creek, and it was as good a soil as 
there is in tliat section of the county. His son, James Daniels, 
was born in Ireland ; he has left behind him the most interesting 
and correct acconnt of the Indians, at the time of the iirst 
Europeans landed here. He describes them as peacable and 
quiet people, until spirituous liquor was introduced among them. 
The alcohol produced a radical change among them, they were 
then often troublesome and more difficult to get along with as 
neighbors. 

Edward Keasbey and his wife had one son — Edward Keasbey. 
Bradway Keasbey's second wife was Jane Waddington, the 



XEASBEY FAMILY. 127 



daughter of Jonathan Waddington; they had issue, one daugli- 
ter, Sarah Keasbey, who subsequently married John, the son of 
Edward Paneoast. The hitter was a resident of Gloucester 
county. John and his wife lived for a short time on her 
property, that was willed to her by her fatlier. They, however, 
in a few years sold it to Samuel Paneoast, and purchased a farm 
of Josiah Reeves, in the same township, located on the north 
side of Alloways creek, on the main road leading from Hancock's 
Bridge to Salem, it being near the former place. John and 
Sarah K. Paneoast had seven children — Hannah, Achsah, John, 
Israel, Jane, David, and Aaron Paneoast. John Paneoast, sev- 
eral years before his death, sold his property in Alloways Creek 
township and purchased a farm of Aaron Paneoast, at Mullica 
Hill, Gloucester county, and there he and liis wife ended their 
days. At that place, Hannah, the eldest daughter of John and 
Sarah K. Paneoast, married John, the youngest son of William 
and Mary Bradway ; she died a comparatively young woman, 
leaving hve children — Clayton, Sarah, Achsah, Ann, and Mary 
Ann Bradwa3^ Achsah, the daughter of John and Sarah K. 
Paneoast, married James Lippincott; they had issue, two daugh- 
ters — Hannah Lippincott, who married Jonathan Colson, and 
Sarah Ann Lippincott, who married William Dunn. John, the 
eldest son of John and Sarah K. Paneoast, married tlie eldest 
daughter of Benjamin and Susan Griscom, of Penn's ISTeck. 
John and his wife had seven children — Benjamin, Mary Jane, 
Beulah, John, Sarah, Susan, and Hannah Paneoast. Jane, tlie 
daughter of John and Sarah K. Paneoast, married Andrew, the 
eldest son of Benjamin and Susan Griscom; she died soon after 
they were married, leaving no issue. Israel, the son of John 
and Sarah Iv. Paneoast, married Sarah Ann Lippincott; they 
had issue — Stacy Keasbey, Dilwyn, and Mary Ann Paneoast. 
David Paneoast, son of John and Sarah K. Paneoast, married 
Ann, the daughter of Joseph Davis, of Pilesgrove; they have 
issue — Joseph D., Mary, Martha, Anna, David,William, Charles, 
and Isabella Paneoast. Aaron, the youngest son of John and 
Sarah K. Paneoast, married Anna Dunn; they have one daughter 
—Deborah Paneoast. 

Edward, the son of Bradway Keasbey, married Lydia, the 
daughter of Jesse Grace Carll; they had issue — Sarah, Joseph, 
Prudence, Grace, Elizabeth, and Edward Keasbey. Sarali, the 
eldest daughter, married Aaron, the son of Jonathan and Sarah 
B. Waddington; they had live children — Sarah Ann, Lydia, 
Joshua, Bradway, and Jane Waddington. Joseph, the son of 
Edward and Lydia Keasbey, married Hannah, the daughter of 



128 KEASBEY FAMILV. 



David Stretch ; lie died a young man, leaving no issue. Prudence 
Iveasbey married Edward Waddington, brotlier of Aaron Wad- 
dington. Edward and his wife had eight cliihlren — Richard, 
Sarah, Edward, Prudence, Elizabeth, Joseph, Lydia Ann, and 
Rebecca Waddington. Grace, the daughter of Edward and 
Grace Keasbey, married Reuben Dare ; I think he was a native 
of Cumberland county. They purchased a farm in Beesley's 
ISTeck, in the township of Alloways Creek, being formerly a part 
of the Joseph Brick estate. Reuben and his wife left several 
children. One of their daughters married William, the son of 
Edward Brad way; they own the homestead and reside thereon 
at this time. Elizabeth, the youngest daughter of Edward and 
Grace Keasbey, married William Plummer; they owned, and 
while they lived occupied part of the homestead of her parents, 
Edward and Grace Keasbey; they had three sons and one 
daughter — William, Edward K., Cliarles, and Elizabetli Plum- 
mer. William married Rebecca, the daughter of Judge Ephraim 
Carll; they have issue. Elizabetli, the daughter of William and 
Elizabeth K. Plummer, married Isaac, the son of David Allen; 
they have several children. Charles, the youngest son of William 
and Elizabeth K. Plummer, married Ann Eliza, the daughter of 
Henry and Elizabeth B. Miller; they have issue. 

Prudence, the daughter of Edward and Lydia Keasbey, 
married Edward, the youngest son of Jonathan and Sarah 
Waddington. Edward and his wife had eight children — 
Richard, Sarah, Edward (who died a minor). Prudence, Eliza- 
beth, Joseph, Lydia and Rebecca. Richard married Mary 
Ann, the daughter of David Bowen, of Alloways Creek; they 
have issue — Anna, Edward, David, Elizal)etli, George ancl 
Mary. Anna married William, the son of Elijah and Beulali 
Ware; they have issue. Edward, the eldest son of Richard 
Waddington, married Mary, the daughter of Daniel Hood; they 
have issue. David Waddington, married Maggie Stretch ; they 
have one child. Elizabeth Waddington married Jonathan, the 
son of Aaron and Mary Fogg. George Waddington's wife is 
Mary, the daughter of Charles and Beulah Gaskill ; they have 
issue. Sarah, the eldest daughter of Edward and Prudence 
Waddington, married James, the son of Oliver Smith ; they 
have three children. Edward, the eldest, married Ann, the 
daughter of Lewis and Elizabeth Fox; they have issue. Oliver, 
the second child, married Hannah, the daughter of Joseph H. 
and Rachel Fogg; they have issue. Keasbey, the youngest 
son, married Mary, the daughter of Jol) Thorp ; they have 
issue. Prudence Waddinijton's husliand was Ebenczer Barrett. 



KEASBEY FAMILY. 129 



A few years after their marriage they removed to Illinois, 
where, I think, Prndence died, leaving fom- or five children. 
Ebenezer, soon after the death of liis wife, removed to Kansas 
with liis family ; they remained at their new home but a sliort 
time, and then emigrated to Nebraska, and settled near Omaha. 
Elizabeth Waddington married John, the son of Maurice 
Welch, of Mannington. John and his \vife are deceased, leav- 
ing two children — Aaron and Lydia. Joseph, the youngest son 
of Edward Waddington, married Ruth, the daughter of Joseph 
and Jane Appleton ; the latter is the daughter of Hezekiah 
Hews, and grand-daughter of Benjamin Wriglit, of Manning- 
ton. Josepli and Ruth Waddington had six cJiildren — Emma, 
Jane, who died young, Joseph, Tacy, Lydia Ann and George. 
Lydia Ann, the daughter of Edward and Prudence Wadding- 
ton, married Jonathan, the son of Adna and Lydia Bradway ; 
they have one daughter — Lydia P. Bradway. Rebecca, the 
youngest daughter of Edward and Prudence Waddington, 
married Samuel Borden, a native of Upper Penn's Neck ; they 
have issue. Edward and liis wife. Prudence, were buried in the 
old grave yard on the south side of Alloways Creek, wiiere all 
the bodies of their ancestors are mouldering in their native 
dust, while their souls have entered upon immortality. Tlie 
great American poet, Longfellow, wrote the following encour- 
aging poem : 

Life is real, Life is earnest, 
And the grave is not its goal ; 

Dust thou art, to dust returnetli, 
Was not spoken of the soul. 

Josepli Keasbey, tlie eldest son of Lydia Keasbey, married 
Hannah, the daughter of David and Mary Street StretcJi. Joseph, 
soon after he became of age, purcliased land in Elsinborougli, 
being part of the Norris estate, bordering on Alloways creek; 
it formerly belonged to the Stubbing family. Joseph and his 
Avife Hannah commenced life on the said farm; he lived but a 
short timp afterwards, dying in 1814, with typhus fever, which 
disease was prevalent and very mortal about that time. He left 
no issue, but devised about two-thirds of his real estate to his 
widow, Hannah Keasbey. A certain portion he directed to l)e 
sold for the payment of his debts, and the residue he devised to 
Mark Stretch, a distant relative of his wife. His widow subse- 
quently married Andrew Sndth. 

Grace, the daughter of Edward and Lydia Keasbey, married 
Reuben Dare. They owned and lived on property in Lower 
Alloways Creek, on a point of land lying on the south side of 
17 



130 KEASBEY FAMILY. 



the creek, called Beesley's Neck. I think it formerly belonged 
to the Brick family. Reuben and his wife had several children. 
AV^illiain W. Bradway, the present occupant of the farm, married 
one of their daugiiters. Elizabeth Keasbey, the youngest daughter 
of Edward and Lydia, married William Plummer, Sr. They 
had four children — William, Edward, Elizabeth, and Charles, 
William, the eldest, married Bebecca, the daughter of Judge 
Ephraim Carll. The children of William and his wife, Bebecca 
Blummer, have been mentioned previously. Elizabeth Plummer, 
the daughter of William Plunnner, Sr., and his wife Elizabeth, 
married Isaac, the son of David Allen, of Upper Alloways 
Creek, now Quinton township. Isaac and his wife Elizabeth 
have issue — David, Sarah, Thompson, and Charles Anna Allen. 
Charles, the youngest son of Elizabeth and William Plummer, 
Sr., married Ann Eliza, the daughter of Henry and Elizabeth 
Miller, of Elsinborough. Charles has been deceased several 
years, leaving a widow and three children — Elizabeth, Henr}'-, 
and Anna. 

Bel)ecca, the eldest daughter of Jesse and Mary Carll, mar- 
ried Bichard, the son of Bobert Moore, Jr. ; she lived but a 
few years after her marriage, leaving issue. Elizal)eth, the 
second daughter of Jesse and Mary Carll, born in 1799, mar- 
ried Jonathan, the eldest son of David and Mary S. Stretch ; she 
also died in early life, leaving no issue. William, tlie son of 
Jesse and Mary Carll, born in 1801, married Ann, the daughter 
of Larry Dowlin; they had seven children — Bebecca, Mary, Ann 
Elizabeth, Arthalinda,. Jesse, Marietta and Janetta. Bebecca 
Carll married William Allen ; she died young, leaving no issue. 
Ann Elizabeth Carll married Thomas, the son of Epln-aim 
Seeley, a native of Bridgeton ; they have issue — Kate and 
Belford Seeley. 

Jesse Carll, the son of William and Ann, married Elizabeth 
Craig, of Cumberland county ; he is deceased, leaving a widow 
and three cldldren — Lydia Ann, William and Catliarine. 
Marietta Carll married Amos, the son of Aaron and Susan 
Badgett; they have two children — Arthalinda and Anna. 
Arthalinda married Daniel Ilogate; they reside in Salem. 
Anna is still unmarried. The Padgetts are one of the oldest 
families in Salem and Cumberland counties. Artlialinda, 
Mary and Janetta Carll died minors. Sarah, tlie daughter of 
Jesse and Mary Carll, married Joseph, the son of Isaac Mills ; 
she has been dead many years, leaving issue. Lydia, tlie 
youngest daughter of Jesse and Mary Carll, married Joseph 
Bowen; tlicy have no issue. Jesse, the father of tlie above 



LIPPINCOTT FAMILY. 131 



mentioned children, died in 1814 of the typus fever. Sarah, 
tlie daughter of Jesse Carll, Sr. and his wife Grace, married 
Job Shepj)ard, and had two sons — John and William. John's 
wife was Sarah, the daughter of Samuel Ward, of Elsinborough; 
tliey have five children — Samuel, Job, Sarah, Rebecca and 
Mary Jane. Samuel Sheppard married Hannah, the daughter 
of James Baker ; they have issue — Hannah, Alabedia and 
Isabella. Jol) Sheppard's wife was Jane Fryant ; they had 
four children — John, Roger, Job and Jenita. John, the eldest, 
married Rachel, daughter of James and Rachel Baker; they 
have issue. William, the youngest son of Job and Sarah 
Sheppard, married Sarah Boyd ; there were two clnldren — 
David and Sarah Ann. David's wife was Rachel Piphran ; 
they removed to Indiana. Sarah Ann Sheppard married 
William, the son of Mark Stretch; they also went to one of 
the Western States; she is deceased now, leaving issue. William 
Sheppard's second wife was Mary Ferrell, a widow, whose 
maiden name was Smith, a native of Delaware. William Shep- 
pard, when about ten years of age, lost his speech by that 
scourge, scarlet fever, and he has been a mute, in a great meas- 
ure, ever since ; he and his wife reside at Hancock's Bridge, 
and both of them are past three score years and ten. 

Anna, the eldest daughter of William and Martha Wadding- 
ton, married Jonathan, the son of Jonathan and Joanna 
Hildreth. They had one daughter — Joanna Hildreth, wdio 
married Dr. Thomas P. Dickinson, a native of Pilesgrove. 
Tlieir children are A. M. P. V. H. Dickinson, who married 
Mary Springer ; Thomas and Hildreth, the latter is deceased. 
Sarah, the daughter of William and Martlia Waddington, 
married Daniel, the son of Daniel and Sarah Tracy ; they had 
no issue. William, the son of William and Martha Wadding- 
ton, married Elijia, the daughter of Davis and Fanny Nelson, 
of Elsinborough. There were two children — Fanny and 
William. Fanny's Inisband is William Jones. She is deceased, 
leaving one daughter — Eliza. William married tlie daughter 
of William Simms ; they have issue. Elizabetli Waddington, 
the daughter of William and Martha Waddington, died a 
young woman of pulmonary consumption. Martha, the daugh- 
ter of William and Martha Waddington, married Joseph, the 
son of John and Elizabeth Hancock. Joseph is deceased, 
leaving no issue. Jesse C, the y(^ungest son of William and 
Martha Waddington, married Rachel Scudders. They are both 
deceased, leaving one daughter, Sarah Waddington, who subse- 
quently married Henry Elwell ; tliey have issue. 



LIPPINCOTT FAMILY. 

The family of Lippincott, it is said, took its name from 
Luffeiicott, a manor and parish at the western extremity of 
the county of Devonshire, on the borders of Cornwall, England; 
which remained their property and the place of their residence 
from the time of King Henry III until the second year of 
King Henry Y, A. D., 1414, or from 1243, or earlier to 1414. 
One of the family, John Lippincott, between 1430 and 1450, 
married Jane, daughter and co-heir of John Wyberry, which 
brought the estate of Wyberrys into the family, and continued 
their property until about 1775, when Henry Lippincott, the 
last of the branch, sold it to Charles Cartcliff. There is a strong- 
reason to believe that the first ancestor of the numerors family 
of Lippincotts in America was Richard Lippincott, born in 
Plymouth, Devonshire, England. He emigrated to Dorchester, 
ISTew England, between 1636 and 1640. In 1644 he returned 
to Plymouth, England, his native land, and about the year 1650 
he joined the new religious sect, the Society of Friends, and 
suffered much therefor. On the 20th of January, 1660, at 
Plymouth, he was committed to prison by Oliver Creely, mayor, 
and with others was taken from a meeting house. How long 
he remained in prison we have no account. In 1663 he and his 
family left England and located themselves in Rhode Island. 
In 1669 he removed from Rhode Island and settled in New 
Jersey, at Shrewsbury, in which place he became a large landed 
proprietor. He died at Shrewsbury 25th of 9tli month, 1683, 
and his widow, Abigail Lippincott, died 2d of 6th month, 1697. 
Richard, a short time previous to his death, purchased 1,000 
acres of laud of John Fenwick, in Cohansey precinct, being on 
the south side of Cohansey river, in Shrewsbury Neck. Pre- 
vious to the death of Abigail Lippincott, the widow of Richard, 
she liberated all her slaves, which act is sutticient to perpetuate 
her name to the latest posterity. 

In the record of the town of Freehold, N. J., mention is made 
of Richard Lippincott as one of the overseers of the town of 
Shrewsbury, in 1670. This book of records is said to be the 



LIPPINCOrr FAMILY. 133 



oldest deed book in New Jersey, it having been commenced the 
1-ith of 12th month, 1667. Richard and Abigail Lippiiicott 
had six sons and two daughters. Remembrance, their eldest 
son, was born at Dorchester, New England, in 16-11. He was 
baptized on the 19th of 7th month, 1641, and died 11th of 2d 
month, 1723. He married Margaret Barber, of Boston; they 
had issue, four sons and eight daughters. He resided in Mon- 
mouth county, N. J. John, their second son, was born at 
Boston, New England, 6th of 9tli month, 1611, and died 16th 
of 2d month, 1720. He married Janetta Austin ; they had issue, 
four sons and four daughters. They resided in New Jersey. 
Abigail, their eldest daugliter, was born in Plymoutli, 17th of 
11th month, 1646, died an infant. Restore Lippincott was born 
at Plymouth, England, 3d of 5th month, 1618, and died at 
Mount Holly, in the 5th month, 1711. He represented Bur- 
lington county in the State Legislature, in 1703, the year that 
East and West Jersey were united under one government, and 
continued a member of that body for several years. At his 
death, Thomas Chalkly mentions in his journal, that he was 
present at the funeral. He further stated that he was informed 
that Restore left behind him nearly two hundred children, grand- 
children, and great-grand-children. Freedom, their fourth son, 
was born 1st month, 1650, at Stone House, England, and died 
in 1697; he was married llrth of 8th month, 1680, to Mary 
Custin, of Burlington, and had three sons and two daughters. 
Increase, their second daughter, was born at Stone House, 
England, 5th of 10th month, 1657, and died 29t]i of 9tli month, 
1695. She married Samuel Dennis, who came from England 
and settled at Shrewsbury, in 1675 ; he died 7th of 6tli month, 
1723, aged seventy-two years. He and his wife had two sons 
and three daughters. Jacob, their fifth son, was born in England, 
in the 3d month, 1660, and died 6th of 12th montb, 1686. He 
married, and had one son and one daughter, both of whom died 
in infancy. Preserved, their sixth son, was born in Rhode 
Island, 25th of 12t]i month, 1663, and died in 1666. Restore, 
their third son, married Hannah, daughter of William Shattock, 
of Boston; they had three sons and six daughters. Samuel was 
l)orn at Shrewsbury, N. J., and married Ann Hulet, of Shrews- 
bury, on the 3d of 5th month, 1700. Abigail, the eldest 
daughter, was born at Shrewsbury about 1678. There is no 
account of her marriage. Hannah, the daughter of Restore 
Lippincott, was born at Shrewsbury, in the 9th month, 1676. 
Hope, tlieir second daughter, was born at Shrewsbury, in the 
8th month, 1681. She married William Gladino; in 1701. 



loi LIPPLN'COrr FAMILY. 



Rebecca, daughter of the same parents, was born 24rth of 9th 
month, 16S4:. James, their son, -was born at Shrewsbury, 11th 
of 4th month, lt3S7. James married Anna Eves, in 1707. 
Eliz:il>eth, daughter of Restore, was born at Shi-ewsburr, 15th 
of 11th niouthri690. About that time Restore removed from 
Shrewsbury to Bm-lington county, and located himself with his 
familv near the town of Mount Holly, at which place his son 
Jacob was born, in the 6th month. 1692. Jacob subsequently 
married Mary, the daughter of Henry Burr, whose ^-ife was 
Elizabeth Hudson, a native of Eugland. Jacob and his %vife 
had six sons and two daughters. Rachel, the youngest daughter 
of Restore and Haimah Lippincott, was born near Moimt Holly, 
Sth of 11th month, 1695 ; she married Zachariah Jess. Jacob, 
son of Restore and Hannah Lippincott, married Haimah Burr; 
thev located in the lower part of Gloucester county, or Piles- 
grove, Salem county, where most of their descendants are 
residing at the present time, together with the descendants of 
Samuel Lippincott, who was a public Friend; he was the son of 
Freedom Lippincott, who was the son of Richard Lippincott, the 
emigrant. Samuel was born 12th of 12th month, 172S, and 
married Abigail, the daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Bates ; 
they had six children — Joseph, Samuel, Joshua, Mercy, Abigail, 
and Elizabeth. Those two branches of Richard Lippincott's 
descendants are inhabitants of Burlington, Camden, Gloucester, 
and Salem counties, X. J., and Philadelphia. 

Jacob Lippincott and liis wife, Hannah Bm-r, had eight chii- 
(li-en — Caleb, Benjamin, Samuel, Joshua, Jacob, AVilliam, 
Mary and Hannah Lippincott. Caleb, the eldest son, married 
Hannah, the daughter of Daniel AVills, a resident of Rancocas, 
in 17S5. Benjamin, second son of Jacob and Mary B. Lippin- 
cott married Hope AYills, the sister of his brother Caleb's wife: 
they h:id three children — Ehzabeth, Aaron and Benjamin 
Lippincott. Caleb and his brother Benjamin owned property 
on the east side of Oldman's creek, in Gloucester county, where 
they and most of their children after them resided. Samuel, 
the' third son of Jacob, married and left one daughter, who 
married Isaac Barber ; they emigrated to Clark county, Ohio, 
and were both living in 1848 at a great age. Joshua, the 
fourth son of Jacob and Mary Lippincott, married Rebecca 
Wood, and they had two sons and one daughter. Jacob, the 
fifth son of Jacob and Mary Lippincott, married a young 
woman of Abington, Pa. William, the sixth son, married 
Sarah Bispham, whose father was a merchant of Philadelphia ; 
they had two children — Joslma and Mary Lippincott. Joslma 



LIPPINCOTT FAMILY. 135 



married Sarah Wetherill, of Pliiladelpliia ; there were three 
children — Sarah Ann, Mary, and Josliua, wlio married a niece 
of James Dnndan. Mary, the daughter of William and Sarali 
Lippincott, married Sanniel Yorlce, of Philadelphia, and they 
had seven children — Edward, William, Peter, Sarah, Mary, 
Joshua and Samuel Yorke. Mary, the daughter of Jacob and 
Mary Lippincott, married Jacob Spicer, Jr. Hannah, the 
youngest daughter of Jacob and Mary Lippincott, mari-ied a 
man by the name of Lord. Caleb, the eldest son of Jacob and 
Mary Lippincott, married Hannah Wills about 1755, and had 
six children — Letitia, who married Aaron Elkinton, Rebecca, 
Elizabeth, Hannah, who married John Knight, William and 
Samuel Lippincott. The latter married Mary, the daughter of 
Samuel Ogden, of Pilesgrove, and had one son — Caleb Lippin- 
cott, who married Ann, daughter of Joshua and Pebecca 
Thompson, of Elsinborough ; they had issue, three sons — 
Samuel, Clark and David Lippincott; the latter is deceased. 
Samuel Lippincott's second wife was a Webster, and they had 
three sons and one daughter — Samuel, Hannah, Josiali and 
Charles Lippincott, His third wife was Christiana, daughter 
of John and Mary Black, native of Burlington county, but at 
the time of their daughter's marriage they resided in Salem 
county. Samuel and Christiana had no issue. Samuel, the 
eldest son of Samuel Lippincott by his second wife, Webster, 
has had four wives ; his lirst Avas a Zanes, her parents residing 
near Mullica Hill, and one son, Joseph Lippincott, was born 
to them. Samuel's second wife, Lydia L-edell, had two daugh 
ters — Sarah Ann and Hannah Lippincott ; his third wife was 
Mary Haines, of Burlington county ; they had no issue ; his 
fourth wife was Hannah Brown, of Chester county. Pa., and 
both are living and reside at Woodbury, Gloucester county. 
Hannah, the daughter of Samuel Lippincott, Sr., has been 
twice married ; her tirst husband was Asa Moore, and her 
second Samuel Duell, of Pilesgrove; she had no issue. Josiah, 
the second son of Samuel Lippincott, married the daughter of 
David and Hannah Clark Cooper, of Woodbury; they have 
issue. Josiah and his wife are residents of Philadelphia at this 
time. Charles, the youngest son of Samuel Lippincott, married 
Amy, the daughter of Jonathan and Hannah Bassett Cawley. 
William lippincott, tlie son of Caleb and Hannah Wills 
Lippincott, married Elizaljeth, daughter of Thomas Folwell ; 
they had eight children — Thomas, Samuel, Anna, Elizabeth, 
Mary, Deborah, Hannah and William. Thomas married Anna 
Stanger; their children were Joseph, Isaac, Anne, Daniel, 



136 LIPPIKCOTT FAMILY, 



Abigail Scull, Rebecca and Elizabeth. Samuel, the son of 
William, was twice married ; by liis first wife he had four cliil- 
dren — Ann F., Nathan T., Samuel M., and George Lippincott ; 
the latter is deceased. Nathan T. Lippincott was twice married; 
his first wife Avas Mary, the daughter of Caleb Borton; she 
died, leaving five children ; his second wife was Priscilla, tlie 
daughter of Ebenezer Wright. Samuel married the daughter 
of Jonatlian Cawley by liis second wife. Nathan married 
Priscilla, daughter of the late Ebenezer Wright, of Manning- 
ton. Samuel's second wife was Abbie, the daughter of Thomas 
Laurie, of Woodstown ; they had issue. Anne, daughter of 
William and Elizabeth Lippincott, married a Buzby; she joined 
the Shakers. Elizabeth, the second daughter of William Lip- 
pincott, mari'ied Thomas Borton, of Woodstown; they removed 
many years ago to Springfield, Ohio. Mary, the third daughter, 
died single. Deborah, the fourth daughter, is deceased. Han- 
nah Lippincott resided in 1848 with Thomas Borton, hi Ohio. 
William, the youngest son of William and Elizabeth Lippincott, 
followed the butchering business in Salem for many years ; he 
married Llannah AVright, of Quaker Neck, the grand-daughter 
of Ebenezer Miller, Jr. William and his wife Hannah had 
two children — William and Priscilla Lippincott. William 
married Elizabeth, daughter of David and Mary Engle Davis ; 
they had issue; their daughter, Letitia, married Robert, the son 
of Aaron and Mary Fogg, of Salem. 

Benjamin, son of Jacob and Mary B. Lippincott, married 
Hope Willis, a sister of his brother Caleb's wife, in IT-ll. He 
resided on and owned a large tract of land adjoining Caleb 
Lippincott, in the lower part of Gloucester, near the Salem 
county line. Benjamin and his wife Hope Lippincott had three 
sons — Aaron, Benjamin, and Jethro. Aaron, the eldest son, 
married, and had two sons — John and Benjamin, both of wliom 
married, and owned and resided on the pro2:)erty that their 
grandfather purchased. Benjamin H., the second son of Aaron 
Lippincott, married and had one son — Benjamin P., who subse- 
quently married Ann Dewell, a lineal descendant of Samuel 
Lippincott, an eminent minister, and a member of the Salem 
Montldy Meeting of Friends. Samuel was the son of Freedom 
Lippincott, who was tlie son of Richard Lippincott, the emigrant. 
Ann Dewell's mother by her first husband had two sons, Samuel 
P. and James Lippincott. The latter lived most of his time at 
Mullica Hill, Gloucester county. Benjamin P. Lippincott's 
second wife was Rebecca Howe ; they had issue — Lsaac, Barclay, 
and Lydia. Barclay was a tailor, and carried on his business on 



LIPl'IJSrCOTT FAMILY. 



137 



Market street, Philadelphia. Joshua, the son of Jacob and Mary 
Burr, married Rebecca "Wood, and had three children. James, 
the eldest, was born 20th of 3d month, 1768; died 17th of 8th 
month, 1822. Jane, their daughter, born 28th of 3d month, 
1770, married Morgan Hollingshead, of Moorestown, K. J. 
Joshua, the youngest son of Joshua and Rebecca Lippincott,was 
born 23d of lOtli month, 1774, and died 16th of 12th month, 
1805. He married Esther, tlie daughter of Jacob Davis, of 
Woodstown, the 27th of 11th month, 1800. They had one 
daughter, Lydia Lippincott, wlio was born 16th of 9th month, 
180i, and married David, the youngest son of Gideon and Sarah 
Scull, in 1823. The Lippincott family is one of the most 
numerous in the State of New Jersey. I will not attempt to 
follow the different branches further. James S. Lippincott, of 
Haddonfield, I have been informed, intends writing a full 
liistory of the large and interesting Lippincott family. 

I have recently received information from Gideon Delaphine 
Scull, now a resident of England, in regard to the ancestors of 
his family in England. After mucli investigation he has ascer- 
tained that there was a clergyman in London by the name of 
JohnScull in the reign of Charles I, and in the year 1630 was 
repelled from his living by Archbishop Laud, because he would 
not conform to the new church rituals. Soon after that event 
he left England and M'ent to Holland ; he likewise writes that 
he recently found a will of Alice Skull, a widow, of Brink - 
worth, county of Wiltshire, written in 1649, in which she says 
that it is reported to her that her son, John Scull, has gone 
into another country, and she does not know if he will ever 
return to claim what slie leaves him. According to that infor- 
mation, John Scull must luive emigrated from Holland about 
1660, and located himself on Long Island, in America. By 
the records, his son John Scull located on a large tract of land 
at Great Egg Harbor as early as 1690; the said lands lay 
adjoining John Somers'. John Scull's wife was Sarah Somers, 
and it is probable she was the sister of John Somers. John 
and Sarah Scull had several cliildren. Their son, Gideon, mar- 
ried Judith, tlie daughter of James and Margery Belange ; 
they had several children. At the first settlement of the prov- 
ince of Pennsylvania there was one Nicliolas Scull, an eminent 
surveyor, who resided in Philadelphia, and who left a family of 
children; it does not appear that they are near connections of the 
family that lived at Long Island, and afterwards at Egg Har- 
bor ; although they miglit liave originated from the same 
parents in England. Respecting the descendants of Nicholas 
18 



LIPPINCOTT FAMILY. 



Seull my knowledge is limited. There is a record of a family 
that WHS buried in Friends' graveyard in Philadelphia, which 
says that James Scull, son of Edward and Sarah, was buried 
29th of 4th month, 1717. Sarah, the wife of Nicholas Scull; 
was buried 8th month, 1717. Elizabeth Scull, daughter of 
James, was buried 29th of 6th month, 1710. Sarah, tlie 
daughter of Joseph Scull, buried 5tli montli, 1718. Abigail 
Scull, daughter of the same parents, buried 9th month, 1749. 
AYilliam Scull, son of William, buried 3d of 10th month, 1768. 
Comfort Scull, wife of William, buried 14th of 9th month, 
1775. Elizabeth, wife of Benjamin Scull, was buried 17th of 
4th month, 1792. 



LAWSON FAMILY. 

Jolui Lawson, from whom the family of tliat name in Salem 
descended, was born in Liverpool, England, of Quaker parent- 
age, in tlie year 1756. In early life he learned the coopering 
business ; it appears soon after he learned his trade, he emigrated 
to America, and located himself at Salem, and followed his 
trade together with William Perry as a partner. He also was 
a member of the Society of Friends. They both continued at 
that business until the Revolutionary war broke out. John left 
the religious society, of wdiich he was born a member, and 
joined the iirst Battalion of ISTew Jersey, of Captain "William 
Helm's company. Soon after peace was declared, he married 
Jane White, of Salem, in 1788 ; they had three sons and one 
daughter. , Edward, their son, born in 1790; was a seaman, and 
was one of the six Jerseymen that was lost during a heavy 
gale, on the night of 20th of 12th month, 1819, on the shoals oif 
Barnegat, wdiile taking the Spanish brig, Le Tigre, which had 
])een taken on a voyage from Laguira to Cadiz, by the South 
American Privateer, Constitution, Captain Brown, who put a 
]irize crew on board, who mutinied and brought her into the 
Delaware bay and up the Cohansey creek, where she was seized 
l)y James D, Westcott, Collector of the Port. The Spanish 
Consul at New York put in a claim in the United States Court, 
in behalf of the Spanisli Government, for the vessel and cargo, 
which was decided in their favor. A new crew was put on 
board to take her from Bridgeton to New York; the company 
was composed of the following persons : Edward Lawson, from 
Salem; Ilowell Mulford, Charles Dare, Thomas Whitney, Talman 
Mulford and Oliver Russell, from Bridgeton; and two Span- 
iards, Nicholas Carrega and Gregario Montot. During the 
storm the vessel went on the shoals and all on board perished. 
Samuel Lawson, the second son of John and Jane Lawson, 
born in 1791, was a hatter by trade, and died in 1836 ; he 
worked for many years as journeyman hatter for the late Delzin 
Iveasbey. John Lawson, the third son of John and Jane 
Lawson, was born in 1793; he learned the trade of a blacksmith 



140 LAWSON FAMILY 



with James Dennis, of Salem. lie showed in early life that 
uncommon industry which was characteristic of Idm during his 
long pilgrimage in this world of care. When lie was an 
apprentice, instead of going ahont the streets in the evenings as 
most other apprentice boys did, he sawed wood whenever he 
could get an opportunity so to do ; he husbanded his earnings 
so much so, when he became of age he had nearly enough 
means within himself to start the business of blacksmithing ; 
and by close application to his trade he acquired a competency 
for himself and family, also to educate his children to tit them 
for business. Mary Lawson, daughter of John and Jane 
Lawson, was born in 1795, married Thomas James ; they had 
three sons — Edward, James and Samuel James. 

To digress, somewhat, there was a young man by the name 
of William Perry, who learned the trade of a blacksmith about 
the same time that John Lawson did, and I think with the same 
man. Perry's father was a partner of John Lawson, Sr., in 
tlie coopering business ; tlie two young men were quite intimate. 
William Perry, sixty years ago or more, went to Cincinnati and 
followed his trade at that place, and was very successful, and 
accumulated a large fortune. It appears by the account I have 
of him that he was greatly respected in his adopted city, so 
much so that one of the principal streets in Cincinnati was 
named Perry street to perpetuate Ids name. He was many 
years one of the most prominent members of Friends' Meeting 
in that city. A few years before the death of John Lawson, 
William Perry and his wife came East, and spent several days 
at Cape Island ; before they returned home he was desirous of 
visiting his native town, and also to see the friend of his youth, 
John Lawson, which he and liis wife did. He soon found his 
friend, but they did not know each other at tirst ; but when 
they did recognize eacli other, after an absence of more than 
forty years, their feelings can better be imagined tlian descril)ed. 
John Lawson served in the war of 1812, for wliich lie received 
a pension ; he married Elizabeth Lummis, of Salem, in 1819, 
and died 24tli of 3d month, 1866, aged al»out seventy-three 
years. His father, John Lawson, brought o\'er with him from 
England one of the first editions of Tliomas Chalkly's journal, 
published in that Kingdom — a work whicli he much admired 
and read, and liad his children's ages recorded in it. Tlie book 
is still in possession of the family, wliich is highly prized as a 
family relic. John and Elizabeth Lawson had five children — 
Jane E., Mary, James D., John and Charles S. Lawson. Mary 
the second daughter, married Powell, the eldest son of William 



LAWSON FAMILY. . 141 



and Mary Carpenter, of Elsinboro. Powell and his wife, Mary 
Carpenter, had issne, one child, who died young before its 
father, which event took place in 1850. Mary's second husband 
is Evan C. Stotsenberg ; they were married in 1872 ; he is a 
resident of Wilmington, Delaware, and a manufacturer in that 
city. James D. Lawson is a merchant in AYoodstown ; his wife 
is Mary D., the eldest daughter of David and Annie Pancoast, 
of that town. James and his wife, Mary D. Lawson, have 
issue, two daughters — Annie P. and Emma S. Lawson. Charles 
S. Lawson, the youngest son of John and Elizabeth Lawson, 
married Ann Elizabeth, daughter of Eli S. Mulford ; they have 
four children — Elizabeth, John, Graham C. and Gertrude 
Lawson. Cliarles has been Mayor of the city of Salem several 
years, and makes an energetic and efficient officer. Jane E. 
and her brother, John Lawson, are single, and occupy the house 
in Salem where their parents lived. 



GRISCOM, MADDOX AND DEKN FAMILIES. 

Andrew Griscom was a native of England, and eniig-rated to 
America in 1680. He purchased a large tract of land where 
South Camden is at the present day, and married Sarah Dole; 
they settled upon it and had two children — Tobias and Sarah 
Griscom. Tobias, his son, married Deborah Gabitas, and they 
settled on the lands he inherited from his father in Gloucester, 
now Camden ; they had the following children — Andrew, 
Samuel, William, Tobias and Mary Griscom. Andrew, the 
eldest, was a blacksmith by trade, and settled near Tuckahoe on 
lands that his grand-father had purchased several years previous; 
he married Susanna Hancock, daughter of John and Mary 
Chambless Hancock, of Alloways Creek, and had three chil- 
dren — Sarah, Everett and William Griscom. Sarah, the eldest, 
died in 1T62, aged twenty years. Andrew, by his second wife, 
Mary, had three children — Mary, Andrew, born 1755, and 
Del)orah Griscom. Andrew married Letitia Tyler, of Green- 
wich, and had two sons — Benjamin, who married Susan Adams, 
of Penn's Neck ; his second M'ife was Rel)ecca, the widow of 
Joshua Thompson, of Elsinboro ; and Andrew Griscom, who 
was twice married, his first wife the daughter of Esther Baker; 
by his last wife, Sarah Griscom, he had four children — Dorcas, 
Job, Martha and R-uth Ann Griscom. Samuel, the second son 
of Tobias sind Sarah Griscom, was a house carpenter and ship 
builder; he married, and carried on his trade in the city of 
Bhiladelphia, and resided for some time on Arch street, between 
Third and Fourth streets. It has been said he became in pos- 
session of a large landed estate in the city, of Philadelphia. He 
assisted in the erection of Independence Hall. As to his chil- 
dren, and the other branches of the Griscom family I have not 
mucli knowledge of, but think his children were daughters. 
William Donaldson married Sarah Griscom, daughter of Sannu^l 
Griscom, ul)Out the year 177-1 or '75 ; tlioir daughter, Margaret 
Donaldson, was born in Philadelphia, 10th of 1st month, 1776, 
and is still living. In 1793 she married Joseph Boggs ; in 
1795 her husl)and died leaving one son, who is now dead. 



GKISCOM, MADDOX AND DENN FAMILIES. 143 



Margaret Boggs resides with her niece's husband, Dr. Stephen 
T. Beale, at Germautown. William Griscom, son of Tobias, 
married Sarah Davis, of Pilesgrove ; they settled at Haddon- 
field, and had two daughters — Hannah and Deborah Griscom. 
Mary, the daughter of Tobias and Deborah Griscom, married 
Thomas Ilolloway. 

John Maddox, the son of Ralph Maddox, was born in 1638, and 
in 1668 he removed to London, and resided in the parish of St. 
Sepulchre, where he followed the trade of a chandler. In 1669 
he married Elizabeth Durham, the widow of Joseph Durham. 
They had one daughter born in London in 1671, named Eliza- 
beth. Li 1678 he and his wife, and their daugliter and son-in-law, 
Richard Durham, and his three servants — Thomas Oder, Thomas 
Iloatan, and Mary Stafford, sailed from London in the ship 
Surry, Captain Steven Nichols. They arrived at New Salem in 
the 9th month following. In 1682, James Maddox pm-chased 
one-half of William Hancock's allotment of 1,000 acres, located 
on the south side of Alloways creek, of Isabella Hancock,widow 
of William Hancock, who died in 1779. In 1700, James 
Maddox sold his property to Jeremiah Powell and Edward 
Hancock, and in the year 1688 Elizabeth Maddox, daughter of 
James Maddox, married James Denn. They had two children 
— Margaret and John; Margaret was born 29th of. ith 
month, 1689, and John in 11th of 6th month, 1693. John 
married Elizabeth Oakford, daughter of Charles and Mary 
Oakford, in 1717. She was born at Alloways Creek, 17th of 
3d month, 1698. Their children were Naomi, born in 1718, 
and John Maddox Denn, Jr., born 25th of 7th month, 1721. 
His wife Elizabeth Denn died about the year 1724. In 1725 
he built his brick house which is still standing within a few rods 
of Alloways creek, now o^vned by one of his lineal descendants, 
William Bradway. John married his second wife in 1728,wliose 
name was Leah Paul. There were two children by his last wife 
— Paul Denn, born in 1728, and their daughter, Leah Denn, 
born 18th of 8th month, 1731. John Maddox Denn departed 
this life in 1733. His son, John Denn, married Elizabeth 
Bacon, of Cohansey, daughter of John and Elizabeth Smith 
Bacon, in 1741. They had five children — Rachel, born 30tli of 
2d month, 1745; James, born 19th of 11th month, 1746; 
John, in 1751 ; David, born in 1756 ; Martha, in 1758. Rachel, 
their oldest daughter, married William Griscom, the son of 
Andrew Griscom, in 1773. They had six children — John, 
William, Everett, Sanmel, Rachel, and David Griscom. William 
Griscom, when married, followed the saddle and harness making 



144 GKISCOM, MADDOX AND DENN FAMILIES. 



business in the village of Hancock's Bridge, and after a few 
years lie purchased a farm in the township of Mannington, 
located near to a place called Guineatown, and at that place he 
and his wife resided until her death. Their oldest son, John 
Cirriscoin, commenced teaching school in early life, and subse- 
quently married a young woman by the name of Haskins, and 
had several children. After her death, and in his old age, he 
married Rachel Denn, of Salem, daughter of John and Rhoda 
iJenn. Many years of his life he taught school in the city of 
New York, and was considered one of the best scholars in that 
city. He was elected a professor in chemistry. When he was 
past middle age he went to Europe, where his name as a scholar 
preceded him. On his arrival in England he was at once intro- 
duced among the literary people of that Kingdom; also on the 
Continent — France, Belgium, Germany, and Netherlands. When 
he returned home he published an account of his travels, called 
his "Tour in Europe," which was much read at the time, and 
greatly admired for its easy and beautiful language. I think it 
is deficient in originality of thought, but upon the whole it is a 
credit to the author, and will perpetuate his name to posterity 
as one of the best American scholars in his time. Soon after- 
wards he traveled through most of the cities and towns of the 
Eastern and Middle states lecturing on Joseph Lancaster's system 
of education in common schools. The plan was generally 
adopted. He might be considered the father of that system in 
this country, as Joseph Lancaster was in England. His letters 
addressed to his mother during her last illness, whilst she was 
suffering with that loathsome disease, the cancer, will always 
reflect great credit to his memory for that kind and sympathetic 
feeling tliey expressed to a kind and affectionate parent in her 
great affliction. 

William, their second son, was a blacksmith by occupation 
in his younger days ; his wife was Ann Stewart, the daughter 
of Samuel and Sarah Stewart, of Salem; they had six children. 
Their names were Samuel, William, George, John, Mary and 
Charles Griscom. Samuel, their oldest son, when quite young 
opened a boarding school at Clermont, near Frankford, in 
Philadelphia county, at the same place where his uncle, David 
Griscom, had taught several years before. Greatly to his char- 
acter he made a home for his aged parents until he married ; 
his wife was Sidney Gillingham, the daughter of Yearness Gil- 
lingham ; they had four children. Samuel now resides at 
Galveston, Texas, with two of liis sons. William Griscom, the 
second son, married Mary Stewart, the daughter of James and 



GRISCOM, MADDOX AND DENN FAMILIES. 145 



Anne Stewart, of Cumberland county; his wife died young 
leaving three children — Hannah, Wade and James Stewart; 
liis second wife was Sarah Whitelock, of Frankford, the 
daughter of Isaac WJiitelock ; lie has three children l)y his last 
wife — Isaac, Anne and Sarah. George Griscom is a lawyer, 
and resides in Philadelphia; he married Mercy Brown; they have 
two or three children ; their names I am not acquainted with. 
John Griscom is a physician, and had a very large practice in 
the city of Philadelphia at one time, but his health failing him, 
of late years he has spent a considerable time in Europe for tlie 
purpose of recuperating his failing constitution ; he married 
Margaret Acton, of Salem, the daughter of Clement Acton, 
Sr. I believe they have three children — Clement, Hannah, the 
youngest, I believe, is a son, but his name I do not know. 
Mary Griscom married Samuel Stewart, of Indiana, who was a 
native of the county of Salem, and son of James Stewart, of 
Alio ways Creek ; there were no children by that connection ; 
he died a short time ago, and his widow is now a resident of 
Woodbury. Charles Griscom's wife was Elizabeth Powell, 
widow of Joseph Powell, and daughter of William Denn. 
Charles died within two years ago of the pulmonary consump- 
tion, leaving a widow and six children ; their names are Carrie, 
Lillie, Charles, Everett, Mary and William Griscom. 

David Griscom, the fifth son of William and Ann Griscom, 
was above ordinary men in mental abilities, and a teacher the 
greater part of his life ; liis first wife was Anne Whitelock; she 
died young, leaving no children. After that event he resided 
in the city of New York, as a private teacher for one Joseph 
Walker, an English friend, to educate his two sons. About 
the time they were througli with their education Josepli made 
an extensive tour in Europe with his two sons, and David 
accompanied them, and after tlieir return to this country David 
married his second wife, she being a sister to the first one ; her 
name was Jane Whitelock. He purchased a farm near Wood- 
bury about that time, and started a nursery ; his pliysical health 
was never very strong ; he died a few years ago with that great 
scourge of the human family, pulmonary consumption, leaving 
a widow and six children to mourn their loss ; he was very cir- 
cumspect in his life and conversation, and at his death tliere 
was a vacuum in general society in the neighborliood in M-liich 
he dwelt that is not easily filled. 

Everett Griscom, the third son of AVilliam and Rachel 
Griscom, was drowned, while batliing, about the sixteenth year 
of his age. The whole of that l)ranch of the Griscom family 



146 GRISCOM, MADDOX AND DENN FAMILIES. 



were remarkable for acquiring education above most other 
children, and he was uncommonly precocious in his studies. 
The late Dalymore Harris, Esq., told me he went to the same 
school for some time with John, William, and Everett Griscom, 
and it was astonishing to him, and he had often reflected upon 
it during his life, how readily Everett Griscom comprehended 
any branch of learning he undertook to study. He left all the 
scholars behind ; even his brother John, who was considered an 
adept in acquiring knowledge, could not compete with his 
brother Everett. Mathamatics he comprehended without any 
great effort ; his reading he never heard equalled during his long 
life. This is the testimony of one respecting Everett Griscom, 
who was an excellent judge, and was himself a good scholar, 
and a practical surveyor. Persons of inquiring minds would 
inquire why a whole family of children should be so precocious 
in acquiring knowledge. I believe their intellect was transmitted 
from their mother. Slie was the grand-daughter of John and 
Elizabeth S. Bacon, both of whom, by all accoimts, had more 
than common intellectual abilities. John was one of the Judges 
of Salem county for many years before Cumberland was set off 
from Salem. In those days men were elected to ofiice according 
to their qualifications, not by political rings, which I fear is too 
often done at the present day without regard to their abilities, 
to fill such offices to which they are elected, creditably to them- 
selves and beneficially to the public. 

Samuel Griscom, fourth son, was a bricklayer, and followed 
liis trade for many years in Philadelpliia. He was subsequently 
chosen Superintendent of the Schuylkill Canal and Navigation 
Company. I believe he held that situation at the time of his 
death. His wife was Ann Powell, the daughter of Jeremiah 
Powell, of Alloways Creek. They are both deceased at the 
present time, leaving twelve children — Rachel, David, Sarah, 
Powell, Elizabeth, Samuel, Edwin, William, Horace, Anne, 
Clialkley, and Emmeline. 

David Griscom, their fifth son, married Rachel Stewart,widow 
of Joseph Stewart, of Salem. Her maiden name was Bradway, 
the daughter of William Bradway. David kept the Clermont 
boarding school, near Frankford, for several years. He after- 
Avards purchased a farm in Chester county, Pennsylvania, gave 
up his school and removed to it, and there ended his days, leav- 
ing a widow and one daughter named Rachel. Slie afterwards 
married Artheneal Alsop's son, wlio, I believe, was a school 
teacher. Rachel Griscom, William and RacheFs daughter, 
married, wlien she was past middle age, John Bullock, of 



GRISCOM, MADDOX AND DENN FAMILIES. 



147 



Wilmington, Delaware, who kept a boarding scliool in that city. 

James Denn, the oldest son of John and Elizabeth Deun, 
after the death of his father, became the owner of the patri- 
monial estate ; his wife's maiden name, I believe, was Kirbj, 
native of Upper Pcnn's Neck; tliej had seven children — Eliza- 
beth, Mary, James, John, Martha, Rachel and William. Their 
oldest daughter Elizabeth, married Mark Stewart. Mary Denn 
married Ezra Bradway. James Denn, Jr.'s wife was a Bacon ; 
she left two sons, and one daugliter who married William Hunt. 
Ilis oldest son, Theophilus Denn, died when he was about 
twenty-one years of age. Job Denn, his other son by his first 
wife, is still living, and resides in Salem at the present time. 
James' second wife was Mary Haines ; there were live 
children l)y his last wife — Franklin, John, who is a carpenter, 
living in Salem, and three daughters. Martha Denn married 
Aaron Evans , she left two children — Mary and Charles Evans. 
Rachel Denn's husband was William Abbott, the oldest son of 
Samuel Abbott. Rachel left two children — John and Hannah 
Abbott. William Denn's wife Avas Mary Stewart, the daughter 
of James and Mary Stewart ; they had seven children — Han- 
nah Ami, Beulah, Claj'^ton, Samuel, Charles, Elizabeth and 
Mary. 

James Denn li\'ed to an advanced life very much at his ease, 
having all his father's real estate ; enjoying the natural privilege 
which were abundant in his time, li^dng mostly at home in a 
retired way ; his brother John, was apprenticed at an early age 
in the city of Philadelphia to his uncle, David Bacon, to learn 
the trade of a hatter, and soon after he became of age he 
commenced tlie hatting business in the village of Hancock's 
Bridge. About that time he married Susan Fitzgerald; her 
family belonged to Delaware ; they had three children — Samuel, 
John and Rachel Denn. A few years later he removed to 
Salem and followed his trade on Market street. The house and 
shop w^ere located where Thomas Hilliard's house now is; he 
continued at his trade until he purchased the Cripp's estate in 
Mannington. Soon after he abandoned his trade, removed, and 
took possession of his farm and soon became one of the most 
successful farmers in that township — certainly he was one of 
the best meadow men that ever lived in the county of Salem. 
About that time his son, John Denn, married Rhoda 
Shourds, daughter of Benjamin and Mary Shourds. He 
built, and divided his farm, and his son, John, occupied the 
part he built on until his deatli, which took place when he was 
comparatively a young man, leaving a widow and live children. 



148 GRISCOM, MADDOX AND DENN FAMILIES. 



Their names were Racliel, Mary, Susan, Anne, and Rebecca, 
who died young, Rachel, his daughter, married Professor 
John Griscom, who has since died, leaving her a widow. Mary 
Denn, the second daughter, died a young woman. Susan 
remains single. Anne, the youngest daugliter living, married 
William Gibbon, of Philadelphia ; he has been deceased several 
years, leaving a widow and two children — Susan and Henry 
Gibbon. The son died a few years ago. Tlie daughter resides 
with her mother in Salem. 

John Denn, Sr.'s daugliter Rachel, married Jacob Hufty, 
she being his second wife. She lived but a short time after their 
marriage, leaving no children. Samuel Denn was a merchant 
in the town of Salem for several years, and married at an 
advanced ago, Elizabeth Alford, tlie daughter of Samuel Alford. 
They are both deceased, leaving no offspring. John Denn^ Sr.'s 
second wife was Margaret Hall, daughter of Joseph and Ann 
Hall, of Elsinborough. They had live children — Elizabeth, 
John, Anne, Margaret, and Rebecca Denn. Elizabeth married 
James Woodnutt, the son of Preston Woodnutt. John sold his 
real estate in Mannington that was left to him by his father, to 
George Abbott, and eventually removed to California. Anne 
Denn remains single. Margaret married Edward Bilderback, 
now deceased, leaving her a widow with two children. Rebecca 
married a young man in the State of Maryland, and has been 
deceased several years, leaving one daughter. 

John Denn, several years before his death, made application 
to the Legislature of New Jersey for a law for him to dig a 
canal across the l)ottle of the meadow that lie owned in Lower 
Penn's Neck, opposite his plantation in Mannington. The 
greater part of said meadow formerly belonged to William 
Penn. James Logan sold it to James Whitten, the former 
owner of the meadow, in 1712, He likewise had the power to 
contract the creek as soon as the canal became navigable. The 
law was obtained, and he soon afterwards commenced opera- 
tions. After the canal was completed sufficiently for navigation, 
it was not of the capacity of the creek for draining the low lands 
and the large tracts of meadow that lay above the mouth of the 
canal, consequently the meadows w^ere greatly damaged by not 
having sufficient fall of water, as great as formerly, before the 
creek was contracted, accordingly there was a great opposition 
by the proprietors of land above said canal. Meetings were 
called- to devise some plan to prevent him from proceeding any 
further in his operations. They insisted he should remove the 
obstruction he had already made in tlie creek, but he continued 



GKISCOM, MADDOX AND DENN FAMILIES. l-i9 



firm in his undertalcings, tukiiii;' tlie precaution to keep within 
tlie limits of the hiw. "lie l)ailt a bridg-e across tlie creek for 
his own accommodation until such time as the canal would wear 
sufficiently to vent the water above, so it would not be any great 
detriment to the meadows. After fifty years or more there is 
now a permanent dam and road across the creek where his 
bridge was formerly. Therefore his plans and motives have 
been^'fultilled, notwithstanding he did not live to see it all com- 
pleted on account of his great age. At his death he was more 
than fourscore. 

David Denn, John's younger brother, lived to_ old age single. 
He was a tanner and currier, and carried it on in a small way, 
I believe, while he lived on his brother James' property, near 
Hancock's Bridge. His sister, Martha Denn, married Mark 
Bradway. They had one son, whose name was Mark Bradway. 
Her second husband was Thomas Thompson. She survived him 
many years. 



MASON FAMILY. 

John Mason was a native of Gloucestersliirc, England, and 
resided in the parish of Winchconie. lie emigrated to America 
when a young man, and hxnded.at Phihidelphia in 1683. Soon 
afterward he came to Salem to live, and purchased a town lot 
in the town, containing sixteen acres; it lay on the south side 
of Broadway, and was bounded on the west by Samuel Hedge's 
land. He erected a brick house there, and lived in it for some 
time. In 1686 he purchased 5,000 acres of land, being part of 
the 32,000 acres that was laid off for Eldridge and AVarner, to 
secure the debt that John Fenwick owed them. James Nevell 
sold the whole of the tract in the year before stated. About the 
year 1690, John Mason purchased of Roger Milton 1,000 acres 
of upland and salt marsh, in the tow^nsliip of Elsinborough ; it 
was bounded on the east by Samuel Nicholson's allotment of 
2,000 acres; on the west by Redroc Morris' land. In 1695 he 
bnilt a substantial brick dwelling, left Salem, and lived on his 
landed estate before described. In 1704 lie built a large addi- 
tion to it, which made it one of the largest brick dwellings that 
was in the county at tliat early day. John Mason married 
Sarah Smith, daughter of John Smith, of Ambelbury ; she was 
l)()rn near London, England, 27th of 10th month, 1671. Their 
oldest child, John Mason, Jr., was born 19th of 7th month, 
1697. Their daughter, Ann Mason, was born 21:th of 11th 
month, 1699; William, the son of John and Sarah Mason, was 
born 23d of 11th month, 1701 ; Sarah, daughter of John and 
Sarah Mason, was born 2d of 2d month, 1704 ; Samuel, son of 
John and Sarah Mason, born 15th of the 3d month, 1706 ; 
Tiiomas son of John and Sarah Mason, was born 28th of 
5th month, 1708. Rebecca Mason, born 1710, daughter of 
John and Sarah Mason, owned land in various parts in Fenwick 
tenth; he purchased considerable tract of land in Monmouth 
precinct of Anna Salter, erected a flour mill about 1705 ; it 
is now known as Maskell mill. He was appointed a Commis- 
sioner for public highways in 1706 ; was a member of the Leg- 
islature for two or tln-ee years, and one of the Justices of Salem 



MASON FAMILY. 151 



Courts for a number of years. He was a large landholder in 
the State of Delaware, likewise in Pennsylvania in the neigh- 
borhood of Chester. Plis descendants are not very numerons ; 
there are none at the present time by the name of Mason of his 
descendents in this county. John Goodwin Mason, who died 
in 1839, was the last of the male descendants. There are quite 
a number in the female line who are direct descendants of John 
Mason, the emigrant. John Mason, the son of Thomas and 
grandson of John Mason, Sr., was born about 1729; his first 
wife was Ann, the daughter of Sarah Hall, of Salem; by her 
he had one daughter — Sarah Mason, who married Elgar Brown, 
a native of Pennsylvania ; tliey had four children — Ann, Eli- 
sha, Israel and John M. Brown. John Mason's second wife 
was Susanna, the daughter of William and Mary Groodwin; 
they had five children — Thomas, Mar}^, Ann, Elizabeth and 
John G. Mason ; Thomas Mason, their son, married Hannah, 
the daughter of Joseph and Hannah Butcher Hancock ; they 
had issue, one daughter, who married Eichard Miller Acton, of 
Salem. Mary Mason, daughter of John and Susanna Mason, 
first husband was Abner Beesley, of Alloways Creek; they 
had four children — Mary, William G., Benjamin and Thomas 
Mason Beesley ; her second husband was Job Ware ; they had 
two sons — Job and Elijah Ware. Ann Mason, daughter of 
John and Susannah Mason, married Joseph Thompson, son of 
Joshua and Sarah Thompson ; they had three daughters who 
lived to grow and settle in life; Susan, Mdio married Joseph 
Pancoast ; Sarah married Thomas Shourds ; and Ann Thomp- 
son married Thomas Fogg. Elizabeth, daughter of John and 
Susannah Mason, died a young woman unmarried. John G. 
Mason, the youngest son of John and Susanna Mason never 
married, died aged iif ty-six years. 

Its probable Thomas Mason emigrated from England to 
AVest New Jersey, aliout the same time his brother, John 
Mason, did; he resided in the town of Salem some length of time. 
After the death of John Fenwick he purchased 500 acres of 
land in Upper Mannington, being part of Fen wick's grove; he 
soon became a citizen of that township and continued to reside 
there until his death. In 1720 he purchased of Sanniel Fen- 
wick Hedge 500 acres of land, being part of Hedgefield. 
There is nothing to show that he even took an active part in 
the public aifairs of the Colony. I see by the court records 
he occasionally served as one of the Grand Jurors. The fol- 
lowing are the names of Thomas and Elizabeth Mason's children: 
Mary, was born in Mannington 2d of 7th month, 1701 ; Aaron, 



152 MASON FAMILY. 



was born in 1702; Martha, was born 12th of 9th month, 1704; 
Joseph, was born 14th of 8th month, 1706. James Mason, 
son of Thomas and Elizabeth Mason, born 11th of 6th montli, 
1709 ; he became in possession of nearly all of the large landed 
estate in the townsliip of Mannington that belonged to his 
father, Thomas Mason. He married a daughter of Abel 
Nicholson; tliey had no issue; he devised the greater part of 
his landed estate to his nephew, James Mason Woodnutt, son 
of Jonathan Woodnutt. James left his mill and farm adjoin- 
ing to his wife's niece, Ann, the daughter of John Nicholson. 



MILLER FAMILY. 

The most reliable information that I have obtained, is that 
Joseph Miller came from the State of Connecticnt in 1698, 
and settled at Cohansey. His occnpation was that of a land 
surveyor. It is well known that at that time, and for many 
years previous, New England, excepting Rhode Island, was not 
a place Avhere the Quakers could meet in peace, and worship 
God according to the dictates of their conscience. Many of 
them went to reside in Rhode Island under a more liberal 
government, created l)y Roger Williams, and a large number 
emigrated to the Middle States. Such men as Robert Zanes, 
Richard Lippincott and their families, and several others, emi- 
grated as early as 1675. Joseph Miller and his Avife had one 
son — Ebenezer, born at Cohansey, in 1702. At the death of 
Richard Tindall, Joseph was chosen deputy surveyor for the 
lower section of Fenwick's tenth. There is no mention of him 
as a public surveyor later than 13th of 9th month, 1729 ; he 
re-surveyed at that time a tract of land of 1,000 acres for John 
Brick, lying on the west branch of Gravelly Run or Stoe Ceeek. 
The said tract of land had formerly been surveyed by Benjamin 
Acton, of Salem, for Samuel Dumming, of Maryland, by order 
of James Logan, agent of William Penn, Governor of the 
province of Pennsylvania. My opinion is that he died about 
the year 1730, and his son, Ebenezer Miller was his successor as 
a public surveyor. In 1724 he married, I think, Sarah Collier, 
daughter of John Collier; their son, Ebenezer Miller, Jr., was 
born 15th of 9th month, 1725 ; their daughter, Hannah Miller, 
was born in 1728 ; Josiah Miller, in 1731 ; their son, Andrew 
Miller, in 1732 ; A¥illiani Miller, in 1735 ; John C. Miller, in 
1737; Mark Miller, in 1740; Sarali Miller, in 1743, and 
Rebecca Miller, 17th of 5th month, 1747. Tlie father of the 
above mentioned children died in the town of Greenwich at the 
age of seventy-two years, with a comfortable hope that all 
would be well with him in a future state. His daughter, Han- 
nah, in 1740, married Cliarles Fogg, son of Daniel Fogo-, of 
Alloways Creek ; they had two children ; their eldest daughter, 
Sarah Fogg, was born in the 5th month, 1747, and died the 
20 



154: MILLER FAMILY. 



following fall. In IT-iO their daughter, Hannah Fogg, was 
was born; she afterwards married William Hancock, son of 
Thomas Hancock, of Elsinborougli, being his second wife. In 
1771 their son, William Hancock, Jr., was born, and died 
within the same year; their son, John, was born 24tli of 4th 
month, 1773, and their daughter, Elizabeth, was born in 1776. 
William Hancock died when his son John was about ten years 
of age, leaving his real estate to his son, subject to his mother's 
thirds. John, before he arrived at the age of twenty-one, went 
into the mercantile business at Hancock's Bridge, as a partner 
with the late Captain John Tuft, of Salem ; he had a delicate 
constitution, and there appears to have l)een an unpleasant feel- 
ing between him and his half-sister, wlio had married a j^oung 
man by the name of Daniels, of Alloways Creek; he was 
determined that if he should die his sister should have nothing 
of his estate, and he accordingly made liis will on the day he 
arrived at the age of twenty-one, leaving his landed proj)erty to 
his cousin, William Hancock, son of Thomas Hancock, and his 
personal property to his mother; he died in a short time after- 
wards. His mother's second husband was Aaron Thompson, 
and they had no children. Hannah survived her husl)and 
many years, and in the latter part of her life made her home 
witli Elizabeth Miller, she being a cousin of Elizabetli's 
husband, Richard Miller. In that family she ended her days 
at a very advanced age. Not long before her death she 
met Thomas Jones, Sr., on Salem street, and he accosted 
her in this way: "Mrs. Thompson, I am sorry to see you 
" lay aside your old-fashioned bee-hive bonnet that the aged 
" Quaker ladies liave worn generally during my time. I was 
" in hopes you would adhere to the old-fashioned bonnets 
" whilst you lived. For my part," he continued, "I expect to 
" continue in the old custom of having my hair done up in a cue 
" whilst I live." 

Ebenezer Miller, Jr., in 1751, married Ruth Wood, daughter 
of Richard AVood, of Stoe Creek township, Cumberland county. 
She was born in 1732. Their children were born in Cumbei-- 
land. Their daughter Hannah was l)orn 14th of 1st month, 
1753; their son Ebenezer in 1761, and died in 1763; Priscilla 
was bor;i in 1763 ; their second son Ebenezer Miller, was born in 
1766, and their daughter Sarah in 1768. Some two thousand 
acres of the Pledger and Lafetra allotment of 6000 acres, now 
known as Quaker Neck, came in possession of Benjamin Wyn- 
coop, he being an Englishman ; it's more than probable that 
the said Wyncoop purchased the Itind of one of the lieirs of 



MILLER FAMILY. 155 



Ilypolite Lafetra. The liouse is still standing that was Lnilt 
1 )j one of the family in the beginning of the last century. The 
jM'operty that the old mansion stands on is owned at present by 
George Griscom. It is certain, however, that at the commence- 
ment of the Revolutionary War he was the owner of the whole 
allotment which is now knoM^n as Quaker Neck, At that period 
all the land from what is called Stone Bridge, which crosses the 
branch of Pledger creek, called then the Neck, extending to the 
Salem line, was covered with heavy timber. It went undei" the 
name of Wyncoop's woods. Great changes have been wrought 
there within 100 years. At the present time there is not less 
than ten farms on said tract; most of them have large and 
costly mansions, l)arns and other buildings, and the lands are 
liighly cultivated. Upon the whole it is one of the most desira- 
l)le situations for an agriculturalist in the county. Benjamin 
Wyncoop being an Englishman by birth, had a strong predelic- 
tion in favor of his native land. Traditional accounts state he 
had fears that for the part he took in favor of England his 
property would be confiscated, and he accordingly offered it for 
sale. 

After selling his possessions here he removed to Philadel- 
phia, and owing to the depreciation in the currency, he 
l)ecame poor, and died a few years afterwards in one of the 
almshouses of that city. John Moimtain, an Irishman by 
birth, who, by industry and econcjmy, in a short time had 
become able to stock a farm, was fortunate enough to rent that 
large and inprgved farm of John Mason, called the Mason's 
Point Farm, in Elsinborough, at a very moderate rent. In a 
few years he accumulated monej^ enough to purchase the home- 
stead of Benjamin Wyncoop. At the time of his death Moun- 
tain left one daughter, Mary, who became the owner of all his 
real estate. Richard Parrott subsequently married her, and 
they had two children named Mary Ann and Isabella Parrott. 
Mary Ann became the wife of Hedge Thompson, of Salem. 
Their children's names I mentioned in the account of the Hedge 
family. Isabella remained single and lived to an old age. The 
landed estate of their mother was divided between them. George 
Griscom is now the owner of Mary Ann's share, and George 
Abbott, Isabella's land. George Hall bought a lai-ge tract of 
land of AVyncoop, l)eing part of tlie Neck, all woodland at the 
time. Lucas Gibbs' of Salem, purchased al^out 175 acres, l3'ing 
next to the town of Salem, and his brother Richard Gibbs 
bought 200 acres or more adjoining the homestead. Both of 
the Gibbs were Salem men. Lucas Gibbs' property was 



156 MILLER FAMILY. 



afterwards owned by Job Tyler, a native of Cumberland. 
The Fogg family are now the owners of Richard Gibbs' 
estate. 

Ebenezer Miller, Jr,, purchased a farm of Wyncoop. — 
Richard Ware, of AUoways Creek, bought land and lived there 
the remainder of his days ; Josiah Wistar is tlie present owner. 
Mark Miller, brother of Ebenezer Miller, purchased land known 
at this time as the David E. Davis farm. William Abbott, of 
Elsinboro, bought the farm and ended his days where his 
grandson Samuel Abbott now owns and lives. Benjamin 
Wright likewise bought 100 acres adjoining the Abbotts. — 
Benjamin in his will devised the said farm to his grandson, 
Benjamin Wright ; Joseph Waddington is the present owner. 
Ebenezer Miller and his brother, Mark Miller, removed from 
Cumberland, and made their homes on the lands they purchased 
of Wyncoop. Mark's wife was Pliebe Foster ; they had live 
children — four daugliters and one son — William F. Miller. 
Mary Miller, their eldest daughter, married Jolm Sheppard, of 
Greenwich. One married Jacob Wood. William F. Miller's 
tirst wife was Esther Cooper, native of Gloucester; she died 
several years before William, leaving one son named Franklin 
Miller. William F. Miller's second wife was a Newbold from 
Burlington county, and she survived her husband several years. 
Franklin Miller married Elizabeth Acton, daughter of Benjamin 
and Sarah Acton ; both of them died young of pulmonary 
consumption, leaving one daughter, Hetty Miller, who inherited 
a large estate from her grandfather and father; She was the 
wife of David E. Davis, formerly of Pilesgrove, who is now 
deceased. 

Josiah Miller, the second son of Ebenezer Miller, Sr., 
married Letitia Wood in 1760, daughter of Richard Wood, 
Sr., of Stoe Creek township, Cumberland county, she l)eing 
a sister of his brother Ebenezer's wife. They had five chil- 
dren — Josiah Miller, Jr., born 12th of 12th month, 1761 ; 
Richard Miller, born 15tli of 4th month, 1761 ; John Miller, 
l)orn in 1767 ; Letitia Miller, born in 1769, who subsequently 
married William Reeve ; and in 1771 Mark Miller was l)orn. 
Josiah Miller about that period ])urchased a large tract of 
land in Lower Mannington, which formerly belonged to 
the Sherron family, it being the southern part of James 
Sherron's allotment of 1,000 acres that lie bought of John 
Fenwick in 1676, being (considered one of the finest tracts of 
taljle land within Fenwick's tenth. Josiah soon after liis pur- 
cliase removed with his family from his native county and 



MILLER FAMILY, 1 6T 



resided on his land in Maniiington ; lie huilt tlie brick house 
where his great-grand-son, Samuel L. J. Miller, owns and lives. 
I think his two youngest sjns, Jolm and Mark Miller, died 
young ; his wife Letitia survived him several years. Josiah 
Miller, Jr., never married. After the death of his mother 
he lived with his brother Richard, and after the death 
of his brother he continued making his home with his widow 
whilst he lived. In his will he devised his farm to his 
sister-in-law, Eliza])eth Miller, during her natural life, and 
afterward to her son Josiah Miller, and to his nephew 
Josiah Miller Reeve, he devised $2,500, with other legacies to 
his relatives. 

The land Josiah Miller owned in Mannington was divided 
between his two sons — Josiah and Richard. The latter mar- 
ried Elizabetli, daughter of Richard Wistar, of Philadelphia, 
by whom he had three children — Sarah, Letitia and Josiah. 
Andrew Miller, third son of Ebenezer, married Rachel, daugh- 
ter of Elisha and Abigail Bassett, of Pilesgrove. Andrew 
died before he reached middle age, leaving a widow, and two 
children, named Daniel L. and Rebecca. Rachel Miller, a 
short time after the death of her husband, opened a small store, 
whilst her son, Daniel, went into partnership with Abram Bois 
and the late Judge Thomas Sinnickson, in the mercantile busi- 
ness. The store was located where the drug store, known as 
Ingham's Building, now is. In the year 1809 he withdrew 
from the firm and moved to Philadelphia, as also did his mother 
and sister. The two latter kept a boarding house on Arch 
street and opened a retail dry goods store on Second street, 
wliich shows that they possessed more than ordinai-y business 
capacities. Daniel L. Miller, the son, and William Nicholson, 
Jr., who had left his native county in tlie same year opened a 
wholesale and retail dry goods store on Second street, under 
the name of Miller & Nicholson. About that period Daniel 
married Hannah Nicliolson, daughter of Abel Nicholson, a 
citizen of tlie upper part of Glo\icester county, but whose fore- 
fathers were natives of Salem. In 1812 William Nicholson 
withdrew from the firm, and James Ivinsey, of Salem, and a 
young man by the name of Cooper, of Pliildelphia, became 
partners with Daniel L. Miller. The firm was known as Mil- 
ler, Kinsey & Co. Daniel and his wife had eight children — 
Charles, Elizabeth, Daniel L., William, Andrew, Rachel, Ann 
and Hannah. William, the oldest, married Ann Maria Seth, 
of Salem. Elizabeth became the wife of William Parrish, the 
son of the eminent Dr. Joseph Parrish, of Philadelphia. 



158 MILLER FAMILY. 



Andrew married Josepliiiie Bunting. Daniel L. Miller, Jr.'s 
wife was Ann Ridgway. Rachers husband was William Bid- 
die, the son of tlie late Clement Biddle ; he kept a large hard- 
ware store in Philadelphia. I believe his sons and grand-sons 
are still in that business, and the lirm is one of the wealthiest 
in that line in the city. Anna married Robert Biddle, the 
brother of William. Daniel L. Miller continued in the mer- 
cantile business until near the close of a long life ; his wife is 
also deceased at the present time. 

William Miller, the fourth son of Ebenezer, born 1737, mar- 
ried Mary Magere, a native of Wilmington, Del., about the 
year 1760, and had three children — AVilliam, Jr., Ebenezer and 
Elizabeth. William Miller, Jr., married Rebecca White, 
daughter of William White, of Pilesgrove, and they had two 
children, both daughters — Sarali Ann and Eliza. Sarah Ann 
married Amos Buzby, the son of Joseph Buzby. Eliza Miller 
married Lewis Hancock, son of William Hancock, of Elsinbor- 
ough. 

John, fifth son of Ebenezer Miller, married Margaret Bacon, 
of Greenwich, in 1767 ; she was the daughter of Joseph and 
Mary Bacon, and was born 20th of 2d month, 1737. John 
and his wife had five children ; their oldest son, Joseph, was 
born 16th of 6th month, 1768 ; their daughter, Mary, was 
born 1770 ; John Miller, Jr., was born 15th of 3d month, 
1772 ; William was born 1771, and Isaac 20th of 5th month, 
1776. Joseph Miller, John's oldest son, was a tanner and cur- 
rier, and he and his brother John carried on that business in 
the town of Greenwich the greater part of tlieir lives. Joseph's 
first wife was Sarah Dawson, of Mount Holly, by whom he 
had four or five children. They all died young except Marga- 
ret Miller, who is still living, aged more than three-score-and- 
ten. His second wife was Letitia Matlack, widow of William 
Matlack, of Upper Greenwich, Gloucester county ; sluj lived 
only four or five years, leaving no children by her second hus- 
band. Joseph's third Avife was Mary Allen, daughter of 
Anthony and Mary Allen, residents of Woodbury ; lie had one 
son by his last wife^Joseph Allen Miller. Joseph survived 
his last wife a number of years. Besides attending to his trade 
he transacted considerable public business, such as settling- 
estates, for which business he was well calculated. The inhabi- 
tants of Greenwich had full confidence in his integrity and 
impartiality in transacting important public business ; he died 
at a very advanced age, regretted by a large circle of relatives 
and friends. 



MILLEK FAMILY. 159 



His son, Joseph Alleii Miller, received a good English 
education; he married Ann Fogg, daughter of Samuel 
Fogg, of Stoe Creek township ; two children — Joseph and 
Franklin Avere born to them. Josej^h with his family removed 
to Salem several years ago, and he was soon after elected 
teacher of the male department of Friends' School in that city. 
After a few years he was chosen principal in one of the public 
scliools, and continued in that situation several years ; he is 
now deceased. His wnfe soon after^ coming to Salem opened a 
trimming store, and by good management and close application 
to her business, has succeeded admirably. Mary, the daughter 
of John Miller, Sr., married George Brown of Upper Green- 
wich, Gloucester county, and had six children, four daughters 
and two sons; their sons names were James and Miller Brown. 
John Miller, second son of John and Margaret Miller, was a 
tanner and currier by trade, and carried on that business in 
partnership with his brother Joseph ; he married Margaret 
Evans, daughter of Joshua Evans, of Haddontield; he was 
remarkable for his exemplary deportment in his intercourse 
with his fellow men, and for his unquestionable piety. It can 
be said of him, with truth, "Behold a true Israelite M-ithont 
guile." He and his wife had four cliildren — John, Evan, Mary 
and Mark. John's wife was Mary Andrews, daughter of 
Josiah and Elizabeth Andrews; they had five children — Eliza- 
l)etli, Margaret, John, Annie and Franklin. Mary Miller mar- 
ried Mark Rulon, and they both died young, leaving no chil- 
dren. Evan Miller married Ann Lane, a widow, of Cincinnati, 
Ohio ; her native place was Greenwich, and her maiden name 
was Test. 

William Miller, third son of John Miller, Sr., married 
Susan Goodwin, daughter of Louis Goodwin, of Elsinboro. — 
There were four children by this marriage — Louis, Rebecca., 
George and Susan. Louis married Emily Lippincott and 
removed to the State of Ohio over forty years ago. Rebecca 
married Charles Harmer, of Greenwich, and she died in a 
short time afterwards. George Miller went to Philadelphia 
many years ago and opened a confectionery store on Market 
street, in which business he has prospered. Susan Miller, the 
youngest, married William Nicholson, and she and her husband 
have lived most of the time since their marriage in Philadel- 
])liia ; slie died recently, leaving four children — Rachel, Susan, 
William and Elizabeth Miller. Isaac Miller, foin-th son of 
John Miller, married Mary Webster, of Stoe Creek ; they 
had three daughters — Phel)e, Lctitia and Ann Miller. Pliebe 



160 MILLER FAMILY. 



was a Findley. Letitia married Thomas BroMai, of Hope- 
well township, Cumberland county. Ann's husband was Jolm 
Piitner. 



MORRIS FAMILY. 

Redroe Morris, son of Lewis Morris, was born in Wales, in the 
Kingdom of England, about the year 1G58. In 1683, Redroe 
Morris, with several others, emigrated to the province oi Penn- 
sylvania; they landed at Philadelphia, in the 9th month, 1683 ; 
in a short time afterwards he removed to Salem to dwell, and 
from thence to Elsinborough, on part of Richard Guy's allot- 
ment of land, that Samuel Carpenter, of Philadelphia., had pre- 
viously purchased. About that time he man-ied Jail Baty, 
daughter of Richard Baty ; she was born in Yorkshire, at a 
place called Ilumpford, about 1658. She emigrated in company 
"with Robert Ashton, for Pennsylvania, in the ship called the 
Shoveld, of Stockton, Captain John Howell, master ; they 
sfiiled from Hull, on the 8tli day of 3d month 1686 ; and 
landed at New Castle in the iiftli month following. At that 
time it was in the district of Pennsylvania. Redroe and his 
wife Jail Morris, had six children, all of them born in Elsinbor- 
ough. Jonathan Morris, their eldest son, was born 16th of 12th 
month, 1690, he died a minor ; Joseph, the son of Redroe and 
Jail Morris, was Ijorn 6tli of 6th month ; Sarah the daugh- 
ter of Redroe and Jail Morris, was born 16tli of 12th month, 
1693 ; Lev^is, the son of Redroe and Jail Moore, was born 23d 
of 11th month, 1695 ; David, the son of the before mentioned 
parents, was born in 1698. Redroe Morris died in 1701, aged 
nearly forty-three years ; he was an active and useful mem- 
ber of Salem Monthly Meeting of Friends. At the time of his 
death he was owner of 1300 acres of land in Elsinborough; in 
liis w'ill he directed his real estate to be equally divided among 
his three surviving sons — Joseph, Lewis and David Morris. He 
had also a large personal estate, which with his slaves, he left to 
his widow and daughter, Sarah Morris. His friend, Nathaniel 
Ciiam bless, of AUoways Creek, was tlie Executor. His widow 
Jail Morris, married John Hart, of Salem, in 1703 ; they had 
issue, one son — John Hart. Joseph Morris became tlie owner of 
the homestead of his father ; he married and died young, leaving 
one daughter — Margaret Morris; she subsequently married Clem- 
21 



162 MORRIS FAMILY 



ent, the son of AVilliam Hall, Jr., and Elizabeth Smith Hall, of 
IMannington. Clement and his wife, Margaret Plall, had six 
children, — two daughters and four sons, — Ann, Sarah, Clement, 
John, Joseph and Morris Hall. Ann married in 1772, John, 
the eldest son of William and Mary Morris Goodwin. Sarah, 
the second daughter of Clement and Margaret Hall, mari-ied 
Dr. Thomas Rowen, of Salem. Clement, the son of Clement and 
Margaret M. Hall, married Rebecca Kay, of the county of 
Gloncester. John Hall, the second son of Clement and Mar- 
garet Hall, resided in Salem, dying, leaving no issue. Joseph 
Hall, son of Clement and Margaret Hall, married Ann, the 
daughter of Joseph and Rebecca Brick, of Elsinborough. Mor- 
ris, the youngest son of Clement and Margaret Hall, married 
Lydia Potts, of Cumberland County. Their children are men- 
tioned in tlie genealogy of the Hall family. 

Lewis, the son of Redroe and Jail Morris born 1695, married 
Sarah Fetters, of Salem. Lewis and his wife left three daugh- 
ters — Sarah, Mary, and Ann Morris. Sarah, the eldest daugh- 
ter, married Thomas, the eldest son of John and Susanna Smitli 
Goodwin ; the latter was the daughter of John Smith, of Smith- 
Held ; Mary, the daughter of Lewis and Sarah Morris, married 
William Goodwin, In-other of Thomas Goodwin. AV^illiam and 
liis wife had live children — John, Lewis, Susanna, Mary and 
William Goodwin, John, the eldest son, married a Hall. Lewis 
was twice married, his tirst wife was a Zanes ; his second, was 
Rachel, the daughter of William Nicholson, of Mannington. 
Susanna, the eldest daughter of William and Mary Goodwin, 
was twice married; her first husband was John, the son of Thomas 
Mason, of Elsinborongli ; her second husband was Joshua Thomp- 
son, of Alloways Creek, son of Joshua and Grace Thompson, of 
Elsinborough ; Mary, the daughter of William and Mary Good- 
win, married Thomas Hancock. AYilliam, the son of William 
and Mary Goodwin, married Elizaljeth Woodnutt, of Manning- 
ton. Ann Morris, the daughter of Lewis Morris, by Sarah his 
wife, married Samuel, the son of Elisha and Al)igail Bassett, of 
Pilesgrove ; they had six children — Grace, William, Samuel 
Morris, Davis, and Ann Bassett. Sarah Fetters, the M^fe of 
Lewis Morris, was a sister of Erasmus Fetters ; he was a tanner 
and currier ; he resided in Salem, on Yorke street ; the house in 
which he lived was a brick, with a hipped roof, it was standing 
in ISIO. Erasmus died in 1760 ; in his will executed in 1756, 
he left £10 each to William and Mary M. Goodwin's 
daughters ; the like sum to each of James Chambless, Jr.'s chil- 
dren — Sarah, Mary, and Rebecca Chambless. The two first 



MOREIS FAMILY 163 



named l)ecaine the wives of AYilliam and David Smith's of Man- 
nington. Erasmus left to his niece Ann, the wife of Samuel 
Bassett, £50, and the remainder of his estate, real and personal, 
to his nephew, Henry Yanmeter, of Pittsgrove. David, the 
youngest son of Redroe Morris, born in 1698, married. He 
and his wife Jane Morris, had one son — Joshua Morris, horn 
3d of loth month, 1723. The child and mother died in a short 
time afterwards. David it appears, died comparatively a young 
man, making a will, leaving his estate to his half-brother, John 
Hart. Tlie real estate was large, comprising about 400 
acres, also a flour mill located at the mouth of Mill Creek, 
near Fort Point. However there were 160 acres of salt marsh 
included with the -100 acre tract. John Hart sold his real 
estate, (that was devised to him by his half brother David 
Morris), to Col. Benjamin Holme, about 1T60. To show what 
energy and perseverance ^^^ll accomplish, Margaret Hall Holme, 
after the death of her husband Jolm Holme, the son of Col. 
Benjamin Holme, purchased the 160 acres of salt marsh that was 
owned by her husband, and part of David Morris' estate, for- 
merly ; she banked and reclaimed it from the overflow of the 
tide, notwithstanding great opposition from some of her neigh- 
bors, who owned meadow adjoining ; that being over fifty years 
ago. The said meadow is at the present day as productive and 
profitable as any otlier portion of the large landed estate of 
the Morris'. 



NICHOLSON FAMILY. 

Samuel Nicliolson, liv^ed in Wisetoii in the coimtj of Not- 
tinghamsliire ; he was a husbandman; liis wife was named Ann; 
they had live chikh-en, all born in England — Parobale, was 
born 20tli of 2d month, 1659 ; she married Abraham Strand ; 
Elizabeth Nicholson, the second daughter of Samuel and Ann 
Nicholson, born 20th of 3d month, 1664; she married John 
Abbott, and left three daughters — Rachel, Mary and Elizabeth 
Abbott. Samuel, the son of Samuel and Ann Nicholson, born 
6tli of 3d month, 1666 ; Joseph, the son of Samuel and Ann 
Nicholson, born 30th of 2d month, 1669 ; Abel, the son of 
Samuel and Ann Nicholson, born 2d of 5th month, 1672. 
Samuel and Ann, his wife, with their live children, emigrated 
in company with John Fenwick. With a number of others 
they landed at where Salem is, on the 5th of 10th month, 
1675. Samuel had purchased, previous to their sailing, 2,000 
acres of land ; the said land was surveyed to him in 1676, 
together witli sixteen acres for a town lot, in new Salem. He 
died about the year 1690, on his property in Elsinborough ; he 
was the !^iirst Justice of the Peace in Fenwick Colony. His 
widow, Ann Nicholson, died in 1693 ; in her will she devised 
her estate to her three grand-daughters — Rachel, Mary and 
Elizabeth Abbott, and her three sons — Samuel, Josepli and 
Abel Nicholson. Sanmel Nicholson, Jr., married, and he and 
his wife both dying soon afterwards; he made a will devising 
his large landed estate to his two brothers — Joseph and Abel 
Nicholson; that was about 1695. Joseph parted with his 
share, which included the old homestead of his parents, located 
on the northern bank of Momnouth river, now known as 
Alloways, to George Abbott, Henry Stubluns and John 
Froth. Joseph Nicholson married and settled near Haddon- 
iield, Camden county. Abel, the youngest son of Samuel 
Nicholson, and Ann liis wife, married Mary, the dangliter of 
William and Joanna Tyler; she was born in England in the 
lltli month, 1677. Abel and liis wife resided in Elsinborough; 
they were married about 169'1. Sarali, their eldest cliild, was 



NICHOLSON FAMILY. 1C)1 



born 19tli of 11th luoiitli, 16fc»l ; Rachel, the daughter of 
Abel and Mary Nicholson, was born 7th of 7th month, 1698 ; 
Abel, the son of Abel, by Mary his wife, was born 13th of 
1st month, 1700 ; Joseph, the son of Abel and Mary Nichol- 
son, was born 4tli of 12tli month, 1701 ; William, the son of 
Abel and Mary Nicholson, was born 15th of 9th month, 1708 ; 
he became the owner of 500 acres of Hedgelield, in Manning- 
ton ; he built a brick mansion on the property, which is still 
standing ; he married, he and his wife had three children — 
llachel, Ruth and William Nicholson, the latter married Sarah 
Townsend, of Penn's Neck. llachel, their oldest child, was 
born 9th of 11th month, 1774 ; Milesant, the daughter of 
William and Sarah Nicholson, was born 3d of Sth month, 1776; 
William, the son of AVilliam and Sarah Nicholson, was born 
Sth of 3d month, 1779, he died young ; Samuel, the son cf 
William and. Sarah Nicholson, was born 2d of 7th month, 
1781 ; William, the son of William and Sarah Nicholson, was 
born 16th of 11th month, 1783 ; Sarah, the daughter of 
William and Sarah Nicholson, was born in 1791 ; Daniel, the 
son of William and Sarah Nicholson, was born 19tli of 1st 
month, 1786, and Ann, the youngest daughter of William and 
Sarah Nicholson, was born in 1793. Ann, the daughter of 
Abel and Mary Nicholson, was born 15th of 11th month, 1707; 
Ruth Nicholson, daughter of Abel and Mary Nicholson, was 
born 9th of 9th month, 1713 ; Samuel, the son of Abel and 
Mary Nicholson, was born 12th month, 1716 ; John Nicholsor.j 
the youngest son of Abel and Mary Nicholson, was born 3d 
of 6tli month, 1719. Ann, the daughter of Abel and Mary 
Nicholson, married John Brick, Jr., of Gravelly Run, it is 
now known as Jericho, Cumberland county. John was one of 
the Judges of Salem courts for a number of years; he died 
23d of ist month, 1758 ; he and his wife, Ann Nicholson 
Brick, had eight children — Mary, their eldest daughter, who 
married Nathaniel Hall, of Manningtou, was born lOth of 2d 
month, 1730. Elizabeth, the daughter of John and Ann 
Brick, was Ijorn 4th of 7th month, 1732, she was afterwards 
the wife of John Reeve, of Cohansey. John, the son of John 
and Ann Brick, was born lOtli of 11th month, 1733 ; Joseph, 
the son of John and Ann Brick, was born 24th of 3d month, 
1735 ; Joseph was twice married, his first wife was Rebecca 
Abbott; his second wife was Martha Reeve. Ann, tiie daughter 
of John and Ann Brick, was born 23d of 1st nu)nth, 1738 ; 
she sul)sequently married Joseph Clement, of Iladdonlield, in 
1761. Hannah, the daughter of John and Ann Brick, was born 



1G() NICHOLSON FAMILY. 



8t]i of 8(1 inontli, 1741 ; Rutli, the daughter of John and 
Ann Brick, was horn 1st of lOth month, 1742; she married 
Benjamin Reeve in 1761. Jane Brick was horn 10th of 1st 
montli, 1743. 

