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Full text of "The history and antiqutities of the county of Somerset"

'ti* 



THE 



HI S T OR Y 



O F 



• • 



SOMERSETSHIRE. 



BY THE 



REV. JOHN CO'LLINSON, F.A.S. 



IN THREE VOLUMES. 



VOL. III. 



T H E 

HISTORY 

AND 

ANTIQUITIES 

OF THE 

COUNTY 



O F 



SOMER 



H 



T, 



COLLECTED FROM 

AUTHENTICK RECORDS, 



AND AN 



ACTUAL SURVEY made by the late Mr. EDMUND RACK. 

ADORNED WITH 

A MAP OF THE COUNTY,*.- 

And Engravings of Roman and other Reliques, Town-Seals, Baths, 
Churches, and Gentlemen's Seats. 



BY THE 



REVEREND JOHN COLLINSON, F. A. S. 

Vicar of LoNG-AsHTON, Curate of Filton alias Whitchuech, in the County of Somerfet; 
and Vicar of Clanfield, in the County of Oxford. 

Exutcz variant Jacitm per feculd gentes. Manilius. ^ 



IN THREE VOLUMES. 
VOL. III. 



BATH : PRINTED BY R. CRUTTWELL ; 



AND SOLD Br 

C. DILLY, POULTRY; G. G. J. and J. ROBINSON, and T. LONGMAN, PATER-NOSTER.RO .V; 

and T. PAYNE, MEWS-GATE, LONDON; 
J. FLETCHER, OXFORD; and the BOOKSELLERS of BATH, BRISTOL, &c 



MDCCJCCI. 



H> 




THE HISTORY OF 



SOMERSETSHIRE. 



THE HUNDREDOF 



M A R T O C K. 



ft 



^HE Hundred of Maitbck, lying in the fouthern part of the county, conlilli 
^ of a fingle parifli of its name, which is derived from Mart, an abbre- 
viation of Market, and T^c, the Saxon word for an oak, which laft 
comes from (JEgCke, a term ufed for that fpecies of tree by the Belga, thj 
ancient inhabitants of thefe parts. The meaning of this derivation is fuppofed to be^ 
that in former times, in the town of Martock, on the fpot where the market-hall now 
ftands, a mart was held for goods brought from Muchelney and other places, under a 
remarkable old oak, which being decayed about two centuries ago, the inhabitants had 
it in contemplation to plant another in its ftead, in order to commemorate this ruftick 
habitude of traffick. 

Nor without reafon:— Our Belgick anceftors held the oak in the utmoft veneration; 
not only their publick bufinefs was tranfafted, and their feminaries trained, under its 
fhadowsi' but their priefts the Druids were denominated from it," and celebrated 
their orgies under its folemn bowers ; their mifleltoe, pofleffing fuch egregious virtues, 
was produced from it; and its branches furnifhed fuel for their facrifices. 



Vol. III. 



Sec the Maxims of the Druids in'OoUut, Rapin, and other writers. 
" ©crto'tii)), a Society of Men celebrating the Oak. 

B 



It 



2 ^ M A R T O C K. , mmoch 

It merits obfervation, that there i^ithin the limits of this hundred a hamlet of the 
name of HurJ}, which itfelf fignifies a wood, or grove; but which was anciently termed 
ylchelai, or the place of oaks, a circumflance additionally evincing the quantity of that 
kind of wood with which this country pnce abounded. Nor is it to'be doubted, but 
that in this fpot, furrounded by venerable oaks, thofe horrid yet folemn rites were- 
anciently praftifed, which, though the rudeft reprefentation of divine obfervance, could 
draw together the wifeft devotees from the moft diftant regions. 

With regard to the more modern hiftory of this diftridl, there is but little memor- 
able. It formerly belonged to the crown of England, till pafTed by grant to the lords 
of its principal manor, Martock. 



M A R T O C K 

IS a large pleafant market-town, fituated in the centre of, and about feven or eight 
miles diftant from the towns of Somerton, Crewkerne, Yeovil, and Langport. The 
market is held twice a week, on Wednefday and Saturday; provifions of all forts are 
plentiful, and the town- fupplied with every convenience. At the jun£tion of three 
turnpike-roads near the middle of the town is a neat market-houfe eredted by Mr. 
Blade, lord of the manor, with an affembly-room over it, and underneath are the 
butchers' fhambles. Near this market-houfe ftands a handfome fluted column, with a 
^ial, being a model of the famous pillar of Trajan, now in the court at Wilton-houfe, 
iJie feat of the Earl of Pembroke. 

The parifh of Martock is very extenfive, and is divided into nine tithings, viz. 

I. Martock, containing the church, and 102 houfes. 
a. Hurst, fituated fouth, 54 houfes. 

3. Bower-Henton, fouth, 40 houfes. 

4. Milton, eaft, 22 houfes. 

5. WiTcoMBE, foutheaft, 13 houfes. 

6. Ash, foutheaft, 34 houfes. 

7. Coat, northweft, 44 houfes. 

8. Stapleton, north, 22 houfes. 

9. Load, or Long-Load, north, 46 houfes and a chapel. 

There is alfo a fmall place near Buckland St. Mary, confifting of three farms, which 
belongs to the hundred of Martock, and to the tithing of Coat, in which thefe eftates 
are charged to the land-tax, and the occupiers are liable to be fummoned upon juries 

here. 



fij^artocfe.] MARTOCK. 3 

here. Thefe lands pay tithes to the vicar of Martock, and tithing weight to the lord 
of this manor; but pay all parochial rates at Buckland St. Mary. It is likewife 
obfervable, that part of the tithings of Hurft and Bower-Henton is called to this day 
Ncwtoriy which probably might have been in former times a diftinft tithing, but is now 
blended with the others. 

The whole number of houfes in this parilh is three hundred and eighty, and of inha- 
bitants nearly two thoufand. 

The fituation is not fo pleafant as that of many other parifhes, being low, flat, and 
woody, except towards the foutli. The foil is heavy, and principally clay. The lands 
are about half arable j the crops chiefly wheat, beans, and flax. The wood is chiefly 
oak and elm; of the latter great abundance. There are fome curious polypodies and 
mofl"es; but few plants that merit attention. The river Parret runs along the fouth- 
weft fide of the parilh, dividing it from South-Petherton and Kingfljury; and the Yeo 
waflies the north fide of it, and empties itfelf into the Parret a few miles below; whence 
they conjointly diredl their waters towards Bridgwater and the Briftol Channel. Both 
rivers contain eels, pike, roach, dace, and gudgeons j and in the Parret are fine trout. 
A large royalty on both belongs to the lord of the manor of Martock. The county 
bridge, called Petherton-Bridge, croflfes the Parret on the Weft, whence there is a turn- 
pike-road throughout the parifh to Load-bridge, which crofl"es the river Yeo on the 
north; thefe bridges being five miles diftant. There is alio another county bridge over 
the Parret, called Galbridge, which divides the hundreds of Martock and Kingfliury. 
Being thus inclofed by thefe two rivers, and contiguous to the demefnes of the famous 
monaftery of Muchelney, this territory was fometimes called in old records Mertok in 
the ijland of Muchelney, and Mertok inter aquas; by which laft it is diftinguiflied in a 
charter of John de Fieules, lord of this manor in the time of Edw. II. 

Martock was one of thofe large manors which were pofl^eflfed by Edith, die Queen 
of Edward the ConfelTor. She was daughter of Goodwin, duke of the Weft-Saxons 
and earl of Kent. Her mother was Githa, the fifter of Sweyn the younger. King of 
Denmark. She died in 1074, and was buried near her huftsand in Weftminfter- abbey. 
Sorrie years before her death, the intrufion of William the Conqueror had ftript her and 
her brother Harold of their pofleflions, and this manor remained in King William's 
hands when the general furvey was compiled; the following account of this parifti and 
its appendages is therein given : 

" The King holds Mertoch. There are thirty-eight hides. In the time of King 
" Edward it gelded for thirteen hides. The arable is forty carucates. Thereof in 
" demefne are eight hides, and there are three carucates, and fix fervants, and fourteen 
" coliberts, and fixty-five villanes, and twenty-three cottagers, with twenty-eight 
" ploughs. There are two mills of thirty- five ftiillings rent, and fifty acres of meadow. 
" Pafture one mile long, and as much broad. Wood one mile long, and two furlongs 
" broad, A fiftiery pays five fliillings. It yields feventy pounds by tale, and one 
" hundred fhillings more, if Bifhop Walchel would give in his verdid. 

" To this manor are added three hides. Thefe were held by three thanes in the 
" time of King Edward They pay to Mertoch four pounds and^ ten ftiillings. 

B a " From 



4 M A R T o c K. [a^attocfe* 

« From this manor is taken one hide, and one virgate of land in Contone. Anfger 
« [the king's cook] holds it. The arable is two carucates. Four homagers have there 
" one plough. It was worth fifty fliillings, now thirty fhillings. 

" From the faid manor is taken away a hide and a tialf. Aluric holds it, and it is 
" worth forty fhilhngs."" 

Shortly after. King William the Conqueror gave this manor, which comprized moft 
of the lands in Martock, Coat, Henton, Hurft, and Newton, and part of Stapleton* 
Witcomb, and Alh, to Euftace earl of Bulloigne in Picardy, annexing it to the honour 
of Bulioigne, to be held by the faid Euftace and his fucceffors in the male line for 
ever." Which Euftace married Goda, fifter by the father's fide to Edward the 
Confefibr, and by her was father of Godfrey de Bulloigne, a famous champion in the 
wars of Paleftine. To him fucceeded William earl of Bulloigne, who gave this 
manor in fee to his fon Faramufius de Bulloigne,' whofe fole heirefs Sibilla, fometimes 
furnamed de fyngrie, was married to Ingelram de Fieules, whof? pofterity wrote them- 
felves Fienes, and were progenitors of the Fienes Barons Dacre, and Barons Say 
and Sele. 

* This Ingelram de Fieules had iflue William de Fieules his fon and heir, who, in the 
8th year of King John, obtained the king's mandate to the ftieriff of this county, to 
make livery to him of this manor, to which his mother Sibill had quitted claim in open 
court." He died 25 Henry III. and was fucceeded by Ingelram his fon, who the fame 
year had livery of his lands. 

Which Ingelram de Fieules, the fecond of thit name, was a knight, and bore a great 
Ihare in all th"^ troubles and complicated fcenes of confufion which obfcured the reign 
of Henry III. to whom he was immutably attached, and at the memorable battle of 
Eveftiam diftinguilhed himfelf in the royal caufe. He died about 5 1 Henry III. 

To him fucceeded another William de Fieules, who 54 Flenry III. preparing'fof 
his iourney to the Holy Land, conftituted William de Amnefe his attorney, to tranlafl: 
allbufinefs for him in his abfencci empowering at the fanpe time Reginald de Fieules 
his brother, to appoint any other attorney for him during the fpace of five years. 
10 Edw. I. he was with the King in Wales in the expedition againft Llewellyn; and 
22 of the fame reign, had fummons to equip himfelf with horfe and arms to attend the 
King at Portfmouth, preparatively to failing into Gafcoigne. He died 30 Edw. I. 
leaving John de Fieules his fon and heir. 

The faid John de Fieules, 13 Edw. II. paid ten pounds for his relief of this manor."^ 
He alfo was engaged in the French wars; and bore on his feal three hons rampant. 
He left iflue a fon of his own name, who with his wife Ifabella are found to be poflefied 
of this manor 5 Edw. III. then holding it of the King in chief by knight's fervice.^ 
Shortly after which it was confifcated to the crown, and given by King Edw. III. in 
the 14th year of his reign to William de Montacute earl of Sarum," who died feized of 
the fame 18 Edw. III.' 
• Lib. Domefday. " Cart. Antiq. « Cart. 4; Hen. III. m. 3. per infpex. " Rot. Claus. 8 Joh. 

« Rot. Pip. 13 Edw. II. ' Seals from ancient Deeds. « Efc. " Cart. 14 Ed. III. m. 47. ' E^c. 

From 



Q&artocft.] M A R T O C K. . 5 

From which William de Montacute this manor defcended to another William,'' who 
gave the royalty of certain lands in Martock to Thomas Hobbes, clerk, and his heirs ;' 
and after him to Sir John de Montacute, who being attainted, the manor of Martock 
came again to the crown, and was granted to John Beaufort marquis of Dorfet, whofe 
defcendants fometime enjoyed the famej and after them it was pofi'efled by Henry 
Stafford duke of Buckingham, by whofe attainder in 1483 it again lapfed to the crown, 
and was retained there till the reign of King James I. who gave it in fee to Lord 
Morly Monteagle, as a reward for his difcovery of the gunpowder plot, in the year 
1605. Which faid Lord Morly fold the reverfion in fee of feveral large farms here to 
upwards of fixty of his tenants, and in the year 1637 fold the manor to William Strode, 
of Burrington, efq; in whofe family it continued till June 20, 1728, when, after a great 
number of other eftates being fold off, the remainder was difpofedof to Zachary Bayly, 
of Bowlin, efq; who difpofed of other lands to the amount of upwards of five thoufand 
pounds to fuch tenants as were inclined to purchafe; and, on the loth of April 1759, 
fold the remaining part of the manor to Meffrs. Henry and John Slade of Arti, of 
whom Henry the elder brother dying without iffue, it became folely vefted in George 
the eldeft fon of John Slade, who is the prefent poffeffor. 

The old manfion-houfe of the Fieules and Montacutes was moated round, and the 
walls embattled and crenellated. Its fcite occupies the (pace of two acres. Nothing^ 
remains thereof, faving a double-arched ftone bridge over the moat, which ferved as 
the principal entrance. In emptying the moat fome years ago there were found feveral 
cannon fhot, the offspring probably of Cromwell, or fome of his coadjiirors. 

A family denominated from the place held lands in Martock of its principal lords; 
of whom were Roger, Stephen, William, and Peter de Mertok, 7 Edw. II. Peter the 
fon of WilUam de Mertok, who was outlawed for felony, held two fhares of a meffuage, 
twenty-feven acres of arable land, fixteen acres of meadow, and eight fhillings and 
three-pence rent in Martock of John de Fieules j and the faid premifes were in the 
King's hand for a year and a day." 

We Ihall now defcend to the other ancient property contained within this parifli. 
The manor of Milton was held in the Conqueror's days by Walter de Dowai, as 
appears from the following record: 

" Richard holds of Walter, Middeltone. Elwacre held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for one hide and a half. The arable is two carucates. There 
" are three viilanes having one plough. It is and was worth twenty-five fhillings."" 

This manor was held of the lords of Martock by the family of Fauconbergh or Fal- 
conbridge, by the fervice of the fourth part of a knight's fee, and from them it acquired 
the name of Milton-Falconbridge. This family was originally from France, and came 

* Externa ibidem fafta menfe Septembris anno regni regis Edwardi tercii poft conqujeftum XLIII". per fa- 
cramentum tocius homagii jure coram Ricardo Home extenditore, quorum quilibet feparatim per fe reddkus ct 
fervicia fua recognovit, ac poilmodum omnes finiul conjundH et onerati dicebant, quod dominus Willehmw de 
Montcacuto, Comes Sarum, tenet manerium iftud de rege in capite, ficut patet in carta ipfius. 

' Pat. 18 Ric. y. p, I. m. 1. "■ Efc. • Lib. Domefday. 

thence 



6 * M A R T O C K. tS@attOC8. 

thence into this country foon after the Conqueft. The firft that appears upon record 
is Peter de Falkeberge, fon of Agnes de Arches, foundrefs of the houfe of nuns at Nun- 
Kelling in Holdernefs." By Beatrice his wife he left ifilie three fons, William, Walter, 
and Stephen, of whom Walter married Agnes daughter and coheirefs of Simon Fitz- 
Simon, and by her was father of Peter de Fauconbergh, who in the time of King John 
took part with the rebellious barons, and thereupon his lands were feizedj but after- 
wards reftored, Which Peter was father of Walter de Fauconbergh, who, by Agnes his 
wife one of the daughters and coheirs of Peter de Brus, had ilTue feven fons, of whom 
Peter was fettled at this place in the time of Edw. II. In the 8th year of the fucceed- 
ing reign, Maud de Fauconbergh, (probably widow of this Peter) was lady of the manor 
of Milton, and then gave tiie manor of Hardington-Wytenine to William de Durnford 
for life.'' Milton was then held of John de Fieules lord of Martock, by the fervice of 
the fourth part of one knight's fee. 23 Edw. III. another Peter de Fauconbergh held 
the manor of Milton-Fauconbergh of William de Montacute earl of Sarum, as of his 
manor of Martock by knight's fervice. He was the laft of the name that poflfefTed 
this eitate: for at his death, the year abovementioned, Thomas Lotterel his coufin was 
found heir to his poffeffions.'' They bore for their arms three lions paflant.' After this 
the manor of Milton reverted to the crown, and was annexed to the dutchy of Cornwall, 
to which it now belongs, being parcel of the pofTeflions of the Prince of Wales. 

The manor of Ash, Ash-Bulleyn, and Pyke's-Ash, fo termed from the Earls of 
BuUoigne its ancient, and the Pykes its more recent pofTeflbrs, has this defcription ia 
the N orman record : 

' " Anfger holds of the Earl [Morton] in Aisse one hide. Briftuin held it in the 
*' time of King Edward. The arable is one carucate, held by two villanes. There 
*• is one acre of meadow, and two acres of coppice wood. It was and is worth ten 
« fhillings.'" 

After the Earls of Bulloigne, the family of Camme were lords of this hamlet. By 
an inquifition taken 34 Edw. I. it was found that Herbert de Camme held the manor 
of Afh of Baldwin de Champflower, by the fervice of the eighth part of a knight's fee; 
and that Margery and Joan de Camme his fillers were his next heirs.' 23 Edw. III. 
Peter de Fauconbergh held one meffuage, and one yard-land in Afh, of William de 
Montacute earl of Sarum, as of his manor of Martock, by the fervice of finding the 
churchwardens of the parifh of Martock three lamps to burn in the parifli church four 
times a year. He alfo held one meflliage and twenty acres of land in Lade, or Load, 
of the King." 8 Henry VI. Richard Pavely, citizen and grocer of London, releafed 
to Hugh Kenne, Agnes his wife, and William their fon, all his right in the manors of 
Afh-Boleyne and Witcombe, with all lands and tenements in the hundred of Martock.* 
And 9 Henry VI. Hugh Pike releafed to the faid Hugh Kenne, his wife, and fon, all 
his right in the lands and tenements in Afli and Witcombe, which were formerly the 
faid Richard Pavely's.^ 8 Edw. IV. William Kenne held of the lords of Martock 
fifteeen meffuages, two carucates of arable land, forty acres of meadow, and twenty 

" Dugd. Bar. ii. 3. ' Inq. ad quod damnum. ' Efc. ' Seals from ancient Deeds. 

■ Lib. Domefday. « Efc. " Ibid. » Rot. Claus. 8 Hen. VI. ' Rot. Claus, 9 Hen. Vli 

acres 



Q^artocft.l M A R T O C * K. 7 

acres of pafture, in Afli-Boleyne and Witcombc, and was fiicceeded in that property by ' 
Anthony Kcnne his fon and heir.* The family of Pyke, or Pike, were the next poffenbrs 
of this place. William Pike, of Pike's-Afh, married Alice the daughter of Thomas; 
Bowring, efqj of Bowring's-Leigh in the county of Devon," and had ifTue Robert 
Pike his fon and heirj who 22 Henry VIII. held two meflliages, tliree hundred acres 
of arable, and tei; acres of meadow in Witcombe, within the lordfhip of Pike's-Afh; . 
and five mefTuages, one hundred acres of arable, thirty acres of pafture, and fix acres 
of wood, with its appertenances in Milton within the faid lordfhip or manor; as alfo fix 
mefTuages, two hundred acres of arable, twenty-four acres of pafhire, four acres of 
meadow, with appertenances, and pafture for twenty oxen, in Afh ; and eleven acres of 
arable, and eight acres of pafture in Pyke-Ham within the faid manor. And likewifc 
a piece of -meadow there cdled-^bree Swatbis of the King as of his manor of Martock." 
To which Robert Pike fucceeded Thomas his fon and heir, who by Mary, daughter of 
John Stawel of Cothelfton, had ifTue Elizabeth married to James Leigh, otherwife 
Reynolds, who difTipated the eftate. Sir William Pole" fays, that there was a tide fet 
on foot that Thpmas Pike abovementioned, the father of Elizabeth, fliould have alfo a 
fon, called Stephen, long time concealed, and never known to his fuppofed father, or 
publickly to any other, before all Pike's land was fold. Pike's-Afh now belongs to the 
family of Napier of Tintinhull. 

A litde to the northweft of Afh is Stapleton, which for a number of fuccefTions 
belonged to the family of St. Clare, or de Sanfto Claro. 6 Henry III. Robert de St. 
Clare held of the King in chief ten pounds a year of land in Stapleton, by the fervice 
of finding an armed fervant with an horfe in the king's army for forty days at his own 
cofts.'' He was fucceeded by his fon Robert, who 7 Henry III. paid ten marks for his 
relief of the land which he held here of the king by ferjeanty." This Robert died 2 
Edw. II. being then certified to hold the manor of Stapleton of the crown in capite by 
the fervice of holding a towel before the Queen at the feafts of Eafter, Whitfuntide, 
and Chriftmas, and likewife at the King's coronation.' Robert de St. Clare, his 
grandfon, fucceeded to the manor of Stapleton, of which he died feized 10 Edw. III. 
leaving iiTue another Robert his fon and heir.^ Which laft-mentioned Robert held ' 
only a moiety of this manor, of which he died feized 22 Edw. III. and was fucceeded 
by Richard his fon and heir.** The other moiety, was held, 42 Edw. III. by Ralph 
Seyncler (as the name was fometimes written) who died without ifTue, as did alfo the 
abovementioned Richard and Margaret his wife ; upon which the manor reverted to 
Robert de St. Clare, a coufin of the abovemendoned lords, who died 46 Edw. III. and 
Sibill his wife had an afTignment of the third part of this manor for her dower; re- 
mainder to Sir William Bonville, knt. and his heirs.' 9 Hen. IV. Sir William Bonville 
held a moiety of the manor of Stapleton, and a mefTuage and one carucate of land in 
Martock, called Sayes-Place, (from the family of Say) of the Earl of Somerfet.'' At 
this time there was a chapel in Stapleton, which feems to have been built by one of the 
St. Clares. It was fubfervient to the church of Martock, but has long fince been 
deftroyed; and nothing further appears memorable of it or the. place itfelf. 

Efc. * Sir William Pole's Survey of Devon. » Efc. ' Survey of Devon. ' Plac. Coron. Somerf. 

• Rot. Pip. 7 Hen. Ill, f fife. « Ibid. " Ibid. ' Cart. Antiq. * Efc. 

The 



« M A R T O C K. C00attOCfe. 

The hamlet of Hurst was, as has been before obferved, more anciently written 
Achelai, and is thus briefly mentioned in Domefday-Book: 

*' Alured himfelf [i. e. Alured De Ifpania] had Achelai. Alwi held it in the 
'* time of King Edward. This is added to Mertoch, the King's manor, and is worth 
*' fifty fhillings per annum."' 

There was an eflate in the pariih of Martock, belonging formerly to the alien priory 
of St. Michael's Mount in Cornwall, a cell to the abbey of St. Michael in Periculo 
Maris in Normandy; on the fuppreffion of which, it was granted, with the reft of its 
polTeffions, to the abbey of Sion in Middlefex. Thefe lands were called Prior's -Lands, 
and on this account it has been furmifed by fome, but erroneoudy, that there was a 
priory in Martock, and the name indeed occurs in a grant of King Henry VIII. jiiade 
in the 34th year of his reign, to Humphry Colles, of lands in Coat lately belonging to 
the abbey of Sion, as of tlie priory of Martock. 3 and 4 Philip and Mary, thefe 
lands were the property of Mrs. Mary Buckland, whofe defcendants enjoyed the fame, 
and were feated at Stanley in the county of Wilts. 

The church of Martock was anciently divided into the following portions, viz. ' 

The portion of the treafurer of Wells, fifty marks. 
The portion of the prior ile Periculo Maris in the fame, forty marks. 
. The portion of the prior of Merton [in Surrey] in the fame, four marks. 
The vicar of the fame, one hundred fhillings."" 

The treafurerfliip of Wells was eredted in the year 1135. The Rev. Paul George 
Snow, A. M. is the prefent treafurer, and as fuch is the impropriator and patron of 
this living, which is a vicarage in the deanery of Ilchefter. The Rev. Nicholas Baker 
is the. prefent incumbent. 

A. D. 1733, the vicarage of Martock was augmented with lands of 430I. value, 
whereof was given 200I. by Queen Anne's bounty; the Rev. Mr. Cooke of Thorn- 
combe, lool.; other benefadors, 130I." 

6 Henry IV. Sir Peter Courtney, knt. held a moiety of the large tithes of this parifh, 
as parcel of the alien priory of Otterington in Devonfhire, which priory was a cell to 
Mount St. Michael in Normandy." 

A chantry was founded in the church of Martock 18 Edw. II. by John Say, who 
then had licence from the King to give one toft, and twenty acres of land in Martock 
to a chaplain to celebrate divine fervice in the church of Martock, for the foul of the 
faid John every day for ever,'' After the diffolution of chantries. King Edw. VI. in the 
4th year of his reign, granted the faid chantry, with its capital meffuage, and the farm 
or manor of Bradford-Bryan, and other lands thereto belonging, to the governors of 
Sherborne fchool in the county of Dorfet. The chantry-houfe is ftill ftanding. 



• Lib. Domefday. ■» Taxat. Spiritual. " From a Tablet in the Church. 

* Efe. «■ Pat. 18 Ed. II. m. 2. 



The 



^artocli.] 9fl^ A il* T O C K. 9 

The church is xrcdicated to All-Saints ; and is a fpacious and elegant Gothick ftnic- 
tiire, built of Ham-lvU flonc, 150 feet long, and 62 feet wide; oonfifting of a navejj*' 
chancel, north and foutk ailes, and porch. At tj^e weft end is a well-built embattled 
tower of excellent mafonry, gc^feet high, with a handfome brafs weathercock, a clock, 
and five large bells. The nave'roof is 46 feet high, (lipported by fourteen light elegant 
pillars; the centres of the arches are ornamented with cherubims difplaying the armorial 
fliields of feveral fuppofed benefadlors to this church. Oaer thefe pillars, between the 
windows in the upper range, are Gothick niches, in which are paintings of the apdftles. 
The roof is boarded between the rafters, which are richly embelliftied with ornamental* 
carving and cherubic bufts, &c. This roof being lately repaired, among the Carved 
work taken down was a board dated 1 5 1 3, which is ftill prcferved; but from the general 
ftile of the building, and other circumftances, it does not appear to be the original date 
of the church ; probably only of a new roof erefted at that time. The chancel and 
part of each aile are feparated from the reft of the church by a fuperb open-work Gothick 
fcreen of fourteen arches, fupporting an enriched cornice of excellent carving and ni 
fine prefervation. Over this fcreen is a rood-loft, 30 feet long, and 17 feet wide. 
Here are four doors, and thirty-five large windows, all of crown glafs, except five in 
*the chancel. Thefe windows were formerly painted with various arms, andoth^orna- 
ments; a head of King Edward VI. ftill remains. This church has lately been new 
pewed in a very handfome manner, the number of pews being 104. A very handfome 
new organ, eredted at the expence of the inhabitants, over the entrance into the belfry, - 
adds greatly to the dignity of this church. Under this organ is a gallery for the fingers, 
which has a neat wainfcot front, fupported by four fluted pillars of the Tufcan order. ' . 
In the centre of the church is a large brafs chandelier with twenty-four fockets.' The 
pulpit and reading-defl< are of fine pannelled wainfcot, and very handfome. In the 
chancel are feveral ftalls with feats which let down in the fame manner as thole 
in cathedrals, this being formerly a choirj and mention is made of Queen Elizabeth 
allowing ten pounds a year for the purpofe of inftrufting four boys in writing and 
finging. 

The vicars choral of Wells cathedral have feveral eftates in this parifh. 

But what renders this church a fubjeft of general admiration, is an elegant fuperb 
altar-piece in ftucco plaifter, erefted at the fole expence of John Butler, efq; as a tcfti- 
mony of his regard and aff^edtion for the church and place of his nativity, ,^'his gen- 
tleman refided many years in .the colony of Nova-Scotia in North-America, where he 
had the honour to be appointed by, his Majefty's fpecial mandamus one of his privy- 
council in that province. 

In. the north wall of the chancel is p. handfome pyramidical mural monument of 
white and black marble, on which is a very elegant fcftooned alabafter urn, with fine 
flowing drapery. On the tablet is the following infcription : 

" Near this place lie the remains of Harriot Leighton, widow of Herbert Leightqn, 

. efq; a faithful follower in fimplicity and godly fincerity of the meek and lowly Jefus, 

who having for many years adorned the doftrine of God her Saviour in all things, 

more efpecially in his humble and fervant-like fpirit, entered into the full poffcfllon of 

Vol. III. C the 



JO M A R T O C K. . .'# [^attOCft* 

the glory purchafed for her by the blood of her, crucified Redeemer, the 15th of July 
^782, agetl 57 years. The Rev. Francis Leighton ereds this monument to the me- 
mory of the beft of mothers." 

In the weft end of the fouth aile is a handfome mural monument of white marble, 
having an arched cornice, with three urns, fupported by two round columns of the 

Tufcan order, and this infcription: " Near this place lie the bodies of John Rue, 

of Coate, gent, and nine of Ws children, whom he had by Hannah his wife, daughter of 
John Goodden of Bowerhenton, gent, with whom he lived happily many years, and 
J who in due regard to their dear memory eredled this monument. He died the 26th 
of December 1747, aged 47. Hannah Rue, the worthy widow, died the i8th of 
January 1782, aged 77, and lies buried near the remains of her hufband and children." 

At the eaft end of the north aile is a neat mural monument of marble, infcribed, — 
" Underneath is interred the body of the Rev. Thomas Bowyer, A. M. fifty-five years 
vicar of this parifh; a man of diftinguiflied piety and learning, great knowledge in the 
Holy Scriptures, and their beft interpreters, the ancient fathers; an able zealous teacher 
of the gofpel; in life and doftrine a rare example of primitive Chriftianity; he ftriftly 
obferv|d the feafts and fafts of the church; the holy eucharift he celebrated monthly; 
by a peculiar addrefs in catechifing children every week, he gave edifying leftbns to all 
his hearers; the vigilant paftor, vifiting from houfe to houfe, exhorted^ comforted, 
relieved, his numerous flock, at once a leader and a pattern. In mecknefs, felf-denial, 
and fubmiffion to God's will, he followed the fteps of his greaj Mafter. Bold in re- 
buking vice, he feared God only; he fpokeevilof no one; the tenth part of his income 
he devoted to charitable ufcs. For the maintenance of God's houfe, and the offices 
thereof, by his intereft and benevolence, he augmented this and two other fmall livings. 
Generations to come may call him bleflTed, for that happy propolal to the public which 
gave birth to infirmaries in this kingdom. In other learned and pious works of his 
pen, being dead, he yet fpeaketh; his whole life was the trueft comment on his laft 
words, " Do all the good you can." How dear a blefling he was in the relation of 
huft)and, father, friend, is engraved elfewhere. He was a defcendant of Sir John 
bowyer, of Knipperfly in the county of Stafibrd. Died June 29th, 1763, in the 79th 
year of his age. ErecTted by his affeftionate widow, daughter of the late Reverend, 
learned, and pious Mr. Norris. The worthy widow died Feb. 16, 1768, aged 78, 
whofe remains lie by thofe of her hufband." Arms, Argent y a lion rampant between 
three crofs croflets fitchee gules. 

On a brafs plate at the eaft end of the chancel:——" Exiivise Georgii BifTe, gen. 
qui probitate & animi candore, de omnibus bene meruit; et Marise conjugis prascha- 
rilTimas, et ufq; ad mortem fidelis marito, pije, caftse, amabilis, moribufque fuaviffimis 
ornatse, fubtus conduntur. 

Ille nat. 24 Oa, 1634, 7 ^ • , t tico r^u- Oo Jan. 1702. 
T11 . c . c ( Coniugat. 9 Jan. 1668; Obiit { ^, ' 
Ilia nat. 24 Sept. 1647, 3 j a 7 j » j ^ 9 Nov. 1685. 

Unus erat thalamus vivis, unumque fepulchrum 
Jam tenet Jios, vinxit quos iiuper unus araor." 

At 




^attOCfe.] M A R T O C K. 11 

At the fouth corner of the communion rails is a (tone, thus infcfibed,— — " Here 
lieth the body of Amos Eford, late vicar of this parifh for the fpace of forty-fix years, 
who died the nth day of May 1625, whofe foul, our hope is, liveth with God; for 
Chrift is to me life, and death is to me advantage; for I am in a ftrait betwixt two, 
having a defire to depart and to be with Chrift, which is far better." 

"Mr. John Goodden, of Bowerhenton, who died March 10, 1721, aged 23, by his 
will gave eleven acres and a half of land, be it more or lefs, lying in Martock fields, 
the profits of which to be diftributed in loaves every Sunday far ever to the poor of 
Henton, Hurft, and Martock, at the difcretion of the minifter and churcl»ivardens for 
the time being. — * Caft thy bread upon the waters, and thou fhalt find it after many 
days.' Ecd. xi. i." 

Robert Goodden, ofCompton-Houfe in thecounty of Dorfer,'efq; the reprefentative 
of the abovementioned John Goodden of Bowerhenton, efq; poflefles very confiderable 
eftates in this parifti. His arms are. Azure, on a bend between two demi-lions ram- 
pant erafed, or, three lozenges vaire, gules and argent. 

A. D. 1 66 1. William Strode, efq; lord of the manor of Martock, founded a gram- 
mar-fchool here, and endowed it with a good houfe and garden; and twelve pounds a 
year to be paid out of the manor for ever, which falary Mr. Bayly, a fubfequent lord 
of the manor, advanced to fifteen pounds per annum and upwards. 

That eminent grammarian and fchool-mafter, Thomas Farnaby, author of notes 
upon moft of the ancient Latin poets, &c. fometime kept a fchool with good reputa- 
tion in the town of Martock. 

In the church-yard is the effigies in fl:one of a female, fuppofed to be one of the 
Fieules' family; there were feveral others, but they have long firice been reiTioved. 

LONGLOAD TITHING 

Confifts of a fl:raggling ftreet, about half a mile in length, and fituated three miles norths 
eaft from Martock cinirch, and four miles fouthweft from Somerton, in the turnpike- 
road between thofe towns. l"he number of houfes is forty-fix, moft of which are built 
•of a kind of ftone like that raifed at Kenton and Kingwefton, and covered with thatcn. 

In former times this place was called Lade, and La Lade, from the Saxon Lat)e, 
which fignifies a ftream or torrent, it being fituated on the river Yeo, which here 
forms a very confiderable channel. 

In the time of Henry III. Sabina the widow of Henry de Urtiaco, lord of the 
manor of Curry-Rivel, by deed without date, gave all her lands in this place to Robert 
Corbyn.^ From which time it was held of the manor of Martock."* A ^^'iiliam de 
Lade occurs witnefs to a charter of one of the Fieules.' 

The chapel is a fmall ruinous building, fifty-three feet long, and feventeen wide, 
with a wooden turret at the weft end containino; a clock and twq bells. Here is a fmall 
antique pulpit, a gallery, and ten pews. 

.• Cart. Antisi. * Efc. ' Cart. Anti<i. 

C a In 



/ 



12 



M A R T O C K. 



C^attoc&» 



In the north wall is the following infcription: " A. D. 1733. This chapel of 

Load was augmented with lands of 400I. value, whereof were given Queen Anne's 
bounty 200I. Winchefter college ail. Martock parifh 179I. 

*' The defign of the parilh in contributing was, that the fucceeding vicars might 
take care that there might be two fermons in Martock church, and one in Load 
chapel, eveiy Sunday in the year for ever j and they are earnellly defired to anfwer this 
good defign." 

The baptifms in this parifli from the year 1776 to 1782 inclufive, were 2951 the 
burials during the fame period 278. 




THE 




L 



THE HUN D R E D 



O F 



MILVERTON 



lES in the fouthweft part of the county, adjoining Devonfliire, being interme- 
diate between that county on the fouth, and the hundred of Kingfbury-Weft 
in this county, on the north and eaft. 



In the hundred of Milverton were formerly twenty-four hides and a half, wherefrom 
the King had for geld fix pounds feven fliillings and fixpence for twenty-one hides and 
one virgate of land; and for two hides and a half which Britell held, the King had not 
his geld. And Robert de Odberville held three yard-lands freely of the King/ 

The hundred was afterwards held by the principal lords of Milverton; the Brets, 
Briweres, Mortimers, Sec. It contains nine parifhes. 

( * Inq. Gheldi Suraerfet. 



M 



V 



R 



O N, 



A Small, but very ancient market-town, eight miles weft from Taunton, and five 
northweft from Wellington. Its fituation is in a woody fertile country, pleafingly 
diverfified with hill and valley, well cultivated and very populous. The principal part 
of the town lies in three irregular ftreets, the church ftanding in the centre on an mnl- 
nence. The market is on Friday. There was formerly here a confiderable manufac- 
ture of ferges and druggets, which of late years is much declined. Here is a charity- 
fchool for twenty boys and twenty girls. The town was anciently a borough, the manor 
whereof is now vefted in the crown, but formerly in other lords, who among a variety 
of immunities, procured it to be eretted into a hundred of itfelf, and exempt from the 
jurifdiftion of the hundred at large. It is governed by a portreve, and fearchers and 
fealers are annually appointed. 

At 



14 M I L V E R T o N. [09Ut)crton» 

At the Conquefl: it was the demefnes of King William, but had before belonged in 
oart to the biflioprick of Bath: 

" The King holds the manor of Milvertune. Bifhop Gifo held it in the time of 
** King Edward, and gelded for one virgate of land."* 

" The King holds Milvertone. In the time of King Edward it gelded for half a 
*' virgate of land." The arable is fixteen carucates. In demefne is one carucate, and 
" three fervants, and three cottagers, and fixteen villanes, and feven bordars, with nine 
*' ploughs. There is a mill of feven fhillings and fixpence rent, and fix acres of meadow, 
" and one hundred acres of pafture, and one hundred acres of coppice wood. There 
*' is a market which pays ten fhillings. The whole renders twenty-five pounds by tale. 
*' In the time of Queen Edith [who fometime held it] it yielded twelve pounds.'" 

This manor was parcel of the barony of Walter Brito, or Bret, of whom it was pur- 
chafed by William the fon of Henry Briwere, lord of Bridgwater in the time of King 
John, for the ufeof his fon Richard Briwere and his heirs.'' Which Richard Briwere 
13 Joh. upon the colledtion of the fcutage of Wales, anfwered for fifteen knights' fees 
of the honour of Moreton, which formerly belonged to the faid Walter Brito.° Shortly 
after this he died, and William his younger brother fucceedcd to the eftate. He mar- 
ried Joan daughter of William de Vernon earl of Devon, with whom he had lands to 
the amount of fifty pounds per annum lying within the manor of Crewkerne in this 
county; as alfo the advowfon of that church. He died without ifi"ue 16 Henry III. 
and Joan his wife, furviving him, had an affignation of this manor in dower.^ After 
her death, the eftates being divided among coheirefl"es, Milverton pafled into other fa- 
milies, and in the time of Edw. III. was held by the Earl of Pembroke, Maurice de 
Berkley, and Jolin de Eures.^ From them it came to the Mortimers, earls of March. 
Roger Mortimer earl of March died feized thereof 34 Edw. III. leaving Edmund his 
fon and heir. Which Edmund married Phihppa daughter of Lionel duke of Clarence, 
and by her had ifllie Roger Mortimer, who fucceeded his father as Earl of March, and 
in 1385, was declared by parhament heir apparent to the crown; he died 21 Ric. II. 
and had for his fucceflbr Edmund the laft Earl of March of this family. At his death 
without ifllie, Richard duke of York, fon of Anne his fifter by Richard earl of Cam- 
bridge, was found to be his next heir.*" The tide of diis Richard to the crown of 
England was apparent; but in the purfuit thereof he loft his life at Wakefield in 1460. 
Whereupon the manor and borough of Milverton, with his other lands and eftates, 
came to the crown, and an annuity of one hundred marks per annum out of the profits 
■of the faid manor and borough was granted to Thomas Courtney earl of Devon, in 
confideration of his loyalty and faithful fervices to King Henry VI.' But it appears 
thatthe manor of Milverton was reftored to the houfe of York, and Cecilia the relidl of 
the deceafed Duke held it in dower. She was the daughter of Ralph Neville, the fecond 
Earl of Weftmoreland, and was m.other of King Edward IV. George duke of Clarence, 

* Lib. Domefday. 
* By which it appears how partially and irregularly the lands in England were affefled to the Dane-geld. 
' JLib. Domefday. " Rot. Pip. 2 Joh. ' Rot. Pip. 13 Joh. ' Rot. Claus. i/Hen. III. m. 8. 

s tib. Feed. » Efc, ' Pat. 38 Hen. VI. p. 1. hi. (>. 

. King 



^mmon.] MILVERTON. 15 

King Richard III. and Edmund earl of Rutland. 17 Henry VI. Richard carl of 
Warwick held at his death the fixth part of the manor of Milverton, with the fixth part 
of the hundred, the fixth part of the borough, and the fixth part of the hundred of the 
faid borough; ail which were held of the King in free burgage by homage only for all 
fervices.'' The fame were held 12 Edw. IV. by Margaret the wife of Sir Richard 
Veer, knt.' 1 1 Henry VII. tlie manor and borough of Milverton were granted by the 
King to Queen Margaret for her dower."" In the time of Henry VIII. the manor of 
Milverton was held of the crown by Sir Richard Warre of Heftercombe, who gave it, 
together with the manors of Tolland, Chipley, and Lovelinch, to hiseldeft fon by 
Joan his fecond wife, daughter of Sir John Hody, chief baron of the exchequer, in 
which branch of the Warre family the faid manors continued till Mary, daughter and 
heir of Edward Warre of Chipley, brought them by marriage to William Lottifham, 
cfq; whofe daughter and heir died without ifllie. 

Chipley lies fouth from Milverton, and was for a number of years the pofllelTion of 
a family of its name, till at length it came to the Warres of Heftercombe by the mar- 
riage of Tliomafine, fole daughter and heir of Thomas Chipleigh, eiq; with Robert 
Warre, fecond fon of Richard Warre, of Heftercombe, efq. The heirefs of Lottifham 
having no ifllie, Ihe gave this manor of Chipley to Mr. Clarke, fon to her huft)and 
by his former wife, in which name it ftill continues j Edward Clarke, efq; being the 
prefent poireflbr. 

To the eaft of Chipley is Bickley, another ancient vill, though now depopulated, 
which alfo gave name to a very refpeftable family, who were lords thereof in former 
times, and whofc defcendants ftill continue. In the time of Edw. I. William de Bykeic 
was lord of Holwell in this county," and was fucceeded by Henry de Bykele, of whicli 
two names there were feveral in fucceflion, who bore for their arms a chevron en- 
grailed between three birds." 19 Edw. III. Walter de Meriet held one carucate of 
land inBykely of the Earl of Pembroke, Maurice de Berkeley, and John de Bures, as 
of their manor of Milverton, by knights' fervice."" 

Between thefe places and Milverton is the hamlet of Houndmoor, and more eaft- 
wardly Wickmoor, anciently called Milverton-Wkk; and northeaft from Milverton, 
are Preston-Bowyer, and Torrells-Preston, which at the time of the Conqueft 
were part of the manor of Brumpton, and are ftill part of the hundred of Wilkton- 
Freemanors. 

" Of this manor, [viz. Brunetone] Earl Moriton holds one hide in Prestetune, 
" which was of the demefne farm in the time of King Edward. The arable is four 
*' carucates. There are two ploughs. It is and was worth forty fliilHngs.'"' 

" Robert holds of the Earl in Prestitone one hide. Earl Harold [formerly] held 
" it. The arable is four carucates. In demefne is half a carucate, with one fervant, 
" and fix villanes, and two cottagers, with two ploughs. There is a mill of twelve- 
" pence rent, and five acres of meadow, and three acres of pafture, and eleven acres 
" of wood. It was and is worth thirty Ihillings. 

" This land belonged to Burnetone, the King's manor with tl^e^arm.'" 

" Efc. 'Ibid. " Rot. Pari, n Hen. VII. " Efc. • Seals from ancient Deeds. 

' Efc. « Lib. Domefday. ' Ibid. 



i6 -MiLVERTON. [a^iitimom 

The family of Bures, a name corrupted of late years into Bo\vy,er, and from which 
the place received one of its additional diflinftions, were anciently lords of this manor.' 
From them it came to the family of Candos; and in the time of Henry II, Robert 
Candos gave it with the manor of Monkfilver to the priory of Goldclive, in which it 
remained till the fupprelTion of alien priories, when it was granted to the collegiate 
church of Windfor. There was formerly a church here : but no trace of it now remains. 

The Torrels alfo poflefled a manor in Prefton, and caufed it to be cajled 'Torrel's- 
Prejlon. This was a very ancient family. In the time of Henry II. William Torel, 
anceftor of the Torrels of this place, was lord of the whole town of Ifle-Brewers in 
this county, and was then fined in the fum of one mark for neglefting to make hue and 
cry after the death of Alured de Aneville.' i Henry IV. Roger Torrel gave to" the 
rc£tor of the church of Milverton twenty acres of land called Minjier-land, lying in the 
parilh of Milverton, to find a chaplain to perform divine fervice thrice a week for ever 
in the chapel of Torrel's-Prefton. Which faid twenty acres of land were held of the 
King by knight's fervice." The prior of Taunton had an eftate here valued in 1293 
at ten fhillings." 

In this parilh is alfo a place called Poleshill, which formerly had owners of its 
name, who were feated here and in Devon. But in the Conqueror's time it belonged 
to Sir William de Mohun: 

" Dodeman Jiolds of William, Pouselle. Uluric held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for half a hide. The arable is two carucates. There is one fer- 
*' vant, and three acres of meadow, and twenty acres of wood. It is worth ten fhillings. 

" To this manor is added one hide, \vhich a thane held freely in the time of King 
*' Edward. The arable is one carucate. It was and is worth thirty pence. '^'"^ 

There was a church at Milverton in the time of William the Conqueror, of which 
the following particulars are recorded: 

" Stephen the chaplain holds the church of Milvertone, with one virgate and one 
" fardel of land. The arable is one carucate.- There are ten acres of wood. It is 
" worth forty Ihillings.'"' 

10 Henry III. William Briwere, lord of the manor, made a grant of the advowfon of 
this church in free-alms to Joceline bifhop of Bath and Wells, and in open court before 
the King and his nobles at Weftminfter, by his gloves gave the bilhop feizin of the faid 
advowfon." It now conftitutes two prebends in the cathedral of Wells j the firft of 
which is annexed to the archdeaconry of Taunton. The vicarage, which is a peculiar 
in the deanery of Taunton, and whereof the Rev. Thomas Camplin is the prefent in- 
cumbent, was valued in 1 292 at nine marks."' 

The church is. dedicated to St. Michael, and is a large edifice, 112 feet in length, 
^nd 60 in breadth, confiding of a nave, chancel, fide ailes, and veftry-room, covered 
with tile. At the weft end ftands a plain clumfy tower, containing fix bells. 



•Cart. Antiq. ' See vol. i. p. 53. " Inq. ad quod damnum, i Hen. IV. =" Taxat. Temporal. 
' Lib. Domefday. * Ibid. • Pat. 10 Henry III. m. 5. ^ Taxat. Spiiitual. 



On 



^ilueccon.] M I L V E R T O N. 17 

On the eaft wall in the chancel Is a plain mural monument of white marble, with this 

infcription : " Subtus conduntur reliquiae Georgii Atwood, filii natu maximi 

Georgii Atwood, A. M. hujus parochias vicarii et Sarae uxoris ejus ; necnon fcholae 
Weftmonafterienfis nuper regii alumni. Qui dum rurc juvenis otiabatur, fubito tor- 
menti idlu correptus, ab alio juvene fortuito explofi, morti fuccubuit die 5 Septembris, 
A. D. 1768, Eetatis ij; amabilis et amatifTimus. Etiam eodem tumulo inhumata 
obdormifcit Harriotta foror prsediifli Georgii Atwood, quas ingruente febre emortua 
eft die 6 Martii, A. D. 1769, astat. 13. Hoc marmor utriufque memorise facrum 
parentum pietas extrui curavit." »■* 

Underneath the above is another mural monument of black ftone, witli the follow- 
ing infcription: "Mary Beavis, daughter of George Atwood, M.A. vicar of this 

parifh, and Sarah his wife, died March 26, 1750, aged 3 weeks. Alfo Betty, another 
daughter, died July 10, 1754, aged 6 years." 

At the eaft end of the fouth aile is an old mural ftone, with this infcription: 
" Subter heic jacet Johannes Lancafter, gent, qui obijt Julii 27, 1687, «taf. fuce 70, 
Hodie mihi, eras tibi." He was fometime lord of this manor. 

In the chancel floor, on flat ftones: 

" Here lyeth the body of John Periam, gent, who dyed Sept. 19, 17 11, aged 54. 

" Here lyethe the bodyes of William, Elizabeth, and Rebecca, fon and daughters of 
John Periam, gent, and Sarah his wife, who were all borne and buried between the 
ift of April 1693, and the 20th of April 1695." Mors omnia vincit. 

" Here lyeth the body of Zachariah Periam, efq; who died May 13, 1738, aged 35. 

" Heic requiefcit in pace corpus Aldredi Seaman, gent, qui obijt 7 die Februarii, 

falutis human^E 1687, stat. fua; 78. Here lieth the body of Charles Seaman, fonne 

of Aldred Seaman, the younger, who died May 27, 1690, aged 3 years. Aldred 

Seaman, jun. of this parifli, gent, who was buried the jgth of Aug. 1723, aged 85." 
Arms, Barry wavy of fix argent and azure; a crefcent or, impaling an enfign on the top 
of an embattled wall ma^onne. ^With feveral others to the Seaman family. 

In the middle alky: 
" Hie jacet corpus Gulielmi Lambe, de Milverton, gcnerofi, qui obijt 1678. Hie 
etiam quiefcit in fpe beats refurreftionis corpus Marix fuse uxoris, quas obijt Odobris 
vicefimo quarto 1724. * 

" Here lyeth the body of John Sprcat, of the parifli of Minehead, gent, who died 
July 30, 1733, aged 70. Alfo the body of John Spreat, gent, of this p.-irifli, nephew 
to the above Jolin Spreat, died Aug. 1746, aged 29. Alio of Thomas Spreat, gent» 
who died Sept. 4, 1755." 

In the fouth aile floor: 
" Alexander Mallet, efqj deceafed March i, 1638, aged 25- 

" Here lye the bodies of Elizabeth Poulet, relifte of Henry PouIet,tfq; and Henry 
Poulet, eldeft fonne of the fuid Henry and Elizabeth. The fonne was buried June 
1642, aged lO; the mother was buried Oftober 1647, ^S^^ S°*" 

Vol. III. D Th4 



r8 M I L V E R T O iST. [Q^ilUtlton* 

The following account of benefaftions is written on five black tablets in this church: 

" Richard Weflcombe, of the parifti of Oak in the county of Somerfet, yeoman, 
gave to the poor, aged, and impotent people of Milverton, one pound eight fhillings 
and eight-pence, to be paid for ever by four quarterly payments, out of the manor of 
Lambrooks-llatch in the borough of Milverton, to the churchwardens and overfeers 
for the time being, to be by them diftributed with the advice of four fubftantial in- 
habitants of this pariili. This part of the manour was given to Eleanor Weft. He 
alfo^aVe out of part of the fame manour the^ ^uiTie of one pound two fhillings and two- 
pence, to be diftributed as above for ever. This part of the manour was given to 
Jacob Weftcombe and William Ley, alias Farthing. He died in 1580." 

" John Dibble, of this parifh, gent, gave to the poor of this parifh, twenty pounds, 
the intereft thereof to be diftributed by the churchwardens to twenty poor labouring 
, men upon Chriftmas-day for ever. He dyed in 17 19. 

" John Aflicombe, of this parifh, yeoman, by his laft will gave one hundred and fixty 
pounds to.be laid out in the purchafe of fome freehold lands within two years next after 
his deceafe; and the rents and profits thereof to be received by the feoffees, and delivered 
by them to the churchwardens of this parifh for the time being; and to be by them 
diftributed quarterly among the poor labouring people of this parifh, giving an account 
thereof to the minifterand parifliioners for the time being. He dyed 1673. 

*' Mrs. Mary Lambe, late of Court-Place in this parifh, relifl of William Lambe, 
' gent, and daughter of Edmund Parker, of Burringdon in Devon, efq; by her will dated 
Sept. 5, 172 1, gave to truftees therein named the fum of three hundred pounds, to be 
laid out in purchafing lands of inheritance, and the rents thereof, and the intereft of 
the faid three hundred pounds, until fuch purchafe could be made, to be for ever em- 
ployed in educating in the principles of the Chriftian religion, as eftablifhed in the 
Church of England, forty poor children, viz. twenty boys, and twenty girls of this pa- 
rifli. And alfo gave her leafehold eftate unto her faid truftees to promote the faid 
charity, which faid eftate being fold by the diredlion of a decree of the court of chan- 
cery, and the profits thereof in the mean time accounted for, the whole charity money 
amounts to 675I. 9s. fd. the intereft whereof (until the fame can be laid out in the 
purchafe of lands of inheritance) is to be applied for the benefit of the faid charity, 
purfuant to the decree, a copy wiiereof is depofited in the parifh coffer. 

" John Weekes, by will dated 18 Nov. 1622, gave four pounds by the year for 
ever, to the poor of the pariflies next adjoining to the vill of Little-Cbipky, and 
chaj-ged his tenement, then John Perry's, in the vill aforcfaid, with the paym.ent 
thereof. Forty fhillings, part of the faid annual fum of four pounds, was by a decree, 
dated 11 Odt. 1682, made in purfuance of a commilfion of charitable ufes, ordered to 
be for ever yearly paid to fuch poor of this parifli as ftiould have moft need, in the 
prefence of two or more of the overfeers for the time being, on Chriftmas-Eve and 
Good-Friday, as appears by a copy of the decree depofited in the parifh coffer." 

This place gave name to John de Milverton, a noted Carmelite friar of Briftol, and 
ti great opponent of Wicklift". He died A. D. 1480. 

LANGFORD- 



^iimm,} t 19 1 



LANGFORD-BUDVILLE, 

AParifh fouthward from Milverton, is called Langford, from its having formerly 
a long ford over the river Tone; and additionally Budville, from the family of 
Budville, or Botteville, who for many fucceffions poffeflcd the principal eftate here. 
Here are feveral fine fpripgs which join the Toncj and turn a grift and fulling-mill in 
this parifh. This river contains trout, dace, and eels. Over it there is a county ftone 
bridge of two arches, called Harford- Bridge. A mile weftward from the church is the 
hamlet of Wellisford, where is a handfome edifice, of late years the feat of Colonel 
Webber. The whole number of houfes in this parifli is eighty-five, and of inhabitants 
upwards of five hundred. There are many confiderable farms, and the lands are 
moftly in tillage. 

The manor of Langford belonged before the Conqueft to Godwin earl of Kent, and 
afterwards to King William the Conqueror: 

" The King holds Langeford. Goduin held it in the time of King Edward, and 
" gelded for five hides. The arable is ten carucates. Thereof in demefne is one hide 
" and a half, and there is one carucate, and four fervants, and twenty-one villanes, and 
" four cottagers, with eight ploughs. There is a mill of feven fhillings and fix-penre 
" rent, and eight acres of meadow, and one hundred acres of pafture, and thirty acres 
" of wood. It yields four pounds and twelve fliillings.'" 

The manor of Wellisford was the property of Robert de Odburuile or Auberville, 
as we read in the fame furvey : 

" The fame Robert holds Wilesforde. Two thanes held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for one hide. The arable is two carucates. In demefne is one 
" carucate, and two fervants, and eight cottagers, ha,ving one plough. There are four 
'* acres of meadow, and ten acres of pafture, and three acres of coppice-wood. It 
" was formerly worth ten fhillings, now fifteen fhillings. 

" Of this hide Earl Moriton holds one virgate, and Bretel of him.""* 

After the death of this Robert de Auberville, King Richard I. gave all the land 
which he pofTefled, confifting of one knight's fee, to William de Wrotham,' forefter of 
the King's forefts in this county and Dorfet. From which family it came to the 
Vernays, and was held of them for feveral fucceffions by the Warres of Heftercombe. 

The village of Langford gave name to a family, of whom Sir Thomas de Langford, 
Itnt. was lord of the manor in the time of Edw. III.; and 46 of that reign, gave it with 
the manor of Fivehead to Francis de Scoland.** 

1 Henry V. William Boteville held half a knight's fee in Langford, and lands and 
tenements in Wellesford.' At the fame time die archdeacon of Taunton held a 

' Lib. Domefday. "Ibid. ' Lib. Nig. Scac. i. 102. " Rot. Claus. 46 Ed. III. • Lib. Feod. 

D 2 knight's 



t9 LANGFO^D-BUDVILLE. [^iltiectom 

knight's fee in Langford and Hamme/ The manor of Langford, with that of Harp^ 
ford in this parifh, now belongs to Edward Clarke, efq. 

The living is a peculiar in the deanery of Taunton, and is annexed to Milverton. 

The church is dedicated to St. James, and confifts of a nave, chancel, and aile on 
the Ibuth fide, all covered with tile. There is a large tower at the weft end, containing 
five bells. ■-••'- 

At the eaft end of the fouth aile is a fmall antique mural monument of ftone, em- 

bellifhed with painting, gilding, cherubs, and arms; infcribed, " Heare under 

lyeth the body of William Bacon, gent, who dyed the I2th day of June 1663, ^g^d 
66. Heare alfoe lyeth the body of Joane, wife of William Bacon abovenamed, who 
dyed the 3d of March 1669, aged 53." , Arms, Argent, a fefs between three round 
buckles, gules. 

On the fame wall is a handfome mural monument of ftone, infcribed, ** In me- 
mory of Captain George Bacon, of Harpford in this parifti, gent, his dear relift Mrs. 
Mary Bacon hath caufed this to be erefted. He departed this life Oft. 15, 1690, 
aged 52; who ably and faithfully ferved his King and country in divers publick capa- 
cities, and was alwayes ready to aflift his neighbours in any private good offices. They 
therefore both loved and honoured him while living; and when dead his memory was 
dear unto them. In memory of Mrs. Mary Bacon, widow of the abovefaid Capt. 
George Bacon, who died Jan. 15, 1708." 

On the north wall of the nave is a mural monument of black and white marble, with 

this infcripcion : " Near this ftone lie the remains of William Webber, efq; of 

Wellisford, who died Oft. 2, 1777, aged 50. He married Mary daughter of Matthew 
Hayiland, gent, of this parifti, who died Oft. 15, 1766, aged 51 ; and Elizabeth 
daughter of Edward Brickley, gent, of Rendy in the parifti of Oak in this county, who 
erefted this monument to his memory, with an earneft requeft that when it ftiould 
pleafe God to take her from this world, ftie might be buried with him, and that this 
common marble might convey their refpeftive names to pofterity." Arms, Argent, in 
chief three towers triple-towered^;^/?, in bafe a chevron engrailed between three mart- 
lets y^^/^; impaling, barry raguly of eleven parts, or; over all on a bend or two lions 
current regarding. 

In the middle paflage, " Here lieth the body of John Haviland, fen. gent, who 

died April 29, 1736, aged 75. Here lyeth the body of Matthew Haviland, of this 
parifti, gent, who died Feb. 13, 17 14, aged 53." 

On another flat ftone: " Here lieth the body of Matthew Haviland, of this parifti, 

gent, who was buried Dec. 23, 1673, aged z^. Alfo of his wife Elizabeth, buried 
Nov. 3, 1721, aged <^z-' 

On another ftone: " In memory of Matthew Haviland, of Wellisford, efq; who 

died November 11, 1753, aged 34. Alfo of Mary, wife of William Webber, efq; and 
fifterto Matthew Haviland, efq; who died Oftober 15, 1766, aged 50." 

'Lib. Feod. 

A little 



Q^iltietton.] LANGFORD-BUDVILLE. 21 

A little northward from the church, on an eminence commanding a fine profpeft 
over a lich country to the fouth and eaft, is the manfion-houfe and feat of John 
Haviland, efq. 

On a ten years' average, the chriftenings in this parilh are found to be annually ifj 
the burials 10, 



1 



ASHBRITTLE. 

THIS Is a fmall parifh, fituated four miles fouthwefl from Milverton, on the very 
borders of Devonfliire. It was originally written ^ijfe; but when it came to be 
pofTeflbd by a lord called Bretel, it received his name as a diftinftion from Afh-Priors, 
and other Allies in this neighbourhood, and was thenceforward termed JJh-Bretel, and 
Ajh-Britul; now corrupted into Afhbrittle. This Bretel was a Saxon thane of fome 
degree of dignity; holding at the Conqueft a number of manors in this and the ad- 
joining counties. The lord under whom he held this manor was Robert earl of 
Morton. The Norman record gives us the following particulars : 

" Bretel holds of the Earl, Aisse. Wado held it in the time of King Edward, and 
*' gelded for four hides. Thereto is added one hide, which two thanes held. The 
" arable is ten carucates in all. In demefne are two carucates, and eight fervants, and 
" fixteen villanes, and twenty-two cottagers, with four ploughs. There are two mills of 
" fifteen fliillings rent, and four acres of meadow, and forty acres of pafture, and thirty- 
" eight acres of wood. It was and is worth one hundred fliillings."* 

In procefs of time the manor of Aflibrittle came to the ancient family of Sydenham. 
8 Edw. IV. John Sydenham died feized of it, leaving Walter his fon and heir."* In 
the fucceeding reign the family of Chaldicote or Chalcot pofleflTed it, and bore for their 
arms Azure, three arrows ered or. They were of Quarrelfton and Eaft-Whiteway in 
Dorfetfhire." By an inquifition taken at Brewton, 24 Sept. 20 Henry VIII. it was 
found that Charles Holcomb, of Hole in Branfcomb, died 16 Jan. 19 Henry VIII. 
feized of the manor and advowfon of the church of Aflibrittle, as alfo of feven mef- 
fuages, two hundred acres of arable, one hundred acres of pafl:ure, thirty of meadow, 
and fixteen of wood, in the parifli of Aflibrittle, all which were held of Queen Catherine, 
as of her manor of Milverton, and that Elias was the fon and heir of the faid Charles 
Holcomb, of the age of twelve years."* From the family of Holcomb the manor and 
advowfon of Aflibrittle came to that of Blewet, of whom John Blewet had it in the 
time of Queen Elizabeth, and then conveyed the fame to Sir Arthur Baflet, and Sir 
John Chichefter, knts. for the ufe of the faid John Blewet." The Rev, Mr. Nutconibe 
is the prefent lord of this manor. 



' Lib. Domefday. " Efc, ' Hutchins's Hift. of Dorfetfliire, i. 119. 

' inq. capt, poll: mort, Carol. Holcomb. \MS. CVew, 



The 



22 A S H B R I T T L E. imVotxm, 

The benefice, which is reftorial and in the deanery of Taunton, was valued in 1293 
■at ten marks/ The patronage has ufually been appendant to the manor. The Rev. 
Nutcombe Quicke Is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is a fmall ftrufture of one aile, dedicated to St. John Baptift, and con- 
tains nothing remarkable. 

That eloquent preacher HunAphrey Sydenham was fometime reftor of this parifli.^ 

f Taxat. Spiritual. * See Wood's Athen. Oxon, ii. 134. 



L 



BADIALTON 

lES on the fouthweft fide of the parifh of Milverton. It was one of thofe manors 
' which King William the Conqueror gave to Sir William de Mohun, after his 
fuccefsful expedition into England. 

« Nigel holds of William, Badeheltone. Two thanes held it. in the time of 
« King Edward, and gelded for two hides. The arable is five carucates. In demefne 
*' is one carucate, and three fervants, and twelve villanes, and one bordar, and five 
*' cottagers, with four ploughs. There is a mill of feven fhillings and fix-pence rent, 
« and fix acres of meadow, and forty acres of pafture, and twelve acres of wood. It 
" was formerly worth twenty fhillings, now fifty fliiUings.'" 

The fuccefiive barons of Dunflier-Caftle, of the name of Mohun, continued lords 
paramount of this manor; and of them it was held by feveral perfons by knight's 
fervice, till the whole centred in a family refident here, and to whom the place gave 
appellation. 1 2 Henry II. Alexander de Badialton held three knights' fees of W illiam 
de Mohun." 14 Edw. I. John de Poulefliull, Hillarius de Badhelton, and Peter de 
la Wodehed, held one knight's fee in Badialton of the fees of John de Mohun."^ The 
fame fee was held 4 Edw. III. of John de Mohun by William de Poulefliull, fon of 
John de Poulefliull, and Hillarius de Badialton;* and foon after this the laft-mentioned 
Hillarius became pofleflbd of the whole manor'and parifli. His fon John, who alfo 
lived in the time of Edw. III. omitted the latter difl:inaion of the family name, and 
adopting the prsnomen of his father, wrote himfelf John Hillary. At his death he left 
iflTue one only daughter and heir MarfiUa, who was married to Simon de Sydenham, 
fecond fon of William de Sydenham, by Joan daughter of William de Gothayte. 
Which Simon de Sydenham was founder of the Badialton branch of that family, 
whereof more mention will be made in another part of this volume. The manor now 
belongs to Mrs. Webber. 

The church is a reftory and peculiar in the deanery of Taunton. The prefentation 
is in the manor; and the Rev. Edward Webber is the prefent incumbent. 

• Lib. Domefdsy. » Lib. Nig. Scac. i. 91. « Lib. Feod. 'Ibid. ^^^ 



ei9iltierton.j badialton. 23 

The church is dedicated to St. Bartholomew, and is a fmall ftriifture; but very 
neatly ornamented, having a moft elegant altar-piece, confifting of a rich cornice and 
capital, fupported by four round fluted Corinthian pillars ; the edges and tops of the 
foliage in the capitals gilt. Between thefe are three arched pannels. In the centre 
one a moft elegant oval glory, wrought in gold and filver tlfliic; the fide pannels con- 
tain texts of Scripture. The communion-table and railing are mahogany. 

On the north wall of the chancel is a handfome mural monument of black and white 

marble, with this infcription :- "In a vault near this place, reft the remains of 

Alexander Webber, A. B. reftor and chief proprietor of this parifti. He died on the 
2d day of Sept. 1782, in the 6ift year of his age. In the year 1750 he married Sarah, 
fecond daughter of Robert Lucas, of Bampton in the county of Devon, efq; by whom 
he had nine fons and fix daughters. He was exemplary for his piety towards God, 
juftice, probity, and kindnefs to men, meeknefs and humility in himielf. As the affec- 
tionate hufband, the tender and provident parent were eminently united in him. His 
widow has caufed this monument to be erefted as a fmall tribute of her gratitude. 
Alfo John, fon of the above Alexander and Sarah Webber, of Pembroke-college, 
Oxford, died the 9th of Feb. 1783, aged 22 years." 

On the floor in the middle paflage: " Here lieth the body of Alex. Haviland, 

M. A. reftor of this church, and redor of the church of Runnington, who died the 
24th of Nov. 1737, aged 47." 

On another ftone: " M. S. Hie fitus eft Edvardus Clarke, de Hurftone, ge- 

netofus, qui mortem obijt 14 May 1734. Hie fitus eft Thomas Clarke, de Hurftone, 
generofus, prjedifti Edoardi pater, qui mortem obijt 16 May 1739. Hie jacet Anna, 
uxorprtedifti ThomEe Clark, qu£e mortem obijt 5"° die Jan. 1758." Arms, Argent. 
on a bend gules between three pellets, as many fwans of the firft. 

On the fouth wall is a brafs plate, with the following infcription: " Here lyetfi 

the body of Edward Sharp, who died the 6th day of November, A. D. 1673; who by 
his laft will gave forty fliillings per annum to the poor of this parifti for ever, out of his 
land called Millhams, to be diftributed every Candlemas-day at the diicretion of his 
heirs. And likewife Margaret his wife, and three of their children. Alfo here lyeth 
the body of Joane, the wife of James Clarke, of Lovington in this county, gent, and 
daughter of the abovefaid Edward Sharp, and Margaret, who departed tliis life Sept. 
24, 1720, aged 52." 

Emanuel Sharp, reftor of this place, was a fufFerer in the time of Charles I. and 
was driven from his benefice; which at the Reftoration he recovered, and likewife ob- 
tained the vicarage of St. Mary Magdalen in Taunton. 

About a mile weftward from the church, is an ancient encampment, nearly of a cir- 
cular form; the area contains about ten acres. The fofs is ncai-ly entii-e. Some 
Roman coins of the lower empire have been found within its circuit. 



^» 



KITTISFORD 



[ 24 ] C^ittjetton* 



KITTISFORD 

LIES on the river Tone, fouthward from Badialtonj and was in the Conqueror's 
days the manor of Roger Arundel: 

" Wilham holds of Roger, Chedesford. Ofmund Stramun held it in the time of 
" King Edward, and gelded for two hides. The arable is feven carucates. In de- 
" mefne are two carucates, and three fervants, and five villanes, and fix cottagers, with 
" three ploughs and a half. There is a mill of feven fhillings rent, and three acres of 
*' meadow, and ten acres of pafture, and twelve acres of wood. It was worth forty 
" flfillings, now fixty Ihillings.'" 

The defendants of this tenant William, by reafon of their refiding in the place, 
aflumed the name of de Kittisford, and held this manor till the time of Henry III. 
when it came, by the marriage of the daughter and heirefs of John de Kittisford, to John 
de Sydenham, lord of Sydenham near Bridgwater." From which family of Sydenham, 
it pafled to that of Blewet by the marriage of Nicholas Blewet, of Lottifham, with 
Agnes, daughter and heir of John Sydenham, lord of this manor. 21 Edw. IV". 
Walter Blewet, a defcendant of the faid Nicholas, held at his death the manor of 
Kittisford, and the advowfon of the church of St. Nicholas thereto' belonging j as alfo 
a'mefluage and one hundred acres of land called Soutbcotehey in the parifii of Kittis- 
ford, of Eleanor countefs of Northumberland, by the fervice of one pair of fpurs to be 
paid yearly, leaving Nicholas his fon and heir of the age of thirty years.' The prefent 
poffelTor of this manor is Thomas Langdon, efq. 

CoTTHAY in this parifh was the feat of the family of Every, who bore for their arms 
Or four chevronels gules. John Every of this place, by Anne hi$ wife, daughter and 
heir of George WiUiams, younger fon of Sir John Williams, of Herringfton in the 
county of Dorfet, knt. had a fon named John, who, dying without ifllie, left his eftates 
to the eldeft fons of his two fifters, Anne, wife of John Leigh, of Norton-Court in the 
Ifle of Wight, efq; and Barbara, wife of Sir Robert Henley, knt. The Everys of 
Chard were a branch of this family. 

The living of Kittisford is a reftory in the deanery of Taunton; the prelentation 
thereto has long been in the family of Efcott; the Rev. Bickham Efcott is the prefent 
incumbent. In 1292 it was valued at fix marks.* 

The church is dedicated to St. Nicholas, and confifts of a nave, chancel, and fide 
ailes, with a tower containing three bells. 

In the chancel floor there is aflione with this infcription: " Sarah wife of the 

Rev. Bickham Efcott, reftor of this parifh, and James their fon, were buried June 4, 
1733. Bickham Efcott, A.M. reftor of this parifh, was buried February 3, 1754, 
aged 51." 

fLib.Domefday. J' Ex Stem, fam, Sydenham. * Efc. * Taxat. Spiritual. 

RUNNINGTON, 



fl0iltiecton.J [ 15 ] 

RUNNINGTON, 

Sometimes called Rowincton, and Runton, 

IS a fmall parifh on the river Tone, which divides it from Wellington in the hundred 
of Kingfbury-Weft, and has over it a county bridge of two arches. The fituation 
is in a woody country, well watered and interfperfed with fmall eminences and valiies. 
The lands arc moftly arable, and very fertile. The poor are chiefly employed in 
hufbandry, and fpinning for the manufadure at Wellington. 

The manor at the Conqueft was William de Mohun's, of whom it was held by one 
of die name of Dodcman: 

" Dodeman holds of William, Runetone. Two thanes held it in the time of 
" King Edward, and gelded for two hides. The arable is two carucates. In demefne 
" is one carucate, and four fervants, and one villane, and eight cottagers, with one 
" plough. There is a mill of five fhillings rent, and eight acres of meadow, and ten 
" acres of wood. It was formerly worth twenty Ihillings, now fifty Ihillings."" 

This eftate was fometime the property of the Sydenham and Arundel families, and 
came into that of Speke by the marriage of Alice, the daughter of Sir John Arundel of 
Lanhern in Cornwall, with Sir John Speke, knt. In his defcendants (of whom fee ii> 
White-Lackington, vol. i. pp. 67, 68,) this manor continued till of late years purchafed ' 
of Mr. Speke of Curry-Rivel by Mr. Thomas Were, brother of Mr. Nicholas Were 
of Wellington, the prefent poffeffor. 

The living was appropriated to the priory of St. Peter and Paul at Taunton; it is a 
reftory in that deanery; the Rev. Hugh Bennet is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is a fmall ftrudure of one pace, with a tower at the weft end in which 
are two bells; it contains nothing worthy of notice. 

• Lib. Domefday. 



SAM FORD-ARUNDEL 

IS fituated three miles weft from Wellington, in the turnpike-road to Tiverton and 
Exeter. The village is compofed of about twenty houfes, which form a fmall 
ftreetnear the church; eighteen are in Samford-Moor, fix adjoin the parifh of Trull, 
and fix others are in the hamlet of Whitehall, a mile diftant weftward in the great 
road. The whole number of houfes is about fifty, and of inhabitants nearly tliree 
hundred. The lands are three-fourths arable; and fome flax is cultivated here. A 
Vol. III. E l""^l 



26" S A M F O R D - A R U N D E L. [0©ilmrtom 

fmall rivulet, the fource of which is under Culmftocke-hill on Blackdown, turns a grift- 
mill in this parifh, and after croffing the turnpike-road under a county bridge, called 
Bean-Bridge, joins the nv&c Tone at Wellington. This parifh, and the adjoining one 
of Thorn St. Margaret, are one tithing: 

The manor was given by King William the Conqueror to Roger Arundel, and in 
Domcfday-book is thus furveyed : 

" Ralph holds of Roger, Sanford. Ailward held it in the time of King Edward, 

" and gelded for one hide, and half a virgate of land, and one ferling. The arable is 

" three carucates. In demefne is one carucate, and three fervants, and two villanes, 

" and four cottagers, with one plough, and twelve acres of meadow. It was and i$ 

. " worth thirty fhillings.'" 

This Roger Arundel was, with other chief men of Normandy, of counfel with Duke 
William, in order to his invafion of this kingdom, and attending him therein led the 
centre of his army in the memorable battle of Haftings. Sir John Arundel, a de- 
Icendant of this Roger, was living at Samford in the time of Henry III. and had 
iffiie one only daughter and heir named Arondella, married to Richard Crifpin, who 
in her right became poflefled of this manor. The faid Richard had iffue William 
Crifpin, who by Joan his wife was father of one fon Roger, who died without ifllie 
7 Edw. II. and a daughter Joan, married to Bradfton; who fucceeded her brother in 
the eftates, and left iflue Elizabeth, the wife of Sir John Streche, knt. who died feized 
of the manor of Samford-Arundel, 29 Edw. III. leaving John Streche his fon and heir 
of the age of fourteen years.*" Which John was alfo a knight, and married Mary the 
daughter of Sir John Molten, of Pinhoe in the county of Devon,"' by whom he had 
ilTue another Sir John Streche, who died 13 Ric. II. leaving iffue by Catlierine his wife 
two daughters his coheireffes, viz. Cecily the wife of Sir Thomas Bonvilie,v'' and Eliza- 
beth the wife of Sir Thomas Beauchamp, of White-Lackington. The manor of Sam- 
ford was allotted to Elizabeth for her portions and Sir Thomas Beauchamp poffefiing 
it in her right, left it to Alice his coufin and heirefs, the wife of Sir John Speke, knt, 
in whofe pofterity through a number of defcents it continued till the beginning of the 
prefent century, when it was fold to the Baker family, who now poffefs it. 

The abbefs and nuns of Canon-Leigh in the county of Devon had the reftory of 
Samford-Arundel appropriated to them by Bifhop Button, with the confent of Sir 
John Arundel." 

The benefice was taxed in 1292 at feven marks.^ It is a vicarage in the deanery of 
Taunton ; the patronage is vefted in Mr. Jeremiah Woodbury, and the Rev. Henry 
Churly Manby is th'e prefent incumbent. 

In the church, which is a fmall ftrufture of one pace, with a tov/er and four bells, 
there is a handfome marble monument with this infcription: — " Sacred to the memory 

• Lib, Domefday. ■• Efc. ■• Sir William Pole's Survey of Devofl. 

" So the Inquifitions ; but Sir William Pole makes one of the coheireffes the wife of Sir William Cheyney , 
« Archer. ^ ' Taxat. Spiritual. 

of 



^iltjetton.] SAMFORD-ARUNDEL. 27 

of Chriftopher Baker, who was high-fherifF of the county of Somerfet 17J4. He was 
the eldefl- fon and heir of Jannes Baker, efq; of Culmftocke in the county of Devon, and 
of Buckland-Soronitn in this county, deceafed, by Sarah his wife; — a very worthy de- 
fcent! for his father was a gentleman of great candour and generofity, and of an 
inviolable integrity of life; and his mother (ftill living) is defervedly eftecmed for her 
piety, conftancy, and virtue. Deceflit 15° die Aug. 1729, astat. fuas 44. H. M. M. 
pie pofuit Johannes Baker, frater amantilTimus." Arms, Argent, a ialiitr /akle; on a 
chief of the fecond five efcallop fliells ermine. 

The church is dedicated to the Holy Crofs. 



THORN-ST. -MARGARET 

ADJOINS to Samford- Arundel on the north, and confifts of fixteen houfes (land- 
ing moftly near the church. The face of the country here is finely varied with 
hills and vales, woods, and large inclofures. In the high banks are various afpleniums, 
mofles, and ferns. The ftones are moftly filiceous, of the coarfe, yellow, and reddifh 
agate, liver-coloured grit, and black jalper kinds, with quartz pebbles, beautifully 
veined with red and ruft colour, and in fome there is a mixture of green. Many of 
all thefe kinds are evidently rounded by water. Here is alfo a little foft bkiifh flate, 
but very brittle. The lands are moftly under tillage, and very fruitful; a litde flax is 
raifed here. 

It abounds not with antiquities. The manor belonged at the Conqucft to the Earl 
of Morton, and is thus furveyed in Domefday-book: 

" Drogo holds of the Earl, Torne. Cheneve held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and gelded for one hide and one virgate. The arable is two carucates. In demefne 
** is one carucate, and three fervants, and three cottagers, and ten acres of meadow. It 
" was worth ten (hillings, now twenty (hiUings." 

"Ralph [the Prieft] holds of the Earl, Torne. Two thanes held it in the time of 
** King Edward, and gelded for two hides. The arable is three carucates. In demclhe 
" is one carucate, and five villanes, and two cottagers, with one plough, and fourteen 
** acres of meadow. It was worth forty (hillings, now thirty-two fliillings."" 

There was a family of th« name of Thorn, who gave lands here to the priory of 
Taunton."" The manor now belongs to Edward Clarke, of Chipley, efq. 

The living is a curacyand a peculiar in the deanery of Taunton, and in the gift of 
the archdeacon thereof. The church, dedicated to St. Margaret, is afmall building 
of one pace, with a tower containing three bells. 

f Lib. Domsfday. * Ibid. ' * Cart. Antjq. 

E 2 STAWLEY. 



r 25 J [^iltietton 



S T A W L E Y. , 

THIS parifli is fituated on the borders of Devon, and on the north edge of tht 
Tone, in a low valley encumbered with wood. The country is finely varied 
•with fwelling hills, between which are fome very romantick winding dingles, overhung 
with wood, which clothes the fteep acclivities of the hills. Their tops have but little 
wood, but large inclofures and quick hedges. There are two hamlets: 

1. Trace-Bridge, half a mile north, containing five houfes. 

2. Uplev, or Apley, a mile foutheaft, containing eight houfes. 

Stawley was a large manor in the Conqueror's time, and divided into two parts; th* 
one held by Alured de Ifpania in demefne; the other of him by Ofward and Ailward. • 

" Alured himfclf holds Stalwei. Earl Harold held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and gelded for three hides. The arable is five carucates. In demefne is one caru- 
" cate, and five fervants, and eight viUanes, and four cottagers, with two ploughs. 
" There is a mill of four-pence rent, and feven acres of meadow, and one hundred acres 
" of pafture. One mile and a half of wood in length and breadth.'" 

" Ofward and Ailward hold of Alured, StAtWEi. They held it in the time of King 
*' Edward, and gelded for two hides. The arable is four carucates. In demefne is 
" one carucate and a half^ with one fervant, and four villanes, and three cottagers, 
" with one plough. There are three acres of meadow. It was always worth twenty 
" killings. This land is added to the lands of Aluric, which Alured holds."" 

The manor of Stawley is now the property of Earl Poulett, in whofe family it has 
been for many generations. 

Apley was alfo a manor in the Conqueror's time, and belonged partly to the Earl 
of Morton, and partly to Baldwin de Execeftre: 

" Bretel holds of the Earl, Appelie. Brifmar held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and gelded for one hide. The arable is two carucates. There are two villanes, with 
*' one plough, and two acres of meadow, and three acres of pafture, and three acres of 
** wood. It is worth ten fhillings."= 

" Drogo holds of Baldwin, Apelie. Norman held it in the time of King Edward, 
** and gelded for three virgates of land. The arable is two carucates. There are four 
-" villanes, and three cottagers, and five acres of meadow, and ten acres of pafture. It 
•*^ is worth fifteen Ihillings.'"' 

The manor of Grindham, or Greenham, was alfo held by the Earl of Morton: 

" Bretel holds of the Earl, Grindeh am. Alric held it in the time of King Edward, 
** and gelded for one hide. The arable is two carucates. In demefne is one carucate, 
" and two fervants, and three villanes, and two cottagers, with half a plough. There 

f Lib. Domefday.. * Ibid, f Ibid. "Ibid. 

is 



a^titjctton,] ? T A W L E Y. £9 

*' is a mill of five ITiillings rent, and three acres of meadow, and three acres of pafturc, 
" and ten acres of wood. It is worth fifteen fliillings."* 

In the beginning of the reign of Edward I. Grindham was the property of Simon de 
Grindham, a perfon of note, and one who was a juror at Shaftfbury 3 Edw. I. concerning 
the liberties of the abbey of Glaftonbury. By Julian his wife, daughter of Jordan de 
Rogus, he left iflue one daughter, Chriftian, who was married to Sir Walter Bluet, by 
which means the manor came into that family, and continued therein till the laft 
century. They were chiefly feated at Holcombe-Rogus in the county of Devon, and 
ha(i for their arms. Or a chevron between three eaglets veri. 

The living of Stawley, which is a reftory in the deanery of Taunton, does not 
appear to be mentioned in Pope Nicholas's taxation. The patronage is in Earl 
Poulett, and the Rev. Mr. Graunt the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Michael ; a fmall Gothick edifice, confifting of a 
nave, chancel, and tower with three bells. 

John How, by his will, dated March 26, 1529, ordered his body to be buried 
within the tower and church of Stawley; and left eighteen-pence a year for ever to the 
churchwardens, to maintain a wax taper, to burn during all manner of divine fervice, 
before our Lady in the north part of the faid church. He likewife bequeathed fix 
ihillings and eight-pence to every parifh church where he had lands, except two, viz. 
to the churches of Afhbrittle, Kittisford, Runnington, Buckland, Burlefcomb, Wel- 
lington, Badialton, Clayhanger, Thorn, Huifli-Champflower, Luxborough, Hillfarence, 
Reddington, and Tiverton. To the churches of Samford-Peverel and Samford- 
Arundel, the fum of three fhillings and four-pence each.' This John How was an- 
ceftor of the Lords Chedworth. • 

• lib, DomeHaj. * Collins's Peerage, vii. 320, ex Regift. Thower, in Cur. praerog. Cantuar. 




THE 




THE HUNDRED 

O F 

NORTON. FERRERS, 

(Vulgo N O R T a N - F E R R I S.) 



THIS Hundred, which borders on the county of Wilts and the northeaft part of 
that of Dorfet, had its nanie from a hamlet in the parlfh of Kilmington, 
called Norton-Ferrers, on account of its having been long poflefled by the 
family of Ferrers of Chartley, who were lords alfo of this hundred, and kept their court 
for it at die faid hamlet of Norton, where they had their manfion. 

This hundred contains one market-town, and eight pariflies. 



WINCAUNTON, anciently WINCALETONE. 

THE river Cale, rifing near Charlton-Mufgrove, vifits and communicates its name 
to Wincaunton, Fin, fignifying pleafant, Eale, the river, and ton, the town;* 
which indeed is moft pleafingly fituated on the weftern flope of a hill, well wooded and 
cultivated, and the furface delightfully varied. The town confifts of four ftreets, viz. 
High-ftreet, which is forty feet wide, and contains many handfome houfes, inns, and 
fliops; South-ftreet, Church-ftreet, and Mill-ftreet. A fire, which happened here in 
1747, opened a way towards the improvement of the buildings of the place. The 

' Skinner derives the name from Vin, •wine, which ho thinks might formerly have been made here, and 
Canute, the Danjih chief, who was fignaUy defeated in this oeighbourhood. Others iavc fought for the 
Qangi here, 

turnpike- 



32 wiNCAUNTON. [mxtms^mmf 

turnpike -road from Taunton to Salifbury runs through it. It has a market on Wed- 
nefdays, which is very confiderable for cheefe, butter, pigs, and flax-yarn for the linen 
manufafture. The market-place is fmall, having on its weft fide the town-hall, a 
reipeclable brick ftrudlure of fifty-fix feet in front, with a ruftick ftone bafement. 
There is alfo a fmall old market-houfe with a few fhambles. Two fairs are held here 
annually, the one on the 29th of September, the other on Eafter-Tuefday. The ma- 
nufafture is of dowlas and tick, and employs moft of the poor inhabitants. There are 
Jikewife a work-houfe and a poor-houfe. At the weft end of the town, in the road to 
Caftlc-Cary, is a very good ftone bridge of two arches over the Cale, built and fup- 
ported at the expence of the county. There is another over the fame ftream adjoining 
to the town in the road to Brewton, at a place called Shatwell, of one arch only. 

At Horwood common rifes a mineral fpring, |he water whereof is ufed by many as 
an alterative for purifying the blood of fcorbutick taints. 

In this town was Ihed the firft blood in the revolution of 1688, when the Prince of 
Orange, paffing through it in his way from Torbay, attacked a party of the King's 
"dragoons, and put feveral to the fword. 

There is no doubt but that this place is of great antiquity, the fpot being near the 
fcene of fo many actions between the Britons, Danes, and Saxons. Even in the Roman 
times the place was noticed, as we may infer from an urn which was difcovered here 
■about fifty years ago filled with coins of that peoplej and a little above Sutton, half a 
peck of the fame fort of coin, with pateras and other antiquities, were found. "" The 
Saxon thanes were long in poffeffion of the placej one Elfi held it in the time of 
Edward the Confeflbr; but when William came to the crown, he gave it to his itine- 
rant fubjeft Walter de Dowai. The following account is given of it in the general 
furvey of that time: 

" Reneware holds of Walter, Wincaletone. Elfi held it in the time of King 
** Edward, and gelded for three hides and a half. The arable is feven carucates. In 
*' demefne is one carucate, and two fervants, and fixteen villanes, and fix bordars, and 
** five cottagers, with feven ploughs. There are fifty acres of meadow, and' as many of 
" wood. It was and is worth feventy ftiillings. 

" To this manor is added half a hide, which Brifmar held for a manor in the time of 
" King Edward, and gelded for half a hide. The arable is five carucates. Reneware 
*' has there one carucate, and two fervants, and feven villanes, and nine bordars, and 
" two cottagers, with three ploughs. There is a mill of thirty-pence rent, and fixty 
" acres of meadow, and thirty acres of pafture, and one hundred acres of wood. It was 
*' and is worth forty ftiillings."" 

The manor and borough of Wincaunton (for thus was it anciently privileged) fell 
after the Conqueft into the hands of the Lovels, lords of Caftle-Cary,'' with which 
manor it regularly pafled through that family, the St. Maurs, and the Zouches, till by 
the attainder of John lord Zouch and St. Maur, i Henry VII. it lapfed to the crown, 

' Stukeley'sltin. Curjof. 5. 150. « Lib, DomeHay. ? See vol. ii. p. 53. 

and 



j]3ortott'jrcrrcrisi.] WINCAUNTON. 33 

and vd < rrranted to Giles lord Daiibeny. The manor however remains ftill in the name 
of Seymour; Edward Seymour, efq; being its prefcnt pofleflbr. 

Marsh-Court, the ancient feat of the Seymours and Zouches, (lands three miles 
fouthward from the town. It now forms a hamlet, containing feven houfes. 

The other hamlets and outlkirts of this parilh are as follow, viz. 

I. The Tithing, a quarter of a mile fouthweft, in which are about thirty houfes. 

a. WiNCAUXTON-CoMMON, fifteen. 

3. Sutton, one mile weft, five. 

4. Barrow-Common, three miles north, about thirty houfes. 

Lands in the laft-mentioned hamlet (part of which lies within the parifli of Charlton- 
Mulgrove) to the amount of 9I. lis. 2d. per annum, belonged to the priory of 
Taunton; after the diflblution of which, thefe lands, with the manor of Roundbill, and 
the reftoiy of Wincaunton, were fold to William lord Stourton, whofe fon Charles lord 
Stourton, being attainted, the faid lands came again to the crown, and were fold in 
1557 at thirty years purchafe to John Dier." Roundhill near Barrow is now the feat 
of Nathaniel Webb, efq. 

Within this parifh, and at the diftance of about three miles northeafl fi-om the town, 
ftand the remains of the priory of Stavordale, founded in the reign of Henry III. 
by Richard Lovel lord of the manor of Wincaunton, for canons of the order of St. 
Auguftin, and regulation of St. Vidtor. This priory was dedicated to St. James, and 
- endowed with lands in Wincaunton, Preftley, Rakynton, Eftrepe, Cuttlefham, Thorn- 
Coffin, and other places in this county, and in Buckham-Wefton in the county of 
Dorfet. 24 Edw. III. it was found not to the King's damage to grant licence to Sir 
Richard Lovel, knt. to grant to the prior and convent of Stavordale, a mefluage, mill, 
two carucates of arable land, twelve acres of meadow, twelve acres of pafture, ten acres 
of wood, and the rent of one pound of pepper, with appertenances in Prejfeleye, to find 
a chaplain to fay divine fervice every day in the priory church of Stavordale for the 
good eftate of the faid Richard while living, and for his foul after his deceafe; and for 
the fouls of his father and mother, and all his anceftors, and all the faithful deceafcd.* 

The priors of this houle were, 

Robert, 1263. 

Robert de Charlton, died in February 1309. 

Walter de Etone, refigned Aug. 13, 1322. 

William de Nimesfeld was confirmed Aug. 29, 1322. He died in 1333; and after 
his death Richard Lovel lord of Caftle-Cary, and patron of the priory, gave licence to 
the canons'thereof to ele£t themfelves a prior.^ They accordingly defied 

Henry de Nimesfeld, July 21, 1333. 

' Harl. MS. 606. James Dyer, a. native of Wincaunton, (of this family probably) was a perfon eminent in 
the law, and publiflied a volume of reports in 1601. He died^ at Stowton in Huntingdonfhire, March 24, 1581, 
Athen. Oxon. i, zir. 

' Inq. ad quod Damn. z4 Edw. III. » Ex. RegiHro Rad. de Salop. Ep. B. & Wdlcn. 

Vol. III. F John 



g4 w I N c A u N T o N. [Cotton* jTerteriS, 

John Pcnfe, 0&. 29, 1418. He died in Oftober 1440. 

Williann Pointington, Nov. $, 1440. 

Andrew Grey, Sept. 22, 1502. 

John Legge, Sept. 1 5, 1 508. He refigned in 1 5 1 3. 

Richard Crue, canon of Brewton, Aug. 11, 1513- He was prior in J533, when 
this convent was united to the priory of Taunton." After the diflblution of that mo- 
naftery, it was granted as parcel thereof, widi all the lands belonging to it, by King 
Henry VIII. in the 36th year of his reign, to John earl of Oxford. 

The old church, which fometime ferved for the conventual one, was efteemed to be 
the mother church to Wincaunfon. This falling into ruins, a new one was built by 
Sir John Stourton, knt. and confeerated June 4, A. D. 1443.' In this church were 
buried Sir Richard St. Maur, and Ela his wife; Nicholas and John St. Maur, and 
many of the family of the Zouches, one of whom founded a chantry here, the laft in- 
cumbent of which, Robert Gulne, received in 1553 apenfion of five pounds." 

This priory is now converted into a farm-houfe and barn, together one hundred feet 
in length. Near the call end, at the fpring of fome arches, are armorial Ihields, bearing 
as follows: i. Ten bezants, a canton ermine, Zouch; impaling quarterly, firft and 
fourth, two chevrons gules, St. Maur; fecond and third, a lion rampant, Lovel. 
2. Zouch, fingly. 3. Zouch, impaling a crofs moline. The crofs beams of the ciel- 
ings of the chambers are roughly carved at the interfefbions with foliage and other 
ornaments. In the barn, which was the chapel of the priory, are two good Gothick 
prches, one twenty, the other thirty-five feet high; the timber work of the roof and 
-crofs beams carved. In the wall of the portal is a bafon for holy water; and on the 
top a fmall turret with one bell. This farm at prefent belongs to Dr. Burford, of 
Banbury in the county of Oxford. In a field belonging to the farm, a little to the 
fouthweft of the houfe, are the remains of an oftagonal ftone crofs, having a fquare 
plinth. This field is called Fair- Clofe, from a fair ufually held there the 5th of Auguft. 

Stavordale gave title of baron, 20 Geo. II. to Stephen Fox lord Ilchefter. 

The reftory of Wincaunton, valued in 1292 at twelve marks,' was appropriated to 
the priory of Stavordale above-mentioned; and in the year 1374, Bilhop Harewell ap- 
propriated the vicarage to it." It is an impropriate curacy in the deanery of Gary; the 
Rev. George Farewell is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul, and is a pretty large edifice, plain 
without, but very handfome within; the chancel having been rebuilt, and the church 
new roofed and windowed in the year 1748. It is ninety-two feet in length, and fifty- 
two feet in breadth, confifting of a nave, chancel, north and fouth ailes, all excepf the 
chancel covered with lead. At the weft end is a plain fquare tower, containing a clock 
and five bells. 

«" Pat. 24 Hen. VIII. p. 2. ' Ex Regiftro Jo. Stafford, Ep. B. & Well. 

»Hift.ofAbbie5,ii. 203. • Taxat. Spiritual. » Archer, ex Regift. Wellen. 

^ On 



J!3otton*jrettetfi[.] WINCAUNTON. 35 

On one fide of the arch which feparates the chancel from the nave, is a handfomc. 
mural monument of black and white marble» crcfted to the memory of John Tripp, 
efq; but without any infcription. Arms, Gules, a fcaling ladder between fix crols 
crofslets argent. 

On a fmall mural monument of white marble: " Hoc marmor flatruit Nathaniel 

Webb, e grata reverentia memoriae Jacobi Laurentij Churchey, armigeri de Round- 
Hill, cujus cineres juxta funt repofiti, et qui rrlTjrtalitatem exuit fecundo die Odobris, 
A. D. 17 16, annoque gratis fuse 48." Aims, ylrgent, on a fefle engrailed between 
three greyhounds' heads erakd/al^k, collared or, as many trefoils flipped of the laft. 

On a ftone monument at the weft end of the fouth aile: " In memoriam Phi, 

Bennett, arm. qui officium clerici pacis com. Somerfet per multos annos diligenter & 
ftudiofe peregit; obijt 7 Aprilis A. D. 1725, astat. fuae 87. In memoriam Annae 
uxoris Philippi Bennett, arm. qua? obijt duodecimo die Decembris, A. D. 1735, setatis 
fuas 78." Arms, G«fe, a bezant between three demi-lions nm'pani ardent ; impaling 
ermine, on a anion fable, a crefcent argent. 

Near the fouth wall is a ftone thus infcribed: " In a vault under the caft part of. 

this aile, built by Abraham Gapper, ferjeant at law, was interred his body, the 23d of 
May 1753. Alfo in the fame vault was interred the body of Mary, wife of the above- 
mentioned Abraham Gapper, efq; the 9th of May 1764, aged 76. Alfo Henry 
Gapper, efq; barrifter, and fon of the above, who died the 15th of May 1767, aged 52. 
Alfo Catharine, daughter of Abraham and Mary Gapper, and relidt of the Rev. Aaron 
Baker, vicar of Akernon, and prebendaiy of Exon, died Dec. 13, 1777, aged 57." 
Arms, a faltier, on a chief three lions rampant; on an cfcutcheon of pretence^a chevron 
between three fwans. 

On a black ftone in the chancel floor: " Here lyeth the body of Thomas 

Churchey, of Wincanton, efq; who dyed Feb. 27, 1721, in the 39th year of his age. 
And Sarah his firft wife, daughter of Robert Wadman, of Imber in the county of Wilts, 
efq; who died the 16th of November 1714, aged 28 years, without ifllie. And here- 
alfo lies Dorothy, the daughter and only iflue of Thomas Churchey, by his fccond wife 
Dorothy, the daughter of John Mogg, of Farringdon in the county of Somerfet, efq; 
who dyed the 28th of April 1722, aged 2 years." >•" 

Benefactions. " Charles Brook, efq; the vicker of Caverly, Welch Davie, and 
John Stacy, gave thirty-two pounds; John Green, thirty pounds; one moyetie of the 
profit thereof to bee diftributed on St. Thomas's-day, and the other moyetie on Good- 
Fryday, to the poor of this parifh for ever. 1693. ^ 

" Mr. John Thick, fometime a citizen of Briftol, gave fifty pounds, the profit thereof 
to be diftributed to the poore of this parifti on St. Thomas's-day for ever. 1670." 

In the church-yard is a pedeftal, on which is the effigies of a man in ftone, on the 

north fide of which is this infcription: " In memory of Nathaniel Irefon, mafter- 

builder, who eredted this monument for himfelf and family, moft of them lying near 
this place. He died the i8th of April 1769, aged 83." 

F a The 



5 W I N C A U N T O N. [aortomjfettctjf* 

The length of this parilh from north to fouth is nearly feven miles; the breadth 
from eaft to weft, three miles. The number of the houfes in the town is 2865 in the 
hamlets 87; and detached ones 10. 

The chriftenings are on an annual average 50; the burials 60. 



BRATTON-SEVMOUR, 

(Anciently called BroctunEj and Brokton) 

ADTOINS to Wincaunton on the weft, and confifts of thirteen dwellings, fituated 
at the bottom of a hill, from which an extenfive and pleafing profpeft opens to- 
wards the north and eaft, bounded by the ridge of Mendip This parifl. was held in 
the Conqueror's time by the fame lord as Wincaunton, and was thus furveyed: 

« Gerard holds of Walter, Broctune. Elft held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and -elded for four hides, The arable is eight carucates. In demefne are two caru- 
« cates! and fix fervants, and feven villanes, with four ploughs. There are four acres 
« of meadow, and fix furlongs of wood in length and breadth. It was worth feven 
" pounds when he received it; now four pounds."" 

In fucceeding times the manor of Bratton was held of the crown in chief by knight's 
fei-vice by the Loveh and St. Maurs, lords of Wincaunton and Caftle-Cary, and from 
the laft of thofe families, the place derived the appellation of Bratm-Seymcur. Froni 
them it paired with their other numerous eftates to the family of Zouche. 2 and 3 i-hil. 
and Mary, Richard Zouche, a defcendant of the Lords Zouche, fold a moiety of this 
manor, with the advowfon of the church, to John Dyer, whofe fon and heir Laurence 
Dver held the fame in the 5th year of the fame reign ; as alfo a meflliage and tenement 
in Bratton, with fixteen acres of land and wood lately belonging to the monaftery of 
Brewton^ 12 Eliz. Charles Zouche gave the other moiety of the manor to Jerom 
Dibben." It is ftiU divided, one woiety thereof belonging to Mr. Warner; the other 
to Mr. Chillwell. ' 

The living, valued in 1292 at loos.' is a redory in the deanery of Cary, and m the 
gift of the lords of the manor. The Rev. John Mefliter is the prcfent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to the Holy Trinity. It is a fmall building of a fingle pace, 
with a tower and three bells, and contains nothing worthy of obfervation. 

.J.ib.Domefday. ' Lib. Feod. ' MS. Carew, - Ter. Sydenham. « Taxat, Spiritual. 




CHARLTON- 



ji^octomjremcg.] [ 37 3 



CHARLTON-MUSGROVE " 

lES northeaft from Wincaunton, and was at the Conqueft parcel of the cftatcs of 
/ the Earl of Morton, as we find it in the following cxtrad: 
« Rainald holds of the Earl, Cerletone. Three thanes with a clerk hcW it in 
« the time of King Edward, and gelded for five hides. The arable ts fix carucatcs. 
« In demefne are three carucates, and fix fervants, and five villanes, and fix cottagers, 
<' with one plough and a half. There are fifty acres of meadow, and forty acres of 
*' pafture, and twenty acres of coppice-wood.'" 

Charlton came foon after to the family of Muccgros, a branch of the family of that 
name who came over with the Conqueror into England, and were afterwards feated at 
Overton in the county of Weftmoreland. In the time of King John, Richard de 
Mucegros was polTelTed of lands in Charlton, Norton, and otlier parts of this county, 
and was alfo farmer of the county of Gloucefter." 38 Henry III. Robert de Mucegros, 
lord of the neighbouring manor of Brewham, is certified to hold in Charlton one 
knight's fee of John de Burgh by royal fervice, and of William de I fie one hide of 
land J and three acres of land of Richard Lovel, and one yard-land of William de 
Brywham, and of Lady Sabina D'Orty ten acres of land, by the fervice of a pair of 
gloves, price one penny, per annum.' He alfo held the manor of Norton (afterwards 
called Norton-Ferrers) of Edward Bloynes.* To tliis .Robert fucceeded John de 
Mucegros, who feated himfelf at Charlton, and died feized thereof 3 Edw. I. leaving 
Robert his fon and heir.* Which Robert is ftiled of Charlton, and was the laft heir 
male of the family that pofifefied this manor; for in 8 Edw. I. he died without male 
ifiue, leaving one only daughter, Hawife, the wife of John de Ferrers, heir to this and 
his other eftates, which defcended in her right to the family of Ferrers, of whom we 
fhall fpeak more particularly hereafter,^ 

But although the manor of Charlton pafTed away from this naltie to that of Ferrers, 
there were divers of the defendants of the Mufgroves, who ftiU retained this as the 
place of their habitation, and flourifhed here for feveial centuries. John Mufgrave of 
tliis place was fherifl^of Wiltfliire, in which county he had large eftates, 2 Ric. III. and 
was progenitor of the Mufgraves of Devonfiiire, and of Nettlecombe m this county. 
Dr William Mufgrave, that eminent antiquary and phyfician, was alfo born here m 
1657. He received the earlier part of his claffical erudition at Wickham's fchooi in 
Winchefter; from which he was removed to New-college in Oxford. In J684 he was 
appointed fecretary to the Royal Society, to whofe philofophical refearches he was a 
moft ufeful affiftapt. In 1685 and 1689, he took his degrees m phyfick, and was 
afterwards admitted fellow of the college of phyficians in London. In 1691 he went 
and fettled in the city of Exeter, where for many years he exercifed his pro.eflion with 
great reputation and fuccets. During his refidence tiiere, befides enriching the medical 

fLib.Domefday. » Mag. Rot. 9 Joh. ' Lib. Feod. "Ibid. • Efc. 

' See Norton-Ferrers in Kilmingtcn. world 



V 



3S CHARLTON-MUSGRAVE. [ll3otton=jrctrettf» 

world with a variety of very ufeful difTertations, he applied himfelf to the antiquities of 
this part of England, and anaong other things publifhed a curious and learned com- 
ment on the epitaph of Julius Vitalis, now remaining at the end of the abbey-church 
in Bath; as alfo obfervations on the equeftrian ftatue of Geta found near that cityj 
and an elaborate account of that part of South-Britain which was formerly inhabited by 
the Belga, comprifing the three counties of Wilts, Hants, and Somerfet. He died 
Dec. 23, 1721. From him defcended Samuel Mufgrave, M. D. lately deceafed, the 
learned author of the Criticifms on Euripides. 

The manor of Charlton-Mufgrove is now difmembered. 

The benefice is reftorial, and in the deanery of Gary. In 1292, it was rated at fix 
marks, three fhillings.* The Rev. Thomas Leir is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated, to St. Stephen the proto-martyr, and confifts of a nave, 
chancel, and tower at the weft end. 

In the chancel, againft the north wall, is a handfome marble monument, infcribed, 
" Here lies interred Thomas Penny, efq; who departed this life April 18, 1730, aged 
57 years. He was a man of found judgment, clear underftanding, and moft excellent 
moralsj a kind and loving hulbandj a careful and tender father; a perfedl good neigh- 
bour; and an unbiafled friend. A merry and cheerful companion; of a free and ealy 
deportment, not tainted with pride or affedlation; of a ferene mind, and fteady refolu- 
tion; and even among the inceffant tortures of the ftone, always calm and refigned. 
Even thus his compofed fmiling foul would triumph over mifery itfelf. But, ah! 
Omnibus mors decreta eft." 

Againft the fouth wall, on a white marble: " Near this place are interred the 

remains of Sufannah, wife of Nathaniel Farewell, of Holbrook in the county of So- 
merfet, efq; and daughter of Robert Coker, of Mapouder in the county of Dorfet, efq. 
Her memory is embalmed with the poflefTion of every Chriftian virtue; having lived 
in the conftant praftice of every relative duty, fhe refigned this life with great firmnefs 
July 3, i745> aged 55." 

" The yeere of our Lord 1693, Mr. Thomas Edwards, of the citty of BriftoU, mer- 
chant, gave tenn pounds, the profitt thereof to be given to two poore houskeepers, not 
receiving weekly almes of this parifli, upon St. John's-day yearely for ever." 

« Taxat. Spiritual. 




KILMINGTON, 



mmri'Mtm^.] [ 39 1 



KILMINGTON. 

THIS parifh, the name of which has been varioufly fpelt, as Cilcmetone, Chelmc- 
tone, Culmington, Kihnanton, and Kilmington, is the moft eafterly parifh in the 
county, being clofely bounded on one fide by Maiden-Bradley, and on the other by 
Stourton and Stourhead, in the county of Wilts. Its fituation is elevated, and very 
pleafant, having extenfive profpefts to the north, eaft, and fouth, the country well 
wooded, and in a good ftate uf cultivation. A fpring of fine water, called Blatcbwe/l, 
rifing near the church, forms a rivulet, which runs half a mile above ground, then finks, 
and rifes again at the diftance of three miles in the parifli of Kingfton-Deverell in tlie 
county of Wilts. It runs fo near the furface of the ground, that its murmurs may be 
heard in feveral parts of its fubterraneous paflTage. About two miles fouthweft from 
ibe church is a fmall encampment, called Jack' s-CaJlk, of an oval form ; but its works 
are nearly erafed. It is fuppofed to be Danifli, from the circumftance of that people 
having fo many engagements in this neighbourhood, particularly when King Alfred 
near this fpot gave them fo decifive an overthrow. The memory of that prince is 
preferved by a ftately tower, ereded at the fouthweft extremity of the parifh, by the 
late Henry Hoare, efq,- on an eminence commanding the moft beautiful inland prof- 
pe€b in the kingdom, and to which defcription would fall very Ihort in doing proper 
juftice.* It is built of brick, of a triangular form, having a turret at each angle, 
and round one of them a railed gallery. Its height is one hundred and fifty-five ket, 
and the afcent to its top is by one hundred and twenty-one fteps. On a tablet over the 
entrance is the following infcription; 

" Alfred the Great, A. D. 879, on this fummit erefted his ftandard againft Danifli^ 
" invaders : to hiiTi we owe the origin of juries, and the creation of a naval force. 
" Alfred, the light of a benighted age, was a philofopher, and a Chriftian; the 
" father of* his people, and the founder of the Englifh monarchy and liberties." 

This tower is now the property of Sir Richard Colt Hoare, bart. grandfon of the 
founder, whofe elegant feat at Stourhead adjoins this parifli on the Wiltfliire fide. 

At the time of the Norman Conqueft the manor of Kilmington wa? thus held: 

^ " The church of St. Edward [of Shaftefbury] holds of Serlo, Chelmetone, for his 
** daughter, who is there. Alfi held it in the time of King Edward. There are fiv« 
" hides; but it only gelded for one hide. The arable is five carucates. In demcfne 
" is one carucate, and four villanes, and three cottagers, with four ploughs. There is 
" a wood one mile in length, and three furlongs in breadth. It was worth- tlnrty ftiil- 
" lings; now forty (hillings."^ 

" From the fame manor [i. e. Brewton] is taken away half a hide in Cilemetone. 
" Serlo de Burci holds it, and it is worth ten fliillings. It was of the demcfne farncv"* 

• See the engraving annexed to Glaftonbury Torr, vol. ii. p. 264, * Lib, Dom«fdajr. ' ILid. 

Fiona 



\ 



40 K I L M I N G T O N. [Jl2otton*jrertct0» 

From Serlo de Burci the manor came to the crowrij and was granted to the family of 
Le Port, of whom Sybilla Le Port held it in the time of King Edw. I. and then gave 
lands here to the monaftery of Brewton. 

By, an inquifition taken at Crevikerne, it was found that George, the fii-fl Earl of 
Huntingdon, died March 21, 1544, then feized of this and divers other manors in this 
neighbourhood J and that Francis earl of Huntingdon was his fon and heir/ But foon 
after this by fome means or other it came to the poflefTion of the Hurtgills, a family of 
confiderable reputation and property in thefe parts; two of whom, viz. William, and 
John his fon, in the reign of Queen Mary, fell unhappy viflims to the cruelty of Lord 
Stourton.' The property heretofore poirefTed by this family is now, by various pur- 
chafes, chiefly in the hands of Lord Ilchefter and Sir Richard Colt Hoare, bart. but fhe 
Jatter has the manor. 

About a mile northeafl from Kilmington is Norton-Ferrers, which gave name to 
this hundred. It was fometimes called Nerton-Bowode^ and Bonewood, and was pof- 
fefled by the Mufgraves, whofe heirefs brought it by marriage to the family of Ferrers. 

John de Ferrers, who married Mufgrave's heirefs, was the firft lord Ferrers of 
Chartley, and as fuch had fummons to parliament among the barons from 27 Edw. \. 
to 5 Edw. II. He died 18 Edw, II. leaving by Hawife his faid wife, Robert de 
Ferrers his fon and heir, then fifteen years of age. 

This Robert was in the wars of Scotland and Flande.'-s, and 23 Edw. III. attended 
the King in that memorable expedition into France, when the Englifh forces obtained 
the fignal viftory at Crefl}'. Fle died the year following, leaving ifllie two fons, John, 
who fucceeded him as third Lord Ferrers, and Robert, of Wem and Overfley. 

John, his eldeft fon, 23 Edw. III. was in the expedition into Gafcony, and had 
fummons to parliament among the barons. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Ralph 
earl of Stafford, by whom, dying abroad 41 Edw. III. he left iflTue Robert, who fuc- 
ceeded to his title and eftates. 

2 Ric. II. this Robert was in the wars of France, but died i Henry V. leaving ilTue 
by Margaret his wife, daughter of Edward lord le Defpencer, Edmund his fon and heir. 

Which Edmund de Ferrers was the fifth Lord Ferrers of Chartley, and having been 
engaged in feveral foreign expeditions, died feized of this manor 14 Henry VI. and 
was fucceeded therein by WiUiam de Ferrers his fon and heir, at that time twenty-three 
years of age. 

This William de Ferrers was the laft of the family in the male line that enjoyed this 
manor; for dying 28 Henry VI. he left iflue one only daughter Anne, heir to all his 
pofTefllons, which fhe conveyed to her hufband Walter Devereux, of Weobly in the. 
county of Hereford, who i Edw. IV. in her right had fummons to parUament by the 
title of Lord Ferrers of Chartley, and foon after was elefted knight of the garter; but 
at length had the misfortune to be flain at the battle of Bofworth in 1485. 

* Coles's Efc, * Sec Strype's Memorials, Englifh Hiftories, &c. 

John 



il3orton=jrerrcts.] K i l m I N G T o N. 4, 

John lord Ferrers, of Chartley, fucceeded his father in this manor, and left iflue 
Walter Devereux lord Ferrers, his fon and heir, who 22 Henry VIII. fold the manor 
of Norton-Ferrers to Lord Stourton, whofe fon being attainted, the faid manor, with its 
appertenances and other lands and hereditaments in Norton, as alfo the capital mef- 
fuage or farm of the manor of Norton, commonly called Norton-Farm, fituate within 
the parilh of Kilmington, was granted by Queen Elizabeth, in the 41ft year of her 
reign, to Hartgill and Willoughby, who fold the fame 44 Eliz. to Smyth and Combe j 
after which it came by divers purchafes to the family of Madox, who fold it to Mr, 
Barnes, and he to Henry Hobhoufe, efq; the prefent pofleflbr. 

Between Kilmington and Maiden-Bradley in Wilts, flrands YaRnfield, which in 
the Conqueror's time belonged to Walter Gifard, or GifFard : 

" Walter Gifard holds of the King, Gernefelle, and William of him. Ernebold 
** held it in the time of King Edward, and gelded for two hides. The arable is three 
** carucates. In demefne are two carucates, with one fervant, and five cottagers, with 
*' one plough. There are twenty acres of pafture, and fixty acres of wood. It was 
" worth forty fliillings, now thirty fhillings."'^ 

This Walter Giffard was fon of Ofborne de Bolebec, and Avelina his wife, fifter tO 
Gunnora, duchefs of Normandy, and great-grandmother to the Conqueror. He was 
the firft Earl of the county of Buckingham after the Conqueft;* and one of the prin- 
cipal perfons who compiled the great furvey called Domelday-Book. His fon and 
heir was another Walter Giffard, fecond Earl of Buckingham, of whom, in the time of 
Henry II. this manor, confifling of one knight's fee, was held by Manfer Biflet,'' who 
gave it with all its appertenances to the holpital which he founded for poor leprous 
women at Maiden-Bradley.' 

The living of Kilmington, the advowfon whereof belonged formerly to the abbey of 
Shaftfbury in Dorfetfhire, and which was in 1292 valued at twenty marks,"" is reftorial 
in the deanery of Cary. The patronage is in the Earl of Ilchefter, and the Rev. 
Charles Digby is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Mary. It is a fubftantial and very neat edifice, con- 
fiding of a nave, chancel, nordi and fouth aile leaded, and a handfome tower at the 
weft end containing two bells. In this tower poor old Hartgill and his wife, and fe- 
veral of their fervants, took refuge from the aflault of Lord Stourton, who, on the 
morning of aWhitfunday, came to this church with a number of men, armed with 
bows and arrows, and guns, with an intent to force away the faid Hartgill and his fon 
to his lordlhip's houfe at Stourton. What could not be effedcd by force, was after- 
wards accomplilhed by treachery; and an apparently amicable invitation to Stourton 
■was an unhappy prelude to the dreadfiil affaflination of both father and fon, and the 
confequently ignominious exit of the perpetrator. 

The Hartgills were interred in the church j but moft of the infcrlptions over their 
jgraves are effaced by time. 

' Lib. Domcfday. « Dugd. Bar. i. 59. * Lib. Nig. Seac. i. 189. 

- ' Mod, Angl. ii. 400. * Ta.^lt, Spiritual. 

Vol. Ill- G i« 



42 K I L M I N G T O N. [JBOtton^JFCttCtfif* 

In the north aile there is a fmall ftone infcrlbed, " Here lyeth the body of John 

Hartgill, efq; who dyed April 5, 1605." Arms, [Jrgent} thret bucks' heads ca- 
bolTed l/aMe.] 

On the north fide of the nave is an elegant mural monument of white marble, with 

this infcription: " Sacred to the memory of John Madox, of Norton-Ferris in this 

parilh, efq; who died Odl. 1772, aged 72. He was an able, upright, and aftive raagi- 
fti-ate, an honeft man, and fincere friend, Jane Madox, his wife, who died Aug. 1774, 
aged 62. Humanity, piety, charity, and benevolence, with every good and amiable 
quality, were united in the charafber of this excellent woman; 

Whofe form each beauty of her mind exprefs'd, 
Whofe mind was virtue by the graces drefs'd. 

Cecilia Madox, their daughter, who died March 1764, aged 27. Richard Madox, 
their fon, who died January 1777, aged 52." 

In the church-yard, which is large and neat, are two tombs to Ferdinando Hartgill, 
efq; who died 1736, aged 79; and John Hartgill, efq; who died 1748, aged 67." 

The chriftenings in this parifh are on an average 18 j the burials 11. 

Brewham-Lodge, weftward from Kilmington, was parcel of the cftate of the 
Mufgroves and Ferrers, lords of Norton. 



PEN, PENZELWOOD, or PEN-SELWOOD. 

THIS parifh is fituated on the eaftern verge of the county, near the junftion of the 
confines of Wilts and Dorfet. The fituation is high, bleak, and expofed, and 
commands a very extenfive profpeft. The river Stour wafhes it on the eaftern fide. 

The ancient names of this place were Penna, Peonna, Peonhoy and Peonhum, all 
which fignify, in the ancient Britilh, a head or eminence, and are metaphorically applied 
to the fummits of mountains, or the tops of any conlpicuoufly elevated places. Selwood 
was afterwards adjoined, becaufe this diftrift was included within the foreft of that 
name; and that thereby it might be diftinguifhed from another Pen in this county. 

This traft and its environs have been the theatre of many notable rencounters in 
times of old, when an extent of foreign dominion, to be purchafed by tumult and by 
blood-fhed, was more eagerly coveted than a fmall domeftick territory, to be enjoyed in 
peace and quiet. The Britons, long harrafled by the perfidious Saxons, and driven 
to and fro throughout the weftern parts of England, refolved in this place to colleft all 
their ftrength, and make a ftand againft the enemy. Kenewalch, fon of Kingils, king 
of the Weft-Saxons, was then hovering in their purfuit, and coming up with them 

on 



iQorton'jrmewo pen. 43 

on the brow fouthweftward from tlie village, a tremendous naughrer enfucd in either 
army, but at length vifbory determined for the Saxons; and the poor Britons feem never 
after to have gathered ftrength fufficient to repel the arms of the enemy; but retiring 
to the Cambrian iiills, left England in difdain, to be poflcflTed by foreigners. This 
event happened A. D. 658," at a period when mofl parts of Britain fuffered in fome 
meafure from the impetuofity of war; but it fhould feem that the place we are fpeaking 
of wasdeftined to experience a double portion of hoftility; for although it is not re- 
corded that Alfred in his march through the foreft againft the Danes A. D. 879, 
touched upon this village, or that any adlion here enfued; yet certain it is that the fame 
people in the year looi," having recruited their forces, after their return into England, 
their devaftation of Cornwall, their taking of Exeter, and their poflefling themfelves of . 
Hampfhire, Dorfet, and the Ifle of Wight, are found in this fpot, engaging with a party 
of King Ethelred's officers, who being few in number, and unable to cope with fo great 
a multitude, fell back, and the Danes purfuing them, put the greater part to the fword, 
and burnt the village of Pen entirely to the ground. Nor was it long after that they 
themfelves, under the conduft of King Canute, experienced in this felf-fame place a fate 
equally fevere; when A. D. 10 16, the vifborious Edmund, determining to annihilate the 
Danilh name and power, oppofed all his army againft them, and fo totally overthrew 
them, that of all their mighty number few efcaped the fury of his fword by flight.' 
The fcene of this laft-mentioned aftion is fuppofed to be a wafte piece of land near the 
church, where to this day remain an immenfe number of pits or hollows, noticed in our 
maps by the name of Pen-Pits. The ground in which thefe pits are, contains about 
two hundred acres; the foil a gravelly clay. Their form is that of an inverted cone 5 
their fizes various, being from ten to fifty feet in diameter at top, and from five to ten 
at the bottom. They are in depth flantwife from five to ten feet, and fituated but at a 
fmall diftance from each other. Their number is confiderably upwards of twenty 
thoufand; but their arrangement is not regular, as fome have aflerted; but contrariwife 
promifcuous and confufed. 

Various are the opinions concerning thefe and fuch-like excavations, which are to 
be found in odier parts of Britain.'' Some have fuppofed them to have been cities; 
others refuges from cold and wintry ftoims, when houfes were infrequent; others, gra- 
naries and receptacles for provifions;" and others, (as in this inftance) encampments 
for foldiery; difcovering their pofitions as to offence and defence; and defigning fome 
nations for the main-body, and others for the advanced guards.' And laftly, others 
have conjeftured* that the pits in queftion were excavated by the Danilh foldiers a 
little before the attack made upon them, and the decifive victory obtained over 
them near this fpot by King Alfred's forces. All thefe conjedures are ingenious; 
albeit the pits in queftion very much refemble the obfolete grooves of the mines of 
lapis-calaminaris on the Mendip hills. 

• Sax. Chron. p. 39. ^ Ibid. p. 132. • Ibid. p. 148. Flor. Worceft. Matt. Weftmon. Brompton, 4c. 

* See Archacologia, vol. vii. * Tacitus, de raoribus Germanorum. ' Hutchins's Hift. of Dorfet, ii. 2J3, 

' Letter from Mr. Crocker in the Gentleman's Magazine for June 1786. 



44 PEN. CJi5otton«jrcrtctsf» 

We have no further account of Pen till the time of Edward the Confeffor, when the 
whole place was occupied by Britnod, a Saxon thane, who being difpoflefled of it at 
the Conqueft, it was given by King William to Roger Arundel, who held it when the 
following account was written: 

" William holds of Roger, Penne. Britnod held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and gelded for three hides. The arable is three carucates. In demefne is one caru- 
" cate, and four villanes, and eight bordars, and four cottagers, with one plough and a 
" half. There is a mill of forty pence rent, and twelve acres of meadow, and twenty 
" acres of pafture. Wood twelve furlongs long, and four furlongs and twelve perches 
" broad. It was worth when he received it feven pounds, now three pounds."'' 

In the time of Richard I. Matthew de Clyvedon was lord of this manor,' and from 
his defcendants it came to a family who received their name from the town of Frome 
where they feem to have had large poffeffions; the name occurring in teftimony to fe- 
veral charters and deeds of the family of Braunche, lords of Frome manor." 25 Edw. I. 
Richard de Frome had a moiety of this manor,' and was fucceeded by another of his 
name. To which Richard fucceeded WiUiam, and to him Reginald de Frome who 
had lands in Compton-Pauncefor^ 5 Edw.j" III. and 7 Edw. III. the fame Reginald 
and Margaret his wife, are certified to hold the third part of the manor of South- 
Cadbury." By an inquifition taken at Brewton 17 June, 17 Henry VIII. it was found 
that John Butler of Badminton died feized of the manor of Pen, 15 Henry VIII • 
It is now the property of the Earl of Ilchefter, the Earl of Egremont, Mr Bieeiii 
and others. ^^ ' 

The living is a reftory in the deanery of Gary. In 1 292 it was valued at fix marks ' 
The lords of the manor are its patrons, and the Rev. Richard Ring is the prefent 
incumbent. -o r v 

The church, which is dedicated to the honour of St. Michael the Archangel is a 
fmall old building, fixty-five feet in length, and feventeen in breadth, having a nave 
chancel, and porch, all covered with tile, and a fquare embattled tower at the weft end 
fifty feet high, and containing three bells. In the porch is a very fine Saxon arch. ' 

On a ten yeais average, the chriftenings in this pariih are found to be annually in 
number fivej the burials three. 

»Lib.Doniefday. ' Rot. Pip. 10 Ric. I. »Cart.Antiq. ' Peramb. Foreft. 

-Efc. ribid. 'Inq. i7Hen.III. ' Taxat. Spiritual. 




SHEPTON- 



Bottow'Smm.} [ 45 3 



SHEPTON-MONTACUTE. 

THIS parifli, containing the hamlets of Upper and Lower-Shepton, Knoll and 
Stoney-Stoke, lies north from Wincaunton; and in the Conqueror's time was 
poffefled by the Earl of Morton, and of him held by Drogo, or Drew de Montacute. 

" Drogo holds of the Earl, Sceptone. Toli held it in the time of King Edward 
".and gelded for five hides. The arable is five carucates. In demefne arc two caru' 
« cates, and eight fei-vants, and eight villanes, and five cottagers, with three ploughs 
« There are two mills j one not rated, the other pays fcven fhillings and fix-pence' 
" There are thirty acres of meadow, wood ten furlongs long, and four furlongs broad' 
" It was worth fcven pounds, now one hundred fhillings. 

" To this manor is added Stoche, [i. e. Stoney-Stoke.] Drogo holds it of the 
« Earl. Robert [fon of] Wimarc held it in the time of King Edward, and .rdded for 
" three hides. The arable is four carucates. In demefne is one carucatc," and two 
« fervants, and five villanes, and eight cottagers, with two ploughs. There are five 
" acres of meadow, and two acres of wood. It is worth three pounds.'" 

^^1^'^ ^'""So de Montacute was one of thofc chieftains who came into Enc^land with 
WiUiam duke of Normandy, in the retinue of Robert earl of Morton, under whom he 
enjoyed this territory, which in procefs of time became tlie feat of a barony, and was 
from Its pofleflbrs denominated Shepton-Montacute. He held alfo of the faid Earl one 
hide of land in Montagud or Montacute in this county, which place is generally fuppofcd 
to have given title to the familyj but their original cognomination was derived from 
Montagu a townfliip in Normandy, where they had pofleffions, and were feated Ion., 
before the place in England had its name. And it is altogether probable that the Earl 
of Morton (if he had any other reafon than that of a Latin definition) impofcd on his 
demefnes at Bilhopfton" the appellation of Montagud or Montacute, in compliment to 
this Drogo, his favourite and confidential friend. But waving this matter, we find the 
faid Drogo de Montacute inpoffeflion of thefc eftates till his deatli, which took place 
about the latter end of the reign of King Henry I. when he was fucceeded by William 
de Montacute his fon and heir. 

To which WiUiam fucceeded Richard de Montacute, who 2 Henry II. paid twenty 
pounds into the King's exchequer for the ancient pleas ;' and 7 Henry II. upon the 
collefbion of the fcutage then levied, he paid twenty marks for the knights fees wliich lie 
at that time held." Soon after which he died, leaving iffue Drogo or Drew de Mon- 
tacute his fon and heir, who was commonly called Drogo Juvenis, or young Dru. 

This Dru, upon the affeffinent of the aid for marrying the King's daughter, 12 
Henry II. certified his knights' fees to be in number nine, a half and a third part of the 
old feoffment, and one of the new. Thefc fces were thus held: 

? Lib. Domefday. » See Montacute in TintinhuU Hundred. 

5 Rot. Pip. 2 Hen. II. ? Rot. Pip. 7 Hen. II. 

William 



^ SHEPTON-MONTACUTE. [JSottOtl* JFemtSl* 

William Malherbe, three fees. 
Robert Fitz-John, one fee. 
Jordan Guihaine, one fee. 

Robert Fitz-William, in Winburneford, half a fee. 
Hamo, half a fee. 
Helias de Arden, half a fee. 
Thomas de Tolre, half a fee. 
Richard Fitz-Eernard, the third part of a fee. 
And of the new feoffment, William de Montacute, one fee. 

Befides one knight's fee in Dichenefcove, [Diflicove] whereof he was unwarrantably 
difpoflefied by Henry Lovel.' For all which fees 14 Henry II. he paid ten marks. 
He married Aliva, the daughter of Alan Baffet, baron ofWiccomb in the county of 
Bucks, and by her had ifllie, 

William de Montacute, who fucceeded to the barony, and 6 Ric. I. paid 61. is. 8d. 
for his eftates in this county, as fcutage for the King's ranfom.^ 7, 8, and 9 J oh. he 
executed the office of fheriff for this county and Dorfet, having under him for the firft 
of thofe years Olbert the clerk his deputy." 17 Joh. this WilUam being found in 
arms with the rebellious barons, all his lands in this county and Dorfet were feized by 
the King, and given to Ralph de Ralegh, but they were afterwards reftored. He died 
18 Joh. and was fucceeded by another William de Montacute, his fon and heir. 

Which William, 17 Henry III. had alfo all his lands diftrained by virtue of the King's 
precept for omitting to repair to court at the feaft of Whitfuntide, there to receive the 
dignity of knighthood, as he was required to do.' But the next year, on doing his 
homage, he was by the fherifFof Somerfet and Dorfet reinftatcd in his pofTeflions. 
He died 31 Henry III. leaving ilTue 

William his fon and heir, who 38 Henry III. had fummons to attend the King Into 
Gafcony, againft Alphonfo X. King of Caftile, who had ufurped that province. 
41 Henry III. he was fummoned to be with the King at Chefter, on the feaft-day of 
St Peter ad vincula, well furnifhed with horfe and arms, thence to march againft 
Llewellyn-ap-Griffith, prince of Wales. 42 Hen. III. he had alfo a fimilar citation." 
By Berta his wife, he left iffue 

Simon de Montacute, who alfo was in feveral expeditions into Wales, and particu- 
larly in that of 10 Edw. I. when Llewellyn loft his territory and life. 18 Edw. I. he 
obtained of that King a confirmation of this manor of Shepton-Montacute, with all 
the woods, &c. thereto belonging, fituated within the foreft of Selwood; and alfo of 
the manors of Yarlington, Chedzoy, Goathill, Knolle, and Laymore, all in this county j 
with other lands and rents in the counties of Dorfet, Bucks, and Oxon.' 22 Edw. I. 
be received command to attend the King at Portfmouth, weU furniftied with horfe and 

'Lib.Nig.Saic.i.94. 'Rot. Pip. 14 Hen. 11. 1 « Rot. Pip. 6 Ric. I. » MS. Dodfworth. 

