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THE 

HISTORY 

AND 

ANTIQUITIES 

OF THE 

COUNTY 

OME1SET 






COLLECTED FROM 

AUTHENTICK RECORDS, 



AND AN 



ACTUAL SURVEY made by the late Mr. EDMUND RACK. 

ADORNED WITH 

A NAP of the COUNTY, 

And Engraving of Roman and other Relio^ues, Town-Seals, Baths, 
Churches, and Gentlemen's Seats. 



by THE 

REVEREND JOHN COLLINSON, F. A. S. 

Vicar of Long-Ashon, Curate of Filton alias Whitchurch, in the County of Somerfet ; 
nd Vicar of Clanfield, in the County of Oxford. 



Exude variant faciem per ftcula gcntes. 



Manilius. 



IN THREE VOLUMES. 
VOL. I. 



BATH : PRINTED BY R. CRUTTWELL ; 

AND SOLD BY 

C. DILLY, »ULTRY; G. G. J. and J. ROBINSON, and T. LONGMAN, PATER-NOSTER-ROW; 

and T. PAYNE, MEWS-GATE, LONDON; 

J.FLETCHER, OXFORD; and the BOOKSELLERS of BATH, BRISTOL, fcft 



AIDCCXU. 



T O 




HIS MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 



Sung #eorp tfie CJutU 



S I R, 

T is with much diffidence of my abilities to 
convey either amufement or inftruclion, that 
I coniign thefe Volumes to your view; but 
as they are defcriptive of a very confide rable 
part of your Majesty's Dominions, and one which has 
in all ages produced men eminent for heroick actions, 
and for loyalty to their Sovereign, the fubjecl:, how- 
ever meanly handled, may not perhaps be altogether 
unworthy of your gracious regard. 

The DiftricT: which I have delineated, participates, in 
an ample meafure, of thofe comforts which refult from 
your Majefty's Throne;— a Throne exemplary infofter- 
ing every Branch of Britain's happy Family, and in 
countenancing every effort exerted in its in te reft. 

May 



May the Supreme Being long continue to this 
Country fo good a Difpenfator of his Benignity, and 
when it fhall pleafe Him to call you hence, may you 
fucceed to that Eternal Crown of Glory, of which you 
have in this life fo ftrenuoufly endeavoured to approve 
yourfelf worthy. This is the earneft prayer of 



Your Majesty's 



Mofl dutiful Subject 



and Servant, 



JOHN COLLINSON. 

Long-AJhtor, 
January i, 1791. 







fy#^&fy^fy&& J ^^ 



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THE 



KING. 



THE Right Hon. Earl of Ailesfbury 
The Right Hon. Lord Apfley 
The Right Hon. Lord Arden 
Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, bart. 3 copies 
Hugh Acland, efq; Bath 
John Acland, efq; Fairfield 
Rev. Alexander Adams, Belluton 
John Adams, efq. 
John Till Adams, M.D. Briftol 
Daniel Adey, efq; Bath 
Rev. Lancelot St. Albyn 
Rev. Jofeph Aldridge, vicar of North-Petherton 
Richard Aldridge, efq. 
Richard Aldworth, efq; Ireland 
Rev. Mr. Alford, Curry- Rivel 
Jefferys Allen, efq; Bridgwater 
Rev. Mr. Alleyne, North-Cerney, Gloucefterfh. 
Levi Ames, efq; Shepton-Mallet 
Robert Proctor Anderdon, efq; Henlade 
William Anderdon, efq; Bath 
Rev. J. Andrew, rector of Powderham, Devon 
Mr. Andrews 

Mr. William Andrews, Prefton-abbey 
Mr. Francis Anftie, Bath 

Arnold, efq; Northamptonfhire 

Mr. Gregory Afh, Briftol 

Mr. Henry Atwood, furgeon, Bath 

Mr. Richard Atwood, Bath 

B. 
His Grace the Duke of Beaufort, large paper 
His Grace the Duke of Buccleugh 
The Right Hon. Marquis of Buckingham 
The Right Hon. Marquis of Bath 
The Right Hon. Earl Bathurft 
The Right Hon. Earl of Bute 
Right Rev. the Lord Bifhop of Bath and Wells 
The Right Hon. Lord Boringdon 
The Right Hon. Lord Bayham, M. P. for Bath 
Hon. Mr. Bathurft 
Vol. I. 



Hon. Mr. Daines "Barrington 

Sir Jofeph Banks, bart. r- . R. S. 

Sir Thomas Beevor, bart. Hethel-hall, Norfolk 

Sir Wm. Burrell, bart. 2 copies, large paper 

Andrew Baine, M.D. Hotwells, Briftol 

J. W. Baker, efq; Ranfton, Dorfet 

Rev. Slade Baker, fellow of New-College, Oxon 

Mr. Baker 

Mr. Gabriel Baker, Yeovil 

Robert Everard Balch, efq; St. Audries 

Capt. Baldwin, of the 47th regiment 

Copleftbne Warre Bampfylde, efq; Heftercombe 

Rev. Jofeph Butler Barber, rector of Norton- 

Malreward 
Mrs. Sufannah Barclay 
Rev. Dr. Barford, prebendary of Canterbury 
Mr. George Hollington Barker 
Mr. Jofeph Barratt, bookfeller, Bath 
Mr. Barrett, Wraxall 
Thomas Barrow, efq; Manchefter 
William Batt, efq; New-hall, Wilts 
George Balch, efq; St. Audries 
Mr. Batchelor, Briftol 
Edmund Batten, efq; Yeovil 
Zachariah Bayly, efq; Widcombe 
James Beailey, efq; London 
Mr. Jofeph Beailey, Worcefter 
Rev. George Beaver, rector of Trent 
Jofeph Beck, efq; Briftol 

Stephen Beckenham,ef'q; Portland-place,London 
Mrs. Beckenham 

Wm. Beech, efq; Netherhavcn, Wilts, 2 ct 
Jonathan Bell, efq; Hertford 
R. A. Bennet, efq. 
Mr. John Pain Berjew, Briftol 
James Bernard, efq; Crowcombe-court 
Thomas Bevan, efq; Upper Harley-ftreet, Ca- 

vendifh-fquare, London 
Richard Bigland, efq; Froccfter, Glouccfterfhirc 
John Billinglley, efq; Alhwick-Grove 

Morris 



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Morris Birkbeck, cfq; Hanford, Dorfet 

Rev. Dr. Bifhop, Whatley 

John Blagrave, efq; Calcot-Place, Berks 

John Blake, efq; Effex-ftreet, London 

Mr. Richard Blake, Briftol 

Wm. Blathwaite, efq; Dirham, Gloucefterfhire 

Thomas Le Blanc, efq; Cavenham, Suffolk 

Mr. Blifs, bookfeller, Oxford 

Robert Bogle, efq; London 

Mr. Bond, Orchard-Portman 

Rev. Mr. Boone, Thurloxton 

Henry Bofanquet, efq; Langford-Court 

Mr. George Bofwell, Piddletown, Dorfet 

Jofeph Bottomley, efq; Holborn 

R. Bovett, efq; Wellington 

Thomas Bowdler, efq; Bath 

Samuel Bradford, efq; Lancafter 

Charles Bragge, efq; Cleeve, Gloucefterfhire 

Wm. Bray, efq; Great Ruffell-ftreet, Bloomibury 

Matthew Brickdale, efq; Monckton 

Rev. Dr. Bridle, Hardwick, Bucks 

Lowbridge Bright, efq; Briftol 

Richard Bright, efq; Briftol 

Briftol City Libraiy 

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William Brodribb, efq. 

Charles Frederick Brook, efq. 

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Mr. Browne, bookfeller, Briftol, 3 copies 

Robert Bryant, efq; Ilminfter 

Mr. Brydges, Tyberton, Herefordfhire 

Mr. Bulgin, bookfeller, Briftol, 6 copies 

Mr. Bull, bookfeller, Bath 

Mr. Bunter, Axminfter 

Mr. Burdon, bookfeller, Winchefter 

John Berkeley Burland, efq; Steyning, Stoke- 

Courcy 
William Burrell, efq. 

William Doble Burridge, efq; Stoke St. Mary 
John Butler, efq; late of the council at Halifax, 

Martock, 3 copies 



The Right Hon. Earl of Chatham, 3 copies 
The Right Hon. Countefs Dowager of Chatham, 

2 copies 
The Right Hon. Earl of Corke and Orrery 
The Right Hon. Earl of Clanrickarde 
The Right Hon. Lord Colville 
The Right Hon. Lord Conyngham 
Samuel Cam, efq; Bradford, Wilts 
Rev. James Camplin, M. A. rector of Norton- 

Fitzwarren and Clatworthy 
Rev. William Camp.in, M. A. vicar of Locking 



Meffrs. Campbell and Gainfborough, book- 
fellers, Bath 
Rev. Dr. Caner, late of Bofton, New-England 
Mifs Mary Anne Carent, Salifbury 
Mr. Cary, bookfeller, Shepton-Mallet 
John Carter, efq; Cricklade, Wilts 
Francis Chalie, efq; Bath 
Richard Chamberlayne, efq; Batcombe 
Rev. Jofeph Chapman, D.D. prelident of Tri- 
nity-College, Oxford 
Rev. John Chapman, D. D. rector of Wefton 
Cirencefter Book-Society 
Mr. William Clachar, Chelmsford, EfTex 
Edward Clarke, efq; Chipley 
Richard Hall Clarke, efq; Bridewell, Devon 
Rev. John Clendon, Brompton-Rcgis 
Gideon William Clootwyk, efq. 
Rev. H. J. Clofe, rector of Hitcham, Suffolk 
Daniel Clutterbuck, efq; Bradford, Wilts 
Thomas Clutton, efq; Clutton, Herefordfhire 
Rev. Thomas Cockayne, Stapleton 
Mr. Benjamin Colborne 
James Collings, efq; Bath 
John Collins, efq; Hatch-court 
Mr. B. C. Collins, Salifbury, 2 copies 
Rev. Mr. Collinfon, Briftol 
Mr. James Colfton, Whitchurch 
Mrs. Coombes, Earnfhill 
Charles Cooper, efq; Norwich, large paper 
Corpus-Chrifti College Library, Oxford 
W. P. A'Court, efq; Heytefbury, Wilts 
Henry Hippifley Coxe, efq; Ston-Eafton 
C. H. Coxe, efq; Stratton 
Charles Coxe, efq; Lypiat, Gloucefterfhire 
Rev. William Coxe 
Rev. Powel Samuel Criche, Bedminfter 
Jofeph Cripps, efq; Cirencefter, Gloucefterfhire 
Mr. Abraham Crocker, Frome 
John Croffe, efq; Thurloxton 
Richard Croffe, efq; Broomfield 
Rev. George Croffman, Weft-Monkton 
Edward Holden Cruttenden, efq; Berners-ftreet, 

London 
Mr. William Cruttwell, Sherborne, 2 copies 
Rev. Clement Cruttwell, Oakingham, Berks 
Mr. Richard Cruttwell, Bath, 50 copies 
Edward Curteis, efq; Bath 
Thomas Curtis, efq; Belmont, Bath 

D. 
The Right Hon. Marquis of Donegal 
The Right Hon. Earl of Dartmouth 
The Right Hon. Earl of Dyfart 
The Right Hon. Earl of Digby, 3 copies 
The Right Hon. Admiral Digby, Tinterne 
Hon. and Rev. Charles Digby, rector of Kil- 
mington 

Baron 



S U B S C 



R I B E R S. 



Baron Dimftlale 

Sir John Durbin, knt. Briftol 

John Dalton, efq; Pitcomb 

Nathaniel Dalton, efq; Shanks near Wincaunton 

Tho Danes, efq; Abingdon-ltrcet, Weftminllcr 

John Daniel, efq; Briftol 

Samuel Daniel, efq; Yeovil 

Lieutenant-Colonel Danfey, Brinfop-Court, 

Herefordfhire 
Thomas Darch, efq; Hill-Bifhops 
William Darley, efq; York 
Thomas Davis, efq; Longleat, Wilts 
Rev. Mr. Daubeny, Stratton, Gloucefterfhire 
John i )ay, efq; Nailfworth, Gloucefterfhire 
Mr. Philip Deck, bookfeller, Bury, Suffolk 
John Delabere, efq; Cheltenham, Gloucefterfliire 
Charles Delaci, etq. 

Vickris Dickinfor., efq; Queen-Charlton 
William Dickinfon, efq; King-Wefton 
Mr. Charles Dilly, bookfeller, London, iz copies 
Mrs. Dimfdale, Briftol 
Matthew Dobfon, M. D. F. R. S. Bath 
Henry Donn, efq; Yeovil 
John Dunning, efq; Bridgwater 
Tho. Erie Drax, efq; Charborough-hall, Dorfet 
Edward Drewe, efq; Exeter 
Rev. Dr. Dumarefque, Yeovilton 
Lieutenant- Colonel Duroure 



The Right Hon. Earl of Egremont 

The Right Rev. the Lord Bifhop of Exeter 

Sir Henry Englefield, bart. 

John Eafon, efq; South-Pctherton 

Mr. Eafton, bookfeller, Salifbury, 4 copies 

Mr. S. C. Edwards, Briftol 

Mr. William Elkmgton, Bath 

Rev. Mr. Emily, Saliibury 

Jofeph England, efq; Dorchefter 

Captain Englilh, Shooter's -hill 

George Ward Errington, efq. 

Rev. Mr. Efcott 

Rev. Mr. Efcott, Hartrow 

Samuel Eyre, efq; Exmouth, Devon 



William Falconer, M. D. F.R.S. Bath, 2 copies 
Thomas Falconer, efq; F. R. S. Chefter 
Samuel Farr, M.D. Curry-Rivel 
Rev. Mr. Farthing, Halfe 
Mr. Field, Melbury, Dorfet 
Mr. John Field 
John Fletcher, M. D. Briftol 
Vlr. Fletcher, bookfeller, Oxford, 2 copies 
[ohn Flint, efq; Shrewfbury 
Mx. Fofter, apothecary', Bath 



a 2 



Rev. Dr. Fothergill, provoft of Queen's College, 

Oxford 
Rev. Thomas Fothergill, M. A. fellow 4b 

Queen's -College, Oxford 
A. Fothergill, M.D. F.R.S. Bath 
Rev. Mr. Foulkes, M. A. ftudent of Chrift- 

Church, and vicar of Uath-Eafton 
James Frampton, efq; Morcton, Dorfet 
William Fiafer, M.D. Hath, large paper 
Thomas Edwards Freeman, jun. efq; Bat s- 

ford, Gloucefterfliire 
Mr. John Freeftone, Broad-Sanduary, Weft- 

minfter 
Mr. James Froom, Briftol 
Mr. Edmund Fry, letter-founder to the Prince 

of Wales, London 
Mr. John Fry, London 
Mr. Jofeph Fry, Briftol 



Rev. Sir Peter Rivers Gay, bart. 
Hon. James Grenville, M. P. Butleigh 

Gape, efq; Bere, Dorfet 

John Garnet, efq; Briftol 

Rev. John Gerrard 

Rev. Thomas Goddard, South-Petherton 

Mr. Goddard 

Gabriel Goldney, efq; Clifton-hill, 

Robert Goodden, efq; Over-Compton, Dorfet 

Mr. Wyndham Goodden, Temple, London 

Mr. John Goodfellow, Ditchcat 

John Old Goodford, efq; Yeovil 

Henry Goodwin, efq. 

Peter Goodwin, efq; Charlton- Houfe, Wraxall 

John Gore, efq; Barrow-Court 

Edward Gore, efq; Kiddington, Oxford/hire 

Charles Gore, efq; Emanuel college, Cambridge 

Richard Gough, efq; Enfield 

George Gould, efq; Upway 

Mrs. Macaulay Graham 

Rev. Mr. Graves, reitor of Clavcrton 

Richard Gray, efq; deputv-auditor to his Royal 

Highnefs the Prince of Wales, Pall-Mall 
Edmund Greathead, efq; Uddens, Dorfet 
Valentine Green, efq; mezzotinto engraver to 

his Majefty 
Mr. Guerin, jun. Cirencefter, Gloucefterfhire 
Bartlett Gurney, efq; Norwich 

H. 
The Right Hon. Earl Harcourt 
The Right Rev. Lord Bifhop of Hereford 
S ir Richard Hoare, bart. 2 copies 
Sir Richard Colt Hoare, bart. Stourton 
Sir Casfar Hawkins, bart. Kelwefton 
Warren Haftings, efq. 
John Blagden Hale, efq; Alderley, Gloucefterfh. 

Rer. 






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Rey.Henry Hall, reaor of Child-Okeford, Dorfet 

Mr. G. W. Hall, attorney at law, Briftol 

Edmund Trowbridge Halliday, efq. 

Mr. Haly, bookfeller, Briftol 

Charles Hamilton, efq; Bath 

Rev. Mr. Hammond, Lydiard St. Laurence 

Ofgood Hanbury, efq; Coggefhall, EfTex 

William Hanbuiy, efq; Northamptonshire 

John Hanning, efq; Eaft-Dowlifh 

Windham Harbin, efq; Yeovil 

Mr. Thomas Harden, Cirencefter 

John Scandaret Haiford, efq; Briftol 

Mr. John Harding, Redcliff-ftreet, Briftol 

Rev. James Hardwicke, LL.B. vicar of Tyther- 

ington, Gloucefterlhire 
James Harford, efq. 
Jofeph Haiford, efq; Briftol 
Henry Harington, M. D. Bath 
Edward Harington, efq; Harington-place, Bath 
Thomas Harris, efq; Briftol 
Mr. Alderman Harris, Briftol 
Rev. Mr. Harris, Sturminfter, Dorfet 
Mr. Charles Harris, ftatuary, London 
Robert Harvey, M. D. Holt 
Henry Harvey, efq; 
John Harvey, efq; Wivelifcombe 
Mr. Harward, bookfeller, Cheltenham, 6 copies 
Edward Hafted, efq; Canterbury 
William Hawker, efq; Pitminfter 
Adam Hawkins, efq; Great Marlborough-ftreet, 

London 
Mr. Hayes, furgeon, Hampftead 
William Hayman, efq; Minehead 
Captain Thomas Haynes, Briftol 
Mr. Jofeph Haythorne, High-ftreet, Briftol 
Mr. Samuel Hazard, bookfeller, Bath 
Mr. Samuel Heel, Bridgwater 
Jofeph Hellier, efq; Dundry 
Wefton Helyar, efq; Newton-Ferrers near 

Callington, Cornwall 
Mr. Robert Henning, attorney, Dorchefter 
Michael Hickes, efq; Williamftrip, Glocefterfh. 
Rev. Mr.Giles Hill, re&or of Hemington 
Mr. Francis Hill, Bradford, Wilts 
Mr. Hill, Paulton 

Mr. Thomas Gundry Hillard, South-Petherton 
J. C. Hippilley, efq. 
Mr. Hippilley 
Henry Hugh Hoare, efq. 
Samuel Hoare, jun. efq; banker, London 
Mr. William Holder, Corn-ftreet, Briftol 
Jonathan Hooper, efq; Yeovil 
Thomas Horner, efq; Mells-Park 
Thomas Strangeways Horner, efq. 
Thomas Hoikyns, efq; North-Parret 
William Hofkyns, efq; North-Parret 
Thomas Houftoun, efq; Frome 



Mr. William Howfe, Afhill 
John Hoyte, efq. 
William Hoyte, efq; Curry-Rivel 
Mr- Howard, Queen-Camel 
Mr. J. W. Hucklebridge, Sarum 
Mr. Hudden, Beckington 
Richard Huddleftone, M. D. Bath 
James Humphrys, efq; Frome 
Dodington Hunt, efq; Charlton-Kings 
John Hunt, efq; Compton-Paunceford 
Alexander Hunter, M.D. York 
Thomas Huftler, efq; Bath 
Charles Hutton, LL.D. F.R.S. 



The Lord Primate of Ireland 

Sjr William Langham Jones, bart. Ramfbury- 
Court, Wilts 

Rev. Nathaniel Jarman, foreign fecrretary to the 
Royal Society. 

Mr. Jofeph Jacob, Ludgate-hill, London 

Mr. John Jacob, Shipham 

John Jeane, efq; Binfords 

Mr. Jeane 

Jofeph Jekyl, efq; Spetifbury, Dorfet 

Richard Jenkyns, efq; Chewton-Priory 

Mr. Walter Jenkins, Bridge-ftreet, Briftol 

Colonel Guy Johnfon, fuperintendant of the fix 
Indian Nations, Buckingham-ftreet, York- 
buildings, London 

General Johnfton, Wefton 

Rev. James Johnfon, Langford, Berks 

John Jones, efq; Frankly-Houfe 

Mr. James Jordan, Oakhill 

Rev. Thomas Ireland, D.D. rector of Clirift- 
Church, Briftol 

James Ireland, efq; Briflington 

Mr. John Ireland, apothecary, Oxford 

Mr. William Ifaacs, North-Petherton 

^ K. 
Rev. Sir Richard Kaye, bart. dean of Lincoln 
Rev. Mr. Keate, Laverton 
Mr. John Kelfon, attorney at law, Briftol 
Rev. Dr. Kent, Pottern, Wilts 
Rev. Mr. Kilner, Cirencefter 
James King, efq; M. C. Bath 
Mr. John King, bookfeller, Yeovil 
Robert Kingfmill, efq; Sidmonton-place, Hants 
Mr. Henry Knight, Bath 
Rev. Mr. Kymer, Wells 



His Grace the Duke of Leeds 
The Right Hon. Marquis of Lanfdown 
The Right Rev. Lord Bifhop of Landaff 
Sir James Tylney Long, bart. M. P. 

Sir 



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Sir James Langham, bart. 

Thomas Lane, efq; Devonfhire 

William Gore Langton, efq; Newton-Park 

Mr. George Ledger, bookfeller, Dover 

Rev. Harry Lee, New College, Oxford 

John Lethbridge, efq; Sandhill-Park 

J. Coakley Lettfom, M. D. F.R.A.SS. 

Rev. Mr. Lewis, Martock 

Nathaniel Lifter, efq; Stafford 

Mr. Lloyd, bookfeller, Briftol, 1 5 copies 

Mr. William Lloyd, Bath 

Dr. Locatelli, phyfician to Archduke Ferdinand 

William Lock, efq; Norbury-Park, Surry 

Edward Beefton Long, efq; Eaft-Barnet, Herts 

Mr. Love, librarian, Weymouth, 2 copies 

Edw. Loveden Loveden, efq; Bufcot-park, Berks 

Rev. Dr. Lovel, archdeacon of Bath 

Thomas Lowfeild, efq; Bath 

John Lucas, efq; Fair-hill near Swanfea 

Stucley Lucas, efq; Barons-Down, Dulverton 

John Fownes Luttrell, efq; M.P. Dunfter-caftle 

Edward Lyne, efq; Saltford 

M. 

His Grace the Duke of Montague 

The Right Hon. Lord Mulgrave 

Sir Charles Warre Malet, bart. ambaflador at 
Poonah in the Eaft-Indies 

Sir Henry St. John Mildmay, bart. Dogmers- 
field, Hants 

Sir John Riggs Miller, bart. Batheafton Villa 

Angus Macoonald, M.D. Taunton 

Mr. John Marks, Tetbury, Gloucefterfhire 

Rev. George Marfh, A. M. Blandford 

Mr. Marfhall, bookfeller, Bath 

Rev. Mr. Mafon, Frome 

Thomas Mafter, efq; M. P. for the county of 
Gloucefter, Cirencefter-abbey 

William Mafter, efq; Starpoint, Kenton, Devon 

Mr. John Mafterman, London 

Mr. Mafterman, Admifton, Dorfet 

Mr. Mafters, Whitchurch 

Mr. William Matthews, fecretary to the Agri- 
culture Society, Bath 

Lieut-General Melville, F. R. A. SS. 

H. Menifh, M.D. Chelmsford 

Rev. John Mefliter, Wincaunton 

Richard Meifiter, efq; Wincaunton 

Paul Methuen, efq; Corlham-houfe, 2 copies 

Paul Cobb Methuen, efq; Lucknam, Wilts 

Mr. Meyler, bookfeller, Bath 

Mrs. Mildmay, Hazelgrove 

Jeremiah Milles, efq; Pifhiobury, Herts 

Thomas Milles, efq; Lincoln's-inn 

Rev. Richard Milles, Barrow-Houfe 

Mr. Thomas Mills, bookfeller, Briftol 

Mr. Minety, Buckland-Dinham 



A. Molefworth, efq; Eaden near Newry 

Humphry Morgan, efq; Antigua 

Rev. Nathaniel Morgan, mafter of the gram- 

mar-fchool, Bath 
Thomas Wilkins Morgan, efq; St. Gcorgc'» 
John Morley, efq; Uminfter 
Rev. Mr. Morley, Elworthy 
Abel Moyfey, efq. 

N. 
His Grace the Duke of Northumberland 
The Right Hon. Earl Nugent 
Sir Stephen Nafti, knt. LL.D. Briftol 
Edward Berkeley Napier, efq; barrifter at law 
JohnNapper, clq; Tintinhull 
Lemuel Dole Nelme, efq; Craven-ftreet, London 
Mr. Samuel New, Caftle-ditch, Briftol 
Francis Newman, efq; North-Cadbury 
John Newman, efq; Berwick 
Robert Nicholas, efq; Aftiton-Keynes, Wilts 
Mr. Richard Nichols, Cruxton, Dorfet 
Rev. Dr. Nicholfon, Queen's College, Oxford 
Mr. Norton, bookfeller, Briftol, 6 copies, il.p. 
Rev. Chancellor Nutcombe, Exeter 

O. 

The Right Hon. Earl of Orford 

Sir William Oglander, bart. 

Rev. Henry Oglander, B. D. fellow of Win 

chefter-college 
Craven Ord, efq; Great James-ftreet, Bedford - 

Row, London 

P. 
His Grace the Duke of Portland 
Her Grace the Duchefs Dowager of Portland 
The Right Hon. Earl of Pembroke 
The Right Hon. Earl Poulett 
Right Hon. William Pitt, Chancellor of the 

Exchequer, 3 copies 
Sir Robert Palk, bart. Haldon-houfe near Exeter 
Sir John Preftwich, bart. 
Sir Thomas Beauchamp Prodtor, bart. Langley- 

Park, Norfolk 
Francis Page, efq; LL.D. M.P. for the univer- 

fity of Oxford, Middle- Afton 
Richard Paget, M. D. Chilcompton 
Mr. Palmer, apothecary, Kcyniham 
C. H. Parry, M. D. Bath 
Mr. Thomas Parfons, Blagdon 
Mr. Thomas Parfons, Widcombe 
Thomas Patten, efq; Bank, Lancashire 
T. Payne and Son, bookfellers, London 
Rev. Thomas Homer Pearfon, Queen-Camel 
Rev. Mr. Pearfon, Ivelchcfter 
Mr. Thomas Pearfon, printer, Birmingham 
Mr. Jofeph Peckover, Fakenham, Norfolk 
Mr. Francis Peirce, Bratton-court, Minehead 
George Perrot, efq; Perihore, Worcefterfhire 

Edward 



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SUBSCRIBERS. 



Edward Phelips, efq; Montacute 

Edward Phelips, jun. efq; M.P. for the county 

of Somerfet 
Mr. James Phillips, London, 6 copies 
Charles Phillott, efq; Bath 
J. Phippen, gent. Meare 
Mr. Pierce, jeweller, Briftol 
Thomas Pitt, efq; Charles-ftreet, St. James's- 

Square, London 
Jofeph Pitt, efq; Cirencefter 
Edmund Morton Pleydell, efq; Milborne St. 

Andrew, Dorfet 
Dr. Plomer, Briftol 

Mr. William Pollett, Bardfield-Lodge, Effex 
Rev. Richard Polwhele, Kenton near Exeter 
Alexander Popham, efq; Weft-Bagborough 
Henry William Portman, efq; Brianfton, Dorfet 
Charles Powel, efq; Brecknock, South- Wales 
Captain Prefton, Bath 
Rev. Mr. Price, keeper of the Bodleian Library, 

Oxford 
Meffrs. Prince and Cook, bookfejlers, Oxford, 

3 copies 
George Prince, efq; Arundel-ftreet, London 
Mr. William Proffer, Norton-Malreward 
Mr. Charles Proffer 
William Provis, efq; Shepton- Mallet 
George Bragge Prowfe, efq; Yeovil 
Mr. Richard Prynne, Bath 
Benjamin Pugh, efq; Midford-caftle 
Mr. Punter, Whitchurch 

R. 

The Right Hon. the Earl of Radnor 

The Right Hon. Lord Rivers 

The Right Hon. Lord Romney 

Count Rice, z copies 

Rev. Mr. Racket, Spetifbury, Dorfet 

Mr. Rawlins, furgeon, Briftol 

Mr. John Rawlins, Stoke-Courcy 

Mr. Ready, attorney, Cirencefter 

Rev. Wm. Rennell, prebendary of Winchefter 

Richard Reynolds, efq; Ketly, Shropfhire 

Rev. Simon Richards, Chipftaple 

Rev. Thomas Richards, Burnham 

Edward Rigby, efq; Norwich 

Thomas Rigge, M.D. Briftol 

Mr. Thomas Robins, Briftol 

Mr. Robbins, Long-Afhton 

Mr. Thomas Robbins, Afhford, Middlefex 

Henry Rodbard, efq; Merriot 

Mifs Rodbard, Bath 

John Rogers, efq; Yarlington 

Dennis Rolle, efq. 

Mr. James Room, Briftol 

Mr. Rudder, Cirencefter 

Mr. John Rudhall, Briftol 



J. B. Ruffell, efq; Beaminfter, Dorfet 
Mr. Edward Ruffell, bookfeller, Bath 
Rev. Dr. Rutherford, Marfton 
Sydenham Rutherford, efq; Temple 

S. 
His Grace the Duke of Somerfet 
The Right Hon. Earl of Stamford 
The Right Hon. Earl of Shaftefbury 
The Right Hon. Earl Spencer 
The Right Hon. Lord Sheffield 
The Right Hon. Lord Suffield 
The Right Hon. Lord Francis Seymour, dean 

of Wells 
Sir John Smith, bart. Sydling, Dorfet 
Sir John Hugh Smyth, bart. Afhton-Court, 

forge paper 
Lady Smyth 
Sir John Stepney, bart. 
Lady Stepney 
Hon. and Rev. Mr. Stuart 
William Sainfbury, efq; Bath 
Mr. Richard Samwell 
Robert Sampfon, efq; Brewton 
H. Sandford, efq; Bath 
John Savery, efq; Butcombe-court 
John Sawbridge, efq; M. P. London 
James Scawen, efq; Maidwell, Northamptonfhire 
John Scott, efq; Amwell, Herts 
Mr. Robert Scott, Afhford, near Ilminfter 
Mr. Sealy, Bridgwater 
Mr. Samuel Seaman, Difs, Norfolk 
Richard Selfe, efq; Cirencefter 
George Penrofe Seymour, efq. 
Peter Sherftone, efq. 

Rev. John Sibley, M. A. re&or of Walcot 
Lieut.-Col. Simcoe, Woolford-Lodge, Devon 
Denham Skeet, LL.D. Bailbrook-Lodge 
John Slade, efq; North-Petherton 
Rev. Dr. Small, rector of St. James's, Briftol 
John Small, efq; Cirencefter 
John Smith, efq; Combe- Hay 
Jofeph Smith, efq. 
Jofhua Smith, efq. 
Robert Smith, efq. 
Partridge Smith, efq; Weft-Holme 
Robt. King Smith, efq; Sidmonton-Place, Hants 
Samuel Smith, efq. 

Rev. Martin Stafford Smith, Prior-park 
Mr. Peter Smith, Stebbing, Effex 
Mr. John Smith, bookfeller, Cirencefter 
Thomas Smyth, efq; Stapleton, Gloucefterfhire 
Hugh Smyth, efq; Long-Afhton 
Mr. Sole, apothecary, Bath 
Mr. William Sollers, Blandford, 6 copies 
Rev. Mr. Somerville, Bibury, Gloucefterfhire 
James Sparrow, efq; Flax-Bourton 

Rev. 



m 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



Rev. Wm. Speke, B. D. Jordans near Uminfter 

Mrs. Stapleton 

James Stephens, efq; Camerton-houfe 

Rev. Lewis Stephens, rector of Semley, Wilts 

Thomas Stepney, efq. 

William Sterne, efq; Dulverton 

Henry Sterry, efq; Hatton-Garden, London 

Mr. Timothy Stevens, bookfcller, Cirencefter 

Francis Steward, efq; Weymouth 

Henry Strachey, efq; Sutton-Court 

John Strettel, efq; London 

John Strode, efq; South-Hill 

Stuart, efq. 

John Swale, efq; London 

Rev. Mr. Swayne, Pucklechurch 

Mr. Walter Swayne 

Henry Sweeting, efq; Kilve 

Rev. John Swete, prebendary of Exeter, Oxton- 

Houfe, near Exeter 
St. Barbe Sydenham, efq; Combe near Dulverton 
Richard Symons, efq; Montferrat 



The Right Hon. Lord Vifcount Townfend 
Sir John Trevelyan, bart. M. P. for the county 

of Somerfet, Nettlecombe- Raleigh 
Sir Charles Kemeys Tynte, bart. 
Lady Tynte 

Rev. Sir Harry Trelawney, bart. 
Sir Noah Thomas, bart. M.D. F.R.S. Bath 
Mr. Tapfcot, attorney at law, Uminfter 
Samuel Taunton, efq; Weft-Lydford 
Cha. Wm. Taylor, efq; Purebrook-park, Hants 
Mr. William Taylor, bookfeller, Bath 
Mr. Elias Taylor, Hounfton near Yeovil 
George Templer, efq; Shapwick 
John Templeman, efq; Dorchefter 
William Templeman, efq; Dorchefter 
Rev. Mr. Templeman, Dorchefter 
Rev. John Templer, Lindridge, Devon 
Philip Thicknefle, efq; Hermitage, Bath 
Mr. Ifaac Thompfon, London 
Bonnell Thornton, efq; Ifleworth, Middlefex 
Rev. Charles Toogood, Afhill 
James Tooker, efq; Norton-Hall 
Rev. Jofhua Toulmin, Taunton 
Lewis Tregonwell, efq; Afton near Salifbury 
James Tucker, efq. 
Edmund Tumor, efq; F. R. A. S S. Sackville- 

ftreet, London 
William Turner, efq; Belmont, Wraxall 
Edward Tumor, efq; London 
Thomas Tyley, efq; Wedmore 
Richard Tyfon, efq; M. C. Bath 



Mr. Henry Vagg, Chilcompton 



Mr. Robert Verry, Long-Afhton 

W. 

The Right Hon. Earl of Winchelfea 
Right Hon. Lord Vifcount Weymouth, M. P. 
for Bath 

Hon. Mr. Horace Walpole, F.R. A. SS. 

J. Walcor, efq. 

Mr. H. Walters, Bath 

Ifaac Walker, efq; London 

James Warren, efq; Bath 

George Warry, efq; Chard 

William Watfon, M.D. F.R.S. Bath 

Mr. Nathaniel Watts, Briftol 

John Fifher Weare, efq; Long-Afhton 

Mrs. Sarah Webber, Badialton 

Simon Wcllman, efq; Taunton 

Mr. Nicholas Were, Wellington 

Rev. Mr. Weft, vicar of Bradford, Dorfet 

Rev. Mr. Weft 

Mr. Weft, Meare 

Rev. Mr. Weftcote, Hatcli 

Rev. Phipps Wefton, prebendary of Wells, 
Witney, Oxfordshire 

Thomas Edward Whalley, efq; Winfcombc 

Jofeph Whatley, efq; Wraxall-Lodge 

James White, efq; Exeter 

John White, efq; Ifle of Wight 

Mr. White and Son, bookfellers, London 

John Whitehead, efq; London 

Thomas Whitehead, efq; Briftol 

Henry Whitmarfh, efq; Trull 

Mr. Jofeph Whittuck, Caftle-ftreet, Briftol 

John Wickens, efq; Maperton, Dorfet 

Rev. Mr. Wiclcham, Horfington 

Rev. Mr. Wickham, Long-Afhton 

James Wickham, efq; Frame 

Mr. Thomas Wickham, Lion's-court, Whit- 
church 

Rev. Richard Wilkins, vicar of St. George's 

Charles Wilkins, efq; Queen's-Square, Bloornf- 
bury, London 

Rev. William Shippen Willes, vicar of Ciren- 
cefter, Gloucefterfhire 

Ralph Willett, efq. 

Rev. John Williams, Marfton 

Mr. Thomas Willis 

Rev. Dr. Wills, warden of Wadham College, 
Oxford 

Mr. S. D. Wilmot, Yatton 

Mr. Samuel Wilmot, jun. Yatton 

Rev. Thomas Wilfon, D.D. 

Walter Wiltfhire, efq; Bath 

Mr. Windey, attorney at law, Briftol 

Mr. John W inpenny, Briftol 

George Winter, efq; Charlton 

John Winter, efq; Stonehouie near Minehead 

Rev. 



% 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



Rev. Mr. Wood, re&or of Newton St. Lo, 

and vicar of South-Stoke 
Dr. Woodward, Bath 
Thomas Woodward, efq; Bungay, Suffolk 
Mr. John Wookey, Long-Afhton 
Mr. S. Woolmer,bookfdler, Exeter, large paper 
Matthew Worgan, efq; Woolley 
Mr. vVrentmore, Maidftone, Kent 
Henry Wright, efq; Bath 
Rev. Mr. Wylde, Yatton 

Names omitted in the foregoing Lift 



Rev. Dr. Wyndham, Corton-Dinham 

Penruddock Wyndham, efq. 

Tho. Wyndham, efq; Clerewell, Gloucefterfhirc 



William Walter Yea, efq; 

Rev. Harry Farr Yeatman, re&or of Kilve 

John Yeldham, efq; Saling-Grove, Effex, 2 copies 

John Yeldham, jun. efq; F. A. S. 

Mr. Yeo, apothecary, Dowry-fquare, Hotwells. 



Bath and Weft of England Agricultural Society, 

2 copies 
Mr. Charles Davis, Mount-Beacon, Bath 
Mrs. Fenn, Long-Afhton 

Mr. John Gardner, Winterbourne, Gloucelterlhire. 
Richard Harford, efq; F.S. A. London 
Mr. William Matthews, Hetling-Houfe, Bath, 

n { fubfcription 



William Reeve, efq; Long-Afhton 
John Stanton, efq; London 
Mr. William Stevens, jun. Glafs-works, Bnftol 
John Topham, efq; Gray's-Inn-Square, London 
Mr. Robert Walker, Briftol 
John Zachary, efq; F. S, A. Arcley-Houfe, 
Worcefterlhire 





R E F 



C E. 



THE advantages which Hiftory affords to mankind, have furnifhed 
to paribus of the greatest abilities fo ample a field for eloquent 
difcuision, that it is unneceffary to repeat what has been fo power- 
fully recommended, and has met with univerfal acquiefcence. But, 
although the ufe of Hiftory at large be manifeft enough, it may not be 
ufelefs to point out fome benefits that may accrue to fociety from the cul- 
tivation of that particular fpecies, which forms the subject of the work here 
offered to the consideration of the publick. 

County Hiftory may be regarded as a branch, or rather perhaps as a por- 
tion of general hiftory. Though limited from its nature in its object and 
its views, it receives proportionable advantages from the enlargement of its 
fcale. All general hiftory muft partake of the nature of an abridgment; 
the tranfactions that compofe the narrative are too numerous for particular 
recital j and it is the bufmefs of the hiftorian to fele£t fuch only as tend 
mod to elucidate his fubject. But events too unimportant, or of too local 
a nature, to find a place in a relation which has for its object the fate of 
dates and kingdoms, may afford entertainment and instruction, when con- 
fidered as illustrating a defcription comprehended within narrower limits. 
Both equally tend to improve our acquaintance with human nature. If the 
former be confidered as the fchool of the politician and the moralist, the 
latter may be regarded as not lefs advantageous in improving our acquaint- 
ance with our country, and its inhabitants. If a knowledge of the former 
be neceflary to direct the application of the national strength and powers, 
'a knowledge of the latter is no lefs requifite, in order to determine of what 
nature thofe powers are, and by what means they may be preferved or 
augmented. 

Nor muft we overlook the effect of thefe local histories in promoting the 
love of our country, which, next to a due veneration for the Deity, and a 
regard for mankind in general, is the most valuable among national attain- 
ments. 



viii PREFACE. 

ments. We cannot love that with which we are totally unacquainted; and 
our attachment to our country cannot fail of bdng increafed, as the oppor- 
tunities of information concerning it become more extended. The virtues 
and heroick actions of Britons, thus preferved and recorded, tend to cheriih 
that honeft national pride, which is one of the chief fources of emulation. 

We are doubly jealous of our national diftinction, when we find it adorned 
by characters which caft a luftre upon human nature. Even the particular 
defcription of thofe places which have been the fcene of fome notable 
achievement, or the habitation of fome illuftrious perfon, tends to excite 
feelings favourable to virtue and patriotifm. We are told by the Roman 
hiftorian/ that Fabius Maximus and Scjpio Africanus were accuftomed to 
declare, that when they looked upon the ftatues of their anceftors they 
found their minds excited in the higheft degree to the emulation of their 
virtues. The genuine Britifh character, of which we have many inftances 
on record, is no lefs worthy of imitation than the ancient Roman; and the 
view, or even the defcription of the aged manfions, or the venerable effigies 
of our illuftrious anceftors, may kindle fparks in our breafts equally fa- 
vourable to virtue and to patriotifm with thofe faid to have been excited by 
the waxen memorials of the Roman nobility. 

Sepulchral tombs and monuments feem to have a peculiar effect in this 
way; and the prefervation and recording of them is in fome meafure worthy 
of publick regard with us, as it was among the nations of antiquity. I do 
not mean that the characters inferibed thereon fliould be implicitly credited; 
as flattery and falfehood have found their way to brafs and marble, as well 
as to lefs durable materials. But fuch memorials may convey information 
of a lefs fufpicious nature ; they may, and often do afcertain a family defcent, 
when other remembrances have perifhed ; and may be appealed to as decifive 
in point of genealogy, when the characters on which they beftow their 
adulation are regarded with indifference, or perhaps with contempt and 
abhorrence. 

The rnoJt important advantages, however, that refult from thefe local 
accounts, are derived from the materials which they furnifh to the general 
hiftory of the country. Thefe are the fources from which a great part of 
the mod authentick information belonging to the latter may be drawn, and 
by which it may in future ages be in a great meafure confirmed or corrected. 
They may not only ferve to afcertain property, preferve the genealogies of 
families, record illuftrious actions, uphold the memory of great characters, 
and retrace and bring to view the peculiar modes of life, laws and cuftoms 

• Salluft. Bell. Jugurthin. 

of 



R 



IX 



of part ages; but alfo contribute to perpetuate our happy conftitution itfelf. 
The hiftorick page, reciting local claims and privileges, has often proved a 
confiderable barrier againft the violence of defpotifm on the one hand, and 
the inconfiderate rage of popular fury on the other. 

Nor, laftly, is the communication of intelligence refpe&ing the natural 
productions of any particular territory a matter of the fmalleft moment. 
There is fcarcely any diftritt fo defe&ive as not to furnifh fome fubjecl: of 
entertainment and improvement; and Somerfetjhire feems to have its (hare 
of the wonderful works of Providence. By an intuition of thefe, fcience is 
delightfully improved ; the mind exults in purfuing the Deity through all 
his operations, and difpenfing different bleflings to different regions. 

Thefe are fome of the benefits which fociety derives from Provincial 
Hiftory; in defcanting on which, however, it has not been my defign to 
applaud my own performance, which is feeble and fuperficial enough; but* 
to point out what has been, and ftill may be, in this way effected by more 
able pens. 

The Topographical part of the work before us refts principally on 
inquiries made in many fucceffive years by my late worthy friend Mr. 
Edmund Rack, to whofe afliduity and integrity I cheerfully pay this me- 
rited acknowledgment. The Hiftorical Memorials are gathered from printed 
books, from various records in publick repofitories, and from divers private 
archaeological collections. 

And in this place I cannot omit exprefling the fenfe I have of the obliga- 
tions which I am under, as well to thofe diftinguifhed perfons who have fo 
handfomely decorated thefe volumes by the engravings which they have 
prefented, as to thofe who have furnifhed me with information and materials. 
The names of the former ftand recorded in the plates themfelves; among the 
latter, I am happy in mentioning the Right Hon. Earl Bathurjl, by whom 
I found accefs to valuable archives, and whofe patronage during the whole of 
my labours purfued me with unmerited kindnefs. To the Right Hon. the 
Marquis of Bath, I offer my refpeclful acknowledgments for the ufe of divers 
MSS. volumes from his library at Longleat; and alfo to the Right Reverend 
the Lord Bijloop of Bath and Wells, for his indulging me with the perufal of 
the regifters of the diocefe. A great deal of ufeful information has been 
owing to the friendly exertions of Ccplejlone JVarre Bampfylde, efq; whom I 
with much efteem commemorate. To Hugh Acland, and to John Acland, 
efqrs. I am highly indebted for the ufe of the late Mr, Palmers Collections; 
to Mrs. Malet, of Staplegrove, for feveral volumes of inquifitions and other 

Vol. I. c b ancient 



PREFACE. 

ancient documents; to Sir John Hugh Smyth, bait, for divers valuable com- 
munications refpecling manerial property and family defcents; to James 
Bernard, of Crowcombe, efq; for two MSS. volumes of the late Mr. Carew, 
to Robert Bryant, of Ilminfter, efq; for a MS. volume of mifcellaneous col- 
lections; to Dennis Rolle, efq; for divers ancient records relating to Glafton- 
bury- Abbey; to John Berkeley Bur/and, efq; for memoirs of the Berkeley, 
Portman, and other families; to Paul Methuen, of Corfham, efq; for feveral 
provincial particulars ; to Jofeph Plant a, efq; and to the Rev. Mr. Ay/cough, 
for their aififtance at the Britifh Mufeum; to Richard Gongh, of Enfield, 
Craven Orde, William Bray, and Edmund Tumor, efqrs. for extracts from pub- 
lick offices; to Henry Harington, M. D. and William Falconer, M. D. of Bath, 
for their kind and obliging fervices ; to Mr. Sole, apothecary of Bath, for a 
lift of the more rare plants growing in this county; to the Rev. John Wills, 
D.D. warden of Wadham-college, Oxford; the Rev. George Beaver, Richard 
Paget, of Chilcompton, M. D. the Rev. Mr. Graves, of Claverton; the Rev. 
yiv.Wylde; Mr. Abraham Crocker ; and to feveral other learned and ingenious 
contributors. 

With all thefe aids, I am ftill aware that there are numerous errors and 
imperfections throughout the whole of this performance; fome of which 
may probably have arifen from the extent of territory which it furveys, 
and others from the ambiguity of records relating to fafts at very remote 
periods; but mod, and which moft I lament, from my own inability to do 
juftice to a tafk, which, in regard of the places and perfons it has to repre- 
fent, is in itfelf fo important and honourable. 



INTRO- 



[ *i 3 



h^<HH4^4<4*H4*4*HW^ 



I N T R O D U C T I O N. 



SOMERSETSHIRE is a maritime county in the fouthweft part of 
England, having the Briftol Channel on the weft ; Gloucefterftiire, 
and the City and County of Briftol on the north; Wiltfhirc on the 
eaft; Dorfetfhire on the fbutheaft; and Devonfhirc on the fouth and 
fouthweft. 

Its form is oblong, being in length from northeaft to fouthweft upwards 
of eighty miles, in breadth from eaft to weft between thirty and forty, and 
in circumference two hundred. 

The Sea-coast is extremely irregular, in fome parts projecting into 
large, lofty, and rocky promontories, and in others receding into fine bays, 
with flat and level fhores. The extreme point of the coaft weftward to- 
wards Devonfhire, is a vaft fucceflion of huge inacceffible rocks, extending 
from the limits of that county to Porlock-Bay, a commodious road for (hip- 
ping, in which ftands the little town of Porlock; this bay terminates north- 
ward in Horeftone -point, an immenfe head-land, from which there is a con- 
tinued range of high cliffs to Minehead. From Minehead-povit, another huge 
promontory, rifing fix hundred and ninety feet above the level of the fea, to 
the pariih of Old-Cleevc, the ihore is flat, and forms a curve of feventy de- 
grees of a circle, in the centre of which ftand the town and caftle of Dimfter, 
at the diftance of about a mile from the fea. From Cleeve to V/atchet the 
cliffs rife from fifty to two hundred feet in height, and at length the coaft 
gradually diftends into the fine bay of Bridgwater, where at the extremity 
of Stert-Point, a long and narrow peninfula, the river Parret immerges into 
the Channel. The coaft from this point northward is flat, and compofed 
of vaft land banks, repelling the inundation of the fea, which in ancient times, 
precedent to the birth of hiftory, vvalhed over thefe fhoals, and flowed up 
into the country to a vary confiderable diftance, covering with its waters 
that vaft territory, now called Brent-Marjh, and the moors as far as Glafton- 
buiy and Somerton. The fea after its general retirement paid frequent 

b 2 vifits 



xii INTRODUCTION. 

vifits to thefe parts, and it was found neceflary to the fecurity of the 
country to eftabliih Commiffioners of Sewers, who fhould examine and infpect 
the fea-banks, ditches, gutters, and fewers, connected with the fea, and 
order the requifite cleanfings and reparations. The firft commiffion of this 
kind upon record occurs A. D. 1304, 32 Edw. I. when Robert de Clare, 
Gilbert de Bere, and John Gereberd, were appointed to the office of infpec- 
tors. After this, fimilar commiffions were iffued to the pofleflbrs of the 
manors and lordthips bordering on thefe parts; among whom we find the 
names of Sir Matthew de Furneaux, John de Meriet, Richard de Rodney, 
John de Godelege dean of Wells, John de Beauchamp, John de Clevedon, 
John Inge, Sir John de St. Loe, Sir Guy de Bryan, Sir Richard Aclon, Sir 
Peter Courtney, Sir Thomas Brooke, and others, in the reigns of Edw. II. 
and III. and Ric. II. and the like offices are in fome meafure extended to 
this day. 

At the northeaft end of Bridgwater-bay the coaft again elevates itfelf, 
the lofty rocky promontory of Brean-Down, emerging as it were out of the 
fea, and forming one of the moft confpicuous head-lands on the coaft. 
Nearly oppofite to it on the weft is the iiland of Steep-Holmes, and on the 
eaft the remarkable hill and village of Uphill, at the influx of the river Ax 
into the Channel. Northward from Uphill is a fiat fandy ftrand two miles 
in length to Anchor-head, at the weft end of Worle-hill, which is another vaft 
rocky eminence, and a remarkable object both by fea and land. Here for- 
merly the fea in like manner enlarged its bounds, and flowed to Banwell, 
Churchill, and other adjacent places, evident veftiges thereof being left be- 
hind in marine plants, fhells, and petrifactions. 

Northward from Worle-hill are Sand-Point and St. Thomas' s-Head, two 
remarkable headlands, bounding the demefnes of the little priory of Wood- 
fpring. Here again the coaft flattening to Clevedon, in early ages ad- 
mitted the waters to that level trac~t extending to Congrefbury, Kenn, and 
Nailfea. At Clevedon the rocks refume their grandeur, and continue with- 
out much intermiffion to Walton, Black-Nore, and P or tijhe ad-Point, which 
forms the laft promontory northward, protruding its lofty brow, covered 
with fine coppices, into a boifterous fea continually raging round its craggy 
bafe. Hence the coaft declines gradually to King-Road, at the conflux of 
the river Avon, and the Briftol Channel. 

The Avon enters this county at Frefhford on the borders of Wilts, 
whence it continues its courfe between woody precipices to the parifhes of 

Claverton, 



INTRODUCTION. 



xui 



Claverton, Bath-Ford, Bath-Hampton, Bath-Wick, and the city of Bath. 
Then becoming navigable for barges, it vifits Twiverton, Kelwefton, Salt- 
ford, Kcynlham, and Briftol, between which and Kingroad, where it dif- 
charges itfelf into the Severn Sea," it forms the boundary of the counties of 
Somerl'et and Gloucefter. 

The other Rivers of moft note which mingle with the Briftol Chan- 
nel, are, 

i. The Ax, which has its chief fource in the remarkable cavern of 
Wookey-hole, at a few miles diftance from which it receives Chedder-ivater, 
and palling by Axbridge, Weare, Compton-Bifhop, and Bleadon, falls into 
the fea (as I have before mentioned) between Brean-Down and the village 
of Uphill. 

2. The Breiv, fometimes erroneoufly called the Brent, rifes near the vil- 
lage of South-Brewham, on the eaftern fide of the county, near the confines 
of Wilts, and gives name to that place, to North- Breivbam, and the town of 
Breivton, whence it runs by Lydford, Baltonfbury, Glaftonbury, and Meare, 
and traverfing the moors difcharges itfelf into the Channel at Burnham. 

3. The Barret, anciently called the Bedred, rifes at South-Parrot in Dor- 
fetlhire, and enters this county at North-Parrot, both thofe villages receiving 
their name from it. It then runs to South-Petherton, and near Muchelney 
receives the river He, which rifing near Chard, vifits and gives name to die 
town of Ilminfter, He-Moor, and the villages of lie-Abbots and lie-Brewers. 
Near the town of Langport the Parret meets with the Teo or Ivel, which 
rifes from feven fprings, called the Seven-Sifters, in Horethorn-hill on the 
borders of Dorfetfliire, whence it paffes to the towns of Yeovil and Ivelchejler. 
At Stanmoor-Point, near the iiland of Athelney, the Parret receives the river 
Tone. This river has its fource in Beverton-hill in the parifh of Clatworthy, 
and paffes between the village of Hewifh-Champflower and the town of 
Wivelifcombe, to Stawley, Kittisford, Runnington, Ninehead, Bradford, and 
the large and populous town of Taunton, which has from it its appellation. 
The Parret foon after its junction with this river receives another ftream 
called Gary, which fprings at Cajlle-Cary, to which it gives name, and 
then runs to Cary-Fitzpaine, Weft-Charlton, Lytes-Cary, Somerton, and 
Boroughbridge; hence the Parret in a large ftream paiics the parifh of 
North -Petherton, and then vifits the port of Bridgwater j after which it 
falls into the fea at Stert-Point, where it is a mile over. 



' This cftuary was called by the Saxons Xr^nc-mu'5. Cbron. Saxt*. 105. 



The 



mv INTRODUCTION. 

4, The river Tow rifes at Compton-Martin on the northeaft fide of 
Mendip-hill, whence it glides by Ubley, Blagdon, Wrington, and Congref- 
burv, and being increafed by a number of other ftreams, a little beyond 
Week St. Laurence falls into the fea. 

Other Rivers in this county of greater note, but not communicating 
with the Briftol Channel, are, 

1 . The Ax, which iffues from a hill called Axnol, near Cheddington in 
Dorfetfliire, and runs thence to Mifterton, Seaborough, Clapton, Wayford, 
and Winfham, and enters Devonfhire at Ford-abbey. 

2. The Cale, which rifes near Charlton-Mufgrave, in the foutheaft part 
of the county, vifits and denominates the town of Wincaunton, and foon 
after enters Dorfetfliire. 

3. The Chew, which has two fources, the one near Chewton under 
Mendip, the other from a fpring called Pile/well, in the parifh of Weft- 
Harptree. Whence the united ftream runs to Chew-Stoke, Chew-Magna, 
Stanton-Drew, Pensford, Publow, Compton-Dando, Chewton-Keynjham, and 
the town of Keynlham, below which it mixes with the Avon. 

4. The river Ex, rifes in the foreft of Exmoor, in the extreme part of 
the county towards Devonfhire, emerging from which it panes the villages 
of Exford, Winsford, and Extcn, and the town of Dulverton, near which it 
meets with the river Barle, (which alfo has its fource in the foreft of Exmoor) 
and enters Devonfhire at Exbridge in its way to Exeter. 

5. The Frome has its principal fource in Yarnfield Common on the 
borders of Wilts, five miles from which it vifits the town of Frome, and 
thence pafles on to Beckington, Telsford, Farley, and Frefhford, at which 
bit place it falls into the Avon. 

The Inland Parts of this county are no lefs romantically irregular than 
the coaft; the furface thereof being varied by lofty hills and rocks, long 
tracts of rich level moor, treelefs plains, and bold afpiring woods. 

The larger chains of Hills are, the Quantcck hills betwixt Taunton and 
the fea; Brendon-hill near Quantock; North-hill near Minehead; Poldon 
near Bridgwater j Mendip; Broadfield-Down, between Brifiol and Wrington; 
Leigh-Down in the hundred of Portbury; Dundry-bill near Briftol; Lanf- 
downneav Bath; IVhite-Down near Chard; and B Inch -Down on the confines 
of Devonfhire. 

Among disjointed mountains, Dunkery-Bezcon in Carhampton near the 
feaj Hamden-hill, Montacute, St. Michael's, Brent-Knowle ; the Torr, near 
Glaftonbury; Bratton, near Minehead; and Snowden, near Chard; are the 
moft confpicuous objecls. . 



INTRODUCTION". xv 

The Moors arc, King's-Sedgmoor, caft of Bridgwater; Eaft-Sedgmoor, be- 
tween Wells and Glaftonbury; Weft-Sedgmoor, between Taunton and Lang- 
port; Stanmoor, War moor, Wejlivall, and North-Moor, on the north fide of 
Weft-Sedgmoor, near the Ifle of Athelney; Aller-Moor, near Langport; Weft- 
Moor, Curry-Moor, and Hay-Moor, near North-Curry; Kingsmoor, on the river 
Yeo, between Ivelchefter and Somerton; llemoor, on the river He; Burtle- 
Mocr, and Heath-Moor, on the north fide of Pol don; Mark-Moor, on the 
river Brew, near the village of Mark; Brent-Marftj, a vaft extent of morally 
ground between the Ax on the north, the Brew and Parret on the fouth, 
Mendip-hill on the eaft, and the Channel on the weft; Kennard-moor, and 
Godney-Moor, fo called from the village of Godney near Glaftonbury; Wefton- 
Moor, between Uphill and Wefton-fuper-Mare ; Banwell-Moor ; S/neath-Moor, 
near Churchill ; Kenn-Moor near the villages of Kenn and Yatton ; Nailfea- 
Moor, north of Kenn ; and Clapton-Moor, between the villages of Clapton 
and Wefton in Gordano, in the hundred of Portbury. 

There were five Forests in this county, viz. Selwood, in the eastern part 
near Wilts; Neroch, on the fouth near Ilminfter; Exmoor, at the fouth weft 
extremity towards Devonfhire; Mendip, near Wells; North-Petherton, near 
Bridgwater ; befides the Chaces of Axbridge, Chedder, and F/lwood on the 
fouth fide of Briftol. 

The Vineyards of moft note were at Bath, Glaftonbury, Mearc, and 
Pamborroio. 

In vegetable and animal productions, Somerfetfhire is by no means defi- 
cient; the hills, plains, vallies, rivers, and feas, abound with commodities 
ufeful to mankind, and adequate to the necefiary wants of life. The vallies, 
whether diftributed into meads, pafture, or tillage, are in general very rich, 
and many of the hills, a few years fmce unacquainted with the plough, 
now, by the improvements in hufbandry, brought to fuch a ftate of cultiva- 
tion as to produce large crops of grain. Hemp, flax, teazels, and woad, are 
cultivated in confiderable quantities. The plains are remarkable for their 
luxuriant herbage, particularly the moors, on which are fattened great 
numbers of nearly the largeft cattle in England. The cheefe made in this 
county is efteemed remarkably fine, and in diftant parts is produced as one of 
the dainties of the table. The fheep are generally of the fmaller kind; the 
Mendip mutton is well known for its peculiar fweetnefs. 

The hills produce various forts of valuable ore; in thofe of Mendip are 
dug immenfe quantities of lead and lap'u-calaminaris, and fome copper: 
the Quantock-hills alfo produce lead and copper; the Broadfield-downs, and 

othe/ 



xvi INTRODUCTION. 

other wilds, have their mines of calamine; and iron-ore has been found, 
though little worked, in various parts of the county; on the rocks near 
Porlock filver in fmall quantities is difcoverable. The coal-mines in the 
northern part, at Clutton, High-Littleton, Midfummer-Norton, Timfbury, 
Paulton, Bedminfter, Afhton, Nailfea, Clapton, and other places, are valu- 
able treafures to the neighbourhood, and fupply great part of the cities of 
Bath and Briftol with moil excellent fuel. The former city lias in great 
meafure been raifed by the fine freeftoneof its neighbouring quarries. The 
blue Kenton ftone is admirable for paving. The rocks onthe coaft contain 
marble, alabafter, and talk; and thofe in the inland parts are generally com- 
pofed of limeftone, and abound with pyrkes, (par, lava, and curious petrifac- 
tions. On Mendip are found, the green foliaceous talk with fmall fpangles, 
brown elafmis, brown pellucid fclenittz, bright oligadra, dull white arthrodium , 
with a variety of fpars and cryftals. Peculiar alio to thefe hills is the hard 
yellow undulated fecomia, which is found in large quantities, lying moftly 
deep. Several other varieties of the fecomia are alfo to be met with here, and 
in many other parts of the county. The other natural productions of 
Mendip are, the brown gaiophragmium with mow-white earthy partitions, the 
pale yellow feptaria with a ruft-coloured nucleus, hard heteropyra with brown 
and purplifh crufts, oblong geodes with a fingle blackifh cruft, thick fhelled 
nih'uiri., friable pale red lithozugium with white veins and red nodules, 
blue cryftalline petridium, filver, gold colour and white marcafites. In fome 
of the perpendicular fiffures of the ftrata of ftone is found that beautiful 
fpecies of the faburra, faburra faxea nivea tenuior, or fine fnow-white ftony 
grit. The dull white coarfe ftony grit is more common, and is found in 
many parts of the county, particularly in the ftone quarries near Bath. ' Of 
ochres there are various fpecies found in thefe parts, fuch as, the hard heavy 
pale yellow ochre at Aihwick, near the road from Bath to Shepton-Mallet, 
lying in a ilratum about eighteen feet deep ; the light friable gold-coloured 
ochre,' which is frequently difcovered hanging to the fides of old mines; and 
the heavy friable yellow ochre, which is found in many parts of the county. 
At Chew and Winford is found that fpecies of red ochre commonly called 
ruddle, fo ,well known for its ufe in marking fhcep ; of this there are three 
different forts, the firft of which is that in general ufe for the above pur- 
poi'e; the fccond is much harder, makes an indifferent kind of paint, and is 
frequently fu'bftituted by druggifts for Bole-Armoniac ; the third is 
peculiar to a very confined fpace on the top of Winford-hill," and differs 

* Principally to an eilate belonging to the Rev. Mr. Wylde, of Yatton. 

materially 



INTRODUCTION. xvii 

materially from either of the other kinds in the brightnefs of its colour, the 
evennefs and fmoothnefs of its texture, in its ponderofity, its not crumbling 
between the fingers, and in being indiflblublc in water. It is found at 
about the diftance of fix fathoms from the furface of the ground, in a 
ftratum of four feet, lying on a bed of black marie, beneath ftrata of 
foft reddifh earth, clay, rock, and loam. It affords a moil excellent and 
fplendid colour, and is in every refpecl: equal to that ochrous earth which is 
dearly imported under the denomination of Terra Pcrfiax. 

The Mineral Springs, befides thofe at Bath, are, at Afhill, Alford, 
Horwood near Wincaunton, Horton, Dillington, Goathill, Yeovil, and 
Queen's-Camel. At Eaft-Chinnock is a fait fpring. 

The Rivers of this county furnilh trout, falmon, roach, dace, perch, eels, 
pike, gudgeon, carp, and tench; and on the fea-coaft we meet with tublin, 
flounders, fandabs, hakes, pipers, fhrimps, prawns, crabs, mufcles, foles, 
herrings, plaice, porpoifes, fkaits, and ftar-fifh. 

The moft remarkable Birds are, the heath-hen, wild-duck, curlew, rail, 
gull, and wheatear. 

In Exmoor and other lower parts of the county are abundance of red-deer. 

On the hills and defert waftes we find the dwarf juniper, the cranberry, 
and the whortleberry; the laft by the natives is called hurts, and produces 
a pleafing fruit, growing fingly like goofeberries, on little plants from a foot 
to eighteen inches in height; the leaves are ovated, and of a pale green, 
growing alternately on the branches. On the rocks upon the coaft are great 
quantities of laver, lichen marinus, or fea-bread. In the moors, once deluged 
by the fea, grows the gale, or candleberry-myrtle. 

Other more rare plants growing in this county are exhibited in the fol- 
lowing lift: 

Acorus Calamus. Sweet Flag. In old turf pits near Wedmore. 

/Egilops incurva. Sea Hard-grafs. In the paftures about Berrow and Burnham. 

Agaricus. odor at us. Svveet-fcented Mufhroom. 

AiRA/eiacea. Fine-leaved Hair-grafs. On Maiden down fo abundantly as to con- 
ftitute the predominant grafs, though very rare in many other countries. 

Allium ampelopra/um. Great Mountain Garlick. On the Steep-Holmes. 

Amanita verna, pileo rotundiori, odorato et ejculento, of Tournefort. In the fir woods 
on Combe down. It has a fine fcent much refembling May-flowers or white-thorn. 

Andromeda Polifolia. Wild Rofemary. On Glallonbury and Burtle turf moors 
abundantly. 

Antirrhinum majus. Great Snap-dragon. The walls of the city of Wells are 
finely adorned with this plant, and the Red Valerian, all the fummer months. 

Vol, I. c Arenaria 



1 



xviii INTRODUCTION. 

Arenaria peplcides. Sea Chickweed. On the rocks as you afcend Brean down, 

Arenaria maritima. Sea Spurrey. On the docks at Bridgwater moft luxuriantly. 

Artemisia maritima. Sea Wormwood. In Burnham fait marines plentifully. 

Arundo arenaria. Sea Reed. On the fand-banks all the way from Burnham 
church to Brean down. 

Arundo calamagrofiis. Hedge Reed. In the hedges between Hinton abbey and 
the church. 

Asplenium Ceterach. Spleenwort. 

Trichomanes. Black Maiden hair. 

Rut a muraria. Wall Rue. 

■ Adiantum nigrum. Maiden hair Fern. The above four plants are to be 

met with in great abundance on Hampton- cliffs; and the firft three on old walls in 
almoft every town of this county. 

Aster Tripolium. Sea After. At the fide of the Avon oppofite the Hotwells. 

Bromus Jquarrofus. Corn Brome-grafs. On Glaftonbury and Burde moors. 

Bunias Cakile. Sea Charlock. On the lands about Berrow church. 

Bupleurum tenuiffimum. Leaft Harefear. In the fait marines near Burnham church. 

Campanula hederacea. Ivy-leaved Bell-flower. In a fmall fwampy place on 
Maiden down, oppofite the Maidenhead inn. 

Carduus Eriphorus. Woolly-headed Thiftle. In the meadows under Smallcomb 
wood, and about Widcombe and Lyncombe. 

Carex arenaria. Sea Sedge. On the fands near Burnham church. 

Carex difticha. Soft Sedge. In old turf pits in Glaftonbury moors. 

Carex canefcens. Hoary Sedge. In old turf pits about Burtle moor. 

Carex digitata. Fingered Sedge. In Friary-wood, Hinton abbey. 

Carex inflata. Bloated Sedge. By the fides of Emborough-pond, Old Down. 

Carex montana. Mountain Sedge. On the rocks oppofite the Hotwells.. 

Chrysosplenium oppofitifolium. Oppofite-leaved golden Saxifrage. In ihady 
ditches about Lyncombe and Widcombe. 

Cicuta virofa. Long-leaved water Hemlock. In old turf pits on Burtle moor 
abundantly, and in the vicinity of Shepton-Mallet. 

Cistus polifolius. Mountain dwarf Ciftus. About the middle of Brean down, 
looking towards Burnham. 

Cochlearia officinalis. Garden Scurvy-grafs. On Chedder cliffs abundantly. 

Cochlearia Anglica. Sea Scurvy-grafs. By the fides of the Avon about Brif- 
lington, and facing the Hotwells. 

Colchicum autumnale. Meadow Saffron. In all the paftures about Bath, particu- 
larly Newton mead, which is beautifully arrayed with it all the month of September. 

Comarum palufire. Marfli Cinquefoil. In turf pits in Glaftonbury moor. 

Convallaria polygonatum. Many-flowered Solomon's-feal. In the woods at 
Eaft-Harptree under Mendip. 

Cokiandrv m fativum. Coriander. On the Steep-Holmes abundantly. 

Crataegus aria. White Beam tree. In all the woods about Bath, and in thofe 
about Burwalls and Stokeleigh, in the parifh of Long- Afh ton, oppofite the Hotwells. 
» ■ Crataegus 



INTRODUCTION. x\x 

Cratxgus tormina/is. Wild Service-tree. In Friary-wood at Hinton abbey. 

Crithmum maritimum. Rock Samphire. On the rocks at the farther end of 
Brean down, and on the Holmes abundantly. 

Cyperus longus. Englifh Galingale. In an old nih-pond at the back of a cottage 
at Walton in Gordano. 

Dianthus glaums. Chedder Pink. On Chedder cliffs. 

Dianthus arenarius. Stone Pink. On Chedder cliffs, with the foregoing; from 
which it differs, in its grafs being much narrower, and not of a fea-green colour; the 
flower alfo is larger, more jagged, and feldom more than one on the ftalk ; it is likewifc 
more fragrant in its fmell, particularly in the evening. 

Digitalis rubra. Red Fox-gloves. In the inclofures about Whiteftanton. 

Draba muralis. Wall Whitlow-grafs. On dry banks at Emborough. 

Drosera anglica. Large Sun-dew. In fwampy places on Black down. 

Eriophorum vaginatum. Hare's-tail Rufh. On Glaftonbury and Burtle turf moors 
abundantly. 

Euphorbia paralias. Sea Spurge. On the fand-banks at Berrow and Burnham. 

Euphorbia vcrrucofa. Warty Spurge. At the end of Collett's wood near the 
rookery at Prior-park. 

Galeopsis galeobdolon. Yellow Nettle-hemp. In all the woods and hedges about 
Lyncombe and Widcombe. 

Geranium maritimum. Sea Crane's-bill. On the rocks at Brean down. 

Geranium rotundifolium. Round-leaved Crane's-bill. On all the old walls about 
Hampton, Claverton, and Hinton. 

Geum rivale. Purple Avens. By the road fide on the left hand as you go from 
Frome to Shepton, about a quarter of a mile beyond Brewton road gate. 

Glastum. Woad. Cultivated at Keynfham and other places/ 

Herniaria Glabra. Smooth fea Rupture-wort. On the coaft at Wefton fuper 
Mare. 

Hippocrepis coma/a. Tufted Horfefhoe Vetch. On Anthony-hill, and mod of 
the dry hills about Bath. 

Hordeum marinum. Sea Barley-grafs. On the fands about Berrow and Burnham. 

Hypericum Ebdes. Marfh St. Peter's wort. On Burtle and Glaftonbury turf 
moors. 

Hypnum crijpum. Curled Hypnum. On Mofes's rock at Prior-park; alfo on the 
moift rocks in Friary wood, Hinton abbey. 

Inula Htknoides. Elecampane. In the paftures at Hinton abbey, near the 
fifh-ponds. 

Lathr/ea Jqtiamaria. Toothwort. At the roots of old trees in Smallcomb wood, 
and in the fhady walks of Prior-park. 

Lathyrus Nijfolia. Crimfon Grafs Vetch. By the road fide half a mile before 
you come to Philip's-Norton, on the left-hand going from Bath. 

» See vol. ii. p. 400. 

C 2 LePIDIVM 



XX 



INTRODUCTION. 



Lepidium Peir<eum. Rock Dittander. In the woods on the rocks facing the 
Hotwells, and at Uphill and Work. 

Lichen marinus. Sea Liverwort or Laver. On the rocks near Minehead. 

Limosella aquatica. Baftard Plantain. In cart ruts in fplafhy places about 
Highbridge. 

Lithospermum purpura- csruleum. Blue Gromwell. In Chedder woods by the 
road fide as you go to Axbridge, abundantly. 

Lolium bromoides. Sea Darnel-grafs. On the banks of the paftures under Brean- 
down, and about Berrow, plentifully. 

Myrica. Gale, Gouls, or Dutch Myrde. On Glaftonbury and Burtle moors 
abundantly j alfo on King's-Sedgmoor. 

Narthecium ojfifragum. Lancafter Afphodel, or Break-bone. In the bogs of 
Glaftonbury and Burtle turf moors. 

Ononis arenarius. Sea Reftharrow. On the fands at Burnham andJSerrow. 

Ophrys apifera. Bee Orchis. In all the hilly paftures about North-Stoke, 
abundantly.. 

Ophrys mufcifera. Fly Orchis. On Hampton down, under the cliffs. 

Ophrys nidus avis. Bird's-neft Orchis. In Friary wood, Hinton abbey j alfo in 
Smallcomb-wood near Bath. 

Ophrys Jpiralis. Screw Orchis. In the paftures under Chard. 

Orobus Jylvaticus. Wood Orobus. This very rare plant has been found growing 
in a dry pit on Mendip, near Emborough ponds, juft by a ftone ftile againft the fluice 
which divides the ponds. 

Ornithogalum pyrenakum. Wood Star of Bethlehem, or Bath Afparagus. In 
the woods at Hinton abbey abundantly; alfo in moft of the woods about Bath. The 
young fhoots of it are eaten by the common people as afparagus, which it much, re- 
fembles, but it is not very wholfome; for if- eaten plentifully, it occafions naufea and- 
opprefiion of the breath. 

Osmunda lunaria. Moonwort. On commons and wafte lands in divers parts of 
the county. 

Osmunda regalis. Ofmund Royal. On Glaftonbury and Burtle turf moors. 

Paris quadrifolia. Herb Truelove. In Smallcomb wood, and in all the woods 
about Bath. 

Phellandrium aquaticum. Common water Hemlock. The ditches about Glaf- 
tonbury, particularly fuch as are neglected, are overrun with this poifonous weed; 
which is very often deftruftive to cattle, efpecially in the fpring before it acquires its 
rank tafte, and they are but juft turned out of the ftraw-yard, when .every thing that is 
green goes down with them indifcriminately. 

Pilularia' globulifera. Pillwort. In wet places on Black and Maiden downs. 

Pimpinella dioica. Stone Parfley. On the rocks about Uphill, and alfo on thofe 
oppofite the Hotwells. 

Pinguicula villofa. Hairy Butterwort. In a little fwamp on Maiden down, 
oppofite the Maidenhead inn. 

Pinguicula 



INTRODUCTION. xxl 

Pinguicula vulgaris. Common Butter-wort. On Glaftonbury and Burtlc 

turf moors. 

Polypodium aculeatum. Prickly Fern. ? T ~ , , . ~, , , 

■a . n n. jc f 1° Emborough wood, Old down. 
crijtatum. Crofted Fern. \ ° 

Polypodium dryopteris. Oak Fern. In the chinks of the garden fteps at Wid- 
combe-houfe. 

Polypodium fragile. Brittle Fern. Under the hedges near the mile-ftone at 
Emborough j alfo at Chewton-Mendip, abundantly. 

Polypodium lobatum. Lobed Fern. In the rocks at Burwall's wood facing the 
Hotwells. 

Polypodium thelypteris. Marfh Fern. On Glaftonbury and Burde rurf moorsj 
abundantly. 

Ranunculus hirfutus. Hairy marfh Ranunculus. In the drove-ways on Glafton-r 
bury moor abundantly. It has very much the habit of Ranunculus bulbofus, but differs 
from it in being an annual plant, and not having a bulbous root. 

Rubia peregrine. Wild Madder. On the rocks of Leigh wood, alfo in the woods 
about Portifhead point, abundantly. 

Salicornia Europea. Jointed Glafswort. In the fait marines near Highbridge. 

Salsola fruticofa. Shrubby Stonecrop. On the Steep-Holmes. 

Salsola kali. Prickly Glafswort. On the fands about Berrow. . • 

Saponaria officinalis. Soapwort. By the road fide near Burnt-gate turnpike on 
the Wells road. 

Saxifraga hypnoides. Trifid-Hypnum leaved Sengreen. On Chedder rocks. 

Sch^jnus marifcus. Baftard Cyperus. On King's-Sedgmoor abundantly. 

Scilla autumnalis. Autumnal ftarry Hyacinth. On the rocks in Burwall's wood 
facing the Hotwells. 

Scirpus holojchanus. Round-headed Club-rufh. Near the fea fide below Watchet. 

Selinum palujlre. Marfh Saxifrage. In Burtle moor plentifully. 

Senecio Jaracenicus. Broad-leaved Ragwort. NearShepton-Mallet and Glaftonbury. 

Serapias grandifiora. Wood Heleborine. In Claverton-wood, alfo in the woods 
at Hinton abbey. 

Silene amcena^ Sea Campion. On the rocks as you afcend Brean down. 

Thalictrum minus. LefTer Meadow Rue. On Chedder cliffs plentifully. 

Trifolium ftellatum. Starry Trefoil, near Wefton in Gordano. 

Triglochin maritimum. Sea Rufh-grafs. In the fait marines below Highbridge. 

Triticum caninum. Bearded Dog's-grafs. In the woods at Hinton abbey. 

Triticum junceum. Sea Dog's-grafs. On the fands about Berrow. 

Turritis kirjula. Hairy Tower-Muftard. About the fione quarries on Combe 
down; alfo on the rocks in Leigh wood. 

Vaccinium oxy coccus. Cranberry. On Glaftonbury and Burtle turf moors. 

Valeriana rubra. Red Valerian. On the ruins of Glaftonbury abbey, and old 
walls about the city of Wells. There is a white variety of this growing about Huntfpill 
and Highbridge. 

Veronica 



XX 11 



INTRODUCTION. 



Veronica mcnlana. Mountain-Speedwell. In Friary-wood, Hinton Abbey. 

Vicia lutea. Yellow Vetch. About the fand-pits on the fouth fide of Glafton- 
bury Torr. 

Utricularia minor. LefTer-hooded Water Milfoil. In old turf pits on Glafton- 
bury-moor. 

Utricularia vulgaris. Great-hooded Water Milfoil. In the turf-pits on Burtle- 
moor. 

The diftrict. now called Somersetshire was in ancient times inhabited 
by the Belgae, a brave Gaulifh people, but of Celtic origin, who migrated 
hither out of Gaul, A.M. 3650, three hundred and thirteen years before 
the birth of ChrirV and repelled the Britons, the aboriginal inhabitants of 
the country, whofe CamCBS ftill crown fome of our higheft mountains, to 
other parts of the ifland. The poneflions of this people extended over a 
very large tract, of country, including Somerfetfhire, Dorfetihire, Devonfhire, 
part of Cornwall, Wiltihire, Hampshire, SufTex, and part of Middlefex, in 
all which they eftablifhed colonies, and in the wafte marfhy grounds prac- 
ticed thofe arts of induftry to which they had been habituated in Gaul, and 
in which they inftructed thofe Britons who chofe to intermix in their 
fociety. About two hundred and fifty years after their fettlement in thefe 
parts, Divitiacus, king of the Sueflbnes, or Soiffons, and according to Csefar e 
the moft powerful prince in Gaul, minded himfelf to bring over into 
Britain a confiderable army of the Continental Belga;, and by the addition 
of his forces to enable the former emigrators to extend the line of their 
pofTefTions. The expelled Britons had doubtlefs made frequent attempts to 
regain their native feats, and by inroads to perplex the innovating barba- 
rians. Upon the arrival of this prince, a plan of compromife and treaty 
feems to have been fuggefted, and a line drawn to define the boundaries of 
either people. This was effected by throwing up a large and deep foffe or 
dike, called from the circumftance of its divifion, (KtlanSDifeC, which to this 
day exifts in many places in perfect prefervation, one of the greateft curiofi- 
ties in antiquity. It commences at Andover in Hampfhire, and thence panes 
nearly in a ffrait direction to Great Bedwin within the confines of Wilts, 
near which, upon its track, have been difcovered celts and inftruments of 
war. It then croffes the great foreft of Savarnack and the wild Marlbo- 
rough downs, where it appears in its prifrine ftate, exceedingly deep and 
flanked by a very lofty mound, after the manner of the elevated rampire of a 
cattle, attracting by its lingular appearance the attention of the curious 

* Ricard. Monach. de fitu Britannia; 50. ■ Casfar de Bello Gall. 

traveller. 



INTRODUCTION. xxiii 

traveller. Quitting the downs, it vifits Calfton, Edington, and Spyc-park, 
crofles the river Avon near Bennacre, and again, after being loft in tilled 
fields, meets with the fame meandring river at Bath-Hampton, where it 
enters the northweft portion of the Belgick territories. Its courfe is then 
continued over Claverton-down to Prior-park, Ingliihcombe, Stanton-Prior, 
Publow, Norton, Long-Afhton, and terminates in the Severn fea near the 
ancient port of Portifhead, forming a line of upwards of eighty miles in 
length, in more than three parts of which it is yet vifible. 

Hence it will be feen how far the territories of the ancient Belgae ex- 
tended towards the north, and that even fome parts of this county, much 
of Wiltfhire, and the whole of Gloucefterfhire, were excluded out of their 
dominions. The chief cities which they had were Ivelchefter, Bath, and 
Winchefter/ two of which are within the limits of our county, and prove 
in fome meafure that this was as it were the metropolitan feat of their empire. 

A long fucceffion of favage and tumultuous contentions intervened be- 
twixt this period and the arrival of the Roman arms in the Belgick dates 
of Britain. This was about the year of Chrift 40, and nine years after two 
trophies were erected by the Emperor Claudius in conlequencc of his having 
utterly annihilated the Cangi, a pofthumous clan of thofe Belgae, who laft 
migrated into this country with the Sueffonian king. 

During the ftay of the Romans in this region, they exerted their national 
activity in building themfelves towns, throwing up roads from ftation to 
ltation, and in fabricating camps as occafional places of fecurity. Their cities 
were Aqua Soli 's, or Bath, and Ifcalis, or Ivelchestf.r; and thole places 
whole ancient names are not transmitted to the prefent day, but are demon- 
itrated to have been Roman by the foundations of their walls, and the dis- 
covery of unquestionable reliques of Romanity, were, Camalet, Hamden, 
Wellow, Coker, Chilcompton, Conquest, Wiveliscombe, Bath- 
Ford, Warley, Street, Long-Ashton, Postlebury, South-Pether- 
ton, Watergore, Wigborough, Yeovil, Putsham, Kilton, Sto- 
g umber, Edington, Inglishcombe, &c. Their principal road was the 
Foffe, extending in a fouthweft direction from Bath to Perry-ftreet on the 
borders of Devonfhire. Another road ran nearly parallel to it from the 
foreft of Exmoor through Taunton, Bridgwater, and Axbridge, to Portif- 
head on the Briftol Channel, where it interfected Wanfdike, and whence 
there was a trajeBus to the city of Ifca-Silurum, now called Caerleon, in 
the county of Monmouth, A vicinal way extends from the FoJJ'e through 

f See vol. iii. p. 298. 

Stoke- 



Kxiv INTRODUCTION. 

Stoke-under-Hamden. Their camps were, Camalet, S0ea0knon, ToOXX}- 
Ditcb, a^asimrp, Doleberrp, OOodeberrp, TBlacfceO^ill, IBurtoalte, ^tofcc* 
Ici$), Caotwtp, Ccu&tirp, Doufedorougb, fi^onburj?, <£0uJl)iU, Coto=catfte, 
Crcnniccaftlc, Cttrlt'^cafflc, i5rompton=13ur]?=caflle, i^atofetiDge^caflle, 
a9ounceauv=cafile, jRetoborough, H3ecocfje, ©tantomlBurp, oec» 

The Romans quitted this country between A.D. 440 and 444; and the 
Saxons infidioufly fupplying their flations, and fubverting the general 
ceconomy of the country, impofed upon this province the new name of 
Sumejrrerercyjxe, or Somerfetjhire, either from Somerton, the chief town at that 
particular period therein, or in regard that they found this the feat of 
fumtner, compared with the frigid fituations which they had fo lately aban- 
doned. In their divifion of this kingdom into petty ftates, in effecting 
which much blood was fhed to obtain little territory, it conftituted part of 
the kingdom of Weflex, or the JVeft-Saxons. 

In the reign of king Ina, a prince in prudence and moderation much 
unlike the majority of thofe who fwayed the Saxonian fceptre either before 
or after him, Chriftianity, notwithftanding the diforders and confulions 
which neceffarily attend the emulous contentions of barbarian powers, 
began to dawn, and to become the national religion of Britain. And al- 
though the ifle of Avalon can never juftly boaft of the honour of that holy 
vifit which monks bewildered by error and fuperftition, have even in the moft 
diftant lands beftowed \ipon it, yet it muft at leaft be granted the felicity 
of having acquired the rudiments of the Chriftian religion, as foon, if not 
much fooner than moft other parts of Britain. The monaftery of Glafton- 
bury, the bifhoprick of Wells, were then founded, and other works of 
piety were inftituted. 

The reign of good king Alfred, who was the fifth in fucceffion to Egbert 
the reducer of the Saxon heptarchy into one fole dominion, was marked 
with many troubles. The Danes, a furious tribe fprung from the frozen 
bofom of the north, had in his time nearly overrun the whole face of 
Britain, and defolated almoft every province. Somerfet, Wilts, and Hants, 
were the only diftricls to which they had not conveyed the terror of their 
arms. At length A.D. 878, they entered thefe confines, and, after many 
encounters in which the efforts of placid expiring virtue gave way to the 
increafmg violence of favage cruelty, Alfred was conftrained to feek an 
humble afylum in the fens of Athelnev, and await the day wherein Pro- 
vidence fhould place him peaceably on his legal throne. Nor was it far 
diftant. At Edington he defeated the combined body of the Danes, and 

retiring 



INTRODUCTION. 



xxv 



retiring to his court at Aller, where he caufed Guthnm the pagan king 
to receive the rite of baptifm, in gratitude to God laid the foundation of a 
noble monaftery to the honour of St. Saviour and St. Peter the apoftle, at 
Athelney, the feat of his priftine folitary retirement.* 

After a prolix feries of invafions, battles, and innovations, well known 
in Britifh hiftory, William duke of Normandy afcended the Britifh throne, 
in full poiTeffion of all the various eftates of England. Thofe in this 
county, exclufive of what he chofe to referve for his own private ufe, and 
which had been the royal demefnes of Edward the ConfeiTor, he diftributed 
to religious foundations, and to thofe perfons who had adventured their 
fortunes and their lives in his rafh but fuccefsful expedition, viz. 

Walcheline, bifhop of Winchefter 

Herman, bifhop of Salifbury 

Odo, bifliop of Baieux 

Geffrey, bifhop of Coutances 

Gifo, bifhop of Wells 

The Church of Bath 

The Church of Glaftonbury 

The Church of Muchelney 

The Church of Athelney 

The Church of St. Peter at Rome 

The Church of Caen in Normandy 

The Church of Montebourgh in Nor- 
mandy 

The Church of Shaftefbury in Dor- 
fetfhire 

Maurice, bifhop of London 

Clerks, tenants of the King 

Euftace earl of Bulloigne 

Hugh de Abrincis earl of Chefter 

Robert earl of Morton 

Baldwin de Exeter 

Roger de Corcelle 

Roger Arundel 

Walter Giffard 

Walter de Dowai 

The feudal fyftem being, in its improved ftate, introduced into this 
country by the Normans, the lands, which heretofore had been poiTeffed 
by thanes and vaflals of the Saxon court, were now condenfed into large 
baronies, each comprifing a great number of eftates, held under the refpec- 



William de Mohun 

William de Owe 

William de Faleife 

William Fitz-Wido 

Ralph de Mortimer 

Ralph de Pomeroy 

Ralph Paganel 

Ralph de Limefi 

Robert Fitz-Gerold 

Alured de Marlborough 

Alured de Ifpania 

Turftin Fitz-Rolf 

Serlo de Burci 

Odo Fitz-Gamelin 

Ofbern Giffard 

Edward de Salifbury 

Ernulph de Hefding 

Giflebert Fitz-Thurold 

Godebold 

Matthew de Moretaine 

Humphrey the Chamberlain 

Robert de Auberville, and other fervants 

of the King 
The King's thanes. 



Vol. I. 



« Vol. i. p. 86. 

d 



tive 



xxvi INTRODUCTION. 

live lords, asthey therafelves held under the crown, by military fervice 
On the principal eftate or head of each barony, caftles were ereded, and 
the feveral owners were by their tenure obliged to fupport the outrages or 
ambition and the madnefs of crufades. 

The principal Barons in this county in the time of Henry II. were, 

Henry de Culture 
Philip de Columbers 
Richard del Eftre 



The Bifhop of Bath 

The Abbot of Glaftonbury 

The Abbot of Muchelney 

William de Curci, fteward to the King 

William Mefchin 

William de Mohun 

William Malet 

Drew de Montacute 

William de Hafelberge 

Richard Revel 

Robert Fitz-Ralph 

Robert Fitz-Harding 

Alexander de Alno 

The possessors of land in this county of moft note in the time of 
Edw. I. a reign diftinguifhed by many and various features of provincial 
popularity, were the following, viz. 



Walter Brett 
William Fitz-Geffrey 
Robert de Beauchamp 
Henry Luvel 
William de Erleigh 
Geffrey de Mandeville 
Hugh de Curcelle 
William de Wrotham 
Hubert de Burgh." 



The Bifhop of Bath and Wells 
The Bittiop of Winchefter 
The Dean and Chapter of Wells 
The Abbot of Glaftonbury 
The Abbot of Athelney 
The Abbot of Cleeve 
The Abbot of Muchelney 
The Abbot of Keynfham 
The Prior of Bath 
The Prior of Brewton 
The Prior of Woodfpring 
The Prior of Stoke-Courci 
The Prior of Montacute 
The Prior of Flinton 
The Prior of Taunton 
The Prior ofBarlinch 
The Priorefs of Cannington 
The Prior of Dunfter 
The Prior of Witham-Friary 
"The Prior of Stavor-dale 



o 



CO 

o 
3 



<"& 



The Priorefs of Barrow 

The Mafter of the Hofpital of St. | 

John in Bath 
The Preceptor of the Hofpital at 

Buckland 
The Mafter of the Hofpital of St. 

Catherine in Bedminfter 
The Mafter of the Hofpital of St. 

John in Bridgwater 
The Preceptor of Temple-Combe^ 
The Abbot of Cirencefter 1 Glouce r_ 
The Abbot of Flaxley Y terfhire" 

The Abbot of Tewkefbury J 
The Abbot of St. Auguftine "J 
The Mafter of Billefwick's j-Briftol. 

Hofpital J " 

The Abbot of Neath in Glamorgan- 
shire 
The Prior of Goldclive in Monmouth- 
fhire 

» Lib. Nig. Scac. Sumcrfet. 

The 



INTRODUCTION. 



xxvn 



The Abbot of Ford in Devonfhire 

The Abbot of Stanley "J 

The Prior of Maiden-Bradley MViltfhire 

The Prior of Bradenftoke ) 

The Prior of Bermondfey in Surrey 

The Prior of Brymore in Hamplhire 

The Prior of St. John of Jerufalem in 

England 
Robert Fitzpaine 
Alan Plucknet 
Nicholas Fitz-Martin 
Maurice de Berkeley 
John de Columbers 
Ofbert Giffard 
Henry del Orti 
William de Stanton 
Matthew de Effe 
William de Poulet 
John de Bykefand 
John de Reigny 
Geffrey de Scoland 
Robert de Brus 
Baldwin Malet 
William de Champflour 
John de Valletort 
Roger Pym 
John de Neville 
Richard de Godelege 
William de Vernai 
Hugh de Conteville 
Richard de Conteville 
John de Gogulmere 
John de Mohun 
Thomas de Bratton 
Henry de Glaften 
William de Bafings 
Hugh Luvel 
Richard Luvel 
Roger de Moels 
Geffrey de Mandeville 
John de Baumfylde 
Reginald Fitz-Peter 
William de Marilco 
John de Tylly 



Ignatius de Clifton 
Gervafe de Clifton 
William Braunche 
Richard de Bigod 
Henry de Merlaund 
Laurence de St. Maur 
Ifabel Sore 
John de Biitafhe 
Baldwin de Andham 
John de Haftings 
Richard de Cantilupe 
John de Burgh 
Edmund de Lacy 
Heniy de Bikeley 
Geffrey de Wroxall 
Hugh Pointz 
John de Cogan 
Nicholas Fitz-Ralph 
Oliver de Dinham 
Nicholas Braunche 
John Apadam 
William de Gouiz 
Philip Paganel 
John de Brewes 
Walter Pauncefot 
Peter de Fauconberge 
Alexander de la Lynde 
John de la Lynde 
John de Dummer 
Walter del Orti 
Peter de Evercy 
Simon de Raleigh 
Thomas de Raleigh 
Hugh Fichet 
Hugh de Popham 
William de Popham 
William de Wigbcrough 
Thomas Trivet 
William Trivet 
Matthew de Furneaux 
Simon de Roges 
Roger Perceval 
Ralph Wake 
Robert Burnel 



d2 



Edmund 



XXV1I1 



INTRODUCTION. 



Edmund Everard 
Maurice de Berkeley 
John de Clevedon 
Richard Arthur 
John de Wyke 
Richard dc Ken 
Joceus de Baioufc 
Thomas de Baioufc 
John Baflet 
Henry de Montfbrt 
William Cotel 
John de Courtney 
Thomas de Gournay 
Walter de Loveney 
Ralph Ruflell 
William de Cheney 
Walter le Bret 
Roger la Warre 
Alexander de Alno 
John de Afton 
Thomas de Lyons 
Elias de Aubeney 
John de Fieules 
Robert de St. Clare 
John de Poulefhull 
Simon de Grindham 
John de Mucegros 
William de Braofe 
Walter de Sydenham 
William de Sydenham 
William de Wiggebere 
Thomas de Multon 
William de Gardino 
Gilbert de Clare 
Ralph dc Gorges 
Richard Perceval 
Edmund de Woodftock 
John Bonville 
John Maltravers 
Leonard de Stawel 
Lawrence Talebot 
Fulke Fitzwarren 
Thomas Portman 
James de Orchard 



Thomas de Orchard 
William de la Brook 
Brice le Denneys 
Thomas Hawey 
Robert de Brent 
Hugh Sanzaver 
Andrew Luttrell 
Matthew de Befilles 
Roger Arundel 
Simon de Crocumbe 
Roger de Dodeton 
John de Elworthc 
Richard de Lod-Hywifh 
Ofbert de Bath 
John de St. Lo 
Nicholas de St. Maur 
Robert Malherb 
Nicholas de la Mare 
Bartholomew Peyctevyn 
John de A don 
Geffrey de Hautville 
Baldric de Nonington 
John le Waleys 
John de Beauchamp 
Joan de Vivonne 
James de Moleton 
Simon de Raleigh 
Roger Baflet 
William de Staunton 
William de Botreaux 
Richard de Emborough 
John de Wrotham 
William de Plefly 
Richard de Plefly 
Ralph Fitzurfe 
William de Wellington 
Ifmania la Sor 
Agnes de Mounceaux 
Simon deMontacute 
John de Ferrers 
John de Moels 
John de Mohun 
John de Meriet 
John de Maundeville 



Hugh 



INTRODUCTION. xxix 

Hugh de Courtney Walter de Avenant 

John de Erleigh Richard de Avenant 

Stephen de la Mare Adam le Bret 

Maud de Kyme William de Mounceaux 

Peter de Hamme John le Waleys 

Malcoline de Harleigh Thomas de Rodney. 
John de Wrotefleigh 

The names of thofe perfons who have ferved this county in parliament 
are here fubjoined: 

Robert de Brent, Philip de Wykes, 1298. 

William de Bere, Hugh de Popham, 1300. 

John de Wykc, John de Wookey, 1302. 

Edmund Everard, John de Dummere, 1305. 

John de Beauchamp, Laurence de Hamelden, 1307. 

Nicholas de Cheyney, Sir John de Erleigh, knt. 1308. 

Writ, but no return, 13 10. 

William de Bere, 131 1. 

Sir Gilbert de Bere, Sir Edmund Everard, knts. 1312. 

Sir John de Erleigh, Sir Robert de Somerton, knts. 13 13. 

John de Beauchamp, John de Dummere, 1314. 

Sir Simon de Montacute, Sir Nicholas de Chartray, knts. 13 15. 

John de Beauchamp, Peter de Evercy, 1316. 

Herbert de Marifco, John de Leddred, 13 17. 

Sir William de Fauconberge, Sir John de Berneville, knts. 1318. 

Sir Thomas de Marleberge, Sir Reginald de Frome, knts. 1321. 

Sir Hamon Fitz- Richard, Sir William de Muleborn, knts. 1322. 

Sir Hamon Fitz-Richard, Sir William de Fauconberge, knts. 1324. 

Sir William de Muleborn, Sir John de Say, knts. 1325. 

John de Clevedon, Hugh de Langland, 1326. 

Nicholas de Odcombe, Robert de Paulfley, 1327. 

Sir Nicholas de Leddred, knt. 1328. 

William de Fauconberge, Simon de Fourneaux, 1328. 

John de Erleigh, Robert de Somerton, 1329. 

John de Erleigh, Hugh dc Langlond, 1330. 

Adam le Bret, Nicholas de Leddred, 1330. 

John de Erleigh, Thomas de Marleberge, 1331. 

John de Erleigh, Robert de Somerton, 1332. 

John de Erleigh, Henry Power, 1332. 

John de Kingfton, John de Draycot, 1332. 

John de Moeles, John de Say, 1333. 

Thomas de Marleberge, Thomas de Gournay, 1334. 

Adam le Bret, Nicholas de Leddred, 1335. 

Walter 



XXX 



INTRODUCTION. 



Walter de Rodney, Edward de Lyons, 1336. 

Adam Luttrell, John le Bret, 1337. 

Peter de Veel, Oliver de Dinham, 1337. 

Brian de Gouiz, John de Leddred, 1338. 

Thomas de Wodeford, Robert de Radefton, 1338. 

John de Kingfton, Henry de Glaftonbury, 1338. 

Thomas de Marleberge, Robert de Radefton, 1339. 

Thomas de Ford, Thomas de Hungerford, 1340. 

Thomas de Marleberge, John de St. Lo, 1340. 

James Hufee, William de Colford, 1341. 

Edward de Stradling, Henry Power, 1342. 

Nicholas de Boleville, Roger de Wefton, 1343. 

William de Fauconberge, Henry Fitz-Richard, 1344. 

Ralph de Middleney, Simon de Furneaux, 1345. 

Simon de Bradeney, John de Merfhton, 1340. 

Sir Ralph de Middleney, Sir Walter de Puteney, knts. 1347. 

John Trivet, John de Merfhton, 1348. 

Thomas de Rodney, John de Merfhton, 1350. 

Ralph de Middleney, Walter de Rodney, 1352. 

Sir Edmund Everard, knt. Walter de Rodney, 1352. 

Thomas de Rodney only, 1353. 

Edward de Clevedon, Ralph de Middleriey, 1354. 

Ralph de Middleney, Thomas Waryn, 1355. 

Walter de Rodney, Thomas Fichet, 1356. 

Ralph de Middleney, Walter de Rodney, 1357. 

Peter de Veel, Thomas Fichet, 1358. 

William de Stanton, John de Wyke, 1359. 

Ralph de Middleney, Matthew de Clevedon, 1360. 

Richard de Acton, John de St. Lo, 1361. 

John de St. Lo, Matthew de Clevedon, 1362. 

John de Raleigh, John de Langlond, 1363. 

Hugh de Durborough, William Bonville, 1366. 

Hugh de Durborough, Walter Blewet, 1368. 

Edward Cheney, Matthew de Clevedon, 1369. 

John Beauchamp of Lillifdon, 137 1. 

Hugh de Durborough, John Reynon, 1372. 

John de la Mare, Walter Blewet, 1373. 

Thomas Marfhall, 1376. 

John de la Mare, Robert James, 1376. 

Maurice de Wick, Sir Walter Blewet, knt. 1377. 

John Burgherfh, John Radington, 1378. 

John de Meriet, Johnde Tummere, 1379. 

Thomas Fichec, John Matravers, 1382. 

Giles Daubeney, William Bonville, 1383, 1384. 



Thomas 



INTRODUCTION. xxxi 

Thomas Fichet, Philip Bryan, 1385. 

William Bonville, Sir Thomas Broke, knt. 1386. 

Thomas Hungerford, John Burgherfh, 1388. , 

Thomas Hungerford, Thomas Beaupine, 1389. 

John Berkeley, Thomas Hungerford, 1390. 

John de Rodney, Sir Thomas Broke, 1391. 

Sir Thomas Broke, William Bonville, 1392. 

Humphry Stafford, John Berkeley, 1393. 

Sir William Bonville, Sir Thomas Broke, knts. 1394. 

Thomas Broke, Thomas Arthur, 1396. 

Thomas Broke, John Fitzwarren, 1397. 

Thomas Broke, William Bonville, 1398. 

Thomas Beauchamp, William Stourton, 1399. 

Thomas Broke, William Stourton, 1402, 1403. 

Hugh Luttrell, Leonard Hahelet, 1404. 

Walter Rodney, Leonard Hahelet, 1406. 

Thomas Broke, Richard de Chedder, 1407. 

Thomas Broke, Walter Hungerford, 1408. 

Thomas Broke, Richard de Chedder, 14 13. 

Sir Hugh Luttrell, Sir Robert Hill, knts. 1414, 1415. 

Richard Baynton, Sir Robert Hill, 1416. 

Thomas Broke, Richard Chedder, 1417. 

Thomas Stalkill, John Stourton, 1420. 

Richard Chedder, John Stourton, 142 1. 

Sir Thomas Broke, Sir William Palton, knts. 1422. 

John Stourton, William Carent, 1423. 

Giles Daubeney, Thomas Beauchamp, 1424. 

Thomas Broke, Richard Chedder, 1426. 

Giles Daubeney, John Stourton, 1428. 

John Stourton, John Hody, 1434, 1440. 

Edward Broke, Alexander Hody, 1441. 

Edward Hull, Walter Rodney, 1446. , 

Thomas Wake, Alexander Hody, 1448. 

John Sydenham, Alexander Hody, 1449. 

William Carent, Alexander Hody, 1450. 

William Courteen, Alexander Hody, 1454. 

John Sydenham, Henry Hull, 1466. 

John Willoughby, John Biconell, 1472. 

[From this date to the year 1553, 1 Mary, there are no returns to be found. J 

Sir Edward Rogers, Sir Ralph Hopton, knts. 1553. 

Sir Edward Waldegrave, Sir John Sydenham, knts. 1554. 

Sir Edward Rogers, knt. 15.55. 

Sir Edward Rogers, John Wallh, 1557, 1558, 1559. 

Sir Edward Rogers, Sir Maurice Berkeley, knts. 1563. 

Sir 



xxxu 



INTRODUCTION. 



Sir Amias Paulet, George Rogers, 1571. 

Sir Hugh Paulet, Sir Maurice Berkeley, knts. 1572. 

George Speke 

Henry Berkeley, Thomas Horner, 1586, 1587, 

Francis Haftings, Edward Dyer, 1589, 1593. 

Sir Francis Popham, Sir Hugh Portman, knts. 15.97- 

Sir Maurice Berkeley, knt. Edward Phelips, 1601. 

Sir Francis Haftings, knt. Sir Edward Phelips, bart. 1603. 

Sir Robert Phelips, Sir Francis Haftings, knts. 1 614. 

Charles Berkeley, Robert Flopton, 1620. 

Sir Robert Phelips, John Symes, 1623. 

Sir Robert Phelips, John Stawell, 1625. 

Sir Henry Berkeley, Sir John Horner, knts. 1626. 

Sir Robert Phelips, Sir Edward Rodney, knts. 1627. 

Sir Ralph Hopton, knight of the Bath, Thomas Smith, 1639. 

Sir John Poulet, Sir John Stawel, 1640. Aug. 8, i642,<hey were difabled, by 
vote of the Houfe of Commons, for putting the CommilTion of Array in execution, 
and fhewing their loyalty to the King. In their place were chofen, 

George Horner, and John Harington, who continued till 1653. 

Robert Blake, one of the generals atfea, John Pine, Denzill Hollis, Henry Harvey, 
were returned as reprefentatives of this county, 1653. 

Sir John Horner, knt. John Buckland, General John Deiborough, John Prefton, 
John Harington, John Afh, Charles Steynings, Robert Long, Richard Jones, Thomas 
Hippefley, and Samuel Parry, 1654. 

John Defborough, John Buckland, Alexander Popham, Robert Long, John Gorges, 
Francis Luttrell, John Am, John Harington, Liflebon Long, William Wyndham, 
and Francis Roll, 1656. 

John Buckland, John Hunt, 1659. 

George Horner, Hugh Smith, 1660. 

Sir John Stawel, Edward Phelips, 1661. 

Hon. John Paulet. He fucceeded his father in 1665, and in his room 

Sir John Warre was elected, againft whom a petition was preferred by Sir John 
Sydenham, and it was referred to a Committee, who reported in his favour. On the 
death of Sir John Warre in 1669, 

Sir John Sydenham was elected. 

Sir John Sydenham, Sir Hugh Smith, barts. 1678. 

Sir William Portman, bart. George Speke, 1679, 1681. 

Sir John Smith, bart. George Horner, 1685. 

George Horner, Edward Gorges, 1688; againft this election John Speke petitioned, 
but was not heard. 

Sir Edward Phelips, bart. Nathaniel Palmer, 1690. 

Sir John Smith, bart. Sir John Trevelyan, bart. 1695. 

Sir Edward Phelips, John Hunt, 1698. 

Nathaniel 



INTRODUCTION. 



XXXIU 



Nathaniel Palmer, John Hunt, 1699. 

Sir John Trevelyan, John Hunt, 1700. 

Sir Philip Sydenham, Nathaniel Palmer, 1701, 1702. 

John Pigot, Nathaniel Palmer, 1705, 1707. 

Henry Portman, John Prowfe, 1708. 

Sir Thomas Wroth. Sir William Wyndham, barts. 17 10. 

Sir William Wyndham, Thomas Horner, 17 13. 

Sir William Wyndham, William Helyar, 17 14. 

Sir William Wyndham, Edward Phelips, 1722. 

Sir William Wyndham, Thomas Strangeways Horner, 1727, 1734. 

Thomas Prowfe, Henry William Portman, 1741. 

Thomas Prowfe, Sir Charles Kemeys Tynte, bart. 1747, 1754, 176 1. 

Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, bart. Sir Charles Kemeys Tynte, 1767. 

Richard Hippifley Coxe, Sir Charles Kemeys Tynte, 1768. 

Richard Hippifley Coxe, Edward Phelips, 1774. 

Richard Hippifley Coxe, Sir John Trevelyan, bart. 1780. 

Sir John Trevelyan, Edward Phelips, 1784, 1790. 

SHERIFFS of this COUNTY." 



Warine de Lifures, 1 1 54. 

Richard de Raddon, 1 155. 

Warine de Lifures, 1 156. 

Richard de Raddon, 1 157. 

Warine de Lifures, 1158. 

Richard de Raddon, 1 159. 

Warine de Lifures, 11 60, 1161. 

Robert de Bello Campo, 1 162. 

Gerbert de Percy, 1163, 1164. 

Richard de Raddon, 1 164. 

Gerbert de Percy, 1165. 

Robert de Puckerel, 1166, 1167, 1168 

Alured de Lincoln, 1169, 1170, 1 17 1, 

1172, 1173, 1174. 
Robert de Bello Campo, 1175, II 7^ J 

1177, 1 178, 1179, 1180, 1181. 
William de Bending, 1182, 1183. 
Robert Fitzpaine, 11 84, 1185, 11 86, 

1187, 1188. 
Hugh Bardolf, 1189. 
Robert de Witefelde, 11 90. 
Ralph de Cahaines, 1191, 1192, 11 93. 



William de Cahaines, 1 1 94, 1 1 95. 

Walter de Giffard, 1 195. 

William de Cahaines, 1 196. 

Peter de Schidimore, 1 197. 

William de Cahaines, 11 98. 

Peter de Schidimore, 1 1 99. 

Robert Belet, 11 99, 1200. 

Hubert de Burgh, 1201, 1202, 1203, 

1204. 
William de Montacute, 1205, 1206, 

1207. 
William de Briwere, 1 208, 1 209, 1 2 1 o. 
William Malet, 1 2 1 1, 1 2 1 2, 1 2 1 3. 
Richard de Marifco, 1 2 1 4. 
Ralph Bray, 121 5. 
Peter de Mauley, 1 2 1 6, 1 2 1 7, 1 2 1 8, 

1 2 1 9, 1 220, 1 22 r. 
Roger de Ford, 1 222. 
Ralph de Gernun, 1223. 
Richard Poore, bifhop of Salifbury, 1 224. 
Roger de Ford, 1225. 
William Fitz-Henry, 1 226, 1 227, 1 228. 



k Somerfctfhire and Dorfetfhire had one common flieriff till the year 1 566, when they were divided by Aft of 
Parliament, and each found Iheriffs by themfelves. 

Vol. I. e Thomas 



XXXIV 



INTRODUCTION. 



•1262. 



Thomas de Cirencefter, 1229, 1230, 

1 23 1, 1232, 1233, 1234, 1235. 
Henry de Campo Florido, 1 236. 
TkomasdeCirencefter, 1237, 1233, 1239. 
Jordan Oliver, 1 240. 
Hugh de Vivon, 1241, 1242, 1243, 

1 244, 1 245, 1 246, 1 247, 1248, 1 249. 
Bartholomew Peche, 1250. 
Elias de Rabayne, 125 1, 1252, 1253. 
John de Aure, "1 

Eli as de Rabayne, [-1254. 
Walter de Burges, J 
Stephen de Aftiton, 1255. 
Walter de Burges, \,r, e (. 

William de Turberville, j 5 ' 57 ' 
Walter de Burges, 1258. 
William Everard, 1258, 1259. 
Humphry Chadd, 1259. 
William deCerne, 1260, 1261. 
John BaOet, 7 

Henry de Aulton, ) 
Philip BafTet, 1263. 
William de Staunton, 
Plenry fil. Reg. Almeyn, 
William de Staunton, 1265, 1266. 
Andrew Wake, 1267, 1268. 
Thomas de St. Vigore, 1269, 1270. 
John de St. Walery, ? 
Thomas de St. Vigore, \ 
John de St. Walery, } 
Robert del Eftre, ' \ l2 7*> 
John de St. Walery, 1273, 1274. 
Richard de Colefhull, 1274, 1275, 1276, 

1277. 
John de Cormailes, 1278, 1279, 1280, 

1281, 1282, 1283. 
John de St. Lo, 1284, 1285, 1286, 

1287, 1288, 1289. 
Richard de Bnrghurft, 1290. 
Thomas de Marleberge, ? 
John de Erleigh, j " 

Walter de Loveney, 1292, 1293. 
Walter de Gloucefter, 1294, 1295, 1296, 

1297, 1298. 



1264. 



Nicholas de Cheigny, 1299. 

John de Gerebert, 1300, 1301. 

John de la Lee, 1302. 

John Gerebert, 1303, 1304. 

Matthew de Fourneaux, 1305. 

John de Montacute, 1306. 

Nicholas de Langelond, 1306. 

Nicholas de Cheigny, 1307. 

Walter de Skidamore, 1307. 

Rich.de Chefelborne, 1308, 1309, 1310. 

Walter de Skidamore, 131 1. 

Thomas de Marlebergh, 131 1. 

Walter de Skidamore, 1 3 1 2. 

John de Chidiock, 13 12, 13 13. 

John de Erleigh, 13 14. 

Matthew de Furneaux, 13 15. 

John de Kingfton, 13 1 5, 1316, 1317. 

Nicholas de Cheigny, 1317. 

Thomas de Marleberge, 131 8. 

Nicholas de Cheigny, 131 8. 

Thomas de Marleberge, 13 19, 1320, 

1321, 1322, 1323, 1324, 1325. 
John de Erleigh, 1325. 
Thomas de Marleberge, 1326. 
Sir William de Whitfield, knt. 1327, 

1328, 1329, 1330. 
Hugh de Langlond, 1330. 
William de Whitfield, knt. 133 1. 
Hugh de Langlond, 1331. 
Sir John de Wroxhale, knt. 1332, 1333. 
Hildebrand de London, 1333, 1334. 
John de Wroxhale, 1334. 
Sir Walter de Rodney, knt. 1335. 
Hildebrand de London, 1336. 
Walter de Rodney, 1337, 1338, 1339. 
John deDurburgh, 1340. 
Hugh Tyrel, 1341, 1342. 
Sir Edward de Stradeling, knt. 1343. 
Sir Thomas de Cary, knt. 1344, 1345. 

U46, i347> 1348, i349> l 3S°> '-3S 1 ' 
John de Palton, 1352, 1353, 1354. 
Sir John de St. Lo, knt. 1355. 
SirRich. de Turberville, knt. 1356, 1357. 
Robert Martin, 1358. 

Sir 



INTRODUCTION. 



XXXV 



Sir John de Raleigh, knt. 1359. 

Nicholas de St. Maur, 1360. 

Thomas de Bridport, 1361, 1362, 1363. 

John de Attehale, 1363,1364. 

John de Longeland, 1365, 1366,1367, 

1368. 
Edmund Cheyne, 1369. 
William deWinterborn, 1370, 1371. 
Roger Mannyngford, 1372. 
Sir Hugh de Durburgh, knt. 1373. 
John Hamelyn, 1373. 
William Latymer, 1374. 
Hugh de Durburgh, 1374. 
Sir Edmund Fitzherbert, knt. 1375. 
William Latimer, 1375. 
Hugh de Durburgh, 1376. 
Sir Edmund Fitzherbert, 1376. 
Hugh de Durburgh, 1377. 
John de la Mere, 1377. 
William Cogan, 1378. 
John Burgherfh, 1379. 
Theobald de Gorges, 1380. 
Sir William de Bonville, knt. 1380. 
William Latimer, 1380. 
Sir William de Bonville, 1 38 1. 
Edmund Fitzherbert, 1382. 
Sir John Streche, knt. 1383. 
John de Burgherfh, 1384. 
John de Coplefton, 1385. 
Humphry Stafford, 1386. 
Sir John Rodney, knt. 1387. 
John le Moigne, 1388. 
Sir Thomas Broke, knt. 1389. 
Sir John de Berkeley, knt. 1390. 
Humphry Stafford, 1391. 
John Bache, 1392. 
Theobald Wickham, 1393. 
Sir John de Berkeley, knt. 1394. 
Sir John le Moigne, knt. 1395. 
Sir John Rodney, knt. 1396. 
Sir Thomas Arthur, knt. 1397. 
Sir Thomas Daccomb, knt. 1398. 
Sir Thomas Arthur, 1399. 
Richard Boyton, 1400. 



e 2 



Sir John Luttcrel, knt. 1401. 

John Frome, 1402. 

William Wroth, 1403. 

Sir Thomas Pomeroy, knt. 1404. 

Richard Boyton, 1405. 

Humphry Stafford, 1406. 

Richard Boyton, 1406. 

Walter Rodney, 1407. 

John Horfey, 1407, 1408. 

Matthew Coker, 1408. 

Robert Hill, 1409. 

Richard Boyton, 1410. 

Humphry Stafford, 1410. 

Sir Humphry Stafford, fen. knt. 141 1. 

John Horfey, 141 2. 

Robert Hille, 141 3- 

Walter Hungerford, 1413* 

Robert Hille, 141 J. 

John Warre, 141 4. 

Humphry Stafford, i^S- 

Richard Boyton, 1416. 

Matthew Coker, 1417- 

John Flory, 141 8. 

Robert Hill, 1419. 

John Newburgh, 1420. 

Robert Hill, 1421, 1422. 

Robert Coker, 1422. 

Sir Richard Stafford, knt. 1423. 

Sir Edward Stradling, knt. 1424. 

Sir Giles Daubeney, knt. i4 2 5- 

William Fyndern, 1426. 

William Carent, i4 2 7- 

John Stourton, 1428. 

John Warre, I4' 2 9- 

John Poulet, i43°- 

John Stourton, fen. 143:. 

John St. Lo, 1432. 

John Seymour, 1433. 

William Carent, 1434. 

Thomas Thame, 1435. 

Thomas St. Lo, 1436. 

William Stafford, 1437. 

Edward Hull, 143 8. 

Walter Rodney, 1439. 

William 



XX XVI 



INTRODUCTION. 



William Carent, 144°- 

William Stafford, I44 r - 

John St. Lo, I44 2 - 

Edward Hull, H43- 

Robert Cappes, H44- 

John Norys, 1445- 

William Carent, 1446. 

John Chidiock, knt. 1447- 

Sir Edward Hull, knt. 1448. 

John Anftil, 1449. 

William Carent, 1450. 

Thomas Thame, 145 1. 

Richard Wane, 1452. 

Nicholas Latimer, 1453. 

John Cheyne, 1454. 

John Willoughby, 1455. 

Nicholas St. Lo, 1456. 

Thomas Warre, 1457. 

John St. Barbe, 1458. 

John Carent, 1459- 

Humphry Stafford, 1460- 

Sir Nicholas Latimer, knt. 1460. 

Chriftopher Worfeley, 1460. 

Thomas Herbert, 1461. 

Humphry Stafford, 1461. 

Thomas Herbert, 14 62 , 1463. 

William Browning, 1463. 

Sir Reginald Stourton, knt. 1463. 

William Browning, 1464. 

John Sydenham, fen. 1465. 

Chriftopher Worfeley, 1465. 

Sir George Darrel, knt. 1466. 

John Sydenham, 1466. 

Robert Stowel, 1467. 

Sir George Darrel, 1467. 

Sir Reginald Stourton, 1468. 

Robert Stowel, 1468.. 

Sir Reginald Stourton, 1469. 

Chriftopher Worfeley, 1470. 

John Cheverel, 1471. 

Sir Nicholas Latimer, knt. 1471. 

John Byconnel, J 47 2. 

John Cheverel, 1472. 

Robert Palmer, 1473. 



John Byconnel, 1473. 
Giles Daubeney, i474« 
Robert Palmer, 1474. 
William Collyngborn, 1475. 
Giles Daubeney, 1475. 
Thomas Norton, 1476. 
William Collyngborn, 1476. 
William Berkeley, 1477. 
Thomas Norton, 1477. 
William Say, 1478. 
William Berkeley, 1478. 
Edward Hartgill, 1479* 
William Say, 1479. 

Giles Daubeney, 1480. 

Edward Hartgill, 1480. 

Richard Morton, 1481- 

Giles Daubeney, 148 1. 

Nicholas Crowmer, 1482. 

Richard Morton, 1482. 

Nicholas Crowmer, 1483. 

Edward Redwaine, 1484. 

Thomas Fulford, 1485. 

Amias Paulet, i486. 

Sir John Turberville, knt. 1487. 

James Daubeney, 1488. 

William Martin, 1490. 

Sir Amias Paulet, knt. 1491. 

William Knoyle, 1492. 

Walter Enderby, 1493. 

Edward Carew, 1494. 

Sampibn Norton, 1495. 

Sir Edward Gorges, knt. 1496. 

Sir Roger Newburgh, knt. 1497. 

Sir Richard Pudfey, knt. 1498. 

Sir Nicholas Wadham, knt. 1499. 

Sir Amias Paulet, knt. 1500. 

Sir William Martin, knt. 1501. 

Sir William Carew, knt. 1501. 

Sir John Trevilian, knt. 1502. 

Edward Wadham, 1503. 

Henry Uved ale, 1504. 

JohnHorfey, 1505. 
John Sydenham, 1506. 
Sir John Carew, knt. 1507. 



Mr 



INTRODUCTION. 



xxxva 



John Williams, 1508. 

Richard Wefton, 1509. 

Sir John Trenchard, knt. 1509. 

Sir John Speke, knt. 1510. 

Walter Rodney, 1511. 

Giles Strangeways, 15 11. 

Sir William Compton, knt. 15 13. 

Sir Edward Gorges, knt. 15 14. 

Sir John Seymour, knt. 151 5. 

Sir Thomas Delalind, knt. 15 1 6. 

Sir Giles Strangeways, knt. 1517. 

Edward Hungerford, 15 1 8. 

John Bouchier, 15 19. 

William Wadham, 1520. 

Sir John Rogers, knt. 1521. 

William Carent, 1522. 

Sir Thomas Trenchard, knt. 1523. 

Sir Giles Strangeways, knt. 1524. 

George Speke, 1525. 

Sir John Seymour, knt. 1526. 

John Ruflel, 1527. 

Sir Andrew Luttrell, knt. 1528. 

Sir Edward Gorges, knt. 1529. 

Sir Thomas Arundel, knt. 1530. 

Sir Edward Seymour, knt. 1531. 

Sir Thomas More, knt. 1532. 

Sir Giles Strangeways, knt. 1533. 

Sir Nicholas Wadham, knr. 1534. 

Sir Francis Darell, knt. 1535. 

Sir Hugh Paulet, knt. 1536. 

Sir John Horfey, knt. 1537. 

Sir Henry Long, knt. 1538. 

Sir Thomas Speke, knt. 1539. 

Sir Thomas Arundel, knt. 1 540. 

Sir Giles Strangeways, knt. 1541. 

Sir Hugh Paulet, knt. 1542. 

Sir John Paulet, knt. 1543. 

Sir John Horfey, knt. 1544. 

Nicholas Fitzjames, 1545. 

John Sydenham, 1546. 

Sir Hugh Paulet, knt. 1547. 

Sir John Thynne, knt. 1548. 

Sir Thomas Speke, knt. 1549. 



George Delalind, 15 50. 
Sir John Rogers, knt. 1552. 
Sir John Tregonwell, knt. 1553. 
Sir John Sydenham, knt. 1554. 
Sir Henry Afliley, knt. 1555. 
John Wadham, 1556. 
Humphry Colles, 1557. 
Sir John Horfey, knt. 1558. 
Sir Thomas Dyer, knt. 1559. 
Sir James Fitz-James, knt. 1560. 
Sir James Wadham, knt. 1561. 
Sir George Speke, knt. 1562. 
John Horner, 1563. 
Sir Henry Afhley, knt. 1564. 
Sir Henry Uvedale, knt. 1565. 
Thomas Morton, 1566. 
Sir Maurice Berkeley, knt. 1567. 
Sir George Norton, knt. 1568. 
Henry Portman, 1569. 
Thomas Luttrell, 1569. 
John de Leigh, 1570. 
Edward Rogers, 157 1. 
John Horner, 1572. 
John Sydenham, 1573. 
Sir John Stowell, knt. 1574. 
Chriftopher Kenn, 1575. 
Thomas Malet, 1576. 
George Sydenham, 1577. 
John Colles, 1578. 
John Bret, 1579. 
Maurice Rodney, 1580. 
Henry Newton, 15 81. 
John Buller, 1582. 
Arthur Hopton, 1583. 
Gabriel Hawley, 1584. 
Nicholas Sidenlum, 1585. 
Sir John Clifton, knt. 1586. 
Sir Henry Berkeley, knt. 1587. 
Edward St. Barbe, 1588. 
Samuel Norton, 1589. 
Hugh Portman, 1590. 
John Harington, 159 1. 
George Speke, 1592. 



George 



xxxvin 



INTRODUCTION. 



George Luttrell, 1593. 

Henry Walrond, 1594. 

John Francis, 1595. 

Sir John Stovvell, knt. 1596. 

John CoHes, 1597. 

John Jennings, 1598. 

George Rodney, 1599. 

Sir Hugh Portman, knt. 1600. 

John Malet, 1601. 

John Maye, 1603. 

Edward Rogers, 1604. 

Sir John Wyndham, knt. 1605. 

Thomas Horner, 1606. . 

Sir John Portman, knt. 1607. 

Sir Edward Hext, knt. 1608. 

Sir Edward Gorges, knt. 1609. 

George Luttrell, 16 10. 

Francis Baker, 161 1. 

Sir John Rodney, knt. 161 2. 

Sir Hugh Smith, knt* 1613. 

Robert Henley, 161 4. 

Nathaniel Still, 16 15. 

Sir John Horner, knt. 161 6. 

Sir Bartholomew Mitchel, knt. 16 1 7 . 

John Colles, 161 7. 

John Pawlet, 161 8. 

Robert Hopton, 161 9. 

Sir Theodore Newton, knt. 1619, 

Henry Henly, 1620. 

William Franceys, 1623. 

John Coles, 1625. 

John Latch, 1627. 

Sir John Stowell, knt. 1628. 

Sir Francis Dodington, knt. 1630. 

Sir Thomas Wroth, knt. 1 640. 

Richard Cole, efq; 1646. 

William Lacy. 

William Hellyar, 1661. 

Henry Gatchell. 

Andrew Moor. 

Edward Hobbes, 1685. 

Edward Strode, 1688. 

Richard Morgan, 1689. 



Sir John Smith, bart. 1690. 
William Whitchurch, 1691. 
William Lacey, 1692. 
Warwick Bampfylde, 1 693. 
Robert Siderfin, 1694. 
John Champneys, 1695. 
Thomas Langton, 1696. 
Thomas Dyke, 1697. 
Henry MomperTon, 1698. 
Smart Goodenough, 1699. 
Francis Hollis Newman, 1700. 
William Helyar, 1701. 
Samuel Rodbard, 1702. 
John Mogg, 1703. 
Samuel Pitt, 1704. 
Sir John Trevelyan, bart. 1705,. 
Thomas Warre, 1706. 
William Fraunceis, 1707. 
Robert Smith, 1708. 
Sir Thomas Wroth, bart. 1709. 
Ifaac Wellman, 1710. 
William Blackford, 171 r. 
Thomas Horner, 17 12. 
Harry Bridges, 17 13. 
William Strode, 17 14. 
John Trevelyan, 1715. 
Henry Walter, 1716. 
Jofeph Browne, 17 17. 
Thomas Archer, 1718. 
Robert Everard, 1719 - 
Jepp Clarke, 1720. 
William Applin, 
Henry Strode, 
William Comes, 
Richard Comes, $ 
Walter Robinfon, 1723. 
Chriftopher Baker, 1724. 
Andrew Moore, 1725. 
David Yea, 1726. 
Edward Dyke, 1727. 
Richard Champneys, 1728. 
Gregory Gardner, 1729. 
John Pigott, 1730. 



1721. 



William 



INTRODUCTION. 



XXXIX 



William Francis, 1731. 

John Proctor, 1732. 

Sir John Smith, bart. ,1733. 

John Wcllman, 1734. 

Jofeph Langton, 1735. 

Orlando Johnfon, 1736. 

JohnPeriam, 1737. 

James Charley Cowper, 1738. 

John Smith, 1739. 

John Freke Brickdale, 1 740. 

William Madox, "1 

Edward Hallet, j *' 

Sir William Pynfent, bart. 1 742. 

William Sandford, 1743. 

Edward Clarke, 1744. 

Francis Newman, 1745. 

John Halliday, 1746. 

Thomas Coles, 1747. 

James Jeanes, 1748. 

Matthew Spencer, 1749. 

Henry William Portman, 1750. 

SirTho. Dyke Acland.bart. 1751. 

John Harding, 1752. 

John Macie, 1753. 

Henry Fowncs Luttrell, 1754. 

Roger Lyde, 1755. 

James Perry, 1756. 

John Collins, 1757. 

Philip Stephens, 1758. 

Henry Powell, 1759. 

Sir William Yea, bart. 1 760. 



John Adams, I761- 

Sir Thomas Gunfton, knt. 1762. 

Samuel Dodington,j763. 

William Helyar, 1764. 

Paris Taylor, 1765. 

James Tookcr, 1766. 

William Provis, 1767. , 

John Helyar, 1768. 

Wm. Rodbard, 1769. 

Nathaniel Webb, 1770. 

Thomas Coward, 1771. 

Henry Rodbard, 1772. 

John Hugh Smyth, 1773. 

John Old-Goodford, 1774. 

SirThomasChampneys.bart. 1775. 

Thomas Wilkins Morgan, 1776. 

Sir John Trevelyan, bart. 1 777. 

Thomas Horner, 1778. 

Samuel Baker, 1779. 

Edward Elton, 1780. 

John Ford, 1781- 

James Ireland, 1782. 

Peter Sherfton, 1783. 

Andrew Gay, 1784. 

Richard Crofse, 1785. 

James Stephens, 1786. 

Nathaniel Dalton, 1787. 

John Lethbridge, 1788. 

Henry Hippilley Coxe, 1789. 

John Stephenfon, 1 790. 

Abraham Elton, i79r. 



The names of all the lords, knights, efquires, and gentlemen, within 
the county of Somerfet, refident in the time of Henry VII. « 



John Bourchier, knt. Lord Fitzwarren 

Hugh Luttrell, knt. 

John Speke, knt. 

John Wadham, knt. 

Edmund Gorges, knt. 

John Rodney, knt. 



* Two hundred marks. 
of the Bath." 



John Choke, knt. 

William Willoughby, knt. 

Richard Pudfey, knt. 

John Trevilyan, cc' ,c * 

Thomas Tremayle, c"" 

John Sydenham, of Brimpton, c" 

» FromHarl. MS. 6166. f. 101. 
Thofe which have the value of their living fct down, were certified to be knights 

Nicholas 



xl 



INTRODUCTION. 



Nicholas Bluet, fenior, c" 

John Fitz -James, fenior, c" 

John Sydenham, of Orchard, c rac 

Thomas Mallet, c mc 

Robert Brent, of Codington, c me 

Richard Warr, of Heftercombe, c" 

William Carent, xl" 

John Wyke, of Ninehead, xl 1 ' 

Robert Stowell, lx" 

Edward Stradling, c mc 

William Reynon, of Bykefolde, 1" 

Thomas Champneys, xl" 

John Hadley, xl 1 ' 

John Verney, xl" 

Thomas Newburgh, l" 

John Harvye, xl 1 ' 

Thomas Tilly, xl" 

Thomas Michell, xl" 

Richard Cogan, 1" 

John Arthur, of Clapton, xl 1 ' 

John Marfhall, xl" 

Alexander Pym, xl 1 ' 

Giles Hill, 1" 

Nicholas Seintlow, xl" 

Henry Champneys, xl" 

Nicholas Bratton, xl 1 ' 

Edward Steyning 

William Knoyle 

James Dawbeney, xl" 

John Fitz-Richard 

John Pyrmanne 

John Huntley 

John Heyron 

John Seintfaver 

William Jane 

Edward Wadham, 1" 

Robert Gilbert, of Camel, x" 

John Bevyne 

Edmund Seintlow 

William Wadham 



Robert Gilbert 

John Bevine 

John Hungerford 

Thomas Gold 

Andrew Hody 

Triftram Stork 

Robert Gerard 

John Steynton, of Stanton 

Thomas Walfh 

Alexander Newton 

James Perceval 

Richard Hadley 

John Rogers 

John Tremayle 

John Popham 

John Dyker 

John Brent 

John Torney 

Richard Mawdley, ofNunney 

John Mufgrave 

John Dodington 

Reginald Hody 

Robert Hacombe 

John Burnell 

Alexander Hamlyn 

James Sydenham 

John Lyte 

William Birke 

John Walton 

William Mylborne 

John Somervill 

Edward Dawbeney 

William GofFe 

Thomas Lyte 

Alexander Birke 

William Hungerford 

William Walfhawe 

Edmund Myll 

John Moore. 



To the foregoing I fhall fubjoin the following List of Justices, named 
in the commiffion of peace for this county, July iy, 1787, together with 
thofe added by fubfequent feals. 

His 



INTRODUCTION. 



xli 



His Royal Highnefs George Prince 

of Wales 
His Royal Highnefs William Duke of 

Gloucefter 
His Royal Highnefs Henry Duke of 

Cumberland 
The Right Rev. John Lord Archbifliop 

of Canterbury 
The Right Hon. Edward Lord Thurlow, 

Lord High Chancellor 
The Right Rev. William Lord Arch- 

bilhop of York 
Dukes of Somerfet 
Richmond 
Grafton 
Bolton 
Leeds 

Marlborough 
Rutland 
Portland 
Manchefter 
Chandos 
Dorfet 
Newcaftle 
Montague 
Marquiffes of Buckingham 
Lanfdown 
Stafford 
Carmarthen 
Earls of Derby 

Huntingdon 
* Salilbury 
Denbigh 
Weftmoreland 
Chefterfield 
Sandwich 
Carlifle 
Jerfey 
Poulett 
Cholmondeley 
Kinnoul 
Marchmont 
Bute 

Dartmouth 
Vol. I. 



Earls of Tanker ville 
Aylesford 
Waldegrave 
Afhburnham 
Effingham 
Earls of Buckinghamfliiic 
Egrcmont 
Hertford 
Cornwallis 
Hardwicke 
Ilchefter 
Spencer 
Chatham 
Bathurft 
Hillfborough 
Aile/bury 
Mansfield 
Leicefter 
Uxbridge 
Camden 

Cork and Orrery 
Egmont 
Be/borough 
Verney 
Shannon 
Ludlow 
Courtown 
Nugent 
Vifcounts Town fend 

Wevmouth 

Stormont 

Mount-Edgcumbe 

Valietort 

Howe 

Barrington 

Bateman 

Galway 

Hinchinbrook 

Hinton 

Mountftuarc 

Beauchamp 

Dungarvon 
Robert Lord Bifhop of London 
Barons Sydney 



Arundel 



xlii 



INTRODUCTION. 



Barons Arundel 
Onflow 
Stawel 
Pelham 
Digby 
Amherft 
Loughborough 
Walfingham 
Grantley 
Carteret 
Boringdon 
Hawkefbury 
Mulgrave 
Hood 
Penrhyn 
Lords Webb Seymour 
William Seymour 
Francis Seymour 
George Lenox 
George Cavendifh 
John Cavendifh 
Charles Spencer 
Robert Spencer 
Frederick Campbell 
Herbert 
North 
Sir Thomas Dyke Acland, bart. 
Sir Charles Warwick Bampfylde, bart. 
Sir Edward Rolt Bayntun, bart. 
Sir Thomas Champneys, bart. 
Sir William Codrington, bart. 
Sir Abraham Ifaac Elton, bart. 
Right Hon. Sir John Goodricke, bart. 
Sir Philip Hales, bart. 
Sir Richard Colt Hoare, bart. 
Sir James Langham, bart. 
Sir Lionel Lyde, bart. 
Right Hon. Sir William Meredith, bart. 
Sir John Mordaunt, bart. 
Sir William Oglander, bart. 
Right Hon. Sir John Parnell, bart. 
Sir George Onefiphorus Paul, bart. 
Sir John William Pole, bart. 
Sir John Hugh Smyth, bart. 



Sir John Smith, bart. 

Sir John Trevelyan, bart. 

Right Hon. Sir Richard Worfley, bart. 

Sir William Yea, bart. 

Right Hon. Sir George Yonge, bart. 

Right Hon. Sir Jofeph Yorke, knight 

of the Bath 
Rt. Hon. Sir John Eardley Wilmot, knt. 
Right Hon. Sir Lloyd Kenyon, knt. 
Right Hon. Sir James Harris, knight of 

the Bath 
Right Hon. Sir William Howe, knight 

of the Bath 
Sir John Durbin, knt. 
Sir Nafh Grofe, knt. 
Sir Thomas Gunfton, knt. 
Sir Benjamin Hammet, knt. 
Right Hon. Sir John Skynner, knt. 
John Acland, of Fairfield, efq. 
Hugh Acland, efq. 
Alexander Adams, efq. 
Francis Adams, efq. 
John Adams, efq. 
Rev. John Adney 
Rev. Thomas Alford 
Rev. Samuel Alford 
Jefferys Allen, efq. 
Robert Proctor Anderdon, efq. 
Rev. Francis Annefley, D. D. 
John Anfty, efq. 
Richard Pepper Arden, efq. 
Rev. William Bailey 
Samuel Baker, efq. 
Robert Everard Balch, efq. 
Copleftone Warre Bampfylde, efq. 
John Band, efq. 
Right Hon. Ifaac Barre 
Rev. Montague Barton 
Rev. William Batchelor 
Rev. George Beaver 
William Beckford, efq. 
Rev. Hugh Bennett 
Rev. Thomas Bere 
Right Hon. John Beresford 

James 



INTRODUCTION. 



xliii 



James Bernard, cfq. 

Rev. JohnBifhop, D. D. 

Richard Bovctt, efq. 

Rev. John Bowen 

John Bragg, efq. 

Edward Brice, efq. 

Matthew Brickdale, efq. 

Matthew Brickdale, jun. efq. 

John Brickdale, efq. 

Richard Meyler Bright, efq. 

William Buckler, efq. 

John Bullen, efq. 

Francis Buller, efq. 

Right Hon. Edmund Burke 

John Berkeley Burland, efq. 

Claver Morris Burland, efq. 

John Butler, efq. 

George Byng, efq. 

George Byng, jun. efq. 

John Cabbell, M. D. 

John Hody Chichefter, efq. 

Henry Chichefter, efq. 

Edward Clarke, efq. 

John Collins, efq. 

John Rawe Collins, cfq. 

Richard Thomas Combe, efq. 

Henry Combe, efq. 

Right Hon. Henry Seymour Conway 

Right Hon. Charles Wolfran Cornwall 

Thomas Coward, efq. 

Henry Hippifley Coxe, efq. 

Charles Hippifley Coxe, efq. 

Richard Crofle, efq. 

Rev. George Croflman, LL.D. 