Sanniel ISTicholson, the son of Ahel and Mary Nicholson, 
married Sarah Dennis, of Cohansey ; tliey had two children — 
Sanniel and Grace Nicholson, tlie latter married Andrew, the 
son of Joshua Thompson, of Elsinhorongh. Samuel Nicholson, 
Jr., married the daughter of Nathaniel and Mary B. Hall, of 
Mannington ; there were live children — John, Ann, Mary, 
Samuel and Josiah Nicholson. John Nicholson, the youngest 
son of Aljel and Mary Nicholson, married Jane Darkin, the 
daugliter of John Darkin. John and his wife lived and owned 
a large farm adjoining the Tylers on the north side of Alio ways 
creek ; they had several children — Ann, Abel and Jane Darkin, 
and one or two otlier daughters. Al)el became the owner of 
the real estate of his parents ; he died a young man ; the prop- 
erty was divided among his sisters. Darkin Nicholson became 
the owner, by his grand-father's (John Darkin) mil, of the large 
and valuable estate in Elsinborough, known as the Windham 
estate ; it is a point of land adjoining tlie Salem town marsh ; 
on that point the New Haven colony located -in 1640. Darkin 
married Estlier Brown, a native of Chester county, but at the 
time of her marriage, she lived in Elsinborough with her 
mother, wlio had recently married William Goodwin, Sr. ; she 
was William's second wife. The cliildren of Darkin and 
Estlier Nicholson were Mary, Esther, James, Darkin and John 
Nicholson. Mary was the first wife of Elisha Bassett, of Man- 
nington. Esther Nicholson married John Thompson, of 
Elsinborough, the son of John and Mary Brad way Thompson. 



OGDEX FAMILY. 

John Ogden was a native of England. It appears by the 
record, he was a man of consideralile distinction in his nati\'e 
country, and possessed more than ordinai-y intellect. For his 
meritorious conduct towards his sovereign, Charles the L, King 
of England, lie was presented witli a Coat-of-Arms, from Charles 
the II., with this motto, " And if I make a show, I do not 
" boast of it." This John Ogden was one of the persons to whom 
King Charles the II. granted the Charter of Connecticut 
in 1662. The record of the family states he lived for a length 
of time on Long Island. About the year 1673, he settled at 
Elizabethto^vn, in East Jersey, when in connection with Bailey 
Baker and Watson, he purchased a tract of land of tlie Indians, 
for which a patent was granted by George Nichols, who was 
Governor of the colony under the Dutch, while tliey held New 
York. The Elizabethtown grant, was the occasion of mucli 
contention with English proprietors, and they looked upon 
Ogden as a leading malcontent. The record of his is correct, 
he Avas a true patriot, a leader of tlie people, an earnest Christ- 
ian and an acknowledged pioneer of the oldest town in the State, 
whose house the first white child of the settlement was born. 
He died in the early part of 1682, leaving manj^ descendants. 
His wife was Jane Bond, sister of Robert Bond. Judge Elmer 
writes, (being well acquainted with the history of the State), 
"that the descendants of John and Jane Ogden have held dis- 
" tinguished places in the government of the State, among whom 
" were Aaron Ogden, Governor in 1813, and his son Elias D. B. 
" Ogden, Judge of the Supreme Court." 

The family of the Ogdens are very numerous both in East 
and West Jersey. John Ogden, the grandson of the emifj-rant, 
came to Fairlield as early as 1690, and became a large land- 
holder in that region ; he likewise became the owner of a large 
tract of land of 655 acres, on the north side of|Cohansey,in Green- 
wich township, adjoining lands of Nicholas and Leonard Gib- 
bon. In 1729, the said John Ogden sold part of said land 
adjoining Pine Mount, to Ebenezer Miller, of Greenwich. Sam- 



168 OGDEJSr FAMILY. 



iiel and Jonathan Ogden c.anio and settled in North Cohansey 
precinct, al^out tlie same time that John did ; whether they 
were brothers or cousins, the record of tlie family does not 
determine. It is evident that Samuel Ogden settled at Deer- 
field, as the ins(;ription3 on one of the tombstones in the Pres- 
byterian Cemetery in that place fully confirms. The Samuel 
Ogden that was buried in Deertield yard must have Ijeen the 
son of Samuel Ogden, who emigrated to Fenwick's Colony, as 
inscribed on the tombstone, " died in 1805, in his T2d year." 
It is generally thought he was a member of the Assembly of 
New Jersey in 1780, and member of Council in 1781, and of 
the same hodj in 1783, and fourteen times afterwards; his last 
services being in 1800. There M'as a Samuel Ogden no doubt 
of the same family, appointed a Captain of the Militia, in 1776, 
and afterwards a Major, and Lieutenant-Colonel. He died in 
1785. The descendants of John Ogden, who settled near Fair- 
t<)n, are very numerous in tlie County of Cuml)ei'land. John, 
and many of his immediate descendants, lie bui-ied in the ancient 
yard of the Presbyterians, that is located on the south hank of 
Cohansey, near the town of Fairton. 

The Ogden family of Cumberland, was, as it appears at the 
time of the Revolutionary War, ardent Whigs, many of tliem 
joined the American army among them was one Benjamin 
Ogden, who was taken prisoner and died in prison in the city 
of Pliiladelphia ; also Jolm, the son of David Ogden, served in 
Washington's army at the time he retreated from New York. 
David Ogden, the grandson of John Ogden, was a large land- 
liolder in Fairfield township, likewise owned a flour mill, the 
said mill was probably erected by John Ogden, his grandfather. 
It is known at the present time as John Trenchard's Mill, and 
is located on a branch of the Cohansey, called by the early 
settlers. North Branch, afterwards Mill Creek. David Ogden 
had eleven children. His oldest son, John Ogden, was born 
1st month, 1755; he married Abigail Bennet 3d of 3d month, 
1799. The following are the names of their children— Al^igail, born 
13th of 12th month, 1779. John, born 21st of 1st month, 1782; 
the latter owned property at Port Norris, and kept a tavern 
there ; afterwards in Port Elizabeth. Hannah Ogden, daughter 
of John and Abigail Ogden, was born 12th of 8th month, 1784. 
Rachel was born 16th of 7th month, 1786 ; Theodocia Ogden 
was born on 13th of 3d month, 1791 ; Aldon, was born on 27th 
of 3d month, 1793; Elmer was born on 28th of 7th month, 
1795 ; Benjamin was l)orn 4th of 10th month, 1797 ; Matilda 
was born 2d of 12th month, 1799, and David Sayre Ogden was 



OGDEN FAMILY. 169 



born IStli of 5tli month, 1803. All of John and Abigail Ogden's 
children lived to grow to matnrity, and married. Abigail, their 
eldest daughter, married Ephraim Westcott; their daughter 
Rachel, married George Summers, in 1801; John Ogden mar- 
ried Charlotte Jones, in 1809 ; Hannah Sayre married John 
Howell, in 1808; Theodocia Ogden married Joseph Hunt, in 
1810, and Adam Ogden married Hannah Tliompson, in 1821. 
Benjamin Ogden, son of John and Abigail B, Ogden, was born in 
1797, and graduated at Princeton College in 1817 ; from 1818 to 
1820 he studied for the ministry, in the Theological Seminary; 
was licensed to preach in 1821, and was ordained the following 
year. He was settled at Lewes, Delaware, until 1826 ; from 
tlience he was called to Pennington, N. J. He continued in 
the latter place until 1838, when he removed to tlie State of 
Michigan ; afterwards he went to Valparaiso, Indiana, M'here 
he died in 1853 ; his wife was Emily Sausbury ; they were married 
15th of 10th month, 1821. Matilda Ogden married Harris Mat- 
thias, 25th of 11th month, 1821 ; David, the youngest son of John 
and Abigail Ogden, married Martha S. Ewing, 2d of 11th month, 
1825. Elmer Ogden, son of John and AbigairOgden, resides at this 
time, in the town of Greenwich ; he has been twice married ; 
his first wife was Sarah, the daughter of Isaac Sheppard ; they 
had seven children — Isaac S., Horace E., Joseph II., Matilda, 
Henry S., Sarah J., and Amanda Ogden. Elmer Ogden's sec- 
ond wife was the widow of Geoi-ge Hall, of Salem ; her maiden 
name was Matilda Riley ; she is deceased, leaving no issue. 

Isaac S. Ogden, son of Elmer and Sarah Ogden, married 
Ann Elizabeth, daughter of Daniel Bacon, they have issue — 
Mary, Matilda and Elmer Ogden. Horace Ogden married 
Maria Jorden, they have six children living — Elizabeth J., 
Edward M., Ella, Clarence C, Sallie S. and Lydia J. Ogden. 
Joseph married Lydia Fithian, daughter of Joel Fithian ; they 
have one son — George B. Ogden, Matilda Ogden married Jon- 
athan Fithian, their children are Cliarles, Frank, Rebecca, 
Joel and Sarah Fithian ; Henry S., son of Elmer Ogden, mar- 
ried Lizzie Syder, they have one son, Frank Ogden. Sarah S. 
Ogden, daughter of Elmer and Sarah Ogden, remains single, 
and resides with her father ; Amanda Ogden is deceased, and never 
married ; Elmer Ogden has been an active business man, and at one 
time was a member of the State Legislature, he is now in his eighty- 
second year, having survived nearly all of his brothers and 
sisters. His mother died in 1818, aged lifty-seven years, and his 
father, John Ogden, died in 1832, aged seventy-seven years. 

Harris Ogden who resides in Fairfield township, Cumberland 
22 



170 OGDEN FAMILY. 



county, is the son of Harris Ogden, and his grand-father was 
of the same name. He is donbtless one of the leading agricul- 
turists in the countj' at the present day ; his farm is located near 
the old Presbyterian Stone Church ; his buildings and fencings 
are not surpassed in that section. He is likewise prominent in 
raising and feeding all kinds of stock, particularly cattle, and it is 
generally cousidered tliat he has no equal in that particular in tlie 
county of Cumberland, since tlie late Dr. AVilliam Elmer, of 
Bridgeton. 

It appears that one of John Ogden's sons or grand-sons left 
Elizabethtown, ]^ew Jersey, and located in Pennsylvania near 
the city of Pliiladelphia, where he and his family became mem- 
bers of the Society of Friends. Samuel Ogden left Pennsyl- 
vania in 1767 and settled in Gloucester county, about one mile 
l)elow Swedesboro, known as Battento'\\ii. He being a tanner 
and currier by trade, there he established his tannery ; the same 
yard was afterwards occupied by his son Joseph Ogden, and his 
<>-rand-son David Ogden, late of AYoodl)ury ; it is still occupied 
by one of David's son's, lie being the fourth generation. Sam- 
uel Ogden married Mary Ann Hoffman, of Gloucester county, 
she was born 19th of 10th month, 1752. Samuel and his wdfe 
Mary Ann Ogden had ten children, who lived to grow up, 
married and had families of children. One of the family has 
in possession the Coat of Arms, given l^y Charles the II, similar 
to the one the family have in tlie county of Cumberland. Mary, 
the daughter of Samuel and Mary Ann Ogden, was born 13tli 
of 6th month, 1771 ; Esther Ogden, their second daughter was 
born 15th of 2d month, 1773 ; Joseph, the eldest son of Samuel 
and Mary Ann Ogden, was born ith of 8th month, 1775 ; 
Martha, daugliter of the same parents, born 2d of 2d month, 
1779 ; Hannah born 29th of 6th month, 1781 ; Ann Ogden 
born 22d of 11th month, 1783 ; Sarah born 22d of 7th month, 
1787 ; Samuel born 27th of 4th month, 1790 ; John Ogden 
born 20th of 6th month, 1792, and David Ogden l>orn 19th of 
2d month, 1796. Samuel Ogden, fatlicr of the above mentioned 
children, purchased a farm near Woodstown, in Pilesgrove, there 
lie and his wife ended their days, he dying 21st of 4th month, 
1821, aged about seventy-six years ; his wife died three years 
previously, aged sixty-six years. Mary, tlieir eldest daughter, 
married Samuel Lippincott, of Glouc^ester, she died young, 
leaving one son — Caleb Lippincott, (see Lippincott family). 
Esther, the second daughter of Samuel Ogden, married Thomas, 
the son of Jacob Davis, of A\^oodstown, they had several cliil- 
dren, (see Davis family) ; Esther departed this life 1st of 8th 
month, 1845, aged seventy-three years. 



OGDEN FAMILY. 171 



Joseph, the eldest son of Samuel and Mary Ann Ogden, 
succeeded his father in the tanning lousiness near Swedesboro, 
at that place he accumulated a large fortune, and retired many 
years before his death to the town of Woodbury. He was 
four times married ; his first wife was the daughter of John 
Tatem, Sr., of Woodbury, she was the motlier of his children ; 
tlieir names were David, Samuel, John, Elizabeth and Mary 
Ann Ogden. One of Joseph Ogden's wives was Prudence 
Hall, daugliter of Clement and Sarah Kay Hall, of Elsinboro, 
she being his third wife. His last wife I think survived him, he 
dying 20th of 11th month, 1863, being in his eighty-ninth year. 
Martha, daughter of Samuel and Mary Ann Ogden, married 
Samuel Abbott, of Mannington, Salem county, she was his 
second wife ; they had issue ; (see genealogy of the Abbott 
family); she died 5th of dtth month, 18-18, aged about sixty-nine 
years. Hannah, daughter of Samuel and Mary Ann Ogden, 
married Isaac ToAvnsend, of Cape May county. Soon after they 
were married tliey resided at Port Elizabeth ; they had issue ; 
tlie names of their children were Samuel, Isaac, Ann, Hannah, 
William and Charles Townsend. Isaac and his wife a few years 
l^efore their death, removed to the city of Philadelphia. Ann 
Ogden, daughter of Samuel and Mary Ann Ogden, mai-ried 
John, son of Zadoc and Eunice Silvers Street, of Mannington, 
about ISO-l or 1805. He sold his valuable real estate in said 
township to John Wistar, and removed with his family to the 
then new State of Ohio, and purchased a large tract of land in 
what is now known as Columbiana county, and there founded a 
town Avhich they called Salem, after Salem, New Jersey. 

The Street family became one of the wealthiest families in 
that section of the State. John, the oldest son of Zadoc and 
Eunice S. Street, carried on a large business for many years as 
a merchant ; he and his wife had several sons, but no daughters. 
Tlie family of Streets have great energy of character and a 
literary turn of mind. Aaron Street, the second son of Zadoc, 
(after the North- West became open to settlers,) left Salem and 
located in the territory of Iowa, and there founded a town he 
called Salem, the said town was the capital of the territory for 
some time. Aaron had a family ; one of his sons was named 
Isaac Street, he also had a family ; one of his daughters was 
named Mary Ann Street, she sul)sequently married a young man 
by tlie name of Duncan, they were of Scotcli famih^ ; Mary 
Ann and her husband reside at San Francisco, California. One 
of the Street family located in Oregon, and there founded a 
town and called it Salem. Ann Ogden Street, the wife of John, 



172 OGDEJSr FAMILY. 



departed this life 31st of 8th month, 1861, aged iseventy-eight 
years. 

Sarali, daughter of Samuel and Mary Ann Ogden, married 
Samuel Holmes, of Upper Penn's Neck; they had four children, 
their names were Martha, Ann Eliza, Sarah and William 
Holmes. Sarah Ogden Holmes died 26th of 2d month, 1829, 
aged about forty-two years. John, the son of Samuel and Mary 
Ann Ogden, has been twice married ; his lirst wife was Ann 
Howe, daughter of Isaac and Abigail Howe, of Gloucester 
county. John and his wife had three daughters — Mary Ann, 
Martha and Ann Ogden. Soon after the death of their mother, 
Ann Street who was on a visit to her relatives in New Jersey, 
asked permission of her brother John to take two of his daugh- 
ters home with her to Oliio, he gave his consent, and she brought 
up and educated them as she would have done with her own chil- 
dren. TJiey are both married, and in affluent circumstances, 
living in their adopted State. John's second wife was Abigail 
Atkinson, widow of Caleb Atkinson, lier maiden name was 
Antrim; they have four children, two are deceased, Joseph and 
Clement are living. John lived the greater part of his life 
on the homestead farm near Woodstown. lie sold his farm 
some years ago, and now resides in tlie city of Salem ; he is 
the only one left of Samuel and Mary Ann Ogden's children ; 
he is now in his eighty-lifth year. David, the youngest son of 
Samuel and Mary Ann Ogden, married Sarah Ann Burr, of 
Burlington county, tlieyhave had two children — Wharton and 
Rebecca Ogden, the latter is deceased ; Wharton has a store at 
Fort Elizabeth. David was a carriage maker, and soon after 
he married, removed to Burlington county, there he followed 
his trade until liis death, which event took place 2d of 7th 
month, 1825, when lie was only twenty-nine years of age. 



OAKFORD AND M(3SS FAMILIES. 

Charles and Wade Oakford emigrated from England to West 
Jersey about 1695 ; it is evident by the records of the Wade 
family they were nephews of Edward Wade, instead of what 
many supposed, tliat Charles Oakford's wife was the daughter 
of Edward. The brothers, Charles and Wade Oakford, had 
considerable means when they came in 1698, each of them con- 
tributed quite a sum of money for that time, towards erecting 
the first l^rick meeting house in the town of Salem. Charles 
purcliased of liis uncle Edward Wade of his allotment of land, 
located in Lower Monmouth precinct, quite a large tract, that 
being about 1696 ; he married and settled ; the following are the 
names of his children — Elizabeth, born at Alloways Creek, 
17th of 3d month, 1698 ; Charles and Mary Oakford, born 
20th of 1st month, 1701, Mary died young ; John Oakford, 
l)orn 12th of 1st month, 1701. Charles' second wife was 
Margaret Denn, daughter of James and Elizal^eth Maddox 
Denn ; their daughter Mary Oakford, was born 21st of 1st 
montli, 1706 ; Susanna Oakford, was born in 1709. Charles the 
father of these children, died about 1728. His son Charles 
inherited tlie homestead, and subsequently was one of the ablest 
farmers in the lower precinct of Monmoutli. In the Assessor's 
duplicate made by George ^Trenchard, Sr., Charles paid the 
highest tax in the township, excepting William Tyler. In 1712 
he built himself a brick dwelling, which is still standing. — 
Charles died in 1760, leaving several children — Elizabeth, Isaac 
and Samuel, also one or two other daughters whose names are 
not given. Elizabeth married Samuel Xaylor, they had issue. 
Their son Charles Oakford Naylor, married, had a son, Joseph 
Naylor, who resides at Hancock's Bridge at this time, being 
over seventy years of age. Isaac Oakford, (Charles' eldest son), 
inherited the homestead and soon after sold the farm to John 
Ware, and purchased lands near Darby, Pennsylvania, and tliere 
ended his days. The Oakfords in the city of Philadelphia are 
his descendants. Samuel Oakford settled in the State of Dela- 
ware ; he lived to a very advanced age, and left issue. Mary, 



i 

174 OAKFORD AND M(1SS FAMILIKS. 



tlie daughter of Charles and Margaret Oakford, married 
James, the son of Nathaniel Chambless ; they had issue. — 
Susanna Oakford, the daughter of Charles and Margaret Oak- 
ford, married Jonathan, the son of William Bradway, she was 
]iis second wife ; they had issue. John, the son of Charles and 
Mary Oakford, married Margaretta Colsten in 1733, tliey had 
several children ; they married in the Acton family of Salem. 

Wade Oakford, tlie emigrant, brother of Cliarles, purchased 
a large tract of land in the upper precinct of Monmouth, being 
part of James Wasse's 7000 acres ; I never heard whom he 
married. His son William Oakford married when he was past 
middle-ago Rebecca Moss, daughter of Abraham Moss ; they 
had two daughters, one of them died a minor. Notwithstand- 
ing William's great possessions, he was a man of very industri- 
ous habits. One day some of his friends called to see him and 
he was not at home, they inquired of his housekeeper where he 
was (his wife was deceased at that time), she told them he was 
in the woods cutting wood. They went to look for him and found 
him busily cutting cord wood ; they told him lie was too old a 
man to work so hard, and abundantly able to live without, and 
leave his only daughter well provided for. To wliich the old man 
assented and replied, "that he expected some stranger would 
"reap the benefit of his labors, inasnnich as some Dutcimian 
" would come and marry his daughter one of these days." This 
proved to be true, for in a short time one of Richard Wistar's 
glassblowers by the name of Jacob Houseman married her. — 
The name has since been abbreviated, and is now spelled House. 
Jacob and Mary Oakford House had one son named William 
House, who married Sarah, the daughter of Jonathan and 
Milicent Wood. Milicent was the daughter of Peter Stretcli. 
William House and his wife Sarah left two children — Jonathan 
and Mary House. Jonathan House who is still living at an 
advanced age, married Francis, the daughter of John Black- 
wood ; they have issue. Mary House, his sister, married Wil- 
liam, the son of James and Catliarine Sherron, of Salem. — 
William and his wife are both deceased ; they left tln-ee or 
more children — Samuel, Albert, and a daughter. Al})ert Slier- 
ron resides in Sidem and keeps a grocery store, and has been 
prosperous in his business. 

Alexander Moss I think came to this country about 1720, he 
located in Alio ways Creek township ; he and his wife Rebecca 
Moss had four children — Richard, was born in lltli month, 
1724 ; Isaac, was born 18th of 11th month, 172G ; Hannah, was 
l)orn 14th of 7tli month, 1730, and Rebecca Moss was ])orn in 



OAKFORD AND MOSS FAMILIES. 175 



1733. Abraham Moss purchased part of Jonathan Smith's 
estate, about the year 1735 ; he died about 1750, and his son 
Richard Moss become tlie owner. In 1751 Charles Fogg 
purchased the farm where "William Cooper now lives of William 
Chandler ; in 1767 Richard Moss and Charles Fogg exchanged 
farms. The Smith property or part of it has been in possession 
of the Fogg family since. Richard Moss had two children— Isaac 
and Rebecca Moss, both of them lived to old age, never married. 
Isaac became the owner of his father's real estate, and subse- 
quently sold it to John Vanculer. 



PLUMMER FAMILY. 

The laws of this country are well calculated to give every 
young person, no matter how poor or obscure their parentage 
is, an opportunity to rise in a social and political standing in 
the community in whicli they live. Hence, many of the most 
useful citizens in this section, and likewise throughout this 
favored country, descended from what is called the lower order 
of society. Samuel Plummer was the son of an emigrant from 
England, named David Pluimner, as is supposed hy the family. 
Tlieir record seems to have been lost. Samuel Plummer mar- 
ried Amy Johnson ; tliey had seven or eight children ; their 
names were — David, William, James, Sarah, Samuel, John and 
Hannah Plummer. Samuel, the son of Samuel and Amy John- 
son Plummer, was born the 29th of 9t]i month, 1813; in early 
life, he was apprenticed to a carriage maker ; after he arrived to 
manhood, he foUow^edhis trade for several years, I think at Sharps- 
town in Salem county. He however, turned his attention to 
politics, and subsequently was elected Sheriff of the county of 
Salem. Soon after the expiration of his term of office, lie was 
elected to the State Legislature, and the following year to the 
State Senate; he now holds the important office of United 
States Marshal for the State of New Jersey. He married Ke- 
ziah Woodruif, daughter of Enos Woodruff, of Bridgeton, Cum- 
berland county ; she can properly claim as long a line of an- 
cestry as any other one in the county of Salem, being a lineal 
descendant of Thomas Woodruff, who was the son of Jolm 
Woodruff, yeoman, in the county of Worcestershire, England. 
Thomas married Edith Wyatt, daughter of Joseph Wyatt, a 
gentleman. The said Thomas Woodruif and his wife Edith, 
left Worcestershire, and removed to London, at which place 
they had several children born ; their names were Thomas, 
Edith, John and Isaac Woodruff. In the year 1678, Thomas 
and Edith Woodruff, together with their children, and in com- 
pany with a number of others, emigrated for West New Jersey, 
on board the ship Surrey, Steven Nichols, Captain. They 
arrived at Salem in_4th month, 1679. Samuel Plummer and his 



PLUMMER FAMILY. 177 



wife, Keziah Woodruff, liave had eight children, only three of 
them are living at this time — Charles, John E. and Sallie Plum- 
mer. Charles has been twice married ; his first wife was Han- 
nah, the daughter of Benjamin Heritage ; she died a young 
woman, leaving one daughter, Willielmina Plummer. His sec- 
ond wife is Anna, the daughter of Benjamin M. Black; they 
have one daughter — Rebecca Plummer. Charles Plummer is a 
merchant, and resides at Pedricktowm, in Upper Penn's Keck, at 
wliich place he has an envial^le reputation ; his future career is 
promising. He was elected last year to represent Salem county 
in the New Jersey State Senate. 
23 



PEESTON FAMILY. 

John E. Preston, M. T)., a resident and practicing physician 
in the city of Salem, New Jersey, is a lineal descendant of 
Peregrine White, who was the lirst European born in this 
countiy nortli of Mason and Dixon line. The following was 
written for one of the Massachusetts' papers a short time since 
by Susanna French, she being one of the family. " Peregrine 
" Wnite was the son of William and Susanna White, who ar- 
" rived on board of the Mayflower at Plymouth Eock, 22d of 12th 
" month, 1620. Peregrine was the son of the before mentioned 
"parents, and was born in the 11th montli, 1620, whilst the ship 
" was anchored in Cape Cod, between Cape Cod and Plj^mouth 
"Eock. Daniel White was the son of Peregrine White. John 
"White, son of Daniel White, mai-riedMiss Skinner, they had a 
" son — John, wlio married Mary Grover, he lived many jesiYS, in 
" Mansfield and was a merchant at that place John and Mary 
" Grover had nine children, named respectively — John, Abial, 
"Otis, Calvin, Mary, Eacliel, Lavinia, Aziah and Susanna 
" White, the latter, the author of the poem published some time 
"ago ; she married William French, who was killed at the battle 
"of Bunker Hill. At the intercession of his mother, she sul)- 
" sequently married William's brother, John French, a resident 
"of the city of Providence, Ehode Island. They afterwards 
"moved to Dublin, New Hampshire. Lavinia, the daughter of 
"John and Mary Grover White, married Aaron Preston ; they 
"had several children. John E. Preston, M. D., the eldest son, 
"who resides at Salem, New Jersey, he iK^ing tlie eighth gener- 
"ation from Peregrine White, and the ninth from William and 
" Susanna White." 



REEVE FAMILY. 

Mark Reeve was another of those early pioneers of America 
who was calculated by his mental endowments and high moral 
character to give a moral force to the neighborhood wherein he 
dwelt. He turned his attention more to the religious associa- 
tions than his intimate friend, William Hall, although the latter 
is frequently mentioned in the early records of Salem Monthly 
Meeting, showing that he was a consistent member of the Society 
of Friends. Mark Reeve, in 1684, married Ann Hunt, of Salem, 
and on the following year the executors of John Fenwick directed 
John Woodledge, the deputy surveyor, to lay off sixteen acres of 
land which Mark Reeve had purchased of them in the town of 
Cohansey. It is most probable that Mark made that place his 
home for a short time, but a few years later he purchased a 
large tract of land on the south side of Cohansey creek, oppo- 
site Cohansey (known at the present time as Greenwich). In 
the year 1705, a four rod road was surveyed from Salem to 
Maurice river, which, after crossing the Cohansey, passed 
between James Pierce's and Mark Reeve's land. The Reeve 
family held large tracts of land in that section for more than a 
century and a half, but at this time the family have disposed 
nearly or quite the whole of it. As early as 1698 James Dun- 
can and Mark Reeve made application to Salem Friends for 
assistance to build a meeting house. There was one erected, 
having been built of logs, near the banks of the Cohansey, on 
the main street, where the present brick meeting house now 
stands. The exact time of Mark Reeve's death does not appear 
in the records, but circumstances go to show that it was about 
1716 or 1717. He left one son, Joseph Reeve, who married 
Ellinor Bagnall, in 1722 ; they had live children — Mark, Josepli, 
John, Mary and Benjamin. Mark, the son of Joseph and Elli- 
nor Reeve, born 28tli of 12th mouth, 1723, became a highly 
esteemed minister in the Society of Friends in early life. He 
married about the year 1761 when he was past middle age. The 
following are the names of his children — Josiah, Ann, Mark, 
William and George Reeve. Josiah, his eldest son, was born 



180 REEVE FAMILY. 



23d of 9th month, 1762, His father purchased a tract of hmd 
in Alloways Creek township, situated on tlie north side of the 
creek, and built a substantial brick building on the property. 
(It is now owned and occupied by Luke S. Fogg.) At that 
place Josiah went to reside, and soon afterwards marriec^ At 
the death of his father the said property was devised to him, 
but he sold it soon afterwards to John Fancoast, and removed 
to Burlington with his family to reside witli his wife's relatives. 
She, I think, was a Newbold, and by her lie had two or more 
children. Martha, their daughter, married Clayton, the son of 
John and Charlotte Wistar, she being his second wife. They 
had one son — Josiah. John Reeve, the son of Josiah, married 
Friscilla, the daughter of John and Mary Slieppard, of Green- 
wich. They had children. 

The Sheppard family is one of the oldest and most numerous 
in the county of Cumberland. David Slieppard emigrated from 
England about the year 1683, aiKl with the Swing family and 
a few others organized the Cohansey Baptist church, which is 
considered the mother of the Baptist churches in this section of 
the State. John and Mark, the grandsons of David Sheppard, 
having become converted to the principles of the Society of 
Friends, left the religious society of their father and became 
members of the Friends' association, but far the largest portion 
of the Sheppard family still adhere to the Baptist society, wiiile 
a number of them are members of the Presbyterian church at 
the present time. William, the son of Josiah and Hannah Reeve, 
w^as born 11th of 12th month, 1766, and subsequently mar- 
ried Letitia, the daughter of Josiah and Letitia Miller, of 
Mannington ; they had eiglit children — Josiali Miller, Anna, 
Elizabeth M., Letitia, William F., Mark M., Friscilla and Em- 
mor Reeve. Josiah M., the eldest son, married a young woman 
in Pennsylvania, by the name of Garrigues. She died not many 
years after their marriage, having two dauglitcrs — Hannah and 
Emma. His second wife was Mary, the daughter of Jonathan 
Dallas, of Port Elizabeth. Josiah and his wife are l)oth de- 
ceased at the present time, leaving one son — Dallas Reeve. Few 
men that have lived in this county possessed a more energetic 
cliaracter tlian Josiah M. Reeve ; his judgment was above that 
of ordinary men, and he was of pleasant and agreeable tempera- 
ment. He more than once represented his county in tlie State 
Legislature. He with his two younger brothers, William F., 
and Emmor, carried on ship l)uilding witli success for a number 
of years at Allowaystown. They did not however, confine their 
attention exclusively to one particular business, but bought 



RSEVE FAMILY. 181 



largely of land in tliat neighborhood, considered not worth 
farming, which tln-ougli their energy and jndicions management 
lias been made to produce more than four-fold. They also en- 
larged and beautified the town of their adoption, with large and 
substantial buildings, and no village in this section of the State 
has superior improvements. I will here state that William 
Reeve and his wife, after marriage, like his brother Josiah, re- 
moved to the county of Burlington and made it his permanent 
home. Their children were born and raised to maturity. Anna, 
the daughter of William and Letitia Reeve, married William 
Hilliard, who lived near Rancocas. Elizabeth M. Reeve, mar- 
ried Jesse Stanger ; I believe they had issue. Letitia M. Reeve 
remains single. William Foster Reeve's wife was Mary, the 
daughter of William Cooper, of Camden ; they have four chil- 
dren living — William Cooper, Augustus, Rebecca and Richard 
H. Reeve. William, the eldest, married Mary, the daughter of 
Richard M., and Hannah Acton, of Salem. Richard, the son 
of William F., and Mary Reeve, married Sarah Ann, the daugh- 
ter of Samuel P. Carpenter; they reside in the city of Camden. 
Mary, tlie mother of the before mentioned children, died sud- 
den recently, wliilst on a visit to her relatives in Camden, her 
native city. William F. Reeve is the only one of the three 
brothers, who still remains at AUowaystown, a place they did 
so much to improve. Josiah M., his elder brother, died at that 
place several years ago, and Emmor his younger brotlier, left 
with his family a few years since and resides in the city of Cam- 
den. Mark M. Reeve, the son of William and Letitia Reeve, 
died a few years ago, unmarried, in one of the Western States. 
The first wife of Emmor, the youngest son of William and 
Letitia Reeves, was Susan the daughter of William Cooper; 
tlicy had issue — Mark, Benjamin and Sarah Cooper. Enmior's 
second wife is Sarah, the daughter of Benjamin and Sarah Ac- 
ton. 

Joseph, son of Joseph and Ellinor Reeve, was l)orn 5th of 
7th month, 1725, and subsequently married Milicent, daugliter 
of Joseph and Ilannah Wade, 29th of 6th month, 1729 ; tliey 
had three children — Samuel, Martlia and Joseph. Samuel, 
their eldest son, inlierited the landed estate of his father, located 
on the soutli side of Coliansey, a part of wldch his great ances- 
tor purchased of the executors of John Fenwick, and there he 
ended his days. His wife was Ruth, the daughter of Gideon 
and Judith Scull. The latter were residents of Egg Harbor, 
and likewise tlie parents of Gideon Scull, who purchased land 
near the liead waters of Oldman's creek, in Salem county, and 



182 REEVE FAMILY. 



carried on merchandising. It was known for many years as 
Sculltown, but is now called Auburn. Gideon and his wife, 
Judith Belange Scull, died in the winter of 1780 with the small- 
pox, which disease they contracted in attending Salem Quarterly 
Meeting, and both died with it a sliort time after they returned 
to their homes at Egg Harbor. Samuel Reeve and his wife 
Ruth had seven children — Joseph, Rachel, Ruth, Martha, Mary, 
Samuel and Benjamin. Four of tliem died in childhood. — 
Samuel died a number of years before his wife, and she subse- 
quently sold the property and removed to Pliiladelphia with her 
children. Her daughter Rachel married Henry, son of Thomas 
P. Cope ; they had issue. Henry and his wife are l)oth de- 
ceased at this time. Martha Reeve married a man by the name 
of Pleasant ; her second husband was Lloyd ; she was several 
years his senior. 

Joseph, the youngest son of Joseph and Milicent Reeves, was 
born 26tli of 9th month, 1756, and married Martha, the daugh- 
ter of Preston and Hannah Carpenter, of Mannington. Soon 
afterward he left his native county, Cumberland, and resided 
for a while in Salem, where he taught the public school on 
Margaret's Lane, as it was called at that time. The name of 
this was derived from an old lady Avho lived there in a small 
tenant house belonging to William Parrott. I believe tlie name 
of the street has been changed two or three times within the 
memory of some of the present generation. At one time it 
was called South street, but at the present time it is known as 
Walnut street. . Joseph Reeve subsequently purcliased a small 
farm in Mannington, being part of his father-in-law's (Preston 
Carpenter) pr(^perty, a part of James Sherron's great estate. — 
He removed there and established a fruit nursery, and continued 
in that business whilst he lived. His son Samuel carried it on 
a number of years after his father's death. Joseph and his 
wife liad five cliildren — Samuel, Milicent, Thomas, (who died 
several years before his father,) Mary and Joseph Reeve. — 
Joseph their father, was a religious man, and possessed a large 
share of the milk of human kindness. His deatli was a great 
loss to his immediate family, and to the religious society of 
which he was a useful member. His eldest son Sanniel in time 
purchased his 1)i'other's and sister's share of the farm, and car- 
ried on farming and the nursery business until within a sliort 
period of his death. He died not many years ago, being over 
four score years. He married, when he was far advanced in 
life, Achsa Stratton, of Burlington county; they had no issue. 
Milicent, the eldest daughter of Joseph and Martha Reeve, 



KEEVE FAMILY. 183 



married Joseph Owen, of Gloucester. She has been deceased 
some years, leavmg no children. Martha, the daughter of 
Joseph and Milicent Reeve, was born 29th of 9th month, 1754, 
married Joseph, the son of John and Ann Nicholson Brick ; 
slie was the second wife of Joseph Brick. They had two sons 
— Joseph and John R. Brick. Joseph, the eldest, born 13th of 
8th month, 1785, married Elizabeth, the daughter of David 
Smith. Joseph and his wife had several children — Samuel, 
Martha, John E., Edward K. and Hannah Reeve. John Reeve 
Brick married Elizabeth Kinsey ; they had one daughter who 
married Clinton, son of Sanuiel and Eliza Clement, of Salem. 
She died young, leaving no issue. 

John, the son of Joseph and Ellinor Reeve, born 5th of 1st 
month, 1730, married Elizabeth, daughter of John and Ann N. 
Brick, in 1753. They had three children — John, who was born 
3d of lltli month, 1754, Ellinor and Peter Reeve. John and 
his wife lived on and owned a large landed estate in Cohansey 
Neck, not far from what is now known as Sheppard's mill. He 
and his elder brotlier Mark, and his younger brother Benjamin, 
were recommended ministers, members of Greenwdch Monthly 
Meeting of Friends, as was also the celebrated James Daniels, 
Jr., who belonged to Alloways Creek Particular Meeting. — 
James Daniels, Jr., traveled extensively in this country, as also 
in England and Ireland, in the ministry. He died in Alloways 
Creek township in 1776, and was considered one of the greatest 
ministers the society ever had in "West Jersey. All four of 
these men were eloquent in their discourses, and their lives 
corresponded with their precepts, hence the Greenwich meeting 
was denominated the "school of the prophets." John Reeve's 
second wife was Jane West, of Woodbury, Gloucester county. 
After that event he left his native place and went to reside 
with his wife, and at that place ended his days at a very 
advanced age. He w^as naturally an energetic business man, 
and those habits of industry continued during his life. There 
are many persons so contracted in their views of tlie duties of 
this life, that they expect those who make a high profession of 
religion, must necessarily abstain from the business concerns of 
life, and put on sackcloth and go mourning on their way to 
the grave. Such was not the opinion of John Reeve, as the 
following well authenticated anecdote that has been handed 
down by tradition proves. It took place in an aged counsellor's 
office in Woodbury, not long before John's death. One of the 
members of his own meeting remarked to the lawyer that he 
thought friend Reeve attended too much to the things of this 



IS-i REKVE FAMILY. 



world for his age and wealtli. The attorney promptly replied 
that " during his long acquaintance witli mankind he never knew 
"a person so well adapted for this woi'ld and the world to come 
" as Mr. Reeve." His son, John Reeve, born 3d of 11th month, 
1754, inherited a large estjite, both real and personal, from his 
father. He married and had one or more children. John 
Reeve, his eldest son, married Sarah, tlie daughter of Jonas and 
Elizabeth Freedland, of Mannington. They subseqnently re- 
moved to one of the Western States. I think Ellinor, daughter 
of Jolm and Elizabeth Reeve, M^as born 15th of 6th month, 
1757, and died unmarried, Peter Reeve, John's youngest son, 
born 1st of 2d month, 1759, married and liad issue — William, 
who married Martha Bacon ; they left no children. Benjamin, 
the youngest son of Joseph and Ellinor Reeve, was born 2d of 
7th month, 1737. He was a clock and watch maker, and fol- 
lowed his trade in the city of Philadelpliia. In 1761 he mar- 
ried Rutli, the daughter of John and Ann N. Brick. I have 
been informed they have a number of descendents living in the 
city of Philadeldhia at the present day. 



ROLPII FAMILY. 

James Rolpb, it is generally tliouglit, first settled in East 
Jersey; he came to Salem about the year 1700, and was a man 
of considerable means. He purchased a lot on the west side of 
Bridge street, and erected a l)rick dwelling thereon, it having a 
hip-roof; lie also purchased a large farm in the township of 
Mannington. He, John Yining, Alexander Grant, and Edmund 
Whetherby, oi'ganized the first Episcopal Cliurch in the town of 
Salem. He died at Salem in 1732, leaving his estate to his son, 
John Rolph, wlio purchased some 300 acres of land in tlie town- 
ship of Elsinborougli, being part of the Robert Windham estate, 
known in more modern times as " Richard Darkin's land ;" it 
was the part that was Josepli Darkin's, 'the son of Richard 
Darkin. John Rolpli, agreeably to tradition, married the daugh- 
ter of Joseph Darkin ; they resided in Elsinborougli until his 
deatli, wliich occurred early in life, leaving one daughter — 
Elizabeth Rolph. His widow subsequently married Aaron 
Bradway, an inhabitant of the same township. They had one 
daughter, who married David Bradway of Alloways Creek. 
(See Bradway family). 

Thomas Clement, a native of Gloucester county, and a lineal 
descendant of Gregory Clement, of England, who was one of 
the Judges thiat tried Charles the I., King of England, married 
Elizabeth Rolph, daughter of John Rolph, of Elsinborougli. 
Thomas and his wife, Elizabeth R. Clement, had three children — 
Joseph, Ruth, and Samuel Clement. Thomas Clement*'s second 
wife was Elizabeth Goodwin, widow of William Goodwin, Jr. ; 
they had no issue; her maiden name was Woodruif. Thomas' 
second wife also died several years before him. He resided on 
his farm in Elsinborougli the greater part of his time ; it lie- 
longed to his first wife. He M^as a merchant for several years 
in the town of Salem. His business was on Market street, 
where his son Samuel Clement afterwards occupied ; he became 
one of the most eminent merchants that ever did business in 
Salem. Thomas Clement lived to an advanced age, with his 
daughter, Ruth Clement, who tenderly cared for him' until the 

24: 



186 ROLPH FAMILY. 



last. lie could ])e justly styled " nature's nol)leinan ;" his manly 
deportment and his upright dealings with his fellow man fully 
warrants that assertion. He was born a member of the Society 
of Friends, but lost liis right l)y marrying his tirst wife', altliough 
slie was a professor. The rules of the society at that time were 
nnich more strict than at present. He nevertheless maintaiued 
a strong attaclnuent towards tlie society of his l)irth, and was a 
.steady attender of meeting during his long life. Not many 
years before his death, his daughter Ruth mentioned to liini tlie 
propriety of his becoming a memljer again. He made this big- 
niticant reply, " All I want in my old age is to be a meml)er of 
" the Church militant." Joseph, the eldest s<jn of Thomas and 
Elizabeth R. Clement, was born 17th of 7th mouth, 1777 ; lie 
died at liis son's, Tliomas K. Clement, in Upper Pittsgrove, 
lOtii of 4th month, 1861, aged eighty-three years, and was 
buried in Friends' yard at Salem by request, wliere his ances- 
tors Avere buried. He married Mary, daughtei' of Colonel Aaron 
Levering, of Baltimore. She was l)orn in Baltinicjre, Maryland, 
23d of 11th month, 1782, and died at the residence of her 
daughter, Elizabeth Pratt, at Lancaster, Ohio, 25th of 1st month, 
1864. Aaron Levering, her father, descended from an ancient 
Clerman family of that name, wlio formerly belonged to the 
Frankford Company, that settled at Germantown in 1684. The 
Leverings were large landholders in Roxbury township, near 
Germantown. Joseph Clement and Mary Levering were mar- 
ried in the city of Baltimore, 17th of 4th month, 1803. Joseph 
was a merchant for a number of years in the town of Salem ; 
his place of business, also his dwelling, was located on Fenwick 
street. He with his wife and most of Ids children, removed to 
the State of Ohio. They had seven children — Aaron, William, 
who died young, Thomas Rolph, Charles B., Elizabeth, William 
Lawrence and Joseph Clement, Jr. Aaron L. Clement, their 
eldest son, never married. Thomas Rolph Clement studied 
medicine, graduated in 1832, and settled in Upper Pittsgrove, 
and is a practicing physician up to the present time; he married 
in 1847, Rebecca B. Elwell. They have had seven children — 
Jerome, born 23d of 2d month, 1848; Mary Levering, born 18th 
of 6th month, 1849, died in 4th month, 1868 ; Annie, l)orn 8th 
of 2d month, 1851 ; Ara])ella, born 23d of 9th month, 1853 ; How- 
ard born 23d of 12tli month, 1857 ; Thomas Rolph, born 15th of 
3d month, 1868, and S. De Witt Clinton, born 13th of 1st 
month, 1869. 

Charles, son of Joseph and Mary Clement, married Martha 
AYelch, of Cincinnati ; they have six children — Aaron L., Wa- 



ROLPH FAMILY, 



187 



liaen, Joseph AVilliam, Mary Elizabeth, Sarah Ellen, and Charles 
Clement ; two of their cliildren are deceased — Sarah Ellen and 
Charles. Elizabeth, danghter of Joseph and Mary Clement, 
has been twice married ; her first husband was George Creed ; 
they had four children — Mary Levering, George W., John M., 
and Charles Creed. Mary L., the eldest, married Frederick Lowe 
in 1857 ; they reside in San Francisco, California ; he has filled 
several important oiiices, among which are United States Senator, 
Governor of California, United States Minister to China ; and 
at present he is President of the Bank of California. Elizabeth 
Clement's second husband is James M. Pratt ; they have two 
children — James Arthur and Jennie Creed Pratt. William 
Lawrence Clement, son of Joseph and Mary Clement, married 
Pauline Peben ; they have four children — John P., Mary, 
Charles and William Lawrence Clement. Joseph, son of Joseph 
and Mary L. Clement, married Maria Paul ; they have two 
childi-en — Creed and Charles Clement. Joseph's second wife 
was Lucy L)rake ; they had two children — John and Clinton 
Clement. They reside in Iowa. Ruth Clement, daughter of 
Thomas and Elizabetli Clement, resided in Salem the greater 
part of her life, dying when she w^as past middle age ; she never 
married. Samuel, youngest son of TJiomas and Elizaljeth Polph 
Clement, was a merchant in Salem the greater joart of his useful 
life ; he was so upright in all his dealings that he received — and 
tliat justly — the name of "honest Samuel Clement." lie was 
for many years in partnership with Gideon Scull, Jr. ; they did 
a large business, particularly as grain merchants ; perhaps the 
most extensive ever done in the city of Salem. Sanniel married 
Eliza, daughter of Jacol) Ilufty ; they had two sons — Samuel 
and De Witt Clinton Clement. Samuel Clement, Jr., married 
a daughter of David and Martha Smitli ; he has been deceased 
several years, leaving no issue. IJe W. C. Clement has been 
twice married ; his first wife was the daughter of John Brick of 
Philadelphia ; she died young, leaving no issue ; his second wife 
is the daughter of Thomas J, Yorke, of Salem ; tliey have 
children. 



SINNICKSON FAMILY. 

The Simiicksoii family is one of the oklest in South Jersey. 
Originally they spelled their name Cinca, corrupted to Sinaker, 
There is no delinite account that I know of fixing the year when 
Anders Seneca left Sweden and settled on the shores of the 
Delaware, but circumstances convince me that he and his family 
came in (company with Minuit, the iirst governor of New Swe- 
den, in 1638; Anders Seneca had two sons born in Sweden, 
Broor and Anders. At what period Anders Seneca, Jr., came 
and settled on the eastern shore of the Delaware is uncertain, 
but it is safe to presume that it was soon after their arrival in 
this country, for Anders Nilsson, Jonas Nilsson, Michael Nils- 
son, Hans Peterson, Yan Nemans (now Yanneman) and several 
other families were inhabitants of Penn's Keck as early as 1640, 
and the Dahlbo family were likewise residing on the eastern 
shore of the Delaware about that period. Tlie mortality among 
the Swedes in the first settlement was very great. Ferris, who 
liad an excellent opportunity to examine the records of the First 
Swedes' Church, gives a list made by Charles Springer, in 1693, of 
the numljer of inhabitants or residents of New Sweden at that 
time, and the number in eacli family. The wliole number was 
945, about 40 of whom were born in Sweden, and among these 
were Broor and Anders Seneca. The church referred to was Ijuilt 
near the mouth of the Christine creek for the convenience of 
the brethren in Penn's Neck (as it was afterwards called), who 
had to cross the Delaware in open boats to attend service. 
Their parents, Anders Seneca and his wife, I suppose, were 
deceased at that time, as they are not mentioned in the census 
roll. Broor Seneca and his family, I think, made a home on 
tlie western shore of the Delaware river, perhaps near the liead 
waters of tlie Christine. At the time Charles Springer took the 
census of New Sweden, Broor Seneca had seven persons in his 
family. It is reasonable to suppose that most of the numljer 
were his children. The Swedes that settled along both sides of 
the river Delaware believed that the lands rightly belonged to 
the native inhalntants, lience most of tliem purcliased the lands 




THOMAS SINNICKSON. 
Born 1786. Died 1873. 



SINNIOKSON FAMILY. 189 



they wished to occupy of the Indian cliiefs, thereby securing 
perpetual peace between the aborigines and Swedish settlers ; so 
much so that there never was known any bloodshed in a 
contentious way between the Scandanavian and Indian races. 
Anders Seneca, Jr., like his brethren, adopted that humane 
policy, and bought a large tract of land in Obisquahasit, now 
known as Penn's Neck, of the natives, and settled thereon ; that 
being about thirty years prior to Fenwick's arrival with liis 
English colony. Soon after liis arrival in this country to take 
possession of his tenth of West New Jersey, in 1675, the 
Swedes, and Anders Seneca among them, acknowledged his 
claim, and in 1679 Fenwick deeded all of Anders' former pos- 
sessions tliat lie got from the natives to him, he stipulating to 
pay tlie proprietor or his heirs the sum of three shillings yearly 
for quit rent. Anders Seneca, Jr., it would seem, left two sons 
— Sinick and John. Sinick Seneca, the eldest son, married 
Margaret "Wigorvie, 21st of 9th month, 1718. She, too, was of 
Swedish descent, as the name would imply. They had one son 
named Andrew, and three daughters — Sarah, Anna, and the 
third's name is unknown at this time. 

John, the youngest son of Anders Seneca, married Anne Gill 
Jolmson. "William Gill Johnson bought land in Penn's Neck 
of William Penn and Michael Lecroa in 168-1, it being two 
years after William Penn purchased all of John Fenwick's right 
and title of Salem county. William Gill Johnson left two sons 
who inherited his property, Thomas and John Gill Johnson. 
Thomas died in 1721, leaving a widow and six daugliters — 
Christina, Rhina, Alice, Sarah, Catharine and Rebecca. Eleanor 
Gill Johnson, the widow of Thomas Gill Jolmson, married 
Thomas Miles al)out the year 1723. Thomas and his wife 
bought of Christina, Rhina, and Alice their shares of the lands 
inherited from their father. Thomas and Eleanor Miles had 
one son, Francis, to whom they left the greater part of their 
landed estate. He left a farm for educational purposes to the 
township of Lower Penn's Neck, which is a part of the land 
William Gill Johnson bought of William Penn. Rhina Gill 
Johnson married Erick Gill Jolmson, supposed to be the son of 
John Gill Johnson. Erick and Rhina luid four daughters. 
Alice married Erick Skeer. Mary died intestate without issuf . 
Sarah Gill Jolmson married Andrew, the son of Sinnick Sin- 
nickson — the first of that family writing his name Sinnickson. 
I think Andrew and Sarah Sinnickson were married about 1745 
or 1746. They liad three sons, Thomas, Andrew and John, 
and four daughters, Mary, Sarah, Eleanor and Rebecca. An- 



190 SINNICKSON FAMILY, 



drew resided on the patrimonial estate called Fenwick's Point. 

At what time the death of Sinnick Seneca, the father of 
Andrew and Ids l)rot]ier John, took place, I liave no means of 
determining — I tliink not earlier tlian 1740. In 173-1 both of 
tliem purchased large tracts of meadow and woodland of the 
heirs of William Penn, as the following order, given to Thomas 
Miles, the deputy surveyor for James Logan, will show: "An 
"■order to Thomas Miles to survey to Sinnick and John Seneca, 
" the marsh called Mud Island, and 100 acres of laud adjoining 
" to their other tracts, and for William Philpot the point of land 
" and marsh between his plantation and Salem creek, and for 
" Oneiiferds Staidey, Margaret Bilderback and Thomas Bilder- 
" back, 100 acres at a place called Hell-gate. Dated 7th of -1th 
" month, 1733. The price of the nuu-sh is live and twenty 
" pounds and 100 acres of woodland, thirty pounds for a 100 
" acres clear of quit rents." Andrew Sinnickson, 3d, held 
important offices in the colonial government in the town and 
county in which he dwelt. He tilled the office of Judge of the 
Court and Justice under George III., and was an ardent Whig 
during the American Revolution. He died 20th of 8th month, 
1790, aged seventy years, leaving to his heirs a large real estate, 
which is considered as good and productive land as there is in 
the county of Salem. 

The Sinnicksons had a family burying ground on their prop- 
erty in Penn's Neck, where most of them were buried for three 
u-enerations or more ; whether the yard is kept in repair, or 
ne'3"lected as many others of the like throughout the county, the 
fence been removed and the plough passed over it, I have not 
heard. The family, like most of the Scandinavian settlers, 
belonged to the Swedish Lutlieran Church, and were members of 
the church located on Christiana in the State of Delaware ; 
regular in attending tlieir meetings, by tradition they were 
remarkably so considering that they had to cross the Delaware 
river, in open boats, in Sunnuer and Winter when the ice would 
permit. There was no edirice for worship on the eastern shoi*e 
of the Delaware nearer than tlie church located at Swedenbor- 
ough ; at what time that was erected is uncertain, but most 
probably in lC-1-1 or 1645. In the year 17-1-1, or about that 
time, tlie Swedes, inhabitants of Penn's Neck and a few French 
Ilugenots, the Jaquetts and some others, erected an edifice for 
Divine worship at a place wdiich is known at the present day as 
Church Landing, it being near the river. It has been said that 
in the latter part of the seventeenth century there was a large 
congregation belonging to tlie said c;hurch ; at the present time 



SIXNICKSOii FAMILY. 191 



but a small number belong to it. Like other Swedish churches 
on the sliores of the Delaware such as those at New Castle, 
Christiana, Wiccacoe or the church at Philadelphia and Swe- 
denborough, all have become Episcopal Chui-ches. I presume 
their church Rituals are nearly the same. 

Thomas Sinnickson, the oldest son of Andrew, 3d, and Sarah 
Sinnickson, took an active part in tlie Revolutionary war ; and 
commanded a company in the Continental army. On account 
of his writings and bitter opposition to British tyranny, he was 
outlawed by Lord Howe, and a heavy reward Avas offered for 
him, dead or alive. At the organization of this government, 
he warmly approved of Alexander Hamilton's views, and hence 
he liecame the leader of tlie Federal party in this section of 
country, during the administrations of Washington and the 
elder Adams. He frequently ]-epresented this county in the 
State Legislature ; was a member of the First Congress of the 
United States, which met in New York City, and also a men - 
l>er of Congress from 1790 to 1798. For a mimber of years, 
he was a Judge, and a Jnstice, and likewise County Treasurer. 
His wife was Sarah Hancock, daughter of Judge William Han- 
cock, who was massacred in his own house at Hancock's Bridge, 
in 1778 by the British troops. Thomas Sinnickson resided the 
greater part of his life in the town of Salem. I tliink he, or 
his father bought lands of John Mason, and he built the house 
where Jonathan Ingham lives at present, and made it his home. 
He was a merchant in the early part of his life. His place of 
business was where is now the Drug store of Eakin & Ballinger. 
He died at an advanced age, leaving a widow who survived him 
several years. Having died intestate, a large real and personal 
estate was left to be divided among his numerous relatives. * An- 
drew Sinnickson, 4tli, son of Andrew and Sarah Sinnickson, wf.s 
born 2d of 3d montli, 1749. He had four wives ; the first Avas Mar- 
garet, daughter of Henry Bilderback. By her he had two sons — 
Henry and Andrew Sinnickson, Stli. Henry Sinnickson married 
Elizabetli the daughter of Andrew McCollan, by whom he had 
one son — John M. Sinnickson, who married Ann the daugliter 
of Jonathan Dallas, of Port Elizabeth. Tliey had three cliil- 
dren, two sons and one daugliter — Henry, Dallas and Elizabeth. 
Henry Sinnickson married Harriet Wells, of Woodbury. He 
was the secjond Mayor of Salem. Dallas, the second son of John 
M. and Ann Sinnickson married Mary E. Sinnickson, daughter 
of Jolm and Rebecca K. Sinnickson. Elizabeth Sinnickson 
married John Johnson, son of James Johnson, of Lower Penn's 
Neck. He died in n few years after their marriage, leaving a 



192 SINNICKSON FAMILY. 



widow and one son, James I). Johnson, who are both deceased. 

Andrew Sinniekson, 5th, married Margaret Walker. Thej 
liad four sons and two daughters — Henry, Kobert, Thomas, 
Andrew, ]\[aria, and Catharine Sinniekson; the oklest son Henr}', 
died in infancy. Thomas married Chirrisa M. Stretch, daughter 
of Daniel Stretch, in 1821, by her there were three sons and six 
daughters — Ilannali Ann, Margaret, Robert, Ruth, Thomas, 
Maria, and Jane, who died young; Andrew likewise died in 
infancy. Hannah Ann married Henry D. Colley, and has four 
children — Henry, Mary, Georgianna and Margaret Colley. Mar- 
garet Sinniekson married in San Francisco. Robert is unmar- 
ried and is a ])rinter by occupation. Tliomas married Caroline, 
daugliter of Benjamin Lloyd. They have one son — Lloyd Sin- 
niekson. Maria married Wesley Stretch; they had one daughter — 
Clara Stretch. Kate is unmarried. 

Robert, the third son of Andrew Sinniekson, married Tabitha 
Burton, in Arkansas, 1816. He died in a short time, leaving 
one son — x\.ndrew Jackson Sinniekson. The widow and child 
reside in MacDonough County, Missouri. Maria Sinniekson 
married Joseph B. Chew, wdio came from an old and respecta- 
ble family of Gloucester county. They had eight children — 
Arabella, Cliarles, Henrietta, Sinniekson, Edwin, Joseph R., 
Henry and Mary Cliew. Aral)ella married AVilliam Penn Chat- 
tin ; they have one daughter — Hannah Maria Chattin. Charles 
married Elizabeth King; they have six children. Henrietta 
married John the oldest son of Calvin Belden ; they have three 
children, one son and two daughters. Edwin Chew's wife was Eliz- 
abetli Hewes ; they have three daughters. Sinniekson Chew is a 
printer l)y trade, he was for a few years, a partner with AVilliam 
S. Sharp, in publishing the " National Standard ;" but has for 
several years edited and pnblished a paper in the city of Cam- 
den ; he was three years Clerk for the Legislature of New Jer- 
sey. He married Sallie, the daughter of Samuel W. ]V[iller, of 
Tapper Alloways Creek. Joseph R. Chew, Jr., married Corne- 
lia Mulford, and Mary married Thomas Dunn, of Salem. Henry 
Chew married Marietta Fogg, daughter of James Fogg, of 
Salem. Andrew Sinniekson married in Windsor, State of New 
York, in 1858; died without issue. Caroline Sinniekson mar- 
ried Eli Sharp, and had eleven children — William, (Benjamin F., 
and Sinniekson deceased,) De Witt Clinton, Harriet, Irene, 
(Maria, and Eli deceased,) Louisa G., Elizabeth R., and Kate 
Sharp. William's occupation is that of a printer. He was the 
Editor and Publisher of the Salem "Standard," for a number 
of years; at this time he publishes a paper in the city of Tren- 



SINNICKSOK FAMILY. 193 



ton ; lie married Indiana Leatlierbnry, from Maryland. De 
Witt Clinton Sharp, married Ann Waddington, they have two 
children — Kate and Eli Sharp. Harriet Sharp married William 
Davis ; they have four children — Sallie, Clinton, Lonisa, and 
Harriet, the others are unmarried. Andrew Sinnickson's sec- 
ond wife was Margaret Johnson, daughter of Robert and Mar- 
garet Morgan Jolmson ; tlie latter M'as a native of the town of 
Chester, Delaware county, Pennsylvania, a descendant of a 
Quaker family of that State, and was herself a member of that 
society. Margaret Morgan fearing the distance which would 
separate her from iier family and friends, if she should marry 
and reside in Salem, at first declined the offer of Robert John- 
son's hand. Impelled possibly by disappointment he made a 
tour in Europe. On his return his ship stopped at Chester 
where he recognized a slave of the Morgans, who told him that 
his young mistress was still unmarried. Mr. Johnson renewed 
his addresses, was accepted and shortly afterward they were 
married. 

The late Judge Thomas Sinnickson, a few years before his 
death, invited me to walk in the Friends' grave yard, in Salem, 
with him, to point out the grave of his grandmother, it having 
been the first grave there to wliicli a marble monument had 
been placed. It was put there by the direction of her husband 
Robert Johnson, Sr., and merely mentioned the time of her 
death, and her age. Andrew and Margaret J. Sinnickson had 
four children, three sons and one daughter ; their names were 
Mary, Robert, Thomas and John Sinnickson. Robert Sinnick- 
son died in Pliiladelphia in 1803, unmarried. Mary married 
John, the son of John and Millicent Smitli, of Alio ways Creek ; 
they had three children — TJiomas S., Margaret J., and Mary 
Smith. Thomas S. Smitli married Mary, daughter of Morris 
and Sarah Hancock ; tliey have two children — Maria and 
Thomas Smith, Jr. Margaret J. Smith married Edward G. 
Prescott, son of Judge William Prescott, of Boston. She was 
killed by a railroad accident in 1856, and left no children. 
Mary Smith married Oliver B. Stoughton, of Salem ; they 
have two children — Mary and Margaret Stoughton. Her 
liusband has been deceased several years. Tliomas Sinnickson 
married Elizabetli, the daughter of John and Mary B. Jacobs, 
of Chester Valley, Pennsylvania. The Jacobs were an old 
family of that place ; his wife, Mary Brinton, belonged to an 
ancient, respectable and wealthy family of that name of Chester 
county. Elizabeth Jacobs was a member of Friends' Meeting 
at the time of her marriage, Thomas Sinnickson and his wife 
25 



194 SIJSTNICKSON FAMILY, 



Elizabeth liad four children, three sons and one daughter — 
John, Charles, AndreAv and Margaret Sinnickson. John, the 
oldest son, is a physician, unmarried. Charles, the second son, 
married Caroline Perry, the grand-daughter of Jacob Hufty, of 
Salem. Jacob Iluf ty was a self-made man ; raised liimself 
to distinction by his own exertions, and was Sheriff of the county 
of Salem at one time. I think that at the time of his death he 
was a member of Congress. Cliarles Sinnickson and his wife 
have two sons — Cliarles and Thomas Sinnickson. Andrew is 
Counseller-at-Law, he married Louisa Booth, of Reading, Penn- 
sylvania. They have two daughters. Margaret J., the daugh- 
ter of Thomas Sinnickson, married Thomas Jones Yorke, and 
has by him live children — Mary, Lizzie, Thomas J., Margaret 
and Caroline Yorke. Judge Sinnickson had the misfortune to 
lose his amiable wife when she was little more than middle age, 
some twenty years before his death. He was Judge of the 
court for many years ; was at one time a member of Congress ; 
and sustained an excellent character in the community in which 
he dwelt. He was a native of the township of Lower Penn's 
Neck, but resided in Salem for nearly eighty years. 

John Sinnickson, the youngest son of Andrew and Margaret 
J. Sinnickson, was active both in body and mind. He, like his 
brother Thomas, was above common men in muscular strength. 
His first wife was Mary Howell, the daughter of Dr. Ebenezer 
C. Howell. She was considered an accomplished lady, and was 
unusually comely in appearance. John and his wife had four 
children — Harriet, Robert, Thomas and William H. Sinnickson. 
Harriet H. Sinnickson married in 1838, Jonathan Ingham, son 
of Samuel D. Ligham, of Pennsylvania, a man that stood high 
in his native state, and the possessor of superior abilities. At 
one time he was a member of Andrew Jackson's Cabinet. 
Jonathan and his wife have four children — George Trenchard, 
Sarah A., William Henry and Mary Rebecca Ingham. Thomas 
Sinnickson married Adeline Wood, daughter of John S. and 
Sarah Ann AVood, of Cumberland county ; they have two chil- 
(li-en — John and Mary Sinnickson. Robert and William Henry 
Sinnickson died unmarried. John Sinnickson's second wife was 
Rebecca K., the daughter of Clement and Rebecca Hall, by 
whom he had three children — John Howard, Mary E. and 
Clement Hall Sinnickson. J. Howard married S. E. Foreman, 
of Freehold, Monmouth county, l)y whom he had three children 
— Fanny, Harriet J. and John Foreman Sinnickson. Mary E. 
Sinnickson married Dallas Sinnickson before mentioned. Clem- 
ent H. married Sarah M. Smith, daughter of Lewis P. and 



SINNICK80N FAMILY. 195 



Henrietta Hancock Smith. He is at the present time (1876) 
a member of Congress. Colonel John Sinnickson died in 
1862, of a lingering disease, after an active and nsefnl life. 
He was a farmer by occupation and resided the greatfer part of 
his life in the township of Lower Penn's Neck, on the property 
he inherited from his father. Some years before his death he 
removed to Salem, and at that place ended his days. He repre- 
sented his county in the State Legislature, and at one period of 
his life ocicupied a seat on the bench as Judge and Justice. 
Andrew Sinnickson's third wife was Sarah Sinnickson, widow of 
Andrew Sinnickson, the grandson of John Sinnick, the brother 
of Sinnick Sinnick. She was the daughter of Joseph Copner, 
and had one son by her first husband, named Sinnick Sinnick- 
son, who inherited a large real estate from his father, adjoining 
Fenwick Point, in Lower Penn's Neck. He married a young- 
woman in Burlington county by the name of Bruer, sister of 
Richard Bruer. Sinnick Sinnickson and liis wife had four 
children, named James, Joseph, Richard and Mary Sinnickson. 
Mary is deceased at this time, and was never married. — 
Richard removed to Cincinnati, and went into business with 
the Longworth family, in the manufacture of wine, and it 
is said became a millionare. James, I think, resides in 
Penn's Neck at tliis time. Andrew, 4th, and his wife, Sarah 
Copner Sinnickson, had one daughter, whose name was Ann 
Sinnickson. She subsequently married Sheppard Blackwood. 
They liad four children — Joseph, Eliza, Jane and Margaret 
Blackwood. Eliza married Thomas D. Bradway, son of 
Thomas and Isabella Bradway, and had three children — 
Thomas, Charles and Isabella Bradway. Joseph Blackwood 
married a young woman by the name of Sheppard, a native of 
Cumbei-land county, and had several children. Jane Blackwood 
married Benjamin Acton, Jr., of Salem. From this union there 
were six children — Thomas W., Annie, Lizzie, Frank M., Louisa 
and Charles H. Acton. Tliomas and Annie died single. Lizzie 
married Dr. B. A. Waddington, son of James Waddington; 
she is now deceased, leaving no offspring. Margaret Black- 
wood, the youngest daughter of Sheppard and Ann Blackwood, 
married Charles Cass Clark, the son of the late Dr. Clark, of 
Cumberland county ; they have two children — Ciiarles C, Jr., 
and Emma Clark. Ann's second husband was Jolm Simpson, 
of Salem, the son of James Simpson. Jolm died recently at 
an advanced age, and was remarkable through a long life 
for his honesty of dealing with his fellow men and was 
greatly respected by his fellow citizens. His wife died a few 



196 SINNICK.SON FAMILY, 



years ago of a long and tedious disease. They had no issue. 
Andrew Sinnickson's fourth ^\dfe was Elizabeth, the youngest 
daughter of Thomas Norris, of Salem ; they had two daughters — 
Rebecca and Sarali Sinnickson. Rebecca married Edward, the 
son of Judge John Smith and Temj^erance Keasbey Smith, 
They had three children — two sons and one daughter. Edward 
and family subsequently removed from Salem, to the western 
part of Pennsylvania, or to one of the Western States, I am 
not certain which. Joel Fithian, of Cumberland married Sarah ; 
tney had two sons and three daughters. They removed to one 
of the Western States. Andrew Sinnickson was an ardent 
Whig. During the American Revolution he raised a company 
of men, commanded them at the battles of Trenton and Prince- 
ton. After the war was over he held a commission as Judge 
and Justice, and lived to an old age, and was greatly respected. 
His death occurred in 1819, much regretted by his lai-ge family. 
John Sinnickson, his brother and the youngest son of Andrew 
and Sarah Sinnickson, married Susan, daughter of Daniel Bil- 
derback. They had one son, Frank, who died a young man 
unmarried, and a daughter, Esther Sinnickson, who subsequently 
married Dr. Thomas Rowan, of Salem. They never had any 
children. John's second wife was a widow named Delfant, 
daughter of Dr. Jonathan McWright, of East Jersey. Tiiey 
had no issue. He died a widower at Biddle's hotel in Penn's 
JS^eck after a short illness, leaving to his heirs one of the largest 
landed estates in the county. Eleanor, the second daughter of 
Andrew and Sarah Sinnickson, married William Mecum. They 
had seven children — George, Andrew, Sarah, Mai-garet, Rebecca 
and Ellen Mecum. William, George and Ellen died unmarried ; 
Andrew Mecum married Ann, daugliter of James Wright. 
They had one son, James AVriglit Mecuin, who subse(jucntly 
married Lydia Ann Ilai-rison. They have several chihh'en. 
Sarah Mecum had three husbands — Robert Clark, Captain Wil- 
liam Medliam, of New Castle county, Delaware, and a tliird. 
She had no children. Margaret Mecum, daughter of William 
and Eleanor Sinnickson Mecum, married Antrim Connarroe, a 
descendant of Roger Connarroe, who emigrated from tlie county 
of Devonshire, England, and landed at Elsinborough Point in 
1681, with his wife Elizabetli Stevenson, Connarroe and several 
other emigrants.* Roger and his wife settled at Salem, and at 

* Roger spelled his name Conars. Isaac Conars, one of his descend- 
ants, removed to Burlington county in 1740. Thomas Connaroe, great- 
grandfather of the present George M., Esq., of riiiladelphia, was tlie 
lirst, who changed the spelling to the present style. 



SINJSriCKSON FAMILY. 



19T 



that town they ended their days. Some of tlieir descendants 
afterward removed to Burlington county. Antrim and his wife 
Margaret Connarroe had one son and four daugliters — George, 
Sarah, Mary, Margaret and lieljecca Connarroe. George, early 
in life, removed to the city of Philadelphia. His wife is Char- 
lotte West; they have three children — George, Maria an 
Ellen. When quite young he displayed a natural genius for 
the fine arts, and has succeeded admirably in landscape and por- 
trait painting ; so much so that he is a credit to the county wliich 
gave him birth. Sarah Connarroe married Archibald Little, 
and had seven children. Mary Connarroe's husband was Abra- 
ham Johnson, the second son of James Jol^ison, of Lower 
Penn's Neck. They have three chihlren. They removed to 
Erie county, Pennsylvania. Margaret's hus])and was George 
Rumsey, who, I think, was a native of Wilmington, Delaware. 
He came to Salem a young man, and after a few years became 
a successful mercliant. lie appeared to prosper in all his under- 
takings, and the public had great confidence in his judgment. 
He was elected Cashier of Salem Bank, which ofHce he tilled to 
the credit of the institution until the close of his nseful life. 
George Rumsey and his wife Margaret had one son, Henry M. 
Rumsey, who married Maria, the daugliter of Benjamin and 
Mary Bassett. Rebecca Connarroe married a youug man by 
the name of Lawrence ; they had no issue. 

Mary Sinnickson, the eldest daughter of Andrew and Sarah 
Sinnickson, and sister of Eleanor Mecum, married George 
Trenchard, Jr. I think they had two daughters — Jane, wlio 
died unmarried, and Rebecca, who subsequently married James 
Kinsey. Tiiey had no children, and ended their days in Salem 
at the residence where Jonathan Ligliam lives at this time. 
Sarah, the youngest daugliter of Andrew and Sarali J. Sinnick- 
son, married Dr. Samuel Dick, of Salem, New Jersey. 

Among the patriotic men of tlie last century, wlio took an 
active part in troublous times of our country, was Dr. Samuel 
Dick, of Salem, New Jersey. Dr. Samuel Dick was of Scotch- 
Irish descent ; his paternal grandfather was a Presbyterian min- 
ister, and resided in the north of Ireland. His father, John 
Dick, married Isal)ella Stewart, a Scotch lady of superior mind 
and cultivation. It is supposed that John Dick and his wife 
came to America between the years of 1730 and 17-iO. Samuel 
Dick, their third child, the subject of this memoir, was born 
the lith day of llth month, 1740, at Nottingham, Prince 
George's county, Maryland. His father, John Dick, in 174:6 
was settled in New Castle, Delaware, as minister of tlie Presby- 



198 SINNICKSON FAMILY. 



terian Church in that phice, and the churches in the vicinity, 
until his death in 1748. His son, Samuel Dick, was educated 
by President Samuel Finly, Governor Thomas M. Kean and 
Dr. McWhorten, and under their pupilage, laid the foundation 
of a classical knowledge, whicli few in our country have sur- 
passed. He spoke and wrote five different languages besides 
his own witli ease and correctness — Hebrew, Greek, Trench, 
Spanish and Latin. His medical education, according to the 
State medical report, was received at one of the medical schools 
of Scotland. He served in Canada, in the Colonial army as 
Assistant Surgeon, in tlie French war, which was terminated in 
1760, by the conquest of that province by the English, and was 
present at the surrender of Quebec. In 1770 he came with his 
mother to Salem, New Jersey, and settled there as a Physician, 
and purchased property on Fenwick street, corner of Walnut 
street, and there he ended his days ; his descendants occupy it 
at the present time. It is an ancient and substantial brick build- 
ing built in 1730. In 1773 Dr. Dick married Sarah Sinnickson, 
the youngest daughter of Judge Andrew Sinnickson, of Penn's 
Neck. In 1776 he was a member of the Provincial Congress 
of New Jersey, and was one of the committee of iive appointed 
to pi-epare a draught of the Constitution of the State, and by 
that Cona'ress was also given a commission as Colonel of the 
militia, in which character he was an active and zealous officer 
in the Kevolutionary War. In 1780 Dr. Dick was appointed 
Surrogate of Salem county, by Governor Livingston, who higldy 
esteemed him both as an officer and a man. This office he held 
for twenty-two years. In 1783 Dr. Dick was elected by the 
State of New Jersey to represent them in the Congress of the 
United States of America, and was a member of Congress 
when the treaty was ratified the llth of 1st month, 1784, by 
which Great Britain acknowledged our independance. [See 
Journal of Congress, Vol. IX, page, 21, 22-30.] In the years 
1783, 1781, 1785 w^as a member of Congress held at Annapolis, 
New York, and Philadelphia, and was selected by Congress 
with others, to transact important business. He was made one 
of the committee in 1781, consisting of Jefferson, Blanchard, 
Gerry, Howell, Sherman, De AVitt, Dick, Hand, Stone, William- 
son and Read, to revise the institution of the Treasury Depart- 
ment, and report such alteration as they might think proper. 
He was also a member of tlie Committee of the States, to sit 
during the recess of Congress, consisting of some of the first 
men of the country as to talents and influence. He was also 
appointed by Congress on other committees, which showed 



SINNICKSON FAMILY. 199 



the estimation in whicli he was held as to aljility and integrity. 

In private life Dr. Dick was greatly respected in word and 
deed, and was never known to speak ill of any person ; the 
latter is inscribed on his tomb stone in the Episcopal CJnirch 
yard, in Salem, New Jersey. His character is described ])y one 
that knew him, in these words : " He was a man of brilliant 
" talents and great requirements, refined taste, and polished 
" manners, a skillful surveyor and physician ; a profound 
" scholar, a discerning politician and zealous patriot." He 
departed this life in Salem, IGtli of 11th month, 1812, leaving 
a widow and six children ; their names were Sarah, Isabella, 
Anna, Samuel Stewart and Maria Dick ; all of whom are 
deceased. His only descendants now living are the children 
and grand-children of his daughter Isabella, who married in 
1804, Josiah Harrisson, a lawyer, now deceased. Josiah and 
Isabella D. Harrisson had four children, all of them were 
daughters. Maria and Henrietta Harrisson are single woman. 
Lydia Ann Harrisson married James W. Mecum ; they liave 
four children — George, Ellen, Maria H. and Charles Mecum. 
Julia Harrisson married Robei't Carney Johnson ; they have 
one son — Henry Harrisson Johnson. 

Sarah, the daughter of Sinnick Sinnickson, Sr., married a 
person l)y the name of Pichai-d. It does not appear that she 
left any issue. Anna Sinnickson, Sarali's youngest sister, 
married a person by the name of Peterson, who was also of 
Swedish origin. They left children, but their record has not 
l)een handed down to the present generation. John Sinaker 
and his wife Ann Gilliamson Sinnickson had three children — 
Sarah, Elizabeth and Sinnick Sinnickson. The latter liad one 
son, Andrew Sinnickson, who subsequently married Sarah 
Copner, daughter of Joseph Copner, of Lower Penn's Neck. 
They had one son — Sinnick Sinnickson. Reference to his 
wife and children have been made previously. Sarah Sinnick- 
son, the eldest daughter of John and Ann G. Sinnickson, 
married William Philpot ; they had issue. Their two grand- 
sons, William and Francis Philpot came into possession of a 
large landed estate, located in the township of Penn's Neck, 
])ordering on Salem creek. They parted with it more than 
fifty years ago and left their native county and located in one 
of the Southern States. Elizabeth Sinnickson, sister of Sarah 
Philpot, married Dennis Murphy ; they had three children — 
John, Sarah and Catharine. Her second husband was Hobert 
McCasson, and had three children — Joseph, Margaret and 
Mary McCasson. Elizabeth's third husband was Ricliard Fitz- 



200 SINNICKSON FAMILY, 



gerald ; there was no issue. John Murphy, tlie son of Dennis 
and Elizabeth S. Murphy, died a young man unmarried. His 
sister Sarah married Jolm Po\yers, and had iiye children — 
Catharine, Eleanor, Samuel, Judith and Mary Powers. Cath- 
arine died young, leaving no issue. Eleanor married Thomas 
Dunn ; the Dunn's are an old family in Penn's Neck. Soon 
after the reyocation of the edict of the Nantes by the order of 
Louis Xiy. in 1684, many Huguenots emigrated to this country 
to ayoid religious persecution. There were two brothers, 
Zaccheus and Thomas Dunn, most probably natives of one of 
the Rhenish Provinces, either Alsace or Lorraine, emigrated 
to tliis country. Zaccheus settled in tlie upper part of Piles- 
grove. He liad a son Zaccheus Dunn, born 2d of 12th 
month, 1698. Seven of his children lived to grow up and rear 
families. Thomas Dunn, liis brother, loc^ated himself in Penn's 
Neck, and liad numerous descendants. He purchased 100 acres 
of land of William Penn in 1689, which was surveyed to liim 
by Richard Tindell ; the said lands joined Hans Corneleus and 
widow Hendricks near Finn's Point. Thomas was a Calvinist, 
and some of his descendants with the Copners and other fami- 
lies organized tlie Presbyterian Church near Pennsville. His 
brother Zaccheus became a memljer of the Society of Friends, 
Thomas and Eleanor Dunn had three children — Sarah, Eliza- 
beth and Mary Ellen Dunn. 

Samuel Powers' wife was Rebecca Hancock; they had five 
children — Catharine, Margaret, Georgiana, Atwood and John 
Powers. Judith Powers married Ephraim Shaw. They had 
issue. Mary, the youngest daughter of John and Sarah Powers, 
married John G. El well, they had one daughter — Elizabeth 
Elwell. Catharine, the youngest daughter of Dennis Murphy, 
married John Patterson, and their children were — Martin, Mar- 
garet, Elizabeth, Ann, William and Jane Patterson. Martin 
Patterson's wife was Elizabeth, daughter of David Fogg, for- 
merly a resident of Upper Alloways Creek. They have four 
dauirhters — Mary, Elizabeth, Margaret and Martha Patterson. 
Margaret, the daughter of John and Catharine Patterson, mar- 
ried John Callahan. Their issue was Jolm, William and Sam- 
uel Callahan. Catharine's second Imsband was Richard Sparks. 
She had two daughters by her last husband — Jane and Anna 
Sparks. The husband of Elizabeth, daughter of John and 
Catharine Patterson, was Samuel Garrison. Their issue was 
one daughter — Hannah Garrison. Ann Patterson married Ja- 
cob Dubois, and left two children — John and Caroline Dubois. 
William Patterson, their second son, married Lydia Ann Good- 



8INNICKS0N FAMILY. 201 



win. They had three children. "William's second wife was 
Mary Finlaw, by wliom he had two children — Horatio and Lucy 
Patterson. Jane Patterson married Joseph Shourds. Their 
children are William and Sarah Shourds. William Murphy, 
the son of Dennis and Elizabeth Sinnickson Murphy, married a 
young woman by the name of Berry. Theii* children were 
Sarali, Elizabeth, Thomas and John Murphy. The Sinnickson 
family, for three generations after their settlement in New 
Sweden, married with the Scandinavian race. It is evident by 
the family record tliat their first connection in marriage with 
the English emigrants was with Thomas Miles. The Gill John- 
sons, who early connected themselves with the Sinnicksons by 
marriage, were Swedes. Circumstances clearly indicated that 
they were of tlie first families that settled at the mouth of the 
Christine. In 1693 there were two of that family resident in 
Penn's Neck, Erick Gill Jonsson and William Gill Jonsson as 
they spelled the name of Johnson at that period. The Sinnick- 
sons, as a family, have maintained a respectable standing for 
more tlian seven generations in this county. 
26 



SHEPPARD FAMILY. 

The Slieppard family is the most nmnerous of any, excepting 
the Thompsons, in the ancient connty of Salem. There were 
three brothers — David, Thomas and John Slieppard; the}'- came 
from Tipperary, Ireland. On their arrival in America, they 
probably resided for a short time at Shrewsbury, East Jersey. 
In 16S3 they settled in what is now Cumberland connty, on the 
South side of the Cohansey, it being a neck of land bounded on 
the north by tlie Cohansey river, on the south by a small creek 
called Back creek. It is not improbable that they gave it the 
name of Shrewsbury Neck, after the township in East Jersey, 
where they first settled. The Sheppard family, I have no doubt, 
were English ; their name implies as much. The Sheppards 
were meml)ers of the Baptist Church of Cleagh Keating, in the 
county of Tipperary, Ireland. They were also among the few 
persons that organized the First Coliansey Baptist Church, in 1690, 
at Shrewsbury Neck. Da\dd Sheppard's iirst known purchase 
was fifty acres of land of Captain William Dare, he afterward 
purchased fifty acres, on which he lived and died. I have no 
doubt he became the owner of a large quantity of land in the 
Neck. 

The Sheppard, Westcott and Reeves families, during the last 
century and the fore part of the present, were the principal 
owners of Back and Shrewsbury Necks. David Sheppard, Sr., 
agreeable to the most authentic account, had six children — David, 
born as early as 1690 ; John, Joseph, Enoch, Hannah and Eliza- 
beth Sheppard. Hannah married a young man named Gilman. 
She died 1T22, leaving one son — David Gilman. John, the son 
of David Sheppard, Sr., died about the year 1716, without issue, 
leaving his property to his brothers and sisters. David, the 
son of David Sheppard, the emigrant, was born about the 
year 1690, and inherited the homestead property of his father, 
in Back Neck. He married about 1719. The children of David 
Sheppard, Jr., and his wife, Sarah Sheppard, were Philip, born 
1720; Ephraim, born 1722; David, 1721; Joseph, 1727, and 
Phebe Sheppard. Philip, the eldest, inherited a large landed 



SHEPPAUD FAMILY. 203 



estate in Back Neck, on which he resided. The property is now 
owned by one of the heirs of the hite Epln-aim Mulford. Phihp 

was twice married, his lirst wife was Mary , his second Sarah 

Bennett. He was considered one of the largest and most snc- 
cessf nl farmers in that neighborhood. Tradition has it that he 
was the first, in that section, that owned a covered wagon. I 
do not suppose that it was an elliptic spring carriage, but plain 
as it was I have no doubt it was considered by the inhabitants a 
great innovation. It was then the custom to travel on horse- 
back. Philip died 5th of 1st month, 1797, aged seventy-seven, 
leaving a large real and personal estate to his children. His 
widow, Sarah Sheppard, married John Remington, in 1801. 
Philip was buried in the Baptist cemetery, near Sheppard's 
mill ; he was a deacon in the church, and was considered one of 
the most prominent citizens in that section of Cumberland 
county. The inventory of his personal property at the time of 
his death amounted to £580 and 6s. His children by his fij'st 
wife, Mary, were Amos, Hannah, Mary and Naomi Sheppard. 
By his second wife Sarah B. Slieppard — Ichabod, Harvey, Pliebe 
and Williani Sheppard. Ephraim, the son of David Sheppard, 
Jr., born 1722, was married three times. His first wife was 
Kesiah Kelsey; his second was Sarah Dennis; third, Rebecca 
Barrett. He lived in Hopewell township, on the road from 
Bowentown to Roadstown, and was owner of a large landed 
estate in that section ; leaving at his death large farms to all four 
of his sons, all adjoining one another on the straight road from 
Bridgeton to Roadstown. He was a highly respected citizen, 
and like his brother Pliilip, was one of the deacons of Cohansey 
Church. He died 8th of 5th month, 1783, «ged sixty years, and was 
l)uried in the Baptist yard adjoining the clnirch, near Sheppard's 
mill, by the side of his wife Sarah Dennis, who died 21st of 1st 
month, 1777. She died in her fifty-first year. His third wife, 
Rebecca Barrett, survived him twenty years. Slie was buried 
at Shiloh, being a Seventh-day Baptist. Ephraim had ten chil- 
dren, all by his second wife, Sarah Dennis. The oldest was 
Joel, born 1718; Abner, born 28th of 5th month, 1750; James, born 
25th of 12th month, 1752 ; Hannah and Rachel. Phebe married 
Wade Barker, who was the grandson of Samuel Wade, Jr., of 
Alloways Creek. She died young leaving no issue. Wade was 
buried in the old Baptist yard at Mill Hollow, near Salem. 
Sarah, Elizabeth and Hope Sheppard, who afterward married 
Reuel Sayre, were the other children. Sayre subsequently 
moved to the State of Ohio. Ephraim's youngest child was 
Ephraim Sheppard. David, the son of David Sheppard, Jr., 



204 SHEPrARD FAMILY. 



was born in the year 1724. He married Temperance Sheppard, 
daughter of Jonadab and Phebe Sheppard. They lived in the 
township of Downe, Cumberhind county. He was a member of 
Cohansey church, as was also his wife, and both became constit- 
uent members of the Dividing Creek Baptist Church at its con- 
stitution, 30th of 5th month, 1761 ; at that time he became 
deacon of the church and afterwards a colleague of the pastor, 
Samuel Heaton. David Sheppard died 18th of 6th month, 1774, 
aged fifty years ; liis widow subsequently married a man by the 
name of Lore. She was born in 1731 and died 28th of 7tli 
montli, 1796, aged sixty-five years; she and her first husband, 
David Sheppard, were buried at Dividing Creek Baptist grave- 
yard. The following are the names of David and Temperance 
Sheppard's children — Hosea, David, Owen, Jonadab, Tabitha, 
Temperance and Mary Sheppard. Joseph, the son of David 
Sheppard, Jr., was born in 1727 ; he married Mary Sa}Te. They 
lived in Back Neck, and owned a large quantity of good land, 
which he left to his children. I have been informed that most, 
if not all, of said land has now passed out of their possession. 
He also left a large personal estate for that time, amounting to 
£647 and 12s. He and his wife were members of the Cohansey 
Church. It seems he was a prominent man in that section. He 
was chosen 22d of 12th month, 1774, one of the Committee of 
Safety, for the county of Cumberland, to carry into effect the 
resolutions of the Continental Congress, and in whose hands 
rested the supreme authority after the war commenced, until 
the formation of the new State Government gave an organized 
power in ISTew Jersey. He died 8th of 1st month, 1782, aged 
fifty-four years, and was buried on liis own farm in an old family 
])urying ground, now long disused. His wife, Mary Sayre 
Sheppard, died in 1790, aged fifty-eight years, and was buried 
in tlie same yard. Their daughter Lydia, also lies there; all 
three of them have tombstones at the liead of their gravies. This 
family graveyard is an exception to the general rule. It was 
the practice, in tlie early settlement of Fenwick's colony, to 
have family burjdng grounds, but the plow lias passed over 
nearly all of them, so no man kuowetli where many of our ances- 
tors lie. I liave been informed that the ancient Swedish family, 
the Sinnicksons, cleared tlieir old family graveyard a few years 
ago, in Obisquahasett, and their intentions are to keep it in 
good order — a noble deed. Dr. George B. Wood lias likewise 
recently caused to be erected a monument to his great grand- 
father, Richard Wood, who died in 1759, in the family grave- 
yard in Stoe Creek township, county of Cumberland. Joseph 



SHEPPAKD FAMILY. 205 



Sheppard, the year before his death, built a large brick house 
on his property, and died soon afterwards ; the house is still 
standing, and the place is now owned by that enterprising cit- 
izen, Richard Laning, the son of John Laning. The following 
are the names of Joseph Sheppard's children : — David born 
1758 ; Lydia, 1760 ; Paith, 17th of lltli month, 17G3 ; Isaac, 
1766 ; Mary, and Lucy 11th month, 1773. 

Amos, the son of Philip Sheppard, born about 1750, subse- 
quently married Hannah Westcott, and died in 1788, at middle 
age ; his widow married John Mulford. Josiah, the eldest son 
of Amos and Hannah W. Sheppard, born 1-lth of 9tli month, 
1778 ; his w^ife was Charlotte Westcott, daughter of Henry and 
Jane Harris Westcott. He died ith of 10th month, 1850. His 
son Henry was born 3d of 6th month, 1808, married and lives 
in Fairfield township, near Cedarville ; they have a family of 
children. Jane, the daughter of Josiah, born in 1811, and died 
a young woman in 1828. Hannali, the daughter of Josiah and 
Charlotte W. Sheppard, born 23d of 10th month, 1813, married 
Ephraim Glaspey ; they have a family of children, and reside 
near the city of Bridgeton. Harriet, the fourth child of Josiah 
and Charlotte W. Sheppard, born 19th of 2d month, 1816, mar- 
ried James Sheppard Kelsay in 1837 ; they have seven children. 
Martha, the daughter of Amos and Hannah W. Sheppard, born 
in 1780, subsequently married Charles Westcott, of Sayre's 
Neck, Cumberland county. She and her husband afterward 
moved to Covington, Kentucky, where she died in the winter of 
1868, leaving children. Hannah, daughter of Philip and Mary 
Sheppard, married Ephraim Shaw; they had three children — 
Harvey, Mary and Lydia. Lydia, the j^oungest, in 1810 mar- 
ried Henry Whitaker. They reside at Millville, and have a 
large family of children, most of whom are married. Mary, 
daughter of Philip and Mary Sheppard, never married, and died 
17th of 5th month, 1799, aged about fifty years. 