' Rot. Fin. 17 Hen. III. m. s- '" Rot- Cla«- f"t> '^^^^ '>^^' ' ^^' '^ ^^- ^- "" 73- 

arms. 



ji3ortoivjrertcr0.] siiepton-montacute. 47 

arms, to fail thence into Gafcony, where he perfornned many great and flgnal ferviccs/* 
26 Edw. I . he was in the Scottifli wars j and the year following was appointed governor 
of Corfe-Caftle in Dorfetlhire. In 1301 he was one of thofe barons who figned a 
memorable letter to the Pope, in anfwcr to his pretences of fupremacy in Scotland: 
his feal affixed thereto was a griffin rampant, with tliis circumfcription: Simon Dns de 
MoNTEAcuTO. 35 Edw. I. he was again in the Scottifli wars j 2 Edw. II. was conftituted 
governor of Beaumaris caftle in Anglefeyj and 7 Edw. II. was Admiral of the King's 
fleet. He married Aufricia daughter and heir of Fergufius king of the Iflc of Man» 
and by her had two fons William and Simon. 

"William de Montacute, the cldeft fon and heir, was alfo in the wars of Scotland for 
feveral years of K^ing Edw. II. with whom he was eminently in favour for his fidelity^ 
circumfpeftion, and prudence, in many weighty matters wherewith he was entrufted j 
and by whom he was appointed fenefchal of Gafcony, and governor of the ifland of 
Oleron in France. He had fummons to parliament among the barons 1 1 and i z 
Edw. II. and the year following died in Gafcony," feized of this manor, Yarlington,. 
Knolle, (for which he had charter of free- warren) Goathill, and Thurlbeer, leaving by 
his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Peter de Montfort, feveral fons and daughters. 

William, the fecond fon of this laft-mentioned William, (John the eldeft having 
died in his life-time) fucceeded to the barony of Shepton-Montacute, and 19 Edw. II> 
was made a knight of the Bath. 2 Edw. III. he was chofen as one of the barons to 
attend the King to Amiens, where Edward did homage to Philip de Valois king of 
France, for his dutchy of Aquitain. His conduft both at home and abroad was fo 
highly approved by his fovereign, and his fervices fo confpicuoufly beneficial to his 
country, that he retained him for the term of his whole life to ferve him as well in time 
of peace as war; in confideration of which he granted him the manor of Wark upon 
Tweed J the manors of Kingfbury and Camel j and the manor, town, and hundred 
of Somerton in this county." He was alfo by the fame King, for his extraordinary 
merit, advanced to the title and dignity of Earl of Salifbury 16 March 1336-7, with 
a grant of the yearly rent of twenty pounds out of the profits of the county o W^ilts, 
to him and his heirs for ever. He had alfo one thoufand pounds penfion, and the 
grant of an eagle added to his arms, with the office of Earl Marlhal for life. He died 
17 Edw. III. feized of this manor, and the hamlet of Blackmore, parcel thereof; as 
alfo of the manor of Stoke-Trifter, with its members of Cucldington and Bayford;. 
leaving by Catharine his wife, daughter of William lord Grandifon, two fons, William, 
who fucceeded him, and John, whofe fon John became Earl of Salifbury, and four 
daughters, who were all married to perfons of high rank and diftindlion.'' 

William de Montacute, or Montagu, fecond earl of Salifbury, upon founding the 
illuftrious order of the garter in 1349, was the fevcnth knight elefted, being then 
twenty-one years old. In 1346 he affifted in the famous batrie of Creffy, and in 1356, 
commanded the rear of the Englilh army in the battle of Poidiers. He ferved in tlie 
French wars all the time of Edw. III. and being lord fteward to King Richard II. lie 

fRot.Vafc.zzEd.I. m.8. f Efc. " Pat. 4 Ed. III. p. i,m. si. ' Efc. 

had 



4« SHEPTON-MONTACUTE. [3l3otton«jrmer0; 

had the honour of conducing the Princefs Anne of Bohemia, daughter of the Emperor 
Charles IV. from Calais to the King her fpoufe at London. He married Elizabeth, 
eldeft daughter and coheir of John lord Mohun of Dunfter, and by her had an only 
fon William, who was unfortunately flain 6 Ric. II. by his father in a tilting at 
Windfor. And the Earl dying in 1397, was fucceeded by his nephew John, the fon of 
his brother Sir John de Montacute, lent, deceafed, and of Margaret daughter and heir 
of Sir Thomas Monthermer lord Monthermer, by Joan of Acres his wife, fecond 
daughter of Edw. I. in whofe right he was fummoned to parliament among the barons 
of the realm from ji Edw. III. to Feb. 25, 1389-90, when he died, and was buried in 
Salifbury cathedral. He had alfo other fons, of whom Simon Montagu, who died 
before him, was anceflor to the Dukes of Montagu, Manchefter, &c. 

His eldeft fon and heir. Sir John de Montacute, lent, third earl of Salifbury, was 
thirty-nine years old at his father's deceafe, foon after which he had livery of his lands ; 
as alfo 21 Ric. II. of thofe lands which defcended to him from his uncle WiUiam de 
•Montacute earl of Salifbury aforefaid.' 22 Ric. II. he was conftituted Marfhal of 
England; but foon after the depofal of that King he entered into a confederacy with 
John Holland earl of Huntingdon, Thomas Holland duke of Surry, and Thomas 
Difpenfer earl of Glouceiler, to dethrone King Henry, and reftore King Richard. With 
this defign they came to Windfor-caftle, under the difguife of Chriftmas players, but 
being detected, they fled in the night-time to Cirencefter in Glouceftcrfhire ; where the 
townfmen, being alarmed at the unexpefted arrival of fuch a number of fbrangers, and 
at fo unfeafonablc a time, flopped up all the avenues to the town to hem them in, and 
prevent their efcape. Hereupon a grievous battle enfued, which lafted from midnight 
till three the next morning, when they yielded up themfelves, defiring they might not 
fuffer death till they could fpeak with the King; which was granted. But a certain 
prieft of their party, having fet fire to a part of the town, with a view of giving them 
an opportunity to efcape, the Cirenceftrians were thereby fb exafperated, diat they 
dragged them out of the abbey, where they were confined, and beheaded them pub- 
licity in the market-place at break of day.' The body of the Earl was buried in the 
abbey-church of Cirencefter, where it remained till 8 Henry V. and was then removed,* 
upon the petition of Maud his widow, to the abbey of Buftlefham, or Bifham, in the 
county of Berks, which his anceftors had fourided.' By Maud his faid wife, who was 
the daughter of Sir Adam Francis, knt. he had ilTue two fons, viz. Thomas; and 
Richard, who died without ifTuej and three daughters, viz. Anne, Margaret, and 
Elizabeth. 

Thomas Montagu, the eldeft fon, was thegreateft hero of his time; being lieutenant 
in Normandy for Henry V. and VI.; fometime general in France under John duke of 
Bedford, and often general in chief. He reduced many places in Normandy, and in 
1418 defeated the French at Frefnoy. In 1423 he overcame the French army, tlien 
befieging Crevant; killed feven Earls and Lords, one thoufand eight hundred knights 
and gentlemen, with feven thoufand common men and prifoners. In 1424, he was 
. chief commander under the Duke of Bedford in the great viftory over the French at 

* Rot. Fin. 21 Ric. II. m. 11. ' Tho. Wals. p. 401. • Pat. 8 Hen. V. m. 4. * Mon. Angl. ii. 355. 

Verneuil, 



3l3orton^jrcrm«.] shepton-MONTACUTE. 4^ 

Verneuil, where among the flain were fifteen earls and noblemen of France, three 
Scots lords, Archibald earl of Douglas the general, the earls of Buchan and Wigton, 
with nine thoufand feven hundred common men, French and Scots. He died in 1428, 
of a wound which he received at the fiege of Orleans, leaving by Helen, daughter 
of Thomas Holland duke of Surry, an only daughter, Alice, wife of Richard Neville, 
fon of Ralph the firft earl of Weftmorelandj who in 1428 was by King Heniy VI. 
created Earl of Salifbury. 

But neither did this Thomas de Montacute, or any of his pofterlty, inherit the 
manor we are fpeaking of, (which, after the attainder of John Montagu earl of Saliftjury 
and father of the faid Thomas, was given away to Sir Richard de St. Maur, and was 
afterwards poflefied by the families of Pole, Dinham, and Berkeley, and is now finally 
enjoyed by Edward Phelips, of Montacute, efq;) for the only manor that was afTigned 
him by the King in companion of his youth, and the low eftate into which he had been 
brought by the attainder of his father, was the manor of Knollcj the other eftates being 
difleminated according to the politicks of the times. 

The arms borne by this family were various," as, i. A griffin fegreant. 2. Two taU 
bots paflant. 3. Argent, three fufils in feffe gules, within a bordure /able; which laft 
are ufed by the prefent Duke of Manchefter. 

The church of Shepton-Montacute was in 1292 valued at eight marks,' and was 
appropriated to the priory of Brewton. It is a curacy in the deanery of Cary, and in 
the patronage of Lord Ilchefter; the Rev. Mr. Goldertirough is the prefent incumbent. 

The building (dedicated to St. Peter) confifts of a nave and chancel, with a tower on 
the fouth fide, containing three bells. On the north wall there is a white marble to the 
memory of William Mogg, and Rebecca his wife. She died Jan. 8, 17 17, aged 551 
he Sept. 18, 172 1, aged 75. As alfo to the memory of Mr. Thomas Wolmington and 
Mary his wife. She died June 6, 1751, aged 6y, he May i8, 1766, aged 82. Arms, 
Ermine, three crefcents gules. 

In the church-yard are the remains of an old crofs. 

" Seals from ancient Deeds. ■ Taxat. Spiritual. 



STOKE -TRI8TER 

IS a parifli on the eaftern fide of Wincaunton, comprifing a large hamlet called 
Bayford, fituated one mile weftward in the turnpike-road from the town of Win- 
caunton to Mere in Wiltfliire. This manor, with its members of Bayford and Cuck- 
lington, was poflefied by Robert earl of Morton at the time of the Norman Conqueft. 

« Bretel holds of the Earl, Stoche. Two thanes held it in the time of King 

«* Edward, and gelded for three hides. The arable is five cirucates. In demcfne is 

Vol. III. H " one 



50 STOKE-TRISTER. CJl3orton*jrertetsf. 

•< one carucate, and feven fervants, and three villanes, and eight bordars, and five cot- 
" tagers, with two ploughs. There is a mill of ten-pence rent, and fifteen acres of 
" meadow. Wood one mile long, and one flirlong broad. It was and is worth fixty 
« Ihillings.'" 

About the time of Henry I. this manor became the property of Richard Del Eftre, 
a baron of great account, who held divers fees in this county of the honour of Morton, 
and the barony of Montacuce.'' It does not appear how long that family were in pof- 
feffion of this manorj but in the time of King John we find it the property of Richard 
Rivel, lord of Curry-Rivd and other manors in this county; whofe heirefs Sabina, in 
the time of Henry III. brought it by marriage to Henry de Ortiaco, or L'Orti, another 
great baron and landholder in the weftern parts of England. This Henry was father 
of another Henry, who, i4Edw. I. having been in the expedition into Wales, obtained 
the King's precept for fcutage from all his tenants by military fervice. 12 Edw. I. he 
had fummons to attend the King at Portfmouth well furnifhed with horfe and arms to 
fail into France.' 25 Edw. I. he was fummoned to parliament among the baronsj and 
32 Edw. I. obtained a charter of free-warren in all his demefne lands at Stoke-Triftrej 
as alfo a licence for a market every week upon the Tuefday at Cucklington; with a 
fair yearly on the eve, day, and morrow after the feaft of All-Saints, and feven days 
enfuing.*" In the fame reign alfo the faid Henry L'Orti granted to the abbey of Bindon 
in the county of Dorfet, all fuit of court, with the homage, &c. in this his manor of 
Stoke-Triftre." This Henry L'Orti died 14 Edw. II. leaving iflue Henry his fon and 
heir, the third of that name. Which Henry, by his deed dated 1 9 Edw. II. granted to 
Thomas Att-Ayfhe Baker, a mefluage, two yard-lands, tv/o acres of meadow, and two 
acres of wood, in Curry-Rivel, Langport, and Weftover, parcel of the demefne lands 
of Curry-Rivel : there remained to the faid Henry, befides this feoffment, the ma- 
nors of Curry-Rivel, Pitney, and Stoke-Triftre, all held of the King in chief by 
knight's fervice.' He died 15 Edw. III. feized of the manors of Stoke-Triftre, Bay- 
ford, and Cucklington, with the advowfon of the church of Cucklington, and the chapel 
of Stoke, leaving John de L'Orti his fon and heir.* Which John de L'Orti, many 
years before his death, granted to one Elizabeth Child, of Stanford, the manors of Stoke- 
Triftre, Cucklington, and Bayford, to hold to her, her heirs and aflighs for ever.*" 
Shortly after this enfeoffment he married the faid Elizabeth Child, and ftie furviving 
him, releafed all her right in the faid manors to Sir John de Molyns, knt. and his heirs,' 
who had likewife before a fimilar releafe thereof from Ralph de Middelney, William de 
Marifchal, and Richard de L'Orti, brother of Sir John de L'Orti, knt. aforefaid." 
17 Edw. III. William de Montacute earl of Sarum died feized in his demefne, as of 
fee, of the manor of Stoke-Trifter, with the members of Cucklington and Bayford, 
and all other appertenances, parcel of the barony de Urtiaco.' After which the faid 
manors paffed to the Fitz- Alans earls of Arundel j and are now vefted in Edward 
Phelips, of Montacute, efq. 

• Lib. Domefday. " Lib. Nig. Scac. i. 98. <^ Rot. Vafcon. 22 Ed. I. m. 7. 

* Cart. 32 Ed. I. m. 3. • Hift. of Dorfet, i. 130. ' Inq. ad quod damnum, 19 Ed. II. 

' 'Efc. »Cart.Andq. « Rot. Claus. 21 Ed. III. Mbid. ' Efc. 

The 



ji^octotfiTmetsio stoke-trister. 51 

The living of Stoke-Trifter is a reftory in the deanery of Caiy, and in the patronage 
of the lord of the manor. The Rev. William Phelips is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is a fmall building of one pace, having a tower with four bells. 

Under the communion-table is an infcription to the memory of the , Rev. Charles 
Michell, reftor of this church, who died Feb. i8, 17 15. 



CUCKLINGTON. 

TO the foutheaft of Stoke-Trifter lies Cucklington, fituated on high ground, oa 
the top of a north flope of a fteep and lofty ridge, called Clay-Hill, which in thi» 
part is the boundary of the counties of Somerfet and Dorfet. From the top of this 
hill, and from the parifh church-yard, to the fouth and weft, the profpedl is very 
extenfive, rich, and beautifiil. The whole number of houfes in this parifh is forty- 
feven, and of inhabitants two hundred and fifty. Forty-two of thefe houfes form an 
irregular ftraggling ftreet near the churchj the reft ftand fingly. There are feveral fine 
Iprings on the flxeet fidci the lands are moftly arable j the foil under the hill a wee 
cold clay. 

The manor is called in Domefday-Book Coc'mtone: 

" Bretel holds of the Earl [Morton] Cocintone. Leuin and Suain held it in thft 
** time of King Edward, and gelded for feven hides. The arable is fix carucates. In 
" demefhe is one carucate, with one fervant, and twelve villanes, and eight cottagers, 
** with two ploughs. There are twenty-two acres of meadow. Wood eighteen fur- 
*' longs long, and four furlongs broad. It was worth feven pounds, now one hundred 
" fhillings.* 

This manor was always an appendage to Stoke-Trifter; and its lords the L'Orti's 
(as has been mentioned in the account of that parifti) procured a weekly market, and 
an annual fair, to be held in this place. Nothing now remains of eitherj its lord is 
Edward Phelips, of Montacute, efq; who is alfo patron of the living, which in 1292 
was valued at ten marks." It is redorial, in the deanery of Caryj the Rev. William 
Phelips is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Lawrence. It is a Gothick ftruflure, fixty feet long, 
and thirty-two feet wide, and confifts of a nave, chancel, and two fide ailes. On the 
fouth fide is an embattled tower, forty-two feet high, with five bells, and a pinnacle 
terminated by a gilt ball, eight feet above the tower. 

On one fide of the eaft window is a neat mural monument of black and white marble, 
infcribed,— — " Hie jacet quod reliquum eft Nicolai Watts, armigeri, qui obijt die 

r Lib. Domefday. «■ T»xat. Spuitual, 



52 C U C K L I N G T O N. imttotl^^mm, 

Nov. 14, A. D. 1 729, aetatis fuas 51. Filia ejus unica, fuperftes et hseres, Elizabetha, 
Rutha uxore genita, hoc debiti honoris et obfervantias teftimonium chari patris fui me- 
morias facrum masrens pofuit." Arms, /fzure, three broad arrows or; on a chief of 
the fecond, as many moors' heads, fide- faced, couped proper: impaling ermine, on a 
bend/aMe, three boars' heads cr. 

•i 

On a fimilar monument againft the north wall of the chancel ; . . " Memoriae fa- 
crum Ruthas, charas fuas uxoris, Nicolas Watts de Shanks, in hac parochia, marmor 
hoc ftatujt. Obijt vicefimo die Julij, Anno Domini 17 16, aetatis 35." 




THE 




THE HUNDRED 



O F 



NORTH-PETHERTON 



Is a confiderable traft of land, lying in the weftem part of this county, and derii* 
ving its nanie as froni the hundred town, fo particularly from the river Parret, 
which runs through it longitudinally, and at length difcharges itlelf into the 
Briftol Channel, at a fmall diftance from its very northern extremity. 

"Within this diftridt were formerly contained thirty-eight hides, three yard-lands, and 
half a furlong i of which thirty-one hides, three yard-lands, and half a furlong, belonged 
to the crown. Five other hides and a half, and half a yard-land, were held in demefne 
by the King's barons; viz. by Walfcin de Douai, two hides j John, the ulher, a yard- 
land and a half; Anfger, the cook, five yard-lands; Robert de Auberville, a hide and 
a half; and the church of Petherton, half a hide.* 

The Kings of England had here a foreft and a park; but the royalty of the hundred- 
was in private hands; being in the time of Henry III. the property of Henry de 
Erleigh, whofe defcendants held it with the manor of North-Petherton, in fee-farm of 
the crown at the rent of five pounds five Ihillings per annum.*" Befides the hundred 
town it contains the borough, market, and fca-port town of Bridgwater, and eight 
other parifhes. 

•Inq. Glield; * Efc. 




NORTH- 



[ 54- ] [Bottfj'lpetlittton* 



N O R T H - P E T H E R T O N. 

A Very large parilh fituated in a woody flat between the towns of Bridgwater and 
Taunton, and waflied by the river Parret, from which it derives its name, being 
anciently written PeD^tOnC, or the town upon the Parretj and not infrequently 
Noj\r-Pej\er, from its more northerly fituation on the fame river, which nearer its rife 
(kins another hundred, in contradiftinftion denominated SuS-Peper, South-Petberton. 

There are within this extenfive parifh the following places, tithings, and hamlets: 



North-Petherton, 

Petherton-Park, 

North-Newton, 

West-Newton, 

Wolmersdon,^ 

huntworth, 



Moorland, 

Bankland, 

Sheerston, 

Tuckerton, 

Mansel, 

Clavelshay, 



Boomer, 

Melcomp-Paulet, 
Road, 
Faringdon, 

and 
Edgeborough. 



The town of North-Petherton confifts chiefly of one ftreet, which is built along the 
tnrnpike-road from Bridgwater to Taunton, and contains many good houfes. It had 
formerly a large market on Saturdays for corn, the remains of which are ftill in being; 
and there is a. fair on the firft and fecond days in May, procured of the crown by the 
ancient lords of the manor and the hundred. 

The town was formerly the poffefllon of the Saxon kings, and it was of fuch confe- 
quence, that it never was afleffed to the Danegeld, nor rated to any other fubfidy. 
King William the Conqueror kept it in his own hands, and his commiffioners gave the' 
following report of it: 

" The King holds Nort-Peret. King Edward held it. It never gelded, nor is 
*' it known how many hides there are. The arable is tliirty carucates. In demefne 
*' are three carucates, and twenty villanes, and nineteen cottagers, and fix fervants, 
** and twenty fwineherds, with twenty-three ploughs. There is a mill of fifteen-pence 
** rent, and one hundred acres of meadow, and two miles of pafture: it yields twenty 
*' Ihillings per annum. 

*' This manor brings in a revenue of forty-two pounds eight Ihillings and four- 
** pence, of twenty in an. ore.'" 

The manor of North-Petherton had after the Conqueft for its pofleflbrs the ancient 
family of de Erlega, or Erleigh, fo denominated from the lordlhip of Erleigh near 
Reading in the county of Berks. In the time of Henry II. William de Erleia (for fo 
was his name then written) certified to the King that by virtue of his tenure he had a 
right to be the King's chamberlain, and that he had one knight in fee, fcil.' Thomas de 
Bercham, of the old feoffment, and none of the new."" This WiUiam was fon of John 
de Erleigh, of whom, and his defcendants, particular notice has been already taken in 

• Lib. Doiaefday. * Lib. Nig. Scac. i. loi. 

the 



©ortWctbertonO NORTH-PET herton. 55 

the pariih of Beckington in the hundred of Frome. It therefore here remains only to 
obferve, that this manor, after having been poflefled by the Erleighs for many fucccirive 
generations, paflfed at length from them to the family of Beaupine, and by the marriage 
of Agnes the daughter and heir of Thomas Beaupine, with John Bluet of Grindham/ 
it became vefted in that family, of whom were John, Walter, and Nicholas Bluet, and 
others, who lineally inherited this manor and hundred. After them it was difperfed by 
coheirefles into different hands. By fome means or other, however, it came to the 
crown, where it lodged for fome length of time, and was granted to Edward earl of 
Hertford, afterwards Duke of Somerfet; \Vho being attainted. King Edw. VI. in the 
7 th year of his reign granted the manor and other hereditaments, late parcel of the 
lands and pofleffions of the faid Duke, to John duke of Northumberland, who the 
fame year exchanged the faid premifes with Sir Thomas Wroth, knt. Both the manor 
and iiundred of North-Petherton are now poflefled by John Slade, efq. 

A little to the eaftward of the town, though in the hundred of Williton Freemanors^ 
is Petherton-Park, the cuftody of which was in ancient times a ferjeanty, belonging 
to the manor of Newton-Foreftcr, now Newton; and in that right was held in the 
time of Henry II. and Ric. I. by Oftjert and William Dacus, or Dennis. 5 Joh. that 
King granted to William de Wrotham the whole lands of William Dacus belonging to 
the cuftody of the park of Petherton, with the houfes and edifices thereon, together 
with the brulhwood, deadwood, pannage, and other perquifites belonging to the office 
of park-keeper, the fame being declared to belong to Newton,, and other the lands of 
William de Wrotham in this county.* At the time of this grant, the faid William de 
Wrotham was forefter of all the King's foreft:s in this county and Dorfet, being there- 
unto elefted, and on the payment of a fine of one hundred pounds was admitted by the 
King.' It muft be underftood that the forefters fo chofen were called Fcreftarii Barcmon 
et Militum, and were of the nature of truftees for the woods, commons, and pannage,, 
which the barons, knights, and other freeholders, held in their own right within the 
King's forefts. Thefe officers were very different from the King's forefters, which 
were only appointed for the prefervation of the King's rights. Of thefe fome were 
arbitrarily appointed, and others had the office annexed to certain lands; which laft were 
called Forefters in Fee. Upon the grant of Newton to WiUiam de Wrotham, the 
fervice was enlarged, and as William Dacus held the fame by the ferjeanty of being the 
King's forefter within the park of Petherton, it was declared that he held it by the 
fervice of being the King's forefter in the counties of Somerfet, Dorfet, Devon, and 
Cornwall. It, does not however appear that his heirs ever executed the office out of 
this county. 

This William was fucceeded by his two fons fucceffively, viz. William, archdeacon 
of Taunton, and Richard; the firft being a clergyman, Richard his brother was fubfti- 
tuted in his room. Which Richard left a fon of his own name, who 35 Henry III. 
died without iffue; on which William de Placetis, fon of Muriel his eldeft fifter; 
Conftance, wife of John le Blund; Emma, wife of Geffrey de Scoland; and Chriftian, 
wife of Thomas Picot; became his heirs.' 

' Efc. * Pat. 5 Joh. • Rot. c. Joli. ' Efc. 

William 



56 NORTH-PETHERTON. [Jisortfe.jpetljettom 

William dc Placetis, as fon of the eldeft fifter, had the office of forefter, as alfo the 
manor of Newton; and 35 Henry III. was admitted, paying a rent of four heifers and 
a little bull for the bailiwick of Exmore, and giving a fatisfadion to the reft of the 
coheirs. This William died 2 Edw. I. and was fucceeded by Richard his fon, who 
dying without iffue 17 Edw. I. his lands were divided between three fifters, Sabina, 
wife of Nicholas Peche; Avclina, wife of Thomas Durant; and Emma, wife of John 
Hairun or Heron. Every one of thefe fifters had a fhare of the manor of Newton, 
which defcended to their children, as will hereafter be Ihewn; but foon after the death 
of Sir Richard de Placetis, it was found that the office of being keeper of Petherton- 
Park, as alfo forefter 6f Exmore, Neroche, Selwood, and Mendip, likewife the cuftody 
of the warren of Somerton, appertained to a certain meffuage within the manor, and 
a meadow called M'^indenreid-Mede; which meffiiage and meadow were included in the 
portion of Sabina Peche; by which means ftie was 24 Edw. I. forefter in fee of thofe 
forefts, and appointed Peter de Hamme to be her deputy. 

In the time of this Sabina Peche, viz. 26 Edw. I. a perambulation was made of all 
the forefts in this county,^ in order to reduce them to their ancient and lawful bounds, 

in 

« I. " Perambulatio forelbe de 4&rieii)oBe in comitatu Somerfet, per vifura Malcolini de Harleigh & Johannis 
de Wrotefleghe, ad vifura didbe perambulationis faciendum per Dominum Regem affignatorum, Galfredi de 
Wrokefhall & Hugonis de Popham militum, de comitatu prjedifto, per prasfatos Malcolinum & Johannem clec- 
torum & eifdem affociatorum, convocatis & prxfentibus Petro de Hamme, tenente locum Sabina: Pecche, foref- 
tarix de feodo Henrici de Carevile, Waltero Alayn, Willelmo Portbref & Nicholao de la Mare, viridarii* 
ejnfdem forefts, fafta ibidem XIII. die Martii, anno regni regis Edwardi XXVI, per facramentum fupradic- 
torum juratorum, qui dicunt, quod bunda: foreibe de Seleiuode incipiunt ad pontem de Sutbbruham, qua: eft 
ultima aqua de Bryixj, & abinde per viam ufque la Bar'ive : & abinde per viam quandam ufque domum 
Bruke : & abinde dimittendo diftam domum a dextris ufque ad portam aula: domini regis, quum parcus de 
Wjcham claufus fuit : & abinde per hayham ufque aquam de Frame : & abinde per di£lam aquam, dimittendo 
ipfam a dextris, ufque pontem de Waledich : & abinde per era bofci de Seleixiode ufque Burtynghburgh defupef 
domum le Noble : & abinde, dimittendo illam domum a dextris, uf4ue la Wytecofte : Sc abinde ufque RadenejCt 
in confmio comkiXaam Sonier/et Sc Ifyiees : et abinde per quendam duftum ufque hofcatn de fferemenej^re : Sc 
i difto bofco per Trencham-mouth per viam, qua: dicitur Hunterfiueye, ufque la Gahere : & abinde per bofcum 
de Kilmetoa, dimittendo ipfum a dextris, ufque locum, qui dicitur Kyngejfecke : Sc abinde per viam ufque Penburi, 
dimittendo totum bofcum de Norton a dextris, qui bofcus eft in comitatu Somerfet: & abinde ufque la Penne: 

& abinde per viam regiam ufque & abinde per viam regiam ufque per medium Biteivode, ficut 

ducellus, qui vocatur Stanebrok, vadit, qui venit de molendino de 5/ax'fr</(»/^ ; & abinde, dimittendo diftum 
molendinum a dextris, per quandam viam extra parcum de Forjhefe verfus orientem : & abinde per altam viam 
ufque ecdefiam de Bruham, dimittendo ipfam a ftniftris : & abinde ufque ad pontem de Suthbruham- ubi prius 
bundse inceperunt. Et dicunt, quod a dextris infra didas bundas eft forefta. Et dicunt, quod omne^ . ..iae et bofci 
fubfcripti a fmiftris extra bundas praediftas fuerunt afForeftati poft coronationem domini Henrici, quondam regis 
Angliae, filii Matildis imperatricis, et dcbent deaiForeftari, juxta tenorem cartae praediftae, videlicet, villa de 
KoUmeton, quam Sibella le port tenet : pars villa: de Penne, quam Ricardus de Frome tenet : quajdjim pars villas 
de Bruton ex parte orieniali partis quam prior de Bruton tenet; major pars v^llae de Northbruham, cum gravis, 
bofcis & moris adjacentibus, quam prior de Bruton tenet. Quaedam pars villarum de Cloford Sc Pofibury, cum 
bofcis & pertinentiis, quas Johannes Flory tenet. Medietas villaede Wo^efire, cum bofcis Sc pertinentiis, quam' 
Johannes de Afton & Elizabetha de Clyvedon tenent. Villa de Truttokejbull, cum bofco Sc pertinentiis fuis, 
quam Nicholaus de la Mare & Galfridus de Muntfort tenent. Villa de Merjion, cum gravis, quam Rjcardus de 
Bigode tenet. Villa de Smethivek, quam abbas de Ciceftre tenet. Villa de Cayver, quam Willelmus Polayn 
tenet. Villa de JVyletham, quam Gilbertus Michell tenet. Villa de Litteford, cum bofcis & pertinentiis fuis, 
fluara Willelmus Portbref tenet. Villa de Radene, quam epifcopus Wygorn. tenet. Villa de Gernrfeld, cum 
gravis, qaam prior de Bradlygh tenet. Villa de A^or^on, cum gravis, quam Johannes de Ferers tenet. Villa de 
JLjIrepe, quam prior de Staverdall tenet. Villa de Northftoke, cum bofcis, quam Alionora Lovel tenet. Villa de 
Hengro've, cum bofco, quam Johannes Hurfchull tenet. Villa de Hengrtve, quam Elizabetha de Clyvedon tenet. 
Villa de Kyn^iMere, cum bofco, quam Johannes de Carvile tenet. 



l3ort|)'Pctl>crton.] north- petherton. 



57 




in piirfiiance of the charter of forefts made 9 Henry III. and that year ratified under 
the great feal of England. The boundaries to be afccitained, were fuch as exiftcd in 
the time of King Henry I. The conimifTioners for the King were, Malcoline de 
Harkigh, and John de Wrotefleighi to whom were joined two others, chofen by the 

county, 

II. 

" Perambulatio foreftae de flmttW, in comitatu Somerfet, per vifum Malcolini de Harleigh & Johannij 
de Wrotedeghe, ad vifmn diftx perambulationis faciendum, per dominum regem affignatorum, & Galfridi de 
Wroxhalc & Hugonis de Popham militum, de eodem comitatu, per eofdem Malcolinum & Johannem cIe.f>orum 
& eifdem aflbciatorum, convocatis & praefentibus Sabina Pecchc, fprellaria diftae forellje de feodo, Reginaldode 
Wytele & Galfrido de Afslond, viridariis didlx foreftae, fadla ibidem decimo none die Martii, anno regni regis 
Edwardi XXVI" , per facramentum Willelmi Tryvctt, Walter! de Loveny, Willelmi de Stanton militum, 
Laurentii de Alyngton, Willelmi de Poulet, Johannis de By kcfand, "Willelmi Fichete de Sydenham, Johannis 
de Rayng, & Mattha-'i de EflTe, qui dicunt, quod omnes villae, terrze & bofci fubfcripti, infra metas forefta; praedida;, 
fuerunt aftbreflati poll coronationem domini Henrici, quondam regis Angliae, fijii Matildis imperatricis, per 
dominum Johannem, quondam rcgem Angliar, ad dampnum tenentium, & debent deaffbreftari, juxta tenorem 
cartx domini Henrici, quondam regis Anglia;, patris domini regis Edwardi, qui nunc eft, de forefta, videlicet, 
quidam mons, qui vocatur caftrum de Uacftic^. Villa de CapelanJ, cum bofcis & pertinentiis, quam Robertus 
de Val tenet. Quidam bofcus, perdnens ad manerium de Bykenbull, quern Willelmus de Welle tenet in cufto- 
diam & dotem. Medietas vi!l;E de Sti'veleghe, cum bofcis & pertinentiis, quam Edmundus Everard & Thomas 
Money tenent. Quidam bofcus, qui appellatur ©trrlcljaiui, pertinens ad manerium Yle-Abbatis, quem abbas de 
Mucheloeye tenet. Bofcus, qui dicitur Sot-vjode, pertinens ad manerium de Drayton, quem idem abbas tenet. 
Qnidam bofcus, qui vocatur Vnhtt, pertinens ad manerium de Ilemjnfler, quem idem abbas tenet. Quidam bof- 
cus, qui vocatur Haukefiere, pertinens ad manerium de Cammd-Abbatis , quem idem abbas tenet. Villa de 
Ojfchull, cum bofcis & pertinentiis, quam Jacobus de Moleton tenet. Quidam bofcus, qui vocatur Clayhull, 
pertinens ad manerium de South-Petherton, quem Elyas de Daubeny tenet. Villa de Brade-way, cum bofcis & 
pertinentiis, quam Henricus de Urtiaco tenet. Hamleta de Stoforde, pertinens ad manerium de TUton, quam 
abbas de Athelnyc tenet. Quoddam ermitagium, cum bofco & pertinentiis, quod "I'homas de Monte Sorelli & 
Johannes de Aflelonde tenent. Medietas villa; de Horton, cum pertinentiis, qu.im abbas de Mochelneye & 
Thomas de Mere tenent. Medietas villje de Dunyote, cum bofcis & pertinentiis, quam Simon de Monte-acuto 
tenet. Hamleta de Stokkpath & Hockey, cum bofcis & pertinentiis, pertinentia ad manerium de Cumba, quae 
Philippus de Welles tenet. Quoddam tenementum, quod vocatur Wodeboufe, cum bofcis & pertinentiis, qui 
Rogerus de Poltemor tenet. Quaedam terras & bofci apud la Grange, quas Laurentius de la Grange tenet. 
Manerium de Deniite, cum bofcis & pertinentiis, quod magifter Rogerus Piftor tenet. Quoddam tenementum* 
cum bofco & pertinentiis, quod vocatur Leghe, quod Cecilia de Belle campo tenet. Hamleta de Tfelbare^ 
cum bofcis & pertinentiis, quam Willelmus de Stanton minor & Willelmus Crukete tenent. QnMam bofcus, 
qui vocatur Stopelewodc, Sc qua;dam pars terr« qua: vocatur Corylond, pertinentes ad manerium de Stapele, cum 
bofcis & pertinentiis, quos Robertus Burnel tenet. In cujus rei teilimonjum figilla prsediflorum juratorum huic 
perambulation! funt appenfa. 

III. 

" Perambulatio foreftae de tfrmcrc, in comitatu Somerfet, per vifum Malcolini de Harleigh & Joharttiis- 
de Wrotefleghe, ad difium vifum faciendum per dominum regem affign.ntorum, & per vifum BaJdrici de 
Nonyton & Hugonis de Popham militum de comitatu pnedifto, per eofdem Malcolinum & Johannem clei5lorum» 
& eifdem aflbciatorum, ad diftum vifum teftificandum, convocatis & prxfentibus Petro de Hamme, tenente 
locum Sabinx Pecche, cuftodis dittx foreftx, & Gilberto de la Putte admeans, viridariis ejufdem forertas, fafla 
ibidem vicefimo fecundo die Martii, anno regni regis Edwardi viccfmio fexto, per facramentum Willelmi de 
Staunton, Willelmi Trivete & Waltrri de Loveny militum, Johannis deReyny, Johannis de PoulcfhuU, Philippi 
de Woleford, Henrici de Gernvile, Johannis de Radyngton, Ricardi de Avele, Rogeri de MatidohuUe, Roberti 
de Mandenhulle, Roberti de Efcote, ThomaeTerel, & Roberti de Chubbworthe, qui dicunt, quoJ bundae foreft.-e 
praedifls, juxta tenorem cartas domini Henrici, quondam regis Angliae, patris domini Edwardi regis nunc, de 
forefta, incipiunt ad quendam locum, qui vocatur Cjniejyde, & abinde procedendo per quandam viam , inter domi- 
nicUm domini regis & feodum Wilklmi de Kytenore, ufquc iilas petras, quae vocautur fijioncs : Sc abinde de- 
fcendenio per quendam dudlum, qui vocatur Lillefcumbe, u(que aquam, quae vocatur Ore : Sc abinde defcendendo- 
ultra brueram ufque ilium montem, qui vcc^tar BJaidergh : & abinde procedendo ufque brceram atque ilium 
raontem Ofinundebergh : Si abinde procedendo ulua brueram uf^ue ilium locum, qui vocatur Spracombejbc-ved : 

Vol. III. J et abinde 



m m 

58 NORTH-PETHERTON. [jSottfj^lPctFjclton. 

county, for the vifitation of each foreftj which for Petherton were. Sir Hugh dc 
Popliam, and Sir Gefferey de Wrockfhale, knts. Thele commiflloners, on a verdift 
found by a jury of the principal gentlemen of the county, made the following report, 
viz. That the bounds of the foreft of Nortli-Petherton begin at a bridge called 

- Ebbynge- 

ct abinde defcendendo per quendam dufluiii ufque aquam, quae vocatur Exe : & abinds afcendendo per quoddatn 
vetus foffiitum ufque illam petram, qux vocatur Radfton : & abinde procedendo inter feodum Johannis Moun & 
feodum abbatis de Neth ufque illud vadum, quod vocatur Reddefird : Sc abinde afce.idendo ultra brueram, 
direfle ufque ilium locum Schepectimbehe-ved, ufque illam petram, qux vocatur Derefmarke : & abinde proce- 
dendo ultra brueram, inter dominicum domini regis & feodum abbatis de Neth, ufque locum qui vocatur 
Stonchijie: & abinde defcendendo ufque locum ilium, in aqua de Berghel, ufque aquam de Schurebiirn, defcendit 
in aqua de Berghel, qui locus vocatur Schurebui-neffite : & abinde defcendendo ultra brueram diredle ufque illam 
petram, qux vocatur Hockhflon : & abinde defcendendo ufque quoddam vadum, quod vocatur Wylhneford, in 
aqua quae vocatur Dunmokejhroke, in conlinio diilorum comitatuum, ufque Cornej'yete, ad locum ubi prius didlDE 
bund* inceperunt. Et dicunt, quod totuni ^ dextris intra bundas pra;diftas in toto circuitu eft forefta domini 
regis. ,Et quod omnes terrx & bofci fubfcripti a fmiftris extra bundas prxdidlas fuerunt afForeftati, ad dampnum 
tenentium, poil coronationem domini Henrici, quondam regis Anglix, filii Matildis imperatricis, iz debent 
deafForeftari juxta tenorem cartx prxdiftx, videlicet, omnes terrs & tenementa et bofci, cum brueris, inter prx- 

diflas bundas & mar qux Johannes Kelly tenet. Villa de Kytenore, cum bofcis, brueris & aliis 

pertinentiis I'uis, quara Willelmus de Kytenore tenet. \'il!a de Ternar, cum bofcis, brueris & aliis pertinentiis, 
quam Jehannes de Meier tenet. Villa de Porloke, cum bofcis, brueris & aliis pertinentiis fuis, quam Simon 
Reges de Porloke tenet. Villa de Bofynton, cum bofcis, brueris & aliis pcitinentiis, quam Henricus de Glaften 
tenet. Villa de U^eJlloSlun, cum bofcis, brueris & aliis pertinentiis: Villa At H'yverefmerejbam, cum bofcis, 
brueris & aliis pertinentiis, quas Galfridusde I^oftun tenet. Villx D'Overey Sc de EJilcclun, cum bofcis, brueri* 
& pertinentiis, quas Baldricus de Nonyngton tenet. Villa de Brcggekfnole & Levecote, cum bofcis, brueris & 
aliis pertinentiis fuis, quas prior de Taunton tenet, Bofcus, qui vocatur M'orthe, cum bruera & aliis pertinentiis 
fois, quas Johannes de Kellynton tenet. Villa de Stoke, cum bofco et aliis pertinentiis, quam Gilbertus Piro tenet. 
Villa de Chittsjliam, cum bofcis, brueris & aliis pertinentiis, quam Ricardus de Chittciliam tenet. Villx de 
Honecetebohie Sc Broford, cum bofcis, brueris & aliis pertinentiis, quas Willelmus de Holne tenet. Hamelets ds 
Forde Sc Style, cum bofco de Haucombe Sc bruera de Dunr.crny, quas Alionora Courteney tenet. Terrx de 
Ellcivorthe, cum bofcis & brueris, quas Jacobus de Torthe tenet. Villx de HaukeivelL' Sc la Walks, cum bofcis, 
brueris & aliis pertinentiis, quas prior de Bath et prior de Cowyke tenent. Manerium de Codecumbe, cum bofcis, 
brueris et ahis pertinentiis, quod Johannes de Moun, Symon de Raleigh tenent. Villa de i^armunces , cum 
bofcis, brueris & aliis pertinentiis, |quas Willelmus de Monceaus tenet. Villa de Almonefivorth, cum bofcis, 
brueris & aliis pertinentiis, quam Robertus, filius P.-igani, tenet. Villa de Exefordemony , cum bofcis, brueris & 
aliis pertinentiis, quam abbas de Neth tenent. Villa de Begger-^armc, cum bofcis, quam Willelmus de Kyte- 
nore tenet. Villa de Wyneford, cum bofcis, brueris Sc aliis pertinentiis, quam Ricardus Ripariis 5: Stephanus 
Beumunde tenent. Hameleta de Wydecumbe, cum bofcis, brueris & pertinentiis, quam Idonca de Kael tenet. 
Hameleta de Hao, cum bofcis, brueris & pertinentiis, quam Johannes de Hoo tenet. Hameleta de Ttttebrcke, 
cum bofcis, brueris & pertinentiis, quam Thomas de Bokehegh tenet. Villa de Exton, Sc Villa Haukebrug^e, & 
villa de Langacre, cum bofcis, brueris & pertinentiis, quas Johannes Herun, Ricardus Durante, Adam Kuile- 
legh, Sc heredes Galfridi de Scolonde & Eoidede Feynes tenent. Villa de Wydepole, cum bofcis, brueris & per- 
tinentiis, quam abbatiffa de Wylton & Ricardus le Kynge tenent. Hameleta de Brutenefworthcy, cum bofcia, 

brueris & pertinantiis, quam de Tyntent tenet. Hameleta de Wejiafixny, cum bofcis, brueris & 

pertinentiis, quam Johannes de Sparkeford tenet. H<imeleta de Z.o/f«?^!^^, cum bofcis, brueris & pertinentiis, 
quam Robertus de Boloyne tenet. Hameleta i.tEfiaj\vay, cum bofcis, brueris & pertinentiis, quam Rogerus 
Beupel tenet. Hamletx de Telchcte Sc de la Merfe, cum bofcis, brueris & pertinentiis, quas prior de Taunton 
tenet. Villa de Dilverton, cum bofcis, brueris & pertinentiis, quam Hawys de Pyne & Thomas de Saleye tenent. 
Hameleta de Haivkewell, cum bofcis & pertinentiis, quam Rogerus deHawkewell tenet. Prioratus de Barlich, 
cura bofcis, brueris & pertinentiis fuis, quern prior de Barlich tenet. In cujus rei teftiuionium figilla juratorum 
Imic perambulaxioni func appenik. 

. IV. 
" Perambulatio foreftx de £59enctifi), in comitatu Somerfet, coram Malcolino de Harleigh & Johanne de 
Wrotetleghe, ad vifum diftx perambulationis faciendum per dominum Regem affignatia, & Galfrido de Wrokef. 
hall & Hugone de Popham railitibus, de comitatu prxdidto, perprsefatos Malcolinum & Johannem eleftis & 

cifdem 



jBottlj'lPetbCCtonJ NORTH-PETHERTON. 59 

Ebbynge-brugge, and from thence run along by a certain ditch, by the fkirts of a wood, 
to a certain lake called lluntyngeye; and thence by the faid lake to a place called 
Chestercrofte; and thence by the faid lake of Huntyngeye, to a place called Jone-weye-, 
and thence going along by a certain du6t between the King's dcmefne, and the fee of 

Sabina 

Philippo de Ireys, & Roberto de Marifco, viridaiiis ejufdem foreftx, fa£la ibidem decimo die Maii, anno regni 
reps Edvvardi vicefimo fexto, per facramentum Thoma: de Tornay, Laurentii de Hameldcn, Roberti d anes, 
eifdcm alTociatis, convocatis Sc pra;fcntibus Petrode Hamme, tcnentc locum Mabina: Pecchc, foreftaria; de feodo, 
Thomjc de Baufe, Bartholomxi de Peytcvyn militum, Hcnrici de Luttleton, Willelmi de Sanfto Laudo, Johannia 
de Butelcr, Johannis de Wyttutcfme, Rogcii de Schokerwyke, Hugonis de Malherbe & Edmundi Hufee, quj 
dicutit, quod bundx forella:; pra;diifla; incipiunt apud Stoburghe, &.abinde procedendo per mediam brueram ufque 
le Thurkfton: & abinde per mediam brueram ufque la Schpiyndtclyffe : & abinde per mediam brueram ufque 
furcas libertatis de ChciUre, dimittendo diilas furcas a dextris in forefta ufque DutineJIon : Sc abinde per quan- 
dam femitam ufque ad pctram, qua: appellatur Dunnejion: Sc abinde defcendendo ulque aotluc^c ufque petram, 
quxdkkm Sliperjlon : & abinde ufque fpinam, qux dicitur Men borne : & abinde ufque marifcum Johannis de 
Afton: k abinde dimittendo didtum marifcum in forefta a dextris, ufque petram, quam Srtiia *>a'niicl poni fecit, 
inter feodum mancrii de Cheddic, et feodum manerii abbatis Glaften : Sc abinde ufque la Nctepole verfus Cljivare, 
dimittendo a finiftrls feodum abbatis Glaften : per feodum Pliilippi de Wyky : & abinde ufque Leremcre per anti- 
quum curfum aqu.x : & abinde ufque A^'Wcwcr* a dextris in forefta : Scibmie.\iit\^e Schernham : & abinde ufque 
la Rede, quK eft de dominico domini regis, dimittendo Schernbam et la Rede a dextris in forefta : et abinde ufque 
Mbrehigbes de Axebruggc : Sc abinde ufque le Portlakcs: Sc abinde ufque Gorexveyfmullc : Sc abinde ufque fonttm, 

qui dicitur HolleivelU: Sc abinde per medium domus Roberti warde, qux eft intra foreftara in villa de 

Axebrugge ufque Honicjlane : et abinde afcendendo ufque montem, qui dicitur C«/«xi,v ; Sc abinde ufque /a 
Rudyngge : Sc abinde per la Rudyngge ulque Lynleghejpoule : & abinde afcendendo per quandam vallem Sc defcen- 
dendo ufque Ifaterfcumbe : Sc abinde dimittendo Waterfeumbe a dextris ufque la Hoh'u.-eye : et abinde ufque 
Meiueye: et abinde ufque C/Wrt'f/orrt'.- & abinde ufque quoddam foflfatum ufque Hyndeivcll : et abinde proce- 
dendo inter feodum Templariorum et feodum de Chartrufe ufque la Horeclive : Sc abinde direile per medianv 
brueram ufque Stenebergb : et abinde direfte procedendo ufque Stenebergh, et ad locum Stenbergh, ubi prius 
bunds inceperunt. Et dicunt, quod a dextris intra prsdiftas bundas eft forefta: Et dicunt, omnes vIII.tl: &: 
•bofci fubfcripti extra bundas prajdidlas a fmiftris fuerunt aiForeftati poft coronationem Domini Heorici, quondam 
regis Anglix-, filii Maiildis Imperatricis, & debent deaffbreftari, fecundum .tenorcm carts Domini tlenrici, 
quondam regis Anglias, patris Domini regis nunc, de forefta, videlicet, Villa de Che'wton, cum bruera, & aliis 
pertineutiis fuis, quam Johanna de Vivonia tenet. Villa de Pridie, cum bruera & pertinentiis fuis quam epifcopus 
Bathon. tenet. Villa de Stoke-Giffard, cum bofco, mora & pertinentiis fuis, quam Johannes Baftet & Ricardus 
de Rodeney tenent. Villa de Cumpton, cum bofco Sc pertinentiis fuis, quam epifcopus Bathon. tenet. Villa de 
Loxton, cum bofco, quam Willelmus Weyland tenet. Upbulle, cum bofcis & pertinentiis fuis, quam Philippus de 
Lunget tenet. Villa de IVorle, quam prior de Worfpryng tenet. Villa de Cbrichejlen, quam Willelmus Donvile 
tenet, & Johannes Howel. Villa de Hution, cum bofcis & marifcis & pertinentiis fuis, quam Johannes de Waleys 
tenet. Villa de Baneiuel, cum bofcis, moris & pertinentiis fuis, quam epifcopus Bathon. tenet. Villa de Church- 
ford Sc I.angeford, cum bofcis & pertinentiis fuis, quas Rogcrus, filius Pagani, tenet. Villa de U'ateUgh, cum 
bofco Sc pertinentiis fuis, quam Johannes de Moreton tenet. Villa de Wynefcumbe, cum bofcis Sc pertinentiis fuis, 
quam ecdefia de Wells tenet. Villa de Schepbam, cum bofco & pertinentiis fuis, quam Willelmus de Malherbe 
tenet. Villa de Robergb, cum bofcis & pertinentiis fuis, quam abbas S'' Auguftini Briftoll. tenet. Villa de Bur- 
ryngton, cum bofcis & pertinentiis fuis, quam abbas Glaften. tenet. Villa de Blakedcn, cum bofcis & pertinentiis 
fuis, quam Willelmus Martyn tenet. Villa de Obbeleigh, cum bofcis & pertinentiis fuis, quam Rodolphus Wake 
tenet. Villa de IVeftharpetre, cum bofcis & pertinentiis fuis, quam Johannes Tylly & Thomas Gornay tenent, 
Villa de Eajlharpetre, cum bofcis & aliis pertinentiis fuis, quam Johannes de Bodeham tenet. 

V. 
" Perambulatio foreftx de J^ortTj.Bftljcrti-n, in comitatu Somerfet, per vifum praidiiSorunrMalcolini & Johan- 
nis, Galfredi & Hugonis, convocatis & prxfentibus Petrode Hamme, tenente locum S.ibinx prxdiftx, foreft.iria; de 
feodo faila ibidem XXV die Maii, anno rcgni regis Edwardi XXVI. per facramentum Willelmi Trivet, Waltc'ri 
deLoveney, Baldricide Nonyton, Willelmi de Stanton militum, Willelmi de Fichet, Johannis de Rayny, Mat- 
thxi de Eife, Willelmi de Cruket, Thomx da Mere, Walteri de Lantoke, qui dicunt, quod bundx forefts; de 
North-Petherton, juxta tenorem cartx dcmini Henrici, quondam regis Angli.x, patris domini Edwardi, regis nunc, 
<5e forefta, incipiunt adponteni, ^v^ivciZLi\ii Ebbynge-Brugge : & abinde procedendo per quoddam foffatum, per 

1 2 o'-i 



6d NORTH-PETHERTON. rBortI)#Ct!)ettOm 

Sabina Peche and John Heron, leaving on the right a moor, called Leghe, up to 
Ebbynge- Brugge y the place where the bounds firft began. And the faid jurors fay, that 
all the places on the right hand contained within the circuit of the bounds abovemen- 
tioned is the King's foreft; but that all the villages, lands, and woods on the left, 
without the aforefaid bounds, were affbrefted after the coronation of King Henry, fon 
of Maud the Emprefs, to the difparagement of the tenants, and ought to be difaffo- 
refted according to the tenor of the charter, viz. All the manor of North-P ether totiy 
with its moors, marlhes, heaths, and appertenances j the village of Huntworth, vj'ilh 
woods, heaths, and appertenances; the hamlets o? Dutmeer and Moorland, with moors, 
and appertenances; the village of Staeih, with woods, moors, and with a moor called 
Saltmoor -, the village of Knap, with the hamlet of Huntham, with woods, moors, marlhes, 
and appertenances ; the manor of Creech, with woods, moors, heaths, and apper- 
tenances; the hamlet of Charlton, with moors and appertenances; the hamlet of 

©rabofci, ufque quendam lacum, qui vocatur Huntyngeye : A abinde procedendo perdiflum lacum, ufque bcum, 
qui dicitur Cheftercrofte : & abinde procedendo per diftum lacum de Hunlengeye, ufque locum, qui dicitur Jone- 
^eye: Sc abinde procedendo per quendam duftum, inter dominicum domini regis ac feodum Sabinse Pecche et 
Johannis Heron, dimittendo a dextris quandam moram, quae vocatur Lighe, ufque pontem, qui vocatur Ebbynge- 
Brugge, locum, ubi prius bundas inceperunt. Et dicunt, quod a dextris intra bundas prsdiftas in toto circuitu 
eft forefta domini regis. Et dicunt, quod omnes villx, terrx & bofci a finiftris extra bundas prsdiftas fuerunt 
affbreftati poll coronationem domini Henrici, quondam regis Angliae, filii Matildis imperatricis, ad dampnum 
tenentium, & debentdeafforeftari, juxta tenorem cartse prxdidae, videlicet, Totum manerium de Nmth-Pethertoti, 
com moris, marifcis & brueris & pertinentiis, qua: Johannes de Erleigh tene<. Villa de Huntyug'WDrth , cum 
bcfcis & brueris & pertinentiis, quam Hugo de Popham tenet. Hamletae de Dunivere et Morland, cum moris 
et pertinentiis, quas Johannes de Erleigh tenet. Villa de Staihe, cum bofcis, moris, et cum mora, quae vocatur 
Saltmore, quas Johannes de Afton, Elizabetha de Clyvedon, Robertus de Berkeleigh, Nicholaus de Braunche & 
domina Ydoneyade Infula, tenent. Villa de Cnappe, cum hamleta de Huntham, cum bofcis moris, marifcis & 
pertinentii«, quam Walterus de Chaara tenet. Manerium de Crich, cum bofcis, moris, brueris & pertinentiis, 
quod prior de Monte-acuto tenet. Hameleta de Chcrleton, cum moris &' pertinentiis, quam idem prior tenet. 
Hamleta de ©atcnclurfftc, cum moris et pertinentiis, quam idem prior tenet. Manerium de Weftlenge Sc Ejiknge, 
cum bofcis, moris, marifcis & pertinentiis, quod abbas de Athelyngnye tenet. Hameleta de ©oselloiir, Pricratut 
de Bokeland, hameleta de llalilcfiotK, & Heggynge, cum bofcis, moris, marifcis & pertinentiis, qua; prior da 
hofpitali de Jerufalem in Anglia tenet. Hameleta de "Biooiif, cum moris, marifcis & pertinentiis, quam idem 
prior tenet. Manerium de Durjfon, com hameleta de MyghUfchurch, cum bofcis, moris, marifcis & pertinentiis, 
quod Galfridus de Wrokelhall & Reylia, uxor ejufdem, tenent in dote ipfius Rofiae, de hereditate Johannis dc 
Erleigh. Villa de Haivyfe-Nyivton, cum bofcis, moris, marifcis et pertinentiis, quam Ricardas de Nywton tenet. 
Hamleta de Sirdepn, cum moris, brueris & pertinentiis, quam Johanna de Reyny tenet. Villa de Ny-vjtoif 
Forefter, cum bofcis, moris, brueris & pertinentiis, quam Sabina Hayrun & Athelina Durante tenent. Hameletae 
de Chademede & Holebroke, cum moris, brueris & pertinentiis, quas Henricus de Somerfet tenet. In cujus rei 
telUmonium figilla prsediftorum juratorum huic perambulationi funt appenfa." 

Salaries of the Forefters in each Foreft. 

*' Fet a remembrer de la fuftenaunce des forifters en la comte de Somerfet. q' eftufte qe dejugerent apres 
la puralee fet flit. Ceo eft a faver en la forefte de Selenvode un forefter a chival lay foftenaunce amontera fis 
livres et cere denieres. Ceo eft a favoir a prendre a la jornee quatre denieres. Et deaus forefters a pye quatre 
Hvres et unzs fouzs. Ceo eft a iavoir p' un forefter a prendre la journee un denier et maille. Sfit ceo eft !a 
fomme de ceo dis livres duze fouzs et quatre deners. Sfit en la foreft de Menedep deaus forefters a pye quatre 
livres & unze fous. SS en la forefte de Pederton deaus forefters a pye quatre livre et unz fouz. SS en la 
forefte de Exmore un forefter a chival fis livres et ccze deniers et deaus a pye quatre livres et unze fouz. Ceo eft 
la fomme fis livres, duze louzs et quatre denieres. SS. en la foreft de Nerachich un forefter a chival fis livres et 
ceze denieres, et deaus a pye quatre livres et unze fouzs. Ceo eft a la fomme dis livres, dis fouzs et quatre 
deiiieres. SS. Sy eft lafonuue totale quarante livres dife nef fous." £x Regut. Wellen. 



jQortf) lPetf)erton.] NORTH-PETHERTON. 6 1 

®atCnCbCr0l[)C, with moors and appertenances; the manor of PFeJi-Ltng, and Eajl^ 
Ling, with woods, moors, marfhes, and appertenances; the hamlet of (©O00ftOlie; 
the priory of Buckland; the hamlets of CablCflOnC and Hedging, with woods, moors, 
marflies, and appertenances; the hamlet of 15tD0nC, with moors, marfhes, and ap- 
pertenances; the manor of Durjion, with the hamlet of Michael-Church, with woods, 
moors, marfhes, and appertenances; the village of Newtcn-Hawt/e, with woods, 
moors, marfhes, and appertenances; the hamlet of Sheerjlon, with moors, heaths, and 
appertenances; the village of Newton-Forejler, with woods, moors, heaths, and 
appertenances; the hamlets of Chedmede and Holbrook, with moors, heaths, and ap- 
pertenances. 

By this reduifbion were disforefted, as may be obferved by the parcels above recited, 
lands of more than a hundred times the value of the legal foreft of North-Petherton; 
but thefe encroachments were inconfiderable when compared with what had been done 
by other forefts in the kingdom, and particularly that of Windfor; which, befides 
a great part of Berklhire and Hampfhire, took in almoft the whole county of Surrey. 
All thefe ufurpations had been without colour of law made by Ric. I. and Henry II. 
upon their fubjefts; who, befides the grievance of having their lands thrown open to 
the King's deer, were fubjedted in their perfons to punifhment for fmall offences, and 
to very arbitrary trials, unknown to Englifh laws; feverer punifhments being inflifted 
on foreft trefpafles, than on the higheft breaches of the publick peace; infoinuch that 
it was cotnplained of by a writer of thofe times, that it was by the foreft-laws fafer to 
be a beaft than a Chriftian-man. 

But as the charter of forefts reduced the bounds, fb it greatly moderated the feverity 
of the laws in queftion, as may be ittn in reading the faid charter; but even as they 
are at this day, though the charter has been by feveral afts of parliament much im- 
proved, there is no one that lives in the neighbourhood of a foreft, but has ftill fome 
reafon to complain of their rigour. 

In procefs of time many of the Royal forefts became neglefted; their courts infre- 
quently kept, and fometimes altogether dilufed ; which happily fell out in this county; 
for thereby the ftatute of 17 Car. I. which enacts that no foreft where the courts had 
not been held for fixty years laft paft, fhould thereafter be deemed forefb, took place, 
and thus we have for ever got rid of our forefts. 

To return to Sabina Peche: fhe died 13 Edw. II.' and on her death Nicholas Peche 
her Ion paid his relief for her lands in Newton. Matthew, the fon of this Nicholas 
Peche, fold all his right in a mefTuage called the Park-boufe, and in certain parcels of 
land in Newton and Exton, as alfo to the bailiwick of the forefts of Petherton, 
Exmore, Neroche, Mendip, Selwood, and the cuftody of the warren of Somerton, to 
Sir Richard D'Amori, knt. This fale was made 10 Edw. III. All which lands and 
office were 31 Edw. III. (probably after another fale from the family of D'Amori) 
found to have been part of the pofTeffions of Roger Mortimer earl of March, in whofc 
defendants, and the Dukes of York, it continued till the time of Edw. IV. when ic 
came to the crown. 

* Efc. 

Thefe 



»2 NORTH-PETHERTON. [lI3ott!)#CtbCttom 

Thefe forefters of the family of Mortimer, as alfo the Dukes of York, appointed 
fubftitutionary forefters, to whom, (as it appears by the park rolls) their whole power 
was delegated, as far as relates to this park of North-Petherton.'' 

lo Ric. II. Richard Brittle, 7 by the appointment of tbe- 

14, Richard Brittle and GefFerey Chaucer, efqrs. j Earl of March. 

21 Gefterey Chaucer, by Alianor countefs of March. 

4 Hen. V. Thomas Chaucer, by Edward earl of March. 

8 Hen. VI. William Wrothe, and Thomas Attemore. 

12 William Wrothe. 

29 Sir Wilijam Bonville, and Richard Luttrell, by the Duke of York. 

33 Richard Stafford, and Richard Luttrell. 

38 James Boteler earl of Ormond. 

2 Edw. IV. Philip de St. Iv^aur. 

5 John St. Albin, of Afliway. 

14 Sir Giles D'Aubeny, for life. 

23 Hen. VII. Robert Wrothe, for thirty years. 

Soon after the expiration of which term, Sir Thomas Wrothe, fon and heir of the 
faid Robert, purchafed, 3 Edw. VI. of that King, the fee of the park and manor of 
Newton-Regis. His defcendants in the time of Queen Elizabeth pulled down the 
park-houfe, and carried the materials to a lodge called the Broad-Lodge, which the 
late Sir Thomas Wroth improved to a handfome dwelling. The whole park' is now 
converted into farms, and belongs to Sir Thomas Acland, bart. in right of his grand- 
mother, eldeft daughter and coheir of Sir Thomas Wroth. 

It might here be obferved, that 6 Edw. VI. Sir Thomas Wroth petitioned the King 
to be admitted forefter in fee of the King's forefts of Exmore, Neroche, Mendip, and 
Selwood, as being one of the defcendants and reprefentatives of William de Wrotham, 
lord of the manor of Newton-Forefter in the time of King Richard I. and being the 
inheritor and polTeiTor of the greateft part of the manor. What was done therein 
does not appear; but 167 8 'an allegation of this petition and right, by the guardians 
of Sir Thomas Wroth, prevented a perfon of great eminence from being appointed 
warden of Exmore foreft. 

To the fouth and fouthweft of Petherton-Park lies the manor of Newton- 
FoRESTER, Newton-Placey, Or Newton-Wrothe, which in King William the 
Conqueror's time belonged to Euftace earl of Bulloigne, and was furveyed as follows: 

*' Earl Euftace held of the King, Newentone. Lewin held it in the time of King 
*' Edward, and gelded for one hide and one yard-land. The arable is four carucates. 
" Thereof are in demefne two virgates and a half of land, and there is one carucate, 
'' and two fcrvants, and feven viUanes, and fix cottagers, with three ploughs. There is 



" Park Rolls. 
' In this park was found the curious amulet of King Alfred, mentioned in vol. i. p. 87. 



" a mill 



jRoitWCtbCtton.] NORTH-PET HERTON. 63 

*< a mill of fifteen-pence rent, and feven acres of meadow, and thirty-three acres of 
** pafture, and feventeen acres of wood. It was and is worth four pounds. Alured 
" [de Merleberge] holdjs it of the Earl."" 

It has been already faid, that the greateft part of this manor in the time of Ric. I. 
belonged to Ofbert Dacus, or Dennis, and after him to William his fon. This Ofbert, 
14 Henry II. held two knights' fees of Gilbert de Perci. William his fon, after he 
had parted with the manor of Newton, had Edgeborough, and other lands in Noi th- 
Petherton and Durfton, and was father of another Ofbert Dennis. Upon this pur- 
chafe of part of Newton, William de Wrotham gave the King one hundred marks, 
and two palfries; bcfides which he had in Newton certain lands, which formerly be- 
longed to Ralph dc Aubcrville, given him by Ric. I." and alfo other eftates heretofore 
the poflcfTion of Roger Eftables, all which were comprehended in the denomination of 
the manor of Newton, then called Newenton-Forefter, and held by the fervice afore- 
faid, being accounted equal to a whole knight's fee. 

As to the parentage of William de Wrotham, he was fon of Gefferey de Wrotham, 
of Radenville near Wrotham in the county of Kent, a domeftick fervant of feveral of 
the archbifhops of Canterbury, of whom Hubert Walter gave him certain lands at 
Wrotham, where he lived, and from which his pofterity received their name. William 
his fon abovementioned, whom he had by his wife Muriel de Lyd, is alfo faid to have 
fervcd the faid Hubert, and to have been by him recommended to King Ric. I. in 
the ninth year "of whofe reign he had the care of the ftannaries in Devonfhire and 
Cornwall, in which commiflion he made fuch rules and ordinances as have been the 
foundation of the ftannary laws ever fince. By the report of this commiflion, which 
is ftill extant," it appears that he was therein fubftituted, by Archbifliop Hubert, guar- 
dian of the realm in the King's abfence; that writs were directed to the fheriffs of 
Devon and Cornwall, to deliver over to him the ftannaries of the faid counties, re- 
quiring them to be afliftant to him, and xo call together fuch juries, as thereby the 
King's property might be afcertained, and the weight, meafure, and coinage of the 
tin, as alfo the illegal exportation thereof might be prevented. In the commiflion 
ieveral gentlemen of the beft rank in both counties are joined with him, and ordered 
to attend as his counfellors. In purfuance of which t^^'o juries were called at Exeter 
and Launcefton, and many ordinances were made, which were reported at large 
under the feals of the commiflioners to the barons of the exchequer. In this report 
are certified the refpeftive days on which this William de W^rotham received the 
charge of the ftannaries of the two counties; and at the end of the report it is fet 
forth, that by the care of the commiflioners, and the providence of William de 
Wrotham, fuch laws had been made as would anfwer the intent of the commiflion, 
and would at all events prevent injury to the King and the fubjeft. 10 Ric. I. the 
Jaid William de Wrotham had a grant from the Kihg of the manor of Cathanger in 
the parifti of Fivehead, the firft lands of which he was pofleflTed in this county; the fame 
year he had alfo the bailiwick of North-Petherton. 1 Joh. he was fherjff of Devon- 
ihire, and again warden of the ftannaries j the fame year he was alfo chofcn forefter of 

" Lib. Domcfday. ' Lib. Nig. Scat. i. ici. " Jbid, 360. 

Dorfctfiiire 



64 NORTH-PETHERTON. [H^OttWctfjettOm 

Dorfetfhlre and Somerfetfhire; the freeholders of thofe counties paying the King the 
fum of one hundred pounds for his admiffion. 4 Joh. he had the grant of Newton, 
and feveral lands in Ham, Creech, Monkton, Sutton, Hawkridge, and Exton, to be 
held in fee by the ferjeanty of being the King's furefter in Dorfet, Devon, Somerfef, 
and Cornwall. 6 Joh. he had a confirmation under the great feal of all the lands he 
had purchafed of Gefferey Fitzacre and Roger Eftables. 7 Joh. he gave one hundred 
marks for the privilege of being impleaded in the King's courts only, and before the 
King, or his chief juftice. 9 Joh. he was IherifF of Kent, and the fame year warden 
of the Cinque-Ports, and conftable of Dover caftle. Soon after which he died, leaving, 
by Maud de Cornhall his wife, two fons, William and Richard. 

William, the eldefl fon, was archdeacon of Taunton 6 Joh. and in that year, toge- 
ther with Reginald de Cornhall, he was receiver of the cuftoms of all the merchants in 
the kingdom, accounting for nearly the fum of fix thouiiind pounds. 7 Joh. he ob- 
tained a market to be kept every Tuefday at the manor of North-Curry, for the benefit 
of the church of Wells, to which that manor appertained. 8 Joh. he was a truflee to 
Gefferey Fitzpiers carl of EfTex, upon the founding the hofpital of Sutton in Yorkfhire. 
On the death of his father he fucceeded him as heir to his lands, and to the office of 
forefter, which was in his life-time executed by his brother. He died 3 Henry III. and 
was fucceeded by Richard de Wrotham, his nephew and next heir. 

Which Richard de Wrotham, 9 Henry III. paid fifty marks to have feifin of the 
bailiwick of the forefls in this county, and the cuftody of the park of Newton, as 
his anceftors held the fame ; he being then in minority, and John le Marefcall and 
John de Erleigh being his fecurity during that time for the performance of his office. 
26 Henry III. this Richard was a knight, and one of the juftices of the court of 
common-pleas. He died without ifTue 35 Henry III. and his fillers, who married into 
the families of Placey, Scoland, Picot, and Bland, became his heirs. The lands of 
which he died feized were, this manor of Newton, the manors of Ham and Cat- 
hanger, and feveral parcels of land in Exton, Hawkridge, Monkton, Creech, and 
North-Petherton, (all which were held by the fervice of a knight's fee) alfo of the 
manor of Chigwell in ElTex, AMenham, and lands in Wrotham, Radenville, and other 
places in Kent. 

Hugh de Placetis, who married his eldeft fifler, -^vas fon of Hugh de Placetis, brother 
of John de Placetis, earl of Warwick, and to William, from whom the French gene- 
alogifts derive the Cardinal de Richlieu. This Hugh refided at Enfield in the county 
of Middlefex, where he died, leaving by Muriel de Wrotham, his wife, three fons, 
William, Richard, and John. 

William, the eldeft fon, died 4 Edw. I. and was fucceeded by Richard his fon, called 
Richard da Barba-Fluta, from the town of Barbeflure, now Barfleur, in Normandy, 
where he lived in his father's life-time. After his deceafe he was called Richard de 
Placetis, and refided at Newton. He died beyond fea, and ordered his body to be 
buried in fome foreign church, near the bpdy of Madelina de Clerby his firfl: wif^^ witfi 
•whom he lived before he came into England, and gave feveral parcels of land in Nor- 
mandy and Poidu to religious vifes fpr the health of his iqnl. His fecond wife was 

named 




J!5ottD=lPCtt)Cl'ton.] NORTH-PET II ERTON. 65 

named Margaret, who furvived him, and had dower in Newton lo Edw. I.' Two 
years before his death this Richard laid the foundation of a perpetual chantry at 
Newtoni' for the health of his own foul, the fouls of his father and mother, and all his 
progenitors and fucceflbrs, and granted to William de Hilprinton, the intended chanter 
and his fucceflbrs, chaplains of the chapel of St. Peter at Newton, a houfe in which 
"William de Grey a former chaplain once lived, and icveral acres of land in Ivymore, 
Highmore, and Ellerhaye, together with the tithes of Newton and Petherton-Park, 
and right of common for fix oxen and fix heifers in all places where he had common. 
The witnefl"es to this charter were, the preceptor of Buckland, Sir GefFerey de Wrock- 
Ihall, Sir John de Placetis, Peter de Hamme, and John de Marifco. At the death of 
the faid Richard, his four fifters became his heirs. The defcendant of the eldeft mar- 
ried into the family of Pecche; and Avelina, the fecond fifter, wife of Thomas Durant, 
had the third part of Newton, as alfo the third part of her father's lands at Enfield, 
on which Thomas Durant their fon and heir built a houfe called Durants, which has 
be.en the chief place of refidencc of his defcendants to this prefent age. This Thomas 
died 22 Edward III. leaving the third part of the manor of Newton, and lands in 
Monkton, Hawkridge, and Exton, all parcel of the poflTeflions of Richard de Wrotham, 
as alfo a houfe and feveral lands at Durants, Enfield, and Edelmetone, (or Edmonton) 
in the county of Middlefex, to Maud his daughter and heir, twelve years old at the 
rime of his death. This Maud married firft Sir Baldwin de Radington, knt. by whom 
(he had no children; and afterwards Sir Thomas Wrothe, of Enfield, knt. great- 
grandfon and heir of Richard, third fon of Hugh de Placetis and Muriel de Wrotham. 

It has been already faid that this Hugh had three fons, William, John, and Richard. 
John the fecond fon was a knight, and from him the Placcys, of Winborne-St. Giles 
in the county of Dorfet, are defcended. Richard, the third fon, was of Enfield and 
Edmonton in the county of Middlefex, where he had a houfe and lands by the grant of 
his father. He had alfo Aldenham, and lands in Wrotham and Ford in the county of 
Kent, and Gobrigge in the county of Surry, by the grant of Richard de Wrotliam his 
isncle; being the greateft part of the poflefiions of that family in thofe counties. 
Befides which he had a mefluage and carucate of land in Sutton, as alfo certain rents 
and fervices arifing in Lintmore, Newton-Forefter, and Weft-Newton, all which were 
the poflTelTions of Richard de Wrotham; and were entailed on this Richard and the 
heirs of his body, remainder in tail-general to William and John, his brothers. In this 
deed lie is called Richard, fon of Hugh de Placetis; but foon after he ftiled himfelf 
Richard de Wrotham; and by that name, 10 Edw. I. had a releafe, from Emma de 
Mallinges, of lands at Rodenhall in Kent, and made feveral purchafes in Creech-St.- 
Michael, Ling, North-Petherton, Moorland, and elfewhere. 17 Edw. I. he had a- 
grant of three^hundred marks, which Berenger le Romeyn his father-in-law owed to 
tlie exchequer, being then called Sir Richard de Wrotham, knt. His will bears date^ 
A. D. 1292, in which he orders his body to be buried in the parifli church of Edel- 
metone, in a chapel which had been built by Berenger le Romeyn, his wife's father, 
and that it fliould be laid as near the body of Gladyna his wife as could conveniently be 
done without injuring the fabrlckj and appoints his two fons, Richard de Wrotham of 

f Cart. Antiq, ' Excerpt, c Regift. Wellen. 

Vol. III. K Shepcrton, 



66 NORTH-PETHERTON. [aott6#Ctfjmon* 

Sheperton, and William, to liave the care of his funeral, whom he alfo makes his exe- 
cutors : and whereas he had for feveral years paid ten marks of filver towards the 
building a church for the friars-preachers in London, he direfts that his fons do 
continue the fame after his deceafe, till the whole fum of one hundred and fifty marks 
be completed; and that afterwards they buy lands of one hundred fhillings rent for the 
maintenance of a chaplain, who Ihould perform divine fervice in the chapel of Edel- 
metone, for his foul, and the fouls of Gladye his wife; Berenger le Romeyn, and Margaret 
his wife; Ilbert de Coftcntine, and Triphasna liis wife; Peter Tybauld, and others. 

John, the eldeft fon of Richard de Wrotham, was bred up in the court of Edw. I, 
but according to the cuftom of thofe times, when many perfons of the greateil quality 
entered into religious orders, became a friar-preacher, and was foon after prior of the 
friars-preachers, having before been confeflbr to King Edw. I. From 30 Edw. I, to the 
end of the reign of Edw. II. he feems to have been the perfon principally employed 
between the courts of England and Rome, being efpecially recommended to the Pope* 
Benedift XI. and Clement V. by King Edw. I. and II. as a perfon of great learning, 
probity, and courtefy, and who had by thofe qualities acquired their efteem, and the 
regard of all the great men of the court. 32 Edw. I. he was recommended under the 
fame charafter to Charles king of Sicily. He died at Bolonia in the year 1323, and 
was there buried. 

On the death of Richard de Wrotham, William his grandfon, viz. Ion of Richard 
Wrothe of Sheperton, fucceeded to his lands; who, dying without iflue, was fucceeded 
by his brother John Wrothe, of Enfield in the county of Middlefex, and of Nortb- 
Petherton in the county of Somerfet, at which laft place he moft frequently refided. He 
poflefled very confiderable eftates at Newton, North-Petherton, Creech, and Monkton 
in this county, and lands at Yeldam in Kent, part of the pofleffions of Sir Richard de 
W^rotham. He was knight of the fhire for Middlefex 6 Edw. III. and died the 12th 
year of the fame reign. He bore on his feal a bend charged with three leopards' faces. 

John Wrothe, fon of this John, lived alfo at Enfield, at a houfe called Wrothe-Place, 
24 Edw. III. he purchafed of Sir Richaid D'Amori a rent-charge, which had been 
paid out of his lands in Petherton and Sheerjlon ; and the following year agreed that 
Margaret his*mother fhould have for her life the entire pofleflion of his manors of 
Sheperton and Overbridge in Middlefex, in lieu of dower on his other eftates. 
33 Edw. HI. he was coUeftor of the King's duties within the port of London, and, in 
eonfideration of his faithful difcharge of that office, obtained a releafe of a debt he 
owed to the exchequer for the wardfhip of John, fon and heir of John de Enfield. He 
died 43 Edw. III. being then a knight. 

John, his eldeft fon, was a knight in his father's life-time, and by the name of Sir 
John Wrothe the younger, was chofen knight of the ftiire for Middlefex ^9, 43, and 46 
Edw. III. as alfo 6 and 7 Ric. II. about which time he died, having married two wives, 
viz. Alice, by whom he had Sir John, who fucceeded him, and Agnes, wife of Sir Pain 
Tibetot, knt. His fecond wife was Maud, fole daughter and heir of Thomas Durant, 
and widow of Sir Baldwin dc Radington,.knt. 

His 



jfijart&'lpetbertonj NORTH^PETHERTON. 67 

His eldeft fon John married in his father's life-thnc Margaret, daughter and at laft 
heir of Sir John Willinton, knt. and was in five parliaments during the reigns of 
Ric. II. and Henry IV. He was knight of the fhire for Middlefcx,- and alfo a com- 
miffioner to receive the loans from that county and Hertford. But as all the Somer- 
fetfliire cftate was by his father made over to the children by the fecond marriage, and 
this Sir John having no lands at Newton, notice can only be taken here, that he left 
one only daughter Elizabeth, married to Sir John Paulton, of Paulton in this county, 
knt, and that, on her dying without iffue, the great inheritance of this family, lying in 
the counties of Middlefcx, Surry, Eflex, Kent, Hants, and Gloucefter, fell to Sir John 
Tiptot, father to the lord of tliat name, and grandfather to the Earl of Worcefter. 

William, fon of Sir John Wrothe by the heirefs of Durant, had his father's lands in 
Newton, North-Petherton, Monkton, and Michael-Creech, by virtue of a feoffment 
made 5 Ric. II. to Thomas Popham and others in truft for the children of Sir John 
Wrothe by his fecond wife j befides which he inherited from his mother the third part 
of the manor of Newton ; all which pofleffions became from that time united under the 
name of the manor of Newton-Wrotbe. The fcal of Sir John Wrothe, father of this 
WilHam, was a lion's head crafcd, crowned; but his fon took the prefent arms, viz. 
Argent, on a bend fable, three lions* heads crafed of the field, crowned or. He always 
refided at Durants in Middlefex, his mother's eftate, and was knight of the fliire for 
that County 5 Hen. IV. in the tenth year of which reign he died, leaving William his 
fon and heir. 

Which William, the fecond of the name who poflcfled Newton, is returned 11 Hen. 
VL among fuch of the principal gentlemen of Middlefex as then took the oaths for the 
maintenance of the laws; but his refidence was moftly at Newton, where he is faid to 
have rebqilt the old court-houfe. In two courts held 8 and la Henry VI. he appears 
to have been keeper of Petherton-Park, and then prefent. This William died in 
Somerfetfhire 28 Henry VI. and was buried on the north fide of the chancel of the 
parifli church of Bridgwater, where was a ftone, with an infcription in brafs, fetting 
forth the time of his death, and that he married a daughter of John Mortimer, efq; 
whofe arms were fix fleurs-de-lis. This monument was in being in 163 1, but is now 
entirely defaced. 

John, fon of William, married Elizabeth daughter of Sir Roger Lewknor, knt. and 
was father of another John, who, by Margaret daughter of Richard Newdigate, efq; 
was father of Edward and Robert, and alfo of a daughter married to Richard Goodear, 
efq. Of which fons, Robert became his heir. This Robert, in the time of Hen. VII. 
was attorney of the dutchy of Lancafter; and 22 Henry VIII. one of the commif- 
fioners to enquire into the cftate of Cardinal Wolfey. He died 27 Henry VIII. 
having married Jane daughter of Sir Thomas Hart, of Kent, knt. by whom he had 
Thomas, Oliver, John, and William Wrothe, of Young in Hertfordihire; alfo two 
dau^iters, Dorothy wife of Sir Edward Lewknor, knt. and Sufan wife of Richard 
Raymond. 

Sir Thomas, eldeft fon of Robert, was 2^ Henry VIII. by the procurement of the 
archbilhop of Canterbury, made gentleman of the chamber to Edward Prince of 

K 2 Wales, 



68 NORTH- PETHERTON. [jQortfj^lPet&ertOtl, 

Wales, and two years after had a grant of 20I. per annunn out of the court of aug- 
mentations for his wages, and 40I. for the time he had ferved. On Edward's coming 
to the crown, he was fworn of the privy council, and was one of the committee of 
council who were always to attend the King ; in which fituation his duty was to infpeft 
the penal laws, and the condition of the branches of the publick revenue, particularly 
thofe of the firft-fruits and augmentations. Edw. VI. is faid to have died in his arms. 
During the time, of his favour he obtained many beneficial grants, and might have had 
a much greater fhare of the church lands, had he not willingly declined it, either from 
a knowledge of the King's great neceffities, and the importunities of thofe about him j 
or from an opinion, always avowed, that what had been once given to the publick 
Ihould never be feparated from it. As a proof that this was fincerely his opinion, he 
furrendered a grant of the monaftery of Sion, and lands thereunto belonging, on an aflli- 
rance that the King had intended thofe lands for the endowment of fome publick charity. 
Although he was a zealous proteftant, he never, either in the life-time of King Edw. VI. 
or after his death, would be brought to do any a6l towards the diiherifon of Henry 
VIII th's children J by which means in the fucceeding reign he was favourably deale 
with, and continued unmolefted in eftate and perfon. 4 and 5 Phil, and Mary, he 
went abroad with the King and Queen's licence, and continued the remainder of that 
reign at Frankfort, where he applied a great part of his revenue to the maintenance of 
fuch proteftant minifters as had been moft remarkable for piety and learning in the 
foregoing reigns. Soon after the acceffion of Queen Elizabeth, he was one of thofe 
who were appointed to confider the Adt of Uniformity, and other afts relating to the 
government of the church of England. This feems to have been his laft publick em- 
ployment} the remaining twenty years of his life being Ipent in a holpitable but pious 
retirement, fometimes at Durants, and others at Petherton; at which laft place he in- 
tended to have built a manfion-houfej but was prevented by death. Oft. 4, 1 586. By 
Mary daughter of the firft Lord Rich, lord chancellor of England, he had iflue Sir 
Robert Wrothe of Durants, Thomas, and many other fons and daughters. 

Sir Robert, his fon and heir, fucceeded him in the greateft part of his eftates, and 
married Ida, daughter of Henry Stoner, of Loughton in the county of Effex, efq; by 
whom he had another Sir Robert, John Wrothe of Loughton, and Henry. 

Which laft Sir Robert was chofen knight of the Ihire for Middlefex in the laft par- 
liament of Queen Elizabeth, and the firft parliament of King James, and was appointed 
one of the commiflioners to treat of an union between the two kingdoms. It appears 
by the journals, that he was one of the moft aftive and eminent parliament-men of 
thofe times; and it alfo appears, from the works of Ben Johnfon, that he was equally 
eminent in the knowledge and pradtice of court entertainments, in which laft qualifi- 
cation he was affifted and furpaffed by his lady, Mary Sidney, daughter of Robert earl 
of Leicefter. By thefe means indeed they acquired the commendation of the moft 
eminent wits of the times, but fquartdered away a vaft patrimony, which his more care- 
ful but lefs polite anceftors had till their time continually increafed. towards the 
latter end of his life he retired to Durants, where he died, leaving iflue Robert his fon 
and heir, who died unmarried. On his death, and the death of his fon, the eftate of 

Loughton 



Bom-^tmrnn.'] NORTH-PET HERTON. 69 

Loughton came to John Wrothe, his brother; from whom the family of that place 
(who had alfo Durants) are defcended. This manor of Newton, being with the greateft 
part of his eftate fold for the payment of debts, was purchafed by Sir Thomas Wrothe, 
fon of Thomas, brother of the firft Sir Robert. 

"Which Thomas, father of Sir Thomas, was a lawyer, and autumnal reader of the 
Middle-Temple ^3 Eliz. and having by his profcfTion raifed a confiderablc fortune, 
fettled himfelf at Blenden-hall in the county of Kent, where he died in 16 10. He 
married Johanna, daughter and heir of Thomas Buhner, efq; and left ifllie, i. Sir 
Thomas Wrothe abovementioned, the purchafer of Newton and Petherton-Park, who 
died there in 1666 without iflue. a. SirPeter Wrothe, a gentleman of great learning, 
from whofe colleftions a great part of the account of this family is taken. He mar- 
ried Margaret, daughter of Anthony Bering, of Surrenden in the county of Kent, knt. 
and was father of Sir John Wrothe of Blenden-hall, Anthony, and Thomas, and three 
daughters. 

Sir John Wrothe, of Blenden-hall, attended the King in the battle of Cropedy- 
bridge, and fecond battle of Newbury, where he was wounded. After the reftoration 
he had a grant from the exchequer of two thoufand pounds, and was made a baronet. 
He died at Newton in 1664, leaving by Anne, daughter of Lord Vifcount Charlemont 
of the kingdom of Ireland, widow of Sir Paul Harris, and afterwards of Sir William 
Gore, barts. Sir John Wrothe, of Petherton-Park, bart. and Sophia, wife of 
Mattocks, efq. 

Sir John married Elizabeth daughter of Peregrine Palmer, of Fairfield, efq; and 
had ifllie Sir Thomas Wrothe, and Elizabeth, married to William Longe, of Ncwhoufc 
in the county of Devon, efq. He died in 1674. 

Sir Thomas, only fon of Sir John Wrothe, having worthily lerved his country in the 
two laft parliaments of King William, and in all the parliaments of Queen Anne, being 
chofen for the borough of Bridgwater, county of Somerfet, and city of Wdls; died 
in the year 172 1 at Kellerton in Devonfhirej and was the laft pofleflfor of Newton of 
this very ancient and worthy family. He married Mary, fole daughter and heir of 
Francis Oftialdefton, of Aldenftsrook in the county of Eflex, efq; and was father of 
feveral children, who died in his life-timci alfo of Cecily, married to Sir Hugh Acland, 
of Columb-John in the county of Devon, bart. who in her right became poflTefled of 
Newton and Petherton-Park, which are now inherited by Sir Thomas Acland, bare, 
and Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Palmer, of Fairfield, elq. 

Having given an account of the defcendants and reprelentatives of two of the fifters 
and coheirs of Sir Richard de Placetis, it remains to fpeak of the third, Emma, the 
wife of John Heron. This Emma had a third part of the manor of Newton, and 
was fucceeded by a Ion and grandfon of the nam.e of John. The laft was father of 
Hugh, who died without ifllie. Margaret his fifter, becoming his heir, fold her Ihare 
of the manor and advowfon of the chantry to Hugh Garton, revcrfional after her own 
life, aj;d the life of Agnes her brother's widow. In this name and family it tontinucd 

three 



7d NORTH-PETHERTON. [jeort{)'IPet|)ettom 

dirfce gcneratiohs, each poflefibr bearing the name of John. 6 Henry V. the laft John 
Garton fold his right to William Gafcoign, efq; whofe brother's grandaughter and 
heir Chriftian, wife of John Reynell, 6 Edw. IV. fold her right to John Pym, efq. 
At the time of the diflblution of the chantry, the right of advowfon was in the crown. 
Sir Thomas Wrothe, and Alexander Pym, efq. Mr. Pym's (hare of Newton has 
fince been fold to different perfons. 

The endowment of the chantry, on the diflblution, being taken away, the chapel fell 
to ruin, and towards the end of Queen Elizabeth's reign, fome one begged of that 
Queen the materials thereof for the vicars-choral of Wells, who apj)lied the fame partly 
to the building an alehoufe, and ftables, for the more commodious reception of them- 
felves and fervants when they fliould keep tlneir courts, and partly to the making of 
ftocks, a ducking-ftool, and pillory, for the ufe of the hamlet of Newton. In the time 
of King Charles I. Sir Thomas Wrothe, having purchafed the chantry lands of that 
king, at his own charge built a new chapel, and gave a ftipend to a minifter, which 
is yet continued. Sir Thomas Wrothe, Sir John, Sir Thomas and his lady, wil^i fome 
of their children, were buried in the chapel of Newton. ' 

The manor here belonging to the vicars-choral of Wells is called Newton-Placey, 
and has been their pofleflion from the i6th of Edw. III. being part of their original 
endowment from bifhop Ralph de Shrewibu:y. It has been already faid that Matthew 
Peche fold to Sir Richard D'Amori the park-houfe and fome tenements, together witli 
the bailiwicks of the forefts. It is probable chat the remaining part of the manor 
(which certainly was the beft of the three) was fold to the bifhop; and that the vicars 
have the portion of Sabina Peche. Courts-leet arc alternately held in the name of the 
refpedtive lords; but each has a feparate court-baron: there were alfo fome tenements 
here called by the name of the manor of Newton-Regis. 

There are feveral members or branches of the ancient manor of Newton, lying dif- 
perfed at confiderable diltances from Petherton; as Cathanger, in the parilh of Five- 
head; Nether-Ham, in die parilh of High-Ham; and Corewall and Newhall in the 
parifh of Holford. The firft of thefe hamlets has already been mentioned,'' the two 
others will be fpoken of in their refpedlive parifhes. 

Southwell from North-Newton is West-Newtok, or Newton-Comitis, or 
Newton-Hawise, or Hvwis, which belonged to the family of Hywis or Huifh, and 
afterwards to that of de Ny weton, or Newton, who held it under the abbey of Athelney. 
Richard the fon of Reginald de Newton, by deed without date, gave to that abbey a 
melfuage and lands in Ling to hold to the monks and their fucceiTors by the fervice of 
conveying him and his heirs and four men of Newton by water to the juftices itinerant 
at Ivelchcfter, once a year at his own coft, in lieu of all other fervices.' This hamlet 
was afterwards held of the fame abbey for feveral generations by the family of 
Coplellon, by the fervice of one knight's fee.' 

There were formerly chapels both at Newton-Recis and at Newton-Comitis, 
wbjeji were given to the monaftery of Buckland by its founder William de Erleigh. 

f Vol. i. p. 40. « Regift. Abbat. de Athelney. ' Lib. Feod. 

The 



ji3ottl)-H?ctl)etton.] north-petherton. 71 

The manor of Wolmersdov, fituated about a mile from Petherton northward, 
■was long before the Conqueft a member of the manor of North-Petherton j but in 
the time of Edward the Confeflbr, the King's bailiff mortgaged part of it to Alwi a 
Saxon thane, and afterwards William the Conqueror gave the whole to Alured de 
Ifjpaniaj we have tiic following account of this property in the Norman record: 

** Alured de Ifpania holds of th(SKing Ulmerestone, and Walter of him. Alwi 
« held it in the time of King Edward, and gelded for half a hide. The arable is three 
** carucates. In demefne is one carucate, with one Servant, and four viJlanes, and 
** thirteen cottagers, with one plough. There are ten acre^ of meadow, and twenty 
*' acres of wood. It was and is worth thirty Ihillings. 

" To this manor is added a virgate and a half of land. This land was [parcel] of 
** Peret the King's manor. The bailiff made it over to Alwi in the time of King 
*' Edward. It was and is worth ten fhillings.'" 

Wolmerfdon was in after-times poflefTed by a family of its own name, who were 
J-efident here, and held the manor for many defcents, till in the time of Ric II. it pafTed 
to the family of Vernai, by the marriage of Amice, grandaughter and coheirefs of 
Rofamund de Wolmerlton, with John de Vernai lord pf Fairfield; from which family 
it has lineally dcfcended through that of Palmer to John Acland, efq; the prefent 
owner. The arms of Wolmerflon, as they were depicted in the windows of Fairfield, 
were Vtrt, a chevron between three lions rampant or. The fainily of Pokefwell, of 
Dorfetfhire, had alfo a concern in Wolmerfdon. 

Northeaft from Petherton is Huntworth, another ancient lordlhip, the property 
in the Conqueror's time of the fame Alured de Ifpania who pofTefTed Wolmerfdonj 
h is thus furveyed: 

" Richard holds of Alured, Hunteworde. Alwi held it in the time of King 
*' Edward, and gelded for one hide. The arable is two carucates, and with it are two 
" fervants, and feven cottagers. There aie four acres of meadow, and ten acres of 
*• moorj when he received it, it was worth five fhillings, now twenty fhillings.'" 

In the time of Henry II. and Ric. I. it was tke pofTefTion of Jordan RufFus, whofe 
daughter and heir Julyan brought it by marriage to Walter de Kentifbury, of Ken- 
tifbury in Devonfliire; to which Walter fucceeded another of his name," who was. 
a knight, and by Sibilla his wife had ifTue Sir Stephen de Kentifbury, whofe fole- 
daughter and heir Joan (firft married to Sir John Trivet) brought it to her feconc^ 
hufband Hugh de Popham, a younger fbn of the family of Popham, of Popham ia 
the county of Hants. This Hugh was a knight, and one of the commifTioners ap- 
pointed by King Edw. I. to take account of the boundaries of the King's forefls in 
this county." He then refided at Huntworth. By Chriflian his wife, he was father of 
another Hugh de Popham, who was alfo of Huntworth, and a knight; from whom, 
after many generations, defcended Alexander Popham, of this place, efq; who by Joaa 
daughter of Sir Edward Stradhng, of St. Donat's caftle in Glamorganfhire, knr. was 
fether of Edward Popham, of Huntworth, efq; and of Sir John Popham, lord chief 

; Lib. Domefday. * Ibid. « Sir William Pok. ' See the Perambulation. 

jufiictf' 




72 NORTH-PETHERTON. [Ji3ort|)*P0t{)et;tOrt, 

jullice of the King's-Bench in the time of Queen Elizabeth, progenitor to the family of 
Lictlecot in Wiltlhire. The defcendants of the elder fon are ftill feated in this county. 
One of them in the time of Charles I. fold this manor to the family of Portman, in 
wJiich it yet continues, being the property of Henry WiUiam Portman, of Brianfton near 
Bkndford in the county of Dorfet, ejq. The chapel here was alfo given to Buckland. 

Further on fouthward, on the Parret, is Mooriand, the ancient eftate of the family 
of Tilly; from whom it defcended by heirs female to the families of Cave, Bythemore, 
and Perceval, anceftor to the Earl of Egmont.' 

And ftill farther is a large tithing called Bankland, which being formerly a manor 
was poflefTed by the preceptory of Buckland. But in the beginning of this century it 
was the property of Sir Coplefton Bampfylde, who, being then an infant, was enabled by 
pai-liament to fell it. In the year 17 16, it was purchafed by Sir Thomas Wrothe, from 
which family it came to that of Acland. 

Sheerston lies fouthward from Petherton, and belonged formerly to the Huifhes, 
after them to the Reignys, from whom it came by the marriage of an heirefs to the 
Poulets. The chapel alfo of this place belonged to Buckland. 

Near this is an eftate called Farington. 

TucKERTON, fouthweft, was formerly parcel of the poflefllons of the hofpital of St. 
John at Bridgwater,'' and is now die property of Sir John Durbin, of the city of 
Briftol, knt. 

There are alfo within this parifh divers places, of which little note is now taken; but 
which have at different periods been the habitations of very great and eminent families. 

Mansel, now the feat of John Slade, efq; newly built, was the hereditary pofleffion 
of a family of the fame name for twenty generations. In the time of Henry II. 
William de Erleigh granted it to Philip Arbaiiftarius, in free marriage with Mabil his 
daughter, to be held by the payment of two young pigs every Whitfuntide at his court 
of Durfton;" which grant Ancilia, widow of the faid William de Erleigh, confirmed to 
Philip de Maunfel, fon of the abovementioned Philip, who married a daughter of Sir 
Hugh de Auberville, and was the firft of this family that aflumed the name of Maunfel, 
er Manfel. In this family the manor and ancient manfion continued till the time 
of Charles I. when it was purchafed of their heirs by the family of Bacon, who refided 
here in the commencement of the prefent century. 10 Henry IV. Robert de Manfel 
bore on his feal a hand clenched,'' but William, fon of the faid Robert, took the prefent 
arms, viz. Sable^ three jambs argent. 

Of equal oblivion with the former is Clavelshay, or Claveljleigh, now called ClaJJey, 
Clawfey, and Clajway farm; which in ancient times derived its appellation from the 
family of Claville, or Clavil, who were refident at and had confiderable poffeflions in 
t^iis place. Thomas de Claville, by his deed without date, gave five acres of land in 
this his manor to Jordan le King, fon of Roger le King of Wefton,' 18 Ric. II. it 
was found by an inquifition that Robert de Hache, late abbot of Atheluey, purchafed 

• 'Houfeofyyery. » Lib. Feod. 

* Cart. Andq. * Seals from ancient deeds. « Regift. Abbat. de Athelney. 



ji9ott!)#et!)ctt0n.l north-petherton. . 73 

of Walter Clopton and Henry Hjichc, a tenement in Weji-Qavellejlegb, called Pecchys- 
flace, and a tenerrtent in EJl-ClavelkJlegby which belonged to Margaret ClaveH, together 
with two hundred acres of land in the {kid hamlets, without the King's licence.' 
After the diflblution of the abbey of Athelney, King Henry VIII. in the 36th year of 
his reign, granted the manor of Clavclfliay to William Portman, efq; whofc defcendants 
have held the fame ever fince ; Heniy William Portman, efq; being the prefent pof- 
leffort Under this family the manor was held for feveral generations by the Gatchclls, 
whofe feat was at Weft-Monkton. Of which family Henry Gatchell, of Clavelfhay, 
efq; who was fheriff of the county, dying without iflue male, left his eftate in fee- 
fimple to Henry fon of his brother Thomas, who was a clerk of the court of chancery, 
and his heirs male; and for want of fuch iflue, to his faidbrother Thomas; and for want 
of iflije male from him, fettled it on the families of Popham of Wellington, and Jeanes 
of Weft-Monkton, into which his two fiflers were married. The two Gatchells died 
without ifilie, and the eftates defcended to Thomas Popham, of Bagborough, and 
Richard Jeanes, of Weft-Monkton, efqrs. But the leafe of Clavelftiay, with feveral 
others belonging to the faid Henry Gatchell, and a confiderable eftate in fee belonging 
to their fadier, defcended to the three daughters of Thomas Gatchell. The eldeft of 
whom, Mary, was married to the Rev. Alexander Popham, reftor of Weft-Monkton, 
younger brother of the above Thomas Popham, by whom flie had iflue one fon, 
Alexander. Elizabeth, the fecond daughter, married the Rev. Afliford Sanford, redor 
of Weft-Monkton, and third fon of John Sanford, of Ninehead, efq; and died without 
iffue. Dorothy, the third daughter, was married to the Rev. Henry Fytch, of High- 
Hall in the county of Dorfet, and redtor of Lydiard St. Lawrence in this county. 
Mrs. Sanford, the fecond daughter, dying childlefs, and her hufljand likewife dying 
before his two brothers-in-law; flie by will difpofed of her fliare of this leale and the 
other eftates to her two fifters; fo that the families of Popham and Fytch became 
leflfees of the manor of Clavelfliay, as well as proprietors of the other eftates in fee.* 

As the hamkt of Clavelfliay originally derived its name from the family of Clavil, 
in like manner did it in afcertimes communicate its whole appellation to the family of 
Clavelftiey, of whom were Cutbert, Richard, and John, which laft was of Curry-Rivel 
in ifyj."" Their arms were. Sable, a c evron per pale, argent and or, between three 
bulls' heads caboflTed argent, armed or. 

Boomer, otherwife West-Melcomb, lying weft from North-Pctherton, is the pro- 
perty of Lady Tynte. It was formerly in the family of Whiting, and by them held 
of the Blewets. 

Melcombe-Paulet feems to be that Alelecome which is furveyed in Domefday- 
Book, as the property of Robert De Odberville, or Auberville : 

" The fame Robert holds Melecome. Saric held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and gelded for a virgate and a half of land. The arable is one carucate and a half, 

' Inq. ad quod Damn. The lands of the Abbot of Athelney in ClaveKliay, and Hoggeflialle, [O.xhole, an 
adjoining hamlet] were in 1293 rated at feven fliiUings. Taxat. Tempor.!!. 

'MS. Carcw. * Brokc's Vifitation of Somerfct, 

Vol. III. L " and 



74 NORTH-PETHERTON. Cll3ortf)#0tf)mon. 

" and there are with it ten cottagers. There is a naill of twelve -pence rent, and ten 
" acres of coppice wood. It was and is now worth fifteen fliillings. 

" From this manor is taken half a hide, which in the time of King Edward belonged 
" thereto. This is held by Walfcin de Dowai, with his manor of Bur [Bower.']" 

In the time of Edw. III. this manor was pofTefied by, the family of Reyney, and 
thence came by an heirefs to that of Poulet, who gave it the diftinftion of its name, 
and afterwards made it one of the places of their refidence. Their other feats were at 
Road, a neighbouring vill, Goathurft, Poulet, and other places.. 

" Richard holds in Rode one hide, which he himfelf held of Reinbold [the prieftj 
" with the King's licence, as he fays. But Reinbold held it in the time of King 
" Edward. The arable is half a carucate. There is one cottager. It was and is now 
" worth ten Ihillings."" This manor now belongs to John Jeane, of Binfords, efq. 

The hamlet of Edgeberry, or Edgeborouch, fituated fouthweft from North- 
Petherton, and near the hamlet of Weft -Newton, was anciently the eftate of Ofbert 
Dacus or Dennis, and after him of William his fon, of whom fee in the account of 
the manor of North-Petherton. 

The prior of Taunton had an eftate in North Petherton, which in 1293 was valued 
at tAyenty ftiillings.' 

As to the ecclefiaftical matters of this parifti, the reftory thereof^ together widi 
divers chapels, was given by William de Erleigh to his priory of Minchin-Bucklandj 
and in Bifhop Ralph de Salopia's return to the King's writ, direfling him to give an 
account of the pofleflions of the prior and brethren of the hofpital of St. John of 
Jerufalem in this diocefe, it was certified to be worth fixty marks per annum." In 
1292 the vicarage was valued at eleven marks and a half;" the prior and convent of 
Buckland received out of it a penfion of four marks per annum," which are ftill paid 
to the crown. The living is in the deanery of Bridgwater; the Rev. Jofeph Aldridgc 
is the prefent patron and incumbent. 

There was a chantry here dedicated to St. Mary, of which the laft incumbent, Richard 
Verfer, had in 1553, a penfion of 5I.'' 

The church, which is dedicated to St. Mary, is a large and handlbme ftrucSbure, 
confifting of a nave, chancel, and fide ailes, covered with lead. At the weft end is a 
very elegant embattled tower, of excellent mafonry, richly embelliftied with carving, 
and curious Gothick ornaments. 

This church, though it can now boaft of few curious or ancient memorials, has been 
the burial place of the Erleighs, Blewets, Gatchells, Pophams, and Fulfords. 

1723. Mrs. Mary Moggridge gave twenty pounds, the profits thereof to be diflxi- 
buted in bread to poor houfekeepers of this parifti on St, Stephen's day yearly for ever, 
at the difcretion of the churchwardens and overfeers.' 

' Lib. Domefday. * Ibid. ' Taxat. Temporal. " Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen. 
" Taxat. Spiritual, ' Archer. ' Hift, of Abbies, ii. 203. ■> On one of the pillars in the church. 

BRIDGWATER, 



jSortWPctberton.] . [ 7S ] 

bridgv/ater, 

[Anciently Brugia, Bruoie, Brucgb, Brucce-Walter, and Burch-Walter] 

IS a large, populous, borough, market, and fea-port town, fituated on the banks of 
the river Parret, which hence in a bold ftream winds its way betwixt the hundreds 
of Cannington and Huntfpill, towards the aeftuary of the Briftol Channel,* In its 
courfe thither a fmall ifland is formed called Dunbal IJlf, which, in the beginning of the 
prefent century, was (as it is faid) fo made by fome unknown perfons making a cut 
of forty yards acrofs the then ifthmus ; this was done in one night, and the operatprs 
were never difcovered. 

The town of Briu'gwater is commodioufly fituated in a woody flat country, having 
rich moors to the north and eaft, in the great weftern road leading from the cities of 
Bath and Briftol, to Taunton, Exeter, and the county of Cornwall, being diftant forty 
miles fouthweft from Batli, thirty-four from Briftol, and eleven nearly north from 
Taunton. The place has been very large and populous; but frequently diminiftied by 
conflagrations and other caufcs; particularly in the year 1645, when it was befieged by 
the parliament forces under Sir Thomas Fairfax, all that quarter of the town called 
Eajiover, a few houfes excepted, was entirely burnt to the ground. Leland, who vifited 
it about the year 1538, informs us, that in the memory of people then living there had 
feUcn to ruin and fore decay upwards of two hundred houfes.*" The town at that 
time was not walled, and he thinks never was; yet, fays he, " There be four gates, 
namid as they be fette, by eft, weft, north, and fouth. The faireft ftreate and principalc 
ihowe of the toune ys from the weft-gate to the eafte-gate.'" At this day the town 
confifts of feveral good ftreets, moft of which ftand on the weft (ide of the river, but 
communicate with the other part, which was heretofore very confiderable, by a lofty 
find ancient bridge of three arches, begun in the time of King John, by William Briwere 
lord of the town, and finiflied by Sir Thomas Trivet, whofe arms being a trivet, in 
nllufion to his name, were affixed to the coping of the ftrufture.'' To tlie north of 
this bridge is the quay, which is large and commodious. Thirty-two veflTels belong to 
the port, from twenty to one hundred and twenty tons burden. The trade is chiefly 
in timber and coals. The duty for the laft feven years on coals coaftwife amounts to 
between fixteen and feventeen thoufand pounds. Other imports in that time about 
fix hundred pounds. The town Has three markets, viz. on Tuefday, Thurfday, and 
Saturday; and a fpacious and moft convenient market -houfe of brick has lately been 
ereded at the top of the High-ftreet near the church. There are alfo four fairs held 
here annually, viz. at Chriftmas, Lent, Midfummer, and St. Matthew's-day, old ftile. 
The intereft of Lord William Briwere with King John got the town erefted into a free 

• Sec vol. i. p. 249. ' Itin. ii. 97. * Il«d. 96, 

■* " Pontis longitudo Brygewater ell 70 Steppys." Itin. Jf^iU. de Worcfflre, 92. Perhaps the idea of the 
town receiving its name frpci tlie bridge will never totally be relinquifhed. 

L 2 borougli 



76 BRIDGWATER. [BOttlJ^ IPctbetton. 

borough by charter dated atChinon in France, 26 June 1200.* It was then governed 
by a prsepofitus or reeve, in whofe room King Edw. IV. fubftituted a mayor and two 
bailiffs/ The charters made heretofore were confirmed by Edw. I. II. III.^ and IV. 
Ric. II. and Henry VI.N by Queen Elizabeth, July 4, in the 19th year of her reign, 
aijd alfo by King James, Feb. 16, in the nth year of his reign. The corporation 
confifts of twenty-four common-council men, and the town is governed by a mayor, 
recorder, and two aldermen. The arms of the corporation are, GuleSy a caftle furmounted 
by two others placed pyramidically and embattled, ftanding on a Gothick bridge with 
water underneath; on each fide the firft caftle a domed tower, furmounted with a ball, 
and the gate in the centre portcullifed. The feal is very ancient. The arms of the 
town, as expreflfed in a town-piece, dated 1666, are fomewhat different, viz. a caftle 
with three towers ftanding on a bridge over a river, &c. From 23 Edw. I. this town 
has fent reprefentatives to parliament. 

The caftle, to which thefe arms bear allufion, ftands on the weft fide of the quay, 
and was anciently a very large and noble ftrufture, the government whereof was always 
vefted in perfons of the higheft eminence and diftinftion. It was built about the year 
1202, and after having experienced a feries of vicifTitudes, fuch as generally befal im- 
portant holds, was at length, in the year 1 645, nearly levelled to the ground in the par- 
liamentary confufions. It had then forty guns mounted on the walls, which were in 
moft parts fifteen feet thick, and all the fortifications were regular and ftrong. The 
moat was thirty feet wide, of great depth, and every tide filled with water. Colonel 
Edmund Wyndham was then the governor of the caftle, which he bravely defended for a 
confiderable time againft the efforts of die parliament army, till at length the eaftera 
part of the town, and feveral houfes in the weftern part, being fired by grenades and hot 
balls fhot from the garrifon, and much blood being fhed among the inhabitants, and their 
property deftroyed/ it furrendeeed to the rebels July 12, 1645. The town was by the 

' Cart. 2 Joh. p. 2. m. 27. ' Cart. 8 Ed. IV. n. 10. 

« 21 Ed. III. the burgeffes paid twenty. fix pounds to the quinzieme, which affeflment, made by the abbot of 
Ford and Sir John Inge, they thought unreafonable, and therefore petitioned parliament for a mitigation thereof, 
alledging, that they were fo impoveriftied, that great part of the inhabitants had not the means to live, and that 
the town was on the point of being ruined. Pet. in ParL 

* Cart. 4 Ric. II. p. 2. m. 23. Cart. 2 Hen. VI. p. 1. m. 32. 

' Individuals fufiered much from this fiege,. as appears (among other inftances) from the following memorial, 
in the pofleffion of Dr. Harvey :— — 

Mr. Harvye'j- Loffes Jujleyned by the Kin^s Governor. 

" 20 dwelling-howfes and 30 gardens pulled downe and layed waft; Mr. Harvye's inheritance. 1 fayre 
pigeon-howfe, built all with ftone, pulled downe and layed waft. 1 barne, and 2 ftables, burnt to the ground by 
him uppon ftorming of the towne ;. land of inheritance. 150 bufhells of come burnt by him. Mr. Harvye's 
dwdiing-howfe battered by hira uppon the ftorminge of the towne, that two hundred pounds will hardly repayer 
yt as y t was before. The goods and howfeholde fluff of the caftle which he ought to have reilored, all loft, being 
worth I hundred marks at the leaft ; the profits of £.xl. a yeare of his lands taken by vyolence from him by the 
governor for 2 yeares. 50 commanders and other foldyers quartered uppon him contrary to a noate under his 
owne hande. 80!. rent due for the caftle for 2 yeares. 15I. lent liim owte of purfe. 3 thoufand hoglheads of 
the caftle lyme foldc and ymployed by him. 1 fatt oxe w""_he agreede to paye 9I. for. 5 other fatt oxen ap- 

prayzed 



Jl30ttf)=lPctl)Crt0n.] BRIDGWATER. 



17 



articles of capitulation to be delivered up on Wednefday morning, July 23, at eight 
o'clock, and accordingly was lb. About one thoufand officers and foldiers, befides 
gentlemen and clergy, were made priibners. In the town were taken by the rebels 
forty-four barrels of powder, one thoufand five hundred arms, forty-four pieces of ord- 
nance, four hundred weight of match, and jewels, plate, and goods of immenfe value^ 
which had been fent hither from all the adjacent parts of the country for fecurity; the 
governor having declared that the caftle was impregnable againft all the force that 
could be brought againll it. The greater part of the valuables were conveyed to 
London, and there fold, and money raifed by the fale fufficient to bellow five fhillings 
on each man, as a reward to the fpldiers who ftormed the place. 

This aflault put nearly afinifliing period to the caftle, of which now only a few parts 
remain; as the water-port, and fome ruins of the lodge. The Ballium is at prefenc 
ufed for a deal-yard. Henry Harvey, proprietor of it in 1638, converted the old gate- 
houfe into a manfion of the form of a Roman B. 

In tiie Cajlle-field, forty years after this adventure, James Scot, duke of Monmouth, 
the firft natural fon of King Charles II. after having been proclaimed King at Taunton, 
and at the High-Crofs in this town, by Alexander Popham, efq; then mayor, and the 
corporation drefied in their formalities; encamped his raw and undifeiplined troops, tO' 
the amount of near fix thoufand men. The Earl of Feverfham was difpatched with a 
confiderable force to oppofe him, and took his poft in Sedgmoor, waiting for the 
motion of the Duke's army. The Duke, finding his military too young and inexpe- 
rienced to hazard a general engagement without previous fpeculation, took a view 
with a glafs of the Earl's encampments from the tower of the parifh church; and find- 
ing that on every hand it would be equally dangerous to retain his fituation, he came 
to the refolution of drawing out his troops. This he did about eleven in the^ night 
with the moft profound filence, and marched his army to Sedgmoor, intending at firft 
to have pafled the Earl's troops undifcerned under the cover of the night. But in this- 
he was miftaken; for the King's troops being prepared to receive him, he was fet upon, 
by the whole army ; and by the error of the dark, he charged upon his own party 
inftead of the King's, infomuch that he was totally routed; three hundred were killed 
in the engagement, and a thoufand more in the purfuit. The Duke himfelf efcaped,. 
and fled with a faithful fervant, the attendant on all his fortunes, towards Dorfetfhirc,. 
whither they were purfued, and at length found concealed in a dirty ditch» covered with 

prayzed at 50I. xx"' marks debt loft to Mr. Harvye by fetting at liberty one Thomas Hill, being arretted uppon 
a lawful procefs. One Thomas Paeon arretted for taking anddryviugeawaye of iSfheepeofMr. Har\7e's, fetc 
at liberty by the governor, and all loft." 

Mr. Harvye'j Loffes by the Parliament Army uppon the florminge of the Tozvne. 

" One inne in Bridgwater of Mr. Harvye's owne inheritance, w'" yeelded him 18I. per ann. bumr.. j or 4: 
other howfes burnt uppon the ftorm. ro horfes plundered. 8 oxen plundered. 8 cows plundered;. More at 
Chelton the fame day, (fci.) 5 horfes, (fci.) i yerlinge and 4 loades of haye. Alio' howfehcldeftuftc, wear- , 
inge apparell, books, and mony ; infoemuche that Mr. Harvye hathe not a bedd left him to lye on ; all loft 
uppon the ftorme, worth fifteen hundred pounds att the leaft. His eftate fequeftered alraoft 2 yearcs ; not a. 
penny allowance to his wife and children. AH this will appeaxe by teftimony to amountc to the value pf fower 
thou&nd pounds att the leatt." 

ftiibble,, 



73 BRIDGWATER. [Jl5ont)=pct()erton, 

Hubble, and with a few peas in their pockets which they had taken by way of fufte- 
nance: the Dulce being thence conveyed to London, was beheaded July 15, 1685.'' 

Bridgwater was neither a place of defence, nor note, before the Roman invafion. 
There are thofe who have conceived it fprung from the ruins of a Roman colony 
planted at the weft end of Poulden-Hill, where coins and foundations of old build- 
ings have been found.' In the time of Edward the Confeflbr it was the private 
cftate of Merlefuain, a Saxon thane, who loft it at the Conqueft, and King Wilham 
gave it to his follower Walfcin or Walter de Dowai, from whom the place derived the 
diftinguifhing part of its appellation j the Norman furvey thus records it: 

" Walfcin holds Brugie. Merlefuain held it in the time of King Edward, and 
*' gelded for five hides. The arable is ten carucates. In demefne are three carucates, 
** and five fervants, and thirteen villanes, and nine bordars, and five cottagers, with 
" eight ploughs. There is a mill of five ftiillings rent, and ten acres of meadow, and 
*' one hundred acres of coppice-wood, and thirty acres of pafture. When he received 
*' it, it was worth one hundred fhillings, now feven pounds.'"" 

To Walter de Dowai fucceeded a fan of his own name, whofe daughter Julian 
brought this and divers other great eftates to William Paganel her huftjand, as already 
has been obferved in the account of Huntlpill, which was another of the manors of 
Walter de Dowai." Which William Paganel had ifiue Fulke Paganel, or Paynel, who 
16 Efenry II. in order by his intereft to regain the King's favour, pafied over this 
manor to William de Briwere, to be held of him the faid Fulke Paganel and his heirs, 
by the fervice of half a knight's fee. This grant was confirmed by William, fon of 
the faid Fulke Paganel, whofe charter is attefted by Reginald de Mohun, Richard 
Briwere, and others." 

This William Briwere, being a perfon in whom much truft was repofed, particularly 
in matters which concerned the crown, built the caftle of Bridgwater, having obtained 
licence there-to a Johnj as alfo to inclofe all his woods here; and in the fame year 
obtained for the inhabitants their firft charter; erefting them for the future into a free 
borough ; to have a free market once a week, a fair yearly, the benefit of tolls and 
paflages, and feveral other privileges."" He began the foundation of the noble bridge 
over the Parret, and made the haven; both which were completed in the time of Edw. I. 
by Sir Thomas. Trivet, one of the juftices to that King. He was alfo attentive to 
matters of religion, and in the beginning of the reign of Henry III. founded and en- 
dowed, to the honour of St. John the Baptift in the town of Bridgwater, for the health of 
the fouls ofHemy II. Ric. I, and King John, an hofpital of the order of St, Auguftin, 
for a prior, matter, and brethren, who were to fuperintend and maintain thirteen poor 
and infirm perfons, befides religious and pilgrims. This inftitution was confirmed by 
Joceline, bifhop of Bath, A. D. 1219, who ordained the faid hofpital to be free, pure, 
iind perpetual, for indigent perfons only; That it ftiould enjoy the fame liberties and free 
tuftoms with otlier houfes of the fame clafs, and be exempt from epifcopal charges. 



'' Some of the arms of Monmouth's men are preferved in theburgefs hall. 

^ Aubrey's Monumenta Britannica MS. " Lib. Domefday. " See vol. ji. p. 390. 

• Men. Angl. ii. 912. ' Cart. 2 Joh. y. 2, m. 27. 



That 



ii3ott&*ipetf)etton.j Bridgwater. f^ 

That the brethren fliould have power to eled a mafter or warden out of their own 
fociety, who, with the brethren's concurrence, fhoiild difpofe of all offices whatfoever 
belonging to the houfe. That they fhoiild wear clerical apparel, fuch as was common 
to holpitallers, but with the diftindhion of a black crofs ftamped on their mantles and 
outer garments. That they ihould fee the parifli church of Bridgwater feiyed by Ibme 
one or odier of their fociety, and by anotiier proper fecular chaplain, as curate or 
afliftant. That one of the brethren, or, in his ftead, fome fecular chaplain, fhould 
perform mafs every day in the chapel of the caftle, and alfo when the lord of the caftle 
Ihould be there and require it to be performed, at canonical hours. That the mafter 
and brethren fliould have all profits and oblations coming from the caftle j and the lord 
thereof for the time being find books, veftments, utenfils, lights, and all other necef- 
iaries for the faid chapel. That fome one of the brethren ftiould have the care of the 
poor and fickly in the infirmary, under the direftion of the mafter of the hofpital, 
and provide for them competently according to the cuftom of the houfe, and their 
own abilities. That two or three women of good fame and conveifation fliould be 
admitted by the mafter and brethren to wait upon the poor and infirm, and have their 
lodging in a cell or chamber in the infirmary near them, and be fupported and main- 
tained at the expence of the mafter and brethren ; the faid women to be always ready 
night and day to afTift the fickly in every other office befides prayers.' 

To this hofpital, befides confiderable poftelTions in Bridgwater,' Chilton, North- 
Petherton, Chedder, and other places, were appropriated the churches of Bridgwater, 
Wembdon, Northover, and Ifle-Brewers, in this county, and the churches of Langteglos 
juxta Fowey, and Morwinfton, in Cornwall.' The mafter and brethren had alfo the 
advowfon of the reftory of Chilton and Idftoke, and their yearly revenues were valued 
in 1534, at 120I. 19s. 2d. The lords of the manc«" were patrons of the hofpital, and. 
the mafters were, 

Geffrey de Mark, 1298. 

Henry de Stanford, eledled in March 131 2. 

John de Walchyn, confirmed May 11, 1334. 

Thomas de Badicote, 1340. 

John Pathull, died 1422. 

Thomas Pulton, eledted Feb. 16, 1422. 

Roger Cory, Oft. 30, 1449. 

John Holford, March 28, 1457. 

Thomas Spenfer, 1498. 

Robert Walflie, Jan. 3, 1524. He was the laft mafter j and with Henry Pety, 
prefident, Thomas Cogyn, Richard Remberyg, John Goolle, and four other deacons j 
John Comb, John Wood, and John More, novices i fubfcribedto the fupremacy 17 

Sept.. 

' Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen. 

' Z3 Edw. III. it was found not to the King's damage, to licence Thomas Fitz-James, Hensy Redmor, Adam 
Caundel, and Thomas the fon of Ralph Caundel, to grant fixteen mefluages, one fhop, one cellar, one flail, one 
garden, and twenty -three acres and a half of land, in Bridgwater and Noith-Petherton, to the Mafter and Bre- 
jhxenof the hofpital of St. John of Bridgwater, to hold to them and their fucceflbrs forever. /»; . ad quod Damn. 

' Mon. Angl. ii. 433. 



S6 BRIDGWATER. [Jl5ott!)#Ctf)ettOin 

Sept. 1534; and FcbK 3, 1539, the faid mafter, with feven brothers, furrendered this 
hofpital to the King, he having a yearly penfion given him of 33I. 6$. 8d. and a gra- 
tuity of 16I. 13s. 4d. ♦ ^ 

In 1553, here remained in charge 3I. in fees, 7I. lis. in annuities, and the following 
penfions, viz. To Richard Crybbe, alias Kymrydge, 4I.; Robert Fyfher 4I. John 
Wylle 4I. John Mors 2I. Thomas Wood 2I.' ^34 Henry VlII. the King granted the 
icite of this ^ofpital, which ftood near the eaft-gate, and of which a few ruins remain, 
with lands near it called Smallcroft, to Humphrey Colics. 

To return to William Briwere, the founder of this hofpital; he, after many benefac- 
tions to the town of Bridgwater, and raifing it from a fmall to a very flourifhing place, 
died II Henry III. and was fucceeded by William his fon and heir; who, following 
the example of his father,, founded ip the weftern part of the town a priory of mino- 
rites or grey-friars, which he dedicated to St. Francis, and endowed with lands." 
One of the lords Botreaux and his wife were great benefaftors to this houfe, and 
his heart and her body were buried in the chapel." This William married Joan, 
daughter to William de Vernon earl of Devon, but died without ilTue, 16 Henry III. 
whereupon his cftate became divided among his fifters, viz. Graecia, Margaret, Ifabel, 
Alice, and Joan. Upon the divifion of the eftates, the caftle, manor, and borough of 
Bridgwater, with the manors of Haygrove and Odcombe, fell to the eldeft filler Graecia, 
-who was married to William de Braofe, lord of the manors of Brecknock, Radnor, and 
Abergavenny, and a great baron of his time. William, the fon of this William de 
Braofe, was maflacred by Llewellyn prince of Wales, and left ifllie four daughters 
his coheirefTes, viz. Maud, wife of Roger de Mortimer; Eve, wife of William de 
Cantilupe; Eleanor, wife of Humphry de Bohun; and Ifabel, firfc wife of David, fon 
of Llewellyn prince of Wales, and afterwards of Peter Fitzherbert. The eldeft 
daughter Maud, wife of Roger Mortimer, had the caftle and third part of the manor 
of Bridgwater for her ftiare, and gave the fame to William Mortimer her third fon, 
who married Hawife, daughter and heir of Robert de Mufcegros, and "died without 
iflue, leaving Edmund lord Mortimer, his elder brother, heir to this eftate. To which 
Edmund fucceeded Roger, Sir Edmund, Roger, Edmund, Roger, and Edmund, earls 
of March, and pofieflbrs of the caftle and third part of the manor of Bridgwater, which 
paffed by an heir female of the laft Earl of March to Richard duke of York, and thus 
to the crown. 

But the borough of Bridgwater, and the out-manor of Haygrove, in the divifion of 
the Braofe eftates, fell to the ftiare of Eve, wife of William de Cantilupe. Which 
William, by his faid wife, left iflue one fon, George, and two daughters, Millicent, firit 
wife of John de Montealt, and afterwards of Eudo lord Zouch; and Joan the wife of 
Henry lord de Haftings. George died without iflue, and thereupon John the fon of 
Henry de Haftings, by Joan his younger fifter, and Millicent his elder fifter, the wife 

' Willis's Hiftory of Abbies, ii. 196. 

" T)ie fcite of this priory was granted 35 Hen. VIII. to Emanuel Lukar. There was alfo in Bridgwater in 
the fame part of ihe town, an hofpital of lepers, dedicated to St. Giles, but endowed with little or no land. 
Lei. Itin.'u, 97. « Ibid, 

ef 



Jf3ortf)#CtbCCton.] BRIDGWATER. 8i 

of Eiido lord Zouch, were found to be his next heirs. A legal partition of the cftates 
being made, the manor of Bridgwater was allotted to Millicent, and in her right came 
to the lords Zouch of Harringworth. By an inquifition taken 1 9 Ric. II. it was found 
that William lord Zouch held at his death, in fee tail to himfclf and Agnes his wife 
and their heirs lawfully begotten, the manor of Bridgwater, with its members and 
appertenances in Haygrove and Odcomb, of the King in free burgage." 7 Henry V. 
William lord Zouch held two parts of the manor of Haygrove, and of the demefncs 
of the borough of Bridgwater, with two parts of the hundred court, the fair, market, 
and other franchifes and liberties belonging to the faid lordfliip and borough.* By 
the attainder of John lord Zouch of Harringworth, i Henry VII. the premifes above- 
mentioned came to the crown; and that King granted a fee-farm rent of 16I. per 
annum out of the town of Bridgwater, the manor of Haygi'ove, and alfo the manors 
of Wincanton, North and South-Barrow, and Marfh, late parcel of the pofleflions of 
John lord Zouch and Seymour, attainted to Giles lord D'Aubney for life, reverfion to 
the heirs of the faid lord Zouch.* This Lord D'Aubney was fo created by Henry VII. 
with whom, while Earl of Richmond, he came from Britanny in France. He was- 
governor of Calais; and in 1490 routed the French at Dixmude. He was alfo con- 
ftable of the caftles of Bridgwater and Briftol, and commanded the fecond divifion at 
the battle of Blackheath in 1497. He died in 1507, leaving by Elizabeth his wife, 
daughter of Sir John Arundel, of Wardour, an only fon Henry, who, fucceeding him, 
was by King Henry VIII. in 1539 created Earl of Bridgwater. He dying without 
ifllie male, the title became extindt; but was revived by King James I. May 27, 1617, 
in the perfon of John Egerton, baron of Ellefmere and vifcount Brackley. He died 
1649, and was fucceeded in the title by his fon John, who died in 1686; from whom 
it defcended to a fon of his own name, the third Earl of Bridgwater, whofe fon Scroop,, 
in confideration of his great merits, was by Geo. I. advanced on June 18, 1720, to the 
honours of Marquis of Brackley, and Duke of Bridgwater. John Marquis of Brack- 
ley, born April 29, 1727, fucceeded his father as fecond Duke of Bridgwater, and died 
Feb. 26, 1747, unmarried, whereupon the title devolved on his brother Francis, the 
third and prefent Duke of Bridgwater. 

The caftlc and borough were fometime held by the Queens of England, and in thls- 
right they had a fhare of the patronage of the hofpital of St. John in Bridgwater,, 
which in 1524 was divided into three parts, one of which belonged to Catherine Queea 
of England, and the other two to Henry lord D'Aubney above-mentioned. 

King Charles I. by letters patent bearing date July 1 1, the fecond year of his reign, 
granted to Sir William Whitmore, knt. and George Whitmore, efq; and their heirs 
and affigns, the manor and caftle of Bridgwater, with the appertenances, the manor of 
Haygrove, and divers meflliages, lands, tenements, and hereditaments, in Bridgwater, 
Haygrove, Durleigh, Chilton, and North-Petherton, together with all toll, courts- leet, 
view of frankpledge, law-days, and afllze of bread, wine and beer, and all other viduals, 
goods and chattels of felons and fugitives, felons of themfelves attainted, convifted, and 
condemned, and put in exigent, fines, amerciaments, waifs, eftrays, dcodands, free- 
st Efc. ^ Ibid. ! Rot. Pari. 

Vol. III. M warren. 



82 BRIDGWATER. fBottb^petftetton. 

v.'arren, &c. in as large and ample a manner as heretofore ufed and accuftomed within 
the faid caftle, manor, &c. and in as large and ample a manner and form as Jane queen 
of England, Katherine countefs of Devon, Roger Mortimer earl of March, or 
Richard duke of York, ever lieretofore had by reafon or means of any charter or grant 
whatfoever. And among many other things the faid King grants all that rent of four 
iron horfe-flioes, and thirty-eight iron nails, a free-rent of John Buckland for his houfe 
called the Swan, with the appertenances in Bridgwater, by the particular mentioned to 
be of the yearly rent or value of four-pence ; — to hold of the King as of the manor 
of Eaft-Greenwich in the county of Kent in free and common foccage, and not in ca- 
pita, or by knight's fervice.'' The Whitmores foon after" fold the manor of Bridg- 
water Cajlrum, cum Hay groves the caftle of Bridgwater, the lord/hip or manor oi- 
Bridgwater, and divers mefluages, lands, and tenements, in Haygrove, Durleigh, Chil- 
ton, North-Petherton, &c. to Henry Harvey, fon of William Harvey, of Bridgwater, 
efq. Which Henry had iflue two fons, Henry and John. Henry the eldeft inherited 
the eftate; but wanting ifTue, gave it by will, dated A. D. 1669, ^'■^ '^is uncle John, 
who, having no ifTue, gave it to Francis, who, likewife wanting iflue, cut off the entail, 
and gave it to John Hirvey his nephew, the fon of John and Agnes Harvey. The 
prefent heir of this family is Robert Harvey, M. D. fometime fellow of Sidney college 
in Cambridge. 

The caftle of Bridgwater was leafed out by Henry Harvey to Edmund Wyndham 
the King's governor, in 1643, two years before the fiege thereof by the parliament 
forces under Fairfax. 

TJie corporation of the town have their peculiar manor in Bridgwater ; but the 
principal one belongs to Sir Philip Hales, bart. the repreferitative of the families of 
Trivet and Pym, in this county. This manor remained in the Trivet family many 
defcents, till 10 Henry VI. itpafTed to the family of Pym*" by the marriage of Roger 
Pym, of Brymore, with Joan daughter and heir of John Trivet. On the death of Roger 
Pym, it defcended to Philip Pym, 12 Edw. IV. and from him to the fucceeding heir* 
of the Pym family. On the death of Sir Charles Pym, the lall of that family, it be- 
came the property of Sir Thomas Hales, bart. in right of his wife Mary, fifter and heir 
of the faid Sir Charles, and is now pofTefTcd by their defcendant Sir Philip Hales, of 
Brymore, bart. 

