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Full text of "History of the city of Spokane and Spokane country, Washington"

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HISTORY 



OF THE 



CITY OF SPOKANE 



AND 



SPOKANE COUNTRY 

WASHINGTON 



From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME III 






4 • > 



* * • 






• • » 



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SPOKANE-CHICAGO-PHILADELPHIA 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1912 



THE HEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

707074 



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ROBKRT E. STKAHORN 



Biographical 

ROBERT EDMUND STRAHORN. 

Starting out in life with less opportunity or equipment than the average Amer- 
ican boy, but evidently possessed of an optimism and determination which enabled 
him to triumph over many adverse situations and discouragements, Robert Edmund 
Strahorn has followed the lead of his opportunities, doing as best he could any- 
thing that came to hand, and creating and seizing legitimate advantages as they 
have arisen. He has never hesitated to take a forward step when the way was 
open. Fortunate in possessing a degree of earnestness and frankness that have 
inspired confidence in others, the simple weight of his character and ability have 
carried him into important relations with large interests and he is now the presi- 
dent of several important railway and other corporations with headquarters in 
Spokane. The North Coast Railroad project especially owes its inception and 
prosecution to him and is constituting a most important element in business activity 
throughout the northwest. 

Mr. Strahorn was bom in Center county, Pennsylvania, May 15, 1852. The 
family is of Scotch-Irish origin and the ancestry in America is traced back to the 
great-grandfather of our subject, who in colonial days came from Scotland to the 
new world and afterward aided in obtaining American liberty in the Revolutionary 
war. He continued a resident of Union county, Pennsylvania, until his death and 
his son Samuel Strahorn, grandfather of our subject, also made his home in that 
rounty. The father, Thomas F. Strahorn, there born and reared, learned the 
trades of a millwright and machinist and in 1856 removed from Center county, 
Pennsylvania, to Freeport, Illinois, and nine years later became a resident of 
Sedalia, Missouri. In 1878 he crossed the Rockies, following in the footsteps of 
his son who had preceded in 1870, and after residing for a time in Idaho and 
Montana he became a resident of Los Angeles, California, where he passed away 
in 1883. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Rebecca Emmert, was born in 
Center county, Pennsylvania, and was of Dutch lineage, a daughter of John Kra- 
mert, who had come to this country from Switzerland. The death of Mrs. Strahorn 
occurred in 1861. 

Robert E. Strahorn spent the first four years of his life in the state of his 
nativity and was then taken by his parents to northern Illinois, where the period 
of his youth was passed in village and farm life where his work was of the hard- 
est. His educational privileges were very limited, as he attended school only imtil 
ten years of age. Private reading and study, however, constantly broadened his 
knowledge and the studious habits of his youth have made him a man of wide 
general information. In the school of experience, too, he learned many valuable 
lessons which have proven of significant worth in his advancement in the busi- 
ness world. In his boyhood days, after his life on the farm, he first sold papers 

5 



6 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

on the streets and then began learning the printer's trade in Sedalia, Missouri, 
following that occupation for five years. Subsequent to his removal to Denver, 
Colorado, in 1870, he was engaged in newspaper work as reporter, editor and 
correspondent until 1877. During the Sioux war of 1875-6 in Wyoming and 
Montana, he was with General Crook as special correspondent of the New York 
Times, Chicago Tribune and Denver News, personally participating in the fight- 
ing in all of the engagements with the Indians, the secretary of war commending 
him for his gallantry and helpfulness to the government. Moreover, he wrote most 
interesting accounts of that frontier warfare, which was needed in quelling the 
Indians in their hostile resentment of the incoming civilization. 

While pursuing the journalistic profession Mr. Strahorn became interested in 
and to some extent identified with the railway business, accompanying as corre- 
spondent several surveying parties and also performing publicity work for the 
Denver & Rio Grande, the Colorado Central and the Union Pacific Railroad Com- 
panies. This opened up to him the opportunity of entering into active connec- 
tion with railway interests and he organized and conducted the publicity bureaus 
of the Union Pacific and Kansas Pacific Companies, during which period, from 
1877 until 1884, he resided much of the time in Omaha and in Denver. He was 
also engaged in a confidential capMtcity in work relating to the extension of lines 
for the Union Pacific, this carrying him by stage, horseback and on foot into 
almost every county of every state and territory west of the Missouri river and 
brought to him his wide knowledge of the conditions and the opportunities of the 
west. His next step in the business world brought him into intimate connection 
with town-site, irrigation and power enterprises in Idaho, Oregon and Washington 
and when six years had passed in that way he returned to the east, settling in 
Boston, Massachusetts, in 1890. Through the succeeding eight years he devoted 
his attention to the negotiation of municipal bonds but since 1898 has perma- 
nently resided in Spdcane, where he again became actively interested in develop- 
ment projects, his special lines of operation being in connection with the construc- 
tion and operation of waterworks, power and. electric plants and irrigation. Those 
interests still, claim his attention and energies to a considerable extent and have 
constituted a significant force in the improvement and upbuilding of the districts 
in which he has operated. His enterprise and executive ability in recent years 
have, moreover, brought him into prominence in railway connections as the promo- 
ter and builder of the North Coast Railroad. He undertook to prosecute that 
project in the spring of 1905 with the result that in the fall of that year a com- 
pany was organized and the engineering and construction work has since proceeded 
steadily. The system is designed to bring Seattle, Tacoma and Portland on the 
west into direct connection with Walla Walla and Spokane on the east and includes 
a new short line between Spokane and Walla Walla and another between Spokane 
and Lewiston, Idaho, and, with its branches, is to have a total length of seven 
hundred and fifty miles. Throughout practically the whole existence of the com- 
pany Mr. Strahorn has been its president and active manager. The value of the 
project is recognized by every business man of this section and its worth as a 
developing factor of Washington can scarcely be overestimated. In connection 
with this, Mr. Strahorn has organized the Spokane Union Terminal project which 
will center five railways in one grand passenger terminal and provide for their 
concentration along one central zone through the heart of the city, with all surface 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 7 

OT grade crossings eliminated. In working this out he overcame obstacles which 
in the aggregate were almost appalling. 

The North Coast Railroad project has sometimes been called the railway 
romance of our time and our subject, its central figure, the "Sphinx" and "Man 
of Mystery" because of the very unusual and unique manner of its financing and 
building, involving many millions of dollars, without the identity of Mr. Strahorn's 
financial backers becoming known. The war made upon him by rival railway in- 
terests* and others bent upon unmasking and defeating him has been a sensation 
of large magnitude in the Pacific northwest, and probably more thaii any other of 
Mr. Strahorn's undertakings has emphasized his fine poise, unfaltering pursuit of 
an undertaking once decided upon and his undying devotion to any trust imposed 
in him, as well as his modesty in success. Late in the year 1910, when the 
larger matters desired had been accomplished, this ban of secrecy was removed 
and it developed that Mr. Strahom had been the confidential agent of Mr. Harri- 
man from the first and the North Coast Railroad enterprise was consolidated with 
other Harriman lines in the northwest under the name of the Oregon-Washington 
Railroad & Navigation Company, and Mr. Strahorn made vice-president of the 
larger corporation. 

In order to appreciate some of the accomplishments of this great railroad builder 
be it stated that several hundred miles of road surveyed and in part constructed 
have been paid for, to the extent of several million dollars, by the personal check 
of Mr. Strahorn. A thousand miles of surveyed lines, a hundred miles completed 
in the Yakima valley, trains operating on portions of road, are a few of the things 
that have been accomplished in an incredibly short time and in the face of tremend- 
ous odds and opposition. There has been built one bridge two thousand nine hun- 
dred feet long spanning the Columbia; another over the Snake will be four thou- 
sand And seventy feet long and two hundred and seventy-five feet high, probably 
the highest over any large river in the United States, and this bridge will have 
ten million pounds of steel used in its construction. Mr. Strahom will erect in' 
the city of Spokane alone one bridge one hundred and sixty-five feet high and three 
thousand feet long; another one hundred and seventy-five feet high and one thou- 
sand feet long, and both to be marvelous engineering feats. 

More recently these interests have organized the West Coast Railway designed 
to do important construction across the Cascade mountains, with Mr. Strahorn as 
president, and also the Yakima Valley Transportation Company, which is build- 
ing important electric railway lines under his direction. Among his many important 
personal enterprises are the Northwest Light & Water Company, owning water- 
power, electric lighting and waterworks plants in various cities of Oregon, Washing- 
ton and Idaho; the Yakima Valley Power Company, which has built electric trans- 
mission lines one hundred and ten miles in length, connecting up and furnishing 
electric power to all the cities of the Yakima valley and Pasco; and the Pasco 
Reclamation Company, which is irrigating and otherwise developing large areas 
of orchard lands surrounding the city of Pasco. Besides financing and being presi- 
dent and manager of these and other companies, Mr. Strahorn has found time to 
engage in many other activities in connection with commercial oi'ganizations through- 
out the northwest. 

On the 19th of September, 1877, Mr. Strahorn was married to Miss Carrie 



8 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Adell Green, a daughter of Dr. J. W. Green, of Marengo, Illinois, whose social 
graces and literary attainments (the latter best evidenced by her authorship of the 
popular volume "Fiftee^i thousand miles by stage") are eloquent testimonials to 
the credit her husband so freely accords her for a large measure of his success. 

Mr. Strahom is a valued member of several social organizations, including the 
Spokane Club, Spokane Athletic Club, the Inland Club and the Sp<Jcane Country 
Club, and for several years he has been a trustee of the Spokane Chamber of Com- 
merce, cooperating in all of its practical plans for the development of the city. 
His genial nature, ever^ready helpfulness and philanthropy have given him a large 
place in the hearts of his fellow citizens. Mr. Strahorn is a man of well balanced 
capacities and powers, without any of that genius which is liable to produce erratic 
movements resulting in unwarranted risk and failure. He is eminently a man of 
business sense, of well balanced mind, even temper and conservative habits, and 
possesses that kind of enterprise that leads to great accomplishments and benefits 
others more than himself. 



MRS. CARRIE ADELL STRAHORN. 

Carrie Adell (Green) Strahorn, wife of Robert E. Strahom, of Spokane, is a 
native of Marengo, McHenry county, Illinois, being the second daughter of Dr. 
John W. and Louise Babcock Green. Her parents were pioneers of northern Illi- 
nois, her father having removed in 1846 from Greenfield, Ohio, of which place Dr. 
Green's parents were founders. These grandparents of Mrs. Strahom, on her 
father's side, were descendants of prominent patriots of like name of the Revolu- 
tionary war. Her mother, who died in Marengo in 1899, was a native of Lavonia 
Center, New York, and was a descendant of Aaron Burr. Dr. John W. Green, 
Mrs. Strahom's father, who died in Chicago in 1893, was for fifty years one of the 
most noted surgeons of the Mississippi valley. He was the first surgeon to admin- 
ister an anesthetic west of Chicago. He served with great distinction during the war 
of the Rebellion, first as regimental surgeon of the Ninety-fifth Illinois, and later 
as brigade and finally as division surgeon with General Grant in the Army of the 
Tennessee. Mrs. Green accompanied her husband throughout the famous Red river 
campaign, sharing every danger of field and hospital. 

Carrie Adell Green had the advantage of the public schools of Marengo, supple- 
mented by a liberal education in the higher branches at Ann Arbor. Developing an 
ardent love for music, she studied to good purpose under some of the foremost 
American and European vocal masters, and thus, when wedded to Robert E. Stra- 
hom, at Marengo, September 19, 1877, she possessed to an unusual degree the 
graces and refinements and all the wholesome attributes* and practical helpfulness 
of the sensibly reared young womanhood of those days. 

It is not too much to say that Carrie Adell Strahorn has well maintained the 
lofty traditions of the sturdy, heroic stock of pioneers, patriots and state builders 
of her ancestry. A superb, home-loving, womanly woman always, yet she has had 
so much to do with the development of the frontier that her public life and ac- 



CABRIE AUELL STRAHORN 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 11 

complishments have been the inspiration and pride of many communities in the 
Rocky Mountain and Pacific coast states. It has been well said of her that she 
has "mothered the west." 

Immediately after her marriage in 1877 she set out with her husband on the 
often dangerous and romantic^ and always toilsome career (in a field covering nearly 
half our continent) the brighter aspects of which are so vividly portrayed in her 
famous book "Fifteen Thousand Miles by Stage," which was published in 1911 by 
G. P. Putnam's Sons. 

Probably no other woman has so thoroughly experienced every phase of far west 
exploration and genuine pioneering. This, covering a period of thirty-four years 
while the west has been in the making, has gone through all gradations from the 
wilderness haunts of the hostile savage along through the rudest camps of the miner 
and cowboy to zealous, practical participation in colonization, and town and city 
building in many waste places, often far in advance of the railways. This work 
was particularly noticeable and effective from 1877 to 1880 in Nebraska, Colorado 
and Wyoming, and from 1880 to 1890 in Utah, Montana, Idaho and Washington. 
From 1890 to 1898, while Mr. Strahom transferred his activities largely to New 
England, Mrs. Strahom pursued her musical and literary studies in Boston. Dur- 
ing this period however, the Strahom's spent a portion of each year in Spokane and 
vicinity, or elsewhere in the Rocky Mountains. Since 1898, when they located p>er- 
manently in Spokane, Mrs. Strahom has been everything in the life and growth 
of the city and state that might be expected from one so fully equipped and so 
ardently in love with the Pacifiitf .j^^a^t o^i^irtry' and its institutions. 

Being a frequent contribikprj;. to 4:^!^ ^Columns of various eastern publications dur- 
ing all these years, she has n^ade the most of many opportunities to faithfully por- 
tray the leading characteristics of far, )V6sk Hfe asd development, never failing to 
award due praise to the heroic woc^.'OT'i^^praite^s, as well as to enthusiastically 
strive for wider recognition of the merits of western resources and institutions, and 
our climatic, scenic and other attractions. 

The camp or home of the Strahoms has always been a landmark of hospitality 
and a rallying point for the creation and nourishing of public spirit and the strenu- 
ous promotion of every good cause. Not a few of the far west's foremost men in 
business, professional and political life, join her noted husband in gratefully ascrib- 
ing much of their success to Mrs. Strahorn's untiring encouragement and general 
helpfulness in her home, social and public activities at the period in their lives when 
such help meant everything to them. She has also accomplished much in church 
building and in the founding and support of educational and charitable institutions. 
Notwithstanding the success, financially and otherwise, of Mr. Strahom, and her 
prominent place and hearty participation in the social life of Spokane, Mrs. Stra- 
hom has not relaxed in her devotion to these more useful and serious things and is 
still actively engaged in literary pursuitst 



EDWARD FRANKLIN WAGGONER. 

Edward Franklin Waggoner is the president of the Union Fuel & Ice Company 
of Spokane, with offices at 407 Sprague avenue. He was bom in Lostant, Illinois, 
February, 15, 1870, and acquired his early education in the public schools there. 



12 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

while spending his youthful days in the home of his parents^ John G. and Sarah 
E. (Cox) Waggoner. He was afterward sent to Eureka College at Eureka, Illi- 
nois, and when he had put aside his text-hooks he became a clerk in a store there. 
The next step in his business career brought him into close connection with the 
McCormick Harvesting Machine Company as traveling salesman and collector, in 
which capacity he traveled for them in Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky. He dis- 
played notable ability in all branches of the harvesting machinery business, thereby 
winning the position of general agent and manager of the company's business in 
Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and a part of Wyoming. In 1908 the Inter- 
national Harvester Company was formed, taking over the McCormick Harvesting 
Machine Company and Mr. Waggoner was continued in charge of the business 
until October 15, 1906, when he resigned to enter upon an independent business 
venture, organizing the Union Fuel & Ice Company, of which he has since been 
president. The company was established as a wholesale and retail business. The 
business has grown steadily and substantially since its inception and is now one 
of the important and prosperous commercial undertakings of Spokane, doing a 
business of nearly a half million dollars in 1911. 