Nathaniel Dalton, efq. 

Samuel Daniel, eiq. 

Thomas Darch, efq. 

Thomas Darch, jun. efq. 

Rev. William Darch 

George Dawbeny, efq. 

Hill Dawe, efq. 

Samuel Day, efq. 

Vickris Dickinfon, efq. 

William Dickinfon, efq. 



William Dickinfon, jun. efq. 

Hon. and Rev. Charles Digby 

Samuel Doddington, efq. 

George Donifthorpe, efq. 

John Donne, efq. 

Rev. Daniel Dumarefque, D. D. 

Right Hon. Henry Dundas 

John Dunning, M. D. 

John Durbin, efq. 

Drax Durbin, efq. 

George Dyke, efq. 

Goodenough Earle, efq. 

John Eafon, efq. 

Right Hon. William Eden 

Harry Edgell, efq. 

Right Hon. Welbore Ellis 

Rev. Abraham Elton 

Abraham Elton, efq. 

Edward Elton, efq. 

Ifaac Elton, efq. 

Rev. Bickham Efcott 

Robert Evered, efq. 

Rev. Thomas Eyre, LL. D. 

Hon. Henry Fane 

Hon. Thomas Fane 

Rev. Samuel Farewell 

Samuel Farr, M. D. 

Rev. John Fewtrell 

Right Hon. Richard Fitzpatrick 

Richard Ford, efq; 

Right Hon. John Fofter 

Right Hon. Charles James Fox 

Samuel Franklin, efq. 

Henry Proftor Gale, efq. 

William Gardiner, efq. 

Philip James Gibbs, efq. 

Robert Goodden, efq. 

Wyndham Goodden, efq. 

Rev. John Culliford Goodden 

John Old Goodford, efq; 

James Gordon, efq. 

James Gordon, jun. efq. 

John Gore, eiq. 

Edward Gore, efq. 



f 2 



Thomas 



xliv 



INTRODUCTION. 



Thomas Gould, efq. 

Rev. Thomas Gould 

Rev. Henry Gould 

Rev. Jonathan Gregg 

Right Hon. James Grenville 

Right Hon. Wm. Wyndham Grenville 

Right Hon. Charles Greville 

Edmund Griffith, efq. 

Thomas Grofvenor, efq. 

Richard Grofvenor, efq. 

Thomas Grove, efq. 

William Chafin Grove, efq. 

John Gunning, efq. 

Andrew Guy, efq. 

John Fraunceis Gwyn, efq. 

John Fraunceis Gwyn, jun. efq. 

Edmund Trowbridge Halliday, efq. 

John Halliday, efq. 

John Hanning, efq. 

William Hanning, efq. 

Wyndham Harbin, efq. 

Samuel Alford Harbour, efq. 

Rev. John Harington, D. D. 

Right Hon. Thomas Harley 

William Hawker, efq. 

John Hellier, efq. 

William Helyar, efq. 

Henry Holt Henley, efq. 

Rev. Charles Hobbs 

Henry Hobhoufe, efq. 

Alexander Hood, efq. 

Jonathan Hooper, efq. 

James Flooper, efq. 

Ifaac Webb Horlock, efq. 

Thomas Horner, efq. 

Thomas Strangeways Horner, efq. 

William Hofkins, efq. 

Thomas Hofkins, efq. 

Thomas Flotchkin, efq. 

William Howe, efq. 

Dodington Hunt, efq. 

John Hunt, efq. 

Rev. John Hunt, LL. D» 

William Huflfey, efq. 



Charles Hutchings, efq. 

Rev. George Hutchings 

Right Hon. John Hely Hutchinlbn 

Rev. Thomas Jackfon, D. D. 

John Jeane, efq. 

Thomas Jeane, efq. 

Richard Jenkyns, efq. 

Benjamin Incledon, efq. 

Thomas Samuel Jolliffe, efq. 

Thomas Johnfon, efq. 

Rev. Thomas Ireland, D. D. 

James Ireland, efq. 

Rev. Ambrofe Kent, D.D. 

W r alter King, efq. 

Robert Kingfmill, efq. 

Robert Kingfton, efq. 

Charles Knatchbull, efq. 

Edmund Lambert, efq. 

Rev. WilliarhLangdon 

William Gore Langton, efq. 

Richard Lanfdown, efq. 

John Lethbridge, efq. 

Maurice Lloyd, efq. ♦ 

Rev. Edmund Lovell, LL. D. 

George Lovell, efq. 

Stuckley Lucas, efq. 

John Fownes Luttrell, efq. 

Francis Fownes Luttrell, efq. 

Rev. Alexander Fownes Luttrell 

Edward Lyne, efq. 

Henry Lyte, efq. 

Arch. Macdonald, efq. 

Right Hon. James Stuart Mackenzie 

John Mallack, efq. 

Gerard Martin, efq. 

Thomas Hutchings Medlycott, efq. 

William Coles Medlycott, efq. 

James Melliar, efq. 

John Merry, efq. 

Paul Methuen, efq. 

Paul Cobb Methuen, efq. 

Rev. John Michell 

Thomas Millard, efq. 

Rev. James Minifie 

Jacob 



INTRODUCTION. 



xlv 



Jacob Mogg, efq. 

George Mogg, efq. 

Right Hon. Frederick Montague 

Thomas Wilkins Morg:ui, efq. 

Francis Morgan, efq. 

John Morley, efq. 

John Morris, efq. 

Edward Horlock Mortimer, efq. 

Jofeph Mortimer, efq. 

Abel Moyfey, efq. 

Edward Berkeley Napier, efq. 

John. Napper, efq. 

Hon. George Auguftus North 

Hon. Francis North 

Hon. Frederick North 

Rev. George Notley 

Right Hon. Thomas Orde 

John Pagett, efq. 

Richard Pagett, M. D. 

Thomas Parry, efq. 

Rev. Francis Crane Parfons 

Arfcott Bickford Peppin, efq. 

John Periam, efq. 

John Perkins, efq. 

Edward Phelips, efq. 

Edward Phelips, jun. efq. 

Rev. William Phelips 

Thomas Phipps, efq. 

William Phipps, efq. 

John Pigott, efq. 

John Pigott, jun. efq. 

Rev. Wadham Pigott 

John Pinny, efq. 

Right Hon. William Pitt 

George Poole, efq. 

Nathaniel Poole, efq. 

Alexander Popham, efq. 

Francis Popham, efq. 

Henry William Portman, efq, 

Henry William Portman, jun. efq. 

Edward Berkeley Portman, efq. 

Hon. Vere Poulett 

George Prior, efq. 

William Proffer, efq. 



William Provis, efq. 

George Prowfe, efq. 

John Prowfe, efq. 

Rev. John Prowfe 

Rev. William Putt 

John Pyne, efq. 

William Pyne, efq. 

Matthew Quantock, jun. efq. 

Rev. Arthur Radcliffe 

Right Hon. Richard Rigby 

Henry Rodbard, efq. 

John Rodbard, efq. 

John Rogers, efq. 

Rev. John Methuen Rogers 

Dennis Rolle, efq. 

John Rolle, efq. 

James Reed, efq. 

Henry William Sandford, efq. 

John Savery, efq. 

Herbert Sawyer, efq. 

Henry Seymour, efq. 

Peter Sherfton, efq. 

John Slade, efq. 

Thomas Slocombe, efq. 

Rev. William Slocombe 

Thomas Smith, efq. 

John Smith, efq. 

John Wyldbore Smith, efq. 

Samuel Smith, efq. 

Hon. Hugh Somerville 

John Somerville, efq. 

Rev. William Somerville 

James Sparrow, efq. 

Rev. William Speke, B. D. 

Thomas Stawell, efq. 

James Stephens, efq. 

Henry Stephens, efq. 

Rev. Charles Stone 

Henry Strachey, efq. 

John Strode, efq. 

Henry Sweeting, efq. 

Rev. Chriftopher Tatchell 

George Templer, efq. 

Hon. Thomas Thynne 



James 



xlvi 



INTRODUCTION. 



James Tooker, efq. 

Right Hon. Charles Townfend 

John Trevelyan, efq. 

] Icnry William Tripp, efq. 

Thomas Troyte, efq. 

John Tucker, efq. 

Rev. William Tudor 

Rev. Thomas Tudor 

Robert Tudway, efq. 

Charles Tudway, efq. 

Clement Tudway, efq. 

Rev. John Turner 

William Turner, efq. 

Samuel Twyford, efq. 

J ohn Tyndall, efq. 

John Johnfon Kemeys Tynte, efq. 

Right Hon. John Charles Villiers 

Rev. James Uttermare 

Henry Walters, efq. 

Thomas Walters, efq. 

John Warren, M. D. 

James Warren, efq. 

John Warry, efq. 

Richard Watkins, efq. 

In the tumults, and commotions, which have at different periods em- 
broiled the quiet of this kingdom, Somerfetfhire has generally born its part; 
nor did it efcape the civil diffenfions of the laft century ; but no very confi- 
derable engagement was fought in this county between the royal and par- 
liamentary forces, fave that of Lan/down, which proved fo fatal to the brave 
Sir Bevill Granville. In 1644 the following eftablifhment was made for 
the eaftern divifion of the county. 

Weekly pay to the governors of the caftles within the county of Somerfet: 



James Watfon, efq, 

Nathaniel Webb, efq. 

Rev. Samuel Webb , 

William Webber, efq. 

Simon Welman, efq. 

Thomas Welman, efq. 

Rev. Phipps Wefton 

Francis Edward Whalley, efq. 

Rev. Thomas Sedgwick Whalley 

Jofeph Whitchurch, efq. 

Henry Whitmarlh, efq. 

John Whitmarfh, efq. 

Cann Wilkins, efq. 

Rev. George Wilkins 

Rev. Richard Wilkins 

Rev. Richard Willes 

Rev. William Willes. 

Rev. John Wills, D. D. 

Walter Wiltfhire, efq. 

John Wiltfhire, efq. 

William Withycombe, efq. 

Rev. John Wyndham, LL. D. 

W r illiam Yea, efq. 



The governor of Bath 
The governor of Portifhead- 
' point 



7 
5 



The governor of Nunney- ) 
caftle ) 

The governor of Farley-caftle 



An eftimate was made that out of the Eaftern hundreds, to be eftablifhed 
for thefe feveral garrifons, might be raifed 85ol. m 

In this county was filed the firft blood in the Revolution of 1688, and 
the laft in the infurrettion of the Duke of Monmouth, which terminated 

"From letters patent dated at Oxford 4 Dec. 20 Car. I. conftituting Edmund Tarnor, efq; treafurer of the 
garrifons aforefkid. 

by 



INTRODUCTION. xlvii 

by his total defeat in Sedgmoor, July 6, 1685. To fhew that the feverities ■ 
exercifed upon the Duke's unhappy and deluded followers have not been 
exaggerated, I fhall produce the following document : 

' Somersetshire. J ' Edward Hobbes, efq; fherreife of y'countie afore- 

i « faid, to the con 6 ' 1 ' and other his Ma"" officers of 

* the cittie and burrough of Bath, greeting: Whereas I have rec' a warr 

* under the hand and feale of the right Hon* the Lord Jeffreys for the 

* executing of feveral rebells within yo r faid cittie, Thefe are therefore to 
' will and require yo" immediately on fight hereof to erect a gallows in the 

* mod publike place of yo r faid cittie to hang the faid trayto" on, and that 

* yo w provide halters to hang them with, a fufficient number of faggotts to 

* burne the bowells of fower traytors, and a furnace or cauldron to boyle 
J their heads and quarters, and fait to boyle therewith, halfe a bufhell to 

* each trayto', and tarr to tarr y m with, and a fufficient number of fpeares 
' and poles to fix and place their heads and quarters : and that yo w warne 
c the owners of fower oxen to be ready with a dray and wayne and the faid 
' fower oxen at the time hereafter mencioned for execufion, and yo" yo'felves 

* togeather with a guard of fortie able men att the leafr, to be prefent on 
' Wednefday morning next by eight of the clock, to be aiding and affifting 

* to me, or my deputie, to fee the faid rebells executed. Given under rny 
' feal of office this 16th day of November, A° i° Jacobi fecundi 1685. 

' EDWARD HOBBES, Vic. 

1 Yo" are alfoe to provide an axe and a cleaver 
1 for the quartering the faid rebells." 1 

EARLS and DUKES of SOMERSET. 

In the Saxon times this county gave title of Earl to a famous General of 
the name of Hun, who was flain A.D. 823 in the battle of Ellendune, be- 
tween Egbert king of the Weft Saxons, and Beornulf king of Mercia." 

The next Earl of this county was Earmtlf, who commanded the Somer- 
fetfhire forces againft the army of the Danes, when they A.D. 845 landed 
at the mouth of the Parret; and were repulfed with great flaughter." 

Sweyn, eldeft fon of Godwin earl of Kent, was fometime Earl of Somerfet. 
He died at Lycia in his return from a journey which he had taken A. D. 
1053 bare-footed to Jerufalem, on penance to expiate the murder of Beorne 
his kinfman.'' 

■ From the original. ° Dugd. Bar. i. it. ' lb. & Chron. Saxon. ' lb. 18. 

Sir" 



xMii INTRODUCTION. 

Sir William cle Mohun, of Dunfter-caftlc, and Sir Reginald de Mohun, 
his defcendant, were Earls of Somerfet. 

In 1396, John Beaufort, eldeft fon of John Plantagenet of Gaunt, by 
Catherine Swinford his third wife, was created Earl of Somerfet by King 
Richard II. and the next year Marquis of Dorfet. He died in 141 o. 

Henry Beaufort his fon fucceeded him in thofe titles, but died with- 
out iflue. 

In 1442 John Beaufort, brother of Henry Beaufort, knight of the garter, 
was created Duke of Somerfet by King Henry VI. He died without iflue 
male in 1444, and was fucceeded in this dignity by 

Edmund Beaufort, his next brother, who was alfo knight of the garter, 
and regent of Normandy. He was flain in 1455 at the battle of St. Albans. 

Henry Beaufort, eldeft fon of Edmund, fucceeded. He was an active 
commander in the French war, and governor of Calais, from which poft he 
was recalled in 1460 to the afliftance of King Henry VI. In 1463 he was 
taken prifoner at the battle of Hexham, and with Thomas lord Hungerford 
and John lord Rofs, was there beheaded by order of King Edward IV. 
From Charles his fon, who aftumed the name of Somerfet, are defcended 
the Dukes of Beaufort. 

Edmund Beaufort, brother of the laft-named Henry, fucceeded in the 
title of Duke of Somerfet. He was beheaded in 1472 at the battle of 
Tewkefbury, and his brother John Beaufort being flain in the fame engage- 
ment, and his other brothers dying unmarried, the title here expired. 

In June 1498, Edmund Tudor, third fon of King Henry VII. was created 
Duke of Somerfet, but died at the age of four years. 

Henry Fitzroy, natural fon of King Henry VIII. was created Duke of 
Somerfet in 1525. He died without iflue in 1 536. 

In 1547, Feb. 15, Edward Seymour protector to young King Edward VI. 
was created Duke of Somerfet and Baron Seymour. He fuffered death on 
the fcaffold at Tower-hill, 24 Jan. 1552. 

In 1 6 14, King James I. conferred the title of Earl of Somerfet on Robert 
Carr vifcount Rochefter, fon of Sir Thomas Carr, of Ferniherft in the 
county of Roxburgh. He with his lady was convicted of the aflaflination 
of Sir Thomas Overbury, and was imprifoned till the year 1645, * n which 
year he died, and was buried in the church of Covent-Garden. 

In 



INTRODUCTION. xlix 

In 1660, William Seymour, marquis of Hertford, great grandfon of 
Edward Seymour the Protestor, that is, fon of Edward lord Beauchump, 
fon of Edward earl of Hertford, Ton of Edward duke of Somcrfet by Anne 
Stanhope his fecond wife, was reftored by parliament to the title and dignity 
of Duke of Somerfet. This William had been preceptor to Charles I. 
and afterwards, when the civil wars broke out, highly diftinguifhed himfelf 
in the royal caufe, by raifing forces in this county, by his conduct at the 
battle of Lanfdown, and by many other noble acts of loyal affection to his 
Sovereign, for whom he even offered to lay down his own life, if it could 
have been admitted as a fubftitute. lie died in October 1660, a few weeks 
only after his advancement to the dukedom, and his fon Henry lord 
Beauchamp, being dead before him, he was fucceeded by his grandfon 
William, who died young and unmarried in 1671, and was fuccceeded by 
his uncle John. 

Which John Duke of Somerfet dying in 1675 without iffue, Francis 
Seymour, fon of Charles lord Seymour, and grandfon to Sir Francis 
Seymour, (who was created Lord Seymour of Trowbridge, 16 Car I. and 
was the third grandfon of Edward earl of Hertford, fon of Edward the 
Protector, and younger brother to Sir William the reftored Duke) fucceeded 
to this honour. This Francis was unfortunately affaffinated in Genoa, 
20 April 1678, and having no iffue, was fucceeded by 

Charles his brother, the fixth Duke of this great and noble family. He 
was knight of the garter, and chancellor of the univerfity of Cambridge. 
In the reign of James II. being then of the privy-council, he affifted in 
collecting the militia of this county againft the Duke of Monmouth. He 
was prefident of the council to King William III. and mafter of the horfe 
to Queen Anne, and George I. at whofe coronations he carried the orb of 
ftate. He died in 1748, in the 87th year of his age, and was fucceeded by 
his eldeft and only furviving fon Algernon earl of Hertford, who dying 
without iffue male in 1749, the dukedom and barony devolved on Sir 
Edward Seymour, bait, of the firft branch of this family, being the feventh 
in lineal defcent from Edward the firft Duke of Somerfet of this name, by 
liis firft wife Catherine, daughter of Sir William Filiol, of Filiol-hall in 
the county of Effex, and of Woodlands in the county of Dorfet, knt. 

Which Edward the eighth Duke of Somerfet married Mary fole daughter ' 
and heir of Daniel Webb, of Monkton-Farley in the county of Wilts, efq; 
and had iffue by her four fons, viz. Edward, Lord Webb Seymour, Lord 
William, Lord Francis, and a daughter, Mary; of whom Edward the eldeft 

Vol. I. g is 



INTRODUCTION. 



is the prefent Duke of Spmerfetj Lord Webb is of Monkton-Farley } Lord 
William refides at Seend in the county of Wilts ; and Lord Francis is the 
prefent Dean of the Cathedral Church of Wells. 

Les Chivaliers & Hommes du Mark en cbefcun eountie d'Angliterre farm. xvii. 

du Roy Ed-warde le primer I 



i. S 

2. S 



3- 3 

4. S 

5- S 

6. S 

7 . S 



8. 

9 . S 

io. S 

ii. S 

12. 

J 3- 



14. 

»5- 

16. 

18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 



Dorset & Somerset Shires. 

re Thomas de Gourney. Palee viij. & x. b. 

re Philip Courtney. Or, iij torteaux g. bend b. 

re Rauf de Tortes. G. griffon fegreaunt or. 

re Robert de Brent. G. griffon fegreaunt ar. 

re Richard de Croupes. Ar. vj mafcles g. 3, 2, 1, label b. 

re Geoffry de Aubemarle G. crufulee or, bend mafculee ermine. 

re William Montacu. y^rg-. iij fufilles in fefle, g. 

re Stephen de Bridmanfton. Ar. vj lozenges voided fa. 3,. 2, 1-. 

re Humphrey de Beauchamp . Verrie arg. & b, label cr. 

re Jehan deWalleys. 'Ermine bend ^. 

re Jehan Button. Ermine bend g. 

re Henrie de Glaftenburie. Ar. bend engrailed fab. 

re Fouk Fitz warren. Quarterlie, per fefle indented ar. & g. a 

mullet y«. 
re William Fitzwarren. Quarterlie per feffe indented ar. 6c g. 
re Henry de Lorty. B. crofs or. 
re Andrew de Grimfted. G. iij barres varrie #r. & b. 
re Jehan de Clyfford. Checkee or & £. bend g. 
re Ellys Cottel. Or bend g. 

re Jehan de Babington. G. ten plates ar. 4, 3, 2, 1. 
re Jehan de Mountfort. Ar. crufulee, g. lion rampant b. 
re Jehan de Chauvent, palee vi. arg. 6c b. 



The total tax for Danegeld in this county paid into the King's treafury 
at Winchefter in the time of King William the Conqueror, was five hun- 
dred and nine pounds. 

The number of inhabitants that paid to the fubfidy of 5 1 Edward III. 
was fifty-four thoufand fix hundred and three. 



' E Codice MS, Jofephi Holland, de quo vide Ath. Oxon. vol. i. col. 521. 



The 



INTRODUCTION. 



li 



The number of houfes which paid chimney-money in this county in 
1685, was forty-four thoufand fix hundred and eighty-fix. 

Somersetshire, with regard to its temporal jurifdiction, is divided into 
two parts, Eastern and Western. The Eajlern divifion contains the 
following Hundreds and Liberties, viz. 



HUNDREDS. 



Bath-Forum 

Bemftone 

Brewton 

Brent cum Wrington 

Catalh 

Chew 

Chewton 

Frome 

Glaflon Twelve Hides 

Hareclive cum Bedminfter 



Horethorne 

Keynfham 

Kilmerfdon 

Norton-Ferrers 

Portbury 

Wellow 

Wells-Forum 

Whitftone 

Winterftoke. 



LIBERTIES. 



Hampton and Claverton 
Eafton and Amrill 
Hinton and Norton 
Eaft-Cranmore 



Hill-Houfe 

Mells and Leigh 
Witham-Friary. 



The Weftern divifion contains, 



HUNDREDS. 



Abdick and Bullion 

Andersfield 

Cannington 

Carhampton 

Crewkerne 

Curry-North 

Houndfborough, Berwick and Coker 

Huntfpill cum Puriton 

Kingfbury-Eaft 

Kingfbury-Weft 

Mai tock 



Milverton 
Petherton-North 

South 

Pitney 

Somerton 

Stone and Yeovil 

Taunton and Taunton-Dean 

Tintinhull 

Whidey 

Williton-Freemannors. 



In refpefl of its Ecclefiajlical Jurifdi&ion, it is divided into three Arch- 
deaconries, viz. 

Archdeaconries. 



lii 



INTRODUCTION. 



Archdeaconries. Deaneries. 

Bath, wherein are two f Bath 

Deaneries, viz. \ Redcliff* and Bedminfter 



Parijhes. 
> in which are \ ^ 



53 



Wells, wherein are feven 
Deaneries, viz. 



Axbridge - 
Cary - 

Frome - - - - 
^ JurifdicYion of Glafton - 

Ilchefter - 

Marfton - - 

Pawlet - - - - 



1 



>in which are < 



f Bridgwater 
Taunton, wherein are J Crewkerne 
four Deaneries, viz. | Dunfter - 

LTaunton - 



3i 



in which are 



Total number of parifhes 482 



Somerfetfhire contains forty hundreds, feven liberties, two cities, . feven 
boroughs, twenty-nine market-towns, one bifhoprick, three archdeaconries, 
thirteen deaneries, and four hundred and eighty-two parifhes. 




^omefoap. 



Bometap JSooL 



& Wi 01 M € £ 



e % e* 



rpic annotantur tcncntcs Cartas in ^ummerfete. 



I. Rex Willelmvs 

II. Epifcopus Wintonienfis 

III. Epifcopus Sarifberienfis 

IV. Epifcopus Baiocenfis 

V. Epifcopus Conftantienfis 

VI. Epifcopus Wcllenfis 

VII. ^Ecclefia de Bada 

VIII. iEcclefia Glaltingberienfis 

IX. iEcclefia Micelenienfis 

X. iEcclefia AdtTmgienfis 

XI. /Ecclefia Romana S. Petri 

XII. ^Ecclcfia de Cadom. 

XIII. iEcclcfia de Monteburg 

XIV. jEcclefia de Sceftefberie 

XV. Epifcopus Mauricius 

XVI. Clerici tencntes de Rege 

XVII. Comes Euftachius 

XVIII. Comes Hugo 

XIX. Comes Morkonienfis 

XX. Balduinus de Fxcceftre 

XXI. Rogerius de Corcelle 

XXII. Rogerius Arundel 

XXIII. Wakerius Gifard 

XXIV Wakerius [velWalfcirfjdeDouuar 



XXV. Willelmus de Moion 

XXVI. Willelmus de Ow 

XXVII. Willelmus de Faleife 

XXVIII. Willelmus filius Widonis 

XXIX. Radulfus de Mortemer 

XXX. Radulfus de Pomerei 

XXXI. Radulfus Pagenel 

XXXII. Radulfus de Limefi 

XXXIII. Robertus filius Giroldi 

XXXIV. Aluredus de Merlebergc 

XXXV. Aluredus de Ifpania 

XXXVI. Turftinus filius Rolf 

XXXVII. Serlode Burci 

XXXVIII. Odo filius Gamelin 

XXXIX. Ofbernus Gifard 
XL. Edwardus de Saiifberia 
XLI. Ernulfus de Mefdins; 
XLII. Giflebertus filius Turold 
XLIII. Godebold. 

X.LIV. Mathiu de Moretania 
XLV. Hunfridus Camerarius. 
XLVI. Robertus dc Odburuile & alii 

fervientes Regis 
XLVII. Taini Regis 






Voi,. III. 



C * J 



©omeftmij'TBwfti 



IjHjHCE^CfC 



Cerra Begt& 

REX tenet Svmmertone. Rex Edwardus tenuit. 
Nunquam geldavit, neque fcitur quot hidas fint 
ibi. Terra eft 50 carucatx. In dominio funt 5 car. 
& 4 fervi & 80 villani & 28 bordarii cum 40 carucis. 
Ibi 100 acrx prati & una leuca pafture in long. & 
dimid. leu. lat. filva. I leu. long. & una quarentena lat. 
Ibi burgum quod vocatur Lanporth, in quo ma- 
nent 34 burgcnfes redd. 15 folid. & z pifcaris redd. 
10 fol. Reddit per ann. 79 lib. & 1.0 folid. &y 
denar. de 20 in ora. 

Huic Manerio addita; funt 3 terra; quas teneb. 3 
taini Tempore Regis Edwardi Brifnod & Aluric & 
Sauuin & geld, pro 5 hid. & dimid. Ibi funt 7 villani 
& 5 Lord, cum 4 car. Redd. 7 lib. & 15 folid. 

De hoc M. eft ablata dimid. hida Denesmodeswelle, 
qua; fuit de dominica firma Regis E. Aluredus de 
Hiipania ten. Sc valet 10 folid. 

Rex ten. Cedre. Rex E. tenuit. Nunquamgel- 
davit, nee fcitur quot hida; fint ibi. Terra eft 20 
car. In dominio funt 3 car. & 2 fervi & unus coli- 
bertus & 17 villani &, 20 bord. cum 1 7 car. & 7 gab- 
latores redd. 17 fol. 

Jn Alsebrvce 32burgenfes redd. 20 folid. Ibi z 
molini redd. 12 folid. Sc 6 denar. & 3 pifcariae redd. 
10 folid. & 15 ac. prati. Paftura 1 leu. long. & tan- 
tundemlat. Redd, per ann. 21 lib. & 2 den. & obo- 
lum de 20 in ora. Silva z leu. long. & dim. leu. lat. 
De hoc M. ten. Gifo Epifcopus unum membrum 
Wetmore, quod ipfe tenuit de Rege E. Pro eo com- 
putat Willelmus vicecomes in firma Regis 12 lib. 
unoqucque anno. 

Deipfo M. eft ablata dimid. virgat. terns qua: fuit 
de dominica firma Regis E. Robertus de Otburguile 
ten. & 15 den. val. 

Haec2M. Svmmertone & Cedre cum append, fuis 
reddeb. firaiam unius noctis T. R. E. 

RExten. Nortperet. RexE. tenuit. Nunquam 
geldavit, nee fcitur quot hidae fint ibi. Terra eft 30 
car. In dominio funt 3 car. & 20 villani & .19 bord. 
& 6 fervi & 20 porcarii cum 23 car. Ibi molin. redd. 
15 denar. Sc 100 ac. prati & z leu. pafturx. Redd. 
20 fol. per ann. 

Redd, hoc M. 42 lib. & 8 fol. & 4 den. de 20 
in ora. 

Rex ten. Svdperet. Rex E. tenuit. Nunquam 
geldavit, nee fcitur quot hida; fint ibi. Terra eft 28 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 5 fervi & 22 coliberti 
& 63 villani & 15 bord. cum 26 car. Ibi molin. 
redd. 20 folid. 8c 50 ac. prati. Silva 1 1 quarent. 
long. Sc 10 quarent. lat. Redd. 42 lib. & 100 denar. 
de 20 in ora. 

De hoc M. tenuit Merlefuain 2 hid. in Stratone 
T. R. E..& era: tainlande. Reddit modo 60 fol. in 
.firma Regis. 



Deipfo M. ablata eft dimid. hida. Norman tenet 
de Rogerio de Curcelle & valet 16 folid. 

Huic M. reddebatur T. R. E. de Cruche per ann. 
confuetudo, hoceit, 6 ovescum agnis totid. & quifquo 
liber homo 1 blomamferri. Tuiltin tenet de comite 
Moriton. fed confuetudinem non reddidit poftquaci 
comes terram habuit. 

Rex ten.CHvRi. Rex E. tenuit. Nunquamgel- 
davit, nee fcitur quot hida; fint ibi. Terra eft 13 
car. In dominio funt 3 car. & 5 fervi & zo villani & z 
bord. cum 10 car. Ibi 40 ac- prati & filva 2 leu. 
long. & una leu. lat. Redd, zi lib. Sc 50 den. dc 
20 in ora. 

DehocM. eft ablata unavirgata terra;. Bretel ten. 
de comite Moriton. Sc valet 10 folid. & 8 denar. 

Hxc 3 Maner. Nordperet & Sudperet & Churi 
T. R. E. reddeb. firmara unius nodtis cum cxmfuetu- 
dinibus fuis. 

Rex ten. Willetone & Candetone & Caren- 
tone. Rex E. tenuit. Nunquam geldaverunt, nee 
fciturquot hidae ibi fint. Terra eft 100 car. In iiu. 
minio iunt 1 1 car & dimid. & 1 1 fervi & 30 coliberti 
& 38 villani & ;o bord. cum 37 car. & dimid. Ibj 

2 molini redd 5 fol. & 104 ac. prati. Paftura 5 leu. 
in Iongit. & 3 leu. in lat. Silva 4. leu. in longit. & a 
leu. & dim. in lat. Reddit 100 lib. & 1 16 folid. & 
16 denar. & obolum de 20 in ora. T. R. E. red- 

debat firmam unius noftis. 

Huic M. Welletone eft addita dimid. hida. Saric 
tenuit T. R. E. pro 2 man. & pro dim. hida gelda- 
bat. Terra eft 5 car. Ibi 6 villani & 4 bord. habent. 

3 car. & 4 ac. prati ibi. Silva 4 quarent. in longit. 
& una quarent. in lat. Redd. 31 fol. & 8 den. 

Eidem ML addita eft alia dimid. hida Waistov quam. 
tenuit Aluuinus T. R. E. & pro dimid. hida geldabat. 
Terra eft I car. Redd. 40 den. Adhuc ipfi M. 
addita eft dimid. hida & redd, in firma Regis 7 fol. 
De Selvere M. Aluredi addita eft huic M. una con- 
fuetudo, id eft, 18 oves in anno. Hasc non pertinuit 
in Welletone T. R. E. 

Rex ten. Beiminstre. Rex E. tenuit. Nun- 
quam geldavit, nee fcitur quot hida; fint ibi. Terra 
eit 26 car. In dominio funt 3 car. & 3 fervi 8c 25 
villani & 22 bord. cum 10 car. Ibi molin. redd. 5 
fol. Sc 343c. prati. Silva 2 leu. long. & una leu. lat. 
Redd. 21 lib. & 2 denar. & obolum de 20 in ora. 
Preibiter hujus M. ten. terram ad 1 car. & valet 20 
folid. De hoc M. ten. Epifcopus Conftantiens 112 
acras prati & filva;. 

Rex ten. Frome. Rex E. tenuit. Nunquam gel- 
davit, nee fcitur quot hidx fint ibi. Terra eft 50 car. 
In dominio funt 3 car. & 6 coliberti & 31 villani & 
36 bord. cum 40 car, Ibi 3 molini redd. 25 folid. 
& mercatum redd. 46 folid. & 8 denar. Ibi 30 ac. 
prati & 50 ac. pafturae. Silva 1 leu. long. & tan- 
tundem lat. Redd. 55 lib. & 5 denar. de 20 in ora. 

De 



3DomcfTin£'T!3oo&.1 



fcummctfcte. 



De hoc M, tenet ./Eccla. 8. Johannis de Froma 8 
car. terrx & fimilit. tcnuit T. K.- E, Reinbald ibi 
Cil prelbiter. 

Rex ten. Brvmf.tone. Rex E. tenuit, Nun- 
C]u;im gcldavit nee fcitur quot bids Tint ibi. Tcna 
elf <o car. In dominio funt 3 car. Sc 5 fcrvi Sc 4 
Coliberti & 28 villani & 26 bord. cum 18 car. Ibi 
5 burgenfes & amis porcarius. Ibi <> nio'ini redd. 20 
Ktlid. Sr 38 ac. prati & 150 ac. pafturx. Silvx 5 
leu. in longit. Sc una leu. 111 lat. Redd. 53 lib. & 

5 denar. de 20 in era. 

Hoc M, cum fuperiori Fromh T. R. E. reddeb. 
iirmam unius noftis. 

De hoc M. funt ablati 9 agri quos ten. Bretel de 
comite Moriton. & val. 18 denar. 

Deco.lcm M. < ft ablata dimid. hidain Cilemetone. 
Serlo de Burci ten. Sc valet 10 folid. De dominica 
£rma fuerunt. 

De ipfo M. eft ablata 1 hida. G07.elinusten.de 
Roberto filio Girolui. Terra ell 3 car. valeb. 40 folid. 
piodo 20 folid. 

Rex ten. Mii.ebvrne. Rex E. tenuit. Nunquam 
^eldavit, neefcitur quot hidx fint ibi. Terra eft 50 
car. In dominio funt 4 car. & 5 fervi Sc 70 villani 

6 18 bord. cum 6; car. Ibi 6 molini redd. 77 folid. 
Sc 6 denar. & 170 ac. prati. Silva 2 leu. in longit. 
& 9 quarent. lat. Paftura 4quarent. long. Sc 2 qua- 
rent, lat. Sc una leu. morx. 

In hoc M. funt 56 burgenfes & ioi mercatores 
•redden tes 60 fol. 

In Givelcestre funt 107 burgenfes redd. 20 folid. 
Mercatum cum fuis append, redd. 1 1 lib. 

Tot. Melebvrne cum predicts append, redd. 
80 lib. dc albo argento 9 folid. Sc 5 den. minus. 
T. R. E. reddeb. dimid. firmam noitis & quadrantem. 

Reinbald ten. .iEcclefiam cum 1 hida. Ibi habet 

I car. val. 30 folid. 

Rex ten. Brvnetone. Ghida tenuit T. R. E. 
Sc geldavit pro 10 hid. Terra eft 60 car. De ea 
funt in dominio 3 hida; Sc ibi 3 car. & 7 fervi & 50 
villani Sc 17 bord. cum 20 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 3 
folid. Sc 60 ac. prati. Paftura 3 leu. long. St una 
leu. lat. & tantund. filvx in longit. & lat. Redd. 27 
lib. & 12 fol. Sc 1 denar. de albo argento. 

De his 10 hid. ten. Prefbit. 1 elemofina dc Re;;e. 
Ibi habet 1 car. Sc 4 villanoscum 1 car. Sc 3 ac. prati. 
Valet 20 folid. 

De hoc M. ten Com. Morit. 1 hid. in Prestetune 
quxfuit de dominica iirma T. R. E. Terra eft 4 car. 
Ibi funt 2 car. Val. 40 folid. & valuit. 

De hoc M. ablat. ell tertius denar. de Milver- 
tone qui reddebatur ibi T. K. K. 

Rixten. Dolvertvne. [Comes] Herald us tenuit 
T. R. B. Sc geldabat pro 2 hid. St dimid. Terra eft 

I I car. De ea ell in dominio 1 hida & ibi funt 2 car. 
Sc 6 fervi Sc 17 villani Sc 6 bord. cum 3 car. & dim. 
Ibi 3 ac. prati. Paftura una leu. long. & dim. leu. 
lat. & tantundem filvx. Redd. Ii lib. & 10 folid. 
de albo argento. 

HuicM. funtadditx 2 hidx terrae dim. ferd. minus. 
Duodec. taini tcneb. T. R. E. Terra ell 10 car. 
Ibi funt 8 villani cum 4 car. & dimid. & 3 ac. prati & 
paftura dimid. leu. long. Sc 4 quarent. lat. Silva 1 leu. 
long. & dimid. leu. lat. Valet 64 folid. Sc 2 den. 



De hoc M. eft ablata eonfuetudo de M. Comit. 
Moriton Brigspord, hoc eft, 240.es per ami. qui ibi 
reddebanturT. R. E. Malgcriusdetin. perComi'.em. 

Rex ten. Cuve. [Com.] Herald, tenuit T. R. E. 
Sc geld ibat pro 4 hid. & una virg. terrx. Terra eft 3 j 
car. Dc ea eft in dominio 1 hida & ibi 3 car. Sc 4 fervi 
Sc 19 villani Sc 9 bord. cum 18 car. Ibi 2 molini 
redd. 54 denar. Sc 24 ac. prati. Silva 1 leu. long. 
Sc dimid. leu. lat. Redd. 23 lib. de albo argento. 

Huic M. adjacuit tertius denar. de Burgherirt Sc 
Carentone & Willetonc Sc Cantetonc Sc Nordpcreth. 

Rex ten. Nktelcvmbb. Goduin [f. Herold.] te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Sc 3 virg. terrx. 
Terra eft 12 car. De ca eft in dominio una virg. Se 
dimid. Sc ibi 2 car. Sc 3 fcrvi Sc 1 5 villani Sc 4 bord. 
cum 7 car. Ibi 6 ac. prati & 100 ac. pafturx Sc 50 
ac. filvx. Redd. — lib. 12 folid. de albo argento. 

Rex ten. Capintone. [Com.] H?rald tenuit Se 
geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 5 car. De ca ell 
dimid. hida in dominio & ibi 1 car. Sc 5 villani cum> 
1 car. Ibi 8ac. prati Sc 20 ac. pafturx Sc 10 ac. fil.x. 
Redd. 46 folid. de albo argento. 

Rex ten. Lanceford. Goduin [f. Herald.] tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra elt 10 car. 
De ea eft in dominio 1 hida Sc dimid. Sc ibi 1 car. Se 
4 fervi & 2 1 villani Sc 4 bord. cum 8 car. Ibi molin. 
redd. 7 fol. & 6 den. & 8 ac. prati Sc 100 ac. paf- 
turx & 30 ac. filvx. Redd. 4 lib. Sc 12 folid. 

Rex ten. Winesford. [Com.] Tofti tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. & dimid. Terra 
eft6ocar. De ea eft in dominio dim. hida & ibi 3 
car. & 9 fervi & 38 villani & 2 bo.d. cum 13 car; 
Ibi molin. redd. 6 den. & 8 ac. prati & 40 ac. filvx. 
Paftura 4 leu. long. & 2 leu. lat. Redd. 10 lib. & 
10 fol. de albo argento. 

Huic M. eft addita dimid. hida. Tres taini teneb. 
T. R. E. & fervieb. praepofito M. per confuetud. 
abfque omni firma donante. Terra eft 4 car. Ibi 
funt 3 villani & 23 bord. Redd. 20 folid. 

Rex ten. Crice. Gunnild tenuit T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro 10 hid. & dimid. Terra eft 8 car. De 
ea funt in dominio 6 hidx & ibi 2 car. & 6 fcrvi & 
20 villani & 10 bord. cum 6 car. Ibi molin. redd. 
8 den. & 8 ac. prati. Paftura 1 leu. long. & tan- 
tund. lat. Silva I quarent. long. Sc tantund. lat. 
Redd. 9 lib. & 4 folid. de albo argento. Ibi eft pif- 
caria fed non pcrtinet ad firmam. 
Rex ten. Nortcvri. [Com.] Herald, tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 20 hid. Terra eft 40 car. De ea 
funt in dominio 5 hidx & ibi 5 car. & 18 fervi & 23 
coliberti Sc 100 villani 5 min. & 15 bord. cum jo 
car. Ibi 60 ac. prati & 50 ac. filvae. Paftura 2 leu. 
long. & una leu. lat. HuicM. pertin. $ burgenfes in 
Langporth redd. 38 den. & 18 fervi & 4 porcarii & 

2 cotarii. Tot. redd. 23 lib. de albo argento. Ibi ell 
pifcaria fed non pertin. ad firmam & 7 ac. vinex. 

jEcclefiam hujus M. ten. [rip.] Mauricius cum 

3 hid. deead. terra. Ibi habet 7 viiianos & 1 1 bord. 
& 2 fervos cum 4 car. & 1 8 acris prati & 5 acris pafturx 
& 1 2 acris filvx. Redd. 60 folid. 

De eadem terra hujus M. ten. Anfger 1 hid. de 
Comite Mont. val. 20 fol. 

tun 



Rev ten. Crvche. Eddeva tenuit T. R. E. Non 
geldabat, nee fcitur quot ibi hid* habentur. Terra 
eft 40 car. In dominio funt 5 car. & 12 fervi & 26 
coliberti & 42 villani & 4; bord. cum 20 car. Ibi 
4 molini redd. 40 folid. & mercat. redd. 4 lib. Ibi 
60 ac. prati. Paftura dim. leu. long. & 4 quarent. 
lat. Silva 4 quarent. long. & 2 quarent. lat. 
Redd. 46 lib. de albo argento. 

De hoc M. eft ablat. Estham T. R. E. fuit de 
firma M. & non poterat inde feparari. Turftin ten. 
de comite Moriton. Val. 50 folid. 

Rex ten. Cvncresberie. [Com.] Herald, tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 20 hid. Terra eft 50 car. 
Deea funt in dominio 5 hida: & ibi 6 car. & Tz fervi 
& 34 villani & 34 bord. cum 34 car. Ibi 2 molini 
redd. 17 fol. & 6 den. & 250 ac. prati. Paftura 2 
leu. long. & dim. leu. lat. Silva 2 leu. & dim. 
long. & dimid. leu. lat. Redd. 28 lib. & 15 fol. de 
albo argento. 

De hac terra huj us M. ten. 3 taini Aluuard Ordric 
)rdulf 3 hid. & 3 virg. ten*. Jr.fi tenebant 
E. nee poterant a domino M. feparari. Ibi 
funt in dominio 3 car. & 4 fervi & 6 viilani & iy 
bord. cum 3 car. & dim. Ibi 20 ac. prati & 30 ac. 
filv*. Toium v:-:l. 60 folid. 

Hujus M. ecclefmm ten. Mauricius Epifcopus cum 
dimid. i.iJa. Val. 20 folid. De ipfa terra hujus M. 
abla;* (unt 2 hida: que ibi jacuer. T. R. E. Gifo 
Epifc pus ten. unam & val. 4 lib. Serlo de Burci 
& Giflebertus films Turoidi ten. alum hidam ic val. 
40 folid. 

Rex ten. Cam<l. Ghida tenuit T. R. E. & gel- 
dabat pro 8 hid. & Jimid. Ibi funt tamen 15 hid*. 
1 ena eft 1c car. De ea fiuit in dominio 5 hida: & 
ibi 4 car. & 6 fervi & 28 villani & 10 bord. 
near. Ibi 2 molini redd. 20 folid. & 



^ummerfete, rDomeftia^'Boo&, 

&a« fu&ter fcriptas terras tenuit 



& 

T. 



cum 

~ 100 ac. prati 

& 100 ac. paftur* & 100 ac. filv*. Redd. 2 ? lib. de 



albo argento. 

Rex ten. Cocre. Ghida tenuit T. R. E. Ibi 
funt l 5 Hid.se & geldabat pro 7 hid. Terra eft 15 
car. Dc ea funt in dominio c hida: & dimid. & ibi 3 
car. & 7 fervi & 4 coliberti & 35 villani & 42 bord. 
cum 12 car. Ibi molio, redd. 5 (olid. & . o ac. prati. 
Paftura 1 leu. long. & dim. leu. lat. Silva 8 quarent. 
long. & 6 quarent. lat. Redd. 19 lib. & 12 den. 
de albo argento. 

Rex ten. i Iardintone. Gunnild tenuit T. R. E. 
& ibi funt 10 hid* & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 
10 car. Deea lunt in dominio 5 hid* & dim. & ibi 
2 car. & 7 krvi & 16 vil ani & 16 bord. cum 8 car. 
Ibi 40 ac. prati. Silva 5 quarent. long. & 4 quarent. 
lat Redd. 12 lib. & 14 fol. de alto argento. 

rr dc te »"' He ^ T£R!GE - [Com.] Herald, tenuit 
1 . K. b. & geldabat pro 10 hid. Terra eft 16 car. 
Piaster lias o hidas elt terra ad 8 car. qu* nunquam 
gel davit. Ibi funt in dominio 5 car. & 8 fervi & 37 
villain & 15 bord. cum 16 car. Ibi molin. 
3? den. & 60 ac. prati. Paftura 
dimul. leu. lat. & tantund. filVae. 
albo argento. 

In hoc M. tenuit unus lib. homo 9 acras terras & 2 
acxas filvae. Val. 30 den. Non fe poterat a domino 
M. ieparare. 



redd 
una leu. long. & 
Redd. 23 lib 



dc 



CnrjtD IReruna. 



Rex ten. Milvertone. T. R. E. geldabat pro 
dimid. virg. terr*. Terra eft 16 car. In dominio 
eft 1 car. & 3 fervi & 3 cotar. & 16 villani & 7 bord. 
cum 9 car. Ibi molin. redd. 7 (olid. & 6 den. & 6 
ac. prati & tooac. paftur* & 100 ac. filvae modicae. 
Ibi mercatum redd. 10 folid. Totum redd. 25 lib, ad 
numerum. T. Eddid Regir* reddeb. J2 lib. 

Rex ten. Mertoch. Ibi funt 38 hid*. T. R. E. 
geldabat pro 13 hid. Terra eft 40 car. De ea funt 
in dominio 8 hid* & ibi 3 car. & 6 fervi & 14 coli- 
berti & 65 villani & 23 bord. cum 28 car. Ibi 2 
molini redd. 35 folid. & 50 ac. prati. Paftura 1 leu. 
long. & tantund. lat. Silva una leu. long. & 2 
quarent. lat. Pifcaria redd. 5 fo id. Redd. 70 lib. 
ad numer. & 100 folid. plus fi Epifcopus Walchel 
teftatus fuerit. 

Huic M. funt addit* 3 hid*. Has teneb 3 taini 
T. R. E. Redd, in Mertoch 4 lib. & 10 folid. 

De hoc M. eft ablata 1 hida & una virgata terr* in 
Contone. Anfgerus [Cocus] ten. Terra eft 2 car. 
Ibi 4 homines habent 1 car. valuit 50 fol. modo 30 
f '!. De ipfo eodem M. eft ablata hida & dimid. 
Aluric [parvus] tenet & val. 40 folid. 

Rex ten. Cainesham. T. R. E. geldabat pro 50 
hid. Terra eft too car. De ea funt in dominio 15 
hid* & dim. & ibi font 10 car. & 20 fervi & 25. 
coliberti & 70 villani & 40 bord. cum 63 car. Ibi 6 
molini redd. 60 folid. & 100 ac. prati & 100 ac. 
paftur*. oilva 1 leu. long & tantund. lat. Redd. 
108 lib. ad numerum. Reddeb. 80 lib. 

Huic M. pertin. 8 burgenfes in Bade redd. 5 fol. 
per annum. 

De ipfis 50 hid. ten. [Com.] Euftachius in Beletons 
4 hid. & Alured de eo. Toui tenun pro uno M. 
1 * ^ ^" . *k' '" dominio 1 car. & dim. cum 1 fervo 
& 5 villanis & 2 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 
22 ac. prati & 20 ac. paftur*. Silva 3 
quarent. long. & 2 quarent. lat. Valuit 3 lib. 
modo 4 lib. 

De eadem terra ipfws M. ten. Rogerius 10 hid. 
in STANxorfB. Ibi habet in dominio 1 car. & ij 
villan. & 13 bord. habent. 7 car. 

Ibi habet in dominio 1 car. & 15 villani & 13 
bord. habent. 7 car. Ibi molin. redd. 13 folid. & 15 
ac. prati. Paftura 4 quarent. long. & una quarent. 
& dimid. lat. & tantund. filvs. Valet 100 lolid. 

. De ipfa terra ten. Epifcopus Conftantienfis dimid. 
hid. & ibi habet dimid. car. Valet 5 (olid. Vluuard 
tenuit nee poterat a M. feparari. Uxor ipfius 
Vluuard ten. 1 hid. de fupradictis 50 hid. & ibi habet 
4 car. cum 3 fervis & 3 villanis & 4 bord. Ibi 12 
ac. prati & 4ac. filvae annul*. Valuit & val. 4 lib. 

Aluric ten. de eadem terra 1 hid. quam ter.uit 
Vlmar T. R. E. nee poterat a M. feparari. Ibi eft 1 
car. & 17 ac. prati & 2 ac. paftur*. Valet 20 folid. 

Rex ten. Ciwftvne. Ibi funt 29 hid*. T. R. E. 
geldabat pro, 1 4 hid. Terra eft 40 car. Deeafunt 
in dominio 1 8 hid* & ibi 9 car. & 20 fervi & 2 coli- 
berti & 18 villani & 25 bord. cum 19 car, Ibi c 

molini 



^omeroa^iDOOfc.] 



Summer (fete. 



molini redd. 30 fol. 5 denar. min. & 100 ac. prati. 
l'allura z leu. lone:. Sc una leu. lat. Silva 1 leu. in 
Jong. & lat. In Bade 4 burgenfes redd. 40 denar. 
Redd. 50 lib. ad numerum '1. K. Rcginx reddeb. 
30 Jib. 

yGcclefiam hujus M. tea. Abb. dc Gemetico cum 
dim. hida terrx. Ibi funt z car. Sc dim. & 2 fervi 
& 2 villani Sc 8 bord. Sc 8 cotar. Valuit & val. 40 
folid. 

Rex ten. Estone. Ibi funt 2 hidx & geld, pro 
una liida. Terra eft 10 car. In dominio ell 1 car. 
& 2 fervi & 7 coliberti & 13 villani & 3 bord. Si 3 
cotar. cum 5 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 100 denar. & 
50 ac. prati Sc 2 leu. filvx minutx in long. & lat. 
Hi 2 hidx fuerunt & funt de dominica nrma burgi 
Bade. 

Rex ten. Bade T. R. E. geldabat pro 20 hid. 
quando fcira geldabat. Ibi habet Rex 04 burgenfes 
reddentes 4 lit. Sc 90 burgenfes alior. hominum red- 
dunt ibi 60 folid. Ibi habet Rex 6 vaftas domus. 

Klud burgum cum predi&a Estone redd. 60 lib. 
ad numerum Sc unam markam auri. Prater hoc redd, 
moneta 100 folid. Eduuard. redd. 11 lib. de tercio 
dcn.iiio hujus burgi. 

De ipfo burgo eft una domus ablata. Hugo [Inter- 
pres] ten. & val. 2 folid. De tercio denano Givel- 
cestre redd. W'illelmus [Moion] 6 lib. de 20 in ora. 
De Melebvrne 20 folid. De Bravetone 20 folid. 
DeLANPORT 10 folid. De Aissebrkje 10 fol. De 
Frome 5 folid. 

$a0 inf)a fqiptas terras tenuit 
Oltoarmis abbaa. 

Rex ten. Corfetone. T. R. E. geldabat pro 7 
hid. Terra eft 7 car. De ea funt in dominio 3 
hidx & dimid. & 1 ferding & ibi I car. Sc 3 fervi Sc 
10 villani Sc S bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 6 ac. prati. 
Silva 2 quarent. long. & una quarent. lat. Valuit 
Sc val. 7 lib. 

Rex ten. Witecvmbe. T. -R. E. geldabat pro 5 
hid. Terra eft 4 car. De ea funt in dominio 3 
hida? & 3 virg. terra; & ibi I car. & 2 fervi Sc 3 vil- 
lani & 3 bord. habentes 2 car. Ibi 6 ac. prati. Silva 
4 quarent. long. & una quarent. lat. Redd. 4 lib. 

Rex ten. PETENig. T. R. E. jgeldabat pro 1 hida. 
Terra eft I car. Sc dim. Hunfrid. ten. ibi dimid. 
hid. Sc ibi habet I car. & 6 acras prati Sc 4 acras filvx. 
Valuit Sc val. 20 folid. Rex quod habet ibi val. 10 
iblid. 

Warmund ten. Mvndiford in Vadimonio de 

Vluuardo tcftimonio brevis Regis. T. R. E. geldabat 

pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 car. De ea funt in dominio 

■m hidx & ibi 2 car. Ibi 12 ac. prati Sc tantund. 

aftuix. Valuit Sc val. 3 lib. 

Cerra OEpifcopi SjOtntonienfi^ 

EpifcopusWintonienfis ten. Tantone. Stigandus 
[Arch.] tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 54 hid. & 
2 virg. terrx & dimid. Terra eft 100 rtr. Prxter 
hanc habet Epifcopus in dominio terrain ad 20 car. 
qua; nunq. geldavit & ibi habet 13 car. Ibi 80 vil- 
lani & 82 bord. & 70 fervi k 16 coliberti & 17 por- 



carii redd. 7 lib. k 10 fol. Inter omnes habent 60 
car. Ibi 64 burgenfes redd. 32 folid. Ibi 3 moliiii 
redd. 100 folid. 60 denar. min. Mercatum redd. CO 
fol. &de Moneta 50 folid. Ibi 40 ac. prati. l'afluia 
2 leu. long. & una leu. lat. Silva una leu. long. Se 
tantund. lat. Quando Walchclin. Epifc. rccep. 
reddebat co lib. Modoreddit 144 lib. & 11 denar. 
cum omnibus appendic. & confuetudinibus fuij. 

lit.'c confuetudines pertinent ad Tantone. Burg, 
herifth. Latrones. Paris in fraftio. Hainfare. De- 
narii de hundret. & denarii S. Petri. Circieti. Ter 
in anno teneri placita Epifcopi fine ammonitione. 
Profeftio in exercitum cum hominibus Epifcopi. 

Has denominatas confuetudines reddunt in Tak- 
tonb hx terrx. Talanda, Acha, Holeforde Sc Vbce- 
dene & Succedene, Maidenobroche, Laford, Hilla St 
Hela, Nichehede, Nortone, Bradeforde, Haifa St 
Hafella. Scobindare & Stocha. Hx dux terrx non 
debent exercitum. Eafdem confuetudines debent illi 
de Bauueberga prxter exercitum Sc fepulturam. De 
his omnibus term fa&uri facramentum vel judicium 
portaturi ad Tantone veniunt. Cum domini de his 
terris moriuntur in Tantone fepeliuntur. 

Hilla & Hela non potcrant a Tantone feparari 
T. R. E. 

. De fupradi&is C4 hid. Sc dim. & dim. virg. terrx 
ten. mododc Epifcopo Goisfrid. 4 hid. & unam virg. 
terrx. Robertus 4 bid. Sc dim. Hugo 2 hid. & dim. 
Ibi funt in dominio 10 car. Sc 12 fervi & 20 villani 
& 28 bord. cum 10 car. Ibi 37 ac. prati Sc 43 ac. 
filvx Sc molin. de 3 fol. iftud eft Hugonis. Inter 
totum val. 27 lib. 

Item de fupradiftis hid. ten. de Epifcopo Goduin. 

2 hid. dimid. virg. terrx minus. Leueua 2 hid. 
Aluuard. I hid. Sc unam virg. terrx Sc dimid. Aluric 
& Edmer 3 hid. Leuuidim. virg. terrx. Ibi in do- 
minio 7 car. & 13 fervi & 13 villani & 20 bord. cum 

3 car. & dimid. Ibi 2 molini redd. 6 folid. Sc 8 den. 
Sc 45 ac. prati & 61 ac. filvx. Inter totum val. 8 
lib. & 3 folid. Qui has terras teneb. T. R. E. non 
poterant ab xcclelia feparari. 

Item de fupradictis hid. ten. comes Moriton. 1 hid. 
Aluredus 1 hid. Johannes 2 hid. & dim. virg. terrx. 
In dominio funt ibi 2 car. & 6 fervi & 12 villani Sc 
17 bord. cum 3 car. & dim. Ibi 2 molini redd. 14 fol. 
Sc 2 den. & 19 ac. prati & 100 ac. pafturx & 20 ac. 
filvx. Hx 3 terrx pertineb. ad Tantone T. R. E. 
& valebant 70 folid. Modo redd. 6 lib. &: 10 folid. 

Huic M. Tantone additx funt 2 hidx Sc dim. in 
Lidiard & Lega quas teneb. unui tainus parit. T. 
R. E. Sc potuit ire ad quemlibet dominum. Mods 
ten. de Epifcopo Wluuard. & Aluuard. per conce/lb- 
nem Regis \V. Terra eft 5 car. Ibi funt 6 villani 
& 3 bord. & 4 fervi & 1 1 ac. prati St icoac. pafturx 
& 49 ac. filvx. Valebat & val. 45 folid. De hi* 
terris feptem jacuer. confuetudines Sc fervitium in 
Tantone Sc Rex W. concefiit iftas terras habendas 
S. Petro & Walchclino Epifcopo ficut ipfe recognovit 
apud Sarifberiam audiente Epifcopo Dunelmcnli cui 
prxcepit ut hanc ipfam concellionem fuara in brevibus 
fcriberet. 

Idem Epifc. ten. Pipeminstrb. StigantL [Arch.] 
tenuit Sc geldabat pro 1 5 hid. Terra eft 20 car. De 
ea funt in domi&io 5 hidx & ibi 2 car. & 17 villani & 

8 bord. 



^timmctfetc* 



fDomeftia2*TSoo&. 



8 bord. cum 12 car. Ibi 6 ac. prati & 400 ac. paf- 
turae Be totid. ac. filvae. Valuit 16 lib. Modo 14 lib. 
Idem Epifcopus ten. Bledone. De vi&u monachor. 
fuit&eft. T. R. E. geldabat pro 15 hid. Terraeftic 
car. De ea funt in dominio 10 hidsc & ibi 3 car. St 
8 fervi Si 16 villani & 10 bord. cum 1 1 car. Ibi 50 ac. 
prati & paftura 1 leu. long. Sc dimid. leu. lat. Valuit 
& val. 1 5 lib. De his to hid. ten. Saulf de Epifcopo 
I hid. & ibi habet 1 car. cum 1 fervo & 1 bord. & 16 
acris prati & unaac . filvac minutac. Val. 20 folid. 

Idem Epifcopus ten. Rintone. Stigand. tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 car. 
De ea funt in dominio 2 hidae & una virg. terra: Sc 
dim. & ibi 3 car. & 2 fervi & 8 villani Sc 7 bord. cum 
3 car. Ibi 10 ac. prati. Silva 4 quarent. long. & 
una quarent. Iat. Valuit & val. 7 lib. 

Cerra OBpifcopi @>arisbericnfisu 

Epifcopus Sarifterienfis ten. Seveberce. Aluuard. 
tenuit T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro hida 8c dim. Terra 
eft 1 car. 8c dim. Tamen funt ibi 2 car. Sc 2 villani 
& 4 bord. & 2 fervi. Ibi dim. molini redd. 10 den. 
Sc 9 ac. prati & 10 ac. filva;. Paftura dim. leu. long. 
& dim. quarent. lat. Huic M. eft addita alia Seve- 
berce. Aluer tenuit T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro hida 
Sc dim. Ibi funt 2 car. cum uno villano & 5 bord. & 
dim. molini redd, toden. & oac. prati & ioac. filvae. 
Paftura dim. leu. long. & dim. quarent. lat. Ha: 2 
terrx non funt de Epifcopatu Sarifberie. Ofmundus 
[Epifcopus] ten. pro uno M. 8c Walter, de eo. Valeb. 
& val. 60 folid. T.R. E.jacuer. in Crvche M.Regis 
& qui teneb. inde non poterant feparari & reddeb. 
in Crvche per confuetudinem 12 oves cum agnis Sc 
una bloma ferri de unoquoque libero homine. 

Idem Epifcopus ten. Contonk Sc Walter, de eo. 
Aluuard tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra 
eft 3 car. In dominio funt 2 car. Sc 2 fervi & 5 vil- 
lani & 4 bord. & 7 cotar. cum 2 car. Ibi molin. 
redd. 30 den. & 143c. prati & 80 ac. filvae & una 
leu. paftura;. Valuit & val. 60 folid. 

Cerva (Epifcopi OBatocenfis. 

Epifcopus Baiocenfis ten. Come Sc Sanfon de eo. 
[Com,] Leuuin. tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 8 
hid. Terra eft 8 car. De ea funt in dominio 5 
hidae & ibi 3 car. & 7 fervi & 10 villani Sc 6 bord. 
cum 2 car. Ibi 40 ac. prati & 40 ac. pafturae & 60 
ac. filva: minutje. Valuit & val. 10 lib. Huic M. 
adjuncts; funt 3 virg. terras in Tornie. Aluuard te- 
nuit T. R. E. pro uno M. & pro tanto geldabat. 
. Terra eft dim. car. Valuit & val. 13 fol. 

Cerca Cpifcopi Conflantienfigf. 

Epifcopus Conftantiens. ten. Dovles. Aluuard 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. & una virg. 
terra;. Terra eft I car. & dim. qua; ibi funt cum 3 
villanis Sc 3 bord. & 1 fervo. Valuit & val. 24 folid. 

Huic M. addita; funt 7 hida; quas teneb. tres 
taini T. R. E. pro 3 Man. Ibi funt in dominio 2 
car. & 2 fervi & 1 1 villani & 1 1 bord. cum 5 car. 
Ibi 44 ac. prati & 4 quarent. paftura; in long. & 
tantund. in lat. & 20 ac. plus. Silva 8 quarent. 



long. & 3 quarent. lat. & 20 ac. infuper. Val. 6 lib. 
& 10 fol. Hanc terrain ten. Willelmus de Epifcopo. 

Idem Epifcopus ten. Caffecome & Radulf. de eo. 
Duo taini tenuerunt T. R. E. & geldabantpro 3 hid. 
Sc dim. Terra eft 3 car. I» dominio eft una & 2 vil- 
lani & 6 bord. habent 1 car. Ibi filva 8 quarent. 
long. Sc tantund. lat. Val. 40 fol. Huic M. addita 
eft 1 hida & 3 virg. terrae. Duo taini tenuer. T. R. E. 
pro 2 M. Terra eft 2 car. Has habent ibi 3 villani. 
j Val. 20 folid. 

Idem Epifcopus ten. Hasecvmbe Sc Willelmus de 
eo. Quatuor taini tenuer. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 
2 hid. & 3 virg. terra;. Terra eft 3 car. In dominio 
funt 2 car. cum I fervo & 4 villani 8c 8 bord. cum 2 
car. Ibi 3 1 ac. prati & 10 ac. filva; minuta;. Valuit 
40 folid. Modo 50 folid. 

Idem Epifcopus ten. Stoches. Aluied tenlit 
T. R. E. Ibi funt 5 hida; & una virg. terras & pro 4 
hid. geld. Terra eft 5 car. De ea funt in dominio 

2 hidae & dimid. Sc ibi 2 car. & 3 fervi Sc 9 villani & 

3 bord. cum 4-car. & dimid. Ibi molin. redd. 3 folid. 
& 15 ac. prati. Paftura 2 leu. long. & una leu. lat. 
Si 2 folid. defuper plus. Silva 1 leu. long. & una 
quarent. lat. Valuit 6 lib. Modo 4 lib. 

Idem Epifcopus ten. Essetvne & Drogo de eo. 
Eduin. tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. & uno 
ferding. Terra eft 12 car. In dominio funt 2 car. 
& 6 fervi & 20 villani & 1 3 bord. cum 7 car. Ibi 8 
ac. prati & 60 ac. filva;. Paftura 1 leu. long. Sc tan- 
tund. lat. Val. 6 lib. De hac ead. terra T. R. E. 
jacuer. 3 virg. terra; in Netecvmbe M. Regis. 

Idem Epifcopus ten. Winemeresham & Drogo de 
eo. T. R. E. geldabat pro hida Sc ! una virg. terra;. 
Terra eft 5 car. De ea funt in dominio 4 virg. & ibi 
1 car. & 3 fervi Sc 5 villani & 3 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi 
200 ac. paftura; & tantund. filvae. Valet 30 folid. 

Idem Drogo ten. de Epifcopo Chetenore. T. R. E. 
geldabat pro 1 hida & una virg. Terra eft 2 car. Ibi 
funt 2 villani & 1 bord. & 1 fervus cum 1 car. & 50 
ac. paftura; Sc iooac. filva;. Valet J5 folid. Hxc 2 
M. tenuit Ofmund T. R. E. 

Edmef ten. de Epifcopo Widicvmbe. Alnod te- 
nuit & pro 3 hid. geldabat T. R. E. Terra eft 10 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 6 fervi & 14 villani 
Sc 7 bord. cum 8 car. Ibi 10 ac. prati & quingentae 
& 50 ac. pafturae & 100 ac. filva; 4 min. Valuit 4 
lib. Modo 6 lib. 

Azelin ten. de Epifcopo Harpetrev. Alric & 
Vluric tenuerunt T. R. E. pro 2 M. & geldabant pro 

5 hid. Terra eft 5 car. De ea funt in dominio 3 hida: 
Sc ibi 2 car. & 2 fervi & 9 villani & 1 bord. & 4 co- 
tar. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. de 5 folid. & 40 ac. prati. 
Paftura 8 quarent. long. Sc 5 quarent. lat. Silva 4 
quarent. long. & 2 quarent. & dim. lat. Valuit & 
val. 40 fol. 

Azelin ten. de Epifcopo Hotvne. Duo taini te- 
nuerunt T. R. E. pro 2 M. & geldabant pro 5 hid. 
Terra eft 5 car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 5 villani & 

6 bord. habent. 2 car. Ibi 30 ac. prati & 200 ac. 
paftura; 8<l i 5 acra; filvae minutae. Valuit 4 lib. 
Modo 60 folid. 

Azelin ten. de Epifcopo Lilebere. Aluuard te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 4 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. cum 1 fervo & 1 villano 



£)omcfnap:'JBoo&.] 



©ummctfcte. 



& 5 bord. cum i car. Ibi zo ac. prati i-40 ac. paf- 
tura:. Valuit 60 fol. Modo 40 folid. 

Herluinus ten. de Epifcopo Wintreth. Briflric 
tcnuit T. R. E. &.- geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra ell 

2 car. Ibi funt cum 2 villanis Sc 2 bord. & 2 fervis. 
Ibi 8 ac. prati & 3 ac. filvx modicae. Valuit & val. 
20 folid. Haec 3 maner. erant de ^Ecclefia Glafting- 
berie T. R. E. Qui teneb. non poterant ab ^Eccltlia 
feparari. 

Herluin. ten. de Epifcopo Aisecome. Briclric 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Sc dim. Terra 
eft c car. In dominio funt 2 car. Sc 7 fervi Sc 6 vil- 
lani & 5 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 40 ac. prati & 3 ac. 
filvx minutx Sc 100 ac. paftura:. Valuit Sc val. ico 
folid. 

Willelmus ten. de Epifcopo Clvtone. Turchil 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 10 hid. Terra eft 8 
car. In dominio funt 3 car. cum 1 fervo & iovillani 
& 1 2 bord. cum 6 car. Ibimolin. redd. 3odenar. & 
107 ac. prati. Paftura 10 quarent. long. & 4quarent. 
lat. Silva dimid. leu. long. & tantund. lat. Valuit 

3 lib. Modo 6 lib. 

Willelmus ten. de Epifcopo Temesbare. Ape 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 3 
car. In dominio eft I car. Sc 2 fervi & 2 villani & 1 
bord. cum 1 car. Ibi 2 partes molini redd. 3 folid. & 
26 ac. prati Sc tantund. pafturx. Valuit 26 folid. 
Modo 50 folid. 

Huic M. additx funt 2 hids quas teneS. Sibe 
T. R. E. pro uno M. Sc pro tanto geldabat. Terra 
eft 2 car. quae ibi funt cum 1 fervo & 1 villano & 3 
bord. Ibi tercia pars molini redd. 2 folid. & 16 ac. 
prati & tantund. paftura:. Valuit 14 (olid. Modo 
30 folid. 

Vlueua ten. de Epifcopo Nortone. Alwold te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 8 
car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 3 fervi & 5 villani & 1 1 
bord. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 40 den. & 34 ac. 
prati & 6 ac. filvse minutx & una leu. filvx in long. 
& tantund. in lat. Valuit 100 fol. Modo 60 folid. 

Folcheran ten. de Epifcopo Cliveham. Gonnil te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 3 car. 
In dominio eft 1 car. cum I fervo & 3 villani & 1 2 
bord. cum 2 car. Ibi 7 ac. prati. Silva 1 quarent. 
long. & tantund. lat. Silva modica dimid. leu. long. 
& tantund. lat. Valuit 20 fol. Modo 30 fol. 

Willelmus ten. de Epifcopo Ferenberce. Edric 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 5 fervi & 4 villani & 
3 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi 77 ac. prati. Sc 74 ac. paf- 
tura;. Valuit & val. 4 lib. 

HuicM. additaefuntjhidas. Aluric tenuit T. R. E. 
pro uno M. & pro 5 hid. geldabat. Terra eft 5 car. 
Nigel ten. de Epifcopo. In dominio funt 2 car. cum 
1 fervo & 1 villano & 5 bord. Ibi 77 ac. prati & 74 
ac. paftura:. Valuit & val. 4 lib. 

Fulcran & Nigeil ten. de Epifcopo Cliveware. 
Turchil tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 virg. terras 
uno ferding min. Terra eft 2 car. quas ibi funt cum 
6 villanis & 10 ac. prati. Valet 15 fol. 

Herluin. ten. de Epifcopo Bichevrde. Algar te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 2 car. 
In dominio eft 1 car. it 3 fervi & 2 bord. Ibi 12 ac. 
prati. Silva 6 quarent. long. & una quarent. lat. 



In Bristou 10 dom. In Babe 2 dom. redd, jo den. 
Valuit 20 fol. Modo 40 fol. 

Azelin ten. de Epifcopo Biscopew«d*. Edric 
tenuit T. R. E. k geldabat pro 1 hida & dim. Terra 
eft 2 car. qux ibi funt cum 4 villanis St 4 bord. St 4 
cotar. Ibi 10 ac. prati Sc 45 ac. pailurw. Valuit 
20 folid. Modo 30 fol. 

Azelin ten. de Epifcopo Westone. Britnod te- 
nuit T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro 7 hid. Terra eft 6 
car. In dominio lunt 3 car. Sc 2 fervi Sc 6 villani Sc 
7 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 33 ac. prati. Paftura 12 
quarent. long. Sc 8 quarent. lat. Silva 7 quarent. 
long. Sc 3 quarent. lat. Valuit & val. 4 lib. St 10 fol. 

Rogerius ten. de Epifcopo Sanford. Quatuor 
taini tenuer. T. R. E. Sc geldabant pro 4 hid. Terra 
eft 6 car. In dominio funt 3 C3r. Sc 6 fervi Si 7 vil- 
lani & 10 bord. cum 4 car. Ibi molin. redd. 12 fol. 
& 6 den. & 32 ac. prati. Valuit Sc val. 6 lib. 

Roger, ten. de Epifcopo Estone. Ailric tenuit 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro 12 hid. Terra eft 9 car. 
In dominio funt 2 car. & 3 fervi Sc 14 villani & 7 
bord. cum 7 car. Ibi molin. redd. 50 denar. & 36 
ac. prati & 30 ac. filvx Sc 100 ac. paftura:. Valuit 
10 lib. Modo 7 lib. 

Willelmus ten. de Epifcopo Porteshe. Aluric te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 8 hid. Terra eft S 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. cum 1 fervo & 9 villani 
& 4 bord. cum 5 car. Ibi molin. redd. 8 folid. Sc 20 
ac. prati Sc too ac. pafturx. Silva minuta 1 2 quarent. 
long. & 3 quarent. lat. Valuit & val. 70 fol. 

Willelmus ten. de Epifcopo Westone. Algar te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. & una virg. terrx. 
Terra eft 3 car. In dominio funt 2 car. Sc 2 fervi & 

4 villani Sc 4 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi 17 ac. prati Sc 1 2 
ac. filvx minutx. Paftura 12 quarent. long. & 2 qua- 
rent. lat. & 6 quarent. morx. Valuit Sc val. 60 folid. 

Herluin. ten. de Epifcopo Clotvne. Algar tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Sc dim. Terra eft 

5 car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 2 fervi Sc iovillani 

6 10 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 50 ac. prati. Paftura 18 
quarent. long. Sc 3 quarent. lat. Silva 7 quarent. 
long. & una quarent. lat. Valuit 40 folid. Modo 
70 lolid. 

Brungarten. de Epifcopo Atigete. Tidulf tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro hida & dim. Terra eft 1 
car. qux ibi eft in dominio cum 3 bord. Ibi 10 ac. 
prati & 20 ac. filvx. Valuit Sc val. 20 fol. 

Ipfe Epifcopus ten. unam terram qux vocatur 
Chen. Ibi eft dimid. hida & ibi habet 1 fervum. 
Valet 5 fo.'iJ. 

Fukran Sc Nigel ten. de Epifcopo Bacoilk. 
Turchil tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 10 hid. 
Terra eft 14 car. Has habent ibi 32 villani & 21 
bord. Sc 2 fervi. Ibi molin. redd. 4 folid. & 24 ac. 
prati. Paftura 1 leu. long. & dimid. leu. lat. Silva 
minuta 1 leu. long. Sc 2 quarent. lat. Valuit & val. 
8 lib. 

Fulcran ten. de Epifcopo Bvdicome. Eluuard te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 3 
car. In dominio eft I car. & 2 (ervi & i 1 villani & 
4 bord. cum 5 car. Ibi molin. redd. 20 denar. Sc 10 
ac. prati & 30 ac. filvx. Valuit & val. 4 lib. 

Nigel ten. de Epifcopo Berve. Edric tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 10 hid. Terra ell 14 car. 

In 



©ummerfetc. 



[Domeftm^lBoofc.. 



In dommio funt 2 car. & 3 fervi & 15 vil'ani Sc 7 bord. 

.Ibimolin. redd. 5 folid. Sc 35 ac. prati & 30 ac. paf- 
tura;. Silva 1 leu. long. & una quarent. lat. Valuit 
& val. 10 lib. 

Ipfe Epifcopus ten. Porberie. Godwin tenuit T. 
R. E. & geldabat pro 8 hid. Terra ell 18 car. in 
dominio funt z car. & 13 fervi & zo villani & 17 

■ bord. cum 16 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 6 folid. & 150 
no prati. Paftura 17 quarent. Iong..& 2 quarent. 



Silva 1 leu. long. & 



15 lib 



3 quarent. Iat. Valuit & 
Tres taini tenuer. 



;)au 
' val. 

Ipfe Epifcopus ten. Estvne. 
T. R. E. & geldabant pro 20 hid. Terra eft 30 car. 
In dominio funt 2 car. & 5 fervi & 1 2 villani & 6 
bord. cum 7 car. Ibimolin. redd. 40 den. & 25 ac. 
prati. Paftura I leu. long. & dimid. leu. lat. & 100 
ac. filvae. Valuit 12 lib. Modo 10 lib. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. Roger, de Epifcopo 
7 hid. & ibi habet in dominio 2 car. & 4 fervos & 8 
villanos & 10 bord. cum 5 car. Ibi 18 ac. prati & 30 
ac. filva;. Valet 7 lib. De eadem terra ejufdem M. . 
ten. Wido [ Prefbyter] 3 hid. & ibi habet 2 car. & 2 
fervos & 3 villanos & 2 bord. cum 2 car. Valet 100 
fol. Ad aecclefiam .hujus M. pertin. una virg. de 
. eadem terra. 

Roger, ten. de Epifcopo Firford. Toui tenuit 

' T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. & dimid. Terra eft 

3 car. In dominio funt 2 car. Sc 8 bord. cum 1 car. 

'Ibi dimid. molin. redd. 5 fol. & 12 ac. prati & 30 

ac. pafturae & 12 ac. filvae minutae. Valuit 40 folid. 

' Modo 60 folid. 

Azelin ten. de Epifcopo Lancheris. JEKi tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. & dim. Terra eft 5 
car. In dominio funt 3 car. & 3 fervi Sc c villani Sc 7 
bord. cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 40 den. & 4 ac. 
prati Sc dimid. Sc 130 ac. paitura;. Valuit 40 folid. 
Modo 60 folid. 

Ipfe Epifcopus ten. Wichb. Aluric tenuit T. R. E. 
Sc geldabat pro 4 hid. Terra eft 4 car. In dominio 
funt 3 car. & 4 fervi & unus villanus Sc 10 bord. Ibi 
molin. redd. 35 fol. & 50 ac. prati & i2oac. pafturae. 
Valet 7 lib. 

Huic M. addita eft una hida in Wilege quam 
teneb. Aluric T. R,E. pro uno M. & pro 1 hida 
geld. Ibi funt 2 car. & 6 fervi & 9 bord. cum 1 
car. Ibi z molini-redd. 2 folid. &.20 ac. filvae mi- 
nutae. Valuit & val. 60 folid. 

Nigel ten. de Epifcopo Wiche. Alured. tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 1 car. 
Valuit & val. 20 folid. 

Ipfe Epifcopus ten. Contone. Edric tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 10 hid. Terra eft 14 car. 
'In dominioeft 1 car. Sc 4fervi &. 16 villani & 6 bord. 
cum 6 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 25 folid. & 15 ac. 
prati & 10.0 ac. paftura; Sc 15 ac. "filva;. Valuit & 
val. 10 lib. 

Ipfe Epifcopus ten. Werocosale. Al«ric tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 20 hid. Terra eft 26 car. 
In dominio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi & 34 villani & 30 
bord. cum 25 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 12 folid. & 6 
<den. & 150 ac prati Sc tantund. filva:. Paftura z 
leu. lo;ig. & 7 quarent. lat. Valuit & val. 15 lib. 
De ead. terra hujus M. ten. unus miles 4 hid. Sc 
,4ub. de Epifcopo & ibi habst 2 car. cum 3 vill, & 



4 bord. Valuit & val. 50 fol. Huic M. addita eft 
una hida quam tenuit unus tainus T.R. E. Terra ell 
1 car. Valet 10 folid. 

Epifcopus ten. Wenfre. Aluuold tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 10 hid. Terra eft 22 car. De ea 
ten. Roger. 4 hid. Folcran 5 hid. Colfuain 1 hid. 
In dominio habent 5 car. Sc ibi 7 fervi & 19 villani 
& 12 bord. cum 14 car. Ibimoiin. redd. 40 den. & 
20 ac. prati. Paftura 2 quarent. long. & una quarent. 
lat. Silva 1 leu. long. & 2 quarent. lat. Totum 
valuit 9 lib. & 5 fol. Modo 20 fol. plus. 

Huic M. addita eft una hida quam tenuit Aluric 
T. R. E. Nunc ten. Colfuain de Epifcopo & ibi 
habet 2 car. Sc 2 bord. Valuit Sc val. 25 folid. 

Willelmus ten. Fvscots. Aldida tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 4 car. In dominio 
funt 2 car. & 3 fervi & 2 cotar. & 3 villani & 6 bord. 
cum 2 car. Ibimolin. redd. 10 folid. & 19 ac. prati 
& 6 ac. paftura; & 20 ac. filvas minuta:. Valuit & 
val. 4 lib. 

Idem W. ten. de Epifcopo Stratone. Aluuold 
tenuit T. R. E. de ascclefia Glaftingberie, nee poterat 
ab ea feparari, & geld, pre 3 hid. Terra eft 3 car. In 
dominio funt 2 car. & 3 fervi & 5 villani & 6 bord. cum 
car. & dimid. Ibimolin. redd. 5 folid. & 20 ac. prati. 
Pafturae 4 quarent. int. long. & lat. Silva 3 quarent. 
long. & 2 quarent. lat. Valuit 50 fol. Modo 4 lib. 

Huic M. addita eft I hida & dim. in Picote. 
Wlmar teneb. T. R. E. & poterat ire quo volebat. 
Terra eft 1 car. Ibi funt 2 villani Sc 2 bord. cum 
1 fervo. Ibimolin. redd. 40 den. Sc 7 ac. prati & 2 
quarent. pafturae & una quarent. filvae. Valuit & 
val. 20 folid. Willelmus ten. de Epifcopo. 

Nigel ten. de Epifcopo Encliscomje. Unus tainus 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 10 hid. Terra eft 
10 cur. In dominio funt 3 car. Sc 6 fervi Sc 3 villani 

6 17 bord. cum 6 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 1 1 fol. Sc 

7 denar. Ibi 12 ac. prati & 100 ac. filva; minuta;. 
•Valuit & val. 10 lib. 

Idem N. ten. de Epifcopo Twertone. Tres taini 
tenuer. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 7 hid. & dimid. 
Terra eft 10 car. In dominio funt 3 car. & 6 fervi 
Sc 7 villani & 1 3 bord. cum 6 car. Ibi 1 moliniredd. 
30 fol. & 15 ac. prati. Valuit Sc val. 10 lib. 

Goisfridus ten. de Epifcopo Twertone. .Unus 
tainus tequit T. R..E. Sc geldabat pro 2 hid. & dim. 
Terra eft .2 car. & dim. quae ibi funt in dominio cum 
4 bord. Sc 2 fervis. Ibi 2 molini redd. 30 fol. & 7 
ac. prati & 4 ac. filvae minutae. Valuit Sc val. 60 
folid. Hanc terram tenuit Alured de Eddid Regina. 
Modo ten. Epifcopus de Rege ut dicit. 

Rogerius ten. de Epifcopo Stoche. Aluied, Aluuin 
& ^Elgar tenebant T. R. E. & geldabant pro 7 hid. & 
3 virg. Terra eft 9 car. In dominio funt 3 car. & 2 
■Jervi & 9 -villani Sc 1 2 bord. & 3 cotar. cum 4 car. 
Ibi molin.. redd. 13 folid. & 12 ac. prati. Valuit St 
val. 7 lib. 

Radaifus ten. de Epifcopo Hardintonb. Tres 
taini tenuer. T. R. E. Sc geldabant pro 4 hid. Terra 
eft 4 car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 4 fervi & unus 
villanus & 7 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 36 ac. prati & 12 
ac. filva; minutae. Valuit & val. 4 lib. In hoc M. 
eft una hida pertin: ad Hamintoke. Balduinus. tenet 
& habet coftynunem pailuram huic M. 

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din ten de Bamnctonh. Duo taini 

tcnu. i pro 5 hid. Terra eft 4 

car. tn domii 8 7 fcrvi &2 villani & 

2 boril. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redci. 40 denar. & 12 
ac. prati .v 15 ac. pafturae. Silva b quareut. long. 
& 1 quarent. lac. v.iluit 40 fol. Modo 60. folid. 

Azelin 1 leopo Millbscotb. Duo taini 

tenner, de :ec> lefia Glaftingbcric, ncc poterant ah 
eaie] 'Jt nibant pro $ hid. & dimid. Terra 

eft 5 car. [11 dominio eft 1 car. & dim. Sc 3 fervi & 

9 villain & 6 bord. Sc 5 cotar. cum 5 car. Ibi molin. 
redd. 6 ibi. & 6 den. & 3 ac. prati. Paftura 4 qua- 
rent, long. 5i • quarent. lat. & tavtund. filvx. Valuit 
40 fol. "Mo.!o 4 lib. 

IplL- Epili <>pus ten. Lolictone. [Com.] Herald. 

tci u'i I ' St geldabat r ro 7 hid. Terra eft' 

<. Ii .initiinio funt 2 car. & 2 fervi & 7 villani & 

10 bo; !. cum 4 car. Ibi molin. redd. 20 folid. & 
20 ac. prati. Silva 6 quarent. long. & 2 quarent. 
lat. Valuit 4 lib. Modo 100 folid. 

Ipfe Epifcopus ten. Horcerlei. Tres taini te- 
nuer. T. R. K. & geldabant pro 5 hid. Terra eft 4 
car. In dominio funt 4 car. & 2 fervi & 3 villani Sc 
9 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 12 folid. & 6 
den. & 24 ac. prati. Silva 6 quarent. long. & z 
quarent. lat. Valuit & val. 4 lib. 

Moyfes ten. de Epifcopo Tablesford. Eduuard. 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 3 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 5 cotar. & 4 bord. 
cum una car. &dim. Ibi dimid. molin. redd. 7 fol. 
& 6 denar. & 7 ac. prati & toac. pafturx & unaac. 
filvx & dimid. Valet 30 folid. 

Huic M. funt additx 3 hidx. Aluiet tenuit T. 
R. E. & pro tanto geldabat. Terra eft 4 car. In 
dominio eft 1 car. & 3 fervi & 3 villani & 8 bord. 
cum 2 car. Ibi dim. molin. redd. 9 fol. & 1 1 ac. 
prati & dimid. Sc 30 ac. pafturx & 4 ac. filvae & 
dimid. Valuit 60 fol. Modo 40 fol. 

Epifcopus ten. Rode pro 3 M. Septem taini te- 
nuer. T. R. E. Je geldabant pro 9 hid. Terra eft 9 
car. Deea ten. de Epifcopo Robertus 1 hid. Moyfes 
dim. hidam. Robertus 1 hidam & dimid. Rogerius 
2 hid. & dim. Sireuuoldus 2 hid. & dim. Ricardus 

1 hid. In dominio funt 7 car. & 6 fervi Sc 3 villani 
& 29 bord. cum 4 car. & dim. De molinis exeunt 
27 folid. & 33 ac. prati & 33 ac. filvae & 25 ac. paf- 
turx. Tot. valuit 7 lib. & 10 fol. Modo inter 
omnes val. 8 lib. Sc 5 fol. 

Nigel ten. de Epifcopo Caivel. Lcucdai tenuit 

T. R. E. & geldabat pro una hida & una virg. terrae. 

Terra eft 1 car. quae ibi eft in dominio cum 12 cotar. 

Ibi molin. redd. 30 denar. Sc 6 ac. prati & 5 ac. 

» pafturx. Valuit 10 folid. Modo 15 folid. 

Ofmundus ten. de Epifcopo Liteltone. Goduin 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 

2 car. qua? ibi funt in dominio cum 1 bord. Sc 6 
fervis. Ibi molin. redd. 10 folid. & 2 ac. prati Sc 6 
ac. pafturx. Valet 40 folid. 

Ipfe Epifcopus ten. Niwetone. Aluric tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 4*iar. 
In dominio funt 2 car. & 4 fervi Sc 4 villani & 3 
ford, cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 7 folid. & 6 den. 
fc 9 ac. prati Sc 40 ac. filva minutx. Valuit 60 
folid. Modo 100 iolid. 



Huic M. funt additx 7 hidx qua-, tench. 2 taini 
T. R. E. Terra eft 8 car. Ibi lunt 14 villani it 8 
bord. Sc 7 fervi cum 6 car. & 23 ac. prati. Valuit 
100 folid. Modo 10 lib. 

Azelinus ten. de EpifcopoFsittKTOKC. Brifmar 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra ell 7 car. 
in dominio funt 3 car. Sc 4 fcrvi & 7 villani & 7 
bord. cum 4 car. Ibi 100 ac. prati. Valuit 50 fol. 
Modo 4 lib. 

Azelin ten. de Epifcopo Estone Tres taini 
tenucr. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 4 hid. & dimid. 
Terra eft 6 car. In dominio funt 3 car. Sc 4 fervi Sc 

5 villani & 4 bord. & 2 cotar. cum 4 car. Ibi molin. 
redd. 30 denar. & 40 ac. prati & 40 ac. pafturx. 
Valuit Sc val. 70 folid. 

Azelin ten. de Epifcopo Herpetrev. Edric te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 4 
car. In dominio eft dim. car. & 7 villani Sc 4 bord. 

6 5 cotar. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 5 fol. Sc 58 
ac. prati & 42 ac. filvx. Paftura 1 leu. long. Sc dimid. 
leu. lat. Valuit & val. 40 folid. 

Robertus ten. de Epifcopo Amelberce. Duo 
taini tenuer. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 3 hid. 
Terra eft 4 car. In dominio funt 2 car. Sc 2 fervi Sc 
6 villani & 4 bord. cum 5 car. Ibi 29 ac- prati. 
Valuit 20 fol. Modo 70 fol. 

Ipfe Epifcopus ten. Camelei. Duo taini tenuer. 
T. R. E. & geldabant pro 9 hid. &dim. virg. terrx. 
Terra eft 9 car. In dominio funt 3 car. Sc 13 fcrvi 
& 9 villani & 1 bord. & 7 cotar. cum 4 car. Ibi mo- 
lin. redd. 5 fol. & 120 ac. prati & 30 ac. paftura: Sc 
50 ac. filvx minutse. Valuit 7 lib. Modo 10 lib. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. Hunfridus I hid. Sc ibi 
habet 1 car. & 3 vill. Sc 1 cotar. cum 1 car. Ibi 40 
ac. prati. Valet 20 folid. 

Willelmus ten. de Epifcopo Chingestoke. Eldred 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 
17 car. In dominio funt 3 car. cum 1 fervo & 18 
villani & 4 bord. cum 1 1 car. Ibi 40 ac. pafturx. 
Valuit & val. 6 lib. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. Fulcran de Epifcopo 
terram 1 car. Sc ibi habet 2 bord. Valet 3 fol. 

Idem W. ten. Chingestone de Epifcopo. Quatuor 
taini tenuer. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 4 hid. & dim. 
Terra eft 7 car. Ibi funt 9 villani & 8 bord. cum 1 
fervo habentes 6 car. & dimid. Valuit Sc val. 60 folid. 
Hoc M. T. R E. non geldabat nifi pro una hida. 

Roger, ten. de Epifcopo Helgetrev. Quatuor 
taini tenuer. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 5 hid. dimid. 
virg. terrx minus. Terra eft 6 car. In dominio eft 
una car. &dim. & 4 villani & 3 bord. & 3 cotar. cum 
2 car. Ibi 27 ac. prati & 33 ac. pafturx. Valuit & 
val. 60 folid. 

Radulfus ten. de Epifcopo Litei.toke. Aluuold 
tenuit T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft ; 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. cum 1 fervo Sc 4 villani 
& 6 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 50 den. & 3a 
ac. prati & 66 ac. pafturx. In Bada 1 burgenfis 
redd. 15 denar. Valuit Sc val. 60 fol. 

Idem Rad. ten. de Epifcopo Omtohb. Lefmer 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 3 car. 
In dominio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi Sc 5 villani Sc 4 bord. 
Sc 2 cotar. cum 3 car. Ibi 5 ac. prati. Silva dimid. 
leu. long. & 4 quarent, lat. Valuit Sc val. 60 folid. 

Lcoainu 



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Leuuinus ten. de Epifcopo Megele. Almar tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro I hida. Terra elt 2 car. 
quae ibi funt cum 2 villanis & 3 bord. & 1 fervo & 
6 ac. prati. Valuit 4 folic!. Modo 20 folid. 

Radtilf. ten. de Epifcopo Weregrave. Tres 
taini tenner. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 2 hid. Terra 
eft 1 car. ouae ibi eft in dominio & 2 fervi St untis 
villahus & 5 bord. & 2 cotar. cum dim. car. Ibi 
molin. redd. 3 folid. & 3 ac. prati & 5 ac. filva;. 
Valuit 20 folid. Modo 30 folid. 

Azelin ten. de Epifcopo Stanwelle. Turmund 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 4 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 2 fervi 3c 5 villani & 
7 bord. & 2 cotar. cum 2 car. Ibi 16 ac. prati Sc ; 
ac. paftura; & 6 ac. filva; minuta;. Valuit 40 folid. 
Modo 60 folid. 

Cerra Cpifcopi dBellenfis. 

Enscopus Wellensis ten. Welle. Ipfe tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 50 hid. Terra eft 60 car. 
De ea funt in dominio 8 hida; & ibi 6 car. & 6 fervi 
& 20 villani & 14 bord. cum 15 car. Ibi 4 molini 
redd. 30 folid. & 300 ac. prati. Paftura 3 leu. long. 
& una leu. fat. Silva 2 leu. long. & 2 quarent. lat. 
. & 3 leu. moras. Valet 30 lib. ad opus Epifcopi. 
De hac terra ejufdem M. ten.canonici 14 hid. Ibi 
habent in dominio 6 car. & 8 fervi & 16 villani & 12 
bord. cum 8 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 50 den. Valet 
12 lib. 

Deead. terra ejufdem M. ten. de Epifc. Faftradus 
6 hid. Ricardus 5 hid. Erneis 5 hid. Ibi funt in do- 
minio 6 car. Sc 10 fervi & 17 villani & 16 bord. cum 11 
car. & 2 molini redd. 10 folid. Int. omnes valet 1 3 lib. 
De ipfa terra ipfius M. ten. de Epifcopo Faftradus 
2 hid. Radulfus 2 hid. Ha» 4 hida: funt de dominio 
Epifcopi. Ibi in dominio 2 car. & 3 fervi & 5 vil- 
lani & 5 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi molin. redd. 7 folid. 
& 6 denar. Totum valet 70 folid. 

De eifd. 50 hid. ten. uxor ManafTe z hid. fed non 
de Epifcopo. Val. 20 fol. 

Prat, has 50 hid. habet Epifcopus 2 hid. quas 
nunquam geldaver. T. R. E. Aluuardus & Edric 
ten. de Epifcopo. Valent 30 folid. 

Idem Epifcopus ten. Cvmbe. Azor tenuit T.R. E. 
& geldabat pro 20 hid. Terra eft 16 car. De ea 
funt in dominio 8 hidse & ibi 3 car. & 12 fervi & 15 
villani & 13 bord. cum 12 car. Ibi I2ac. prati & 
dimid. leu. paftura; int. long. & lat. & una leu. filvas 
int. long. & lat. Valuit 10 lib. Modo 18 lib. 

Idem Epifcopus ten. Chingesberie. Ipfe tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 20 hid. Terra eft 24 car. 
De ea funt in dominio 6 hidae & ibi 2 car. & 4 fervi 
& 16 villani Sc 4 bord. cum 11 car. Ibi 2 molini 
redd. 30 folid. & 100 ac. prati. Paftura una leu. 
long. & 3 quarent. lat. 

De ead. terra hujus M. ten. tres milites & unus 
clericus 8 hid. Valet ad opus Epifcopi 12 lib. Ad 
cpus militum 8 lib. 

Idem Epifcopus ten. Cerdre. Ipfe tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 8 hid. Terra eft 20 car. De ea funt in 
dominio 2 hida; & ibi" z car. & 1 1 lervi & zo villani cum 
14 car. Ibi molin. redd. 30 denar. Sc 20 ac. prati. 
Silva 2 Isu. long. & 4 quarent. iat. & lantund. 



paftura;. De ead. terra ten. unus tainus z hid. qui 
i.oii poteft feparari ab ascclefia. Tot. valet 16 lib. 

Idem Epifcopus ten. Litelande. Ipfe tenuit 
T, R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft H car. De 
ea eft 1 hida in dominio & ibi 2 car. & 2 fervi Si 3 
villani & 6 bord. cum 2 car, Ibi 12 ac. prati & 100 
ac. pallui«e& zoac. filvx. Valuit Sc val. 40 fol. 

Idem Epifcopus ten. Wivelescome. Ipfe tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 15 hid. Terra eit 56 car. 
De ea funt in dominio 3 hidae Si ibi 4 car. & H fervi 
& 16 villani & 3 bord. cum 7 car. Ibi molin. redd. 
50 den. & 34 ac. prati Sc 200 ac. paliiuae Sc bo 
ac. filva:. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. 3 milites de Epifcopo 
9 hid. & ibi habent 16 car. Ha:c terra eft de dominio 
Epifcopatus nee poteft ab Epifcopo feparari. Valet 
Epifcopo 10 lib. Miiitibus 15 lib. 

Idem Epifcopus ten. Walintone. Ipfe tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 14 hid. Terra eft 30 car. 
De ea funt in dominio 3 hida; & ibi 4 car. ,v 3 1 
fervi & 53 villani & 6 bord. cum 25 car. Ibi 2 
molini redd. ic fol. Sc 105 ac. prati. Paftura una 
leu. long. & dim. leu. lat. Silva 3 quarent. long. 
& tantund. lat. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. Johannes de Epifcopo 
z hid. de terra villanorum. Totum valet 25 lib. 

Huic M. addita eft 1 hida quam tenuit pro M. 
Alueua T. R. E. Terra eft 3 car. qua: ibi funt cum 
8 villanis & 4 bord. & 1 fervo. ibi 5 ac. prati. 
Silva 3 quarent. long. & tantund. lat. Valet 30 fol.- 
Idem Epifcopus ten. Lidegar. Ipfe tenuit T.R. E. 
& geldabac pro 10 hid. una virg. minus. Terra eft 
16 car. De ea funt in dominio 3 hidae Sc ibi z car. 
Sc 5 fervi & zo villani & 12 bord. cum 6 car. Ibi 
molin. redd. 31 denar. & 30 ac. prati. Paftura I 
leu. long. Sc 3 quarent. lat. & tantund. filvae. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. z milit. 3 hid. de terra 
villanorum & ibi habent 3 car. Tot. valet 13 lib. 

Idem Epifcopus ten. Banvvelle. [Com] Heraldus 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 30 hid. Terra eft; 
40 car. De ea funt in dominio 6 hidae & ibi 3 car. 
& 5 fervi & 24 villani & 12 bord. cum 18 car. Ibi 
100 ac. prati. Paftura 1 leu. long. & lat. Silva z 
leu. & dim. in long. Sc lat. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. de Epifcopo Serlo 3 
hid. Radulfus 5 hid. & dim. Rohard 5 hid. & 
dim. Faftradus 1 hid. Bono 1 hid. Eluui 1 hid. 
Ibi funt in dominio 9 car. & 5 fervi & 25 villani & 
15 bord. habentes 13 car. & dim. Ibi 2 molini 
Rohardi redd. 10 folid. Ordulfus 1 molin. Redd. 
40 den. Tot. M. valet 15 lib. ad opus Epifcopi. 
Ad opus hominum 15 lib. fimiliter. 

Idem Epifcopus ten. Evrecriz. Ipfe tenuit T. 
R. E. Sc geldabat pro 20 hid. Terra eft zo car. 
De ea funt in dominio 3 hidae & ibi 3 car. & 6 fervi 

6 3 villani & 10 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 

7 folid. Sc 6 den. & 60 ac. prati & 200 ac. paftura:. 
Silva 1 leu. long. & una quarent. lat. Valet 10 lib. 

De ead. terra ejufdem M. ten. de Epifcopo 
Erneis 7 hid. Macharius hid. &dim. Ildebertus I 
hid. In dominio funt 4 car. k 4 fervi & 5 villani & 
4 bord. cum 2 car. Int. omnes val. 1 10 folid. De 
ead. terra ten. Prefbiter & z alii Angli 5 hid. & 
imam virg. ten x. Valet 4 lib. 

Idem 



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Idem BpifeODUJ ten. Westberie. Ipfe tcnuit T. 
R. K. & geldabat pro 6 hid. Terra eft 8 car. De 
ea funt in dominio 3 hid* & ibi 2 car. Sc 2 fervi Sc 

6 villani & 10 bard, cum 5 car. Ibi 30 ac. prati & 
Aha 1 leu. long. k 2 quarent. lat. Valet 8 lib. 

Ofmundus ten. de Epifcopo Winksham. Elfi te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 10 hid. Terra tit 10 
car. De « funt in dominio 4 bids Si ibi 3 car. & 12 
fervi & 50 villani cum 9 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 20 
folid. & 6 ac. prati. Silva dim. leu. long. & una 
quarent. St dimid. lat. Valuit6 lib. Modo 10 lib. 

Ipfe Epifcopus ten. Chivve. Ipfe tenuit T. R. E. 
Sc geldabat pro 30 hid. Terra eft 50 car. De ea 
funt in dominio 4hidx &ibi 6 car. & 14 fervi. & 30 
villani & 9 bord. cum 24 car. Ibi 3 molini redd. 20 
fol. Sc 100 ac. prati &c 50 ac. pafturx. Silva -a leu. 
Jong. Sc dim. leu. lat. Valet Epifcopo 30 lib. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. de Epifcopo Ricardus 

5 hid. Rohardus 6 hid. Stefanus 5 hid. Aluricus 

7 virg. Vluricus 2 hid. In dominio funt ibi 7 car. 

6 8 fervi Sc 1 8 villani & 27 bord. cum 10 car. Ibi 2 
molini redd. 10 fol. Int. omnes valet 13 lib. 

Idem Epifcopus ten. Jatvne. Johannes Danus 
tenuit T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro 20 hid. Terra eft 
22 car. De ea funt in dominio 6 hidae & ibi 2 car. 
& 3 fervi & 10 villani & 1 4 bord. cum 6 car. Ibi 32 
ac. prati. Silva 1 leu. long. k 2 quarent. lat. Morse 
una leu. in long. & lat. Valet Epifcopo 6 lib. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. de Epifcopo Faftradus 

5 hid. Ildebertus 4 hid. In dominio funt ibi 3 car. 

6 4 fervi Sc 18 villani 8s 23 bord. cum n car. 
Int. eos valet 9 lib. Una paftura Waimora ditta 
ibi eft quae T. R. E. pertineb. ad Concresbie M. 
regis. ^Ecclefiam hujus M. cum 1 hida ten. Benthel- 
mus de Epifcopo. Val. 20 fol. 

Idem Epifcopus ten. Wedmore. Ipfe tenuit T. 
R. E. & geldabat pro 10 hid. Sunt tamen ibi 11 
hidae. Terra eft 36 car. De ea funt in dominio 5 
hida: una virg. min. & ibi 4 car. & 4 fervi & 1 3 vil- 
lani & 14 bord. cum 9 car. Sc i8cotar. Ibi 70 ac. 
prati Sc 2 pifcariac redd. 10 fol. Sc 50 ac. filvas Sc 
una leu. pdlura: int. long. k lat. Valuit 20 lib. 
Modo 17 lib. 

Canonici S. Andrex ten. de Epifcopo Wandes- 
trev. Ipfi teneb. T. R. E. k geldabant pro 4 hid. 
Terra ell 4 car. De ea funt in dominio 2 hidae & 
ibi 2 car. Sc 4 fervi & 5 villani & 2 bord. cum 3 car. 
Ibi 12 ac. prati. Silva 3 quarent. long. & 2 quarent. 
lat. Valet 3 lib. 

Ipfi ten. Litvne. Ipfi teneb. T. R. E. & gelda- 
bant pro 8 hid. & dim. Terra eft 7 car. De ea funt 
in dominio 6 hidae & dimid. & ibi 2 car. & 6 fervi 
& 8 villani & 7 bord. cum 4 car. Ibi 3 molini redd. 
10 folid. & 60 ac. prati Sc mille ac. paftura; & 3 qua- 
rent. filvac in long. Sc lat. Valet 100 folid. 

Rex ten. M. Milvertvne. Gifo [Epifcopus] 
tcnuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terrae. 
Rogerius Arundel ten. 1111. M. Aissa, & jaceb. T. 
R. E. in Leoiart M. Epifcopi. Gifo Epifcopus te- 
neb. Sc geldabat pro 3 hid. & una virg. Rogerius 
ten. de Rege injuilc. Valet 3 lib. 



STetra <£cclcftac tie TSatic. 



Ecci.hsia S. Petri de Bada habet in burgo ipfo 

2 \. burgenfes redd. 20 folid. Ibi molin. redd. :-> 
fol. Sc 12 ac. prati. Tot. v..l. p fol. 

Ipfa /lkclcfia ton. Pri ictoni. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro 6 hid. Term ell 8 car. De ca funt in dominio 
2 hidae & ibi 1 car. St 3 fervi | k 8 bord. 

cum fi car. Ibi molin. redd. 7 fol. Sc 6 den. 4: 20 
ac. prati Sc 80 ac. paftura-. Valuit Sc val. 6 lib. 

Ipfa iEcclefia ten. Stantone. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro 3 hid. Terra eft 3 car. De ca eft in dominio 
dimid. hida & ibi 1 car. & 3 fervi Sc 4 villani Sc 3 
bord. cum 2 car. Ibi 12 ac. prati Sc 30 ac. pafturx 
Sc 30 ac. filvae minuta?. Valuit Sc val. 3 lib. 

Walterius ten. de TEcclefia Wimedone. Vnus Mi- 
nus tenuit dexcclefiu T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. 
Terra eft 4 car. In dominio funt 2 car. Sc 2 fervi Sc 
7 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi molin. redd. 5 folid. Sc 10 ac. 
prati & 10 ac. paftura:. Valuit Sc val. 60 folid. 

Ipfa ^Ecclefia ten. Westone. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro 15 hid. Terra eft 10 car. De ca funt in do- 
minio 8 hida; & dimid. Sc ibi 2 car. Sc 7 fervi Sc 7 
villani & 10 bord. cum 6 car. Ibi molin. redd. 10 
folid. Sc 20 ac. prati. Silva: minutae una leu. int. 
long. & lat. Valuit 8 lib. Modo lolib. 

Ipfa iEcclefia ten. Forde. T. R. E. geldabat pro 
10 hid. Terra eft 9 car. De ea funt in dominio 5 
hidae & ibi 2 car. & 6 fervi & 5 villani Sc 7 bord. cum 

6 car. Ibi molin. redd. 10 folid. Sc 12 ac. prati Sc 
una leu. filvx minuta: int. long. & lat. Valuit Sc 
val. 10 lib. 

Ipfa ./Ecclefia ten . Cvme. T. R. E. geldabat pro 
9 hid. Terra eft 8 car. De ea funt in dominio 6 
hidae & ibi 3 car. & 6 fervi Sc 6 villani & 8 bord. cum 

5 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 13 fol. & 6 den. & 32 ac. 
prati & una leu. filva: minutae in long. Sc lat. Valuit 

7 lib. Modo 8 lib. 

Willelmus ten. de jEcdefia Cerlecvme. Unus 
tainus tenuit T. R. E. de aecclefia & geldabat pro 4 
hid. Terra eft 4 car. In dominio funt 2 car. Sc 3 
fervi Sc 5 villani & 4 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi 5 ac. 
prati & loac. filvx minutae. Valuit 50 folid. Modo 

6 lib. 

Ipfa .<EccIefia ten. Lincvme. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro 10 hid. Terra eft 8 car. De ea funt in dominio 

7 hida; & ibi 3 car. & 8 fervi k 4 villani & 10 bord. 
cum 3 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 10 folid. Sc 30 ac. 
prati & 200 ac. pafturae. Valuit 6 lib. Modo 8 lib. 

Walterius ten. deipfa ^EcclefiaEsTONE. Vluuardus 
abb. tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro una hida & dim. 
Terra eft 2 car. In dominio eft 1 car. cum I villano 
& 8 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 6 folid. & 8 
denar. Ibi 2 ac. prati. Valuit 30 fol. Modo 40 folid. 

Hugo [3 hid. J & Colgrim [2 hid.] ten. de ipfa 
jEcclefia Hantone. Duo taini tenuer. T. R. E. nee 
poterant ab aecclefia feparari Sc geldabant pro 5 hid. 
Terra eft 6 car. In dominio funt 3 car. Sc 3 fervi & 

3 villani & 6 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 28 ac. prati Sc 6 
quarent. pafturae int. long. & lat. & 10 quarent. 
filvx minutx in long, k latit. Valet 1 10 folid. 

Rannulfus [Flambard] ten. de ipfa -flLccIefi* 
Vniiewiche. Unus monachus de col. monafterio 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. & dim. Terra 

eft 



12 



%ummctfete* 



fDottteft>ag='Boo&. 



eft 3 car. Ibi funt 5 bord. & dimid. molin. redd. 
5 folid. & 12 ac prati & 30 ac. pafturae. Valuit & 
val. 20 folid. 

Ipfa Xcclefia ten. Corstvne. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro 10 hid. Terra eft 9 car. De ea funt in clomi- 
nio 5 hid. & ibi 2 car. & 4 fervi & 5 villani & 8 
bord. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 30 den. & 6 ac. 
prati. Valet 8 lib. 

Ipfa ^Ecclefia ten. Evestie. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro una hida. Terra eft 1 car. quae ibi eft in domi- 
nio & 3 fervi & 4 ac. prati. Valet 20 folid. 

Ipfa ^Ecclefia ten. Escewiche. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro dimid. hida. Terra eft dimid. car. Ibi eft unus 
fervus & 2 villani redd. 42 den. & 12 ac. prati & 3 
ac. filvae minutae. Valet & valuit 42 denar. Tota 
haec terra jacuit in ipfa xcclefia T. R. E. necpoterat 
inde feparari. 

Cerra ^anftac sgariae (Siaffingbc- 
rfenfig. 

Eccxesia Glastincberiensis habet in ipfa villa 12 
hid. quae nunq. geldaver. Terra eft 30 car. De 
ea funt in dominio 10 hidae dimid. virg. minus & ibi 5 
car. & 17 fervi & 21 villani & 23 bord. cum 5 car. 
Ibi 8 fabri & 3 arpenz vinex & 60 ac. prati & 200 
ac. pafturx & 20 ac. filvae & 300 ac. filvx minutx. 
Valet 20 lib. 

Huic M. adjacet infula quae vocatur Mere. Ibi 
funt 60 ac. terras. Terra 1 car. quae ibi eft & 10 
pifcatores & 3 pifcarix redd. 20 den. & 6 ac. prati & 
6 ac. filvx & 2 arpenz vineae. Valet 20 folid. 

Alia, infula pertitv. ibi quae vocatur Padeneberie. 
Ibi funt 6 ac. terras & 3 arpenz vineae & unus bord. 
Valet 4 folid. 

Tercia infula adjacet ibi & vocatur Ederesige 
in qua funt 2 hidae quae nunq. geldaver. Ibi eft 
1 car. cum 1 bord. & 2 ac. prati & una ac. filvse 
minutx. Valet 1 5 folid. Goduinus ten. de abbate. 

Ipfa ^Ecclefia ten. Winescome. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro 1 5 hid. Terra eft 30 car. De ea funt in domi- 
nio c hidae una virg. minus & ibi 2 car. & 3 fervi & 
z8 villani & 6 bord. cum 9 car. Ibi molin. redd. 5 
folid. & 60 ac. prati & una leu. pafturae in long. & 
lat. Silva 2 leu. long. & una leu. lat. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. de abbate Rogerius 2 
hid. & dim. Radulfus j hid. & unam virg. Pipe 
dim. hid. Ibi funt 5 car. Hoc M. valet abbati 8 
lib. Hominibus ejus 55 folid. 

De terra hujus M. ten. Epifcopus Conftantiens. 
de Rege 1 hid. & val. 20 folid. Bri&riclibere tenuit 
T. R. E. fed non poterat ab xcclefia feparari. 

Ipfa vEcclefia ten. Midiltone. T. R. E. gelda- 
bat pro 6 hid. Terra eft 6 car. De ea funt in do- 
minio 4 hidae & 7 ac. & ibi 2 car. & 8 villani & 6 
bord. cum 4 car. Ibi 50 ac. prati & 100 ac pafturae. 
Valuit & val. 6 lib. 

Rogerius ten. de Xcclefia Lideford. Aluuardus 
tenuit T. R. E. nee poterat ab xcclefia feparari Sc 
geldabat pro 4 hid. Terra eft 5 car. De ea funt 
in dominio 3 hidae & dimid. virg. terra: & ibi 2 car. 
& 6 fervi & 6 villani & 3 bord. cum 1 car. & dim. 
Ibi molin. redd. 10 fol. & 40 ac prati. Valuit & 
val. 4 lib. 



Ipfa Xcclefia ten. Sapeswich. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro 30 hid. Terra eft 40 car. Prxt. hanc habet 
abb. terram 20 car. quae nunq. geld. Ibi funt 
1 2 car. [villanorum] & alibi 4 car. in dominio & 6 
fervi & 5 coliberti & 15 villani & 16 bord. Ibi 60 
ac. prati & 60 ac. pafturae & 57 ac. filvx minutae. 
De his 30 hid. ten. Rogerius de Abbate 5 hid. in 
Sutone & 5 hid. in Eduuinetone & 5 hid. in Ceptcne 
& 5 hid. in Caldecote. Has teneb. 14 taini T. R. E. 
& non poterant ab xcclefia feparari. Ibi funt in do- 
minio 9 car. . & 11 fervi & 19 villani & 23 bord. 
cum 8 car. & dimid. Ibi roo ac. prati una minus 
& 31 ac. filvae minutae. De eifd. 30 hid. ten. 
Aluredus 5 hid. in Hvnlauintone & ibi habet 2 car. 
Ibi 5 fervi & 12 villani & 8 bord. cum 6 car. De 
ead. terra ten. Warmund dimid. hid. de Abbate & 
ibi habet 1 car. & 4 bord. Val. 10 fol. Hoc M. 
valet Abbati 12 lib. Rogerio 19 lib. Aluredo 7 lib. 

Ipfa ^Ecclefia ten. Sowi. T. R. E. geldabat pro 
1-2 hid. Terra eft 20 car. De ea funt in dominio 

5 hidae & ibi 2 car. & 2 fervi & 1 2 coliberti & 27 
villani & 13 bord. cum 14 car. Ibi 30 ac. prati & 
12 ac. filvae minutae. Valuit 10 lib. Modo 24 lib. 

Walterius ten. de Abbate Cosintone. Aluuin 
[Pic] tenuit de Abbate T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 
hid. Terra eft 6 car. De ea eft in dominio 1 hida 

6 ibi 1 car. & 4 fervi & 9 villani & 9 bord. cum 5 
car. Ibi 10 ac. prati & 2 ac. filvae minutae. Valuit 

6 val. 6 lib. 

Rogerius ten. de Abbate Dereberge. Ofuuald te- 
nuit de abbate T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra 
eft 3 car. Ibi funt 3 villani & 3 bord. cum 2 car. & 
in dominio dimid. car. & 1 1 ac. prati & 20 ac. paf- 
turae & 10 ac. filvae. Val. 30 folid. Cum recep. 
40 folid. valeb. 

Ailuuacre ten. de Abbate Blacheford. Alnod 
tenuit de Abbate T. R. E. & geldabat pro 4 hid. 
Terra eft 6 car. In dominio funt 3 car. & 5 fervi & 

7 villani & 10 jord. cum 4 car. Ibi 115 ac prati 
& 43 ac. pafturae & 47 ac. filvae. Valet 100 fol. 
Quando recep. 4 lib. 

Godefcal ten. de Abbate Stawelle. Aluuard te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. & dimid. Terra 
eft 2 car. & dim. In dominio eft 1 car. & 3 fervi & 
3 bord. cum 1 car. & 20 ac. prati. Valet 40 fol. 
Quando recep. 5 folid. 

Ipfa ^Ecclefia ten. Waltone. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro 30 hid. Terra eft 40 car. Deea funt in domi- 
nio 10 hidae & ibi 4 car. & 4 fervi & 17 villani U. 
12 bord. cum 18 car. Ibi 50 ac. prati. Paftura 7 
quarent. long. & una quarent. lat. Silva 7 quarent. 
long. & 3 quarent. lat. Valet Abbati 15 lib. 

De his 30 hid. ten. de Abbate Rogerius 5 hid. in 
Contone. Walterius 3 hid. in Aissecote & 3 hid. 
in Pedewelle. Qui teneb. T. R. E. non poterant 
ab aecclefia feparari. In dominio funt ibi 3 car. & 6 
fervi & 15 villani & 12 bord. cum 8 car. Rogerius 
habet 20 acras prati & 6 quarent. filvae in long. & 
una quarent. lat. Walterius 12 ac. prati & 40 ac. 
filvae minutae. Int. eos valet 8 lib. 

Rogerius ten. de Abbate Bodeslege, Winegod 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 virg. tenae. Terra 
I eft 1 car. & dim. quae ibi funt cum 7 bord. Ibi 6 ac. 
I prati & 2 ac. filvae. Valet 10 folid. 

Idem 



3?omefnap=TBooL] 



^ummcrfctc. 



»? 



Idem Ro. ten. de Abbate Dondeme. Algar tenuit 
T. R. K. & geldabat pro c hid. Terra eft 4 car. 
De ea funt in dominio 3 hidx & dim. virg. terra; & 
ibi z car. Sc 4 fervi & 5 villani & 10 bord. cum 3 car. 
Jbi 40 ac. prati & 10 ac. filvx. Valet 100, folid. 

Mem Ro. ten. de Abbate Aissecote & pertin. ad 
Waltone M. Abbatis. T. R. E. geldabat pro 2 
hid. Terra eft 3 car. Ibi funt 2 villani & 3 bord. 
& 2 fervi cum I car. & 4ac. prati. Valuit & val. 
40 folid. 

Girardus ten. de Abbate Graintone. Vlmerte- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Sc dim. Terra 
eft 2 car. & dimid. In dominio eft 1 car. & 5 fervi 
& 2 bord. & 2 colibcrti cum 1 car. Ibi 20 ac. prati 
& 3 ac. filvx. Valet Sc valuit 50 folid. 

Ipfa ^Ecclefia ten. Lega. T. R. E. geldabat pro 
4 hid. Terra eft 10 car. De ea funt in dominio 2 
hidx. Una ex his fuit teinland non tamen potcratab 
iccclefia feparari. In dominio funt 4 car. cum 1 fervo 
Sc 7 villani & 10 bord. cum ; car. Ibi 35 ac. prati 

6 30 ac. pafturae & 6 ac. filvx. Valet 8 lib. 

Ipfa ^Ecclefia ten. Hame. T. R. E. geldabat pro 
17 hid. Terra eft 20 car. De ea funt in dominio 5 
hidx & 2 virg. & dim. & ibi 3 car. & 5 fervi & 22 
villani & 21 bord. cum 8 car. Ibi 30 ac. prati & 16 
ac. filvx. Valet 10 lib. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. de Abbate Robertus 1 
hid. & unam virg. & Serlo 5 hid. Girardus 3 virg. 
terrx. Leuric & Aluuold Sc Almar tenuer. T. R. E. 
r.ec poterant ab xcclefia feparari. In dominio funt 
2 car. & 4 fervi Sc 2 villani & 14 bord. cum 2 car. 
Ibi 30 ac. prati & 20 ac. pafturae. Valet inter tot. 
110 folid. 

Ipfa jEcclefia ten. Bodvchelei. T. R. E. gelda- 
bat pro 20 hid. Terra eft 20 car. De ea funt in 
dominio 5 hidx & ibi 5 car. & 7 fervi & 1 1 villani & 

7 bord. cum 6 car. Ibi 50 ac. prati Sc 100 ac. filvx. 
Valet abbati 10 lib. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten.Turflinus 8 hid. Roge- 
jius 2 hid. Duo taini teneb. de aecclefia T. R. E. & 
con poterant inde feparari. In dominio funt ibi 4 
car. & 6 fervi & 1 1 villani & 6 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 
14 ac. prati Sc 12 ac. filvx minutx. Valuit & val. 7 
lib. int. eos. 

De eadem terra ten. Aleftan de Abbate dimid. hid. 
& ibi habet 1 car. Valet 10 fol. 

Hunfridus ten. de Rege 2 hid. in Lodreford Sc 
pertin. huic M. Aluric teneb. T. R. E. nee poterat 
ab xcclefia feparari. Terra eft 2 car. Valet 20 folid. 

Ipfa jEcclefia ten. Piltone. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro 20 hid. Terra eft 30 car. Prxter hanc habet 
abbas ibi terram 20 car. qux nunq. geldavit. In 
dominio funt 10 car. & 15 fervi Sc 21 villani & 
42 bord. cum locar. fupra terram non geldantur. Ibi 
2 molini redd. 10 folid. & 46 ac. prati it 40 ac. paf- 
turx. Silva 1 leu. long. & dim. leu. lat. De terra 
qux non geld. ten. Alnod. monach. 1 hid. liberalit. 
tie Abbate conceflu Regis. Haec tainland fuit nee 
poteft ab xcclefia feparari. Totum valet 24 lib. 
Valuit 16 lib. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. Rogerius in Sefetone 
6 hid. & dimid. Sc in Corutone 3 hid. Vluert & 
Elmer tenuer. T. R. E. & non poterant ab xcclefia 
feparari. In dominio funt 3 car. Sc 8 fervi & 1 3 vil- 
li 



lani Sc 19 bord. cum 6 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 6 
folid. & 3 denar. Sc 50 ac. prati & 42 ac. filvae mi- 
nutx. ■ Paftura 3 quarent. long, Sc una quarent. lat. 
Valet tot. 9 lib. 

De eadem terra ejufdem M. ten. de Abbate Adret 

5 hid. in Vtone Sc Serlo 5 hid. in Pille Sc Radulfus 

2 hid. in ipfa Piltone. Qui teneb. T. R. E. non 
poterant ab xcclefia feparari. In dominio funt ibi 4 
car. & dimid. Sc 8 fervi Sc 8 villani Sc 18 bord. cum 

3 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 4 fol. Sc 6 den. Sc 36 ac. 
prati & dimid. Sc 20 ac. paflurx & 4 ac. filvae. Tot. 
valet 7 lib. & 10 fol. int. eos. 

Ipfa jEcclefia ten. Pbnnarminstre. T. R. E. 
geldabat pro 10 hid. Ibi funt tamen 20 hidae. Terra 
eft 12 car. De ea funt in dominio 12 hidx & ibi 5 
car. & 4 fervi. & 17 villani & 9 bord. Sc 10 cotar. 
cum 6 car. Ibi 30 ac. prati Sc 40 ac. paflurx. Silva 

1 leu. & dimid. long. & 4 quarent. lat. Valet Ab- 
bati 12 lib. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. Serlo de Abbate ! hid. . 
Ailmarus tenuit T.R. E. Ibi funt 4 villani habentet 

2 car. Sc 8 ac. prati Sc 30 ac. filvx. Valuit Sc val. 
30 fol. 

Ipfa Xcclefia ten. Baltvnesberce. T. R. E. 
geldab. pro 5 hid. Terra eft 6 car. De ea funt in 
dominio 4 hidx & una virg. & ibi 2 car. & 4 fervi 

6 5 villani Sc 9 bord. & 3'cotar. cum 2 car. Ibi 
molin. redd. 5 folid. & 30 ac. prati. Silva una leu. 
& dim. long. & dimid. leu. lat. Valuit Sc val. 6 lib. 

Ipfa Xcclefia ten. Doltin. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro 20 hid. Terra eft 20 car. De ea funt fn domi- 
nio 12 hidx Sc ibi 2 car. & 5 fervi & io villani Sc 6 
bord. & 4 cotar. cum 6 car. Ibi 30 ac. prati Sc 60 
ac. pafturae & 60 ac. filvx minutx. Valet Abbati 
14 lib. 

De hac terra ten. Rogerius 3 hid. Sc unam virg. 
terrx in Ceri.etone & alibi 2 hid. & 3 virg. M 
In dominio eft una car. cum 1 fervo & 8 villani & 6 
bord. cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 9 denar. & 23 
ac. prati & 10 ac. pallurx Sc 30 ac. filvx minutae. 
Valet 100 folid. 

Ipfa ^Ecclefia ten. Batecvmbe. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro 20 hid. Terra eft 16 car. De ea funt in domi- 
nio 9 hidx & 3 virg. terrx & ibi 2 car. & 6 fervi & 4 
villani & 14 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 5 
folid. Sc 20 ac. prati & 6 ac. pafturx & 40 ac. filvae. 
Valet Abbati 7 lib. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. Rogerius 2 hid. Vluui 
tenuit T. R. E. Sc non poterat ab xcclefia feparari. 
Ibi habet I car. cum 1 fervo & 3 bord. Ibi 12 ac. 
prati & 10 ac. pafturx. Valet 20 folid. 

De ipfa terra ejufdem M. ten. Azelinus in Wf.jt- 
cvmbe 7 hid. & 3 virg. terrx. Alfhilla tenuit 
T. R. E. & non poterat ab xcclefia feparari. In do- 
minio funt 2 car. & 6 villani & 7 bord. & 6 cotar. 
cum 1 fervo habcut. 2 car. Sc dimid. Ibi 2 molini 
redd. 5 folid. & 12 ac. prati & 12 ac. pafturx & 16 
ac. filvx. Va!et 4 lib. Sc 10 folid. Dux hidx do 
hac terra futrunt de terra villanorum Sc alix virg. 
erant tainland. 

Ipfa yEcckfia ten. Mvllb. T. R. E. geldabat 
pr(J2ohid. Terra eft 20 car. De ea funt in domi- 
nio 10 hidx & ibi 2 car. & a fervi & 8 villaoi & 7 
bord. & ; cotar. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd, c 

folid. 



*4 



©ummctfcte* 



[Domef6a5^oo&, 



folid. & 15 ac. prati & 12 ac. pafturx. Silva 1 leu. 
long. & 2 quarent. lat. Valet abbati 10 lib. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. Godeue de Abbate 1 
hid. Virejus tcnuit T. R. E. nee poterat ab .&ccle- 
fia feparari. Valet 78 den. 

Epifcopus Conftantienfis ten. de Rege 5 hid. & 
dim. pertinent, huic M. Duo taini teneb. T.R.E. 
fed non poterant ab aecclefia feparari. Azelinus ten. 
de Epifcopo. 

Waltcnus ten. de Abbate in Watelei 4 hid. 
Vlgar [Monac] tenuit T. R. E. & non poterat ab 
/Eccleiia feparari. Terra eft 4 car. De ea funt in 
dominio 2 hidae Sc dimid. & ibi 2 car. & 4 fervi & 8 vil- 
lani & 5 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 5 fol. & 6 
ac. prati & 50 ac. pafturae & 1 4 ac. filvas. Val. 70 fol. 
In eodem M. ten. Johannes de Abbate 1 hidamde 
terra villanorum. Terra eft 1 car. quae ibi eft cum 2 
villanis. Valet 15 folid. 

Ipfa .(Eccleiia ten. Weritone. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro 20 hid. Terra eft 32 car. De ea funt in domi- 
nio 1 1 hidae & ibi 6 car. & 7 fervi & 41 villani & 
12 bord. cum 20 car. Ibi 3 molini redd. 14 fol. & 
2 denar. & 44 ac. prati & 200 ac. pafturae. Silva 2 
leu. long. & tantund. lat. Valet Abbati 30 lib. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. Rogerius 1 hid. & 
dimid. de Abbate. Unus tainus tenuit T. R. E. & 
non poterat ab aecclefia feparari. Ibi funt 3 car. & 2 
villani & 6 bord. Valet 30 folid. 

De ipfa terra ten. Saulf I hid. & dim. Ipfe te- 
nuit T. R. E. Ibi habet 1 car. & dimid. & unus 
villanus cum 4 cotar. habent. 1 car. Valet 30 folid. 
Ipfa JEcclefia ten. Monechetone. T. R. E. gel- 
dabat pro 15 hid. Terra eft 20 car. De ea ten. 
Walchel Epifcopus de Abbate 5 hid. & unam virg. 
terras; in dominio & ibi 3 car. & 7 fervi & 20 villani 
& 7 bord. cum 7 car. Ibi 20 ac. prati Sc 100 ac. 
pafturae & 24 ac. filvae. Valet 7 lib. 

In ipfa villa ten. Rogerius de Abbate 4 hid. & 3 
virg. terrae & Serlo 2 hid. & dimid. Qui teneb. 
T. R. E. non poterant ab aecclefia feparari. Ibi funt 
4 car. in dominio & 3 fervi & 8 villani & 1 1 bord. 
cum 2 car. & dimid. & 193c. prati & 40 ac. pafturae. 
Valet inter eos 4 lib. & 10 folid. 

Ipfa JEccleRa. ten. Mercesberie. T. R. E. gel- 
dabat pro 10 hid. Terra eft 8 car. De ea funt in 
dominio 4 hid. & dim. & ibi 2 car. & 5 fervi & 6 
villani & 5 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 19 ac. prati & 40 
ac. filvae. Valet 10 lib. De hac terra ten. unus 
tainus 2 hid. & dimid. Valet 20 folid. Ofuualdus 
tenuit T. R. E. Sc non potuit ab aecclefia feparari. 

Ipfa ^Ecclefia ten. Dicesget. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro 30 hid. Terra eft 30 car. De ea funt in domi- 
nio 3 hid as & ibi 3 car. & dimid. & 2 fervi & 13 
villani & 18 bord. & 3 cofcez. cum 7 car. Ibi mo- 
lin. redd. 7 folid. & 5 den. & 40 ac. prati & paftura 
6 quarent. long. & 2 quarent. lat. Silva una leu. & 
dim. long. & 2 quarent. lat. Valet Abbati 1 2 lib. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. de Abbate Serlo 5 hid. 
& dim. in Horblawetone. Radulfus 6 hid. Sc dim. 
in Alentone. Nigellus 5 hid. & dimid. in Lamieta. 
Qui teneb. T. R. E. non poterant ab secclefia fepa- 
rari. In dominio funt 4 car. Sc 4 fervi & 29 vil- 
lani & 12 bord. Sc 3 cofcez. cum 15 car. Ibi 3 
molini redd. 13 fol. & 4 den. & 55 ac. prati & 20 



ac. paftura;. Silva 9 quarent. long. & una quarent «• 
& dimid. lat. Tot. val. inter eos 14 lib. & 10 
folid. Valuit 11 lib. 

De eifdem 30 hid. ten. de Rege Alfric & Eurardus 
1 hid. Hanc tenuit unus tainus T. R. E. nee po- 
tuit ab jEcclefia feparari. Valet 20 folid. 

De eifdem 30 hid. ten. Comes Morit. de Rege 7 
hid. Has tenebat unus tainus de Abbate T. R. E. 
nee poterat ab aecclefia feparari. Valet 100 fol. 

Ipfa jEcclefia ten. Camelertone. Edmer tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 10 hid. Terra eft 10 car. 
De ea funt in dominio 7 hidae & ibi 2 car. Sc 8 fervi 
& 6 villani & 6 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 
5 folid. & 80 ac. prati & 20 ac. pafturae & 40 ac. 
filvae. Valet 7 lib. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. Rogerius de Abbate 1 
hid. & ibi habet 1 car. cum 1 fervo & 1 bord. Ibi 
10 ac. prati & 6 ac. filvae. Val. 10 fol. Hoc M. 
ded. com. Moriton Abbati pro excambio Tvtenelle. 
■ Harding ten. de Abbate Crenemelle. Ipfe te- 
nuit fimilit. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 12 hid. Terra 
eft 10 car. De ea funt in dominio 6 hidae & ibi una 
car. & 6 fervi & 8 villani & 2 bord. & 7 cotar. cum 
3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 30 den. & 50 ac. prati &60 
ac. pafturae & 100 ac. filvae. Valet 4 lib. Haec terra 
non poteft feparari ab aecclefia. 

Ipfa .iEcclefia ten. Brentemerse. T.R.E. gel- 
dabat pro 20 hid. Terra eft 30 car. Deeafuntirt 
dominio 4 hidae & ibi 8 car. & 5 fervi & 50 villani 
& 47 bord. cum 16 car. & 20 ac. prati. Valet Ab- 
bati 50 lib. 

De his 20 hid. ten. de Abbate Rogerius 1 hid. 
Radulfus 5 virg. Alfric c virg. Goduinus 1 hid. & 
dim. Qui teneb. de Abbate T. R. E. non poterant 
ab aecclefia feparari. In dominio funt ibi 4 car. cum 
1 fervo & 3 villani & 5 bord. & 10 cotar. cum 3 car. 
Valet inter eos 4 lib. Sc 10 fol. 

Walcinus ten. de Abbate Lodenwrde. Unus tai- 
nus tenuit T. R. E. nee poterat ab aecclefia feparari 
& geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 5 car. In dominio 
funt 2 car. & 4 fervi & 4 villani & 5 bord. & 5 cotar. 
cum 4 car. Valet 40 fol. 

Erneis ten. de Abbate Dvnehefde. Vlgar Mo- 
nacus tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra 
eft 5 car. De ea funt in dominio 2 hidae & ibi 3 car. 
cum 5 villanis & 4 bord. Ibi 5 ac. prati. Paftura 5 
quarent. long. & 2 quarent. lat. Silva dimid. leu. 
long. & tantundem lat. Valuit & val. 40 folid. 

Siuuardus ten. 3 virg. terrae de JEcclefia Glafting- 
berie in M. quod vocatur Dinnitone. Valet 13 
folid. & 2 den. 

Mauricius Epifcopus ten. ^Ecclefiam [S. Andree] 
de Givelceftre cum 3 hid. terrae de Rege. Hanc te- 
neb. Briftric T. R. E. de^EcclefiaGlaftingberie, nee 
ab ea poterat feparari. 

Epifcopus Conftant. ten. de Rege Hutone, Ele- 
berie, Hetfecome & Stretone. Ha; terrae erant tain- 
land T. R. E. nee poterant ab iEcclefia feparari. 
Valent 100 folid. & amplius. ^Ecclefia fervitium 
inde non habet. 

Comes Moriton ten. de Rege haec M. Stane, Stoca 
& Stoca Dreicote. Hae terrae fuerunt tainlande in 
Glaftingberie T. R. E. nee poterant ab ea feparari. 
Valent 14 lib. 

Idem 



SDomefW^oofc.] 



©ummcrfctc. 



*5 



Idem com. ten. in M. Booechelie 2 quarent. filva: 
in long. & unam quarent. lat. quod f'uit in Glailing- 
berie T. R. K- 

Rogerius deCorcelle habet unum M. Liminctone 
pro quo ded. pat. ejus 5 hid. in cxcanibio quas tcneb. 
de ^Ecclefia Glailingberic, ncc inde poterant fcpa- 
De his xcclefa fervitium pcrdit. 



ran 



Ccrra Ccclcfiae De a^tcclenic. 

Ecclesia S. Petri de Micelenye habet 4 caru- 
catas terra: qua; nunq. geldaver. in his infulis 
Mtchelenie, Midelenie & Torleic. Ibi funt in domi- 
nio z car. & un.arpent vines. Ibi4fcrvi & 3 villani 
& 18 bord. cum z car. Ibi z pifcarias redd. 6 mill, 
anguillar. & 25 ac. prati Sc 12 ac. filva: & 100 ac. 
pafturx. Valuit Sc val. 3 lib. 

Jpfa JEcclefia ten. Cipestaple. Celric tenuit 
T. R. E. k geldabat pro z hid. & dim. Terra eft 6 
car. De ea eft in dominio dim. hida Sc ibi I car. & 
2 fervi & 16 villani & 2 bord. cum 5 car. Ibi dimid. 
ac. prati & too ac. pafturx. Silva dim. leu. long. 
& 2 quarent. lat. Valet 50 folid. 

Ipfa ^Ecclefia ten. Ileminstre. Liuuard [Abb.] 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 20 hid. Terra eft 
20 car. De ea funt in dominio 9 hida; Sc una virg. 
& dim. & ibi 3 car. & 10 fervi & 25 villani & 22 
bord. cum 20 car. Ibi 3 molini redd. 22 folid. & 6 
den. Sc 80 ac. prati. Silva 3 leu. long. Sc una leu. 
& dim. lat. Ibi mercatum redd. 20 folid. 

De hac terra ten. 2 taini 1 hid. & dimid. qui non 
poterant ab xcclefia feparari. Totum valet 20 lib. 
Quando Abb. obyt valeb. 26 lib. 

Ipfa yEcclefia ten. Ile. Godricus tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 car. De ea 
funt in dominio 3 hid.-e & ibi 2 car. & 6 fervi 
& 12 villani & 5 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 

15 folid. & 40 ac. prati & 7 ac. pafturx. Silva 3 
leu. long. Sc una leu. & dim. lat. Valuit Sc val. 
4 lib. 

Ipfa iEcclefia ten. Ile. Eduinus tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro una hida & dimid. Terra eft 1 
car. It dim. Ibi funt 3 bord. tenent. 15 acras. 
Alia eft in dominio & 10 ac. prati & 7 ac. pafturae. 
Silva 3 quarent. long. & una quarent. lat. Valet 

16 fol. 

Ipfa ^Ecclefia ten.DRAiTVNE. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro 20 hid. Terra eft 15 car. Deea funt in domi- 
nio 1 1 hida: & 2 virg. terra; & dim. Sc ibi 6 car. & 
10 fervi & 16 villani Sc 14 bord. cum 9 car. Ibi 50 
ac. prati Sc paftura 2 leu. long. Sc una leu. lat. Silva 

2 leu. long. & una leu. & dim. lat. De his 20 hid. 
ten. Celric & Vluuard 2 hid. Has teneb. Bri&uinus 
& Leuing de AbbatiaT. R.E. nee inde poterant fe- 
parari. Ibi funt 4 bord. Sc 3 ac. prati & 35 ac. 
paftura: Si 7 ac. filvx. Totum valet 10 lib. 