Naomi, daughter of Philip, married William Conner ; they 
liad three children. Abigail, the eldest, born 31st of 8th 
month, 1761, married Thomas Brooks in 1789 ; they had ten 
children, Thomas died 16th of 9th month, 1829, and his widow, 
Abigail Brooks, died 19th of 8th month, 1841, aged seventy- 
seven years. Prudence, born 1766, and her first husband was 
James Sheppard, son of Elias and Susanna Sheppard, (James 
was a nephew of Mark Sheppard, who was one of the first of 
the Sheppard family that became a member of the Society of 
Friends.) Prudence had one daugliter by her first husband , James 
Sheppard, which died in infancy. Her second husband was 



206 SHEPPAKD FAMILY. 



William Johnson. William and Prudence Johnson had eight 
children. She died 2d of 9tli month, 1860 ; her last husband, 
William Johnson, died 17th of 2d month, 1831. David Conner, 
son of Naomi, left his native state and went to North Carolina, 
and there married and had a large family of children. Ichabod, 
son of Philip and Sarah Bennett Sheppard, born 11th of 12th 
month, 1769, married Ruth Sheppard, daughter of Joel and 
Hannah Jenkins Sheppard, (Joel was the cousin of Ichabod, being 
the son of Ephraim Sheppard.) Ichabod and his wife had two 
children — Phebe and Naomi. Ichabod died 22d of 4:th month, 
1799, and his widow, Ruth Sheppard, married David Batoman, 
a minister in the Baptist denomination ; they had three sons — 
Isaac, Daniel and David Bateman. Ruth, their mother, departed 
this life 29th of 7tli month, 1806. Soon after that event David 
Bateman and his three sons — Isaac, Daniel and David — removed 
to Ohio, where their children, or some of them, are still living. 
Phebe, daughter of Ichabod and Ruth Sheppard, married 28th 
of 3d month, 1819, John Reeves. There were two children by 
tliat connection — one daughter living at this time in the city of 
Bridgeton, and a son residing near Shiloh. Naomi, second 
daughter of Ichabod and Ruth Sheppard, born 17th of 9th 
month, 1800, and in 1817 she married Jonathan Young, who 
was afterwards drowned at sea ; they had five children, all of 
w^hom died young, excepting Lewis Young, who is a resident of 
Bridgeton. 

Harvey, son of Philip and Sarah B. Sheppard married in 
1797, Hannah Smith, of Greenwicli, daughter of Isaac and Cyn- 
thia Smith ; he had one daughter — Hannah, by his first marriage. 
She married in 1818, John Test, the son of Francis Test, Jr. 
Jolm and his second wife, Hannah S. Test, removed to Indiana. 
He studied law, and was elected to Congress during Andrew 
Jackson's administration. He was an uncle to Joseph Test, 
wlio resides in Salem. The second wife of Harvey Sheppard was 
Ruth Ogden, daugliter of Elmer and Charlotte Ogden, of Fair- 
field township ; they had tln-ee cliildren — Philip, Abi and 
Rntli. The third wife of Harvey Sheppard was Amelia Davis, 
of Shiloh ; he and his last wife went west in 1818. Phebe, 
daughter of Philip Sheppard, married Joseph Newcomb. Tliey 
lived in Back Neck, and had two children — Joseph and Sarah 
S. Newcomb. AVilliam, son of Philip Sheppard, born 29tli of 
11th month, 1778, married 8th of 2d montli, 1803, Matilda 
Westcott, daughter of Henry and Jane Harris Wcstcott ; they 
had six children — Ichabod, William, Sarah, Harris, Phebe and 
Elmer Ogden Sheppard. 



SHEPPAKD FAMILY. 207 



Joel, son of Epliraim and Sarah Dennis Slieppard, born in 
1748, married Hannah Jenkins, who was born 1749 and died 
in 1807 ; she left seven children, Dennis, Rnth, Sarah, Lydia, 
Amy, Elizabeth and Renben Sheppard. Joel's second wife was 
Letitia Platts, widow of David Platts and daughter of David 
Oilman ; they had no issue. His third wife was Sarah Davis, 
of Shiloh ; they had no children. Joel was deacon in the old 
Cohansey Church, and was a large farmer, living in Hopewell 
township, and was a prominent citizen. Dennis, son of Joel 
and Hannah Sheppard, married a young woman by the name of 
Ayars. They moved to one of the Western States in 1817. 
Kuth, daughter of Joel Sheppard, married Ichabod, son of Philip 
and a cousin of her father. Sarah, daughter of Joel and Han- 
nah J. Sheppard, born 1775, married in 1799 Samuel Bond 
Davis, son of Ehiathan and Susannah Bond Davis. Elnathan 
was the greatest surveyor in his generation in this section of the 
State, for many yenYS after the Revolution. The late Josiah 
Harrison, of Salem, who died aged over ninety years, who was 
a surveyor in his early life, told me a short time previous to his 
death that he regarded Elnathan Davis as captain general of 
the surveyors of Salem and Cumberland counties. Samuel B 
and Sarah Davis had several children, one of whom, Jarman A. 
Davis, lives in Shiloh, and is a Justice of the Peace. Lydia 
Sheppard, daughter of Joel, married in 1804 Oswell Ayars ; 
they had children but they are all deceased. Amy, daughter of 
Joel and Hannah Sheppard, born 15th of 2d month, 1780 ; in 
1803 she married Oliver Harris, son of Robert Harris. Oliver and 
Amy Harris had seven children — Hosea, Hannah S., Mary, Eliza, 
Samuel S. and Robert. Eliza was born 14th of 10th month, 1808, 
and in 1826 married Hezekiah Johnson; they moved to Oregon 
and are still living. One of tlieir children is Franklin Jolmson, I). 
D., pastor of a Baptist Clnn'ch,at Newark, New Jersey. He is the 
author of several commentaries on the International Sunday 
School Lessons, now in general use. Samuel, son of Oliver 
and Amy Harris, was born 24th of 11th month, 1813. Eliz- 
abeth, daughter of Joel and Hannah Sheppard, in 1805 mar- 
ried Eli Bereman. Soon after tlieir marriage they moved lo 
Highland county, Ohio ; they had issue. Reuben, son of Joel 
and Hannah Sheppard, married Elizabeth W. Dare. Reuben 
and his wife moved to Oliio in 1817 ; they had one son — Wil- 
liam Alfred Sheppard, who was a physician at New Viennji, 
Clinton county, Ohio. He died in 1871, leaving children, one 
of whom, Henry A. Sheppard, is a lawyer at Hillsboro, Ohio. 

Abner, second son of Ephraim and Sarali Dennis Sheppard, 



208 SHEPPARD FAMILY, 



born 28th of 5tli month, 1750 ; his iirst wife was Mary Dowd- 
ney, who died about fifteen months after their marriage, leaving 
one child. Abner's second wife was Ruth Panlin ; she died 1st 
month, 1797. His third wife was Mary McGear, widow of John 
McGear ; she died 29th of 4th month, 1809, and his fourth wife 
was Elizabetli Fithian. Abner was a farmer, and lived in Hope- 
well township the greater part of his life. At the time of the 
American Kevolution he was in the Militia, and was in Colonel 
Hand's regiment at the fight of Quinton's Bridge, and took 
part in the battle; he died 12th of 3d month, 1824. The follow- 
ing are the names of his cliildren — Mary, Ephraim, (who died 
young,) Henry, Temperance, Phebe, Prudence, Delanali, Lafay- 
ette, Ruth, Mary and Epliraim Elmer Sheppard. 

James Slieppard, the son of Ephraim and Sarah Dennis Shep- 
pard, was born 25th of 12th montli, 1752, His wife was Han- 
nah Brooks, whom he married 23d of 1st month, 1774 ; she died 
in 1777. His secjond wife was Keziah Barber ; they were mar- 
ried in 1778. She died lltli of 6th month, 1824, and James, 
her husband, 3d of 6th month, 1825. He was a deacon in Co- 
hansey Baptist Church, a farmer and a large land owner in 
Hopewell township, and had an excellent character for upright- 
ness in his dealings with his fellow men, and was greatly re- 
spected by all who knew him. The children of James and 
Hannah B. Sheppard were David and Phebe Sheppard, and 
by his second wife, Keziah Barber Sheppard, Hannah, Rachel, 
Mary, Joseph, William, Prudence, Rebecca, Phebe and Hope. 
Most of these children lived to grow up and marry. William, 
the son of James Sheppard, born 30th of 7th month, 1785, 
married 23d of 3d month, 1808, Ann Husted, daughter of 
Henry and Ann Sheppard Husted, of Shrewsbury Neck. Wil- 
liam was an ordained minister of the Baptist denomination, but 
never had charge of a church. He was a farmer, and preached 
as he had opportunity. They had thirteen children. 

Hannah, the daughter of Ephraim and Sarah Sheppard, born 
about 1754, married Daniel Moore ; she died about 1784. Rachel, 
another daughter, born in 1761, married James Sayre, who was 
wounded at the massacre at Hancock's Bridge in 1778. Ephraim, 
son of Ephraim and Sarah, moved to Salem, and married Eliza- 
1)eth, widow of John Challis, and mother of John and James 
Challis; (the latter afterward became an ordained minister 
among the Baptists.) Elizabeth Milbank, mother of these chil- 
dren, was born at Waltham, England, 2d of 5th month, 1770. 
Ephraim and his wife, Elizabeth M. Sheppard, had one daugh- 
ter, Mary W., born in 1809. 



8HEPPARD FAMILY. 209 



David, son of Joseph and Mary Slieppard, born 1^758, married 
in 1783, Phebe, daughter of Providence and Sarah Ludlam ; 
she died in 1799, leaving six children. Sarah, the eldest child, 
married in 1803, William Walker, a resident of Upper Allo- 
ways Creek, Salem county ; they had three children. Phebe 
Walker, their eldest daughter, married Thomas Bilderback, of 
Allowaystown ; they have children. William Sheppard, a son, 
married Ann Stow, and lived on the homestead farm until his 
death; since that event his widow and his daughters have 
resided in Salem. Charles H. Walker owns and I'esides upon 
the homestead farm. 

Joseph, the son of David and Phebe L. Sheppard, born 9th 
of 1st month, 1786, was elected pastor of the First Baptist 
Church at Salem, in 1809, and was pastor of said church until 
1829, and then removed to Mount Holly, where he continued as 
pastor seven years, but his healtli failing him he resigned his 
pastoral charge and moved to Camden. He never took another 
pastoral charge, but preached occasionally when health per- 
mitted ; he died in Camden in 1838, in the fifty-third year of 
his age. His wife was Hannah F. Budd ; they had four chil- 
dren — Mary, Phebe Ann, Hannah and Josephine Sheppard ; 
they all married but Hannah. Phebe Ann lived in the state of 
Georgia. Josephine lived in Washington, D. C, but died a 
few years ago. David Sheppard's second wife was Miriam 
Smith, widow of Isaac Smith ; she died in 1815, and David in 
1827. He was a deacon of Cohansey Church, and was a promi- 
nent citizen. For many years he lived on the homestead farm 
in Fairfield township, but in later years he moved to Bridgeton, 
and built a large brick mansion on the west side of the Cohansey, 
where his son, Isaac A. Sheppard, lived and died. The dwelling 
is now known as Ivy Hall Seminary for ladies. Providence 
Ludlam, son of David Sheppard, born 21st of 2d month, 1788, 
married Mary Letson, of New Brunswick, New Jersey. One 
of their children, Ebenezer L. Sheppard, lives in Pittsgrove 
township, and is a member and clerk of the Pittsgrove Baptist 
Church. He has recently written and published a historical 
sketch of that church. William Ludlam and David were twin 
sons of David Slieppard, and were born 6th month, 1790. 
William died in 1823, and never married. David, his brother, 
studied for a physician, but died suddenly about the time he was 
ready to commence the practice of his profession. Ercurius, 
the son of David, married Martha Lupodius, of New Brunswick. 
She is still living, but Ercurius is deceased. He left three chil- 
dren — Mary, Sarah and Martha. Ebenezer, the son of David, 
27 



210 SHEPPAKD FAMILY. 



born 23d of 7th month, 1798, died 6tli month, ISli. Maiy, the 
daughter of David and Miriam Sheppard, liis second wife, 
married in 1824, Jonathan J. Hann ; they had two children — 
Maria and Mary Hann. The hitter married Joseph Moore, 
homeopathic physician, of Bridgeton ; she died in 1860. Isaac A. 
Sheppard, son of David, born in 1806, married 8th of 4th month, 
1828, Jane H, Bennett ; she died in 1839, aged thirty-iive years. 
Isaac's second wife was Hannah B. McLean, whom he married 
in 1811, but she only lived a little over a year. His third wife 
was Margaretta E. Little, who is still living ; they were married 
in 1850. Isaac A. Sheppard died suddenly in his office in 1863, 
having been found dead sitting in his chair. He was a deacon 
of the First Baptist Church of Bridgeton. His oldest son, 
Isaac A., born in 1829, died 11th of 4th month, 1832. Jane 
B., daughter of Isaac A. Sheppard, born in 1831, married 
in 1868, Horatio J. Mulford, the eldest son of the late Henry 
Mulford, of Bridgeton. Horatio, with his brother Isaac W., 
and his sisters, were the originators and principal benefactors of 
the South Jersey Institute, a school for both sexes, located in 
Bridgeton. The cost of the building has been estimated at 
§60,000. It has a fine corps of teachers, and has been in 
operation six years, during which time it has established a 
reputation equal to the best educational institutions in the 
country. Horatio's wife, Jane Mulford, like her father, died 
suddenly, and was found dead sitting in her chair, on the even- 
ing of 9tli of 2d month, 1874. She was a woman of great 
usefulness in the chm-ch and in the community, and her loss 
was deeply felt by all. She left one child, a son, Horatio Jones 
Mulford, Jr., who was born in 1869. There were seven other 
children of Isaac A. Sheppard's — Miriam, Theodore, Francis, 
Charles, Elizabeth, Frank and Frederick. 

Isaac, son of Joseph and Mary Sheppard, born in 1766, mar- 
ried Sarah, daughter of Jeremiah Bennett ; she died in 1797. 
Isaac's second wife was Jane Harris Westcott, the widow of 
Henry Westcott, and daughter of Ephraim and Jane Harris, of 
Fairfield township. His tliird wife was Abigail B. Husted, 
widow of Henry Husted, and daughter of Ichabod Bishop. 
Isaac Sheppard died 16th of 12t]i month, 1815. He had five 
children — Isaac, the eldest, never married ; Hemy, the second 
son of Isaac and Sarah Sheppard, married 27th of 3d month, 
1811, Eimice Westcott. Soon after their marriage they moved 
to one of the Western States, and Henry died there. His 
widow returned to her native state and died in 1868. They 
had a family of children. Sarah, daughter of Isaac and Sarah 



SHEPPAKD FAMILY. 211 



Sheppard, bom 23d of lltli month, 1797, married I7th of 3d 
month, 1819, Ehner Ogden; she died 21st of 12th month, 1853; 
lie lives in Greenwich, and has several children, Ephraim, 
the son of Isaac and Jane II. Sheppard, born 15th of 8th 
month, 1801, married in 1819, Jane, daughter of Jehiel 
and Mary Westcott ; she died in 1823. His second wife was 
Mary, daughter of John and Mary B. Westcott, of Fairfield ; 
she died in 1812, and he died 9th of 7th month, 1818. His 
children by liis first wife were Ephraim, the eldest, who went 
west, and died there ; and Elias Sheppard, who died young. — 
Mary Jane, daughter of Ephraim and Mary Sheppard, mar- 
ried Charles Campbell. Isaac Aplin Sheppard, son of Ephraim 
and Mary Sheppard, went to Philadelphia to live, and subse- 
quently was elected a member of the Pennsylvania Legislature 
for several sessions. Isaac is the head of the great stove firm 
of I. A. Sheppard & Company. Joseph, tlie son of Ephraim 
Sheppard, married Sarah Flanagin, of Sculltown ; he now 
lives in Camden county, between Haddonfield and Camden. 

Lucy, the daughter of Joseph and Mary Sheppard, born in 
11th month, 1773, married Isaac, son of Isaac and Judith 
Wheaton, in 1792 ; Isaac was born in 9th month, 1769. By 
that connection there were seven children — Joseph, the eldest, 
born 17th of 3d month, 1795, died 3d of 3d month, 1871, never 
married. Their second son. Providence Ludlam Wlieaton, born 
21st of 4th month, 1798, died 1st of 3d month, 1867; his wife 
was Ruth Foster; they had one son — Andrew Evans Wheaton, 
who resides at Greenwich witli his mother. Mary Sheppard 
Wheaton, the eldest daughter of Isaac and Lucy S. Wheaton 
was born 20tli of 11th montli, 1799 ; she was the second wife 
of Henry Mulford. Their three oldest children were Anna, 
Maria, Hannah and Isaac W. Mulford. William Wheaton, 
the son of Isaac and Lucy Wheaton, was born 18th of 4th month, 
1801, is living in Hopewell township, and has a large family of 
children. Isaac Wheaton, born 26th of 2d month, 1803, died 
6th of 7th month, 1846, leaving no children. Hannah, the 
daughter of Isaac and Lucy S. Wheaton, born 25th of 3d month, 
in 1805, married in 1823 Gabriel Davis Hall, of Bacon's Neck, 
son of Ebenezer Hall. Gabriel and his wife had several chil- 
dren. She died 31st of 8th month, 1849. 

Henry, son of Abner and Ruth Sheppard, was born in 
1787, and married in 12th month, 1815, Margaret Lummis ; she 
died 11th of 8tli month, 1817. Ilem-y's second wife was Sarah 
B. Ogden, widow of John B. Ogden. They were married in 
3d month, 1819 ; she died in 1858, and her husband, Henry 



212 SHEPPAED FAMILY. 



Sliepparcl, in 30th of 7th month, 1867. He was a hatter, and fol- 
lowed the business many years in Bridgeton, wlierehe settled early 
in life. He was postmaster for several years in that town. All 
his children were by his second wife, Sarah B. Ogden. Jane 
Buck, daughter of Henry and Sarah B. Sheppard, born 11th of 
12th month, 1819, married in 1840, to Lorenzo Fisler Lee ; he 
died 17th of 7th month, 184:8, leaving a widow and four 
children — Henry Sheppard, Jr., born 8th of 11th month, 1821, 
married 3d of dth month, 1845, Rhoda S. Nixon, daughter of 
Jeremiah Nixon. A short time after their marriage they moved 
to Springfield, Green county, Missouri ; and he has prospered 
there. For many years he and his brother Charles did tbe 
leading mercantile business of the place, but both have now 
retired from active business. Henry commanded one of the 
regiments of the militia of the state, and was out several times 
during the Rebellion. That part of tlie state suffered much 
from the war. They have four children — Francis Henry, John 
Nixon, Mary Thompson and Margaret Sheppard. Charles, son 
of Henry and Sarah Sheppard, born 5th of 9th month, 1823, 
married 5th of 11th month, 1856, Lucy Dow, daughter of Ira 
and Mary Dow, of East Hardwick, Yermont ; Charles and his 
family are living at Springfield, Missouri ; he being cashier of 
Greene County National Bank. There are three more children 
of Henry Sheppard, Sr. — Sarah, Margaret and Josepli Ogden, 
who reside in Bridgeton. Joseph is a physician, and during 
the Rebellion for a time served as a surgeon in the army. 

Ephraim Elmer, son of Abner and Mary Sheppard, born 2d 
of 10th montli, 1804, married 1st of 5th month, 1828, Jane Eliz- 
abeth Dare, daughter of David and Rebecca Fitliian Dare. — 
They reside in Bridgeton. Ephraim was elected Clerk of the 
county of Cumberland in 1852 and served to 1857. He was 
appointed a Judge of the Court of Common Pleas for said 
county in 1863, and re-appointed in 1868, and was elected 
Mayor of Bridgeton in the spring of 1873. His term expired 
in 1876. Ephraim and his wife had eight children. Ephraim 
Elmer, Jr., born 19th of 3d month, 1830, married 2d of 4th month, 
1856, Cinderilla Maxson Bonham, daugliter of Ilezekiali Bon- 
ham, of Sliiloh, They had several children, four of whom are 
living. They reside at Elmer, Salem county. Elizabeth R. 
Sheppard, born 6th of 4th month, 1832, married in 1850 George 
W. Elwell. They live in Bridgeton, and have one son, Albert 
Sheppard, born 17th of 3d month, 1853, who is a druggist. 
Ruth N. Sheppard, daughter of Ephraim, born 2lst of 12t]i 
month, 1834, is not married. David Dare Sheppard, son of 



SHEPPARD FAMILY. 213 



Epliraim, born 15tli of 6tli mouth, 1836, married 18th of 10th 
month, 1866, Cornelia All)ertson, daughter of Amos Buzby, of 
Pilesgrove. He was in the dry goods business in Bridgeton 
until 1870, when he moved to Springfield, Missouri, and went 
into business with his brother, William 1). Sheppard, John 
Caldwell Calhoun, son of Epln-aim Sheppard, born 23d of 
4th month, 1840, married in 1861, Jane Elizabeth Smith, of 
Philadelphia, and resides in that city. William D. Sheppard, 
son of Ephraim, born 28th of 2d month, 1842, married 18th 
of 3d month, 1869, Josephine M. Trull, daughter of ^Nathaniel 
Trull, of North Tewsbury, Massachusetts. He moved to Spring- 
field, Missouri, in the fall of 1866, and is in business with 
his brother, David Sheppard. Enoch Fithian Slieppard, son of 
Ephraim, born 21st of 8t]i montli, 1843, died in 1846. Charles 
E., son of Ephraim and Jane Elizabeth Sheppard, born 1st of 
11th month, 1846. He is a lawyer, and resides in Bridgeton. 

The descendants of John and Thomas Sheppard, the emi- 
grants from Ireland, are more difiicult to follow than the de- 
scendants of David, the emigrant. John married, and his eldest 
son, Dickinson, was born as early as 1685, and became a large 
landholder. In 1722 he purchased 1,400 acres of land on the 
south side of Antuxet creek. In the following year he made 
another purchase of 1,600 acres adjoining his first purchase, all 
in the township of Downe, Cumberland county. Dickinson and 
his wife, Eve Sheppard, liad seven children — Patience, Stephen, 
Dickinson, Jr., John, Jonadab, Ann and Eve Sheppard. 

Mark Sheppard, son of Jolm, (probably the John wlio was the 
son of Dickinson, and grandson of John, the emigrant,) was 
born in 1728. His parents were members of the Baptist Church, 
but he, when a young man, was convinced of the principles of 
the Society of Friends, applied for membership, and was received 
by the Society. By his first wife he had a daughter, Mary 
Slieppard, who married James, son of John and Mary Stewart, 
of Alloways Creek. She died young, leaving no issue. Mark 
Sheppard's second wife was Mary Craven, whom he married in 
1760. By that connection there were four children — Thomas, 
born 12th of 11th month, 1764 ; Sarah, born 2d of 5th month, 
1769 ; William, born 7th of 2d month, 1772, and Josiali, born 
6th of 4th month, 1774. Mark Sheppard, the father, died tlie 
16th of 5th montli, 1780, aged fifty-two years. During liis life he 
resided in Bacon's Neck. His son, William Sheppard, afterward 
married the widow of Ebenezer Hall, by whom he had fi\-e 
children, as follows: William married a young woman at Shiloh, 
a Seventh-day Baptist; Mary married Zebedee Clement; Charles 



214: SHEPPAKD FAMILY. 



married tlie daughter of Isaac Jones, of Conslioliocken ; Rich- 
ard's lirst wife was Ann, daughter of Rachel Stewart, of Salem. 
She died young, leaving one daughter, Rachel Ann, who married 
Anthony Conard, near Wilmington, Delaware. She is deceased. 
Richard's second wife is Martha Holmes, daughter of Samuel 
Holmes, formerly of Upper Penn's Neck. Richard and his 
wife live at this time at Westiield, Burlington county. Casper 
W., the youngest son of William Sheppard, married the daugh- 
ter of the late Henry Mulford. Casper died several years ago. 

David Slieppard, who lived in Bacon's Neck, was probably a 
brother of Dickinson. David and his wife, Ann Sheppard, had 
six children — David, Abel, Thomas, Prudence, Lucy and Phebe. 
David, their father, died in 17T1, and his son Abel succeeded 
his father on the liomestead in Bacon's Neck. Abel and Abigail 
Sheppard had nine children. Caleb, their son, born 1757, lived 
in Bacon's Neck on his father's property during his life. 

Job Sheppard, born 1706, was the lirst pastor of the Baptist 
Church, at Mill Hollow, near Salem ; he died with the small-pox, 
2d of 3d month, 1757, and was buried in the graveyard at that 
place. He and his wife, Catharine Sheppard, had thirteen chil- 
dren. Elnathan, their oldest son, married and lived in Hope- 
well township, near the old Cohansey Church. Job Sheppard, 
Jr., was born 6th of 7th mouth, 1735, married Rachel, daugliter 
of Thomas Mulford, of Cumberland. Job and his wife lived in 
Hopewell, near BowentoNvn. They had seven children. Belbe 
Sheppard, son of Job and Catharine Sheppard, was born al^out 
1737, married and resided in Alloways Creek. He died in 1761, 
and from him the Sheppard family in Lower Alloways Creek 
descend. Elizabeth, daughter of Job and Catharine Sheppard, 
married, but died young and left no issue. Jemima Sheppard, 
daugliter of Job, married and left no issue. Daniel, son of Job 
and Catliarine Sheppard, married a young woman, a resident 
of Salem. They had one son — Daniel Sheppard. Kerenhap- 
puch, daughter of Job Sheppard,lived in Lower Alloways Creek. 
Rebecca, daugliter of Job and Catharine Sheppard, married Jon- 
athan Bowen, of Bowentown, she being his hrst wife. She died 
y(ning, leaving one child, which died in infancy. Her husband was 
the grandfather of the late Dr. William S. Bowen, of Bridgeton. 
Catharine, daughter of Job, died when about sixteen years old. 
Cumberland Sheppard, son of Job and Catharine, married Amy 
Matlack, of Gloucester county. He lived and died there with 
his wife. They had several children. Martha, daughter of 
Job, married Isaac Mulford, of Hopewell. She did not live 
more than a year or two after that event. She left one child. 



SHEPPARD FAMILY. 215 



Keziali, daughter of Job and Catharine Sheppard, married Wil- 
liam Kelsay. Robert Kelsay, their oldest son, followed tlie 
sea. Daniel, their second son, married Grace Bacon, and had 
one daughter, Tal)itha Kelsay, who married a man by the name 
of Jerrell. They settled in one of the Western States. Daniel 
Kelsay's second wife was Lovisa Mulford. They had two chil- 
dren — Daniel Kelsay, Jr., who w^as a Baptist minister, and a 
pastor of Pittsgrove Cluirch, and Maria Kelsay, who married 
Noah Flaiiagin, and removed West. Daniel Kelsay's third wife 
was Hannah, daughter of James and Keziah Sheppard. Tliey 
had three children. Martha Kelsay, daughter of William and 
Keziali, married Jacol) Richman, and lived in Greenwich, and 
had four children — Joseph, Jonathan, Lydia and Mary. Rutli, 
youngest cliild of Job and Catharine Sheppard, never married, 
but died about the age of twenty-two years. 

Moses, son of Thomas Sheppard, the emigrant, was born in 
Fairfield township in 1698, and married in 1722, Mary, sister of 
Philij) Dennis, of Bacon's JN'eck. Mary was born in 1701. 
They had six children — Rachel, born 1723 ; Nathan, born 1726 ; 
John, born 1730 ; Sarah, born 1732 ; Moses, Jr., born 1737, 
and Mary D., born 1741. Moses was a prominent member of 
the Baptist Church, but it is probable his wife inclined towards 
the Friends, as her brother, Philip Dennis, was an influential 
member of the Society, and a member of Cohansey meeting, as 
it was then called. John Sheppard, their son, born 1730, sub- 
sequently became a prominent member of the Society of Friends, 
and married in 1756, Priscilla Wood, the youngest daughter of 
Richard and Priscilla Wood, of Stoe Creek, Cumberland county. 
Priscilla was born Irth of 3d month, 1731. Mark Reeve, in 
1689, sold his lot of sixteen acres, it being on the east side of 
tlie main street of Cohansey, adjoining the river, that he pur- 
chased of the executors of John Fen wick in 1681, reserving his 
family burying ground, where his wife, Ann Hunt Reeve, was 
buried. Joseph Browne, a merchant in Philadelphia, purhcased 
the property for £80, a considerable sum for such a small lot of 
land at that period. The said Joseph Browne died in Philadel- 
phia about the year 1711, leaving two sons — Josepli and Isaac. 
The eldest afterward lived on his father's property, in Cohan- 
sey, and a number of his descendants are at this time residents 
of Cumberland and Salem counties. Joseph's widow was Mar- 
tha Spicer, sister of Jacob Spicer, and was born in the state of 
New York on the 27th of 11th month, 1676. In the year 1714 
she married Thomas Chalkley, an eminent minister of tlie 
Society of Friends, being his second wife. His first wife was 



216 SHEPPARD FAMILY. 



Martha Betterson, of London, in which city they were married 
in 1699. She died in Philadelphia in 1711. Joseph's youngest 
son, Isaac, I believe, lived and died in London, England. 
Joseph Brown, Jr., conveyed the lot in Coliansey to his father- 
in-law, Thomas Chalkley, in 1738, and he to John Butler, who 
sold it to Thomas Mulford. In a short time Mulford sold it to 
"William Conover, and in the year 1760 Conover sold it to 
John Sheppard, son of Moses and Mary Dennis Sheppard, 
and the property is still owned by the Sheppard family. 
John and Priscilla Wood Sheppard had six children, born as 
follows : Rachel, 2d of 7th month, 1762 ; Mary, 4th of 11th 
month, 1761 ; John, 29th of 1st month, 1767 ; Priscilla, 25th 
of 11th month, 1769; Richard in 1771; Sarah, 22d of 8th 
month, 1775, and Moses 3d of 2(1 month, 1777. John, son of 
John and Priscilla W. Sheppard, married Mary, daughter of 
Mark, son of Ebenezer Miller, deputy-surveyor for Fen wick's 
Colony, after the death of Richard Tyndall. John and his wife 
had ten children. Thomas R., born 29th of 4th month, 1789, 
married Letitia, daughter of Richard and Elizabeth Wistar 
Miller, of Mannington. Thomas and his wife are deceased, 
leaving one daughter — Sarah Sheppard, second wife of Sanmel 
P. Carpenter. Mark Miller Sheppard, born 12th of 1st month, 
1791, never married, and died 15th of 5th month, 1876, in his 
eighty-sixtli year. Charles R. Sheppard, born 10th of 2d 
month, 1793, died young. Benjamin Slieppard, born 14tli of 
3d month, 1795, married Mary R. Saunders, daugliter of James 
Saunders, of Woodbury. Benjamin and his wife had eight 
children — Letitia, Samuel, Sarah, James, Morris, Mary, John 
and Anna. Charles Sheppard, born 24th of 2d month, 1798, 
married Rachel Redman Carpenter, daughter of William and 
Mary R. Carpenter, of Mannington. They had two children — 
William and Mary. The latter died young, and William 
Sheppard married a young lady named Zerns, of Pennsylvania. 
Tliey live in Mannington. Priscilla Wood Sheppard, born 15th 
of 5th month, 1800, married John M. Reeve, of Burlington 
county. He was the son of Josiali Reeve, a native of Shrews- 
l)ury Neck, below Coliansey, and great grandson of Mark 
Reeve, the emigrant. John and his wife Priscilla had ten 
cliildren. The lirst wife of John E., son of John and Mary 
Sheppard, born 25th of 11th month, 1802, was Ann Elizabeth 
Wood, the eldest daughter of Richard and Elizabeth Bacon 
Wood, of Greenwich. Their children are George and Elizabeth. 
Elizabeth died young. George Wood Sheppard married Ruth, 
daughter of Moses and Ann Sheppard. They have issue. John 



SHEPPAKD FAMILY. 217 



E. Slieppard's second wife is Margaret Garrett, The Garrett 
familj'' is one of the oldest English families that first settled in 
Pennsylvania. Their forefather came in the same vessel with 
William Penn, and landed at Chester in 1682. John and 
Margaret have three children — Philip G., Ann E. and Margaret. 
Clarkson, the son of John and Mary Sheppard, born 14th of 
4tli month, 1813, married Ann Garrett, daughter of Philip 
Garrett ; Clarkson and Annie have three daughters living — 
Rebecca C, Mary M. and Martha G. Clarkson's second wife 
was Lydia Warrington, of Burlington county. He is a highly 
esteemed minister of the Society of Friends. Richard, the son 
of John and Priscilla W. Sheppard, born 1771, married Lydia 
Foster, daughter of Josiali Foster, of Burlington county ; they 
had seven children. Moses, the son of John and Priscilla Wood 
Sheppard, married Rachel, the dangliter of Charles and Rebecca 
Miller Bacon, of Bacon's Neck, Greenwich township. Rachel 
Bacon's ancestors were among the first families in that part of 
the colony. Her father, Charles Bacon, was the grandson of 
John and Elizabeth Smith Bacon, one of the judges of the 
Salem Courts for a number of years. His wife, Elizabeth, was 
the youngest daughter of John Smith, of Smithfield, and 
Rachel's mother was the youngest daughter of Ebenezer Miller, 
Sr. ; she was born in the town of Greenwich, 17th of 3d montli, 
1747. Moses and his wife, Rachel B. Sheppard, had two 
children — Moses and Beulah ; the latter died young. Moses, 
the son of Moses and Rachel B. Sheppard, married Ann, the 
daughter of Job and Ruth Thompson Bacon ; they had three 
daughters, as follows — Ruth, who married Goorge B. Sheppard ; 
they reside in Stoe Creek township. Rachel, who married Job, 
the son of John and Ann Bacon, of Bacon's Neck ; Rachel is 
deceased, and left children, and Ann, who is not married. 
Moses' second wife was from West Chester, Pennsylvania ; 
they had no issue. 
28 



SCULL FAMILY. 

John Scull emigrated from Long Island about 1690, in com- 
pany with others, who took up large tracts of land along the 
sea shore. He was called a whaleman ; and a number of per- 
sons at that time followed the Imsiness of catching whales from 
Sandy Hook to the Capes of Delaware ; whales, at the first set- 
tling of Jersey, being numerous enough to make the business 
profitable. At tlie present time they, are rarely seen. John 
Scull was the owner of a large tract of land not far from Great 
Egg Harbor. John Fothergill, an eminent minister of the 
Society of Friends, visiting the provinces in 1722, writes that he 
had a religious meeting at the house of J olm and Mary Scull, 
at Great Egg Harbor, which was well attended. Thomas 
Chalkly also mentions having a meeting at John SculPs house 
in 1725. John and his wife had thirteen children, eight sons 
and five daughters. John, their eldest son, was stolen while an 
infant, by the Indians, and was never recovered. They likewise 
had a son named John Kecompence Scull, who lived to a great 
age. The tribe of Indians who lived around Great Egg Harbor, 
belonged to the Delawares, or Lenape or first people. In the 
year 1758 the celebrated Indian Chief, Isaac Still, claimed land 
from the mouth of Great Egg Harbor river to the head branches, 
except the Soraers', Steelman's and Scull's tracts of land. John 
Scull owned 550 acres of land, purchased of Jacob Yalentine ; 
it being on Patounk creek. He died 1745. His son, Gideon 
Scull, married Judith Bellanger. The Bellanger family, which 
name has been corrupted into Bellangee, came from the pro\'- 
ince of Poitou, in France, and emigrated first to England and 
from thence to America, between the years 1682 and 1690. In 
the early work of French Heraldy, the name is written de Bel- 
linger. The arm borne by them, are given Avith very emblazon- 
ment, and a shield, azure, with a chevan. This coat of arms 
has been in possession of the family in New Jersey, since their 
first arrival in America, and was given by Judith Bellangee to 
her niece, the late Hannah Smith, of WoodstoAvn, whilst on a 
visit to Philadelphia, sixty years ago ; and by her given to her 



SCULL FAMILY. 219 



grandson, Smith Bowen, of Philadelpliia. Judith Bellange and 
her sister Christiana, who married Daniel Shourds, lived to be 
over ninety years of age. The father of Iv^es Bellange was shot 
during the clragonnades of Louis XIY., and his wife and five 
children fled for refuge to tlie caves and forests of their native 
province, where they were concealed for several months, until 
an opportunity presented for them, in company with others, of 
escaping to England, most likely to Dover, as in the year 1687 
Theophilus Bellanger arrived there out of France, as the record 
states. By reason of tlie late trouble, yet continuing in the 
same year, the name of John Delaplaine, linen weaver, is also 
found among the records, as living as a refugee, at Dover, and it 
is likely he proceeded to America in company with the Bellange 
family. Ives Bellange, a weaver, and Christiana Delaplaine, a 
spinster, were married in 1697, at Friend's meeting, on Market 
street, Philadelphia. Among the witnesses of their marriage 
were James and Hannah Delaplaine, and thirty-nine others. 
There were others of the name of Bellange besides Ives in 
America at that time. James Bellange, in 1696, appears to 
have been a Friend residing in Burlington, New Jersey, where 
he held some town lots. There was a Henry Bellange, who, in 
1684, located 262 acres of land in Evesham, Burlington county. 
The general opinion is, tliat Henry, James and Ives Bellange 
were brothers. This belief is founded on the tradition, that 
the Huguenot children emigrated to America. There is reason 
to believe that all the families in West Jersey, named Bellanger, 
are the descendants from those above named. The change in 
the orthography having taken place during the lapse of time. 
In the old records of London, it is stated that Adrian de Bel- 
lange, in the reign of James L, about 1622, was one of the house- 
holders, being strangers within the liberty of St. Marlins le 
Grand, London. 

In the first report of the French Relief Committee in London, 
dated December, 1687, fourteen months after the revocation of 
the edict of Nantes, 15,400 refugees had been relieved during 
the year. Of these, says Weiss, the historian, of tlie Hugue- 
nots, 13,050 were settled in London, and 2000 in different sea- 
port towns, where they had disembarked 140 persons of quality, 
143 ministers, 144 lawyers and physicians, traders and burghers, 
the rest artisans and workmen, for 600 of whom no work could 
be found, and they were sent to America. Ives Bellange and 
his wife, Christiana Bellange, soon after their marriage removed 
from Philadelpliia to Egg Harbor. They had two children — 
James and Ives Bellange. James married 9th month, 1727, at 



220 SCULL FAMILY. 



Great Egg Harbor, to Margery Smith, grand-daughter of Ricli- 
ard Smith, the wealthy patentee of Smithtown, on Long Ishmd. 
Tliere is a tradition of the Smith family of Egg Harbor, that 
Richard Smith, the patentee, had nine sons, tM^o of whom pur- 
chased lands at Great Egg Harbor and there resided. Three 
of their descendants about seventy years ago, David, Jonathan 
and Robert, died at Egg Harbor ; but the latter's widow, Doro- 
thea, and her hve children, removed to Salem county. James 
and his wife, Margery, had eight children — Pliebe, Judith, 
Susannah, Christiana, Ruth, Margery, Thomas and James 
Bellange, 

Phebe Bellange married John Ridgway, and had live sons 
and two daughters. Susan Bellange married John Ridgway, 
Jr.; they had live children. Christiana Bellange married Daniel 
Shourds ; she died in 1822, aged ninety years, leaving six child- 
ren. Ruth Bellange married Job Ridgway; they had five 
children. Thomas Bellange married Mary Barton ; there were 
six children. James Bellange married Grace Ingle. Gideon 
Scull, son of John and Mary Scull, born in 1722, married Judith, 
the second daughter of James Bellange ; they had four sons 
and six daughters. They died in 1776, of the small-pox, which 
disease they contracted while attending Salem Quarterly Meet- 
ing. William Lawrence, the second of the brothers, born in 
Hertfordshire, England, in 1623, emigrated under the charge of 
Governor Winthrop, Jr., to iSTew England, wdth his elder brother, 
John Lawrence, in the ship Planter, in 1635. The younger 
brother Thomas Lawrence came to America. William Lawrence 
removed to LongIsland,and became one of the patentees of Flush- 
ing, in which town he resided during the remainder of his life, 
dying in 1680, leaving a large estate — his own plate and personal 
property alone being valued at £1,430. His se( ond wife was Eliz- 
abeth Smith, a daugliter of Richard Smith, before mentioned. His 
son William, by his lirst wife, married in 1680, Deboridi Smith, 
the youngest sister of his father's second wife, Elizaljetli. By 
this marriage they had, among other children, Samuel, who 
married Mary Hicks, living at Black Stump, Long Island. 
They had nine children, the youngest of whom was Abigail, 
born lltli of 3d month, 1737. She married at ISTewtowm, Long- 
Island, in 5th month, 1758, to James James, of Philadelpliia. 
She died at Woodstown, 6th of 5th month, 1770, and was 
interred in the Friends' burying ground at that place. James 
James died at Sculltown, 16th of 5th month, 1807, aged seven- 
eightyears. JamesandAbigail L.James had live children. James 
James married Kerranhappuck Powell, who lived in Sunbury, 



SCULL FAMILY. 221 



Georgia ; they liad three cliiklren. William died single in one 
of the Southern States. Abigail James married Judge Francis 
Child, of Morristown, New Jersey, where their descendants 
reside. Hannah married William Wayman, of Long Island, 
and subsequently moved to Woodstown ; they had live children. 
Sarah married Abram Canfield. Mary James married Daniel 
Harker, of Philadelphia ; they had one child — Abigail. Sam- 
uel Lawrence James, the youngest child of James and Aljigail 
L. James, married. Mary Hall, the daughter of Colonel Edward 
Hall, of Mannington, grandson of William Hall, the emigrant, 
who was a Justice and the second Judge of the Courts of Salem 
county. Edward Hall's mother was Elizabet]i Smitli, grand- 
daughter of John Smith, of Almsbury, who died at his grand- 
danghter's in his one hundred and seve,nth year. He landed at 
Salem in company with John Fenwick, in 1675. Samuel and 
Mary James had eight children ; the eldest was Clara, who 
married David Reeve, of Bridgeton, and suljsequently removed 
to Phoenixville, Pennsylvania ; they had one son — Samuel, and 
three daughters — Mary, Rebecca and Emily Reeve. Hetty 
James, the second daughter of Samuel L. and Mary H. James, 
married Josiah, the son of Richard and Elizabetli W. Miller ; 
they had three sons — Richard, Samuel L. J. and Wyatt W. 
Miller. Hetty was the second wife of David Reeve. James 
James, the eldest son of Samuel, married Beulah Arney, of 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania, daughter of Daniel Arney. They 
went to Tennessee. They had cliildren, one of whom, Samuel 
James, married a daughter of ^ a large cotton dealer, in Louis- 
iana. Tiie fourth child of Samuel and Mary James was 
Samuel, who lives in Missouri, unmarried. The fifth child, 
Sarah, married Joseph Pierson, of Baton Rouge, Louisiana; 
they had children. After the death of Pierson, she married 
David Reeve, being his third wife. Caroline James, the sixth 
child, married Robert Buck, of Bridgeton. He is one of the 
proprietors of tlie nail and iron works of that city. They have 
several children. Edward, the seventh child, married and lived 
in Missouri ; they had several children. Mary Hall James, the 
eighth child, I believe, remained single. 

Gideon Scull, the grandson of John Scull, was born at Great 
Egg Harbor, in 1756, married Sarah James, tlie eldest child of 
James James, 29th of 4tli month, 1784. Gideon sold his share 
of the patrimonial estate to his brother, Mark Scull, and removed 
to Salem county to Lockheartsto\vn, being the Swedisli name of 
a place on Oldman's Creek ; and at that place he followed the 
mercantile business. It was called Sculltown fur upwards of 



222 SCULL FAMILY. 



sixty years, but lias been changed to Auburn. Gideon and his 
wife had nine children, the eldest was Abigail, who died young. 
The second child was named Abigail, who died in Philadelphia, 
in 1867, at an advanced age ; she never married. James Scull 
died at sea in 1820. Gideon Scull married Lydia Ann Rowen, 
the daughter of Dr. Thomas Rowen, Sr., by his last wife; they 
had five sons and five daughters. Gideon was an enterprising 
business man. He and Samuel Clement were in the mercantile 
business together on Market street, Salem, for a number of 
years, and their's was the leading store in the town at that time. 
He subsequently removed to Philadelphia and went into the 
wholesale grocery business ; the firm was kno"\vn as Thompson 
& Scull. Paul, the third son of Gideon and Sarah J. Scull, mar- 
ried Hope Kay, whose parents resided near Woodbury. Paul 
and his wife lived on the Plainfield farm, as it was called, 
located about two miles from Woodstown. He was considered 
one of the greatest agriculturalists in the couuty, energetic and 
full up in all the modern improvements in the way of fertilizing 
the exhausted virgin soil. He died before he was far advanced 
in life, with pulmonary disease, and his death was a public loss. 
He had one son and three daughters. Olliy, the fourth son, 
died young; Sarah, the third daughter, died single, in the city 
of Philadelphia. David, the lifth son, married Lydia, the 
daughter of Joshua and Esther Davis Lippincott, in 1823. She 
was born in 1801, and died in 1851. They had eight children; 
three sons and five daughters, who are all living except two, 
who died young. Their namgs are Caroline, Gideon Dela- 
plaine, Hannah, Jane Lippincott, Lydia L., David, Jr., Edward 
Lawrence, and Mary Scull. Hannah, the youngest child of 
Gideon and Sarah J. Scull, married William Carpenter, Jr., the 
son of William and Mary P. Carpenter, of Mannington; she 
died the first year after her uiarriage, leaving no issue. David 
Scull's second wife is Haunali D., daughter of Richard and 
Elizabeth Bacon Wood, formerly of Greenwich, Cumberland 
county. 

Gideon Scull, before mentioned, was born in 1756, and died in 
1825, aged sixty nine years ; and his M'ife, Sarah J. Scull, born in 
1759, died in 1836, aged al)out seventy-seven years. She was a 
recommended minister in tlie Society of Friends. The family 
belonged to Pilesgrove Monthly Meeting. David Scull, their 
youngest son, born in 1799, left his native place, Sculltown, many 
years ago, together with his family, and went to Philadelphia, 
where he kept a wholesale wool store on Market street. His 
business capacity, and close application to business, enabled him 



SCULL FAMILY. 223 



to acquire a competency, and he has retired from the business, 
two of liis sons having taken his place. Caroline, the eldest 
daughter of David and Lydia Scull, died young. Gideon Dela- 
plaine, the eldest son, born in 1824, married in 1862, Anna 
Holder, of England. They have two children — Walter Dela- 
plaine Scull, born in Bath, England, and Edith Maria Lydia Scull, 
born at Great Malvern, England. At this time G. D. Scull 
and family reside at the Laurels, Hounslow Heath, near London. 
Hannah, the second daughter of David and Lydia Scull, remains 
single. Jane Lippincott, the third daughter, married William 
D. Bispham ; they have one son — David Scull Bispham. Lydia 
Scull, daughter of David and Lydia Scull, died young. David 
Scull, Jr., married Hannah Coale, of Baltimore, who is deceased ; 
she left one son — William Ellis Scull. Edward Lawrence 
Scull is single, and is in business with his brother David, on 
Market street, Philadelphia. Mary, the youngest daughter of 
David and Lydia Scull, married Paschal Harker ; they have no 
issue. 



SMITH AND DARKIN FAMILIES. 

The original name of Elsinborougli township was Elfsborg, 
called thus by the Swedes. The name was derived from a fort 
that was erected on the soutli side of Assomhocking creek, so 
called ])y the Indians. The Swedes named the stream Varick- 
enkill, but it was afterward called by Fenwick's colony Salem 
creek. The fort alluded to was built in 1643, by order of Gov- 
ernor Printz. Ferris, in his history, of the early settlement on 
the Delaware, whicli is the most reliable tliat I know of, says it 
was erected on tlie south side of the creek, at its junction witli 
the Delaware river. If that is correct, whicli I have no reason 
to doubt, the mouth of the creek must have been a mile or more 
further down the river than it is at the present time. Tlie 
Swedes made no permanent settlement there. After they 
abandoned their fort, which took place in 1651, their settlement 
was further up and on both sides of the Delaware river ; on the 
Jersey side as far as the mouth of Raccoon creek, on the oppo- 
site shore from the mouth of Christiana creek to "VVeccacoe, 
where Pliiladelphia is now located. The first English settle- 
ment in the county of Salem was in Elsinborough, on a point of 
land which now belongs to Amos Harris, and to AYilliam, 
Joseph and Casper Thompson. The said point was called by 
the aboriginal inhabitants Assomhocking point. An exploring 
company from New Haven, Connecticut, reached here in the 
year 1610. They were not over two years in this county, but 
whilst here they explored a stream about four miles below 
Salem creek, and named it Cotton river on account of tlie cotton 
wood that they found growing in the low ground along the 
shores of tlie stream. It is now known as Alio ways creek. 
They were looked upon by the Swedes and Indians with con- 
siderable jealousy, and in the winter of 1642 an epidemic broke 
out among them, which they called the pleurisy, and more than 
half of their number died of the disease, and those that escaped 
returned in tlie summer to New Haven again. It does not 
appear that there was any other settlement in the township 
until John Fenwick arrived with his colony in the Spring of 



6MITH AND DARKIN FAMILIES. • 225 



1675. Robert Windliara, in the fall of tlie same year, purchased 
1,000 arces of land of the proprietor, it being the same that tlie 
New Haven colony had partly cleared and left over thirty years 
before. The said land was bounded on the west by Salem 
creek, on the east by Alemsbury creek, south by John Smith's 
land, south-west by Middle Neck, as it was afterward named. 
Robert "Windham and his wife lived there until tlieir deatli, 
wliich took place about the year 1686, leaving one daughter. 
Her name was Ann Windham. She sliortly afterward married 
Richard Darkin, who emigrated to this country from England 
in 1683. He seems to have been a man above mediocrity, and 
rendered great assistance to the new colony in their civil affairs. 
He was likewise a consistent and useful member of the Society 
of Friends. Richard and his wife Ann Darkin had four chil- 
dren — Josepli Darkin, their eldest son, was born at Windham, 
near New Salem, 8th of 1st month, 1688 ; their daughter, 
Hannah Darkin, was born 3d of 9th month, 1691 ; their son, 
John Darkin, was born on the 9th of 6th month, 1694, and 
Ann Darkin was born 31st of 1st month, 1700. In 1717 John 
Darkin, son of Richard Darkin, married Sarah Thompson, 
daughter of Thomas Thompson. They had two children — J ale 
Darkin, born 11th of lOth month, 1718. She married Jolm 
Nicholson, son of Abel Nicholson. John Darkin, son of John 
and Sarah Darkin, was l)orn in 1720. The last mentioned John 
Darkin left no children, but left his Windham estate to his 
nephew, Darkin Nicholson. In the year 1719 Josepli Darkin, 
son of Richard Darkin, married Ann Smart, daughter of Isaac 
Smart. They had one daughter. Her name was Hannah, 
born 18th of 10th month, 1722. 

John Smith was the son of John Smith. He was born in the 
county of Norfolk, in England, 20th of 7th month, 1623. The 
said John Smith married Martha Graffs, daughter of Christo- 
pher Graffs, of Northamptonshire. They were married in 1658. 
The following are the names of tlieir children born in Eng- 
land: Daniel Smith, born 10th of 12th month, 1660; Sam- 
uel Smith, born 8th of 3d month, 1664 ; David Smith, born 
19th of 12th month, 1666, and Sarah Smith, born ith of 12th 
month, 1671. John Smith, his wife and children, sailed for 
West New Jersey, in America, on board the ship Grithth, Rob- 
ert Griffith being master, and landed at a place they called 
New Salem, 23d of 6th month, 1675. The names of their 
children born in this country are as follows: — Jonathan Smith, 
born in New Salem, 27th of 10th month, 1675 ; Jeremiah Smith, 
born at Alemsbury, llth of 9th month, 1678. John Smith 
29 



226 ^ SMITH AND DARKIN FAMILIES. 



purchased 2,000 acres of John Fenwick, tlie purchase ex- 
tending from the head of Alemsburj creek to Allowajs creek, 
and bounded on the east bj Edward Charapney's land, on the 
west by Samuel Nicholson, After tlie townships were laid off, 
one-half of said allotment of land was in Alloways Creek town- 
ship. Daniel Smitli, the eldest son, bonght 1,000 acres in 
in Alloways creek township, near what is now called Quinton. 
The land lay on the north side of the creek. He built and lived 
on tlie property that was owned by the late Ann Simpson. This 
Alemsbury estate was divided between Samuel, David and Jon- 
athan Smith. His daughter, Sarah Smith, married John Mason, 
of Elsinhorough. 



SAYRES FAMILY. 

The Sayres family, it has been said, is of Swedish origin, but 
at what time their forefatliers arrived in this country, is a mat- 
ter of uncertainty. About the year 1716, Thomas Sayres, son 
of Jonas Sayres, purchased a hirge tract of land, tradition says, 
of William Hall. I think it not improbable, inasmuch as Hall, 
about that time was the owner of a vast quantity of land in this 
county, including what is now Cumberland county. The Sayres 
land was located near Masons, now known as MaskelFs Mill. 
Thomas Sayres and his wife Rachel, had several children — 
Thomas, James, Leonard, Lot and Ruth. The latter afterw^ards 
became tlie wife of James Daniels, an eminent preacher in the 
Society of Friends; he died in 1T76, leaving Ruth, who was 
several years younger than himself, a widow ; they had no chil- 
dren. Thomas Sayres and Rachel Abbott were married in 17-12 ; 
they had eleven children — Abbott, born in 1713, Reuben, Han- 
nah, David, Reuel, Joseph, Dennis, Rachel, Thomas, Dorcas 
and William. Abbott Sayres married, and died a young man, 
leaving one daugliter — Hannah Sayres. The Sayres family, gen- 
erally, were ardent Whigs during the American Revolution. 
Reuben Sayres, the second son of Thomas and Rachel, born 
5th of 11th montli, 1716, married Hannah, the daugliter of 
Bradway Stretch, who was several years older than himself. He 
volunteered in the army under Colonel Holmes, stationed at Han- 
cock's Bridge. The morning of the bloody massacre at that 
place he was killed. He succeeded in escaping from the house 
with his musket, but was pursued by several of the Tories, and 
one or two of the English soldiers. He ran for a large tract of 
woodland that was about a half mile distant from the house of 
William Hancock where the carnage took place, and reached it 
in safety. His pursuers followed him closely, and he then ran 
towards a swamp called the Holly Swamp, but as he climbed 
upon the fence his pursuers shot and killed him. His remains 
were not found for several days afterwards. He had two cousins 
who took part in the same engagement. One of them, John 
Sayres, was killed in the house whilst asleep, and James Sayres 



228 SAYRES FAMILY. 



was severely wounded, but finally recovered. Reuben left a 
large real and personal estate, which was appraised at £1,345 
8s. 9d. It appears there was considerable difficulty in appor- 
tioning his personal estate between his relatives and widow. 
The law at that period in reference to personal estates were not 
easily to comprehend, owing, I have no doubt, to the unsettled 
condition of the country. The administrators and heirs agreed 
to leave it to three disinterested men as arbitrators, and Andrew 
York, William Smith and Edward Hancock were ciiosen. The 
following is their verbatim return. " We the undersigned being 
" respectfully chosen to settle the personal estate of Reuben 
" Sayres, deceased, between the administrators and the several 
" heirs, this fourth day of February, 1779. We received the 
" papers and heard the allegations and proofs respecting premises 
" and the statement of the amount. We do agree and determine 
" the annexed statement is just and true for settling between the 
"heirs and the administrators. Witnesses our hands, that is 
" the widow sJiould have the sum of £4-45 16s. 8d. Andrew 
" York, William Smith, Edward Hancock." TJie widow, Han- 
nah Sayres, afterwards married Wade Barker; they had one 
daughter — Hannah Barker. After the death of lier second 
husband, she married James Sayres, the cousin of her first 
husband. 

David Sayres, the son of Thomas and Rachel Sayres, was 
born 3d of 11th month, 1751. I have been informed by the 
family that he died a young man. He married and left one 
son, whose name was Aljbott Sayres. Reuel, the son of Thomas 
and Rachel Sayres, born 4th of 10th month, 1754, inherited the 
farm which now belongs to Robert Butcher, and built the 
present house on the premises ; it has l)een rebuilt within a few 
years by the present owner. Reuel Sayres and his wife, I 
think, sold it to Henry Mulford, the father of the late Charles 
Mulford, of Salem. Reuel and his family removed to Ohio. 
Henry Mulford, I think, retained the property whilst he lived, 
and it was then sold, James Butcher being the purchaser ; hence 
the proj)erty was brought back into the Sayres family. James 
Butcher's wife, Hannah Sayres, was the daughter of Abbott 
Sayres, a direct descendant of Thomas and Rachel Sayres. 
William, the youngest son of Thomas and Rachel Sayres, born 
in 1767, subsequently married Amy Evans ; they had issue — 
Reuben Sayres, born in 1798, and Evan Sayres, born in 1800, 
he died a minor. Samuel and Thomas Sayres were born in 
1802. Reuben, the son of William and Amy Sayres, married 
Clarissa Press ; tliey have issue. Their daughter Amanda 



SAYEES FAMILY. 229 



Sayres, was born in 1825. James Sayres, their son, was born 
in 1829, subsequently married Martha, the daughter of Silas 
Harris, of Salem ; they had issue, two daughters and one son. 
He removed to Camden several years ago and followed his trade 
of house carpentering. Amy Sayres, Reuben and Clarissa 
Sayres' second daughter, married Edward, the eldest son of 
Ephraim and Mary Ann Carll ; they have issue — Mary Ann, 
Milton and Sarah Carll. Sarah D. Sayres, the youngest daugh- 
ter of Reuben and Clarissa Sayres, born in 1837, is unmarried, 
and remains at home. She has the charge, in a great measure, 
of her aged and honorable parents, who have long been consist- 
ent members of the Baptist Church at Canton. Paying a visit 
to the aged couple, at one time, and observing the solicitous 
care of their daughter towards her parents, it brought to my 
mind the saying of a wise man in ancient times, in addressing 
his son : " Go my son and observe the young stork of the 
" wilderness. See he bears on his wings his aged sire, he carries 
" him, lodges him in safety, and supplies him with food." 

Thomas, the son of Thomas and Rachel Sayres, was born in 
1763, and came in the possession of part of his brother Reuben's 
real estate ; he married and had two daughters and one son — 
Anna, Rachel and Thomas B. Sayres. Anna Sayres, daughter 
of Thomas Sayres, Jr., married David Bowen ; iiiej had four 
children — J. Madison, Rachel, Mary Ann and Thomas Bowen. 
J. Madison Bowen came into possession of the homestead farm, 
but afterwards sold it to Eliakim Smith, and removed to Cum- 
berland county. Rachel, the daughter of David and Anna 
Bowen, married Jervis Batcher, who was a hatter and followed 
his trade in Salem. He died many years ago, leaving a widow 
and one son — Jonathan Butcher. Mary Ann, the second 
daughter of David and Ann Butcher, subsequently married 
Richard, the son of Edward and Prudence Waddington ; they 
had six children — Anna,, Edward, David, George, Elizabeth and 
Mary Waddington. Mary Ann, tlie mother of the above 
mentioned children, has been deceased for several years. — 
Thomas, the youngest son of David and Anna Bowen, removed 
to one of tlie Western States when a young man. Rachel, the 
second daughter of Thomas Sayres, Jr., married David Elwell. 
Her second husband was Benjamin Garrison, of Pilesgrove. I 
have been informed they lived in Camden for some time, and 
eventually removed to one of the Western States. Thomas 
B. Sayres, the son of Thomas Sayres, Jr., married the daughter 
of Sylvanus Sheppard ; they had issue. He and his family 
went to one of the Western States many years ago. 



230 8ATRES FAMILY. 



James, the son of Thomas Sayres, the emigrant, was born 
about 1720. The most reliable account I have is that he lived, 
after he married, in Stoe Creek township, Cumberland county. 
He had three sons — James, John and Ephraim Abbott Sayres. 
James and John enlisted in the army of the American Revolu- 
tion and ser\^ed under Colonel Hand. They were stationed at 
Hancock's Bridge, at the time of the bloody massacre at that 
place in 1778. John was killed while he was lying on the floor 
asleep, and his brother James was thought to be mortally 
wounded by having a bayonet thrust through him, but he finally 
recovered. James' first wife's name I do not know, but they 
had isswe — James Sayres, 3d. His second wife was Hannah, 
tlie widow of Wade Barker, and the daughter of Bradway 
Stretch. Her first husband was Reuben Sayres, cousin of her 
third husband. James and his wife Hannah had one daughter, 
Rachel, wlio subsequently married Daniel Oilman, of Cumber- 
land. James Sayres' third wife was Sarah, widow of Job 
Smith. Her maiden name was Sarah Mulford, and she had by 
her first husband seven children — John, Jane, Sarah, Samuel, 
Mary, Eliakim and Job. The latter is a cabinet maker and 
undertaker, and carries on his business at Hancock's Bridge. 
James and Sarah Sayres had one daughter, Hannah, who subse- 
quently married Ednnmd, son of Conrad Hires, of Bridgeton. 
Abbott Sayres, the son of James, married and had two or more 
children — Hannah, who married James Butcher, and a son — 
Abbott, Jr. The latter married Mary Harris, and had one son, 
Abbott, who at the present time resides in Cumberland county. 

Ephraim, the son of James Sayres, Sr., married and had one 
son — Ephraim. The last named purchased a farm in Stoe 
Creek township, Cumberland county, being originally part of 
Ricliard Wood's landed estate, and resided thereuntil his deatli. 
He had two children by his first wife — Mary and Abbott. His 
daughter Mary married Reuben Dayton ; her second husband 
is Edward, the son of Edward and Catharine Fogg, and they 
have several children. His son, Abbott Sayres, married and at 
this time resides at Bridgeton. 

Ananias Sayres, brother of Thomas, the elder, married Mary, 
the daughter of Richard Gibl)on, living near Roadstown. Mary, 
it appears, inherited a farm from her fatlier on which she and 
her luisband dwelt. They had issue — Hannah, Rachel, Mary, 
Sarah, and Leonard G. Sayres. Hannah, their eldest daughter, 
married Job Remington, of Greenwi(;h; they had one son — 
Job, who was apprenticed in Philadelphia to learn the house 
carpenter trade. He subsequently kept a lumber yard below 



6AYEES FAMILY. 231 



Green street wiiarf, in tliat citj, known as the George Knox 
lumber yard, and accumulated a large fortune. He retired 
many years before his death with a competency. His mother, 
Hannah Kemington, married John Adams, a native of Egg 
Harbor, but at the time of tlieir marriage followed his trade, 
that of a carriage maker, in the town of Greenwich. John and 
his wife had three children — Hannah, Joseph and John. 

Rachel, the daughter of Ananias and Mary Sayres, mari-ied 
Job Tyler, of Greenwich. They had issue — Benjamin, Jo]), 
Mary and Richard, all of whom are noticed in the sketcli of the 
Tyler family. Mary, the daughter of Ananias and Mary Sayres, 
married David Mulford. Tliey had eleven children — Hannah, 
born 9th of 2d month, 1776 ; Ephraim, Mary, Thomas, Nancy, 
David, Sarah, Rebecca, William, John and Elizabeth. Hannah, 
Nancy and Sarah died minors. John Mulford died unmarried 
at the age of twenty-six. Ephraim, the son of David and Mary 
Mulford, born 8th of 10th month, 1778, married Ruth Wheaton, 
the second daughter of Isaac Wheaton, who lived at Cohansey 
Neck, near the town of Green wicli, Tlie said Isaac Wheaton 
and his eldest daughter were drowned off Billingsport, in the 
Delaware river, with several others from on board the Green- 
wich Packet, Rachel, during a violent gale on the niglit of the 
15th of 2d month, 1802. Ephraim and Ruth had issue — Ana- 
nias, William, Isaac and David Mulford. Ephraim's second 
wife was Rhoda, daughter of John Laning; they had three 
children — Ruth, Ellen and Alfred Mulford. Ephraim, their 
father, lived far beyond the age allotted to man, having died at 
the age of ninety-two years, leaving a large estate to his children. 
Mary, the daughter of David and Mary Mulford, was boi-n 27th 
of loth month, 1780, and married Dr. Charles Hannah, of Han- 
cock's Bridge. She died a young woman, leaving one son — 
James M. Hannah. 

Thomas, the son of David and Mary Mulford, was born 19th 
of 12th month, 1782, and married Phebe Butcher, sister of the 
late James Butcher; they had issue — Richard and Charles 
Mulford. His second wife was a widow, Rachel Evan Scudder ; 
they had one daughter, Elizabeth Mulford, who subsequently 
married Richard Dubois, Jr. Richard, the son of Thonias and 
Phebe Mulford, married Lucetta, the daughter of Washington 
Smith ; they had issue — Phebe, Ann, Maria, Mary and Martha. 
Rebecca, the daughter of David and Mary Mulford, born in 
1791, married Asa Couch. William, the son of David and 
Mary Mulford, was born in 1792 ; he married Grace Carll, the 
daughter of Ephraim Carll, Sr., and left several children. 



232 BAYKES FAMILY 



Sarali, the daughter of Ananias and Mary Sayres, married 

Richard Cole. They liv^ed a number of years on the Isaac 

Norris farm near Salem, and had four sons and one daughter, 

Sarah Cole, who with her two eldest brothers, Charles and 

Richard, died in early age of consumption ; soon after that 

event Richard and his wife removed to Gloucester county, and 

there ended their days. Leonard G. Sayres, the son of Ananias 

and Mar}', appeal's to have left liis native county and settled in 

tlie state of Ohio, when the city of Cincinnati was a village. 

WJiether he married before he went West I have no knowledge. 

He is reported to have prospered in his adopted State, and to 

have accumulated a large fortune. Leonard's second wife was 

Hannah Anderson, a widow, and the daughter of Thomas and 

Rebecca Thompson, of Salem. Lot, the youngest son of Thomas 

Sayres, married the daughter of John Warner, a member of the 

Society of Friends. He, like many of that persuasion, became 

a strong Whig, and at the battle of Quinton's Bridge, in the 

revolutionary struggle, (notwithstanding he was an old man like 

John Burns of Grettysburg memory,) took his musket and 

volunteered in the skirmish. Lot and his wife had one 

son. Job Sayres, who was born in 1765, and subsequently 

married Sarah Padgett ; they had issiie ; their eldest child 

was Street Sayres ; lie was born in 1791, and died a minor. 

Rachel, the daughter of Job and Sarah Sayres, born in 1793, 

married Captain Daniel Dixon ; their children were Thophilus 

Beesley, Job S. and Daniel. Job Sayres' second wife was Mary 

Tuft, sister of the late Captain John Tuft, of Salem. By that 

union there were three children — Margaret, William and 

Rebecca Sayres. Tlieophiliis B. Dixon married Harriet, the 

daughter of Daniel Dorrell; they have six children — John F., 

Sarah, Mary, Bilbe, Martha and Theophilus B. Jr. Job Dixon 

married Eliza F. Brown, one of the descendants (on her mother's 

side) of Joshua Carpenter, of Philadelphia, being the seventh 

generation. Slie was the daughter of Zaccheus, Jr. and Eliza 

Fogg Brown. Job and his wife have four children — David 

Fogg Brown, Zaccheus B., Daniel and Rachel Dixon. Daniel, 

the son of Daniel and Sarah S. Dixon, married Mary, the 

daughter of Edward Orr ; they have nine children — William, 

Tliomas V., Joseph, Charles, George, Helen, Hannah, Mary 

and Alljert Dixon. Margaret, the daughter of Job and Mary 

T. Sayres, married Japhet Somers, of Penn's Neck ; they have 

issue — A¥illiam, Mary and Ann Somers. William, the son of 

Job and Mary T. Sayres, married Eliza Pendgar, of New York ; 

tliey have no issue. Rebecca, the youngest daughter of Job 

unci Mary T. Sayres, married William Simkins ; they have issue. 




THOMAS SHOURD'S RESIDENCE. 
Built by one of his ancestors (Joseph Ware, 2d,) in 1730. 



SHOURDS FAMILY. 

History informs iis soon after William Penn purcluised the 
province of Pennsylvania lie traveled through parts of Germany 
and Holland on horseback, inviting the inhabitants of those 
countries to emigrate to his newly acquired province in North 
America. Among tliose that accepted his invitation was Cor- 
nelius Slioverde, a stadtholder of one of the provinces of Hol- 
land. He and his family arrived at Philadelphia in 1 684. They 
lived in a cave for a short period of time, near Germantown. 
Subsequently he purchased 300 acres of land of the propri- 
etor ; the said land was located in Penn's manor, nearly oppo- 
site where Bordentown now is in New Jersey. Tliere was 
a large stone placed at one corner of the allotment, witli his 
initials cut on it, and the writer, in company with the late Hec- 
tor Ivins, who at that time resided near by, visited the place of 
his ancestor, where he lived and ended his days. His wife's 
maiden name was Sophina Weimar, and most of their cliildren 
were born in Holland. Their names were Samuel, Catharine, 
Esther, Sarah and Sophina. Sophina, the youngest, married 
Zebulon Gaunt, in 1715 ; their children were Samuel, Zebulon, 
Israel, Hannah, Mary and Sophina Gaunt. Samuel, the son of 
Zebulon and Sophina Gaunt, married Hannah Woolman; they 
had seven children — Judali, Aslier, Reuben, Elihu, Peter, Se- 
reptlia and Elizabeth. 

Samuel, the son of Cornelius and Sophina Slioverde, married 
Sarah Harrison, of Philadelphia; and he and his wife, Sarah 
Slioverde, had a large family of children. Two of the youngest 
located themselves at Tuckerton, and that generation of the 
family changed the sj^elling of their name from Slioverde to 
Shourds, Mary, the daughter of Samuel and Sarah Shourds, 
married Jonathan Pettit. They resided at Tuckerton, and their 
house was standing a few years ago in a commanding situa- 
tion, near Barnegat bay. Their son, Joseph Pettit, married 
Sarah, the daughter of Elislia and Mary Woodmitt Bassett, of 
Mannington ; they had issue — Woodnutt, Jonathan and Mary 
Pettit. Daniel, the son of Samuel and Sarah Shourds, married 
30 



234 8HOUED8 FAMILY. 



Christiuna BcUange, wlio died 21st of lOtli niontli, 1822, aged 
ninety _years. Tliej liad six cliildren— Samuel, John, Daniel, Shady, 
Ilannali and Amy Shourds. Samuel, the eldest, married Han- 
nah Gray;* tliey had nine children — Grray, Thomas, Samuel, Ben- 
jamin, John, Asa, Job, Daniel and Elizabeth Shourds. John, 
the son of Daniel and Christiana B. Shourds, married Sarah 
Johnson ; tliey had five children — David, Joseph, Hannah, Reu- 
ben and Ruth Shourds. Samuel and his brother, John Shourds, 
sold, their property at Tuckerton over lifty years ago. Samuel 
rented a farm in Back Neck, Cumberland county, and resided 
there for several years, and John Shourds rented property of 
the late Dr. Thomas Rowen, in Penn's Neck, and he and his 
family resided there several years. Samuel and. liis brotlier 
John sul)sequently removed to New York with their families, 
excepting David, the eldest son of John Shourds, who married 
and settled in the township of Lower Penn's Neck; he was the 
father of the present Joseph Shourds, of that township. 

Samuel Shourds and his brother John purchased large tracts 
in parts of Munroe and Genesee counties. New York. The 
greater part of their land was then in its primitive state, it 
being soon after the Erie canal was completed, but their prop- 
erty advanced rapidly in value, and the natural result was they 
became quite independent in a few years. An uncommon 
circumstance occurred a few years before Samuel and John's 
death. They felt desirous to visit their native place once more 
before their death, and accordingly they came to Woodstown to 
visit Jonathan and Hannah Smith, the latter being their sister, 
and all four of them went to Tuckerton by land. Samuel was 
then in his eighty-ninth year, his brother, John, tw^o years 
younger, Jonathan Smith in his eighty-eighth year, and his 
wife, Hannah, eighty-two years old. When they arrived at the 
place of their nativity what pleasing and also sad reflections 



* Samuel, the son of Daniel and Christiana Shourds as stated in the 
Shourds genealogy, married Hannah Gray. She was a sister of Samuel 
Gray. The Gray family I think were natives of Monmouth county. 
Samuel Gray and his wife had four children — Charles F. H. Gray, Jesse, 
who now resides near Pemberton, New Jersey, Hannah and Charity 
Gray. Charles F. H. Gray came to this county in company with his 
father many years ago, and married a daughter of the late Joseph 
C. Nelson, an eminent land Surveyor of Pittsgrove. Charles and his 
wife have several children. He has filled many and various township 
offices. His father, Samuel Gray, ended his days at his son's house. 
Charles' grandfather and one of his uncles, emigrated to Genesee 
county, State of New York, more than half a century since, in comi^any 
with Samuel and John Shourds. 



SHOURDS FAMILY. 235 



they must have had in recurring l)ack to tlie days of their youth. 
How many of their former friends and associates liad gone to 
tlieir linal resting phice. There was one, however, who resided 
at Great Egg Harbor, their brother Daniel, who was still living 
to receive his aged relatives. Daniel, the son of Daniel and 
Christiana Shourds, married Rebecca Leeds ; they had issue — 
William, Phebe, Matilda and Daniel, 2d. Shady, the daughter 
of Daniel and Christiana Shourds, married Walter Wilson, of 
Burlington city ; they have issue — William, who died a minor. 
Hannah, the daughter of Daniel and Christiana Shourds, born 
about the year 1765, married Jonathan Smith, a lineal descend- 
ant of Richard Smith, of Long Island ; they had three children 
— Jerusha, Elizaljeth and Jonathan Smith. Jerusha married 
Satnuel, the son of William AVhite, of Woodstown ; their 
children were Mary, Samuel, William, David, Wilson and 
Jonathan. Jonathan married Lydia Waddington, the daugh- 
ter of Aaron Waddington, of Elsinboro. Elizabeth was 
twice married. Her lirst husband was Clement Hinch- 
man ; they had issue, one daughter — Clemence Hinchman. 
Her second husband was William Cawley, son of Samuel 
Cawley, Jr. Elizabeth, the daughter of Jonathan and Hannah 
Smitli, was twice married. Her first husband was Daniel 
Bowen, M. D., a native of Bridgeton ; they had one son — Smith 
Bowen, who married Ann Bisham, daughter of Samuel Bisham, 
of Philadelphia ; they have three children — Mary, Elizabeth, 
Anna Stoke and Samuel Bisham Bowen. Elizabeth Smith's 
second husband was Hosea Fithian, M. D., son of Jonathan 
Fithian, of Cumberland county ; they had three children — 
Hannah, Mary and Elizabeth. Elizabeth, their mother, died 
in 1854. Jonathan, the son of Jonathan and Hannah Smith, 
married Hannah, daughter of Jacob Davis, of Pilesgrove ; they 
had four children — Mary E., Samuel, who died young, Jonathan 
a id Ellen Smith. 

Samuel, the son of Samuel and Sarah Shourds, was born 2-lth 
of Tth month, 1718. The latter was a clock and watcli maker, 
and followed his trade in Bordentown, New Jersey. His wife 
was Taminson, the daughter of John and Elizabeth Pancoast, 
of Burlington county. Taminson was born 29th of 11th month, 
1725. Benjamin, the son of Samuel and Taminson P. Shourds, 
was born 7tli of 1st month, 1753. He subsequently married 
Mar}^, the daughter of William and Rachel Silvers, of Piles- 
grove ; they had seven children — Thomas, Rachel, Samuel, 
Rhoda, William, Mary and Benjamin. Thomas, the eldest', 
died 23d of lltli month, 1778. Rachel, the eldest daughter of 



236 SHOUEDS FAMILY. 



Benjamin and Mary Shourds, married Jervis Hall, of Manning- 
ton ; she was liis second wife. There were two children — 
Casper and Rachel Hall. E-achel, their mother, died when her 
children were yonng. Casper Hall died in 1819, when lie was 
about eighteen years old. Rachel, the daughter of Jervis and 
Rachel S. Hall, married Josiah, the youngest son of Sanmel 
Nicholson, of Mannington ; they had two or three sons and one 
daughter — Hannah Nicholson, who married George Radcliff; 
they have issue. Josiah Nicholson has been deceased many 
years. His widow, Rachel Hall Nicholson, resides in the city 
of Salem, and is a teacher in one of the public schools of that 
city. Rhoda, the daughter of Benjamin and Mary Shourds, 
married John, the son of John and Susan Denn, of Manning- 
ton ; they had live children — Rachel, Mary, Susan, Ann and 
Rebecca. The latter died yoimg. John Denn, Jr., died in 
Mannington before he arrived to middle age. Soon after that 
event Rhoda Denn removed to the town of Salem with her 
children. She was above mediocrity in intellect, and remark- 
able for self-denial. She was a recommended minister in the 
Society of Friends for a number of years. Her communications 
in public meetings were not extended to much length, but she 
possessed a faculty of condensing and saying much for her 
hearers to reflect upon in a few words. She has been deceased 
a number of years. Her daughter, Rachel Denn, married Pro- 
fessor John Griscom, the son of William and Rachel Denn 
Griscom; she was his second wife. They resided in the city of 
Burlington until his death. Soon after that occurred his widow, 
Rachel D. Griscom, returned to Salem to live. Mary, the 
t-econd daughter of John and Rhoda Denn, died a young 
woman, unmarried. Susan Denn, the third daughter of John 
and Rhoda Denn, remains single. She aiul her sister, Rachel D. 
Griscom, keep house together, on Broadway, in Salem. Anna, 
the fourth daughter of John and Rhoda Denn, married William 
Gibbons, of Philadelphia ; they had two cliildren — Susan and 
Henry Gibbons. William, their father, has been deceased 
several years. Their son, Henry, died in tlie West Town 
boarding school. He was a promising and interesting youth, 
and if his life had been spared I have no doubt he would have 
made his mark on the sands of time ; but such is life. Anna 
Gibbons and her daughter, Susan, reside in tlie city of Salem. 
William, the son of Benjamin and Mary Shourds, married 
Martha, the daughter of Peter and Mary Andrews, of Man- 
nington. Peter was a native of Great Egg Harbor ; his wife, 
Mary, was the daughter of Whitten and Martha Iluddy Cripps, 



SHOURCS FAMILY. 237 



of Mannington,* William and Martha Sliourds had four 
children — Rachel, Mary, Benjamin and William Shourds. — 
Rachel, their eldest daughter, married Thomas Mullineux, of 
Ulster county, New York ; her husband is deceased, and she 
now lives at Mount Holly, Burlington county. Mary Shourds 
lives in the city of Philadelphia, and remains single. Benja- 
min, the eldest son, resides in Philadelphia, and is a brick layer 
]^y trade. He is married and has several children. William 
Shourds has been twice married ; his first wife was Hannah 
Yardly, by whom he had three children — Martha, Letitia and 
Hannah. His second wife is Rebecca Rainer. Mary, the 
daughter of Benjamin and Mary Shourds, married Samuel 
Hewes, of Delaware county, Pennsylvania; they are both 
deceased, leaving one son — Charles Hewes. Samuel Shourds, 
the second son of Benjamin and Mary Shourds, was born 6th 
of 9th month, 1781 ; he married Elizabeth, the daughter of 
Jacob and Mary Carpenter Ware. Jacob was the great grand- 
son of Joseph Ware, the emigrant, who came to this country in 
the sliip Griffith, as a servant, and landed at Salem 5th of 10th 
month, 1675. Jacob's wife was Mary Carpenter, the daughter 
of William and Mary Powell Carpenter. William was the 
grandson of Joshua Carpenter, of Philadelp]iia. He was born 
in the State of Delaware, and came to this county about tho 
year 1715 or '16, and married Mary, the daughter of Jeremiah 
Powell, Jr., who was several years younger than her husband ; 
they had four children — Mary, William, Powell and Abigail. 
Sanmel atid Elizabeth Shourds had three children — William, 
Mary and Thomas. William died young. Samuel Sliourds, 

*I have frequently alhided to the Cripps family without stating their 
ancestry. It is an old family of England. Nathaniel, the tirst that I 
have knowledge of was the sou of John Cripps, born about ItJoG. He 
married, in England, Grace, sister of James Whitten, who located laud 
in Lower Mannington, at the first settlement of Salem county. 
Nathaniel and his wife, Grace Cripps, came to America in 1G78, and 
settled in Burlington county. By tradition he was the founder of 
Mount Holly. Nathaniel and Grace Cripps had six children — John, 
Benjamin, Samuel, Virginia, Tlieophla and Hannah Ami Cripps. — 
John, the eldest son, married INIary Eves, of Haddonfield. Benjamin, 
the second son, married Mary Hough. Their chiklren were Whitten, 
who in 1759 married Martha Huddy; John, their second son, died a 
minor; Hannah, married Samuel Mason, of Mannington, in 1756, son 
of Thomas Mason, of the same place ; Cyntha married James Bonsall, 
of Darby, Pennsylvania. Whitten Cripps subsequently was the owner 
of the landed estate of his great-uncle, James Whitten ; he had two 
children — Benjamin, who married the daughter of Peter Carney, of 
Upper Penn'a Neck ; and Mary Cripps, who married Peter Andrews, a 
native of Egg Harbor. 



238 SHOUKDS FAMILY. 



the father of the before mentioned children, died in 1807, in 
his twenty -sixth year. He resided, at the time of his death, in 
Lower Penn's Neck, wliere his children were born. Mary 
Shourds married William Bradway, the son of Ezra and Mary 
Denn Bradway, of Lower Alloways Creek ; they have six 
children — Elizabeth, Sarah, Mary, Anna, Bachel and Ellen 
Bradway. Thomas Shourds was born 28th of 2d month, 1805, 
and married Sarah, tlie daughter of Joseph and Ann Mason 
Thompson, 10th of 1st month, 1828. Joseph Thompson, her 
father, was the son of Josliua Thompson, a native of Elsinboro, 
and the great grand-son of Andrew Thompson, the emigrant, 
who landed at Elsinboro in 167T. Ann Mason, wife of Joseph 
Thompson, was the daughter of John Mason, who was the 
son of Thomas Mason, and he was the son of John Mason, 
who emigrated from England and landed at Philadelphia 
in 1681 ; (he, however, came and settled at Salem soon 
afterwards.) Tliomas and Sarah Thompson Sliourds had 
eight children — Anna T., Samuel, (who died when about 
twenty months old,) Tlionipson, Samuel, 2d, Thomas M., Eliza- 
beth T., Sarah W. and Mary Carpenter Shourds. Samuel 
Shourds, 2d, died when lie was in his nineteenth year. Sarah 
Ware Shourds died wlien she was in her twenty-lirst year. 
Elizabeth Thompson Shourds died when she was about thirty- 
one years old. Thompson, the son of Thomas and Sarah T. 
Shourds, is a carpenter and builder, and follows that business in 
Philadelphia. He married Racliel, the daughter of Comly and 
Susan Tyson ; tliey have had three children — William, Anna 
T. and Susan |T. Rachel, his wife, is deceased, as also their 
oldest child, Willie Shourds. Tliomas Mason Shourds, the son 
of Thomas and Sarah T. Shourds, married Anna, the daughter 
of Joseph and Mary Brown, of Alloways Creek; they have 
ihree children — Sarah W., Mary and TJiompson Shourds. 



SUMMEEILL FAMILY. 

The SmnmeriU's are a large and ancient family of Upper 
Penn's Neck. The most relial)le account of the family is that 
William Summerill and Thomas Carney emigrated from Ireland 
about 1725, and settled in Penn's Neck, Salem county. William 
Summerill, soon after his arrival, purchased a large tract of land 
near the present Ijrick mill at the liead of Game creek, extend- 
ing to Salem creek. He and his wife, Mary Summerill, resided 
on that part now owned by Benjamin and Rebecca Summerill 
Black, (she having inherited tlie property from her father.) 
They had two sons — Joseph and John. When his children were 
young he had the misfortune of losing his wife ; soon after which 
he left the township of Penn's Neck and settled in Pittsgrove, 
and there married a widow by the name of Elwell. By this 
wife he had two daughters, one of whom subsequently married 
a Newkirk, the parents of Garrett and Matthew Newkirk, of 
mercantile fame of Philadelpliia. An incident, relating to the 
introduction of those eminent men into business life in Phila- 
delphia, w^as related to the writer more than thirty years ago by 
an aged physician, then a resident of Pittsgrove. He said the 
father of Garrett and Matthew Newkirk was in the practice of 
going to Philadelpliia market with his poultry once in a year, 
which was common among the farmers of Salem county at tliat 
time. On one of his trips his eldest daughter accompanied him 
for the purpose of buying a new bonnet, soon after they arrived 
in the city, she went to one of the milliners and purcliased her- 
self one, and whilst waiting for it to be trimmed to her liking, 
she was impressed with the idea that she would be glad to have 
the opportunity of learning the trade before she left. Slie 
asked the milliner in attendance if she would 1)0 willing to take 
her to learn the trade ; tlie milliner replied in the affirmative, 
but when she mentioned tlie matter to her father he discouraged 
and desired her not to undertake it. But her mind was settled 
upon it ; she told her father that if he would pay her board 
whilst learning the trade, that would be all of his estate she 
wanted. He at last consented. After she had learned the busi- 



240 eUMMEKILL FAMILY. 



ness she set iTp on lier own account, and in a few years accumu- 
lated a fortune. At the death of her fatlier she obtained a 
situation in one of the dry good stores for her eldest brother 
Garrett, and in a short time afterwards she found a situation for 
her younger brother, Matthew; both of them eventually became 
successful and wealthy merchants in tlieir adopted city. Wil- 
liam Summerill, the emigrant, died in Pittsgrove, at a very ad- 
vanced age. 

Joseph, the eldest son of William and Mary Summerill, set- 
tled in AV^ilmington, Delaware, and engaged in tlie shipping and 
blacksmitliing Inisiness. He married and liad two sons and two 
daughters; both of liis daughters married sea captains. His 
sons, Joseph and Nelieraiah, became merchants in Philadelphia, 
but finally failed, causing, also, the failure of their fatlier. Aftei- 
which they removed to the interior of Pennsylvania, wliere, it 
is said, some of their family still remains. Jolm, the youngest 
son of William and Mary Summerill, married Naomi Carney, 
daughter of Thomas and Mary Carney, of Carney's Point. The 
Carriey's purchased a large tract of land on the Delaware river, 
being part of the Bowtown tract of 1640 acres, that formerly be- 
longed to Matthias Nelson, he being a Swede. John and his Mdf e, 
Naomi C. Summerill, owned and lived on the property that his 
father purchased when he first settled in New Jersey. It is now 
owned and occupied l)y Benjamin and Rebecca S. Black, as 
before mentioned. The old mansion house was burned during 
the war of the Revolution by a marauding party from the Brit- 
ish fl.eet that was lying in the Delaware river opposite Helms 
Cove. There is now a large iron pot in the possession of the 
Summerill family, that was in the old family mansion when it 
was burned ; it certainly is quite a centennial relic. John 
Summerill, 1st, died comparatively a young man, lea^^ng a 
widow and four sons — John, Jr., Joseph, Thomas and William, 
and two daughters — Mary and Rebecca. Naomi, their mother, 
proved a parent indeed. She remained and carried on farming, 
and raised and educated her six children. She never married 
again. 

John Summerill, 2d, mai-ried Christiana Holton ; they had 
nine children. James and Josiah died minors. Their father 
was a successful agriculturist, and at his death was the owner 
of a large quantity of excellent land in tlie townsliip of Upper 
Penn's Neck. He lived to be nearly fourscore years, leaving 
four sons and three daughters — John, 3d, Naomi, Garnett, 
William, Ann, Rebecca and Joseph C. Joseph Summerill, the 
second son of Jolm, 1st, married Mary Linmin ; they had two 



8UMMERILL FAMILY. 241 



children — William and Mary; both of whom are deceased. 
William Summerill, son of Joseph, married Elizabeth A. Cris- 
pin. He purcliased the James Mason farm, in Manuiugton, 
near Salem, and resided thereon until his death. lie left a 
large family of children. Most of William Summerill's chil- 
dren's names I have no knowledge of, excepting three of his 
sons — James, Robert and Henry, who are residents of Upper 
Pittsgrove. William's widow is still living. Mary, the daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Mary L. Summerill, married Stephen 
Straughn. He is deceased. Thomas, the son of John and 
Naomi Carney Summerill, married Elizabeth Borden ; they are 
both deceased, dying young, and leaving a family of young 
children, who are all deceased excepting two daughters — Han- 
nah and Elizabeth Paul. One of the sons was married, and 
left two sons, who are in business in Philadelphia. Hannah, 
the daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth B. Summerill, married 
Samuel Holton ; she is deceased, leaving one son. Elizabeth, 
daughter of Thomas Summerill, married Somers Barber ; the 
latter is deceased, and leaves two children, both living. William, 
son of John and Naomi Summerill, died a young man, unmar- 
ried. Mary, daughter of John and Naomi Summerill, was 
twice married ; her first husband's name was Clark, and after 
ids death she married John Holton ; they left tlu-ee sons — 
Thomas, Samuel and Andrew Holton ; the last named is living ; 
the two oldest brothers are deceased. 