Mr. Waggoner is also trustee and secretary of the Masonic Temple Association 
and it was he who as the master of Spokane Lodge No. 84, F. & A. M., conceived 
the project of erecting a Masonic Temple in Spokane and assisted in the forma- 
tion of the association which erected the temple. He acted as secretary of the 
board of trustees and as chairman of its finance committee from the outset until the 
temple was completed, and his work in this connection has received warm com- 
mendation. The association was formed in 1901 ; ground for the temple was 
broken by President Roosevelt on the 26th day of May, 1908; the corner stone 
was laid October 6, 1904; and the building was dedicated June 14, 1906. Mr. 
Waggoner is one of the best known and most prominent Masons of the state, tak- 
ing an active part in the work of the order and ever upholding the high standard 
which has been maintained by this fraternity. He belongs to and is past master 
of Spokane Lodge, No. 84, F. & A. M.; is a member and past high priest of Spo- 
kane Chapter, No. 2, R. A. M. ; and belongs to Spokane Council, No. 4, R. & S. M. ; 
Cataract Commandery, No. 8, K. T. ; Oriental Consistory, No. 2, S. P. R. S.; and 
El Katif Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. He has been awarded high honors in the 
order and was grand master of the state of Washington in 1906-7. He likewise 
belongs to Spokane Lodge, No. 228, B. P. O. E.; Samaritan Lodge, No. 52, 
I. O. O. F. ; Spokane Council, No. 92, United Commercial Travelers; and is a 
Woodman of the World. 

In addition to his other business interests he is a director and a member of the 
executive committee of the International Casualty Company and also a director in 
the Western Soap Company, one of Spokane's largest manufacturing institutions. 
He is now serving for the second term as a trustee of the Chamber of Commerce 
and has cooperated readily and effectively in its measures and plans for promoting 
public progress. His political allegiance is given to the Republican party and he 
takes an active and helpful interest in its work, yet would never consent to be- 
come a candidate for office. He wields an influence which is all the stronger, per- 
haps, because it is moral rather than political, and is exercised for the public weal 
rather than for personal ends. 

On the 16th of February, 1898, Mr. Waggoner was married, in Chicago, to 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 13 

Miss Nellie McKibben, a daughter of Captain J. M. and Margaret McKibben, of 
Shelbyville, Illinois. They have two children, Edward F.; Jr., and Margaret. In 
the social circles of Spokane they are well known and the hospitality of the best 
homes is cordially extended them. His business interests have brought him a wide 
acquaintance in the northwest and through Masonry he has become even more 
widely known, standing as a prominent representative of that order which has ever 
inculcated principles of high and honorable manhood and promoted good citizenship. 



S. A. STANFIELD. 



S. A. Stanfield is one of the widely known residents of Lincoln county, who has 
been more or less actively identified with the agricultural and business interests of 
Odessa for more than twenty years. He was bom in Umatilla county, Oregon, on 
February 10, 1869, and is a son of Robert N. and Phoebe (Atwood) Stanfield, 
natives of Illinois. In the early '50s they crossed the plains to California, whence 
they later removed to Oregon, settling in Umatilla county where the father filed on 
some government land and engaged in agricultural pursuits. 

The early years of S. A. Stanfield did not differ save in details from those of 
other lads reared on ranches on the frontier at that period. He attended the public 
schools in the acquirement of an education until he was eighteen years of age, and 
when not engaged with his studies assisted his father with the operation of the 
ranch. By the time he had attained his maturity he was thoroughly familiar with 
the practical methods of tilling the fields and caring for the stock. In 1887, he en- 
gaged in stock raising for three years, meeting with very good success. At the 
expiration of that period, in 1890, he came to Lincoln county and filed on a home- 
stead near Odessa, and for fourteen years devoted his entire time and energy to 
the cultivation and improvement of this place. As he is a man of practical ideas 
who intelligently directs his efforts toward the accomplishment of a definite pur- 
pose, he prospered in his undertakings. He brought his land into a high state of 
productivity and erected good substantial bams and outbuildings as well as a com- 
fortable residence on his ranch, making it one of the attractive and valuable prop- 
erties of that section. In 1904< he disposed of it and withdrawing from agricultural 
pursuits removed to Odessa. Here he established a meat market that he con- 
ducted with very good success for two years, and then disposed of it. After selling 
his business he went to Grant county, Washington, and bought a section of land 
that he cultivated for about a year. Renting this property in 1907, he passed the 
following two years in and about Spokane, subsequently returning to Odessa. In 
1909 he again took possession of the meat market he had previously established, 
bat only conducted it for a brief period, closing out the business in 1910. Prior 
to this he had acquired a fine tract of land adjacent to Odessa upon which he lo- 
cated and here he has ever since resided. His land is all under cultivation and is 
well adapted to the raising of fruits and alfalfa in which he is specializing with 
very good results. Mr. Stanfield has prospered in his undertakings and is the 
owner of some very fine land, that is constantly increasing in value. He sold his 
section of land in Grant county, Washington, as the cultivation of the ranch on 
which he is living brings him an income that is more than sufficient for the needs 
of himself and family. In addition to these properties he has a nice residence in 
Odessa and is a stockholder and director of the Odessa Mercantile Company. 



14 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Umatilla county was the scene of Mr. Stanfield's marriage on December 22, 
1889, to Miss Emma B. Boardman, a daughter of Robert Boardman of Illinois, 
and they have become the parents of one son, Lloyd, whose natal day was in 
April, 1891. 

Mr. Stanfield has attained the rank of a Royal Arch Mason and is affiliated 
with the lodge at Davenport. Politically he is a democrat, but has never been 
officially identified with local governmental affairs. He is an excellent representa- 
tive of the unassuming, enterprising citizens who form the strength of a community 
and measure its possibilities and resourcefulness. 



RICHARD ASHTON HUTCHINSON. 

Richard Ashton Hutchinson is well known in Spokane through the real-estate 
business which he has conducted, but is perhaps more widely known throughout 
the state as the senator from the Spokane district. He has been almost continu- 
ously in office since 1882 when, at the first election held in Spokane county, he was 
chosen assessor. Consecutive progress has brought him to a position of prominence 
and individual ability has made him a leader in public thought and action. 

Mr. Hutchinson was born in Grand Gulf, Mississippi, February 14, 1858, a 
son of William Dean and Margaret (Murray) Hutchinson. The father, who was 
born in Kentucky in 1798, was a cousin of Andrew Jackson, whose mother be- 
longed to the Hutchinson family. In 1886 William Dean Hutchinson removed 
from Kentucky to Illinois and afterward went to Havana, Cuba, where he was 
engaged in business until the outbreak of the Mexican war, when he returned to 
the United States and volunteered for service with the Mississippi troops. He 
also went to California in 1849 with the argonauts in search of the golden fleece, 
but after a brief period spent on the coast returned to Mississippi. His opposi- 
tion to slavery caused him to join John Brown in his famous campaign in Kansas 
and during the Civil war he served as guide on General Sigel's staff in Missouri 
but became disabled and left the army. In the winter of 1 862 he went to Colorado 
but returned to Kansas and was the builder of the first house in Hays City, that 
state. He became a resident of eastern Washington, and he and his sons became 
the first settlers in what is now Mondovi, Lincoln county, where his death occurred 
on the 8th of November, 1884. There have been few men whose lives have been 
more closely connected with a greater number of events of national importance 
than William Dean Hutchinson. Enterprising in spirit, fearless in action, he was 
the champion of his country's interest in the Mexican war, the friend of the op- 
pressed when slavery marred the fair name of the nation and he met with valorous 
spirit the hardships and privation incident to pioneer life in California and Wash- 
ington. His wife was of Irish and Scotch descent. Her father was a lieutenant 
in the Scotch Grays of the British army during the Napoleonic wars and fought 
under Wellington throughout the Peninsular campaign and at Waterloo. 

Richard Ashton Hutchinson was with his father in Missouri in 1857 when a 
lad of four years and afterward in Colorado and Kansas. While in the former 
state he served as a page in the legislature and also worked for a time in the 
Denver mint. During his residence in Kansas he was for seven years engaged in 



R. A. HUTCHINSOX 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 17 

driving cattle and in conducting a store as well as in fighting Indians^ for the set- 
tlers had to contest their right to the territory against the red men. In 1872 with 
the others of the family he became a pioneer of Quillayute county on the Pacific 
coast where he improved and developed land. About that time his father met 
with reverses and the support of the family fell upon Richard A. Hutchinson, then 
twenty-two years of age. From 1878 until 1879 he worked in the coal mines at 
Newcastle, King county, but while there became crippled and also lost his health. 
On* the 1st of May, 1879, he started on foot for eastern Washington with his 
younger brother William Hutchinson. They arrived at Spokane on the 20th day 
of May, finding here a hamlet of fifty people. The brothers took up land thirty- 
five miles west of the city which they developed and cultivated, transforming 
it into a valuable tract which they still own. Almost from the beginning of his 
residence in Spokane county Mr. Hutchinson has been prominent as a factor in 
its public life. At its first election held in 1882 the district, then comprising the 
present counties of Spokane, Lincoln, Adams, Douglas and Franklin, he was 
elected assessor. In 1883 the division of the county was changed so that his 
property was beyond the borders of Spokane county and as he wished to be 
with his father he resigned his office but was elected assessor of Lincoln county. 
In June 1886, he grubstaked the halfbreeds who discovered the mines at Ruby 
camp, Okanogan county when the reservation was first opened. He has always 
been interested there and still retains a working property in that district. When 
Joseph's band of Nez Perce Indians were brought to Spokane in 1886 he received 
them as prisoners of war and took them to .tb^ Nespelem valley on the Colville 
reservations where he lived with them until July, 1889, teaching them farming. 
During the first year and a half Mr. Hutchinson and his wife were the only 
white residents with those Indians, his nearest neighbor being a horseman fifteen 
miles distant, on the south side of the Columbia river. 

From time to time Mr. Hutchinson was called to public office and has done 
not a little in shaping the policy of the country during its formative period. In 
1 890 he had charge of the United States census in Lincoln county and was elected 
a member of the house of representatives for the fifteenth district. In 1892 he 
was chosen senator from Okanogan and Lincoln counties representing the first 
district, and thus he was actively concerned with framing the laws of the state, 
giving careful consideration to every important question which came up for set- 
tlement. 

Reverses overtook Mr. Hutchinson in 1893, for during the panic of that year 
he lost all of his property and was in debt fifteen thousand dollars, but with 
resolute spirit he looked to the future to retrieve his losses and in 1895 came to 
Spokane, where with a borrowed capital of five hundred dollars he embarked in 
the real-estate business. Such was the sound judgment that he displayed in his 
purchases and sales of property that within a short time he was able to regain 
possession of his old home in Lincoln county and discharge all of his indebted- 
ness. Since that time he has continued not only to engage in the real-estate busi- 
ness but also in mining and he is one of the most extensive individual wheat rais- 
ers in the state^ having over ten thousand acres in Lincoln, Adams, Douglas and 
Spokane counties. His mining interests are in the Coeur d'Alenes, British Colum- 
bia and in Okanogan and Stevens counties. Recognizing the possibilities for the 
country especially when water can be secured to aid in its development, Mr. 



18 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Hutchinson became the promoter of the Opportunity irrigation district east of 
Spokane. The National Country Life Commission, appointed by President Roose- 
velt, said of Opportunity: "It is the most ideal place for Rural Homes that we 
have seen." Since disposing of his interest in Opportunity Mr. Hutchinson has 
been actively engaged in real-estate dealing in Spokane, especially handling that 
district of the city known as the Hutchinson addition. His fitness for office as in- 
dicated by his public-spirited citizenship and his devotion to all that works for 
the welfare of the locality and the commonwealth led to his election in 1906 to the 
house of representatives from Spokane county and in 1908 he was elected from the 
fourth district to the state senate, wherein his term of office will continue until 1912. 
Senator Hutchinson has been twice married, his first -wife being Miss Amelia 
Johnson, a native of Washington. They were married in 1883. Three children 
were born to bless this union: Margaret Elizabeth, wife of J. B. Hayes; Ida A.; 
and William Dean. Mrs. Hutchinson died April 10, 1893. On the 9th of Feb- 
ruary, 1895 he was united in marriage to Marguerite Wright, a native of Virginia 
and a daughter of Weitzel A. and Sarah Ann (Taylor) Wright. Mrs. Hutchinson 
taught the first school inWenatchee in 1885, being then only sixteen years of age. 
Three children were born of this union, Marita, Rachael and Richard Ashton, Jr. 
The parents are members of the Episcopal church and are interested in all those 
features which contribute to the material, intellectual, social and moral welfare 
of the community. The life record of Mr. Hutchinson if written in detail would 
present many thrilling and unusual chapters because of his life on the frontier and 
his experience with the red men, as well as his efforts to attain advancement in 
a business way, efforts that have ultimately been crowned with a substantial meas- 
ure of success. 



F. R. JANSEN. 



F. R. Jansen, manager of the Odessa Union Warehouse Company, has been 
identified with the business interests of Odessa for the past five years. He is a 
native of Iowa, his birth having occurred at Avoca on the 16th of March, 1881, 
and a son of Henry and Caroline Kuhl. The parents were both bom and reared 
in Germany, whence they emigrated to Iowa, where for many years the father 
engaged in farming. In 1889, they removed to Washington, settling in Lind, 
Adams county, and there the father continued his agricultural pursuits. 

As he was a lad of eight years when his people removed to Washington, the 
education of F. R. Jansen was begun in the schools of his native county and con- 
tinued in those of Adams county. He subsequently pursued a commercial course 
for two years in Walla Walla, thus better qualifying himself for the practical 
duties of life. At the expiration of that time he came to Lincoln county, settling 
in Krupp, where he began his business career as a grain buyer. He remained 
there for three years following this occupation, and during that time he discharged 
his duties with such efficiency and capability that he attracted the attention of 
various local grain men, and in 1907 he was offered the position of manager of 
the Odessa Union Warehouse Company, with headquarters at Odessa. This com- 
pany is operating &ye warehouses in this vicinity, all of which are under the charge 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 19 

and supervision of Mr. Jansen^ whose services have proven in every way equal to 
the expectations of his employers^ as is manifested by the p>eriod of his connection 
irith the company. 

At Lind^ this state^ on the 80th of May^ 1906^ Mr. Jansen was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Gertrude Baumgard^ a daughter of August Baumgard^ a prominent 
pioneer ranchman of Adams county. 

Mr. Jansen is a trustee of the Presbyterian churchy in which his wife also holds 
membership^ and in his political views he is a socialist^ believing that the principles 
of this party are best adapted to subserve the highest interests of the majority. 
He is one oi the younger members of the local business circles^ where he is held 
in high esteem and is recognized as a very capable young man^ whose enterprising 
and progressive ideas give every assurance of his success. 



JOSEPH E. HORTON. 



Joseph £. Horton^ who has been actively engaged in the real-estate business 
in Spokane for the past eight years with offices located in the Lindelle buildings 
was bom in Dubuque county^ lowa^ in September^ 1854. His parents are George 
W. and Elisabeth (Byrne) Horton, formerly farming people of Iowa, whence they 
later removed to Minnesota, but they are now residents of California, having lo- 
cated there in 1910. The father has long outlived the Psalmist's allotment of 
years, having passed the ninety-fifth anniversary of his birth, while the mother 
is now seventy-six years of an^e. 

The preliminary education of Joseph E. Horton was obtained in the public 
schools of Minnesota, in which state he was reared, this being supplemented later 
by a course in the State University at Minneapolis, where he received the degree 
of B. L. in 1880. Three years later he located in South Dakota, becoming a resi- 
dent of Campbell county, where in 1888 he was appointed to the office of probata 
judge and was elected to same office in 1884. He served in this capacity until 
1886 when he was elected register of deeds and ex-officio county clerk for a term 
of four years, and in 1891 and 1892 he was state senator on the democratic ticket 
from Campbell and Walworth counties. Two years later, in 1894, Mr. Horton 
was appointed Indian post trader at the Cheyenne river agency. South Dakota, 
continuing to fulfil the duties of this position until 1899. The following year he 
organized the Bank of Linton, North Dakota, of which he was president for three 
years, during that time developing it into one of the conservative and firmly es- 
tablished financial institutions of the county. In 1908, Mr. Horton disposed of all 
of his interests in North Dakota and came to Spokane, where he has ever since 
engaged in buying and selling real estate on his own account. Possessing much 
sagacity and foresight, he has made a success of this undertaking, as he possesses 
the intuitive faculty of recognizing an opportunity not discernible to the average 
individual and utilizes it to his own advantage. Since locating here, Mr. Horton 
has been connected with a number of important real-estate transfers, and is the 
owner of some valuable property. He built and still owns the city market, located 
at the comer of Second avenue and Stevens street, which covers twenty-five thou- 
sand feet of floor space and contains twenty-four stalls. 