Ipfa jEcclefia ten. Camelle. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro 10 hid. Terra eft 16 car. De ea funt in domi- 
nio 4 hidx Sc dimid. Sc ibi 4 car. & 5 fervi Sc 7 vil- 
lani & 8 bord. cum 6 car. Ibi molin. redd. 10 folid. 
& 60 ac. prati & 60 ac. paftura:. De his 10 hid. 
ten. Dodeman de Abbate 1 hid. & ibi habet 1 car. & 

3 vill. cum 1 car. & 2 acris prati. Totum valet 
10 lib. & 10 folid. 



Ipfa -dEcdcfia ten. Cathancre. Wadel tenuit 
I T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro 1 hida & dimid. Terra eft 
I 1 car. & dim. Ibi eft unus villanu.cum 1 bord. te- 
nent. 15 acras. De hac terra ten. Ingulf. 1 hid. & ibi 
habet 1 car. cum 3 bord. Ibi 6 ac. prati & l; ac. 
filvat. Valet 20 folid. Pan Monachorum 7 fol. 
Godric & Eduin Sc Wadel non pcrtinuer. Abbatiaru 
T. R. E. 

Cerra aBcclcfiae DC 0DeUnrrt. 

Ecclesia S. Petri oe Adelingye ten. Atiltoke. 
T. R. E. geldabat pro 8 hid. Terra eft 12 car. In 
dominio funt 4 hida: Sc ibi 3 car. & 4 fervi & 10 vil- 
lani & 6 bord. cum 4 car. Ibi molin. redd. 7 fol. Sc 
6 den. & 40 ac. prati Sc 30 ac. paftura:. Silva »leu. 
long. Sc alia in lat. Valet 100 fol. De terra hujus 
M. ten. comes Moriton 2 hid. qux erant in ipfa 
xcclefia T. R. E. Terra eft 4 car. Sc val. 30 folid. 

Ipfa ^Ecclefla ten. Svtvne. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro 10 hid. Terra eft 16 car. De ea funt in dc- 
minio 4 hida: Sc ibi 2 car. & 4 fervi & 8 villani Sc 6 
bord. cum 6 car. Ibi 40 ac. prati Sc 1 00 ac. paftura:. 
ValetAbbati8 1ib. 

De ipfa terra ten. Rogerius [Brito] dimid. hid. oc 
habet 1 car. 

De eadem terra hujus M. ten. Rogerius <le Cor- 
celle 2 hid. invito Abbate. Duo taini tencbant de 
aecclefia T. R. E. nee inde poterant feparari. Terra 
eft 2 car. qua; ibi funt in dominio & 6 ac. prati. 
Valet 50 folid. Duo homines ten. de Rogerio. 

Ipfa ^Ecclefia ten. Seovenamentone. T. R. E. 
geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 2 car. quas ibi funt 
cum 7 vill. & 3 bord. & 2 fervis. Ibi 6 ac. prati. 
Valet 30 folid. 

Ipfa iEcclefia ten. Hame. T. R. E. geldabat pro 
una hida. Terra eft 4 car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 4 
fervi & 1 vill. Sc 7 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi 15 ac. prati 
& 3 ac. filvae minutx. Valet 30 folid. 

Ipfa ^Ecclefia ten. Lence. Ibi eft 1 hida fed non 
geld. T. R. E. In dominio funt ibi 2 car. Sc 6 fervi 
& 3 villani & 4 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi 12 ac. prati 
& 50 ac. filva:. Valet 40 folid. ' 

Comes Moriton ten. 2 hid. in Aisselle & Rogerius 
de Corcelle ten. 2 hid. deM. Svtone & Radulfus de 
Limcfi ten. 1 hid. de M. Bosintone. Ha: terra; 
jaceb. in Adelingi T. R. E. Sc non poterant inde 
feparari. 

Ccrra (Ecclefiae iRomanac. 

Ecclesia Romana beati Petri Apoftoli. ten. de 
RegePERiTONE. Eddid Regina teneb. T. R. E. Ibi 
funt 6 hida:, fed non geld, nift pro 5 hid. Terra 
eft 12 car. De ea funt in dominio 3 hida: & ibi 2 
car. & 4 fervi & 1 1 villani Sc 4 bord. cum 6 car. Ibi 
150 ac. prati Sc 150 ac. paftura;. Redd, per annum 
12 lib. 

Cerra <EatJom ^anfti ^tefant De 
CaDom. 

Ecclesia S. Stefani ten. de Rege xcclefiam 
Crvche. Ibi funt 10 hida:. Terra eft 1 3 car. De 
ea funt in dominio 2 hida; Sc ibi 1 car. cum 1 fervo & 

1 1 villani 



i6 



©ummctfetc. 



[Domenja^'TBoofe. 



1 1 villani & 2 colibcrti fc 17 bord. cum 6 car. Ibi 
jo ac. prati & dimid. leu. paftura: in long. & in lat. 
De his 10 hid. ten. unus miles de abbate 3 hid. &ibi 
habet 2 car. cuin 1 fervo. '& 6 villani & 2 bord. cum 
4 car. Habet molin. redd. 5 folid. & 10 acras prati & 
dim. leu. paftura in long. & in lat. Valet Abbati 7 
Lib. Militi 4 lib. 

Ccrra^an&ae a^aiiae ue^onte* 

Ecclesia S. Marias de Monteburg tenet dc Rege 
unum manerium dono Nigelli medici. Spines pref- 
biter teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra 
eft 3 car. De eafunt in dominio 2 hidae & dimid. & 
ibi 2 car. & 2 fervi & 5 villani & 1 2 bord. cum 2 car. 
Jbi molin. redd. 30 denar. & 20 ac. pafturae. Silva 
dimid. leu. long. & tantund. lat. Olim & modo 
val! 4 lib. 

Cerra ^anftt CBtuarBi* 

Ecclesia S. Edwardi ten. Cvmbe. T. R. E.gel- 
c'.'iat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 car. De ea funt in 
i .( niinio ?. hid* & dim. & ibi 2 car. & 4 villani & 7 
bord. cum 2 car. In Ivlelcburne 6 burgenfes redd. 
ro denar. Fratum 4 quarent. long. & z quarent. 
lat. Silva ^ quarent. long. & 2 quarent. lat. Paf- 
ftura 2 quarent. long. & una quarent. lat. Valuit_& 
val. 6 lib. 

iEuon e©attrtciti0 Cpifcopu* tenet. 

Emscopus Mauricius ten. de Rege ^Ecclefiam S. 
•Andrew. lirictric tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 
3 hid. Terra eft 3 car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 
3 fervi & unus villauus & 6 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi 
inojin. 'redd. 20 folid. & 30 ac. prati. Valuit & val. 
100 folid. 



jCtuoti Clevici Begis. 

Reinbaldus ten. vEcclefiam de Frome cum 8 car. 
tens. In dominio funt 2 car. & dim. & 4 fervi & 8 
villani &.12 bord. cum 6 car. Ibi molin. redd. 5 
folid. & 35 ac. prati. Silva 6 quarent. long. & 2 
quarent. lat. Valet 6 lib. 

Richerius ten. vEcclefiam de Warverdinestoch de 
Rege. T. R. E. geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 4 
-car. Ibi funt 5 villani & 4 bord. & 2 fervi cum 2 
car. Ibi 3 ac. prati & 20 ac. paftura; & 4 ac. filvas. 
Valet 3 lib. & 4 vaccas. 

Erchenger ten. de Rege in JEcclefia de. Cante- 
tone 2 virg. terras & dimid. Terra eft 2 car. In 
dominio eft dimid. car. cum 1 villano & 6 bord. Ibi 
7 ac. paftura; & 30 ac. prati & 4 ac. filvae minutae. 
Valet 30 fol. 

Stefanus Capellanus ten. VEcclefiam de Mii.ver- 
-Tone cum una virg. terrae & uno ferding. Terra eft 
1 car. Ibi 10 ac. filvas. Val. 40 fol. 

Aluiet prefbiter ten. de Rege 1 hidam in Svdpere- 
vone. Terra eft 1 car. quae ibi eft cum 1 bord. & 
*iuo fervo. Ibi 8 ac. prati. Valet 20 folid. 



In JEcclefia Carentone jacet 1 hida & dim. Ibi 
eft in dominio I car. & dimid. cum prefbitero & I 
villano & 8 bord. Ibi 40 ac pafturae & 15 ac. filvae. 
Valet 30 foiid. 

In vEcclefia de Peretvne jacent 3 virg. terras. 
Terra eft 1 car. quae ibi eft. Valet 20 folid. 

Has 2 ^Ecclefias tenuit Petrus Epifcopus. Modo 
funt in manu Regis. 

Liofus ten. Bera qui& tenuit de Rege E. & gelda- 
bat pro una virg. terrae. Terra eft I car. quae ibi eft 
cum 1 fervo & 2 bord. Ibi molin. redd. 6 den. & 
6 ac. prati. Valet 10 folid. 

Turftinus ten. Lege. Pater ejus tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 1 car. Ibi funt z 
bord. Valet 10 folid. 

Goduinus ten. dimid. hid. in M. quod vocatur 
Ragiol de Rege in elemofina. Valet 3 ibi. 

In iEcclefia de Cvri eft dimid. hida. Ibi habet 
prelbiter 1 car. Valet 12 fol. 

Eddida monialis ten. in elemofina de Rege 1 2 acras 
terras. Ibi habet 80 acras filvae & paftura;. Val. 5 
folid. 

Dux Nonnae ten. de Rege in elemofina 2 virg. 
terras & dimid. in Honecote. Terra eft 2 car. Ibi 
eft l car. & 5 ac. prati. Valet 5 folid. . 

In Chenemeresdone eft dimid. hida terrae. Val. 
10 fol. Petrus Epifcopus tenuit. Modo eft in 
manu Regis. 

Cecra Comitis ©ofiacfjij. 

Comes Evstachivs tenuit de Rege Neyventone. 
Leuuinus tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro una hida 
& una virg. terrae. Terra eft 4 car. De ea funt in 
dominio 2 virg. terrae & dim. & ibi 1 car. & 2 fervi 
& 7 villani & 6 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 
15 den. & 7 ac. prati & 33 ac. paftura: & 17 ac filvas. 
Valuit & val. 4 lib. Aluredus [Merleberg] ten. de 
comite. 

Idem Aluredus ten. de Co. Commiz. Leuuinus 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida & dim. Terra 
eft 6 car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi & 2 villani & 
1 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi 26 ac. prati & io ac. paf- 
turx & 2 ac. filvas. Valuit 50 fol. Modo 40 folid. 
Eurardus ten. de Co. Lecheswrde. Aluuardus 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terrae. 
Terra eft 2 car. In dominio eft dimid. car. & 4 fervi 
St 4 villani & 3 bord. cum 1 car. & dimid. Ibi 2 
molini redd. 2 plumbas ferri & 3 ac. prati & 20 ac. 
filvae. Valuit & val. 30 folid. 

Ipfe Comes ten. Lochestone. Vlueua tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 7 car._ 
De ea funt in dominio 4 hidae & ibi 2 car. & 2 fervi 
& 5 villani & 6 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 6 
den. & 50 ac. prati & 60 ac. pafturac & 6 ac. filvas 
minutae. Valuit & val. 100 folid. 

Aluredus ten. de Co. Celeworde. Thuri te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 3 
car. De ea funt in dominio 2 hidae & dim. & 3 vil- 
lani & 2 bord. cum 1 car. & in dominio alia. Ibi 5 
ac. prati. Silva 5 quarent. long. & una quarent. lat. 
Valet6o fol. 

Aluredus ten. de Co. Belcetone. Toui Iibere 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 4 hid. Terra eft 4 

car. 



jDomenra^TBoofc,] 



©unmieiTcte. 



»7 



car. In dominio eft I car. ft dim. cum I fcrvo ft 5 
villani & 2 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi rnoltnum redd. 15 
folid. & 22 ac. prati & 20 ac. pallurx. Silva 4 qua- 
rent, long. ft 2 quarent. lat. V..luit 3 lib. Modo 
4 lib. 

Comitifla [Bplonienfisl Ida ten. de Rege Chinwar- 
destvne. Vlucua tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 
hid. Terra eft 8 car. De ea funt in dominio 2 hicx 
& 3 virg. & ibi 2 car. & 6 fcrvi ft 8 villani & 8 
bord. cum 5 car. Ibi 25 ac. prati &. 22 ac. pallurx. 
Silva 3 quarent. long. & una ac. lat. Valuit' ft val. 
6 lib. 

Mathildis ten. de Co. Contitone. Wlnodus te- 
nuit T. R. E. ft geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 car. 
De ea funt in dominio 3 hidx & ibi 2 car. ft 4 fervi 
& 5 villani & 10 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 
64 den. & 5 ac. prati. Paftura 4 quarent. long. & 
2 quarent. lat. Valet 100 folid. 

Cerra fMonte Comitia. 

Comes Hvco ten. de Rege Tedintone & Willel- 
mus de eo. Ednod tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 
una hida. Terra eft 4 car. In dominio eft una car. 
& 4 fervi & 5 villani ft 8 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi 5 ac. 
prati & 100 ac. paftura: ft 40 ac. filvx. Valuit & 
val. 40 folid. 

Willelmus ten. de Co. Sanford. T. R. E. gelda- 
bat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 5 car. In dominio eft 1 
car. cum 1 fervo & 8 villani cum 1 car. Ibi 9 ac. 
prati ft 50 ac. filvae & molin. Valuit & val. 3 lib. 

Willelmus ten. de Co. Alre. Ednod tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 2 car. 
cum 1 fcrvo ft I bord. &" l villano ft 1 ac. prati ft 36 
ac. paftura; ft 6 ac. filvx. Valuit 20 fol. Modo 
1 s fol. 

jEcclesia S. Severi ten. de Co. Hengesterich. 
Ednod tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 4 hid. Terra 
eft 3 car. De ea funt in dominio 3 liuix ft dim. ft 
ibi 2 car. Sc 4 fervi ft 6 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi 30 ac. 
prati & 30 ac. paftura ft fdva 4 quarent. long. & 1 
quarent. lat. Valet 4 lib. & 10 lol. 

Cciva Comitis flgjoritonienfitf. 

Comes Moriton ten. de Rege Crvche ft Turfti- 
nus dc eo. Sireuuoldus tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat 
pro 6 liid. Terra eft 5 car. De ea funt in dominio 
4 hidx ft ibi 3 car. ft 2 fcrvi ft 6 villani & 5 bord. 
cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 12 folid. & una ac. 
& dimid. Silva 7 quarent. long. ft 2 quarent. 
lat. Valuit 4 lib. Modo 100 folid. 

Malgerus ten. de Co. Sevenehantvne. Aluuard 
tenuit T. R. E. ft geldabat pro 7 hid. Terra eft 7 
car. De ea funt in dominio 5 hida; ft dim. ft ibi 5 
car. ft 6 fervi & 8 villain ft 7 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 
molin. redd. 5 folid. & 40 ac. prati. Valuit S lib. 
Modo 100 folid. 

De hoc M. funt ablatas 10 ac. fijvae Sc 25 ac. morx 
& prati & funt in Sudpcrct M. Regis. 

Malgerus ten. de Co. Contvne. Godric tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 3 car. 
In dominio eft 1 car. & 6 villani cum 6 bord. habent. 
) car. Valet 60 folid. 



Anfgerus ten. Stantvni dc Com. Aluuard tenuit 
T. R. E. ft geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 8 cm 
dominio ell 1 tar. St dim. ft 6 fervi Sc IS villani St 4 
bord. cum 3' car. &c dim. Ibi matin, fine cenfu St 
260 ac. filva: & 50 ac. paftura; redd. 4 blomaj fcrri. 
Val. 60 fol. 

Ipfe Comes ten. Sceptone. Algar tenuit T. R. E. 
Sc geldabat pro 6 hid. Terra eft 4 car. Dc ea funt 
in dominio 4 hida: dim. virg. minus Sc ibi I car. Sc 
dim. & 3 fcrvi & 9 villani i 3 bord. Sc I 5 ac. prati. 
Valuit 100 folid. Modo 4 lib. 

Gerardus ten. de Co. Lopene. Aluuardus tenuit 
T.R.E. & geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra ell 1 car. 
Ibi eft 1 bord. cum 1 fcrvo & 10 ac. prati. Valet 
20 folid. 

Robertas ten. de Co. Crawecvmbe. ./Ecclefia S. 
Suuithuni Winton. tenuit T. R. E. Ibi funt 10 hida: 
fed non geld, nifi pro 4 hid. Terra ell 12 car. De 
ea eft in dominio 1 hida & ibi 3 car. & 6 fervi Sc 31 
vill. Sc 10 bord. cum 10 car. Ibi 11 ac. prati Sc 20 
ac. filva;. Paftura 1 leu. long, ft dimid. leu. lat. 
Valuit & val. 8 lib. 

Anfgerus ten. de Co. Isle. Vlnod tenuit T. R. E. 
Sc geldabat pro 6 hid. Terra eft 6 car. In dominio 
funt 2 car. ft 5 fervi & j villani ft 4 bord. cum 2 
car. Ibi molin. redd. 1 4. loliti. ft 17 ac. prati. Silva 
3 quarent. ft dimid. long. & 2 quarent. lat. Valet 
1 00 folid. 

Ipfe Com. ten. Tintehalle. jEcclefia Glafting- 
benac tenuit T. R.E. Ibi funt 7 hidx ft una virg. 
terra; fed pro 5 hid. geldabat. Terra eft locar. De 
ea funt in dominio 4 hida; & ibi 2 car. & 5 fervi ft 
19 villani ft 9 bord. cum 8 car. Ibi molin. redd. 30 
denar. ft 60 ac. prati ft 200 ac. paftura; & 57 ac. 
fihac. Valet 16 lib. Drogo ten. de Co. unam virg. 
de ipfa terra ft val. 1 markam argenti. 

Hubertus ten. de Co. Chincestone. JEcdefia 
Glaftingberie tenuit T. R. E. ft geldabat pro 8 hid. 
Terra eft 8 car. De ea funt in dominio 4 hidx ft 
ibi 2 car. ft 3 fervi ft 11 villani ft 13 bord. cum 5 
car. Ibi 41 ac. prati. Silva 6 quarent. long. & 
3 auarent. lat. Valuit ft val. 9 lib. ^Ecclefia fer- 
vitium non habet. 

Malgerius ten. de Co. Stochet. Aluuinus tenuit 
T. R. E. ft geldabat pro 2 hid. ft una virg. terrx Sc 
dim. Terra eft 3 car. In dominio funt 2 car. Sc 7 
fervi cum 1 villano ft 1 bord. Ibi molin. redd. 40 
den. U i<d ac. prati. Val. 40 folid. 

Willelmus ten. de Co. Draicote. Vluui tenuit 
T. R. E. ft geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 3 car. In 
dominio eft una car. ft dim. ft 9 bord. cum 1 car. & 
dim. Ibi molin. redd. 15 folid. ft 26 ac. prati ft 
dim. ft 31 ac. pallurx ft tantund. filvx minutx. 
Val. 40 olid. 

Robertus ten. de Co. Stoche. Quinque taini te- 
nuer. T. R. E. ft ^clJabant pro 5 hid. ft dim. Super- 
eft ibi una virg. terrx qux non geldabat T. R. E. 
Terra eft 8 car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 5 fervi ft 
2 villani ft 14 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 2 molmi redd. 9 
folid. ft 25 ac. prati ft 2 quarent. pallurx ft 3 ac. 
lilvre. Valuit ft val. 7 lib. 

Robertus ten. de Co. Stochet. Tres taini tenuer. 
T. R. E. ft geldabant pro 2 hid. dimid. virg. terras 
minus. Terra eft 2 car. Ibi funt 4 bord. ft 10 ac. 

prati 



iS 



©ummerfete* 



[DomcfDag'TBooft, 



prati & 15 ac. pafturx &. 4 ac. filvx. Valebat & 
val. 40 fol. 

Bretel ten. de Co. Seweli.e. Aluualdus tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra elt 4 car. In 
dominio eft 1 car. cum I fervo & 6 villani & 12 bord. 
cum 2 car. Ibi 34 ac. prati. Silva 5 quarent. St 10 
pertic. long. & 2 quarent. lat. Valet 60 folid. 

Malger ten. de Co. Brvcheford. Ordulf tenuit 
T. R.E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 12 car. 
In dominio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi St 10 villani & 5 bord. 
cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 1 2 folid. & 6 den. & 6 
ac. prati St 17 ac. filvx. Paftura dimid. leu. long. 
& 3 quarent. lat. Valet 4 lib. 

Malger ten. de Co. Brede. Aluric tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft I car. Ibi eft 
unus bord. Val. 10 folid. 

Hoc M. debet per confuetud. in Cvri M. Regis 
unam ovem cum agno. 

Malger ten. de Co. Aiselle. Duo taini tenuer. 
T. R. E. & geldabant pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 car. 
In dominio funt 2 car. St 4 villani & 17 bord. cum 
2 car. Ibi 40 ac. prati. Silva 40 quarent. long. & 
20 quarent. lat. Val. 60 fol. 

Hoc M. debet reddere in Cvri M. Regis 30 denar. 

Malger ten. de Co. Bradewei. Alnod tenuit 

T. R. E. & geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft I car. 

Ibi funt 3 villani St 3 bord. cum 1 fervo. Ibi 12 ac. 

prati & 4 ac. filvx. Valuit & val. iofolid. 

Bretel ten. de Co. Aisse. Wade tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 4 hid. Ibi eft addita 1 "hida quarn 
tenuer. z taini. Terra eft 10 car. int. totum. In 
dominio funt 2 car. & 8 fervi & 16 villani & 22 bord. 
cum4car. Ibi 2 moliniredd. 1 5 fol. & 4 ac. prati & 
40 ac. paftura; & 38 ac. filvx. Valuit & val. 100 fol. 
Bretel ten. de Co. Grindeham. Alric tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 2 car. 
In dominio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi St 3 villani & 2 bord. 
cum dim. car. Ibi molin. redd. 5 fol. & 3 ac. prati 
& 3 ac. pafturae & 10 ac. Yilvx. Valet 15 folid. 

Bretel ten. de Co. Appelie. Brifmar tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 2 car. 
Ibi funt 2 villani cum 1 car. St 2 ac. prati St 3 ac. 
pafturx & 3 ac. filvae. Valet 10 folid. 

Drogo ten. de Co. B r e d d e. Celred tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 1 car. 
quae ibi eft cum 1 fervo. Ibi 7 ac. prati St 3 ac. 
filvx minutse. Valet 15 folid. 
Hoc M. debet per confuetud. 
unam ovem cum agno. 

Drogo ten. de Co. Doniet. 
Dunftan, teneb. pro 3 M. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 5 
hid. Terra eft 5 car. In dominio eft I car. St 3 
fervi & 6 villani & 9 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi molin. 
finecenfu & 20 ac. prati & 50 ac. pafturx St parcus. 
Valuit & val. 100 folid. 

Hoc M. debet per confuetud. in Cvri M. Regis 5 
oves cum agnis. 

Ipfe Comes ten. Staple. Duo taini tenuer. 
T.R. E. & geldabant pro 10 hid. Terraeft 9 car. De 
ea funt in dominio 7 hidx & ibi 3 car. & 6 fervi & 
20 villani cum 6car. Ibi molin. redd. 30 den. St 24 
ac. prati. Paftura dimid. leu. long. & una quarent. 
lat. Silva una leu. long. & 2 quarent. lat. Valuit 
10 lib. Modo 12 lib. 



in Cvri M. Regis 
Adulfus, Sauuin, & 



Huic M. pertin. unus ortus in Langeport redd. 50 
anguill. 

Willelmus ten. de Co. Bichehalle. Aluric te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft ; 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 3 fervi St 9 villani St 
7 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 14 ac. prati. Silva 1 leu. 
long. & una quarent. lat. Valuit 20 folid. Modo 
70 folid. 

Hoc M. debet per confuetud. in Cvri M. Regis 5 
oves cum totid. agnis & quifque lib. homo unam blo- 
mam ferri. 

Rainaldus ten. de Co. Bere. Algar tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 4 car. In dominio 
funt 3 car. & 4 fervi & 6 villani & 7 bord. Ibi 20 
ac. prati & 12 ac. pafturx & 5 ac. filvae. Valuit 100 
fol. Modo 60 fol. 

Robertus ten. de Co. Hache. Godric & Goduin. 
& Bollo tenuer. T. R. E. pro 3 man. & geldabant pro 

5 hid. Terra eft 6 car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 
'3 fervi & 1 1 villani & 4 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 8 ac. 

prati & 60 ac. filvx. Valuit 8 lib. Modo 4 lib. 
Deuna ex his hid. quam Bollo tenuit debetur in Cvri 
M. per confuetud. una ovis cum agno. 

Drogo ten. de Co. Torlaeerie. Vluiet tenuit 
T.R.E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 9 car. In 
dominio funt 2 car. & 5 fervi & 2 1 villani cum 7 car. 
Ibi 1 5 ac. prati & 20 ac. filvae. Valuit & val. 6 lib. 

Anfger ten. de Co. Torne. Algar tenuit T. R.E. 
St geldabat pro 6 hid. Terra eft 6 car. In dominio 
funt 2 car. & 3 fervi & 5 villani & 4 bord. cum 2 
car. Ibi 8 ac. prati & 2 ac. filvx minutx. Valuit 

6 val. 3 lib. 

Dodeman ten. de Co. Meriet. Leuuinus & Brif- 
tuuard tenuer. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 7 hid. 
Terra eft 7 car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 6 fervi & 
10 villani & 6 bord. cum 4 car. Ibi 3 molini redd. 
30 folid. St 25 ac. prati & dimid. leu. pafturx in. 
long. & lat. Valuit 4 lib. Modo 7 lib. 

Turftinusten. de Co. Estham. Goduinus tenuit 
praepofitus Regis cum Crvche M. Regis & non poterat 
a firma feparari T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra 
eft 2 car. qnx ibi funt in dominio cum 10 bord. & 
uno fervo. Ibi molin. redd. 12 folid. & 12 ac. prati 
St 20 ac. filvx. Valuit & val. 50 folid. 

Drogo ten. de Co. Crvchet. Duo taini tenuer. 
T. R. E. & geldabant pro 3 hid. Terra eft 4 car. 
In dominio eft una car. cum 1 fervo & 5 villani St 4 
bord. cum dimid. car. Ibi 8 ac. prati St 80 ac. filvae. 
Valuit 10 fol. Modo 30 fol. 

Robertus ten. de Co. in Prestitone i hidam. 
Hanc tenuit [Com.] Heraldus. Terra eft 4 car. 
In dominio eft dimid. car. cum 1 fervo & 6 villani Si 
2 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 12 den. & 5 
ac. prati & 3 ac, pafturx St 1 1 ac. filvx. Valuit & 
val. 30 folid. 

Hasc terra jacuit in Bvrnetone M. Regis cum 
firma. 

Anfger ten. de Co. in Aisse i hid. Brifluin te- 
nuit T. R. E. Terra eft 1 car. quam habent ibi 2 
villani. Ibi 1 ac. prati & 2 ac. filvx minutx. Valuit 
& val. 10 folid. 

Robertus ten. de Co. Harpetrev. Alduin tenuit 
T. R . E . & geldabat pro 5 h id . Terra eft 5 car. In 
dominio funt z car. & 6 villani & 6 bord. cum 2 car. 

Ibi 



5DomcrtJa2»Ti5ooft.} 



eummcrfete. 



Ibi molin. redd, j folid. & 40 BC. prati & 60 ac. 
filvx. Paftura 8 quarent. long. & 5 quarent. lat. 
\ r aluit & val. 40 folid. . 

Duo portarij de Montagud ten. de Co. Estvrt. 
Brifnod tcnuit T. R. E. &geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra 
e(t 3 car. In dominio funt 3 car. St 4 fcrvi cum 1 
bord. Sc I villano habent. 1 car. Ibi 16 ac. prati. 
Valuit 30 folid. Modo 50 folid. 

Drogo ten. de Co. Bredene. Orde tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra ell 2 car. qua; ibi funt 
in dominio cum I fervo Sc 3 bord. Ibi molin. redd. 
12 fol. Sc 6 den. & 18 ac. prati & 20 ac. paftura; & 
20 ac. filvx. Val. 40 folid. & valuit. Hoc M. 
reddere debet per confuetud. 2 oves cum agnis in 
Cvri M. Regis. 

Aluredus ten. de Co. Bradeford. Eduinus te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra ell 8 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 5 fervi & 19 villani 
& 7 bord. cum 6 car. Ibi molin. redd, to folid. & 
30 ac. prati Sc 10 ac. pailura; Sc 72 ac. filva;. Valuit 
8 lib. Modo 11 lib. 

Aluredus ten. de Co. Hele. Eldred tenuit 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro una hida. Terra ell 3 car. In 
dominio eft car. & 4 fervi i- 2 villani & 7 bord. cum 
1 car. Ibi molin. redd. 10 folid. & 10 ac. prati & 
15 ac. filvx. Valuit 40 folid. Modo 4 lib. 

Haec terra T. R. E. non poterat feparari aTantone 
M. Walchelini [Wintonienfis] epifcopi. 

Aluredus ten. de Co. Nortone. Ofmund tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 10 car. 
In dominio funt 3 car. & 6 fervi & 13 villani & 8 
bord. cum 8 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 1 1 folid. & 3 
denar. & 25 ac. prati Sc 40 ac. film. Valuit 8 lib. 
Modo 15 lib. 

Aluredus ten. de Co. Eford. Teodric tenmt 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dimid. hida. Terra eft 1 
car. quae ibi eft cum 2 bord. & ibi 2 ac. prati. Valuit 
20 fol. Modo 30 fol. 

Rainaldus ten. de Co. Cerletone. Tres taini 
cum uno clerico tenucr. T. R. E. Sc geldabant pro 5 
hid. Terra ell 6 car. In dominio funt 3 car. & 6 
fervi Sc 5 villani & 6 bord. cum una car. Sc dimid. 
Ibi 50 ac. prati & 40 ac. pafturx & 20 ac. filvx 
minutx. 

Ipfe Comes ten. Cinioch. Edmer tenuit T. R. E. 
Sc geldabat pro 7 hid. Terra eft 7 car. In domi- 
nio funt 3 car. Sc 4 fervi & 10 villani & 12 bord. 
cum 4 car. Ibi molin. redd. 1 5 den. & 60 ac. prati 
& 20 ac. pafturx. Valuit 100 folid. Modo 12 lib. 
Bretel ten. de Co. Peret. Algar tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 10 hid. Terra eft 8 car. In domi- 
nio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi Sc 8 villani Sc 12 bord. cum 3 
car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 14 fol. & 18 ac. prati. Silva 
6 quarent. long. Sc 3 quarent. lat. Valuit & val. 7 lib. 
Anfger ten. de Co. Vdecome. Edmer tenuit 
T.R.E. Sc geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 car. 
In dominio funt 2 car. Sc 4 fervi & 10 villani & 16 
bord. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 7 folid. Sc 6 den. 
Ibi 20 ac. prati & 12 ac. pallurx Sc una quarent. 
filva: minuta;. Valuit & val. 100 folid. 

Aluredus ten. Ceolseberck. Duo taini tenucr. 
T. R. E. & geldabant pro 5 hid. Terra ell 5 car. In 
dominio eft una car. & 2 fervi & 10 villani Sc 12 
bord. cum 4 car. Ibi molin. redd. 15 folid. & 38 ac. 



prati Sc 3 ac. filvx minutse. 
100 folid. 



*9 

Valuit 60 folid. Modo 
Uniu tainus tcnuit 



Malger ten. de Co. Cinioch. 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 3 car. In 



IVlalger t< 
'.R.l 
dominio eft 1 car. & 3 lervi & 2 villani Sc 9 bord. 
cum 1 car. Ibi 36 ac. prati. Valuit 4 lib. Modo 3 lib. 
Aluredus ten. de Co. Cinioch. Unus tainu» te- 
nuit T. R. E. Sc geldabat 4 pfo hid. Terra eft 4 car. 
In dominio funt 2 car. Sc c fcrvi & 5 villani Sc 10 
bord. cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 10 folid. Sc 40 ac. 
prati & 2 ac. pafturx. Val. 4 lib. 

iEccLESiA S. Marine de Greiftan ten. de Co. 
Nortone. Unus tainus tcnuit T. R. E. & geldabat 
pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 car. De ea funt in dominio 
2 hida: Sc ibi I car. & 5 fervi & 8 villani Sc 6 bord. 
cum 3 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 20 folid. & 25 ac. 
prati. Silva 2 quarent. long. Sc una quarcnt. lat. 
Valuit Sc val. 100 folid. 

Aluredus ten. de Co. Penne. Aluuard tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra ell 5 car. 
In dominio funt 3 car. Sc 2 fervi tt 5 villani Sc 10 
bord. cum 4 car. Ibi 10 ac. prati & 4 quarent. paf- 
tura; in long. Sc lat. Silva 7 quarcnt. long. Sc 3 
quarent. lat. Valuit 40 fol. Modo 60 fol. 

Ipfe Conies ten. Clovewrde. Unus tainus tcnuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro7 hid. Terra ell 6 car. In 
dominio funt 3 car. & 3 lervi & 10 villani Sc 7 bord. 
cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 1 5 folid. Sc 1 2 ac. prati. 
Silva 4 quarent. long. Sc 2 quarent. lat. Vaiuit St 
val. 7 lib. . . 

Aluredus ten. de Co. Claford. Quinque taini 
tenucr. T. R. E. Sc geldabant pro 10 hid. Terra eft 
9 car. In dominio funt 3 car. St 2 fervi St 3 cotanj 
& 12 villani & 17 bord. cum 7 car. Ibi molin. redd. 
3 fol. & 20 ac. prati & 300 ac. paftune & i6oac. 
filvx. Valuit 7 lib. Modo 10 lib. 

Ipfe Comes ten. Gerlintvnb. Alnod tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 7 hid. Terra eft 7 car. In 
dominio eft 1 car. & 6 fervi St 8 villani & 6 bord. 
cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 7 folid. Silva 6 quarent. 
long. & 3 quarent. lat. Valuit 7 lib. Valet ico fol. 
Drogo ten. de Co. Vfetone. Tres taini tenuer. 
T. R. E. & geldabant pro 3 hid. & una virg. terra; & 
dim. Terra eft 2 car. & dim. In dominio eft 1 
car. & 8 cotar. cum 1 villano & 5 bord. cum 1 car. 
Ibi molin. redd. 30 denar. Sc 10 ac. prati. Valuit 
50 folid. Modo 40 folid. # 

Drogo ten. de Co. Svtone. Bundi tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 car. In dominio 
funt 2 car. Sc 2 fcrvi & 3 villani & 9 bord. cum 2 car. 
Ibi molin. fine cenfu & 16 ac. prati & Sac. ii'.vx. 
Valuit & val. 100 folid. 

Drbgo ten. de Co. Sceptone. Toll tcnuit T. R. K. 
Sc geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 car. In domi- 
nio funt 2 car. & 8 fcrvi & 8 villani Sc 5 bord. 
cum 3 car. Ibi 2 molini, unum fine cenfu, aiterum 
redd. 7 fol. & 6 den. Ibi 30 ac. prati. Siiva 10 
quarent. long. & 4 quarent. lat. Valuit 7 lib. Modo 
100 folid. 

Huic M. eft addita Stoche. Drogo ten. de Com. 
Robertus [fil. Wimarci] tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat 
pro 3 hid. Terra ell 4Car. In dominio eil un a car. 
& 2 fervi & 5 villani & 8 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi 5 
ac. prati & 2 ac. filvx. Valet 3 lib. 

r Brete 



20 



gitmmcrfetc. 



pDomettJag*TBooiu 



Hretel ten. de Co. Roliz. Aluric teneb. T. R. E. 
Si geldabat pro 4 hid. Terra e.'i 6 car. In dominio 
eft 1 car. & 4. villani & 3 bord. & 7 corar. cum 1 car. 
Jbi 15 ac. prati. Silv;: 2 quarent. long. & dim. qua- 
rent. lut. Valet 40 folid. 

Malgerus ten. de Go. Chintvke. Duo taini te- 
rmer. T.R. JS. & geldabant pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 
car. In dominio fuiit 3 car. & 5 fervi & 2 villani 
& 4 bord. cum I cotar. habent. 1 car. & dim. lbi 
30 ac. prati. Valet 4 lib. 

Ricardus ten. de Co. Credelincote. Godeman 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. & dim. Terra 
eft 3 car. In dominio funt 2 car. cum 1 fervo & uno 
villano & 3 bord. Ibi molin. redd. 5 folid. & io ac. 
prati. Valet 50 folid. 

Aluredus ten. de Co. EcEwrcHE. Aleftan tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terra;. Ibi 1 vil- 
lanus & 1 fervus. Valuit & val. 10 fol. 

Bretel ten. de Co. Berrowkse. Almasr tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 car. 
In dominio eft una car. & 2 fervi & 10 villani & r 
bord. & 4 cotar. cum 4 car. Ibi 8 ac. prati & 20 ac. 
paftura; & 40 ac. filvrc. Valuit & valet 4 lib. 

Bretel ten. de Co. Stoche. Duo taini tenuer. 
T. R. E. & geldabant pro 3 hid. Terra eft 5 car. 
In dominio eft 1 car. & j fervi & 3 villani & 8 bord. 
& 5 cofcez cum 2 car. Ibi molin urn redd. 10 denar. 
& 1 5 ac. prati. Silva I leu. long. & una quarent. lat. 
Valuit & val. 60 fol. 

Bretel ten. de Co. Cocintone. Leuing & Suain 
tenuer. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 7 hid. Terra eft 6 
car. In dominio eft 1 car. cum 1 fervo & 12 villani 
& 8 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi 22 ac. prati. Silva 18 
quarent. long. & 4 quarent. lat. Valuit 7 lib. 
Modo 100 folid. 

Anfger ten. de Co. Aldedeford. Godric tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 car. 
In dominio eft I car. & 3 fervi & 7 villani & 4 bord. 
& 4 cot. cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 7 fol. & 50 
ac. prati & de villanis 8 blomas ferri. Valuit 100 
fol. Modo 4 lib. 

Robertus ten. de Co. Babachan. Godric tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. & dim. Terra eft 3 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 3 fervi & 6 villani & 
4 bord. cura 1 car. Ibi 14 ac. prati & 8 ac. pafturx. 
Valuit 50 fol. Modo 60 (olid. 

Hugo ten. de Co. Fedintone. Celred tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida & una virg. terra: & 
dim. Terra eft 2 car. In dominio eft 1 car. cum 1 
villano & I bord. cum I car. & 4 ac. prati. Valuit 
30 fol. Modo 20. 

Malger ten. de Co. Clopetone. Duo taini tenuer. 
T. R. E. & geldabant pro 3 hid. Terra eft 3 car. 
In dominio eft 1 & 2 fervi & 2 villani & 3 bord. 
Val. 30 folid. 

Aluredus ten. de Co. Westone. Brictuid tenuit 
T. R.E. & geldabat pro 1 hida & 2 virg. & dim. 
Terra eft 1 car. qua; ibi eft cum 5 bord. Ibi 
dimid. molin. redd. 30 den. Valuit 20 lolid. Modo 
'30 fol. 

Hunfridusten.de Co. 1 hid. in Gatelme. Godric 
tenuit T. R. E. 'Terra eft 2 car. qua: ibi funt cum 2 
villanis & 3 bord. Ibi molin. redd. 10 fol. & 15 ac. 
prati & 15 ac. filvas. Val. 30 fol. 



Warmundus ten. de Co. in Melebvrne i hid. 
Terra eft 1 car. quae ibi eft in dominio cum 2 bord. 
& 2 fervis & 11 ac. prati ibi & molin. redd. 16 
denar. & 5 burgenfes reud. 3 folid. Tot. val. 20 
folid. 

Ipfe Co. ten. Merstone. Quatuor taini tenuer. 
T. R. E. & geldabant pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 car. 
In dominio eit 1 car. cum 1 fervo & 5 villani & 10 
bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 40 ac. prati & 30 ac. firva;. 
Valuit & val. 10 lib. 

Robertus ten. de Co. Merstone. Quinque taini 
tenuer. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 2 hid. Terra eft 2 
car. Has habent ibi 5 villani & 2 bord. & 24 acras 
prati. Valuit 40 fol. Modo 60 fol. 

Drogo ten. de Co. in Etesberie 3 virg. terrae. 
Aluui tenuit T. R. E. Terra eft dimid car. qua; 
ibi eft cum 3 bord. Ibi 6 ac. prati & 10 ac. fil.se. 
Valuit & val. 10 fol. 

Anfger ten. de Co. Trente. Brifnod tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 7 hid. Terra eft 5 car. In 
dominio eft 1 car. & 6 fervi & 7 villani & 10 bord. 
com 4 car. Ibi 30 ac. prati & 60 ac. palturse & 30 
ac. filvse. Valuit & val. 8 lib. 

Willelmus ten. de Co. Ponditone. Adulfus te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. & dim. Terra 
eft 3 car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 4 villani & 6 
bord. cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 32 den. & dim. 
ac. prati & 20 ac. paftura;. Valet 40 folid. 

Drogo ten. de Co. Torne. Cheneue tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una hida & una virg. Terra 
eft 2 car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 3 fervi & 3 bord. 
& 10 ac. prati. Valuit 10 fol. Modo 20 folid. 

Radulfus [Prefbiter] ten. de Co. Torne. Duo 
taini tenuer. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 2 hid. Terra 
eft 3 car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 5 villani & 2 
bord. cum 1 car. & 14 ac. prati. Valuit 40 fol. 
Modo 32 folid. 

Aluredus ten. de Co. Cilterne. Eriftuinus te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 3 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 2 fervi & 3 vilani & 

5 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi 15 ac. prati & 20 ac. lilvac. 
Valuit &val. 60 folid. 

Aluredus ten. de Co. Cilterne. Aluui tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 3 car. 
In dominio funt 2 car. & 5 fervi & 2 villani & 4 
bord. cum 2 car. & 30 ac. prati. Valuit 30 fol. 
Modo 40 folid. 

Anlger ten. de Co. Hvndestone. Ties taini 
tenuer. T. R. E. & geldabant pro una hida. Terra 
eft 1 car quae ibi eft in dominio & 2 fervi & 2 villani 

6 3 bord. & 3 ac. prati & dimid. Valuit 10 fol. 
Modo 20 folid. 

Anfger ten. de Co. in Lochltone i hid. Aluuinus 
tenuit T. R. E. Terra eft una car. qua; ibi eft in 
dominio & 2 fervi & 3 bord. & 10 ac. prati. Valet 
20 iblid. 

Ipfe Co. ten. in Givele i hid. Terra eft 2 car. 
Ibi funt 2 bord. Valet 3 fol. 

In eadem villa ten. Amundusde Co. 1 hid. Terra 
eft 1 car. qu» ibi eft cum 2 bord. Ibi molin. redd. 5 
folid. Tot. valet 20 folid. Quatuor taini tenuer. 
has 2 hid. T. R. E. & pro tanto geldabant. 

Robertus ten. de Co. Soche. Septem taini tenuer. 
T. R. E. & geldabant pro 3 hid. & dim. Terra eft 

S car. 



jDomcfDap=U5oofc.] 



©ummerfcte. 



21 



5 car. In dominio funt 2 car. cum I fervo & 8 vil- 
fani Si 2 bord. cam 2 car. Ibi 70 ac. prati. Valuit 

6 val. 65 (olid. 

lpfc Comes ten. in dominio Biscopestone & ibi eft 
cnftellum ejus quod vocatur Montagvd. Hoc M. 
geldabat T. R. E. pro 9 hid. & erat dc Abbatia de 
Adelingi & pro eo ded. comes eid. iEccle&C M. 
quod Candel vocatur. 

In hoc M. Bifcopeftone eft terra 7 car. Deea funt 
in dominio 2 hjdnc Sc dim. & ibi 2 car. & 4 fervi & 4 
villani & 3 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 50 
denar. & 15 ac. prati. 

De his 9 hid. ten. dc Comite Aluredus 1 hid. & 
dim. Drogo 1 hidam. Bretel 1 hid. Donecan 1 
hid. Ibi funt 5 car. cum 1 fervo Sc 19 bord. Valet 
Comiti hoc M. 6 lib. Militibus 3 lib. & 3 folid. 

Certa TBattwini De oEreceffre. 

Baldvinus [Vicecomcs] ten. Hamitokb de Rege. 
Siuuardus tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 21 hid. 
Terra elt 20 car. De ea funt in dominio 8 hid* & 
ibi 4 car. & 1 1 fervi & 26 villani & 8 bord. cum 12 
Car. Ibi 12 ac. prati & 50 ac. filvxminutx. Paftura 
dimid. leu. long. & dim. leu. lat. Valuit Sc val. 

19 lib. De hac terra 1 hida eft in communi paftura 
in Hardintone M. epifcopiConftantiens. 

Drogo ten. de Bald. Apelie. Norman tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 virg. terra?. Terra eft 2 
car. Ibi funt 4 villani & 3 bord. & 5 ac. prati Sc 10 
ac. paftura;. Valet 15 fohd. 

Idem ten. de Bald. Portloc. Algar tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 12 car. Ibi funt 
6 villani & 3 bord. & 6 fervi & 300 ac. filvx &quin- 
gentx ac. paftura;. Valuit 4 lib. quando recep. 
Modo 25 folid. 

Dodeman ten. de Co. Mvndiford. Wnulfus 
teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 4 hid. & dimid. 
Terra eft 4 car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 7 fervi Sc 
unus villanus & 7 bord. cum I car. Ibi molin. redd. 

20 fol. Sc 15 ac. prati Sc 40 ac. paftura;. Valuic & 
val. 4 lib. 

ftetra ftogetii De CocccIIe. 

Rogerivs de Cvrcelle ten. de Rege Cvri. 
Briftric tenuit T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro 3 hid. & dim. 
Terra eft 4 car. De ea eft in dominio 1 hida & ibi 2 
car. & 2 fervi & 1 1 villani Sc 7 bord. cum 3 car. & 
dimid. Ibi 12 ac. prati Sc 5 ac. pafturae Sc dimid. 
leu. filvx int. long. & lat. Valuit 4 lib. Modo 100 fol. 

Ipfe Rog. ten. Cvri. Celtic tenuit T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro 3 hid. Sc dim. Terra eft 4 car. De ea 
eft in dominio 1 hida Sc ibi una car. cum 1 fervo & 
10 villani & 7 bord. cum 3 car. & dim. Ibi 10 ac. 
prati & 5 ac. paftura; & dimid. leu. filvx in long. & 
lat. Valuit 4 lib. Modo 100 folid. 

Has 2 terras ten. Rog. pro uno M. 

Robertus ten. de Ro. Niwetone. Eilaf tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 virg. terra:. Terra eft I 
car. quae ibi eft cum 1 villano Sc 5 bord. & 2 fervis. 
Ibi 6 ac. filvx. Valet 20 folid. 

Robertus ten. de Ro. Hateware. Algar tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 1 car. & ; 



dim. Ibi.funt 2 fervi Sc 1 viflanus & 9 hord. tc 4 ac. 
prati Sc 7 ac. filvae Sc 36 ac. pafturae. Valuit 15 fol. 
Modo 20 folid. 

De hac hida habet W. de Dou;.i unam virg. tcrr ae. 

Goisfridus ten. de Ro. Peri. Quatuor taini te- 
nucr.T. R. B. & geldabantpro 1 hida & unofcrling. 
Terra eft 2 car. In dominio eft una car. St 2 villani 

6 5 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi 33 ac. prati & 43 ac. paf- 
turae Sc 37 ac. filvx. Val. 30 fol. 

Willelmus ten. de Ro. Vlveronetone. Aluni 
tenuit T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro 1 hida Sc uno ferling. 
Terra eft 2 car. In dominio eft una car. cum 1 fervo 
Sc 3 villani & 3 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi 1 1 ac. prati Sc 

7 ac. pafturx & 13 ac. filvae. Valuit & val. 22 folid. 
Huic M. addita eft 1 hida in Peri. Aluuard te- 
nuit T. R. E. & pro 1 hida geldabat. Terra eft 2 
car. In dominio eft 1 car. Sc 2 villani & 3 bord. cum 
1 car. Ibi 10 ac. prati & 7 ac. pafturx Sc 13 ac. 
filvae. Valuit Sc val. 20 folid. 

Anchitil ten. de Ro. Claihelle. Ordgar tenuit 
T. R.E. & geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 3 car. 
In dominio eft 1 car. Sc 2 villani Sc 7 bord. cum z 
car. Ibi 3 ac. prati & 8 ac. pafturx Sc 1 2 ac. filvae. 
Valuit Sc val. 20 folid. 

Robertus ten. de Ro. Siredestone. Sired tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat prodim. hida. Terra eft 1 car 
quae ibi eft in dominio cum 1 fervo & 2 villani & 5 
bord. cum 1 car. Valuit 10 fol. Modo 15. fol. 

Anfchitil ten. de Ro. Rime. Aluui tenuit T.R.E. 
& geldabat pro dim. virg. terrac. Terra eft 2 bov. 
Ibi eft unus bord. & 2 ac. prati. Val. 25 den. 

Anfchitil ten. de Ro. Cilletone. GoJric tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terrx. Terra eft 
1 car. Ibi eft 1 bord. Valuit Sc val. 20 folid. 

Robertus ten. de Ro. Rachedeworde. Godric 
tenuit T.R.E. & geldabat pro una virg. terrx. 
Terra eft dimid. car. Ibi funt 2 bord. Sc 6 ac. filvae* 
Valuit & val. 4 folid. 

Ipfe Rog. ten. Cerdesling. Aluui tenuit T. R.E. 
& geldabat pro una hida & dim. Terra eft 3 car. 
In dominio funt 2 car. & 4 fervi & 3 villani & 3 
bord. cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 6 den. Sc 3 ac. prati 
&. 1 3 ac. pafturx & 2 ac. filvx. Valuit Sc val. 40 fol, 

Ipfe Rog. ten. Cvriepol. Aluui tenuit T.R.E. 
& geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 4 car. In dominio 
eft dimid. car. Sc 6 villani Sc 5 bord. habent. 3 car. 
Ibi 7 ac. prati & 100 ac. pafturx & 6 ac. filvx. 
Valuit & val. 40 folid. 

Goisfridus ten. de Ro. Pvchelege. Almarus tenuit 
T.R.E. Si geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra ell 4 car. 
In dominio funt 2 car. & 5 fervi & 2 villani & 4 bord. 
cum 2 car. Ibi 6 ac. prati & 6ac. pafturx. Valuit 
& vul. 40 folid. 

Goisfridus ten. de Ro. Godelece. Aluuard tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 2 car. 
In dominio eft una car. & 5 villani & 5 cofcez cum I 
cr.r. it 1 fervo. Ibi dimid. molin. redd. 10 denar. 
& 20 ac. pafturx. Valet 20 fol. Valuit 30 fol. 

Goisfridus ten. de Ro. Terracolgrin. Colgrin 
tenuit T.R.E. & geldabat pro dimid. virg. terrx. 
Terra eft 2 bov. Ibi funt 3 bord. Valet 4 fol. 

Robertus ten. de Ro. Otramestone. Eduin te- 
nuit T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft- 
1 car. Sc dim. Ibi funt 4 villani & 1 bord. & unus 

% fervus 



22 



©ummctfetc* 



DDomenra^TBoofc. 



fcrvus. Ibi 2 ac. prati & dim. ft 12 EC. pafturx & 
7 ac. filvas roinutas. Valuit &val. 18 folid. 

Robertus ten. de Ro. Vlwardestone. Vlf tenuit 
T. R.-E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft dim. 
car. Ibi eft unus villanus & 17 at. prati & 42 ac. 
pafturas. Valuit 10 fol. Modo 15*01. 

Aluuard ten. de Ro. Hol ecvm be. Ipfe tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terras. Terra eft 
2 car. In. dominio eft I car. & 2 fen & unus vil- 
knus & 5 bord. cum dim. car. Ibi n.olin. redd. 6 
den. & 75 ac. pafturas & 15 ac. filvas. Valuit & val. 
10 folid. 

Anfchitil ten. de Ro. Dvdesham. Tres taini te- 
nner. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 3 virg. terra: & dim. 
& 5 ac. Terra eft 2 car. quae ibi funt cum 6 bord. 
Ibi 5 ac. prati & 12 ac. pafturas. Valuit & val. 20 
folid. 

Anfchitil ten. de Ro. Perredeham. Goduinus 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro dimid. virg. terrae. 
Terra eft. 1 car. Hanc habent ibi 4 bord. Ibi 1 
ac. prati. Valuit & val. 10 folid. 

Anfchitil ten. de Ro. Cildetone. Leuegar tenuit 
T. R. E, & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 2 
car. In dominio eft una car. cum 1 fervo & 2 villani 
& 5 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi 6ac. prati & 8 ac. paftura; 
& 16 ac. filvas. Valuit 20 folid. Modo 40 folid. 

Anfchitil ten. de Ro. terram Aluuini. Aluuinus 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terras & uno 
ferling. Terra eft 1 car. quae ibi eft in dominio cum 

1 bord. Ibi eft molin. redd. 12 den. & 2 ac. prati. 
& 2 ac. pafturas. Valuit & val. 10 folid. 

Anfchitil ten. de Ro. Cildetone. Merefuuet te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 

2 car. Has habent ibi 4 villani & 6 bord. & in do- 
minio eft dimid. car. & dimid. molin. redd. 20 folid. 
Ibi 6 ac. prati & 8 ac. pafturas & 16 ac. filvas. Valuit 
& val. 40 folid. 

Anfchitil ten. de Ro. Pilloch. Godric tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dimid. ferling. Terra eft 
ilim. car. In dominio tamen eft una car. & 2 bord. 
Sc 3 ac. prati & 7 ac. pafturas. Valuit & val. 6 fol. 

Anfchitil ten. de Ro. Stocheland. Duo taini te- 
nuer. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 1 hida& dim. Terra 
eft 2 car. quae ibi funt in dominio & 2 fervi & 3 vil- 
lani & 2 bord. cum I car. Ibi 24 ac. prati & 12 ac. 
filvx. Valeb. 30 folid. quandorecep. Mode 65 folid. 

Anfchitil ten. de Ro. Edev-estone. Aluuinus te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. & dim. Terra 
eft 4 car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 7 fervi & 7 vil- 
lani cum 1 bord. habent. 3 car. Ibi 40 ac. prati It 5 
ac. filvas. Valuit & val. 100 folid. 

Robertus ten. de Ro. Radeflote. Godric tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 2 car. 
Ibi vill. & 2 bord. & molin. redd. 6 den. & 5 ac. 
prati & 24 ac. pafturas & una ac. filvas. Valuit 20 
iblid. Modo 15 folid. 

Rannulfus ten. de Ro. Svindvne. Aluuardus te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro una Virg. terras. Terra 
eft 1 car. qua; ibi eft in dominio Sc 2 fervi & 5 bord. 
& molin. redd. 3 den. & una ac. prati & 3 ac. paf- 
turas & 7 ac. filvae. Valuit 15 folid. Modo 20 folid. 

Herbertus ten. de Ro. terram Teodrici. Tedric 
tenuit T.R.E. & geldabat pro una virg. terras. 
Terra eft 1 car. Ibi una ac. prati & dim. Val. 10 fol. 



Robertus (en. dc Ro. terram Oka. Aluuardus 
tenuit T. R.E. & geldabat pro una virg. terrae. 
Terra eft 1 car. Ibi funt 2 bord. & una ac. prati & 
dimid. Valuit Sc val." 10 folid. 

Johannes ten. de Ro. Ichetoche. Vlf tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terras. Terra eft 
dimid. car. quae ibi eft in dominio cum 7 bord. & 20 
ac. prati & 7 ac. filvas minu;as. Valet 12 fol. 

Willelmus ten. de Ro. Widiete. Edric tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 virg. terras. Terra eft 1 
car. &dim. Ibi funt 2 villani & 5 bord. cum car. 
& molin. redd. 6 den. Valuit & val. 15 folid. 

Willelmus ten. de Ro. Strencestvne. Siuuard 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terras Sc 
dim. Terra eft dim. car. quae ibi eft in dominio cum 

1 bord. & una ac. prati & 6 r.c. pafturas. Valuit & 
val. 8 fol. 

Anfchitil ten. de Ro. Blachemore. Aluric tenuit 
T. R.E. & geldabat pro una virg. terrae. Terra eft 
dim. car. Huic M. addita eft una ac. terrae quam 
teneb. unus tainus T. R.E. Ibi funt 2 bord. Tot. 
valuit & val. 8 folid. 

Willelmus ten. de Ro. Worde. Duo taini tenuer. 
T- R. E. & geldabant pro 1 hida & dim. Terra eft 
3 car. Ibi funt 10 villani cum 2 car. & dimid. & 4 
ac. prati & 4 quarent. fiivx in long. & 2 quarent. in 
lat. Valuit & val. 60 folid. 

Idem ten. de Ro. Chenolle. Godric & Aluric 
tenuer. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 1 hida & una virg. 
terras. Terra eft 2 car. In dominio eft 1 car. Sc 5 
villani & 4 bord. cum dimid. car. Ibi 4 quarent. 
filvas in long. & 2 quarent. in lat. Valet 25 folid. 

Huic M. eft addita Illece. Bruning tenuit pro 
M. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 virg. terrae. Terra eft 

2 car. Ibi eft una car. cum 1 villano & 1 bord. Sc 
uno fervo. Valuit & val. 1 5 folid. 

Girardus ten. de Ro. Loptone. Leuuinus tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 1 car. 
quas ibi eft in dominio cum 1 bord. & 10 ac. prati. 
Valet 20 fol. 

Eldred ten. de Ro. Selve. Ipfe tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 1 car. & dim. 
Ibi 1 villanus & 2 bord. cum 1 fervo habent. 1 car. 
Ibi 3 ac. prati & 62 ac. pafturae. Valuit Sc val. 20 
folid. 

Alric ten. de Ro. Selve. Brifmar tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro dimid. hida. Terra eft 1 car. & dim. 
Ibi 4 villani cum 1 bord. habent. 1 car. Ibi 6 ac. 
prati & i6ac. pafturas & 16 ac. filvas minutas. Valuit 
& val. 20 folid. 

Alric ten. de Ro. Halsweie. Ipfe tenuit T. R. E. 
Sc geldabat pro 3 virg. terra:. Terra eft 3 car. In 
dominio eft car. & dim. & 3 fervi & 4 villani cum I 
bord. habent. car. & dim. Ibi 3 ac. prati & 400 ac. 
pafturas. Valet 20 fol. 

Alric ten. de Ro. Colforde. Ipfe tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 3 ferlingis terras. Terra eft dimid. 
car. In dominio tamen eft 1 car. Val. 2 ibi. 

Bertran ten. de Ro. Hewis. Vlgar tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 3 virg. terrae. Terra eft 2 car. In 
dominio eft una cum 1 fervo & 3 villani & 2 bord. 
habent. 1 car. Ibi 3 ac. prati & 30 ac. pafturas. 
Valet 20 folid. 

Alric 



jDomcrtm^lBoofc.] 



^ummerfetc. 



2J 



Alric ten. de Ro. Fescheforde. Domne tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft I car. 
Hanc habent ibi 2 villani cum 1 bord. & in dominio 
eft dim. car. Ibi 43c. prati & 3 ac pafturx & 1 1 ac. 
filvx. Valet 9 folid. 

Robertus ten. de Ro. Fescheforde. Brifmar te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 

2 car. In dominio eft 1 car. & unus villanus Sc 3 
bord. habent. 1 car. Ibi 2 ac. prati Sc 20 ac. pafturx 
& 40 ac. filvae. Valuit & val. 17 folid. 

Alric ten. de Ro. Imele. Vlgar tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 2 car. In do- 
minio eft dimid. car. & una ac. prati & dim. & 4 ac. 
pafturx. Val. 5 folid. 

Ipfe Rog. ten. Clive. Briclric tenuit T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro 2 hid. & dim. Terra eft 4 car. In 
dominio funt 2 car. cum I fervo & e villani & 5 
bord. cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 6 folid. & 13 ac. 
prati & 12 ac. filvae. Paftura 1 leu. & dim. long. & 
dim. leu. lat. Valuit & val. 4 lib. 

Huic M. eft addita Hille. Eduualdus tenuit pro 
M. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra ell 2 car. 
Ibi unus villanus & 5 bord. & 2 fervi habent. dim. 
car. Ibi molin. redd. 12 den. & 7 ac. prati Sc 20 
ac. filvae. Valuit & val. 30 folid. 

Eidem M. addita eft Perlestone. Perlo tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 1 
car. quae ibi eft in dominio Sc 2 villani & 4 bord. 
cum dim. car. Ibi 3 ac. prati & 12 ac. pafturx & 6 
ac. filvae. Valuit & val. 10 fol. Normanus ten. 

Goisfridus & Willelmus ten. de Ro. Waicome. 
Tres taini tenuer. T. R. E. & geldabant pro i hida. 
Terra eft 1 car. Sc dim. Ibi eft unus bord. Tot. 
val. 32 fol. 

Willelmus ten. de Ro. Westov. Edeluualdus te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 2 
car. In dominio eft una car. & 3 fervi & 2 villani & 

3 bord. cum dim. car. Ibi 4 ac. prati & 8 ac. paf- 
turae & 15 ac. filvae. Valuit & val. 40 fol. 

Hugo ten. de Ro. Ascwei. Aluric tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro dimid. hida & uno ferling. Terra 
eft 6 car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi & 1 1 vil- 
lani Sc 3 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi 1 ac. prati & 60 ac. 
filvae. Paftura 1 leu. long, & dim. leu. lat. Valet 

25 folid. 

Willelmus ten. de Ro. Broford. Vluuinus tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terroe. Terra eft 
2 car. In dominio eft una & 4 villani habent aliam. 
Ibi 5 ac. fdvae. Val. 7 folid. 

Willelmus ten. de Ro. Broford. Almar tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro uno ferling. Terra eft 
dim. car. Ibi funt 2 bord. Sc 4 ac. filvae. Val. 

26 denar. 

Ipfe Rog. ten. Potesdone. Bri&ric tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro una virg. terrae. Terra eft 2 car. 
Ibi 20 ac. pafturae & 3 ac. filvae. Valuit & val. 30 
denar. 

Willelmus ten. de Ro. Pochintvne, Leuing te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida Sc dim. Terra 
eft 1 car. & dim. Ibi funt 3 villani & 3 bord. & 
2 fervi cum 1 car. & 1 1 ac. prati & dim. & 6 ac. 
pafturae St 66 ac. filvae. 

Huic M. addita eft Pochintvne. Aluuard tenuit 
T. R.E. pro M. & geldabat pro una hida & dim. 



Terra eft 1 car. & dim. Ibi funt 4 bord. cum 1 
villano Sc 1 fervo Sc 2 ac. prati Sc 6 ac. pafturx Sc 66 
ac. filvae. 

Has 2 terras tencb. Leuing Sc Atuuard de jEccle- 
fia S. Petri nee ab ea poterant feparari. T. R. E. 
valeb. 60 folid. 

Ogifus ten. de Rog. Lam ore. Suetth tenuit 
T. R. E. de jEcclefia Mucelcnie nee poterat ab ea 
feparari & geldabat pro 1 hida Sc dim. virg. terrx & 
eft de 20 hid. de Draitvne & eft tainlande. Terra 
eft 1 car. quae ibi eft in dominio & 6 fervi Sc 10 ac. 
prati & 7 ac. filvae. Valuit Sc val. zo fol. 

Ipfe Rog. ten. Edmvndesworde. Edric tenuit 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro una virg. terrae. Terra eft 
6 car. In dominio eft 1 car. Sc 2 fervi & 6 villani Sc 
9 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 8 ac. prati Sc 30 ac. filvae 
minutae. Paftura 2 leu. long. Sc 2 lat. Valet 
2; folid. 

Eileua ten. de Ro. Donescvmbe. Lefmerus tenuit 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro uno ferling. Terra eft 1 
car. Ibi eft 1 bord. cum dimid. car. Sc 6 ac. prati 
& 3 ac. filvae & 6 ac. pafturx. Valet 2 folid. 

Ipfe Rog. ten. Aisseford. Aiulf tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro dim. virg. Terra eft 2 car. Ibi 1 
bord. Sc 1 fervus cum dim. car. & 10 ac. prati Sc 10 
ac. pafturae Sc 12 ac. filvae minutae. Valet 3 folid. 

Ednod ten. de Ro. Aisseforde. Edric tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro uno ferling. Terra eft 1 
car. Ibi eft 1 bord. cum dim. car. Sc 2 ac. filvx Sc 
3 ac. prati & 10 ac. pafturx. Valet 30 denar. 

Ipfe Ro. ten.STOCHE. Ailhallc tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro dim. virg. terrx. Terra eft 2 car. 
Ibi eft 1 car. cum 1 fervo & 2 bord. & 50 ac. pafturx 
& 60 ac. filvx. Valuit & val. 5 folid. 

Caflo ten. de Ro. Bagelie. Ipfe tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro dim. virg. terrx. In dominio eft 1 
car. Sc 2 bord. habent. dim. car. Ibi 50 ac. pafturx 
& 12 ac. filvx. Valuit 12 den. Modo 40 denar. 

Ipfe Rog. ten. Cvmbe. Alric tenuit T. R. E. Sc 
geldabat pro una virg. terrx. Terra eft 1 car. Ibi 
ell dim. car. cum 1 bord. Sc 16 ac. pafturx Sc 18 ac. 
filvx. Valet 5 fol. 

Ogifus ten. de Rog. Alre. Brifmar & Edmar te- 
nuer. T. R. E. & geldabant prodim. hida. Terra eft 
1 car. & dim. In dominio eft 1 car. cum 1 fervo Sc 

1 villano Sc 1 bord. qui habent dim. car. Ibi 60 
ac. pafturx. Valet 8 folid. 

Alric ten. de Ro. Gildenecote. Eduinus tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft I car. 
Sc dim. Ibi eft 1 car. cum 3 bord. Sc 6 ac. prati Se 
50 ac. pafturx & 15 ac. filvx. Valet 10 folid. 

Willelmus ten. de Ro. Hvnecote. Aluric Sc 
Briftuin tenuer. T. R. E. & geldabant prodim. hida 
Sc dim. virg. terrx. Terra eft 2 car. ft dim. Ibi 
funt 4 villani cum 1 bord. ft habent 2 car. Ibi 16 
ac. pafturx. Valet 22 folid. 

Alric ten. de Ro. Dovri. Eddeue tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro una virg. 
Ibi 2 villani cum I bord. 

Willelmus ten.,de Ro. 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro una virg. terrx. Terra eft 

2 car. Sc dim. Ibi 3 villani & 4 bord. cum 1 car. Sc 
dimid. & dim. ac. prati & 30 ac. pafturx Sc 14 ac 
filvx minutx. Valet 6 folid. 

Willelmus 



1 cab 



terrx. Terra eft 

Valet 8 folid. 

Holme. Godric tenuit 



24 



©ummerfete. 



[*Domefoa^lBoo&. 



Willelmus ten. de Ro. Aisseford. Vluuinus te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro uno ferling. Terra eft 
i car. Ibi 2 bord. cum dim. car. & 3 ac. prati & 
10 ac. pafturae. Valuit & val. 30 denar. 

Ipfe Rog. ten. Estone. Bri&ric tenuic T. R. E. 
Ibi eft dim. virg. terras. Terra eft 2 car. fed vafta eft. 
Bertran ten. de Ro. Fifhide. Aldredus tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida & dim. Terra eft 2 
car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi & 4 bord. Ibi 
1 5 ac. prati & 20 ac. filvas. Valuit 30 ibi. Modo 
40 folid. 

Vluuard ten. de Ro. Erneshele. Liuing tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 1 car. 
& dim. In dominio eft I car. cum 1 fervo & 3 bord. 
Ibi 8 ac. prati & 8 ac. pafturas. Valet 1 2 folid. 

Ogifus ten. de Ro. Sanford. Aluuinus tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 7 car. In 
dominio funt 2 car. & 5 fervi & 1 1 villani & 6 bord. 
cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 8 den. & 5 ac. prati & 
200 ac. pafturas & 47 ac. filvas. Valuit 20 fol. Modo 
50 fol. 

Alric ten. de Ro. Torne. Tres taini tenuer. 
T. R. E. & geldabant pro una hida & 3 virg. terrse. 
Terra eft 5 car. In dominio eft I car. & 3 fervi & 
9 villani & 5 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 10 
folid. & 4 ac. prati & 30 ac. pafturas & 8 ac. filvas. 
Valuit 20 folid. Modo 40 fol. 

Goisfridus ten. de Ro. Animere. Algar tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 4 car. 
In dominio eft I car. & 2 fervi & 3 villani & 3 bord. 
cum 3 car. Ibi 68 ac. filvae. Valuit & val. 40 fol. 
Goisfridus ten. de Ro. Lecheswrde. Orgar 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terras. 
Terra eft 1 car. Hanc habent ibi 2 villani & 2 bord. 
Ibi molin. redd. 2 plumbas ferri & 4 ac. filvae ibi. 
Valuit & val. 15 folid. 

Goisfridus ten. de Ro. Lecheswrde. Adeftan 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terras. 
Terra eft 3 car. Ibi 4 villani & 4 bord. & 2 fervi 
habent. 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 2 plumbas ferri & 5 
ac. prati & 20 ac. filvas. Valuit & val. 40 folid. 

Goisfridus ten. de Ro. Blacheshale. Lcuric 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terras. Terra 
ell 3 car. Ibi 3 villani & 3 bord. cum 1 fervo habent. 
2 car. Ibi 60 ac. filvas. Valuit 20 fol. Modo 30 
folid. 

Robertus ten. de Ro. Ceder. Adulfus tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. & una virg. terras. 
Terra eft 4 car. In dominio funt 2 car. cum 5 vil- 
lanis &5 bord. Ibi 15 ac. prati. Valuit 40 folid. 
Modo 30 folid. 

Robertus ten. de Ro. Sipeham. Alduin tenuit 
T. R.E. & geldabat pro 4 hid. Terra eft 6 car. 
In dominio funt 2 car. & 2 villani & 7 bord. cum 1 
car. Ibi 3 ac. prati & 200 ac. pafturas & 10 ac. 
filvx minutae. Valuit 40 folid. Modo 30 folid. 

Ipfe Rog. ten. dim. hidam in Panteshede & ibi 
habet dim. car. cum uno fervo. Ibi dim. ac. prati. 
Valuit & val. ic folid. 

Goisfrid. ten.de Ro.Ache. Domno tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 3 .hid. & dimid. Terra eft 6 car. 
In dominio funt 2 car. & 4 fervi & 14 villani & 14 
bord. habent. 3 car. & dim. Ibi molin. redd. 4 fol. 
U 17 ac prati & 15 ac- pafturas & 10 ac. filvas. In 



Milvertone una domus redd. 1 1 denar. Totum val. 
4 lib. Quandorecep. 50 fol. valeb. 

Willelmus ten. de Ro. Talham. Vluuinus tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 6 car. In 
dominio funt 2 car. cum 1 fervo & 11 villani &4 
bord. habent. 4 car. Ibi 10 ac. prati & 15 ac. filvae 
& 60 ac. pafturae. Valuit & val. 50 folid. 

Willelmus ten. de Ro. Holeford. Adeluualduj 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro dimid. hida. Terra 
eft 1 car. Ibi 2 bord. & 2 fervi ic unaac. prati & io 
ac. pafturas & una ac. filvae. Valet 18 folid. 

Alric ten. de Ro. Holeforde. Aluuard tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dimid. virg. terras. Terra 
eft dimid. car. quas ibi eft cum 1 villano & redd. 3 
folid. 

Norman ten. de Ro. Liteltone. Almar & 
Ofborn & Godricus pro 3 maner. tenuer. T. R. E. 
& geldabant pro 3 hid. Terra eft 4 car. In dominio 
funt 2 car. & 3 fervi & 4 villani & 3 bord. cum 1 car. 
Ibi 40 ac. prati & totid. ac. filvae minutae. Valuit 
& val. 40 folid. 

Robertus ten. de Ro. Stalrewiche. Smeuuin 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida & dim. Terra 
eft 3 car. In dominio eft I car. & 2 villani & 7 
bord. Ibi 6 ac. prati & 4 ac. filvas. Valuit 50 fol. 
Modo 20 fol. 

Almar ten. de Ro. Ecferdintone. Aluric tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra" eft 4 car. 
Ibi 6 villani & 3 bord. cum 3 car. & 13 cofcez. Ibi 
6 ac. prati & 60 ac. filvas, Valuit 60 fol. Modo 
40 fol. 

Almar ten. de Ro. Ferlege. Smeuuin tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Ibi 1 villanus 
& 3 bord. & 2 cotar. habent. 1 car. Ibi 3 ac. prati 
& 6 ac. filvas. Valuit 20 fol. Modo 10 folid. 

Robertus ten. de Ro. Witochesmede. Duo taini 
tenuer. T. R.E. & geldabant pro 1 hida. Terra eft 
2 car. quas ibi funt in dominio cum 1 fervo & 6 bord. 
Ibi 3 ac. prati & 30 ac. filvae. Valuit & val. 3 lib. 
Willelmus ten. de Ro. Witeham. Erlebaldus te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 3 
car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi & 4 villani & 3 
bord. & 4 cofcez cum 2 car. Ibi 20 ac. prati & 30 
ac. pafturas. Silva 1 quarent. long. & dim. quarent. 
lat. Valuit 20 folid. Modo 30 fol. 

Hasc terra T. R. E. jaceb. in Briweham maner. 
Willelmi de Moion, nee poterat inde feparari. 

Erneis ten. de Ro. Briwetone. Goduinus tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro I hida & una virg. terras. 
Terra eft 2 car. Ibi eft 1 car. cum 3 bord. & molin. 
redd. 30 den. Valuit & val. 30 folid. 

Norman ten. de Ro. Bertone. Aleftan tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida & dim. Terra eft 2 
car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 2 villani & 4 bord. cum 
1 car. Ibi molin. redd. 5 folid. & 24 ac. prati & 
totid. ac. pafluras. Valuit 40 folid. Modo 30 folid. 
In hoc. M. jacuit Chintone T. R. E. Ibi eft 1 
hida; Comes Morit. tenet. 

Ipfe Rog. ten. Eimintone. Saulf tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 7 hid. Terra eft 8 car. In dominio 
funt 3 car. & 3 fervi & unus villanus & 13 bord. 
cum 1 car. Ibi molin. redd. 20 folid. &6oac. prati. 
Paftura 12 quarent. long. & 2 quarent. lat. VaLuit 
& val. 7 lib. 

Vjtalis 



Domeftmy^ook.] 



Summer fete. 



Vitalis ten. de Ro. Essentone. Goduinus tenuit 
T.R.iv. & petdabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 3 car. 
In dominio eft I car. cum I fervo & 2 villani & 4 
bord. cum I car. lbi 43 ac. prati Sc 20 ac. pafturae. 
Valuit & val. 40 (olid. 

Vitalis ten. de Ro. Soche. Tochi tenuit T. R. E. 
Sc geldabat pro hida & dim. Terra eft 2 car. In 
dominio eft 1 car. Sc 3 bord. & 10 ac. prati & 15 ac. 
pafturae. Valuit & val. 15 foJid. 

Herbertus ten. de Ro. Brvnetone. Seulf tenuit 
T.R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 4 car. 
In dominio funt 2 car. Sc 2 fervi & 2 villani & 8 
bord. cum 2 car. Ibi 13 ac. prati & 4 ac. filvx 
minutae. Valuit 40 folid. Modo 60 (olid. 

Ipfc Rog. ten. dimid. hida qua; val. 10 folid. hacc 
pcrtineb. T. R. E. in Barintone M. Regis. 

Dodeman & Warmund ten. de Ro. Svtone. Duo 
taini tenuer. T. R. E. de ^Ecclefia Adelingi & non 
poterant ab ea feparari & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra 
eft 3 car. In dominio funt 3 car. cum 1 fervo & 4 
villani & 3 bord. habent. 1 car. Ibi 8 ac. prati. 
Val. 50 folid. 

Ceaa Wogetij arunoel. 

RocERivs Arundel ten. dc Rege Halse. Ailmar 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 4 hid. Terra eft 7 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. ( '& 3 fervi & »6 villani 

6 7 bord. cum 3 car. Sc dim. Ibi molin. redd. 10 
folid. & 8 ac. prati & 12 ac. filvae & 20 ac. pafturae. 
Quando recepit valeb. 100 folid. Modo 6 lib. 

Ipfe Rog. ten. Hiwis. Ailric tenuit T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro 2 hid. & 3 virg. terra:. Terra eft 12 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 5 fervi & 20 villani 
Sc 6 bord. cum 6 car. Ibi molin. redd. 12 denar. Sc 
20 ac. prati Sc 60 ac. filva;. Paftura 1 leu. long. & 
dim. leu. lat. Valeb. quando recepit 6 lib. Modo 

7 lib. 

Ipfe Rog. ten. Wislagetone. Almar tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 10 hid. Terra eft 10 car. 
In dominio eft I car. & 7 fervi & 9 villani & 30 
bord. cum 7 car. Sc 7 porcarii redd. 40 porcos. 

Ibi molin. redd. 15 folid. Sc 50 ac. prati & 6l ac. 
paftura; & 240 ac. fihae. Valeb. quando recepit 12 
lib. Modo 9 lib. 

Ricardus ten. de Ro. Destone. Aluui tenuit 
T. R.E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Sc 3 virg. terrae. 
Terra eft 4 car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 4 fervi & 4 
villani & 5 bora. & 4 cotar. cum 3 car. Ibi 15 ac. 
j rati & 20 ac. pafturae Sc 20 ac. filvae. Valuit Sc 
val. 40 folid. 

Radulf us ten. de Rog. Sanford. Ailuuard tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida & dim. virg. terras 
& uno ferling. Terra eft 3 car. In dominio eft ana 
car. & 3 fervi k 2 villani & 4 bord. cum I car. Sc 1 2 
ac. prati. Valuit Sc val. 30 folid. 

RaduIfusten.deRo. Peri. Vluric tenuit T. R. E. 
Sc geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 1 car. quae ibi 
eft in dominio Sc 8 ac. prati. Valuit & val. 10 fol. 

Radulfus ten. de Ro. una virg. terra; in Newetone. 
Briftuuoldus tenuit T.R.E. Terra eft dim. car. 
Ibi 1 ac. prati & 2 ac. filva*. Val. 5 Ibi. 

Hugo ten. de Ro. Fit-intone. Ailuuard tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 4 hid. Terra eft 6 car. In 

g 



dominio funt 2 car. St 2 fervi Sc 6 villani Sc 5 bord. 
cum 3 car. Ibi 2 moliui redd. 2 fo!. Sc 21 a>. 
Sc 80 ac. ac. palluix Sc 43 ac. morae Sc 42 ac. fii\ae. 
Valuit & val. 4 lib. 

Hugo ten. de Ro. Tochiswelli. Elian tenuit 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro una virg. ten*. Terra ell 
dim. car. Ibi 2 villani Sc 3 bord. habent. 1 car. 
Ibi 1 40 ac. filvae Sc 41 ac. morx- Sc 40 ac. paftura;. 
Valeb. quando reccp. 20 folid. Modo 1 2 folid. Sc 
6 denar. 

Odo ten. de Ro. Cvdworde. Tres taini tenuer. 
T. R. E. &ge!dab. pro 3 hid. &dim. Terra eft 4 car. 
In dominio eft 1 car. Sc 2 fervi & 4 villani Sc 2 bord. 
cum dimid. car. Ibi 4 ac. prati. Paftura 8 quarcnt. 
long. St 2 quarent. lat. Valuit 40 fol. Modo 30 folid. 

Robert us fen. de Ro. Scheucate. Goda tenuit 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro I hida Sc una virg. terra;. 
Terra eft 4 car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 5 fervi Sc 
5 villani Sc 2 bord. cum dimid. car. Ibi molin. 
redd. 10 den. & 2 ac. prati Sc 60 ac. filvx. Paftura 

4 quarent. long. & una quarent. lat. Va!et30 folid. 

Idem ten. de Ro. Mh,detvne. Dunno ten jit 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro 1 hida uno ferling minu»i 
Terra eft 3 car. In dominio eft 1 car. Sc 2 fcrvi Sc 3 
villani & 1 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi 2 ac. prati Sc 5 ac. 
filvae: Paftura 3 quarent. lone. Sc una quarent. lat. 
Valuit 30 folid. Modo 20 folid. 

Robertus ten. de Ro. Radinoetvme. Duo taini 
teneb. T. R. E. Sc geldabant pro 2 hid. Terra eft 8 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. & j-fervi & 5 villani Sc 

5 bord. cum 4 car. Ibi molin. ad aulam inolen. 

6 3 ac. prati & 6 ac. fdvae. Paftura 4 quarent. long. 
& 3 quarent. lat. Valuit Sc val. 30 (olid. 

Drogo ten. de Ro. Timbrecvmbe. Aluerd tenuit 
T.R.E. & geldabat pro una hida & dim. Terra eft 
8 .car. In dominio eft I car. Sc 2 fervi Sc 3 villani & 
8 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi 11 ac. prati & 150 ac. paf- 
turae & 6 1 ac. filvae. Valeb. quando recepit 100 
folid. Modo 40 folid. 

Huic M. additus eft unus ferling. Algar tenuit 
T. R.E. Terra eft 1 car. Ibi eft dim. car. cum 2 
bord. & 8 ac. pafturae & 4 ac. fiivx. Val. 5 folid. 

Willelmus ten. de Ro. Chedesford. Ofmund 
Stramun tenuit T. R, E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. 
Terra eft 7 car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 3 fervi Sc 

5 villani Sc 6 bord. cum 3 car. & dim. Ibi molin. 
redd. 7 fol. & 3 ac. prati & 10 ac. pafturae Sc 12 ac. 
filvae. Valuit 40 fol. Modo 60 fol. 

Willelmus ten. de Ro. unam virg. terrae in Side- 
ham. Cheping tenuit T. R. E. Terra eft 1 car. 
Ibi 15 ac. pafturx. Valet ij denar. 

Wido ten. de Ro. Hasewelle. Aluuardus tenuic 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 2 car. 
In dominio eft 1 car. Sc 2 fervi & 2 villani & 3 bord. 
cum 1 car. Ibi 14 ac. filvae. Valet 25 folid. 

Robertus ten. de Ro. Cari. Duo taini tenuer. 
T. R. E. Sc geldabant pro 1 hida uno ferling minus. 
Terra eft 1 car. quae ibi eft in dominio cum 4 cotar. 
Ibi 20 ac. prati. Valuit & val. 20 folid. 

Ipfe Rog. ten. Cerletvne. Aluerd tenuit 
T. R. E. w geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 6 car. In 
dominio eft 1 car. & 4 fervi & 3 villani & 9 borJ. 
cum 3 car. Ibi 30 ac. prati Sc 2 ac. filvx. Valuit 

6 lib. Modo 100 folid. 

Ipfe 



?ummcrfete. 



[DomefDa^TBooft. 



Ipfe Rog: ten. Aixe. Ailric tenuit T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra ell 4 car. In dominio 
eit 1 car. & 3 fervi & 5 villani & 5 bord. cum 2 
car. Ibi 3 ac. prati & 10 ac. filvae. Paihira 2 qua- 
rent, long. & una quarent. lat. Valet 20 fol. 

Hulc M. addita eft Aixa. Sauuinus tenuit de 
Epifcopo Wcllenfi & non poterat ab eo feparari 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro I hida & una virg. terra:. 
Terra eft 3 car. In dominio eft 1 car. & villani ha- 
bent. 2 car. & dimid. Valuit & val. 30 folid. Rog. 
ten. de Rege & Giuold de eo. 

JpfeRo. ten. OrECEDRE. Domno tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 3 hid. & dim. Terra eft 5 car. In 
dominio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi & 6 villani Sc 6 bord. 
habent. 3 car. Ibi 23 ac. prati & 15 ac. paftura: & 

2 ac. filvaj. Valuit 50 folid. Modo 60 folid. 

De hac terra hujus M. ten. Robertus 1 hid. & ibi 

1 car. habent. cum 1 fervo & 5 bord. & molin. redd. 

3 fol. Ibi 3 ac. prati & 5 ac. pafturas & 4 ac. filvae. 
Valuit 15 fol. Modo 20 folid. 

Ipfe Rog. ten. Cedre. Vluuinus tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 2 hid. & dim. Terra eft 4 car. In 
dominio eft 1 car. & 3 fervi & 6 villani & 6 bord. cum 
3 car. Ibi 248c. prati & 15 ac. pafturae. Va!et6ofol. 

Rogerius [Buiflel] ten. de Ro. Svtone. Vluuard 
tenuit T. R.E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 
car. Ibi funt 6 bord. & 4Cotar. 8c molin. redd. 16 
folid. Ibi 12 ac. prati. Paftura 3 quarent. long. & 

2 quarent. lat. Valuit 100 fol. Modo 30 fol. 
Ipfe Rog. ten. Bechintone. Ailuert tenuit 

T. R. E. & geldabat pro 10 hid. Terra eft 10 car. 
In dominio funt 2 car. & 9 villani & 7 bord. habent. 
6 car. Ibi molin. redd. 20 folid. 8c 12 ac. prati & 
8 ac. paftura; & 100 ac. filva:. Valeb. quandorecepit 
10 lib. Modo 6 lib. 

Robertus ten. de Ro. Berchelei. Toui tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. & dimid. Terra 
eft 3 car. In dominio funt 2 car. cum 1 fervo & 3 
villani &4 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi molin. redd. 12 
fol. & 6 den. & 6 ac. prati & 70 ac. filvae. Valuit 
& val. 40 folid. 

Ipfe Rog. ten. Mersitone. Aeluert tenuit T. R.E. 
& geldabat pro 3 hid. & dim. Terra eft 5 car. In 
dominio eft I car. & 2 fervi & 5 villani & 14 bord. 
habent. 5 car. Ibi molin. redd. 6 folid. & 16 ac. 
prati & 100 ac. paftura?. Silva 1 leu. long. & tan- 
tund. lat. Valet 7 lib. 

Wiilelmus ten. de Ro. Penne. Britnodus tenuit 
T. R.E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 3 car. 
In dominio eft I car. & 4 villani & 8 bord. & 4 
cotar. cum I car. & dim. Ibi molin. redd. 40 denar. 
& 12 ac. prati & 20 ac. pafturs. Silva 12 quarent. 
long. & 4quarent. & 12 pertic.lat. Valeb. quando 
recepit 7 lib. Modo 3 lib. 

Azelinus ten. de Ro. Eslide. Goduinus & Seric 
tenuer. T. R. E. & geldabnntpro 2 hid. Terra eft 2 
car. quae ibi funt in dominio 8c 4 fervi cum 1 bord. 
Ibi 43c. prati & 2 ac. filvx. Valuit & val. 40 folid. 

Ccrra mzltmi etfatrj, 

Wai.terivs Gifard ten. de Rege Gernefelle 
& Wiilelmus de eo. Ernebaldos tenuit T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro z hid. 'i cite eft 3 car. In duminio 



funt 2 car. cum 1 fervo & j bord. cum 1 car. Ibi 
20 ac. paftura: & 6p ac. fiirse. Valuit 40 foL 
Modo 30 fol. 

Cerra Mlalterij De Dotoai. 

Walterivs de Dowai ten. dc Rege Worle. Efgar 
tenuit T. R.E. & geldabat pro 6 hid. & dim. Terra 
eft 15 car. In dominio funt 4 car. & 5 fervi & 22 
villani Sc 3 bord. cum 9 car. Ibi 50 ac. prati. 
Paftura 13 quarent. long. &c 2 quarent. lat. Valuit 
10 lib. Modo 7 lib. 

Walfcinus ten. Stracelle & Reneuualdus de eo. 
Leuegar tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro dimid. hida. 
Terra eft 2 car. In dominio eft una car. cum 1 
fervo & 3 bord. & 10 ac. prati. Valuit & val. 50 fol. 

Reneuualdus ten. de W. Stracelle. Edduuoldus 
tenuit T. R.E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra 
eft 1 car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 2 fervi & unus 
villanus & 2 bord. cum 1 car. 8c dim. Ibi 10 ac. 
prati. Valet 50 fol. 

Rademerus ten. de W. Wallepille. Eduuardus 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 virg. terra:. Terra 
eft 1 car. quae ibi eft in dominio & unus villanus & 3 
bord. cum dimid. car. Valuit & val. 20 folid. 

Walterius ten. unam virg. terra: quae vocatur Done- 
ham. Algar tenuit T. R. E. Haec eft de ilia terra 
quam Rex ded. ei int. 2 aquas. Valet 12 den. 

Rademerus ten. de W. Crvce. Eduuardus tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. Terra eft 1 car. 
quae ibi eft in dominio cum 4 bord. Val. 10 folid. 

Rademerus ten. de W. Bvre. Saric tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 3 car. 
In dominio eft 1 car. cum 1 fervo & 3 villani & 2 
bord. habent. 2 car. Valuit & val. 40 folid. 

Haec terra pertinuit T. R. E. ad Melecome qu t 
m. ten. Robertus de Odboruile. 

Walfcin ten. Werre. Aluuacre tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 5 hid. Sunt tamen ibi 6 hidae. 
Terra eft 8 car. De ea funt in dominio 3 hidx & 
dim. & ibi 2 car. & 2 fervi & 5 villani & 8 bord. 
cum 2 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 42 folid. & 32 ac. 
prati. Quando recepit valeb. 10 lib. Modo 100 
folid. 

Fulcuinus ten. de W. Bagewerre. Duo taini 
pro 2 man. tenuer. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 2 hid. 
Terra eft 2 car. In dominio eft una car. & 2 villani 
& 8 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi 9 ac. prati. Valuit 15 
fol. Modo 20 fol. 

Radulfus ten. de W. Alwarditone. Vlnod te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Ibi additae 
funt 6 hida: quas teneb. 2 taini T. R. E. pro 2 maner. 
int. tot. Terra eft 8 car. De ea funt in dominio 9 
hidae dim. virg. minus & ibi 3 car. & 4 fervi 8c 9 
villani & 9 bord. cum 4 car. Ibi 40 ac. prati & 300 
ac. paftura;. Quando recepit valeb. 8 lib. M0J0 
100 folid. 

Ludo ten. de W. Ternoc. Aluuard tenuit 
T. R. E. & gcidiibat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 2 car. 
&■: dimid. qure ibr funt in dominio & 2 fervi & 4 
bord. Ibi 20 ac. prati & 5 quarent. paftura: in long. 
& tantund. in lat. Val. 20 folid. 

Ricardus ten. de W. Ternoc. Leuuinus tenuit 
T. R.E. & geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 2 car. 

8c dim. 



tDomefoap-15oo&.] 



©ummccfctc. 



=7 



Sc dim. In dominio tamen funt 3 car. & 2 fcrvi & 1 
villan. & 2 bord. Ibi 30 ac. prati & 6 quarent. 
pailuna in long- & tantund. in lac. Valuit 15 fol. 
Modo 25 ("olid. 

Hubertus ten. de W. Alnodestone. Duo taini 
tenuer. T. R.E. Sc geldabant pro 4 hid. Sc dim. 
Terra eft 6 car. In dominio funt 3 car. cum 1 fervo 
Sc 6 villani & 3 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi 15 ac. prati Sc 
20 ac. filvx. Valuit & val. 60 folid. 

Gerardus ten. de W. Broctvne. Elfi tcnuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 4 hid. Terra eft 8 car. 
In dominio funt 2 car. Sc 6 fervi Sc 7 villani cunv-4 
car. Ibi 4 ac. prati & 6 quarent. filvx in long. Sc 
lat. Valuit 7 lib. quando rccepit. Modo 4 lib. 

Ricardus ten. de W. Middeltonb. Eluuacre 
teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro hida & dim. Terra 
eft 2 car. Ibi 3 villani habent. 1 car. Val. Sc va- 
luit 2; folid. 

Reneuuarus ten. de W. Wincaletone. Elfi tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Sc dim. Terra eft 7 
car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi Sc 16 villani & 
6 bord. & 5 cotar. cum 7 car. Ibi 50 ac. prati Sc 
totid. filvx... Valuit Sc val. 70 folid. 
' Huic M. additaeii dim. hida qua Brifmar teneb. 
pro M. T. R. E. Sc pro dim. hida geldabat. Terra eft 

5 car. IbihabetReneuu. I car. Sc 2 fervi & 7 villani 

6 9 bord. ft 2 cotar. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 
30 den. & 60 ac. prati Sc 30 ac. pafturx & 100 ac. 
iilvae. Valuit & val. 40 folid. 

Waiterius ten. Cari. Elfi tenuit T. R. E. & gel- 
dabat pro 1 5 hid. Terra eft 20 car. De ea funt in 
dominio 8 hidae & ibi 6 car. & 6 fervi & 33 villani 
& 20 bord. cum 17 car. Ibi 3 molini redd. 34 fol. 
& 100 ac. prati. Silva 1 leu. long. & dim. leu. lat. 
& unus burgenfis in Givelceftre & alt. in Briuueton 
reddent. 16 den. & obolum. Quando recepit valeb. 
16 lib. Modo 15 lib. 

Fulcuinus ten. de W. Spercheforde. Eluuacre 
tenuit T. R.E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. & una virg. 
terra:. Terra ell 5 car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 
dimid. Sc 6 fervi Sc 9 villani Sc 7 bord. cum 4 car. 
Ibi molin. redd. 7 fol. & dim. & 40 ac. prati & 100 
ac. pafturx Sc una quarent. filvx in long. Sc lat. 
Valuit 4 lib. Modo 100 folid. 

Yiuricten. de W. Almvkdesford. Chetel tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 6 car. In 
dominio funt 2 car. & 3 iervi ft 5 villani Sc 4 bord. 
cum 5 car. Ibi molin. redd. 7 fol. & dim. & 20 ac. 
prati Sc 20 ac. pafturx. Silva 4 quarent. long. & I 
& dim. lat. Quando recepit valeb. 4 lib. Modo 
3 lib. 

Radulfus ten. de W. Berve. Elfi tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 car. In dominio 
funt 2 car. & 3 iervi & 7 villani & 5 bord. cum 3 car. 
Ibi 25 ac. prati & 3 quarent. filv.-e in long. & 1 que- 
rent, lat. Quando rccepit valeb. 100 fol. Modo 
60 folid. 

Walfcinus ten. Brvgie. Merlefuain tenuit 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 10 car. 
In dominio Tunc 3 car. & 5 fervi Sc 1 3 villani Sc 9 
bord. & 5 cotar. cum 8 car. Ibi molin. redd. 5 fol. 
Sc 10 ac. prati & 100 ac. filv* minutx & 30 ac. 
paftura. Quando recepit valeb. : 00 fol. Modo 7 
lib. 



Ludo ten. de VV. W/.dmenovke. Merlcfi ; in 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. cum 1 fervo & 7 villain 
Sc 6 bord. cum 4 car. Ibi 10 ac. prati Sc 132c. 
paftura; Sc 5 ac. filvx. Quando recepit valeb. 3 lib. 
Modo 4 lib. 

Reneuualdus ten. de W. Bacutkepb. Merlefuain 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 8 
car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 6 fervi & 1 1 villani Sc 
7 bord. Sc 3 cotarij cum 5 car. Ibi molin. redd. 4 
ibi. & 100 ac. prati & 40 ac. pafturx. Valeb. 50 
folid. Modo 60 folid. 

Reneuualdus ten. de W. Bredenie. Alnod tenuit 
T. R.E. Sc geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 1 car. 
& dim. Ibi eft unus villanus Sc 5 bord. Sc 1 cotar. 
Sc 1 fervus cum car. & dim. Ibi 25 ac. prati. Valet 
20 folid. 

Rademer ten. de W. Hvrsi. Eluuard teneb. 
T.R.E. Sc geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 7 car. 
In dominio funt 2 car. Sc 2 fervi & 8 villani & 6 
bord. Sc 3 cotar. cum 5 car. Sc 24 ac. paftura;. Valet 
4 lib. 

Rademer ten. de W. Pavelet. Semar tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terrx. Terra ell 
1 car. qua; ibi eft in dominio cum t fervo Sc 2 bord. 
Sc 3 cotar. Sc 5 ac. prati. Valuit & val. 10 folid. 

Ipfe W. ten. Bvrneham. Brixi tenuit T. R. E. 

6 geldabat pro 4 hid. Terra eft 12 car. In do- 
minio ell 1 car. & 3 fervi Sc 7 villani Sc 8 bord. cum 5 
car. Ibi 150 ac. prati Sc 20 ac. paftura;. Valet 4 lib. 

De hac terra ten. Rademer de Walterio 2 hid. Sc 
ibi habet 1 car. & 3 fervos & 7 villani~& 8 bord. Sc 
3 cotar. cum 5 car. Sc 150 acris prati Sc 20 acris 
pafturx. Valet 4 lib. 

Ipfe W. ten. Honspil. Eluuacre tenuit T. R.E. 
Sc geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 1 3 car. In do- 
minio funt 2 car. & 5 fervi Sc 21 villani & 5 bord. Sc 

7 cotar. cum 11 car. Ibi 100 ac. prati & 200 ac. 
pafturx. Valuit & val. 8 lib. 

Ipfe W. ten. Brien. Merlefuain tenuit T.R.E. 
& geldabat pro 2 hid. Terraeft 8 car. In dominio 
funt 3 car. cum I fervo & 9 villani Sc 7 bord. & 7 
cotar. cum 3 car. Sc dim. Ibi 30 ac. paftura;. Valet 
100 folid. 

Radulfus ten. de W. Contvne. Eluuacre tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 4 hid. Terra eft 3 car. 
In dominio funt 2 car. & 4 bord. Sc 7 cotar. & I 
villanus cum dim. car. Ibi molin. redd. 6 den. Sc 
12 ac. prati Sc 10 quarent. pafturx in long. Sc 2 
quarent. lat. & 3 quarent. filvx in long. Sc 2 qua- 
rent. in lat. Valuit Sc val. 50 folid. 

Huic M. addita eft 1 hida Contvne vocata. Alric 
teneb. pro M. T. R. E. Sc pro tanto geldabat. Terra 
ell 1 car. Ibi eft dim. car. cum I villan o & 2 bord. 
& z ac. prati & 4 ac. pafturx Sc 4 ac. filvx minutx. 
Valuit & val. 10 folid. 

Radulfus ten. de W. Harpetrev. Eluuacre te- 
nuit T.R.E. & geldabat pro c hid. Terra eft 4 
car. In dominio eft I car. & 2 fervi & 5 villani & 2 
bord. cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd. 5 fol. Sc 68 ac. 
prati & 62 ac. filvx. Paftura 1 leu. in long. Sc lat. 
Valuit & val. 40 fol. 

Radulfus ten. de W. Ecewiche. Eluuacre tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una viig. terrx & dim. & 

8 acris. 



28 



^ummerfcte. 



[Domenra^TBoofe. 



8 acris. Terra eft I car. Ibi eft I bord. Valcf 
10 folid. 

Rademerten. de W. Alsistvne. AluuolJ tenuit • 
T.R.E. & geldabat pro I hida. Terra eft 3 car. 
In dominioeft 1 car. cum 4fervo & I villano & 4 bord. 
& 3 cotar. habentibus 1 car. & 40 ac. pafturx. Valuit 
& val. 20 folid. 

Ipfe W. ten. Hvnespil. Aluuinus tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 3 virg. terras. Terra eft 2 car. In 
dominio eft icar. & 4 fervi & 2 villani & 5 bord. & 
4 cotar. cum 1 car. Ibi 20 ac. prati. Valuit & val. 
20 folid. 

Raimar [clericus] ten. de W. Hiwis. Chinefi 
tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terrae. 
Terra eft 1 car. qu.e ibi eft cum 1 fervo & I cotar. & 
3 bord. Valuit & -val. 10 folid. 

Radulfus ten. de W. Hiwis. Ailuui tenuit 
T. P.. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terras. Terra 
eft 1 car. qua; ibi ell cum 5 bord. Valuit & val. 
10 fol. 

Idem Rad. ten. de W. Ateberie. Elfi tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro I hida & una virg. terras. 
Terra eft I car. quae ibi eft cum I villano & I 
bord. Ibi 10 ac. prati & 20 ac. filvx. Valuit & 
val. 15 folid. 

Cerra ©Billeton He 0©oton. 

Willelmvs de Moion ten. de Rege Stochelande. 

Algar tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro 4 hid. & una 

virg. terrx. Terra eft 5 car. In dominio funt 3 

car. & 6 fervi & 5 villani & 4 bord. cum dim car. 

Ibi molin. redd. 10 den. & 48 ac. prati & 12 ac. 

filvx. Quando recepit valeb. 60 folid. Modo 4 

lib. & 10 folid. 

Huic M. ell addita Sedtamtone. Aluric teneb. 

T. R. E. pro uno M. & geldabat pro 3 virg. terrae. 

Terra eft 1 car. Ibi funt 13 ac. prati & 6 ac. filvse. 

Valuit & val. 10 lolid. 

Ipfe ten. Torre & ibi eft caftellum ejus. Aluric 

tenuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra 

eft I car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 10 fol. & 15 bord. & 

5 ac. prati & 30 ac. paftura: Valeb. olim 5 fol. 

Modo 15 fol. 

Hugo ten. deW. Tetesberge. Sex taini teneb. 
T. R. E. & ge'dabant pro 2. hid. Terra eft 4 car. 
In dominio eil 1 car. & 3 fervi & 6 villani & 12 
bord. cum 3 car. & dim- Ibi 6 ac. prati & 100 ac. 
p.ifturx & 10 ac. moras & 2 ac. filva:. Valuit & val. 
40 folid. 

Garmund ten. de W. Ailci. Algar tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. 1 erra eil 2 
car. In dominio ell una cum I fervo* & 6 bord. cum 
1 car. Ibi 10 ac. filvas. Valuit &. va!. 20 folid. 

Robertua ten. de W. Lege. SireuuaUi tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 4 car. 
In dominio eit 1 car. cum I fervo & 5 villani & 2 
bord. & 8 ac. prati. Silva 2 quarent. long. & una 
quarent. lat. Valuit clim 30 iol. Modo 20 folid. 

Rogerius ten. de W. SJtrate. Hufearl & Almar 
tenuer. T. R. E; & geltfcbanc pro I hida & dim. 
Terra eft 2 car. Ibi iunt 3 villani & 1 bord. cum 1 
car. & una ac. prati & dinrid. Paftura 5 quarenh 
long. & 2 quarent. lat. Valeb- Jv val. 15 ltd. 



Turgis ten. de W. Bvrnetone. BricVic teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. & dimid. Terra eft 
12 car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 7 fervi & 16 vil- 
lani & z bord. cum 8 car. Ibi molin. redd. 30 den. 

6 6 ac. prati & 20 ac. filvas & 1 leu. pafturas. 
Quando recepit valeb. 40 fol. Modo 4 lib. 

Hxc terra fuit de ^icclefia Glaftingberie nee po- 
terat inde feparari T. R. E. 

Ogifus ten. de W. Clatevrde. Aluiet teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida & dim. Terra eft 

7 car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 2 fervi & 16 villani 
& 5 bord. cum 5 car. Ibi molin. redd. 6 den. & 5 
ac. prati & 25 ac. filvae. Paftura dimid. leu. long. 
& 4 quarent. lat. Valuit olim 20 fol. Modo 40 folid. 

Hasc terra non poterat feparari ab jEcclefia Glaf- 
tingberie fed erat ibi tainlande T. R. E. 

Ipfe W. ten. Vdecome. ./Elmar teneb. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 1 5 car. In dominio 
funt 4 car. & 6 fervi & 18 villani & 5 bord. cum 5 
car. Ibi 6 porcarii redd. 31 pore. & molin. redd. J 
fol. & 6 ac. prati. Paftura 2 leu. long. & I leu. lat. 
Silva 1 leu. long. & dim. leu. lat. Valeb. olim 3 
lib. Modo 6 lib. 

Dehac terra hujus M. ten. 3 milites de W. unam 
hid. & dimid. virg. terrx & ibi habent 2 car. & 4 
villan. & 6 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi 2 ac. prati & 14 
ac. filvx. Paftura dimid. leu. long. & 5 quarent. 
lat. Valeb. & val. 35 folid. & 6 denar. 

Ipfe W. ten. Manheve. Algar teneb. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 12 car. In do- 
minio funt 3 car. & 12 fervi & 27 villani & 22 bord. 
cum 10 car. Ibi molin. redd. 3 folid. & 12 ac. prati 
& 24 ac. filvx. Paftura 4 leu. long. & 2 leu. lat. 
Quando recepit valeb, 100 folid. Modo 6 lib. 

Ipfe W. ten. Avcome. Algar tenuit T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 3 car. In domi- 
nio eft 1 car. & 4 fervi & 3 villani & 4 bord. cum 
2 car. Ibi 8 ac. prati & 3 quarent. pafturas. Valuit 
& val. 20 fol. 

Durandus ten. de W. Brvne. Eduuoldus tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro rhida. Terra eil 6 car. 
In dominio funt 2 car. & dim. & 2 fervi & 13 villani 
& 3 bord. cum 4 car. Ibi I ac. prati & 80 ac. 
pafiurx & 12 ac. filvx. Valeb. olim 20 fol. Modo 
40 folid. 

Tres milites ten. de W. Langeham. Tres taini 
teneb. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 1 hida. Terra eft 6 
car. In dominio funt 3 car. cum 1 fervo & 5 Tikani 
& 8 bord. cum 3 car. & dim. Ibi molin. redd. 3 
folid. & 4 ac. prati & 60 ac. pafturas & 36 acrx filvx. 
Valuit & val. 30 fol. 

Mainfridus ten. de W. Coarme. Ai'uuardus te- 
nuit T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 
4 car. In dominio eft 1 car. cum uno fervo & 5 
viilani & 4 bord. cum I car. Ibi I ac. prati & 10 
ac. filvae. Paftura 5 quarent. long, i 5 lat. Valeb. 
ohm 7 fol. Modo 15 folid. 

Ritardus ton. de W. Bichecome. Duo taini 
teneb. T. R. E. & geldabant pro una virg. terrx. 
Terra eft 2 car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 3 villani & 
6 bord. cum dim. car. Ibi 3 ac. prati & 40 ac. 
pafiurx. Valeb. olim 6 fol. Modo I £ folid. 

IpeW. ten. Bradewrde. Alric teneb. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pio dim. hida. Terra eil 1 car. qux ibi 

eft 



S>omcCDaB*TBoofeO 



©ummctfcte. 



29 



eft in lomioio Sc 2 fervi & 3 villani Se 2 bord. cum 1 
car. Ibi ? ac. prati. Paftnra 1 leu. long. Sc dim. 
]eu. 1 leu. long. & 4quarent. kt. Valeb. 

olim 10 Col Modo 15 fol. 

Radul. ten. de W. A vena. Aluric tcneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra ell 2 
car. In dominio eft 1 car. It 1 villanus Sc 5 bord. 
cum dim. car. Ibi molin. redd. 20 den. & 4 ac. 
prati Sc 2 ac. lilvx- Se 50 ac. pallura.-. Valuit Sc val. 
10 fol id. 

Ipfe W. ten. Stantvne. Walle teneb. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 3 virg. terra;. Terra ell 2 car. Ibi 

2 villani Se 2 fervi Se 2 bord. cum 1 car. Se 5 ac. 
prati Sc 40 ac. pafturae. Valet ij folid. 

Huic M. addiia una virg. terra: quam tenuit unus 
tainus T. R. E. pro uno M. Terra eft 1 car. Ibi 
ell unus bord. & 3 ac. prati & 50 ac. pafturae. Valec 

3 fol. 

IpfeW. ten. Aisseforde. DomnotenuitT. R. E. 
& geldabat pro uno ferling. Terra ell 2 bov. Ibi 
ell unus villanus & 15 ac. pafturae. Valuit & val. 
15 denar. 

Ipfe W. ten. Aisseforde. Sarpo teneb. T. R. E. 
Se geldabat pro 1 ferling Sc dimid. Terra ell dim. 
car. Sed jacet in pallura & redd. 12 denar. 

Durandus ten. de W. Staweit. Leuing tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terrae. Terra eft 
1 car. quxibiellin dominiocum 1 villano Sc 1 bord. 
Ibi 1430 filvae. Valeb. 3 fol. Modo 10 folid. 

Durandusten.de W.Wochetrev. Mannotenuit 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro dim. virg. terra:. Terra 
eft 1 car. Ibi funt 2 villani cum dim. car. & 4 ac. 
filva:. Valuit 4 folid. Modo 6 folid. 

Durandus ten. de W. Alvrenecote. Leuuinus 
tenuit T. R. E. & geld, pro dim. virg. Terra eft 2 
car. Ibi eft I car. cum 2 villanis Se 2 bord. Se 8 ac. 
pallura; & 2 ac. filva:. Valuit & val. 6 folid. 

Goisfridus ten. de \V. Mene. Leuuinus tenuit 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 2 
car. qux ibi funt in dominio Se 4 fervi cum 1 bord. 
Ibi 1 ac. prati & 4 ac. film Se 50 ac. paftura. 
Valuit 1 j fol. 

Rogcnus ten. de W. Bratone. Aluric teneb. 
T. R. E. Se geldabat pro 3 virg. terra;. Terra ell 4 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. cum I fervo Se 2 villani 
& 4 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi 2 ac. prati & 100 ac. 
paftune. Valuit olim 5 folid. Modo 30 folid. 

Rogerius ten. de W. Ernole. Paulinus teneb. 
T. R. E. Se geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 3 car. 
In dominio eft car. Se dim. & 1 fervus Se 1 bord. Se 
4 villani cum 1 car. Ibi 1 leu. filvse minutae in long. 
&dim. leu.lat. Valeb. olim 5 folid. Modo 25 folid. 

Rannulfus ten. Lclochesherie. Duo taini tenue- 
runt T. R. E. & geldabant pro 1 hida. Terra eft 4 
car. In dominio eft una car. Se 3 fervi Se 6 villani 
& 3 bord. cum 3 car. ibi 100 ac. pallura; & 30 ac. 
filva. Valet 20 folid. 

Nigel ten. de W. Lolochesberie, 
T. R. E. Se geldabat pro I hida. 
Ibi 2 ac. prati Se 100 ac. pafturx 
Valuit Se val. 15 folid. 

IpfeW. ten.CANTocHEVE. Elnod teneb. T.R. E. 
Se geldabat pro 3 hid. Se dim. Terra eft 8 car. In 
dominio funt 3 car. Se 7 fervi Se 10 villani & 4 



Brifmar tenuit 
Terra eft 3 car. 
8c 50 ac. filva:. 



> 



bord. cum 6 car. Ibi 16 ac. priti Sc 50 ac. fil»je; 
Pallura una leu. long. Sc una leu. lat. Valuit 3 lib. 
Modo4 lib. 

Ipfe VV. ten. Chilvetvne. Aluuardus Sc Lcuric 
teneb. pro 2 M. T. R. E. Se geldabant pro to hid. 
& dim. Terra eft to car. In dominio funt 4 car. 
Sc 7 fervi & 16 villani Se 6 bord. cum c car. Ibi6o 
ac. prati & 60 ac. pallura; & 100 ac. filvae. Valuit 
olim 100 fol. Modo 7 lib. 

De eadem terra ten. Radu'fus de W. unam lud.im 
& ibi habet I car. Se 2 viliauos cum 1 car. Ibi 
lc. prati Se una virg. pafturae. Valet 20 folid. 

Ipfe W. ten. Niwetvne. Aluiet tenuit T. R. E. 
&g<.tdabat pro 4 hid. & dim. Terra eft 7 car. In 
dominio funt 2 car. & 4 fervi Se 13 villani Se 4 bord. 
cum 5 car. Ibi molin. redd. 40 denar. & 18 ac. 
prati & 50 ac. filvae & una leu. pafturae in long. Se 
lat. Valeb. 60 fol. Modo 100 fol. 

Ipfe W. ten. Vlvretvne. Britmar tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 1 car. Ibi 2 
villani Se 2 bord. habent. 2 car. Ibi 7 ac. prati Sc 
io ac. pallura: & 7 ac. filvae. Valeb. olim 10 fol. 
Modo 20 folid. 

Dtfdeman ten. Elwrde de W. Dunne teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 4 hid. Terra eft 5 car. 
In dominio funt 2 car. & 2 fervi & 9 villani Sc 8 bord. 
cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 4 fol. & una ac. prati Sc 
dimid. & 120 ac. pallura; & 50 ac. filva;. Valeb. 
olim 20 fol. Modo 40 folid. De hac hida ten. 
Rex unam virg. terra: ad maner. de Welletune. 

Dudeman ten. de W. Willet. Dunne teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 4 
car. In dominio eft 1 car. cum 1 fervo Se 9 villani Sc 
6 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. fine cenfu Se 3 ac. 
prati Se 50 ac. pafturae & 40 ac. filvae. Valeb. olim 
10 folid. Modo 20 folid. 

Idem ten. de W.Colefqrd. Brifluin ten.T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro dim. hida uno ferling minus. Terra 
eft 2 car. Ibi 2 villani habent 1 car. Valet 6 folid. 

Idem D. ten. de W. Wacet. Aluuold tcneb. 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro una virg. tcrrx. Terra 
eft dim. car. Ibi tamen eft 1 car. cum 1 fervo & 1 
bord. Ibi molin. redd. 10 folid. Valet 15 fol. 

Hugo ten. de W. Tvrvestone. Lefsinus tcneb. 
T. R. E. Se geldabat pro 1 hida& dim. Terra eft- 

4 car. In dominio funt 2 car. Se 5 villani Se 6 bord. 
cum 2 car. Ibi molin. fine cenfu & 15 ac. prati & 
dim. Sc 1 1 ac. pafturae Se 46 ac filva:. Valeb. olim 
30 folid. Modo 50 folid. 

Hugo ten. de W. Holeford. Aluuold teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 2 car. 
quae ibi funt in dominio cum 1 fervo Sc 1 villano Sc 

5 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi molin. redd, to den. Sc 3 
ac. prati & 60 ac pallura: Sc 4 ac. filvx. Valeb. 
olim 10 folid. Modo 20 folid. 

Rogerius ten. de W. Haretrev. Vluuolduste- 
nebat T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 4 
car. In dominio eft 1 car. cum 1 fervo Sc 2 villani 

6 6 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi molin. redd. 6 den. & 5 
ac. prati & 100 ac. paftune Sc 6 ac. filva:. Valeb. 
olim 10 fol. Modo 20 folid. 

Meinfridus Se Robertus ten. de W. Cibewrde. 
Duo taini teneb. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 1 hida. 
Terra eft 3 car. In dominio eft 1 car. & unus vil- 
li c Janus 



3° 



iummetfete. 



pDomefoa^TBoolu 



lanus & 4 lord, cum dim. car. Ibi 4 ac. prati & 50 
ac. pafturae & 5 ac. filvx. Valeb. olim 10 fol. 
Modo 12 folid. 

Turgis ten. de W. Come. Ailmer teneb. T. R. E. 
& gcldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 3 car. Indominio 
eft 1 car. cum 1 fervo &6 bord.cumdim. car. Ibi 
molin. fine cenfu & 4 ac. prati & 50 ac. pafturae & 4 
quarent. filvaein long. & 2 quarent. in lat. Valeb. 
olim 15 fol. Modo 20 fol. 

Briftric ten. deW. Sordemaneford. IdemBric- 
tric teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terra:. 
Terra eft dim. car. Hanc habet ibi 1 bord. & 7 
acras filvae. Valuit &val. 6 folid. 

Nigel ten. de W. Badeheltone. Duo taini te- 
neb. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 2 hid. Terra eft 5 
car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 3 fervi & 12 villani & 
1 bord. & 5 cotar. cum 4 car. Ibi molin. redd. 7 
fol. & 6 den. & 6 ac. prati & 40 ac. pafturae & 12 
ac. filvae. Valeb. olim 10 fol. Modo 50 folid. 

Rannulfus ten.de W. Maneworde. Vlf teneb. 
pro 1 hida. Terra eft 3 car. In dominio eft 1 car. 
cum 1 fervo & 3 villani & 2 bord. cum dim. car. 
Ibi 7 ac. prati Sc 12 ac. filvae & 12 ac. pafturae. 
Valeb. olim 10 fol. Modo 20 folid. 

Dodeman ten. de W.Rvnetone. Duo taini teneb. 
T. R.E.& geldabant pro 3 hid. Terraeft2car. In 
dominio eft I car. & 4 fervi & unus villanus & 8 bord. 
cum 1 car. Ibi molin. redd. 5 folid. & 8 ac. prati & 
lo ac. filvae. Valeb. olim 20 folid. Modo 50 folid. 

Dodeman ten. de W. Povselle. Vluric teneb. 
T.R.E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terraeft 2car. 
Ibi eft unus fervus & 3 ac. prati & 20 ac. filvae. 
Val. 10 fol. 

Huic M. additaeft una hida quam teneb. T. R. E. 
onus tainus Iibere. Terra eft 1 car. Valuit & val. 
30 denar. 

Mainfridus ten. deW. Lege. Cheping teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Tamen ibi eft 
1 hida. Terra 2 car. In dominio eft I car. & 2 
fervi & 2 villani & 3 bord. cum dim. car. Ibi 1 ac. 
prati & 1 2 ac. pafturae & 20 ac. filvae. Valeb. olim 

5 fol. Modo 12 folid. 

Rogerius ten. de W. Stoche. Eddida teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 2 car. 
quae ibi funt in dominio cum 8 bord. Ibi8ac. prati 

6 4 ac. filvx minutae. Valuit & val. 30 folid. 
Ipfe W. ten. Brvnfelle. Alnod teneb. T. R. E. 

& geldabat pro 3 hid. Terraeft tocar. Indominio 
eft 1 car. & 8 fervi & 12 villani & 2 bord. cum 4 
car. Ibi 10 ac. prati & una leu. pafturae & una 
leu. filvae in long. & lat. Quando- recepit valeb. 40 
fol. Modo 60 fol. 

Ipfe W. ten. Lidiard. Alric teneb. T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 6 car. In dominio eft 
I car. & 4 fervi & 10 villani & 6 bord. cum 1 car. 
Ibi molin. redd. 8 folid. & 15 ac. prati & 10 ac. 
pafturae & 20 ac. filvae. Valuit & val,. 7 lib. 

Ipfe W. ten. Baoeberge. Leuric teneb. T. R. E. 
&geldabatpro3 hid. Terraeft 10 car. Indominio 
funt 3 car. & 7 fervi & 21 vill. & 2 bord. cum 4 car. 
Ibi 1 1 ac. prati & 200 ac. pafturae & 10 ac. filvae. 
Valeb. & val. 100 folid. 

Ipfe W. ten. Stochh. Aluuard teneb. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 2 hid. Terraeft 6 car. Ibi 6 villani & 



2 bord. cum 1 fervo habent. 2 car. Ibi 1 ac. prati & 
200 ac. pafturae & 6ac. filvae. Valeb. & val. 30 fol. 

Radulfusten. de W. Herfeld. Eluuinus teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. & dim. Terra eft 6 
car. In dominio eft I car. & 5 fervi & 7 villani & 

5 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi molin. redd. 30 denar. & 18 
ac. prati & 50 ac. pafturae & 30 ac. filvx. Valeb. 
30 iol. Modo 4 lib. 

Turgis ten. de W. Noivn. Colo teneb. T. R. E. 

6 geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 3 car. In dominio 
eft l car. & 4 fervi & 3 villani & 8 bord. cum 1 car. 
Ibi dimid. molin. redd. 30 denar. & 20 ac. prati & 
totid. pafturae & 100 ac. filvae. Valeb. olim 40 
fol. Modo 60 fol. 

Ipfe W. ten. Br'iweham. Robertus Filius Wi- 
marci teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 12 hid. 
Terra eft 15 car. In dominio funt 4 car. & 2 fervi 
& 22 villani & 28 bord. cum 13 car. Ibi 2 molini 
redd. 9 fol. & 2 den. & 60 ac. prati & 200 ac. filvae. 
Quando recepit valeb. 12 lib. Modo 14 lib. & 12 
folid. 

Huic M. funt additae 3 virg. terrae. Almar teneb. 
T. R. E. Terra eft dim. car. Ibj funt 3 cotarij. 
Valeb. & val. 5 folid. 

De hoc Man. funt ablatae 3 hida; quas teneb. 
Erleboldus T. R. E. de Roberto nee poterat feparari 
a Maner. Rogerius de Corcelle modo ten. 

Warmundusten.de W. Eiretone. Ernui teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terraeft 3 car. In 
dominio eft 1 car. & dimid. & unus villanus & 4 
bord.cumdim. car. Ibi ioac. prati & totid. pafturae 
& 12 ac. filvae. Valuit & val. 40 folid. 

Cerva cEMelmi tie ©to, 

Willelmvs de Ow ten. de Rege Watelege. 
T. R. E. geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 1 car. 
Ibi funt 2 villani & 6 quarent. filvae in long. & 4 
in lat. Val. 10 fol. 

Ipfe W. ten. Hantoke. T. R. E. geldabat pro 
13 hid. Terra eft 1 2 car. Deea funt in dominio 5 
hidx & ibi 4 car. '& 5 fervi & 1 6 villani & 24 bord. 
cum 10 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 7 fol. & 6 den. & 
60 ac. prati. Silvae i leu. in long. & dim. leu. lat. 
Quando recepit valeb. 12 lib. Modo 15 lib. 

Radulfus ten.de W. Geveltone. T.R. E. gel- 
dabat pro 8 hid. Terra eft 8 car. In dominio funt 

3 car. & 4 fervi & 6 villani & 4 bord. cum 5 car. 
Ibi 2 molini redd. 30 fol. & 90 ac. prati & 4* ac. 
paftur.-u. Quando recepit valeb. 9 lib. Modotantund^ 

Huic M. funt additae 2 hida; quas teneb. 5 taini 
T.R. E.in paragio. Terra eft 2 car. Val. 30 folid. 

Herbertus ten. ae W. Lavretoke. T. R. E. 
geldabat pro 10 hid. Terra eft iocar. Indominio 
funt 3 car. & 2 fervi & 6 vjllani & 8 bord. cum 4 
car. Ibi 12 ac. prati & 60 ac. pafturae & 60 ac. 
filvae. Quando recepit valeb. 7 lib. Modo 8 lib. 

Radulfus ten. deW. Hantone. T.R.E. gelda- 
bat pro 8 hid. Terra elt 6car. & dim. In dominio 
funt 2 car. & dim. & 4 fervi & 7 villani & 3 bord. 
& 4 cotar. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 4 folid. & 
60 ac. prati. Silva 1 leu. long. & una quarent. lat. 
Valeb. 6 lib. Modo 100 folid. De hac terra ten. 
Hugo de W. dim. hidam. Semper val. 3 fol. 

Hi'go 



Domcfoa^lBooK.] 



^ummcrfete. 



3* 



Hugo ten. de W. Ivi.b. T. R. E. geldabat pro 
6 hid. Terra eft 6 car. In dominio ell 1 car. & 3 
fervi ft 11 vil : ani& 14 bord. cum 6 car. Ibi molin. 
redd. 10 folid. & 33 ac. prati & 30 ac. paiturx. 
Semper val. 8 lib. 

Huic M. addita; funt 22 mafurae quas tencb. 22 
homines in paragio T. R. E. Reddunt 12 (olid. 

Warnerius ten. de W. Citfrne. T. R. E. gel- 
dabat pro 1 hida. Terra ell 1 car. Val. 10 ; 
Has terras praediftas teneb. Aleltan BofcomeT. R.E. 

Ipfe W. ten. Ticheham. Saulf & Tcolf teneb. 
T. R. E. pro 2 maner. & geldabant pro 8 hid. •& 
dim. Terracll 9 car. In dominio funt 3 car. & 4 
fervi & 12 villani & 5 bord. cum 6 car. Ibi 30 ac. 
prati & 60 ac. pailurx & 1 10 ac. filvse. Valeb. 
100 fol. quando recepit. Modo 6 lib. 

Cerra OTllelmi De JFaletfc. 

Willelmvs de Faleise ten. de Rege Stoche. 
Brixi teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 4 hid. & dim. 
Terra ell 14 car. In dominio funt 4 car. & 5 fervi 
& 38 villani & 3 bord. & 3 coliberti cum 10 car. 
Ibi molin. redd. 16 den. & 150 ac. prati & 19 ac. 
pailurx ic 100 ac. filvx. Quando recepit valeb. 
25 lib. Modo 20 lib. 

Huic M. addita eft dimid. hida quam teneb. 
T. R. E. unus tainus in paragio & poterat ire quo 
voleb. Terra eft 1 car. qua ibi eftcum 1 bord. & 
2 fervis. Val. femper 10 folid. 

Ipfe W. ten. Otone. Algar teneb. T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra ell 10 car. In dominio 
funt 3 car. & 6 fervi & 10 villani & 8 bord. cum 3 
car. Ibi molin. redd. 10 den. & 4 ac. prati. Paf- 
tura 1 leu. long. & dim. lat. & tantund. filvx. 
Valuit & val. 100 folid. 

Ipfe W. ten. Worsprinc conceffu Regis W. Serlo 
[Borci]ded.ei cumfuafilia. Euroac teneb. T.R. E. 

6 geldabat pro 6 h'd. & una virg. terrx. Terra 

eft 12 car. In dominio Ibi 13 villani & 6 

bord. habent. 6 car. Ibi 10 ac. pafturx & 10 ac. 
filvxminutx. Semper val. 100 fol. 

HuicM. funt addita: 3 hidx quas teneb. T. R. E. 
Aluuard & Colo pro 2 maner. & pro 3 hid. geldab. 
Terra eft 8 car. In dominio funt 3 car. & 4 fervi & 

7 villani & 4 bord. cum 3 car. & 8 ac. paftura:. 
Semper val. 4 lib. 

Cerra (KtliUcImi filit &HiDoniS. 

Willelmvs filivs Widon ten. de Rege Horste - 
ketone. Sauardus & Eldeua teneb. T. R. E. pro 2 
M. & quo voleb. ire poterant & geldabant pro 11 
hid. Terra eft 10 car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 4 
fervi & 12 villani & 10 bord. & 1 2 cotar. cum 7 car. 
& dim. Ibi molin. redd. 42 denar. & 100 ac. prati. 
Paftura 6 quarent. long. & 5 quarent. lat. Silva 7 
quarcnt. long. & 6 quarent. lat. Quando recepit 
valeb. 8 lib. & 15 fol. Modo tantund. De h;;c 
terra ten. Radulfus de W. 1 hid. & dim. St ibi habet 
I car. & dimid. Semper val. 2; folid. 

Bernardus ten. de YV. Cherintone. Aluuoldus 
tenebat T. R. E. & geldabat pro 6 hid. Terra eft 6 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 6 fervi k 5 villani & 
4 bord. & 2 corar. cum 3 car. Ibi 125 ac. prati. 
Paftura 5 quarent. long. & 3 quarent. lat. Silva 7 



quarent. long. & tantund. lat. Qjando recepit 
valeb. 100 folid. Modo61ib. 

De hac eadem terra 5 hid. emit Aluuoldus de 
Abbruia Ccrnel. in vita fua tantummoJo & poll 
mortem ejus terra debeb. redire ad iEcclcfiam. 

Cecra EaDulfi De £@ortemer. 

R ADVI.PVS de Mortemer ten. de Rege Waltoni 
& Ricardus de eo. Gunni teneb. T. R.E. & gel- 
dabat pro 3 hid. & dim. Terra eft 4 car. In do- 
minio eft 1 car. & 7 villani & 5 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 
2oac. prati & ioo.ac.paftutac& 5oac.filvae. Quando 
recepit valeb. 50 folid. Modo plus 20 folid. hoc ell 70. 

Cerra EaDulfi De IPomerei. 

Radvlfvs de Pomerei ten. Stawei & Beatrix de 
eo. Aimer teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro una 
virg. terrae. Terra eft 3 car. In dominio funt 2 car. 
& 3 fervi & unus villanus & 4 bord. Ibi 2 ac. prati 
& 6 ac. filvac & pafturadim. leu. long. & 4quarent. 
lat. Valuit & val. 20 fo'iJ. 

Ipfe Rad. ten. Are. Edric teneb. T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 6 car. In dominio 
funt 2 car. & 4 fervi & 7 villani & 5 bord. cum 4 
car. Ibi 2 ac. prati & 1 5 ac. filva:. Paftura 2 leu. 
long. & una lat. Val. 30 fol. 

HocM. redd. per confuetud. i2ovesin Carentone 
M. Regis perann. Radulfus retinethanc confuetud. 

Cer?a KaDulfi Ipagenel. 

Radvlfvs Pagenel ten.de Rege Stocheland & 
Radulfus deeo. T.R. E. geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra 
ell 5 car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 4 fervi & 7 
villani & 4 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 50 ac. prafi & 
80 ac. pafturx. Semper val. 100 folid. 

Idem Rad. ten.de Rad. Cantocheheve. T.R.E. 
geldabat pro 7 hid. Terra eft 20 car. In dominio 
funt 2 car. & 4 fervi & 13 villani & 7 bord. cum 7 
car. Ibi molin. redd. 7 folid. & 6 denar. & 20 ac. 
prati & 50 ac. filvx. Paftura 2 leu long. & una leu. 
Jat. Valuit 1 1 lib. quando recepit. Modo 8 lib. 

Idem Rad. ten. de Rad. Hewis. T. R. E. gel- 
dabat pro 1 hida & dim. Terra eft 6 car. In dominio 
funt 2 car. & 5 fervi & 9 villani & 6 bord. cum 3 
car. Ibi molin. redd. 3 fol. & 12 ac. prati & 100 
ac. pafturx. Semper val. 3 lib. 

Idem R. ten.de Rad. Bagebergk. T. R. E. 
geldabat pro I hida. Terra ell 4 car. In dominio 
eft dim. car. & 3 fervi & ; villani & 5 bord. cum 2 
car. & dim. Ibi 3 ac. prati & 60 ac. pailurx. 
Semper val. 50 fol. 

Robertus ten.de Rad. Nevhalle. T.R. E. gel- 
dabat pro una virg. terrx. Terra ell 2 car. Ibi funt 
2 bord. & dimid. leu. filvae. Semper val. 10 fol. 
Has terras prasdi&as teneb. Merlcfuaiu T. R, E. 

Cerra JRaDttifi De ILimefi. 

Radvlfvs de Limesi tenet de Rege Comich & 
Walterusde eo. Liuuard teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat 
pro 1 hida & dim. Terra eft 6 car. In dominio ell 
1 car. cum 1 fervo & 4 villani &5 bord. cum 2 car. 
Ibi 28 ac. prati & 5 ac. paftura: tc 2 ac. filvac. 
Semper val. 40 fol. 

Ipfe 



32 



©ummwfete. 



DomeCtiap-TBoo&» 



Ipfe Radulfus ten. Locvmbe. Eddida Regina 
teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 8 
car. In dominio funt 3 car. & 2 fervi & 1 8 villani & 
6 bord. cum 4 car. lbi 5 ac. prati & 50 ac. filvae. 
Paftura 1 leu. long. & dim. leu. lat. Vaieb. 3 lib. 
Modo 4 lib. 

Ipfe Rad. ten. Selevrde. Eddida Regina teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 5 car. 
In dominio funt z car. & 2 fervi & 7 villani & 5 
bord. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 20 denar. & 5 
ac. prati & 60 ac. pafturae & 40 ac. filvas. Valeb. 
20 folid. Modo 25 fol. 

Ipfe Rad. ten. Alresford. Edric teneb. T.R.E. 
& geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 5 car. In domi- 
nio funt 2 car. & 2 fervi & 6 villani & 2 bord. cum 
1 car. lbi molin. redd. 15 den. &6ac. prati & 20 
ac. paftura: & una ac. filvae. Valuit 15 fol. Modo 
20 folid. 

Hoc M.redd. perconfuetud. 12 oves per annum 
in Carentone M. Regis. Radulfus hanc confuetu- 
dinem ufque modo detinuit. 

Ipfe Rad. ten. Bosintvne. ^Ecclefia de Adelingi 
tenuitT. R.E. &devi£tu monachor. fuit & geldabat 
pro 1 hida. Terra eft 5 car. In dominio eft 1 car. 
cum 1 fervo & 5 villani & 2 bord. cum 1 car. Paf- 
tura 1 leu. in long. & dim. leu. lat. Valuit & val. 
20 folid. Quando Rex ded. terram fuam Radulfo 
erat ^Ecclefia faifita de hoc M. 

Ipfe Rad. ten.TRABERGE. Edric teneb. T.R.E. 
& geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 5 car. In do- 
minio eft 1 car. Ibieftunus villanus & 30 ac. filvae. 
Paftura 1 leu. long. & tantund. lat. Val. 7 fol. 
Nam vaftata eft. 

Ipfe Rad. ten. Epse. Vluuard tenuit T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 1 car. Ibi eft 
unus villanus & 16 ac. prati. Val. 3 folid. 

Ipfe Rad. ten. Alre. Vluuard teneb. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 4 car. In dominio 
funt 2 car. & 2 fervi & 5 villani & 12 bord. cum 2 
car. Ibi 15 ac. prati & 200 ac. pafturae & 10 ac. 
filvae. Quando recepit valeb. 1 00 folid. Modo61ib. 

Cerra IRofcerti filii #erolDt. 

Robertvs filius GiROi.Dten.de Rege Cerletone 
& Godzelinus deeo. Godmanteneb. T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 1 2 car. In dominio 
funt 3 car. & 7 fervi & 4 villani & 15 bord. & 3 
cofcez cum 8 car. Ibi molin. redd. 5 fol. & 50 ac. 
prati. Paftura 4 quarent. long. & 3 quarent. lat. 
Silva dimid. leu. long. & tantund. lat. Valuit 10 
lib. Modo 6 lib. 

Ipfe Robertus ten. Vitel teneb. T. R. E. 

& geldabat pro 10 hid. Terra eft 10 car: In do- 
minio funt 3 car. St 8 fervi & 4 coliberti & 1 1 vil- 
lani & 17 bord. cum 5 car. Ibi 30 ac. prati & 100 
ac. pafturae. Silva 3 quarent. long. & 2 quarent. 
lat. Quando recepit valeb. 18 lib. Modo redd. 
100 cafeos & 10 bacons. 

Cerra aiurcDi De a^erle&erp. 

Alvredvs de Merleberge ten. de Rege Cel- 
lewert & Nicolaus de eo. Carle teneb. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 5hid. Terra eft 5 car. In dominio eft 



1 car. & 4 fervi & 3 villani & 4 cofcez cum ! car. 
Ibi7 ac. prati & 30ac. filvae. Valuit &val. 100 folid. 

Cerra aiureoi De 3Ifpania. 

Alvredvs de Ispania ten. de Rege Vlmerestonb 
& Walterus de eo. Aluui teneb. T. R. E. & gelda- 
bat pro dimid. hida. Terra ell 3 car. In dominio 
eft 1 car. cum 1 fervo & 4 villani & 13 bord. cum 1 
car. lbi 10 ac. prati & 20 ac. filvse. Valuit & 
val. 30 folid. 

Huic M. eftaddita unavirg. terrae & dim. Haec 
terra fuit de Peret M. Regis praspcfuus praeftitit 
Aluui T. R. E. Valuit & val. 10 folid. 

Ipfe Aluredus ten. Bvr. Aluui teneb. T, R. E. 
& geldabat pro dim. hida. Terraeft5car. Ibifunt 

8 villani & 6 bord. & 3 fervi. Semper val. 100 folid. 
Huic M. eft addita una virg. terras qua: fuit de 

firma Regis in Peret. Terra eft 1 car. Val. 10 folid. 

Ricardus ten. de Aluredo Hvnteworde. Aluui 

teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 

2 car. quae ibi funt. cum 2 fervis & 7 bord. Ibi 4 
ac. prati & 10 ac. moras. Quando recepit valeb. 5 
fol. Modo 20 folid. 

Rannulfus ten. de Alur. Strenecestone. Aluui 
teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 3 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 4 fervi & 3 villani cum 

1 car. Ibi 4 ac. prati & 50 ac. pafturae. Val. 50 fol. 
HuicM. eftaddita dimid. virg. terraequam teneb. 

Briftiuelibere T. R. E. Terra eft dim. car. Hanc 
habet ibi 1 villanus. Semper val. 5 fol. 

Ipfe Aluredus ten. Spachestone. Aluui teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. &dim. Terra eft 8 
car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi & 3 villani & 

2 bord. cum I car. Ibi 26 ac. prati & 9 ac. filvae. 
Quando recepit valeb. 50 fol. Modo fimilit. 

De hac eadem terra ten. unus miles de Alur. 1 hid. 
& ibi habet 2 car. & 3 fervos & 3 cotar. & 6 vill. 
&5 bord. Ibi 4 ac. prati & 1 20 ac. filvse. Valeb. 

3 lib. Modo tantund. 

Herbertus ten. de Alur. Otremetone. Eftan 
teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida & 2 virg. 
terrae & dimid. Terra eft 3 car. In dominio funt 
2 car. cum 1 fervo & 5 villani & 3 bord. & 3 cotar. 
cum 2 car. & dimid. Ibi 5 ac. prati & 3 ac. paftura: 
& 3 ac. filvae. Semper val. 40 fol. 

Herbertus ten.de Alar. Rad eflot. Eftan teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida uno ferding 
minus. Terra eft 1 car. & dim. lbi funt 2 villani 
cum 1 bord. & 5 ac. prati & 21 ac. pafturae & 3 
ac. filvje. Valuit & val. 15 folid. 