John Summerill, 2d, died in 1854, and left seven children. 
The eldest son, John Smnmerill, 3d, died in 1865, aged sixty- 
two years. He was above mediocrity in mental abilities. In 
early life he became an active politician, was elected to the 
State Legislature when a young man, and was subsequently 
chosen a State Senator and served the full term with entire sat- 
isfaction to his constituents. Ho was affable and very pleasing 
in his manner. His wife was Emily Parker. At his death he 
left two sons — John, 4th, and Joseph C. Summerill, both of 
whom are store keepers ana large dealers in grain at Helms 
Cove, a short distance below Pennsgrove. Tliere their father 
commenced the same business in 1829. 

Naomi, the daughter of John, 2d, and Christiana H. Sum- 
merill, married Robert, the son of James and Elizabeth Newell. 
Robert and his wife since their marriage, reside in the township 
of Mannington. They have three sons and one daughter living. 
John S. Newell, their eldest son, married Emma, the daughter 
of William Morris, late of Sharpstown ; they have one child — 
Robert. Their daughter, Josephine, married Edward A. Van- 
31 



242 SUMMERILL FAMILY. 



neman, of Upper Penn's Neck ; lier husband is deceased, leav- 
ing children. The two younger sons of Kobert and Naomi 
Newell are Robert, Jr., and James. Garnett, the second son 
of John and Cln-istiana Summerill, is a farmer, and owns and 
resides on the property tliat was formerly owned and occupied 
by Peter Carney, the youngest son of Thomas Carney, Sr. Gar- 
nett married Mary Borden, of Sharpstown. They liad four chil- 
tli-en — James, Annie, William G. and John, M. D. James is 
deceased ; Annie married Henry M. Wright ; William J. and 
John M. Summerill are unmarried. William, the third son of 
John and Christiana Summerill, married Hannah Vanneman, 
He resides in Upper Penn's Neck. He and his wife have two 
gons — Josiah and Daniel V. Summerill, both of whom are mar- 
ried, and reside on farms near Pennsgrovo. William Summerill 
does a large amount of public business in his native county, 
having been, and is at the present time, one of the Judges of 
the Salem County Courts, and is also one of the Directors of 
the Canal Meadow Company. This canal was projected as early 
as 1801 by John Moore White and Michael Wayne, two emi- 
nent lawyers of West Jersey, who, at that time, owned a large 
tract of low lands and meadow bordering on Salem creek. They, 
in conjunction with the late Joseph Reeve, who resided near 
Sharpstown, made an application to the State Legislature for a 
law to cut a navigable canal for a two-fold purpose. The said 
canal was intended to carry off the waters that flowed down the 
upper branches of Salem creek into the river, instead of a cir- 
cuitous route of more than twenty miles to the Delaware river 
by the course of Salem creek, and only two miles and four rods 
by the canal. The contemplated canal was dug, but proved a 
failure. It was attempted about thirty years ago to open it 
deeper, but it was soon abandoned as impracticable. Some 
seven years since, there was an application made to the State 
Legislature for a new law for tlie purpose of taxing all the 
owners of the low lands and meadows that lay above John 
Denn's canal to the head of tide water, for tlie purpose of defray- 
ing the expenses of digging a canal large enough for navigation, 
and also, to stop the creek some distance below the contemplated 
canal. The meadow was surveyed by three commissioners chosen 
for that purpose, wliich survey amounted to seven or eight 
thousand acres, and a tax assessed on said meadow by a second 
set of commissioners elected for that purpose, agreeable to their 
law. The Directors decided in cutting the new canal on the 
site of the old one, about half a mile below Hawk's Bridge, 
that was dug nearly seventy years previous. Through the energy 



SUMMERILL FAMILY. 243 



and perseverance of Elislia Bassett, William Snminerill, George 
Biddle, David Pettit and Robert Walker, the work was com- 
menced and the canal was completed so as to be navigable, and 
Salem creek completely stopped abont fifty rods below the canal, 
where it empties into Salem creek. This public work was under- 
taken through great opposition by some of the owners of land 
that lay bordering on Salem creek, notwithstanding it is likely 
to prove one of the greatest public benefits that was ever under- 
taken and fully consummated of the kind in Salem county. In 
regard to navigation it enables owners of land in Upper 
Penn's Neck, a large part of Maimington and Pilesgrove town- 
ships, as well as the owners of extensive meadows and low lands, 
that lie below the dam, to send the products of their farms to 
market without much cost, or labor. Tlie complete draining by 
the canal makes their meadows more than two-fold profitable 
than heretofore. 

Ann, the daughter of John and Christiana Summerill, mar- 
ried Elias Kaighn, of Camden, The latter is deceased, leaving 
one daughter, but his widow is now living at Helm's Cove, 
Upper Penn's Neck. Rebecca, the daughter of John and 
Christiana Summerill, married Benjamin Black ; they own and 
reside on the old homestead farm of the Summeriirs, as hereto- 
fore mentioned. They have two sons and two daughters. 
Joseph, the youngest son of John and Christiana Summerill, is a 
Methodist clergyman, of which religious society, I think, most 
of the Summerill family are members, Joseph married Sarah 
I. Yanneman, and has six children, three daughters and three 
sons — Hannali, Christiana, Louisa, Joseph C, Thomas C. and 
Daniel Yanneman Summerill, At the death of Thomas Car- 
ney, 1st, he left two sons — Thomas and Peter Carney, and two 
or three daughters. He, as was the custom in that day, devised 
all his real estate to his sons ; his daughters, particularly Naomi, 
liis eldest daughter, who married John Summerill, 1st, did not 
lieir any of her fatlier's real estate. Thomas Carney, Jr., left 
one daughter to inherit his large estate, who afterward married 
the late Robert Gr. Johnson, of Salem. Peter Carney, the 
])rother of Thomas, left two daughters ; one of them married 
Benjamin Cripps, of Mannington ; the other daughter married 
John Tuft, of Salem, but died young, leaving one son — Sinnick- 
son Tuft. There is a singular circumstance comiected with the 
Carney and Summerill families that does not often occur. 
Naomi Carney Summerill's descendants, now, after a lapse of 
nearly a century, owns the larger part of the landed estate that 
belonged to her two brothers, Thomas and Peter Carney, 
ineludinu' several larire and vahial)le farms. 



SHARP FAMILY. 

The Sharps are an ancient family of tlie Sontli of England, 
They held a large landed estate in Till)ury, in Gloncester, near 
the city of Bristol. Anthony Sharp, the subject of this sketch, 
being the eldest son of that lineage of the Sharps, inherited the 
great landed estate of the family, in the county of Gloucester, 
lie was born about 1630, and early in life became convinced of 
tlie doctrines of George Fox ; likewise one or two of his younger 
1)rothers became members of the persecuted religious sect, called 
Friends or Quakers. Anthony Sharp, the eldest brother, emi- 
grated from Tilbury, England, in the time of Cromwell, and 
settled in Queens county, Ireland, and purchased a large county 
seat called Houndwood, near Mount Mellick. That was his 
home, although he resided and did an extensive mercantile busi- 
ness in the city of Dublin. The estate called Roundwood is 
still in the possession of the Irish branch of the Sharp family to 
tliis day. Anthony Sharp purchased a large landed estate in 
East and AYest Jersey. On the 22d of 4th montli, 1681, he 
l)ouglit of Roger Roberts, of Dublin, tlie one-tenth part of the 
onc-aundredth part of West New Jei-sey. Again in a deed, 
dated 16tli of 9th mouth, 1700, he purcliased of Henry Mason 
and Elizabeth his wife, and William Barnard, tlie sixteentli of 
the twentieth part of the one-hundi-cdth part; he likewise 
l)0Ught of the same parties the following day the tenth part of 
the one-hundredth part of West New Jerse3^ Anthony Sharp 
also purchased of Thomas AVarner, of Dublin, the one-third part 
(if the one-half part of John Hay wood's, one of tlie East Jersey 
])roprietors. The deed was dated 14tli of lOtli month, 16H2. 
The said John Haywood, William Penn, Gwinn Laurie, Robert 
Barclay, and eight others, all being members of the Society of 
Friends, bought from George Carterett East New Jersey. The 
said John Haywood sold his one-twelfth to Thomas Warner, of 
Dublin, for £350 sterling ; not for himself alone, but including 
in that transaction, as equal parties, were Anthony Sharp and 
Samuel Claridge ; botli of these were citizens of Dublin. A 
division was made of the one-third part each owned, tliat being 



SHAKP FAMILY. 245 



in 1682. Afterwards Antlionj Sharp purchased of Samuel 
Claridge one-half part of his original one-thii-d of John Hay- 
wood's moiety, as one-lialf part of the original one-twelfth of 
East New Jersey. This deed bears date 20th of 2d month, 
1694. 

Anthony Sharp, the elder, had three sons — Isaac, Joseph and 
Daniel, and one daugliter — Rachel Sharp. He died in the year 
1707, and was bmied in the ancient Friends' burying-gronnd in 
the city of Dublin. Isaac, the eldest son of Anthony, married 
and had three sons — Anthony, Isaac and Joseph Sliarp, and four 
daughters ; their names were Mary, Sarah Mason, Rachel and 
Margaret Sharp. Anthony, the eldest son of Isaac Sliarp, mar- 
ried and had two children, one of wJiom whose name was Isaac, 
died during his minority. Tlie daughter, Francis Sharp, mar- 
ried Lake Flood, of Queens county, Ireland. The family of 
Floods are an ancient family of both England and Ireland 
Francis and her husband resided on the great landed estate 
called Roundwood, that was owned by the iirst Anthony Sliarp. 
Mary, the daughter of Isaac Sharp, probably died unmarried. 
Her sister Sarali Mason Sharp, married a person by the name 
of Daniel Delaney, and Margaret, the youngest daughter of Isaac 
Sharp, married a man by the name of Hill ; they afterwards 
emigrated to America. Anthony Sharp, 1st, becpieathed to 
liis third son, Daniel Sharp, and his heii-s in male line in the 
order of primogeniture, one-fourth part of his lands in East Jer- 
sey. He bequeathed to his second son Joseph, and his heirs in 
the male line, one-fourth part of all his lands in East New Jer- 
sey, and in default of such issue to his eldest son Isaac Sharp. 

Joseph Sharp, second son of Anthony, married Catharine 
Sewage of Ireland, had one daughter. Isaac, the second brotlier 
of Anthony, 2d, emigrated to America, and settled in West Jer- 
sey, at a place called Blessington, now known as Sharpstown. 
He brought the frame of his house with him from Ireland, and 
tlie site where he built his house is on the farm owned at the 
present time by Joseph Robinson. The tract is known as " The 
Park" to this day by the old inhabitants in that section. It is 
probable that the said Isaac Sharp emigrated al)out the year 
1730. He was appointed Judge of the Court of Salem county, 
by George II., King of England, 1741. This is the copy: 
" George the Second, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, 
" France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and to our 
" trusty and well beloved Isaac Sharp, Esq., Greeting : We, 
" reposing especial trust and confidence in 3^onr integrity, pru- 
" dence, and ability, have assigned, constituted and appointed, 



24:6 SHARP FAMILY. 



" and we do by these presents assign, constitute and appoint 
" you, tlie said Isaac Sharp, to be om- officer. Judge of Inferior 
" Court of Common Pleas, to be held in and for our county of 
" Salem, in our Province of Kew Jersey, giving and hereby 
" granting to you the said Isaac Sharp, full power and authority 
" to exercise and enjoy all power and jurisdiction, belonging to 
" the said Court, and to hear, try and determine all causes, and 
" quarrels which is recognizable in our said Court, and to award 
" execution therein accordingly. In testimony whereof, wc 
" have caused the Great Seal of our said Province of New Jer- 
" sey to be hereunto affixed. Witness our trusty and well beloved 
'' Lewis Morris,Esq., Captain General and Governor-in-chief over 
" our said Province of Nova Cesaviea, or New Jersey, and the 
" territories therein depending in America, and Yice Admiral in 
" the same, and at our city of Perth Ambo}", the sixteentli day of 
" August, in the eighteenth year of our reign. Anno Domini, 
" 1741. HoLilE." 

Isaac Sharp married a daughter of Thomas Lambert, who 
resided near the falls of the river Delaware, in the county of 
Burlington, previous, however, to the marriage of his father. 
Isaac, then residing on his country-seat, in Ireland, called Round- 
wood, made a settlement on him, it being six hundred acres on 
land at Blessington, situated in the township of Pilesgrove, in 
the county of Salem, and all other (his) the said Isaac Sharp's 
lands in the said county of Salem, and likewise one moiety, or 
half of all other the said Isaac Sharp's lands within the said 
province of East and West New Jersey, in America, except 
1050 acres of land on Cooper's creek, in the county of Glouces- 
ter, known by the name of Rush Hill ; also all the said Isaac 
Sharp's personal estate in tlie county of Salem, or elsewhere in 
America. Isaac Sharp, the emigrant and his wife, had three 
sons and five daughters ; their names were Samuel, Edward, 
Anthony, Mary, Jaicl, Hannah D., Sarah, Rachel Wyncoop, and 
Elizabeth Sharp. Tlie time of the death of Isaac Sharp, the 
fatlier of the above mentioned children, is not mentioned ; prob- 
ably before tlie year 1770. I think his name is not mentioned 
in Salem County Court records after that date. He had a l)irth 
i-ight in the Society of Friends, and he continued to be a mem- 
])er during his long and active life. 

Anthony, the youngest mm of Isaac Sharp, of Sharpstown, 
espoused the part of the patriots during the Revolutionary 
struggle. He lay concealed in the barn whilst tlie British were 
in the neighborhood of his home, and Samuel Humphries, the 
projenitor of the present families of IJiimplii'eys, then a small 



SHARP FAMILY. 247 



boy, carried provisions to him in Lis place of refuge. He, how- 
ever emerged from his retreat, and went with Dr. Ebenezer 
Ehner, (tlie father of Judge L. Q. C. Ehner,) of Bridgeton, to 
Fort Ticonderoga, to participate in the engagements on the 
frontier. It was here tliat, altliough a Quaker, lie attained the 
rank of Colonel in the army ; and his name now stands coupled 
with the above grade on the roster of tlie otKcers of the Ameri- 
can forces. When driven from their home the silver plate and 
other valuables of the Sharps, of Sharpstown, were conveyed 
across the Delaware river to their relatives, the Delaneys, who 
resided at Wilmington, Delaware. The man who rowed the 
boat was named Jonas Keen, and he related the circumstance 
on his death bed as one that had made a deep impression on his 
memory. The said Jonas Keen lived to the very advanced age 
of ninety years, and has descendants now residing in Salem. 

Edward, the second son of Isaac Sharp, the emigrant, as 
stated before, married Martha Thompson, of Sussex county. 
East Jersey. She was the daughter of Colonel Mark Thomp- 
son, of Marksboro, in the above county, and who served with 
the rank of Colonel in the Revolutionary army. Whilst 
engaged under General Dickinson, at the battle of Princeton, 
he was severely wounded, and was carried under the same tree 
to which the soldiers had taken General Mercer. Dr. Jacob 
Thompson Sharp, formerly of Salem, grandson of Colonel Mark 
Thompson, alluded to above, was (until children were born to 
him by his wife, Hannah Ann Smith, of Philadelphia,) the 
sole surviving representative of the family of Sharp's, M'ho emi- 
grated to Salem county from Ireland ; which is confirmed by 
the report of Mr. Gifford before the Historical Society of New 
Jersey, at Newark, several years ago, which expressly states that 
the above assertion is true. There are other families bearino- the 
same name in Salem county, likewise in New Jersey, which are 
remote from the Sharps of Blessington, or Sharpstown. Ed- 
ward Sharp alone married, tlie otliers dying witliout issue. He 
married the daughter of Mark Thompson, as before stated ; 
they had four sons — Samuel, Jacob Thompson, Breckenridge 
and Edward Sharp, and one daughter — Mary ; all of whom 
died before attaining their majority, except Jacob Thompson 
Sharp, who studied medicine and practiced that profession many 
years, in both East and West Jersey ; and now resides in Cum- 
l)erland county. He married, as before stated, Hannah Ann, 
daughter of Edward Smith, a prominent merchant of Phila- 
delphia, and a native of Salem county, as were likewise his 
ancestors for several generations. Dr. Jacob Thompson and 



248 SHARP FAMILY. 



liis wife, Hannah Ann Sharp, had six children, four of whom 
are still living, viz : Dr. Edward S. Sharp, of Salem ; Sallie M. 
Westcott, of Briclgeton, Alexander Henry Sharp, a lawyer of 
Atlantic county, and Thomas M. Sharp, Esq., of Port Eliza- 
abeth, Cumberland county Martha Thompson Sharp and 
Jacob Thompson Sharp are deceased. 

Joseph Sharp, younger brother of Isaac Sharp, of Blessing- 
ton, near Salem, resided at the same place and doubtless emi- 
grated from Ireland simultaneously with his brother Isaac. 
Isaac Siuirp, 1st, did by his last will, bearing date 15th of 3d 
month, 1734:, give to his two sons, Isaac, and Joseph, all his 
lands wliatsoever in East and West Jersey, ratifying and con- 
lii'ming the above mentioned conveyance to his father by Thomas 
Warner to his heirs and assigns forever. 

William, the younger brother of Anthony Sharp, born in 
Gloucestershire, England, married a young woman by the name 
of Covert ; they had a son by the name of Thomas Sharp. 
Anthony Sharp, his uncle, gave to him, m'Iio was then about 
emigrating to America, and in consideration of his, Thomas 
Sharp, looking after Anthony Sharp's possession, tliere for his 
ease and best advantage ; he, tlie said Anthony Sharp, granted 
and confirmed unto him, and his lieirs, something over 
1,000 acres tluit Anthony Sharp bought of Roger Roberts, 
of Dublin, in 1681 ; and the deed of conveyance was nuide the 
same year. This property was located on the King's Highway ; 
Salem County Alms House farm is part of it. Thomas Sharp 
had a son Isaac, who built in the first decade of the eighteenth 
century a large and substantial brick dwelling, which is still 
standing, in good repair. William Austin is now the owner. 
That family of Sharps, like those of Sharpstown, liad a large 
deer park, which is still visible. 

Thomas, the father of Isaac Sharp, had a family burying 
ground, wliich was common at the first settlement of this 
country. John Fenwick was buried there ; the reason assigned 
was — Fenwick was desirous to lay witli his wdfe's relatives, the 
mother of his children, she being a cousin of Thomas Sharp. 
Isaac, the son of Thomas Sharp, was one of the Justices of 
Salem court from the year 1709 to 1739 ; he was an active and 
useful member of Salem Meeting of Friends. Thomas Chalk- 
ley mentions in liis journal being at the house of his worthy 
friend Isaac Sharp, in 1730. Isaac's descendants are not 
numerous ; he had a grandson that married Grace Bassett ; 
their children were — Abraim and William Sharp. Dr. Grifiith 
who resided in Salem a number of years ago, married a lady of 



SHARP FAMILY. 249 



that family. 'No part of the large and valuable estate of the 
Sharp's family belong to their descendants at the present 
time. 

32 



JOHN SMITH (OF SMITHFIELD) FAMILY. 

John Smith, the son of William Smith, was one of Fenwick's 
executors. He ^vas bora in the county of Kent, in England, in 
the year 1645. In 1673 he married Susannah Marcy, daugliter 
()f Edward Marcy, and in 1685 he and his Avife, together witli 
a number of emigrants, embarked for America on board the 
si lip Ariel, Edmund Baily master. They landed at New Castle 
in the 4:th month of tlie same year. In the 6th month 
following, he came to Salem, in West New Jersey, and pur- 
chased i,000 acres of land of Samuel and Anna Hedge, in 
Upper Mannington, it being one-half of the Hedgefield allot- 
ment, and there he made his permanent home. From that time 
it was known as Smithheld. It has been said he was a relative 
and also an inmiediate friend of John Fenwick. I presume 
this was the reason he was made one of Fenwick's executors, 
notwithstanding he had not arrived in this country at the time 
of his death. It is generally admitted by those familiar with 
the characters of the first settlers, that he had more than ordi- 
nary intellect and lousiness capacities. He and his wife had two 
cliildren born in England, who died the first year after they 
arrived in this country. Their cliildren born in America were 
Susanna Smith, born in Mannington 8th of 8th month, 1689 ; 
Joseph Smith, their eldest son born in 1691 ; John Smith, Jr., 
born in 1693 ; Samuel Smith, born in 1696; and Elizabeth Smith, 
l)orn 3d of 3d month, 1703. She mai'ried Judge John Bacon, 
of Bacon's Neck. Joseph Smith, the son of John and Susanna 
Smith, married and had one son — Thomas Smith, who in 174(1 
married Sarah, the daughter of Elisha and Abigail Bassett, of 
Bilesgrove ; they had three sons, the eldest was AVilliam, born 
31st of 8t]i month, 1741. He married Sarah, the daughter of 
James Chambless, Jr., of Alloways Creek; their children were 
Mary, Charles, AVilliam, James, Beulali, Clement and Atilla 
Smith. Mary, tlie eldest, married John Ellet, son of Charles 
and Hannah Carpenter Ellet ; tlieir children were Hannah C. 
and Maria Chambless Ellet, the latter remains single and resides 
in Salem. Hannah Carpenter Ellet was twice married, her tirst 



JOHN SMITH (of SMITHFIELD) FAMILY. 251 



liusbfmd was George W, Smith, of Yirginia; they had issue, one 
son — Cliarles P. Smith. Her second husband was Joseph E. 
Brown, the son of Joseph and Ann Allen Brown ; they had 
issue, two sons. James Smith, son of William and Sarah 
Cliambless Smith, married Hannah, the daughter of Jediah and 
Hannah Carpenter Allen, of Mannington ; their children are 
Sarah Ann and Mary Smith. Clement, tlie youngest son of 
William and Sarah Smith, married Hannah, the daughter of 
William and Catharine Low Tyler, of Salem ; they had one 
son — Clement Smith. Beulah, daughter of William and Sarah 
Smitli, married Joseph H. Wilson, of Philadelphia ; their child- 
ren were Mary, William, Emelinc, James, Harlin, Louisa and 
Sarah Wilson. Charles, William and Atilla Smith never 
married. 

David Smith, the second son of Thomas and Sarah Bassett 
Smith, was born 17th of 7th month, 1744-. He married Mary, 
the daughter of James, Jr., and Mary Oakford Cliambless, sister 
to his brother William's wife. They had no issue. David was 
a hatter by trade and followed his business in the town of Salem 
during his life. He adopted his nephew, the son of Thomas 
Smith, and made him the heir of his estate. David, the son of 
Thomas, married Martlia, the daughter of Thomas Jones, of 
Salem. They had issue, three children — Mary, James and 
Arabella ; one of whom married Samuel, the eldest son of 
Samuel and Eliza Clement ; the other married a son of Judge 
Hornlilower, of East Jersey. 

Thomas, the youngest son of Thomas and Sarah Bassett, was 
born 25tli of 1st month, 1717. He married Hannah Shillis ; 
their children were Elisha, Stephen and David Smith. Elisha 
married and left heirs — Stephen, Eliza and Ellen Smith. Ste- 
phen married Mary W. Jones, of Philadelphia ; their children 
were Sarah, James, Thomas, Charles, Elizabeth, Cliambless, 
Clement and Isaac Smith. 

Li 1718 Samuel Smith married Hannali Giles. Tlieir son, 
Giles Smith, was born 18th of 10th montli, 1719, and their 
daughter Hannah Smith was born in 1721. She, in 1712, 
married Preston Carpenter, the son of Samuel Carpenter, and 
grandson of Samuel Carpenter, Sr., who arrived in Philadelphia 
in 1683, in company with his brother, Joshua Carpenter, and 
other emigrants, and who was one of the first merchants in 
that city, and in the year 1700 was computed to be the richest 
man, except the proprietor, in the province of Pennsylvania, 
but towards the close of his life he met with several heavy 
losses, and his estate was considerably reduced l)ef<)re lie died. 



252 .lOHN SMITH (of smithfield) familv. 



Preston Carpenter and his wife liad, I think, seven children — 
Thomas, EHzabeth, William, Hannah, Margaret, Mary and 
Martha. TJiomas married a yonng woman in Gloncester whose 
maiden name was Tonkins. They were the grand-parents of 
Jndge Thomas Carpenter, of Camden. Willim Carpenter's 
first wife was Elizal^eth Wyatt, daughter of Bartliolomew, 3d. 
His second wife was Mary Redman, daughter of John Redman. 
Elizabeth Carpenter married Ezra Firth, son of John Firtli. 
Margaret Carpenter married James Mason Woodruff. Hannah 
Carpenter's first husband was Charles Ellet ; her second hus- 
band was Jedediah Allen. Mary Carpenter mai'ried Samuel 
Tonkins. Martha Carpenter married Joseph Reeve. 

Elizabeth Smith, youngest daughter of John Smitli, of Smith- 
field, was born in 1703, and married John Bacon, of Cohansey, 
in 1720. He was, I believe, the son of Samuel Bacon They 
liad seven children, named respectively Thomas, John, Eliza- 
beth, David, Martha, Mary and Job. Thomas Bacon, the old- 
est son, was born in 1721, and was the father of Charles and 
John Bacon. Charles married and settled on his father's prop- 
erty in Bacon's Neck, Greenwich townsliip. They had five 
children. Thomas, married a young woman in Mannington by 
tlie name of Wright. They both died young, and left one son, 
the present Thomas Bacon, formerly of Mannington. Benja- 
min's second son married a young woman in Gloncester county 
by the name of Allen. They liad two children. His second 
wife was Susan Dallas, daughter of Jonathan Dallas. David 
Bacon, their third son, never married, and Avas a merchant in 
tiie town of Salem for several years, but after a time he removed 
to Woodstown and there ended his days, leaving a legacy to 
Pilesgrove Monthly Meeting for them to erect a school house, 
which is now known as Bacon's School. Charles Bacon never 
married, and died at an advanced age on his farm in Ba(;on's 
Neck. Rachel Bacon married a Sheppard. She was the mother 
of the late Moses Sheppard of Greenwich. John Bacon cam.e 
to this county and made it his home. After a time he married 
Hannah Denn, daughter of Paul Denn, of Alloways Creek. 
They had five children — Thomas, Eleanor, Martha, Hannah and 
John. 

Elizabeth Bacon married John Denn of Alloways Creek, and 
was the mother of the late John Denn, of Mannington. David 
Bacon learned the hat trade in Philadelphia, and made liis per- 
manent home in that city, where he followed his trade the 
greater part of his life and amassed a fortune. He married and 
left two children — Joseph and Hannah Bacon. Joseph Bacon 



JOHN SMITH (of SMITHFIPJLd) FAMILY. 253 



the son of David Bacon, married and had four sons named 
Thomas, David, Joseph and Sanuiel Bacon. Hannah tlie dangli- 
ter of David Bacon, married Jonathan Evans. Thej were the 
parents of the late Tliomas Evans, who married Catherine Wistar, 
tlie daughter of John Wistar, of this county. Job Bacon, the 
youngest son of John and EHzabeth S. Bacon, was born 1735, and 
married Mary Stewart, daughter of John Stewart, of Alloways 
Creek. They had three children — Job, Elizabeth and George Ba- 
con. Job Bacon, their son, had two children by his first wife— John 
and Martha Bacon, His second wife was Ruth Thompson, 
daughter of John Thompson, of Elsinborough. They had four 
children named respectively Mary, Sarali, Ann and Josiah Bacon. 
Mary w^as the lirst wife of Clement iVcton, of Salem ; Sarah 
remains single and resides at Greenwich ; Ann married Moses 
Sheppard ; Josiah Bacon went into the mercantile business in 
Philadelpliia. It is believed tliat he has accumulated a large 
fortune. He is one of the Pennsylvania Railroad directors. 
The widow of Job Bacon, Sr., Mary S. Bacon, married Richard 
Wood, Jr. He was born in Stoe Creek township, Cumberland 
county, as it is now called, in 1728. He was tlie son of Riciiard 
Wood, who purchased ] ,000 acres of land and built himself a 
brick house, as early as 1725, which is still standing. He died 
in the year 1759, and was buried in his own family burying 
ground on his farm. I have been informed tliat his great grand- 
son. Professor George B. Wood, of Philadelphia, has erected a 
small marble monument in the old family graveyard to the 
memory of his great ancestor. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Job and Mary Bacon, married Rich- 
ard Wood, 3d. He was ])orn 7th of 2d month, 1755. Eliza- 
beth was his second wife. He was a successful merchant in tlie 
town of Greenwich, and had six children — Professor George Ba- 
con Wood, Richard, Charles, Horatio, Ann Elizal)eth and Han- 
nah Wood. At tlie death of Richard Wood, 3d, the poor and 
afflicted lost a valuable friend. He was ever ready to adminis- 
ter to their necessities ; so much so that his name in (4rcenwich 
and in the country around is held in grateful remenil)rance by 
the inhabitants to the present day. He told his wife a few years 
before his death to always look after the poor, and remarked 
that there was no danger but there would be enough attention 
paid to the rich. The case of this truly great man reminds me 
of the wise man, wlio said he never knew the righteous forsaken 
or liis children begging bread. This saying has been verified 
respecting Richard Wood's children, as they have all been 
successful in life in a renuirkable degree as to this world's 



25-i JOHN SMITH (of SMITHFIELD) FAMILY. 



goods, also a very respectable staiKlinii!; in general soeiety. 
George Bacon, son of Job Bacon and Mary, his wife, married 
Naomi Tyler. Tliey had four children — Ezra, George, Francis 
and Mary Bacon. He was a partner in the mercantile business 
with his brother-in-law, Richard Wood, several years, and he 
was far above ordinary men in his conversational powers, easy 
in his address, and without ostentation, which made his company 
veiy agreeable and interesting. He wielded a great influence 
ioY good in the town of Greenwich, and in society generally in 
which he associated. He died at an advanced age greatly 
regretted by all wlio knew liim. 



STRETCH FAMILY. 

Joseph Stretch emigrated to tliis countr}' from EngLuid about 
tlie year 1695. In tlie year 1700 he married Ilannali, the young- 
est daughter of Edward and Mary Bradway, who was born in 
New Salem, the 7th of 7th month, 1681. Joseph and liis wife 
settled on the southern portion of a tract of land which her 
father had purchased of the heirs of John Fenwick, contain- 
ing 900 acres of fast land and meadow. The said tract 
was below the Salter line, now known as Stoe Neck. About 
the year 1720, William Bradway, the son of Edward, had a 
brick dwelling erected on his part of the property, and his nephew, 
Bradway Stretch, built liimself a brick dwelling about the size 
of his uncle's, on the jDroperty lie inherited from his mother, 
about the year 1740. Tliere are standing at this time six brick 
dwellings, all in siglit of each other, which were erected in the 
fore part of the last century, — Daniel's, Brad way's. Stretch's, 
Padgett's, Butcher's and Richard Wood's. They are located on 
the head of the tide waters of the Unknown or Stoe creek. The 
early emigrants universally made the iirst clearings and settled 
on the navigable streams. I presume for two good causes — the 
tirst M^as there were but few public highways, and they poorly 
kept up for traveling, and what traveling they did do was on 
horseback; the second was by living near to navigation they 
could more readily get their produce to market in vessels and 
boats. There was a more important cause than either before 
mentioned: our hardy pioneers of the wilderness being men of 
judgment and enterprise, soon discovered the most fertile lands 
lay bordering on the navigal)]e streams and their trilnitaries, 
which, I think, is the case in tlie counties of Salem and Cund)er- 
land. 

Jose])h and Hannah Stretch had two sons — Bradway, born 
11th of 8d month, 1702, and Joseph, born in 1701. Bradway 
subsequently married Sarah, tlie daughter of John and Mary 
Cliaml)less Hancock, born 15th of 11th month, 1703. Thev 
were married in 1721, and had eight children — Hannali, 
William, David, James, Sarah, Mary, Bradway and Eleanor 



246 STRETCH FAMILY. 



Stretcli. William, the eldest son of Bradway and Sarah, mar- 
ried and left one son, John Stretch, M'ho married a Finlcj. 
lie afterwards sold his part of the Stoe Neck property to his 
nephew, John Finlev. James, the son of Bradway and Sarah, 
horn 4tli of 4th month, 1793, married Elizabeth Evans. She 
inherited the hrick honse farm which belonged to her father, 
a short distance below Harmersville. (The farm l)elongs at 
the present rime to Peter E. Harris.) At that phice James 
and his wife commenced life. They had three children — 
James, Dorcas and Rachel. James' second wife was a 
widow by the name of Allen ; they liad no issne. James lived 
to reach about eighty-seven years. His son James had two 
wives. The name of the first I never learned ; she lived 
but a short time after marriage. His second wife was Mary, 
daughter of Asa Jefferies ; they had several children. A shoit 
time after his father's death lie sold the property inherited 
from his parents and removed with his family to Indiana. 
He and his ^vife are both deceased, leaving, I understand, a 
large estate to their children. Two of their sons studied law, 
and are successful in their profession. Dorcas, the daughter of 
James and Elizabeth Stretch, married Samuel, the son of Ed- 
ward and Hannah Pancoast. They were natives of Burlington 
county, but subsequently removed to Gloucester, and there 
ended their days, leaving a family of eleven children — Josepli, 
Elizabeth, Eliakim, James, Hannah, Samuel, William, Dorcas, 
Josiali, Charles and Anna. Joseph married Susan, the daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Ann Thompson ; their children are mentioned 
in the Thompson family. Elizabeth's husl>and Avas Malichi 
Horner, of Gloucester, who is deceased ; they had no issue. 
Eliakim kept a feed and flour store for a number of ^^ears in 
Philadelphia, and married Tacy Roberts, of Byberry ; they liad 
issue. John and Mary Pancoast both died young. The parents 
of the above mentioned children are deceased. James was a 
bricklayer, and followed his trade in Philadelphia during his 
life. He married and left several children. Hannah, the 
second daughter, possessed great natural abilities, a logical 
mind, a remarkably mild temperament, and conversational 
powers above mediocrity. The poet truly wrote : 

There is many a gem that is born to bloom unseen 
And waste its sweetness on the desert air. 

She married Townsend, the son of Reuben llilliard. He was 
a carpenter, and carried on his trade in Philadelphia. Tiiey 
had nine children — Elizabeth. Sanniel, Joseph, Hannah, Reuben, 



8TKETCH FAMILY. !3o < 



Anna, William, Mary and Charles. Hannah P., the mother, 
died several years ago of that loathsome and painful disease — 
cancer, which appears to be hereditary in the Pancoast family. 
Her husband is still living. All of their children (each of whom 
evinced uncommon intellect) are deceased excepting Anna, who 
married Bennett Smedley. Samuel, tlie son of Samuel and 
Dorcas Pancoast, was sent in early life to Philadelphia to learn 
the carpenter trade. After his term of apprenticeship expired, 
he followed the business several years with success. He married 
Mary, the daughter of Enoch and Beulah Allen ; she lived but 
a short time, leaving no issue. His second wife is Malenia 
Skirms, whose parents lived near Trenton, New Jersey. Sam- 
uel and his wife have four children — Allen, Mary, Eveline 
and Charles. Allen Pancoast's wife is Eliza Denfield ; they 
have issue. Mary Pancoast married Oliver Lund ; they have 
issue. Tlie younger children are unmarried. Samuel was a 
member of the Legislature of Pennsylvania for two or tliree 
terms. For many years of his life he pursued the business of 
buying and selling real estate in the city of Philadelphia. He 
has now retired from business and from public life, possessed 
of a competency, and lives at his country seat at Tioga. Wil- 
liam Pancoast, his brother, died a .young man unmarried. 
Dorcas, the daughter of Samuel and Dorcas Pancoast, is 
living with her relatives in Philadelphia, unmarried. Jo- 
siah Pancoast removed when a yoimg man to one of the 
Southern States, and died in a short time unmarried. Charles, 
the youngest son of Sanniel and Dorcas Pancoast, resides in 
Philadelphia, where lie has been an Alderman for a number of 
years. He married Harriet Merrill, a widow, a native of Mas- 
sachusetts. Charles and his wife have no issue. Anna, the 
youngest daughter of Samuel and Dorcas, was very precocious 
in acquiring an education, and was a teacher in the Philadelphia 
schools the greater part of her life. She subsequently married 
William Keyser, an eminent teacher in that city, a native of 
Bucks county, Pennsylvania. They had one daughter — Eveline 
Keyser. William died not many years after his marriage of 
pulmonary consumption. Her second husband M'as Henry 
Maguire ; tliey liad one child — Jenny. Anna is now deceased, 
dying of the same disease of which her husband died. Sanmel 
Pancoast, father of the above mentioned children, died in 
Elsinborough, in 1833, of Asiatic cholera, which he contracted 
while in Pliiladelphia on a visit to his children. Soon after 
tliat event his widow, Dorcas Pancoast, removed to Philadel- 
33 



258 STRETCH FAMILY. 



p]ii;i and made lier lioiiie with one of lier dauij;liters ; she lived 
to nearly fourscore yeai's. 

Hannah, the daughter of Brad way and Sarah Stretch, Ijorn 
6th of 2d month, 1725, married Wade Barker. They had 
issue, a daughter, Hannah Barker, who sul)sequently married 
Robert Watson ; her second husband M'as James Sayres. Rachel 
Sayres, their eldest child, married a man by the name of Gil- 
man, a native of Cumberland county. Sarah, the daughter of 
Bradway and Sarali Stretch, born 14th of 2d month, 1736, 
married Samuel Scudders ; tliey had issue. (They were the 
great-grand-parents of William Evans Scuddcr, who keeps store 
at Hancock's Bridge at the present time.) Mary, the daughter 
of Bradway and Sarah Stretch, born 2-ith of 2d month, 1736, 
married a Corliss. They had issne, Jacob Corliss, M'ho subse- 
quently married and died a yonng man, leaving one son, Benja- 
min Corliss, who inherited the farm that Jervis Hires now 
owns, located near the village of Canton. Mary S. Corliss, the 
mother of Jacob, departed this life 2d of 6tli month, aged over 
sixty-seven years. Eleanor, the daughter of Bradway and Sarah 
Stretch, born J6tli of 3d month, 1745, married a man by the 
name of Evans ; she died in 1770, aged twenty-six years, 
leaving issue. 

Joseph, the son of Joseph and Hannah B. Stretch, was l)orn 
12th of 8tli month, 1704 ; from liim there are numerous de- 
scendants. He purchased more than two-thirds of the Christo- 
pher White allotment of 1,000 acres bought of John Fenwick in 
1676. The greater part of said estate was inherited by Josiah 
White, the grand-son of Christopher. Joseph Stretch, Jr., was 
the pnrchaser of a large part of it, inclnding the old brick 
mansion that was built by Christopher White in 1691. Joseph 
and Deliorah Stretch had eleven children — Sarah, Mary, Peter, 
Joseph, Samuel, Jonatlian, Joshna, Martlia, Nathan, Aaron and 
Rebecca. Sarah, the eldest daughter, born about 1725, married 
Solomon, the son of Joseph Ware, Jr., and Elizal)eth Walker 
Ware, There were eiglit children by that imion — Beter Strctcli, 
Elizabeth, Job, Hannah, Elisha, Barsheba, Sarah and Solomon. 
This large family of children all died minors excepting Sarah, 
who was born 14th of 6th month, 1756. She subsequently 
married Joshua Thompson, of Elsinborough, but died young, 
leaving three children — Joseph, John and Elizabeth. John 
died soon after his mother's deatli, aged about ten years. Those 
whom Joseph and Elizabetli married, and their offspring, are 
mentioned in the genealogy of the Ware and Tliompson 
families 



STRETCH FAMILY. 259 



Joseph Stretch, 3(1, l)orn 3d of 9th month, 1732, married 
Sarah, daughter of Joseph Ware, 3d. She was born 2d of 8th 
montli, 1737. They had issue — Jael, born in 1762, and Martha 
in 1763. Samuel, the son of Joseph and Sarah Stretch, born 
8th of 7th month, 1736, had two wives ; their maiden names do 
not appear in the family records. The issue by his first wife 
was Joseph Stretch, who subsequently married and left one son 
— Jonathan Stretch. Samuel by his second wife had two sons 
— Samuel and Luke Stretch. Samuel died a young man un- 
married, and devised all the estate he inherited from his parents 
to his brother Luke. The latter subsequently married Sarah, 
daughter of Joseph and Mary Street Fogg. Luke and his wife 
hud three children, two of them died young during the lifetime 
of their parents. The other son, Aaron, became possessed of a 
considerable estate, which had belonged to his parents. He 
died young, and leaving no near relations of the Stretch family, 
excepting the issue of Joseph Stretch, half brother to his father, 
there originated a long contested law controversy for the pos- 
session of the property. Tlie real estate was taken possession 
of by Jonathan Stretch, a son of the half blood of Jjuke Stretch. 
The personal property was decided by the legal adviser to 
belong to Joseph Fogg, he being an own brother of Sarah F. 
Stretch, the decedent's mother. The real estate, I believe, was 
tiaally decided to l)clong to David Stretch, lie being a descend- 
ant of the oldest male line of Samuel Stretch, and from him to 
his son Nathaniel. 

Sarah Stretch married Samuel Test in 1768. They lived on 
a small property she inherited from her parents, about a mile 
below Hancock's Bridge, containing about 50 acres. They had 
issue, two sons. Samuel, the eldest, was born in 1768, and learned 
th'i hat busiuess. His brother Mark, I think, married Dorcas 
Jveasbey. The property after their parent's death was divided 
ecpudly between the two brothers. Samuel's share was where 
liis parents lived ; Josepli Brown is at the present time the 
owner. It appears that Sanuiel Test, soon after the deatli of 
his parents, sold his estate to Barzilla Jeffers, and removed to 
Indiana, and settled in Kichmond, which at that time was a 
small village, and there he followed his trade the greater part 
of the remainder of his life, and acquired a competency. He 
was a leading member in his middle and old age of the largest 
Society of Friends on the Continent of North America — the 
Indiana Yearly Meeting. After he reached nearly four-score 
years he made a pilgrinuige to his native State and county, and 
iii (•ompany with his friend, the late Josiah M. Reeve, visited 



2G0 STRETCH FAMILY, 



the house in Avhich he was born, located in Alloways Creek 
township. AVe can well imag-ine his emotions as he went from 
room to room of the home of his youth. It doubtless brou<i;lit 
back pleasing remembrances of his affectionate parents as he 
again stood in that ancient building where he first uttered that 
endearing name, mother, whicli the good and wise in all ages 
have delighted to venerate. WJien he looked around his native 
liome, and tlie generation of men he was familiar with in the 
days of his youth, he realized that the friends and neighbors of 
liis parents had gone to their final liome, and had been succeeded 
by another generation whom he knew not. Such a visit and his 
own reflections were amply suflicient to repay him for the long 
and toilsome journey to his native home. I have l)een informed 
he lived but a short time after he returned. Of his innnediate 
family I have no means of knowing. His brother Mark and 
his wife Dorcas Test had one son — Mark. He sold the estate lie 
inherited from his parents more than forty years ago to Morris 
Hancock, and settled near his uncle Samuel in the vicinity of 
Richmond, Indiana. 

Jonathan, the son of Joseph and Deborah Stretch, born 8tli 
of 8th month, 1737, married Hannah, the daughter of Joseph 
and Elizabeth Ware, born 4th of 7th month, 1739. They had 
issue, seven children The eldest was Sarah, who was born in 
1759, David, Deborah, Mark, Elizabeth, Rebecca and Jonathan. 
Hannah W. Stretch, their mother, departed this life 18th of 
12th month, 1775. Jonathan Stretch's second wife was Eliza- 
l)eth Fogg. The}' had issue — Hannah Stretch. David, the son 
of Jonathan and Hannah Stretch, born 25tli of 5th month, 1763, 
married Mary, the widow of Joseph Fogg. Her maiden name 
Avas Mary Street, and slie held a large tract of land in her own 
right located near the village of Canton. David and his wife 
had six children — Hannah, Jonathan, Nathaniel, David, Mark, 
and Jael. David's second wife was Rachel Baker, of Manning- 
ton. She Avas a widow, the daughter of Jedediah Allen. David 
and his second wife had no issue. 

Hannah, the daughter of David and Mary Stretch, was born 
in 1778. Her first husband was Joseph Keasbey ; there was no 
issue. Her second husband was Andrew Smith. They had 
four children — Mary, Hannah, Catharine and David. The latter 
married Elizabeth, the eldest daughter of Thomas and Rachel 
Hancock. They had issue — Morris and Sarah Smith. Mary, 
the daughter of Andrew and Hannah Smith, married Charles, 
son of Thomas Reeves. Charles B. and his wife had issue — A. 
Smith, Elizabeth and Thomas. A. Smith Reeves nuirried Mary, 



8TRET011 FAMILY. 



261 



the daugliter of Eichard and Lucetta Mulford ; tliey have issue. 
Hannah, the daughter of Andrew and Hannah Smitli, married 
Hiram Harris. Tlie}^ have two children — David and Catharine. 
Catharine, the youngest daughter of Andrew and Hannali Smith, 
married Amos, the son of Stretch and Rebecca Harris. They 
have two children — Rebecca and Stretch Harris. 

Jonathan, the eldest son of David and Mary Stretch, born 
in 1790, married Elizabeth, the daughter of Jesse and Mary 
Carll ; they had no issue. His second wife was Hannah Shep- 
pard. He died not long after marriage, leaving no offspring. 
His widow subsequently married Dr. David Jayne. Nathaniel 
the son of David and Mary Stretch, was born in 1792. His 
lirst wife «^as Susan, the daughter of Solomon Dubois. By that 
connection there were three children — Mary Ann, Sarah F. and 
Susan. (The last mentioned child died young). Mary Ann 
Stretch, born in 1815, married Abner, the son of Wasiiington 
and Mary Smith. Abner and his wife had one daughter — Su- 
san, who married Charles Hires ; they have three sons. Nathan- 
iel's second wife was Elizabeth, the daughter of John Harris. 
The said John Harris served as a soldier during the whole of 
the Revolutionary war, and was in the regular army the winter 
that Washington and his army lay at Yalley Forge. He mar- 
ried after he returned home, and he and his wife had four chil- 
dren — Benjamin, Lydia, Elizabeth and Clara. Nathaniel Stretch 
has been deceased for several years, leaving a widow, but no 
issue by liis last wife. 

David, the son of David and Mary Stretch, was l)orn in 1795. 
His wife was Sarah, the daughter of Moses Hadley ; by that 
(ionnection there were five children — George, Aaron, Jonathan, 
Lydia Ann and Mary. The wife of George Stretch was Mary, 
the daughter of David S. English. Aaron and Jonathan Stretch 
removed in early life to Nashville, Tennessee. Lydia Ann 
Stretch married William H. Nelson ; he died several years ago 
leaving a widow but no issue. Mary, the youngest of David 
and Mary Stretch's children, married Richard Sailor. Slie is a 
widow at this time, her husband having been deceased for a 
number of years. Mark, the youngest son of David and Mary 
Stretch, was born in 1797. He, in after life, married Elizabeth, 
the daughter of Jonathan and Joanna Hildreth. Mark and his 
wife had four children — Joseph, Mary, Elizabeth and Joanna. 
His second wife was Tamson Finley ; they had one daughter — 
Deborah. Mark is deceased, and his son, Joseph H. Stretch, 
lived beyond middle age. He died recently, leaving a lai'ge 
landed estate ; he never nuirried. Mary, the daughter of Mark 



2(32 STRETCH FAMILY. 



and Elizabeth Stretch, marriecl John II., tlie son of Wilham 
Morris, of Pilesgrove. John and his wife liave one son — Wil- 
ham. The hnsband of Elizabeth, the danghter of Mark and 
Elizal)eth Stretch, is William A., tlie son of Joseph Casper. 
They have issue — Ilildreth, William J., Annie, Elizabeth and 
John. Joanna, the daughter of Mark and Elizabeth Stretch, 
married Charles B. Reeves. She was his second wife, and by 
that connection there were two sons. Joanna is deceased at 
this time. Jael, the youngest daughter of David and Mary 
Stretch, born in 1799, married David, the son of George Grier, 
Sr. She was his second wife, (his first wife was Lydia, the 
daughter of Jonathan and Joanna Ilildreth, who left no issue.) 
David left two sons by his last wife, — George and Richard 
Grier. George, the eldest, died a minor. Richard subsequently 
married Amanda, the daughter of David and Mary Davis, of 
Pilesgrove. Jael's second husband was William II., tne son of 
Davis and Francis Nelson. She was a dutiful wife, and an 
affectionate and loving mother. She died many years before 
lier husband, leaving no issue by the last marriage. 

Joshua, the son of Joseph and Deborali Stretch, born 28tli 
of 12tli montli, 1740, married Lydia, the widow of Paul Denn, 
and daughter of John and Mary Stewart. They were married 
at Alloways Creek in 1762, and had three children — Job, Mili- 
cent and Elisha Stretch. Job, the eldest son, was born 6th of 
12t]i month, 1763. I think he died a young man unmarried. 
Milicent was born 10th of 11th month, 1766, and married 
James Hance ; she died not many years after that event, and 
left no issue. Elisha, the son of Joshua and Lydia Stretch, was 
born 17th of 12th month, 1768. His wife was Sarah, the 
daughter of William and Mary Ware Bradway. They had 
eight children, three of whom died young ; Mary, Joshua, Wil- 
liam, Ann and Job Stretch all lived to mature age. Mary, the 
eldest, married Mark, the son of Mark and Martha Bradway. 
She lived but a short time after marriage, leaving no issue. 
Joshua married Elizabeth, the daughter of Waddington Brad- 
way, Sr. There was one son by that connection, Joshua 
Stretch, who studied medicine, and practiced his profession in 
Salem for a time. He married L3^dia, the daughter of Mark 
Bainer, of Philadelphia. lie left Salem and removed to Phila- 
delphia, where he died soon after of that insidious disease so 
destructive to the human family, pulmonary consumption. He 
left a widow and two or three children. His father, Josluia 
Stretch, was remarkable for his high moral character. For a 
number of years he taught school in Sal(;m with great credit to 



STRETCH FAMILY. 263 



liimself, and with tlio approval of tliose wlio ])atronized liiin. 
William, the second son of Elisha and Sarah Stretch, learned 
the tailoring business, and followed it after he became of age 
in Salem. He was very proficient in his calling, and his cus- 
tomei's were the best in the town and county. Toward the 
close of his life he left Salem with his family and removed to 
Jersey City. He married several years before he left Salem, 
but the name of his wife I have never learned. He died not 
long after, leaving several children. 

Ann, the youngest daughter of Elisha and Sarah W. Stretcli, 
married John D., the son of Mark and Elizabeth Stewart. 
They had seven children — Elizabetli, Charles, Elisha, Sarah, 
James, John and Ann, Elizabeth, the eldest, died before her 
mother, who died in 1857, aged over fifty-two years. Charles, 
Elisha, Sarah, James and John died soon after they had arrived 
to the age of maturity — a time when life is full of hope and 
pleasure — leaving behind an aged and kind father and a beloved 
sister to mourn their untimely end. Job, the youngest son of 
Elisha and Sarah Stretch, was apprenticed to his brother Wil- 
liam to learn the tailoring business, and he followed that occu- 
pation in Salem during the remainder of his life. His wife was 
Catharine, the daugliter of John Nicliolson, a lineal descendant 
of the fifth generation of that eminent Eriend, Samuel Nichol- 
son, who in 1675 emigrated to this country in company with 
Jolm FenAvick and his family f]-om the county of Northampton- 
shire, England. Job and his wife Catharine had tlu-ee children 
— Eliza, Charles and Mary. Eliza, I have been informed, mar- 
ried Joseph Paul ; tliey reside in Philadelj^hia. Mary Stretcli's 
husband is John P. Moore, who keeps a hardware store on 
Market street, in the city of Salem. He was a partner several 
years in tjiat business with tlie late Thomas W. Cattell, tlie 
father of Alexander G. Cattell. Job Stretch, the father of the 
above mentioned children, died a number of years ago of con- 
sumption, wliicli is hereditary in his mother's family. Elisha 
Stretch's second w^ife was Mary, the widow of Ezra Bradway, 
the daughter of James Denn. They had three daughters — 
Beulah, Mary and Sarah. Beulah, the eldest, married Nathan 
Kiger; by that connection there were four children — Alfred, 
Mary, Anna and Nathan. Her second husband is Simon Wal- 
len. Mary, the second daughter of Elisha and Mary Stretch, 
died a young woman, unmarried. Sarah, their youngest daugh- 
ter, married Joseph Mitten. I think they are at this time resi- 
dents of California. 

Rachel, the daughter of James and Elizabeth Stretch, married 



264 STRETCH FAMILY. 



Jonathan Butcher. She died in early life, leaving one daugh- 
ter, Ruth Butcher, wlio subsequently married George Grier, 
Jr., the son of George and Rebecca Ware Grier. I shall 
digress somewliat to mention the families that organized tlie 
iirst Presbyterian Clnirch in Lower Alloways Creek. Richard 
Moore (;ame from Pittsgrove and purchased land near what was 
called Logtown about 1840. He had five children — Robert, 
Joamia, Rebecca, Mary and Hannali. Robert, Jr., married and 
died young, leaving two children — Richard and Rebecca. Jo- 
anna Moore married Jonathan, the son of Joseph Hildreth. 
They had five children — Lydia, Hannah, Elizabeth, one who 
married Joseph Corliss, (being his first wife,) and Jonathan 
Hildreth, Jr. Rebecca married George Grier, and had three 
sons — Richard, George and David. Mary Moore maj-ried Solo- 
mon Dubois ; they had three or four cliildren. Hannah Moore 
married Daniel, the son of Peter Stretch ; they had several 
children which I shall mention hereafter. Tliese families, to- 
gether with tlie Sayres, Woodruffs and Padgetts, were the 
principal families which constituted the Presbyterian congrega- 
tion. The church stood ou tlie old road leading from Han- 
cock's Bridge to the village of Canton, a short distance below 
Harmersville. They also purchased a lot of ground for a grave- 
yard adjoining the Baptist graveyard at the present time. I 
have been informed that both yards are enclosed with one fence. 
The Presbyterian clmrch was reduced to one or two families at 
the beginning of this centmy, and they finally abandoned it, 
and the house was removed after standing little over half a 
century. 

George and Ruth B. Grier had five children — Richard, the 
eldest, died a young man unmarried ; Jonathan B., Ra(;hel, Rob- 
ert and Charles. Jonathan B. Grier married Lydia, the daugh- 
ter of David and Hannah Fogg. I think they have five children — 
David, George, Rebecca, Anna and Jonathan B. Griej-. David 
Grier married Gulielma, the daughter of Josiah and Sarah 
Engle, of Pilesgrove ; they have issue. George Grier married 
the daughtei" of Allen Wallace. Rebecca Grier, married James, 
the son of John and Hannah Lindsey, of Lower Penn's Neck ; 
they have issue. Anna Grier married Richard, the son of Ben- 
jamin and Mary Bassett ; they have issue. Jonathan, tlie young- 
est son, married Anna, the daughter of Samuel P. and Hannah 
Allen, of Mannington. Robert, the son of George and Ruth 
Grier, married Sarah, the daughter of William and Elizabeth 
Thompson, of Elsinborough. They have five cliildren — Ruth, 
Georgiana, Abigail, Richard and William T. Ruth, their eld- 



STRETCH FAMILY. 265 



est daiigliter, married Robert, tlie son of George and Hannah 
C. Boon. Georgianna married Joseph, the son of Aaron Lip- 
pincott, of Mannington. Rachel, daughter of George and Rntli 
B. Grier, married John, tlie son of Jesse and Ann Patrick. They 
liad f 0111- childj-en— Richard, George, Charles and Morris. CharleF, 
the youngest son of George and Ruth Grier, died a young man 
unmarried. At the death of James, the son of Bradway Stretcli, 
he devised his landed estate which he had inherited from his 
father (being one-half of Stoe Neck farm), to his daugliter, Dor- 
cas Pancoast, and his granddaughter, Rutli Butcher, afterM-ards 
Grier. Samuel Pancoast and George Grier sold the said prop- 
erty to John Finley, who some years l)efore had purchased one- 
half of the Bradway Stretch farm of John Stretch. 

Peter Stretch was advanced in years when he married, and 
there is no definite record of the maiden name of his wife, Ijut 
tradition says it was Temperance Howell, which I think quite 
probable. (She named a son by her second husband, Howell 
Hall.) Peter was a large landholder, and the greater part of 
his real estate was located near Hancock's Bridge, and was orig- 
inally the Christopher White estate. Peter, the son of Peter 
and Temperance Stretch, born 16th of 2d month, 1767, married, 
but died a young man, leaving issue — Elizabeth Stretch, who 
died a minor. Anthony, the son of Peter and Temperance 
Stretch, born 11th of 1st month, 1769, died at the early age of 
three years. Daniel, the son of Peter and Temperance' Stretch, 
was born 7th of 9th month, 1770. Peter Stretch died about the 
year 1774:, leaving a widow and two minor children — Peter and 
Daniel. Temperance, his widow, subsequently married Colonel 
Edward Hall, of Mannington, and they had two cliildren — Sarah, 
born 9th month, 1779, and Howell, born 18th of 1st month, 
1785. Temperauce, their mother, died about 1787. Daniel, the 
son of Peter and Temperance Stretch, subsequently married 
Mary Stretch, a distant relative ; they had two sons — Peter and 
Robert. Peter Stretcli died without issue in 1797, and the large 
estate, both personal and real, descended to his brother Daniel. 
Daniel's second wife was Hannah, the daughter of Richard and 
Mary Moore, wdio was born 15th of 1th month, 1776. They 
had six children — Daniel, Clarissa, Edward, Ann, Richard and 
Temperance. Daniel and his wife Hannah died in 1813 at the 
village of Canton, wdule their children were all minors. His 
estate at the time of his death was larger than that of any other 
person living in the township. Peter, his eldest son, married 
Phelie, the daughter of Moses Hadley. They liad six children — 
Emily, Elizabeth, Richard, Josiah, Wesley and Phebe. Peter 
34 



266 STRETCH FAMILY. 



and his wife are botli deceased at this time, and most of their 
chikh-en died young. One of his sons, Wesley Stretch, I have 
been informed, resides in Philadelphia, and is concerned in the 
celebrated drug store of the late I3r. David Jayne, on Chestnut 
street. 

Daniel, the son of Daniel and Hannah M. Stretch, born 3d 
of 11th month, 1799, married Eliza Iladly, sister of his brother 
Peter's wife. They had two sons — Edwin and Pichard. I think 
Edwin married the daughter of Joseph Boon; they have issue. 
Richard Stretch married Lydia, the daughter of Edward and 
Eliza Smith; they have several children. 

Clarissa, the daughter of Daniel and Hannah M. Stretch, 
born 26th of 1st month, 1802, married Thomas Sinnickson, of 
Salem. They had issue, all of whom were noticed in the gene- 
alogy of the Sinnickson family. 

Edward, the son of Daniel and Hannah M. Stretch, born 3d 
of 7th month, 1804, married the daughter of William Nixon. 
There were three sons and one daughter by this union — AYilliam, 
Edward, Peter and Hannah. William married Mary Ann, 
widow of Robert Hancock, and the daughter of James Fisher. 
William and his wife have several children, 

Ann, the daughter of Daniel and Hannah M. Stretch, born 
11th of 9th month, 1806, married Josiah Paullin ; they have 
issue — Anne, Josiah B., George M. and William Hemy. Ann 
subsequently married William Hunter. George M. was a sur- 
geon in the army during the late rebellion, and is now a prac- 
ticing physician in Canton. He married Annie, the daugliter 
of John H. and Elizabeth Lambert ; they have issue. Richard 
M., the son of Daniel and Hannah M. Stretch, was born in 1809. 
He has for many years been in the mercantile business at Allo- 
waystown. He married Rebecca, the daughter of Robert and 
Anna Coe. They have four children — Charles, Anna, Robert 
and Mary. Charles married Hannah Gray, of Philadelphia ; 
they have issue. Anna married Benjamin I. Diament. Robert 
is connected with the West Jersey Express Company, in Phila- 
delphia. 

Aaron, the son of Joseph and Deborah Stretch, l.)orn 14th of 
10th month, 1746, married Elizabeth Reeves ; they had one son. 
Reeves, and two or tln-ee daughters. Aaron died a compara- 
tively young man. His widow afterwards married a man by 
the name of Mills, by whom she had two children — Joel and 
Keziah. Elizabeth's third husband was William Bradway, of 
Stoe Neck ; they had no issue. Reeves, the son of Aaron 
;md Elizalwtli Stretch, man-ied a Glaspe3^ They liad five 



STRETCH FAMILY. 267 



children — Job, Racliel, Sarah, Kosanna and Reeves. Job, the 
eldest son, married Rebecca, the daughter of Joseph Deal ; they 
had issue. Elizabeth married Enoch, son of Richard Garrison, 
of Cumberland ; they have three or four children. Job Stretch, 
Jr.'s wife is Sarah, the daughter of Isaac and Martha Harris ; 
they have live children. Richard, the youngest son of Job and 
Rebecca Stretch, married Sarah, the daughter of Job Thorp. 
Job Stretch, Sr.'s second wife was Charlotte, widow of Jacob 
Dubois, and daughter of Jolin Finley. 

Reeves, the youngest son of Reeves Stretch, Sr., married the 
daughter of Richard Garrison. He died a young man, leaving 
three minor sons — Richard, Charles and Reeves. Rachel, the 
daughter of Reeves Stretch, married Daniel Barnes. Sarah, 
tlie second daughter of Reeves Stretch, married Elisha Bonham, 
the son of Justice Bonham ; they had two or tln-ee children. 
She is deceased at the present time, Rosanna Stretch's husband 
was George A. Githens of Greenwich. They had five children 
— Hannah, Louisa, Cecelia, George A. and William H. George 
and his wife Rosanna Githens are deceased at the present time. 
Georgh A. Githens' wife is Martha, daughter of Richard and 
Lucetta Mulford. For several years past he has resided in 
Salem, and is in the mercantile business. Louisa Githens 
became the wife of Charles, the youngest son of Judge Ephraim 
Carll. She lived but a short period after her marriage, dying 
of pulmonary consumption, leaving one child. Hannah, her 
sister, lias paid the debt of nature since of a similar disease. I 
think Cecelia is still livini::. 



TYLEE FAMILY. 

The Tylers in this country are descended from an ancient 
Englisli family. Their ancestors came with William, the Con- 
queror, into England, and fought in the Inittle of Hastings in 
1066. They were residents of England for five hundred years. 
About that period there were three brothers, branches of the old 
English family, Avho emigrated to America. One settled in 
Now England, one in the state of Virginia, (the ancestors of the 
ex-President, John Tyler), and the other, William Tyler, came 
to West Jersey about 1688, and purchased a lai-ge tract of land 
on the north side of Monmouth river of John Champney, being 
part of the 2,000 acres that John Fenwick deeded in 1676 to 
James Cliampney, and his wife Priscilla Fenwick Champney. 
William Tyler, whilst he was in his native country, married as 
nearly as can be ascertained in 1676, Johanna Parson. They 
liad four children born in England as follows — Mary T^yler, at 
Walton, in the county of Somerset, 11th month, 1677 ; William 
Tyler, 5th of 7t]i month, 1680 ; John Tyler, in the 5th month, 
1682, and Johanna Tyler in 1684. The following certificate 
given him by his friends in England sliow conclusively where 
his residence was in his native land: " Whereas, William Tyler, 
' of Walton, in the county of Somerset, Yoeman, intends to 
' transport himself and family into the province of Pennsylva- 
' nia, in America, if tlie Lord will, and has desired a certiticute 
' on Ids behalf. We therefore, whose names are subscribed, do 
' herel>y certify that the said William Tyler hath professed the 
' truth for several years past, and that we do not know but that 
' his conversation hath been answerable to his profession, and 
' tliat we do know that he hath been ready and willing to con- 
' tribute to the service of truth, as opportunity h.ith offered and 
' occasion required, and that as to his dealings with the world, 
' he has been punctual and of good report as far as any of us 
' know or have heard, and we know nothing of debts or other 
' entanglements on his part but that lie may with cdearness 
' ])rosecute his intended voyage. In testimony whereof we 
'liave hereunto subscribed our liands. Dated the eleventh day 



TYLEK FAMILY. 269 



" of seventh month, called September, in the year 1685. Signed 
" by Edward Chanyles, William Lidden, Thomas Howell, Jolm 
" W. Bidder, and ten others." It is evident that William Ty- 
ler's wife, Johanna, lived but a short time after their arrival in 
this country. His second wife's first name was Elizabeth ; her 
maiden name I never heard. He had three children by Eliza- 
beth. Their oldest was named Catharine, who was born 13th 
of 6th month, 1690 ; their son, Philip Tyler, was born in the 
6th month, 1692, and Elizabeth Tyler, 1691. WiUiam Tyler, 
the father of the above mentioned children, \vas a farmer, and 
likewise carried on the tanning business. Pie made his will in 
the 2d month, 1700, in which he bequeatlied a large landed 
estate to his sons. The Champney property, where he resided, 
he left to his oldest son, William, it being about 400 acres, and 
to his second son, John Tyler, 800 acres situated in the lower 
part of Alloways Creek township, together witli some other 
lands in the same township. The witnesses to the will were 
William Hall and John Firth. There appears no reliable record 
of any time of liis death, but it is thought by the family to have 
occurred in 1701. Mary Tyler, daughter of William Tyler, Sr., 
married Abel Nicholson, tlie son of Samuel Nicholson. They 
had eight children — Sarah, Kachel, Joseph, William T., Ann, 
Jolm, Ruth and Samuel. 

John Tyler, the second son of William Tyler, married Han- 
nah Wade, the daughter of Samuel Wade. He inherited a large 
landed estate from his father, which I think was located in 
Alloways Creek township, not far from the village of Harmers- 
ville, being part of Annie Salters' allotment. John and liis 
wife Hannah W. Tyler, had one son — Benjamin by name. The 
year he was born is uncertain, prol)ably about the year 1720. 
Soon after lie an-ived of age, he sold his patrimonial estate at 
Alloways Creek, and purchased some 400 acres near the town 
of Greenwich, now Cumberland county, being part of the Gib- 
bon estate. In 1746 he married Naomi Dennis, the sister of 
Philip Dennis, of Bacon's Neck. They had four children — Eliz- 
abetli, born 28th of 2d month, 1748 ; Rachel, born in 1751 ; Jolm 
in 1753; Letitia, 9th of 11th month, 1755. Tlie last mentioned 
was young when lier mother died. In 1759 Benjanun married 
his second wife, Mary Adams by name, and he had four chil- 
dren — Job, l)orn in 1760 ; Lydia, in 1763 ; Ilannali, in 1765, and 
Benjamin, 30th of lOth month, 1771. John Tyler, the son 
of Benjamin, married Abigail Lippincott. They had three chil- 
dren — Samuel, Benjamin and Naomi. His second wife was 
Nancy Hall, but she died in a slK)rt time afterwards lea\'ing no 



270 TYLER FAMILY. 



issue. Benjamin's third wife was Hope Sharp, by whom lie had 
one daui^hter — Hannah Y. Tyler. Elizabeth, the oldest daugh- 
ter of Benjamin Tyler, married John Dunham. They had two 
children — John and Elizabeth Dunham. The latter afterwards 
become the wife of Job Tyler, Jr. Letitia's first husband was 
Andrew Griscom. They had two children — Benjamin and An- 
drew Griscom. Her second husband was James English, and 
they had two children — Martha and Tyler English. Martha 
afterwards became the wife of Benjamin Harris. Rachel Tyler's 
husband was John Botts, Jr., of Bacon's Neck. They left chil- 
dren. Job Tyler, the oldest son of Benjamin Tyler by his last 
wife, married Rachel Sayre. Soon after they were married he 
sold his farm tliat was left to him by his father, and his iirst 
purchase in Salem county was the James Sterling farm in Man- 
nington, .vhich property now belongs to John T. Bassett. Job 
Tyler did not own the property long before he sold it, and 
bought Lucas Gibbs' large farm in Quaker Neck. He was a 
man of considerable energy, and was considered one of the best 
farmers of his time in Salem county. His attention was turned 
to grazing and feeding cattle ; perhaps he has never been equalled 
in this section .of the country in that particular. He raised the 
fattest, but not the largest, bullock that was ever exhibited in 
Bhiladelphia. Its neat weight was 2,165 lbs. The inhabitants 
of Salem county considered it a credit to the place, and the 
directors of Salem Bank honored him by using the impress of 
the Tyler ox on their one dollar notes for many years. Job 
and Rachel Tyler had four children — Benjamin, the oldest, mar- 
ried a young woman by the name of Burden, and had by her 
one son named James, who subsequently married a woman by 
the name of Penton, l)y whom he had two children, a son and 
daughter, named Rachel and James Tyler. The latter married 
one of the daughters of John H. Lambert, and Rachel is the 
wife of John Lambert, Jr. Job Tyler, Jr., married Elizabeth 
Duuhani, she being his cousin, lie inherited tlie homestead 
farm in Quaker Neck. A few years after the death of his father 
lie sokl it to Andrew Griscom and moved to Salem. He and his 
wife had no children. His wife died some length of time before 
him. At his death he willed the greater part of his estate, being 
])rincipally in money, to his brother Benjamin's grandchildren, 
Rachel and James Tyler. 

Mary, daughter of Job Tyler, Sr., married John Bacon, son 
Job Bacon, of Greenwich. She lived but a short time after her 
marriage. Richard Tyler, the youngest son of Job and Rachel 
Tyler, was one of the most promising young men, of his time, 



TYLER FAMILY. 271 



in the county. Remarkably pleasing in person and address, he 
attracted to himself many friends. He died unmarried al)out 
1819, witJi that distressing disease, the bilious dysentery, which 
became an epidemic complaint in that year and the season 
following in tliis county, and many, particularly the young, fell 
victims to it. 

Samuel Tyler, the son of John Tyler, married Rachel Peck, 
by whom he had eight cliildren — Abigail, Benjamin, Martha, 
Samuel, Clarissa, Nancy, Rachel and George. Abigail died 
unmarried. Benjamin, his son, embraced the Presbyterian 
faith. He studied for the ministry, and became a highly 
esteemed clergyman of that sect. His wife was Mary Seeley, 
the daughter of Richard Seeley. Benjamin died a compara- 
tively young man, leaving a widow and three cliildren — Charles, 
Joseph and Benjamin, who are living. Martha Tyler, daughter 
of Samuel, married Oliver H. Williams. Samuel Tyler, Jr. 
married Elizabeth Burden. Rachel Tyler married Auley B. 
Wood. Clarissa and Nancy Tyler were twin children, both of 
them died unmarried. George Tyler, the youngest son of 
Samuel, married Emily Moore. But one of the eight children 
of Samuel survived him, and that was Samuel, who has been 
dead several years. 

Bemjamin Tyler's, son of John Tyler, first wife was a 
Thompson. By her he had six children — Hannah Ann, John, 
Mary, Ebenezar, Lydia and Benjamin. His second wife was 
Hope Allen, but they had no issue. His third wife was Martha 
Owen, a widow, whose maiden name was Buzby, the daughter 
of Nathaniel Buzby, of Port Elizabeth. She survived Benja- 
min several years. Hannah Ann Tyler, daughter of Benjamin, 
married Josiah Harmer. Her second husband was Evi Smith. 
John Tyler married Beulah Griscom, daughter of Benjamin 
Griscom, of Salem. Mary Tyler married Charles Harmer. 
Her second husband was Andrew Thompson, of Mannington. 
Ebenezar Tyler married Sarah Stewart, daughter of James 
Stewart, Jr., of Alloways Creek. Lydia Tyler married Reuben 
Hilliard, of Mannington, sou of Samuel Hilliard, of the same 
place. Benjamin Tyler, Jr. married Alice Woolman, of Piles- 
grove. Naomi Tyler, the daughter of John Tyler, married 
George Bacon, of Greenwich. Their children were Eliza, 
George, Richard, Francis and Mary Bacon. 

William Tyler, Jr., the oldest son of William and Johanna 
Tyler, was born at Walton, in England, 5th of 7th month, 1680. 
At the death of his father he was about twenty-one years of 
age. It appears that his father had much confidence in him, as 



TYLER FAMILY. 



he directed in his will that he should have charge of the younger 
cliildren, some of whom were not more than two or three years 
of age, and was left executor to his fatlier's will. Among his 
papers tliat hav^e been preserved by liis descendants is a manu- 
script inventory of his father's goods, wliich is as follows: 
" An inventory of the goods and chattels of William Tyler, 
" deceased, as they were brought l)efore us. Kudoc Morris, 
" Joseph Parson and John Parson, this 25th of 2d month, 1701, 
" l)eing appraisers." The amount of the personal estate of Wil- 
liam Tyler amounted by the appraisement to £519, 9s, 2d, and 
was recorded the 20th of 6th month, 1701, in Salem, by Samuel 
Hedge, 3d, recorder. William Tyler, Jr., received as executor 
to his father's will, through Elias Osborne, of England, agent 
of his uncle, Thomas Parsons, of Philadelphia, a considerable 
amount of money from England. It appears from a letter 
dated 10th month, 1688, three years after William Tyler, Sr., 
emigrated to America, that Abraham Grundy was placed in 
charge of his estate which he had left in England, and his son 
William also kept up the corres])ondenee after liis father's death. 
A letter dated 5th of lOtli month, 1702, lie writes to the execu- 
tor of Abraham Grundy to pay him £20 sterling. I presume 
it was the balance of his fatlier's estate in England. William 
Tyler, Jr., married Mary Abljott, sister of George Abbott, the 
emigrant, and by her had six cliildren. Their oldest, William 
Tyler, 3d, was ' born 2d of 5th month, 1712; Editli, their 
daughtei-, born 24th of 11th month, 1711:; Rebecca, born 
29th of 3d month, 1716 ; Mary, born 16th of 1st month, 
1718; James, born 30th of 12th month, 1720; and Samuel, 
born 26th of 10th month, 1723. The mother of these chil- 
dren survived their father, and afterwards married Robert 
Townsend, of Cape May, in the 3^ear 1735. By this marriage 
she had one daughter, Rany Townsend, who subsequently mar- 
ried a man by the name of Stites. After the death of Robert 
Townsend, his widow returned aiid lived with her Tyler children. 
AVilliam Tyler, 2d, died in 1733, aged lifty-three years. A 
short time previous to his death he made liis will, in whicli he 
l)equeathed the plantation on which he lived to his son William, 
(it is owned at the present day by William Robertson and 
Thomas Yanmeter,) for M'hich William was to pay £50 to his 
(huighter, Edith Thompson, the wife of Samuel Thompson, and 
the like sum to his daughter, Rebecca Tyler. The said sums to 
be paid by AVilliam in foiu" years after the decease of his father. 
He left to his second son, James Tyler, a farm of 234 acres, 
whicli he bought of William Hall. Ricliard McPherson and 



TYLER FAMILY. 273 



Aaron Fogg are the present owners of the said property. He 
gave to his youngest son, Samuel Tyler, a tract of land com- 
monly called Smith Neck, containing 150 acres. He also willed 
to his two sons, William and Samuel Tyler, a tract of land 
lying between the first mentioned messuages and the said 
Smith Neck, containing 100 acres more or less. The said land 
formerly belonged to John Maddox Denn. lie furtlier be- 
queathed to his wife, Mary Tyler, and his daugliters, Edith and 
Kebecca, all his personal estate, after his funeral expenses and 
just debts were paid, to be equally divided among them. He 
also willed that iiis wife should have the privilege and use of 
one-half of his best mansion liouse to dwell in during her natu- 
ral life, and also to keep a horse and cow upon the first men- 
tioned messuage so long as she continued to dwell thereon. 
He nominated and appointed his wife, Mary Tyler, and his son, 
William Tyler, and liis son-in-law, Samuel Thompson, executors 
of his last will and testament. The will was made 29th of 11th 
montli, 1732. The inventory of his personal estate amounted 
to £271, 13s. The appraisers were Abel Nicholson and Thomas 
Taylor. William Tyler, 3d, married Elizabeth Thompson. Slie 
was the daughter of Joseph and Sarah Thompson, and they 
lived where Allowaystown is now located. She was born 1st 
of 8th montl), 1716. They had three daughters. The oldest, 
Sarah Tyler, married Samuel Stewart, the son of John and 
Mary Stewart, of Alloways Creek. Their children were Joseph, 
Mary, Mark and Ann. The last mentioned married William 
Griscom. Joseph Stewart married Kachel Bradway. Mark's 
wife was Elizabeth Denn, daughter of James Denn, and Mary 
died unmarried. 

Rebecca Tyler, William's second daughter, married William 
Abbott, the son of Samuel Abbott, of Elsinborougli. Their 
children were Josiah, Samuel and George. Mary Tyler, his 
youngest daughter, married Jacob Scoggins, whose cliildren 
were Tyler, Jonas, Mary, Phebe, Eebecca and Elizabeth. I 
believe Tyler Scoggins died a young man and single. Rebecca 
lived to an old age and died unmarried. Mary married Joseph 
Piper and had tliree children. Elizabeth Scoggins' husband 
was James Dennis. Their cliildren were Mary, Naomi, Jona- 
than and Rebecca. It is probable that Jacob Scoggins and his 
wife Mary bought the share of the homesterd farm of her two 
sisters, Sarah and Rebecca, that their father, William Tyler, 
inherited from his father. Sometime after the death of Jacob 
and Mary Scoggins, their children sold the farm to John Lind- 
sey, after having been in the Tyler family four generations. 
35 



274 TYLER FAMILY. 



After the death of Lindsey the farm was divided between his 
two sons, John and Joseph. Thomas Jones, Sr., pnrchased 
Joseph Lindsey's farm, which was part of James Yanmeter's 
wife's share of her father's estate. John Lindsey, Jr.'s farm 
was sokl some time after his death, and WilHam Robertson was 
the purcliaser, tlie father of the present \Yiniam Robertson. 

Edith Tyler, danghter of William Tyler, 2d, married Samuel 
Thompson, who was born 6th of 9th montli, 1707. He was the 
son of William Thompson and grandson of Andrew Thompson, 
who emigrated to this country in 1677, and purchased land of 
Richard Guy in Elsinboro, and settled thereon ; whilst his son 
William bought a large tract of land in Upper Monmouth, 
where Allowaystown is now located, and at that place he resided 
until his death. From them sprung numerous descendants. 
Samuel and his wife had five children. The oldest M'as Samuel 
Thompson, Jr. He was the grandfather of the late 
Joshua Thompson, who died recently in Salem at an advanced 
age. Aaron Thompson, their second son, married Hannah 
Hancock, widow of William Hancock, of Elsinborough. Aaron 
and his wife left no children. Hannah's maiden name was 
Fogg, daughter of Charles Fogg. Their oldest daughter, I 
think, was Sarah, she married Josiah Kay. He lived in Glou- 
cester county, about three miles above AVoodbury. They had 
one son, and a daughter — Rebecca Ivay. She married Clement 
Hall, of Elsinboro, the eldest son of Clement and Margaret 
Hall, of the same township. They had seven children — Ann, 
Margaret, Prudence, Sarah, Morris, Deborah and Rebecca. 
Edith Thompson, daughter of Samuel, married Jedediah Allen, 
of Mannington. He was the oldest son of Jedediah Allen and 
grandson of Nathaniel Chamblcss, of Allowaj^'s Creek. Their 
eldest son, Samuel T. Allen, went to Philadelphia and became 
an eminent merchant and sliipper, and accumulated a great 
fortune. One of his cousins paid him a visit on one occasion, 
and remarked to him whilst he was at his house upon the splen- 
dor in which he lived, Samuel replied, "It does not produce 
" happiness." Samuel married Maria Wilkins. They had four 
daughters, one of whom married, and she and her husband emi- 
grated to South America. Rebecca Thompson, the third daugh- 
ter of Samuel and Edith Thompson, married David Allen, tlie 
brother of Jedediah. From that union tliere were ten children 
— Hannah Allen, born 5tli of 3d month, 1767, whose first hus- 
l)and was Aaron Fogg ; second, David Bradway. Mary Allen, 
born 1768, married Joseph Bassett. Ann Allen, born 1770, 
married Josepli Brown. Rebecca and David Allen, twin chil- 



TYLER FAMILY. 275 



(Iren, born in 1772 ; Kebecca's first luisband was Josliua 
Thompson ; second, Benjamin Griscom ; David Allen went to 
the West Indies and there died. Edith Allen, born in 1775, 
died I think unmarried. Beulah, born in 1779, died unmarried. 
Samuel, born in 1781, married a young woman of Gloucester 
county. Jedediah, born in 1784 ; his first wife was Sarah 
Austin, his second wife Hannah Abbott. Chambless Allen, 
born 1786 ; his wife was Sarah Nicholson, the daughter of 
William Nicholson, of Mannington. David Allen died when 
most of his children were minors. His widow, Kebecca Allen, 
by her great energy and perseverence made lierself adequate to 
the great charge that was committed to her in raising such a 
large family of children. Rebecca Tyler, daughter of William 
Tyler, 2d, died a young woman, unmarried. Mary Tyler, 
daughter of the same parents, died young, before her father. 
Johanna Tyler, daughter of AVilliam Tyler, was born at Wal- 
ton, England, in 1684: She married Jonathan Waddington, 
son of William Waddington, From this union sprung a line of 
descendants. Old receipts still exist for the payment of her 
paternal inheritance, which were given thirty years after the 
death of her father. " Be it known to all men of these presents 
" that we, Jonathan Waddington and Joan Waddington, liis 
" wife, wliich is the daughter of William Tyler, deceased, do 
" acknowledge we have received of lier brother William Tyler, 
" 2d, executor of the last will and testament of her father, Wil- 
" liam Tyler, aforesaid, deceased, the sum of one hundred and 
" twenty-nine pounds in full satisfaction of a legacy left said 
" Joan by said father, of which said one hundred and twenty- 
" nine pounds, hj us received as aforesaid, we do acknowledge 
" ourselves fully satisfied and paid. Of every part and parcel 
" thereof we do clear, exonerate, and forever, by these presents, 
" from the beginning of the world unto tliis day, as witnesses 
" our hand and seal the 14th day of May, 1731. Signed, sealed 
" and delivered in the presence of 

" Jonathan Waddington, 

Her 
" Joan M Waddington.'' 
Mark. 
Philip Tyler, son of William Tyler, 1st, was born 1692, near 
Salem, New Jersey. His first wife was Elizabeth Denn, the 
daughter of John Maddox Denn, and by her he had two chil- 
dren — Enoch and Elizabeth Tyler. His second wife's name 
was Moore, and by that connection were two daugliters, the 
elder was named Rachel, the j'ounger one's name is unknown at 



276 TYLER FAMILY. 



the present time. Two of Pliilip's descendants were living in 
1847. The description of their ancestor, as handed down to 
them, was that he had been in person a tall and spare man. He 
speculated in land largely, likewise in other business, was un- 
successful, and died poor, about the year 1777, nearly eighty 
years of age, and was buried in the ancient burial ground of 
Friends, on the north side of Monmouth river, near Hancock's 
Bridge. His son Enoch Tyler died a minor. His daughter 
Elizabeth Tyler married a man by the name of AVatson ; they 
had three sons — Thomas, Jolm and Tyler Watson. Rachel 
Tyler, daughter of Philip by his last wife, died single ; her sister 
married Ephraim Sayre, and numerous descendants sprung from 
that union. 

Rebecca Tyler, daughter of William Tyler, 1st, w^as born near 
Salem in 1698, and married William Murdock. The Murdocks 
are said to have married into the Wliital family near Woodbury, 
the Whitals being recorded in the Tyler's family Bible seems to 
corroborate it. 

James Tyler, the son of William Tyler, 2d, and Mary his 
wife, was born 30th of 12th month, 1720, and resided all his 
life on the property on Alloways creek, that was left to him by 
liis father. He built himself a brick house on the said property 
about the year 1745. His wife was Martha Simpson ; they had 
two children — James Tyler, Jr., and Ruth Tyler. He died at 
the age of eighty years, and was succeeded on the farm by his 
son James, who married a young woman by the name of Acron. 
Their children were Catherine, William, Samuel and John 
Tyler; the sons so far as known left no children. Catherine 
Tyler married William Walker, a man of peculiar character, 
Avho, after passing througli a variety of changes here, emigrated 
aV)Out 1818 to Cincinnati, then to Indiana, where lie lived until 
tlie war with Mexico. Being strongly allured by the military 
spirit with which he was surrounded, he applied to the Govern- 
ment for a Captain's commission. It was at first refused him 
on the plea that he was too old, but was subsequently granted, 
and he, when more than seventy years of age, marched at the 
head of his company into Mexico ; was present at tlie battle of 
Buena Vista, where he fell in 1847. He had several children, 
who are still living in the West ; one a doctor, another son a 
lawyer. Ruth Tyler, daughter of James Tyler, Sr., married 
John Ware, the son of John and Elizabeth Ware, of Alloways 
Creek Neck. Ruth inherited one-tliird of her father's real 
estate. Wlien they were first married they lived on tlie farm 
that was left liim by his father, and subsequently he built on his 



TYLER FAMILY. 



277 



wife's property, and resided there until his death. When her 
brother James' children offered for sale the property that they 
inherited from their parent, John Ware sold his farm in Allo- 
ways Creek to Mark Townsend, of Cape May, which enabled 
him to purchase the whole of the property that once belonged 
to his father-in-law, James Tyler. John and Ruth Ware had 
two children — Martha and Eleanor. Martha died a young 
woman whilst on a visit to her uncle David AVare, near l)arVjy. 
Eleanor Ware married Jeremiah Tracy, who was many years 
younger than hei'self ; there was no issue from tliis union. She, 
during their marriage, deeded all her real estate to her husband, 
and died a short time afterwards. This indenture conveyed the 
last of 700 acres on Alloways creek that was purchased by 
William Tyler, 1st, one hundred and seventy-live years ago. 

Samuel Tyler, youngest child of William Tyler, 2d., and 
Mary his wife, was born 26th of 10th month, 1723. He was 
about ten years old at the death of his father. Wlien lie was 
nearly eighteen years of age he apprenticed himself to Benja- 
min Acton, of Salem, to learn the tanning business. An 
indenture found among his papers, dated 1741, signed Samuel 
Tyler, and witnessed by his mother, Mary Tyler, and George 
Trenchard, specified that he was to serve four years at the busi- 
ness. Soon after the expiration he sold his possesions on 
Alloways creek, that he inherited from his father, and bought 
of Rebecca Edgil, of Philadelphia, the property of the upper 
end of Salem, since known as Tyler street. In the deed for 
this purcliase, dated 1746, the house is called " a new brick 
" liouse," making it at the present time more than one hundred 
and twenty years old. It is now owned by William Davidson. 
At this liouse he carried on the tanning business. In 1751 he 
married Ann Mason, the daughter of John Mason, Jr., and 
granddaugliter of John Mason, the emigrant. Their children, 
live in number, were named William Tyler, born 3d of 11th 
month, 1752 ; John, born 7th of 9th month, 1755 ; Mary, born 
11th of 8th month, 1756 ; Samuel, born in 7th month, 1758 ; 
and Rebecca, born in 6th month, 1764. Samuel lived to see 
most of his children grow up, and died 26th of lltli month, 
1778, at the comparatively early age of Hfty-five years. Ann 
Tyler, his wife, died 23d of 2d montli, 1777, nearly a year 
before her husband. William Tyler, 4th, administered on the 
estate of his father. The property was appraised 5th of 1st 
month, 1779 ; Samuel Stewart and Samuel Thompson were the 
appraisers. The whole of his personal property amounted to 
about £1,500, a large sum for that period. William Tyler wag 



278 TYLER FAMILY. 



twenty-six years old when his father died — his mother dying 
the year before. He and his brothers and sisters were thus 
deprived of both parents. They however, found a parent in 
their maternal aunt, Mary Mason, wlio went to live with them, 
and remained with some of the family until her death. Accord- 
ing to the law at that time, William Tyler, 4th, as the oldest 
S3n, was entitled to all the landed estate. He was not, however, 
unmindful of liis brothers and sisters, but assigned them a share 
of their father's property. It appears the family all remained 
at tlieir native home until William's marriage with Beulali 
Ridgway, in 1792. I think she was the daughter of Job 
Ridgway, of Mannington. The Tyler family then separated, 
and Jie continued at the paternal mansion. His wife lived but 
a short time after they were married, and died leaving no issue. 
In 179G he married his second wife, Catherine Low, daughter 
of Hugh Low, of Philadelphia. She was born 5th of 2d 
month, 1765, and died in 1825. Hugh Low was the son of 
English parents, members of the Society of Friends, who came 
over to tliis country with their family when he was an infant 
and settled in Philadelphia. He was considered to be a man 
of good natural abilities and strict integrity, liberal in his 
feelings, and became a firm friend to the country of his 
adoption. 