20 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

On the 4th of August^ 1894, Mr. Horton was united in marriage to Miss Minerva 
A. Eckert, a daughter of Henry and Caroline Eekert, of Tumwater, Washington, 
and they have become the parents of four children: Erwin, who was born in 1895; 
Josephine, whose natal year was 1 897 ; Doris, who celebrated her ninth anniversary 
in 1911; and Jack, whose birth occurred in 1907. The family hoine is located at 
2408 Altamont boulevard, this city, where Mr. Horton owns a beautiful residence. 

Mr. Horton votes the democratic ticket, but he has had neither the time nor 
inclination to prominently participate in governmental affairs since locating in Spo- 
kane, and his fraternal relations are confined to his membership in the Masonic 
order. He is intensely loyal to the state of his adoption and feels that the develoj>- 
ment of Washington, industrially, commercially and agriculturally during the next 
few years will exceed by far that of the past decade, as its wonderful natural re- 
sources are just beginning to be realized. 



JOSEPH KRIEGLER. 



Joseph Kriegler, who is actively engaged in the real-estate, insurance and loan 
business in Odessa is one of the town's most public-spirited and enterprising citi- 
zens. He was born in Bohemia on the 18th of February, 1866, and there he was 
likewise educated and reared to the age of nineteen years. As he was a most 
ambitious youth he longed to make more rapid progress in the business world than 
was possible in his native land with its conservative methods and system, and he 
decided to come to America, feeling convinced that he would here find the op- 
portunities he was seeking. Upon his arrival in this country in 1885, he first 
located in Waterville, Minnesota, where for eighteen months he followed agri- 
cultural pursuits. During that period he became quite familiar with the language 
;ind customs of the country, thus qualifying himself to become identified with com- 
mercial activities. He, therefore, withdrew from farming and went to Castleton, 
North Dakota, where he engaged in the general mercantile business for two years. 
At the end of that time he returned to Minnesota, and for eighteen months followed 
the same business at Wadina, that state. Five years had elapsed since he first 
came to the United States and a longing to see his boyhood home proved too strong 
to be resisted and in 1891, he returned to Europe. He spent four months amid 
the scenes of his native land, and then came back to America, locating in Everest, 
North Dakota. For a short time thereafter he clerked in a general mercantile 
store, that he subsequently purchased and conducted with excellent success for 
ten years. Soon after he bought this establishment he opened a branch store at 
Castleton, where he had previously been in business, and this also proved to be a 
very successful undertaking. In 1901, he disposed of both places and came to 
Washington, settling in Odessa, and here he has ever since resided. When he 
first came here Mr. Kriegler engaged in business with his brother E. J. Kriegler 
for several years, but later he sold his interest to his brother and went into the 
lumber business. He applied himself energetically and intelligently to the devel- 
opment of this enterprise, which he operated under the name of the Joseph Kriegler 
Lumber Company until 1908, when he sold it and withdrawing from commercial 
activities engaged in the real-estate, insurance and loan business. Mr. Kriegler 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 21 

is an alert, wide-awake^ enterprising business man^ who quickly recognizes op- 
portunities not discernible to a man of less perspicacity and utilizes theln to his 
advantage. He has prospered in a most gratifying manner since locating here, 
and has acquired not only some fine town property but twenty-five hundred acres 
of excellent wheat land that he is leasing. 

Odessa was the scene of Mr. Kriegler's marriage in 1908 to Miss Louise Hal- 
ler, a native of Sp<d£ane^ and to them has been born one son Joseph E., who is 
now attending school. 

Mr. Kriegler is a communicant of the Roman Catholic church. He has al- 
ways taken a very deep interest in all municipal affairs and for the past five years 
has discharged the duties of town treasurer and he is also a member of the school 
board. In matters of citizenship he is most progressive^ always finding ample time 
and opportunity to promote the welfare of the community or to cooperate in devel- 
oping the various public utilities. He was one of the • organizers of the Odessa 
Commercial Club, of which he was president for two terms, and has always en- 
thusiastically championed every movement inaugurated by this association that he 
felt would in any way tend to advance the interests of the town. In addition to 
his other business responsibilities he is vice president of the Union State Bank of 
Odessa and is one of the largest stockholders of this institution, which is . one of 
the county's well established and conservative financial enterprises. Mr. Kriegler 
is one of the highly regarded business men of the town and is meeting with well 
deserved success in the development of his various undertakings. His prosperity 
is generally recognized as the reward of unceasing industry, close concentration 
and the inherent faculty to utilize every opportunity to the best possible advantage. 
He has high standards of citizenship and although he is much absorbed in the 
development of his personal affairs, never neglects his public duties, his services 
always being at the command of the community. 



FREDERICK OMAR HUGHES. 

In a rapidly growing country there is excellent opportunity for the architect 
and in that profession Frederick Omar Hughes is winning not only a livelihood 
but gratifying success as a member of the firm of Diamond & Hughes. He was 
bom near Muskoka, Canada, December 6, 1880. His parents, Peter and Emma 
(Jarrett) Hughes, are both natives of England and are now residents of Spokane, 
having in September, 1886, removed to this city where the father was engaged in 
the general contracting business but is now living retired. He erected the first 
Medical Lake Insane Asylum and, prior to 1900, was the builder of a large 
number of the business blocks of Spokane. In addition to Frederick Omar Hughes 
the others of his father's family are: Thomas B., conducting a wholesale plumbing 
establishment in Spokane; R. H., foreman of the print shop of the Shaw & Borden 
Company; and Minnie, a resident of Spokane. 

As a pupil in the public schools of Spokane Frederick Omar Hughes passed 
through consecutive grades and followed his high school course by two correspond- 
ence courses in architecture. He received practical training under the direction 
of his father, with whom he worked for four years in the contracting business. 



22 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

and then entered upon the active work of his chosen profession as a draftsman in 
the employ of Albert Held, and was afterward with the firm of Preusse & Zittel 
and subsequently joined C. T. Diamond in the organization of the present firm with 
offices in the Mohawk block. They have specialized in store interiors and bank 
fixtures, yet also do a general architecture business. They were architects for the 
Lloyd apartments, representing an expediture of eighty-five thousand dollars, and 
the wholesale plumbing house of Hughes & Company, . representing an investment 
of fifty thousand dollars. They remodeled the Fidelity National Bank and were 
professionally employed by the Spokane Table Supply Company, Greenough Broth- 
ers, the Inland Empire Biscuit Company and many others. 

On the 6th of October, 1906, in Spokane, Mr. Hughes was united in marriage 
to Miss Carrie McPhee. He has spent the greater part of his life in this city and 
has a wide acquaintance socially as well as professionally, sterling qualities win- 
ning him high regard in both connections. 



WILLIAM PETTET. 



The life history of William Pettet if written in detail would furnish many a 
chapter of thrilling interest and in the plain statement of facts should serve to in- 
spire and encourage others, giving indication of what may be accomplished when a 
high sense of duty is coupled witL. determined purpose, energy and intelligence. He 
came to Spdcane as a pioneer of-' I898«^ J^e./^^^.'s^hen sixty-five years of age, his 
birth having occurred in England -ik^Septem^r;) 1818. He was bom of wealthy 
parents, pursued his education in the schools of hid native land and in 1886, when 
about eighteen years of age, crossed^ the, Atlantic to New York. Two years later 
he removed to the south, settlfngTn Mditile?^ Alabama, where in connection with two 
practicing physicians he established a drug store. The following year, however, his 
partners and two other business associates succumbed to the yellow fever. He 
bravely faced this crisis in his affairs when it became necessary for him to close 
out the business and make a division of interests in behalf of those deceased, al- 
though he had scarcely entered upon manhood at that time.. In 1841, then twenty- 
three years of age, he established a commission house in New York and in 1842 
accompanied the Amon Kendall party as far as Galveston, Texas. On the 6th of 
May, 1846, he left Independence, Missouri, on the overland trip to San Francisco, 
whence he made his way to Yuba Bueno. When they passed through Kansas they 
experienced considerable trouble with the Indians and at different times had to 
reckon with the hostility of the red men, engaging with them in a severe fight on 
the Truckee river in order to recover stock driven away by them. When near 
Truckee lake they were overtaken by a snow storm at which time Mr. Pettet joined 
a party of six and started for the Sacramento valley, leaving behind their wagons 
and about sixty people who, refusing to proceed, camped near the lake. Mr. Pettet 
and his companions reached Sutter's Fort in safety but those who remained all 
perished save four and these were insane when they finally secured assistance. 

Mr. Pettet remained at Sutter's Fort for the purpose of enlisting emigrants as 
they came in for the war that was then being waged in southern California. With 
quite a number of enlisted men he went to San Francisco where the troops were 
fitted out for service on the sloop of war Portsmouth. Returning to Yuba Bueno 



? 



-— \ 



."^ 



1 



1 .»•'• ' ' 



4 



-T^ 



WILLIAM PETTET 



MRS. WILLIAM PETTET 



r 









SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 27 

Mr. Pettet then organized the firm of Ellis & Pettet for the purpose of dealing with 
the Russians at Sitka^ Alaska^ and when he had disposed of his business interests 
in that country he returned to San Francisco, where he was elected to the office of 
city clerk. He was afterward appointed sheriff and at the close of his term in that 
position returned to New York. In 18(fl, however, he returned to San Francisco, 
sending around Cape Horn the material for the first iron building erected in that 
city — a structure destroyed by fire a few weeks after its completion. Ill health 
a^in compelled him to return to New York and while there he became interested 
in mercantile enterprises. In 1868 he went abroad with his family and spent ^ve 
years in Europe, returning to the United States in 1878. For some time he was a 
resident of St. Paul, where he was widely known. 

The year 1888 witnessed the arrival of Mr. Pettet in Spokane and, believing 
that the city would enjoy rapid and substantial growth at a later day, he made 
considerable investments in real estate. The following year in connection with F. 
R. Moore, now deceased, F. Chamberlin and William Nettleton, he secured the 
block on which the county courthouse now stands and at their own expense these 
gentlemen erected a building for the reception of the county records when they 
were brought from Cheney. In association with Messrs. Moore and Chamberlin 
Mr. Pettet also established permanent arc lights for the streets. From this part- 
nership developed the present Edison Electric Light Company of Spokane. It was 
this company that purchased the lower falls of the river and the land on which 
the big power plant of the Washington Water Power Company now stands. He 
invested in considerable business property together ivith a large amount of north- 
side residence property and with the growth of the city and demand for realty, his 
holdings grew in value, in time making him one of the wealthiest residents of Spo- 



On the 7th of November, 1850, in Milford, Worcester county, Massachusetts. 
Mr. Pettet was united in marriage to Miss Caroline S. Dean, a daughter of Syl- 
vester and Charlotte (Cutler) Dean, both representatives of old and well known 
Massachusetts families. The former was a son of Seth Dean, a soldier of the 
Revolutionary war. Sylvester Dean became a merchant of New York, where he 
long continued in business. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Pettet were bom two children. 
The son George is now assistant secretary of the Spokane & Eastern Trust Com- 
pany. The daughter, Grace, became the wife of J. P. M. Richards, president of 
Ac Spokane & Eastern Trust Company, and unto them were born ^ve children: 
Grace, who is the wife of the Rev. E. P. Smith, of Boise, Idaho, and who has two 
children, Dorothy and Cornelia; Caroline, the wife of Lieutenant Sherburne Whip- 
ple, of the United States army now stationed in the Philippines and by whom she 
has one son, Sherburne ; and John Vanderjwol, Josiah and William Pettet Richards. 
In the spring of 1889, three months before the great fire, Mr. Pettet was stricken 
with typhoid fever from which he never fully recovered. The latter years of his 
life were largely spent at his home, Glasgow Lodge, on the North boulevard, where 
he had a forty-acre tract of land within the city limits and a beautiful residence 
on the banks of the Spokane river, fitted up in English style. His eightieth 
birthday was celebrated by a garden party attended by over two hundred of his 
friends. It was said of him: "Mr. Pettet's benign influence has been very sensibly 

felt in Spokane to the development of which he has contributed incalculably. He 
voLm— s 



28 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

has always been a man of great energy and his superb business ability and keen 
foresight made him eminently successful in his various enterprises." 

In his political views Mr. Pettet was a republican during the early days of his 
residence in thl^ country but in later life became a stanch democrat. He attended 
the Episcopal church until old age compelled him to remain away from the house 
of worship^ after which he always observed the Sabbath in services at home. He 
was a most congenial^ entertaining man^ of kindly nature and greatly enjoyed the 
companionship of young people. He died in November^ 1904^ in London. He 
and his wife three years before had left Spokane for an extended tour of the old 
country and were on their way home when both were taken ill in London. Mrs. 
Pettet improved but her husband gradually failed until the end came. He -was 
then about eighty~six years of age. His had been a long^ well spent and honorable 
life, and it is said that no one who met him, even casually^ would ever forget his 
frank personality. He was a remarkable and unique character and a most valuable 
citizen. He sought out his own ways of doing good but they were effective ways, 
productive of immediate and substantial results. He contributed much to the pio- 
neer development of the city, giving impetus to its industrial and commercial in- 
terests in the era which preceded the fire and also in the period that followed the 
great conflagration. His wise judgment and clear insight were often used for the 
benefit of others as well as in the conduct of his own business affairs and he stood 
as a splendid type of the Anglo-Saxon race who finds or makes his opportunity and 
uses it to the best advantage. 



STANLEY ALEXANDER EASTON. 

Stanley Alexander Easton, living in Kellogg, has since 1902 acted as manager 
of the Bunker Hill & Sullivan Mining & -Concentrating Company. His birth oc- 
curred in Santa Cruz, California, on the 17th of April, 1874, his parents being 
Giles A. and Mary Elizabeth (Gushee) Easton. The father, a California pioneer, 
was an early officer of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company and later entered the 
ministry as one of the pioneer Episcopal clergymen of San Francisco. His demise 
occurred about 1896. 

Stanley A. Easton supplemented his early education by a course of study in the 
department of mining engineering of the University of California, from which he 
was graduated in 1894 with the degree of E. M. He first came to Wardner, Idaho, 
in 1896 and as a mining engineer entered the service of the Bunker Hill & Sullivan 
Mining & Concentrating Company but was absent for several years, working at 
his profession in British Columbia, other parts of Idaho, Colorado, and all the 
principal mining centers. Returning to Wardner in 1902, he took charge of the 
properties of the Bunker Hill & Sullivan Mining & Concentrating Company as 
manager and in this capacity has ably served to the present time. It has been dur- 
ing his administration that the Bunker Hill & Sullivan Mining & Concentrating 
. Company erected the Young Men's Christian Association building in Kellogg. In 
the line of his profession Mr. Easton is connected with the American Institute of 
Mining Engineers, the Mining Metallurgical Society of America and the Institute 
of* Mining & Metallurgy, of London, England. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 29 

On the 15th of November, 1906, Mr. Easton was united in marriage to Miss 
Estelle Greenough of Missoula, Montana, a daughter of Thomas L. Greenough, 
the prominent mining and railroad man of Montana and Idaho, who passed away 
in July, 1911. Our subject and his wife have two children, Ruth and Jane, who 
were born in the years 1907 and 1910 respectively. 

Mr. Easton's fraternal relations are with Wardner Lodge, No. 84, A. F. & A. 
M., of which he is master, and Wallace Lodge, No. 881, B. P. O. E. He is like- 
wise a member of the Spokane Club of Spokane and belongs to the Idaho Sons of 
the American Revolution. His business career has been marked by steady advance- 
ment and he has ever maintained an unassailable reputation for integrity as well 
as enterprise. 