Hugoten.de Alur. Planesfelle. Edred teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 2 
car. Ibi funt 3 bord. & 1 fervus & 2 ac. prati & 1 j 
ac. filvae. Quando recepit valeb. 20 fol. Modo 
10 folid. 

Hugoten.de Alur. Mvlselle. Aluuinusteneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 1 car. 
Ibi eft 1 bord. cum 1 fervo & 15 ac. prati. Sem- 
per val. 15 fol. 

Ricardus ten. de Alur. Selvre. Aluui teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida & dim. Terra eft 

9 car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 4 fervi & 1 1 villani 
& 5 bord. cum 7 car. Ibi molin. redd. 3 fol. & 2 ac. 

prati 



£>omcftiag*T5ooft.] 



^timmei-fete. 



11 



prati Sc 160 ac. pafturas. Silva 3 quarent. long. & 
2 quarent. lat. Valuit 3 lib. Modo 4 lib. 

Ipfc Alur. ten. Stalwbi. Hcralduj [Com.] tc- 
ncb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra ell 5 
car. In dominioclt 1 car. Sc 5 fervi & 8 viilani Sc 4 
bord. cum 2 car. lbi molin. redd. 4 denar. & 7 ac. 
prati Sc 100 ac. paftura;. Silvx 1 leu. & dim. int. 
long. & lat. 

Ofuuardus& Ailuuardus ten. dc Alur. Stalvvm. 
Ipfi tcneb. T. R. E. Si geldabant pro 2 hid. Terra 
eft 4 car. In dominio tit 1 car.it dim. cum 1 lervo 
& 4 viilani >& 3 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi 3 ac. prati. 
Semper val. 20 folid. IIxc terra eit addita terris 
Aluui quas Aluicdus tenet. 

Rann ultus ten. de Alur. Alfaccstone Sc Ledinc. 
Aluui tencb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra 
ell 3 car. In dominio eit l car. cum 1 fervo & 4 
viilani & 2 bord. cum 2 car. Ibi S ac. prati & 30 
ac. pafturx Sc- 35 ac. filva:. Valuit & val. 20 fol. 

Hugotcn.de Alur. Lege. Domno teneb. T. R.E. 
& geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eit l car. it dim. 
Ibi funt 2 bord. Si 2 ac. prati. Silva 3 quarent. long. 
Sc dim. quarent. lat. Valuit Sc val. 17 fol. Hxc 
terra addita eft terris Aluui quas ten. Alured. 

Hugo ten. de Alur. Radehewis. Aluui teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terra:. Terra 
eft 1 car. nux ibi eft in dominio cum 1 bord. & 1 
ac. prati Sc 1 2 ac. palturx. Quando recepit valeb. 
2 fol. Modo 6 folid. 

Robertus Sc Herbertus ten. de Alur. Stawbi. 
Aluui teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra 
eft In dominio funt 2 car. cum 1 fervo & 2 

viilani Sc 4 bord. Ibi 4 ac. prati & 20 ac. filvx. 

Quando recepit valeb. 100 folid. Modo 60 folid. 

Ricardus ten. de Alur. Ile. Aluui teneb. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 2 car. In dominio 
eft 1 car. cum 1 fervo & 8 viilani & 2 bord. cum 1 
car. Ibi molin. redd. 20 den. Si 10 ac. prati Sc 10 
ac. paftura: & 30 ac. filva;. Quando recepit valeb. 
20 fol. Modo 40 folid. 

Hugo ten.de Alur. Prestetone. Aluui teneb. 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro 3 hid. una virg. minus. 
Terra eft 5 car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi & 
14 viilani cum 1 car. Ibi molin. redd. 20 den. & 8 
ac. prati & 15 ac. filvx. Quando recepit valeb. 30 
fol. Modo 60 folid. 

Walterius [5 virg.] Sc Anfger (2 virg. terra;] ten. 
de Alur. GaHers. Aluui teneb. T. R. E. & gelda- 
bat pro 1 hida Sc 3 virg. terra;. Terra eft 6 car. In 
dominio funt 2 car. & 4 fervi & 1 3 viilani Sc 5 bord. 
cum 4 car. Ibi 62 ac. filva:. Quando recepit valeb. 
70 folid. Modo fimiliter. 

Rannulfus ten. de Alur. Malrice. Aluui teneb. 
T. R. E.'Sc geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 2 car. 
& dim. In dominio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi & 4 viilani Si 
1 bord. cum 1 car. & dim. Ibi molin. red. 6 den. & 
30 ac. paftura; &2oac. filvx. Valuit & val. 20 folid. 

Robertus ten. de Alur. Cantoche. Aluui teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terrx. Terra ell 
1 car. Sc dim. Has habent ibi 3 viilani & 8 ac. 
filva; minutx. Quando recepit valeb. 20 fol. Modo 
25 folid. 

Waltcrus ten. de Alur. Hille. Aluui teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 6 car. In 



dominio eft 1 car. Sc 4 fervi Sc 1 1 viilani Sc 4 bord. 
Sc 1 cQiar. cum 1 car. Ibi molin. redd. 30 denar. 
Sc 17 ac. prati & 10 ac. putturae & 17 ac. filva. 
Valuit 3 lib. Modo 2 lib. 

Ipfe Alur. ten. Lochintone. Aluui tencb. 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eit 5 car. In 
dominio funt 2 car. Sc 3 fervi 8c 8 bord. cum una 
car. Ibi molin. redd. 10 fol. Sc 1 2 ac. prati. Silvx 
dim. leu. long. Sc 3 quarent. lat. Qjando recepit 
valeb. 6 lib. Modo 3 lib. 

Ipfe Alur. habuit Ackklai. Aluui tenuitT. It. K. 
Hoc addita eft in Mertoch M. Regis & val. 50 folid. 
per annum. 

Ccrra Ctorflini ftlii Eolf. 

Tvrstinvs j-'ilivs Rolf ten. de Rege Pidecomb. 
Aluuoldus teneb. T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro 5 hid. 
Terra clt 5 car. I11 dominio funt 2 car. Si 5 viilani 
& 19 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 15 fol. 
& 22 ac. prati Sc 5 ac. filva;. In Briuuetone 1 1 bur- 
genfes redd. 23 lol. Totum valet 7 lib. Quando 
recepit valeb. 8 lib. 

Butolf ten. de Turftino Witeham. Chetcl tc- 
neb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 2 
car. In dominio eft 1 car. Sc 6 cotar. cum 1 car. 
Quando recepit valeb. 15 fol. Modo 20 folid. 

Huic M. addita eft una hida in Wltvne quam 
Chetel teneb. pro uno Man. T. R. E. Terra ell 1 
car. qux ibi eft cum l fervo & 6 cotar. Ibi 2 ac. 
prati. Valet 10 fol. Quando recepit valeb. 30 folid. 

Hxc terra eft addita terris Aluaoldi quas ten. 
Turftinus. 

Rippe ten. de T. St or pe. Aluuinas teneb. 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 1 car. 
quse ibi eft cum 3 cotar. Silva I quarent. long. Sc 
lat. Semp. val. 20 fol. 

Hugo ten. de T. Sindercome. Ccrric teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hid. Terra eft 5 car. In 
dominioeft 1 car. & 7 viilani & 7 bord. cum 3 car. 
Ibi 17 ac. prati & una leu. paftura: in long. & lat. 
[Sc 50 acre filve.] Valuit & val. 20 folid. 

Ipfe Turftinus ten. Cadeberie. Aluuold teneb. 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro 1 2 hid. Terra eft 1 2 car. 
In dominio funt 3 car. & 6 fervi Sc 16 viJlani Sc 20 
bord. cum 8 car. & unus porcarius redd. 12 porcos 
per ann. Ibi 2 molini redd. 22 folid. Sc 50 ac. prati 
Sc 70 ac. paftura;. Silva 4 quarent. long. Sc una 
quarent. lat. Valuit 20 lib. Modo 12 lib. • 

Huic M. eft addita West one. Aluui teneb. 
T. R.E.p.oman. &poteratirequovoleb.& geldabat 
pro 2 hid. it 2 virg. tCJTK Sc dim. In dominio eft 

1 car. Sc dim. Sc 2 fervi & 6 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi 
dimid. molin. redd. 45 den. & 24 ac. prati. Silva 

2 quarent. long. & una quarent. lat. Valuit & val. 
40 folid. Ricardus ten. de Turlt. 

Aluuinus tan. de T. Westone. Ipfe teneb. 
T. R.E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft dim. 
car. Ibi tainen eft l car. cum 1 villano. Valet 10 
folid. 

Bernardus ten. de T. Svdcadeberie. Aluuoldus 

teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 virg. terra;. Ibi 

addita: funt 2 hidx &■ una virg. terrx quas teneb. 

libere 4 taini T. R. E. Int. tot. terra eft 3 car. 

i Bernardus 



34 



©ummerfete. 



[DomefDap^'Booft, 



Bernardus habet2 hid. Unus clericus dimid. hid. 
Unus Anglicus dim. hid. Valeb. & val. 3 lib. Has 
omnes terras funt addita; terris Aluuoldi quas tenet 
Turflinus. 

Adhuc eft addita 1 hida in Vltone quam teneb. 

Alnodus libere T. R. E. Terra eft 1 car. Leuiet 

ten. de Turft. & ibi habet 1 fervum & 3 cofcez 

& 4 acras prati & 3 acras filvae minutae. Valet 

lofol. 

Adhuc eft addita Cloptone. Alnodus libere te- 
r.-eb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 3 
car. Radulfus ten. de Turft. & ibi habet 1 car. 
cum 1 villano & 4 bord. $c 2 fervis. Ibi 10 ac. prati 
& 4 quarent. filvae in long. & 2 quarent. lat. Quan- 
do recepit valeb. 40fol. Modo 20 folid. 

Aluuardus ten. de T. Blacheford. Idem tenuit 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una hida. Terra ell 1 car. 
quae ibi eft cum 3 bord. Valet 15 fol. 

Goisfridus ten. de T. Cvntone. Aluuardus 
teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 6 hid. Terra eft 6 
car. In dominio eft dim. car. & 4 fervi & 9 villani 
& 1 1 bord. cum 5 car. Ibi molin. redd. 8 folid. & 
1 5 ac. prati. Silva 4 quarent. long. & una quarent. 
lat. Valet 100 fol. Olim 6 lib. 

Goisfridus ten. deT. Malpertone. Aluuoldus 
teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eit 6 
car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 10 fervi & 3 villani 
& 9 cofcez cum 3 car. Ibi 2 moliniredd. 5 folid. & 5 
den. & 5 ac. prati & 10 ac. pafturss. Silva 5 qua- 
rent. long. & 3 quarent. lat. Valuit olim 8 lib. 
Modo 6 lib. 

Norman ten. de T. Wandestrev. Aluuoldus 
teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 5 
car. In dominio lunt 2 car. & 4 fervi & 4 villani & 
4 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi 363c. prati & 303c. paiturat. 
Silva l leu. long. & dim. leu. lat. Valet 3 lib. 
Olim 6 lib. 

Norman ten. deT. Ckaivert. Leuedai ter.eb. 
7. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft dim. 
car. quae ibi eft in dominio cum 4 cotar. Ibi 4ac. 
prati & 4 ac. paflurae. Valet 7 fol. 

Bernardus ten. deT. Dvncretone. Aluuoldus 
teneb. T. R. E. & geld;U>at pro 3 hid. Terra eft 8 
car. In dominio funt 4 car. & 8- fervi & lovilbni k 
o bord. cum 4«r. Ibi molin. redd. 7 fol. & 6 den. 
& 6 ac. prati. l'aftura 4 quarent. long. & 2 quarent. 
lat. Valet 6 lib. Ohm valeb. 100 folid. 

Iltiic Mi eft addita una virg. terras & valet 5 folid. 
Eduui teneb. libere T. R. E. 

Robertus ten. deT. Cirftvne. Aluuoldus teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 2 car. In 
dominio eft 1 car. cum 1 villano & 4 bord. Ibi 6 ac. 
prati & una quarent. liiva; in long. & in lat. Valet 
30 fol. Olim valch. 4c fol. 

Ccrra ^ctfoms De !i5Urei . 

Serlo de Bvrci ten. de Rege Blachedone. AI- 
mar teneb. T..K. E. & geldabat pro 10 hid. Terra 
eft tocar. In dominio funt 2 car. cum I fervq & 5 
villani & 8. bord. cum j.car. Ibi 2 molini redd. 5 
fol. & 1.0 ac. prati k.zoo ac. filva?. l'aftura 1 leu. 
in long. & lat. Valet 2.0 fol. Quando recepit 
valeb. 10 lib. Modo 7 lib. 



Dehac terra ten. Lambertas 1 hid. de Serlone & 
ibi habet 2 car. cum 2 villanis. 

Quatuor milites ten. de S. Opopille. Euuacre 
teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 6 hid. & dim. Terra 
eft 10 car. In dominio funt 4 car. cum 1 fervo & 7 
villani & 4 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi 70 ac. prati & 100 
ac. paflurae. Valuit & val. 6 lib. 

Ipfe S. ten. Stoche. Euuacre teneb. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro dimid. hida. Terra ell 1 car. cum I 
fervo & ibi eft in dominio & 1 ac. prati &dim. Silva 
4 quarent. long. & unaquarent. lat. Valet 10 folid. 

Ipfe S. ten. Cilele. Euuacre teneb. T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro 3 virg. terrae. Terra eft 2 car. quae ibi 
funt cum 1 villano & 1 bord. & 1 fervo. Ibi I 
ac. prati & dim. Valet 15 folid. 

Huic addita eft Stoche. Aluric tenuit pro M. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 1 
car. quae ibi eft cum 2 bord. & dim. ac. prati. 
Val. 10 fol. 

Walterus ten. de S. Ajldvic. Almar teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 5 car. In 
dominio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi & 4 villani & 1 bord. 
Ibi molin. redd. 3 fol. & 15 ac. prati & 49 ac. filvae. 
Olim Si modo val. 40 folid. 

Guntard ten. de S. R agiol. Quatuor taini teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabant pro 2 hid. Terra eft 2 car. 
In dominio eft 1 car. cum 1 fervo & 1 villano Ibi 

5 ac. prati & 5 ac. filvae minutas. Valet 30 folid. 
Huic addita ell una hida & una virg terra;. Unus 

tainus teneb. libere T. R.E. Terraell 3 car. Walterus 
ten. de Serlone & ibi habet 1 car. & 4 fervi cum 1 
villano &^bord. Jbi 3 ac. prati & 3 quarent. filvas 
in long. & lat. Olim 10 folid. Modo 30 folid. 
Hasc terra non pertinuit ad Euuacre. 

Ecclefia'S. Edwardi ten. de S. Chelmetone pro 
filia ejus qux ibi eft. Alii teneb. T. R. E. Ibi 
font 5 hida; fed pro una hida geidab. Terra eil s 
car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 4 villani & 3 bord, 
cum 4 car. Ibi una leu. filvas in long. & 3 quarent. 
lat. Olim 30 fol. Modo 40 lolid. 

Ipfe S. ten. Lovintvke. Tres taini teneb. 
T. R. E. [pro trib. maner.] & geldabant pro 6 hid. 
Terra eft 2 car. In dominio funt 2 car. & 2 fervi 

6 8 villani & 9bord. cum 6 car. Ibi molin. redd. 
10 folid. & 40 ac. prati. Silva 4 quareivt. long. Sc 
2 quarent. lat. Olim 6 lib. Modo 100 folid. 

De hac terra ten. Lanbertus 1 hid. & ibi habet 1 
car. cum -3 villanis. Ibi 12 ac. prati. Valet 20 folid. 

Ipfe Serlo ten. Watehelle. Eimer teneb. T. R.E. 
de yEcclefia Glaftingberienec poterat ab ea feparari 
& geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 4 car. In dominio 
eft 1 car. cum 1 iervo & 1 bord. Olim 40 fol. Modo 
40- fol. 

De hac terra tea. de S. Goisfridus 1 hid. & val. 
to foiid. 

Ipfe S. ten. Contone. Euuacre teneb. T. R. E. 
& geidahat pro 5 hid. Terra eil 5 car. In dominio. 
funt 2 car. & 2. fervi & 5 villani & 6 cot. & 5 bord. 
cum 4 car. Ibi 15 ac. prati Sc una leu. paiiura; in 
long. & 2 quarent. lat. Silva 1 1 quarent. Jong. & 9. 
quarent. lat. Olim 100 fol. Modo 4 lib. 

De hac terra ten. Ricardus de S. unam virg. terrx 
& 1 fcrling & ibi habet 1 car. cum 2 bord. & 5 ac. 
praii. Olim 5 fol. Modo. 1 5 folid. 

Ipfs 



Domeftm^TBoofc.] 



©ummcrfere. 



35- 



Ipfc S. ten. Mortonb. Tres taini teneb. [pro trib. 
maneriis] T. R. E. & geldabant pro c hid. Terra eft 
c car. Godric ten. de hac terra 2 hidas Sc Klric 2 
hid. In dominio funt 2 car. & 9 viilani & 1 1 bord. 
cum 2 car. Ibi molin. red). 5 lolid. & 40 ac. prati 
|J«C. filvae. Olim & modo val. 3 lib. 

De eadem terra ten. Ricardus 3 virg. terra; Sc 
IJunfridus 1 virg. terra;. Ibi ell 1 car. & 2 viilani & 
3 Lord. & 18 ac. prati & 4 ac. lilv:c Sc 2 ac. paftura:. 
Olim Sc modo val. 3 lib. 

Rainaldus ten- de S. Mvdiford. Eimar teneb. 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra til 3 car. In 
dominio eft 1 car. Sc dim. & 3 viilani & 4 bord. cum 
2 car. Olim & modo val. 3 lib. 

Huic M. ell addita Stank. Sareb teneb. libere 
pro man. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 
1 car. & dim. Olim & modo val. 10 folid. 

Cerra ©uonis filii ffiamclin. 

Odo filivs Gamf.lini ten.de Rege Locvmbe & 
Vitalis de eo. Fitel teneb. T. R . E. & geldabat pro 

1 hida. Terra eft 6 car. In dominio eft 1 car. & 2 
fervi Sc 8 viilani & 1 bord. cum 2 car. & dim. Ibi 2 
ac. prati & I 2 ac. iilvx Sc 50 ac. paftura;. Olim 
Sc modo val. 40 fol. 

Cerra Dsijcrni <5tfam. 

Osbernvs [Gifard] ten. de Rege Canoi.e. Alnod 
teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 3 
car. In dominio e;t 1 car. & 5 viilani Si 6 bord. 
cum 2 car. Ibi 16 ac. prati & 20 ac. pafturac. Silva 

2 quarent. & dim. long. & dimid. quarent. lat. 
Olim 30 fol. Modo val. 40 folid. 

ipfu O. ten.TELvvK. Dono teneb. T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra ell 4 car. In dominio eft 
1 car. & 2 lervi & 3 viilani & 4 bord. cum 3 car. 
Ibi 2 molini redd. 100 denar. Sc 14 ac. prati & 16 
ac. filvae minuta: Sc 14 ac. parturae. Olim 3 lib. 
Modo 4 lib. 

IpfeO. ten. Vdeberge. Dono teneb. T. R.E. 
& geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 2 car. In do- 
minio eft 1 car. & 6 bord. cum 1 fervo Sc 8 ac. prati. 
OJira 30 folid. Modo val. 40 foiid. 

Cerra (ZECtoarui ^arisbertenfis. 

Edwaruus Sarisberiensis ten. de Rcgc Han- 
tone. Vluuen teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 10 
hid. Terra eft 10 car. In dominio funt 3 car. Sc 9 
ftrvi Sc 12 viilani & 15 bord. cum 6 car. Ibi 2 
molini redd. 34 Ibi. & 1 -' ac. prati. Suva 1 leu. 
long. Sc dim. leu. lat. 

In Bade 2 domus, una redd. 7 den. Sc obolum. 
Olim 10 lib. Modo val. 12 lib. 

Ipfe E. ten. Nortvne. luing teneb. T. R.E. & 
geldabat pro 10 hid. Terra eft locar. In dominio 
funt 3 car. & 3 fervi & 3 viilani Sc 13 bord. cum 3 
car. Ibi molin. redd. 5 folid. Sc 20 ac. prati Sc totid. 
paftura;. Silva 1 leu. long. & tantund. lat. Olim 
6 lib. Modo 7 lib. De his 10 hid. ded. Rex E. 
prjjdiilo luing 2 caruc, ter, *\, 



Cerra Crmrtfi tie l^enMng. 



Ernvlfvs de Hksding ten. de Rege Wk»toi«e. 
Edric teneb. T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra 
eft 7 car. In dominiofunt 2 car. Sc 10 fervi & 6 vii- 
lani Sc 1 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 20 folid. 
Sc 1 3 ac. prati Sc 60 ac. paftura: Sc 30 ac. filvae. la 
Hade 3 domus redd. 27 den. Totuui olim & modo 
val. 8 lib. 

Engeler ten. de Em. Tichkiiam. Edric teneb. 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro I hida Sc 3 virg. terrx. 
Terra eft 3 car. Ibi funt 3 viilani Sc 1 bord. Sc 1 
fervus & 6 ac. prati. Silva 3 quarent. long. & una 
quarent. lat. Val. 40 folid. 

Ingelramnus ten. de Er. Reddens. Edric teneb. 
T. R.E.& geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 3 car. 
qua; ibi funt in dominio & 3 fervi Sc 28 bord. Ibi 2 
molini redd. 15 folid. & 20 ac. prati & 303c. paftura;. 
Silva 1 leu. long. & tantund. lat. Olim Sc modo 
val. 4 lib. 

Cerra <£>tsleberti filii CtiroIDi. 

Gislkbertvs filivs Tvroldi ten. de Rege Chi- 
wbstoch & Ofbernusde eo. Edric teneb. '1 .R.E. 
& geldabat pro una hida & dim. Terra eft 2 car. 
qux ibi funt in dominio & 2 fervi Sc 2 bord. St 20 
ac. prati & 10 ac. iilvac minutae. Olim 20 fol. 
Modo val. 30 folid. 

Walterus ten. de G. Tvmbeli. Edric teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro c hid. Terra eft 5 car. In 
dominio eft I car. & 2 fervi & 5 viilani Sc 4 bord. 
& 4 cofcez cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 30 den. Sc 
35 ac. prati. Paftura 1 leu. long. Sc dim. leu. lat. 
& tantund. filvae. Quando recepit valeb. 100 fol. 
Modo tantund. 

Idem ten. Estone. Edric teneb. T. R. E. Sc 
geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 1 car. qua: ibi ell 
cum 3 bord. Redd. 30 folid. 

Cerra <S5otiebolDi. 

Godebpi.dvs ten. de RegeCARME. Albrift teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 virg. terrse. Terra eft 3 
car. In dominio ell 1 car. cum 1 fervo & 3 viilani 
cum 1 bord. Ibi 3 ac. prati & 50 ac. pailurac. Olim 
20 fol. Modo val. 10 folid. 

Cerra afjatfnti He agojetania. 

Mathiv ten. de Rege Cuvfdone & Ildebertus de 
eo. Johannes teneb. T. R. E. Sc geldabat pr05 hid. 
& dimid. Sc 2ferlingis. Terraeftbcar. In dominio 
funt 2 car. cum I fervo & 8 viilani & 10 bord. cum 
4 car. Ibi 468c. prati. -Paftura 1 leu. Sc dim. 
long. t\ tantund. lat. Silva 2 quarent. long. & dim. 
quarent. lat. Olim 40 folid. Modo val. 4 lib. 

Rumaldus ten. deM. Calviche. Torchil teneb: 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft tear. 
In dominio eft rear. & 2 fervi & 3 viilani & 4 bord. 
cum 2 car. Ibi 6ac. Kvse minuta;. Olim ..%: modo. 
40 fol. 

De hoc M . eft ablata una virg. tenx quam teneb . 
Turchil cum prxdicla terra. Epifcopus Conftan- 

tienfis ten. 

IiPEBEiwnm, 



■2* 



^ttmmcrfetc. 



Domefta^TDOoL 



Ildelertus ten. de M. Mideltvne. Vluuard 
■teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 10 hid. Terra eft 6 
car. In dominio Aim 2 car. & 4 fervi & 9 villani & 
9 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi molin. redd. 5 folid. & 24 
ac. prati. Silva ioquarent. in long. & lat. Quando 
reccpit valeb. 100 fol. Modo 6 lib. 

Cerra IDtmftttri. 

Hvkfridvs [Camer.] ten. de Rege Cvri. Ordric 
-& Liuing teneb. T. R. E. &geldabant pro 1 hida& 
unoferling. Terra eft 1 car. qua: ibi eft in dominio 
cum t bord. & 2 cotar. Ibi 20 ac. prati. Olim 20 
folid. Modo val. 40 folid. Hasc terra addita eft 
terris Bridric fed ii qui teneb. T. R. E. quo voleb. 
ire poterant. 

Idem H. ten. Cvri. Leuing teneb. T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 3 car. In dominio 
funt 2 car. & 3 villani & 3 bord. cum 1 car. Ibi 24 
ac. prati. Olim 30 fol. Modo val. 40 folid. & haec 
eft junfta terris Bridric fed qui teneb. T. R.E. quo 
voleb. ire poterant. 

Roteertvs de Odburuille ten. de Rege in Warne 
2 virg. terra: & dim. quae nunquam geldav. Terra 
eft dim. car. Ibi eft unus bord. cum I fervo. Val. 
15 folid. Vaftam accep. 

HicRobertushabuit unam virg. terrsequam teneb. 
Dodo libere T. R. E. Hxc addita fuit Dolver- 
tone Maner. Regis. Modo dijudicata eft efie 
tainland. Val. 10 fol. 

Idem R. ten. dimid. hid. in Widepolle. Tres 
foreftarij teneb. T. R. E. Terra eft 4 car. De hac 
reddebat Robertus 20 folid. in firma Regis ad Wines- 
tord. Modo diratiocinata eft in tainland. 

Idem R. ten. Wilesforde. Duo taini teneb. 
T.R. E. &geldabantpro unahida. Terra eft 2 car. 
In dominio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi & 8 bord. haben 1. 1 car. 
Ibi 4 ac. prati & loac. pafturae& 3 ac.filvae minuta:. 
Olim 10 folid. Modo val. 15 folid. Dehachida 
ten. Com. Morit. unam virg. & Bretel de eo. 

Idem R. ten. Melecome. Saric teneb. T.R. E. 
& geldabat pro una virg. terrae & dimid. Terra eft 
1 car. & dim. & ibi funt cum 10 bord. Ibi molin. 
redd. 1 2 den. & 10 ac. filva: minuta:. Olim & modo 
val. 1 5 fol. 

De hoc M. eft ablata dimid. hida qua: T. R. E. 
ibi pertineb. Hanc ten. Walfcinus de Douuai cujn 
Bvr maner. fuo. 

Johannes Hoftiarius ten. de Rege Pegens. 
Bridric teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro una hida 
& una virg. terras. Terra eft 2 car. In dominio eft 
1 car. & 2 villani cum 1 bord. Ibi prefbitercum 1 
car. & 2 bord. Ibi 5 ac. prati. Olim 40 folid. 
Modo 30 folid. valet. 

Idem Johannes ten. Pe ri. Orgar teneb. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro dim. hida & dim. virg. tens & 
dimid. ferling. Terra eft 1 car. qux ibi eft cum 2 
vill. & 2 bord. Ibi 5 ac. prati. Olim 10 fol. 
Modo val. 1 5 folid. 

Stable ten . de Johanne Newetvne. Samar teneb. 
T. R.E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 1 car. 
quae ibi eft cum 2 villanis & 2 bord. & 8 fervis. Ibi 
5 ac. prati & 5 ac. filvx. Olim 10 fol. Modo val. 
15 folid. 



Robertvs ten. de Johanne Candetonb. Semar 
teneb. T. R. E. k geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra 
eft 1 car. quas ibi eft in dominio cum I villano & 4 
bord. Ibi molin. redd. 5 folid. & 23 ac. prati &6 
ac. pafturas. Olim 15 folid. Modo val. 20 folid. 

Ipfe Johannes ten.WiNCHEBERiE. Aluuard teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft I car. & 
dim. & ibi funt cum 2 villanis & 3 bord. Ibi 8 ac. 
piati. Olim 20 folid. Modo 30 folid. 

Ipfe Johannes ten. Hustille. Aluuard teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terra:. Terra eft 
2 car. quae ibi funt cum 3 villanis & 4 bord. Ibi 
10 ac. pafturas. Olim 10 fol. Modo val. 20 folid. 

De hac terra dimid. virg. & unus ferling T. R. E. 
pertinebat ad Svmertone. Val. 5 fol. 

Ansger [fouuer] ten. de Rege Cu,detone. 
Aluuinus teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. 
terra;. Terra eft I car. quae ibi eft cum 1 villano 
& 1 fervo. Ibi 14 ac. prati & 5 ac. paftuxae. Olim 

5 fol. Modo val. 15 fol. 

Idem A. ten. Michafliscerce. Aluui teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dim. hida. Terra eft 1 
car. Olim & modo val. 5 folid. 

Idem A. ten. Siwoldkstonb. Duo taini libere 
teneb. T. R. E. & geldabant pro una virg. terra:. 
Terra eft dim. car. Olim & modo val. 4 folid. 

Idem ten. Derlege. Alfi teneb. T. R. E. &gel- 
dabat pro 2 virg. terrae & dimid. & uno ferling. 
Terra eft 3 car. qua ibi funtcum 4 villanis & 2 bord. 

6 3 fervis. Ibi 20 ac. filva:. Olim & modo valet 
20 folid. 

Ansger [Coquus] ten. de Rege Lvlestoch. 
Bridie teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. 
Terra eft In dominio lunt 3 car. & z fervi 

& 1 1 villani & 7 bord. & 20 ac. filvas in uno loco 
& in alio filva 1 leu. long. Sc dimid. leu. lat. Olim 
& modo val. 100 folid. 

Anschitil [Parcher] ten. de Rege Newetvnb. 
Ofuardus teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida & 
una virg. terra:. Terra eft 3 car. qua; ibi funt cum 
8 bord. Ibi 15 ac. prati & 20 ac. mors & 10 ac. 
filvas. Olim 40 fol. Modo val. 30. 

Idem A. ten. Herdeneberie. Aluric teneb. 
T. R'. E. & geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 2 car. 
Ibi funt 3 bord. cum 1 fervo & 60 ac. paftura;. 
Olim 20 fol. Modo val. 5 folid. 

Idem A. ten. Mideltone. Ofuuardus teneb. 
T. R. E. <& geldabat pro 1 hida. Terraeft 1 car. 
quae ibi eft cum 1 villano & 2 fervis. Ibi 6 ac. prati 
& 2 ac. filva: minuta: & 20 ac. pafturx. Olim & 
modo val. 15 fol. 

Girardvs ten.ERNESEL. Leuing teneb. T. R. B. 
& geldabat pro 1 hida terra:. Terra eft 1 car. Ibi 
eft 1 bord. & 2 fervi &6 ac. prati & 10 ac. filva:. 
Olim & modo val. 30 folid. 

Edmvnd filius Pagen ten. Bertvne de Rege. 
Jadulfus teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid! 
& dim. Terra eft 6 car. In dominio eft 1 car. cum 
1 fervo & 2 villani & 4 bord. & 6 cotar. Ibi molin. 
redd. 10 folid. & 50 ac. prati & 60 ac. paftura:. 
Olim 6 lib. Modo 3 lib. 

De hoc M. eft ablata 1 hida quam ten. Malger 
de Cartrai. 

Idem 



£>omcfoap=i5oott.] 



©ummcrfcte. 



37 



Idem E. ten. Picote. Jadulfus teneb. T.R. fi- 
fe geldabat pro 3 hid. & dim. Terra eft 4 car. In 
dominio funt 2 car. & z fervi & 3 villani & 8 bord. 
cum 2 car. Ibi molin. redd, co den. Ibi 8 ac. 
prati & 1 2 ac. palturae & 50 ac. filvx. Olim & modo 
val. 4 lib. 

Idem E. ten. Waltvne. Elmar teneb. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 4 car. Ibi in do- 
minio 1 car. & unus villanus & 6 bord. cum 1 car. 
& dimid. Ibi 6 ac. prati & 40 ac. paftura:. Silva; 
minuta: 1 quarent. in long. Sc lac. Olim 4 lib. 
Modo 40 folid. 

Vxor Manaffes [Coqui] ten. Haia. Edric teneb. 
T. R.E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra ell 2 car. Ibi 
funt 2 bord. cum 1 cotar. & 6 ac. prati & 12 ac. 
paftura:. Olim 20 folid. Modo val. 15 folid. 

Eadem ten. Estone. Alduinus teneb. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro una hida & una virg. terra;. Terra 
eft 2 car. qua; ibi funt in dominio cum I villano & 3 
bord. & uno cotar. Ibi 8 ac. prati it 6 ac. paftura:. 
Olim Sc modo val. 20 fol. 

Ccrtac Camorum Ecgis. 

Brictric & Vluuardus ten. de Rege Boche- 
lande. Idem ipfi teneb. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 
1 hida & dim. Terra efl 3 car. In dominio funt 2 
car. Sc 2 villani & 4 bord. Valet 20 folid. 

Hanc terram teneb. ifti de Petro Epifcopo dum vixit 
& reddeb. ei 10 fol. Modo ten. de Rege fed port 
mortem Epifcopi Rex inde nil habuit. 

De hac terra teneb. uxor Bolle 3 virg. T. R. E. 

Siward ten. Sevknemetone. T. R. E. geldabat 
pro 3 hid. Terra ell 3 car. In dominio ell 1 car. 
& 2 villani & 3 bord. & 2 fervi Sc 8 ac. prati. Valet 
3 "b. 

Hardinc [f. Alnod] ten. Lopen. Toui teneb. 
T. R. E. Sc geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra ell 2 car. In 
dominio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi Sc 2 villani It 5 bord. & 
20 ac. prati. Olim 20 folid. Modo val. 40 folid. 

Harding ten. Brade. Toui teneb. T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 2 car. In dominio 
eft I car. cum 1 villano. Olim 20 fol. Modo 10 fol. 

Idem ten. Capilande. Toui teneb. T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra ell 2 car. In dominio 
eft 1 car. cum 1 bord. & 1 fervo & 6 ac. prati & 30 
ac. filvs. Olim 5 fol. Modo val. 20 folid. 

Huic M. ell acldita dimid. hida qua; fuit de Cvri 
maner. Regis. Val. 5 folid. 

Idem ten. Meriet. Goduinus teneb. T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 6 car. In dominio 
funt 2 car. & 2 fervi & 9 villani & 6 bord. cum 2 
car. Ibi molin. redd. 5 folid. & io ac. prati Sc 3 
quarent. paftura;. Olim 100 fol. Modo val. 4 lib.. 

Harding ten. Bocheland. Toui teneb. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro una hida. Terra eft 4 car. Ibi 3 
ac. prati & 10 quarent. paftura; in long. Sc 4 Inc. 
Silva 2 quarent. long. & una lat. Olim 40 fol. 
Modo 10 folid. 

Harding ten. Dinbscove. Toui teneb. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 3 car. In domi- 
nio funt 2 car. cum 3 villanis. Ibi 81 c. pr.-.ti St 3 
quarent. pallurw in long. Sc Jut. Olim & modo val. 
40 folid. 

k 



Brictric ten. Tochfswellb. Goduinus teneb. 
T. R. B. Ibi eft dim. virg. terrx Sc non geldabat 
T. R. E. Terra eft I car. Ibi funt 4 bord. cum 1 
fcrvo. Olim Sc modo valeb. 12 folid. &6u 

Siuuardus ten. DvnintonC. Edmar teneb. 
T. R. B. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 3 car. 
quae ibi funt cum 6 villanis Sc 3 bord. Ibi rn'.lin. 
redd. 8 denar. & 8 ac. pr.iti. Paftura 3 quarent. 
long. Sc 2 quarent. lat. Silva 3 quarent. long. & z 
quarent. lat. Olim 20 folid. Modo val. 40. 

Siuuardus ten. Ettebere. Idem ipfe teneb. 
T. R.E. Se geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 1 car. Sc 
dim. & ibi funt cum 2 villanis & 3 bord. Ibi 6 ac. 
prati & una quarent. filva; in long. & lat. Olim & 
modo val. 20 folid. 

Dodo ten. Stawe. Siuuoldus teneb. T. R. L. Sc 
geldabat pro 3 virg. terra:. Terra eft 3 car. In do- 
minio eft 1 car. & 3 fervi & 6 villani Sc 2 bord. & 
molin. fine cenfu & 5 ac. prati Sc 30 ac. paftura; Sc 3 
ac. filva;. Olim Si modo val. 20 folid. 

Vlf ten. Havechewblle. Idem ipfe teneb. - 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro una virg. terra; Sc uno fer- 
ling & quarta parte unius ferling. Terra eft 3 car. 
Ibi funt 3 car. cum 1 fervo Sc 3 villani Sc 4 bord. 
Valet 25 folid. 

Alwardus Sc fratres ejus ten. Stochb. Pater 
eorum teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra 
eft 2 car. qux ibi funt cum 1 villano & 1 fervo & 13 
bord. Ibi 15 ac. prati & 8 ac. pallurx. Olim 60 
fol. Modo val. 50 fol. 

Goduinus ten. Draicote. Ipfe Sc mater ejui 
teneb. T. R. E. & defendebant fe pro una virg. terra;. 
Terra eft dim. car. Redd. 2 fol. per annum. 

Aldvi ten.S-rocHE. Idem ipfe teneb. T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro 1 hida & 3 virg. terras. Terra ell 2 
car. Ibi funt 3 bord. & 2 fervi cum 1 car. Ibi 
molin. redd. 6 folid. & 8 den. & 6 ac. prati. Paftura 
c quarent. long. & 2 quarent. lat. Silva 3 quarent. 
long. & 2 quarent. lat. 

BRisMARten. Halberce. Idem ipfe ten. T. R.E. 
Sc geldabat pro 10 hid. Terra eft 8 car. In do- 
minio eft 1 car. & 2 fervi & 8 villani & 16 bord. 
cum 5 car. Ibi molin. redd. 5 folid. & 13 ac. prati 

6 dim. & dimid. leu. pallurx in long. Sc lat. & tan- 
tund. filva;. Valet 8 lib. 

Alvbrd ten. Wiche. Idem ipfe teneb. T. R. E. 
Sc geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 3 car. qua: ibi funt 
cum 2 villanis & 6 bord. Sc 3 fervis. Ibi molin. 
redd. 5 folid. Sc 5 ac. prati & 10 ac. fpineti. Val. 
40 folid. 

Donno ten. Bochelande. Idem ipfe teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 12 hid. Terra eft 7 car. 
Ibi funt 5 car. & 1 1 villani & 5 bord. & 7 fervi Sc 40 
ac. prati & 30 ac. filva: minutae Sc dim. leu. pillur» 
in long. Sc unaquaient. & dim. in lat. & molin. redd. 

7 fol. Olim 8 lib. Modo val. 106 folid. 
Acelricvs ten. Cvmb. Eddid Regina teneb. 

T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 5 car. 
qua: ibi funt S: 6 villani & 5 bord. & 3 fervi. Ibi 
molin. redd. 50 den. & 8 ac. prati & 20 ac. filvse. 
Olim 20 fol. Modo 4 lib. 

Alvric ten. Lideford. BricVtc teneb. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 9 hid. Terra eft 8 car. Ibi funt 7 
car. Sc 6 villani & 9 bord. & z cotar. Sc 8 fervi. Ibi 

molin. 



3« 



g>ummerfete. 



[Domeftm^lBoolu 



molin. redd. 15 folid. & 60 ac. prati & 30 ac. paf- 
turae & una leu. filvae in long. & Iat. & porcarius 
redd. 10 porcos. Olim & modo val. 8 lib. 

Alvric ten. Scepeworde. Briftric teneb. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro dimid. hida. Terra eft dimid. car. 
Valet 5 folid. 

Brictoward ten. Writelinctone. Bnctuuoldus 
teneb. T. R..E. & geldabat pro 6 hid. Terra eft 5 
car. & tot. ibi funt cum 8 villanis & 3 cotar. Ibi 
1 2 ac. prati & 24 ac. pafturae & 1 2 ac. filvae minutae. 
Olim 100 folid. Modo val. 4 lib. 

Huscari.e ten. unam virg. terne quam ipfemet te- 
neb. T. R. E. in Estrope. Ibi habet dimid. car. 
Valet 40 denar. 

Osmer ten. unam virg. terrae in Otremetone. 
Pater ejus teneb. T. R. E. De ea funt 2 partes ab- 
lata: & in Candetone maner. Regis pofitas. 

3|tem ^nftitii Certa t guorunrjam 
aUorum, 

Hvnfridvs ten. Baeecari. Bruno libere teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. & dimid. Terra eft 
3 car. In dominio funt tamen 2 car. & 2 fervi & 6 
villani & 3 bord. cum 3 car. Ibi I4ac. prati & 8 ac. 
pafturae. Olim 40 fol. Modo val. 50 folid. Hsc 
eft addita terris Briftric. 

Hunfridus ten. Altone. Alnod teneb. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 2 hid. Terra eft 2 car. In dominio 
eft 1 car. & unus villanus & 4 bord. cum dimid. car. 
& 1 fervo. Ibi 6 ac. prati & 6 ac. filvaj. Olim 20 
fol. Modo val. 30 fol. 

Hunfridus ten. Sanford. Tres taini teneb. libere 
T. R. E. & geldabant pro 6 hid. Terra eft 6 car. 
& tot. ibi funt & 4 villani & 15 bord. & 4 fervi & 8 
ac. prati. Paftura 2 quarent. long. & una quarent. 
Iat. Silva 4 quarent. long. & una quarent. Iat. 
Olim 8 lib. Modo val. 9 lib. 

ODoFlandreniis ten. Timesberie. Gonuerd teneb. 
T.R. E. & geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 4 car. 
Ibi funt 2 car. & 5 villani & 3 bord. & molin. redd. 
40 denar. & 40 ac. prati 1 minus & 39 ac. pafturae. 
Valet 3 lib. 

Willelmus [Hofed.] ten. Tatewiche. Tres taini 
teneb. T. R. E. & geldabant pro 1 hida & dimid. 
Terra eft 1 car. qua; ibi eft in dominio & 3 fervi & 2 
bord. & dimid. ac. prati & 10 ac. filvae minutae. 
Olim 10 folid. Modo val. 30 folid. 

Radulfus [deBerchelai]ten. Tatewiche. Godric 
teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro dimid. hida. Terra 



eft 1 car. quae ibi eft cum 3 fervis. Ibi 1 ac. filvae. 
Olim 10 folid. Modo val. 15 folid. 

Hugolinus [interpres] ten. de Rege Herlei. 
Azor teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida. Terra eft 
3 car. & tot ibi funt cum 1 villano & 5 bord. & 2 fer- 
vis. Ibi dimid. ac. prati & filvae minutae 3 quarent. 
int. long. & Iat. Olim & modo val. 50 fol. 

Idem ten. Estone. Ingulf teneb. T. R. E. & 
geldabat pro 3 hid. Terra eft 5 car. Ibi funt 3 car. 
& 3 villani & 6 bord. & 2 fervi & molin. redd. 5 
folid. Olim 40 folid. Modo val. 60 folid. 

Idem ten. Claftertone. Suain teneb. T. R. E. 

6 geldabat pro 5 hid. Terra eft 6 car. & tot. ibi 
funt & 4 villani & 7 bord. & 4 fervi & molin. redd. 

7 fol. & 6 denar. & 20 ac. prati & 1 2 quarent. pafturae 
in long. & Iat. Olim & modo val. 7 lib. 

Drogo [de Montagud] ten. Chenolle. Alnod 
teneb. T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida & dimid. 
Terra eft 3 car. & tot. ibi funt & 6 villani & 4 fervi 
cum uno cotar. Ibi 15 ac. prati. Silva 4 quarent. 
in long. & 3 quarent. in Iat. Olim 40 fol. Modo 
val. 4 lib. 

De hac terra eft ablata 1 hida terrae quae T. R. E. 
ibi erat. Turftinus [f. Rolf] ten. Valet 20 folid. 

Hugo ten. Fodindone. Aluuardus teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 2 hid. & una virg. terrae. 
Terra eft 3 car. & tot. ibi funt & 2 villani & 1 cotar. 
& 6 fervi & 14 ac. prati. Olim 30 fol. Modo val. 
40 folid. 

Ricardus ten. in Rode 1 hid. quam ipfe tenuitde 
Rainboldo [prelbitero] licentia Regis ut dicit. Rein- 
bold vero tenuic T. R. E. Terra eft dim. car. Ibi 
eft unus bord. Olim & modo val. 10 folid. 

Schelin ten. Fodindone. Bricftouuard teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro 1 hida & una virg. terrae & 
dim. Terra eft 2 car. quae ibi funt cum 1 fervo & 
uno bord. Ibi 6 ac. prati. Olim & modo val. 20 
folid. 

Eldred ten. Brochelie. Idem ipfe ten. T. R. E. 
& geldabat pro 4 hid. Terra eft 4 car. & tot. ibi funt 
& 6 villani & 7 bord. & 16 ac. prati. Valet 30 folid. 

Eldred ten. Grenedone. Idem ipfe teneb. 
T. R. E. & geldabat pro dimid. hida. Terra eft dim. 
car. Ibi funt 4 bord. cum 1 fervo & molin. redd. 30 
denar. & 3 ac. prati & 2 ac. filvae minuts. Valet 5 
folid. 

Ansgerus [de Montagud] ten. de Rege Preste- 
tone. Aluuard teneb. T. R. E. _& geldabat pro 2 
hid. Terra eft 1 car. quae ibi eft in dominio cum 1 
fervo & 8 bord. Ibi 10 ac. prati. Olim 15 foL 
Modo val. 40 fol. 



FINIS LIB. DOMESDAY. 



[ 39 ] 



INDEX TO DOMESDAY. 



(t5" men an Ajierijk (* ) is added to a figure, it denotes that the name occurs more than once in the fame page. 



Ancient Name. 


Modern Name. 


Page. 


Ancient Name. 


Modem Name. 


Page 


A CHA > 

-T\. Ache, 


A. 
1 Oake 


5 
2 4 


Bada. 
Bade, 


j Bath, vide Bade f 


1 1 

4.S.7. 
9> 35 


Achelai, 


Hurft, in Martock 


33 


Badehelton, 


Badialton 


30 


Adelingye, 
Ailgi, 


Achelney Abbey 
Vellow, in Stogumber 


'5 

28 


Bageberge, 


f Bagborough-Weft 
I Eaft 


3» 
3' 


Aifecombe, 


Afhcombe 


7 


Bagelie, 


Baglv _ 


2 3 


Aifelle, 


J Afhill 


18 


Bagetrepe, 


Bawdrip 


2 7 


Aiflelle, 


'5 


Bagewerre, 


Badgworth 


26 


Aifla, 


A (h- Priors, 'vide Aixa Sc 




Baltunefberge, 


Baltonlbury 


•3 




Aixe 


11 


Banwelle, 


Banwell 


10 


Ai/Te, 


( Afhbrittle i 
( Alh, near Martock J 


iS 


Barintone, 
Batecumbe, 


Barrington 
Batcombe 


1 5 
13 


Aiirebrige, 


Axbridge, vide Alfebruge 


s 


Baweberga, 


Bagborough 


S 


AifTecote, 


Afhcott 


"3* 


Bechintone, 


Beckington 


26 


AifTeford, 


Aftiford 


2 3> 24 


Beiminftre, 


Bedminfter 


2 


Aifleforde, 
Aixa, 


Exford 

| Afti-Priors, 

I vide Aifia 


29 

26 


Beletone, 
Belgetone, 


| Bell nton near Pen sford j 


4 
16 


Aixe, 


26 


Bera, 


Beer 


16 


Aldedeford, 


Alford, 


20 


Bere, 


Beercrocombe 


18 


Aldvic, 


Aldwick near Blagdon, 


34 


Berchelei, 


Berkley 


26 


Aler.tone, 
Alfageftone 


Alhampton in Ditchet 
Alfoxton, 




Berrowene, 
Bertone, 




__ 


H 
33 


Barton-David 


2 4 


Almundesford, 


Almsford 


2 7 


Bertune, 


Burton 


36 


A innHf»ftnnp 








Berrow 


2 7 
7 


. Ulll/UVILlf UV, 

Aire, 


Aller, 


2 7 
3 2 


Berve, 


r Barrow Minchin f 
< Barrow-Gurney, in S 
t Bedminfter Hundred J 


Alresford, 


Allerford 


3 2 






Alfebruge, 


Axbridge, vide Aiflebrige 


z 


Bichecome, 


Bickham 


28 


Alfiftune, 


Alfton-Maris 


28 


Bichehalle, 


Bickenhall 


18 


Altone, 


Holton, or Halton 


38 




1 Builhport.orBifhopfworth 




Alurenecote, 


Hurcott 


29 


Bicheheurde, 


i in Bedminfter, vide Bif- 


7 


Alwarditone, 


Allerton 


26 




/ copewrde 




Amelberge, 


Emborow 


9 


Bifcopeftone, 


Bilhopfton 


21 


Animere, 


Enmore 


2 4 


Bifcopewrde, 


Bi/hopworth 


7 


Apelie, 
Appelie, 


}A P ley { 


21 
18 


Blachedone, 


Slagdon in Winterftoke 
Hundred 


34 


Are, 


Oare 


3' 




^Blackford in Whitley 




Afcwei, 
Ateberie, 


Alhway 

Adbeer vide Ettebere 


2 3 
28 


Blacheford, 


J Hundred 

J Blackford near North- 


12 


Atigete, 


Havyat 


7 




l_ Cadbury 


34 


Atiltone, 


11 ton 


15 


Blachemore, 


31ackmore in Churchill 


22 


A ucome, 


Allcombe 


28 | 


Blachelhale, 


Blackfhill 


2 4 


Avena 


Avill 


28 J 


Blcdone, 


Jleadon 


6 




B. 




Bocheland, 


juckland 


37 


Babachan 




20 
38 


Bochelande, 


rBuckland-St. Mary 
\ Buckland-Denham 


98 

37 


Babecari < 


Jabcary 


Babingtone, 

Bacoilc, 


Jabington 
Backwell 


9 
7 


Bodechelei, 
Boduchelei, 1 


J Budeigh 


12 



Bodeflege, 



4° 



.INDEX TO DOMESDAY. 



Ancient Name. 

Bodefiege, 

Bofintone, 

Bofintune, 

Brade, 

Bradeford, 

Bradeforde, 

Biadewei, 

Brdewrde, 

Bratone, 

Brauetone, 

Bredde, 

Brede, 

Bredene, 

Bredenie, 

Brentemerfe, 

Brien, 

Brigeford, 

Briltou 

Briweham, 

Briwetone, 

Brochelei, 

Brodune, 

Brofbrd, 

Brucheford, 

Brugie, 

Brumetone, 

Brune, 

Brunfelle, 

Brunetone, 

Budicome, 
Bur, 
Bure, 
Burnhara, 

Bumetone, 



Cadeberie, 

CafFecome, 

Cainelham, 

Caivel, 

Caldecote, 

Calviche, 

Camel, 

Camelle, 

Camelei, 

Camelertone, 

Candel, 

Candetone, 

Canole, 

Cantctone 

Cantoche, 

Cantocheve, 

Cantocheheve, 

Capilande, 

Capintone, 

Carentone, 

Can, 



Modern Name. 
Butleigh 

[ Bofllngtou 
B radon 

^Bradford 

Broadway 

Broad wood 

Bratton, near Minehead 

Brewton, -vide Brumetone 



1 Bradon 

Bradney 

Brent-Marfh, or Eaft-Brent 

Brean 

Brufhford, -vide Brucheford 

Briftol 

Brewham 

Brewton 

Brockley 

Bratton-Seymour 

Brow ford 

Brufhford 

Bridgwater 

Brewton, vide Brauetone 

Brown 

Broomfield 

f Brumpton-Regis 

I Brympton 
B utcom be- Thrubwell 

r Bower-Eaft 

\ Bower- Weft 
Burnham 

f Brumpton-Regis 

I Brompton-Ralph 

C- 

{Cadbury North 
Cadbury South 
Chaffcombe 
Keynfham 

Cayford, vide Chaivert 
Catcot 
Chelvy 

Camel Queens 
Camel Weft 
Camely 
Camerton 

Candel in Dorfetfhirc 
Cannington, i>;V.Cantetone 
Knolle, in Bedminlter 
Cannington 
Quantock 

Quantockfliead Well 
Quantockfhead Eaft 
Capland 

Capton in Stogumber 
Carhampton 
r Cary Caftle 
I Cary-Fitzpaine 



Page 

12 

«5 

3 2 

37 
'9 
5 
18 
28 
29 

5 

18 
18 
•9 
2 7 
H 
2 7 

3 

T 

24,30 
24 

38 
z 7 
2 3 
18 

z 7 
3 

28 
30 

3 
25,28 

7 
26,36 

32 

2 7 
18 
28 

33 

33 

6 

4 
9 

12 

35 

4 
'5 

9 

>4 
21 

'5.38 

35 

l S 

33 

2 9 

3i 

37 

3 

2, 16 

2 5 

2 7 



Ancient Name. 
Carme, 
Cathangre 
Ceder 
Ctdre 
Celeworde 
Cellewert 
Ceolfeberge 
Ceptone 
Cerdefling 
Cerdre 
Cerlecume 

Cerletone 

Cerletune 

Chaivert 

Chedesford 

Chelmetone 

Chen 

Chenemerefdone 

Chenolle 

Cherintone 

Chetenore 
Chilvetune 
Chingefberie 

Chingeftone 

Chintone 

Chintune 

Chinwardeftone 

Chiwe, 

Chiweftoch, 

Churi, 

Cibewrde 

Cildetone, 

Cilele, 

Cilemetone, 

Cilletone, 

Cilterne, 

Cinioch, 

Cipeftaple, 

Ciretune, 

Citerne, 
Ciwetune 
Claford, 
Claftertone, 
Claihelle, 
Clatewrde, 
Clive, 
Clivedone, 
Cllveham, 
Clive ware, 
Clopetone, 
Cloptone, 
Clotune, 
I Clovewrde, 



Modern Name. 

Quarum, vide Coarme 
Cathanger 

j Chedder { 

Chelwood, or Chelworth 

Chillworthy 

Chiffelborough 

Chilton upon Poldon 

Charlinch 

Chard 

Charlcombe 
r Charlton 
) Charlton-Mufgrove 
f Charlton-Camville 

Charlton-Adam 

Cayford, vide Caivel 

Kittisford 

Kilmington, v. Cilemetone 

Kenn 

Kilmerfdon 

Knolle 

r Cheriton, or Churton- 
|_ North, vide Ciretune 

Kitenor 

Kilton 

Kingfbury-Eaft 
i Kingfton-Seymour 
< Kingfton, in Tintinhull 
L Hundred 

j Kenton-Mandeville 

King-Wefton 
Chew-Bifhops, or Magna 
Chew-Stoke 
Curry-Rivel, vide Curi 



Chilton near Bridgwater 



or 



Kilmington, v. Chelmeton 
Chillington 
Chilthorce-Domer 
r Eaft- Chin nock 
i Middle and Weft 
Chipllaple 
r Chenton North, 
< Churton, vide 
C Cherintone 
Chilthorne-Domer or Vagg 
Chewton-Mendip 
Cloford • 
Claverton, 
Clayhill 
Clatworthy 
Cleve Old 
Clevedone 
Claverham 
Clewer 

Clapton, near Stoke-Trifter 
Clapton, near Hoi ton 
Clapton in Gordatio 
Cloiworth 



Page 

35 

'5 

24 

2,26* 
16 

3 2 

l 9 
12 

21 

10 

11 

13 

'9 
3 2 
2 5 
34 
2 5 
34 

& 

22,38 

3i 

6 

29 

10 



'7 
24 

20 

] 7 
1 1 

34 

2 
29 
22 
34 

3 
21 
20 

46 

»5 

34 
3i 
3» 

4 
"9 
38 

2 1 
28 

3. 
35 

7 

7 

20 

34 

7 

*9 



2 3 



Clutane, 



INDEX TO 



Ancitnt Name. 

Clutone, 

Coarme, 

Cocintone, 

Cofintone, 

Cocre, 

Coleford, 

Colforde, 

Come, 

Comich, 
, Commiz, 
Contitone, 

Contone, 



Contune, 

Corfetone, 

Corillone, 

Corftune, 

Crawecumbe, 

Credelincote, 

Crenemclle, 

Crice, 

Cruce 

Cruche, 

Cruchct, 
Cudeworde, 

Cumbe, 

Cume, 

Cungrcfberie, 

Cungrefbie, 

Cuntone, 

Curi, 

Curiepol, 

Denefmodefwelle 

Dereberge, 

Derlegc, 

Deftone, 

Dicefget, 

Dinefcove, 

Dinnitone, 

Doltin, 

Dolvertone, 

Dolvertune, 

Dondeme, 

Donefcumbe, 

Doneham, 

Doniet, 

Doules, 

Douri, 

Draicote, 

Dreicote, 

Draitune, 

Dudelham, 



Modern Name. 

Clutton 

Quarum, <vidt Carme 

Cucklington 

Codington 

Coker 

Coford 

Coleford near Mells 

{Combe-Hay 
Combe-Flory 

J Combwick 

Compton 

!Compton-DurvilIe 
Compton-Martin 
Cliilcompton 
Compton-Dando 
{Compton-D unden 
Compton-Biihops 
Corton-Denham 
Crofcomb 
Corllon near Bath 
Crowcombe 
Creedlingcot 
Cranmore-Eaft 
Creech St. Michael 
Crockftreet 
Crewkerne 

Cricket Malherbe 

Cudworth 

I Combe St. Nicholas 

K Combe-Abbots 

I Combe-Sydenham 

Combe Monkton 

I Congreibury 

Compton-Paunceford 

f Curry-Rivel 

I Curry-Mallet 
Currypool 

D. 
In Somerton 
Durborough 
Durley 
Durfton 
Ditcheat 
Dilhcove 

Dinnington, <v. Dunintone 
Doulting 

V Dulverton 

D unden 



Downend 
Donyat 
Dowlifh-Wakc 
Dover-Hay 

> Draycot 

Drayton 

Doddilham 



Page. 

7 
z8 
20 

4 
29 

22 

6 

30 
16 

'7 

4 
34 

8 

9' 
'7 
27 
5 
'3 
12 

'7 
20 

'4 

3 

12 

4> 6. 

«S.i7 
18 

*S 

10 

•5 
2 3 
11 



16 

21,36 

21 



12 

36 
25 
'4 
37 
'4 
»3 

3»36 

•3 

2 3 
26 
18 
6 
z 3 

>7>73 
'5."4 

23 
22 



DOMESDAY. 


4» 


Ancient Name. 


Modern Name. 


Page. 


Diincretone, 


Dunkerton 


34 


Dunchcfde, 


Downhead 


■4 


Dunintone, 


Dinnington.wV; Dinnitone 

f Alhwick, vide Efcewick 
I Alhwick, near Mountfo 


37 


Ecewiche, 


12 


27 


Ecferdintone, 


Farington 


'4 


Ederefige, 


And red fey 


12 


Edeveilone, 


Edllone 


22 


Edmundefworde, 


Edingworth 


23 


Edwinetone, 


Edington 


12 


Eford, 


Edllone 


'9 


Eiretone, 
Eleberie, 






Elborough 


•4 


Elwrde, 


Elworthy 


i9 


Englifcome, 


Inglilhcombe 


8 


Epfe 


Epilbury 


j2 


Ernefel 
Ernelhele, 


| Earn (hill 


-4>3 6 


Ernole, 


Yamhill 


29 


Eflide, 


Gurney-Slade 


26 


Eftham, 


Eallham 


4,i<? 


Efientone, 


Alhington 


25 


Efletune, 


Exton 


6 


Ellon, 


Bath-Eafton, vide Eftone 




Eftone, 


f Ealton in Gordano 

I — — in Stanton-Drew 


9 
21 


Eftune, 


Long-Alhton 


8 


Eftrope, 


Droop 


38 


Efturt, 


Stert, near Babcary 


'9 


Ettebere, 


Ad beer 


37 


Eveftie, 
Evercriz 




12 
10 


Evercreech 
F. 

Fiddington, v. Fidintone 


Fedintone, 


20 


Ferenberge, 


Farm borough 


7 


Fere n tone, 


Farrington-Gournay 


9 


Ferlege, 


Farley 


24 


Fefcheforde, 


Fremford 


23 


Fifhide, 


Fivehead 


24 


Firford, 
Fitintone, 




| 


Fiddington, >v. Fedintone 


2> 


Fodindone, 


Fodington 


3* 


Ford, 


Bathford 


1 1 


Frome, 


Frome 


2. 3 

,-.6 

8 


Fufcote, 


Fofscot 




G. 




Gahers, 


Goathurft 


33 


Gatelme, 


Goathill 


20 


Gerlintune, 


Yarlington 


'9 


Gernefelle, 


Yarnfield 


25 


Gcvcltone, 


Yeovil ton 


3° 


Gildeacote, 


Goldfoncot 


*3 


Givelceftre, 


Ivelchefter 


3-5' 


Givele, 


Yeovil, vide Ivle 


'4 

20 


Glaftingberie, 


Glaftonbnry 


11 


Godelegc, 


Gantheney 


21 


Graintone, 


Greinton 


13 


Grenedone, 


Cnndon 

Grin 


3» 

dchim, 



4 2 



INDEX TO DOMESDAY. 



Ancient Name. 
Grindeham, 

Hache, 

Hafella, 

Haia, 

Halberge, 

Haifa, 

Halfe, 

Halfweie 

Hame, 

Hamintone, 

Hamitone, 

Hantone, 



Hardintone, 



Haretrev, 

Harpetrev, 

Herpetrev, 

Hafecumbe, 

Hafewelle, 

Hateware, 

Havechewelle, 

Hela, 

Hele, 

Helgetrev, 

Hengefterich, 

Herdeneberie, 

Herfeld, 

Herlei, 

Hefterige, 

Hetfecome, 

Hewis, 

Hiwis, 

HiJIa, 

Hille, 

Holecumbe, 

Holeford, 

Holeforde, 

Holme, 

Honecotc, 

Hunecote, 

Honfpill, 

Hunefpill, 

Horblawetone, 

Horcerlei, 

Horftenetone, 

Hotune, 

Hundeftone, 

Hunlavingtone, 

Hunteworde, 

Hurfi, 

Huftille, 

Hutone, 

Jatune, 
Ichetoche, 



Modern Name. 

Greenham 

H. 
Hatch-Beauchamp 
Heathfield, wide Herfeld 
Hay 
Hafelborough 

} Halfe 

Halfway 
Ham-High 

> Hemington 

C Bath-Hampton 

< Hinton vSt. George 

C Hinton-Charterhoufe 
X Hardington, in Houndf- 
J borough Hundred 

J Hardington, in Kilmerf- 

L don Hundred 
Hartrow 

[ Har'ptree-Eaft 

I Harptree-Tilly 
Harptree-Weft 
Heftercombe, i>.HetfecQtne 
Halfwell 



Hawkwell 

Heale 

Hill-Bilhops 

Hallatrow 

Henftridge, v. Hefterige 



Heathfield v. Hafella 

Warley 

Henftridge, v. Hengefterich 

Heftercombe,i'. HaJecum be 

Huifh 

Huifti-Epifcopi 

Hill-Biihops, vide Hele 

Hill-Farence 

Hocombe 

Hoford 

Holeford 

Holham 

j Holnicot 

} HuntfpiH 

Hornblotton 

Orchardley 

Horfington 

Hutton, vide Hutone 

Hounfden 

Wool&vington 

Huntworth 

Horfey 

Hunftile 

Hutton, vide Hotune 

I. 
Yatton 
Idftock 



Page. 



18 
5 

37 
37 

5>25 

22 

'3. '5 

8 

ii 

3° 
35 



8 
29 

6 
2 7 

I 

2 5 
21 

37 

5 
'9 

9 
'7 
36 
30 
38 

4 
»7 

22,31 
25,28 

5 

2 3>33 
22 
24,29 

S» 2 4 
23 
26 

27,28 

'4 

9 
3« 

6 
20 
iz 
3 2 

3 6 
>7 

11 

54 



Ancient Name. 

He, 

Iile, 

Ileminftre, 

Illege, 

Imele, 

Jncerta Maneria, 

Ivle, 

La ford, 

Lamieta, 

Lamore, 

Lancheris, 

Langeham, 

Langford, 

Lanporr, 

Lanporth, 

Lavretone, 

Lechefivrde, 

Lediart, 

Lidiard, 

Leding, 

Lega, 

Lege, 

Lideford, 

Lidegar, 

Lilebere, 

Limingtone, 

Limintone, 

Lincume, 

Litelande, 

Liteltone, 

Litune, 
Locheftone, 
Lochetone, 
Lochintone, 

Locumbe, 

Lodenwrde, 

Lodreford, 

Loligtone, 

Lolocheiberie, 

Lopen, 

Lopene, 

Loptone, 

Lovintune, 

Luledoch, 

Maidenobroche, 

Malpertone, 

Malrige, 

Manheve, 

Maneworde, 

Megele, 

Meleburne, 

Mileburne, 

Melecome, 

Mene, 

Mercefberie, 

Mere, 



Modern Name. 

rifle- Abbots 

I Ifle-Brewcrs 
llminfter 
Ely- Green 



Yeovil, vide Givele 

L. 
Larford 
Lamyat 
Laymore 
Langridge 
Langham 
Langford-Budville 

\ Langport 

Laverton 

Lexworthy 

Biihops-Lydiard.i/. L idegar 

Lydiard St. Laurence 

Ledich 

Leigh near Mells 

Ling 

f Lydford Eaft 

ILydford-Wefl: 
Bifhops-Lydiard, v. Lediart 
Elborough 

\ Limington 

Lyncombe 
Leighland 

{Littleton-High 
Littleton-Stoney 
Litton 

j Loxton 

Luckington 

{Luckham-Eaft 
Luckham-Weft 



Lotterford 
Lullington 
Luxborough 

} Lopen 

Lotten 

Lovington 

Lilftock 

M. 
Maidenbrook 
Maperton 
Merridge 
Minehead 



Midghill 

j Milborn-Port 

Melcombe 
Myne 
Markfbury 
Meare 



Page. 

'5 

'7 

'5 

22 

2 3 
16,32 

3i 

5 

'4 

8 

z8 

3 



3° 
•6, 
11 

5.30 
33 

5. 
36 

12 

37 
10 

6 



13 



'5,24 

11 

10 

9 
24 
n 

16,20 

33 
32 
35 
H 
»3 
9 
29 
37 
'7 

22 

34 

36 



5 
34 
33 
28 

3° 
10 

3>5> 2 ° 

36 
29 
«4 
12 

Meriet, 





INDEX TO 


DOMESDAY. 


43 


Ancient Name. 


Modern Name. 


Page. 


s'ncient Name. 


Modern Name* 


Pag* 


Meriet, 


Merriott 


•8.37 


Pilecome, 


Pitcombc 


13 


Merfitone, 


Marilon-Bigot 


26 


Pillc, 


Pylle, 


«3 


Merftone, 


Marfton-Magna 


20 


Pilloch, 


Pileigb. 


22 


Mcrtoch, 


Martock 


4 


Piltone, 


Pilton 


'3 


Michaelifcerce, 


Michael's-Cburch 


36 


Pipeminrtre, 


Pitminftcr 


5 


Michelenie, 


Muchelney 


'5 


Plancsfelle, 


Plainsfield 


32 


Midelenie, 


Middleney 


'5 e 


Pochintune, 


Puckington 


23 


Mideltone, 


Puddimore-Milton 


"2»3 6 


Ponditone, 


Pointington 


20 


Mideltune, 


Milton-Clevedon 


36 


Porbcrie, 


Portbury 


8 


Middeltonc, 


Milton near Long-Load 


z 7 


Portefhc, 


Portiihead 


7 


Mildetune, 


Middleton near Clotworthy 


*5 


Portloc, 


Porlock 


21 


Millcfcote, 


Middlecot 


9 


Potefdone, 


Pixton 


23 


Milvertone, 


| Milverton | 


3>4» 


Poufelle, 


Polefliill 


30 


Milvertune, 


1 1, 16 


Preftetone, 


Preflon 


33.33 


Monechetone, 
Montagud, 


Monkton-Weft 
Montaeute 


'4 

21 


Prcftetune, 
Preftitone, 


| Prellon in Milverton 


3.18 


Mortone, 


Moreton 


35 


Prifdone, 


Prifton 


1 1 


Mudiford, 
Mundiford, 


} Mudford { 


5.21 

35 


Puchelege, 


Peglinch 
R. 


21 


Mulle, 


Mells 


'3 


Rachedeworde, 


Rakefworth 


21 


Mulfelle, 


Mountfey 

N. 


3 Z 


Radeflot 
Radeflote, 


} Radlet 


22.3Z 


Netecumbe, 
Netelcumbe, 


| Nettlecombe 


3.6 


Radchewis, 
Radingctune, 


Rodhuifh 
Raddington 


33 
2 5 


Ncuchalle, 


Newhall 


3» 


Ragiol, 


Regill 


34 


Newentone, 

Newetone, 

Newetune, 


Newton-North 
j Newton-Weil 


16 


Reddene, 


Rodden 


35 

2 | 


25'36 


rvime, 
Rintone, 


Rimpton 


6 


Niwetone, 


Newton St. Loe 


9,21 


Rode, 


Road 


9.38- 


Niwetune, 


Newton 


29 


Roliz, 


Rcdlinch 


20 


Nichehede, 


Ninehead 


5 


Runetone, 


Runnington 


30 


Noiun, 


Nunney 


3° 




S. 




Nortcuri, 


North-Curry 


3 




f Samford-Arundel 


7> l 7 




C Norton-Fitzwarren 


45 


Sanford, 


< Sandford-Bret 


24.25 


Nortone, 


< Norton-under-Hamden 


ly 




L Sandford-Orcas 


58 


C Norton-Midfummer 


«5 


Sapefwich, 


Shapwick 


12 


Nortune, 


Norton St. Philips 


35 


Scheligate, 


Skilgate 


2 l 


Nortperet, 


North-Petherton 


2 


Scepeworde, 


Shipway 


33 




O. 




Seep tone, 


f Shepton-Beauchamp 
I Shepton-Montacute 


•7 


Opecedre, 


Upper- Chedder 


26 


'9 


Opetone, 


Upton-Noble 


9 


Scobindare, 


In Taunton 


5 


Opopille, 


Uphill 


34 


Sedtamtone, 


Stanton 


28 


Otone, 


Wotton-Courtney 


3 1 


Seleurde, 


Selworthy 


32 


Otrameftone, 
Otreraetone, 


> Ottcrhampton i 
P. 


21,32 
38 


Selve, 

Selvere, 

Selure, 


Kilve 
} Monkfilver 


22 
2,32 


Pantefhede, 


Poundisford 


2 4 


Sepetone, 


Shepton-Mallet 


'3 


Pavalet, 


Pawlet 


z 7 


Seovenamentone, 


Sevington-Abbots 


»S 


Pedewelle, 


Pedwell 


12 


Sevenehantune, 


Sevington St. Michael 


•7 


Pegens, 


Pigney 


36 


Sevenemetone, 


Sevington St. Mary 


37 


Pennarminflre, 


Pennard-Eaft 


'3 


Seveberge, 


Seaborough 


6 


Penne, 


f Penzelwood 
I Pendomer 


•9 

26 


Sewelle, 
Sideham, 


Swell 
Sydenham 


18 
-5 


Peret, 


North-Parrot 


'9 


Sindercome, 


Syndercombe 


33 


Peretune, 


> Puriton 


15,16 


Sipeham, 


Shipharn 


24 


Peritone, 


Siredeftone, 


Sheerilon 


21 


Peri, 


Perry 


21,25 


Siwoldeftone, 


Sherfton 


36 


Hprt(*ftrtnp 






Soche 


Sock-Dennis 


20,24 
30 


1 CI XCllUllCy 

Perredeham, 


Petherham 


2 3 
22 


Sordemaneford, 


Shoremansford 


Petenie, 


Pitney 


5 


Sowi, 


Middlezoy 


12 


Picote, 


Pitcott 


8,37 


Spachcftone, 


Spaxtoa 

Sperch 


3- 
eford, 






..— * 



44 


INDEX 


TO 


DOMESDAY. 


Ancient Name. 


Modern Name. 


Page 


Ancient Name. 


Modern Name. 


Snercheford, 


Sparkford 


2 7 


Timbrecumbe, 


Timberfcombe 


Stane, 


Stone, 


■4.35 


Tintehalle, 


Tintinhull, v. Tutenelle 


Stalrewich, 


Standerwick 


24 


Tochefwelle, 


Tux well 


Siahvei, 


Stavvley, 


2 3 


Torlaberie, 


Thurlbury 




f Stanton-Drew 
I Stanton-Prior 


4 


Torleie, 


Thorney 


Stanton, 


11 




f Thorn-Falcon 


Stantune, 


Staunton near Dunfter 


17,29 


Tome, 


\ Thorn-St. Margaret 


Stanwelle, 


Stawell, vide Stawelle 


10 




( Thorn-Coffin 


Staple, 


Staple- Fitzpaine 


i3 


Tornie, 


Twinney 


Stawe, 


Stowey 


37 


Torre, 


Dunfter 


Stawei, 


( Stowey-Nether 
I Stowev-Over 


33 


Traberge, 


Treborough 


3' 


Trente, 


Trent 


Sraweit, 
Stawellc, 




29 
12 


Tumbeli, 
Turveftone, 


Tunley 
Torwefton 


Stawell, vide Stanwelle 




f Stoke under HamJen, 
1 vide Stoche 




Tutenelle, 


Tintinhull, <v. Tintehalle 


Stoca, 


'4 


Twertone, 


Twivert6n 


i-tocha, 


Stoke St. Mary 


s 




U. 




.-Stoke-South 
Stoke-Trifter 
J Stoke-Pero 


8,17 


Ubcedene, 


Upper-Cheddon 




19,20 


Udeberge, 


Wood borough 




z 3 
3° 




f Odcombe 
ICutcombe 


Stoche, 


'■ Stoke-Courcy 


Udecome, 




j Stoke-Rodney 
*-Stogumber 




Ufetone, 
Ulmereftone, 






3 1 

34 


Woolmerfdor. 


Stocheland, 


S Stockland-Briftol 


22, 28 


Ultone, 


Holton 


Stochelande, 

Stoches, 

Stochet, 




3« 
6 

'7 


Ulveronetone, 

Ulvretune, 

Undewiche, 


| Woolverton 


Stocket 


Woodwick 


Storpe, 


Throop 


33 


Utone, 


Wotton-North 


Stragelle, 


Stretchill 


26 


Ulwardeftone, 


Woolfton 


Strate, 


Street 


28 




W. 


Stratone, 


f Stratton-Over 

I Stratton on the Fofs 


2, 8 


Wacet, 


Watchet 


Stretone, 


'7 


Wadeneberie, 


Pamborow 


Strengeflone, 
Strengeftune, 


f Stringfton 


22,32 


Wadmendune, 
Waicome, 


Wilmington 
Weacomb 


Succedene, 


Lower-Cheddon 


5 


Waimore, 


Waimore, 

Weftowe, vide Weftou 


Sudcadeberie, 


South-Cadbury 


33 


Wailtou, 


Sudperet, 


j South-Pethertoii 


2, 16 


Walintone, 


Wellington 


Svdperetone, 

Suindune, 

Summertone, 




Wallepille, 

Waltone, 

Waltune, 


Walpole 

Walton, in Kilmerfdon 

Walton in Gordano 


Somerton 


22 

2»3 6 




( Sutton-Mallet 


12 


Wandeftrev, 


Wanftrow 


Sutone, 


i Sutton-Montis 


47 


Warne, 


Wearn 




L Sutton-Bingham 
Long-Sutton 


64 


W.n r vprd 1 n pftnr n 




Sutune, 


, Watehelle, 


WheathiU 


Tablesford, 


T. 

Telsford 


9 


Watelei, 
Watelege, 


} Whatley 


Talanda, 


Tolland 


5 


Wed more, 


Wedmore, vide Wetmore 


Talham, 


Tilham 


24 


Welle, 


Wells 


Tan tone, 


Taunton 


s 


Wenfre, 


Winford 


Tatewiche, 


Tatwick 


38 


Weregrave, 


Wedergrave 


Tedintcne, 


Tetton 


17 


Weritone, 


Wrington 


Telwe, 


Wellow 


3S 


Werocofale, 


Wraxall 


Temefbare, 
Timefberie, 


> Timfborough 


7>3* 


Werre, 
Weftcumbe, 


Overweare 
Weftcombe 


Ternoc, 


Tarnock 


26 


Weftberie, 


Weftbury 


1 Vrra A lu/ini 




22 




f Wefton in Gordano 
J Wefton-Super-Mare 
J Weftori near Bath 


i tiiii niu lui) 

Terracolgrin, 
Terra-Olta 






2 1 
22 


Weftone, 


M VI 1 U~ V/ltll^ 




Terra-TVoHri. i 




22 




LWefton-Bampficld 


1 vl 1 tt~ M. \*\J\ll 1^-ii 




Tetefberge, 


Edbrook 


28 


Weftou, 


Weftowe, vide Waiftou 


Ticheham, 


'Tickenharh 


3>>3S 


' Wetmore, 


Wedmore, vide Wedmore 



Page 

2 S 
>7 

2 ?>37 
18 

»5 

18 

20 

24 

6 

28 

32 
20 

35 
29 

'4 
8 

5 
35 
'9 

28 

'9 

32 
34 

21,29 

11 

>3 
22 

29 
12 
2 7 
2 3 
3i 
2 

10 
26 
12 
3' 

M,34 
36 
16 

34 
14,30 

11 
10 

8 
10 

14 

8 

26 

•3 
11 

7 
11 

20 

33.35 
2 3 
2 

Wiche, 






INDEX TO DOMESDAY. 



Ancient Name. 

Wiche, 

Widcpolle, 

Widiete, 

Widicume, 

Wilegc, 

Wilesforde, 

Willet, 

Willetone, 

Wimedone, 

Wincaletone, 

Winch* berie, 

Winemercfham, 

Winefcome, 



Modern Name. 

( Bathwick 

( Week Sr. Laurence 
Withypool 
Windiatcs 
Withycombe 
Woolley 
WellWord 
Willet 
Williton 
Wembdon 
Wincaunton 
Wigborough 

Winlham, <vidt Wiaefliam 
Winfcombe 



Page 

8 

37 
36 

22 

6 

8 
36 
29 

2 
11 

3 6 

6 

12 



Ancient Name. 

Wincsford, 

Winefham, 

Wintreth, 

Wiflagetonc, 

Witecumbe, 

Witeham, 

Witochefmede, 

Wivelefcome, 

Wochetrev, 

Worde, 

Worle, 

Worfpring, 

Writeliudtone, 



Modern Name. 
Winsford • 

Winfliam.T/.Wincmereftiam 
Wintcrliead 
Whitelackington 
Widcombe near Bath 
Witham-Friary 
Whiteoxmead 
Wivelifcombe 
Oaktrow ; 
Worth 
Worle 
Woodfpring 
Writhhngton 



45 

1,36 
1 1 

7 

*S 
S 

»4» 
M 

<■> 

•9 

.:• 

M 

M 



U 




Vol I. 



m 



BATH. 



[ I ] 

BATH. 



THIS city is fituated in latitude 51 degrees, 22 minutes, and 32feconds 
north;' in longitude 2 degrees, 21 minutes, and 30 feconds, and 
in time 9 minutes and 26 feconds weft, from London; being 107 
miles diftant from that metropolis, 19 northeaft from Wells, 12 eaft from 
Briftol, 39 north weft from Saliftmry, 41 nearly fouthweft from Gloucefter, 
and 67 fouthweft from Oxford." It ftands in a deep narrow valley, bounded 
on the north, eaft, fouth and fouthweft by lofty hills, forming a very plea- 
fant natural amphitheatre, and affording the city a double advantage, a 
barrier againft the winds, and fountains of the pureft water. This valley 
runs nearly from northeaft to northweft, being incurvated in its centre by 
the fwelling ridge of Lanfdown-hill, which is its chief boundary towards 
the north. On the northweft fide it widens, and gradually opens into a 
plain, divided into rich meads and paftures, and watered by the river Avon, 
(the Antona of Tacitus) which, leaving the city on its northern banks, hence 
winds its way to Keynfham, and the port of Briftol. 

Various have been the appellations which this remarkable city has fuf- 
tained in the different periods of its exiftence. The Britons called it CaCC 

PallaDtor, Cact>T5arjon, Caer*15lauin, <Eaer*<£ran, Caer pn ennatnt ttopmpm 

* The fouthweft corner of Queen-Square was found to be, on a medium of twenty -one accurate observations » 
withabrafs Hadley's fextant made by Ramfden, 51 degrees, 22 minutes, and 32 feconds, which varies only two 
feconds from the account given in the tables requifitc to be ufed with the Nautical Ephemeris, and publilhed by 
order of the Commiflioners of Longitude; that work giving the latitude 51 deg. 22 min. 30 fee; longitude in 
degrees 2 deg. 21 min. 30 fee. longitude in time 9 min. 26 fee. weft. Bath is placed by Ptolemy in long. 17 deg. 
20 min. eaft from the Canary or Fortunate Iflands, and in lat. 53 deg. 30 min. The difference between which 
latitude and the true latitude, is nearly the fame with that between the true latitude of Byzantium, and tlut 
which he afcribes to it. 

Ptolemy's lat. of Byzantium - 43 5' Lat. of Bath, according to Ptolemy - 53° 30' 
True latitude — — 41 1 True latitude — 51 22 

Difference 2 4 I Difference 2 8 

Might not this miftake be derived from the ancient error, which perplexed all the geographers till the prefent 
century, of fuppofing Marftilles and Byzantium to be in the fame parallel of latitude ? 

" It is placed by Antoninus at the diftance of 24 miles from Venta Silurum or Caerivent, 15 miles from Abtni 
or Henbury, 6 from TrajeSlus or Hanham, 15 from Vcrlucio or Hcddington* 35 from Cunetio or Marl "mrougb, 50 
from Spin* or Span, and 65 from Collegia or Silcbefler. In which reckoning it is very obfcrvable that tlic dis- 
tance in Englifh miles from Bath to Marlborough is 32.51, which agrees cxa&ly with the modern rarafure. 

Vol. I. , a Its 



B 



H. 



Its Greek names were "yZxrct Step?, and B»&£«j c its Latin Aqua Soils, Pontes 
CaHdt, Ach am annum, Therma, Badonia, Bothnia, Balnea, and Badonefj'a -,'- 
and its Saxon, Kcemanner--ceapr:n.e, d Kcemanep-bejU, EerbaeSun, and BaBan- 
cepren; fome of which refer to the genii of the hot fprings, and others 
to thofe fprings themfeives, which have rendered this city fo celebrated 
throughout the world.* 

Thefe waters are faid from the lateft experiments to contain a fmall 
portion of common fait, a larger proportion of felenites, a portion of 
iixible air, and fome fulphureous gas or inflammable air, together with a 
flight chalybeate impregnation. Thefe are all that chemiftry has as yet 
difcovered; but from the inadequacy of thefe impregnations to the effects 
produced, it is probable that fome latent caufe is concerned of too fubtile a 
nature to be fubjected to fuch analyfis, or perhaps to be the object of our 
fenfes, or even of our comprehenfion. 

The proportionable fpecific gravity which the feveral mineral waters bear 
to the others ufed in diet and for domeftick purpofes in this city, and to 
diftilled water, is as follows : 

N. B. The proportions are exprelfed in decimals, and are nearly, but 



not altogether accurate. 
TABLE L 



DiftjJled water - 
River water - - - 
Circus Refervoir 
Claverton Refervoir - 
JBeechen-cliff Refervoir 
Common Pump Water 
Pump in the Grove r - 
King's-Bath Water - 
Hot-Bath Water 
Crofs-Bath Water - 



The heat of the Bath 
Bath 1 17 degrees, Crofs- 



TABLE II. 

Of the number of Grains in a Pint which the 
Mineral and other Waters of this City exceed 
Diftilled Water. 

River Water — five grains and a half. 
Circus Water — five grains and a half. 
City Refervoir — feven grains four-tenths. 
Beechen-cliff — eight grains three-tenths. 
Beacon-hill — feven grains four-tenths. 
Pump Water — twelve grains one-tenth. 
Pump in the Grove — fix grains and a half. 
King's-Bath Water — twenty-fix grains. 
Plot-Bath Water — twenty-fix grains. 
Crofs-Bath Water — twenty-four gr. one-tenth. 

waters is as follows: Kings-Bath 1 16 degrees, Hot- 
Bath 1 1 1 degrees on Farenheit's thermometer. 



Grains. 
1. OOOO 
I.0008 
I.0008 

I.OOIO 
I.OOII 

1.0016 

1.0009 

1.0020 
I.0020 
I.C0l8 



c BAAIZA, iroXis ms BgtrUm'xs, IloXuS'i©' V%i6t.m&i*Jrii, to i9vixo> Ba^fx?©-. Stephanus de Urbibus. 
d Dr. Peirce, in his Bath Memoirs, propofes calling it Cripple-Tonvn. 

* The prefent name of this city is derived from the Saxon BsS, which fignifies a Bath, and comes from 
the Greek B«Su profundum. 
* The water of this pump is commended by Dr. Oliver, fenior. See his work on the Bath Waters, p. 139. 

The 



BATH. 3 

The difordcrs which are particularly benefited by the Bath Waters, are, 

i . ObJlruStions of the Vifcera, as of the liver, fpleen, and mefentery, whether 
arifing from hot climates, intemperance, or any other caufe. In thefe, how- 
ever, it muft be premifed that a trial muft be made before the difeafe be fo 
far advanced as to bring on fever, as in fuch circumltances, the waters in 
every form and mode of application are injurious. In cafes of this kind, 
fuited to their ufe, they are drunk, and ufed (with caution) as baths. 

2. Palfies. In thefe their ufe has been celebrated from the earlied times, 
both internally taken, and (what is here of more importance) ufed as baths. 
An account of their fuccefs in the different kinds of palfy, taken from au- 
thentick memoirs of the Bath Hofpital, is here annexed. 

Out of 730 patients admitted into the Bath Hofpital, for palfy from no 
affignable or obvious caufe, there were cured 87, much better 287, better 
123, no better 202, dead 31. The proportion of thofe who received benefit 
to the whole number admitted is, as 497 to 730, or nearly as 1 to 1.4688. 
The number of deaths is nearly as 1 to 23.548. Of 24 patients that were 
admitted for palfy from external cold, two only received no'benefit, and 
none died. Out of 19 cafes of palfy from external accident that were ad- 
mitted from May 1751 to May 1764, fixteen were cured, two were no better, 
and one dead. 

By another account it appears that out of thirteen patients admitted from 
the end of 1775 to the end of 1785, two were cured, five were much better, 
two were better, three were no better, and one dead. 

In palfy from diftortion of the vertebrae, nine perfons out of forty fo 
afflicted were cured, 3 much better, 8 better, 18 no better, and 2 dead. 
Of 276 perfons admitted into the Bath Hofpital for palfy of the hands from 
colic, (from May 1751 to May 1764) 256 were cured or benefited, 6 were 
no better, 1 o died, and 4 were improper fubjefts for a trial of the waters. 

By a later account, viz. from Jan. 1, 1776, to Dec. 31, 1785, it appears, 
that out of 264 admitted within that time, 117 were cured, 138 were much 
oetter, 5 were better, 2 were no better, and only 2 dead. 

In palfies fucceeding fever, it appears, that from May 1751 to May 1764, 
1 7 cafes were admitted, of which 1 3 were cured or benefited, 2 were no- 
better, 2 were improper for a trial of the waters, and none dead . 

By a later account we find that from Jan. 1, 1776, to Dec 31, 17^5. 
1 5 patients of this kind were admitted, of wheru 5 were cured, 9 much 
letter, 1 no better, and none dead. 

a 2 In 



4 BATH. 

In cafes of weaknefs of the limbs fucceeding rheumatifm, it appears from 
Dr. Charlton's account, that of twenty-feven patients, 22 received benefit, 
and none died. A later account is however lefs favourable, in that two out 
of three received no benefit. 

In palfy from women's lying-in or mifcarriage, four out of five patients, 
4b admitted, received benefit. 

The average of ftay in the hofpital of thirty-fix patients taken in fuc- 
cefiion, who were all difcharged cured of palfy without any affignable caufe, 
rather exceeded ninety days to each perfon. 

If the difeafe be local or confined to one limb, the pump is generally ufed 
daily from fifty to two hundred ftrokes. If the difofder be of larger extent, 
the bath is generally advifed twice a week, or if the patient can bear it, 
thrice. The pump is fometimes ufed to the patients when in the bath. 
The time of bathing in the publick baths is in the morning, the time of 
ftay from ten minutes to half an hour, and a warm feafon of the year is 
preferable. The Crofs-Bath is generally firft tried, as being cooler than the 
others. If this be too warm, or other circumftances attending its ufe in- 
convenient, private baths of any degree of heat that may be defired, may be 
had either at the Hot and King's Baths, or at thofe belonging to the 
Pierpoint family, fituated in Abbey-ftreet. The water is drunk from half 
a pint daily to a quart; two- thirds of the quantity taken is given before 
breakfaft, and the remainder at noon. The Crofs-Bath water is generally 
advifed for a few days at the commencement of the courfe. 

The Gout is alfo much relieved by the ufe of the Bath Waters, both inter- 
nally taken and externally applied. The intervals between the paroxyfms 
are the proper times for their application ; want of appetite, debility, and 
ftifrhefs of limbs, arifing from the fame caufe, often receive great benefit. 
The mode of ufmg them does not differ materially from that above de- 
fcribed in palfy. 

Rheumatick complaints alfo are relieved by the ufe of the Bath Waters, that 
kind efpecially which comes on rather in the decline of life, and is not 
attended with fever. 

The Hyjierick Colick, and that which goes under the name of the Colick of 
Pointers, are proper for a trial of thefe waters, and are generally relieved. 

Jamidice, when proceeding from biliary calculi, and not from any inflam- 
jnation of the liver, is generally cured by the ufe of the waters. 

Hip 



B 



H. 



Hip cafes, and JVhite Swellings of the Knee, if taken in time, are generally 
cured by the external application of the waters ; of the former one hundred 
and fixty-feven cafes were admitted from the beginning of the year 1778 to 
the end of the year 1784, of whom 31 were cured, 66 were much better, 
30 were better, 40 no better, and none dead. The proportion of thofe that 
received benefit to thofe that received none, is as 3.175 to 1. 

In the fame fpacc of time twelve patients with White Swellings of the 
Knee were admitted, of whom 1 was cured, 4 were much better, 5 better, 
and 2 no better. The proportion of thofe benefited to thofe who received 
no benefit, is as 5 to 1. 

Leprofy is another complaint in which the Bath waters have been found 
fuccefsful. Of 196 patients admitted for this loathfome difeafe from Jan. I, 
1776, to Jan. 1, 1783, 119 were cleanfed, 51 were much better ; 12 were 
better, 8 were no better, 2 died of the fmall-pox, 1 was difcharged for mif- 
behaviour, and 2 were improper for a trial of the waters . The proportion 
of thofe benefited to thofe that received no benefit is as 22.75 to '■ 

Hyjlerical and Hypochondriacal complaints are alfo relieved by the Bath 
waters, the former particularly, if accompanied with obftruction of the 
natural difcharges. 

Other fpafmodick difeafes, as St. Vitus 's Dance, have alfo received benefit ; 
of nine patients admitted for this complaint from the beginning of the year 
1775 to the end of 1784, eight were cured, and one was better. 

The circumftances which contraindicate the ufe of the Bath waters, are, 
All feverifh complaints, efpecially if attended with cough, pain of the breaft, 
or difficulty of breathing. All cafes attended with -any open fore or ulcer. 
All cafes wherein there is reafon to fufpecl: any internal fuppuration or fchir- 
rhus has taken place. All cafes of perfons fubjec"V. to haemorrhages of any 
kind, if confiderable. Cafes of Hernia or Inteftinal Rupture. Cafes of 
Mania, or any tendency thereto, or derangement of the underftanding, efpe- 
cially if attended with fever. Great Plethora and rednefs of the face, efpe- 
cially if attended with coflivenefs. 

The difcovery of thefe fo falutiferous waters is by ancient hiflorians attri- 
buted to Bladud fon of Lud-Hudibras, who was king of this country eight 
hundred and ninety years before the birth of Chrift. This Bladud is faid 
to have been a perfon deeply verfed in myftick fcience, and to have taught 
necromancy throughout Britain. Proteus-like, he affumed a vari:ty of 
fhapes and figures, turned one thing into another, made the deal to fpeak, 
flopped the courfe of rivers and the flight of birds, and difcompofed the order 

of 



6 BAT H. 

of the elements. Among other his prodigious exploits, he converted the cold 
fprings, which he obferved to flow in this particular fpot, into a hot foun- 
tain, built over it a temple to Minerva, and inflituted facred fires to burn 
perpetually upon her altar. 8 At length, to prove the confummate excellence 
of his art, he made himfelf wings to fly withal through heaven, in which 
attempt he fell, and was dallied to pieces upon the temple of Apollo at 
Trinovantum." 

To this prepofterous account other writers have added circumftances 
equally ridiculous; fuch as Bladud wandering in difguife from his father's 
houfe, to which he had become offenfive by reafon of a noifome leprofy, and 
hiring himfelf .to a fwineherd at the village of Swainfwick. That ofttimes 
obferving fome of the fwine which he fuperintended, and drove from pafture 
to pafture, to delight in running down the hill, and plunging themfelves 
into a deep black morafs; and perceiving that fuch of his herd, as before 
were covered with fquamous eruptions, were fuddenly reftored whole, and 
perfectly fmooth ; he began to inveftigate the caufe and the place of their 
miry wallpwing, difcovered the virtues of the waters, applied them to his 
own diftempered frame, and foon becoming clean, returned to his father's 
houfe in peace. That fhortly after fucceeding to the throne, he environed 
the waters which had contributed to his recovery with a ftrong inclofure, 
and afterwards built round them a city, which he called after his own name. 

Abfurd however as thefe legends are, frill they have fome tendency to 
point out the antiquity of the hot fprings ; nor could it indeed have hardly 
been poflible for fuch a wonderful phcenomenon to have remained unob- 
ferv d by the rudeft aborigines of the country; but the antiquity of the 
city and the baths themfelves we are not to refer to any higher period 
than the arrival of the Romans, a people peculiarly happy in converting the 
gifts of nature to the propereft ufes, and in fupplying her deficiencies by 
admirable works of art. 

* This fomewhat agrees with the account given by Solmus of thefe waters: ' Fontefque calidi opiparo ex- 
' fculpti apparatu ad ufus mortalium, quibus prasful eft Minerva numen, in cujus sde perpetui ignes nunquam 
* canefcunt in favillas; fed ubi ignis tabuit, vertitur in globoS faxeos.' Solin. PclybiJIor. cap. xxv. 

* Pontici Virnnnii Britan. Hift. lib. z. The monks imputed the virtues of thefe waters to a miracle of St. 
David. Alexander Necham, a poet of the thirteenth century thus defcribes theru: 

Bathoni/e Thermis <vix frafero Virgilianas 

ConfeSlo profunt Balnea nojira fern. 
Profunt attritis, collifis, invalidifque, 

Et quorum morbis frigida caufa fubeft. 

Virgil's fam'd baths o'er ours no palm can claim,—— 
Here old age blooms, here nimbly walk the lame j 
Congenial heats the fong-loft ftrength reftore, 
And pain aifli&s the morbid frame no more. 

It 



BATH. 7 

It was in the year of our Lord 44, and in the reign of the Emp 
Claudius, that the Roman forces, under the conduct of Flavius Vefpafiau, 
after having reduced all the Belgick colonies and the weftern parts of 
Britain under the fubjection of the Roman empire, fat down in this terri- 
tory, to which they had probably been directed by the native Belgae. The 
report of fuch genial waters as flowed with fpontaneous heat from the 
bofom of the earth in a rude and barbarous country, was a fufficient in- 
ducement to a people who had fo lately left the luxuries of Italy, where 
every art was employed in creeling the moft fuperb baths and fudatories, 
and in fabricating with immenfe labour and expence that very article of 
indulgence, which nature in this fpot furnifhed without the fmalleft trouble 
to their hands. Such an extraordinary and unexpected bounty they could 
not fail afcribing to that orb, which imparts heat and vigour to the univerfe; 
and they at once beflowed upon the waters the appellation of Aquce Solis, 
or the Waters of the Sun. Here they ftationed the firft detachment of the 
fecond legion, building proper habitations for the officers and the military in 
general, and at length, by the arrival of other legions, the place grew into a 
city, endowed with Roman liberties, and governed by Roman laws. Walls, 
gates, and temples, were erected, and a little Rome began to adorn a dreary 
inhofpitable wild. 

In the reign of Hadrian, about A. D. 118, that fame detachment of 
the fecond legion, ftill remaining here, was joined by a diviiion of the 
fixth; and in that of Severus, a part of the twentieth legion, removed 
from Deva/m, or Chefter, had their ftation in Aquce Solis, which was then 
become the moft capital city in Roman Britain, and die principal, if not 
the only place in this part of the ifland for preparing the legionary arms 
and enfigns. This appears by a monumental ftonc found in 1708, on the 
Fofle-road near Walcot, inferibed with the following memorial: 

IVLIVS VITA 
LIS. FABRICIES 
IS. LEG. XX.V V. 
STIPENDIOR 
VM IX ANNOR. XX. 
IX. NATIONE BE 
LGA. EX COLEGIO 
FABRICE. ELATV 
S. H. S. E. 

^Julius Vltalh Fabricienjis, legionis i-ieefi/zue, valentij, r fi£lricis-,ftipendiQrum novcm, 
Ainnorum viginti novem, nationc Belga, ex collegio fabrics elatta, bicjitus eft. 

By 



8 BATH. 

By which wc are to underftand that Julius Vitalis, a ftipendiary of the 
twentieth legion, aged twenty-nine years, a countryman of Britifh Bel- 
gium, was here buried at the expence of the fociety of artifts to which he 
belonged. This curious relique is flill preferved at the eaft end of the abbey- 
church, fronting the Orange-Grove, and is probably the firft of thofe vene- 
rable monuments which illuftrate the antiquity of this city. 

The old Roman city was built in the form of a pentagon, the area 
whereof was one thoufand two hundred feet in length, and the greateff 
breadth about one thoufand one hundred and fifty. It was furrounded by 
a ftrong wall compofed of layers of flone, brick, and terras, nine feet in 
thicknefs, and twenty feet in height: this wall was flanked by circular 
towers at each angle, and had four gateways, anfwering nearly to the four 
cardinal points of the compafs, from which in fubfequent times the principal 
flreets had their denominations. In the centre of the city, betwixt the north 
and fouth gates flood the praetorium, the lodgings of the officers, the balnea, 
and the temple dedicated to Minerva. The fite of this laft-mentioned ftu- 
pendous edifice has been plainly indicated by the late difcoveries made in 
laying the foundations of the new buildings at the top of Stall-ftreet. It 
flood on the eaflern fide of the great FofTe-road, running through the city 
from north to fouth, and nearly midway betwixt the Porta Decumana, or 
north gate, and the Porta Flumentana, or fouth gate, leading to the river. 
Its front was towards the weft, and confifted of a portico, fupported by very 
large fluted columns, of the Corinthian order, crowned with the richeft 
fculptured capitals. The architraves were charged with infcriptions to the 
Su/livce, the Decs Campeftres, and to other local deities, and the frieze was 
enriched with gigantick images, figures of birds and beafts, and groups of 
foliage. The internal recefles contained their votive altars, infcribed with 
the names of their relatives, either thofe opprefTed with lingering difeafe, 
or engaged in military perils. 

A great part of the fragments of this vaft temple have been dug up. 
Among others, the bafe, fhaft, and capital of an elegant column, nearly three 
feet in diameter? a portion of an architrave, infcribed, 

CE PROACI 
DEAE SVISMi 

another thus, 

NDVS-LIGVR 
YE-NIMIA VETVS ; 

a remnant 



BATH. 9 

i 

a remnant of a large elliptick ornament, formed by a wreath of oaken 
boughs moft exquifitely fculptured; an immenfe head of Phoebus, or the 
Sun with radiant Locks, intwined with ferpents; an owl, the bird of 
Minerva; head of Diana, a hand holding a facrifical inftrument; Mer- 
cury's caduceus; a quantity of bones of fmaller victims; and a votive altar, 
with the following infeription : 

DEAE SVLI 

PRO SALVTE ET 

INCOLVMITA 

TE MAR. AVFID. 

MAXIMI. LEG. 
VI. VIC. . 

AVFIDIVS EV 

TVCHES LE.B. 

VS. LM. 

Dea Suliva, pro falute et incolumttate Marci Aujidii Maximi, legionis fexta 
viftricis, Aufidius Eutucbes, legatus Britannicus, votum folvit lubens merito. 

Behind this temple, towards the eaft, flood the fplendid Roman baths, 
the foundations of which were difcovered in the year 1755, at the depth of 
twenty feet beneath the furface of the ground. The walls of thefe baths 
were eight feet in height, built of wrought ftone lined with a ftrong cement 
of terras; one of them was of a femicircular form, fifteen feet in diameter, 
with a ftone feat round it eighteen inches high, and floored with very fmooth 
flag ftones. The defcent into it was by feven ftone fteps, and a fmall 
channel for conveying the water ran along the bottom, turning at a right 
angle towards the prefent King's bath. At a fmall diftance from this was 
a very large oblong bath, having on three fides a colonade, furrounded with 
fmall pilafters, which were probably intended to fupport a roof. On one 
fide of this bath were two fudatories nearly fquare, the floors of which were 
compofed of brick, covered with a ftrong coat of terras, and fupported by 
pillars of brick, each brick being nine inches fquare, and two inches in 
thicknefs. Thefe pillars were four feet and a half high, and fet about four- 
teen inches afunder, compofing a hypocauft or vault for the purpofe of re- 
taining the heat neceflary for the rooms above. The interior walls of thefe 
apartments were fet round with tubulated bricks or funnels about eighteen 
inches long, with a fmall orifice opening inwards, by which the fleam of 
heat was communicated to the apartment. The fire-place from which the 
heat was conveyed was compofed of a fmall conical arch at a little diitance 
from the outward wall; and on each fide of it adjoining to the above-men- 

Vol. I. b tioned 



IO 



BATH. 



tioned rooms, were two other fmaller fudatories of a circular fhape, with 
feveral fmall fquare baths, and a variety of apartments which the Romans 
ufed preparatory to their entering either the hot baths or fudatories; fuch 
as the frigidarium, where the bathers undreffed themfelves, which was 
not heated at all; the tepidarium, which was moderately heated; and the 
eleothefion, which was a fmall room, containing oils, ointments, and per- 
fumes. Thefe rooms had a communication with each other, and fome of 
them were paved with flag ftones, and others beautifully teffelated with 
fmall dies of various colours. A regular fet of well-wrought channels con- 
veyed the fuperfluous water from thefe baths to the river Avon. 

But to inftance all the greatnefs of the Romans in this city, we muff. 
. recur to the feveral other remains which have been difcovered within and 
without its ancient walls, both as to thofe which ftill remain, and thofe 
which have perifhed either by time or violence, or have been conveyed to 
other parts. In the time of Henry VIII. on the city wall beneath the north 
and fouth gates, were vifible the head, and near it the whole-length figure of 
Hercules ftrangling two ferpents; a foot foldier with his fword andfhield; 
feveral wreaths of foliage; two images embracing each other; two heads 
with ruffled locks, and a greyhound running. Near the weft gate were the 
head of Medufa, and Laocoon incompaffed with ferpents ; and between the 
weft and north gate, a naked man laying his hand on a foldier; Cupids with 
wreaths of vine leaves; two images, one grafping a ferpent; and feveral 
momfmental tables. On the fragment of a ftone near the north gate, was 
cut in very large chara£ters the following memorial to a fenator of the 
colony of Gloucefter, who probably came hither for his health, and lived 

not to return : 

DEC. COLONIC GLEV. 
VIXIT AN. LXXXVI. 

Decurioni colonia Glevenfis vixit annos oSioginta fex. 

Near the weft gate there ftood an oblong ftone, at one end of which was 
the figure of Proferpine with a cornucopia thrown over her left fhoulder; 
and at the other, victory holding a palm-branch in her left hand: the. 
intermediate table was filled with this infcription : 

D. M. 

SVCC. PETRONIiE VIX. 
ANN. III. M.IIII.D.IX.V. PETRO 
MVLVS ET VICT. SABINA 
FIL. KAR. FECv 

Dis 



BATH. 



ii 



Dis Manibus Succia Petronia: vixit annos tres, menfes quatuor, dies rwvem t 
Valerius Petronius famulus, et Viftorina Sabina, jilice carifjima fecerunt. 

On a broken ftone a little lower was the following: 

VRN 
IOP 

On another ftone in very large characters: 

VLIA 
ILIA 

Near the laft there was the figure of a hare running. 

On another ftone, 

IVLIVS SA. 
VL. VXSC. 

Julius Sabinus Julia uxori. 

Adjoining to this was the head of Medufa with her fnaky locks. Thefe 
feveral infcriptions were ftill exifting in the old city walls in the time of 
Queen Elizabeth; but moil of them have fince been deftroyed, together 
with the walls which held them. 

At Walcot, in the fame reign, were dug up by the road fide, two ftones 
with the following infcriptions: On the firft, 

C. MVRRIVS 
C. F. ARNIENSIS 
FORO. IVLI. MO 
DESTVS MIL. 
LEG. II. AD. P. F. 
IVLI. SECVNDI 
ANN. XXV. STIPEND. 
H. S. E. 

Caius Murrius, Caii filius, Arnienfis, Foro Julienfis, Modejlus miles legionis fe- 
cunda, adjutricis, pice, fidelis, Julii Secundi, annorum viginri quinque Jlipendi- 
crum, hie Jitus eft. 

On the other, 

DIS MANIBVS 
M. VALERIVS. M. 
FIE. LATINVS C. EQ^ 
MILES LEG. XX. AN. 
XXXV. STIPEN. XX. 
II. S. E. 

b 2 Dis 



12 



BATH. 



Dis Manibus, Marcus Valerius, Marci jilius Latinus, centurio e quit urn, miles le- 
gionis viceftmcE, annorum triginta quinque, Jlipendiorum •viginti, hie Jitus eft. 

At the Bell in Walcot was dug up a ftone, inferibed, 

VIBIA IVCVNDA AN. XXX. 
H. S. E. 

Vibia Jucunda, annorum triginta, hie Jit a eft. 

On another ftone, 

FORTVNAE 

CONSERVA 

TR1CI 

L. SENECIA 

NIVS MAR 

TIVS LEG. 

VI. VICT. 

Fortunce confervatrici Lucius Senecianius Martius, legionis fextce viBricis. 

In the fame wall which contains the infeription to Julius Vitalis, the 
legionary artificer, at the eaft end of the abbey-church, is fixed a monu- 
mental ftone, on the top of which is fculptured in baflo relievo the figure 
of an equeftrian foldier, armed with his fpear, and trampling on his fallen 
enemy; this ftone is broken in two, and the upper part having been firft 
difcovered without the original concomitant infeription, it was by fome 
furmifed" to have been erected in honour of Geta, who was a praefecl: in 
Britain in the time of the Emperor Severus, and is faid to have been an 
extravagant admirer of horfes. However, in the year 1736, the counter- 
part of the ftone was difcovered in digging a vault in the market-place, 
whereby this curious relique was reftored to its proper owner. 

L. VITELLIVS MA 
NIAI F. TANCINVS. 
CIVES. HISP. CAVRIESIS 
EQ^ ALAE VETTONVM CR. 
ANN. XXXXVI. STIP. XXVI. 
, H. S. E. 

Lucius Vitellius, Maniani Jilius, Tancinus cives Hispanienfts, Caurienfts^equitum 
Alee Vettonum centurio, annorum quadraginta fex, Jlipendiorum viginti fex, hie 
Jitus eft. 

In digging a cellar in Stall-ftreet, June 29, 1753, there was found a ftone 
inferibed with the following memorial : 

* Mufgrave de Geta Britannico, 1714. LOCVM 



BATH. 13 

LOCVM RELI 
GIOSVM PER IN 
SOLENTIAM E 
RVTVM 

VIRTVTI ET N. 
AVG. REPVRGA 
TVM REDDIDIT 
C. SEVERIVS 
EMERITVS 3 
PEG. ' 

Locum religiofum, per infolentiam erutum, virtuti et numini Augufli repurgatum y 
reddidit Caius Severius Emeritus, & hoc pofuit ergo gratice. 

Under this (tone were found feveral coins of the Emperor Caraufius. 

Near the fame place in 1 754, an altar was dug up, infcribed, 

PEREGRINVS 
SECVNDI FIL. 
CIVIS TREVER. 
IOV. CETIO 
MARTI ET 
NEMETONA 
V. S. L. M. 

Peregrinus, Secundi Jiiius, civis Trevirenjis, Jovi Cetio, Marti, et Nemetona, 
votum folvit labens merito. 

Another altar was difcovered here in 1754, infcribed as follows: 

SVLEVIS 
SVLINVS 
SCVLTOR 
ERVCETI F. 
SACRVM F. L. M. 

Sulevis, Sulinus Scultor, Bruceti Jiiius, facrum fecit lubens merito. 

In 1774, in removing the rubbifh from the head of the fpring of the hot 
bath, an altar was found with this infcrl ption : 

DEAE 
SVLI. M 
INERVAE 
SVLINVS 
MATV 
RI FIL. 

V. S. L. M. 

* Dea 



H 



BATH. 



Dece Sulivcc, Minerva, Sulinus Maturi jilius, votumfolvit lubens merito. 

1 

This and the preceding altar are depofited in the Guildhall. There 
were found with it a great number of coins of Nero, Vefpafian, Hadrian, 
Trajan, and Antoninus Pius. 

Another altar was found in the fame bath, May 19, 1776, infcribed, 

DEAE DIA 
NAE. SACRATI 
SSIMAE. VOTV 
M. SOLVIT V. 
VETTIVS BE 
NIGNVS. L. M. 

Dea Diana facratiffimce votumfohit Valerius Vettius Benignus lubens merito. 

A moft curious and beautiful head of Minerva (or, a.s fome think, of 
Apollo) was, in the month of July 1727, dug up at the depth of fixteen 
feet from the furface of the ground, in Stall-ftreet, and is ranked amongft 
the moft curious remains that ever have been difcovered within this an- 
cient city. It is of brafs gilt, and of excellent workmanfhip ; being part of 
a mutilated ftatue, which is fuppofed to- be ftill lying buried in the fame 
fpot. It originally had on it a crown, probably of the mural kind, the 
holes by which it was affixed being ftill vifible. With this head (which is 
preferved in the guildhall) were found at the fame time feveral coins of 
Marcus Aurelius, Maximinus, Maximian, Dioclefian, Cohftantine, &c. 

There was alfo dug up in the environs of Bath a very large and fmgular 
head of a female, twenty-one inches in height, and one hundred pounds in 
weight, with braided hair, covered with a curious attire of pearls. This 
head was cut out of a fpungy kind of ftone, and was thought to have be- 
longed to a ftatue, placed as an ornament either in fome private garden, or 
fome military way. It was at firft attributed to Andromache, from its 
fmgular drefs, thus illuftratedin Juvenal: 1 

Tot premit ordinibus, tot adhuc compagibus ahum 
Mdificat caput, Andromachen a fronte videbis-, 
Pojl minor eft, credas aliam. 

With curls on curls they build her head before, 

And mount it with a formidable tow'r; 

A giantefs fhe feems ; but look behind, 

And then fhe dwindles to the pigmy kind. Dryden. 

1 Sat. vi. v. 501. £>!•, 



BATH. ,- 

Dr. Stukcly has, with a greater degree of probability, afcribed this head to 
the Emprefs Julia Domna wife o£ Severus. "' 

The antiquities of inferior note, which have at different periods been cad 
Up from among the ruinous foundations of this city, are almoft innumerable; 
vaft mafles of fculptured ftone, columns, capitals, architraves and friezes of 
huge buildings; tefielated pavements, bricks of various fhapes and dimen- 
fions; paterae, urns, vafes, lachrymatories, coins, fdver and brafs inftruments 
of various kinds, having from time to time been difcovered, and fold to 
ftrangers frequenting the city. At Walcot, and the elegant hermitage of 
Mr. Thickneffe under Lanfdovvn, were burial places of the Roman foldieryj 
and at both great quantities of urns, fibulae, armillae, chains, and other re- 
liques, have been found. The coins which have been met with, are princi- 
pally thofe of Claudius, Vefpafian, Domitian, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus 
Pius, Severus, Gordian, Gallienus, Dioclefian, Maximinus, Maximian, Ca- 
raufius, and Conftantine; but few, if any of them, have on their reverfes 
any particular allufion to the local occurrences of the city. 

During the reign of the En\peror Theodofius, Chryfanthus being then 
governor in Britain, the Roman legions began to leave this city, and, as 
we may fairly conclude, with fome reluctance. Congenial to their natures, 
it had become a very favourite ftation, and, as I have before obferved, it 
had, from a very fmall and inconfiderable poft for a few foldiers, increafed 
into a great and populous city, inhabited by families unconnected with 
military concerns, and practifing the arts of civilization and peace. At 
length, about the year 444, the Roman army totally withdrew from the 
place, and left it to the poffeflion of the Britons, who, by their intercourfe 
and intermarriages with the Romans, had before conftituted a confiderable 
part of its inhabitants, and had learnt from them a different mode of war, 
which they foon found occafion to exercife againft a different kind of people. 

The Saxons, who had been invited into Britain, and difperfed themfelves 
into the various parts thereof, by fmall degrees erected themfelves into 
feveral petty ftates, or monarchies. Bath, with a few other confiderable 
cities in the weftem parts of the ifland, ftill remained in the poffeflion" of 
the Britons, till in the year 577, a large army of the Saxons, under the 

m Itin. Curiof. i. 157. 
" Camden, and other writers, fix the 12th battle of King Arthur, mentioned by Nennius [chap. 62,] under 
the name of Vritan Q9cnti« "SaDcmia, to Banrfdc-wn or Lanfdmtiu, overlooking Want VaBcn, or the Vale of Bath. 
But it is much more probable that the fcene of this engagement was Bqydtnhill, on the confines of VI ills and 
Berks, where to this day cxiils a tradition of a bloody battle having been fought between King Arthur and the 
Saxons, and Saxon armour has been found in barrows on the neighbouring plain. 

command 



16 BATH. 

command of Ceaulin and Cuthwin, advanced towards its walls. Their 
firft halt was at Sodbury, where they ftrongly encamped themfelves on the 
brow of the hill, overlooking a vaft extent of their future conquefts in the 
territories of Gloucefter and Monmouth, and thence they advanced to 
Dyrham, about feven miles diftance from the city. Here they were met by 
three Britiih kings of the names of Conmail, Condidin, and Farinmail, 
who, giving them battle, fell, and Bath foon after was obliged for the firft 
time to yield to the Saxon arms. 

This period afforded a new name, and a different profpecl: to this memo- 
rably city j becoming part of the dominions of the Weft-Saxons, under 
which it flourifbed for near two hundred years j and perhaps it is owing 
to this people, that we know fo little or fo much of the Roman ftate of 
Bath. On the foundation of thofe walls, which they themfelves had induf- 
trioufly deftroyed, frefli bulwarks were ere£ted with the old material , and 
with others brought from the ruins of temples, maufoleums, and trium- 
phal arches, and therein was inferted a variety of fculptures which they 
had thrown down from the ruined buildings. The interior parts of the 
city were decorated in a new tafte, and filled with adventitious ftructures. 
Religion alfo, under Chriftian aufpices, began to dawn, and on the ruins 
of the defolated temple of Minerva, whofe altars had long remained un- 
tinged by beftial facrifices, Ofric king of the Northumbrian ftates, with 
the confent of Kentwine, that once relentlefs chacer of the Britiih powers, 
crefred, in the year of our Lord 676, a houfe of nuns to the honour of God 
and St. Peter the apoftle. 

In this ftate the city continued till the year 775, when Offa, king of that 
part of the Saxon heptarchy called Mercia, having with great force carried 
his conquefts from the Darent to the Avon, made himfelf mafter of Bath and 
all the adjoining territories, Kineulf king of the Weft Saxons, although 
a brave and fkilful warrior, being, through a deficiency of military ftrength, 
obliged to concede the poffeflions of his puiffant anceftors to the victorious 
Mercian. After this prince had imbrued his hands with the blood of 
Ethelbert king of the Eaft Angles, he either through fhame, terror or re- 
jnorfe, removed his court to this city, and to expiate his crime, caufed the 
monaftery of Ofric, which had fallen in the confufions of war, to be re- 
edified, one hundred years after its firft foundation, and inftituted therein a 
fociety of fecular canons. 

For a long fpace after this event, the Danifh invafions interrupted the 
tranquility of the city, and the progrefs of its improvements; to recount 

Chron. Saxon. 22. which 



BATH. 



'7 



which, would be only to depict a fcene of barbarous tumults, in which 
not only particular families, but multifarious hofts; not only private walls, 
but publick bulwarks, and even the venerable ftructures of religion, fell 
indifcriminately to the ground. At length, it aflumed new fplendour under 
the Auguftan reign of Edgar, who in the year 973 was confecrated and 
crowned with great folemnity in the church of St. Peter, in the prefencc 
of Ofwald archbilhop of York, and the feveral other prelates of England/ 
This monarch endowed the city with divers valuable privileges, eredting it 
into a free borough, granting it a market, and the liberty of coinage, and 
exempting it from toll, tribute, and taxes ; the memory of which benefac- 
tions the inhabitants preferred for many ages in anniverfary games and 
feflive pageantries. This feems to have been the fecondary origin of the 
city's future greatnefs ; and whatever occafion the politicks of thofe times 
might have to detract from the merit of the royal donor, yet in this parti- 
cular his memory is to be revered, in that he laid the foundation of the 
liberties of a city, whofe fame has fpread through all countries. 

At the time of the invafion of this country by the Normans, there were 
within the walls of Bath one hundred and feventy-eight burgefles, fixty- 
four of whom were tenants to the King, ninety to the barons and great 
men, and twenty-four to the church of St. Peter. 

" The King (fays the Norman furvey) holds Bade. In the time of King 
" Edward it [was held by Queen Edith,'' and] gelded for twenty hides, 
" when the county [of Somerfet] was aflelTed. The King has there fixty- 
" four burgefles, rendering four pounds, and there are fourfcore and ten 
" burgelfes of other men, paying yearly to the borough fixty (hillings. The 
" King has there fix unoccupied houfes. 

" This borough with Estone [Bath-Eafton] renders fixty pounds by tale, 
v ' and one mark of gold. Befides this a mint yields one hundred /hillings. 
" Edward accounts eleven pounds for the third penny of this borough. 

" From the fame borough one houfe is taken away. Hugh the interpre- 
" ter holds it, and it is worth two (hillings."' 

Such was the (late of Bath in the time of King William the Conqueror; 
but in the fucceeding reign of Rufus it underwent a revolution, which 
proved the fubjecT: of much controverfy and unfeemly confufion to the eccle- 
fiaftical polity of the county. From the time of the Con^ueft foreigners 
had been invited and encouraged to fettle within the precincts of this city. 

' Gervas. Adl. Pontif. Cantuar. de Sand. Dunrtano. « Lib. Domefday, Exon. ' Lib. Domefday. 

Vol. I. c Among 



18 BAT H. 

Among the reft was John de Villula, a native of Tours in the province 
of Orleanois in France, who for feveral years pra&ifed phyfick in this 
refort of valetudinarians, and accumulated by his practice a prodigious 
fortune j by virtue hereof, and by his intereft with the monks eftablifhed 
in the ancient foundation of King Offa, he at length procured the bifhop- 
rick of Wells, vacant by the death of Bifliop Gifo, another French emigrant. 
The attachment which he had conceived to this favourite city, the fofterer 
of his enterprizes, and the nurfe of all his affluence, together with the 
odium which he maintained againft the members of his church at Wells, 
who obftinately oppofed all his meafures, as well as the urgent perfuafions 
of the monks, led him to unwarrantable innovations, by determining to 
remove his pontifical feat from Wells to Bath, and to unite the bifhoprick 
of the former with the abbey of the latter. To effect this, nothing was 
wanting but the authority of the 'crown, which being at that period of 
time attainable by pecuniary advances, the religious contributed the fum of 
five hundred marks towards the purchafmg the whole city of the King, a 
ftep previoufly neceffary to the accomplifhment of the bifhop's defigns. 
Accordingly, in confideration of the faid fum, King William Rufus, in 
the 5th year of his reign, for the health of his own foul, and the fouls of 
his anceftors and fucceffors, granted to the church of St. Peter, and the 
faid Bifliop John de Villula, and to his fucceffors, in pure and perpetual 
alms, the whole city of Bath, together with the mint and the baths 
therein, and with the toll, market, and all other rights, members, and 
appertenances belonging thereto, for the augmentation and aggrandifement 
of the Bathonian fee. This done, the Bifliop repaired and beautified the 
old monaftery, erected a palace adjoining to it, and adorned this central 
part of the city with other additional buildings. Soon after which he re- 
leafed the city with its appertenances, and with many lands and heredita- 
ments in Bath and its environs, to the faid monaftery, over which he 
appointed a prior inftead of abbot, referving the patronage of the houfe to 
himfelf and his fucceffors in the fee for ever. 

The various revolutions of the bifhoprick, which twice afterwards 
changed its name, preferving in the laft the decided preference to this city, 
with which it was then moft materially connected, will beft be feen in the 
fuccefllon of the feveral prelates of this fee; and of the monaftery of Bath, 
which thus came to the poffeffion of a large extent of property in this 
neighbourhood, a more particular account will fhortly be given : fuffice 
it at prefent to obferve, that the annual payment, by which the monks 

held 



BATH. 19 

held the town and barton of Bath, was twenty pounds payable into the 
King's exchequer; and that over and above this rent, 20 Henry III. the prior 
paid the fum of thirteen pounds eleven (hillings, for reparations due to the 
King's houfes in the city of Bath, and to the walls inclofing the Kings-Bath; 
a record* proving the early date of that particular bath's denomination. 

At the inftance of Bifhop Burnel in the reign of Edw. I. this city firft fent 
reprefentatives to parliament, many of whom will appear by the following 
lift to have been perfons of rank and diftindtion. 

A lift of the Representatives in Parliament for the City of Bath: 

Henry Bayton, Thomas de Mefsletre, 1297. 
William Leken, Peter le Brenetour, 1299. 
William Snell, William Cook, 1301. 
William de Brokenbere, GerTerey le Hey, 13x1. 
William de Brokenbere, John de Suthftoke, 13 12. 
William de Brokenbere, Roger le Tanner, 13 12. 
Peter le Brennetor, William Cook, 13 13. 
Robert de Hertford, Adam de Nottingham, 13 14. 
William de Brokenbergh, Adamde Nottingham, 13 16. 
Adam de Nottingham, William de Brokenbergh, 13 18. 
John de Southftoke, William de Brokenbergh, 1321. 
Adam de Nottingham, William de Brokenbergh, 1322. 
William de Brokenbergh, Robert de Hereford, 1324. 
AdamWitefon, William de Brokenbergh, 1326. 
William de Brokenbergh, John de Hampton, 1327. 
Robert de Hampton, William de Brokenbergh, 1328. 
Robert de Hampton, HughdeWyke, 1328. 
William de Brokenbergh, John de Dunftore, 1330. 
John de Hall, Robert de Hampton, 1331. 
Thomas de Ford, William de Bromefburgh, 1332. 
John Petit, Thomas de Whittokefmede, 1332. 
JohnTully, John Brudeport, 13-33. 
James Hufey, John le Draper, 1334- 
JohnBerrill, John Attewode, 1335. 
John Buryhale, John de Calvefton, 1336. 
John Attehall, John le Colman, 1337. 
John Hufey, John Rookes, 1337. 
John Hufey, John Attehall, 1338. 



• Rot. Pip. 20 Hen. III. 

C 2 J anKS 



20 



BATH. 



James Hufey, John de Hungerford, 1338. 

John de Suthftoke, Nicholas le Porter, 1338. 

James Hufey, Alexander le Teynturer, 1339. 

Roger Crift, James Hufey, 1340. 

James Hufey, John Deenmeed, 13 41. 

William de Brokenbergh, Richard le Vignour, 1343. 

John de Merfhton, John Prior, 1346. 

John de Merfhton, Robert de Wyke, 1347. 

Alexander de Doghe, Robert de Wyke, 1348. 

William le Goldfmith, Robert de Bath, 1350. 

Edward Nyweham, Walter de Crompton, 1354. 

John Merfhton, Richard Sodbury, 1355. 

Richard Sodbury, Roger Berleghi 1357. 

Roger de Berlegh, John de Whittokefmede, 1360. 

Thomas Stote, William Mulverton, 1361. 

John Mulverton, Nicholas Swayn, 1362. 

John de Whittokefmede, John Tregory, 1363. 

John de Whittokefmede, Adam White, 1369. 

John de Whittokefmede, 1371. 

John de Whittokefmede, John Tregory, 1372. 

John de Whittokefmede, John Mulverton, 1373. 

John Compe, Richard Budell, 1376. 

John Hatto'n, Richard Budell, 1377. 

John Tregory, William Tonk, 1378. 

Richard Budell, Robert Wafpray, 1378. 

Sewall Francis, John Cerne, 1379. 

Richard Budell, Sewall Francis, 1383. 

John Natton, William Cook, 1383. 

John Palmere, Richard Budell, 1384. 

Sewall Francis, John Honybrig, 1386. 

John Natton, William Cook, 1388. 

Richard Wydecombe, Reginald Hobb, 1389. 

Hugh de la Lind, Nicholas Samborne, 1391. 

Hugh de la Lind, Thomas Riton, 1392. 

John Tempeft, John Marifee, 1393. 

Robert Draper, John Martin, 1394. 

Robert Auger, John Marifee, 1396. 

Hugh de la Lind, John Chauntez, 1397. 

John Chaunceys, John de Whkeokefmede, 1399; 



John 



BATH. 



21 



John de Whiteokefmede, John Haygoby, 1401. 
Henry Bartlet, John de Whiteokefmede, 1409. 
Richard Wydecombe, William Philips, 141 3. 
Richard Wydecombe, William de Radeftoke, 1414. 
Ralph Hunt, Walter Rich, 14 17. 
Thomas Remar, Henry Bartlet, 141 9. 
Henry Bartlet, John de Whiteokefmede, 1420. 
Richard Wydecombe, Roger Philips, 1420. 
Walter Rich, Robert Pewlyn, 1421. 
Ralph Hunt, Walter Rich, 1422. 
Ralph Hunt, Philip Payne, 1423. 
Walter Rich, Richard Wydecombe, 1424. 
Richard Wydecombe, John de Whiteokefmede, 1428. 
Roger Stanburgh, John Cotys, 1446. 
William Hodgkine, Thomas Troppevell, 1448. 
Roger Stanburgh, John de Whiteokefmede, 1449. 
William Hofkins, Thomas Hall, 1450. 
William Hofkins, John Burreby, 1454. 
Hugh Golding, Andrew Beddeford, 1467. 
William Haynes, Robert Batten, 1471. 

[The writs, returns, and indentures, from this date to the firft year of 
Queen Maiy, are all fuppofed to be loft.] 

Richard Chapman, Edward Ludwell, 1553. 

William Sherfton, Thomas Ayfh, recorder of Bath, 1583. 

John Court, John Walley, 1587. 

William Sherfton, William Heath, aldermen of Bath, 1596. 

William Sherfton, William Heath, aldermen; 1600. 

William Sherfton, Chriftopher Stone, 1603. 

William Sherfton, Chriftopher Stone, 1605. 

Sir Robert Philips, knt. Robert Pye, 1620. 

Sir Robert Pye, knt. John Mallet, 1623. 

Sir Edward Hungerford, knight of the Bath, Richard Gay, then mayor 

of Bath, 1625. 
John Popham, Walter Long, 1627. 
Sir Charles Berkeley, knt. Alexander Popham, 1640. 
Alexander Popham, William Baffet, 1640. 
Alexander Popham, William Prynne, 1 660. 
Alexander Popham, William Prynne, 1661. 

Sir 



22 BATH. 

Sir William Baflet, Sir George Speke, 1678. 

Sir Walter Long, Sir George Speke, 1 68 1 . 

Lord Fitzharding, Sir William Baflet, 1685. 

Lord Fitzharding, Sir William Baflet, 1688. 

Jofeph Langton, William Blaithwayt, 1690. 

Sir Thomas Eftcourt, bart. William Blaithwayt, 1695. 

Alexander Popham, William Blaithwayt, 1698. 

Alexander Popham, William Blaithwayt, 1701. 

Alexander Popham, William Blaithwayt, 1 702. 

William Blaithwayt, Samuel Trotman, 1705. 

William Blaithwayt, Samuel Trotman, 1708. 

John Codrington, Samuel Trotman, 1710. 

John Codrington, Samuel Trotman, 171 3. 

John Codrington, Samuel Trotman, 1 7 1 4. 

George Wade, John Codrington, 1722. 

George Wade, Robert Gay, 1 727. 

George Wade, John Codrington, 1734 

George Wade, Philip Bennet, 1741. 

Sir John Ligonier, K. B. Robert Henley, 1747. 

Sir John Ligonier, K. B. Robert Henley, 1754- 

Lord Vifcount Ligonier, William Pitt, 1761. 

Sir John Saunders Sebright, bart. John Smith, 1766. 

Sir John Saunders Sebright, John Smith, 1768. 

John Smith, Abel Moyfey, 1774. 

Sir John Saunders Sebright, Abel Moyfey, 1775. 

Hon. John Jefferys Pratt, Abel Moyfey, 1780. 

Hon. John Jefferys Pratt, Abel Moyfey, 1 784. 

Lord Vifcount Bayham, Lord Vifcount Weymouth, 1790. 

The government of the city was originally vefted in a fheriff; the firft 
that appears to have born this office was Alfred, who is faid to have been 
a great benefactor to the city, and died A. D. 907.' It afterwards had 
a provofl or bailiff. Its firft charters were confirmed by King Edw. III. 
in the 5th and 14th of his reign, and alfo 5 Ric. II. 2 Henry V. and 25 
Henry VI. Queen Elizabeth in the 3 2d year of her reign, Sept. 4, 1590, 
granted the city a new charter, declaring it to be a fole city of itfelf, and 
the citizens to be a body corporate and politick, by the name of Mayor, 
Aldermen, and Citizens of the city of Bath ; to be capable of purchasing 
and felling lands, of pleading and being impleaded in any court, and to 

• Chron. Sxxon. 103. have 



BATH. 23 

have a common feal ; that there fhall be one mayor, and four aldermen at 
the leaft, and not exceeding ten at the moft, and twenty of the chief citizens 
to be called the common-council, and to be afliftant to the mayor. That 
the mayor, aldermen, and common-council, or the greater part of them, 
(whereof the mayor for the time being to be one) may make laws, let lands, 
and impofe fines. William Sherftone to be the firft mayor; William 
Cavill, George Perman, William Wally, John Chapman the elder, John 
Wally the elder, Thomas Fitch, John Tachfield, and John Wally the 
younger, to be the firft aldermen, during their lives, unlefs in the mean 
time they (hall be removed for ill-behaviour. That the mayor, aldermen, 
and common-council, fhall yearly, on the Monday before the feaft of St. 
Michael the Archangel, choofe and name one of themfelves to be mayor 
for the year enfuing, and that two alfo of themfelves fhall be chofen in like 
manner bailiffs for one year; that if the mayor die, or be removed within 
the year, the aldermen and common-councilmen fhall elect another from 
among themfelves into that office. That they fhall have and elect a re- 
corder, common clerk, or prothonotary, chamberlain or receiver, conftables, 
and other inferior officers, with two ferjeants of the mace. John Courte, 
efq; to be the firft recorder, and William Price, gent, to be the firft common 
clerk. That if any being elected refufe to take the faid offices, except 
thofe of recorder and common clerk, it fhall and may be lawful for the 
mayor, aldermen, and common-council for the time being, to commit him 
to prifon and fine him. That the liberties of the city fhall extend, accord- 
ing to its ancient limits, " from the fouth end of the bridge, where the 
two images of a lion and a bear, engraved in ftone, are creeled upon the 
laid bridge, and from thence unto the meadow called Kingsmead, and about 
and on every fide of the faid meadow called Kingsmead, through the middle 
of the water or river there called Avon, as the faid meadow doth extend, 
and from the middle of the fame river in the weft fide of the faid meadow 
unto the head fpring of the brook or river there called the mouth of Mud 
Brook, by the fide of the faid brook, and fo from thence unto the highway 
leading from Wejlon towards Walcot, fo continuing by the faid way unto a 
clofe of pafture, commonly called the Winyards, and from the fame clofe 
through a certain lane on the north fide of the faid clofe, and as the way 
leadeth by the church-yard of the church of Wakot, unto the north corner 
of the fame church-yard, and from the fame corner directly unto the river 
Avon aforefaid towards the eaft, and fo from thence through the middle of 
the fame river to the fouth end of the faid bridge, and through, by, and 
over all lands, foils, and grounds lately belonging or appertaining to the 

Priory 



f 



24 BATH. 

Prion of Bath, and by, upon, and over all other lands, foils, grounds, and 
places, lying, being, or contained within the faid limits." That the mayor* 
aldermen, and citizens, (hall and may perambulate and walk through and 
over the faid bounds for the purpofe of afcertaining the liberties of the city, 
without let or hindrance. 

The charter further fets forth, that the mayor, aldermen, and common- 
council, fhall and may make from time to time of the inhabitants free 
citizens and burgeffes of the city, and bind them with an oath to ferve and 
obey the mayor, aldermen, and common-council, in all lawful demands. 
That a court of record fhall be held every Monday in every week through- 
out the year, before the mayor, recorder, and two of the aldermen, (who 
mail be juftices of the peace) and the common clerk, or before four, three 
or two of them at the leaft, (the mayor or recorder to be one) to hold pleas, 
actions, fuits, and demands, of trefpaffes, debts, accounts, and covenants ; 
the ferjeants of the mace to be attornies attending the faid court of record : 
and the bailiffs for the time being to have the execution of all manner of pro- 
ceffes within the city. The mayor and corporation to have a prifon or gaol 
for the keeping of prifoners attached within the liberties of the city; and 
to hold a court-leet and view of frank-pledge twice a year in the guildhall. 
That the mayor and every other juftice of the peace, being a citizen, fhall 
have the power of apprehending felons, thieves, and malefactors; and the 
bailiffs to have the return of writs, precepts, bills, warrants, and proceffes 
of the crown; fo that no fheriff, under-fheriff, bailiff, or other minifter 
thereof fhall enter the precincts of the city for doing his office therein. 
That the mayor, aldermen, and citizens, fhall have the cognizance of all 
manner of pleas, and the aflize of bread, wine, and beer, and all other 
victuals in the city and liberties thereof. That the mayor for the time 
being fhall be clerk of the market. That the mayor, aldermen, and citizens, 
fhall have all fines and forfeitures of offenders and malefactors, and all 
manner of goods and chattels, waifs and eftrays, and goods of felons and 
fugitives. That they fhall have and keep within the city and its liberties 
two markets in every week, viz. on the days of Wednefday and Saturday, 
and fuch fairs as had heretofore been ufually held; together with a court 
of piepowder to be holden before the bailiff for the time being. That the 
mayor, recorder, and two of the aldermen, (to be chofen out of the corpo- 
tation) fhall be jointly and feverally juftices of the peace; and that the 
common clerk fhall be clerk of the peace within the city, and the fuburbs, 
liberties and precincts thereof. That the mayor for the time being fhall 

be 



B 



A 



H. 



25 



be coroner within the city, and its fuburbs, liberties and precincts, and that 
no other coroner fliall prcfume to enter therein to do any thing belonging to 
his office. That the mayor, aldermen and citizens, and their heirs and 
fucceflbrs for ever, fliall be exempt from all tolls, cuftom, paflage, pontage, 
ftallage, pickage, and carriage of goods and merchandife; and that they 
fliall not be put on juries with foreigners, or perfons dwelling out of the 
liberties of the city. And whereas the mayor and citizens did then hold, 
occupy, poflefs, and enjoy, to themfelves and their fucceflbrs, the faid city of 
Bath with the appertenances, and all the waters and baths therein, and cer- 
tain wafte grounds and foils within the faid city, and alfo divers lands and 
tenements, rents, and reverfions, commonly called Katherine Lands, chamber 
lands, fchool lands, alms lands, hofpital lands, church lands, and alfo divers 
other lands, tenements, and hereditaments, liberties, cuftoms and jurifdic- 
tions within the faid city, and the fuburbs and liberties thereof; the faid 
Queen Elizabeth by her faid charter fully confirms and ratifies all thofe 
pofleflions to the mayor, aldermen, and citizens, and their fucceflbrs for 
ever, empowering them to make purchafes of lands, manors, &c. under the 
yearly value of twenty pounds, without any fine for a licence of alienation. 

The firft mayor, as mentioned in the foregoing charter, was William 
Sherftone 1590. He held the office eight feveral times. 