John Mason Tyler, son of William Tyler and Catharine 
Tyler, was born 28th of 5th month, 1797. Hannah Gillespey 
Tyler, was born 30th of 8th month, 1798. Hugh Low Tyler, 
was born 20th of 3d month, 1800. Mary Tyler, was born 21st 
of 11th month, 1801. Annie Tjder, was born 1st of 3d month, 
1805. William Tyler, fifth son of William and Catharine 
Tyler, was born 16th of 9th month, 1806. William and Catha- 
rine Tyler, the parents of the above mentioned children, lived 
together more than twenty-seven years, it is said, with great 
conjugal felicity. He w\as a man of retiring disposition, of few 
words and was considered honest and impartial in his dealings 
with his fellow men. He died after an illness of about two 
weeks in 1823, in his seventy-second year. Catharine Tyler, 
his wife, survived him fifteen months. Her death took place 
23d of 3d month, 1825, when she was about sixty-nine 3'ears of 
age. She was considered a discreet and sensible woman, with 
warm sensibilities and devoted piety, sprightly in character and 
was anxious that her children should be brought up aright, that 
they might become useful and worthy citizens. John Mason 
Tyler, the eldest son of William Tyler, in his youth left liis 
parents' home and M^as adopted by his uncle, John Tylei-, and 



TYLER FAMILY. 279 



went to live with liiin. At this home he continued, succeeded 
his uncle in business, and married Dorothea Graham Hoskins, 
of Radnor, Pennsylvania, in 1832. Tliey had two children — 
Catharine Low Tyler, born in 1833, and William Grraham 
Tyler. Joseph Hoskins, the father of Dorothea Tyler, was a 
native of New Jersey. He went to Delaware county, Pennsyl- 
vania, settled on a farm and married Mary Graham, a descend- 
ant of an old and respectable family at Chester. Hannah G. 
Tyler married Clement Smith, of Mannington, in 1818. He 
was the son of William Smith, and a lineal descendant of John 
Smith, of Sraithiield. Clement and his wife Hannah Smith 
had one son — Clement William Smith. He M^as born 28th of 
9th month, 1819. Clement Smith, his father, died about the 
year 1820, leaving a young widow and an infant son. Hugh 
Low Tyler, second son of William Tyler, was born in 1800. 
In 1835 he married Mary Shiply Miller, daughter of George 
Miller and Mary Levis Miller, of Delaware county, Pennsylva- 
nia ; he was a large landholder in that county. Hugh and his 
wife had three children — William Levis Tyler, born in 1836 ; 
George M. Tyler, in 1838, and John Edgar Tyler, in 1842. 
His wife at the death of her father becoming possessed of a 
valuable farm in that county, he left the farm at Salem and he 
and his family moved to Delaware county and subsequently 
sold the Tyler farm which had been in the family for more than 
one hundred years. Mary Tyler, the second daughter of Wil- 
liam and Catharine Tyler, was born in 1801. She is considered 
by those persons that know her to be above mediocrity in 
point of intellect. I think she is still living. William Tyler, 
youngest son of William Tyler, when a young man made a long 
tour through the Western States. After his return lie estab- 
lished himself in 1832 in the leather business in Philadelphia. 
There it was that his sister joined him and made one household 
until he married. He was persevering and diligent in his 
business, and it is said by untiring application became prosper- 
ous in his circumstances. He married in 1847 Ann Painter, 
daughter of Enos Painter, a farmer and extensive landholder 
in Delaware county, Pennsylvania. He and his wife have two 
sons — William Enos Tyler, born in 1848, and John J. Tyler, 
born in 1851. 

John Tyler, son of Samuel and Ann Tjder, was born in 1755. 
At the time of his brother William's marriage he bought prop- 
erty in the town of Salem, on Fourth street where his tan-yard 
was situated ; he built himself a dwelling house on said property 
in which he and his sister Mary resided. He followed the tan- 



280 TVLEK FAMILY. 



nins^ business all his life, and at it he acquired considerable 
property. He was very unostentatious in his manners. A 
cotemporary said of him at his deatli " An honest man is gone." 
Late in life lie became a member of the Society of Friends in 
whose mode of worsliip he was educated. He never married 
and died in 1825 aged more than seventy years. Mary Tyler, 
his sister, was born in 1756 ; she never married and spent most 
of her life with lier brother Jolm. She died in the meridian of 
life aged forty-eight years and a few months. Samuel Tyler, 
the youngest son of Samuel and Ann Tyler, was born in 1758. 
He married in 1796 Grace Acton, she being a widow. Her 
maiden name was Ambler. Slie was the daughter of Peter 
Ambler, of Mannington. Samuel Tyler about that time pur- 
chased a small farm adjoining his native home and went to 
farming, the said farm belongs at this time to Thomas B. Stow, 
of Salem. Their children were Ann and Elizabeth Tyler. Ann 
married Mark Smith, and by him had five children. Rebecca 
the oldest, married William Davidson ; Beulali Smitli, tlie second 
daughter, married William Dor man ; Samuel Tyler Smith, 
Sarah Ann Smith and Elizabeth Smith. Samuel Tyler's daugh- 
ter, Elizabeth, married John Miller, of Gloucester county. They 
have seven children — Abigail, Lydia, Samuel Tyler, Emily, John 
Mason, Anna and Edward Miller. John Miller, father of the 
before mentioned children, lived near Paulsboro'; he was a pop- 
ular man in his native county, and was several times elected to 
the State Legislature, lastly was elected a Judge of the Court of 
the coimty, 

Rebecca, the youngest daughter of Samuel and Ann Mason 
Tyler, was born in 1761. She lived in great retirement with 
her brother John Tyler until his death. She never married. At 
the death of her aunt, Mary Watson, and her sister Mary Tyler, 
she fell heir to a considerable sum of money. She built herself 
a house on Broadway, Salem, where she lived several years, but 
subsequently removed to Gloucester county, and spent the last 
years of her life with her niece, Elizabeth Miller. She died in 
1843, aged seventy-nine years. 

Nearly every family has an inclination for some particular 
occupation. This was tlie case to a remarkable degree in the 
ancient and respectable Tyler family. Their ancestor who em- 
igrated to this country was a tanner, and his descendants for 
four or five generations, particularly the Samuel Tyler line, 
have followed and are to the present time following the occupa- 
tion of manufacturing leather. It is likewise true of Benjamin 
Tyler's lineage, that many of them became eminent agricultur- 



TY'LEE FAMILY. *2H1 



ists ; particularly Job Tyler, and his son Job Tyler, Jr., late of 
Mannington or Quaker Neck. They are, as a whole, a family 
of retiring disposition, avoiding ostentatious show. 
36 



TIXDALL FAMILY. 

Richard Tindall was one of Fenwick's executors and surveyor- 
general, cliosen to that office in the year 1680 by John Fen- 
wick, after the disagreement between him and Kichard Han- 
cock. He was also chosen by James Nevell to survey the lands 
l)elongiug to Governor William Penn, within the bounds of 
Fenwick's tenth. Richard Tindall emigrated to this country in 
1678, and soon afterwards purchased 500 acres of land being 
part of the allotment of laud that was deeded to them in Penn's 
Neck in 1676 by their father John Fenwick. Part of the said 
land is now owned by Firman Lloyd, and was known formerly 
as Tindall Grove. His immediate family I have no knowledge 
of. His grandson, Benjamin Tindall, was born about the year 
1720. Joseph Tindall, son of Benjamin and Hester Tindall, 
was, born 16th of 6th month, 1749 ; and Mary Tindall, their 
daughter, was born in 1751. She married Elijah Ware, of 
AUoways Creek, he being a minister of the Society of Friends, 
and remarkable for his meek and quiet disposition. He and his 
wife left no children. By his will he devised that, after his 
widow's death, a small farm located in Penn's Neck should go 
to the Salem Monthly Meeting of Friends. Joseph Tindall, 
the brother of Mary, married and left two sons — Benjamin and 
Elijah W. Tindall. Benjamin married Rachel Thompson, the 
daughter of Andrew Thompson, of Elsinboroiigh. She inherited 
a small farm in Penn's Neck from her grandfather, Samuel 
Nicholson, and on that farm Benjamin and his Avife lived most 
of their time. A few years before his death Benjamin and his 
wife removed to Elsinborough on a farm formerly belonging to 
his wife's grandfather, Samuel Nicholson. Benjamin in a few 
years afterwards died there, leaving four or five children. Jo- 
seph Tindall, their eldest son, married Eliza Hancock, daughter 
of Thomas Hancock, Jr., and they had one daughter named 
Lydia Ann, who married Ebenezer Dunn, of Salem. 



THOMPSON FAMILY. 

Jolm Thompson, the son of Thomas Thompson and Eliz- 
abeth his wife, was born in Yorkshire, Enghmd, in 1635. An- 
drew Thompson, son of the same parents, was born in 1637. In 
1658 Thomas and his wife Elizabeth, with their two minor 
sons, John and Andrew, removed from England to Ireland 
and located near Dublin. In tlie year 1665, John, the eldest son, 
married Jane Humbly, daughter of Thomas Humbly. John 
and his wife, Jane Thompson, had three children born in Ire- 
land. James, the son of John and Jane Thompson, was born 
in 1666. Ann, the daughter of John and Jane Thompson, 1st 
of 9th month, 1672. Mary, the daughter of John and Jane 
Thompson, was born 25th of 10th month, 1675 ; Thomas Hum- 
bly, tlie father of Jane H. Thompson, was a native of the county 
of Durham, England ; but at the time of his daughter's mar- 
riage, resided in Ireland. 

Andrew, the son of Thomas Thompson, married Isabella Mar- 
shill, daughter of Humphry Marshill. Andrew and his wife, 
Isabella Thompson, had three children born in Ireland. Eliz- 
abeth, the daughter of Andrew and Isabella Thompson, was 
born 15th of 8th month, 1666. AVilliam, the son of Andrew 
and Isabella Thompson, was born 9th of 8th month, 1669. An- 
drew, the son of Andrew and Isabella Thompson, was born 13tli 
of 11th month, 1676. 

In the year 1677, John and Andrew Thompson, with their 
wives and children, (John had one man servant, William Hall, 
who subsequently became one of the most eminent characters in 
Fenwick's Colony), set sail on the 16tli of 9th month, in the ship 
called the Mary, of Dublin, John Hall, Captain, and landed at 
Elsinborough Point, in West Jersey, 22d of 12th month, the 
same year. About the year 1680, the brothers, John and An- 
drew Thompson, purchased of Richard Guy one-half of his 
allotment of land that he had purchased of John Fenwick, some 
few years previous. Andrew's location was near the mouth of 
Salem creek ; he built himself quite a commodious house there. 
The said house was standing since the memory of the writer, 



284 THOMPSON FAMILY. 



and was known as tlie " emigrant lionse." Jolm built and set- 
tled on the property that is known at the present time as tlie 
Morris Hall farm. John Thompson was a farmer, likewise a 
brewer, which he carried on extensively for home use, and also 
sent considerable quantity to Philadelphia and New Amsterdam. 
The old brew house was standing until about 1850. On liis 
farm was the family burying ground of the Thompson family ; 
and after the property was sold in 1725 to Jolm Hancock, of 
Hancock's Bridge, the family of Hancocks buried there for a 
number of years, and kept it in good repair ; but it, like other 
family burying grounds in Salem county, has been neglected of 
late years. The fence has gone down, and the plow has passed 
over the remains of some of the most useful emigrants tJiat ever 
settled in the Salem tenth. 

John Thompson, it appears, never took very active part in 
the civil affairs of the Colony; but was an active, useful member 
of Salem Monthly Meeting, and was an elder of the church 
many years previous to his death. He took an active part in 
erecting the first brick meeting house in West Jersey that there 
is any record of, on the Nicliolson lot, in Salem. He had in a 
great measure, the care and oversight in building it, and gave 
£30 towards it, being the largest sum contributed by any one. 
He died about 1710, aged about seventy-nine years, leaving a 
son — James TJiompson, who married a young woman resident 
of New Castle, State of Delaware. By that connection there 
were several children ; all died young, exceptnig one son. 

James Tliompson, son of James and Ann Tliompson, was 
born in Elsinborougli, the 26th of 8th month, 1712 ; when he 
became of age he sold the homestead of his grandfather, John 
Thompson, to John Hancock, of Alio ways Creek, and went to 
the State of Delaware to reside, and married Sarah Wood. She 
possessed a large tract of land in her own right, it being near 
the state line, between Delaware and Pennsylvania, The prop- 
erty is still owned by some of the Thompson family. They are 
quite numerous at the present day. 

Andrew, the brother of John Thompson, was more of a public 
man than his brother. He was appointed by Fenwick as one 
of his Justi(;es of the Peace of the Colony ; from him the nu- 
merous family of the Thompsons in this county originated. 
Andrew and his wife Isabella Thompson had one son born in 
America — J olm Thompson, Their son was born in Elsinborough 
23d of 4th month, 1684. Andrew died about 1696 aged nearly 
sixty years. Elizabetli, the eldest daughter of Andrew and 
Isabella Thompson, was born in Ireland in 1666. She married 



THOMPSON FAMILY. 285 



Isaac Smart, who was the son of Roger Smart. Isaac was born 
in the county of Wiltshire, England, in 1658. He came to 
America in the sliip Griffitli, in company with the proprietor, 
in 1675. He and Elizabeth Thompson were married 25th of 
2d month, 1683. Isaac and his wife owned and lived on Middle 
Neck, in Elsinborongh, adjoining the Thompson property. 
They had five daughters and one son — Mary Smart, their 
eldest, was born 20th of 10th month, 1685; Sarah, the daugh- 
ter of Isaac and Elizabeth Smart, born 29th of 1st month, 1687; 
Nathan Smart, son of Isaac and Elizabeth Smart, born 20th of 
6th month, 1690 ; Hannah, the daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth 
Smart, born 8th of 6th month, 1692 ; Rebecca Smart, daughter 
of the same parents, born 23d of 12th month, 1695 ; Ann, the 
daughter of Isaac and Elizabetli Smart, born 20th of 6th month, 
1697. Isaac Smart died in 1700, and his widow, Elizabeth 
Thompson Smart, married Edward Keasbey in 1701 ; by him 
she had two sons and one daughter. [See Keasbey Family.] 

William Thompson, the eldest son of Andrew and Isabella 
Thompson, purchased a large tract of land in Monmouth pre- 
cinct, where Allowaystown now is, and settled there. He was 
three times married. Joseph Thompson, the son of AVilliam 
and Sarah Thompson, was born 22d of 1st month, 1693 ; Wil- 
liam, the son of William and Jane Thompson, was born 1 6th of 
3d month, 1795. Jane, the daughter of William by his third 
wife, Hannah Thompson, was born 29tii of 7th month, 1700. 
Susanna, the daughter of William and Hannah Thompson, was 
born 26th of 8th month, 1704. Samuel Tliompson, son of 
William and Hannah Thompson, was born 6th of 9tli month, 
1707. Mary, the daughter of William and Hannah Thompson, 
was born 21st of 11th month, 1710. Rebecca, the daughter of 
William and Hannah Thompson, was born 19th of 12th month, 
1714. Benjamin, the son of William and Hannah Thompson, 
was born 11th of 8th month, 1719. 

Andrew Thompson, 2d, son of Andrew and Isabella Thomp- 
son, married and settled on his father's property in Elsinborongh. 
Jonathan, the son of Andrew, 2d and Rebecca Thompson, was 
l)orn 16tli of 9th month, 1697. Hannah, the daughter of 
Andrew and Rebecca Thompson, was born 12th of 1st month, 
1699. Isaballa, daughter of Andrew and Rebecca Thompson, 
was born 22d of lOtli montli, 1700. Andrew, the son of 
Andrew and Rebecca Thompson, was born 2d of 2d month, 
1704. Thomas, son of Andrew and Rebecca Thompson, was 
born 28th of 11th month, 1707. Sarah, the daughter of An- 
drew and Rebecca Thompson, was born 8th of 2d month, 1709, 



2S6 THOMPSON FAMILY. 



Abraham, son of Andrew and Rebecca Thompson, was born 
26th of 10th month, ITIO. Joslnia Thompson, son of Andrew 
bj his second wife, Grace Thompson, was born 2d of 2d month, 
1713. Tiiomas, son of Andrew and Grace Tliompson, was 
born 21st of 7th month, 1719. Abraliam, son of Andrew and 
Grace Thompson, was born 27th of 5th month, 1721. Jona- 
than, Isabella, Andrew and Thomas Thompson, children of 
Andrew by his first wife, Rebecca Thompson, died yonng. 

Nathan Smart, the son of Isaac and Elizabeth Thompson 
Smart, was born 20th of 6th month, 1690 ; was married in 1713. 
Mary, their oldest daughter, was born 22d of 5th month, 1714 ; 
about that time he built an addition to the brick mansion that 
was built by his father in 1696, which is still standing. Eliza- 
beth, the daughter of Nathan and Deborah Smart was born 4th of 
1st month, 1716. Ilannali, the daughter of Nathan and Deborah 
Smart, born 23d of 12th month, 1718. Isaac, son of Nathan and 
Deborah Smart, was born 4th of 2d month, 1721. Edward, the 
son of Nathan and Deborah Smart, was born 14th of 5th month, 
1724. Isaac, the eldest son of Nathan and Deborah Smart, mar- 
ried Ann Wilson in 1756. Isaac inherited the homestead farm 
in Elsinborough; he and his wife resided there whilst they lived, 
and raised a large family of children. Mary, the eldest child 
of Isaac and Ann Smart, was born 1st of 10th month, 1757 ; she 
lived to an advanced age and died in Salem. Nathan Wilson 
Smart, son of Isaac and Ann Smart, was born 20th of 12th 
month, 1759. Nathan remained single, and died in middle age. 
Isaac, the son of Isaac and Ann Smart, was born 2d of 3d month, 
1761, and married Rebecca, the daughter of Jolm and Mary 
TJiompson, of Elsinborough. Isaac and liis wife had nine chil- 
dren — Ann, Nathan, Mary, Jolm, Deborah, Rebecca, Hannah, 
Isaac and William Smart. Not one of the large and ancient 
family of the name of Smarts is a resident of Salem county at 
this time. Robert, the son of Isaac and Ann Smart, was born 
19th of 11th month, 1763. Ann Smart, the daughter of the 
same parents, w^as born 25th of 11th month, 1765. She died 
in 1766. Ann Smart, daughter of Isaac and Ann Smart, was born 
25th of 9th month, 1768. Slie married Samuel, the son of Jo- 
sepli and Rebecca Abbott Brick. [See the Brick Family]. Jane, 
the daughter of Isaac and Jane Smart, was born 26tli of 10th 
month, 1775. Some of the children of Isaac and Rebecca Thomp- 
son Smart are married and settled in the Western States. 

Joseph, the son of William and Sarah Thompson, was born in 
1693. He owned property not far from Remster's Mill, where he 
built a brick dwelling, which was removed by James Fries, and 



THOMPSON FAMILY. 287 



a new frame dwelling was erected near the site of the old one. 
The property at this time is owned and occupied by Daniel 
Dial. Elizabeth, the daughter of Joseph and Sai-ah Thompson, 
was born 1st of 8th month, 1716. Jane, the daughter of Joseph 
and Sarah Thompson, was born 7th of 8th month, 1718. "Wil- 
liam, son of Joseph and Sarah Thompson, was born 30th of 8th 
month, 1720. Joseph, the son of Joseph and Sarah Thompson, 
was born 30th of 1st month, 1723 ; he married Mary Conden, 
of Mannington, in 1747 ; they had children. Samuel, the son of 
William and Hannah Thompson, was born in 1707, and married 
Edith Tyler, the daughter of William Tyler, 2d; they had 
issue. Their son Samuel Thompson, M'as a tanner and currier, and 
carried on his trade in tlie town of Salem ; tliey were the grand- 
parents of tlie late Joshua Thompson. Rebecca, the daughter 
of Samuel and Editli Thompson, married Da\dd Allen, of Man- 
nington. David and his wife, Rebecca T. Allen, had eight 
children — Hannali, Mary, Rebecca, Edith, Beulah, Samuel, 
Jedediah and Chambless Allen. Benjamin Thompson, son of 
William and Hannah Tliompson, was born 11th of 8th month, 
1719 ; he married Elizabeth Ware, daughter of Joseph AVare, 
2d, and Elizabeth Walker, his wife, in 17-15. Benjamin Thomp- 
son did a large amount of public business ; had also the charge 
of Richard Wistar's Glass Works near AUowaystown, whilst it 
was in existence. He and his wife had issue. His son, Benja- 
min Thompson, married a Willis ; they were the parents of the 
late James Thompson, of Upper Penn's Neck. William Thomp- 
son, the son of William and Hannah Thompson, married, and 
settled near AUowaystown ; left children. His son, William, 
succeeded his father to the old homestead. The property was 
located near Stephen Reeve's Mill. 

Joshua, the eldest son of Andrew Thompson, 2d, by his 
second wife, Grace Thompson, was born 2d of 2d month, 1713. 
He was twice married, and by his first wife he had two cliildren. 
Andrew, tlie son of Joshua and Sarah Thompson, was born 
29th of 5th month, 1739. Sarah, the daughter of Joshua and 
Sarah Thompson, was born 21:th of 12th month, 1742. Joshua's 
second wife was Elizabeth Gibson, of Woodbury, Gloucester 
county, where lier parents resided. Joshua and Rebecca Thomp- 
son, children of Joshua and Elizabeth Thompson, were born 
8th of 6th month, 1748. John, the son of Joshua and Eliza- 
beth Thompson, was born 7th of 4th month, 1752. Joseph, 
the son of Joshua and Elizabeth Tliompson, was born 26th of 
3d month, 1756. Joshua was left a widower several years 
before his death, He was an elder and leading member of 



288 THOMPSON FAMILY. 



Salem Monthly Meeting for a number of years. It lias been 
said of him, " that he was a true Israelite, without guile." He 
was more than four-score years old, at the time of his death. 
Andrew, the eldest son of Joshua Thompson, married Grace 
Nicholson, of Elsinborougli, the daughter of Samuel and Sarah 
Nicholson, of the same townsliip ; she was born lltli of 9th 
month, 1746. Andrew and his wife, Grace Thompson, had five 
children — Joslnia, born 19th of 9th month, 1767 ; Sarah, born 
20th of 1st montli, 1769 ; Grace, was born 12th of 2d month, 
1771 ; Kachel, born 7th of 5th month, 1773, and Samuel Nich- 
olson, born 23d of 5th month, 1777. 

Joshua, son of Andrew anl Grac3 Nicholson Thompson, 
married Rebecca, daugliter of David and Hebecca Allen, of 
Mannington ; they had three cliildren — Andrew, Ann and 
David Thompson. Andrew, tlieir eldest son, was thrice mar- 
ried ; his first wife was Rebecca, the daughter of Samuel Abbott, 
of Mannington ; they had one daughter — Hannah Ann. An- 
drew's second wife was Ann Elkinton, of Port Elizabeth, daugli- 
ter of John Elkinton ; Andrew and liis wife liad issue, four 
sons — Joshua, Clark, John and Andrew Thompson. Andrew's 
third wife was Mary Horner, widow of Charles Horner, and 
daughter of Benjamin Tyler, of Greenwich ; they had four 
children — David, Richard, Anna and Rebecca Thompson. Ann, 
daughter of Joshua and Rebecca Thompson, was twice married ; 
her first husband was Caleb, son of Samuel Lippincott, of 
Gloucester county ; tliey had tliree children — Samuel, David 
and Clark Lippincott. Her second husband was Joseph, son of 
Joseph and Mary Bassett ; they are both deceased, leaving no 
issue. David, son of Joshua and Rebecca Thompson, when a 
young man left his native county, went and resided in the 
western part of the State of New York, where he ended his 
days ; he never married. 

Sarali, the daughter of Andrew and Grace Nicholson Thomp- 
son, born 20th of 1st month, 1769, married Jacob, the son 
of John and Elizabeth Ware, of Alloways Creek ; she was his 
second wife ; they had tliree children that lived to maturity — 
Sarah, David and Samuel Ware. [See the Ware Family.] 
Grace, daugliter of Andrew and Grace N. Thompson, born 12tli 
of 2d month, 1771, married Job Ware, brother of Jacob Ware. 
He died young, leaving one son — John Ware. Rachel, daugh- 
ter of Andrew and Grace Thompson, was born 7th of 5tli 
month, 1773 ; she subsequently married Benjamin, son of Jo- 
seph Tindell, of Penn's Neck; they had several children — 
Joseph, Andrew, Sarah and Benjamin Tindell. Samuel Nich- 



THOMPSON FAMILY. 289 



olson Thompson, son of Andrew and Grace Thompson, was 
born 23d of 5th month, 1777. He became the owner, bv will, 
of Ills grandfatlier's (Samuel Nicholson) homestead farm in 
Elsinboroiiojli. Samuel married Ann, the daughter of Clement 
Hall, of Elsinborough ; tliey had six children — Samuel N., 
Joshua, Charles, Clement, Ann and Isaac Thompson. 

Sarah, daughter of Joshua and Sarah Thompson, married 
William Hancock, of Hancock's Bridge. He was killed at the 
massacre in his own house during tlie Revolutionary war in 
1778 ; leaving a widow and one son, John Hancock, the father 
of Thomas Y. Hancock. Joseph, the son of Joshua and Eliz- 
abeth Thompson, kept a store with his brother-in-law, William 
Hancock,, at Hancock's Bridge, and was killed at the same time 
with his partner. Joshua married Sarah, the daughter of 
Solomon and Sarah Stretch Ware, of Alloways Creek, in 1773; 
there were three children — Joseph, John and Elizabeth Thomp- 
son. Joshua's second wife was Susanna Mason, widow of John 
Mason, and daughter of William and Mary Morris Goodwin. 
By her there were two sons — William and Josliua Thompson. 
Joshua's tliird wife was Mary Shourds, of Salem, widow of 
Benjamin Shourds ; there was no issue. She died several years 
before her husband. He died in 1831, aged nearly eighty-three 
years. 

Joseph, the eldest son of Joshua and Sarah W. Thomp- 
son, was born 27th of 10th month, 1771. He married Ann, 
the daughter of John and Susanna Mason ; they had six chil- 
dren (two sons who died young), Susan, Elizabeth, Sarah, and 
Ann Thompson. His second wife was Elizabeth Powell ; they 
have no children living. John, the son of Joshua and Sarah 
Thompson, died when he was tln-ee years old. Elizabetli, the 
daughter of Joshua and Sarah W. Thompson, born 13th of 11th 
month, 1778 ; married William, the son of William and Sarah 
Nicholson, of Mannington ; they had eight children — Elisha, 
Ruth, Rachel, Beulah, Elizabeth, William, Joshua and Sarah 
Ann Nicholson. 

William Thompson, tlie eldest son of Joshua, by his second 
wife, Susanna Thompson, married Elizabeth Carpenter, the 
daughter of William and Elizabeth Ware Carpenter, of Elsin- 
borough. William and his wife, Elizabeth Thompson, had nine 
children — Susan, Eliza, Sarah, Joshua, William, Thomas, Abi- 
gail, Lewis and Ann Elizabeth Thompson. William, the father 
of tlie before named children, has been deceased for a number 
of years ; their mother is still living at the age of nearly four- 
score years. Joshua, the son of Joshua and Susanna Thomp- 
37 



290 THOMPSON FAMILY. 



son, died in 1820, in Salem, where he taught Friends' School 
for a uumber of years ; he never married. 

Rebecca, the daughter of Joshua and Elizabeth Gibson 
Thompson, born in 1748, married Isaac Jones, of Philadelphia; 
they had issue, one son — Isaac Jones, born in 1773, who was a 
merchant in that city. John, the son of Josliua and Elizabeth 
G. Thompson, was born 7th of 4th month, 1752. In early life 
he learned the blacksmi thing business, and followed his trade 
many years in the town of Salem ; he and Jacob Hufty were 
in partnership together. He afterwards purchased a farm in 
Elsiuborough, being part of the Windham estate, but is gene- 
rally known as Richard Darkin property. He soon after aban- 
doned his trade, and went and settled on his farm; there he 
and his wife remained, until old age. Both of them ended their 
days in tlie town of Salem. His wife was Mary, the daughter 
of AVilliam and Sarah Hancock Bradway, of Stoe Neck, AUo- 
way's Creek township. John and his wife had four children — 
Rebecca, Ruth, John and William B. Thompson. Rebecca, 
their eldest daughter, married Isaac Smart; the names of their 
children are mentioned in the Smart family. Ruth, the second 
daughter of John and Mary Thompson, married Job Bacon, of 
Greenwich, Cumberland county ; they had four cliildren — Mary, 
Sarah, Ann and Josiah Bacon. Mary married Clement Acton 
of Salem, and died young, leaving no issue. Sarah remains 
single. Ann married Moses Sheppard, of Greenwich ; they had 
three daughters — Rachel, Ruth and Mary Ann Sheppard. Ra- 
chel, the eldest, married Job Bacon, the son of John and Ann 
Bacon, of Bacon's Neck. Rachel is deceased, leaving children. 
Ruth married George Wood Sheppard. Mary Ann Sheppard 
remains single. 

Josiah Bacon, the son of Job and Ruth T. Bacon, went to 
Philadelphia when young ; he afterwards became an eminent 
merchant in that city, and has been for some years one of the 
Du'ectors of the Pennsylvania Railroad. 

John, the son of Jolm and Mary Thompson, married Estlicr, 
the daughter of Darkin and Esther Nicholson, of Elsinborough. 
They had eight children — Ann, William, John, Joseph, Casper, 
Mary, Elizabeth and Rebecca Thompson. Three of their chil- 
dren are deceased — John, Ann and Rebecca. William, their 
eldest son, married Rachel, daughter of Daniel and Mary 
Nicholson ; they liave no issue. Joseph married Elizabetli, the 
daughter of William and Mary B. Carpenter; they had two 
children — Mary and John Tliompson. Casper Thompson, their 
youngest son, married Mary, the daughter of Casper and Re- 



THOMPSON FAMILY. 291 



becca Wistar, formerly of Mannington ; they have issue. 
Elizabeth Thompson, daughter of John and Esther Thompson, 
married Kathaniel, a son of James and Millicent Buzby Brown] 

Thomas, the son of Andrew, 2d, and Grace Thompson, was 
born 21st of 7th month, 1719. Thomas Thompson learned the 
tailor trade, and followed it in the town of Salem, on Broadway 
street. His dwelling and shop were located where the First 
Baptist Church is now situated. He married, had one son and 
one or two daughters. Thomas Thompson, the son of Thomas 
and Mary Thompson, was born 19th of 10th month, 1745. 
He also learned the tailoring business of his father, and followed 
it at the old homestead until about 1795. Thomas Thompson, 
Jr., married Bebecca, the daughter of Samuel Hedge, 4:th, and 
Hannah Woodnutt Hedge. Tliomas and his wife Rebecca 
Thompson had seven children — Ann, Hannah W., Hedge, 
Mary, Rebecca, Jane and Rachel Thompson. Ann Thompson, 
the eldest daughter of Thomas and Rebecca Thompson, married 
John Firth ; they had issue. Their sons who married were 
Thomas and John ; there were two or more daughters. 

Hannah, the second daughter of Thomas and Rebecca 
H. Thompson, was twice married ; her first husband's name was 
Anderson ; they had issue. Her second husband was Leonard 
Sayres ; at the time of their marriage he was a citizen of Cin- 
cinnati, State of Ohio. He was a nativ^e of Cumberland county. 
He was a son of Ananias Sayres, the first Sheriff of that county, 
when it was set off from Salem in 1748. Hedge Thompson, 
the son of Thomas and Rebecca H. Thompson, was a physician, 
and practiced it some years in his native town and county ; but 
he abandoned his profession before middle ago. He was a 
Member of Congress at one time, also one of the Judges of 
Salem Court. His wife was Mary Ann Parrott, the daughter 
of Richard Parrott. Hedge and his wife had five children — 
Richard P., Thomas, Joseph, M. D., Mary and Rebecca Thomp- 
son. Mary, the daughter of Thomas and Rebecca H. Thomp- 
son died past middle age ; never married. Rebecca, daughtei* 
of Thomas and Rebecca H, Thompson, married John Holme, 
the son of Colonel Benjamin Holme, of Elsinborough. Re- 
])ecca died young, leaving one daughter — Rebecca Holme. 
Jane, the daughter of Thomas and Rebecca H. Thompson, 
married John, the son of Hill and Ann Nicholson Smith, of 
Mannington. John and Jane T. Smith had three children — 
Ann, Hill and Thomas T. Smith. Rachel, the youngest daugh- 
ter of Thomas and Rebecca H. Thompson, married Doctor 
Benjamin Archer, at that time was a practicing physician, 



293 THOMrsoN family. 



residing in the city of Salem ; but lie was a native of Swedes- 
boro, Gloucester county. He was a lineal descendant of 
one of the oldest Swedish families that located on the eastern 
shore of the Delaware river. Benjamin and his wife had one 
son, Fenwick Arclier, who is now living, and resides in Salem, 
where his parents formerly lived. Thomas and Redecca Hedge 
Thompson lived happily together more than hfty years ; he 
dying first, aged about eighty-two years. Rebecca, his widow, 
died at about the same age. 

Thomas, the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Tliompson, was 
born near Dublin, Ireland, about 1659 ; at Avliich place his 
parents had removed from Yorkshire, England, witli their two 
sons, John and Andrew, in the year 1658. In what year 
Thomas emigrated to New Jersey is uncertain ; I think it more 
than probable that he came in company with his brothers, John 
and Andrew, on board the ship Mary of Dublin, and landed at 
Elsinboro, 22d of 12th month, 1677; there was frequent 
mention of him soon after that time up to the fore part of the 
eighteenth century. He paid £18 in 1699 towards erecting a 
Friends' Meeting House in Salem. Where his residence was is 
somewhat of an uncertainty, but circumstances indicate that it 
was in Elsinboro. He died about 1714. His son, John Thomp- 
son, purchased a tract of laud in Alloways Creek, it Ijeing part 
of Ann Salter's allotment, lying on the western branch of Stoe 
creek, and lying between John Mason's Mill, now Maslvcll's, 
and John Chandler's Mill, now known as Wood's Upper Mill. 
The road that crosses tlie present mill-pond, was originally the 
dam erected l)y John Thompson to raise a head of water for 
his fulling mill; which business he followed for many years. 
He left three sons and one daughter — Thomas, Andrew, Jacob 
and Hannah Tliompson. Hannah married Philip Dennis, of 
Greenwich, Cumberland county, in 1761 ; they had a lai-ge 
family of children. Thomas married Deborah Oakford, in 
1762. Andrew Thompson and Elizabeth Bassett were married in 
the same year, 1762 ; they lived but a short time together. Eliza- 
beth Thompson departed this life 9th of 7th month, 1770, and 
Andrew Thompson, her husband, 15th of 1st month, 1775. 
He was called Alloways Creek Andrew in the records to distin- 
guish between him and Andrew Thompson of Elsinboro. 
Thomas Thompson had one son — Thomas, born 1763, who 
subsequently married, and had five or more children. Jacob, 
the eldest, married Mary, daughter of Thomas Hartly, of Salem; 
they had two children — Mary and Mark Thompson. The daugh- 
ter died a minor, but the son is still living. 



THOMPSON FAMILY. 293 



Andrew, the second son of Thomas Thompson, married Ra- 
chel, the daughter of Charles Shields, a native of Ireland ; tliere 
were two sons — Josiah and Charles Thompson. Josiah's lirst 
wife was Sarah, daughter of Jacob Thompson, who was a dis- 
tant relative, by whom he had three children — Ephraim and 
two daughters. His second wife was the daughter of Edward 
Bradway. She died in a short time after her marriage. Soon 
after his marriage with the third wife he left his native State 
and moved with his family to the State of Illinois ; he after- 
wards sent for his aged mother, who lived a few years and tlien 
passed away. Josiah possessed good business capacities, and 
was soon appreciated in his adopted home, and did considerable 
public business ; he was appointed postmaster in the town in 
which he lived. He died several years ago. 

Tliomas, the youngest son of Thomas Thompson, married 
Rebecca, the daughter of Richard Moore, of Alloways Creek. 
Thomas and his wife had seven children — Lewis, Richard, Elea- 
nor, Ann, Thomas, Rebecca and George Tliompson. Eleanor, 
the oldest daughter, married Asbury Stiles. Ann married Isaac 
Thompson, of Salem ; he was the youngest son of Samuel Nich- 
olson and Ann Thompson, of Elsinboro. Rebecca, the young- 
est daughter, married Samuel, the son of Jonathan Taylor, of 
Alloways Creek ; she died several years ago. Thomas' sons, 
I believe, left their native county for the purpose of bettering 
their condition in some other parts of the country. 

Jacob Thompson, son of John, was born about 1735 ; married 
Hannah Harris. The forefather of the Harris family, as I have 
lieen informed, 1)y the late Dalymoore Hai-ris, located near 
Roadstown, about the year 1700. The children of Jacob and 
Hannah Thompson, were Phebe, Hannah, Samuel, Rachel, Ja- 
cob and Mary Thompson. Phebe, the eldest daughter, married 
William Finlaw ; they had six children — John, Sarah, Hannah, 
Phebe, David and Rachel Finlaw. John, their eldest son, mar- 
ried Sarah, the daughter of Joshua Moore; they had issue — 
Hiram, Charlotte, Sarah and Isaac J' inlaw. Hiram married, 
and in a few years afterwards removed to the State of Del- 
aware. Charlotte was twice married ; her first husband was 
named Miller, of Philadelphia ; tliey had three children. Her 
second husband was Jacob, the youngest son of Solomon Du- 
bois. Sarah, the daughter of William and Phebe T. Finlaw, 
married Daniel Ashton; they had issue. Hannah, the daugh- 
ter of William and Phebe T. Finlaw, was twice married ; her 
first husband was Samuel Padgett, and her second Abram 
Dilks. Phebe, the daughter of William and Hannah T. Fin- 



294 THOMPSON TAMiirr. 



law, married William Padgett. David, the second son of 
William and Hannah T. Finlaw, married Elizabeth, the daugh- 
ter of Elijah and Lydia Sa^a-es Fogg. He was the son of 
Samuel and Prudence Fogg, born 12th of 6th month, 1775. 
David and his wife, Elizabeth Finlaw, had three daughters — 
Prudence, Phebe and Lydia. Prudence, married Ephraim, the 
son of Jesse and Mary Slieppard Carll ; they had seven chil- 
dren, four of whom lived to man and womanhood — Sylva- 
nus, Winfield, Laura and Mary. Phebe, the daughter of Da- 
vid and Elizabeth Finlaw, married Jesse P. Carll, the son 
of Ephraim and Mary Ann Carll. Phebe is deceased, and 
leaves four children — James W., Rosanna, Laura and Isabella 
Carll. Lydia, the youngest daugliter of David and Elizabeth 
Finlaw, married Samuel P. Smith, the son of Peter Smith, of 
Mannington. Their children are David F., Fanny, Phebe, 
Franklin and Peter Smith. Rachel, the youngest child of Wil- 
liam and Phebe Finlaw, married Joseph Corliss ; she was his 
second wife. His first wife was the daughter of Jonathan and 
Joan Hildreth. Joseph and Rachel Finlaw Corliss had two 
children — Maiy and Phebe Corliss ; the latter died young, un- 
married. Mary Corliss married Smith Robinson, who is now 
deceased. She has two children living — Rachel F. and Joseph 
Corliss Robinson. 

William Mulford married Prudence Maskell, of Greenwich, 
Cumberland county. They had six children, the eldest being 
Abigail, who be(;ame the wife of Isaac Hall, of Philadelphia. 
Jacob Mulford, their eldest son, was twice married ; his first 
wife beino- Hannah, the dauofhter of Jacob and Hannah H. 
Thompson, and his second wife was Tamson Mulford. Hope, 
the third child of William Mulford, married Stephen Mulford, 
who resided in Salem. William, the son of William and 
Prudence Maskell Mulford, married Ann, daughter of 
Elijali Cattell, of Salem. Rachel Mulford, the daughter 
of William, married Captain Benjamin Sheppard. Maskell, 
the son of William and Prudence Mulford, married Rachel 
Ewing, a cousin of Judge Ewing, who died at Trenton of 
cholera morbus more than thirty years ago. William Mul- 
ford's second wife was Sarah Ewing, who was born 10th of 
7th month, 1750. She was a grand-daughter on her mother's 
side of Thomas Maskell, who emigrated from New England 
about 1700 and settled at Cohansey ; and daughter of Samuel 
and Abigail Fithian, of Greenwich. William and Sarah Mul- 
ford had two sons — Thomas E. and James W. Mulford. Thomas 
E. Mulford resided many years in Salem, and followed the 



THOMPSON FAMILY. 295 



coopering business ; he married Abigail Clark. James W". 
Mulford also resided in Salem ; liis lirst wife was Sarah Alford, 
and his second Abigial Woodruff. Jacob, the eldest son of 
William Mulford, lived the greater part of his life in the city of 
Salem, and his occupation was that of a diy goods merchant. 
His place of business was where his grandson's (Dr. Patterson) 
new buildings are located, on Fenwick's street. Jacob in early 
life left the religious association of his parents (Presbyterian) 
and became an ardent member of the Methodist Society, and 
continued to the end of his days a consistent member thereof. 
He was very exemplary in his deportment, and in his inter- 
course and dealings with his fellow men. He twice married, 
his first wife being Hannah, daughter of Jacob and Hannah 
Thompson, of Alloways Creek. Her ancestors were members 
of the Society of Friends from the first settlement of Fenwick's 
Colony. Jacob and his wife Hannah Thompson Mulford had 
six children, who all lived to be men and women — Clarissa, Pru- 
dence, Hannah, William T., Charlotte and Jacob W. Mulford. 
Clarissa married Edward Stout, a Methodist clergyman, by 
whom she had live children — Joseph T., Hannah, Sarah Ann, 
Clarissa and Dr. Daniel M. Stout. Prudence, the second 
daughter of Jacob and Hannah Mulford, married in 1817, 
James, the son of James Patterson, who emigrated from the 
north of Ireland. He was born in 1749 of Scotch parentage, 
and circumstances go to show that he left his native country 
when young. There was a family of that name and nationality 
who located themselves in Philadelphia. John Patterson also 
came from Scotland, settling in the city of Baltimore, and 
became an eminent and wealthy merchant. Jerome Boneparte 
married his daughter, Elizabeth Patterson. The Salem family 
have no knowledge that there is any relationship existing be- 
tween the above mentioned families, but their nationalities are 
the same, and their emigration took place about the same time. 
I think it not improbable that there is a relationship between 
them. 

James Patterson, the Scotch-Irish emigrant, married Martha 
Kent, a lineal descendant of Thomas Kent, who purchased a 
lot of ten acres of the executors of John Fenwick, in 1686. 
The said lot was at the junction of ISTevell street (now Kent) 
with Yorke street. The family owned a large farm and brick 
mansion with a Mansard roof. Anthony Keasbey became the 
owner of the property, and his grandson, Quinton Keasbey, 
holds the property at the present time. James and Martha K. 
Patterson had five cliildren — John, Elizabeth, Mary, Rebecca 



L'96 THOMPSON FAMILY. 



and James Patterson. James, the father of the above men- 
tioned children, died in 1806, aged abont fifty-seven years. 
His wife sursdved him about six mouths. Their occupation was 
farming. James and his wife, Prudence Mulford Patterson, 
liad five chikh-en — William, James Kent, Jacob Mulford, 
Theophilus, M. D., and Mary Jane Patterson. James, their 
father, died in 1865, aged seventy-three years, and his wife, 
Prudence Mulford Patterson, died in 1811:, aged fifty-two years. 
AVilliara Patterson, their son, married in 1846, Amelia Rumsey 
Ware, the daughter of Bacon and Anna J. Ware. Bacon was 
the son of Job and Hannah Ware, of Bacon's Neck, Cumber- 
land county. His wife Ann T. Rumsey, was the daughter of 
Benjamin Rumsey, of Maryland. William and Amelia had 
three children — Anna, Henry Ware, and George R. Patterson, 
who died in infancy. William is a clock and watch maker, and 
his place of business is on Broadway, nearly opposite Market 
street, in Salem. James K., the second son of James and 
Prudence M. Patterson, resides in Salem, and at present is 
largely concerned in a canning establishment. He is unmarried. 
Jacob Mulford Patterson, the son of James and Prudence M. 
Patterson, married Clementina F. Lloyd, in 1851-. They have 
four children — Theophilus, George Walter, William M. and 
Pamela Patterson. They reside in Woodbury, Gloucester 
county. Theopilus Patterson, M. D., married in 1858, Caroline 
R. Ware, daughter of Bacon Ware. They have four children 
— James Allen, George C, Carrie Ware and Amelia Rumsey 
Patterson. Dr. Theopilus Patterson is much interested in the 
cause of education, and for several years was Superintendent of 
the Public Schools of the city of Salem. His services and 
labors in that direction were duly appreciated, as was shown at 
his last election, when he was chosen without any political 
opposition by his fellow citizens. At the last annual election he 
declined a re-election owing to his pressing professional duties. 
Mary Jane, youngest child of James and Prudence Patterson, 
married John C. Coote, in 1866. 

Hannah, the daughter of Jacob and Hannah T. Mulford, 
married Charles Rumsey, a silversmith, formerly of Wilming- 
ton, Delaware. Cliarles and Hannah T. Rumsey had five chil- 
dren — Charles, James, Jacob M., George Augustus and Han- 
nah Ann. Charles, the father, has been deceased several years. 
His eldest son, Charles Rumsey, was a merchant in Salem for a 
number of years, but he is now living in Philadelphia. He has 
been married twice ; his first wife was Emma Michner, of Phila- 
delphia, by whom he had two children — Emma G. and Anna 



TJIOMPSON FAMILY. 297 



G. Rumsey. His second wife was Fanny Sovereign ; they have 
six cliildren — Jennie, Fanny, Belle, Fred S., Horace M. and 
Cliarles Leslie. The last two births were twins. James M., 
the second son of Charles and Hannah M. Rnmsey, resides at 
Portsmouth, Ohio. He married Harriet Gaffy, and has four 
children — John, James, Eliza and Willie. Jacob Mulford 
Rumsey married Mary Stanger in 1857 ; they liave one child — 
Edward Smith E-umsey. George Augustus Rumsey married 
Cornelia, daughter of James M. and Ann K. Hannah. They 
lived several years in the State of Ohio, but are now residing in 
their native town of Salem. They have five children — \y alter, 
Eugene, Anna, George A. and Carrol Livingstone. Hannah 
Ann Rumsey married Samuel L. J. Miller, son of Josiah and 
Hetty Miller, formerly of Mannington. Tliey have one child — 
Wyatt W. Miller. Hannah Mulford, the widow of Charles 
Rumsey, is still li\dng at an advanced age. 

William Tliompson Mulford, eldest son of Jacob and Hannah 
T. Mulford, succeeded his father in the mercantile business sev- 
eral yeai'S. He married Eliza Fisler, and by her had one daugh- 
ter, Emma D. Mulford, who subsequently married Jonathan J. 
Broome, a merchant in the city of New York. They had one 
daughter — Alice Broome. Charlotte, the youngest daughter of 
Jacob and Hannah T. Mulford, born about 1803, was uncom- 
monly apt in acquiring education, and was generally at the head 
of her class in school. She married Peter Bilderback, 21st of 
7th month, 1824, and died at an early age, leaving one son — 
Edward M. Bilderback, wlio married Elizabeth Heishon, in 
1845. Edward and his wife have five children — Cliarles H., 
Joseph H., Peter, Lorenzo Dow and Edward Bilderback. 
Charles H. Bilderback, their eldest son, married Mary Elwell. 
Joseph H. Bilderback, the second son, married Kate Robinson, 
of Ohio ; they have one child — Elizabeth. Peter, the third 
son, is a traveling minister of the Methodist denomination in 
one of the Western States, where he married. Edward Bilder- 
back and his family recently removed to the State of Ohio. 
Jacob W. Mulford, the youngest child of Jacob and Hannah T. 
Mulford, like his sister Cliarlotte, possessed more tlian ordinary 
intellect. At one time he resided in the city of Philadelphia, 
and was in the mercantile business, but towards the close of his 
life he returned to his native town of Salem. His wife was 
Jane Fisler. He left one son, Jacob, who is a lawyer residino- 
in Camden, IST. J. The second wife of Jacob Mulford, Sr., 
was Tamson Mulford, and by her Ijad one son, James W. Mul- 
37 



298 THOMPSON FAMILY. 



ford, wlio married Emily L. Ford, of Delaware. James and 
liis wife are both deceased, leaving no issue. 

Samuel, the son of Jacob and Hannah Thompson, removed 
to one of the Western States. Kachel Thompson, daughter of 
Jacob, married Jacob Ware, of Cumberland county ; there were 
two cliildren l)y this union — Beulah and Theophilus, but they 
both died single. Jacob, tlie second son of Jacob and Hannah 
Thompson, married Mary Finlaw, and by that union there wei'e 
six children — Rachel, Hannah, Sarah, Mary, Margaret and Su- 
san. Hannah, the second daughter, was married twice, her first 
huslmnd ])eing Samuel, the son of Elijah Fogg, and her second 
William Kates. Sarah Thompson was the first wife of Josiali 
Thompson, son of Andrew; Mary Tiiompson married Hugh 
Pogue ; Margaret Thompson married Horatio Emerson. Susan 
Thompson, tlie youngest daughter of Jacob and Hannah Thomp- 
son, married William Sheppard. 

Jacob Thompson's second wife was Elizabeth Plummer ; they 
had three children — Elizabeth, John and Margaret. Elizabeth, 
the eldest, married James Harris; there were three children — 
Jacob, Mary and Isaac Harris. John, the son of Jacob and 
Elizabeth P. Thompson, married Abigail McPherson ; they had 
five children — Rebecca, Ellen, John, Jacob and Eliza. Marga- 
ret, youngest daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth P. Thompson, 
born 24:th of 12th month, 1781, married David Allen, 4th of 
3d month, 1801. She departed this life 15th of 1st month, 
1813. She and David Allen had four children — Kent, David, 
Sophia and Isaac. David, their second son, came to an untimely 
death, in 1811. He was chopping wood, and while falling a 
tree, a limb fell from one of the upper boughs and struck him 
on the head, wliich caused his death in a short time. Sophia, 
the daughter of David and Margaret Allen, married William 
Robinson, Jr.; they liave five children — two sons and three 
daughters — William, George, Sarah, Margaret and Rebecca. 
They are all married excepting Rebecca, who remains single. 
Isaac, tlie youngest son of David and Margaret Allen, married 
Elizabeth, tlie daughter of William and Elizabeth Keasbey 
Plummer, of Lower Alloways Creek ; tliey have several chil- 
dren. Mary, tlie youngest daughter of Jacob and Hannah 
Thompson, married Jason Garrison, of Cumberland county. 

James Patterson, the emigrant, had a sister, Elizabeth Patter- 
son, who accompanied him to America ; she afterwards married 
Raneir Penton, of New Castle, Delaware. Tliey had several 
children, one of whom, John Penton, married and left one daugh- 
ter, Eliza Patterson Penton, who subsequently married Thomas 



THOMPSON FAMILY. 299 



W. Belville, Esq., of St. Georges, Delaware ; they had seven 
children — Penton, Edward M., Thomas C, Lucy M., Sarah W., 
Georgianna and Belville. Elizabeth Patterson's second husband 
was Henry Rowen, of New Castle, Delaware ; she died about 
1806. John Patterson, the son of John and Martha Kent Pat- 
terson, married Sarah Beard ; they had live children — Anna, 
Elizabeth, James B., Rebecca and John. Anna Patterson mar- 
ried a Casperson ; slie died young, leaving one child — Eliza 
Casperson. Elizabeth, tlie second daughter, is not married. 
James B. Patterson, the son of John, married Ann Skees, in 
1832, of Pittsburg, Pa., and have six children — Sarah, William 
S., John, Elizabeth, Mary and Harriet A. Patterson. James 
B. Patterson, their father, died at Pittsburg, in 1833. 

Elizabeth, the daughter of James and Martlia K. Patterson, 
married James Robinson in 1806, and died in 1820. They had 
six cliildren — Mar}', Benjamin, Prudence, Ann, James P. and 
John, who died in infancy. Mary, the eldest daughter of James 
and Elizabeth P. Robinson, married John Fowler, of Manning- 
ton ; they had four children. John R. Fowler married Theo- 
docia, the daughter of Benjamin and Theodocia Griscom, of 
Salem. John and his family reside in Philadelphia ; he is a 
commission merchant. Mary, the daughter of John Fowler, 
Sr., married John Dawson. Benjamin married Elizabeth Linch, 
and Susan Fowler married John McAllister. Benjamin, the 
son of James Robinson, died in 1830. Prudence S., daughter 
of James Robinson, married George T. Ivelch ; she died in 
1811. Ann Robinson married John Taylor. James P., the 
son of James and Elizabeth P. Robinson, married in 1839, 
Elizal)eth Franklin, daughter of Benjamin Franklin, of Man- 
nington; she died young, leaving one daughter — Mai-y Ennna 
Robinson, M. D. James' second wife was Anna A. Hass, of 
Philadelphia ; they were married in 1816, and have two children 
now living — Ann Eliza and Lavinia. Ann Eliza married 
George Coles, and Lavinia married Lewis R. Jessup, of Glouces- 
ter county. 

Mary, the daughter of James and Martha K. Patterson, mar- 
ried David Fogg, of Upper Alloways Creek, in 1808. They 
had four children — Martha A., Elizabeth, James P. and Isaac 
Fogg. Martha, the eldest daughter, married Thackara Dunn. 
Elizabetli, tlie second daughter, married Martin Patterson, of 
Penn's Neck ; they have issue. James P. Fogg married Sarah 
Dunn ; they had issue. Isaac Fogg married Mary Dewer. 

Rebecca, tlie daughter of James and Martha K. Robinson, 
married William Robinson, of Lower Penn's Neck, in 1811, 



300 THOMPSON FAMILY. 



and died in 1827, leaving six children — "William, ]S'oah, John 
P., James T., Mary and Benjamin. The eldest married Sophia, 
the daughter of David Allen ; their children were mentioned in 
the Allen Family. Noah Robinson married Jemima Foster, 
daughter of Joseph Foster, of Salem. Noah is deceased, leav- 
ing children. James T. Robinson married Iverinhappuck Har- 
ris, daughter of Isaac Harris, of Alloways Creek, the 3d of 3d 
month, 1848. They had three children — Mary Ellen, Sallie E. 
and Isabella. James' second wife is Sarah H. English, daugh- 
ter of David and Sarah Ann English, the daughter of Judge 
Anthony Nelson, one of Salem county's self-made men. His 
pleasing address and correct language were far above the gen- 
erality of mankind, and it is remarkable when we consider what 
little opportunity he had in early life to acquire an education. 
When quite young he was apprenticed to the late Samuel Brick, 
of Elsinboro. Those who have a knowledge of how bound 
children were treated a half century or more ago, will readily 
agree that Anthony Nelson was, by nature, a superior man. 
lie represented his native county at three or four different 
periods in the State Legislature, and was one of the Judges of 
Salem Courts for a number of years. James and Sarah H. 
Robinson have nine children — Caddie L., Ennna Stretch, John 
Douglas, Kerinhappuck Harris, Jael E., Frank L., James T., 
Fannie H. and Hattie S. Mary, the daughter of William and 
Rebecca Robinson, married Jonatlian, tlie son of Jusc])h and 
Mary Hildreth Corliss ; tliey have no children. 




EDWARD VAN METER. 
Born 1811. Died 1875. 



YANMETER FAMILY. 

The YanMeters in company with several other families, emi- 
grated from Holland to tlie State of New York, between the 
years 1650 and 1660, settling at what is now known as Ulster 
county. Between the years 1712 and ITl-l, a company of the citi- 
zens of the Dutch Reformed, or Presbyterian faith removed 
from the neighborhood of Esopis, to Pilesgrove now Upper 
Pittsgrove, their minister David Evans accompanied them, and 
his tombstone, with appropriate inscriptions, can be seen in the 
Presbyterian burial ground at Daretown, in Upper Pittsgrove, 
Salem county, New Jersey. That these emigrants were families 
of respectability, may be inferred from the standing of their 
pastor, who was recognized as a man of learning and piety. 
These families seemed to have been mindful also, of the advan- 
tages of education, inasmuch as a iirst-class scliool for that early 
time, was established by them, and the most competent tea(;hers 
procured. Parents from long distances sent their children to 
this school, and some of the most distinguished men in the State, 
in subsequent years, were proud of the leai'uing obtained at the 
Pittsgrove College, as it was termed. John Moore White, one 
of West Jersey's ablest lawyers, was educated there. He 
was one of the Associate Judges of the Supreme Court for 
many years, and also Attorney Cieneral. Among the company 
who left New York, were three brothers, and tlieir families by 
tlie name of YanMeter. Some of the family settled in East 
Jersey, chiefly in Monmouth county ; one of the brotliers, Jo- 
sepli YanMeter settled in that county, and the other two brothers 
Jolm and Isaac settled in Pilesgrove township, Salem county. 
Occasional intercourse, as one of the family writes, and visiting 
continued between the East Jersey and Salem county YanMe- 
ters, for some years, but as the older members of the family 
died, communication between the younger branches of the fam- 
ily gradually ceased. For some reason the name in East Jersey 
lias been changed in spelling to Yanmater, and Yanmartin, but 
in West Jersey it is uniformly spelled YanMeter. The first and 
earliest records of the family to be seen in the Clerk's Office at 



302 VANMETER FAMILY. 



Salem in 1714 is spelled in that way, and ever since, in all the 
public records it appears tlie same. 

The Presbyterian Church at Pittsgrove was organized 30th 
of 4th month, 1741, David Evans being the pastor. Tlie church 
covenant was signed by the following members : Isaac Yan- 
Meter, Henry VanMeter, Cornelius Newkirk, Abraham Newkirk, 
Barnett DuJjois, Lewis Dubois, Garrett Duljois, John Miller, 
Francis Tully, Jeremiah Garrison, Eleazer Smith, William 
Alderman, John Rose, Simon Sparks, Tliomas Sparks, Richard 
Sparks, John Craig, William Miller, Natlian Tarbel, Hugh 
Moore, Peter Haws, James Dunlap, Jacob Dubois, Jr., Joshua 
Garrison, and Jost Miller. Tradition of a reliable nature states, 
that the above families did not constitute themselves a church 
organization, or connect with any Presbytery from the time of 
their settlement. Religious services were held in their school 
house and families, from 1714 until 1741, when they erected a 
log church, and in 1767 the substantial brick church, which is 
still standing, was erected. A new church opposite the parson- 
age was dedicated 15th of 8th month, 1867. Many of those 
earlv settlers seem to have been men of means. John and 
Isaac VanMeter located in company with the Duboises, a 
tract of 3,000 acres of land, from Daniel Cox, of Burlington, 
New Jersey, the record of which can be seen in tlie Clerk's 
Office in Salem, recorded in 1714. These parties divided their 
lands by the compass, the Duboises taking theirs on the north 
side of a line, the YanMeters the south side. The YanMeters 
continued to purchase until they owned a very large portion of 
the land, reaching from the Overshot Mill in Upper Alloways 
Creek near Daretown, southerly, south-east to Fork Bridge, 
about 6,000 acres in all, and most of the titles to the lands held 
by the present occupants go back to the YanMeter titles. The 
early YanMeters w^ere noted for their desire to reach out, and 
obtain broad acres of land, and their love of good horses, the 
latter is characteristic of the family to the present time, 
although careful of display. At tlie organization of the church 
in 1741 or 1742, John YanMeter's name does not appear, he 
had no doubt died previously to that date, leaving a son Henry 
to represent him, and in that Henry most, if not all of the 
YanMeters who now reside in the county of Salem, can properly 
claim their ancestorship. Isaac YanMeter was one of the 
founders of the original church ; he had a son, Garrett, who 
married a daughter of Judge Jolin Holme, in 1774. Garrett 
emigrated to Virginia with his family, and some of his descend- 
ents are there still. 



A'ANMETEK FAMLLT. 303 



Henry VanMeter, son of John, was married four times. The 
following named children are mentioned in his will — Joseph, 
Ephraim, John, David, Elizabeth, Kebecca, Jacob and Benja- 
min YanMeter. Tlie two last were children of his last wife, 
Marj Fetters, of Salem. About the year 1685, Erasmus La- 
Fettre and wife emigrated from England to West Jersey, and 
settled in the town of Salem. They lived on Yorke street, near 
Elsinborough line, it being so near it was sometimes called Am- 
blebury. Doubtless some of the elder inhabitants of the town 
of Salem remember in the early part of the present century an 
old hip-roof brick house, standing where David Fogg's apple 
orchard is now. That was, I have been informed, LaFettre's 
mansion. Erasmus LaFettre was a French Huguenot ; he left 
his native country, together with thousands of others, soon after 
the revocation of the edict of Nantz, by order of Louis XIY., 
and fled to England. Erasmus and his wife were members of 
the Society of Friends. They had several children — Erasmus, 
Thomas, Sarah, Mary, Hannah and one other daughter, wliose 
name is not given, who married James Sherron's son ; they had 
two children — Roger and Griiiith. Thomas Fettres, for that 
generation of children omitted La wlien writing their names, 
and spelled it Fettres. Thomas located in the city of Philadel- 
phia, became a mariner in 1722, and settled on one of the Ber- 
muda Islands. In the same year he gave his intimate friend, 
Captain Benjamin Vining, a citizen of Philadelphia, and like- 
wise a mariner, a general power of attorney to have charge of 
liis estate in America, personal and real, and to sell and forward 
the proceeds to him. The instrument of writing was executed 
in the city of Philadelpliia the 8th of 8th month, 1722, before 
James Logan. Sarah Fettres married Lewis, son of Rudroe 
and Jael Morris, of Elsinborough ; there were live daughters — 
Sarah, who married Thomas, son of John and Susanna Smith 
Goodwin, of Salem ; Mary married William, brother of Thomas 
Goodwin; Jael Morris married William Shipley; Ann married 
Samuel, son of Elislia and Abigail E. Bassett; Hannah Morris 
married John Whittal. Mary Fettres, as before stated, married 
Henry YanMeter. 

Erasmus Fetters, the eldest son of Erasmus, was a tanner by 
trade and carried it on in the town of Salem at the old mansion 
on Yorke street. In 1739 he purchased of John Acton, on Fen- 
wick street, a house and tan yard, containing one acre and a 
half of ground as set forth in the deed ; he was twice married, 
his last wife was the widow of James Chambless, Jr., of Allo- 
ways Creek. Erasmus died in 1757 without issue, making his 



304 VANMETER FAMILY, 



will in 1756 and disposing of his estate in the following man- 
ner: gave tlie house and premises bonght of John Acton to his 
nephew John Whitel ; to Roger Sherron £56; to Griffith Sher- 
ron £10 ; to John, son of William Goodwin, £10 ; Susanna 
Goodwin £10 ; Lewis Goodwin, £10 ; to his last wife's three 
daughters, Rebecca, Sarah and Mary Chambless, £10 each, 
also their mother's wearing apparel ; to his niece, wife of 
Thomas Goodwin, £10; to Mary Goodwin, wife of Wil- 
liam, £10; to his niece Jail Shipley, wife of William, £10; 
to his niece Ann, wife of Samuel Bassett, £10; to John 
Winters two daughters, Hannah and Sarah Whitel, £5 
each; his negro boy Dick he bequeathed to William Good- 
win for ten years, on condition that at the expiration of that 
time he should be set free. The remainder of his estate both 
real and personal was bequeathed to his sister Mary YanMeter's 
two sons, Jacob and Benjamin VanMeter. William Goodwin 
and John Whitel were his executors. His personal estate, after 
his just debts were paid, amounted to £1119 18s. 5d., as was 
filed in the office at Burlington in 1758 by his exec- 
utors. 

Jacob VanMeter settled in Genesee county, New York, and 
left a family, who in former days visited the home of their 
ancestors. Benjamin YanMeter married Bathsheba, daughter 
of Captain James Dunlap, of Pittsgrove ; he was the son of 
Captain James Dunlap, Sr., of Penn's Keck. The Dunlaps 
came from Delaware to Penn's Neck, and are supposed to be of 
Irish descent. James Dunlap's will was written in 1758 ; he 
died the same year, leaving three sons and one daughter — John, 
James, Thomas and Mary Ann. James, Jr., married Anna 
Hunter, and died 19th of 9th month, 1773 ; his wife died 16th 
of 1st month, 1780. The Hunter family were from East 
Jersey ; a branch removed and settled in Salem county. Rob- 
ert Hunter died, leaving a widow and two daughters — Anne 
and Mary. His widow married Hugh Moore; they had issue, 
one son, Richard Moore, who settled at Lower Alio ways Creek ; 
he died, leaving one son and five daughters. One of the daugh- 
ters married George Grier. Johanna married Jonathan Hil- 
dreth. One married James Sayres, one married Solomon Du- 
bois, one married Daniel Stretch. As has been stated Anne 
Hunter married James Dunlap, Jr. ; they had one son and two 
daughters — Bathsheba and Mary Dunlap. Bathsheba, the 
eldest daughter, married Benjamin, the son of Henry and Mary 
Fetters YanMeter. Mary, daughter of Robert Hunter, married 
Samuel Purviance ; left one sou and three daughters. Mary, 



VANMETEK FA3IILY. 305 



the eldest daughter of Samuel and Maiy Purviauce, married 
Samuel Eakin.a Presbyterian pastor, tlieir children were Samuel, 
James, Ann, Susan and Johanna. The latter married Isaac Hazel- 
hurst ; slie died in 1809, leaving five children — Richard Hunter, 
Samuel, Isaac, Jr., Andrew Purviauce and Mary. The other 
daugliter of Sanniel and Mary Purviauce married William P. 
Leigh, of Virginia. These Hunters are believed to be the de- 
scendants of Robert Hunter, one of the Colonial Governors of 
New Jersey, who held office from 1710 to 1720. The Hunters 
were distinguished in early history for their prominence in the 
pulpit, and State offices, and for their leai'uing and eloquence. 
Benjamin VanMeter, as before stated, married Bathsheba Dun- 
lap. He settled in early life on his ancestral estate, and was a 
useful man in his time, being a ruling elder in the Presbyterian 
Church at Daretown. He was the owner of a number of 
slaves, but becoming convinced in his own mind tliat it was an 
evil to hold his fellow man in bondage, he liberated all of tliem 
a few years before his death. At that time there was no law 
to compel him to do it, and he had been so kind a master that 
some of his slaves refused to leave, and accordingly ended tlieir 
days with liim. Benjamin VanMeter departed this life 15th of 
10th month, 1826, aged eighty-two years; his wife died 7th of 
11th month, 1831, aged eighty-four years. Tlieir children were 
James, Mary, Ann, Sarah, Erasmus Fetters, Robert Hunter and 
Bathsheba. James, the son of Benjamin VanMeter, was a 
pliysician, and commenced practicing medicine at Alloways 
Creek when a young man. He boarded with John Hancock. 
However he remained there but one year, and then removed to 
the town of Salem, and soon afterward married Ruth, the 
daughter of Thomas Jones. He had a very extensive practice 
as a physician, perhaps greater than any other one physician 
that ever resided in the town of Salem, particularly so among 
the members of the Society of Friends. He was one of the 
founders of the Presbyterian Church in that place, and died in 
1847, aged eighty years. His wife died a few years before 
]iim, aged sixty-three years. They left an only child, a son, 
Thomas Jones VanMeter, who graduated in early life as a 
physician. He never practiced to much extent. He married 
Hannah, daughter of Anthony and Hannah Keasbey, of Salem. 
Their children are Artemisa K., Martha J. and James Anthony 
VanMeter (the latter died in childhood). Hannah, wife of Dr. 
Thomas VanMeter, died in 3d month, 1871. 

Mary, daughter of Benjamin and Bathsheba VanMeter, mar- 
ried Matthew Newkirk, and died in early life, 7th of 7th month, 
39 



306 VANMErEK FAMILY. 



1802, leaving four daiigliters, Bathsheba, Elizabeth, Ann and Sa- 
rah Newkirk. Bathsheba, the eldest, married Jeremiah Stull, and 
had several eliildren. John married Julia, daughter of Dani.d 
Garrison of Salem; Mary Stull married a person by the name 
of Cloud, of Maryland. Caroline Stull married Dr. Wallace. 
Sarah married James Johnson. Bathsheba married Jacob Mencli 
— all of them have children. Elizabeth, daughter of Matthew and 
Mary Newkirk, married a person by the name of Effinger, and 
had several children. Ann, daughter of Matthew and Mary 
Newkirk, married Henry YanMeter; they had one daughter, who 
afterwards married a person by the name of Carruthers, and 
had several children. Sarah, the daughter of Matthew and 
Mary Ncwkirk, married a person by the name of Olmstead ; 
they had several children. Ann, daughter of Benjamin and 
Bathsheba VanMeter, died 10th of 9th month, 1851. Sarah and 
Fetters YanMeter, children of Benjamin and Bathsheba Yan- 
Meter, died in infancy. Erasmus, son of Benjamin and Bath- 
sheba YanMeter, married Mary Burroughs; he inherited the 
family homestead, and died 7th of 11th month, 1812, aged sixty- 
six years. He was a ruling elder in the church of his fathers at the 
time of his death; his wife died 10th of 8th month, 1860, aged sev- 
enty-five years. Their children were Benjamin, Jolm, William, 
James, Elizabeth and Bathsheba YanMeter. Benjamin YanMe- 
ter married Hannah McQueen ; they had several children, and 
remov^ed West. John YanMeter, son of Erasmus, married and 
died, leaving children. William YanMeter, son of Erasmus, 
went West, married there, and has several children. Elizabeth, 
daughter of Erasmus YanMeter, married Samuel Swing; they 
had four children — Erasmus Y., Mary Jane, Ruth Ann and 
Alfred. Erasmus Y. Swing is a practicing physician. He mar- 
ried a Burroughs, and settled in Pennsylvania. Alfred was killed 
in the late rebellion. Bathsheba, daughter of Erasmus YanMe- 
ter, married Thomas Brooks ; they had two cdiildren — Bebecca 
and Benjamin Brooks. Rebecca married James Robinson, and 
Benjamin married Amanda Johnson. James, the son of Eras- 
mus and Mary YanMeter, married a sister of James and Wil- 
liam Coombs ; they settled in the State of Ohio. Robert Hun- 
ter, son of Benjamin and Bathsheba YanMeter, graduated as a 
physician in 1TU9, and settled in Pittsgrove. His lirst wife wrs 
Rachel Burroughs of the same place; she died three months 
after marriage ; his second wife was Sarah Leake Whitaker, 
daughter of J, Ambrose and Rachel Leake AVhitaker. They 
moved to Salem in 1800. Dr. Robert YanMeter was also one of 
the founders of the Presbyterian Church in Salem, and a ruling 



VANMETEK FAMILY. 307 



elder in the cliurcli at the time of his death ; tlieir children were 
Emma, Mary, James, Roljert, Edward, Mason, Josiah and Harriet. 

Emma, daiii^hter of Robert and Sarah A^anMeter, died near 
Baltimore 16th of lltli month, 1869. Mary, daughter of 
Robert and Sarah YanMeter, married Enos R. Pease, of Con- 
necticut, and died 17th of -Ith month, 183-1, leaving one child, 
Alvin Robert Pease, who died in Alleghany City, Pennsylvania, 
in his seventeenth year. James, Robert and Josiah, children of 
Robert and Sarah YanMeter, died in infancy. Edward, son of 
Robert and Sarah YanMeter, married Caroline, daughter of Isaac 
and Ann Whitaker. They had three children — Mary Caroline, 
Harriet Fetters and Anna Hunter A^anMeter. Edward Yan- 
Meter died Ith of 1st month, 1875. He studied law in early 
life in his native town of Salem, and it appears at that time he 
was not much attached to his profession, for he soon after went 
into the mercantile ]:)usiness at Hancock's Bridge. The firm 
was known as YanMeter & Dubois. Soon after leaving the 
store he was employed by Jonas Miller as his book-keeper. 
Jonas was the proprietor of one of the largest public houses at 
the time on Cape Island. Edward continued with him two or 
three seasons. Soon after he was married, he turned his atten- 
tion to his first calling, that of law, as attorney and solicitor in 
chancery. He did a large amount of public business in his time, 
and was considered one of the l)cst business men in the city of 
Salem. 

Mason, son of Robert and Sarah YanMeter, is still unmarried, 
living in Salem. Harriet, daughter of Robert and Sarah Yan- 
Meter, married R. J. Cone, of New York, a clergyman. They 
had two children — Norris Hunter and Charles Kirtland Cone. 
Noi-ris Hunter Cone graduated from Lafayette College 6th 
month, 1872, and went to Colorado where he now resides. 
His brother, Charles Kirtland Cone, died at the age of nine 
years. 

Bathsheba, daughter of Benjamin and Bathsheba A^anMeter, 
married A\''illiam Mayhew ; they had one daughter, Maria, who 
married a person by the name of Johnson, and had one daugh- 
ter, Anna, who married Charles Burroughs. After the death 
of Maria's first husband she married James Richman, and has 
several children. Bathsheba Mayhew died 17t]i of 9th month, 
1866. 



CHRISTOPHEK A¥HITE FAMILY. 

Christopher Wliite, son of Thomas AVhite, was born at Omnar, 
in the county of Cumberhmd, England, in the year 1642. From 
thence he removed to London in 1666, and in 1668 he married 
Elizabetli Leath. She was a widow, and was the daughter of John 
Wyatt, of the county of Yorkshire. They had one daugliter 
Elizabeth, who was born in Shadwell, near London, in 1669. 
His first wife Elizabeth died about the year 167L It appears 
he married his second wife in the year 1671-, whose first name was 
Esther, but her last name is not given in the records. Josiah 
White, son of Christopher and Esther White, was born in Lon- 
don, in 1675. Christopher and his wife and their two children, 
and their two servants, John Brinton and Jane Allen, emigrated 
to America, and landed at Salem 23d of 6th month, 1677. They 
had one son — Joseph White, born in Salem 5th of 11th month, 
1678. Christopher White, like several other emigrants, had 
purchased one town lot in Salem, together with 1,000 acres of 
land, of the proprietor before he left his native country. He 
I'esided on his property in Salem until about the year 1682, and 
he then removed and took possession of his allotment of land in 
Alloways Creek. In 1690 he built a large brick house on his 
property in said township, the King's Highway from Salem to 
Cohansey running through his lands, the house was built near 
said road, not far from the meadow. There is a tradition in 
the neighborhood that he sent to England for an architecture, 
and likewise had the brick imported from that country for the 
house. The following is the description and size of the build- 
ing, given to me by Judge Ephraim Carll, who had an excellent 
opportunity of knowing — he and his family having resided there 
for several years, and was also present when the building was 
taken down : 

The main building was thirty-two by eighteen feet, and two 
stories high. The walls were eighteen inches in thickness up 
to the second story, and the joist of that story projected beyond 
the walls five feet, making a projection of that width on three 
sides of the building, and the Myalls from that point were twelve 



CHRISTOPHER AVHITE FAMILY. 309 



inches in thickness. The joist in the main building were clear 
yellow heart pine, and floor boards were of the same material, 
being one and a half inches in thickness. Beyond the main 
walls of the building was an extension from the foundation built, 
being eight l)y ten feet, for a stairway to the second story and 
garret. On top of said walls was an arch roof which gave the 
building a singular appearance. There was also a cellar under 
the whole of the main building, which was paved by square 
English brick. The basement floor, and likewise the second and 
attic floors, were supported l)y large beams twelve by fourteen 
inches, which extended across the middle of each floor. The 
main entrance to the main building on the west side of it, took 
five large stone steps from the ground to enter the building, and 
on the east side there was a one-story kitchen attached, wliich 
likewise was built of brick, sixteen by twenty feet in size. 
There was a good sized yard around the house which, at one 
time, was paved with square brick, but at the time the house 
was removed many of the yard bricks had been broken up and 
removed. I have been more particular in describing this build- 
ing on ac'-ount of the interest the old inhabitants of the town- 
ship had respecting it^ and when it was erected. The late 
Robert G. Johnson told me the year after it was taken 
down, that he regretted very much that there was Mot a photo- 
graph drawing of the building for the Historical Society of New 
Jersey. 

Israel Ilarrisson married Esther, the daughter of Christopher 
and Esther White, of Monmouth precinct, about 1693. Israel 
and his wife Esther had two children. Joseph, their son, born 
1694, and Sarah, the daughter of Israel and Esther Ilarrisson, 
was born 14th of 12th montii, 1696. Israel died in 1704. 

Christopher White died about the year 1698, leaving a widow 
and three cliildren — Elizabeth, Josiah and Joseph Wliite. 
Christopher White appears to have been a man of an energetic 
turn of mind, and a high moral tone of character, and those 
traits were transmitted to his descendants for several genera- 
tions. His daughter Elizabeth married William Bradway, in 
the year 1689. Josiah White, son of Christopher, I believe, 
married Hannah Ashbury in 1698. Their son Christopher 
White, was born 23d of 6th month, 1699, and died a minor. 
Their son, Josiah Wiiite, was born in 1705. Hannah White, 
daughter of Josiah and Hannah Wliite, was born at Alloways 
Creek in 1710. Josiah White, Sr., died about the year 1726, 
leaving his landed estate to his son, Josiah. 

As early as 1698, the owners of the meadows and low lands 



310 christoi>hp:k white family. 



bordering on Alloways creek obtained a law from the West Jer- 
sey Legislature to enable them to put a dam across the said 
creek, and to put a sufticient sluiceway to drain all the low lands 
lying above the present Hancock's Bridge. For some cause 
which has never been explained, tlie work was not undertaken 
until the year 1723, at which time the Company contracted with 
Josiah WJiite to build the dam. He was the son of Josiah 
White, and grandson of Christopher White, the emigrant. Jo- 
siah was born 21st of 6tli montli, 1705, at the old homestead of 
the family, called at that time Monmouth Precinct. He made 
a contract to erect a dam and put in a sufHcient slui(;eway for a 
spccilic sum, the amount of wliich I have never learned, and 
guaranteed it to stand one year before he was to receive his pay. 
But the meadow owners above the dam soon discovered that 
their lands did not drain as well as before, and besides losing 
the navigation of the creek, which was an incalculable loss, for 
there was as much valuable timber on tlie land bordering the 
creek at that time as in any part of West Jersey. Before the 
expiration of the year the dam broke. Since that day innnense 
quantities of the best quality of ship timber, and thousands of 
cords of fire wood, together with products of the farms, have 
been sent to market from the lands bordering the creek above 
tlie dam, by the navigable highway which nature designed Mon- 
mouth river to be. Within a few years past, by the wear of 
the creek, many of the ancient piling and other timber on the 
south side became a liindrance to navigation, and the Freehold- 
ers of the county determined to have the timber removed out 
of the stream. They offered proposals for the lowest bidders 
to clear the navigation. Edward and Lewis S. Carll agreed to 
do it, they being the lowest bidders, for the sum of $210. Many 
of tlieir friends were fearful they would incur a loss by the un- 
dertaking, but by good management and perseverance they have 
been succ-essful in removing a large quantity of heavy timber. 
Tlie dam was constructed with two cribs, twenty feet each, 
making the width of the embankment full forty feet wide. 
About iif ty or sixty feet from the south side of the creek, wdiich, 
I presume, at that time, was near tlie channel, they found large 
quantities of wood cut in lengths to cord tightly in between the 
three rows of piling and land ties, which, I have no doubt, was 
used as a tumbling dam until such time as the other part of the 
enbankment could be raised above tide water. Many of the 
piling, drawn b}' means of a stump puller, were imbedded fif- 
teen and some nearly twenty feet in tlie mud and gravel. The 
land ties drawn to the shore from the bottom of the creek, were 



CHRISTOPHKK WHITE FAMILY. 311 



over fifty feet in length, Jind squared twelve to fourteen inches, 
they being to all appearance as sound as when put there — one 
hundred and lifty-six years ago. They were of white oak. 
The creek since that time lias clianged its cliannel northerly 
fully sixty feet. The Urst bent on the south side of the stream, 
with the piling and land ties, are at this time imbedded under 
the mud fully three or four feet deep, extending under the 
present tide bank. 

I previously mentioned that the work was done by contract 
by Josiah White. Tradition says the dam was cut on the night 
before the year expired. Tiie company contended that the 
stopping broke, but their statement found little or no credit, 
and was never believed except by tliose persons who were 
interested in the meadow company, and they decided not to pay 
liira. Josiah was under the necessity of selling his large patri- 
monial estate to pay the debt he had incurred in erecting the 
works for their beneiit. At that time he was only twenty-three 
years old. Many persons in the same adversity would have 
become dispirited, but not so with one who had inherited from 
his father and his grandfather tliose qualities of heart and 
mind, which made him capable of witlistanding more than 
ordinary trials. After disposing his estate to Joseph Stretch 
and others, he was enabled to pay his indebtedness and have 
£500 left. He then determiued to leave his native county, not 
having any family. His widowed mother, Hannah White, had 
died a short time previous. He went and settled in Burlington 
county, at or near Mount Holly, and there purchased land on the 
head waters of Rancocas creek. Soon after he made a dam 
across the creek for the purpose of raising a head of water, and 
then built a fulling mill, in which, I think, he carried on the 
manufacturing of cloth tlie greater part of the remainder of his 
life. He married 1st of 10th month, 1734, Rebecca, tlie 
daughter of Josiah and Rebecca Foster, a highly respected 
family of Burlington county ; she was a descendant of the 
Borden family, from whom Bordentown, on the Dela-ware river, 
derives its name. She was born 1st of 10th month, 1702. 

Josiah and his wife, Rebecca F. White, had six children. 
Their eldest daughter, Amy, born 13th of 5th. month, 1737, died 
when she was about thirteen months old. Hannali, the second 
daughter, born 2Sth of lltli month, 1739, married Tliomas 
Prior, in 1763 ; her second husband was Daniel Drinker. 
Josiah,son of Josiah and Rebecca White, born 21th of 4th month, 
1752, died when two years of age. Rebecca, the daughter of 
Josiali and Rebecca, born 15th of 3d month, 1745, married a 



;12 CHKISTOPHKK WHITE FAMILY. 



young man by the name of Redman, of ITnddonfield. John, 
the son of Josiah and Rebecca, born 9th of 7th month, 1747. 
Josiali AVhite, the youngest son of Josiah and Rebecca, was 
born 20th of 8th month, 1750. The father of the al)ove named 
children was a minister in the Society of Friends, recommended 
as such in the year 1743. On the same day the celebrated 
John Woolman was also recommended by the Mount Holly 
Monthlj^ Meeting. Josiah had the happy faculty of condensing 
what he desired to express either in his public communications 
or his private conversation, and his company was mucli sought 
after. He and Dr. Benjamin Franklin were on quite intimate 
terms, as he was also with Governor William Franklin, the son 
of Dr. Franklin, whose country seat M-as near Mount Holly. 
Josiah imbibed the idea similar to Homer, the father of poets, 
that there were plants and herbs tliat grew to cure all diseases 
the human family is liable to. I have been informed tliat for a 
number of years of liis life he used no other medicine in his 
family but wliat he made of herbs, and he was frequently sei.t 
for by his neighbors to administer the same to their families. 
He received the appellation of lierlj doctor. He certainly was 
a man of clear and comprehensive judgment, and was well 
calculated to leave his foot-prints on tlie sands of time, and 
those great qualities were transmitted to his descendants to a 
remarkable degree to the first, second and third generations, as 
their lives and their undertakings for the public good (all of 
which they accomplished) fully demonstrate. 

Josiah lost his wife about nine years before his death ; she 
died 6th of 12th month, 1771, aged nearly sixty-three years. 
He was born at Alloways Creek, 21st of 6th month, 1705, and 
died at Mount Holly, 12th of 5th month, 1780, aged nearly 
seventy-five years. He descended from an ancient family of 
the name of White, in the county of Cumberland, in England. 
Tliomas White, his great-grandfather, became converted to the 
principles of George Fox, and soon after tliat event left his 
native county and removed to London. In the year 1664 he 
was taken from the Bull and Mouth meeting, in that city, and 
taken l)efore Alderman Brown. He told the Alderman that he 
thought he had filled up the measure of his wickedness, at 
w]ii(;h the Alderman, incensed, struck him in the face, kicked 
him and sent him to Newgate prison. His grandfather, Chris- 
topher White, also suffered much violence and persecution in 
the city of London on account of his religious opinions. It is 
probable for that reason he concluded to leave his native coun- 
ti-y and emigrate to the wilds of America, where he could enjoy 



CHRISTOPHER WHITE FAMILY. 313 



civil and religions liljertj. He accordingly pnrchased 1,000 
acres of land of Jolm Fenwick before he left England, in the 
early part of the year 1675, and with his family arrived at New 
Salem in tJie 6th month, 1677. He became an active and use- 
ful citizen in Fenwick's iiifant colony. He died on his planta- 
tion in Monmouth Frccinct, now Alloways Creek township, 
about the year 1696. His son, Josiah White, who was born in 
London in 1675, succeeded liim and became the owner of his 
real estate in said township. 

John, the son of Josiah and Rebecca "White, born 9th of 7th 
month, 171:7, married 7th of 6th month, 1775, Rebecca, daugh- 
ter of Jeremiali Haines, of Burlington coimty ; she was born 
28tli of 7th month, 1711. John and his wife Rebecca White 
had four children. Jolm, tlie eldest, lived to grow up to man- 
hood and died unmarried ; Christopher, their second son, died 
a minor ; Josiah was born 4th of 3d month, 1781 ; and Joseph, 
the yonngest, was born 28th of 12t]i month, 1785. John, their 
father, died 22d of 8th month, 1785, aged about thirty-eight 
years. 

Josiah White, well known as the pioneer of introducing the 
Schuylkill water for the use of the inhabitants of the city of 
Philadelphia, also one of tlie first projectors of the Schuylkill 
canal, and also tlie Lehigh Coal and Navigation Company. The 
latter he commenced and completed nearly or altogether by his 
own individual exertions, so as to enable the different coal com- 
panies, which were then organizing in the anthracite coal 
regions, to carry it to tlie Philadelphia market for common use 
as fuel. Before that period it was not much used, owing in a 
great measure to the high price of transporting it to market, 
which put it out of reach of the common people, it being from 
$25 to $40 per ton. Josiah was the third son of John and 
Rebecca H. White, and was born 3d of 4th month, 1781. He 
was married twice ; his first wife being Catharine Ridgway, of 
Burlington county, whom he married in 1805. She died a few 
years after her marriage, leaving no issue. Josiah's second wife 
was Elizabeth, the daughter of Solomon and Hannah White, of 
Philadelphia. There were five children by that connection — 
Hannah, the eldest, married Richard Richardson, of Wilming- 
ton, Delaware ; she is still living. Their next child was a son, 
who died young. Solomon, their third child, lived until he was 
in his nineteenth year. He has been represented as a yoimg 
man of uncommon promise, and was possessed of a mind above 
mediocrity, and consequently his untimely death was a great 
loss to his aged and beloved parents. Josiah and Elizabeth 
40 



314 CHRISTOPHER WHITE FAMILY. 



White's fourth chiki was a son, M-ho died young. Rebecca, 
their youngest chikl, is still living, unmarried. Josiah White, 
the father, died l^th of 11th month, 1850, aged nearly seventy 
years. 

Joseph White, the youngest son of John and Kebecca IJ. 
White, was born 2Sth of 12th month, 1785. Like his elder 
brotlier, Josiah, he inherited fi'oin his ancestors that great 
energy of character and a cast of mind which made them pio- 
neers in new and important improvements for the benefit of 
mankind. lie married Rebecca, the daughter of Daniel D. and 
and Elizabetli Schooley Smith, of Burlington county. Daniel 
D. Smith was a descendant of Richard Smith, M. D., who was 
baptised 18th of 5th month, 1593, and died at Branham, York- 
shire, England, in 1617. Elizabeth Schooley Smith was the 
great-grand-daughter of Samuel Jennings, first Governor of 
West New Jersey. Rebecca Smith, her daughter, was born 
29th of 3d montli, 1787. Joseph and Rebecca S. White had 
eight children — John Josiah, Daniel S., Elizabeth, Sarah S., 
Anna (who died young), Howard, Barclay and Anna Maria. 
John J. White, the eldest son, resides in Philadelphia, in the 
house on Arch street that was formerly occupied by his uncle, 
Josiah White. He is a lawyer by profession. He has been 
twice married, his first wife being Mary Kirkbride Shoemaker, 
and his second wife Abigail Weaver. 

Daniel S. White, the second son, married Rebecca L. Shreve. 
Elizabeth, the eldest daughter, married Joshua Lippincott, of 
Philadelphia. Sarah S. White died unmarried ; Howard died 
unmarried ; Barclay married Rebecca Merritt Lamb, daughter 
of Restore Lamb, of Burlington county. She died several years 
ago, leaving issue. His second wife was Beulali Sansom 
Shreve. Barclay at this time is one of the Government's Su- 
perintendents of Indian Affairs, and is located at Omaha, 
Nebraska. Anna Maria, the youngest child of Joseph White, 
married J. Gibbon Hunt, M. 1). During the year 1808 Joseph 
White and Samuel Lippincott purchased Josiah White's stock 
of hardware and commenced business as importer of and dealer 
in hardware, under the firm of White & Lippincott, at No. Ill 
Market street, Philadelphia. The following interesting narra- 
tive of Joseph White, written by his youngest son Barclay, and 
forwarded to me a few mouths ago, shows that his life had been 
extended to threescore years and ten ; he had the ability and 
energy to have risen as high on the pinnacle of fame in the 
history of his country as his elder brother. He died at the age 
of forty-one years in the prime of his life. 