In 1599, the town of Bridgwater gave birth to that valiant and fuccefsful Ad- 
miral, Robert Blake, who was educated at the grammar-fchool here, whence he 
removed to Oxford, and was fuccefTively of Alban-hall and Wadham-coUege in that 
univerfity. He very early difcovered republican and puritanical principles, on which 
account he was in 1640 eledled member for the borough of Bridgwater. In 1643, he 
governed a fmallfort at Briftol under the command of Colonel Fiennes. He ferved 
afterwards in this county, and, in conjundion with Sir Robert Pye, furprized Taunton 
for the Parliament. In 1648, he was appointed to command the fleet with Colonels 
Deane and Popham; and in 165 1, he burnt and deftroyed the whole fleet of Prince 
Rupert, two Ihips only excepted. The fame year he reduced the Scilly Iflands, which 

* Ex. Autog. 1630. ? OfthisfamJly, fef volj. p. 233. 

were 



Bom-'&mttm.] bridgwater. 83 

were held for the King. In 1652, on the expeftation of a Dutch war, he was ap- 
pointed fole admiral for nine months, and in that capacity foon after forced Van 
Trump the Dutcli admiral to retreat precipitately from the Downs, In 1653, he 
gained a complete victory over the Dutch fleet, confifl:ing of a hundred and twenty 
men of war, and commanded by the fame admiral. In the fame year he reprefcnted 
his native town of Bridgwater in the Proteftor's new parliament. In 1654 heexadcd, 
ample fatisfaftion from the Algerines for injuries done to the Englifh merchants; and 
failing to Tunis, reduced the caftle of Porto-Ferino, and burnt all the Ihips belonging, 
to the pirates in the harbour. In 1657, he failed with a fleet of twenty-five men of 
war to Sandta-Cruz, in the ifland of Teneriffe, and in a fhort fpace of time and with 
little lofs he forced that flirong place, and burnt the Spanifli fleet lying therein. For 
this lafl: adlion he received the thanks of the parliament, and a diamond ring valued 
at five hundred pounds. Upon his return to the Mediterranean he cruiled fome time 
before Cadiz, but finding his health declining faft, he refolved to return to England, 
and died as the fleet was entering Plymouth, Aug. 17, 1657, aged 58, " His body 
was conveyed to Wefl:minfter- Abbey, and interred with great pomp in Henry VIIth'3 
chapel; but it was removed from thence in 166 1, and reinterred in St. Margaret's 
church-yard." 

The environs of Bridgwater are not unnoted in our early annals. To the fouth of the 
town lies Ham, in which village, A. D. 794, ten caflTates of land were given by Brithris 
king of tlie Weft-Saxons, to his prefedl Wigfruth and to his heirs after him, for the 
health of his own foul and the expiation of his fins, and in confideration of the faid 
"Wigfruth's faithful and indefatigable fervices at Ham. This territory was known by 
the following defcription: " It has Hem on the eaft, and goes fouthwards to a watery 
place called Sivanmore, thence northwards to a muddy river called Hciebrouk. Weft- 
wards the bounds touch upon a certain tumulus or hillock, called from a ftone infixed 
on the fummit thereof Stanbrow. Thence to the fouthweft ripe of a water called 
Bradanflot; thence to a certain marfhy rivulet, and fo nortJiwards to a ditch called 
Candeldichy and dience by a furrow to three ftones; and fo to a certain fmall path ver- 
ging towards the weft ; and thence northeaft wards to a ftone; and from that ftone by tlie 
northern extremity of the boundaries to fome confpicuous chalk-pits ; and from thoie 
pits by a high place to a remaikable Pear-tree, (in arbor em frunuofatn, id eji, Jp^CtlC,) 
and then to the weflrwards along the publick road to Liguumy which they call Barkte's 
Trow. Then from the fouth it verges by a rivulet into the morafs of the river Patride ." 
Afterwards, viz. A. D. 958, King Edwi gave a manfe in the fame village to Ceolward 
his fervant and to his heirs ;^ and in 1009, King Athelred granted the whole territory 
of Ham to the abbey of Athelney.*" In the Norman record it is thus furveyed : 

" The church [of Atheley] itfelf holds Hame. In the time of King Edward it 
" gelded for one hide. The arable is four carucatcs. In demefne is one carucate, and 
" four fervants, and one villane, and feven cottagers, with one plough. There arc 
" fifteen acres of meadow, and three acres of coppice-wood. It is worth thirty 
« Ihillings."' 

5 Biog. Djft. ii. 230, <■ Regift. Abbat. de Athelney, MS. • Ibid. 

!• Ibid. ' Lib. Domefday. 

Ma A.D. 1225, 



84 BRIDGWATER. [Ji3ortf)#et!)crton. 

A. D. 1225, Abbot Benedift and his convent gave a certain place in the manor of 
Ham for the fupport of lights in the chapel of St. Mary.'' In 1293, the lands be- 
longing to that monaftery here were valued at 61. los.' There was a compofition 
between the abbot of Athehiey and the mafter of the hofpital of St. John in Bridg- 
water, concerning the tithes of Ham, whereby it was agreed that the faid hofpital fhould 
receive the tithes of all their demefnes in Ham, and pay yearly to the monaftery of 
Athelney twenty fhiUings. That the abbot and convent fliould be allowed to perform 
divine fervice in the oratory of Ham when they fhould be there, without prejudice to 
the mother church. But that the mafter and brethren of the hofpital ftiould perform 
fervice in the faid oratory on St. Leonard's-day, and receive all oblations.™ The manor 
of Ham belongs to Lady Tynte. 

Partly within this parifti, and partly in that of Durleigh, is West-Bower, and wholly 
in the former is East-Bower ; which hamlets are thus furveyed in Domefday-Book: 

" Rademer holds of Walter [de Dowai] Bure. Saric held it in the time of King 
*' Edward, and gelded for half a hide. The arable is three carucates. In demefne is 
*' one carucate, with one fervant, and three villanes, and two cottagers, having two 
" ploughs. It was and is worth forty fhiUings. 

" This land belonged in the time of King Edward to Melecome, which Robert de 
" Odborvile now holds."" 

" Alured [de Ifpania] himfelf holds Bur. Alwi held it in the time of King Ed- 
*' ward, and gelded for half a hide. The arable is five carucates. There are eight 
" villanes, and fix cottagers, and three fervants. It was always worth one hundred 
" fhillings. 

" To this manor is added one virgate of land, which was of the King's farm in Peret. 
" The arable is one carucate. It is worth ten fhillings."° 

The family of Godwyn were long lords of Bower, and gave it the name of Godwyn's- 
Bower. In the time of Edw. II. Hugh Godwyn, burgefs of Bridgwater, pofTefTed lands 
in Bridgwater, Bower, and Dunwere, and by Margery his wife left ifTue John Godwyn, 
who died 20 Edw. III. leaving by Joan his wife, daughter of Robert de Bradford, 
(who furvived him) John his fon and heir. Which John was living 21 Edw. III. and 
bore on his feal a chevron between three leopards' heads. He was fucceeded in his 
eftates by William Godwyn his fon and heir, and he by another William Godwyn, who 
died 21 Henry VI. feized of the manor of Godwyne's-Boure, and certain lands and 
tenements in North-Boure, parcel of the fame manor, held under Alexander Hody, as 
«f his manor of Otterhampton.' William Godwyn, fon of the laft-mentioned WiUiam, 
was living i Edw. IV, and had ifTue William Godwyn, called in his father's life-time 
William Godwyn the younger, who was father of Chriftopher Godwyn, and grand- 
father of Thomas Godwyn, who fold this manor, and that of Bagborough, to John 
Brent, of Coflington, efq; who died feized of the fame, and the manors of Dunwere, 

* Regift. Abbat. de Athelney. ' Taxat, Temporal. ■» Regift. Abbal. de Athelney. 

! f Lib. I>omefday. "Ibid. " Efc. 

Slap, 



j^ortij^petbmon.] Bridgwater. 85 

Slap, Eaft-Bower, and others, i6 Henry VIII.'' all which defcended to W illiam his 
fon and heir. Thefe manors were afterwards fold away from the Brents, and difperfcd 
into other families. 

44 Edw. III. John Horfey was lord of the manors of Eaft and Weft-Bower/ 

7 Henry VI. Thomas Mychell, William Befylis, and John Walyngford, held the 
fourth part of a knight's fee in Bower, which the heirs of Robert Chilton formerly 
held.' The family of Cokcr were likewife poflefled of lands in Bower. 

DuNWEER in this vicinity was in the time of Ric. I. the eftate of Geffrey Cociis,' or 
Cook, as the family was afterwards called, and from them it defcended to a family, who 
had their name from the neighbouring village of Bradney. 17 Edw. II. Joachim de 
Bradney held twenty-five acres of arable land, and three acres of meadow in la Slape, 
and Donwere, of the King in chief, by the fervice of the thirty-fecond part of a knigiit's 
fee." Simon de Bradney was his fucceflbr in this manor, which afterwards came to 
the Chichefters, and continued for many defcents in their poffefTion. According to the 
furvey taken previous to the divifion and allotment of King's Sedgmoor, this manor 
confifted of fix hundred acres, and then belonged to the heirs of Sir Robert Chichefter.' 
There was a family of the name de Donwere, who held lands here in the time of 
Henry II. and Ric. I." 

Northward from Bridgwater is Horsev, which in the time of King William the 
Conqueror belonged to the lord of Bridgwater, and was held of him by Rademer 
a Saxon. 

" Rademer holds of Walter, HuRsr. Elward held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and gelded for two hides. The arable is feven carucates. In demefne are two caru- 
" cates, and two fervants, and eight villanes, and fix bordars, and three cottagers, widi 
** five ploughs, and twenty-four acres of pafture. It is worth four pounds."* 

In the time of Henry II. the manor of Horfey was the pofleflion of a family of its 
name, who bore for their arms three horfes' heads couped,' it being ufual for ancient 
families to adopt fome emblematical bearing fignificative of, or allufive to their titles. 
In the reign above mentioned, Philip, Walter, William, and Thomas de Horfey were 
fucceflive lords of this manor."" They were a family of great opulence and reputation, 
and generally refided at Horfey, though fometlmes at Clifton in Dorfetlhire, which 
came to tiiem by an heir-general of the Maubanks.'' " The auncient name and maner 
place of the Horejeys was at the end of the greatc hylle that goidie from Gleffcnbyry 
almofte to Bridgewatar. It is about a myle from Bridgewatar, and Ser John Horfey 
polFeffithe yet the lande.'"* In this name it continued till the latter end of the laft cen- 
tury, when Sir George Horfey, knt. having by extravagance diflipatcd the large eftate 
which had defcended to him from a long train of ancellry, fold this manor and the 
adjoining one of Pignes, for a trifling fum to Sir John Stawel. It appears from an old 

■• Inq. pod mort. Joh. Brent. ' Efc. • Lib. Feod. • Rot. Pip. 7 Ric. I. " Efc. 

* Dugdale's Hift. of the Fens. >■ Cart. Antiq. .= Lib. Domefday. * Seals from ancient Deeds. 

■' Sit William Pole. ' Hutchins'sITift. of Doriet, U. 459. . ■' Lcl. Itin. vii. 109. 

evidence. 



86 BRIDGWATER. CJl50ttf)=lPetf)ett0tt. 

evidence,' that the manor was worth by the year 43I. and holden of the King as of his 
dutchy of Lancafter by knights' fervice. There was a chapel in the village of Horfey, 
which has long fince been ruinated. 

The manor of Pignes or Pegens, called from the Horfeys HorJey-PigneSyh thus 
furveyed in the old record; 

" John the Porter holds of the King, Pegens. Bridric held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for one hide and one yard-land. The arable is two carucates. 
" In demefne is one carucate, and two villanes, with one cottager. There is a prieft, 
" with one carucate, and two cottagers. There are five acres of meadow. It was for- 
" merly worth forty fliillings, now it is worth thirty fliillings."'^ 

There is a tradition that here was the mother-church to Chilton, which feems to be 
confirmed by the foregoing extradt. The manor ^ways paffed with Horfey in the 
times fucceeding the Norman Conqueft. 

The laft place that remains to be noticed within this ciraiit, is the ancient vill and 
manfion of Sydenham, which afforded name to the feveral branches of that worthy 
family, which have flourifhed in this county for upwards of five hundred years, bearing 
for their arms. Argent^ three rams paflanty^z^/^. This place was formerly called Sideham, 
in regard of its fituation on the fide of the river Parret, being pofleffed in Edward 
the Confeflbr's days by one Cheping a Saxon, and in the time of WiUiam I. by Roger 
Arundel. The amount of the arable land on this eftate was one carucate, and there 
were fifteen acres of pafture; all valued at fifteen-pence.^ As it was cuftomary for 
families to affum.e names from the territories wherein they more efpecially refided, fo 
fome lord of this manor, which after the Conqueft grew very confiderable, called, 
himfelf ^1? Sydenham^ a name ufed by all his defendants to this day. In the time of 
King John, Robert de Sydenham was lord of the manor of Sydenham, and at his 
death left iflue a fbn whofe name was John, living in the time of Henry III. To 
which John fucceeded Walter de Sydeham (being thus written in the evidences of 
Dunfter-caftle) who 14 Edw. I. held under Richard de Greynville a knight's fee in 
Sydeham of John de Mohun as of the honour of Dunfter.*" He was fucceeded by John 
de Sydenham, who married the heirefs of John de Kittisford, of Kittisford in this 
county, and by her had iflue two fons, William, and Richard, of whom William inhe- 
rited this manor, and was living here in the time of Edw. III. Which William, by 
Joan the daughter and coheir of William de Cothay, of Cothay in the parifh of Kittis- 
ford, left three fons, Roger, Simon, and Williamj whereof Simon, marrying Marfilla, 
daughter and heir of John Hillary of Badialton, was founder of that branch of the 
Sydenhams who fcated themfelves in that parifh. Roger, the eldeft fon of William 
de Sydenham was lord of Sydenham and Kittisford 15 Edw. III.' and left iflue tsvo 
fons, the youngeftof whom, Richard, was a judge, and lord of Combe-Sydenham in 
this county, and the eldeft, whofe name was John, fucceeded to this manor. He 

married Mary, daughter and heir of de Pixton, lord of Pixton near Dulverton in 

this county, aj?d by her had two fons, John and Hugh, and a daughter, married to John 

' Ex. MS" Codice Tho. Rawlinfon. ' Lib. Domefday. « Ibid. » Lib. Feod. ' Efc. 

Carru. 



j^ortfj-i^etftcrtoiL] Bridgwater. 87 

Carru. Hugh de Sydenham, the fecond fon of John, marrying Joan the daughter and 
heir of William PolefwcU, was anceftor to the baronets of this family, and to all the 
branches of the houfe now fubfilUng in the male line. But John, the cldeft fon, mar- 
ried Alice the daughter and heir of John Redmere, and dying in his father's life-tirne, 
left ifiue one fon John, and a daughter named Joan; which John dying without ifluc, 
Joan his fitter became heirefs to the eftate. 

This Joan was twice married; her firft hufband was Richard Cuffe, alias Cave, (fon 
of Thomas Cave, by Ifolda, daughter and heir of Hugh de Marifco, or Mareis, and 
grandfon of Thomas Cave of the county of Northampton) who in her right be- 
came lord of Sydenham; her fecond hufband was Robert Bozun. To which Richard 
Cave fucceeded his fon Philip, who by marriage with Catharine, daughter and at 
length heir of Walter Tilly, (a defcendant of Thomas de Tilly, living in the time of 
Edward I.) pofleflcd the manors of Moorland and Willy, and dying in 147 1, 
feized of Sydenham, and large eftates in Wembdon, Bridgwater, Bawdrip, North- 
Petherton, Moorland, Dunweer, North-Bower, Woolmerfdon, and Nctherham, left 
ifiue William Cave, who fucceeded to the manor, and by Anne his wife was father of 
one fon, John, who died without iflue in the time of Henry VIII. and a daughter, 
Alice, married to Thomas Perceval, of Tickenham and Roulfton, fon to Ralph, bro- 
ther to Sir Ralph Peixeval, lord of Wefton in Gordano. Which Thomas Perceval 
rebuilt the manor-houfe of Sydenham, where he refided, and in which eftate he was 
fucceeded by David Perceval his ion and heir. This David married Alice, the daugh- 
ter of Thomas Bytliemore, of Nailfea in this county, efq; and dying 25 Henry VIH. 
left iflue by her three fons, of whom George became lord of Sydenham, Moorland, 
Willy, and other lands in this county, and had his refidence chiefly at Nailfea, but 
after the fale of that eftate he removed to Sydenham, and there lived in a frugal and 
retired manner. There goes a ftory of him whilft he lived here, that one night he 
was tranfported out of his bed-chamber through the barred windows of the old houfe, 
and, by the marvellous power of fome invifible fpir'it, was carried through the air, 
and placed in the upper branches of a great oak, whofe venerable head (fays my 
author) ftill rears itfelf, not yet remarkably decayed, at fome diftance from the feat.'' 
To this George fucceeded Richard Perceval his fon and heir, fecretary of the court of 
wards in England, and regiftrar of the fame court in Ireland, who, A. D. 1613, fold 
diis manor to Mr. Bull, from whom it defcended to George Bubb Doddington, efq; one 
of the Lords of the Treafury. 

The church of Bridgwater is next to be confidered. On the foundation of St. 
John^s hofpital by William Briwere, the tithes of this parifli were appropriated to that 
inftitution, and tke mafter and brethren thereof had the advowfon of the vicarage, 
which in 1292 was valued at eight marks.' The church had before been given by 
Fulke Paganel to the foreign abbey of St. Martin Marmonftier,"' the poflTefllons of which 
in England were feized into the King's hands during the war with France. The gifc 
of the living is in the crown, and the Rev. William Woolen is die prefent incumbent, 

* Anderfon's Genealogical Hiftory of the houfe of Y\'ery, ii. ii8. ' Taxat. Spiritual. 

? Mon.Ang. ii. 912. 

The 



88 , BRIDGWATER. [Bortb^etbetton, 

The church, which is dedicated to St. Mary, is a large handfome ftrufture, confift- 
ing of a nave, chancel, and two fide ailes, with a tower at the weft end, furmounted by 
a very lofty fpire, being with the tower one hundred and feventy-four feet in height. 
There is a very beautiful altar-piece given by the late Hon. Anne Poulett, many years 
member for the town. This painting reprefents our Saviour reclining his head on the 
lap of his beloved difciple John, who is finely reprcfented in the anguifh of filcnt grief, 
covering his face with both his hands. On the left hand the Virgin Mary lies fwoon- 
ing with her head in the lap of the wife of Cephas, who hangs over her with the mingled 
expreffion of grief, difmay, and tender affection. In the back ground is Mary Mag- 
dalen ftanding with her right hand thrown back, her left raifed equal with her head, 
her eyes exalted; and the whole attitude finely expreffive of her breathing a devout 
prayer to heaven. The artift of this valuable piece is uncertain. 

Divers of the Wrothe, Horfey, and other ancient families, were buried in this 
church; but there are now no monuments of confequence. 

There were feveral chantries here, as, i. St. George's chantrj'; the laft incumbent 
of which was John Saunders, penfioned in 1553 with 5I. 2. The Virgin Mary's 
chantry. John Toller, the laft incumbent, had a fimilar penfion." To this chantry 
belonged ten mefluages, eight acres of land, and forty ftiillings rent in Bridgwater." 
3. Trinity chantry. John Inger the laft incumbent of this had alfo a penfion of fl."" 

" The chapelle of .S". Salviour at the fouth fide withoute the town was buildid in 
hominum memoria, by a merchaunt of Bridgewater, cawllid William Poel or Pole,"* 

" Willis'sHift. of Abbies, ii. 201. » Pat. 16 Ric. II. p. 2. m. 30. 

p Willis, ut fupra. ' Lei. Itin. ii. 97. 



CHILTON 

LIES a mile weftward from Bridgwater, on the edge of a common, which runs 
down almoft to the river Parret. This parifti, which in old records is called 
Chiltcn-'Trinitatis, on account of the dedication of its church, was anciently a hundred 
of itfelf, and divided into feveral manors, as East-Chilton, West-Chilton, or 
Chilton-Trivet, Idstoke-Inverne, and Hunstile. The two firft vills are thus 
defcribed in Domefday-Book: 

*' Anfchitil hol4s of Roger [de Curcellc] Cildetone. Levegar held it in the time 
" of King Edward, and gelded for half a hide. The arable is two carucates. In de- 
" mefne is one carucate, with one fervant, and two villanes, and five cottagers, widi 
" two ploughs. There are fix acres of meadow, and eight acres of pafture, and fix- 
" teen acres of wood. It was worth twenty fhiUings, now forty Ihillings. 

"Anfchitil 



jSonlj^lPctijccton.] c ii i L t on. sg 

" Anfchitil holds of Roger, Cildetone. Morcfwct held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for half a hide. The arable is two cariicatcs. Thcfe are occu- 
" pied by four villanes and fix cottagers; and in demefne is half a cariicate, and half 
" a mill rendering twenty fhiHings. There are fix acres of meadow, and eight acres of 
" paftiire, and fixtecn acres of wood. It was and is worth forty flaillings."'' 

Its immediate poflcflbrs after the Conqueft affumed the name of Chilton, and con- 
tinued in thefe parts for many ages, having confiderable eftates, as appears by the inqui- 
fitions and other ancient evidences. Of them were feveral Sir John de Chiltons, Sir 
Thomas de Chilton, and Sir Robert de Chilton, Icnts. 7 Henry VI, Thomas Mychell, 
William Befyls, and John Walyngford, held the fourth part of a knight's fee in Chilton, 
which the heirs of Sir Robert de Chilton formerly held there.'' The fame family were 
alfo poflcflred of lands in South-Petherton and Pitney. In the time of Edw. III. the 
manor of Chilton was the property of the family of de Wigbere or Wigborough, fo 
denominated from their manor of Wigborough near South-Petherton. In the firft year 
of that reign Richard de Wigbere held the manors of Chilton, Hunftile, and Wigbere, ' 
of the King in chief by the fervice of being door-keeper to the King's chamber, and by ' 
the rent of forty fliillings per annum.' 33 Edw. III. Maud the widow of Richard de 
Wigbere held at her death the manor of Wigborough, and a meflliage and one caru- 
cate of arable land, fix acres of meadow, fix acres of wood, and ten fliillings rent, in 
Hunftile j and alfo a meflliage and three hundred and fixty-nine acres of land in Chilton; 
reverfionary to John the fon and heir of Ralph de Horfey, then under age and in ward 
to the King.** The family of Horfey were the fubfequent owners of this eftate; but the 
manor of Hunftile defcended from the Wigberes to the Cogans lords of Huntlpill. 

This manor was formerly thus furveyed : 

" John [the Porter] himfelf holds Hustile. Alward held it in the tiriie of King 
" Edward, and gelded for one virgate of land. The arable is two carucates, with 
" which are three villanes, and four cottagers. There are ten acres of pafture. It 
" was formerly worth ten fliillings, now twenty fliillings. 

" Of this land half a virgate and one furlong in the time of King Edward belonged 
" to Sumertone. It is worth five fliillings.'" 

From the Cogans this manor defcended to the Bourchiers lords Fitzwarrcn, as ^<'iU 
be feen hereafter in the account of Wigborough. 

West-Chilton, or Chilton-Trivet, belonged to the Trivets of Durborough, 
in which name it continued till 25 Henry VI. when it pafled by the marriage of an only 
daughter to John de Compton. 12 Henry VI. Elizabeth the wife of Thomas Tryvet 
held among other lands the manor of Chilton of Sir Robert Poynings, knt. as of his 
manor of Wyke; and a toft, and one carucate of land in Clzyhvll Juxia Cbilton-l'rivet, 
of John Bluetj as of his manor of North-Petherton. 

The village of Clayhill is thus defcribed in Domefday-Book: 



* Lib. Domefday. 


" Lib. Feod. 


' Efc. Sec Wigborough in South-Petherton. 


Vol. III. 


• Efc. 


* Lib. Domcfday. 

N " Anfchitil 



90 c H I L T o N. [iI5o«f)#ct!5erton. 

" Anfchidl holds of Roger [de Curcelle] Claihelle. Ordgar held it in the time 
" of King Edward, and gelded for one hide. The arable is three carucates. Inde- 
" mefne is one carucate, and two villanes, and feven cottagers, with two ploughs. 
" There are three acres of meadow, and eight acres of pafture, and twelve acres of 
" wood. It was and is worth twenty fhillings."'. 

7 Henry VI. Thomas Mychell, WilHam Stapleton, and Ifabel Hove, held half a 
knight's fee in CleyhuU, which the heirs of Robert Teftard, and Richard le Hare, for- 
merly there held.^ 

The ancient family of Wigbere abovementioned were lords alfo of the manor of 
Idstock, or Idstoke, fituated near Cannington-Park. Of this place the following 
notice is taken in the furvey : 

" John holds of Roger [de Curcelle] Ichetochb. Ulf held it in the time of King 
*' Edward, and gelded for one virgate of land. The arable is half a carucate, which 
** is there in demefne, with feven cottagers, and twenty acres of meadow, and feven 
*' acres of coppice-wood. It is worth twelve fliillings."'' 

This manor, with that of Bere, belonged to the Bonvilles, and, after the death of 
Lord "William Bonville, to the Duke of Suffolk; after whofe attainder it was fold by 
the crown in 155.7 to John Bower, for the fum of 405I. 6s. 8d'.' 

In this hamlet Sir William Paulet of Bere, 3 Henry V. founded in a new chapel 
there erefted on the north fide of an old one, to the honour of the blefled Virgin Mary, 
a chantry for one prieft to celebrate mafs for the health of his own foul, and the fouls 
of his anceftors and fucceflbrs, and endowed the fame with three mefluages, one hun- 
dred acres of arable land, fixteen acres of meadow, three acres of pafture, five acres of 
wood, and one fhilling rent, inEdefton, Stoke-Gourcy, Pederhamjuxta Combewiche, 
Sedernmede, Icheftoke, and Cannington, for the maintenance and fupport of the faid 
fervice.'' i Edw. IV. David Harneys was chaplain of this chantry.' 

The chapels of Idftoke and Hunfl^ile were annexed to the church of Chilton,"" 
which reftory was appropriated to the hofpital of St. John in Bridgwater, and with 
Idftoke was valued in 1292 at eight marks." The hving is now confolidated with 
"Bridgwater, and -in the gift of the crown. The Rev. William Woolen is the prcfenc 
incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to the Holy Trinity, and is of one pace, having a tower at 
the weft, end wiriif four bells. 

' Lib. Domefday. « Lib. Feod. » Lib. Domefday. '• Harl. MS. 607. 

* Inq. a^ quod Damn. ' Caxt. Antiq. ." Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen. » Taxat. Spiritual. 



BAWDRIP. 



j[5ortf)#ct|)ecton.] \ 9^ ] 



B A W D R I P. 

EASTWARD from Bridgwater, under the fouth ridge ofPouldon-hill, and on the 
edge of the moors, is Bawdrip, which was anciently called Bagetrepe, and was 
held in the Conqueror's days by Walter dc Dowai: ^ 

" Renewald holds of Waker, Bacetrepe. Merlefuain held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for two hides. The arable is eight carucates. In dcmelhc is 
" one carucate, and fix fervants, and eleven villanes, and fcven bordars, and three cotta- 
" gers, with five ploughs. There is a mill of four (hillings rent, and one hundred acres 
" of meadow, and forty acres of pafture. Lt was worth fifty Ihillings, now fixty Ihillings."* 

In the time of Edw. I. Richard de Conteville held a knight's fee in the village of 
Bagdripe of Hugh lord Lovel of Caftle-Cary;"" which fee was fometime held by a 
family who aflumed their name from this place, and are fuppofed to have been progeni- 
tors of the family of Broadrep, of South -Mapcrton in the county of Dorfet,' and other 
families of that name, fcated indifferent parts of this kingdom. 12 Henry II. Robert 
de Baketerpe held lands here of Henry Lovell.^ Adam de Baudrip had land^ in this 
parifli and North-Petherton 28 Edw. I. 32 Edw. III. John de Baudrip lord of this 
manor granted to Sir John Coumbe, knt. and his heirs, a yearly rent of 20I. to be 
paid out of all his lands and tenements in Bawdrip and Wafhford." This J6hn de 
Baudrip bore on his feal a crofs between four fheldrakes.' Thefaid Sir John Coumbe 
died 36 Edw. III. then feized of two parts of the manor of Bawdrip, with the reverfion 
of the third part, which Orcngia Brodrip held in dower of Richard fon and heir of 
Nicholas Seymour, as of his manor of Caftle-Cary. He alfo held four tenements in 
IFalpulky and divers lands in Wafliford, of the abbot of Cleeve, leaving John his fon 
and heir, married to Ernmalina daughter of Robert Partiche.^ After this the maoQr 
of Bawdrip was in the families of Beaupine and Worfton,'' or Wrofton, afterwards 
corniptcd into irroughton. 37 Henry VI. William Baudrip, efq; the fon of Thomas 
Baudrip, releafed to John Wroughton, of Broad-Hinton in the county of Wilts, efq; 
and to his heirs, all his right in the manor of Bawdrip, and in his lands at Waihford, 
Walpole, Stretchill, Chedzoy, and Chilton.' In which family of Wroughton this 
manor continued feveral defcents, and is now the property of JefFerys Allen, efq. 

There were divers ancient villages and manors in this parifh, of which Ford was 
poflcfled by a family of that name, from whom it came by the marriage of Claricia, 
daughter and heir of Sir Adam de la Ford, to Robert Brent of Cofllngton.'' This Sir 
Adam de la Ford, who had for his arms three lions paflant,' founded 23 Edw. I. a 
chantry in a chapel then newly built at Ford to the honour of the blefled Virgin Mary; 
and endowed the fame with a mefl'uagc, fifty acres of arable land, and four acres of 
meadow in Stawel, for a chaplain to celebrate divine fervice dierein." 

* Lib. Domefday. ' Lib. Feod. ig Ed. I. ' Hutchins'sHift. of Dorfet, i. s8i. * Lib. Nig. Scac. i. lOi. 

• Rot. Claus. 33 Ed. II. ' Seals from ancient Deeds. « Efc. ' Ibid. ' Rot. Claus. 

* From the Pedigree of Brent. I' Ar.cient Seals. •■•' Inq. ad quod Damn. Excerpt, e Rcgill. Wellen. 

N 2 The 



92 B A w D R I p. [jaovtl)#et&evton. 

The manor of Crandon within the parifli of Bawdrip was lately the pofTeffion of the 
Duke of Chandos. Its priftine name was Grenedone. 

" Eldred holds Grenedone. He alfo held it in the time of King Edward, and 
** gelded for half a hide. The arable is half a carucate. There are four cottagers, 
" with one fervant, and a mill rendering thirty pence, and three acres of meadow, and 

• two acres of coppice-wood. It is worth five (hillings."" 

8 Edv/. I. Sir Thomas Trivet held at his death ten pounds worth of land in this 
village, for which he paid into the King's exchequer 6s. 8d. per annum in lieu of all 
fervices." To which Thomas fucceeded William Trivet his fon and heir, who 9 Edw. I. 
paid nine {hillings and five-pence for livery of the lands 01 his ir.heritance.'' This 
William was a knight, and -,vas a perfon of fome account in the cou t of Edw. II. in 
the eighth year of whofe reign he died,*" leaving ilTue Thomas his fon and heir, who 
13 Edw. II. paid half a mark for his relief of thofe lands and tenements in Crandon 
which his father held.' The lands of Trivet, after many dcfcents, came by females to 
be divided between the families of Vernay and Dodington. 

The manor of Bradney was alfo the pofTeffion of Walter de Dowai : 

" Renewald holds of Walter, Bredenie. Alnod held it in the time of King Ed- 
" ward, and gelded for one hide. The arable is one carucate and a half. There is 
*' one villane, and five bordars, and one cottager, and one fervant, with a plough and a 
" half. There are twenty-five acres of meadow. It is worth twenty ftiillings.'" 

This manor was likewife held of the lords of Caftle-Cary. Joachim de Bradney was 
lord of it in the time of Edv/. II. and left iflue Simon his fon and heir.' Which Simon 
bore on his feal 5 Edw. III. a bend cotifed." He had very confiderable pofleffions in 
this neighbourhood, particularly in Bridgwater, Currypool, Sandford, and Bawdrip, 
which pafled by Beatrix de Bradney, an heirefs, to other families. This Beatrix, 46 
Edw. III. bore the following arms, viz. i. Bendy within a bordure. 2. Three 
roundels; impaling, within a bordure, a lion rampant." 5 Henry VI. Sir William 
Sturmy had this manor, and 32 Henry VI. William Beaumont held the fame, together 
with the manors of Pilleigh, Willet, and Plaifh. At the time of the divifion and allot- 
ment of King's- Sedgmoor, this manor was the property of Thomas Muttlebury, efq. 

Weftward from Bawdrip is a hamlet called Knolle. 

A. D. 1291, Robert de Baggedrippe gave to the church of St. Athelvvin of Athelney 
the church of Baggtdrip, belonging to \v\\njure patronatus, and William de Baggedrippe 
his fon ratified the grant.'' In 1292 it was valued at twelve marks.^ It is a redtory 
in the deanery of Pawlet. The Rev. John Stradling is patron and incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to the honour of St. Michael the Archangel, and is a fmall 
ftrufture of the form of a crofs, with a plain tower in the centre, containing four bells. 

• • Lib. Domefday. " Efc. " Rot. Pip. 9 Edw. I. ' Efc. ' Rot. Pip. 13 Ed. II. 

• Lib. DBraefday. ' Efc. ° Seals from ancient Deeds. "Ibid. 

'' Regift, Abbat. de Athelney. ' Taxat. Spiritual. 

At 



jf3ort[)4Petf)crton.] B A -w D R I P. 93 

At the end of the north aile or chapel, under a large Gothick arch, lies the effigy in 
armour of Sir Simon dc Bradney, knt. who A. D. 1330 founded, at the altar of the 
bliiied Virgin Mary here, a chantry for one prieft to celebrate mafs for his own foul, 
and the foul of Joachim his father, five days fucceffivcly in every week, endowing the 
fame with a huufe for the prieft to live in, and eighteen acres of land in the parifhes 
of Bridgwater and Bawdrip.* 

On the floor of this chapel is the following infcription : " Here lie the bodies 

of Richard Allen, deceafed the 16 dale of Jan, 161 1, and of Marie his wife." 

Againft the north wall of the chancel is a ftone monument, infcribed, — " Edvardus 
Loveli uxorem duxit Eleanoram Bradford, ex qua duas habuit filias, Eleanoram et 
Mari .m. Uterque parens, Batcomb, com. hoc Somerfet. ex honefta familia oriundus^ 
haud miiiorcm ftirpi retulit quam accepit gratiam. Eleanora, pientilTima mater, fimul 
ac coniux fideliffima, hanc vitam pro coelefti mutavit, April. 14°, A. D. 1666. Illam 
fecuta eft Maria, filia obfequentiflima, et eximis fpei virgo, Maij n°, A. D. 1675. 
Edvardus, pater, A. M. Coll. jef. apud Cantab. Soc. necnon hujus ecclefia; reftor 
per quatuordecim annos dignifTimus, ftudiorum coronam accepit Sept. 1°, A. D. 1675. 
Eleanora dcnique fiha, gentihcia; virtutis et fortunse hasres, obijt Jun. 14°, A.D. 168 1. 
Hanc fubito et immaturo (ipfos pene inter Hymenasos) fato correptam mceftiflimus 
luxit maritus; et in gratam piamque parentum, foioris, et diledtiffinise conjugis memo- 
riam, monumentum hoc erigi voluit." Arms, Urgent, on a hend/ai/le, three fleurs- 
de-lis of the field, in chief a file of three pointSi impaling barry nebulee of fix cr 
and guks. 

In this parifh was born A. D. 1598, John Atherton, advanced in 1636 to the 
bifhoprick of Waterford and Lifmore, and hanged at Dublin in 1640. 

• Excerpt, e Regtft. Wellen. Inq. ad quod Damn, necnon ap. Cart. Antiq. 



C H E D Z O Y. 

THIS parifli lies in the moors eaftward from Bridgwater, and fouthward from 
Bawdrip. The lands here are very richj the foil a fandy loami the whole 
amount of the parifh is one thoufand four hundred and fix acres. 

The manor of Chedzoy, which is now the property of Robert Mackreth, efq; is not 
fet down in the Conqueror's furvey. It was anciently vefted in the crown, and given 
by Edw. I. in the i8th year of his reign to Simon de Montacute," in whofe defcendants 
of the name of Montacute, or Montague, earls of Salifbury, it continued till the time 
of Henry VI. when Alice, the only daughter and heir of Thomas Montague earl of 
Salifbury, brought it by marriage to Richard Neville, who was created in her right 

• Cart. 18 Ed. I. n. 73. ^ . 



94 c H E D z o y. [ji3ottb==lg)etl)crton. 

£arl of Salisbury. After his death it was pofleffed by William de la Pole marquis of 
SufFolk, and after him by Edward, fon of George duke of Clarence, upon whofe at- 
tainder it came to the crown, and Henry V;ll. held it till his death. Soon after which, 
it was by patent dated 4 Oft. 5 Henry VIII. granted to Margaret his filler, who was 
attainted in 1539; and thus the manor, again lapfing to the crawn, was kept thet'e 
till 7 Edw. VI. when that King granted it to the Earl of Pembroke. The prior of 
Brewton had eftates here valued in 1293 at ten Ihillings.*- 

In this village Roman coins have oftenbeen difcoveredj and in 1701, feveral earthen 
urns and a fibula were found near the church. 

The living is a reftory in the deanery of Bridgwater, and in the gift of the Coney 
family. The Rev. Francis Annefley is the prefent incumbent. In 1292 the living 
■was valued at thirty marks.* 

"The church, which is dedicated to St. Mary, is a large Gothick ftrudture, confifting 
of a nave, chancel, tranfept, north and fouth ailes, and a large tower at the wefl: end 
containing five bells. The ends of feveral of the old oak backed benches are curioufly 
carved with different devices; among others are, a lamb bearing the crofs and tram- 
pling on a lion J a flying dragon with its tail twifted round a circular girdle buckled.; 
the letter M furmounted with a coronet, a rofe on one fide, and a thift:le on the other, 
■all within a circular belt buckled, on which is the date 1559 ; a large W in a wre^ 
"with a ferpent twining through it. 

Over the communion table in the cieling is a painted canopy, at the bottom of which, 
on one fide, are thefe arms. Gules, a fefle lozengy argent j on the other the fame, im- 
paling, argent, three battle-axes in ^i\e. fable. 

In the chancel floor there is the portraiture in brafs of a man in armour; and feveral 
memorials of the Coney family ; and on the north wall are two elegant mural monu- 
ments of various marbles, embellifhed with fefl:oons, foliage, &c. 

On the one is this infcription : " M. S. Thomas Coney, S. T. P. hujus et 

ccclefis Bathonienfis reftoris eruditi. Cui labor plus, ingenium limatum, animi mag- 
nitudo, incorrupta fides, nuda Veritas, veritatis fermonem refte dividens, illuftres, opu- 
lentos, juxta ac pauperes compte redarguebat ; astatis perditse mores nervofo depingens 
ftilo. Annos perplures munere paftorali fundlus fideliter, operibus mira pietate con- 
fcriptis, adhuc vivit mortuus ; mortuus loquitur. Condones plufquam elegantes, trac- 
tatus maxime pios, ad mentes infirmorum confolandas, paupenim inftituendas, divitum 
excitandas, perquam idoneos, hie pafl:or eximius benigne reliquit pofl:eris. Doftrinis, 
precibus, monitis, ubique verba exsquantur. In verbis ineft vis; in periodis nitida 
verborum concinnitas ; Heu, venufta pietas ! heu, prifca fides ! Multis ille quidem 
flebilis occidit, nullis flebilior quam ecclefise Chrifti Anglicanas amicis ; qui concionatis 
ab ore penderent laai. Obijt 6° Aprilis 1752, anno astat. 78." 

On the other monument: " In eodem lepulchro quo Thomas Coney, S. T. P. 

pater, fubtus jacet, Johannes Coney, A. M. fihus; in hac atq; ecclefia de Over-Stowey, 
quin et prebenda de Buckland-Dynham in sede cathedralii apud Wellenfe, fucceflTor 

! Taxat. Temporal. * Taxat. Spiritual. 

onn 



Jl3ottl)#etl)erton.] c h E D Z o Y. 95 

non indignus. Qui fi clarifllmum patrem non licuit paffibus asquis fequi fama, in 
lacrofanfti tamen minifterii officiis rite fungendis ad illius exemplum fe componere 
non inftrenuc ncc infeliciter laboravit. Obijc 8° die Februarii 1763, aetatis 58." 
Anns, SablCy a fefs cotifed or between three conies fejant, argent. 

In the fouth end of the tranfept, on the eaft wall, is a mural monument of black 

flrone, with this infcription : " Near this place lie interred the remains of William, 

John Jeanes, and Edward, fons of Richard and Jane Stradling. John Jeancs Scradling 
died Jan. 26, <758, aged 3 years j Edward, Jan. 16, 1759, *g^"^ ^ yitM; Willianv, 
April 30, 1767, aged 17 years." 

Severn! minillers of notoriety have pollefled this benefice. Richard Nikke, LL. D. 
was redor thereof A.D. 1489. In 1492 he was conftituted vicar-general to Richard 
Fox biHiop of this diocefe ; in 1494 he was archdeacon of Wells, and in 1496 he was 
made canon of Windfor, and rcgiftrar of the order of the garter. In 1501, he was 
defted to the biflioprick of Norwich, in which dignity he died in 1 536, and was buried 
in his own cathedral.' 

In 1620, Walter Raleigh, S. T.P. afterwards dean of Wells, was prefented to this- 
living by William earl of Pembroke. He was murdered by the rebels in 1646. 

Anthony Pafchal, reftor of this parilh in the latter end of the laft century, under- 
took the exordium of a hiftory of this county; but publiflied only a few fugitive pieces, 
among which is a letter to Dr. Hooke concerning a flight fhock of an earthquake felc 
in the village of Ghedzoy, and in all the neighbourhood of Bridgwater, Jan, 4, 1682, 

♦ Athen. Oxon.i. 671. 



A 



D U R S T O N, 

Small parifh, fituated in the very fouthern extremity of this hundred, in a low 
and woody but fertile fpot, and containing about thirty houfes. 

This manor belonged at the Conqueft to Roger Arundel> and was then called 
Destone. 

" Richard holds ofT^ogcr, Destone. Alwi held in the time of King Edward, and 
** gelded for two hides and three virgates of land. The arable is four carucates. In 
*' demefne is one carucate, and four fervants, and four villanes, and five bordars, and 
"^ four cottagers, with three ploughs. There are fifteen acres of meadow, and twenty 
" acres of pafture, and twenty acres of wood. It was and is worth forty fliillings."" 

The Erleighs were very foon after the Conqueft poflefled of this manor, and held it 
till the time ofi Henry VI. when it was transferred by art hei^ female tO the houfe of 

• Lib. Donufdiy, 

St. 



96 D • u .R s T o N. [jeort!)#etl)mon. 

St. Maiir ; and fv6m them pafled by a colieirefs to Kobert Stawell, efq; of the tniftees of 
■whofe defcendant Ralph lord Stawell it was purchafed in the beginning of tliis century 
by Mr. Portman, and it is now the property of Henry Seymour, efq. 

To the eaft of Durfton is the priory of Buckland-Sororum, founded about the year 
of our Lord 1167 by William de Erieigh, lord of the manor of Durfton, for the health 
of his own and his wife's foul, and for the fouls of Henry II. and Eleanor his queen, 
for canons of the order of St. Auguftin. Thefe canons having foon after their inftitu- 
tion behaved themfclves in a veiy riotous and dilbrderly manner, particularly in killing 
their fteward, who was a relation of William de Erieigh the founder; the King, by the 
confent of the bifhop of Bath and Wells and the archbifhop of Canterbury, in the life- 
time of this William, rem.oved them to the priories of Taunton, Barlinch, Smithfield, 
and other monafteries, and gave their houfe and lands to Garner de Neapoli, then prior 
of St. John's in England, for the endowment of a priory of fifters hofpitallers for the 
benefit of the order of St. John, under a ftipulation that fifters of that order fhould 
never be received into any other of their houfes within the kingdom.'' After wliich the 
faid Garner called together the fifters from the fevcral hofpitals in England, and ap- 
pointed nine to be the firft fifters at Buckland. 

It is to be obferved, that all donations to the order of St. John were donations to 
the order in general, and that the feveral priors and preceptors throughout Chriftendom 
were no more than deputed brethren, who were to refide in their refpeftive priories or 
preceptories, and to account to the order in general for the overplus of the profits of 
the refpedive eftates. In procefs of time this method of accounts ceafed; and inftead 
thereof each preceptory or commandery ftood at a certain rent, which was in like 
manner (under the name of a refponfion) paid to the general ufe of the order, that is, 
for the maintenance of hofpitals for fick and needy pilgrims to the holy fepulchre, and 
(after the inftitution became military) for carrying on a perpetual war againft the infidels. 
The maintenance of thefe fifters was one of the expences allowed the preceptor of Buck- 
land in his accounts, and fometime after was regulated by the prior of St. John' at 
thirty-eight marks eleven fliillings and fix-pence per annum. In all refpedls the fifters 
were looked on only as fervants, and as not capable of receiving or holding any thing but 
from the fupreme powers of the order, even in donations expreflively made in their own 
behalf. In the latter end of the reign of King John, Loretta countefs of Leicefter 
gave to St. Mary, and to St. John the Baptift, and to the poor of the houfe of the 
hofpital of Jerufalem, for the fupport of the fifters of Buckland, and for tJie mainte- 
nance of a prieft in their houfe, to fay mafs every day at the altar of the bleflfed Virgirt 
Mary in the fitter's church at Buckland, for the health of her own foul, and Lord Robert 
her huftjand, formerly Earl of Leicefter, and for the health of the fouls of her father 
and mother, and all her predecefiTors and fucceflTors, all her land of J!3Ot0ftOn and 
j^neffbrD, and fixty-four acres of her demefnes upon iRutOetlOnC ; and all her land of 
iRutefCOke, i^ele, Cl)OtleCOtC, CuneCOte, and IBOtebUtnCJ a hundred acres of 
her demefnes in 1B?emmCfmore, and her wood called anClttUODe, and one furlong 
at JR0iCfjCgC, with all appertenances in the manor of COUftofeC/ The profits of thefe 

' Mon. Angl. ii. 550. ' Ibid. 438. 

lands 



JI90tt6=l{9ctIjttton.] DURSTON. ^ 

lands Robert dc Alneto, prior of St. John's, took to the general ufe, and, witli the con- 
fent of his chapter, appointed a ftipcnd to be paid to fiich a prieft, and ordered ; that 
neither the faid prieft, nor his fiicccfTors, flioiild be deputed to any other fervice. In 
like manner King Henry IV. granted exprefTively to die priorefs and fifters of Buck- 
land three load of coppice-wood every week, to be taken out of his woods of Pedier- 
ton,' and ordered his bailiffs there to deliver the fame at the houfe at Buckland ; but 
the faid priorefs and fifters being incapable of taking fuch a grant, on account of their 
obedientiary terms widi the prior of the hofpital of St. Jolin of Jerufalem, the patent 
was altered, and made to the prior of St. John's of Jerufalem; and the wood was ac- 
cordingly received by the preceptor of Buckland, and delivered to the ufe of the fifters. 

Notice has already been taken, that the original inftitution of the holpitallers was to 
take care of fick and needy pilgrims to the holy fepulchre; this inftitution was before 
the holy war. Several devout perlbns of both fexes coming as pilgrims to Jerufalem, 
refolved to continue there on this charitable account, and fubfifted on fuch fupplies to 
themfelves and tlie pilgrims they took care of, as the bounty of well-difpofed Chriftians 
thought fit to fend them. As their care was not confined to any particular fedl of 
Chriftians, nor even to Chriftians themfelves, they were protefted while Jerufalem was 
in the hands of the Saracens. After the Chriftians were mafters of Jerufalem, they be- 
came more known for the great helps they afforded to the fick and wounded foldiers, . 
and had grants and donations both in money and lands, all over Chriftendom ; by which ■ 
means they were encouraged to form themfelves into a regular corporation, and loon 
after to eredt that corporation into a military order, and to hire foldiers to fight under 
their banner, for the defence of the holy fepulchre, and Chriftianity. For it was never 
known that they took part in quarrels between Chriftians, till the time of the Albigenfes. 

The office of the fifters at Jerufalem was to be nurfes to the fick pilgrims; befides 
whom, there were other charitable women, who, in fev'eral parts of Chriftendom, made it 
their bufinefs to affift and take care of fick and indigent people. The fimilitude of 
their vocation was probably the inducement of their afTuming the habit of the fifters of 
Jerufalem, and probably made them choofe to refide in or near the preceptories of the 
holpitallers. Of fuch of thefe the firft nine fifters eftabliflied at Buckland were chofen. 

The provifion for thefe fifters was at firft thirty-eight marks, to be allowed to the 
preceptor of Buckland in his yearly account of relponfions; afterwards the fifters be- 
came more independent, and upon fome difpute arifing between the priorefs and the 
preceptor, Roger de Vere prior of St. John's, being prefent at Buckland, ordained that 
for the future the priorefs and convent fliould have a fteward of their own, who ftiould 
eat at the table of tlie {)receptor, and a man-fervant to be maintained with the precep- 
tor's fervants. That the faid fteward, at the three courts of Kinner/done, la Hele, and Hock- 
day^ Ihould have five loaves of white bread, and his bottles' full of ale delivered him by 
the preceptor's cellarer ; but that all his other expences fhould be borne by the priorefs 
and convent. That if the fteward mifbehaved himfelf, the priorefs might forbid him 
fiom intermeddling in the affairs of the convent, but was not to remove him without 

" Pat, 6 Hen. IV. p. z. m. 28, • Cofirtlks fimt fUnos cervi^a. 

Vol. III. O the 



..Lv. 



98 D u R s T o N. moith'-mthmon, 

the confcnt of the prior. They were alfo to have a fecular prieft to fay mafs for the foul 
of one of their deceafed priorefles, and for the fouls of all their founders and benefaftors; 
which prieft was to eat with the preceptor and his brethren; but an allowance to be 
made them of five marks for his diet and the diet, of the prieft inftituted by the Coun- 
tefs of Leicefter, as aforefaid, and three fhillings for the clerk of tlie chapel/ 

The endowments of this priory, befides thofe mentioned of the Countefs of Leicefter, 
and King Heniy IV. were the following, viz. 

William de Erleigh gave the church of Petherton, with all its members, chapels, and 
appertenances, viz. the church of Chedzoy member thereof, with all the right the bre- 
thren of the hofpital have or ought to have thereby in the church of Pawlet; the chapel 
of Huntworih; the chapel of Newton-Cotnitis; the chapel of 'Thurloxton ; the chapel of 
Sheerfton ; the chapel of Newton-Regis -, the church of Beckington, with all its apperte- 
nances; the church oi Kilmerfdort; and the church oi Shirfton. 

Ralph, fon of William de Briwere, gave the church of Tolland. 

Alan Ruffel gave the church of Donnington, in the diocefe of Lincoln. 

Warren de Aula gave Bud/comhe. 

Afcuil Mufard gave Chilcomb, Wichanger, and Bochelcot. 

Robert Arundel gave Halje.^ 

Muriel de Bohun gave forty folidatse of land in Sherborne and Primejky in Dorfetfliire.'" 

They had alfo the entire tithes of Broomfield and Durfton, and four marks per 
annum from the vicar of North-Petherton, which are ftill paid to the crown.' 

AH thefe poflefTions, valued in 1534 at 223I. 7s. 6d. were comprehended in the aft of 
of parliament which diffolved the priory of St. John's in England, 32 Henry VIIL 
Catherine Bowfer the laft priorefs, furrendered her houfe to the King Feb. 10, 1539, 
and had a penfion of 50I. per annum, with a gratuity of 25I. In 1553, there remained 
in charge 5I. in fees, 12I. 13s. 4d. in annuities; and the following penfions, viz. To Joan 
Hylbere 4I.; Thomafine Fluntyngdon 4I.; Katherine Popham 4I,; Anne Mawndefeld 
4I.; Joan Babyngton 4I.; Elizabeth Grene 4I.; Agnes Mathewe 4I.; and William 
Mawndefley, clerk, 4I.'' 

■Rachel Newton was priorefs of this houfe in 1537, and Elizabeth Carey and Cathe- 
.rine;Nevil, fitters thereof, were living 1565, and married, the firft to Thomas Speed, 
and the fecond to the vicar of Ling.' The fifters were generally people of diftinftion. 

1320, John de Werewell was preceptor of Buckland, and was appointed by the prior 
of St. John of Jcrufalem to be procurator and adminiftrator of the eftatcs belonging to 
that hofpital in this diocefe."* 1536, Richard Mareis was preceptor, and probably the 
Jaft. The habitation of the preceptor and his brethren was on the nortli fide of the 

' Mon. An£l. ii. 55 1 . ' Ibid. » Hutchins's Hift. of Dorfet, ii. 394. ' Archer. 

"^Hift. of Abbies, ii. 196. ' MS. Palmer. " Archer. 

great 



jSortD^etfjcnon.] d u R s T o N. 99 

great church, as appears by an account taken of the buildings at Buckland in 1571, in 
which it is called the houl'e of the lord prior's fteward." 36 Henry VIII. this priory 
and manor, with lands belonging to it, were granted by the King to William Halley, 
efq; whofe defcendant Lord Hawley fold the manor to John Baker, efq; receiver- 
general of the land-tax in this county, whofe fon Chriftopher fold it to George Parker, 
of Boringdon in the county of Devon, efqj whofe defcendant John Parker, created 
Baron Boringdon, of Boringdon in the county of Devon, by letters patent bearing date 
May 18, 1784, is the prefent owner. 

The living of Durfton is a curacy in the deanery of Bridgwater. The Rev. Thomas 
Exon is the prefent incumbent. The church is a fmall building, with nothing re- 
markable. 9 Edw. III. the reftory of Durfton was rated at eight marks." 

- JWS. Palmer. » Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen. 



St. MICHAEL'S, or MICH AELCHU RCH. 

THIS little village, containing very few houfes, lies to the north of Durfton, and 
is entirely infulated by the parifh of North-Petherton. 

Micbaeliscerce was in the Conqueror's time pofleflcd by one Anfger, a menial attcnd- 
anton the King's houftiold. 

" The fame Anfger holds Michaeliscerce. Alwi held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for half a hide. The arable is one carucate. It was formerly 
*' and is now worth five fhillinss. 



9>a 



Inprocefs of time this land became incorporated with the other pofleflions of the 
Erleighs, lords of Petherton and Durfton abovementioned, and from them it defcended 
to the St. Maurs, Bampfyldes, and Stawells, and now belongs to Edward Seymour and 
John Slade, efqrs. 

Henry de Erleigh, by his deed without date, granted to the abbot and convent of 
Athelney, all his right in the patronage of tlie chapel of St. Michael's-church, with all his 
lands lying at Ridene, and other appertenances, to hold to the faid abbot and convent, 
and their fucceflbrs in the faid monaftery of Athelney, for ever.'' After its diflblution, 
the reftory and the advowfon of this church, with divers lands and tenements in the 
village, were granted to William earl of Eflex and his heirs.' The church is not va- 
lued in the Lincoln taxation. 

The living is a vicarage in the deanery of Bridgwater. The Rev. Simon Paget is 
the prefent incumbent. 

• Lib. Domefday. " Regift. Abbat. Athelney. Pat. 36 HWi VIII. p. 1. 

O 2 The 



loo s T. M I c H A E L ' s. [Ji5ottb#etl)etton. 

The cliurch is a fmall ancient Gothick edifice, about fifty feet long, having on the 
north fide a low clumfy tower, with a tiled roof of a pyramidical form, and containing 
one bell. Some of the family ofBacou, of Manfel-houfe, were interred here. 



P A W L E T 

IS a confiderable parilh five miles northeaft from Bridgwater, bounded on the north 
by Huntfpill, and on the fouth by Bridgwater, and the river Parret, over which there 
is a paflage to Combwich, two miles diftant from the church. The fituation is in a fine 
grazing country, bounded on the northeaft and weft by rich luxuriant marflies. 

In the time of William the Conqueror it was poffefTed by Walter de Dovvai lord of 
Bridgwater, Huntfpill, and other manors in this neighbourhood j and in the general 
furvey then taken it is thus fet down : 

" Rademer holds of Walter, Pavelet. Semar held it in the time of King Edward, 
*' and gelded for one virgate of land. The arable is one carucate, which is in demefne, 
*' with one fervant, and two bordars, and three cottagers, and five acres of meadow. It 
" was and is worth ten fhillings."" 

From Walter de Dowai this land defcended to the Paganels, Fitzhardings, Gaunts, 
and Gournays. Robert de Gournay, by deed bearing date i6 Henry III. gave for the 
Health of the foul of Maurice de Gaunt his uncle, and for the health of his own foul, 
and the fouls of all his anceftors and fucceffors, this manor of Pawlet, with all its ap- 
pertenances in demefnes, villenages, homages of freemen, fervices, mills, liberties, and 
free^cuftonis, to the hofpital of Gaunts or Billefwyke in Briftol, founded by the faid 
Maurice de Gaunt, for the maintenance and fupport of one hundred poor people every 
day."" From the circumftance of which donation thefe lands aflumed the appellation 
of the manor of Pawlet-Gaunts, and they continued in the poffeflion of the ho^ital till 
its fuppreflion by Henry VIII. when coming to the crown, they were granted' to Richard 
Cowper, of Rockbourne in the county of Southampton, efq; anceftor of the Earl of 
Shafteft)ury, the prefent lord of the manor of Pawlet. 

The faid Richard Cowper, or Cooper, had a few years before this grant purchafed 
the other part of Pawlet, of Sir Amias Pawlet, knt.^ to whofe progenitors this place 
had given name (this being their moft ancient habitation in this county") and from 
whom iffued fo many flourifhing branches. Of this family we have already Ipoken in 
the account of Hinton-St.-George, in the hundred of Crewkerne, the manor and refi- 
dence of the prefent Earl of this name.' Their eftate here was held of the manor of 
Horfey by the fervice,of die fourth part of a knight's fee.^ 

* Lib. Domefday. i" Mon. Angl. ii. 455. « Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. z. 

" Collins's Peerage, iii. 394. ' Lei. Itin. vi. 11. f Vol. ii, 165. « Lib. Feod. 

Northward 



jaott!)#etf)ctton.l P a w L E T. loi 

Northward from Pawlct is the hamlet of Stretchill, which was another manor of 
"Waifcin or Walter de Dowai, and divided into two 'portions, as appears by the ge- 
neral furvey: 

*' Waifcin holds Stracelle, and Renewald of him. Leuegar held it in die time 
*' of King Edwaid, and gelded for half a hide. Tlie arable is two caiaicates. In de- 
** mefne is one carucate, with one fervant, and three cottagers, and ten acres of meadow. 
" It was and is worth fifty fhillings. 

*' Renewald holds of Walter, Stracelle. Edwold held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for half a hide. The arable is one carucate. In demefne arc 
** two carucates, and two fervants, and one villane, and two cottagSrs, with one plough 
*' and a half. There are ten acres of meadow. It is worth fifty Ihillings."* 

49 Henry III. Anaftafia, the widow of Walter Croc, (who fometime held this manor 
from the crown) gave to Sir Thomas Trivet, of Durborough, all her lands and tene- 
ments in EJlrecholle, which fhe had by the grant of WiUiam Fitz-Ermilph her fatherj 
likewife all her lands at Wyre^ and two new houfes in Pawlet, one occupied by William 
de Paulet, and given to her by Ralph de Horfi; and the other held of her for the term 
of fix years by Maud de Lupel, together with thirty acres of meadow in le Erode 
Merfchcy and common pafture in la Rughe Merjchcy and her woods at Sillewode and 
Martinfeye, and all her lands in Poulet, purchafed by William Fitz-Ernulph her father 
of Sir Ralph de Horfi, and two mefluages with appertenances in Honejpulle, purchaled of 
Simon de Bradenei ; and her land in JVyre, and four meflTuages, fifty-fix acres of mea- 
dow, and twenty fliillings rent in the fame parifh, held by her of the grant of Robert 
de Wyrei as alfo a meflliage in Ham, and certain lands there granted her by Geffcrey 
•de Paulet and Emma his wife ; and part of her land in Langelond, lying on the fouth 
fide of the land of William de Paulet. Moreover fhe grants to the faid Sir Thomas 
Trivet, the fervices of Robert de Brent, Adam de Pureton, Hugh de la Mare, William 
de Poulet, Adam Ic Gouyze, William le Medour, John Bufchell, Hugh deSchapwich, 
William de Bray, Emma de Wanton, Simon de Wanton, Maud de Lupell, John Croc, 
Ralph le Rule, Robert le Vifche; and all other fei-vices which the faid Anaftafia had, 
or ought to have in Poulet, Eftrecholte, HonifpuUe, Wyre, Horfi, and Periton. The 
witneflfes to tliis grant were Sir Ralph de Columbers, Sir William Trivet, Sir Ralph de 
Bray, knts. Adam de Periton, William de Vernai, WiUiam de Poulet, Gefferey his fon, 
Ralph RulTel, Robert de Coker, William Ruflel of Bernardfworth, Peter Trivet, 
William de Storke, Adam the chaplain, and divers others.' 

On the fouth fide of Pawlet is Walpole, which by the name of Wallepille is furveycd 
next after Stragelle, as another parcel of the pofleffions of Walter de Dowai. 

" Rademer holds of Walter, Wallepille. Edward held it in the time of King 
** Edward, and gelded for three virgates of land. The arable is one carucate, which is 
" in demefne, and one villane, and three cottagers, with half a plough. It was and is 
" worth twenty fliillings."'' 

" Lib. Domefdar. ' Cart. Amiq. * Lib. Doroefday. 

The 




102 P A w L E T. [5Dott!)#etlietton» 

The church of Pawlet, valued in 1292 at fifteen marks,' was appropriated to St. 
Auguftin's-abbey in Briftol, and the abbot and convent prefented to the vicarage, which 
by an ordination of the bilhop, confifted in all oblations, and fmall tithes, and tithe of 
mills, and tithe of the abbot and convent demefnes, viz. of corn and hay of the de- 
mefne which they had in the year 1239, and in tithes of hay purchafcd or to be pur- 
chafedj and in the tithe of fix acres given them by Hugh Trivet; and in four acres 
and a half of meadow in the Old Moor., and in one acre of meadow near Horfeacre, and 
befides, in two acres of meadow which the officiating prieft had heretofore, and in one 
acre of arable land on which the vicarage-houfe was built. Otit of which the vicar was 
to pay yearly in behalf of the faid monaftery one mark, of filver to the fillers of Buck- 
land; and to be anfwerable to the archdeacon of Wells for his procurations, and a 
donation of twelve pence, and to pay to the church of Pereton an offering at Eaflier of 
fifteen pence; and to fuftain all other proportionable charges of the faid church as well 
ordinary as extraordinary." 

The gift of the living, which denominates a deaneiy, is in the crown. The Rev. 
William Cornifh is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. John the Baptift, and is compofed of anave, chancel, 
and crofs ailej at the weft end ftands a tower, containing a clock and five bells. 

' Taxat. Spiritual. " Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen. 



THURLOXTON 

LIES fix miles to the fouthweft of Bridgwater, in a woody and well-cultivated 
.country; the parifli contains twenty-five houfes, moft of which are fmall farms 
near the church; the lands very good, and moftly in tillage. There are two gentlemen's 
ftats, one the refidence of John Crofs, efq; adjoining the church-yard, a fmall ftone 
houfe with neat gardens; the other is Leverfdown, a large ftone building, the property 
of William Harrifon, efq. 

This place is not mentioned in the Conqueror's furvey, and is only diftingiiifhed in 
antiquity for having given name to a family who refided here, and held their lands of 
the honour of Dunfter-Caftle. Philip de Thorlakefton was living here 18 Edw. I. 
and held lands in Thorlakefton of Sir John de Mohun, who held the fame of the King.'' 
One of this family gave either the manor, or confiderable territory in this village, to the 
monks of Taunton, who are certified by the inquifitions and books of knights' fees to 
hold the manor and the advowfon of the church of Thurloxton, with divers lands and 
tenements in this parifh, of the caftle of Dunfter, by the feryice of one knight's fee.'' 
Their eftate here was in 1193 valued at feventy fhillings and eight-pence.' After the 
diflblution of the priory, this manor, continuing fometime in the crown^ was granted, 

• Lib. Feod. ' Ibid, et Irq. * Taxat. Temporal. 

together 



jf3ottf)=lPetl)erton.] THURLOXTON. 



103 



together with the advowfon of the church, and lands and appertenances, to William 
Babington and his heirs,"* who 6 Eliz. fold the fame to Henry Portman, in whofc de- 
fcendant Henry William Portman, efq; it is now veiled. 

JBefides the church, which was appropriated to the priory of Taunton, there was a 
chapel in Thurloxton, which was given by William de Erleigh to the canons of 
Buckland.' 

The living is a reftory in the deanery of Bridgwater; the patronage is appendant to 
the manor; and the Rev. Charles Ruflel is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Giles; it is a fmall building of one pace, covered with 
blue tile, with a tower containing four bells. 

The chriftenings in this parifli are eight, the burials five, on an average annually. 



* Pat. J & 4 Ph. & Mary, p. 10. 



• Mon. Aogl. U. 551. 



w 



M B D O N. 



THIS village, lying to the northweft of Bridgwater, was in the Conqueror's time 
parcel of the revenues of the church of Bath, and was recorded as follows: 

*• Walter [probably Walter de Dowai] holds of the church, Wimedone. A thane 
" held it of the church in the time of King Edward, and gelded for three hides. The 
*' arable is four carucates. In demefne are two carucates, and two fervants, and feven 
*' cottagers, with one plough. There is a mill of five Ihillings rent, and ten acres of 
*' meadow, and ten acres of pafture. It was and is worth fixty fhillings.'" 

The manor was afterwards alienated from the church, and held by the families of 
Teftard, Hody, and Mychell or Mitchell; and in the time of Henry VII. Thomas 
Mychell pofleffed half a knight's fee here, formerly held by the heirs of Robert Teftard.", 

There are two other manors in this parifli, called from their refpeftive owners, 
PuRY or PeRry-Furneaux, and Pury-Fitchet, of both which families mention has 
already been made in oth«r places. The former of thcfe manors is now the property 
of Sir William Oglander, bart,; the latter of John Cridland, efq. As there are four 
Peris in the Norman record, thefe places may not fo eafily be diftinguifhcd therein, or 
the paflTages fo readily applied. 

A. D. 1284, the church of St. George at Wembdon was appropriated by Robert 
Burnel bifliop of Bath and Wells to the hofpital of St. John the Baptift at Bridgwater j' 
and in 1304 a vicarage was ordained by Bifliop Walter Hafelfhawj by which ordina- 
tion it was fct forth that Richard de Bridport, the then vicar, and his fucceflbrs, Ihould 
• Lib. Dom»fd»y. » Lib. Feod. ' Mon. Angl. ii. 43^- 

have 



104 W E M B D O N. [Jl3ort|j#Ct!)CrtOrt. 

have a houfe, with garden, curtillage, and all other appertenanccs, and three acres and 
a half of arable land, and four acres of meadow, of old time allotted to the vicarage of 
the church of Wembdon j as alfo all oblations, vifitations of the fick, all legacies, 
trentals, mafs-pence, with anniverfary bequefts, and confeffional pence, and alfo all the 
wax accruing to the church of Wembdon. Alfo the tithes of lambs and wool, and all 
other fmall tithes whatfoever. The vicar and his fucceflbrs were to receive from the 
mailer and brethren of the hofpital two quarters of wheat of good quality, two quarters 
of barley, two quarters of oats, and half a quarter of beans, and to give holy water to 
the officiating clerks. The mafter and brethren of the hofpital, as redors of the church, 
to have all the meadow and arable land of the demefne belonging thereto, excepting 
three acres and a half of arable, and four acres of meadow afligned to the vicar as afore- 
faid, as alfo the tithe of ftieaf and hay of the whole parilh of Wembdon as ufual, and 
to fuftain all ordinary burdens, and of extraordinary charges two parts, and the vicar one 
third."* This ordination was confirmed by Bilhop John Drokensford.' 

Of this vicarage the Rev. Lancelot St. Albyn is the prefent incumbent. 

The church ftands in the deanery of Bridgwater, and, as appears by the foregoing 
extrad, is dedicated to St. George. A. D. 1464, it having been reprefented to the 
bifhop that there was, within the bounds and limits of the parilh church of Wembdon, a 
certain well, commonly called St. John's well, to which an immenfe concourfe of people 
had within a few days paft, and not before reforted, and had there made oblations to 
the honour of God, the bleffed Virgin Mary, and St. John the Baptiftj and that many 
who had for years laboured under various bodily difeafes, and had found no benefit 
from phyfick and phyficians, were by the ufe of thefe waters (after paying their due 
offerings) reftored to their priftine health j the faid bifhop ifTued a mandate to Mafter 
Robert Hurft, canon of Wells, his commilTary-gencral, and Thomas Overay, LL.B. 
to make inquiry into the particulars of this miraculous fpring, and to report the 
Chriftian and furnames of the perfons who had been cured by thefe waters, the places 
of their habitation, thefymptoms of their quondam complaints, how long they had la- 
boured under them, and in what manner they found themfelves relieved.' What the 
effefl of this mandate was, does not appear. Fountains were certainly in the earlieft 
ages fuperftitioufly frequented, and loaded with unufual honours by our good fore- 
fathers; but the monkifh traders in religion, were perhaps the firft clafs of people that 
ever diverted their ftreams into a pecuniary current. 

A chantry was founded in this church by Matthias the fon of Robert de Cocre, 
i9Edw. 11.^ 

* Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen. • Ibid. * Wilkinfii Concil. torn. iii. p. 596. 

« Excerpt, e Regift. WeUen. 




THE 



[ '05 ] 



■«4|4»-t^>-(^>-t^>-(^»4J4 M J» <j l> <g t > ( J4H4»»-»4**-Hi*»-«4t»-«4»- «J 4> <<«H^4>4 < «» 



THE HUNDRED 



- O F 



SOUTH-PETHERTON. 



Is fo denominated in regard of its foutherly fituation on the river Parret, and is 
divided into three parts ; the firft of which, lying on the fouthweft fide of the 
hundred of Martock, contains the town of South-Petherton, and five other pa- 
rifhesj the fccond part, which is fevered from the former by a narrow tradt 
of the hundred of TintinhuU, comprifes feven parifhes; and the laft, which borders 
upon Devonfhire, has in it only one. 

This hundred was always a parcel of the manor of its name, and was firft held by 
the crown, afterwards by the Lords Daubeny, and is now vefted in Lord Arundel. 



SOUTH-PETHERTON, 

ANCIENTLY called Pebpeban, from the river Pedred or Parret, is the firft con- 
fiderable parifh which that ftream formerly traverfed in its way from Sourh- 
Parret in Dorfetftiire (where it rifes) to the fea.' It pafles here under a ftone bridge 
of three arches a mile fouthward from the church, in the turnpike-road from Ilminfter 
to Yeovil, and at the interfeftion of the Roman fofle road coming from Ilchefter. This 
bridge was formerly of wood, which being become ruinous, and two children having 
been drowned in the river near it, the parents of thofe children rebuilt it of ftone, and 

• A. D. 68x, Baldred king ofKent gave the filhery of the Pctride to Hemgilfus abbot of Glaflonbury. GuiU 
Malmejhur. 50. 

Vol. III. P caufcd 



ic6 



S O U T H - P E T HE R T O N. [^OUtfj^etfjettOtt. 



caufed their little infant effigies to be placed thereon by way of commemorating the 
circumftancc.'' In a field near this bridge a large pot full of Roman coins, to the quantity 
of fix pecks, was dug up about the year 1720." And near Jailer' s-Milly in the fame 
neighbourliood, in the tithing of Southarp, a little below the furface of the ground, are 
•the remains ef Roman buildings j which the common people, from the name, fuppofe 
to be the foundations of an old prifon. In this fpot alfo coins, fragments of urns, pa- 
tera:, and pieces of terras, have been difcovered. 

This parirti is divided into the following tithings, viz. 

1. The Town-Tithing, confiding principally of three irregular ftreets about the 
church. A market is held here on the Thurfday, and there is a fair for cattle and 
pedlary 0x1 the fifth day of July. There was formerly a large market-hall and crofs 
here, bodi which, with feveral houfes, were deftroyed in the laft century ; and inftead 
of a large manufafture of cloth, there ftill remains a confiderable one of dowlas. 

2. SouTHARp-TiTHXNG, which lics foutheaftward from the church, and in fome 
ancient records is called SouthingtoHi alias Southapbrigg. 

3. Over-Stratton, lying fouthward, and deriving its name from the old Roman 
flreet the Foffe, on which it is fituated. 

4. CoMPTON-DuRviLLE, northweft. 

It need not be argued that South-Petherton and its vicinity were known to the Roman 
people, as it lies fo near to one of their principal roads, and as their reliques have here 
been fo frequently difcovered. The names of the places where thefe have principally 
emerged to view, are, Jailer's-Brid-ge, before- mentioned j Watergore, a hamlet 



^ This event gave birth to the following Elegy : 



Seeft thou yo'\ limpid current glide 
Beneath yon bridge, my haplefs theme. 

Where brambles fringe its verdant fide. 
And willows tremble o'er the ftream ? 

From Petherton it takes its name. 
From whence two fmiling infants ftray'd. 

Led by the ftream they hither came. 
And on the flow'ry margin play'd. 

Sweet viiftims ! muft your Ihort-liv'd day 
So foon extinguifh in the wave ; 

And point the fetting fun his way, 
That glimmer'd o'er your wat'ry grave ! 

As each, by childifli fancy led, 

Cropt the broad daifies as they fprung ; 
Lay ftretch'd along the verdant bed. 

And fweedy ply'd the lifping tongue ; 

Lo ! from the fpray-deferted fteep 
Where eithe; way the twigs divide ; 

Tlie one roU'd headlong to the deep, 
-Andplung'd beneath the clofmg tide. 



The other faw, and from the land — 
(While nature imag'd ftrange diftrefs) 

Stretch'd o'er the brink his little hand. 
The fruitlefs fignal of redrefs. 

The ofFer'd pledge, without delay. 
The ftruggling viftim rofe and caught ; 

But ah ! — in vain — their fatal way 
They both defcended, fwift as thought. 

Short was the wave-oppreffive fpace, 
ConvuU'd with pains too (harp to bear : 

Their lives diffolv'd in one embrace. 
Their mingled fouls flew up in air. 

Lo 1 there, yon time-worn fculpture ftiews 
The fad, the melancholy truth ; 

What pangs the tortur'd parent knows. 
What £iares await defencelefs youth ! 

Here, not to fympathy unknown. 
Full oft the fad Mufe, wand'ring near. 

Bends filent o'er the mo/Ty ftone. 
And wets it with a willing tear. 



* Stnkely's Itin. Coriof. i. 156. 



ibuthward 



®outWetbetten.] south-petherton. 107 

foiithward of the town, where a Roman pavement was difcovere'd in 1673; ^"d Wio- 
BOROUGH, which is fuppofed to have been a Roman town, not only from its name, but 
from the extenfive foundations of buildings which have been traced by curious ob- 
fervers. We have no Roman name for either. When that people relinquilhcd this 
country, South-Pctherton became the poflelTion and the feat of the Saxon Kings. Ina 
had a palace here. The inhabitants fhew an old houfe near the church, with ancient 
windows and armorial Ihields, which ftill bears that prince's name, but which in reality 
was the ereflion of more modern times, and the old palace muft long ago have been 
level with the ground. King Athelftan is reported to have kept his fcaft at Pedredan, 
and the pofleflion of this place was thought an objcd of importance by all his fucceflbrs 
till after the Norman Conqueft. The extent and value of this lordlhip in thofc days,, 
will appear from the following record: 

** The King holds Sudperet.. King Edward held it. It never gelded, nor are the 
*' number of hides known. The arable is twenty-eight carucates. In demefne are two 
" carucates, and five fervants, and twenty-two coliberts, and fixty-three villanes, and 
" fifteen cottagers, with twenty-fix ploughs. There is a mill rendering twenty fhil- 
" lings, and fifty acres of nreadow. Wood eleven furlongs long, and ten furlongs broad. 
" It yields forty-two pounds and one hundred pence of twenty to the ore. 

" Of this manor Merlefuain held two hides in Str atone [Over-Stratton] in the 
" time of King Edward, and it was thane-land. It now pays fijcty fhillings to the 
" King's farm. 

" From the fame manor is taken away half a hide. Norman holds it of Roger de 
" Curcelle, and it is worth fixteen (hillings. 

" To this manor was paid in the time of King Edward from Cruchc [Crewkerne] 
" an annual cuftomary rent, that is, fix fheep with as many lambs, and from every free 
" man a blome of iron. Turftin holds it of Earl Morton, but the cuftom was difufcd 
" after the Earl became feized of the land.'"* 

This large and valuable manor was not immediately parted from the crown, but, ex- 
clufive of a few portions of land feparated therefrom, was held by the Kings of England 
for aconfiderable fuccefllon, till at length it became the property of the family of De 
Albaniaco, Albini, D'Albini, or Daubeney. 

The firftofthis great family was Robert de Todenci, a noble Norman, who came 
into this country in the retinue of King William the Conqueror, and had Belvoir-caftle 
in Leicefterfliire for the chief feat of his barony; in which and his other poflefllons he 
was fucceeded by William his fon and heir. Whiclii William, for fome unknown 
reafon, adopted a different furname from that of his father, being called in all ancient 
evidences William de Albani, with the addition of Brito. Under this name he ferved 
as a principal commander in the army of Henry I, and in the time of King Stephen he 
was ajuftice itinerant in conjunftion with Richard Baffet. 

Ralph de Albini, a younger fon of this William, was progenitor of the family of this 
place, who bore the name of De Albini for fome time, and afterwards that of Daubini.. 

■' Lib. Domcfday. 

P 2 12 Henry. 



loS SOUTH-PET HERTON. [^outWetijectom 

12 Henry II. tliis Ralph held fifteen knights-' fees of his b'rother William de Albini," 
and 28 Henry II. gave two hundred marks for licence to many the mother of Everard 
de Rofs/ He died in the Holy Land 3 Ric. I. and was fucceeded by Philip De Albini. 

Which Philip, in the time of King John, was governor of the caftles ofLudlovv and 
Bridgnorth, and 3 Henry III. was appointed governor of Devizes-caftle, and keeper of 
the forefts of Melkfham and Chippenham in the county of Wilts. Upon the collec- 
tion of the fcutage of Montgomery 8 Henry III. he anfwered for feven knights' fees 
and a half in this county.^ He died in Paleftine 20 Henry III. leaving Ralph de Albini 
his nephew heir to hiseftates. This Ralph died 20 Edw. I. feized of the manors of 
SoTJth-Petherton, Barrington, and Chillington, all within this hundred, and held of the 
King by knight's fervice,*" leaving ifllie two fons, Philip and Elias de Albani, of whom 
the elder, Philip, dying two years after without iffue male, -the eftate became the inheri- 
tance of Elias de Albani the younger fon.' 

Which Elias was fummoned to parliament among the barons 23, 24, 25, 28, 30, 
32, and 23 Edw. I. in which laft year he died, feized of this manor of South-Petherton, 
in which were then found to be the following free tenants among others: William de 
Wiggebere held one meffuage and one yard-land in Eaft-Stratton. Richard de Abindon 
and Maud his wife held one meffuage and one carucate of land in IJttle-Lopen j and 
one mefluage and one yard-land at Drayton ; and one mefluage and three furlongs of 
land in South-Petherton. William Weylond and Elizabeth his wife held in Hajfekmore 
one mefluage and two yard-lands. Free tenants for life, among others, were, Hugh 
Hudde and Ahce his wife, who held two parts of a mefluage and one yard-land at 
Little-Stratton, and two parts of a meflfuage and one yard-land at More ; and two parts 
of a meflfuage, and half a yard-land at South-Petherton; and two parts and one furlong 
of land at La IVorthe. The record here certifies that Barrington, Chillington, and 
Bruges, (or Bridge) were hamlets of the faid manor of South-Petherton.'' 

To this Elias fucceeded Ralph his fon and heir, whofe name in mofl publick docu- 
ments is written D'Aubeney. Which Ralph 20 Edw. II. was one of the knights of 
the Bath, and 16 Edw. III. had fummons to parliament. He married to his firfl: wife 
Catherine the fifl:er of Thomas de Thwenge; by whom he had ifliie one only daughter, 
married to Sir William Botreaux, knt. His fecond wife was Alice daughter of Lord 
Montacute, by whom he had iflTue Sir Giles D'Aubeney, knt. his fon and heir,' 

Which Sir Giles D'Aubeney held at his death 4 Henry IV. the manor of South- 
Petherton, with the hamlets of Barrington, Donyat, Chillington, and Southarp, with 
the members and parcels belonging to the faid manor, together with the hundred of 
South-Petherton, parcel of the fame, of the King in capite by the ferviceof one knight's 
fee, and left ifllie John his fon and heir.*" 

To which John, who did not long furvive his father, dying 1 1 Henry IV. fucceeded 
another Sir Giles Daubeney, his fon and heir, who 10 Henry VI. was flieriff of the 

" Lib. R>ab. Scac. ' Rot. Pip. 28 Hen. II. « Rot. Pip. 8 Hen. III. " Efc. ' Ibid. 

.»Jbid. "Ibid. «'Ibid. 

counties 



^outb^lpctberton.] south -PET HERTON. 109 

counties of Bedford and Bucks; and by his will, bearing date March j, 1444, bequeathed 
his body to be buried in the chapel of our Lady within the church of St. Peter and Paul 
at South-Petherton, before die altar there j and appointed that a prieftfliould fing for 
the Ipace of three years in the faid cliapel for his own foul, and the fouls of Joan his 
wife, and of William Daubeney, whofe bones were there depofited." Soon after which 
he died, and William his fon and heir, doing his homage, had livery of his lands.' 

This William feems to have been altogether refident at South-Petherton, where 
moft of his deeds are dated, and for which place he obtained of King Henry VI. a fair 
to be held yearly on the eve, day, and morrow after the nativity of St, John the Baptill, 
and the three days next cnfuing.'' He was fucceeded by 

Giles Lord Daubeney, his fon and heir, one of the moft eminent perfons of his days, 
being one of the efquires for the body to King Edw. IV. from whom, in confideration 
of his fervices, he had a grant for life of the cuftody of the King's park at North- 
Petherton. After the battle of Bofworth-Field he was made one of Henry Vllth's 
chief counfellors, conftable of Briftol caftle, matter of the mint, and the fame year was 
advanced to the dignity of a baron of the realm. 3 Henry VIII. he was conftituted 
one of the chamberlains of the King's exchequer; and the next year was governor of 
Calais. 7 Henry VII. he was employed as embafiador for making a treaty with the 
French. 9 Henry VII. he was made juftice itinerant of all the King's forefts on the 
fouth of Trent, and. the following year was appointed lord-chamberlain of the King's 
houfliold. 13 Henry VII. he commanded the army againft the forces near Taunton, 
which had been landed in Cornwall on the behalf of Perkin Warbeck, where they 
were totally defeated. 19 Henry VII. he was made conftable of Bridgwater-caftlc. 
By his teftament bearing date May 19, 1507, he bequeathed his body to be buried in 
St. Peter's-abbey at Weftminfter, and appointed that his feoffees ftiould ftand feized of 
the manors of Winterflow in Wilts, and Crichel-Gouis in Dorfet, of the yearly value 
of 26I. 1 3s. 4d. to the intent that with the ilTues of the fame three pricfts Ihould per- 
petually be maintained to fing for his foul, and the fouls of his father and mother, viz. 
two in the church where he was to be buried, and the third in the parifti church of 
South-Petherton, where divers of his anceftors lay interred, each of them to have for 
his falary ten marks fterling. He died May 28th following, leaving by Elizabeth liis 
wife, daughter of Sir John Arundel of Lanherne in the county of Cornwall, knt. one 
fon Henry, and a daughter Cecily, married to John Bourchier lord Fitzwarren, after- 
wards Earl of Bath. 

Which Henry lord Daubeney 6 Henry VIII. had ^ fpecial livery of all his father's 
lands, and 19 July 30 Henry VIII. was created by that King Earl of Bridgwater. 

Which Henry earl of Bridgwater conveyed the manor and hundred of South- 
Petherton to Sir Thomas Arundel, knt. from whom is defcended Henry lord Arundel, 
of Wardour-^caftle in the county of Wilts, the prefent polTeflbr, 

The manor of SouTHARP is the property of Mrs. Child, relift of Robert Child, cfq; 
late an eminent banker in London. 

" Dugd, Bar. i. 117. ' Rot. Jin. 24 Hen. VI. m. 13. ' Cart. 25 Hen, VI. n, 5. 

Hele- 



iio SOUTH-PETHERTON. [^out!)#etf)erton* 

Mele-House manor in the town-tithing belongs to Henry Stephens, of Salifbury, eJ'q. 

CoMPTON-DuRviLLE was anciently a manor held of the lords of Petherton by the 

family of Durville, who gave it its name. 3 Edw, III. Euftace de Durville being 

attainted, this manor was granted by the King to Henry Wytheley, efq."" In the time 

of Ric. II. Nicholas lord Biirnel was owner of Compton-Durville, and afterwards 

^ the Hodys.' 

WiGBOROUGH lies within the tithing of Southarp, and was anciently written Winche- 
herie, being at the Conqiieft the eftate of one John, the King's porter or door-keeper j 
the Norman record defcribes this land as follows: 

" John himftlf holds Wincheberie. Alward held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and gelded for two hides. The arable is one carucate and a half, and there are with 
\ " it two villanes, and three cottagers. There are eight acres of meadow. It was 

" formerly worth twenty fhillings, now thirty (hillings.' 

The defendants of this John feated themfelves at this place, and aflumed the name 
of De Wiggebere; and as in che time of William the Conqueror this manor had been held 
by the King's porterj fo the fame office or ferjeanty of keeping the door of the King's 
hall or chamber was preferved in the perfons of its fliture poffeflbrs. In the time of 
Henry III. Richard de Wiggebere was owner of the manor of Wigborough, and lands. 
• in Pegenes wliich Elena his mother fometime held in dower by the fervice abovemen- 

tioned, and the rent of forty fhiUings per annum payable to the King yearly by the 
hands of the fheriffat the feaft of St. Michael.' He died 55 Henry III. leaving iflue 
William de Wiggebere his fon and heir, who had livery of his lands that fame year." 
This William, who as well as his father was a knight, died about 18 Edw. II. and was 
fucceeded in the pofleflion of this and his other eftates by Sir Richard de Wiggebere 
his brother and heir, the fecond of that name. Which Sir Richard 18 Edw. II. had 
livery of the manor of Wigborough, and the hamlets of Pegens and Hunftile, all which 
he held of the King by the fervice of keeping the door of the King's haU or chamber." 
He died i Edw, III. leaving iflue an only daughter and heir, Mary, married to Sir 
Richard Cogan, of Huntfpill, knt. who thus became poffefled of this manor, which de- 
fcended from him to Sir William Cogan, knt. and paffed by his coheirefs to Sir Fulke 
Fitzwarren.*" From him it came to the family of Bourchier lords Fitzwarren. Fulke 
Bourchier lord Fitzwarren, by his deed bearing date May 10, 15 Edw. IV, enfeoffed 
John lord Dinham and others in his manor of Wigborough and in other lands and 
eftates, in truft for the ufe of his two daughters Jane and Elizabeth, appointing each of 
them to have one thoufand marks out of the profits of the faid manor and lands to- 
wards their preferment in marriage."' After which the manor came to Sir Richard 
Hankford, knt. and after his death, 9 Henry VI. was divided betwixt his daughters, of 
whom Elizabeth held a moiety thereof 12 Henry VI. and left it to her filler Thomafia." 
But in the fucceeding reign of Edw. IV. the manor of Wigborough reverted to the 
Bourchiers, and by the inquifition taken after the deceafe of Ful]<;e Bourchier lord 

1 Cart. Antiq. ' Efc. ' Lib. Domefday. ' Efc. " Rot. Pip. 55 Hen. III. 

'Rot. Pip. 18 Ed. II. J-Seevol. ii. p. 391. ^ Rot, Claus. 15 Ed. IV. 'Efc. 

Fitzwarren 



^OUtf>lpet!)ecton.l SOUTH- PETHFRTON. Ill 

Fitzwarren 19 Edw. IV. it appears that he held this manor of Wigborot-igh, and alfo 
the manors of Huntfpill, Novington, Hiinft<ile, and Norton-Fitzwarren, widi lands in 
Pitney and Taunton, in all which he was fuccecded by John Jiis fon and heir." 
26 Henry VIII. John Bourrhier earl of Bath fold this manor witli its appcrtcnanccs 
to John Selwood, who the year following conveyed the fame in like manner to John 
Broome and his heirs.' Which John Broome 23 Eliz. is certified to hold the manor 
of Wigborough, with its appertenances and lands in South-Petherton, of the King in 
chief by the fervice of keeping the door of the King's ciiamber.'' Infomuch that wc 
fee the fame ferjeanty of being the King's porter continued down from the time of 
William the Conqueror to that of Queen Elizabeth, in the feveral occupiers of this 
manor, which became afterwards the property of the family of Hele, and now belongs 
to Robert Hillard, efq. The manor-houfe, now ftanding, was built in the year 1585. 

In the fame tithing of Southarp is Bridge-Farm, anciently called Bruges, which 
was lately the feat of William Oftler, efq; now of John Eafton, efq. 

*' Alviet the prieft holds of the King one hide in Sudperetone. The arable is one 
" carucate, and there is on it one cottager and one fervant. There are eight acres of 
" meadow. It is worth twenty Ihillings.'" 

In 129a the reftory of South-Pctherton was valued at 53I. 6s. 8d. the vicarage at 
ten marks.' It was appropriated to the priory of Brewton,* and after the fupprelTion 
of that houfe was given by King Henry VIII. to the cathedral of Briftol. The dean 
and chapter are the patrons, and the Rev. Dr. Robins is the prefent incumbent. 

Of the feveral chantries or fervices founded in the church of South-Petherton, die 
principal one, and which was moft richly endowed, was the chantry of St. John the. 
Baptift, of the advowfon of which the lords of the manor were always patrons."" After 
its diflblution, Edward Napier of Halywell, fomctime fellow of All-Souls College in 
the univerfity of Oxford, gave by iiis will, bearing date Aug. 8, 1558, all his lands in 
this parifh, lately belonging to this chantry, to the faid college of All-Souls to keep his 
obit.' In 1553, William Dyer, incumbent of a fervice here, had a penfion of 51.^ 

The church ftands on a little eminence nearly in the centre of the town, and is dedi- 
cated to St. Peter and St. Paul. It is a large ftrufture, built in the form of a crofs, 
having two fide ailes, and a north and fouth tranfept, with an ofbangular tower at their 
interfeftion, crowned with a fpire covered with lead, and containing a clock, chimes, 
and fix mufical bells. Behind the altar is a veftry-room, which was formerly a con- 
feflional, having two doors to enter into it. 

Upon a flat ftone in the fouth tranfept there was formerly a brafs-plate, containing 
the portraiture of a female, and this infcription : 

' Efc. • Licence to alienate. * Efc. • Lib. Domefday. ' Taxat. Spiritual. 

'^ William Gilbert prior of Brewton, and fuiFragan biihop to Cardinal Woiky, was fometime incumbent of this 
vicarage, to which he was inftituted Dec. 16, 1525. 

" Efc. ' Wood's Hift. of Oxford, 264. ' Willis's Hift. of Abbies, 203. 

'* IDic 



112 SOUTH-PETHERTON. [^outf)#et!)e«om 

" ^ic jacetiDiia s^aria D'Subeneg uror CgiDi) D'aubeneg miUtis, quon^ 
nam filia ^imonis ILceftc, armigcri, com. Botingfjamiae, quae oftiit 17° 
mcnfig jTctiruarii, 3nno Domini 1442, 

In the fame tranfept is a fine tomb of Sienna marble, having thereon the effigies in 
brafs of a man and woman, with,this infcription at their feet: 

*' ^is ttHis f te qn non meet W lapis ifte. 
Corpus ut ornetur, fct fpiritus ut memoretur. 
€Xui0quisi ttid qui tranfieris, fla, peclcge, plota : ' 
^um Qti ecis, fucramq' qD es, pro mc prccor ora." 

This tomb is afcribed to the Earl of Bridgwater. 

Againft the eaft wall is an old ftone monument, with feveral figures kneeling, to the 
memory of Henry Compton and his wife. Arms, Sable, three clofe helmets, argent. 

Another ftone tomb, covered with black marble, commemorates Thomas Hele, of 
fleet in the county of Devon, efq; who died Nov. 13, 1665. 

Among feveral handfome memorials to the families of Ayfhe and Sandys, in the 
north tranfept, which now belongs to Henry Stephens, efq; is the following; 

" Memorije asternae, Jacobi Ayfhe, generofi, qui cum ad 28 pie vixiffet annum, in 
Domino placide obdormivit Maij 5, 1626. 

" Dormit in hoc tumulo corpus; fed fpiritus alte 

Scandit, et ad coelum gratia pandit iter. 
Non dedit in noftris vicinia noftra diebus 

Do6lrina fimilem, vel pietate, virum. 
Integra vita fiiit; pia mors; mens dedita Chrifto; 

Eft pia, grata Deo, mors, quia vita fuit. 

" Elizaberiia Ayfhe, uxor ejus amantifTima, conjugalis amoris ergo monumentum 
mcerens pofuit." Arms of Ayfhe, Argent, two chevrons fable. Of Sandys, Or, a 
fefTe dauncettee between three crofs-croflets fitchee, gules. 

In the fouth aile, which belongs to the manor of Wigborough, are feveral memorials 
to the family of Gundry. 

Many of the monuments in this church, with the organ, (built about eight years 
before) were fpoiled in the civil wars of the laft century. 

Benefaftors to the poor of South-Petherton. 



1670. 


Mr. John Sandys, ofLon-7 £. 
don, merchant, gave \ 100 


1706. 


Mr. Hugh Langley gave - ;^.io 




1710. 


Mr. Edward Anftice - £.20 


I68I. 


Mrs. Ann Sandys - - ) 


1732. 


Mr. Samuel Gundry - £.^0 




The Rev. Mr. Marks - K l-S 




Mr. John Smart - - jC.20 




Mr. Stephen Weftcot - C each. 








Mr. Robert Vile -J 




1738. James 



@outf)'ipetf)erton.] south-petherton. ,13 

1738. James Harcourt, D. D. vicar of this place, being defirous that the children of 
South-Petherton might be inftruftcd in the Church Cateclufm, and have the fame ex- 
pounded to them in the time of morning-prayer in this parifli church once at Icaft in 
every week, by the vicar or his curate, and that the Common-Prayer might be read 
every Wednefday and Friday, and every Saint's-day for ever; in order to encourage 
fuch his defire, did purchafe for the fum of 35I. i is. and give to the vicars for ever, 
one acre and one yard of ground, being part of the ground leading to the vicarage- 
houfe ; but in caie the faid vicars do negled to catechifc and read prayers, without 
fhewing caufe to be approved of by the archdeacon of Taunton, that then the faid piece 
of ground fliall revert to the heirs of the faid James Harcourt, during the incumbency 
of all and every vicar fo negleding. 



BARRINGTON, 

Otherwife called Barrington-Stembridge. 

THIS parifh lies to the northweft of Petherton, in a low and woody fituatlon; th<T 
lands fertile, and moftly arable; great quantities of hemp and flax are cultivateil 
in this neighbourhood. The village confifts of a pretty irregular ftreet, about half a 
mile in length. 

In the Conqueror's time it was rated only at half a hide, being parcel of the manoc 
of South-Petherton, held by Roger de Curcelle, and under iiim by Norman; it was 
then valued at fixteen fhillings." In future times it was held with Petherton by the 
Daubeneys. 20 Edw. I. Ralph Daubeney is certified to hold his lands here and in 
Chillington, by the fervice of finding Peter de Ardern a man on foot to ferve at his 
caftle at Aldeford in the time of war.'' 15 Ric. II. Sir William Botreaux, knt. held a 
a fair in the village of Barrington, together with the advowfon of the church, of the 
grant of Ralph Daubeney. 6 Edw. VI. the manor and park of Barrington were held 
by Henry duke of Suffolk, who fold the fame to William Clifton and his heirs." 
35 Eliz. the manor with its appertenances, and two hundred acres of pafture, twelve 
hundred of wood, and three hundred of moor, with appertenances in the foreft of 
Neroch, belonging to this manor, and the capital meflliage and park of Barrington,, 
and three water-mills, two dove-houfes, and all mefluages, buildings, lands, and tene- 
ments, within the faid park, as alfo a meffuage and curtilage called the Hinde-Hozv/e in 
Barrington, adjoining to the park, were held by Sir John Clifton, knt. of the King in 
chief The manor came afterwards into the family of Phillips, who built here the 
capital manfion-houfe which is ftill Handing. By an inquifuion taken at Ilminfter 

• • Lib. Doraefdsy. » Efc. ' Licence to alienate. * Efc. 

Vol. III. Q^ 2.9 Sept.. 



114 BARRiNGTON. [^outi).'^etf)erton. 

-29 Sept. 16 Jac. Sir Thomas Phillips, knt. is found to have died feized of this manor 
26 June 1618, leaving Thomas Phillips, efq; his fon and heir of the age of twerity- 
eight years." 

The living is a curacy in the deanery of Crewkerne, and in the gift of Earl Poulett. 
The Rev. Thomas Allen is the prefcnt incumbent. 

The church is in the form of a crofs, having in the centre an oftangular tower, con- 
taining a clock and five bells. In this church were buried feveral of the Strode family 
who refided in the parilh. 

' Inq. poft Mort. Tho. Phillip, mil. 



CHILLINGTON, 

WHICH was another branch of the manor of South-Petherton, lies at a confi- 
derable diftance fouthweft from that town, between the hundred of Crewkerne 
and that of Abdick and Bullion. The fituation is in a rich vale, under the north brow 
of high land called Chillington-Down, from which it derives its name; Eealb, bleak, 
and ron, a town. Tliefoil is fandy, abounding with grey and yellowilh flints j but is 
in feveral parts fertile for fummer corn. 

King "William the Conqueror gave this fmall village to Roger de Curcelle, of whom 
it was held by Anfchicil : 

" Anfchitil holds of Roger, Cilletone. Godric held it In the time of King Edward, 
" and gelded for one virgate of land. The arable is one carucate. There is one 
" cottager. It was and is worth twenty IhiUIngs,'" 

It does not appear when it became united with South-Petherton, but the Daubeneys 
held it with the foregoing parifh of Harrington for many generations. 13 Eliz. this 
manor was the property of Thomas Lord Wentworth.'' Two tenements and forty 
acres of land in ChiUington, valued at 40s. were given for the maintenance of three 
priefts in the parifh church of Ilminfter, which, after the diflblution of chantries, were 
fold to Henry Simfon." The Rev. Mr. Notley is now lord of this manor. 

The living is a curacy in the deanery of Crewkerne. The Rev. Thomas Allen is 
the prefent incumbent. 

The church, dedicated to St. James, is a fmall ancient flrufture of one pace, having 
a turret at the weft end, twenty-five feet high, with two bells. 

In the church-yard is a large ancient yew-tree. 

» Lib. Domefday. t Ter. Sydenham. = Harl. MS. 606. 

CHAFFCOMBE. 



©outD-Petljerton,] [ 115 ] 



CHAFFCOMBE. 

THIS is a fmall parifh, fituated in a pleafant valley near the borders of Chard 
common. The lands being cold and wer, are unfavourable to agriculture. In 
a narrow fequeftered lane leading from this place to the parifh of Cricket-Malherbe, 
a botanift would find much entertainment, there being a great variety of ferns, afple- 
niums, and curious mofles. The purple digitalis flourifhes here in high pcrfedion. 
This parifh contains about thirty houfes, including a hamlet called Libnash, fituated 
a mile fouthward from the church. 

The ancient name of this parifh is Caffecome, which is compounded of the Saxor» 
Cap, Iharp, and Homb, valley. In the Conqueror's time it belonged to die Bifhop 
of Coutances: 

" The fame Bifhop holds Caffecome, and Ralph of him. Two thanes held it in 
** the time of King Edward, and gelded for three hides and a half. The arable is three 
*' carucates. In demefne is one [carucate] and two villanes, and fix cottagers, having. 
" one plough. There is a wood eight furlongs long, and as many broad. It is worth 
*' forty fliillings. 

" To this manor are added one hide, and three virgates of land. Two thanes held 
" it in the time of King Edward for two manors. The arable is two carucates. Thefe 
** are held by three villanes. It is worth twenty (hillings.'" 

But in procefs of time this manor became a part of the honour of Gloucefter, which 
extended itfelf throughout this county. 7 Edw. II. Hugh de Beauchamp held one- 
moiety, and Ralph de Stocjclinch the other moiety of this village, each by the fervice 
of the third part of a knight's fee, of Gilbert de Clare earl of Gloucefler.'' This Ralph 
de Stocklinch was feated at the neighbouring village of Stocklinch-Otterfey, which 
gave his family their name, and was held by them for many generations. In the 
account of that place in ^ the firlt volume of this work, it was conjedkured that it 
obtained its name from the family of Oterfchawe, who were refident at a place now 
depopulated in the neighbourhood of I fie- Abbots, in the adjacent hundred of Abdick.' 
By other evidences it further appears that die faid parifh of StockUnch was fomedmes 
difcriminated by the appellation of Stocklinch-Oy?ru'^r, and that the manor was held 
by the fervice of keeping an oftrum or hawk for the lord paramount thereof 1 4 Ric. II. 
John Denbaud held at his death the manor of Stokelynch-OJlricer, with the advowfon of 
the church, of the Earl of Huntingdon, as of his manor of Hafelborough, by the fervice 
of keeping a hawk \oJlrum'\ every year till it fliould be completely fit for fervice. 
And when die faid hawk fhould be fo fit, he was to convey it to his lord's manor- 
houfe, attended by his wife, together with three boys, diree horfes, and direc grey- 
hounds, and to flay there forty days at the lord's expence, and to have the lady's 
fecond-betl gown for his wife's work.** 



• Lib. Domefday. ' Lib. Feod. « See vol. i. p. 63. ' Efc. 



0,2 



The 



A 



,i6 c H A F F c M B E. [®out|)#etl)etton* 

The fame Jolin Denbaiid held alfo this manor of Chaffcombe of the abbot of Ford 
in Devonfhire, by the fervice often fhillings per annum for all fervices, together widi 
one mcfTuage, one hundred acres of pafture, and fix fhillings and eight-pence rent per 
annum, in the parifli of Chaffcombej of Sir John Rodney, knt. as of his manor of 
Backwell by knight's fervice/ 

From which family of Denbaud, or Denebaud, the manors of ChafFcombe and 
Stocklinch-Otterfey came by marriage to the Poulets, and is now the pofleffion of their 
reprefentative John earl Poulett. 

Another manor here belongs to Mrs, Mallard. 

The living is reftorial, and in the deanery of Crewkeme; Lord Poulett is patron, 
and the Rev. John Fewtrell the prefent incumbent. 

The church, which is dedicated to St. Michael, is a fmall building, confifting of a 
nave, chancel, north aile or chapel, and a tower at the weft end, in which are three bells. 

In the north aile there is a mural monument of various kinds of marble, with this 

infcription: " Here lie the bodies of Samuel Sealy, of this parifli, who died the 

loth of May 1742, aged 63J and of Sarah his wife, who died 2 Feb. 1716, aged 36; 
with his father, mother, and feveral of his anceftors." Arms, Gules, a fefle between 
three wolves' heads erafed argent. 

In this church was buried Sir Amias Paulet, knt. who died June 25, 1538/ 
The chriftenings in ^his parifli are annually on an average five j the burials four. 
' Efc. ' Colljns's Peerage, iv. 197. 



CRICKET-ST. -THOMAS 

IS a fmall parifli lying foutheaft from ChafFcombe, between Crewkeme and Chard, 
under the fouthern ridge of White-Down. It contains now only eleven houfes, 
but formerly there were many more, and the place much more confiderable. 

It was held of the great barony of Caftle-Cary by mihtary fervice. 19 Edw. I. 
Richard de Contevyle held two knights' fees and a half in Cricket of Sir Hugh Lovel, 
knt." 2 Edw. III. Walter de Rodney was lord of this manor.'' 6 Henry IV. it was 
held by Sir Peter Courtney, knt.' and 13 Henry IV. the manor and advowfon of the 
church belonged to Margaret widow of Sir John St. Loe, who held the fame of Lord 
St. Maur as of his manor of Caftle-Cary.'' It thence paflTed to Sir William Botreaux, 
knt. and by his daughter and heir came to the Hungerfords. 31 EHz. the manor of 
Cricket-Thomas, with the advowfon of the church, and lands in Knoll and Hill, were 

•Lib. Feod. » Efc. ,'Ibid. 'Ibid. 

held 



®outf)#etbettcin.] cricket-st.-thomas. uy 

held by John Prcfton. It now belongs to Sir Alexander Hood, who has here a very 
neat feat with elegant plantations, embellifhing a Ipot by nature pleafing, and charm- 
ingly romantick. 

The living is a reftory in the gift of the lord of the manor; the Rev. John Golden 
is the prefent incumbent. In 1292 it was valued at three marks ten fliillings.' 

The church is very fmall, confifting of a nave, chancel, and fouth aile tiled, with a 
fmall turret at the weft end, containing two bells. 

The abbey of Ford had an eftate in this parifh valued in 1293 at 21s.' 
• Taxat. Spiritual. ' Taxat. Tejrporal. 



CUDWORTH 

IS a parifli fituated three miles eaft from Chard, on a fmall elevation under the high 
ridge of Chillington-Down. The number of houfes is twenty-eight, and of inhabi- 
tants about one hundred and fifty. Moft of the houfes ftand in Upper and Lower Were. 

Cudeworde was the land of Roger Arundel : 

*' Odo holds of Roger, Cudeworde. Three thanes held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for three hides and a half. The arable is four carucates. In 
" demelhe is one carucate, and fix fervants, and four villanes, and two cottagers, with 
*' half a plough. There are four acres of meadow, pafture eight furlongs long, and 
'* two furlongs broad. It was worth forty {hillings, now thirty lhillings."» 

The chief pofleflbrs of this manor after the Conqueft were the Wakes, from whofe 
family it came into that of Keynes, by the marriage of the daughter and heir of Thomas 
Wake of Dowlifh," with John fon of Thomas Keynes of Winckley. From the family 
of Keynes it paiTed to the Spekes, and became the property of Lord North, in a fimilar 
way with Ilminfter and many other manors in this neighbourhood. 

The church is a prebend in the cathedral of Wells, valued in 1292 at ten marks.'^ 
The living is a peculiar in the deanery of Crewkerncj the Rev. John Templeman is 
the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Michael, and is compofed of a nave, chancel, north 
aile and porch, with a turret containing two bells. 

The prebend of Cudworth was annexed to the abbey of Muchelney, and confider- 
.ible lands in this parilh belonged to that monaitery, under which they were held for 
fevcral fuccefTions by the family of Buller. 

• Lib. Domefday. » Sec under Eaft-Do«iiih, p. 1 19. f. Taxat. Spiritual. 

The 



ii8 cuDWORTH. [@outl)#ctl)erton. 

The famous Dr. Richard Bufby was fometime prebendary of Cudwordi, to which 
he was admitted in July 1639. The next year he was admitted to the mafterlhip of 
Weftminfter-School, in the difcharge of which office, for the fpace of fifty-five y^ars, 
he by his fkill and dihgence bred up the greateft number of eminent men in Church 
and State that ever adorned at one time any age or nation. He died April 6, 1695, 
aged 89, and was buried in Weftminfter-abbey.'' 

" Biog. Dia. iii. 52. 



KNOLL, OR KNOWLE ST. GILES, 

STANDS wefl from Cudworth, of which manor it was a member at the time of the 
Conquefl. It now belongs to Lord Poulett. Its fituation is on elevated ground, 
as its name imports, Enoll being the Saxon term for the apex of a hill. The roads 
here are rough and narrow, overhung with hedge-rows, and full of fharp, yellow, and 
grey flints. 

There is very little notice taken of this place in our ancient records. The family of 
L'Orti, or de Ortiaco, were its chief lords. 40 Henry III. Lord William de Parys 
held it of the heirs of Lady Sabina de L'Orti, by the fervice of the third part of a 
knight's fee." 56th of the fame reign Ralph Inweans held of Richard de L'Orti half a 
knight's fee in Knoll, and a certain paflure in the manor of North-Stoke, containing 
twenty acres, of Lord William de Montacute.'' By an inquifition taken at Wells Jan. 1 5, 
1588-9, it was found that Sir Amias Poulett, knt. died feized of this among many 
other manors on Sept. 26, 1588,= from whom it has defcended to the'prefent proprietor. 

The living is a donative and peculiar in the deanery of Crewkerne; the Rev. Lewis 
Evans is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is a very low fmall ftrufture of one pace, with a turret and two bells. 
It is dedicated to St. Giles, whence the village had its additional name. 

• Lib. Feod. " Efc. ' Coles's Efc. in Bibl. Harl. 



DOWLISH-WAKE, or EAST-DOWLISH, 

(So called from the family who polTefTed it, and from its eaflerly fituation from another 
place of the fame name in the hundred of Bulfton.*) 

IS a fmall parifh, two miles foutheafl from Ilminfter, containing forty-one houfes, and 
about two hundred and thirty inhabitants. The fituation is in a pleafant vale, but 
the church ftands on a little eminence, wliich commands a good view of the country to 

» See vol. i. p. 37. 

the 



®outa#eti)ectonO dowlish-wake. 119 

the foiith and weft. The eftate called Bere-Mills, lying between Knowle-St.-Giles 
and Weft-Dowlifh, belongs to this parifh. The lands are about three-fifths arable. 
The foil in the eaft part fandy, in the north part ftone-rufh-j the fouthern part is gene- 
rally a black earth and gravel, and very fertile. Several fprings rifing in this part 
unite in a little ftreana, which running through Weft-Dowlifh joins the river Iflc at the 
foot of Sea-Mill in the parifli of Ilminfter. 

The manor of Doules, comprehending the two vills now called Eaft and Weft- 
Dowliftj, was given by King William to the Bifhop of Coutances, whofe lands here 
are thus furveyed : 

" The Bifhop of Coutances holds Doules. Alward held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for two hides and one virgate of land. The arable is one caru- 
*' cate and a half, and there are three villanes, and three cottagers, and one fervant. 
" It was and is worth twenty- four fhillings. 

" To this manor are added feven hides, which three thanes held in the time of King 
" Edward for three manors. There are in demelhe two carucates, and two fervants, 
" and eleven villanes, and eleven cottagers, with five ploughs. There ^re forty-four 
*' acres of meadow, and four furlongs of pafture in length, and as many in breadth, and 
** twenty acres more. Wood eight furlongs long, and three furlong? broad, and 
** twenty acres befides. It is worth fix pounds and ten fhillings. This land William 
" [dc Moncels] holds of the Bifhop."." 

The Wakes were feated at Dowlifh early in the twelfth century. They derived 
their defcent from Herewaldus le Wake, a Saxon general, who was the laft that with- 
ftood the arms of King William the Conqueror, and by a compromifc with him in the 
year 1076, was reftored to the eftate and honours which he had pofleflfed before the 
arrival of the Normans.' This family was in procefs of time difpcrfed by various 
branches into different parts of the kingdom; but their chief eftate was at Deeping in 
the county of Lincoln, which continued in their polfeiTion till the beginning of the laft 
century. All the names of that branch which poifeffed this manor are not tranfmittcd 
to US; but it appears that in the time of Edw. I. it was the property of Sir Ralph Wake, 
a perfon of great account in thefe parts, and one of thofe who 25 Edw. I. was fum- 
moned to be at London with horfe and arms the next Lord's-day after the oftaves of 
St. John the Baptift, thence to attend the King beyond the feas.** This Ralph, befides 
the manors of Eaft and Weft-Dowlifh, had that of Compton-Martin in this county, as 
alfo the manors of Stour-Cofin, Eaftover, and Weftover, Stoke in Blakemore, Gore- 
well, Candel-Wake, and Hull, in the county of Dorfet, and the manor of Tangle in 
the county of Southampton. By Alice his wife he left ilTue John, fometimes called de 
Wake, and fometimes le Wake, his fon and heir, who fucceeded to thefe eftates, and 
died feized of them 22 Edw. III. leaving three daughters his coheirs, viz. Ifabel the 
wife of John de Keynes, Margery the wife of Hugh Tyrel, and Elizabeth who was 
unmarried.' The manors of Eaft and Weft-Dowlifli, with the third part of tlie manor 
of Compton-Martin, were allotted to Ifabel Keynes, who held the former manors of 

.' Lib, Domefday. ' EngUfh Baronetage, i, 466. " Harl. MS. 119Z. • Efc. 

the 



I20 DOWLISH-WAKE. [^outf)#et&ertott; 

the Countefs of Warren, as of her honour of Trowbridge, and the third part of the latter 
of James de Audley. She died 33 Edw. III. and was fucceeded in her eftates by 
Thonnas Keynes her fon and heir/ This Thomas Keynes was a lineal defcendant of 
the ancient family of Keynes or Kahaynes, who were feated at Winckley in the county 
of Devon in the time of Henry II. and bore for their arms. Azure y abend undee co- 
tifed argent} He married Margaret daughter of Sir John Beaumont of Yolfton, knt. 
by whom at his death, 35 Edv/. III. he left ifllie John, who was then of the age of 
eight years."" Which John married Joan daughter and coheir of Nicholas Wampford, 
and by her had iffue two fons, Richard and John; which laft was of Dowlifh, and died 
8 Henry V. feized of the manors of Eaft and Weft-Dowlifh, with other manors and 
eftates in this county and Dorfet, leaving Joan the wife of John Speke, efq; his daughter 
and heir.* Which John Speke was father of Sir John Speke, of White-Lackington in 
this county, knt." from whom this manor defcended through eleven generations to 
George Speke, efq; father of the prefent Lady North, who devifed it to Mary his 
eldeft daughter (whom he had by his firft wife) and to her heirs male; and in failure 
of fuch iffue, to George Speke, of Curry-Rivel, efq; and his heirs. But the faid 
Mary dying unmarried, and George Speke alfo dying without iffue, this manor de- 
fcended to his heir at law the Rev. William Speke, B. D. of Jordans near Ilminilec, 
the prefent poffeffor. 

The prior of Farley had an eftate in thisparifh, wliich in 1293 was rated at fix 
fhiUings.' 

The living of Dowlifh-Wake is reftorial, and in the deanery of Crewkerne; the 
patronage is vefted in the loi-d of the manor, the Rev. William Speke abovementioned-; 
and the Rev. Septimus CoUinfon is the prefent incumbent. In 1292 this benefice was 
rated at eight marks." 

The church is dedicated to St. Andrew, and confifts of a nave, chancel, north aile^ 
and chapel; with a well-built quadrangular tower between the chancel and the nave. 
The north part has been the burial-place of the families of Keynes and Speke, and there 
ftill remain feveral ancient tombs, one of which reprefents John Speke and Joan his 
wife, the heirefs of Keynes, who brought this eftate into that family. 

Againft the chancel wall is a ftone monument, infcribed, " Underneath lies the 

mortal part of the Rev. Mr. Arthur Hood, fifty-one years reftor of this parilh. His 
pious foul was called from her earthly manfion July 22, 1759, aged 81 years. His 
doftrine was the rule of his life, and his life an example of his doftrine." 

Adjoining to the church-yard is a good old manfion, the refidence of J . Hanning, efq. 

'Efc. » Sir William Pole's Survey of Devon. » Efc. 'Ibid, 

* See voU i. p. 67. ' Taxat. Temporal. " Taxat. Spiritual.. 



DINNINGTON. 



®outl)=lpetl)ertonJ - I m ] 



DINNINGTON. 

THIS parini is fituated eaftward from Dowlifh-Wake, and betwixt that and Hinton- 
St.-George, the road to which is very beautiful, being on a terrace under the 
ridge of Earl Poulett's park, crowned with noble woods, and affording a fine and ex- 
tenfive profpeft to the eaft, north, and northweft. 

The manerial property of this parifh is vefted in Earl Poulett. At the Conqueft it 
was held by one of the King's thanes called Siward, as we read in the general furvey: 

" Siward holds Dunintone. Edmar held it in the' time of King Edward, and 
** gelded for three hides. The arable is three carucates, on which there are fix villanes, 
*' and three cottagers. There is a mill of eight-pence rent, and eight acres of mea- 
*' dow. Pafture three furlongs long, and two furlongs broad. Wood three furlongs 
** long, and two furlongs broad. It was formerly worth twenty ftiillings, now forty.'" 

•' Siward holds three virgates of land of the church of Glaftingberie in a manor 
" which is called Dinnitone. It is worth thirteen fliillings and two-pence."'' 

The manor was held of the honour of Gloucefter in the reigns of Edw. II. and III. 
by Alexander and Elias de la Lynde.' 

The living is a redory in the deanery of Crewkerne, and in the gift of Earl Poulett, 
the Rev. Henry Stambury is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, which is dedicated to St. Nicholas, is a fmall building of one pace,, 
with a turret at the weft end, containing two bells. 

Under the communion-table is a ftone with this infcription:- " Here lieth the 

body of Worthington Brice, gent, buried March 14, 1649, aetat. fuae 6j. Chrifti vir- 
tute refurgam." 

On the north wall is an old monument to others of the lame family, but the infcrip- 
tion is illegible: the arms are a griffin rampant. 

In 1651-2 the Brices compounded for their eftates here in the fum of 195I. los.*' 

• Lib. Doinefd.iy. 'Ibid. • Lib. Feod. * Somerfetftiire Compofition. 



L O P E N 

IS a parifh very pleafantly fituated on the turnpike-road from South-Pethcrton to 
Crewkerne, well wooded, and abounding with excellent water. The number of 
houfes is about fevcnty, which moftly ftand round the church; but a few are fituated in 
the hamlet of Broomhill, about a quarter of a mile northwardj and feme are ftrag- 
gling about the parifh. A rivulet rifing near Hinton-St.-George divides this parifh 
from that of Mcrrigt, and this hundred from that of Grewkerne. 
Vol. III. R The 



122 L o p E N. [®outf)*pctf)ertoiu 

The vill of Lopen is furveyed in two diftinft parcels in Domefday-Book: 

" Gerard holds of the Earl [Morton] Lopene. Alward held it in die time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for one hide. The arable is one carucate. There is one cot- 
" tager, with one fervant, and ten acres of meadow. It is worth twenty fliiUings.'" 

" Harding (Fitz-Alnod, a Saxon thane) holds Lopen. Tovi held it in the time of 
*' King Edward, and gelded for two hides. The arable is two carucates. In demefne 
" is one carucate, and two fervants, and two villanes, and five cottagers, and twenty 
" acres of meadow. It formerly was worth twenty fliillings, now forty fhillings."'' 

This place gave name to a family who held their lands of the Malets; but in the 
time of King John this manor of Lopen was the pofleffion of Nicholas de Meriet, and 
was fometime farmed by John Wac," who fcems to have been of the fame branch of 
the family of Wake, of whom we have made mention in the parilh of Eaft-Dowlifh.* 
In this family of Meriet the manor of Lopen continued till the time of Ric. II. when 
George de Meriet dying without iffue, the eftates were divided between his two fifters, 
Margaret the wife of Sir Thomas Bonville, knt. and Elizabeth the wife of Humphry 
Stafford. lo Edw. IV. this Humphry Stafford, eari of Devon, (fo created by that 
King) held at his death this manor of Lopen of Sir John Colefhill, knt. as of his 
manor of Sevenhampton.' After which this manor came into the family of Poulett, 
in which it ftill continues. There were formerly a market and a fair in this village, 
which John de Meriet procured of King Edw. I. 2 Edw. III. George de Meriet 
pleaded in parliament that his anceftors, time out of mind, had poffeffed the manors of 
Merriot and Lopen, together with the fairs and markets ufed in thofe towns, and pe- 
titioned that they might be continued.^ 30 Eliz. the fair at Lopen, with its appcrte- 
nances, was granted to Tipper and Dawe.^ It had before been granted in the time of 
Edw. IIL and Ric, 11. to Gilbert Talbot and Walter Chamberline. 

The manor above recited was denominated Mcgna-Lopen, by way of diftinftion from 
Lopen-Parva, und Lopen- Abiis or ?V/«/)/i?, which lafteftate belonged to the preceptoryof 
Temple-Combe, of which mention has been made in the fecond volume of this work. 
Among the benefadtors to the knights-templars or hofpitalers of St. John of Jerufalem, 
Milo de Franca-Quercu is fet down as having given to them divers lands and tenements 
in the village of Lopen belonging to the prcceptory of Temple-Combe.'' Thefe hnds, 
fometimes called by the name of a manor, amounted to half a knight's fee, which the 
mafter of the knights-temple held of Hugh Lovel as in fee de Mortaigne 1 9 Edw. I.' 

34 Henry VIII. that King granted the reftory of Lopen' to the dean and chapter of 
<he cathedral church at Briftol, to be held to them and their fucceffors, of the crown in 
pure and perpetual alms.'' It is a curacy in the deanery of Crewkernej the Rev. John 
Templeman is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, which is dedicated to All-Saints, is fmall, being of one pace, and at the 
weft end has a fmall turret containing two bells. There are no memorials worth notice. 

In this parifh there is a confiderable manufadture of dowlas. 

Lib. Domefday. 'Ibid. ' Rot. Pip. 14 Joh. " See page iig. ' Efc. |' Petit, in Pari. 2 Ed. III. 
« PAt.joEIiz.p. 16. !" Mon. Angl. ii, 551. ' Lib. Fcod. " Pat. 34 Hen. VIII. p. 10. 

SEVINGTON, 



®outb=lPctbertonO [ 123 ] 

SEVINGTON, 

Anciently Seofenemptotit Seovenamentone, Sevenehanlane, and Sevenemelone. 

OF this name there are feveral places in this neighbourhood adjoining each other, 
of which SEVINGTON-ST.-MICHAEL, fo called from the dedication of its 
church, ftands northweft from the parifli of Lopen laft defcribed, and in the road from 
Ilminfter to Yeovil. 

Of this place Robert earl of Morton was lord at the time of the Conqueft. 

" Malger holds of the Earl, Sevenehantune. Alward held it in the time of 
" King Edward, and gelded for feven hides. The arable is feven carucates. Thereof 
" in demefne are five hides and a half, and there are three carucates, and fix fcrvants, 
" and eight villanes, and feven cottagers, with three ploughs. There is a mill of five 
" /hillings rent, and forty acres of meadow. It was worth eight pounds, now one 
" hundred fhillings. 

" From this manor are taken away ten acres of wood, and twenty-five acres of moor 
" and meadow, and arc in Sudperet the King's manor.'" 

The following record feems more applicable to the place now diftinguifhed by the 
name of Sevington-St. -Mary: 

" Siward holds Sevenemetone. In the time of King Edward it gelded for three 
" hides. The arable is three carucates. In demefne is one carucate, and two villanes, 
" and three cottagers, and two fervants, and eight acres of meadow. It is worth three 
" pounds."" 

It appears from fubfequent evidences that the manor of Sevenhampton was held after 
the Conqueft by the family of de Vallibus or Vaux, and that it came in the time of 
Henry III. by the marriage of Maud the daughter of Hubert de Vaux, to Thomas de 
Multon, a great baron in thofe days, whofe great-grandfon Thomas de Multon ob- 
tained of Edw. II. a charter of free-warren in this his manor of Sevenhampton, and in 
Pinhoe in the county of Devon." i Ric. II. Sir John Streche, knt. is certified to hold 
ten knights' fees in Afhill and Sevenhampton, cum membris, of Hugh Courtney earl of 
Devon.*" Which faid knights' fees were held by Thomas Courtney earl of Devon, 
defcendant of the faid Hugh, 36 Henry VI.' 9 Henry VI. Cecilia the widow of 
Sir William Cheyney, knt. held the manor of Sevenhampton-Vaus of Lord Zouch, as 
of his manor of Caftle-Cary, in focage. She died that year, leaving Elizabeth and 
Anne her fifters and next heirs,*^ Which Elizabeth becoming the wife of Sir John 
Colefhill, knt. conveyed the manor of Sevenhampton into his family, in which it con- 
tinued fomedme. 20 Henry VI. Sir Humphrey Stafford, knt. held at his deadi the 
manor of Sevejihampon-Tieneys of the King in chief, leaving Avicia the wife of Sii" 
James de Ormond, knt. his coufin and heir.* 22 Edw. IV. that King granted- the 

• Lib. Domefday. " Ibjd. ' Cart. 10 Ed. II. n. 21. " Lib. Feod. ' Ibid. ' Efc. • Ibid. 

R 2 manor 



SEVINGTON-ST .-MICHAEL. [@OUtl)#etIjetton» 

manor of Sevenhampton-Deneys to the abbey of Glaftonbury, in confideration of two 
hundred and forty acres of land which the abbot had ceded to the King for the en- 
largement 6f his park at Blagdon in the county of Dorfet." 

The manor of Sevington-St.-Michael now belongs to the college of Winchefter. 
The livin*^, valued in 1292 at ten marks,' is arcftory in the deanery of Crewkerne. 
and in the patronage of Earl Poulett. The Rev. Henry Stambury is the prefent 
incumbent. 

The church is a fmall low ftruaure of one pace, having a wooden turret containing 
three bells at the weft end. In the chancel lies the effigy in ftone of fome unknown 
perfon. 

" Pat. 22 Ed. IV. p. 2, m. 14. '' Taxat. Spiritual. 



SEVINGTON-ST. -MARY 

LIES to the weftward of Sevington-St.-Michael, and contains about My htfCifts. 
forty of which are difperfed about the church, and ten compofe a Wthing half a 
mile eaftward, called S^ingtm- Abbots, from its having belonged to the abbey ^ 
Athelney King Cnut by his charter without date gave to Goo and St. Feter, and the 
abbot and convent of Athelney, two manfes, or one perch of land, in a place commonly 
railed Seofenempton, on condition that they the faid abbot and monks fhould offer up 
pfalms and prayers to God for his evil deeds, that after death he miglit by their pious 
interceffions be admitted into the kingdom of heaven.^ To this fnoall donation accrued 
In a Ihort time divers others ; fo that in the time of Edward the Confeffor the abbots 
eftates in Sevenhampton were affeffed at the proportion of two hides, or between two 
and three hundred acres. The fame was its amount at the time of the Conquelt. 

" The church kfelf holds Seovenamxktoni. In the time of King Edward it 
« gdded for two hides. The arable is two carucates, afid there are with it feven vil- 
« lanes, and three cottagers, and two fervants. There are fix acres of meadow. It is 
" worth thirty {hillings."" . 

One of the abbots buik a chapel in this place, which contmned tifl the d?ffolutiOft 
of monafteries. 

The living of Sevington-St.-Mary is a curacy in the deanery of Crewkerne, and 
gift of Earl Poulett. The Rev. Thomas Allen is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is of one pace, and has at the weft end an «nbattled tower oontaining 

three bells. , .^ -r. « 

• Regift. Abbat, de Athelnef . J L** Domefdsy. 

SHEPTON- 



€)OUt!)'-lpetf)ctton.] [ 125 ] 



T 



SHEPTON-BEAUCHAMP. 

HIS is a confiderable parilh, lying on the weftern fide of Sonth-Pethcrton, tn a 
^ rich, flat, and inclofcd country. A fpring rifing in the centre of the parifti forms 
a rivulet, which, uniting with another from a fpring in the hamlet of West-Cross, 
there turns a grift-miU. The number of houfcs in this parifh is eighty-five. The 
place derived its additional name from the barons Beauchamp its ancient lords; at the 
Conqueft it belonged to the Earl of Morton: 

« The Earl himfelf holds Scbptone. Algar held it in the time of King Edward, 
« and gelded for fix hides. The arable is four carucates. Of this in demefne are four 
« hides, wanting half a virgate, and there is one carucate and a half; and three fcrvaiits 
« and nine viUanes, and three cottagers, and fifteen acres of meadow. It was worth 
« one hundred fhillings, now four pounds."" 

The Lords Beauchamp, of Hatch, being foon afterwards enfeoffed of this manor, it 
became part of that barony, and was held of the King in chief by the fervice of half a 
knight's fee." Of this noble and ancient family notice having been already taken,' it 
only remains to fay, that this manor continued in their name and pofleffion till the latter 
end of the reign of Edw. III. when John Beauchamp dying without ilTue, it became 
the property of Cecily his filler and coheirefs, who was firft married to Roger Seymour, 
and afterwards to Richard Turbervillc, of Bere-Regis in the county of Dorfet. Which 
Cecily bore on her feal, 47 Edw. III. cheeky, being the arms of Turberville her fecond 
hufband ' She died 17 Ric. II. feized of this manor of Shepton-Beauchamp and the 
advowfon of the church, leaving Roger Seymour, fon of Sir Wilham Seyniour, her 
grandfon and heir,' anccftor of the Seymours dukes of Somerfet. In the fchedule of 
%it eftates of Edward duke of Somerfet, the proteftor, this manor is certified to be of 
the yearly value of 37I. I2S. i|d.' This manor was the property of the late Robert 
Child, efq. 

The benefice is reftorial, and was valued in 1 292 at ten marks.' The patronage is 
in the lord of the manor; the Rev. Heniy Kewmin is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, which ftands on a rifing ground, is a handfome ftrufture of ftonc 
brought from Ham-hill, and of excellent mafonry. It confifts of a nave, chancel, north 
and fouth ailes, and at the weft end is a well-built embattled tower feventy feet high, 
with a clock, chimes, and fix mufxcal bells. In the weft front of the tower ftands the 
ftatue of St. Patrick with his crofier. In the chancel are tliree arches nfuig one above 
the other, and vulgarly called the Three tabernacles. 
On a black tabtotis tht following account of donations left to this parilh: 
« Thomas Rich, of London, gent, left fnc acres of land within the parifti of Merriot 
ferthe inftruftion of twelve poor children. 

? Lib.Domefday. » Lib. Feod. 'Vol.i.p.44. 'Cart.Antiq. f Efc. 

' MS. Valor. « Taxat. SpirUual. ^^ Hcnrv 



,26 SHEPTON-BEAUCHAMP. [^outi)#et|)ettom 

" Henry Werrott, of this parifli, gent, left one hundred pounds, the intereft of which 
is to be applied to the binding poor children apprentices. 