John Parker was mayor 1655. 
John Boyce, 1656. 
Matthew Clift, 1657. 
John Mailers, 1658. 
John Pearce, 1659. 
John Biggs, 1660. 
John Ford, 166 1. 
John Parker, 1662. 
Robert Child, 1663. 
Henry Chapman, 1664. 
Walter Gibbs, 1665. 
John Chapman, 1666. 
Thomas Gibbs, 1667. 
Robert Chapman, 1668. 
William Child, 1669. 
Edward White, 1670. 
John Mafters, 167 1. 
Henry Chapman, 1672. 
Henry Parker, 167 j. 
John Reed, 1674. 
Vol. I. 



John Bufh, 1675. 
Walter Gibbs, 1676. 
Benjamin Baber, 1677. 
Robert Chapman, 1678. 
John Mafters, 1679. 
William Bufh, 1680. 
Edward Bufhell, fen. 168 1. 
Robert Hay ward, 1682. 
Walter Hicks, 1683. 
Jofeph Bufh, 1684. 
John Stibbs, 1685. 
John Pocock, 1686. 
Benjamin Baber, 1687. 
Walter Gibbs, 1688. 
Robert Chapman, 1689. 
John Mafters, 1690. 
George Collibee, 1691. 
William Bufh, 1692. 
Edward Bufhell, 1693. 
Robert Hay ward, 1694. 



Walter 



26 



B 



H. 



Walter Hicks, 1695. 
John Axford, 1696. 
John Bufh, 1697. 
John Stibbs, 1698. 
Thomas Gibbs, 1699. 
Benjamin Baber, 1700. 
Richard Matters, 1701. 
William Chapman, 1702. 
JohnBufh, 1703. 
William Bum, 1704. 
Walter Hicks, 1705. 
Edward Woolmer, 1706. 
John Stibbs, 1707. 
Edward Bufhell, jun. 1 708. 
Charles Child, 1709. 
Walter Gibbs, 17 10. 
Thomas Gibbs, 1 7 1 1 . 
Richard Morgan, 17 12. 
Richard Ford, 17 13. 
Thomas Biggs, 17 14. 
William Long, 17 15. 
John Saunders, 17 16. 
Richard Mailers, 17 17. 
Thomas Bulhell, 1718. 
William Collibee, 17 19. . 
Edward Woolmer, 1720. 
George Tryme, 172 1. 
William Bufh, 1722. 
John Hicks, 1723. 
Thomas Attwood, 1724. 
Rofewell Gibbs, 1725. 
Walter Chapman, 1726. 
William Chapman, 1727. 
John Billing, 1728. 
Francis Bave, 1729. 
Richard Ford, 1730. 
William Horton, 173 1. 
Milo Smith, 1732. 
Richard Morgan, 1733. 
Thomas Short, 1734. 
Thomas Atwood, 1735. 
Richard Matravers, 1736. 
James Attwood, 1737. 
John Saunders, 1738. 



William Bum, 1739. 
Charles Stone, 1740. 
Henry Atwood, 1741. 
Ralph Allen, 1742. 
Ambrofe Bifhop, 1743. 
John Chapman, 1744. 
John Cogfwell, 1745. 
Thomas Atwood, 1746. 
Thurfby Robinfon, 1747. 
James Atwood, 1748. 
Charles Stone, 1749. 
Henry Atwood, 1750. 
Francis Hales, 175 1. 
Thomas Atwood, fen. 1752. 
Thomas Atwood, jun. 1753. 
John Chapman, 1754. 
Samuel Bulh, 1755. 
Edward Bulhell Collibee, 1756. 
William Chapman, 1757. 
Henry Atwood, 1758. 
Francis Hales, 1759. 
Thomas Atwood, 1760. 
John Chapman, 176 1. 
Francis Hales, 1762. 
Samuel Bufh, 1763. 
John Horton, 1764. 
Edward Bufhell Collibee, 1765. 
Henry Wright, 1766. 
William Chapman, 1767. 
Charles Biggs, 1768. 
Thomas Atwood, 1769. 
John Chapman, 1770. 
John Horton, 177 1. 
Walter Wiltfhire, 1772. 
Francis Bennett, 1773. 
Philip Ditcher, 1774. 
Edward Bufhell Collibee, 1775. 
Henry Wright, 1776. 
John Chapman, 1777. 
Simon Crook, 1778. 
John Chapman, 1779. 
Walter Wiltfhire, 1780. 
Francis Bennett, 1 7 8 1 . 
Leonard Coward, 1782. 



4k 



James 



6 



H. 



*7 



James Leake, 1783. 
William Street, 1784. 
Edward Bufhell Collibee, 1785. 
William Anderdon, 1786. 



Leonard Coward, 1787. 
Jacob Smith, 1788, 
Leonard Coward, 1789. 
John Horton, 1790. 



BODY CORPORATE, 

John Horton, efq; mayor. 



1790-1. 



ALDERMEN. 



> juflices. 



John Chapman, efq. 
Edward Bufhell Collibee, efq 
Henry Wright, efq. 
Simon Crook, efq. 



Leonard Coward, efq. 
Walter Wiltlhire, efq. 

James Leake, efq. *. 

William Anderdon, efq. 

Jacob Smith, efq. 



Mr. Henry Parry, 

Mr. Edmund Anderdon, 

H. Harington, M. D. 
Mr. Thomas Harford 
Mr. John Symons 
Mr. John Palmer 
Mr. George Chapman 
Mr. Charles Phillott 
Mr. Harry Atwood 
Mr. W. Watfon 



COMMON -COUNCIL. 

Abel Moyfey, efq; chamberlain. 
Wm. Edwards, 



fherifls. 



1 



Charles Gunning, \ 

Mr. Robert Eorman 
Mr. Jofeph Phillott 
Mr. Thomas Rundell 
Mr. E. Hutchinfon 
Mr. Charles Crook 
Mr. Morgan Nidiolls 
Mr. Joilph Spry. 
William Frafer, M. D. 



conflables. 



The arms of the city are, Per feffe embattled azure and gules, the bafe 
mafoned crenelle fable, in chief of the firfl two bars wavy argent, over all in 
pale a fword of the laft, hiked and pomelled or, on the blade a key. 

The oath anciently taken by a citizen at his admiflion to the freedom of 
the city is a fingular curiofity. 

I fchall buxom a?id obedyent be to the mayr of Bathe, and to al hys fucceffotarys. 
And y fchal mentayne me to no lordfehyp for hynderans of eny burges of Bath. 
Nether y fchal nogth plete ivyth no burges of Bathe, but 09 the mayr's curtefyf 
hit fo be that the mayr nsoyll do me rygth, or may do me rygth, Seynt Katern day 
y fchall kepc halyday ycrcly, and Seynt Katern chapell and the brygge helpe to 
mentayne, and to fufleyne by my poivre. All other cuflurnys and fredumys that 
langit to the fore fayde fredom y fchal 'well and truly kipe and mentayne on my 
bchofe. Selme God and Hah Dome." 

u Codex Ruber Bathcro. MS. 

d 2 Three 



m 



28 BATH. 

Three fairs have from ancient time been held in this city, viz. on the 
feaft of the Purification (now Feb. 14,) on the invention of the Holy Crofs, 
May 3, (now difcontinued), and on the feaft of St. Peter and St. Paul, 
June 30, (now July 10.) The laft of thefe fairs was granted by King 
Henry I. A. D. 1101, to John de Villula bifhop of Bath, ut cum maxima 
honor e ibi Pontificate m fuam fedem habeat. x 

The commerce of Bath, abftracted from the expenditures of fafhionable 
company reforting to the city, is now altogether inconfiderable; nor is there 
any manufacture which deferves particular notice. Formerly, however, 
it was almoft in a manner maintained by clothing. Leland, who vifited 
this place in the reign of Henry VIII. informs us, that a little before his 
time there were three capital clothiers of the names of Style, Kent, and 
Chapman, " by whom the toun of Bath then.florifhid;" 7 and it is afferted, 
that at the time of the Reftoration there were no lefs than fixty broad looms 
employed in the fmgle parifh of St. Michael.* Hence arofe a company of 
artificers called the Weavers Company, which has been long fince extinct; 
coeval with which were two other affociations in this city, viz. the fhoe- 
makers and taylors. To thefe in procefs of time were added the companies 
of mafons, carpenters, joiners, and cabinet-makers. 3. Tilers and Plaif- 
terers; 4. Bakers; 5. Barbers and Peruke-makers ; 6. Grocers; 7. Mercers 
and Drapers. 

The river Avon was made navigable by an act of parliament 1 o Anne, 
and the firft barge laden with deals, pig-lead and meal, was brought up to 
the city, Dec. 15, 1727. The number of barges employed upon this river 
to and from Briftol is nine, and their burden on an average 30 tons each. 

This city,' like that of Rome, from a very fmall and mean beginning, is 
now become fo large in bulk, and withal fo elegant in its buildings, and fo 
refpectable in its inhabitants and its vifitors, as to be the pride of England, 
and the admiration of foreigners. The old city walls are now built over, 
and its priftine ftate almoft wholly obliterated by modern improvements. 
The moil: fuperb edifices, raifed by the moft fkilful architects, rife in every 
quarter, and compofe one of the moft beautiful cities in the world. 

* Adam de Domerham. Hift. in Au&uar. i. 286, 

y Lei. Itin. ii. 67. A. D. 1553, Sir Thomas White, lord-mayor of London, gave 104I. to be lent to four 
poor tradefmen, freemen and inhabitants of the city, and in the clothing line, to each 25I. for one year without 
intereft. z Wood's defcription of Bath, 422. 

* It has been feveral times deftroyed by fire ; firft A. D. 1013 by Swein king of Denmark, in his invafion of 
England to revenge the maffacre*of his fitter Gunnild. Secondly, A. D. 1088 in that great rebellion raifed in 
thefe parts by Geffrey de Coutances, William de Ewe, and others, againft King William Rufus. Thirdly, 
July 29, 1 137, w hen the whole city, with the church of St. Peter, and the monaftery, was reduced to a mafs 
of ruins. 

and 



BATH. 29 

It has been already obferved, that the form of the ancient city was a 
pentagon; the form thereof in its prefent improved ftate is nearly a triangle, 
the fuburbs having more widely extended on the northern fide up the accli- 
vity of Lanfdown than in the lower parts towards the river Avon. Within 
the compafs of the old walls are contained the following ftreets, lanes, 
and places : 

High-Jlrcet, anciently called Vicus Borealis, or North-ftreet, is all that fpace 
which is contained in a ftrait line between the fite of the North Gate and 
the precincts of the abbey-church, and is the principal avenue into the old 
town from London, Oxford, and Gloucefter. The North Gate Hood at the 
northeaft angle of the old rampire or borough-walls, and was in its perfect 
flate a handfome building furmounted with a tower. The great gateway, 
over which flood a grotefque figure of King Bladud, was ten feet wide 
and fifteen high, and on each fide was a poflern fix feet wide and eleven 
feet high. This gate, by reafon of its being the principal entrance into the 
town, was fometimes called the Town-Gate. On the foutheaft fide thereof 
flood a parifh church dedicated to the bleffed Virgin Mary, the tower of 
which, efteemed very ancient two centuries ago, b was fometime ufed for the 
city prifon. 

Before this church, and nearly in the middle" of the flreet, flood St. 
Marys Conduit, a handfome quadrangular refervoir of water, built in the 
Dorick flile, with a cymatium roof terminating in a point, and decorated 
with pinnacles at the angles. To this conduit the mayor and citizens of 
Bath, borrowing their practice from days of old, when wells and fountains 
had their particular honours, ufually made their grand proceffions, and here 
they generally halted. One of thefe proceffions, made on the coronation 
day of King Charles II. April 23, 1661, with the folemnities obferved upon 
the occafion, is thus recorded in a letter from John Ford, efq; then mayor of 
the city, to William Prynne, efq; one of the elected citizens in parliament. 

' Whilfl the morning was ufheted in and welcomed by the bells, the 
1 drums beat, calling to fuch as would demonflrate their good affections to 
1 the King, to fliew themfelves in arms for the celebrating the day. Where- 
' upon all men that had arms fit for that employment appeared. By this 
' time, (that we might the better mix our joys with pious contemplations 
1 of prayers and thankfgivings unto the King of Kings for returning unto 
* us, and crowning this our unparallelled earthly king,) myfelf and the 
' aldermen, in fcarlet, attended by the reft of our corporation in their gowns, 

' Lei. Itin. ii. 67. 

• went 



3 o BATH. 

c went to church, the ftreets being guarded by thefe forementioned perfons 
' in arms on both fides, leaving a paffage for us to pafs between, and cry- 
' ing out " God fave the King," with great acclamations of joy. After us 
' followed above four hundred virgins, mofl in white waiftcoats and green 
"* petticoats, going two and two, each two bearing aloft in their hands 
' crowns, and garlands made in the form of crowns, bedecked with all 
' manner of rare and choicefl flowers. Thefe ufhered Miflreffe Mayoreffe 

* to the church, who was attended on by the aldermen's wives, and common- 

* councilmen's wives, and divers other gentlewomen of the city. Thefe 

* being palled, the fouldiers marched after, and having laid by their arms, 

* came into the church, as generally the whole city did; fo that our church 
' was never fuller; all perfons expreffing as much piety towards God as 
' loyalty towards their King. After Mr. Mailers our minifler had given us 

* a mofl excellent and learnedvfermon, inflrucling us both in our duty to- 
' wards God and towards the King, taking his text out of Matth. xxii. and 
' 2 1 ft verfe; the fermon being ended, the fouldiery again made a guard for 
c us, and we having now the loud mufick playing before us, and being fol- 
« lowed by the faid four hundred virgins, and the gentlewomen before- 
' mentioned, we paffed from the church to the conduit in the market-place, 
1 being alfo guarded by the way with a company of foot from the parifh of 
' Wefton, a mile from us, led by Captain Sheppard of the fame parifh, and 
' alfo by a troop of horfe, being volunteers, commanded by your nephew 
1 Mr. George Clark. Having paffed thefe and come to the conduit, it began 
' to run with claret, where we drank a health to his Majefly, which was 
' feconded with loud acclamations of loyalty, each perfon crying out " God 
' fave the King." From thence we paffed to the guildhall, where having 

* entertained the gentlemen of our city, and fuch gentlemen as came out of 
' the country to us, we with the fouldiery marched from thence with the 
' loud mufick playing before us, through every flreet in our city. In the 

* mean time, the gentlewomen and their virgin^ttendance were entertained 
' by the mayorefs at home. All which being performed, with many vollies 
' of fhot, and loud acclamations of joy, the night began to participate of our 

* mirth, which we entertained with bonfires and flying fireworks, prepared 
' by certain perfons fent to for that purpofe from Briftol, who excellently 
' well performed their undertakings forfeveral hours. Which being done, 

* the people civilly difperfed, and the whole day's work was carried on with 
' great fobriety and temperance, I hope to the great credit of our city.' 

It is here to be obferved that this city had in the earlier part of the civil 
wars been garrifoned for the fervice of King Charles the Firfl, and the fum of 

feven 



• 



BATH. 



3 1 



{even thoufand pounds was expended on its fortifications. Notwithstanding 
which, upon the approach of a fmall party of dragoons to the city walls, 
and the appearance of another upon Beechen-cliff, the gates were thrown 
open, and the city furrendered to the enemy. Hereupon it became one of 
the principal pofls of the parliament forces in this county, and here Sir 
William Waller, the rebel general, lay for a confiderable time with his 
whole army, making fallies into the country, and inviting together all the 
difaffected from the neighbouring clothing -towns and villages. But after 
the battle of Roundway-dovvn, July 13, 1643, in which Sir William Waller 
was defeated, and the withdrawing of the garrifon hence to the reinforce- 
ment of Briflol, the King's troops retook poffeffion of *he city without 
difficulty; and at the Reftoration above thus commemorated, it was reflored 
to its tifual tranquillity, though much damaged in its walls and buildings. 

A little lower than St. Mary's conduit abovementioned flood the Conduit 
of St. Peter and St. Paul, which being built in the form of a crofs, and 
{landing on the fite of the old city high crofs demolifhed at the Reforma- 
tion, was not infrequently termed the High Crofs Conduit. Both thefe re- 
fervoirs were fupplied with water from a fpring called St. Sivithin's Well, on 
the dope of Beacon-hill, which was granted to the abbey of Bath by the 
parifh of Walcot, in confideration of a certain quantity of bread to be de- 
livered yearly into their parifh veftry. 

Near the laft-mentioned conduit flood the City Pillory, which was erected 
foon after the year 141 2. It appears upon record that a jury was fum- 
moned on the iixth day of November in that year, to determ ine on the place 
moft proper for this penal apparatus to be fixed. The jury was compofed 
of the following perfons, viz. John Hyvvet, John Pork, Richard Wydecomb, 
John Yhenele, Thomas Kyngton, John Eyton, William Honybrygge, John 
Glafyere, William Sewell, Robert Honybrygge, Walter Rych, William 
Goldfmyth, Roger Hobbes, John .Haygoby, John Yhette, Robert Walley, 
Laurence Webbe, Robert Phylpez, William Eynfliam, John Hygecok, 
Thomas Swyft, Walter Here ward, John Croke, and John Were; all of 
whom, except John Pork, declared upon their oath, that the beft place in 
the whole city for the faid pillory to fland in, was jiear the crofs in North- 
ilreet, where the old pillory ufed to fland. Which ordination was con- 
firmed by Robert Hylle, fleward of the court, the next enfuing law-day . c 

In this part of High-ftreet alfo, approaching to its very utmofl extre- 
mity, flood the old Town-foil and Market-houfe, built in 1625, after a plan 

« Codex Rub. Bathon. 

of 



32 BATH. 

of the celebrated Inigo Jones. This ftrufture was of the Dorick and Ionick 
orders, placed one upon another, and refted upon fix arches on either fide, 
and two at each end. In the wall of the front were ftationed in ghaftly 
majefty, the ftatues of King Coel, the fabulous, and King Edgar, the real 
founder of the liberties of the city. The conduits and the pillory have long 
fince vanifhed, and this building was taken down in 1777, and the pre- 
fent guildhall erected within a commodious recefs on the eaft fide of the 
ftreet, adjoining to the markets, which extend from it nearly to the edge of 
the riven 

From the foutheaft angle of High-ftreet there runs a narrow lane, called 
Boat-Jlall-lane, towards the Eajl Gate of the city. This is the only one of 
the four that is now left {landing. It was alfo the fmalleft of the four, 
being only feven feet wide, and nine high to the centre of the arch; the 
embattled wall, connected with it weftward, and now fuperftructed by 
dwelling -houfes, is ftill feen to a considerable diftance. 

The fouthern extremity of High-ftreet is clofed by a range of houfes di- 
viding it from the abbey cemetery. Hence diverts a fhort ftreet till of late 
days inconveniently ftraitened by the projection of fhops, called Cheap-Jlreet y 
having been anciently occupied by Eypemen, or retailers of the market. 
The continuation of this ftreet is denominated Wefigate-flreet, from the Welt 
Gate of the city by which it is terminated. 

This gate was taken down in the year 1776. It was a very large clumfy 
pile of building, with a poftern, and over it were fome handfome apart- 
ments, occafionally ufed by divers of the Royal family and other per- 
fons of diftinction in their vifits to the city. From an ancient drawing it 
appears that one angle of this gate was originally furmounted by a very 
lofty turret. 

The fpace between Weftgate-ftreet and the boundaries of the ancient 
city northward, is filled by three avenues, or lanes, called Bridewell-lane 
or Spurriers-lane, Parfonage-lane, and Locks-lane, vulgarly called Cock-lane. 
At the top of which is a ftreet running parallel with the City or Borough- 
ivalls, (from which it derives its name) and extending from the North 
gate to the north weft angle of the wall, where in former times flood 
a tower called Gafcoyne's-tower, having been built on a ruinated part of the 
rampire by a citizen of the name of Gafcoyne, by way of fine for fome tref- 
pafs or other which he had committed in the city.' 1 The veftiges of the 
old wall are in this part ftill difcernible; but the ground, by reafon of the 

v * Lei. Itin. ii. 62. 

frequent 






.BATH. 33 

frequent accefTion of ruins and rubbifh, now reaches to within three feet of 
the top of the battlements. 

From Weft Gate the Borough-walls extended to an angle on the fouthwefl 
fide of the city, and near the fpot where Weflgatt-buildings, erected on their 
foundations, now terminate. From this angle was carried in later times an 
additional rampart and fofle quite down to the river, by which means this 
quarter of the city was on two fides rendered fecure againfl the approach of 
any hoftilc power. 

From the fouthwefl: angle and the commencement of the additional works 
abovementioned, the city wall formed a fweep to the South-gate, which flood 
oppofite to the pariih church of St. James, and formed the boundary of the 
ancient city fouthward. This gate was rebuilt A. D. 1362, and was eleven 
feet wide and fifteen feet in height. In a niche over the arch on the fouth 
fide was the ftatue of King Edward III. fitting; on one fide of him flood the 
flatue of Bifhop Ralph de Salopia in his pontifical robes, and on the other 
the flatue of Prior John de Walecot. Through this gate, which was taken 
down in the year 1755, the Fofle-road led to the river, not running di- 
rectly parallel with the prefent Stall-Jlreet, but a little declining towards the 
fouthwefl. This flreet forms nearly aflrait line from the union of Cheap- 
ftreet and Weflgate-flreet to the fouth gate abovementioned, and the fpace 
comprehended between it and the wefl and fouthwefl ramparts, contains the 
following places, viz. Chandos-buildings, Hetling-court, Chapel-court, St. John's 
Hofpital, St. Catherine 1 ? Hofpital, Bellot's Ho/pita/, the Hot and Crofs Baths ; 
and feveral narrow and obfeure avenues, which are intended fhortly to be 
removed to make way for new improvements. 

The eaflern quarter of the old city, or that contained between the Foffe 
or Stall-flreet, and the river Avon, is almofl wholly occupied by the terri- 
tories of the ancient monaflery of St. Peter and St. Paul, which extended 
from the faid flreet on the wefl to the city wall on the eafl upon the banks 
of the river, where there formerly flood a fulling-mill belonging to the 
monks, and from that circumflance denominated Monk's-mill; and from the 
Market-place on the north to the South Gate on the fouthwefl, near which, 
on a fpot called the Leer- lands, was one of the principal entrances into the 
priory from the town, called the Ham Gate, erected on the fite of the old 
rampart, whence the city wail was continued till it joined the Eafl Gate 
on the river. Within this area are now included the Abbey-green, slbbcx- 
lane, Abbey-ftrcet, Church-Jlreet, the Abbey-church and Church-yard, the King's 
Bath, the Queen's Bath, the Duke of Kingston's Baths, Kingston-Jlreet, St, 

Vol. I. e James's- 



34 BATH. 

James' s-ftreet, Weymoath-Jlreet, Gallawaf s-buildings, Lilliput-alley , and the 
Orange-Grove. 

This Grove is a fine open area, one hundred and ninety feet from north 
to fouth, and one hundred and feventy from eaft to weft. It is planted 
with rows of elms, and in the centre Hands a fmall obelifk, erected by 
Mr. Nam, in compliment of the Prince of Orange, with the following 
infcription: 

In Memoriam 

Sanitatis 

Principi Auriaco 

Aquarum Thermalium Potu 

Favente Deo 

Ovante Britannia 

Feliciter reftitutae 

MDCCXXXIV. 

On the fouth fide of Orange-grove there is a neatly paved terrace walk, 
running nearly on the line of the old city wall, two hundred feet in length, 
and twenty-feven in breadth, emphatically called The Walks, having for- 
merly been the principal place of genteel refort in the city for exercife and 
pleafure, a band of mufick ufually attending. At the lower end of this 
walk were the Old AJJembly-Rooms, now converted into ware-rooms. 

At the fame fouthern extremity of the walks a dire£t angle is formed 
by the North or Grand Parade, a beautiful open terrace, raifed on arches, 
eighteen feet above the level of the old Roman ground, fifty-two feet in 
breadth, and five hundred and thirty-eight feet in length. The buildings 
are on the fouth fide, and are uniformly handfome and commodious, com- 
manding a delightful profpe£t of the fine valley lying eaftward from the 
city, wafhed by the river Avon, and bounded by pifturefque hills at eafy 
diftances. 

From this Parade two ftreets, called Duke-Jlreet and Pierpoint-Jlreet, lead 
to the South-Parade, which in point of ftrufture much refembles the for- 
mer, but has a different profpe£r. of the parifh of Widcombe, Pfior-Park, 
and the high towering Beechen-c liff with its hanging woods. At the eaft 
end flows the river Avon, over which there is a ferry into the meadows 
interjacent between the city and the fuburb of Claverton-ftreet, and in the 
front of the buildings lies the Ham, now partly turned into a kitchen- 
garden. 



BATH. 35 

garden. Here formerly the monks of Bath had a large grange, and a fair 
was held upon the fpot by a grant to them from the crown. 

I fhall now make fome curfory mention of the Suburbs of the ancient 
city of Bath, which have run to a prodigious extent on almoft every quarter. 
Without the South Gate, a ftreet called Horfe-Jlreet, and running in the 
fame line with Stall-ftreet, leads to St. Laurences Gate and Bridge* over the 
river Avon, which here divides the city from the parifh of Widcombe and 
Lyncombe. On the weft fide is the quay with warehoufes for goods, and 
between it and the Weft Gate are the following places, viz. Back-Jlreet, 
Garrard-Jlreet, Corn-Jlreet, Milk-Jlreet, Avon-Jlreet, Peter-Jlreet, St. James's- 
Parade, (a long paved avenue with well-built pleafant houfes on either fide) 
Wine-Jlreet, and Almery-lane, (fo called from its leading to the almonry of 
the monaftery) Weftgate-builditigs, a handfome row of modern houfes, built 
partly on the city wall, and extending from St. James's-Parade to the fite 
of the Weft Gate, from which they were denominated. 

Without the Weft Gate are the following additional buildings, viz. St. 
John-court, Beaufort-fquare, (a fmall open area) Princefs- ftreet leading to 
the Square, Monmouth-ftreet in the upper-road to Briftol, Crofs-la?ie, be- 
tween Monmouth -ftreet and Kingfmead-ftreet; Kingsmead-fquare, (an open 
area, one hundred and forty-eight feet in length, and one hundred and 
twenty-one feet in breadth, built on a plot of ground called the Kings- 
Meadow, being part of the ancient demefnes of the Kings of England) Kings- 
mead-ftreet, and New King-ftreet, terminating in that part of the meadow 
which abuts upon the river Avon, and which being a fine pafture unoccupied 
by buildings, ftill retains the original name of Kingsmead. The two laft- 
mentioned ftreets are interfered at right angles by Upper and Lower Charles- 
ftreet, the former whereof leads through a narrow avenue, called from the 
adjoining chapel, Chapel-row, into the beautiful area of ^ueen-fquare. 

This Square is fituated on an elevated airy fpot of ground, and is in 
length from north to fouth three hundred and fixteen feet, and three hun- 
dred and fix in breadth from eaft to weft. In the centre of the area is a 
garden or pleafure-ground, and in the midft of it an obelifk feventy feet 
high, and terminating in a very acute point. On the fouth fide is inl'cribed 
the following memorial of its erection : 

d See page 168. This bridge and gate were fo denominated from a fmall chapel built upon one of the pirn, 
a id dedicated to St. Laurence. It was a kind of oratory, having a fmall >ccefs for an altar, at whiei in 1'opifh 
times a prieft celebrated mafs, and received the donations of paflengers, as is common abroad i.i Catholick 

countries. 

e 2 In 



3$ BATH. 

In Memory 
of honours conferred 

and in gratitude 
For benefits bellowed 

In this city 
By his Royal Highnefs 
Frederick Prince of Wales 
And his 
Royal Consort 
In the year mdccxxxviii 

This obelifk is ere£ted 
By Richard Nash, efq. 

The buildings which compofe the Square are exceedingly grand, and of 
excellent architecture, particularly the north wing, which is of the Corin- 
thian order upon a ruftick bafement, and has, as it was intended by the 
architect/ all the appearance of a magnificent palace. On the northweft 
fide of it, adjoining to the Bartori meadows, in a dry and elevated fituation, 
flands the Queens-Parade. 

From Queen-Square an acclivous ftreet, called Gay-Jlreet, conduces to 
the King's Circus, a grand circular pile of uniform houfes, built after the 
Dorick, Ionick, and Corinthian orders, and decorated with every ornament 
of each. In the centre there is a refervoir of water. 

On the weft fide of the Circus, Brock-ftreet forms the avenue to the Royal 
Crefcent, an admirable and auguft afTemblage of building of an elliptical 
form, with a fingle order of Ionick pillars fupporting the fuperior cornice. 
This crefcent confifts of 30 houfes, and has a mod pleafing profpec~l of great 
part of the city, the valley on both fides the Avon, and the oppofite hills, 
among which the high afpiring mount of Barrow-Hill 1 prefents a Angularly 
pidturefque appearance. 

e Mr. Wood. 
' So called from a barton or grange belonging to the Prior of Bath, ftill preferving the name of Barton-Farm, 
and fituated on the fouthweft fide of Marlborough-buildings. It was granted to the monastery in the year 
1203/ together with an exempt and feparate jurifdittion, infomuch that it became a liberty or hundred of 
itfelf; and a fair was held upon the premifes by a charter from King Edward I. » After the difiblution the 
eftate was granted to the Colthurft family ; and the houfe called Bartoti-Hcufe was the refidence of William 
iiherllon, efq; the firft mayor of Bath, during the time of his mayoralty. 

* Cart. 5 Joan, n. 107. b Cart. 32 Ed. I. n. 5. 

1 See vol. ill. p. 339. 

At 



B 



II. 



37 



At the weft end of the Crefcent ftands a noble range of buildings recently 
:rected under the name of Marlborough-buildings, which are the termination 
of this part of the city weftward; but towards the north, upon the acclivity 
of Lanfdown, vaft ftructures arc rifing every day. A fecond crefcent, deno- 
minated from its fituation, Lanfdown-place, is already finifhed, and being 
elevated far above the other (which itfelf in its early ftate was accounted 
lofty) has a much greater command of profpect, and furveys a great extent 
of country, from the Wiltfhire hills on the eaft, to the environs of Briftol 
on the weft, and to the diftant tower of Dundry, immerging its lofty head 
into the clouds. Below this crefcent, a fmall, but very neat chapel is 
erected for the accommodation of the inhabitants in publick worfhipj and 
ftill lower a fquare is finifhing, called St. James' s-fquare, with feveral new 
ftreets and avenues. 

Between thefe buildings and the Lanfdown road, we find Hill-Jlreet, 
Portland-place, a row of new elegant houfes opening into Burlington- 
Jlreet, parallel with which are Ballance-Jlreet, Crocked-lane, and Murford- 
Jlreet, terminated by Cottle 's-lane, Montpelier, and Lrunfwick-Place. Below 
thefe, towards the confines of the Crefcent and the Circus, are Gloucejler- 
Jlreet, River s-Jlreet, Catherine-place, (a very neat open area) Harley-place, 
Fielder s-lane, Thomas-Jlreet, New Church-Jlreet, Margaret-buildingi, (having 
their name from a chapel erected there in honour of that faint) Stable-lane^ 
Circus-lane, and RuJJ'ell-Jlreet ; which laft rifes with a fteep afcent from 
Bennet-ftreet to Montpelier buildings. Bennet-ftreet connects the Circus 
with the Oxford road, and is adorned with the New AfTembly-Rooms, 
which extend from its fouthern fide into a parallel ftreet, called Alfred- 
flreet, communicating with the former ftreet by a paved way in front of the 
Rooms, and alfo by an avenue called Saville-row; below which are Bartlet- 
ftreet, St. Andrews-terrace, and Miles 's-ccurt, opening into George-Jlreet, on 
the north fide of which are Edgar-buildings, and Princes-buildings, anil 
oppoiite to the latter York-buildings, at the interferon of the London and 
Oxford roads. 

This brings us to the immediate fuburbs of the North Gate of the ancient 
city, without the fite of which, and between it and the parifh church of St. 
Michael, is Northgate-Jlrect, on the weft fide whereof, juft without the pre- 
cincts of the Borough-wall northward, are the following ftreets and lanes, 
viz. Barton-lane, Frog-lane, laid to have been (o called from a mineral fpring 
there, and running parallel with the rampire; Burton-jlreet, Bond-Jlreet, and 
%uecn-jlreet, running northward from it; Trim-Jhxct, interfering Queen- 

ftreet, 



38 BATH., 

ftreet, and communicating with it by an arched gateway; Barton-Jlreet, 
leading from Gafcoyne's tower to the bottom of Gay-ftreet; Harington-place, 
a neat and pleafant court between Barton-ftreet and Queen-ftreet; JVood- 
Jfreet, leading from the foutheaft angle of the Square to the top of Queen- 
ftreet; Northumberland-buildings, on the fouth fide of Wood-ftreet; John- 
flrtet, running in a line with Queen-ftreet, and forming an angle with 
Wood-ftreet; King-flrcet, between the northeaft extremity of John-ftreet 
and Queen-fquare; Barton-court, on the north fide of King-ftreet; Milfom- 
ftreet, a wide and very handfome ftreet between Bond-ftreet and Edgar-build- 
ings ; S^uiet-ftreet, and Green-Jlreet, a continuation of Wood-ftreet from the 
Square to St. Michael's church, at the top of Northgate-ftreet before- 
mentioned. 

Here two ways branch off, the one leading to Broad-Jlreet and the upper 
parts of the new city; the other directly to the parifh of Walcot. The 
former is the high road to Lanfdown, nearly half way up which there 
is a continuation of buildings, feverally denominated Fountain-buildings, 
Belmont, Oxford-row, Belvidere, and Lanfdown-Jlreet. At the top and on 
the eaftern fide of the laft-mentioned ftreet, upon the edge of Beacon-hill a 
projecting point of Lanfdown, a moft fuperb range of buildings, of an 
elliptick fonn, and denominated Camden-placc , is now nearly completed, 
overlooking all the eaftern parts of the city, and the beautiful continuous 
valley, with the river Avon winding through the meadows, the neat villages 
fcattered on its margin, the great London road, and a pleafmg amphithea- 
trical range of mountains rifing on either fide. Almoft immediately under- 
neath lies Walcot, in ancient times a fmall inconfiderable village, deriving 
its name from a little habitation in the wealds or woods upon the Roman 
Foffe; but now become a part of Bath, and including within its parochial 
limits the greater part of the new buildings in the upper, part of the city, 
and in the lower, befides its old component village ft.ruct.ures, a beautiful 
parade upon the London road, called after its own name Walcot-parade ; 
Margaret' s-hi 11, St. Mark's-buildings, Hoopers-court, and feveral other new 
detached ranges of buildings. This village communicates with the city 
of Bath by two different ways ; one of which is part of an old Roman 
vicinal road, branching from the Foffe at the parifh church, and paffing 
through Guinea-lane and the upper parts of the city to Wefton in its way 
towards the 'TrajeBus, or paffage over the Severn; but the prefent upper 
road into the city divaricates from the former at the beginning of Guinea- 
lane, and paffes by a variety of elegant ftructures, as Axford's-buildings, 

Paragon- 



BATH. 



39 



Paragon-buildings, Harlequins-row, the Vineyards, and Bladud's-buildings, till it 
reaches the central part of the city at the top of Broad-ftreet, and there 
interfects the Oxford road, climbing up the fleep of Lanfdown hill. The 
other way from Walcot into Bath is the Roman Fofle-road itfelf, and enters 
the city at the pari Hi church of St. Michael, paffing by Gibbs's-court, Chatham- 
row, Cornwall-buildings, Lady-mead, and Walcot-ftreet> which laft was anci- 
ently denominated Foffe-Jlreet, from the circumftance of its fituation. 

The Avon, flowing along the eaftern bank of this road, approaches very 
near to the north caft boundaries of the ancient city, and in this part has 
over it a modern handfome bridge built at the expence of William Pultcney, 
efq. This bridge, which denominates a ftreet running in a ftrait direction 
from the Borough -walls, refts on two arches, and on either fide is a row of 
fmall neat (hops, which have a pleafing appearance from the neighbouring 
valley. The oppofite fide, formerly a fwampy mead, belonging to the parifii 
of Bath-Wick, has now begun to partake of architectural improvements. 
Argyle-buildings commence with the bridge, and open into Laura-place, an 
aflemblage "of fuperb houfes, difpofed in the form of a lozenge; the ex- 
treme point eaftward terminating in Great Pulteney-Jlreet; the other points 
are denominated Johnfon-Jlreet and Henri etta-jireet. The principal part of 
theie buildings are elevated upon a double row of arches. 

Having thus briefly enumerated the ftreets contained within the precincts 
of the ancient and modern city ; I fhall now in the fame manner defcribe 
the publick ftructures which at this day adorn both. But it fliould previ- 
oufly be obferved that the ftreets in Bath, particularly thofe in the new parts 
of the city, are commodioufly wide and airy; the footways paved with fine 
broad flag-Hones; and there being a declivity from moft of them, by which 
the rain is rapidly conveyed towards the river, they are rendered remarkably 
clean, and foon dry after the hardefl fhower. The brilliant company which 
daily pafs either on foot, or in carriages, give them an additional air 
of elegance, and enliven fcenes, already lively, with continual charms of 
fplendid novelty. 

The King's and Queen's Baths are fituated on the fouthwefl fide of the 
Abbey Church-yard, and one hundred and fifty feet from the well front of 
the Abbey Church. The firil of thefe baths is an oblong fquare, fixty-fix 
feet in length, and forty-one in breadth, and is environed by a Hone parapet 
erecled in the laft century at the charge of Sir Francis Stoner, of Stoner- 
hall in the county of Oxford. The interior fides of the walls towards the 
bottom are full of niches of very ancient Handing; whereof twelve are on 

the 



4 o B A T H. 

the north fide, eight on the eaft, as many on the welt, and four of larger 
dimenfions on the fouth. In the centre ftands an elegant crofs of freeftone, 
with feats and recefles for the bathers, encircled with a Dorick colonnade. 
On the fouth wall of this bath is an old ftatue of King Bladud, with an 
infcription engraved on copper to that fancied difcoverer and founder of thefe 
wonderful baths. The main fpring is in the centre of the area, and is in- 
clofed within a large refervoir of lead, whereby its rapid motion is moderated, 
and the waters are equally diftributed. « It is remarkable that at the clean- 
c ling of the fprings, when they fet down a new pump, they conftantly find 
' great quantities of hazel nuts, as in many other places among fub terraneous 
• timber. Thefe I doubt not to be the remains of the famous and univerfal 
1 deluge, which the Hebrew hiltorian tells us was in autumn, Providence by 
1 that means fecuring the revival of the vegetable world." 1 

Behind this is the Queen's Bath, which is as it were an appendage to 
the former, being fupplied with water from the fame fpring. This bath 
had its name from Anne the Queen of King James I. who being alarmed 
by a flame or vapour, which rofe up by her fide when Ihe was bathing in 
the King's-Bath, could not be prevailed on to ufe that ciftern any more, 
but removed to the adjoining one, out of the way of the fpring which 
caufed the terrifying phcenomenon. After this event the corporation 
erefted a crofs in the centre of this bath, in honour of the Queen, on 
the top of which was the crown of England on a globe, with this infcrip- 
tion: ' Ann^ ReginjE Sacrvm.' It is afquare of twenty-five feet. Both 
thefe baths are twelve feet beneath the furface of the ground; and there are 
flips by which the bathers defcend, and adjoining to them are drelfing- 
rooms and pumping-rooms. The hours of bathing are from fix to nine in 
the morning, during which time fires are kept in the flip apartments, pro- 
vided at the expence of the chamber of the city. The drefles are of flannel, 
and without them no perfon is admitted into the baths ; a ceremony which 
heretofore feems not to have been always attended to, for I find a mandate 
from the Bilhop of Bath and Wells, dated 29 Aug. 1449, That no perfon 
whether male or female, who had attained the age of puberty, Ihould thence- 
forth prefume to enter the baths at any time of the day, without drawers, 
, or fome other proper and decent coverings, on pain of a heavy fine and 
utter excommunication. 1 

On the north fide of the King's Bath, and oppofite to the long-forgotten 
cemetery of St. Mary de Stall, Hands the Pump-Room, confiderably elevated 

b Stukely's Itin. Cm. i. 147. ' Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen. 

above 



BATH. 41 

above the level of the area. This room was built in the year 1704, en- 
larged in 175 1, augmented by a portico in 1786, and in 1791 amagnificcnt 
frontifpiece was erected, adjoining to the coftly baths and fudatories lately 
added to the weftern fide of the King's and Queen's Baths above-men- 
tioned, on the fite of the ancient Temple of Minerva. 

The Duke of Kingston 's Baths lie eaftward from the King's and Queen's 
Baths, between Abbey-ftreet and Church-ftreet, upon the fite of the old 
Priory or Abbey-houfe; and confifts of a fuit of apartments, contrived with 
great elegance and utility. Thefe baths are, from the monaftery, fometimes 
called the Abbey Baths. 

There was alfo a bath on the fouth fide of St. Jamcs's-church, called the 
Horfe Bath ; and that for two reafons, the firft becaufe it originally had the 
ftatue of a horfe ftanding in its centre; and fecondly, becaufe it was ufed in 
the days of its decay for a pool or pond to warn horfes in. This bath was 
filled by the wafte water of the King's Bath. 

On the weft fide of Stall-ftreet, and about three hundred feet from the 
front of the new baths, is the Crofs Bath, of a triangular form, and fo 
denominated from a very curious crofs or pillar, erected in it by John 
Earl of Melfort, fecretary of ftate to King James the Second, on the Queen's 
conceiving after the ufe of the waters. This crofs was of marble, of a 
circular conftru&ion, having in its circumference three Corinthian columns, 
crowned with an hexagonal dome, and on the cornice and frieze was this 
infeription, commemorative of the event. 

In perpetuam 
Regjnje Marine Memoriam, 
Quam, Ccelo in Bathonienfes Thermas 
Irradiante, Spiritus Domini, qui fertur 
Super aquas, 
Trium regnorum hseredis 
Genctricem effecit. 
Utrique parenti, natoque principi 
Abfit gloriari, 
Nifi in Cruce Domini noftri, Jefu Chriltij 
Ut plenius hauriant 
AqVas CVM gaVDIo 
eX fontlbVs faLVatorls. 
Vol. I. f Deo 



42 BATH. 

Deo trino et uni, 

Tiibus digitis orbem appendenti, 

Ac per crucem redimenti, 

Hoc tricolumnare trophaeum 

Vovet dicatque 

Johannes, Comes de Melfort. 

This very lingular crofs, being crowded with a variety of emblematical 
ornaments moft richly fculptured, is faid to have coft upwards of fifteen 
hundred pounds. In 1783 it was taken down, and the whole bath has 
fince undergone a thorough reparation. A fmall neat pump-room is an- 
nexed to it. 

At a fmall diftance fouthward from this bath, is the Hot Bath, eminently 
fo called from the feemingly fuperior heat of its waters ; Farenheit's ther- 
mometer {landing in it at one hundred and feventeen degrees. This bath, 
the form of which is a parallelogram, has of late years been very neatly 
fitted up, with the acceffion of private baths, dry pump-rooms and fuda- 
tories. The pump-room for drinking the waters of this fpring is fituated 
at the eaft end of Hetling-court, oppofite to Weftgate-buil dings. 

Adjoining to the Hot Bath, and deriving its waters therefrom, was the 
Lepers Bath, being appropriated to leprous perfons only. This ciftern was 
ten feet in length and eight in breadth ; and clofe to it was a fmall hofpital, 
called the Lazar's Hofpital, being dedicated to St. Lazarus ; and erefted for 
the ufe of leprous patients about A. D. 1 138, by Robert the firft Biihop of 
Bath and Wells. 

The difeafes of poor infirm people reforting to thefe baths for a remedy 
to their ills, gave rife to feveral other charitable inftitutions in this quarter 
of the city. In 1 180 Reginald Fitz-Joceline, fucceffor in this fee to Bifhop 
Robert above-mentioned, founded near the baths now diftinguifhed by the 
names of the Hot and Crofs Baths, to the honour of St. John the Baptift, an 
hofpital for the fuccour of fuch fick poor as came hither for the benefit of the 
waters $ and endowed the fame with lands and tenements in the city and vici- 
nity of Bath. Its revenues feem at firft to have been inconfiderable j and fo 
late as 26 Henry VIII. were valued only at 22I. 16s. io*dj but fince that 
time they have increafed to an enormous value. It was fuffered to outlive 
the general diflblution of monaftick focietiesj and in 1578 Queen Elizabeth 
granted the advowfon thereof to the Mayor and Commonalty of the city, 
who are its prefent patrons. 

The 



e 



BATH. 43 

The firft mafter of this hofpital that appears upon record was 

Adam, who prefided A. D. 1260. 

Thomas Gofmale was collated by the Bifhop, by lapfe, Sept. 7, 1343, 

John Afhmeek died in March 1398, and was fucceeded by 

John Shaftefbury, who refigned in January 1428. 

Peter Byryman occurs 1438. He refigned in January 1457. 

John Vobe was prefented to the mafterfliip by the Prior and Convent of 
Bath, Jan. 8, 1460. 

Thomas Cornifh, M. A. was collated by the Bifhop, by lapfe, Aug. 5, 1483. 

John Ruftat, chaplain to King Charles II. was prefented by him to the 
mafterfliip of this hofpital, Feb. 12, 1662. 

William Peake fucceeded, being prefented by the Mayor and Corporation, 
Feb. 1, 1680. 

William Clement, M,A. Dec. 3, 16.83. 

John Chapman, M.A. Jan. 3, 1711. 

Walter Chapman, D. D. 1737. 

John Chapman, D.D. 1791. 

In 1728 the old hofpital, a low mean building of one ftory, was taken 
down, and rebuilt by the Duke of Chandos. It maintains in decent apart- 
ments fix poor men, and fix poor women, whofe weekly ftipend is four 
{hillings and two-pence each, arifing from the referved rents of the hofpital 
eftates ; befides which they have a fhare of the fines for the renewal of leafes, 
and are otherwife very comfortably provided for." Adjoining to the hofpital 
is a plain neat chapel, one fide of which faces a court, called after it Chapel- 
court, the other Hetling-court. In this chapel prayers are read to the bre- 
thren and fifters twice every day. The Lord Chancellor, the Lord Keeper, 
the Mafter of the Rolls, and the Bifliop of the diocefe for the time being, 
are vifitors of this hofpital. 

Southeaftward from it, in a lane called Bclltree-lane, leading from the 
Hot Bath to Stall-ftreet, ftands Bellofs Hofpital, founded upon part of the 
lands belonging to the Hofpital of St. John abovementioned by Thomas 
Bellot, efq; fteward of the h'oufhold, and one of the executors of the Right 

k In the regiflers of the diocefe there occurs a letter direfted from Bifhop Beckington to the Reve of the city 
of Bath, for the payment of an annual penfion of one hundred (hillings to the Malter and Brethren of the Hof- 
p'talofSt. John, in lieu of garb, and other pcrquifites, which they ufuJly received a p>-tJtceJjiiribus f»is, «/ 
qfeatur. Dated 3 Jan. 1447. 

f 2 Hon. 



44- 



B A T H. 



Hon. William lord Burleigh, lord treafurer of England. It is a fmall low 
building, fixty-feven feet in front, and forty-fix feet in depth, with a court 
or area in the centre, thirty-five feet long, and fifteen feet broad; and con- 
tains fourteen apartments, the entrance into which is from the court within. 
Over the door-way into this court from the lane are the arms of the 
founder, now nearly obliterated, and the following infcription : 

* This houfe (with the garden adjoyning) commonly called Billets Hof- 

* pitall, being part of the lands belonging to the hofpitall of St. John Bap- 
' tift in Bath, was freely granted without fine to the maior, aldermen, and 
1 citizens of Bath by Tobias Ruftat, efq; brother and leflee to John Ruftat, 
f clerk, mafter of the faid hofpitall of St. John, to the end it may be re- 
' ftored and continued to the fame ufe to which it hath been applyed by 
< Thomas Billet, gentleman, fince his firft obteyning the fame of the mafter, 

* cobrethren and afters of the faid hofpitall. 

* March y e 25th, A° Dni 1672/ 

In this hofpital (which is fometimes called Rujlafs, and by corruption 
Rufcott's charity) are ufually twelve poor men and women, who have lodging, 
the liberty of bathing gratis, and a ftipend of one fhilling and ten-pence 
each per week; but they have no clothing; nor is the ftipend extended to 
more than the fummer half-year, the houfe being (hut up the other half. It 
is under the guardianfhip of the corporation. 

To the fouth of Bellot's Hofpital, in a narrow pafl'age, denominated Bin- 
bury-la?ie, near the fouthweft angle of the old Borough-walls, are the 
Bimberries, Black- Alms, or Hofpital of St. Catherine, founded in ancient times 
by two fifters of the name of Bimbury. This hofpital falling into decay, 
was rebuilt by the corporation of the city in the year 1553. It is a mean 
ftrutture, two ftories high, and contains fourteen tenements for as many 
poor perfons of either fex, ten of whom only have the allowance of three 
fhillings and fix-pence each weekly, and a black coat once in two years. 
There was anciently a chapel belonging to this hofpital, on the front of which 
were placed the ftatues of the cofounders ; but thefe have long fince pe- 
rifhed with the chapel itfelf. 

On a wall near the common pump, lately taken down, was a brafs-plate 
bearing the following infcription: 

' All poore perfons not being conveniently able to mainteyne them felves, 
1 & refortinge. to y e Bath for cvre of their difeafes or infirmities may take 
1 notice that there ovght to be a Phyfitian yearely nominated & appointed 

' by 



B 



H. 



45 



« by y e Maior & Aldermen of Bath who is to give his beft advice from time 
1 to time to y e faid poore perfons withovt any reward from them; there 
« being a falarie provided to that pvrpofe by y c charitable gvift of Dame 
« Elizabeth Vi-Countess Scvdamore.' 

At the top of Parfonage-lanc, fronting the Borough-walls, on the north 
fide of the old city, Hands the General Hofpital, the original defign of 
which was fet on foot in the year 171 5, by fome charitable perfons, for the 
cure and maintenance of poor ftrangers. After a confiderablc fubferip- 
tion being raifed, the fcheme lay dormant many years, till in 1738 it was 
refumed, frefh contributions were made, a fpacious and very commodious 
edifice erected, and an act of parliament procured for incorporating the 
Directors of the Charity by the name of The Prefident and Governors of the 
General Hofpital or Infirmary at Bath. In 1 742 the houfe was opened for 
the reception of the fick poor from every part of Great-Britain and Ireland, 
thofe of Bath only excepted, in regard they always have a readier and lefs 
expenfive accefs to the benefits of the water. The number of patients ad- 
mitted into this hofpital has varied from time to time, in proportion to 
the amount of thofe benefactions which have been extended towards its fup- 
port. In 1763, the number was 85; in 1764, 96; in 1765, and 1766, 105; 
and fince that time as many patients have been admitted as the houfe will 
contain; the generous continuance of charitable benefactions enabling 
the governors to expand this charity, 'the objects of which are Very fre- 
' quently thofe miferable patients who have been difcharged from other 
' hofpitals, as not to be relieved, or incurable.' The numerous benefits 
which have been derived to the afflicted from this mofl noble inflitution 
will appear from the following ftatement: 



Patients difcharged from 1742 

to 1791 



Cured, 



3784 



Much 
better. 



5022 



Incurable,' Improper, I IrreguIar.jDead 



or no 
better. 



566 



or hectical 



1726 



or Misbe- 
haviour 



145 



145 



Total. 



12342 



A State of the Patients for 1791. 

Remained in the Houfe April 30, 1790 
Admitted from April 30, 1790, to May 1, 179 1 

Difcharged from May r, 1790, to May I, 1791 

Remaining in the Houfe - 



in 

312 

313 
no 



423 



423 

Pbyficians 



46 BATH. 

Phyjicians and Surgeons belonging to the General Hofpital, 



Physicians. 
Henry Harington, M. D. 
Daniel Lyfons, M. D. 
WilKam Falconer, M. D. 



Surgeons. 
Henry Wright, efq. 
Mr. Jofeph Phillott 
Mr. Harry Atwood. 



Chaplain. The Rev. John Parry, fupported by a voluntary contribution. 

Conditions of Admijjion into the General Hofpital. 

I. The cafe of the patient mull be defcribed by fome phyfician or perfon 
of fkill in the neighbourhood of the place where the patient has refided for 
fome time; and this defcription mull be fent in a letter (franked or poll- 
paid) directed to the Regiiler of the General Hofpital. 

The age and name of the patient ought to be mentioned in the defcrip- 
tion of the cafe, and the perfons who defcribe it are defired to be particular 
in the enumeration of the fymptoms ; fo that neither improper cafes may be- 
admitted, nor proper ones rejected by the phyficians and furgeons, who al- 
ways examine and fign the cafes as proper or improper, previous to their 
being laid before the weekly committee. 

If the patient has any fever upon him, as long as the fever continues, he 
will be deemed improper. Patients with coughs attended with pain in the 
chefl, or fpitting of blood, are improper, as are alfo thofe with abfcefles or 
with any external ulcers, until fuch ulcers are healed. 

From want of attention to the above particulars, and notwith (landing the 
cautions frequently given by printing the conditions of admifiion in the 
public papers, very imperfe6t defcriptions of cafes have been, and are flill 
fent : And many patients have been difcharged as improper foon after their 
admirhon, to the difappointment of the patients thus fent. 

II. After the patient's cafe has been thus defcribed, and fent, he mud re- 
main in his ufual place of refidence 'till he has notice of a vacancy, fignified 
by a letter from the Regiiler, accompanied with a blank certificate. 

III. Upon the receipt of fuch a letter, the patient muft fet forward for 
Bath, bringing with him this letter, the parifli certificate duly executed, and 
atteiled before two juflices for the county or city to which the patient be- 
longs; and three pounds caution money, if from any part of England or 
Wales; but if the patient come from Scotland or Ireland, then the caution- 
money, to be depofited before admifiion, is the fum of five pounds. 

IV. Soldiers 



B 



II. 



47 



IV. Soldiers may, inftcad of parim certificates, bring a certificate from 
their Commanding Officers, fignifying to what coqis they belong, and that 
they fhall be received into the fame corps when difcharged from the hofpital, 
in whatever condition they are. And the fame is expected from the Gover- 
nors of Chelfea and Greenwich hofpitals refpecting their penfioners. But 
it is neceffary that their cafes be defcribed, and fent previously, and that they 
bring with them three pounds caution money. 

N.B. The intention of the caution money is to defray the expences of 
returning the patients after they are difcharged from the hofpital ; or of their 
burial, in cafe they die there. The remainder of the caution money, after 
thefe expences are defrayed, will be returned to the perfon who depofitcd it. 

All poor perfons coming to Bath, under pretence of getting into the hof- 
pital, without having their cafes thus defcribed and fent previoufly, and 
leave given to come, will be treated as vagrants, as the act of parliament 
for the regulation of the hofpital requires. 

If any patient fhould have the fmall-pox here, fuch perfon muft be re- 
moved out of the houfe, and the caution money defray the expences 
thereof. Likewife all perfons, who fhall come into the hofpital without 
decent and neceffary apparel, mull have fuch neceffaries provided out of the 
faid caution money. 

Prejident, T'reafurers, and Governors of the General Hofpital. 

The Right Hon. Lord Harewood, Prefident. 

Benjamin Col borne, efq. 1 

Samuel Campbell, efq. I Treafurers. 

Mr. Charles Phillott, J 

Stephen Afliley, efq. 
Abraham Atkins, efq. 
Robert Adamfon, efq.f 
Hugh Acland, efq. 
♦Chriftopher Anftey, efq. 
Benjamin Afhe, efq. 
*William Anderdon, efq. 
*Mr. Harry Atwood 
*Rev. Edward Armftrong 



Wm, Thornton Aftell, efq. 
George Edward Allen, efq. 
Richard Atwood, efq. 
James M. Adair, M. D. 



The Marquis of Bathf 

Charles Lord Bifhop of Bath and Wells 

Right Hon. Lord Bayham 

Sir Edward Bayntun, bart. 

Thomas Bury, efq. 

John Brathwaite, efq. 

William Brereton, efq. 

*Winthrop Baldwin, efq.f 

John Bowdler, efq. 

♦Thomas Bowdler, efq.f 

Francis John Brown, efq.f 

*Mr. Charles Brett, f 

♦Major William Brooke 

John 



48 



B 



H. 



John Lewis Boiffier, efq. 
Peter Boiffier, efq. 

Right Hon. Earl Camdenf 

Bicknell Coney, efq. 

Claude Champion Crefpigny, efq. 

William Caldwall, efq. 

*Samuel Campbell, efq.f 

Samuel Cam, efq.f 

Charles Coxe, efq. 

Rev. Potter Cole, of Hawkefbury f 

*Mr. George Chapman 

Rev. Dr. Chapman, of Wefton 

*Leonard Coward, efq. 

William Colborne, efq.f 

*Benjamin Colborne, efq.f 

Rev. H. J. Clofe 

Rev. John Adey Curtis 

Nathaniel Elias Coflerat, efq. 

*Simon Crook, efq.f 

*Mr. Charles Crook 

John Culme, efq. 

Rev. Dr. Cooper. 

William Duke of Devonfhiref 
Hon. Baron Dimfdale 
Rev. John Dobfon 
Philip Dehaney, efq. 
Rev. Dr. Dechair 
William Dawfon, efq. 
William Downes, efq. 
William Drake, jun. efq.f 
Barnard Dickinfon, efq.f 
Mr. Thomas Daviesf 

Samuel Eyre, efq. 

Henry Flitcroft, efq.f 
Thomas Edwards Freeman, efq, 
*William Falconer, M. D. 
Jofeph Fraine, efq. 
William Frafer, M. D. 
Rev. John Shirley Fermor 
Jofeph Ofgood Freame, efq.f 

Right Hon. Earl of Guildford 
John Gardner, efq. 



Edward Greenly, efq. 
*Rev. Samuel Griffith, D. D. 
*Rev. Robert Burd Gabriel, D. D, 

*Henry Harington, M.D.f 

Wrlliam Hoare, efq.f 

Sir Richard Colt Hoare, bart, 

Mr. Henry Howfe 

*Mr. Henry Edward Howfef 

Mr. Samuel Howfef 

*John Horton, efq. 

Langley Hill, efq. 

Ifaac Webb Horlock, efq. 

Samuel Hawkins, efq. 

John Hatfell, efq. 

Benjamin Harrifon, efq. 

Jofiah Eyles Heathcote, efq. 

* Thomas Hicks, efq. 

Rev. James Arch. Hamilton, D.D. 

The Two Juftices of Bath 

Walter James James, efq. 

Rev. Mr. Jardine 

*John Jefferys, efq; town-clerk of Bath 

James King, efq. M. C. 

Sir James Tylney Long, bart. 
Peter Leigh, efq. 
Walter Long, efq.f 
John Lethbridge, efq. 
*Rev. William Leigh 
John Lloyd, efq. 
*Daniel Lyfons, M.D.f 
Richard Warburton Lytton, efq. 
Thomas Lowfeild, efq.f 
John Lowder, efq. 
William Gore Langton, efq. 
Rev. Mr. Leeves. 

Conftantine Lord Mulgravef 

Lord de Montalt 

*Sir John Riggs Miller, bart. 

*The Mayor of Bath 

Abel Moyiey, efq.f 

John Morris, efq. 

Paul Methuen, efq.f 






Paul 




B 



Paul Cobb Methuen, efq. 
William Melmoth, efq. 
Richard Milford, efq. 
*Rev. Nathaniel Morgan 
Thomas Manningham, M. D. 

Henry Duke of Newcaftle 
Edward Nairne, efq. 
William Oliver, efq. 

John Lord Bifhop of Peterborough 

The Lord Primate of Irelandf 

Humphry Prideaux, efq.f 

William Provis, efq. 

Henry Portman, efq. 

Charles James Packe, efq. 

John Pigot, efq. 

♦Mr. Jofeph Phillott 

*Mr. Charles Phillott 

* Rev. James Phillott, D. D. rector of 

Bath 
Lieut.-Col. Pechell 
Mr. William Perry 
Edward Phelips, efq. j ft 

Thomas Parry, efq. 
Rev. John Penton 
*C.H. Parry, M.D. 
The Hon. Philip Pufey.f 

Sir Matthew White Ridley, bart. 
*George Ramfay, efq. 
Mr. Thomas Rundell 
*Rev. Francis Randolph 
Edward Rudge, efq. 

Right Hon. and Rev. Lord Francis 
Seymour, Dean of Wells 

{£3* Thofe marked thus * are Afliftants or Committees, as by act of parliament. 

Thofe marked thus f are Governors by donation, having contributed at one or more 
times the full fum of forty pounds. 

The houfe ftands upon the fite of the old city theatre, and is a noble 
fpacious pile of building, of the Ionick order, confuting of a ground, prin- 
cipal and chamber ftories, and extending in length ninety-nine feet in the 

Vol. I. g north 



t n. 

Sir John Sebright, bart.f 

James Stephens, eiq. 

John Smith, efq. 

John F. Scriviner, efq. 

William Strode, efq. 

Henry Southby, efq. 

Ralph Schomberg, M. D. F.S.A.f 

Rev. Dr. Stonhoufe 

*Rev. John Sibley 

Rev. Martin Stafford Smith 

John Slade, efq.f 

Sir Robert Throckmorton, bart.f 
Sir John Trevelyan, bart. 
Sir Noah Thomas, M. D. 
Bartholomew Tipping, efq. 
Richard Tyfon, efq. M. C.f 
*John Toke, efq. 

Lord Vernonf 

Right Hon. Lord Weymouth 
Sir William Wentwoith, bart. 
Sir Edward Winnington, bart. 
William Wade, e(q. 
Henry Walters, efq. 
Matthew Worgan, efq.f 
Rev. Edward Woodcock, D.D. 
Rev. Samuel Whitchurch 
*Henry Wright, efq. f 
Walter Wiltshire, efq.f 
*Mr. Thomas Weftf 
William Watfon, efq.f 
Mr. Wake 
Samuel Whitbread, efq.f 



49 



^o ' BATH. 

north front, eighty-four in the weft, and ninety-feven in the eaft. The 
apartments for the phyficians, furgeons, and apothecary, for committees, 
fecretary, fteward and matron, as well as the wards for patients of either 
fex, are very aptly and judicioufly arranged in the feveral portions of the 
ftruclure. 

As the General Hofpital receives only fuch patients as labour under difeafes 
to which the Bath waters are peculiarly applicable, and by virtue of the aft 
excludes the inhabitants of the city from the benefits of the inftitution, 
another charity was eftablifhed in the year 1 747, under the name of the 
Pauper Charity, for medical and chirurgical affiftance to the poor, who either 
refide or happen to be taken ill in the feveral parifhes of St. Peter and St. 
Paul, St. James, St. Michael, Walcot, and Bath-Wick. Of this inftitution,. 
which has relieved thoufands of patients in every kind of difeafe, 

Sir John Riggs Miller, bart. is prefident. 
Mr. Charles Phillott, treafurer. 

Charles Hillier Parry, M.D. 

.ians. 



> phyficic 



John Stark Robertfon, M.D. 

Mr. John Grigg,. ) furgeons 

Mr. William Day, $ & 

Mr. Gent, apothecary. 

The laft publick charity of this kind to be mentioned is the Cafualty 
Hofpital., which was inftituted in the year 1788, by the private fubfcription 
of a few benevolent inhabitants of the city. This charity (as its name 
implies) takes under its roof thofe unfortunate perfbns who meet with broken 
limbs and other fudden accidents which require immediate relief. The 
houfe appropriated to the reception of fuch patients (who have been very 
numerous) is fituated in Kingfmead-ftreet. 

Between Gafcoyne's tower and the top of Bridewell-lane, ftands the 
fchool-houfe of the Blue-coat Charity, firft inftituted in the year 171 1, 
by the pious and learned Robert Nelfon, efq ; and fmce continued by be- 
nevolent contributions. The houfe, which is large, lofty, and very con- 
venient, was built in 1721, upon ground granted by the corporation for 
that purpofe. The number of children here educated is one hundred, who 
have clothing once a year, are inftruSted in reading, writing, and accounts ; 
the girls alfo in fewing, knitting, &c. and at the age of fourteen are appren- 
ticed to ufeful trades. 

The 



BATH. 51 

The publick Grammar-School is fituated in the middle of the weft fide of 
Broad-ftreet, and is a large and very handfome ftruclurc, ercfted in the year 
1752. It was founded by King Edward the Sixth, who by his letters 
patent bearing date 12 July 1552, granted to the mayor and citizens of 
' Bath, in truft, for the fupport thereof, all the mefTuages, lands, tenements, 
tofts, cottages, orchards, gardens, meadows, paftures, mills, fhops, cellars, 
lofts, and all other eafements, commodities, emoluments and hereditaments 
whatfoever, with all their rights and appertenances, fituated as well within 
the city of Bath, as in the fuburbs of the fame, late parcel of the lands, pof- 
feilions and revenues of the difiblved priory of Bath, being of the clear 
yearly value of twenty-five pounds, over and above defeats, rents, and tithes 
of the fame mefTuages and tenements ; to have and to hold for ever of the 
King and his fuccelibrs, by fealty only, in free foccage or burgage of the faid 
city, and not in chief, paying yearly to the King and his fuccefTors the furn 
of ten pounds into the court of augmentation. The mafter's falary was at 
that day iol. per annum." 1 The prefent mailer of this fchool is the Rev. 
Nathaniel Morgan. In the centre of the ftreet, near the fite of this fchool- 
houfe, anciently ftood a handfome conduit, called, after the ftreet, Broad- 
jlreet Conduit. 

The City Guildhall ftands on the eafl fide of the Market-place, or High- 
ftreet, to which its front affords a moil fuperb ornament. The bafement 
ftory of this ftructure is occupied by a kitchen and other offices ; the ground 
ftory (to which there is an afcent by fteps) confifts of a veftibule, court of 
juftice, drawing-room for the mayor, town-clerk and deputy town-clerk's 
offices, record office, and room for the jury; and the principal ftory contains 
the great banqueting and affembly-room, eighty feet in length, forty in 
breadth, and thirty-one in height, decorated with great tafte and elegance; 
and alfo a drawing-room, occasionally ufed for a council-room. 

Here are depofited, befides the ColofTeal head of Minerva, before de- 
fcribed, feveral altars, columns, friezes, and other antiques, which have 
. efcaped from Roman ruins, to gratify the fpeculations of connoifTeurs, and 
the reveries of the lovers of •verttt. 

Behind the Guildhall are the Markets, which are fupplied with meat, fca 
and frefh-water fifli, poultry, vegetables, and every other fpecies of provifion, 
in the greateft profufion, and in the higheft excellence. 

The Old Jjfembly-Rooms ftand oppofite the terrace-walk at the foutheaft 
corner of Orange-Grove. They were built in the year 1750. The great 

■ Excerpt. eRegift. Wellcn. 

g 2 ball- 



52 BATH. 

ball-room is ninety feet in length, thirty-fix in breadth, and thirty-four in 
height, finifned by a fine ceiling of ftucco work, from which handfome 
chandeliers are fufpended. Adjoining to it is a card-toom, fixty feet in 
length, and thirty in breadth, with a coved cieling. Each of thefe rooms 
has a portrait of the celebrated Beau Nafh. There are alfo two very neat 
Tea-rooms. 

The New Ajfembly-Rooms are fituated in the upper or new part of the city, 
on the eaft fide of the Circus, between Bennet-ftreet and Alfred-ftreet. 
This extenfive and fuperb pile of building was erected between the years 
1768 and 1 77 1, by a fubfeription of feventy perfons to the amount of nearly 
twenty thoufand pounds'. The ball-room is one hundred and fix feet in 
length, forty-three in breadth, and forty-two in height. There are two 
card-rooms, one of which is octagonal, forty-eight feet in diameter, and 
contains portraits of Captain Wade and Richard Tyfon, efq; Matters of the 
Ceremonies} the other is oblong, feventy feet in length, and twenty-feven 
in breadth. All thefe rooms are decorated in the moft elegant ftile, and 
furnifhed with moft fumptuous chandeliers and girandoles. 

The 'Theatre ftands in Orchard-ftreet, juft without the foutheaft angle of 
the old Borough-wall, and near the North and South Parades,- from which- 
there is a communication by a large portico en the weft fide of Pierpoint- 
ftreet. It is a fmall but very commodious and neat ftructure of a femi- 
circular form, with proper emblematical and other decorations. 

The City Prifon ftands in Bathwick Meadow, on the eaftern bank of the 
river Avon, and at a fmall diftance from the new buildings near the bridge. 
It was erected in the year 1771, and is an ample and fpacious edifice, fixty 
feet in front, and eighty in depth, comprifing a large court-yard, and apart- 
ments well fuited to the purpofe of its erection. 

Near the new bridge, and on the fauthern fide of Laura-place, is 
Spring Garden., Vauxhall, a celebrious refort of fummer entertainment: this 
garden being to be covered by buildings, a new Vauxhall is intended in the 
centre of Sydney-place, an area of nineteen acres to be encompaiied by elegant 
buildings, fituate at the eaft end of Great Pulteney-ftreet. 

Another publick garden is alfo laid out, and thtf erection of an hotel and 
afTembly-room begun, on the banks of the Avon, eaft of the London-road, 
about half a mile from the Guildhall, within an area of houfes twenty acres 
fquare; to be called Grofvenor Gardens and Hotel. Both thefe gardens are 
undertaken by fubfeription. 

In 



; 



BATH. S3 

In this city before the Reformation, and the confequent detrufion of reli- 
gious ftrufturcs, there were, befides the conventual church of St. Peter and 
St. Paul, feven other churches of confiderable note, viz. 

i . St. Mary de Stall, otherwife Stall Church, at the top of the flreet which 
ftill retains its name. 

2. St. Mary intra Muros, juft within the North Gate. 

3. St. Mary extra Muros, on the banks of the Avon eaftward. 

4. St. Michael intra Muros, within the Weft Gate. 

5. St. Michael extra Muros, without the North Gate. 

6. St. James, near the South Gate. 

7. St. Werburgh, at the top of Broad-ftreet. 

Befides which there were the chapels of St. "John and St. Michael at the 
Crofs Bath; St. James, on the foutheaft rampire; St. Winifrid, ontheLanf- 
down-roadj St. Laurence, on the Old Bridge; and St. Helen, between the 
North Gate and Walcot. 

The church of St. Mary de Stall, or of the Stable of Bethlehem, was, with 
the chapel of Widcombe appendant, appropriated to the prior and convent of 
Bath, whofe pittancer received out of it an annual penfion of two pounds 
ten millings and four-pence." An ordination of the vicarage was made 
13 Feb. 1322, whereby it was appointed that the vicar and his fucceflbrs 
fliould have a houfe, with curtillage, and the tithe of all the wool of the 
parifliioners of Widcombe, Lyncombe, and Berewyke, and the tithe of all the 
hay of the faid parifliioners, and alfo the tithes of milk, geefe, pigs, pigeons, 
eggs, chicken, flax, leeks, apples, calves, and ale, together with the fees for 
the celebration of mafs at the exequies and interment of the dead, as alfo all 
bequefts and legacies; and all kinds of oblations and obventions ifluing 
from the chapel of Widcombe and the parifliioners there howfoever. They 
were alfo allotted all the tithe of ale of their parifliioners in Bath, and cer- 
tain annual ftipends for the celebrating mafs there, and the tithe of flax, 
apples, calves, pigs, geefe, and pigeons; and all legacies, oblations, and ob- 
ventions howfoever accruing to the faid church of Stall, as well from the 
living, as in behalf of the parifliioners deceafed, or of non-pari (hi oners 
whatfoever, in like manner as the faid vicar and his predeceflbrs ufed to re- 
ceive the fame. It was alfo ordained, that the vicar for the time being 
fliould conftantly refide at Bath, and ferve the faid church "either perfonally, 
or, in cafe of abfence on account of ficknefs or any other reafonable caufe, 
by fome proper curate; and that he fliould find a refident chaplain to per- 

■ Taxat. Spiritual. 

farm 



54 BATH. 

form divine fervice in the chapel of Widcombe; and that he fhould defray 
the procurations of the archdeacon at his feveral vifitations. It was further 
decreed, that the prior and convent of Bath, as rectors of the faid church, 
fhould receive and have the tithe of all the corn of the villanes, and the 
other parifhioners of Lyncombe, with the tithes of all corn and hay growing 
on the lands of Sir John de Wejlon, and alfo the tithe of lambs at Lyncombe, 
together with the tithe of wool as well of fheep as tags which they ufed to 
receive yearly from the brethren of the BleJ/ed Mary Magdalen. And laftly, 
it was ordained that the religious fhould fuflain all ordinary and extraordi- 
nary charges whatever incumbent on the faid church and chapel, (together 
with thofe of repairing and covering the chancel of the faid church of Stall) 
the archdeacon's procurations as abovementioned only excepted. 

On the north fide of the old parifh church, at the union of Stall-flreet, 
Cheap-ftreet, and Weftgate-ftreet, was an old refervoir of water, called 
Stall's Conduit; and at the termination of Stall-ftreet, without the South Gate, 
flood another conduit, called, after the parifh church, St. James's Conduit, 

The city is now divided into the following parifhes, viz. i. St. Peter and 
St. Paul. 2. St. James. 3. St. Michael; and 4. The out-parifh of Walcot. 

The parifh of St. Peter and St. Paul occupies the central part of the 
city, and was eftablifhed upon the ruins of the diffolved monaftery. This 
monaftery was firft founded in the year of our Lord 676, by Ofrick a 
petty king of Northumberland, for the reception of a few nuns, or religi- 
ous women. 

During the invafions of the facrilegious Danes this houfe was relin- 
quifhed by the religious j and at length, being totally demolifhed, Offa king 
of the Mercians, in the year y/^, by a licence from the Pope, rebuilt the 
church, and inftituted therein a fociety of fecular canons, fubject to the juris- 
diction of the cathedral church of Worcefter; foon after which it was de- 
tached from the fuperiority of that bifhoprick, and became a moft celebrated 
monaftery, being ftiled in the time of King Ecfrid, Offa's fon, celeberrimum 
Monafierium ^tbaeBun. Upon the reformation of religious eftablifhments, 
and the expulfion of fecular canons, who were thought to interfere too much 
with the regular clergy, King Edgar, about the year 970, converted this mo- 
naftery into a magnificent abbey, and placed therein an abbot, and twenty 
monks of the order of St. Benedict. The firft prefident upon this new 
foundation was, , ' . 

1 . Elphege, prior of Glaftonbury, who immediately on his acceflion re- . 
.built the monaftick church. This Elphege was a native of Wefton near 

Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen. ' this 



BATH. ss 

this city." He governed the abbey many years, and was in 984 promoted to 
the fee of Winchefter, and thence to Canterbury, where he was malfacred by 
the Danes. To him fucceeded 

2. Sewold, who prefided in the time of King Edward the Confeflbr, and 
had for his fuccelfor 

3. Stigand, who was abbot in 1067, the fecond year of William the Con- 
queror, by whom he was taken into Normandy, where he died. 

4. TElfig occurs 1075. In his time many manumiflions were made to 
dependants on the abbey, the certificate of one of which for its curiofity is 
here fubjoined: 

" fcep rpurelap on piryene Enij-re)" bee. -f JE-g/lyrte bohre Fynnic aer iElprge 

• abbube mib anon yne jolbep Dyrrej" yy ro gepirnyjye /Elpnyb nonr-3ejieua 3 

• eal re hipeb on Ba'Son ; Enirr hine ablenbe pe pip gepnre apenfce.' 1 ' 

That is — Here is notified in this book of Chrifi, that JEgilJig hath redeemed 
Wynric of Abbot Mlfig with one ounce of gold. Witnefs thereto Mlfrid Jheriff of 
the city, and all the convent in Bath. May Chrifl Jlrike him blind, who Jhall per- 
vert this writing. 

/Elfig died in 1087, and the next year Bifhop John de Villula, annexing 
the abbey to his fee, fubje£ted it to the government of priors, the firft of 
whom was 

1. Peter, who occurs in the years 1 159 and 1 175. 

2. Walter, fub-prior of Hyde in Hampihire, fucceeded him, and died at 
Wherwell, May 31, 1198. 

3. Gilbert was the next prior, and after him, who prefided but a fhort tirr 

4. Robert, who was prior in 1 Z05, and was elected abbot of Glaftonbury 
in October 1223, in which year fucceeded 

5. Thomas, who was fucceeded by 

6. Walter, who was elected prior in May 1261. 

7. Thomas was prior 1300. 

&-. Robert de Cloppecote or Clapcot occurs 1303, and 1332, in which lait 
year he died, and was buried on the 1 7th day of February. 

9. Robert de Sutton was elected and confirmed March 12, 1332, and con- 
tinued in his priorfhip till June the following year, when he was removed 
by the authority of the Pope's provifionary bull, and was tranflated to the 
priory of Dunfter, with a penfion of twenty marks. 

f See page 166 of this volume. 
« Lye Did. Sax. & Go:h. Latin. in Append, e Cod. MS. in B'.bl. C. C. C. Cant. 

10. Thomas, 



56 BATH. 

10. Thomas Chrifty was collated in his flead, Sept. 24, 1333, and left the 
priory in Auguft 1340. 

1 1. John de Irford was prior in 1346. 

12. John de Walecot fucceeded him. 

13. John de Dunfter prefided in 1406. He died Feb. 6, 141 1. 

1 4. John de Tellisford, a monk of Dunfter, was elected March 10, 1 4 1 1 . 
There were nineteen monks then prefent, viz. fourteen at Bath, and five 
from Dunfter, which was a cell belonging to this priory. In the time of 
this prior there was a mighty difpute between the convent and the mayor 
concerning the ringing of bells in this city, which continued feveral years, 
and was finally adjufted by a decree, that no one fhould ring any bells within 
the precincts of Bath at day-time, before the prior had rung his bells, nor in 
the night-time after the prior had rung his curfew/ He died in 1425, and 
was fucceeded by 

15. William Southbroke, who died June 7, 1447. 

16. Thomas de Lacock was elected Sept. 16, 1447, by the Biihop, on 
whom the nineteen monks then belonging to the convent had by compromife 
devolved the nomination of the prior. 

17. Richard was prior 1476. 

18. John Cantlow prefided in 1489. The Archbifhop of Canterbury vi- 

fited this monaftery in the time of his prefidentihip, viz. A.D. 1494. This 

prior was a confiderable benefactor to his monaftery; he alfo rebuilt the 

hofpital of St. Mary Magdalen in Holloway, and the chancel of the church of 

, St. Catherine, as appears by infcriptions ftill extant, and died in Auguft 1499. 

19. William Bird was inftituted by Bifhop Oliver King, Aug. 31, 1499. 
There were twenty-one monks then refident in the convent. The old con- 
ventual church being in his time become ruinous, the Biihop, at the inftance 
and with the affiftance of this prior, fet about rebuilding it in a more fump- 
tuous manner; but neither of them lived to fee it completed. Bird died 
May 22, 1525, as it is faid, in great poverty, having expended too much in 
building, and in chemical experiments, to which he was extremely addicted.' 
On his death, 

20. William Holway, alias Gibbs, was eleiled July 5, 1525, twenty-one 
monks being then in the convent.' Immediately after his appointment, he 
applied himfelf to perfe&ing the work of his predeceflbr, in which he fuc- 
ceeded, but June 29, 1539) was obliged to furrender his monaftery to the 

' Inq. 9 Hen. V. n. 31. Itid. ap. Cod. Rub. Bathon. ' Wood's Fafli Oxon. i. 7. « Archer. 

King; 



BATH. 



57 



King; whereupon the following penfions were affigned to him and the bre- 
thren of the monaftery by the King's Commiflloners, viz. Firft, to William 
Holway, prior, 8ol. in money for his yearly penfion, with certain perquifites 
out of the revenues of the baths, and a tenement fituated in Stall-ftreet, juft 
within the South Gate, lately in the occupation of one Jeffrey Stayncr, being 
of the yearly rent of 20s. To John Pitt, fub-prior 9I. Richard Griffith, 
prior of the cell of Dunfter, Thomas Bathe, Nicholas Bathe, B.D. 81. each. 
Alexander Briftow, John Beckington, 61. 13s. 4d. Richard Lincoln, John 
Arleflon, Thomas Powell, John Browne, Richard Bygge, 61. Richard Gilles, 
Thomas Worcefter, William Clement, John Edgar, Edward Edwaye, Patrick 
Vertue, John Humylyte, John Gabriell, William Bowachyn, John Benett, 
John Style, Patrick Archer, Thomas Stylbond, John Barnet, John Bewfham, 
5I. 6s. 8d. Thomas Powell, 5I. John Pacyence, John Long, 4I. 13s. 4d." 

The pofleflions of this monaftery in Bath at the time of the Norman Con- 
queft are thus recorded : 

" The Church of St. Peter of Bada has in that borough twenty-four 
" burgefTes, rendering [yearly to the Abbot] twenty millings. There is a 
" mill" of twenty (hillings rent, and twelve acres of meadow. The whole is 
" worth forty millings." 7 

In 1444 the revenues of the monaftery were valued at 5 81. 13s. 4d. and in 
1534, at 61 7I. 2s. 3id. 1 

Soon after the diflblution, King Henry VIII. by his letters patent bearing- 
date 16 March 1543, granted the fite of the abbey, with the cuftomary 
works and fervices of tenants in Lyncombe, Holloway, and Walcot, and the 
capital mefluage of Combe, lately belonging thereto, together with all fuch 
court-leets, view of frank-pledge, aflize of bread, wine and beer, knights' 
fees, wards, marriages, efcheats, heriots, fairs, markets, tolls, cuftoms, com- 
mons, free-warrens, goods and chattels, waifs, ftrays, profits, commodities, 
emoluments and hereditaments whatsoever, as the abbots and priors of the 
faid monaftery or priory, ever held or enjoyed, to Humphry Colles, efq;' 
who foon after fold the fame to Matthew Colthurft, whofe fon Edmund 
Colthurft gave the abbey-church, then become ruinous, and ftript of its 
lead, glafs, iron and bells, and every thing elfe that could be fold for money, 

" Willis's Hid. of Abbies, i. 221 , and in Addend. 6j. 

» This mill was afterwards called Monks' Mill, and was fituated on the weir oppofite the eaft end of Orange- 
Grove. There was alio another mill upon the river belonging to the monaftery, which was diftinguilhcd by the 
name of Ij'abd's Mill. 

1 Lib. Domefday. * Archer. ' • Pat. 34 Hen. VIII. p. 11. 

Vol. I. h together 



5* 







B 



H. 



together with the ground upon the eaft, weft and north fides of it, to the 
Mayor and Citizens of Bath for their parochial church and church-yard. 
The abbey-houfe, with the park called the Prior's-Park, with its apperte- 
nances, and lands, tenements and hereditaments in Bath, was fold by the faid 
Edmund Colthurft, 27 Jan. 1569, to Fulk Morley," from whole descendants 
it came to the Duke of Kingfton. 

The buildings of the monaftery extended over a large fpace of ground; 
they confifted of the church, cloifters, chapter-houfe, prior's houfe, monk's 
lodgings, and dormitory built by Bifhop Beckington." The prior's houfe, 
with fome of the apartments of the monks, ftood on the fouth fide of the 
conventual church, and reached with its feveral offices a great way towards 
the avenue which led from it into the South Gate of the city, ftill retaining 
the name of Abbey-lane. Some time after the diffolution it was repaired, 
and again made habitable, and there were elegant gardens belonging to it on 
the eaft fide within the walls, and orchards extending quite down to the 
river. Some parts however of the old houfe, fuch as obfolete offices, obfcure 
rooms and lofts, were left in their priftine ftate, and were never occupied 
after their defertion by the monks. On pulling down fome of thefe build- 
ings in the beginning of the prefent century, one of the apartments, which 
had been walled up and never explored, difclofed a very curious and intereft- 
ing light. Round the walls, upon pegs, were hung as in aveftry-room, 
(which the place undoubtedly was) the copes, albs, chefiples, and other gar- 
ments of the religious, which, on the admiflion of the air, became fo rotten 
as to crumble into powder. There was alfo found the handle of a crofier; 
and on the floor lay two large chefts, without any contents, as it was 
alleged by the workmen, one of whom, however, grew rich upon the occa- 
fion, and retired from bufmefs. 

In the window of a parlour in the monks' lodgings were thefe arms, viz. 
1. Argent, an eagle rifmg or; Prior Cantlow. 2. A chevron between three 
eagles difplayed, on a chief a rofe between two lozenges, over all a mitre and' 
crofier; Prior Bird. 3. Party per pale indented gules and or, a chevron of 
the laft; impaling fable, two bars argent, in chief three plates; HungerfordL* 

The dimenfions of the old church were as follows :.. 
The length of the church 270 feet, 
The length of the principal aile 60 feet, 
The breadth of the fame aile 45 feet.' 

b Licence to alienate. c Itin. Willelm. de Worceftre, 285. 

* Antiq. of the Abbey Church of Bath, 268. • Itin. Willelm. de Worceftre, 116. 

When 



BATH. 



S9 



When by the giant of Edmund Colthurft the abbey-church fell into the 
hands of the citizens, after having been expofed to the ruthlefs elements for 
a great number of years, it was by the contributions of pious benefactors, 
among whom the munificence of Thomas Bellot, efq; and Bifhop James 
Montague, fhone moft confpicuous, fitted up for divine fervice nearly in 
the fame ftile wherein we fee it now/ It is a veiy ilately ftructure in 
the form of a crofs, light, airy, and withal f firmly compacted. Its length 
from eaft to weft is two hundred and twelve feet, and from north to fouth 
one hundred and twenty-fix. The breadth of the nave and fide ailes is 
feventy feet; and the length of the choir feventy-four feet. Over the inter- 
feron of the tranfept with the nave ftands a beautiful tower, one hundred 
and fixty-two feet in height, and containing a peal of ten large bells. The 
weft end of the nave is profufely decorated with fculpture. The great door, 
which was beautified in 1617 by Sir Henry Montague, knt. lord chief juftice 
of the King's Bench, is richly carved, and charged with the arms of the fee, 
impaling thofe of Montague; and on one fide of it, within a niche, ftands a 
large ftatue of St. Peter, on the other that of St. Paul, the apoftolick patrons 
of the edifice. At each angle of the front is ah octagon turret, on the fides 
whereof are images of the twelve apoftles, and in the fore-part are reprefented 
angels attending and defcending a lofty ladder, expreflive, as it is faid, of a 
dream or vifion of Bifhop Oliver King, previous to his defign of rebuilding 
the church. Over the great window is a reprefentation of the Holy Trinity, 
with a great number of angels or cherubs difperfed on either fide. Over the 
window of the north aile there is this infeription: iDoiTUliS Sg)ea; over that 
of the fouth, fDomtl0 ©tonig, i. e. Orationh. Thefe inferiptions were origi- 
nally laid on with gold at the expence of Bifhop Montague/ On each of 
the buttreffes at the angles is carved in ftrong relief an olive-Xvtt, fupported 
by two elephants, and furmounted by a crown, and underneath is the follow- 
ing allegorical allufion to the founder's name, taken out of the book of 
Judges ix. 8. 

3!erunt ligna ut ungcrcnt fupec fe tcgem, 
Diretunt que ©liuae 3impeta nobis. 
Crccs going to cfjcfe their, king, 
%aio, TBc to U0 the ©Itoer Eing. 

The nave of the church is very lofty, and is divided from the fide ailes by 
twelve cluftered pillars fupporting elliptick arches. On the vaulting of the 

' Some of the windows were inferibed with quibbles on the nr.mes of their donors, as Malet meliera; Mr. 
Malet of Enmore: Bis fecit, fa filix bis j Mr. Bifs of Spargrove, &c. 

• Antiq. of the Abbey Church of Bath, 172. 

I) 2 rcof 



6o BAT H. 

roof, which is ornamented with neat carved work, are the arms of the church 
of Wells, the city of Bath, Bifhop Montague, Sable a crofs engrailed or, 
and the arms of the feveral contributors to the building of the roof. 

At the upper end of the nave, under an arch dividing it from the north 
aile, is a fumptuous altar-tomb of elegant workmanfhip, whereon lies the 
effigy of Bifhop Montague in his epifcopal habit, and on the fouth fide is this 
infcription : 

" Memoria; facrum, pietate, virtute, et do&rina infignis Jacobus Montacutus, 
Edwardi Montacuti de Boughton, in comitatu Northamptonise, equitis aurati, a Saris- 
burienfibus comitibus dedudta propagine, filius quinto genitus, a fapientiffimo Jacobo 
Rege Sacello Regio Decanus praspofitus, ad Epifcopatum Bathonienfem promotus, 
et deinde ad Wintonicnfem, ob fpectatam in maximis negotiis fidem, dexteritatem et 
prudentiam, in fanttius concilium adfcitus, Regique (cui chariffimus erat) in aula afli- 
duus, in medio acluofse vit£e curfu, quam Deo, ecclefia;, et patriae devoverat, ad eter- 
nam vitam evocatus 20 Julii, Anno Domini 16 18, aetatis 50." 

On the north fide: 

" Reverendiffimus hie Epifcopus in hoc templo antiquiflimo, quod, inter alia multa 
egregia pietatis monumenta, maximis impends inftauravic, corpus deponi juffit, donee 
Chrifto Redemptori videbitur, eum cum juftis ad interminatam vitam, quam in terris 
femper anhelavit, excitare. Edvardus Montacutus, de Boughton, Henricus Montacutus, 
capitalis in Banco Regio juftitiarius, Carolus Montacutus, teftamenti curator, et 
Sidneius Montacutus, a fupplicum libellis, equites aurati, fratri optime merito, cum 
lachrymis pofuerunt." 

On each fide of the tomb are two fhields of arms; 1. Gules, two keys in 
bend finifter, crofTed by a fword argent and or counterchanged; Abbey of 
Bath ? impaling quarterly, firft, argent within abordure fable three fufils in 
feffe gules, Montague; fecond and third, or, an eagle difplayed vert, armed 
gules. At the head and feet are two marble Corinthian pillars fupporting an 
entablature, at the top of which are fhields with the fame bearings. 

On an oppofite pillar of the nave there is a very neat monument, having 
on a pyramid of Sienna marble a medallion with the half-length figure of 
the facetious James Quin, and on a tablet underneath the following inr- 
fcription: 

" That tongue which fet the table on a roar, 
And charm'd the publick ear, is heard no more; 
Clos'd are thofe eyes,, the harbingers of wit, 
Which fpake, before the tongue, what Shakefpeare writ;. 
Cold is that hand which living was ftretch'd forth, 
At friendfhip's call, to fuccour modeft worth. 

Here 



B 



H. 



6r 



Ob. 



Here lies James Quin: — Deign, reader, to be taught, 
Whate'er thy ftrength of body, force of thought, 
In nature's happieft mould however cad, 

* To this complexion thou mull come at lall.' D. Garrick. 

mdcclxvi. Etatis lxxiii." 



Near the above is a fmall marble monument, inferibed, 

" Sacred to the memory of William Clements, efq; a youth diflinguilhed by the 
fweetnefs of his manners, and the excellence of his heart — generous, humane, affec- 
tionate: his life was a fource of happinefs to others; his death, it is hoped, was the 
commencement of his own. 

Look down, bleft foul, and from the realms above 
Accept this lad fad tribute of our love. 
The lall — ev'n now our forrows we refign> 
And lofe our feelings to rejoice in thine." 

In the fouth tranfept, againft the fouthweft pillar of the tower, is a large 
handfome monument of ftatuary and veined marble, having a pediment fup- 
ported by Corinthian columns, and on a table this infeription : 

" Here under lyes all that was mortal of Col. Ambrole Norton, a worthy and loyal 
defcendant of worthy and loyal anceftors. He ferv'd the crowne of England aboue 40 
years, in employments both civil and military ; in which he ever acquitted himfelf 
faithfully, and as a man of honour. He was exceeding gracefull in perfon and beha- 
viour; his jullice, gentlenefs, and fweetnefs of difpofition, were equall to his courage; 
and he crown'd all his other virtues with a mod exemplary piety. He was a branch of 
the ancient family of the Nortons, of Somerfetlhire, and coufin-german to Sir George 
Norton, of Abbot's-Leigh in that county. A houfe, happily renovned in hiflory for 
the concealment and prefervation of King Charles the Second, at the fatal battle of 
Worcefter. The Lady Norton, having beene a widdow 3 years, firft of Sir George 
Norton, (to whofe memory fhe has erected a marble monument at Abbot's-Leigh, of 
the fame form and dimention as this) and fince the widdow of Col. Ambrofe Norton* 
has in her great regard to his memory erefted this monument; where he defired his 
body might be interr'd, expecting a bleffed refurrection. He died in the 77 th year of 
his age, on the 10th day of September, in the 10th year of his Majefly King George, 
his lad Royall Mailer, Afioq. Dom. 1723." Arms, Argent, on a bend cotifed be- 
tween two lions rampant fable, three efcallops or, impaling barry or and /able, on a 
chief argent three mullets of the firft. 

On a fouth pillar near the well door is a monument inferibed, 

" Exuvias hie depofuit Robertus Phelips, Jacobo fecundo thronum poffidente,. 
Ducatus et comitatus Palatini Lancaftrias Cancellarius, Roberti Phelips de Monte- 
Acuto, in agro hoc Somerfetenfi, equitis aurati, filius natu fecundus. Qui, regnantibus 
Carolo primo, Carolo fecundo, et Jacobo fecundo, contra omnes perduelles, tarn 
Scotos quam Anglos, Ecclefue, nccnon legalis Monarchise Anglicana?, ftrenuus et 

conftaui 



62 BATH. 

conftans afifertor extitit; temporibus mutatis, nan mutatus in illis. Natus i Feb. eeite 
Chrifti 1 6 1 8 j denatus 21 Junii 1707." Arms, Argent, a chevron between three roles 
gules. Motto, Tout jours fidele. 

On the eaft wall of the north tranfept, on a black marble enchafed in white, 
is this infcription: 

w Here lyeth the body of Walter Ernele, efq; fonne of Michael Ernele, of Burton 
in the county of Wilts, efq; deceafed, and of Sufan, the eldeft daughter and one of the 
coheires of Sir Walter Hungerford, knt. of Farley-caftle in the county of Somerfet, 
alfo deceafed. Which Walter Ernele died the 27th day of Sept. A Dni. 161 8. 

An Ernele Hungerford here lyeth in grave: 
More than thy owne, O earth, thou maift not have : 
His earthy part, his body, that is thine; 
His heavenly, his foule, that part divine, 
Is heaven's right, there doth it live and raigne, 
In joye and blifle for ever to remaine. 
His body in her bofome earth muft keepe 
Till fuch as reft in hope fhall rife from fleepej 
Then body joyned with fowle for ever (hall 
In glory live, raigne both cceleftiall." 
Arms, Argent on a bend Jable, three eagles difplayed or. 

On the north fide of the fame tranfept is a mural monument of marble, 
on the top of which is the bull of a female under a curtain between two 
urns, and underneath is this infcription, written by Mr. Dryden : 

" Here lyes the body of Mary, third daughter of Richard Frampton, of Moreton in 
Dorfetfhire, efq; and of Jane his wife, fole daughter of Sir Francis Cottington, of 
Founthill in Wilts; who was born January the ift, 1676-7, and dyed (after feven 

weeks ficknefs) on the 6th of September 1698. This monument was erefted by 

Catherine Frampton, her fecond fitter and executrefs, in teftimony of her grief, affec- 
tion, and gratitude. 

Beneath this marble monument is laid 

All that heaven wants of this celeftial mayd: 

Preferve, O facred tomb ! thy truft confign'd ! 

The mould was made on purpofe for the mind; 

And fhe would lofe, if at the latter day 

One atom could be mix'd of other clay. 

Such were the features of her heav'nly face, 

Her limbs were form'd with fuch harmonious grace; 

So faultlefs was the frame, as if the whole 

Had been an emanation of the foul, 

Which her own inward fymmetry reveal'd, 

And like a pi&ure ftione, in glafs anneal'dj 

Or 



1 



B A T If. 9 63 

Or like the fun eclips'd with (haded light, 

Too piercing elfe to be fuflain'd by fight. 

Each thought was vifible that roll'd within, 

As through a cryftal cafe the figur'd hours are feen : 

Anil heaven did this tranfparent veil provide, 

Becaufe Ihe had no guilty thought to hide. 

All white, a virgin-faint, fhe fought the fkies: 

For marriage, though it fullies not, it dyes! 

High though her wit, yet humble was her mind, 

As if fhe could not, or fhe would not find, 

How much her worth tranfcended all her kind. 

Yet fhe had learn 'd fo much of heaven below, 

That when arriv'd, fhe fcarce had more to know ; 

But only to refrefh the former hint, 

And read her Maker in a fairer print : 

So pious, as fhe had no time to fpare 

For human thoughts, but was confin'd to prayer; 

Yet in fuch charities fhe pafs'd the day, 

Twas wond'rous how fhe found an hour to pray. 

A foul fo calm, it knew not ebbs or flows, 

Which paflion could but curl, not difcompofe! 

A female foftnefs, with a manly mind, 

A daughter duteous, and a fifter kind ; 

In ficknefs patient, and in death refign'd." 

Arms, Urgent, a bend gules, cotifed Jable. 

The choir is exceedingly neat, and has that awful fblemnity of appearance 
which feems to be peculiar to Gothick conventual and cathedral churches. 
The eaft window is very lofty, reaching almoft to the top of the building, 
and is glazed with party-coloured panes of glafs difpofed in the manner of 
billets, in allufion to the name of its donor, the charitable Thomas Bellot, 
efq. The roof is curioufly vaulted with Gothick work, and on it are feveral 
fhields of arms, viz. In the centre, 1. Gules, a key and fword in faltire, or, 
the emblems of St. Peter and Paul. 2. Azure, three bends embattled fable. 
3 . England and France. 

On the north fide, 1. A crofs botonnee, on a canton dexter the Virgin 
Mary and Child ; Glaftonbury-abbey. 2. A crofs flory between four mart- 
lets. 3. as 1. 4. A key and fword in faltire. 

On the fouth fide, 1. An eagle difplayed. 2. A chevron between three 
eagles difplayed, on a chief a rofe between two lozenges; Prior Bird. 3. Per 
pale, on a chevron three eicallops. 4. A crofs coupee between four martlets. 

On 



1 



64 *« B A» T H. 

On the north fide is an elegant chapel 1 6 feet in length, and 8 in breadth, 
erected by Prior Bird, whofe arms are on the eaft wall, neatly cut in ftone, 
pierced with a crofier, and furmounted by a mitre; over the door within is 
this device, a W. and a Bird. It is generally fuppofed that the prior was 
here buried. On the centre pillar of this chapel, facing the choir, is a 
monument with the following infcription : 

" Near this place lyeth the body of John Turnor, efq; fori of Sir Edmund Turnor, 
of Stoke-Rochford in the county of Lincoln, knight. He married Diana, daughter 
of Algernon Cecil, one of the youngeft fons of the Right Honourable William earl of 
Salifbury, and dyed the 1 8th of July 17 19. 

" In the fame place alfo lyeth the body of Diana Bramfton, daughter of the above- 
mentioned John Turnor, efq; who was firft married to Robert Fern, of Snitterton in 
the county of Derby, efq; afterwards to Thomas Bramfton, of Screens in the county 
of Efiex, efq; and dyed the 9th of January 1725-6." 

Arms, 1. Ermine, on a crofs quarter pierced argent, four fers de moulins fable; 
Turnor: on an efcutcheon of pretence, barry of ten argent and azure, over all fix 
cfcutcheons fable, each charged with a lion rampant argent; Cecil. 2. Per bend or 
and gules two lions' heads counter-changed; Fern: impaling Turnor. 3. Or, on a feile 
fable three plates; Bramfton: impaling Turnor. 

On the fouth fide of the chancel is a mural monument of black and white 
marble, fupported by two Corinthian pillars gilt, and having thereon the 
figures of a man and woman in ruffs kneeling at a delk; underneath the 
man is a fon habited in a cloak with a fwathed infant before him; and under 
the woman are five daughters in the attitude of praying. On a tablet is 
this infcription : 

" In obitum Bartholomasi Barnes defun&i, viri veras religionis amantifilmi, nuper 
mercatoris Londinenfis, nuncque ccelorum regni civis beati. 

Religio, pietas, facundas gratia linguas, 

Ingenium, virtus, inviolata fides, 
Cum gravitate tepos, cum fimplicitate venuftas, 

Larga manus, pectus nobile, firmus amor. 
Denique quicquid habet natura quod addere poffit, 

Addere quod poffit gratia, quicquid habet. 
Omnia Bam<eum vrvum comitata fuerunt, 

Omnia mors atrox obruit ifta fimul. 
Obruat ifta licet trifti mors faeva fepulchro, 

Poft tamen illorum fata fuperftes erit." 

Arms, Azure, two lions pafiant gardant argent. 

On the north fide of the altar is a beautiful monument of ft atuary marble, 

elegantly deligned, and moft exquifitely finifhed, with this memorial on 

its bafe: 

" Near 



BATH. 65 

" Near this monument are depofited the remains of Lady Miller, wife to Sir John 
Miller, bart. of Bath-Eafton Villa; fhe departed this life at the Hot-Wells of Briftol the 
t4th of June 178 1, in the 41ft year of her age. 

Devoted ftone! amidft the wrecks of time, 

Uninjur'd bear thy Miller's fpodefs name: 
The virtues of her youth and ripen'd prime, 

The tender thought, th' enduring record claim. 

When clos'd the num'rous eyes that round this bier 

Have wept the lofs of wide-extended worth, 
O gende ftranger, may one gen'rous tear 

Drop, as thou bendeft o'er this hallow'd earth ! 

Are truth and genius, love and pity thine, 

With lib'ral charity, and faith fincere? 
Then reft thy wand'ring ftep beneath this fhrine, 

And greet a kindred ipirit hov'ring near." 

Arms, Argent, a fefle gules between three wolves' heads erafed azure-, Miller : on an 
efcutcheon of pretence, gules, a fefle ermine between three water fpaniels argent; Riggs. 

' In the fouth aile of the choir is a freeftone monument, a kind of farco- 

* phagus, under a canopy fupported by fix pillars of the Ionick order. In 
c the farcophagus are lodged two bodies, in flight oak coffins, one upon 
1 another. The man, who lies uppermoil, is reduced to a fkeleton, with 
' the fkin completely dried on the breaft and belly, and the hair of his head* 

* chin and chefl, perfectly preferved; that on his head thin and red. His 

* head reclines to the right, the jaw fallen, his arms flretched by his fide, 

* the right hand lies on his right thigh j the left arm pendant} the nails on 

* the great toe and third toe of his left foot perfect and long, and the leader 
' of the leg complete; the toes of the right foot lefs perfect. The body 
c meafures five feet ten inches. Pieces of the wrapper remain between the 
' thighs and legs. The woman, who, by being placed under the other coffin, 

* was not difcovered till within the laft fix or feven years, is completely in- 

* veloped in a wrapper of linen, incrufted with wax, or fome preparation, 
1 which when firft opened was white, but is now turned to a yellow colour. 
c The outer fwathing is gone, but the web of the linen may be feen in that 
1 part which has been broken into, and which difcovers the left hand dried 
« like the man's, and lying on the belly. This corpfe meafures five feet four 
' inches, and the head reclines to the left.' s 

Thefe are the embalmed relicks of Thomas Lychefield, who was lutanift 
to Queen Elizabeth, and of Margaret his wife. There is no infeription 

• Gough's Sepulchral Monuments 1786. Introd. lxxvii. 

Vol. I. i o\ 



66 BAT H. 

on the monument, but on the top are thefe arms, viz. Two bends couped. — 
Near it, againft the fame wall, is an old freeftone monument, fupported by 
two Corinthian pillars, and on the table this infcription: 

" A. D. 1577. Here lieth the body of Joh. Bellingham, late of Farneham in the 
county of Suffex, efquier." On the top are thefe arms, Quarterly, firft and fourth, 
three bugle-horns garnifhedj fecond and third, bendy of fix, on a canton a lion rampant. 

On the fouth fide of this aile is a veftry with a fmall library 11 begun by 
Bifhop Lake, and afterwards augmented by feveral other benefaflors. In 
the window, over the entrance, are the arms of the Company of Merchant 
Taylors, and this infcription: 

" This window was repaired, and continually kept by the Taylors, 1641." 

At the fouth end of the fouth tranfept is a handfome monument of black 
and white marble, the tomb of which is fupported by four Corinthian 
pillars, and thereon lies the effigy of a knight in armour, raifed on his 
right arm, and mourning over his lady by his fide: at their feet a young 
daughter is fitting in her chair, and a fon in a fimilar pofture at their head. 
Over them is this infcription : 

" To the deare memory of the right vertuous and worthy lady, Jane Lady Waller,, 
fble daughter and heir to Sir Richard Reynell, wife to Sir William Waller, knight.. 

Sole ifiue of a matchlefs paire, 
Both of their ftate and vertues heyrej 
In graces great, in ftature fmall,. 
As full of fpirit as voyd of gall ; 
Cheerfully brave, bounteoufly clofe, 
Holy without vain-glorious fhowes; 
Happy, and yet from envy free, 

Learn'd without pride, witty, yet wife 

Reader, this riddle read with mee, 

Here the good Lady Waller lyes." 

There is a tradition, that King James the Second, palling through the- 
church, and calling his eye on Waller's obnoxious effigy, inftantly drew his 
fword, and with an air of wanton defpite hacked off the poor knight's nofe, in 
which mutilated ftate his face ftill continues, a record of that brave princely 
manoeuvre. 

" In the old Library of the Monks were the following MSS. volumes at the Reformation, viz. 



Is A COG E Joannicii. 
L I B E L L u s Galeni ad Mtecenatem. 
Hiponosticon Laurent ii Danelmenfis carmine de <ve 
teri et nc-vo Tefiamenlo. 



Galenus<& Morbo et Accidenti. 
LlBER DI Febribus, quern tranjiulit Con/lantinus 
Monachus CaJJinetifn ex lingua Arabic a. 

COMMENTARII CjESARIS." 

• lid. Colleftan. iv. 1 57, 

Notwithstanding 



B 



H. 



67 



Notwithstanding there were fix Bilhops interred within this church ante- 
cedent to Bifhop Montague, viz. John de Villula, 1122; Godfrey, 11351 
Robert, 1 1 65; Reginald Fitz-Joceline, 1191; Savaricus, 1205; and Roger, 
1247; 1 befides feveral Priors of Bath and Dunftcr, and many diftinguifhed 
perfonages of old; yet there now remains no trace of any ancient monument 
wliatever." Doubtlefs in that long tract of time wherein the church lay un- 
roofed and totally neglected, many of the old memorials periflied, and others 
were probably defaced by the fall of parts of the fabrick, when it was ftript 
of all its valuables for fale. It is now filled from one end to the other with 
modern monuments of all fhapes, materials, and dimenfions, charged with 
ornaments of various kinds, and inferiptions to families of almoft every 
county in the kingdom, befides many to foreigners whom the fame of the 
waters had invited to this city, and who, here finiihing their earthly courfe, 
chofe to have their bodies reft in this mifcellaneous apotheca of mortality. 

Alphabetical Lift of Monumental Inferiptions in the Abbey-Church at Bath. 



A.D. 

AHMUTY Alice Fridefwide 
Bath 17 90 
Alchorn Rev. Edward 1652 

Alleyne Hannah Sarbadoes 1762 

Afty Elizabeth Hertfordftnre 1736 

Aubery Rev. Edmund Wells 1757 

Avery William London 1745 

Baker Rev. William, D. D. Bifhop 



of Bangor and Norwich 



Sir William, knt. 


London 


Ball Thomas 


Bath 


Mary 




Barkley Andrew 




Barnes Bartholomew 


London 


Hefter 


Bath 


Bathoe Elizabeth 


Bath 


William 




Bave Samuel, M. D. 


Bath 


Francis 


Bath 


Rebecca 


Bath 



1732 
1770 
1786 

1787 
1790 

1607 

1659 
1788 
1780 
1668 

1733 



A.D. 
Lady Mary 

Norfolk 1767 

Suffex 1577 

Bath 1728 

1752 

Blanchard James Somerfetjhire 1690 

Boothby Sir William, bart. 1787 

Bofanquet Jacob London 1767 

Bollock Richard, M. D. Shropjhire 1747 



Bedingfield Hon. 

Belingham John 
Billings Frances 
John 



Boyd Mary 






1762 


Bramfton Diana 




EJfex 


1725 


Brett John Morton, M. 


D. 


1769 


Brocas Thomas 




Hampjhire 


1750 


1 Mary 






1775 


Brown Nicholas 


Northumberland 


1762 


Browne James 




Ireland 


1788 


Buck Lady Anne 






1764 


Buller Edward 




Cornwall 


1791 


Bufby Anne 




Oxford 


1751 


Bufhell Hefter 




Bath 


1671 


Bufhell Tobias 






1664 



BeauvoirRev.Ofmund,D.D.Z.<wdo«i789 

' Leland tells us, that he faw in this church a fair great marble tomb of a Bifhop of Bath, out 6f which they 
faid that oil did diftil ; ' and likely (fays he) for his body was baumid plentifully.' I/in. ii. 63. 

k Several ftone coffins have been difcovered in different pn-'sof the flructurc ; and in one taken from under- 
neath the flooring of the north tranfept was found a curious cualice, with fome leather foles of fcoes, and other 
habiliments. 

/ 2 Callis 



♦ 






68 



B 



H. 



A.D. 

Callis Admiral Smith 176 1 

Camplin Rev. Thomas, LL.D. 

Somerfetjhire 1780 



Canning Letitia 
Cazalet Peter 
Chapman Frances 



George 

Peter 

Richard 

Rev. Robert 

Robert 

Sufanna 

Walter 

William 

William 

William 

William 



Walcot 



Child William 
Churchill Charles, 



Ireland 1786 
1788 
Bath 1709 
1644 
1602 
1572 
1728 
1672 
1672 
1729 
1586 
1627 
1657 
1711 
1675 



Clavering Elizabeth 



Bath 

Governor of 

Plymouth 

Durham 



1745 
176J 



London 
Bath 



Clements William 
Clootwick Jane 
Cornilh Sufanna 
Coward Leonard 
■■ — Elizabeth 
Cowper Rebecca 
Croft Sarah 
Crowle David 
Culliford Robert 
Cunliffe Margaret 
Currer Sarah 

Darell John 

■ ■ Catherine 
Dixon Abraham 

Alice 

Draper Sir William, K. B. 
Dunce Samuel London 

Duncombe John 
Durell John, advocate-general of 

Jefe 

Elletfon Roger Hope, governor of 

Jamaica 1775 



1786 
1750 

1764 

1764 

Hertford/hire 1762 

London 1690 

Tork 1757 

Dorfetjhire 16 16 

Lancajhire 1759 

Tork 1759 

Surrey 1768 

1774 
Northumberland 1746 

J 753 
1787 

1736 

1747 

J739 



Ellis Rev. John, LL.B. Merionethjh. 



A.D. 



Enys Dorothy > 

Maria \ 

Ernele Walter 



1785 

Cornwall 1784 

Wilts 16 18 



Fenwick Jane Northumberland 1769 

1768 

Efex 17 13 

1768 

1774 

Bath 1733 

1732 

1745 
1749 
1743 
Bath 1783 
Dorfit 1698 
1674 



Fielding Sarah 
Finch Anne 
Flood Luke 

Anne 

Ford Richard 

Eleanor 

Frances 

Mary 

Prifcilla 

Fowell Richard Bridgen 
Frampton Mary 
Frowde Sir Philip, knt. 



Gambier Vice-Admiral James 



Tork 



Oxford/hire 

London 

Aberdeen 

Scotland 



Gee Roger 

Gethin Lady Grace 

Godfrey Charles 

Goodfellow Charles 

Gordon George 

Gathea Harriot 

Grant Duncan 

Grenville Hon. Henry 

Grefley Sir Nigel, bart. Staffordjhire 

Grieve James Tamefz Mo/cow 

Grieve Elizabeth 

Grieye Elizabeth Northumberland 

Griffith Rev. Guyon, D.D. 

Frances 



London 

Carmarthen/hire 

Dorfetjhire 



Gunfon Richard 
Gwyn Elizabeth 
Gyare Elizabeth 
Mary 

Heath William Bath 

Henfhaw Jonathan ditto 

Hickes Rev. Robert Adams Wilts 
Hobart Dorothy Norfolk 

Houfton Sir Patrick 



1789 
1778 
1697 
1714 
1728 

*779 
1788 

1788 
1784 
1787 
1787 

1758 
1752 

1784 
1786 
1762 
1756 
1688 

I 7 H: 

1707 
1764 

1788 

1722 

1785 

Howfe 



B 



A.D. 



Howfe Elizabeth Bath 1787 

Hudfon Henry Northumberland 1789 

Hughes Admiral Robert 1774 

Hutchinfon Edmund Bath 1791 

James Rev. Charles, D.D. Glouc. 1695 
Jephfon Serjeant William 1772 
Jernegan Sir John, bart. Norfolk 1737 
Jefup Edward Efex 1770 
Jones Loftus Ireland 178a 
I (ham Sufanna Cumberland 1726 
Ivy Sir George, knt. Wilts 1639 
Lady Sufanna 



H. 



Kelly Elizabeth 
Kingfton Anthony 



Ireland 1761 
Bath 



Jamaica 



Lamb John 

Legh Calveley, M. D. 

Leigh Michael Ireland 

Leman Dorothy Somerjetjhire 

Leyborne Rev. Robert, D.D. 

Rebecca 1 



1772 
1727 



1709 

1759 

1756 

Lincoln 1725 

Flint/hire 1728 

Cumberland 1764 

ditto 1744 



Lifter Martha 
Lloyd Evan 
Lowther Catherine 

Lychefield Thomas 7 

J. Margaret \ tm *' EU *> R W»' 

C. M. 176$ 

Maden Colonel Martin 1756 

Maplet John, M. D. 1670 

— — Anne 1670 

Martyn Thomas Devonjhire 1627 

Mafham Lady Damaris EJfex 1708 



69 



A.D. 

Mafon Robert Kent 1664 

Matthews Anne Staffordjhirt 174a 

Mereilyth Colonel Henry Ireland j 7 1 5 
Miglioruccio Jacobo Antonio 

Florence 1704 
Miller Lady Bath-Eajlon 1781 

Moffat Elizabeth London 1791 

Molyneux Diana Nottingham 1750 

Montague Rev. James, D.D. 

Bifhop of Bath and Wells, and 

Winchefter 



Morris Thomas 
Morrifon Elizabeth 
Moutray John 

Nagle Mary 



1618 
London 1763 

1738 
Scotland 1785 

Ireland 1784 



Nichols Maria Northampton/hire 161 4 
Norton Colonel Ambrofe Somerfet 1723 

Ogle John Northumberland 1738 

Oliver William, M. D. Cornwall 1 7 j 6 

Parker John Lancajhire 1768 

Pearce John &?/£ ,6 72 

William 

Dorothy 

Pedder James Jamaica 

Pellings Rev. John, S.T.B. 

Pennington Hon. Lady Cumberland 1 738 

Phelips Robert Lancajhire 1707 

Philips Sir Erafmus, bart. 

Pierce Elizabeth 

Pipon Thomas 7^7^ 

Poole Serjeant David 

Porter Catherine Surrey 



1671 
1691 

1620 



1743 
1671 

1735 

1762 

1779 



Price Elevedale Denbigh/hire 1764 



' Her monument is againft a fouth pillar of the nave, and is infcribed with the following extraordinary panegy rick : 

" In memory of Rebecca Leyborne, interred at the foot of this pillar. Born June the 4th, 1698. Deceafed 
February 18th, 1756. A wife more than twenty-three years to Robert Leyborne, D. D. (reclor of the churches 
of St. Dunftan, Stepney, and of St. Ann's, Middlefex, near London, and principal of Alban-hall in Oxford,) 
who never once faw her ruffled with anger, nor heard her utter even a peevilh word ; whether pain'd or injur'd, 
the fame good woman, in whole mouth, as in whofe character, was no contradiction : refign'd, gentle, courteous, 
affable ; without paffion ^though not without fenfe : She took offence as little as fhe gave it ; (he never was, or 
made an enemy: To fervants, mild; to relations, kind; to the poor, a friend; to the ftranger, hofpitable: 
always caring how to pleafe her hufband, yet not lefs attentive to the one thing needful. How few will be able 
to equal, -what all mould endeavour to imitate '." 

Pringle. 



7° 



B 



A 



H. 



Pringle Margaret 
Pyper Granville 

Quin James 

Reeve Mary 
Rice Griffith 
Robinfon Luke 
Roebuck John 
Roffey James 

Rebecca 

Rowe Elizabeth 
Roycroft Samuel 

Sanderfon Colonel Robert 
Saunders Rev. Erafmus, D. D 



A.D. 

Scotland 172 
Cornwall 



London 

Carmarthenjhire 

York 

ditto 

ditto 

Somerfetjhire 
Bath 



Scarfe Elizabeth Cornwall 

Schutz Elizabeth 
Shadwell John, M. D. 
Sherwood John, M. D. 

— - Henry 

Maria 

Simpfon Jofeph 

— Mary 

Southoufe Henry London 

• Thomas 

Sowerby Ralph Northumberland 
Stacey Richard Weftminfler 

Stapylton John York 

Stewart Brigadier-general William 1736 
Stibbs John Bath 1708 

John 

Captain Bartholomew 

Edward 

Bath 

Nottingham/hire 
Bath 
John, bart. 

Northumberland 1744 



1717 
1766 

1664 
1729 
1776 
1767 
1769 

1765 
1779 
1790 
1724 

*775 
1747 
17.65 
1747 
1620 
1620 
1612 

*755 

1755 
1720 

1716 

1765 
1714 

1750 



Stonor Lucy 
Sutton Robert 
Swanton Jane 
Swinburne Sir 



i73 2 
^735 

J739 

1782 

1775 
1697 



A.D. 
Taylor John London 171 1 

Temple Sir Richard, bart. 1786 

Thompfon Lucy Shrcpjhire 1765 



Bucks 












Throckmorton George 

Mary 

Robert 

Anne 

Francis 
Townfend Rev. Edward, D. D. 
Dean of Norwich 
Tryme Anne Somerjetjhir e 169T 

' Eleanor 1695 

Turnor John Lincoln/hire 1 719 

Venner Tobias, M. D. Bath 1660 



1762 

1763 

1779 

1783 

1788 

1765 



York 

Wefiminjler 
Middle/ex 



Worcefier 1776 



Bath 



Northumberland 

York 

Gloucejlerjhire 



Wade Thomas 
Wahup Margaret 
Waldo Elizabeth 
Wall John, M. D. 
Waller Lady Jane 
Wallyjohn 
Walfh Robert 
Ward Edward 
Watts Robert 
Webb John 
— — Hon. Elizabeth 

Mary 

Wentworth Hon. Lady 
Wharton William 
Wiltfhire Anne 
Winkley Elizabeth 
Woolmer Edward 

— Sufanna 

Wylde Anne 

Elizabeth 

Wy vil Sir Marmaduke Afty, bart.' 

York 



1790 
1718 
^63 



1615 

1788 

1777 

1739 

1745 
1772 

York/hire 1786 

York 1706 

St. Kitts 1782 

1747 

Lancajhire 1756 

Bath 1721 

1752 

Worcefter 1784 

1791 



1774 



There were in ancient times feveral chantries inftituted in this church, as, 
i. St. Catherines Chantry. 3. Botreauxs Chantry. 

2. St. Andrew's Chantry. 4. La Commune Chanterie. 

On two tables are recited the following benefaBions to this parifh. 
«* 1608. The Right Rev. Doctor James Montague, bifhop of this diocefe, 
gave 1 oool. towards covering the roof of this church, <( , , M 



BAT H. n i 

« 1646. Mrs. Elizabeth Chapman of this city gave one filvcr flagon for 
the ufe of the facrament in this church for ever. 

" 1654. Sir William Waller, Lady Booth, and Mr. Edward Sturidge, gave 
300I. which fum is in the chamber of this city, the intereft at 15I. per 
annum, paid by the chamber, for the ufe of this church for ever. 

" Mr. Theodore Wakeman, town-clerk of this city, gave one filvcr flagon 
for the ufe of the facrament in this church for ever. 

" 1683. Mrs. Mary Joyce, widow, gave one filver falver for the ufe of 
the facrament in this church for ever. 

" 1683. Mr. Richard Pitcher, alderman of this city, gave a field in the 
parifh of Widcombe, the profits of it for the ufe of the church for ever. 

<c 1701. Mrs. Mary Chapman, Mrs. Mary Eaft, Mr. Henry Woolmer, 
all of this city, gave the three brafs branches in this church. 

" 1725. The Hon. George Wade, efqj one of the reprelentatives in par- 
liament for this city, gave the marble altar-piece to the church. 

,c 1746. Mr. George Webb gave one filver falver for the ufe of the fa- 
crament in this church. 

" 1784. Mr. Daniel Morris, apothecary of this city, gave two filver 
falvers, one filver cup and cover, and a filver pint. 

" Mr. Power gave 40s. per annum for ever to the poor of this city, to be 
paid out of his houfe in the Market-place, now in poffeffion of Mrs. Ann 
Taylor, widow. 

" 1743. To be diftributed at the difcretion of the Mayor and Juftices 
for the time being, Mr. Atwood left 52s. per annum to the poor of this 
city for ever, to be paid out of the chamber, to be given in bread one mil- 
ling every Sunday. 

" Mr. Clement and others left 61. 5s. per annum for ever, to be paid out 
of the chamber, to be given in bread to the families of poor freemen of this 
city on the Fridays in Lent. 

" 1677. Mr. Walter Pelling, apothecary of London, gave a tenement 
and 14 acres of land in the parifh of Hunfden, in the county of Hertford, 
for the poor of this city and the town of Trowbridge for ever: the yearly 
income, being divided into two equal parts, is to be diftributed by their re- 
fpeftive minillers and churchwardens. 

" 1769. Mr. James Roffey left 100I. the intereft of it to be given in 

bread every Chriftmas to the poor of this parifh." 

The 






7 2 



BATH. 



The feveral parifhes into which the precincls of the ancient city are 
divided, now conftitute one fole re&ory, within the archdeaconiy and 
deanery of Bath, whereof the corporation are patrons, and the Rev. James 
Phillott, D.D. is the prefent incumbent. The parfonage-houfe, a modern 
handfome ftru£lure, ftands near the Borough-walls, on the north fide of the 
city, between the Blue-coat School and the General Hofpital. The arch- 
deaconry of Bath was ere&ed A.D. 1106, and was rated in 1192 at iol. n 
The firft archdeacon was one of the name of Gilbert ; the prefent is the 
^ Rev. Edmund Lovell, LL.D. 

The parifh of St. James comprehends that part of the city which lies 
between the limits of the parifh of St. Peter and St. Paul on the north, and 
the river Avon on the fouth and fouthweft. The parifh church is fituated 
a little -eaftward from the fite of the old South Gate; the original ftru&ure 
was ancient and curious, confifting of a nave, chancel, and north aile, with 
an embattled tower at the weft end. In the belfry was depofited the muti- 
lated effigy of one of the priors of Bath, neatly cut in ftone. This church, 
on account of its decay as well as fmallnefs, was partly taken down in 1 71 6, 
and an additional aile and tower were ere&ed; and in 1 768 the body of the 
church was rebuilt by a voluntary fubfcription. It is fixty-one feet in length, 
and fifty-eight in breadth, and is fupported by four columns of the Ionick 
order. The altar is inclofed within a large femicircular niche, in the front 
of which is a painting of the Laft Supper. The tower ftands at the 
weft end, and contains eight mufical bells. There is no monument in this 
church; underneath it is a large fepulchral vault, but the general parifh. 
burial-ground is in the avenue leading to St. James's-Parade, at the diftance 
of two "hundred yards towards the north weft of the parifh church. 

The parifh of St. Michael, otherwife called St. Michael extra Muros, or 
without the walls, comprifes a fhort fpace between the northern limits of 
the old city, and the foot of Lanfdown-hill. The parifh church, as it flood 
in the year 1663, was a fmall venerable ftru6lure of one pace or aile, with a 
chancel on the eaft, and a lofty quadrangular tower at the weft end, and on 
the fouth fide of the nave were two chantries or chapels of very ancient 
workmanfhip. In the year 1734, the walls of this church, then become 
ruinous, were removed, and the prefent one finifhed in 1 742, partly by a 
rate on the parifhioners, and partly by a general voluntary fubfcription. It 
is of the Dorick order, with a neat dome; its length is fixty- three feet, its 
breadth thirty-lev en. In a tower on the north weft fide are eight bells. 

* Taxat. Spiritual. 

Near 




BATH. 73 

Near the old church of St. Michael formerly flood two conduits or rcfer- 
voirs of water, called St. Michael's Conduit, and Carnivell. The firft of thcie 
was placed juft before the fouth front of the church, and was a handfome 
lofty flru£lure, compofed of four Ionick pilaflers, Handing upon a pedeflal, 
the entablature of which was Surmounted by five fteps, and above them a 
fmaller pedeftal with a double plinth crowned with an ornament in the 
fhapc of an hour-glafi. Carnwell, the other conduit, flood in Walcot- 
flreet, at the north end of the church, within an alcove, furmounted by a 
lofty turret of neat Gothick workmanfhip. 

The parifh of Walcot, anciently called Fealbcore, Waldefcote, and Wale- 
cote, comprehends all thofe parts of the city, which lie on the north, north- 
eaft and northweft fides of the pari ill of St. Michael, and extends itfelf to 
the confines of Wefton on the weft, including the Circus, Crefcent, and all 
the other new buildings on the acclivities of Lanfdown and Beacon hills. 
This pari lb, although now (the greater part) condenfed within the liberties 
of the city, was in ancient times utterly diflincl: from it, and as to its ma- 
nerial and many other properties remains fo ftill. There were many lands 
within it which belonged to the monaftery of Bath, from before the Nor- 
man Conqueft (at which period no mention is made of its name) to its final 
diiiblution ; and the monks had a grange, or praedial manfion, on the fide 
of the Parade, which now bears the parochial name. The manor was the 
property of the late Rev. Sir Peter Rivers Gay, bait, to whom it was de- 
vifed by Sir Benet Garrard, of Lamer in the county of Hertford, bait, who 
poflcHed it by virtue of the will of Margaret Garrard, of Hatton-garden 
in the county of Middlefex, widow of Thomas Garrard, of the Inner Temple 
in London, efij. 

The living of Walcot was in 1 292 valued at nine marks and a half, the 
infirmarer of Bath having then a penfion of half a mark out of it. h It is a 
rectory in the deanery of Bath; the patronage is veiled in the lord of the 
manor, and the Rev. John Sibley is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, which is dedicated to St. Swithin, or Swithun, bifhop of 
Winchefter, and inflruclor to King Ethelwolf, flands on the flope of the 
northeaft bafe of Lanfdown, and at the divifion of the FofTe and the vicinal 
way to Wefton. It has been, like the other churches in Bath, rebuilt at 
different periods. The prefent church was erected in the year 1780, in the 
modern fafhionable ilyle of religious edifices, and has at its weft end a fmalL 
tower, furmounted bv a neat fpire, and containing a clock and three bells. 

» Taut. Spiritual. 

Vol. I. k At 



74 BATH. 

At the fouthweft corner of Queen-fquare Hands a neat chapel, dedicated 
to the bleffed Virgin Mary. This fabrick had its foundation in 1734, by a 
fubfcription of divers gentlemen, in whofe reprefentatives the property thereof 
is now veiled. Its internal parts are of the Ionick order, the external Do- 
rick, and open towards the Square by a handfome portico. 

On the eafl fide of Milfom-ftreet is the OSlagon Chapel, a light neat build- 
ing, fmifhed in the year 1767. Here is a fine altar-piece,, reprefenting the 
Pool of Bethefda, in the lively colours of Mr. Hoare. This chapel is the 
fole property of the Rev. Dr. Gabriel, by whom it was purchased of the 
executors of the late William Street, efq. 

Margaret Chapel., fituated in Margaret-buildings, on the north fide of 
Brock-ftreet, was built in the year 1773. It is a neat Gothick ftruclure, 
feventy feet in length, and fixty in breadth; the altar ftands within a recefs, 
and has over it a painting of the Wife Men's Offering, by Mr. Williams. 
The minifter of this chapel is the Rev. Dr. Griffith. 

The chapel under Lanfdown-place is a Gothick edifice in a very neat 
tafty ftile, embellifhed with turrets and niches ; and at the weft end is a 
fmall tower fmifhed in the fame manner. 

A chapel is building by fubfcription at Lower Eaft-Hayes, in the parifh 
of Walcot; and another is intended on a tontine in Henrietta-ftreet. 

The diffenting chapels or meeting-houfes are, Lady Huntingdon?, in Harle- 
quin-Row ; Mr. ^/Z?/s, inNewKing-ftreetj Mr. Whitfield's, in St. James's- 
paffage; Baptifis, in Garrard-ftreet; Quakers, in Marchant's-court, High- 
ftreet; Independents, in Argyle-buildings; Moravians, in Monmouth-flreet ; 
Roman Catholicks, in Corn-ftreet; and Unitarian, in Frog-lane, Burton-ftreet. 

The city of Bath has produced feveral eminent perfons in their different 
callings. 1 The memorable John Hales, who was for his learning ftiled the 
walking library, was born in the parifh of St. James in the year 1584, and 
was educated in the city grammar-fchool. At the age of thirteen he was 
fent to Corpus-Chrifti college in Oxford, and in 1605, by the intereft of 
Sir Henry Savile, who became the patron of his rifing learning, he was 
elected fellow of Merton College in that univerfity. In 16 12, he was 
appointed Greek profeffor, and the following year was cholen to make the 
funeral oration of Sir Thomas Bodley, founder of the Bodleian Library. 

'' Gildas, furnamed Badonhus, was not, as it has been generally aflerted, a native of Bath, but of Wales, and 
had the cognomen which gave rife to the former opinion from his being born in the year wherein the great battle 
of Bajdon-Hill was fought between the Britons and the Saxons. 

The 



rB A T IT. 7S 

The fame year he was alfo admitted fellow of the college of Eaton. In 
i6j8 he accompanied Sir Dudley Carlton, King James the Firft's ambafla- 
dor to the Hague, in the capacity of chaplain, by which means he found 
admiflion to the famous Synod of Dort, to which deputies were convcr 1 
from all the reformed churches throughout Europe, to take into confut- 
ation and to adjuft the difceptations of the doctrines of Luther, Calvin, and 
Arminius. Of the proceedings of this fynod he gave Sir Dudley a parti- 
cular account in a feries of letters, which arc printed among his Golden 
Remains. In confequence of fome afliftance which he had rendered to Arch- 
bifhop Laud in his anfvver to Fifher the jefuit, he was in 1639 promoted 
to a canonry of Windfor, which he held with the efteem of all good and 
learned perfons till the commencement of the great civil war, when being 
bereaved of his poffeffions, fick of an uncharitable world, and forefeeing the 
fubfequent troubles of the times, he retired from his college at Eaton to a 
final! obfeure lodging, where he remained three months, unknown to any 
one, and fuftained only by a little bread and beer. And when at length he 
was difcovered in this retreat by the pious Anthony Faringdon, his parti- 
cular friend and fellow-fufFerer, he had only a few fhillings in his pocket, 
which he had faved out of the fale of his valuable library/ He died foon 
after, May 19, 1656, in the feventy-fecond year of his age, and was buried 
in Eaton-college church-yard, tranfmitting to future periods a ftrong rcpre- 
fentation of profound and polite learning, laden with the oppreilions of an 
ignominious age, and of generofity pinched with the hard neceflities of un- 
folicited penury. 

In this city alfo was born in 1 707, Benjamin Rubins, an eminent mathe- 
matician, and the real compiler of Lord Anfon's Voyage round the World, 
publifhed in 1748, from the papers of the Rev. Richard Walter, chaplain 
of the Centurion. He died in the fervice of the Eaft-India Company, 
July 29, 1751.' 

Perhaps no perfon ever made fo much noife in this city as that celebrated 
director of its ceremonies, Richard NaJJj, efq; otherwife called Beau Najh. 
He was born at Swanfea in Glamorganshire in the year 1674, and had his 
education at the grammar- fchool in Carmarthen. He was thence fent to 
Jefus College in Oxford, with a view of his ftudying the law, but poffefs- 
ing too great a fpirit of gaiety and difiipation, he made a rapid retreat from 
that feminary of learning, and entered into the army, which he deemed 
a more aufpicious line to difplay his gallantry to advantage. But being 

* Biog. Didt. vi. 405. ' Ibid. xi. 108. 

k 2 fooa 



76 BATH. 

foon alio difgufted with this mode of life, he gave up his commission, 
and became a student in the Middle-Temple, where, by the vivacity of 
his manners, the eafe of his addrefs, and the brilliancy of his converfa- 
tion, he procured a numerous train of the moft fafhionable acquaintance. 
The publick opinion of his elegance and tafte was fo great, that when King 
William came to the throne, he was appointed to fuperintend a pageant 
entertainment for that Monarch, who was fo well pleafed with the manner 
in which he acquitted himfelf of his office, that he offered him the honour 
of knighthood. His finances running low, and having experienced feveral 
considerable diminutions at the gaming-table, by which he was princi- 
pally fupported, he in 1704 paid a vifit to Bath, and no fooner arrived than 
he was chofen to fucceed Captain Webster as mafter of the ceremonies, in 
which he exercifed his abilities to univerfal fatisfaction, and by the adroit- 
nefs of his regulations he improved every publick amufement of the city. 
He likewife bore an active part in establishing the General Hofpital, and it 
was by his directions that the Old Aflembly-rooms, the Theatre, and feveral 
other publick places, were eftabliihed; fo that hemay befet down as one of 
the moft considerable benefactors to the city. In his perfon Naffi had a re- 
markable appearance; being large, clumfy, and of an awkward make, his 
features harfh, and irregularly difpofed ; his drefs alfo was singular, he wore 
a white hat, with a broad brim, furioufly cocked up; and his clothes were 
profufely covered with tawdry lace. He travelled in a chariot drawn by fix 
grey horfes, with a number of attendants on horfeback and foot, carrying 
French horns and other inftruments of mufick. In his manners he was 
lively, affable and polite, pofleffed a ready flow of wit, and never miffed an 
opportunity of difplaying it; but his greatest merit centered in the genero- 
sity and opennefs of his heart, which directed his hand to unbounded a£ts 
of charity; he frequently diltreffed himfelf to alleviate the miferies of others. 
He died at his houfe in St. John's-court, Feb. 3, 1761, and was interred 
in the Abbey-church, where a neat monument has lately been erected in 
the fouth aile of the nave, with the following infcription to his memory. 

**- Adefte, 6 cives, adefte lugentes ! 

Hie silent leges 

Ricardi Nash, armig. 

Nihil amplius imperantis 

Qui diu et utiliffime 

Aflumprus Bathoniae 

Elegantise arbiter, t 

Eheu 



B 



H. 



77 



Ehcu 

Morti (ultimo dcfignatori) 

hand indecori fuccubuit 

Ann. Dom. 1761. JFx. (ux 87. 

Beatus ille, qui fibi impcriofus! 

If focial virtues make remembrance dear 

Or manners pure on decent rule depend, 
To his remains confign one grateful tear, 

Of youth the guardian, and of all the friend. 
Now deeps dominion ; here no bounty flows ; 

Nor more avails the feftive fcene to grace ; 
Beneath that hand which no difcernment fliews, 

Untaught to honour, or diftinguifh place." H. H. 

I fhall now produce another character, with which it is requifite that the 
reader of this Provincial Effay fhould be properly acquainted. 

Mr. Edtnund Rack" was born at Attleborough in the county of Norfolk. 
He was educated in the religion of his parents, Edmund and Elizabeth 
Rack, who were both Quakers. We are informed that his father, a labour- 
ing weaver, was a man of an excellent character; and that his mother was 
well-known for her preaching, and highly efteemed among her own feet. 
Thus humble in his parentage, he had little opportunities of inftruction 
at that early feafon when the mind is bell: difpofed for receiving it. The 
knowledge of arithmetick was Mr. Rack's higheft attainment, when he was 
removed to Wymondham, as an apprentice to a general (hopkeeperj and 
though poflefiing talents that difdained the drudgery of his occupation, he 
was never heard to repine at the neceffary labours attending it. An employ- 
ment of this nature muft exact that mechanical regularity, which (though 
common abilities may fubmit to it without reluctance) is, of all things, 
mod infupportable to genius. 