JAMES M. SIMPSON. 



James M. Simpson, actively engaged in the practice of law in Spokane since 
1902, now has a large clientage that has connected him with much important liti- 
gation tried in the courts of this and adjoining states. He is a western man in that 
he was born this side of the Mississippi river, which event occurred in Knox county, 
Missouri, on the 1st day of January, 1860, his parents, Benjamin and Perlina 
Simpson, being pioneers of that county. 

He entered the public schools there when a boy of six years and after com- 
pleting the course of study therein prescribed, attended the State Normal School 
at Kirksville, Missouri, from which institution he graduated in the full course of 
four years in June, 1886. Mr. Simpson first came west in 1882, locating at Deer 
Lodge, Montana, remaining west but a short time, when he returned to Missouri 
to complete his education and again came west to Deer Lodge, Montana, where he 
engaged in educational work until 1904, having charge of the public schools of 
that place. He devoted the hours that are usually termed leisure to the study of 
law and was admitted to the bar of that state in June, 1898. Mr. Simpson con- 
tinued his educational work for a time after his admission to the bar, but has now 
been engaged in the active practice of his profession for about fifteen years. His 
careful analysis and logical deductions, and his correct application of precedent 
and principle to the points at issue, were factors in his success. In 1901 he be- 
came prosecuting county attorney of Powell county, Montana, serving in that ca- 
pacity for nearly two years. In 1902, he resigned the office of county attorney of 
Powell county, Montana, and came to Spokane, where he has since continued in 
the practice of the law. He has a large and well selected law library and has 
remained a student of the principles of jurisprudence to this day. His work done 
before the courts has won him the recognition and admiration of his professional 
brethren and has awakened the confidence of the general public to an extent that 
bas brought him a gratifying clientage. Mr. Simpson has always taken an active 
interest in politics, but has not sought office, having been a candidate for office but 
once in his life. 

Mr. Simpson was married, July 1, 1886, to Miss Kate M. Funk, a daughter 
of Thomas W. and Rachel Funk, of Kirksville, Missouri. Mrs. Simpson is also a 
graduate of the State Normal School at Kirksville, Missouri, having graduated in 



30 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

the class with Mr. Simpson in June^ 1886. They have one child James C. Simp- 
son, of this city. Mr. Simpson is identified with three of the leading fraternal 
organizations. Holding membership in the Masonic fraternity, he has attained 
high rank and is now a member of El Katif Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He 
also belongs to Imperial Lodge, No. 184, I. O. O. F., and to Camp No. 99, W. O. 
W. He belongs also to the Central Christian church and these associations in- 
dicate much of the nature of his interests and the rules of conduct upon which he 
bases his life. Those who know him — and his acquaintance is wide — have faith in 
his ability and his manhood and thus the circle of his friends is continually growing. 



FRANK PIERSON TEBBETTS. 

Frank Pierson Tebbetts, who was formerly engaged in the practice of law, 
but since locating in Spokane three years ago has been identified with various 
activities, was born and reared in Salem, Massachusetts, his birth occurring on 
the 29th of October, 1888. He is a son of Irving S. and Annie M. (Cunningham) 
Tebbetts, and in the paternal line is descended from the early Puritan settlers of 
New Hampshire, while his forefathers on the mother's side emigrated to America 
during the French and Indian war, in which some of them participated. They have 
been seafaring people for many generations, having long sailed out of the port 
of Gloucester, Massachusetts. 

After the acquirement of his early education which was obtained in the public 
schools of his native city, Frank Pierson Tebbetts decided upon a legal career and 
matriculated to this end in the law department of Boston University, being awarded 
the degree of LL. B. with the class of 1905. While pursuing his professional studies 
he took up special work in the liberal arts at Harvard University, specializing in 
literature thereby practically doing eight years work in the space of four. Im- 
mediately following his admission to the bar of Massachusetts, he became associ- 
ated with James M. Marden and they engaged in a general practice in both the 
criminal and civil courts of Boston under the firm name of Marden & Tebbetts. 
During his student days, Mr. Tebbetts became quite deeply interested in settle- 
ment work and after establishing an office in Boston he took up his residence at 
"South End House." This is one of the best-known and most highly successful 
settlements conducted in America and is under the charge of Robert A. Woods, a 
friend of Jane Addams of Hull House, Chicago, and of Toynbee Hall, London. 
Literary pursuits always engaged much of his time and he contributed to various 
publications, his products being chiefly essays of an editorial nature, and he was 
at one time editor and publisher of a magazine known as "The Inquisitor." He 
likewise organized about the same time a literary society, known as the **Bo-Tree," 
that numbered among its members many well known poets and writers of New 
England. In 1908, Mr. Tebbetts made a trip through the northwest and was most 
favorably impressed with Spokane, recognizing and appreciating its wonderful 
natural advantages, and feeling convinced that it had a great future ahead of it. 
He found the enterprise and enthusiasm that characterize the people in this section a 
very great contrast to the dignified conservatism of his native state, but it fascinated 
him, nevertheless, and he became so thoroughly imbued with the spirit of the west 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 31 

that he determined to make it his home. Returning to Boston^ he disposed of all 
of his interests there and removed to Spokane^ with the expectation of opening 
a law office here^ hut there were so many advantageous openings along other lines^ 
that promised better returns in less time for the same amount of energy^ that he 
gave up all thought of continuing in his profession^ and turned his attention to 
other activities. He identified himself with the Chamber of Commerce and was 
assistant manager of the apple show in 1909^ and later he became associated with 
the Spokane Title Company^ of which he was assistant manager. In 1911^ he as- 
sumed charge of the city business of the Edward J. Dahm Company as secretary^ 
including fire^ casualty and liability insurance^ and at the present time he has under 
way a project to make Spokane one of the insurance centers of the west. He has 
already secured a number of general agencies for this city and has other contracts 
ready to close and others still under advisability. 

This dty was the scene of the marriage of Mr. Tebbetts in June, 1911, to Miss 
Elizabeth A. Turrish, a daughter of James J. Turrish, who came to Spokane in 
1876. He is a brother of Henry Turrish of Duluth, Minnesota, one of the well 
known lumber magnates of the United States. Mrs. Tebbetts is a graduate of 
Holy Name Academy and Normal School of Spokane, having qualified herself to 
teach but was married before she identified herself with that profession. She is 
quite talented and is a musician of more than average ability, as are also her two 
sisters. Mr. and Mrs. Tebbetts have a very attractive residence, built in the Swiss 
style, located at 744 Twelfth avenue, the hospitality of which is graciously ex- 
tended to their many friends, who are always assured of being most delightfully 
entertained at "Chalet Alpenstein," as their home is named. 

Mr. Tebbetts has always been an earnest and active worker in the Young Men's 
Christian Association, especially in committee work, both in Salem and since lo- 
cating here. While residing in Massachusetts he was a member of the Second 
Corps Cadets of Salem, which was originally General Washington's company of 
body guards, and has for many years been the crack regiment of the state. Mr. 
Tebbetts is affiliated with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, belonging to 
Salem Lodge, No. 797, of Salem, Massachusetts, of which his father is past ex- 
alted ruler. In politics he is a progressive and while living in Salem in 1907 he 
represented his ward in the city council. He was also at one time secretary of 
the board of trade of that city. Mr. Tebbetts is a man of high ideals, who fully 
appreciates the bonds of humanity. He is tireless in his efforts to forward all 
beneficient movements, giving his support to every undertaking that he feels is 
at all likely to advance the welfare of the community. He believes in Spokane 
and is helping to build its civic and commercial future. 



WILLIAM HORTON FOSTER. 

The life record of William Horton Foster is perhaps representative of the laws 
of heredity. He is not only descended from an honorable ancestry but by a most 
creditable record has added laurels to the family name and his son, Warren Dun- 
ham Foster, has also added notable achievement to the family record. Mr. Foster's 
choice of a profession was that of the law and he continues in general practice as 
counsel for the Spokane & Eastern Trust Company of Spokane. 



32 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

A native of Montreal^ Canada^ Mr. Foster was born Jane 6, 1868. His par- 
ents were E. C. and Judith Ellen (Horton) Foster, the father being a native of 
Canada and a representative of an old New England family of English descent 
that was founded in America prior to the Revolutionary war. He became a lawyer 
and was assistant attorney general of the United States at the time of his death. 
While born across the border his parents were citizens of the United States so 
that he never had to take out naturalization papers. He was with the department 
for many years, first as general agent of the department of justice and afterward 
successively in different positions which finally brought him to that of assistant 
attorney general of the United States. His wife, who bore the maiden name of 
Judith Ellen Horton, was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1840. She pursued 
her education at Lima, New York, and afterward removed to Clinton, Iowa. She 
studied law,' was admitted to the Iowa bar in 1872, (one of the first women to be 
admitted) and was associated with her husband in practice under the firm style 
of Foster & Foster. She became very prominent in political and temperance 
circles, being widely known as speaker in behalf of republican principles and as 
president of the Woman's Republican Association of the United States. The 
name of J. Ellen Foster became known from one end of the country to the other. 
She was very prominent in the Woman's Christian Temperance Union and was 
superintendent of its legislative department. When that organization affiliated 
with the prohibition party she united with the non-partisan Women's Christian 
Temperance Union. She was one of the officers of the American Red Cross Society 
and was one of the delegates to the international convention at St. Petersburg, 
Russia, and ever maintained a foremost position as a noted public lecturer to the 
time of her death, which occurred in Washington, D. C, August 11, 1910. Her 
work and the notice of her demise was mentioned by the press throughout the en- 
tire country. A son, Emery M. Foster, was a prominent newspaper man, who 
died in New York in 1909. He was managing editor of the Chicago American, 
and New York and Philadelphia papers and at the time of his death was editor 
of the New York World. 

William H. Foster pursued his education in the Northwestern University at 
Evanston, Illinois, and in the Albany Law School, from which he was graduated 
with the LL. B. degree. In 1885 he was admitted to the bar of Illinois and in 1910 
was admitted to practice before the courts of Washington. He followed his pro- 
fession in Geneseo from the time of his graduation until 1900 and during the 
succeeding nine years in Chicago. In December, 1909, he arrived in Spokane and 
while he specialized in the localities where he previously resided in corporation 
law, he engaged in general law practice for a time as a member of the firm of 
Cullen, Lee & Foster, leaving that firm in January 1912, to become counsel for the 
Spokane & Eastern Trust Company. 

Mr. Foster is a recognized leader in republican ranks and has done important 
work as a member of county committees, being an officer of the League of Republi- 
can Clubs. He was also a member of the state executive committee of Illinois and 
was a delegate to several national and state conventions. He has long been in- 
terested in educational work and is a member of a number of national societies for 
the advancement of education along various lines, including the American His- 
torical Association, the American Academy of Political and Social Science, and 
the American Economic Association. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 33 

In May, 1885, at Geneseo, Illinois, Mr. Foster was united in marriage to Miss 
Edith Dunham, a daughter of Charles Dunham, a lawyer with whom Mr. Foster 
was formerly associated in the practice of his profession under the firm style of 
Dunham & Foster. He was a leader in democratic circles and was elected to the 
state legislature in the district that had a normal republican majority. He was 
also repeatedly a candidate for congress in republican districts and was offered the 
position of ambassador to Russia by President Cleveland but declined the honor. 
He was very prominent in his profession, in politics and as a man and was ever 
recognized as a strong man in his honor and his good name. Mr. and Mrs. Foster 
have become parents of a son, Warren Dunham Foster, who is department editor 
of the Youth's Companion although only twenty-four years of age. He has a 
phenomenal record, having progressed by leaps and boimds. He possesses the 
western "ginger" and enterprise and has used these effectively in the east. His 
training was received on Chicago dailies and he was graduated from the Chicago 
University, after which he served for one year as instructor in English at the Ames 
University, of Ames, Iowa. He then went to the Youth's Companion to accept a 
temporary position but has remained with that paper continuously since. Mr. 
and Mrs. Foster hold membership with the Methodist Episcopal church of Spo- 
kane and are interested in the various activities which tend to uplift humanity and 
which bring a nearer, clearer knowledge of the political, economic and sociological 
conditions of the country, Mrs. Foster being president of the Spokane Young 
Women's Christian Association. Their influence has always been given on the 
side of progress, reform and improvement, and their labors have been effective 
forces for good. 



T. O. BURRILL. 



An enterprising and highly successful young business man of Harrington is to 
be found in the person of T. O. Burrill, who for the past decade has been engaged 
in contracting and building in Lincoln county. He was bom in Umatilla county, 
Oregon, on the 25th of April, 1879, and is a son of Sanford and Ann (Stewart) 
Burrill. The father, who was a minister, followed his profession in Illinois until 
1877, when together with his wife and family he came to Washington, arriving in 
Walla Walla on the 1st of January. He remained there for six months, when he 
was sent to a church in Weston, Oregon, that he retained for two years. At the 
expiration of that time he filed on a homestead and for several years devoted his 
energies to the improvement and cultivation of his ranch and for five years was in 
the hardware business in Adams, Oregon. In 1890 he came to Harrington and 
engaged in the mercantile business, but he soon disposed of this and again turned 
his attention to farming. Later he returned to the ministry and was so occupied 
for seven years. He passed away in 1909, one of the honored pioneers of the state 
and a veteran of the Civil war, having gone to the front as a member of a company 
of the Forty-sixth Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 

The greater part of the boyhood and youth of T. O. Burrill were passed on his 
father's ranch, in the cultivation of which he gave such assistance as he was able. 
In the acquirement of his education he attended the common schools of his native 



34 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

county and Harrington^ and at the age of twenty he went to Tacoma, where he at- 
tended the preparatory department of Puget Sound University for two years. He 
then learned the carpenter's trade^ and upon his return to Harrington he engaged 
in contracting and building in which he has met with gratifying success. He is not 
only an excellent workman but he is thoroughly reliable and trustworthy and can 
always be depended upon to keep his word in a business transaction. These 
qualities have been important factors in promoting his progress and today he is 
ranked as one of the foremost men in his line in the town. Although he is young 
he has had much experience and has been awarded contracts for many of the most 
important public buildings in the town, including the city hall, opera house, bank 
and Methodist Episcopal church, as well as many of the best residences. Mr. Bur- 
rill has prospered in a most satisfactory manner and, in addition to his fine busi- 
ness, is one of the stockholders in the Burrill Orchard Company of Washington^ 
organized by the heirs of the late Sanford Burrill. 

On the 5th of December, 1907, Mr. Buirrill was united in marriage to Miss 
Maud Graff^ a daughter of Fred and Kate Graff, well known pioneers of Lincoln 
county. Both Mr. and Mrs. Burrill hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
church, in the work of which they take an active interest, while for six years he has 
been superintendent of the Sunday school. Fraternally he is affiliated with the 
Knights of Pythias, and in politics he is independent, giving his support to such men 
and measures as he deems best adapted to serve the highest interests of the com- 
munity. Mr. Burrill is an energetic, progressive young man, who highly merits 
such success as he has met with, as he always applies himself closely to his business 
in the conduct of which he conforms to the highest standards of commercial integrity. 



ARTHUR R. BLEWETT. 

The industrial enterprises of Spokane find a worthy and well known repre- 
sentative in Arthur R. Blewett, who is the secretary and general manager of the 
Northwest Harvester Company, an enterprise that has excellent equipment and 
is well established on the road to success. A native of Bowling Green, Kentucky, 
Arthur R. Blewett was born June 14, 1877, of the marriage of Alexander Chap- 
man Blewett and Galveston Stone. The mother was named for her native city, 
Galveston, Texas, and belonged to an old southern family, prominent in antebellum 
days. She was of English descent, as was her husband, who was a native of 
Kentucky. The latter died in California, in 1898, and his wife passed away in 
1901. In their family were three sons and two daughters: Arthur R. ; Hannibal 
C, who is living in Turlock, California; Roy V., of the same place; Miss Betsy 
Stark, of Spokane; and Effie, who is also living in Spokane. 