" William Palfry, of London, gent, left eight pounds four Ihilllngs and four-pence 
yearly, papble out of an eftate at Curry-Rivel to the fecond poor. 

« William Drew and John Cogan, gents, gave three pounds yearly to the fecond 
poor, payable out of the manor of Cheddington. 

" William Glanfield, of this parilh, gent, left nine acres of land within the parifh of 
South-Petherton, for binding out poor boys apprentices. 

" Mrs. Elizabeth Morgan, of this parilh, left two hundred pounds, the intereft of 
which is to be applied to the inftruftion and apprenticing out fix poor boys." 

In this parifli is a large ancient houfe, the property of Thomas Grofvenor, efq. 



WHITESTANTON. 

THIS parifh lies at the fouthweft extremity of the county, being thi-ee miles north- 
weft from Chard, and eleven eaft from Honiton in Devonlhire. It is fituated in 
a valley nearly furrounded by hills, and in a very rough uneven traft of country. 
There is a great deal of wafteland. The inclofed parts are nearly equally divided be- 
tween pafture and tillage, and in general good. There are feveral fine woods, con- 
taining principally oak timber. A fine fpring, having its rife near the church, forms a 
rivulet which runs into Yarcombe river within the confines of Devon. The houfes 
here are thinly fcattered and very mean, there being many cottages or huts of only 
one floor, and a fingle room for a family. The country abounds with the digitalis, or 
red large fox-gloves, which generally grow in the hedges of the inclofures, but are alfo 
fo thick in fome parts of the wafte, as to rhake the hills appear red at a diftance like a 
field of poppies. 

There are feveral parts of this neighbourhood which have the prasnomen o( white or 
whitty fuch as this parifh of White-Stanton, White-Lackington, White-Crofs, White- 
Down, a difcrimination they feem primarily to have derived from the faint White, who, 
together with St. Rayn, (according to William of Worcefter') was buried in a chapel 
upon the plain near Crewkerne. 

The original name of this place was Stantme, and it is thus defcribed in the Norman 
furvey as parcel of the poffeflions of Robert earl of Morton : 

*' Anfger holds Stantune of the Earl. Alward held it in the time of King 
*• Edward, and gelded for three hides. The arable is eight carucates. In dcmefne is 

• P. 163, 

" one 



mm'^tmnon,} WHITESTANTON. 127 

" one carucate and a half, and fix fervants, and eighteen villanes, and four cottagers, 
" with three ploughs and a half. There is a mill not rated, and two hundred and fixty 
"acres of wood, and fifty acres of pafturc. It renders four blomes of iron. It is 
" worth fixty fliillings."" 

A defcendant of the laft Earl of Morton feems to have been fettled at this place, and 
to have aflumed its name. In the time of Henry II. Robert de Stantone held two 
knights' fees of Walter Brito or Brett,' which Walter Brett had this manor by the 
grant of the crown, and was progenitor of a refpecflable family who pofleflcd it till the 
beginning of the prefent century. To which Robert de Stantone fucceeded William, 
Henry, John, and John de Stantone; which laft was living in the time of Edw. II. 
and had for his arms a chevron between three lions' heads erafcd.'' To him fucceeded 
another John, and to him William de Staunton, who was lord of the manor of White- 
Staunton 3 Ric. II.' 

The Bretts, its chief lords, were a family of much repute, and produced many perfons 
of eminence both in politicks and literature. Richard Brett, fon of Robert Brett of 
this place, was one of the tranflators of the bible now ufed in our churches and private 
families; he was well verfed in the Latin, Greek, Hebrew, Chaldaick, Arabick, and 
Ethiopian languagesj and publilhed feveral books of hiftory, biography, and criticifm. 
He died in 1637, and was buried at Quainton in Buckinghamlhire, of which parifh he 
was redtor.' Henry Brett, the reprefentative of this ancient family, fold this manor 
with the advowfon of the church to Sir Abraham Elton, bart. whofe defcendant Ifaac 
Elton, of Stapleton in the county of Gloucefter, efq; is the prefent pofleflbr. 

The living is a redtory in the deanery of Crewkerne, and in the gift of the lord of 
the manor. The Rev. James Knott is the prefent incumbent. 

This benefice was in 1292 valued at eight marks.^ 

The church, which is dedicated to St. Andrew, confifts of a nave, chancel, and north 
and fouth ailes. At the weft end is a ftrong well-built embattled tower, having a turret 
at one corner, and five bells. 

In the fouth aile is an old ftone tonnb, with the following coats, but no infcription : 
viz. I. Cheeky. 2. Three lozenges in fefle. 3. A chevron between three rofes. 
4. Effaced. 

On a black ftone in the wall: " In this ifle lyethe buried Margaret Brett, one of 

the daughters and coheirs of Hugh Ratcliff, efq; and wife of John Brett, efq; lord of 
this manor of Whitftanton, who died the 22d day of Februarie 1582, and here refteth in 
the affured hope of the joyful refurreftion." Arms, Argent, a lion rampant between five 
crofs-croflets fitchee gules : Brett. Impaling, Argent, a bend engrailed /able : RatclifF. 

" In this ifle lyethe buried Mary Morgane, eldeft daughter of John Brett, efq; and 
and Margaret his wife, lord of this manor of Whitftanton, and wife of Chriftopher 



» Lib. Doraefday. • Lib. Nig. Scac. i. 99. " Seals from ancient Deeds. • Efc. 

' Athen. Oxon. i. 608. « Taxat. Spiriiu-il. 



Morgane, 



128 



WHiTESTANTON. [^outi)^ii?eti)erton. 



Morgane, of Maperton, efq; who died the 4th day of Januarie 1582, and here refteth 
in the affured hope of the joyful refiirreftion." Arms, Argent^ on a bend zoixit^. Jable^ 
a fleur-de-lis between two cinquefoils gules: Morgan, impaling Brett. 

In the floor on a grave-ftone:- " Here lyeth the body of Alexander Brett, efqj 

who died the firft day of July, A. D. 167 1, aetatis fuse 38." 




THE 



■ -t 



[ 129 ] 

«^4fgr»4fr^ii|i> »t\ »%i n%\ n%\ *i|>4t|»«t t» «i t > »t t« "t > '» t> "> ' ^^«*fef<*| mt t »t i > M| r 

THE HUNDRED 

O F 

PITNEY. 



THIS is a fmall traft of land lying in the fouthern part of the county; and 
wafhed by the rivers Ivel and Parret, which divide it into two portions^ 
It contains the ancient borough and market-town of Langport, and two 
other parilhes. 



PITNEY, 

FROM which the hundred derived its name, and where the courts were ufiially Held,, 
is a village very pleafantly fituated on the weft fide of Somerton, and to tlie north 
of the road leading from that town to Langport, in a fine vale embofomed in a grove 
of elms. A rivulet rifing at the eaft end of the parifh paflTes through it to the river at 
Langport. This parilh is divided, both with regard to property and locality, into 
three parts; the village and manor of Pitney; the ancient hamlet of Beer; and the 
hamlet and manor of Wearn, fituated fouthweft near Huifli-Epifcopi. 

The manor of Pitney, or Petenie, was partly ancient demefne of the crown, as wc 
learn from the following furvey: 

" The King holds Petenie. In the time of King fedward it gelded for one hide,. 
** The arable is one carucate and a half. Hunfi-id holds dicre half a hide, and has one 
*' plough, and fix acres of meadow, and three acres of wood. It was and is worth 
" twenty fhillings. What the King has there is worth ten fliillings."* 

* Lib. Domefday. 

Vot. IIL S In 



130 PITNEY. [Pimcg. 

In the time of Henry III. Pitney was the pofleffion of Henry L'Orti, from whom 
and his defcendants it had the name of Titney-Lorti. i\ of that reign the faid Henry 
and Sabina his wife, who was the daughter of Richard Revel, baron of Curry-Rivel, 
paid twenty fliilHngs and one gofhawk into the King's exchequer for the lands which 
they held in Pitney and Wearn, parcel of the manor of Somerton.'' To which Henry 
fucceeded Sir Henry de L'Orti, knt. (during whofe minority this manor was held by Sir 
Eubulo de Montibus}') and to him Sir John de L'Orti, who was twice knight of the 
fhirefor this county m the time of Edw. III. Which Sir John about 13 Edw. III. 
gave the manor of Pitney to Sir Ralph de Middleney, knt. in marriage with his filler 
Elizabeth,'' who died feized of the fame and the advowfon of the church 35 Edw. III. 
without iflfue." Elizabeth his faid wife furviving him, married to her fecond hufband 
Sir Robert de Afhton, knt. who in her right held the manor and hundred of Pitney 
with the advowfon of the church, and all other appertenances thereto, of the King in 
chief by the fervice of paying yearly to the Kin^ by the hands of the fherifF twenty 
lliillings, or in lieu thereof a goihawk at the feaft of St. Michael.' He died 7 Ric. II. 
and in the inquifition taken after his deceafe it is faid that his heir was uncertain, but to 
an eftate in Dorfetfhire, Ralph Cheneye and Morris Rufiell are found to be the heirs 
of the fiid Sir Robert de Afhton. But it is evident that neither of them pofTeffed this 
manor; for it appears by another inquifition that Sir Robert de Afhton had a fecond 
wife, whofe name was Phillippa, who furviving "him was afterwards married to Sir 
John Tiptot, knt. and held this manor with the advowfon of the church for the term of 
her lifc.^ After her death one moiety of the faid manor, hundred, and advowfon, 
defcended to Elizabeth the wife of John Andrew, fifter and heir of Maud the wife of 
John Langeryche, and one of the fillers and heirs of Hugh Lorty, a defcendant of the 
barons L'Orti; and the other moiety of the manor, hundred, and advowfon, became 
the property of Elizabeth the wife of John Gunter, the other furviving fifter, and heir 
of the faid Hugh Lorty.*" After the death of Elizabeth the wife of John Andrew 
' abovementioned, tlie whole manor of Pitney-Lorti, and its appertenances, became 
veiled in the family of Gunter, of whom Roger Gunter died 15 Henry VI. in poffefTion 
hereof, leaving John his fon and heir.' This John died 13 Edw. IV. feized of the 
manor of Pitney-Lorti, and the advowfon of the church ; as alfo of the manor of KnoUe, 
which had defcended with Pitney from Sir John de L'Orti in the time of Edw. III. 
and was held under the abbey of Athelney; in all which he was fucceeded by Vv'illiam 
his brother and heir.'' Which William died i Ric. III. and had for his fuccefibr 
Edmund Gunter,' who bore for his arms. Sable, three gauntlets argent.'^ Hence it 
pafTed to other families, and in the time of Philip and Mary was the property of 
Robert Morton, who fold the manor of Pitney-Lorti to the family of Popham." It is 
now the property of John Pyne', efq. 

The manor of Wparn, called alfo Pitney-Wearn, has no other diflinftion in the 
Korman furvey than the following: 

' Rot. Pit). 21 Hen. III. « Rot. Pip. 41 Hen. III. * Cart. Antiq. ' Efc. 

' Efc, ' Cart. Antiq. " Inq. Som. 5 Hen. V. ' Efc. » Lib. Feod. 

' Efc. " Seals from ancient Deeds. ° Licence to alienate. 

" Robert 



IPitne?.] 



T N 



Y. 



i3» 



*' Robert de Odburuile holds of the King in Warne two virgates and a half of land, 
" which never gelded. The arable is half a' carucate. There is one cottager with one 
" fervant. It is worth fifteen (hillings. It was wafte when he received it."° 

The lands of this Robert de Auberville In this county came to William de Wrothain, 
and after him to the family of Plugenet, from whom the village of Wearn obtained 
the appellation of IVearn-Plucknet. Its next pofleflbrs were the family of Haddon. 
10. Edw. III. Henry Haddon held the manors of Putteney and Werne-Plukenet of 
the King by the fervice of a pair of gilt fpurs, or fix-pence for all fervices.'' He died 
that fame year, and Eleanpr his wife furviving him had this manor for her dower.' 
By the faid Eleanor he had ifllie a daughter, Amice, who was married to Sir William 
Fitzwarren, who pofi^efied this manor in her right; and after him it came to John 
Fitzwarren, whofe heirefs brought it to the Chidiocks of Dorfetfhire. This portion 
of Pitney has long been in the pofleffion of the Earls of Northampton. 

The living of Pitney is a redtory, and a peculiar in the deanery of Ilchefter. John 
Pyne, efq; is the patron, and the Rev. John Michell is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, which ftands at the north end of the village on a rifing ground, is dedi- 
cated to St. John the Baptift, and confifts of a nave, chancel, fouth aile, and tower 
containing four bells. 

In the chancel floor a flat ftone commemorates Cannanvell Bernard, M. A. minifter 
of this place forty-four years, who died Nov. 9, A. D. 1668. Another is to the 
memory of the Rev. Dr. Edmund Lovell, who was likewife reftor here, and died 
Nov. 12, A. D. 1721. 



? Lib. Domefday, 



' Nom. tenent. in cap. Com. Somerfet. 



' Efc. 35 Ed. III. 



A N 



O R 



THE river Parret, foon after its junftion with the Ivel, vifits the ancient town of 
Langport, the name whereof being compounded of the Saxon words Lanj, fro- 
lixus, and Poj^, ofpidum, originally arofe from its uncommon length of building. It 
was anciently very large, and is faid to have been moated round j but at prefent no 
veftiges of fortification are difcernible, and it confifts chiefly of two ftreets, the principal 
of which is called IVeJl-ftreet, being the road to Taunton and other places wcftvvard. 
It is divided into two parts, denominated Langport-Eajlo'oer, and Langpcrt-JVeJlover, in 
regard of their oppofite fituations ; and ftands moflJy upon a fmall afccnt, having a 
traft of rich level champain on the north, weft, and fouth, with two large commons and 
a moor weftrward, containing about one hundred and forty acres of fine rich meadow 
land, which from the circumftance of its being depaftured in common and without 

S a intcrruptioa 



«, 



,3» 






13-2 ^ L A N G P O R T. [l^itncg, 

interruption by the cattle of all the adjoining parifhes, is denominated Common Moor. 
Another piece of land of finnilar defcription, containing about feventy acres, called 
Vag^-Common, lies between this town and Sonnerton, but is not of equal goodnefs with 
the former. No lord of any adjoinir^g manor has right of foil in either of thefe pieces 
of land J but the neighbouring inhabitants of all defcriptions, by long cuftom, affert 
the liberty both of building and feeding their cattle thereon, when and in what manner 
they pleafer The Parret, navigable here for large barges, crofTes the lower part of 
Weft-ftreet, and has over it a flone bridge of nine arches; a branch or outlet of the 
fame river crofies the fame ftreet near the Town -hall, under another bridge of two 
arches, and mixes with the main ftream at the diftance of about two furlongs below. 
The fall of the river hence to Boroughbridge is only one inch in a mile, and from 
Boroughbridge to Bridgvyater it is one inch and a quarter. From the level of King's- 
Sedgmoor to the bed of the river, the fall is fifteen feet. A court of the commiflioners 
of the fewers is held here quarterly. 

The town of Langport was anciently more celebrious than now. In the time of 
Xing William the Conqueror it was a royal burgh, and had in it thirty-four refident 
burgefles, who, under the firm of the manor of Somerton, paid a rent of fifteen fhillings 
to the King. There were two fifiicries on the river, which belonged to the borough, 
and pr.id a rent of ten' fhillings; and the whole revenue of the place was rated at 
791^105. 7d. per annum,' a very large fum in thofe days. Nor did the Kings of Eng- 
land think ?it to part with fo defirabie an eftate till the time of Ric. I. who, finding 
■occafion for baronial aid, gave it with feveral other eftates in the neighbourhood to Sir 
Richard Revel, knt. who procured a charter for the town, and is faid to have built a 
caftle here."" From him the manor and borough defcended by an heir female to the 
L'Orti's; and in fucceeding times, by virtue of the franchife obtained by Revel, the 
, manor and town of Langport-Eaftover, and Langport-Weftover, were held in free- 
burgage by the Earls of Salifbury,'the Marquis of Dorfet, and the Earl of Hertford: 
and in the time of Queen Elizabeth, Hugh Sexey, efq; being lord of Langport-Eaft- 
over, left tlie fame in truft to feoffees, who fetded it on the hofpital at Brewton. Which 
manor, called fometimes by the name of the Out-Manor, or Mamrium-forinjeciimi is 
now held under a referved rent to Brewton by Sir Richard Colt Hoare, bart. whole 
uncle purchafed it of Lady Northampton, widow of the Lord Berkeley. 

But the manor intrinjecal belongs to the portreve and the corporation, which confifls 
of twelve burgefies, who have the royalty of the river, and a variety of other powers 
and liberties annexed to burghal tenures. The mofl ancient arms of this town was an 
embattled and crennellated tower; thofe afterwards ufed were only a portcullis." It 
thrice fent members to parliament. 

It was the intention of King Heniy I. to have erefted in this town a very fplendid 

and large monafterv;'' but he altered his defign, and tranflated his munificence to the 

town of Reading in Berklhire, where the ruins of his flately abbey are ftill feen. It 

does not appear that there were any religious houfes in the town, fave only a houfe or 

hofpital of poor lepers, dedicated to St. Maiy Magdalen. This was founded before 
> 

' Lib- Domefday, Vide Somerton. ? Cart. Antiq. ' Ancient Seals, and Town-piece. ^ Lei. Itin. ii. 92. 

the 



3p>imC5.] L A N G P O R T. ijy 

the year 1310, when Bifhop Drokensford granted the lepers here a brief to colled 
alms throughout his diocefe for their fupport." An indulgence alfo was granted, by 
Richard Metford bifliop of Sali/bury, to the benefacftors of this hofpital/ 

The living of Langport, being vicarial, is united with that of Huifli, and both form a 
peculiar of the archdeacon of Wells. The Rev. John Michell is the prefent incumbent. 

The church (lands on an eminence at the eaft end of the town, and is dedicated to 
All-Saints, confiding of a nave, chancel, north and fouth ailes, and two chapels, and a 
vellry-room (formerly a confelTional) in ruins.* There is a good tower at the weft 
end, in which are five bells ; on the weft fide of it are fouv large niches, which formerly 
contained ftatues long fince gone. 

The fouth chapel was built (as it is faid) by the family of Heme or Heron, one of 
whom lies buried here under a large ftone-tomb covered with grey marble : the brafs- 
plates which contained the infcription are ftript off, and the arms defaced ; but in all 
the three windows are thefe arms: Per fefle argent and Jable, a pale counterchanged, 
three herons of the firft. In the fouth window, i. On a roundle gules a hernftiaw 
argent. 1. Sable, three fwords in pile argent: Pawlct. 

In the eaft window of the north chapel is the figure of St. Ambrofe, and thefe arms, 
viz. Argent, a fefiTe nebulee gules, furmounted by a bend or; impaling argent a chevro^ 
gtdes between three acorns or. 

In the north windows of the chancel are the figures of the Virgin Mary, St. Gabriel, 
St. Elizabeth, St. Clement, St. Catherine, and others. 

Againft the north wall is a fmall monument of black and white marble, infcribed, 
" Juxta in progenitorum fepulchro jacct Johannes Michell, vir fumma humanitate, et 
incorrupta fide infignis. Qui turn in arte chirurgica, tftn in medicamentaria, multum 
verfatus, affliftis nodle dicque, quam maxime potuit, opem ferebat. Omnibus quibus 
innotuit flebilis occidit Jan. 12, A. D. 176 1, astatis 40. Uxor moerens tam chari con- 
jugis defiderio, in ejus memoriam hoc monumentum erexit." Arms, Gules, a chevron 
between three fwans argent. 

At the entrance of the chancel, on another fmall monument of black and white 

marble: " Infra fepukus eft Johannes Michell, A. M. hujus ecclefiie vicarius, qui 

Martij die 28° Anno Domini 1744°, aetat. fuse 52° deceflit." 

A little to the eaft of the church is a fmall old building, vulgarljr called the Hanging- 
Chapel, in which is kept a free-fchool founded by Thomas Gilkt, of Compton-Paunce- 
fort, in the laft century. The road to Yeovil pafl"es under the arched gateway of this 
ftnifture, which on this fide gives the place at entrance the appearance of a fortified 
town. Its military tranfaftions however have been few, and we have little recorded 
in this refpeft, if we except the hoftilities of the laft century; when, July 10, 1645, a 
brigade of Lord Goring's army, being ftationed here to guard a pafs, were overpowered 
by the rebels, and forced to a diforderly retreat with the lofs of three hundred mea 

' Archer. ' HaxU MS. 862, p. ijJ. * 1785* 

killed 






Mi. 



134 L A N G P O R T. [Pitnep* 

killed and taken. In this aflion Sir John Digby received a wound, of* which he Ihortly 
after died.'' 

This town has a market on Saturday, and four fairs, viz. the fecond Monday in Lent, 
Old-Midfummer, Michaelmas, and St. Martin's daysj and gave title of Baron to 
Charles Lord Berkeley of Rathdown. 

'' Mercurius Belgicu;, p. 49. 



M U C H E L N E Y, 
,0r. The Great Island ; 

SO called by reafon of its being inclofed between the rivers Ivel and Parret,' and its 
being frequently infulated by the ftagnant waters of the furrounding moors, is a 
parifli two miles fouth from Langport, confifting of the village of its name, in which 
are about thirty houfes; the hamlet of Thorney fouthwardj and Muchelney-Ham 
eaftward, each containing nine houfes. 

The village of Muchelney is rendered memorable for its very ancient and rich abbey, 
founded by Athclftan, king of the Weft-Saxons, A. D. 939. That king, in the earlier 
part of his reign, having given too implicit credit to certain falfe infinuations of the 
defign of his brother Edwin againft his life, caufed him to be fent with only one atten- 
dant in an open boat into the ftormy fea, where he perifhed in the waves. Repenting 
afterwards of this ralh and cruel aftion, he is faid, by way of penance, to have Ihut 
himfelf up in a cell at Langport for feven years ; and at the expiration of that term, as 
an atonement for his crime, to have founded in the adjacent village of Muchelney an 
abbey of Benedidine monks, which he dedicated to the honour of St. Peter and St. 
Paul. To this foundation, which by fome is afcribed to King Ina, many monarchs 
were benefaftors both before and after the Norman Conqueft. At that period, as 
appears by the general furvey, the abbey was poffefled of the following territories : 

" The church of St. Peter of Micelenye holds four carucates of land, which never 
" gelded, in thefe three iflands, Michelenie, Mideleme, and Torleie. Theie are in demefne 
" two carucates, and one arpent [or acre] of vineyard. There are four fervants, and 
" three villanes, and eighteen cottagers, with two ploughs. There are two fifheries 
" which produce fix thoufand eelsj and twenty-five acres of meadow, and twelve acres 
" of wood, and one hundred acres of pafture. 1 1 was and is worth three pounds."'' 

* " The firft upon the right, as from her fource, doth make 
" Large Muchelney an ifle." Polyolbion, p. 48. 

1 . 1 * Lib. Domefday. Their 



ptnep.l M U C H E L N E Y. 135 

Their other lands in this county, as recited in the fame record, were Cipcftable, 
[Chipjlaple] Ileminftre, [Ilminfter'\ Ifle, [^IJle-Mbots'] Draitune, [Drayton] Camelle, 
[IVeft-Camel] and Cathangre, [^Cathanger] in the parifh of Fivchead. Befides which 
the abbot and convent had afterwards the manor of DownheacT, Middle-Chilcombe, 
Weft-Earnlhill, and Eaft-Earn(hill j lands ifi Drayton, Burton, Here, Ilford, Ilminfter, 
Martock, and otlier places;' with the churches of Muchelney, Chipftaple, Somerton, 
Ide-Abbots, Fivehead, Merriot, Ilminfter, and the chapel of Drayton.** 12 Heniy II. 
the abbot certified to the King that he, in like manner with his predeceflbrs in the mona- 
ftery, held his lands by the fcrvice of one knight's fee, which fee was then partly held 
by Richard Revel, and partly by Margaret daughter of Ralph Tabucl." In the time 
of King John the abbot was by an order from the crown difpoflrefled of his lands and 
chattels, and gave three marks of gold to have reftoration of the abbey and its poflef- 
fions.' 14 Henry III. the abbot paid three marks for one knight's fee, to the aid for 
the King's firft paflage into Britanny,' and 38 Henry III. the fame fum to the aid for 
making the King's eldeft fon a knight.'" In the taxation of Pope Nicholas temp. Edw. I. 
the abbot's revenues in Muchelney were valued at feven pounds fourteen fliillings.' 

Of this monaftery the King was always patron j and the abbots were fummoned to 
the convdcation. 

Richard was abbot in 1201. 

Walter, 1248. 4 

"William de Givele, 1 274. 

John de Hentone, 1304. He died June 9, 1334/ 

John de Somerton was confirmed July 19, 1334. 

Thomas de Overton, 1353 and 1368. 

William de Shepton, 1375 and 1387. 

John de Bruton, 1399 and 1432. 

John de Charde was eledbed in 1432. IIe"was canon of Wells, and prebendary of 
the prebend of Ilminfter.'' He died Sept. 10, 1463. 

Thomas Pipe,ele(5ted Sept. 21, 1463. There were fourteen rnonks then in the abbey.' 
William de Crewkerne occurs abbot 1465, 1467, and 1468." • 

John Bracey was at the eledion of John Gunthrop, dean of Wells, 1472. He died 
May 16, 1490. 

William de Wick fucceeded June 15, 1490. Fifteen monks were then in the 
abbey, and two abfcnr. He died in the month of Oftober 1504. 
Thomas Broke was confirmed Jan. 21, 1504, and died in 1522. 

' Cart. Antiq. '' Taxat.' Spiritual. ' Lib. Nig. Scac. i. 89. ' Mag. Rot. 3 Joh. 

« Ibid. 14 Hen. III. " Ibid. 38 Hen. III. ' Taxat. Temporal. 

" Adam de Domerham in Prefat. p. xxx. 

* Archer's account of Religious Houfes ; in Walter Hemingfbrd's Chronicle, 6ii. 

" Adaro de Domerham, ut fopra. 

John 



136 M U C H E L N E Y. Wittlt^* 

John Scherborne was ele£led 00:. lo, and confirmed Nov. 6, 1522. 

Thomas Yve was the laft abbot," who with Richard Cofcob, prior, John Montague, 
and eight others, fubfcribed to the fupremacy July 2, 1534, and afterwards to the 
furrender Jan. 3, 1539. In 1553, there remained in charge of annuities 61.° 

The revenues of tWis abbey were in 1444 valued at 97I. 3s. 4d. and 1534, at 447I. 
5s.'' 30 Henry VIII. the King granted to Edward earl of Hertford the monaftery 
and manor of Muchelney, with the manors of Drayton and Wefton, Middleney, Lang- 
port and Othery, Yarnhill, Weft-Camel, Downfhead, IIle-Abbots, Ilminfter, Ilcombe, 
Fivehead, Chipftaple, Ivell, Ilchefter, Milton, and Marfton, moft of them belonging 
to this monaftery.' The manor of Muchelney belongs now to Walter Long, efq. 
Another manor in tkis parifti is the property of Bethune, efq. 

Tlife abbey^, according to William of Worcefter, and a furvey taken juft after the 
diflblution, was a large and fine ftrudure; the church was one hundred and fifty-fix 
feet long, and forty-five feet broad j the length of the cloifter was eighty-one feet, the 
breadth fifty-ofte feet; there was a chapel in it dedicated to the blelled Virgin Mary/ 
It ftood adjoining to the prefent church-yard; the buildings are now moftly taken down, 
and the remaining part converted into a farm-houfe, ftill diftinguifhed by the appel- 
lation of the abbey. Moft of the houfe and offices now ftanding have an ancient 
appearance, being in the Gothick ftile, with battlements, fine arched windows, ftone 
ilair-cafes, and large quoins. In feveral of the windows there are the fragments of 
what once was finely painted glafs. In the adjoining orchard the foundations of the 
ancient ftrufture may eafily be traced to a great extent. It is furrounded by old vene- 
rable elms, and feems to have been a place well adapted to retirement and religious 
contemplation. 

The cliurch of Muchelney was in 1292 valued at nine marks.' In 1308 there was 
an« ordination of the vicarage by Walter Hafellhaw bifhop of Bath and Wells, by 
which it was articled that the vicar for the time being fhould have all that houfe 
and curtillage, then occupied by Richard Baldewyne of Martock, vicar of the faid 
church, that he fhould have from the abbey cellar every day one of the monks' large 
loaves, and two pitchers of the beft conventual ale, and from the abbey kitchen 
twice a week, viz. Sundays and Tuefdays, a difh of meat; but the reft of the week 
only a difh of eggs or fifh, at the pleafure of the kitchen fbeward. The vicar and 
his fuccefTors were to receive yearly from the fexton of Muchelney for the time being, 
at the four ufual quarters of the year, four pounds of filver to defray charges; alfo 
all the money offered on fabbath-days, as well at Muchelney, as in the chapel at 
Drayton annexed thereto, as alfo all the money offered at funeral folemnities as well at 
firft as fecond mafsi alfo legacies left and mafs-pence offered for the deceafed; alfo all 
the bread, and eggs, and other oblations at the crofs on Whitfunday and Eafter-day, 
in the church at Muchelney, and the chapel of Drayton, as alfo all confeffional obla- 
tions and gifts at purifications. The abbot and convent to receive all tithes great 

" Archer, ut fupra. ' Willis's Hift. of Abbies, ii. 199. p Archer. ' Strachey's Lift, 661. 

' Itin. Willelm. de Worceftic, 150. = Taxat. Spiritual. 

and 



Ipimcpj 



M U C H E L N E Y. 



^17 



and fmall belonging both to Muchelney and Drayton, and every other perquifite not 
above lijecifiedj and the vicar to fuftain all epifcopal, archidiaconal, and other ordinary 
charges, befides archdeacon's procurations, and to find a proper chaplain to officiate in 
the chapel of Drayton. This ordination is dated at Chew Dec. a, A. D. 1308.' 

This vicarage lies in the deanery of Ilchefter. The dean and chapter of Briftol are 
patrons, and the Rev. Thomas Powell is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul, and confifts of a nave and chan- 
cel tiled, and north and fouth ailes leaded. At the weft end ftands an embatded tower, 
containing five bells. In fome of the windows are the remains of painted glafs, but 
little perfedl. In the fouth wall of the chancel are three niches or tabernacles. 

* Excerpt e Regilt. Wellen. Etiam in Appendice ad Prxfat. Ad. de Domerham. Hid. p. boxiii. 




1 



Vol. III. 



THE 



T^ 






[ 139 1 



■ ■a^.j^i.- jj^.. *'**. iA«. i Jaj. iJ*.- nJt. ij.> ia«..*<»^ i-a^.. «<«> »Ji> «^t..|Jjfc iitit ijij i^ifc iiBifc f 'tii i Jt> i Jifc4Jfc*^ 



THE HUNDRED 



O F 



P O R T B U R Y. 



THIS territory, lying at the very northernmoft extremity of the county, and 
in a very reclufe angle thereof, feems as it were a province of itfelf, and 
not continuous with that large tradt of country to which it really belongs; 
having the fea on the weft and north weft; and the river Avon, which 
divides it from Gloucefterftiire, on the eaft and northeaft; and being on the fouth 
fee ludedfrom the inland parts by a long and lofty ridge of mountain, extending from 
the intrenchments of IBUttO&HlOl on the Avon over againft the viUage of Clifton, 
to Clevedon-flats oppofite the coaft of Cardiff in South-Wales. The plain fouth- 
ward of this ridge was formerly a branch of the fea, which, according to unvaried 
tradition, waftied as high as the vale o( J/bton; but when its waters retired, thefe parts 
became moors, which are in wet feafons ftill covered with ftagnant water, and are deep 
and fwampy, like all fuch other parts of the coaft as have once been vifited and at 
length forfaken by the waters of the fea. 

This diftrid, being thus retired, and fortified on three fides by the fea and the river, 
and on the fourth by a natural embankment, was a moft advantageous Ipot for the 
Romans to exercife their arms, to defend themfelves againft the inroads of the inhabi- 
tants of the fouthern and eaftern countries, and to obferve the tranlaftions of the 
oppofite Tranfabrinians. One of their military ways (in many parts ftill plain and 
vifible) coming from Axbridge, and the Pouldon-Hills near Bridgwater, pafles tranf- 
verfcly through it towards the fea at Portiftiead, where was a paflage to Ifca-Silurum, 
now called Caerleorit in Monmouthftaire, the principal town tliey had on that fide of 
the water. 

Ta To 



140 PORTBURY HUNDRED. 

To this remote corner alfo tends that egregious boundary of the Belgick wamors, 
called Wanjdike, or IVanditch, which we have had fo frequent occafion to take notice 
of. Its courfe is direfted hither from the ancient fortification of Mays-Knoll in the 
tithing of Norton-Hautville foutlieaflward, whofe lofty weftern rampart feems to have 
been a poft of obfervation for all thefe parts. Defcending the hill it crofles Highridge- 
Common, where its trad is ftill vifible, and foon after thwarting the great weftern road 
from Briftol to Bridgwater, forms by its vallum a deep narrow lane overhung with 
wood and briars leading to Tanley-krttt in the parilh of Long- Afhton. From Yanley 
it traverfes the meadows to a lane anciently denominated from it JVondefdich-Lane, as 
appears from a deed dated at Afhton 3 Edw. II. wherein William Gondulph grants to 
Adam de Cloptone a cottage with a piece of land adjoining to it in Ayjlonejuxta Brijioll, 
fituated on the eaftern fide Venelle de JFondefdichJ" Here it crofles the Afhton road at 
Rayenes-Crojs, and afcending the hill, enters the hundred of Portbury in the parifh 
of Wraxall, and terminates at the ancient port of Portifhead abovementioned on the 
Severn fea. 

In the time of King Wilham the Conqueror the hundred of Portbury was certified 
to contain eighty-fix hides and a half, fixty-three of which with one yard-land were 
rated to the King; the reft was held by the barons, the Bifhop of Coutances, Ernulph 
de Hefding, and others." 14 Henry II. the ftierifF accounted one hundred fhiilings for 
murder committed in this hundred, which fum was paid out of it as an amerciament 
to the King.' 8 Edw. I. it was found by the inquifition taken after the deceafe of 
Maurice de Berkeley, that the faid Maurice held the out hundred of Portbury in chief 
of the King, and that his anceftors had holden the fame time out of memory.'' 

Some of the parifhes belonging to this hundred are fituated in the moors fouthward; 
the reft lie behind the hills towards the Briftol Channel, into which the river Avon, 
emptying itfelf at the very northernmoft point, forms by its conflux with the Severn an 
excellent road or ftation for fhips, called Kingroad. 

• Ex Autog. penes J. H. Smyth, baronet. ' Inq. Gbeldi. • Mag. Rot. 14 Hen. II. r. 10. b, * Efc. 




PORTBURY. 



jport&urg.] [ 141 [ 



PORTBURY. 

THIS place, which gives name to the hundred, and was in former times the prin- 
cipal town in all thefe parts, is fituated in the valley northward from that traft 
of mountain we have juft now fpoken of, and betwixt it and the harbour of Kingroad 
in the Briftol Channel. It was anciently a town of the Romans, as appears from the 
indubitable evidence'of coins of the Lower empire, and maflive foundations of old build- 
ings; and alfo from the Military way, which has been already mentioned, traverfing the 
hill hitherward from Axbridge. But perhaps we muft not give too implicit credit to 
thofe who affirm, without any very good foundation, that tliis was the ftation called 
Nidus, fet down as the next place to Bomium in the twelfth Iter of Antoninus.* Its 
prefent name is derived from the Saxon Pojit:, a Port, and Bupj, a fortified town, 
which is fufficiently expreflive of its ancient confequence, and countenances the tradition 
that the towns of Portbury and Portifhead were once joined, and that the latter was die 
port of this country before the city of Briftol had its being. 

Among the various donations which William the Conqueror made to his favourite 
Geffery bilhop of Coutances, the following manors are noted within this hundred : 
Porbcrie, [Portbury] Portejhe, [Portifhead] F.ftone, [Eafton in Gordano] JVerocoJak, 
£Wraxall] Weftone, [Wefton in Gordano] and Clotune, [Clapton in Gordano].'' Of 
which this manor of Portbury, being near Briftol the place of his refidence, and where 
he had the chief government of the caftle, was kept in his own hands, as we learn from 
the following record : 

" The Bifhop himfelf holds Porberie. Goduin held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for eight hides. The arable is eighteen carucates. In demefne 
*' are two carucates, and thirteen fervants, and twenty villanes, and ieventeen cottagers, 
" with fixteen ploughs. There are two mills of fix ftiilllngs rent, and one hundred and 
" fifty acres of meadow. Pafture feventeen furlongs long, and two furlongs broad. 
" Wood one mile long, and five furlongs broad. It was and is worth fifteen pounds-"" 

Thefe lands, having been given to the Bilhop of Coutances only for the term of his 
life, on his death in 1093 reforted to the crown, and were granted to Harding, a rich 
merchant, and governor of the city of Briftol, who came into this country, with the 
Conqueror, and was a fon of one of the kings of Denmark. This Harding was father 
of Robert, who, according to the ufage of thofe times, called himfelf Fitz-Harding, or 
the fon of Harding, and was alfo governor of Briftol, and one of thofe who aided" 
Maud the Emprefs and her fon Henry againft King Stephen, for which fervice he was 
by them created Lord Berkeley. He procured a weekly market for this place, and a fair 
yearly, and fometime refided here. His fon Maurice married Alice the daughter of 
Roger lord Berkeley of Durdey, and was progenitor of the feveral branches of the great 



* Vide Antonini Iter Britanniarum xii. Horfley's Britannia Roraana, 464, 465. 
» Sec Domefday Book. ■ Ibid. 



and 



142 PORTBURY. [JpOtt&Utp* 

and noble family of the Berkeleys, in which the manors of Portbury and Portiftiead 
continued for a long feries of defcents, till it became veiled in the family of Coke, of 
Holkham in Norfolk, into which two females of the houfe of Berkeley had inter- 
married. Of which family was Sir Edward Coke, knt. lord chief juftice of England in 
the time of James I. and from him defcended Thomas Coke, who in 1728 was created 
Baron Lovel of Holkham in Norfolk, and in 1744, Vifcount Coke and Earl of Lei- 
cefter. He married Margaret daughter and coheirefs of Thomas Tufton earl of 
Thanet, by whom he had iflfue an only fon Edward, who died without ifllie in 1753; 
and his father dying in 1759, the title became extinft; and the manors of Portbury and 
Portifhead, with the hundred of Portbury, defcended to Thomas Wenman Coke, of 
Holkham-hall in the county of Norfolk, efq; who in the year 1784 fold them to James 
Gordon, efq; the prefent poffefTor. 

An eftate in this parifh having been given by one of the Berkeley family to the 
Auguftin priory of Bromere in Hampfhire, a cell was here eftablifhed fubfervient to 
that houfe, and five or fix monks were refident therein. In 1293 this eftate was valued 
at nine marks, or 61.'' 20 Edw. III. Maurice de Berkeley is certified to hold half a 
knight's fee in Portbur)', and the prior of Bromere the other half." After the fuppref- 
Con of that priory King Henry VIII. granted the manor or farm oi Portbury-Priorsy 
with other lands belonging thereto to Henry marquis of Exeter,' who lofing his life in 
1538, for correfponding with Cardinal Poole, the faid premifes came again to the 
crown, and the fame King in the 34th year of his reign granted the manor, grange, or 
farm of Portbuiy-priors, with lands and appertenances, to Robert Goodwin and his 
heirs, to be held of him in chief by the fervice of the twentieth part of a knight's fee.* 
After this the priory lands were poflefled by John Digby earl of Briftol, and being now 
moftly incorporated with the manor, are the property of James Gordon, efq. The 
ruinated (hell of the monaftick grange, called by the inhabitants the Priory, is ftill ftand- 
ing, venerably clothed with ivy. And on tlie dope of the hill is a wood called Prior's 
Wood, the property of Henry Goodwin, of Charlton in the parilh of Wraxall, efq. 

This parilh is divided into the following tithings : 



I. 


Honour Tithing 


5. Shipway"" 


8. Peter's Tithing 


1. 


Court Tithing 


6. Caswell 


9. Wick, and 


3- 


Abbot's Tithing 


7. Ham-Green 


10. WOLCOMBE. 


4. 


Cross Tithing 







The church of Portbury was in 1292 valued at fifteen marks.' It is a vicarage in 
the deanery of Redclifi^ and Bedminfter. The Bifliop of Briftol is patron, and the 

" Taxat. Temporal. « Lib. Feod. ' Pat. 28 Hen. VIII. p. I . « Pat. 34 Hen. VIII. p, 12. 

" The name of this place, which lies between Portbury and Portifhead, favours ftrongly of maritime affairs, 
being compounded of the Saxon Scip, a fliip, and lUsj, a way, or according to the Domefday etymology, 
lUopB, a village. It was held in the time of King Edward the ConfefiTor by BriiSric, and after the Con^ueii; 
by Aluric, a thane, and confiiled of half a carucate of land, worth five ihillings. Lib. Dome/day. 

At Casweh, near this was an eftate of the Arthurs of Clapton, and there were anciently feveral fmall 
manors within this parilh, all held under the family of Berkeley. 

' Taxat. Spiritual. 

Rev. 



IPOttftUrp.] P O R T B U R Y. 143 

Rev. Dr. Cafberd the prefent incumbent. It was formerly appropriated to the abbey 
of St. Auguftinc in Briftol, and after its diflblution the reftory and advowfon of the 
vicarage were fettled on the newly erefted biflioprick. of Briftol.* 

The church is dedicated to St. Mary, and is a large ftrufture, confifting of a nave, 
chancel, north and fouth ailes, and chapel (dedicated to St. Mary) with a large and 
good tower at the weft end, containing five bells. There is alfo a faint's bell. In the 
fouth wall of the chancel are three large niches, with a fourth above it, which is fmaller, 
and has at the bottom a bafon for holy water. There are three fimilar arches in the 
fouth wall of the fouth aile. 

1 1 Edw. III. Thomas lord Berkeley gave certain lands in this parifli to the vicar of 
the church to celebrate the anniverfary of Lady Eve, his mother, on St. Nicholas's- 
day, by placebo and dirigey with a mafsj afligning to the two chaplains there, if prefent, 
two-pence a piece. Alfo to do the hke upon the anniverfaiy of Margaret his wife, 
daughter of Roger Mortimer earl of March, and his own when he Ihould depart this 
life. He likewife gave a mefluage, fifty acres of land, and forty ftiillings rent in Port- 
bury, for a prieft to fing in our Lady chapel there for the fouls of all his anceftors, 
himfelf, his fucceflbrs, and all the faithful deceafed.' After the diflblution of this 
laft-mentioned chantry, William Powell the laft incumbent was allowed a penfion of 
i\. 13s 4d." Maurice, eldeft fon of the faid Thomas Lord Berkeley, 23 Edw. IIL 
gave lands in this parilh to Walter Rope his chaplain, to pray daily in the chapel of St. 
Mary abovementioned for the good eftate of his father, and Lady Catherine then his 
wife : likewife for his own foul, and the foul of Elizabeth his own wife, as alfo for the 
fouls of Lord Maurice and Lady Eve Berkeley his grandfather and grandmother, and 
Lady Margaret his mother. 28 Edw. III. he made a grant of other lands in this 
parifli to a fimilar purpofe to Richard March his chaplain." 

Lady Eve Berkeley, the wife of the third Lord Maurice Berkeley, with many others 

;>f the fame family, was buried in this church; but there are no monuments remaining;. 

id the only memorial of note is a brafs-plate affixed to the wall of the north aile,, 

^•whereon is the portraiture of a female kneeling at a deflc, with this infcripdon : 

" Sarah uxor Walter! Kemifli, gen. obijt A. D. 1621, jetatis fuae 38." Behind her are 
two children praying, with the names Elizabedi and Fraunces ; and at the bottom 
two infants, with the names infcribed Roger and Frances. Arms, On a chevron three 
pheons. On two windows in this aile are the arm^ of Berkeley, viz. Gules, a chevron 
between ten croflfes pattee argent. 

In the church-yard are three very large yew-trees ; the firft of which ftanding weft- 
ward is nineteen feet in circumference at feven feet from the ground, and timber for near 
fi.xty feet high. The fecond is eighteen feet round at four feet height, and runs diat 
fize for near twenty feet; the height of the topmoft branches, which are widely fpread, 
is feventy feet. The third, which is entirely a fliell, is fifteen feet round at three feet 
height, and continues that fize to the height of eighteen feet. Near the fouth door 



* Pat. 34 Hen. VIII. p. 10. • Dugd. Bar. i. 358. 

"■ Waii's Hill . of Abbies, ii. 203. • Dugd. Bar. i. 359. 



tlierc 



II 



144 P O R T B U R Y. [IPOtt&Utp* 

there is a fourth, but much fmaller than the reft. They altogether exhibit a veiy ve- 
nerable pifture, and are doubtlefs upwards of five hundred years old. 

A, D. 1772, Mr. James Selby, of the city of Briftol, gave one hundred pounds, the 
intereft thereof to be diftributed to the poor of this parifli for ever. 

A fair is annually held in this parifh on Whitfun-Monday. 

It appears from the parifh regifters that there are about fixteen chriftenings, three 
marriages, and fourteen burials, on an average per annum. 



PORTISHEAD. 

TO the nordiweft from Portbury ftands Portilhead, or the head of the port, from 
Pojrr, port, and pepeb, head, there having been formerly at this point of land 
a harbour, and a pafTage to the coaft of Monmouthfliire and Wales. The inhabitants 
corruptly call it Pojfut. 

It is pleafandy fituated on the fouth fide of a high ridge of hills finely wooded, 
which rife immediately from the fkirts of the channel, and defend it from the ftrong 
wefterly winds. At the northeaft end of the parilh the hills end, and admit a level 
traft of meadows to the water. The Ihore is very rocky, and in fome places nearly 
fixty feet in perpendicular height. The rocks are compofed of a kind of grit ftone, in 
which is fome gypfum; and on them grow vaft quantities of the kelp-weed, but no 
other varieties. Flat fifli and Ihrimps are caught on the beach. A few market-boats 
are employed in carrying corn, cyder, and other goods daily to Briftol, and in return 
bring bricks, tiles, timber, and fundry other articles. On the fpot called Portiftiead- 
Point a fort was eredted in the laft century to command this ftrait part of the Channel j 
but it was demoliftied, and only the foundations of the walls now remain. A fpring 
called prelly-Spnng, rifes on Welly-Hill about a mile from the church, and running m 
a fmall brook through the village, falls thence into the main channel at the water-mill. 

The Norman furvey calls this place Portejhe, and thus defcribes it: 

" William holds of the Biftiop, Porteshe. Aluric held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for eight hides. The arable is eight carucates. In demefne are 
*' two carucates, with one lervant, and nine villanes, and four cottagers, with five 
*' ploughs. There is a mill of eight IhiUings rent, and twenty acres of meadow, and 
" one hundred acres of pafture. Coppice wood twelve furlongs long, and three fur- 
" longs broad. It was and is worth feventy ftiillings.'" 

In fucceeding times this manor of Portiftiead was poffelTed by the fame lords as that 
of Portbury, and is now the property of James Gordon, efq. 2 Henry IV. Thomas 
lord Berkeley obtained of that King a charter of free-warren for himfelf, his heirs, and 
fucceflbrs, in this his manor of Portiftiead, and alfo in the manors of Wefton, Walton, 
and Charlton, in the parifti of Wraxall.*" 

• Lib. Domefday. " Cart. 2 Hen. IV. p. 2. n. 2. Within 




¥ 



IpOttiJUrp.} P O R T I S H E A D. 145 

Within this manor of Portifhead is Capenor-Court, which formerly belonged to 
a family of that name, being held by them of the Percevals of Wefton.' In the time 
of Queen Elizabeth, Richard Chocke, efq; held this manor with its appertcnances of 
James Perceval as of his manor of Wefton in Gordano, by the fervice of the twentieth 
part of a knight's fee/ It afterwards came to the Mohuns of Fleet in the county of 
Dorfet, a family dcfcended from Robert, fifth brother of John Mohun, anceftor to the 
Mohuns of Dunfter-Caftle, and from them pafled to the family of Full by the mar- 
riage of Elizabeth, daughter and heir of William Mohun, efq; with Sir Edward Fuft, 
bart. only furviving fon and heir of Sir John Full, of Hill-court in the county of 
Gloucefter, bart. and it now is the property of Lady Fuft, relift of the late Sir John 
Full, great-grandfon of Sir Edward abovementioned. 

The living of Portilhead was valued in 1292 at twelve marks five fhillings and four- 
pence j the church of Weft-Harptree having a pcnfion out of it of eight Ihillings." It ^ 
is a redlory in the deanery of Redcliff and Bedminfter, and in the gift of the chamber of 
Briftol, who have here a very large eftate. The Rev. James Brown is the prefent 
incumbent. 

The church is a good building, decorated with a very lofty and beautiful tower,, 
crowned widi elegant pinnacles, and of excellent mafonry. 

In the upper end of the north aile are infcriptions for William Mohun, efq; who died 
March 23, 168 1, and Mary his wife, who died July 26, 1692; and for Grace, wife of 
Robert Halfwell, efq; who died Auguft 29, 1657, aged 70. This is the family vault • 

of the Mohuns and Fufts, and over the graves are banners with the arms of Sir Edward 
Fuft, and on a hatchment thofe of Mohun, impaling Morgan of Eafton. 

Next the chancel is a ftone to the memory of John Read, D. D. vicar of St. Nicholas 
jia. Briftol, and prebendary of Wells, who died 15 Feb. 17 1 2, aged 62 years. 

On the fouth wall of the chancel is a black marble monument, infcribed, 

Johannes Lovel, hujus parochise reftor, quadraginta ofto annorum obijt decimo' 
nono die Martij, anno falutis 1748, aetatis fuae 79. Maria Lovel, uxor Johannis 
Lovel, hujus parochise reftoris, ex antiqua et honefta familia Brentorum in agro Somer- * 

fetenfi oriunda, filia reverendi viri Humphredi Brent, olim de Bedminfter cum ecclefiis 
annexis dignifllmi vicarii, et Francifcas uxoris, ex familia Hawkinfiorum, in urbe BriC- 
tollienfi diu et bene nota, baud minorem ftirpi retulit quam fufcepit gratiam. Deo,, 
Marito, parentibus et amicis debita dum vixit officia perfolvens, coronam virtutis ac- 
cepit i"" die Januarij, anno falutis 1720, jetatis 47. In gratam piamque memoriam 
parentum et dileftiffimas conjugis, mceftiflimus maritus hunc lapidem locari voluit." 

In the church-yard is acrofs of five rows of fteps, and a pillar in the centre twelve, 
feet high, 

« Can. Antjq. " Efc. 35 Eliz. » Taxat. Spiritual. 



Vol. IIL U EASTON: 



¥ 



,.< 



♦ • 



9 



[ 146 ] [Poctburp* 

EASTON IN GORDANOj 
Or, St. G E O R G E ' s. 

EAftward from the parifhes of Portbury and Portifhead, lies the village of Eafton 
in Gordano, otherwife called St. George's, from the dedication of its parifh church 
to that heroick Britifh faint, whofe name in times of chivalry was highly honoured by 
our Englilh military barons. It is delightfully fituated on rifing ground, five miles 
northweft from the city of Briftol, and within two miles of King-Road harbour, over 
which it commands a very pleafing profpedt. 

Upon the river Avon, northeaftward from the village, ftands the hamlet of Crock- 
ERNE-PiLL, the buildings of which chiefly arofe in the laft century for the habitation 
of mariners, whofe bufinefs confifts in piloting veflels to and from Briftol, and down 
the Channel, fometimes as low as the ifland of Lundy, in which a great number of 
towing boats and yawls are conftantly employed, befides fkifFs which ply down the 
channel in fpeculation for the arrival of veflels. 

In our early records this whole parifh is exprefled by the fingle name of Eftone, 
which it obtained from its eafterly fituation fi-om the hundred town of Portbury, being 
at the Conqueft held by the fame perfon, viz, Geffery bilhop of Coutances: 

" Roger holds of the Bilhop, Estone. Ailric held it in the time of King Edward, 
*' and gelded for twelve hides. The arable is nine carucates. In demefne are two 
"^ carucates, and three fervants, and fourteen villanes, and feven cottagers, with feven 
" ploughs. There is a mill of fifty-pence rent, and thirty-fix acres of meadow, and 
" thirty acres of wood, and one hundred acres of pafture. It was worth ten pounds,. 
^' now feven pounds."" 

Very foon after the bifhop's deceafe. King William Rufus gave this whole manor of 
Eafton to Robert Fitz-Hamon, on whom he had juft before conferred the honour and 
earldom of Gloucefter, as a reward for his fervices in aiding to quell the faction excited 
againft him in favour of his brother Robert duke of Normandy. This Robert had four 
daughters, whereof Mabel the eldeft carried this manor in marriage to Robert de 
Mellent, who was created Earl of Gloucefter A. D. 1 100. 

This Robert had a principal fhare in all the perturbations of the reign of King 
Stephen, being a ftrenuous advocate for the caufe of the Emprefs Maud, for whom he 
raifed forces, and manned divers fortifications. He built the caftle of Briftol of ftone 
which came from Normandy, and gave every tenth ftone thereof towards the building 
a chapel to the honour of St. Mary in the priory of St. James, which he had founded 
in that city.'' He likewife built the caftle of Cardiff, and founded the abbey of Margam 
in Glamorganfhire, and was a benefaftor to the monafteries of Neath, Tewkeftjury, 
and Gloucefter. He died A. D. 1147, and was buried in the choir of the priory of 
St. James in Briftol abovementioned under a green jafper ftone." 

f Lib. Domefday. ^ Dugd. Bar. i. 535, 5 ibid. 

William, 



Ipottburp.] eastoninGORDano. 147 

William, his elcieft Ton and fucceflbr, was founder of the monaftery of Keynfham, 
which he amply endowed with lands and revenues out of the honour of Gloiicefter/ 
He refided for the mofl: part at Cardiff-caftie in Glamorganfliirc, being the chief lord 
of all ^hat province, then called (StDlflOiJOtjan, or the Land of Morgan, which he 
pofleflcd by hereditary right from Robert Fitz-Hamon, who in the time of William II, 
had, widi his twelve knights, put all that territory under his fubjedion. It is related 
that this Earl William in the enjoyment of his pofielTions in this country experienced 
much annoyance from one of his vaflals of the name of Yvor, furnamed Bach, on 
account of the remarkable fmallnefs of his ftature. He was withal a perfon of incre- 
dible fpirit and animofity, and had his habitation chiefly in the woods and mountains, 
of which fylvan retreats the Earl with his men at Cardiff had often ufcd the means to 
bereave him, or at leaft confine the limits of his excurfions. The impetuous Yvor not 
brooking this unwelcome treatment, took occafion on a certain night to approach the 
caftle of Cardiff with divers of his adherents, and though the battlements were lofty 
and well guarded, there being in the caftle no lefs than one hundred and twenty fol- 
dicrs, befides a great number of archers, he found means to fcale the walls, and took 
away this William earl of Gloucefter, with his countefs and their young fon; and car- 
rying them to the woods,, refufed to releafe them till he had affurance of the full refti- 
tution of his property." 

One of this Earls retinue in Wales was Peter de Salfa Marifco, or Saltmarlh, to 
whom for his trufty fervices he granted lands of very confiderable value lying in this 
parifh of Eafton, and thofe of Wefton and Clapton, and in other parts of the hundred 
of Portbury, to hold of him by the fervice of the fourth part of a knight's fee/ Geoffry 
de Marifco, a dcfcendant of this Peter, in the time of Henry III. gave thefe lands in 
marriage with his grandaughter to Emerick de Gardino, or Gordein,* an ancient family, 
who principally refiding in this neighbourhood, the places where they poffcffed eftares, 
or in which they had any material intercourfe, became diftinguifhed by their names. 
Whence arofe the corrupt appellations of Eafton in Gcrdam, IVeJlon in GordanOy Clapton 
in GordanOy &c. Notice is taken of this particular, in regard there are fome who have 
erroneoudy conceived that this whole territory we are now fpeaking of was anciently 
called Gardinum; and others, equally miftaken, have given it as their opinion, that the 
feveral places to which the diftinftion in queftion is affixed, having during the minority 
of fome one of the Berkeleys, been in ward or gardien to the King, were thence cogno- 
minated to preferve the memory of fuch a circumftance occurring in th# manerial pro- 
perty of that illuftrious family. 

But to return to the Earl of Gloucefter. Having diftinguifhed himlelf by many 
military exploits, and more by his munificence to monafteries and religious eftablifli- 
ments, he died A. D. 1 173, and was buried in the abbey of Keynfham. He jnarricd 

* See Vol. iJ. p. 402. ' Giraldi Cambrenfis Itin. Cambr. Kb. i. cap. 6. ' Cart. Antiq. 

« Tefla de Nevjl Somf. et ap. Cart. Antiq. Ralph de Gardino, one of the fame family, was living at Clcvedon 
in the time of Ric. I. and held lands there of Matthew dc Clivedon. Thomas de Gardino, 47 Hen. III. held a 
cirucatc of land in Well-Harptrec of Robert de Gournay. 17 Edw. I. William de Gardino held lands and te- 
nements in the town of Somercon, and a raefluage and lands in the parifh of Farrington. Other branches of 
this family were featcd \\\ Dorfctlhire and Dcvonilure. 

U 2 Hawife, 



548 E A S T O N IN G O R D A N O. [PortfJUtp* 

Hawife, daughter of Robert earl of Leicefter, and by her had iflue one fon, Robert, 
-who died in his father's life-time, and was alfo buried at Keynfliam, and three daughters, 
viz. Mabil, wife of the Earl of Evereux, Amice, wife of Richard de Clare earl of 
Hertford, and Ifabel. Almaric, the fon of Mabil the eldeft daughter by the Earl of 
Evereux, dying without iflue, the inheritance of the honour and eftate totally devolved 
to Amice the wife of Richard de Clare, the next filler.'' 

By which Richard the faid Amice had iflue Gilbert de Clare, who was the firft Earl 
of Gloucefter and Hertford jointly, and dying in 1229, 14 Henry III. left iflfue by 
Ifabel his wife, daughter and coheir of William Marefchal earl of Pembroke, three 
fons, Richard, who fucceeded him, William, and Gilberti as alfo three daughters, 
Amice, Agnes, and Ifabel. 

Which Richard de Clare was, like mofl: of his anceftors, a military man, and ferved 
King Henry III. in the different capacities of general, ambaflTador, and counfellor. 
Under him this manor was held by Sir Ignatius de Clyfton, knt.' The epitaph on 
his tomb at Tewkefbury, in the choir of which church he was buried, on the right- 
hand of his father, in 1262, 46 Henry III, is fully expreflive of the charader of this 
great man. 

^ic putior ^ippolitj, iparinis scna, fcnfiiS UlMs, 
aencac pictag, Ji)caoris ira jaccnt/ 

Gilbert his fon and heir, having a fair and ruddy complexion,' acquired the furname 
of Rufus, or Red Gilbert. He married Alice de March, daughter of Guy earl of 
Angolefme, from whom he was divorced, and took to his fecond wife Joan of Acres, 
daughter of King Edw. I. to whom, in order to conciliate the match, he gave up the 
inheritance of all his caft:les and manors in England and Wales, among the refl; this 
manor of Eaft:on in Gordano, which the flieriff^ had a mandate to feize into the King's 
hands." But thefe lands were foon afterwards reftored, and the faid Gilbert de Clare 
died feized of this manor 24 Edw. I. leaving iflTue Gilbert his fon and heir, then five 
years of age, as alfo three daughters, Eleanor, Margaret, and Elizabeth." 

Which Gilbert was a chief commander in mofl: of the expeditions of the armies of 
Edw. II. and being 7 Edw. II. captain of the van-guard of the King's hofl: in Scot- 
land, had the misfortune to be flain in the battle of Bannockbourne near Striveling, 
whence his body was fent without ranfom to England to be interred. Dying without 
any furviving iflTue, his three fifl:ers became his heirs, viz. Eleanor the wife of Hugh le 
Defpenfer, Margaret the wife of Piers de Gavefl:on, afterwards of Hugh de Audley, 
and Elizabeth the wife of John de Burgh, fon of Richard earl of Ulfter in Ireland, 
afterwards of Sir Roger D'Amori, knt.° Between which fifl:ers the inheritance being 
divided*, this manor fell to the fhare of Ehzabeth lady of Ulfter, who by the faid John 
de Burgh her hufband had iflTue William de Burgh earl of Ulfter,' whofe fole daughter 
and heir Elizabeth was married to Lionel Plantagenet, third fon of King Edw, III. 
who in 1J62 was created Duke of Clarence. He was alfo in right of his faid wife 

" Dugd. Bar. j. 536. ' Cart. Antiq. " Dugd. Bar. i. 213. ' Lei. Itin. vj. 81. 

" Rot. Fin. 18 Ed. I. m. 15. » Efc. » Dugd. Bar. i. 217. ' Lei. Itin. vi. 82. 

Earl 



iPottburg,] EASTON IN GORDANO. 149 

Earl of Ulfter, and was one of the companions of the nnoft noble order of the garter. 

He died in Italy 43 Edw. III. then feized of this manor,'' leaving by Elizabeth his faid > 

wife an only daughter Philippa, afterwards married to Edmund Mortimer, the third 

Earl of March of that family. 

To which Edmund earl of March, who in right of his wife held thjs manor, and • 

died feized thereof 5 Ric. II.' fucceeded Roger Mortimer earl of March his fon and 
heir, who 17 Ric. II. had livery of all his lands. 19 Ric. II. he was appointed lieute- 
nant of the provinces of Ulfter, Connaught, and Meath, in Ireland, and in the year 
following lord-lieutenant of that whole realm. He was flain there 22 Ric. II. and 
being brought to England, was buried with his anceftors at Wigmore' in Hereford- 
fliirej leaving ifTue two fons, Edmund, who fucceeded him, and Roger, and two 
daughters Anne and Eleanor. 

"Which Edmund Mortimer, eldeft fon of Roger earl of March, fucceeded to the title 
and eftate of his father, and having married Anne daughter of Edmund earl of Stafford, 
died feized of this manor 3 Henry VI. without ifTue, whereupon Richard Plantagenet, 
earl of Rutland and Duke of York, fon of Anne his fifter by Richard earl of Cam- 
bridge, was found to be heir to his honours and his lands.' 

This Richard bfihg flain at the battle of Wakefield in 1460, his cflates became 
confifcated, and this manor of Eafton in Gordano,. with divers other lands and apper- 
tenances thereto, was given that fame year to John Yonge, one of the King's juflices 
of the bench of common-pleas, and to his heirs after him. George duke of Clarencer 
at the fame time releafing to the faid Yonge and his heirs all his right in the faid 
manor, of Eafton in Gordano, to which he had urged a claim of inheritance." 

This John Yonge was fon and heir of Thomas Yonge of the city of Briftol, and was 
lord-mayor of London, and one of the members for that city. He was knighted by 

King Edw. IV. to whofe interefts he had loyally adhered, and from him, befides this J| 

manor received other fignal marks of approbation. He was fucceeded in this eftate by 

Thomas Yonge, who at his death, 17 Edw. IV. held the manor of Eafton in Gor- ^ 

dano by fealty of William lord Berkeley, leaving Thomas his fon and heir." 

Which Thomas Yonge died feized of this manor 21 Henry VII. leaving ifTue a 

fole daughter and heir Alice, married to WiUiam Malet, of Enmore in this county, efqj ' 

who by virtue of the faid marriage pofTefTed this manor, and held the fame of the King 

by the fervice of half a knight's fee/ 


36 Henry VIII. Richard Malet, of Enmore, and Joan his wife, fold this manor " 

of Eafton in Gordano, with its appertenances, and twelve mefTuages, twelve cot- * 4 

tages, one water-mill, twenty-four gardens, twenty-four orchards, one hundred and 

forty acres of arable land, one hundred acres of meadow, two hundred and forty of 

pafture, twenty of wood, four hundred of marfh, 4I. 12s. 6!d. rent, two pounds of 

pepper, and one calk of clove-wine, with appertenances in St. George's and Eafton in 

Gordano, to Richard Morgan, efq; and his heirs.* In which family it continued till 

' Efc ' Ibid. • Dugd. Bar. i. 150. • Efc. " Rot. Claus. 39 Hen. VI. ' Efc. 

^ ibid. * Licence to alienate* 

the 



4 



ijo EASTON IN GORDANO. [Pott&urg* 

the beginning of the prefent century, when Richard Morgan, dying without ifllie, devifed 
it to his widow, who left the fame to Thomas Wilkins, efq; her grandfon by her former 
hufband, who afllimed the name of Morgan, and is the prefent owner of this manor. 

The church of Eafton in Gordano is a prebend belonging to the cathedral of Wells. 
In 1292 it was valued at twelve marks." The vicarage is a peculiar in the deanery 
of RedclifF and Bedminfter; the Rev. Richard Wilkins is the prefent incumbent. 

T he church confifts of a nave, chancel, veflry on the north fide, and fouth aile, with 
a handfome tower at the weft end containing fix bells, and a clock j the tenor bell has 
this poefy, Come when I call toferve God all. 

The upper end of the fouth aile is the burial-place of the family of Morgan. On 
the eaft wall are three monuments, the firft next the chancel, being of marble, has this 

infcription : " Near this place lyeth the body of Thomas Morgan, of this parifh, 

efq; who departed this life the 6th of April 1723, aged 86 years. Alfo the body of 
Mrs. Ann Morgan, relift of the abovenamed Thomas Morgan, efq; who departed this 
life the 2ift of Sept. 1747, aged 64. Likewife the body of Mrs. Ehzabeth Morgan, 
late wife of Thomas Wilkins Morgan, of this parifli, efq; who departed this life the lift 
of March 1765, aged 34. Alfo of Ann Morgan, daughter of the faid Thomas Wilkins 
Morgan, efq; who died the i6th of March 1767, aged 10 years. Alfo the body of 
Mrs. Mary Morgan, fecond wife of Thomas Wilkins Morgan, efq; who died the 17th 
of May 1776, aged 31. This monument was erefted by Mrs. Ann Morgan, wife and 
relift of the abovenamed Thomas Morgan, efq; anno 1736." Arms, Sable, three crofs 
croflets in bend argent, Morgan : Impaling, Gules, on a bend argent, three hurts. 

Next to this is a fmall black monument, infcribed, " Under this place lyeth the 

body of Richard Morgan, of this parifh, efq; who departed this life the 4th day of 
Odober 1688, aged 66 years." 

On the third monument: " Near to this place lies interred the body of the moft 

pious, virtuous, and charitable Mrs. Mary Morgan, the daughter of Col. John Jeaffrefon, 
of Dulligham in the county of Cambridge; and Sarah the daughter of Aden Parkins, 
efq; of Dunny in Nottinghamfhjre. She had for her firft hufband Charles B.'-ett, efqj 
one of the gentlemen of the honourable band of penfioners to King Charles II. Her 
fecond hufband was Thomas Lewis, of Penmarke in the county of Glamorgan, efqj 
and her third hufband was Richard Morgan, of St. George's in this county of So- 
merfet, efq; where Ihe died on the 21ft day of December, Anno Domini 1701, in the 
54th year of her age." Arms, Morgan, impaling, Azure, a fret or, on a chief argent 
three leopard's heads gules, JefFerfon. 

Againft the fouth wall: " Near this place lyeth the body of Mrs. Mary Morgan, 

late wife of Richard Morgan, efq; and daughter of Sir Herbert Croft, of Croft-caftle in 
the county of Hereford, bart. and Elizabeth his wife, who departed this life the 7th day 
of July, Anno Dom. 17 10, statis fufe 27°. Alfo the body of the abovenamed Richard 
Morgan, efq; who died the 4th day of February 17 14, aged 30." Arms, Morgan, 
impaling quarterly per fefTe argent and azure counterchanged ; in the chief dexter 
quarter a lion paffant or: Crofts. 

■ Taxat, Spiritual. 

Againft 



IPortaur?.] eastoninGordano. ,^, 

Againft the north wall of the chancel is a heavy monument, whereon between two 
columns is the half length figure of a pried in his canonicals, with the following in- 

fcription: « Hie jacet Rogerus Soudon, hujus parochias et Portburis vicarius 

obijt quarto die Martij Anno Domini 1703." ' 

Near this is a fmall elegant monument of marble, infcribed, « Near this place 

are depofited the remains of Cordelia, wife of the Rev. Richard Wilkins, vicar of this 
parilh, and daughter of the Rev. Conyers Place, A. M. of Marnhull in the county of 
Dorfet, who died Aug. 1 7, 1774, jet. 40. As alfo the body of Cann, fon#f the above 
Richard and Cordeha, who died Jan. 28, 177 1, aged 7 months." Arms, per pale or 
and argent, a wyvern rampant wr/, Wilkins j impaling, per pale cr and gtiles, a lion 
paflant counterchanged. Place. 

Jn the chancel floor: " Here lieth the body of Mary wife of the Rev. George 

Wilkins, who departed this life the 23d of January 1773, aged 30 years, A lady 
whofe engaging fweetnefs of temper and charitable difpofition juftly recommended her 
to the favour of the world, her exemplary piety and virtue to that of heaven.. 

' non te facundia, non te 

Reftituent pietas." 

In the fouth wall of the chancel are the remains of three tabernacles. 

An upright tablet againfl: the north wall of the nave contains the followint^ memorial- 
" Captain Samuel Sturmy, of this parilh of St. George's, made and gave unto the 
fame two dials at the Pill, and two more upon the church porch; alfo in the fame 
parifh hee write his Mathematical Treatife in folio, intided. The Marinors' or Jrtijes 
Magazen. One of thefe books he freely gave to this parifli, upon the condition (viz.) 
that the booke Ihould be chained too, and locked in the deolk where now he is left 
(always) and the key to remaine in the hands of Capt. Richard Morgan, efq; or his 
amgnes (ever) untill any ingenious perfons of the fame parifh, or Lye, or Portbury's 
parillT; or any other which defires the ufe thereof, which fliall not be denied them freely 
provided diey firft give unto Capt. Morgan, or his affignes, good fufficient fecurity as 
he or them lliall think fit for three pounds fterling, that fhall be forfeited and loft, if 
any that be fo ingauged IhaU cut, teare out, or blurr any paper, Iheet, figuers, or dia- 
gram, that is in the laid book. And that 3I. is to put fuch another in its placej but on 
the contrary, if Capt. Morgan or his affignes doth receive the booke in as good con- 
dicion of the party obleiged as when he received it, then fliall the party be free of his 
obligation untill the next time he defier to ufe it, then to give the fame, and likewife all 
other perfons for ever. For an acknowledgment of kindnefs unto the author, the mi- 
nifter doth proinife to preach a fermon always on his birth-day, being the 5th of Nov. 
(he was borne at Gloucefter, anno 1633) and the fame day the marinors or ringers to' 
give him a peale of bells at the fame parilh. Witnefs our hands the ift day of May, 
Anno 1669. Non nobis Jolum nati fumus. 

Minifter, George Willinton. 



Churchwardens, J ^"'"^",^°«^°-^' 
I Richard Wasbrow. 



This 



ija EASTONinGORDANO. [pottljurg, 

This fcientifick credential is clofed by fome Engliih lines, and a fliort Latin perora- 
tion, now nearly obliterated. On the top of the tablet is Sturmy's piAure. 

Captain Daniel Defney, of Great- Yarmouth in Norfolk, was benefactor to this 
church, which was pewed in 1730, cieled in 1731, and beautified and painted in 1763. 

That pious and humbly learned divine George Bull, born at Wells in 1634, and 
promoted to the fee of St. David's in 1705, was for a fhort fpace vicar of this church, 
and that at a time when blind bigotry and mad enthufiafm had trampled under foot 
thofe wholdfome ordinances, which regal laws, and civil and ecclcfiaftick elocution, 
had in vain endeavoured to eftablifh and inculcate. The parilh of St. George's then 
fwarmed with aconfufed mixture of pertinacious feftaries,'" whom, though our preacher 
could not entirely vanquifh j yet, by his exemplary behaviour, found doftrine, and 
argumentative difcourfes, he feems to have wrought more on his hearers than generally 
befals the lot of a reclufe minifter, who has to combat the united attacks of difguifed 
ignorance and avowed infolence. At leaft he convinced infidels. He died in 1709, 
and was buried in the collegiate church of Brecknock.'' 

There was anciently a chapel at the foutheaft extremity of the parilh, near Ham-. 
Green -, the place where it flood retains the name of Chapel-Pill. 

■" See Biog. Didl. iii. 8. ' Godwin de Prsfulibusj 589. 



ABBOTS-LEIGH. 

ON the brow of the hill, foutheaftward from St. George's, and in the road thence 
to Briftol, ftands the village of Abbots-Leigh, fo called for diftindtion from the 
other Leighs in this county, and becaufe it formerly belonged to the abbots of St. 
Auguftine in Briftol. A great part of the hill to the fouth and fouthweft is hence de- 
nominated Leigh-Down^ being an uncultivated plain, covered with a fine Iheep feedj 
but the foil is fo thin, that in many places the rock lies bare for a cbnfiderable fpace. 
That part of the parifh which lies towards the north is almoft one continued ridge of 
limeftone rock covered with wood ; the lofty and precipitous fides of which form a fine 
amphitheatre from the water. Thefe rocks, like St. Vincent's, contain hexagonal and 
pyramidal quartz cryftals, and fpar of various tinges ; fome with an almoft clear black 
watei', others with a caft of red ; others diaphanous from iron veins j others amethyftine 
concreted on iron ore, and others of a bright yellow proceeding from lead. Thefe 
fpars and cryftals are found on the down, either loofe or cluftered in nodules of reddifh 
ftone. Lead ore has frequently been found on thefe downs, and fome ftiafts have been 
funk for the purpofe of extrafting iti but the quantity obtained has generally proved 
too infufficient to defray the expence of working them. 

The 



Iportburp.] A B B O T S-L EJ G H. 153 

The manor of Leigh or Lega was at the time of the Conqucft a member of the 
large lordfliip of Bedminfter; it confided of one hundred and twelve acres of meadow and 
wood, (the reft then lying wafte) and was hdd of the King by the Bifliop of Cou- 
tances.' After the Conqueft it came into the hands of Robert I'itzharding, who gave 
it to the canons of St. Auguftine, founded by liim in the city of Briftol, A. D, 
1 148, 13 Steph."" Which grant was confirmed by King John/ and the faid canons 
obtained of King Edw. I. a charter of free-warren in all their lands here/ which con- 
tinued in their pofiefiion till the general diflblution of monafteries. The manor was 
then granted by King Henry VIII. to Paul Bu(h the firft bifliop of Briftol, who, May 
25, 1559, granted the fame to King Edw. VI. On the 23d of September the fame 
year that King granted the reverfion of it, after die death of Paul Bufh aforefaid, to 
Sir George Norton, knt. and his heirs for ever. Which Sir George Norton died 26 
EHz. fcized of the manor of Abbots-Leigh, with its appertenances, and one hundred 
meflliages, twenty cottages, two mills, one dove-houfe, two hundred gardens, five hun- 
dred acres of arable land, three hundred of meadow, one thoufand of pafture, one thou- 
fand two hundred of wood, one hundred of moor, one thoufand of wafte, one thoufand 
of gorfe and heath, and common pafture for all forts of cattle, and feventeen fliillings 
rent, with appertenances in Leigh, Afliton, Portbory, Ham-Gfeen, Clevedon, and 
Tickenham.' He was fucceeded in the poflelTion of thefe lands by Samuel Norton 
his fon and heir, and he by George Norton, whofe daughter and heirefs, Grace, was 
married to Arthur Norton, fon and heir of Bonham Norton, of Stretton in the county 
of Salop, efq; by whom ftie had ifluc George, born in 1622. He married Ellen, 
daughter of Sir William Owen, of Condover in the county of Salop, knt. fon of 
Thomas Owen, one of the juftices of the King's-Bench, by Ellen his wife, daughter of 
Robert lord vifcount Kilmoryj and dying Feb. 14, 1677, left by the faid Ellen his 
wife, two fons, George and Edward, and two daughters, Ellen and Grace. EUen his 
wife furviving him, was afterwards married to Sir Timothy Baldwin, of the city of 
London, knt. and died May 6, 1667, and was buried with her firft huft»and in the 
parifli church of Abbots-Leigh.' Sir George Norton, fon and heir of the faid George 
Norton by Ellen his wife, had ifiiie another Sir George Norton, born in 1658. This 
Sir George, being a well-wiftier to all the means which had been exerted towards 
the reftoration of his country and his Sovereign, diftinguiftied himfelf eminently loyal 
in hazarding both his life and fortune, by concealing in his houfe here the perfon ot 
King Charles II. till he could provide means for his efcape into France.^ He married 
Frances, the daughter of Ralph Freke, of Hannington in the county of Wilts, efq; 
by whom he had iffue three children, George, Grace, and Elizabeth. George and 
Elizabeth died young; Grace their fifter was married to Sir Richard Gethin, of Ge- 
thin-Grort in the kingdom of Ireland. She was a lady of moft uncommon accom- 
plifliments, and though ftie lived only to the age of twenty-one, flie has left behind her 
the moft evident traits of a mature and very refined underftanding. In her book en- 
titled Reliquiae Gethinian<e, (being publijhed after her deceafe) there is the following 

• See the Domefday Extrafl in Bedminfter, vol. ii. p. 280. ' Mon. Angl. ii. 233. ' Ibid. 

* Cart. 13 Ed. III. n. 35. « Efc. 26 Eliz. ' From the monument in the church. « Ibid. 

Vol. III. X • Pitl^y 



A B B, O T S - L E I G H. [POttfiUtp. . 

1 54" 

pithy obfervation: ' Reading ferves for delight, for ornament, and for ability} itper- 
« fefts nature, and is perfefted by experience; the crafty condemn it, fimple admire it, 

< and wife men ufe it. Some books are to be tafted and fwallowed, and- fome few to 

< be chewed or digefted. Reading makes a full man, conference a ready man, and 

< writin- an exaft man. He that writes little needs a great memory, he that confers 
' little a^prefent wit; and he that reiids little, needs much cunning to make him feem 
* to know that which he does not.'" 

The three children of Sir George Norton dying ifluelefs, the manor of Abbots- 
Leieh came into the family of Trenchard, by virtue of the marriage of William 
Trenchard, of Cutteridge in the county of Wihs, with Ellen daughter and coheir of 
George Norton, (by the daughter of Sir William Owen, of Condover abovementioned) 
and fifter of Sir George Norton, grandfather of the faid lady Grace Gethin. By 
which Ellen the faid William Trenchard had ifllie John Trenchard, who married Anne 
daughter of Sir William Blacker, bart. and died without iflue, as alfo two daughters, 
one of whom was married to Thomas Hippefley, efq; who in right of his wife be- 
came poffeffed of this manor, and by her had iflue Robert Hippefley, who aflunned 
the name of Trenchard, and was father of J. W. Hippefley Trenchard, efq; the prefent 
owner of this manor. The arms of Norton of Leigh are, Argent, on a bend cotifed 
between two lions rampant>^/^, three efcallop fliells or. Thofe of Norton of Stretton 
are. Or, two bars gules, on a cKxti azure, an inefcutcheon ermine. The arms of Tren- 
chard, Per pale argent and azurey in the firft three pellets. 

The manor-houfe is a very large building fituated on the brow of the hill north- 
ward, from which there is an extenfive and beautiful profpeft of the Channel, part of 
Gloucefterfliire, Monmouthfliire, and the Welch mountains. 

Abbots-Leigh is a chapel to Bedminflier. The church is a good Gothick edifice, 
built with reddifli fl:one, probably from the neighbouring rocks, and confifts of a nave, 
chancel, and fouth aile, at the weft end is an embattled tower, containing fix bells, i 

In the chancel is the burial-place of the Norton and Trenchard families, and there are 
infcriptions for divers of them whofe names are fet down in the defcent of the manor. 

Thomas Gordon, the celebrated tranflator of Tacitus, lived a while at the Court- 
houfe in the capacity of amanuenfis to Mr. Trenchard, in conjunftion with whom he 
publiflied Cato, and the Independent Whig. After his patron Mr. Trenchard's death, 
he married his widow, and died July 28, 1750. 

» Biog. Dia. Ed. 1784, vol. vi. p. 78. 




WRAXALL. 



lp)ort6urp.] 



[ 155 ] 



W R 



L. 



FOLLOWING the courfeof this lancet ridge of mountain fouthweftward, the next 
viUaee we come to is Wraxall, fituated in a cove formed by a fweep of the hill 
from the eaft to the northweft, apd commanding a profpeft almoft pecuhar to tlu* 
extraordinary acclivity. To the weft appear the Holmes and the Welch coaft about 
Cardiff in Glamorganlhirej and to the fouth, foutheaft, and fouthweft, the following 
villages are all in view, viz. Dundry, Barrow, Flax-Bourton, Backwell, Chelvy, Con- 
grefbury, Yatton, Worle, Uphill, Kenn, Kingfton-Seymour, Nailfea, ^'^kcnham 
andClevedoni the profped to the fouthweft and weft is bounded by Mendip and 
Noon's-peak hills. 

This parifti is very extenfive, comprifing within its limits not only a confiderable 
part of the valley beneath the village, but ftretching itfelf over the whole breadth of 
The hiU behind it to its northern brow, which overlooks the Bnftol Channel, and the 
villages of Monmouthfhire. On this brow, at the very extremity of the panfh towards 
Clapton, ftands Naijh-Houfe, the feat of Walter King, efq; embelhlhed with fine and 
flourilhing plantations; and further on towards the eaft, in a very pleafing retired fitu- 
ation is Charlton-House, a large and handfome manfion, formerly the pofleflion of 
the families of Berkeley and Gorges, afterwards of Yates and Muggleworth, and now 
the manerial refidence of Henry Goodwin, efq. Still further eaftward is Favlan-d, 
once a confiderable viUage, and the habitation of divers refpeftable families, as the De 
Failands, who had their name from it; the Meades of Meades-Place; the Jubbes of 
^ubbe's-Court. The manor is the property of John Blagrave, efq. On the fouthcrn 
fide of die hill, and eaftward from the village of Wraxall, ftands Belmont, the feat ot 
William Turner, efq; a very neat houfe, fituated on the declivity, with a fine wood m 
the back ground, cut out into beautiful walks; and the bare fummit of the hill pic- 
turefquely rifing above it. In front is a fine view to the fouth and fouthweft, and a 
gentle defcent to the rich vale of Bourton. 

The lands of this parifii are moftly pafture, and in the valley good; the wood moft 
common is elm, which grows high, and forms confiderable timber; among the hazel 
coppices which patch the fiopes of the hill there are feme oaks, but the fiialownefs of 
the foil prevents their flourilhing ; amidft the rocks grow a great number of large aged 
yews, whofe Umbs are twifted into rude grotefque forms, fporting as it were with the 
hand of nature. The hills are almoft an entire mafs of lime-ftone. 

The manor of Wraxall is noted in early record as parcel of the eftatcs of that 
Gefferey bifhop of Coutances, of whom we have made fo frequent mention; it was 
anciently written Werocojak: 

"The fame Biftiop holds Werocosale. Aluric held it in the time of Kuig 
- Edward, and gelded for twenty hides. The arable is twenty-fix carucates. In de- 
cc mefne is one carucate, and two fervants, and thirty-four viUanes and thirty cottagers 
with twenty-five ploughs. There are two miUs of the rent of twelve fl^^J-S^^^ 



tt 



tt 



,^6 WRAXALL. [IPort&Utp. 

" fix-pence, and one hundred and fifty acres of meadow, and as many of wood. Paf- 
" ture two miles long, and feven furlongs broad. It was and' is worth fifteen pounds. 

" Of the fame land of this manor a knight holds four hides and a half of the bifhop, 
*' and has thereon two ploughs, with thi-ee villanes, and four cottagers. It was and is 
« worth fifty (hillings. 

" To this manor is added one hide, which a thane held in the time of King Edward. 
" The arable is one carucate. It is worth ten fliillings.'" 

Of all which lands, including the villages of Bourton and Nailfea, the family of De 
Wrokefhale became poflefled foon after the date of the above record, and in that name 
it continued till the time of King John, when it came by the marriage of the heirefs 
of Richard de Wrokefhale to Eudo de Moreville, whofe defcendant John de Moreville 
in the time of Henry III. left iffue an only daughter and heir named Elena, married 
to Ralph the fon of Ivo de Gorges, of Tamworth in the county of Warwick. 

This Ralph de Gorges was a knight and great warrior; being one of thofe who in 
the year 1263 was blocked up with King Henry III. in the city of Briftol by the 
difaffefted citizens.'' Soon after which he was appointed governor of the caftles of 
Sherborne and Exeter; and 50 and 51 Henry III. was flieriff of Devonfhire. 54 
Henry III. he attended Prince Edward into the Holy Land, and died foon after his 
return, leaving by the faid Elena his wife Ralph de Gorges his fon and heir.' 

Which Ralph de Gorges was a knight, and 21 Edw. I. was marlhal of the King's 
army in Gafcony, in which country he was engaged in feveral expeditions. 28 Edw. I. 
he had fummons to be at Carlifle on the feaft of the nativity of St. John the Baptift, 
well fitted with horfe__ and arms to march with the King againft the Scots then in rebel- 
lion.'' 2 Edw. II. he was fummoncd to parliament among the barons, and died 29 Nov. 
17 Edw. IL feized of the manor of Wraxall, which he held of Hugh de Courtney by 
knight's fervice,'' leaving iffue by Eleanor his wife Ralph de Gorges his fon and heir, 
then of the age of feventeen years; and one daughter Eleanor, married to Theobald 
Ruffell, fon of Sir WiUiam Ruffell, of Kingfton-Ruffell in the county of Dorfet, knt. 
and by his fecond wife, daughter and heir of John de la Tour, progenitor to the Duke 
cf Bedford,' 

The faid Ralph de Gorges, the third of that name, dying without iffue, the manor of 
Wraxall became the inheritance of his fitter Eleanor, the wife of Theobald Ruffell 
abovementioned. They had iffue three fons. Sir Ralph, who was of Kingfton-Ruffell 
aforefaid, and of Dirham in the county of Gloucefter; William, who died without 
iffue; and Sir Theobald, who was portioned with the manor of Wraxall, and was 
anceftor of the Gorges of Bradpole in Dorfetlhire, and thofe of the county of Hereford. 

This Sir Theobald relinquilhing his paternal name affumed that of Gorges, as well 
as his mother's coat of arms, which was, Lozengy or and azure, and born by her in 
confequence of her defcent from the heirefs of Moreville; but the original arms of 

• Lib. Domefday. * Seethe Engliih Hiftories. ' Efc. * Harl. MS. 1192. 

? Rot. Pip. 19 Ed. II. f Hutchins's Hiftory of Dorfet, i. 298. 

Gorges 



Jportburg.l 



W R A X A L L. 



^57 



Gorges was a whirlpool, or gurges, in allufion to their name. Being thus pofrcflcd of 
the nnanor of Wraxall, he 36 Edw. III. obtained a grant from the King for a market 
to be kept here every .Thurfday weekly, and alfo for a fair yearly on the eve, day, and 
morrow of the feaft of All-Saints, and five days next enfiiing.* He died 4 Ric. II. 
leaving iflue three fons. Sir Ralph, who died that fame year without iflue," Bartholomew, 
whofucceeded him, and. Thomas.' 

Which Bartholomew dying alfo without iflue, 20 Ric. II. the cftate devolved to his 
brother Thomas, who married Agnes the widow of Thomas Norton, efq; by whom he 
had two fons, John, borrt in 1396, and Sir Theobald Gorges, knt. He died 5 Hen. IV. 
feized of this manor, with its members of Bourton and Nailfea; and Agnes his wife 
furviving him, had the faid manor in dower, and died 7 Henry V.* 

John, eldeft fon of Thomas de Gorges, dying without iflue i Henry VI. Sir Theo- 
bald his brotlier fucceeded to the eftate. Which Sir Theobald, 15 Oft. 1333, was 
married to Agnes the daughter of John de Wyke, in the chapel or oratory belonging, 
to the manfion of Court de Wick in the parifh of Yatton, licence being given thereto 
by bifliop Ralph of Shrewsbury.' He died lo Edw. IV. leaving iflue two fons, 
Walter, who fucceeded him at Wraxall, and Richard, who by the grant of his father 
had lands in Sturminfter-Marflial in the county of Dorfet, where he and his poftcrity 
were feated." He was buried in the parifli church of Wraxall, where there flill remains 
the following memorial round his grave-ftone in the chancel: 

*' I^cre \ptxu %\x Cptibot ®ocgc0, fenggfjtc $ tianeret, of to&o0 foule <SoD 
iiatie mcrcg. 9men, h^s." 

Walter, fon and heir of this Sir Theobald Gorges, died in his father's life-time; but 
left iflTue by Mary his wife, daughter and heir of William Ouldhall, a fon called Edmund^ 
who fucceeded him in the eftate at Wraxall. 

This Edmund was a knight of the Bath at the creation of Arthur Prince of Wales, 
fon of King Henry VII. He married Anne daughter of John Howard duke of Nor- 
folk, by Catherine his wife, daughter of William lord Molines, and both he and his 
lady lie buried under a large altar comb in the chancel of the parifli church of Wraxall. 
They had iflTue five fons and three daughters, whereof Sir Edward his eldeft fon was 
feated at Wraxall. He married to his firfl wife Mar)' daughter of Sir John Newton, 
by whom he had iflTue one fon Edward, who fucceeded him in this manor, and a 
daughter named Anne. To his fecond wife he married Mary, daughter of Sir Anrhony 
Poyntz, of Iron-Afton in the county of Gloucefl:er, by whom he had feveral children. 
Of whom Sir Thomas Gorges, the fifth fon, lived at Langford in the county of Wilts, 
and having married Helena relift of William Parr marquis of Northampton, left iflue 
Sir Edward Gorges, knt. (who was created a peer of the kingdom of Ireland, by die 
tide of Baron of Dundalk, July 13, 18 Jac. 1. and was father of Richard lord Gorges, 
who died without iflTue,) and alfo a daughter Elizabeth, married to Sir Hugh Smyth, 
father of Thomas Smyth, of Long-Afhton in this county. 



« Cart. 36 Ed. III. n. 14. 

' Excerpt, e Rcgift. Wellwi. 



Efc. ' Ibid. 

"" Hilt, of Dorfet. ii. 125. 



Ibid. 



Edward, 



158 W R A X A L L. [I!?)0tt6ut^ 

Edward, fon of Sir Edward Qorges, by Mary daughter of Sir John Newton, was 
born in 1 526. He married a daughter of Sir John Walfh, of tlie county of Gloucefter, 
and was father of 

Sir Edward Gorges, born in 1564. He married Dorothy daughter of Sir George 
Speke, of White-Lackington in this county, knight of the Bath, by whom he had iffue 
Sir Robert Gorges, who died without iffue in 1638, and Samuel, who fucceeded to the 
eftate, and feveral daughters, of whom Elizabeth was married to Francis Trenchard of 
Cutteridge, and Anne to Edward Tynte of Chelvy, efqrs. 

Samuel Gorges, eldeft furviving fon of Sir Edward, lived at Wraxall in the times of 
the troubles of the laft century, and paid 582I. compofition money for his eftate;" 
he married Jane daughter of—— Cotterel of Winford, by whom he left iffue at his 
death, in 1671, 

Edward Gorges his fon and heir, who, by Grace daughter of William Winter, of 
Clapton, efqj was father of Samuel Gorges, efq; the laft heir male of this family of the 
Wraxall line, who, dying in 1699, left iffue an only daughter and heirefs Elizabeth, 
married in 1709 to John Codrington, of Codrington in the county of Gloucefter, efqj 
who in her right became poffeffed of this manor of Wraxall, and the manors of NaiKea, 
Flax-Bourton, and Tickenham, all which defcended to Jane his fole daughter and 
heir, who in 1742 was married to Sir Richard Warwick Bampfylde, bart. of Poltimore 
in the county of Devon, father of Sir Charles Warwick Bampfylde, bart. the prefent 
poffeffor. 

The manor-houfe, called Wraxall-Lodge, is a good old building, fituated north- 
weftward from the church, and has a park adjoining to it on the fide of the hill. There 
was a meffuage in Wraxall belonging to the Tyntes, called Whelps-Place, and another 
in Chariton called Crede-Place, which was held by the Berkeleys. 

The living of Wraxall is a reftory in the deanery of Redcliff and Bedminfter, and 
with the chapel of Bourton was in 1292 valued at thirty-two marks.° The patronage 
is in the lord of the manor; the Rev. Robert Simpkinfon is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, which is dedicated to All-Saints, is a very handfome, and within a very 
neat ftrufture, confifting of a nave, chancel, north and fouth ailes, with a good tower at 
the weft end, containing a clock and five bells. In the eaftern wall of the porch, 
which is on the fouth fide of the church, is a door-way leading up eight narrow fteps to 
a fmall opening, from which it formerly was ufual for an acolyte or clerk of inferior 
order to addrefs the people at their entrance into the church, and by fome feafonable 
admonitions to prepare their minds for die enfuing folemnities. 

In the chancel on a large altar tomb of ftone lie the effigies of Sir Edmund Gorges, 
and Anne his wife, the daughter of John Howard duke of Norfolk. He is in armour 
with a gold chain round his neck ; Ihe in a loofe robe with large fleeves, and a 
hood turned back from the face and reaching to the Ihoulders. Round this tomb are 
the following coats of armsj viz. On the fouth fide, i. Lozengy, Or and azure, a 

" Somerfetlhjre Compofition 1651-2. " Taxat. Spiritual. 

chevron 



Iportfiurp.] W R A X A L L. 159 

chevron gules : Gorges. 2. Quarterly, firft, Gorges: {ccond, argett/, om chief gules 
three bezants, Ruflell of Dirham : third. Gules, a lion rampant argent, Mowbray: 
fourth. Argent, a chevron between three caters on the d^xct, fable, Englowes, 3. Ruflell 
of Dirham. On the north fide, i. Mowbray. 2. Quarterly as before. 3. Englowes. 
At the eaft end, i. Quarterly, firft, Argent, three trevets faile : fecond. Gorges: 
third, argent, a chevron engrailed _/}z^/if ; a martlet for diftindion : fourth, Ruflell. 
a. Quarterly as before. At the weft end, i. Gorges and Ruflell, impaling G«i^j, a 
bend azure, between fix fleurs-de-lis or. 2. Barry indented of fix or and azure, im- 
paling or a bend wa.Yy fal/le. 

In the eaft window of the chancel are the arms of Gorges quartered with Ruflrll, 
Mowbray, and Englowes, and the following coat, viz. Or, five falconer's gloves pen- 
dant proper. 

On grave-ftones in the chancel floor are memorials to Grace the wife of Edward 
Gorges, efq; who died Sept. 9, 169S, and Dorothy their daughter, who died Jan. 29, 
1693. Edward Gorges, efq; was interred the 8th day of Sept. 1708. 

Elizabeth the wife of John Codrington died the 13th of February 1740, aged 51. 
Agnes, their fecond daughter, died July 30, 17 15; and Rachel their third daughter, 
Feb. 18, 1717. Elizabeth, the eldcft, died Sept. 27, 1735, aged 25. Arms, a fcfCc 
embattled and counter-embattled between three lions paflTant, Codrington. On an 
efcutcheon of pretence, quarterly firft and fourth, a whirlpool fecond and third lozengy, 
being the ancient and modern arms of Gorges. 

On a plain white marble againft the north wall: " Hie tandem laboribus de- 

fundlus, requiefcit una cum conjuge Avicia (nee enim par conjunftiflimum mors ipfa 
dirimit) venerabilis vir, Thomas Flolt, S. S. theologias profeflTor, ecclefije cathedralis 
Wellenfis cancellarius, & canonicus refidentiarius ; hujus ecclefias parochialis reftor ; 
Irenarches, feu jufticiarius ad pacem in comitatu Somerfetenfi : rerum humanarum 
vices aliquoties expertus, et fata ecclefias Anglicanas, bis peflTundata:, bis inftaurat.-c, 
bis viftas, bis triumphantis, fortunam eodem femper vultu excepit, feu blandientem, 
feu minantem. Vir prifca fide, omnibus aequus ac juftus, fero naturse quod debuit 
perfolvit, anno jetatis fuse 80°, 10'' calendas Aprilis A. D. 1688. Obijt Avicia 4°ca- 
lendas Februarii 1687, anno astatis 70°. Arms, Argent, on a bend engrailed /al>le, 
three fleurs-de-lis of the field. 

On a grave-ftone underneath, on the north fide of the communion-rails, is this in- 

fcription: " Here lyeth the bodies of William Jones, bachelor of the civil lawes, 

one of the prebendaries of the cathedrall churche of Welles, and reftor of the redtory 
ofWraxall. He deceafed the 11 Februari 1609. And of Margaret Jones his wife, 
daughter of Edmund Gorges, efquior, deceafed 17 Februari 1582." 

On the fouth fide of the rails : " Here lyeth the body of Mr. Samuel Still, 

clerk, late reftor of Wraxal, and Argentine his wife, who bodi departed this life in the 
yeare 1698." 

Againft the fouth wall of a fmall chapel forming a recefs at the eaft end of the fouth 
aile, is a handfome marble monument with the following infcription;— — 

" This 



i6o W R A X A L L. [JPOtt&urp* 

" This monument, facred to the memory of Margareta the wife of the Rev. Samuel 
Coopey, M. A. She was the daughter of the Rev. Charles Brent, M. A. reftor 
of Chrift's-Church and St. Werburg in the city of Briftol, and canon-refidentiary of 
St. David's. His ancefbor came from Normandy with the Conqueror, and had great 
pofleffions at Coflington and South-Brent in the reign of Henry I. Many of the 
family ferved the Kings of England in the wars both in Gafcony and Scotland in the 
quality of knights, and were great benefaftors to the abbey of Glaftoribury. The lafl: 
pofleflbr of that ancient family, John Brent, efqj died at Coffington 1693. 

« This is an account of her family only j but fhe wanted no advantages of birth to 
adorn her charader. 

*' Know then, reader, that if a moft compleat education, joined with the fweeteft 
temper J if the fincereft heart, if charity anduniverfal benevolence, if all the focial and 
conjugal virtues, adorned with a truly Chriftian life, could have refcued her from the 
grave, thou wouldeft not have feen here infcribed the imperfcd defcription of this ex- 
cellent woman. 

" After a long and moft painful illnefs, which fhe bore with a marvellous patience, 
it pleafed God to releafe her from all her miferies and troubles, on the 6th day of Dec. 
1744, aged 51. 

" In vicino fubtus domicilio cum cariffima conjuge dormit Samuel Coopey, A. M. 
honeftifilmis parentibus natus. Qualem, dum apud mortales commoratus eft, vitam 
egit, DIES iLLE indicabit. Emigravit A. D. mdccl." Arms, Gules, a chevron ermi- 
misy between three crofles Calvary argent j Coopey : impaling gules, a wivern argent, 
charged on the breaft with three fpots oi ermine; Brent. 

On a brafs plate againft the wall, near the entrance into the pulpit : -" Hie re- 

quiefcit corpus Johannis Tynte, armigeri, qui ineunte etate Rebeccam filiam Ricardi 
Stevens, armigeri in uxorem cepit; fed moriens fine prole, fibi fucceffit jure hereditario 
Edwardus Tynte de Chelvy, armiger, frater ejus proximus. Is Annam, filiam quartam 
Edwardi Gorges de Wraxall militis, in uxorem duxit, ex qua numerofam fufcepit pro- 
lem, quibus omnibus propitietur Deus. Obijt xiiii" die Oftobris 1616, anno xiii° Regis 
Jacobi." Arms, a lion couchant between fix crofs croflets, three in chief, and as many 
in bafe. 

On a tablet againft the wall of the fouth aile, is the following account of benefac- 
tions to this parifti : 

" The Right Hon. the Lady Marchionefs of Northampton, relift of Sir Thomas 
Gorges, knt. gave lool. for the ufe of the poor of Wraxall, with which were purchafed 
certain lands in the parifli of Nailfea, called the Frith, being about twenty acres, and 
now lealed out for iil. 10s. per annum; which money is to be diftributed upon St. 
Thomas's-day, according to the will of the donor. 

" Mrs. Elizabeth Gorges, relift of Samuel Gorges, cfq; gave a filver falver for 
bread for the ufe of the communion-table, . 

"John 



JpOttftUtgO WRAXALL. i6i 

« John Codrington, cfq; gave the cufliion and pulpit cloth now ufed, and a covering 
of the fame for the communion-table. 

*' John Codrington, efq; gave five pounds five fhillings towards the church clock. 
" The branched candlcftick was given by Ifaac Martindale, gent, in the year 1728." 
In the church-yard is a large yew-tree, and a fine crofs, with the fteps and pedeftal 
nearly perfcdt. 



FLAX-BO URTON. 

IN the valley betwixt Wraxall on the north, and Barrgw on the fouth, ftands the 
little village of Flax-Bourton, primarily denominated Bourton, or Burghton, becaufc 
it had about it a burgh or fence at a time when the adjoining villages were open and 
undiflinguifhed by inclofuresj and additionally Flax-Bourtony becaufc the abbot of 
Flaxley in Gloucefterfhire anciently held the principal eftate in this parifh, having 
exchanged for it certain of their demefnes at Regil in the parifh of Winford.' It 
confifts chiefly of one ftreet, pleafantly fituated upon the turnpike-road from Briftol 
through Long-Afliton (from which it is three miles diftant) to Brockley, CongerHjury, 
and the villages on the coaft of the Briftol Channel. John Gore and James Sparrow, 
efqrs. have here very good houfes. At the bottom of the valley, which has the appella- 
tion o( Bourton-Combe) a fpring called Stancombe rifes at particular periods once or twice 
a year, and forming itfelf into a rivulet runs through the parifh into Nailfea water. 

This place was originally and ftill is a member of the manor of Wraxall, and there- 
fore is not nominally accounted for in the Norman furvey. In fubfequent records it is 
ftiled Hamleta de Burton, and pafTed through the families of de Wrockfhale, Moreville, 
Gorges, and Codrington, to that of Bampfylde, wherein it ftill continues. 

The living is a curacy in the deanery of RedclifF and Bedminfter, and is a chapel to 
the church of Wraxall, where the inhabitants have their burial. 

The church is a very fmall ftrufture of one pace, ftandingon the north fide of the 
high road, being 64 feet in length, and 22 in breadth, with a tower at the weft end jo 
feet high. In an arcade over the divifion betwixt the chancel and the nave, hangs a 
faint's bell, which is common in moft churches in this neighbourhood. In tiie church- 
yard is a yew-tree, and the reliques of a crofs. 

The inhabitants here tell travellers, that whenever divine fervice is pei-formed, the 
minifter preaches on the pinnacle of the tower. This is literally true; for the pinnacle 
being many years fince blown down, was cut into joifts for the floor of the pulpit. 

About fourfcore years ago one John Doughton left ten fhillings per annum, for a 
fermon to be preached in this church, in commemoration of a narrow efcape from death 
by the fall of a tree, 

f Cart. Antiq. 

Vol. III. Y NAILSEA. 



[ i62 ] ri^ort&ur^ 



N A I L S E A. 

THIS parifh is fituated to the weft of Flax-Bourton, and to the fouthweft from 
Wraxall, in a deep and miry country, in fome parts (particularly that called 
Nailfea-Heatb, which has the appearance of a difufed and neglected foreft) thickly tufted 
with timber-trees, holly, and common briar. The foil abounds with coal, of which 
there are four pits within the precinfts of- this pari(h: the coal is of that fort which 
burns into white afh, and being quick of kindling, affords excellent fuel. A manu- 
fadure of crown plate glafs has lately been eftablilKcd here by Mr. John Robert Lucas, 
of Briftol, at which a great number of hands are employed, and a range of houfes, forming 
as it were a fmall colony, is eredted for the habitation of the workmen and their families. 

The village of Nailfea, comprifing the parifh church, lies weftward on the Ikirts of 

a large moor, to which it gives its name. 

This place was another member of the manor of Wraxall, (to the lord whereof it to 
this day belongs) and the fame records which mention Bourton, include this alfo as a 
hamlet or outfkirt to the then town of Wraxall, whofe buildings extended on this fide 
to the brook which traverfes the valley on the north fide the village. 

But it; fhould feem that fome one of the lords of Wraxall had parcelled out the 
royalty of fome eftates in this parifli to other families. For the inquifitions and other 
documents exprefsly fliew that the family of de Mora, de la More, or Bythemorc, 
wei'e pofTefTed of a manor in Nailfea in very early time.' And it alfo appears that the 
faid manor, which was held of the lords of Hinton-St.-George, palTed from them by an 
heirefs to the Percevals, and was fold in 1582 by George Perceval to Richard Cole of 
the city of Briftol, who afterwards, referving a part of it, fold the reft of it in parcels.'' 
The court, or manor-houfe, fometime inhabited by Cole's family abovementioned, is 
fituated at a very confiderable diftance from the village of Nailfea, and near the church 
of the adjoining parifh of Chelvy. 

The living is a curacy in the deanery of Redcliff and Bedminfter, and is like Eourtpn 
a chapel to Wraxall; but with this diftinftion, that the inhabitants bury in their own 
parifh church, which is a confiderable building, compofed of a nave, chancel, fouth aile, 
and tower at the weft end containing five bells. 

The pulpit is of ftone, and fingularly conftrufted, the afcent thereto being up a low 
narrow flight of fteps in the wall to a fmall projeding opening for the ftation of the 
iTiinifter. 

Againft the north wall of the chancel is a good old monument, with this infcription 

on the tablet: " M. S. Under thofe fiibjacent ftones reft interred the bodies of 

Richard Cole, efq; who deceafed June the 7th, 1650, aged 62 years; and of Ann his 
wife, the daughter of Sir Arthur Hopton, knight, who departed this life June the 9th, 
1650, by whom he had ifTue a fon named Samuel, who put off mortality at twelve yeares 
old, Oa 17, i6a6, and his body is heer inhumed. Alfo a daughter named Dorothy, 

' Vide %. poll Mort. Cart. Antiq. &c. » Houfeof Yvery.ii. 117. married 



IportlJUtg.] N A I L S E A. 163 

married to Alexander Popham, efq; Ofbobcr the 29th, iW5> who changed this life at 
the age of 24, April 2, 1643, and lyeth buried at the Gaunys at Briftol. 

" Hcer refteth likewife the body of Mary the daughter ocWilliann Collins, efq; and 
Ann his wife, fifter to die aforefaid Richard Cole, who departed Sept. 12, 1647, in 
the firft year of her age. 

" And laftly, of William Cole, efq; brother and heyre to the faid Richard, who 
ended this frayle life Febr. the 22d, 1657, in the 57th year of his age, at whofc ap- 
pointment and charge this monument was eredlcd. 

*' Mifta fenum ac juvenum conduntur corpora, fitque 
" Candidus in tumuli carcere carbo cinis.' 

" The candid Coles which kindly burn'd 

" To' the warmth of many by their heat, 
" To alhes black by death are turn'd, 

" Yet fhine their foules in heavenly feat." 

" Hojea xiii. 14. I will ranfome them from the power of the grave, I will redeeme 
" them from death." 

Arms, On the top of the monument. Quarterly, firft and fourth, party per pale 
ttfient and gules, a bull paflant counterchanged; Coles. Second, Gules, on a chevron 
argent, three etoiles/a^/f. Third, Or, a fefle azure-, over all a faltire gules charged with 
five bezants J Afh. Under the monument, Azure, a lion rampant gules, impaling Coles. 

On the fouth wall of the aile is a neat marble monument to the memory of William 
Bullock, of this parilh, gent, who died Jan. 18, 1780, aged 53; and to feveral of his 
family. And another. To the memory of William Hinkes, who pradifed phyfick and 
furgery in this parifh 50 years with reputation and fuccefs, and died July 15, 1747, 
aged 77. Mary his wife, who died June 29, 1754, aged 72, and divers of their chiU 
dren, are alfo commemorated. 

At the weft end of this aile the following infcription is cut on an upright ftone in 
the wall: 

As DAIES DOO PASS AND NIGHTS DOO COME, 
So DOTH man's life DECAIE, 

Therefore lett vs while wee have tyme 

Doe good if that we maie. 

For Thomas Jenkens who latelie liv'b 

Is nowe laide in the grovnd; 

And to the poore of Nailsea towne 

Bv WILL he cave five povnde. 

The vse thereof each half yere's end 

They are to have fvll svre. 

And eake the stock from age to age 

For ever to endvre. Thomas Jenk[ens] 

Rector de Backwill is 

Obijt mortem 15 DIE Octob. 1626. 

Y 2 TICKENHAM, 



[ i64 ] [Potttjur?, 



T I C K ^ N H A M. 

A Large moor, deep and moralTy, and two centuries ago impaffable, but now ren- 
dered tolerably fafe for horfes by a caufey raifed acrofs it, divides the parifh of 
Nailfea from that of Tickenham, which ftands on the very edge of the moor, and at 
the foot of that fame chain of mountain which fkirts this hundred from eaft to weft, 
and in this fpot is rendered beautiful by patches of flouriftiing woods. Upon the very 
brow of the hill, overlooking the village, is a Roman encampment called Cadbury- 
Cajile, the etymology of which has already been given in the account of another work 
of the farne name, but of much greater extent and confequence/ This contains about 
one acre of ground, and is nearly of an oval form, fortified by a double rampart twelve 
feet in height, and compofed of loofe limeftone, the produce of the fpot. To the eaft 
of this camp Is a large wood called Umebridge-lVood, which was formerly a manor of 
the Berkeleys, and is now attached to that of Portbury. In this wood, as in many 
others in this neighbourhood, are great numbers of the Fly-Orchis, and fome other 
fpccies of that plant. The modern name of this place is certainly a corraption of the 
Saxon Lime-pperj, which fignifies a ridge of lime-ftone, and in that fenfe is pecu- 
liarly adapted to this rocky eminence. Between the villages of Tickenham and Wraxall, 
there is alfo a hamlet called Stonage, which originally derived .its name from its fitu- 
ation on the ftony edge or acclivity of the fame rock. 

At the time of the Conqueft the village of Tickenham was divided between William 
de Ow, and Ernulph de Hefding: 

" William himfeif holds Ticheham. Saulf and Teof held it in the time of King 
" Edward for two manors, and gelded for eight hides and a half The arable is nine 
" carucates. In demefne are three carucates, and four Icrvanis, and twelve villanes, 
** and five cottagers, with fix ploughs. There are thirty acres of meadow, and fixty 
** acres of pafture, and one hundred and ten acres of wood. It was worth one hundred 
*' ftiillings when he received it, now fix pounds."* 

" Engeler holds of Ernulph, Ticheham. Edric held it in the time of King Edv/ard, 
*' and gelded for one hide, and three virgates of land. The arable is three carucates. 
" There are three villanes, and one cottager, and one fervant, and fix acres of meadow. 
" Wood three furlongs long, and one furlong broad. It is worth forty ftiillings.'" 

A branch of the Berkeley family having their refidence in this village, adopted their 
furnames from it, and called themfelves de Tickenham. Roger de Tickeuham was 
living in the time of Ric. I."" and was father of Nicholas de Tickenham, who in the 
time of King Henry III. for the health of his own foul, and the fouls of Sybil and 
Wendyen his two wives, granted to the hofpital of Billefwick in Briftol the privilege 
of digging turf in his moor of Tickenham.' To him fucceeded Ralph de Tickenham, 



' Vol. u. p. 72. ^ Lib. Domefday. « Ibid. t Cart. Antiq. 

' Regift. Hofpital de Billefwyke, MS. 



■who 



IPortburg.] 



TICKENHAM. 



165 



who is witnefs to a charter of Thomas de Berkeley in the time of Henry III. and had 
iflue Nicholas, who confirmed the grant made to the hofpital of Billefwick aforefaid j' 
and 33 Edw. I. is certified to hold two carucates of land in the manor of Tickenham, 
which manor was held of Roger Bigod, earl of Norfolk and marJhal of England, by 
the fervice of keeping the gate of the caftle of Chepftow in Monmouthfhire for forty 
days in the time of war.* From which Nicholas, furnamed Fitz-Ralph de Tickenham, 
defcended Sir Thomas Fitz-Nicholas, who was owner of Tickenham 7 Ric. II. and 
5 Henry IV.*" and at his death left iflue a fole daughter and heirefs, Catherine, married 
to Robert Poyntz, whofe defcendant Nicholas Poyntz lived at Tickenham in 1 640. 
The manor now belongs to Sir Charles Warwick Bampfylde, bart. to whofe father Sir 
Richard Bampfylde, bart. it defcended from the Codringtons and the Gorges. 

From other documents we learn that in the time of Edw. I. Sir Richard Keylle held 
the fifth part of a knight's fee in Tickenham of the honour of Gloucefter.' An4 
aj Edw. III. the heir of William de Bradford held the fourth part of a knight's fee here 
of Hugh Le Defpenfer.'' 1 9 Edw. IV. John Berkeley, efq; held at his death the manor 
of Tickenham of the earl of Huntingdon, as of his manor or caftle of Chepftow in the 
marches of Wales; as alfo the manor of Brytton, of the Bilhop of Bath and Wells, as 
of his manor of Compton-Epifcopi, and lands in Mark and Burnham, leaving Cecilia 
the wife of James Afh, his fifter and heir.' 

A confiderable eftate alfo in this parifli belonged to the Percevals of Wefton, into 
whofe family it came in the time of Henry VI. by the marriage of the heirefs of William 
de Bofco with Ralph Perceval, whole defcendant Sir John Perceval alienated the fame 
in 1656." The Baves afterwards had this eftate, and there was an old court-houfe 
(now pulled down) belonging to it, called Barrow-Ceurt, fituated under the hill in the 
road to Clevedon. 

But the ancient manfion, called 'Tickenbam-Court, ftands adjoining to the church- 
yard, and with its ruined walls and Gothick windows make a very venerable appearance. 
In awing of the building eaftward ftands the chapel, now ufed as a brew-houfej and 
in an old parlour over the chimney, carved in the oak wainfcot, were three fliields of 
arms J the firft of which is gone; the fecond is, Quarterly, firft and fourth a griffin 
fegreant, Davis. Second and third, a chevron between three fpears' heads; Rice, 
impaling two lions paflant. The fecond coat impales three eagles difplayed, Rodney. 
Rice Davis, whofe arms are here quartered, fometime refided at Tickenham, and mar- 
ried Dorothy daughter of IMaurice Rodney, efq; and fifter and coheir of Sir George 
Rodney, knt. 

The patronage of the church of Tickenham, valued in 129a at nine marks,' was 
anciently in the abbot and convent of St. Auguftine in Briftol; and after the diflblu- 
tion of that monaftery, was granted by King Henry VIII. to the Biftiop of Briftol and 
his fucceflbrs for ever. The living is a vicarage in the deanery of RedclifF and Bed- 
minfter. The Rev. John Cafberd, D.D. is the prefent incumbent. 



' Regift. Hofpital. de Billefwyke, MS. « Efc. 

' Efc. ■"HoufeofYveiy. 



* Cart, Antiq. ' Lib. Feed, * Ibid. 

* Taxat. Spiritual, 



The 



i66 TICKENHAM. [IPotttJUr?, 

The churthj which ftands on a rifing ground near tlie edge of the moor, is, accord- 
ing to Edlon, dedicated to St. Quiricus and Julietta. It is an ancient building, confid- 
ing of a nave, chancel, north and fouth ailes, and a tower at the weft end containmg 
five bells. 

The font here is very ancient, being a fquare ftone ciftern, refting on four fmall 
round pillars, one at each angle, and a larger one in the centre. 

In the fouth aile ftands a very ancient altar tomb, covered with a flat ftone, in which 
is cut a large crofs flory voided; but no infcription. 

Againft the north wall of the north aile, on a long raifed ftone bench, lie three full- 
fized effigies in length, two of them being men in armour, with an oblong ftiield on 
their left arm; and the middle one a female attired in a long robe, with a wimple under 
her chin, and her hands placed together in a fuppliant pofture. Thefe effigies are 
fuppofed to reprefent fome of the de Tickenham family, but no memorial remains 
whereby to afcertain the particular perfons of whom they were intended to preferve 
the remembrance. 

Againft the wall of the fouth aile is a marble monument to the memory of Mr. 
Samuel Bave, of this parifti, gent. Arms, Or, a rofe gules j on a c\\\t( azure a lion 

courant argent. , 

In a window of the fouth aile, over the ancient ftone effigies above-mentioned, are 
thefe arms in painted glafs, viz. i . Or, three pallets gulest within a bordure azure be- 
zantee; Baffet, i. Quarterly, Gules and or, a bend argent; Fitz-Nicholas. In the 
chancel window are thefe arms, i. Argent, on a canton dfnAtr gules, a quatrefoil or. 
2, Gules, a. chevron between ten crofles patee argent, Berkeley. 3. Gules, on a chevron 
er three ttoilts/abk, 4. Or, three pallets gules, on a canton a crofs patee argent. 



CLEVEDON. 

THIS village ftands at the extremity of the hill weftward from Tickenham, and is 
fo denominated, becaufe the ClifF or Clive here ceafing a Dun or Valley is 
formed, declining to the Briftol Channel. The rocks here rife with prodigious gran- 
deur, and to a great height; on one of them, overlooking a vaft extent of land and 
water, a tower formerly ftood, called Wake^s-Tower, from the family of Wake, who 
were lords of the manor, and erefted it as a place of obfervation. This tower has long 
lince been demoliftied, and in its place, about the year 1738, Mr. Elton built a fummer- 
houfc, which alfo is gone to ruins. In this liill are feveral old lead mines, and that kind 
of ore is frequently found in digging near the furface. Lapis calaminaris alfo was for- 
merly dug here. The ride to this village over ths hill from Leigh-Down is juftly 
efteemed the fineft jo the coynty. 

King 



IPOCtburp.] C L E V E D O N 

•^^* . 167 

Chvedon IS certified to hold two knUrs' fees of H7nrv T . " F "'.^'"'^"^ ^^ 
of William earl of Gloucefter ' Thril u ^ °''^'' ^"'^ °"^ ^"'ghfs fee 

William fucceeld Ma ^w de Cli Jvtn T'' ' o- "''"°'" °^ ^^*^^^d°"- To thi» 

de Cliveden was llvfnTL " ■ ,6c « Edi m" °" "T'i'- "°""«'-' "^""-ew 
;. Ric n. and ^<^^^^.rJ:ci'lf^%'^^\^^^^^ ■37». 

liave been out of the reo-nlar lin^ of ^»r . r • ^ ^hefe laft feem to 

of Joan one of the fifter. nfrh^ r IS? ''"^rx Thomas Lovel, knt. the hu/band 

Margery hs other fifter In which " ''".^'''' ^"' J"'" ^'"^^' ^^e hufband of 

Bluet and Marc^er/hrw^fe ' 9 '/ u °^°"-^'y'^°"'"' ^^''^ ^'^g"^^ ^o John 

all his righS[ji:t s.f rit: tveff :r of ^f r " ^r 7-r ^ 

ment bned. Which 9ir Th^^. . u ■ . ^ , VV^""^' '"" °* ^"^ Thomas Lovel above- 
married to SW^^^^'^^Z'tt 'f :""" ""'"8'"" '^ '"''"''■ ^8""' 

a.iedinparSa:^dt=ir;:5.t-eir'^^^^^^^^^^^ 

y mn. MS. 1,92. « Seals fron, ancient Deed^. ' Cart. Antk,. 

^•"^- *^'''<'- ' Rot. Claui. ,5 Ric. n. 



year 



1 68 C L E V E D O N. [IPotttJUtp. 

year of his reign granted one moiety of this manor of Clevedon to Sir Humphrey 
Stanley, and Sir James Parker, knts. and the other to John Crocker and John Dudley, 
efqrs. to hold by the fervice of a red rofe, payable yearly at the feaft of the nativity of 
St. John the Baptift." But fhortly after the faid Roger Wake obtained a pardon, and 
the reftitution of all or the greateft part of his lands, and fetded this manor, with the 
capital manfion, and divers lands and tenements in Clevedon, on Richard Wake his 
fecond fon, whom he had by Elizabeth, daughter of Sir William Catefby, of Afliby- 
Legers in the county of Northampton, knt.° 

Which Richard Wake bore for his arms Or, two bars gules, in chief three torteaux; 
he had iffue feveral children, of whom John the eldeft was of Clevedon, and married 
Elizabeth daughter of Sir Edward Gorges, knt. by whom he had iffue five fons, whereof 
John the eldeft fucceeded him in this manor, and William the youngeft was progenitor 
of William Wake archbifhop of Canterbury. John, the eldeft fon, married Margaret 
daughter and heir of Robert Goodwin, of Portbury, efq; and by her had iffue Sir 
Baldwin Wake, who was created a baronet by King James I. in the 19th year of his 
reign. He married Abigail daughter of Sir George Digby, of Colefhill in the county 
of Warwick, knt. and had iffue Sir John Wake, and feveral other children. 

Hence the manor of Clevedon came to the pofleffion of John Digby earl of Briftol, 
and of that family was purchafed by Sir Abraham Elton, the firft baronet of that name, 
whofe defcendant Sir Abraham Ifaac Elton, bart. is thcprefent poffeffor. 

The nfiinor-houfe of Clevedon is a noble old building, the work of different periods, 
very pleafantly fituated on the fouth fide of the village, facing Nailfea moor, and on 
the fouthem flope of the hill, which is here wildly feared with craggy rocks, intermixed 
with fine herbage. 

The church of Clevedon was appropriated to the abbey of St. Auguftin in Briftol, 
and was in 1292 valued at twelve marks.'. The living is vicarial in the patronage of 
the Bilhop of Briftolj the Rev. Edward Colfton Greville is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Andrew; it ftands at the weft end of the village, at 
a fmall diftance from the edge of the cliff, which is here very fteep and rugged ; but by 
reafon of its height the building is fecure from the fury of the fea, which Ibmetimes 
beats with vaft violence when the wind fets in ftrong from the weft. It is built in the 
form of a crofs, with the tower in the centre, and is from eaft to weft one hundred and 
four feet, and including the porch, fifty-fix feet in breadth from north to fouth. 

In the fouth crofs aile or chapel, which is the burial-place of the lords of the manor, 
there is a ftone on which is the effigy of a man in armour, with his fword by him, and 
under his feet a bull. The arms and infcription, by being frequendy trod on, are 
worn out. 

Againft the north wall of the chancel is a large ftone-tomb, with this infcription 
round the top ftone: — " Heere refteth the body of John Kenn, of Clyvedon, the fonne 

• Rot. Pari. 3 Heu, VII. » EngUflj Baronetage, i. 468. ? Taxat. Spiritual, 

of 



IpOttbUtg.] CLEVEDON. 169 

of John Ken, of Ken, efquier, who decefled the 12th daye of Aprill in the yeare of 
oure Lord Gou 1593." Arms, Ermine, three crefcents j-a/w, two and onej a naullct 
for diftindtion, 

" Thomas Gwrlliam, alias Phillips, gave fix acres of land in Kingfton, the profits 
thereof yearly for ever to be employed in placing poor men's fons of this parifh 
apprentices. He died March 4, 1650. 

" The Right Hon. John earl of Briftol gave five pounds per annum to the poor of 
this parifh forever, April 6, 1687. 

" 1727. Sir Abraham Elton, bart. fettled five pounds per annum, clear of all 
charges, for teaching poor children to read, inhabiting in this parifli, for ever." 



WALTON IN GORDANO. 

THAT chain of rocky mountain which bounds the greater part' of this hun- 
dred on the fouthern fide, having terminated at Clevedon, a frefh ridge here 
commences over againft the other, ftretching in a northeaft direftion along the Channel 
to Portifhead-Point, where it dips into the fea. The intermediate fpace betwixt thefe 
hills is formed into a pleafing and pifturefque amphitheatre, the fides of which arc 
ftudded with villages, feats, woods, rocks, and paftures. The bottom is a moor, the 
commonage of which belongs to tliis parifh, and thofe of Wefton and Clapton j this 
moor is a long narrow wedge-like level, extending nearly three miles from eaft to weft, 
often overflowed in the winter feafon, and frequented by numbers of wild-geefe, ducks, 
and other forts of aquatick fowls. There was formerly a decoyj butof late years it has 
been neglefted. 

The village of Walton lies under the fouthern brow of the hill abovementioned, 
with ah afpeft towards the moor, and the north (lope of the Clapton and Tickenham 
heights. It derived its name from the Saxon Fealb, a v:ild, or wold, and ron, a town, 
a term ftridly applicable, if not to its prefent, at leaft to its original fituation, which 
was on the northwefl; declivity of the hill towards the fea, where now ftand the ruins 
of the old parifh church. On the very fummit of this hill, (commanding on the land fide 
a delightful profpcft of a long trad of hilly country, bounded on the eaft by Gloucefter- 
fhire, and on the fouth by Mendip; and on the fea fide a full view of the coaft of Wales, 
the Channel juft underneath, and the flat and fteep Holmes, rifing as it were out of 
the bofom of the water) ftands Walton-Caftle or Lodge, the property of Lord Poulett. 
This building is of an o6langular form, having a round tower at each angle, and an 
embattled wall between each. In the centre of the area ftands the keep or citadel, 
which is alfo oftangular, and has a fmall turret of the fame fliape on the fouthcaft fide, 
rifing above the reft of the ftrudurei the roof and floors are fallen in, and no uie made 

Vol. III. Z of 



WALTON IN GORDANO. [IPOttiJUtp. 

of anv Dirt of the caftle except a fmall portion of the hallium, which ferves as a dairy 
?or th^eCan of the r^eighbouring farm. The entrance is through an embattled gate 
eXard Th ch led dirfftly to a%ortal opening into the keep. Over the door-way 
of 2 of the round tovverJ are the arms of Poulett, tl.e owners of tbs confpicuous 
edifice, and lords of the contiguous manor j viz. three fwords in pile. 

Walton was the only manor in this county which was pofieffed at the Conqueft by 
Rabhde Mortimer, kinfman of the Norman duke, and one of h.s prmc.pal com- 
manders in hi expedition into England. His eftates lying widely difperfed through- 
out thTs kingdom, this manor was held under him by one Richard who in all proba- 
bUh^was pSgen-itor of the family of de Walton, who held eftates here long after the 
following furvey was taken: e ■>.• n ' 

cc Ralph de Mortemer holds of the King, Waltone, and Richard of him. Gunn. 
« held it^in the time of King Edward, and gelded for three hides and a h^lf- The 
« arable is four carucates. In demefne is one carucate, and feven villanes, and five 
« cotuaers with three ploughs. There are twenty acres of meadow, and one hundred 
.c ac^es^of prC-e, and V-res of wood. When he ^received it, it was worth fifty 
« fhillin^s; now twenty Ihillings more; that is, feventy. 

Of the defcendants of this Ralph de Mortimer, who were Earls of March, and lords 
ofWilore in Herefordfhire, notice has already been taken in other parts of this 
work It will therefore be fufficient to obferve, that they continued in the pofleffion 
Tf h^ rovakv of this manor till it paffed in the time of Henry VI. by an heir female 
; he Hou Lf York. An inquifftion taken after the deceafe of Roger de Mortimer 
eaifof March, 35 Edw. III. fets forth, that the faid Roger held at his death half a 
knight'rfe in Walton juxta Portbury, which moiety was afterwards held by Andi-ew 
de Irompton.^ But the demefnes and other eftates in Walton were leafed out to the 
JamuTf Berkeley, who a Heniy IV. obtained for the fame a ^^f^^l^J^-^^^^X 
In the timeof Henry VI. the manor of Walton was the property of Sir Thomas de 
Chedde;, by whofelughter and coheirefs it pafled to Sir John Newton, knt^ and .6 
Edw. IV. was held in dower by Emmota Newton of the Duke of York. After her 
deaTh it was inherited by Richard fon of the faid Sir John Newton, who left two 
da ;\ rs hL coheirs, of'whom Jane the wife of Sir Thomas Griffin, knt. -^^[^^ 
this manor as a parcel of the fliare of her inheritance. Soon after which it fell into 
h h'nds of the'crown; and, together with the manor of Chedder, was granted by 
King Edw. VI. by letters patent bearing date at Ely, Dec. 6 the fixth year of his 
S to Sir Edward Seymour, knt. and his heirs and affigns, refervingao annual rent 
ofTi X9S. 8d. to be plid to the King, his heirs and fucceffors out of the f-d manors 
at the feaft of St. Michael the archangel.^ Which Sir Edward Seymour, 16 May 4 
and 5 Phil, and Mary, fold this manor with its appertenances to Sir John Thynne, 
W'from whom it came to Chriftopher Ken, of Ken -/J^^ -"J'/J^i.:,^^ 
daughter and coheirefs Elizabeth conveyed it in marriage to John the firft Earl 1 oulett, 
ancestor of John the fourth and prefent Earl Poulett, who is now lord of this manor. 

. Lib. Domefday. ' Efc. ' Cart. * Hen. IV. p. - ». 2. ' Efc. 16 Ed. IV. 

• Harl, MS. 608. ' Licence to alienate. 



l^ottbutp.] 



WALTON IN GORDANO. 



lyi 



The living is a reflory in the deanery of RedcUffand Bedminfter, and in the patro- 
nage of the lord of the manorj the Rev. Thomas AUcn is the prefent incumbent. 

The original ancient parifh church, which was dedicated to the honour of St. Paul 
ftands in ruins at the bottom of the hill, a fmall diftance wcftward from the caftie and 
within a few yards of the beach. It confifted of a finglc aile, with a tower at the wefl: 
end, which, except the roof and crown of the parapet, is pretty entire; and at the 
northeaft angle is a winding ftone flair-cafe to the top of the building. A large mitred 
arch opens to the nave, fome of the walls of which are alfo (landing; and in the wail 
at the eafl end are two fmall niches, and the remains of a third, which formerly held 
images. In the fouth wall is a benetoire for holy water. In the church-yard, a little 
eaftward from the ruins, ftands an ancient crofs of three rows of fteps, with apedeftal 
and pillar nearly perfed. This cemetery is furrounded by a ftone waU, and is to this 
-day the place of fepulture of the poor of Walton parifh, whofe bones reft here more 
quietly than thofe enflirined within the maufoleums of the great. For here no fpade 
inquifitive of earth's contents, difturbs the hallowed foil, which is but feldom trod 
even by the foot of the antiquarian; and the traveller, who vifits this folitary demain 
IS welcomed by no other founds than the howling of the winds, the roarintr of the fea* 
tlie lowing of the cattle, and the bleating of the fheep upon the neighbouring mountain! 
A church of modern eredlion of one pace, plain and fimple to a degree, with a turret 
and one fmall bell, ftands in the viUage on the fouth fide of the hill, and is the prefent 
place of worfliip for the inhabitants. 

Near this laft-mentioned church, under the cove of the hill, is a good ftone manfion 
adorned with a neat pleafure-ground and plantations, the feat of Sir John Durbin, knt. 