At the clofe of his apprenticefhip he went into EfTex; and at Bardfield 
became a fhopman to Mifs Agnes Smith, whom he married not long after 
his refidence in that place. The fervilities of his ftation were now in ibme 
meafure done away. Nor were his talents unobferved; for though his em- 
ployment was in fome meafure an obftacle to focial communication, he had 
the good fortune to introduce himfelf to the friendihip of a feleft few, who 

m For this articlelam indebted to the Rev. Mr. Polwhele, of Kenton near Exeter, the ingenioui t-an- 
flator of the Idyllia of Theocritus, and author of the Englijb Orator, Pi3uresfrom Xalurf, Dijiourfet, Sec. From 
the fame ingenious pen the publick are alfo in expedition of the Hiftory of Dtvinjbirt. 

contributed 



78 BATH. 

contributed to cheer the gloom of his obfcurity. Nothing more powerfully 
affifts the expanfion of the mental faculties than liberal converfation. To 
this Mr. Rack added the perufal of thofe Engliih authors that form the 
tafte, but add little to the flores of fcience. Of the learned languages he 
was ignorant; and though he frequently regretted his inferiority to thofe 
who were proficients in claflical literature, he had never the refolution to 
approach the great originals of antiquity. That he had not leifure for the 
talk, will not eafily be admitted, when we confider how much time he de- 
voted to the compofition of eifays, letters, and poems. In fuch exercifes he 
often amufed himfelf; and, amidft all the inconveniences of his fituation, 
commenced author before he arrived at the age of thirty. His writings, 
indeed, at firft, but rarely affected a more dignified place than the corner of a 
newfpaper or a magazine; yet his performances were by no means contemp- 
tible; efpecially thofe which appeared in the Monthly Ledger and Monthly 
Mifcellany, under the title of Eufebius. Thefe publications were followed by 
a few controverfial tracts ; which foon, however, funk into oblivion. 

But the period was now approaching, when he was to enlarge his views, 
and ftep forward as a more refpe6lable member of fociety. 

It was about his fortieth year (1775) that he fettled at Bath, where, as a 
man of letters, he found himfelf not unpleafantly fituated. He had juft col- 
lected into one view his befl poetical pieces, that had made their appearance 
on different occafions in periodical pamphlets. Thefe, with feveral addi- 
tional poems, he printed in one fmall volume about the time of his arrival 
at Bath. 

His next publication was Cafpipinds Letters, in two fmall pocket volumes, 
dated Bath, February 28, 1777- Thefe letters were written by the Rev. 
Jacob Duche, a gentleman who refided fome time in Philadelphia; but 
Caspipina is a mere cypher, as follows: « TAMOC CASPIPINA: The 
y^lTiftant Minifter of Chrift's-Church #nd St. Peter's m Philadelphia m 
Aorth-^merica." 

Mr. Rack had not long refided in Bath, before "he was introduced to fome 
refpectable perfonages among the literati. Mrs. Macaulay, who at that time 
lived at Alfred-houfe with the Rev. Dr. Wilfon, paid him very particular 
attention ; and was known to regard him both as a man of integrity and 
abilities. About the fame time alfo he became acquainted with Lady Miller » 

In the latter end of 1777, he publifhed a fmall tract entitled " Mentors 
Letters," the fubftance of which he had written about four years before, for 

a few 



BATH. 79 

«r; of his younger acquaintances. The advice of .Mentor u feriousand 
fententious. It is admirably calculated for youth; as it gives an expreflive 
outline of the great duties they ought to ohfervc, and points out the vices 
and temptations to which they are peculiarly expofed. He was known alfo 
in 1 777> as one of the writers for the Farmer's Magazine; the three laft 
Volumes of which are rendered valuable by his communications in agricul- 
ture. But this prolifkk year, in which he had {o fully difplayed the fertility 
of his genius, was concluded by a fignal inftance of his publick fpirit. 
Through the vehicles of the Farmer's Magazine and the Bath Chronicle, he 
communicated to the publick a fcheme for the inftitution of an Agricultural 
Society, and fo generally approved was his plan, that the Society for the 
four counties of Somerfet, Wilts, Gloucefter, and Dorfet, was inftitutcd in 
the beginning of the year 1778, with the promifing views of a permanent 
eftablifhment. He had the fatisfaction to fee it fupported by the continual 
acceflion of new fubferibers ; whilft he received, as fecretary to the fociety, 
the mod flattering teftimonies of approbation. He had the pleafure alfo 
to feel himfelf more comfortably fituated in regard to pecuniary cir- 
cumftances, fince he was rewarded in fome meafure by a considerable falary. 
In the mean time, he advanced his literary fame, by his well-written 
papers in the Bath Society Books; a publication which is ftill remark- 
able for its ingenuity and fpirit. It was this inftitution that conferred 
a greater celebrity on the name of Mr. Rack, than all his exertions in the 
line of polite literature. In the latter he endeavoured to be ufeful; in the 
former he was decifively fo. The bare precepts of morality have no very 
confpicuous influence on the manners of mankind; but fuch an active infti- 
tution as we are at prefent contemplating, may produce beneficial confe- 
quences far beyond the point of utility to which it obvioufly afpires. It may 
roufe the rural inhabitant from the fomnolency of his repofe, and urge him to 
employ his time and talents to advantage on a fubjecT: which correfponds with 
the notions he had imbibed from education, and which is congenial with his 
feelings and his interefts. It may be more ferviceable to the caufe of moral 
happinefs, by precluding licentioufnefs or diflipation, whilft it calls forth 
ferious thought, and fills up the languid intervals of time, than the whole 
congeries of unanimated inftruclion that may iflue from the pulpit or the 
prefs. In the fupport of this excellent eftablifhment, the remaining part of 
Mr. Rack's life was ftrenuoufiy employed, nor were his labours fruitlefs; for 
to this moment it flourifhes: and may it flourifti, the unpcriihing memorial 
of his judgment, his benevolence, and his induftry! 

He 



I 



1 



8o BAT H. 

He now often lamented, that he had lefs time than ufual for cultivating a 
correfpondence with his friends ; and to fupply the want of a communica- 
tion to which he had been long accuftomed, he would frequently retire to 
his clofct, and recall to memory the fentiments of his youth. « It is but a 
" moment (he would often complain) which I can now and then refcue 
« from unfeeling bufinefs, for this heart-edifying amufement!" In one of 
thofe folitary moments, looking over fome old letters, where the traces of 
youthful fenfibility were frefh and vivid, he recollected the whole train of 
correfpondence, with the regretful thought that it was now probably inter- 
rupted to be refumed no more. It was on this occafion that he was ftruck 
forcibly with the idea of publifhing thebeft letters in his colleftion; and he 
accordingly felefted from a mafs of two hundred letters about fixty, which 
the publick would probably have received with complacency ; but through 
the avocation of bufinefs the fcheme was laid afide. 

About this time he was troubled with a violent cough, which was fuf- 
peflred to be confumptive. In a letter dated May 2, 1778, he thus writes of 
himfelf : c I feem to be verging downwards to that valley which terminates 
1 in the ftiadow of death. Perhaps I may defcend it with unexpeded celerity; 

• but I am not folicitous about an event which mull be left to the great 

< Difpofer of all Things, who will certainly do what is right; yet I fome- 
■ times think that this hand, which now guides the pen of friendfliip, will 

♦ foon forget its cunning, and become the food of reptiles in the grave.' 
On the 26th of the fame month, he writes again : ' I am, through mercy, 
c much better than when I wrote laft: indeed as well as I can expect to be; 
' my conftitution is but feeble, and will never, I apprehend, fully recover the 
c ihock it received from a fever four years ago. I cannot bear to pay that 

< attention to ftudy which I have formerly done, without feeling the effects 
« of it for feveral days.' 

At the end of the year he was afflicted with the yellow jaundice to fuch a 
degree, that he thought the fiher cord would foon be broken. But the profpect 
of dsath (he faid) was folemn, though not dreadful. From this diforder he 
was relieved for a thort interval; his cafe, however, was judged defperate by 
the medical people who attended him. In January 1779, he had a relapfe, 
that awhile interrupted his labours for the publick good. But in this year 
we find him attempting to eitablilh at Bath a Phihfcphical Society-, of which 
^ he was alfo nominated the Secretary. It was a fcheme not calculated, like 

the other, for people in general. And the Philofophical Society, if it could 
ever be faid to exiil, has certainly languilhed from its firft production to the 

prefeht 



BATH. 81 

prefcnt moment. Though Mr. Rack never perfectly enjoyed the Wettings 

of health from the period of that fatal fever to which he attributed the feeble- 
nefs of his conftitution, yet his fpirits were generally ftrong and flowing. It 
is true, he had his feafons of dejection ; but, even amidft the fevereft illnefs, 
he pofleiTed that Chriftian resignation which is the only remedy for the 
afflictions of life. Neverthelefs, his ftudious application was greatly relaxed 
by fitch a feries of indifpofition. 

In 1780, he teems to have experienced a tranfitory renovation both of his 
mental and corporeal faculties. The frequent journies he was obliged to 
take on the bufinefs of the fociety, and occafions of a private nature, might 
have produced thefe flattering appearances of health ; though his difeafe ftill 
lurked within, too obftinate to be fubdued. 

But, whilft his thoughts on leaving this world feemed to be momentarily 
fufpended, he was doomed to fufFer a lofs in his external circumftances, fuffl- 
cient to detach his affections from earthly things; he pofleffed but little, and 
that little he was deftined to lofe. His falary, as fecretary to the focieties, 
was now his chief fupport. This was a fevere ftroke; which he fuftained, 
however, with the fortitude of a Chriftian, who knows to chaflife his feel- 
ings, rather than with the apathy of a philofopher who prefumptuoufly 
affects to extirpate them. 

He was in a fhort time fufficiently collected to refume the interrupted 
labours of his mufe; and, as his mind (he faid) had run fallow in refpect to 
morality, he was determined to reexert its latent energies, though not even 
to the momentary remiflion of thofe agricultural tranfactions that required 
his attention as fecretary to the fociety. 

At the commencement of the year 1781, he publifhed an octavo volume 
of letters, effays, and poems, by fubfeription ; — a mode of publication, to 
which his extenfive connexions were peculiarly favourable. Several of the 
efTays had before appeared in Magazines; but the greater part of them 
are original. 

The laft of Mr. Rack's literary engagements was, a joint fhare in the 
History of the County of Somerset, in which his particular depart- 
ment was the topographical parochial furvey. This, notwith (landing his ill 
ftate of health, he indefatigably purfued during the fucceflive years of 1782, 
1783, 1784, 1785, and 1786, and, except a few towns and parifhes, lived to 
finifh : but only a fmall part of the firft volume was printed before his death. 

The fale of his works was pretty confiderable; particularly that of his 

Mentor's Letters, which, as their ferioufnefs was unenlivened by any intervening 

Vol. I. / epifodes 




i 



8 2 BATH. 

epifodes or digreflions, the author! did not expect to fee very extenfively 
circulated. He was, however, agreeably furprized by their rapid fale, having 
difpofed of no lefs than three thoufand copies from the period of their firft 
impreflion to the year 1785; when, in February, he publifhed a fourth 
edition, to which an introduction was prefixed, that has been much admired 
for the elegance of its language. This fourth edition is corrected and en- 
larged. One great caufe of Mentor's popularity is the liberal caft of reli- 
gious fentiment that pervades it; and on every occalion, Mr. Rack fhewed 
himfelf fuperior to the narrow-minded bigotry of the fectarift. 

But his diforders were now returning with an afpect more than ufually 
formidable. In the fummer of 1785 he was attacked by an afthma, from 
which he fomewhat recovered about Auguft, in confequence of a journey into 
his native county. In October, however, it again grew fo bad, that he found 
it painful to purfue his favourite ftudies. He could not, without the greateft 
difficulty of refpiration, walk acrofs a room; fo that he rather exifted than 
lived: and " for this (he obferved) there was no cure." But as a true 
Chriftian, awaiting the ftroke of death without a murmur, he dragged on the 
chain of his wearifome exiftence a confiderable time longer; and died at 
Bath, February 22, 1787, in the 52d year of his age, fincerely regretted by 
his friends, who were as refpectable as they were numerous. 



From the city of Bath the title of Earl has been derived to feveral per- 
fonages of high dif Unction. The firfl dignified therewith was, 

Philibert de Shaunde, a native of the province of Bretagne in France, who 
having difplayed great martial valour at the battle of Bofworth-field, in 
which Henry earl of Richmond acquired at once a victory and a crown, was 
in confideration thereof, by letters patent bearing date Jan. 6, i486, created 
Earl of Bath, with a fee of one hundred marks per annum, payable out of 
the iflues and profits of the counties of Somerfet and Dorfet, for the better 
fupport of the faid dignity." The next that enjoyed this title was, 

John Bourchier, grandfon of William lord Fitzwarren, who was advanced 
to this honour in 1536 by King Henry VIII. and was fucceeded therein by 
his fon 

John, in 1539; and he by his fon 

William, in 1561. 

Edward Bourchier, earl of Bath, fon of this William, leaving at his death 
only three daughters his coheirefTes, 

» Dugd. Bar. ii. 288. Henry 



•» 



BATH. 83 

Henry Bourchier, his uncle, fucceeded to the title in 1638, but died 
unmarried. 

Sir John Granville, (fon of Sir Bevil Granville, who fell fighting in the 
Royal caufe at the battle of Lanfdown in 1643) was in 1661 created Earl 
of Bath, Baron Granville, and Vifcount Lanfdown, by King Charles the 
Second. He died in 1701, and was fucceeded by his fon 

Charles, who ferved as a volunteer in the army which routed the Turks 
before Vienna in the year 1683, and was the fame year at the taking of Gran. 
By the Emperor Leopold he was made a Count of the Empire, and in 1696 
he was fummoned to the Houfe of Peers by his father's title of Baron 
Granville of Kilkhampton in the county of Cornwall. He lived a few days 
only after his fucceeding to the title of Earl of Bath in 1701, being acci- 
dentally fhot in examining one of his own piftols. After his death his fon 

Hemy William Granville fucceeded as Earl of Bath; but dying in 171 1, 
unmarried, the title became extinct 

William Pulteney, grandfon of Sir William Pulteney, was created Earl 
of Bath in 1742. His only fon, John Lord Pulteney, died in 1763 in the 
life-time of his father, who alfo dying in 1764, the title again expired. 

Thomas Thynne, vifcount Weymouth, was created Marquis of Bath on 
the 18th of Auguft 1789, in whom that title ftill continues. 



Lift of the Writers and Books on the SubjeB of the Bath Waters. 

Alexander Necham. See p. 6, note h . 

Thomas Chaundelir, chancellor of Wells, De Laudibus Baiorum, MS. 

Andreas Baccius, (an Italian) DeThermis notabiitfws. Romas 1595. 

William Turner, M. D. and Dean of Wells. DJ Anglic, Germanise & Italia Balneis. 
Edit, prima, Bafiliae 1557. Second edition in Englifh, printed at Cologne. 

John Jones, Bathes of Bathe's Ayde. London, 1572. 

J ohn Turner. 'Treatife of Englijh Bathes. 

To. Venner, M. D. of Bath. Bathes of Bathe. London, 1637. 

Edward Jorden, M. D. Nature and Ufes of our Bathes at Bathe. London, 1631, 
1632. Reprinted with an Appendix by Guidott, 1668. 

Thomas Johnfon, M. D. editor of Gerard's Herbal. Mercurius Botannicus &? de 
Tbermis Botanicis. London, 1634. 

Dr. John Maplet, principal of Gloucefter-hall. Epjlola ad Joannem Wedderbourr.e 
M. D. & equitem auratum. 1669. 

Carolus Claromontius Lotharingus. De Aere, Aquis &f Locis Terra AnglU. 167 r. 

Henry 



» 



4* 






► 






84 BATH. 

Henry Chapman. Therm* Rediviva. London, 1673. 

Robert Pugh, confefibr to Henrietta Maria, Queen Mother of England. Bathoni-- 
tnjiwn & Aquisgranenfium Thermarum Comparatio. London 1676. 

Thomas Guidott, M. D. Eugenii Philandri opufculum. London, 1673. 

. De Balneis Bathonienfibus. 1676. 

. De Thermis Britanicis. London, 1 6 9 1 . 

, Regifter of Bath. 1694., 

An Apology for the Bath. London, 1 708. 

Robert Pierce, M.D. of Bath. Bath Memoirs. Briftol, 1697. London 1 651, 1.7 ij;. 

"William Oliver, fen. M. D. Praclical Dijfertation on Bath Waters. London, r.6.94,, 
1716, 1719, 1747* 

William Oliver, jun. On Bathing in Gouty Cafes. 

George Cheyne, M. D. Obfervations on the Method of treating the Gout. London,, 
1720, 1725. 

John Wynter, M. D. Cyclus Metafyncritus. London, 1725, 

■ Of Bathing in the Hot Baths at Bathe. London, 1728*. 

John Quinton, M.D. Treatife of warm Bath Water. Oxford, 1733. 

— — Kinneir, M. D. New EJfay on the Nerves. London,, 1737. 

Sumner, M. D. 

John Wood, architect. Effay towards a Description of the City of Bath. 1742,, 

i749» I 7 6 5- 

George Randolph, M. IX Enquiry into the Medicinal Virtues, of Bath Waters^. 
Oxford, 1752. 

Thomas Smollet, M. D. EJfay on the external XJfe of Water. London, 1752; 1767,-. 

Rice Charleton, M.D. of Bath. Treatife on the Bath Waters, Bath, 1754. 

Charles Lucas, M.D. Effay on Waters. 1756. 

William Baylies, M.D. Praclical Refieclions on the Ufes and Abufes of Bath Waters.. 
London 1757. 

J. N. Stevens, M. D. of Bath. Treatije on the Mineral Qualities of Bath Waters.. 
London, 1758. 

Alexander Sutherland, M. D. of Bath and the Briftol Hotwells.. Attempts to revive, 
ancient Medical Dotlrines. London, 1763,1764. 

Charles Lucas, M.D. Curfory Remarks on the Method of inveftigating the Principles 
and Properties of Bath and Briftol Waters. London, 1764. 

Diederick Weflel Linden, M.D. Seafonable and Modeft Reply to Dr. Lucas.. 
London, 1765. 

Wm. Falconer, M. D. of Bath. Effay on the Bath Waters. London, 1770,-2,-4. 

1 EJfay on the Water commonly ufed in Diet at Bath. 1776.. 

■' Praclical Differtation on the Medicinal Effetls of the Bath 

Waters. Bath, 1790. 

Narrative of the Efficacy of the Bath Waters in variouskinds of Par aly tick Diforders 
admitted into the Bath Hofpital from the end of 1775 to the end ^1785. Bath, 1787. 



THE 



THE HISTORY OF 

SOMERSETSHIRE. 

THE HUNDRED OF 

A B D I C K and BULSTON. 



THIS Hundred lies at the fouthweft extremity of the county, and extends 
from Langport on the northeaft, to Pickeridge and Staple hills on the 
fouthweft; and in the parifh of Buckland St. Mary, one point of it touches 
the borders of Devonfhire. 

The furface and foil are various: on the northweft fide from Curry-Rivel to 
Bickenhall is a fine broken ridge of hill, the fteep flopes of which front the northweft, 
and are finely indented and ftriped with beautiful hanging woods. Thefe declivities 
bear evident marks of having formerly been a bold rocky coaft; Weft Sedgmoor, 
which extends in a fine level below, having indifputably been once covered by the 
fca, which feems to have reached weftward to the parifhes of Creech St. Michael 
and Ruifhton. 

The central part of the hundred is moftly flat and woody; but the eaft and fouth- 
eaft exhibit a pleafing variety of well cultivated hills, and fruitful vallies, watered by 
many fmall ftreams. ■ 

The principal river is the He, which in its courfe gives name to the following 
places, viz. Hillcombe, or Ilcombe, Ilminftcr, Ilford, Ikon, Ifle-Brewers, Ifle-Abbots, 
and Ilemoor. It has two fources, one near Combe St. Nicholas, the other under 
Pickeridge hill, in the parifh of Staplc-Fitzpainc. Thefe branches unite in Ilemoor, 
about two miles eaftward from Ifle-Brewers, and join the Parret about three miles 
fouth from Langport. 

The lands are in general inclofed, fertile, and pretty well cultivated, being nearly 
half arable, the reft dairy and grazing. The fouth and eaft parts abound with ftone of 
various kinds, in which are found great quantities of foflil lhells. 

The hundred (or hundreds) of Abdick and Bulfton (for they have generally been 
diftinct with regard to jurifdiction, but chiefly as to property united) was parcel 
of the ancient pofleflions of the crown; and in the reign of Edward II. was granted 
to Henry de Ortrai. 1 In 1396, 20 Richard II. it was held by William de Montacutc 
earl of Salilbury." 1 1 Henry IV. John de Beaufort marquis of Dorfct died feized 

• Cart. 3 Edw. II. m. 12. b Efc. 20 Ric. II. 

Vol. I. B thereof, 



•. 



2 ILMINSTER. [a&tlicft 

thereof, as did alfo Henry de Beaufort, 3 Henry VI. C It feems afterwards to have 
been vefted in the bifhops of Bath and Wells ; for 6 Henry VII. we find licence 
granted to Richard, bifhop of this fee, to alienate his right therein to the bifhop of 
London, and Richard Skipton clerk. d After this, it came to the family of the Spekes, 
and from them devolved to the prefent poflefTor Lord North. The Hundred court 
is held at Ilford-bridges inn in the parifh of Stocklinch Magdalen. 

This hundred contains one market-town, and twenty-five parifhes, in which are 
one thoufand three hundred and feventy houfes, and about feven thoufand and ninety 
inhabitants. 

« Efc. 3 Hen. VI. d MS. Donat. in Muf. Brit. 



ILMINSTER. 

THE name of this ancient town is Saxon, fignifying the church upon the river 
He, and was afligned to it by way of eminence, and diftinction from the other 
lies in this hundred. 

The town of Ilminfter (lands on the turnpike road leading from Somertonto Chard, 
and from Taunton to Crewkerne; and is diftant twelve miles foutheaft from Taunton, 
five north from Chard, and ten fouth from Langport. The fituation is low, but very 
pleafant. It confifts principally of two irregular ftreets, one of which (viz. that from 
eaft to weft) is near a mile in length, the other about half a mile, and both together 
contain about three hundred houfes, many of which are decent buildings of ftone or 
brick; but the greater part are conftructed with low ftone walls, covered with thatch. 
It was formerly much larger than at prefent, having frequently fufFered by fire, parti- 
cularly in the year 1491, when it was nearly reduced to afhes. 

The town was privileged before the Norman conqueft with a market, which it 
ftill retains: the day whereon it is kept is Saturday, and there is a market-houfe 
fupported by ftone pillars, and likewife a range of fhambles one hundred feet in length. 
The cloth manufacture formerly flourifhed here to a very great degree, and at this 
day moft of the poor are employed in manufacturing narrow cloths, of which about 
a thoufand pieces are annually made. 

Hiftory has been very filent concerning this place during the many centuries in 
which it was poflefTed by the abbots of Muchelney ; a cafe indeed common enough 
with places that belonged to monaftick focieties. The abbots had a grange here in 
a fpot near the church, now called Court Barton, on the eaft fide of which there is a 
houfe ftill (landing, called Court Hall, wherein the leet has ufually been held ; but 
the houfe is converted into a meeting-houfe for the Quakers. In the barton above- 
mentioned there arifes a remarkably fine fpring, ifiuing from a fandy foil, containing 
beds of (andftone. A conduit houfe is built over it, from which a dream of excellent 
water is conveyed by means of leaden pipes to a place called the Stock, for the publick 

ufe 



ano OBuIOon.] ILMINSTER. 3 

ufc of the inhabitants. There are likewife within this parifli two mineral fprings, one 
at Dillington, the other in the road to Horton, the waters of both which were in the 
days of credulity much ufed for various diforders. 

The foil of this parifh is partly a fandy loam, and partly a gravelly clay. The lands 
are nearly half arable, and naturally fruitful, but (till capable of great improve- 
ment. There are many quarries of a hard, dark, yellowiih ftone, abounding with 
foflils of the cornu ammonis, nautili, pecten, anomia, carduum, and venus kinds, 
with a great number of belemnitcs. 

In a common field northweft of the town, called Beacon field, from a beacon having 
formerly been creeled there, a very beautiful and cxtenfive profped opens to the view, 
extending northward over a rich Hat country to Mendip hills, eaftward into part of 
Dorfctfliire, and fouthward to Bere and Seaton on the feacoaft and part of Devon- 
ftiirc. The furrounding country is fo very populous, that from one fpot on this emi- 
nence the eye commands thirty parilh churches within the diftance of eight miles. 

The river He runs through this parifli about a mile weftvvard from the town, where 
it crofles the turnpike road to Taunton under a ftone bridge of four fmall arches, called 
Hort bridge, built and fupported by the truftees of the free grammar-fchool here. 
There is alfo another ftone bridge of two arches over it in the road to Chard, which is 
fupported by the parifli; and a third of two arches one mile north, called Cox bridge, 
repaired likewife at the expence of the faid fchool. 

Thefchool above alluded to was founded in the year 1550 by Humphry Walrond 
and Henry Greenfield of Sea in this parifli, and by them endowed with certain 
tenements and three curtelages in Ilminfter, called the Cbantry-houfes, (being lands 
formerly appropriated to the fupport of fundry chantries in the parifli church here) and 
alfo a tenement called Mody's in the tithing of Winterhay, and another called Rippe's 
tenement in the tithing of Horton, both within this parifli. Thefe lands and tene- 
ments being taken to the crown, King Edward Vlth, in confideration of divers fums 
of money, did, by his letters patent bearing date April 2, 1550, grant and aflign to 
Giles Kelway of Strowde in the county of Dorfet, efq; and William Leonard of Taunton, 
merchant. On the 16th of May 1550, the faid Giles Kelway and William Leonard 
conveyed their right in all thefe lands to Humphry Walrond and Henry Greenfield of 
Sea aforefaid, for the fum of 1 26I. They, " tendering the virtuous education of youth 
" in literature and godly learning, whereby the fame youth fo brought up might the 
" better know their duty as well to God as the King's Majefty, and for divers other 
" honeft and godly considerations," afligned over all the faid premifes in the fame 
month of May, and in the fame year, to John Balch, John Sydenham, and others, 
(in all to the number of feventeen) for the purpofe of chooling a proper fchoolmafter 
to inftrucl: and bring up, as well in all godly learning and know ledge, as in other 
manner of learning, all fuch children and youth as fliould be brought to him, ap- 
pointing the faid fchoolmafter a houfe called the Crofs-houfe, for his habitation 
during his mafterftiip; and alfo for the choofing a bailiff of the premifes, whofe 
bufinefs was to be the collecting the iflues and profits of the lands, and the difpofing 

B2 of 



4 ' ILMINSTER. [a&Wcft 

of them to the payment of the fchoolmafter's ftipend, and other neceflary expences; 
the refidue to be applied to the difcharge of king's filvers, and to the mending and 
repairing the highways, bridges, watercourfes, and conduits of water, wherewith the 
inhabitants of the faid parifh of Ilminfter were then charged, or might be charge- 
able, as far as the money fhould extend. 

The revenues are fince greatly incrcafed. In 1606 the truftees purchafed the free 
chapel of Evelton, with a parcel of land belonging to it, for 280I. 

In 1 609 they purchafed, of Henry Walrond of Sea, the fee-fimple of the manor of 
Swanwich in the ifle of Purbeck in Dorfetfhire, for 6661. 13s. ^.d. 

In 1632 they purchafed an eftate at Purtington in the parifh of Winfham in this 
county, which coft them 339I. 17s. 4d. 

And at fundry times fince they have purchafed other eftates within the parifhes 
of Cricket-Malherbe, Donyat, Afhill, Ifle-Abbots, Cudworth, &c. 

Such being the acquifitions of this charitable foundation, properly difpofed and 
managed, the mafter's falary has been increafed from 20I. to 40I. per annum ; befides 
which, the truftees are enabled to allow a ftipend of 20I. and a houfe to a writing- 
mafter, and five guineas to a reading miftrefs. The bailiff's falary, which a century 
ago was about three millings only, is now advanced to twice as many pounds. 

The parifh of Ilminfter comprehends the eight following hamlets, viz. 

1 . Sea, fituated one mile fouth from the town, containing nine houfes. This was 
anciently a manor, and belonged to the family of Walrond, who originally came from 
Bradfield in Devonfhire. Humphry Walrond, one of the founders of the grammar- 
fchool above-mentioned, feems chiefly to have refided here. 

2. Crockftreet, three miles fouth weft, containing five houfes. 

3. Peafemarfh, two miles fouth, eight houfes. 

4. Horton, one mile and a half weft, ten houfes. 

5. Higher Horton, two miles weft, eighteen houfes. 

6. Winterhay, half a mile northweft, fourteen houfes. 

7. Afhwell, one mile north, eight houfes. 

8. Dillington, one mile northeaft, which has twelve houfes, one whereof is a 
ieat of Lord North. 

The above houfes, added to thofe in the town, amount to near three hundred and 
eighty. The whole number of inhabitants is about one thoufand fix hundred and 
feventy, of whom about fifty are freeholders. 

The parifh is divided into five tithings, viz. Church tithing, Town tithing, 
Winterhay tithing, Horton tithing, and Hillcombe tithing, formerly manors, but 
now difmembered; as is likewife Dumpole, another ancient manor, formerly the 
poffeflion of Edward duke of Somerfet. 

The 



anUTMflon.J I L M I N S T E R. s 

The manor of Ilminfter, \\ ith the whole place, was given by Ina, king of the Weft 
Saxons, to the abbey of Muchelney in this county, founded by King Athclflan in the 
year 939; and in Domefday-book, compiled about 1086 by order of William the 
Conqueror, we find it furveyed as parcel of the pofTcffions of that monaftery. 8 

" The Church itfelf (faith that record) holds Ileminftre. Liward the abbot held 
" it in the time of King Edward (the Confeflbr,) and paid geld for twenty hides/ 
" The arable is twenty carucates.* Thereof in demefne arc nine hides, and one 
" virgate b and a half: and there arc three carucates and ten fcrvants,' and twenty-five 
" villanes, fc and twenty-two bordars 1 with twenty ploughs. There are three mills of 
" twenty-two (hillings and fix-pence rent, and eighty acres of meadow. A wood 
" three miles long and one mile and a half broad. There is a market which pays 
" twenty (hillings rent." 1 

" Of this land two thanes" held one hide and a half, which could not be feparated" 
" from the church. The whole is worth twenty pounds. At the time of the abbot's 
" death it was worth twenty-fix pounds. " p 

In 1293 the temporalities of the faid abbey in Ilminfter were valued at 81. ios.* 

After 

e The method of this ancient and very curious furvey, at leaft that obferved in this county, is, 

1 ft. To Specify the landlords and tenants of each place at the time that the furvey was made. 

2dly. Thofe who held the fame in the time of King Edward the Confeflbr, and the rate they paid for 
Danegeld, a tax of twelve-pence upon every hide, originally levied for the purpofe of raifing 
forces, &c. againfl the incurfions of the Danes. 

3dly. T ne quantity of arable land computed by carucates. 

4thly. The quantity held in demefne, that is, kept in the lord's hands, and referved for his own ufe. 

5thly. The number of fervants, tenants, and hufbandmen, with the quantity and quality of the lands 
they held, as well as the number of ploughs ufed upon the eftate, the dimenfions of woods, 
rents of mills, &c. 

6thly. The value of the lands in Edward the Confeflbr's time, and the value of the fame at the time 
of drawing up the furvey. 

f Hide : a Saxon meafure, confifting of from one hundred to one hundred and twenty acres. 

s Carucate . a term ufed by the Normans to exprefs fo much arable land as would well employ one plough 
a year in tilling it. For this reafon it is ufually called in Englifli a plough land. 

h Virgate, or Yard-land, is ufually eftimated to be the fourth part of a hide, perhaps about thirty acres. 
It is evident, however, that thefe meafurcs are by no means determinate; but on the contrary, that they differ 
much in different parts, according to the nature of the foil, the various modes of hufbandry, and many other 
circumflances. The reader of this furvey will obfervc, that the arable land is meafured by hides and caru- 
cates, the meadow and pallure by acres only. 

1 Servants. Thefe were nearly the fame with our's : the}- did their lord's work, and were maintained by him. 

k Villanes, or Bondmen, held by bafe tenure : their peifons and property were fubjeft to the will of their lord. 

1 Bordars. Thefe were cottagers, who held a dwelling-houfe and fmall parcel of iand by the fcrvtcc of 
r.iiiing provifion for their lord's table upon his demefne grounds. 

1,1 The Norman fhilling was equal in weight to three of our's, fo that their pound was worth three pounds 
of the prefent money. " Thanes : Saxon nobles. 

Alienated. ? Lib. Domefday. * Taxat. temporal. MS. in Bibl. Cotton. 



6 ILMINSTER. [ZMtk 

After the fupprefiion of religious houfes, this manor coming to the crown, King 
Henry VIII. by his letters patent under the great feal, bearing date 30 Jan. 1538, 
granted the fame, together with the rectory and the advowfon of the vicarage, to Edward 
earl of Hertford, afterwards created Duke of Somerfet by King Edward VI. to whom 
he was uncle and protector. By the attainder of the faid duke in 1 55 1, the manor re- 
verted to the crown, but was afterwards reftored by Queen Elizabeth to his fon Edward 
Seymour, whom that Queen reinftated in all his father's honours and poffeflions. 

The faid Edward Seymour earl of Hertford had two fons, viz. Edward Seymour 
lord Beauchamp his eldeft fon, and Thomas Seymour his fecond fon, who both died 
in their father's lifetime; the former leaving three fons: Edward Seymour, efq; after- 
wards Sir Edward Seymour; William Seymour, afterwards Earl but then Marquis of 
Hertford, and afterwards Duke of Somerfet; and Francis Seymour, efq; afterwards 
Sir Francis Seymour, knight. 

Edward Seymour the firft fon of Lord Beauchamp died without iffue, and William 
his next brother, upon the death of his grandfather Edward earl of Hertford, inherited 
the faid Earl's pofTeflions, and fettled the fame upon the marriage of his eldeft fon 
Henry lord Beauchamp with Lady Mary Capel, afterwards Duchefs of Beaufort. 
This Henry lord Beauchamp died in the lifetime of his father, leaving William his 
only fon, who died without iffue. Upon which the manor came to his uncle John 
lord Seymour duke of Somerfet, who alfo died without iffue, leaving the premifes 
incumbered with various debts and annuities. 

To difcharge thefethe manor was afterwards decreed to be fold; and in July 1684, 
the fame was fold to Sir Thomas Travel, and Edward Ryder, and to John Gore; 
the latter being named a truftee for the faid Thomas Travel as to two third parts 
thereof, and for the faid Edward Ryder as to the other third. 

In 1 700 Sir Thomas Travel, after difpofing of fome fmall parcels, fold and conveyed 
his fhare to John Speke, efq; and his heirs ; and 

In 1724 Edward Ryder, after difpofing of other fmall parcels, fold his fhare to 
George Speke, efq; the only furviving fon of the faid John Speke, and his heirs; 
who, thereupon becoming feized of the whole manor, devifed the fame by will to 
Anne his only furviving daughter. 

In 1756 the faid Anne Speke was wedded to Frederick lord North, who thus 
became poffeffed of this manor, and is the prefent lord thereof. His lordfhip's arms 
are, azure, a lion paffant, or, between three fleurs de lis, argent. 

About half a milenorthweft from the town, is a common called Winterhay green, 
containing ninety acres of good land, being parcel of the wafte belonging to the 
manor; on which the occupiers of all thofe lands, which were formerly portions of 
the manor under Travel and Ryder, have an unlimited right to departure any number 
of cattle at all times of the year. 

We now come to the Church of Ilminfter, the parfonage of which being granted 
in 1 201, by Richard, abbot of Muchelney, and his convent, to Savaricus bifhop of 

Bath 



anu TBulflon.] 



ILMINSTER. 



Hath and Glaftonbury, was by him conftituted a prebend in the cathedral church of 
Wells, and annexed to the abbots of Muchclncy, who continued prebendaries thereof 
till the diflblution. 

In the taxation of ecclefiaftical benefices made by order of Pope Nicholas VI. A. D. 
1592, the faid prebend is rated at thirty-three marks ten (hillings/ 

The living is a peculiar: the vicarage in 1534, 26 Henry VIII. was valued in the 
King's books at twenty-five pounds five {hillings. The advowfon has ever fince the 
diflblution been appendant to the manor, and confequently now belongs to Lord North. 
The Reverend William Speke, B. D. a defcendant of the ancient family of that name, 
is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, according to Browne Willis, is dedicated to St. Mary; but a fair 
being held here on the lafl: Wedncfday in Auguft, fomc have been induced to think 
that Bartholomew is the tutelary faint. It is a fine Gothic flrudrure, built in the 
form of a crofs, one hundred and twenty feet long, and fifty wide. It confifts of a 
nave, chancel, tranfept, north and fouth ailes, and porch. In the centre ftands a 
handfome tower crowned with twelve pinnacles, and containing a clock, chimes, and 
five bells. At the eaft end of the church is a fmall veftry-room, which was formerly 
a chantry chapel. 

Of chantries or religious ferviccs inftituted in this church, we are furnifhed with 
the following names : 

St. Mary's Chantry. In 1553 John Button and John Poole, incumbents of this 
chantry, were afligned a penfion of five pounds each. 

St. Catherine's Chantry. Thomas Mychell, incumbent thereof, had the fame year 
a fimilar penfion allowed him. 

Holy Crofs Chantry. Robert Oliver incumbent, the fame fum. 

St. John Baptiji' s Chapel. Whereof the lafl: incumbent, whofe name was Matthias 
Broke, received the fame year a penfion of four pounds five {hillings.* 

The revenues of thefe chantries were confiderable: how fome of the lands belong- 
ing to them were difpofed of at the diflblution, has already been fecn in the account 
of the grammar-fchool. 

The internal parts of this church arc fuitably decorated. 

In the north tranfept is an ancient tomb erecled to the memory of that notable 
couple Nicholas and Dorothy Wadhara. This tomb is built partly of marble, and 
partly of ftone the produce of the neighbourhood. On the upper furface arc their 
portraitures in brafs. From the mouth of Nicholas proceeds a label with this 
fcroll: tDeatf) 10 imtO me aOtiantagC. From the lips of Dorothy this: % tPtlt 
tlOt DpC bill IgtJC, antJ aeclaje tfjC lOOrhC Of tf)C ICtD. At their feet arc the 
following inferiptions: 



* Taxat. Spiritual. MS. in Bib!. Cotton. 



^Willis's Mil. of Abbie?, vol.ii. p. 202. 



Here 



8 ILMJNSTER. [attlicli 

" Here lieth interred the body of Nicholas Wadham, whiles he lyved of Merefeild 
in the county of Somerfet efquier, ffownder of Wadham colledge in Oxforde, who 
depted this lyfe the xx day of Octob. 1609. 

" Here lyeth alfo the body of Dorothie Wadham widow, late the wife of Nicholas 
Wadham efquier, FoundrefTe of Wadham colledge in Oxforde, who died the 16th of 
May 1 61 8, in the yeare of her age 84." 

On the back of this tomb is raifed a marble monument of Corinthian architecture, 
charged with the following infcriptions on a tablet : 

Hie jacet occiduis Wadhamus cognitus Anglis, 

Cujus cum Phcebi lampade fplendor abit. 
Nee tamen in terras totus defcendit ; Eois 

Fulget adhuc multa luce micante plagis. 
Non cernis ? Pofitas trans Ifida fufpice turres, 

Quae ftruxit mufis culmina, templa Deo, 
Ulic, Wadhami radios nil! confpicis oris, 

Effufa eft animo fpiflior umbra tuo. 

Lucrari multis eft vita, et perdere funus: 

Sic tua damna putas vivere, lucra mori : 
Scilicet in terris quas negligis, has tibi ccelum 

Funere cum multo fcenore reddit opes. 

Petraeo Patre magna, Marito magna Wadhamo, 

Hie fundatoris filia, fponfa jacet. 
Par titulis utrique fuis, Patri atque marito 

Fundatrix, in fe magna, Wadhama jacet. 
Nobilis Aufpiciis, Progreflu, fine Parentis, 

Clarefcit radiis Conjugis atque fuis. 

Apoflrophe ad Leciorem. 
. '■ Quaeris quot annos vixerit? vixit diu. 

Votum bonorum refpicis ? vixit parum. 
Spectas an aedes quas pia ftruxit manu? 
Victura femper eft: nee unquam fecula 
Futura funt tarn fera, mundus tarn fenex, 
Ut non fuperfit hoc opus pulcherrimum; 
Vivatque in illo Fceminas illuftriflimae 
Nomen, Vetuftate ultima vetuftius. 

On the head of the monument, 
" Hoc monumentum, vetuftate collapfum, inftauratum erat fumptibus Domini 
Edvardi Wyndham baronetti, et Thomas Strangways armigeri, duorum cohasredum 
dicti Nkolai Wadham, Septembris die vii mo anno Dom. mdcxxxix." 

On the monument in a large fhield are the arms of Wadham, viz. Gules, a 
chevron between three rofe^ argent, (creft, a rofe argent, between two branches proper) 

marlhalled 



WiDTBuIftOirJ ILMINSTER. p 

marflullcd with. I. Or, on a chevron gules three martlets argent. 2. Argent, 
on a chief gules two (lags' heads caboflcd, or. 3. Gules, a chevron argent, between 
nine bezants. 4. >W/r, fix lions rampant, 3, 2, i, or. 5. Argent, a chief indented 
•:yt/; furmountcd by a bend, gules. 6. Barry of fix, or. and rtz/w ; over all an eagle 
difplaycd, gules. 7. Per pale azure, a lion rampant, or and gules* 8. Gk/^j, a 
bend lozengy ermine. 9. Argent, a chevron between three cfcallops y^/ir . 1 o. Gules, 
a lion rampant between feven efcallbps or. 11. Or, within a bordure inverted, 
foezanty, a lion rampant, gule s. 12. Argent, on a bend 'gules, five plates. 13. Argent, 
on a chevron gules, three flcurs de lis, or. 

In the fame tranfept is an ancient tomb of freeftonc ornamented with fruit, 
foliage, and antique fcurpture, covered with black and whicc fpcckled marble, on 
which are the portraitures in brafs of a man and woman refprefented as (landing 
under an enriched canopy; he in armour, fpurrcd, treading on a lion couchant; (he 
in weeds, and veiled. Much of the inferibed brafs which was placed round thefc 
figures is loft: from what remains we gather that it was the fepulchre of William 
Wadham, who died 3nn0 ©lit. milltttO CCCC£. Under each of the figures is a 
brafs plate, containing four Monkiih lines - y but the legend is imperfect, and almoft 
obliterated. 

Irt the fouthcrn tranfept is a handfome marble monument with this infeription : 

HlC IACET HvMFREDVS WaLROND SVB PVLVERIS VMBRA, 

Marcescens jevo, sed pietate virens. 
Clericvs ad Robas, coivdicis ORDINE FVNCTVS r 
MVNERE VIR DIGNVS', MVNERA DIGNA; VIRO. 
Avg. xvii, MDLXXX. 
The arms are, quarterly, 1 . Argent, three bulls' heads caboffed fable, attired or* 
i. Argent, on a bar fable, three crofs croflets fitches or. 3. Sable, fix fifties haurienr, 
3, 2, 1, argent. 4. Speke. 

Near the reading defk, a plain blue ftone is inferibed to' the memory of the late- 
■wear,, and father of the prefent worthy vicar of this parifh.- 

Beneath lies the Rev. William Speke, LL. B^ 
Late of Jordans in the parifti of Aftiill, 
Rector of Staple-Fitzpainc, and vicar of this church. 
Ob. 23 April 1773. /Etat. Si. 

The family arms are rudely fculptured on the ftone: viz. argent, two bars azure,- 
aver all an eagle difplaycd, with two nccks> gules. On- an efcutchcon of pretenco 
argent, three cfcallops on a chevron gules. 

Richard Sanvwaies, a learned divine r and a great fuffcrer in. the parFiamentary 
rebellion, was a native of this place, of which his father was vicar. In 1638 he was' 
elected fellow of Corpus Chrifti coHege in Oxford, from which he was in 1 648 ejected 
by the vifitors appointed by Parliament; but he was afterwards rcftorcd, and promoted' 
to the rectory of Meyfey-Hampton in the county of Gloccftcr,.in the chancel of which 

Vol. I.. C ■ church 



io A S H I L L. [3irt>fefc 

church he lies buried. The infcription on his grave-ftone is now effaced. He died 
in 1669. Among other things he wrote " England's faithful reprover and monitor: 
"octavo, London, 1653."' 

For an account of the cruelties exercifed on John Tarlton, minifter of this place 
in the time of Charles I. fee Walker's fufferings of the clergy, printed 1-1 8. 

This parifh furnifhed Muchelney with feveral abbots. 



A S H I L L. 

ASHILL is a fmall village, pleafantly fituated on a rifing ground three miles weft 
from Ilminfter, fix north from Chard, and nine eaft from Taunton. It pro- 
bably derived its name from the quantity of afh trees that heretofore grew upon 
the fpot, which conftituted part of the great foreft of Neroche. At this day it is 
tolerably wooded. 

The parifh of Afhill is of large extent, and contains fifty-five houfes, twenty-four 
of which compofe the village, wherein ftands the church ; and the remainder are in 
the hamlets of Southton, Wimblehill, Wood, Rowlands, and Jordans : the number 
of inhabitants is about three hundred and twenty. 

The laft-mentioned hamlet had its appellation from the little river of Jordan, which 
divides this parifh on the eaflern fide from that of Ilminfter, and has a ftone bridge 
over it in the road to Horton. Another ftream rifing in the foreft feparates this 
parifh on the north from Ifle-Abbots. The crofs roads are rough and narrow, full of 
loofe brown flints, and other ftones, which render travelling very difagreeable. 

In a field in this parifh belonging to the Earl of Egremont, there is a medicinal 
fpring, bearing the name of Skipperham Well, the water of which is of a fingular 
property, and has been thus analyzed : 

x. The foil of the field feems to be a fand mixed with clay, and the ftones which 
the water flows over are covered with a yellow ochrey fubftance. 

2. The water, frefh taken from the well, is of a light grey colour, which is very 
confpicuous in the bath, approaching to blue ; but it is collected there in a large 
quantity, and generally foul. It is very cold, but never freezes; has no fmell, but is 
of a fubacid and gently ftyptick tafte, which goes off upon keeping. 

3. The fides of the well are covered with air-bubbles, where the water ebbs and 
flows every day. This effect, however, is not retained afterwards upon being taken 
out of the well ; that is, the water does not fparkle in a glafs ; but in paffing from one 
veffel to another, even after it has been bottled, fomething of the fame kind may be 
obferved. After ftanding about two months, it depofited a tenacious green fediment 
upon the fides of the bottle, which had a putrid fmell and tafte, and felt like greafe. 

I Wood's Athen, Oxon. vol, ji. p. 130. 

4. The 



ant) TBuIfton.] A S H I L L. 



I! 



4. The fpecifick gravity of this water to that which is commonly ufed was as 740 
to 700. 

5. Twelve grains of green tea infufed by an ounce of this water induced a bright 
amber colour. 

6. A fimilar infufion with galls became firft of a light brown, and after (landing 
two days afTumcd a green hue upon the top, with a greafy fcurn. 

7. An infufion of afh bark in this water was turned almoft inftantancoufly to a 
beautiful light green, with a bluifh circle at the top. 

8. This water made a flight ebullition upon fpirit of vitriol being poured into it; 
it alfo became much brighter, and bubbles continued to rife from the bottom for 
ibme time. 

9. The fame appearances occurred with fpirit of fait, and vinegar. The former 
fecmed to change its colour to a purple. 

1 o. With fait of tartar this water aflumed a pearl colour, and depofited a white 
fediment. 

1 1. With lime-water it became milky, and precipitated a white fediment. 

12. With fpirit of fal ammoniac it formed a light bluilh cloud, and upon ftanding 
emitted bubbles. 

13. Being boiled with milk it did not coagulate, but lathered very cafily with 
foap. 

14. A piece of filver having been immcrfed in it, was, after ftanding fomc hours, 
covered with air-bubbles, and the water became more pellucid than natural. 

15. With a folution of filver in the nitrous acid, it firft threw up white clouds, 
and afterwards became of a deep dirty purple colour, and depolited a fediment of 
the fame. 

1 6. With faccharum faturni it put on the appearance of milk, and depolited a 
light-coloured fediment. 

17. With allum it became of a bluiih grey colour, and depofited a brownilh fedi- 
ment, which was re-diflblved the next day. 

1 8.. A pint of this water having been evaporated, left five grains of reiiduum of a 
darkifh brown colour, a lixivious fmell, and pungent alcaline tafte. 

19. This refiduum deliquefced freely in the air. Other qualities were not examined, 
as they feemed to be involved in the fait and earth which were afterwards analysed. 

20. The fait which was extracted from the refiduum was of a brackiih tafte, and 
bright yellow colour, but had no peculiar fmell. 

21. It moiilencd very rapidly in the air. 

22. It grew hot with fpirit of vitriol, and emitted acid fumes, though with little 
ebullition. 

23. With alcalies both fixed and volatile the folution of it retained its clearnefs, 
and with the latter excited an urinous fmell. 

24. The indnToluble matter left after the filtration of the fait weighed two grains. 

C 2 25. This 



*« A S H I L L. [atiDicfe 

25, This fubflancc had neither fmell nor tafte, was of a light brown dove colour, 
and impalpable confidence, 

26, Did not ferment either with fpirit of vitriol, or of fal ammoniac 

27, The magnet attracTed a fmall quantity, 
2S, it fparkl.ed on burning coajs. 

29. It grew red hot. when burnt, and afterwards afiumed a blaekilh hue. 

30. With galls in a folution of fal ammoniac, it ftruck a deep red or claret colour, 
and after fome time a red fediment was depofited, 

31. Its ufes in medicine have generally been in cafes of fcorbutick eruptions and 
inflammations of the eyes from the fame caufc. A gentleman who lately drank a large 
quantity, found It to create a naufea and purging, 

32. Itfeemsto contain fome iron pofllbly in its ftate of vitriol, fome fulphur, an 
alcaline fait, and a fmall quantity of the muriatick acid. It may juftly be ranked 
among the light chalybeates, and which require to be ufed on the fpot. u 

Annexed to this well is a bath. 

In Domefday book this place is written Aifelle, and is there faid to be held by- 
Robert earl of Morton, being one of the many manors which he obtained of his 
brother the Conqueror in this county. In the faid record it is thus particularized : 

" Malger holds of the earl Aifelle. Two thanes held it in the time of king 
" Edward, and were rated at five hides. The arable land confifts of five carucates. 
*' In demefne are two carucates, and four villanes, and feventeen cottagers with two 
" ploughs. There are forty acres of meadow. A wood forty furlongs long and 
M twenty broad. It is worth fixty {hillings. This manor pays a rent of thirty pence 
" to Curi, a manor of the king."* 

In fucceeding times this manor was poffefled by the family of Hull, who refided 
here, The daughter and heirefs of that family was married to Multon of Pinho, in the 
county of Devon, in which name it continued for three fucceffive generations. Thomas 
de Multon, lord of this manor, 1 p Edw. II. obtained of the king a grant of a weekly 
market here on Wednefday, and two fairs to be held yearly, one on the eve, day, and 
morrow, of the feftival of the blefied Virgin Maiy ; and the other on the eve, day, 
and morrow of the feaft of Simon and Jude/ In the beginning of the fifteenth 
century, Mary the daughter and heirefs of John Multon married an anceftor of Sir 
Thomas Beauchamp, of Whitelackington, knight, whole coufin and heirefs Alice 
transferred this manor by marriage to Sir John Speke, knight, in which family it 
continued for twelve generations ; and at length became the pofleffion of Frederick 
lord North by his marriage with Anne daughter of George Speke, efq; as mentioned 
in our account of Ilminfter, Some years fince his lordfhjp fold this manor to Robert 
}3ryant, of Ilminfter, efq; late clerk of the peace for this county; at whofe death it 
defcended to Robert his eldeft fon, who is the prefent pofleflbr. 

1 We are indebted to Pr. Farr, of Curry-Rivel, for this analyfis, 
f Jib, Dp.mefday, f part, >p Edw, 11, n, SU 

The 



V 



• 



flirt) TMfton,] A S H I L U 13 

The church of Afliill is a prebend belonging to the cathedral of Wells. The 
Rev. Thomas Alford is the prefent incumbent of the vicar?gc, which was valued in 
26 Henry VIII. at 32I. 3s. 

The church is dedicated to St. Mary. It is a fmall but neat Gothic ftruclure, fixty- 
five feet long, and twenty-four feet wide, and confifts of a nave, chancel, and two 
porches. At the weft end is a quadrangular embattled tower fifty-fix feet in height, 
and containing a clock and five bells. 

Over the entrance into the chancel is a fine zigzag Saxon arch, eleven feet in the 
fpan. The font is octagonal, and very antient : two coats on it are, gttles, a mitre or. 

In the north wall of the body of the church under elliptic arches are the crumbling 
remains of two very ancient tombs. One of thefe was defigned to perpetuate the 
memory of a woman, who, according to afoolifh tradition, had feven children at one 
birth. Their effigies arc difpofed round that of the mother in the following order: 
one at each corner above her head, one on each fide of her face, two at her feet, and 
the feventh, which is demolifhcd, was at her head. A part of thefe effigies, and of 
the tombs themfclvcs, has been cut away to admit the ends of the feats up to the wall. 

The only infeription in the church is the following in the eaftern wall of the chancel : 

" Underneath lies interred the body of Thomas Alford, A. M. prebendary of Wells, 

and late vicar of Afhiil and of Wefton Zoyland ; who married Mary the daughter of 

Richard Standfaft, late of Cheddon Fitzpaine in the county of Somerfet, gent, by whom 

he had five children, one of which died in his infancy; four arc left behind to lament 

thelofs of him. xi, .. rfalutis noftrce 1777, 

Obntanno [ xuu {ux ^ 

f* Pallor fidelis, ct probitate fingulari ; 
" Egenis liberalis, omnibus bencvolus." 

** Alfo here lies the body of Mary Alford, wife of theaforefaid Thomas Alford, who 
departed this life Jan. 11, 1763, a-tat. fuae 51." 

In the church-yard are two very large yew-trees, one of which is fifteen feet round, 
with a vaft fpread of branches extending north and fouth fixty-fix feet. The other 
divides into three large trunks jufi: above the ground, but many of the arms arc 

decayed.*' 

z Our forefathers were particularly careful in preferring this funereal tree, vvhofe branches it was ufual for 
jiiourners to carry in folemn proceflion to the grave, and afterwards to depofit therein under the bodies of 
their departed friends. The branches thus cut off from their native flock, which was to (hoot forth again at 
the returning fpring, were beautifully emblematical of the refurrecYion of the body, as, by rcafon of their 
perpetual verdure, they were of the immortality of the foul. 



BEER- 



[ 1 4 3 [a&Dicft 

BEER-CROCOMBE. 

THIS is a fmall parifh, containing thirty-two houfes, lying northward from Aihill, 
and about eight miles foutheaft from Taunton, in a flat and rather unpleafant 
iituation ; the foil whereof is a Met clay, and the lands almoft equally divided between 
pafture and tillage. The principal crops are, wheat, beans, peafe, and vetches ; but 
the foil being very heavy is unfavourable to barley; infomuch that we will not conceive 
the name of this place to have proceeded from the antient word Bere, which fignifies 
that grain," but from fome other fource, deeply buried in the arcana of etymology. 
A fmall ftream arifing in the parilh of Staple-Fitzpaine runs through it, under a 
bridge of two arches. 

The parifhioners claim a common right in the adjacent .foreft of Neroche, and on 
Weft Sedgmoor. 

But of this place little memorable can be faid. The Norman record limply writes 
it Bere, and thus defcribes it: 

" Rainald holds of Earl Morton, Bere. Algar held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and paid for five hides. The arable is four carucates, three of which are in de- 
"mefne: and there are four fervants, and fix villanes, and feven cottagers. There 
" are twenty acres of meadow, and twelve acres of pafture, and five acres of wood. 
" It was worth one hundred (hillings, now fixty ihillings." b 

In the time of Henry II. the manor of Beer was held of the family of Lovell by 
Wimund de Craucumbe and Reginald Heirun. The defcendants of the former (of 
whom we fhall hereafter fpeak more particularly) gave name to the eftate, and con- 
tinued poflefled of it for many fuccefiions; 'till in the reign of Edward III. it feems 
to have been alienated. For in the 38th of that reign there appears to have been 
fome litigation betwixt other parties concerning the right of this lordfhip, which was 
terminated by John Bays of Yeovil quitting all his title therein to Guy de Brien 
knight, and others. After this, it came to the pofleflion of Thomas de Beaupine 
of Dorfetihire, in which county he held lands late the property of the Beauchamps. 
The faid Thomas, 14 Richard II. having been attached for trefpafs in the foreft 
of Neroche, and paid a fine thereupon, procured licence from the King to lop the 
branches from the oaks and other trees growing in Ubare wood within the faid 
foreft, belonging to this his manor of Beer, without moleftation of the forefters. d 
20 Henry VII. John Haiewell, efq; died feized of this manor, leaving by Anne his 
wife, the daughter and heir of Richard Middleton, efq; five daughters ; of whom 
Elizabeth, firft the wife of Anthony Raleigh, and afterwards of Leonard Rede, had, 
upon the partition of the inheritance, this manor for her fhare. It is now the pro- 
perty of the Earl of Egremont. 

a Richard Beere, abbot of Glaflonbury, in allufion to his name, ufed for his device an ear of barley. See 
more of this in Glaftonbury. 

" Lib. Domefday. « CJauf. 38 Edw. III. 30. «> Pat. 14 Ric. II. m. 13. 

Part 




nrtD lBuIflon.] SOUTH BRADON. 15 

Part of the hamlet of Capland lies within this parifh, the other being in Broadway • 
It was anciently a manor, and in the Conqueror's furvey is certified to belong to Harding 
one of the king's thanes, confiding at that time of two plough lands worth twenty 
(hillings.* Afterwards it generally paflfed along with the manor of Bcer-Crocombc, 
to the parochial church of which it had formerly a chapel fubfervient. 

The living is a redtory in the deanery of Crewkerne; the patron thereof Lord 
Egreraont. The Rev. Mr. Norman, of Staplcgrove, is the prcfent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. James. It is feventy-two feet long, and feventcen 
wide, confining of a nave, chancel, and porch, with a clumfy tower at the weft end 
forty feet high, covered w ith a leaden cap, and containing five bells. 

The annual number of births in this parifli is on an average two, and of burials three. 

* Lib. Domefday. 



SOUTH BRADON 

IS a very fmall parifh north of Ilminfter, containing only four houles, and about 
live hundred acres of land. The country is flat and woody, and the foil a ftrong 
clay. The arable is worth from eight to twelve fhillings, and the meadow twenty-one 
lhillings per acre. 

Only one poor perfon receives pay from the parifh. 

This village feems to have been no more populous or confiderable in the time of 
King William the Conqueror, than it is now. It then belonged to Earl Morton, of 
whom it was held by Drogo, or Drew. 

" Ordc held it in the time of King Edward, and paid geld for two hides. The 
" arable confifts of two carucates in demefnc, with one fervant, and three cotta- 
" gcrs. There is a mill which pays twelve fhillings and fixpence; and eighteen acres 
" of meadow, and twenty acres of pafturc, and twenty acres of wood. It is and 
" was worth forty fhillings. This manor pays a rent of two fheep with their lambs* 
" to Curi, a king's manor. 6 " 

The manor is now divided ; feven parts in twelve belong to the Earl of Egremont, 
four parts to the Earl of Ilchcfter, and one part to William Wyndham, efq. No court 
is held, but the lords rents are paid to the refpective ftcwards at Ilford-bridges inn. 

The living is redlorial, and worth forty pounds per annum. The prefentation is in 
the lords of the manor in rotation. The Rev. Mr. Watfon is the prcfent incumbent. 

* This was merely a cufiomary acknowledgment, as was likewifc the payment of honey, eels, a night's 
lodging for the king, &c. mention of which is frequently made in this furvey. 
b Lib, Domcfdnv. 

The 



s6 B R O A D W A Y. [abBicfe 

The glebe confifts of {even acres of arable, and half an acre of meadow. There has 
been no church here within the memory of man : the inhabitants attend divine fervice 
at the parifh church of Puckington. It was. dedicated to St. Mary Magdalen, and 
was valued in the reign of Henry VIIL at 5I. 4s. 4d. ob. 

Within this parifh was. a hamlet called North-Bradon, now reduced to one houfe. 

Adjoining thereto is another parifh called Goofe-Bradon, now entirely depopulated, 
having neither church, houfe, nor inhabitant. It had its additional name of Goofe 
from the family of Gouiz, who were anciently pollened hereof; and,. as appears from 
the dates of fundry deeds, relided here In. the reigns of Edward II. and III. it 
was held by the Warres of the family of Meriet, by the fervice of the fifth part of a 
knight's fee." Roger la Warre refided here fome part of the reign of Edward III. 
and in the year 1334 prefented John de Welweton to the rectory of this parifh, as- 
he did John de Ernefhull in 1339^ 

The prefent incumbent is the Rev. James Uttermare, who is likewife pofiefied of 
ahe advovvfon, which he purchafed of a defcendant of Mrs. Wefkott, heretofore of" 
Hatch-Beauchamp.. 

c Cart., anti^.. *Efc c Excerpt, e Kegill; Wellens. 



BROADWAY. 

THIS village takes its name from its fituation, being originally a few huts buii.; 
on each fide a broad path cut through the woods, which were at that time a- 
foreft called the foreft of Roche, or Neroche.. 

This foreft,. which was of confiderable extent, took its name from a very ancient 
Roman encampment deeply intrenched, called Roche or Rachiche caftle, fituated on 
the edge of Blackdown hill to the fouth of Curland,. and commanding a moft beau- 
tiful and extenfive profpect.. 

In the time of King John,. William, de Wrotham was forefter of this and the 
other forefts in this county; and after, him Richard de Wrotham by inheritance. 

35 Henry III. William de Placetis had the office of forefter, which he held to the 
2. Edward I. when dying,, he was fucceeded therein by Richard de Placetis his fon. 

24 Edward I,. Sabina the wife of Nicholas Peche was forefter in fee of this foreft v 
and appointed Peter de Hamme to be her deputy.. 

In her time, 26 Edward Li perambulation- was^ made of all the forefts in this 
county, in order to reduce them to their antient and lawful bounds, in purfuance of 
the charter o^ forefts that year ratified under the great feal of England.. The com- 
miffioners for the King were Malcoline de Harleigh, and John de Wrotefieigh, to> 

whomj, 



anDT6ulflcm.] BROADWAY. 17 

whom, for the view of every foreft, were joined two others, chofen by the county, 
which, for the foreft we arc now fpcaking of, were Geffery de Wroxall and Hugh 
de Popham, knights. The jury was compofed of the following perfons ; William 
Trivet, Walter de Lovcny, William de Stanton, knights; Laurence de Alyngton, 
William de Poulct, John de Bykefand, William Fichet of Sydenham, John de 
Raygny, and Matthew de Eire. On a verdict found by this jury, the commif- 
fioners made the following report, viz. That all the villages, lands, and woods, 
hereafter-mentioned, within the bounds of the faid foreft of Neroche, were afforcftcd 
after the coronation of Henry II. by king John, to the detriment of the tenants, and 
ought to be difafforefted, viz. A certain hill called the Caftlc of Rachich; the ul- 
lage of Capeland, with its woods and appertenances ; a certain wood belonging to 
the manor of Bickcnhall; half the village of Stivelcigh, with its woods and apper- 
tenances; a certain wood called Oterfchawc, belonging to the manor of Ifle-Abbots; 
a wood called Sotwode, belonging to Drayton manor; a certain wood called Uniret, 
belonging to the manor of Ilminfter; a certain wood called Haukcfbcrc, belonging to 
the manor of Cammel- Abbots ; the village of Afhill, with its woods and apperte- 
nances ; a certain wood called Clayhull, belonging to the manor of South Petherton ; 
the village of Broadway, with its woods and appertenances ; the hamlet of Stoford, 
belonging to the manor of Ikon; a certain hermitage, with its woods and apperte- 
nances, in the tenure of Thomas de Montforell and John de AfTelonde; half tin- 
village of Horton; half the village of Donyat, with its woods and appertenances ; 
the hamlets of Stoklepath and Hockey, with their woods and appertenances, belong- 
ing to the manor of Combe St. Nicholas; a certain tenement called Wodehoufc, with 
its woods and appertenances; certain lands and woods at the Grange; the manor of 
Donyat, with its woods and appertenances; a certain tenement, with its woods and 
appertenances, called Legh; the hamlet of Yfelbare, with its woods and apperte- 
nances; a certain wood, called Stopclewode; and a certain part of land called Corv- 
lond, belonging to the manor of Staple.* 

17 Edward II. Nicholas Peche, fon of Sabina Peche above-mentioned, is certified 
to hold the bailiwick of this foreft of the king, in capite, by grand ferjeanty, and 
by paying into the king's exchequer the fum of twelve (hillings and fix-pence 
per annum. 

10 Edward III. Matthew Peche fold all his right to the faid bailiuk k to Richard 
d'Amori, knight; who, 18 Edward III. granted the fame to Matthew de Clivedon; 
which grant was the fame year confirmed by the king. b 

34 Edward III. the office of foreftcr of this and the other forcfts is found to belong 
to Roger Mortimer earl of March, in whofe defcendants earls of March, and in 
their heirs, the dukes of York, it continued till the time of king Edward VI. when 
it became united to the crown. During the attainder of the duke of York, 38 Henry 
VI. James earl of Ormond was appointed keeper of the faid forefts. 

* Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen, b Pat. 18 Edw. III. p. i. m. 38. 

Vol. I. D The 



v 



iB BROADWAY. [a&Mck 

The parifh of Broadway lies ten miles foutheaft from Taunton, and two miles 
northweft from Ilminfter. It is divided into two tithings : i . Broadway tithing, a 
long irregular ftreet containing about fifty houfes, moft of which are farms, occupied 
by their refpective owners : 2. Capland tithing, fituated two miles northweft from 
Broadway, containing about ten houfes ; in all about fixty houfes, and three hundred 
and twenty inhabitants. 

Two brooks rifing in the foreft of Neroche bound this parifh on the north and fouth, 
and empty themfclves into the He. 

The fituation of Broadway is flat and woody ; the lands are nearly all meadow and 
pafture ; the foil is a clayey loam. 

A confiderable manufacture of ferges, narrow cloths, druggets, duroys, &c. was 
carried on here for many years with fome fuccefs; but of late the trade has declined. 

The little we know of the Hate of this village in ancient times is, that foon after 
the Norman conqueft it belonged to the earl of Morton. 

" Malger holds of the carl Bradewei. It was in the time of Edward the Confefibr 
" in the tenure of Alnod, who was rated for it at one hide. The arable land is one 
w carucate. There are three villanes, and three cottagers, with one fervant. There 
« are twelve acres of meadow, and four acres of wood. It was and is worth ten 
<l millings.'" 1 

In the time of Edward I. Broadway was the pofieffion of the family of L'Orti, 
lords of Curry Rivel. 34 Edward I. Henry de L'Orti obtained licence for a market 
here on Tuefday, (which market has been long difcontinued) and a fair on the feaft 
of St. Aldbelm, the patron faint of the church, and the eight following days. 

By an inquifition taken 30 Elizabeth, it was found that Hugh Brook died feized of 
this manor, which he held of the heirs of George Speke, knight, as of his manor 
of Whitelackington. It is now the property of Henry William Portman, efq. 

The living is a rectory in the deanery of Crewkerne, and the patronage in 

Lay, efq. The Rev. Mr. Fewtrell, of Hinton St. George, is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, which ftands nearly half a mile fouth from the ftreet, is built in the 
form of a crofs, being in length fixty-four feet from eaft to weft, and from north to 
fouth fifty-one feet. The tower contains five bells. 

On the fouth wall of the chancel is an old ftone with this infeription : 
" In commemoratione Saras natas Johfs Forde clerici, concionatoris hujus ecclefiae; 
et Hannae uxoris ejus, quae obiit 28 Decembris, 1621. 
" Difce mori mundo, vivere difce Deo." 

On the north wall of the nave is a very neat mural monument of white and grey 
marble. On the top of the tablet is an elegant white urn circled w ith a feftoon. Below 
are the arms, viz. Or, four chevronels gules. Creft, a demi unicorn of the fecond. 

c Lib. Domefday. 

« Here 



an& TMffon.] BROADWAY. ip 

" Here Iieth the body of the Rev. William Fcwtrell, A. B. prebendary of Wells, 
rector of this parifh, and of Hinton St. George, and Stocklinch Ottcrfey, in this 
county, who died the 16th of May 1777, aged 64. 

" Alfo the body of Sufanna Fcwtrell his wife, (daughter and co-hcirefs of Hugh 
Broom, gent.) who departed this life the 1 8th of Sept. 1773, aged 61 . 

'* In tender regard to the memory of two mod worthy and affectionate parents, 
this monument was erected by their furviving children. 

" Near this place lie alfo the bodies of Richard Knight Fcwtrell and William 
Fcwtrell, fons of the faid William and Sufanna Fcwtrell: Richard died Sept. 24, 1742. 
William Jan. ri, 1739, aged 7 months." 

In the church-yard is the following infeription: 

" Here lies the body of Agnes Maine, who died July 4, aged 47 years. 

Shall then the great in taunting accents fay, 
' What mighty deeds have dignified this clay? 

1 Or was (lie rich in fortune or in blood?' 

Ah! flie was more, much more, for fhe was good. 
Her life in fervice and obedience fpent, 
She gain'd not riches, but fhe gain'd content: 
Whilft o'er herfelf fhe kept a ftrict controul, 
And heap'd up treafure that enrich'd her foul. 
Mofi: firm in morals, rcfolutely juft, 
Of fofteft manners, but a rock in truft : 
Happy in mind, with ferioufnefs endued, 
A feeling heart that teem'd with gratitude. 
Thy friends lament thus foon the grave thy doom, 
Thy miftrefs lov'd thee, and inferibes thy tomb. 
Go, take thy wages now by Heav'n's decree, 
Where fervice is eternal liberty. 

" She lived twenty-nine years in one place of fervice." 

In the church-yard are the remains of a fine old crofs. There is alio an ancient 
yew-tree, the body of which at four feet height is fourteen feet in circumference; the 
trunk is quite hollow, but it has a fine lofty fpreading head. 

There is an alms-houfe in this parifh endowed with twenty-one pounds per annum 
for the maintenance of feven poor perfons, who are admitted thereto by the joint 
approbation of the minifter and parifh officers. 

The births on an average are twelve; the burials ten. 



D 2 BUCKLAND 



[ 20 ] [a&Mck 

B U C K L A N D St. MARY. 

THIS parifh, fo called from the dedication of its church, lies in the feveral 
hundreds of Abdick and Bulfton, South Petherton, and Martock; and in the 
fouthern extremity of the foreft of Neroche. The word Buckland is of Saxon origin, 
Boclanb in that language fignifying fuch lands as were granted by the Saxon kings to 
their thanes or nobles; and thefe territories were fo called, becaufe, being here- 
ditary and exempt from vulgar fervices, they were conveyed by charter, and com- 
mitted to a writing or book. It extends nearly five miles from eaft to weft, and 
contains three tithings and hamlets. 

i. Buckland tithing, in which are twenty-four houfes, near the church. 

2. Weftcomb land, containing twenty-eight houfes, eighteen of which are farms 
from 30I. to 200I. a year. 

3. Dommet, in South- Petherton hundred, containing twenty houfes, fifteen of 
which are farms. There are alfo about thirty fingle houfes and cottages ; in the 
whole about one hundred houfes, and five hundred and forty inhabitants. 

The fituation is pleafant, being under the north ridge of Blackdown hills, and agree- 
ably varied with eminences and vales. That this neighbourhood anciently expe- 
rienced the rude foot of war, is ftrongly indicated by the various military relicks that 
have been difcovered, and the ftrong entrenchments of Neroche caftle ftill frowning 
over a vaft extent of country. On the top of that part of Blackdown which lies 
within this parifh, by the road fide from this caftle to Chard, are immenfe quantities 
of flint ftones lying in vaft heaps, upwards of fixty yards in circumference, which are 
called Robin Hood's Butts, and are generally fuppofed to be the tombs of ancient war- 
riors, who fell during the fevere contefts betwixt the Danes and Saxons in thefe parts. 

There is a confiderable quantity of wafte land in this parifh, on which the poor are 
privileged to cut fuel. The Cultivated parts area mixture of arable and pafture; 
and there are about three hundred acres of woods, which are moftly coppice, but 
contain fome good oak and afh timber. Several brooks run through the parilh, con- 
taining trout and eels. 

A fair for cattle and toys is held here on the Wednefday and Thurfday after the 
20th of September. 

The manor is chiefly difmembered : what little remains is the property of Ifaac 
Elton, of Briftol, efq. 

It was in ancient times (as its name imports) thaneland, and in Domefday book is 
furveyed under the title of lands belonging to the king's thanes, or perfonal attendants. 

" Brictric and Ulward hold of the king Bochelande. The fame held it in the time 
" of king Edward, and gelded for one hide and a half. The arable is three caru- 
" cates. Two carucates are in demefne, and two villanes, and four cottagers. It is 
" worth twenty fhillings. 

« This 



auD li5ulflon.] 



BUCKLA 8 D St. MARV. 



21 



" This land they held of bifliop Peter as long as he lived, and paid him for it ten 
" fhillings. They now hold it of the king; but lincc the bi (hop's death the king ha; 
" received nothing from it. Of this land the wife of Bollc held three virgatcs in the 
" rime of king Edward."* 

In the time of Edward I. we find this manor, with the advowfon of the church, 
polfeffed by the family of Merit i, who had great eilates in thefe parti: other lands in 
Buckland belonged in the fame reign to the family of Ruflcll. b 2 Edward III. the 
king granted licence to Thomas dc Merlebergc (or Marlborough) to amortize certain 
lands in this parifiY for the maintenance of two chaplains in the church of Iflc- 
Brewcrs/ 38 Edward III. John Bays of Yeovil rcleafcd to Guy de Bricn all his right 
to lands in Buckland St. Mary, and in the advowfon of the church of Wanftrow." 

The church was in 1292 valued at eight marks;' and 26 Henry VIII. at 12I. 
19s. 9[d. It is a rectory in the deanery of Crewkerne, and in the prefentation 
of the family of Popham. The Rev. George Popham, of Taunton, is the prefent 
incumbent. 

The church is a neat ftrudture, eighty feet long and forty-four feet wide. It confifts 
of a nave, two fide ailes, and chancel, all leaded except the laft. The nave and ailes 
arc open to the lead. It contains no monument; but on two flat (tones are the fol- 
lowing inferiptions : 

:t Here lyeth the body of Maximilian Kymer, gent, who dyed the 1 2th of January 
x 7 2 3> a gcd 76. 

4< Alfo of Eleazer Kymer, gent, who dyed March 13, 1700, aged 93. 
" Alfo of Gilbert Kymer, gent, who died Dec. 21, 1711, aged 69. 
" Alfo Rofe Kymer his widow, who died March 16, 1739, a g ed 39-" 

In the north ailc, 
" Here licth the body of Parge the fon of John and Mary Shire, who died the 24 th 
day of Auguft 1748, aged 7. 

" Alfo here lieth the body of the Rev. Mr. John Shire, father of the above Parge, 
who died Nov. 22, 1772, jetat. fuae 72." 

In the church-yard are nine tombs, and a ftone crofs with the top of the pillar 
broken off. Here is alfo a large yew-tree, whofe trunk is four yards in circumference 
at four feet above ground. 



a Lib. Domefday. 
k Efc. 



c Inq. ad quod damnum. 
d Rot. claus. 38 Edward III. 



*Taxat. Spiritual. 



CRICKET 



I 22 ] [atfljicft 

C R I C K E T-M A L H E R B E, 

A Small parifh three miles fouth from Ilminfter, and three eaft from Chard, 
fituated on elevated ground, under the range of hills called White Down. The 
foil is cold and wet, but there is plenty of wood. It contains only, one farm and 
ten cottages, and the number of inhabitants is about threefcore. 

This place afTumed the additional name from its having fometime belonged to the 
ancient family of Malherbe. Domefday furveys it under the fimple appellation of 
Cruchet, as follows: 

" Drogo holds of the earl (Morton) Cruchet. Two thanes held it in Edward the 
"■ ConfefTor'S: reign, and paid tax for three hides. The arable is four carucates. In 
" demefne is one carucate with one fervant, and five villanes, and four cottagers, with 
" half a carucate. There are eight acres of meadow, and eighty acres of wood. It 
" was formerly worth eleven (hillings, now thirty fhillings." a 

When the Malherbes came to this eftate, or how long they poffeffed it, does not 
appear. 1 2 Henry II. in the aid for marrying the king's daughter, Robert Malherbe 
held one knight's fee and four parts of another of William Malet; and in the fame 
affeffment William Malherbe is certified to hold the number of four knights fees. b 

In the fucceffive reigns of Henry IV. V. VI. and Edward IV. the manor of Cricket- 
Malherbe was pofferTed by the family of Dynham, who were likewife lords of Buck- 
land-Dynham, Corton, and other manors ia this county; and their pofterity feem to 
have inherited it {o late as the beginning of the reign Of Henry VIII. : for by an 
inquifition taken at Bridgewater Sept. 18, 15 20, it was found that Thomas Dynham, 
knight, died Nov. 12, 1519, feized of the manor of Cricket-Malherbe, leaving John 
his fon and heir, then of the age of feventeen years. This John married Joanna the 
daughter of John Heron, knight, from whom this lordfliip parted to the Drews of 
Stanton. The manor and whole parifh now belong to Stephen Pitt, efq. 

The living is a rectory in the deanery of Crewkerne, and in the gift of Mr. Pitt 
aforefaid. The Rev. Mr. Palmer is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, dedicated to St. Mary Magdalen, is a fmall gothick edifice, confiding 
of one pace, forty-five feet long and eighteen wide, with a fmall turret in which are 
two bells. It contains neither monument, infeription, nor any thing elfe worth notice. 

* Lib. Domefday. b Lib. nig. p. 93, 94. e Efc. 



CURLAND. 



ano l6ulfton.] r *3 ] 

C U R L A N D. 

CURL AND Hands fix miles fonth from Taunton, and the fame drftonce north- 
weft from Chard, fituatcd in a narrow flat at the foot of the north ridge of 
Blackdown. It comprifes a fimll hamlet of the name of Britty, in which arc two 
houfes; the whole number is twenty-five, and of inhabitants about one hundred and 
twenty-fix. Moft of the habitations are fmall, thatched, rough-ftonc, cottages, fomc 
having two floors, others only one. 

The lands are chiefly arable; but there is fome pafture, and a common, on which 
all the poor have a right of cutting fuel and turf. The roads are narrow, rough, 
and ftony. This village is famous for fcythe ftones, which the inhabitants dig on 
Blackdown. 

This place being originally a member of Staple-Fitzpaine, is not particularly 
noticed in the Conqueror's furvey. It pafTed along with the faid manor for feveral 
Centimes, till being alienated therefrom, it fell into different hands; and in the reign 
of Edward VI. we find it the property of Thomas Reve and George Cotton, « ho 
conveyed it to Valentine Brown; and he 7 Eliz. to Robert Howfc. 38 Eliz. lands 
were held here by John Dorchefter, who, 2d of March, had licence to alienate the 
fame to William Powell, D. D. m Henry Seymour, of Sherborne, efq ; is now lord 
of this manor. 

Curland was anciently confidered only as a chapel to Curry-Mallet, but being 
erected into a parifh, is now a rectory in the deanery of Crewkernc, and held by the 
rev. William Spekeof Jordans in the parifh of Afhill. 

The church is a fmall building of one pace, and contains nothing remarkable. 

The chriftenings are yearly on an average feven; the burials three. 

•MS. Donat. 



CURRY-RIVE L. 

THIS is a very confiderable village, fituatcd at the northern extremity of the 
hundred, two miles weft from Langport, and eleven caft from Taunton; the 
great road betwixt thofe towns lying through it. 

The parifh is extenfive and populous : the village confifts of fifty-feven houfes, 
forming feveral irregular ftreets near the church; befides which there are three 
hamlets, viz. Hambridge (fo denominated from a county bridge here thrown over 
the If!c which runs through this parifh ;) Heal, in which is a pleaiant feat belonging to 
Mrs. Powel ; and Wick. In thefe three hamlets are forty houfes; which, with nearly 
fifty more ftanding iingly and on the fide of the moor, make about one hundred and 
fifty in all. The number of inhabitants in the whole parifh is about eight hundred. 

The 






24 C U R R Y-R I V E L. [abWcfe 

The foil is chiefly of the ftone-rufh kind ; there are feveral quarries of blue lime 
ftone, fit for building, and white lyas ; in which are found bivalve fhells of the venus, 
tellinae, and other forts. They have likewife here an excellent kind of broad paving 
ftone, which is frequently raifed ten feet long and three broad. 

Among the great quantities of wood with which this parifh abounds, elm feems 
to be the moft, and oak the leaflr thriving. Of the latter fpecies, however, a lingular 
curiofity occurs in a field near the Angel Inn, where there is an oak, which bears 
acorns of an uncommon fize, being more than thrice the ufual dimensions ; and by 
fome experiments made by an eminent naturalift, it appears that the plants which 
they produce grow twice as faft as thofe raifed from common acorns. 

The inhabitants have a right of commonage in the adjoining moors, and in the 
foreft of Neroche. 

The north fide of this parifh is a bold ridge of hills, which rifes with a fteep 
afcent about four hundred feet, from Weft-Sedgmoor; the flope being finely waved, 
indented, and clothed with beautiful hanging woods : thefe woods alternately fwell 
into bold projections, and recede into fine hollows, forming a grand profile when 
viewed from the eaft or weft. Within a cove open to Sedgmoor, on the 'very top of 
this ridge, is Burton-Pinfent, the feat of the Earl of Chatham. The houfe is a large 
irregular building, erected at different periods, and compofed of various materials ; 
but the modern part is moftly brick. The apartments are elegant, and contain fome 
excellent paintings.* The principal front is to the north, commanding a rich and 
very extenfive profpect of all the flat country between Mendip and theQuantock hills, 
the channel and Welch mountains. Immediately under the eye is a beautiful moor, 
level as a bowling-green, and covered with the fineft verdure, to the extent of near 
fix miles in length, and from one to three miles in width, fkirtcd thick with villages. 
From this point more than thirty churches may be diftinctly feen. 

* The Dining-room is 35 feet by 21, and 16 feet high ; ornamented with four whole-length portraits, and 
fome line, three-quarter lengths. 

In the Stone Hall, 27 feet by 18 L and 1 1 f feet high, are, a fine old painting of our Saviour when taken 
down from the crofs, feveral landfcapes, and many old half-length portraits. 

The Drawing-Roora is 33 feet by 21, and 15 feet high, hung with green damaflc. Over the door 
is a very line painting of a lady leaning on a table ; the drapery excellent, colouring chafle. Over the chimney- 
piece, an admirable painting of a favourite fpaniel. 

The Bird-Room 20 feet by 24, and 1 1 high, falmon-coloured ftucco. Here are four line landfcapes, 
with birds, fowls, and rabbits ; the attitudes natural. Thefe paintings are fix feet fix by five feet nine, and 
executed by Bogdani. 

The Library is 35 by 18, and n high, painted fea-green, embellilhed with Le Brun's battles, and the 
triumphal entry of Alexander into Babylon ; a half-length of one of the prefent family, and two others. 

The Bail-Room 60 feet by 28, and 17 feet high. Six fine whole-length portraits, viz.— the late Earl and 
the prefent Countefs of Chatham, Earl Temple, Marquis of Granby, Admirals Saunders a«nd Bofcawen. 

On 



anuTSuiaon.] CURRY -RIVE L. 2 5 

On the northeaft point, at the diftancc of about two furlongs from the houfc, is a 
fine column of white ftone, one hundred and forty feet high, built on a fmooth green 
projecting knoll, with a ftecp declivity of more than three hundred feet down to the 
edge of the moor. This pillar was erected by the late carl of Chatham to the 
memory of fir William Pynfcnt, and coft two thoufand pounds. On one fide of the 
pedeflal (which is about twenty-five feet high) is the following infeription: 

" Sacred to the memory of fir William Pynfcnt. 
" Hoc/altem fungar inani vuaure." 

The fouth or back front of the houfc looks into a park perfectly level, finely 
wooded with large elm and other trees, and commands a very fine view to the fouth, 
foutheaft, and northweft, bounded by that high ridge of land which ftrctching from 
near Sherborne in Dorfetfhire extends to Columftokc Beacon on Blackdown. The 
pleafure-grounds on the brow of the hill are elegantly difpofed, and admit of great 
variety. At the end of a narrow walk, (haded with laurels and other evergreens, is 
an urn of white marble, furrounded with a feftoon, arid fupported on a fquare bafe- 
ment. This urn is elegantly (haped, and the fculpture admirably executed. 

On the front is this infeription: 
" Sacred to pure affection, this fimple urn (lands a witnefs of unceafing grief for 
him, who, excelling in whatever is mod admirable, and adding to the excrcife of 
the fublimeft virtues the fweet charm of refined fentiment and polifhcd wit, by gay 
and focial commerce, rendered beyond comparifon happy the courfe of domeftick 
life, and beftowed a felicity inexprefiible on her, whofe faithful love was blefTed in a 
pure return, that raifed her above every other joy but the parental one — and that (till 
(hared with him. His generous country, with publick monuments, has eternized his 
fame. This humble tribute is but to footh the forrowing bread of private woe." 

On the back, 
" To the memory of William Pitt, earl Of Chatham, this marble is inferibed by 
Heftcr his beloved wife, 1 78i." b 

With regard to the landed property of this place, it hath had a variety of families 
for its owners. In Edward the Confefibr's reign it was the deroefnc of the crown,, 
and had a church, as we read in that notable Norman record called Domefday, 
wherein Curry is thus furvcyed: 

" The king holds Churi. King Edward the Confeflbr held it. It never paid tax, 
" nor is it known how many bides are there. The arable is thirteen carucates. In 
" demefne are three carucates, and five fen ants, and twenty villanes, and two cottagers, 

b This illuftrious fenator, whofe chara&er is too well known to need our encomiums, was created vifcount 
Pitt, of Burton-Pynfent, in the county of Somerfet, and earl of Chatham, in the county of Kent, July 30, 
1766, 6 Geo. III. His lordfhip's arms are, /able, a fefs checque, er and azure, between three bezants. 
Creft, on a wreath, a crane dofe, proper, beaked and membered er, holding his dexter foot upon an anchor 
ereft er. 

Vol. I. E vith 



2 6 CURRY -RIVE L. [Stoicfe 

with ten ploughs. There are forty acres of meadow, and a wood two miles long, 
and one mile broad. It yields twenty-one pounds and fifty pence, allowing twenty to 
the ounce. 

" From this manor is taken one virgate of land. Bretel held it of earl Moreton, 
and it is worth ten millings and eight-pence. 

" The three manors of Nord-Peret, Sud-Peret, and Churi, in the time of king 
" Edward, paid the farm of one night with its appendages. 

" In the church of Curi is half a hide. A prieft has there one carucate. Eddida 
" the monk holds in free alms of the king twelve acres of land. There are eighty 
" acres of wood and pafture. It is worth five (hillings." 

It feems to have continued in the crown till the reign of Richard the firft, when 
it was granted with Langport to Richard Revel, or Rivel, a perfon of great note, and 
iheriff of the counties of Devon and Cornwall, for feveral fucceflive years.' 1 

This Richard left an only daughter, by name Sabina, who was wedded to Henry 
L'Orti, or de Urtiaco, from which match Curry became the inheritance of that family. 
In 2 1 Henry III. this Henry obtained licence of the king to impark his woods here, 
in order to be exempt from the regard of the neighbouring foreft of Neroche.* He 
died 26 Henry III. and Sabina his wife furviving him had livery of the lands of 
her inheritance. 

To him fucceeded another of his name, who was in great eftimation with king 
Edw. I. in 25 th of whofe reign he was fummoned to parliament amongfl the barons of 
this realm, and foon after procured a charter of free warren in his demefne lands in 
this village;' a liberty which, after the Norman conqueft, was abfolutely necefiary for 
every landholder who was difpofed to enjoy himfelf on his own territories. He de- 
ceafed 14 Edward II. leaving iffue a third Henry, who had livery of his lands, and 
died 1 5 Edward III. then feized of this manor, with the advowfon of the church, 
which he held of the king in chief by the fervice of one knight's fee.* He was fuc- 
ceeded by John his fon and heir, who inherited the eftate, but left no male iffue. 

After which this manor pafied to the family of Montacute, and from them to the 
Beauforts, marquifes of Dorfet. 

In the reign of Henry VII. it belonged to the bifhop of Bath and Wells, who 
alienated it to the bifhop of London. It afterwards came to the crown, and 

30 Henry VIII. was granted to the duke of Norfolk. 3 Eliz. it was held in chief 
by Henry lord Strange and lady Margaret his wife, with remainder to the heirs of 
the body of Charles late duke of Suffolk; but it feems to have been alienated fhortly 
after: for 8 Eliz. Thomas Snagge and Jeffery Morley are certified to be lords thereof. 1 ' 

34 Eliz. a yearly rent was paid out of Curry-Rivel to the dean and chapter of Wells. 

«Lib. Domefday. « Cart. 21 Hen. III. m. 6. *Efc. 

* Cart, in Turr. Lond. f Cart. 32 Edw. I. n. 35. * MS. donat. 

42 Eliz. 



antnsulflon.] curry-rivel. 27 

42 Eliz. Roger Forte appears to have been lord of this manor,' which after pafllng 
through fcveral other hands came at length to the Acland family; and being now 
divided belongs to Mrs. Maria Acland, and William Barber, efq; who hold court - 
leet and baron annually. 

In 1292, 20 Edw. I. the church was valued at thirty marks; 11 but 26 Hen. VIII. 
at 13I. 1 6s. It was appropriated by biftiop Erghum in 139 1 to the prioiy of Byfliam 
in Berks. 8 Eliz. the rectory and advowfon of the vicarage belonged to William 
Clifton, efq; in whofe family it remained for fomc defecnts : they feem likewifc to 
have had fome fharc in the manor. The patronage is now veiled in lady Chatham 
and George Speke, of Jordans near Ilminftcr, efq. The rev. Samuel Alford is the 
prefent incumbent. The vicarage is worth about iool. per annum; but has neither 
glebe, queen's bounty, nor any private donation. 

The church ftands on an eminence, and is a very handfome ftructure, compofed 
of a nave, chancel, and two fide ailes, covered with (late. At the weft end is a large 
embattled tower, with a clock and five bells : under the battlements thereof, on the 
fouth fide, is a ftatue of St. Andrew, its patron faint. The roof is twenty-eight feet 
high, but plain; that of the chancel is twenty-fix feet, ceiled in fquare compartments 
between the ribs of the arches. The roof is fupportcd by light and elegant cluftcred 
pillars, painted marble colour. The pulpit is of mahogany, finely carved and gilded. 

In the chancel is a ftately tomb, with an arched canopy, on the top of which are 
four reclining cherubs, and arms ; argent, a chevron, or, between three bezants. On 
a chief ermine, three cinquefoils gules. Creft, a redbreaft fitting on a wreathed 
murion. On this tomb lie the effigies, in ftone, of two men in compktc armour; 
but much mutilated. At their heads is this infeription : 

" Here lyeth the body of Marmaduke Jennings, efq; who was buried the 25th of 

April 1625. /Etat. 58. 

" And alfo Robert Jennings, efq ; who was buried May 7, 1630. /Etat. 32." 
The Jennings's were of Burton-Pynfent. Mary the daughter and coheir of Thomas 

Jennings, efq; was married to fir William Pynfent, bart. whofe family gave the 

additional name of that eftate. 

At their feet is the following infeription: 
" Et pater et natus tumulo conduntur eodem: 

Quis renuat cum mors imperiofa vocat? 
Pnevius eftgenitor: patre dempto vivere nollet 

Filius; officium praeftitit ille fuum. 
Hinc fibi bina meus lector documenta capefiat; 

Quo poffit recte vivere, vclle mori." 

At one end of this tomb is inferibed, 
" If age or youth could quitt us from the graue 
Or all th' endowments that belong to both 

« MS. donat. k Tsuot. Spiritual, 

Ea Wee 



z8 CURRY-RIVE L. [StJUitft 

Wee would implead th' unequal fates and fave 
The father for his age, the fon for's youth. 
But fince intomb'd together here they lie 
What mall I fay but this, that all muft dy." 

On the fides of this tomb are the portraitures of many children kneeling, and two 
little beds, with three infants in one, and two in the other; together with the effigies of 
Mary Powel, Fran. Bifhop, and Elizabeth Townfend. 

Under the north wall, at the end of the aile, are five gothick niches, in which lie 
effigies in ftoneof feveral branches of the Jennings and the Trevelyan families; but 
much mutilated. 

On the remains of an old broken tomb is this legend : 

f Here lyeth the bodie of Raphe the fonne of Raphe Trevillian, who died April 
1624, aged 27." . 

* When thou kneeleft down to pray to God 
Remember him in hart and word 
If at the facrament thou bee 
Beleive in Chrift that died for thee 
Trevillian 's wife dur'inge her life 56 
Yeares, and die her huf band's mother." 1 

Near the above is a fione tomb, on the tablet of which is this infeription : 
** Here lyeth Robert Jennings, deceafed the 10 th of December 1593." 

" As thou art now fometime was I 

But now as thou muft be, 
In life a man, a man is dull 

Inclofed in clay you fee. 
Doe good therefore, this is the ftate 

Of all that yeildeth breath; 
For fodenlye death on them feife, 

And brings them to the earth. 
Here is my home till trumpet fonds 

And Chrift for me doth call, 
Then ftialle I ryfe to lyfe againe, 

No more to dye at alle." 

On a monument of black marble in the eaft wall : 

" Here lyeth the body of Marmaduke Jennings, efq; who died Dec. 7, 1660. He 
was fon of Mar. Jennings, efq; who alfo lyeth here by." 

" Here lyeth the body of Ann Pitt, wife of John Pitt, of Meriot, efq; who dyed 
July 16, 1678, who was the daughter of Mar. Jennings, efq." 

1 This is truly copied. 

At 



ano TBulflon,] curry, rive l. 2St 

At the eaft end of the fouth aile are three plain mural monuments or black flone 
to the Powel family : 

" Here lyeth the body of Samuel Powel, cfq ; who dyed July 7, 1 738, aged 46 years, 
whofe predeceflbrs, for two generations, lye buried in the chancel under the com- 
munion table, from one fide to the other. 

" Samuel Powel, his elded fon, died Jan. 24, 1739, aged 17. 

" To the memory of Henry Powel, cfq ; the laft male iftuc of that ancient family. 
He executed the office of high flicriff of this county in the year 1759, with great 
reputation to himfelf and fatisfaction to his friends. Mis regular and exemplary 
attendance on the publick offices of religion, declared the difpofition of his mind a.<. 
a chriftian: his benevolence, affability, and humanity, whereby he acquired the love 
and eftecm of all ranks and conditions whilft living, and the grief univcrfally (hewn 
at his death, arc fufficient indications of his character as a member of fociety. He 
died March 14, 1769, aged 39." 

Arms, parted per pale, three lions rampant langued. 

" To the memory of Sarah Powel, (relict of Samuel Powel, efq ; ) whofe liberal 
hofpitality, engaging affability, fincerity in fricndftiip, and beneficence to the poor, 
rendered her amiable in life, and in death univcrfally regretted. She died March 
26, 1783, aged 90." 

. In the chancel floor: 

" Here lieth the body of George Spckc, clq; fon of George Spekc, cfq; who died 
Nov. 18, 1758, aged 25 years." 

Here are alfo fix flat ftones with inferiptions to many branches of the Jennings family. 

On another flone : 

" Here waits in expectation of the laft day John Atwood. What kind of a man 
he was that day will determine. He died April 21, 1765, aged 73. 

" Underneath this ftonc (at his particular requeft) are depofited the remains of 
Richard John Atwood, who died May 14, 1775, setat. 37. 

"Alfo thofe of Louifa Ann Atwood, his daughter, who died Aug. 31, 1772, 
an infant." 

On another ftonc : 

U.S. 

" Thomas Alford, A. M. hujus parochial vicarius, qui in medio vitae curriculo, 
heu! fincm attigit, longiori vita dignus, nifi mcliori dignior. Obijt omnibus fuis 
admodum flcbilis, fed nulli flebilior quani charae uxori, quae hoc noviflimo pignore 
pium animi ardorem teftari voluit. 

f falutis 1708, 
Anno i sntatis fuse 36." 

Hero 



3 o E A R N S H I L L. [abUicfc 

Here are alfo (tones in the floor with the names of Wahh, White, Hilliard, and 
Podger. 

Over the fouth door is a lift of donations to the poor of the parifh of Curry-Rivel: 

". Mrs. Johanna Alford, of Farrington in the county of Berks, gave by her will 
the fum of 20I. every year, for ever, to ten families of the fecond poor refiding and 
inhabiting within this parifh. To be distributed each year between Michaelmas and 
Chriftmas by the minifter and churchwardens. 

" " Mrs. Barthya Atwood, widow of Richard John Atwood, late of St. James 's-ftreet, 
London, (whofe remains are depofited in this chancel) gave by her will iool. which, 
with the addition of iol. 15s. from the poors ftock, was laid out in the purchafe of 
200I. in the three per cent, confolidated annuities, the intereft of which ftock is to 
be laid out in bread, and diftributed to the poor on Chriftmas-day and New- Year's- 
day, for ever." 

" Marmaduke Alford gave a new communion table and railing, with a bible, 
common-prayer book, and furplice, to the church." 

The births on an annual average are twenty-eight; the burials feventeen. 



EARNSHILL. 

SOUTHWARD from Curry-Rivel is a very ancient fpot, but now in a manner 
depopulated, called Eamfhill, or Hearnfhill, written in Domefday book Eme/bele 
and Erne/el, and probably fo denominated from fome Saxon owner. In the faid furvey 
the place is thus defcribed : 

" Ulward holds of Roger de Corcelle Ernefhele. Living held it in the time of 
" king Edward, and paid for it at the rate of half a hide. The arable is one caru- 
" cate and a half: in demefne is one carucate, with one fervant, and three cottagers. 
" There are eight acres of meadow, and eight acres of pafture. It is worth twelve 
« millings. " 

" Girard holds Ernefel. Living held it in the time of king Edward, and gelded 
" for one hide of land. The arable confifts of one carucate. There is one cottager, 
u and two fervants, and fix acres of meadow, and ten acres of wood. It was formerly, 
u and is now, worth thirty (hillings. "' 

It is evident, that in the Saxon times thefe lands were only one manor, as we fee 
in the above extract they were both poffefied by the fame perfon of the name of 
laving. Small as it was, the Conqueror disjointed it, as he did many other manors, 

* Lib. Domefday. 

to 



nntJ TBulflon.] CURRY- MALLET. 31 

to gratify the numerous train that attended him, and looked up to him each for a 
(hare of his newly acquired territory. 

Thefe parcels of land were however reunited foon after the conqueft, and inprocefs 
of time beftowed upon the abbey of Muchclncy. In 30 Hen. VIII. the manor was 
granted to Edward earl of Hertford, in the fchcdulc of whofe cftates it is valued at 
14I. 1 os. 8d. per annum. k It afterwards belonged to the Jennings's, and is now the 
property of Mrs. Coombc, relict of the late Richard Coombe, cfq. The feat is a 
modern building of brick and frcc-ftone, and is pleafantly fituatcd on a riling ground, 
finely intcrfperfed with elm and other timber trees. 

This place had anciently a chapel appendant to Curry-Rivel, c but was afterwards 
ere&ed into a parifh of itfelf: the benefice is rectorial, and in the valuation of Hen. 
VIII. was rated at 2I. is. o^d. a penfion of two (hillings was paid out of it to the vicar 
of Curry-Rivel. 

When and by what means the church was destroyed, wc have no account tranfmitted 
to us. 

b MS. valor in the poflelfion of his grace the duke of Somerfet. 
« Dr. Hutton's Collections in the Harleian Library. 



CURRY-MALLET. 

THIS parifh lies in the weftern extremity of the hundred, on the borders of 
North Curry, and, including the fmall hamlet of Stcwley, contains fifty-three 
houfes, and about two hundred and feventy inhabitants. The greater part of the 
houfes, which are meanly built, form a draggling ftreet near the church. The reft 
are called High-ftrcet, or High Curry-Mallet, in which is an ancient manfion belong- 
ing to Mr. Pine, the only freeholder in the parifti. Near this houfc was formerly a 
fmall chapel, but it has long fince been demolifhcd. The turnpike road from Lang- 
port to Taunton is made through a part of this parifh. 

Its fituation is flat and woody: the foil a ftiffclay, and produces principally wheat, 
beans, peas, and vetches. There is rather more arable than pafture: the former 
worth on an average eight (hillings, the latter twenty (hillings an acre. It has a right 
of common in Wcft-Sedgmoor. 

A revel is held here on the feaft of St. James. 

In the Conqueror's time this manor was poflcfled by Roger dc Corcelle, or Churchill, 
an illultrious Norman, whofe cftates here are thus furvcyed: 

" Roger de Corcelle holds of the king Curi. Brictric held it in the time of king 
* Edward, and paid tax for three hides and a half. The arable is four carucatcs, 

■ whereof 



32 CURRY-MALLET. [abtJicfc 

«« whereof in demefne is one hide; and there are two carucates, and two fervants, and 
"eleven villanes, and feven cottagers, with three carucates and a half. There are 
*' twelve acres of meadow, and five acres of pafture, and half a mile of wood in 
•' length and breadth. It was worth four pounds, now one hundred (hillings." 

" Roger himfelf holds Curi. Celric held it in the time of Edward the Confeffor, 
41 and was rated at three hides and a half. The arable is four carucates, of which 
c< in demefne is one hide, and there is one carucate, with one fervant, and ten vil- 
" lanes, and {even cottagers, with three carucates and a half. There are ten acres of 
" meadow, and five acres of pafture, and half a mile of wood in length and breadth. 
" It was worth four pounds, now one hundred ihillings. Thefe two lands Roger holds 
" for one manor."* 

The lords of this place, from whom in after days it aflumed its additional name, 
were perfonages of moft diftinguifhed eminence in the feveral periods wherein 
they lived. 

The firft of the Malets, or Mallets, of whom any particular mention is made in 
hiftory, is William Malet, who diftinguifhed himfelf in the memorable battle of 
Haftings, under the banners of the victorious Norman; and was one of thofe who 
were deputed to fee the body of Harold, there flain, decently interred. In the third 
year after this event, this William was fheriff for Yorkfhire. By Hefilia his wife he 
left iffue a fon called Robert, b a great favourite of king William; from whom he 
obtained immenfe eftates in various counties, which are fpecified in the great furvey 
of that reign. He likewife held the office of great chamberlain of England ; but 
fiding with Robert Curthofe, in the reign of Henry the firft, he was difherited of his 
property, and baniihed the kingdom. To him fucceeded William Malet, who is 
mentioned as a benefactor to the abbey of Glaftonbury;' and after him another 
William, who 2 Hen. II. paid the fum of twenty-five pounds for danegeld in this 
county ;'' and in the twelfth year of the fame reign, upon the afTeffinent of the aid 
for marrying the king's daughter, he certified the knight's fees he then held to be in 
number upwards of twenty-one of the old feoffment, and upwards of two knights 
fees of the new: -for all thefe fees, in 14 Hen. II. he paid the fum of fifteen pounds 
twelve (hillings and ten-pence. He left iffue William Malet his fon and heir, who, 
7 Ric. I. upon paying the fine of one hundred pounds, had livery of the lands of his 
inheritance. This William refided at Curry, which was then the principal feat of 
his barony; and 12 John ferved the office of fheriff for this county and Dorfetfhire. 
He married Alice the daughter of Thomas Baffet, of Hedington in the county of 
Oxford, and had iffue one fon William, (who died without iffue) and feveral daughters, 
one of whom, Helewife by name, being married to fir Hugh Ponz, or Poinz, carried 
this manor, which fhe had for her fhare in the divifion of her father's lands, to the 
Poinz family. 

* Lib. Domefday. ... . *.Cartular. ejufd. Monaft. e Lib. nig. 93. 

* Dug'd. Bar. 1, iii. ''Rot. pip. 2 Hen. II. 

The 



nnDTBllIflon.] CURRY-MALLET. 33 

The aforcfaid fir Hugh Poinz died 4 Hen. III. leaving ifluc Nicholas Poinz his fon 
and heir, who, 38 Hen. III. upon the collection of the aid then levied for making 
the king's elded fon a knight, paid twenty-three pounds nine (hillings and live-pence 
for the moiety of the fees of William Mallet.' This Nicholas was one of thofe 
barons that took up arms againft the king, and died 2 Edw. I. then feized of the 
manor of Curry, which he is certified to have held of the king in capitc by military 
fervice. 1 To which Nicholas fucceeded Hugh his fon and heir, who 2 Edward I. 
doing homage, had livery of his lands; and 1 1 Edw. I. paid fifty pounds for his relief 
of the moiety of the barony of Mallet. He was fummoned to parliament amongft 
the barons of this realm from the year 1295 to 1307, in which laft year he died feized 
of Curry, which he held as a moiety of a barony of the king in chief by the fervice 
of one knight's fee. h He left iflue Nicholas Poinz his heir, who was, at 'the date of 
his did father's deceafe, of the age of thirty years, and in the fame year had livery 
of all his lands. This Nicholas was in the Scottilh wars in the latter part of the 
reign of Edward the firft, and the commencement of that of Edward the fecond, 
when he had fummons to parliament. 1 He took to wife Elizabeth the daughter of 
Millicent de Montealt, by whom, deceafing 5 Edw. II. he left ifiiie one fon of the 
name of Hugh, then eighteen years of age. To this Hugh was granted by king 
Idward the fecond a licence for a market in this his manor of Curry on Mondays, 
and a fair yearly on the eve, day and morrow of the feaft of All Saints. k 1 8 Edw. II. 
he received the honour of knighthood, and had likewife fummons to parliament*by 
the title of lord Poyntz, baron of Curry-Mallet, till the year 1337, when he died 
feized of the manor and advowfon of the church. Soon after the above date, we 
find the family of Gournay pofieffed of the manor of Curry-Mallet, from whom it 
came to the crown. 

In a parliament held at Wcftminfter 1 1 Edw. III. it having been determined that 
the king's eldeft fon fhould from that time forward poffefs the title of duke of Corn- 
wall ; this manor of Curry, with many others, was appropriated towards the fupport 
of the faid dignity. It was afterwards granted out by the crown to divers perfons; 
but ft ill remains the property of the Prince of Wales, and as fuch, is parcel of the 
dutchy of Cornwall. 

The church, valued in 1 292 at fifteen marks, is a rectory in the deanery of 
Crew kerne. The Prince of Wales, as lord of the manor, is patron, and the rev. 
William Spekc, B. D. the prefent incumbent. 

The church (which is dedicated to St. James) is a Gothic ftructure, ninety-eight 
feet long, and forty-four feet wide, confifting of a nave, chancel, a north and fmall 
fouth aile, and porch, all tiled except the nave and north aile, which are leaded. At 
the weft end is a plain embattled tower, fifty feet high, containing five fmall bells. 
The chancel has been lately rebuilt, the roof nineteen feet high, with a neat plain 
ceiling. 

f Rot. pip. 38 Hen. IH. (fife, >>Efc. ' Dugd. Bar. I, 2. » Cart. 16 Edw. II. 

V01. 1. F In 



34 CURRY-MALLET. [SHHJicfe 

Ift the north aile is a large tomb, in which are depofited the remains of one of the 
family of Mallet ; but the infcriptions are quite illegible. About fixty years fince, 
on opening this tomb, the corpfe was found entire, with one of the legs drawn up ; 
which correfponds with the tradition that the perfon interred herein had a con- 
tracted leg. 

In the fame aile is a fmall mural monument of alabafter of the Ionick order, on 
which is the effigy of a lady kneeling at a reading ftand, with two children reclined at 
bottom, but no infcription. 

In the fouth aile is an antique mural monument of alabafter. Two round detached 
columns of the Ionick order fupport an open pediment. Underneath, in two arched 
i ecefles, are the ftatues of a man and woman kneeling on cufhions ; and on the tablet 
is the following infcription; viz. 

«' Obdormiunt fub hoc marmore Johannes Pyne de Curry Mallet, armiger, ct 
Juliana Uxor ejus cariffima, qui mortalitatis pallium exuentes (ille 25 Decembris 1609, 
hasc 2 Maii 1628) ad horrendum tubas fonum immortalitatis ftolam przeftolantur. 
Denaria prole felices folum tamen natu fecundum Hugonem Pyne de Cathanger 
armigerum habuere parentalia curantem, cujus impenfis hoc qualecunque monu- 
mentum debiti officii teftimonium pofitum et confecratum fecit 1642." 

The former infcription on ftone being effaced, it has been copied on a brafs plate 
which is affixed. 

In the chancel, on the north fide, is a monument, with the following infcription : 

" Radulphus Mighill facra? theologias baccalaureus theologus eximius omni lingua- 
rum artium fcientiarum genere longe eruditiffimus fapientia et vitae fanclitate clarus 
cvangelicae doclrinje praeconem femper agens et docendi afiiduitate reverendiffimus 
annis plus minus triginta feptem hujus ecclefiae paftor vigilantiffimus magno de fe 
apud omnes defiderio reliclo fie fepultus jacet. Mortalitem in exuit vicefimo tertio 
die menus Julij, anno aetatis fuse feptuagefimo ahoq. doni, 1633." 

In the chancel, on the north fide, on a plain oval tablet of black marble: 

" To the memory of the rev. Charles Pulteney, late rector of this place. Ob'- 
May 6 th , 1 77 1, aetat. 66." 

On a plain oval tablet of white marble : 
" This cenotaph is inferibed to the memory of Geo. A. Pulteney, efq; who, after 
twelve years diftinguifhed fervices, was promoted by fir George Rodney to the com- 
mand of his Majefty's fhip the Prince Edward of 64 guns, and died on board her 
off the coaft of Ireland, May 20 th , 1781, aetat. 27. 

•• Virtutem difce ex illo verofque labores, 
" Fortunam ex aliis." 



UONYAT. 



anDTBuiaon,] [ 35 ] 



D O N Y A T. 

TI IIS parilli is iituatcd two miles fouthweft from Ilminfter, and four miles north 
from Chard. The hamlet of Widney, containing twelve houfes, and a part of 
Crock-ftrcct, belong to this parifh. The reft of the houfes are moftly iituatcd near 
the church; the whole number being about fifty, and of inhabitants near three 
hundred. Not more than half a mile call from the church is the ancient manor 
houfe, called Park Farm, which was formerly a feat belonging to one of the dukes 
of Somcrfct. 

This parifh is plcafantly fituated, and well wooded and watered, the river Ifle 
running through it in its way to Ilminfter. Over this ftream a ftonc bridge of one 
arch has been erected, and is kept in repair by the commiflloners of the turnpike. 
Mere are alfo three timber bridges, repaired by the lord of the manor. 

About a mile northeaft from the church is a circular eminence called Heron Hill ; 
on the top of which is a fine plantation of firs, intermixed with a few beeches, and 
covering an area which contains near two acres. This plantation was made by the 
late Richard Coombes, efq; of Earnfliill, and is in a thriving ftate. The foil of this 
hill is light and fandy ; but that of the parifh in general is a good loamy ftone rufh, 
and produces good crops of wheat, peas, barley, oats, and clover, with a few turnips » 
but improved hufbandry is little underftood in this and fcveral of the neighbouring 
parifhes. The foil abounds with lime-ftone and coarfe ycllowilh flints; but little, if 
any, marie has been found here. Here are many large orchards. The price of 
labour is one Hulling a day and cyder. 

In the hamlet of Crock-ftrect arc three potteries, in which a confiderablc quantity 
of coarfc earthen ware is made. 

Here is a labourers club confiding of eighty-four members, who contribute two- 
pence a week each for their mutual fupport in times of ficknefs and in old age; and 
by thefe means the parochial rates are much eafier than in divers other parilhcs. 

A revel is held here on the Tuefday following Allhallows-day. 

Here is an alms-houfc founded by John Dunfter, of London, who, by his laft will 
dated Auguft 1625, gave the fums of 6opl. iool. and 2Ql. to the following ufes, vi/.. 
600I. for the purchafing of lands, to be conveyed and allured to certain truilccs, who 
were enjoined to beftow the rents and profits thereof, " towards the perpetual main- 
" tenancy of fix poor people; i. c. three men and three women, in the alms-houfc of 
" Donyat," which he had before that time founded and creeled. " The men to be 
" of the age of fifty-fix years at leaft, and unmarried ; and the women to be fifty 
" at leaft, and unmarried." They were to be of the parifti of Donyat, if fuch were 
there found; if not, they were to be of the parifhes of Ilminfter and Broadway. 

The faid fum of 1 ool. was alfo bequeathed for " tbc n/itf" of the poor in the faid 
alms-houfe. The 20I. he bequeathed to the miniftcr and churchwardens of Donyat 

F2 



36 D O N Y A T. [9bmcit 

for the time being, to remain, and be delivered from churchwarden to churchwarden 
fucceflively, for a flock for the faid church. 

By a deed dated 22 Novemb. 10 Car. I. it appears that the executors of John 
JDunfter's will purchafed fome fee-farm rents to the amount of forty-fix pounds per 
annum, out of the manors and re&ories of Deverell-Longbridge, and Monckton- 
Deverell, in the county of Wilts. 

In the Saxon times there were no lefs than three manors here, all of which were 
held by one perfon; but at the conqueft being reduced to one manor, it then became 
the property of Robert earl of Morton, as it is recorded in Domefday book : 

" Drogo holds of the carl Doniet. Adulfus, Sawin, and Dunftan, held it for three 
■" manors in the time of king Edward, and gelded for five hides. The arable is five 
" carucates. In demefne is one carucate, and three fervants, and fix villanes, and 
" nine bordars, with two ploughs. There is a mill not rated, and twenty acres of 
" meadow, and fifty acres of pafture, and a park. It was and is worth one hundred 
" {hillings. This manor pays a rent to Curi, the king's manor, of five fheep with 
" their lambs. " a 

In the fubfequent records this manor is certified to be held of the king in capite 
by the family of Montacute, as parcel of the large manor of Shepton-Montacute in 
this county. They had here a capital feat and manfion, which William de Montacute, 
2 Edward III. caufed to be fortified and embattled; but having done this without 
licence, he was obliged to fue the king's pardon, which he obtained the following 
year; b as likewife to impark a certain portion of his lands within this parifh, the 
greateft part whereof feems to have belonged to him. c This William was afterwards 
advanced to the title of earl of Salifbury, and died feized of Donyat 1 7 Edw. III. d 

From this family it came after many defcents to that of Pole. 23 Hen. VIII. it 
was valued at 27I. 19s. 6d. c being then parcel of the eftates of Margaret countefs of 
Sarum, widow of fir Richard Pole^ and modier to Cardinal Pole. The faid Mar- 
garet was attainted in parliament 31 Henry VIII. and beheaded 23 Henry VIII. On 
her death it reverted to the crown, and was granted to Edward earl of Hertford, in 
whofe fchedule it is valued at 31 1. 5s. 1 id. f We next find it in the pofTeflion of lord 
Lovel, who afterwards fold it to Richard Coombes, efq; of Earnfhill, of whofe widow, 
Mrs. Ann Coombes, it is now the property. 

The living was in the year 1 292 valued at eight marks, 5 and 26 Hen. VIII. at 
15I. 15s. It is in the deanery of Crewkern. The patronage of the rectory is 
appendant to the manor; and the rev. Mr. Thomas is the prefent incumbent. 

The church {which is dedicated to the Virgin Mary) is eighty feet long, and forty- 
two feet wide; confifting of a nave, chancel, north and fouth ailes, and a porch, the 
whole covered with lead. At the weft end is a quadrangular embattled tower iixty- 

a Lib. Domefday. c Cart, antiq. e Dugd. Bar. v. 2. p. 292. « Taxat, Spiritual. 

b Pat. 3 Edw. III. p. 2. m. 24. * Efc. f MS. valor. 

three 



antJlSulfton.] west-do wlish n 

three feet high, with a turret at one corner, and u t!o< k and tour beila. 1 arch 

is damp and dirty, and the pews, feats, and pavement, going lail to decay. 

Over the communion table is a fmall, but very neat, mural monument of ivhita 
marble, terminated with a cone of grey marble three feet high, pa which h the 
following infeription: 

" Underneath lies the body of the rev. Charles Campbell, A. If. ree'lor of tin* 
parifh, who departed this life the 2Q lh day of May 1746, aged 32 > cars. 

" Alfo the body of Mrs. Bridget Campbell his mother, widow of John Campbell, 
of Dublin, M. D. She departed this life the 26"' day of December 1750, aged 
65 years. 

" Her fincerc piety, and firm belief of a better life after this, fhe manifefted by 
her true parental affection. For lhe blefied her children with an early, and ftrictly 
religious education. Out of a deep fenfe of the incftimablc worth of that treafure, 
this ftone is erected to her memory." 



WEST-DOWLISH. 

WEST-DOWLISH is a fmall parifh fituatcd one mile fouth from Ilminfter, to 
which it adjoins, confiding of the two hamlets of Moolham and Oxcnford, 
which, together, contain about ten houfes, and about fifty-fix inhabitants. 

The land is generally good, being about two-thirds pafture, and the reft arable. 

Within this parifti there is a quarry of large hard ftone, with which the church of 
Ilminfter, and fome others in the neighbourhood were built. It contains a few folfils 
of the cornu ammonis, venus, and belemnite kinds. 

We have no mention of this Dowlifh in the Norman furvey. After the conqueft 
it was fome time held by the lords of Donyat. It was in the reign of Edward I. 
the property of the family of Wake/ of whom Ralph Wake, or dc Wake, died feized 
thereof 32 Edw. L In the reign of Edw. III. it was held by John Wake, who in 
1347 enfeoffed Ifabcl the wife of John dc Keines of this his faid manor. b To which 
Ifabel fuccceded Thomas Keines her fon and heir, who died feized of Weft-Dow hih 
35 Edw. III. This Thomas had a ion of the name of John, who inherited the fame; 
after whom we find it poffeffed by another John, who deccafed 7 Hen. V. and was 
fuccceded by a third John Keines, who died the following year, viz. 8 Hen. V. then 
certified to be feized of the manor of Weft-Dowlifti, and the advowfon of the church.' 

* The Wakes were likewife lords of the other Dowlilh in South-Petherton hundred, and gave the name 
thereto to duYmguifh it from this. b Efc. ' Ibid. 

Joan, 



3» DRAYTON. [afojicfe 

Joan, the daughter of the laft John Keines, was married to John Speke, efq; who 
in her right pofieflmg this manor, it became the inheritance of that ancient family; 
the rev. W. Speke, B. D. of Jordans, being the prefent lord. 

The benefice of Weft-Dowlifh is rectorial, and has of old been appendant to the 
manor. It is now a finecure. The rev. Septimus Collinfon, fellow of Queen's college 
in Oxford, is the prefent incumbent. 

The church has been in ruins more than a century: it was dedicated to St. John 
Baptift, and in 1535 was valued in the king's books at 3I. 7s. 6d. The church-yard 
Hill remains, and has eleven ancient tombs in it, but almoft overgrown with briars 
and nettles. The inhabitants attend the church of Eaft-Dowlifh. 



DRAYTON. 

AT the diftance of nine miles eaftward from Ilminfter, and two weft from Lang- 
port, {lands Drayton, the river Parret dividing it from Muchelney, and the He 
from Lambrook and Kingfbury. 

This parifh is flat, damp, and woody, and is almoft furrounded by moors. It con- 
tains about fifty houfes, which are moftly built with rough (tone, or mud, thatched. 
Forty of them form the village of Drayton, an irregular rtreet near the church; three 
"others are in the hamlet of Week, one mile northweft; and the remainder are feparate 
houfes. The number of fouls about two hundred and fixty-eight. 

The lands are chiefly a mixture of meadow and pafture, and on an average worth 
thirty {hillings an acre. There is however a confiderable (hare of arable in common 
fields, which produce good crops of wheat and barley, worth at leaft twenty {hillings 
per acre. The ftone here is a ftrong lyas. The roads are rough in fummer, and 
miry in winter. 

The manor anciently belonged to the abbey of Muchelney, as appears from the 
. following record : 

M The church itfelf holds Draitune. In king Edward's time it gelded for twenty 
*' hides. The arable is fifteen carucates, whereof in demefne are eleven hides, and 
" two virgates and a half; and there are fix carucates, and ten fervants, and fixteen 
" villanes, and fourteen cottagers, with nine ploughs. There are fifty acres of meadow, 
" and pafture two miles in length and one in breadth. A wood two miles long, and 
*' one and a half wide. Of thefe twenty hides Celric and Ulward hold two. Thcfe 
" were held by Brictuin and Leuing of the abbey, in the time of king Edward, and 
" were infeparable from it. There are four cottagers, and three acres of meadow, 
" and thirty-five acres of pafture, and feven acres of wood. The whole is worth 
" ten pounds."' 

* Lib. Domefday. 

In 



ann TBtlWon.] D R A V T O N. V) 

In the year 1293 thecftates of the faid abbey iiuhis place were valued at 81. 12s. 6d." 
The monks continued to enjoy the manor till the dhTohition of their houfc, when it 
was conferred by king Henry VIII. on Edward earl of Hertford. It wasafteruank 
alienated, and became the property of the Trcvclyan family. 5 

The patronage of the church was anciently in the abbot and convent of Muchclney 
aforefaidj but after the diflblutionof that monaftery, the rcclory, with theadvowfon 
of the vicarage, was granted by king Henry VIII. together with certain other rectories 
and advowfons in this county, all parcels of the pofleflions of the faid late diflblvcd 
monaftery, to Edward earl of Hertford. He, 27 March of the fame year, rccon- 
veyed this property to the crown; and the king thereupon, by letters patent bearing 
date 1 8 November 1542, granted the fame to the dean and chapter of Briftol, and 
their fucceflbrs, who are the prefent patrons. The rev. Mr. Goddard, of Devcrcll, 
Wilts, is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is a very ancient edifice, compofed of a body, north ailc, chancel, and 
porch, covered with tiles. It has an embattled tower at the welt end, forty feet 
high, with a turret at the northeaft angle, a clock, and five bells. The length of the 
church is ninety-fix feet, the breadth twenty-feven. The entrance into it from the 
porch is under a fine Saxon arch. 

In the north aile is a plain mural monument of black ftone, with the following 
infeription: 

"M..S. 

" Johannis Trevillian de Middlency intra hanc parochiam armigeri. Qui imo 
anno Georgii imi regis comitatus Somerfetenfis vicecomitis et multos per annos 
juftitiarii ad pacem ut et burgi Langportcnfis recordatoris fumma prudentia, fide & 
honore muneribus perfunctus eft. Obiit Dcccmbris die 19 

Anno S Domi " i I 74f.. 
I jetat. fuae 7 8°. 

In the church-yard are two fine yew-trees, with circular ftone feats under them; 
and an old ftone crofs, with three rows of fteps, in good repair. 

Here are alfo two tombs to the Fry and Meade families ; and a few head-ftoncs. 

A revel is held here on Whit-Monday. 

Within thisparifh is an ancient manor called Middlency, which likewifc belonged 
to Muchelney abbey/ and pafled with Drayton and the other lands to the duke of 
Somerfet, in whofe fchcdule it ftands valued at the annual fum of 9I. 2s. io»d. 

b Taxat. temporal. e Lib. Domcfi ; 



FIVEHEAD. 



[ 40 ] tattoicfc 



FIVEHEAD. 

THE parifh of Fivehead is fituated to the caft of Curry-Mallet, on the north fide 
of a large fine common, called He Moor, or Ilmoor. The lite is rather flat 
and woody; the foil heavy, and the lands nearly equally divided between pafture and 
arable. In a quarry of blue, and another of white lyas, are found petrified oyfter 
{hells, mufcles, cardiums, anomias, and cornua ammonis. The inhabitants have a 
right of common on Weft-Sedgmoor. The number of houfes within this parifh is 
fifty-fix. It contains three manors, viz. Fivehead, Staye, and Cathanger. 

The firft of thefe belonged in the time of William the conqueror to Roger de 
Churchill. 

" Bertran holds of Roger Fifhide. Aldred held it in the time of king Edward, 
" and gelded for one hide and a half. The arable is two carucates. In demefne is 
*' one carucate, and two fervants, and four cottagers. There are fifteen acres of 
" meadow, and twenty acres of wood. It was worth thirty fhillings, now forty 
*' fhillings.'* 1 

It afterwards became the property of the abbots of Muchelney, whofe poffeffions 
here were in 1293 valued at forty fhillings. b 29 Hen. VIII. this manor was granted 
to Edward earl of Hertford, and 1 8 Eliz. was held by Thomas and Michael Henneage 
and others. It is now likewife divided, and belongs to Mrs. Maria Acland, Thomas 
Chappie, and William Barber, efquires. 

The manor of Staye, which heretofore was the pofTeflion of a family denominated 
from this parifh, now belongs to lady Aylcsford. 

Northward from Fivehead is Cathanger, lying in two hundreds, partly in this 
of Abdick and Bulflon, and partly in that of Williton Freemanors. Though now 
little known, it is a place of great antiquity; and, if we may judge from the name, 
has been the feche of military atchievements/ 

In the time of king Edward the ConfefTor, it was the pofleffion of Wadel, a noble 
Saxon, from whom at the conqueft it was taken-, and beftowed on the abbey of 
Muchelney^ which enjoyed it at the time the Norman furvey was compiled. 

" The church," fays that record, ,c holds Cathangre. Wadel held it in the time 
"'of king Edward, and gelded for one hide and a half. The arable confifts of one 
" carucate and a half. There is one villane, with one bdrdar, holding fifteen acres. 
" Of this land Ingulfus holds one hide, and has there one plough, with three bordars. 
" There are fix acres of meadow, and fifteen acres of wood. It is worth twenty 
" fhillings. The part of the monks feven fhillings. Godui, Eduin, and Wadel, did 
" not belong to the abbey in the time of king Edward." 1 ' 

• Lib. Domefday. <■ Cath in the old Britiih figmfies a battle, 

b Taxat. Temporal. * Lib. Domefday, 

The 



aim TBulfton.] F I V E H E A D. 41 

The manor however was afterwards, by fomc means or other, transferred from the 
monks, and given by king Richard the iirft to William dc Wrotham, chief forcftcr 
of this county and of Dorfet. This William, 2 John, paid ten marks for the king's 
protection, that he might not be impleaded but before the king or his chief jull 
and likewife that he might not anfwer for his land of Cathangcr, or any other of his 
lands, but by the law and affize of the realm. 

This William had two fons, William and Richard; the former of whom fucccedcd 
him in this eftate. After his death, 9 Hen. III. Richard dc Wrotham his nephew 
found to be his next heir. This Richard was a knight, and one of the juftices of the 
court of common pleas. He died 35 Henry III. without ifTuc ; whereupon William de 
Placctis, or Pleffy, fon of his cldcft filter Conftance, Sufanna wife of John lc Blund, 
Margaret wife of Geffrey de Scoland, and Chriftian wife of Thomas Picot, became 
his heirs/ 

On the divifion of the family eftates, the manor of Cathangcr was included in the 
portion of Margaret wife of Geffrey de Scoland, who is found by inquilition to have 
held it in her right of the king in capite by knight's fervice. He dcccafcd 1 6 Edw. I. 
and was fucceeded by Francis dc Scoland, who, by Juliana his wife, was father of 
another Francis. This laft Francis died 1 2 Edw. III. leaving ifTuc Henry dc Scoland 
his fon and heir, who died 41 Edw. III. then feized of a capital meffuage in Cathangcr, 
a dove-houfe, a garden, three hundred and thirty-two acres of arable land, nineteen 
acres of meadow, and a certain pafture called Blyndhcv, containing two acres; and a 
certain other pafture called Langlefe, and another called Litcl Orchard ; twenty ai 
of wood, and thirty-fix millings and two-pence rent : all which he held by the fervice 
of the eighth part of a knight's fee.' 

Francis, fon and heir of the faid Henry, feems to have been a perfon of great 
account in thefe parts, being witnefs to many charters of the reigns of Edw. 111. and 
Richard II. He died 3 Henry V. leaving Eleanor his fole daughter and heirefs: this 
Eleanor married Thomas Montague, efq; who thus became poffeffed of the manor 
of Cathanger, and bore for his arms, as appears by his feal, three lozenges between 
three roundlets. On.his death 28 Henry VI. his grandaughters became his heirs, viz. 
Mary wife of Thomas Aylworth, and Elizabeth wife of fir Edward Broke and after- 
wards of Robert Palmer. 

Which Robert Palmer in right of his faid wife had large poffefllons in this county, 
and refided chiefly at Cathangcr. 8 Henry VII. he releafcd to John Brent, efq; and 
others, all his right to this and other eftates, which formerly belonged to Thomas 
Montague above-mentioned. Soon after which, viz. 12 Hen. VII. John Walfhe, efq; 
poffeffed Cathanger, probably in right of his wife Jane, daughter of fir Edward Broke; 
by whom he had a fon and two daughters, Agnes w ife of Nicholas Salifbury, and Lucy 
wife of Thomas Cook. On his wife's death, he was fain to take holy orders, and 
retired into the neighbouring abbey of Muchelney, from whence he was expelled for 

• Mag. Rot. 1 Joh. ' Efc. * Efvr. 

Vol. I. G a rape 



42 F I V E H E A D. [a&Wcfc 

a rape on the body of Mary Claufe, and being degraded from his orders married the 
laid Mary, by whom he had one fon, Thomas, and two daughters, whofe names 
were Lucrece and Sufan. 

John the eldeft fon of the faid John Walfhe, by Joan his firft wife, was 6 Mary 
called to the degree of ferjeant at law; and 5 Eliz. was made one of the juftices 
of the king's bench. This John built the houfe at Cathanger, and was buried with 
his lady in the parifh church of Fivehead. He left one only daughter his heir, mar- 
ried to lord Edward Seymour, eldeft fon to the firft duke of Somerfet. 

Notwithftanding this lady Seymour had fevcral children, the eftate of Cathanger, 
foon after the death of Judge Walfhe, appears to have been pofTefTed by Geo. Salifbury 
his fifter's fon. It afterwards became the property of Hugh Pymc, of Lincoln's inn, 
cfq. This Hugh lived in the reign of James the firft, and married Mabel daughter 
of Henry Staverton, efq; by whom he was father of Arthur Pyme of Cathanger, who 
was married, but had no children; and Chriftabella, wife of fir Edmund Wyndham, 
of Kentsford. 

From this fir Edmund, Cathanger pafTed to fir Hugh, and afterwards to Edmund 
Wyndham, fon and grandfon of the above-mentioned Edmund. It afterwards came 
by marriage to Edmund Elliot, efq; anceftor of the prefent pofiefibr. 

The manor-houfe, a venerable old edifice, in the form of an L, is ftill ftanding, 
inhabited by a farmer. The entrance into the court-yard, which has had an embattled 
wall round it, is through a large porter's lodge remaining entire. The great hall is 
lofty, and has a ceiling of good mafonry, divided into lozenges. In one of the 
windows, which are large and ftately, are three coats. 1 . Quarterly, gules and azure, 
in pale three lionels couchant or, in chief three fleurs de lis of the third. 2. Azure, 
feven mullets or, impaling, checque argent and fable, three wyverns of the firft 3, almoft 
effaced. Over this hall there is a large old apartment, with a curious antique ceiling 
and chimney-piece, embellifhed with armorial fhields. In the compartments of the 
ceiling are a variety of grotefque figures. Over one of the windows is a well-executed 
carving of a fhip at fea, attended by feyeral boats ; a whale [pouting, and fome other 
marine objecls. In another part is reprefented a town environed by a crenellated 
wall. Over the entrance of the porch is cut in ftone, JOHN WALSHE, ANNO 
DNI 1559, SERJANT AT LA WE. On the weft fide is a fpacious ftone ftair- 
cafe leading to the top of the building. 

The church of Fivehead was valued in 1292 at three marks. It is a vicarage in 
the deanery of Crewkerne, and in the gift of the dean and chapter of Briftol, having 
been granted to them at the fame time and in the fame manner as Drayton. The rev. 
Thomas Price, A. M. is the prefent incumbent. The glebe, worth eight pounds per 
annum, confifts of twenty acres of arable and meadow, and two acres of coppice. 

In the year 1 746 Beata Elliot gave by will one hundred pounds towards the aug- 
mentation of this living. 

The 



anD TSuifton.] hatch.beauchamp. 43 

The church is a neat building, eighty-eight feet in length, and thirty in width, 
confining of a nave, chancel, fouth aile, and porch, tiled; and having at the « ell 
end an embattled tower, fifty feet high, with a clock and five bells. In the ailc is an 
ancient fuit of armour belonging to the Wyndham family, which formerly hung in 
the great hall at Cathangcr, and was brought hither in the year 1727. 

In the church are the following inferiptions: 

" Here lycth the body of Edmund Elyott, cfq; of Cathangcr, fon of Thomas 
Elyott, who was gentleman of the bedchamber to king Charles II. ami he himfelf 
was page to James duke of York; and foon after that prince's acccflion to the crown 
made captain of a man of war. He dyed June 13, 1725, aged 63. 

" Here's alfo the body of Mrs. Beata Elyott, widow of the above Edmund Elyott, 
cfq; and daughter of fir Charles Wyndham, knight, of the ancient family of the 
Wyndhams of Orchard -Wyndham in the county of Sumcrfet. She was no lefs 
confpicuous for her benevolence and charity than for her ancient defcent. Ob' Ma\ 

IQ > J 749» a g ed 62 -" 

On another ftonc: 

" Here lyes the body of Carolina Wyndham, daughter of fir Edmund Wyndham, 

of Kcntsford in the county of Somerfet, who dyed the 4"' of June, 1 72 1, aged 87." 

On another: 
" Here lye the bodies of Hugh Pine, of Cathanger, efq; counfcllor at law; and 
Maybella his wife, who were buried 161 8, and 1628. 

On a fmall grave-ftone in the church-yard : 
" Beatus fanctus qui habct partem in rcfurrectionc prima. 

" Here lyeth the body of Mr. Robert Fairhill, miniflcr of Fivchead, who dyed the 
22' 1 day of September, 1666." 

The births in this parifh yearly are on an average ten; the burials fix. 



HATCH.BEAUCHAMP. 

THE village of Hatch-Beauchamp is diflant about fix miles from Taunton, and 
(lands on the turnpike road from that town to Ilminfter. Its lituation is 
pleafant, the country being well wooded and watered, and affording from its variety 
of furface many agreeable profpects. The number of houfes is thirty-fix, and of 
inhabitants nearly two hundred, of whom thirteen are freeholders. The houfes arc 
mofily fmall farms and cottages. 

Near the church, on elevated ground, is an elegant houfc built of Bath ftone, the 
feat of John Collins, efq; with a pleafant park furrounding it, embellifhcd with fine 

G 2 plantations, 



44 HATCH-BEAUCHAMP. [atitJiCk 

plantations, gardens, &c. On the north fide of this eminence feveral temples and 
feats are erected on the brow of the hill, which is fteep, finely indented, and adorned 
with hanging woods. The profpecls from divers points of this ridge are very exten- 
five and beautiful to the north and weft; overlooking the rich vale of Taunton, with 
a grand outline of hills beyond it, extending from Quantock to Blackdown." 

The farms here are moftly dairy and for corn; but agriculture is in no high ftate of 
improvement. The only petrefactions found here are griphytes and anomia. 

A brook rifing at Staple-Fitzpaine runs under two ftone bridges in this parifh; and 
contains trout, eels, roach, dace, and gudgeons. The roads are rough and ftony. 

There was formerly a market kept here on Thurfdays ; licence for which was pro- 
cured by John de Beauchamp, lord of this manor, 29 Edw. I. 1301, but it has been 
long difcontinued ; as is likewife a fair included in the fame grant; but a revel is held 
here the firft week in September. 

This parifh has a right of common in the foreft of Neroche and on'Weft-Sedgmoor. 

The earlieft account we have of this place is in the Norman furvey, where it is thus 
defcribed under the title of Terra Comitis Morito?iierijis: 

" Robert holds of the earl Hache. Godric, and Goduin, and Bollo, held the fame 
" in the time of king Edward for three manors, and were rated at five hides. The 
" arable is fix carucates. In dcmefne are two carucates, and three fervants, and eleven 
" villanes, and four cottagers, with three ploughs. There are eight acres of meadow, 
" and fixty acres of wood. It was worth eight pounds, now four pounds. From one 
" of thofe hides which Bollo held, a cuftomary rent is due to the manor of Curi of one 
" fheep with a lamb."" 

Not long after the conqueft, thefe manors being united, the whole place became 
veiled in the family of Beauchamp, from whom it derived its additional name. This 
noble family originated from Normandy. 

In the reign of Henry II. Robert de Beauchamp, or kilo catapo, Ailed of Hache, 
was fheriff of this county feveral years. His poiTeflions in it were very conliderable ; 
the number of knight's fees being no lefs than feventeen, which he certified to 
hold when the aid was levied for marrying Matilda, Henry's daughter, to the duke 
of Saxony.* 1 He died in 1211, leaving Robert his fon and heir, then in minority, 
and in ward to Hubert de Burgh, who, upon raifing the fcutage of Wales that 
fame year, anfwered four and twenty marks for thefe feventeen knight's fees which 
he held. He dying about 35 Hen. III. 1251, Robert de Beauchamp the third, his 
fon and heir, had livery of his lands, and was one of thofe who attended the king 
in his military expedition into France in 1 253. To him fucceeded John de Beauchamp 
his fon and heir, who in 1277, 5 Edw. I. was appointed governor of the caltles of 

a Of this elegant feat the proprietor has favoured us with a plate. 