Arthur R. Blewett, taken to California in his boyhood days, his parents re- 
moving to that state in 1890, supplemented his public-school course by study in 
San Joaquin Valley College at Woodbridge, California. After putting aside his 
text-books he engaged in farming ninety-five hundred acres of land at Turlock, 
Stanislaus, California, but withdrew from agricultural pursuits in 1906 and went 
upon the road as a traveling salesman for The Holt Manufacturing Company, at 
Stockton, California, with which he was connected six years. He traveled over 



A. R. BLEWETT 



p *^« . ^ , 






I ^ 



- l ► * X j 

-1 • .-.. -• --•'_l 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 37 

the northwest territory, covering Oregon, Washington, Montana and Canada, and 
in 1907 was made the district manager for the company at Spokane, continuing 
in that position through the years 1908 and 1909. Since then he has been the 
secretary and manager of the Northwest Harvester Company, of which he was 
one of the organizers. They make a specialty of side hill combined harvesters 
and build two types of machines — one called the Northwest Side Hill Combined 
Harvester, and the other the Blewett Side Hill Combined Harvester. The in- 
ventions and patents of the latter are owned by Mr. Blewett. In addition to the 
manufacture and sale of harvesters, the company conducts a general foundry and 
machine shop business, builds a variety of special machinery and does all kinds of 
repair work. They have completed their second year in business and in ten 
months their output in machines amoimted to over eighty thousand dollars. They 
now have plans for the building of sixty machines for the year 1912, which will 
represent over one hundred thousand dollars. The company owns its own plant 
adjoining Spokane, with four acres of ground, and has an exceptionally good class 
of all brick factory buildings, with concrete floors, numbering nine. Modem ma- 
chinery has been installed and everything is planned for the rapid filling of orders. 
They have won notable success since embarking in this enterprise and not a little 
of the result is attributable to Arthur R. Blewett, whose previous experience with 
The Holt Manufacturing Company well qualified him to undertake the duties that 
devolve upon him in his present connection. The Northwest Harvester Company 
has the following officers: Ben C. Holt, president and treasurer; C. Parker Holt, 
vice president; and Arthur R. Blewett, manager and secretary. The business is 
capitalized for three hundred thousand dollars. 

In addition to his other interests, Mr. Blewett owqs> an irrigated ranch at 
Turlock, California, which he is now improving. He belongs to the Spokane 
Club, to the Spokane Athletic Club and also to the Chamber of Commerce. His 
political views are in accord with the principles of the democratic party and he 
keeps well informed on the questions of the day but does not seek nor desire office, 
feeling that his time and attention are fully occupied by business affairs, which 
are growing in volume and importance and which have already won him recogni- 
tion as an enterprising and successful business man of his adopted city. 



G. W. FINNEY. 



G. W. Finney, president of the Union State Bank of Odessa, was the founder 
of the town in the development of which he has always taken a prominent part, 
being one of the foremost citizens and most progressive business men in the place. 
He is a native of Missouri, his birth having occurred in Linn county, on the 24th 
of June, 1861, his parents being Franklin and Nancy J. (Hizer) Finney. The 
father was a native of Virginia and the mother of Kentudcy, but they were long 
residents of Linn county, where the father engaged in agricultural pursuits. 

G. W. Finney was given the advantages of a good practical education in the 
district and public schools of his native county, where he passed tlie first twenty 
years of his life. In 1881, he left home and started out to make his own way in 
the world. In common with the majority of young men of that period he felt that 



38 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

better opportunities were to be afforded in the west so he went to Colorado and 
worked in the mines for several years. At the end of that time he returned to 
Missouri but only remained a year or two, when he decided to come to the north- 
west. He arrived in Lincoln county in the spring of 1886 and immediately there- 
after filed on a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres. Having been reared 
on a farm he was thoroughly familiar with agricultural pursuits and stock raising, 
and was in every way well qualified to make a success of the cultivation of his 
ranch. A man of clear judgment and thoroughly practical in his ideas, he directed 
his undertakings with intelligence, and although he met with the usual discourage- 
ments and obstacles that confront the pioneers in every section, he possessed the 
determination of purpose and confidence in his own powers that carried him on to 
success. During the succeeding years he met with constantly increasing pros- 
perity, and had brought his land under high cultivation and had it well improved 
when the Great Northern Railroad Company extended their lines through this 
section of Lincoln county in 1892. They passed directly through Mr. Finney's 
ranch, and being a man of much foresight and perspicacity he naturally recognized 
the wonderful opportunity and advantage this afforded him, and determined to 
utilize it to his own benefit. There was no settlement in this immediate vicinitv 
at that period, and with the improved transportation facilities settlers began com- 
ing into the country in constantly increasing numbers, and Mr. Finney began for- 
mulating plans for the location of a town site on his homestead. He had these en- 
tirely completed and his land platted and laid out ready for settlement before 1898. 
About the same time he established a lumberyard here and not only sold lots to 
the new-comers but also supplied them with all building materials. The location 
was a most excellent one and the town, which had been incorporated and named 
Odessa, grew with amazing rapidity and is now one of the most prosperous and 
thriving villages in Lincoln county. Mr. Finney has been tireless in his efforts to 
promote its development along the various lines and has erected four of the largest 
and most substantial business blocks in the town. In 1902 he became associated 
with other citizens in the organization of the Odessa State Bank, and was 
one of the directors of this institution and later became the vice president. 
Its development was promoted with very good success until 1911 when it 
became consolidated with the First National Bank. In 1911 both of these in- 
stitutions were liquidated, and the Union State Bank was organized with Mr. Fin- 
ney as president;. Joseph Kriegler and William R. Lesley, vice presidents; Charles 
T. Deetz, cashier; and Henry Ryke, assistant cashier. Mr. Finney has been 
financially interested in various local enterprises, and he still engages in the lum- 
ber and real-estate business. He is a very public-spirited man and is always ready 
to give his indorsement and cooperation to every movement that will forward the 
financial, moral, intellectual or social welfare of the community. He is an active 
member of the Odessa Commercial Club, and enthusiastically champions its var- 
ious undertakings. In addition to his extensive town property, he is the owner of 
two thousand acres of fine wheat land that he is leasing. 

G. W. Finney was twice married, his first union with Miss Mary S. Ray took 
place in Colorado and of the children born of this marriage two survive, Trella D. 
and Pearl M. Mrs. Finney passed away in Odessa in 1891. On February 25, 
1893, Mr. Finney was married at Odessa, to Miss Emma Durland. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 39 

Mr. Finney is chairman of the board of trustees of the Methodist Episcopal 
cuurch, with which his family also affiliate^ and he is also a member of the Odd 
FeUows fraternity. His political support he gives to the democratic party, and 
although he is actively interested in local governmental affairs has always refused 
to accept office barring that of member of the board of education, of which he 
now serves as president. He has been connected with this board for eight years. 
He is one of the representative citizens of the town and belongs to the type of 
men to whose energies and progressive ideas the northwest is indebted for its rapid 
and substantial development. Mr. Finney is widely known throughout Lincoln 
county and is generally accorded the esteem and respect his powers of organiza- 
tion and executive ability as well as general business sagacity so highly merit. 



JOHN J. MOAK. 



There is something in the free, open life of the west that brings out the strong- 
est elements of manhood, that calls forth the real worth of the individual and in 
riding the range in early manhood John J. Moak became self-reliant, resolute and 
determined and thus laid the foundation for his advancement and success in later 
years. He is today well known as a mining engineer and real-estate dealer of 
Spokane and his life typifies in large measure the progressive spirit which dominates 
the Pacific coast country. He was born in the state of New York, August 28, 
1859, one of two sons of Levi and Cecelia (Van Naton) Moak, who were also 
natives of New York. His ancestors came to America with Peter Stuyvesant and 
settled on the Hudson river. They were originally from Holland and in later 
generations the family was represented in the Revolutionary war. Levi Moak 
remained a resident of the Empire state until 1858, when by way of Panama and 
Aspinwall he made his way to California, becoming one of the pioneer residents 
of that state. He filled the office of assessor of Butte county for many years and 
▼as well known as a leading citizen of his district. His wife, who is also a, rep- 
resentative of an old Holland family, is now living in Charleston, Idaho, but Mr. 
Moak passed away in 1900. Jacob E. Moak, one of their sons, is now a resident 
of Silver Hill, Washington. The two daughters are: Mrs. Fannie L. Kirkpatrick, 
also of Silver Hill ; and Mrs. Carrie Vadney, of Clarkston, Idaho. 

In the public schools of California John J. Moak pursued his early education, 
which was supplemented by study in the State University at Eugene, Oregon, where 
he specialized in mineralogy, metalurgy and chemistry. His first business ex- 
perience, however, was in riding the range in California, Oregon and Nevada, and 
thus his time was occupied until he reached the age of twenty-three years. He 
then engaged in mining at Canyon City, Oregon, where he remained . for &ve or six 
years, connected with both quartz and placer mining. Later he engaged in placer 
mining in Susanville, Oregon, and from there went to the Coeur d'Alenes where 
tie remained in 1 884-5, doing placer mining. He next located in Farmington and 
Tekoa, where he carried on general merchandising for two years, and subsequently 
he again became interested in mining operations at Susanville. At Baker City, 
Oregon, he engaged in both placer and quartz mining and then went to Boise, 
Idaho, where he followed placer mining until he located in the Bohemia district 
above Eugene, Oregon, where he spent four years. 



40 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

On the expiration of that period Mr. Moak went to the Black Rock district in 
northern Nevada as a placer miner and later was connected. with the lumber and 
wood business for a year in Plumas and Shasta counties^ in northern California. 
After spending three months in exaptiining copper properties in the Washoe river 
country he went to Shaniko^ Oregon, and invested in city property. While re- 
siding there he acted as superintendent of the waterworks and street grading but 
left that place to go to the Coeur d'Alenes where he devoted ten years to placer and 
quartz mining. Again he returned to Spokane and entered into the real-estate 
business as a partner of C. C. Barnard. In September, 1910, he purchased an in- 
terest in the Garmen Realty & Building Company with which he has since been 
connected, and has also been identified with placer interests in Idaho. They have 
&ye hundred and forty acres lying along California creek, in Idaho county, Idaho. 
Work is there carriei on under the name of the Humboldt Quartz Placer Milling 
Company with Mr. Moak as general manager and superintendent. They have a 
ditch two miles long with fourteen hundred feet of steel pipe, two No. 2 giants 
and two hundred feet head. The work has just been begun and the ground assays 
from one to twenty dollars per yard, giving a general average of two dollars and 
a half per yard. It is estimated the contents of deposits are six hundred feet on 
one channel, four hundred feet wide, with an average depth of thirty-five feet. There 
are eight claims a mile long and a quarter of a mile wide with a creek channel 
through the center, and the average depth is fifty feet. There is plenty of water 
and dumpage witb pressure to spare and the claims are to be worked by the 
hydraulic method. 

While at Susanville Mr. Moak was foreman of the Humboldt mine and he 
owned ground at Marysville that he worked. He was foreman for the Coeur 
d'Alene Placer Company and was also foreman for Keney Brothers at Macy Ridge, 
Susanville. He had the Gardner placer diggings at Granite under lease and worked 
that property for two seasons. He was also foreman and superintendent for the 
Elk Creek placer mines at Baker City and foreman at Baker City for the Second 
Creek Placer Mining Company. He was connected with the Noonday mine and 
mill at Boheniia, acting as mill boss. At Murray he was connected with the Golden 
Chest mill, dividing four years between mill and mine. He afterward secured a 
lease on the Fancy Gulch placers in Eagle Creek district near Murray which he 
worked for two years. 

Mr. M^ak is prominently known in the Knights of Pythias lodge in which he 
has filled all of the chairs and is now past chancellor commander. While in 
Oregon he became identified with the Ancient Order of United Workmen but has 
since drop{>ed his membership. In politics he is an active republican and while in 
Oregon represented his party in county and state conventions. He also served on 
the republican county central committee for several terms and did all in his power 
to promote the growth and insure the success of the party. In 1 876 he served as 
a member of the Walla Walla Home Guards which comprises his military ex- 
perience save that while in Butte county, California, he had a number of skirmishes 
with the Indians who at that time would plunder the farms of the settlers. He 
often had to live out in the brush two or three days at a time in order to protect 
his home. The Mill Creek Indians were then known as the Big Foot tribe and 
occasioned considerable trouble to the settlers. There is no phase of pioneer life 
on the Pacific coast with which Mr. Moak is not familiar and few men are more 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 41 

thoroughly informed concerning its mining development and all the hardships and 
difficulties incident to the life of the miner. He has, however, lived to enjoy much 
of the success which is to be attained from the development of the rich mineral 
resources of the country and because of the extent and importance of his operations 
and his work he is well known. 



ERNEST D. WELLER. 



Ernest D. Weller, of the firm of McWilliams, Weller & McWilliams and a 
representative of the Spokane bar, was born at New London, Iowa, September 18, 
1888, his parents being William L. and Martha M. (Roberts) Weller. The father 
was a prominent agriculturist of Iowa and had four children. 

Ernest D. Weller pursued his education in the public schools of New London, 
completing his literary course by graduation from the Iowa Wesleyan University 
in 1904. Subsequently he became a student in the law department of the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, from which he was graduated in 1908. Upon being admitted to 
the bar he immediately settled at Cheney, where he remained for two years, dur- 
ing which time he served one year as city attorney. In 1910 he came to Spokane 
to become a member of his present firm and has since been engaged in the practice 
of law in this city. He does not concentrate his energies up6n any special line 
but engages in general practice and has secured a good clientage,' which is proof 
of his ability, as the public does not place its legal interests in unskilled hands. 

On the 24th of August, 1909, Mr. Weller was married, at Burlington, Iowa, 
to Miss Grace M. Jackman, a daughter of George B. and Sadie A. Jackman. 
Mr. and Mrs. Weller have one daughter, Elizabeth. Mr. Weller holds membership 
in the Chamber of Commerce. He possesses admirable social qualities and that 
spirit of courtesy and kindliness which has gained for him an extensive circle of 
friends during his two years' residence in this city. The family home is at East 
920 DeSmet avenue. 



HARRY A. FLOOD. 



Harry A. Flood is justlv classed with the wide-awake, alert business men of 
Spokane, for he has contributed in substantial manner to the progress and rapid 
development of the city, his business affairs being largely of a nature that has 
promoted general activity and prosperity as well as individual success. He is 
recognized as one of the leading factors in The Trustee Company of Spokane 
which owns and controls a number of the best business blocks of the city, and his 
keen sagacity, enterprise and determination have been salient features in the or- 
ganization and management of this company which ranks second to none of the 
kind in the Inland Empire. 

Mr. Flood is yet a young man to whom undoubtedly the future holds out much 
promise. He was born in Decatur, Illinois, May 9, 1878, a son of Henry and 
Catherine (Bricker) Flood. The family is of Irish lineage, having been estab- 



42 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

lished in America by the great-great-grandfather of Harry A. Flood, who, leaving 
the Emerald isle, crossed the Atlantic to the new world while this country was 
still numbered among the colonial possesions of Great Britain. His father, Henry 
Flood, now residing in Spokane is a native of Kentucky and for a considerable 
period operated extensively in real estate in the northwest, his success enabling 
him at length to put aside business cares, and live retired in the enjoyment of the 
fruits of his former toil. His wife is a native of Ohio and in their family were 
four sons, of whom William C. and Frank M. are both deceased. The living 
brother of Harry A. Flood is John R. Flood, now master mechanic of the Black- 
well Lumber Company at Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. 