WESTON, NORTH-WESTON, or WESTON in GORDANO. 

npHIS village is fituated at the foot of the fame chain of mountain, and is diftant 
one mile eaft from Walton, and betwixt that and Portifhead. It obtained die 

"J"^? J^fT r"" "' '^'^""^y ^""^"^'^ ^^""^ ^he hundred town of Portburv; that 
otmrth-WeJiort, from its northerly fituation in refped oiWejlon-Ju^er-Marc; and that 
p r^'" z« Gordano, or Wejion-Gordein, for the reafon afTigned in the account of 
talton, or St. George's. The hill above the village is denominated from it Wefton- 
uown, and has on its flope fome fine coppice woods of oak and hazel, but the rock 
prevents the timber from arriving at any large fize. On the brow fronting the fouth, 
IS a neat houfe, the feat of Cann Wilkins, efqj who is lord of this manor. 

At the time of the Conqueft it was held of the Bifhop of Coutances by Azelin, or 
records' ^^'^^''^> ^s we are informed by the Norman furvey, which thus 



Z2 



" Azelin 



172 WESTON IN GORD AN O. [PottfiUtg* 

" Azeliti holds of the Eifliop, Westone. Britnod held it in the time of King 
".Edward, and gelded for feven hides. The arable is fix carucates. Irt demefne are 
" three carucates, and two fervants, and fix villanes, and feven cottagers, with three 
"ploughs. There are thiity-three acres of meadow. Pafl:ure twelve furlongs long, 
" and eight furlongs broad. Wood feven furlongs long, and three furlongs broad. 
" It was and is worth four pounds and ten fhillings.'" 

Who this Afcelin-Gouel de Perceval was, has already been Ihewn in the fecond 
volume of this work, in treating of the ancient barony of Cary, which was deduced 
fi-om the fame perfon through the Lovels and the St. Maursi*" we fhall now retrace 
the defcendants of this Afcelin in the name of Perceval, who had their refidence and 
interment within the manor we are now fpeaking of. 

This Afcelin Gouel de Perceval married Ifabeldaughter of William earl of Breteuil, 
Pacey, Conflrantine, and Yvery, in Normandy;" and by her had iflue feveral fons, of 
whom Robert and William fucceffively pofleflTed this manor. The latter, who adopted 
the furname of Lovel, married Auberie daughter of Robert earl of Mellent, by whom 
he had iflue five fons, Waleran, furnamed de Yvery, Ralph, Henry, William, and 
Richard. 

Waleran de Yvery, tlie eldeft of thefe fons, fucceeded his father in the Norman 
eftates, and left a pofterity which enjoyed the fame. Ralph the fecond fon ufed the 
paternal title of Lovel, and married the daughter of Henry de Newmarch, but left no 
children. Henry the third fon had iflue by Alice his wife two fons, Ralph and Henry, 
the firft of whom dying without iflue, this manor, with the barony of Cary, and the 
greater part of the eftates in England, came to Henry his brother, the fecond of that 
name, fon of Henry, and grandfon of William Gouel de Perceval abovementioned. 

Which Heniy was living in the time of King John, and by Chriftian his wife had 
ifliie Richard Lovel, baron of Cary, (from whom were five defcents of that name from 
38 Henry IIL to 25 Edw. IIL when it terminated in St. Maur;'') and alfo four daugh- 
ters, to whom he gave this manor in four equal portions. The firft of thefe daughters 
was married to Sir Walter de Efleleg, or Afliley; the fecond to Thomas le Briton; the 
third to Matthew Wakej and the fourth to WilHam Fitz-Walter. William Fitz- 
Walter fold his fourth part of this eftate, which he had in right of his wife, to Thomas 
le Briton ; and he conveyed the fame together with his own fliare to Gefferey Maun- 
deville, who thus became pofl"efled of a moiety of this manor. The part belonging to 
Matthew Wake was given by him to Philip Lucan in marriage with his daughter; and 
the remaining fourth part, belonging to Walter de Efleleg, was by him given to 
Geffery de Marifco, who gave it in marriage with his grandaughter to Emerick de 
Gardino, or Gordein." In procefs of time, however, thefe portions became united in 
the families of Wyke and St. Maur, and from them again returned by marriage to the 
houfe of Perceval> whofe genealogy we now purfue. 

• Lib. Doraefday. ^ Vd, ii. p, jz. 

' Anderfon's Genealogical Hift. of theHoufe of Yvery, i. 191. 

* See vol. ij, of this work, p. 54. , .' Telia de Nevil. 

Sir 



PortbUtp.] WESTON IN GORDANO. 173 

Sir Richard de Perceval, the youngefl: fon of William dc Gouel de Perceval, by 
Aviberie daughter of Robert earl of Mellent, was portioned by his father with lands in 
Stawel in this county, befides which he had Butcombe, Eaftbury in Carhampton, and 
many other eftates, which defcended to his pofterity the fucceffivc lords of Wefton in 
Gordano. This Sir Richard de Perceval attended King U.ic, I. in his expedition into 
Paleftine, A. D. 11 90, where, being a pcrfon of uncommon ftrtngth and valour, he 
diftinguiflaed himfelf in feveral fierce engagements. In one of them, it is faid, that 
having loft his leg, he undauntedly continued on horfeback till he alfo loft his arm, and 
that even then with the horfe's bridle in his teeth, he perfifted to deal (laughter round 
him till he fell by lofs of blood/ Notwithftanding this tradition (one part of which feems 
to be confirmed by the family creft, which was a man armed on .horfeback, with one 
leg couped) it is certain that he lived to return home, and was buried in the church of 
Wefton, under a fuperb monument, which was deftroyed in the civil wars of the laft 
century. On a ftone near it there was this infcription to his memory. 

*' ©rate pro anima EycatDi Ipcrcetial, qui miUtatiit in tecra fanta com 
mesc BgcarDo, a. C. mn." 

He bore for his arms. Argent, on a chief Undented gules three croffes patee of the 
firft; ancj having married the daughter of William de Mohun, had ifTue three fons, 
Robert furnamcd de Butcombe, Hamelin, (both of whom died without iffue) and 
Richard, by whom this line of Perceval was continued. 

This Richard was alfo in the wars of Paleftine with his father, and was likewife buried 
at Wefton, where his monument remained till the year 1692.* He left iftue Robert 
Perceval, who fettled in Ireland, and was fummoned to parliament there as Baron 
Perceval, 1 3 Edw. I. being progenitor of the Lords Perceval of that kingdom ; Hugh, 
who had Walton, Coreville, and other manors in this county j and John, fometimes 
called de Walloti, and fometimes de Perceval. 

Which John, being twice married, had iffue feveral children, of whom Sir Roger de 
Perceval, the eldeft, inherited Wefton, and was fummoned to parliament among the 
barons, 24 Edw. I. He died about the year 1 3 1 2, leaving iffue by Joan, daughter and 
heir of Sir John de Bretefche, Sir John Perceval, who fucceeded himj and Richard, 
who was parfon of the church of Exford. 

Sir John Perceval, the fecond of that name, lord of Eaftbury in Carhampton» But- 
combe, Thrubwell, and Clewer, all in this county, which he inherited from his ancef- 
tors, married Millicent the daughter and heir of Lawrence de St. Maur, by which 
match he regained to his famHy a moiety of the manor of Wefton in Gordano, which, 
as has already been fliewn, had been difleminated by Henry Lovel his progenitor. 

John de Perceval, the eldeft fon of the faid Sir John, by the match abovementioned, 

died without iffue, and was futceeded by his brother Sir Walter Perceval, knt. who 

married Alice daughter and heir of William de Afton, of Adon in the county of 

Gloucefter, knt. and was father of John, who died without iffue, and Sir Ralph, wha 

fucceeded to his eftate. 

' Houfe of y very, i. 310. » Ibid, i. 314. 

Which 



174 WESTON IN GORDANO. [PottfJUtg. 

Which Sir Ralph married Elizabeth, one of the daughters of John de Wyke, of 
Ninehead-Flory in this county, of whom he- obtained by this intermarriage the other 
part of Wefton, which had been alienated from his family. He had iffue by the faid 
Elizabeth, Sir John, Richard, and Walter. He died about the month of February in 
1403, having the 4th day of January preceding prefented Robert Faderwin to the 
church of Wefton in Gordano. 

Sir John Perceval, his eldeft fon and heir, died feized of this manor 8 Hen. V. 
without iflliei and was fucceeded therein by his next brother Sir Richard Perceval, 
who May 6, 1424, prefented Walter Toucker to the living of Wefton, then vacant by 
the death of John Bufti, who fucceeded Faderwin above-mentioned. On this occafion 
John Reynolds, reftor of Portifhead, whofe emoluments had been infringed by his 
parifliioners' frequenting the church of Wefton, lodged a complaint and petition with 
the biftiop, and obtained an injunftion that the faid Walter Toucker ftiould not, under 
penalty of the lefler excommunication, admit any of the pariftiioners of Portifhead to 
any of the religious rites of his church at Wefton, to the prejudice of his faid church of 
Portifhead.'' He married Agnes, daughter of Sir Richard Arthur, of Clapton, knt. and 
by her had Sir John Perceval, who died without ifTue in 1439J Sir Ralph, who fuc- 
ceeded to this manor of Wefton; and Ralph Perceval the younger, the lineal anceftor of 
the prefent Earl of Egmont. 

Sir Ralph, the fecond fon of Sir Richard Perceval, fucceeding to this manor, pre- 
lented to the living April 20, 1453, John Brice, clerk, Wajter Toucker the former 
incumbent being then dead. He married Joan daughter and heir of Richard de 
Bofco, or Boyce, of Tickenham in this county, and died 17 Edw. IV. feized of this 
manor of Wefton in Gordano, which he held of Elizabeth Queen of England, by 
knight's fervice, as of her honour of Trowbridge in the county of Wilts,* leaving iffue 
three fons, Richard, John, and Ralph. 

Richard the eldeft fon fucceeded his father in the manor of Wefton, of which he died 
feized 22 Edw. IV. and was buried with his wife Catharine, who was the daughter and 
coheir of Richard Hampton, in the parifh church of Wefton, where their monument 
ftill remains againft the north wall. By his faid wife he left illiie three fons, Richard, 
Ralph, and William, who all dying in their minority, the inheritance devolved to Sir 
John Perceval his brother. 

This Sir John, as feoffee of his elder brother's will, on Nov. 23, 1479, prefented 
John Turner to the reftory of this church. He married Joan daughter of Thomas 
Chedder, efq; by whom he had ifTue one fon James, and a daughter married to 
Gilbert Cogan, efq. 

James Perceval, fon of Sir John, was born in 1467, and 17 Henry VII. on the 
marriage of Arthur Prince of Wales, with the Princefs Catharine of Arragon, was 
returned among the chief men of this county, who were judged worthy of receiving 
the honour of knighthood. In 15 14, upon the refignation of John Turner, he pre- 
fented JohnDurbaine to the benefice of Wefton. This Sir James beautified and re- 

* Houfe of Yvery, from the Regifters of Wells. ' Efc. 

paired 



IPoct&utg.] 



WESTON IN GORDANO. 



'75 



paired the pari/h-church, and greatly ornamented the manor-houfe at Wefton. By his 
will, bearing date 15 June, 1536, he orders his body to be buried in the chapel of St. 
Mary Magdalen, within the church of St. Paul of Wefton in Gordano, and appoints 
Joan his wife to find an honeft prieft to fing and pray for his foul, and all chriftian 
fouls, in the faid chapel for the fpace of one whole year." He died in 1549, leaving 
ifliie by the faid Joan his wife, the daughter of John Ken, of Ken in this county, efq; 
Edmund his fon and heir. 

Which Edmund married two wives, by the firft of whom, whole name was Ifabel de 
Marifco or Mareis, he had a fon called James, and two daughters. His fecond wife 
was Elizabeth Panthuit, who bore him a numerous proge.ny. 

James the eldeft fon and heir of Edmund fucceeded to the inheritance of this manor 
in 1550, and in 1554 prefented Richard Baker to the reftory of Wefton. He mar- 
Tied five wives, the firft of whom was Mary, the daughter of Edmund Gorges, of 
Wraxall, efq; on whom he fettled this manor. The fecond was a daughter of — — 
Luttrell, of Dunfter-Caftle, efq. The third was Elizabeth the eldeft daughter of 
. Chriftopher Ken, efq. The fourth was Elizabeth the widow of Richard Marftiall, of 
Ivythorne in this county, efq; and the fifth was Elizabeth the fecond daughter of Sir 
Maurice Berkeley, of Brewton, knt. By the firft four wives he had no iflue, but by 
the laft he had ten children, viz. two fons, James, who fucceeded to the eftate, and 
John, who died unmarried, and eight daughters, whofe names were Elizabeth, Ger- 
trude, Anne, Florence, Sarah, Grace, Alice, and Mary. 

James Perceval his fon and heir was ten years old at his father's deceafe, which was 
in 1 593, and inherited the greateft part of the family eftate, as this manor of Wefton in 
Gordano, Thrubwell, Butcombe, Stoke-Bilhop, Eaftbury, and Bridcotj the former of 
which, viz. Wefton in Gordano, as alfo Wefton-Capenor, (a fmall lordfliip within the 
other, fo called from the Capenors its polTeflbrs) he is certified to have holden by the 
fervice of half a knight's fee, as parcel of the king's honour of Hereford and Trow- 
bridge. Sept. 4, 1630, he, as lord of this manor and patron of the church, prefented 
William Wale to the living of Wefton. He died in 1644, ^"d agreeably to a requeft 
which he had made upon his death-bed, " that his body might be laid in the fame 
tomb with that of Sir Richard (the famous warrior) his anceftor, that his afties might 
mingle with thofe of his glorious predeceflbr,"' he was interred in the church of Wefton 
in the fame monument, which it is faid was then very magnificent, ornamented with 
rails, and plates of brafs gilt, of very great antiquity, (having then ftood upwards of four 
hundred and fifty years) and of a workmanftiip extremely airious for the rude times in 
which it was erefted." By Alice his wife, daughter of William Chefter, efq; he had 
five fons and four daughters. Four of the fons died young, and Thomas, the only 
furviving one, fucceeded to the eftate. 

This Thomas was a ftgady adherent to the royal caufe, for which reafon his eftate 
here was much injured by the parliament forces, who ranfacked his houfe, deftroyed 
the family writings, defaced the monuments of his anceftors, and obliged him to 



* Houfcof Yvery, from the Regifters of Wells, 



Ibjd. i. 309. 



. " Ibid. 449. 



pay 



176 WESTON IN GORDANO. [PortbUtg* 

pay the fum of 25 81. by way of compofition." After the Reftoration he was twice 
vifited at his inanor-houfe in Wefton by King Charles II. from whom he expefted, 
but in vain, a gratuity for his fervices. He died in 1691, and was buried at Wefton, 
leaving by Catharine his wife, daughter of Robert Lloyd, of Place-Ifcoyd in the- 
county of Denbigh, Anne Perceval, his fole daughter, and heirefs of this branch of the 
houfe of Wefton, who was fii-ft married to Evan Lloyd, of Llaneminick in the <:ounty 
of Salop, efq; and afterwards to Colonel Thomas Saliftjury, of Bachagraige in the 
county of Flint, efq. But Ihe having no ifTue that furvived by either of them, this 
branch of this ancient family terminated with this lady, who, cutting off an old entail, 
fold at different times the .whole eftate. This manor was purchafed out of chancery by 
Cann Wilkins, efq; father of the Rev. George Wilkins the prefent owner. 

The manor-houfe, built about the year 1430, ftands fouthward from the church near 
the moor. It was formerly a large and handfome ftrufture, having in the windows in 
painted glafs the arms of the different branches of the Perceval family, and their inter- 
marriages for feveral hundred years. Thefe, as well as great part of the houfe itfelC 
were demoliflied in the civil wars. 

The living of Wefton is reftorial, in the deanery of Redcliff and Bedminfter. The 
lord of the manor is patron, and the Rev. Richard Wilkins the prefent incumbent. 

The church, which is dedicated to St. Paul, is a fmall and very ancient building, 
confifting of a nave, chancel, and chapel on the fouth fide, dedicated to St. Mary 
Magdalen, adjoining to which on the fame fide is the belfiy and tower, in which hang 
five bells. On each fide of the chancel are four old femicircular ftalls, and two fimi- 
lar ones on each fide the entrance weftward. Againft the fouth wall of the nave is a 
ftone oratory. 

The only remaining monument of the Percevals is that erefted to Richard Perceval 
and Catharine his wife againft the north wall of the nave. This monument has in the 
bafe an altar tomb, and on the back of the fcreen above it are two figures with fcrolls, 
on one of which is EgCljarO IPCtfptiale ^& fOtOlC f)atie mercp. Arms: I. Jrgenf, 
on a chief indented ^«/^j, three croffes patee of the firft; Perceval: impaling ^«/(?j, a 
bend argent between fix fleurs de lis or; Hampton, a. Argent, on a chevron fable three 
cfcallops of the firft; Ballowe : impahngyiz^/^, a chevron ermine between three efcallops 
argent; Chedder. 3. Perceval, impaling, argent, in chief three bucks' heads caboffed 
Jahle. 

In the church-yard is alfo an old tomb with the arms of Perceval thereon. 

" Somerfetlhire Compofition. 



CLAPTON 



Ipjxtbucg.] 



r '77' '*3<^ 



CLAPTON IN CORD AN O. 

ON the other fide of th^'ivibbr, a'Kd'oh' tHe ricii-thern iccli^'iry of that firft range of 
hills which we have defci;ibed as running from Leigh to CIcvedon, (lands Clapton, 
having Portifhead on the north, Wefton on the northweft, Tickenham on the fouth, 
and Portbury on the eaft. The lands of this parifh are almoft wholly pafture; the foil 
in foine places Tandy, and in the fields near the church a rich red earth, which b^ari 
fine crops of grafs. On the fiope of the hill weftward is a fine wood of oak and hazel} 
the lower part of the parifh is planted with elms and willows. Hefe is a coal-mine, 
which has been worked upwards of a century; the coal is very quick of kindling, and 
abounds with fulphur. A large quarry of ftone for paving and tiling was formerly 
wrought in the wood called /i^^-Pari:, but has been for many years difcontinued. 
Two rivulets, one rifing in Walton, the other in Clevedon, run through the village, 
and fall into the fea at Portifliead-Point, / ,; i 

This place is called in the old Norman record Glotune, and is fux-veyed.as follows: 

" Herluin holds of the Bifliop [of Coutances]'CLOTUNE. Algar held it in the time 
"of King Edward, and gelded for five hides and a half The arable is five carucates. 
" In demefne are' two carucates, and twb fervants, and ten villanes, and ten cottager^ 
" with three ploughs. There are fifty acres of meadow. Pafture eighteen furlongs 
" long, and three furlongs broad. "Wood feven furlongs long, and one furlong broad. 
" It was worth forty fhillings, now feventy fhilHngs."* 

This manor \vas held of the honour of Gloucefter by a family who lived in the place, 
and were denominated from it de Clapton. In the timeof Henry I. Wido dc Clapton 
held an eftate here oi Robert earl of Gloucefter." 'To him fucceeded Arthur de 
Clapton, who was owner of lands in Clapton 25 Henry I.^ and was fucceeded therein 
by Nigel Fitz-Arthiir, who is mentioned as refident here In i deed 'of award between 
Robert Fitz-Harding and others in the timeof King Stephen.* The fuccefibrs of this 
Nigel aflumed the name of Arthur, and bore for their amis. Gules, a chevron (O-gent, 
between three clarions, or horfemen's refl;s, orC in allufion probably to the arms of 
Robert Conful earl of Gloucefter. In the time of Henry III. William Arthur held 
one knight's fee in Clapton and Biftiopworth of the earl of Gloucefter.' Which William 
had ifTue Sir Richard Arthur, knt. who was living 12 Edw. I. and by the daughter and 
heirefs of Flory was father of Sir William Arthur of Clapton, who was conftable 
of Briftol caftle, and held other confiderable offices in this part of England. He 
married a daughter and coheir of Baffet of Winterbourne, by whom he had ilTue a fon 
named Richard, who was living at Clapton 44 Edw. III. , Which Richard, by Ifabel 
daughter and heir of Roger Turville of the city of Briftol,' had iffue two fons. Sir 
Thomas, who fiicceeded to the Clapton eftate, and Edmund, to whom his fidier gave 
the manor of Bilhopworth in Bedminfter, to be held of the manor of Clapton by the 



• Lib. Domefday. *• Cart. Aniiq. 

' Lib. Feod. 

Vol. III. 



Ibid. "Ibid. ' Seals from ancient Dee(is. 

» Brokc's Vifitatioa of Somerfetnure. 

A A fervicc 



178 CLAPTON IN GORDANO. [IpOttbUtg, 

fervice of a red rofe, to be paid by him and His heirs on Midfiimmer-day yearly .'" He 
had alfo one daughter, Agnes, firft married to William de Vernai, and afterwards to 
Richard Payne. 

Sir Thomas Arthur, knt. eldeft fon and heir of Richard, by a daughter of Ken, of 
Ken, was father of John Arthur, of Clapton; Thomas, who was flain in Francej 
Nicholas, who was of Bifhopworth, and left iflTue a fole daughter and heir, Alice, mar- 
ried to Roger Kemys; and one daughter, whofe name was Mary. 

John, the eldeft fon, was living at Clapton 11 Henry VI. and had ilTue Richard 
Arthur, who was living here 20 Henry VI. and by Alice the daughter of James lord 
Berkeley, was father of John, who by Joan the daughter of Roger Hyet had feveral 
children, viz. John, who inherited this manor, and was living here in the time of Henry 
VII. Thomas and Edmund, who died without iflbe; and three daughters, Margaret, 
Ifabel, and Julian; thelaftofwhom was married to Richard Mead, of Mead's -Place 
in the parifh of Wraxall. 

John Arthur aforefaid, elcS;ft fon of John, married Margaret daughter of John' 
Boteler, of Badminton in the county of Gloucefter, and dying Jan. 30, 13 Hen. VIII. 
feized of the manors of Clapton and Alhcombe, and lands in Wefton in Gordano, 
Milton, Gloucefter, and Briftol,' left behind feveral children, whereof Thomas Arthur 
the eldeft became poflefled of this manor, and had iffue two fons, John, who married 
Joan the daughter of Sir Edward Gorges, knt. but died without ifllie, and Thomas, 
who by Cecily daughter of John Agard, of the city of London, had ifllie two fons, 
Edward Arthur, living at Clapton in 1592; and Thomas, who was feated at Clevedon, 
and one daughter Anne, who became the wife of Lawrence Sweetenham. 

Edward Arthur married Mary, daughter of Erafmus Pym, of Brymore in this 
county, efq; by whom he had feveral children, who left a pofterity; but Maiy his 
daughter, and at length heir, became poflefl^ed of this manor, and by her marriage 
transferred it to William Winter, youngeft fon of George Winter, of Dirham in the 
county of Gloucefter, efq. 

Which William Winter, lord of Clapton, in right of Mary his faid wife, was father 
of another William, who was living in 1636, and was fucceeded in this eftate by 
Henry Winter his fon and heir. Which Henry married Catherine daughter of Sir 
Popham Southcot, knt. and died in 1685, leaving iffue by the faid Catherine four fons, 
Henry, William, Arthur, and John ; and a daughter, Catherine. 

Henry the eldeft fon, by his will bearing date July 10, 1685, afligned the manors of 
Clapton and Wefton-fuper-Mare, to Sir John Smyth, bart. and others, to be fold for 
the payment of his debts; in purfuance of which feveral eftates in Clapton and Wefton 
were fold to difierent perfons; and afterwards by deeds dated i and 2 May 1690, the 
refidue of the manor of Clapton was, with the confent of Henry the fon, fold for the 
fum of 4350I. to Thomas Edwards, of the city of Briftol, efq. From him it defcended 
to Mrs. Colfton,'' of Broughton in the county of Oxford, one of his daughters and co- 
heirefles, whofe fon the Rev, Robert Ready is the prefent pofleflbr. 

» Broke's Vifitation. I Gglcs's Efc. " See under Weft-Lydfwd, vol. ii. p. 84. 

Nailh- 



3pott6utg.] 



CLAPTON IN GORDANO. 



179 



Naifli-Houfe and grounds (on the borders of the parilh, now the feat of Walter 
King, efq;) and Dunhills, part of the Cunnygree and Quarrs, were part of the Winters* 
eftates, and were fold from them in 1687, to Mrs. Kemys for the fum of 2450I. 

The manor-houfe of Clapton (lands near the church, and is an ancient ilrudhire, 
built by one of the Arthurs, whofe arms, impaling thofe of Berkeley, arc placed over the 
front of the porch; from which it feems probable that Richard Arthur, who married 
Alice the daughter of James lord Berkeley, in the time of Henry VI. was the founder. 

The living of Clapton, valued in 1292 at eight marks,' is a rectory in the deanery 
of Redcliff and Bedminfter. The lord of the manor has the patronage; and the Rev. 
Henry Still is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, which is dedicated to St. Michael the archangel, is fituated on an emi- 
nence, near the edge of the moor, and commands a pleafing prolpedl of that natural 
amphitheatre, which has been taken notice of in Walton, by whofe afpiring caftle the 
view is on that fide terminated. It confifts of a nave, chancel, and aile on the north 
fide; at the weft end is a plain tower containing three bells. 

In the north aile is the burial-place of the Winter family; and againft the wall 
thereof, ftands a ftately monument of ftone, on which are the effigies of a man in 
armour, and a lady in a black clofe-bodied veft, both kneeling, and between them a 
child feated in a chair, and holding a fmall fcull in his lap with his right hand. On tlie 

bafe is this infcriprion : " Herelyeth the body of Edmund fonneof Henry Winter, 

efq; who departed this life November the 25th, Anno Domini 167a." On the top of 
the pediment thefe arms. Sable, a fcR'c ermine ; acrefcent for diftindion ; Winter: impa> 
ling argenty a chevron betweea diree coots/able; Southcote. 

Againft the north wall is a fmall monument, infcribed,— — " Here lyeth the body 
of William Winter, efq; who departed this life tlie 21ft day of Aprill, A. D. 1632. 
Alfo Mary his wife, daughter and heire unto Edward Arthur, efq; who departed this 
life the 17th day of Februarie, Anno Dom. 1632, whofe ifllie were three fonns, and 
four daughters." Arms, Winter, impaled with gules, a chevron argent between three 
clarions or; Arthur. 

' Taxat. Splriraal, 




Aaa 



THE 



\ ?fb lol ?vi'' 






[ i8i J 



4^4*^^^T^^^^^r'^T^'*T^'*^^P*^T9'*T^'*^'^'* 1^5^^ 4?54*T^^*T^T>i^4*iT54^^?5T^4^4*iig4>4T|4*^iJ4*T^!t>T^4*i^Tfc 



THE HUNDRED 



O F 



S O M E R T O N 



Is fituated in the fduthern part of the county, adjoining to the hundred of Pitneyj 
and contains nine pariflies, one of which comprifes the ancient town of Somcrton, 
which gives name to this diftrift, and, according to the generally received opinion, 
to the whole county. Here was formerly. a royal warren, the cuftody of which 
belonged to a certain mefluage within the manor of Newton-Forefter in the hundred of 
North-Petherton, and was held jointly with the five forefts in this county. 52 Hen. III. 
this hundred with its rents, profits, and all other appertenances, was granted by the 
King to Eleanor the wife of his fon Prince Edward, afterwards King Edward I." 

* Mich, commun. 52Hen, III. Rot. 2. a. 



' S O M E R T O N. 

oi ,v:.,, 

THIS town, which in ancient times gave name to the whble county we are dc- 
fcribing, and is fuppofed to have received its own from the ajlival plealantnefs 
of its fituation (the Saxons calling it Sumup-tun,) ftands in a very fertile and beautiful 
part of the county, finely interfperfed with cultivated hills, and rich luxuriant vallies. 
Its diftance from Bridgwater is fixteen miles towards the foutheaft, and towards tlie 
fouth thirteen from the city of Wells. 

It is fituated on elevated ground, and confifts principally of five ftreets, containing 
two hundred and fifty-one houfes, which are chiefly built of blue lyas ftone, brought 
from the quarries in the neighbourhood of the town. This part is called the borough of 

Somerton, 



1 82 s o M E R T o N. [Common* 

Somerton, and adjoining to it is the tithing of Lower-Somerton, or Somerton- 
Erleigh, in which are twenty houfes. One mile eaftward is the tithing of Hurcot, 
having nine houfes. In the whole parifli are about two hundred and eighty houfes, 
and nearly one thoufand four hundred and eighty inhabitants. 

On the eaftern fide of the hill, above the hamlet of Hurcot, are confiderable quan- 
tities of fine white alabafter. The fouthweft declivity of tliis range of mountain, 
extending four miles northward, bears confpicuous traits of its having formed in feme 
very early perior' i bold and rocky boundary to the fea, being remarkably fteep, ftrongly 
indented, and in fome parts fretted into deep concavities; and there are many plants 
growing thereon fuch as are ufually met with on the fea-coaft. If King's-Sedgmoor 
was once a part of the fea (and that it was little doubt can remain in die mjnd of an 
attentive obferver) its waters would naturally flow into this refervoir, and form a bay 
under this fine ridge.of hills. The river Cary runs through this parilb under a ftone 
bridge of three arches, a quarter of a mile northeaftward from the town. Under an 
plms-houfe fituated in the weft ftreeC tliere is a Ipring of very fine water, which emits 
five different ftreams, about two feet diftant from each other; from which circumftance 
it has obtained the name of Rmgers'-Well. Thefe five ftreams conjointly form a ri- 
vulet which falls Into the river foutheaftward from the town. 

The alms.-houfe juft mentioned was founded by Sir Edward Hext In the year 1626, 
for eight poor men, viz. four of Somerton, two of Langport, and two of High-Ham j 
eadi of whom have a room and garden plat allotted them ; and two fhillings a week, 
with about fix fhillings weekly for the purchafe of coals. On the front of the building 
are the initials E. H. for Edward Hext, and his arms, a tower between diree battle- 
axes; as alfo this verfe of fcripture: " He hath dilperfcd abroad aad given tb the poor: 
his benevolence remaineth for ever. 1626." 

The government of the town is vefted in conftables; and there is a hall for holding 
petty-fefllons. The market is on Tuefday, and very confiderable for corn, cattle, &c. 
There are five fairs for cattle, three weeks intervening between each; the firft begins on 
the Tuefday in Pafllon-Week. Here are alfo two other fairs, held Sept. 30, and 
Nov. 8, for catde, ftieep, hogs, and pedlary-ware. 

It has been fuppofed by fome that Somerton was a Roman town; but hiftory is 
filent of any event incident to it previous to the heptarchy, when it is faid to have 
been of large capacity, fortified and walled round by the Weft-Saxon kings.* Here 
King Ina had his palace and his caftle, which in the wars with Mercia A. D. 73a, 
Ethelbald king of that country made himfelf mafter of,*" but was foon after driven 
from the country, and in a mutiny flain by his own fubjeds. About the year 877 the 
place was plundered and laid wafte by the Danes under the conduft of their captains 
Inguar and Hubba,' but being foon re-edified, became the moft confiderable town in 
all this territory, both in regard of its extent and population, and the ftrength of its 
titadel or ^orfrefs; which having been founded by' the Kings of Weflex on the brow or 
edge of the hill, had from its fituation the name of Monteclefe,^ and at different periods 

• Cotton MS. Julius F. vl, ? Chron. Saxon. 54. ' Cwwn MS. Ht fopra. * Ibid, 

contained 



©ometton.] 



SOMERTON. 



183 



contained within its walls the perfons of moft diftinguinied prifoners, among whonn 
•was John king of France, who 33 Edw. III. was removed hither by order of the King 
from Hertford-caftle, with a view of more firmly lodging his royal charge. For the 
bufinefs of this removal, and for fecuring the monarcli on his arrival at Somerton, com- 
miflioners of high rank were appointed by the crown ;"• and the caftle was fitted up 
commodioufly for his reception. On the decay of this caftle, the common prifon of 
the county was erefted out of its ruins, and was " imbattcUed aboute caftell lyke in 
ferpetuatn ret memoriam."' The ruinous fragments of this laft building are ftill extant, 
and part of an inn, called the Bear-inn, built out of them; at the back of which fouth- 
ward is a remnant of the old wall, with two or three crencllations, and the veftiges of 
a femicircular tower. 

There were at the Conqueft few more confiderable manors in the county than that of 
Somerton, which comprehended, befides the town of its name, the borough of Lang- 
port, and the eftaces of three Saxon thanes. The following account of it Is given in 
tlie Norman furvey: 

" The King holds Sumertone. King Edward held it. It never gelded, nor is the 
" number of hides known. The arable is fifty' carucates. In demefne are five caru- 
*' cates, and four lervants, and fourfcore villanes, and twenty-eight cottagers, with forty 
" ploughs. There are one hundred acres of meadow, and one mile of pafture in length, 
" and half a mile in breadth. "Wood one mile long, and one furlong broad. 

" There is a borough which is called Lanporth, in which refide thirty-four bur- 
" gelTes, rendering fifteen fhillings, and two fiflieries render ten (hillings. It brings in 
" per annum feventy-nine pounds ten ftiillings and feven-pence of twenty in tlae ore. 

" To this manor are added three lands which three thanes held in the time of King 
" Edward, Brifnod, and Aluric, and Sawin, and gelded for five hides and a half. 
" There are fcven villanes, and five cottagers, with four ploughs. It yields k.ytn 
" pounds and fifteen ftiillings. 

** From this manor is taken away half a hide, Dekesmodeswelle, which was of the 
" King's demefne farm. Alured de Hifpania holds it, and it is worth ten (hillings."* 

" The two manors of Sumertone and Cedre [Chedder] with their appendages in the- 
" time of King Edward paid the expence of one night's entertainment for the King."'' 

After the Conqueft this manor was given by King Henry II. to his natural fon 
William Tongefpte or Longfword, who by Ric. I. was created Earl of Saliftjury. This 
William Eongefpce eredled at Somerton, on the fpot where now ftands the parilh 
church, a houfe for nuns, and endowed the fame with certain lands of his demefne in 
Somerton. Which nunnery, according to fome, is faid to have been fupprefied on 
account of the focicty clandeftinely fending news by fpies to the French King; and 
according to others by Henry V. for the building of the monafteries of Shene and 
Sion.' In the time of this pofleflbr the inhabitants of the town of Somerton were 

5 See the Engli(h Hiflories ; Dugdak's Baronage, i. 388 ; ii. 168, &c. ' Cotton MS. ut fupra. 

« Lib, Damefday. " Ibid. ■ > Cotton MS. ut fupra. 



184 s o M E, R T o N. [^omcttom 

aflefled in the fum of four pounds aid for marrying the King's daughter j'' and 14 Hen. 
III. were tallaged at ten pounds.' 

This WilHam, whofe furname originated from the very long and remarkable fword 
he ufually wore, was one of the aftive barons in the time of King John, and was fherifF 
of Wiltfhire, warden of the marches of Wales, fherifF of the counties of Cambridge 
and Huntingdon, commander of the Englifh- fleer, fherifF of Somerfet, and governor of 
the caftles of Winchefter, Portchefter, and Sherborne. He married Ela the daughter 
of William Devereux earl of Salifbury, who furvived him, and who being a lady of no 
mean accomplifhments, after ferving the office of fherifF for the county of Wilts for 
three feveral years in the reign of Henry III. folicited that King, and paid him the fum 
of two hundred marks, to have that office continued to her for the refidue of her life. 
But being a perfon of much piety alfo, fhe feven years after her hufband's deceafe, for 
the healtii of his foul, her own, and all her anceflors, founded in a certain place called 
^nailC0=^Cll0, in the parilh of Laycock in the county of Wilts, to the luonour of 
our Lady, and St. Bernard," an Augufline nunnery, in which fhe firft took the habit 
of a nun; and afterwards in the year 1240 the office of an abbefs in that foundation. 
After having prefided for the fpace of-eighteen years, being grown old, and become 
incapable of any longer holding her facred function, fhe refigned the fame; and dying 
in 1 263, was buried in her own abbey, where, in the cloifters of this venerable building, 
great part of which is now ftanding, a flat ftone flill preferves the following infcription 
to the memory of this very illuftrious lady : 

" :jnfra fimt DefoOa (jBIac ucnembilis oflfa, 
£iimc oeoit bas fenes faccas monialibus acDeis. 
atliatifla Quioem quae fanftc nixit itiiDcm, 
(St comitifla ^arum, tiictutum plena ttonarum* 
i)i)iit 00CCI." 

.i'.;. -i J-.; .. _ 

From this family the manor, town, and hundred of Somerton came to tlie crown, 

and were granted by King Edw. II. in the thirteenth year of his reign to Edmund, 

^"urnamed, from the place of his ufual refidence, de Woodftock, the fecond fon of King 

Edw. I." who the year enfuing procured a licence for a fair to be held in this town 

yearly on the eve and day of St. Andrew the apoftle, and the feven following days.° 

This Edmund forfeited his eftates by attainder, and the prem.ifes aforefaid were given 

to William de Montacute earl of Salifbury for the term of his life; but the attainder 

being revoked, the property was perpetuated in the perfon of Edmund, fon of the faid 

Edmund de Woodflock, who, dying in his minority, was fucceeded in all the eflates by 

his brother John earl of Kent, which John 26 Edw. III. died feized of the manors of 

Somerton, Kingfbury, and Eafl-Camel, all which he held of the King in chief as parcel 

of the county of Kent, leaving Joan his fifter the wife of Sir Thomas Holand, afterwards 

Duke of Surrey, heir to his eftates.'' The faid Sir Thomas Holand left ifFue an only 

daughter and heir Helen, married to Thomas Montague earl of Salifbury, who inherited 

the eflate, ajid left ifllie a fole daughter and heir named- Alice, married to Richard 

Neville, fon of Ralph earl of Weftmoreland, created Earl of Salifbury by Henry VI. 

" Mag. Rot. 14 Hen. II. ' Ibid. 14 Hen. III. ■" Mon. Angl. iii. 342. 

• Cart. 13 Ed. II. n. 20. " Cart. 14 Ed. II. n. i;. ^ Efc. To 



®omtrtort.] somerton. 185 

To this Richard carl of Salifbuiy fucceeded another Richard his fon, who was 
knight of the garter, high admiral of England, and Earl of Warwick. He died in 
1472, and the manor we are now fpeaking of pafled to George duke of Clarence, 
who had married Ifabel the eldeft daughter of the faid Earl Richard. Margaret, a 
daughter by this match, was by King Henry VIII. created Countefs of Salilbury, and 
fucceeded to the polTeffion of this manor, which in her life-time was valued at 72I. 3s. 
Qj-d.' But after her death, which unprovifedly happened in the year 1541, the manor 
of Somerton was feized by die crown, and there held till the firft year of the reign of 
Queen Mary, when it was granted to Francis earl of Huntingdon, and the lady Cathe- 
rine his wife (grandaughter of Margaret the faid Countefs of Sahfbury) whofe grandfon 
Sir Francis Haftings, 2 Dec. 35 Eliz. fold the fame to Sir Edward Hext and his heirs/ 

This Sir Edward Hext by Dionyfia his wife left an only daughter heirefs to his great 
pofleffions, of which this manor and the neigiibouring one of Aller were part; who was 
firft married to Sir Ralph Killigrew, knt. and afterwards to Sir John Stawell, knight of 
the Badi. 

From Sif John Stawell, fecond hufband of the faid heirefs of Hext, Somerton de- 
fcended to his fon Ralph Stawell, who by King Charles II. was created Baron Stawell 
of Somerton ; in whofe dcfcendants the manor continued till fold by the executors of 
the laft Lord Stawell to Colonel Strangwayes, from whom it has come to the Earl of 
Ilchefter the prefent proprietor. 

The manor of Somerton-Erle, or Erleigh, (fometimes alio called Somerton^ 
Parva) was fo named from its pofleffors and refidentiary inhabitants, the fainily of 
Erleigh, of whom mention has been made in the account of Beckington in the hun- 
dred of Frome.' They held this manor by the grand ferjeanty of being the King's 
chamberlain, and pouring water on his hands upon his birth-day.' In the time of 
Edw. III. John de Erleigh fold the manor of Somerton-Erle, with the advowfon 
of the chapel of the faid manor, to Richard Brice and Edith his wife;" who pafled 
the fame to Sir Guy de Bryan, knt. who 12 Ric. II. enfeoffed Robert Fitzpaine and 
Others in truft with the manors of Kingfton, Somerton-Erle, and Somerton-Randolf, 
remainder to Guy his fon and his heirs male, and in default of ifllie to William de 
Bryan his fon and his heirs male, and in default of fuch iffue of him, to Philip his Ion 
and his heirs male.* The faid Guy de Bryan died 14 Ric. II. then feized of this 
manor, which defcended to Philippa his coxifin and coheirefs, firft married to John 
Devereux, and aftei-wards to Sir Henry le Scrope, knt. Which Philippa held at her 
death, 8 Henry IV. the manor of Somerton-Erle, and alfo one mefiliage, one carucate 
of arable land, ten acres of meadow, and ten of pafture, in Somerton-Randolf, of 
Elizabeth Juliers countefs of Kent by knight's fervice; as alfo the manor of Kingfton, 
and the advowfon of the church, held of Sir Robert Latimer, knt.; and the manors of 
Downhead and Stoke, held of Philip Hampton; and the manors of Shockerwick and 
Bath-Eafton, held of the Biftiop of Bath and Wells; leaving Elizabeth her fifter, the 

' Dvgd. Bar. iii. 292. ' Licence to alienate. • Vol. ii. p. 198. ? Efc. 

» Cart. Antiq. ' Rot. CJaus. 12 Ric. II. 

Vol. III. B b wife 



i86 s o M E R T o N. [^omertom 

wife of Robert Lovel, her next heir/ In the time of Henry VIII. this manor belonged 
to the Earl of Northumberland, who fold it to Johnfon, and he to William Popley, 
gent, who 20 May, 37 Henry VIII. fold it to John Wiffe. 2 Dec. 40 Eliz. the faid 
John Wifle fold the manors of Somerton-Erleigh, and liendall, otherwife Somerim- 
Handolf, to the family of Fifher,' in which it continued till the beginning of this cen- 
tury, when it paffed by an heirefs of John Fiftier to Mr. Bernard. He dying inteftate, 
the eftate was divided between four children, of whom were three fons and one 
daughter. One of the fons died foon after the father. The daughter was married to 
Mr. Gill, who in her right enjoyed the third fhare, and added another thereto by the 
purchafe of the younger Mr. Bernard's purparty. The other third part remains vefted 
in John Bernard, efq; fon of Mr. Bernard aforefaid. 

The manor of Hurcott, or Hurdecote, which formerly belonged to Lord Grey, is 
now the property of Richard Henry Bennett, el'q. 

17 Edw. I. William de Gardino, one of the fame family whereof we have Ipoken in 
the hundred of Portbury, held in the parifh of Somerton a meflliage, one hundred 
and feventy acres of arable land, eight acres of meadow, thirty fhillings and one farthing 
rent of afTize, and thirty fhillings cuftomary rent, with other fervices. As alfo a mef- 
fuage, one hundred and twenty acres of arable, two acres of meadow, and forty {hillings 
rent, in Farringdon. And in Cogges, a meffuage with a clofe, thirty acres of arable, fix 
acres of meadow, forty fhillings rent of affize, and five fhillings cuftomary rent, with 
other fei-vices and cuftoms.» 

A. ly. 8 94, King iEthelred gave to the abbey of Athelney all the tithes of Somerton- 
Erleigh, which grant was confirmed by William de Erlega, A. D. 1168.'" The fame 
"abbey had a penfion of ten marks out of the church of Somerton." 

Bifhop Savaricus appropriated the tithes of Somerton to the abbey of Muchelney in 
the year 1205,'' and in 1292 the redory was valued at thirty nrurks, and the vicarage at 
one hundred fhillings.' 

The benefice is vicarial in the deanery of Ilchefter, and in the gift of the Earl of 
Ilchefter. The Rev^ John Chafie is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Michael the archangel, and confifts of a nave, chancel, 
fide ailes, veflry-room, and porch. On the fouth fide is an octangular embatded tower, 
fixty-three feet high, in which are eight windows, and fix bells. 

In the fouth wall of the belfry, in a niche formed by a plain pointed arch, lies the 
effigy of ' one Edithe in portrature of flone, the whiche was bylyke the Saxten, th^t 
' had the rule of the churche and howfes, and by lyke the fowndres of the fteple.*' 
Divers of the chief nuns were buried here.^ 

Againft the fouth wall of the chancel is the following memorial: "Thomas 

Preen, gen. hanc capellam fumptibus propriis ornavit. Anno Dom. 1627." 

'' Efc. ^ Licence to alienate. ' Efc. » Regift. Abbat. de Aihelney. ' Ibid. 

'Excerpt. eRegift.Wellen, ,« Taxat. Spiritual. ^ Cotion MS. ut fupra. » Ibid. 

Upon 



feoinccton.] S o M E R T o N. 187 

Upon the fame wall is a marble monument, infcribedj " Underneath are depo- 

fited the remains of Harbin Arnold, gent, of this town, who died the firfl; of Auguft 
1782, aged 77 years. He built the veftry-room at his own expence, gave two brafs 
chandeliers to the church, and added another bell in the tower. He alfo bequeathed to 
the fccond poor of this town an annual gift of eight guineas for ever to be diftributed 
in bread. In grateful teflimony of his liberal benefaftions, and moft eminent virtues 
both private and publick, and as an example to teach pofterity beneficence, his execu- 
tors have credted tliis monument." 

On the north wall is a marble monument to the memory of Tliomas Rooke, gent, 
who died July 25, 1764, aged 62; and Prifcilla his wife, who died June 5th, 1751, 
aged 42. 

" Alice Yeates, widow and relict of Henry Yeates, of Hurdcot within this parilh, 
gent, having a due regard for the promotion of the Chriftian Religion, by her laft will 
and teftament gave tiie fum of five pounds to be paid yearly for ever for the educating 
at an Englifh fchool twelve poor children of this parifh." 

*' Mr. Thomas Churchey, goldfmith of London, fon of Mr. Jerome Chiirchey of 
this town, out of his great love .ind charity to the poor of tliis town, being the place of 
his nativity, did by his will give ten pounds, to be diftributed to the poor people the 
day he was- brought hither to be buried. And gave one hundred and fifty pounds 
more to be beftowed in lands, and appointed the profits thereof to be given to the 
poor in bread every Lord's-day. He died the ninth day of February 1690, and lies 
interred in the fouth porch of this church." 

" Mr. Thomas Glover, citizen and ironmonger of London, becaule his father was 
born in this town, and intended to give fomething for the publick benefit thereof, but 
died before he performed it, gave a houfe near the church-yard to the town for ever, 
that the rent and profits thereof might be beftowed every week in bread for the poor. 
He gave alfo another houfe in the town towards the fetting up and maintenance of a 
free- fchool. Anno Dom. 1675." 



A L L E R, anciently SLRe. 

THE Brltifti word SltDSt fignifies a Mint or Treafury; but it is not clear how fir 
its meaning may be applicable to this village, which is fituated near the banks 
of the Parret, northweft from Langport, that river dividing it from Eaft-Ling and the 
I fie of Athelney, the celebrated retreat of the illuftrious Alfred, whofe name has 
ftamped immortality on this lefs confpicuous fpot. 

That King, having at Ethandune, or Edington, fignally overthrown the Danilli 
forces, reduced them to terms of peace, and engaged on his part to refign the king- 
dom of the Eaft- Angles to fuch of their people as would embrace the Chriftian 

B b a religion. 



i88 A L L E R» [^ometton* 

religion. In purfuance of this treaty, Godrun or Guthrun their leader came to Alre^ 
the place we are now fpeaking of, being in the vicinity of Athelney, with thirty of his 
officers, to receive the rite of baptifm, and King Alfred himfelf ftood fponfor for him at 
the font, and gave the barbarian convert the name of JElhelJian. The Danes ftaid 
twelve days after at AUer with the King, and were then difmifled with large prefenta 
of money." 

The next account we have of this place occurs in the Norman record, where we are 
told that one Ulward a Saxon was owner of it in the time of Edward the Confeflbr, but 
that when the furvey was taken it belonged to Ralph de Limefi, one of the Conque- 
ror's followers : 

" Ralph himfelf holds Alre. Ulward held it in the time of King Edward, and 
** gelded for two hides. The arable is four carucates. In demefne are two carucates, 
*' and two fervants, and five villanes, and twelve cottagers, with two ploughs. There 
"are fifteen acres of meadow, and two hundred acres of pafture; and ten acres of 
*♦ wood. When he received it, it was worth one hundred fliillings, now fix pounds.'"" 

In the time of Edw. II. John de Afton held a moiety of this manor of John 
Odingfeles by the fervice of a knight's fee, and a fourth part of the neighbouring 
village of Staeth of Nicholas de Moels, and died 6 Edw. II. leaving John de Adlon 
his fon and heir.' The whole manor of Aller, with that of Allermore, and other 
cftates here, loon after this came to the family of Botreaux, whofe heirefs carried it to 
the Hungerfords, from whom it carpe to the Haftings earls of Huntingdon/ 25 Eliz. 
Henry earl of Huntingdon fold the capital mefluage here, wjth one hundred acres of 
arable land, fix hundred of meadow, and fixteen hundred of pafture in Aller, Allermore, 
and Combe, to Roger Bromely, and Chriftopher Southowfe, and the heirs of the faid 
Chriftopher.' The manor was purchafed by Sir Edward Hext, and from him it came 
to the family pf Stawell; but now belongs to Emanuel^college in Cambridge. 

In this parifh is a hamlet called Worth, fituated a mile towards the fouthweft, which 
jn the Conqueror's time belonged to Roger de Curcelle, being then written Worde, 

" William holds of Roger, Worde. Two thanes held it in the time of King 
*' Edward, and gelded for one hide and a half. The arable is three carucates. There 
** are ten villanes, with two carucates and a half, and four acres of meadow, and four 
" furlongs of wood in length, and two furlongs in breadth. It was and 15 wprfh 
S' fixty ftiillings,'" 

The living, which is a reftory in the deanery of Ilchefter, was in 1292 valued at 
twenty marks.^ The patronage is in Emanuel College, and the Rev. John Grefley \% 
the prefent incumbent. 

In tjic church, which is dedicated to St. Andrew, were formerly founded feveral 
chantries; as, i. St. Mary's chantry, the laft incumbent of which, John Chynne, 
^ad in 1553 a penfion of 5I. 2. 'Trinity chantry. Henry Larb^ck incumbent, 61, 
f js, 4d, John Whytwell, another incumbent, 61. 13s, 4d, 3. Holy Crojs chantry, 

* Chron, Saxon, p. 8j, ' Lib. Domefday, « Efc, ■■ Ibid, 

S Licence \q alienate, ' Jiib. I^oinef^ayt ' Taxat, Spiritual. 

Williani 



* 



®omecton.] A L L E w 189 

William Troylyan 61.'' The church is an ancient edifice of one pace, with a tower at 
the weft end, containing three bells. The fouth door is furnriounted by a very fine 
Saxon arch, and in the upper pannel of the door is a curious antique carving of a 
pelican and her young. 

Under an arch in the north wall of the chancel, lies the effigy in armour of Sir 
Reginald de Botreaux, knight, and near it on an upright ftone this infcription : 

" f^ic meet Eeffinalijus filius Mlilbclmi Domini De TSotceaur, qui ohiit 
xtx" Die mcnfis 3!uWi, 9nno Domini ^ccccrr"." 

In the church-yard is alfo a mutilated effigy, probably of another of this ancient and 
noble family. 

Dr. Ralph Cudworth, redtor of this parifh, was father of that moft learned divine 
Ralph Cudworth, the celebrated author of the " Intelle£fual Syftem.'* He was bora 
here in 1617, and in 1630 was admitted penfioner of Emanuel-coUege in Cambridge, 
where he received his degrees. He was afterwards prefented to the redlory of North- 
Cadbury in this county j appointed in 1644 mafter of Clare-hall in Cambridge, and 
the year after nominated profeffor of the Hebrew tongue in that univerfity. In 1654 
he was chofen mafter of Chrift's- college, Cambridge; and in 1657 was one of the 
perfons nominated by a committee of the parliarnent to be confulted about the Englilh 
tranflation of the Bible. He died June 26, i688, and was buried in the chapel of 
Chrift's-college. He was a man of very extenfive learning, excellently (killed in the 
learned languages and antiquity; a good mathematician, a fubtle philofopher, and 
profound metaphyfician.' His works in print and manufcript are very numerous, 

Aller-Moor is famous for a fight in 1645 between the royalifts and parliament 
forces, It has in it a fine decoy, belonging to Lady Acland. 

" Willis's Hift. of Abbies, ii. 20i. ' Biog. Dift. iv. 24.8. 



T 



WEST-CAMEL. 

HIS pariih lies at the eaftern extremity of the hundred, adjoining to the parifti of 
Queen-Camel in the hundred of Catafti, in a flattifta woody country, the foil of 
which is a wet heavy ajid cold clay. It comprehends 

1. DowNHEAD, in which are eleven houfes, fituated northweft. 

2. Urgashay, about half a mile weftjvard from the church, containing nine houfes, 

The village itfelf contains forty-one houfes; the number of inhabitants is ^vo hun- 
dred and fixty-three. It had once a family of its name. 

In a hill half a mile to the north two catacombs were dlfcovered a few years ago, ia 
which lay many bodies regularly arranged in rows, each in a fmaU trench, che ijitcrme- 

diato 



190 ^S> E s T - c A M E L. [^otttecton* 

diate fpace filled up with fmall ftones; thefe bodies were found at the depth of five feet 
beneath the furface, with their feet turned towards the north. 

The manor of Weft-Camel was part of the pofieffions of Muchelney-abbey, and is 
thus recorded: 

" The church itfelf holds Camelle. In the time of King Edward it gelded for tei> 
" hides. The arable is fixteen carucates. Thereof are in demefne four hides and a 
" half, and there are four carucates, and five fervants, and feven villanes, and eight 
*' cottagers, with fix ploughs. There is a mill rendering ten fhilHngs, and fixty acres 
*' of meadow, and fixty acres of pafture. Of thefe ten hides Dodeman holds of the 
" abbot one hide, and has there one plough, and three villanes, with one carucate, and 
" two acres of meadow. The whole is worth ten pounds and ten Jfhillings."" 

In 1 2 93 the temporalities of the abbot of Muchelney in this parifh were valued at 
81.'' After the difl"olution the manor was granted to Edward earl of Hertford, and in 
his time was valued at 25I. 14s. id. per annum.' But in this laft-mentioned valuation 
was included the manor of Downhead, which 32 Edw. III. William Derby, chaplain, 
and Alexander de Cammel, clerk, gave to Thomas de Overtone ^bbot of Muchelney, 
and the convent of that monaftery, to find a certain regular chaplain to celebrate divine 
fervice in the abbey-church there for the good eftate of the faid Alexander during his 
life, and for his foul after his deceafe, and the fouls of all his anceftors, and all the 
faithful deceafed, every day for ever.'' The manor of Weft-Camel has of late years 
belonged to the family of Kingfton. 

There was an ancient manor called SloOy but now Slow, which formerly belonged to 
the family of Montague. 

The living is reftorial in the deanery of Marfton, and in the gift of the Bifhop of 
Bath and Wells. The Rev. William Willes, archdeacon of Wells, is the prefent incum- 
bent. In 1 292 diis redory was rated at twenty marks.' 

The church is dedicated to All-Saints, and confifts of a nave, chancel, and north 
alle tiled, with a fquare tower on the fouth fide, crowned with a fmall fteeple covered 
with lead. The north aile belongs to the proprietor o{ Slow-Court, and has been long 
the burial-place of the family of Parfons. 

In the chancel there is a marble monument to the memory of the Rev, Montrich 
Hill, A. M. redtor of tliis parifh, who died Aug. 16, 1744, aged 58. 

The chriftenings in this parifti are on an average ten, the burials five. 

Adjoining to the church-yard ftands the parfonage-houfe, built on the fcite of the 
old grange belonging to the abbots of Muchelney. 

At Downhead there was anciently a chapel j but it has long fince been deftroyed. 

• Lib. Domefd^y. * Taxat. Temporal. « MS. Valor. 

* Adam de Doraerham, in Append, ad prsfat. Ixxiii. ? Taxat. Spiritual. 



CHARLTON- 



1 



^omccton.] [ 191 ] 



CHARLTON-ADAM, otherwife EAST-CHARLTON, 

IS a fmall parifli eaftward from Somerton, confifting of about forty houfcs, and two 
hundred and ten inhabitants. The houfes are in general very decent dwellings, 
and fome very good ; being built of that excellent blue lyas which is found at Hinton- 
Mandeville and Kingwefton. The village confifts of two irregular ftrects near the 
church. The river Cary divides this parifh from Kingfdon, and continuing its courfc 
by the town of Somerton, and round the north fide of Ham-hill, joins the Parret near 
Boroughbridge. The houfes in this parilh ftand in a grove of fine elms, which fringe 
the borders of almoft every inclofure and road. 

This and the adjoining parifh of Weft-Charlton,. or Charlton-Mackarel, arc in 
Domefday-Book comprehended under the undiftinguiihed title of Cerktune, and thus 
furveyed: 

*' Roger [Arundel] himfelf holds Cerletune. Aluerd held it in the time of King 
*' Edward, and gelded for three hides. The arable is fix carucates. In demelhe is one 
** carucate, and four lervants, and three villanes, and nine cottagers, with three 
** ploughs. There are thirty acres of meadow, and two acres of wood. It was worth 
*' fix pounds, now one hundred fhillings."'' 

The manor of Charlton- Adam became in future time the pofleflion of the priory of 
Brewton, under whom it was fometime held by Lord Henry Fitz-Richard, who ob- 
tained of the prior and convent licence to ereft a free-chapel or chantry in his court of 
Charlton-Adam, to be ferved by a chaplain who fhould receive all oblations coming to 
the altar of the faid chapel. And the faid Henry Fitz-Richard, for himfelf and his 
lieirs, and for the health of his own foul, and the fouls of his anceftors and fucceflbrs, 
gave and granted in pure, free, and perpetual alms, to the church of our Lady at 
Brewton, and the canons there ferving God, in recompence of damages that might be 
luftained by the mother-church of Charlton-Adam, belonging to the faid prior and 
convent, by reafon of the faid chantry fix acres of arable land of his Iprdfhip in the town 
of Charlton, and one acre of meadow, to hold to them and their fucceflbrs freely and 
peaceably for ever.'* In 1293 the temporalities of the prior of Brewton in this place 
were rated at 61/' 8 Ric. II. William de Windfore was tenant of this manor undef 
the faid priory, and lord alfo of Lydford, a neighbouring manor, and Knoll, whicK 
he held of the abbey of Athelney,'' 1 Eliz. the Queen granted the manor of Charlton- 
Adam, lately belonging to the monaftery of Brewton, to Sir Francis Walfingham, 
lent.' who fold the fame to Sir William Petre, knt. It is nowthe property of the Rev. 
Edmund Gapper. 

2 Edw. VI. the chantry or free-chapel of St. Stephen in this parifli abovementioned 
was granted to Sir Thomas Bell, knt. and Richard Duke, efq; to be held of the King 
as of the manor of Stalbridge in the county of Dorfet/ 

» Lib. Domefday. ' E Regift. Oliveri King. « Taxat. TemporaL * Efc. 

• Pa:. 2 Eliz. ' Pat. 2 Ed. VI. p- $• 

- The 



192 CHARLTON- AD AM. t^omettOrt, 

The church of Charlton- Adam was valued in 1 292 at loos.^ The living is a vica- 
t-age in the deanery of Ilchefterj the Rev. Samuel Gatehoufe is the prefent incumbent* 

The church is dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul, and confiftsof a nave, chancel, 
and fouth aile tiled, with a tower containing five bells. 

In the fouth aile is an old mural monument, infcribed, — —^" Here lieth the bodi of 
Thomais Bafket, of Charlton in com. Som. efquir. He decefed 16 Nov. A.D. 1592." 

In the fame aile are the following memorials to the family of Strangways of this 

place: " Here underneath lyeth the body of Giles Strangways, efqj of Charlton- 

Adam, who died Jan. 30, 1677, jet. fuas 77. 

*' Anne Bonham, wife of Thomas Strangways, efq; mother of four fons and twelve 
daughters, married 39 years, aged 60, buried Nov. 3, 1638. 

" Prope jacet Bonhamus Strangways, armiger, Portlandias caftri, regnante Guliclmo 
tertio, prsefeftus, filius et hasres iEgidii Strangways ex Margaretta filia Henrici Ludlow, 
equitis aurati, ac forore illuftris Edmundi Ludlow. 

" Juxta item reconditur Jana prasfati Bonhami vidua, et filia Roberti Coker, armr-' 
geri de Mapowder in agro Dorceftrenfi. Bonhamus anno 17 19, Jana anno 1741^ 
pleni annis in Domino obdormiverunt." 

• Taxat. Spiritual. 



■EBi 



CHARLTON-MACKARELL, or WEST-CHAR LTO^f, 

ADJOINS to Charlton-Adam weftward. The river Cary here runs under a ftone 
bridge of two arches on the Roman fofle-road, called Poppli- Bridge, and gives 
its name to two very iancient places, viz. Lytes-Cary, and CARV-FiTzfAiNE. The 
latter of thefe places is thus furveyed in the Domefday record: 

*' Robert holds of Roger [Arundel] Cari. Two thanes held it in the time of 
*' King Edward, and gelded for one hide wanting one fiirlong. The arable is one 
carucate, which is in demefne, with four cottagers. There are twenty acres of mea- 
dow. It was and is worth twenty fhillings.'" 

This feems to have been one of the chief feats of the family of Fitzpalne, who had 
in early times the poflefllon of the greateft part of this parilh. 8 Edw. I. Robert 
Fitzpaine is certified to hold a moiety of the; manor of Charlton-Mackarell, and the 
manors of Cary, Bridgehampton, and Cheddon-Fitzpaine, with divers other eftates in 
this county and that of Dorfet, for half a barony, being parcel of the honour of Roger 
Arundel j all which defcended to Robert Fitzpaine his fon and heir,'* This Robert 

i Lib. Domefday. ? Efc. 

was 



K 



©omctton.] 



C H A R L T O N-M ACKARELL. 



'93 



was fucceeded in thcfe eftates by a Ton and grandfon of his own name; the lafl: of whom 
died feizcd of this manor and that of Cary 28 Edw. III.j and having no iflue male, 
the faid manors were fettled for life on Robert the younger fon of Richard lord Grey 
of Codnor, and Elizabeth his wife, and the ilfue male of their bodies lawfully begotten. 
From diis family of Grey, this parifh for a while aflumed the name of Charlton-Grey, 
and was afterwards poffefled by the Lords Zouche of Harringworth. 

Other property in this parifli came by the heirefs of Fitzpaine to the families of 
Poynings and Percy. A confiderable eftate alfo in Charlton was long in the pofleflion 
of the Horfey family. Ralph de Horfey was living here in 1340, and then gave a 
mefTuage, two yard-lands of arable, and twelve acres of meadow land in Charlton- 
Mackarell, to a chaplain to perform divine fervice for the foul of die faid Ralph, his 
anceftors and fucceflbrs, in the church of the blefled Virgin Mary of Charlton every 
day for ever." A. D. 1395, John Horfey, who was in all probability fon of the 
abovemcntioned Ralph de Horfey, founded another chantry in this parifh in a chapel 
called Uorjley chapel, and gave thereto one mefluage, eighty acres of arable land, and 
twelve acres of meadow lying within this parifh, for the maintenance of a chaplain to 
celebrate therein. At the fame time alfo Roger Rondell granted to the reftor 6f the 
church of Charlton and his fucceflbrs, one acre of arable land and one acre of meadow 
in the faid village, for ringing a certain bell there early in the morning; as alfo eight 
acres of arable land, for the finding five lights in the faid church every high feftival 
yearly forever; and ten acres of arable land, and two acres of meadow, to find a lamp 
to burn perpetually before the high akar/ Mofl of the lands belonging to thefe 
chantries were after their difTolution granted to Sir Thomas Bell, knt. and Richard 
Duke, efq.° John Drewe was the lafl incumbent of Ralph de Horfey's chantry, and 
had in 1553 a penfion of il. 4s.' There was a place in Charlton-Mackarell called 
Horfcy-Court. The manor now belongs to Thomas Lockyer, of Ilchefler, efq. 

The manor of Lytes-Cary had its name from the ancient family of Lyte, who had 
their habitation here in a large manfion, in which was a chapel, where their arms, viz.. 
GuleSy a chevron between three fwans argent, with many of their intermarriages, were 
depifted. Much of their property came into the family by the marriage of Thomas 
Lyte with the heirefs of Drew, whofe family derived great eftates from that of Horfey. 
The laid Thomas Lyte left ifTue feveral children, the eldefl of whom, John, married 
Edith the daughter of John Horfey, efq;^ a defcendant of the founders of the chan- 
tries abovemcntioned. The name is not yet extinft; but many of the original eflates 
have pafTcd into different families. A ftone in the church floor informs us that 
Thomas Lyte, efq; buried in 1638, was the fourteenth in lineal defcent of this very an- 
cient family. 

The living is a reflory in the deaneiy of Ilchefler, valued in 129a at twenty-five 
marks." The patronage is in the family of ChcfTelden. The Rev. Richard Ford is 
the prefent incumbent. 



« Inq. ad quod damn. * lUd. ' Pat. 2 Ed. VI. 
« Cooke's Wuation of Somerfetlhire. 

Vol. III. C c 



' Willis's Hift. of Abbies, ii. 202. 
f Taxat. Spiritoal. 



The 



194 C H A R L T O N-M A C K A R E L L. [^ometton. 

The church is dedicated to the blefled Virgin Mary, and is a handfome Gothick ' 
ftrudlure in the form of a crofs, having in the centre a large embattled tower, contain- 
ing four bells. 

A.t the north end of the tranfept is an ancient tomb, having thereon the mutilated 
remains of the effigies of a man and woman, reprefenting probably fome of the Lyte 
family, who were buried in this part of the church. 

In the floor are thefe infcriptions : 

" Sept. i8, Ano Dni 1638, Thomas Lyte, of Lytes-Carie, efq; in lineal defcent of 
that furname and family the 14th, here refteth in the Lord. Mihi vita Chriftus. 

" Here lyes the body of John Lyte, efq; who departed this life May 15, 1698. 

" Alfo the body of Thomas Lyte, efq; who died Sept. 7, 1761, aged 67." 

In the eaft wall of the chancel are two elegant mural monuments of white rnarble, 
to the Dodd family, with the following infcriptions : 

" Underneath are depofited the remains of the late Rev. Mr. William Dodd, M. A. 
reftor of this place, and fole patron of the church, vicar of Northover, and prebendary 
of Cudworth and Knowl founded in the cathedral church of St. Andrew in Wells. He 
departed this life the i8th of March 1760, in the 69th year of his age. He was a 
tender hufband, an affeftionate parent, a cheerful companion, and a fincere friend; he 
performed the bufinefs of his function regularly, decently, and with ferioufnefs ; and his 
life and converfation were not inconfiftent with his profefllon. Near this place alfo 
lies the body of Mrs. Jane Dodd, daughter of John Strachey, of Sutton-Court in this 
county, efq; and wife to the abovefaid the Rev. Mr. Dodd, who died Sept. 23, 1732, 
3-ged 39." 

On the other monument: " Near this monument reft the remains of Lydia 

Dodd, fecond daughter of the late Rev. William Dodd, reftor of this church. She 
Jived in this world as one expefting a better, and in that hope departed this life June 
19, 1778, aged 52 years. Her filter Jane Chefelden, as a mark of her great affec- 
tion, erefts this monument to her memory." 

On the north wall, in the chancel, is an old fmall mural monument to the Rev. 
Simon and Mary Whitcomie, but the infcription is nearly illegible. 

On the fouth wall, on a plain black ftone: « To the memory of the Rev. Mr. 

Jarvis, Odt. 31, 1670 ; — Mr. Brown, April 17, 1684; — Mr. Lapley, Jan. 5, 1685;—, 
Mr. Carter, July 29, 17 18; — fometime rectors of this place; this ftone is infcribed by 
the prefent incumbent, 1757." 

On a ftone in the chancel floor:- — — " Underneath are buried Eleanor a daughter 5 
&nd Charles and Arthur, twins, fons of John Pyne, efq; and Mary his wife; they dyed 
in their infancy." 




KINGSDON 



®ometton,j 



[ ^95 ] 



K I N 



DON 



IS a panfli lymg nearly midway between Ilchefter and Somerton, on high land 
commanding an extenfive prolpedl towards the fouth and fouthweft. On the fide 
Of the hill, below the village, there are feveral large quarries of a kind of Oate or ruft 
coloured ftone, which he in thin lamina one above another nearly horizontally with 
thin layers of earth between them. This ftone contains a few foflll Ihells of the bivalve 
kind. This parilh contains about one hundred houfes, and about four hundred and 
fifty inhabitants. 

There is no mention of this place in the Conqueror's furvey, it having been at that 
time perhaps a member of fome other manor. In the time of Edw. IIL John Go^he 
held dus manor.' After this it belonged to the Fitz-Alans earls of Arundel, and The 
Scroops of Mafliam." 6 Edw. VI. the manor of Kingefdowne, with its appertenances, 
and the advowfon of the church, and other lands, tenements, and hereditaments in 
Kingefdowne, were held by Sir Edward Fines, knt. Lord Clinton and Say, of the Kin» 
by the twentieth part of a knight's fee.' In the fucceeding reign the fame manor bet 
longed to Matthew Arundel, efq;" and is at prefent the property of the Earl of Arundel. 

In the taxation of 1 292 the living, which is a reftory in the deanery of Ilchefter was 
rated at twenty-one marks.' The lord of the manor is the patron, and the Rev. 
Thomas Tucker is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to All-Saints j it ftands on high ground, and is a lar-e ful?- 
ftantial edifice, built in the form of a crofs, with a large well-built tower at the weft 
end, containing a clock and fix bells. 

At the eaft end of the tranfept, under the window, is the ftone effigy of a military 
perlon with his Ihield and belt. ' 

In the chancel floor there is a brafs-plate with this infcription : " Hie jacet ma- 

gifter Johannes Dotin, medicus ac aftrologus infignis, quondam hujus ecclcfise paftor 
nechon Collegii Exonien. Oxon. reftor, qui obijt f Novembris, A° Dni 1561, cul 
gloriofam concedat Dominus refurreftionem." 

This John Dotin was a bachelor of phyfick, and according to Anthony Wood, 
though he wrote nothing, yet was a learned man, and a benefaftor to learning, by chiving 
to the college whereof he was reftor, a iioufe and lands fituated in the parifti of Bampton 
in the county of Oxford, (of which place he was one of the vicars) and alfo all his 
books of medicine for the improvement of the college library. He was likewife fome- 
time reftor of Whitfton in the county of Cornwall, and canon of the cathedral church 
of Exeter.' 

The chriftenings in this parifh are twenty, the burials fifteen, upon an average annually. 



• Efc. 30 Ed, Iir. ' Efc. « Ter. Sydenham. - Ibid. 

' Wood's Fdli/i. 55. Hift. of Oxford, 114. 

C c a 



' Taxat. Spiritual, 



EAST- 



[ 196 ] [^ometton, 



EAST-LYDFORD. 

OF this place, which lies on the Roman fofle-road, here traverfed by the river 
Brew, running from Brewton towards Glaftonbury, we have the following ac- 
count in the Norman furvey: 

" Roger holds of the church [of Glaftonbury] Lideford. Alward held it in the 
*< time of King Edward, nor could he be feparated from the church, and gelded for four 
*' hides. The arable is five carucates. Thereof are in demefne three hides and 
*' half a virgate of land, and there are two ploughs, and fix fervants, and fix villanes, 
*' and three cottagers, with one carucate and a half. There is a mill of ten Ihillings 
" rent, and forty acres of meadow. It was and is worth four pounds.'" 

This manor is not rated to the abbey in the taxation of its temporal eftates made 
A. D. 1293, and therefore v/e may fuppof^ the abbots had nothing further to do with 
it than as mefne lords. It became in procefs of time attached to the honour of Glou- 
ceftcr, and 24 Edw. I. was held therefrom, then confifting of two knights' fees, by Sir 
John Bonville, knt.'' After which it became the property of the Hills, of Hounfdon 
aad Spaxton. In the inquifition taken after the deceafe of Sir John Hill, knt. 15 
Edw. III. he was found to have died feized of the manor and advowfon of Eaft- 
Lydford, and the manors of Littleton, Harnam, Pury-Fitchet, Aflaolt, Poftridge, 
Yard, Sherington, Durland, Wellefleigh, and divers other manors and eftates in this 
county, in which he was fucceeded by Robert Hill his fon and heir/ 13 Henry VI. 
John Hill, of Spaxton, efq; was lord of this manor and, patron of the church, and after 
him John Hill, his fon and heir.'* 24 Henry VII. Richard Mawdley of Nunney died 
feized of the fame." The manor now belongs to the Rev. Mr. Ryall. 

The living is a redkory in the deanery of Gary; the Rev. Narciflus Ryall is the pre- 
fent incumbent. In 1292 it was rated at ten marks.' 

The church ftands in a low fituation near the river, and is a fmall building of one 
pace, with an open turret at the weft end, in which hang two bells. 

There is a handfome mural monument of various marbles ereded in memory of John 
Ryall, gent, of this place, who departed this life Sept. 9, 1781, aged 73; at the eX- 
pence of John and Elizabeth Davis, nephew and niece of the deceafed. Arms, Quar- 
terly, Argent und/aMci on a bend gules, three fleurs-de-lis on 

• Lib. Domefday. ' Lib. Feod. ' Inq. poft Mort. Jo. Hill, roil. * Efc. 

* Coles's Efc. ap, Harl. MSS. 756, fo. 177. ' Taxat. Spiritual. 




LONO- 



@ometton»] 



[ 197 ] 



LONG 



SUTTON. 




THIS panfh, being fo called on account of its extent, and to diftin^mifh it from 
other Suttons, lies three mUes fouth from Somcrton, on the river Yeo whicli 
divides It from the parifh of Martock. It confifts of one hundred and thirty houfes 
of which one hundred and five compofe feveral ftragghng ftreets near the church and 
the reft are fituated m the hamlet of Knowle, a mile eaftvvard in the road to Ivelchcfter 
The lands are in general a heavy yellowifh clay, and moftly arable. Here is a great 
deal of moor-land, particularly Kingsmoor, containing upwards of two hundred acres 
which belong moftly to this parifli, Somerton, and Martock, all which parilhes have a 
right of common on it for young cattle, horfes, and fheep, under the direftion of com 
miflionen,, chofen out of the pariflies of Long-Sutton and Somerton. A fair for oed- 
lary ware is held here on Trinity-Monday. 

In the year of our Lord 852, King Alfred gave to the church of Athclney the manor 
of Long-Sutton, confift.ng of ten caffates of land, and diftinguifhed by the following 
boundaries: « Ferft on Chdbroke, from Chelbroke up to Harepath, end elang Harepath 
to Merfronford, from Merfronford end lung ftrate on Ryjhwyll, from Ryfhwyll to Fcul- 
wUe mto J>:her,cc, end langes Penheved unto Foxhole, from Foxhole y^nxo Ertheme 
eaftwards, out of Erthcnote into Cuttlejion, from Cuttlefton unto Herpath, end elang 
Herpath unto Dyrfton ynto Jnhence, from Anhence end elange the more unto Boylt 
dych froni Boyle-dyche into the Lake, end elang the Lake unto the Dyche, out of the 
Dyche end lang Mores unto Be„ham eaftwards, from Benham unto Swanmore, out of 
Swanmore into Tcvel, out of Yevel into Pedryd, out of Pedryd into Abaulah, out of 
Abaulake eft into Chelbroke.'" j ul «i 

The next account of this manor is in tlic Conqueror's furvey, where it is fet down 
as follows: 

« The Church itfelf holds Sittune. In the time of King Edward it gelded for ten 
" hides. The arable is fixteen carucates. Of this are in demefne four hides, and there 
« arc two carucatt-s, and four fervants, and eight villanes, and fix cotta-ers, with fix 
" ploughs. There are forty acres of meadow, and one hundred acres of pafture. It 
" is worth to the abbot eight pounds. 

" Of d;is land Roger [Brito, or Bret} holds half a hide, and has one plough. 
"Of the fame land of this manor Roger de Corcel holds two hides againft the 
abbot s confent. 1 wo thanes held them of the church in the time of King Edward, 
and they could not be ievered from it. The arable is two carucates, which are in 
demefne, and fix acres of meadow. It is worth fifty Ihillings. Two homagers hold 
" It of Roger. * 

This manor now belongs to the Countefs of Northampton. 

Another manor in Sutton, called Suttok-Damer, is the property of— Williams, cfq. . 
♦ Regift, Abbat. de Aihelney, «> Lib. Domefday. 

The 



198 L o N G - s u T T o N. [®omeiton* 

The manor of Knowle was long held of the abbots of Athelney by the family of 
Gunter, and before them by the families of Middleney and L'Orti."^ This was a 
chapel to Long-Sutton. 

Bifliop SavaricuSj about the year 1198, Benedift being then abbot of Athelney, 
created the church of Long-Sutton into a prebend in the cathedral church of Wells."* 
Which prebend, valued in 1292 at thirty-five marks/ Continued in that monaftery 
till its diflblution. 

The living is a vicarage, and a peculiar in the deanery of Ilchefter, and in the gift of the 
dean and chapter of Wells. The Rev. Chriftopher Tatchell is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to the Holy Trinity. It confifts of a nave, chancel, north 
and fouth ailes, and two porches, all covered with lead except the chancel. At the 
weft end is a well-built tower, one hundred feet high, decorated at the top with twelve 
Gothick pinnacles, and containing a clock and five bells. The weft front of this tower 
has fix niches for faints. 

At the eaft end of the north aile there is a mural monument of marble to the memory 
of Elizabeth wife of Thomas Banbury of this place, gent, and daughter of Jafper 
RadclifFe, of Franklin-houfe in the county of Devon, efq; who died Dec. 29, 17 16, 
aged 29. Arms, Argent, a crofs between four mullets gules, a crefcent for diftinftionj 
Banbury: impaling, <2r^^«/, a bend engrailed ya^/e; RadchfFe. 

There are a few other infcriptions to others of the fame family. 
• Efc. * Archer. ' Taxat. Spiritual. 



YEOVILTON. 

THIS place, lying nearly eaftward from the town of Ilchefter, originally had its 
name from the river Yeo, or Ivel, which divides a part of this parifti from that 
of Limington. In ancient times it was called Geveltone, the G in old S.ixon writings 
frequently ferving the place of Y, as now ufed at the beginning of many of our modern 
names of things and places. The parilh is divided into two tithings, viz. 

• I. Yeovilton Tithing, containing twenty-one houfes, one of them a mill. 

1. Speckington cum Bridghampton Tithing, fituated about a mile eaftward 
from the church, in which are fourteen houfes. 

King WiUiam the Conqueror beftowed the manor of Yeovilton on William de Auco, 
or Ow, as he is called in the furvey of that time : 

" Ralph holds of Wilham, Geveltone. In the time of King Edward it gelded for 
'* eight hides. The arable is eight carucates. In demefne are three carucates, and 

"four 



feomCCton.] YEOVILTON. 199 

" four fervants, and fix villancs, and four cottagers, with five ploughs. There arc two 
** mills rendering tiiirty fiiillings, and fourfcore and ten acres of meadow, and forty 
** acres of pafture. When he received it, it was worth nine pounds, now as much. 

" To this manor are added two hides, which five thanes held in the time of King 
** Edward in equal portions. The arable is two carucates. It is worth thirty fliillings."* 

This William de Ow, Auco, or Ewe, was the fon of Robert earl of Ewe, one of the 
chief counfellors to William duke of Normandy before his conqueft of England. In 
the year 1088, he was of the number of thofe who took part with Odo bifliop of 
Bayeaux, and Robert earl of Morton, for endeavouring to advance Robert Curthofe to 
the crown; and in that purfuit did much mifchief in GloucefterHiire and other parts of 
die kingdom. But afterwards, in 1093, he forfook that caufe, and fubjefted himfelf to 
William Rufus, to whom alfo he in a (hort time proved unfaithful, and in confequence 
thereof forfeited his fortune and his life together. Although many of his lands were 
afterwards reftored to his fucceflfors, yet it is evident this manor never was, at leaft (o 
fully as he had himfelf enjoyed it. For it appears that in the time of Henry II. it was 
held by Hugh Fitz-Richard,'' who was progenitor of a family that adopted the name of 
de Teovilton, from this their place of refidence, and bore for their arms two bars nebiilce.' 
12 Ric. II. Sir John Cobham, of Blackborough, knt. held at his death the manor of 
Yeovilton jointly with Catherine his wife, who furvived him, of the King in chief, 
leaving John his fon and heir.* 6 Henry IV. Sir Peter Courtney, knt. died feized 
thereof; and 12 Henry IV. John Wyke of Ninehead held it, in right of Catherine his 
wife for the term of her life, of John Rogers as of his manor of Berwick.' 13 Hen. IV. 
Margaret the widow of Sir John St. Lo held this manor of the heir of the faid 
John Wyke;' after which it came with the manor of Aller to the family of Botreaux 
by the marriage of Sir William de Botreaux, knt. with Elizabeth daughter and heir of 
the faid Sir John de St, Lo and Margaret his wife; which WiUiam had iflue a fon of 
his own name, who died 18 Ric. II. and he another William, who, after the death of 
Elizabeth his grandmother, 12 Henry VI. had livery of all the lands of his inheritance.* 

This William de Botreaux, by his deed bearing date 23 Sept. 37 Henry VI. gave 
" this manor of Yeovilton, with certain lands in the parifh of Camerton in this county, to 
the prior and convent of St. Peter's at Bath, for a mafs to be celebrated daily for the 
good eftate of King Henry VI. Queen Margaret his wife, and Edward then Prince of 
Wales; as alfo for the good eftate of him the faid William, and Margaret at that time 
his wife; and after this life for the health of their fouls; likewife every Sunday in the 
year for a mafs de SanSld Trinitate; on Monday de Saudis Jngelis; on Tiaefday de 
Omnibus SanSlis; on Wednefday de San5Id Maria Magdalend; on Thurfday de S, Petrq 
is Paulo Apojlolis; on Friday de Epiphanid Domini; and on Saturday the like mafs de 
S, Maria. Likewife that three days before Eafter (when mafs Ihall not be faid) for 
the diftribution of fix-pence to the poor of Bath in bread, fo that each poor man 
might have the value of a farthing. And that each prieft, naonk, or fecular, faying 



* J/ib, Domefdajr. " Rot. Pip. 23 Hen. II, * Seals from ancient Dec4s, * Efp. 

« Ibid, ' Ibid. « Rot, Fi», jz Hen, VI. m. ?o. 



mafs 



200 



y E o V I L T o N. [©ometton* 



mafs weekly, fhould toll a bell in that monaftery thrice, (the faid bell to be called 
Botreaux Bell;) and at the introite of the mafs, fay with a loud voice, " Ye fliall pray 
for the good eftate of our Sovereign Lord the King Henry the Sixth, and of our 
Sovereign Lady the Queen j andofPrjnce Edward; and of William lord Botreaux, 
and Ma^-^aret his wife, while they liven, and for their fouls after they be departed out 
of this w^'orld; and for the foul of Elizabeth, late the wife of the faid Wilham lord 
Botreaux; and for his fader's foul, and his modyr's foul, and his grandfader's foul, and 
his criandam's; and for all the fouls which the faid Lord will afTign them to pray for in 
wririn<^; and for all his anceftors' fouls, and all Chriften fouls, Pater-nofter thrice, and 
A've-Maria, with this pfalm, De frofundis clamavi, &c. with a low voice." And that 
the prieft faying fuch mafs Ihall daily receive two-pence, and the convent of that mo- 
naftery to receive from the prior, for the obit of the faid Lord, and Elizabeth his late 
wife to be performed in albis, before the altar of the Holy Trinity, forty fhillings, 
to be equally divided amongft them. Likewife that there Ihould be diftnbuted to 
the fame convent twenty-feven fhillings for three other obits; viz. On the twenty-fifth 
of May for the obit of William Botreaux, father of the faid Lord; on the fourth of 
September, of Elizabeth mother of the faid Lord; on the third of January, of Margaret 
St. Lo, grandmother to the faid Lord by his mother; and twenty Ihilhngs yearly to 
the facrifts for providing bread and wine, and all other things neceffary for the faid 
mafles and obits."* 
The manor of Yeovilton is now in the poffeffion of Thomas Lockyer, efq. 
The manors of Speckington and Bridghampton were probably the two hides which 
at the Conqueft were added to the manor of Geveltone; but came afterwards to the 
Fitzpaines of Charlton. 8 Edw. II. Robert Fitzpaine was lord of Speckington, and 
then gave to John Wycombe, parfon of the chapel of Speckington, and to his fuc- 
ceffors, for the health of his own foul, and for the fouls of his anceftors, a meffuage, 
and fixty acres of land, lying within the villages of Speckington and Bridghampton." 
Of which chapel at the diflblution of chantries William Hodges was incumbent, and 
had a penfion of il. i8s. 4d/ The faid Robert Fitzpaine was fucceeded in thefe 
eftatesby a fon of his own name, whofe daughter and heirefs Ifabel carried them by 
marriage to Sir Richard Poynings, knt. Which Ifabel furviving her faid huft)and had 
thefe manors among many others for the term of her life; and i8 Ric. II. is certified 
to hold one meffuage and one carucate of land in Bridghampton, and die manor of 
Speckington, with the advowfon of the chapel of the faid manor, Robert Poynings 
" being her fon and heir.' In the fchedule of the Duke of Somerfet's eftates the manors 
of Speckington and Bridghampton are valued at lol." In the time of Queen Ehza- 
beth, Thomas Hodges was lord of Bridghampton cum Speckington, and 45 Eliz. fold 
the fame to Humphry CoUes." The manor and capital meffuage now belong to John 
Hunt, of Compton-Paunceford, efq. 

In the time of Ric. II. Peter de Yeovilton was living at Speckington, and had an 
only daughter and heir named Margery, who was married to Thomas Pain, of Painjhay 
.' D'ugd. Bar. i. 630. ' Inq. ad quod. damn. * Hift. of Abbies, ii. zoj. » Efc. 

: MS. Valor. f Licence to alienate. 



• _ _ _ 

in 




©omerton.] yeovilton. 



201 



in the county of Devon, by whom fhe had ifllie Catherine, who was firft married to 
JohnSturton of Prefton; and fecondly, to William Carent." The faid Catherine 
Carent died 13 Edw. IV. feizedof the manors of Speckington and Yeovilton," which 
defcended to Alice her daughter by her former hufband, married to William Daubeney, 
progenitor of Henry earl of Bridgwater. 

The living of Yeovilton is redorial, in the deanery of Ilchefter, and in the patro- 
nage of the bifhop of Bath and Wells. The Rev. Daniel Dumarefq, D. D. is the 
prefent incumbent. In 1292 this reftory was rated at thirty-five marks.' Thead- 
vowfon was granted to the bifhoprick the year preceding this valuation.' 

The church is dedicated to .St. Bartholomew; it has only a fingle aile, with a well- 
built tower at the weft end, containing five bells. In the weft window are thefe coats, 
1. Two fwords in faltire. 2. Jrgeyit, on a fefle azure a mitre with labels expanded or\ 
between three bucks' heads caboffed gules, in chief, and in bafe as many ^hcomfabU. 
The arms of Bilhop Beckington. 

Near the communion-table is a mural monument of ftone, with this infcription: 



« Near this place are laid the bodies of Katharine the wife of John Hunt, efq- who 
died May 21, 1626. And of Johanna Hunt, fifth daughter of Robert Hunt, efq; and 
Elizabeth his wife, who lived a virgin, and died in hope 24 Aug. 1^7 9." Arms, Azure 
two chevrons between three martlets argent. ' * 

Aflat ftone commemorates the Rev. Edwin Sandys, M. A. fometime fellow of 
Magdalen-college, Oxford; archdeacon and canon of Wells, and redor of this parifli 
and Puddimore-Milton; who died Oft. 8, 1705, aged. 6 2. 

Another ftone is to the memory of the Rev. Robert Woodforde, LL.B. redor of 
this church, and treafurer and canon of Wells, who died April 4, 1762, aged 87. 

• Sir William Pole's Survey ofDevon, in Axminfter Hundred. r Efc. 

' Taxat. Spiritual. r Cart. ig Ed. I. n. 19. 



ftXM^^M 




Vol. III. D d 



THE 



[ 203 1 



4j|4>4^-i^»-t4»«<4**<**-»4*»-»4*><i^*i^-Hi«<4^-»4*»<<^+^*"H|**"^*****4^*<*»^** 



THE HUNDRED 



o F 



STONE AND YEOVIL. 




THIS hundred takes its name from a village in the neighbourhood of Yeovil, 
where the hundred courts were formerly held. It was anciently called Stanet 
from the Saxon Stan, and was granted by King Henry II. to the bqrgefles 
of Ivelchefter;' but was afterwards held with the hundred of Catafh by 
the Earls of Huntingdon;'' being then diftindt from Yeovil, which was not united with 
it till of late years. It adjoins to the hundred of Horethorne on the eaft, and on the 
foutheaft is contiguous to the county of Dorfet, containing the parifh and ancient 
town of Yeovil, and fix other parilhes. 



• Cart. Antici. 



Efc. 



E O 



IS a large and populous town, fituated in the great weftern road from London to 
Exeter, being dittant four miles fouth from Ivelchefter, nine eaft from Chard, and 
fix weft from Sherborne in Dorfetfliire. It has its name from the river Yeo or Ivel, 
which rifing from feven fprings, called the Seven Sifters, near Sherborne, runs here under 
a ftone bridge of three arches, dividing the counties of Somerfet and Dorfet. This 
river by Ravcnnas is ftiled Velox.^ 

This town is pleafantly fituated, being defended from the north by a range of high 
hills finely cultivated. The furface of the furrounding country is pleafingly diverfificd 
and well wooded. The lands are in general goodi almoft eqiully divided between 



f Anonym! Ravennatis Britanniae Chorographia. 

Dd2 



pafturc 



* '204 Y E o . V I L. c^tonc f geottil. 

pafture and tillage j the foil a fandy loam. Near the town is a pool, the water of which 
is green, and fuppofed to receive that tinfture from fome latent veins of vitriol ; there 
is alfo a chalybeate fpring, which is reckoned to contain more fteel than moft others of 
like nature. The town abounds with fine fprirtgs, and in the centre is a common pump, 
from which a great part of the inhabitants are fupplied with water. 

The town of Yeovil confifts of upwards of twenty ftreets and lanes j fome of the 
ftreets are wide, and contain many good ftone and brick fafhed houfes. In the year 
1449 one hundred and feventeen houfes in this town were deftroyed by fire, among 
which were fifteen houfes belonging to the chantry of the Holy Trinity, founded in the 
parifh church here; eleven belonging to the chantry of the blefled Virgin Mary, 
without the church; nineteen belonging to another chantry of the Virgin Maiy within, 
the church ; and two belonging to the almshoufe. Forty days of indulgence were 
granted to charitable contributors on this occafion." 

The market here is kept on Friday, and is very large for corn, cattle, and pigs ; for 
bacon, cheefe, butter, flax, and hemp. In the two laft articles there is frequently from 
600 to loool. returned on a market-day. There is a good market-houfe, feventy feet 
' long, and twenty wide, fupported by twenty ftone pillars ; and in the middle of it are 
the remains of an ancient crofs. There are alfo feveral rows of fhambles. There are 
two fairs of two days each; one held on the fixteenth of November; the other the 
twenty-eighth of June ; both for cattle of all kinds, narrow cloths, and pedlary ware. 
There was formerly a large manufafture of woollen-cloth ; but now the principal one ' 
is of leather-gloves, in which a great number of hands are conftantly employed. 

* The towne is privilegyd with greate libertes, and keepithe courts for decidinge of 
' futs." It is governed by a portreve and eleven burgefles, out of whom the portreve, 
•who is a magiftrate for the time being, is annually chofen. There are alfo a mace- 
bearer, and two conftables for the town, and two others for the parifh, which is diftindt 
from the borough. The town-feal is ancient, and is charged with the figure of St. 
John the beloved difciple of our Lord holding the holy lamb, within a canopy between 
two rofes, and this circumfcription : " ^igiUum COmUtlitatiS tilUe DC <3C0t\ faC- 
, turn in bOnOtC Ctl 31Ol)l0»" I have a town-piece of Yeovil, having on one fide the 
initials E. R. underneath a crown, and this legend, " the borovgh of yeovil ;" 
on the reverfe " made by the portreve 1669." 

Roman coins and remnants of Mofaick pavements have been difcovered here, and in 
all probability it was a town in the days of that people. Its Saxon name was Devele: 
it is recorded in Domefday-Book under the following defeription ; 

" Hugh holds of William [de Ow] Ivle. In the time of King Edward it gelded 
" for fix hides. The arable is fix carucates. In demefne is one carucatc, and three 
" fervants, and eleven villanes, and fourteen cottagers, with fix ploughs. There is a 
" mill of ten fhillings rent, and thirty-three acres of meadow, and thirty acres of 
" pafture. It was always worth eight pounds. 

* E Regiftro Thoma; Bekynton. « Lei. Itin, vii. no. 

« To 



©tone $ ipeotjil.] Y E o v I L. 205 

" To this manor are added twenty-two ground plats [mafuras] which 22 homagers 
*• held in coparceny in the time of King Edward. They rendered twelve fhillings.'' 

" The Earl [of Morton] himfelf holds in Givele one hide. The arable is twg. 
" carucates. There are two cottagers. It is worth three Ihillings. 

"In the fame town Amund holds of the Earl one hide. The arable is one carucate, 
" with which there arc two cottagers. There is a mill of five fhillings rent. The 
" whole is worth twenty Ihillings. Four thanes held thefe two hides in the time of 
** King Edward, and gelded for as much^"° 

The feveral lands above recited fell afterwards to the pofTefllon of the crown, and 
fome one of the Kings of England annexed part of them, by the name of the manor of 
Yeovil, to the parfonage of tlie church of St. John the Baptift, founded al/ antiquo in 
the faid town of Yeovil, and endowed it with divers privileges, fuch as a market on 
Friday, profits offtallage, fairs, view of frank- pledge, &c.' The place was in thofe 
days called the town, borough, lordjhip, and hundred of Teovil, and was incorporated 
by the name of the provoft and commonalty, and a court of piepowder was held by the 
provoft every day in behalf of die parfon of the town. 

The faid manor and lordfliip of Yeovil continued thus veiled in the fucceffive reftors 
of the church of St. John the Baptift, till about the year 141 8, when the then redtor 
rengned the parfonage, together with the town and lordfliip, to King Henry V.* who 
granted the manor or lordfhip of Yeovil, with its appertenances, fuch as views of frank- 
pledge, leets, and law-days, together with the flocks, pillory, and tumbril, and all fines 
and amerciaments, and all profecutions, impiifonments, and attachments, and alfo the 
appropriate reftory of the church of Yeovil, to the abbot and convent of the Virgin 
Mary and St. Bridgett, which he had founded at Sion in the county of Middlefex. 
This grant was confirmed by King Edw. IV. After the difl"olution of that monaftery 
Henry VIII. in the 25th year of his reign, granted the manor and lordfhip of Yeovil, 
■with the redlory of the church, to his confort Queen Catherine, who held the fame till 
her death, when it came to King Edw. VI. in whofe time it was filled the borough, 
lordjhip and hundred of Teovil. After which it continued in the crown till the time 
of James I. who in the 8th year of his reign granted the manor under the yearly rent 
of 8s. 2d. to George Whitemore and Thomas Whitemore, and their heirs and afTigns 
for ever. The fliid George and Thomas Whitemore 27 Nov. 9 Jac. I. granted the faid 
manor or lordfhip, with its rights, members, and appertenances, and the right of court- 
leetSj views of frank-pledge, law-days, and the afTizes of bread, wine, corn, chattels, 
jurifdiftions, franchifes, liberties, cufloms, privileges, commodities, efcheats, goods and 
chattels of felons and fugitives, and felons de fe, deodands, heriots, free-warrens, and 
hereditaments whatfoever, in as full and complete manner as the late King James might 
have enjoyed the fame, to Sir Edward Phelips and Sir Robert Phelips, their heirs and 
aiTigns for ever. In which family the faid premifes ftill continue, being the pofTefTion 
of Edward Phelips, of Montacute, efq. 



" Lib. Domefday. « Ibid. •■ Madox's MSS. vol. xxLx. in Mufeo Britannico, 

« Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen. 



Near 



-«o6 Y E O V I L. C^tone « geotjil* 

Near the town of Yeovil, on the banks of the river Yeo, Hands Newton, anciently 
called Newton-Sermonville, now the feat of Wyndham Harbin, efq. The family 
of Sormaville or Sormayle, who polTeffed this manor and gave it their name, were of 
Norman extraftion, and, as appears by the inquifitions and other records, held this 
manor by a very particular tenure, i Edw. II. Johanna de Sormaville held in the 
village of Newton, then called Nyweion, a certain meffuage, with a garden and fixty- 
fix acres of arable land, half an acre of meadow^ one acre of wood, and two acres of 
alder-grove, by the petty ferjeanty of paying yearly into the exchequer, on the feaft of 
St. Michael, a new table-cloth ten ells long, and a towel five ells long, in lieu of all 
fervice.'' In the time of Edw. III. andRic. II. the family of Muflcet had confiderablc 
cftates in Newton.' By an inquifition taken 14 Henry VI. after the death of John 
Warmwell, of Newton-Sormail, it was found that the faid John Warmwell died feized 
of this manor, and that he was the fon of Roger Warmwell, and by Margery his wife 
had iflue two daughters, Alice and Agnes, his coheirs, between whom the manor was 
divided. Alice was married to Richard Penny, who dying without iflue, fhe married 
to her fecond hufband Simon BIyhe. Agnes was married to Ralph Brett, efqj by whom 
Ihe had ifliie one fon, who died childlefs. The faid manor of Newton is certified to be 
held of the King in capite by Uie fervice of 6s. 8d. a fuccedaneous equivalent for the 
towel and table-cloth above-mentioned. The prefent proprietor of the manor is de- 
fcended from an ancient and refpedtable family, and bears for his arms, AzurCy a faltire 
voided between four fpears' heads erefl or.^ 

. Henford, or the old ford, is another ancient manor, additionally called Matravers, 
,from its owners. The firft of this family that we find had any concern in this county, 
was Hugh Maltravers, who was witnefs to King Henry the Firft's charter to the 
monks of Montacute. To him fucceeded William Maltravers, and John, which laft 
was Hving in thefe parts in the time of Henry II. Waiter Maltravers occurs in 
the time of Ric. I. His ifllie was John, who held this manor in the latter end of the 
reign of Henry III. and left ifliie a fon of his own name, who died 24 Edw. I. feized 
of this manor, which he held of the Earl Marfhal by the fervice of being conflable of 
Strigoil-caftle in Monmouthfhire, leaving iflue John his fon and heir. Which John 
was twice married; his firft wife's name was Alice; his fecond was Joan, daughter and 
heir of Sir Laurence Sandford, knt. who furviving him was afterwards married to 
Alexander Venables.' John, his fon and heir by his laft wife, fucceeded to this manor, 
then called Henford- Maltravers-, and 12 Edw. II. obtained a charter of free-warren 
for the fame."" i Edw. III. he was fummoned to parliament among the barons, and 
died 38 Edw. III. He married to his firft wife Ela the daughter of Maurice lord 
Berkeley, by whom he had John Maltravers, who died in his father's life-time; to his 
fecond wife he married Agnes daughter of William Berneford, and relift firft of Sir 
John Argentine, knt. and fecondly, of John Nerford; by whom he had iflue John 
Maltravers, jun. who was feated at Hooke in the county of Dorfet. John his eldeft 
fon, who, as we have before faid, died in the life-time of his father, by Wentliana his 



Efc. * Ibid. '' See the infcription on the Monument in ^he account of Yeovil Church. 

• Hutchinj's Hift. of Dorfet, ii. 113. " Cart. 12 Edw. II. n. 76. 



wife 



®tonc cf ^coDil.] YEOVIL, 207 

wife left ifllie one fon Henry, who died childlefs, and two daughters, Joan, who yras 
twice married, but died without progeny; and Eleanor, firft the wife of Sir John Fitz- 
Alan, fon of Richard earl of Arundel, and afterwards of Reginald lord Cobham, of 
Sterburgh, whofe defcendants enjoyed this manor, now the pofleflion of Jonathan 
Hooper, efq. The arms of Maltravers were, Sable, a fret or, over all a file of tliree 
points ermine. There was anciently a church or chapel in Henford called Brag-Churchi 
it has long fince been demoliflied, but its fcite may be ftill traced, and a lane near the 
fpot retains the appellation of Brag-Church-Laue. 

WicDEN manor, now the property of George Braggq Prowfe, efq; had formerly 
owners of its name; of whom was John de Wigetone, who 13 Edw. I. was lord of 
the adjacent manor of 

Kingston juxta Teovil, fometimes called Kingston-Pitney, with the advowfon of 
the free chapel there, valued at loos. per annum." From the family of de Wigetone ic 
came to the Fitzpaines, who held it by the fervice of half a knight's fee." 30 Edw. III. 
John Fawconer, of Weft-Marfh, releafed to William fon and heir of William de Carent, 
then under age and in ward to the King, all his right in the manors of Kingfton juxta 
Yeovil, and Huntekghe-MarJIiJ' From the Carents this manor defcended to the 
Stourton family, and was held with divers other lands in Yeovil 16 Henry VII. by 
William lord Stourton.'' 22 Eliz. John lord Stourton held the manor and the ad- 
vowfon of the chapel of Kingfton juxta Yeovil, with the hundreds of Weft-Perrot, 
Andersficld, Williton, and Freemanors.' In that part of Kingfton, which is now 
called Kingfton-ftreet, ftood the chapel, to which the finecure of Pitney is annexed, , 
and where the reftor reads prayers after inftitution. The Rev. Dr. Hunt is the pre- 
fent incumbent of the living of Kingfton alias Pitney. 

Marsh, which lies a mile wettward from the parifh church, had the additional 
name of Huntekghe, or Hunteley, from its old pofleffors. i Edw. II. John de Huntley 
held of Maud the widow of Hugh de Mortimer the day that ftie died the manor of 
Merftie, by the fervice of half a knight's fee.' There was a chapel alfo in this hamlet, 
and the place where it ftood is ftill Ihewn. 

To the north of Yeovil is Lyde, formerly the eftate of the families of Fitzpainc and 
Poynings, now the feat of William Tanner, efq. 

Another hamlet called Pen-Mill lies eaftward from Yeovil. 

Near Henford is a fpot called Elston-Combe, where formerly was another chapel, 
which has long ago been ruinated. The ground where it ftood, and the lands belonging 
to it, are in deeds, and in the common language of the pariftiioners of Yeovil, called 
Eljlon-Combe Chapel to this day. 

Thefe feveral chapels in the hamlets abovementioned were originally erefted for the 
purpofe of oratories, and the performing of maftcs for the fouls of the refpeftive lords 
ofthofe vills wherein they were fituated; and afterwards, when thofe places became 
more populous, the chapels were ufed by the inhabitants for their publick devotions; 

" Efc. • Lib. Feod. ► Rot. Claus. 30 Ed. III. 1 Efc. ' Ter. Sydenham. • Lib. Feod. 

but 



2o8 YEOVIL [@tonc « gCOtJil* 

but they all belonged to the mother-church of Yeovil, in which the inhabitants had 
their burial, and the particular fpots can ftill be pointed out which were allotted in the 
parifh church for the fepulture of Henford, Kingfton, Marfli, &c. the fmall tithes of 
all which places belonged and ftill belong to the vicar of Yeovil. 

In 1 192 the church or chantry of Yeovil was rated at fixty-eight marks and a half; 
the vicarage at feven marks and a half. The prior of Bermondfey in Surrey received 
out of it a penfion of three marks, and the prior of Montacute in this county another 
of .five pounds.' The lord of the manor is the patron, and the Rev. William Phelips 
the prefent incumbent. 

• The paroche chirche is faire and lyghtefom. In it be 4 or 5 cantuaries endwyd 
'with lands.'" Thefe chantries were, 

I." The chantry of St. John the Baptlft. 

1. Holy Crofs, founded 11 Henry VI. and endowed with tenements in Yeovil to 
rhe amount often marks, befides tenements and lands in other places." 

3- Holy Trinity, endowed with lands and tenements in Yeovil to a confiderablc 
amount. 

4. Virgin Mary's chantry, founded without the church. 

5. Virgin Mary's chantry, within the church. 

6. Samborne's chantry, founded 22 Edw. III. by Robert de Samborne, and endowed 
v/ith feven meflliages and thirty acres of land in Yeovil, Kingfton, and Marfh.'' 

The church is called by the inhabitants, from the tradition of their anceftors, as well 
as from the feats of the finging men, and the defks for the finging books, ftill remaining 
in the chancel, a Quarter-Choir. In the veftry are the remains of two fets of organs, 
which were deftroyed in the rebellion of the laft century. 

This church, which is dedicated to St. John the Baptift, confifts of a nave, large 
chancel, north and fouth aile, and tranfept, all covered with lead. At the weft end 
ftands a large plain tower, ninety feet in height, with a ftone balluftrade at top, con- 
taining a clock and eight large bells: the tenor is fifty-two hundred weight, and has a 
remarkable fine found. The length of the building is one hundred and forty-fix itctt 
the breadth fifty, and the length of the tranfept eighty feet. In the centre of the 
church hangs an elegant brafs chandelier, the gift of Edward Boucher, tobacconift, 
in 1724, The altar-piece is very handfome, being formed into a rich portico, fupported 
on .each fide by four handfome fluted pillars with Corinthian capitals, and a rich enta- 
blature. This portico is divided into fquare compartments with cherubs and rofes 
gilt, and decorated with a tranfparent glory encircled with clouds. 

In this church are no monuments of antiquity; but on the north fide of the chancel 

is a mural monument of white marble, with the following infcription : " In this 

church is depofited the body of the Rev. John Phelips, A. M. late vicar of this town, 
fecond fon of Edward Phelips, efq; of Montacute in this county. He died April 14, 

* Taxat. Spiritual. " Lei. Itin. vii. no, ' Pat. 11 Hen. VI. p. i. m. 19. J' Inq. ad quod damn. 

1766, 



©tone $ geotiit.] YEOVIL. 209 

1766, aged 39. Juft, candid, focial; he was efteemed and beloved whilft living: 
benevolenr, moderate, humane; he wa$ regretted and lamented when dead. His 
widow, in pious and grateful remembrance of him caufed this monumental ftone to be 
ercfted and infcribcd. Heu! quam caduco fidere nafcimur! VitJcque mortem pro- 
tinus additam lugemus; emifllquc cunis, ad tacitam properamus urnam. Tu fola, 
virtus, mortis aculeum, ludis fuperb oforcior impetu expandis alas; numiniiquc intuitu 
propiore gaudes." 

Againft the eaft wall of the north tranfept is a monument of grey and white marble, 

the tablet of which has this infcription: " In a vault beneath this place lie the bodies 

of John Harbin, efq; Ton and heir of Robert Harbin,, of Weeke in the county of 
Dorfet, and of Newton in this county, efq; and Bridget his wife, daughter of William 
Drewry, gent. As alfo the body of Robert Harbin, efq; fon of John and Bridget, who 
married Gertrude daughter of Anthony Stocker, of Chilcompton in this county, efq. 
As alfo the body of John Harbin, clq; fon of Robert and Gertrude, who firft married 
Ifabella daughter of William Pert, of Arnolds in the county of Eflex, clq; and aftenvards 
Elizabeth daughter of Sir Richard Strode, of Ncwnham in the county of Devon, knt. 
As alfo the body of Robert Harbin, eldeft fon of John and Ifabella, who died unmarried. 
As alfo the body of William Harbin, efq; their fon and heir, who died i6 Nov. 1705, 
aged 51. He married Elizabeth (who lies by him) daughter of Sir Francis Windham, 
of Trent in this county, bart, by whom he had nine children. She exchanged this life 
for a better 30 June 1708. They lived together many years, being as great pattern* 
of piety and virtue, as they were remarkable for their hofpitality and extenfive charity. 
As alfo the body of John Harbin their eldeft fon, who died 17 March 1704. As 
alfo the body of William^ Elarbin their youngeft fon, who died 15 May 1705. In 
pious memory of all thefe, Windham Harbin, of Newton, efq; only, furviving fon of 
William and Elizabeth, hath erefted this monument. Anno Domini 1711." 

The church-yard is large, and contains many old tombs and grave-ftones. It is 
planted round with lime-trees, which are kept dipt, and have a handfome appearance. 

In the year 1476, John Wobourne, minor canon of St. Paul's, founded and en- 
dowed in this town an almshoufe, for one cuftos or mafter, two wardens, and twelve 
poor people of both fexes; and in 1477 fettled on the faid foundation one hundred and 
twenty-eight acres of arable, meadow, and pafture land, lying within the parifli of 
Ocford-Fitzpain in the county of Dorfet, for the fupport of the faid poor, and for the 
maintenance of a chaplain to perform divine fervice every day in a chapel newly 
ereded for their ufe to the honour of St, George and St. Chriftopher the martyrs, 
or otherwife in the parilh-church of Yeovil, for the good eftate of him the faid 
founder, for William Wobourne and Richard Huet, cofounders and benefaftors; 
of Henry Wobourne and Margery his wife, parents of the faid John and William 
Wobourne; Mr. Ralph Baldock and Mr. John Chefeed, predeceflbrs of the faid John 
Wobourne; as alfo for the good eftate of King Edw. IV. Lady Eleanor Poinings 
countefs of Northumberland, Henry Percy earl of Northumberland her late huftiand, 
Henry Percy then earl of Northumberland, William earl of Arundel, Lord Richard 
Poinings and Eleanor his wife. Sir Thomas Darnett, Sir John SncU, Thomas Harling 

Vol. Ill, E e late 



310 Y E o V I l: Intone 5 J^eotif!, 

late parfon of Yeovil, Mr. Richard Kentwood, Mr. John Cole, Mr. Nicholas Lyte and 
Elizabeth his wife, and Thomas Helling and Agnes his wife. 17 Edw. IV. Thomas 
Bartlet vicar of Yeovil, Thomas HoUyng, John Harold, William Bufh, and William 
Godfrey, conferred fourteen mefliiages, and twenty-one acres of land lying in Yeovil, 
Stanford in the parifh of Afhington, Kingfton, and Henford, (all held under the abbot 
of Sion) on the above-mentioned inftitution,'' which was confirmed by King Edw. IV. 
and was fubjeft to the following orders and regulations: 

*• I. That an alms-houfe, one cuftos, two wardens, and twelve poor people of both 
kinds by equal portions of number, or eight at the leaft, always fole and chafte, not 
leprous, of Yeovil, do pray for ever in a chapel built to the honour of St. George and 
St. Chriftopher the blefled martyrs, or in the parifh church of Yeovil. 

" 2. That thefe be called the cuftos, wardens, and alms-houfe of WilUarn Wobourne, 
late canon-minor of the cathedral church of St. Paul's in London. 

" 3, That the cuftos, wardens, and poor of the faid alms-houfe, and their fuceeflbrs 
for ever, ftiall be one body and pne commonality for ever in fubftance and name, and fhal| 
L»: able perfons in law, and may purchafe, obtain, receive, &c. whatfoever lands and 
other profits fliall be fold, bequeathed, given, afligned, SfC- — may plead and be im- 
pleaded — profecute and defend caufes, &c. 

" 4. That every year the cuftos and wardens continually be changed within fifteen 
flays after Eaftcr, and chofen by five or feven of the honefteft and difcreeteft men of 
Yeovil, to be named by the cuftos and wardens then in being. That when chofen 
they fliall take an oath before thofe prefent to all and fingular which pertain to their 
olHce; and in cafe either die within the year, a new choice may be made by the reft, 
with confent of five or feven as aforefald, and of the poor in the faid alms-houfe. 

" 5, That when any of the poor depart, die, or be removed for ill-behaviour, another 
may be chofen within fifteen days by the euftos and wardens, 

" 6. That on the 8th of January a cotTimemoration be annually celebrated in the 
thurch, and a dole made, viz. To the vicar 1 ad.^— to every one of the nine chaplains 
prefent 6d.— to every clerk 4d.'-r— to each of the boys Serving the choir id. — ■ to the 
cuftos of the alms-houfe, and to every. warden, 6d.— r-and for two new candles then to 
be burning of at leaft lib, of wax, iid.— to the prieft reciting the names of the bene- 
fadtors in the pulpit every Sunday yearly, i6d.-;^to the cryer for reciting their names 
jn the town, id, 

" 7. July 32. Alfo one other alms for ever in the church ^t the procefTion on the 
day of St. Mary Magdalen, viz. To the vicar 2d. — chaplains id. — clerk id.— feven 
finging boys id. each. — cuftos 1 2d.-— wardens of the houfe iid. — the ringers 6d. — 
cryer id, — &c, 

" 8. Od^, 21. Alfb one other dole every year for ever on the day of the iiooo 
virgins, vi?. The chaplains prefent id. — every clerk id. — wardens of the houfe iid. 
ringers 6d,— cryer id. — feven boys id. each.— cuftos id. 

* In(}. ad quod Damn. 

f* 9. Nov, 



p 



fttonc f i?COtii!.] YEOVIL.. tii 

" 9. Nov. 25. Alfo one other dole for ever in the church on St. Katharlne's-day at 
the proceflion: To the vicar doing his office rid. — the nine chaplains prefent id. — • 
boys id. each — cuftos id. — wardens 2d. — ringers 6d. — crycr id. 

** 10. That five-pence and the po^tiohs of all them that be abfent be diftributed 
yearly on Shreve-TuelUay in bread to the poor prefent and fick abfent of faid parifh. 

** II. That the cuftos ind wardens do make a brotherhood of the parifhioners of 
Yeovil, and all others wlio of their own devotion will join them, to provide for the fuf- 
ficient fuftentation of the poor aforcfaid, and of other charges of the poor of the faid 
alms-houfe, and that the faid cuftos and wardens have the government of the faid (oc'iity. 

" 1 2. That the cuftos and wardens as chofen and fworn, fhall make a faithful in- 
ventory of all the goods of the houfe and fraternity, in the prefence of five or fevert 
men as aforefaidi 

'* 13. And at the end of the year the cuftos and wardens Ihall make and yield lawful 
accounts of their receipts and expcnces, and of the goods and ornaments, before five or 
fevcn men as aforefaid, and others that the parifti may prefent. 

" 14. That the cuftos and wardens have a common coffer for the comrhori leal and 
letters pjttent, and all other writings and papers relative thereto, with three keys witK 
divers wards. 

" 15. That the cuftos, wardens, and twelve or feven poor, and their fucceflbrs, fliall 
have ten marks by the year above all charges and expences, viz. obits, proceffions, 
f'eparations and quit-rents, or aftual rents which of our Lord the King be holden, to 
fupport all charges above fpecified ; and the refidue of the faid ten marks if any to 
be given to the poor of the faid houfe. 

" 16. That the cuftos and wardens do fee all the ftatutes and articles, according to 
the ftrength, force, and efFedt of thefe prefents, oblerved and kept; and that for 
their labour they take yearly on that behalf each one two-pence. 

" 17. That each of the twelve or feven poor have weekly. ort the Sunday before 
high noon three-pence. 

" 18. That for more farety, one of the poor that is of the ftrongeft body, with the 
cuftos or his afligns, or the wardens, do yearly within fifteen days after Michaelmas 
furvey and overl'ee the lands lying in Okeford-Fitzpaine belonging to the faid alnns- 
houfe, to be rooted and cleanfed by the farmers from thorns and brambles, and 
Other hurtful things; and other defaults of the hedges, ditches, ways and paths to 
be amended. 

" 1 9. That there be planted yearly by the farmers twenty or thirty oakeh plants irt 
the hedges of the faid land. 

" 20. That every one of the poor fliall continually wear on his breaft a red crofs, in 
memory of St. George the martyr. . 

" Signed and foaled by John Wobourne brother to the faid William, and by Richard 
Huet, chaplain^ in a writing tripartite indented, given at Okeford 1477- 

E e 2 '" ''21. And 



212 y E o V I L. [^tone (J geoijil, 

^" 21. And by way 6f amplifying the obits and proceffional days aforefaid, that 
there be affigned to the portreve of Yeovil (being perfonally at the obits aforefaid) is. 
— to the bailiff" of the faid town, 6d. — -to every warden of the faid houfe, 4d. — alfo to 
the aforefaid portreve for every proceflional day, 2d.— to the bailiff of the faid town, 
id. — to every clerk and warden id. 

" 22. That there be affigned to five or fix of the beft and difcreeteft of the parifh 
of Yeovil, as well at the eleftion as at the account of the officers of the faid alms- 
hoiife, being for their drinking at the faid alms-houfe, 8d. 

" Thefe rules and orders are by Mr. John Beal, vicar of Yeovil, re£tor of Sock- 
Dennis, and fometime fellow of King's-college in Cambridge, extrafted out of the 
tranflated copy of one of the tripartite indentures which is attefted by A. Maynard to 
agree with the writing indented lying in the veflry of the monks of Mountague, and 
with the writing indented lying in the coffer of the bifhop Baldock, in the chapel of St. 
George at Bull's in London." 

In the year 161 9, a fuit in chancery was commenced by the poor of Yeovil againft 
Francis Sutton and others, for demifing and felling fundry parcels of land belonging to 
the alms-houfe, confiderably under their known real value, to the injury of the faid 
charity. On a hearing of the cafe, the Lord Chancellor ordered a commiffion to 
the Bifhop of Bath and Wells, and Dr. HufTey, one of the maflers in chancery, who 
pafTed a decree i 

ly?. That the tenants' and cuftos* of the faid alms-houfe negligence was inexcufable, 
and that they fhould pay ten pounds to the poor of the faid alms-houfe. 

zdly. That for a fuller amends unto the poor people, the tenants who had taken leafes 
for longer terms than the flatute made for hofpitals permits, fhould furrender the fame. 

And ji/y. That from henceforth they fhould let no leafes for longer terms than the 
charter for their foundation and the laws of the land prefcribed. 

Which being certified by the f^id commiffioners, the Lord Chancellor confirmed 
the fame. 

Here is alfo a charity- fchool, in whigh poor children are educated and clothed, and 
afterwards put out to ufeful ti'ades. 



ASHINGTON 

lES four miles north from Yeovil, in a low, flat, and woody, but withal a fruitful 
country, wafhed by the river Yeo. 

This was one of the manors which King William the Conqueror bellowed upon 
Roger de Curcelle after the fettlcment of this kingdom. 

« Vitalis 



etonc * ^COtiH.] ASHINGTON. 213 

" Vitalis holds of Roger, Essentone. Godiiin held it in the time of King Edward, 
*' and gelded for three hides. The arable is three carucates. In dcmefnc is one caru- 
" cate, witJi one fervant, and two villanes, and four cottagers, with one plough. 
*' There are forty-tliree acres of meadow, and twenty acres of pafture. It was and u 
** worth forty fhillings."* 

It was afterwards held of the manor of Diinden upon Poldon, of the families of 
Malet, Vivonne, and Beauchamp of Hatch, fuccefTivcly lords of that manor, under the 
abbey of Glaftonbury.'' 32 Henry II. Robert Fitz-William died feized of this manor, 
and left ifllie Reginald Fitz-William, who was of age 3 John, but it feems died without 
children. For 15 Joh. Henry de Furnellis paid a fine to the King, that a reafonablc 
partition might be made of the lands which he claimed in right of Joan his wife, 
daughter and coheir of Robert Fitz-William.' Upon which partition, this manor and 
alfo that of Kilve in this county, fell to the fhare of de Furnellis, or Furneaux, and 
were inherited by Matthew, fon of this Henry and Joan. 

Matthew, fon of this Matthew, was 2% Edw. I. lord of Afliington and Kilve, and 
then a knight. 33 and 34 Edw. I. he together with William de Montacute was fherifF 
of this county and Dorfet. 36 Edw. I. he obtained licence for a fair at his manor of 
Pury, afterwards called Pury-Furneaux, near Bridgwater. 4 Edw. II. he was again 
Iheriff of Somerfet and Dorfet. He died 1 1 Edw. II. leaving ifllie by Maud his wife, 
daughter of Sir Warine de Ralegh of Nettlecombe, Simon, Walter de Furneaux of 
Holford, and Johnj alfo feveral daughters, whofe families became afterwards heirs 
to his eftate. 

Simon eldeft fon of Sir Matthew de Furneaux 12 Edw, II. married Alice daughter 
of Sir Henry de Umfraville, of Penmark-caftle in the county of Glamorgan, and dying 
24 Edw. Ill, left iflue by her Elizabeth his daughter and heir,*" who in his life-time had 
been married to Sir John Blunt, by whom flie had iflue a daughter Alice, who fuc- 
ceeded to the eftate. 

Which Alice was firft married to Sir Richard Stafford, and afterwards to Sir Richard 
Storey, knts. but dying without children, the lands of Sir Simon de Fourneaux became 
divided among the defcendants of his fifters. The manor of Afliington, in the parti- 
tion, fell to Richard St. Barbe, fon of Mary, daughter and coheir of Sir Humphrey 
Langland, knt. and Margaret his wife, fifter of Sir Simon de Fourneaux, and becaVnc 
a principal feat of that family, from whom it has defcended to St. Barbe Sydenham, 
efq; the prefent poflTeflbr. 

The living, which is a reftory in the deanery of Marfton, was in 1 192 valued at ten 
marks.* The patronage is appendant to the manor, and the Rev. John Williams is 
the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Vincent, and is a fmall fl:ru(fturc of a Angle pace, 
with a turret at the weft end containing two bells. 



• Lib. Domefday, ' Cart. Antiq. • Rot. Pip. 15 Joh. 

t See vol. i. p. 262, ' Taxat. Spiritual. 



In 



Sii4 A S H i N G T O N. [^tonc f gfoiJlf, 

In the chancel there is a handfonne nnonilment of grey and white marble, infcribed, 

" Here lies Sir John St. Barbe, bart. pofTefled of thofc amiable qualities, which birth, 
education, travel, greatnefs of fpirit, and goodnefs of heart, produce. Interred in the 
fame vault lies his fecond wife Alice Fiennes, aunt to the prefent Lord Say and Sele. 
His firft was Honotir, daughter of Colonel Norton. He died at his feat of Broadlands 
in Hampfliire Sept. 7, 1723, leaving for his only heir and executor Humphrey 
Sydenham, efq; of Combe in Somerfetfhire, who ordered this marble to his memory." 
The arms of St. Barbe were. Cheeky argent zxAjahki 



BklMPTON-b'EVERCY. 

THIS village is fituated two miles weft from Yeovil, and on the turnpike-road 
from that town to Taunton. Half a mile eaftward from the church is a hamlet 
called Alvington or Avington. There are about fourteen houfes in the parifh^ 
and about eighty inhabitants. 

At the Conqueft it had the fame lord as Afhingtoh, arid was thus furveyed: 

" Herbert holds of Roger, Brunetone. Seulf held it in the time of KingEdward^ 
*' and gelded for three hides. The arable is four carucates. In demefne are two ca- 
*' rucates, and two fervants, and two villanes, and eight cottagers, with two ploughs. 
" There are thirteen acres of meadow, and four acres of coppice-wood. It was 
** worth forty Ihillings, now fixty Ihillings."* 

The manor obtained its additional name from the family of D'JEvercy, who were 
feated here in very early times, and held their lands of the family of Fourneaux 
t)f Afhington; In the time of Edw, I. Sir John D'Evercy, knt. gave this manor to 
Peter D'Evercy and his heirs. Which Peter dying 18 Edw. II. left iffue an only 
daughter and heir Anne, married to Sir John Glamorgan, who pofielTed this manor iri 
her right) and left five daughters his coheirs. But foon after this we fihd the manor 
in the pofleflion of Dame Ifabel D'Evercy, who died feized thereof, and after her 
death Piers Glamorgan, fon and heif to AmiCe daughter of the faid Ifabel, entered 
tpon the eftate, and entailed the manor, in default of iffue, on Joan Glamorgan his 
lifter.'' But Nicholas Glamorgan, brother of the faid Peter, inherited the manor, and 
at his death 36 Edw. III. held it with the advowfon of the church of Ifabel Blountj 
as of her manor of Aftiington, leaving Ifabel, Petronilla, Margaret the wife of Walter 
Rofe, Nichola, Eleanor^ Anne the wife of Peter Veer, his fifters, and John the fon of 
Joan another fifter, his next heirs.' The family of Sydenham next poffeffed this 
inanbr, and it was according to Leland the oldeft houfe of that family.** By an inqui- 
sition taken 12 Edw. IV. it was found that Joan the wife of John Sydenham held at 

* Libi Domefdafi *> Rawlinfon's Book of Inquifidonsi 5 Efct * Itin. ii. 99. 



©tone <J IP0OWU] BRIMPTON-D'E VERCY. 



215 



her death the manors of Biimpton and Alvington, with the advowfon of the church of 
Brimpton, and the chantry of the blefled Virgin Mary in the faid church; as alfo the 
manors of Combe-Syderiham, Stoke-Gomer, Prefton, Boffington, with lands and tene- 
ments in Timberfcombe, Kitnor, Quarum-Kitnor, Mountfey, Sydenham, Cothay, 
Smithay, Manworth and Novington, Thorn -St. -Margaret, and Langford-Budvillc ; 
as alfo Aihbritde, with the advowfon of the parifh-church there; Chilthorne-Domer, 
and Milverton, together with two tenements, a fulling-miJl, and one carucate of land 
in Streme in the parifh of St. Decumans, and one mefluage, fixty acres of arable land, 
feventy acres of meadow, one hundred acres of palhire, and four acres of wood, irj 
Eaft and Weft-Chefcomb; John Sydenham, the fon of Walter Sydenham, ^fq; being 
the heir of the faid Joan.' This branch of the Sydenham family became extinft 
in theperfon of Sir Philip Sydenham, bart. who died in 1739. Some time before his 
death he fold this manor to a gentleman of the fame name, who likewife fold it to a 
Mr. Penny, then receiver-general for the county of Somerfet. He being remifs in his 
returns to the exchequer, the manor was feized by the commifTioners, and being ex- 
pofed to fale, was in the year 1730 purchafed by Francis F!^ne, efq; for the fum of 
twelve thoufand pounds. The faid Francis Fane dying in 1757, left it by will to his 
fecond brother Thomas Fane, of Briftol, efq, from whom it ha§ defcended to John 
Fane earl of Weftmoreland, the prefent proprietor. 

The manor-houfe is a noble large old building, {landing near the church, at the foot 
of the hill fronting the fouth, and fheltered oq the north and northeaft by fine hilh 
planted with wood, 

The living is a redory in the deanery of Ilchefter, and in the gift of Lord Weft- 
rporeland. The Hon. Mr. Charles Strangways is the prefent incumbent. 

In 1 192 this living was valued at fifteen marks/ 

34 Edw. I. Peter D'Evercy gave a mefliiage and forty acres of land in this parifh tQ 
a chaplain to perform divine fervice in die church of St, Andrew of Brimpton for th^ 
foul of the faid Peter, his anceftors and fucceflbrs, and for the foul of all the faithful 
deceafed.^ The advowfon of this chantry was annexed to the manor.' 

This church is an old ftrufture, compofed of a nave, two fide ailes, two chapels, and 
chancel, with a fmall turret at the v/eft end in which are two bells. In fome of the 
windows are the remains of fine painted glafs. 

In a chapel on the north fide is the vault and burial-place of the Sydenham family, 
and over it a ftately marble monument, on the tomb of which four Corinthian columns 
with gilt capitals fupport a grand canopy, adorned with carving, painting, and the 
^rms of the family, viz. Argent, three rams pafTant /a/'/(?, and thofe of its fcveral 
alliances. On a marble table within the canopy is the following infcription : 

" My foundir Sydenham, match'd witli Ilobye's heyr, 
Badde me informe thee (gentle paflenger) 



' Efc^ ' Taxat. Spiritual. ' Jnq. ad <)uod Damn. 



Efc, 



That 



2i6 BRIMPTON-D'EVERCY. [^tOtie f gJCODiU 

That what hee hath donne in mee is only meante 
To memorize his father and 's difcent. 
Without vayne glorye; but hee doth intreate, 
That if thou comeft his legende to repeate. 
Thou fpeake him truly as hee was ; and then 
Report it fo, hee dyed an honeft rrmn. 

lo November 1626." 

On a flat flone below:—" Here lyes my honoured father; a great lover of his 
country. Sir John Pofthumus Sydenham, bart. fon of Sir John Sydenham, bart. and 
Anne fecond daughter of Sir John Hare, of Stow- in Norfolk. He dyed 1 696, aged 54, 
Phillip Sydenham." 

" Here lies Elizabeth a daughter of the ancient and honourable family of the 
Pomfrets of Hinton-St.-George, firft wife of Sir John Pofthumus Sydenham, by whom 
ihe had .... who died and was buried at Binjo 1664: Ihe died 1662." 

" Here lies the beft of wives, the beft of mothers, the Lady Mary, fecond daughter 
of Philip earl of Pembroke, and fecond wife of Sir John Pofthumus Sydenham, by 
•whom ftie had John, who died unmarried 1692, Philip living 1714, and Mary who 
died 1698. She died to the great lofs and grief of her family 1686." 

There are other infcriptions to the memory of the Sydenhams, but they are either 
illegible or imperfed. 

On each fide of the eaft window of the chancel is a Gothick niche, which probably 
in former times contained the ftatues of faints. 

In the church-yard and juft above thefurface of the ground, are feveral ftone effigies, 
which formerly lay in the church. One of them reprefents a knight templar, crofs- 
legged; another a lady of diftinftion in the habit of the times; a third a nun ; a fourth 
that of a monk in his cope with his crown ftiaved, and holding a chalice in his hand. 
In this church-yard there is likewife a ftone crofs, and a fine yew-tree. 



CHILTHORNE-DOMER 

LIES northweft from Yeovil, and between that town and Ivelchefter. It was a 
manor of the Earl of Morton, and was at the Conqueft divided into two parts, 
both held of the Earl by one of the name of Alured: 

" Alured holds of the Earl, Cilterne. Briduin held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for three hides. The arable is three carucates. In demefne are 
" two carucates, and two fervants, and three villanes, and five cottagers, with two 
" ploughs. There are fifteen acres of meadow, and twenty acres of wood. It was and 
" is worth fixty fhillings. 

" Alured 



®tonc (J )tt)eotiii.] chilthorne-domer. 217 

" Mured holds of the Earl, Cilterne. AIwi held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and gelded for two hides. The arable is three carucates. In dcmefne are two ca- 
" rucates, and five fervants, and two villanes, and four cottagers, with two ploughs, 
" and thirty acres of meadow. It was worth thirty fhillings, now forty fhillings.'" 