6 Lib. Domefday. ' Lei. Collecl;. 1. 208. d Liber niger Scac. 1. 100. 

Carmarthen 



anO TSulOon.] H A T C H - B E A U C H A M P. 45 

Carmarthen and Cardigan.' Ho deputed 1 1 1 i s life in the twelfth year of the fame 
reign/ and was fucceeded by a fecond John de Beauchamp, his ion and heir, who 
in 1306, 34 Edw. I. was one of thofc gentry who received the honour of knighthood 
with prince Edward previous to the king's expedition againfl the Scots. This John 
refiding afterwards at Hatch obtained a licence for fortifying his maniion-houfe* there, 
which was afterwards called Hatch-Caftlc, and deccafed 10 Edw. III. fei/.cd of this 
manor, which he held of the king in chief by the fcrviccof one knight's fec, h leaving 
a fon and heir of his own name, then thirty years of age, who had livery of his father's 
lands the following year. Which faid John was one of thofc knights who accom- 
panied king Edward in his wars in France; and being in Flanders upon his fovercign's 
account in 1340, it is recorded of him as a memorable thing, that he procured 
licence to tranfport from England twelve facks of his own wool for his better fupport 
in the king's fervice in thofe parts : a liberty, for obvious rcafons, feldom granted, 
cfpccially in that reign, but on very particular occasions. He was fummoned to parlia- 
ment from 1336x0 1343, in which year he died, leaving hTue John his fon and heir, 
who married Alice the daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, earl of Warwick, (of 
whole retinue he appearcth to have been) and departed this life 35 Edw. III. anno 1361, 
without iflue. He left therefore for his heirs Cecilia de Beauchamp his filler, who 
WU firft wife to fir Roger Seymour, and afterwards remarried to Richard Turberville, 
of Bere-Rcgis in the county of Dorfet; and John, the fon of Eleanor Meriet his 
other filler. Upon the fubfequent divifion of the Beauchamp eflates this manor came 
to Cecilia the former, who by her marriage as aforefaid transferred the title and eilate 
to the illuflrious family of Seymour, who arc found to have enjoyed it for a number 
of defecnts; and in the fchedulc of the duke of Somerfct's eflates it is valued at the 
yearly fum of 29I. 17s.' The prefent lord of the manor is the rev. Mr. Uttcrmare, 
whofc father had it by purchafe. 

The living is a rectory in the deanery of Crewkerne, and has forty-fix acres of 
glebe land. The rev. John Cope Weftcote (by whofe grandfather the perpetual 
advowfonwas purchafed) is both patron and incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. John the Baptifl, and (lands almofl furrounded by 
lofty trees. It is a neat edifice, eighty feet long, and thirty-two wide, confiding 
of a nave, chancel, north aile, and porch, tiled ; with a pretty embattled tower, 
forty feet high, adorned with eight Gothic pinnacles, a 1 lock, and four bells. The 
roofs of the nave and chancel are twenty -tour feet high, arched and ceiled: the north 
aile fourteen feet high, ceiled between the timbers. 

1 n the chancel, over the altar, is a fine painting of our Saviour jufl taken down from 

the crofs, with his mother and Mary Magdalen weeping over him, and St. John 

looking on the body, in the attitude and with the afpect of llrong but awful anxiety. 

This painting is eight feet by nine and half, in a gilt frame, and above is painted a 

crimfon fefloon curtain, fringed with gold, which fills up the whole end wall. 

* Pat. 5 Edw. I. m. 24. f Efc. * Pat. 7 Edw. III. n. 2. m. 2. » Efc. ' MS. V.dor. 

The 



46 I L T O N. [a&lJicfc 

The communion table is of old oak, inclofed with a balluftrade topp'd with iron 
Ipikes twilled into antique forms. 

The fingers' gallery is placed in the belfry, and behind it is a front of an organ. 
The pulpit is old pannell'd wainfcot, ftone-colour. The aile is feparated from the 
nave by three arches, fupported by pillars fix feet round, and eight high. 

In the church-yard' is the bafe of an old ftone crofs; and a fine old elm tree, the 
body of which is twenty-two feet round. 

In this church there is no monument, except an upright ftone in the aile with 
this infcription: 

" Here lyeth the body of John Uttermare, fon of John and Betty Uttermare of 
this parifh, who departed this life the 18 th of January 1747, aged 6 years. 

* God called me in my youthful days 
" For evermore to give him praife. 

" Alfo here lieth the body of John Uttermare, of this parifh, gent, who departed 
this life the 2d of May 1752, aged 50." 

The chriftenings are yearly on an average four; the burials three. 



I L T O N. 

THIS village received its name from the river He, which runs eaftward of it, 
lying five miles north from Ilminfter, and ten miles eaft from Taunton, in a 
low, flat, and woody fituation. 

The parifh extends fix miles in length from eaft to weft ; but not more than a mile 
from north to fouth; and comprifes the five following hamlets, viz. 

1 . Cad-Green, near the church, containing fourteen houfes. 

2. Ilford, fo called from an old ford here over the He, a mile and a quarter diftant 
from the laft, containing feven houfes. 

3. Hurcot, anciently written Hurdecote, three miles foutheaft, having three houfes. 

4. Afhford, one mile northeaft, containing three houfes. In Domefday book it is 
written Aiffeford, and is thus furveyed : 

" William holds of Roger [de Corcelle] Aiffeford. Ulwin held it in the time of 
" king Edward, and gelded for one furlong. The arable is one carucate. There are 
" two cottagers, with half a carucate, and three acres of meadow, and ten acres of 
*' pafture. It was and is worth thirty-pence." 1 

a Lib. Domefday. 

Elias' 



anu TBulfton.] I L T o N. 47 

Elias de Afhford, by charter without date, gives a mill in Afhibrd to the abbey of 
Athclney. b 36 Edw. III. Peter dc Ycvclton granted to the fame abbey certain lands 
in the manors of Afliford, Ikon, and Wight-Lackington. c 

5. Rapps, one mile weft, fivehoufes. 

The whole parifli contains fixty-fix houfes, and about three hundred and fifty 
inhabitants. The buildings arc in general mean, being of rough (lone, thatched: 
fomcof them arc paved with flints, of which there is great abundance in this parilh. 

Nearly half the lands arc arable; the foil a heavy clay, in fomc parts mixed with 
gravel, and lets from feven to eighteen (hillings the acre. The paflnre and meadow 
lands, which are cold and wet, are worth from fifteen to thirty (hillings an acre. 
Notwithftanding agriculture is but fparingly attended to, the lands have been coh- 
liderably improved by the ufc of marie, found here in fufrkient quantity. 

What little we know of Ilton in ancient times is, that it was one of thofe eftates 
which were given to the abbey of Athclney in this county, founded by king Alfred in 
the year 882. In Domefday book we have the following account of it: 

" The church of St. Peter of Adelingye holds Atiltone. In the time of king Edward 
" it gelded for eight hides. The arable confifts of twelve carucates. In demefne are 
" four hides: and there are three carucates, and four fervants, and ten villancs, and fix 
" cottagers with four ploughs. There is a mill of feven fhillings and fix-pence rent, 
" and forty acres of meadow, and thirty acres of pafture. A wood one mile long, 
" and as much broad. It is worth one hundred fhillings. Of the land of this manor 
" earl Morton holds two hides, which were in the time of king Edward held by the 
" church in demefne. The arable confifts of four carucates, worth thirty fhillings."* 

Benedict was abbot of Athelney at the time the above furvey was made ; and his 
fuccefTors continued in pofTeffion of this manor till the year of their diflblution. Their 
lands here were valued in the year 1293 at 17I/ In the duke of Somerfet's fchcdule 
the yearly value of Ilton is fct down at 74I. 8s. 8d. ob. The manor now belongs to 
the carl of Egremont . 

An ancient manor lies within this parifh, called Merrifield, and in ancient evidences 
Murefeld and Mcrefeld. In the rcgifter of Athelney abbey, John de Uminfter occurs 
lord of it: and a family denominated from the place are found to have held lands here 
in the time of Edw. II. 17 Edw. III. John dc Beauchamp died feized of the fame, 
leaving John his fon and heir, who deceafing without ifTue 35 Edw. III. the family 
eftates were (as already has been faid) divided between his two lifters Cecily and Mar- 
garet. The manor of Merrifield, in the partition, was allotted to Cecily. She was firft 
married to Roger Seymour, and a forwards to Richard Turberville, knight. Sir Richard 
died 36 Edw. III.: foon after which Cecily his relict granted this manor to Fulk de 
Bermyngham, knight.' It afterwards came to the family of Popham, and from them 

* Regift. Abb. Atheln. * Lib. Domefday. f Rot. Clauj. 48 Edw. III. 

e Ibid. c Taxat. Spiritual. 

to 



48 I L T O N. [abMcfi 

to the Wadhams, by the marriage of fir John Wadham with Elizabeth the daughter 
and coheir of fir Stephen Popham of this place, and of Popham in Hampihire. The 
family of Wadham took their name from the lordfhip of Wadham, in the parifh of 
Knowfton, in the county of Devon. Their chief feat was at Edge, near Branfcombe 
in that county ; but after the marriage of John Wadham above-mentioned, they made 
Merrifield the chief place of their refidence. The faid fir John Wadham, by Elizabeth 
his wife, was father of another fir John, who fucceeded him in this eftate, and having 
married Elizabeth the daughter of Hugh Stukely, efq; had iffue Nicholas Wadham, 
knight, who was flieriff of this county and Dorfet 14 Hen. VII. and for feveral years 
lieutenant of the Ifle of Wight. This fir Nicholas married two wives: the firft was 
Joan the daughter of Robert Hill, of Halfway, efq; by whom he had ifiue Lawrence, 
(who died without ifiue) John, Nicholas, Giles, and Andrew ; Mary the wife of fir 
Richard Chudleigh, and Elizabeth wife of Richard Bampfylde of Poltimore. His 
fecond wife was Margaret, daughter of fir John Seymour, of Wolf-hall in the county 
of Wilts, fifter of Jane Seymour, afterwards married to king Henry VIII. John 
Wadham, hiseldeft fon and heir, who is ftiled of Edge, married Joan the widow of 
John Kelleway of Columpton, daughter and coheir of John Tregarthin of Cornwall, 
and had ifiue Nicholas Wadham, founder of Wadham college in Oxford ; Joan, wife 
of fir Giles Strangeways; Margaret, wife of Nicholas Martin, of Athelhampfton ; and 
Florence, wife of John Wyndham, efq. Nicholas Wadham, the fon and heir, married 
Dorothy the daughter of William Petre, knight, principal fecretary of ftate, and 
father of the firft lord Petre; but died without ifiue in 1609. His wife Dorothy 
furviving him had this manor in dower; and having completed the work at Oxford, 
which her hufband had begun, but left unfinifhed, died in the year 161 8, and was 
buried with her hufband in the church of Ilminfter. On the death of the faid 
Nicholas Wadham, and Dorothy his wife, without iffue, the children of his three 
filters aforefaid inheriting his eftates, Merrifield became the property of Wyndham, 
from whom it has lineally defcended to the earl of Egremont, the prefent poffefibr. 
When John Wyndham came to the eftate, difliking thefituation of the houfe, becaufe 
it was furrounded with wood, he pulled it down, and with the materials built a farm- 
houfe at a little diftance, now called Woodhoufe, and likewife an alms-houfe in the 
village of Ikon. There now remains no part of the ancient edifice, except an old 
wall on the eaft fide. The feat was formerly moted round, and the buildings exhibited 
many ftriking indications of remote antiquity. 

The church of Ikon denominates a prebend in the cathedral of Wells, which pre- 
bend was in 1292 valued at eighteen marks. 8 The vicarage is not mentioned in the 
taxation. 

The church is a Angular conftruclion, having a tower on the fouth fide, the lower 
part of it ferving as it were for a porch or entrance. This tower is furmounted with a 
wooden fpire, cafed with lead, and contains a clock and four bells. It has two ailes: 
part of the north aile next the chancel is railed off, and called Wadham's ailej under 

* Taxat. Spiritual. 

the 



anu iBuWon.] I L T o N. 49 

the window lies the effigy of a female in full length, but without any infeription or 
arms. In the wall of the fouth aile is a large niche intended for the iimilar purpofc 
of a monumental receptacle. 

Under the communion table is the following infeription on a plate of brafs: 

w IPrap for the route of Bpcbolasf caanbam, fonc to fur jflpcbolas 
axUaobam, fenprjbt, anu cayten of tbc 3llc of 2£lprjbt, tobpebe oepteu otote 
of tbifi toorloctbe mi) Dap of December, in tbe pere of our ioroe 00&tiii j, on 
tobog foulc 3bu Jjatic merci. amen." 

On the fame floor: 

" Depofitum integerrimi viri Guliclmi Baker, hujus ecclefias vicarii, qui per uvin 
annos, quibus circa rem divinam hie loci miniftravit, doctrina ct fnnplicitatc \ 
cvangelica populum inftituit. 

" I, Lector, tantarum virtutum imitatione cognatos ccclos require,, quos ille 71 
annos natus repetiit 3 Aug. 1708." 

" Herealfo lie the bodies of William the fon, and Joan the daughter, of William 
Baker, who died, one Jan. 7, 1667, the other July 21, 1682." 

" Sacred to the memory of the rev. John Baker, A. M. 12 years vicar of II ton. 
He died Jan. 20, 1757, aged 44. 

" His ways were ways of plcafantnefs, and all his paths were peace." 

Of this family many have been eminent for their learning. 

Thomas Baker, born here in 1625, was eftccmed one of the beft mathematicians 
of his time. He was firft of Magdalen Hall, and afterwards of Wadham College in 
Oxford; which univerlky he early left for the living of Bifhop's Nympton in Devon- 
shire. His (kill in, mathematicks was fo great, that once the members of the Roud 
Society propounded to him fome queries of the mod abftrufe and difficult nature; to 
which he returned an anfwer fo fully Satisfactory, that they prefentcd him with a 
medal, inferibed with encomiums of his learning. He died in 1690, and was buried 
in the parifli church of Nympton. 

Of the fame family was the rev. WiJIiam Baker, S. T. P. a native like-wife of Ilton, 
and educated at Wadham College. He was firll biihop of Bangor, and afterwards 
of Norwich. He died A. 1). 173-, and was buried in the Abbey church of Bath, 
where is the following infeription to his memory: 

" Memorise facrum reverend i admodum praefulis Guuelmi Baker, S. T. P. Ban- 
goricnlis primum, dein Norviceniis epifcopi. Qui Utonc, in agro Somerfetenii natus, 
in Collegio Wadham apud Oxonienfes bonis literis innutritus, fuum illud collegium 
alumnus, focius, gardianus, moribus, prudentia, auctoritate, cohoneftavit, auxit, 
ftabilivit. Ecclcfiae Sti iEgidii in campis Londini, diu fumma cum laude praefuit 
rector, atque in urbc Britanniac noftrce primaria, concionator facundus, doctus, gravis 

Vol. I. H inter 



50 ISLE-ABBOTS. [ffirtlfefc 

inter celeberrimos emicuit. Mox ad akiora merito fuo evedtus, non tarn ab ampliffimis, 
qua? geflit, muneribus ipfe dignitatem mutuaffe quam eadem proprio fplendore illuf- 
traffe videbatur. Mortalitati valedixit quarto die Decembris, anno humanae falutis 
1732, aetatis 65." 

There are two alms-houfes in this parifh: one built by John Wyndham,.of Merri- 
field, efq; as before-mentioned ; and the other by John Whetftone, efq. 

The births in this parifh are on an average eleven; the burials nine. 



ISLE-ABBOTS. 

THIS parifh has of late years been written Ilk; but its ancient appellation was He, 
derived from its fituation on the river of that name. It obtained its addition 
from its having formerly belonged to the abbots of Muchelney. 

It ftands in a damp and woody flat, about four miles north from Uminfter, and 
contains twenty-eight houfes, and nearly one hundred and fixty inhabitants. 

There is one wood in this parifh which contains near one hundred acres, all oak, 
to the growth of which tree the foil, being a ftrong wet clay, is particularly favour- 
able. The lands are moftly pafturage, and worth on an average about one guinea 
an acre. The inhabitants have a right of common in the forcft of Neroche, and 
on Weft-Sedgmoorl 

The manor belonged very early to the monaftery above-mentioned, which feems to 
have engrofTed moft of the eftates in this neighbourhood. In Domefday book it is 
thus furveyed: 

" The church [of Micelenie] itfelf holds He. Goduin held it in the time of king 
•' Edward, and paid geld for five hides. The arable is five carucates. There are in 
" demefne three hides, and there are two carucates, and fix fervants, and twelve 
*' villanes, and five cottagers with two ploughs. There is a mill of fifteen fhillings 
" rent; and there are forty acres of meadow, and feven acres of pafture. A wood 
" three miles long, and one mile and a half broad. It was and is worth four pounds. 

" The church itfelf holds He. Eduin held it in the time of king Edward, and 
" gelded for one hide and a half. The arable is one carucate and a half. There are 
" three cottagers who hold fifteen acres. There is one acre in demefne, and ten acres 
" of meadow, and feven acres of pafture. A wood three furlongs long and one 
" furlong broad. It is- worth fixteen fhillings. 3 " 



» Lib; .Domefday. 



The 



amneuwon.] isle-abbots. 5 i 

The lands of the faid abbey here were in i 293 valued at 61. 129. 6d. 1 - The family 
of Portman fecm to have fome concern in this place in the reign of Edw. 1V. C but the 
monks held the manor till their difperfion in 1539, when it came to the crown, anj 
was granted to Edward earl of Hertford, in whofe time it was valued at the yearly 
fum of 35I. 4s. 3^d. d It was afterwards alienated by the faid family to that of 
Prymc, and being now divided, is the property of lady Aylcsford and Mr. Pine, each 
of whom holds a court here. 

The church was anciently appropriated to the abbey of Muchclncy, and in 1292 
was valued at four marks.* After the diflblution the rectory and the advowfon of the 
vicarage were patted away by the king along with the manor; but again reverting to 
the crown, were granted 34 Hen. VIII. to the dean and chapter of Briflol, who now 
are patrons. The rev. James Uttcrmare is the prcfent incumbent. 

This church (dedicated to St. Mary) is a large hand fome edifice, one hundred feet 
long, and twenty-eight feet wide, and confifts of a nave and chancel tiled ; and a 
north aile and porch covered with lead. At the well end is a tower of excellent 
mafonry, finely embellifhed with(iothic pinnacles and other ornaments, and fourteen 
ftatues, four of which arc in the weir from, vith niches where two more once flood, 
now demolifhed. This tower is feventy feet high, and has a clock and five bells. 

In the chancel on a flat done: 
" Hie jacet corpus Catharine Bromc, chariffimse uxoris Philippi Brome, de Ifle- 
Brewers, in comitatu Somerfetenfi gen. unius attornat. curias de commit ni banco, &:c. 
quae obiit 1 8° die Augufti anno Domini 1677. ^tatis fuae 25. 

Cbron. ** Uxori fidae caelum paratur." 

Cbron. " Vera virtus piis cnituit." 

" Here lyeth the body of Philip Bromc, who departed this life on Monday the 
29' h dayof June, anno Domini 1640. 

" Scio quod redemptor meus vivit." 

On a tomb in the church-yard : 
" Elizabeth Brome, daughter of Philip and Elizabeth Brome, left this life for k 
better Aiiguft 3, anno Domini 1738, oetat. 15. 

" When fudden fate our feeming blifs aflails, 
How paffion triumphs, and how reafon fails ! 
Alas! weak nature will too oft fupply 
The breaft with throbbings, and with tears the eye; 
Whilft hence with joy untainted fouls remove, 
And with impatience court their realms above; 
No more, dear parent, at my death repine, 
I father Abraham's bofom change for thine." 

• Taxat. Temporal. « Rot. daus. 10 Edw. IV. * Valor MS. « Taxat. Spiritual. 

Ha On 



$t ISLE-BREWERS. [3bWck 

On the other fide of this tomb : 

" In memory of lieutenant Robert, fon of Philip and Mary Brome, who fell at the 
battle of Thornhaufen, Auguft i, 1759, whilft he was difcharging the duty of his 
profeflion againft the perfidious French. Mtat. 38. 

x( Beyond or love or friendfhip's facred band, 

Beyond myfelf, I lov'd my native land ; 

On this foundation would I build my fame, 

And emulate the Greek and Roman name; 

Think England's peace bought cheaply with my blood, 

And die with pleafure for my country's good." 

At the eaft end of the fame tomb : 

" Ann Martha, daughter of Philip and Mary, aged one year, departed this life 
1 2 th March 1726. 

" When infants to their dear Redeemer go, 
They fin efcape, and multitudes of woe. 
He that is born to-day, and dies to-morrow, 
Lofes fome hours of mirth, but months of forrow : 
Let chriftians then with Job fubmit, and fay, 
' The Lord gave, and the Lord hath taken away, 
* Blefled be the name of the Lord." 

The births on an average are five ; the burials two. 



ISLE-BREWERS. 

ISLE-BREWERS is a fmall parifh feven miles foutheaft from Taunton, nine north 
from Chard, and four north from Uminfter. a The number of houfes is thirty, 
and of inhabitants about one hundred and fixty. Moft of the houfes are fmall farms, 
built of rough ftone, covered with thatch; and the reft mud-walled cottages. The 
fituation is low, being a woody flat, on the foutheaft fide of Ilemoor. The lands are 
about two-thirds pafture, worth twenty fhillings an acre, arable worth ten; the crops 
moftly wheat and barley. 

This parifh has a few rights on Ilemoor, which are not inclofed. Oak and elm are 
the principal wood, and thrive very well. 

a It is additionally called Brewers, in regard of its having belonged to a family of that name. 

Here 









aMjOBulfton.J ISLE -BREWERS. 53 

Here is neither manufactory, gentleman's feat, fchool, nor fair; but a revel is held 
in Whitfun week. 1 * 

When William the Conqueror came to the throne, he divided this village, whicb was 
then confidcrable, into two parcels, one of which he gave to his half-brother R< 
earl of Morton; and the other to Alurcd dc Ifpania, one of the many chiefs that 
attended him in his expedition. 

The former is thus furveyed: 

" Anfgcr holds of the earl lie. Ulnod held it in the time of king I£d\vard, and 
M gelded for fix hides. The arable is fix carucates. In demefne are two carucatcs, 
" and five fervants, and five villanes, and four cottagers with two ploughs. There 
" is a mill rented at fourteen (hillings, and eighteen acres of meadow. A wood three 
" furlongs and a half long, and two furlongs broad. It is worth one hundred flullings." 

The latter parcel thus: 

" Richard holds of Alurcd He. Alwi held it in the time of king Edward, and gelded 
" for two hides. The arable is two carucates. In demefne is one carucatc, with 
" one fcrvant, and eight villanes, and two cottagers with one plough. There is a 
" mill of twenty-pence rent, and ten acres of meadow, and ten acres of pafiure, and 
" thirty acres of wood. When he received it, it was worth twenty fliillings, now forty 
*' fhillings."* So that he had improved it double. 

Thefe lands were afterwards conjoined, and probably, after the forfeiture of William 
the carl of Morton's fon, d were kept in the crown a confiderable time; for we find 
nothing more concerning this place till the thirty-firft year of Henry II. when William 
Torel, lord of it, was fined in one mark for ncgledling to make proper purfuit and 
enquiry concerning the death of Alured dc Anevilky who in all likelihood came to an 
untimely end here: amercements of which kind were very common at that period.' 

After him it had the family of Briwere, or Brewer, for its lords. The firft of that 
name that occurs, having any concern with Somcrfetfhire, is William the fon of Henry 
Brewer, who held many offices of truft in the feveral reigns of Henry the fecond, 
Richard the firft, and John: and was in fuch high cfteem with king Richard the firft, 
that he was one of thofe three to whom the government of the kingdom was entruftcd 

b In this place, in the month of May 1681, a woman was delivered of two female infant;, whofe bodies 
were joined together from the navel upwards ; but each with all its parts below proper to itfelf, and not only 
diltinct all along, but feparatc. Upwards beneath the breafts thefe bodies parted again, and then all was as 
below, diftinft and feparate. When laid fupine they feemed to have but one body where joined; but when 
turned there was a deep furrow between both. Each had a diilincl fpina derji, &c. and nipples in theii 
proper place refpefting the feveral bodies. They did not always fleep at the fame time ; they exonerated apart 
freely, and lived for fome time. They were baptized by the names of Aquila and Prifcilla, (though they 
were both females) and were born by an eafy travail to the mother, who had been infirm for two years, and 
had three children before. Phil. Trans. Lcwtl.crp's AbrUg. ii. 303. 



c Lib. Domefday. ' Mag. Rot. 3 1 Hen. IL 

d See Dugd. Bar. 1 . 25. f See Mado.x's Excheq. p. 386. 



during 



5 4 ISLE-BREWERS. [abDicfc 

during his abfence in the Holy Land. His principal residence was at Bridgwater, 
where he built a caftle and a hofpital. For feveral fucceflive years, in the reign of 
John, he ferved the office of fheriff for this county and Dorfet, (then united) as he 
had before for many other counties/ He married Beatrix de Valle, a concubine of 
Reginald earl of Cornwall, by whom he had iffue two fons ; Richard, who died in his 
father's life-time, and William, who fucceeded him : as alfo five daughters, viz. Grecia, 
married to Reginald de Braofe; h Margaret, to William de Ferte; Ifabell, firft to one 
of the name of Dover, and afterwards to Baldwin Wake;' Alice, to Reginald de 
Mohun; and Joan, to William de Percy. He died in 1226, and was buried before 
the high altar in the abbey of Dunkfwell, in the county of Devon, which he had 
founded for Ciftercian monks. k 

His fon William Brewer inherited his eftates, whereof Ifle was one; and 17 John 
obtained from the king a grant of a difcharge of his relief for all his lands. He took 
to wife Joan the daughter of William de Vernon, earl of Devon, and died in the 
year 1232, 16 Hen. III. without iflue. 

Whereupon, a legal partition of the eftates taking place betwixt the five fitters 
above-mentioned, Alice de Mohun had this manor of Ifle for her purparty, and in her 
right Reginald de Mohun her faid hufband died feized thereof; 1 from whom it 
defcended to John de Mohun, who died 7 Edw. I.™ 2 Edw. III. Thomas de Merle- 
berghe occurs lord of this manor;" foon after which Henry de Haddon is certified 
to hold it for the term of his life of the grant of John de Haddon, reverfional to 
William Fitzwarren, and the heirs of his body. The faid William Fitzwarren died 
feized of it 35 Edward III. John Chideock, knight, at his death 28 Hen. VI. held 
this manor, leaving Catherine, wife of William Stafford, efq ; and Margaret, wife of 
William, fon of John Stourton, knight, his daughters and heirs." In the fucceeding 
reign, 14 Edw. IV. Richard Harecourt, knight, and Edward Grymftone, efq; en- 
feoffed Giles Daubeny of the manor of Ifle-Brewers. p 16 Eliz. the manor was held 
by Laurence Wyther, of London, efq; who alienated it to the Walronds; and it is 
now the property of David Robert Mitchel, efq. 

37 Hen. VIII. divers lands and tenements in this parifh, with a capital mefTuage 
and farm called Southayej as alfo the rectory and advowfon of the vicarage, with the 
appurtenances, were held in chief by James Bowerman. 11 

The church in 12 19 was appropriated to William Brewer's hofpital of St. John at 
Bridgwater. 

*Dugd. Bar. 1. 702. 

h An old MS. in the poffeflion of Dr. Harvey, of Holt, touching the genealogy of the Brewers, fays, 
William de B. which muft be a raiftake. See Dugdale's Baronage, vol. i. p. 419, 702. 

1 The fame MS. fays Watn. m Efc. J> Rot. claus. ^Edw. JV. 

k Mon. Ang. 1. 925. « Inq.ad quod damnum. * MS. Donat. 

1 Pfc. Efc. 

In 



aim TSulflon.j 



PUCKINGTON. 



In 1328 a chantry was founded in this church by Thomas dc Mcrlebcrghc, fomc- 
1 ime lord of this manor, which he endowed with kinds here for the maintenance of 
two chaplains to celebrate divine fervicc for the hralth of his own foul and the fouls 
of his progenitors. 

The living is a vicarage in the deanery of Crcwkcrne ; the patronage is appendant 
to the manor; confequcrttly in the gift of David Mitchel, cfq. The rev. Mr. Millward 
is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, which is dedicated to All Saints, is feventy feet in length, and nineteen 
in width, and confifts of a body and chancel tiled. At the weft end is an embatded 
tower fifty feet high, in which hang four bells. 

On a mural monument in the chancel, on the north fide, is this infeription: 

" Merc lies the body of Henry Walrond, efq; who departed this life the 9 th day of 
October, and was buried the tV* day, anno Domini 1698. Gratis fuae 54. Arms, 
argent, 3 bulls' heads caboltcd, fable. 

" Ad mortem fie vita rluit velut ad marc flumen: 
" Vivcre nam res eft dulcis, amara mori." 

The number of baptifms and burials in thisparifh, taken on an annual average of 
ten years, are, baptifms thirteen, burials thirteen. But it is to be obferved, that in one 
of thefe ten years there was an epidemic iicknefs which carried off fourteen people. 






PUCKINGTON. 

THIS parifh, which derives its name from fome Saxon poflcflbr, is plcafantly 
fituated three miles northcaft from Ilminfter, and contiguous to the road from 
that town to Langport. 

It confifts of twenty-four houfes, twelve of which are farms, and have a right of 
common on Weft- Moor, and Wcft-Sedgmoor : the reft are cottages. The lands are 
principally arable, and worth about fifteen {hillings an acre. There are two commons 
within the precincts of this parifh, called Horfcmoor and Puddimore, both watered 
by the river lie. 

In the Conqueror's time the manor of Puckington was pofieflcd by Roger de 
Churchill, as appears from the old record : 

" William holds of Roger Pochintunc. Lcving held it in the time of king Edward, 
" and gelded for one hide and a half. The arable is one carucatc and a half. There 
M are three villanes, and three cottagers, and two fcrvants, with one plough, and 
V eleven acres of meadow and a half: and fix acres of pafture, and fixty-lix acres 
" of wood. 

"To 



56 P -U C K I N G T N. [3f>tlicft 

" To this manor is added Pochintune. Alward held it in the time of king Edward 
" for a manor, and gelded for one hide and a half. The arable is one carucate and a 
" half. There are four cottagers, with one villane, and one fervant, and two acres of 
" meadow, and fix acres of pafture, and fixty-fix acres of wood. Thefe two manors 
" Leving and Alward held of the church of St. Peter, [at Rome] nor could they be 
" feparated from it. In the time of king Edward they were worth fifty fhillings : 
"now fixty fhillings."* 

In this place the Mallets had fome poffeffions in the time of king John, and a park. 

In after-days it was the property of the Bonvils, a family which 'flourifhed in this 
county for many generations. In the reign of Henry VI. William lord Bonvil married 
Elizabeth the heirefs of the Harington family, and by her had iffue a fon and heir, 
viz. William, called after his mother's name lord Harington, who was flain at Wake- 
field 39 Henry VI. fighting on the part of the houfe of York. He left by Catherine 
his wife, daughter of Richard Nevil earl of Salifbury, an only daughter, whofe name 
was Cecilia. She married with Thomas Grey marquis of Dorfet, by whom fhe had 
a fon, viz. Thomas, who married Margaret daughter of fir Robert Wotton. He 
died 22 Hen. VIII. leaving ifiue a fon and heir of the name of Henry: which faid 
Henry Grey, marquis of Dorfet, having married Frances Brandon, daughter of Charles 
Brandon duke of Suffolk, was in her right advanced to that title in 155 1 by king 
Edward VI. Two years after which he fufiercd death for the ill-timed ufurpation of 
his daughter lady Jane Grey, which he was accufed of countenancing. Whereupon 
all his eftates, which had been accumulating for many years, became confifcated, and 
were difpofed of different ways to different people. The manor of Puckingjxm, with 
the advowfon of the living, was decreed to be fold by the commiffioners for the ufe 
of the crown, and was accordingly in 1557 purchafed by Henry Portman, efq. The 
anfvver to the commiffioners warrant runs as follows : 

" Hit apperethe that the feid manor was annexed to the crowne by thatteyndure 
" of the feid late duke. And whether the fame was at eny tyme before parcell of the 
" duchesof Lancafter or Cornewall, or of thauncient demeanes of the crowne thau- 
" ditor knoweth not. 

" The feid manor lyethe nere to none of the Quenes Majefties houfes of acceffe. 

" There ar nether parkes, mynes, leade or belles upon the feyd manor to thauditors 
" knowledge. 

" The woods are to be certified by thofficers of the woodes. 

" What ftats the tennants have in the premiffes, or who ought to bere the repara- 
" tions the recorde declarethe not more then is declared in this value. Ex. per Jo. 
" Horniolde, auditore. 13 die May 1557, rated for Henry Porteman." 

* Lib. Domefday. 

« The 



anDTBitlffon.] PUCKINGTON. S7 

" The clcrc ycrely value of the prcmifics 15I. 1 8s. 6d. which rated at twenty-eight 
" ycres purchacc, amountithc to 445I. 1 8s. addc thereto 13I. 17s, 3d. for one yerc* 
" purchace of thadvoufon of the parfonagc of Pokington, and fo thole is 459I. 58. 3d. 
" The money to be paid before the 26 of May 1557. 

" The king and queens majeftes to difchardgc the purchaccr of all things and 
" incumbraunccs made or done by their majeftes except lcalcs. 

" The purchacer to difchardgc the king and quenes raaj cities of all fees and repi 
" goyng out of the prcmifles. 

" The tenure in chefe. 

" The purchacer to have thiflucs from the feft of.thanuncyacon of our lady laft paft. 

" The purchacer to be bound for the woodes. 

" The Ieade and belles to be excepted. 

" William Pctre, Frauncis Inglefcld, Jo. Bakere." b 

The manor has continued in the family of Portman from that time to this, being 
now the property of Henry William Portman, efq; of Brianftone near Blandford. 

The benefice, which is rectorial, was in the year 1292 rated at ten marks.' The 
patronage is appendant to the manor: the rev. Mr. Gappcr the prefent incumbent. 
The glebe is worth about 20I. per annum. 

The church is dedicated to St. Andrew, and confifts of a nave, fmall aile, and 
chancel, with a tower fixty feet high, and containing five bells, at the weft end. 

On the fouth fide of the chancel arc three recefTes in the wall, vulgarly called 
the three tabernacles : in the loweft of them is a coarfc daubing of Elias, inferibed 
Unum Elije. 

On the north fide is an old tomb adjoining to the wall with thefc arms : Quarterly, 
argent and fable. Creft, the holy Lamb. This tomb is fuppofed to contain the 
remains of a quondam rector of this parifh of the name of Paget. 

Over the communion table is a black mural monument inferibed : 

** Subtus jacet Jacobus Afton Coll. D. Johan. Bapt. Oxon, &c. qui obiit Nov. 4, 
1693, astat. 74." 

* Harl. MS. 606. ■ Taxat. Spiritual, 



Vol. I. I STAPLE- 



[ 58 ] tatjUick 



STAPLE-FITZPAINE. 

WE may infer that this place was anciently a mart of fome account from the 
evidence of the name, which comes from the Saxon, and implies a place 
whither merchants carry their wool, cloth, tin, and fuch like ftaple commodities, for 
the convenient difpofal of them. If this were formerly the cafe with the parilh we 
are defcribing, it is far fallen from its original confequence. The name of Fitzpaine 
was added to it in confequence of its having once belonged to a family fo called. 

It lies five miles fouth from Taunton, and feven northweft from Chard, and it 
includes three hamlets, viz. Bowhall, Whitley, and Bulford. 

The whole number of houfes is about fifty, and of inhabitants about two hundred 
and eighty. 

The fituation is in a rich woody vale, below the north ridge of Blackdown and 
Pickeridge hill, from the top of which are «xtenfive and beautiful profpecls. Two 
fprings riling under that hill form a little river, which, running under Battle Bridge 
through Hatch-Beauchamp and He- Abbots, joins the He near He-Brewers. Over this 
ftream are feveral plank bridges, but none of ftone, within this parifh. On Blackdown 
and Staple-hill are about one thoufand acres of common land, on which all the land 
owners have a right for cattle, and all the poor a right to cut fuel and turf. Several 
hundred acres of wafte land adjoin the foreft of Neroche. 

The manor of Staple was in the time of the Conqueror in the pofleffion of the earl 
of Morton, who is faid to have then held it in his own hands as demefne. 

" The earl himfelf holds Staple. Two thanes held it in king Edward's time, and 
«' gelded for ten hides. The arable is nine carucates. In demefne are eight hides, 
" and there are three carucates, and fix fervants, and twenty villanes, with fix ploughs. 
" There is a mill which pays thirty-pence, and twenty-four acres of meadow. Pafture 
" half a mile in length, and one furlong in breadth. A wood one mile long, and 
" two furlongs broad. It was worth ten pounds, now twelve pounds. 

*' To this manor appertains an orchard in Langeport, which pays fifty eels." 1 

On whom this manor was conferred after the banifhment of the earl of Morton, 
we have not difcovered; but in the reign of Edward I. it was the property of 
Robert de Brus, who held it of the king in capite by the fervice of half a knight's 
fee, together with two plough lands in Curiand, and one yard-land in the hamlet of 
Hurcot. b 

His fon John de Brus had a daughter of the name of Beatrix, whom he gave in 
marriage to Robert Burnell, nephew of the bifliop of Bath and Wells, and with her 
ihis manor of Staple.' 

■ Lib. Domefday. * Efc. 4 Edw. I. 1 Efc. 21 Edw. I. 

After 



ana TBulflon.] staple-fitzpaine. 



59 



After which we find it in the pofleffion of the Fitzpaincs. In the reign of Edw. III. 
Robert Lord Fitzpaine refided licrc for fomc time in a manfion of his own building. 
He died feized of it 28'" of the fame rcign. d Ifabcl, his only daughter and heir, wa* 
married to Richard Lord Poynings, who thus became poJTdTed of Staple, with other 
large cftates in divers counties. This Richard died in Spain in 1387, leaving ifluc, by 
the faid Ifabcl his wife, Robert, his fon and heir, then in minority. He had fum- 
mons to parliament from 1404 to 1445 2 4 Hen. VI. and was flain at the fiege of 
Orleans the enfuing year. 

His fon Richard Poynings died in his father's life-time, attending the duke of 
Lancafter in Spain in the year 1387. He left a daughter Eleanor, folc heirefs to the 
family, who becoming the wife of Henry Piercy, third carl of Northumberland, 
carried this eftate with no lefs than three baronies into that noble and ancient family. 

The faid Henry carl of Northumberland was flain at the battle of Towton in 
1 462, in the thirty-feventh year of his age. 

Soon after this the manor feems to have fallen to the crown. 

By an inquilition taken Aug. 2, anno 1605, 2 Jac. it is fct forth that Hugh 
Portman, knight, died 7 March 1604, feized of the manor of Staple-Fitzpaine, and 
the advowfon of the church, which he held of the king in capite by the fortieth part 
of a knight's fee.* In this family the manor £1111 continues, Henry William Portman, 
efq; being the prefent lord thereof. 

The manor houfe, built and inhabited by Robert lord Fitzpaine, exifted till the 
reign of Henry VIII. when it was almoft deftroyed by fire. A part of the kitchen 
has been converted into a poor-houfe, near the church; and many ruins of the old 
manfion are ftill vifible in the orchard. 

The living is a reclory in the deanery of Crewkerne, and in the patronage of Mr. 
Portman. The rev. John Wyndham, LL. D. is the prefent incumbent. In 1 292 
it was valued at eight marks. There belong to it about fifty acres of glebe land. 

The church is dedicated to Saint Peter. It is a handfome Gothic ftruefcure eighty- 
fix feet long, and thirty-two feet wide, confifting of a nave, chancel, and porch tiled ; 
and an aile on the north fide leaded. At the weft end is an elegant tower feventy 
feet high, in which arc five bells, with a turret at one corner, and eight handfome 
pinnacles. 

In the northweft corner of the aile is a curious old mural monument of ftonc, 
having a heavy cornice fupported by two fmall black round columns, with Corinthian 
capitals gilt. On each corner Hands a cherub, and in the centre a rich urn girt 
with foliage. In the middle, inclofed within a carved gilt border, is a black tablet 
thus inferibed : 

" Underneath Iyeth the body of William Crofle, who was born in the Park Lodge 
in this pariih, Dec. 15, 1620, and died Aug. 25, 1702. Gloria fed memoria." 

<Efc. 21 Edw. I. *Efc. 

1 2 In 



60 STAPLE-FIT ZPAINE. [atDkk 

In the chancel floor are three black flat ftones, with the following infcriptions:— 

" Juxta in diem fupremum reconduntur reliquiae Annas Jofephi Chetle viduae, de 
Vigornia. Obiit io° die Maii anno Dom. 1743, astat. 84." 

Arms: argent, a fefs coti&d faMe. 

« M. S. 
" Saras Hare prius reverendi Thomas Farnham, Gulielmi Hare, gent, poflmodum 
conjugis, praedi&orum Jof. et Ann. Chetle Alias, quae Vigorniae nata 23 Aprilis, 1693. 
Cognatis, amicis, pauperibus, bonifq; omnibus notis defiderata, faeculo fupremum 
dixit vale vn° iduum Novembris 1 75 1.** 

" Memorise Dni. R di Chetle Farnham, A. M. in hacce nati parochia ubi mortem 
obiit xv. cal. Martii, anno Chrifti MDCCLXIX. aetatis autem 45. Tam chari capitis 
ut defiderium teftaretur, armarii tegmen hoc lapideum, D ni Anna Farnham vidua 
ejus masrens infcriptum voluit : — 

" Literarum artiumque elcganter peritus, 
Mente perfpicaci behigniflime occupata, 
Morum comitate animique modeftia 
Omnium comparavit obfervantiam. 
Medicam feliciflime exercuit artem, 
Et medicamina, queis fani evaderent, 
Pauperibus gratuito prasbuit. 
Omnibus cor, egenis manus patuere. 
Honeftum rediumque tenaciter coluir, 

Fallere nefcius. 
Conjux, pater, dominus, vicinus, amicus, 
Humaniflimus, optimus, integerrimus ; 
Et dum fata tulerunt, 
Filius pietate nulli fecundus. 
Gregi cum fidiflimus turn chariflimus Paftor erat, 
Quern in pafcua laeta falutis vocantem delectati audiere. 
Denique vir fuit ingenue bonus, et poftera 
Laude dignus. 

Age, lector, qualis erat, efto! 

" Hie etiam jacent reliquiae dominae Annas Marias Farnham, predicto reverendo 
Chetle Farnham quae fola prolum fupervixit : invaletudo cum longa ct molefta non 
illam folida mente invaflt, virtutibus ab omni redempta vitio, pulcherrimam efflavit 
vitam Sept. die 27 mo anno Domini 1780." 

"P. M. S. 
" Ornatiflimi viri Gulielmi Chetle, A. M. Vigornienfis et hujus nuper et vicinas de 
Orchard ecclefiae redoris. 

*' Sciant 



anO TStllOon.] B I C K E N H A L L. 61 

" Sci»nt adco Poftcri 
Nihil quod aut homincm ingcnuum 

Aut pium Chrillianum, 
Aut fidclcm miniftrum dcccat, 

Ei dcfuifTc. 

"Qui quum aetatis fuae annum jam quinquagcfimum quintuin agcret poftridic 
calcndas Januarij e vita dcceffit, 1722." 

S H. S. E. 

" Vir rcvercndus dominus Thomas Farnham, A. M. hujufcc parochiae nee non 
vicinae et nativae de Orchard Portman, rector, atrophia laborans morialitatinon vitsc 
valcdixit die 1 8° Aprilis anno D01T1. 1 727. ^Etat. fuae 29 ." 

" Thomas filius Thomae & Sarae Farnham, obiit infans Martii 9*, 1725-6. 

" Anna filiaet infans, obiit Maii 24, 1727." 

In the church-yard arc two tombs, in memory of the families of William Hare, 
gent, and Thomas Wright, gent. 

Here are alfo the remains of an old (tone crofs, but the pillar is down; and of a 
fine old yew-tree, with a pair of (locks under it. 

An alms-houfe was endowed here about 1 643 by Mrs. Rachael Portman, for fix 
poor pcrfons, viz. two of Staple, two of Bickcnhall, and one of Thurlbcare. Thcfc 
poor have two-pence per week, and a black cloth gown once in two years, which 
they are obliged [if well] to wear at church every Sunday, or forfeit fix-pence to the 
clerk. One of them reads prayers to the reft, and has a falary of two (hillings and 
four-pence a week. Towards the fupport of this charity certain fums are paid out 
of the high rents of the manors of Staple and Bickcnhall. 



BICKENHALL. 

ADJOINING to Staple-Fitzpaine northwards is Bickcnhall, formerly accounted 
only a hamlet thereto, but now a reputed parifli. 

Its fituation is low and woody; the foil a wet ftiff clay: the arable part is worth on 
an average twelve (hillings, and the paflure twenty (hillings an acre; but is improve- 
able. There are two woods, containing about fixty acres each: the one is called 
Bickcnhall Wood ; the other Middle Room. 

The number of houfes is twenty-nine, and there is a poor-houfe for four families, 
which pays chief rent to the lord of the manor; but the parifti keeps it in repair. 

Here arc three tan-yards, and a manufacture of dowlas and ticks. 

Bickcnhall 



tz BICKENHALL. [atfttcfe 

Bickenhall was at the conqueft parcel of the pofTefFions of the earl of Morton. 

" William (fays Domefday) holds of the earl Bichehalle. Aluric held it in the 
" time of king Edward, and gelded for five hides. The arable confifts of five caru- 
" cates. In demefne are two carucates, and three fervants, and nine villanes, and 
V eight cottagers, with three ploughs. There are fourteen acres of meadow. A 
'* wood one mile long, and one furlong broad. It was worth twenty ihillings, now 
" feventy fhillings. 

" This manor by cuftom pays to Curi, a king's manor, five fheep with as many 
*' lambs; and every free man one pig of iron." 1 

From which laft pafiage it fhould feem that there was an iron forgery here before 
the conqueft. 

9 Edw. I. John de Pavely held at his death the manor of Bickenhall in capite of 
the king, by the fervice of one knight's fee. 19 Edw. II. another John de Pavely 
poflefled it, whofe heir was Robert de Pavely his brother, who, together with Alice 
his wife, held it 1 Edw. III. b 16 Edw. III. John de Stapilton is certified to hold this 
manor with appurtenances by royal grant, and that his heir was Robert de Stapilton. 
36 Edward III. Cecilia the wife of Stephen Laundey died feized of the hamlet of 
Bickenhall with appurtenances. Hence it came to the family of the Orchards, of 
whom William Orchard poflefled it 8 Henry V. After this the manor was divided ; 
and John Dodington appears to have held the third part thereof 22 Henry VI. 
He had a fon of his own name who inherited the eftate. 1 2 Edward IV. Chriftina 
Portman, daughter and fole heir of William Orchard, efq; held the third part of 
Bickenhall in dower. After her, her fon and heir John Portman enjoyed it: he 
married Edith daughter of John Porter, by whom he had iflue John his fon and heir. 
This laft John married Alice the daughter of William Knowell, and had iflue William 
Portman, who 1 6 Hen. VIII. is found to hold of the king in capite in Bickenhall, 
three meflliages, one hundred acres of arable land, fix acres of meadow, one hundred 
acres of pafture, and feven acres of coppice wood. In the fame year he gave thirty- 
three Ihillings to the king for his relief of the aforefaid premifes. A like quantity 
of land in Bickenhall was held the fame year (being another third) by Richard 
Dodington, fon and heir of John Dodington, a defcendant of the name above- 
mentioned, who gave for his relief the fum of feventeen (hillings and two-pence. c 
Thefe parcels were in procefs of time conjoined in the family of Portman, whofe 
reprefentative Henry William Portman, efq; is the prefent pofleflbr. 

Bickenhall has a fmall church, confifting of a nave and chancel, fifty-two feet long, 
and feventeen wide. A tower ftands at the weft end, which is forty feet high, and 
contains one bell. 

Againft the fouth wall of the chancel is an ancient monument of alabafter, having 
the effigy of a woman kneeling. Of the infeription nothing is legible, but " Rachel 
" Portman, who dyed in the 77 th year of her age." . 

» Lib. Domefday. b Efc. c Ibid. 

There 



atrtJ TBUlflOtl.] STOCKLINCH-OTTERSEY. 63 

There is no other infcription. 

Rachael Portman gave ten pounds to this parifh, the intcreft whereof to be dif- 
tributcd among the fecond poor annually on Eafter-day. 

The chriftenings on a yearly average arc five ; the burials three. 



STOCKLINCH-OTTERSEY 

IS a fmall parifh in the eaftern limit of the hundred, diftant three miles northeaft 
from Ilminfter, and feven weft from Crcwkerne. 

The number of houfes is about twenty-two, a few of which are farms; and of 
inhabitants about one hundred and twenty. Moft of the houfes ftand irregularly 
about the church. 

The country is woody, and rather flat ; but over a vale of fine meads to the fouth 
there is a pleafing view of White-Lackington village, and Dillington-houfe, the feat 
of lord North. The lands are moftly arable, and very rich, being worth twenty-five 
fhillings an acre: pafture and meadow from twenty to forty fliillings an acre. Hemp 
and flax are generally cultivated here; and turnips are well hoed, with a horfc-hoe 
invented by Mr. Hicks, a farmer in this parifli. The ftone, of which there is great 
plenty in this parifh, abounds with the fame kinds of foflils as are defcrihed in the 
account of Ilminfter. 

Neither of the two places now known by the name of Stocklinch can be dif- 
tinguifhed in the Norman furvey of this county. 

In the perambulation of the forcft of Nerochc, within this hundred, mention is 
made of a certain wood called Oterfchawe; and in an old MS. there is a brief account 
of a ruin of the fame name in the neighbourhood of lie-Abbots, from which a family 
are faid to have derived their appellation. In the cartulary of Glaftonbury abbey the 
name frequently occurs; and it fcerns probable, that fome of this family gave the 
additional title to this place. However, the records take little notice of it as a diftinct 
manor till the reign of Richard II. when it appears that the Denebauds were lords 
thereof. In 14 Rich. II. John Denebaud is found by inquifition to have died feized 
of this manor, and the advowfon of the church.* The Denebauds were originally 
of Pefcayth in Monmouthfhire, and chiefly refided at Hinton St. George in this 
county. Elizabeth the fole heirefs of John Denebaud, efq; by marriage with fir 
William Paulct in the reign of Henry VI. brought this manor to that family. Sir 
•\n\ias Paulet died feized of it in 1 5 88, b from whom it has come by lineal defcent to 
carl Paulet, the prcfent lord hereof. 

• Efc. b Ibid. 

The 



k>4 STOCKLINCH ST. MAGDALEN. {atrtiick 

The living is a rectory in the deanery of Crewkerne, and gift of the Child family. 
The rev. Mr. Fewtrel, of Hinton St. George, is the prefent incumbent. 

Here are very few poor chargeable to this parifh. 

The church is a fmall Gothic edifice fixty-two feet long, and twelve feet wide, 
confifting of a nave, chancel, and fouth aile, covered with tiles. At the weft end is 
a low tower with three bells. 

There is only one infcription in the church, which is on a fmall black ftone againft 
the wall of the aile: — 

" In memory of Mary wife of Thomas LefTey of this parifh, who died May 29, 
1734. aged 39." 



STOCKLINCH ST. MAGDALEN. 

STOCKLINCH ST. MAGDALEN lies weftward of Stocklinch-Otterfey, about 
two miles northeaft from Uminfter, and about feven from Chard. It has fifteen 
houfes ; one of which is an inn by Ilford-Bridges, on the turnpike road from Langport 
to Uminfter; four farms; the reft cottages: moft of the houfes ftandnear the church. 

The fituation is woody, and admits of little diftantprofpecl; but the lands are very 
good, and chiefly arable. Hemp and flax are produced here in confiderable quantity. 
The roads are rough and narrow, and overhung with hedges. 

The manor of Stocklinch St. Magdalen is divided: part belongs to the alms-houfe 
of Ilchefter, part to earl Poulet, and part to lord North. 

The living is a rectory in the gift of earl Poulet and deanery of Crewkerne. The 
rev. Mr. Gyllett, of White-Lackington, is the prefent incumbent. 

This parifh abounds with foflils of the fame kinds as at Uminfter. 

The river He divides this parifh from Ilton, and contains roach, dace, eels, perch, 
trout, and gudgeons. It runs under a ftone bridge of two arches on the turnpike 
road, which is kept in repair by thofe two parifhes. 

A revel is held here on St. Mary Magdalen's day. 

The only pauper in this parifh is a blind old woman, named Ann Symonds. 

The parifh church is a fmall building fifty feet long, and fourteen wide. At the 
weft end is a wooden turret thirty feet high, containing three bells and a clock. 

There is no monument or infcription; and the only thing worth notice, is a fine 
pointed arch between the nave and chancel, which is of excellent workmanfhip. 

SWELL. 



i; 



anu T5uIflon.] [ 65 ] 



SWELL 

IS a fmall parifli, nine miles eaft from Taunton, and four miles weft from Langport, 
and about half a mile to the fouth of the turnpike road between thofe towns. 

The fituation is fruitful' and plcafant; being under high ground to the north and 
northcaft, and open to the fouth, which affords an agreeable profpect. The number 
of houfes is twenty-five, moft of which arc fmall cottages; and of inhabitants about 
one hundred and thirty. 

The whole parirti is rated at about 700I. per annum. The poor rates arc one (hilling 
in the pound. The lands arc moftly arable: the foil partly clay, and partly ftone- 
rufli, and worth about eighteen millings an acre. Some petrifactions arc found here 
of the following kinds, viz. oyftcria, carduum, mufcle, fmall conchs, and cornua 
ammonis. 

In the Conqueror's furvcy this place is written Sewelle, and defcribed among the 
lands of Robert carl of Morton: — 

* Bretel holdcth of the carl Scwellc. Alvvald held it in the time of king Edward, 
" and was rated at three hides. The arable is four carucatcs. In demefne is one 
" carucate, with one fervant, and fix villanes, and twelve cottagers, with two ploughs. 
" There are thirty-three acres of meadow. A wood five furlongs and ten perches 
" long, and two furlongs broad. It is worth fixty (hillings."* 

After the conqueft this manor was poflefied by the family of Rivel, who held it in 
capite of the king by barony, and were fucceeded in it by the family of L'Orti; from 
whom it pafied through various other hands to the Warrcs; and is now the property 
of the honourable Thomas Grofvenor, efq; of Grofvcnor-fquare, London, whofc 
father fir Robert Grofvenor married Jane the folc heirefs of Thomas Warre, cfq; 
lord of this manor. 

The manor houfe ftands near the church, and is a curious old fabrick. The hall 
is twenty-fix feet high, and has one of thofe vaulted ceilings which arc common to 
fuch apartments. On a large hatchment are thefe arms: azure, a garb or: in chief 
a bloody hand dexter: over all, on an inefcutcheon^«/c\r, aJion rampant, between eight 
crofs croflets argent. Creft, a talbot on a wreathed murion. At each corner of the 
porch, which has a fine Gothic arch at the entrance, is a cherub holding an armorial 
(hield, on which are, 1. A chevron between three fifties hauriant argent. 1. Argent, 
a lion rampant fable. 3. On a fefs, between three bezants /able, three lozenges gules, 
4. Argent, three mallets purpure. 

The church of Swell was anciently appropriated to the priory of Bruton, and in 
1292 valued at four marks and a half. b 

a Lib. Domefday. b Taxat. Spiritual. 

Vol. L K The 



66 WHITE- LACKINGTON. [abtJiCk 

The church is a vicarage in the deanery of Crewkerne, and in the gift of the dean 
and chapter of Briftol. The rev. Thomas Price, of Merriot, is the prefent incum- 
bent. The glebe confifts of thirty acres. 

The church (dedicated to St. Catherine) is a fmall building, partly of Saxon and 
partly of Gothic architecture, fifty-two feet long, and eighteen wide, and confifts 
only of one aile and a chancel tiled. At the weft end is a fmall wooden turret with 
three bells. In fome of the windows there are remains of good painted glafs. 

In the chancel floor on a brafs plate : 

" Here lyeth the body of Toole, efq; who was married to Agnes the daughter 

of Thomas Newton, efq; having iflue by her 14 fonnes and fix daughters. He 
deceafed the io lb daye of June 1583." 

A chantry was founded in this church A. D. 1250, by Mabel Rivel, lady of the 
manor, and endowed with certain tenements in this parilh, fourfcore acres of arable 
land, five acres of meadow, and five acres of wood in Holeway, within the faid 
manor, for the maintenance of one chaplain to celebrate divine fervice in the faid 
church in perpetuum. The charter of this endowment was confirmed by Walter de 
Urtiaco, or Orti, grandfon of the faid Mabel, who, in addition to the grant, gave 
three acres and one perch of arable land, and half an acre of meadow, for the pro- 
vifion of lights and wine for the faid office, upon the altar of St. Catherine here. 
Confirmed by William, bifliop of Bath and Wells, at Wooky, 6 id. March, 1 273.° 

* Exc«rpt. e Regifl. Wellen. 



WHITE-LACKINGTON. 

THE pariih of White-Lackington is pleafantly fituated one mile northeaft from 
Ilminfter, in an open country, agreeably varied with rifing grounds and vallies, 
waftied by the river He. Although extenfive, it is but thinly peopled : the village 
confifts of fixteen houfes, which ftand fcattered northward of the church; ten form 
the hamlet of Atherfton, half a mile diftant; and four more join part of Broadway. 

In the general furvey this manor, called Wijlagetone, is thus accounted for among 
the large pofieflions of Roger Arundel: — 

*' Roger himfelf holds Wiflagetone. Almar held it in the time of king Edward, and 
" gelded for ten hides. The arable is ten carucates. In demefne is one carucate, 
*' and feven fervants, and nine villanes, and thirty cottagers, with feven ploughs, and 
" feVen Swineherds, who pay forty hogs. There is a mill of fifteen ftiillings rent, 
" and fifty acres of meadow, and fixty-one acres of pafture, and two hundred and 
•' forty acres of wood. It was worth when he received it twelve pounds, now nine 
" pounds."* 

* Lib. Denw fday. In 






aninBuiaonO WHITE-LACKINGTON. 67 

In the time of Edw. III. this manor was held by the family of Bryan, or Brean. 
It afterwards became the pofieffions of the Hulls of Afhill, from whom it pafTcd by 
an heirefs to the Multons of Pinho in Dcvonfhirc, which family likewife terminating 
in an heir female, it was transferred by marriage to the Beauchamps. Sir Thomas 
Beauchamp, ftiled of Whitc-Lackington, knight, died feized of this manor, with 
thofe of Atherftone and Afhill, in 1430, 9 Hen. VI. leaving no ifTue; (his fon John 
Beauchamp having died in his father's life-time:) whereupon Alice his niece became 
his next heir. She was married to fir John Spcke, knight, who in her right enjoyed 
this and the other manors before-mentioned. 

The family of Spcke were very anciently pofTcfled of the manors of Wemworthy 
and Brampton, in the county of Devon, and chiefly rcfided in the former of thofe 
parifhes, at a feat denominated Heywood. 1 ' 

In the time of king Henry II. Richard LeEfpek (for fo their name was formerly 
written) held three knight's fees of Robert Fitz-Roy, lord of the manor of Okc- 
hampton. In the fame reign he held one fee of William Tracy, and two fees of 
Oliver Tracy. e 

Thefaid Richard LeEfpek had ifTue William, and he another Richard, who was 
under age 30 Henry II. Richard was father of fir William Le Efpek, who married 
Alice daughter and heir of fir Walter Gervois of Exon, and by her had ifTue William, 
which William, by Julian daughter of fir John de Valletort of Clift St. Lawrence, was 
father of William and John. This John, who was of Branford, wrote his name 
L'Efpek: he married Conftance the daughter of John de Eflc, and had iflue John. 
Robert, and William: the two eldcfl died without iflue; William Spcke (the name 
being by him thus firft abbreviated) was father of John Spekc, who married Joan 
daughter and heir of John Keynes, of Dowlifli in this county, and had ifliie by her 
John Speke, knight. 

Which fir John married (as has been before mentioned) Alice, hcirefsof fir Thomas 
Beauchamp; after whofe death the family conftantly rcfided at Whitc-Lackington. 
The faid Alice died 24 Hen. VI. Their iflue was fir John Speke, knight, who by the 
daughter of William Somafter, of Nethercot, cfq; was father of another fir John. 
He married Joan, daughter and hcirefs of John Winard, efq; and by her had iflue 
John and fir George Speke. John married Alice the daughter of fir Thomas Arundel, 
of Lathern in Cornwall, and died in his father's life-time ; but left iflue four children, 
Thomas his heir; fir George, who lived and died at Dowlifh; Chriftopher, a prieft; 
and Alice, who died unmarried. Thomas, his fon and heir, was fheriff of this 
county and Dorfet, (as were many others of this family) and was made a knight by 
king Henry VIII: he was likewife of the privy chamber of king Edward VI. He 
married Anne, daughter of fir Rich. Berkley, and fifter of fir Maurice Berkley, knights,, 
and had iflue by her George Spdce, who was knighted at Windfor 28 Henry VIII. 
The faid fir George married, to his firft wife, Elizabeth daughter of fir Andrew 

b Sir William Pole's furvey of Devonfliire, MS. c Lib. nig. Scac. vol. i. 120, 121, 123. 

K 2 LuttrclJ,. 



68 WHITE-LAC KINGTON. [abtJiefc 

Luttrell, and widow of Richard Malet of Enmore, and by her had iftue one fon 
George, and two daughters, Anne married to fir George Trenchard, knight; and 
Barbara married to William Thornhill, efq. To his fccond wife he married Dorothy 
daughter of Edward Gilbert of London, by whom he had Hugh, who married the 
heirefsof Beke, of Berkftnre; Elizabeth married to John Chudley, efq; and Dorothy 
the wife of fir Edward Gorges, knight, who died at Ilminfter. Sir George Speke, fon 
of the faid fir George, married Philippa the daughter of William Roufwell, efq; 
folicitor to queen Elizabeth, and had hTue feveral children, of whom George the 
eldeft fucceeded in the eftate. He married Joan daughter of fir John Portman, bart. 
and was father of a fourth George, who married Mary daughter of fir Robert Pye, 
knight, befides feveral other children, of whom William was the progenitor of the 
rev. William Speke, the prefent vicar of Ilminfter. George Speke, by his faid wife, 
had a numerous iflue, the eldeft of whom was named John, and fucceeded at White- 
Lackington. He married firft, Catherine the daughter of Edward Prideaux, efq; 
by whom he had no iflue; and fecondly, Elizabeth daughter of Robert Pelham, efq; 
by whom he had iflue George, the fifth and laft of that name refident at White- 
Lackington. The faid George Speke married three wives: I. Alice, daughter of 
Nicholas Brooking, efq; by whom he had two daughters, Mary who died in 1777, 

and Alice who died an infant. 2. Jane, daughter of Huckmore, efq; and widow 

of William Pitts, efq. 3. Anne, daughter of William Fitz-Williams, efq; by whom 
he had two children, George who died in infancy, and Anne, the wife of Frederick 
lord North, who is the prefent lord of this manor. 

The arms of Speke are, Barry of eight, azure and argent; over all an eagle difplayed, 
with two heads gules. The ancient creft of the family was a porcupine ; but fir George 
Speke changed it to that of his mother, a dexter hand holding a battle-ax. The 
prefent family, however, have refumed the porcupine. 

The hamlet of Atherstone within this parifti was heretofore written Athelarde- 
flone, and was probably fo denominated from an ancient Saxon owner. It was 
generally held by the lords of White-Lackington, who had a chapel here, whereof 
GefFereyde Hamme was chaplain, anno I4i5. d 

The living is a prebend in the cathedral church of Wells, valued in 1292 at 
eighteen marks/ The vicarage is difcharged: the rev. William Gyllett the prefent 
incumbent, 

The church is in the deanery of Crewkerne, and is dedicated to the Virgin Mary. 
It confifts of a nave, chancel, north and fouth ailes, and two fmall femi tranfepts, 
which heretofore were chapels. At the weft end is an embattled tower, fixty-four 
feet high, with a clock and four bells. This tower is built of the Hambdon (or 
Ham) hill ftone, and the mafonry is remarkably fine. 

In the fouth tranfept under the window, are the mutilated effigies of a man in 
armour; and of another with a military belt and fword in it: but no infeription 
remains. Thefe effigies lie on plain ftones, raifed about four inches from the floor. 

' Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen. * Taxat. Spiritual. In 



ana H5ulfton.] white-lackingt-on. 6,, 

In the caftern wall of this ailc is a large Gothic niche, and over the top two corbels 
or fupportcrs, for fmall images.. There arc alfo two efcutchcons with anus belonging 
to the Spckc family. 

In the north tranfept is an ancient but flatcly mural monument, the body of which 
is a tomb, covered with a black, (tone, beneath a rich arched canopy, cmbcllifhed with 
arms and Gothic ornaments: on the top are five hexagonal twilled pillars, on the tops 
of two of which are old helmets ; and near them hang two ancient fmall fwords. 

On a mural monument of plain black flonc in the chancel: 

" To the memory of the rev. Mr. George Bowyer, vicar of this parifli, fbn of the 
rev. Mr. Thomas Bowyer, vicar of Martock, and grandfon of the rev. Mr. John 
Norris, rector of Bemerton. 

" Worthy of fuch a father, and grandfather, he was an honeft man, a pious 
chriflian, a faithful paftor : infriendftup fincere, in focial life amiable: affectionate to 
his relations, companionate to the poor, benevolent to all. By inftruction and 
example he zealoufly endeavoured to promote chriflian knowledge and practice. Thus 
living he was beloved ; and died univcrfally lamented March 8, 1 766, aged 49." 

On two black flones in the weft end wall : 

" Here underneath lie the remains of Jo. Hallett, who departed this life March 
2 1 ft, 1773, in the 63 d year of his age." 

" In memory of William Crabb, fen. of Atherftone in this parifti, who departed 
this life the 20 ,h day of October 1729, aetat. 75. 

" In memory alfo of Sufannah the wife of William Crabb, fen. who departed this 
life the 9"" day of February 1724, aetat. 77. 

" Worn out with age we lye confined to duft, 
" In hope to rife and live among the juft. 

" In memory alfo of William Crabb, jun. of Atherftone, fon of the abovefaid 
William and Sufannah Crabb, who departed this life the 8"' day of April 1738, 
aetat. 52. 

" Beneath lye the remains of Mrs. Ann Hallett, the widow of Mr. William Crabb, 
jun. Ihe departed this life the io' h day of October, and in the year of our Lord 1766, 
a:tat. 74." 

In the body of the church on the floor: 

" Here lyeth the body of Mrs. Elizabeth Speke, fpinfter, grandaughter to the laft 
fir George Speke, knight, who departed this life the 27'* day of December 1702. 
/Etatis fuae 73." 

In the church-yard are four neat tombs erected to the memory of the Harming, 
Chaffey, and Hallett families. 

And 



7 o 



WHITE-LACKINGTON. [abHicfc ami ISulflon. 



And another tomb, 

"In memory of John Lewellyn, gent, who died Dec. 21, 1753, aged 80 ; and of 
Sarah his wife, who died Aug. 31, 1765, aged 74. 

« In God they trufted, without doubts or fears ; 
They grew in goodnefs as they grew in years. 
Their fouls, unfetter'd, flew to realms above, 
Secure of blifs through their Redeemer's love." 




THE 




[ 7* ] 



THE HUNDRED 



O F 



ANDERSFIELD 



TOOK its name from a fmall hamlet in the parifh of Goathurft, where the hun- 
dred courts were formerly held. It confifts of only fix parifhes, viz. Broom- 
field, Durley, Enmore, Goathurft, Creech, and Ling. The firft four are 
fituated under the eaftern fide of the Quantock hills j and the laft two form a long 
narrow flip of land on the north fide of the river Tone, disjoined from the other part, 
and lying betwixt the hundreds of North -Petherton and North-Curry. Two high 
conftables are chofen, one for each part of the hundred. 

It formerly belonged to the crown, and 26 Henry VI. was granted,* with all its 
rights, members, and appertenances, to fir John Stourton, knt. dien created baron of 
Stourton in the county of Wilts. His defcendants continued in pofTeffion of the fame 
till the year 1688, when Edward lord Stourton fold it among many other eftates to 
Mr. Gore his fteward: it is now the property of the earl of Egmont. 

• Pat. 26 Hen. VI. p. 2. m. 26. 



BROOMFIELD. 

BROOMFIELD, anciently written Brunfelle, is a large parifh, fituated at the foot 
of Quantock-hills, fix miles north from Taunton, and feven weft from Bridg- 
water, on high ground, beautifully varied with fwelling hills, and deep romantick vales, 
and commanding a great variety of pleafing landfcapes, and very extenfive profpects, 
to which the Bridgwater river, the Briftol Channel, and the Welch mountains, parti- 
cularly contribute. 

The lands, which are moderately fruitful, are nearly divided between pafture and 
arable. The foil in general is fhallow, and abounds with that kind of rag flate ftone, 
divifible into thin laminae, which is found almoft every where in the neighbourhood of 
Quantock. It is, however, favourable to the growth of timber; and Spanifh chefnut 

1 trees, 



7 2 b R o o M F I E L D. [anoergfieiu. 

trees, beech, firs, pines, and allies, flourifh here, and grow to a very large fize. On 
the banks are found fome curious fpecies of polypody, and moflesj and the hills, in 
fummer, are rendered very beautiful by feveral kinds of erica, hawkweed, and the 
purple digitalis. 

This parifh has always been remarkably healthy, even in times of general ficknefs 
elfewhere. It contains about fixty houfes, and three hundred and thirty inhabitants. 

A fair is held here annually on the 13th day of November, for coarfe cloths and all 
forts of cattle. 

The manor of Broomfield is fet down in the Norman furvey as parcel of the pof- 
feffions of William de Mohun: 

" William himfelf holds Brunfelle. Alnod held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and gelded for three hides. The arable is ten carucates. In demefne is one caru- 
•* cate, and eight fervants, and twelve villanes, and two cottagers, with four ploughs. 
<c There are ten acres of meadow, and one mile of pafture, and one mile of wood in 
" length and breadth. When he received it, it was worth forty millings, now fixty 
" millings.'" 

The next pofleflbrs of this manor that we meet with, were the family of Montacute, 
of whom it was held for many defcents by the De la Lyndes of Dorfetfhire. 1 Edw. I. 
John de la Lynde is found by the inquifitions to have held it at his death of the heir, 
of William de Montacute by the fervice of one knight's fee. b 8 Edw. II. Walter de 
Ja Lynde died feized of the fame, and other manors in this county and Dorfetfhire. 
Hence it came to the family of de Crocumbe, and in the time of Edw. III. became 
the pofleffion of John Biccombe by his marriage with Ifolda, daughter and heir of 
Simon de Crocumbe, in whofe poflerity it continued till the year 1556, when it was 
fettled upon Maud, the youngeft daughter of Hugh Biccombe, upon her marriage with 
Hugh Smyth, of Long-Afhton in this county, efq. The faid Hugh Smyth died in 
1580, leaving one only daughter and heir, Elizabeth, married to Edward Morgan, of 
Lanternan in the county of Monmouth, efqj whofe two fons by the faid marriage fold 
the manor in 1634 to Andrew CrofTe and William Towill. In 1659 William Towill 
conveyed his part of the manor to Hugh Halfwell, efq; from whom it came to the 
Tyntes, and is now the property of Lady Tynte, relict of the late Sir Charles Kemeys 
Tynte, bart. The other moiety of the manor is the inheritance of Richard CrofTe, 
efq; who has a handfome houfe near the church, with beautiful grounds, and elegantly 
difpofed plantations. 

At Binfords, about two miles diflant, is an elegant feat of John Jeane, efq. 

The church of Broomfield was appropriated to the priory of Buckland. It is a 
donative in the deanery of Bridgwater: the patronage is veiled in John Mofs, and 
Hamilton, efqrs. The Rev. John Blundell is the prefent incumbent. 

The fabrick confifts of a nave, chancel, and north aile tiled ; having at the weft end 
a fquare tower, fifty feet high, in which are five bells. 

* Lib. Domefday. » Efc. 

On 



anucrflfielD.] broomfield. 73 

On a ftone monument againft the fouth wall is the following infeription: 
" Sub hoc faxo requiefcunt o(Ta Mariae reliifrae Guliclmi Towil, hujus parochiae 
gener: quae, mundi pertasfa, matura caelo, aegram fenectutem cum immortalitate 
commutavit i2calcndas Junij: anno aetat. 82. Salutis reparatac 1677. 

" Honcfte nata, pudice cducata, famaq; illibata, fuit; placidi oris, fevcrae virtutis ; 
inter cautiflimas prima, matcrfamilias prudentiflima, mater optima; pietatis adeoquc 
fpei plena obdormivit." 

On another fmall (tone adjacent : 

"Uxorum dilccWimarum triados Georgii Hillier clcrici, hujus ecclcfia: curati, 
quod rcliquum hie reconditur. 

" Prima Urfula, 14 kal. Scxtilis, A. D. 1678, aetat. 37; 
" Altera Dorothea, 16 kal. Ap. 1693, aetat. 61 ; 
" Tertia Diana, 4 kal. Deccmb. 1700, aetat. 45. 

" Tres duxi, tribus orbus cram, tria funera flevi 
** Uxorum; has lachrymas fifte triune Dcus. 

* G. H." 

" Hue acccflit ctiam Georgius, fupradicli Georgii filiolus (ex uxorc Diana genius) 
xvii kal. Jan. 1703, aetat. menfes 7. 

" Fefta dies natum, defunctum, fefta fcpultum 
" Vidit; in aeternum nunc mihi fefta dies." 

On a large ftone in the floor: 

" Here lieth the body of William Towil, of Enmorc, who was buried the 23" 1 of 
Aug. 1 59 1 ; Mho was conftable of the hundred of Andersficld four years. 

" Here lieth the body of William Towil, of this parilh, gent, who dyed May 1 8, 
1649, a g et * 58." 

With fcveral others of this family; and alfo that of Slapc, Colford,. Gardiner, 
Webber, Sec. 

In the church-yard arc two fine old yew-trees, and a ftone crofs, tolerably perfecl. 

To this parifh belongs a weekly charity of twelve two-penny loaves, which are 
diftributed every Sunday to the like number of poor perfons, at the difcretion of 
the parifh officers. This donation was made by one of the Towil family, who charged 
the living with the payment of the fame for ever. 

The annual average number of chriftcnings in Broomfield is eleven; of burials 
eight. 



Vol. I. . L CREECH 



[ 74 ] [anoetsificlD. 

CREECH ST. MICHAEL. 

THAT the fea did heretofore reach this parifh, and form a notable creek or cove, 
is evident as well from the name, which comes from the Saxon Enecca, as 
from Situation and natural appearance.* 

This parifh is very extenfive, being four miles in length from north to fouth ; and 
is fituated three miles eaftward from Taunton, and ten nearly fouth from Bridgwater. 
It includes a confiderable village, confifting of forty-three houfes, which ftand near 
the church; and five hamlets, viz. 

1. Long-Auler, fituated one mile northweft, containing five farms. 

2. Adfborough, anciently a place of eminence, now containing eighteen houfes, 
chiefly farms, at the diftance of two miles and a half from Creech northward. 

3. Charlton, one mile eaft, having feven houfes, four of which are farms. 

4. Ham, nearly a mile foutheaft, in which are ten houfes. 

5. Creech-Heathfield, one mile north, comprizing fifteen tenements, which are 
chiefly cottages. 

The whole number of houfes within the parifh is about one hundred and thirty- 
three, and of inhabitants nearly fix hundred, of whom about twenty are freeholders. 

The lands are moflly arable, and worth on an average about twenty fhillings an 
acre; the pafture and meadow thirty {hillings. The foil is a clay, mixed with a fmall 
portion of gravel and ftone-rufh. Elm is the principal wood. The river Tone runs 
through a rich moor, containing about two hundred acres, belonging to this parifh, 
and has over it a county bridge built of ftone, which has three arches. On this moor 
the parifhioners of Ruifhton have a right to turn out nine hundred and ninety-nine 
fheep. A fmall ftream likewife rifing at Weft-Monkton paffes through part of this 
parifh, and empties itfelf into the Tone a little below Ham. There are feveral mills 
on thefe ftreams, and among them fome oil mills. 

There are two paffages in Domefday book which refer to this manor: one of them 
writes it Crice, and defcribes it, or part of it, as demefne of the king: the other 
writes it Cruchc, and fets it down as the property of Robert earl of Morton, or 
Mortaigne in Normandy. 

11 The king" (faith the firft pafTage) " holds Crice. Gunnild held it in the time of 
" king Edward, and gelded for ten hides and a half. The arable is eight carucates. 
*' Thereof in demefne are fix hides, and there are two carucates, and fix fervants, and 
" twenty villanes, and ten cottagers, with fix ploughs. There is a mill of eight-pence 
" rent, and eight acres of meadow. Pafture a mile in length, and as much in 

■ See the general account of the hundred of Abdick and Bulftone. 

" breadth. 



anocrsfieio.] creechst. michael. 7$ 

" breadth. A wood one furlong in length and breadth. It yields nine pounds and 
" four (hillings of" white money. b There is a fifhery, but it docs not belong to 
" the farm." 

The other parcel is thus furveyed: — 

" Earl Moriton holds of the king Cruchc, and Turftin of him. Sircwold held it 
" in the time of king Edward, and gelded for fix hides. The arable is five carucatcs, 
•' of which in demefne are four hides, and there are three carucatcs, and two fcrvants, 
" and fix villanes, and five bordars, with three ploughs. There is a mill rented at 
" twelve fhillings, and one acre and a half of meadow. A wood feven furlongs long, 
" and two furlongs broad. It was worth four pounds, now one hundred (hillings."' 

Whether or no the former of thefe eftates came to the carl of Morton docs nor 
appear, but it is moft probable that it did. He was, as has been faid, brother by the 
mother's fide to William the Conqueror, who gave him large eftates in this and in 
other counties, together with the title of carl of Cornwall, as a reward for his ferviccs 
in forwarding him to the throne of England. He married Maud, daughter to Roger 
dc Montgomery, carl of Shrewsbury, and by her had ifiue William, who fuccccded 
him in the earldoms of Morton and Cornwall. 

This William having founded a monaftery for Cluniac monks at the foot of Mon- 
tacute hill, endowed it with this his manor of Creech, among divers other lands in 
this county, and gave it to the monks thereof, to hold to them and their fuccefibrs, 
in pure and free alms. This benefaction was not long conferred, before the founder, 
who is reprefented to have been of a malicious and arrogant fpirit from his childhood, 
envying the glory of king Henry I. engaged in rebellion with Robert Curthofc, duke 
of Normandy, who was then urging his claim to the crown of England. Upon this 
the king feized not only upon all the carl's pcrfonal eftates, but thofe which he had 
beftowed on the priory of Montacutc. 

Henry, however, commiferating the poverty of the religious, who, in confequcncc 
of this deprivation, were abfolutely reduced to beggary,' 1 foon after reftorcd to them 
their former poileftions, with additional giants and privileges. Thefe were confirmed 
by the fuccecding kings. 37 Henry III. they had free warren granted them in Creech/ 
and in the fame reign a charter for a weekly market. 1 In 1293 their property here 
was valued at 60I.* 

The faid monks of Montacute retained poftefllon of this manor till the latter end 
of the reign of Henry VIII. when their focicty being diflblved, and their lands 
eftranged, it w as granted to fir Thomas Wyat, knight, whofe fon Thomas, who was 
alfo a knight, being attainted for trcafon in 1554, it reverted to the crown; and queen 
Mary, in the fecond year of her reign, beftowed the fame on Edward Haftings, 
knight of the garter, and mafter of the horfe to that queen. He was foon after 

b Pure filver in bullion. e Lib. Domcfday. d Lei. Itin. v. 2. p. 92. 

c Cart. 37 Hen. III. m. 8. f Cart. 53 Hen. III. m. 13. * Taxat. Temporal. 

L 2 advanced 



7 6 creech st. Michael. [affljewfieto. 

advanced to the degree and title of lord Haftings of Loughborough; but having 
founded a hofpital at Stoke-Pogcys in Buckinghamshire, and endowed it with a rent 
of 53I. 9s. iffuing out of this manor, he retired thither, and there died without iffue. 
In the fucceeding reign Lawrence Radford, being pofleffed of this manor, conveyed it 
to Robert Cuffc, efq; h of whofe family was Henry Cuffe, the memorable aflbciate of 
die earl of Effex in his treafonable machinations againft queen Elizabeth. Hence 
the manor came in procefs of time to the Keyts of Gloucefterfhire, of whom it was 
purchafed by the prefent proprietor William HufTey, efq; member in the prefent 
parliament for Salifbury, who holds court-leet and baron here annually. 

The church of Creech was appropriated in 1362 to the priory of Montacute, and 
a vicarage ordained the fame year by bifhop Ralph de Salopia, when it was appointed 
that the vicar for the time being fhould have the whole parfonage-houfe, with 
the orchards and gardens belonging thereto, and alfo all the arable and pafture lands 
of the faid parfonage, excepting certain feven acres of arable, and pafture for eight 
oxen, which had always belonged to the rector of the faid church. That the vicar 
ihould likewife have all the tithes of hay, wool, milk, mills, fiiheries, and all fmall 
tithes whatfoever, except thofe which appertained to the prior's demefne: likewife 
the third part of the tithes of all kinds of corn, which the rectors ufually received; 
together with oblations, mortuaries, and all other obventions, exclufive of the altarage 
of the faid church: that he fhould moreover have commonage in all the paftures 
within the faid parifh, excepting thofe belonging to the feparate demefne of the con- 
vent. That the faid vicar fhould pay yearly half a mark to the chapter of the church 
of Wells, and forty pence to the archdeacon of Taunton, in the name and by way 
of an indemnification, for the lofs they might fuftain from this appropriation; and 
that he fhould defray all procurations of cardinals, legates, archdeacons, and other 
vifitors, repair the chancel, provide books, veftments, and other ornaments, and fuftain 
all other ordinary and extraordinary burdens. Dat. 20 Oct. 1362/ 

In 1292 this vicarage was rated at twenty-nine marks and a half, out of which a 
penfion of half a mark was paid to the prior of Montacute. k 26 Henry VIII. it was 
valued at 1 61- 8s. 9d. It is in the deanery of Taunton. C. W. Bampfylde, efq; is the 
patron; and the rev. Thomas Exon the prefent incumbent. 

The church (which is dedicated to St. Michael, giving the additional name to the 
parifh) ftands on an eminence on the north fide of the river Tone. 1 It confifts of a 
nave, chancel, and fide ailes, covered with tile. The north aile is divided in the 
middle by the belfry, which fupports a fquare embattled tower, fixty feet high, 
wherein hang five mufical bells. The fouth aile belongs to the family of Cely of 
Charlton, and is feparated from the nave by a handfome open work Gothic fcreen 

h MS. Donat. » Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen. k Taxat. Spiritual. 

1 Moil churches dedicated to the honour of St. Michael tlie archangel are fignificantlyfituated on elevated 
ground, or elfe have high towers, or fteeples. Of which, among many others that might be mentioned, 
St. Michael's Mount in Normandy, St. Michael's Mount in Cornwall; Michael's Borough, and St. Michael's 
on the Torr near Glaitonbury in this county, are notable inftances. 

and 






anoerfifieio.] creech st. michael. 77 

and rich cornice. Againft the wall is an efcutchcon charged with a chevron between 
three mullets. Crcft, a wolf paflant langued on a wreathed rnurion. 

In this aile is a blue ftone with the following infeription : 

" 3In memory of (ZEMoarti Cclp of Cbarlton in tbte patiflj, efq. barrifle? 
at lato, tobo oeceafeo on tfje 6tb oaj? of JFebruarp, tobofe beep toas bcrc 
burieo tbe aotb Bag of tbc fame, ano Domt 1676," 

Arms: a chevron between three mullets, with a label for diftin&ion. 

In the wall of the fame aile, on a plain ftone: 

* Here lyeth the body of Jane the wife of James Trivctt, daughter of Edward 
Cecly, efq; who died Feb. 13, 1705." 

Near the eaftcrn end of the north aile, in a niche, are the remains of a large and 
once elegant ftone monument. The tomb, part of the cornice above, and two of 
the four fmall fluted Corinthian pillars that fupportcd it, ftill remain; and alio an 
infeription as follows: 

" Robert Cuffc dyed the 1 1 daye of Mayc 1595." 

Arms: Or, on a bend dancette fable, cotifed argent, bezante, three flcurs delis gules. 

At the eaft end of the chancel is a very handfome mural monument of various kinds 
of marble, inferibed 

" In memory of John Keyt, gent, fecond fon of William Keyt, efq; and grandfon 
of fir William Keyt, of the county of Gloucefter, bait, who died Feb. 27, 1732, 
aged 37. 

" Alfo of William Keyt his fon, who died March 13, 1739, aged 20. And alfo 
Mary Keyt, widow of the above-named John Keyt, only daughter of William Pratt, 
of Thurloxton, efq; who died Dec. 19, 1757, aged 63." 

The arms are, Azure, a chevron between three kites' heads erafed, or. Keyt. 
Impaling, argent, on a chevron fable, between three ogreflcs, each charged with a 
martlet of the firft, three mafcles or. Pratt. 

Under the communion tabic, on a flat ftone : 
" Here lyeth the body of David Marler, who lived vicar of this church 62 years, 
and died the 7' h of Februarye, anno Dom. 1627." 

" Here lyeth the body of John Tale, vicar of this church 30 years, and was buried 
July 7, 1696, aged 54. 

" Alfo here lyeth the body of John, the fon of John Tale, vicar of this church, 
and Mar)' his wife, grandfon of the abovefaid John Tale, who was buried Oft. 21, 
1 710, aged 2 years." 

" Here lyeth John Gale, vicar of this church 34 years, who died May 5, 1738, 
aged 63." 

On 



78 DURLEIGH. [affljewfiefo. 

On another ftone : 

"Here lyeth Elizabeth, the wife of Robert Cuffe, efq; who died the ift of 
Odlober 1616." 

On the next ftone: 

' " Here lie the remains of the rev. John Skerrat, rector of Brereton in Chefhire, 
He died March 24, 1755, in the 66"' year of his age." 

t 

Againft one of the corner pillars in the north aile is a black ftone monument: 

" In memory of James Friend of this parifh, gent, who died Jan. 1, 1728, aged 55." 

' There are many ftones in the floor, inferibed with the names of Raymond, Crofs, 
Bobbett, Celey, Moore, Pococke, Barbor, Muttlebury, &c. 

In the church-yard are two very large old yew-trees, the bodies of which are 
hollow, and meafiire fifteen feet in circumference. 

About the year 1 740, Mrs. Anne Seager of this parifh gave by will two acres and 
three roods of land, the rents thereof to be applied to the teaching poor children to 
read. This brings in forty fhillings a year, and the eftate now pofTefled by Mrs. 
Arundel is charged with it. 



DURLEIGH. 

THIS fmall parifh, the name whereof fignifies a watery pafture, is fituated one 
mile and a half weft from Bridgwater, on the turnpike road from that town 
to Bifhop's-Lydiard. 

The fituation is low and woody; the lands moftly pafture and meadow, and very 
wet; but fo flat, and bounded with higher grounds, as not eafily to be drained. The 
foil is in general a heavy clay, but tolerably fruitful. 

A ftream rifing under Cothelftone-hill croffes the turnpike-road here under a ftone 
arch, and turns a grift-mill; after which it empties itfelf into the Parret near 
Bridgwater. 

This whule parifh is rated only at 500I. per annum, and is divided intofeveral good 
farms. The principal landholders (for the manor is difmembered) arc, fir Philip 
Hales, and fir Charles Kemeys Tynte, bart. Moft of the houfes, which are twenty in 
number, ftand near the church, and are mean thatched cottages, fome of them in 
a ruinous condition. 

In the time of William the Conqueror, this parifh, then called Derlege, was held 
of the king by Anfger. « Alfi held it in the time of king Edward, and gelded for 

" two 






antjetafielD.j goathurst. 79 

" two virgatcs of land and a half, and one furlong. The arable is three carucatcs, 
" and there are with it four villancs, and two cottagers, and three fervants. There 
" are twenty acres of wood. It was formerly, and is now, worth twenty (hillings."* 

St. John's hofpital, and other publick foundations in Bridgwater, had formerly 
lands here. In the time of Henry VIII. the manor and farm, with appcrtenanccs, 
and divers lands and meflliages in Bridgwater and Durleigh, were held by John 
Smyth, efq; from whom they defcended to Hugh Smyth, cfq; his fon and heir. The 
manor-houfe is a large good old building near the church, a fituation common to 
buildings of that fort. 

The church was anciently appropriated to the hofpital of St. John at Bridgwater 
before-mentioned, founded by William Brewer in 1 219. It is a vicarage in the 
deanery of Bridgwater, and in the patronage of Dr. Dunning of that town. The 
rev. Mr. Coles is the prefcnt incumbent. 

The church is a fmall ftructure, fixty feet long, and fixtccn wide, confiding of a 
nave, chancel, and porch tiled, with a fquarc embattled tower at the weft end forty 
feet high, and containing four bells. 

There is neither monument nor infeription. 

* Lib. Domefday. 



GOATHURST. 

THIS parifh is fituatcd in the larger divifion of the hundred, at the diftance of 
three miles weft from the town of Bridgwater, and eight north from that of 
Taunton. It is of confidcrable extent, and contains forty-eight houfes, and three 
hundred inhabitants. 

Half a mile weftward is the little hamlet of Anderskield, a place formerly fo 
considerable as to give name to the hundred. It now contains only four houfes. 

The lands of this parifh are very good, and chiefly employed in pafture. They 
produce remarkably fine timber: there are fome chefhut-trecs in Halfwcll-park which 
are upwards of fifteen feet in circumference, and contain more than feven tons of 
timber each. In this park rifes a fine fpring of water, which runs through the parifh, 
and turns feveral corn-mills in its way to the Parrct. 

In the Norman furvey the name of this place (which is obvioufiy compounded of 
the Saxon Car, a goat ; and fcyprT, a wood ; the village having large woods abound- 
ing formerly with that animal) is limpingly written Gabers : the French tranferibers 
having been unable either to pronounce or indite fo rough a word as Gatburji. They 
give us the following account of it : — 

« Walter 



8o 



GOATHURST. 



[anoergfietD, 



*« Walter and Anfgcr hold of Alured [de Ifpania] Gahers. Alwi held it in the 
f time of king Edward, and gelded for one hide and three virgates of land. The 
" arable is lix carucates. In demefne are two carucates, and four fervants, and 
«• thirteen villanes, and five cottagers, with four ploughs. There are fixty-two acres 
" of wood. When he received it, it was worth feventy fhillings: now the fame." 1 

After the conqueft this vill had lords of its own name. 1 2 Henry II. Hugh the fon 
of Malger de Gaherfte held one knight's fee here of Philip de Columbers. b In other 
reigns it was held under different appellations ; but its molt permanent pofieflbrs feem 
to have been the family of Poulet, of whom fir John Poulet, knight, refided here in 
the reign of Edward III. In this family Goathurft continued for many generations ; 
till at length, the male line failing, the eftates were divided between four filters 
coheirefles; and three parts in four of this manor became the property of fir Charles 
Kemeys Tynte by purchafe: the fourth belongs to the family of Jeane, by their 

anceftor's intermarriage with the heirefs of Paine, of North-Petherton, efq; 

who married one of the coheireffes above-mentioned. 

Another manor in this parifh, viz. Halswell, was the rcfidence of a family of that 
name for feveral centuries. It is written in the great furvey Hafevpelle, and is thus 
defcribed : — ■ 

" Wido holds of Roger [Arundel] Hafewelle. Alward held it in the time of king 
*' Edward, and gelded for one hide. The arable is two carucates. In demefne is one 
" carucate, and two fervants, and two villanes, and three cottagers, with one plough. 
" There are fourteen acres of wood. It is worth twenty-five fhillings." 

Its fubfequent lords, the family of Halfvvell, had large pofTefnons in this and 
divers other counties, which defcended to a fole heirefs, Jane, the daughter of Hugh 
Halfvvell, fon of fir Nicholas Halfwell. She married John Tynte, of Chelvy, efq; 
progenitor of the late fir Charles Kemeys Tynte, bart. whofe lady is the prefent 
pofTefTor of this manor. Sir Charles died Aug. 25, 1785, after having reprefented 
this county in feveral parliaments. He married Anne daughter and coheir of the 
rev. Dr. Bufby, of Addington in the county of Bucks, to whom, having no ifTue, he 
bequeathed this manor of Goathurft, and his moiety of the manor of Broomfield, 
together with all his lands in this county, for her life; remainder to his filter's 
daughter, who married John Johnfon, efq; late lieutenant-colonel in the guards; 
with other remainders. The faid John Johnfon has fince the death of fir Charles 
aflumed the name of Kemeys Tynte. 

The manfion-houfe at Halfwell was rebuilt in 1689 by fir Halfwell Tynte, bart. 
who was advanced to that dignity 26 Car. II. It is in front ninety-feven feet, and in 
height fifty-four feet. The rooms in front are, a parlour, falloon, and drawing- 
room: a library and ftair-cafe in the ends. Over the falloon is an elegant room of the 
fame dimenfions, ufed as a breakfaft-room, the windows falling to the floor, with a 



* Lib. Domefday. 



b Lib. nig. 97. 



Lib. Domefday, 



balcony 



antJetafielD.] 



GOATHURS. T. 



Si 



balcony before them. In the fevcral apartments, and in the flair-cafe, are many good 
paintings by Bartolcmeo, Vandyke, fir Peter Lely, &c. 

" But," fays an elegant writer, 1 ' whofe accurate defcription of I lalfwell we fhall 
without apology introduce, " what chiefly attracts the notice and attention of ftrangers 
" are the decorated grounds. 

" The riding which leads to the principal points of view croftcs the park from the 
" houfc, commanding a fine view of the rich vale of Bridgwater. It then runs by 
" the fide of a woody precipice, and up through fomc new plantations, from a dark 
" part of which you enter through a door into a temple dedicated to Robin Hood ; 
*' upon which a moil noble profpect breaks at once upon the beholder, which acts not 
" a little by the furprizc of the entrance. The ground fhclves from it in front and 
" to the right gradually; but to the left in bolder flopes; where the dips are beauti- 
" fully grouped with wood, and the hills above them rife in waving inclofurcs. 

*' About the houfc the groves thicken; and a vaft vale of rich inclofurcs, fpotted 
" in a beautiful manner with white objects, ftrctches beyond it to the diflancc of 
" twelve miles. Then you command the channel, which, is here nine miles over, the 
" Steep Holmrifing in the midft of it very boldly, and beyond thefe the mountains 
" of Wales rife one behind another. 

" From hence the riding leads up the hills, commanding all the way a mod cxtcn- 
five profpect: after which it turns down through a plantation to a fingle oak, with 
a few pales about it, and a bench. Here the grounds finking from the eye form a 
mofl fweet landfcapc. The lawns undulate in thefincll manner, and the groves oi 
oak feem to drop into the hollows. The clumps and fcattcred trees have an uncom- 
mon elegance, and unite the foreground of the fcene with Robin Hood's temple, 
which is here feen to great advantage. Beyond the whole you have the dillant 
extenfive profpect. 

" From hence the riding leads down the hill to a wood of noble oaks, which fliadc 
a fpot beautifully wild and fcqucftered, where a limpid fpring rifes at the foot of a. 
rock overhung in a fine bold manner by wood growing from its clefts. The water 
winds away through the grove in a proper manner. Here is a tablet with thefe lin< 

* When IfratTs wand'ring fons the defcrt trod, 

* The melting rock obey 'd the prophet's rod; 

* Forth gufh'd the ft ream ; the tribes their thirft allay'd ; 

* Forgetful of their God, they rofe and play'd. 
' Ye happy fwains, for whom thefe waters flow, 
' OhT may your hearts with grateful ardours glow! 

* Lo! here a fountain ftrcams at his command, 

* Not o'er a barren, but a fruitful land ; 

* Where nature's choiceft gifts the vallics fill, 
' And finding plenty gladdens every hill.' 

<■ Arthur Young, e/q. ! 

Vol. I. M " Turning 



82 GOATHUR6T. [antWtffieU), 

" Turning the corner you catch a bridge, under a thick fhade, and then come to 
" the Druid's temple, built, in a juft ftile, of bark, &c. the view quite gloomy and 
" confined : the water winds filently along, except a little guihing fall, which hurts 
" not the emotions raifed by fo fequeftered afcene. 

** Following the path towards the bridge, you catch, juft before you come at if, 
" a little landfcape through the trees, of -diftant water, finely united with wood. 
" From the bridge the river appears to great advantage; nobly embanked on one fide 
" with tall fpreading trees, and on the other with green dopes, in which finglc ones 
" are fcattered. 

" From thefe retired and gloomy fpots you leave the dark groves, and open into a 
" more cheerful ground : the river is bounded only on one fide by thick wood, and on 
•* the other by waving lav. ns open to the fields, and fcattered thinly with trees. From 
*' a bench on the banks you view a flight fallof water well ftuded. 

M As we advance, the character of the ground again changes moil happily; the 
** woods open on both fides the water ; the waving lawns are of the moft lively verdure. 
** Trees thinly fcattered — brighter ftreams— touches of diftant profpect and elegant 
*" buildings — all unite toraife the moft cheerful ideas, which we were prepared for, by 
■* gradually leaving the gloom of the more fequcftered woods. 

"A break through the trees to the right lets in a view of the Rotunda. Pafilng to 
" the Ionic portico, which is excellently placed, the fcenery in view is truly enchanting: 
" the lawn is gently waved, and fpotted with trees and fhrubs in the happieft tafte. 
" The water feems to wind naturally through a falling vale; and a fwelling hill, 
*' crowned by the rotunda, forms a complete picture. The whole fcene is really 
*' elegant ; every part is riant, and bears the ftamp of pleafure. 

u As you crofs the bridge, you look to the right on a very beautiful cafcade, which 
** makes five or. fix flight falls over a mofs and ivy bank, under a dark fhade of wood. 
" The flopes, wood, and water, unite to render the fcene ftriking. 

«* Turning down by the water the lawn continues very beautiful, and you gain a 
u fine view of the Ionic portico on a fifing flppe, which here appears to great 
" advantage; but the middle cafcade, which you here command, fhould be totally 
" hid; it is an inferior repetition of the principal one. 

" Rifing the hill by the fide of the water, you have from a bench under a fpreading 
** wood, an agreeable view of a bridge; and a little further another commands the 
" fame object, and has alfb a very pleafing opening through the trees to the portico. 
" The view to the left up to the river, is a confirmation of Shenftone's obfervation. 

" The riding which follows on the bank of the river under the gloomy fhade of 
" numerous venerable trees, is a fit refidence for contemplation to dwell in. The 
*• openings acrofs the water on the oppofite lawn are juft fufrrcient to heighten by 
" contraft. The awful fhade, the folemn ftillnefs t)f the fcene, broken by nothing 
■ but the fall of diftant waters, have altogether a great effect, and imprefs upon the 

** mind 



antjetsfielD.] goat hurst. 8 3 

" mind a melancholy fcarccly effaced by the cheerful view of a rich vale, with the 
" water winding through it, which is fecn on eroding the park towards the houfe. 
" This feat has received rich gifts from nature, and very pleafing ones from art. The 
" riding is of large extent, and commands a great variety of diftant profpeel and 
" rich landfcapes. The home fcenes arc elegant, and fct off by the fhade of fuch a 
" noble wood, that every impreflion they make is rendered forcible. The buildings 
" are in a light and pleafing ftile." 

The living of Goathiirft is rectorial, and in the deanery of Bridgwater. The 
patronage is in the lord of the manor. The rev. James Minific is the prefent 
incumbent. 

The church (which is dedicated to St. Edward) is eighty feet long, and eighteen 
wide, confuting of a nave, chancel, and fouth ailc tiled, and a north aile leaded. At 
the weft end is an embattled tower, fixty-three feet high, containing a clock and fix 
bells. The outfidc of this tower, and of the whole church, is, to the reproach of 
tafte and the abufe of antiquity, whitewashed. In the chancel is an altar-piece con- 
taining two old paintings, indifferently executed, of our Lord's Supper and the railing 
of the Crofs. 

On the north wall of the nave is a handfomc monument of white marble, altar- 
fhaped, and terminated by a buft in a canonical habit: below, this infeription: 

" Sacred to the memory of the rev. fir JohnTynte, baronet, rector pf this church: 
who efteemed his function to be his higheft honour, and difcharged the duties of it 
with the greateft plcafurc. The ornaments of this fabrick are publick evidences of 
the pious regard he had for the fervicc of God. His many aifts of friendfhip and 
charity, void of orientation, are more lading proofs of his goodwill towards men. 
This fmall teftimony of gratitude to a molt generous brother was erected by fir 
Charles Kcmeys Tynte, bait. 174.2." Below are the family arms, quartered with 
thofe of Halfwell, viz. 1 and 4. Gules, a lion couched, between fix crofs croflets, 
three in chief and as many in bafc, ardent. 2 and 3. azure, three bars wavy, argen!: 
over all a bend, gules. 

On a fmall mural monument of black (tone in the chancel : 

*' In memory of the rev. Mr. William Trivett, rector of this parifh, who died the 
I2 lh of April, A. D. 1730." 

In the church-yard there is an old tomb, having thereon a curious fquarc pillar, 
ornamented with emblematical carvings, and on the top a flaming urn: 

" To the memory of John Willis, andSufan his wife, who dyed 1710 and 1725." 

Near the church is a good building erected by fix Charles Tynte, and given by 
him to the ufe of the poor of this parifh for ever. 

The annual average number of births is ten; of burials eight. 

M 2 EAST- 



[ 84 3 [anuetgfieio, 

EAST-LING 

IS a long narrow parifh north of Creech, and in the fame disjointed part of the 
hundred, on the northern bank of the river Parret, between the hundreds of 
Narth-Petherton and North-Curry. It is [even miles nearly fouth from Bridgwater, 
five northweft from Langport, and feven eaft from Taunton. 

The fituation is low, damp, and unhealthy; being almoft furrounded by moors, 
and the inclofed parts very woody. Thefe moors contain neither peat, heath, nor 
fedge, like thofe on the north fide of Poldon-hill; nor are they divided by ditches, 
planted on each fide with willows, like thofe about Glaftonbury; but are rich, flat, 
open commons, fkirted with high lands, and producing rnoft excellent pafture. The 
inclofed parts are likewife rich land, chiefly arable, and worth on an average nearly 
thirty fhillings an acre. The muddy flime of the Parret affords fine manure; but 
agriculture withal is here badly attended to; infomuch that the farmer's fuccefs is far 
more owing to nature than to fkill. The river Tone is navigable from Taunton to 
Eaft-Ling, where it runs under a wooden bridge of two arches, and divides this part 
of Andersfield from the hundred of Curry. It joins the Parret at Stanmoor point. 

This parifh confifts of a long, dirty, ftragling ftreet, containing fixtecn mean houfes 
near the church, and three hamlets, viz. 

I. Weft-Ling, one mile weftward from the church, in which are twenty-two houfes. 

i, Outwood, nearly two miles weft, eight houfes. 

3. Boroughbridge, about two miles eaftward, eighteen houfes. The whole num- 
ber of houfes within the parifh is fixty-four; and of inhabitants about three hundred 
and forty. 

The ancient village of Ling was parcel of the pofTefllons of the Saxon princes. 
In the year of our Lord 937 king Athelftan, for the fake of his own foul, and for the 
foul of Alfred his grandfather, granted to God and the church of St. Peter of Athelney 
(which his faid progenitor had founded) all this his land, called by the name of 
Relengen, and diftinguifhed by the following bounds: 

" Firft into Gorlak thanne to Bykenftill; from that ftill to the Whitfton; thans unto 
'* the old ditch; from thulk dick to Depebroke in the old dicke place; then to the 
" five acres; from the five acres unto the Hundflawe, and fwo adoun to the Slo; and 
" from the Slow to Rifelheie ; thans to Whatcombfhey, and fo adoun to the Oldenvorth, 
" and thennes to Brodemerfh to the Reddich, end elong the dich anon to the Inrek : 
" from thenns to Privetes-Morefhed ; from Moreihed anon to the middle of Privates 
" B r igg> an d thens end elong the more anon to Threfkwold, and thens to Afhlake : 
" from Afhlake unto the old lake up into Chefterlake and unto Toteyate : from Tote- 
" yate to Hengeft-were : from Hengeft-were unto Hornvvere : from Hornwere unto 
" Shirwold lode, eftfones into Gorlake."* 

" Regift. Abb. Atheln. MS. In 



annerafieto.] bast-ling. 

In the time of king William the Conqueror the abbots of Athtlncy ftill continued 
in poflcflion of this manor, the name whereof was then contracted tp Lenge, a 
find it in the Norman furvcy : — 

" The church itfdf holds Lenge. There is one hide; but it paid no geld in the 
"" time of king Edward. In demefne are two carucates, and fix fcrvants, and three 
<c villancs, and four cottagers, with two ploughs. There are twelve acres of meadow, 
■" and fifty acres of wood. It is worth forty (hillings. " b 

In 1293 the abbots eflatcs in this parilh were valued at 9I.* 

When the monaftery of Athdney was difiblvcd, this manor was granted by king 
Henry VIII. to John Clayton, who fold the fame to John Tynbury, from whom it 
<lefcended to William Tynbury. Which William, by licence dated March 2, 
25 Eliz. conveyed it to Thomas Leigh and George Grenville, cfquircs. It was ulti- 
mately purchafed by fir Thomas Wroth, of Fairfield, bait, whence it palled by the 
marriage of an heirefs to the family of Palmer, and from them in like manner to 
that of Acland ; and is now the property of Mrs. Acland of Ninchead, rdict of Arthur 
Acland, late of Fairfield in this county, efq. The manor court is held in a barn in 
the hamlet of Weft-Ling, near to which are the ruins of a chapel, which heretofore 
belonged to the church of Eaft-Ling. The manor-houfc anciently ftood near this 
fpot, but not a veftige thereof is now remaining. 

The three hamlets of Weft-Ling, Outwood, and Boroughbridge, were all parcels 
of the fame manor. 

The Jaft-mcntioncd hamlet is partly in this parifli, and partly in the pariflies of 
Othery, Middlczoy, and Wefton-Zoyland. It had its name from a large borough or 
mount, very high and ftccp; which, though generally reckoned natural, fecms to have 
been thrown up by hands for the purpofe of a fepulchral tumulus. This opinion is 
corroborated by the many battles which arc known to have been fought in thefe parts 
in very early times, the tradition of the inhabitants, and the inftrumentsof war which 
have been found in its vicinity unfimilar to thofeof modern ages. Add to this, the 
materials of which this borough js compofed are fuch as arc not to be found within 
lefs than three miles of the place, viz. at Red-Hill, within the parifli of Curry-Rivel, 
being a ftirf, very deep red clay. This mount ftands on the eaft fide of the river 
Parret, and has on it the ruins of an ancient chapel, built in the form of a crofs: 
part of the tower and moft of the main walls are ftill Handing, and form a very lingular 
and picturefque object. It was dedicated to St. Michael, and occurs very early in the 
memorials of Athelney abbey, to which it was appendant. It fuftained much damage 
(though it was ruinous before) in the great rebellion of the laft century, when Goring 
garrifoned this place with one hundred and twenty men, who fortified themfelves in 
the ruins, and made a moft rcfolutc defence againft their aflailants. But after the 
battle of Langport, General Fairfax fending Colonel Okcy with a detachment to re- 
duce them, they were (6 intimidated with the fummons, and the rout which they had 

b Lib. Domefdny. c TaxtU Temporal. 

fecn 



86 east-ling. [ant»er*fieltj, 

feert given to their fellows on Allcr moorjuft under the hill, that they immediately 
fufreridered. The field on which the mount and ruins ftand is about eighteen acres, 
and belongs to Mr. Chard of Othery. 

The river Parret is navigable to this hamlet, and hence to Langport. It has over 
it a fione bridge of three high arches, which gives the additional name to the place. 
This bridge, by order of court held at Bridgwater 21 Car. II. 1669, is repaired at 
the joint cxpence of the fevcral pariflies of Wefton-Zoyland, Middlezoy, Othery, 
Grcinton, Aflicot, Moorlinch, North -Petherton, and Chedzoy. At high water, 
when the tide is in, the river is fixty feet wide, and eighteen deep, and coal barges of 
forty or fifty tons eafily come up it. 

Between this hamlet and the church of Ling is the famous ifle of ATHELNEY, 
being a fpot of rifing ground on the north fide ofStartmoor, bounded on the northweft 
by the river Tone, over which there is a Wooden bridge, ftill called Athelney Bridge. 
The name given by the Saxons to this ifiand was iESelinja igje, or the Ifle of nobles, 
by contraction Athelney. 

This fpot, which was anciently environed with almoft impaflable rrtarfhes and 
morafles, will be ever memorable for the retreat of king Alfred, from the fury of 
the Danes, who in tumultuous numbers had overrun the eafterti part of his domi- 
nions. The regifter of Athelney fets forth, that Alfred, after having bravely encoun- 
tered his enemies for nirie fucceOive years, was at length reduced to the ncceffity 
of fleeing from them, and taking refuge in the little ifle of Athelney. The place 
that lodged him was a fmall cottage belonging to St. Athclwine, formerly an hermit 
here, the fon of king Kyncgilfus. After his emerflon from this retirement and the 
total defeat of his enemies, he founded a monaftery for Benedictine monks on the fpot 
which had given him (belter, and dedicated the fame to the honour of St. Saviour, 
and St. Peter the apoftle, appointing John the firft abbot, and endowing the eftablifh- 
ment with the vvhole ifle of Athelney, exempt from taxes and all other burdens; with 
common pafture and free ingrefs and egrefs in Stathmoor, Saltmoor, Haymoor, and 
Curr)moor, and all other moors within his manor of North-Curry. He likewife gave 
ten cafTatcs or hides of land in Long-Sutton, with all meadows, paftures, rivers, and 
all other appcrtenances whatfoever : which benefactions Were afterwards confirmed to 
the monks, and many others added thereto by different kings and nobles.' 1 

William of Malmfbury gives us a romantick account of this ifland and monaflery. 
" Athelney," fays he, "is not an ifland of the fea; but is fo inaccefliblc, on account 
" of bogs and the inundations of the lakes, that it cannot be got to but in a boat. 
" It has a very large wood of alders, which harbours flags, wild goats, and other 
" beafls. The firm land, which is only two acres in breadth, contains a little monaf- 
" tery, and dwellings for monks. Its founder was king Alfred, who, being driven 
" over the country by the Danes, fpent fome time here in fecure privacy. Here in a 
* dream St. Cuthbert appearing to him, and giving him affurance of his reftoration, 

' Regnl. Abb. Atheln. 

he. 



aitfwrjaifielD.j 



E A S T - L I N G. 



f; 



." he vowed that he would build a monaflery to pop. Accordingly he c reded a 
" church, moderate indeed as to hzc, but as to method of conilructiou lingular and 
"novel: for four piers, driven into the ground, fupport the whole fabrick, foui 
" circular chancels being drawn round it. The monks arc few in number, and 
" indigent; but they are fufriciently compenfated for their poverty by the tranquillity 
" of their lives, and their delight in folitude." 

Some allufion to the vifion of St. Cuthbert above-mentioned is fuppofed to have 
been intended by a little curious amulet of enamel and gold, richly ornamented, that 
was found in 1693 in Newton Park, at fome diftance northward from the abbey. 
On one fide of it is a rude figure of a perfon fitting crowned, and holding in each 
hand a fecptre furmounted by a lily, which Dr. Hickes and other antiquaries have 
imagined to be defigned for St. Cuthbert. The other fide is filled by a large flower, 
and round the edge is the following legend; AELFRED MEC HEIT GEVVRCAN; 
that is, Alfred ordered me to be made. This piece of antiquity is now in the mufcum 
at Oxford, accompanied with the accounts of doctors Hickes and Mufgravc, and 
the following memorandum : "Nov. 16, 1718, Tho. Palmer, efq; of Fairfield in 
" Somerfetfhire, put this ancient picture of St. Cuthbert, made by order of king 
" Alfred, into my hands to bee conveyed to y Bodlcan Library in Oxford, where 
" his father Nat. Palmer, efq; lately dead, defired it .might be placed and preferved. 

"Geo. Clark." 

John, a native of old Saxony, was the firft abbot. of this houfe: we find his name 
mentioned A. D. 888, 890, and 892. The firft monks. w ere likewife foreigners, there 
being none in England that would take the habit. f 

John Brigge occurs 1410. 



After him Alfward occurs 1009. 
Simon fuccccded him.* 
Athelward was abbot in 1 016- 
Athelwin fucceeded. 
Benedict 1221 and 1225. 
Roger de Derham was abbot 1231. 
Robert 1232, 1249, ant ^ I20 3- 
Richard 1276. 
Andrew de Wells 1281. 
Ofmund de Sowi 1 305 and 1 3 1 2 . 



John Pederton was abbot 1446. He died 
Feb. 10, 1457. 

'Robert Hylle w as elected the fame year, 
Feb. 27. Nine monks were then in 
the convent, and two abfent. Thif 
Robert died Oct. 10, 1485. 

John George was elected Oct. 29, I48'5. 
There were then eleven monks in the 
convent. He died in May 1503. 



Robert de Ifle was confirmed March 25, John Wellington fucceeded, and died in 



Richard was abbot 1337. 
Robert de Hachc 1362. 
John Hywifti, abbot, was inftalled pre- 
bendary of Long-Sutton, Aug. 4, 1391. 

.'Will. Malmefb.ap. Dugd. Mon.Angl. i. to;. 
« Regift. Abb. Atheln. 



1 5 16. 
Richard dc Wraxall was confirmed abbot 

Jan. 7, 1 5 16. 
John Hcrtc was abbot 1525. 

f AfleriMeneY.de rebus iElfredi geftis, p. 18. 

The 



88 EAST-LING. [«ntet0«eHk 

The laft abbot was Robert Hamlyn, who, with eight monks, furrendered this 
monaftery to the king Feb. 8, 1539, the abbot having a yearly penfion of 50I. given 
him, and the prebend of Long-Sutton, by way of a gratuity. 1 * 

In 1553 there remained here in charge 7I. in fees, and 46I. 6s. 8d. in annuities; 
and the following penfions, viz. to Robert Edgar 5I. Henry Poynings 5!. and to 
John Jenyngs al. 13s. 4d.' 

The revenues of the abbey were valued in 1444 at 98I. and in 1534, 26 Hen. VIII. 
at 209I. os. 5d. per annum. 

The fcite thereof, with many of the lands belonging to it, was granted at thediflb- 
Iution to John Clayton. The latter end of the laft century the premifes belonged to 
Capt. Hacker, and now are the property of John Evercd, of Bridgwater, efq. 

The abbey buildings are fuppofed, from various parts of them that have been dis- 
covered at different times, to have been very magnificent. In 1 674 fome labourers, 
employed by Captain Hacker to remove part of the ruins, difclofed a very ancient 
fepulchre of well-wrought ftone, containing the fkull of the deceafed, the os ilium, 
and a fmall fragment of cloth. The infide of this receptacle was Angularly contrived, 
the bottom being excavated, or fcooped out, fo as to admit the feveral parts of the 
body. They afterwards difcovered the foundation of the ancient church, which ftood 
on the top of the hill to the northeaft, and there found bafes of pillars, elegant 
tracery-work of windows, and divers pieces of fculptured free-ftone, ftill retaining 
the marks of paint and gold. The labourers were laid to have likewife fouftd at the 
fame time a large fpur of gold, which they privately dffpofed of for their own benefit. k 

About eighteen years fince, in digging up fome other of the ancient ruins, about 
fixty yards from the prefent farm-houfe northward, the workmen difcovered a vault 
eight feet fquare, and feven high, containing three human fkulls. The ftone of 
the arch and fide-walls being taken away, the cavity was filled up, covering the fkulls 
with earth. Fourfcore yards from this funereal fpot ftood a chapel, the ruins of which 
were removed about the fame period. 

The conventual church was partly rebuilt in 1321, and an indulgence of twenty 
days granted to the contributors thereto. 1 Not a veftige now remains of this once 
famous pile, the field en which it ftood being converted into tillage. The whole 
ifland contains about one hundred acres, and forms a compact farm of about equal 
portions of arable and pafture: a farm-houfe has of late years been erected near its 
fouthern extremity. 

The church of Eaft-Ling was anciently appropriated to the abbey we have been 
defcribing. In the taxation of Pope Nicholas, made anno 1292, it is ftiled Capella 

h Dr. Archer's account-of the religious houfes in this diocefe, at the end of Hemingford's Chronicle, p. 5 80* 
1 Willis's Hid. of Abbies, vol. 2. p. 195. 

■ Letter from Nxr. Pafchal to Mr. Aubrey, printed in " MifcelJanies on curiow fubjefts." Lond. 1714. 
1 Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen. 

de Lenge- S 






anDCt0fielD.] E N M O R E. 8$ 

de Lenge, and thercvalued at fcven marks and a half.™ Ic is a vicarage in the deanery 
of Bridgwater: the rev. Mr. Paget is both patron and incumbent. 

The edifice, which is dedicated to St. Bartholomew, is very neat, and confifts of a 
nave, chancel, and porch tiled. At the weft end is a well-built tower of free-done, 
fixty feet high, having a clock and five bells. There are alfo two other bells, which 
are not hung in peal with the reft ; but lie on the floor of the clock loft. Thefc bells 
were brought from the tower of Borough Chapel: they are not ancient, as. might ha\e 
been fuppofed, bearing only the dates 1607 and 1625. There was a third bell in 
the faid chapel tower, which now hangs in that of Middlczoy, and ferves for the 
treble; the churchwardens of thatparifh having given a bond to the officers of Ling 
to return or produce it when required." The oldeft of the bells in Ling tower has oa 
it the date 1609. The church contains no monument or infeription. 

The average number of chriftcnings in this parifli is twelve; and of burials nine. 

ra Taxat. Spiritual. 

* The inftitution of church-wardens is of remote antiquity, they having been firit appointed at the African 
council, held under Ccleftine and Boniface about the year of our Lord 423. Thcfe officers have at different 
periods been diilinguifhed by different appellations, as Defenfores, Oeconomi and Priepofiti Eccle/iec; Tf/lei 
Synodalts, &c. In the time of Edward III. they were called Cburch-Rrves, as we read in Chaucer ; 

*' SDf cfyitcfrrcbcs, anti of tcftamentcft, 

" !Df contratrctf, ami of ittkt of focramciucss, jc."' 

At this day they are called cljitrcTj-toartcnti ; all thofe names being expreffive of the nature of the office, which 
is to guard, preferve, and fuperintend, the rights, revenues, buildings, and furniture of the church. In an. 
old church-wardens' book of accounts belonging to the parifli of Farringdon in the county of Berks, and 
bearing date A. D. 1518, there is the form of admitting church-wardens into their office at that period, in 
the following words, viz. " Cherchye Warden) s thys (hall be your charge — to be true to God and to the 
" cherche — for love nor for favor off no man wythin thys parriche to withold any ryght to the cherche ; bik- 
" to relieve the dettys to hyt belongythe, or elfe to goo :o the devell." 



T 



E N M O R E. 

HIS is a fmall parifh pleafantly fituated on rifing ground, four miles weff from 
Bridgwater, and about eight north from Taunton, having the noble ridge of 
Quantock-hills three miles to the weft of it. 

In the time of king William the Conqueror it belonged to Roger de Curcelle, 
eldeft fon of Wandril de Leon, of a noble family in Normandy. It is recorded in 
the great furvey of that reign, that 

" Goisfrid holds of Roger Animere. Algar held it in the time of king Edward, 

«' and gelded for one hide. The arable is four carucates. In demefne is one caru- 

Vol. I. N " cale > 



90 E N M R E. [anBmffielD, 

*• cate, and two fervants, and three villanes, and three bordars, with three ploughs. 
" There are fixty-eight acres of wood. It was and is worth forty (hillings."* 

How long this Roger de Curcelle poflefied this land, or when it reverted to the 
crown, does not appear; but it is fuffickntly evident, that foon after the Conqucft it 
became the property of the family of Malet, and continued in their pofiefiion for 
■feveral fucceffive centuries. 

Of the origin of this ancient family fome mention has been made in our account 
of the manor and barony of Curry. It fhould there have been obferved that William 
Mulct, who came over into England in the Conqueror's army, had another fon befides 
Robert, whofe name was Gilbert, and one daughter, Beatrix, married to William de 
Archis. 1 ' Which Gilbert, and not William, as was there faid, fucceeded his brother 
in the Somerfetfhirc eftates, which had been reftored by the crown; and left them to 
William his fon and heir, whofe fuccefTor of the fame name was the laft in the male 
line of this branch of the Malet family. 

We (hall now return and deduce the defcent of the Malets of Enmore from 
William Malet, whom we before mentioned as a benefactor to the abbey of Glafton- 
bury, and who was included in the fentence of banifhment with his kinfman Robert, 
for feditious practices againft king Henry thefirft. It is not certain how nearly this 
William was related to Robert Malet above-mentioned ; but he was indubitably of 
the fame family, and had two fons; of whom Hugh, during the difgrace of his 
father, is faid to have afTumed the name of Fitchet, from whom defcended divers 
families which long retained that appellation; as thofe of Spaxton, Merridge, String- 
iton, and others.' By Baillea his wife he was father of feveral children: Baldwin the 
eldeft of them, upon the reconciliation of the family to the king's favour, reaflumed 
the former name of' Malet, and fettled at Enmore, which became the principal feat 
of the family's reildence. This Baldwin was a knight, and in the evidences of his 
time he is (tiled de Emnore: on the feal annexed to one of his deeds is, on one fide, 
the figure of a man armed with fword and (hield, ftriking at a lion which is ru(hing 
on him; and on the other, two men talking in gowns, the one having a crown on his 
head: the circumfcription ^tgillum 15alOt0ini 0@alCt, d He married Emma the 
daughter of Hugh de Neville, by whom he left iffue fir William Malet, knight, 
who was pofiefled of Enmore temp. Ric. I. He married Sarah the daughter of 
Robert Sylley, who furvived him, and afterwards granted to William her fon twenty 
ihillings rent in Baggehay for her homage and fervice. e 

Which laft mentioned William was alfo a knight, and was living in the time of 
Henry III. By Mary his wife he left ifiiie 

Sir Baldwin Malet, who fucceeded him in this eftate, to which he greatly added 
by his marriage of Mabilia daughter and coheir of fir Hamelyn de Deaudon, of 
Deaudon in the county of Devon. 

» Lib. Domefday. •> Sir Simonds Dewes's life, MS. in the Karleian Library, 646. 

* Sir W. Pole's MSS. Colleaions. " Cart. Antiq. ' Cart. Sar. Malet. 

His 






atrtergfietti.] ENMORE. 91 

His fon and heir fir John Malct fuccccdcd him. By Sybil his wife, the daughter 
of Robert dc St. Clare, he was father of another lir Baldwin, the third of that name 
from the Conqueft. 

This fir Baldwin Malet pofTefied Enmore, and prcfentcd to the church in the third 
year of king Edward III. f He married Hawifc, daughter of fir Simon Ralegh of 
Ncttlecombe, and by her had ifluc two fons, fir John, his fucccflbr, and Baldwin. 

Sir John Malet, fon and heir, appears to be pofieflcd of this cftate in the nineteenth 
year of king Edward III. by a deed wherein he confirms a donation of Hswife his 
mother to his brother Baldwin. His wife's name was Elizabeth,, the daughter of fir 
John Kingfton, by whom he became father of 

Sir Baldwin Malet, who lived at Enmore in the reign of Henry IV. He married 
two wives, 1. Elizabeth, daughter of fir Thomas Trivet, by whom he had one fon 
named John. 2. Amice, daughter and coheir of Richard Lyffe of Currypool, fon 
of Godfrey Lyffe, by Julian his wife, daughter and coheir of Hugh Valletort, bv 
whom he had Hugh, Thomas, and Philippa. 

Sir John Malet died in the life-time of his father; but left ifiue by Joan, daughter 
of John Hill of Exeter, one only daughter and heir Eleanor, who by marriage of 
fir John Hull conveyed to him this- manor. 






Sir John Hull was father of fir Edward Hull of this place: which fir Edward 
dying without iffue male, this effate reverted to Hugh Malet, fon of Baldwin Malet 
by Amice Lyffe aforefaid, who was lord of Currypool, and having married Joan the 
daughter of John Ronyon, had by her Thomas and William ; and two daughters, 
viz. Joan, the wife of Robert Brent, and Margaret, the wife of John, Crcwkcrn. He 
died feized of this manor 5 Edw. IV J 

Thomas Malet his fon fucceeded, and prcfentcd to the church A. D. 1498. He 
married Joan, daughter of fir William Wadham of Merrifield, by whom he had 
William, his eldeft fon; Baldwin, fettled at St. Audries, (of whom, and his defcend- 
ants, we fhall fpeak hereafter;) Hawife, the wife of John Coker; and Elizabeth, firft 
the wife of Thomas Afhley, and afterwards of Hugh Trow» 

William, his fon and heir, married Alice daughter of Thomas Young of BriftoF 
and was father of three fons, Hugh, Richard, and William; and two daughters, 
Joan the wife of John Vcrnay of Fairfield, and Jane the wife of Thomas Warre of 
Heftercombe, efquires. 

Hugh his eldeft fon inherited this manor, and prcfentcd to the church in 1530. 
By Ifabel, daughter of Thomas Michel of Cannington, he had fcveral children, whofe 
names were, Richard, William, and Barnabas; Joan, the wife of John Danvers, efq; 

Mary, wife of Sturgcs, cfq ; Elizabeth, of Ivy, cfq; Agatha, of John 

Payne; and Dorothy, of Robert May. 

• Excerpt, e Regift. Wefkn. » Efc. 

N 2 Richard 



92 EN M ORE. [amjcrafieto. 

Richard his eldeft fon fucceeded him, and married Elizabeth daughter of fir 
Andrew Luttrell, of Dunfter Caftle, knight, by whom he left one only fon Thomas 
Malet. The faid Richard died 6 Edw. VI. 

Thomas his fon and heir bore the office of high lheriff for this county 19 Eliz. 
He married Elizabeth daughter of Humphrey Colles, of Barton in this county, efq; 
by whom he had fir John Malet, knight of the Bath; George and William; Elizabeth 
the wife of fir Thomas Palmer; and Mary the wife of John Hacche, of Northaller 
in the county of Devon, cfq. He died in 1 5 80, and was fucceeded by his eldeft fon 

Sir John Malet, who prefented to the church in 1601 and 1613. His wife was 
Mary, daughter of fir John Popham, knight, chief juftice of England, by whom he 
had iflue John, Thomas; Amice wife of Charles Trevanion, Elizabeth the wife of 
Peter Speccot, Mary, and Winifred. 

John Malet, fon and heir of the faid fir John, married the daughter of fir John 
Tracy, knight, by whom he had one fon, John, who fucceeded him, and feveral 
daughters. 

The faid John married Untia, the daughter of Francis lord Hawley, by whom he 
had Elizabeth his only daughter and heir, who was married to John Wilmot, earl of 
Rochefter, who by means thereof became poueffed of this manor 

John the faid earl of Rochefter died in 1684, leaving iftue oy Elizabeth his faid 
wife three daughters coheireftes, of whom Anne the eldeft was firft married to Henry 
Bayntun, of Spy-Park in the county of Wilts, efq; and afterwards to Francis Grevile, 
efq; fon of lord Brooke; Elizabeth the fecond daughter was married to Edward earl 
of Sandwich ; and the youngeft daughter to John lord Lifborn. 

The faid Henry Bayntun, by his marriage with Anne Malet, became pofTefled of 
this manor, and from him it defccnded to the prefent fir Edward Bayntun Rolt, bart. 
who, by virtue of an acT: made 1 5 George II. fold the fame, with other eftates, to 
James Smyth, of St. Audries, efq; from whom it was conveyed to the Earl of 
Egmont, father of John earl of Egmont, the prefent pofteflbr. 

We fhall now go back and trace the other branches of this family." 1 

Baldwin, the fecond fon of Thomas Malet of Currypool, by Joan the daughter 
of fir William Wadham, and brother of William Malet of Enmore, was folicitor to 
king Henry VIII. He married two wives, the firft whereof was the daughter and 
heir of John Tacle, of Hohiton in Devonfhire, an eminent lawyer, by whom he had 
iftue Michael Malet, anceftor of the Malets of St. Audries. To his fecond wife he 
married Anne, the daughter and fole heir of Thomas Hatch of Wolley in the fame 
county, by whom he was father of John Malet, (who fucceeded in the faid eftate at 
Wolley) Thomas, and Adam. 

Michael Malet, fon and heir of the faid Baldwin, by the daughter of Stawell, 
was father of 



h Ex ilemmate. 



Richard 






antocraficlD.] 



E N M O R E. 



93 



Richard Malct of St. Audita, who married Joanc the daughter of Richard Warrc 
of Hcftcrcombe, and had iffuc three fons, whofe names were Arthur, Michael, and 

Gavvcn. 

Arthur the elded, dying without iffuc, was fuccccdcd by his brother Michael, the 
fecond fon of Richard Malct. Which Michael married Catherine fecond daughter 
and coheir of Henry Alley, of GufTage in the county of Dorfct, and by her left iffue 

Richard Malet his fon and heir, born in 1618, and Joan the wife of Thomas 
Fulford. Richard died without iffuc in 1677, and was buried at Milverton, where- 
upon Gawen the third fon of Richard Malet became the heir. 

The faid Gawen, by Cicely daughter and coheir of Henry Alley, of Guffage, efq ; 
was father of Alley Malet, and a daughter Elizabeth married to Poulct. 

Which Alley dying without iffuc, the line of Michael Malet of St. Audrics, the 
eldeft fon of Baldwin Malct, became cxtin<ft, and fir Thomas Malet, grandfon of John 
Malet, fecond fon of Baldwin by Anne the daughter and heir of Thomas Hatch, 
became the next heir male in the dired line of the faid Baldwin Malet. 

Which John Malet, grandfather of fir Thomas aforcfaid, was of Wolley, and 
married Alice the daughter of Anthony Monke, of Povvdridge, in the county of 
Devon, cfq; and had iffuc three fons, Robert, Francis, and Malachi. 

Robert the eldeft married Elizabeth, daughter of George Rolle of Stcphenfton, and 
was father of John, and Eleanor, wife of fir Arthur Acland, and afterwards of fir 
Francis Vincent, bart. 

John died without iffue, as did alfo Francis the fecond fon of the faid John Malet, 
and brother of Robert: whereupon Malachi the third furviving fon fucceeded. 

This Malachi married Elizabeth Trevanion of the county of Cornwall, and by her 
had iffue 

Sir Thomas Malet aforefaid, knight, and heir to both the branches of this family. 
The faid fir Thomas, 1 July 17 Car. I. was made one of the judges of the King's 
bench; and 31ft May 12 Car. II. was again constituted one of the judges of the faid 
court. He died in 1665, and was buried at Pointington, leaving iffue, by Jane the 
daughter of Francis Mills of Southampton, 

Sir John Malet, of St. Audries, knight, who by Florence, daughter of John 
Wyndham, had iffue Baldwin Malet, of St. Audrics, his fucceffor; William, who 
died at Smyrna unmarried; and John, who Mas of the Middle Temple, and married 
Margaret, daughter of fir Roger Moftyn, of Moftyn in Flintfhire, bart. by whom he 
had feveral children, who all died young. He had likewifc two daughters, Scnobia 
the wife of Daniel Hough of London, and Elizabeth the wife of Philip Rofc; both 
of them living in 1714. 

1 The 






1 



94 E N M O R E. [^tltietJgfiClD. 

The faid Baldwin, fon and heir of fir John Malet aforefaid, married to his firft 
wife Anne daughter of fir George Horner, of Mells in this county, knight, by whom 
he had feveral fo'.is, neither of whom left any ifluc to pofterity. His fecond wife 
was Anne, daughter of George Harbin, merchant, by whom alfo he had feveral 
children, who all died unmarried except Alexander the youngeft, reclor of Combe- 
Flory, and prebendary of Gloucefter. 

Which Alexander married Anne, daughter of the Rev. Lawrence St. Lo, D. D. 
by whom he had two fons, Charles Warre, and Alexander; and four daughters, viz. 
Margaret, Catherine, Elizabeth, and Anne.' 

Charles Warre Malet, eldeft fon of the faid Alexander, has been long refident in 
India, at prefent in the capacity of Ambaftador from the company to Poonah, and 
is the worthy reprefentative of this ancient and illuftrious family. 

The arms of the family of Malet are, according to fir W. Polc, k much miftaken. 
The coat azure, three efcallops or, was properly the coat of the Deaudons of Devon- 
fhire, which was aftumed by the Malets upon their intermarriage with the heirefs of 
Deaudon, and conftantly ufed by them ever after. But the true arms of the lords 
Malet were, Paly of fix,- ermine and gules-, over all a lion paffant or. Which coat of 
arms was imitated by the family of Fitchet, who gave gules, a lion rampant or, 
debruifed with a bend ermine, and fometimes with a bend argent; and on the bend 
.three efcallops. 

The manfion-houfe, called Enmore Cajlle, was built by the late Earl of Egmont, 1 
and is fituated on a gently rifing hill in the midflrof a fine inclofed country. It is a 
very lingular ftructure, being a large quadrangular embattled pile, built of a reddifh 
dark-coloured ftone, having femicircular baftions at the corners, and inclofing a 
fpacious court within. It is furrounded by a dry foffe forty feet wide, and fixteen 
deep, which opens all round into the offices under the caftle, and alfo into a range 
of others under the lawn that furrounds it: amongft the latter are the ftables, which 
are all under ground; the principal way into them is at fome diflance from the caftle, 
the entrance being at the fide of the hill. 

In this parifli is alfo a pretty houfe, the feat of Andrew Guy, efq; with fome 
elegant plantations. 

Contiguous to Enmore is another ancient manor of the name of Lexworthy. 
It was originally written Lccheftvrde, and is furveyed in Domefday book in three 
diftincT: parcels. 

" Eurard holds of the Earl [Euftace earl of Bulloigne] Lecheswrde. Alvvard held 
" it in the time of king Edward, and gelded for one virgate of land. The arable-is 

'• Ex ftemmate. k MSS. Colleaions. 

1 For the progenitors of this great and noble family, fee vol. iii. p. 172, 173, 174. 

" two 



anaetsfieio.] E N M o r e. 95 

" two carucatcs. In dcmcfnc is half a canicatc, and four fervants, and four villancs, 
" and three bordars, with one carucatc and a half. There are two mills which pay 
" two balls of iron, and three acres of meadow, and twenty acres of wood. It wa I 
•* and is worth thirty {hillings." 

The two other parcels of this manor are furvcyed immediately after Enmore. 

'* Goisfrid holds of Roger Lcchcfwrdc. Orgar held it in the time of king Edward, 
° and gelded for one virgate of land. The arable is one carucate, which is held by 
" two villancs, and two cottagers. There is a mill which pays two balls of iron, and 
" three acres of meadow. It was and is worth fifteen (hillings." 

" Goisfrid holds of Roger Lechefwrde. Adeftan held it in the time of king 
" Edward, and gelded for one virgate of land. The arable is three carucates. There 
** are four villancs, and four bordars, and two fervants having two ploughs. There 
** is a mill which pays two balls of iron, and five acres of meadow, and twenty acres 
n of wood. It was and is worth forty (hillings. "' 

After the Conqucft the family of Furncll were fometime lords of Lcxworthy; but 
they feem to have held it under the Malets, who were almoft the folc pofleflbrs of 
this parifh, and it is now, as Enmore, the property of lord Egmont. 

In the time of Henry IV. a grant was made to fir Baldwin Malct, knight, of a fair 
to be held in this parifh for two days yearly on the eve and day of St. John the 
Baptift; and likewife of a weekly market on Monday; but neither fair nor market 
is now continued. 

The number of houfes in Enmore is forty-five, and of inhabitants about two 
hundred and twenty. 

The living is a reclory in the deanery of Bridgwater: the patronage of it is appen- 
dant to the manor: the rev. Mr. Jafon is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, which is dedicated to St. Michael, is a confiderable Gothic ftruclure, 
eighty-eight feet long, and twenty wide, confiding of a nave and chancel tiled. At 
the weft end is a fquare embattled tower, feventy feet high, containing a clock and 
five bells. 

Againft the fouth wall of the nave is a handfome monument of different kinds of 
marble, with the following infeription: 

" In a vault near this place lycth interred James Jeanc, of Barford, efq; who died 
Feb. 4, 1759, a g ctl 6 4- 

"And alfo Margaret Jeane, relict of the above-named, who died Odl. 12, 1769, 
aged 73." Arms: Argent, two chcvronels gules andfaMc between three rofes pr 
impaling, ermine, three bezants on a bend gules. 

Againft the eaficrn wall of the chancel, near the communion rails, is a plain blue 
ftonethus inferibed: 

1 Lib. Domcfdav. 

^♦In 



9 6 E N M o R E. [anBertffielD. 

" In memory of the reverend Thomas Skynncr, reftor of this parifli, and mafter 
of arts, vicar of Wellington and Buckland, and chaplain to the right honourable 
John lord Berkley, admiral of England, who departed this life the 22 d of Auguft 1729, 
aged 70 years. 