After largely mastering the branches of learning taught in the common schools 
Harry A. Flood left home at the age of eighteen and for six years was upon the 
road as a traveling salesman, after which he turned his attention to the insurance 
business, acting for twelve years as manager of life insurance companies, the latter 
half of that period being spent as manager of the Prudential Insurance Company 
of America. He entered the insurance field as agent for the Metropolitan Life 
Company of New Orleans and in 1896 went to San Francisco as agent for the 
Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company, his recognized ability winning him pro- 
motion to the position of assistant superintendent. The company sent him to 
Butte, Montana, where for ninety days he superintended its interests and then 
came to Spokane to open the district for the company in April, 1898. As superin- 
tendent for the Pacific Mutual he figured in insurance circles in Spokane until 
January 27, 1902, when he became manager of the Prudential. From the be- 
ginning of his connection with insurance interests promotions came to him rapidly 
because of his thorough mastery of every task and duty assigned, resulting in a 
developing power that qualified him for larger responsibilities. He remained with 
the Prudential until October, 1906, when he resigned that position to become secre- 
tary and active manager of The Trustee Company of Spokane. Since that time 
his duties have been further increased in his election to the presidency and he 
now acts in the dual capacity of president and general manager. Mr. Flood be- 
came identified with this company soon after its formation and was instrumental 
in securing capital and raising the capital stock to two hundred thousand dollars. 
Enthusiastic and zealous in his advocacy of the northwest and with firm belief in 
its possibilities and in its future Mr. Flood has made extensive investment in wheat 
and irrigated lands on the Columbia river in connection with his father, Henry 
Flood, securing in all over twelve thousand acres of land near Beverly of which 
they still retain ten thousand acres. His property is crossed by the Chicago, Mil- 
waukee & St. Paul railroad, thus affording him excellent shipping facilities for 
his products. He is furthermore known in business circles in Spokane as one of 
the directors of the Spokane Title Company. 

On the 27th of November, 1901, at Glendive, Montana, Mr. Flood was united 
in marriage to Miss Jennie M. Kirkpatrick, of Malvern, Arkansas, formerly a 
resident of Michigan and a daughter of William Kirkpatrick, a native of Glasgow, 
Scotland, who following the establishment of his home in the south became an 
extensive land owner at Malvern, Arkansas. Mr. and Mrs. Flood have become 
parents of two children, Kathryn and William Harry, the former now attending 
school. The parents are members of the Vincent Methodist Episcopal church and 
are interested in the church work, Mr. Flood serving as a trustee of the Marie 
Beard Deaconess Home. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 43 

• 
He belongs also to the Spokane Club^ the Spokane Country Club and the 
Chamber of Commerce and in fraternal relations is a prominent Mason^ having 
taken the degrees of the blue lodge^ commandery^ consistory and Mystic Shrine. 
On various occasions he has been called to office in the different branches of 
Masonry^ being a past master of the lodge^ past commander of the Knights Templar 
commandery^ and a past potentate of the Mystic Shrine. He is a member of the 
Inland Club and during 1911 served as trustee of the National Apple Show. He 
regards it his duty as well as the privilege of citizenship to express his political 
views which he does in unfaltering support of the republican party, and in the days 
of conventions he frequently attended as a delegate while at different times he has 
served as a member of the central committee. The interests and activities of his 
life have been varied and in considerable measure have contributed to the welfare 
and progress of the communities in which he has lived. He holds to high ideals 
in business as well as in citizenship, and careful investigation into his life record 
shows that his path is never strewn with the wredc of other men's fortunes but 
that constructive measures have always been used in the attainment of the success 
which is now his. 



A. G. MITCHUM. 



One of the well known pioneer residents of Lincoln county is A. G. Mitchum, 
who located in the vicinity of Harrington in 1888, many years before that thriving 
town was founded. He was bom in Colusa county, California, on the 15th of July, 
1861, and is a son of James and Anna Mitchum, natives of Kentudcy. His parents 
made the journey overland to the Pacific coast in 1852, locating in California, 
where the mother passed away during the boyhood of our subject. The father, who 
was a veteran of the Mexican war, engaged in farming in California until 1879, 
when he came to Washington with his son A. G. After spending several months 
in the vicinity of Medical Lake he returned to California, where the following year 
he died. 

The first eighteen years of his life A. G. Mitchum spent in his native county, to 
whose public schools he is indebted for his early education. Together with his 
father in 1879 he came to Washington and assisted in sur\xying and platting the 
town of Medical Lake. The entire state was but sparsely settled at that time, be- 
ing little more than a wilderness, even Spokane numbering few white people among 
its citizens. In the fall, the father and son returned to California, where the latter 
snbsequently spent two years in college, devoting his attention to surveying and 
other branches of civil engineering. When he was twenty-one he was the successful 
' candidate for the office of county surveyor in Colusa county, but he resigned at the 
ex{Hration of six months and returned to Washington. Here he filed on a homestead 
of one hundred and sixty acres in the vicinity of the present site of Harrington, 
that he operated for six years. Disposing of his ranch at the end of that period he 
purchased three hundred and twenty acres of improved land, successfully engaging 
in its caltivation until 1894. He then leased his ranch and came to Harrington, 
where very soon thereafter he was appointed postmaster, retaining this office for 
four years. During that time he became associated with M. F. Adams in the gen- 



44 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

eral mercantile business^ under the firm name of Adams & Mitchmn, continuing 
to be identified with this enterprise until 1904. In 1898 he and Mr. Adams to- 
gether with John F. Green organized the Bank of Harrington^ with Mr. Green as 
president^ M. F. Adams^ vice president and Mr. Mitchum^ cashier. This was eon- 
ducted along conservative lines and had become one of the flourishing financial in- 
stitutions of the county in 1910^ when they sold it to the Union Securities Company. 
Mr. Mitchum has now retired from active connection with all business enterprises, 
his entire time being required in the supervision of his extensive property interests. 
He is a man of rare business sagacity and foresight, having the intuitive faculty of 
recognizing opportunities overlooked by the average man of affairs and utilizing 
them to his own benefit. Despite the exacting demands of his large personal inter- 
ests he has always found time to promote the welfare of the community at large and 
has been one of the prominent factors in developing the town. 

Mr. Mitchum was united in marriage on June 21, 1883, to Miss Mattie E. Han- 
num, a daughter of Warren W. Hannum, a well known farmer of Yolo county, 
California, and they became the parents of two daughters. Leila, the elder, is 
the wife of A. W. Haynes, a farmer of Alberta, Canada, and the mother of two 
children, Geraldine and Bernice. Imogen, who is a graduate of the University of 
Washington, is an instructor in the high school of Harrington. 

The fraternal connections of Mr. Mitchum are confined to his membership in 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Politically he is a democrat, and served 
as county surveyor for four years. Mr. Mitchum has always taken an active in- 
terest in all questions pertaining to the public welfare, giving his unqualified sup- 
port to' every progressive movement that promised the betterment of local condi- 
tions or the attainment of a higher standard of citizenship. 



GUSTAV LUELLWITZ. 



Throughout his entire life, since making his initial step in the business world, 
Gustav Luellwitz has been connected with the lumber trade and is now at the 
head of the Shaw- Wells Lumber Company, in which connection he is active in 
control of one of the most important enterprises of this character in the north- 
west. He was born at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, November 80, 1870, and is an 
adopted son of Mr. and Mrs. F. Luellwitz, of Milwaukee. The father, who was 
an officer in the German army, died in 1908, but the mother is still living in Mil- 
waukee. Her father was Professor Witte, prominent in the field of college educa- 
tion and an old friend of Bismarck. 

In the public schools of his native city Gustav Luellwitz pursued his education 
to the age of thirteen years. He first engaged in the sawmill manufacturing busi- 
ness in the northern part of Wisconsin at the age of eighteen years and there re- 
mained until 1897, selling lumber from 1890- until 1897 on the road. On the 1st 
of January, 1900, he left the middle west and made his way to Montana, where 
he was employed by the Big Blackfoot Milling Company of the Amalgamated 
Company, with which he continued for six months as a salesman. He was after- 
ward in business, on his own account at Salt Lake City until the fall of 1901. 

Mr. Luellwitz was there married on the 17th of December. 1901. to Miss 



GrSTAV LrKI,I,WlTZ 



*-'* ^-^ \/% i'l r 1 






SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 47 

Emma Lewis McMillan, a daughter of H. G. McMillan, a prominent resident of 
Salt Lake City, who held a government position for many years daring the Mor- 
mon difficulties. His grandfather was for one term governor of Tennessee, and 
a brother of Mrs. McMillan has been judge of the supreme court of Wyoming for 
a number of years. She was a representative of one of the old and prominent 
Kentucky families. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Luellwitz was blessed with 
one son, Henry McMillan, who was born February 14, 1903. 

In the fall of 1901 Mr. Luellwitz came to Spokane and organized the McClain 
Lumber Company, under which name he operated for a year. The business was 
then reincorporated under the name of the William Musser Lumber & Manufactur- 
ing Company, in which Mr. Luellwitz was interested, retaining the management 
of the business until 1908, when he severed his connection therewith. He next 
entered business on his own account under the name of Gustav Luellwitz & Com- 
pany and in the. spring of 1904 papers of incorporation were taken out under the 
name of the Jenkins-Luellwitz Lumber Company for the conduct of a general 
lumber business. In 1905 the Luellwitz Lumber Company was incorporated to 
take over the retail department of the business and the same year the name of 
the Jenkins-Luellwitz Company was changed to the Day-Luellwitz Company, at 
which time Harry L. Day became a partner in the undertaking. The two com- 
panies were operated independently, the Day-Luellwitz Company carrying on the 
wholesale and lumber manufacturing business. His last notable step in the busi- 
ness world has been in connection with the consolidatipa. of the Shaw- Wells and 
Luellwitz interests, which occurred March 2,, IftJI:^.*^ Operations are still to be con- 
tinued under the name of the Shaw-Wellp Cpqipjiny:, lidiW «Mr. Luellwitz as presi- 
dent, Frank H. Shaw, former president of the Shaw-Well^ Company, as the vice 
president and manager of the new company^^§nd.<£^ Macpuaig, formerly of the 
Luellwitz Company, as treasurer. The Jboai^d- /of ^difecwrt is composed of these 
officers together with George R. Dodson, Herbert Witherspoon, E. F. C. Van Dis- 
«el, J. P. Langley and C. E. Wells, the last named a resident of Racine, Wis- 
consin. The new corporation has been capitalized for one million, two hundred 
thousand dollars, and plans have been made for the erection, on the Luellwitz 
property along the railroad tracks on the north side, of a modern three-story 
semi-fireproof warehouse at a cost of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. The 
purchase of about two blocks of ground at the junction of Marietta street and the 
railroad tracks has also been consummated, and constituted the largest real-estate 
deal on the north side in the present year. The new warehouse will be supplied 
with excellent shipping facilities and eventually the salesroom and offices of the 
Company will be located there. The merger of the Shaw-Wells and the Luellwitz 
Companies is a notable step in the enlargement of the business of the big mail order 
hoase. By this combination the firm plans to handle lumber and mill work through' 
loail orders on a plan used by the leading houses of this character in the east. Mr. 
Luellwitz is also the owner of the Athol Lumber Company and is interested in 
the Buckeye Lumber Company, the Newman Lake Lumber Company and the 
Rainier Lumber & Shingle Company of Seattle. He owns large timber tracts in 
British Columbia and is likewise interested in the Yardley town site. The Day- 
Lnellwitz Company is incorporated for two hundred thousand dollars and the 

Luellwitz Lumber Company for one hundred thousand dollars. 
ToL in—s 



48 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Mr. Luellwitz turns aside from business to cast his ballot in favor of the men 
and measures of the republican party but has never sought nor desired office. He 
is prominent in Masonry^ holding membership in the blue lodge and chapter of 
Phillips, Wisconsin, and in the commandery, consistory and Mystic Shrine at 
Spokane. He belongs also to the Spokane Club, the Spokane Country Club, the 
Spokane Athletic Club and the Hoo Hoos, an organization of lumbermen, with 
which he has beeii identified since its inception. He is likewise a member of the 
Chamber of Commerce and his active aid can be counted upon to further its in- 
terests and its projects. His early business experience laid the foundation for 
his success, bringing him a knowledge of the' lumber trade which has constituted 
a basic element in his subsequent advancement in this line. As the years have gone 
by he has more and more largely gained a knowledge of the different phases of the 
business and is today an acknowledged authority on lumber in the northwest and a 
prominent representative of the trade. The story of his life is the story of honest 
industry and thrift. He has been, aptly termed a man of policy. To build up 
rather than to destroy has ever been his plan and he attacks everything with a 
contagious enthusiasm, his business ever balancing up with the principles of 
truth and honor.* 



W. S. THOMPSON. 



Through his capable direction of the hardware business with which he has been 
identified since November, 1906, W. S. Thompson has become recognized as an 
active force in promoting the commercial activities of Harrington. A son of W. 
H. and Catherine (Leuallen) Thompson, he is a native of Tennessee, as were also 
his parents, his birth having occurred in Anderson county, on the 3d of December, 
1862. In 1866, together with his wife and family W. H. Thompson removed to 
Indiana, where they resided for three years. At the end of that period they again 
started westward, with the northwest as their destination, locating in Lebanon, 
Oregon, in 1869. The father followed ranching in various parts of the state until 
November, 1906, when he engaged in the hardware business in Harrington, VV^ash- 
ington, with his son, continuing to be identified with this enterprise until his death 
in November, 1907. He was one of the well known and progressive citizens of 
Lincoln county, and had been called to various positions of public trust. At the 
time of his demise he was a member of the state legislature, having entered upon 
the duties of representative in 1906. A man of energy and ability he directed his 
efforts toward a definite purpose, meeting with success in his various undertakings, 
and at his death held the title to twelve hundred and eighty acres of land in this 
county in addition to his other interests. 

W. S. Thompson was only a child of four years when he removed with his 
parents to Indiana, where his education was begun. After the family residence 
was established in Oregon he continued his studies in the public schools of Lebanon 
until he graduated from the high school, after which he went to the college at Mc- 
Minnville, where he pursued a scientific course for three years. At the end of 
that time he engaged in teaching in Linn county for three years, but not feeling 
that he cared to make of this profession a life vocation he later withdrew from it 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 49 

and became identified with commercial activities. In 1887, at the age of twenty- 
five, he went to Albany, this state, where for two years he was in the grocery busi- 
ness. He subsequently gave this up in order to accept the position of assistant 
cashier in the Bank of Oregon, continuing to be connected with this institution until 
Its failure in 1893. His boyhood and youth had been spent on a farm, and after 
the nervous strain involved in his business life, the country seemed most alluring 
and he leased a ranch that he operated for four years. In 1899 he removed with 
his parents to Harrington, where his father purchased two sections of land that 
they operated together for two years. At the end of this period Mr. Thompson 
again returned to the business world as a clerk in the hardware store of Newland 
Brothers of this city, continuing in their employ until November, 1906, when he 
and his father purchased the business. They were associated in the conduct of the 
store, that has ever since been operated under the name of Thompson & Son, until 
the father's death.- Mr. Thompson has a large and well assorted stock of goods, 
that he offers at reasonable prices, and is enjoying an excellent patronage. After 
the death of his father he disposed of their large realty holdings and is now giving 
his undivided attention to the direction of his business, in the development of 
which he is meeting with gratifying results. 

On the 26th of August, 1 886, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Thompson and 
Miss lone Magers, a daughter of W. B. and Mary S. (Barkhurst) Magers. The 
father, who was a physician, was a native of Virginia and the mother of Ohio, and 
they crossed the plains to Oregon in 1852, Dr. Magers passing away in Staten, this 
state. Of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Thompson there has been bom one child, 
M. Beatrice, who is still at home. 

Mr. Thompson is a deacon of the Baptist church of which his wife and daugh- 
ter are both active members^ and he has for many years been superintendent of 
the Sunday school. In politics he is a republican and since 1904 he has been a 
member of the county school board. In matters of citizenship Mr. Thompson is 
progressive, his support and cooperation always being . accorded every movement 
that bespeaks the advancement of community interests or the development of public 
utilities. 



GEORGE WILLIAMS. 



George Williams has been prominently identified with the development of Coeur 
d'Alene for the past eighteen years, during which period he, has designed and 
superintended the construction of many of the finest public buildings in the city. 
He was bom in Henry county, Illinois, on the 11th of November, 1859, and is a 
son of Robert E. and Lucretia C. (Lester) Williams. 