Another portion of land in this parilh has the following defcription, under a diffc- 
jent name : 

« Warner holds of William [de Ow] Citerne. In the time of King Edward it 
" gelded for one hide. The arable is one carucate. It is worth ten lliillings. The 
" aforefaid lands Aleftan Bofcome held in the time of King Edward."" 

This place obtained its adiund ai^pellation from the family of Domcr, or Dommere, 
who were lords of it, as another fituated foiithward had that of Vagg, fi-om the 
family of Page, and is now by corruption fimply called Va^. In the time'of Edw. I. 
Johnde Dummere was lord of Chilthorne-Domer, and^hen gave one acre of knd 
in this parifh with the advowfon of the church to Thomas bifhop of Exeter, who be- 
ftowed the fame on the prior and convent of Brewton/ 9 Edw. III. Richard 
Dommere held lands in Chilthorne by the fervice of the fourth part of a knight's fee." 
Thefe lands deicended by an heirefs to the family of Page, of whom we find the fol- 
lowing particulars:— 29 Edw. I. John Page held at his death two parts of the village of 
Chilterne-Fage of the heir of Baldwin de Aldham, by the fervice of the fourth part of a 
knight's feej and alfo the eighth part of a fee in Eford juxta Taunton, by die fervice 
of paying five-pence yearly to the Bifliop of Winchefter, on the feaft of St. Michael. 
John Fag his fon and heir was then of the age of eighteen years.' Which John Fa^-^ 
or Page, and Catherine his wife, held jointly 34 Edw. III. of the heirs of Sir John de 
St. Clair, the manors of Chilthorne-Fage and Chilthorne-Domer,*^ and were fucceeded 
therein by Marmaduke Page, who by Alice his wife had iflbe Thomas Page, who in- 
herited the eftates.^ After which the manor of Chilthorne-Domer came to the family 
of Sydenham J and 9 Edw. IV. was held by Walter Sydenham, efq; and Margaret his 
wife, of Sir Humphry Stafford, knt. late Earl of Devon, as of his manor ofCompton- 
Dundcn." After continuing in this family for a number of dcfcents, it was fold by 
them to the family of Hawker, in which it ftill continues. 

The church was appropriated to the monaftery of Brewton, and valued in 11 92 at 
fourteen marks and a halO the prior of Bermondfey had out of it a yearly penfion of 
twenty fhillings.' 

The living is a vicarage in the deanery of Ilchefteri the Rev. Matthew Hodge is the 
prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Mary, and is a fmall ftrudure of one pace, having a 
turret at the weft end in which are two bells. 

In an aich under the north wall lies the effigy, according to tradition, of John de 
Dummere, a great warrior, and lord of this manor in die time of Edw. II. he is in 
.armour, widi his fliield, military belt, and fwordj one leg is broken off". 

'Lib.Domefday. 'Ibid. ' Inq. - Lib. Feod. « Efc, 'Ibid. 

_, , *i'>«d. Mbid. ? Taxat. Spiritual. 

Vol. III. F f On 



2i8 CHILTHORNE-DOMER. [^tone (J l^COtiil. 

On the fouth wall a fmall monument has this infcription :— — " Near this place lies 
George Hawker, efqj of Vagg, who died Jan. 6, 1716, aged 28. In a vault near this 
place alfo lieth Mary, daughter of the above George Hawker, efqi who died April 3, 
175 1, aged 36." 



LIMINGTON, 

OR the town upon the torrent, (Him in the old Britilh, from the Greek word 
■XifAvri) figrjifying as much) lies between Afliington and Ivelchefter, on the river 
Yeo or Ivel, and is divided into two tithings, viz. 

1. LiMlNGTON. 

2. Draycot, a hamlet, fituated half a mile eaflwai-d. 

At the time of the Norman furvey Roger de Curcelle pofleffed the lordfliip of 
Limington, for which his father gave five hides in exchange to the monks of Glafton- 
bury." It is thus defcrjbed: 

" Roger himfelf holds Limintone. Saulf held it in the time of King Edward, 
*' and gelded for feven hides. The arable is eight carucates. In demefne are three 
« carucates, and three fervants, and one villane, and thirteen cottagers, with one plough. 
" There is a mill of twenty fliillings rent, and fixty acres of meadow. Pafture twelve 
** furlongs long, and two furlongs broad. It was and is worth feven pounds.'"" 

This was held of the barons Beauchamp, of Hatch, by the family of Fitz-Ber nard, 
and afterwards by that of Gyverney.'- In the time of Edw. II. Sir Richard Gyverney, 
a famous knight, was lord of this manor, and lived in a manfion on the northeaft fide 
of the parifii church.'' This Sir Richard, A. D. 1329, gave a mefluage, five acres and 
one rood of arable land, one acre of meadow, and feventy-two fliillings rent, with 
appertenances in Limington, to God and the church of Limington, and to John 
Fychet chaplain, and all other chaplains his fucceflbrs, to perform divine fervlce every 
day at the altar of the blefled Virgin IVIary in the parifli church of Limington, for the 
fouls of him the faid Sir Richard and Maud his wife, and for the fouls of Gilbert 
Gyverney and Mabil Gyverney, father and mother of the faid Sir Richard, and of lord 
Philip de Columbers and Eleanor his wife, Gunnora formerly wife of the laid Sir 
Richard Gyverney, and Maigaret alfo formerly his wife, and of Henry Power and 
Maud his wife.' 

Soon after the foundation of this chantry this Sir Richard Gyverney died, and was 
buried in a fair chapel on the north fide of the parjlli church of Limington,' Having 
no iffue male, his eftates defcended to Henry Pov/er, who had married Maud his filler. 

• Lib. Domefday. 'Ibid. ' Lib. Feod. " Lei. Idn. ii. 91. 

' Exfcrpt. e Regift. Wellen. The laft chantry prieft here was Thomas Raplyn, who in 1553 had a penfion 
granted him of 3I. 12s. ff'illis, ' Li\. Jun. ii. 91. 

Which 



etone $ peotiil.] LIMINGTON. 219 

Which Henry died feized of this manor 35 Edw. III. leaving an only daughter Joan, 
who was married to William de Sharefhull.' After which the manor came to the 
Bonvilles. Sir William Bonville held it at his death 9 Henry IV. of Lord Beauchamp, 
William the fon of John Bonville being his coufin and heir.'' From the Bonville family 
it came to the Marquis of Dorfet. 6 Eliz. the manor of Limington and form called the 
Wejlern-Farm within the fame manor, and other lands, tenements, and hereditaments,, 
in Yeovilton and Limington; as alfo a farm called the Eajiern-Fartriy and the advowfon 
of the church of Limington, were held by William Rofewcll> Thomas Rofewell, 
William Smithe, and Henry Dale.' 

Draycot was the land of Robert carl of Morton, as we learn from the following 
Record : 

" William holds of the Earl, Dr aicote. Ulwi held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and gelded for two hides. The arable is three carucates. In demefne is one caru- 
** cate and a half, and nine cottagers, with one plough and a half. There is a mill of 
** fifteen fhillings rent, and twenty-fix acres and a half of meadow, and thirty-one acres 
'' of pafture, and as many of coppice- wood. It is worth forty fhillings."'' 

A fmall portion of this vill was held by Goduin one of the King's thanes: " He 
** and his mother held it in the time of King Edward the Confeflbr, and p^id Danegeld 
" for one virgate of land. The arable is half a carucate. It renders two fliillings 
*' per annum."' 

This manor is now by inheritance the property of St. Barbe Sydenham, efq. 

The living is a reftory in the deanery of Ilchefter j in 1 1 92 the value thereof was 
certified at thirty marks.'" The Rev. John Clothier is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, which is dedicated to St. Mary, confifts of a nave, chancel, and north 
aile or chapel j at the weft end is a plain tower containing four bells. 

In a niche under the north window of the chapel lies the effigy of Sir Richard 
Gyverney the founder of the chantry; and at his feet that of a woman veiled. Under 
the arch which divides this chapel from the nave is a large tomb, whereon lie the 
effigies of another of the Gyverney family (probably Sir Gilbert) and his lady by his 
fide. All thefe figures are much mutilated. 

There is a mural monument to the memory of Mr. Edward Gould, fon of Mr. 
James and Mrs. Mary Gould, of London, who died Jan, ao, 1747, aged ai. Arms, 
Paly of fix argent znd/al/le, fix crofs-croflets or. 

In the chancel are two ancient pews, on fome of tlie pannels of which are carved divers 
armorial fliields, with the bearings of the Houfes of York and Lancafter. Another coat 
is, Quarterly, firft and fourth fix mullets, fecond and third a fret. On another is the 
cypher of Cardinal Wolfey, who was reftor of this church, to which he was prefented by 
the Marquis of Dorfet. There goes a ftory of him, that foon after his preferment to this 

•Efc. 



» Ibid. 


' Pat. 6. Eliz. p. 8. 


' Lib. Domefday. 


' Ibid. 


" Taxat. Spiritual. 
Ff2 


living 



220 L I M I N G T O N. [^tonc ^ geotii!. 

living, he was put into the flocks by Sir Amias Pawlet, a neighbouring juftice of the 
peace, for getting drunk and making a riot at a fairj a kind of difcipline which Wolfey 
did not forget when he arrived at the high ftation of Lord Chancellor of England j but 
fummoned his correftor up to London, and after a fevere reprimand, enjoined him fix 
years clofe confinement in the Temple. 



M tr D F O R D. 

NORTHWARD from Yeovil, and in the road thence to Caftle-Gary, (lands 
Mudford, which originally had its name from an ancient ford through the river 
Yeo, over which there is now built a bridge of two arches. There are three places of 
this name, viz. Mudford-Street, West-Mudford, and Upper-Mupford; all 
■which are indifcriminately furveyedin the Norman record, as follows; 

" Warmund holds Mundiford, in mortgage of Ulwarji, by evidence of the King's 
*' writ. In the time of King Edward it gelded for five hides. The arable is five ca- 
*' rucates. Thereof are in demefne two hides, and there are two ploughs. There are 
" twelve acres of meadow, and as many of pafture. It was and is worth three pounds.'" 

" Dodeman holds of the Earl [Baldwin de Execellre] Mundiford. Wnulf held it 

*' in the time of King Edward, and gelded for four hides and a half. The arable is 

* " four carucates. In demefne are two carucates, and feven fervants, and one villane, 

*' and feven cottagers, with one plough. There is a mill rented at twenty ftiillings, and 

*' fifteen acres of meadow, and forty acres of pafture. It was and is worth four pounds."'* 

" Rainald holds of Serlo [de Burci] Mudiford. Elmar held it in the time of 
*' King Edward, and gelded for three hides. The arable is three carucates. In de- 
*' mefne is one carucate and a half, and three villanes, and four cottagers, with two 
" ploughs. It was formerly and is now worth three pounds. 

" To this manor is added Stane, \_StoKe, which anciently gave name to the hun- 
" dred.] Sareb held it freely for a manor in the time of King Edward, and gelded for 
" two hides. The arable is one carucate and a half It was formerly and is now wortli 
« ten fiiillings.'" 

The principal pofleflbrs of the chief manor in Mudford after the Norman Conqueft 
were denominated from it de Modiford. Henry lord of Modiford, by a deed without 
date, granted to William Malet lord of Enmore two fardels of land in the village of 
Mudford, In free marriage with Sarah the daughter of Lord Raymond de Sulley. The 
feal appendant to this deed has the name de Modiford furrounding a rofe, the arms of 
' that ancient family.-' 

? Lib. Domefday. 'Ibid. 'Ibid. * Rawlinfon's Book of Inquifitions, 

Thofe 



©tone (J peotiil.] M U D F O R D. 221 

Thofc lands which were held in Mudford at the Conqueft by Baldwin de Mxctcr 
dcfcended to the Courtncys earls of Devon, and continued long in the pofTeirion of that 
family. Another manor was denominated Mudford-Torrv, and was held in the time 
of Edw. I. by the family of Plugcnet of Hafclborough, under that of de Romefly or 
Romfey.* 20 Edw. III. Nicholas the fon of Nicholas Dannay held at his death in 
demcfne of the King in chief the manor of Mudford-Tony, leaving ifTue Sir John 
Dannay, knt. his fon and heir, whofe fole daughter Emma inherited his lands.' 14 
Henry IV. Thomas Romefye granted to William Brocas and others a third part of 
this manor, with all his lands in Saltford and Chilthorne-Domer.' This family feem 
always to have been lords paramount of this manor: they became extindt about the 
beginning of the reign of Henry VI. 36 Henry VIII. that King granted the manor 
of Mudford, with its appertenance's and lands in Mudford, to Richard Fermor and Ann 
his wife, for the term of their lives, remainder to John Termor and Maud his wife for 
their lives, remainder to the heirs male of the body of the faid John, to be held of 
the King in chief by knight's fervice.*" Thefe Fermors were anceftors of the Earl of 
Pomfret. The manor now belongs to the Raymond family of Gloucefterlhire. 

The manor of Stone, which has already been mentioned in the Domefday account 
of Mudford, is in that record thus farther noted : 

" Earl Moriton holds of the King thefe manors, Stane, Stoca and Stoca, Drei- 
** COTE. Thefe lands were thane-land in Glaftingberie in the time of King Edward, 
*< and could not be feparated from it. They are worth fourteen pounds."' 

This vill was afterwards given to the priory of Bermondfey in Surrey, whofe eftates 
here were in 1 193 valued at 61. 5s.'' It is now a depopulated place between Mudford 
and Yeovil. 

The other hamlets in this parifli are, i. Socke, or Old-Stock, fituated a mile 
fouthweft from Mudford, and containing feven houfes, one of which is a large ancient 
Gothick pile, built of Ham-hill ftone, formerly the feat of the family of Raymond. 
The Philolbphical Tranfadions take notice of a pool in the paftures of Mr. Phelips, at 
Sock-Farm, to which pigeons refort, but which cattle will not drink even when there 
is fcarcity of water, being to the tafte not only brackilh, but in other refpefts very dif- 
agreeable. In a ghifs it looks clear, but greenifh. On boiling it in a bell-meral 
veflel, it fuddenly yields a thick froth, having fomething of a vitriolick tafte, and when 
evaporated leaves a vitriolick fait on the fides of the pan. The mud and earth about 
this fpring are Roman vitriol. In a long and hard froft, Dr. Heal fent for a bottle of 
the water, and found it very tliick and blackilh. It fmelled intolerably ftrong, and not 
much unlike gunpowder newly inflamed. 

This hamlet is defcribed in Domefday-book, next after FJfentone, or Afliington: 

" Vitalis holds of Roger, Soche. Tochi held it in the time of King Edward, and 
f* gelded for a hide and a lialf. The arable is two canicatcs. In demefne is one 

' Lib. Feod. ' Efc. • Rot. Claus. 14 Hen. IV. " Pat. 36 Hen. VIII. p. 6. 

' Lib. Domefday. » Taxat. Temporal. 

*' carucatr. 



222 M tJ D F o R D. C^tone gt faeotiit 

** cariicate and three cottagers, and ten acres of meadow, and fifteen acres of pafture. 
** It was and is worth fifteen fhiUings."' 

This eftate was held of the Courtneys lords of Mudford. 

a. Haifa mile to the northweft of Mudford is the hamlet of Hintok, containing 
fix houfes. And, 

3. East-Lane, containing two cottages. 

Befides which there is a fingle old houfe called Wood-Court. The whole number of 
houfes in this parifh is about fixty, and of inhabitants about three hundred. 

The prior of Montacilte had an eftate in Mudford, which was valued in 1 193 at 81.* 

The benefice was anciently rated at thirty marks." It is a vicarage in the deanery 
of Marrton, and in the gift of the dean and chapter of Wells. The Rev. Aaron 
Fofter is the prefent incumbent; 

The church, which is dedicated to St. Mary, is a large handforrie ftrufture, confift- 
ing of a nave leaded, and a chancel and finall north aile tiled. At the weft end is i. 
large well-built tower, containing a clock, and five bells. The old tower which ftood 
here was blown down in a ftorm Sept. 4, 1 309, which likewife deftroyed the tower of 
Yeoviltoni and did much other damage in this neighbourhood." 

in the north aile is a fmall mural monument of ftone,—" In memory of Chriftopher 
Raymond, of Old-Stock in this parifti, efq; fon and heir of George Raymond, of Yeat 
in the county of Gloucefter, efq; who died Jan. 1 8, 1 7 23-4, astat. fuje 60." Arms, Sable, 
a ehevrbn between three eagles difplayed argent; on a chief of the firft three boars 
paflant Jable-. 

The chriftenings in this parilh are on an average fix, the burials feven annually. 
' Lib. Domefday. " Taxat. Temporal. » Taxat. Spiritual. • Triveti Annales, ii. 7. 



PRESTON 

IS a confiderable parilh one mile northweft from Yeovil, in the turnpike-road to 
Taunton. It is divided into two tithings, viz. 

I. Preston-Pluckn£t, containing forty houfes, with the church. 

2i PftEstdN-BERMONDSEY, Containing fourteen houles. 

The whole number is fifty-fourj and of inhabitants two hundred and eighty. There 
are abotit teft farrhs j the reft are moftJy cottages, but better than in many other pst- 
J-ifties; The foil is a rich light fandy loam, and ftone-rufti, with good blue marie under 
it, and the fituation very pleafant. It is highly cultivated, Well watered by Iprings, and 
brnamentedj but not encumbered with wood, 

It 



<8jtonc f ^eotoil.] PRESTON. 223 

It was anciently, as it is at prefent, divided into two manors, the firft of which was 
held by Alured de Ifpania, one of the Conqueror's attendants, who derived his furnanie 
from the circumftance of Spain being his native countiy. 

" Hugh holds of Alured, Prestetone. Alwi held it in the time of King Edward, 
and gelded for three hides wanting one virgate. The arable is five carucates. In 
" demefne is one carucate, and two fervants, and fourteen villanes, with one plougli. 
** There is a mill of twenty-pence rent, and eight acres of meadow, and fifteen acres of 
" wood. When he received it, it was worth thirty ftiillings, now fixty fliillings.'" 

The other manor was given by King William to Anfger dc Montagud, and is ti)us 
fet down: 

" Anfger holds of the King, PRESTETOt;fi. Alward held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for two hides. The arable is oac carucate, which is in demefne, 
*' with one fervant, and eight cottagers. There are ten acres of meadow. It was for- 
" merly worth fifteen (hillings, now it is worth forty fliillings,"'' 

The former of thefe manors obtained the appellation o( Preflon^Plucknet, in regard of 
its having been parcel of the eflate of the family of Plugenet, corruptly called Plucknet. 
Under them it was fometime held by a family who had their names from this place, 
where they had their ufual refidence. Thomas de Prefton occurs witnefs to a charter 
6 Edw. I. after him came William dePrefl:on, who was of Prefton in the time of Edw, II.' 
John de Prefton held at his death 35 Edw. III. of the King in chief a meffuage in 
Prefton-Pluckner, by the fervice of the third part of one knight's fee."* To him fuc- 
ceeded another John de Prefton, who 10 Ric. II. gave a leafe of lands in Prefton- 
Plucknet to Felicia the widow of Roger Warmewell.' William de Prefton, a natjve of 
this place, was a rrjonk of Bermondfey, and compiled a regifter of the charters and muni- 
ments refpefting the liberties, churches, rents, penfions, portions, and all other poflef- 
fions, belonging to the houfe of our Holy Saviour of Bermondfey juxta London, A, p. 
1863.' This manor of Prefton-Plucknet belongs now to the Earl of Weftmoreland. 

The other part of Prefton is diftinguiflied by the name of Bermondfey, by reafon of 
its having been formerly poflefled by the monks of Bermondfey abovementioned. In 
the year of our Lord 1 1 26 Anfgerius Brito, a defcendant of that Anfger de Montagud 
who held this n)aDor at the Conqueft, gave Prefton, confiftjng of two hides, to the 
Cluniac priory of our Hojy Saviour of Bermondfey, to the intent that with the profits 
thereof two chaplains might be found to celcbr;itc divine fervice in the church of that 
monaftery for the foul of the faid Anfger, and the fouls of his anceftors, and all the 
faithful deceafed.^ This grant was confirmed by Walter Brito, or Bret, fon of the laid 
Anrger,"" and in 11 93 the monks were foiind to have poflelTions here of the value of 
81, 3s. 4d.' This manor is now the property of John Wills, efq. 

The church of Prefton was not rated in the taxation of 1 192, It is a vicarage in 
jthe deanery of Marfton, and in tlie patronage of Edward Phelips, of NJontacute, efq. 
The Rev, William Phelips is the prefent incumbent, 

• iiib, Domefday. 'Ibid. ' Cart. Antiq. " Efc. 'Ibid. ' Tanner's Notitia Monallica. 
' Inquif, anno 5 Henry V. n, 9. ' Mon, Angl, ' Taxat, Temporal. 

The 



224 PRESTON. [^tone u geotJil, 

The chufch confifts of a nave, chancel, and two fide ailes, with a tower at the weft 
end, containing four bells. 

On two black frames is the following account of benefadions to the parifli : 

" 1726. Thomas Freke, of this parifh, gent, gave 20s. a year to be diftributed to 
the poor on Chriftmas-day for ever. 

" 1730. Philip Freke, of Briftol, merchant, gave one annuity or rent-charge of 50s. 
ifluing out of Shore's-Clofe, to five poor families of this parifh not receiving alms, viz. 
I OS. to each on the 23d of December yearly, at the difcretion of the minifter and 
churchwardens for ever. 

" 1 73 1. William Freke, of Briftol, merchant, gave 40I. to pay 40s. yearly to four 
poor families of this parifh not receiving alms, los. to each on the 23d of Dec. for evcE. 

" 1732. Thomas Freke, of Briftol, merchant, gave 20s. a year out of Shore's- 
Clofe to the poor for ever. 

"17 Dec. 1747. James Hooper, of Yeovil, gent, by will gave 50s. yearly on 
Feb. 2, and Nov. 5, to the fecond poor of this parifh ; and charged his clofe of free- 
hold land in Yeovil, called Cookfham, with the payment thereofj which faid devife 
has been fince confirmed by the faid teftator's only fon and heir, by a deed enrolled in 
the court of chancery. Oft. 30, 1780." 

There is a publick charity-fchool inftituted here for the clothing and teaching twelve 
boys and twelve girls to read. After they leave this fchool, they are removed for further 
inftruftion to the charity-fchool in Yeovil. 

Not far from the church is a large old manfion, called Prejlon- Abbey, having been 
formerly one of thofe granges which are commonly met with in manors belonging 
to religious eftablifhm,ents. The windows in this houfe are Gothick, and fome very 
large; the door-ways arched, and the ftair-cafes of ftone. The predial barn is one 
hundred and fourteen feet in front, of ftone well quoined, with a fpacious arched en- 
trance, and a timber roof curioully contrived for ftrength and duration. 




THE 



f 225 ] 



■«Jt«**g*>->4*n4»H^>-«^><'3»-<^<^-tij*>4^>-«^-Hi»4g4» t j o ij li > 3H tjl» || H itll > |H >|tl >tl» < < »» 



THE HUNDRED 



O F 



T A U N T O N - D E A N, 



THE river Tone," gliding through a fuccefllon of rich meads and paftures, 
imparts to a large diftridt, forming one of the moft beautiful dens, or vallics, 
in the county, the diftinguifhing appellation of Taunton-Dean, whereon 
Drayton, in the third fong of his Polyolbion, pafles this encomium: 

** What eare fo empty is, that hath not heard the found 
" Of Taunton's fruitful Beam? not matcht by any ground." 

In the hundred oiTantone, and in the hundred oi Pipminfter, [Pitminfter] were con- 
tained at the Conqueft fix-fcore hides, tiuee virgates, and one furlong of land, which 
were held by the King, Walchelin bifliop of Winchefter, William the fheriff, Roger 
Arundel, and John the porter.' 

31 Henry II. this hundied was fined five marks for not certifying the fheriff of the 
death of Walter de Wateley.'' 

This hundred, exclufive of the town of Taunton, contains the following parifhes: 



Angers-Leigh 

Bagborough-Weft 

Bradford 

Cheddon-Fitzpaine 

Comb-Flory 

Corfe 

Cothelfton 

Heathfield 

Hill-Bilhops 



Hill-Farence 

Kingfton 

Lidiard-St.-Laurence 

Ninehead 

Norton-Fitzwarren 

Oake 

Orchard-Portman 

Otterford 

Pitminfter 



Rimpton 
Ruifhton 
Staplegrove 
Stoke-St.-Mary 
Tolland 
Trull 
Wilton 
and 
Withiel-Floiy. 



• 10 William III. an aft pafled for making this river navigable from Bridgwater to Taunton; which naviga- 
tion was improved by another aft in 1708. 

» Polyolbion 48. • Lib. Domefday, Exon. * Mag. Rot. 31 Hen. II. rot. 12. 

Vol. III. G TAUNTON, 



[ 226 ] [CauntoivDean, 

TAUNTON, 

TliONODUNUM/ (or the Town upon the river Tone.) 

THIS town, which in point of fize, buildings, and refpeftability of inhabitants, 
may vie with moft cities, is fituated fifty-two miles fouthweft from Bath, and 
thii^ty-two northeaft from Exeter, being Intermediate, and on the publlck road between 
thole two cities. Its extent from eafb to weft is nearly a mile, and it confifts of four 
principal ftreets, which are wide and very well built; and there is a noble fpaclous 
market-place, In which is a handfome commodious market-houfe, with a town-hall 
over it, the building whereof was completed in the year 1773. The markets are large, 
and kept on Wednefday and Saturday; and there are two fairs, one held on the 17th of 
June, the other on the 7th of July. The woollen-manufadlure has flourifhed in this 
town almoft ever fince its firft introduftion into England by the memorable Jolin 
Kempe from Flanders j the firft manufaflure being eftabliilied here about the year 
J 336. Of late years it has decayed, and its fuccefs has been in great meafure tranflated 
to the neighbouring town of Wellington. A filk manufafture was introduced here in 
1780. In the year 1477 the conftables, portreves, and burgelTes, prefented a petition 
to parliament, praying that licence might be granted for paving and otherwife im- 
proving the town of Taunton, which was granted upon a provifo that the a.Q. ftiould 
not extend to the prejudice of William blfliop of Winchcfter, or his fucceflbrs, or of any 
tenements belonging to his biflioprick."' The principal ftreets at that time were deno- 
minated (as they are at this day) North-ftreet, Eaft-ftreet, Fore-ftreet, and High-ftreet. 

It is obferved by Mr. Aubrey, a writer who deals largely in fuperftition, that once 
in feven years there rages in Taunton a fmall-pox which the phyficians cannot mafter, 
and he gives us the following extrafts relating thereto from theparifti reglfter: 

Small-pox in Taunton all the year 1658 
Likewife in the year — 1670 

Again in the year — — 1677 

Again very mortal in the year 1684." 

Taunton is an ancient borough by prefcriptlon, and has returned members to par- 
liament .from the year 1294, 23 Edw. I. The right of choofing thefe members is 
vefted in the p9,ri(]iioners boiling their own pot (hence called Pot-Wallers, and Pot- 
Walloners) refiding within the limits of the borough, not being ftated paupers, nor 
having within a twelve-month received any fbare from the funds of the refpedlve 
charities. It was incorporated by King Charles I. and again by King Charles II. 
A. D. 1677, ^"^^ put under the government of a mayor, who returns the burgefles to 
parliament. The firft mayor under the former charter was Andrew Henley, efq; fon 
of Robert Henley, of Leigh in this county, efq; and progenitor of the prefent Earl of 

• Dr. Stukcley fuppofes a Roman rpad pafled hence to Bridgwater ; but Taunton was no Roman town. 
" Pet. in Pari. 17 Ed. IV. ' Aubrey's Mifcellanies 33. 

Northington, 



Cmmtoii'Dcan.] T A u N T o N. 227 

Northington. The fiift under the fecond charter was Roger Gale, efqj grandfather of 
tlic Rev. Thomas Gale, vicar of the church of St. Mary-Magdalen in the town of 
Taunton, and great-grandfather of Henry Prodor Gale, of Haydon, cfq. The cor- 
poration confifts of a mayor, recorder, a juftice of the peace, two aldermen, ten capital 
and ten inferior burgefles. The juftice is always the laft mayor, who with the two 
aldermen is annually elefted out of the capital burgefles, and the vacancies occafioned 
by this eleftion are filled up from the inferior members of the corporation. The officers 
are, a town-clerk, two ferjeants at mace, a bell-man, and a beadle. There are afting 
under the mayor and fworn by him two conftables and fix tithing-men or petty- 
conftables, who with two portreves and two bailiffs are annually chofen by a jury, and 
are, properly fpeaking, the officers of the Bifhop of Wincheftcr, in whofe court they are 
eleded. The. conftables were formerly the chief magiftrates of the town j and the 
province of the portreve is to colledl tiie Biiliop's rents. The mayor's officers cannot 
arreft within the borough ; and there being no prifon, except a kind of town-bridewell, 
called the Nook, debtors are fent to the county gaol at Ilchefter, and criminals are 
committed to that at Wilton. 

The corporation have neither lands, houfes, nor joint-ftock, the laft charter pre- 
cluding them from any fuch pofieffions. Their original feal was, an eagle ftanding on 
an imperial crown with wings difplayed: under the crown, on a icroU, this motto, 
Defendamus: the circumfcription, Sigillum Burgi de Taunton. The arms of 
the town are a caftle triple-towered, crenellated and embattled; and the device, allufivc 
to its name, is the letter T paflcd through a tuti, lying feflTeways.'' 

The caftle ftands on the weft fide of the town, and is part of a ftately edifice, ereded 
by William Giffard biftiop of Winchefter, and lord of the town in the time of Henr)' I. 
By feveral documents of the bifliops of that fee dated at Taunton-caftle, • it fcems to 
have been a place of their frequent refidence. In 1495 the wliole building was 
repaired, and an embattled gate-way built by Thomas Langton biihop of Winchefter 
from i486 to 1492. This gate is ftill ftanding, and has over it a fliield between four 
rofes, with a crofs charged with five rofcs, and this infcription: " 1490. LaU0 tifat 
Cijl-ifte C. JLangtO COintO." He alfo ereclied the houfe adjoining to the porter's 
lodge. In 1577 the buildings received confiderable improvements from the hands of 
Bifliop Robert Horn, who likewife built the affize-hall as it now ftands, and whofe 
arms, three bugle-horns, impaling the fee in 1577, remain ftill thereon. 

23 Edw. I. Nicolas de Bonvile was conftable of Taunton-caftle. 

14 Edw. II. John de Buckland had the fame office. 

9 Edw. III. Hugh de Taunton was Janitor Caftri da Tantone, and held lands in 
Taunton under Adam de Orlton biftiop of Winchefter. 

6 Hen. V. Thomas Chaucier was conftable of the caftle. 

13 Henry VI. Sir John Daubeney was conftable. 

? Tavnton Farthing, by the Constablej, 166-. 

G g 2 17 Mcniy 



228 . , TAUNTON. [Caunton'Si^ean, 

17 Henry VI, Sir John Stradling was conftable of Taunton-caftle, and had an 
annuity of 20I. per annum granted to him out of the borough or manor of Taunton. 

18 Edw. IV. the office of feodary and bailiff of the franchifes of Taunton was 
granted to WilUam Bodelh 

13 Henry VII. Giles Lord Daubeney had the conftablefliip of the caftle, and the 
annuity of 20I. This year the Cornifh rebels under the command of Perkin Warbec, 
who laid claim to the crown of England under the pretext of being Richard duke of 
York, fecond fon of King Edw. IV. came to Taunton, and laid fiege to the caftle, 
which they tookj but were foon repulfed; and their leader, being purfued by Lord 
Daubeney to Beaulieu in Hampfliire, was there taken, fent to London, and executed. 
The Cornifh infurgents had the year before invefled the place, and murdered in the 
caftle the provoft of Penryn, who had been appointed a commifiioner of the new 
lubfidies." 

19 Henry VIII. the office of feodary and bailiff of Taunton was granted to Robert 
Hill and William Payne. 

22 Henry VIII. Thomas and Matthew Arundel had the office of confl:able and 
gate-keeper of the caftle. 

24 Henry VIII. the fame office was granted to Poole and Drables. 

4 Edw. VI. the conftablefliip was granted for life to Walter Halfe. 

4 and 5 Philip and Mary, the office of woodward of Taunton was granted to 
Nicholas Lenthall and Hugh Lyddon. 

4 Eliz. the office of clerk of the caftle and bailiff of Taunton was granted to 
Hugh Norris and his two fons. 

1 7 Eli2. the bailiwick and conftablefliip of Taunton were granted to Jerome and 
Edmund Home. 

1 8 Eliz. Richard Rofewell was woodward of Taunton. 

39 Eliz. the bailiwick and conftablefliip of the caftle were granted to Edward 
Lancafter and his affigns for three lives. 

10 Jac. I. Sir Francis Popham, knt. was conftable. 

25 Nov. 4 Car. I. the office of clerk of the caftle, town, and lordftiip of Taunton 
was furrendered by Sir John Horner, knt. John Syms, and Thomas Malet, efqrs. at 
the requeft of George Browne, and was granted to the faid George Browne, and Robert 
Browne, for their lives, and the longer liver of them. They had alfo a grant at the 
fame time of the office of gate-keeper of the caftle. 

14 May, 9 Car. I. George Browne being dead, Robert Browne furrendered the 
office, and took a grant of the fame to himfelf and John Browne for their lives. 

10 March, 20 Car. I. the conftablefliip of the caftle was granted by Walter bifliop 
of Winchefter to Francis Keene, of Wells, gent.' 

* See the Englifli Hiftories. ' From the Ledger books of Winchefter. 

In 



Caunton»S?Cfln.] TAUNTON. 229 

In 1642 this caftle fdl into tlie hands of the parliament army, who placed a garrifbu 
therein, and intended to have made it their chief lioid in all diis country; it was 
however qoickly refcued from them by the Royalifts under the Marquis of Hertford, 
and as quickly retaken by Colonel Blake for the parliament, who in 1645 defended ic 
againll an army of ten tlioufand men that was brought againft it by Lord Goring. 
After the Reftoration King Charles II. ordered it to be difmantled, in which ruinous 
ftate it has ever lince continued to this day. 

It ftood nearly upon the fcite of a fortrefs eredled about A. D. 700 by Ina king 
of the Weft-Saxons, for the purpofe of better fecuring the conquefts which he had 
made in this part of Britain, and awing thofe difaffedted nobles who fixed a jealous 
eye on his dominions. It was here that that prince, whofe reign throughout is marked 
with fortitude tempered with moderation, and prudence heightened by religion, con- 
vened the clergy of the Weft to affift him in the promotion of the Chriftian religion, 
and framed that code of laws, which was intended to regulate the police of his 
country, and was in many points fo favourable to the Aborigines of the ifland. Not- 
withftanding the infurreftion of Ealdbright Clito, who urged a prefumptivc claim to 
his crown and fceptre, and whom he vanquifhed underneath his walls, and the (editi- 
ous murmurs of fome other malecontents of inferior note, he lived to fee his territories 
in the ftill pofleflion of tranquillity; and there being now no longer an occafion for 
walls and bulwarks, the caftle of Taunton was demolifhed, and the King, having put 
the government of his kingdom into the hands of Ethelard, brother of his Queen 
Ethelburga, retired to a monaftery at Rome, and there ended his days. 

Ethelard fucceeding to the throne, feems to have followed the fteps of his great pre- 
decelTor, and to have cultivated peace, piety, and religion, in which he was affifted by 
his devout Queen Frithogitha, who, abandoning all her fplendid pofleflions, devoted 
herfclf entirely to God, and, among many other ads of religious charity, prevailed 
upon Ethelard to beftow the town of Taunton, then the feat of Royal refidence, on the 
church of Winchefter, which had been founded by Cygenils the firft Chriftian king 
of the Weft-Saxons. 

To this donation, which was made fomewhat above three hundred years before the 
arrival of King William the Conqueror, was appended in that fpace fuch a remarkable 
fliare of immunities, prerogatives, and privileges, as is hardly to be found in the de- 
fcription of any other manor in the Norman furvey. 

The Land of the Bishop of Winchester. 

" The Bifhop of Winchefter holds Tantone. Stigand [bilhop of Winchefter, and 
" archbifhop of Canterbury] held it in the time of King Edward, and gelded for 
" fifty-four hides, and two virgates and a half of land. I'he arable is one hundred 
" carucates. Befides this the Bifliop has in demefne land to the amount of twenty 
" carucates, which never gelded, and has there thirteen ploughs. There are fourfcore 
" villanes, and fourfcore and two cottagers, and feventy fervants, and fixteen coliberts, 
" and feventeen feeders of fwine, paying feven pounds and ten {hillings. Amongft 
" them all they have fixty carucates. There are fixty-four burgeffes paying thirty-two 

" (hillings. 



230 TAUNTON. [Caunton^Dcan, 

" fhillings. There arc three mills rented at one hundred (hillings wanting fixty-pence. 
" A market pays fifty Ihillings, and fifty fhillings [are paid] for the liberty of coining. 
" There are forty acres of meadow. Pafture two miles long, and one mile broad. 
" Wood one mile long, and as much broad. When Bifhop Walchilin received it, its 
" revenue was fifty pounds. Now it produces one hundred and fifty-four pounds and 
*' thirteen-pence, with all its appendages and cuftoms. 

" Thefe cuftoms belong to Tantone. Burgherifth,^ robbers,"" breach of the peace,' 
" hainfare,* hundred-pence,' and St. Peter's-pence,'" cluirchfet." To attend the Bifhop's 
" pleas thrice a year without being fummoned, and to go to the army with the 
'• Bifliop's men. 

" Thefe faid cuftoms thefe lands were accountable for to Tantone. Talanda," 
" Achtty lloleforde^ and UhcedenCy and Succedene,' Maidenobrocke^ Laforde^ Hilla^ and 
" Hela/ Nichehedey Nortone%' Bradeforde," Halja,^ and Hafella^ 

" Scohindare^ and Stocha\ thefe two lands do not owe the army.^ 

" The fame cuftoms owe they o£ Baweherga^ except the army and the fepulture.' 

" Of all thefe lands thofe who would make oath or carry their decifion come to 
** Tantone.'' When the lords of thefe lands die, they are buried in Tantone. 

" Hilla and Hela could not be feparated from Tantone in the time of King Edward. 

" Of the aforefaid fifty-four hides and a half, and half a virgate of land, Goisfrid 
" now holds of the Bifhop four hides and one virgate of land. Robert four hides and 

^ The cognizance and power of puniftiing houfe-breakers in the borough. 

'' The fame extended to the judging and executing thieves and highway-robbers. 

' Power of adminiftering juftice in all mifdemeanors and petty commotions. 

'' Jurifdiftion over fervants abfconding from their mailers. 

' A fum demanded by the IherifFfrom each tithing within his county by way of fubfidy. 

" A tribute of one penny for every houfe, given by King Ina to the church of St. Peter at Rome in his pil- 
grimage thither, A. D. 720. 

" A mcafure of wheat formerly paid to the church by every houfekeeper on St. Martin's-day, in the name 
of firft-fruits. 

" Tolland. ' Oake. ' Holford. ' Over-Cheddon. ■ Nether-Cheddon. ■ Maidenbrook. 

" Ford. » Hill-Bi(hops. ^ Heal. ' Ninehead. • Norton-Fitzwarren. ^ Br.idford. 

' Halfe. " Heathfield. ' ' Stoke-St.-Mary. 

^ Are not obliged to fend men to attend the Bifhop's men in the army. 

'' Bagborough. ' Fees paid for interment, 

' The meaning of this fentence is, Thofe who were difpofed to acquit themfelves of any charge alledged againft 
them, either by oath, or carrying in the hand a red-hot iron of a pound weight forthe fpaceof nine ftep:;, were 
to apply to the Bifliop's court at Taunton to make fuch proof of their inrtocence. This mode of purgation from 
the charge of puilt, by an appeal as it were to God himfelf, was called by our forefathers fire-ordeal, and was 
only the privilege of freemen, or better fort of people. It was of two kinds, that abovementioned being ihc fim- 
pleft of the two: the other was performed by ftepping barefoot and blindfolded over nine red-hot plough-ftiares 
laid at equal diilances. In either way, if the defendant efcaped unburnt, he was dcclared'innocent ; but if burnt, 
guilty. Tlie ordaliati law was totally aboliflied by an aft of parliament in the time of Henry III. 

<' a half. 



cmmtoivaDcan.j T A u N T o N. 231 

« a half. Hugh two hides and a hah". There are iti demcfne ten carucates, and 
« twelve fervants, and twenty villanes, and twenty-eight cottagers, with ten ploughs. 
" There Are thirty-feven acres of meadow, and forty-diree acres of wood, and a mill of 
" three fliillings [rent.] This is Hugh's. In all it is worth twenty-feven pounds. 

" Alfo of the aforefaid hides Goduin hold* of the Bilhop two hides wanting half a 
" virgate of land. Leveva two hides. Alward one hide, and one yardland and a half. 
" Aluric and Edmor three hides. Lewi half a virgate of land. There arc in demefnc 
" feven carucates, and thirteen fervants, and thirteen villanes, and twenty cottagers, 
" with three ploughs and a iialf. There are two mills of the rent of fix /hillings and 
" eight-pence, and forty-five acres of meadow, and fixty-one acres of wood. In all it 
" is worth eiglit pounds and three fiiillings. They who held thefe lands in the time of 
" King Edward could not be fcparated from the cliurch. 

" Alfo of the aforefaid hides Earl Moriton holds one hide. Alured one hide. John 
" two hides and half a yaidland. In demefne there arc two carucates, and fix fervants, 
*' and twelve villanes, and feventeen cottagers, with three ploughs and a half. There 
" are two mills rented at fourteen fhillings and two-pence, and nineteen acres of mea- 
" dow, and one hundred acres of pafture, and twenty acres of wood. Thefe three lands 
" belonged to Tanton^ in the time of King Edward, and were valued at feventy 
" fiiillings. Their profits are now fix pounds and ten fiiillings. 

" To this manor of Tantone are added two hides and a half in LUianf and Lega^ 
" which a thane held in parage in the time of King Edward, and could go to what lord 
" he would. Wlward and Alward now hold them of the Bifiiop by the grant of King 
•' William. The arable is five carucates. There are fix villanes, and three cottagers, 
'^ and four fervants, and eleven acres of meadow, and one hundred acres of pafture, 
" and forty-nine acres of wood. It was and is worth forty-five fiiiUings. From thefe 
" lands cullom and I'ervice always belonsied to Tantone, and King William sranted 
" thofe lands to be held by St. Peter and Bifliop Walchelin, as he himfelf acknowleged 
" at Sarifiieri [Salifbury] in the hearing of the Bifiiop of Durham, to whom he gave 
" inftrudions to enroll this his faid grant in the records."" 

This Walchelin, who is fometimes otherwife called Walkelm, and Valceline, was 
coufin and chaplain of King William tlie Conqueror, and profeflxjr of theology at Paris." 
Soon after his coming into England, he was, in the room of Stigand, who had been for 
divers reafons deprived of his epifcopal honours, confecrated Bifhop of Wincliefter by 
Arminfrid the Pope's legate, on the feaft of the Holy Trinity, A. D. 1070.'' He pre- 
fided over that fee feven and twenty years,, and died Jan. 2, 1097.^ He is generally 
fuppofed to have inftituted the cuftoms of the manor. 

To which Walchelin fucceeded in the fee of Wincheft:er, and in the manor of Taunton, 

William Gifl^ard, 1 107, He built the cafl:le and the priory. 

Henry de Blois, brother of King Stephen, 1 1 29. He was a benefactor to the priory. 

' Lydiard-St.-tawrcDce. " Leigh, orJCnight's-Leigh. " Lib, Domcfday. " Rudborne Hill. Wlnton. 
f Godwin de Prxfulibus, z\\, ' Simeon Dunclm. FDft. zij. 

Richard 



232 TAUNTON. [Caunton^a:)ean. 

Richard Toclive, alias More, 1173. He was a native of Ivelchefter. 

Godfrey de Lucy, fon of Richard Lucy, chief juftice of England, 1 189. 

Peter de la Roche, 1204. Made chief juftice of England by King John. 

William de Raley bifhop of Norwich, 1238. ' . - 

Ethelmar, or Adomar, fon of Hugh earl of March, 1260, 

John de Gernfey, or John de Oxford, 1262. 

Nicholas d^ Ely, 1268. Was a benefactor to the priory. 

John de Pontifiara, or Pointes, 1282. 

Henry Woodlock, prior of Marmonftier, 1305. 

John de Sandale, canon of York, 13 16. 

Reginald de Afler, canon of Orleans, 1320. 

John de Stratford, archdeacon of Lincoln, 1323. 

Adam de Orlton, or Tarlton, tranflated from Worcefter, i323' 

William de Edendon, lord treafurer of England, 1345. 

William de Wykeham, 1367. 

Henry Beaufort, cardinal of St. Eufebius, 1405. This bifiiop, .14 Heiiry VL 
granted to John archbifhop of York and others a certain yearly rent of 133I. 6s. 8d. 
iflTuing from the manors of Downton, Eblefbourne-Epifcopi and Knoyle in Wiltfhire; 
and 333I. ifiliing from the caftle and town of Taunton, and from the manors of Hull, 
Staplegrove, Holway, N aiknjourne, Otterford and Rimptonj and the prior and con- 
vent of St. Swithin in Winchefter ratified the grant.' 

William Waynflet, 1447. He granted the old guildhall (which with the high crofs 
was taken down in 1769) to Nicholas Dixon, vicar of Taunton, under the yearly rent 
of a red rofe. 

Peter Courtney, i486. 

Thomas Langton, 1493. He repaired, and greatly added to the caftle. 

Richard Fox, 1504. He was founder of the free-fchool in Taunton. 

Thomas Wolfey, the famous cardinal, 1529. 

Stephen Gardiner, 1534. 

John Poynet, 1550. 

John White, 1557. '■ 

Robert Horn, dean of Durham, 1560. He built the aflize-halL 

John Watfon, 1580. 

Thomas Cooper, the author of the Chronicle and Thcfaurus, 1584. 

William Wickham, 1595. 

William Day, dean of Windfor, 1595. 

Thomas Bilfon, 1597. 

Thomas Mountague, bifhop of Bath and Wells, 1617. 

Lancelot Andrews, 1618. 

' Rot. Claus. 14 Hen. VI. 

Richard 



s. 


d. 


I 


51: 


o 


6 


15 


10 


I 


3\: 


17 


10 



Caunron=2Dcan.] TAUNTON, 233 

Richard Ncile, tranflated from Durham, 1628. He was the laft prelate of the fee 
who enjoyed this manor without moleftation; for in the time of his fucceflbr 

Walter Curie, who fucceeded in 1632, an aft pafTed for the fale of Bifhops* lands; 
and die manor of Taunton and Taunton-Dcan, together with the caftle and all other 
appertenances, were fold by the truftees appointed by parliament, on March 20, 1647, 
to Brampton Gurdon, of AfTington in the county of Suffolk, efq; and John Hill, of 
Taunton-Dean, gent. But the manor was afterwards recovered by and is ftill veiled 
in the bilhoprick of Winchcfter. 

This manor has five divifions or hundreds, viz. Hollway, Hull, Poundisford, 
Staplegrove, and Nailsbournej and by the return of the furveyors appointed by 
parliament for the furveying the manor of Taunton-Dean, in order to a fale, Feb. 9, 
1647, it was found that 

The tenants of the hundred of Hollway paid at the firft coming in") £. 
of every Bilhop, by way of acknowledgment, called Recognition > 24 

Money, the fum of J 

The tenants of the hundred of Hull . 10 

The tenants of the hundred of Poundisford — . ■ ■ - 12 

The tenants of the hundred of Staplegrove — — ■■ 13 

The tenants of the hundred of Nailfbourne — ■ 9 

In this manor there are two forts of lands, Bondland and Overland: The Bondland is 
that whereon there have been and commonly are ancient dwelling-tenements, and is 
held by a cuftomary fine and rent certain, paying heriots, and doing other fuits and 
fervices to the fame belonging. The Overland is that whereon in ancient time there 
were no dwellings, and is held by a fine and rent certain and fealty j but the tenants 
thereof pay no heriots, and do no other cuftoms, fuit, or fervice, for the fame. 

By the cuftom of this manor, if any tenant die feized of any cuftomary lands or tene- 
ments of inheritance within the fame, having a wife at the time of his death, then his 
wife inherits the fame lands as next heir to her hufband, and is admitted tenant thereto, 
to hold the fame to her and her heirs for ever, in as ample a manner as any other cuf- 
tomary tenant there holds his lands, under the rents, fines, heriots, cuftoms, duties, fuits, 
and fervices, for the faine due and accuftomed. And if any tenant die leized of any 
cuftomary lands or tenements of inheritance within the faid manor, having no wife at 
the time of his death, and having but one fonj then that fon inherits the fame land as 
heir to his father; but if he have more fons than one, then the youngeft fon inherits the 
fame as fole heir to his father. And fo likewife of daughters : if he have more than 
one, and die without ilTue male, then the youngeft daughter inherits the fame as fole 
heir to her father. But if fuch tenant have neither wife, fon, nor daughter, then the 
youngeft brother of the whole blood inherits the fame lands; and if he have no brother 
of the whole blood, then the youngeft fiftcr of the whole blood; and if he have neither 
brother nor fifter, then the youngeft next of kin of the whole and worthieft blood in- 
herits and holds the lands to him and his heirs, or to her and her heirs for ever, under 

Vol. III. H h the 



«f? 



234 TAUNTON. [Cauttton^tDean* 

the fines, rents, heriots, cuftoms, duties, fuits, and fervices due for the fame, by the 
cuftom of the faid manor.' 

The affairs of the Bifhops of Winchefter, and die revohitions of their caille, engrofs 
the hiftory of Taunton for feveral hundred years. Its other tranfaftions have been 
but fewwith refpeft to notoriety; and perhaps the moft memorable occurrence in its 
jmodern annals is the adventure of James duke of Monmouth, and the cruelties exer- 
cifed on his partifans by Kirk and Jeffreys. 

The Duke, having in the fpring of the year 1685 failed from the Texel with three 
veffels, came on Ihore at Lyme in Dorfetfhire with about fourfcore followers. The 
novelty of his expedition, and the difaffeftion of the people to the meafures of King 
James II. foon drew numbers to his ftandard, and his army increafed daily as he 
advanced up the countr}'. On the 1 8th of June he arrived at Taunton, which he made 
his head-quarters, and having won many perfons of confidcrable efteem to his caufe, he 
procured himfelf to be proclaimed King on the Cornhill the 21ft following, by the title 
of James II. and then publiflied three feveral proclamations againft the King, the 
parliament, and the Duke of Albemarle. To quell diis ufurper. General Kirk, an 
officer who had habituated himfelf to look on afts of favage cruelty with afecret de- 
legation, was, among others, difpatched into thefe parts; and as the Duke's deluded 
followers were without much difficulty captivated, fo they were without any fhew of 
mercy, or form of trial, immediately and moft inhumanly put to death ; the General 
ordering nineteen men at one time, thiity at another, and many others at different times, 
to be hanged on the Cornhill, their bowels to be burnt, and their limbs boiled in pitch, 
to be expofed in the ftreets and publick roads. On the 28 th of Auguft following, 
George Jeffi-eys the Lord Chief Juftice was fent by the King on the Weftern circuit, 
efcorted by a party of Kirk's foldiers, with a fpecial commiffion oiOyer and Terminer 
to try the infurgents; and here, on Sept. nth, he held what is very properly ftiled his 
bloody aflize; for neither age, fex, nor character, efcaped his barbarity; and he feems 
to have exerted all the powers of his underftanding in the invention of methods 
Jiow to torment and tantalize his miferable prifoners previous to their fate, and caft the 
bitter gall of affliction on thofe their friends who offered interceffions in their behalf. 
The particulars of thefe unparalleled barbarities need not here be recited: it will be 
fufficient to obferve, that the numbers hanged by order of the judge in different parts 
of the Weft were three hundred and thirty-one; eight hundred and fifty were fold for 
flaves, and four hundred and eight were fined, whipped, and continued in prifon. 

We fhall now fay fomething of the religious matters of this place. On the fouth- 
eaft fide of the town William Giftard bifhop of Winchefter, about the year mo, 
founded a priory of canons-regular of the order of St. Auguftine, wiiich he dedicated 
to the honour of St. Peter and St. Paul.' This monaftery he endowed with all the 
churches of Taunton, with their chapels and all their appertenances; the land of 
Blqgdon, and the church o( Kingston, with its chapels and appertenances; the church of 

* Cuiloms of the manor of Taunton and Taunton-Deane, revifed by R. Locke. 

• Tanner's Notitia Mocaftica. 

Leigh 



Caunton^Dcan.] TAUNTON. 235 

Leigh with its appertenances, and the church of Hill with its appcrtenances. Henry 
de Blois bifhop of Winchefter, who by Leland is fet down as a co-founder of this 
priory," gave thereto the church of Pitminjier., with its appertenances and chapels. 
Robert Arundel gave two hides of land at JJh, (called from that donation ylJh-Priors) 
and the church of that village with its appertenances. William Fitz-Odo, the land of 
Wildelandt and the church of the fame village. William de Mohun, the land of Lidiard. 
Richard de Turberville, with the confent of Hugh his brother, gave tlie church of 
Dulvertcn, and the land of Tolland. Roger Bret, the land of Upcott. Baldwin de 
Combe, the land of Moor. Geffrey Foliot, one yard-land and a half in Staunton. Ofbert 
and Geffrey de Hidone, the land of Middleton. Baldwin de Combe, fifteen acres. 
Hugh de Flury, twenty acres of land in Hejler combe. William de Montacute, earl of 
Sarum, gave the manor and hundred of Dulverton, with their appertenances.* This 
laft grant was dated in the chapter-houfe of Taunton March 1 8, lo Edw. III. Befides 
which the prior and convent had the manor of Middlecot, and lands in Orchard, Trull, 
Corfe, Lydiard St, Laurence, Thorn St. Margaret, Ninehead,Wcft-Monkton, Bridg- 
water, North-Petherton, Thurloxton, Spaxton, Stringfton, Hagwell, and Stoke St. 
Mary J and they prefented to the reftories of Combe-Flory, Lidiard St. Lawi-ence, 
Runnington, and Thurloxton. They had alfo the appropriate reftories of the following 
vicarages to which they prefented, viz. Kingfton and Cothelfton, Ninehead, Withiel- 
Flory, and Pitminfter. The rcftories of the following parifhes were entirely appropri- 
ated to them, viz. the vicarage of St. Mary Magdalen in Taunton, with eight chapels 
belonging to it, viz. St. James in Taunton, Hill-Bifhops, Ruilhton, Stoke St. Mary, 
Staplegrove, Thurlbury, Trull, Wilton; and alfo Corfe, Otterford, and Afh-Priors. 
In 1444 the revenues of this prioiy were valued at 146I. ijs. 4d. and in 1534 at 
a861. 8s. lod.' 

The fucceffive Bifliops of Winchefter were patrons of this priory, and the priors 
were fummoned to convocation. The names of thofe that occur, were 

Stephen, 1175, 1189. 

John, 1313. 

Stephen de Pycotefton, 1315. He died 1325. 

Richard de Colmftoke, 1325. 

Ralph de Colmftoke, 1331. He refigned March 22, 1338. 

Robert de Miflingham was eleded April 19, 133.9. There were then twenty-four 
canons prefent in the convent. 

Thomas Cok, or le Cock, April 8, 1346. 

Thornas de Pederton, died 1361. 

Walter de Gratley, 1 36 1. 

Walter Coke, died in January 1407. 

Robert Newton, January 18, 1407. He died Aug. 12, 1431. 

Thomas Ufcolm was elefted Sept. 14, 1431. Fourteen Monks were then 'm 
the convent. 

" Lei; Colleftan. i. 81. » Mon. Angl. ii. 83. 

» SoDngdale, andHarl. MS. 701, but Archer, from the Regifters of Wdb, fays a861. 10s. 

H h 2 Thomas 



236 1 A u N T o N. [Caunton^Dcan, 

Thomas Bennet, prior of this houfcj was in 1438 fummoned to the council of Florence. 

Richard Glene was fummoned to the convocation 1449. He died Jan. 31, 1475. 

John Aylhent, fucceeded Feb. 28, 1475. Fifteen canons were then in the houfe. 

John Prowfe, 1492. He refigned in 15 13. 

Nicholas Feper, was eleded Feb. 23, 15 13, when thirteen canons were prefent, and 
three abfent. He died Sept. 26, 1523. 

William York, B. D. canon of Brewton, was nominated by Cardinal Wolfey, 
Odt. 27, 1523. Twelve canons were then prefent, and one abfent.* 

William Williams was the laft prior, and with twelve monks furrendered the priory 
to the King, Feb. 10, 1539, being allowed a penfion of 60I. per annum, and a gra- 
tuity of 30I. 

In 1553 there remained in charge 61. 13s. 4d. in fees, and 39I. 6s. 8d. in annuities; 
and the following penfions, viz. To William Baylie 61. 13s. 4d. — Nicholas Befam 61. 
— John Warren 5I. 6s. 8d. — John Hayward 5I. 6s, 8d. — John Cockeram 5I. 6s. 8d. 
William Ferfons 5I. 6s. 8d. — and to William Brynfmede 5I. 6s. 8d.* 

;^6 Henry VIII. the fcite of this priory, with its appertenances, and lands in Taunton, 
Hill-Billiops, Staplegrove, Ruiihton, Trull, Corfe, Pitminfter, Hill-Farence, Norton, 
Kingfton, and Cheddon, was granted to Sir Francis Brian, knt. and Matthew Colthurft, 
gent, and the heirs of the faid Matthew, to be held of the King in chief by the fervice 
of the twentieth part of a knight's fee.'' 

It has been aflerted that Jafper Tudor earl of Pembroke, half brother to King 
Henry VI. ordered his body to be buried in this prioryj but Keynfham was in reality 
the monaftery wherein he appointed his interment, and where his remains were accord- 
ingly depofited." 

Leland, who faw this priory before its diflblution, takes notice of the following books 
in the monks' library, viz. Chronicon Ivonis, Philaretus de fulfibuSi 'iheo-philus de urinis.^ 

Near the chapel of St. Margaret in this town, ftood an ancient hofpital, founded in 
the time of Henry III." for the maintenance and fupport of poor lepers, by one 
Lambrizt, or Lambright, a merchant of this place, whole fucceffors annexed the ad- 
vowfon thereof to the abbey of Glaftonbury.^ 

Here was alfo a houfe of Carmehte or White Friars, founded by Walter de Meriet," 
lord of Combe-Flory in the time of Edward III. The fcite of this houfe belongs to 
Henry Proftor Gale, efq. 

In Taunton there are two pariflies, St. Mary Magdalen, and St. James. In 1292 
the church of the blefled Mary Magdalen in Taunton, with the chapel belonging to the 
fame, was valued at ninety marks, the vicarage at nine marks.'' It was appropriated to 
the priory, and in 1308, the following ordination refpefting the vicarage was made by 

» Archer. • Willis's Hift. of Abbies, ii. 200. * Pat. 36 Hen. VIII. p. 21 . 

•See Vol. ii. p. 403, Dugd. Bar. ii. 242. " Lei. CoUeftan, iv. 153. « It is mentioned before 1269. 

' Tanner's Notitia MonalUca, ^ ibid. * Taxat. Spiritual. 

Walter 



Caunton^Dcan.] TAUNTON. 237 

Walter Hafellhaw bifliop of Bath and Welh, viz. " That Mafter Simon dc Lym, as 
incunnbenc of and duly inftituted in the vicarage of St. Mary Magdalen in the town of 
Taunton, fhould receive every week throughout the year twenty-one canonical loaves, 
and forty-two conventual flagons of ale, and feven loaves of bolted bread of the fame 
weight as the canonical loaves, and twenty-eight loaves of fine wheat flour, and feven 
flagons of beft ale. That he Ihould receive every year from the prior and convent fif- 
teen marks of filver, and fix cart-loads of hay, and feven bufiiels of oats every week for 
his horfe, and two fliillings forfhoeing his horfe yearly; that he fhould have all legacies- 
left to him in the faid parifli, and fuch tithes and curtilages as his predeccfibrs ufually 
had, with the following duty, viz. tliat he fhould ferve, with proper afTiflants, the chapel 
of the blefled Mary Magdalen of Taunton, and the chapels' of 'Trendle, the Cajlle, and 
St. George's Well, in facraments and other facred offices at his own expenc?, with this 
addition, that he fhould find a refident minifler to officiate always at Trendle. For the 
relief of the faid vicar and his fuccefTors (to whom the care of the fouls of the whole 
parifli was committed by the ordinary) the prior and convent were to find a fecular 
refident priefl for the chapels of Sioke and Rijlon, another for Staplegrove and St. James, 
and a third for Hull-Epifcopi, at their own expence. It was further ordained, diat the 
faid vicar and all his affiftants ferving the faid chapels fhould make an oath of trufl to 
the faid prior their reftor, at their admiffion, that they would without any defalcation 
or referve reftore and refund all and fingular the obventions received in the aforefaid 
places. That for the augmentation of the faid vicarage two quarters of wheat fliould 
be delivered out of the priory grange or granary to the faid vicar on the feaft: of our 
Lord's Nativity. The prior and convent to fuftain ordinary and their proportion of 
extraordinary burdens, and find boolis, veftments, and other neceffaries, for the faid 
chapels at their own expence.'" 

The living is in the patronage of Henry William Portman, efq. The prefent in- 
cumbent is the Rev. William Chafin. 

The church flands in the eaft part of the town, and is a large and beautiful Gothick 
fl:rudl:ure, having at the weft end a fine lofty tower of moft excellent workmanfliip, 
crowned at the top with four (lately pinnacles, thirty-two feet high: the whole height 
is one hundred and fifty-three feet. In this tower are thirteen windows, and the whole 
ftruiflure has an air of elegance and magnificence blended together, which is not perhapS 
to be equalled in any other building of the kind in this kingdom. 

In this church there are no very ancient monuments nor infcriptions : between the 
middle aile and tlie belfry is a flat flone, infcribed, 

" ©rate pro ata 3!oiS Coofc mcvcatorisf Cantonic qui oftiit 19° oie menfi0 
aprilis, 3nno ^alutis 1502, ciu' aiepropicictin:3:)c% amen." 

On the fouth fide of the church is a mural monument with this infcription : ■ • • 
" Here under lyeth buried the body of Richard Huifh, efquire, borne in Taunton, 
and aunciently defcended of the famllie of the I luyflies of Donyford in the countie of 
Somerfet. He founded the hofpital in Mawdelyn lane in Taunton for thirteen poor 
men, begunne by himfelf in his life-tyme, and finiflied by his executors after his deatli; 

' Excerpt, e RegilV. Wellen. 

and 



238 TAUNTON. [Caimton^Deatt* 

and for the reliefe of the faid poore men, he gave by his laft will one hundred and three 
pounds by the yeare for ever, yflliing out of certain howfes and tenements in the Black 
Fryars, London. And alfo by his fayd will he gave one hundred pounds a yeare for 
ever owt of the fayd tenements for the maintainance of fyve fchoUars of his name of 
Huyfh and kindred at one or both of the Univerfitys of Oxford or Cambridge j and 
dyed in the true fayth of Chrift Jefus, the 73d day of Feb, Ano Doiri. 16 15." 

Againft the north wall of the church there is a handfome monument erefted to 
another benefaftor to this town, Robert Gray, elq; whofe effigy thereon reprefents him 
in his flieriff's robes: 

** Taunton bore him, London bred him; 
% Piety train'd him, virtue led himj 

Earth enrich'd him, heaven careft himj 

Taunton bleft him, London bleft him. 

This thankful town, that mindful city. 

Share his piety, and his pity. 

What he gave, and how he gave it, 

Afk the poor, and you Ihall have it. 

Gentle reader. Heaven may ftrike 

Thy tender heart to do the like. 

And now thy eyes have read this ftory. 

Give him the praife, and Heaven the glory. 

" He died in the year 1635, aged 65." 

He was the founder of the alms-houfe at Eaft-Gate, for poor people of either fex, who 
have a comfortable allowance and clothing, and for its fupport the fum of two thoufand 
pounds was in the year 1640 confirmed by a decree of chancery to truftees for ever. 

Near it was another alms-houfe, founded by Lady Grace Portman, which was burnt 
down in the civil wars by Lord Goring's forces, but afterwards rebuilt by Mr. Pope 
in the year 1648. 

In the church of St. Mary Magdalen were founded in ancient times divers chantries 
and religious fervices, whereof the following are the names : 

1. The fraternity of the Holy-Crofs, to which Robert Bathe and TifFania his wife 
gave four mefluages in Taunton 21 Ric. 11." William Trowbridge was the laft in- 
cumbent of this fraternity, and had in 1553 a penfion of 4I.' 

2. St. Andrew's chantry. Henry Bull the laft incumbent thereof had a penfion of 5I. 

3. Holy 'Trinity chantry. Ralph Wylkyns 5I. 

4. St. Ethelred'% chantry. William Callowe 5I. 

5. St. Michael's chantry. John Seyman 4I. i6s. 

6. Virgin Mary'% chantiy. John Pytte 4I. 

7. Twing's chantry. Alexander Maggott 3I. 14s. 4d." 

» Efc. 5 Hen. VI. •HJft.ofAbbie5,ji.303. f Ibid. 

Near 



Caunton^Pean.] TAUNTON. 139 

Near this church Mrs. Dorothy Henley founded an alms-houfe for eighteen poor 
people, ■Who were to receive each one-and-twenty-pence per week out of lands in HuU- 
Bifhops, and Afli-Priors. 

The living of St. James in Taunton is a curacy, and both it and the former arc 
comprehended within the deanery of its name. The Rev. Lawrence Head Luxton is 
the prefcnt incumbent. 

The church is a neat plain and ancient ftrufture, and has a ring of five bells. It is 
fuppofed to have been ereded in the thirteenth century. 

Taunton has denominated an archdeaconry in the cathedral of Wells ever fince the 
year i io6, when Robert was the firft archdeacon. The prefent archdeacon of Taunton 
is the Rev. John Turner, A. M. and canon refidentiary of Wells cathedral. 

In 1535 Taunton was made the fee of a fuffragan bifhop, and William FInche, laft 
prior of Bromere in Hampfhire, was fuffragan bilhop of Taunton in 1538. After the 
diflblution of his monaftery he had a penfion of 18I. per annum, which he enjoyed 
A.D. 1553." 

This town has yielded birth and name to divers refpedlable and diftinguifhed perfons. 

Gefferey de Tantone was a monk of Winchefter 1 170. 

William de Tanton was prior of Winchefter 1249. 

Gilbert de Tanton was almoner of Glaftonbury-abbey 1274. 

Walter de Tanton was abbot of Glaftonbury in 1322. 

Samuel Daniel the poet, of whom we have given a brief account in the parifli of 
Beckington, the place of his fepulture," was born here in 1562. 

In 1683 this place gave birth to Henry Grove, a learned diffenting minifter, de- 
fcended from the Groves of Wiltfhire, and the Rowes of Devonfliire. He received 
the early part of his education at the academy of tiie Rev. Mr. Warren in Taunton, 
in which he afterwards fucceeded him, and acquitted himfelf in that employ with ample 
reputation. Befides feveral papers in the eighth volume of the Spedtator, he publilhed 
many diftinft works, chiefly on divine fubjefts, in which his piety and learning appear 
equally confpicuous. He died Feb. 27, 1737-8. 

In the year 1522 a/ree-fchool was founded in this town by Richard Fox bifliop of 
Winchefter, of which fchool the learned John Bond, A. M. was defied mafter in 1579. 
He was educated at Winchefter, and in 1569 was entered a ftudent at New-College 
in Oxford, where he was highly efteemed for his clafTical learning. He continued in 
the mafterftiip of Taunton-lchool many years, and thence fent into the world many 
eminent fcholars. At length he turned his thoughts to the ftudy of phyfick, which, 
after relinquiftiing his former employment, he praftifed with much reputation. He 
• died Aug. 3, 1612, and was buried in the chancel of the church of St. Mary Magdalen, 
with the following infcription on his grave-ftone: 

" Willis's Haft, of Abbies, ii. 204. • See vol. ii. p. 201. 

«Qui 



240 ' ^ TAUNTON. [Cauttton^Ocan* 

" Qui medicus do£lus, prudentis nomine clarus, 
Eloquii fplendor, Pieridunnque decus. 
Virtutis cultor, pietatis vixit amicus; 

Hoc jacet in tumulo, fpiritus alta tenet." 

He wrote fome ufeful commentaries on Horace and Perfius. 

In 15915 Simon Saunders, gent, gave lool. with which was purchafed an annuity of 
aal. towards clothing the induftrious poor of the town of Taunton for ever. 

Thomas Trowbridge, merchant-tailor, gave lands to the amount of i il. per annum 
to the poor for ever, 16 14. 

Sir George Farwell gave il. 4s. per annum, 1621. 

Robert Mpggridge, clothier, gave 5I. per annum, 1645. 

Mr, Clarke gave lool. — Mr. Warman 50I, — Mr. Grabham lOol. 

Mr. George Hooper, two acres and a half of meadow land lying at Pyrland; Mrs. 
Florence Stone, 20I.J and Mrs. Jane King 2I. per annum, to the poor for ever, about 
the middle of the 17 th century. 

William Gill, merchant, gave Stringlands to the poor for ever, 1672. 

Mr. John Meredith gave 400I. 1677. 

Archibald Thompfon, efqj gave 10s. per annum, 1693. 

Sir Hugh Parker gave 5I. per annum, 1694. 

Mr. Samuel Reynolds gave half the profits of a meadow at Holwayj Mr. Philip 
Gadd 2I. los. per annum^ and Mrs. Margaret Cornilh, a meadow to the poor for ever, 
about the year 170D. 

The foundation of a county-hofpital was laid here Sept. 29, 1772. 

Of the other parilhes in this hundred we fhall treat in alphabetical order. 




ANSGERS. 



Caunton^Dean,] [ 241 ] 

♦ ANGERS-LEIGH, 

LEIGH-MILITIS, or KNIGHTS-LEIGH. 

THIS parilh is pleafantly fituated in the fouthern part of the hundred under the 
ridge of Blackdown, fix miles fouth from Taunton, and five foutheaft from 
Wellington. Its lands are aimed equally divided between dairy and arable. The 
country abounds with brown, red, and yellow flints, and fome black jafper, but there 
are few foffils. The whole parilh is rated at about 450I. per annum, and contains 
twelve houfes, eight of which are farms, the reft cottages. 

This manor, originally written Lega and Lege, was given by William the Conqueror 
to Walchelin bifhop of Winchefter, of whom it was held by one Alward a Saxon.' 
It obtained the name of Jnger's -L.e\gh from a family who poflefled it. 18 Edw. II. 
John Anger was lord of tliis manor, and prefented to the living, as did alfo Maud, 
widow of the faid John Anger, in the year 1360,'' Both the manor and advowfon con- 
tinued in the fame name till the year 1427, when Richard Chedder, efqj became pof- 
fefled thereof, and gave the fame to Robert Chedder, efq; from whom it defcended to 
his fon Thomas Chedder, efq; whofe daughter and coheirefs Ifabel carried it in mar- 
riage to Sir John Newton, knt. Richard Newton, fon of Sir John, left two daughters 
his coheirs, of whom Ifabel was married to Sir Giles Capel, knt. who in her right pof- 
feffed the manor and advowfon of the church, and from him it defcended to Sir Henry 
and Sir Arthur Capel, knts. and continued in that family till about the year 1670, when 
it became the property of the family of Proftor, and is now the inheritance of Henry 
Proftor Gale, efq. 

The living of Angers-Leigh is a reftory in the deanery of Taunton, and in the gift 
of Henry Pro<5lor Gale, efq. The Rev. Thomas Wyndham Goodwyn is the prefent 
incumbent. • 

The church is dedicated to St. Michael, and is a fmall building, Axty-five feet long, 
and feventeen wide, with a tower at the weft end, containing four bells. 

In the church-yard is a fine old yew-tree, the trunk of which at a foot from the 
ground, divides into four other large trunks, which at ten feet height fubdivide them- 
felves into a great number of branches. 

* Lib. Domefda/. * Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen. 




Vol. IIL I j BAGBOROUGH- 



s 



[ 242 ] " [Cauntou'Dean. 



BAGBOROUGH-WEST 

TANDS on high ground, under the weftern ridge of Quantock-Hills, which par- 

, I ticularly in this part wave into fine fwells and hollows, clothed with purple erica, 

and patched with fine woods on their (lopes, and in their receffes. It comnaands a fine 
and extenfive profpeft over the vale of Taunton to the fouth and weft, the view being 
bounded by Blackdown and Brendon-Hill. 

This manor was alfo held under the Bilhop of Winchefter, fubjed to divers cuftoms 
and fervices," by William de Mohun. 

« William himfelf holds Bageberge. Leuric held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and gelded for three hides. The arable is ten carucates. In demefne are three caru- 
" cates, and feven fervants. and twenty-one villanes, and two cottagers, with four 
« ploughs. There are eleven acres of meadow, and two hundred acres of pafture, and 
*' ten acres of wood. It was and is worth one hundred fnillings."" 

It was for the moft part in future time held of the caftle of Dunfter, and the fervice 
due for it was one knight's fee. 14 Edw. I. Maurice de Membury held one knight's 
fee in Bagborough,>w medio, of Sir John de Mohun lord of Dunfter.' 16 Henry VI. 
we find a deed of releafe from William Taverner to Sir Thomas Brooke, knt. and his 
heirs, of the manor and advowfon of the church of Weft-Bagborough, and the manors 
of Lufton, Brooke-Ivelchefter, and other lands in the county of Somerfet." By an 
inquifition taken 30 Sept. 21 Henry VIII. it appears that William Tanfield, efq; died 
feized of the manor of Weft-Bagborough, which he held of Andrew Luttrell, efq; by 
the rent of two ftiillings for all fervices; the manor of i^i^o-^ held of the biftiop of 
Winchefter J the manor of Oldbury of the priory of Taunton; and the manor of Dur- 
borough-Quantock of Sir William Say, knt. leaving Francis his fon and heir of the 
age of feventeen years.' i Jac. Sir John Stawel, knt. died feized of this manor, and 
it is now the property of his reprefentative Henry lord Stawel. 

Eaftward from the village is Eajl-Baghorough, which in^the Conqueror's time- was 
the land of Ralph Paganel: 

" The fame Ralph holds of Ralph, Bageberge. In the time of King Edward it 
« crelded for one hide. The arable is four carucates. In demefne' is half a carucatp, 
" and three fervants, and five villanes, and five cottagers, with two ploughs and a half. 
« There are three acres of meadow, and fixty acres of pafture. It was always worth 
« fifty ftiUlings.'" 

The defcendants of this Ralph Paganel, the Gaunts and Luttrells, were lords pa m- 
mount of this manor, which was held by knight's ii?ivice of the manor of Eaft-Quan- 
tockfliead. 21 Henry VI. William Godwyn, of Godwyn's-Boure, held it of Sir 
Philip Courtney, knt. as of that manor,^ apd from that family it came to the Brents | 

• Seethe Domefday account of Tauntoa. " Lib, Dcmefday. ' Lib. Feod. " Rot. Claus. 16 Hen. VI. ;. 

' Inq. capt. apud Brygwater. ' Lib. Domefday. ' Efc. 

- of 



Caimton»Dcan.] bagborough-West, 



843 



of Coflington; but is now the poflefllon of Thomas Slocomb, efq; who has a feat here 
called i'hbill; with a paik, afcending almofl: to the top of Quantock-Hili. if 

There are three other hamlets of the names of Triscombe, Stockham, an^ 
Westwood. 

The living of Weft-Bagborough, the patronage whereof has generally been appen- 
dant to the manor, is a redrory in the deanery of Taunton. The Rev. George Norman 
is the prefent incumbent. In 1 292 this benefice was valued at ten marks.'' 

The church, which is dedicated to the Holy Trinity, is fmall but neat, and confifts of 
a fingle aile and chancel, and an embattled tower at the weft end, in which arc five belJs. 

On the fouth fide of the church is a mural monument of white marble, infcribed, 

" Underneadi is buried Thomas Popham, efq; defcended from the ancient family of 
Huntworth, being eldeft fon of Alexander Popham, of Wellington, efq; by Mary 
Gatchel, of ClavilHiay. He married Sarah, eldeft daughter and coheirefs of John 
Andrews, of Axbridge, efq; who alfo is here interred. By her he had iffue Alexander 
his heir; Thomas, who died young; Charles, who was unfortunately caft away with 
Governor Vanfutart in the Aurora frigate, failing to the Indies; and LjEtitia, married 
to James Sparrow, of Bourton, efq. Alexander his fon married Frances, daucrhter of 
the Rev. Mr. Sanford, of Walford, by Catherine daughter of Sir John Chicheft?r, bart 
who, alas! died March 18, 1773, in child-bed (of a fon, who furvived her but a few 
days) aged 2 1 years." Arms, Argent, on a cY^id gules two bucks' heads cabofled or. 

Mr. Popham has a good feat near the church. 

' Taxat. Spiritual. 



B R 



D 



O R D, 



Or the Broad-Ford, from the Saxon Bpab, latus, and Fojxb, vadum, 

LIES upon the river Tone (over which there is a ftone bridge of two arches near 
the church, and another in the hamlet of Hele) betwixt the towns of Wellint^ton 
and Taunton. The fituation is low and woody. ^ 

This was another member of the bifhop of Winchefter's manor of Taunton, and 
was m the time of King Edward the Confeflbr held therefrom by Eduin, a Saxon. But 
after the Conqueft it was given to the Earl of Morton, and held under him by 
Alured the King's butler. 

^^ "Alured holds of the Earl, Bradeford. Eduin held it in the time of King Edward, 

^^ and gelded for five hides. The arable is eight carucates. In demefne are two 

' carucates, and five fervants, and nineteen villanes, and feven cottagers, with fix 

I i 2 »« ploughs. 



BRADFORD. [Caunton-Oean* 

*< ploughs There is a mill often fhillings rent, and thirty acres of meadow, and ten 
« acres of pafture, and feventy-two acres of wood. It was worth eight pounds, now 
** eleven pounds."" 

1 7 Joh this manor was held by John de Montacutej" but afterwards came into the 
family of Meriet of Combe-Flory, and from them to the Warres of Heftercombe.^ 
21 Edw III. Sir Thomas de Camoys, knt. releafed to Simon de Meriet and his heirs, 
all his right in the manor of Bradford juxta Taunton, and in aU its members, in Hele 
and elfewhere, and the advowfon of the church of the fame manor." 

31 Eliz the manor of Bradford, with its appertenances, and feven meffuages, two 
cottages, ten gardens, four hundred acres of arable land, fifty of meadow, one hundred 
of pafture, ten of wood, forty of gorfe and heath, and nineteen fhillings and eight-pence 
rent with appertenances in Bradford aforefaid, and alfo the redory and the advowfon 
of the vicarage of the church of Bradford, were held by John Parker of the crown by 
the fervice of the twentieth part of a knight's fee." 

The manerial property of this parifh is now vetted in the reprefentatives of thefe 
families, and in Edward Clarke, efq; and William Doble Burridge, of Stoke St. 
Mary, efq. 

The hamlet of Hel£ is a mile and a half diftant from the church. Near Buckland 
is another hamlet called Stoford. 

The prior of Montacute had a fmall eftate in this parifh. 

The church of Bradford, valued in 129a at twenty marks,' was appropriated in the 
year 1387 to the priory and convent of St. Nicholas atBarlinch;^ after the diffolution 
of which priory. King Henry VIII. in the 35th year of his reign granted the reftory tp 
Richard Parker," who 38 Henry VIII. fold it to John Parker and his heirs, m whofe 
defendant John Parker, efq; the patronage is now vefted. The living is vicanal in 
the deanery of Taunton > the Rev. John Burrow is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Giles. It is compofed of a nave, chancel, and two 
fide ailes, with an embatded tower fixty feet high, containing a clock and five bells. 
In this church was a chantry ; John HufTey the laft incumbent had a penfion of 51." 
In the time of Henry III. William de Forde was lord of Forde within the parifh of 
Bradford, and by his deed without date granted to Roger de Vernay all his lands, mef- 
fuages, curtilages, and gardens, with all appertenances in Ford, to hold to him his heirs, 
and alTigns, for ever.' 

• Lib, Doraefday. » Rot. Pip. 13 Joh. ' Efc. - Rot. Claus. 21 Ed. III. 

•EfcsiEliz. 'Taxat. Spiritual. « Archer. - Pat. 35 Hen. VIII. p. 1. 

' Licence to alienate. " Hift. of Abbies, u. 201. ' MS. Palmer. 



CHEDDON- 



Caunton^Dcan.l [ 245 ] 



CHEDDON-FITZPAINE 



i 



Is fituated two miles north from Taunton, at the foot of the foutheaft corner of the 
Quantock hills. 

The Norman furvey calls this diftrift by the names of Ubcedene, or Upper-Cheddon, 
and Sucudme, or Lower-Cheddon; and adds thereto Maidenobroche, or the hamlet of 
Maiden BROOK, lying betwixt the village of Cheddon and the town of Taunton. All 
which places did fuit and fervice to the Bifhop's court at Taunton, and were fubjeft to 
thofe cuftoms which are mentioned in that old record j but there is no particular furvey 
taken of either. It is probable that the Norman names of Ubcedene and Succedene 
funk into the fimple one of Cedetie very foon after the Conqueft, when the manor came 
into the poffeflion of the family of Fitzpaine, by whofe furname it is to this day 
diftinguifhed. 

The firft that afllimed this name was Robert the fon of Pain Fitz- John, brother of 
Euftace Fitz-John, nephew and heir of Serlo de Burgh, founder of Knare/borough- 
caftle in the county of York.* This Robert, 31, 32, ^Zt 34, and 35 Henry II. was 
ftieriff of the counties of Dorfet and Somerfet, and was lord of the manor of Oakfey 
in the county of Wilts. 

To him fucceeded Roger Fitz-Pain, who married Margaret one of the fifters and 
coheirs of Alured de Lincoln, by whom he had iflue Robert his fon and heir, who 
had livery of all his eftates, lying in the counties of Wilts, Somerfet, and Dorfet, 
30 Henry III. 

This Robert Fitz-Pain was a military perfon, ferving in feveral expeditions in the 
reigns of Henry III. and Edw. I. and at his death 9 Edw. I. he is certified to have 
held his lands in this county, by the moiety of a barony, for which he rendered to the 
King one knight's fervice in his army."" 

Robert his fon and heir was twenty-feven years old when his father died, and 25 
Edw. I. was fummoned to parliament among the barons. 31 Edw. 1. he was in the 
Scottifh wars, and 23 Edw. I. was governor of Corfe-caftle in Dorfetfhire. The year 
following he was knighted with Prince Edward, whom he attended into Scotland. 
I Edw, II. he was made governor of Winchefter-caftle, and 2 Edw. II. being then 
fteward of the King's houfhold, was difpatched with Otto de Grandifon in an impor- 
tant embafiy to the Pope. He died 9 Edw. II. leaving by Ifabel his wife Robert 
his fon and heir. 

Which Robert 10 and 12 Edw. II. was in the wars in Scotland, and by Edw. III. 
whom he attended into France, was created a knight baneret. He died 28 Edw. III. 
feized of the manor and advowfon of the church of Cheddon, and other manors and 
churches, leaving ifllie an only daughter and heir Ifabel, who was married to Richard 
lord Poynings, of Poynings in the county of Suffex. 

* Dugd. Bar. i. 90. ii. 572. * Efc. 

Robert, 



246 CHEDDON-FITZPAINE. [caunton=2:)ean» 

Robert, fon of this Richard lord Poynings, by the faid Ifabel his wife, was fummoned 
■ to parliament from 5 Henry IV. to 24 Henry VI. and the next year was flain at the 
faege of Orleans, being then feized of the manors of Cheddon, Staple, Radway, Stoke- 
Coiircy, Gary, Charlton, Wick, Speckington, and the hundred of Cannington.' 

Richard his eldeft fon died in his father's life-time, A. D. 1387, but left ifllie by 
Eleanor daughter of Sir John Berkley, of Beverfton, knt. a daughter Eleanor, fole 
heirefs to the family, who became the wife of Sir Henry Percy, afterwards the third 
Earl -of Northumberland. Which Sir Flenry Percy by this marriage came into the 
pofleffion of the manor of Cheddon-Fitzpain, and in his family it continued till the 
timeof James I. when it was fold to Thomas Moore, efq; fon of Francis, and grandfon 
of Thomas Moore, efq; of the priory in Taunton, to whofe memory a large tomb, 
ornamented with many coats of arms belonging to his family, isereded in the chancel 
of the church of St. Mary Magdalen in that town. He. died in 1576. The faid 
Thf)mas Moore, grandfon of the laft-mentioned, who purchafed this manor, married 
Rachel, daughter of Sir John Wyndham, of Orchard-Wyndham in this county, knt. 
by whom he had iffue Thomas Moore his fon and heir, who married Elizabeth, eldeft 
daughter of Sir John Bampfylde, of Poltimore in the county of Devon, bart. and at 
his death in 1695, left four daughters his coheirs, of whom Gertrude the third daughter, 
marrying Anthony Methuen, efq; brought to him this manor, and that of Withey in 
this county, in the divifion of Mr. Moore's eftates. At his death in 1717, their only 
fon Thomas Methuen, efq; fucceeded to this manorj he married Anne daughter of 
Ifaac Selfe, of Beanacre in the county of Wilts, efq; by Penelope his wife, daughter of 
Charles lord Lucas, by whom he had ilTue an only fon, Paul Methuen, of Corfham in 
the county ofWilts, efq; who by Chriftian his wife, daughter of Sir George Cobb, of 
Adderbury in the county of Oxford, bart. had ifTue an only fon Paul Cobb Methuen, 
efq; the prefent proprietor of this manor, which his- father fettled on him on his mar- 
riage in 1776 with Matilda daughter of Sir Thomas Goocb, of Benacre-hall in the 
county of Suffolk, bart. 

1 3 Ric. II. lands in Maidenbrook belonged to the hofpital of St. John in Bridgwater.* 

The living of Cheddon is a reftory in the deanery of Taunton. The prefent incum- 
bent is the Rev. Nathaniel Alfop BlifTe. It was rated in 1292 at ten marks.' 

The church is feventy feet bng, and thirty wide, and confifts of a nave, chancel, 
fouth-aile, and tower containing five bells. 

On the north wall are thefe infcriptions : 

" Immanuel Drake, late of Pitminfter, gent, gave unto this parifh the fum of fifty 
pounds to be beftowed in lands of inheritance, fo as to bring in the full rent of fifty 
{hillings the year to be diftributed every Chriftmas-day by the minifler and church- 
wardens for the time being to five honeft laborious perfons of this parifh, not receiving 
conllant coUeftion, at los. each perfon. The money thus given was laid out in houfe 
and land lying on the left hand of Broomfield road, oppofite to Vollis-farm." 

^Efc * Inq. ad quod Damn. ! Taxat. Spiritual. 



Caimton=Dean,i cheddon-fitzpaine. 



247 



*' In perpetuam viri et ret memoriam. Roger Drake, of the city of London, efq; 
gave to this parifli, the place of his birth, one hundred pounds, to purchafe a parcel of 
land of inheritance of the clear yearly value of five pounds, to be diftributed yearly by 
thf parfon and churchwardens of this parifh, and their fucceflbrs, unto fix inhabitants of 
this parifn, poor labourers and induftrious men, or widows; viz. to.each of them 
1 6s. 8d. at the feaft of the Nativity of our blefled Saviour. The money was employed 
according to the donor's willj and the land purchafed belongs to the corner houfe at the 
call end of this church-yard. Vade viator , et fac ftmiliter. Anno Domini 1 67 2." 






COMBE-FLORY 



TAKES its original name from its fituation, which is in a rich vale well wooded and 
watered, about feven miles nearly weft from Taunton. A little eaftward from the 
church, on a fwelling knoll, ftands the feat of John Fraunceis Gwyn, efq; adorned with 
fine plantations. From an oppofite hill, whereon ftands an old building, now ufed for a 
fummcr-houfe, the profpeft is very pleafing. At a fmall diftance, on a level with the 
eye, is the houfe, with a deep vale lying between, in which are the offices, the church, 
and the village. Over the houfe, and along the fouthern flope of Quantock-hills, 
interfperfed with fine fwells and hollows, villages, woods, and gentlemen's feats, the 
view extends near fifteen miles in length, and is terminated by the channel and the 
Welch mountains. 

There is alfo a very neat houfe in a pleafant vale, with good gardens, the refidence 
of the Rev. Mr. Webber. 

Combe was of the number of thofe manors which were held of the bifhoprick of Win- 
chefter. Its moft ancient pofrefl"ors were the family of Cumbe, or de Cumbe, who held 
their lands in thefe parts by the fervice of three knights' fees.' In the time of Henry I. 
lived Baldwin de Cumbe, and held this manor of the Biftiop of Winchefter, in which 
he was fucceeded by Hugh de Fluri,'' or Flory, and after him came Ranulf de Fluri, 
from whom the manor derived its adherent denomination. From this family of Flory, 
it very fliortly came to that of Meriet, of whom fome notice has already been taken 
in the account of Merriot in the hundred of Crewkerne, and Ajhton-Meriet in that of 
, Hareclive and Bedminfter." 13 Edw. II. John de Meriet obtained of that King a 
'charter of free-warren in all his demefne lands in the manor of Combe-Flory.'' Walter 
de Meriet, a defcendant of this John, was a benefadtor to the Carmelite friars in 
Taunton, and appropriated at one time nineteen acres of meadow land, and at another 
nine acres called Cockfinede, lying in Taunton, to the ufe of their houfe forever.' This 
Walter de Meriet died 19 Edw. III. without ifllie, and Simon fon of John de Meriet, 
his brother, became his next heir.' 

• Lib. Feod, * Lib. Nig. Scac. Suthamtefcire, i. 69. 

' Sec Vol. ii. p. 169, 297. See alfo Heftercombe in this hundred. " Cart. 13 Ed. lU. n. 35. 

* Inq. ad quod Damn. 15 ct 17 Ed, III. ' Efc. 

Aft^r 



m 



248 coMBE-FLORY. [CautitomDean, 

After fome other defcents in this family, the manor of Combe-Flory came by the 
mairiage of a co-heirefs to the family of Fraunceis, an ancient houfe defcended from 
the Fraunceis' of Bolham in the county of Devon ; in whofe pofterity it has ever fince 
remained, being now the poflefiion of John Fraunceis Gwyn, efq. 

Between this village and Bilhop's-Lydiard is a manor called East-Combe, to diftin- 
guifh it from the former, and is the property of John Somerville, efq. 

Here is alfo an ancient manor called Yard, but anciently Zerde, which belonged to 
the Hills of Spaxton, and was held by them under the family of Stawel of CotheKtone.^ 

An eftate in Combe-Flory, valued in 1 293 at ten {hillings, belonged to the abbey 
of Athelney." 

The prior and convent of Taunton were patrons of the church of Combe-Flory, 
which in 1 292 was rated at fix marks and twenty-pence.' It is a reftory in the deanery 
of Taunton, and in the gift of the crown. The Rev. David Webber is the prefenc 
incumbent. 

The church, which, according to Efton, is dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul, is a 
neat Gothick edifice, confifting of a nave, chancel, and north aile; at the weft end is a 
good tower with five bells. The aile belongs to the lord of the manor, and is very 
neat. At the weft end on a tomb raifed a little above the floor lie the effigies in ftone 
of a man and two females j the man is crofs-legged, in a coat of mail, with his Ihield on 
his left arm, and his military belt and fword. This was the burial-place of the Meriets. 

In the chancel is a mural monument of white and Sienna marble, infcribed, 

*' Sacred to the memory of Alexander Malet, M. A. reftor of this parifti, and of 
Maiden-Newton in the county of Dorfet; and a prebendary in the church of Glou- 
cefter j whofe exemplary virtues added dignity to his profeffion, and luftre to the ancient 
family"* from which he was defcended. He was a kind huft)and, an affeftionate parent, 
and a cordial friend. To his furviving acquaintance his death is an irreparable lofsi 
to himfelf it is the commencement of an endlefs felicity. He died Sept. 19, 1775, 
aged 71." Arms, Azure y three efcallops or, Malet j impaling argent, on a bend y<?^/(?, 
three annulets or, St. Lo. 

Walter de Meriet, lord of this manor, founded a chantry in a chapel dedicated to 
the blefled Virgin Mary, near the church, to which John Still prieft was prefented 
20 Edw. III. by Simon de Meriet.' Robert Spyce was the laft incumbent of this chantry, 
and had a penfion of 3I. 4s. 4d.'" 

• Efc. * Taxat. Temporal. ' Taxat. Spiritual. * See vol. i. p. go. 

' Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen. " Willis's Kft. of Abbies, ii. zoz. 







CORFE 



cauntoti'Dean.] [ 249 ] 



C O R F E 

IS a parifh four miles fouth from Taunton, fituated in a woody flat under the north 
ridge of Blackdown, and watered by a fmall ftream rifing in the neighbouring 
paiiHi of Otterford. Half the lands in this parifli are arable, the crops moIUy wheat 
and barley, and fome flax. A confiderable quantity of common land lies on Black- 
down-Hill. 

Corfe, being part of the fifty- four hides of Taunton, is not particularly mentioned in 
the Norman furvey. It has always been parcel of that manor, and is confequendy 
regulated by the fame cuftoms. 

It has generally been reckoned a chapelry to St. Mary Magdalen ; the living formerly 
appropriated to the priory of Taunton, is a curacy in the deanery of Taunton, under 
the appointment of Goodenough Earle, of Barton in the parifh of Pitmintter, ef^ 

34 Henry VIII. the reftory and advowfon of Corfe were granted to Humphrey Colics. 

The church ftands furrounded with high trees, and confifts of a nave, chancel, and 
fmall aile on the fouth fide, with a plain tower at the weft end containing four bells. 
This church is fixty-four feet long, and thirteen feet wide. 

The font is very ancient. The chriftenings in this parifh are annually on an average 
ten } the burials feven. 

In the church-yard is a tomb with an infcription to the memory of Anna Catharina, 
daughter of Samuel and Sarah Brown, who died March 2, 1760, in the 8th year of 
her age. 

*' See from the earth the fragrant lilly rife. 

It fprings, it flouriflies, it fades, it diesi 

So this fair flower fcarce bloflTom'd for a day; 

Sweet was the bloom, and fpeedy the decay." 



COTHELSTONE. 

THIS parifh, which is fituated on the fouthern flope of the Quantock-Hills, at the 
diftance of kven miles northweft from Taunton, has been ever fince the Con- 
quefl the pofTeffion of the family of Stawel, who derived their name from Stawel near 
Moorlinch in the hundred of Whideigh. The firft perfon of this name was Sir Adam 
de Stawel, who was living in the time of William the Conqueror, and had a Ion named 
Henry de Stawel, who was father of Sir Pagan de Stawel, and grandfather of another 
Sir Pagan, both knights in the time of King John and Henry III. 
Vol. III. K k To 



250 c o T H E L s T o N E. [caumon*D?an» 

To the laft-mentloned Sir Pagan fncceeded Sir Leonard de Stawel, who was among 
the parliamentary barons in the time of Edw. I, and was father of Sir Henry de Stawel, 
who by the daughter and heir of Sir Matthew Stratton, knt. had ilTue an only Ton and 
heir. Sir Nicholas de Stawel, who married Chriftian daughter of William Ruflel, by 
whom he had ifliie two fons. Sir Adam and Sir Geffrey de Stawel, which laft inherited 
this manor, and left three fons, Matthew, Rollo, and Nicholas. Matthew de Stawel, 
the eldeft fon, had ilTue Sir Geffrey de Stawel, knt. who is ftiled of Cothelftone. He 
married Joan daughter and heir of John de Columbers, by whom he had a daughter 
Joan, married to Bardolph de Ceftrcton, and one fon. Sir Geffrey, who lived in the 
time.of Edw. III. and by Julian his wife, filler and heir of Sir William Gaftelin, knc. 
had feveral childien, of whom Sir Matthew Stawel, knt. his eldeft fon, inherited the 
manor of Cothelftone, and his other eftates in this county, and in Wilts and Gloucefter. 
He married Eleanor, one of the daughters and coheirs of Sir Richard Merton, of 
Merton in the county of Devon, knt. by whom he had iflue Sir Thomas Stawel, knt. 

Which Sir Thomas married to his firft wife Joan daughter of Walter Frampton, of 
the county of Dorfet; fecondly, Margaret daughter of Henry Burton; and thirdly, Jane, 
daughter of Lord Berkeley; and dying 16 Henry VL was buried in the fouth tranfept 
of the church of Glaftonbury-abbey.' In the inquifition taken after his deceafe he is 
certified to have holden the manor of Cothelftone, and the advowfon of the church, of 
Henry cardinal of England, as of his manor of Taunton; and the manors of Stony- 
Stratton and Evercreech of the abbot of Glaftonbury.*" 

Walter, fon and heir apparent of Sir Thomas Stawel, died in the life-time of his 
father; and having married Joan, daughter and heir of John Farway, left iffue Robert 
Stawel, who after the death of his grandfather fuccecded to the eftate. 

This Robert married Elizabeth daughter of William Wadham, of Merrifield, efq; 
fon of Sir John Wadham, the judge, founder of Wadham-college in Oxford, by 
whom he had iffue Edward his fon and heir. The faid Robert was buried in Glafton- 
bury abbey. 

Which Edward married Agnes daughter of John Cheyney, of Pinhoe in the county 
of Devon, and by her had iffue 

Robert Stawel, who fucceeded him in this eftate, and married Anne eldeft daughter 
and coheir of John St. Maur, lord of North-Moulton in Devonftiire. By which Anne 
he had two daughters, Joan, and Elizabeth married to Henry Beaumont; and two fons, 
John and William. 

John, the eldeft fon and heir, was twenty-four years of age a Henry VIII. He 
married Dorothy daughter of Sir Edmund Carew, knt. and was father of 

Richard Stawel, who married Lady Alice Powlett, eldeft daughter of William firft 
marquis of Winchefter, by whom he had two fons, Sir John, who fucceeded him, and 
Thomas, who married Thomafine daughter of John le Floyre. 

• Vol. ii. 26J, » Efc. 

Sir 



caunton'DeanJ cothelstone. 251 

Sir John Stawel, the eldeft Ion, married Frances daughter of Sir Thorinas Dyer, 
lent, and by her left another 

Sir John Stawel," who was one of the knights of the Bath at tlie coriion.ition of 
King James I. He married Lady Elizabeth I'econd daughter to George Touchct 
lord Audley, and by her was father of a third 

Sir John Stawel, knight of the Bath, who had his education at Queen's-college'in 
the univerfity of Oxford. He was one of the moft eminent perfons in this county for 
eftate, wifdom, and prudence; and having ferved the office of (heriff, deputy-lieutenant, 
&c. for the fame, he accumulated great efteem and intercft, and was returned kniglit 
of the Ihire to the parliament convened at Weftminfter, Nov. 3, 1640. Being a 
perfon zealoufly affefted to the caufe of his Sovereign Charles I. for whom he raiietl 
at his own expence three regiments of horfe, one of dragoons, and another of foot, he 
expofed himfclf to the malevolence and perfccution of riie parliament, who imprilbneJ 
him in Newgate, fold his lands, cut down his woods, and dcmolifhed his houfe at 
Cothelftone, which had been the refidence of his family for many generations. He 
lived however to fee the Reftoration, and retiring to his feat at Nether-Ham near 
Somerton, there died Feb. 21, 166 1-2, and was conveyed with great funeral pomp to 
Cothelftone, and interred in that parifti church. He married Elizabeth daughter and 
heir of Sir Edward Hext, and widow of Sir Jofeph Killigrew, and by her had I'evcral 
fons, of whom 

Ralph the eldeft was, in confideration of the eminent loyalty and very exemplary 
fufFerings of his father, created a Peer of this realm by the title of Lord Stawel, baron 
Stawel of Somerton in the county of Somerfet, by letters patent bearing date Jan. 15, 
1682-3. He married to his firft wife Anne daughter of John Ryves, of Runfton in the 
county of Dorfet, efq; by whom he had iflue John lord Stawel, who fucceeded him; 
to his fecond wife he married Abigail daughter and heir of William Pitt, of Hartley- 
Wefpall in the county of Southampton, efq; by whom he had ilTue two fons, William 
and Edward, and four daughters, Elizabeth, Catherine, Lucy, and Diana. He died 
Aug. 5, 1689, and was buried at Low-Ham, or Nether-Ham, near Somerton aforefaid. 

John his eldeft fon fucceeded him as fecond Lord Stawel, and married Margaret 
daughter of James earl of Salifburyj but died vvithout iflue Nov. 30, 1692, and was 
fucceeded by his brother 

William, the third Lord Stawel, one of the gentlemen of the bedchamber to his 
Royal Highnefs George Prince of Denmark. He married Elizabeth widow of William 
Forfter, efq; by whom he had W^illiam his fon and heir, who died before him in 1740, 
and a daughter Charbtte; and dying Jan. 23, 1741-2, was fucceeded by his only 
furviving brother 

Edward, fourth Lord Stawel, who married Mary daughter and heir of Sir Hugh 
Stewkley, bart. by whom he had illue a fon, the Hon. Stewkley Stawel, who died 

' The manors which this Sir John Stawel died feized of were Cothelftone, Cufhuifh, Weft-Bagborongh, Stawel, 
Littleton, Stony-Stratton, Mcrriilge, and Heathcombe. Ik held alio the reitory of the church of Halic. and 
the advowfon of the vicarage ; and a moiety of the manors of Babcary, Pury, Blackford, Wolfton, PricftJy, 
Purllon, and Michaelchurch. Jiiq. poft Mort. Johis Stawd, mil. capt. ap. Taantofit «7 Aii«. 3 Jac. 

K k 2 youiig. 



252 c o T H E L s T o N E. [Caunton^Dean, 

young, and a daughter Mary. He died at his feat at Aldermafton in Bcrkfliire, 
April 13, 1755, without any furyiving iflue male, and his ellates defcended to Mary 
his only daughter and heir. 

Which Mary was firft married to the Right Hon. Henry Bilfon Lcgge, fourth (on of 
William firll Earl of Dartmouth; who, after ferving his King and country in divers 
hbnourable capacities, died Aug. 21, 1764. To the faid Mary Legge, his late 
Majefty, in the 34th year of his reign, granted the dignity of a Baronefs of Great- 
Britain, by the tide of Baronefs Stawel of Somerton, and the dignity of Baron to her 
heirs male by her faid hufband, by whom in 1757 flie had iffue the Hon. Henry 
Stawel L.egge. Her Ladyfhip's fecond hufband was the Right Hon. Wills Hill earl 
of Hilllborough. She died July 29, 1780, whereupon the title of Baron Stawel de- 
volved upon her fon 

Henry Stawel Bilfon Legge, the prefent Lord Stawel, and pofleflbr of this manor. 
His Lordfliip's arms are, Firft and fourth. Azure, a buck's head cabofled argent, for 
Legge; fecond and third. Gules, a crofs lozengy argent, for Stawel. 

Cothelftone-Park lies on the eaftern fide of the parifh, and the lodge ftill remains, 
ftanding on a high hill juftly celebrated for commanding one of the fineft profpefts in 
this part of the county. On afcending this eminence, the firft objeft that ftrikes 
the fight is the fine fucceffion of hills and vallies round the lodge, cut into rich in- 
clofures; the beautiful vale of Taunton to the fouth, and to the weft a feries of hills 
rifing in a.pidturefque gradation, bounded by tlie fbreft of Exmoor. A great part of 
Dorfetftiire, and part of Wiltftiire, are in view. But to the north, northeaft, and 
jiorthweft, the profpeft is very extenfive, commanding all the middle part of the county, 
like a map, from the high lands near Sherborne to the Channel; Mendip bounding the 
view to the eaft, at about thirty miles diftance. To the north and northweft appear 
the Channel for near fifty miles in length, the mountains about Brecknock, and the 
greater part of South-Wales. From this delightful fpot the eye commands fourteen 
counties, and with a glafs in a clear day, one hundred and fifty churches^ 

The living of Cothelftone is a curacy in the deanery of Taunton, and in the gift of 
Lord Stawel. The Rev. James Browne is the prefent incumbent. 

The church confifts of a nave, chancel, and fouth ailej at the weft end is a tower 

with fix bells. 

The aile is divided from the nave by two arches fijpported by a large round Saxon 
pillar. Under one of thefe arches is a handfome ftone tomb erefted to the Stawel 
family, whereon lies the effigy of a knight in armour, and his lauy by his fide. And at 
the eaft end of the nave under the north wall are the remains of another ancient tomb, 
with two effigies lying on it, but much more defaced than the former. 

In the chancel are two mural monuments of the fame fize and ftile, having a cornice 
fupported by two round Corinthian pilafters of black marble. The firft is inicribed, 

" Hie jacet Johannes Stawel, miles de Balneo, filius Johannis Stawel militis, et 
pater Johannis Stawel militis de Balneo, in hac canceiia in oppofito iiti, qui obijt 
vicefimo tertio die Januarij, annoque Domini 1603." 



Caunton^Dean.] c o T H E L s T o N E. 253 

On the other: 
*' Hie fiftus eft Johannes Stawcl de Cochelftone, prsenobilis ordinis Balnei miles. 
Uxorcin duxit Elizabetham Edvardi Hext, dc Ham in com. Somerfet, equitis au- 
rati, filiam et heredem, e qua fufcepit filios Johannem, Georgium, Raciulphum, patri 
fupcrftites ; Edvardum, equitem aiiratum, Thomam, Ferdinandum, Ricardum, Wil- 
liclmum, Robertum ; filias autem Luciam ct Miriam fine prole defundlos. GrafTante 
perduellione, magnas equitiim peditumque copias, fuis fumptibus, in auxilium regis 
paravit. Poft perditam rem familiarem, jedirum ruinam, carceres, aliafque calamitates, 
cxoptatifTimo Regis Caroli Secundi reditu laetans, diem obiit 21° die Feb. 1661. 
Anno aetatis 61°. Patri cariffimo monumentum pofuit Georgius filius." Arms, Gulest 
» crofs lozengy argenf. 



HEATHFIELD 

IS fituated five miles weft from Taunton, in the road thence to Wivelifcombe. A 
ftream rifing on Brendon-Hill divides this parifli from that of Bifiiop's-Lydiard. 

This manor was given by the Conqueror to William de Mohun, and in his record it 
is thus mentioned: 

" Ralph holds of William, Herfeld. Elwin held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and gelded for three hides and a half. The arable is fix carucates. In demefne i& 
" one carucate, and five fervants, and feven villanes, and five cottagers, with one 
" plough. There is a mill of thirty-pence rent, and eighteen acres of meadow, and 
" fifty acres of pafture, and thirty acres of wood. It was worth thirty ftiillings, now 
•* four pounds."* 

From its refpeftive pofleflbrs under this family of Mohun, the manor in procefs of 
time acquired the names of Heathfield-'Talbot, Heathfield-Durborough, and Heathfield- 
Columbers, 1 a Henry II. Talebot de Hathfelde held two knights' fees of William de 
Mohun." To him fucceeded Gilbert Talebot, and to him Laurence Talebot, which 
laft 6 Edw. I. held one knight's fee in Hethfelde-Talebot, valued at lOOs. of John de 
Mohun lord of Dunfter-caftle.' The fame fee he alfo held 14 Edw. I."* In the time 
of Edw. III. the property of the Talbots in this place came to the poflTefllon of the 
family of Durborough. 26 Edw. III. Sir John de Durborough held at his death the 
manor of Heathfieldof John de Mohun of Dunfter by knight's fervice, and was fuc- 
ceeded therein by his fon Sir Hugh Durborough, knt.° To which Sir Hugh fucceeded 
James Durborough his fon and heir, who married Alice daughter of John Bath,^and 
by her had ifliie John Durborough of Heathfield, who dying without ifiiie i Hen. V. 
this eftate became the pofleflion of his uncle Ralph Durborough, who by Joan daughter 

•Lib.Domefday. » Lib. Nig. Scac. i. 92. « Lib. Feed. 'Ibid. 

* Efc. ' MS. Pedigree, Palmer^ 



154 H E A T H F I E L D. [Caunton'tDcan* 

of John St. Barb had ifTue two daughters, Alice the wife of Alexander Hadley, and 
Joan the wife of John Courtenai, who died without iffue. This manor came to 
Alexander Hadley, whofe fon John, by Joan the daughter of Richard Stawel, had 
ilTue Richard Hadley his heir, who married Philippa the daughter of Sir Humphrey 
Audley, knt. and by her had one fon James, who refided at Withycombe in this 
county }* which manor, together with tliis of Heathfield, defcended to his grandfon 
Arthur Hadley, who dying without iflue, they became the property of his fifter 
Margaret, the wife of Thomas Luttrell, anceftor of John Fownes Luttrell, efqj the 
prefent owner. 

The property which the family of Columbers had in this village amounted to half 
a knight's fee, which was alfo held under the family of Mohun of Dunfter.'' 

The prior and brothers of St. John of Jerufalem, at London, were patrons of the 
reftory of Heathfield, which was rated at five marks.' i6 EUz. the advowfon be- 
longed to Gabriel Hawly.'' The patronage is now veiled in the Rev. Mr. Efcott, of 
Hartrow, and the Rev. Thomas Cornifli is the prefent incumbent. 

The church confifts of a nave, chance], fmall fouth aile, and tower, containing 

two bells. 

« See Vol. ii. p. 48. * Feod. Johannis de Mohun, 4 Ed. III. 

' Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen. " Strachey's M, 653. 



HILL-BISHOPS, or BISHOP's-HULL, 

A Confiderable parifli on the river Tone, adjoining to Taunton weftward, and on 
•*^^ the turnpike-road to Exeter. It is divided into three tithings, viz. 

1. HiLL-BisHOPs Tithing. 

2. FipicK, or Fydoakj one mile northweft from the church. 

3. RuMWELL, two miles fouthweft, in the road to Wellington. 

This manor was parcel of the fifty -four hides of Taunton, and was held of the Biihop 
of W inchefter by the Earl of Morton, and of him by Alured : 

" Alured holds of the Earl, Hele. Eldred held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and gelded for one hide. The arable is three carucates. In demefne is one caru- 
** cate, and four fervants, and two villanes, and feven cottagers, with one plough. 
" There is a mill often fhillings rent, and ten acres of meadow, and fifteen acres of 
** wood. It was worth forty fhillings, now four pounds. 

" This land in the time of King Edward could not be feparated from Tantone, the 
'* manor oC Biihop Walcheline."* 

* Lib, Domefda/. 

The 



Caunton IDean.] H I L L - B I S H O P S. 255 

The manor with its appertenances is ftill vefted in the bifhrtprick ofWinchcfter. 

The living is a curacy in the deanery of Taunton, and in the gift of Nathaniel 
Jarman, efq; by inheritance from the family of Farewell. The Rev. Michael Dickfon 
is the prefent incumbent. 

The church confifts of a nave, chancel, and north and fouth ailes, covered with tile. 
On the north fide of the nave is an odanguiar tower fixty feet high containing five bells. 

In the north wall of tlie chancel is a fumptuom tomb of red and white marble, 
upon which under an arch within a recefs lies the effigy of a Dodor of Laws in his 
robes; his head reclining on his right hand, the left hand broken ofF. Underneath, 
within a fmaller arch, is the effigy of a man kneeling on a cufhion, and before him 
three boys kneeling, with large ruffs j and behind him five girls in the fame attitude, 
with large ruffs alfo. On a tablet above is this infcription : 

" Parenti fuo colendifllmo Georgio Farewel, armigeri, et Irenarcha;; juftitiae et 
pacis publicas procuratori et confervatori ; fummo pauperum patrono, religionis ortho- 
doxse non cultori modo, fed propugnatori: conftantifTimo principi denique fubdito, 
iixori marito, familiaribus amico fidelifTimo; necnon liberis patri amantifTimo; qui 23" 
die Augufti, anno a?tatis fuaeyi," Dominican Incarnationis 1609°, ex hac valle miferi- 
arum ad Creatorem fuum mira cum alacritate remigravit. Georgius Farewel, equts 
auratus, ejufque filius natu maximus, hoc monumentum qualecunque fit, in fpcin 
refurredionis, et filialis obfequii fymbolum, moerens moeftusque erigi curavit. 

" Unus eram, dum vivus eram; poft funera binus: 

DifTecor in partes, qui prius unus eram. 
Terram terra petit j repetit pars Caslica ctehim; 

Ad proprium tendit pars ita quasque locum. 
Nata cadunt} fors veflri ctiam veifatur in urnaj 

Scala Jacobi fcandite cafb-a Dei." 

*' Scio quod Redemptor mcus vivit, et in noviflimo die furrefturus fum et rurfus 
circundabor pelle mea, et in carne meo videbo Deum." Job ix. 25, 26. " Equat 
omnes cinis." Arms, i. SaMe, a chevron engrailed between three efcallops argent i 
Farewel. a. The fame impaling a flag's head cabofTed, argent. 3. The lafl iitipa- 
ling, party per fefic indented or and gules. 

On the fouth wall is a mural monument, infcribed :— — " In memory of the excel- 
lently accomplifht Sir George P'arcwell, knt. who died May 14, 1647. Alfo of his. 
moft pious lady, who was the daughter of Sir Edward Seymour, of Berrie-caftle in 
Devon, baronet, by whom he had twenty children, and who died Dec. 13, 1660. 

** A perfon graceful, learn'd, humble, and good. 
Well match'd with beautie, virtue, and high blood. 
Yet after fufferings great and long, both dead. 
To mind us where great worth is honoured." 

Againfl the fame wall is a fuperb mural monument of black and grey marble, the 
cornice of which is fupported by two black Corinthian pillars with gilt capitals; on the 

tablet 



2^6 H I L L - B I s H o P s. [Caimton^Dean* 

tablet is this iofcription: " To the pious memory of Mrs. Mary Brune, daughter 

of Sir George Farewel, of Bifhop's-Hull in the county of Somerfet, knt. relift of 
Charles Brune, of Athelhampftone in the county of Dorfet, efq; mother of Mrs. Bridget 
Fowel, her daughter and only child, who, in teftimony of her inviolable duty, and 
affeftion to her moft tender and indulgent parent, hath erefted and dedicated this 
marble. She was a perfon of excellent endowments both of body and itiind; but thofe 
could not exempt her from the common fate; for fhe departed this life the firft of 
April, anno aetatis fuje 80, et Domini 1697. 

" Beneath in duft her mortal relicks lie. 

Subdued by death, become the viftor's prey; 
Her foule, tlie nobler part, doth foar on high 
In glorious regions of eternal day." 
Arms, I. Farewel. 2. Argent, a chevron>^/?, on a c\i\d gules three mullets of the 
field, Fowel; impaling azure a crofs moline or, Brune. 
Weflward from Bifhop's-Hull is the hamlet of Upcott. 



F 



H I L L - F A R E N C E. 

OUR miles to the weft of Taunton, in a low flat country thickly wooded, 1$ 
_ HiU-Farence, which in the Conqueror's time was held diftinftly from the manof 
di Taunton by Alured de Ifpania, and of him by Walter. 

" Walter holds of Alured, Hille. Alwi held it in the time of King Edward, and 
" gelded for three hides. The arable is fix carucates. In demefne is one carucate, 
« and four fervants, and eleven villanes, and four bordars, and one cottager, with one 
<' plough. There is a mill of thirty-pence rent, and feventeen acres of meadow, and 
" ten acres of pafture, and feventeen acres of wood. It was worth three pounds, now 
** two pounds."* 

This manor came foon after to the ancient family of Feron, or Ferun, from whom 
it obtained the addition to its name, being written Hulle-Ferun, and Hulle-Ferons,oi 
which the prefent denomination is a flagrant corruption. Of this family were John, 
Alexander, Michael, and Robert Ferun, which laft, by his deed without date, granted 
to Symon de Locumbe and his heirs all his land lying in mieford, with all its apperte- 
nances, liberties, and free cuftoms, to hold by the fervice of paying yearly, to the faid 
Robert Ferun and his heirs at the feaft of Eafter, a pair of fpurs, value three-pence, m 
lieu of all fervices." From this family the manor defcended to that of Vernal. In the 
time of H«nry III. Lady Cecilia de Vernai, the wife of Philip de Columbers, of Nether- 
Stowey in this county, being feized in demefne of half a knight's fee in Hulle-Ferun, 

• Lib. Domefday. ' Cart. Antiq. apud CoUeftan. Tho. Palmer, de Fakfield, arnrig. 



Cflunton^Dean.] 



H I L L - F A R E N C E. 



^17 



by her charter bearing date the 41ft of that reign, granted the fame to Maud de Vernai 
her daughter, and to the heirs of her body lawfully begotten, rcverfionary, in default 
of fuch iflue, to the faid Cecilia and her heirs for ever. Soon after which Philip de 
Columbersj fon and heir of the faid Cecilia, and Philip her hufband, ratified and 
confirmed the grant to the fiid IMaud de Vernai, who fettled this manor on her eldcft 
fon William de Vernai, on his marriage with Margaret daughter of Sir Ralph Ruflel, 
knt." In which family of Vernai the manor of Hill-Farence continued through divers 
defcents, till in the time of Queen Elizabeth it pafled with Fairfield and other lands by 
marriage to the family of Palmer, and from them afterwards came to that of Acland, 
wherein it ftill remains, being now the property of John Acland, efq. 

To the northeaft of Hill-Farence, is the hamlet of Allarford, which anciently 
had poffcffors of its name. Elias de Allarford was living 21 Edw. I. and after him 
came Robert de Allarford, lord of the manor of Allarford, who left ifliie two daughters 
his coheirs, viz. Dionyfia the wife of William de Vernai, and Maud the wife of Robert 
dc Staunton. Which Robert de Staunton dying without iilue, Maud his faid wife 
granted all her Ihare in this manor to the aforefaid William de Vernai, her brot!ier-in- 
law, whofe defendants held it with Hill-Farence."* 

The living of Hill-Farence is a curacy in the deanery of Paunton, and in the gift of 

Trinity college in Oxford. The Rev. Thomas W^arton is the prefciit incumbent. 

It was appropriated to the priory of Barlinch, and in 1292 valued at lOOs." There 

' was an eftate alfo in this pari(h belonging to the fame priory, which was rated in 1 293 

at 40s.' 

The church, dedicated to tlie Moly-Crofs, is a filial! building, confiding of a navi.', 
chancel, fmall aile on the Ibuth fide, and tower, containing five bells. Tlie aile or 
rather chapel was built by William de Vernai lord of this manor, who founded a mafs 
in this church for the good eftate of his own foul, and the fouls of Dionyfia and Ancilla 
his wives, William de Vernai his f^ither, Margaret de Vernai his mother, and Vs'^illiarn 
de Vernai his grandfather} and dying in 1333, was buried in tlie chapel above-men- 
tioned. William de Vernai his father was alfo buried in this church/ 



' Diflent de Hilleferons, apud Colkaan. Tho. Palmer. 
' Taxat. Temporal. 



' Diflent de Allerford. 
• MS. Palmer. 



•" Taxat. Sjjiiiuu!.' 




Vol. III. 



L I 



KINGSTON. 



[ 258 ] [Caunton^2:)eam 



KINGSTON. 

THIS parifli is fituated under the fouthern extremity of the Quantock-Hills, about 
four miles nearly north from Taunton, and comprifes the following tithings: 

1. Kingston Tithing, in which ftand the church, and about forty-feven houfes, 
inhabited by upwards of feventy families. 

2. Nailesbourne, about a mile fouth, in which are feventeen houfes, and twenty 
families. 

3. CowsHuisH, or CusHuisH, (including the hamlet of Toulton) feventeen houfes, 
and twenty families, fituated nearly three miles towards the northweft. 

4. NoRTH-FuLFORD, nearly two miles fouthweft, including the hamlets of Yarford 
and CuTLEv, and containing twenty-one houfes, and about twenty-four families. 

5. Illbeare, containing ten houfes, and twelve famihes. 

6. Hestercombe. 

All the above tithings, a few trifling eftates excepted, belong to the cuftomary manor 
of Taunton-Dean, where the tithingmen are annually chofen, and in the general 
account of which the lordfhip of Kingfton is involved in the Norman furvey. 

On the eaft fide of this parifh, on rifing ground, moft admirably improved by art, 
and exquifitely.embellifhed by tafte, ftands Hejlercombe-Houje, anciently the feat of the 
family of Warre, now of Copleftone Warre Bampfylde, efq. 

This eftate was in the time of King Edward the Confeffor parcel of the pofTeffions of 
the abbey of Glaftonbury;^ but King William the Conqueror took it from the church, 
and gave it to the Bifliop of Coutances. 

" The fame Bifhop holds Hasecumee, and William of him. Four thanes held it 
*' in the time of King Edward, and gelded for two hides and three virgates of land. 
" The arable is three carucates. In demefne are two carucates, with one fervant, and 
" four villanes, and eight cottagers, with two ploughs. There .are thirty-one acres of 
"meadow, and ten acres of coppice wood. It was worth forty fhillings, now fifty 
" fhillings."" -^^ 

Hence this manor became the pofl"eflion of the Mohuns, from whom it pafled by 
purchafe to the family of Flory, of whom Hugh de Flory gave twenty acres of land in 
Heftercombe to the priory of Taunton." From them it came to the family of Meriet, 
who held it by knight's fervice of the Bifhop of Winchefter, as of his manor of Taunton. 
John Meriet, knt, was lord of Heftercombe 6 Edw. II. and 8 cal. Aug. 13 16, had 
a licence granted him by the Bifhop of Bath and Wells to found a chantry in his 
oratory at Heftercombe j'' and 13 Edw. II. he obtained a grant of free-warren for 
the manor." 



* Lib. Domefday. (_'' Ibid. ' Mon. Angl. ii. p. 83. * Excerpt, e Regift, Wellen 

' Cart. 13 Ed. II. n. 35. 



Walter 




aunton^Dcan.] KINGSTON. 259 

Walter Meriet, fon of this John, died 15 Edw. III. poflcfled of the following 
manors: Connbe-Flory, and Hcftercombe, held by knight's fervice of the Bifhop of 
Wincheiler, as of his manor of Taunton; one carucate of land at Cerncy in Glou- 
ceftcrfhirc, and nineteen acres of meadow in Taunton, called Coke's-Mead; one 
meflliage and three carucates of land at Wyke, of the Bifliop of Bath and Wells; one 
carucate of land at Bykely, held of the manor of Milverton; one carucate of land at 
Pilleigh, held of Geffrey Stawell; two carucates of land in Wydccombe and Eftcote, 
held of John de Mohun; one carucate of land in EUworthy and Plafhe; half a carucate 
of land in Brompton-Rauf, of Sir John Mohun; one carucate of land in Capeland, of 
Sir John Afton, knt.; the manor of Bradford near Wellington, held of John de St. 
Clare, as of the manor of Chifelbury; and two carucates in Long-Afhton, of Thoma* 
Berkeley.' 

This Walter Meriet was fucceeded by another Walter, who dying without iflue 19 
Edw. III. his nephew Simon inherited the eftate, to whom a licence was granted by 
the bifhop of Bath and Wells to have maffes and other divine offices celebrated in his 
chapel at Heftercombe.* 

John Meriet died feized of Heflercombe 43 Edw. III. and was fucceeded in it by 
another John, a knight, which John, in a deed dated 48 Edw. III. excepts Combe- 
Flory and Hcftercombe from a deed of feoffment of his eftate.*" The faid Sir Joha 
Meriet died 15 Ric. II. leaving one only daughter and heir, Elizabeth, married to Johrt 
la Warre, who in her right became pofTelled of Hcftercombe.' 

The family of la Warre was a collateral branch of the ancient barons of that name, and 
bore for their arms. Gules, crufuly fitchee argent, a lion rampant of the laft. They were 
feated in this county from very early times; but the firft of the anceftors of la Warre 
of Hcftercombe that we can fpeak of with certainty, is Robert la Warre, who married 
a daughter and heir of Kentifbere of Huntworth, a veiy ancient and knyghdy family, 
a moiety of whofe lands came to the Pophams by the marriage of another daughter and 
coheir. This Robert la Warre was probably the fame who, with Alexander Luttrell,. 
Richard Filiol, and others, was figned with the crofs in order to attend Prince Edward 
to the Holy Land 54 Henry IIL By the daughter of Kentifbere he had ilTue 

Matthew la Warre, who married Fehcia the daughter of PhiHp Denbaud, of Hinton 
St. George, and Sybilla his wife, daughter of Simon Gryndham; with her he badlands 
in Hinton, which were held of the honour of Hampfted-Marfhall; alfo the manor of 
Crafte adjoining, which continuing long in the family was thence denominated Crafte- 
Warre. This Philip Denbaud was the fon of Agnes one of the daughters of Sir 
William Hereward of Devon, and Dulcia his wife, fifter to Sir Richard Stapledon and 
Walter Stapledon bifhop of Exeter, and founder of Exeter- college and Hart-hall> Oxon. 

The faid Matthew la Warre was living 9 Edw, III. being at that time witnefs to a 
deed of Matilda, widow of Sir William de Falconbridge, fifter and heir of Sir Robert 
de Mandeville, together with John de Clyvedon, Richard Picks, and Henry de Urtiaco, 
knts. He had ifTue, by the daughter of Denbaud, 

' Efc. « Excerpt, e Regift. WeUen. " Sir WiUiam Pole's MS. p. 545, ' Efc. 

L 1 2 John 



26o KINGSTON. [CauntomH:)ean. 

John la Warre, who, as we have already faid, by his marriage with the daughter 
and heirefs of Meriet, brought Heftercombe into the Warre faniily, as by the marriage 
of another daughter of Meriet, Combe-Flory was conveyed to the family of Fraunceis. 
This John left ifTue 

Ricliard la Warre his fon and heir, who married Joan daughter and heir of John 
Atwood by Gonilda his wife, filler and one of the heirs of Sir William Percehaye. By 
the faid Joan he had iflue Elizabeth wife of John Chiflelden, efq; of Holcombe in the 
county of Devon, and one fon 

John, who became his heir. He married Joan daughter and heir of John Combe, of 
Dalwood in the county of Dorfet, efq; by which match feveral manors in that county 
were added to his eftate. He was high-fherifF of this county and Dorfet 2 Henry V. 
and 8 Henry VI. 

Robert Warre his fon and heir married Chriftian, fifter to Sir Richard Hankford, of 
Annery in the county of Devon, and was fheriff of Somerfet and Dorfet 36 Henry VI. 
He died 5 Edw. IV. being then pofleffed of Heftercombe, Baghaye, the manor of Crafte- 
Warre held of Sir William Poulet, knt. Wellysforde, Bradford, and Grenevylefwike, 
all in this county. The probate of his will bears date 6 Aug. 1465. In it he orders 
his body to be buried in the monaftery of Athelney.' He had iffue 

Richard Warre, who married Joan daughter to Lord Stourton, but died without 
iflue. This Richard repaired and adorned the chapel at Heftercombe, which being 
in a very ruinous ftate, was a few years fince taken down. On the windows were the 
arms of the matches of the family, viz. 

I. Gules, crufuly fitchee, a lion rampant argent: Warre. 

a. Gules, a pair of wings conjoined argent, debruifed by a bend azure: Kentifbcre. 

3. Barry of fix or and/able, abend ermine: Meriet. 

4. Argent, a crofs moline^«/w: Percehaye. 

5. Or, three keys |;k/^^: Clavile. 

6. Sable, a bend or between fix fountains proper: Stourton. 

7. Azure, a chevron between three ftags' heads cabofled or: Chipleigh. 

8. Argent, four bars wavy gules, over all a faltire or: Mawbank. 

9. Argent, a feffe indented paly vert zndjabk, cotifed of the firft, witliin a bordure 

engrailed of the fecond, in chief a xvmWct fable : Hody. 

10. Azure, three efcallop-lhells or: Malet. 

1 1. Or, a chevron between three eagles difplayed, vert: Blewet. 

12. Argent, on a chief gules, two flags' heads cabofi^ed or; a crefcent for diftindion: 

Popham. 

13. Cl.ecquy argent and /able: St. Barbe. 

14. Azure, a chevron between three lions' heads erafed on Wyndham, 

'. Reg, Godwyn, Prerog. offic. f. 73. 

15. Ardent 



cauntomDean.] Kingston. 261 

15. ytgent, on a bend azure, three boars' heads of the firftt Broke/by. 

16. Ermine, a faltier engrailed |;a/fj: Defmond. 

17. Argent, a bend nebule cotifed 7^^/^. 

1 8. Azure, three leopards' heads cabofled or. 

19. f'ffr/, a faltier engrailed <7r^««/: Hawley. 

20. Argent, on a bend dauncettce /<?^/i?, cotifed azure bezantce, three fleurs-de-lis 

of the field : Cuffe. 

21. Azure, a faltier voided between four fpears or: Harbin.* 
There was this infcription on the eaft window of the chapel: 

" ©rate pro anima IRofterti marrc, armigeri, Domini De ^eficrcomlie.' 

Richard Warre died 11 Edw. VI. being at that time feized among other lands of 
Grenvillefw'ke and Bickleigh, in this county, held of Cecily duchefs of York, mother 
to Edw. IV.; Wellysford, of William Vernay; and Crafte -Warre, of Sir William 
Poulet, knt. Upon the death of this Richard, his heir was found to be 

Richard the fon of John Warre of Chipleigh, younger brother to John who married 
the daughter and heir of Combe of Dalwood. Robert Warre, fecond fon to Richard 
and Joan daughter of Atwood, married Thomafine fole daughter and heir of Thomas 
Chipleigh, of Chipleigh in this county, a family that had long been lords of that 
cftate. His fon and heir John married Joan daughter of Philip Mawbanck or Malbank, 
a houfe of great antiquity in Dorlet; by her he had Richard Warre of Chipleigh, 
who at the age of fifteen inherited the lands of the above-mentioned Richard Warre of 
Heftercombe. 

This Richard Warre was created knight of tlie Bath, at the marriage of Piincc 
Arthur, A. D. 1501. In 1530, 22 Henry VIII. he was appointed a commiffioner, 
together with Sir William Poulet, Sir Nicholas Wadham, and William Portman, to 
make enquiry into the lands of Cardinal Wolfey in Somerfetfhire. And 3 1 Hen. VIII. 
he was fhcriff of this county and knight of the fliire^ He married two wives, the firft 
was Margaret daughter to John Brockman, of Witham in the county of Eflfex. His 
fecond wife was Joan daughter of Sir John Hody, chief baron of the exchequer. 
To his eldeft: fon by this laft lady he gave Chipleigh, Tolland, Milverton, and Love- 
linch; which manors continued in that branch of the Warre family a few generations, 
till the daughter and heir of Warre of Chipleigh brought them by marriage to William 
Lottiftiam, whofe daughter and heir (dying without ilTue) gave Chipleigh to Mr. 
Clarke, fon to her hufband of that name by his former wife, in which name it ftill 
continues. Sir Richard Warre died '^^ Henry VIII. feized of the manors of Hele» 
Chipleigh, Tolland, Milverton, Hinton-Crafte, Grenevylefwyke, Brufhford, Banwell, 
Lovelinch, &c. all which lands (excepting thofe abovenamed given to his eldeft fon 
by his fecond wife) defcended to Thomas Warre his eldeft fon by his firft wife. 