CHRISTOPHER WHITE FAMILY. 315 



In the year 1811 Josepli left Pliiladelphia with the intention 
of traveling on horseback to St. Louis, Missouri, and other 
places in the AYestern and Southern country, for the purpose of 
extending the business of the firm, and collecting debts due to 
it. Stopping at Brownsville, Pennsylvania, he stabled his horse 
and strolled through the streets to view the town. Passing a 
store, he noticed a man standing in its door, clad in such cus- 
tom as denoted he was a member of the Society of Friends; and 
being a stranger in a strange place, Joseph was attracted towards 
this member of his own religious Society. Asking for some 
trivial article of merchandise as an excuse for opening a conver- 
sation, he entered the store. This new acquaintance proved to 
be Elisha Hunt, who, witli his brotlier Caleb, were conducting 
a mercantile business there. The conversation that ensued was 
interesting to both Friends, and when supper was announced, 
Joseph was invited to join the family circle. The Hunts made 
a proposition tliat if Josepli White would give up his journey 
on horseback and assist tliem in building and freighting a keel 
boat, Caleb Hunt would in the spring join him on the trip to 
St. Louis, thus making a more pleasant journey, with favorable 
prospects of a successful mercantile venture. Such an arrange- 
ment was agreed upon. Joseph White spent the winter at 
Brownsville, the boat was built, and freighted witli general mer- 
chandise, and in the spring of 1812, Caleb Hunt and Joseph 
White, with a crew of French-Canadian boatmen, started her 
from the landing at Brownsville, Pennsylvania, bound for St. 
Louis, Missouri. Dm'ing the previous 11th month an earth- 
quake, which is known as the "earthquake of New Madrid," 
had clianged and rent the banks of the Ohio river, adding to 
the risks and labors of the voyage. As they pursued their course 
with the current of the river, there was much leisure time, and 
the boatmen noticed that Joseph frequently interested himself 
by reading from a volume which he carried in his pocket, and 
tliey asked that he would read to them. The volume was the 
Bible, and Ijy commencing his readings with the narrative por- 
tions, they became so interested in the book that the readings 
were made regular and systematic during the remainder of the 
voyage. 

As far as the mouth of tlie Ohio the voyage was compara- 
tively easy, recpiiring only watchful care to keep the boat in 
the current and avoid obstructions, but from the Ohio's mouth 
to St. Louis, against the rapid current of the Mississippi river, 
was another kind of lal)or. They now doubled the number of 
their men, and pulled tlic boat up stream with a long rope, a 



316 CHRISTOPHER WHITE FAMILY. 



number of hands on shore dragging it. This was called " cor- 
delling" and " bushwhacking," as the men would catch a bush 
with one hand and pull the rope with the other. This arduous 
labor was well calculated to lead the reflective mind to consider 
if some other power could not be successfully applied for pro- 
pelling boats against such a current. 

After reaching St. Louis the mei-chandise was sold, partly for 
cash, the balance to be paid for in lead, which was to be deliver- 
ed at St. Genevieve, Missouri, during the spring of 1813. 
Having successfully disposed of their goods, and ascertained 
that the St. Louis merchants, who were indebted to White & 
Lippincott, were unable to pay the debt, the friends turned their 
keel boat down tlie Mississippi river homeward bound. They 
entered the mouth of the Ohio river, and proceeded up it as far 
as Smithland at the mouth of the Cumberland river, where, 
not finding an opportunity to sell their keel boat, it was com- 
mitted to the charge of Joseph Wood, to sell, freight or charter. 
Joseph White bought a horse of Wood for |50, and with 
Caleb Hunt, left Smilhland on the 6th of 7th month, 1812, at 
six o'clock A. M., on horseback for the journey home. From 
the notes of this journey, which are now before me, they 
passed through Louisville, Kentucky. At Hopkinville they 
received the intelligence of war being declared with England. 
The diary notes : — " We were much shocked thereat ; this un- 
" expected intelligence overclouded my prospects, and makes 
" my ride gloomy." " At Bowling Green, Kentucky, I fell in 
" with the proprietor of a cave, who wanted me to purchase it. 
" He asked $10,000. With five men he makes one hundred 
"pounds of saltpetre per day ; to manufacture it costs him from 
" five to six cents per pound ; it is now worth twenty-five cents 
" per pound in Lexington, Kentucky." 

At Sheppardsville, Kentucky, the friends separated, and 
Joseph White proceeded to Louisville, where he found consider- 
aljle commotion on account of a man being arrested on suspicion 
of being a British spy, and fomenting the negroes to insurrec- 
tion. He passed through Frankford, the seat of government, 
which he describes as " a smart town, containing about one 
" hundred and fifty houses." " Cynthina contains about fifty 
" houses," tlience to Lexington, which he found to be " a delight- 
" f ul place, with hospitable people and luxurious soil." Passing 
through the gap of the Cumberland range of mountains, he 
traveled on to Knoxville, Tennessee, which is mentioned as " a 
" lively town, with from two hundred to three hundred houses ; 
" liere I was introduced to the Governor of the State and several 



CHRISTOPHER WHITE FAMILY. 317 



"principal people." "Near Rogersville I exchanged horses 
" with William Lyons, gave liim ^50 to boot, and am to pay $10 
" more if he should think it a liard bargain." From Abington, 
Virginia, he passed up the Valley of Virginia, or Shenendoah 
Valle}'^, tln-ough Lynchburg, stopping to view the Natural 
Bridge ; then on to " Strasburg, containing sixty or seventy 
" houses," through " Winchester, a line place with about four 
" hundred houses," passing by Harper's Ferry, where lie found 
an extensive manufactory of arms, producing nine hundred 
stand per month, rating at $12 each. Thence to Frederickstown, 
Maryland, which he supposes " contains eight hundred or one 
thousand houses,"thence through Columbia,Lancaster and Down- 
ington, in Pennsylvania, arriving in Philadelphia, 16th of 8th 
month, 1812. This horseback journey from Smithland, Ken- 
tucky, to Philadelphia, appears to have occupied forty -one days. 

During the autumn of 1812 Elisha Hunt visited Philadelphia, 
and while there arrangements were made and a stock company 
formed to construct steamboats and carry passengers and freight 
by steamboats between Pittsburg and New Orleans. The stock 
of this company was divided into six shares, of which Joseph 
White owned two or one-third of the whole amount of stock. 
Daniel French, a Connecticut man, owned a patent for steam- 
boats, and had built a little stern wheel steamboat on his plan, 
which was then running as a ferry boat between Cooper's Point, 
Camden, New Jersey, and Philadelphia. 

French said he could construct steamboats that would run five 
miles an hour, against the current of the Mississippi river, and 
an arrangement was made with him by which he sold to the 
company the right to use his patent west of the Alleghany 
mountains. The services of French were engaged, shops were 
erected at Brownsville, Pennsylvania, tools for working in iron 
were made, logs were cut into plank with whip saws, and with 
the ferry boat above mentioned as their model, they constructed 
the steamboat Enterprise, costing about fifteen thousand dollars, 
and in the latter part of the summer of 1813 she left Pittsburg 
for New Orleans, under the command of Captain Henry Shreve, 
who was the son of Israel Shreve, of Burlington county, New 
Jersey, a Colonel in the Revolutionary army. 

The Enterprise reached New Orleans, and was there seized by 
the State Marshal, at the instance of Fulton and Livingstone, 
for coming within the limits of Louisiana, they having obtained 
from the Legislature of that State a charter, granting them the 
exclusive privilege of running steamboats on the waters of that 
State. Captain Shrev^e gave security for trial, the Enterprise 



318 CHRISTOPHER WHITE FAMILY. 



was released, and i-eturned up the river with a full cargo of 
freight and passengers. The charge for carrying freight was 
eight cents per pound, and one hundred and twenty-five dollars 
for each passenger. It was announced in the Pittsburg papers, 
and copied into Cramer 6z Spears' Almanac that the steamboat 
Enterprise had just arrived with a full cargo of passengers and 
freight, in the remarkable short passage of twenty-six days from 
New Orleans, thus proving the practicability of navigating the 
Mississippi river by steam. 

The Steamboat Company labored under a great disadvantage 
on account of fuel and had axemen on board to chop wood, 
which they took on the banks of the river and from drifts, as 
they could find it. This occasioned great detention, but arrange- 
ments were made for a supply at several landings against the 
next trip. Tlie next time the Enterprise landed at New Orleans, 
Greneral Jackson pressed her into the service of the United 
States, and sent her up to Alexandria, on the Red river, with 
provisions, ifcc, for the army there. 

The Enterprise made about three round voyages between 
Pittsburg and New Orleans, when peace was declared between 
the United States and England. Passeno;ers and freight then 
went around by sea. The Enterprise finally reached Shippins 
Port, below the Falls of the Ohio river, and the river being low 
above, and freights dull, the Captain anchored the boat in deep 
water, and hiring two men to take care of her, went by land to 
Pittsburg. One of the men went ashore and the other got 
drunk and neglected the pumps, the weather was hot, the seams 
of the boat opened, and the Enterprise filled and sank to the 
bottom, where, as Elisha Hunt, in a letter written during the 
year 1851, sa^'^s "she still is." Elisha further states that while 
he was down in Kentucky, in 1818, a man offered him $1,000 
for the wreck, as he thought he could get her engine out to run 
a saw mill. 

Fulton I.V: Livingston obtained judgment against the Company 
in the State Court, but on appeal the United States Court set 
that decision aside and left the navigation of the Mississippi 
free, and open to all. Said suit cost the Company l)etween 
S1500 and S2000. 

TJie Stcaral.)oat Company then built a second boat called the 
Despatch, designed for shoal water, she soon sank in the Ohio 
river, after which the stockholders became discouraged, and the 
Company dissolved. 

The Enterprise was tlie first steamboat that ever went out of 
the Monongahela river to New Orleans, and returned up against 
tlie current. 



CHRISTOPHER WHITE FAJSHLY. 319 



One of Elisha Hunt's letters says : " The amount of dividend 
" paid to the stockhoklers out of the profits of the boats I am 
" not able to give, for no book account was ever kept by the 
" Captain. On his return to Brownsville he brought his funds 
" in several shot bags, of Spanish dollars, which were poured 
" out on the counter of E. & C. Hunt's store, and laid off into 
" six piles to the stockholders, with which they M^ere satisfied at 
" the time." 

In consequence of the sinking of the boats, the stockholders 
lost all their investment, which was about $20,000. The Steam- 
boat Company manufactured the tools necessary for the con- 
struction of steam macliinery, and also constructed a cotton mill 
at Brownsville, in which they placed a steam engine, manufac- 
tured in their shops. After the close of the war the cotton mill 
failed. 

After Captain Henry Shreve left the service of the Steamboat 
Company, he constructed a boat at Wheeling, called the Wash- 
ington. Shreve was employed by the government to remove 
the snags out of the river, and afterwards entered into an 
engagement with the United States to remove the Ked river 
raft. He invented a powerful snag boat, and with it improved 
the navigation of the Ked river to Slireveport, wliicli town was 
named after him. 

One of Elisha Hunt's letters states : " The little office con- 
" nected with our Brownsville store was the rendezvous of many 
" intelligent and enterprising young men, and there , all the 
" recent inventions for improving travel, etc., were argued and. 
" discussed." Among the regular visitors there he mentions 
Neal Gillespie Blaine, grandfather of Ex-Speaker Blaine, of 
the House of Representatives, Robert Clark, Stephen Darling- 
ton and others. 

The lead which was to be delivered at St. Genevieve in part 
payment for the keel boat merchandise, was on hand according 
to contract, when the Enterprise stopped for it. The boat 
carried it to Pittsburg, whence it was freighted to Philadelphia 
in Conestoga wagons, and there sold, netting over one hundred 
per cent, profit on the keel boat venture. 

In 1813 or 1814: Elisha Hunt sent to Joseph White one barrel 
of "Seneca Oil" gathered at Oil Creek, Pennsylvania, which 
Joseph sold to Daniel Smith, a druggist in Philadelphia. The 
oil was gathered by damming up the rivulets, and spreading a 
blanket over the water to absorb the oil. The blanket was then 
wrung over barrels, which caught the oil. 

Joseph White was extensively engaged in coal operations in 



320 CHRISTOPHER WHITE FAMILY, 



the Lackawanna region during the latter years of his life, and 
died in Philadelphia 25tli of' 5th month, 1827, aged forty-one 
years. 

After many years of mercantile life at Brownsville, Elisha 
Hunt returned to his native place, Moorestown, New Jersey, 
where lie passed many of his later years, and died in the summer 
of 1873 in the ninety-fourth year of his age. It was my privi- 
lege and pleasure on several occasions during those years to con- 
verse witli liim upon his social and business connections with my 
father, and the incidents above narrated have been chiefly 
derived from such conversations. 

It is more than probable that if Josiah White, Jr., had not 
been defrauded of his just dues by the inhabitants of the Upper 
Precinct of Monmouth, he would have remained in his native 
county of Salem, a district of country for which nature has done 
so much. The inventive genuis and uncommon energy of 
character possessed by him and his descendants would have 
been an incalculable advantage to this section of the State ; for 
as William Penn wrote in one of his maxims respecting human 
life : " Great minds were destined by Providence to be the pio- 
" neers of all that is good and useful for the benefit of 
" mankind." 

Josiah White, while in his twenty-eighth year, sold all his 
goods to his brother, Joseph White, and Samuel Lippincott, he 
having by this time obtained the amount of property he desired 
as being sufficient for him. It appears he was out of business 
about two years, and in 1810 ho married his second wife Eliza- 
beth, the daughter of Solomon and Hannah White. Her father 
had been a successful merchant in Piiiladelphia, but was then 
deceased. Notwithstanding his plans of life, it seems he was 
designed for active life, and about two years after he sold out 
his interest in Market street, there was a water power offered 
for sale at the Falls of Schuylkill, belonging to Robert Kennedy, 
comprising about four feet available fall, with all the water of 
the river, with the right to construct a lock for navigation, 
charging fifty cents toll on each boat for passing ; also, there 
was four acres of ground on the east side of the river, and seven 
or eight acres and an old tavern house on the west side adjoin- 
ing the bridge. He built a large mill for the manufacture of 
wire, and a smaller one for making nails, and entered himself 
in the manufacture of these articles about that time. He asso- 
ciated with him Erskine Hazard, who became a partner in the 
manufacture of wire. In 1801 he took out a patent for rolling 
iron, and in 1812 another patent for making wire and heading 



CHKISTOPIIEK WHITE FAMILY. 321 



nails. Li 1817 he and Josepli Gillingham endeavored to make 
arrangements with the City Council. They offered to furnish 
the city with tln-ee millions of gallons of water every twenty- 
four hours for twenty years, at twenty-five thousand dollars a 
year, and then three millions of gallons every twenty-four hours 
at three thousand dollars a year forever. But it appears they 
M'ero not successful in making a contract Avith the City Council 
at tliat time. 

About the year 1812 they made an experiment of anthracite 
coal in their rolling mill. They procured a cart load of it which 
cost them one dollar per bushel. This quantity was entirely 
wasted without getting up the requisite heat, and another cart 
load was obtained, and a whole night spent in endeavoring to 
make a fire in the furnace, when the hands shut the furnace 
doors and left the mill in despair. Fortunately one of them left 
his jacket in the mill, and returning for it in about half an hour, 
noticed that the furnace door was red hot, and upon opening it 
was surprised to find the whole furnace of a glowing white heat. 
The others w^ere summoned, and four separate parcels of iron 
were heated and rolled by the same fire — before it required 
renewing. The furnace was then replenished, and as letting it 
alone had succeeded so well, it was concluded to try it again, 
and the experiment was repeated wdth the same result. Coal 
at that time was $10 per ton. 

White & Hazard applied to the Legislature in 1813 to grant 
them the privilege of making the Schuylkill navigable so as to 
bring the coal to market, and supply their own wants at a 
cheaper rate, but the idea M'as ridiculed. The members from 
Schuylkill county said in the Legislature, that althougli they 
had a black stone in tlieir county it would not burn, and they 
were unsuccessful in obtaining the law for that purpose at that 
time. [See Hazard Report, page 302]. White & Hazard 
called a meeting for all those that were interested in the nav- 
igation of the Schuylkill to meet at the tavern, corner of Fifth 
and Race streets, Philadelphia, in 1815. Josiah White opened 
the business of the meeting by proposing the application to the 
Legislature for a company to improve the Schuylkill for slack 
water navigation by dams and locks. This was the commence- 
ment of the present Schuylkill Navigation Company. The Com- 
pany was incorporated in 1815, showing clearly that he was the 
originator of that inland navigation which has been millions of 
dollars benefit to the city of Philadelphia and State of Pemisyl- 
vania. 

In 1819, White sSc Hazard sold their water-jioAvcr fit the 
41 



322 CHRISTOPHER WHITE FAMILY, 



Falls of the Schuylkill to the city of Philadelphia, They then 
turned attention to the coal regions at Mauch Chunk. They 
left the city on horsel)ack, and the greater part of the way they 
liad to travel through tlie wilderness, particularly in the moun- 
tainous regions, and arrived at Summit Hill in safety, a short 
distance from Mauch Chunk. 

In 1792 a company was formed called the Lehigh Coal 
Mine Company, who took up a large tract of land contiguous 
to that on which the coal had been found. White, Hazard & 
Company rented ten thousand acres of land of said company for 
twenty years, for one ear of corn a year, if demanded, and from 
and after three years to send to Philadelphia at least forty 
tliousand bushels of coal per annum on their own account. So 
as to be sure of introducing it in the market, they immediately 
set to work to improve the navigation of the Lehigh, with a 
capital of two hundred thousand dollars, and afterward tlie stock 
was increased to a million. In the year 1820 the dams and 
locks being completed, the first anthracite coal was sent to 
market by artificial navigation. The whole quantity, says 
Josiah White, was three hundred and sixty-live tons. This, he 
said, proved more than enough for family supplies in Philadel- 
phia. In 1823 the navigation of the Lehigh was completed, 
and was inspected by commissioners who reported it finished, 
and the Governor issued his licence on the 17th of 1st month, 
1823, authorizing them to take toll. 

Josiah White removed his family from Philadelphia, in 1821, 
near Mauch Chunk. Kext year a comfortable house was pro- 
vided for his family upon tlie hill-side above the beautiful 
river, with spacious grounds, adorned M'ith rocks and forest 
trees. An extensive inclosure, called the Park, contained elk 
and deer, for the amusement of his children, and at that place 
his mother closed her life in the family of her son, in the 
eighty-second year of her age. In 1831 the works of the com- 
pany being so far completed as not to require his constant 
attention, the family returned to Philadelphia, and resided at 
the corner of Seventh and Arch streets. Soon after a heavy 
domestic affliction was experienced by the parents in the loss of 
their only remaining son, a prominent young man in his nine- 
teenth year. 

From 1820 to 1871 the production of coal from the Lehigh 
Coal and Navigation Company from official reports amounts to 
] 3,705,298 tons. 

Josiah White was much interested in the subject of education, 
particularly desiring its diffusion among the lower classes of the 



CHRIS rOPirER WHITE FAMILY. 323 



people, in a wuy to make tliem self-reliant and self-sn])portin^, 
often contributing liberally of his means for sucli purpose. lie 
bequeathed funds for the establishment of two manual labor 
schools in the West — one in Indiana and the other in Iowa — 
especially having reference to the religious training of tlie 
pupils. 

A short time before his death he visited Salem, and in 
company with Kobert G-. Johnson, visited the native place of 
his ancestors at Alio ways Creek. He died in Fliiladelphia the 
14th of 11th month, 1850, in the seventieth year of his age. 

Notwithstanding his life was a busy one and vast his under- 
taking in improving the inland navigation of his adopted State, 
which, by his perseverance and good management he completed, 
and his mind appeared to be centred to the great first cause. He 
wrote the following touching expressions, among others of a 
similar nature, in his religious reflections not long before his 
death : "When I consider the relationship of man to his Maker, 
"how depending he is before him, yea, nothing but a cloud of 
" dust, and the life he lives is only by the will and power of the 
"Holy One; it is even He that created this dust, and gave it 
" life and being and capacity to serve him, and to do his will 
" and life forever." He left three daughters, two of whom are 
still living. Hannah married Richard liicliardson and Rebecca 
remains single. 

I close the short account that I have written of this truly 
great man by copying the remarks made by Charles V. Hagner, 
from a woi'k he wrote of some of the leading men tliat lived 
near the Falls of Schuylkill. After mentioning tlie various and 
great undertakings Josiali White liad accomplislied f(jr the 
benefit of the city and State, he says: "Have I not sliown good 
" reasons for saying that I know of no man to whom the citizens 
" of Philadelphia are so much indebted for substantial benelits 
" tliey have so long enjoyed as they are to Josiah White. First 
" we see him in company with Mr. Hazard, making experiments 
" witli the anthracite coal, and succeeding in bringing it into 
" practicable use in the rolling mill. Next in successfully con- 
" triving gates to make it applicable for domestic use. Then 
" starting the Schuylkill Navigation Company to bring down a 
" supply of coal. Originating the idea of the Fairmount Dam, 
" resulting in giving to the citizens of Philadelphia such a plen- 
" tifiil supply of water as they never dreamed of before, and 
" finally originating the Lehigh works. The warrior who slays 
" thousands of liis fellow creatures is lauded and glorified, higli 
"monuments are erected to iiis memory, on wliich are eml)la- 



324 CHRISTOPHER WHITE FAMILY. 



" zoned Ids deeds of blood, but the modest, plain, unassuming 
" citizen who does so much good for his fellow men, and wlio 
" neither seeks or courts notoriety, sleeps his last sleep, conipar- 
"atively unnoticed or forgotten." 



JOSEPH WHITE FAMILY. 

Joseph "Wliite descended from an ancient family of Nortli- 
amptershire, England. He was the son of Samuel and Elenor 
White, and was'born the 20tli of 1st month, 1651. He left 
liis native place in England and removed to Ireland, in 1672 ; 
soon after that event, he married Elizabeth, daughter of An- 
tliony and Elizabeth Church, who had removed from Stafford- 
shire, England, to Ireland, a few years before, and they became 
members of New Garden Monthly Meeting, neai- Dublin. In 
said meeting, about the year 1679, Joseph White and Elizabeth 
Church were married. They, in company with a number of 
friends, among whom were Hugh Middleton, from Gloucester- 
shire, England, Allen Matthias and Hannah Ashbury, all 
originally natives of England, set sail from Dublin harbor, and 
after a passage of eight weeks and two days, they landed at 
Elsinborough Point in West Jersey, on the 17th day of 9th 
month, 1681. The same day they landed, they had a daughter 
born, which they named Rema White. Josepli White located 
on land in Elsinl)orough and resided thereon. He was an active 
2nan in the civil affairs of the Colony ; and likewise an influen- 
tial member of Salem Monthly Meeting. Joseph White, Jr., 
son of Joseph and Elizabeth White, was born in Elsinborough, 
29th of 11th month, 1692. I think that Joseph White, Sr., 
died about the year 1703. 1 lind no mention of him after that 
date in public records, or in the meeting books. The family 
soon after his death left Elsinborough and settled in the upper 
part of the (county. 

Josepli White, 2d, married and had several children. John 
White, S(m of Joseph and Mary White was born 19tli of 3d 
month, 1717. Joseph White, 3d, son of Joseph and Mary 
White, was born 21st of 10th month, 1719. AVilliam White, 
son of the same parents was born in 1722. Here appears a 
discrepency in the records. I have heard stated there were 
two or three daughters. William White, son of Joseph, 3d, 
married, and had several children, six daughters and one son. 
William was l)orn in 1751 ; he subsequently became an eminent 



32G 



.TOSEl'H WHITE FAMILY, 



land Siu-vejor. He died 18tli of lltli month, 1836, in Ids 
eiglity-Hfth year. He enjoyed remarkal)le liealth, and was 
never known to be sick during his long life, until a few days 
before his death. He was married three times. His first wife 
Avas a Fisher, by whom he had one daughter — Hannah White. 
She married Benjamin Heritage, of Gloucester county. Benja- 
min and his wife had ten children, four sons and six daughters. 
"William White's second wife was Anne Paul, daughter of 
Samuel Paul, of Gloucester ; they had ten children — William, 
Samuel, Ann, Rebecca, Mary, Joseph, Sarah, Isaac, John and 
Joel White. William White's third wife was Mary Silvers, 
widow of Thomas Silvers ; they had no issue. 

William, the son of William and Anne White, married Susan 
Bates, of Gloucester county ; they had five children — William, 
George, Samuel, Charles and Susan White. They are all 
married and scattered in the Western States. Samuel, son of 
William and Anne White, married Jerusha, daughter of Jona- 
tlian and Hannah Shourds Smith, of Pilesgrove. Samuel and 
his wife had eight children — Elizabeth, Jonathan, William, 
Mary, Samuel, Caroline, David and Wilson White. Elizabeth, 
daughter of Samuel and Jerusha White, has been twice married. 
Her first husband was Clement Hiuchman, he however died a 
short time after marriage, leaving one daughter — Clemence 
Hinchman. Her second husband was William Carll, son of 
Samuel Carll, Jr. Jonathan, the eldest son of Samuel and 
Jerusha White, married Lydia, daughter of Aaron and Sarah 
Waddington, of Elsinboro. Jonathan died young, leaving one 
(U\ughter — Gertrude White. William, son of Samuel and 
Jerusha White, married Emily Buzby ; he died without issue. 
Mary, daughter of Samuel and Jerusha White, married Brad- 
way, son of Aaron and Sarah Waddington. Bradway died a 
young man, leaving two children — Ada and Frank Waddington. 
Ada married a person in New York. Samuel and Caroline, 
children of Samuel and Jeruslia White, died minors. David, 
son of Samuel and Jerusha White, married a young woman of 
Gloucester county ; they have cliildren. Wilson AVhite, mar- 
ried a Lovcland ; they have issue. 

Ann, daughter of William and Anne White, married William 
Haines, of Gloucester county; they had five children — Joshua, 
William, Ann, Sarah and Samuel Haines. Joshua, the son of 
William and Ann White Haines, married Hannah Albertson, 
of Burlington county; they had three children — Chalkley, Abi- 
gail and liebecca Haines; Chalkley and Al)igail are married. 
William, son of AV^illiam and Anna Haines died repently ; his 



JOSEPH WHITE FAMILY. '327 



wife was Rachel Lippincott. "William was a recommended min- 
ister, and a member of Upper Greenwich Meeting; like liis 
grandfather, lie was an eminent Sm'veyor. He and his wife 
had fom- children — Job S., William, Emily and Hannah Ann 
Haines. Job married Ellen Holmes ; tliey have fonr children — 
Jacob, Stacy, Idella and Jesse Haines; William, son of William 
and Eachel Haines, remains single. Emily married Joseph Livy- 
ley; they have live children; Samuel, son of William and Anna 
Haines, married Ann Eliza Holmes, of Upper Penn's Neck ; 
they had one son — Howard Haines. Ann, the daughter of Wil- 
liam and Anna Haines, married Champion Atkinson ; she died 
leaving no issue. Sarah Haines, sister of Ann, married Cham- 
pion Atkinson, former husband of her sister ; they are both 
deceased, leaving no issue. Rebecca, daughter of William and 
Anne White, was twice married ; her iirst husband was William 
Miller, of Greenwich, Camberland county; they had three daugh- 
ters — Sarah Ann, Eliza and Maiy Miller. Sarah Ann Miller, 
their eldest daughter, married Amos, son of Joseph Buzby ; 
they have ten children — Edward, Chambless, Joseph, William, 
Samuel, Franklin, Emilj', Elizabeth, Rebecca and Cornelia 
Buzby. Eliza, daughter of William and Bebecca Miller, mar- 
ried Lewis, son of William and Martha Hancock, of Elsinboro ; 
they had two daughters — Mary and Martha Hancock. Mary, 
the daughter of William and Rebecca Miller, married Caleb 
Borton ; they had three children — Omar, Mary and Bhebe Ann 
Borton. Omar, son of Caleb and Mary Borton, is a successful 
Apothecary in Woodstown ; his wife is the daughter of John 
and Sarah Albertson, of Baltimore, Maryland. Omar and his 
wife, have one daughter — Izetta Borton; she married Dr. La- 
fayette Allen. Mary, daughter of Caleb and Mary Borton, 
married Nathan Y. Lippincott ; they had five children — George, 
Edward W., Ellen, Ilannah and Emma Lippincott. George, 
son of Nathan and Mary Lippincott, married Rachel, the daugh- 
ter of Allen Wallace ; they have issue. Edward W. Lippincott, 
married Emma, daughter of the late Henry Ridgway, of Cros- 
wicks, Burlington county ; they have no issue. Ellen, daugh- 
ter of Nathan Y. Lippincott, married Daniel Taylor; they have 
two daughters. Emma, daughter of Nathan Y. and Mary Lip- 
pincott is not married. 

Joseph, son of William and Anne White, was twice married ; 
his first wife was Deborah, daughter of James Hewes ; he was 
a lineal descendant of AVilliani Hewes, who purchased a large 
tract of land of William Penn in Upper Penn's Neck, in 1689 ; 
tlie said land was surveyed by Richard Tyndall, by an order of 



328 JOSEPH WHITE FAMILY. 



James Nevill, of Salem. Joseph and Dehorali White had three 
cliildren — James II., Ann and Edward AVliite. Josepli White's 
second wife was Lydia Moore, of Woolwich, Gloucester county; 
they had five children, namely — Renben, Hannah, Del)orah, 
Thomas and Martha. James, son of Joseph and Del)orali 
White, married Mary Ann Holmes, daughter of Samuel Holmes, 
of Upper Penn's Neck ; they had nine children ; their name s 
are — Esther, Sarah, Samuel, Ann, Joseph, James, Franklir, 
Martha and William White. Ann, the daughter of Joseph and 
Deborah Wliite, married Aaron Lippincott, and have five chil- 
dren, four sons and one daugliter. Joseph, married Georgianna, 
daughter of Robert and Sarah Given, of Salem ; they thave no 
issue. Deborah, daughter of Aaron and Ann Lippincott, mar- 
ried Charles Ballenger; they liave two children. Edward, 
Benjamin and David Lippincott are single. 

Edward, son of Joseph and Deborah Wliite, is at the preseLt 
time Surrogate of Cumberland county. He married Ann, 
daughter of Jonatlian and Fanny House, of LTpper Alio ways 
Creek; tliey have issue, two daughters — Fanny and Maiy 
White. Isaac, son of William and Anne White, left his native 
State, and went to the city of Kew Yorlv. John and Joel 
White, sons of William, settled in one of the Southern States. 
The family have not heard from them for a number of years. 




WILLIAM CARPENTER. 
Born 1792. Died 1866. 



WARE FAMILY. 

Joseph Ware came to this country in 1675 as a servant of 
Edward Wade. Robert Wade, in 1678, sold his allotment of 
land on the south side of Alloways creek, prior to his purchase 
in Pennsylvania near the ancient Swedish town of Chester. 
James Denn and Anthony Page were the purchasers. Soon 
afterwards Page sold 250 acres to Joseph Ware, who subse- 
quently bought another 250 acres adjoining his first purchase, 
of Edward Wade, making in all 500 acres. In 1683 he married 
Martha Groff, and their children were Joseph, born 1684 ; Sa- 
rah, born 5th of 7th month, 1686 ; and John, born about tlie 
year 1688. The latter settled at Cohansey, and became a mem- 
ber of the Baptist Society. He had a son named John, born in 
1722, who died in 1773, and was buried in the ancient Baptist 
grave-yard at Cohansey. His son. Job, born in 1761, was also 
interred in the same grave-yard in which liis father was bui-ied. 
From this family there is a large number of descendants., Mas- 
kell Ware, of Salem, being one of them. Joseph Ware, Jr., in 
1707, married Elizabeth Walker. They had three sons and one 
daughter, Elizabeth Ware, who married Benjamin Thompson, 
near Allowaystown. Their sons were Josepli, 3d, Solomon and 
John Ware. Joseph Ware, 3d, married Elizabeth, daughter of 
Philip Blanchard, born 20th of 8th month, 1716. Joseph and 
his wife had six children ; the eldest, Mary, born 22d of 8th 
month, 1735 ; Sarah, Hannah, Rebecca, Joseph, 4th, and 
Elijah Ware, born 30th of 1st month, 1748. Elijah's wife was 
Mary, the daughter of Benjamin Tindall, of Penn's Neck, and 
great-grand-daugliter of Richard Tindall, of Tindall's Grove. 
Elijah and his wife had no issue. He died several years before 
his wife, and made a will which, after the death of his widow, 
devised a small farm to Salem Monthly Meeting, He was con- 
sidered one of nature's noblemen — an honest man — and was an 
approved minister of the Society of Friends, meek and humble 
in his deportment, and wielded great moral influence in the 
neighborhood in which he lived. Sarah Ware, the sister of 
Elijah, was born 2d of Sth month, 1737, and married Joseph 
43 



330 WARK FAMILY. 



Stretch, 3d, in 1761. They had two daiigliters, Jael, born in 
1762, and Martha, born llth month, 1763. Solomon, the 
second son of Joseph Ware, Jr., was born in 1717. His wife 
M-as Sarah Stretch, whom he married in 1740. They lived on 
the homestead farm of his father, the property upon which I 
now reside. The house was built by Joseph Ware, Jr., in 
in 1730, more than one hundred and forty years ago. Solomon 
and his wife had eight children. Peter, the eldest, born 25th 
of 8th month, 1741 ; Elizabeth, Job, Hannah, Elisha, Sarah 
and Solomon; they all died minors excepting Sarah. Solomon 
Ware died in 1761, at the age of forty-live years, and his widow 
departed this life in 1765, four years after her husband. Only 
two of their children, Elisha and Sarah, were living at that 
time, and Elisha died with the pleurisy the year after his mother, 
in liis eighteenth year. 

The whole of the estate of Solomon Ware, consisting of a 
farm of 250 acres, and a considerable personal estate, came into 
the possession of the surviving daughter. Sarah "was born 12th 
of 6th month, 1756, and married Joslma Thompson, of Elsin- 
borough, in 1773. They had three children — Joseph, born 27th 
of loth month, 1774; John, born in 1776, and died in 1779, 
and Elizabeth, born 13th of llth month, 1778. The latter mar- 
ried William, son of William and Sarah Nicholson, of Manning- 
ton, and had eight children — Elisha, Ruth, Rachel, Beulah, 
Elizabeth, William, Joshua T. and Sarah Ann Nicholson. Elisha 
went as supercargo on a voyage to the West Indies, and 
died of yellow fever on the passage home. He never married. 
Ruth Nicholson's husband was Joseph Edgar Brown, and they 
did not live together more than two or three years. She died 
in 1827, and was regretted by a large circle of relatives and 
friends for her many admirable qualities. She possessed a tine 
intellect, pleasant and agreeable manners, and warm sympathies 
for the afflicted. She left no children. Rachel Nicholson mar- 
ried Thomas Y. Hancock. Tliere were live children. Elizabetii, 
the eldest's, first husband was David, the son of Andrew Smitli, 
of Elsinborougli; her second liusband was Sanuiel Fowser. Slic 
died several years ago. Ellen, the second daughter, married 
Dr. Henry Childs, of Philadelpliia. William N., the third child, 
married Beulah, daughter of William Fowser. Cornelia, tlie 
third daughter, lias not yet married. She conducted herself 
most admirably during the late rel)ellion, having served with 
the army of the Potomac the greater part of the war, attending 
to the sick and wounded, and continued to assist in the hospitals 
until the rebellion closed. Since the war ended she has been at 



WARE FAMILY. 331 



Charleston, South Carolina, teaching a school of colored chil- 
dren. Thomas Hancock, Jr., the youngest child, was drowned 
while bathing wlien he was not more than ten 3'ears of age. 

Beulah, daughter of William and Elizabetli Nicholson, died 
a young woman, in 1819 or 1820. Elizabeth, another daughter, 
died in infancy. William Nicholson, their son, married Susan, 
the daughter of William Miller, and had four children — Kachel, 
Susan, William and Elizabeth. Rachel, the eldest, married 
Thomas Mathers, near Germantown ; Susan married James Gas- 
kill. William, Jr.'s wife is Florence Earl, and Elizabeth's hus- 
band is Sylvester Garrett. Joshua Nicholson married Eliza 
Smith, daughter of Stephen Smith, and moved to Illinois many 
years ago. When the war broke out he enlisted in the Western 
army, and from exposure was taken sick, I believe, near Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, and died in one of the army hospitals, leaving 
a widow and one son — Alexander Nicholson, Sarah Ann Nich- 
olson married Dr. Henry Childs. She has been deceased many 
years, leaving two children — Elizabeth and John. Joseph, the 
eldest son of Joshua and Sarah Thompson, was born 27tli of 
10th month, 1774. His first wife was Ann, the daughter of 
John and Susanna Mason. Joseph and his wife had live chil- 
dren — Elisha, who died when about two years of age, Susan, 
Elizabeth, Sarah and Ann. Susan married Joseph Pancoast, 
son of Samuel and Dorcas Pancoast, and had seven children — 
Ann, Samuel, Elizabeth, Joseph, Thomas, Hannah and John. 
Elizabeth Thompson, died in 1820, in her sixteenth year. 

Sarah Thompson, their third daughter, born in 1807, married 
Thomas Shourds, 10th of 1st month, 1828. Ann, the youngest 
daughter of Joseph and Ann Thompson, born in 1809, married 
Thomas, son of Aaron and Hannah Fogg, in 1827. They have 
twelve children — Susan, Joseph, Elisha, Elizabeth, William, 
Morris, Rebecca, Ann, Mason, Clarkson, Emily and Albert 
Fogg. Ann Mason Thompson, the wife of Joseph Thompson, 
departed this life in 1810, and in 1815 he married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Jeremiah and Sarah Powell. They lived together 
in conjugal felicity for more than thirty years. In the autumn 
of 1845 he was attacked with inflammation of the bowels, and 
after great suffering for upwards of two weeks, his strong con- 
stitution gave way and death ensued. He was in the seventy- 
first year of his age, and his death cast a gloom over a large 
circle of relatives, neighbors and acquaintances. He was kind 
and hospitable to the poor and needy, always ready to contrib- 
ute to their necessities, and in the latter part of his life he 
became greatly interested in pleading the cause of bondmen — 



332 WARE FAMILY. 



tlie bleeding slaves of our land. It can truly be said of him, — 
" Mark the perfect and upright man, for the end of that man 
" shall be peace, and assurance forever." His last wife was 
nearly thirteen 3'ears younger than himself, and left no issue. 
She departed this life in 1864:, being the possessor of talents of 
liigh order, and if her early education liad been attended to, few 
women in the country would have equaled her. She, like her 
Imsband, was kind and sympathetic in her feelings. Always 
ready to plead the cause of the oppressed, she was a co-worker 
with her two Friends, at Salem, Elizabeth and Abigail Goodmn, 
against the institution of slavery. 

John, the youngest son of Joseph and Elizabeth Ware, was 
born 3d of 3d month, 1720. He inherited the property from 
his father where Samuel C. Pancoast resides at the present time. 
He was a farmer and weaver. In 1750 he married Elizabeth, 
sister of Joseph Fogg, who was born about 1730. They had 
eight children, all of whom lived to grow up. They all married 
and had children. John, the eldest, born 16th of 7th month, 
1751, married Ruth, the daughter of James Tyler, and two 
children, Martha and Eleanor, were born to them. Milicent, 
the eldest daughter of John and Elizabeth Ware, born 12th of 
lOtli month, 1753, married Jolm Smith, the great-grandson of 
John Smith, of Amblebury. He owned and lived upon the 
ju'operty in Lower AUoways Creek township, now belonging to 
Jlobert Grier, which was part of the Smith allotment of 2,000 
acres. John Smith and his wife Milicent had one son, John, 
who subsequent}}^ married Mary, the daughter of Andrew Sin- 
nickson. They had two sons and two daughters, named respec- 
tively, Robert, Margaret, Thomas and Mary. Robert died in 
infancy. Thomas married Mary, the daughter of Morris and 
S.irah Hancock. Mar}^ married Oliver B. Stoughton, a native 
of Connecticut, who came to Salem in company with his friend, 
the late Calvin Belden, ujDwards of fifty years ago, and they 
commenced the hardware and tinning business together in that 
city. By industry and careful attention to business they each 
ac(|uired a competency, and became useful and respected citizens 
(if their adopted town and State. Oliver and his wife had 
several children. He died several years ago, but his widow is 
still living. Margaret, the eldest daughter of John and Mary 
Smith, married Edward G. Prescott, an eminent Episcopal 
clergyman. He was a native of Boston, Massachusetts, and a 
brother of William H. Prescott, one of America's favorite 
liistorians. I have been informed that Edward had symptoms 
of pulmonary consumption before he came to Salem. He was 



WARE FAMILY. 333 



a man of great acquirements in the way of learning, and 
possessed considerable oratorical powers. He l:)ore an enviable 
reputation as a Christian minister. His physicians recom- 
mended a sea voyage, thinking it would be the means of 
arresting the fatal disease lurking within him. He repaired to 
his native city to bid his aged father and family adieu. I have 
been told that within a few days after the vessel sailed he died 
and was buried at sea. I think he and his wife had no children. 
Margaret, his M'idow, was killed near the city of Burlington, 
together with several other passengers, at the terrible railroad 
disaster in 1856. Mary Sinnickson Smith, the widow of John 
Smith, is still living, l)eing more than ninety years of age. I 
think she is the oldest person living at this time in the city of 
Salem. 

David Ware, the second son of John and Elizabeth Ware, 
was born 5th of 4tli month, 1755. He commenced life on a 
farm that was left him by his father, of which James Baker is 
the present owner. His first wife was Sarah Oakford ; they 
liad one daughter — Sarah Ware. Her mother died when she 
was young. David Ware's second wife was Letitia, widow of 
William Craig. He owned and lived about two miles above 
Allowaystown, which is now known as Remster's Mill — it for- 
merly belonged to Richard Wistar. Letitia's maiden name was 
Morrison. She was an approved minister among Friends. David 
sold his farm at Alloways Creek soon after his second marriage, 
to his brother Jol) Wai-e, and purchased a farm near Grey's 
Ferry, Philadelpliia county, wliere he went ,with his family to 
reside. His dauglitei- Sarah AVare married. Aaron Ashbridge; 
they had three children — Anna, David and Sanuiel Howell Ash- 
bridge. Anna Ashbridge married John Firth, of Salem, son of 
John and Ann Firth. Jacob Ware, son of John and Elizabeth 
Ware, was born 28th of 11th month, 1759 ; he married Mary 
Carpenter in 1780, the daughter of William and Mary Carpenter. 

I think it would be right to digress to give the liistory of the 
Powell family, as they are closely connected with the Ware and 
Carpenter families by marriage. William and Jeremiah Powell, 
brothers, emigrated to America and settled in Philadelphia in 
1681:. William, the eldest, purchased of the proprietor a large 
tract of land on the west side of the Schuylkill river. West 
Philadelphia occupies part of the land that he purchased. He 
established a ferry where the present Market street bridge 
stands. [See Watson's Annals.] William's family after several 
generations was narrowed down to one individual, a widow. 
Her possessions were great and valuable. Tradition savs that 



334 WAKE FAMILY. 



a young man l)y the name of John Hare, a distant relative of 
her husband, lived with her. She gave him to understand that 
if lie would make application and have the name of Powell added 
to liis name, lie should be her heir. This being accordingly 
done, he become the owner of that large estate called Powell- 
ton. Jeremiah Powell, the younger brother of William, settled 
in this county. Whether lie was a married man when he came 
to Jersey I am not certain ; most probably he was. He was one 
of the contributors towards building the Friends' Meeting House 
which was erected in 1700 where the grave yard is now in the 
town of Salem. In that year he purchased a tract of land near 
Hancock's Bridge of John Maddox, formerly part of William 
Hancock's allotment, and leaving the town of Salem settled 
thereon. His son, Jeremiah Powell, was born at Alloways 
Creek, 18th of 3d month, 1701, and Samuel Powell, his second 
son, was born in 1704. I presume they were the only children 
he had, no others being mentioned in the records. 

Robert Ct. Johnson, in his history states that the Friends' 
meeting at Alloways Creek was established by the Powells and 
others — it was a mistake. The meeting was organized in 1684, 
several years before Jeremiah Powell was an inhabitant of the 
county of Salem. Jeremiah Powell, Jr., in 1735 married Jane 
Blanchard, the daughter of Philip and Mary Blanchard, who 
resided in the township of Alloways Creek. They had three 
children — Elizabeth, Mary and John Powell. Samuel Powell, 
the brother of Jeremiah, married before his brother and settled 
on the homstead farm in 1730. George Trenchard, Sr., was 
chosen an Assessor for the whole township of Alloways Creek, 
and William Tyler was the Collector. Samuel Powell was 
assessed for the Powell property. Samuel died a young man 
leaving no children. Elizabeth Powell, the eldest daughter of 
Jeremiah and Jane Powell, was born in 1736, and married 
Benjamin Smith, the grand-son of Daniel Smith. Benjamin 
and his Mdfe resided in the township of Mannington. They 
had three children — Joshua, Powell and Elizabeth. The last 
married John Smith, the son of Christopher Smith. They 
left one son — Samuel. Joshua Smith married a young women 
a native of Gloucester ; they left two or three children. Powell 
Smith married Sarah Am])lcr, daughter of Peter Ambler ; they 
had two children — Sarah and Isaac Smith. Mary Powell, 
daughter of Jeremiah and Jane Powell, was born I3th of 11th 
month, 1738 ; she married William Carpenter, a native of the 
State of Delaware, and grandson of Joshua Carpenter, of 
Philadelphia. His age is not definitely known, but I think he 



WAKE FAMILY. 335 



was several years older than his wife. They had four children 
— Mary, Powell, A¥illiam and Abigail. John, tlie son of 
Jeremiah and Jane Powell, was born in 1740, and became a 
farmer and weaver. When he was about twenty-three years of 
age he married Ann Dickinson, whose parents lived in Upper 
Alloways Creek township. John and his wife had one son, 
Jeremiah Powell, 3d, born in 1764, John Powell possessed a 
weak constitution, and died while young, leaving a young widow 
and an infant son. He was pious, of strict integrity, and pos- 
sessed more than ordinary abilities. Though young he fre- 
quently was called upon to settle difference among his neighbors. 
Like many persons in this country who have clear intellectual 
minds,he fell a victim to that scourge of mankind, the pulmonary 
consumption 

Jacob Ware and his wife Mary, had two children — Elizabeth 
and Millicent. The latter died young, and unmarried, Eliza- 
beth Ware married Samuel, the son of Benjamin and Mary 
Shourds. They had three children. William, the eldest, who 
died young; Mary and Thomas Shourds. Mary Shourds was 
born in the 1st month, 1804, and married William Bradway, 
the son of Ezra Bradway ; they liad six children — Elizabeth, 
Sarah, Mary, Anna, Rachel and Ellen Bradway. Jacob Ware's 
second wife was Sarah Thompson, daughter of Andrew and 
Grace Thompson, and grand-daughter of Samuel Nicholson. A 
short time after they were married they went and lived on her 
grandfather's property, in Lower Penn's Neck. Samuel Nichol- 
son in his will left his large and valuable estate in said toM'nship 
to Sarah Ware and Racliel Tindell, the wife of Benjamin Tin- 
dell, they being his grandchildren ; Sarah was to have her share 
during her life, and it then went to her oldest son, David Ware. 
She died several years before her husband, leaving three chil- 
dren — Sarah, David, and Samuel Ware. Jacob's third wife 
was Sarah Reed, the daughter of Robert Reed, who formerly 
was a resident of Pittsgrove township, and by her he had two 
children — Ann and Jacob Ware. After the death of her hus- 
band, Sarah Ware with her two children, removed to the State 
of Ohio, in company with her father, Robert Reed, Jacob 
Ware, her son, I believe, is still living near Columbus, Ohio, 
Sarah Ware, the daughter of Jacob Ware, married Samuel 
Hall, the son of Joseph Hall ; by him she had one son — Joseph 
Hall, who resides near Lockport, New York, Her second hus- 
band was John Vanculan, who owned and lived where William 
Cooper now resides ; they had four children — Eliza, Sarah, John 
and Samuel Yanculan. Her third husband was Sirge Ayres, a na- 



336 WAKE FAMILY 



tive of Cumberland county. They had one daughter — Emeline 
Ayres. DaWd Ware's wife was Kebecca Hall, daughter of 
Joseph and Ann Hall ; they had ten cliildren — Sarah, Ann, 
Samuel, Joseph, Mary, Charles, Emeline, John, David and Re- 
becca. Samuel Ware, son of Jacob and Sarah Ware, married 
Ann Fox, daughter of Jacob Fox. They had one son who re- 
moved West, and two daughters — Mary Jane and Annie. Both 
of them are deceased. 

Mary, the second daughter of John and Elizabeth Ware, was 
born in 1757, and married William Bradway, Jr.; they had 
five children — Sarah, Anna, Ezra, John and Rachel Bradway. 
Sarah, the eldest, married Elisha, the son of Joshua Stretch, 
and their children were Mary, Joshua, William, Ann and Job 
Stretch. Anna, daughter of William and Mary Bradway, 
married James Stewart ; they had two children — Hannah and 
Mary. Hannah died a young woman, unmarried. Mary mar- 
ried William, the son of William Griscom, Jr., and Ann 
Griscom. Their children were Hannah, who married Charles 
Marott, of Philadelphia ; William Wade Griscom, whose wife 
was Sarah Cooper, the daughter of James Cooper, who resided 
near Woodbury ; and James Griscom, w^ho married Hannah 
Borton, daughter of William Borton, of Woodstown. Samuel 
Fogg married Anna, the widow of James Stewart. By him 
she had one son, William Fogg, who married Mary Hall, the 
eldest daughter of Clement and Sarah Hall, of Elsinborough. 
William and his wife have resided in Salem for several years. 

Hannah, tlie third daughter of John and Elizabetli Ware, 
was born 17th of 1st month, 1761. She subsequently married 
her cousin, Edward Fogg. They had five children — Samuel, 
Elizabeth, Ebenezer, Edward and David. Samuel's first wife 
was Anna, the widow of James Stewart ; his second wife was 
Rebecca, the daughter of Joseph and Letitia Harmer, of Green- 
wich. Samuel and Rebecca Fogg had four children, named 
respectively — x\nn, Joseph, Rebecca and Caroline. Ann mar- 
ried Joseph Miller, Jr., of Greenwich, and had two chihiren — 
Joseph and Franklin. Josepli, the son of Samuel and Rebecca 
Fogg, married a yoimg woman at Shiloli. She was a member 
of the Seventh-day Baptist Society. Rebecca, tlie daughter of 
Samuel and Rebecca Fogg, married a young man by the name 
of Tomlinson, of Stoe Creek township, Cumberland county. 
Slie has been deceased many years. Caroline, daughter of Sam- 
uel and Rebecca Fogg, married Franklin Dare, son of James 
Dare, of Greenwich. Franklin lias lived in Bridgeton for a 
number of years, where he has followed the drug business. 



WARE FAMILY. 33T 



They have one son — Cliarles Dare, a physician })racticing in tlie 
village of Shiloh. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Edward and Hannah Fogg, died at 
middle age, unmarried. Ebenezer Fogg's wife was Abigail 
Hancock, the grand-daughter of William and Mary Powell Car- 
penter. I3y her he had one daughter — Eliza Fogg, whose 
tirst husband was Zaccheus Brown, Jr. Eliza, Ebenezer and 
Zaccheus were the names of their three children. Her second 
husband was Al^ner Penton, by whom she had three children — 
Abner, Albert and Rachel Penton. Eliza's third husband was 
Firraan Blew, who followed the sea in his younger days, but 
towards the latter part of his life he purchased a farm near 
Bridgeton, and at that place he and his wife in their declining- 
years lived together happily. They are botli deceased at the 
present time. Eliza, the eldest daugliter of Zaccheus and Eliza 
Brown, married Job Dixon. They live together at Hancock's 
Bridge, and have several children. El^enezer Brown married 
Milicent, the daughter of James Holliday, and they had two or 
three children. Edward Fogg, the third son of Edward and 
Hannah Fogg, married Catharine Hartley, by Avhom he had 
seven children — Mary, Casper, Thomas, Bichard, Edward, 
Charles and David Fogg. Mary Fogg, their daughter, married 
Joseph, the son of Joseph Brown. They have two children — 
Anna and Edward Brown. Anna married Thomas M. Shourds, 
and Edward's wife was Hannah, the daughter of James Butcher, 
Jr. Casper Fogg resides in New Orleans. He is married and 
has a family of children. Thomas Fogg died several years ago 
unmarried. Richard Fogg's wife was Mary Woolman, of Piles- 
grove ; they have several children. Edward Fogg married 
widow Hunt's daughter, who resided in the town of Salem ; she 
left one daughter. Edward's second wife is Mary Sayres, tlie 
daughter of Ephraini Sayres, of Cumberland county. Charles 
married Barbara Butcher, widow of James Butcher, Jr. David, 
the youngest son of Edward Fogg, married Sarah Green. Ed- 
ward Fogg, Sr.'s second wife was Sarah, daughter of Mark 
Stewart ; there was no issue. They are botli deceased at the 
present time. David, the youngest son of Edward and Hannah 
Fogg, married Henrietta Davis. They are both deceased at the 
present time, leaving no childi-en. 

Eliza, the eldest daughter of Zaccheus and Eliza Brown, mar- 
ried Job Dixon. They live near Hancock's Bridge, and have 
several children. Ebenezer Brown married Milicent, the 
daughter of James Holliday, and they had two or three chil- 
dren. Elizabeth, the daughter of John and Elizabeth "Ware, 
4o 



3o8 ^VAKE FAMILY. 



was born 2d of 3d month, 1763, and married AVilliam Carpen- 
ter, the son of AVilliam and Mary P. Carpenter. Slie was an 
uncommonly energetic woman, very zealons in attending reli- 
gions meetings, and was desirous that lier children might be eg 
trained as to l)e(iome useful and moral citizens in their day and 
generation. Her husband, a few years after they were married, 
upon an improving lease, rented a large farm of Samuel Nichol- 
son, Sr., in the township of Elsinborough, for a number of 
years. He was to l)ank and improve a large number of acres 
of meadow, now known as the Mason Point Meadow Company, 
that lay adjoining the upland. Upon that farm he and his wife 
ended their days. William and his wife had seven children — 
Samuel, Mary, Abigail, William, Elizabeth, Powell and Sarah 
Carpenter. Samuel Carpenter, their eldest son, married Mary, 
the daughter of James and Rebecca Mason, of Mannington. 
They had three or four children, three of whom were named 
William, Elizabeth and Rebecca Carpenter. Samuel and his 
wife removed West a short time after they were married. He 
is living at the present time, and is about ninety-two years of 
age. Mary Carpenter, the eldest daughter of William and 
Elizabeth Carpenter, married Thomas Hancock, of Elsinbor- 
ough. They had four children, three daughters and one son 
— Eliza, Lydia, Susan and Morris Hancock. The latter was 
accidentally killed, when a lad. Eliza married Joseph Tindall; 
Lydia's Imsband was George Bowen, of Salem. They did not 
live together many years. I believe she died with pulmonary 
consumption. Subsequently George married Susan Hancock, 
sister of his first wife. Mary's second husband was Samuel 
Cooper. They are both deceased at the present time, and leave 
no children. Abigail Carpenter, the daughter of William and 
Elizabeth Carpenter, married John Goodwin, of Elsinborough. 
Soon after their marriage tliey settled in the State of Ohio. 
She died comparatively young, leaving three sons — Lewis, 
William and Thomas GoodM'in. LeM'is, I think, is still living 
in one of the Western States ; William Goodwin is a wealthy 
citizen of Philadelphia ; Thomas Goodwin, the youngest son, 
died several years ago. William Carpenter was the second son 
of William and Elizabeth Carpenter. He married Mary Bees- 
ley, daughter of Abner and Mary Beesley, and had by her six 
children — Elizabeth, Powell, Anne, AVilliam B., Morris and 
John M. Carpenter. Elizabeth Carpenter married Joseph 
Thompson, the son of John and Esther Thompson ; they liave 
two children — Mary and John Thompson. Powell Carpenter's 
■wHe was Mary Lawson, the daughter of Jolm Lawson, of 



WAEE FAMILY. 339 



Salem. Powell fell to the pavement from near the eaves of a 
Baptist Clim-ch, whicli he was building, and died of congestion 
of the brain. He left no children. He was a kind and affec- 
tionate husband, a dutiful son, and his loss to his family and 
relatives was great. He had uncommon business capacities, 
and his death was considered a public calamity to the town of 
Salem. 

Anne, the daughter of William and Mary Carpenter, has been 
deceased several years ; she never married. She was afflicted 
many years previous to her death, but she bore all her suffer- 
ings with Christian fortitude, and when the time of her depart- 
ure from this life came she could say with sincerity, " Lord, thy 
servant is ready.'' William Beesley Carpenter, the second son 
of William and Mary Carpenter, married Martha Gaskill, the 
daugliter of Josiah and Eliza Gaskill, formerly of Burlington 
county. William and his wife had seven children — Howard, 
Mary, Elizabeth, William, Louisa, Anna, Martha and Bebecca 
Carpenter. Three of the before mentioned children, Howard, 
William and Bebecca, are deceased. The wife of William B. 
Carpenter died in 1868 of pulmonary consumption. She was 
a dutiful wife, an affectionate parent, and a great loss to her 
family. Her death was much regretted by a large circle of rel- 
atives and acquaintances. William's second wife is Nancy Pease, 
a native of Connecticut. They have two children — William and 
Julia Carpenter. Morris H. Carpenter is a resident of the city 
of Philadelphia, and is unmarried. Jolm Mason Carpenter, the 
youngest son of William and Mary Carpenter, married Ann 
Harvey, daughter of Minor and Lydia Harvey. Jolm and his 
wife live in Salem. They had two children — Powell who died 
young, and Geoi'ge Carpenter. 

Elizabeth Carpenter married William Thompson, son of 
Joshua Thompson. Their children I noticed in the Thompson 
family's genealogy. Powell, the son of William and Elizabeth 
Carpenter, resided the greater part of his life in Philadelphia. 
His iirst wife was Eliza Slaughter ; she died leaving one son, 
Charles Carpenter. His second wife was Ann Slaughter, sister 
of his Iirst wife. Their children were Ann, William and Caroline. 
Sarah, the youngest child of William and Elizabeth Carpenter, 
married Joseph Hancock, of Mannington. They had four chil- 
dren — Chambless, Elizabeth, Caroline and Hannah. 

Job Ware, the youngest son of John and Elizabeth Ware, 
was born 16th of 1st month, 1766. His iirst wife was Grace, 
the daughter of Andrew Thompson, of Elsinborough She 
died young, and left one son — John Ware. John married 



340 WARE FAMILY. 



IlrtTinali, the daughter of Clement Acton, of Salem. He died 
vonns:, leavino- one son — Clement Ware. Job Ware's second 
wife was the daughter of Christopher and Rebecca Hancock 
Smitli, of Mannington, who lived but a. short time, and left no 
children. His third wafe was Mary, the widow of Al)ner 
Beesley, by whom he had two children — Job and Eliza Ware. 
Job Wai-e, Jr., married Elizabeth Waddington; they are both 
deceased, leaving one daughter — Sarah Ellen Ware. Elijah 
AYare married Beulali Powell ; they have live children — Sarah, 
AVilliam, Mary, Anna and Charles. 

Sarah, the youngest daughter of John and Elizal)eth AVarc, 
was born 11th of 4th month, 1769. She was four years old at 
the time of her father's death, which occurred 2l8t of 2d 
month, 1773, when he was fifty years old. He was buried with 
his ancestors in the grave yard situated on the north side 
of Allowa^^s Creek. Sarah AVare married Jeremiah Powell, 
3d, in 1785. He was the son of John and Ann Powell. — 
Jeremiah and his wife lived on the property that he inherited 
from his father ; the said property lay adjoining tlie village of 
Hancock's Bridge, where their grandson, Jeremiah Powell, now 
owns and occupies. Jeremiah and his wife lived together more 
than fifty-seven years in great unity. He was above ordinary 
men in iutellect, and liad great argumentative powers. His 
wife was an agreeable companion to liim, industrious, frugal, 
and possessing a sympathetic natui'c. They had four cliikh'en 
wlio lived to maturity — Elizabeth, Ann, John and AA'illiam. 
Elizabeth was tlie second wife of Josepli Tiiompson. Ann 
married Samuel Griscom ; they had twelve children, whose 
names are given in the account of the Gi iscom family. 

John Powell married Rebecca, the daughter of John Mow- 
ers, of Upper AUoways Creek. Tliey had ten children — Sarah, 
Jeremiah, William, Joseph, Samuel, Jolm, Elias, Hicks, Eliza- 
beth and Rebecca. Eour of the al)Ove mentioned cliildren are 
dead — AVilliam, Joseph, Elizabeth and Rel)ecca. John Powell 
died in 1843 or 1844 in Elsinborough, with a cancer in his 
stomach. His widow, Rebecca Powell, died four or five years 
ago. Sarah, daughter of John and Rebecca Powell, married 
Chalkley Griscom, of Pennsylvania. There are several children 
from this union. Jeremiah Powell's wife was Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of AA^'illiam and Mary Bradway. They had four children — 
Sarah, Ann, Louisa and John. Joseph Powell married Eliza- 
beth, daughter of AVilliam and Mary Denn. He died young, 
leaving one son — Joseph Powell. Samuel Powell's wife is Sa- 
rah Jane, daughter of Josiah and Elizal)eth Smith. They have 



AVARE FAMILY, 341 



tliree children — one daugliter named Anna, and two sons, Sam- 
uel and Franklin. Tlie wife of John Powell, Jr., was Emma 
Sutton ; several children were born to them. Elizabeth Powell 
married Quinton Harris, She died young, and left one daugh- 
ter — Elizabeth Harris. Ann, tlie daughter of John Powell, 
married Waddington, the son of Jacob and Mercy Ridgway. 
They have five children — Lydia, John P., William, Henry and 
Edwin, 

William, the youngest son of Jeremiah and Sarah Powell, 
married Sarah, the daughter of Aaron and Hannah Fogg, 
The}^ had one daughter, Beulali Powell, who subseqnently 
mari'ied Elijah Ware, William died several j-ears since, but 
his widow is still living, and resides with her daugliter in the 
city of Salem. 



WADE FAMILY. 

Robert Wade was a citizen and carpenter of tlie city of 
London, He purchased of the proprietor of West New Jersey, 
before he left England, 500 acres of land, which was sur- 
veyed for him by Richard Hancock, in 1676, adjohiing his 
brother, Richard Wade's, and William Hancock's allotments 
of 1,000 acres each. The said lands lay on the south side 
of Monmouth river, also a lot in the town of Salem, on the 
north side of Market street. He never built on said lot, it 
being the same, I believe, that Alexander Grant purchased 
afterward and built himself a brick house on the premises, and 
there lived. Samuel Fenwick Hedge's wife was j .is daughter. 
Robert Wade sold his landed estate at Monmouth early in the 
year 1678 to James Denn and Joseph Ware. He then went 
to Upland, now known as Chester, and bought 500 acres 
of land on the south side of what is known as Chester creek, of 
one of the early Swedish settlers who had purchased a large 
tract of land of one of the Indian chiefs, some thirty years pre- 
vious to that date, and on that land he erected a large and com- 
modious house for the purpose of entertainment, and gave it 
the name of the Essex house. Some liistorians called it the 
emigrant's house. About tliat time there were several families 
of Friends, emigrants from England, that had bought lands in 
that neighborhood and settled tiiere. Robert fitted up part of 
his house for the purpose of holding meetings in, and in that 
house was the first regular Quaker or Friends meeting held in 
Pennsylvania. 

^Vhen AVilliam Penn on his first arrival in the Delaware river 
in 16S2, landed at Upland, (at that time it was a village of con- 
siderable size) Robert met him there at the landing. The pro- 
prietor turned to his intinuite friend Pierson, and asked : " What 
shall we name this place?" He replied, " Call it Chester, after 
my native county, Chestershire," William Penn and family 
were the guests of Robert Wade for a few days. Robert was 
likewise one of the members of the Provincial Assembly that 
the Governor convened for the purpose of organizing a provin- 



AVADE FAMILY. SiS 



cial government, and was a member of that Ijody for sevcra. 
years af terwai'ds. Respecting liis descendants I have no definite 
information, but I liave l)een told some of them are living in the 
neighborhood of Chester at tlie present day. 

Edward Wade was a cloth maker and citizen of London, and 
with his wife, Prudence, arrived in this country in 1675. He 
was one of the leading emigrants in Fenwick's colony, and pur- 
chased of the proprietor a town lot on Bridge street, now known 
as Market street, on the north side. Fenwick retained the land 
on the south side of said street for himself and his heirs. 
Edward Wade erected a brick house on his lot, and it was stand- 
ing about forty years ago. By tradition it was the first that 
was ever built on said street. Edward and his wife ended tiieir 
days at that place, which event took place before the beginning 
of the eighteenth century. There is no account that they ever 
had any sons, but they had one daughter — Mary Wade. 

In the year 1676, on the first 2d day in the 6th month, a few 
Friends met together to organize a meeting of business, it being 
the first of the kind held on Continent of North America. — 
The following is the minute of their organization " It is unan- 
" imously considered that the first 2d day of the week, in the 
" 6th month, that Friends do meet in the town of New Salem, 
" in Fenwick's Colon}^ ; and all Friends thereunto do monthly 
" meet together, to consider of outward circumstances and bus- 
" iness, and if such that has been convinced, and walked 
" disorderly, that they may in all gravity and uprightness to 
" God, and in tenderness of spirit and love to their souls, be 
" admonished, exhorted, and also reproved. And their evil 
" deeds and practices testified against in the wisdom of God, and 
" in the authority of truth, that may answer the witness of 
" God within them." Signed by John Fenwick, Edward Wade, 
Samuel Wade, Francis Nebo, Samuel Nicholson, Richard Guy, 
Edward Champney and Isaac Smart. 

Women at tlie first rise of the Society of Friends did not 
participate in meetings of business for more than a quarter of 
a century afterward. The early sons of the morning of the 
Quaker Society were not prepared to condemn what Jehovah 
had declared in the beginning, " that he had made man in his 
own image," but his evil deeds and practices. 

I have digressed somewhat to show that Edward Wade par- 
ticipated largely in religious as well as in the civil organization 
of Fenwick's Colony. It appears he always was a firm and 
steady friend of the proprietor, and was willing to make a due 
allowance for his foibles and the impetuosity of his disposition, 
believing his heart was right. 



344 MADE FAMILY. 



The brothers, Edward, Robert and Samuel Wade, were born 
in Northamptonshire, England. They emigrated to this prov- 
ince in company with John Eenwick. Samuel, the youngest, 
was born in 1645, and in the year 1668 he married Jane Smith, 
the daughter of Thomas Smith, of the same county. They had 
tlu'ce children born in England, named respectively Henry, 
Andrew and Ann, and one son born after tliey arrived in this 
country, Samuel Wade, Jr., who was born at Alloways Cretk 
in 1685. Their first three children died young. Edward Wade, 
Samuel's brother, gave him a deed for 100 acres of land, being 
part of his 1,000 acres of land that he purcliased of John Fen- 
wick. In the year 1680 Samuel and his family settled at Allo- 
ways Creek on his property, and in 1686 he built himself a one 
story brick house, it being one of the first of the kind built in 
South Jersey. Samuel and his wife died in the early part of 
the eighteenth centurj^, leaving one son, Samuel Wade, Jr., who 
nuirried and lived on his patrimonial estate until his death in 
1733. He left four daughters, his two sons, Joseph and Sam- 
nel, having died the year before their father. One of his 
daughters married James Barker, and they had one son, 
John Barker, whose occupation was that of a tailor. He 
resided in Philadelphia, and at the breaking out of the 
Revolutionary war joined the army, and was in a short time 
promoted to a colonel, and continued in the army until the 
war was ended. Soon after he was elected Mayor of the city 
of Philadelphia, he being the Republican candidate and Robert 
Wharton the Federal candidate. The contest for that office 
was kept np between these two men for many years. Barker 
was elected three or four different times, and Wharton also was 
elected to the oflice for several terms. 

Esther Wade, the third daughter of Samuel AV^ade, Jr., 
married Samuel Lewis, and she left one son — James Lewis. 
He followed his trade, which was that of a tailor, in the village 
of Hancock's Bridge. He left two children. Esther Lewis 
lived the greater part of her life with her nncle, John Barker, 
in Philadelphia, and after his death she came to Salem and 
taught school for several years. Solomon Lewis was a chair 
maker, and carried on that business several years in the town of 
Salem. He man-ied a young woman by the name of Brown 
in the county of Gloucester,and purchased a farm in that neigh- 
borhood and became a farmer. Some of his children are 
living there at the present time. Samuel's fourth daughter 
married John Tyler, of Cumberland county, and she left several 
children. 



AVADK FAMILY. 345 



John Stewart was born in Scotland in 1709. His parents 
belonged to the nobility of Edinburgh, and lie consequently 
received a liberal education. He left his native land in compa- 
ny with two other young men of the same standing in society, 
unknown to their parents. They arrived in West New Jersey 
in 1728. John Stewart at that time was about nineteen years 
of age. Soon afterwards he hired as a farm laborer witli 
George Abbott, Jr., in Elsinborough, and remained with him 
until he married Mary Wade, tlie eldest daughter of Samuel 
Wade, Jr. He by that time, it is believed, received some 
remittances from Scotland which enabled him to buy the three 
other shares of the homestead farm of the Wades. Accordingly 
he and his wife commenced life at that place, and both lived to 
be over four-score years. He raised anotlier story on the old 
brick house tliat Samuel Wade had built more than fifty years 
before. John Stewart having more education than was common 
for men to have at tliat time, was called on frequently to 
transact business for the public. The community had great 
confidence in his ability and integrity. He was also pleasing 
in his address and a good conversationalist. Tliat latter trait oi 
character was transmitted to his children and grand-children 
generally. He and his wife Mary had nine children — Elizabeth, 
Lydia, Samuel, John, Mary, Ann, James, Milicint and Joseph. 
I believe two of them, Ann and Milicint, died minors. Eliza- 
beth, the oldest, married a Bradway, which I mentioned in the 
genealogy of the Bradway Family. Lydia, their second daugh- 
ter, married a Duell of Pilesgrove, the grandmother of the 
present John and Samuel Duell of that place. 

Samuel Stewart married Ann Tyler, the daughter of William 
Tyler. He and his wife bought what is known as the Cow Neck 
farm, in the township of Salem, and at that place they spent 
their days. He was much esteemed in general society for his 
kindness and evenness of temper, and by reason of his clear and 
excellent judgment, he was frequently called upon to settle dif- 
ferences between persons in the neighborhood in which he lived. 
He likewise often served as commissioner in dividing lands in 
this and neighboring counties. It was in acting in that capacity, 
dividing the great estate of Benjamin B. Cooper, in the lower 
part of Cumberland county, that ho took a severe cold and died 
a short time afterwards, leaving four children — Ann, Mark, 
Mary and Joseph. Ann Stewart married William Griscom, and 
they had six children — Samuel, William, George, John, Charles 
and Mary Griscom. 

Mark Stewart's first wife and mother of his children was Eliz- 
44 



346 WADE FAMILY. 



abetli DenD, the daughter of James Demi. Their children's 
names were John, Samuel, Sarah, James, Joseph, William, Eliz- 
aljeth and Mary Ann Stewai't. 

Joseph Stewart's wife was Rachel Bradway, the daughter of 
AVilliam Bradway. John Stewart's wife was Hannah Butcher, 
of Cumberland. They left one son — James Stewart. Mary 
Stewart married Job Bacon, of Cumberland ; they had three 
children — Job, Elizabeth and George. James Stewart's first 
wife was a Sheppard. She liv^ed but a short time after marriage. 
His second wife was Mary Ballinger, wdiose parents resided near 
Woodbury. They had five children — James, Deborah, Beulah, 
Mary and Samuel. There were three men about of an age, 
natives of the township of Alloways, who were above ordinary 
men in intellect. Their names were Professor John Griscom, 
William Waddington and James Stewart, Jr. The latter fol- 
lowed the sea most of his life, and was considered an excellent 
navigator. He married Sarah Smith, and left five children — 
Ann, William, Mary, Sarah and James Stewart. 

The grandfather of the above mentioned children died with 
the cancer in his face about the year 1835. I went to see him 
a few days before his death. The old man was sitting up in 
his bedroom apparently comfortable and quite cheerful. In our 
conversation I remarked the room looked ancient, and he said 
it was, for his mother was born there and lived eighty-five years 
and died in the same room she was born in, and eighty-five years 
and a few days over, I was born in the same room and expect 
to die here in a short time, which he accordingly did. Joseph 
Stewart, the brother of James, was by trade a hatter, and fol- 
lowed that business in the town of Greenwich, where he died in 
the prime of his life of hemorrhage of the lungs. 



WADDINGTON FAMILY. 

"William Waddington was a French. Hugeunot, and emigrated 
to this country about 1690. He purchased of Edward Wade 
1,000 acres of land, it being the southern portion of his allot- 
ment, and settled thereon. The said property was held by one 
of the branches of the Waddington family until about ten years 
ago. William and his wife had one son, Jonathan Waddington, 
who subsequently married and had four or five daughters and 
one son — Jonathan, Hannah, Ann, Elizabeth and Jane Wad- 
dington. Hannah, tlie eldest daughter, married Maurice Bees- 
ley ; they had five children — Walker, Hannah, Mary, Benjamin 
and Abner Beesley. Walker, the eldest son, was killed at the 
massacre in the Revolutionary war at Hancock's Bridge. Han- 
nah, the daughter of Maurice and Hannah Beesley, married John 
Beesley, her cousin ; they had two sons — Walker and David 
Beesley. The latter died a young man, unmarried. Mary, the 
daughter of Maurice and Hannah W. Beesley, married Peter 
Townsend, of Cape May ; tliey had no issue. Benjamin, tlie 
son of Maurice and Hannah W. Beesley, died a young man. 
Abner, tlie youngest son of Maurice and Hannah Wad- 
dington Beesley, married Mary, tlie daughter of John and Su- 
sanna Mason, of Elsinborough ; they had issue — Mary, William, 
Benjamin and Thomas Beesley. [See Mason Family.] Ann 
Waddington, daughter of Jonathan Waddington, married in 
1750 John Baracliff. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Jonathan Waddington, married Ed- 
ward, the son of Jonathan Bradway, in 1760 ; they had four 
sons and two daughters — David, Hannah, Waddington, Edward, 
who died young, Adna and Elizabeth ; the latter married 
Abraim Silvers. Hannah Bradway, her sister, married Job 
Stretch ; they had issue, Jane, the youngest daugliter of Jona- 
than Waddington, married Bradway Keasbey, she being his 
second wife ; they had one daughter, Sarah Keasbey, who 
married John, the son of Edward and Hannah Pancoast. John 
and his wife Sarah K. Pancoast had six children — Hannah, 
John, Israel, Jane, David and Aaron Pancoast. 



348 WADDINGTON FAMILY. 



Jonathan Waddington, Jr., I think, married the grand-daugh- 
ter of John and Mary Chambless Hancock. He died in 1760, 
leaving an infant son — Jonathan Waddington, 3d. He was 
tlie only one at the death of his father that bore the name of 
Waddington in this country, and he subsequently married 
Sarah, the daughter of Aaron Bradway, of Elsinborough. 
Jonathan and Sarah B. "Waddington had six sons — William, 
Robert, Aaron, Jonathan, Thomas and Edward Waddington. 
William, their eldest son, married Martha, tlie daughter of 
Jesse Carll ; they liad six cliildren — Anna, Sarali, William, 
Martha, Hannah and Jesse Waddington. Kobert, second son 
of Jonathan and Sarah Waddington, married, and died a young 
]nan, leaving three sons — Aaron, Samuel and James Wadding- 
ton. Aaron, the son of Jonathan Waddington, 3d, married 
Sarali, the daughter of Edward Keasbey ; they have three 
daugliters and two sons — Sarah Ann, Lydia, Joshua, Bradway 
and Jane Waddington. Jonathan, the son of Jonathan and 
Sarah Waddington, died unmarried. Tliomas, son of the 
])efore mentioned parents, was twice married. By his first wife 
lie had five children — Elizabeth, Sarah, Mary, Jonathan and 
Thomas Waddington, and his second wife was Hannah Davis ; 
there were two children — Beulah and Jane Waddington. 
Edward, the youngest son of Jonathan and Sarah Bradway 
Waddington, married Prudence, the daughter of Edward and 
Lydia Keasbey; they had eight children — Richard, Sarah, 
Edward, Prudence, Elizabeth, Joseph, Lydia Ann and Prudence 
Waddington. 



WHITACAR FAMILY. 

The Whitacars are an ancient English family. Kicliard, the 
ancestor of the Whitacars in West Jersey, was a native of Lon- 
don. By tradition, he came to America at the time of the 
plague, in 1665, or in the following year, after the great fire. 
The record of the family in England is supposed to have passed 
into the hands of otiier branches. About a hundred years ago, 
an Englislnnan who was traveling in this country told a inem- 
ber of the WJiitacar family that he knew a place in England 
called Whitacarstield, which was doubtless the family property. 
The early Wliitacars were very particular about the spelling of 
their names, this liaving been enjoined upon them b}' liichard, 
the emigrant, who stated that there were landed estates in Eng- 
land belonging to the AVhitacars, which they might inherit at 
some time were they careful to keep up tlieir record and the 
olden way of spelling their nan:ies. In latter years, however, 
the last syllable was changed from " car" to " ker," and it is 
now generally spelled AVhitaker. 

I have no doubt, if their tradition is correct, that Richard 
landed in Maryland, and in company with some others entered 
the Delaware bay in a small vessel, and ascended up the river 
as far as Billingspoi't, he being the first of the company that 
reached the shore, and was therefore tlie first Englishman that 
set foot on AVest New Jersey. He sprang on shore, and with 
a hatchet cut down a bush, according to the uiicient mode of 
taking possession, in the name of King Charles II. He doubt- 
less remained in America but a short time before lie returned 
to England. It is probable that soon after his I'cturn he became 
a member of the Society of Friends. When Fenwick was fitting- 
out his expedition to West New Jersey, together with a innnber 
of emigrants who had previously bought land of him, I find 
Richard Whitacar was one of the number. William Hancock, 
of the county of Middlesex, purchased 1,000 acres and one build- 
ing lot of 1 6 acres in the town that the proprietor should lay 
out when he arrived in West Jersey ; the said Hancock ap- 
pointed his friend Richard Whitacar his Attorney until he came 



350 WHIT AC AK FAMILY. 



to take charge of it, which he accordingly did in 1677. The 
power of Attorney reads : " Be it known nnto all men by these 
" presents, tliat I, William Hancock, of the parisli of St. Len- 
" ard, Shoreditch, comity of Middlesex, to Richard Whitacar, 
" of ye city of London, to be my lawful Attorney, deputy for 
" me, in my name, for all my lott or lotts of land situate, lying and 
" being in New Jersey, or Nova Csessaria, America in ye parts. 
" And I the said William Hancock, shall and will ratify, allow, 
" confirm all and whatsoever my said Attorney or his substitutes 
" shall lawfully do or cause to be done in or about the Premises, 
" by virtue of these presents. In witness whereof, I, the said 
'• William Hancock, have hereunto sett my hand and seal the 
" sixth day of July, Anno Domini, 1675. And in ye 27th year 
"of Reign of our Sovereign Lord. King Charles ye second, 
" over England. William Hancock. Sealed and delivered in 
" ye presence of ns, Thomas Sramodmo and William Johnson, 
" Esq., Notary Public." It is said that tliis paper was executed 
the day previous to the sailing of the ship Griffin, which is a 
further confirmation that John Smith and Samuel Nicholson 
were correct in stating that the ship anchored opposite Elsin- 
borough Point 23d of 9th month, 1675, that making them two 
months and sixteen days on the passage. 

The power of Attorney, and a black morocco book in which 
Richard Whitacar carried it over the sea, is still in the possession 
of the family, which I have no doubt they highly prize. — 
Richard Whitacar was made one of Fenwick's Council of Pro- 
prietors to govern West Jersey, whicli office he held from 1676 
to 1702, at which time the Colonial Government was formed. 
He resided most of his time in the town of Salem until about 
1690. On 17th of 1st month, 1679, he and Elizabeth Adkin 
of Alloways Creek, were married in Salem at Friends' Meeting, 
in the old log meeting house on the Nicholson lot. In 1690 
he and his wife moved to the South Cohansic precinct, where 
about that time there was a considerable emigration from parts 
of New England and East Jersey, and at that place he located 
on a large tract of land not far from New Englandtown, and 
there they settled. The land lay in Fairfield township. — 
Richard, soon after he settled in the township, built himself a 
substantial brick dwelling. This property, I have been inform- 
ed, belonged to the family until after the old French war. — 
The house was taken down some ten years ago ; the piles of old 
bricks were to be seen in various places in 1873 — all that 
remained of the old Whitacar mansion. 

Richard Whitacar and Henry Buck kept a store for several 



WHITACAR FAMILY. 351 



years near Kew England town, where they owned a large sloop 
and traded with New York and Boston. The firm doubtless 
transacted a great deal of business, this being tlie only store of 
any importance in that region. The place where the present 
thriving city of Bridgeton is now was then a wilderness. The 
old store book of the lirm is still in possession of the family. 
The writer had an opportunity of looking through it some time 
since, and it is particularly interesting to the antiquarian, giving 
as it does a knowledge of the names of many of the early inhab- 
itants of that section of Cumberland county which otherwise 
probably would liave been lost. The first entry in the book is 
dated October 9th, 1704, and in the page before is written, 
" We sailed from Boston September 18th, 1704." It appears 
by the day book that they kept dry goods, groceries, ready-made 
clothing, liquors and books, particularly scliool books, bibles and 
psalm books, and farming implements. Richard Whitacar 
and his partner, Henry Buck, did considerable public 
business, as their names frequently appear in the Court 
minutes to be seen in the Salem Clerk's Office, beginning 
with 1706, but after 1709 Richard's name is missing. He 
doubtless died the following winter, and is thought to have 
been about sixty-six jears of age. Henry Biick died about 
1726. Richard Whitacar left a number of children. One of 
his sons, Richard, married and liad issue ; his oldest cliild was 
Nathaniel, whose descendants are given. Of the otlier children 
of Richard, Sr., and Elizabeth Whitacar and their branches it 
is impossible to speak of with certainty. One of their daugh- 
ters, however, probably married Samuel Alexander, of Fairfield. 
Their daughters were merged into other families, but there 
have always been sons enough to keep up the name. They are 
scattered over the country, and it would be no easy task to 
collect their genealogies. Silas Whitacar, one of the celebrated 
party who burned the tea at Greenwich 22d of 12th month, 
1774, was a descendant of Richard. 

Although Richard Whitacar, Sr., and his wife, Elizabeth 
Adkin Whitacar, and their children when young, were mem- 
bers of the Society of Friends, most of their descendants at the 
present time are Presbyterians. Nathaniel Whitacar, son of 
Richard, Jr., married Mary Ann Dixon, I8th of 11th month, 
1729. Their children were Ambrose, Lemuel (who died young,) 
Lewis W., who married but died at an early age, leaving tlu'ee 
children, whose names were Lydia, Lemuel and Lewis. Lydia 
married her cousin, Nathaniel Whitacar ; Lemuel settled near 
Muskingum, in Ohio, and died there, leavmg several children, 



352 WHirACAR FAMILY. 



being about eighty years of age at the time of his death. Lewis 
settled at Muskingum, Ohio ; from thence to Henepin, Illinois, 
and died there leaving several children. One of his children, 
John Whitacar, was one of the framers of the Constitution of 
Illinois, in 1818. Mary, the wife of Nathaniel Whitacar, died 
13th of 9th month, 1738, Nathaniel's second wife was Ruth 
Buck ; their children were Sarah, who died unmarried about 
1808 ; Hannali, their second daughter, married Ephraim Foster; 
Daniel Wliitacar, their son, died a single man; Ruth, the young- 
est daughter, married Josiah Harris, by whom she had two sons — 
Enos and John Harris ; Josiah died. Ruth's second husband 
was a Davis, by whom she had two children, one of wliom was 
named Sarah, wlio married a young man by the name of Mench ; 
they settled at Cincinnati, Ohio. Nathaniel Whitacar died in 
12th month, 1752, aged about fifty-eight years. 

Ambrose Whitacar, the eldest son of Nathaniel, married 
Freelove Stratton 16th of 1st month, 1755; tlie children were 
Freelove, Mary, Nathaniel, Abigail and Catharine. Freelove, 
wife of Ambrose Whitacar, died in her thirty-third year. On 
the 10th of I2th month, 1766, Ambrose married Ruth Harris, 
by whom he had the following children — David, Hannah and 
Lewis. Ruth died, 5th of 10th month, 1772, in her thirty-ninth 
year. Ambrose married his third wife, Rachel Leake; their 
children were Recompence, Oliver, Freelove, Isaac, Sarah and 
Leake. The last named married Dr. Robert H. YanMeter. 
[See YanMeter Family.] Ambrose Whitacar departed this life 
5th of 11th montli, 1796, in the sixty-sixth year of his age. 
Rachel, his last wife, died 30th of 1st month, 1823, in her eigh- 
tieth year ; both are buried in the same grave in the Presbyte- 
rian church yard at Daretown. 

Freelove, daughter of Ambrose and Freelove Whitacar, mar- 
ried, when young, Butler Thompson ; she died while young, 
leaving one daughter, Mary Thompson, who subsequently mar- 
ried Thomas Sheppard, by whom she had four children — Lydia, 
Sarah, Ann and Mark. Lydia Sheppard married Evi Smith, 
son of David Smitli, of Mannington ; they had three children — 
Charles, Mary and Hannah. Mary married David, the son of 
Elisha and Mary Bassett. Hannah married Edward H. Bas- 
sett; Hannah is deceased. Charles, the son of Evi and Lydia 
Smith, married and resided in Philadelphia ; he is deceased and 
left issue, two sons. Sarah, daughter of Thomas and Mary 
Sheppard, married Anthony Taylor ; they Jiad six children — 
Mary, Sheppard, Samuel, Joseph, Anthony and Sarah. Mark, 
the son of Thomas and Mary Sheppard, married Patience 



AVHITACAB FAMIL,r. 353 



Buzby ; tlieir children were Joseph, John, Lydia and Marj 
Sheppard. Ann, the dauo;hter of Thomas and Mary Sheppard, 
married Joseph Harmer, of Greenwich ; they had six cliildren 
— Mark, Ruth, Sarah, Richard, Elwood and Letitia Harmer. 
The second husband of Mary, tlie widow of Thomas Sheppard, 
was Samuel Silvers ; tliey had one son, Thomas Silvers, who 
resides in the city of New York. He married Anna V. Bird, 
of Philadelphia ; they have three children — Helena, Isabel and 
Melbourne Silvers. Thomas is quite an inventive genius ; his 
most noted invention is the steam governor. His family resides 
in the city of New York, but he himself spends most of his time 
in London. Mary's third husband was William White, of 
Woodstown ; he died many years before her. After his death 
she resided at Greenwich with lier relatives, but died at Woods- 
town over four-score years of age. Mary, daughter of Ambrose 
and Freelove WJiitacar, married. Jedediah Ogden, in 1783 ; 
they had live children — Isaac, Ambrose, Jedediah, Ruth, Nevo 
and Daniel. Isaac Ambrose Ogden is a Presbyterian minister, 
settled in Ohio, and has several children. Jedediah and Daniel 
Ogden settled near Fairfield, Indiana, and have several children. 
Ruth Ogden married Obediah Bennett, and in 1854 was a 
widow with children. Neve Ogden died, leaxdng children. 
Nathaniel, son of Ambrose and Freelove Whitacar, married 
his cousin Lydia, in 1784- ; they had five children — Jael, Ruel, 
Anna, Natlianiel and Lydia. Jael and Nathaniel settled near 
Henepin, Illinois. Ruel married and had a number of children, 
among whom are Abigail, Clara, Ephar and Harriet. Abigail 
died unmarried. Clara has been twice married ; her first hus- 
band was a Harris, and her second husband is Judge Whitacar, 
of Fairton. Ephar is a Presbyterian minister, settled in South- 
liold. Long Island, and has several children. Harriet married 
Professor Clark, of Tjnnessee. Anna Whitacar married Pres- 
cott Bishop. Lydia married James Craig, and settled near tLe 
home of her ancestors in Cumberland county. 

Abigail, daughter of Ambrose and Freelove Whitacar, mar- 
ried Jeffrey Parvin, in 1785, and died in 1794, leaving two 
cliildren — Sarah and Abigail Parvin. Sarah married Daniel 
Simkins and died, leaving three children. Abigail married 
Moses Riley and was left a widow with two children. Catha- 
rine, daughter of Ambrose and Freelove Whitacar, married 
Joshua Reeve, of Bridgeton, in 1782 and died in 1796, in her 
thirty-fourtli year, leaving several children ; their names were 
Samuel, Elizabeth, Joshua, Thomas, Catharine, Harriet and 
Maria. Samuel, tlie eldest, died young ; Elizabeth maj-ried 
45 



354 AVHITACAR FAMILY. 



George Johnson, settled in Fhiladclphia and died in 1848, 
leavinii: children ; Joshna enlisted in the army and died ; Thomas 
married Eunice Bishop and died near Cincinnati, Oliio, in 
1838, leaving six children — Daniel, Charles B., Caroline, Mary, 
John B. and Horace. Catharine, the dangliter of Joshua and 
Catharine ^V. Reeve, married Benjamin Forljes and died, leaving 
several children ; Harriet married David ilnsted ; Maria mar- 
ried Vickers Harris ttnd was left a widow in 1853. 