The education of George Williams was completed in the Tabor high school of 
Cooncil Bluffs, Iowa. Having decided to adopt the profession of architecture for 
^ life vocation, at the age of seventeen years he laid aside his school books and 
devoted his attention to draughting and designing in the office of a local architect. 
He made good progress in the work and was subsequently able to go into business 
for himself. In December, 1 890, he came to Oregon, first locating in the eastern 
part of the state, where he remained for twelve years. At the expiration of that 



50 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

period he came to Coeur d'Alene and established an office that he has ever since 
maintained. Mr. Williams has been especially successful in designing public build- 
ings, particularly for school purposes^ and was the architect of the Coeur d'Alene, 
St. Maries^ Sand Point, the Blackfoot, Idaho and the Colville, Washington, high 
schools, in addition to a number of others of this vicinity. The style and proportion 
of all of these buildings is noticeably fine, while they meet the practical require- 
ments for which they were intended. Many of the most imposing of Coeur d'Alene's 
buildings can be attributed to him, as for instance the Masonic Temple, City Hall 
and Nixon block, all of which are characterized by uniformity of outline and har- 
mony as well as the individuality consistent with the purpose they serve. The same 
qualities that are notable in Mr. Williams' public buildings, distinguish his private 
residences, all of which are truly consistent with the laws of art and yet are thor- 
oughly practical in every respect. 

On the 15th of November, 1885, Mr. Williams and Miss Emma C. Jones, a 
daughter of Alexander Jones of Sioux City, Iowa, were united in marriage. Two 
children have been bom unto Mr. and Mrs. Williams, as follows: Carl, whose 
birth occurred on October, 1891; and Fred, whose natal day was in June, 1893. 
Both young men are now working with their father and make their home with their 
parents at 962 North Fifth street, this city. 

Fraternally Mr. Williams is prominently identified with the Masonic order, be- 
ing a thirty-second degree member of the Scottish Rite. He is affiliated with Temple 
Commandery, No. 8, K. T., and the various other Masonic lodges in which he has 
passed through all of the chairs. He is also a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, while he maintains relations with the other members of his pro- 
fession through the medium of his connection with the Architects' Club of Spokane. 
He takes a helpful interest in political activities and served as councilman from 
his ward during 1909 and 1910. All matters pertaining to the development of the 
community or its various public utilities engage the attention of Mr. Williams, who 
is one of the zealous workers in the Commercial Club, the interests of which he 
promotes on every possible occasion by giving his unqualified support and coopera- 
tion to every movement it champions. 



C. C. GRIMES. 



C, C. Grimes has spent practically his entire life in Lincoln county. He was 
born in Linn county, Oregon, on the 25th of June, 1881, and is a son of George 
G. and Tunia (King) Grimes, natives of Indiana. During the early years of his 
life George G. Grimes removed to California, subsequently locating in Oregon, 
whence he removed to Washington, settling in Lincoln county in 1883. Here 
Mr, Grimes was for many years successfully engaged in ranching, but he is now 
living n^tired in Edwall, being one of the well known and prominent residents of 
that section of the county. 

As he was only a child of two years when his parents located in Lincoln county, 
C. C. Grimes obtained his education in the public schools of EdwaD, after the com- 
pletion of which he took a special course in bookkeeping. He withdrew from school 
«i the age of nineteen and during the succeeding two years held the position of 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 51 

assistant postmaster at Edwall. At the expiration of that period he became deputy 
assessor of Davenport under his father, but after serving in this capacity for two 
years returned to Edwall and entered the drug store of Dr. J. Kaulbach. He 
spent two years there learning the business and then came to Harrington to clerk 
for W. C. Hannum, a druggist of this city. The next year Mr. Hannum sold his 
store to Gunning & Hallin^ and after conducting it for about four months Mr. Gun- 
ning sold his half interest in the business to Mr. Grimes, the name being changed 
to the Harrington Drug Co. About eighteen months after Mr. Hallin died and 
the entire business then passed into the control of Mr. Grimes, who has ever since 
been ccmducting it. He occupies an advantageous location, his store is attractively 
arranged and he carries a full and complete line of drugs and sundries, such as 
are usually to be found in an establishment of this kind. As he is always gracious 
and affable and courteously considerate of his customers, striving to please and 
accommodate all, he has succeeded in building up a good, permanent patronage, 
that is constantly increasing. 

On the 18th of January, 1908, Mr. Grimes was united in marriage to Miss 
Bertha Buestad a daughter of John and Gertrude Buestad, formerly of Chicago, 
but now residing in California. One child has been bom of this union, Dorothy, 
whose birth occurred in 1909. 

Mr. Grimes belongs to the Masonic fraternity, the Knights of Pythias, Pythian 
Sisters and D. O. K. K. In politics he is a republican and is serving as police 
justice and he was also secretary of the McKinley Club at Edwall. He is one of 
the highly successful and enterprising business men of the town, whose personal 
interests are identical with those of the municipality, in the development of which 
he is one of the prominent factors. 



H. C. TURNER. 



H. C. Turner, who for the past two years has been successfully engaged in 
the fire insurance and real-estate business, is one of Lincoln county's pioneers. 
He was bom in Chariton, Iowa, on the 17th of September, 1880, and is a son of 
George P. and Sarah Jane (Dotson) Turner, natives of England and Pennsylvania, 
respectively. He came to America in his youth, first locating in New York, where 
be remained until 1849 when he made the overland trip to California. Subse- 
quently George P. Turner returned to the middle west, settling in Iowa, where 
be engaged in farming until May, 1884, when, with his wife and family, he again 
removed to the west, Washington being his destination on this occasion. He filed 
on a homestead in the vicinity of Davenport upon his arrival, and the operation of 
this engaged his attention until his death on the 18th of October, 1896. He wait 
one of Lincoln county's pioneers and became widely known throughout this section 
of the state, where he had made many friends. The farm he entered from the 
government is still in possession of the family and is now being operated by one 
of his sons. Mr. Turner was drafted into the army during the Civil war, but be- 
lieving that his first duty was to his wife and children he sent a substitute. 

As he had not yet passed the fourth anniversary of his birth when he removed 
with his parents to Washington, H. C. Turner obtained his education in the gram- 



52 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

mar school of Davenport and the high school of Waterville, Douglas county, fol- 
lowing which he pursued a commercial course in the old Blair Business College at 
Spokane. When he had attained the age of twenty years he laid aside his text- 
books and began his independent career. His first position was that of stenog- 
rapher and bookkeeper for the Harrington Milling Company, whom he served in 
this capacity for six years. He was a very efficient employe, faithful in his dis- 
charge of his responsibilities, trustworthy and reliable, at all times working for 
the best interest of the firm. In recognition of these qualities, in 1906 they pro- 
moted him to the position of manager, the dutes of which he discharged in a highly 
satisfactory manner. Fully recognizing the limitations surrounding the man work- 
ing on a salary, and being desirous of advancing more rapidly than he felt was 
possible as an employe, in 1909 he withdrew from his position and began for him- 
self. Being thoroughly familiar with the country and widely acquainted, he con- 
sidered that the real-estate and insurance business offered a very promising field, 
and established an office. Immediately starting operations in this business, his 
efforts have met with a gratifying degree of success. Opportunity in the majority 
of cases is nothing more or less than foresight and initiative, as in the average 
walks of life all have practically the same advantages, but either fail to recognize 
them or lack the determination that lights the road to success. Mr. Turner in the 
early days of his career showed himself to be possessed of the indomitable cour- 
age and unswerving purpose that convert failures into opportunities, and thus he 
has steadily forged ahead in his enterprise. 

On the 6th of January, 1904, Mr. Turner was united in marriage to Miss Eliza- 
beth Glascock, a daughter of Frank and Leila (Anderson) Glascock, residents of 
Blade Station, California, and unto them has been born one son, Harold A., in 1908. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Turner are members of the Presbyterian church, and fra- 
ternally he affiliates with the Masonic lodge and the Knights of Pythias. In 
politics Mr. Turner is an ardent republican and is now serving as justice of the 
peace, his discharge of the responsibilities of this office manifesting the same 
efficiency and thoroughness that characterize his efforts in every direction. He is 
a member of the Lincoln County Pioneer & Historical Association and at the pres- 
ent time is secretary and treasurer of this worthy society. 



CHARLES L. KING. 



Charles L. King is a member of The Jensen-King-Byrd Company, doing an 
extensive jobbing business in hardware at Spokane. Not all days in his career 
have been equally bright, for at times he has seen the gathering storm clouds which 
have seemed to threaten disaster, but has always been able to turn defeats into 
victories and promised failures into successes. In the accomplishment of this task 
he has wisely used his time and talents and improved each opportunity as it has 
been presented. He was born June 8, 1863, in London, England, a son of Charles 
and Martha I. (Scott) King, who were also natives of England, the former bom 
in Norfolk and the latter in Norwich. The father was a representative of an old 
English family and came to the United States when his son Charles was but five 
years of age. He located first in Chicago but after two years removed to Seward, 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 53 

Nebraska^ and in that locality engaged in farming. When four years had gone by 
he continued on his westward way to California and while living in that state served 
as public administrator and coroner of Solano county^ being located at Benecia^ 
where his last days were passed. He departed this life in 1898 and is still sur- 
vived by his widow, who is living in Spokane, at the age of seventy-eight. 

Charles L. King was reared in Sacramento valley, California, and completed his 
education by graduation from the high school at Rio Vista. He then entered the 
telegraph office at that place, where he learned the business and acted as operator, 
filling the position at the time the news of the assassination of President Garfield 
was received. He continued there until 1888 and then removed with his parents 
to Benecia, where he accepted the position of manager in the office of George W. 
Humes, proprietor of a salmon cannery. Two years later, or in 1885, he left home 
and went to Oakland, California, where he took a position with C. £jiox Marshall, 
merchant and proprietor of a hay and feed store. The next year, 1886, he was 
offered a situation as cashier with the firm of Miller & Lux, and in April, 1886, 
was sent to their Soldier's Meadow ranch in northwestern Nevada. There he rode 
the range and attended to the business of the ranch until December, 1886, when 
he returned to the office of Miller & Lux, in San Francisco, but made his home 
in Oakland. 

In April^ 1888, Mr. King first became a resident of Washington, at which time 
he made his way to Sprague, where he secured a saddle horse and then followed 
Crab creek, down to what is now the town of Wilson Creek, and then up the Grand 
Coulee and on to Wild Goose Bill's ferry on the Columbia river. He afterward 
went up to the head of the Grand Coulee and returned by way of the California settle- 
ment, where in those days was found the most important wheat district on the 
Big Bend. This trip lasted three weeks, his purpose being to find some well watered 
land suitable for stock-raising, but even at that early day he found that all well 
watered land had been taken up, with the exception of a few small tracts not suited 
to bis purpose. 

Near Harrington Mr. King met an old acquaintance, L. C. Fisher, formerly 
of Oakland, California, for whom he worked that season at haying and harvesting. 
Early in September he secured a position in a hardware store in Sprague and in 
the following year purchased a half interest in the business from a Mr. Brooks, 
one of his former employers. The firm style of Jensen, King & Company was 
then assumed and under that name the business was continued until 1895, when 
the town of Sprague was almost totally destroyed by fire. The outlook was a very 
dismal one, and on the 1st of January, 1896, the members of the firm removed 
to Spokane and consolidated their interests with the well known hardware firm of 
Wolverton & Byrd, Incorporated, under the name of The Jensen-King-Byrd Com- 
pany, under which caption the firm style continues to do business. At first they sold 
only to the retail trade, but have since developed their business to include a jobbing 
department, which is now the largest end of the concern. 

On the 5th of November, 1890, Mr. King was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
L. Adams, a daughter of John L. Adams, superintendent of the railway shops at 
Sprague, and a sister of Mrs. Jensen. The three children of this marriage are 
Martha, Edith and Charles Adams King, all now attending high school at Spokane. 
The parents are members of the Westminster Congregational church and Mr. King 
is also serving on its executive board. He is a director of the Young Men's Chris- • 



54 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

tian Association and takes active interest in many projects and measures for the 
material and moral development of the commmiity. He belongs to the Inland Club 
and to the Chamber of Commerce and for four years was a director of the Inter- 
state Fair Association^ in the work of which he has always taken an active interest. 
His political support is given to the republican party and his efforts along that 
line have been effective forces for success. He was president of the Federated Men's 
Clubs^ covering twenty-six of the improvement clubs of this city which are work- 
ing in behalf of legislation that resulted in the present primary laws. It was these 
federated clubs^ during Mr. King's incumbency as president, that secured the elec- 
tion of Mayor Herbert Moore and Mayof M. S. Pratt. Mr. King was at one time 
mayor of Sprague, filling the office in the years 1895-6. He has always preferred, 
however, to do his duty as a private citizen rather than as an office holder, and 
has been everywhere recognized as one whose labors have constituted him a co- 
operant factor in the attainment of much that is beneficial to the community. 



RUDOLPH BOWMAN SCOTT. 

The spirit of enterprise must be the dominant factor in the life of an individual 
who makes his way into a new and undeveloped country, willing to meet the diffi- 
culties and hardships incident to its upbuilding in order to enjoy the opportunities 
and advantages there offered. Such a spirit was possessed in large measure by 
Rudolph Bowman Scott, who became one of the best known and most prominent 
men of the northwest. He possessed marked force of character and left the im- 
press of his individuality upon all public movements or business concerns with which 
he became in any wise closely connected. He therefore did much for the benefit 
of the Spokane country through his activities in farming, real estate, mining, and 
fire and life insurance. He arrived here in 1888, having made his way from Denver, 
Colorado, to Coeur d'Alene tliree years before. His labors were therefore an effec- 
tive force in shaping the history of not only the western part of Washington but 
of the state in general. He was an American of Indian, African and Scotch ex- 
traction. His birth occurred in New Haven, Connecticut, November 16, 1846, and 
he came of New England ancestry. His maternal grandfather was a Pequot In- 
dian chief,, who married a Scotch woman and fought on the side of liberty through- 
out the war of the Revolution. His paternal grandfather was a West Indian African 
of the Toussaint TOuverture stock and the son of a Barbadoes planter sent to New 
Haven, Connecticut, to be educated at Yale College. 

Rudolph B. Scott pursued a course of study in the Lancasterian School of New 
Haven, Connecticut, where among his class-mates were four who afterward be- 
came governors. He learned the trade of a wood carver in Chauncey Jerome's 
clock manufacturing establishment in New Haven, Connecticut, but at the time of 
the Civil war put aside all business and personal considerations to espouse the 
cause of the Union. Already he had become deeply interested in political questions 
and in the situation of the country prior to this time. He was a boy when in 
1859 Abraham Lincoln made campaign speeches throughout Connecticut and in 
the celebration Mr. Scott carried a torch in the procession in New Haven. He 
and a brother enlisted for service in the Civil war. He was in the North Atlantic 



ADKl.r.K A. HWTT RIDOLPH B. SCOTT 



■ THE mwTt:;^— I 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 57 

Squadron on board the United States gunboat Chicopee and was one of the men 
that volunteered to accompany Lieutenant Gushing when he blew up the rebel 
ram Albemarle. At the capture of Plymouth, North Carolina, Mr. Scott was 
severely wounded. Following the close of the war he engaged in mining in Colo- 
rado, New Mexico and Washington and was at one time connected with the United 
States mail service, being United States mail agent from Chicago, Illinois, to Dan- 
ville, at the time of the historic republican convention held in Chicago in 1880. 
While the three hundred and ^ve delegates stood solid for U. S. Grant for presi- 
dent Mr. Scott held back forty thousand copies of the Cincinnati Enquirer which 
were full of abuse for General Grant and were intended to flood Chicago and de- 
feat Grant's nomination. The copies did not arrive xmtil the day after the con- 
vention, too late to harm his old comrade. 