« The arms of Bamp^'lde are Or, on a bend guUi three mullets argent. 

Thomas^ 



262 KINGSTON. [Caunton^Dcan. 

Thomas Warre mairied Joan daughter of William Malet, of Enmore, by wlMm 
he had iflue Richard, John, William, Henry, Thomas, Edward; Joanna, married to 
Thomas Michel), efq; of Cannington, and Mary, married to George Sydenham, of 
Chilworthy; alfo Alicia. He died foon after his father 34 Henry VIII. and added the 
manor of Pulton in Wilts to his eftate. 

Richard Warre, his eldeft fon and heir, married Catharine daughter of Sir Roger 
Blewett, of Holcombe-Rogus in the county of Devon, lord of North-Petherton, 
which eminent family terminated in daughters married to Wallop, now Lord Lyming- 
ton of Hampfhire, Stonehoufe of Berkfhire, &c. Ele died 44 Eliz. and left iflue 
Roger Warre. 

Which Roger married Eleanor daughter of Sir John Popham, chief juftice of the 
Queen's -Bench. By her he had twelve fons, viz. Richard, John, Thomas, Francis, 
George, Alexander, Edward, Roger, Robert, W illiam, John, Amice, and two daughters, 
Anne and Eleanor. He died 14 Jac. I. and left Richard his eldeft fon and heir. 

Richard Warre married the daughter and heir of Thomas St. Barbe, ofWhite- 
parifh in the county of Wilts, by whom he had two fons, Roger and Thomas. From 
Thomas the fecond fon is defcended Richard Warre, lately firft clerk to one of the 
fccretaries of ftate's office. Thomas Warre purchafed the manor of Middlezoy in 
1615, and the manor of Weft-Monkton in 16 16. 

Roger eldeft fon of Richard married Anne daughter of Sir Thomas Wyndham df 
Kentsford, and by her had John, and one daughter. 

John Warre was knighted by King Charles II. foon after his reftoration, in memory 
of his fidelity to him in his troubles. In the Dutch war he raifed a troop of horfe in 
the Duke of Richmond's regiment, and ferved in parliament as knight of the Ihire for 
Somerfet. He married Unton daughter of Sir Francis Hawley, bart. of Buckland- 
Sororum, afterwards Baron Hawley of the kingdom of Ireland; defcended by his 
mother and grandmother from the Portmans of Orchard-Portman, and the Lords 
Poulet of Hinton St. George. This lady had been before married to John Malet 
of Enmore, by whom flie had iflue an only daughter and heir, Elizabeth, married to 
John Wilmot earl of Rochefter. Sir John Warre died A. D. 1669, and left iflTue by 
the faid Unton an only fon Francis. 

Which Francis Warre was raifed to the dignity of a baronet id of June 1673. He 
married to his firft wife Anne daughter and heir to Robert CufFe, of Creech St. Michael, 
efq; by whom he had one fon, who ferved as a captain in the regiment of dragoons 
commanded by lieutenant-general Rofs. He died at Glient in Flanders in the 33d 
year of his age. His fecond wife was Margaret daughter of John Harbin, of the 
city of London, merchant, of a family of that name near Yeovil in this county; by her 
he had Margaret his only daughter and heir, and Wilham, who died an infant. The 
faid Sir Francis Warre in his early years was a captain in the Duke of Monmouth's 
own regiment, with many other gentlemen of high birth and diftinftion. Upon his 
marriage he retired, and was colonel of the Taunton regiment, vice-admiral of Somer- 
fetlhire and the port of Briftol, deputy-lieutenant, and juftice of the peace. In all 

which 



caunton=2:)can.] Kingston. 263 

which employments he acquitted himfclf with honour and integrity, profcfling a dutiful 
regard to the true interefl: of the church, crown, and counay. He reprefcnted the 
boroughs of Bridgwater and Taunton in various parliaments to the year 17 16. He 
died I Dec. 17 18 and is buried with his anceftorsin the family vault at Kingfton. He 
was heir to Kentifbere, Meriet, Atwood, Percehaye, Clavile, Combe, Chipleigh, St. 
Barbe, and Cuffe, whofe arms he quartered with his own. 

Margaret daughter and heir of the faid Sir Francis Warre married John Bampfylde, 
efq; brother to Sir Copleftone Warwick Bampfylde, of Poltimore in the county of 
Devon, bart. by which match Heftercombe and many other eftates came into that 
family. The faid John Bampfylde reprefented the city of Exeter, and afterwards the 
county of Devon in parliament, and died 17 Sept. 1750, in the 60th year of his 
age, and was buried at Kingfton. By the faid Margaret his wife he left ifilie Copleftone 
Warre Bampfylde, the prefent owner of Heftercombe j Margaretta the wife of John 
Tyndale, of the city of Briftol, efqj and Elizabeth: He had alfo one fon and fix 
daughters, who all died infants, except Frances. Margaretta has ifflie by John Tyndale, 
efq; Margaretta the wife of Charles Hill, of the city of Briftol, efq; John and Elizabeth 
born twins; Charlotte, married to Thomas Eagles, of Briftol, efq; and Thomas 
Bampfylde Tyndale, an ofEcer in the 14th regiment of foot. 

Copleftone Warre Bampfylde, efq; the prefent pofleflbr of Heftercombe, married 
Mary fecond daughter of Edward Knight, of Wolverley in the county of Worcefter, 
efq. He was colonel of the Somerfet regiment of militia feveral years. 

There is alfo a manor called Volis, or Volesse, now the inheritance of Copleftone 
Warre Bampfylde, efq; from the family of Warre. 

The living of Kingfton is vicarial, in the deanery of Taunton, and in the gift of tlic 
Dean and Chapter of Briftol; the Rev. James Brown is the prefent incumbent. It 
was anciently appropriated to the priory of St. Peter and Paul in Taunton, and with 
Cothelftone (to which it was the mother-church) was rated in 1292 at twenty marks.* 

The church, which is dedicated to St. Mary, is a handfome Gothick edifice, eighty- 
fix feet in length, and forty-eight in breadth, confifting of a nave, chancel, north and 
fouth ailcs, the whole covered with tile. At the weft end is a well-built and elegant 
tower, feventy feet high, adorned with fculpture, and crowned with twenty-four pin- 
nacles. This tower has a clock and fix bells. 

On the fouth fide of the chancel is a noble old monumental tomb of the Warres of 
Heftercombe, round the fides of which were painted their arms, and thole of tlieir 
matches; but moftof them are defaced. There ftill remain. Ermine, acrofs engrailed 
guks; and j^rgent, acrofs moline gules, in the dexter chief a chefs- rook. The marble 
flab that covers this tomb is ten feet long, and four feet and a half broad, and is a fort 
of grey granite. It is not known who it was of the Warres that eredted this fine 
monument. 

In the fouth window of the chancel were painted in glafs the arms of Warre, impaled 
with others; in the north window were the coats of Kentjftjere, Scourton, &c. all more 

" Taxat. Spiritual. 

ancient 



264. KINGSTON. [Caunton=13ean» 

ancient than their matches with Hody; alfo Ermine, three lions' heads jeffant-de-lis 
azure: with the arms of Stawel, viz. Gules, a crofs lozengy argent: and thofe of 
Columbers, Bendy azure and argent i and Argent a chevron or between three bezants. 

Henry James, D. D. late niafter of Queen's-coUege, Cambridge, who died in 17 17, 
aged 75, by his will gave one hundred pounds to this parilhj and the late Thomas 
Dyke, efq; of Tcttonin this parifh, who died in 1721, aged 61, in his life-time gave 
one hundred and fix pounds, and with which the above legacy, and one year's interefl: 
thereof, (being in the whole 21 il.) fome lands were purchafed in the parifh of Halfe, 
now let for lol. 15s. a year. I'he deed bears date the 17th of Sept. 1721, and in the 
church-book is the following copy of an order of the Bifliop of Bath and Wells: 

*' Whereas Henry James, D. D. late mafter of Queen's-college ia Cambridge, did 
by his laft will give unto the parilh of Kingfton near Taunton in the county of So- 
merfet, the fum of one hundred pounds, by which fome lands have been purchafed, 
and by deeds of conveyance fettled in truftees : and wliereas by the faid will the prefent 
Lord Bifhop of Bath and Wells, or his fucceffor, is defired to determine and appoint 
the difpofal of it to the beft advantage for the faid parifh, whether in keeping a charity- 
fchool, or in any other way he fhall think fit: I do hereby, in profecution of the pious 
intention of the faid teftator, direft, that the annual fum arifing from thefe lands be 
employed in fetting up and maintaining one fchool for the education of the poor chil- 
dren of the faid parifh. And I do alfo hereby direft, that the place where the fchool is 
to be kept, and the nomination of the mafter, fhall be in the joint confent of the vicar 
and veftry; and that the nomination of the children be made by the vicar and church- 
wardens. And I further direft, that if any difference arife between the vicar and veftry, 
it be determined by the Archdeacon perfonally, or by two or three by him fpecially 
appointed: And that if any difference fhall be between the vicar and churchwardens, 
it fhall be determined by the archdeacon or his furrogate. In teftimony of all which, 
I have hereunto fet my hand and feal manual, this 29th day of September 1725. 

" George Bath & Wells." 

Here is alfo a charity of feven pounds per annum payable for ever out of the parfon- 
age of Kings-Brompton, given by one of the family of the Dykes: — Two pounds per 
annum given by a Mrs. Bult, payable out of the eftate where Mr. Thomas Sminney 
Bult now lives: — And the intereft of one hundred pounds, given by the late Mr. Coles 
of this parifli, is given annually to the fecond poor on St. Thomas's-day. — There is 
alfo a donation of fifty fhillings per annum, payable out of another eftate, now the 
property of Mr. William Williams. 




LYDIARD- 



Caunton*H^enn.] [ 265 ] 



LYDIARD ST. LAURENCE. 

THIS paiifli is fituated eight miles northweft from Taunton, in a valley about a 
mile northeaftward from the high road thence to Dunfter. A fine fpring rifing 
in a field near the church emits a rivulet, which falls into the Tone below Bifhop's- 
Lydiard: this water has been found ferviceable in fcrophuloiis diforders. Another 
ftream rifing at Tolland runs alfo through a part of this parilh. 

It contains a number of little villages and hamlets, viz, 

1. Westowe, a little northweft from the church, in which are three farms, and one 
cottage. 36 Henry VIII. the lordfhip or manor of Weflowe, with a wood called 
Middiffcrd-Woody and other lands and hereditaments in Laurence-Lydiard, were granted 
to Joan Sidenham, widow." 

2. HoLFORD, two miles northeaft, three farms. 

3. CoRSLEY, one mile eaft, two farms and one cottage. 

4. Nethercot, a mile and a half nearly eaft, two farms and one grift-mill. The 
two laft-mentioned villages belonged formerly to the family of Malet. 

5. Pyleigh, one mile fouth, three farms and eight cottages. This village belonged 
to the family of Flory, whence It was fometimes called Leigh-Flory. It pafled from 
that family to the Meriets and the Beaumonts." 

6. Chipleigh, two miles fouth, where formerly was a chapel, four farms, and 
two cottages. 

7. Deane, three miles fouth, one farm and one cottage. 

8. HocKHAM, two miles and a half fouth, three farms, four cottages, and a grift-mill, 

9. West-Leigh, one mile and a quarter Ibuth, three farms and three cottages. 

10. Tarr, two miles fouthweft, three farms and one cottage. 

About the church are eight farms and twelve cottages. In all leventy houfes, and 
about three hundred and fifty inhabitants. 

A fair is held here Aug. i o, formerly for cattle, now only for pedlary ware. 

It was in this parifli that, A. D. 1666, one of thofe immenfe pitchers teeming witii 
Roman coins was found, which gave birth to a curious difcourfe on the antiquities of 
this diftrift, wliere it is fuppofed the Romans completed the conqueft of this country,' 

It was held at the Conqueft by William de Mohun: 

" William himfelf holds Lidiard. Alric held it in the time of King Edward, and 
*' gelded for two hides. The arable is fix canicates. In demefne is one carucate, and 
" four fervants, and ten villanes, and fix cottagers, witla one plough. There is a mill 
** of eight fliillings rent, and fifteen acres of meadow, and ten acres of pafture, and 
*' twenty acres of wood. It was and is worth feven pounds."* 

• Pat. 36 Hen. VIII. p. 6. " Efc. ' See vol. ii. p. 493. " Lib. Domefday. 

Vol. III. Mm The 



266 LYDIARD ST. LAURENCE. [CauntOtvDcam 

The records are not explicit with regard to the fubfeqiient defcent of this manor. 
In the time of Edw. IV. it was held of the family of Fraunceis of Combe-Flory. 12th 
of that reign Elizabeth the widow of Richard Whiteley hejd at her death the manor 
of Lydiard St. Laurence, together with the advowfon of the parifli-church there, of 
Nicholas Fraunceis, efq; as of his manor of Combe-Fioryj and one burgage in Bridg- 
water of George Darell: John Seymour her fon and heir of the age of twenty-one years." 
It afterwards belonged to Edward duke of Somerfet the Proteftor, and is valued in the 
Ichedule of his eftates at lol. i6s. 6d. per annum.*^ It is now the property of Meffrs, 
Philip and Robert Hancock, whofe father purchafed it of the Sellecke family. 

A branch of the family of Coker long refided in this parifh. 

The church, valued in 1292 at fourteen marks,^was appropriated to the priory of 
Taunton, and the prior of that houfe had a particular yearly penfion from the fame of 
two marks.*" An eftate here belonging to the fame foundation was in 1293 valued at 
twenty fliillings.' 

It is a reftory in the deanery of Taunton, and in the patronage of Henry William 
Portman, efq. The Rev. Charles Ruffell is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Laurence, fecond archbifliop of Canterbury, and fuc- 
celTor to St. Auguftine, A. D. 604, from whom this parilh had its additional title. It 
ftands on a rifing ground at the fouth end of the village, and confifts of a nave, chancel, 
and north aile. At the weft end is an embattled tower feventy feet high, with eight 
pinnacles, a turret at one corner, a clock, and five bells. 

In the fouth wall of the chancel is a ftone feat with three niches, divided by round 
ftone columns. 

On the north fide of the chancel is an ancient tomb, the memorial thereof effaced ; 
and above it a fmall monument infcribed to the memory of the Rev. John Goodwin, 
D. D. reftor of this church, who died Jan. 14, 1628. 

In the floor is a memorial to the Rev. Thomas Brickenden, B.D. reftor of Corton- 
Dinham in this county, and canon of the church of Wells, who died July 17, 1700,' 
aged 75. 

The intereft of 5I. per annum was left to the poor of this parifli by Mrs. Colbey a 
clergyman's widow, to be diftributed on Chriftmas-day. 

The chriftenings in this parifh are annually on the ufual average 21, the burials only 9. 
' Efc. ' MS. Valor. « Taxat. Spiritual. •■ Ibid. ' Taxat. Temporal. 




NINEHEAD- 



Caunton'a:)ean.] [ 267 ] 



NINEHEAD-FLOR Y, anciently NICHEHEDE, 

IS a fmall parifh in the extreme angle of this hundred towards the fouthweft, being 
fituated betwixt Milverton and Wellington, from which laft parifh it is divided by 
the river Tone. 

A mile eaftward from the church is East-Ninehead, or Ninehead-Monks, or 
Monkton; and about half a mile north is the hamlet of Upcot. 

In this parifh is alfo Chipleigh-House, the ancient eftate of the Warre family, 
now of Edward Clarke, efq.' 

The manor of Ninehead is included in the Conqueror's furvey in the number of 
thofe lands which owed fervice to the Bifhop of Winchefler's court at Taunton, and 
has been always held under that great lordfhip. In the time of Henry I. and King 
Stephen, it was the pofTefTion of Ranalph de Fluri, who in allufion to his name bore on 
his feal a chevron between three crofTes flory,*" which arms with a little variation of the 
crofTes were afterwards ufed by the family of de Wyke, who it feems by fome inter- 
marriage with the Floris became pofTefTed of the manor of Ninehead. To the faid 
Ranalph de Fluri fucceeded Robert and Hugh de Fluri, both of whom were living in 
the time of Henry 11." John de Wyke was lord of this manor in the time of King 
Edw. I. whom he attended in an expedition againfl the Scots,'' and was fucceeded by 
another John de Wyke," and he by Philip de Wyke, who held this manor, and that of 
Withiel-Flory 13 Edw. II.' He had two fons, Walter and John, of whom the latter 
inherited this manor, and was living in the time of Edw. III. having ilTue a fon of the 
fame name, who was refident at Ninehead 13 Ric. II. He married Catharine daughter 
of Sir William Bonville, knt. and relift of Sir John Cobham, knt.^ in whofe right he 
had the manor of Yeovilton in this county for his life.* He died 12 Henry IV. feized 
of that manor, and the manor of Ninehead-Flory, as alfo a moiety of the manor of 
Lillifdon, leaving Robert his fon and heir then of the age of nineteen years.' This 
Robert was father of John Wyke, who was of Ninehead in the time of Edw. IV. and 
died the loth of that reign, feized of the manors of Ninehead-Flory, Withiel, Uphill, 
and Oldmixon, leaving Richard his brother and heir of the age of fixty years.'' Which 
Richard Wyke (or Wykes, as he is called in the inquifition) died i Ric. III. feized of 
the manors of Ninehead and Withiel-Flory, held by knight's fervice of the Bifhop of 
Wincheflerj the fourth part of the manors of Uphill and Chriflov, held of Thomas 
lord Stanley, as of his manor of Blagdon; and four mefliiages, eighty acres of arable 
land, twenty acres of meadow, and forty acres of pafture in Oldmixon, held of John 
Arthur. John his fon and heir was then of the age of forty years.' The faid John 
Wyke, fon and heir of Richard, was a knight of the Bath at the marriage of Arthur 
fon of Henry VII. with the Princefs Catharine of Spain,"" and was fucceeded in the 

• See page 15 of this vol. ^ Seals from ancient deeds. * Lib. Nig. Scac. i. 69. '' Harl. MS. 1192. 

• Efc. ' Fin. 13 Ed. II. Somf. n. 8. ' Cooke's Vifitation of Somerfetfhiie. " Efc. ' Ibid. 

Mbid. 'Ibid. ■» Harl.MS. 6j66, fol. 101. 

M m a pofiefTion 



% 



26S N I N E H E A D. [Caimton^DeaiT, 

pofleffion of this manor by Richard Wyke, who held it with Withiel of the Eifhop of 
Winchefter, the latter end of the reign of Henry VII." He married Eleanor Hadley 
of Withycombe, by whom he had iflue Richard Wyke of Ninehead, who married 
Margaret daughter of George Rollcj of Stevenftone in the county of Devon, efq; by 
whom he had a numerous offspring, and dying in 1590, was buried in the parifli- 
church of Ninehead. 

There was a branch of this fame family feated at Court de JVick, in the parilh of 
Yatton, in the hundred of Winterftoke, which eftate paffed to the Chedders, Kens, 
and Poulets. '^ 

At Eaft or Monks-Ninehead was an eftate belonging to the monks of the priory of 
Taunton, (whence its name) which in 1293 was valued at twenty-five fhillings." 

The reftory of Ninehead, valued in 1292 at fix marks and a half,"" was appropriated 
to the fame mcnaftery, and the prior and convent had alfo the advowfon of the vicar- 
age, the patronage of which is now in the crown, and the Rev. Dr. Bovett the prefent 
incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to All-Saints, and is a fmall ftrudure, confifting of a nave, 
chancel, and two fide alles. At the weft end is an embattled tower, containing five- 
bells. The north aile belongs to the family of Acland. 

Againft the north wall of the chancel there is a plain ftone monument, infcribed,— 
" Heere liethe interred Richard Wike, ofNinhed in the county of Somerfet, efquier, 
who died June 17, 1590, being then of the age of 6;^ years; and Margaret his wif, 
daughter of Georg Role, of Stevenfton in the county of Devon, efquier, who died 
Aug. 12, 1578, being then of the age of 41 years, and parents of 17 children, vid. 
fix fonns, and 1 1 daughters." Arms, Argent, a chevron gules between three crofles 
moline Jabk. 

On the fouth wall of the chancel is a monument of black and white marble, with 

this infcription: " Near this place lyeth the body of William Sanford, of Ninehead- 

Court, efq; who married Anne the daughter of Edward Clark, of Chiply, efq; by whom 
he had three Ibns, two only furviving him, viz. William and John, infants. He died 
Feb. 9, 17 1 8, aged 23' His death was much lamented by all, he having lived the 
fincereft friend, the moft affeftionate huft)and, the tendereft of fathers, and beft of 
mafters. Anne his widow thus perpetuates his memory, Dec. 27, 1720." Arms, 
Jzure, three bars wavy argent-, Sanford: impaling, Or, two bars azure, in chief three 
efcallop fhells gules ; Clarke, 

Ninehead has been the refidence of the family of Sanford for feveral generations, 
whofe prefent reprefentative is Henry William Sanford, efq. 

At the foutheaft corner of the fouth aile is a grand mural monument of ftone, on the 
bafe of which are the effigies of a man and woman kneeling on a cufliion, with a reading 
ftand and two books open before them. The man is in black, with a long flowing 
cloak; the woman in a black gown, the tail of which is tucked behind, and tied to her 
waift ; the fleeves are large, fliort, and tied clofe round the arms above the elbow, with 

» Efc. 19 Hen, VII, * Taxat. Temporal, » Taxat. Spiritual. 

fliort 



Cauntott'Dean.] N i N E H E A D. 269 

fliort ruffles below; fhe has a black hood tied clofe under her chin. On the tablet is 
this infcription: — " To the memory of Elizabeth wife of Edward Clarke, of Chiplcy, 
efqj eldeft daughter and heire of William Lottifham, efq; and Mary his wife, who was 
daughter and coheire of Edward Warre, of Chipley, efq. She dyed the 1 5 of March 
1667, aetat. fuas 42. 

" This happy foul exchang'd by her deceafe 

The lands of Warre into the fields of peace. 

Whither in triumph by her virtues led, 

Grace hath advanc'd, and glory crown'd her head. 

As fire and grandfire's heire, fhe here pofTefti 

But knowing heaven's inheritance is befl, 

She parted hence to be a facrifice, 

Whofe afhes fall, and fpirit in flames doe rife, 

Bleftfoul! 

My fad attendance and thefe trophies fhew 

The dear affecftion to your worth I owe : 

Your virtues bid me not approach the urne, 

Unlefswith groanes and teares your lofs I mourne> ^ 

Which griefe in vaine lamenteth ; for withftand 

None can the force of the Almigh tie's hand. 

The comfort left me is, I trufl to view 

And fhortly fliare eternal joys with you." 

Arms, I. Clarke. 2. Gules, ciaifuly fitchee argent, a lion rampant of the lafl, Warre: 
impaling, argent, three bulls' heads cabofTed ya^/^ armed or. 3. Clarke, impaUng 
argent, on a bend double cotifed/a^/^ five bezants. 

On a fmall mural monument of marble:' " Near this place lyeth the body of 

Guftavus Venner, of Fitzhead in this county, efq; who died April 28, 1717, aged 46. 
To whofe memory this monument was erefted by his executor Samuel, younger fon of 
Edward Clarke, efq; of Chipley in this parifh, 17 16." Arms, Gules, on a fefTe or, 
three efcallopsy^/J/^; Venner: impaling, argent, on a fclTe gules, between three crofTes 
Jable, as many martlets of the firft. 

In the fouth wall of the fouth aile is a memorial to Richard Wyatt, efq; who died 
1693, and Alice his wife, daughter of Edward Thurfton, of Buckland, efq; who died 
April 18, 1732, aged 70. Arms, Sahle, a fefTe dauncettee argent, between three eagles 
difplayed or; Wyatt: impaling, yai-/^, three bugle-horns ftringed or, garnifhed azure-, 
Thurflon. 

In the chancel floor: " 1643. Here lieth the body of Martin Sanford, of 

Ninhed in the county of Somerfet, efquier, who died the 20th of Sept. aged 68. 

Epitaphe. 
" Under this polifli'd flonc inhum'd doth reft 
' The country's patriot huddled up in duft; 
Had worth and wifdom, true religion, zeale, 
Prov'U fovreigne antidotes againft death's ill* 

^ He 



I 



270 N I N E H E A D. [Caunton»Oean. 

He had not dy'd ; no privilege wee fee : 
The law innmortal made man mortal bee. 
Yet in defpight of fate, his virtues Ihall 
To future times furvive his funerall. 
Vivit poft funera virtus. 
" Here aifo lyeth Sufannah his wife, who died March 17, 1661." 

" Here lyeth the body of Henry Sanford, of Ninhcad in the county of Somerfet, efq; 
who was buried the 9th of February 1 644. Alfo Mary his wife, daughter of Henry 
Afhford, of Afhford in the county of Devon, efq; who was buried the 3d of Sept. 1662. 

" Two Fords conjoyn'd incorporate, 
A hufband and his fpoufed mate. 
Make one fair ftreame whofc very name 
Might give to heraldry a theme. 
But as propenfe all rivers runne 
Into the ocean whence they come 5 
Soe they to earth their tending have. 
Both here concenter in the grave." 

" Here lyes the body of William the fonn of William Sanford, of Ninhead, efq; and 
Ann his wife, who died Aug. 19, 1715. 

" Subtus bene requiefcunt ofla Annas Sanford, Gulielmi Sanford^ armigeri viduas, 
qus obiit 6° die Aprilis anno falutis 1777, astatis 59." 

Againfl; the eaft wall of the fouth aile is a plain black monument, with the following 
infcription, without name or date : 

" A little booke and taper's light 

Did folace me in my laft night ; 

My taper fpent, booke clos'd I late. 

In bed thereon to meditate : 

With what improvment thinke — I know 

Then volumes more, or funne can fhow." 




NORTON- 



Caunton'a;)ean.] [271 ] 



NORTON- FITZWAR REN 

LIES four miles weft from Taunton, in the turnpike-road from that town to Mil- 
verton; the parifli is compofed of the following tithingsand hamlets, viz. 

1. Norton Tithing. 

2. Fenhampton Tithing, fituated a mile weftward, and containing three farms 
and one cottage. 

3. Langford Tithing, half a mile northward, three farms and ten cottages. 

4. FiTzoy, a mile and a quarter north, one farm and three cottages. 

5. Ford, half a mile weft, three farms. The reft of the houfes, which are forty- 
eight in number, form a ftraggling ftreet along the road near the parifli-church. The 
fituation is woody, and the lands are rich, and watered by feveral rivulets, the chief 
iburce of which is in Brendon-hill. 

Before the Norman invafion one Ofmund held this manor; but King William 
gave it to the Earl of Morton, under a certain acknowledgment to the biftioprick of 

Winchefter: 

" Alured holds of the Earl, Nortone. Ofmund held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for five hides. The arable is ten carucates. In demefne arc 
" three carucates, and fix fervants, and thirteen villancs, and eight cottagers, with 
*' eight ploughs. There are two mills of eleven fliillings and three-pence rent, and 
" twenty-five acres of meadow, arid forty acres of wood. It was worth eight pounds, 
" now fifteen pounds."* 

The Fitzwarrens, who adjoined the diftindlion to this place, were a family defcended 
from Guarine de Meez, one of the houfe of Loraine, who was ftierifF of Shropftiire in 
the time of William the Conqueror, and one of the chief counfellors to Roger dc 
Montgomery earl of Shrewft)ury.'' To him fucceeded Fulke his fon, who called him- 
iHf Fitz-Guarine, the fon of Guarine, which title degenerating into Fitzwarren, was 
ever after ufed by his defendants. There were nine of this nam.e of Fulke Fitzwarren 
in regular fuccefTion, all of them perfons of note in the feveral reigns wherein they lived, 
and chiefly concerned in matters of the crown. The laft Fulke lord Fitzwarren died 
in his minority 8 Henry V. and Elizabeth his only fifter, the wife of Richard Hankford, 
cfq; became heir to his eftates, which defcended to her fole daughter by the faid 
Hankford, Thomafine, married to Sir William Bourchier.. knt. who was afterwards 
fummoned to parliament by the tide of Lord Fitzwarren. Fulke Bourclaier lord 
Fitzwarren, fon of this WiUiam, died 1 9 Edw. IV. feized of the manor of Norton juxta 
Taunton, held of the heir of Sir Thomas St, Lo, knt.; the manor of Novington, held 
of the Biihop of Bath and Wells; nine mefluages, eight gardens, ten acres of meadow, 
and twenty acres of pafture, in Pyntenay and Taunton, of the Bifliop of Winchefter in 
free burgage; the manor of Huntfpill, of the King; the manor of Hunftile, of the Biihop 

? Lib. Domefday. * Dugd. Bar. i. 44;. 

of 



272 NORTON-FITZWARREN. [CauntomDcam 

orWinchefter; and the manor of Wigboroiigh, of William Berkeley; leaving Jo hnhis 
fon and heir of the age of nineteen years/ And after his deceafe both title and manor 
merged in the Earl of Bath. 

But there was another manor in Norton, which was anciently diftinguiflied by the 
name of Norton-Veel, by which family it was held under the lords of Chiffelborough. 
17 Edw. III. Peter de la Veel poffelTed it, and tranfmitted it to Peter his fon and heir." 
Which Peter de la Veel was a knight, and a perfon of great account in the time of 
Edw. III. and Ric. II. In the 9th year of the laft-mentioned reign he granted to 
Hugh Berd, clerk, and John Guft, all his manor of Norton juxta Taunton,' and the 
year following configned to the King and others in truft an acre of land within his faid 
lordlhip, called fVicklond, together with the advowfon of the church of Norton.^ The 
fame year the faid Hugh Berd and John Guft releafcd to the King and John Lufcote 
prior of the monaftery of the Salutation of the Mother of our Lord, of the Carthufian 
order near London, all their right in the land and advowfon aforefaid.^ Which property 
came afterwards to Hankford, and thus became incorporated with the polTeffions of 
Fitzwarren. The manor of Norton now belongs to William Hawker and Thomas 
Wclman, efqrs. 

The hamlet of Fenhampton was held 1 6 Edw. III. by John de Stapleton and Cecilia 
his wife, of Walter Meriet, by the rent of 20s. and id. per annum."" 

The living is a redory in the deanery of Taunton, and in the gift of William 
Hawker, efq. The Rev. James Minifie is the prefent incumbent. In 1292 it was 
valued at twenty-nine marks eight fhillings and four-pence. The prior of Montacute 
had out of it an annual penfion of five fhillings."' 

. The church, which is dedicated to All-Saints, ftands on a fmall eminence northweft 
from the ftreet, and is compofed of a nave, chancel, north aile, and tower. Between 
the nave and the aile ftand two large clumfy Saxon oftangular pillars, fix feet round, 
and feven and a half high to the fpring of the arches which they fupport. The chancel 
is divided from the nave by an ancient open work fcreen of fix arches, over which is a 
gallery-now clofed up. This fcreen has a curious cornice richly carved and gilt, and 
ornamented with a row of grotefque figures of men and animals. Among tJie reft are 
three oxen fingly drawing a very antique plough, held by a man in a ftooping pofture, 
■while another inclines over the fore part of the beam. Behind is a man fowing, and 
ftill farther backwards an aUigator tearing out the bowels of a man. Near the end 
of it is the name of the churchwarden in the year of its ere£1:ion, cut in wood, viz. 

mapfje Jpaitis, C. Wi. 

On the fouth fide of the. nave is a ftately monument of marble, infcribed to the me- 
mory of James Prowfe, efq; who died Dec. 1 1, 1672, aged 35. 

The average annual chriftenings in this parifh are eleven; the burials fix. 

' Efc. " Ibid. ' Rot. Claus. 9 Ric. II. ' Ibid, 10 Ric. II. * Ibid. 

" Efc. ! Taxat. Spiritual, 



OAKE. 



I 



I 



Caunton=Dcan.] [ 273 ] 



O A K E. 

THERE are at leaft three places in this county, which derive their Gmple and 
uncompounded appellations from the fort of wood with which they heretofore 
relpeftively abounded; viz. Elm, in the hundred of Frome; yip, in that of Kingfbury; 
and Oak, which wc are now (peaking of, a village fituated to the north of Ninehead, 
and to the weft from Taunton (being diftant thence five miles) in a flat woody country, 
traverfed by deep miry roads overhung with hedges. Its ancient names were Sc, 
Acha, and Ache, all fignifying an oak. tree, and derived from the ancient Belgick 
(2B^ClkC> and the place was one of the many appendages to the Bifhop of Winchefter's 
manor of Taunton, being held at the Conqueft by Roger de Curcelle, and under h\n\ 
,by Goisfrid: 

" Goisfrid holds of Roger, Ache. Domno held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and gelded for three hides and a half. The arable is fix carucates. In demefne are. 
*' two carucates, and four fervants, and fourteen villanes, and fourteen cottagers, having 
" three carucates and a half. There is a mill of four Ihillings rent, and feventcen acres 
" of meadow, and fifteen acres of pafture, and ten acres of wood. In Milvertone, a 
*' houfe pays eleven-pence. The whole is worth four pounds. When he received it, 
" it was worth fifty fliiUings.'" 

The Malets of Enmore were anciently enfeoffed of this manor, and made feveral 
grants thereof to divers perfons to hold for life. Sir Baldwin Malet, by his deed dated 
at Oke, 48 Edw. III. grants the reverfion of this manor after the death of Sir John 
Trivet, on whom he had fettled it for life, to William Coker and his heirs. The wit- 
neffes to this deed were Sir Richard de Afton, Sir Hugh Durborough, Sir Matthew 
Stawel, knts. and others.'' By an inquifition taken at Bridgwater 26 Odt. a Hen. VIII. 
it was found that William Malet, efq; died feized of the manor of Oake among many 
others, Sept. 7, a Henry VIII. leaving Baldwin his fon and heir of the age of fourteen 
years. Oake was then held of the manor of Compton-Dunden." 

The living is redlorial in the deanery of Taunton, and was valued in 1292 at lOOs.* 
The Rev. William Slocombe is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Bartholomew, and confifts of a nave, chancel, and 
fouth aile, at the weft end of which is a tower with four bells. 

On grave-ftones within the chancel rails are thefe infcriptions : 

" The remains of Mrs. Mary Galhampron, daughter of John Colfbrd, of Bromfield, 
efq; and Mary his wife, firft married to Alexander Webber, M. A. and redbor of this 
parifli; afterwards married to Oliver dalhampton, M. A. and reftor of Enmore. She 
was a perfon of excellent natural and acquired parts, and what crowns all, of more extra- 
ordinary piety. Buried Odl. 3*1, 1699, aged 76." 

• Lib. Domefdajr, ' Sir William Pole's Book of Charters. ' Coles's Efc. * Tax»t. Spiritual. 

Vol. III. Nn « "The 



274 o A K E. [Cauntou'Dean* 

" The body of Mrs. Mary Prowde, wife of Francis Prowde, clerke, M. A. reftor 
and patron of this parifli, daughter of Alexander Webber and Mary his v/ife, buried 
June 16, 17 13, aged C^." 

« Hie fubtus jacet Francifcus Prowde, hujus ecclefife nuper reftor, qui obiit 17° die 
Septembris, Anno Dooiini 1722, aetat. 70.'* 

In the floor of the aile: " Hie jacet corpus Samuelis Raymond, de Oake, 

magiftri in artibus et medicinse profefforis, qui obiit decimo prime die Martii, A. D. 
i662j astat. 46," Arms, Argent, three h^rs Jabk. 

Here is a fmall free-fchool endowed with thirty fhillings a year, for teaching poor 
children belonging to the parifh. 

The births are annually fivej the burials three. 



ORCHARD-PORTMAN, 

ABOUT two miles nearly fouth from Taunton ftands Orchard, which belonged 
anciently to a family of its name. The firft of this family of whom we have any 
account was James the fon of Baldwyn le Orchard, who 25 Henry III. levied a 
fine of this and other eftates to the ufe of his fon Emerick; from whom it defcended 
3 Edw. I. to James the fon of Emerick. It pafTed from him in lineal defcent for 
feveral generations to William Orchard, who lived about the time of Henry VI. and 
dying without ifl"ue male, left it to his only daughter Chriftian, the wife of Walter 
Portman, efq; whofe fon inherited the property of Orchard,' in right of his mother. 
Walter died 14 Edw. IV. 

- The name of Orchard-Portman was from that time given to this feat and eftate, to 
diftinguilh it from Orchard-Wyndham, an eftate in this county which alfo formerly 
belonged to the Orchards, from whom it defcended to the family of Sydenham, an 
heirefs of whom marrying a Wyndham, it devolved to that family, in which it has ever 
fmce continued, and now belongs to Wyndham earl of Egremont. 

The Portmans appear to have been a family of note in this county in the reign of 
Edw. I. at which time lived Thomas Portman, whofe grandfather bore the prefent 
arms of Portman.*" His lineal defcendant William Portman appears to have been 
fettled at or near Taunton 8 Henry IV. and gave lands to the priory of that place, 
where he was buried, ad orandum pro animd Jud. 

The fon of William was Walter, who married the heirefs of Orchard, as mentioned 
above. His grandfon Sir William Portman, knt. was ferjeant at law to Henry VIII. 

\ 1 he arms of Orchard were. Azure, a chevron argent between three pears or, 
\ The arras of Portman are. Or, a fleur-de-lis a%ure. 

one 



Caunton^Oean.] orchard-portman. 275 

one of the juftices of the common-pleas, and afterwards lord chief jufticc of Englandi, 
in which fituation he diftingiiilhed himfelf by difplaying a degree of integrity and inde- 
pendence very unufual among the judges of thofe arbitrary and defpotick times. He 
died in the year 1555, 3 Phil, and Mary, and was buried in St. Dunftan's church, 
London, where a monument is eredted to his memory. 

John Portman, his grandfon, was created 'a baronet 25 Nov. 161 2. He married 
Anne daughter of Sir Henry Gifford, knt. of Hampfhire, and left iflue four fons, viz. 
Sir Henry Portman, knt. and bart. who married Anne only daughter of William earl 
of Derby, and died without ififue 1621; Sir John and Sir Hugh, who both died un- 
married; and Sir William, who married Anne daughter, and coheir of John Colles, of 
Barton in this count)', efq; by his wife Elizabeth, daughter and fole heir of Humphrey 
Wyndham, of Wivelifcombe, efq; and four daughters, viz. Joan, who married George 
Speke, of Whitelackington, efq; Anne, married to Sir Edward Seymour, of Bury- 
Pomeroy caftle, (anceftor of the prefent Duke of Somerfet) Elizabeth, married to John 
Bluet, of Holcombe, efq; and Grace, who died unmarried. 

Sir William Portman, bart. fon of Sir William, was created a knt. of the Bath by 
King Charles II. He married three wives, viz. i. Elizabeth, daughter and hcirefs of 
Sir John Cutler, bart. 2. Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Southcote, knt. 3. Mary, 
daughter and heirefs of Sir John Holman, bart. But having no ifllie by either of them, 
the title became cxtindl. By a releafe dated Feb. 26, 1689, he devifed Orchard- 
Portman, together with other eftates to a great amount, to his coufin Henry Seymour, 
efq; (fifth fon of Sir Edward Seymour abovementioned) who affumed the name and 
arras of Portman. He married, firft, Penelope daughter of Sir William Haflewood, of 
Maidwell in Northamptonfhire; fecondly, Meliora, daughter of William Fitch, of 
High-hall in the county of Dorfet, efq; but dying without ifTue, his property devolved 
by a further limitation in the will of Sir W^illiam Portman to William Berkeley, of Pill 
in this county, efq; who by an ad of parliament 9 Geo. II. was enabled to take the 
name and bear the arms of Portman. 

The family of Berkeley take their name from the caftle of Berkeley' in Gloucefter- 
Ihire, which at the time of die Conqueft was pofTefTed by Roger a Saxon nobleman, 
who, following the cuftom introduced by the Normans, aflumed the furname of Berkeley; 
but becoming a monk in the priory of Stanley St. Leonard in 109 1, it devolved to his 
nephew William de Berkeley, whofe grandfon Roger, lord of Berkeley and Durfiey, 
having taken part with King Stephen againfl: the Emprefs Maud, was difpofTefled of his 
barony and lands of Berkeley, in favour of Sir Robert Fitzharding, from whom the 
families of Berkeley are lineally defcended. The father of Sir Robert Fitzharding was 
Harding a fon of a king of Denmark, who accompanied Duke W^illiam from Nor- 
mandy, and was with+iim at the battle of Haftings, when the death of Harold decided 
the fate of the kingdom in favour of the Normans. He refided at Briftol, of which he 
was governor, and poirefied great wealth and large eftates both in Somerfet and Glou- 
ceflcrflaire. He married Lyveda, a woman of noble birth, by whom he had five fons 

' This word is derived from the two Saxon words Bipc, a birch uee, (with wiiich thatpatt of Gloua^tr- 
fhirc abounds} and Lty, a paflare. 

N n 2 wd 



# 



? 



'f 



276 ORCHARD-PORTMAN. [Cauntoit^Oean* 

and three daughters. He lived during the reigns of William the Conqueror, William 
Rufus, and Henry I. and died in 1 1 15. 

Sir Robert Fitzharding his fon was alfo governor of Briftol, and by the fupplies both 
of money and troops which he afforded to King Henry II, was principally inftrumental 
in recovering the throne from the ufurper Stephen i but Roger lord of Berkeley and 
Durfley, having born arms in fupport of Stephen, his eftates of Berkeley were con- 
fifcatcd, and conferred as a reward on Robert Fitzharding, when the viftorious Henry 
diftated the terms of peace to his rival. From this time a violent hatred fubfifted be- 
tween the two barons, which proceeded to fuch lengths that both Stephen and Henry 
interpofed, and after having obliged both parties to enter into covenants of pacifica- 
tion, made a counter-marriage between Maurice fon of the Lord Berkeley, and Alice 
a daughter of the Lord Durfley j and alfo between Robert the fon and heir of the Lord 
Durfley, and Helena daughter of the Lord Berkeley. Thefe marriages were cele- 
brated at Briftol with great fplendor and magnificence in the prefence both of Stephen 
and Henry. 

Robert lord of Berkeley founded the'monaftery of St. Auguftine'' in Briftol, (now 
the cathedral) in the year 1146,° and afterwards became a canon thereinj he alfo 
repaired and enlarged the caftle of Berkeley, which in the records of thofe times is 
ftiled the honour of Berkeley, and is faid to be the only caftle in England, except that 
of Arundel, which ftill retains its feudal privileges. He took his feat as peer i Henry II. 

He married Eve (the daughter of de Eftmond, and of Godiva fitter of William 

the Conqueror) by whom he had four fons and two daughters; he died 1 170, aged 75. 
Maurice his fecond fon and fucceflTor gave a thoufand marks to the King as a fine for 
the confirmation of his right to the honour of Berkeley. He was the ftrft who took 
the name of Berkeley, and laid afide that of Harding. He founded the hofpital of 
Lowring, and that of the Holy Trinity at Longbridge in Gloucefterfliire. He died 
I Ric. I. 1 189, and was buried at Branford (Brentford) in Middlefex, leaving fix fons, 
Robert,' Thomas,* Maurice, William, Henry, and Richard; the two youngeft of whom 
accompanied William King of Scotland on his return into that country after his im- 
. prifonment in England, and became the anceftors of many eminent families in Scotland, 
Ireland, and France. 

" Over the College gate at Briftol is the following infcription: " Kfp J;enrtctts! ^ecmiDuiS » 23n« JRoiettH^ 

fill' S,)ct5i»njji filii Regis 23acit ^iil' inonaftctii ptimi fimtiatotes) tjctitttunt." 

' He began the biulding A.D. 1140, and ended the fame 1146; Robert bifliop of Worcefter, Boniface bifliop 
of Exeter, Nicholas bilhop of LlandafF, and Gregory bifliop of St. Afaph, dedicated the faid monaftery. In 
it the founder was buried between the abbot and prior's cell at the entrance of the choir. 

• ' This Robert lord Berkeley was a great benefaftor to the monaftery of St. Auguftine. He alfo founded the 
hofpital of St. Catherine in Bedminfter near Briftol, and lies buried in the fecond arch of the north aile in St. 
Auguftjne's. Thomas lord Berkeley, his brother, was alfo a great benefaftor to the faid hofpital of St. Cathe- 
rine, and did many great works of charity; he lies buried in the arch next the Rood altar, in the fouth mle-of 
St. Auguftine's. 

'This faid Thc.mas lord Berkeley was the firft of the family that charged his coat with the ten croffes, whereas 
before they bore only the chevron, as appears at St. Auguftine's over the vcftry door. 

Robert 



cauntoivDcan.] orchard- portman. 277 

Robert the eldeft fon fucceeded his father, and attended King John in his wars in 
France; but when that King by his exaftions and oppreflions drove the nobles into 
rebellion, he joined the other great barons of the realm, who took up arms, and extorted 
a confirmation of their rights and privileges by compelling John to fign that charter 
which laid the firft foundation of our civil liberty. When the King afterwards over- 
powered the barons, he was among thofe whofe eftates were forfeited to the crown, 
which he did not recover till the fubfequent reign, when in i Henry III. the whole 
was reftored to him, except his caftle of Berkeley, on his paying a fine of 966I. He 
married Juliana daughter of William de Portlarch, and niece to the Earl of Pembroke, 
proteftor to Henry III. but died without iffue 4 Henry III. 1220, and was fucceeded 
by his brother Thomas lord Berkeley, to whom the caftle was reftored 8 Henry III. 
From the augmentation in the arms of this lord, it feems probable that he was infefted 
with the fuperftitious heroifm which prevailed in that age of carrying arms againft the 
infidels of the Holy Land : and this is the more probable, as one of his fons was a 
knight-templar. He married Joan daughter of Ralph de Somery lord of Campden, 
and dying 28 Henry III. 1243, was fucceeded by his fon Maurice"" lord Berkeley, who 
was at that time attending the King in the wars of Gafcony. This Lord entertained 
King Henry III. at the caftle of Berkeley, and attended the King in his wars againft 
Llewellin ap Griffin prince of Wales; he^ alfo ferved fixteen times in perfon in the 
King's wars. He married Ifabel daughter of Edmund earl of Cornwall, fon of Richard 
earl of Poidou and Cornwall, King of the Romans and Emperor eleft, who was 
brother of Henry III. King of England; but this alliance did not reftrain him from 
joining the other barons in their rebellion againft the King, for which his lands were 
feized, but they were reftored to him 55 Henry III. and he held them by the fervice 
of three knights' fees. This lord, like moft of his anceftors, enriched the monaftery of 
St. Auguftine with great benefaftions. He died 4 April 1281, 9 Edw. I. and was 
buried in that church. His eldeft fon Maurice being flain in a tournament at Kenel- 
worth, his property devolved on Thomas his fecond fon, who did homage to the King, 
and had livery of his lands the fame year. This lord was one of the greateft noblemen 
and braveft foldier of his time; he lived in his caftle of Berkeley with a princely mag- 
nificence, and had two hundred perfons in his train, under the different titles of knights, 
efquires,' yeomen, grooms, and pages. He was a principal aftor in moft of the battles 
in the reign of Edw. I. and for his fervices under his grandfather Edmund earl of Corn- 
wall againft the Welch, had a fpecial grant to hunt in the King's foreft of Mendip, and 
the chace of Kingfwood, and was acquitted of an hundred marks due to the King as a 
relief of his barony. In the year 1292, 20 Edw. I. he was appointed one of the com- 
miffioners at the famous convention at Norham in Northumberland, to decide on the 
claims of the different competitors for the crown of Scodand; under the fandion of 
■which, the ftiadow of royalty was conferred by the ambitious Edward on the unfortunate 
John Baliol, and the independence of Scotland was from that inftant annihilated. 

'' This Maurice lord Berkeley in the life-time of his father fealed with the ten crofl°es, with a file of three 
points, by the name of Maurice fonne of Thomas lord Berkeley. 

' The pay of an efquire at that period was three-pence-halfpenny per diem> a horfe and two fuits of furr'd 
clothes, and three halfpence per diem for a boy to attend him. 

In 



278 



ORCHARD-PORTMAN. [Caunton=2:)can, 



In the year 1292 Lord Berkeley was appointed embaflador to treat of a truce 
with the King of France, and the year following was made conftable of England. 
35 Edv/. I. he went embaflador to the Pope, i Edvv. II. he marched againft Robert 
Bruce, who taking advantage of the King's imbecility, and of the diflentions of the 
barons, had afllimed the title of King of Scotland j and in 13 14 he was fummoned to 
join the whole military force of England to the number of one hundred thoufand men, 
which Edward led in perfon to the frontiers of Scotland, where Robert Bruce, with 
an army confifting of only thirty thoufand, marched out to oppofe them, and totally 
defeated the Englifh army in the fatal batde of Bannockburn. According to the Scots 
hiflorians fifty thoufand men were left dead on the field of battle, among whom was 
the Duke of Gloucefter nephew to the King, with many other great lords, and feven 
hundred knights. The Lord Berkeley was among the prifoners, and found in Robert 
a generous and humane conqueror. After a Ihort time he was reftored to his liberty 
on paying a confiderable fine for his ranfom. In 1321 he joined with the other great 
lords of the kingdom in their oppofition to the unfortunate and mifguided Edward, 
but died on the 23d of July in that year, and was buried in the abbey of St. Auguftine, 
to which, and to the monks of Kingfwood, he had been a great benefactor. He mar- 
ried Joan the daughter of William de Ferrers earl of Derby. From his fecond fon Sir 
Thomas Berkeley are defcended the Berkeleys'' of Wymondham in Leicefterlhire. 

His fucceflbr Maurice had been fummoned as a baron to parliament in his father's 
life-time; he had alfo been appointed governor of Gloucefter, and was governor of 
Berwick in the 8th of Edw. II. when the fuperiority of the Scots made that command 
tiie moft dangerous and difficult of any in the kingdom. He raifed in his own neigh- 
bourhood, and in South-Wales, of which he was jufticiary, thirteen hundred men for 
the King's fervice, commanded by his two fons Thomas and Maurice. At the time of 
his fither's death herefided in the dutchy of Aquitaine, of which he was high fteward,' 
and on his return joined with the other barons in a confpiracy to overthrow the Spencers, 
(the favourites of Edward) whofe lands they laid wafte, and in the enfuing parliament 
procured a fentence of perpetual exile and forfeiture againft them. But the year fol- 
lowing, the King, having gained an advantage over the barons, recalled the Spencers, 
and declared their opponents traitors. The Lord Berkeley was feized, all his eftates 
confifcated, and himfelf committed a prifoner to the caftle of Wallingford, where he 
died, and was buried 19 Edw. II. 1326; but his body was removed to St. Auguftine's 
abbey on the reftoration of his family. He married Eve daughter of Eudo lord le 
Zouch, by whom he had ifllie Thomas, Maurice, John," Eudo, and Peter, who were 
both in orders. By his fecond wife Ifabel, daughter of Gilbert de Clare earl of Glou- 
cefter and Hertford^ he had no ilTue. 

Thomas his eldeft fon was imprifoned together with his father, and was not releafed 
till the fortunes of the King funk before the forces of the Queen and Mortimer. His 

' The Berkeleys of Wymondham bore cinquefoils in their arms inftead of croffes. 

' He was appoiuted high fteward of Aquitaine by the title of the King's heloiied Kinfman. He was fecond 
coufm to the King. 

" From Sir John Berkeley are defcended the Berkeleys of Shropshire. 

lands 



Caunton=2?can.] orchard-portman. 279 

Jands were reflorcd to him in the firfl: year of King Edw. III. and the depofed King 
was committed prifoner to his cuftody, but being ru(pe«5l:ed of treating him with more 
gentlenefs than was agreeable to the favage mind of the Queen and her paramour, 
and not deemed an inllrument fit to be tiufted with the bloody purpofe they medi- 
tated; he was commanded to deliver up the cuftody of his caftle and royal prifoner to 
John lord Maltravers and Thomas Gournay, by whom the murder was perpetrated 
with circumftances of the moft horrid cruelty. 

This lord lived with greater magnificence than any of his anceftors; he attended 
Edw. III. in moft of his wars, was prefent at the battle of Crefly, and at the taking of 
Ca;lais, and was one of the chief commanders at the glor'ious battle of Poifliers, where 
he took fo many prifoners, that with their ranfom he built the caftle of Beverftone. He 
died J5 Edw. III. 1361, and was buried at Berkeley. His firft wife was Margaret 
daughter of Roger Mortimer earl of March. He left feveral fons, from the eldeft of 
whom, Maurice, the prefent Earl of Berkeley is defcended. 

Sir Maurice Berkeley, the fecond" fon of the laft Lord Maurice, took part with his 
father and elder brother againft the Spencers, and during his father's imprilbnment 
ravaged their lands, for which his property was feized by Edw. II. but was reftored by 
hitfucceflbr, who rewarded him with a grant of Stoke-Gifixjrd, and feveral other ma- 
nors in the counties of Gloucefter, Wilts, and Somerfet, which had been forfeited by tiie 
rebellion of John Giftbrd, and the next year la Edw. III. the King conferred on him 
the caftle and manor of Brimpsfield forfeited by the attainder of John de Maltravers, 
He was a partaker with Edward the Black Prince in moft of the victories in France ; 
nor was he fatisfied with the fame of a warrior alone, but diftinguifhed himfclf by his 
fkill and pre-eminence in thofe martial pageants which conftituted the gallantly, and 
tended to the refinement, of the age in which he lived. 

15 Edw. III. a tournament was proclaimed by the King to celebrate tlie birth of 
his fon Edmund of Langley, in which the Earl of Hainault and feveral other foreign 
noblemen entered the lifts, and Sir Maurice diftinguiftied himfelf there fo much for his 
prowefs and valour, that Edward conferred on him the dignity of a knight banneret, 
the moft honourable badge of military merit. 

He was two years afterwards joined in commiftion with the Earl of Lancafter, to 
treat with the commiflioners of the King of France, touching Edward's right to the 
I crown of that realm, which was debated in the prefence of the Pope and feveral 

Cardinals at Avignon. But Edward put an end to the treaty by breaking the truce, 
to which the necelTity of his affairs had obliged him to fubmit; and the battle of 
Crefly, in which Maurice" had a command, crowned his arms with viftory. His next 
exploit was an attack upon Calais, where the length of the fiege proved fatal to many 
officers of diftinftion, and among others to Sir Maurice Berkeley, who ended his life 

" He bore ermine on his chevron for diftinflion. 

" This Maurice had in his train 6 knights, 32 efquires, 30 archers on horfeback, and 200 on foot. The pny 
of a knight banneret in thofe days was 4s. per diem, of a knight 2s, ofanefquire is. and of an archer for himfelf 
and his horfe 6d. 

in 



8o ORCHARD-PORTMAN. [Caunton^2:)eam 



2bO 



in the camp before that place, on the iith of 'Feb. 1347. Edward, ever ready to 
reward merit, and fenfible of the fervices of the father, conferred on his fon Sir Thomas 
Berkeley (who though very young, was prefent at the fiege) a grant of the profits of 
his wardlhip, and of his lands and marriage ; and this he did on the third day after his 
father's death. 

Sir Thomas Berkeley of Stoke ferved under Edward the Black Prince, and fought 
by his fide at the memorable battle of Poiftiers. 31 Edw. III. he was returned 
knight of the (hire for the county of Gloucefter, and died 35 Edw. III. at the age of 
thirty, leaving his fon Maurice an infant. He married Catherine daughter and coheir 
of John the fecond Lord Botetourt, whofc grandfather was fummoned to parliament 
23 Edw, I. 

Maurice ferved in the French wars under John duke of Britanny, on which account 
he was knighted by Ric. II. and reprefented the county of Gloucefl:er in the parliament 
held 15 of that King. He died a Henry IV. 1401, leaving his wife Joan, daughter 
of Sir John Dinham, pregnant with a fon, of which fhe was afterwards delivered, whofe 
name was alfo Maurice. 

This Maurice was knighted when he came of age, and fued out livery of his lands 
in fix counties, in the firft year of Henry VI. after a wardfliip of twenty-one years. He 
afterwards ferved under the Duke of Bedford regent of France ; he alfo reprefented 
Gloucefterfhire, and inherited the cafl:le of Weley from the Lord Botetourt. He died 
4 Edw. IV. leaving ifTue, by Helena daughter of Sir William Montford, Catherine, 
married to the fon of Maurice lord Berkeley; and William, who was made a knight of 
the Bath at the coronation of Ric. III. This Sir William was adively concerned in 
the various events of thofe turbulent times, and having fought on the fide of Richard 
at the battle of Bofworth-field, he was attainted i Henry VII. but was reftored the 
nth, and died the i6th of Henry VII. He married Anne daughter of Humphrey 
Stafford. His fon Richard fucceeded to his fortune; he died 5 Henry VIII. having 
married Elizabeth the daughter of Sir Humphrey Coningfby, knt. (one of the juftices 
of the King's-bench) by whom he had ilTue Sir John and Sir Maurice Berkeley. 

From Sir John Berkeley was defcended Norborne Berkeley, efq; of Stoke-Gifford, 
who 4 Geo. III. claimed the barony of Botetourt, as heir to his ancefl:or John lord 
Botetourt, which claim was allowed by parliament, and he took his feat in 1764; but 
dying without iflue in 1776, the name of Berkeley became extindl in that branch, and 
the barony defcended to his fifter Elizabeth Duchefs dowager of Beaufort. 

Sir Maurice Berkeley, the fecond fon, was ftandard-bearer to Henry VIII. Edw. VI. 
and Queen Elizabeth. His laft will bears date at Brewton on the loth of Feb. 1581, 
in which he bequeaths to Elizabeth his fecond wife, daughter of Anthony Sandys of 
Kent, efq; his manor of Brewton for life, and makes his eldeft fon fole executor. His 
firft wife was Catherine daughter of William Blount lord Montjoy, and fole heirefs of 
Charles Blount the laft Lord Montjoy, created Earl of Devonfhire in 1603. He was 
fucceeded by his eldeft fon Sir Henry Berkeley, of Brewton, knighted by Queen 
Elizabeth in 1585, who married Margaret daughter of William Liggon, of StafFordfhire, 

efqj 



CauntomDeanO orchard-portman. 



281 



efq; by whom he had three fons, viz. Sir Maurice, Sir Henry, (from whom defccnded 
the Berkeleys of Yarlington, which branch is now extinft) and Sir Edward Berkeley. 

Sir Maurice, who was knighted by the Earl of EfTex in the expedition againft Cadiz, 
died in 1617, and by his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Killigrew, left five fons, 
all knights, the eldeft of whom. Sir Charles, was on the King's reftoration fworn of the 
privy council, and made treafurer of the houflioldj and on the death of his fecond fon 
Charles, (who, for his great fervices to the King during his exile, was created Baron 
Berkeley of Rathdown, and Vifcount Fitzharding, and afterwards Baron Botetourt and 
Earl of Falmouth) he became Baron Berkeley and Vifcount Fitzharding, according to 
a limitation in the patent of creation, which titles defcended to his fons Maurice and 
John in fucceflion, who both died without iffue male. 

Charles Berkeley, earl of Falmouth, was keeper of the privy purfe, and colonel of a 
regiment of guards. He fought on board the Duke of York's (hip in that bloody 
engagement which happened in 1665, and was killed by his fide. His death is fup- 
pofed by Bifliop Burnet to have ftruck James with a panick, which faved the Dutch 
fleet, and left the vifbory undecided. He and his two brothers all dying without ifiue 
male, their property reverted to their uncle Sir John Berkeley, (for an account of 
whofe life the reader is referred to Lord Clarendon and the other authors who have 
written the hiftory of the rebellion, in which he ferved his royal mafter with courage, 
honour, and integrity. The defence of the Weft was committed to him, together with 
the Marquis of Hertford, and Sir Ralph (afterwards Lord) Hopton; and it was owing 
to their exertions that the King's caufe was fupported in the Weft, after he had been 
abandoned by all other parts of the kingdom. Nor would the King have ever fallen 
into the hands of his enemies, had not the rafhnefs of Mr. Aftiburnham defeated the 
plan which Sir John Berkeley had laid for his efcape. Charles IL rewarded his fer- 
vices by creating him Baron Berkeley"" of Stratton, (from the battle of Stratton-Moor, 
which he had gained over the rebels) by letters patent dated at Bruxelles, May 1 9, 
1658. In 1669, he went as Lord Lieutenant to Ireland; in 1675 '^^^ ambaflador to 
France, and died in 1678. From this Lord was defcended the laft Lord Berkeley of 
Stratton, who, dying without iflue, left the abbey of Brewton and a great part of his 
property to the Earl Berkeley, in order (as he exprefled it) to fupport the ancient 
Itock of the family. 

From Sir Edward Berkeley, uncle of Sir John, and third fon of Sir Henry, is de- 
fcended the only remaining branch of the Berkeleys of Brewton, of which we are now 
about to fpeak. 

Sir Edward married Margaret daughter of John Holland, of Suflex, efq; whofe 
anceftor Thomas Holland earl of Kent married Joan the fair, grandaughter of Edw. I. 

f It is curious to obferve the different charaflers given of this nobletnan by Lord Clarendon and Bifhop Barnct; 
the former, (whofe veracity and candour have been acknowledged by his greateft enemies) though profeffedly at 
variance with Lord Berkeley, does him that juftice which his fervices and abilities defervcd ; while the latter, 
whofe judgment was always biaffed by his political prejudices, and whofe credit as an hiiforian does not ftand 
nnimpeached, takes every occafion of fpeaking ill of him, and of putting a bad conllruilion on all his aftions ; 
and is abfurd enough in his rancour even to refufe him the credit of being well defcended ; nor does he coufine 
his cenfures to this Lord Berkeley, but vilifies with equal fplcen all of that nlune who appear iq his hiftory. 

Vol. III. O o and 



282 ORCHARD^PORTMAN. [CauntomSDean. 

and afterwards wife of Edward the Black Prince. He was knighted in the firft year of 
Cha. I. 1625. He built the manfion-houfe of Pylle in this county, where he refided, 
and poffeflfed a confiderable property. He died in 1654. 

His fon Edward Berkeley, of Pylle, efq; married Philippa daughter of George Speke, 
efqj of Whitelackington, and, died in 1669, leaving iffue Edward, who married 
Elizabeth daughter of John Ryves, of Ranfton in Dorfet, efq; by whom he had iffue 
two fons, Maurice and William. 

Maurice commanded a regiment of the militia of this county at the battle of King's- 
Sedgmoor, when the Duke of Monmouth was defeated. He died without iffue in 
1717, and devifed his eftates by will to his brother William Berkeley, of Pylle, who 
fucceeded afterwards to the fortune, and took the name of Portman, as was before 
related. He refided alternately at his three feats of Orchard-Portman, Pylle, (at which 
he died in 1737) and Bryanfton. On the 8th of Jan. 1708, he married Anne only 
daughter of Sir Edward Seymour, of Bury-Pomeroy, bart. by whom he had iffue 
Henry-William Berkeley Portman, who inherited the Portman property; Edward 
Berkeley, who took the Berkeley eftates, and married Anne daughter of Thomas Ryves, 
of Ranfton, efq; by whom he had two daughters; and Lsetitia (who held the Berkeley 
eftates and the manfion-houfe at Pylle for her life after the death of Edward in 1774) 
married to the Hon. Sir John Burland, knt.' of Steyning in this county, one of the 
barons of the exchequer, by whom Ilie had one fon. 

Sir Edward Seymour' their maternal anceftor was Ipeaker of the Houfe of Commons, 
and cotnptroller of the houftiold to Queen Anne, and was one of the principal inftru- 
ments of the revolution. He was the eldeft male defcendant of Edward Seymour the 
firft Duke of Somerfet, (lord proteftor of England, and uncle to Edward VI.) whofe 
honours being fettled on the iffue of his fecond wife, continued in that branch of the 
family until the year 1749, when by the death of Algernon duke of Somerfet' without 
iffue male, the titles of Duke of Somerfet and Baron Seymour devolved, by virtue of 
the remainder in the original patent, on Sir Edward Seymour, bart. grandfon of the 
above Sir Edward, whofe fon now enjoys them. 

The above Sir Edward Seymour married for his fecond wife Lastitia daughter of 
Alexander Popham, of Littlecot, efq; by whom he had Mrs. Berkeley Portman, and 
Francis, created Baron Conway by Queen Anne in 1702, father of the prefent Earl 
of Hertford. 

Henry William, eldeft fon of William Berkeley Portman, efq; married Anne 
daughter of Thomas Fytche, of High-Hall in Dorfetfhire, efq; who died and was buried 
at Bryanfton in 176 1, aged 52. 

« For an account of whofe family fee Steyning in Stoke-Courcy, vol. i. p. ;z^6, 257. 

' He brought the habeas corpus aft into the Houfe of Commons. 

' Charles Seymour duke of Somerfet, father of Algernon, married the heirefs of Jocelyn Percy the laft Earl 
of Northumberland; in whofe right he inherited the Baronies of Percy, Lucy, Poynings, Fitz-Payne, Bryan, 
and Latimer, which on the death of Algernon defcended to his daughter Elizabeth, married to Sir Hugh 
Smythfon, created Duke of Northumberland. 

He 



Cauntott'Dcan.] 



ORCHARD-PORTMAN. 



283 



He was fucceeded by his only fon Henry William Berkeley Portman, cfq; born in 
1738, who now refides at Bryanfton in Dorfetdiire. He inherited the Portman eftatei' 
from his father, and fucceeded to the family eftate of Pylle on the death of his aunt 
Lady Burland. He married Anne daughter of William Wyndham, of Dinton, in 
the county of Wilts, efqj by whom he has ifllie two fons, Henry William, now on his 
travels abroad, Edward Berkeley, a fellow commoner of St. John's college, Cam- 
bridge, and three daughters, Anne, Harriot, and Wyndham, all living. 

The family of Berkeley is defcended from the blood-royal of Denmark, by Harding 
their firft anceftor ; from the Dukes of Normandy, by Eve wife of Robert Fitzhardingj 
from the ancient Saxons, by Alice daughter of the Lord of Durfley; and from the 
Kings of England, by Ifabel daughter of Edmund earl of Cornwall. 

Southeaftward from Orchard ftands the hamlet of Heale. 

The benefice of Orchard-Portman is reftorial in the deanery of Taunton, and in 
the patronage of Henry William Portman, efq. The Rev. William Draper is the 
prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Michael, and confifts of a nave, chancel, fouth aile, 
and an embattled tower containing four bells. 

The chriftenings in this parilh are annually four, the burials two. 



O T 



R 



O R D 



LIES at the very fouthernmoft extremity of the hundred, under the flope of Black- 
down, on the borders of Devonlhire. The country here is rough and hilly, but 
has fome good land, which is moftly arable. A great deal is common land, covered 
with furze and heath, and full of coarfe yellow and reddifh flints. In fome parts which 
are boggy are found curious mofTes. On the north fide of the parifli, from the brow 
of Blackdown, is an extenfive profpeft over the whole of Taunton-Dean, the country 
as far as Dunfter, the Quantock-hills, the moors round Bridgwater, the Welch moun- 
tains, and the inland parts eaftward up to Glaftonbury, bounded by the Mendip hills. 
The number of houfes in this parifla is forty (moft of them fmall farms) and of 
inhabitants about two hundred. The houfes are meanly built, and ftand fingly about 
the parifh. 

The river Oter or Otter, rifing in this parifh, gives its name thereto, and traverfing 
the county of Devon, difcharges its waters at Ottermouth into the Britifh fea. The 
more ancient name of the village was fimply Ford, and there was a family thus called, 
who were formerly tenants under the biflioprick of Winchefter, to which the manor 
of Otterford, unnoted in the Norman furvey, ftill belongs. 

The living is a curacy in the deanery of Taunton; it was foi-merly appropriated to 
the priory there. 

O 2 The 



284 o T T E R F O R D. [Cauntort'lDean. 

The church is dedicated to St. Leonatd, and is a fmall building of one pace, with a 
tower at the weft end containing four bells. 

" Mr. John Books, of this parilh, who died Feb. 2, 1769, gave 50I. to the minifter, 
churchwardens, and overfeers for the time being, that they and their fucceflbrs might 
apply the intereft thereof every year to the teaching fix poor children of fix poor fami- 
lies of the fame parifh to read. 



PITMINSTER, anciently PIPEMINSTRE, 

IS fituated northward from Otterford towards Taunton, and comprifes the following 
hamlets, viz. 

1. Blagdon, in which are forty- feven houfes. 

2. Leigh, fifty-feven houfes. 

3. Fulford, twenty-three houfes. 

4. Trendle, thirty houfes. 

5. DuDDLESTONE, twcnty-cight houfes. 

In the village of Pitminfter are thirty-eight houles. 

In the whole about two hundred and forty dwellings, and one thoufand and thirty- 
fix inhabitants. 

This manor, known by the name of PippefmCnlJtC, was given by King Hardicnutc 
to the church of Winchefter.* 

" The fame Bilhop holds Pipeminstre. Stigand held it, and gelded for fifteen 
" hides. The arable is twenty carucates. Thereof are in demefiie five hides, and 
" there are two carucates, and feventeen villanes, and eight cottagers, with twelve 
" ploughs. There are fix acres of meadow, and four hundred acres of pafture, and as 
*' many acres of wood. It was worth thirteen pounds, now fixteen pounds."'' 

The manor ftill continues in the bifhoprick. 

Blagdon, or Blackdown, was alfo parcel of the pofiieffions of the church of Win- 
chefter, and is thus defcribed in the Norman furvey: 

** The fame Bifliop holds Bledone. It was formerly and is now applied to the ufe 
" of the refeftory of the monaftery. In the time of King Edward it gelded for fifteen 
" hides. The arable is feventeen carucates. Thereof are in demefne ten hides, and 
" there are three carucates, and eight fervants, and fixteen villanes, and ten cottagers, 
" with eleven ploughs. There are fifty acres of meadow, and pafture one mile long, 
" and half a mile broad. It was and is worth fifteen pounds. 

* Mon. AngI, i. 979. i* Lib. Domefday. 

"Of 



Caunton<E)eanO 



PITMINSTER. 



285 



" Of thefe ten hides Saulf holds of the Bifhop one hide, and has there one plough, 
** with one fervant, and one cottager, and fixteen acres of meadow, and one acre of 
*' coppice-wood. It is worth twenty fhillings.'" 

It continued in the biflioprick till the time of Henry I. when Bi(hop William Giffard 
gave it to the priory of Taunton. The priors had a feat here, and a park which ftill 
retains their name. There is alfo on the flope of the hill a wood, of nearly one hun- 
dred and twenty acres, called Prior's Park Woody in which are a great number of very 
fine large oaks. After the diflbUition of that monaftery the manor of Blagdon, the 
grange of Barton, the reflory and advowfon of Pitminfter, Corfe, and Trull ; the manor 
of Middlecot, and parcels of land in Orchard, Trull, Pitminfter, and Corfe, and tene- 
ments in Cachanger in the parifh of Stoke-Courcy, all belonging to the faid priory, 
were granted by Henry VIII. in the 34th year of his reign to Humphrey Colles, efq.* 
This gentleman nriade Barton his principal feat, and ferved the office of Ilieriff for tiiis 
county 4 and 5 Phil, and Mary. He was fuccceded by John Colles, cfqj who married 
Anne the daughter of Sir John Thynne, knt. and had ifllie John Colles, efq; who was 
flieriff of this county 21 Eliz. He married Elizabeth daughter and heir of Humphrey 
Wyndham, efq; by whom he left three daughters, his coheirs, viz. Anne wife of .Sir 
"William Portman, Margaret wife of Sir Gerard Napier, of Middlemarlh in the county 
of Dorfet; and Elizabeth the wife of John Coventry, efq; eldeft fon of Thomas lord 
Coventry, lord keeper of the great feal of England in the time of Cha. I. by Elizabeth 
his fecond wife, daughter of John Alderfey, of Spurftow in the county of Chefter, efq. 
This eftate of Barton became the purparty of the ^faid John Coventry, who added to, 
or built a noble feat here. It afterwards became the property of Smart Goodenough, 
elq; who was fheriff for this county, and Uved here with great honour and reputation 
both to himfelf and his country many years. He died about the year lyio, when this 
eftate came to W^illiam Earle, efq; ferjeant at law, who married a daughter and coheir 
of the faid Mr. Goodenough, and who at his death left this manor of Blagdon, Barton, 
or grange of Barton, and other eftates in Pitminfter, to his fon Goodenough Earle, 
efq; in which name it ftill continues. 

Divers other families of note have their refidence in this parilh, as William Hawker, 
Thomas Welman, and John Mallack, efqrs. 

PouNDiSFORD is One of the five fubdivifions of the hundred of Taunton-Dean. 
Here was a chapel, as there was alfo at Trendle." 

The church of Pitminfter was appropriated to the priory of Taunton by Henry de 
Bloisbiftiop of Winchefter in the time of King Stephen, and in 1292 was valued at 
thirty-two marks.' The prior and convent prefented alfo to the vicarage, which was 
at the fame time valued at fix marks and a half.^ The living is a vicarage in the 
deanery of Taunton, and in the gift of Goodenough Earle, efq. The Rev. Thomas 
Wyndham Goodwyn is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Andrew, and St. Maiy, and is a light handfome 
Gothick ftrufture, eighty-eight feet long, and forty feet wide, confifting of a nave^ 
chancel, and two fide ailes. At the weft end is a tower of an odtagonal form, fur- 

• Lib. Domefday. " Pat. 34 Hen. VIII. p. 11. 'See page 237. ' Taxat. Spiritual. » Ibid. 

mounted 



286 p I T M I N S T E R. [Caunton^Dcait* 

mounted by a neat fpire. Tlie prefent church is not ancient, having been raifed on 
the ruins of a very old one fuppofed to have been built in Saxon times, the name of the 
village indicating fuchkn edifice exifting at that early period. 

At the eaft end of the chancel is a large handfome tomb of alabafter, having a cir^ 
cular arched canopy divided into fquare compartments, coloured blue, with gilt rofes 
in the centres. On this tomb lies a man in compleat armour, with his lady by his 
fide. On the front are three boys and three girls kneeling on cufhions, and between 
them is a black tablet with this infcription: 

" Johanni Coles, armigero, pacis confervatori integerrimo, ac in agro Somerfetenfi 
loci tenentis deputato celeberrimoj viro ornatiffimo; ac Anns uxori fuae pijffims pla- 
cidiflims; Johannis Thynne, de prenobili ftirpe Botevillorum, equitis aurati illuftrif- 
fimi, filise: parentibus chariffimis hie infimul confopitis. Johannes Coles, armiger, 
corporum, virtutum ac terrarum, hasres masftiflimus, hoc qualecunqj amoris ergo (proK 
<k)lor) pofuit. 

" To earth and ftones confinde, cache by cache other. 

Lies here a hufband, father, wife, and motherj 

Yet all but one, as man and wife are one. 

Hymen and love make perfedl union. 

They ly vde, they lovde, they dyed, and nowe behold ! 

One' tombe holdes both, whom erft one bedd did hold. 

Tho' men imagine they are dead and gone. 

They fhall out-live this monument of ftone. 

Eternal night, fliort daye, fliort night, and then 

Eternal daye fhutts in the courfe of men. 

Whoe from vafte nothinge, as from death proceedinge, 

Live, die, and live, and death and life fucceedinge. 

Before, in after time, our richeft treafure 

Are uniformde in number, weight, and meafure. 

Thus God hath man and all man's changes framde 

By juft proportion lawe eternall namde. 

Yet this the bodye only comprehends, 

Whofe weaker fabricke both begins and ends. 

The divine foul's refultinge fubftance flies 

On angel's wings to heav'n and never dies. 

On the fouth fide of the chancel is another large and handfome tomb of alabafl:er, on 
which are the effigies of a man in armour, and his lady by his fide. On the fide of the 
tomb are four children kneeling on cufliions. Above is this infcription: 

" Be wee followers of John Colles, of Barton in the countie of Somerfet, efqj and in 
commiffion for the peace there; whoe by his wife Elizabeth, daughter and heyre to 
Humferie Windham, efq; had ifllie one fonne, John, (who dyed an infant) and fower 
<iaughters, Elizabeth, Margeret, Anne, and Dorothie. He died aged forty-five yeers, 
S^pt. 3, A. bom. 1627. 

« This 



cauntott'Dean.] 



PITMINSTER. 



287 



*< This Holy Goofte tempel, refolved to dufte, 

Shewes whither all human perfedlion muft. 

Hee that refolv'd it will thefe ruins rayfe 

To far more beauty and eternal dayes. , 

This ftru6lure fhewes the model of much grace, 

"Which the architect did in that fair pile place. 

The tenant fowle dwells with her landlord, till 

He reare her howfe, and covenants all fullfill. 

The quenched Colles Ihall quenchlefs heate refume. 

To rayfe from love's incenfe prayfe's perfume." 

On another tablet: 
*• Artd view the excellences of the faid Elizabeth the only wife and wife only of the 
faid John Colles, who living his forrowful widdow feaven yeares, and having carefully 
and plentifully provided for all her daughters, (whereof the youngeft cut off her mo- 
therly intentions in her untimely death) living a fit example of virtuous and conftant 
piety, with the fame fame departed, aged 48, A. D. 1634. 

" The mirror of her fex throughout her life. 
Borne a rich Jicire, a mayd admired, a wife 
Beyond example; in her children bleft. 
Who fucking goodnefs from her virtuous breftj 
Spake her ajoyous mother; pyetie 
Gave inward beauty, to her charitye 
An outward luftre j mind and body faire 
Made in this happy faint a glorious paire. 
This monument her fame, this ground her duft 
Prefervesj her foule 's enthron'd among the juft." 

On the fame fide of the chancel is another tomb, with an effigy of a man lying 
thereon. 

One of the ailes in this church is called Pomidisford die, and was the burial-place of 
the family of Hill, who had that manor during its fequeftration from the bifhoprick 
of Winchefter. 




RIMPTON, 



[ 288 ] [Caunton^Dean* 



R I M P T O N. 

THIS parlfli lies detached, and at a great diftance from the other parts of the hun- 
dred, being fix miles northeaft from Yeovil, and about two northweft from 
Sherborne in Dorfetfhire. The reafon of this fpot being annexed to the hundred of 
Taunton, is, that the manor has been from very ancient time part of the eftate of the 
bifhoprick of Winchefter, and the tenants were formerly bound to do their fuit at the 
Bifhop's court in Taunton. It has this defcription in the Norman record: 

" The fame Bifliop holds Rintone. Stigand held it in the time of King Edward, 
** and gelded for five hides. The arable is five carucates. Thereof are in demefne 
" two hides, and one virgate and a half of land, and there are three carucates, and two 
" fervants, and eight villanes, and feven cottagers, with three ploughs. There are ten 
" acres of meadow. Wood four furlongs long, and one furlong broad. It was and is 
** worth feven pounds.'" 

In which bifhoprick of Winchefter does this manor remain vefted to this day. 

The benefice, which is reftorial and in the deanery of Marfton, was valued in 1 292 
at eighteen marks.** The Bifhop of Winchefter is patron, and the Rev. Francis Crane 
Parfons the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Mary, and is a fmall Gothick ftrufture, confifting 
of a nave, chancel, and fouth aile; at the weft end is an embattled tower containing 
three bells. 

This parifh has five donations of 5I. each, the intereft of which is annually paid to 
the fecond poor, at the difcretion of the minifter, churchwardens and overfeers. 

The annual average of chriftenings is fix, the burials three. 

There is a fmall hamlet in this parifh called Woodhouse, confifting of three houfes, 

• Lib. Domefday. » Taxat. Spiritual. 



R U I S H T O N, or R I S T O N, 

IS three miles eaft from Taunton, on the river Tone which divides this parifh from 
Monkton and Creech St. Michael, and has over it a county bridge. The whole 
parifli contains about one thoufand acres, and the lands are nearly equally divided 
betMcen pafture and tillage. 

A mile foutheaft of the church is the tithing of Henlade, in which is the feat of 
Robert Proftor Anderdon, efq; very pleafantly fituated near the turnpike-road from 
Taunton to London, by way of Salifbury. 

The 



Caunton^Dean.] 



R U I S H T O N. 



289 



The parilh of Ruifliton is part of the manor of Taunton-Dean, being cuftomary lands 
of inheritance held under the Bi(hop of Winchefter; on which account it is not parti- 
cularly noted in the Conqueror's fui-vey. 

With regard to ecclefiaftical matters, ic was anciently dependant on the church of St. 
Mary Magdalen in Taunton; but is now a curacy, of wliich the Rev. George Davis is 
the prefent incumbent. 

The church (dedicated to St. George) is a fmall, but venerable ancient edifice, con- 
fiding of a nave, chancel, and fouth aile, all covered with tile. At tiie weft end is an 
old tower fifty-fix feet high, embellifhed with many Gothick pinnacles at the angles ; 
but the top is quite plain, and apparently never finifhed according to the original plan. 
This tower contains a clock and three bells. The font is very ancient, lined with lead^ 
and fiipported by five Gothick pillars. The fouth aile is die property of Robert Prodor 
Anderdon, eli^. 

This church contains no infcriptions of any confequence; but in the church-prd are 
two tombs and a head-ftone to the memory of many branches of the family of Proftor,. 
the oldeft infcription being to the memory of John Prodor, who died June 21, 162 1,. 
Near the tombs is the family vault. 

Here are the remains of an old ftone crols. 



STAPLEGROVE. 



THIS alfo is a member of die manor of Taunton, and was a chapelry thereto, til! 
erefled into a diftinft parifli in the year 1554. It is fituated on the weft fide of 
Taunton, and is divided into two tithings, Staplegrove and Whitemore, the laft 
being a hamlet half a mile eaftward from the parifti church, containing five houfes. 

A mile towards the northeaft is Filly-Street, another hamlet, containing 1 1 houfes. 

In Staplegrove are two mills, one of which is turned by a ftream which has its rife at 
Crowcombe, and after pafiing through this parifti, falls into the river Tone. This 
ftream parts the parifli of Staplegrove from that of Norton-Fitzwarren, and crofies the 
turnpike-road to Milverton, under a ftone bridge of two arches. Another rivulet rifing 
at Heftercombe turns the other mill here, and empties itfelf into the Tone near Taunton 
bridge. A confiderable quantity of flax is raifed in this parifti, and the lands are chiefly 
arable. Here is a great deal of white popple, and brown grit ftone, and this part of 
the country abounds alfo with a coarfe brown agate. 

The priors of Taunton had in this place a fmall grange with a cell or oratory, which.- 
laft is ftill ftanding at the fouthweft corner of the church-yard. 

To the northeaft of Staplegrove, but in the parifti of Taunton St. James, is 
Pyrland, the feat of Sir William Yea, brat, who is defcended from David Yea, of 

Vol. III. P p Sturminfter- 



290 s T A P L E G R o V E. ICauntoivDcan. 

Sturminfter-Marflial in the county of Dorfet, efq; who married Urfula daughter of 
Edward Hobbes, of Bronapton-Ralph and Stoke-Courcy in this county, efq; by whom 
he had iffue one fon, 

David Yea, of Oakhampton and Brompton-Ralph, efqj who was high-fherifF for this 
«c6unty. ' He married Dorothy, youngeft daughter and coheir of William Lacy, of 
Hartrow and Elworthy,'efq; and had iflue one fon, David, and three daughters, Mary, 
Jenny, and Dorothy. 

David only fon of the faid David Yea, efq; ferved the office of high-fherifF for this 
county, and was one of his Majefty's juflices of the peace for the fame. He married 
Joan daughter and heir of Nathaniel Brewer, of Tolland, efq; defccnded from the 
Brewers of Chard in this county. They had ifTue four fons and five daughters, viz, 
David, the eldefl, who died in December 1758; Thomas, the fecond, who died un- 
married; William, the third, who fucceeded to the eflate; and Robert, who died an 
infant. The daughters' names were, Mary, Dorothy, Jenny, Betty, and Sally. 

William, the third and only furviving fon of David Yea, efq; was created a baronet 
June i3, 1759, 33 Geo. II. he ferved the office of high-fherifF in 1760, and is one of his 
Majefly's juflices of the peace for this county. He married Julia eldefl daughter of 
Sir George Trevelyan, of Nettlecombe, bart. by whom he has feveral children. His 
arms are. Quarterly, i. Fert, arampafTant, argent. 1. Gules y two rams wavy ermine. 
3. Gules, two bends wavy or, a chief vaire. 4. As the firfl. 

The living is a reflory in the deanery of Taunton. The late Rev. James Minifie 
•was both patron and incumbent. 

The church confifls of a nave, chancel, and two fide ailes, with a fmall plain tower at 
the wefl end of the fouth aile containing five bells. This aile and tower feem to havfe 
been the original church, the other part being in a different ftile of building, and 
evidently more modern. 

On the north fide of the nave is a neat mural monument of white marble infcribed, — 
"Propter hunc parietem cineres reponuntur Jacobi Minifie, hujus parochise olim 
mercatoris. Uxorcm duxjt Mariam, fiham unicam Gulielmi Morfe, de Norton- 
Fitzwarren, generofi; ex qua reliftis tribus pofl fe liberis, obijt anno aetatis 69, falutis 
1725." Arms, Vert, a chevron or, between three annulets argent; impaling argent, a 
i)ugle-horn/«^/(f in bafe, in chief three yew-trees proper. 




STOKE 



Caumon-'Dean.] [ 291 ] 



STOKES T. MARY. 

THIS fmall parifli lies three miles nearly foiith from Taunton, in a very pleafant 
fituation, under the weftern ridge of a confiderable hill clothed with a fine wood. 
There are two hamlets, viz. 

1. Stoke-Hill, containing fix houfes, 

2. Broughton, one mile and a half fouthweft from the church, in which are 
three houfes. 

This place was anciently written Stocha, and it was one of thofe which did all the 
cuftomary fervices to the manor of Taunton, which are recited in the account of that 
extenfive lordfiiip, except that of fending men to the army with the vaflTals of the 
Bifliopof Winchefter. Why it was exempt from this fervice does not appear; per- 
haps the place was nearly in a manner depopulated at that period j. and the lofs of a 
few men- might have been materially felt in the cultivation of the lands of the village. 

It would be tedious and unneceflary to refurvey the Wintonian hiftory of Taunton 
In the account of the feveral villages, which did anciently and do now compofe that 
manor; becaufe moft of the circumftances which refpedt one are equally applicable to 
all. It may however be obferved that the Bifhops of Winchefter had a charter of 
free-warren, and all other manerial privileges within their territories, which, with very 
little alienation, have defcended through the feveral prelates of that fee from a very 
early date before the Norman invafion to the prefent day, in the fame extended right 
of pofi*effion. 

The benefices of this parifh and Thurlbury are an united redory in the gift of Henry 
William Portman, efq. The Rev. Charles Ruffell is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is a fmall ftrudture of one pace, with a tower at the weft end containing- 
three bells. On the floor is this infcription: 

" Here lyeth the body of Mary the wife of William Doble, gent, who died Od. 25, 
'673, aged 41. Alfo of William Doble, gent, who died May 9, 1687, aged 63. 
Alfo of Philip Doble their fon, who died July 14, 1708, aged 54." Arms, Sable, a. 
doe paffant between three bells argent. 

Stoke-House is the feat of William Doble Burridge, efq. 




P p 2 TOLLAND 



[ 292 ] i^mmon-'lDmh 



TOLLAND 

IS fituated at the northwcft angle of the hundred, towards that of Williton-Free- 
manors, and a mile fouthward from the turnpike -road leading from Taunton to 
Dunfter. It ftands in a rich, woody, and well- watered vale, furrounded with hills finely 
cultivated. Eaftward from the church is a fine hanging wood which clothes the fteep 
flope of a pretty high hill, and has a pleafing appearance. This whole parifh is rented 
at about five hundred pounds per annum, and confifts of only twelve houfesj four of 
which are in the hamlet of East-Toll an d. The lands are moftly arable ; the general 
crops wheat, barley, peas, and fome flax. A fpring rifing at North-Combe in the 
parifh of Brompton-Ralph, runs through and turns a grift-mill in this parifli, whence 
it pafles through Lydiard St. Laurence, and empties itfelf into the Tone. The crofs 
roads here are very deep, narrow, precipitous, and overhung with hedges. 

The manor of Tolland, anciently written Taland and Talanda, was held of the 
bifhoprick of Winchefter by the families of Gaunt and Luttrell, lords of Eaft-Quan- 
tockfhead, and was given in the time of Henry III. by Andrew Luttrell, together 
with the manors of Quantock, Bagborough, and Begarn-Huilh, to Alexander his 
younger fon." Since which it has had a variety of poflelTors, and now belongs to the 
executors of th^ late Lady Horner, of Mclls, who gave it in truft for the augmentation 
of fmall livings. 

Garldon, or Garmilden, an ancient manor in Tolland, belonged 7 Eliz. to 
Francis Southwell, elq.** 

Ralph Briwere, the fon of William Briwere, gave the church of Tolland to the 
priory of Buckland," and in 1335 the faid church was rated at three marks.*" It is a 
reftory in the deanery of Dunfter, and in the gift of the crown. The Rev. Edward 
Crofle is the prefect incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. John the Baptift, and is a fmall building, confifting 
of a nave, chancel, and a fmall aile on the north fide. At the weft end is a cl«mfy 
cmbatded tower thirty feet high, containing three fmall bells. 

In the church-yard are the remains of an old ftone crofs. 
•MS. Palmer. 'MS. Carew. • Mon. Angl.ii. 55:1. " Excerpt, c Regift. Wellen. 




TRULL. 



J 



Caimton'aDcatt.] 



[ 293 ] 



R 



u 



L 



L. 



THIS village is fituated two miles fouth from Taunton, and betwixt that town and 
Pitminfter, towards the Blackdown-hills. The parifh is woody, and rather flat, 
the foil rich, well watered, and abounding with fine elm. It contains about one hundred 
houfes, mofl of which are fcattered round the church. 

In this place was born, A. D. 1588, George Bond, fon of Robert Bond, who by 
great induftry in trade, and confiderable talents, amafled a large fortune, was made a 
knight, and lord-mayor of the city of London j to which he became afterwards a great 
benefadlor. Dyonifia, daughter and coheir of this Sir George, was married to Sir 
Henry Winfton, of Standifli in the county of Gloucefter, and had by him Sarah her 
daughter and coheir, married to John Churchill, of Mintern in the county of Dorfet, 
efq; father of Winfton Churchill, and grandfatlier of John Churchill the great Duke 
of Marlborough. 

The following authentick account of a remarkable inftance of longevity in this 
parifli is extrafted from the Bath Chronicle. 

** Being laft fummer in the parifli of Trull, near Taunton, curiofity led me to vifit 
an ancient woman who is now in the 115th year of her age. Her name is Elizabeth 
Broadmead, (formerly Rottenborough) and the daughter of a little farmer who bore 
arms at the battle of Sedgmoor, when the Duke of Monmouth's army was defeated 
there in 1683; at which time flie was 15 years old, and left by her father at home to 
take care of the family, and bring the produce of the farm to the camp or Taunton 
market. To this account of her age the parifli regifter gives indubitable teftimony. 
About four years fince flie became incapable of walking, and loft the ufe of her right 
arm ; fbon after this ftie loft her fight, and became too deaf to hear and underftand, 
unlefs fpoken to very near, and with a confiderable exertion of voice. She is about 
the middle ftature, and has ftrong features. Her nofe has been large, and projeds con- 
fiderably at the end; and her voice, though now reduced to a trc'ble, has been ftrongi 
harfli, and mafculine. Till within five or fix years her memory has been tolerably good, 
and enabled her to relate the particulars of many events within her own knowledge, 
at, and even before, the time of Monmouth's defeat. Being blind, fhe did not perceive 
my entering the room, and for a while I refrained from fpeaking, that I might fee her 
free from all reftraint. It was her dinner timej and flie was fitting by the fire with a 
fmall table before her, on which was an earthen pan with fome cut pieces of boiled 
meat and bread in it. This flie ate with an apparently good appetite, feeding herfelf 
with her left hand. Though her teeth were gone, fhe chewed her food a little, and 
fwallowed it pretty quick. When flie opened her lips to take a morfel, I obferved her 
tongue wouW frequently fall out, and feemed very thick, and too big for her mouth. 
Her complexion was rather dark, her eyes languid, but the lines of feature were ftill 
ftrong; and 1 fliould not, from her countenance merely, have fuppofed her more than 
70, or at moft 80 years old. She often complains of being in pain, and wiihes for 

death. 



294 



R u L L. l^mntovi'lDun, 



death. She frequently groans, but it appears to be more from habit than any other 
caufe. She has a daughter living with her, who is between 70 and 80 years of age. 
After fbme little converfation, the old woman fung us a ftanza of a fong made in her 
youthj but very juftly obferved, as an apology for herfelf, that herfmging days were now 
over. Although in very indigent circumftances, Ihe is decently fupported with every 
neceffary, by Henry Whitmarlh, efqj (a gentleman who lives near her) and fome 
other kind neighbours; and there appears no figns of a fpeedy diffolution.'" 

The living of Trull is an impropriate curacy in the gift of Goodenough Earle, efq. 
The Rev. Michael Dickfon is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to All-Saints. It is a neat building, compofedof a nave,, 
chancel, fide ailes, and tower with five bells. The pulpit, which is of wood, is half a 
pentagon, each fide being a nich embellifhed with Gothick ornaments, and filled with a 
ftatue; and above, and between thefe are fourteen fmaller ftatues, curioufly carved. la 
the eaft window are thefe arms, Argent, a fefl"e between three torteaux. 

• She died a few months after this account. 



WILTON 

FORMS a confiderable fuburb to Taunton on the fouth, and comprifes the hamlets of 
I. G ANTON, fituated half a mile fouthweft from the church, and containing three 
farms and two cottages. 

2. Sherford, the fame diftance fouth, in which are twenty dwellings; with the feats 
of Sir Benjamin Hamett, knt. and Welman, efq. 

Two fmall ftreams traverfe this parilb, one rifing in Pitminfter, and the other near 
Buckland, towards their influx into the river Tone. The ftone raifed here is a coarfe 
brown agate, variegated with rufl-coloured veins, and is of great hardnefs. The lands 
are rich and fertile, and all the environs of the town of Taunton feem profufely fijr- 
nilhed with the munificence of nature. A manufacture of duroys, druggets. &c. 
employs a confiderable number of the inhabitants. The county gaol was eredted here 
A.D. 1755. 

The church is a fmall Gothick edifice, dedicated to the honour of St. George, to 
whom a remarkable well in this village was anciently dedicated, and vifited by devotees 
and pilgrims from diftant parts, who received their entertainment at an holpital built 
here for that purpofe by one of the Bifhops of Winchefter. From which well this 
fpot originally derived the names of Welton and "Wilton, [Saxon, Fell-ron] and Fons- 
SanEii Georgii. A number of other fountains in this county were patronifed by the 
fame Saint, at which, according to the cuftom of fuperftitious ages, oblations and 
religious honours were paid, and miracles performed. This Saint was a native of 

Cappadocia, 



CauntomDcan.] w i L T o N. 295 

Cappadocia, and fuffered martyrdom in defence of the Chriftlan religion under the 
Emperor Dioclefian, A. D. 290. According to the Romifh legends, when Robert 
Duke of Normandy, fon of William the Conqueror, in the profecution of his viftories 
againft the Turks, was laying fiege to the city of Antioch, in which many of our 
Englilh heroes were engaged j and when, after feveral unfuccefsful attacks, the united 
forces of the Chriftians received a fudden damp from the news of the approiich of a 
large body of the Saracens on their march to relieve the citadel; the vifion of this 
Saint fuddenly appeared, attended by an innumerable army on the hills, arrayed in 
white, and wearing a red crofs upon his banner, to reinforce the army of the faithfulj 
who, animated with the fight, and confident of fuccefs, renewed their afl"ault with frefh 
vigour, and made themfelves mafters of the town. Hence accrued that honour with 
which Britifli militants in all ages have aggrandized this Saint, as their chief patron, 
the patron of Chriftianity, who by his powerful influence could thus fignally detrude 
and trample on the enemies of Chrift's religion. 

The chapel of Wilton was formerly ferved by the vicar of the church of St. Mary 
Magdalen in Taunton; but. the place being in latter times erefted into a parifh, the 
living has become a curacy, of which the Rev. Michael Dickfon is the prefent 
incumbent. 

The church is fmall, confifting of a nave, chancel, fide ailes, and tower at the weft 
end, containing five bells; and is only remarkable for a fine altar-piece, reprefenting 
our Saviour bleffing the bread and wine, which was prefented to the church by Sir 
Benjamin Hammett, knt. one of the reprefentatives in parliament for the borough 
of Taunton. 



I 



WITHIEL-FLORY. 

THE laft parifh in this hundred is Withiel-Flory, fituated in a flat under Brendon- 
Hill, at a very confiderable diftance from the other component parts thereof, 
being entirely infulated by the hundreds of Williton-Freemanors and Carhampton ; 
but anciently attached to this by its lords the Floris, of Combe and Ninehead. Of 
this family, as well as that of the Wykes, their fucceflTors, and the fubfequent owners 
of this parifli, notice has already been taken in the account of Ninehead, where, and 
in this place, they alternately had their refidence. The prefent lord of this manor is 
Sir James Langham, bart. 

A very neat houfe and gardens in this parifli belong to Thomas Stawel, efq. 

The church was anciently appropriated to the priory of Taunton, and was in 1 292 
rated at five marks.' It is a curacy in the deanery of Dunfter, and in the gift of the 
family of Bryant. The Rev. Samuel Knight is the prefent incumbent. 

• Taxat. Spiritual. 

The 



296 



WITHIEL-FLORY. 



[Caunton^Dean* 



The church, which is dedicated to St. Mary Magdalen, is a fmall ftrufture, fituated 
on an eminence, and nearly furrounded by trees. It is of a fingle aile fixty-two feet 
long, and fourteen widci at the weft end is a tower with three bells. 

Ao-ainft the north wall of the chancel is a neat marble monument, infcribed,— — 
" Nwr this place lyeth the body of James Bryant, gent, who died Od. 30, 1733, 
aged 77. And alfo the body of Jane his wife, wl>o died the aSth of Dec. 1729, 
aged 45." 




THE 



[ ^97 ] 



*%'^^*^*^>*<^^^^-^'^*^'>^^M^^y^,^^^^^^^^ 



THE HUNDRED 



O F 



TINTINHULL 



Is fituated between the hundred of Somerton on the north, and the hundreds of 
Houndfborough, Berwick, and Coker, on the fouth. It had its name from an 
eminence anciently called rutendk, now TintinhiU, where the courts were 
formerly held. This name is itfelf derived from the Saxon Cotran, which 
fignifies to examine or fpeculate, and is ftUl preferved in many eminences' in this 
county, as Cleve-root in the pari(h of Yatton, and Fairy-Toot in the parifh of Nemnet, 
&c. thofe being confpicuous elevations, whence in times of war furvey was wont to be 
taken of diftant parts, in order to a defence againfl: an approaching enemy. 

This whole hundred (which 14 Henry II. was fined forty /hillings for a murder") 
including the village of its name, was given by WiUiam earl of Morton to the monks 
of Montacute. 

• M»g. Rot. 14 Hen. II. Rot. 10. b. 



IVELCHESTER. 

'T^HIS very ancient town, which has fcarcely left above ground fufEcient veftlges to 
JL teftify its former greatnefs, is fituated in a flat luxuriant foil upon the river IveJ, 
the ancient Velox of Ravennas, at the diftance of eighteen miles fouth from the city of 
Wells, and twelve north from the town of Crewkerne. It is indifi^erently built, and ia 
compofedoffourftreets,viz. Alms-houfeor Foffe-ftreet, Church-ftreet, Back-Lane, 
and Borough-Green. The river bounds it on die north, and has over it a ftone bridge 
of two large arches. The old bridge was conltruftcd of icvcn arches,* 



Vol. III. 



* Lei. Itin. ii. 90; 



The 



298 I V E L c H E s T E R, [C(mm!)un» 

The Britifh name of this place, according to Nennius,*" was Ca(t#enfatlClCOit, 
which fignifies the city at the head of the river's mouth in the wood, whence the 
Greeks called it I(r;^jaX<?, and it is ranked by Ptolemy, in his geography of Britain,' the 
firft town in the territory of the Belgas: 

Toii St AcCavoTs, BEAFAI, zcti •jroXa?, 

Toocrcc ^sp[A,oc, 

Its Roman name was Ifchalis, and it was one of the mofl eminent ftations that people 
pofleffed in all thefe parts. It was by them environed with a ftrong wall and deep 
ditch, which originally was filled with water from the river. Its form was an oblong 
Iquare, Handing upon the oblique points of the compafs, the Fofle-road pafllng through 
it from northeaft to fouthweft. The veftiges both of the wall and the ditch are in 
piany places ftill difcernible, the former being regularly compofed of ftone and brick- 
work intermingled. The ditch on the northweft fide forms a road anciently called 
Zercle, now Yard-lane, whence it runs through the Friary garden, and turning the 
anole, crofles the Foffe and the gardens at the back part of the town, where the wall is 
frequently difcovered by the gardeners. Near it and within its whole enceinte have 
been found in almoft every period Roman hypocaufts and baths; gold, filver, and 
copper coins, particularly of Antoninus Pius, (on the reverie of fome of which is 
Britannia fitting on a rock) of Trajan and Vefpafian; urns, lachrymals, teflelated 
pavements, (one of them preferved in the garden of the late Thomas Lockyer, efq;"*) 
fibulas, bracelets, pateras, and almoft every other relique of Romanity. Vaft arches, 
and immenfe foundations of ancient buildings lie beneath the furface of the ground, 
and the entire fcite of the old city is filled with fubterraneous ruins. There exifts a 
tradition that it owed its demolition to fire, by matches tied to the tails of Ijjarrows, 
let fly from Stannard Crofs-hill. The FofiTe-road was here paved with large fiag-ftones> 
fome of which are ftill vifible in the old ford through the river near the bridge. 

The Saxons denominated the place Cipelecej-cjie, or the fortified city upon the Ivel, 
and the Roman works not being totally erafed, ferved them in their rencounters with, 
the Britons and the Danes. At the coming in of the Normans it was a city offuch 
confiderable note as to contain within its walls one hundred and feven burgefl"es, who 
ftood at a yearly rent to the king of twenty ftiillings. There was alfo a marker, the 
revenue whereof with its appertenances was eleven pounds per annum; and of the third 
penny or part of the fines and other profits and emoluments arifing from the county 
courts, the fum of fix pounds was accounted for to the crown for this borough.* 
About this time Ivelchefter feems to have retained its original ftrength and confequence 

' Hiftoria Britonum, Havniae, p. 144, « Book ii. chap. 3. tab. i.. 

* The houfe Ltely inhabited by this gentleman is an ancient ftruilure ftanding upon fubterraneous arches^ 
»nd has very lofty cylindrical chimnies of excellent mafonry. 

'. Lib, Domefday. 

in 



CiiUinljuU.] 



IVELCHESTER. 



299 



in point of military concerns, having round it ftrong walls and large fortifications. 
For here it was that A. D. 1088, the forces of Geffrey biihop of Coutances, and 
William de Ewe, who had joined with Odo bifliop of BayeuXj Euftace count of Bou- 
logne, Robert earl of Morton, and other confederate barons, to depofe King William 
Rufus, and in his ftead to place his brother Robert duke of Normandy upon the 
throne, after having ravaged the counties of Wilts and Gloucefter witJi unimpeded 
fuccefs, received fuch an effectual check from the bravery of the befieged inhabitants, 
as threw a fatal damp on all their future enterprifes. From which time and circum- 
ftance the town of Ivelchefter may perhaps date the asra of its provincial aggrandife- 
ment. In the year 1203, King John granted to the burgeffes the whole borough, with 
all its appendages and privileges; the hundred of Stone, and the villages oi Hewardf- 
wyke and Hycinge, in confideration of a fee-farm rent of thiity pounds per annum/ 
This rent being by them confidered as exorbitant, in regard they had been abridged of 
ibme part of their ancient pofle(nons,'was in procefs of time reduced to the fiim of 
20I. 15s. 6d. and granted at different times as a gratuity to various branches and fa- 
vourites of the crown.'' A. D. 13 14, 8 Edw. II. the burgeffes preferred a petition to 
parliament that the county meetings might he held in their town, according to the 
ancient ufage, and not in Somerton, where they were then held to the difparagement of 
this ancient place.'' This petition does not appear to have been then granted; but in 
the enfuing reign, 40 Edw. III. a patent was iffued for the holding the county courts 
and the county affizes here, and in no other place within the county whatfoever;' as 
alfo for the repairing the ftreets and highways in and about the town of Ivelchefter/ In 
this and the two preceding reigns the town returned members to parliament, com- 
jnencing to do fo 26 Edw. I. but 34 Edw. III. this privilege was refcinded, nor 
reftored till 12 Edw. IV. when, after partaking a fmall fliare of parliamentary affairs, 
it again intermitted till the year 1621, and was then by James I. re-admitted to this 
honour. The natives at large paying fcot and lot are the eleftors; the number of 
voters is about two hundred and fifty. The corporation confifts of a bailiff, twelve 
burgeffes, a conftable, and fub-bailiff. The ftaft'or mace is a very curious piece of 
antiquity, the head being of brafs gilt, adorned with the images of two kings, a queen, 
and an angel. Round the bafe is this poefie in old French : 

3i€^0 ^<B DiRe <ZE1R3I€, 

;*. e. I Jesus was of God, notwithstanding the gift vtas ill received. 

The arms of the town are, in a crefcent an etoile of fixteen points. 

The market here (though of which there are now but fmall remains) has exifted 
ever fince the Conqueft, being kept on the Wednefday; and there were three fairs,' viz. 
on St. John's day, St. Mary Magdalen's day, and the Monday before Palm-Sunday. 
A fair is now held on March 25, for horfes, horned cattle, and Iheep. The original 

' Cart. Antiq. ' Ibid. * Petit, in Parliament. ' Pat. 40 Ed. III. p. 1 . m. 29 in dors. 

* Ibid. m. 14 in dors, ' Cotton MS. Julius F. vi. 



Q^q2 



manufadure 



300 I V E L C H E S T E R. [CintinfeuU^ 

manufadure of this town was thread lace, which of late years has greatly deelined. A 
filk manufadure has recently been introduced with fome profpeft of fuccefs. 

The publick buildings of this town are but few. The hall, wherein the county 
court is held, is a good building with a council-chamber. The original county gaol is 
faid to have ftood near the old town-wall eaftward from the church, which being de- 
ftroyed, another was eresfled near the bridge, on the fcite (as tradition affirms) of an 
ancient caftle built to guard the pafs through the river Ivel. This is now fuperftded 
by a new gaol built upon the modern improved plan. 45 Edw. III. the cuftody 6f 
the old gaol was granted for life to Richard Porter."" Other grants of this kind were 
made 1 and 13 Henry IV," 

Over againft the gaol, on the other fide of the river, fland the ruins of the ancient 
hofpital of White-hall, de Alba Aula, or Blaunchfak, founded to the honour of the Holy 
Trinity about A. D. 1226, by William Dacus or Dennis, and endowed with lands and 
tenements in Ivelchefter, Sock-Dennis, and Taunton, for the entertainment of pilgrims 
and poor travellers. In 1241, Bifhop Joceline appropriated to this hofpital the church 
of St. Mary Minor in this town, with the confent of the redlor and the abbot and con- 
vent of Cerne in Dorfetfhire, who were patrons of that church." Soon after which this 
houfe was converted into a nunnery, (ftill however retaining a hall, chapel, and other 
diftinft accommodations for pilgrims) and was governed by a priorefs, ftiled PrioriJJa de 
.Alba Atda, and PrioriJJa de Blaunchfale, in Ivelchefter. By an inquifition taken fo early 
as 9 Edw. I. it was found that the priorefs and nuns of Blaunchfale were poflefled of 
two melTuages and four acres of land in Ivelchefter.'' 

Of this houfe Alicia de Zerde ]Tard in Ivelchefter] was priorefs in the years 1315 
and 1 3 1 6 J and Walter de Wobourne was then warden of the hofpital.* 

Alicia de Chilthorne was expelled in 1 325. Sir Nicholas de Bonville was then patron, 

Cecilia de Draycot was priorefs Aug. 7, 1335. 

Soon after this it became a free chapel, and was ftiled Libera Capella de Whitehall, ta 
■which King Henry VI. Nov. 29, 1485, prefented William Ellyot, a clerk iachancery, 
upon the death of John Banys.' 

March 10, 1497, Biftiop Oliver King collated to it by kpfe» 

■A-ug. 30j I5i9> Richard biftiop of London, Edmund biftiop of Sarum, Sir John. 
Fineux, knt. chief juftice of the common-pleas, Sir John Nevil, knt. lord of Aberga- 
venny, and Sir Robert Poyntz, knt. feoffees of Henry Stafford earl of Wilts,, prefented 
to this chapel, as they did again in 1525.' 

In 1534, it was valued at 16I. 9s. 9^d.' The laft incumbent thereof was George 
Carewe, who in 1 553 had a penfion on account of it of 61. 1 3s. 4d.'* 42 Eliz, the free 

"■ Pat. 45 Ed. III. p. 2. m. 38. - Pat. 1 Hen. IV. p. 4. m. 5. Pat. 13 Hen. IV. m. 12, 

' . ° Archer from the Regifters of Wells, p Efc. 9 Ed. I. 

of*Ch *' ^ ^^' ^^' ^' ^' "*■ ''• ^^^ ™^"°'' «f Y A R D in Ivelchefter was part of the eftate of the Lords Bonville 

'Archer. 'Ibid. 'Ibid. " Willis's Hifl. of Abbies, ii, 202. 

chapel 



CintfntJUU.] I V E L C H E S T E R. jof 

chapel of Whitehall, and the free chapel of tJie Holy Trinity of Whitehall, with lands 
and tenements in Ivelchefter, Northover, Taunton, and Limington, were granted to 
Sir Michael Stanhope and his heirs, to be held of Eaft-Greenwich in free foccage." 
The houfe is now converted into a weaving fhop. 

Not far from it ftood a houfe of lepers, with a chapel adjoining to it, to which Hugh 
bilhop of Lincoln, in his will made A.D. 121 1, left three marks/ 

At the extremity of the Fofle-ftreet, and at the fouthweft angle of the city wall, are 
the remains of the Friary, or houfe of black friars, founded about the year 1 270. This 
building was in its original ftate large and handfome. The north tranfept of the 
church is Handing, and now ufed as a fpinning-houfc for the filk manufafture. In a 
parallel building in the Friary-court is an arched way, now nearly filled up, leading to a 
fubterraneous paflage betwixt this houfe and the Whitehall nunnery. This paflage is 
in many parts broken dirough, but in thofe that remain entire the vault is high enough 
for a man to walk upright in: there are niches or refting-places in the walls, and the 
floor is well paved with flag-ftones, 28 Henry VIII. Robert Sandwiche was prior 
of this houfe, which 37 Henry VIII. was granted to William Hodges. 

Oppofite to it is an almshoufe for fix poor men, and a woman to take care of the 
dwelling. They have two fhillings a week each, and new clothing annually. 

There have been a great number of churches in the town of Ivelchefter, of which 
we can recover the following names, viz. St. Andrew, St. Michael, St. Peter, St. 
Mary Major, St. Mary Minor, and St. John. The firft of thefe exifted before the 
time of the Norman invafion, and was held by Bri<5lric, a Saxon prelate, in the time of 
Edward the Confeflbr. But when William the Conqueror came to the crown, he be- 
ftowed all its lands and revenues upon his chaplain and chancellor Maurice, who was 
afterwards promoted to the fee of London. In the record of that age we have a minute 
account of its pofleffions. 

" Maurice the bifhop holds the church of St. Andrew of Givelcestre, with three 
*» hides of land of the King. This Bridtric held, in the time of King Edward, of the 
" church of Glaftingberie, and it could not be feparated from it.'" 

" Bilhop Maurice holds of the King the church of St. Andrew. Briftric held it in 
** the time of King Edward, and gelded for three hides. The arable is three carucates. 
*' In demefne are two carucates, and three fervants, and one villane, and fix cottagers, 
" with one plough. There is a mill of twenty fhillings rent, and thirty acres of 
*' meadow. It was and is worth one hundred fhillings."'' 

The abbot -and convent of Athelney were patrons of the church of St. Michael,'' 
which was a very ancient building, having under it a ftone gate arched and vaulted." 

St. Peter was a chapel to St. John, in which parifh the abbot of Muchelncy had a 
yearly revenue of 6s. the abbot of Sherborne 6s. and the prior of Montacute is."" 

» Pat. 42 Eliz. p. 19. > See the Wiliin vol. ii. p. 310. 

* Lib. Domefday. • Ibid. ' Regift. Abbat. de Athelney. ' Lcl. Ion. ii. 91 . " Taxat. Temporal. 

The 



302 I V E L C H E S T E R. [CintinbuU, 

The church or chapel of St. Mary Minor flood upon the bridge. Aug. 20, 1502, 
the'parifh-churches of St. Mary Minor, and St. John the Baptift, were united and 
annexed to the church of St. Mary Major, the profits and revenues of thofe feveral 
churches being found inadequate to the decent fupport of refpedive minifters at each. 
John Chaundeler was then reftor of St. John's."* 

The benefice of Ivelchefter is reftorial, in the deanery of its own denomination. 
The patronage is in the Bilhop of Bath and Wells, and the Rev. Mr. Davis is the 
prefcnt incumbent. 

Tlie only church now remalmng is dedicated to St. Mary,* and confifts of a nave, 
chancel, and north aile or chapel. At the weft end ftands an oftagonal tower of fifty 
feet high, containing a clock, and five bells. This tower is conftrufted of Roman ftone. 

Againft the fouth wall of the chancel is a ftone monument with this infcription :-- — 
« Neare this place lyeth buried the body of Mary Raymond, the late wife of William 
Raymond, deceafed, of this towne of Ivelchefter, and daughter of John Every, efq; 
fervant to King Henry the Vlllth, and fervant to Edward the Vlth, and fervant to 
Qiieene Mary, and ferjant at armes to Queene Elizabeth. Shee dyed the 2d day of 
Sept. An" i)ni 1639. Mors mihi lucrum eft." Arms, Or, four chevronels gules. 

On a fmall ftone againft the north wall of the nave " Neere to this place lyeth 

buried the body of William Raymond, of Ivelchefter, gent, who departed this life the 
loth day of September A° Dni 1625, being the 56th yeare of his age. In whofe 
memory Mary his wife, the daughter of John Every, of Charcomb in the county of 
Somerfet, efqj fergeant at armes, hath ereded this monument." 

« Mr. John Hodges, of Eaft-Quantockftiead in the county of Somerfet, gave to the 
poor of rfiis parifti and Nether-Stowey, the yearly profits of two tenements called 
Morejhead and Pophani^s-Hurft, both in Cannington, for all the refidue of the feveral 
terms mentioned in the leafes, to be diftributed yearly by the minifter and fix honeft 
and fubftantial men of each parifli, on the 20th day of December, between twelve poor 
perfons of each parjfti, as do not receive relief of their faid parifti, in fuch manner and 
proportion as they fhall think fit." 

Of the fuburbs of Ivelchefter, fome notice muft now be taken. 

Without the walls, towards Montacute, was an ancient village called Brook, or 
the ^rco/^,- whence a family of great antiquity derived the name o( At- Brook, and ^/tf 
la Brooke, this being the place of their ufual refidence. There are fome faint men- 
tions of this family in times approaching very near towards the Norman invafion ; but 
in the time of Henry IIL and Edw. I. we can fpeak with certainty of the owners 
of this place, who had tlierein manerial rights under the commonalty of the town of 
Ivelchefter. In thofe reigns lived William de la Brook, lord of the manor of the Brook 
juxta Ivelchefter, and had iflue Henry de la Brook, who married Nichola, the daughter 
pf Bryan Gonvile/ by whom he had iflue Henry de la Brook, whofe fon Henry died 



E. Regiftro Oliveri King. ' Efton fays St. John. 

^ Caftrated fheets of Holinlheds' Chronicle, reprinted 1723. 



18 Edw. 



CintinfjuU.] IVELCHESTER. 303 

18 Edw. II. leaving ifllie by Elizabeth his wife John de la Brook lord of this manor. 
Which John is fometimes called At-Brook, and is certified to hold at his death 
22 Edw. III. a mefluage with a curtillage and garden, and one carucate of land at the 
Brook without the walls of the town of Ivelcheller, of the commonalty of that town; 
and alfo lands in Sock-Dennis, Bifliopfton, and Kingfton,* He married Joan the 
daughter of Sir John Bardftone, knt. by whom he had iffue Sir Thomas Brook, knt. 
who 31 Edw. III. granted to Thomas Waryn and liis heirs a certain yearly rent of 20I. 
payable out of his lands and tenements in la Broke juxta Ivelchcfter, and in the town of 
Ivekhefter.*" He married Conftance the daughter of one Markensfeld, and dying 
41 Edw. III. left iflue by her Sir Thomas Brook his fon and heir. Which Sir Thomas 
married Joan fecond daughter and one of the heirs of Simon Hanape of Gloucefterlhire, 
and .widow of Robert Chedder, of the city of Briftol, efq. The faid Joan died 
15 Henry VI. feized of twenty manors in this county, befides feveral advowfons of 
churches, and large eftates which fhe had in dower from her former hufband.' By her 
fecond hufband fhe had iffue two fons. Sir Thomas Brook, and Michael: fhe lies buried 
with her faid hufband Sir Thomas Brook in the parifh-church of Thorncombe in the 
county of Devon, A. D. 1437.'' Sir Thomas Brook, eldeft fon of the lafl-mentioned 
Sir Thomas, married Joan the daughter of Sir Reginald Braybrook, knt. in whofe 
right he was by King Henry VI. created Lord Cobham, of Cobliam in Kent. By 
which Joan he had iffue eight fons, viz. Sir Edward Brook lord Cobham, who fuc- 
ceeded him, Thomas, John, Robert, and Peter, who all died without iffue, Reginald 
Brook of Apfale, Morgan Brook, who alfo died iffuelefs, and Hugh Brook; as alfo 
four daughters, viz. Elizabeth the wife of Sir John St. Maur, knt. Joan, married to 
John Carent, fon and heir of William Carent, efq; Margaret and Chriflian, who died 
without iffue.' Edward Brook lord Cobham, fon of the above-mentioned Thomas 
Brook lord Cobham, was a rigid Yorkifl, and was in 1454 at the firfl battle of St. 
Albans, and commanded the left wing of the York forces at the battle of Northampton, 
July 10, 1460. He died in 1464, 4 Edw. IV. feized of the manors of Brook- 
Ivelchefler, Lufton, Sewardfwicke, and Grubbefwick; and alfo of lands and tenements 
in Sevenhampton, Brook-Montacute, and Chard, leaving John Brook lord Cobham 
his fon and heir." Which John ferved Edw. IV. Ric. III. and Henry VII. in feveral 
military expeditions, and died 2a Henry VII. He married Margaret daughter of 
Edward Neville lord Abergavenny," by whom he had iffue Thomas Brook lord 
Cobham, who 5 Henry VIII. attended that King at the fiege of Tournay in France. 
He died in 1529, and was buried with his father in the collegiate church of Cobham in 
the county of Kent." By Dorothy his wife, the daughter of Sir Henry Heydon, knt. 
he had iffue George Brook lord Cobham, who was a knight of the garter in the time 
of Edw. VI. and dying 1558, left iffue eight fons, viz. Sir William Brook, knr. 
George, Thomas, John, Henry, Thomas the younger, Edmund, and Edward; and 
two daughters, Elizabeth fecond wife of William Parr marquis of Northampton, and 
Catherine. William Brook lord Cobham, fon of George, was embaffador to the 
King of Spain in the firfl year of Queen Elizabeth, and was alfo a knight of the garter. 

• Efc. - Rot. Claus. 31 Ed. III. ' Efc. » Holinmed ut fupra. ' ]bid. 

" Efc. ° Dugd. Bar. ii. 28a. " Weever's Funeral Monuments, 122. 

Mc 



504 IVELCHESTER. [Cintin&un* 

He is faid to have fometime refided at Brook's-Court near Ivelchefter, and died feized 
of that manor 39 Eliz."" leaving iflue Henry Brook lord Cobham his heir and fucceflbr 
both to tide and eftate. Which Henry was warden of the Cinque Ports, and a perfon 
eminent in his days; but being found guilty of raifing a confpiracy againft King 
James I. in conjun(5tion with the Lord Grey of Wilton, and Sir Walter Raleigh, he 
became attainted, forfeited eftates to the amount of 7000I. per annum, and died in 
1 6 1 9 in great poverty. After his death William Brook, fon of his brother George, 
(who was beheaded for the Ihare which he bore in the infurreftion abovementioned) 
tvas found to be his next heir, and was reftored in blood, but not permitted to enjoy the 
title of Lord Cobham, without the King's fpecial grace.' In the next reign the title 
was renewed in the perfon of Sir John Brook, of Hekington in the county of Lincoln, 
but became extind at his death A. D. 1651. 

In the friary of Ivelchefter was born A. D. 1214, that celebrated philofopher Roger 
Bacon, who was juftly accounted the wonder of his age. His youthful education was 
had at Oxford, from which univerfity he returned to Ivelchefter with great acquifitions 
of claffical knowledge, and there took the habit of a Francifcan friar. He then applied 
himfelf to the ftudy of philofophy, in which he made fo great a proficiency that he was 
invited over to Paris to afTift in the tranfaftions of that univerfity. Here he was 
admired and envied, and known too much in an invidious and vulgar age to profper. 
The occult fciences to which he applied drew the attention of thofe who had not the 
underftanding to weigh uncommon afpeftions in the true fcale of reafon and philofophy, 
and they accufed him of dealing with the devil. His own fi-aternity alfo caballed 
againft him, and he was fometime confined in prifon as a magician and forcerer. 
When thence relieved he returned to Oxford, and there in the college of Francifcans 
Ipent the remainder of his days in ftudy, and the writing the following books, fome of 
which have been printed, others tranflated, and the reft remain in manufcript in the 
publick libraries, viz, 

De Logica 

Commentaria in Librum Avicennas de Anima 

De Septem Experimentis 

De Secretis 

Epiftola inftar Libelli ad Clementem Pontificem Romanunn 

De Utilitate Lin^arum 

De Scientia Perlpeftiva 

De Fluxu et Refluxu Maris Britannici 

De Rebus Metallicis 

De Utilitate Aftronomias 

De Coelo et Mundo 

De Impedimentis Sapientiae 

Commentarii in Libros Sententiarum 

Super Pfalterjum. 

»Efc < Bar. ut fupra. 

De 



Ctntml)un.] 



IVELCHESTER. 



305 



Dc Afpeftibus Lunas ad alias Planetas 

De Operibus non occultis 

De Vidtoria Chrifti contra Antichriftum 

De Copias vel Inopise Caufis 

De Retardatione Senc(5l:utis 

Antidotarium 

Dc Gradibus Medicinalibus 

Dc Locis 

De Aite Memorativa 

De Centris Gravium vel Planis 

Parabolx de Quadratura 

De Rebus Alchymicis, alias Speculum Alchymia: 

De Communibus Naturalibus, lib. 4. 

Dc Speciebus & Legibus Multiplicationum 

De Forma in fpeculo refukante 

De Vita Edmundi, Archiepifcopi Cantuarienfis/ 

The extent of this man's learning may be gathered from the foregoing catalogue. 
The fubftance of his writings evince it to have been far fuperior to that of all his 
cotemporaries. He was well Ikilled in the Latin, Greek, Hebrew, and Chaldaick 
languages J nor lefs in geography, chronology, and the belles lettresj but philofophy was 
the line in which he particularly fhone. He was the firft perfon that introduced 
chemiftry into Europe. With regard to mechanicks he has been ftiled the fecond 
Archimedes; and in opticks was fo well verfed as to be generally allowed the firft in- 
ventor of the telefcope. In the unenlightened age in which he lived he was confidered 
as a magician J in the prefent as a perfon wonderfully clear in his underftanding, un- 
bigotted in his principles, a friend to Chriftianity, and, by the freedom wherewith he 
imparted his difcoveries, a well-wiflier to his fellow-creatures. He died A. D. 1294, 
and was buried in the houfe of the Grey Friars at Oxford, in which city a tower of 
no mean nor modern conftruftion till of late years flood diftinguiflied by his name, 
wherein it is faid he held his private lucubrations. 

Of Mrs. Elizabeth Rowe, a celebrated modern writer, born in this place A.D. 1674, 
notice has elfewhere been taken.' 

Stephen Fox was created Lord Ilchefter May 11, 1741, and Earl of Ilchefter 
June 5, 1756. 

» Leland. de Scriptoribus Britannicis, 258. • Vol. ii. p. 230. 



Vol. in. 



Rr 



NORTHOVER. 



t 306 ] ^ [CintinfjulU 



NORTHOVER. 

THIS village ftands on the Foffe-road, juft without the precinfts of the town of 
Ivelchefter northward, being divided from it by the river Ivel. We have 
no account of it in the Norman furvey, and but little in the records which relate to 
Ivelchefter. ' 

23 Edw. III. Gilbert d'Umfraville held the fourth part of a knight's fee here/ and 
35 Edw, III. Henry duke of Lancafter held half a knight's fee here belonging to the 
priory of Bridgwater, a,nd another half fee of Roger de Camel.'' 43 Edw. III. this 
hamlet (as it was then called) was held by Sir Hugh de Courtney of the Bilhop of Bath 
and Wells, and defcended by his fifter and coheirefs Muriel to Sir John de Dinham, 
knt.' whofe defcendant Sir John de Dinham 3 Henry IV. granted the manor for life to 
James Aumarle.'' The Dinhams continued in pofleffion of it till the latter end of the 
reign of Henry VIII. Sir Thomas Dinham and Sir John Dinham then holding the 
fame of the manor of WelUngton." 35 Henry VIII. it was granted with its apperte- 
nances to John Leigh and his heirs,' who 36 Plenry VIII. fold it with its appertenances, 
and lands called Bough-Hayes, Stamard-Hill, Mead-Hill, Oxen-Leafe, BuW s-CloJe, and 
Water-Ham:, to John Soper,^ who 38 Henry VIII. conveyed it to William Lyte,'' 
whofe defcendant John Lyte, 12 Sept. 8 Eliz. fold the fame with its appertenances and 
lands here and in Charlton, Kingfton, and Somerton, to Thomas Raymond, gent.' It 
is now by inheritance the poflefiion of Henry Chichefter, efq; whofe houfe adjoins the 
church-yard J and near it ftands a remarkable fine old elm, which from its head fends 
out feven large arms in nearly a circular diredtion, and fo wide as to admit a large , 
fummer-houfe to be built within it, capable of containing twenty perfons. 

7 Edw. IV. Walter Ralegh held at his death eight meffuages, two tofts, forty acres 
of meadow, and three hundred acres of arable, in Northover juxta Ivelchefter, of John 
.Prior of the houfe and church of St. John Baptift in Bridgwater by fealty."" 

The church was appropriated in i a 1 9 by William Bruere to the hofpital of St. John 
in Bridgwater, and by an ordination made in 1337, the vicar was afllgned a houfe with 
a curtillage, nine acres and a half of arable ground, and two acres of meadow j as alfo 
all oblations whencefoever forth-coming, together-with the tithe of hay, and the tithe 
of ale, [cervifias] lambs, wool, milk, flax, hemp, pigeons, pigs, geefe, apples, honey, 
wax, heifers, chicken, mills, leeks, garlick, and all other fmall tithes, within the faid 
parifti whatfoever. The vicar to find proceflional candles, bread and wine for the 
celebration of mafs, and incenfe as often as required, and have the church clothes 
cleaned at his own expence. The mafter and brethren of the hofpital to fuftain all 
other charges-' 

• Lib. F^od. Ibid. ' Efc. « Rot. Claus. 3 Hen. IV. ' Efc, 

•■ Pat. 35 Hen. VIII. p. 10. » Licence to alienate. ■• Ibid. ' Ibid. " Efc. 

' Excerpt, e Regift. Wcllen. 

The 



Cintin&mi.] N O R T H O V E R. 307 

The living is a vicarage in the deanery of Ivelchefter. The lord of the manor is 
the patron, and the Rev. Nathaniel Bartlett is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, which is dedicated to St. Andrew,Jlands on a little eminence, clofe by 
the weftern fide of the Fofie-road, and confifts of a nave, chancel, and tower at the weft 
end, containing four bells. It contains no monument, nor infcription of confequence. 

Dr. Stukely in his Itinerarium Curiofum,™ makes mention of a greyhound in this 

village, through whofe fide a fkewer of wood feven inches long had worked itfelf out from 

the ftomach. 

" Vol. i. p. r5;. 



SOCK-DENNIS. 

THIS, now an obliterated place, lies at a fmall diftance fouthward without the 
town of Ivelchefter. It was given by William the Conqueror to the Earl of 
Morton, being near his demefnes of Bifliopfton. 

" Robert holds of the Earl, Soche. Seven thanes held it in the rime of King 
" Edward, and gelded- for three hides and a half. The arable is five carucates. In 
*' demefne are two carucates, with one fervant, and eight villanes, and two cottagers, 
" with two ploughs. There are feventy acres of meadow. It was and is wordi fixty- 
« five ftiillings.'" 

Whence this manor became attached to the feignory of Morton, and was Held under 
it by the barons Beauchamp of Hatch, and under them by the family of Daeus or 
Dennis, from whom the place obtained the addition to its original name. In the time 
of Henry II. and Ric. I. Oft)ert and William Dacus, or Le Deneys, were keepers of 
Petherton-Park in this county;'' the former of whom had ifilie Ralph Dacus, who 
12 Henry II. held half a knight's fee of William de Mohun.' In the time of Henry III. 
WiUiam Dacus the founder of the hofpital of Whitehall in Ivelchefter, was lord of the 
manor of Sooke-Deneys, and was father of Brice he Denneys, who i Edw. I. being in 
minority and in ward to the King, the manor was granted by the crown for die faid 
term to John de la Lynde, being then held of John de Beauchamp by the fervice of two 
knights' fees.* Which Brice Le Denneys was of age before 21 Edw. I. when Robert 
Burnell, biftiop of Bath and Wells, held a moiety of this manor under him by the fervice 
of a pair of gilt fpurs." The other moiety of the manor was then held by Nicholas de 
Bonville, the Beauchamps being always the mefne lords.' And in procefs of time the 
whole manor came into the poflcffion of the Bonvilles, and was held of them by the 
families of Berkeley and Brook.^ 

• Lib. Domefday. ' See page 55 of tWs vol. ' Lib. Nig. Scac. i. 92. 