" Alfo in memory of Thomas Skynner his fon, aged four years; and of Anne his 
daughter, who died at one month old." 

Arms: Argent, a chevron or, between three griffins' heads tnSisi fable 1 in chief a 
mullet for diftindlion. 

In the church-yard is an old crofs pretty entire, and an ancient yew tree, the body 
whereof is nineteen feet round at the height oi four feet. 



THE 



I 97 1 



THE HUNDRED 



O F 






BATH- FORUM 



IS fituated at the northeaft point of the county, being bounded on the north by the 
county of Gloucefter , on the eaft by that of Wilts, on the weft by the hundred 
of Keynfham; and on the fouth and fouthweft by that of Wellow. It extends 
from North-Stoke brow on the north, to the hamlet of Iford in Frefhfprd parilh on the 
fouth, ten miles; and from the hamlets of Shockerwick and Warley on the eaft, to 
Swinford in the parilh of Saltford on the weft, nine miles. 
This hundred includes 

'Hampton and Claverton, which contain the parifhes of Bath- 
Hampton, Claverton and Charlcombe. 

The Liberties of ^ Easton and Amrill, comprifing Bath-Eafton, and the tithing of 
Amnll, or Amorel, from which place it derives its name. Part 
of this tithing is in the parilh of St. Catherine's. 
JThefe were anciently exempt liberties of the church of Bath. 
The furface of this diftrift is one continued fucceflion of hills and vales, highly culti- 
vated. It is watered by the river Avon, which, touching Frefhford, crofles a peninfula 
of Wiltftiire, and re-enters this hundred at Monkton-Combe. 

From the numerous hills and eminences, the moft extenfive as well as picTurefque 
and romant.ck views open on every hand, and render it one of the moft beautiful fpots 
in this county, or perhaps any other county in the kingdom. 

At the time of the Conqueft the hundred of Bath-Forum contained ninety-five hides, 
befides twenty wh.ch belonged to the borough of Bath, and paid to the King as geld 
the fum of ten pounds.* 



■ Lib. Domefday, Extm. 

Vol. I. ' O 



14 Henry 



•4. 



9 8 THE HUNDRED OF BATH-FORUM. 

14 Henry II. this hundred was fined three marks for three murders committed 
herein. h 

This hundred is divided between two high conftables; and has for its lord William 
Oliver, M. D. who holds his court at "Widcombe. 

Exclufive of Bath it contains feventeen parifhes, one thoufand four hundred and 
ninety houfes, and about eight thoufand two hundred and fifty inhabitants. 

* Mag. Rot. 14 Hen. II. rot. 106. 










EATH- 






M&'JTotumj [ 99 J 



BATH-EASTON. 

THE firft parifli to be defcribed is Bath-Eafton, fituatcd two miles eaftward from 
the city of Bath, whence it obtained its appellation. It is very populous, con- 
taining one hundred and feventy-fix houfes, and nearly one thoufand inhabitants, 
and comprifes a large village, part whereof is delightfully fituated on the great road 
from London to Bath. On the foutheaft this parifli is bounded and divided from Bath- 
Hampton by the river Avon, which, fringed with willows, forms an eafy bend through 
a range of fine rich meads, called Arno's-Vale, extending from Bath-Ford to the city. 
The houfes ftanding along the turnpike-road overlook this beautiful valley, with the 
village of Hampton, embofomed in trees on the oppofite banks of the Avon, and 
overhung by the lofty ridge of Hampton-down, whereon plantations of firs, and patches 
of rugged rocks, are contrafted with each other. 

On the northweft fide of the village, Salijbury hill rifes with a fteep afcent from 
behind the houfes, to the height of nearly fix hundred feet from the river. On this 
hill antiquaries have fancied that Bladud built a fecond temple, confecrated to Apollo. 
It is a large copped eminence, having on its fummit an intrenchment of an almoft cir- 
cular fhape, generally fuppofed to be Saxon, and to have been thrown up by that 
people about the time they laid fiege to Bath, A. D. 577. Some parts of the vallum 
ftill remain; and from the declivity of the hill we may judge it to have been a place 
of no inconfideiable ftrength. The area is now an arable field, and produces fine 
crops of barley, being a lightifli ftone-rufh foil, almoft covered with loofe yellowifh 
rag-ftones. In fome old quarries, and in the lane leading up to this hill, are great 
quantities of foffil fhells, of the anomia, pecten, trochus, cardium, cochlea, and 
mufcle kinds, with belemnites and foffil coral. About midway up the hill hangs 
a beautiful grove, which, with the naked fummit rifing behind it, forms a fine pictu- 
refque objeft. 

The Roman Fojfe road enters this parifh on the northeaft fide, traverfing the down 
called Banner, or Barrow-down, and communicates with the London road at a 
bridge thrown over a little ftream, which runs through the parifh, and difcharges 
itfelf into the Avon. The Fofle here is deep, narrow, and overhung with hedges; a 
circumftance, which, in many cafes, the Romans could not avoid ; fometimes being 
under the neceffity of humouring the ground, and at other times of making uft of 
thofe hollows which nature herfelf had formed therein by torrents from the hills. 
But the general method was to raife all their roads in Britain as high as pofiible 
from the common level, in order that they might be enabled to overlook the country 
through which they pafl'ed, and guard againft the ambufcades of the Britons lurking 
in the woods. The great road with which the Fofie here joins is formed on the 
foundation of another Roman road, called Via Badonka, which comes from Marlbo- 
rough in Wiltfhire, and is to this day very confpicuous on die downs above Heddington 
in that county. 

O 2 As 



ioo BATH-EASTON. [T5at&«jFotum. 

As the Foffe road is fo intimately connected with, and frequently afiumes the name 
of the Akeman Street, or Via Aqitina, coming out of Oxfordfhire towards Akemancefter, 
the Eximia Civitas Aquarum, I fhall trace its progrefs from the junction of theje two 
roads at Cirencefter, the ancient Corinium, firft to Bath, the primary object of its ten- 
dency, and afterwards to its termination with our county on the borders of Devon. 

' The FofTe-road quits the town of Cirencefter at the caftle or weft-gate, and confti- 
tutes the foundation of the prefent road to Bath, Briftol, and the weftern parts of 
England. Skirting the noble park and plantations of Earl Bathurft, (a name by me 
ever to be revered, and held in the moft grateful remembrance) it paries a fmall 
Roman caftrum of the name of Truejbury, fituated on its northern verge, and con- 
tinues its courfe in a ftrait line through an open country, for the fpace of four miles 
from Cirencefter, to a fpot corruptly called Jacuman's Bottom, but more properly 
Akeman 's Bottom, or valley, from the ftreet whereon it is fituated. Here the turnpike 
and the Fofle roads feparate, the former branching off towards the weft, and the latter 
purfuing a fouthweft direction up the oppofite hill, on the foudi fide of Cuckerton 
Grove, a fpot where Roman money, and foundations of old buildings, have heretofore 
been difcovered. In this part, for the firft time, the original face of the Fofle fhews 
itfelf in a high ridge, with the old ditches on either fide, to which it owes its appella- 
tion. Quitting the grove it pafles between and divides the parifhes of Crudwell 
and Aftiley, at which laft place divers Roman remains have been dug up ; whence it 
proceeds to the pariih of Long-Newnton, a grange formerly belonging to the abbots of 
Malmfbury," where a rich profpect opens fouthweftward, difclofing Malmfbury minfter, 
and the new-built manfion of Thomas Eftcourt, efq. About half a mile from this 
elevation it crofies the road leading from Tetbury to Malmfbury and the Devizes, and 
defcending the hill fords a fmall ftream running through a narrow valley well-wooded, 
and beautifully green. It foon after bifects the parifhes of Shipton-Moigne and Bro- 
kenborough, now pafling over the open field, and now through green lanes, fhaded on 
either fide with oak and hazel. In the adjoining pariih of Eafton-Grey it communi- 
cates its name to the remarkable eminence of Fofs-Knoll; and here flood the ancient 
city of Whitewalls, denominated without doubt from the appearance of the walls with 
which it was environed. This city was of confiderable extent, and not only its 
mafoned rampires, but the remains of four gates, and a feries of ruined foundations of 
buildings within its area, have been difclofed. A vaft quantity of Roman coins, par- 
ticularly of Vefpafian, Trajan, Adrian, Antoninus Pius, and Fauftina, authenticate the 
antiquity of this curious, but little noted fpot. 

Leaving the towers of Eafton-Grey and Sherfton on the right-hand, it fkirts a 
large wood called Common-wood, where it fevers the pariih of Sherfton on the right 
from that of Hullavington on the left. About a mile from this wood, in the 
pariih of Alderton, clofe by the road fide, ftands a fingular natural curiofity, a hillock* 

* In the charter of King Edward the Confeffor, reciting the grants of former kings to the abbey of Malmfbury, 
we find the following notice of this eftate, and of the road which I am now defcribing, viz. " Imprimis Neivem- 
" tune, ex dune Eatbtlredi Regis ; terra eft xxx bidarum,fita ab occidental! parte Jlratee public*? qua FofTa nomina- 
\ " tur." Mon. Angl. i. 51. 

on 






IBatMorum.] BATH-EASTON. ioi 

on which an elm and afh tree grow fo near together that they feem to fpring from 
one common root; whence the fpot is termed by the country people Elmanajb. 
The tradition is, that a man was buried in the hillock, and that two flakes were rim 
through his body, which thenceforward grew, and in procefs of time became large 
trees incorporated at it were in clofe union one with the other. The Fofle here is nar- 
row, and confined betwixt much wood. 

At the concourfe of the pariflies of Grittleton, Littleton, and Caftlecombe, it enters 
the Malmfbury turnpike-road, and continues with it about a quarter of a mile, where, 
at an inn called the Fcjfe-Houfe, it interfects the high road from Briftol through Chip- 
penham to London. 

At about three furlongs diftance from this interferon, and two hundred yards from 
the road, on the right hand, is a very remarkable barrow of an oblong form, two hun- 
dred feet in length, eighty in breadth, and nine in height, running nearly due eaft and 
weft. At the eaft end is a monument of the Cifl-faen kind, confuting of three ftones, 
the tranfverfe of which is fallen down, and reclines againft the uprights. The fouthern- 
moft of thefe uprights is fix feet nine inches in height, and that on the north fide 
fix feet. The tranfverfe ftone is eleven feet fix inches long, and from four to fix 
feet wide. I doubt not that this was the monument of fome Roman chief, who died 
on the march, and was commemorated in this rude manner for want of time and 
other conveniences. 

Soon after this, the Fofle vifits the little village of Nettleton, and pafles within 
view of the tower of Weft-Kington upon the right. On the left hand is Caftlecombe. 
Towards the fouth lies the village of North-Wraxall, about a quarter of a mile diftant. 
The road then flopes between the high towers of Marfhfield and Colern, nearly 
equidiftant from both, and commanding a delightful profpect of the Wiltfliire hills, 
Roundaway-camp, and Bradenftoke-abbey. Hence traverfing a deep combe or valley, 
at the bottom of which runs a limpid rivulet, the banks whereof are planted with 
poplars, it continues its caurfe till it joins the Colern road, about a mile from that 
village, where its high bank is very obfervable, and has a picturefque appearance. 
With this road it continues for a confiderable length, palling by the three fliire ftones, 
at the junction of the counties of Wilts, Somerfet, and Gloucefter, and foon after 
crofies Banner-down, defcends the weftern brow of the hill, nearly oppofite to the upper 
part of the village of Bath-Eafton, and joins the Via Badonica, as beforementioned. 

Through the greater part of the tract above defcribed, this road is by travellers, and 
the inhabitants of the country through which it pafles, emphatically, and with great 
propriety, called the Long-Lane. 

From the point of its junction with the Via Badonica, the Fofle pafles on the northern 
bank of the river Avon to Walcot, (where, as I have faid before, a vicinal way branches 
off" toward the Trajetlus) and thence to the north gate of the city of Bath. Leaving the 
fouth gate of the city it pafled the river Abone or Avon by a ford, (the veftiges of which 
were difcernible in the beginning of the prefent century) and mounted the hill up that 

deep 



io2 BATH-EASTON. PBatfcJFOtttm. 

deep and narrow ftreet called Holloway, from the remarkable cavity of the road below 
the foundation of the buildings. At the extremity of Holloway it coincides with the 
new road towards Wells and Shepton-Mallet, and runs in conjunction with it upwards 
of three miles, in the courfe of which it is fo incorporated with the other as not to be 
diftinguifhable; but on the hill over againft the village of Combe-Hay, being deferted 
by the turnpike-road, it difplays its ancient original vallum, little altered by the fucceffion 
of fixteen hundred years, its furface being convex, and raifed to a great height above 
the ditches which inclofe it, and the fields which bound it on either hand. Defcending 
the hill it crofies the turnpike-road at Dunkerton bridge, and is again feen climbing in 
a flrait direction the oppofite acclivity, on the brow of which it again conjoins the 
modern road, and runs with it through the parifhes of Wellow and Camerton, to the 
ancient tumulus of Woodborough, which is generally fuppofed to be Roman, by the 
coins of Adrian, Antoninus, and other Emperors, which have been ploughed up in the 
adjoining field. Near this the turnpike -road and Fofie again feparate, that going 
through the village of Radftock, and this, in one part remarkably perfeft, palling on 
between lands of Camerton and Midfummer-Norton on the weft, and of Radftock on 
the eaft, till it reaches the fouthern limits of the parifh of Radftock, where it again 
meets with the prefent high-road, and pafles on therewith between the parifhes of 
Norton and Kilmerfdon, till the Wells and Shepton roads feparate; whence it goes 
with the latter through the village of Stratton on the Fojfe, and thence between Afhwick 
and Stratton to Afhwick-Grove ; pafiing through which it proceeds between lands of 
Shepton-Mallet and Stoke-Lane, till it comes to a diftinguifhed fpot, on an elevated 
part of the foreft of Mendip, called the Beacon. \ * 

This beacon appears to have flood on the eaftern verge of the Fofle-way, and com- 
manded a mod extenfive and advantageous profpeft of the fouthern part of the county in 
general, and of many Roman camps around in particular, fuch as Clay-hill, Battlebury, 
&c. in Wiltfhire on the eaft; and Mafbury, Cadbury, Hamden, and Neroche, in this 
county; and Pillefdon and Lambert's- caftle in the county of Dorfet, lying nearly fouth. 

From the beacon the Fofie pafles fouthward through a newly inclofed farm, and 
from the lower part of it through a rocky lane to the hamlet of Charlton in the parifh 
of Shepton-Mallet, leaving that town about a mile to the weft. 

From Charlton it purfues its track to Cannard's-Grave, (anciently called Kyneard's- 
Grave, b or Wood, being an eftate once belonging to the abbots of Glaftonbury) where 
it is joined by the turnpike-road from Shepton-Mallet to Ivelchefter. 

Leaving Cannard's-Grave, it proceeds between lands of the parifhes of Pilton and 
Doulting, through the hamlet of Street on the Fojfe, within the parifh of Pylle; thence 
between Eaft-Pennard and Ditcheat through the village of Weft-Lydford between 
Charlton and Babcary, Kingfdon and Puddimore-Milton, to the ancient Roman town 
IJcalis, or Ivelchefter. 

From Ivelchefter the Fofie runs between lands in the parifhes of Martock and 
Stoke; and at about four miles fouth from Ivelchefter we find the grand caftrum of 

b From the Saxon snsp, focus. 

Hamden- 



TSatfcJForum.] bath-easton. 103 

Hamden-Hill, fituated due eaft, and about a mile diftant from the road, whence 
a vicinal way branched to the encampment through the village of Stoke-under - 
Hamden. Hence the FofTe goes with the Ilminfter turnpike-road to the hamlet of 
Watergore in the parifh of South-Petherton, leaving that town about a mile to the 
weft; it then takes its courfe througli the village of Lopen to Chillington-down, 
where it is joined by the turnpike-road from Crewkerne to Axminfter. Here it 
commands a view of the encampments of Pillefdon and Lambert's-caftle, at about 
feven miles diftance on the eaft, and the caftle of Neroche at about eight miles 
diftance on the weft; the road from the former to the FofTe palling through Bur- 
ftock and Wayford, and from the laft-mentioned through Broadway, Ilminfter, and 
Kingftone. 

From Chillington-down the Fofie pafies over White-down, through the hamlet of 
Street in the parifh of Winfham, over the fouth end of Chard Common, about two 
miles foutheaftward from that town, through the hamlet of Perry-ftreet, near which 
it falls in with the turnpike-road from Chard to Axminfter, at which fpot the county 
of Somerfet ends ; the FofTe thence continuing its courfe over a fmall part of the 
county of Dorfet into Devonfhire, about three miles northeaft from Axminfter, through 
which town it pafied to Honiton, Exeter, &c. 

But to return from this long digrefiion to the fpot I was firft fpeaking of. 

The village of Bath-Eafton is divided into two parts, the Upper and Lower. The 
upper part lies northward from the great road, and contains the church and feveral 
handfome houfes, one of which was the refidence of the late ingenious architect John 
Wood, efq; to whom the city of Bath is indebted for fo many of its noble ftructures.. 
The other part of Bath-Eafton lies parallel with the Roman road. 

On the north fide of this road, at a fmall diftance from the village, on an eminence 
commanding a moft pleafing profpecT: of a rich vale, waflied by the river Avon, 
and bounded by romantick towering hills and rocks, ftands Bath-Eafton Villa, the 
elegant feat of Sir John Miller, bart. of whofe family we learn the following particulars: 

Early in the reign of James IV. there were in Scotland five heads of families, and 
matters of manfions, of confiderable property and confideration, of the name of Miller, 
generally allied to each other ; as in that country intermarriages of kindred have been 
peculiarly prevalent. 

William Miller, of the Slate, is recorded to have ferved in perfon near James IV. 
at the difaftrous battle of Flodden-field in 1 5 1 3. 

John Miller, of the Slate, his eldeft fon, and anceftor to the prefent baronet, married 
Ann Culwel, the eldeft of two coheirefies of that name and family, by whom he added 
a fair property to his paternal eftate, already confiderable for its extent, and for the 
command it gave; by her he had iflue three fons, John, James, and William. 

John, the eldeft, inherited the family eftate of the Slate. To James his father left 
the ample property of Temple, and other lands in the (hire of Air; having fold his 

portion 



io4 BATH-EAST ON. [ISat^JTorum. 

portion of the Culwel eftate, which came by his wife, to make that purchafe. And 
William died young without fettlement or profeffion. 

This John married Barbara Mackay, only fifter to Donald the firft lord Rea, and 
by her had ifiue John and William, and feveral daughters. 

John married Agnes Campbell, daughter of fir Duncan Campbell, of Glenorchy, 
fifter to the lady of fir William Murray, who was grandmother to the firft marquis of 
Athol, and by her had ifiue John and James, who both fat in the Scottifh parlia- 
ment at the commencement of the civil war, (when the peers and commons formed 
only one houfe.) John's inclinations were to the republican caufe; James's to that of 
the king. 

John the fon of Agnes Campbell, in a vifit to Ireland in 1643, having married 
Elfe the only fifter of fir Charles Porter, afterwards lord chancellor of that kingdom, 
foon after fold all his property in Scotland, and purchafed confiderable eftates in the 
county of Antrim in Ireland, called New-Town, C lough-Mills, Clownevees, &c. &c. 
Alfo other manors and eftates near Dungannon in the county of Tyrone, where he 
refided. Thefe laft he purchafed of fir Arthur Chichefter, anceftor of the earl of 
Donegal: they were denominated Killyman, Killymadden, and Killymean. By his 
wife Elfe he had two fons, Ifaac and John; Ifaac died young and unmarried; and 
John married Margaret Caulfield, only fifter to Thomas the firft vifcount Charlemont, 
at the early age of feventeen. He died in his twentieth year, and in the life-time of 
his father, leaving two fons by his wife Margaret Caulfield, John and William: which 
William, in pafling from England to Ireland, was by diftrefs of weather driven into 
the Ifie of Mann, where being immediately captivated by the charms of a beautiful 
Manks woman, to her he entirely devoted himfelf, and there lived and died without 
further communication with his family, country, or property. 

John the elder brother, who inherited the family eftate in Ireland, (no commu- 
nication or intercourfe having for a long time fubfifted between the Irifti and Scottifh 
branches of his family) though but nineteen years of age at the commencement of 
the revolution in 1688, (when the laws, the liberty, and the religion of his country 
feemed to him ready to expire under the prefilire of popery and defpotifm) raifed 
from among his tenants and neighbours a company, confiding of one hundred and 
ten men; thefe he clothed, armed, difciplined, and moreover maintained, during 
a confiderable part of that war, chiefly, if not folely, at his own expence; having 
fold his family plate, and contracted heavy debts for that purpofe; the revenues of 
Ireland being then too fcanty, and its government too ill-adminiftered, to admit of 
its fully fupporting fuch of its fubjects as armed and arrayed in the caufe of the 
revolution. At the head of this company, he a£ted with, and afterwards joined 
himfelf to, and became incorporated in, the renowned Innifkillen regiment, which 
formed a part of the garrifoh of Londonderry ; where the firft great ftand was made 
againft the Popifh army, and where that diftinguifhed garrifon endured dangers, 
difficulties, and diftreffes, rarely to be equalled in the annals of mankind. He after- 
wards ferved with that corps at the action of the Penny-Burn Mills, the battles of the 

Boyne 



lSatb'JTorum.j B a t h - E a s t o n. 105- 

Boync and of Aughrim; and laftly, at the fiege and capitulation of Limerick; whi( h 
capitulation put a happy period to (hat important war, and fully confirmed to thefe 
kingdoms their liberty and their religion. He was four times wounded very fevcrcly 
in the leg, and had three ribs of his right fide complcatly extracted. King William's 
government being folidly cftabliihcd, he rcfigncd his majority in the Innifkillcn 
regiment; and much admiring that part of the county of Clare near the banks of the 
Shannon, made it his future refidence. He married one of the daughters of lord 
Blancy, baron of Monaghan in Ireland, by whom he had two fons, John and I lcnrj. 
John the cldeft fon married Anne Browne, of New-Grove in the fame county, who 
was of aKcntifh family, and immediately defcended from fir Thomas Browne, trea- 
furer of the houfhold to king Henry VI. She bore on her arms, ermine, an eagle 
difplaycd, gules. The above-mentioned John died in his father's lifetime 1736, 
and was buried in Drumlin church in the county of Clare, where there is a monument 
to his memory. By Anne his faid wife he was father of two fons, William, and John 
the prcfent baronet. 

William, who had early diftinguifhed himfelf in the univerfity of Dublin, and was- 
in all refpeds a youth of great expectation, died fuddenly at Lciccftcr in 1762.. 

John the younger fon received his education firft at Dalfton fchool near London, 
then at Eaton ; and after paffing four years at Trinity college, Cambridge, early in 
1760 he was appointed cornet in general Elliot's regiment of light dragoons: with 
this regiment he fcrved in Germany at the diftinguifhed adion of Emfdorf, on the 
16"' of July 1760. In November 1761 a company being given him in the 1 
battalion of foot, with that corps he embarked for the ifland of Belleifie on the 
coaft of France, where he continued to the end of that glorious war. In 1 765 
he married Anna the only daughter of Edward Riggs, (by Margaret Pigotr, of the 
ancient houfe of Chetwynd in Shropfhire) and folc heirefs to her grandfather the 
right honourable Edward Riggs, one of the commiflioners of his Majefty's revenue 
in Ireland, and member of parliament in that kingdom for the borough of Killybcggs. 
In 1778 he was created a baronet of the kingdom of Ireland; and at the general 
election in 1784 returned to ferve in parliament for the borough of Newport in 
Cornwall. In 17&1 lady Miller died, leaving two children, a fon and a daughter. 
Sir John Miller bears for his arms: argent, a fefs wavy azure > between three wolves' 
heads erafed, gules. Motto, Pro religione et patria. Creft, on a wreath, a wolf's 
head erafed, argent.* 

* In thefe arms both the fefs and colours are different from thofe of the Kcntifh Millers. Their near 
refemblance, however, to the arms borne by the Millers of Kent, (the lart baronet of that family fir Borlace 
Miller having died in 1714 without male iffue, the title became extincl, and the property was carried into- 
other families by the females) juftifies a preemption, that that family was of Scotifh origin, being confeffedly 
of inferior antiquity to the Millers of Scotland. See Ilaftcd's Hittory of Kent, and Andcrfon's and Nemit's 
genealogies of Scotland. But vifitations being unknown in Scotland and in Ireland, and the civil convuHion* 
which have agitated both thofe countries, to the dclWrion of many records both of apublick and of a private 
nature, a* well as the frequent variations of fituation, and of property, of thofe who were affefted by fuch 
publick events, ncccfiarily impede a perfeftiy regular dedutfion of defcent in the prefent as well as in many 
other inftances. 

Vol. I. P Thu 



to6 -BATH-EASTON. [ISatMotlim. 

The parrfh of Bath-Eafton was in ancient times fimply written Eflone, and was 
parcel of the poffeflions of the Saxon kings. In the time of William the Conqueror 
it was divided; one part thereof being royal demefne, and the other the property 
of the church of Bath, as we find it in the general furvey of that reign. 

The land of the king. " The king holds Eftone. There are two hides, and it 
** gelded for one hide. The arable is ten carucates. In demefne is one carucate, 
4t and two fervants, and {even coliberts, b and thirteen villanes, and three bordars, 
" and three cottagers, with five ploughs. There are two mills, rented at one hun- 
" dred pence, and fifty acres of meadow, and two miles of coppice wood in length 
* c and breadth. Thefe two hides were, and are, of the demefne farm of the borough 
« of Bath." 

The land of the church of Bath. " Walter holds of the church Eftone. Ulward 
•" the abbot held it in the time of king Edward, and gelded for one hide and a half. 
*' The arable is two carucates. In demefne is one carucate, with one villanc, and 
" eight bordars, with one plough. There are two mills of fix (hillings and eight- 
-" pence -rent. There are two acres of meadow. It was worth thirty (hillings, now 
" forty (hillings." 11 

The former portion of the lands here defcribed, together with the city of Bath, to 
which they were annexed, king William Rufus in the fifth year of his reign beftowed 
on John de Villula, biftiop of Bath, and his fucceflbrs, in pure and perpetual alms. 
Shortly after, viz. 7 Henry I. the faid bifhop conveyed the greater part of his lands 
here to the abbey and convent of St. Peter in the city of Bath, referving to himfelf a 
fuperior right in the manor, which was thenceforward held under the bifhoprick. 

The firft lords of Bath-Eafton that occur after the above-mentioned date, are, the 
family of Ofatus, or Hofatus, afterwards- foftened into Hufee and Huffy, who in the 
time of Henry II. when the aid was levied for marrying Maud the king's daughter to 
the duke of Saxony, held feveral fees in thefe parts of the bilhop of Bath. e Their 
principal feat was at Shockerwick in the parifti of Bath-Ford. f 

In the time of the Edwards the manor was held by the family of Fitzurfe, or 
Fitzour, lords of Wiliton in this county. Upon the death of fir Ralph Fitzurfe 
35 Edw. III. this, among other his eftates, was affigned to Maud his eldeft daughter, 
the wife of fir Hugh Durborough, fon and heir of fir John Durborough of Heath- 
field. The faid lady Maud feems to have made this fome time the place of her 
refidence. Hence the manor paffed to the family of Brien, who had large poflefllons 
in this part of the county. 20 Ric. II. William Brien held at his death this manor, 

b The coliberti were tenants in free focage, or fuch as being villanes were manumitted by their lord, on 
condition of fome particular works and fervices. 

c The difference betwixt the bordarii and cotarii is this: — the former did fervice for their pofTeflions, fup- 
plying their lord's table with poultry, eggs, &c. : the latter paid a certain rent for fmall parcels of land 
without firvice. The prefent word cottager is applicable to bgth. 

A Lib. Domefdar. • Lib. niger. Scac. i. 86. f Cart. Antiq. 

with 







•EattKforttm.] bath-easton. 107 

with that of Shockerwick and others, of the bifhop of Bath by knight's fcrvice, 
leaving Philippa the wife of John Devercux, or Devcrofc, and Elizabeth the wife of 
Robert Level, daughter of Guy Bryen, jun. heirs to his eftates. Joan his wife fur- 
viving him had an aflignation of this and fome other manors in dower. After her 
death Philippa the faid wife of John Dcvcreux became poffeffed hereof. She fur- 
viving her faid hufband, married fecondly fir Henry le Scroop, knight, afterwards 
created lord Scroop, and died 8 Henry IV. being then feized in her demefne as of 
fee of the manors of Bath-Eafton and Shockerwick, which flic held of the bifliop 
of Bath. In 35 Henry VI. it was found by inquifition, that Avicia, the wife of" 
James Botelcr earl of Wiltfhire, late attainted for treafon, held Bath-Eafton of John 
Newton, efq; as of his manor of Swell in this county. She died that year, and 
Humphry Stafford is certified to be her heir. In the next reign Edmund Blunt held 
the fame, and died 8 Edw. IV. leaving Simon his fon and heir, of the age of fixtccn 
years: which Simon fecms to have had large property in thefc parts, and to have 
reflded for fome time at the neighbouring village of Swainfwick, which was another 
of his manors; for in the atteftation of a deed he ftiles himfelf of that place. He 
died 16 Edw. IV. leaving Margery his daughter and heir, then of the age of twenty- 
eight years." In 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, Thomas carl of Northumberland held' 
the faid manor. In 1667 the fame was, for the confidcration of 600I. conveyed by 
fir Robert Button of Tockenham-Court, bait. William Duckett of Hartham, efq; 
and Thomas Blanchard of North-Wraxall, clerk, to James Lancafliire, of Manchcfter, 
efq j which is almoft the laft account we can find of this manor, for at prefent no 
court is held, nor manerial right claimed. 

The church of Bath-Eaflon was in early times appropriated to the abbey of Bath,, 
and was in 1292 valued at fifteen marks. h There having been fome controverfy be- 
twixt the prior and convent of that monaftery, and the vicar of this parifh, concerning 
certain tithes, Sec. it was at laft, in 1 262, agreed by way of compolition between both 
parties as follows : That the vicar for the time being fhould in future receive all ' 
oblations, and fmall obventions, tithes of horfes, colts; Heifers, fwine, flax, wool,., 
milk, honey, gardens, pigeons, and mills of the faid parilh, except in certain lands 
belonging to the prior and convent: that the faid vicar fhould have a dwelling-houfe 
fituated near to the church, with a competent garden and curtilage, and the grafe of 
the church-yard; together with the tithes of all the hay of the fields contiguous to- 
the Avon within this parifh, and likewife all mortuaries whatfoevcr; That the faid 
vicar fhould fuftain all ordinary vicarial burdens, together with the chantry of the 
chapel of St. Catherine within the faid parifh, the vicar for the time being to provide 
at his own cxpence a chaplain for the daily fcrvice thereof, who fliall every day, 
except the Lord's day and folemn feftivals, celebrate mafs, with the full fcrvice for 
the deceafed, viz. the Dirigc and Placebo, and efpecial commendations for the fouls 
of all the bifhops that have filled the cathedral fee of Bath and Wells ; and for the 

*Efc. *Taxat. Spiritu.1. 

P 2 fouls 






m 



a 06 B A T H - E A 3 T O N. [10atMorum. 

The parHh of Bath-Eafton was in ancient times (imply written Eftone, and was 
parcel of the poffeflions of the Saxon kings. In the time of William the Conqueror 
it was divided; one part thereof being royal demefne, and the other the property 
of the church of Bath, as we find it in the general furvey of that reign. 

The land of the king. " The king holds Eftone. There are two hides, and it 
* gelded for one hide. The arable is ten carucates. In demefne is one carucate, 
*« and two fervants, and (even coliberts, b and thirteen villanes, and three bordars, 
" and three cottagers, with five ploughs. There are two mills, rented at one hun- 
" dred pence, and fifty acres of meadow, and two miles of coppice wood in length 
* c and breadth. Thefe two hides were, and are, of the demefne farm of the borough 
"«• of Bath." 

The land of the church of Bath. " Walter holds of the church Eftone. Ulward 
«' the abbot held it in the time of king Edward, and gelded for one hide and a half. 
" The arable is two carucates. In demefne is one carucate, with one villanc, and 
«' eight bordars, with one plough.. There are two mills of fix (hillings and eight- 
** pence rent. There are two acres of meadow. It was worth thirty (hillings, now 
" forty (hillings." 11 

The former portion of the lands here defcribed, together with the city of Bath, to 
which they were annexed, king William Rufus in the fifth year of his reign beftowed 
on John de Villula, biftiop of Bath, and his fucceflbrs, in pure and perpetual alms. 
Shortly after, viz. 7 Henry I. the faid bifliop conveyed the greater part of his lands 
here to the abbey and convent of St. Peter in the city of Bath, referving to himfelf a 
fuperior right in the manor, which was thenceforward held under the biftioprick. 

The firft lords of Bath-Eafton that occur after the above-mentioned date, are, the 
family of Ofatus, or Hofatus, afterwards- foftened into Hufee and Huffy, who in the 
time of Henry II. when the aid was levied for marrying Maud the king's daughter to 
the duke of Saxony, held feveral fees in thefe parts of the biftiop of Bath. c Their 
principal feat was at Shockerwick in the parifti of Bath-Ford. f 

In the time of the Edwards the manor was held by the family of Fitzurfe, or 
Fitzour, lords of Wiliton in this county. Upon the death of fir Ralph Fitzurfe 
35 Edw. III. this, among other his eftates, was alfigned to Maud his eldeft daughter, 
the wife of fir Hugh Durborough, fon and heir of fir John Durborough of Heath- 
field. The faid lady Maud feems to have made this fome time the place of her 
refidence. Hence the manor parted to the family of Brien, who had large pofTeffions 
in this part of the county. 20 Ric. II. William Brien held at his death this manor, 

b The coliberti were tenants in free focage, or fuch as being villanes were manumitted by their lord, on 
condition of fome particular works and fervices. 

c The difference betwixt the bordarii and cotarii is this: — the former did fervice for their pofleffions, fup- 
plying their lord's table with poultry, eggs, &c. : the latter paid a certain rent for fmall parcels of land 
without fervice. The prefent word cottager is applicable to bgth. 

A Lib. Domefdar. « Lib. niger. Scac. i. 86. f Cart. Antiq. 

with 




TBatb'jrorum.] bath-easton. 107 

with that of Shockcnvick and others, of the bifliop of Bath by knight's fervice, 
leaving Philippa the wife of John Dcvereux, or Devcrofc, and Elizabeth the wife of 
Robert Lovel, daughter of Guy Bryen, jun. heirs to his eftatcs. Joan his wife fur- 
viving him had an afllgnation of this and fomc other manors in dower. After her 
death Philippa the faid wife of John Dcvcrcux became poffeffed hereof. She fur- 
viving her faid hufband, married fecondly fir Henry le Scroop, knight, afterwards 
created lord Scroop, and died 8 Henry IV. being then feized in her demefne as of 
fee of the manors of Bath-Eaflon and Shockcrw k k, which flic held of the bifhop 
of Bath. In 35 Henry VI. it was found by inquifition, that Avicia, the wife ot" 
James Botclcr earl of Wiltfhire, late attainted for treafon, held Bath-Eafton of John 
Newton, efq; as of his manor of Swell in this county. She died that year, and 
Humphry Stafford is certified to be her heir. In the next reign Edmund Blunt held, 
the fame, and died 8 Edw. IV. leaving Simon his fon and heir, of the age of fixtccn 
years: which Simon fee ms to have had large property in thefc parts, and to have 
rcfided for fomc time at the neighbouring village of Swainfwick, which was another 
of his manors ; for in the atteftation of a deed he ftiles himfclf of that place. He 
died 16 Edw. IV. leaving Margery his daughter and heir, then of the age of twenty- 
eight years." In 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, Thomas earl of Northumberland held 
the faid manor. In 1667 the fame was, for the confederation of 600I. conveyed by 
fir Robert Button of Tockenham-Court, bait. William Duckett of Hartham, efq-, 
and Thomas Blanchard of North- Wraxall, clerk, to James Lancafhire, of Manchcftcr, 
efq; which is almoft the laft account wc can find of this manor, for at prcfent no 
court is held, nor manerial right claimed. 

The church of Bath-Eaflon was in early times appropriated to the abbey of Bath,, 
and was in 1292 valued at fifteen marks. h There having been fomc controvcrfy be- 
twixt the prior and convent of that monaftery, and the vicar of this parifh, concerning 
certain tithes, &c. it was at lafl, in 1262, agreed by way of compofition between both 
parties as follows : That the vicar for the time being fhould in future receive all ' 
oblations, and fmall obventions, tithes of horfes, eoltSj toilers, fwine, flax, wool,., 
milk, honey, gardens, pigeons, and mills of the faid parilh, except in certain lands 
belonging to the prior and convent: that the faid vicar fhould have a dwelling-houfe 
fituated near to the church, with a competent garden and curtilage, and the grafe of 
the church-yard; together with the tithes of all the hay of the fields contiguous to 
the Avon within this parifh, and likewife all mortuaries whatfoevcr. That the faid 
vicar fhould fuftain all ordinary vicarial burdens, together with the chantry of the 
chapel of St. Catherine within the faid parifh, the vicar for the time being to provide 
at his own expence a chaplain for the daily fervice thereof, who fhaU every day, 
except the Lord's day' and folemn fcflivals, celebrate mafs, with the full fervice for 
the deceafed, viz. the Dirige and Placebo, and efpecial commendations for the fouls 
of all the bifhoos that have filled the cathedral fee of Bath and Wells ; and for the 

*Efc. k Taxat. Spirit 

P 2 fouls 



- 

10S BATH-EAS.TON. [TUat^JTotUm.- 

fouls of the father and mother of lady Maud [Durborough] of Bath-Eafton, lady of 
the faid vill, their anccftors and fucceflbrs; and for the fouls of all the priors and 
monks of Bath, and canons and vicars of Wells ; and alfo for the fouls of all the 
parifhioners of Bath-Eafton, and all the faithful deceafed throughout the realm. 
And for the better fupporr of the faid chantry, the prior and convent of Bath agree 
to give up a certain area with curtilage to the vicar of the faid church of Bath-Eafton, 
to be built on at his expence for the refidence of the faid chaplain, and allow fexen 
bufhels of wheat from their grange, to be paid every year on the next Sunday after 
the feaft of St. Michael the archangel, &c. All other burdens ufually belonging to 
the reclor, the faid prior and convent covenant to fuftain.' 

Out of the parfonage the almoner and facriftan of Bath had an annual penfion 
of nine marks. 

The living is a vicarage in the deanery of Bath, and gift of Chrift-Church college 
in Oxford. Hie rev. Mr. Higfon is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, which is dedicated to the honour of St. John the Baptift, ftands in 
the north part of the village, and is a handfome Gothic ftructure, one hundred and 
•eight feet in length, and twenty-two in breadth, confifting of a chancel, nave, and 
porch. At the weft end is a beautiful quadrangular embattled tower of excellent 
mafonry, and one hundred feet in height. In this tower are fix bells. 

The roof of the nave is twenty-four feet high, ceiled and pannelled into fquare 
compartments of plaifterer's work. On the outlidc of the roof, betwixt the nave and 
■chancel, is an arch or receptacle for a faint's bell. The floor is good, and the whole 
church kept clean, neat, and decent. 

In the north wall of the chancel is a monument of white marble, 
" To the pious memory of Mrs. Cecilia Panton, third daughter of Charles Panton, 
gent, deceafed, and Cecilia his wife; who departed this life Sept. 12, A. D. 1712, 
aetat. 21. 

" O deaths how long wilt thou fo fiercely rage, 

Without regard to virtue, fcx, or age ! 

Could you have fpared this blooming virtuous maid, 

We'd willingly have any ranfom paid : 

For furc before ne'er were together join'd 

So pure a foul, a body fo refin'd. 

Well therefore might that foul to hcav'n retire, 

So well prepared for the celeftial choir. 

For who can think it wonderful, that fhe, 

Who here an angel was, an angel there (hould be?" 

* Mrs. Betty Panton, their fecond daughter, died July 6, A. D. 1 7 1 6, aetat. 26. 
She was an eminent inftance of God's goodnefs at ten years of age; being to all that 
knew her exemplary and obliging; to her relations affectionate; to her parents 
•dutiful and obfequiousj but above all, in her piety to God conftant and unwearied. 

' Ex aatog. Neither 







lBatI)=jTortim.] B A T H - E A S T O N. 109 



Neither the bloom of her youth, nor the vanities of the world, could divert her 
from prcfling towards her mark; and as flic foon finiihed her courfc, flic al Co quickly 
received her crown." 



On the fame wall is a handfomc monument of white and grey marble, with the 
following infeription: 

" Mrs. Ann Sclfe, relict of Ifaac Sclfe, of Mclkfliam in the county of Wilts, eft; 
youngeft daughter of Charles Panton, gent, and Cecilia his wife, after a long illncfs, 
fatal to her filters, exchanged this mortal for an immortal life Jan. 31, 1740, in the 
35"' year of her age; having by her amiable temper and engaging behaviour endeared 
herfelf to her acquaintance; and by an exemplary goodnefs and linccrc piety recom- 
mended her foul to God, and leaving behind the character of an agreeable woman 
and a good Chriflian. 

" To whofc memory Mrs. Cecilia Panton, her forrowful mother, caufed this monu- 
ment to be erected 1 hoping with the aftics of her dear daughter, near this place 
depofited, one day to mingle her own." 

On this tomb arc the arms of Selfc impaled w ith thofc of Panton, viz. Ermine, three 
chevrons gules: impaling, gules, two bars or, on a canton fable, a fer de moulinc ermine. 

At the eaft end of the chancel is an elegant mural monument of white and yellow 
marble, with this infeription: 

" Underneath are depofited the remains of Henry Walters, efq; eldeft fon and heir 
of Eldad Walters by Mary Blanchard his wife. He died the 23d of April 1753, 
aged 85 years. 

" Alfo Mary his wife, daughter of Jofeph Houlton, of Trowbridge, efq; by Mary 
Ewers his wife. She died the 6 th of Augult 1752, aged 73 years. 

" Elizabeth their youngeft daughter died the io'" of May 1731, aged 13 year*. 

" Mary their eldeft daughter died the 13 th of November 1763, aged 47 years. 

" Elizabeth Walters, filter to the faid Henry Walters, died in the year 17,35, aged 
59 years. 

"Alfo the remains of feveral of their infant grand-children." 

Arms: Quarterly, 1 and 4, fix keys in faltier, with two fquirrcls fcjant proper. 
•2 and 3, on a fefs wavy between three talbots' heads erafed azure, three bezants. 

On a neat marble monument on the fouth fide of the chancel : 
" Near this place arc interred the remains of James Walters, efq; who died July 
16, 1739, aged 56 years. Alfo the remains of three of his children, to wit, Clement, 
Ann, and Sufanna, who all died in their infancy. 

" Likcwifc of Mary Clement, wife of the above James Walters, efq; and after- 
wards wife and relict of Thomas Drcwet, gent, who died Oct. 19, 1770, aged 68." 

Anns: azure, two keys in faltirc or, a fquirrcl fejant proper. Impaling, gules, three 
garbs within a bordure argent, charged with eight torteauxes. 

Againft 






♦ 



f 



t 













.* 



no BATH-EASTON. (T8at&«jrorum, 

Againft the north wall of the chancel is an old monument of ftone, bearing at the 
top the following arms: gules, within a bordure argent, two bars ermine: on a canton 
/able a fer de mouline of the fecond. In the centre of the monument is a brafs plate* 
with this infcription : 

" Epitaphium 
" In funus Domini Richardi Panton, 
Eximii peritiflimique medici, 
Qui defiit mori decimo fexto die 
Septembris, anno Domini 1684. 

* Alter en Hypocrates jacet inferiore fub urna, ' 

Qui modo Pantonias gloria ftirpis erat. 
JEgros fanavit non folum; fed furiofos 

Ingenio veteri reddidit ille viros. 
Nobilis ars, fortuna, genus, paticntia, virtus, ' 

Singula funt paucis; fed data cundta tibi." 

On a fmall mural monument of white marble near the laft: 

*• Juxta hie jacet corpus Caroli Panton Generofi, Richardi Panton and Maris 
irxoris ejus filii primogenki, olim e collegio Lincoln: in acidemia Oxonienfi; ubi ex 
illo fonte illuftriflimo omnium artium, et rerum, uberrima cognitione affluente, 'aflidue 
fe ftudiis imbuendo plerifque rebus, praecipue veromedicinalibus, admodum eruditus 
effet. Ille Ceciliam, Jacobi Self de Beanacre in agro Wilton armigeri, filiam, 
uxorem duxit; ex qua natas funt ei quatuor filiae Maria, Bettia, Cecilia, et Anna. 

Brevitate autem potiulata c'ogor filentio praetermittere qua? hoc marmor in per- 
petuum merito commembrarTet et folummodo dicam, quod amans erat maritus in- 
dulgenfque pater, bonus vicinus, vir jurTus, in pauperes benignus, vereque pius domi, 
et ec-clefiae Dei venerator. Natus in hac parochia de Bath-Eafton vicefimo tertio die 
Aprilis A° Diii 1662, denatus vero ibidem tricefimo die Augufti A° Dni 1711, et 
jetat. fuae 50." 

On the north fide of the nave is a neat mural monument of white marble, on the 
cornice whereof are thefe arms; gules, three garbs argent, within a bordure bezantee. 

" Underneath this monument lies interred the body of Samuel Clement, of this^ 
parifh, gent, who died Sept. 22, 1728, in the 59 th year of his age." 

In 17S0 this parifh paid to the poor 173I. 17s. iod. 

The manor of Longney in Gloucefterfhire pays the yearly fum of ten pounds to 
the parifh of Bath-Eafton, purfuantto the will of Henry Smith, efq; who died in 1 627. 



BATH- 



** 



TSatMorum.] [ m ] 



»C 






BA'TH-FORD, 

SO called from its having a ford over the Avon, and from its vicinity to Bath, is 
a confiderablc parifh, three miles weft ward from the city, and in the great road 
to London through Devizes. 

The fituation of the town is exceedingly pleafant, being on an eminence at the 
weftem declivity of the point of a bold hill, called Farley-Down, which rifes behind 
it to the height of nearly feven hundred feet, and is fo divcrfificd with wild rocks, 
ftone quarries, and irregular patches of wood, as to form a very picTurefquc object. 
To the fouth, and at lefs than a mile diftance, on the oppofite fide of a beautiful 
valley, through which the Avon winds its way in a ferpentine direction, Hampton 
Cliffs rife with great magnificence, being cloathed with fteep hanging woods, inter- 
mixed and crowned with rugged rocks of a vaft height. To the weft and northweft, 
part of the city of Bath, the villages of Bath-Eafton and Hampton, the rich vale 
between, watered by the Avon and the lofty hills behind them, form an enchanting 
landfcape moft beautifully varied. 

This parifh chiefly confifts of an irregular ftreet, running from the great road 
fouthward to the church, containing fixty-feven houfes, five of which are gentlemen's 
feats: befides which there are two hamlets, viz. 

i. Warley, one mile fouthward, containing eleven houfes. 

2. Shockerwick, near two miles northward, containing fix houfes. 

The whole number of houfes is eighty-four, eleven of which are farms; and of 
inhabitants nearly four hundred and fixty. 

The vicinity of this place to two Roman roads, and to Aqua; Solis, or Bath, will 
account for the many antiquities of the Romans which have been difcovered here at 
different periods. In the year 1691, a hypocauft was found in a ground near the 
Horfland, belonging to Mr. Skrine of Warley. This hypocauft, according to the 
defcription given of it by Mr. Vertue in his letter to the Antiquarian Society, dated 
Aug. 30, 1739, feems to have been fingular. "The pillars," fays he, "meet in 
*' arches, the bottom inlaid with mofaic." About the fame time were difcovered 
two Roman altars, and an urn filled with coins of that people. At Warley, not long 
fince, was found the capital of a pillar of very curious workmanfhip, indifputably 
Roman, of which an etching has been made by a gentleman of the fociety. There 
is likewife on the down above the village, a Roman tumulus, and the veftiges of an 
encampment ; and in the garden of the rev. Mr. Berjew was lately found a coin of 
the emperor Allectus. 

The manor of Ford belonged at the Conqucft to the abbey of Bath. 

" The church itfelf (faith Domefday book) holds Forde. In the time of king 
<J Edward it gelded lor ten hides. The arable is nine carucatcs. Thereof in demdhe 

" are 



* 



\ 



•\? 



<* 




m 

j'ia B A T H - F O R D. [TrSatfrJFojum. 

»• are five hides, and there are two carucates, and fix fervants, and five villanes, and 
«« feven cottagers, with fix ploughs. There is a mill of ten (hillings rent, and twelve 
P acres of meadow, and coppice wood one mile in length and breadth. It was and 
«* is worth ten pounds."* 

In 1293 the temporalities of the faid abbey here were rated at 4I. 5s.* 

In the reign of Edw. IV. the manor was fome time held by the family of Blunt.' 
In 27 Eliz. lands here, formerly belonging to the abbey of Bath, were granted 
to Collins and Mayland. 36 Eliz. the manor was held of the crown by William 
Button, efq. It is now the property of Skrine, efq; and others. 

The manor of Warley is furveyed in Domefday book as follows : 

" Hugoline holds of the king Herlci. Azor held it in the time of king Edward, 
" and gelded for one hide. . The arable is three carucates, with which there is one 
" villane, and five cottagers, with two fervants. There is half an acre of meadow, 
" and three furlongs of coppice wood in length and breadth. It was formerly, and 

" is now, worth fifty (hillings. " d 

1 

It has long been the property of the family of Skrine, who have a feat here, 
delightfully fituated under Farley-hill upon the banks of the river Avon. 

The other hamlet Shockerwick gave name to a family fo early as the reign of 
Henry II. in whofe twelfth year Adam de Socherwiche is certified to hold part of a 
knight's fee of the bifhop of Bath. He was fuccceded by others of the fame name, 
all of whom held under the bifhoprick by knight's fervice. When this name ceafed, 
it became the property of the family of Huffy, or Hofatus, (as they are called in the 
old records) of whom we have fpoken in the parifh of Bath-Eafton. One of thefe 
lords built much at Shockerwick, and the manor from them was in fucceeding times 
called the manor of Hufei's court. An old building, the remains of which the 
inhabitants imagine to have been part of a parifli church, was the work of one of 
this family. In the time of Edw. III. Shockerwick is found to be the property of 
Walter de Creyk, knight, who refided here; whence it came to the family of Brien, 
lords of Bath-Eafton, with which manor it afterwards defcended. 

It is now the feat of Walter Wiltftiire, efq; who has built here an elegant houfe 
of Bath (tone, in a warm plcafant fituation, w ith good gardens. 

The living of Bath-Ford is vicarial, and confolidated with that of Hampton. It 
was anciently appropriated to St. Peter's abbey, and was in 1292 valued at thirteen 
marks. The dean and chapter of Briftol are the patrons thereof, and the rev. Mr. 
Berjew the prefent incumbent. The glebe land belonging to the vicarage is eftimated 
at about 1 61. per annum. 

The church, which (lands in the deanery of Bath, and is dedicated to St. Swithin, 
is an old building, eighty feet in length, and twenty in breadth, confiding of a nave, 

• Lib. Domefday. » Taxat. temporal. c Efc. d Lib. Domefday. 

chancel, 



l3atfcj?orum.] B a T n - f o r d. 



f> 



chancel, and porch, all tiled. At the weft end is a fquare tower, containing two 
bells. The nave is divided from the chancel by a clumfy Saxon an h. 

On the fouth wall of the chancel is a wry handfomc monument of marble, fourteen 
feet by fix, terminating in a mitred pediment. 

On this monument arc two tablets. On the uppcrmoft, which projeds in the form 
of a tomb, is the following infeription: 

" Near this place lie the remains of George Tyndalc, of this parifh, efq. I le was 
a pcrfon of unblemifhcd honour, imparl ial jufticc, and ftrid integrity. I lew as the 
fecond and only furviving fon of Thomas Tyndalc, alfo of this parifh, efq; dc- 
fcended from the ancient family of the Tyndalcs, of Tyndalc in the county of 
Northumberland, by Elizabeth his wife, fecond furviving daughter, and at length 
coheirefs, to George Booth, of Woodford in the county Palatine of Chcftcr, efq. He 
was born Jan. 29, 1704, and departed this life the 24.'" of February 1771." 

On the lower tablet : 

*' Alfo the remains of Vere his firft wife, third daughter of the honourable and 
reverend Robert Booth, D. D. dean of Briftol, (fifth fon of George lord Delamer) 
by Mary his fecond wife, eldeft daughter of Thomas Hales, efq; eldcft fon of fir 
Robert Hales, of Howlets in Kent, bart. She was endowed with ingenious parts, 
fingular difcretion, confummate judgment, great humility, meek and companionate 
temper, extenfivc charity, exemplary and unaffected piety, perfect rcfignation to 
God's will, and endowed with all other virtuous qualities. A confeientious dif- 
charger of her duty in all relations; being an affectionate, faithful, obliging, and 
obfervant wife; a tender, indulgent, and careful mother; a dutiful and refpedful 
daughter; gentle and kind to her fervants, courteous and beneficent to her neigh- 
bours, a fincere friend, a lover and valuer of all good people; juftly beloved and 
admired by all that knew her; who having perfected holinefs in the fear of God, was 
by Him received into an eternal reft from her labours on the 31ft of May, 1753; 
calmly and compofedly meeting and defiring death, with joyful hope and ftedfaft- 
nefs of faith. A lively -pattern of real worth and goodnefs, and an example defcrving 
imitation. [Of whom the world was not worthy. Heb. xi- 38.] To perpetuate the 
remembrance of fo much virtue, till that great day come w herein it fhall be openly 
rewarded, this monument is creded, as a mark of dutiful refped and affedion by 
their only fon George Booth Tyndalc." 

Oppofite to the above, on the north fide of the chancel, is a neat mural monu- 
ment of white marble, fix feet by three, with the following infeription: 

" Near this place lie interred the remains of John Tyndalc, efq; fifth fon of 
Thomas Tyndale, of Eaftwood park in the parifh of Thornbury, in the county of 
Glocefter, efq; by Dorothy his wife, daughter of William Stafford, of Marlwood in- 
tke fame parifh, efq. He was baptized Nov. 5, 1 628, and died without iffue 10 Jan. 
2716, aged 88 years. 

Vol. E Q_ " Alfo 



/ * 



J i* BATH-FORD. [TSatt)* Jorum. 

" Alio the remains of Joan his firft wife, daughter of Robert Plea, of the city of 
Briftol, gent. She was buried the r 2 ,h of September 1682. 

" Alfo the remains of Thomas Tyndale, of this parifb, efq. He was eldeft fon 
of William Tyndale, of the priory in the parilh of Kington St. Michael, in the county 
of Wilts, efq; (who was eldeft fon of the firft-mentioncd Thomas Tyndale, efq;) by 
Margaret his wife, daughter of Anderfon Atchcrly, of Ludlow in the county of Salop, 
efq. He was born June 2, 1667: died Oct. 18, 1747. He married Elizabeth 
fecond daughter and coheirefs of George Booth, of Woodford in Cheftiire, efq; by 
whom he had two fons and four daughters.- Martha, Maria, deccafed; John born, 
Sept. 30, 1 701, died Nov. 13, 1728, buried at St. Ann's Soho; Elizabeth now living; 
George deceafed; Mary now living; Ifabella born July 1, 1708, died June 24, 1709^ 
buried at St. Mary's inChefter." 

Arms : Argent, a fefs gules between three garbs fable. Creft, on a helmet crowned 
or, a plume of feathers proper. 

On the fame wall is an elegant monument of black, white, and grey marble, the 
lower part of which reprefents the front of a tomb, on which (its a weeping Cupid, 
wiping his eyes, with an urn on his right hand, and emblems of mortality on his 
left. Above this, and fupportcd by' a neat cornice, is a white truncated cone on a 
back ground of black marble veined with yellow, on which is this infeription: 

" Near this place lie interred the remains of Martha Maria Phillips, relict of 
Richard Phillips, efq; fecond fon of Thomas Phillips, of Bremenda in the county 
of Carmarthen, efq; and eldeft daughter of Thomas Tyndale, late of this parifh, efq; 
Ir Klizabeth his wife, fecond furviving daughter and coheirefs of George Booth, of 
Woodford in the county palatine of Chefter, efq. She was born Aug. 28, 1700, an4 
died Dec. 27, 1759." 

Above this infeription is a neat mitred pediment bearing the arms: Argent, a lion 
rampant fable, within a border ingruiled of the fame, impaling argent, a fefs gules, 
between three garbs fable. 

On the fame wall is a neat mural monument of white, grey, and yellow marble, 
terminated with a truncated cone, on which are the arms : Argent, a fefs gules, be- 
tween three garbs fable. Over all an inefcutcheon of the firft, bearing three boars' 
heads erafed of the laft, langued. 

On a projecting tablet: 

" Near this place lie interred the remains of Elizabeth, relict of Thomas Tyndale, 
efq; daughter and coheirefs of George Booth, formerly of Woodford in the county 
palatine of Chefter, efq; who was eldeft fon and heir of fir John Booth, knight, fifth 
fon of fir George Booth, of Dunham-Mafiey in the fame county, bart. from whom 
George earl of Warrington was defcended. She died Nov. 14, 1768." 

On a plain ftone in the fouth wall of the chancel : 
" Heare lycth the body of Mr. Phillip Ellis, merchant of the citty of Briftol, who 
died June 1, 1661." 

On 



TeattKfrorum.] BATH-FORD. 115 

On the north fide of the nave is a plain mural monument of (tone; 
" To the dene memory of iohn skrinc, who deceffed this life the 26 ,h of March 1 675. 

« To thee I lived, in thee I died, 
O Chrifr } my Saviour dcarc, 
My foule is bleft, my body reft 
With in this priflbn hcarc, 
Till Jefus loofc the bands of death, 
And up my body reare. 

" Alfo to the memory of Samuel Skrine, fonn of Nathaniel Skrine, who dcccafcd 
this life the ift of June 1684. 

Heare lyeth a plant not fully groun, 
in fteps death and cuts it doun; 
Bvt tho long it did not ftand, 
We hope now is at God's right hand. 
A likely branch twas to have been, 
to have feared God, and hated linn." 

Adjoining the above is another plain ftonc ; 

" To the dearc memory of Thomas Skrinc, who deceafed Oct:, the twentio 
nine, 1658. 

" And alfo of Chriftophcr, fonn of Thomas Skrinc, who deceafed Jan. the twentie- 
fifth, 1656. 

•* To the deare memory of Ann Skrinc, wife of the above Thomas Skrinc, who 
deceafed 1665. 

" Death is a dcte which is due, 
" Wee have paid it, fo muft you." 

On the north wall of the nave is a plain ftonc to the memory of Richard Fifhcr, 
and William Fifher his fon. 

On a plain ftone in the chancel is inferibed : 

" Here lyeth interred the body of Francis lord Hawley, who died May 29, 1743, 
aged 73. 

•* Alfo Elizabeth his wife, who died Jan. 29, 1747, aged 67." 
Above ajre the arms; afaltire engrailed, with a baron's coronet. 

On a fmall white marble ftone in the chancel floor: 
" Here lies the body of Thomas fon of George Langton, efq; of Langton in 
Lincolnfhire, (and of Mary his wile, daughter of Thomas Tyndale, ciq ; ) who dyed 
Nov. 21, 1712, aged 21 years." 

Qjs On 



ii6 BATH- HAMPTON. [TBatMotum. 

On an adjacent ftone: 
*' Here lieth the body of Elizabeth the wife of George Meredith, gent." 
In the eaft window of the chaneel arc feveral panes of painted glafs. 
This parifh paid to the poor in 1771 thefum of 98I. and in 1780, 145!. 18s. 90!. 



BATH-HAMPTON 

IS a fmall parifh two miles eaft from the city of Bath, pleafantly fituated on a riling 
ground, on the foutheaft banks of the Avon. The village of its name ftands 
nearly oppofite to Bath-Eafton, from which it is divided by the river, and about the 
centre of that rich and beautiful valley which extends from Bath to Bath-Ford. On 
the north, eaft, and fouth fides it is furrounded by hills, and on the weft the proud 
ftructurcs of the city rife ftreet above ftreet in magnificent fucceflion. 

The number of houfes within the parifh is twenty-fix, and of inhabitants about one 
hundred and fifty. The houfes, fome of which are good dwellings, are moftly built 
of rough ftone, and form a rural irregular ftreet weftward from the church. On the 
river is a mill at which a ferry-boat is kept, and there is a pleafing water-fall near it 
from a high wier. In the lower part of the parifh the lands are generally rich pafture 
and meadow; and there are divers gardens here which fupply the market at Bath. 
A confiderable part of the hill which rifes foutheaft from the ftreet is- in this pariih, . 
and is called Hampton-down. It contains many fprings, and produces excellent 
fheep-feed; but on account of the thinnefs of the ftratum of earth, which in many 
parts fcarcely covers the rock, it is incapable of cultivation. The eaftern part of 
this hill, called the Cliffs, is at leaft fix hundred feet above the river, and from its 1 
fteepnefs is almoft inacceffible. Its brow is finely contrafted by rugged projecting 
rocks and quarries, and by plantations of firs, beneath which fine hanging coppice 
woods extend almoft to the bottom. From this elevated fpot the profpecls are truly 
romantick and beautifully diverfified. On the north and northeaft, the village of 
Bath-Eafton and its noble back-ground of hills; the fine vale which extends between 
Colerne and Box, through which the London road winds, and which is divided into 
beautiful inclofures; and the village of Bath-Ford, with the fhapelefs brow of Farley- 
down hanging over it; are commanded by this eminence.. To the eaft, immediately 
under the eye, is the fteep rugged defcent before-mentioned. At the bottom is a 
continuation of the vale, interfered by hedge-rows, and wafhed by the river Avon, 
which glides through it with majeftick folemnity. On the oppofite fide of this vale, 
Farley-down rifes to an immenfe height above the bed of the river. This hill forms 
a kind of amphitheatre, the lower part whereof is divided into fine large cultivated 
pclofures : in the middle part are large ftone quarries, and the north-eaftern point is 

a rough 



TBatf^jrortim.] bath-iiampton, n 7 

a rough cliff, crowned with an ancient tumulus, and clumps of firs, which form a 
noble contrail with the cultivated fcenery below. To the right the vale winds fouth- 
ward, till it is loft to the eye between the hills of Claverton, and Monkton-Farlcy. 
Hampton-down is pleafingly ornamented with clumps of firs, and beneath the turf 
is found a curious fpecies of madrepora with ftellatcd cavities; but there are few 
other foflils. 

The manor of Bath-Hampton (anciently fpclt I lantonc) is recorded among the 
pofllffions of the church of Bath in the following extract from the Norman furvcy: 

" Hugo and Colgrin hold of the church Hantonc. Two thanes held it in the time 
" of King Edward, and could not be feparated from the church. They gelded for 
n five hides. The arable is fix carucatcs. In demefnc are three carucatcs, and three 
" fervants, and three villancs, and fix cottagers, with three ploughs. There are 
" twenty-eight acres of meadow, and fix furlongs of pafturc in length and breadth, 
" and ten furlongs of coppice wood in length and breadth. It is worth one hun- 
" drcd and ten fhillings."" 

41 Henry III. William Button, bifliop of Bath obtained a charter of free warren 
in all his lands here, b which with thofe he polR-ifed in Claverton were valued in 
1293 at 1 5!-" 

8 Edward IV. Edmund Blunt held this manor, and was fucceeded in it by his fon 
Simon Blunt, who died 16 Edward IV. feized of the fame. They both held it under 
the bilhop of Bath. 

William Barlowe, bifliop of this fee, in 1548 exchanged this manor with the king 
for other lands late the property of the prior of Bath; but it did not long continue 
in the crown; for 7 Edward VI. both the manor and the hundred, or liberty, appear 
to be the property of William Crowch, gent, in whofe name and family the fame 
continued to 36 Elizabeth, when Walter Crowch had a licence for alienating his 
pofieflions here to Thomas Popham, efq. From this family the manor paired to the 
Hungerfords, and from them to the Ballets. Sir William BafTet was lord thereof 
1688, of whofe heirs and executors it was purchafed in 1701, under a decree 
of chancery, by Richard Holder, efq. Charles Holder, a defcendant of the faid 
Richard, conveyed the fame to Ralph Allen, efq; of Prior-Park, who left it by his 
wil! to his only brother Philip Allen, efq; poft-mafter of Bath. From which Philip 
it defcended to his cldcft fon Philip Allen, efq; late comptroller of the bye-letter 
office in l^ondon, who dying lately, it became the property of George Allen, the 
prefent pofleflbr, now a minor. 

The church, valued in 1 292 at ten marks and a half, was appropriated to the 
prior and convent of St. Peter in Bath, d and a vicarage ordained in 1317, by which 
ordination it appears that the vicar was to have a competent dwclling-houfe, with 
all the tithes of wool, lambs, heifers, pigs, chicken, fwans, pigeons, eggs, flax, 

■ tab. Domefday. *» Cart. 41 Hen. HI. • Taxat. temporal. * Pat. 2 Edw. 1L 

honey, 



n8 BATH- HAMPTON. [TeatMorum. 

coney, checfe, milk, butter, gardens, curtilages, mills, and all other fmall tithes, 
as well as all the oblations and profits of the altarage of the faid church. The 
(aid vicar was to receive from the convent a yearly ftipend of twenty fhillings fterling; 
and the prior and convent, having the great tithes of corn and hay, to fuftain all 
rectorial burdens. But the vicar was to find proccffional candles, books, and to caufe 
the faid books to be bound, and to repair the furplices : the prefentation to the faid 
vicarage to be referved to the faid convent and their fucceffors.' 

After the diffolution of monafteries 34 Henry VIII. the rectory and advowfon of 
this church were granted to the dean and chapter of Briftol, who are the prefent 
patrons. The living was confolidated with Bath-Ford under Mr. Chapman the laft 
incumbent, and was augmented with queen Ann's bounty by the late Rev. Mr. 
Simons. The Rev. Mr. Berjew is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is in the deanery of Bath, and dedicated to St. Nicholas. It is a neat 
Gothic ftructure, confiding of a nave and fouth aile leaded, and a chancel tiled. At 
the weft end is a handfome embattled tower containing four bells. The whole church 
is very neatly pewed and feated, well paved with broad grit ftone, and kept very clean 
and decent. The communion table is of folid ftone. 

The fouth aile of this church was rebuilt about the year 1754 by Ralph Allen, efq; 
who at the fame time repaired and beautified the whole. Before this reparation there 
were two figures of ftone lying on altar monuments under the fouth wall, but are now 
removed into the church-yard. One of them in all probability reprefents a knight 
templar, being in armour, having his legs croffed, and a target of an oval form on 
his left arm. The other is the effigy of a female, with her head muffled up, and 
at her feet fome animal much mutilated. There was likewife fome monfter at the 
feet of the man, but little of it remains. 

At the eaft end of the church without, under the chancel window, in a niche, is 
the ftatue of a woman in alto relievo, holding a book in her left hand, the other hand 
on her breaft. This figure is much defaced by time and mifchief, nor is it certain 
whom it was intended to reprefent. 

In the fouth aile are four monuments. 
1. A neat oval mural monument of white and Sienna marble, with this infeription: 

" Sacred to Ralph Allen, efq; of this parifh, who dyed Auguft 30, 1777, aged 
40 years. 

" Here Allen refts! far from the fcene of ftrife, 

This vale receiv'd his laft remains of life: 

A calm affociate, and a friend approv'd, 

Who heard, efteem'd him, and who knew him, lov'd; 

The filial (hade parental aflies know, 

Their virtues crown'd by heav'n as join'd below: 

A brother's figh the fpeaking tablet rears, 

Graved on his memory whom his heart reveres." 

e Excerpt, e regift. Wellen. II, A 



IMMotum.] C A T H - II A M P T O N. u 9 

2. A handfomc mural monument of (lone, in which two Ionick fluted pilaflers fup- 
port an open arched pediment, on which recline the figures of a man and woman 
holding palm-branches gilt. On the centre is an elegant urn belted with gilt foliage, 
and under it a fliip on a murion, being the crcft. Below are the arms: Salle, a 
chevron between three anchors argent: impaling, azure, a chevron between three 
cranes or. In chief over all, on an inefcutcheon, three bars or, charged with a lion 
rampant gules. 

On a marble tablet is this infeription: 
w Near this place lyeth the body of Hefter the late wife of Charles Holder, efq; 
lord of this manor, and of the liberty of Claverton, Charlcomb, Bath-Eafton, Shock- 
crvvick, and Amirell, who departed this life Feb. u, 1734, aged 68. 

" Near this place was buried the body of Mary Oram, who died Sept. 22, 1729, 
aged 53 years; lifter to the above Hefter Holder." 

3. A very elegant mural monument of white, black, and Sienna marble, nine feet 
high, with a neat mitred pediment, and white urn cmbclliftied with foliage: 

" In memory of Charles Holder, efq; of this pariih, who died Mardh 5, 1 763, 
aetat. 89. 

" As alfo of Hefter his daughter, who died July 27, 1757, aetat. 17." 

Arms : Sable, a chevron between three anchors argent. 

4. A very neat fmall monument of white and Sienna marble terminated by a white 
urn. Under an elegant white feftoon is a tablet with this infeription : 

" In a vault near this place are depofited the remains of Philip Allen, efq; of 
the city of Bath, who departed this life Oct. 15, 1765, aged 71. And of Jane his 
wife, who died April 14, 1767, aged 63." 

Arms: Argent and fable, three martlets counter-changed, impaling, gules, a bezant 
between three demi lions couped argent. 

On the north and fouth walls of the chancel are feveral memorials of the family 
of Fillier. 

On a fmall oval marble ftone in the nave floor: 

"Rev. T. Chapman, 1776." 

In the church-yard, on a plain tomb, on the north fide of the church: 

" Here reft the remains of John Baptiftc vifcountdu Barry,' ob. 18 Nov. 1778." 

This pariih paid to the poor, in 1771, 36I. 10s. 4d. ; and in 1780 more than 
double that fum, viz. 74I. 17s. iod. 

• He loft his life in a duel with Count Rice on the down above the village. See the Bath Chronicle for 
Nov. 19, 1778. The fpot where he fell is known by the event, and remains a melancholy monument of 
the pernicious efFefts of phrenfy and 0/ folly, couched under the fpecious name of honour. 

BATH- 



[ i2o ] nBatfcjFotum* 



B A T H - W I C K. 

A Small parifh plcafantly fituated on the banks of the Avon, which divides it 
from the city of Bath, being about two furlongs from the New Bridge. The 
word Wicbe implies a villa, and Bath was added thereto to diftinguifh it from other 
places of the fame name, and by reafon of its vicinity to that city. 

The whole parifh contains forty-five houfes, and about two hundred and fifty inha- 
bitants. Moft of the houfes form an irregular ftreet near the church; and along this 
ftreet a fmall ftream of excellent water, rifing in Claverton, or Hampton down, flows 
through a narrow ftone channel, and in fummer has a cool and pleafing appearance. 
On the fouth fide of the ftreet are many neat gardens, with fummer-houfes creeled in 
them. Thefe are moftly rented by tradefmen in Bath, who, after the bufinefs of the 
day, retire hither, to enjoy the fweets of leifure, the cool breezes of evening, and the 
delightful fcenery with which this fpot is furrounded. 

The fituation of this vill, however, during the winter months, is not defireable, 
the air being damp and foggy, and the meads, which almoft encircle it, frequently 
under water by the overflowing of the river, from fudden rains : and when the wind 
fets in wefterly, the fmoke of a great part of the city is driven over it. 

The lands are very rich, and on account of their hearnefs to Bath let, as meadow, 
from three to four pounds an acre; and for garden ground from twelve to fixteen 
pounds an acre. A manufacture of broad cloth is carried on here. 

In the two meads between this parifh and the city are fome agreeable walks, much 
frequented in fummer evenings both by the company and the inhabitants. Spring- 
Gardens, Bath-Wick Villa, and the publick prifon, are all likewife within this parifh ; 
but for a more particular defcription of thefe fee the account of the city of Bath. A 
few Roman coins have been found here. 

The manor of this vill was given by king William the Conqueror to Geffrey, 
bifhop of Contancc in Normandy, whofe property here is thus furveyed in the great 
Norman record : 

" The Bifhop himfelf holds Wiche. Aluric held it in the time of king Edward, 
14 and gelded for four hides. The arable is four carucates. In demefne are three 
" carucates, and four fervants, and one villane, and ten cottagers. There is a mill 
*' of thirty-five fhillings rent, and fifty acres of meadow, and one hundred and twenty 
" acres of pafture. It is worth feven pounds." 1 

This Geffrey, bifhop of Contance, had a diftinguifhed command at the battle of 
Haftings; he was, as it has been faid, of a noble Norman extraction; but much 
more fkilful in arms than in divinity, in the knowledge of training up foldiers, than 
of leading his proper flock in the paths of peace. However, for his fignal fervices 

2 Lib. Domefday. - 

he 



Teatb'JForum.] B A T H - W I C K. 121 

he was highly rewarded by the Conqueror, having no lefs than two hundred and four- 
fcore lord (hips in England given him by that king. b He was likewife in many other 
battles againft the Engliih and Danes, and always meeting with good fuccefs, obtained 
immenfe pofTeflions in this country. He died in 1093, and many of his cftatcs being 
fcized on by the crown, were difpofed of to different favourites. 

It is not long after this period that we find the manor of Wichc accounted for 
as parcel of the pofTelTions of the Benedictine nunnery of Whcrwcll in Hampfhire, 
founded in 986 by queen Elfrida, in expiation of her guilt in being concerned in 
the murder of her firfl hufband Ethelwolfc, and of her fon-in-law king Edward. 
In 1228 both the manor and the rectory hereof were confirmed by pope Gregory the 
ninth to the faid monaftery.' 

In 1 293 the conventual eftates in Wick and in Wolley, then called from the cir- 
cumftance Wick-Abbas and Wolley-Abbas, were valued at 1 2I. 5s. d 

4 Edward II. it was found not to the king's damage to grant licence to Roger Ic 
Forefter, to give one mefTuage and forty acres of land in Bathwyk to the abbefs and 
monks of Whcrwcll and their fucceflbrs for ever. 

In the eighth of the fame reign licence was alfo given to Henry the fon of Henry 
le Waytc, and Lawrence dc Overton, to give one mefTuage, twenty acres of land, &c. 
in Bathwyk, to the faid abbefs and convent, who in the record are faid to hold their 
lands here of the king in capite by barony.* 

The convent enjoyed this manor till the year of -their diflblution, when it came to 
the crown, and therein continuing fometimc, was at length, 1 and 2 Philip and Mary, 
granted with its appertenances and the advowfon of the church to Edmund Neville, 
knight. It foon after came to Capel earl of EfTex, whofe defcendant, in 1 726, fold 
the fame to William Pulteney, efq; afterwards created earl of Bath ; whofe reprcfen- 
tative William Pulteney, efq; is the prefent lord hereof. 

The church was appropriated to the aforefaid nunnery of Wherwcll, and in 1292 
was valued at 1 2 marks/ out -of which a yearly pennon was paid to the convent of 
43s. 4d. and the fame fum to the prior of Bath, who had likewife lands in this parifli. 
It was ordained in 1320, that the vicar fhould have an area or court on the eaft fide of 
the rector's garden, feparated and inclofed from the other part, for the purpofe of 
making a curtilage, and building a houfe proper for the refidence of the faid vicar: 
that he fhould likewife have all fmall tithes, oblations, and obventions, belonging to 
the faid church, and the chapel of Wolley appendant thereto, with the profits of the 
altarage; the tithes of beans and all other kinds of grain; the tithes of hay of the 
villanes of the faid parifli. The vicar to fervc the aforefaid church and chapel; to 
furnifh proceflional lights; bind books; cleanfe the veftments and ornaments of the 
church and chapel, and keep them in order and repair; and the rector to prefent to 
the vicarage whenever it became vacant. 8 

k Dugd. Bar. i. 56. e Mon. Angl. iii. 10. d Taxat. temporal. 

e Inq. ad quod damnum. f Taxat. temporal. * Excerpt, e Regitt. Wdleft. 

Vot. I. R The 



«s S a t n - W I c k. [T6atb'JFotum. 

The living is now a rectory confolidated with Wollcy: William Pukcncy, efq; is 
the patron, and the Rev. Peter Grigg the prefent incumbent. 

The church is an ancient building, dedicated to St. Mary, fixty-four feet in length, 
and feventeen feet in breadth, covered with tiles. At the weft end is a fquarc tower, 
thirty-four feet high, with a chevron roof, and containing three bells. 

On the fouth wall, neaf the pulpit, is an oval mural -monument of white marble, 
over which are arms: Gules, an armed leg, couped at the thigh, fpurred or, be- 
tween two broken fpears argent. Cre'ft, an arm embowcd in armour proper, grafping 
a broken fpear or. 

On the tablet : 

" Underneath lies interred the body of Mary Gilbert, who died Dec. i, 1760, 
-aged 7 years. 

" Alfothe body of William Gilbert, who dyed March $f, 1764, aged 6 years. 

" Alfo the body of Thomas Gilbert, who died Feb. the 23 d , 1770, aged 17 years." 

This monument was erected by Thomas Gilbert, of Bath- Wick, gent, in token 
of the great affection he had for thefe his children. 

Near the above is another fmall monument of black and white marble, on which 
is inferibed : 

" Near this place lieth the body of John Robins, of this parifh, yeoman, who died 
Feb. 29, 1705, aged 83. 

" Alfo the body of Joyce his wife, who dyed Dec. 26, 1712, aged 80." 
On the north wall is a mural monument, whereon is this infeription: 

** Out of a filial and affectionate regard to the memory of the beft of parents, 
Robert and Joanna Davis, late of the city of Bath, who lie interred fronting the 
door of this church with three of their children, this marble is erected by their 
furviving iltue John Davis." 

On the left hand is a fmall mural monument of white marble furrounded" with a 
fcroll, on which is the following infeription : 

" In this church-yard lies the body of Eliz. Brookman, who died June 20, 1759. 

" Alfo of William Brookman, who departed this life Aug. 4, 1774, aged 49." 

To the left of the above, on a mural monument of ftone, 4 feet by 3, is inferibed: 

" Near this place lyeth the body of Amy the wife of William Lewis, fen. of this 
parifh, who dyed March 28, 1729, aged 89. 

." Here alfo lies the body of Martha wife of William Lewis, fon of the above- 
named, who dyed Jan. 22, 1738, aged 69. 

" Alfo William Lewis aforefaid, who died June 17, 1740, aged 67. 

" Alfo Mary Bull, daughter to the above William and Martha Lewis, dyed Feb. 
26, 1 77 1, aged 70." 

To 



T5at&*jrorum.j B a T n - w i c k. 123 

On the fame wall is an elegant mural monument of white, grey, and yellow marble, 
on the tablet of which is this infeription : 

" Near this place licth the body of Thomas Batchelor, fen. of this pariih, who 
died Sept. 6, 1733, aged 66 years. 

" Alfo of Sarah Batchelor, widow of the above Thomas Batchelor, who died Sept. 
3, 1762, aged 95. 

" Alfo the bodies of their fon and daughter, viz. Sarah Batchelor, who died Dec. 
21, 1748, aged 38. Thomas Batchelor, who died Dec. 10, 1768, aged 70. 

" Alfo Edward, fon of the above Thomas and Sarah Batchelor, who died the 17th 
of October, 1777, aged 72." 

On a plain ftone in the wall beneath the fingers' gallery: 

" Under the font lyeth the body of Mifs Hannah Smith, daughter of Samuel 
Smith, of the Ifle of Wight, merchant, who died Aug. 30, 1746, aged 32." 

On the fouth wall, in the chancel, is a plain black ([one, with this infeription: 
" Here lies the body of Mr. John Mackinnon, of the Ifle of Skye, an honcft man. 

" N. B. This Mackinnon was with the Pretender in the battle of Cullodcn, and 
the very man who carried him off. After his efcapc, by wandering about, and lying 
in woods and bogs, he loft the ufe of all his limbs ; and lbmc years after came to 
Bath for the benefit of the waters, and dyed there." 

In the chancel floor is a flat marble ftone with the following infeription : 

" Underneath lies interred the body of Mr. William Carter, of Kcw-Grcen in the 
county of Surry, whofe integrity, juftice, candour, and humility, were apparent to 
all. A moft indulgent hufband; a mod tender father; with a fine confidence in 
God he patiently reiigned Feb. 9, 1 73 " , aged 6^^ 

" Here alfo are depofited the remains of Rofe relict of the above William Car 
a truly virtuous, good woman; who, after a well-fpent life of eighty-five years, 
furrendered her foul to its merciful Creator January 28, 1766. They both died 
parifhioners of this place." 

On other ftones : 

" Here lies the mortal part of Henrietta Wray, tire fecond daughter of Benjamin 
and Elizabeth Wray, of Kelfeeld near York. Her immortal part flic willingly re- 
flgned into the hands of her Creator October 26, 1761, in the 29th year of her age," 

" Here lieth the body of Jacob Neale, cittiibn of London, who dejurted this life 
Jan. 13, 1 73I, aged 61." 

" Here lieth the dear remains of Maria Thercfa daughter of George and Sarah 
Duperre, of the city of Bath. She died Sept. 6, 1759, a g^ 4 > cars a,u ' 4 months. 
Speedily was (lie taken away, left fin fhould alter herundcrftanding, or deceit bcguiU- 
her fwcet foul." 

R 2 " Alfo 



i24 F R E S H F o k D. cn5atb*jrojum. 

" Alfo Mrs. Ann Chriftopher, who died July 16, 1763, As fincerdy lamented as 
juflly beloved." 

" Elizabeth Grigg, aged 45, Aug. 4, 1766." 

Here are alfo two ftones to the memory of the Robins family. 

The chriftenings in this parifh are on an annual average nine; burials (exclufiveof 
fuch as are brought from other parifhes) five. 

Bath- Wick paid to the poor in 1780, 52I. os. iod. in 1781, 27I. 14s. 2d. 



FRESHFORD 

IS a confiderable parifh, four miles fouth of Bath, and two miles weft from Bradford 
in Wiltfhire, fituated on the fouthern declivity of a hill in a part of the country 
well cultivated, and rendered pi&urefque and romantick by a pleating intermixture of 
hills, woods, glens, and deep vallies. The number of houfes it contains is about one 
hundred and fixty, and of inhabitants nearly nine hundred. Ofthefe houfes, about 
one hundred compofe the village of Frefhford, which is formed into feveral irregular 
ftreets round the church ; the reft are in the following hamlets : 

1. Shafton, half a mile fouth, containing fix houfes. 

2. Shrubs, fo called from a family who formerly refided here, fituated one mile 
fouth, and containing fix houfes. 

3. Pipards, northward of the village, containing twelve houfes. This hamlet was 
likewife denominated from a family who anciently pofll'fTed it. The Pipards were 
lords of the manor of Cold-Afhton in Glocefterfhire, and divers others in Wiltfhire, 
during many fucceffive reigns; and their eftates paffed by an heirefs to the Botelers 
carls of Ormond. 

4. Park-Corner, northweft, twenty-fix houfes. 

5. Shitten-Lane, twelve houfes. 

6.' Iford, in the road to Farley-Caftle, wherein are two houfes, one of them the 
feat of John Guisford, efq; very pleafantly fituated, with beautiful plantations. This 
houfe was formerly the property of the Halliday family, of Taunton. There were 
within thefe few years a chapel, and a cloifter, belonging to this houfe; but the 
former is now converted into a green-houfe, and the latter is pulled down. This 
place is mentioned in Domefday book by the name of Eford, as follows : 

" Alured holds of the earl [Morton] Eford. Teodric held it in the time of king 
" Edward, and gelded for half a hide. The arable is one carucate, and there are two 
" cottagers and two acres of meadow. It was worth twenty fhillings, now thirty 
* millings,*' 1 

* I/ib. Domefday. 

The 



TBttftijrofllttt] FRESH F O R !). 

The two hamlets of Shrubs and Iford, with 1 re fh ford mills and bridge, are all in 
the county of Wilts: the river Avon being the boundary at theft places. 

Contiguous to Frcfhford was another very ancient parifli, called WOODWICK, 
in the Saxon faysUndmicbe. The manor thereof at the Conqucft belonged to the 
church of Bath, and is thus accounted for in the general furvey: 

" Rannulf [Flambard] holds of the church Undcwiche. A monk of the feme 
** monaftcry held it Q in the time of king Edward, and gelded for two hides and a half. 
" The arable is three carucates. There arc five bordars, and half a mill of five 
" millings rent, and twelve acres of meadow, and thirty acres of pafturc. It was 
" and is worth twenty fhillings." b 

In the year 1448, the livings of Frcfhford and Woodwick, on account ot their 
vicinity and the fmallnefs of their income, were with the confent of Thomas Halle, 
cfq; of Bradford, patron of the faid churches, and John Franklcyn, rccior of the 
church of Frcfhford, united; 1 from which time, the church of Woodwick feems to 
have fallen into decay, and now there is not the fmallcft veftigc of it remaining, the 
memory of it being only preferved in the name of certain fields, called by corruption 
Woodwards; and in particular, one named Church-Field, or Church Powels; out of 
which feveral tomb-ftones have been lately dug, and other ccclcfiaftical antiquities 
have been difcovered at different times. 

The river Avon wafhes the village of Frcfhford on the eaft, where it is joined by a 
ftrcam which rifes near Frome ; over which is a done bridge of three arches, eredtcd 
in the year 1783. 

The manor is written in the Norman furvey Fefchefordc, and is thus furvcyed: 

* Alric holds of Roger [de Curcelle] Fefchefordc. Domne held it in the time of 
" king Edward, and gelded for half a hide. The arable is one carucate, on which 
" there are two villanes, with one cottager, and in demefne is half a carucate. There 
" are four acres of meadow, and three acres of pafturc, and eleven acres of wood, 
" It is worth ten fhillings. 

" Robert holds of Roger Fefchefordc. Brifmar held it in the time of king Edward, 
" and gelded for half a hide. The arable is two carucates. In demefne is one caru- 
" cate, and one villane, and three cottagers, with one plough. There are two acres 
" of meadow, and twenty acres of pafturc, and forty acres of wood. It was and is 
" worth feventeen fhillings. " d 

Thefc two parcels of land, being conjoined after the Conqueft, were given to the 
Carthufian abbey of Hinton, founded bv Ela countefs of Salifbury in the year of our 
Lord 1332. In which abbey this manor continued till the diffolution thereof, when 
it was granted to Anthony Stringer for life; but he dying foon after, it reverted to 
the crown, and was given, 3 and 4 Philip and Mary, to John Cheeke, cfq. He it 
feems likewife had it only for life; for we find a grant of it 45 Eire, to John Davifon 

' Mb. Domefihy. « F.xwpt. e Rrgilt. Tho. de Brkynton. Ep. B. i- W. i Ijb. Domefday. 

and 



j 26 F R E s H F o r D. [Teatfcjrortim. 

and his heirs, whofe family, and thofe of Ford and Afh, pofTefled the greateft part 
of the parifh during the laft century, until purchafed of their heirs the beginning 
of the prefent by Anthony Methuen, efq; whofe only fon the late Thomas Methucn 
inherited this manor, and it is now the property of his only fon and heir Paul 
Methuen, of Corfham in the county of Wilts, efq. 

The living is a rectory in the deanery of Bath, and in the gift of William Norris, 
of Nonfuch in the county of Wilts, efq. The rev. Mr. Long is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, dedicated to St. Peter, is a Gothic ftruiture, fixty-two feet long, and 
thirty-two feet wide, confifting of a nave leaded, and a chancel, fouth aile, and 
porch tiled. At the weft end is an embattled tower, forty-four feet high, with pin- 
nacles at the angles, and containing a clock and four bells. 

Between the nave and the chancel are three fmall mural monuments of white 
marble, with the following inferiptions : 

, " In memory of Mrs. Elizabeth Still, daughter of John Still, efq; of Shafton St. 
James, Dorfet, who died Dec. 17, 17 84, aged 62. 

u In memory of Honor, wife of John Cooper, and daughter of John Still, efq. 
She died May 8, 1753, a g e ^ (i2 - 

. «« Alfo in memory of Mr. John Cooper, who died the 6th of May 1 762, in the 7 1 ft 
year of his age. 

«< In memory of Ann wife of George Cooper, daughter of Henry Fifher, gent. 
She died the 8th of January 1760, in her 32d year." 

On a black ftone Handing on the gallery ftairs : 

- " Mary Afhe, the mod forrowful relicl: of Edward Afhe, gent, hath put thefe 
verfes in Englifh to the perpetual memory of her dear huiband, who deceafed 
Dec. 31, 1 66 1, and of age 26. 

■ •" If all my vows and prayers had prevail'd, 
From death's areft you doubtlefs had been bail'd, 
And you had mourned for me at death's cave, 
As I doe mourn at your untimely grave; 
But fith the juft and righteous God's decree 
Was not to heare my prayers, as I fee ; 
You goe to reft before me, whiles mine eyes, 
Fitted for mourning, drop out elegies. 
Sweet boanes ly foft, the grave's a bed of trufl ; 
My boanes fhall fho'rtly mingle with the duft. 

* V Here lies a peice of heav'n, and Chrift one day 
Will fend his angels to fatch it away. 
Heav'n hath his foul, the earth his corps doth hide, 
Yet fo that it fhall not flail heare abide : 
His foul fhall come with Chrift, and at Chrift's call, 
Earth fliall give up her fhare, and heav'n have all." - 



TCatWForum.] K e l w e s t o n. \i 7 

" Olim umbrofa fuit qucrcus gratiffima nymphis, 

1 raxinus hie cafa eft feci* et amata Deo. 
Concidit ante diem; fed genu inat in paradifo; 

Corporc dcfunlto, fama perennis crit." 

In 1 77 1 this parifh paid to the poor 223I. J«. 3d. and in 1780, 2.14k !')■•>■ >d. 



K E L W E S T O K 

[Anciently written KELVESTONJ 

IS a fmall parifli three miles and a half northweft from Bath, on the northern bank 
of the river Avon, and in the upper turnpike road from that city to Briflol, by 
way of Kingfwood. This road is as beautiful as can be imagined, being cut along 
a gently waving and dipping terrace. On the left is a rich vale, through which the 
Avon flows in a ferpentine direction, having on its fouthcrn banks the villages of 
Corfton, Newton, and Twiverton, with a fine lofty range of cultivated hills beyond 
them, which on that fide bound the profpecl:. On the right, the ftill loftier range 
of Lanfdown-hills rife with a fteep afcent immediately from the road. Under the 
laft mentioned hills rife feveral fprings, that uniting form a brook called Combes- 
brook; which, after eroding the parifli, empties itfelf into the Avon juft below. 
Another fpring rifes in that part of the parifli which borders on North-Stoke, and 
forms a fmall rivulet. 

In the caftern part of this parifli is a fine eminence called Henftridge-hill, and fome- 
times Kelfton Round-hill, which rifes to a vaft height above the bed of the river. The 
upper part of it has the appearance of a very large tumulus, and on its top is a 
plantation of firs, inclofed by a circular wall. This fpOt commands a profpeel very 
extenfive, and as finely varied with grand and pleafing fcencry as moll in the county. 
To the eaft it extends to Marlborough forcft ; to the fouth over Salisbury plain and 
into Dorfetfliire; to the weft, over all that part of the county north and eaft of 
Mendip-hills, the whole range of which bound the view: On the northweft lies the 
Briftol channel, the Holmes, and coaft of Wales, near fifty miles in length, with part 
of Monmouthfliire and the forcft of Dean. The cities of Bath and Briftol arc both 
in view, with the fertile vale between them, and the Avon gently winding through it. 

We have no account of this parifli in the Norman record; but we find that it was 
in very early times parcel of the pofieflions of the great abbey of Shaftefbury in 
Dorfetfliire, and, as fuch, was in 1 293 valued at 23!.* Mabel (by foiiie called 
Matilda) Clifford, abbefs of that monastery, procured a charter of free warren in all 
her'lands lure, 2; Edward I. b 

a Tax it. tempoia', b Cart. :i Y.hv. L 

The 



i 2 8 KELWESTON. [15atf)-'jrorum, 

The abbefs received a yearly penfion of thirty marks from this manor/ After the 
diilblution of religious houfes, king Henry VIII. in the thirty-eighth year of his reign, 
granted this manor, with thofe of Bath-Eafton and Katherine, and the capital mef- 
fuage called Kathcrinc's-court, to John Make and Ethcldred Make, alias Dyngley, the 
king's natural daughter, begotten upon the body of Joanna Dyngley, alias Dobfon. 
Which Etheldred was committed to the care of the faid Make, who was the king's 
taylor, for education : and the king, having fpecial love and regard for her, granted 
thefe eftates for her ufe and benefit; but the always palled for Make's natural daugh- 
ter. She was fhortly after married to John Harington, efq; a confidential fervant 
of the king, who thus obtained the feveral eftates above-mentioned. The faid John 
Harington was progenitor of a very refpectable family, of whom were feveral per- 
fons of learning and erudition; particularly his fon fir John Harington, knight, the 
celebrated tranfiator of Ariofto's Orlando Furiofo, who lived in the reign of queen 
Elizabeth. The chief refidence of the family was at Kelwefton, and the manor 
eontinued in their pofieffion till fold of late years to Caefar Hawkins, efq; created 
a baronet of Great-Britain July 25, 1776; whofc grandfon fir Casfar Hawkins, 
baronet, is the prcfent pofleflbr. 

This family affirmed their furname from having been the ancient barons of Have- 
rington in Cumberland. Sir James and fir Robert, defcendants of this houfe, were 
deprived of twenty-five large manors, for engaging in the York intereft during the civil 
wars between the houfes of York and Lancajler. John Harington, the confidential 
fervant to Hen. VIII. above-mentioned, was the firft who fettled at Kelwefton, about 
1546, and from whom the Somerfetfhire line is derived. Another branch was pof- 
feffed of very confiderable eftates in Rutland and Lincolnfhire; from which were 
defcended James Harington, author of the celebrated work Oceana, and his anceftor 
John Lord Harington, of Exton, preceptor to the princefs Elizabeth, afterwards 
queen of Bohemia, daughter to James the firft. The prefent fir James Harington, 
baronet, is of the Rutland line alfo. The old houfe at Kelwefton, built by John, 
and finifhed by his fon fir John, was conftructed as a proper reception for queen 
Elizabeth during a fummer's excurfion, who here vifited her godfon in her way to 
Oxford 1591 . d 

The old manor-houfe flood near the church, and was erected in 1587 by Sir John 
Harington, after a plan of that celebrated architect James Barozzi, of Vignola. 
This houfe fir Caefar Hawkins pulled down, and about twenty years fince erected an 
elegant manfion fouthward of it, on an eminence commanding a moll beautiful 
varied profpect of the furrounding country, the Avon, and the city of Bath. From 
the point of the hill on which the houfe ftands, a fine lawn, interfperfed with fingle 
trees, extends to the river, which here forms a fine curve through one of the richeft 
vales in the world, and is then loft to the eye under the hanging woods, which veft 
the declivity of the hill to the fouth and weft. 

* Dr. Archer's Account of Religious Houfes, Hemingford's Chron. p. 637. 

11 See Dugdale's Baronetage; Wright's Rutland/hire, &c. 

The 






TBAtMottim.] KELWESTON. 129 

The living is a rcclory in the deanery of Bath. The lord of the manor is patron, 
and the rev. Mr. Green incumbent. In the taxation of 1292 it was rated at fourteen 
marks, out of which a pennon of twenty (hillings was paid to the cook and almoner 
of Shaftcibury abbey. 1 At the diflblution it was valued at 20I. per annum.* 

The church is dedicated to St. Nicholas. It (lands at the weftern extremity of the 
village, and is a fmall low ftrudhirc, feventy feet long, and nineteen wide, confining 
of a nave leaded, and a chancel, and two porches tiled. The entrance into the fouth 
porch is walled up, and now fcrves for a veftry-room. At the weft end is a fquare 
tower, forty feet high, containing four bells. 

Over the communion table is a fmall mural monument of black and white marble, 
with this infeription : 

" Here lyeth the body of the lady Diones Harington, late wife of John Harington, 
cfq; and daughter of the right honourable James earl of Marlborough, who died the 
8th of Auguft, annoq; Dom. 1674." Arms: Sable, a fret argent, Harington, impaling, 
argent, a chevron between three bears heads coupcd.y^-Zr, for Ley carl of Marlborough. 

Near the above arc two fmall monuments of (tone, on the firft of which is inferibed, 

" Here lyeth the body of John Harington, fon of John Harington, efq; and Mary 
his wife, daughter and coheire of Peter Specot, of Thornbury in Devon, efq; who 
dyed the 20 ,tl day of February, 1674." 

Arms: Quarterly, firft and fourth Harington, fecond and third, or, on a bend, 
gules, three fer-de-moulins pierced, argent, Specot. 

On the fecond : 

" Hie jacet Maria uxor Johannis Harington, armigeri, filia Petri Specot de Thorn- 
bury, in comitat. Devon, armigeri, qua? obiit 24 Aug. Ao. Domini 1660." Arms 
as above. 

On the floor, within the communion rails, are the following memorials of the 
Harington family: 

" In memory of fir John Harington, knight, 161 2. 

"John, efq; 1654. John, cfq; 1700. Henry, cfq; 1769. In line defcendant 
from Johannes baron dc Haverington in Cumberland, created firft lord of that houfc 
1324, by king Edward II. f 

" Alfo Mary, wife of Henry, and daughter of Richard Backwcll, cfq; 1731. 

" Lady Mary, wife of fir John, daughter of fir George Rogers, 1634. 

" Helena, wife of John, efq; daughter of Benjamin Goftlct, efq; 171 8. 

" Goftlet, cfq; fon of John, cfq; 1706." 

Near the above : 

" Hie jacet Gcorgius Harington, gencrofus filius tertius natu Johannis Harington 
militis, qui obiit 7 die Deccmbris, anno Domini 1665." 

d Taxat. fpiritua!. e MS. Survey. 

' Johannes dominus de Haverington, created knight of the B.idi by Edw. I. 13:4- 

Vol. I S O.i 



-i?o K E L w e s T o n. tuatb'tfonmi. 

, On the north fide ot the chancel is a fmall plain mural monument of white marble, 
inicribed: 

" In memory of Robert Kenning, M. A. fomctinie vicar of Marfhfield in the count) 
" of Glocelter, and xxvii years rector of this church, who, among other charities, 
" gave one hundred and twenty pounds to the poor of this parifh, and of Marfhfield 
xt aforefaid; and was buried in this chancel the xvi* day of Auguft moccix, in the 
" Lxv th year of his age/' 

At the weft end of the chancel is a fmall mural monument of ftone, with this 
infeription : 

" Infra oonduntur exuviae Griffini Smith hujus ecclefise non ita olim paftoris vere 
digni, qui obiit junii 27, 1681. Coloff. iiL 3. Vita veftra eft abfeondita cum 
Chrifto in Deo." • 

On a black marble againft the fouth wall : 

" Neere to this place lieth the bodyc of Mary Smith, the deare daughter and onely 
child of Griffin Smith, minifter, and of Marie his wife, who dyed May the fift, 1678. 
Her motto; Set your affections on things above, not on things on the earth. Col. iii. 2." 

On an oval ftone againft the fouth wall of the nave: 
" Hie deponuntur exuviae Dom. Johannis Fenn hujus parochiae qui morti obiit 
vigelimo octavo Jan. anno Dom. 169^1 zetatis fuse 59." 

Over the north door are two marble monuments, with the following inferiptions: 

" Near this place lieth the body of Lawfon Hudlefton, archdeacon of Bath, canon 
of the cathedral church of Wells, and recTor of this parifh; defcended from the 
ancient family of Hudlefton in Cumberland, who died April 19, 1743, aged 66. 

" Alfo that of Helena his wife, daughter of John Harington, cfq; of Kelfton, who 
died December 16, 1748, aged 67. Hie et in ccelo quies. Here and in heaven is reft. 

" Neare this place lieth the body of John Hudlefton, eldeft fon of Lawfon and 
Helena Hudlefton, who died 5"' January 1749, aged 34 years." 

On a ftone on the floor: 
" Here lies the body of Anne Thomas, widow of Col. William Thomas, late of the 
ifland of Antigua, who departed this life the 30'" day of December, 1741, aged 58." 

On a white marble : 
" Here lieth the body of Mrs. Alicia Jones, who died December 24, 1777, aged 
44 years. She was daughter of Charles Valence Jones, efq; and Mary his wife; and 
niece to the late right honourable Philip Yorke, earl of Hardwicke, lord high chan- 
cellor of Great-Britain. Mrs. Elizabeth Jones inferibes this to the memory of an 
affedtionate fifter, a fincere friend, and pious chriftian." 

In the north porch ic a fmall ftone monument thus inferibed : 
u Near this place lieth the body of Alice the wife of Thomas Feckenhnm, of 
Marfhfield in the county of Gloucefter, daughter of John Harington, efq; of this 
parifh, who departed this life the 2 d day of May, 1742, aged 71 years." 

Part 






T6at&--JForum.j 



K E L W E S T O N. 



»3' 



Robert -\ ( 1 1^>S 

SufannaC Harington ^1765 
John ) (1736 



John } f J 7*S 

Dorothy > Harington J1726 
Ifabclla ) C l 7S5 



l " 0757 

• Harington-? 176?. 

1 (1752 



Part of the church-yard is railed off for a vaulc of the Harington family, where, 
on grave ftones, arc the following names: 

Edward ] 
Hcftcr j 
Colthrop, 

At the noi thweft corner of the church-yard is a fine yew tree. 

John Harington, efq; gave the fum of 3I. annually for the fchooling of poor 
children of this parifh, and charged the eftate and lands with the payment of the 
fame for ever. 

Lawfon Hudlefton, archdeacon of Bath, gave twenty millings per annum to be 
diftributcd to the poor in bread on Chriftmas-eve, and charged the fame for ever on 
an eftate at Wefton town, near Marfhfield. 

Robert Kenning, M. A. left by will the Intereft of one hundred pounds for ever, 
for binding one poor boy apprentice every fifth year: the intereft of the faid money, 
during the four years that ruuft ncceflarily elapfe between every fifth, to apprentice 
one boy in each year, belonging to the parifh of Marfhfiold. 

Mrs. Hcftcr Harington gave 500I. by will, the intereft to be diftributcd in bi 
and coal to the poor. 

This parifh paid to the poor in 1 771, 14I. 13^ 7d.; in 1780, 53I. 6s. 6d. 



*m 



L A N G R I D O K. 

THIS is a fmall parifh, confining of twelve houfes, fituated three mile.- north 
from the city of Bath, on the eaftern declivity of Lanfdown-hill, with a rich 
and beautiful vale below it. Dr. Stulcely, in his itinerary, fcems to apprehend that 
its name is derived from the Roman road, which partes wefhvard of it towards the 
Trajeftus; but others may think it more probable that it was denominated from the 
long ridge of hill whereon it is fituated. Be this as it may, the old Norman furvcy 
writes it Lancberis, and defcribes it as tl>e property of the bilhop of Coutancc, who 
poueficd fo many manors in this county. 

" Azeline holds of the bifhop Lancheris. Ai\f\ held it in the time of king Edw. 
" and gelded for two bides and a half. The arable is five carucates. In demefne 
" are three carucates, and three fervams, and five villains, and fcven cm, with 

" two ploughs. There is a mill of foity pence .rent, and four acres and a half 0*' 
*' meadow, and one hundred and thirty acres of pafturc. It was worth forty fhil- 
** lings, now fixty (hillings."- 1 

1 Lib. Domefdsy. 

S 2 7 Eow. 



flja LANGRIDGE. [TBat&--JFoium, 

7 EJw. 11. Adam lc Walifli is found by the inquifitions to hold the manor of 
Langridge, with the advowfon of the church, by the fcrvice of half a knight's fee; 
and after him Robert le Walifli, or Walfhe, held the fame. b Their fucceflbrs con- 
tinued polfeffed of it for feveral reigns, and, as they nude it the chief place of their 
refidence, many of them were buried in the parifh church.' From them the manor 
pafied in procefs of time to the Walronds, who likewife refided and were buried 
here. This family held Langridge in their pofleffion for a long fcries of years, till 
in the beginning of the prefent century one of them fold it to William Blathwaite, efq; 
whofe grandfon, William Blathwaite, of Dirham in the county of Qocefter, efq; is 
the prefent poffeffor. His arms are, Or, two bends engrailed fable, impaling azure, 
a lion argent. 

The old manor-houfe, built by one of the Walfhes, ftands near the church ; but 
much of the original building feems to be gone : what remains conftitutes a good 
farm-houfe. On the fouth fide is a fquare tower, with very narrow lights, and a 
door eaftward ftopt up. This the inhabitants have a tradition was a prifon ; but 
in all probability, it was nothing more than a granaiy, or fome fuch repofitory. 
Near this tower, at the end of the dwelling-houfe, is a very old Gothick window. 

The living is a rectory in the deanery of Bath, in the gift of the lord of the 
manor, to which it has always been appendant. The rev. Mr. Blathwaite is the 
prefent incumbent. There are twenty-four acres of glebe land. In 1292 the church 
was valued at nine marks." 1 Six pounds per annum are paid out of it, as tithings 
for lands held under St. John's hofpital in the parifh of Walcot, to this parifh. 

The church is a fmall building, but very anefcht. It confifts of one pace twenty- 
eight feet long, and fifteen wide, and a chancel ; the entrance into which from the 
nave is through a fine zigzag arch, feven feet and a half wide, of Saxon architecture. 
The entrance into the church from the fouth porch is likewife Saxon. At the weft 
end is a fquare tower, in which are three very old bells, with Latin Monkifh inferip- 

tions. On the firft is, Cane Johannes 3ple. On the fecond, Etefono 90icljaeli 
JLauDem : and on the third, §>it noitien Domini beneoi&um. 

In the chancel floor, among other memorials partly defaced, are the following : 
On a brafs plate fixed in a large grey ftone: 

"$ic meet iRobtus COalOje, atmujfaui obiit ferto tie menfte 8@aij, 
anno Dm. miUimo, cccc°m>u, cunw animae propicietur Deus. amen." 

At the top of the ftone is the portraiture of the faid Robert Walfhe, with this fcroll, 

s^iferete mei Detw. 

On a ftone next to the above: 
" Here iyethe the bodie of Edward Walrond, of Langrige, efquier, who deccfed 
the eight day of Januarye, anno Domini, 1604." 

At the foot of the fame ftone reverfed : 
*« Here lyeth the body of Francis Walrond, fen. who departed this life the 2$ h of 
Auguft 1703, aged 35 years." 

» Inq. poft mortem. « See the inferiptions. <■ Taxat. fpiritual. Againft 



TSatfrjForum.] langridge. ijj 

Againft the north wall of the chancel is a monument of white nurWc, with thf 
following infeription.: 

" Near this place lieth the body of Mrs. Catherine, wife of Mr. Lawrence Walrond, 
fen. who departed this life the 3d day of January 171 ]. 

" Alfo the body of Richard, ion of Mr. Lawrence Walrond, by Sarah his wife, who 
departed this life the 20 ,h day of January 172], aged 18 years and a half." Arms: 
Barry of fix, or and azure, over all an eagle difplaycd guhs. Crcft, on a wreath a 
demi horfc naiant. 

On a long ftone tablet againfl the fouth wall: 

" Ncarc this ftone lyeth the body of Mr. Lawrence Walrond, who departed the 
24"' of March, and was buried the 27 th of March, in the year of our Lord 1679. 

" Alfo ncarq this ftone lyeth the body of Mrs. Mary Walrond, who was buried the 
6" 1 of September, in the year of our Lord 1:63$. 

" Alfo ncare this ftone lyeth the body of Edward, fon of Mr. Lawrence Walrond, 
Mho departed the 13* of May, and was buried the f6 ,h of May, in the ycare of our 
Lord 1679." 

Within the communion rails: 

" Here lyeth the body of Mr. Roger Turner, rector of this parifh, who departed 
this life November the 9th, 1727, aged £1 years." 

On a fmall brafs oval near the fame^ 

" Here lyeth the body of Mrs. Elizabeth Turner, the pious and virtuous fifter of 
Mr. Roger Turner, rector of this church, who departed this life the^ift day of July, 
A. D. 171 1, aetatis fuae 47." 

On a fmall ftone-, 

"HERE LYETH THE BODI OF PENELOPE POWE, 161 5." 

There is another ftone, almoft obliterated, to the memory of fome other of the 
Powe family. 

On the floor at the entrance into the chancel is the portraiture of a woman in brafs, 
with the following infeription at her feet : 

" foic iacct (ZEUsabett) CflaUc&e, que obijt xx° Eie mens aphtf 3nno Dni. 
mtccrrlt , quoDam uroc iRoberti OMlcbe, atmiger, qui jacct in cacella iQT 
ecclie quor afab's spitizt Dcus* amen." 

Under an arch in the north wall of the nave lies the effigy of a female, having her 
hands uplifted in a fupplicating pofture. There is no infeription, nor perhaps ever 
was ; but it is generally fuppofed to be the monument of one of the Walflie family, 
who are faid to have built the church, with which this muft be coarval. 

In the chancel window are two fmall circular pieces of glafs, with the initials 
1R. £2L for Robert Walflie. 

The expences of the poor of this parifli amounted in 1771 to ill. 10s. 4d.; in 
J 7 80, to 23L is. 9d. There is a poor-houfe; but it has no endowment. 

NORTH- 



[ i34 I [TBatfcJForuttu 



NORTH-STOKE 

STANDS four miles northweft from Bath, under the fouthweft brow of Lanfdown- 
hill, and is bounded on the north and weft by Gloucefterfhire. The parifh is 
but fmall, containing about twenty houfes, eight of which are in a hamlet on the 
Briftol road, called Swinford, where was antiently a chapel, now deftroyed; and the 
reft are near the church. 

The land is moftly pafture, and varies much in value, fome being very good, 
producing fine hay; the reft rough, fteep, and rocky. There arc five farms; the reft 
of the houfes are chiefly cottages. 

From an elevated point of land in this parifh, called North-Stoke brow, there is 
one of the moft exteniive, beautiful, and diversified profpects in this county. Hence 
the eye wanders with delight and aftonifhment over the cities of Bath and Briftol; a 
vaft range of cultivated country, thrown into the fineft inequalities of hills, vallies, 
and woods, and the Severn, with the majeftick range of Welch mountains beyond it. 
But as this view takes in moft of the objects already mentioned in the defcription 
of Kelwe'fton round-hill, it will be unnecelfary again to particularize them. 

On that part of Lanfdown which belongs to this parifh, is an intrenchment about 
one hundred and fifty yards in length, and eighty in breadth, thrown up by the par- 
liament army in the time of Charles I. juft before the memorable battle of Lanfdown, 
wherein fir Bevil Granville was ilain : of which we fhall fpeak under the artide of 
Wefton. The Roman road, branching from the Fofs at Walcot, traverfes this parifh. 

The manor of North-Stoke was given about the year Soo by Kenulf, king of Mercia, 
to the Benedictine monks of Bnth, inftituted by king Ofta fome few years before. 
They muft have enjoyed this territory at the time of the compilation of Domefday 
book, but we do not there find it ranked among the poffeffions of that monaflery ; nor 
is this, or the other Stoke in this hundred, diftinguifhable in the furvey. But there 
was a family of fome account that affumed their name from the place, as was the 
common ui'age in ancient times, who poiTbffed great property here, and even difputed 
the title Of the monks to this manor. In a court, held by John bifhop of Bath, A.D. 
1 1 2r, Modbert de Stoke appeared to afTcrt his right thereto, ailedging that he had 
married the daughter of Grenta de Stoke, who was lord of the manor by hereditary 
right, and had given him the faid manor in marriage with his daughter. But for 
want of fufficient evidence, and it bt ing proved that the monks held the faid manor 
of royal grant, Modbert was obliged to give up his claim, -and the religious were 
afterwards confirmed in their old pofieffion by king Henry I. and king Stephen." 
Their tcmporalites in this place were rated in 1293 at 55s.* After the fupprcfiiou 
of monaftcrks, the manor remained in the crown fome t'rmv-, but in 3 I -".d ward VI. 

a M-idox's HilK of the Exchequer, p 7$, '- Ta.xat. temporal. 

was 



MfrJrOWm.] NORTH-STOKE. 135 

was granted 10 William P.uilet, lor J Si. John, to be held of the king in chief by 
knights' fcrvice. 31 Eli/., lands in North-Stoke, late belonging to the ddlblvcd abbey 
of" Bath, were granted to Bageholte and Yard ley, to be held of the manor of Eaft 
Greenwich. John Hooper, of Bath, el'q; is the prefent lord hereof. 

The church is a re&ory, in the deanery of Bath. The patronage, which was 
formerly verted in the prior and convent of Bath, is now in the crown. The rev. 
Mr. Walker is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, which is dedicated to St. Martin, Hands on an eminence at the call: 
end of the village; and is a fmall low ftructurc, confirming of one pace, a chancel at 
the eaft: end, and a tower at the welt thirty feet in height, whereon is the date 1731. 
The chancel forms a diftinet room, being divided or rather lhut out from the body 
of the church by a wall, in which are two windows and a door. The whole is out 
of repair, and very dirtily kept. 

In this chancel, on grave ftones, are the following inferiptions: 

" Underneath lieth the body of the rev. George BcLl, fellow of Merton college, 
Oxford; who departed this life May 7' h , 1 771, aged 46 years." 

Within the communion rails: 
** Here lyeth the body of John Lee, rector, who departed this life December the 
16 th , 1676." 

Clofe to the above: 

" Here lyeth the body of Jane Lee, wife of John Lee, rector of this parilh, who 
departed this life December 27, 1678." 

In the nave arc fcvcral monuments to the memory of the families of Afli and 
Ward. 

In the belfry is an elegant mural monument of grey and white marble; in the body 
of which is a well-executed female figure of white marble, in Roman draper)', fitting 
under a palm tree fn a penfive attitude. Her right elbow rcfts on her knee, while 
her hand fupports her head. Her left arm refts on an urn, and fhe holds a palm 
branch in her left hand. Above this figure, at the two corners, are two handfome 
marble flaming urns; between which rifes anobtufe cone of grey marble, terminated 
by thefe arms: Gules, a chevron between three flcurs dc lis, or. 

On a white oval tablet is this infeription: 

" Here lie the remains of Colonel Edward Brown who departed this life September 
the 2o' h , 1772, aged 77. ( Bleiled are the dead which die in the Lord, faith the 
fpiritj they reft from their labours, and their works do follow them.' 

*' This monument is in moft affectionate and grateful duty creeled by Mary Rigby, 
his niece and fole executrix." 

In a -lozenge, at the foot of the monument, is this an; : Barry tit fix, <?>£.•;.•/, and 

'iztov, on a < the fecond, throe dnqotGoiis or. 

In 



136 SOUTH. STOKE. pBat&--jrorum. 

In the church-yard, is a tomb to the memory of Mrs. Mary Mundy, daughter of 
James Mundy, efq; ferjeant at law, who died June 8, 1782, aged 82. 

Here is like wife an old yew-tree. 

This parifli paid to the poor in 1771, 1 7I. 19s. 3d. and in 1780, 1 61. us. od. 

The annual number of chriftenings here is five, and of burials three. 



SOUTH-STOKE. 

THIS little parifh is very pleafantly fituated two miles fouthweft from the city of 
Bath, and contains thirty-five houfes, and about two hundred inhabitants. 
The church and mod of the houfes (land on the fouthern declivity of a hill, half a 
mile weft of the turnpike road to Warminfter. A few of the houfes Hand at the 
bottom of the hill in the road, and form a part of the hamlet of Midford ; through 
which a fmall ftream runs under a ftone bridge, dividing this parifli from Charter- 
houfe-Hinton. About midway, defcending the hill from Bath, in a very romantick 
lituation, ftands Midford-caftle, a modern edifice, built a few years ago by Henry 
Difney Roebuck, efq. The conftruction is Angular; being in a triangular form, with 
the angles rounded off, and embattled at the top. As it is erected on the flope 
of the hill, the terrace on the lower fide is raifed to a confiderable height, and fur- 
rounded with a handfome balluftrade of Bath ftone. On the north and eaft fides of 
this houfe, is a very deep narrow fequeftered glen ; the fteep rugged fides of which are 
cloathed with fine coppice woods, interfered with beautiful ferpentine walks, orna- 
mented with flowering fhrubs. On an abrupt part of the brow, which overlooks the 
hollow, at the bottom of which a brook (called Horfecombe brook) murmurs along 
a rocky channel, the proprietor has erected an elegant building called the Priory, with 
Gothick windows and a circular embattled tower, in which is a commodious tea room, 
and offices below. At a little diftance from this, under a thick mafs of fhade, ftands 
a ruftick hermitage on the brow of a fteep defcent. The whole furrounding fcenery 
is highly picturefque and romantick. 

From the brow of the hill above the church, the profpect is finely varied with in- 
clofures, woods, and projecting rocks; and to the foutheaft is very extenfive, being 
bounded by the high ridge of Salilbury plain. In the lower part of the parifh, are 
fome fine meadows; but the land on the flope of the hill, efpecially on the eaftern 
fide, is thin, cold, and rather unfruitful. 

The manor of South-Stoke was fold a few years ago by Lord Sandwich to Mr, 
Cooper of Salilbury; but no court is held. In an old leafe we find the following 
memorandum: " That the vicar of South-Stoke, for the time being, fhall have going 
" and pafturing freely with the farmers beafis there for thre beftcs ; whereof one fhall 

** be 



TSatMovum.] SOUTH- STOKE. 

** he a marc, a horfc, or a gelding; the fecond a kowc, and the third a bullock: 

«' which three (hall go and pafture in this manner; his mare, horfe, or gelding, with 

•' the farmer's mares ; his kowc with the farmer's kyne, and his bullock with the 

M farmer's bullock, in certain lefues and pallures ; that is to fay, in Brodc-Clofc, 

" Grove-Clofe, and Shephoufe-Medc, from time to time, as it hath been ufed and 

" accuftomed tyme owte of myndc."* 

The living is a vicarage in the deanery of Bath. It was formerly appropriated 
to the abbey of Bath. The rev. Mr. Wood is the incumbent, and hath the perpetuity 

of the living. The church, dedicated to St. James, is a fmall building, compofed 

of a nave leaded, chancel and porch tiled. The length from eaft to weft is fixty- 
two feet, the breadth eighteen feet. At the weft end is a quadrangular ftonc tower 
embattled, fifty feet high, with a turret and pinnacles. 

On the north fide of the chancel, is an elegant fmall mural monument of black 
and white marble, with this infeription: 

" Juxta hoc nurmor, fub fpe feliciter rcfurgendi, jacct Jacobus Hoffham Murifon, 
de Iford in comitatu Wiltonienfi, armiger; cui probitas ct benevolentia, urbanitas et 
eruditio, omnefque alia? virtutes, dotefque animi morumquc, qua: illuftrem reddunt 
\ hum, et fidei Chriftianae profellbrem, pari jure fummoque delcdbe. Memoriae cujus 
carse, hoc monumentum, Margareta uxor ejus nuper beatiflima, quacum conjunc- 
tiflime vixit annos prope quadraginta, nunc vidua moeftiflima, confecravit. Obijt 
12° die Aprilis, anno Domini 1776, aetat. fuae 62." Arms: Argent, three black- 
moors' heads fable: impaling, a pall of the fecond. Crcft: a blackmoor's head 
wreath, gules and argent. Motto, " Mors Janua vitae." 

To the right is another fmall plain mural monument of white marble, thus inferibed : 
" Near the belfry, under a ftone inferibed with her name, lie interred the remains 
of Mary Collins, relict of Thomas Collins, gent, of Camaine in the county of 
Glamorgan. Her nephew, the vicar of this church, in gratitude for her great bene- 
volence and love to him, and in juftice to her character, which was adorned with fuch 
rare and excellent qualities and virtues, as rendered her living beloved, refpected, and 
cfteemed; and dying, an ornament to our moft holy faith; has erected this monument 
a tribute to her memory. She died the i9' h of May 1773, a g e ^ 82." 

Within the altar rails is a neat mural monument of white marble thus inferibed: 
" In earneft expectation of a blefled immortality, here reft beneath all that was mortal 
of Betty Pettingal, wife of Hanbury Pettingal of Bath, who died 1 9* Feb. 1 7 84, aged 70." 

In the chancel floor: 
" Here lyeth John, fon of Richard Gay, of South-Stoke, gent, and Quirina his 
wife; who died the 12 th of October 1706, aged 66." 

The chriftenings in this parifh are, on an annual average, eight ; the burials, five. 
The cxpences of the poor amounted in 1770, to 64I. 3s. $d. in 1780, 10371. 3s. 6d. 

• Ihrl. MS. 39-0. 

Vol. I. T KATHERINE, 



[ 138 ] [TBat^jFotum. 



KATHERINE, or ST. KATHERINE's. 

THIS parifli is denominated from the patron faint, to which the church or chapel 
here, built by the abbots of Bath, was dedicated. 

It is fituated at the northeaft extremity of the hundred ; four miles from the city 
of Bath, and two north from the great road which runs through Bath-Eafton from 
that city to London. 

The fituation is truly beautiful. The village ftands on the declivity of a fteep hill, 
called Holt Down, facing the eaft, and covered with wood, difpofed in the moft 
pi&urefque manner. A fmall rivulet winds through the vale beneath, which is com- 
pofed of rich verdant meadows; and on its back rifes another hill of about equal 
height, fkirtcd with wood. The road hither from Bath-Eafton, which is almoft the 
only way to get to the village, is through dark lanes, overhung with trees and hedges, 
and in many places* very fteep and rocky. The precipitous height of Holt-Down 
on the right, and the profpect to the left of a rich varied country, ftretching to 
the Wiltfhire hills, and the wildnefs and filent gloominefs of the fcenery around, 
render this folitary track, which is little vifited by the traveller, pleafing and delight- 
ful;, nor need we wonder that the monks of Bath fhould feledt the fpot, for their 
retirement and devotions. They polTefled this manor from very early times, and had 
here a grange, gardens, and a vineyard. In a leafe, granted by the prior and con- 
vent to Thomas Lyewelyn, about 15 Henry VIII. it is fet forth, that the capital 
meffuage called Katherine's court, ftands near the church* " the court of the fame 
" betwene the Church-hey and the houfe, and coming in a entrey, and on the ryght 
" hand a hall, and behinde the hall a whitehoufe, (dairy) and on the fyde of that a 
" parlor and a butterye on thone fide; with a chimney bothe in the hall and in the 
" parlor; and betwene the faid whitehoufe and the parlor, a fteyres of fton going into 
" a chamber, celed over theparlar with a chimney in hit; and over the hall a wol loft; 
" over the entrye coming into the houfe a chamber, and by the entrye a vacant grounde, 
" and over and under chambers, and alfo a other hall called the lower hall, with a 
" vaute undernethe, and over a malt lofte, and adjoyning to the fame 2 chambers, 
" On above, and the other benethe; and at thende of the fame hall on other malt lofte, 
" with a myll called a quyver, and a place undernethe to wynow malt — all this under 
«.« on rofte."* 

After the diflblution of the abbey of Bath, this manor was granted by Henry the 
eighth to John Make, and Etheldred Make, alias Dyngley, who was afterwards married 
to John Harington, efq. 1 It was fubfequently alienated from this family to that of 
Blanchard, in whom it continued for many defcents, till Elizabeth, the daughter and 
fole heirefs of Henry and Quirina Blanchard, brought it by marriage to James 
Walters, efq; of Bath-Eafton; by whom fhe had ifiue one daughter, Quirina, the 

4 Ex Autog. b 8ee in Kelweflon, p. 128. 

wife 



TBfltWoium.] K A T H E R I N E. 

wife of Thomas Parry, cfq; the prefent lord of the manor, i le rcfidcth in the old 
manlion-houfe near the church. 

Tho living ftf Katherine is a vicarage, and U annexed to Bath-F.aumi, to which it 
was anciently a, chapel only. , 

The church confitts of one pace, chancel, and belf'rey. The nave is tvu-nty-l'cvon 
feet long, and fourteen wide: the chancel eighteen feet long, and thirteen wide. 
The belfry is about ten feet fquarc. The roof of the nave and chancel are arched 
and ceiled. At the weft end is a fquarc embattled tower containing four bells. 

Againft the north wall of the chancel, is a curious old monument of none, con- 
futing of a pediment and cornice, hipported by two pillars of grey marble; the 
capitals of which are in the Corinthian (tile, neatly executed and gilt. Upon the 
tomb are the figures of a man and woman, kneeling in a devout pofture; the man 
in half armour; the woman in the drefs of the times. Below are the figures of torn 
children, three daughters, and one fon, all kneeling, and the latter at a reading-lUind. 

On a tablet is the following memorial : 
" Heere lyeth the body of Captaine William Blanchard, who deceafed the 7th 
daic of April, anno Dni 1631. 

« Blanchard thou art not mkerf. compriz'd; 
Nor is thy worth characterize : 
Thy justice, charitie, vertve, grace, 
Doe nowe possesse a highere place: 
For unto Heaven (as we reade) 
- Good workes accompanie the deap." 
Arms: Gules, a chevron or, in chief two bezants, in baft* a griffin's head, erafed, 
of the fecond, Blanchard, impaling, or, on a crofs fable five lions rampant of the firir. 
On an old thick raifed tomb, within the chancel rails, but which formerly ftood 
elfewhere, are the following memorials, partly old, and partly recent : 

" Here lyeth the body of captaine William Blanchard, the younger, who departed 
this life the 27 th day of October, anno Dni 1644. ... 

" William Blanchard, fon of captaine William Blanchard, died Nov. the 7th, 1686. 
"Henry Blanchard, fon of William Blanchard, died December the 17th, 1730, 

aged 64. 

« William Blanchard, fon of Henry Blanchard, died .Aug, : thc 8th, 1747, aged 52. 
" Elizabeth Blanchard, buried December the 26th, 1748*- • \ • 

" Quirina Blanchard, died the 7th of Auguft 1759, aged -90 years." 

On a mural monument of black marble, in the eaft angle of the chancel : 
<< William Blanchard, efq ; fon of captaine William Blanchard, died November 7th, 
anno Dom. 1686, and was buried in his father's grave. 

" Prifca fides Angli: generofa et ncfeia fraudis 
"Mens, vivum ornabant; lint mon n.cnta tibi." 



H° K A T H E R I N E. [TBatMotUltt. 

Arms: Blanchard, impaling a bend betwixt fix mullets. 

On a grave ftone in the chancel floor: 
" Here Iyeth the body of Sufanna the wife of Samuel Webb, of Box in the county 
of Wilts, gent, and daughter of William Blanchard, efq. She departed this life the 
20th day of Auguft, in the yeare of our Lord 1689, and in the 28thyeere of her age." 

Arms: A crofs quarterly, in the chief dexter quarter an eagle difplayed, impaling 
Blanchard. 

In the chancel floor without the rails : 

" Here lyeth the body of Mrs. Florance Blanchard, daughter of Henry Blanchard, 
efq; who departed this life the 16th day of July 1723, aged 29 years. 

" Under part of this ftone lyeth the body of Francis Blanchard, who died in the 
yeare 1659." 

On another ftone hard by : 

M Here lyeth the body of Mrs. Sufanna Blanchard, (daughter of Henry Blanchard, 
efq; and Quirina his wife) who departed this life near the 10th of March 1725, 
«ged 25 years." 

On a mural ftone againft the fouth jamb of the chancel: 
" Near this place are interred the remains of Mary, wife of Thomas Parry, jun. 
gent, who died February 2d, 1773. 

" Alio of Thomas their fon, who died in his infancy. 

" Alfo the above-named Thomas Parry, died 4th of January 1778, aged 40." 

On the floor underneath : 

" Mary Parry, 1773. 
" Thomas Parry, 1778." 
" E. W. H. W. died June 1722." 
" Mary Parry, died 10th March 1785, aged 32. Quirina Parry, died 3d May 
1785, aged 67." 

In the nave are four infcriptions to the memory of the family of Dyer, and one in 
the porch. 

There are four windows in the chancel ; in each of which, as well as in one of the 
nave fouthward, are the remains of well painted glafs. In the eaft window of the 
chancel we are furniftied with the name and founder thereof, and the date of its 

eredion, as follows: Diii 3obi0 Cantloto, quontja prions — $anc Caceiia 

fieri fecit 3° IDni mCCCCtarir. Beneath are the arms of the abbey, viz. a St. 
Peter's key crofled with a fword. In another compartment is the mitre for the abbey. 
In the fmaller lights are rofes, and the fun in full force, many times repeated in this 
as well as in all the other windows; in each of which is an eagle holding in his beak 
a fcroll infcribed with ^>ti0t CatltlOtD. On the north fide of the chancel is a bene- 
toire or receptacle for holy water. 

The 



u?ati) jrorumj charlcombe. i 4 i 

The font is old, large, and lined with lead; being one of thofe formerly ufed for 
total immcrfion. Its uppcrmoft edge is adorned with intcrcircular ornaments. The 
pulpit, which is ftuck againft the north wall of the nave, is of wood, very old, and 
formed in Gothick niches, which are painted, or rather retain the colours with which 
they were once painted, of red and yellow. 

In the church-yard is an altar tomb, whereon is a tablet of white marble charged 
with the following infeription: 

" Near this tomb lyeth the body of John Feckenham, of the parifh of Marfhfield, 
fonof the rev. Thomas Feckenham, and Alice his wife, daughter of John Harington, 
of Kelfton, efq; who died November 3d, 1743, aged 42." 

Arms: Sabk\ a fret argent, Harington; impaling a coat effaced. 

This parifh paid to the poor in 1771, 12I. 4s. 7d.; in 1780, 26I. is. 8d. It 
contains only fifteen houfes. 



CHARLCOMBE 

TS a fmall parifh one mile and a half northeaft: from the city of Bath; containing 
•"*■ only nine houfes, and about fifty inhabitants. 

Its fituation, which is cxprcfTed by its ancient name Leonlcumb, is on a rifing 
ground, in a deep retired valley, under the high eaftern ridge of Lanfdown. The 
views round this rural fpot arc confined, but very pleafing; it being almoft furrounded 
with hills, which rife nobly on every fide, and are fringed with fine hanging woods 
and coppices on their acclivities: a little ftream, rifing on Lanfdown, winds through 
the bottom of the vale, and falls into the Avon at Lambridge. 

The whole village belonged fome time before the Conqucft to the abbey of Bath, 
and was held of that monaftery in the time of king Edward the confefTor, by a thane 
or Saxon noble, whofe name is not tranfmitted to us. In the reign of William the 
conqueror William Hofctt, or Hofatus, held the manor of the faid abbey; in which 
reign we have the following authentick account of the particulars of this place: 

" William holds of the church Cerlecume. A thane held it in the time of king 
" Edward of the church, and gelded for four hides. The arable is four carucates. 
*' In demefne are two carucates, and three fervants, and five villancs, and four eotta- 
" gers, with two ploughs. There are five acres of meadow, and ten acres of coppice 
" wood. It was worth fifty fhillings: now fix pounds." 1 

There is extant a curious agreement betwixt this William, and the convent, written 
in the Saxon language, which for the fingularity thereof is here tranfiatcd. 

• Lib. Domefday. " In 



H2 charlcombe. [i5atl>jrormm 

" In this writing is declared the agreement which William Hofett hath made with 
" Wlfwold the abbot, and /Elffig the abbot, and the whole convent of Bath, con- 
" cerning the land of Ccorlcumb: that is to fay, they have delivered into his hands 
" that faid land, with ten oxen, and fixty fheep, and one acre for fovving, upon con- 
" dition that he pay the monaftery every year two pounds rent, and that he go to the 
" king's bank, and pay tallage to the king. This is done upon condition that he be 
" faithful and obedient to each abbot, and to all the brethren, in all things; and if 
'« he fhall violate the truft which he hath pledged to them, he fhall forfeit the afore- 
" faid land, and be curled by (Thrift, and Saint Mary, and Saint Peter; to whom this 
" monaftery is dedicated. " b 

To this William Hofett fucceeded another William, and to him Walter Hofett, 
who is a fubferibing witnefs to the charter of John de Villula; wherein he appoints 
the epifcopal fee to be removed to Bath. c After him we find Walkeline Hofatus, 
who was fucceeded by a third William, who in the time of Henry II. held this manor 
of Charlcombe. After this nothing more of this name and family occurs as being 
concerned with this place. They feem to have branched fouthward, and to have -laid 
the foundation of a family ftillflourilhing, of the name of Huffey, under which name 
we yet find divers poileffions in the county we are defcribing. 

23 Henry VI. it was found by inquifition, that Robert Greyndor, efq; died feized of 
the manor of Charlcombe, and the advowfon of the church, which he held in right 
of Joan his wife, of the bifhop of Bath and Wells. The faid Joan, who is (tiled 
lady Joan Greyndor, fometimes written Greindour, furvived her hufband, and bore 
On her feal a chevron between ten crofs crofslets, impaling Button, a fefs ermine. 
Elizabeth, the wife of Reginald Weft lord de la Warre, is certified to be the heir 
of the faid Robert Greyndor. d 2 Ric. III. Joan Barry, widow, was lady of this 
manor ; c after whom we find it in other families, all tenants under the abbots of Bath, 
who were lords paramount of it till the diffolution of their monaftery; foon after which 
we find it in the pofleflion of the family of Bedingfield, from whom it came to the 
Sherftons, who conveyed it to William Parkins, efq. The faid William Parkins left 
it by his will to his niece Elizabeth Parkins, of Ravenfield in the county of York, 
who devifed it to her kinfman Matthew Worgan, efq; the prefent poflefibr. 

The benefice is rectorial, in the deanery of Bath; and was in 1292 valued at fix 
marks and a half/ Its patronage, which was formerly vefted in the lords of the 
manor, was of late years conveyed to the corporation of Bath, by the patron the 
rev. Walter Robins, to be annexed to the mafterfhip of the 'free grammar-fchool 
in Bath for ever. The rev. Nathaniel Morgan is the prefent incumbent. The 
parfonage-houfe is a very neat building, delightfully fituated near the church: it 
commands a moft pleafing profpect towards the fouth, and is adorned with an 
elegant little garden. 

k Madox's Formul. Anglic, p. 73. e Dugd. Mon. Angl. v. i. p. 186. 

* Inq. poll ciortem. « Ibid. f Taxat. fpirkual. 

The 



IBat&.-JTOtum.] C II A R L C O M B E. 143 

The church, dedicated to St. Mary, is a fmall, but curious ancient fabrick, con- 
fifting of a nave and chancel, fifty feet long, and eighteen feet wide. The common 
tradition is, that it was the mother church to Bath, and that the abbey ufed to pay it 
annually a pound of pepper by way of acknowledgment. On its weftcrn extremity 
is a fquarc embattled turret of a fingular conftru&ion, its weftcrn fide projecting from 
the plane, and fupportcd on the main wall by three clumfy corbels. In this turret 
arc receptacles for two bells, and two bells it formerly had ; but one of them being 
broken, was, not many years ago, conveyed away in the night time by thieves. Their 
burden, however, proving (as it is fuppofed) too heavy for them, they were fain to 
leave it in an adjacent field, where it was afterwards found, and fold to be melted 
down. On this bell, which was very old, was the following infeription: ^QHCtC 
PCttC Ota PCD nobis. The bell that remains fecms to be of equal antiquity; and is 
thus inferibed: ^anfta S^atia OW pro nODitf. It is obfervable, that both thefe 
bells were dedicated to the original tutelary faints of the abbey of Bath. 

The church windows have had much painted glafs, of which little now remain?, 
except two fmall fragments in a window of the chancel; one of which is the figure 
of a man, with this fcroll; $tt)C 6©atta ®t-; that is, $raciae plena: the other is 
the face of a female very delicately exprefTcd. The pulpit is curious, and without 
doubt as old as the church itfelf; it was formerly afcended through a door in the fouth 
wall by ftonc fteps, which door ftill remains, though now blocked up by the feats; the 
prefent entrance is from the middle of the nave. It is conftructed entirely of ftonc, 
of a circular lhapc, nine feet in circumference within, and one foot thick all round. 

Great encroachments fecm to have been made on the church-yard, which, in its 
prefent ftate, is perhaps one of the fmalleft in the kingdom. At the northcaft angle 
without the wall there fecm to be the foundations of fome ancient building, which 
it is not improbable might have been once appropriated to the refidence of the pricft, 
which fort of houfes were in ancient times ufually built within the inclofure of the 
cemetery. At the fouthweft corner is a fine yew-tree. 

On the fouth wall of the chancel is a ftonc monument u ith the following infeription : 

" H. S. E. 
" Samuel Batt, filius natu minimus Michaelis et Annae Batt, de Monkton Devcril 
in agro Wilton, ecclefiae Anglicanae prefbyter, A. M. e coll. Regin. Cantab, qui ubi 
in hac et vicina parochia de Swaynfwick Johannis Taylor rectoris vices per triennium 
impleverat, animam Deo placide reddidit Sept. calend. fextilis, anno Domini 1701, 
aetatis 30. Frater mocftiflimus Michael Batt." 

Above the foregoing, on a neat marble monument : 
" Here reft the remains of Mrs. Dorothy Barker, relic! of George Barker, e% of 
Chifwickin Middlefex. She died at Bath March 22, 1783, aged 80." 

On the north wall of t