David, son of Ambrose Whitaker, by his second wife Rutli, 
married Catharine DuBois in 1788, and died 29th of 7th montli, 
1807, aged forty years. They had six children — Peter, Ruth, 
Elizabeth, Lewis, David and Rebecca. Peter married Nancy 
Riley. Their children were Lorenzo, Lucius, William, Louisa 
and James Lambert. Lorenzo, the eldest son, married Sarah 
Cake; died and left two children — Lucius and Anna AVhitaker. 
Lucius Whitaker married Ruth Nixon. There were three chil- 
dren. William died unmarried. Louisa Whitaker married Wil- 
liam Cole, of Woodstown ; he is now deceased. They had two 
children — Annie and William Cole. James Lambert Whitaker 
married Fannie Reeves, and settled in Bridgeton. He died 8tli 
month, 1875, leaving one child. Ruth, daughter of David and 
Catharine DuBois Whitaker, married David YanMeter ; botli of 
them are deceased leaving children — Isaac W., David, Phebe 
and Enoch YanMeter. Elizabeth Whitaker, daughter of David, 
married Isaac Mayhew; both are deceased, leaving children. 
Lewis and David Whitaker, sons of David, settled near Logans- 
port, Indiana. Rebecca, the youngest daughter of David, mar- 
ried Joseph Heward. They also settled at Logansport. 

Hannah, the daughter of Ambrose and Ruth Whitaker, mar- 
ried Ephraim Foster, by wdiom she had the following cliildren — 
David, Ephraim, Nathaniel, Jonathan, Jeremiah, Phebe, Rutli, 
Hannah, Elizabeth and Esther Foster. Phebe Foster married 
Hosea Sneathen, and died without issue. Jonathan Foster died 
a young man, unmarried. Ruth Foster married Samuel Thomp- 
son, and died, leaving several children. Their names were 
Sanuiel, Newcomb, Phebe, Harriet an<l Elizal^eth Thompson. 
Hannah, daughter of Ephraim and Hannah Foster, married 
John McQueen. She died in 1854, at an advanced age. Their 
children wei-e Ephraim, Rel)ecca, Elizabeth, Sarali and Hannah. 
Rebecca married Jonatlian Swing, of Pittsgrove. They had 
several children. Elizabeth McQueen married John Garrison ; 
tliey lived near Deeriicld. Elizabeth died leaving one child. 
Hannah married Benjamin YanMeter. There were several chil- 
dren by this union. Sarah McQueen never married. Elizabctli, 



WHIT AGAR FAMILY. 355 



the daughter of Ephraim and Hannali Foster, married Matthew 
Newkirk, of Pittsgrove, (Newkirk's station) ; being his second 
wife. She had children — Matthew, Nathaniel and Mary New- 
kirk. Matthew married and died young, leaving one son, Mat- 
thew, who married and resides in Ohio. Nathaniel, son of Mat- 
thew and Elizabeth Newkirk, was a physician, and married 
Martha, daughter of John and Ann Bacon, of Greenwich, Cum- 
berland county. He died at Bridgeton, leaving issue. Mary 
Newkirk, daughter of Matthew, is living, unmarried. Elizabeth, 
widow of Matthew Newkirk, married Samuel Thompson. She 
died at Bridgeton, leaving no issue by her last husband. Esther 
Foster married Ethan Osborne ; he was an eminent Presbyterian 
minister, of Fairfield church. Slie was his second wife, and 
died without issue. 

Lewis, son of Ambrose and Ruth Whitaker, was married to 
Mary DuBois,in 1797, and died 1st of 10th month, 1828, in his 
iifty-eighth year. Their children were Ambrose, Hannah and 
John Whitaker. Ambrose is unmarried, and lives near Swing's 
Corner, in Pittsgrove. Hannah Wliitaker married Benjamin 
Burroughs. They settled near Cincinnati, Ohio, and left chil- 
dren. John Whitaker married and died at Pittsgrove, leaving 
issue. Lewis Whitaker was married the second time, and had 
issue — Mary, Nathaniel, Benjamin B. and Ruth Whitaker. 
Mary, daughter of Lewis Wliitaker, married John G. Sweat- 
man, and died in 1851, at Watson's Corner, leaving no children. 
Nathaniel Whitaker married and died in Pittsgrove. Benjamin 
B. Whitaker is unmari-ied. Ruth married John Alounce, they 
have no children. 

Recompence, son of Aml)rose and Rachel Whitaker, (Rachel 
was his third wife,) married Rachel Moore Gth of 3d month, 
1800, and died in his thirty-sixth year, leaving live children. 
, Their names were Al)igail, Enoch, Hannah, Caroline and Racliel 
Leake Whitaker. Abigail, daughter of Recompence AVhitakei-, 
married Buckly Carll, a Presbyterian minister. Her husband 
is deceased, and buried at Daretown. Abigail is still living. 
Hannah Whitaker, daughter of Recompence, married George 
Hires ; she is still living, having no children. The other chil- 
dren of Recompence Whitaker died young. 

Oliver, son of Ambrose and Rachel Whitaker, married Mary 
Summerill, 2d of 2d month, 1799. The children l)y this mar- 
riage were Rhoda, Summerill, Rachel, Rutli and William. 
Rhoda married William Biggs, of Cincinnati. They have a 
large family of children. Summerill married early in life, and 
went to the State of Illinois. Rachel Whitaker married Jacob 



350 ^VHITACAR FAMILY. 



Jolms ; tliey reside in Iowa, and have issue. Ruth married 
William Yillers, near Cincinnati ; they have a large family of 
children. William is deceasd, leaving no issue. Mary Sum- 
merill, wife of Oliver Wiiitaker, died aged twenty-four years, 
and in 1807 Oliver married Elizabeth Kirby. Their children 
were Ambrose, Phebe, Oliver, Ephraim K., Joseph and Mary 
Jane Wliitaker. Phebo, daughter of Oliver, married James 
Buck, by whom she had one child — Sarah Elizabeth Buck. 
Oliver Whitaker married Hannah R. Hollingsworth ; their 
children were Isaac, Martha, Ann, Sarah Jane, Mary, Elizabeth, 
Joseph B., Charles II., William A., and Abraham WJiitaker. 
Ephraim K. Whitaker married Mar}' Vanderoot ; their children 
were Bhebe, Sarah Elizabeth and Isaac Newton. Joseph 
Whitaker married Rebecca McBriant ; the .* had four children — 
Mary L., William Oliver, Ephraim X. and Elizabetli Ann. 
Mary Jane died in childhood. Oliver Whitaker, Sr., soon after 
his marriage with Mary Summerill, settled in Clinton county, 
Ohio. His descendants are numerous, and scattered through 
the AVest. He di(?d lltli of Pitli month, 1831, aged about 
fifty-six years. 

Freelove, daughter of Ambrose and Rachel Whitacar, mar- 
ried David I)ui3ois, 23d of 4th month, 1804. Their children 
are as follows : Henrietta, Jonathan, Jedediah, Edmund, Asher, 
Janetta and I)a\id DuBois. Henrietta DuBois married James 
Coombs, of Upper Pittsgrove. They had issue — Mary Ann, 
Albert, Edwin, Jane, Oliver, Isabella and Henry Coombs. 
Albei't, Jane and Isabella are deceased. Jonathan DuBois 
inari-ied Martha Adcock ; he died, leaving two sons — Henry 
and (xoorge DaB jis. Jedediah DuBois marriad Ann Adcock, 
and died, leaving three sons. E(hnund DuBois married Sarah 

Johnson; there are children. Asher DuBois married 

Swing, and died, leaving children. Janetta DuBois married 
Edward Shute, and died leaving issue. David DuBois married 
a daughter of Adam YanMeter, they had one daughter. David 
DuBois, Sr,, died in 5th month, 1837 ; Freelove, his wife, died 
in 1st month, 1842, aged sixty-four years. Both are buried in 
the old church yard at DaretowH. Isaac, the son of Ambrose 
and Rachel Whitacar, married Ann, daughter of Jonathan 
Fithian, of Deerfield, 10th of 3d month, 1814; they had twelve 
children — Isaac, Ann, Mary, Sarah, Caroline, Oliver, Enoch, 
Charles, Eliza, James, Lydia and Lewis Whitacar. Isaac, son 
of Isaac and Ann AVhitacar, settled in Carlinville, Illinois, 
about 1840. He married there Virginia B. Bement, formerly 
of New York. He was known as Captain AYliitacar. His 



H-fjlTACAR FAMILY. 357 



wife died leaving six cliildren — Mury Ellen, Harriet B., Edna 
Caroline, Virginia, Charles and Clara Wliitacar. Mary Ellen, 
married Victor Iloyt. Harriet B. married James Gand. Ann 
married Jacob Webb ; they had five children — Harriet, Alexan- 
der, Charles, Isaac W. and George Smith ; two snrvive, 
Alexander and George ; l)otli of whom are married and have 
children. Ann and husband arc deceased. Mary married 
Edward Burton, of Bunker Hill, Illinois ; they have one child, 
named Joseph. Sarah AYhitacar, daughter of Isaac, Sr., mar- 
ried Daniel Smith ; she died in her forty-second year, leaving 
the following children — Anna B., Elizabeth L., Caroline W. 
and Franklin Smitli, Anna B. and Franklin are the only sur- 
viving ones. Caroline, fourth daugliter of Isaac and Ann 
Wliitacar, married Edward VanMcter, of Salem. [See Van- 
Meter Family.] 

Oliver, son of Isaac and Ann Wliitacar, married Sa ah 
A. Fisher ; they had one child — Mary Wliitacar. Enoch 
Whitacar married Ruth Diamond ; they had tliree children — 
Lewis, Edward V. and Kicliard W. Whitacar. Charles, son of 
Isaac and Ann AYhitacar, died in his nineteentli year. Eliza 
died in infancy. James Whitacar, son of Isaac and Ann, mar- 
ried Louisa Iszard ; they had five children — Joseph, Frank, 
Louisa, Charles and Coleman AVhitacar. Lydia AYhitacar, 
married Jonathan D. Ayres. Their surviving cliildren are as 
follows : Harriet W., Robert S., Caroline V. and Florence 
Ayres. Lewis, the youngest son of Isaac and Ann Wliitacar, 
married Mary Elizabeth Shove ; they have four cliildren living 
— Harriet, Anna, Elizabeth and Lewis Whitacar. 

Isaac, son of Ambrose and Rachel Whitacar, wiicn lie was 
about eighteen years of age, attended scliool at Woodl)ury, New 
Jersey. Among his classmates was James Lawrence, afterwards 
Captain James Lawrence, of the Chesapeake, wliose dying- 
words, " Don't give up the ship !" liav^e often been quoted. When 
Lawrence received his commission he tried to induce Isaac Whit- 
acar, with whom he was very intimate, to accontj^any liini on 
liis vessel, promising to get him a commission also, but Isaac 
knowing his mother would never consent to such a thing, de- 
clined, although very anxious to go. As a keepsake, James 
Lawrence drew on a piece of paper, a ship in fnll sail, and pre- 
sented it, before leaving school, to Isaac Whitacar, his cliosen 
friend. This is now in possession of the family, and is highly 
prized by them. 

Isaac Whitacar, Sr., departed this life 23d of 2d month, 1857, 
in his seventy-eighth year, Ann, his wife, died 23d of 4th 



358 WIIITAOAR FAMILY. 



month, 1855, in her sixty-third year. Both arc buried in the 
Presbyterian cluirch yard at Deerficld. Most of their family 
are living at the present time in Illinois. 



WYATT FAMILY. 

Bartholomew Wyatt emigrated to this county about tlie year 
1690. I believe he came from the county of Worcestershire, 
England. Soon after liis arrival he purchased 1200 acres of 
land in Mannington, of Jolm Fenwick's heirs. The said land 
was bounded on the east by James Sherron's land. The first 
house he built on his property was a log house of considerable 
size, as I was told by Samuel Austin, who was considered in his 
time as the most correct antiquarian in that part of the county. 
The said house stood upon the point of land near the meadow, 
not far from a small creek, (called Puddle Dock), nearly half a 
mile from where, a few years later, he built himself a large 
brick house, it being not far from Mannington creek, which was 
navigable at that time. He was a prominent man in his time 
in the civil affairs of the Colony, frequently serving as a Grand 
Juror, as the records of the Court show ; also an active mem- 
ber of the Society of Friends, and was one of the largest con- 
tributors to the fund for the erection of the Friends' brick 
meeting house in the present graveyard in Salem. He and his 
wife, Sarah Wyatt had two clnldreu — Bartholomew, who was 
born 4:th of 1st month, 1697, and Elizabeth who was born in 
1706. There is no mention in the records of the county, or of 
the meeting's records later than the year 1728 ; therefore I pre- 
sume he died somewhere near that period. His son Bartholo- 
mew inherited all his father's real estate. He married about 
the year 1730, Elizabeth Tomlinson, who was born in 1706. He 
and his wife Elizabeth resided in Mannington during their lives, 
and in the year 1731 their son Bartholomew Wyatt, 3d, was 
l>orn. Their daughter Sarah Wyatt was born in the year 1733, 
and subsequently became the wife of Richard Wistar, of Phila- 
delphia. Bartholomew Wyatt, Jr., the father of the before 
mentioned children, lived what was considered at that time 
quite aged. He died in 1770, aged seventy-two years ; his wife 
liad been deceased many years before. It is probable that the 
disease with wliich most of the AYyatts and several of the V^h- 



360 WYATT FAMILY. 



tar family died witli (being pulmonary consumption), was hered- 
itary ill his wife's family. 

Bartholomew Wyatt, 3d, in physical appearance, I have been 
informed by persons that knew him, was tall, and remarkably 
pleasing in his address. He was considered one of the best 
English scholars, at tlie time in wliich he lived, in the county of 
Salem. The late Casper Wistar, when young, it is said, looked 
very much like his great-uncle as to his size and the features of 
his face. His company was very much sought after ; and being 
of a benevolent turn of mind, he gave largely to the poor and 
needy ; and when the Society of Friends at Salem and vicinity 
thought it would be a benefit to them to build a larger meeting 
house, he was tlie largest contributor, excepting Samuel Nichol- 
son, of Elsinborough. Bartholomew died in the prime of his 
life, at the age of tifty years, leaving one daughter, Elizabeth, 
who, a short time before her father's death, had married Wil- 
liam Carpenter, the son of Prescott Carpenter. William and 
his wife Elizabeth had two children — Mary and Hannah. The 
last named child died in infancy. Elizabeth Car])enter, their 
mother, died before she arrived at middle age. Mary Carpen- 
ter, their daughter, afterwards married James Hunt, a son of 
John Hunt, of Darby, Pennsylvania. I believe she left three 
daughters and two sons, and they disposed of the greater part 
of the real estate of their ancestors in Mannington, to Andrew 
Thompson, of Elsinborough. 

Casper Wistar was the first of that name in this country. 
He emigrated to the province of Pennsylvania hi the year 1717, 
and as Watson states, was naturalized in 1722 as a citizen of the 
province of Pennsylvania. His native place was Germany. It 
appears he had three children — Richard, Casper and Sarah 
Wistar, and was by trade a button maker. As soon as he had 
sufficient funds by working by day's work at any employment he 
found to do, he commenced business at his trade in manufactur- 
ing buttons. They were small brass buttons, being nearly 
round, and were used on short clothes whic^h were the common 
wear at that time, and they were much sought after and readily 
sold at renumerative prices. He would invest his money in 
lands within tlie city limits, and as the town incrett^ed in size 
the property became valual^le, consequently his heirs became 
wealthy by the increased value of property. 

Casper Wistar, Jr., I have bten informed, only left one 
daughter, Elizabeth Wistar, who became the wife of Abram 
Sliarpless, of Chester county, Pennsylvania. She and her hus- 
band resided near Concord villc, in Delaware county. Abram 



WYATT FAMILY. 361 



owned a large tract of land in that neighborhood, and together 
with his wife's property in the city of Philadelphia, enabled 
them to leave to their two sons, Abram and Casper Wistar 
Sharpless, princely estates. Both of them died a few years ago 
with much reduced estates, fultilling the old saying : — " The 
" tirst gets it, the second keeps it, and the third spends it." 

Sarah Wistar, I am informed, never married, and lived to a 
very advanced age. In her will she left four of her great- 
nephews, all of them named Casper, £11,000 a-piece, and after 
the specific legacies were paid, there was left £4:-i:,000 to her 
legatees. Ricliard Wistar, the eldest brother, purchased a large 
tract of land in Alloways Creek township, most probably from 
William Hall, Jr. Soon afterwards he erected a glass factory 
about two miles above the village of AUowaystown, and com- 
menced the manufacture of glass. Johnson, in his history of 
this county, stated it was the first of its kind in the United 
States, but I think he was mistaken in that statement. Massa- 
chusetts claims the first, which was started in 171:2. The most 
reliable account I have ever seen respecting Richard Wistar 
fixes the time he commenced operation in 17-11:, it being two 
years later than the Massachusetts enterprise. Richard's glass 
works, it has been stated, proved to be a very profitable invest- 
ment. His own time was very much taken up in looking after 
his great estate in the city of Philadelphia, and consequently he 
employed Benjamin Thompson, a young man of great business 
capacity, the son of William Thompson, of AUowaystown, to 
be the overseer of his glass works. He filled the position, it 
has been stated, during the time the glass works were in opera- 
tion, much to the satisfaction of the proprietor. About the 
year 1750 Richard married Sarah Wyatt, the daughter of Bar- 
tholomew Wyatt, Jr., of Mannington. I think they had six 
children — Richard, Casper, John, Thomas, Elizabeth and Cath- 
arine. Ricliard Wistar, Jr., married and left two children. 
Richard and Sarah died a few years ago. Casper became one 
of the most eminent pliysicians of his time in the city of Phila- 
delphia, and I l)elieve he left a family of children. John mar- 
ried Charlotte Newbold, the daughter of Clayton Newbold, of 
Burlington county. 

At the death of Bartholemew Wyatt he owed his son-in-law, 
Richard AVistar, £1,000. In making his will he devised one- 
half of his real estate in Mannington to Richard and his wife 
Sarah, provided he would cancel the debt, whicli was accord- 
ingly done, and Richard Wistar became the owner. His son, 
John, after his marriage, settled tliercon, and at tlie death of 
46 



362 WYATT FAMILY. 



his father the said property became a part of his share of his 
father's great estate. 

John Wistar, it can be truly said, was one of Nature's noble- 
men, lie had an intellectual mind which he inherited from his 
mother's family, and a large share of the milk of human kind- 
ness. It has been stated, and I do not doubt the correctness of 
it, because it was in accordance with his feelings toward suffer- 
ing humanity, that he was the first to advocate the establishing 
of the Salem County Alms House. He and his wife had, I 
think, eight children ; their names were Mary, Bartholomew, 
Clayton, Charlotte, Casper, Hannah, Catharine and John. 
Their father, John Wistar, died in Ids fifty-sixth year, of pulmo- 
nary consumption. It could be truly said of him he was lost too 
soon for his family and his own religious society, and to the 
comnnmity generally. His widow survived him several years. 
Their oldest daughter Mary married Isaac Davis, of Philadel- 
pliia. Bartholomew married a young woman by the name of 
Newbold. He was a merchant in Philadelphia. Clayton 
Wistar's wife was Mary Stevenson, the daughter of John Ste- 
venson, who was a lineal descendant of that eminent man, 
Samuel Jennings, of Burlington. Clayton and his wife had 
two sons — John aad Kichard Wistar. His second wife was 
Martha Reeve, the daughter of Josiah Reeve, of Burlington, 
formerly of Cumberland. By this connection they had one 
son, Josiah Wistar, of Mannington. 

Charlotte Wistar married Jonathan Freedland, the son of 
Jonas Freedland, who was one of Salem county's favorite sons. 
Charlotte has been deceased several years, leaving no children ; 
her husband is still living. 

Casper Wistar's wife was Rebecca Bassett, daughter of Jo- 
seph Bassett. Casper is now deceased, leaving a widow and 
five children — Sarah, Mary, Casper, Joseph and Catharine. 
Hannah Wistar married Dr. Theophilus Beesley. He had an 
extensive practice in Salem when he was married, and a few 
years afterward he and his wife removed to Philadelpliia. In 
that city he stood high in his profession. They are both de- 
ceased now. Catharine Wistar married Thomas Evans, the 
son of Jonathan Evans, of Philadelphia. Thomas, whilst living 
was an eminent minister in the Orthodox branch of the Society 
of Friends. John Wistar, the youngest, was left the homestead 
of liis father. In a few years he became of age, he sold it to 
Thomas Bacon and removed to Philadelphia. 

Elizabeth Wistar, the daughter of Richard and Sarah Wistar, 
married Richard Miller, the son of Josiah and Letitia Miller, 



WYATT FAMILY. 3G3 



of Mannington. They lived most of the time after they were 
married on the property wliere their grandson, Wyatt W. Mil- 
ler, now owns and lives. Richard died in the prime of his life, 
leaving a widow and three children. Their names were Sarah, 
Letitia and Josiah Miller. Elizabeth W. Miller was considered 
in her time more than ordinary in her physical and mental abil- 
ities. She, when quite 3^oung, had an attack of scarlet fever, 
which impaired her hearing, and before she reached middle age 
she was entirely deaf ; but it often occurs when a person is de- 
prived of hearing, the other senses are much stronger and it 
was true with her to a remarkable degree. I well remember 
when young in seeing her in Friends' meeting, at Salem, taking 
her seat fronting the gallery, and if any one spoke she would 
watch the lips of the speaker, and if the one that was speaking 
remained motionless, it has been said she would get as good un- 
derstanding of tlie discourse as others did who had their hearing. 
Also in conversation, particularly with persons she was accus- 
tomed to, there appeared to be no difficulty for her to under- 
stand them. She resided in Mannington on the farm for a few 
years after her husband's death, and then removed to Salem, 
and died there aged over ninety years. 

Sarah Miller married Benjamin Acton, son of Clement Acton, 
of Salem. Benjamin and his wife Sarah had eight children — 
Richard M., Benjamin, Hannah, Letitia, Elizabeth, Cliarlotto, 
Sarah Wyatt, and Casper W. Acton. Benjamin and his wife 
are both deceased, although she survived her husband several 
years. 

Letitia Miller's husband was Thomas B. Sheppard, the son of 
John Sheppard, of Cumberland county. She died young, 
leiiving one daughter. 

Josiah Miller, the son of Richard and Elizabeth Miller, in 
physical and mental abilities, was above the ordinary man, and 
if he had cultivated his mind, with his wealth and family influ- 
ence, he would have been one of the most useful men in his 
generation. 

Josiah married Hetty James, daughter of Savjuiel L. James. 
She was amiable in her disposition, and was well calculated to 
make home pleasant and agreeable. He died a comparatively 
young man, leaving a widow and three minor children — Richard, 
Samuel and Wyatt Miller. Tlie two youngest own and reside 
on their patrimonial estate in Mannington. The said property 
has been in the Miller family four generations. 

Hetty Miller, the widow of Josiah lived until she was ad- 
vanced in life, and then married David Reeves, of Pluenixvillo, 



364 WYATT FAMILY. 



Chester county, Pennsylvania. He was formerly a resident of 
Bridgeton, Cumberland county, New Jersey, and was the son 
of Tliomas Reeves, of Gloucester county. Tliat connection 
was of short duration, however, as she was taken away by a 
short and severe illness in a short period after they were mai*- 
ried, and he survived her only a few years. 



WHITTAN FAMILY. 

James Wliittan purchased property in Mannington the latter 
part of the seventeeuth century, adjoining lands of Richard 
Woodnutt on the west, lands of Wheoeby on the east. lie and 
his wife, Sarah Whittan, had two children — Ann, their daugh- 
ter, was born in 1707, and tlieir son, Joseph Whittan, was born 
in 1709 ; lie died a minor. 

James Nevell and Richard Tindell died al)out the year 1703 
or 1704. Nevell was a lawyer, and acted as agent for William 
Penn in disposing of his lands lying in Fenwick's tenth. It 
appears that Penn had implicit confidence in his ability and 
integrity. The settlements he made with the proprietor for 
lands he disposed of for him fully justify that opinion. Rich- 
ard Tindell was considered in his time to be remarkably correct 
in his surveying and in his calculations ; so much so, that I have 
been informed the surveyors at, the present time have no ditfi- 
culty in following the various lines of the numerous tracts of 
land that he run and calculated more than one hundred and 
eighty years ago. I call the attention of the reader to one 
tract of meadow and swamp Richard Tindell re-surveyed by an 
order from James Kevell in 1685, it Ijeiiig the town marsh 
which was given by John Fenwick to the inhabitants of Salem 
town in 1676, and was surveyed by Richard Hancock the same 
year. Some five or six years ago the present owners of said 
meadow agreed to have a general survey of it again. They 
employed Belford Bonham, of Cumberland county, who is 
considered one of the most correct surve3^ors in this part of the 
State. The number of acres that Belford made of tlie meadow 
was about the same tliat Richard Tindell surveyed one hundred 
and eighty years ago,it being 560 acres. After the death of these 
two eminent men, Novell and Tindall, James Logan, the faithful 
secretar}'' of William Penn, took upon himself the task of dis- 
posing the lands that belonged to the proprietor witliin the 
l)oundaries of Fenwick's tenth. He accordingly appointed 
Benjamin Acton, Jr., to be his surveyor. The said Benjamin 
Acton resided in Salem, on the property formerly belonging to 



306 WHITTAN FAMILY. 



his fatlier. The property was on East Broadway, opposite 
Johnson street. Benjamin Acton, Jr., built a hirge brick house 
on the lot of ground in 1T27. The foundation is still remaining. 
George Ramsey rebuilt it a few years ago. 

After somewhat of a digression, I now come back to the 
Whittan family again in 17i2. James Logan gave an order to 
Benjamin Acton to survey 100 acres of meadow for James 
Whittan, the said marsh being over the creek, opposite said 
Whittan's plantation, for which he paid £20 pounds, new cur- 
rency. James Whittan, I think died in 1730, leaving his estate 
to his daughter, Ann Whittan. She married Benjamin Cripps, 
and their son, Whittan Cripps, became the owner of the real 
estate of his mother, Martha Huddy. 

William Cripps married and had two children — Benjamin 
and Mary. Mary married Peter Andrews. He was a native 
of Egg ilarbor. Soon after their marriage they purchased a 
farm of Robert Johnson, Ijeiug part of the Pledger property in 
Mannington. Clark Lippincott is tlie present owner. On that 
farm Peter and his wife resided. Whilst they lived they had 
four children. Their names were Clara, Martha, Isaac and 
Thomas Andrews. After the death of Peter Andrews his widow 
and daughter, Clara, lived in Salem. Both of them died there 
at an advanced age. Martha Andrews' husband was William 
Shourds. They left four children — Rachel, Mary, Benjamin 
and William Shourds. They all reside in Philadelphia except 
Racliel, her home is in Mount Holly. Isaac married the daugh- 
ter of John AVoodside, of Mannington. They subsequently 
removed to the State of New York, near Rochester. Thomas 
Andrews, likewise, went to the same neighborhood with his 
brother. He, I believe, studied law, and afterward located liim- 
self and family in the State of Micliigan. Whittan Cripps was 
considered above mediocrity as to his native talent. At the 
l)reaking out of the war of the American Revolution he left the 
Society of Friends, of which he was born a member, and devoted 
all his energies in assisting to carry it on in this part of the 
county, and at the close of the Revolution he became an active 
politician as a member of the Republican party as it was tlien 
called, but afterwards known as Jeffersonian Democrats and 
was considered to be the leader of that party in this county. 
He was elected two or three times in succession to the office of 
Sheriff, During his last term of office a law was passed by the 
Legislature of this State, prohibiting any person holding the 
office of Slicriff more than one term in succession, and his son, 
Benjamin Cripps, was chosen Sheriff at the next election. 



WHITTAN FAMILY- 36T 



According to the accounts we have, men were much more 
easily excited in politics the latter part of the last century, dur- 
ing the organization of the government, and party feeling was 
more acrimonious than it has been since. It was during one of 
the strongly contested elections, Jacob Ilufty was a candidate 
for the office of Sheriff on the Republican side. A person on 
the opposite side of politics being at the polls at the time of 
voting, asked what Mr. Hufty done with his broad-axe, he being 
a ship carpenter. Whittan Cripps, who was within hearing, 
quickly said that Hufty had buried it under the walls of Quebec, 
where such a coward as you dare not show his head. After 
Whittan's death the property in Mannington was left to his son, 
and he, not having the management of his father, became intox- 
icated with politics, neglected his business, and it is said, became 
involved in debt, and that fine estate was put in market. John 
Denn that time followed his trade in Salem, he being a luitter. 
By industry and frugality he had accumulated a sufficient 
amount of money to warrant him in l)uying it and in a few 
years he had the property paid for. He was likewise one of 
the best meadow men that was ever in this count3^ 

Nathaniel and his wife, Grace Cripps, came to America in 
1678, and settled in Burlington county. By tradition he was 
the founder of Mount Holly. Nathaniel and Grace Cripps liad 
six children — John, Benjamin, Samuel, Virginia, Theophla and 
Hannah Ann Cripps. John, the eldest son, married Mary 
Eves, of Haddonfield. Benjamin, the second son, married 
Mary Hough ; their children were Whittan, who in 1759 mar- 
ried Martha Huddy ; John, their second son, died a minor ; 
Hannah married Samuel Mason, of Mannington, in 1756, son 
of Thomas Mason, of the same place. Whittan Cripps and his 
wife settled on tlie landed estate of his great-uncle, James Whit- 
tan, in Lower Mannington, Salem county. He and his wife 
had two children — Benjamin and Mary Cripps. Benjamin 
married the daughter of Peter Carney, of Upper Penn's Neck, 
and Mary married Peter Andrews, a native of Egg Harbor. 



WOODNUTT FAMILY. 

Richard Woodnutt, the lirst one of the family of whom 
there is any record, came from Engh^nd about 1690. It is 
supposed he first settled in Philadelphia, but in 1695 it appears 
he located at Salem. lie was a bricklayer by occupation, and 
was a member of the Society of Friends, and a man of consid- 
erable means. He paid $75 towards erecting the first brick 
meeting house in West Jersey, which was built on the Nicholson 
lot on VV^est Broadway, in Salem. Most probaljly he was the 
master brick-layer of the said building. He came into posses- 
sion of a large tract of land in Mannington, being part of John 
Pledger's allotment, by marriage or purchase, I think in 1696. 
Fie married Mary Pledger, some antiquarians think, but there 
is no record of his having done so ; the names of his children, 
however, seem to indicate it. Richard Woodnutt and his wife 
Mary had four children. Joseph, the eldest son, was born 5th 
of 7th month, 1697 ; Richard was born 22d of 12th month; 
1700 ; Grace in 1703, and Sarah in 1708. Joseph in 1722 
married Rachel Craven, and they commenced life on his patri- 
monial estate in Mannington, near the town of Salem. Most 
of said estate is owned at the present time by Ricliard Wood- 
nutt, of Salem, he being the sixth generation from the first 
emigrant of that name. The old mansion house was burned 
down upward of fifty years ago,while in tenure of James Elliott. 
Joseph and his wife Rachel had five cliildren — Thomas was 
born in 1724, Mary in 1727, Hannah in 1730, Richard in 1732, 
and Joseph in 1735. Thomas died a young man, unmarried. 
Mary married Elisha, son of Elisha and Abigail Davis Bassett, 
of Pilesgrove. Elisha and his wife Mary had six children — 
tlieir eldest son, Joseph Bassett, died in infancy ; Rachel, their 
eldest daughter, died a young woman, unmarried ; Sarah Bas- 
sett was born lOtli of 8th month, 1759. She subsequently 
married Joseph Petitt in 1779, and her children were Wood- 
nutt, Rachel, David, Jonatlum, Thomas and Mary. Hannali, 
daughter of Elisha and Mary Bassett, born in 1762, married 
John Roberts, near Haddonfield, and had two children — Benja- 



AvooDNurr family. 369 



m'n and David Roberts. Joseph Bassett, 2d, born 26th of 6th 
montli, 1755, married Mar}^, the daughter of David and Ee- 
becca Allen. By that nnion there were nine children — Elisha, 
Joseph, David, Hannah, Rebecca, Samuel, Renjamin, William 
and Mary. Joseph and his wife lived above the age that is 
alloted to man, he being more than four-score at the time of his 
death. He was one of the most successful agriculturalists that 
Salem county ever produced. David Bassett, his brother, died 
a young man, unmarried. 

Hannah, the youngest daughter of Joseph and Rachel Wood- 
nutt, born in 1T29 married Samuel Hedge, 5th. They had four 
children — Rebecca born in 1751 ; Mary born in 1753 (she died 
a young woman unmarried in 1775) ; Samuel, born in 1775, and 
Joseph in 1758. Neither of the sons married, and both died in 
1797, in the old Hedge house on Broadway street, in the town 
of Salem. Their great landed estate fell to their sister Rebecca, 
who was at that time the wife of Thomas Thompson, the son of 
Thomas Thompson, and grandson of Andrew Thompson, the 
emigrant, of Elsinborough. The children of Thomas and his 
wife Rebecca were noticed in the genealogy of the Hedge and 
Fenwick families. 

Richard Woodnutt, the son of Joseph, married Elizabeth, 
daughter of William Hall, Jr., of Mannington. Richard died 
when he was about twenty-eight years of age, leaving one dauo-h- 
ter — Elizabeth, who married William Goodwin, Jr., of Elsin- 
borough, the youngest son of William and Mary Morris Good- 
win. By that union there were six daughters — Prudence, Mary, 
Rachel, Sarah, Elizabeth and Abigail. Their genealogy has 
been traced with the Goodwin family. EHzabeth's second hus- 
band was Thomas Clement. Joseph, the youngest child of Jo- 
seph and Rachel Woodnutt, was born in 1735. I think he died, 
leaving no issue. The second husband of Rachel Woodnutt, 
the widow of Joseph, was Daniel Garrison. Grace and Sarali, 
daughters of Richard and Sarah Woodnutt, I think died unmar- 
ried. 

Woodnutt, the eldest son of Joseph and Sarah B. Pettit, mar- 
ried Sarah Jess; they had ten children — Rachel, Hannah, 
David, Joseph, Samuel, Samuel C, Ann, James, Ruth and 
Sarah. Rachel married William G. Beesley, who has been 
deceased more than thirty years, leaving no issue. Ilaimali 
married David Bassett ; she is deceased, and left no issue. 
David Pettit's wife is Martha B. Engle ; their children are 
Mary, Woodnutt, William, Franklin, Hannah and David. 
Joseph Pettit, son of Woodnutt, married Caroline, daughter of 
47 



370 'vvooDaNuxr family. 



Aaron Panooast, Thej liave four sons — George, Charles 
Eliu and Joseph. Samuel Pettit died young ; Sanniel C. died 
a young man ; Anna married Eliu Roberts, of Philadelphia, 
and had three children — Woodnutt, Charles and Hannah Rob- 
erts. James Pettit married Elizabeth W. Ilidgway. Tiieir 
children are Clarkson, Puth and Dillwyn. Ruth died a young 
woman. Sarah, the youngest child of "Woodnutt and Sarah 
Pettit, married Edward P., son of David and Hannah Cooper, 
of Woodbury. They have three sons — David, Courtlandt and 
William. Rachel, the daughter of Joseph and Sarah Pettit, 
married Benjamin Hewitt ; she died young, and I think she 
left no issue. David Pettit, son of Joseph and Sarah, died a 
young man, unmarried. Jonathan Pettit married Ann, daugh- 
ter of George Woolly, of Philadelphia ; her children were 
Charles, Charlotte, Huldah, Lewis, Sarah Ann and Jonathan. 
Thomas, the youngest son of Joseph and Sarah Pettit, died 
young. Mary Pettit, their youngest daughter, married Nehe- 
iniah Hogbin, and had one son, Charles Hogbin, now deceased. 
The mother of Joseph Pettit, father of Woodnutt, was Mary 
Shourds. Woodnutt's wife's (Sarah Jess) grandmother was 
Ruth Silvers ; tlierefore Woodnutt and his wife were both 
relatives of my family. 

James Mason Woodnutt married Margaret Carpenter in 1776. 
They had ten children — Sarah, Hannah, Thomas, Jonathan, 
Preston, Elizabeth, William, Margaret, Mary and Martha. Sa- 
rali, the eldest child, born 1777, died unmarried ; Hannah, born 
in 1780, married Clement Acton, Sr., of Salem, being his sec- 
ond wife. They had two children — Clement and Margaret 
Acton. Clement went to Cincinnati many years ago and en- 
gaged in the mercantile business, at the old stand of his uncle, 
AVilliam Woodnutt. He married Fanny Biddle, and they have 
two children — Helen and John Acton. Margaret, daughter of 
Clement and Hannah W. Acton, married Dr. John Griscom, of 
I'hiladelphia, son of William and Ann Griscom. They have 
three children — Hannah, John and William W. Thomas Wood- 
nutt was born in 178ti, and died single. Jonathan, the second 
son of James and Margaret Woodnutt, l)orn 12t]i of lOtli montJi, 
1784, married Mary, the daughter of William and Elizabeth 
Goodwin. They had four children — Richard, William, Thomas 
and Mary Woodnutt. Richard, tlieir eldest son, married Lydia, 
the daughter of Clement and Sarah Hall, late of Elsinborough, 
They have six children — Mary, Emily H., Sarah IL, Elizabeth 
G., Mary and Richard II. Woodnutt. 

William Goodwin Woodniitt, Jonathan's second son, married 



WOODNUTT FAMILY. 371 



Elizabeth, dangliter of Joseph and Lydia Bassett. They have 
seven children — Emily C, Joseph B., Jonathan, Thomas, Anne 
E., Howard C. and William A\^oodnatt. Tliomas, the youngest 
son of Jonathan and Mary Woodnntt, removed to Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and went into the mercantile business with his cousin, 
Clement Acton. He married Hannah Morgan, a resident of 
Ilichmond, Indiana, where he resides at the present time. They 
have three children — Abbie, William, and Clement A. AVood- 
nutt. 

Mary, the daughter of Jonathan and Mary Woodnutt, mar- 
ried Edward, the son of Isaac and Lucy Ann Acton. They had 
four children — Walter W., Isaac Oakford, Elizabeth, and Jon- 
athan Acton. Jonathan Woodnutt's second w^ife was Sarah, the 
widow of Henry Dennis, (her maiden name was Goodwin, tlie 
sister of his first wife). They lived together in much unity to 
an advanced age, and in their death the poor and afflicted lost 
kind and sympatliizing friends. 

Preston, son of James M. and Margaret Woodnutt, was born 
24:th of 1st month, 1787. His wife was Rachel, the daughter 
of William and Elizabeth Goodwin, and a sister to his brother 
Jonathan's wife. Prescott and his wife Racliel died about mid- 
dle age, leaving five children — James, Elizabeth, Hannah Ann, 
Edward and Pj-eston. Their eldest son, James, married Eliza- 
beth, the daughter of Jolm and Margaret Denn, who were resi- 
dents of Mannington. John and his wife had five children — 
Charles, Henry, Franklin, Preston and Margaretta. 

Charles Woodnutt, the son of James, married Mary Garret- 
son. They have three children — Clifford, James and Edward. 
Henry, the second son of James AVoodnutt, married Anna 
Frost. They have five children — Ilannali, Thomas, Elizabetli, 
Henry and Clifford. Franklin Woodnutt, the third son of 
James, married Eveline Ware ; they have one daughter, Eliza- 
beth. Preston and Margaret remain single. Elizabeth G. 
Woodnutt, daughter of Preston and Kacliel, married Amsley, 
tlie son of Benjamin Ncwlin, of Chester county, Pennsylvania. 
Tliey had two children — Francis and Benjamin. Hannah A. 
Woodnutt, daughter of Preston and Rachel, married Nathan 
Baker ; there were two children — Mary E. and Henry Preston 
Baker. I think Preston's two youngest sons, Edward and 
Preston Woodnutt, remain single. 

Elizabeth, the daugliter of James M. and Margaret, married 
Morris, the son of Clement and Rebecca Hall, formerly of 
Elsinborough. They had five children — Margaretta, James, 
Franklin, Hannah and Rebecca. Marijjaretta married Joiin AV. 



372 WOODNUTT FAMILY. 



Ilighter, and their cliiklren were Elizabeth, James, William and 
Charles. William, the son of James and Margaret Woodnutt, 
was born in 1792. In early life he sold his patrimonial estate 
in Mannington, and removed from his native county to Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, wdiere he embarked into the mercantile business 
which he pursued successfully, accumulating an ample fortune. 
Some years before his death he sold out his interest in that city 
to his two nephews, Clement Acton, Jr. and Thomas Woodnutt, 
and ended his days in Philadelphia, leaving a large estate to be 
divided among his relatives. I think he never married. 

Margaret, the daughter of James M. and Margaret Wood- 
nutt, born in 170-Jr, married William J., son of Isaiah Shinn, 
of Pilesgrove. AVilliam and his wife had six children — Erne- 
line, Joseph, Samuel, Elizabeth, Sarah and Martha. The last 
mentioned cliild married Dr. Isaiah Clawson. Sarah Shinn 
married Dr. Thomas Reed. Mary Woodnutt, the daughter of 
James M. and Mai-garet, born in 1767, married Benjamin 
Newlin, of Chester county, Pennsylvania. They had one 
daughter, Martha, wlio married Thomas Travilla ; they liad one 
daughter — Martha. Martlia Woodnutt, the daughter of James 
M. and Margaret, born in 1799, married Joshua Reeves, the 
son of Piddle Reeves, of Gloucester ; she was his second wife. 
They had two children — Margaret and William Reeves. The 
latter married Rutli, tlie daughter of James J. Pettit ; their 
children are James P., Frank and Martha Pettit Reeves. 

Ileiiry, the second son of Ridiard and Ann Wamsley Wood- 
nutt, born 4th of 12th month, 173H, married Eve Wood ; they 
liad three chihh-en — Ann, Margaret and Joseph Woodnutt. 
Ann Woodnutt, Henry's oldest daughter, married John Wil- 
liams; by that union there were six cliildren — John, Henry, 
Margai-et, Josej^h, Thomas and Sarah Williauis. The first wife 
(if John AVilliains, Jr., was Hester Harris; his second, Eliza- 
beth Lambson ; his third, Hannah Brad way. There were 
fourteen children — John, Rebecca, Elizabeth, David, Auumda, 
Anne Mariaj Sarah, Margaret, Hester, Ann, William, Ciiarles, 
Sarah Ann and Moses Williams. John l)y occupation was a 
shoe maker ; I believe he followed it during his life in the city 
of Salem, and he had an excellent reputation for integrity and 
uprightness in all his transactions with his fellow men. Ilenry, 
the second son of John and Ann W. Williams, was a tailor. 
His wife was Rachel Hutchiuson ; their children were Wood- 
nutt, Maria, Charles and Ilenry Williams. Margaret Williams, 
the eldest daughter of John and Woodnutt Williams, has lived 
a life of great usefulness as a faitliful and tender nurse ; she 



WOODNUTT FAMILY. 373 



remains single. Joseph, tbe third son of John Williams, mar- 
ried Ann Welsli ; tliey liad fonr children — Sarah, Emeline, 
Margaret and Tlionms Williams. Thomas Williams married 
and had one child — Joseph AVilliams. Sarah AVilliams, tlieir 
youngest daughter, it appears died single. 

Margaret, the second daughter of Henry and Eve Woodnutt, 
married Isaac Elwell ; they had two children — John and Mary 
Ann Elwell. The latter subsequently married a man by the 
name of Dolbow. The numerous branches of the Woodnutt 
family at the present day, as far as I have the means of judging 
endeavored to live so as to bring no reproacli upon their ances- 
tors, and it should be the duty of the present generation to 
adopt the many good, benevolent and christian acts they did in 
their time, so that true civilization and Christianity jnay advance 
in this and succeeding generations higher than it lias ever yet 
obtained. 



WOODRUFF FAMILY. 

The Woodruffs are an ancient family in Worcestershire, Eng- 
land. Thomas Woodruff, son of Jolin AVoodruff, was born, in 
Worcestershire, about 1630, In early life he became a mem- 
ber of the Society of Friends, and married Edith Wyatt, daugh- 
ter of Joseph Wyatt, who located on a large tract of land, in the 
township of Mannington, at the first settlement of the province. 
Tliomas Woodruff and wife, soon after their marriage, removed 
to London, Mdiere they had several children born, their names were 
Thomas, Edith, John and Isaac Woodruff. In the year 1678, 
Thomas and his wife Edith Woodruff, and their aforesaid children, 
together with one man-servant, named Allen Hanway and his 
sister, children of Leonard Hanway, of Weymouth, set sail for 
America. They had a daughter born on the sea, named Maiy 
Woodruff ; the name of the ship was Surrey, Stephen Nicliols 
was the captain. They arrived at Salem in 4tli month, 1679, at 
which place it is most probable, Thomas, and his wife Edith Wood- 
ruff ended tlieir days. Their descendants are found in most of the 
States of the Union. The family of Woodruffs is numerous in the 
(u)unty of Cumberland at this time; this circumstance will jus- 
tify tiie belief that some of Thomas Woodruff's sons located in 
tlie Cohansey precinct, and became citizens of that part of Fen- 
wick's Colony. I called a short time since to see the venerable 
Daniel M. AVoodruft, (a linciil descendant of Thomas Woodruff,) 
at his lioaie in Bridgeton ; although his sight was nearly gone, 
on account of his great age, being nearly ninety, in other re- 
spects he reta'ins his physicai and mental faculties remarkably. 
He entei-ed into conversation in a lively and interesting manner, 
inquiring after those with whom he was formerly acquainted, 
and particularly those, of whom he formerly bought cattle, 
when he followed the butchering business in the city of Bridge- 
ton. He mentioned John Denn, William Carpenter, Wistars 
and Bassetts ; he supposed they were all deceased. I answered 
him in the alhrnuitive. He tlien said, " They were all honest 
" men." Daniel at one time was Sheriff of Cumberland county, 
also Clerk of the countv and Judge of the Court of Common 



^VOODEUFF FAMILY. 375 



Pleas, and for many years the principal auctioneer of Bridgeton 
and the surrounding county. Mr. Woodruff, although not the 
oldest person, is now the oldest living resident of Bridgeton. 



YORKE FAMILY. 

The Yorkc's spruno; from an ancient Englisli family. Thomas 
Yorke was hio;h Sheriff of Emj^hind three different times in the 
roit>:n of Henry the A'^IIE. Simon Yorke was horn at Calme, 
in Wiltshire, EngLmd, and owned a large landed estate in that 
county. He left AViltsliire soon after tlie death of Charles 1, 
with the intention of leaving his native 1 md on account of t!ie 
prominent part he had taken on the side of tliat unfortunate 
monarch. It seems he changed liis mtention and settled at 
Dover, in the county of Kent, and died tliere 2d of 3d montli 
1682, aged seventy-six years, and was buried in the Church of 
St. James, at Dover. He had iiv^e sons and one daughter. One 
of liis sons was the fatlier of Simon Yorke, who lived at Ething, 
in Derbyshire, and died 28th of Tth month, 1767, leaving issue, 
the late Philip Yorke, a man not unknown to the literary world ; 
he died 19th of 2d month, 1804, aged sixty-one years. He mar 
ried Elizabetli, sister to Lord Brownlong, in 7th month, 1770 
and had issue, Simon Yorke, formerly a member of Parliament 
for Grantham. Philip the second son of Simon and Elizabeth 
Yorke, born in Wiltshire in 1651, left his native place and set- 
tled in the county of Kent, and there married Elizabeth Gib- 
bon, a young woman of ancient family, daughter and heiress of 
R. Gibbon, of Dover. Lord Chancellor Hardwick always quar- 
tered the Gibbon arms, as may be seen in the middle of Temple 
Hall. 

Thomas Yorke arrived from England and settled in Salem as 
early as 1685. In 1687 Richard Tindell received an order from 
James Nevell to resurvey a tract of land containing 500 acres, 
lying on Nicomer's Run, a part of Fen wick's Grove, in Man- 
nington, known at that time as White's Vineyard. It was 
owned by Thomas Yorke and Mary White, the faithful house- 
keeper of John Fen wick. (He made an honorable mention of 
her in his will, and devised to her a large landed estate). Thomas 
Yorke resided in the town of Salem in 1690. I presume he 
died without issue. The Yorke family, it seems, had forgotten 
liim. 




THOMAS JONES YORKE. 
Born 1801. 



TORKE FAMILY. 377 



Thomas Yorke, the ancestor of the present Yorke famil)^ 
in the United States, came from Yorkshire, EngLmd, about 
1728. He left in England a brother, two sisters, and his uncle, 
Joseph Yorke, who was Lord Mayor of Dover, and ambassador 
to Hague in the reign of George II. John Potts, founder of 
Pottstown, Pa., married Ruth Savage. John and his wife Ruth 
had three daughters — Elizabeth, Mary and Martha Potts. Eliz- 
abeth, the eldest daughter, married Joseph Walker, and Mary 
Potts, their second daughter married Deniah Cleaver. Thomas 
Yorke, soon after he arrived in this country, went into partner- 
sliip with John Potts in the iron business. In 1736 he married 
Martha Potts, the youngest daughter of his partner. They had 
two sons — Edward, the eldest, born 20tli of 9tli month, 1738, 
died 12th of 4tli month, 1781; and Stephen, born about 1740. 
Thomas Yorke's second wife was Margaret Robeson, a member 
of the Robeson family of New Jersey. Secretary of Navy Robe- 
son remarked recently in Salem that he could trace his family 
in New Jersey for six generations. Tliomas and Margaret R. 
Yorke had two sons — Andrew, who was born 26th of 11th 
month, 1742, and died in 1794, and Thomas, born 16th of 11th 
month, 1740. He joined the Royalists at the breaking out of 
the Revolutionary war, and at its close went to England. He 
Avas Mayor of Hull, England, for several years. He died with- 
out issue. Thomas Yorke's third wife was Mary Robeson, a 
niece of his second wife, Avho was a cousin to his Urst wife, 
Martha Potts. Thomas and Mary Yorke had four children — 
Robeson, Samuel, Martha and Margaret Yorke. Thomas Yorke 
was Justice of the Peace in Pottstown in 1745 ; in 1747 he was 
Lieutenant-Colonel in the French and Indian wars, and in 1757 
and 1758 he represented Berks county, Pennsylvania, in the 
Provincial Assembly. A short time afterwards he removed to 
Philadelphia, and was appointed Judge of the Courts by the 
crown of England. 

Edward, the eldest son of Thomas and Martha P. Yorke, 
l)orn about 1738, married Sarah Stille, and had nine children — 
Thomas, Eliza, Stille, Stephen, Gustavus, Samuel, Peter, Mar- 
tha and Edward Yorke. Thomas, the eldest son, died a young 
man, single. Eliza, the eldest daughter, married a man by the 
name of Cole ; they had one daughter, Eliza Cole, who died 
without issue. Eliza's second husband's name was Farquhar, 
and they had issue — Isabel, George, Emma (who married An- 
drew Jackson Donaldson) and Edward Farquhar. Samuel, the 
son of Edward and Sarah S. Yorke, married Mary Lippincott; 
their children were Peter, Edward (who married Sarah Ilawn, 
48 



378 YORKE FAMILY. 



of Louisiana), Samuel and William (who married Mary Mur- 

Peter, the sou of Edward and Sarah lorke, married Sarali 
Haines ; they had issue, three children — Marian, Sarah and 
Jane. Marian married an Adams. Sarah's hushand was An- 
drew Donaldson Jackson, the adopted son of General Andrew 
Jackson, and now resides at the " Hermitage," Tennessee. — 
Their issue was Rachel Jackson, who married Dr. Canrum, of 
Tennessee; they had issue — Andrew Jackson and Sanniel 
Wetherill Jackson Canrum. Jane was married twice ; her lirst 
husband |was S. M. AVetherill, and her second husband's name 

was Taggart. Marian Yorke and Adams had one son — 

John Adams. Jane Yorke, by her first husband, S. M. Weth- 
erill, had five children — Ellen, Jane, Alfred, Sarah and Martha 

Wetherill ; and by her second husband, Taggart, she had 

two children — Edward and Rebecca Taggart. 

Martha Yorke, the daughter of Edward and Sarali Stillc, 
married Mordica Wetherill ; they had one son, Samuel M. 
Wetherill, who married Jane Yorke, as before stated. Stephen 
Yorke died single. 

Andrew Yorke, the second son of Thomas and Margaret 
Robeson Yorke, born in the city of Philadelphia 26tli of lltli 
month, 1742, came to Salem in 1773, and lived and kept store 
in the old brick building which is still standing at the corner of 
Yorke and Magnolia streets. His wife was Eleanor Coxe, of 
Manayunk, Pennsylvania. Their issue was Andrew, Eleanor, 
Martha, Lewis and Thomas Yorke. At the commencement of 
the Revolutionary war, Andrew took an active part in favor of 
the Colonies, and was an aid to General Newcomb in the 
Revolutionary Army. Andrew died at Salem, New Jersey, in 
1794, and was buried at St. John's Episcopal church-yard in 
that city. His son, Andrew Yorke, Jr., died M'ithout issue. 
Eleanor, the daughter of Andrew and Eleanor C. Yorke, mar- 
ried John, the son of William and Sarah Thompson Hancock, 
of Hancock's Bridge. They had six children — William, Sarali, 
Henrietta, Thomas Yorke, Maria and Caroline Hancock. 
William, their son, died young. Eleanor Y., a short time 
before her death, moved from Hancock's Bridge to Salem, to 
reside wuth her daughter, Sarah, but died soon afterwards, and 
was buried in the Episcopal grave-yard where her parents were 
interred, her husband, John Hancock, having been deceased a 
number of years previous. Sarali, the oldest daughter of John 
and Eleanor Hancock, married Morris, the son of Thomas and 
Mary Goodwin Hancock, of Elsinborougli ; they liad issue — • 



YORKE FAMILY. 



379 



Morris, Eleanor, Mary, Sarah, John and Henrietta Hancock. 
Eleanor, the eldest daughter, married Daniel Stratton, a Pres- 
byterian clergyman, and a native of Bridgeton ; they had issue 
— Morris H. and Daniel P. Stratton. The latter married Isa- 
bella Barnes, daughter of the late Joseph Barnes, of Woods- 
town, Daniel and his wife reside in the State of Missouri. 
They have issue — Eleanor H. and Rebecca Stratton. Mary, 
the daughter of Morris and Sarah Hancock, married Tliomas 
Sinnickson Smith, son of John and Mary Smith, of Salem ; 
they have two children — Maria and Thomas S. Smith. The 
latter is a lawyer and resides in Salem. Maria, their daughter, 
married Constant M. Eakin ; they have issue — Eleanor Y. and 
Constance Eakin. Sarah, the daughter of Morris and Sarah 
Hancock, married Dr. Quinton Gibbon, of Salem ; they have 
issue — Henrietta Gibbon. 

Henrietta, the daughter of John and Eleanor Hancock, mar- 
ried Lewis P. Smith, of Bucks county, Pennsylvania ; they had 
four children — Henry, Louisa, Genovie (who is now deceased) 
and Sarah M. Smith. The latter married Clement Hall Sin- 
nickson. He is a lawyer, and has an extensive practice in 
Salem. He was elected to Congress from the First District of 
New Jersey in 1874, Clement and his wife had issue — M. L. 
Sinnickson, deceased. Thomas Y., second son of John and 
Eleanor Hancock, married Bachel, daughter of William and 
Elizabeth Thompson Nicholson, formerly of Manniugton. 
Rachel's mother was a first cousin of Thomas Y. Hancock's 
father, Jolm Hancock ; they had issue — Elizabeth, Ellen, Wil- 
liam, Cornelia and Thomas Hancock. 

Eliza])eth, daughter of Tliomas Y. and Racliel Hancock, was 
twice married ; her first husband was David, the -son of Andrew 
and Hannah Streteli Smith, of Elsinborough. David and 
Elizabeth Smith had issue — Morris and Sarah M. Smith. Mor- 
ris died young, and Sarali married Nathan, the son of Belford 
M. Bonliam, of Cumberland county, Elizabeth H. Smith's 
second husband was Sanniel, the son of AYilliam and Ann 
Fowser. Elizabeth has been deceased several years. Ellen, 
the second daughter of Thomas Y. and Racliel Hancock, mar- 
ried Dr. Henry Childs, the son of John and Rachel Childs, of 
Pliiladelphia, They have three sons — William, Edward and 
Thomas. William, the son of Thomas Y. and Rachel Han- 
cock, married Beulah, the daughter of William and Ann Fow- 
ser ; they have issue — Anna F. and Ellen M. Hancock, Cor- 
nelia, daughter of Thomas Y. and Rachel Hancock, has great 
energy of character. During the recent rebellion, directly after 



380 YORKB FAMILY 



the battle of Gettysburg, she hastened there, and rendered great 
assistance in caring for the sick and wounded in tlie hospitals. 
She continued in the army hospital until the final overthrow of 
the rebellion, after which event she volunteered in the praise- 
worthy undertaking of teaching school for colored children, 
near Charleston, South Carolina, where she is still in the same 
employment. Thomas, the youngest son of Thomas Y. and 
Rachel Hancock, was drowned wliilst bathing in Alloways 
^ creek, when he was about seven or eight years old. Maria, 
daugliter of John and Eleanor Hancock, married Richard P., 
tlie eldest son of Hedge and Mary Ann Parrott Thompson ; 
they had issue — Isabella Thompson. 

Louis Yorke, second son of Andrew and Eleanor C. Yorke, 
married Mary, the daughter of Thomas and Mary Jones, of 
Salem. Tliomas was of those men that made his own fortune, 
beginning with small means at his disposal, by industry and 
close application to his business acquired a competency ; lived 
to an advanced age, and was greatly respected by his fellow citi- 
zens. Louis and his wife, Mary J. Yorke, left Salem soon after 
their marriage and located in the village of Hancock's Bridge. 
Louis kept store with Lewis Paullin as partner in J olm Hancock's 
store house, near the bridge, now occupied by Carll & Brother. 
Louis and his wife had issue — Andrew, Thomas Jones and Louis 
S. Yorke. TJieir father died in Pliiladelpliia in 1809, and was 
l)uried in Christ Church burying ground in that city. Andrew, 
tlie eldest son of Louis and Mary Yorke, died young. Their 
second son, Thomas J. Yorke, was twice married. His first 
wife was Mary, the daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth Smith, 
of Bucks county, Pennsyh^ania. Mary died a young woman, 
leaving one son; — Louis Eugene Yorke. Tlie second wife of 
Thomas J. Yorke was Margaret Johnson Sinnickson, daughtei' 
of Thomas and Elizabeth Jacobs Sinnickson. She was from 
Chester count}', Pennsylvania, and her pai-ents were consistent 
members of the Society of Friends, descendants of the Jacobs' 
and Brinton's being among the first Quaker families of Chester 
county. Thomas and his wife, Margaret J. Yorke, have issue — 
Mary A., Elizabeth S., Thomas J., Jr., Margaret and Caroline 
P. Yorke. The eldest daughter, Mary A., married DeWitt 
Clinton Clement, son of Samuel and Eliza H. Clement; they 
have issue, one daughter — Eliza H. Clement. Margaret J. 
Yorke married Dr. J. B. Parker, a surgeon in the United States 
Navy, and their issue is Mary S. Parker. Caroline P. Yorke 
married William F. Allen, editor of the " Travelers' Official 
Guide ," their issue is Yorke and Frederica W. Allen. 



YORKE FAMILY. 381 



Thomas J. Yorke, early in life, went in the store of his grand- 
father, Tlioraas Jones, in Salem. In 1817 he removed to Phil- 
adelphia, and was clerk in one of the dry goods stores nntil 
1821, when he returned to Salem and enfered into the mercan- 
tile business with his uncle, Thomas Jones, Jr., in the same 
store house that his grand-father, Thomas Jones, formerly 
occupied. It is now known as the Star Corner building, corner 
of Market and Broadway streets. The building is one of the 
oldest store houses in the city of Salem. It was built by Wil- 
liam Cattell, and his son, Elijali Cattell, occupied it as a store 
during the greater part of his life, and soon after his death it 
was sold to that eminent philanthropist, Isaac Moss, who, in a 
short time afterwards, conveyed it to TJiomas Jones, Sr. 
Thomas Jones Yorke continued in business with his uncle until 
1847. He was elected a member of the State Legislature in 
1835, and in the succeeding year he was elected to Congress, 
taking his seat in 1837, and continued a member of that body 
up to 1843. In the year 1853 he was elected a Director and 
Secretary and Treasurer of the West Jersey Railroad Company, 
which offices he held until 1866, when he was elected President 
and continued in tliat position until 2d month, 1875, when, on 
account of his failing physical strength, which is incident to old 
age, he resigned the office. The Company, however, retained 
him as one of its Directors. His eldest son, Louis Eugene 
Yorke possessed more than ordinary abilities. He was educated 
as a civil engineer at tlie Renselar Institute, in the State of 
New York, and early in life he entered tiie service of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Company, and assisted to locate tlie tunnel 
tlii-ough tlie Alk'ghaney mountains. He was a resident engineer 
of tlie Memphis and Charleston Railroad, and soon jiftcrward 
was employed with the Iloboken Land Improvement Company, 
and also had cliai-ge of the Bergen tunnel in 1860. At the 
breaking out of the war of the rebellion the martial spirit he 
had inherited from his ancestors was aroused, and in 1861 ho 
entered the army as a private in the Seventh Regiment of the 
New York Volunteers. By his great energy and bravery he 
was soon promoted to Captain in the Fourteenth Regiment of 
the Regular Army. He was on General Sherman's staff, and 
later, chief officer to General Logan. He was wounded at 
Arkansas Point, and made the march with General Sherman 
from Atlanta to the sea. He resigned at the close of the war 
with a commission as Brevet-Colonel in the Regular Army. 
His wife was Mary Miller, of Cincinnati, Ohio. Eugene died 
in that city in 7th month, 1873, aged forty- one years. Thomas 



382 YORKE FAMILY. 



Jones Yorke, Jr., second son of Thomas J. Yorke, by his second 
wife, Margaret J. Sinnickson, assisted his father several years 
in the Raih-oad Company, and was appointed Secretary and 
Treasurer of the West Jersey Marl Company. He subsequently 
entered into the coal business with his uncles, John and Charles 
Sinnickson, in the city of Philadelphia, under the firm name of 
Sinnickson & Co. Louis S. Yorke, the third son of Louis and 
Mary Yorke, married Adelaide Patton, of Philadelphia ; their 
issue was two sons and one daughter — Patton Jones, Louis A. 
and Adelaide P. Yorke. Patton J. Yorke, their eldest son, 
married Rebecca Coleman, of Louisana ; tlieir issue is Catharine 
C. and Louis S. Yorke. His second wife w^as Lizzie Little, of 
Albany, New York. Louis A., second son of Louis and 
Adelaide Yorke, mai-ried Emma M., daughter of Robert Smith, 
Esq., of Philadelphia. 

Adelaide, tlie daughter of Louis and Adelaide P. Yorke, mar- 
ried Charles King, of the United States Navy ; they have one 
daughter — Adelaide King. Louis S. Yorke, the son of Louis 
and Mary Yorke, in early life had an inclination to follow the 
sea. Accordingly in 1818 his first voyage was in a brig, com- 
manded by Captain Wood house, of the United States Navy, 
from Philadelpliia to Rio Janeiro and the river La Platte, in 
South America. Afterwards he made frequent voyages to 
Monte Yidoe and Buenos Ayres as mate and master. After- 
wards at different times he commanded several large ships in 
the European and East Indian trade, going to India by tlie Cape 
of Good Hope and returning through the Pacific by the way of 
Cape Horn. He returned from the sea a number of years ago, 
and resided in Salem and Philadelphia. When the war of re- 
bullion broke out, he again went to sea and entered the United 
States Navy as paymaster. At the end of the war he went to 
Louisiana to reside with his eldest son, Patton. Patton Jones 
Yorke, his eldest son, entered the service of the United States 
as a volunteer before he was twenty-one years of age. He con- 
tinued in the army through the war, and was promoted to Co- 
lonel of the Second Regiment of New Jersey Cavalry. After the 
war he married Rebecca Coleman, of Carroll Parish, Louisiana, 
and there he settled. He has been several times a member of 
tlie Legislature of his adopted State, and is a member of that 
body at the present time. Louis A., the se(M)ud son of Louis A., 
and Adelaide Yorke, is paymaster in the United States Navy, 
and is now in the East India squadron. 

Thomas, the third son of Andrew and Eleanor Coxe Yorke, 
was born at Saloni. When young ho went to Philadelphia in 



YOKKE FAMILY. 383 



the dry goods store of M. Plerbenton, in Soutli Second street. 
In the war of 1812 lie joined the privateer Shadow as purser, 
the ship being commanded by liis rehitive, Captain Taylor. When 
the war was ended Thomas traded to the West Indies as captain 
of a merchant vessel. lie afterwards went into the European 
and East India trade as captain of a merchantman, and contin- 
ued in that business a number of voyages. When he left the 
sea he came back to his native county, and made his home with 
his sister, Eleanor Hancock, at Hancock's Bridge. He lived 
but a short time afterwards, and was buried in the Episcopal 
church yard at Salem. Nature had done much for Thomas 
Yorke. He was blessed with good abilities and above the ave- 
rage of mankind, was prepossessing in looks, and dignified in 
his manners and address — the latter being characteristics of the 
Yorke family. 

Martha, the second daughter of Andrew and Eleanor C. 
Yorke, soon after her father's death, removed from Salera to 
Hancock's Bridge, and resided at the latter place most of her 
life. I think she never married. 

The third wife of Thomas Yorke, the emigrant, was Mary 
Robeson, as before mentioned ; they had four children. Their 
eldest son, Robeson Yorke, died without issue. Their second 
son, Samuel, married Tabitha Keen, of Dover, Delaware, and 
had issue, Thomas Yorke, who married a young woman by the 
name of Cox, by whom he had five children — Mary, Samuel, 
Anna, Emma and AVilliam Yorke. Martha, the daughter of 
Thomas and Mary Robeson Yorke, married James Humphreys ; 
they had issue. Susan Humphreys, their eldest daughter, died 
without issue. Their son, James Y, Humphreys, married 
Louisa McAuley, and had one daughter — Sarah Humphreys. 
Mary Y. Humphreys married Captain Graham, by whom she 
had one child, Ella, who married John Armstrong, and had 
issue — Mary Armstrong. Lewis Yorke Humphreys died 
without issue. His sister, Martha Y. Humphreys, married 
a man by the name of Madara ; they had issue, one child — Mary 
Madara. 

Margaret, the youngest daughter of Thomas and Mary R. 
Yorke, married Ludwig Sprogell, and had issue. John, their 
eldest son, died single. Their daughter, Mary Sprogell, died 
young. Louis Sprogell was Captain in the United States 
Army. Thomas Sprogell mari'ied Mary Stretch, and had issue. 
Georgianna, their daughter, married Dr. J. Peaco, of the 
United States Navy ; they had children. Their eldest son, 
John Peaco, died young, and their daughter, Virginia Peaco, 



>g4. YORKB FAMILY. 



married Dr. J. Henderson, of the United States Navy. Dr. J. 
Henderson and his wife, Vir-inia P. had six clnldren— John 
Aiio-ustus, George, Virginia Mary, Sylvanus and Carohne. 



LOCKE AND KOCKE FAMILIES. 

There have been many of the African race born and raised in 
Fenwick's Colony, that have shown considerable mental intel- 
lect. Among tliose, tliere were two young men in modern times, 
who grew up among us, manifesting uncommon abilities, con- 
sidering their opportunity. Ishmael Locke was one of them ; 
being born of poor parentage he was bound out to John Bal- 
linger, a farmer residing in Upper Alloways Creek, near Quin- 
ton's Bridge. Ishmael was sent occasionally to a common coun- 
try school, during the winter season, but even with that limited 
opportunity, he applied himself closely to his studies. Being 
an excellent and careful workman, as a farm laborer, he found 
no difficulty in procuring good places, and likewise the highest 
wages. Soon after he arrived at the age of twenty-one, he hired 
with the late William Carpenter, of Elsinborough, at which 
place he continued several years ; by his orderly conduct and 
close attention to business, he endeared himself to the family, 
always studying in his leisui-e hours. Upon leaving Elsinbo- 
rough, he taught* the colored school at Salem for some time. 
From Salem, he went to Camden, and there taught the colored 
school. Subsequently he went to Liberia for the purpose of 
educating his race in that distant land. The climate was not 
congenial to his health, and he returned to the United States, 
after being absent a few years; he again opened a school in 
Camden, but his health being much impaired whilst in Liberia, 
he did not live long after his return. As a mathematician he 
was seldom equalled by any one that was ever raised in Salem 
county, and in the otlier branches of learning, there were very 
few his superiors. His application was wonderful. The late 
Richard P. Thompson, when he was State Attorney, remarked 
to me once — " If 1 had wdien young, the indomitable application 
" that Locke possessed, it would have been incalculable advantage 
" to me in my profession." 

John Rocke, Jr., possessed a fine intellect. He was born in 
Elsinborough. His father, Jolm Rocke, was a good citizen and 
an honest laborer. He luid a natural tuj-n for reading, and 
49 



386 LOCKE AND ROCKE FAMILIES. 



was above the ordinary men of his race in intelHgence. His 
wife was Maria "Willetts. The Willetts were formerly slaves 
to one of the ancient Quaker families in this county. Their 
son, the subject of this sketch, showed in early life a thirst for 
knowledge, and was by nature an elocutionist, being very fond 
of reading. His parents, though poor, gave him every oppor- 
tunity in their power for an education ; but as soon as he was 
able to work he labored for a livelihood among the farmers in 
his neighborhood, but when an opportunity afforded he was 
always found endeavoring to improve his mind by reading and 
also in mathematics. "When Ishmael Locke left the colored 
scliool at Salem, John Locke, Jr., succeeded as a teacher. He 
remained in that situation a few years, and then left his native 
county and State, and went to Boston, Massachusetts. In a 
short time after that event he studied medicine wdth one of the 
noted physicians of that city. After due course of study he 
received his diploma. There was a disease lurking about him, 
for which he had to undergo a surgical operation, but without 
success. He was induced by Charles Sumner to go to Paris, 
to the celebrated surgeon that had operated on him a short time 
previous with such good results. He accordingly went and was 
operated upon. Rocke informed the writer, after his return to 
this country, when on a visit to his parents, that the surgeon 
told him "he liad better turn his attention to some other call- 
" ing, that his physical disease was against his being a prac- 
" titioner in medicine." He studied Law, and was admitted to 
practice some two or three years afterward. He was a pleasing 
and interesting speaker ; his oratory was not declamatory. He 
showed great learning in his speeches, was cool and deliberate 
in his address, so much so, that he attracted the attention of the 
lawyers of his adopted city. He was a great favorite of the 
eminent statesman, Charles Sumner, to such an extent, that by 
his intercession he was admitted to practice in the United States 
Courts, thereby being the first of his race that ever received such 
a distinguished honor. Througli all his high attainments, he 
was not unmindful of filial duties. He employed in Salem 
county an agent, and furnished him funds to assist his parents 
in procuring tlie necessaries of life. Soon after the death of liis 
aged father, he took his mother to Boston with him, and main- 
tained her in a comfortable manner, until lier death. He sur- 
vived her but a few years, being a victim of !hat insidious 
disease, pulmonary consumption. He was a credit to his race, 
and an honor to the State and county of his birth. 



:e3: z s GT o :eb ■3r 



OF THK 



RELIGIOUS BODIES OF FENWICK'S COLONY. 



Comprising Sketches of their Places of Worsliip, and the 
Lives of their most Prominent Members, carefnlly 
prepared hy the Author, and arranged 
in their seniority. 



(88^j 




FRIENDS' MEETING HOUSE. 
Salem, N. J. Built 1772. 



FKIENDS SOCIETY. 

I will endeavor to give an account of the first religious organ- 
izations \vithin Fenwick's Colony, and a short notice of the con- 
spicuous members of the different societies when they were 
established. 

The Swedes no doubt were the first, but their place of wor- 
ship appears to have been at Christiana until about 1746, when 
the Swedes and a few French Hugeunots, Jaquetts, Philpotts, 
and others, built a church in Penn's Neck, at tlie place now 
known as Church Landing. The principal families who were 
members of the church were the Joansons, Wolversons, Hen- 
dricksons, Tonsons, Hans Jeansons, Nielsons, Wolleysons, Sin- 
nicksons, and several others. In all probability the first house 
erected in West Jersey for Divine worship was at Maurice 
Kiver, where there was a settlement of Swedes. Being zealous 
Protestants, and a long distance from their mother church, 
they built a place of worship near Mauricetown about 1640, 
more than thirty years before Fenwick, with his Colony, arrived 
at Elsinborough Point, which was on the 26th of 8th mouth, 
1675, according to the present computation of time. Fenwick 
ascended the Assamhocking up to the place where Salem 
is now, and at that point of land he and the emigrants that 
were with him permanently landed. Tha greater number of 
the persons who accompanied him from England to his possess- 
ions in New Csessaria were members of his own religious 
Society. 

At that place he determined to lay out a town to be the seat 
of government for his colony. He named the town New Salem, 
as he observed the name signified Peace. He chose from the 
number of emigrants Richard Noble as his Surveyor General, 
and directed him to lay out a street ninety feet in width from 
the creek, which lie named Salem, to run in a south-eastern 
course. The street was called Wharf street, but afterwards 
called Bradway street, and at the present time it is known as 
Broadway street. There was another street laid out start- 
ing from Fenwick creek, a branch of tlie Salem creek, also to 



392 FRIENDS SOCIETY. 



be ninety feet wide, until it reached the town marsh, but for 
some reason it was nev^er opened further than Bradway street. 
It was tlien called Bi-idge street, but is now known ae Market 
street. Probably the cause tluit Fenwick's plans were not car- 
ried out, is that he died at an early date of the history of 
Salem, and left the direction of the improvement of the town 
to his favorite son-in-law, Samuel Hedge, particularly respect- 
ing the streets. He died in a few y«ars after the dettth of Fen- 
wick (which event took place in the year 1693) before he could 
consummate tlie proprietor's plans upon these two ipain streets. 
The emigrants first settled upon Wharf street, where the first 
religious organization took place of the English Colonies in 
West New Jersey. 

Samuel Nicholson, one of the wealthiest emigrants who 
arrived with John Fenwick, and his wife, Ann Nicholson, with 
their five children, came from Northamptonshire, England. 
Soon after their arrival he purchased a lot on Wharf street 
containing 16 acres, also a tract of land in Elsinborough con- 
taining 2,000 acres, and built himself a house on his lot in 
Salem, principally of liewn logs. At his house, in 1676, the 
first religious organization in Fenwick's Colony took place, and 
it is interesting to examine the records of that early time to see 
the difficulty which the Friends had to find a permanent place 
for public worship. On 2d of 4th montli, 1979, Richard Guy, 
Edward Bradway, Isaac Smart and Edward Wade were ap- 
pointed to select a place for a meeting house and burying 
ground. It appears they were not successful, and at a meeting 
held 5th of 11th month, 1679, Edward Wade, James Nevell, 
John Maddox and George Deacon were appointed to treat with 
Samuel Nicholson and William Penton for their houses and 
plantations in Salem, and also to see Ann Salter, widov of 
Henry Salter, about her lot of ground. 

At a meeting held in 12tli month, 1679, George Deacon, 
John Maddox and Henry Jennings were appointed to take a 
view of Edward Bradway's house, and see whether it was 
suitable for a meeting house. A minute was made at that 
tune fixing upon the 1st and 4th days of the week for religious 
worship, tlie meetings to be held first at Samuel Nicholson's, 
next at Robert Zane's, and next at Richard Guy's housb. 

In the 9th month, 1680, there was another commfttee ap- 
pointed to endeavor to pwrchase a lot of ground of Edward 
Champney to build a meeting house upon and for a burying 
ground. They did not succeed in getting a lot to suit Dliem, 
and finally in 1681, in the 6tli montli, Samuel Nidioleon and 




FRIENDS' GRAVE YARD. 
Salem, N. J. First used in 1681. 



FKIBNDS SOCIETY. 398 



his wife Ann deeded tlie whole of tlie 16 acres of land 
situated on Bradway street, in Salem, for the use and benefit of 
Salem Monthly Meeting forever, for a meeting house and grave 
yard and other purposes. As soon as the deed was given, 
John Thompson, of Elsinborough, and Robert Zane, of Salem, 
were appointed by the meeting to repair the house, and get it 
fit for Friends to meet in. About a year afterwards the same 
persons were directed to enlarge the meeting house by adding 
sixteen feet in length, and height equal to the old frame build- 
ing, with a chimney and a pair of stairs. For some reason this 
was not done until tlie next year, in 1683, at which time Ben- 
jamin Acton was employed to build the addition. There was 
a proposition to have the floors of the house made of boards, 
but that failed, and on 27th of 12th month, 1687, Benjamin 
Acton and Thomas Wood were appointed to have the old and 
new house floored with a good clay floor, and have it ready 
before the Yearly Meeting should convene. 

The first Yearly Meeting was held at Salem 15th of 2d 
month, 1684, and included the Friends of Haddonfield and 
Burlington. It was held at Salem and Burlington alternately, 
and was known as the Half Yearly Meeting. These meetings 
were continued several years. 

At the Yearly Meeting held at Salem in the 2d month, from 
the 27th to the 31st, 1693, George Keith appeared with his 
friends and laid before the meeting their proposals for the 
settlement of tlie differences among them. These were in the 
shape of several propositions covering the points at issue, and 
discussing the reasons for their adoption, which led to much 
controversy, and final separation of many members from the 
Society. These proposals were signed by Jeremiah Colbert, 
John Penrose, Nathaniel Sykes, Anthony Taylor, Samuel 
Cooper, Isaac Tause, James Shattock, Samuel Adams, George 
Keith, Thomas Budd, Henry Furness, Nicholas Pierce, Thomas 
Withers, Andrew Griscom, and others. Thomas Sharp, member 
of Newton Meeting, was Clerk of the Yearly Meeting at that 
time. The Friends who adhered to George Keith, had great 
influence in the Society, and most of them after Keith returned 
to England became members of the Baptist Church. Andrew 
Griscom became reconciled with his former friends, and died a 
member of the Society, and many of his descendants have 
been active and useful membersthereof. 

The account I have of George Keith fully proves that he 
possessed an uncommon intellect, was a forcible writer, and a 
pleasing and interesting speaker. The nature of the proposition 
50 



394 FBIENDS SOCIETT, 



that lie and liis followers offered to the Yearly Meeting at 
Salem, I have never fully understood, but it appears there was 
no fault found of church discipline, the matter of dispute 
beino- on religious dogmas. Keith advocated his peculiar views 
so ably that lie drew forth the ablest minds in the Society 
of Friends in England and in this country'- to confute his views. 
After his return to his native land he joined the Chur(;li of 
England. 

Among the early Friends of Salem, William Cooper was 
was quite prominent for a young man. lie and his father, 
William Cooper, emigrated to America about the year 1678, 
the father settling in Burlington county, wdiilst the son located 
at Salem, and followed his trade, which was that of a blacksmith. 
In the year 16S2 he married Mary, the eldest daughter of Ed- 
ward and Mary Bradway, and had three children — John, Han- 
nah and Mary Cooper. As near as can be ascertained, William 
and his family left Salem in 1688 and purchased land where 
Camden is now located, and resided there imtil his death, which 
took place in 1691. In his will he named his father, William 
Cooper, and his fatlier-in-law, Edward Bradway, his executors. 
John, the son of AVilliam and Mary B. Cooper, married Ann 
Clark. Hannah Cooper married John Mickle. Mary Cooper, 
theii' youngest daughter, married Benjamin Thackray. John 
Cooper died in 1750, leaving a widow and the following named 
children — James, John, David, Mary, Ann, Sarah and Hannah. 
My estimable friend, Judge John Clement, of Fladdonfield, who 
as a genealogist and historian has no superior in West Jersey, 
informed me that one of the collateral heirs of James Fenni- 
more Cooper, the celebrated novelist and publicist, recently 
came from his home in New York to trace the connection of 
the Cooper family of West Jersey with his family. He found 
by examining the wills and deeds that his ancestor, Fennimore 
Cooper, was a descendant of William and Mary Bradway Cooper. 

Robert Zane, who was active in organizing the first Friends 
Meeting at Salem, purchased of tlie proprietor a 16 acre lot on 
Fen wick street, tlie junction with the street now known as Yorke 
street, located on the west side. The old house which his son 
built and occupied is still standing, and has what is called a " hip 
roof," which resembles in some measure the modern French 
mansard roof. Such roofs were common at that time in this 
country. Kobert Zane left Salem before the year 1690, and 
purchased a large tract of good land near the old Newton Meet- 
ing House, bordering on Newton creek, and there he and his 
wife died. Most of his landed estate is still owned by his de- 



FRIElSfDS SOCIETY. 39f 



scendants, particularly in the female line. A part of tlie family 
remained at Salem. Robert's 2;reat-granddangliter married Lewis, 
son of William and Mary Morris Goodwin, of Elsinborough, 
about 1778 or 1779. There were two children — John and Su- 
sanna Goodwin. 

The minute of the first organized Monthly Meeting of Friends 
in West Jersey, was as follows : " At a meeting held last day 
" of the fifth month, 1676, it was imanimously considered that 
" the first second day of tlie week in the 6th month, that Friends 
" do meet in the town of New Salem, in Fenwick's Colony, and 
" all Friends thereunto, do monthly meet together, to consider 
" of outward circumstances, and business. And if such that has 
" been convinced, and walked disorderly, tliat they may in ail 
" gravity and uprightness to God, and in tenderness of spirit 
" and lov^e to their souls, be admonished, exhorted, and also re- 
" proved, and tlieir evil deeds and practices testified against in 
" the wisdom of God, and in the authority of truth, that may 
"answer the witness of God within them. • Signed, 

" Samuel IsTicholson, 

" ROBEET ZaJSTES, 

" Robert Wade, 
" Edward Wade, 
"Richard Guy, 
"Isaac Smart, 
" John Fen wick, 
" Richard Johnson", 
" and others." 
After Samuel Nicholson and his wife sold their Salem lands 
to the Society of Friends tliey removed to Elsinborough, on 
tlie 2,000 acre tract, of land that he purcliased of the pro- 
prietor in 1676, and tliere ended their days. The precise time 
of liis deatli is uncertain, but events which occurred soon after 
indicate that it was about 1690. Tlieir eldest daughter. Para- 
ble, born in England 20th of 2d month, 1659, married Abraham 
Strand, at New Salem, 25th of 9th month, 1677. Joseph, their 
second son, born at Northamptonshire, England, 30th of 2d 
month, 1669, married a young woman at Haddonfield. At the 
death of Samuel Nicholson he devised that his landed estate 
in Elsinborough should be divided between his eldest son, Sam- 
uel Nicholson, Jr., and his youngest son, Abel Nicholson. 
Samuel Nicholson, Jr., married, and died in a short time after- 
ward, leaving no issue, and he devised the whole of his real 
estate to his brother, Joseph Nicholson, who resided near Had- 
donfield. Joseph, in 1696, sold about one-half of it to George 



396 FRIENDS SOCIETY. 



Abbott, who had recently emigrated from New England. The 
balance was purchased by Samuel Stebbins and John Firth. 
Joseph Nicholson died in 1702, intestate, leaving but two cliil- 
dren — George and Samuel. George, in 1717, married Alice 
Lord. Samuel had three wives. His first wife was Sarali 
Burroughs, whom he married in 1722. In 1744 he married 
Jane, widow of William Albertson, and daughter of John 
Engle. Their descendants are numerous in the vicinity of 
Iladdonfield. Samuel Nicholson died in 1750, leaving the fol- 
lowing children — Joseph, their eldest, who married Catharine 
Butcher, of Burlington county, in 1738 ; Samuel, who married 
Rebecca, daughter of Aaron Aaronson ; Abigail, who married 
Daniel Ilillman, in 1743 (her second husband was John Gill, 
whom she married in 1769) ; Hannah, wlio married John Hill- 
man ; and Sarah Nicholson, who died unmarried in 1756. 

Abel Nicholson died in 1761 before his first child was born. 
It proved to be a son, who was named Abel, after his father, 
and subsequently married Rebecca, the daughter of Isaac Ellis. 
From this son sprung the immediate family of tlie name of 
Nicholson in the neighborhood of Haddonfield at the present 
time. Abel Nicholson, the youngest son of Samuel Nicholson, 
the emigrant, was born in England 2d of 5th month, 1672, and 
he resided on his estate in Elsinborough which he inherited from 
his father, the greater part of liis life. He married Mary, the 
daughter of William and Joanna Tyler, who was bora in Eng- 
land in the 11th month, 1677. TJieir children were — Rachel, 
born 7th of 7th month, 1698 ; Abel, born 13th of 1st month, 
1700 ; Joseph, born 4th of 12th month, 1701 ; and William, 
born 15th of 9th montli, 1703. (Tlie latter subsequently 
became tlie owner of 500 acres of land in Mannington, being 
part of Iledgefield.) 

Ann Nicholson was born 15th of 11th month, 1707, and 
married John Brick, Jr., of Gravelly Run, in the county of 
Cuml)erland. Rutli was born 9th of 9th month, 1713. Samuel 
was born 10th of 12th month, 1716, and he became the owner 
of all his father's real estate in the township of Elsinborough. 
He married Sarah Dennis, of Greenwich, in 1742. John, the 
youngest child, was born 6th of 3d month, 1719, and his wife 
was Jael Darkin, of Elsinborough. The descendants of Abel 
Nicholson I have mentioned heretofore. 

Friends of Salem continued to hold their meetings in the 
house purchased of Samuel Nicholson until the year 1700, at 
Avhich time they built a new brick house where the present 
grave-yard is. It stood east of the oak tree. Tlie meeting 



FEIEND8 SOCIETY. Z9t 



increased in numbers so much that the house was not large 
enougli to accommodate them, and in 1770 members of Salem 
Monthly Meeting bought a lot of ground on Fenwick street, of 
Thomas Hancock and Robert Johnson, and erected the present 
commodious building, which was completed in 1772. 

There was an "Indulge Meeting," as is known in tlie Society, 
in Elsinborough as early as 1680. The house stood on the 
property of Richard Darkin (Casper W. Thompson owns the 
land at this time.) There was a regular meeting of Friends 
held at Alloways Creek, at the house of James Denn, in 1679, 
and continued until 1685. 

In the year 1684 Edward Champney and Jolm Smith each 
deeded half an acre of ground to Christopher White and Sam- 
uel Wade — one for a meeting house and tlie other for a grave 
yard. The ground was a corner of each of their lots on Mon- 
mouth river. Tlie same year Salem Monthly Meeting of 
Friends agreed witli Christopher to build a meeting house on 
one of the said lots, the cost of the building not to exceed £40. 
He was also directed to clear a road from tiie King's Highway 
to the meeting house, for which he charged £10 more. In 1685 
the first religious meeting was held there, and so continued 
until 1718. The greater part of tlie members resided on the 
south side of the creek, and there being no bridge at that 
period, they were put to great inconvenience in getting to 
meeting. 

Joseph Ware gave the Friends a lot of ground on his planta- 
tion on the south side of the creek, the deed having been given 
in 1717. As soon as the meeting house was finished, the mem- 
bers on the north side of Monmouth river were attaclied to 
Salem Particular Meeting. The families were the Abbotts, 
Stubbins, Moss and Tylers. The meeting house was abaudoned 
about that time, but the grave-yard was used for a number of 
years after the meetings ceased to be held at that place. The 
Friends subsequently purchased a lot of ground on the south 
side of the creek, near Harniersville, for a burying ground, 
which has been the principal place for interment up to this 
time. A number of persons, however, have been buried in the 
ancient grave-yard since the members of the Society, in a meas- 
ure, abandoned it ; such families as the Waddingtons, Hancocks, 
Carlls, and a few others, were desirous to be lain with their 
ancestors. The principal families that were members of Allo- 
ways Creek Meeting at the time alluded to were the Whites, 
Bradways, Denns, Wares, Chambless, Oakfords, Wades, Dan- 
iels, Hancocks, Stretches, Barbers, and several others. Friends 



398 FRIENDS SOCIETY. 



continued to hold their meeting in the house built on the Ware 
property until tlie year 1756. In 1753 William Hancock 
deeded a lot of ground to the members of Alloways Creek 
Particular Meeting for a meeting house, as it was a more con- 
venient location. The house was built at two different periods 
of time, the oldest in 1756, the new, as it is called, in 1784. 

The Friends meeting at Lower Greenwich w\as established at 
an early period in the settlement of the English Colony. Mark 
Reeves, William Bacon, James Duncan and others, made appli- 
cation to Salem Monthly Meeting in 1698 for assistance in 
Iniilding a meeting house. Previous to that time meetings were 
held at private houses. Members of Greenwich Meeting, with 
the assistance of Salem Monthly Meeting, built a meeting house 
that year. It stood where the present meeting house is located, 
near the Cohansey, for the purpose of accommodating the Friends 
tliat resided on the south side of the river in Fairfield township. 
Greenwich Meeting, in the fore part of the last century, increased 
largely in the number of its members, so much so that it was 
deemed necessary to build a larger house for their accommoda- 
tion. There was a substantial brick house erected on or near 
where the old frame house formerly stood. The influential per- 
sons and their families that were members of Greenwich Par- 
ticular Meeting during the middle and latter part of the 18th 
century, were the Reeves, Davis, Millers, Woods, Sheppards, 
Tests, Bricks, Dennis, Harmers, Bacons, Tylers, Stewarts, and 
several others. Several of those mentioned above were conspic- 
uous men in the generation in wliich they lived. The Reeves, 
whom I mentioned in the genealogy of their families, and the 
Woods have left an enviable reputation. There were four Rich- 
ard Woods born in Cainberluud county, three of them being 
influential members of Greenwich Meeting. The fourth Rich- 
ard Wood left his native town and eventually resided and died 
in Pluladelphia, and became an eminent merchant, and left a 
large estate. The first Ricliard Wood that we have account of 
in this country, resided on Gravelly Run, known at this time as 
Stoe Creek township, Cumberland county. The Wood family 
owned a large tract of land at that place. Ricliard's wife, I 
think, was Priscilla, the daughter of Mark Reeve, the emigrant, 
])orn about 1700. They had five children — Jane, Richard, Le- 
titia, Ruth and Priscilhi Wood. The fatlier of these children 
died in the year 1759, and was buried on his own farm in the 
AVood's family burying ground. His son, Richard Wood, was 
born 18tli of 1st month, 1728, and he learned the trade of a 
cooper and foUow'ed it in the town of Greenwicli, and lie has 



FRIENDS SOCIETY. 399 



been represented to have possessed unusual business capacities. 
Notwithstanding Jiis industrious habits, he never let worldly 
affairs prevent him from attending to his religions meeting. He 
traveled with his friend, Mark Reeve, as companion, on a relig- 
ious visit through the New England States. He married twice. 
By his first wife he had two children — Richard and James Wood. 
His last wife was Mary, widow of Job Bacon, and the daugliter 
of John and Mary Wade Stewart, born 6th of 1st month, 1746. 
She had three children ]>y her first husband — Jol), Elizabeth and 
George Bacon. Richard and ids last wife, Mary Wood, had no 
issue. I have been told that he retired, in a great measure, from 
business, and purchased tlie large brick house and a number of 
acres attached, property formerly of Nicholas Gibbon, and at 
that place lie spent the evening of his days, dying several years 
before his wife. After his deatli the widow continued to reside 
there, and her house was a resort of her numerous relatives and 
acquaintances. She lived to an old age, and was truly a mother 
in Israel. 