JEfc. 'Ibid. 'Ibid. 'Ibid. 

R r 2 ' 2 Henry 



,q8 s o c k - d e n n I s. [CintinljutU 

1 Henry V. John de Sock is recorded as an inhabitant of Sock Dennis.*" 
The advowfon of the redory of Sock was in 1294 valued at twenty pounds/ 
The church has long fince been^^defolated, and the village itfelf, once populous, is 
now reduced to a fingle dweUing. The principal farm was long in the pofTeffion of 
the family of Phelips of Montacute; it now belongs to Mr. Pliipps, of Weftbury, 
Wilts. The other farm and lands belong to Mr. Windham, of Dinton near Sarum, 
and are denominated Windham's Sock.'' 
* Cart. Antiq. ' Efc. 22 Edw. I. " For an account of a Mineral ^ool at Sod, fee page 221 of this vol. 



TINT IN HULL. 

FURTHER on "towards the fouthweft, and upon the fame Roman FolTe-road, is 
the parilli of Tintinhull, giving name to this hundred. This manor, confifting 
of five hides, was given by King Edmund the elder to Wulfrick his fervant and 
attendant, who conveyed the fame to the abbey of Glaftonbury. At the time of the 
Conqueft the abbot exchanged it with the Earl of Morton for the manor of Camerton,' 
and it is thus accounted for as his property in the old Norman furvey: 

« The Earl himfelf holds Tinteh alle. The church of Glaftingberie held it in the 
-" time of King Edward. There are feven hides and one virgate of land, but it gelded 
" for five hides [only]. The arable is ten carucates. Thereof are in demefne four 
" hides, and there are two carucates, and five fervants, and nineteen villanes, and nine 
*' cottagers, with eight ploughs. There is a mill of thirty pence rent, and fixty acres 
« of meadow, and two hundred acres of pafture, and fifty-feven acres of wood. It is 
" worth fixteen pounds. Drogo [de Montacute] holds of the Earl one virgate ofthe 
" fame land, and it is worth one mark of filver."" 

From which Robert it defcended to William earl of Morton, who gave it with the 
hundred and the advowfon of the church to his monaftery of Montacute, hereafter to 
be mentioned. The monks had free-warren here, a market and a fair,' and the eftate 
was rated to them in 1293 at 20]." After the diffolution 33 Henry VIII. the manor 
was granted to Sir Thomas Wyatt,' and in the time of Queen Elizabeth belonged to 
Sir William Petre, knt. who by his will, dated April 1 2, 1 57 1, gave to the poor of this 
parifh and that of Montacute the fum of 61. 13s. ^d/ It is now the property of John 
Napier, efq; who is defcended from Nicholas Napier, fon of John Napier, and grandfon 
of Sir Alexander Napier, of Merchifton in Scotland, knt. by a filler of Robert Stewart 
earl of Athol, who came into England in the time of Henry VII. and feated himfelf at 

' Lib. Domefday. ' Ibid. ' Cart. 37 Hen. III. ra. 8. " Taxat. Temporal. 

' Pat. 33 Hen. VIII. p. 6. ' Collins's Peerage, vii. 32. 

Swyre 



Cintin&uU.] 



T I N T I N II U L L. 



309 



Swyre in Dorfetfliire, where he was buried. The family arms are, Argent, a faltire 
engrailed between four rofes guks, feeded or. 

Here was a cell to Montacute priory called Babkw, or Balhozv, the fcite of which in 
the time of Edw. VI. belonged to John Lyte, of Lyte's-Cary. 

The church, being appropriated to the monaflery of Montacute aforefaid, was in 
1 2^2 valued at twenty-four marks.* The prior had an annual penfion of one mark 
out of it.*" 

The living is an impropriate curacy in the deanery of Ivelcliefter, and in the gift of 
the lord of the manor. Ihe Rev. Edward Napier is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Margaret, and confifts of a nave and chancel, having 
•in the centre on the north fide a plain tower, with a clock and five bells. 

On the north fide of the chancel is a large mural monument infcribed to the memory 
of Thomas Napier, gent, great-grandfon of Thomas Napier, and grandfon of Thomas 
Napier, and fon of Thomas Napier, fuccefiively owners of this impropriation. And 
on the fame wall is another memorial to Thomas Napier, eldefl: fon of Thomas Napier, 
by Elizabeth his wife, daughter of John Edwards, of Lyme-R"egis in the county of 
Dorfet, efq; and to Sarah his wife, daughter and coheircfs of George Hawker, of Vagg 
in this county, efq; which Thomas died Jan. 10, 1760, aged 42, and was owner of this 
impropriation. 



Taxat. Spiritual. 



Ibid. 



M O N 



A 



U 



E. 



THIS parifh is fituated four miles fouthweft from Ivelchefter, at the foot of a fine 
broken ridge of lofty hills to the fouth and wefl:, enriched and beautified with 
noble plantations. Thefe hills merit a particular defcription, in regard they aflx>rd 
mod confpicuous objefts to the furrounding country, and have been remarkable for 
ages; which have fcen, both upon and underneath their fummits, the ferocious tranf- 
aftions of war fucceeded by the cool habits of religious peace. 

Adjacent to the church-yard rifes that noble mount, called Montacute and St. Mi- 
chael's-hill, the bafe of which contains near twenty acres. Its form is conical, and its 
afcent very fl:ecp, the top terminating in a flat area of half an acre, whereon ftands a 
round tower fixty feet in height, and crowned with an open balluftrade. On this tower 
is a flag-ftafF fifty feet high, on which a flag is occafionally difplayed, floating fifty-fix 
yards in the air, and exhibiting a grand and pidurefque appearance. The fummit of 
this tower being fo highly elevated above the level of the central part of the county, 
affords a rich and extenfive profpeft, extending weftward to the hills below Minehcad 
and Blackdown in Devonfliire; and northeaftward over Taunton, Quantock-Hills, 

Bridgwater 



310 MONTACUTE. [Cmtin&uU. 

Bridgwater-bay, the Channel, and coaft of Wales. To the north Brent-Knoll, the 
whole range of Mendip, the city of Wells, and Glaftonbury-Torr j eaftward Creche 
and Knowl-hills, Alfred's-tower at Stourton, and the high lands about Shaftefburyj and 
fouthward over the Dorfetfhire hills to Lambert's-caftle near Lyme ; the whole a circle 
of above three hundred miles, in which on a clear day eighty churches are diftinguifh- 
able. This hill is planted from bottom to top with oaks, elms, firs, and fycamores, 
the intermingled foliage of which (efpecially in the autumnal feafon) forms a rich and 
beautifully tinted fcenery. 

About a quarter of a mile weftward is another conical eminence called Uedgecock- 
hill, the "bafe of which is round, and a mile in circumference, and which terminates in 
a point at about eight hundred feet in perpendicular height. This hill is faid to have 
taken its name from an ancient hedge, which divided it into two parts, the fouth fide 
belonging to the parifii of Montacute, and the north to that of Stoke. In the place of 
this hedge now ftands a wall; and the hill being planted on the Montacute fide with 
firs, and the Stoke fide with alhes from top to bottom, forms a fine deep mafs of Ihade, 
and has a noble appearance. 

Southwell from this is the high rocky ridge of Hamden-hiWy on which is a notable 
Roman encampment, and the moft extenfive the Romans had in this part of England, 
being nearly three miles in circuit. The northweft part thereof, which by nature was 
the moft difficult of accefs, was fepa rated from the other part by a very ftrong and 
lofty rampire of ftone and earth, called the Cornice, the fpace of encampment within 
which is more than twenty acres. Many Roman coins have been dug up here, and 
the veftiges of diftinft parts of the works remain to this day j fuch as the prsto- 
rium, the amphitheatre or bull-ring, and the adytus to the equeftrian camp. The 
watering-place was at a fmall diftance in the bottom, and is now become a morafs, 
round which, juft under the furface of the earth, are the remains of feveral large 
cifterns or water-troughs. The vallum round this camp is almoft entire, the entrench- 
ments extending a confiderable way beyond the regular line of fortification. 

This hill has been remarkable for many ages for its freeftone quarries,' the produce 
of which poflefies the excellent quality of hardening by time, and by that means be- 
coming exceedingly durable, retaining for centuries all the acute points and edges of its 
workmanfhip. Moft of the churches for many miles round, both in this and the adjacent 
counties, are built with this ftone, and are in general efteemed very handfome edifices. 

Near this hill is fituated the village of Montacute, which in ancient times was a 
borough and a market- town; and of thofe privileges with which it was heretofore 
endowed, it ftill retains a court-leet, free-warren, and divers other peculiar franchifes. 
Its Roman name is unknown; the Saxons termed it Lejbejiej-bejij, Lobejajiej^bujij, 
Lojbejiej-bupj, Lojjajiej^beojij, LojJ^efiepbeofih, Lojfjojiepbufijh, Lojbejiej-bone,'' 
all which names were derived from Logwor, a pofleflbr of this territory in thofe days, 
whofe name was preferved in one of thofe curious pyramids, which ftood before the 
cemetery of the monks of Glaftonbury, where he had his burial." He is generally 

• See vol. ii. p. 334. » Guilielm. Malmefbur. Ad. de Domer. et Joh. Glafton. Hilt. « Vol. ii. p. 267. 

fuppofed 



Cintin&uU.] MONTACUTE. 3ir 

fuppofed to have been a prelate in the church, and that, becaufe, when tlie ancient 
name of Logwors-borough was fomewhat before the time of the Norman Conqueft 
difregarded, the town afllimed to itfelf the name oi Bijljopjlony by which the ftreet and 
chief tithing remain diftinguifhed to the prefent time. The narne of Montacute was 
impofed on this fpot when the great Earl of iVIorton, who at the time of the Conqueft 
pofiefled fo many lordfliips in this county, added this alfo to the reft by exchanging 
with the abbot and convent of Athelney, the manor of Candcl in Dorfetlhire/ To 
which abbot and convent the faid manor had been furreptitioufly conveyed by the 
monks of Glaftonbury its pofleflbrs from the year of our Lord 68 1, when Baldrcd King 
of Kent gave the fame, confifting of fixteen hides, to abbot' Hemgifel.' The Norman 
furvey defcribes the Earl's demefnes in this neighbourhood as follows: 

" The Earl himfelf holds in demefne Biscopestone, and there is his caftle which is 
" called MoNTAGUD. This manor gelded in the time of King Edward for nine hides, 
" and was of the abbey of Adelingi, and for it the Earl gave to the fame church a manor 
" which is called Candel. In this manor of Bifcopeftone is arable land to the amount 
" of feven carucates. Thereof are in demefne two hides and a half, and there are two 
** carucates, and four fervants, and four villanes, and three cottagers, with two ploughs. 
" There is a mill of fifty pence rent, and fifteen acres of meadow. 

" Of thefe nine hides Alured holds of the Earl one hide and a half. Drogo one 
** hide. Bretel one hide. Donecan one hide. There are five carucates, with one fer- 
" vant, and nineteen cottagers. This manor is worth to the Earl fix pounds. To 
" the knights three pounds and three Ihillings."*^ 

Thus this Robert earl of Morton, or Mortaigne in Normandy, following the Norman 
Duke into England, here fixed his caftle and his refidence, and the acutenefs of the hill 
whereon he built, and the circumftance of Drogo de Montagu (a Norman chieftain, fo 
furnamed from his anceftors' abode in France) being his confidential friend and afFiftant 
in all his enterprifes, as well as firft caftellain of his caftle, determined him to affign to 
this fpot the denomination which it ftill preferves. Who this Robert was, has already 
in many parts of this work, as in almoft all other provincial hiftories, appeared. He 
was in 1091 fucceeded in the earldoms of Mortain in Normandy, and Cornwall in 
England, by his fon William, who at the foot of the hill built a religious houfe or 
priory of black Cluniac monks, which he dedicated to the honour of St. Peter and St. 
Paul, and for the fake of his good cftate during life, and for his Ibul after his deceafe, 
as well as for the fouls of Robert his father, and Maud his mother, gave to the 
faid priory the borough and market of Montacute, with exemption of toll; and the 
caftle and chapel with their appertenances, and with the orchards and the vineyard next 
to his demepies, the manor and hundred of Bijhopftone, with the mill there, with other 
appendages, and the fair of Hamdsn. The manor alfo of •Tintinhull, with the church, 
hundred, mill, fair, and appertenances. The manor of Creech, with Havi, and (2£tCn= 
bCtgC, and Jl^igClTlOC, and the church and hundred with their appertenances. The 
manor alfo and church of Chimock, and the hundred oi Hotftdjbcrough, and 2xIltttlClfl]?» 
with all their appertenances. The manor of Go/worth, the church and mill of the 

* Lib. Domefday. ' Joh. Glafton. Hift. 91. ' Lib. Domefday. 

fame, 



M O N T A C U T E. [Cmtinfjun. 

fame and the lands of Melbury, Widcombe, and Ford, and DCnetoOlDClljam, with their 
™tenances The manor church, hundred, and mill of Mudford, and the lands of 
Td^ZmZ, with their appertenances: and the land of the ^ielle and ^..^ 
with appertenances; the manor of Leigh, and the church ^"^ hundred of JClfCt) am 
Tn Devonfl.ire, and twenty Shillings rent in ®tX^t. I^UUecrOft, and lOtietlap J and 
a certain piece of land called IBateSfClD J the church of Gerfic All-Samts, with 
appertenances. And in Cornwall, the churches of Lerky, Mremm, Sennet, and 5/ 
cLntccus, with all their appertenances in lands and tithes. And alfo a ba.hwick called 
Pennard, and the church of 2V%/.«, with appertenances; the churches of Bnmpion, 
and Odcombe; two parts of the tithes of Ockford, and the tithe of Chnnoch, a moiety 
of the tithes of Chijfelborough, Cloford, and Norton juxta Taunton; and the tithes of 
Marfton, Creedlingcot, ^eCCCUmbe, Cmdel, Thorp, the three Cernels, Toller, ^nd Hook- 
and two parts of the tithes of 15iCl)Ci)UUe, DiCtoitiefiUne, Point Ington, Loder, and 
Chilthorne ' The prior's lands in Montacute were valued in 1293 at thirteen pounds. 
The monaftick and other records have preferved to us the following names of the fuc- 
ceflive prefidents of this houfe: 

Walter was the firft prior, in whofe time the lands of the religious were taken away 
on account of the founder's rebellion; but were afterwards reftored. 

After him came Reginald, chancellor to King Henry I. who enlarged the monaftery 
with buildings and poffeOions,^ and converted the remains of the call e on the mount 
into a beautiful chapel « rofed all wyth ftone, covered verye artyfycyallye, dedicated o 
St. Mychell, vawted within, with ftayres made with ftone from the fote of die hyll to 
the toppe."' 



Pontius." I Ranulf I Arvald 

Guy I Aimer | Durand 

Thomas. He was in 1 174 elefted abbot of Hyde in H 



William 
Joceline 
ampfliire. 



Huc^h ( Richard 1 Peter | Simon 

Vigo I Pontius I Simon | Daniel 

Durand. He was expelled for ill-behaviour in iao8," the year before which the 
conventual church was deftroyed by fire.° 

Marcus Fificus Bonus 

Roger Norman occurs about the year 12,60. 

Hugh de Noers 

Gilbert de BufTa was ele£ted 1266 

Guy de Marchaunt fucceeded 1278 

Peter Gaudemer was conftituted prior 1289 

John de Bello Ramo 

Geffrey de la Doufe was elefted 1292 

« Mori. Angl. ii. 909, " " Taxat. Temporal. ' Lei. Itin. ii. 92. " IH^. 

' Cotton MS. Julius F. vi. "" Willis's Hill, of Abbies, ii. J99. • Mag. Rot. 10 Joh. 

• Rot. Pip. 9 Joh. „ , 

Stephen 



Cintinf)UU.] MONTACUTE. 3»3 

Stephen Paulin, alias Rowlan, 1295. 

John, furnamed Caprarius. 

Guychard. 

John de Port. I. 

John de Port. II. 

Gerald Roche occurs 1362. 

Francis was prior 1384. 

William Cryche. 

John, was fummoned to the convocation Nov. 9, 141 6.' 

John Bennet was fumnnoned to the convocation June 7, 1449. 

Robert de Montacute was elefted 1460. 

John Watts was prior 1498 and 1509. 

Thomas Chard was fummoned to the convocation 15 15. 

Robert Cryche fucceeded him. 

Robert Whitelocke was the laft prior, who, March 20, 1539, Surrendered his pnory 
to the King, (thirteen monks being then prefent) and had a yearly penfion of eighty 
pounds allowed him, with a gratuity of twenty pounds, and the capital meffua^ ot 
Eaft-Chinnock to live in." In 1553 there remained in charge 4I; ^3^-f' »" *««. 
24I. 18s. in annuities, and thefe following penfions, viz. To Robert Warren 12I. 
Thomas Taunton 7I. William Draper, John Cribbe, John Webbe, and John Clerk, 
61. 13s. 4d. each. William Winter, John Pauley, and John Skyner, 5I. 6s. 8d. each. 
William Crefe 5I. and John Rogers 4I. 13s. 4d.' 

The monks had free-warren in all or moft of their manors, as well as fock and fack. 
toll and theam, infangtheof, and all other liberties and free cuftoms withm their bo- 
rough,' and hundreds of Montacute, TintinhuU, Houndfborough, Creech, Leigh, and 
Frifeham in Devonlhirej and were exempt from all fecular jurifdiftions, exadions 
impofitions, and taxes whatever, throughout England.' That they were favoured and 
patronized by feveral Princes of the Houfe of Lancafter, appears by their arms, affixed 
to the qrand arch and other remains of the monaftery, ftill exifting near the panlh 
church-yard in ancient and venerable magnificence; and the fociety (who having been 
originally fubjeft to the monks of Clugny in the diocefe of Mafcon in Normandy 
w fe made denifon and enfranchifcd by King Henry IV.") flounn.ed till the ^ra of 
the general diflblution of monafteries in this kingdom, when its revenues were rated at 
I76H4S. y^d. The fcite, &c. of the priory was granted to Sir William Petre, and 
fold by him to Mr. Robert Freke, of whom it was foon after purchafed by the family 
of Phelips, who at that time polTefled fome other parts of the manor. 

p Archer. 'Ibid. ' Hift. of Abbics, u. 200. 

. „ Edw I this borough returned the following niembers to parliament, viz. Andrew lo Bakere and Henry 
kPocherman. ^ra/,V. < Mon. Angl. i. 669. • nnrfe.(hire S/ 

" The following cells were annexed to this priory, viz. Caref^.U in Devonnure. a,b« m Dorfetflure. S/. 
Sjriac in Cornwall, and Malj>as in Monmouthlhire. ^j^^ 

Vol. IIL ^ » 



314 MONTACUTE. [CintinljlC 

The family of Phelips migrated into this county from Wales, where they were long 
anciently eftablifhed, about the time of Edw. I. and were many years refident at 
Harrington, a few miles diftant from Montacute. A bfanch of the family fettled at 
Corf-Mullen in Dorfet, having received a grant of that manor from King Henry VIII. 
and they reprefented the boroughs of Pool and Wareham in feveral parliaments. In 
the reign of Queen Elizabeth Sir Edward Phelips, knt. the Queen's ferjeant, and third 
fon of Sir Thomas Phelips of Barrington, fettled himfelf at Montacute, where he builc 
the large and noble manfion-houfe ftill {landing. This houfe is ninety-two feet in 
height, and a remarkable gallery runs the whole length of the building to the extent 
of one hundred and eighty-nine feet: it was originally a library; but the books 
and furniture were deftroyed in the great rebellion. In the windows of the prefent 
library are painted the arms of die family, viz. Argent, a chevron between three rofes 
gulesy feeded or, barbed vert; and thofe of mod of the nobility and gentry of the county 
in the time of Queen Elizabeth. This building was begun in 1580, and finifhed in 
1 60 1, and has been pofiefTed and inhabited by the founder's pofterity ever fince in the 
following fucceflion: Sir Edward Phelips, afterwards mafter of the rolls, chancellor to 
Henry Prince of Wales, and fpeaker of the Houfe of Commons in the time of Queen 
Elizabeth and James I.; Sir Robert Phelips his fon, in the time of James and Cha. I.; 
Colonel Edward Phelips, in the time of Charles II.; Sir Edward Phelips, knt. in the 
time of James II. and William III.j Edward Phelips, his nephew, in the time of 
Queen Anne and Geo. I.; and in Geo. II. and the prefent reign of Geo. III. his fon 
Edward, and grandfon of the fame name, both now living. 

The parifh of Montacute is divided into three tithings, viz. Bishopston, Hvde, 
and WiDcoMEE; befides which there is a fmall hamlet called Thorn. The tithing of 
Eifhopfton (ftill retaining its priftine denomination) comprehends the town of Monta- 
cute, which confifts of three ftreets, forming nearly the letter H, and wherein are 
one hundred and eighty houfes, and nine hundred inhabitants. It had but a poor 
market in the time of Leland," and now has none. It was formerly a great mart for 
leather. The great and noble family of Montagu are generally (tliough erroneoufly) 
fuppofed to have derived their title from this town of Montacute, but the progenitor of 
that family came from Montagu in Normandy with William the Conqueror before this 
place commuted its appellation.'' They had however pofieffions in this place, and were 
always patrons of the priory, as the priors were of the church, which in 129a was 
valued at fifteen marks, and the vicarage at one hundred fhillings.'' The living is 
vicarial, in the deanery of Ilchefter, and in the gift of Edward Phelips, efq. The Rev. 
Henry Rawlins is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Catherine. It confifts of a nave, chancel, and two 
fide ailes; at the weft end there is an embatded tower containing a clock and five bells. 

In the north aile lie the effigies in ftone of David Phelips, efq; and Anne his wife, 
who died in 1484; of Thomas Phelips, efq; in armour, who died 1588; Eliza Phelips, 
1598; and of Bridget Phelips 1508. On the eaft wall is a ftately mural monument of 
marble, infcribed to the memory of Sir Edward Phelips, knt. who died April 4, 1699, 

!Itin. ii. ga. ? Ses p. 4S, &c, of this volume, . ! Taxat. Spiritual. 

in 



CintinfjUlIO MONTACUTE. 3,^ 

in the 6 1 ft year of his age, and of Dame Edith Phelips his wife, (daughter and heirefs 
of Mr. John Blake of Langport) who died Sept. 28, 1728, aged 66. 

On an old monument: 

" Thomas Phelips, efq; buried 1588. 

Sir Edward Phelips, knt. 1614. 

Sir Robert Phelips, knt. 1638. 

Edward Phelips, efq; ^679. 

Sir Edward Phelips, knt. ^699. 

Edward Phelips, efq; — — — . 1734." 

At the eaft end of the nave is a memorial to Lady Dorothy Phelips, wife of Sir 
Edward Phelips, knt. and daughter of Henry Cheeke, of Weft-Newton in the parifli 
of North-Petherton, efq; who died Nov. 19, 1678, and was buried the 6th of De- 
cember following." 

In the church-yard is an old ftone crofs witli a ftatue in a niche much mutilated. 

By Hamden-Hill a Roman vicinal way conducSts us hence to the parifti of Stoke-' 
nnder-Hamden. 

• By her the manor, farm, and demefnes of West-Newton came to the family of Phelips. 



STOKE-UNDER- HAMDEN. 

THIS parifh is fituated (as its name implies) under the great encampment upon 
Hamden-Hill, weftward from Montacute, being divided into two parts, called 
East and West-Stoke. 

Before the Norman invafion this territory was poflefled by five Saxon thanes, 
whofe tenure was unalienable from the abbey of Glaftonbury.* The Conqueror on his 
arrival took it to the crown, and fometime after beftowed it on Robert Earl of Morton. 

" Robert holds of the Earl, Stoche. Five thanes held it in the time of King 
" Exlward, and gelded for five hides and a half. There remains one virgate of 
" land, which in the time of King Edward paid no geld. The arable is eight ca- 
" rucates. In demefne are two carucates, and five fervants, and two villanes, and 
" fourteen cottagers, with three ploughs. There are two mills of nine Ihillings rent, 
*' and twenty-five acres of meadow, and two furlongs of pafture, and three acres of 
" wood. It was and is worth feven pounds."'' 

By the unnatural rebellion of William fon of this Robert earl of Morton, the manor 
becoming confifcated to the crown, was granted to the Lords Bcauchamp of Hatch, 
of whom fome mention has been made in the former part of this work') and thus 

' Lib. Domcfday. '' Ibid. « Vol. L p. 44. 

S r 2 became 



3i6 STOKE>UNDER-HAMDEN. [CintinM* 

became a portion of their great barony of Hatch, where they refided. The firft of the 
family that took up his refidence at Stoke was John de Bello Campo, or Beauchamp, 
who in the time of Edw. I. ereded here, of ftone brought from the Hamden quarries, 
a laro-e and noble manfion, which he obtained from King Edw. III. a licence to fortify 
and embattle after the falhion of thofe turbulent times,'' and in which many of his 
pofterity refided. 

In this manfion, which thenceforward had the appellation of a caftle, (and even to 
this day retains the fame in ruins) there was a free-chapel dedicated to the honour of St. 
Nicholas, (bifliopof Myra in Lycia in the time of Conftantine the Great) wherein this 
John de Beauchamp, with the confent of Cecily his mother, daughter and coheir of 
Maud de Kyme, founded and endowed, A. D. 1304, a college or chantry for five 
chaplains (one of them to be named and to aft as a provoft) to fay five mafies, accom- 
panied with other offices, every day, and to offer devout prayers for the fouls of Lord 
John de Beauchamp his father, Robert de Beauchamp his brother, his progenitors, 
fucceflbrs, and all the faithful deceafed; and for the good eftate of Edward King of 
England, Walter Hafelfliaw bifhop of Bath and Wells, of the faid Cecilia de Beau- 
champ, and of himfelf the faid Lord John de Beauchamp, and of Lady Joan his wife, 
and their children, Aleanor and Beatrix his fillers, and alfb of his relations, friends, and 
benefadors, during their lives, and for their fouls after their dcceafe.' 

In 

* Pat. 7 Edw. III. p. 2. m. 2. 

• Fundatio Cantarla de Stoke fubter Hamedon. 
" Univerfis, &c. Walterus Epifcopus B. W. falutem. Veniens ad nos Johannes de Bellocampo, tanquam mifes 
eatholicus & divinitus infpiratus, de confenfu Ceciliae de Bellocampo matris fuae, petijt humiliter, quod nos de terris 
fruftibus & obventionibus omnibus fpedlantibus ad liberam capellam fuam (in honore Sanfti Nicholai in curia 
fua de Stoke fub Hamedon conftruftam) tunc vacantem per refignationem Henrici de Wyk reftoris ejufmodi; 
necnon & de uno meffuagio ac 4 virgatis terrae cum pertinentijs fuis in difto manerio fuo de Stoke unacum advo- 
catione ecdefia: parochialis ejufdem villze, cujus diftus Johannes verus patronus exiftit, de licentia Regis ad fuften- 
tationem 5 capellanorum qui in perpetuum teneantur in difta capella fingulis diebus 5 miffas cum officijs debit)* 
celebrare, & fundere preces devotas pro animabus domini Johannisde Bellocampo patris fui, Robertide Bello- 
campo fratris fui, progenitorum, et fuccefTorum, omniumq; iidelium defunitorum; & pro falubri ftatu E. Regis 
Anglia:, W. de Hafelfchaw Epifcopi B. W. difbe Ceciiiae de Bellocampo, diftique domini Johannis, et domina? 
Johannx confortis fuse, liberorumq; fuorum Alienor* et Beatricis fororum ejus, necnon parentum, amicorura,. 
fidelium, familiarium & benefaftorum ejus dum vixerint, & pro animabus cum ab hac luce fubftradli fuerint, 
ordinare curaremus. Nos traflatu habito cum capitulis noftris B. & W. ordinamus, — 5 capellanos — fcil. domi- 
num Reginaldum de Moncketon, dominum Hen. Cros, dominum Tho. de Attebere, dominum Joh. Champion, 
& dominum Will, de Schipton, quos diftus dominus Joh. de Bellocampo nobis prsefentavit — admilimus, et 
diiSum Dominum Reginaldum diftae capella; Sanfti Nicholai, & csteris 4 praifecimus capellanis, ita quod ipfe Re- 
ginaldus fit diftorum 4 prelbiterorum prsepofitus & tali nomine in poftcrum nuncupetur. Alios autem 4adjungentes 
eidem tamquam focios & confodales, ac facerdotes minores, qui fibi in mandatis canonicis tanquam fuo prae- 
pofito intendent & obedient ficut decet. Diftus praepofitus & confocij fui ibidem refidentiam faciant con- 
tinuam, fimulque morentur, & in una dome fimul comedant atque bibant, jaceantque in una camera nifi infirmitas 
vel alia caufa rationabilis fubfit. In eundo ad capellam, & redeundo, & intra praefatam capellam de Stoke, dum 
fuum faciunt fervicium in fuperpellicijs albis atque honeftis, & defuper nigris capis terram tangentibus, more 
canor.icornm, fmt induti. Salvo tamen quod praepofitus utatur amucia more canonicorum Well. & confodales 
fai facerdotes amucijs more vicariorum utantur, & infra fcepta domus fu^e & extra habebunt veftes unius ejufdem 
coloris ac pr.»tij talaris, cum albis mantellis & cruce indea in parte finiftra, fcutp de armis difti dcraini Johannis 
defuper confuto, feu capa rotunda ejufdem 'coloris cum figno prenotato. Ita quod pretium ulnae panni quo 
veftientur 20 den. non excedat. Pra:pofitus infuper & caeteri facerdotes miniftrique fui horas canonicas & officium 
mortuoxum cum nota qualibet die dicent, fecundum diveriitatem temporis anni, & miffas celebrabunt temporibus 

opportunis. 



rfntinl)UU.j STOKE-UNDER-HAMDEN. 317 

In the time of Henry VIII. this chantry was upon tlie decline, and Lcland informs 
us, that when he vifited the place there was mals performed here only three times a 

week. 

opportunis. Ita quod nifi impedimentum occurrat legicimum, j tnidx fmgulis diebus celebrentur ibidem, quarum 
I' celcbrabitur circa ortum folis, de Sanfto Spiritu, fincnoca, profalubri ftatuantediitorumdum vixerint, &cum 
ab hoc luce fubftraAi fuerint, pro animabus eorum: et in die annivcriiario domini Johannis pacris & Roberti 
fratris, domin*: Cedlii, dominique Johannis & Johanna, folemne fervicium facient fpeciatiter pro eifdeni, ac dif- 
iribuent annis fmgulis pauperibus in pane duas marcas pro animabus ipforum, viz. pro Johanne patre, Cecilia 
matre, & Johanne filio 20s. pro rata portione: & pro Roberto fratre, & Johanna uxore difti domini Johannis 
dimidium marca; pro portione aiquali. 2'. Mifla celcbrabitur pro antediftis & omnibus alijs fidelibus defunftia 
fine DOta. 3'. In honore Sanits Maria; cum nota pro vivis & defunftis. 4*. De die cum nota celebretur. 
Et 5'. Erit pro difpofitione pra;pofui. Ordinamus etiam quod praipofitus antediflus habeat & percipiat ad 
fuftentationem et habitationem fuam, et 4 fociorum fuorura ac minillrorurn eifdem fervientium in futurum, mef- 
fuagium illud cum pertincntijs quod reftor hujus capelia: prius habuit, necnon & omnes terras, prata & decimas 
tarn majores tata minores, obventioncs, oblationes, & proventus, qua; ad diftam capellam prius fpedabant, qua: 
certis defignationibus, ad omne dubium toliendum in pofterum, prxfentibus duximus exprimenda, viz. Medietatem 
decimarum provenientium de 6 acris & dimidio in parochia de Schipton-Beauchamp, in campo qui vocatur 
Stanclyve, & de 3 acris fuper la Hulle; et de 2 acris in Babbeclyve, et etiam de omnibus antiquis dominicis 
Domini de Schipton. Praedida tarn in terris in excambium datis, & ad redditum traditis, quam de aliis terris 
de antique dominico, hoc exccpto, quod de 5 acris qua;funt inter terram domini de Schipton, in campo, qui vocatur 
Middel Forlong, & de 3 acris qua; funt in campo qui Nethermede Forlong & jacent juxta foflatum de Compton, 
& de 3 acris quae funt in campo qui vocatur f rogmere ; et de i dimid. acrae jacente ad caput difti campi de 
Frogmere, Praopofitus prsefats capclla: nihil omnino percipiet ; fed reftor ecclefix de Schipton, omnes decimas 
provenientcs de diftis terris percipiet, unacum alia mcdietate decimarum provenientium dc antiquis dominicis 
de Schipton. Percipiet etiam prxpofitus d'lAx capellx medietatem omnium decimarum provenientium de curia 
domini de Schipton, & de animalibus cotariorum qus nutriuntur in domibus fuis, vel extra in campis de Schipton, 
infra tenements antiqua dominici de Schipton. Percipiet etiam pr.-ediftus pra;pofitus diiSs capellx Chirchcftun, 
nomine fuo Sc capellx fua; pra;diftx, fcil. [de 8 viris quorum nomina rccenfentur] de quolibet eorum 4 bufs. 
filiginis per annum ad feftum Sanfti Martini, et fic percipiet de tencmentis eorum ad quorumcunque manus 
hujusmodi tenementa devenerint in futurum. Percipiet etiam idem prspofitus de Stoke Chircheftun de [8 viris 
quorum nomina recenfentur] viz. dc quolibet eorum 2 dcnar. per annum, ad feftum prxdiftum, & fic percipiet de 
tenementis prxdiftorum, ad quorumcunque manus devenerint in futurum. Habebit etiam diftus prxpofitus & 
cxteri prefbiteri ad fuftentationem fuam communem totum illud mefluagium cum terra quod Roger Oliver ali- 
quandotenuitin Stoke cum omnibus pertincntijs fuis, et advocationem parochialis ecclefix diftx villx de Stoke, 
qux diftus dominus Johannes de Bellocampo de novocontulit ad fuftentationem diftorum5 capellanorum : ordi- 
navimus etiam quod mortem prxpofiti confocij fignificent Johanni de Bellocampo vel hxrcdibus fuis, infra 
menfem, & fi patronus non prxfentaverit alium infra 4 menfes, liceat domino epifcopo ifta vice dare & inftituere. 
Mortem cujuslibet alii facerdotis prxpofitus infra menfem fignificabit patrono, qui fi intra 2 menfcs alium non 
prxfentaverit, liceat prxpofito de confenfu fociorum fuorum .alium eligere. Inhibemus etiam prxpofito & cxtcris 
confocijs fuis fub pxna amiffionis flatus fui ne quis eorum rccipiat annualia tritennalia, vel pecuniam quamcunque 
ab alijs pro miffis celebrandis, occafione cujus fervicio fuo in capclla de Stoke poffit fraus vel fubftraftio fieri in 
futurum. Nee licebit difto domino Johanni vel hxrcdibus fuis, equos, canes, vel aves mittere ad diftum prxpo- 
Titum et focios fuos, ut ibidem nutriantur et perhendinent contra voluntatem ipforgm, nee eis gravamen inferre, 
fi recufent talia rccipere fi mittantur. Statuimus etiam quod cedente vel decedente domino Roberto de 
Bellocampo, nunc reftore diftx ecclefi.x de Stoke 2 partes omnium decimarum, proventuum Sc obventionum 
fpeftantium ad ecclefiam parochialem prxdidiam de Stoke cedant in ufus proprios prxdiftorum prxpofiti & foci- 
orum in augmentum fuftentationis eorundem. Tertia vero pars didarum decimarum, omniumque proventuum 
et obventionum, ad diftam ecclefiam fpeftantium, una cum manfo & curtillagio competenti, remanebit aflignanda, 
per nos vel fucceffores noftros, in eventum vacationis, ecclefix memoratx vicario, qui diftx ecclefix de Stoke 
honefte ferviet, Quem quidem vicarium didlus prxpofitus, de confenfu confociorum fuorum, nobis & fuccefToribus 
noftris canonice prxfentabit. Nee licebit prxpofito vel focijs fuis de portionibus aflignatis feu alFignandis vicario 
pro fuftentatione ipfius aliquid minuere. Onera quidem cxtraordinaria omnia predidlx ecclefix de Stoke in- 
cumbentia pro 2'"" partibus decimarum et obventionum quas diftus prepofitus & confocij fui percipient a difbi 
ecclefia fupportabunt atque agnofcent. Et vicarius omnia onera ordinaria tarn epifcopalia quam archidi.iconalia 
fupportabit, & ad extraordinaria quidem onera fupportanda pro 3* parte quam percipiet tene.itur. Solvet etiam 
idem vicarius & ejus fuccefiTores unam marcara argenti fingulis annis ad fabricam ecclefix Well, ad feftum 

Pafch* 



3i8 STOICE-UNDER-HAMDEN. [CintinlJUfl, 

week/ In the fucceeding reign it was quite diflblved, and all its lands and poffeflions, 
of which the following account was returned by the King's commiflioners, were feized 
to the ufe of the crown: 

" Stoke under Hamden in the countie of Somersett. 
*' The furvey of the perticuler and yerely valewe of the college, provoftrie, free- 
chappell, and perfonage of Stooke under Hamden, with the chardgis and deduc- 
tions going owte of the fame, taken there the a5th daye of Julye in the fecound 
yere of the reigne of our Soveraigne Lorde Edwarde the Sixte, by the grace of 
God King of Englounde, Fraunce, and Irelond, defendour of the faythc, and of 
the churche of Englonde, and alfo of Irelonde, in earthe the fupreame heddj by 
Sir Hughe Poulett and Sir Thomas Dier, knights, as well by the perticuler 
perufe of the rentts, tithes, and all manner of profitts thereunto belonging, as by 
thexamynacon of John Kyte, now fermor there, by a leafe thereof made to hym 
by indenture for yeres yet to comyng, as it ftiall hereafter playnely and perticulerly 
appeare in either parte upon the depofition of the faide fermor before us in everey 
thing touching the fame. 

*' The Colkadge, Provoftrie, Freechappell, and Perfonage of Stoke under Hamden, being 

of valewe in £. s. d, 

" The fcite of the houfe, with the orcharde and other appertenances, 7 

conteigning 4 acres. . , , f o 40 o 

" A broode cloofe in the moor, conteigning 5 acres — 012 o 

" A cloofe of pafture cauled Barmehaye, conteigning i acre and a half 050 
" A cloofe of pafture called Clerken-Mede, conteigning 3 acres — 070 

" A cloofe of pafture caulled Hare-Haie, conteigning i acre o o 20 

" A cloofe of pafture called Sukeman's-Land, conteigning 4 acres — 040 
« A cloofe of pafture lying at Yvekheftre on thefter fide of Stooke, con- 
teigning by eftimacon 4 acres-, and a cloofe of pafture lying att( 
Tvelcheftre called Spttell, conteigning by eftimacon 12 acres, va-( 
lewed together at 

" Tenne acres and oone half feftre of medow lying at rWf/&f/?r^ o 18 10 

Pafcha; in recompenfationem duarum part'ium fequeflri quod ad diaam ecclefiam Well, pertinet tempore vaca- 
tionis ecclefis predids de Stoke ; et archidiacono Well. & ejus fucceflbribus dim. marc, ad idem feftum occafionc 
fequeftri pra:difti. Si prelbiteri minores deiiquerint infra capellam feu curiam diai domini Johannis de Bellocampo 
in maneno fuo de Stoke, feu infra fcepta domuum fuarum, fubjacebunt in hoc correftioni fui prxpofiti, & eos 
pumet canon.ce. dum tamcn fit tale deliftum quod abfque auftoiitate epifcopi, feu fui fuperions, legitime poterit 
emendari. In alijs autem locis fi quis eorum deliquerit ordinaris fubjaceat poteftati. Prspofitus vero prsdiftus, 
per nos, fucceflores noftros, vel aliquem per nos deputatum, femel in anno in ecclefiaparochiali de Stoke vifitavitur: 
pra^pofitus etiam prsdiftus res communes & negotia communia cum confilio fociorum fuorum pertraftet, & coram 
eifdcm de adrainillratione fua & ftatu bonorum fuorum communium, quolibet anno infra Odab. SandiMichaelis 
teneatur reddere rationem, quam nobis vel noftro Commi/Tario oflendet in parochiali ecclefiade Stoke quando 
earn fecenmus vifitan, & ipfe fuerit requifitus. In quorum omnium prsmiflbrum tellimonium, huic prafenti 
ordmationi noflra; figiUum nollrum duximus apponendum. Dat. apud Banevvell 4 non. Odobris I ^04. Confe- 
eratwnis noftrae 2'."^ E Re0ro Johannis de DrokensfirJ, Ep. B. i^ If'ell. 

' Itin. ij, 94. 

One 



O 21 8 



3'9 

C' S' d. 

O O 12 
054 



050 



CintinbuU.] STOKE-UNDER-HAMDEN. 

" One acre of meede in Eaji-meede at Stoke 

« In the comen pafture caUed Rekefden at Stoke, 8 beeftes leas, valued at 

" In Marjion in the comen 25 acres of furfey grounde which the tenant" 

doth occupye everey thirde yere, and thother 2 yeres itt lycth( 

comen to other men, and the tenant dothe take noprofitt thereof,( 

which is valewed communibus annis at 

"Fyve acres of meede in £)-,?- Af^^J-,? at .S'/*?^/^,? — 

« Arrable grounde 1 64I acres at 1 2d. th acre — _ _ 3 4 6 

" The (lief and other tithes valued by the othe of John Kyte fermor of? 

the fame to be worthe one yere with an other , | Jo o o 

£.44 12 O 

" Going owte of the Jame in 
" Paymentes to the preeft for his ftipende yerelye — 8 o o 7 
"Payments to the Bifshopp,Deane, and chapiter of Welles o 36 lol-j 9 ^6 io| 

" And fo remayneth cleere l.2>\ 1 5 i-r 

« Memorand That there hath been 40s. proffitts commyng oute of Shepton- 
Beacham, which hath been withdrawn by the fpace of 15 yeres. 

<'Item. Thoblacons of the chappell of Saynte Nycholas of Stoke hathe been worth 
by the yere 4I. whiche hath been decayed by the fpace of 12 yeres. 

Hugh Poulett, 
Thomas Dyer. 
" Forafmuche as myLorde Proteftor's graces pleafureis, that Mrs. Elizabeth DarrcII 
Ihould have a leafe of the preamifles; make therefore a leafe of the lame for 21 yeres 
paying the rentt aforefaid with provifo as is ufed in lyke caafe, and in confideracon of 
the difchardge of 300I. which the faide Mrs. Darrell dothe clayme of the Kinoes 
majeltie for a dett dewe unto her.*" ^ 

The provoft of this college had a large houfe in the village of Stoke." 
But to return to the family of Beauchamp. Sir John de Beauchamp, the founder of 
the aforefaid chapel, died feized of the manor of Stoke-under-Hamden, 10 Edw III 
being certified to hold the fame of the King in chief by the fervice of one knight's fee.' ' 
To whom fucceeded two of his own name, his fon and grandfon, the laft of whom 
dying without iflTue male, 35 Edw. III. this eftate came to the family of Meriet by the 
marriage of Sir John de Meriet with Eleanor de Beauchamp, his fifter and coheirefsj 
whofe fon Sir John de Meriet conveyed this manor to Sir Thomas de Gournay," lord 
of Inghfhcombe in this county, who by treafon forfeiting it to the crown, it thence 

•Harl.MS.6o6,p.6o. "161.11111.11.94. i Efc. " Of this family fee more in vol. ii. p. 138. 

became 



320 STOKE-UNDER-HAMDEN. [Cintinfeufl. 

became attached to the dutcby of Cornwall, wherein It continues to this day, being the 
property of the Prince of Wales. 

Sir Matthew de Gournay, fon of the abovementioned Sir Thomas de Gournay, was 
one of the moft famous warriors of the age in which he lived; having fignalized 
his valour at the battles of Crefiy, Poidiers, and many other great engagements, 
in the reigns of Edw. III. and Ric. II. At length retiring to his native manfion at 
Stoke-under-Hamden, he there died in peace Sept. 26, 1406, and was buried in the 
collegiate chapel abovementioned, where the following infcription round his portraiture, 
engraved in brafs, was fixed upon his grave-ftone to his memory : 

*' 3(cp gift le noble $ tiaUlant cbitiaUc ^afjcu ue ®umep iaDys fcnefc&al Dc 
lanties gt capitain Du cbaftel Daqiies por noftre ^eignov le Hog en la Uiicbc 
lie (S5u2ene, que en fa tJie fu a la fiatail De T6eaumarin (j ala apte0 a la fiege 
Dalgeiice fur le ^ara^ines, ^ auri a le fiatailles He JLcfclufe, De Creflp, Dc 
^ngenelTe, Delpegteceg, De il3a?ara, Dcrjrep, et aplufiurs autreg l)ataille0 
et affegeg, en Ics quer il gaina noblcment graunD log ^ honour pec lespace De 
xxxxiiij ^ rDj ang, f motul! le xxMi jouc De ©eptemftre Ian noflre ^eignot 
3icfu C&rift mcccctin que Dc falme Dieur tit mercj). 3men." 

The once noble manfion of the Beauchamps and the Gournays is now in ruins, its 
fmall remains being converted into offices for a farm-houfe, and tlic chapel into a cyder- 
vault. On the Ibuthweft fide of the chapel lay three effigies in ftone of men in armour, 
and two females reprefenting fome of the noble family of Beauchamp, whofe arms, 
Valre, argent and azure, were depifted on the tomb and in the windows. There were alfo 
in this part of the chapel two altar tombs without effigies. On the north fide of the 
body of the chapel was a tomb in the wall; and another having thereon the effigy of one 
of the fame family of Beauchamp, charged with a fhield vaire. Sir Matthew de Gournay 
lay before the choir door. His arms, paly of fix or and guks, were in the windows. 
Another coat in the fame windows was, Gules, femee of crofs-crodets or. At the weft 
end of the body of the chapel there was a large fiat ftone without any infcription:' 

There is now no trace of any of thefe monuments remaining. 

The Norman record takes the following notice of fome other manerial property in 
this neighbourhood: 

" Malger holds of the Earl [of Morton] Stochet. Alwin held it in the time .of 
** King Edward, and gelded for two hides and one virgate and a half of land. The 
" arable is three carucates. In demefne are two carucates, and feven fervants, with 
" one villane, and one cottager. There is a mill of forty-pence rent, and ten acres of 
" meadow. It is worth forty Ibillings.'"" 

" Robert holds of the Earl, Stochet. Three thanes held it in the time of King 
** Edward, and gelded for two hides wanting half a virgate of land. The arable is two 
" carucates. There are four cottagers, and ten acres of meadow, and fifteen acres oif 
*' pafture, and four acres of wood. It was and is worth forty Ihillings."" 

' Le\. Itin. ii. 93, 94. " Lib. Domefday. • Ibid. 

Sfoket, 



Cintint)uU.] 



STOKE-UNDER-HAMDEN. 



321 



Stokety or EJloket, in the time of Edw. III. belonged to Sir Robert Hull, knt. and 
pafled by Catherine his daughter and heir in marriage to Sir Robfert l.atimer, knt. 
grandfon of William lord Latimer, baron of Corby in the county of Northampton." 

The church of Stoke-under-Hamden was, in 1292 valued at thirty marks.' The 
living is a curacy in the deanery of Ilchefter. The Rev. Edward Whitley is the 
prefent incumbent. 

The church confids of a nave, chancel, and fouth ailej on the north fide of the nave 
is a tower containing five bells and a clock. 

In the north wall of the chancel, under an arch, lies the effigy of one of the family 
of Strode J near it is a monument with this infcription: ■ 1 " Here underneath lies the 
body of John Strode, gent, who departed this life Dec. 5, 1725, aged 66. Alfo is 
•interred Maiy his wife, who died Nov. 22, 17 12, aged 46." 



" Hutchins's Hift. of Dorfet, u. 255. 



* Taxat. Spiritual. 






U 



o 



N. 



THIS fmall parifh is fituated one mile eaftward from Montacute, and three miles 
weftward from Yeovil, at the foutheaft extremity of the hundred we are de- 
fcribing. Its ancient names were Lochetone, and LuSlone, under the former of which it 
is thus defcribed in the Norman furvey: 

" Anfger holds of the Earl [Morton] in Lochetone one hide. Alwin held it in 
" the time of King Edward. The arable is one carucate, which is in demefne, and 
" [there are] two fcrvants, and three cottagers, and ten acres of meadow. It is worth 
*' twenty ftiillings."* 

This manor, which in the time of Henry VI. and Edw. IV.'' was held by the family 
of Brook, of Brook-Ivelchefter, of whom we have lately fpoken, is now die property of 
William Wyndham, efq. 

The living is a reftory in the deanery of Ivelchefter, and in the patronage of the 
lord of the manor. The Rev. Henry Sampfon is the prefent incumbent. 

The church, which is dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul, is a fmall low edifice of 
one aile, with a turret at the weft end containing two fmall bells. 



• Lib. Domefday. 



•Efc 




Vol. III. 



Tt 



THORN- 



[ 3^2 ] [Cintinbull. 



THORN-COFFIN 

LIES to the north of Lufton, and about three miles fouth from Ivelchefter, in a 
pleafant country, well wooded, and varied with fmall vales and eminences j the 
foil a lightifh fandy loam. 

Its ancient name, which is of Saxon growth, might poflibly have originated from a 
fuperabundant quantity of that tree growing in thefe parts j its other name was given 
it by a family who poffeffed the manor. The Norman tranfcribers wrote it as they 
pronounced it, ^orne, and thus furveyed it as the property of Roger de Curcelle: 

" Alric holds "of Roger, Torne. Three thanes held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and o-elded for one hide, and three virgates of land. The arable is five carucates, 
« In demefne is one carucate, and three fervants, and nine villanes, and five cottagers, 
*' with three ploughs. There is a mill of ten fhillings rent, and four acres of meadow, 
" and thirty acres of pafture, and eight acres of wood. It was worth twenty fhillings, 
«' now forty fhillings.'" 

Robert Coffin was living here 13 Edw. II. and bore on his feal three roundels be- 
tween five crofs-croflets.'' His lands here were held of the barony of Montacute." In 
the time of Edw. III. the manor of Thorn-Coffin belonged to the family of de Clevedon, 
from whom it pafled to Hoglhaw, and thence to Bluet.'' 10 Henry VI. three parts of 
the manor, with divers tenements in the parifh, were granted to the priory of Stevordale." 

John Napier, efq; of Tintinhull, is the prefent lord. 

The living is a reftory in the deanery of Ivelchefter, and in the gift of the lord of the 
manor. The Rev. Edward Napier is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Andrew, of one pace, forty-one feet long, and fourteen 
wide, with a fmall wooden turret at the weft end containing two bells. 

■ Lib. Domefday. » Seals from ancient Deeds. ' Lib. Feod. ? Rot. Claus. 15 Ric. !!► 

* Pat. 20 Hen. VI. p. i. m. 21. 



KINGSTON. 

153J.'J 

THIS is a disjointed parifti, lying contiguous to Ilminfter in the hundred of Abdick 
and Bulftone. It is fituated on rifing ground, with an agreeable variety of fur- 
face, and well wooded and watered. The foil is a ftone-rufh, mixed with fand. The 
lands nearly equally divided between tillage and dairy. Two hamlets are comprifed 
within this parilh, viz. 

1. Alownshay, one mile eaftward from the church. 

2. LuDNEY, the fame diftance towards the foutheaft, 

A. D. 9'40, 



Cintinbun.] KINGSTON. 323 

A. D. 940, Edmund, brother of King AthelfVan, gave this manor, confiding of eight 
hides, to the abbey of Glaftonbury," in which, till the general fubverfion of EnglKh 
property by William the Conqueror, it continued; and was then given with the other 
adjacent lordfliips to the Earl of Morton. 

" Hubert holds of the Earl, Chincestonk. The church of Glaftingbcrie held it 
** in the time of King Edward, and gelded for eight hides. The arable is eight caru- 
*' cates. Thereof are in demefne four hides, and there are two carucates, and three 
" fervants, and eleven villanes, and thirteen cottagers, with five ploughs. There arc 
" forty-one acres of meadow. Wood fix furlongs long, and three furlongs broad. It 
*' was and is worth nine pounds. The church has no fervice."'' 

8 Edw. I. John de Burgh held this manor with that o( Jlown/hay," whence it came 
to the family of Fitzpaine, and afterwards to the Chidioks of Dorfetfhire.* Earl Poulett 
is its prefent poflcflbr. 

At Alownfhay, which has been a place of great antiquity, was formerly a church or 
chapel. Of this place was Henry Jeanes, fon of Chriftopher Jeanes of Kingfton, 
who became a commoner of New-Inn-hall in the univerfity of Oxford in the year 
1626, and afterwards, being a learned preacher both in the univerfity and elfewhere, 
was in 1635 prefented by Sir John Wyndham to the redlory of Beer-Crocombe and 
Capland in this county; foon after which he became vicar of Kingfton; and at length, 
upon the change of the times in 1641, he became reftor of the church of Chedzoy in 
the room of Dr. Walter Raleigh. He wrote divers books, and was according to the 
relation of Wood," a fcholaftical man, a contemner of the world, generous, free-hearted, 
jolly, witty, and facetious. He died at Wells A. D. 1662, and was buried in the 
cathedral church. 

The living is a curacy in the deanery of Crewkerne, and in the gift of the dean and 
chapter of Wells. In 1292 it was valued at twenty marks.' 

The church confills of a nave and chancel, between which ftands a large embattled. 
tower, containing four bells. 

* Guiliehn. Malmefbur. de Antiq. Glafton. Ecclef. Ad. de Dom. 72, ' Lib. Domefday. 

' Efc. * Jbid. ' Athen. Oxon. ii. 298. ' Taxat. Spiritual, 




T 1 1 THE 



[ 325 I 
THE HUNDRED 

O F 

W E L L O W 



LIES on the fouthern fide of Bath-Forum, and extends noithweftward to that 
of Keynfliam. The Roman Fofle-road, entering this diftridl at Odd-Down, 
traverfes it obliquely from northeaft to fouthweft, and is in many parts ftill 
perfed. The ancient lords of the hundred were the families of Montefort, Berghcrfh, 
Hungerford, and Raftings, It now belongs to Thomas Samuel JollifFe, and Samuel 
Twyford, efqrs. 



W E L L O W. 

THIS large parifli is fituated in a delightflil champaign country, five miles fouth- 
weft from the city of Bath, in a vale nearly furrounded with hills finely cultivated, 
and wooded with elm, afti, oak, and hazel coppices, which in this foil thrive luxuriantly. 

This place, lying fo contiguous to the Fofle, and fo near the Aqua Solis of the 
Romans, became one of their moft confiderable villas in thefe parts, and the veftiges 
of their works are here frequently developed. There is a fpot of ground called IVellow 
Hayes, which feems particularly to have been inhabited by that people, there having 
been no lefs than four Roman teflelated pavements found here. The firft was in the 
year 1685 ;» the others in 1737 and 1739. Thefe pavements werd moft elegantly inlaid 
with fmall tejfevie, forming a variety of figures of men, animals, leaves, fquares, and 
circles."" At the fame place were alfo difcovered the remains of a Roman fudatory, in 
which were the fragments of pateras and other utenfils, and large hewn ftones, fome 
round and others fquare, being part of fome very large and noble edifice. In a barrow 

* Gale's Antoninus, p. 89. ' Plates of thefe have been publiihed by the Anti<iuarian Society. 

alfo 



326 w E L L o w. [mmo\a, 

alio here were found fomefew years ago feveralftone coffins; but thefe muft have been 
depofited by a fubfequent people, probably the Saxons, fome one of whofe chieftains, 
according to provincial tradition, having been flain in a bloody battle, lies buried under- 
neath an immenfe tumulus, called JVoodborough, at the extremity of the parifli. 

The Norman topographers, miflaking the Saxon F,' wrote this place Telwe, and in the 
Conqueror's furvey thus defcribe this manor, and the adjoining one of Woodborough: 

" Ofbern himfelf holds Telwe. Dono held it in the time of King Edward, and 
" gelded for five hides. The arable is four carucates. In demefne is one carucate, 
" and two fervants, and three villanes, and four cottagers, with three ploughs. There 
" are two mills rented at one hundred pence, and fourteen acres of meadow, and fix- 
" teen acres of coppice-wood, and fourteen acres of pafture. It was formerly worth 
" three pounds, now four pounds.'"* 

" Ofbern himfelf holds Udeberce. Dono held it in the time of King Edward, and 
" gelded for one hide. The arable is two carucates. In demefne is one carucate, and 
" fix cottagers, with one fervant, and eight acres of meadow. It was formerly worth 
" thirty fhillings, now it is worth forty flnllings."* 

This Ofbern, who was furnamed Gifard, or Giffard, had by the grant of William 
the Conqueror feveral manors in various parts of England, of which Brimpsfield in 
Gloucefterfhire was his principal featj but afterwards Winterborn in Wilts became the 
head of his barony, and was denominated from him Winterborn-GifFard. He was fuc- 
ceeded by Helias GifFard, who was a benefadtor to the abbey of St. Peter at Gloucefter, 
as was alfo Helias his fon, who was living in the time of Henry II. and then gave lands 
at Aldbourn in the county of Wilts to the knights-templars. This Helias was a monk 
of St. Peter's abbey in Gloucefter.' To him fuccecded another Helias, the third 
of that name, who 12 Henry II. held nine knights' fees, and gave one hundred marks 
fine for lively of his inheritance.' His fucceflbr was Thomas GifFard, who lived in the 
time of Ric, I. and was father of another Helias GifFard, who joined with the rebellious 
barons againft King John, and thus loft many of his eftates. This manor of Wellow 
in the fuccecding reign is found to be held of the honour of Gloucefter by Henry de 
Montefort,'' whofe defcendant Reginald conveyed it 20 Edw. III. to Sir Bartholomew 
de Burgherfh,' whence it came to the families of Hungerford, Haftings, and Huntingdon. 
1630 Sir Arthur Capel, knt. was lord of this manor. It is now the property of 
William Gore Langton, efq. 

Lands in Woodborough belonged to the Carthufian monaftery of Hinton." It is 
jnow the feat of the family ofLanfdown. 

Southward from Wellow, at the diftance of about one mile is the hamlet of Stoney- 
LiTTLETON, which before the Norman invafion was the land of three Saxon lords, but 
was given by the Conqueror to Roger de Curcelle. 

'Many names are mifpek in Pomefday-book, by reafon of the tranfcribers not underftanding the Saxon cha- 
rafters, or to coj-y them from the pronunciation of the natives. ; 

' Lib. Domefday. 'Ibid. ' Dugd. Bar. i. 500. « Rot. Pip. 12 Hen. II. 

* Lib. f eod. ' Rot. Claus, 20 Ed. III. •■ Pat. 36 Ed. Uh 

*' Norman 



I 



melloto.] W E L L O W. 327 

" Norman holds of Roger, Liteltone. Almar and Ofbern and Godric held it for 
*' three manors in the time of King Edward, and gelded for three hides. The arable 
*• is four carucates. In demefne are two carucates, and three fervants, and four vil- 
** lanes, and three cottagers, with one plough. There are forty acres of meadow, and 
" as many of coppice-wood. It was and is worth forty fliillings."' v 

The lords of Wellow were aftei-wards the chief lords of this manor, under whom 
it was fometime held by the family of Brook. 5 Henry V. Sir Thomas Brook, knt. 
held the manor of Littleton, with lands and tenements, in Wellow, Pekeliniche, or 
Peglinch, Harferig, now called Haflage, fVoodborough, Sbenigscomb, now Shafcomb, and 
Camely, of Sir Walter Hungerford, knt." The manor is now the property of John 
Smith, efq. 

Another adjacent hamlet is called Beggeridge, which formerly gave name to a family. 
24 Edw. I. Gilbert de Baggerugge held part of a knight's fee here of the honour of 
Gloucefter." The abbot and convent of St. Auguftine's in Briftol had alfo pofleflions 
in this hamlet, which 32 Henry VIII. were granted to tfte Earl of Hertford." 7 Edw. 
VI. the manor of Beggeridge was the property of William Crowche, efq."* 

Weftward from Wellow is the ancient village of Whiteoxmead, which in the Con- 
queror's time was called Witochefmedey probably from fome Saxon lord, and was then 
held by Roger de Curcelle: 

" Robert holds of Roger, Witochesmede. Two thanes held it in the time of 
*' King Edward, and gelded for one hide. The arable is two carucates, which are in 
*• demefne, with one fervant, and fix cottagers. There are three acres of meadow, and 
♦* thirty acres of wood. It was and is worth three pounds.'"* 

This place alfo gave name to a family, of whom John Wittokefmede occurs witnefs 
to a certificate from the rolls of a court of piepowder 35 Henry VI. he was then bailiff" 
to Richard Beauchamp bilhop of Sali/bury. 9 Edw. II. Joan Atte-chambre held at 
Whiteoxmead one mefluage, ten acres of meadow, eight acres of arable, and two acres 
of wood, of Sir Elias Cottel, knt. by fervice of fuit at the three week court of the faid 
Elias at Camerton.' 23 Edw. III. the heir of the faid Sir Elias Cottel held the eighth 
part of a knight's fee in Whiteoxmead, and Richard de Rodney the fame, of Hugli le 
Delpenfer.' The priors of Hinton had tenements in this hamlet, as they had alfo in 

Peglinch, another neighbouring vill, written in ancient times Puchekge, and Poke- 
lincbe. This was another of the manors of Roger de Curcelle, as we learn from the 
following extraft: 

" Goisfrid holds of Roger, Puchelege. Almar held it in the time of King Edward, 
** and gelded for one hide. The arable is four carucates. In demefne are two caru- 
" cates, and five fervants, and two villanes, and four cottagers, with two ploughs. 
*' There are fix acres of meadow, and fix acres of pafl:ure. It was and is worth forty 
« Ihillings.'" 

• Lib. Domefday. » Efc. - Lib. Feod. 

• Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 6. The abbot's lands m Wellow were in 1293 valued at loos. Taxat; Timporal. 
» Ter. Sydenham. ' Lib. Domefday. ' Efc. ' Lib. Food. « Lib. Domefday. 

The 



328 W E L L O W. [mz\lo\X>, 

The manor became afterwards the property of the families of Montfort, and Rodney. 
25 Edw. III. Sir Walter de Rodney, knt. gave this manor, with a carucate and two 
yard-lands in Woodborough, Ekewike or Eaft-Wick, and Whiteoxmead, to the prior 
and convent of Hinton," in which it continued till the difTolution of monafteries, when, 
36 Henry VIII. the manor of Peglinch, and the hamlet of Chefcombe or Shascombe 
in this parifh, Eaft-Wick, and Whiteoxmead j as alfo lands and tenements in Peglinch, 
Shefcombe, Whiteoxmead, Woodborough, Eaft-Wick, Wellow, and Camerton, were 
granted to John Biffe and his heirs, tenable of the King in chief by the fervice of the 
twentieth part of a knight's fee." The manor is now the property of Walter Long, 
of Wraxall in the county of Wilts, efq. 

TwiNNEY, or TwYNiHo, a hamlet northeaftward from Wellow, imparted its name 
to a family of repute, who were originally feated here, but afterwards removed to 
Cayford and other parts.'' This eftate belonged fometlme to the family of Hungerford, 
and other lands were held here by the abbot and convent of Muchelney.'' It was an- 
y ciently written Tornie, and Ticfiie, and was at the Conqueft (as we ihall fee hereafter) 

a member of the manor of Comb-Hay. 

Of the hamlets of Shascombe and Hassage, little occurs memorable. The former 
is the eftate of Walter Long, efq. 

The abbot and convent of Cirencefter in the county of Gloucefter, were patrons of 
», the church of Wellow, which was given to them by their founder King Henry I. A. D. 

1 133." The redtory was in 1292 valued at twenty-four pounds; the vicarage at 
thirteen marks.*" 

The living is vicarial, in the deanery of Frome, and in die patronage of the Rev, 
Edmund Gardiner. The Rev. William Devey is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to St. Julian. It was built at the expence of Sir Walter 
Hungerford about A. D. 1372, and is a handfome edifice, confifting of a nave, chancel, 
t\*o fide ailes, and tower at the weft end, cfontaining a clock and eight bells. 

In the chancel is an ancient ftone monument, whereon lies the effigy of a woman 
drefled in a clofe-bodied gown, with a large ruff, and in the lower part of the front of 
the tomb the effigies of feveral children, two of whom are lying fwathed on fmall 
tombs. On a tablet is this infcription: 

" Epitaphium in mortem Dorothea; Popham, fideliffimje conjugis Edwardi Popham, 
armigeri; obijt Anno Chrifti incarnati 16 14, primo Decembris die, anno aetatis 26. 
" Alma parens, mater virtutis, Candida conjux — ' 

Hasc tria cum parvo corpore magna jacent, 
Degit cafta viro, virtuti vixit alumna: 

(Quid magis optandum) pauperibufque parens. 
Vir virtus: Populi damnum deplangite veftrum — 
En miferi! tumulo cundla fepulta jacent." 
Arms: yfr^^/, on a chief |;«/<?j two bucks' heads cabofled cr^ 

" Inq. ad quod Damn. " Pat. 36 Hen. VIII. » See vol; ii. p. 189. ' Efc. 

* Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen. * Taxat. Spiritual. 

Near 



(DUcUoto.] W E L L O W. 329 

Near the above is a finall mural (lone, infcribed, " Here lyeth the body of Giles 

Hiingerford, gent, who departed this liFe the 14th ofOdt. in the yeare of our Lord 1638." 

On another is a brafs-plate with this infcription : " Here lyeth the body of M"' 

VrfulaHungerford, fccond daughter of Mr. John Hungerford, of North-Standing in the 
county of Wilts, who departed this life the i6th day of Oftober, anno Dom. 1645." 

Againft the fouth wall of the chancel is a ftone,. infcribed, " Here lyeth the body 

of Richard Landfdowne, efq; who departed this life the 9th of January 1694. Here 
alfo lyeth the body of Dorothy the wife of Richard Landfdowne, who was daughter of 
Alexander Thilllethwayte, of Winterflow in the county of Wilts, efq. She dyed 
July 17, 1717." 

Againft one of the pillars in the nave, — " This in memory of Thomas Scudamore, 
gent, of Whiteoxmead in tliis parifh, who lies interred near this pillar. He departed 
this life July 5, Anno Dom. 1718, astat. 79." 

In the fouth aile is a mural monument of black and white marble, with the following 

infcription: " Near this place lyeth the body of the Rev. Mr. John Hodfon, 

minifter of this place many years, who died March nth, 17 18, aged 75. As alfo the 
body of his fon Edwrn Hodfon, late member of the corporation of Bath, who died 
May the i8th, 1735, aged 40. And alfo the body of Mrs. Sarah Bletchly, of Bath, 
who died July 21, 1741, aged 57; at whofe expence this monument was eredled to the 
memory of the abovefaid Mr. Edwin Hodfon." 



CAMERTON. 

THIS parifh is fituated fouthweft from Wellow, near the Fofle road, fix miles from 
the city of Bath. That part of it which was in ancient times moftly inhabited, 
was (as it is faid) its weftern and foudiweftern extremity, where large foundations of 
buildings have been feen. Near the Fofie were heretofore found fome large bones, and 
part of a teffclated pavement. A fmall brooli", called the Cam, rifing at Camtly, and 
giving name to that, as well as this village, waflies the valley, and pafllng by Dunkerton, 
Combe-Hay, and Midford, difcharges its waters into the river Avon. 

In the year of our Lord 954, Alfred, with the confent of King Edred, gave this manor 
of Camerton, tlien written Camelartcne, to the monks of Glaftonbury.' Its contents 
were at that period certified to be five hides, or about fix hundred acres of land. When 
William the Conqueror came to the crown, he feized the eftate, and beftowed it upon 
his fiivourite the Earl of Morton, who fliortly after exchanged it with the abbey for the 
manor of Tintinliull ; by thofe means reinftating the monks in their former pofTcflion. 
Thefe negociations appear from the furvey of that age: 

• Guilielm, Malmefbur.ap. Ad.de Doraerham, i. 76. * Ibid. 

Vol. III. U u " The 



330 C A xM E R T O N. [mzlim, 

"The Church itfelf holds Camelertone. Edmer held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for ten hides. The arable is ten carucates. Thereof are iri 
" demefne feven hides, and there are two carucates, and eight fervants, and fix villanes, 
" and fix cottagers, with two ploughs. There are two mills of five fhillings rent, and 
" fourfcore acres of meadow, and twenty acres of pafture, and forty acres of wood. It 
" is worth feven pounds. 

" Of this land of this manor Roger holds of the Abbot one hide, and has there one 
*' plough, with one fervant, and one cottager. There are ten acres of meadow, and fix 
" acres of wood. It is worth ten Ihilhngs. 

" This manor Earl Moriton gave to the abbot for Tutenelle in exchange."' 

In the time of Henry I. Abbot Herlewin, whofe extravagance and profufe liberality 
involved his church in many difficulties and much difgrace, gave the manor of Cu- 
merton, then called Camekrton, to one Sir Robert de Cotele, knt. his favourite, who, 
at Herlewin's death in 1120, entered on this cftate, and many others which he had 
obtained by the fame abbot's indifcretion.*" He died himfclf foon after, and Sigfrid, 
fucceeding to the abbacy, fet about proving his right to this manor, which, in the time 
of his fiicceflbr Henry de Blois, was peaceably ceded to the abbey." Notwithftanding 
which the feme family of Cotele continued for a long fucceffion tenants under the 
relpeftive abbots of Glaftonbury. In the aid levied for marrying the King's daughter 
1 2 Henry II. Richard Cotele is certified to hold twenty pounds worth of land, which 
formerly belonged to the demefnes and refedtory of the monks, and was exempt from 
doing any fervice for the fame/ perhaps through an indulgence to the children of Sir 
Robert de Cotele, who claimed this manor by virtue of the grant made by Abbot 
Herlewin. 

To this Richard Cotele fucceeded Sir William Cotele, who was a knight in the 
time of Henry III. and Edw. I. and left iffue Elias Cotele, who held this manor of the 
Bilhop of Bath and Wells, by reafon of an award made in favour of that fee during its 
diflTentions with the abbots of Glaftonbury.^ This Elias Cotele prefented to the church 
of Camerton 9 Edw. 111.*" and was the laftof the name that had any concern with the 
place. For 16 Edw. III. Oliver Dinant, or Dinham, a younger fon of the Dinhams, 
barons of Hartland in Devonfhire, and of Buckland in this county, died feized hereof 
leaving by his fecond wife Margaret, the daughter of Sir Richard Hydon, three 
daughters his coheirs; the eldeft of whom, Margaret, was married to Sir William 
Afthorpe, knt. who in her right became pofl^efled of this manor, and held the fame 
from 39 Edw. III. to i Henry IV. when he died, and Robert Paulton was found to 
be his next heir.' Which Robert Paulton held it but one year, and was fucceeded 
therein by Sir William Paulton, knt. his brother and next heir." This Sir William 
married Elizabeth daughter of Sir John Wroth; but having no ifi"ue by her, he fettled' 
this manor upon the hufbands of his kinfwomen, Joan the wife of John Kelly, and 
daughter of Elias Fitzpayn, of Studley in the county of Devon; and Agnes the wife of 

' Lib. Domefda/. " Ad. de Domerham. Hift. ii. 312. * Ibid. 313. ' Lib. Nig. Scac. ii. 89. 
* Ad. de Domerham. ut fupra, 472. " Excerpt, e Regift, Wellen. ' Efc. " Ibid. ■ MS. Carew. 

Nicholas 



OlcUoto.] C A M E R T O N. 331 

Nicholas St. Lot; who at his death 28 Henry VI. were found to be his next heirs.™ 
John Kelly died feized of a moiety of this manor 5 Edw. IV. leaving by the faiil 
Joan his wife two fons, Tiiomas and William, the firft of whom left one daughter 
Edith, the wife of Humphry Calwodelegh; but they having no iffiie, the two daugh- 
ters of William, the fecond fon of John Kelly, became veiled with the eftate; the 
cldell of whom, Margaret, was married to Michael Kelly, and the other to John 
Carew fon of Sir William Carew, of St. Edmundfbury in the county of Suffolk, dc- 
fcended from the ancient and eminent family of Carew, of Carew-caftle in the county 
of Pembroke." The faid family of Carew became afterwards fblely pofTefTed of tlie 
manor of Camerton, and held the fame till about the middle of the prefent century, 
when Thomas Carew, efq; fold it to Philip Stephens, efq; father of James Stephens, 
efq; the prefent pofTefTor, who has a handfome houfe near the church, with a large 
pleafure ground embelliflied with thriving plantations. 

In the valley at Rodford is a coal-mine belonging to the fliid James Stephens, efq; 
and other gentlemen, which has been worked for fbme years with much fuccefs. In 
the ftrata of black flone are a great variety of curious impreffions of ferns, rufhes, and 
other plants. In the corn fields of this parifh grows a kind of tithymalus or efula, 
fomewhat refembling the fun fpurge; its flalks are reddifh, and the leaves pale green, 
or inclining to yellow. 

Northward on the hill is the hamlet of Tunly, anciently called Twnbeli. This 
eflate belonged in the time of King William the Conqueror to Giflebert Fitz-Turoldj 
it is now part of the manor of Camerton. 

" Walter holds of Giflebert Tumbeli. Edric held it in the time of King Edward, 
" and gelded for five hides. The arable is five carucates. In demelhe is one carucate, 
'' and two fervants, and five villanes, and four bordars, and four cottagers, with three 
" ploughs. There is a mill of thirty-pence rent, and thirty-five acres of meadow. 
" Pafture one mile long, and half a mile broad, and as much of wood. When he re- 
«t ceived it, it was worth one hundred fhillings, now the fame."" 

Near this flands another ancient village denominated Creedlingcot, fometimes 
corruptly Camicut, which in the fame furvey is thus defcribed: 

" Richard holds of the Earl [Morton] Credelincote. Godeman held it in the 
" time of King Edward, and gelded for three hides and a half. The arable is three 
" carucates. In demefne are two carucates, with one fervant, and one villane, and 
** three cottagers. There is a mill of five fhillings rent, and ten acres of meadow. 
•" It is worth fifty fhillings."'' 

This manor was afterwards held by the family of Lovel, and under them by others 
as of the feignory of Morton. 19 Edw. I. the heirs of Wilham Franceis and Robert 
le Harper held one knight's fee de Mortaigne in Cridlincote of Sir Hugh Lovel, knt.** 
The family of Bampfylde were its fubfequent lords. The tithes of Creedlingcot were 
given by William earl of Morton to the monks of Montacute.' 

The ancient vill of Wick is called in the record above quoted Ecewkhe. 

" Efc. ■' See Crowcombe in the hundred of Williton-Freemanors. • Lib. Domcfd.iy. 

"Ibid. "• Lib. Feod. 'See page 312. " Alurcd 

Uu 2 



332 C A M E R T O N. [mm\0. 

" Alured holds of the Earl, Ecewiche. Aleftan held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for one virgate of land. There is one villane, and one fervant. 
" It was and is worth ten (hillings.'" 

It was afterwards fometime called EJiwike, and lands here belonged to the monaftery 
at Hinton. 

There is alfo a hamlet called Medyate, weft from Tunly, containing three houfes, 
and another called Lemasfield, northward from Tunly, in which are two houfes. 

The living of Camerton is a reflory in the deanery of Frome. and in the gift of the 
lord of the manor. The Rev. John Prowfe is the prefent incumbent. In 1292 this 
reftory was rated at lol. i8s. 8d. The abbot of Glaftonbury had a penfion from it of 
13s. 4d. and the prior of Montacute another of 8s.' 

The church is dedicated to St. Peter, and confifts of a nave, chancel, and north 
chapel, with a large tower at the weft end. 

In the chapel are two large tombs, on the firft of which lie the effigies of Sir John 
Carew in armour, and his lady in a clofe-bodied veft; beneath on one fide are the images 
of three boys kneeling, and on the other four girls in like pofture, with a little babe 
under them fwathed like a mummy, and reclining on two fcuUs. The infcription as fol- 
lows: " This monument was eredbed to the memory of John Carew, knight, and Dame 
Elizabeth his wife, anno Dom. 1640." At the head of thefe effigies are two erefb 
Ihields oppofite each otherj the one bearing Or, three lions palTant in ^s\t fable, armed 
and langued gules, Carew. The other. Argent, a chevron gules between three coots fable, 
Southcot. At the feet is a large ered ftiield refpefting the figures, and charged as follows: 
Quarterly, Firft and fourth, Carew. Second, Argent, a. chevron between three billets 
gules, Kelly. Third, Argent, a crofs between four choughs fable: impaling Southcot. 

The other tomb fupport the effigies of John Carew, efq; and Dorothy his wife; 
he is drefled in a coat refembling leather, with long flit cuffs, and large round buttons 
from top to bottom; fix on the flap of each pocket, and fixteen on each fkirt from the 
hip to the bottom, trunk hofe, and high-heeled ftioes. She is attired in a black loofe 
hood, the lappets of which are tied under her chin, ftays of the prefent fafhion, and a 

loofe black coat below. On each fide is the figure of a child formally habited. 

" Here lieth the body of John Carew, efq; fecond fon of Sir John Carew, knt. who 
dyed the 5th of June 1683. Mrs. Dorothy Carew, wife of John Carew, efq; who 
erefted this monument, dyed Jan. 4, 1686." At the weft end of the tomb is this coat. 
Quarterly, i. Carew, 2. Argent, a chevron between three leopards' he^ids erafed or, 
langued gules, 3. Southcot. 4. Sable, on a bend cotifcd three mullets or. 

On the north fide is a handfome mural monument of fine veined marble, on the tablet 

of which is this infcription : " Near this place, in the vault underneath, refts the 

body of Thomas Carew, efq; who was fon of Thomas Carew, merchant in London, 
and grandfon of Thomas Carew, efq; of Studley in the county of Devon, "and great- 
grandfon of Sir John Carew, knt. of Carew- caftle^ in the county of Pembroke in the 
principality of Wales. He departed this life the 4th day of Sept. in the year 17 19. 

' Lib. Domcfday. ' Taxat. Spiritual, J^g 



mtWo^^} C A M E R T O N. 333 

He married Eliza the eldeft daughter of John Sanford, efq; of Nynehead in this county, 
by whom he had Uving at his death four fons, Thomas, John, George, and Henryj 
and fix daughters, Eliza, Mary, Penelope, Ann, Lucy, and Amy, all young and un- 
married. He was the bed of hufbands, and the beft of fathers, a fincere friend, a good 
mafter, a kind neighbour, and charitable to the poor. Here alfo lyeth the body of 
Sarah the daughter of Thomas Carew, and Elizabeth his wife, who departed this life 
the 4th of April in the year 17 14. In memory of her very loving, and entirely be- 
loved hufoand, this monument was erefted by his forrowful relift, A. D. 1721. 

*' Here likewifc is depofited the body of Elizabeth the relift of the faid Thomas 
Carew, efq; who died 24th of Sept. 1728, aged 56." Arms, i. Carew. 2. Per faltirc 
argent and gules. 3. Fert, three fnakes coiled or. 4. Jrgent, three fleurs-de-lis gules. 
5. Urgent, i\^ mvWets fal/le, 2i '2-, i. 6. Or, three torceaux. 7. G«/(fj, a fefle lozengy 
argent. 8. Argent^ a fefle between three ■^\<g%Jable. Motto, J'ejpere bieti. On another 
fmaller fhield, Carew, impaling argent three bars wavy azure. 

At the eaft end of the fame aile is an elegant mural monument of black and white 

marble, infcribed, " In the vault belonging to the family are depofited the remains 

of Elizabeth wife of John Carew, efq; and daughter of John BilHng, efq; once mayor 
of the city of Bath: fliedied March the 5th, 1747, aged 42. Alfo the remains of the 
above John Carew, efq; who died Dec. 12, 1750, aged 45." 

On a tomb in the church-yard, juft railed above the furface, lies reclined with her 
right elbow refting on a cufhion or pillow, a female figure cut in ftone, without in- 
fcription or other memorial. 

The church-yard is one of the prettied in the kingdom, rendered fo by tlie proprietor 
of the neighbouring manfion. The tombs are almoft hid by laurels, arbor- vitals, and 
rofesj the walls of the church are mantled over with ivy and pyracanthas. 

The chriftenings in this parifii from 1751 to 1758, were 60; the burials 42. From 
1775 to 178 1, the chriftenings were 75; the burials 50. 



COMBE-HAY, alias COMBE-HAWEY, 

IS fituated a mile north from Wellow, and three miles nearly fouthweft from Bath, 
on the verge of a rich comb or valley. The environs of this village are very beau- 
tiful, being thrown into all the varieties of hill and dale, highly cultivated, and adorned 
with wood, and neat farms and cottages interfperfed among the deep winding dingles. 
Two fprings rifing on the hills conjoin in the ftreet, and form a rivulet which runs 
hence to Midford in its way to the river Avon. Betwixt the village and the prefent 
road from Bath to Wells, the Roman Fofl^e is feen in its original perfeft form; being 
raifed very high, with a deep foffe or ditch on either fide, imparting name to this vene- 
rable rclick of antiquity. 

Among 



334 



C O M B E -H A Y. [metioto* 



Amon» the many manors which King William the Conqueror beftowed upon his 
kinfman Odo bilhop of Bayeiix, there was only one in this county, which was this of 
Combe, thus recorded in the grand furvey of that time: 

'The Land of the Bipop of Bayeux. 

" The Bifliop of Baieux holds Come, and Sanfon of him. Lewin held it in the 
" time of King Edward, and gelded for eight hides. The arable is eight carucates. 
" Tliereof are in demefne five hides, and there are three carucates, and feven fervants, 
« and ten villanes, and fix cottagers, with two ploughs. There are forty acres of 
" meadow, and forty acres of pafture, and fixty acres of coppice- wood'. It was and is 
" worth ten pounds. 

" To this manor are added three virgates of land in Tornie, [i.e. Twinney.] Alward 
" held them in the time of King Edward for a manor, and gelded for as much. The 
" arable is half a carucate. It was and is worth thirteen Ihillings.'" 

This Odo was half brother to the Conqueror by the m.other's fide, Bifliop of Bayeux 
in Normandy, and Earl of Kent in England. He was alfo Count Palatine, and Chief 
Jufticiary of all England, and was reputed the wifeft and wealthieft man in the realm. 
He commanded his brother's armies with much honour and fuccefsj but his extraor- 
dinary power and wealth made him forget himfelf, and he became infolent, opprefllve, 
and ambitious. Thinking himfelf rich enough 4:0 purchafe the papacy of Rome, 
wliich was then filled by Hildebrand, he in the year 1082 coUefted together all his 
treafures, and a great band of choice foldiers to attend him into Italy; but King 
William, having intelligence of his defign, furprized him in the Ifle of Wight, feized 
his peribn and poffefTions, and banifhed him into Normandy. 

When upon the death of William the Conqueror, William, furnamed Rufus, fuc- 
ceeded to the crown, Odo was retaken into favour and reftored to his earldomof Kent; 
but he ftill maintained his ambitious principles, and could not obferve the power of his 
new fovereign, without refiefting on the diminution of his own; he therefore incited 
the nobility and people of the realm to fet up Robert Curthofe duke of Normandy 
on the throne, in the room of Rufus ; but here again his plots were intercepted, and 
he was obliged to abjure the realm for ever. 

The eftates which this great man pofTefled, were difpofed of by the crown in various 
ways to various perfons. What primarily became of this manor does not appear, but 
it foon became the pofieffion of the family of Hawey or Hay, who gave it the additional 
name, whereby it is to this day diftinguifhed. 

There is no doubt that this family were originally of Somerfetfhire; but no perfeft 
account of them can be obtained. The manor of Combe continued in their pofieffion 
for fcveral generations, (there being the fuccefiive names of William, John, Robert, 
John, and Thomas Hawey) till in the time of Edw. I. it pafl^d by the marriage of 
Julian, daughter and fole heir of Thomas Hawey, to Sir Peter Stradling, knt. a defen- 
dant of the ancient family of Le Efiierlings, who had their habitation in a townfliip of that 
name on the Baltick fea. Sir William Le Efterling, the firft who .came into England, 

* Lib. Domefday. 

was 



^aielloto.] C O M B E - H A Y. 335 

was one of thofe knights who in 1090 attended Robert Fitz-Hamon earl of Glouceftcr 
in his expedition into Wales againft Prince Rhefe, and for his fervices therein obtained 
of that prince thecaftlc and manor of St, Donat's in Giamorganfhire, which became the 
principal feat of his dcfcendants. Sir John his fon fuccecded iiim, and by Maud his 
wife, daughter of Sir Robert Corbet, knt. had ifllie Sir Maurice L'Efterling, who mar- 
ried Cecily daughter and heir of Picot de Say. Which Sir Maurice was father of Sir 
Robert, who firft wrote his name Stradling; he married Hawife daughter of Sir Hugh 
Brin, by wiiom he had ifllie Sir Gilbert Stradling, father of Sir William, grandfather 
of Sir John, and great-grandfather of Sir Peter Stradling abovementioned, who mar- 
ried the heijefs of Hawey. 

1 

Which Sir Peter Stradling, lord of the manor of Combe-Hawey in right of Julian 
his wife, had ifllie by her Sir Edward Stradling, wlio married Eleanor daughter of Sir 
Gilbert Stradling (a younger branch of this family) and was father of anothei- Sir Edward, 
who 17 Edw. III. was one of the knights of the fliire for this county, and with his 
colleague Sir Henry Power had an allowance of twelve pounds for thirty days attend- 
ance on the parliantient, going, ftaying, and returning. He married Wentlian fifler and 
heir to Sir Laurence Berkrolls, fon of Sir Roger Berkrolls, by his wife one of the 
daughters and coheirs of Pagan de Turberville, lord of Coity in the county of Gla- 
morgan, by whom he acquired a very large efl:ate. 

Sir William his fon fucceeded him, who 9 Henry IV. was made a knight of the 
Holy Sepulchre whilft he was at Jerufalemj his wife was Julian daughter of Sir John 
St. Barbe, by whom he had iflue Edward, who was with his father in the Holy Land, 
where he had the fame honour of knighthood conferred upon him; and in the begin- 
ning of the reign of Henry V. married Jane daughter of Henry Beaufort cardinal and 
bifhop of Winchefter, by whom he acquired the manor of Halfway in this county. 

Sir Henry, fon of the laft-mentioned Sir Edward, was the next poflTeflTor of this manor; 
but his chief refidence was at St. Donat's, in coming from which to his feat in this 
county, he was taken by a pirate of Bretagne, and obliged to pay two thoufand two 
hundred marks for his ranfom ; which occafioned the fale of two manors in Oxfordlhirc, 
and other eftates in different parts. He likewife was knighted at Jerufalem, but died 
in his way home at Cyprus, leaving ifllie by Elizabeth his wife, daughter of William 
Thomas of Ragland, Thomas Stradhnghis heir and fucceflbr in this eftate. 

This Thomas married Jennet daughter of Thomas Matthew, of Rhydor in Glamor- 
ganfliire, by whom at his death in 1480 he left iflTue Sir Edward and Henry. Sir 
Edward, the eldeft fon, married Elizabeth daughter of Sir Thomas Arundel, of Lan- 
hern in the county of Cornwall, and died in T535, leaving ifliie Sir Thomas Stradling,' 
whofe wife was Catherine daughter of Sir Thomas Gamage, by whom he was father of 
Sir Edward Stradling, who was a grCat fcholar, and author of a Welfh grammar which 
he wrote in his travels, and was efteemed in its day a capital performance. He married 
Agnes daughter of Sir Edward Gage; but having no ifllie, he gave his eftate to his 
kinfman Sir John Stradling, who in the year 161 1 was created a baronet. Which Sir 
John married Elizabeth, daughter of Edward, fon of Sir Edward Gage aforcfaid, by 
whom he had a numerous iflTue, neither of whom enjoyed this eftate long; for in 1644 it 

became 



336 COMBE - H A Y. [melloto, 

became the poflefllon of Sir Lewis Dyve, lent, from whom it came to George Hufley, 
efq; whofe fucceflor fold it to Thomas Bennet, of Steeple-Afliton in the county of 
Wilts, efq; who gave it to his fon Thomas Bennet, by whofe fitter and heirefs Mary, it 
came in marriage to Robert Smith, efq; anceftor of the prefent proprietor John Smith, 
efq; whofe elegant feat, beautifully aided both by art and nature, adjoins the parilh 
church-yard. 

The living is a refbory in the deanery of Frome, and was valued in 129; at fix 
marks three fhillings and four-pence.'' The lord of the manor is the patron, and the 
Rev. Francis Merewether the prefent incumbent. 

The church is a fmall but handfome edifice, all of it (the tower excepted) having 
been rebuilt about thirty years ago. It is of one pace, having a neat tower at the well 
end, containing a clock and four bells. 

In the chancel are two mural monuments of white and grey marble; the firft of 

which is infcribed,' " In memory of John Bennet, efq; of this place, fon of Thomas 

Bennet, efq; of Steeple Afhton in the county of Wilts, who died Aug. 12, 17 19, aged 
31 years. As alfo of Jane daughter of Thomas Bennet, efq; younger brother of the 
above John, who died Feb. 11, 1727, aged 3 months. Thomas, the fourth fon of 
Robert Smith, efq; of this place, and Mary his wife, daughter of the above Thomas 
Bennet the elder, and heirefs of the family, died June 10, 173 1, aged 1 month." Arms, 
Party per feffe crenellee gules and argent, a pale, and three demi-lions rampant, coun- 
terchanged, crowned or. 

The other has this infcription: " Near this place lies the body of Robert Smith, 

efq; L.L.D. who departed this life April 5, 1755, aged 54. Alfo the remains of 
Edward Smith, fon of the above Robert Smith, who died December 1757, aged 16. 
Likewife an infant daughter, (died July 5, 1758, aged one month) by the Hon"'' Ann 
wife of John Smith, efq; heir of the faid Robert Smith, who caufed this monument to 
be erefiied 1760." Arms, Gules, on a chevron between three cinquefoils argent, two 
leopards' faces gules. On an efcutcheon of pretence, Bennet. 

In the floor on a brafs-plate: " Here lyeth the body of Sir Lewis Dyve, of 

Bromham in the county of Bedford, knt. only fon of Sir John Dyve, of Bromham, 
knt. by Dame Beatrice his wife, daughter of Charles Walcot, of Wajcot in the county 
of Salop, efq; who was afterwards married to the Right Hon. John earl of Briftol, by 
whom Ihe had ifllie the Right Hon. George now Earl of Briftol. The faid Sir Lewis 
Dyve took to wife Howard daughter of Sir John Strangways, of Melbury-Sampford in 
the county of Dorfet, knt. and by her had iffue living at the time of his death, three fons, 
Francis, Lewis, and John, and one daughter, Grace, who married George HufTey, of 
Marnhull in the county of Dorfet, efq. He died April 17, Aiio Dom. 1669." 

On another brafs-plate in the chancel floor : " Heere lyeth the body of Robert 

Pierce, Bachelor in Divinity, once reftor of this place, who died Apr. 7, 1641, aged 49. 
Hee married Elizabeth daughter of Chidiock Tutt,>fq; who (after 16 yeares widow- 
hood) died at Chefton in Hartford fhire, Aug. 8, 1657, aged 60." Arms, a bend 
raguly between two unicorns; impaling quarterly effaced. 

' Taxat. Spiritual. DUNKERTON, 



mtWoM [ 337 ] 



DUNKERTON. 

FOUR miles fouth from Bath, in a deep valley, on the old Foflfe road, ftands Dun- 
kerton, the name of which being compounded of Dun, a hill. Cam, a monument 
of ftones, and Ton, a town, fignifies the town near the Carnedd mountzini there being 
at fome little diftance northeaftward from the church a remarkable eminence tautolo- 
gically called Duncorne-HiW, whereon once ftood a Carnedd, or pile of ftones, eredtcd 
by our Britilh forefathers to notify fome viftory, or other memorable event, to fuc- 
ceeding ages.* 

In thofe early days, however, we know but little of this place, or the adjacent country, 
nor have the Romans themfelves left us any thing here whereby to record their me- 
mory, fave their old road, (in this parifh very confpFcuous) and a few coins and moul- 
dering urns. In the Saxon times we find it the eftate of Alwold, a thane, and perfon 
of diftinftion, who loft it at the Conqueft, and William gave it to his attendant Turftin, 
furnamed Fitz-Rolf; we have the following account of his pofleflions here: 

"Bernard holds of Turftin, Duncretone. Alwold held it in the time of King 
*' Edward, and gelded for three hides. The arable is eight carucates. In demefne are « 

** four carucates, and eiglit fervants, and ten villanes, and fix cottagers, with four 
" ploughs. There is a mill of feven fliillings and fix-pence rent, and fix acres of 
" meadow. Pafture four furlongs long, and two furlongs broad. It is worth fix 
*' pounds. It was formerly worth one hundred {hillings. 

*' To this manor is added one virgate of land, and it is worth five ftiillings. Edwi 
" held it freely in the time of King Edward."'' 

This Bernard, tenant of the manor under Turftin, was furnamed Pancewolt, but ^ 

afterwards aiTumed the appellation of de Novo Mercatu, or Ncwmarch, under which he ' * 

occurs witnefs to King William's charter to the monks of Battle in the county of Sufl"ex.= 
In the fucceeding reign of William Rufus, when the land was fo profufdy ftocked with 
foreigners, that the whole realm became in a manner too little for their appetites, he 
according to the cuftom of thofe times, when every man looked upon that as his own ^ 

which he could at any rate lay hold of, went over into Wales, and conquered all the ^ 

t.hree cantereds of the province of Brecknock,'! where he feated himfelf, and founded a 
priory of Benediftine monks near his caftle." 

To him fucceedcd Adam de Newmarch, who was a benefa6lor to the houfe of Auftin 
canons at Noftell in the county of York. After him came another Adam de Newmarch, 
who had iflTue William de Newmarch, who lo Ric. I. paid one hundred pounds for 
livery of his father's lands/ ' , 

* Of a fimilar etymobgy is Dunkery-Beacon in the hundred of Carhampton, (fee vol. li. p. 5.) where pro- 
bably once ilood a cam or carnedd. ' 

'' Lib. Domefday. ' Mon. Angl. i. 317. " Giraldi Cambrenf. Itin. Cambria:, 77. 

' Mon. Angl. i. 320. ' Rot. Pip. lo Ric. I', 

Vol. III. X X To 



i 



338 D U N K E R T O N. [©Uenoto. 

To which William fucceeded Henry de Newmarch, who, with the confent of his wife 
Ifabel, granted to Ralph Luvel, in marriage with his daughter, all thofe lands in Dun- 
kerton which were held of him by William Baalun.^ His fon's name was William, 
who it feems died in his father's life-time; for James de Newmarch brother of Henry 
fucceeded to the eftate, and 6 Joh. gave two hundred marks for livery of his lands.** 
He died about 17 Joh. leaving iffue two daughters his heirs, viz. Ifabel the wife of 
Ralph Ruffell, and Hawifc, firft married to Sir John de Botreaux, and afterwards to 
Sir Nicholas de Moeles.' 

Which Sir Nicholas de Moeles in right of his faid wife poflefled the barony of New- 
march, of which this manor was a part, and was held under it by various lords by the 
fervice of one knight's fee. 9 Edw. II. it was held by Sir Ralph de Gorges, and 
II Edw. III. by John de Pederton, of Hardington in this county.'' This John de 
Pederton had very confiderable eftates in thefe parts, and at his death left iffue an only 
daughter and heir named Agnes, who was married to John Baumfilde, efqj whereby 
this manor, with the reft of his lands, came to that family, in which it Hill continues, 
being the property of Sir Charles Warwick Bampfylde, bart. 

The church of Dunkerton was in 1292 rated at twelve marks.' It is a redlory in the 
deanery of Frome, and in the patronage of the lord of the manor. The Rev. William 
Munton is the prefent incumbent. 

The church is dedicated to All-Saints, and is afmall building of one pace, having a 
tower at the weft end, in which are five bells. It contains nothing remarkable, fave 
the following memorial on a grave-ftone on the altar fteps: 

" Hie jacet Reverendus Johannes Dickes, hujus ecclefias reftor, denatus Augufti 4% 
1634.° Memoriae ergo. 

" Hie, hasc, hoc, hunc, huic, hujus, bonus, optima, clarum, 

Fulgor, Fama, Decus, veftit, adhseret, erit. 
Mente, anima, oh ! requiem vivens AIOEKAETOS ille, 
Carpfit honore facro ; jam fuper aftra manet." 

« Cart. Antiq. » Rot. Pip. 6 Joh. ' Of this family fee vol. ii. p. 66. " Lib. Feed. 

' Taxat. Spiritual. 




INGLISHCOMBE. 



mtWo'm,} [ 339 ] 



INGLISHCOMBE. 

NORTHWARD from Dunkerton, on the fide of one of thofe {helving dingles, 
which are fo frequent in this neighbourhood, ftands Ingliihcombe, three miilcs 
diftant nearly fouthweft from the city of Bath. 

Its name is of uncertain origin; it might have been derived from the Saxon 
In^a and Comb, fignifying the paftures in the valley, or from Giijla-Eomb, the valley 
of the Englifh, in regard of fome fignal victory obtained in thefe parts by the inha- 
bitants of the country over the Danes, or fome other hoftile intruders. 

But however uncertain its etymology, and however filent hiftory and oral tradition 
are concerning it, there remain the moft evident demonftrations that fome very notable 
affairs have been tranfafted in thefe parts in the earliefl: ages of the countiy. That 
ftupendous Belgick rampart IVan/dike, crofles tliis parilh in a direction from eaft to 
weft, and in the paftures near the church exifts in its original form, compofed of 
a deep graff, and elevated vallum on the fouth fide, its top being twelve feet high per- 
pendicularly from the bottom of the trench, the breadth of which is in fome places 
eight, and in others ten feet. In its way hither it pafles one of the largeft, and moft 
remarkable barrows or tumuli in the world, which feems to have been intended as a 
monumental ^^r«/«;« for all the adjacent country. This eminence, which has been 
called for ages Round-Barrow and Barrow-Hill, although it has generally been con- 
fidered a natural mount, ftands on the brow of a high ridge of hills, about half a 
mile eaft ward from the village of Inglifhcombe, clofe by the fide of the road from 
Briftol to Frome, and commands from its fummit a full view of the city of Bath, the 
Wiltfhire hills, Lanfdown, the vale of Avon, and a long traft of Gloucefterfliire be- 
yond it, bounded by the Severn and the Cambrian mountains. This tumulus is at its 
bafe eight hundred yards in circumference, its apex is thirty-fix yards in diameter from 
eaft to weft, and twenty-eight yards from north to fouth. The Hope towards the 
eaft is one hundred and four yards ; and the perpendicular height weftward one hun- 
dred k^t. 

Conjedture itfelf cannot reft fatisfied concerning the origin of this immenfe mount; ^ -0 

it might have been raifed in commemoration of fome fignal viftory, or it might to this 
day cover the reliques and fpoils of fome great warrior, who here expired in the caufe 
of the Sueflbnian Divitiacus, the fabricator of the contiguous boundary; for to this age 
it muft be referred. A fine copper coin of Antoninus Pius was found in 1786 in the 
road near the foot of the hill. 

According to tradition, Ingli(hcombe was the feat of fome of the Saxon kings, from 
whom the place acquired a new denomination. In die time of Edward the ConfeflTor, 
it was the eftate of one of the Saxon thanes, but at the Conqueft fell to the ftiare of 
the great Bifliop of Coutances, as we are informed by the general furvey: 

" Nigel holds of the Bifliop, ENCLtscoME. A thane held it in the time of King 
« Edward, and gelded for ten hides. The arable is ten carucates. In demefne arc 

X X 2 " three 



# 



340 I N G L I S H C O M B E. [mcUoto* 

" three carucates, and fix fervants, and three villanes, and feventeen cottagers, with fix 
" ploughs. There are two mills rendering eleven Ihillings and feven-pence. There 
" are twelve acres of meadow, and one hundred acres of coppice wood. It was and is 
" worth ten pounds."' 

In the time of King John, we find this large eftate in the pofleffion of Thomas the 
fon of William de Harptrec, baron of Eatl-Harptree in this county, who 3 of that 
reign gave fixty marks for his lands in Ingliflicombe, which he had by the grant of 
Havvlfa de Gournay." Robert the fon of this Thomas by Eva his wife, fitter and heir 
of Maurice de Gant, and daughter of Robert Fitzharding, afliimed the name of 
Gournay, and at his death 53 Heniy III. held twenty-two knights' fees and a half in 
this county, and thofe of Wilts and Dorfet, among which is fet down the manor of 
Inglilhcombe.' To him fucceeded Anfelm de Gournay his fon and heir, who 14 
Edw. III. granted this' manor to Thomas his youngeft fon, and the heirs of his body, 
to be held for ever by the annual fervice of twelve crofs-bow fliot.'' After which this 
place became one of the principal feats of this family, and here they had one of their 
baronial caftles; but by the attainder of Sir Thomas de Gournay, fon of the laft-men- 
tioned Thomas, on account of the murder of FLdw. II. this with the refl: of his eftates 
was confifcated to the crown, and foon after fettled on the dutchy of Cornwall. The 
Prince of Wales, as Duke of Cornwall, is the prefent lord hereof. 

The caftle of the Gournays flood on a break of the hill, about a quarter of a mile 
eaftward from the village. It was furrounded by a deep foffe, which is ftill remaining, 
as are alfo fome fmall parts of wall-work, on the fouth and weft fides j but the building 
itfelf has been demoliflied near a couple of centuries, and the redlorial barn near the 
church erefted with its materials. In the centre of the area was a well, which was 
difcovered about forty years ago, by the taking down a large maple-tree, in confequence 
of a prevailing popular opinion that curiofities were to be found underneath. It was 
nine feet in diameter, compofed of finely hewn ftones, but was only perfeft to the 
depth of four feet, the reft being fallen in, and the fpace filled with rubbifh. The caftle 
field is called Cuherhays. 

About a mile weftward from the village is a pleafant hamlet called Inglisbatch, 

In the beginning of the reign of King John, Hawifa de Gournay appropriated the 
church of Inglifhcombe to the monaftery of Bermondfey in the county of Surreyj but the 
monks of Bath were afterwards its appropriators, and received from the reftory for the 
life of their refedion a penfion of fifty fhiUings, which was always paid through the hands 
of the prior of Bermondfey," who had alfo another penfion out of the fame of two marks 
ten ftiillings.*^ In 1 292 this refboiy was rated at fix marks three fhillings and four-pence.^ 
36 Henry VIII. the parfonage with the advowfon was, in confideration of the fum of 
335I. granted to John lord Ruflell and James Biflle, of Stoke-St.-Michael, efq; from 
whom it came to Colonel Hales of Gloucefter, who Ibid it to the family of Catherall, 
and they to Philip James Gibbs, efq; the prefent impropriator. 



• Lib. Domefdty. " Rot. Pip. 3 Joh. ' Efc "> Ibid. « Taxat. Spiritual. 

' Archer. « Taxat, Spiritual. 



The 



mmM I N G L I S H C O M B E. 341 

The living is a vicarage in the deanery of Bath; the Rev. Mr. Pitcairn is the pre- 
fent incumbent. I'he old vicarage-houfe was a curious building, having Gothick 
windows, and a very large wooden porch, (landing on a flight of fteps, mantled at the 
top with wood, and covered with a prodigious roof of thatch. 

The church ftands on the brow of the hill weftward of the village, and is an ancient 
ftrufture, confifting of a nave, chancel, and fmall chapel on the fouth fide. Betwixt the 
nave and chancel ftands an cmbatdcd tower, containing five bells. On the north fide 
of the belfry are two Saxon zigzag arches. 

On the north wall there is a monument of black and white marble, infcribed,— — . 
" Near this place is interred the body of John Gay, of Haycombe, gent, who died the 
8th of Odlober 1729, in the 63d year of his age. Alfo four of his children, by Jane 
his wife, who caufed this monument to be erefted, viz. Richard died the nth of Nov. 
1736, aged 19 years; Richard died the 3d of Nov. 17 16, aged i week; Elizabeth died 
the 28th of Feb, 1743, aged 28 years; Mary died the 30th of May 171 2, aged 7 weeks." 
Arms, Or, on a {ePk/aMe, between three efcallop Ihells azure, five lozenges argent} 
impaling a chevron ermine between three filhes haurient argent. 

On a grave-ftone in the chapel: 

" This grave's a bed of rofes: here doth ly 
John Rofewell, gent, his wife, nine children by.' 
iEtatis fuse 79, obijt 1° die Decemb. Anno 1687.'* 
Arms, Per pale, a lion rampant. 

On four ftone (hields againft the mouldings of the weft window of the nave, arc at 
bugle-horn, the arms of Bath abbey, and a bow and quiver filled with arrows. 



NEWTON ST. LO. 

NEXT to Inglilhcombe, towards the north, on the fummit of a ftiarp hill, ftands 
Newton, additionally ftiled St. Lo, or Loe, from that family its ancient pofleflTors. 

At the Conqueft.this eftate belonged to the Bilhop of Coutances, and it is thus 
recorded: 

" The Bilhop himfelf holds Niwetone. Aluric held it in the time of King Edward, 
« and gelded for three hides. The arable is four carucates. In demefne are two 
*' carucates, and four fervants, and four villanes, and three cottagers, with two 
" ploughs. There is a mill of feven Ihillings and fix-pence rent, and nine acres of 
" meadow, and forty acres of coppice-wood. It was worth fixty ftiillings, now one 
« hundred Ihillings." 

«'To 



342 N E W T O N ^ S T. L O. [CQelloto* 

. *' To this manor are added feven hides, which two thanes held in the time of King 
" Edward. The arable is eight carucates. There are fourteen vilknes, and eight 
" cottagers, and feven fervants, with fix ploughs, and twenty-three acres of meadow. 
"It was worth one hundred {hillings, now ten pounds.'" 

The family of St. Lo, orde Sanfto Laudo, the fubfequent owners of this place, had 
their name from the town of St. Lo, fituated upon the river Vire in Normandy, where 
they were feated before the year 1060. When William the Norman Duke undertook his 
great expedition, divers of this family migrated with him into England, and difperfed 
themfclves into different parts of the country. It does not appear at what particular time 
the eftate of Newton came into this family, but it is certain they had their habitation 
here at leaft fo early as the reign of Ric. I. And in the fucceeding reign of King 
John, when fuch exorbitant fums of money were levied on the great men of the king- 
dom, to fupport the extravagance of that luxurious monarch, we find the flieriff 
accounting in the fum of one hundred pounds and two palfries, for the manors of 
Newton and Publow, the property of Roger de Sanfto Laudo.*" 

This enormous demand, among other confiderations, it is probable, induced this 
great man to take up arms with the rebellious barons againft the King, whom, when 
his meafurcs of reconciliation with his people failed, he is faid to have fometime de- 
tained a prifoner in one of the towers of his manfion here, which was embattled and 
otherwife fortified after the manner of a caftle. He died about the middle of the 
reign of Henry 111. and was fucceeded by Sir John de Sanfto Laudo, or St. Lo. 

Which Sir John de St. I,o, 47 Henry III. is certified to hold one knight's fee and 
a fourth part in Newton and Publow i' in which faid year he died, leaving ifiue a fon 
of his own name. 

This John de St. Lo was alfo a knight, and was with Prince Edward in the Holy 
Land in 1271, when Acres was inverted by the Saracens. He lived only to the 8th 
year of that King's reign, when this manor of Newton defcended to his fon 

Sir John de St. Lo, the third of that name, who was alfo a military perfon, and was 
one of thofe who in 1299 were fummoned to attend King Edward at Carlifle on the 
feaft of St. John the Baptift, with horfe and arms to march againft the Scots, in order 
to reprefs their perfidy and nefarious proceedings." He died 7 Edw. II. leaving ifllie 
Sir John de St. Lo, who fucceeded him in the pofleffion of the lordfliip of Newton, 
and the advowfon of the church, both held by the fervice of one knight's fee." 

Which Sir John de St. Lo, 23 Edw. III. is certified to hold the faid fee of Hugh Le 
Defpenfer, and he to hold it of the King in chief.' He was living 46 Edw. III. and 
then bore on his feal a bend furmounted by a label of five points.* 

To him fucceeded in this manor and that of Publow, Edmund de St. Lo, his fon 
and heir, who was a clerk, and by that name is ftiled lord of Newton and Publow 
49 Edw. ILL when it was found by the jury that Edward Le Defpenfer held no knights* 



' Lib. Domefday. •■ Rot. Pip. 11 Joh. ' Lib. F»od. ■> Had. MS. 1192, « Efc. 

•■ Lib. Feod. « Seals from ancient Deeds. 



fees. 



I 



mm^.l . N E W T O N S T. L O. 343 

fees, or advowfons of churches of the King in chief in his dcmefnc as of fee, the day 
whereon he died; but that Edmund dc St. Lo, clerk, John Luputt, parfon of the 
church of Backwell, William Vinour, parfon of the church of Aller, Nicholas Saltcot, 
parfon of the church of Newton-Sormaile, held in their demefne as of fee in capite of 
the faid Edward Le Defpenfer the manors of Newton and Publow by knights' fcrvice.** 

Sir John St. Lo, knt. his heir and fuccefTor, was the laft lord of Newton of this 
name, leaving at his death by Margaret his wife, a fole daughter and heircfs Elizabeth, 
married to William lord Botreaux, who in her right poflefTed this manor, and from 
whom it defcended to his fon and grandfon, both of the name of William. The laft 
William lord Botreaux, dying without ifllie male, it pafied by his daughter and heirefs 
Margaret to her hufband Sir Robert Hungerford, grandfather of Thomas lord Hun- 
gerford, whofe daughter and heirefs Mary conveyed it in marriage to Edward lord 
Haftings, father of George lord Haftings Earl of Huntingdon. It is now the feat and 
eftate of William Gore Langton, efq; who has adorned the ancient demefnes with a 
very elegant houfe, a fine- piece of water, and beautiful plantations. 

From a younger brother of the Lords St. Lo, defcended Sir John St. Lo, knt. wlio 
in the time of Henry VL was conftable of Briftol caftle, and keeper of Kingfwood 
and Filwood forefts. From the fame branch were alfo defcended the St. Los of Dor- 
fetfliire. Thefe younger branches were poflefled of many confiderable eftates in this 
county, but the ancient patrimonial inheritance merged in the families of Botreaux' and 
Hungerford abovementioned. 

The living of Newton is reftorial, in the deanery of Bath. The prior of Bath and 
the abbot of Keynfham received from the parfonage each a yearly penfion of half a 
mark.'' The lord of the manor is the patron, and the Rev. John Wood is the prc- 
fent incumbent. 

The church, which is dedicated to the Holy Trinity, is a handfome edifice, confift- 
ing of a nave, chancel, and chapel on the fouth fide, covered with lead. At the weft 
end is a tower containing a clock and five bells. 

At the weft end of the chapel is a magnificent mural monument of grey and white 
marble, the pediment of which is fupported by two round detached columns of the 
Corinthian order, and divided into two compartments by a fluted column in the centrej 
the firft compartment has this infcription : 

" Viator audi: flens marmor te alloquitur, ne lateat quis hie tumatus quiefcit. 
Henrici eft quam premit hasc terrse moles, quem Jofepho Langton, armigero, Francifca 
conjux, felicem olim partum tulit, jam ferentem lu6tus cumulatiores, et lachiymas vix 
confolabiles. Juvenis erat ereftas ad omne honeftum indolis j artibus humanioribus ultra 
setatem politusj cui illimis morum candor, et animi tranflucentis fuavitas, ct mundana 
omnia conculcans magnanimitas, mirandus quod ita caeperit, miferandus quod ita de- 
fierit. In fe perfefturus quod ceptum erat in fuis. Sed proh dolor 1 magna aflequutus, 
et ad majora natus, fatorum ceffit invidije, gratijs lugentibus, in vernanti aetate rapcus 
ab amplexu fuorum; et fpes parentum, et Isetitia, et perennis dolorj juvenibus relin- 

!■ Efc. ■ ' For an account of this famiiy, fee vol. ii. p. 66. » Taxat. Spiritual. 

quens 



344 N E W T O N S T. L O. (MJeHoto. 

quens exemplum, fenioribus fufpirium; omnibus dulcem et indelebilem memoriam. 
Obijt lo Sept. 1701, astatis 24. Ejufdem fepulchii gremio contumulantur Thomas, 
Elizabetha, Johannes, Jofephus, Borlaceus, deUcias breves parentumj quos tenella 
jetate ad meUora rapuere fata. His etiam accefferunt, setate proveftiores, JVIaria et 
Dorothea. Maria annos circiter quindecem expleverat; Dorothea ad vicefimum ufqj 
primum fuos beavit. Ingenio faslix, afpedu fuavis, tota amabilis, et quK virtutes, quas 
ierioribus annis exhiberet, promifit in primis. Digna fenio, juventute floruit; fed de- 
biram meritis fedem cum non haberet in terris, properavit ad ccelum, annorum nume- 
rum dotibus et moribus exasquans." 

On the other tablet : 
*' Sifte iterum viator: En novi luftus caufa! Poft fletus liberis debitos moriuntur 
parentesj Francifca enim, uxor Jofephi LangtOn chariffima, acutifllmis fradta morbis, 
eofque animo pkifquam virili perpefla, ab omnibus liberata eft, Aug. 26, 17 16, 
St. 69. Nee diu fuperfuit ejufdem maritus, hujus parochias decus et tutamen; qui ad 
fedes beatorum lubenter difcefTit, annorum et virtutum plenus, Mar. 17, 17 19, a;t. 82.. 
Dc quo plurima laude digna dicerentur, nifi quod ipfc vetuerit. Hie deniqj dormiuat 
amborum cineres, fpe beatas refurredtionis. 

" Flens adhuc loquitur marmor. Hie jacet aggregatus ad fuos, Jofephus Langton, 
armiger, Roberti Langton e Briflington, arm" filius, Jofephi fupra memorati nepos 
maternus, utriuique hsres; ob. 10 Feb. 1779, set. 72. Vir, fi quis alius, juftitias tenax, 
decori ftudiofus, vitae integer. Eodem infuper tumulo duarum ejus uxorum conduntur 
cxuvias, viz. Carolettas, Petri Bathurft, e Clarendon-Park, in agro Wilt. arm', filias, 
quae prolem vix fuperftitem enixa, deceffit 24 Jul, 1757; necnon Brigettas, Gul"' 
Evelyn Glanville, e Sinclair, in com. Cant, armigeri, filiae, quas ob. 9 Jan. 1774, filiam 
unicam & haeredem marito lugenti relinquens." Arms, Quarterly, firft and fourth, 
quarterly Sable and or a bend argent, Langton; fecond and third, ermine., on a bend 
Jable, two arms proper wrefting a horfe-flioe or. 

In the floor of this chapel is the portraiture of a female cut in" brafs, with her hands 
uplifted, and the following fragments of an infcription round the edge of the ftone: 

*' i^ic meet Cli^abetb n^eell— Eegtijorpc ct PtcftolDe in— Ipar tJitis ct 
rcQuies Befunftis!. 9men." 

In the body of the church, on the north wall, is a monument of grey and white 

marble, with this infcription: " In the burial-place of the family are depofited the 

remaines of Dame Ann Cobb, (wife of Sir George Cobb, of Adderbury in Oxfordfhire, 
baronet) who departed this life in the year 1749, aged 70. She was daughter and co- 
heir of Jofeph Langton, of Newton-Park, efq; and relid of Robert Langton, efq; of 
Briflington in this county, (eldefl: fon of Sir Thomas Langton, knight) to whofe me- 
mory this monument is likewife erefted." Arms, Paly of fix, Or and Jable per fefle 
counterchanged, over all two bendlets argent; impaling, Jable, a chevron between three 
dolphins embowed naiant argent, a chief or, Cobb. 

Againft the north wall of the chancel is a marble monument, infcribed, " Near 

this fpot lie the remains of Abel Moyfey, late of the city ©f Bath, Doctor of Phyfick, 

who 



CaJcnoto.] N E W T O N S T. L O. 345 

who clofcd a life diftinguiflied by uncommon talents, induftry, and fuccefs in the prac-i- 
ticeof his piofefTion, on the eleventh of AuguH: 1780, in the fixty-fifth year of his age. 
He was taken off after a fliort illncls, in the fullnefs of profperity, and in the vigour of 
his faculties, — but not unprepared. He had fet religion ever before his eyes, and died 
the death of the righteous. i<iiblatum ex oculis qUierimus." Arms, Or, on a ii:fft: fable 
between three cinquefuils vert, a crofs flory of the field, MoyfeVj impaling, argent^ 
three griffins' heads trzikd fable langued gules. 

On a fmall marble againft the fouth wall: " M. S. Johannis Chapman, S.T.B. 

pridem Coll. Line. Oxon. Socii Somerfetenfis, dein hujus ecclefise, ecclefiarum infuper 
apud Bathoniam, reftoris; necnon archidiaconi Bathohienfis. Obijt Anno Domini 
1786, astatis fus 75. Qiialis erat, qualis et tu, ledlor, dies alter manifcftabit." Arms, 
per chevron Argent and gules, a crefcent counterchanged, a canton of the fecond. 

Near the church is a free-fchool for teaching the poor children of the parifh to read 
and write, built and endowed at the expence of Richard Jones, of Stowey in this 
county, efq; A. D. 1698. 

This parifh receives annually the fum of 30I. from the demefne lands and parfonage 
of Longney in the county of Gloucefterj the donation of Henry Smith, efq; a chari- 
table gentleman of the laft century. 



CORSTON, OR COSTON. 

CLOSE underneath Newton-Hill, towards the northead, (hrouded in a grove of 
trees, ftands Corfton, the lands of which parifh are moflly arable; the foil is very 
fine and light, and produces excellent crops of wheat and barley. In the quarries here 
and in thofe of the neighbouring parifhes are found the cornua-ammonis, and other 
petrified fhells in great abundance, particularly venus's, cochleas, and gryphites. 

Corflon was at the Conqueft (as we are informed by Domefday-book) parcel of the 
pofTelTions of the Church of Bath. 

" The Church itfelf holds Corstune. In the "time of King Edward it gelded (oi 
" ten hides. The arable is nine carucates. Thereof are in demefne five hides, and 
" there are two carucates, and four fervants, and five villanes, and eight cottagers, v/ith 
" three ploughs. There is a mill of thirty-pence rent, and fix acres of meadow. It 
" is worth eight pounds."" 

About the time of Henry I. this manor was parted with by the monks of Bath to 
Sir Roger de St. Lo, knt. in exchange for certain lands lying in Newton and Staunton- 
Prior," and continued in the defendants of that family till the time of Edw. II. when 

• Lib. Domefday, ' Regift. Priorat. Bathon, 

Vol. Ill* Y y is 



346 C O R S T O N. [CCteUota* 

it pafled to the family of Inge, who feem to have been domefticks to the St. Los for 
feveral generations. i8 Edw. II. Sir John de Inge was living at Corfton, and bore ot\ 
his feal a chevron between three eaglets." He left iffue a fon of his own name, who 
died feized of this manor 6 Ric. II."* and was fucceeded by Sir William de Inge, 
and he by John de Inge, who died poflefled of Corfton 3 Henry V. leaving iffue 
Thomas de Inge his fon and heir.° a Ric. III. a fine paffed of this manor and its 
appertenances from Richard Fitzjames, clerk, and others, to Roger Norman, remainder 
to John Storke, and the heirs of his body, remainder to the right heirs of Thomas 
Inge.*^ In procefs of time it came to the family of Harington; and was by them fold 
to the late Jofeph Langton, efq; whofe daughter and heirefs brought it in marriage to 
William Gore Langton, efq; the prefent poffeffor. 

The church of Corfton, which in 1292 was valued at feven marks nine fhillings and 
four-pence,^ was appropriated to the prior and convent of Bath,"" and a vicarage or- 
dained here by Bifhop John de Drokensford, i Nov. 1321, decreeing th^t the vicar 
and his fucceffors in perpetuum, fliould have a hall with chambers, kitchen, and bake- 
houfe, with a third part of the garden and curtillage, and a pigeon-houfe formerly be- 
longing to the parfonage. That he fhould have one acre of arable land, confifting of 
three parcels, late part of the dem^fne of the faid parfonage, together with common 
pafturage for his fwine in fuch places as the reftor of the faid church ufed that privi- 
lege. That he fhould receive from the faid prior and convent of Bath one quarter of 
bread corn yearly ; and have all the alterage, and all fmall tithes of beans, and othf r 
blade growing in the cottage inclofures and cultivated curtillages throughout the parifli. 
That the religious aforefaid and their fucceffors, as rectors of the faid church, fhould 
have all the arable land, with a park belonging to the church (the acre abovementioned 
only excepted) and receive all great tithes, as well of corn as of hay, belonging to the 
faid church, not affigned to the vicar as aforefaid. The faid religious to fuftain all 
burdens ordinary and extraordinary, incumbent on the faid church, as redtors thereof.' 
The prior of Bath had a yearly penfion out of the vicarage of four fhillings.'' 

This vicarage is fituated in the deanery of Redcliff and Bedminfter, The Bifnop 
of Bath and Wells is the patron, and the Rev. Thomas Broughton is the prefent in- 
cumbent. 

The church, which is dedicated to All-Saints, is a fmall ftruflure of one pace, ffand- 
ing on the fouth fide of the ftreet; at the weft end is a fmall tower furmounted by a 
low conical fpire, containing two bells. 

In the chancel are the following memorials to the farnily of Harington: 

<' In memory of William Harington, efq; who v/as born the 5th of July 1705, and 
fjied the 10th of May 1780." 

" Near this place lyeth the body of Benjamin Harington, efq; eldeft fon of John 
flarington, efq; of Kelfton, who departed this life the i ft of December, Anno Domini 

' Seals "rom »i»cient Deeds, " Efc, ' Ibid. ' Fin. 2 Ric. Ill,' » Taxat, Spiritual. 

" ?f.t, i §d. m. jp. J. p>. 10. ' Excerpt, e Regift. Wellen. " T^ixat. Spiritual, 



mt\0\Xi.] C O R S T O N. 347 

171 1, in the 39th year of his age, leaving ifTue two fons, John and William; and two 
daughters, Abigail and Elizabeth. Alfo Mary, who died the 5th of June 1708." 

" Near this place lies interred the body of Mary the wife of John Harington, of this 
parilh,efq; who departed this life the 16th of Apt il 1732, aged 25. Alfo near this place 
lieth the body of Elizabeth, widow and rclid: of Benjamin Harington, of this parifli, efq; 
who died the 28th of Dec. 1735, ^S*^^ 55- Alfo of John Harington, fon of the above 
Benjamin and Elizabeth; obijt i May 1763, jetat. 61." Arms, Sai/le, a fret argent. 

The chriftenings in this parilh are on an average fix; the burials fcven annually. 



TWIVERTON, OR TWERTON. 

THIS village, confifting of one ftreet half a mile in length, is fituated on the northern 
bank of the river Avon, a mile and a half from Bath, and in the lower road from 
that city to Brillol. The high lands about Inglilhcombe bound it on the fouth. 

Some have fuppofed that this place obtained its name from two fords or fhallow 
places in the Avon that were fordable here before the wears were built acrofs the river;* 
but the Norman record writes it as it is pronounced at this day Twertoney and defcribes 
it as the property of the Bilhop of Coutances, who was lord of Inglifhcombe, Newtonj 
and almoft all the adjacent territory. 

" The fame Nigel holds of the Bifhop, Twertone. Three thanes held it in the 
" time of King Edward, and gelded for feven hides and a half. The arable is ten 
" carucates. In demefne are three carucates, and fix fervants, and feven villanes, and 
" thirteen cottagers, with fix ploughs. There are two mills of thirty fliillings rent, 
" and fifteen acres of meadow. It was and is worth ten pounds." 

" Goisfiid holds of the Bifliop, Twertone. A thane held it in the time of King 
" Edward, and gelded for two hides and a hal£ The arable is two carucates and a 
" half, which are there in demefne, with four cottagers, and two fervants. There are 
" two mills of thirty (hillings rent, and feven acres of meadow, and three acres of cop- 
" pice wood. It was and is worth fixty Ihillings. 

" This land Alured held of Queen Eddid. Now the Bifliop holds it of the King, 
" as he fays."" 

47 Henry III. Thomas de Baiocis, Baiofe, or Bayeux, and Mar>' his mother, held 
eight knight's fees and a half in Twerton, Backwell, and Stoke, of the honour of 
Gloucefter,' all which 24 Edw. I. were held by Joceus de Baiofe/ a fon probably of 

? Wood'j Defaiption of Bath, i. 97. ' Lib. Domefday. f Lib Fcod. *Ibid, 

Y y 2 the 



34S T W I V E R T O N. imcWO^, 

the faid Thomas, whofe hcirefs brought this large eftate to the family of Rodney. 
7 Edw. II. Sir Richard de Rodeneye poiTeffed the whole village of Twiverton, thefer- 
vjce due for which was one knight's fee, and the refervcd rents 27I. per annum.' There 
are Jeveral inclofures in this parifh, wjiich to this day retain the name of Rodney their 
ancient pofleflbrs, in whom this manor continued till the time of Queen Elizabeth. 
In latter times it has been much divided; the late Duke of Chandos being poffefled of 
one third part hereof fold the fame to the refpedtive tenants j another third part be- 
longed jointly to William Gibbs, of Bath, efq; and the Rev. Mr. England; at the death 
of the former his moiety of thisfhare was fold to William GoreLangton, efq; who was 
before pofTefled of the other third part of the manor. John W alker Heneage, efq; 
has alfo a manor within this parifh. 

The church of Tv/iverton, valued in 1 3 1 8 at fix marks/ was appropriated to the 
priorefs and convent of Kington-St.-Michael in the county of Wilts, by Sir William 
Malreward, lord of Norton-Malreward in this county, and the donation was confirmed 
by GefFerey his fon.^ In 1342 a vicarage was ordained to the following efFrft: viz. 
That the vicar fiiould have all fruits, rents, and profits belonging to the faid church, 
and the reftorial houfe, with the adjacent curtillage; and that he fhould fuftain all ordi- 
nary and extraordinary burdens, and pay to the faid priorefs and convent one hundred 
{hillings yearly; and as often as he fhould be deficient in that payment, fo often he 
fliould pay one mark to the building of the church of Bath; the Bilhop referving tQ 
himfelf and his fuccelTors (with the concurrence of the religious aforefaid) the power of 
augmenting and diminifhing the faid vicarage, and of interpreting and declaring this 
fame ordination in fuch manner as to him and his lucceffors fhould feem fit. This 
ordination was dated at Evercreech 3 Id. Aug. 1342.'' The nuns of Barrow had a 
penfion of two marks out of the reftory.' 

The living lay formerly in the deanery of RedclifF and Bedminfler; it is now 
jncluded within that of Bafh. The Rev. Thomas Broughton is both patron and 
incumbent. 

TThe phurch is dedicated to St. ^'^ichael, and is a good decent edifice, confifting of 
^ nave leaded, and chancel tiled. At the w?ft end is a large embattled tower, con^ 
):aining fix bells. 

The chriflepings in this parifli are on a feven years* average 13, the burials 18 
annually. 

The firfl houfe on the right hand at entering this village from Bath was the refidenc^ 
,pf that celebrated novelift Henry Fielding while he wrote his Tom Jones. 

« MS. Carew. ' Archer, from the Kegifters pf Wells. ' Mon. Angl. i. 888. 

" Excerpt, e Regifl. Wellen. ' Taxat. Spiritual. 



FPXCOTE, 



CClenotU.] [ 349 ] 



F O X C O T E, OR F O S S C O T, 

THIS parifh is fituated near the Fofle road (as its name implies) in the foiithern 
extremity of the hundred towards Kilmcrfdon, having that hundred on the fouth, 
the parifli of Wellow on the north, and Norton St. Philips on the eaft. This fpot is 
very plealant, being on the flope of a Httle eminence, rifing out of a deep vale well 
wooded and abounding with orchards. There is fcarcely an acre of level ground i^ 
the parifh, all being irregularly pifturefque and pleafingly romantick. A rivulet from 
Radftock runs through the valley towards Wellow, and has over it a fmall ftone bridge. 
In this ftream are trout, eels, roach, and dace. 

That this place was anciently called Weftom (and that probably on account of its 
wefterly fituation from the town of Norton) appears by the ancient chronicles of the 
abbey of Glaftonbury; wherein it is faid that A. D. 926, Duke Ethelftan, being con- 
verted and become a monk at Glaftonbury, gave to that monaftery Weftone, quod nunc 
Foxcote dicitur, [now known by the name of Foxcote] confifting of five hides." WhicJi 
territory however the monks loft a confiderable time before the invafion of England by 
the Normans; for in tlie time of Kdward the ConfefTor, we find it in the poffefiion of 
one Aldida, Alditda, or Aldith, who accounted for it to the King's geld in five hides, 
according to its ancient valuation. When it came to the Conqueror's hands by his 
advancement to the crown of England, he beftowed the manor op Geffrey biftiop of 
of Coutances, under whom it was held by William de Muncellis, or Monceaux." 

" William holds Fuscote. V^ldida held it in the time of King Edward, and gelded 
" for five hides. The arable is four carucates. In demefne are two carucates, and 
" three fervants, and two cottagers, and three villanes, and fix bordars, with two 
" ploughs. There is a mill often Ihillings rent, and nineteen acres of meadow,-and 
*f fix acres of pafture, and twenty acres of coppice wood. It was and is worth foyr 
*^ pounds.*^ 

After the Conqueft this place had owners of its name; but their refidence was 'in 
Wikfhire, where 12 Henry II. Herebert de Foxcote held lands of Walter Waleran by 
the fervice of finding one knight to keep the caftle of Sarum.*" In the fame reign 
William de Foxcote held two knights' fees of Humphrey de Bohun," but theBerkeleys 
were the mefne lords of this manor. 

.31 Henry III. Ofbert de Giffard is certified to hold the manor of Foxcote of 
Maurice de Berkeley by the fervice of half a knight's fee, in which tenure he was fuc- 
ceeded by Ofbert his fon and heir.' Which Oft)ert having committed fundry offences 
againft the government. King Edw. I. feized this manor, but reftored it upon Ofbert's 

» Guilielm. Malmcfbur. de Antiq. Glafton. Ecclefiae, ap. Ad. de Doroerham, i, 70. Job. Claftoo. Hift. de 
rebus Glaftomenfibus, i, 113. 

* Lib. Domefday, £a-o». * Lib. Domefday, /^>/?OT(>«a/7. " Lib. Nig. Scac. i. 109. • Ibid, 110. 

' Dr. ^awUnlon's Book of Inqoifitions. 

petition