Richard Wood, 3d, born 7th of 6tli montli, 1755, married 
twice. There were two sons by his first wife. David, the eldest, 
in after life, became largely interested in the u'on works at Mill- 
ville. Richard's second wife was Elizabeth, the daughter of 
Job and Mary Stewart Bacon. There were six children by that 
marriage — George B., Richard, Charles, Horatio, Ann Elizabeth, 
and Hannah Wood. It is but justice to tlie memory of Richard 
Wood, 3d, to say that he is still held in grateful remembrance 
by the old inhabitants of Greenwich, through his many acts of 
kindness and benevolence to his fellow creatures. 

Tlie Davis family were distinguished members of Greenwich 
Meeting. I have no definite knowledge at what time Charles 
Davis went to Cohausey to reside, but he became a large land- 
liolder in Greenwicli township, at the place known as Bacon's 
Neck. In 1739 lie married Elizabeth Dennis, of the same place. 
There was one son, Gabriel Davis, who subsequently came in 
possession of a large tract of excellent land tliat belonged to 
his father, and in the year 1767 he married Sarah, the daughter 
of Ebenezer Miller, Sr., born at Greenwich 17t]i of 3d month, 
1746. They had no issue. Gabriel Davis was one who did a 
great many acts of kindness in assisting young men who had 
but little means, by loaning them money to commence business 
with. Such acts of benevolence and kindness gave him a name 
as a benefactor to the poor and needy in the section of country 
in which he lived. In his will he devised the greater portion 
of his landed estate to his nephew, Ebenezer Hall, whc subse- 



400 FK1END8 SOCIETT. 



quently married, and at his death, left tliree children — Gabriel, 
Elizabeth and Ann Hall. Elizabeth married Thomas Bacon, 
of Philadelphia. Ann, the youngest daughter, married John, 
the son of Job Bacon. 

There was a Friends Meeting established near the head of 
Alloways river, at tlie village of Thompson's Bridge, The 
name of this place has since been clianged to Allowaystown. 
The meeting house stood on the north side of the creek, ad- 
joining the farm owned by William F. Reeve at this time. 
There was a burying ground near the meeting house, where 
most of the early settlers in that section where interred. The 
liouse was removed many years ago, but the lot is still enclosed. 
The persons that belonged to Allowaystown Particular Meeting 
were members of Salem Montlily Meeting, and the names of 
the principal members were William Thompson, Thomas, Ben- 
jamin, Samuel, Joseph and William Thompson, Jr., Joseph 
Fogg, and his three sons, Joseph, Daniel and Samuel Fogg, 
and their families, William Oakford and family, William Craig, 
the Noblets, and a few other families. Samuel Fogg subse- 
quently purchased land in the lower part of the township, 
which is known at this time as Lower Alloways Creek. He 
and his family became members of Alloways Creek Particular 
Meeting. William Thompson, from whom Thompson's Bridge 
derived its name, was tlie son of Andrew and Isabella Thomp- 
son, and was born near Dublin, Ireland, 9th of 8th month, 1666. 
He emigrated with his parents in 1677, and landed in New 
Jersey at Elsinborough Point the same year. Benjamin 
Thompson, son of William and Hannah Thompson, was born 
11th of 8th month, 1719, and subsequently married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Joseph Ware, Jr., the marriage having taken place 
in 1745. Benjamin was considered the best business man of 
his day in that section of country. He had the principal 
oversight of Richard Wistar's glassworks the greater part of 
the time it was in operation. The said glass works were located 
about two miles east of Allowaystown, on the property now 
owned by Jacob P. Reeves. The most authentic account I 
have seen gives this factory as the second one of the kind in 
the English Colonies in America. There was one started in 
Massachusetts two years previous to Wistar's in Salem county. 
Benjamin Thompson died about 1775, and his wife died in the 
same year. 

William Oakford, another distinguished member of Friends 
Meeting at Thompson's Bridge, was a descendant of Wade 
Oakford, and ho had large possessions in landed estate near 



FRIENDS SOCIETY. 401 



that place. Jonathan House, who owns and resides on part of 
the Oakford estate, is a lineal descendant o£ "William Oakford, 
as is also Albert W. Sherron, of Salem, on his mother's 
side. 

About tlie year 1725 there was a Friends Meeting established 
at Woodstown, which was then called and still bears the name 
of Pilesgrove Meeting, after the name of the township in which 
it is located. The principal families which composed Piles- 
grove Meeting at the time of its organization were the Lippin- 
cotts, Davis, Barnes, Dunns, Silvers, and a few years later 
Samuel and William Bassett, and several others, became mem- 
Ijcrs. Although Pilesgrove Meeting was small in the beginning 
it is at the present time the largest Friends Meeting in what is 
known as Fenwick's Colony. 

About the year 1760 there was a meeting established at Port 
Elizabeth, the j^rincipal families of which were Jonathan Jones 
and family, the Dallas, Buzbys, and several others. 

In the fore part of this century, Coates and Britton, of 
Philadelphia, banked a large tract of meadow land lying on the 
lower side of Maurice river, and extending do^vn the bay nearly 
or quite to West creek. After the said meadow and low lands 
were completely reclaimed from the overflow of the tide, they 
divided the property into small farms, and held out inducements 
for persons to settle thereon. There were several families, 
members of Friends Meeting, from Gloucester county and Cape 
May settled there. George Craft, Sr., of Gloucester, was hired 
by the proprietors to superintend the whole property, and most 
of the persons that were tenants under Coates and Britton were 
members of the Society of Friends. By that means the meeting 
at Port Elizabeth was greatly increased in numbers. The 
enterprise of reclaiming such a large body of swamp and salt 
marsh appeared to ansv/er admirably for some years, but there 
came a terrible storm and a great swell of the ocean in the 9th 
month, 1819, which carried and swept away miles of their tide 
l)ank along the bay sliore, and the inhabitants barely escaped 
with their lives, whilst a large number of horses and cattle per- 
ished. That disaster entirely broke up the little settlement, 
and many families returned to their former homes. Although 
the meeting at Port Elizabeth was diminished in numbers by 
the catastrophe, it was kept up for a number of years afterwards 
by the families of the Jones, Buzbys, Dallas, Elkintons, Town- 
sends, Bradways, and others. Several of the heads of those 
families have long since paid the debt of nature, whilst the 
younger branches have moved to other parts of the country. 
51 



402 FBIEND8 SOCIETY. 



At this time there is no Friends Meeting kept up at PortElizabeth. 

About the middle or Latter part of the last century there was 
a Friends Meeting established at Pedricktowu, in the township 
of Upper Penns Neck, it being a branch of Pilesgrove meeting. 
The principal families that composed the meeting were the Ped- 
ricks, Somers, Taylors, Greens, Kirbys, and a few others. The 
Pedrick family is one of the oldest in the county of Salem. 

On the 22d of 3d month, 1689, James Nevell gave an order 
to Richard Tindall to resurvey for Roger Pedrick, at Oldman's 
Creek, 1,000 acres, which the said Roger Pedrick had pur- 
chased of the proprietor in the fore part of 1676. The Somers 
family emigrated to this county from Great Egg Harbor. 

Although somewhat foreign to the subject that I have written 
upon, there has been much speculation respecting J acob Spicer. 
Some have thought he emigrated to New Jersey from England, 
but he was born at Long Island, of Quaker j^arentage, his 
parents, Samuel and Hester Spicer, having resided at Graves- 
end, L. I. They had six children — Abram, born 27th of 8th 
month, 1666 ; Jacob, born 20th of 1st month, 1668 ; May, born 
20th of 8th month, 1671; Sarah, born 19th of 4th month, 
1674; Martha, born 27th of 11th month, 1676; Sarah, born 16th 
of 2d month, 1677 ; and Abigail, born 26th of 1st month, 1683. 
Hester Spicer, the mother of the children mentioned, was born 
in 1647, and was a daughter of John and Mary Tilton. 

Samuel Spicer, the father of Jacob Spicer, purchased lands 
about the year 1683, near Gloucester Point, Gloucster county, 
and he settled thereon. It is well kno'svn tliat his son Jacob 
become conspicuous in the affairs of West Jersey, and died near 
Cold Spring Inlet, Cape May county. His son Jacob was 
equally as useful a man as his father. He and Learning wrote 
the laws of West New Jersey. 

As early as 1720 there was a Friends Meeting established at 
Cape May composed of the founders of Egg Harbor, the Som- 
ers, Sculls, Leeds, and a few other families ; the members of 
Cape May were Richard Townsend, Peter Corson and Aaron 
Leaming. The latter was a native of Connecticut. He came 
to Salem when a boy and was early noticed by Sarah, the widow 
of William Hall. He spoke of her as being very intelligent 
and wealthy, and of having an excellent library, which she in- 
vited him to her house for the purpose of reading. Whilst 
Aaron resided at Salem he joined the Friends Society. Soon 
after that event he went to Cape May and located a tract of 
land at Goshen, and married Lydia Shaw, also a member. They 
liad four children — Aaron, Jeremiah, Mathias and Elizabeth. 



FRIENDS SOCIETY. 



403 



At a montlilj meeting of Friends held in New Salem, in 
Fenwick's Colony, the 29th of 6th month, 1698, John Thomp- 
son, Sr., Isaac Smart, Ruthro Morris and Richard Darkiii were 
appointed to superintend the building of a meeting house, to be 
of brick, for the use of Salem Monthly Meeting, and to raise 
money by a voluntary subscription for that purpose. 

The following are the names of Friends that contributed, 
and the different sums of money each gave opposite their 
respective names : 



£ sh. 

John Thompson, 30 00 

Richard Darkin, 25 00 

WiUiam Tyler, 20 00 

Isaac Smart, 18 00 

Richard Johnson, 15 00 

Thomas Thompson, 18 00 

John Smith, of Smithfield, 18 00 

Bartholomew Wyatt, 18 00 

Ruthro Morris, 16 00 

William Ramsey, 15 00 

Nathaniel Chambless, Sr., 15 60 

Nathaniel Chambless, Jr., 15 00 

Josiah White, 7 00 

John Hancock, 10 00 

Benjamin Thompson, 10 00 

William Thompson, 10 00 

A. Thompson, Jr., 10 00 

Joseph Ware, 8 00 

Abel Nicholson, 7 00 

Richard Woodnutt, 6 00 

John Shales, 3 00 



Edward Goodwin, 
Joseph White, 
Esther Harrison, 
John Mason, 
John Remington, 
Wade Oakford, 
William Bradway, 
Edward Keasbey, 
Jeremiah Powell, 
James White, 
John Maddox, 
William Savage, 
William Hall, 
John Smith, of Arbebbury, 
Daniel Smith, son of the 

above, 
Charles Oakford, 
Samuel Wade, 
Esther White, widow of 

Charles H. White, 
James Daniels, the elder, 



£ sh. 


4 00 


2 10 


2 06 


10 00 


5 00 


2 10 


3 03 


4 00 


2 00 


1 10 


10 00 


3 10 


5 00 


10 00 


10 00 


5 00 


7 00 


5 00 


2 02 



The names of Friends that contributed toward erecting tlie 
building of dwellings in other places : 

£ sh. 

Samuel Carpenter, Philadelphia, 15 00 

Edward Shippen, Philadelphia, 5 00 

Samuel Jennings, Burlington, 5 00 

Bridget Guy, widow of Richard Guy, 5 00 

Rol)ert Ashton, of Delaware, 5 00 

Thomas Smith, of Darliy, Pennsylvania, 2 00 



Report of tlie Committee to the Monthly Meeting: 

Cost for brick, stone and lime, and workmanship, . 

For timber, boards, shingles and glass, 

Iron work, nails and glazing, ....... 

Paying John Thompson for his trouble and expenses, and 
overseeing the work, 



37 00 


£ sh. 
188 11 
194 03 

37 17 


5 00 



425 11 



404: FRIENDS SOCIETY. 



The house was erected a few rods east of the large oak tree. 
At that time, several of tlie ablest and oldest emigrants were 
deceased, such as Fenwick, Samuel Nicholson, John Pledger, 
Edward Bradway, Edward Wade, Andrew Thompson, Sr., Rob- 
ert Windham, Christopher White. All of them lay in tlieyard, 
except John Fenwick and Cliristopher White ; the former, by his 
request, was buried in the family burying ground of the Sharp 
family, in Upper Mannington, near the Alms House ; Christo- 
plier White was buried in the ancient burying ground of Friends, 
at Alloways Creek, not far from Hancock's Bridge. Said yard 
is situated on the north side of Monmouth river. It was deeded 
to Cln-istopher White and Samuel Wade, by Edward Champny. 
the son-in-law of John Fenwick, in 1684. 

There in that ancient yard stands a white oak which has be- 
longed to Salem Monthly Meeting of Friends for nearly two 
centuries. Its life has been in accordance with the laws which 
liave always governed it, and has to a remarkable degree re- 
tained the vigor of its early life. It has been a close attender 
of all the meetings held for worship or discipline in tlie old 
meeting-house, which formerly stood in the grave yard for up- 
wards of seventy years, and has been present at all the funerals 
which have taken place in the yard from 1681 up to the present 
time ; it lias likewise been a large benefactor to the human race, 
never having turned any one away who came for protection or 
shelter from the storms or scorching rays of the noonday sun. 
The laws which governed this ancient member are unchangable, 
always standing upright among men, and not heeding their con- 
Hiciting opinions, and while the earth, with all its allurements, 
was kept firmly beneath liim, his watchword seemed to be up- 
ward and onward, with each succeeding year ; it has been nour- 
ished by its friends who lie buried there, and watered l)y the 
tears of their mourners. The size of this ancient member at 
this time — the trunk is twenty feet in circumference, the branches 
parallel with Broadway street one hundred feet, from Broad- 
way to the cast one hundred and ten feet. 



BAPTIST SOCIETIES. 

About the year 1683 some Baptists from tlie county of Tip- 
perary, in L'eland, settled in the neigliborhood of Cohansey. 
Among these, the early accounts name David Sheppard, Tliomas 
Abbot and William Button. Tliey were members of a Baptist 
Church at Cleagh Keating in Tipperary county. This churcli 
was still in existence in 1838, but has since been disbanded. 
Thomas and John Sheppard, brothers or cousins of David, set- 
tled in the same neighborhood at the same time, and were doubt- 
less also members of this church. In 1685, Obadiah Holmes 
and Jo]m Cornelius arrived from Rhode Island. In 1688, Bi- 
near Yan Hyst, John Childe and Thomas Lambson were bap- 
tized by Rev. Elias Iveach, pastor of tlie Pennepeck Baptist 
Church, Pennsylvania. 

About this time. Rev. Thomas Killingsworth settled in Fen- 
wick's Colony, and was the first Baptist clergyman wlio located 
in South Jersey. He owned a fine tract of land on the King's 
Highway from Salem to Mauiice River, nearly all of which lay 
in tlie present limits of Salem township. After his death, tbe 
property was owned by the Keasbey family. He was not only 
a clergyman of considerable reputation, Init was tlie first judge 
of Salem courts. Through the troublesome time of Corn bury 's 
administration as the first Governor of East and West Jersey, 
Killingsworth maintained the dignity of the Bench through all 
opposition. Obadiah Holmes, who came from Rhode Island, 
as already mentioned, was the son of Rev. Obadiah Holmes, 
who was publicly whipped in Boston for his religious opinions 
l)y the Puritans of that day, and who removed to Rhode Island, 
and died at Newport, October 15, 1682, aged seventy-six years. 
Two of his sons, Obadiah and Jonathan, removed to Middle- 
town, Monmouth county, where they purchased a tract of 1600 
acres from the Indians, and were constituent members of the 
Middletown Baptist Clmrcli, the oldest in this State. Oba- 
diah soon removed to Fenwick's Colony, and settled in Co- 
hansey Precinct. He occasionally preached, though it does not 
appear that he was a regularly ordained clergyman. He pos- 



406 BAPTIST SOCIETIES. 



scsscd by nature a legal mind, and represented the Coliansey 
Precinct as Judge of Salem Courts, acting with Killingsworth 
from the year 1700 to 1709. 

1 have no doubt the Baptists held meetings in private houses 
prior to 1690, in tlie spring of which year they organized a 
church, now known as the First Cohansey Baptist Church at 
Iloadstown. This was the first church of this denomination in 
this part of the State. The first meeting house was built on 
land of Da\dd Sheppard, in Shrewsbury Neck, on the south side 
of the Cohansey, now owned by William Mulford. Killings- 
worth was the first pastor, and served as such until his death in 
tlie spring of 1709, 

A company of Baptists emigrated to Coliansey Precinct from 
Swansea, in Massachusetts, al)0ut the year 1687, aud settled 
about what is now known as Bowentown. Among them were 
the Bowens, Brookses, Barretts, Swinneys, &c. They had a log 
meeting house at Bowentown, and maintained a separate organi- 
zation on account of the differences of opinion concerning pre- 
destination, laying on of hands, &c. Their pastor was Rev. 
Timothy Brooks, who came with tnem. After the death of 
Killingsworth, through the efforts of Rev.Yalentine Wightman, 
of Groton, Connecticut, they united with the Cohansey Clnirch, 
and Rev. Timothy Brooks became the second pastor of that 
church in 1710, and continued such until his death in 1716, in 
the 55th year of his age. The meeting house on the south side 
of tlie Cohansey was soon after abandoned, and land was pur- 
chased 23d of 12th month, 1713, on the north side of the river, 
in Hopewell township, near what is now known as Sheppard's 
Mill, and a meeting house erected. The new site was chosen, 
(.loubtless, as a compromise between the old one on the south of 
the river and the one where Mr. Brooks' company had wor- 
shipped at Bowentown. Quite a number of Mr. Brooks' com- 
pany afterwards liecame Sabbatarians, and were among those 
who organized the Shiloh Seventh-Day Baptist Cluircjh in 
1737. 

After the death of Mr. Brooks, the church was witliout a 
pastor for several years. Rev. William Butcher, from Chester 
county, Pennsylvania, l)ecame the third pastor in 1721, but 
after a short service of three years, died 12t]i of 12th montli, 
1721, in the 27th year of his age. 

Rev. Nathaniel Jenkins became the fourtli pastor in 1730. 
lie was born in Caerdicansliire, Wales, 25tli of 3d month, 1678, 
(;ame to this country in 1710, and settled at Cape May in 1712 
as pastor of the churcli tlierc. He was a man of talents and 



BAPTIST SOCIETIES. 407 



education, and served also as a Trustee of the Loan Office and 
as a member of Council, as the State Legislature was tlien 
called. A bill being introduced into the Council in 1721, 
" to punish such as denied the doctrine of the Trinity, the 
"• Divinity of Christ and the Inspiration of the Scriptures," he 
stood boldly forth on the platform of " soul liberty," declaring 
that although he believed these doctrines as firmly as the warm- 
est advocate of the bill, yet he would never consent to oppose 
those who rejected them with law or with any other weapon 
than argument. The bill was accordingly quashed. During 
his pastorate branches of the Church'were established at Salem, 
Pittsgrove, and Great Egg Harbor. A new meeting house was 
also built in 1711, on the same site as the last, a frame building 
Ihirty-six by thirty-two feet, which has since been removed. 
The old grave-yard, which adjoined it, is still kept up in ordi- 
nary repair. I visited the ancient cemetery some two years ago 
and saw many names that were quite familiar ; such as John 
and Job "Ware. They were the lineal descendants of Joseph 
Ware, who emigrated to this county in company with John 
Fenwick, the proprietor, in 1675, and located himself in Mon- 
mouth precinct. On one of the tomb stones in said yard is a 
historical record, " In memory of Deborah Swinney, who de- 
" parted this life the 4th day of April, 1760, in the 77th year of 
" her age. She was the first white female child born in Colian- 
" sey." Mr. Jenkins died 2d of 6th month, 1754, in the 77th 
year of his age, and the 25tli of his pastorate. 

He was succeeded by Rev. Robert Kelsey. He was born in 
Drummore, Ireland, in 1711, came to Maryland in 1734, and to 
Cohansey in 1738. Having become a Baptist he was ordained 
in 1750, and preached for the brancli at Pittsgrove, and on the 
death of Mr. Jenkins was, by his recommendation on his dying 
bed, called as their pastor. He declined at first, but afterward 
accepted and became pastor in 1756, and served the cliurch 
until his death, 30th of 5th month, 1789, in the 79th year of his 
age. 

Rev. Henry Smalley ])ecame the sixth pastor 3d of 7th 
month, 1790. He was born at Piscataway, New Jersey, 23d of 
10th month, 1765, and graduated at the College of New Jersey, 
at Princeton, in 1788. A new brick meeting house was com- 
pleted and dedicated in 1802, and is the one now used by the 
Church, situate in the village of Roadstown. Its dimensions 
are forty-five by sixty-tln-ee feet, with galleries, and is capable 
of seating five hundred persons. The Church has, during tlie 
last year, erected a commodious chapel adjoining. Mr. Smalley 



408 BAPTIST SOCIETIES. 



was a man of sterling wortli, and was well known and honored 
thronghont the whole comnnmity, and the Chnrch greatly pros- 
pered under his care. He died 11th of 2d month, 1839, in the 
74th year of his age, and in the -49th of his pastorate. 

Since liim Rev. Isaac Moore, Rev. Edward D. Fendall, Rev. 
Jonathan G. Colhirn, Rev. Joseph N. Folwell, Rev. James M. 
Challis, Rev. Thomas G. Wright, Rev. Thomas O. Lincoln, and 
Rev. W. F. Basten, the present pastor, have served this 
ancient church. The present number of members is two hun- 
dred and sixty-six. 

John Holme resided for h while in the city of Philadelphia 
after he emigrated from England. He purchased a large quan- 
tity of land of the proprietor where Holmesburg now is, and 
one of his sons became the owner and resided on the property. 
John Holme, about 1690, bouglit a tract of land in Alloways 
Creek Precinct, not far from Allowaystown. In a short time 
he left Philadelphia with his family and made that place his 
home until his death, in the year 1701. He was the grandfather 
of Benjamin Holme of Revolutionary memor3^ I think he and 
Thomas Killings worth were the first members of the Baptist 
Church who lived in the neighborhood of Salem near the time of 
its first settlement. Baptist meetings were sometimes held at 
the house of Thomas Ivillingsworth, at Salem, and at other times 
at John Holme's, and were continued until the death of Killings- 
worth, in 1709. Jn 1705, Ivillingsworth also had a preaching 
place at the house of Jeremiah Nixon in Penns Neck. After 
the death of Holme and Killingsworth, meetings were contin- 
ued at the houses of Samuel Fogg and Daniel Smith, the last 
named being a son of John Smith, of Almesbury. Daniel was 
a follower of George Keith, but afterwards became a Baptist. 
He was born in the county of Norfolk, England, 10th of 2d 
month, 1660, and was a great favorite of John Fenwick, who 
made an honorable mention of him in his will. 

The Baptists of this section were connected with the Church 
at Cohansey. Timothy Brooks, pastor of the Cohansey Church, 
preached occasionally for them up to the time of his death, in 1716. 
Their meetings were frequently held at the house of Edward 
Quinton. After the death of most of the old members, the new 
converts united with the Cohansey Church, and attended the 
mother church until about the year 1741. After the member- 
ship from the vicinity of Alloways Creek and Salem became 
more numerous, they prevailed upon Nathaniel Jenkins, pastor 
of the Cohansey Church, to come and assist them occasionally. 
A])out this time three of the younger members of the Church 



BAFl'IST SOCIETIES. 409 



who lived at Cohansey, Abraham Garrison, Robert Kelsey and 
Job Sheppard were called to the ministry, and were permitted 
to visit and preach to the branches of the church. About this 
time the Baptists turned their attention towards building a 
meeting house. A quarter of an acre of land was given them 
by Daniel Smith, Jr., lying between Salem and Quinton's 
Bridge, near the King's Highway that led to Maurice River. 
The "i^lace was called Mill Hollow, and a meeting house was 
built there in 1743. In the 12th month, 1748, by the urgent 
request of the congregation of the new church. Job Sheppard, 
tlieir minister, moved his family from Cohansey to what is known 
at this time as the towmship of Quinton. They held regular 
meetings every week. It was not until sixty-five years after the 
commencement of Baptist meetings in and around Salem, and 
twelve years after they had built their church at Mill Hollow, 
tliat the church was constituted. It appears that in 1754 the 
question of separation from the Cohansey Church and organ- 
izing a new church at Mill Hollow came up for serious consid- 
eration. The members of the church made an appeal to the 
mother church to that effect. Their brethren at Cohansey, after 
some time for consideration, sent the following answer : 

" To our dear brothers in and near Alloways Creek, being in 
" Church membership with us: — We, the Church of Christ, and 
" Cohansey, baptized upon profession of our faith, holding and 
" maintaining the baptism of believers by immersion, the laying 
'' on of hands, the resurrection of the body, and eternal judgment, 
" return this to you as. our answer." 

Then followed the consent that the Baptists of Salem and 
Alloways Creek, who met at Mill Hollow, should form a dis- 
tinct Gospel Church. The names of the following constituent 
members are signed to the church covenant : Job Sheppard, 
pastor; Catharine Sheppard, Edward Quinton, Temperance 
Quinton, Edward Koasbey, Prudence Iveasbey, Abner Sims, 
Sarah Sims, John Holme, Daniel Smith, Jr., Seth Smith, Sam- 
uel Simms, Joseph Sneathen, John Whittal, Sarah Smith, 
Phebe Smith, Rachel Sneathen, Patience James, and Iveren- 
happuch Blackwood. This was the first Baptist Church con- 
stituted within the present limits of Salem county. The Baj)- 
tists continued to hold their meetings at Mill Hollow until about 
1790, when the old meeting house was sold, and moved into 
Salem and used as a barn for several years. The colored Meth- 
odists bought it finally and moved it to their lot on Eenwick 
f»^rGet, where they need it m a place of. worship until recently* 
63 



410 BAPTIST SOCIETIES. 



It stands now in the rear of their new brick churcli, and is used 
at this time as a school for colored cliildren. 

About the year 1670 the Baptist Society purchased 100 acres 
of Abel Smith for a parsonage. The property was located about 
one mile from Salem, on the Quinton's Bridge road. When 
the church was built on Yorke street, in the town of Salem, the 
Society was in debt about four himdred and seventy-one pounds. 
Tlie incorporation fully agreed to dispose of the parsonage for 
the relinquishment of the debt, and Anthony Keasl^ey, one of 
the trustees, was the purchaser for about six hundred poimds. 
Tlie property is known, at the present time, as the " Hannah 
farm," and is one of the most valuable in this county. On the 
lifth day of the 8th month, Mary Dunlap, a widow, deeded to 
John Holme, Thomas Sayre, Benjamin Holme, Anthony Kcas- 
bey, John Briggs, Samuel Yance and Howell Smith, a lot con- 
taining one acre and a half, located on Yorke street, and joined 
on the east by lands formerly belonging to Thomas Killings- 
worth, but at that time owned by Antliony Keasbey. The lot 
was conveyed to the before mentioned trustees of the Anti- 
Pedo-Baptist Society to build a meeting house upon, and also 
for a graveyard for said Society. It was stipulated in the con- 
veyance that the Society should pay, as a consideration for tlie 
property, one ear of Indian corn yearly, if demanded. The 
liouse was completed about the year 1790, at a cost of fourteen 
hundred and thirty-four pounds and some shillings, leaving a 
debt of four hundred and seventy-one pounds and eleven pence 
unpaid. The Baptist church at Salem, during the latter part of 
the last century, increased slowly in numbers, and up to 1801 
tliere were but seventy-four members. From that date, however, 
to 1869 they numbered nearly seven hundred members. After 
a time it was thought advisable, to have a meeting house more 
in the central portion of the town, and the majority of the trus 
tees purchased a lot on Broadway of the heirs of the late Thomas 
Thompson, and they erected on this lot a large and substantial 
brick cluirch, with a clock in the cupola, the tirst, I think, that 
was ever placed in any building in the city of Salem. The 
l)uilding was completed in 1845, and it is known, at the present, 
as the First Baptist Church of Salem. C. E. Cardo is tlie pastor, 
and it has a membersliip of 452. The congregation increased 
so greatly in numbers that some of the members believed it 
would be advantageous to tlie church to build another house for 
worship, which was accordingly done. The church was erected 
and completed in 1870 and stands at the corner of Parrot and 
Fenwicl^ streets, fronting on the latter. The building is large 



BAPTIST SOCIETIES. 411 



and elegant in appearance, and is quite an addition to that part 
of tlie town; it is called tlie Memorial Baptist Church, and has 
208 members. A. C. Williams is the pastor. 

An old manuscript book, wliich at one time belonged to 
Thomas Killingsworth, the first Judge and Baptist clergyman 
in Fenwick's colony, dates back to the 18th of January, 1690 ; 
and at the death of Killingworth it was delivered to Cornelius 
Copner, an inhal^itant of Penn's Neck, on the 16th of August, 
1709. About 1725 or 1730 Thomas Miles, the celebrated 
surveyor, became the possessor of it. In it it appears that Kil- 
lingsworth kept a genealogical record of a number of families 
that adhered to the Baptist faith, some of whom can be traced 
a(;curately up to this day ; and others, whose children have 
either left the State, or the name has been lost in the female 
line. Most of the English families tliat he chronicled were 
inliabitants of Penn's Neck. 

Tliomas Baldwin was born in Oxfordshire, England, in De- 
cember, 1657. His wife, Mary Baldwin, was, born in tlie Parisli 
of Macefield, in the county of Sussex, England, 24:th of 8th 
month, 1653. They emigrated to America soon after they were 
married, and located in Fenwick's colony, in the township of 
Penn's Neck, about the year 1683. Their stay in this county 
was of a short duration, for in 1685 they removed to Chester 
county, Pennsylvania. Thomas and Josepli Baldwin, the twin 
sons of Thomas and Mary Baldwin, were born at Chester, Au- 
gust 26th, 1685 ; William Baldwin, son of Thomas and Mary 
Baldwin, born 19th of December, 1687 ; Anthony Baldwin, 
born 10th of February, 1690; Mary, their daughter, born 25tli 
of Fel)ruary, 1692 ; Martha and Mary, their daughters, were 
born the 16th of December, 1694. 

The Lambson is an ancient family of Penn's Neck. Thomas 
and his wife, Ann Lambson, emigrated to America and located 
in Penn's Neck, in 1090, and agreeably to Killingsworth, they 
were of the Baptist faith. Giles, the son of Thomas and Ann 
Eambson, was born the 22d day of July, 1692 ; Eleanor, their 
daughter, was born the 21st day of March, 1694 ; Thomas was 
born tlie 29th of December, 1696 ; Joseph was born the I5t]i 
of Septeml^er, 1700 ; Catharine, their daughter, was born the 
21st of March, 1703 ; Mathias Lambson, son of Thomas and 
Ann, was Ijorn 31st of May, 1705 ; Micliael was born 29th of 
September, 1707 ; Mary, their daughter, was born 13th of 
April, 1710 ; Daniel was born the 1st day of February, 1715. 
Many of the large families of Lampson, as well as the Copner 
family, adhered to the religion of tlieir ancestors, althougli a 



412 BAPTIST SOCIETIES. 



number became active members of the Presbyterian Church 
that was organized in the township, in 1760. Mathias Lamp- 
son, of the present century, lived in and owned the ancient 
brick dwelling that was built by his ancestor about 1730, which 
stands near Salem creek. He had two or more children. His 
daughter married the late Charles Swing, being his first wife. 
His son, Thomas Lampson, not being contented to remain on 
the farm, turned his attention to mercantile business. He 
bouglit property at the foot of Broadway street, Salem, and 
erected the spacious brick house that is now standing, whicli 
belongs to the Steamboat Company. The old mansion and 
farm in Penn's Neck is owned by the late John Lindzey's 
Jicirs. 

Cornelius Copner was one of the active English citizens of 
Penn's Neck as early as 1695 up to his death, in 1731, as the 
puljlic records of Salem county fully corroborate. He was 
twice married. By his first wife, whom he married April 28th, 
1701, he had the following named cliildren — Edmund, born 2d 
day of February, 1702; Ann, born 16th of January, 1703; 
Elizabetli, born 7th of April, 1705 ; Cornelius, born 25th of 
July, 1707 ; John, born 11th of November, 1709 ; Edmund, 
born 23d of February, 1712 ; Christian, third daughter of Cor- 
nelius and Christian Copner, was born 17th of June, 1714. 
Christian Copner, the wife of Cornelias, departed this life 18th 
of June, 1714. Sarali, the second wife of Cornelius Copner, 
was born 15th of September, 1696, and married on the 21st of 
December, 1714. Christian, daughter of Cornelius and Sarah 
Copner, was born 3d of January, 1716, and died two days 
later; Tobias, the son of Cornelius and Sarah Copner, was born 
lltli of February, 1717. Tobias was th'e father of Joseph and 
Ebenezer Copner. Samuel, the son of Cornelius and Sarali 
Copner, was born 17th of February, 1719 ; Sarah, daugliter of 
Cornelius and Sarah, was born 9tli of February, 1720 ; Samuel, 
2d, son of Cornelius and Sarali, born 20th of November, 1721. 
Joseph Copner, at one time of his life, belonged to the Presby- 
tca-ian Church, but in his old age, became a member of Salem 
Monthly Meeting of Friends. Cornelius Copner owned a large 
tract of excellent land, part of which still l)elungsto his family. 
Benjamin Acton, of Salem, is the owner of a part of it, whose 
wife is a lineal descendant of Cornelius Copner. 

A few Baptists settled on Oldman's creek as early as 1665 ; 
they were companions of Robert Carr. It does not appear that 
tliey had any regular meetings for a number of years after they 
first settled in Salem county. At a subsequent jjcriod they 



BAPTIST SOCIETIES. 413 



became members of Cohansey Church, it being at the time the 
micleus around which the Baptists in West Jersey centered. 
It appears, by tlie care of the mother church, those scattering 
members residing on Oldman's creek and in Pilesgrove were 
constituted a branch of the Cohansey Church, at Daretown, in 
1743. At that period there were several families from New 
England by the name of Reed, Elwell, Cheesman, Faullin, 
Wallace, Champney and Mayhew. Many of their descendants 
are still living in Pittsgrove at the present time, and most of 
them, I have been told, still adhere to the religious sect of their 
foro^athers. Robert Kelsay was their pastor soon after the 
branch was organized, and continued to be until 1754. Accord- 
ing to their record, the Baptists on Oldman's creek, in 1740, 
purchased a piece of ground near the head of tide water, near 
what in after time was known as Sculltown, for a burial ground, 
on which they erected a log meeting house in 1771. It Jias 
gone down, and the lot is used as a common burying ground by 
tne neighboring inhabitants. In 1771 Pittsgrove Baptist 
Church became a distinct Gospel Church. 'jPhe following- 
minute made at Cohansey Church 9th of 5th montli, 1771, says, 
" We conclude tliat all such of our members as shall join in 
" said intended constitution are fully dismissed from us. So, 
" recommending you to God, and the words of his grace, we 
" rest your brethren in the Paith and Pellowship of the Gospel,''' 
It was signed at their monthly meeting in belialf of the whole 
church by David Bowen, Clerk. They further stated that the 
members dismissed from Cohansey Ciiurch, wJio became mem- 
bers of Pittsgrove, were John iVfayliew, iSr., VViiJiaiu Brick, 
Jacob Elwell, Jolni Dickinson, CornL4ius Aubtm, ISaiuuei Briciv, 
Johanna Mayhew, Eleanor iNelson, Estlier liewcs, Il;uinaii 
Elwell, Matthew Aarons, Pamannah Garton, I'uhda liudteoii, 
Mathias Dickinson, Piiebe Nelson, Iveuhania Austin, ana 
Rachel Brick. The cliurch was incorporated in ITbti, and 
John Mayhew, William Brick, William Dickinson, Jolm Kci- 
ley, Samuel Rose, David Nichols, and Jacob Wright were made 
Trustees. As was the custom in the lirst organization of the , 
Protestant Societies in this colony, the first Baptist meeting 
house in Pilesgrove was built of logs. It stood in their grave 
yard on the same spot where, in 1743, the frame meeting house 
was built. This last was of moderate size, but was a substantial 
structure, and remained over a century. It was sold in 1844 to 
the colored people for a liouse of worship, and the present 
brick house was built the same year (1844) at a cost of <^ii,200. 
They have a parsonage situated about two miles from their 



414 BAJTIST SOCIETIES. 



church, near Pole Tavern, containing, at the present time, 
a comfortable dwelling house, thirty acres of land, and other 
buildings. In 1762, when Pilesgrove embraced the present 
township of Pittsgrove, John Mayhew, Jr., in consideration of 
£80 proclamation money, did give and convey 60 acres of land, 
lying near Pole Tavern, to Jacob Elwell, John Mayhew, Sr., 
and John Dickinson, in trust, for the use and beneiit of such 
person as shall be minister or teacher amongst us, and for the 
Ana-Baptist congregation in Pilesgrove, aforesaid, and only 
during his official connection with them. It seems, from a want 
of legal authority in said person to receive the trust, it was 
deemed necessary by the future generation that a deed of con- 
lirmation of said trust should be made by the surviving heirs of 
the original grantor. The last deed was given in 1809, by John 
Mayhew, Sarah Worth, Susannah Smitli, and Lydia Davis, 
heirs of John Mayhew, the elder, to Jonathan Elwell, Stanford 
Mayhew, Samuel Aarons, Uriah Elwell, John Coombs, Joseph 
Suxton, and John Duulap, trustees of the Baptist congregation 
of Pittsgrove. At a subsequent period part of the said land 
was sold, leaving about 30 acres. William Worth ^as received 
into fellowship of the Pittsgrove Baptist Church, and became 
their pastor in 1771, and continued in that capacity for twenty- 
two years, during which time there were sixty -live new members 
added to the congregation by baptism. Erom the year 1788 
the aged Pastor Worth imbibed doctrines contrary to the fund- 
amental creed of the Baptist faith. The effect of such doctrines 
enunciated from the pulpit, was the cause of many of his con- 
gregation attaching themselves to the neighboring Presbyterian 
Church, whilst a number of male members of the Baptist 
Church imbibed his doctrine. The conllict between the two 
contending parts of the congregation was sliarp and very per- 
sistent, and their historian states tluit, in 1803, after a struggle 
of ten years, two deacons and William Worth were excluded 
for heresy, Wortli being deposed from the ministry. He re- 
mained a Universalist until approaching death induced him to 
renounce his error. 

After sucli severe contention the congregation was rent in 
twain, the male members adliered to their pastor, wliilst many 
of the female members maintained the doctrine of the mother 
church at Cohansey. Their names were Susanna Elwell, Cath- 
arine Harris, Heuhana Austin, Ann Iloberson, Tabitha Mayhew, 
PrisciUa Blue, Abigail Joslin, Piiuhama Moore, Ilachel Hobi- 
son, and Ilachel Brick. Being de})rived from meeting in tlie 
chiircli ])y the apostate pastor, and, Avliicli was more trying, by 



BAPTIST SOCIETIES. 415 



their husbands and sons, these sterling women frequently held 
their meetings in private houses, and in pleasant weather, in a 
contiguous grove. Ancient Rome was saved at one time by a 
heroic band of women, and the fundamental doctrines of the 
Baptists were maintained at the Pittsgrove church by those 
faithful women,whose names, I have no doubt, are held in grate- 
ful remembrance by the congregation up to the present time. 
From the year 1803 the congregation gradually increased, and 
in the year 1876 they numbered two Inmdred and thirty-one, 
Levi Morse being pastor. 

The Dividing Creek Baptist Church was constituted 30th 
of 5th month, 1761, by permission of Cohansey and Cape 
May churches. The following are the names of the mem])ers 
at the time of its organization : Jonadab Sliepj)ard, Thomas 
Sheppard, William Paullin, William Dallis, Temperance Shep- 
parcl, Ann Sheppard, Patience Paulin, John Terry, Sarah Terry 
and Eve Sockwell. Their first meeting house was erected on a 
lot donated by Seth Lore, in 1751. Edwards writes that their 
first meeting house was destroyed by fire, in 1770, and was 
rebuilt in 1771. The size of the building was 30 by 22 feet; 
they continued to occupy the new building up to 1821 ; when 
like the former clmrcli it was destroyed by fire. In 1823 they 
Ijuilt a new building, 40 by 34 feet, and in 1860 there was added 
in the length of the building twenty feet, and the old side gal- 
leries removed and the entire building improved. It appears 
by the record kept by the meeting as early as 1761, before the 
church was regularly organized, steps were taken to secure a 
permanent home for their pastor. The people of Nantuxet and 
Dividing Creek, having agreed to build a parsonage, (it being 
first introduced by four men, Samuel Heaton, the pastor, Jona- 
dab Sheppard, David Sheppard, and William Paullin,) they pur- 
chased of Alexander Moore, one hundred acres of land, on which 
they erected a house and other necessary buildings, for the use 
of their pastor. They paid two Inmdred pounds for it, and sold 
it some few years since* for ^2,700, and in 1850 they secured a 
lot in the village near their meeting house, on which they erec^ted 
their present parsonage. Their pastor is II. B. Raybold. They 
have 291 members. 

The Alloways Creek Baptist Church, known as the Canton 
Churc]i,was constituted in 1818. There was a Baptist meeting 
held in this vicinity some years previous to the date of its organ- 
ization, from tlie Cohansey mother church. At the decline and 
final close of the Presbyterian Church at Logtown, many of its 
members, together with the Mulford family, purchesed a lot 



416 BAPTIST SOCIETIES. 



adjoining the Presbyterian grave-yard and erected a meeting 
]iouse thereon. At what time they commenced holding tlieir 
meetings at that place I liave no means of determining. Frank 
Spencer is the pastor. Nntnl>er of members 319. 

Woodstown Baptist Chnrcli constituted in 1822. Tliey num- 
ber 172 members, and have no pastor at the present time. 

Allowaystown Baptist Church was constituted an independ- 
ent Baptist Church in 1830. The persons who took the most 
active part in the affairs of that meeting were William Walker, 
the Lambert family, and a few others at that period. M. M. 
Finch is the present pastor. There are 144 members. 

A number of the inhabitants of Bridgeton, in the latter part 
of tlie last century, were Baptists. They were members of the 
old Cohansey Churcli. The advantage of establishing a meet- 
ing for their denomination in Bridgeton, was early recognized 
by the members then connected with the mother church at Co- 
liansey. As a number of the members lived in the town of 
Bridgeton and surrounding neighborhood, they were desirous of 
liaving meetings that they could attend, nearer than the meet- 
ings of the Cohansey Church, which at that time wei'e held in 
the Neck, near Sheppard's mill. About 1797 the Baptists com- 
menced liolding religious meetings every First-day afternoon 
in the Court I^ouse in the town of Bridgeton. The Pastor of 
Cohansey Church, Henry Smalley, generally attended their 
meetings. His services were continued, and tlie number of 
Baptists increased in the town. They soon found the need of 
a house of worship, and although the large edifice at Roadstown 
liad been finally completed but a few years before, at a largo 
expense for that time, and tlie clouds of war were gathering 
over the nation, the Baptists at Bridgeton resolved to wait no 
longer, and selected a suitable lot. On the 6tli of 6th month, 
1812, the matter was brought before the Cohansey Church, at 
that time removed to Roadstown, and met their approval. A 
committee was appointed to purcliase the lot already selected, 
then belonging to Daniel Elmer. This committee promptly 
attended to their duty, and reported at a meeting held July 16th, 
of the same year, that they had secured a " deed" for two acres 
of land, on condition that a house of worship be built thereon 
within three years, and a street three rods in width was to be 
kept 0]>en between the meeting house and his lot, and on failure 
thereof the lot to bo "forfeited." The lot cost $155, and the 
deed bears date July 16th, 1812. Tlio lot is the one so long 
occupied by the church, bounding on Pearl, Marion and Bank 
streets, ttwd k the «iM)>e where in itiU tht?I>" tsgmeiery, and whero 



BAPTIST SOCIETIES. 417 



tlio house stciuds which they built, now romodcled, enlarged and 
occupied by the Pearl street Baptist Church, a branch of the 
First Church. On July 23d, 1812, a committee was appointed 
to procure materials and superintend the building of the meet- 
ing house, and Moses Harris, Isaac Mulford and Moses Platts 
were chosen. The chief share of the responsil)ility rested on 
Mulford. But, as the result of the magnitude of the enterprise 
for those interested in it, and the high prices incident to the war, 
the l)uilding was not completed nntil the latter part of 181G. 
In accordance with the custom of the greater number of the 
religious denominations, the building was dedicated to the wor- 
ship of Almighty God 17th of 12th month, 1816. Joseph Shep- 
pard, pastor from Salem, preached the sermon on the occasion, 
and the pastor, Henry Smalley, from the First Cohansey Church, 
made tlie dedicatory praj^er. The meetings that were formerly 
held at the Court House were transferred to the new house, and 
were regularly held there thereafter. 

The first meeting with reference to a separate organization 
was held 1st of 2d month, 1827. At that meeting there were 
thirty-eight members, men and women, applied for letters of dis- 
mission from the First Cohansey Church, for the purpose of 
forming a separate church. The letters of dismission were 
granted at a meeting held 5th of 1st month, 1828, and the church 
at Bridgeton was constituted a separate body the 31st of the 1st 
month, the same year. The number of members belonging to 
the new organization was forty, and George Spratt was their 
])astor. He and his wife Elizabeth were from the Third Bap- 
tist Church, Philadelphia. The rest of the congregation were 
from the F'irst Cohansey Church, among whom were John Sil)- 
ley, Curtis Ogden, Noah Ayres, Lewis Paullin, Ruth B. Ogden, 
iSarah Sibley, and a number of others. The church was incor- 
])orated by the name of the " Second Cohansey Baptist Church, 
at Bridgeton." The first trustees elected were Smith Bowen, 
Daniel Pierson and Garrison Maul, Mr. Spratt continued as 
]jastor until 20th of lOth montli, 1830. He was succeeded by 
John C. Harrison in 2d montli, 1831, who remained until 3d 
month, 1834. Michael Frederick became the third pastor in 
12th month, 1831r, and died in tlie pastorate, 13th of 11th month, 
1837. Large numbers were added to the church during his 
pastorate, and the numl)er of members at his death had in- 
(ireased to one hundred and sixty-eight, ])esides thirty-one dis- 
missed in tlie fall of 1836, to form a new church at Cedarville. 
Galleries and a vestibule were put into the meeting house during 
liis time, greatly increasing its acconunodations. The fourth 
53^ 



418 BAPTIST 80CIET1E8. 



pastor was Charles J. Hopkins, who commenced his labors 25th 
of 11th month, 1838, and resigned 25th of 9th montli, 1813. 
During his pastorate the church increased to two hundred and 
thirty-nine members, and a chapel was built on Atlantic street, 
near the centre of the town, for evening meetings and Sunday 
School purposes, which was dedicated 11th of 1st month, 1840. The 
liftli pastor was Charles E. "Wilson, wlio commenced his labors 
Ttli of 4th month, 1844, and remained until 5th month, 1852. 
Tho number of members had increased to 304 at the time of his 
removal. The sixth pastor was William Cornwell, who was 
installed 7th of 8th month, 1852, and remained until IStli of 
7th month, 1856. Soon after his arrival, the subject of repair- 
ing and enlarging the meeting house, or building a new one, 
was advocated, and on 26th of 2d month, 1853, a meeting of 
the ciuirch was held to consider the subject, and a resolution 
was adopted to procure a lot in as central a location as possible 
and build a new house of worship, and a committee, consisting 
of James Stiles, Horatio J. Mulford and Isaac A. Sheppard, 
was appointed to carry out the above resolution. A lot, 67 
feet front and 126 feet deep, situated on the south side of Com- 
merce street, just above Pearl and in the centre of the city, was 
purchased for $1,300, of Azel and Henry R. Pierson, the deed 
being dated 3d of 10th month, 1853. The size of the building 
was 50 feet in width, and 99 feet in length. It has a basement 
story for evening meetings and Sunday School purposes, and the 
upper story is for the main audience room. The basement is 
built of stone, and the rest of brick. The whole building is 
rough-cast, with a tower in the centre of the front, surmounted 
with a steeple rising 140 feet from the ground. The building 
was completed in the fall of 1857. 

Mr. Cornwell was succeeded, as pastor, l)y J. Spencer Ken- 
nard, Itli of 1st month, 1857 ; the church prospered greatly 
during his pastorate, which lasted until 11th of 9th month, 

1859. He was succeeded by James F. Brown in 6th month, 

1860, who remained until 3d month, 1868. William "Wilder 
became the ninth pastor 1st month, 1869, and continued until 
7th month, 1871, when he resigned, and was succeeded in 3d 
month, 1872, by E. B. Palmer, the tenth and present pastor. 
Tlie walls and ceiling of tlie audience room of their house of 
worship were handsomely frescoed in the summer of 1872. A 
parsonage, situated on Atlantic street, was purcliased in 1869, 
at a cost of about $5,500. The church also has three chapels, 
two frame and the other brick, used for Sunday school purposes. 
The present number of members is three hundred and sixty-six. 



6APTIST B0CIETIE8. 419 



In 7th month, 1866, sixty-nine members of the First Church 
were dismissed, and were constituted a new cluirch under the 
name of the Pearl Street Baptist Church, of Bridgeton. Tlie 
mother church gave them a deed for the old meeting house, 
which they have since enlarged and handsomely improved, at a 
cost of about $20,000. William K. McNeil became their first 
pastor, and remained until 2d month, 1872. He was followed 
by B. S. Morse, in 4th month, 1872, who resigned in the spring 
of 1874. A. B. MacGowan is the third and present pastor. 
They number two hundred and eighty-eight members at the 
present time. 

I am indebted to my young friend, Charles E. Sheppard, of 
Bridgeton, for the particulars of the first Baptist churches, and 
the time they were constituted in that city. 

As a result of a series of meetings held at Cedarville in 1835 
and 1836, by Mr, Frederick, pastor of the Bridgeton Baptist 
Church, a large number of persons united with that church, and 
on their application thirty-one persons were dismissed and con- 
stituted a church at Cedarville, 6th of 9th month, 1836. Dur- 
ing the last year the congregation have erected a large and 
elegant building for a church edifice, and a building attached 
where they hold their First day or Sunday school, which is a 
very commodious room. The cost of the whole building was 
nearly $10,000. Wm. A. Durfee is the pastor. There are at 
present two hundred and thirty-five members. 

The Baptist Church at Greenwich was constituted from Co- 
hansey in 1850, and erected a plain and substantial brick edifice 
on tlie main street of Greenwich. S. C. Dare is the pastor. 
There are two hundred and tliirty-seven members. 

The Baptist congregation at Newport built themselves a good 
meeting house within the town a few years ago ; tlie church was 
constituted in 1855. W. A. Durfee is the pastor, and they 
liave one Inindred and thirty-seven members. 

Within the recollection of some of the oldest inliabitants of 
this section of the country, the place wliere Vineland is now 
located was a wilderness, where many sportsmen of the towns 
of Salem and Bridgeton, in the fall of the year, went in pursuit 
of deer and otlier wild animals. When Landis purchased the 
tract of land of the late Hichard Wood, it was in its primeval 
state. He soon afterward commenced running out the land 
into convenient lots, and held out inducements for persons to 
settle tliereon, and many embraced the opportunity from several 
states — the result i^, there is no part of South Jersey that has 
a more cultivated set of inliabitants than can be found in Vine- 



420 BAPTlSl' SOClE'riEia. 



land. A seminary was built, and good school houses were 
established; meeting houses were erected of nearly all religious 
organizations; among them are two Baptist churches, whicli are 
rapidly increasing in members. The first one was constituted 
in 1SG5 ; N. B. Randall is tlie pastor, and has three hundred 
and nineteen members. .The second, called Sonth Vineland 
Baptist Church, was organized in 1871 ; Wm. W. Meacli is the 
pastor, and it has fifty-six members. 

The idea of a High School for the southern part of jSTew 
Jersey, to be under the control of Baptists, originated with R. 
F. Young, in 1819, then pastor of the First Baptist Church in 
Salem. Through his influence a convention was subsequently 
called, connected with the West New Jersey Baptist Associa- 
tion, to be held at Salem. To this invitation a number of 
churches responded. After deliberating on the propriety of the 
enterprise, passed resolutions touching its desirableness and 
importance. No corresponding act, however, followed, and the 
whole project ended. It was revived again at a meeting of the 
West New Jersey Baptist Association, held in Greenwich in 
September, 1865. At that time tlie Association passed the 
following resolutions : 

Resolved, That this Association has heard, with pleasure, of 
the establishment of a denominational school, for the education 
of both sexes, at Ilightstown, and that in the judgment of this 
body, the time has come when a high school, for the education 
of both sexes, should be established within the bounds and under 
the exclusive direction of the West Jersey Baptist Association. 

Resolved, That this Institution shall be located in that place 
which shall present the greatest inducement. 

Resolved, That the minimum amount to be raised for the 
buildings and grounds of said Institution, shall l)e twenty-five 
thousand dollars. 

There was a committee appointed at the time, to carry out the 
ol)jects of the aforesaid resolutions. All the churches belonging 
to the West New Jersey Baptist Association were represented 
on the committee; they had power to act as trustees till the 
next meeting of the Association. The first meeting of the com- 
mittee was held 3d of 10th month, 1865, at the rooms of the 
American Baptist pnblication society, 530 Arch street, Bhila- 
dclphia. The following preamble and resolutions were passed : 

Whereas, The sum of ten thousand dollars has been offered 
l)y the following individuals, conjointly, II. J. Mulford, Isaac 
W. Mulford, Anna Maria Mulford, Hannah Mulford and Lucy 



BAPTIST fiiOClE'fiES. 421 



W. Mulford, with the understanding tliat the proposed scliool 
shall be located in Bridgeton, their place of residence, respect- 
ively ; 

Whereas, This is the highest sum offered for the location ; 
Therefore, 

Resolved, That the school shall be located in Bridgeton, New 
Jersey, agreeable to the resolutions passed at the late meeting 
of the West Jersey Baptist Association. 

Horatio J. Mulford, in 1868, offered the ground for the Insti- 
tute on west side of the Coliansey, containing ten acres and 
forty-two rods, which was cordially accepted, as being ample in 
size and most eligibly located. This Institute is located on tlio 
west l)ank of the Coliansey. It is built of brick, with a mansard 
or French roof, and is a great improvement to the city of Bridge- 
ton. The school was opened in the fall of 1870, and lias taken 
a higli rank in the community, and is in a prosperous ('ondition. 



SEVENTH-DAY BAPTIST SOCIETIES. 

The Seventli-Day Baptists are an ancient religious organiza- 
tion in the American Provinces. As early as 1662, a large 
number of Welsh Baptist emigrants, known as John Miles 
Company, he being their pastor, arrived at Boston, and settled 
in Massachusetts, and named their location " Swansea," after 
tlieir native place in Wales. (See Davis' History of the Welsh 
Baptist). Meeting with persecution from their Puritan neighbors, 
a large number of their children and grandchildren, with some 
Baptists from Scotland, moved to South Jersey, in the year 
1687, and settled at Barratfs Run, Bowentown and Shiloh. 
This colony from New England, was known as the "Rev. 
Timothy Brooks," or the Bo wen Company ; and kept up a sep- 
arate Society until 1710, when they united with the old Cohan- 
sey Baptist Church. From 1695 to 1700, and subsequently, 
Jonathan Davis, son of the pastor by the same name, of the 
Miles Company from Wales, a Seventh-Day Baptist from Long 
Island, (see Morgan Edward's History,) having married Eliza- 
beth Bavven, one of the Miles Company, visited his Welsh 
cousins at Bowentown, Shiloh and vicinity; he gained' many 
converts to tlie Seventh-Day Baptist Clmrch. Tlieir mimbers 
were also increased l)y additions from Pennsylvania, Delaware 
and Maryland, and from Trenton, Bonhamtown and Piscata- 
way. New Jei'sey. It appears from their old records, that in 
1716 these Seventli-Day Baptists had a temporary organization, 
and held meetings from house to liouse. About the year 1700, 
Jonathan Davis moved from Long Island and settled at Tren- 
ton, with his brother Elnathan Davis, who was the Surveyor 
General of New Jersey ; from there Jonathan made frequent 
visits to his brethren at Shiloh. Jonathan Davis, son of Elna- 
than, the Surveyor-General, married Estlier, daughter of Isaac 
Ayars, Sr., of Shih:)h, and located near by, and became a prom- 
inent preacher of tlie Gospel. On the 27tli day of the 3d month, 
1737, the Seventli-Day Baptist Church of Shiloh, was organized, 
with the following articles of faith, and agreement, and the 
names in the order as they are found in the old records. It 



SKVENTH-DAY BAPTIST SOCIETIES. 42 S 



commences thus: "We, whose names are hereunder written, 
" do join together upon the articles of agreements following 
" which includes nine articles of Faith. 1st. We believe that 
" unto us there is but one God, the Father, and one Lord, Jesus 
"Christ, who is the Mediator between God and mankind. Wc 
" believe the Holy Ghost is the Spirit of God." The other ar- 
ticles of faith I omit on account of brevity. John Swinney, his 
wife Deborah Swinney, Dr. Elijah Bowen, Deborah Bowen, 
John Jerman, now spelled Jarman, Caleb Barratt, Abigail Bar- 
ratt, Hugh Dunn, Amy Dunn, Jonathan Davis, Jr., Esther 
Davis, Caleb Ayars, Joseph Swinney, Deborah Swinney, Jr., 
Samuel Davis, Ann Davis, Jane Philips, of Newtown Square, 
Pennsylvania, and Anna Swinney. 

It should be borne in mind that many of the Seventh-Day 
Baptists still held their membership vdth the First-Da}'^ Bap- 
tists, and hesitated to become contentious members, among 
whom were Timothy Brooks' two daughters. Some of the 
consistent members had burial lots in other societies, and were 
not interred at Shiloh ; among this class were the first two 
names on the list who were buried in the old Baptist burying 
ground of -Cohansey, located near Sheppard's Mill. On a 
marble tombstone, still standing, are carved the words, " In 
" memory of Deborah Swinney, who departed this life the 4th 
" day of April, 1760, in the 77th year of her age." She was 
the daughter of John Swinney, who was one of the first 
European settlers at Cohansey. The inscription further states 
that Deborah was the first wliite female child born at Cohansey 
precinct. At the constitution of the church Jonathan Davis, 
Jr., was chosen pastor ; ruling elders and deacons were also 
elected officers of the church — the former to look after the 
spiritual, and the latter the temporal interests of the flock. 
About the year 1S30 the office of ruling elder was discontinued, 
partly from an unwillingness on the part of some to submit to 
the close spiritual oversight of the elders, partly on account of 
the belief that the deacons should attend to the spiritual as well 
as temporal concerns of the church. On the 24tli of 3d montli, 
1738, Caleb Ayars, Sr., deeded to the church one acre of land, 
near the village, for a meeting house lot and burying gi-ound ; 
and a frame house for worship, size forty by thirty feet, was 
erected the same year. The ministers of the Seventh-Day Bap- 
tist Church were many of them noted for their learning and 
piety. Jonathan Davis, of Trenton, was never a settled pastor 
at Shiloh ; his wife was Elizabeth Bowen, sister, aunt and 
cousin to the Bowens, Brookses, and Swinneys, who resided at 



424r SEVENTH-DAY BAFHST SOCIETIES. 



Bowentowu and vicinity. On acconnt of this relationship he 
frequently visited Coliansey, and preached mostly at Shiloh ; 
occasionally at the Coliansey Chnrcli. History says he was 
very tall and large in proportion, and was sometimes called 
" great liigh priest." Samuel Bowen, of the Timothy Brooks' 
company, was colleague for many years of tlie first pastor, Jona- 
than Davis, Sr, The younger Jonatlian Davis continued to be 
pastor of Shiloh Clmrch till his death, wliich occurred 2d of 2d 
montli, 1768, in his 60th year. He was succceeded by Jona- 
than Davis, of the Welsh tract, now Brandywine, Delaware. 
He married Margaretta Bond, of Delaware, a descendant of 
tlie distinguished Sharpless family, of Chester county, Penn- 
sylvania. Before settling in Sliiloh he founded Newark Acad- 
emy, wliich has since grown into Delaware College. This 
Elder Davis was born 7th of 7th month, 173-i, ordained in 
Shiloh Church 1768, and continued to be their pastor till his 
death, which event took place in 1785. It was this man, so 
eminent for learning and true piety, tliat gave the beautiful 
name of Shiloh, in imitation " of the Ark of God resting at 
" Shiloh." Previous to that time the place was called Cohansey 
Corners. Jonathan Jarman was his colleague fox some years, 
and after his deatli supplied the church until he moved to Cape 
May, where he died, but his remains were brouglit back to Slii- 
loh for burial. For about two years Thomas Jones, a First-Day 
Baptist minister, supplied the church, and Deacon Philip Ayars, 
a prominent member of the church, administered the ordinance 
of baptism, in the absence of a pastor. In 1786 Nathan Ayars 
was called by the church, and ordained to the gospel ministry, 
and remained pastor till his death in 1810. John Davis, 
youngest son of Jonathan Davis, of Delaware, was ordained in 
1807. He continued within the clmrch until 1842, when he 
resigned on account of age. During his pastorate there were 
large nuiiil)ers added to their church. 

Azor Estee was the next pastor, who remained nearly three 
years ; during that time, their records state, there were ninety 
new members. In 1844, Solomon Carpenter took the oversight 
of their church, but his transfer to the China mission left them 
without a pastor. In 1845, Samuel Davison, a convert to the 
Seventh-Day I'aptist Church, took the pastoral charge, and was 
succeeded in 1848 by Giles M. Longworthy, whose sickness and 
premature death again left them without a pastor. Enoch 
Barnes, a convert from the Methodist Church, supplied the pul- 
pit during the summer of 1850. Elder George R. Wheeler and 
wife) joined the church under the ministry of Davison, m^ he 



6EVENTH-DAY BAPTIST B0CIETIE8. 425 



supplied the cliurch occasionally ; but living at Salem, twelve 
miles distant, could not perform pastoral labor. Soon after, he 
became pastor of tlie Seventh-Day Baptist Chnrch at Marl- 
borough, located in Salem county near Cumberland line, it being 
a branch of Shiloh Church. 

William Jones became a convert to the Seventh-Day Baptist 
Church, while laboring in Ilayti under the Baptist Free Mis- 
sionary Society. He became the pastor of Shiloh Church in 
1850, and continued there three years. During that time, the 
present brick meeting house was completed, and dedicated. The 
old building was donated to Union Academy, and fitted up es- 
pecially for the wants of tliat institution, then so prosperous 
under the principalship of Prof. E. P. Larkin. Their pastor, 
"William Jones, continued after the new meeting house was com- 
pleted, to hold meetings from night to night, which resulted in 
a large addition to the church, principally young people. In 
the year 1853, Jones resigned his charge to go as missionary to 
Palestine, and was succeeded by Walter B. Gillette, after a 
successful pastorate of nearly twenty years ; during his minis- 
tration the cause of education advanced, and the present Aca- 
demic building was erected. He resigned the pastorate to go 
as missionary in the Western Association. In April 1873, A. 
II. Lewis was elected as pastor of their church ; during his 
ministration a parsonage in the village was purchased and re- 
modeled at a cost of al)out three thousand dollars. Lewis is 
above mediocrity as a pulpit orator, possesses great learning, 
and is aifable and pleasing in his address, consequently many 
joined the church during the last winter. It now numbers about 
three hundred and seventy -five. In 1827 a Sabbath School was 
organized, and I have been informed it has continued ever since, 
uninterruptedly. The old, as well as the young, take absorbing 
interest in the maintenance of the schools. The first settlei'S of 
Shiloh were an intelligent people, and some were graduates of 
institutions of learning. They soon established a library of 
useful books in their village school ; the higher branches were 
taught, as well as the rudiments of knowledge, and Shiloh be- 
came noted for its schools. In 1818, an academy was opened 
under the management of Prof. E. P. Larkin, which stood for 
many years as the leading institution of learning in South Jer- 
sey, and still continues to exert a healthful influence under the 
care of Prof. G. M. Cottrell. The temperance cause enlisted 
the feelings of the members of this ancient church. In 1833, 
their Elder William B. Maxson, introduced the subject in their 
liioeting, and so great m interest w^s mniiifeste^ t\\^t qi\q bu^, 
H 



426 6EYENTH-DAY BArTIST SOCIETIES. 



dred and forty signatures to a temperance pledge were immedi- 
ately obtained ; but none entered into the cause more heartily, 
nor rejoiced more to see it prosper, as I have been informed, than 
their venerable pastor, John Davis. Some years after the church 
adopted a temperance clause, and as a clnirch has been com- 
mitted to it ever since. 

Although the church at Shiloh has from time to time 
incurred heavy expenditures in money in building their churches 
and academies, I have been informed that it is clear of debt. 
They have obtained, by legacies and from other sources, consid- 
erable sums of money. In 1774 Esther Davis, daughter of 
Isaac Ayars, and widow of the first pastor, Jonathan Davis, left, 
l)y will, a house and lot to the church. In 1754 Richard 
Sparks, a Keithite Seventh-Day Baptist, left, by will, a lot on 
Fifth street, Philadelphia, for a burial ground. George Keith, 
the apostate Quaker preacher, in the latter part of the seven- 
teenth and early part of the eighteenth century, left the Soxjiety 
of Friends, of which he at one time was a consistent and useful 
member, and with his followers adopted the Seventh day as the 
Sabbath, and espoused the Baptist creed. Several of John 
Smith's, of Amblebury, grand-children became the followers of 
Keith, and others that resided within the Salem tenth, a number 
that belonged to l^ewton meeting, also many Friends that were 
citizens of Philadelphia and adjacent country, so much so that 
there were three Keithite meetings established — one in Bybcrry, 
one within the city limits, the third, I think, was located near 
Radnor. George Keith, within a short time after these meet- 
ings were established, returned to England, his native land, and 
became a member of the Church of England. Most of his fol- 
lowers in America, in a few years, became members of other 
religious denominations, generally the old Baptist organization. 
The city government soon afterward prohibiting interments 
thereon, the New Market and Sliiloh churches took charge of 
it, and realized some $4,000 or $5,000 from the part not occu- 
pied by the graves. 

In 1858 Deacon Ayars, grandson of Rev. Jonathan Davis, 
3d, left, by will, $1,000 to the church, the interest only to be 
used. In 1873 the late Caleb Sheppard left, by will, $500 to 
tlie Shiloh Academy, and that sum, with the recent subscrip- 
tions, will free the institution from debt. 



PRESBYTERIAN SOCIETIES. 

From the year 1690 np to 1745 there was a large emigration 
from New England and New York States to Femvick Colony. 
Many of the emigrants were Presbyterians, and they, like the 
early Friends, were satisfied with erecting log houses for Divine 
worship here in the wilderness. Tlie first Presbyterian church 
erected in Fenwick's tenth was l)uilt at Fairfield, on the south 
bank of Cohansey creek, about the year 1695. It was composed 
of logs. The pastor of the church at that time was Thomas 
Bridges, who, it is said, was called away to Boston in 1702. 
A few years later the congregation erected for themselves a 
frame edifice in the old New Englandtown grave-yard, on the 
banks of Cohansey creek, it being about one mile from what is 
known at this time as the old stone church. Howell Powell, it 
seems, was one of the early pastors of Fairfield church. lie 
died in 1717. 

In the year 1727 Daniel Elmer emigrated to Fairton from 
Connecticut. He was a young man, and a clergyman of con- 
siderable note in his native State. He was a pastor of Fairfield 
Prcsl)yterian church up to the time of his death, which occurred 
in 1755. From him originated the Elmers of Cumljerland 
county, many of whom have been distinguished men in profess- 
ional and civil life up to tlie present day. The ancestors of the 
Potter, Ewing, Fithian, Westcott and Bateman families also 
came from New England and settled at Cohansey in the latter 
part of the seventeenth or early in the eighteenth century. 
They have held an infiuential position in Cumberland county 
for several generations. 

The Presbyterians from New England settled on both sides 
of Cohansey creek, and quite a number of them purchased 
homes in, and in the neighborhoood of, Cohansey (now Green- 
wich). About the year 1705 they established and organized 
the first Presbyterian church on the north side of Cohansey 
creek, which was named Greenwich Church. I am indebted to 
the venerable Dr. Fithian, of Greenwich, for much valuable 
information respecting it. It appears that the early records of 



428 PRESBYTEKIAN SOCIETIES. 



the church were destroyed accidentally by lire, and the oldest 
record in possession of the congregation is a deed of gift from 
Jeremiah Bacon to Henry Joice and Thomas Maskell, for one 
acre of land, in trust for the people called Presbyterians, living 
on the north side of Cohansey creek, to build and establish a 
cluirch for the public worship of God, dated 24:th of 4tli month, 
1717. It is probable that this was a part of the thirty-two 
acres of land that William Bacon purchased of the executors of 
John Fenwick in 1688. The first pastor of the church was a 
gentleman of the name of Black, and he remained as pastor for 
about three years. In 1708 he removed to Le\ves, Delaware, 
and in 1712 Ebenezer Goold, a native of New England, was 
installed pastor. The year after the installation of Goold the 
congregation procured a piece of land, on which they built a 
parsonage. The deed for the land (six acres) was from Nicholas 
Gibbon and Leonard Gibbon to Josiah Fithian, TJiomas Maskell 
and Noah Miller. They made a provision in the deed that Presby- 
terians should build a house for their minister to dwell in, by deed 
dated 13th of 1st month, 1729. AVliat a noble example the two 
wealthy men, Nicholas and Leonard Gibbon, set for future 
generations ! They, though strict members of the Church of 
England, were willing to assist other religious denominations. 
The congregation did build a house on the land, in which their 
pastor resided until it, together with the furniture it con- 
tained, was consumed with fire, as also the early records of the 
church. Ebenezer Goold, soon after he went to Greenwicli, 
married Ann Brewster, a sister of Francis Brewster, one of the 
elders of the church, and a descendant of Elder Brewster, 
who landed from the Mayflower, at Plymouth, in 1620. The 
congregation increased so greatly about the year 1735 that tlie 
house of worsliip was too small to accommodate them. They 
I'esolved to build a new church, and started a subscription for 
that purpose. Perhaps it would be interesting to many at this 
day to knowwlio were the leading members of the Presl)yterian 
Church at Green^vich at that period, wlio subscribed to the 
fund. They are as follows : 





£ sh. 




£sh. 


Ebenezer Goold, 


5 00 


Jos. Simpkins, 


1 00 


Will. Watson, 


10 00 


Thos. Wartham, 


3 00 


Elias Getting, 


10 00 


Matthias Fithian, 


5 00 


Saniuol Clark, 


5 00 


Constant Maskell, 


10 00 


Benj. ])arc, 


10 00 


John Woolaey, 


2 CK) 


Thos. Ewing, 


10 00 


Ananias Sayre, ' 


4 00 


Abel Carll, 


5 00 


Aaron Mulford, 


3 00 


Thos. Buryman, 


5 00 


Chas. Fordham, 


3 00 



PRESBYTERIAN SOCIETIES. 



429 





£sh. 




£sh. 


Abraham Reeves, 


10 00 


Wm. Perry, 


4 00 


Jonathan Sayre, 


2 00 


Jas. Carathers, 


4 00 


Nathaniel Bishop, 


2 05 


Thos. Eoad, 


3 00 


Samuel Miller, 


4 00 


John Woodruff, 


3 00 


Jonathan Holmes, 


G 00 


Noah Miller, Jr., 


4 00 


Thomas Sayre, 


5 00 


Jos. Moore, 


6 00 


John Padgett, 


8 00 


Jas. McKnight, 


2 00 


Harbour Beck, 


4 00 


Ebenezer Smith, 


1 00 


Nehemiah Veal, 


3 00 


Nathan Lupton, 


1 10 


Balbie Sheppard, 


1 00 


John Tyler, 


1 00 


Francis Brewster, 


2 00 


Deborah Keith, 


1 00 


Samuel Moore, 


5 00 


John Plummer, 


10 


John Miller, 


4 00 


Elias Davis, 


1 00 


Joseph Peck, 


2 00 


Mercy Maskell, 


2 00 


Nathaniel Harris, 


2 00 


Samuel Bacon, Jr., 


15 


Francis Tulies, 


1 10 


Josiah Parain, 


4 00 


John Shaw. 


3 00 


Thos. Padgett, 


6 00 


Philip Vickers, 


5 00 


James Crawford, 


1 00 


John Keith, 


2 10 


John Finlaw, 


1 00 



The subscription amounted to £234 10s. I think a number 
of those who subscribed were members of Deerfield Churcli, tlie 
members of which were in unison witli Greenwicli Presbyterian 
Church. The sum raised was insutiicient to build the church, 
which in size was 44 feet in length by 34 feet in width, and 
it was not completed until 1751, It was built of brick, and has 
since been taken down, and a more modern edifice has been 
erected on the opposite side of the street. 

When John Fenwick had determined upon laying out a town 
on the banks of the Cohansey, to be called after the Indian 
name of the river Cohansey; hence all the (-ounti-y on the north 
and south sides of said river was known as Cohansey Precinct. 
The country was known by the same name until about the year 
1710 or 1720. In 1690 there were a number of emigrants from 
Connecticut came to Fenwick Colony, and settled at a place 
which they called Fciirton, on the south side of Coliansey river, 
in Shrewsbury Neck, as it was called by the first settlers of 
Fenwick Colony. The name was changed by the Eastern emi- 
grants to Fairlield, after their native township in Connecticut. 
There were also a number of families from the State of New 
York and the Eastern States emigrated and settled in the town 
of Cohansey and the country adjacent, such as tlie Denn, Miller, 
Maskell, Padgett, Watson, Ewing, Seeley, and several other 
families, who became conspicuous in the religious and civil 
affairs of the Colony. The great-grandson of the lirst Watson 
that settled at Cohansey removed to Philadelphia, and late in 
life wrote ' Annals of Philadelphia," a work that will perpetuate 



430 PKESBYTERIAN SOCIETIES. 



Ids name for many generations. About the time the families 
that I mentioned came from New England and New York, 
the name of Cohansey was changed to Greenwich, after the 
native town of some of the emigrants. 

William Fithian emigrated from England to America, and 
settled at East Hampton, New York, in 1639, and his son, Sam- 
uel Fithian, removed from New York to Fairfield, in Fenwick 
Colony, in 1700, with his family. His wife was Priscilla Bur- 
nett. Tliey had six children — John, Josiah, Samuel, Esther, 
Matthias and William. Josiah Fithian removed from Fairfield 
and made Cohansey his permanent home, in 1706, and there 
married Sarali Dennis. They had seven children — Jolm, Jere- 
miah, Samuel, 3d, Hannah, (who subsequently married Ephraim 
Seeley) ; Esther, Joseph, Sarah and Josiah. Josiah and Sarah 
Dennis Fithian were the great-grandparents of the present Dr. 
Enocli Fithian, of Greenwich. 

By a deed dated 13th of 2d month, 1738, the Presbyterian 
grave-yard was enlarged by the addition of one acre and a quar- 
ter to its soutliern end, which was jDurchased for the sum of £25. 
The deed, made by John Ogden, of Cohansey, conveyed to Jo- 
siah Fithian, William Watson, and Abraham Reeves, " in trust 
for the sole and proper use and benefit of the Presbyterian con- 
gregation of Greenwich, for a meeting house and burying- 
ground forever, and to and for no other use." 

About tlie year 1700, William Hall, of Salem, and Daniel 
Cox, of Burlington, came into possession of large tracts of ex- 
cellent land in the southern portion of Pilesgrove township, 
Deerfield, and other parts of the Colony. They held out in- 
ducements to purchasers, and from the year 1715 to 1750 tliere 
was a large emigration from New York and other places to 
South Jersey. The Parvin, Harber Peck, Harris, Preston, 
Foster, and several otlier families, most of tliem Presbyterians, 
purchased lands in Deerfield, Cumberland county, as it is called, 
since the division of Salem tenth. Nearly at the same period 
tlic Newkirk, Vanmeter, Dubois, and other families bought 
lands of Cox and the heirs of Hall in what is now Pittsgrove, 
being formerly part of Pilesgrove. About 1737 the first Pres- 
byterian Cimrcli was erectetl at Deerfield. It seems that the 
churches at Greenwich and at Deerfield were in full unity with 
each other, both of them being under the charge of a body of 
deacons and elders who were members of both churches. Their 
names were as follows : Andrew Hunter, their pastor, Josiah 
Parvin, Harber Peck, Joseph Peck, Nathaniel Harris, Isaac 
Preston, and Jeremiah Foster, of Deerfield Church; Jonathan 



PKESBYTERIAN SOCIETIES. 431 



Holmes, Isaac Mills, Francis Brewster, Thomas Padgett, Thomas 
Ewing and Abraham Reeves, of Greenwich Clinrch. It appears 
that Andrew Hunter succeeded Ebenezer Goold as pastor of 
those two churches. He was born in Ireland about tlie year 
1715, and has been represented to have had great oratorical 
powers in the pulpit ; better than all, his moral and Christian 
life was in accordance with his precepts. He married Annie 
Stockton, of Princeton, New Jersey who survived him ; they 
left no children. Andrew Hunter died 7th month, 2d, 1775, 
and was buried in the ancient grave-yard at Greenwich, he being 
at the time of his death about sixty years of age. 

The Presbyterians, like the early Friends, seem to have had 
dissensions among them. The old church at Fairfield adhered 
strictly to the old Calvinistic doctrines, wliile the members of 
Greenwich and Deerfield took a more liberal view of their modes 
of faith; hence there was no unity between the two oldest Presby- 
terian churches in Fenwick Colony. While the Fairlield mem- 
bers adhered to what they called the old side, the members of 
Greenwich and Deerfield churches strenuously advocated the new 
modes of faith. It appears there was not full unity between the 
two churches for nearly forty years. Tlie eloquence of Hunter, 
however, attracted many persons from Fairfield Church, as "Welj- 
ster, their historian remarked, to the congregation at Greenwich. 

Pilesgrove Presbyterian Church is known at this time as 
Pittsgrove congregation, on account of the division of the town- 
sliip of Pilesgrove. The said church was organized by David 
Evans, in 1741 ; it was associated at the first period of its 
existence with the church at Gloucester, later with Deerfield, 
the neighboring church, and finally with Quihawkin, located in 
Pcnn's Neck. There appears to be no definite record showing 
when the latter named church was founded. It is generally 
believed by the members of that society that it was about tlie 
time Pilesgrove church was organized. The families that were 
members of Pittsgrove churcli at its establishment were — David 
Evans, their pastor, DuBois, YanMeter, Newkirk and. Mayhew, 
and at a later date the Coombs family, and a number of others 
that I do not recollect at this time, whose descendants generally 
are members of the same church that their forefathers assisted 
in founding in the wilderness more than one hundred and 
thirty years ago. The congregation at this time is said to be 
large, and has a large moral and religious influence in that sec- 
tion of the county. 

I ^Quihawkin Church was located at Obisquahasit, now Penn's 
Jfock, (m thQ banks of the ^hanangah (now DeLiware) river. 



432 PRESBYTERIAN SOCIETIES. 



near what is now Pennsville. The building was similar to the 
old Presbyterian Church at C-rreenwicli, but less in size ; it has 
been taken down for a number of years. Some of tlie persons 
that were members of it at its organization were Tobias Copner 
and family, and Dunn and Lambson families. Tradition asserts 
that the Philpot family, Thomas Miles, and liis son Francis, 
and a numl")er of otliers, were also members of said cliurcli. 
There is no Presbyterian meeting now kept up in that township. 
Joseph Copner, the son of Tobias, became a member of the 
Society of Friends in old age, while the large and influential 
family of Dunns have left the religious society of their ances- 
tors, most of them being memljers of tlie Methodist church. 

The records of the Presbyterian churcli located formerly at 
Logtown, in Alio ways Creek, seems in lapse of time to have 
been lost. Johnson, in his history of Salem county, says that 
the said church was founded in 1750. The families that were 
members of it at the time of its organization were James Sayre, 
Joseph Hildredth, Richard Moore, a person by the name of 
Woodruff, (I think it was Thomas, whose grandparents, Tliomas 
and Edith Wyatt Woodruff, emigrated from Worcestershire, 
England, to Salem county, in 1678), and Thomas Padgett, 
Jr. Towards tlie latter part of the last century Solomon Du- 
Bois, a young man from Pittsgrove, George (irier, Sr., Henry 
Wood, and a few others, became members of said church. I 
think it was not at any time large. The house of worship has 
been taken down more than a half century. Tlie cemetery that 
once belonged to tlie churcli is now enclosed with the Baptist 
grave-yard, near the village of Canton, where the descendants 
of the former members of the Presbyterian church still bury 
their deceased relatives, and a number whose parents were 
formerly members of the Logtown Churcli have become mem- 
1:)er8 of the Baptist Society. 

Bridgeton is comparatively a modern city in Fen wick's Col- 
ony. Richard Tindall, after the difficulties between Richard 
Hancock and the proprietor, was made surveyor-general of the 
province by Fen\vick, in the year 1680. In 1682 Richard 
Hancock erected a saw mill on the south side of Cohansey, 
where Bridgeton is located, on a small stream that flows into 
the Cohansey, called Mill creek. I presume that name was 
given to it on account of Hancock's mill being located there. 
What time ho remained there I have no means of determining, 
but Judge Elmer thinks he left that place and purchased prop- 
erty where Hancock's Bridge is located, find the family by that 

namo at that placQ aro lu^ ipBcendantB, I am ioclined to think 



PRESBYTERIAN SOCIETIES. 433 



that Ricliard Hancock left no children, if any they were daugh- 
ters ; hence tlie name of the family is lost. There were three 
persons by that name wlio emigrated to this country. Richard 
came with the proprietor in 1675. William Hancock, who pur- 
chased one thousand acres of land of the proprietor before he 
embarked to take possession of the province. William gave 
Richard Whiticar the powder of attorney to take charge of his 
landed estate until such time as he should arrive in this country 
himself, which was in 1677. He died in 1679, on his allotment, 
leaving two sons — John and William Hancock. John Hancock 
was the father of William, who was killed at the massacre in 
his own house during the American Revolution. William Han- 
cock, the son of the emigrant, purchased lands in Elsinborough, 
and was the ancestor of the family by that name in that town- 
ship. John, the cousin of Richard and William Hancock, came 
to this province in 1680, and married Mary, the daughter of 
Nathaniel and Elizabeth Chambless, in 1681. Their descend- 
ants are numerous in tlie county at this time. 

Where the city of Bridgeton is now located the first bridge 
across the Cohansey was built. The village, during the time of 
the Revolution, went under the name of Cohansey Bridge. 
The American Militia, under Colonels Hand and Home, was 
quartered there for some time in the years 1777-8. I was told 
many years ago by a celebrated antiquarian, the latc]^i)alyman 
Harris, that a few years before the Revolution John Moore, a 
native of Ireland, after he arrived in this country ,'^followed the 
l)usiness of a pedlar of dry goods. According to the custom of 
that day he carried the pack of merchandise on his back. By 
strict economy he soon was enaljled to build a small building 
on the north side of the creek, near the bridge, in whicli he 
kept store. My informant further stated that he believed lie 
married a young woman by the name of Reeve, grand-daughter 
of Mark Reeve. They were the grand-parents of the late John 
Moore White, of Woodbury. At the time of his death he was 
more than fourscore years and ten. He was a good lawyer, and 
for a number of years one of the Judges of the Courts. 

Allen H. Brown, a divine of considerable eminence, gave the 
following of the first Presbyterian Church built at Bridgeton, 
in a discourse delivered in that city, in 1865 : " Sensible of the 
" inconvenience of attending public worship in the neighboring 
" churches, the people of Bridgeton determined, about the year 
" 1774, to build a house for public worship and to form a con- 
"gregation on or near the lot where the old session house re- 
" cently stood. The revolutionary war coming on soon after, 
55 



434 PRESBYTERIAN SOCIETIES, 



" tlio project was relinquished. In 1778 the subject was revived, 
"l)ut because of disaj^reeincnt respecting the location, the site 
"was not determined upon until 1791, The work was l>ei;;un 
" in 1792, and in the same year the lionse was enclosed. In 
" May, 1793, a lottery was started for raising two thousand 
" dollars for the purpose of hnishing the building, which was 
" drawn in January, 1791. In May, 1795, the house was 
" opened and dedicated by Davenport, the pastor of Deerlield 
" church.'' Although the same author further states that they 
possessed a house, the people still felt unable to support the 
Gospel alone. They made a proposition to Greenwich church 
to unite with them as a collegiate church, under the name of the 
" United Churclies of Greenwich and Bridgeton," with Imt one 
set of church officers, and one cliurch session for both churclies, 
and that for the present the officers of Greenwich church shall 
control both churches, but in filling vacancies, elections shall be 
held and officers chosen alternately at each church, Greenwich 
congregation did not agree to the proposal, and the plan was 
relinquished. Application was then made to the Presbytery for 
a separate congregation in Bridgeton, and the prayer was 
granted in 10th month, 1792. Tlie population at that place at 
tliat period was about three hundred. Tliey now number aljout 
eight thousand. I have been informed that at the present time 
there are three Presbyterian churches in that city, besides a 
large seminary called the West Jersey Academy, The said 
institution, if the report respecting it be correct, is extensively 
patronized. 

I think many of the ancestors of tlie meml)ers of the Presljy- 
terian churches of Bridgeton were members of the old Presby- 
terian church at Fairfield. It can safely be said of Bridgeton 
that it is a place of factories and churches, and tliere seems to 
be a general industry and talent in its population that is calcu- 
lated to produce good results upon their ciiaracter. 

The Presbyterian church at Salem was founded about 1821. 
At that time there were only six members — the late Dr. James 
VanMeter, and his brother, Robert YanMeter, were two of the 
principal members, and took an active part in its organization. 
The corner stone of their clmrch was laid in the Ijeginning of 
3d month, 1821, on a lot on Griftith street, which was given to 
the church by Robert Johnson. In 1821 the congregation 
increased from six to thirty-one members, and the number who 
generally attended tlieir meeting was about two hundred. The 
(congregation agreed about that time to give their pastor, Burt, 
three hundred dollars per annum, and liis firewood, and find 



PRESBYTERIAN SOCIETIES. 435 



him a house to live iu. Their record further states that " their 
" people are mostly of common circumstances. From the atten- 
'• tion given to their minister the congregation confidently ex- 
" pected, by the goodness of Divine Providence, that in a few 
" years the Society will be so far increased in numbers that they 
" may be able to support their minister without the aid of their 
" brethren elsewhere." They further stated that " they will be 
" thankful to their Christian friends for any pecuniary assist- 
" ance they may feel disposed to confer upon the infant churcli 
" at Salem." 

Notwithstanding the Presbyterian church had erected a sub- 
stantial brick edifice on the lot they obtained from Robert G. 
Johnson, on East Griftith street, they soon found it too small to 
accommodate the congregation, and a few years afterward they 
built an addition to it. Their pastor at that period was Daniel 
Stratton, a native of Bridgeton, New Jersey. He married 
Ellen, the eldest daughter of Morris and Sarah Hancock, of 
Salem. Daniel was educated for the ministry. In early life, I 
liave been informed, he was threatened with consumption, and 
soon after his marriage he removed witli his wife to Newburn, 
North Carolina, where he was installed pastor of the Presbyte- 
rian church of that town. Thinking, I have no doubt, tliat a 
warmer climate would be more genial to his weak constitution, 
lie continued in that place for several years, and in 1852 he and 
his family returned to their native State. I think he was 
installed pastor of the Salem Presbyterian congregation the 
same year. He continued in that service until his deatli, in 8th 
montli, 1866, which event cast a gloom over his admiring con- 
gregation, a large number of relatives and acquaintances, and 
the inhabitants of the city of Salem generally, by whom he was 
nnich beloved for his Christian and moral deportment whilst 
residing among them. He was succeeded in the pastoral charge 
of tlie congregation by Frederic W. Banns, who continued to 
fill tlie duties of pastor for sixteen or seventeen montlis, having 
resigned the charge in 1868. He was followed by the present 
popular pastor, William Bannard, who was installed by the 
congregation the same yeai-. 

The Presbyterian Church, desiring a more eligible lo(a'"ion 
for their house of worsliip, bouglit a lot of ground on Market 
street of the late Calvin Bclden, who was a member and a lib- 
eral contributor, the lot costing $1:,000. The corner stone was 
laid July 17, 1854, for tlie new church, and the house, wlien 
completed, cost ^22,000, furniture $1,200;