Mr. Scott had an extended acquaintance among prominent men throughout the 
country and was one of the leading representatives of the Grand Army of the 
Republic, in the work and activities of which he took a very helpful part. He 
served on the staff of Conunander Cosgrove of the department of Washington and 
Alaska, and was an aid-de-camp on the staff of Russell A. Alger, commander-in- 
chief of the Grand Army of the Republic. He also served as chief mustering officer 
of the department of Washington and Alaska and in 1898 was a member of the 
council of administration, while in 1894 he was a delegate from Washington and 
Alaska to the twenty-fourth national encampment at Boston. He served as in- 
spector of the department in 1890 and &ve years later as chief mustering officer. 
At Seattle, he was elected junior vice commander 'of the department of Wash- 
ington and Alaska at the department encampment, on the 22d of June, 1889. 
Mr. Scott was also a delegate from Spokane county to the state convention that 
organized the state of Washington held at Walla Walla iil September, 1889 and was 
a delegate to the state convention held at Seattle -to elect delegates to the national 
convention at Minneapolis. 

Mr. Scott came to the northwest in 1880 and spent three years in the Coeur 
d'Alene mining country. In 1888 he arrived in Spokane and was one of the 
first men to establish a fire and life insurance agency here, his company pay- 
ing all claims in the great fire of 1889. For several years he was manager of 
the Pequot Mining & Milling Company of Spokane. He continued actively in 
business until after the outbreak of the Spanish-American war, when he enlisted 
at Seattle on the 25th of April, 1898, as a private of Company B, First Wash- 
ington Veteran Artillery, continuing with that command until November 1, 1898, 
when bj reason of the close of the war he was honorably discharged at Seattle 
with the rank of first lieutenant. He was called to public office in 1902 when 
appointment of President Roosevelt made him United States Chinese inspector, 
which position he filled for four years, when in 1906 he resigned on account of ill 
health. It was three years later that he passed away, his death occurring March ^ 
28, 1909. 

Mr. Scott was survived by a widow and three children. On the 4th of Sep- 
tember, 1888, in Denver, Colorado, he had wedded Miss Adele A. Wagner, a 
daughter of H. O. and Susan (Lyons) Wagner. The father was a well known 
character in the anti-slavery days in connection with his service in the operation 
of the underground railroad. At one time at his home in Chicago he entertained 
John Brown, the martyr of Harper's Ferry, and twelve fugitive slaves, all of 



58 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

whom he assisted on their way to freedom in Canada. H. O. Wagner, Jr., a brother 
of Mrs. Scott, was for five years United States consul at Lyons, France. Mrs. 
Scott was bom in Chicago and by her marriage has become the mother of two 
sons and a daughter: Rudolph B., a civil engineer in the city service; Henry W., 
who is spending his time in Mexico and Panama; and Addie S., at home. Mrs. 
Scott has been quite prominent in the Woman's Relief Corps and was the patriotic 
instructor for the department of Washington and Alaska which was installed June 
22, 1899. She is also widely known in connection with her work in the Inde- 
pendent Order of Foresters, being the first vice chief ranger in the first com- 
panion court organized in the state of Washington. For the past twelve years 
she has been its financial secretary and in 1904 and 1905 was the department 
inspector. 

In addition to Mr. Scott's connection with the Grand Army of the Republic 
he was also prominent in various fraternal organizations. In Masonry he at- 
tained the thirty-third degree of the Scottish Rite and he was also widely known 
as a leading representative of the Independent Order of Foresters, being deputy 
supreme chief to Oronhyatekha, the Mohawk Indian, who is the supreme chief of 
the order. Mr. Scott represented Spokane in the high council of the Independent 
Order of Foresters in 1897, 1898 and 1899. He was a personal friend of Chief 
Joseph, the great Indian chief of the Nez Perces tribe, and went to Washing^n, 
D. C, in 1897, with Chief Joseph and his chiefs to present their cause before 
the Indian commission and the president. Again he accompanied them in 1900 
and he did much to formulate public opinion in favor of Chief Joseph during the 
past few years. He was major general of the department of the northwest of the 
Union Veterans Union. His religious faith was indicated by his membership in All 
Saints cathedral. He died March 28, 1909, and thus passed from the scene of 
earthly activities one who had been a most unique and interesting figure on the 
stage of action in the northwest. • His character and reputation were alike above 
reproach. He was a great reader and possessed a remarkable memory so that he 
could call to mind at almost a moment's notice any of the important historical 
events which have had to do with molding the department of the northwest. He 
was himself a great lover of outdoor life and of nature. One of his marked char- 
acteristics was his loyalty to his friends who could count upon -him under any 
and all circumstances. He ever held to the highest ideals yet was charitable in 
his opinions of others and was always ready to extend a helping hand to uplift a 
fellow traveler either in a material or moral way. 



ROBERT L. McWILLIAMS. 

Robert L. McWilliams of the firm of McWilliams, Weller & McWilliams, was 
born in Neola, Iowa, on the 27th of March, 1881. He received his education in 
the public schools of Nebraska and Oregon. Subsequently, he was a student at 
the University of California, from which he was graduated with the class of 1904. 
Two years later, he received the degree of Doctor of Jurisprudence from the* law 
department of the same institution. The year prior to his graduation in the law 
school, he passed the bar examinations of California. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 59 

Immediately following bis graduation^ he came to Spokane and started in the 
practice of his profession. In 1910 he acted as assistant corporation counsel of 
the dly of Spokane. In January, 1911, he was appointed, and is at present serv- 
ing as chief deputy prosecuting attorney of the county. He at present holds the 
. position of instructor in the law school of Spokane College, holding evening classes. 
Mr. McWiUiams has contributed a number of articles to the leading law journals 
of the country. 

He holds membership in the Knights of Columbus, of which organization he is 
past grand knight and in the University Club. Mr. McWilliams at the present 
time is serving as chairman of the grievance committee of the Bar Association. He 
was married on the 18th of November, 1909, to Miss Madge Nagle, a daughter of 
Michael and Bridget Nagle of San Francisco. Miss Nagle was also a graduate 
of the University of California. They have one daughter, Helen. 



CHARLES I. HUBBARD. 

A highly successful and enterprising representative of the commercial interests 
of Cheney is to be found in the person of Charles I. Hubbard, who located here 
ten years ago, and has ever since been a prominent factor in promoting the town's 
development. He was bom in Walworth county, Wisconsin, on the 27th of Au- 
gust, 1856, and is a son of Ogden T. and Ann (Conkey) Hubbard. The parents, who 
were among the pioneer settlers of Wisconsin, are now both deceased, the mother 
having passed away in 1881 and the father in 1908. 

Reared at home Charles I. Hubbard acquired his preliminary education in the 
common schools in the vicinity of his home, after which he attended the State Normal 
at Whitewater, Wisconsin for a time. He subsequently matriculated at Beloit Col- 
lege, Beloit, that state, concluding his studies there in 1876. Having been reared 
in the county it was quite natural that in the selection of a vocation after leaving 
college he should turn his attention to agricultural pursuits. He located on a farm 
in Walworth county, Wisconsin, continuing to direct his energies along agricultural 
lines during the succeeding twenty years, meeting with more than an average 
degree of prosperity. With his thorough uderstanding of the best practical methods 
of tilling the fields and caring for the crops he made a most capable and success- 
ful farmer. In 1900 he withdrew from the active work of the fields and disposing 
of his interests in ' Wisconsin, he together with his wife and family removed to the 
Pacific coast, locating in Cheney. Very soon thereafter he became identified with 
the commercial interests of the town by purchasing an interest in a hardware and 
grocery store. He had the misfortune to be burned out two years later, in 1902, 
but so adjusted his affairs that he was soon able to resume business. In the con- 
duct of his store Mr. Hubbard has manifested the same foresight and appreciation 
of the requirements of the situation as has characterized the direction of his other 
andertakings. He is broad-minded and progressive in his ideas yet practical in 
their execution, never considering the minutest detail connected with the operation 
of his business too insignificant to receive his personal attention. In 1908 he con- 
structed the beautiful modem building he is now occupying and which affords ex- 
cellent opportunities and advantages for the attractive display of his stock of mer- 



60 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

chandise. He carries a very complete and carefully selected line of goods in both 
departments^ chosen with due regard for the varied tastes and circumstances of his 
patrons. His attention is always carefully given to the selection of brands that 
he can conscientiously recommend, knowing their value to be fully commensurate 
in every respect to the prices. He accords his patrons the most courteous treatment 
and careful consideration, striving to please and satisfy all, recognizing that the 
prime factor in business success is the spirit of cooperation existing between the 
merchant and his customers. During the period of his residence here Mr. Hubbard 
has acquired extensive property interests in the northwest and in addition to these 
and his mercantile interests in Cheney he is also one of the stockholders and a 
director of the First National Bank. 

On the 6th of December, 1878, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Hubbard 
and Miss May E. Storms, the event occurring at Spring Prairie, Wisconsin. Mrs. 
Hubbard is the daughter of M. Storms, who was of the pioneer settlers of Wis- 
consin, having removed there from Ohio in the very early days. He made the 
journey by way of Chicago, which at that period gave little evidence of becoming 
the flourishing metropolis it is today, flrst locating in Milwaukee, at that time 
little more than a settlement. Of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Hubbard there 
have been bom two children: B. Anna, who is a school teacher; and Clarence M., 
who is engaged in the clothing business in Cheney. 

The family affiliate with the Congregational church, and fraternally Mr. Hub- 
bard is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His political sup- 
port is given to the republican party, and although he has never taken a particularly 
active part in municipal affairs, while living in Wisconsin he served for three years 
as town treasurer. Loyalty to the community in which he resides and cooperation 
in the advancement of all public utilities has always characterized Mr. Hubbard, 
who is an enterprising and enthusiastic member of the Cheney Commercial Club. 
By reason of his public-spirit and indorsement of every progressive movement dur- 
ing the period of his residence in the county he has become recognized as a most 
desirable and valuable citizen, and is accorded the general esteem of his fellow- 
townsmen. 



HUGH L. McWILLIAMS. 

Hugh L. McWilliams, the senior member of the law firm of McWilliams, Weller 
& McWilliams, was born at Mineral Point, Wisconsin, October 2, 1849, and is the 
son of Samuel and Theresa S. (McKenna) McWilliams. His father was one of the 
early pioneer agriculturists of Wisconsin. Mr. McWilliams obtained his early 
education in the public and high schools of his native state, while later he read law 
in the office of Ross & Flickinger Brothers at Council Bluffs, Iowa, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1879. 

He practiced his profession in the state of Iowa for ^ye years before removing 
to Nebraska, where he continued in the practice for twelve years. He also organized 
and was president for about seven years of the Keith County Bank at Ogalalla, 
Nebraska, and the Citizens Bank of Julesburg, Colorado. He later disposed of 
his interests in these institutions, removing to Omaha, Nebraska on account of the 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 61 

better educational facilities for his children, where he again engaged in the law 
practice under the firm name of McWilliams, Halligan & Clair. He afterward 
removed to Houston^ Texas, where he resided for about ten years. In 1900, he 
removed to Ashland, Oregon, at which place he organized the First National Bank, 
and was attorney for that institution until coming to Spokane; and was also city 
attorney at the same place for a period of four years. 

His present firm, composed of himself, his son Robert L. McWilliams, and Mr. 
E. D. Weller, is rated among the leading law firms of the city. In the care and 
precision with which they prepare and conduct their cases they have the full con- 
fidence of the bench and the bar of the state. 

Mr. MoWiUiams was married in 1880 to Miss Anna Stuart, a native of Canada. 
She is a daughter of Robert and Margaret Stuart, who came from Scotland, located 
in Toronto, Canada, later coming to the United States. Mr. and Mrs. McWilliams 
are the parents of three children, Robert L. McWilliams, Frank S. McWilliams, 
and Justin E. McWilliams. The eldest son, Robert L., is a member of the present 
law firm; Frank S., engaged in the mortgage-loan business as secretary of The 
Fidelity Building & Loan Association; and Justin E. is employed as a clerk in the 
Old National Bank. The two younger sons reside with their father and mother 
at their home^ East 518 Indiana avenue, Spokane. 

Mr. McWilliams gives his political allegiance to the democratic party, but takes 
no active part in politics aside from a public-sjMrited interest in the welfare of the 
state and nation as promoted through public labors and influence. He holds mem- 
bership in the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Ancient Order of Hibernians, 
the Modem Woodmen of America and is a member of the Inland Club of Spokane. 
He has many friends inside and outside of the profession. He takes- pride in the 
statement that he has never lost a client through dissatisfaction with his work, and 
has hosts of warm friends at every place in which he has resided during his entire 
Ufe, 



A. E. CRISP. 



A. E. Crisp, who has spent the greater, part of his life in Lincoln county, has 
for the past decade been successfully engaged in the hardware business in Har- 
rington. His life record began in Cherokee, Iowa, on the 29th of June^ 1879, his 
parents being F. G. and Barbara (Mcintosh) Crisp. They were bom and reared 
in England, whence they emigrated to America, first locating in Canada opposite 
Niagara Falls. From there they removed to the United States in 1877, settling in 
Iowa, where for eleven years the father engaged in farming. At the end of that 
time they once more changed their place of residence this time coming to Wash- 
ington, locating in Lincoln county in 1888. Here Mr. Crisp resumed his agricul- 
tural pursuits, being for many years numbered among the successful find capable 
ranchers of the county. Ten years ago he withdrew from active life and is now 
living retired in Harrington, enjoying the ease and comfort provided by the in- 
come received from his valuable property interests. 

A. E. Crisp was introduced to the elements of English learning in the district 
schools of his native state, where he spent the first nine years of his life. He con- 



62 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

tinued his education in the schools of Lincoln county until he was fifteen and then 
laying aside his school books^ he devoted his efforts to assisting his father in the 
operation of the ranch. In 1902 he removed to Harrington and together with the 
late Mr. Glascock bought out a small hardware store. They invested more capital 
and enlarged the business until it became one of the thriving commercial activities 
of the county. This partnership was terminated in 1907 by the death of Mr. Glas- 
cock^ and for three years thereafter Mr. Crisp continued alone. In 1910 he took 
R. G. Turner into partnership and the business is now conducted under the name 
of the Harrington Hardware Company. 



HENRY A. KLUSSMAN, M. D. 

Dr. Henry A. Ellussman^ one of the well known and highly successful repre- 
sentatives of the medical fraternity of Spokane, whose office is located in the Granite 
buildings was bom in EUiston, Ohio^ on the 18th of Aprils 1878. He is a son of 
Dr. F. J. and Margaret A. (Apel) Klussman^ the father being a prominent phy- 
sician of Toledo^ Ohio^ while the mother is a daughter of John Apel of Bowling 
Green^ that state^ the owner of extensive oil interests in that vicinity. 

After the completion of his preliminary education, Dr. Klussman entered the 
Ohio Normal University at Ada, Ohio, being graduated from that institution with 
the degree of Ph. G. in 1896. Having decided to adopt the profession of his 
father for his life vocation, he subsequently matriculated in the Kentucky School 
of Medicine at Louisville, that state, being awarded the degree of M. D. with the 
class of 1900. Dr. Klussman was an unusually bright and clever pupil, seemingly 
having been endowed with an exceptional natural aptitude in this direction, and in 
his junior and senior years in college he was assistant clinical demonstrator on 
genito-urinary diseases. Immediately following his graduation he came to Spokane 
as assistant to Dr. C. P. Thomas, with whom he remained until the following 
October, when he opened his own office which he has ever since maintained. Dr. 
Klussman is a very ambitious, progressive man and is constantly striving to ad- 
vance in his profession. He has pursued a number of post-graduate courses during 
the eleven years he has been engaged in practicing in Spokane, in addition to which 
he keeps in close touch with all modern discoveries and research through the medium 
of the various medical journals and reviews. Soon after locating here he went to 
New York city, where he spent several months, pursuing courses in both the Post 
Graduate School of Medicine of that city and the New York Policlinic Medical 
School and Hospital. At the same time he took some special and private courses in 
diseases of the kidneys and bladder at the Presbyterian Hospital of New York 
under Drs. Cabot and Spooner, and in operative surgery under Professor Daw- 
born. In 1908 he made a trip to Europe, visiting the leading hospitals of London, 
Berlin, Vienna and Paris, in all of which he attended lectures on special subjects. 
He joined classes in the various cities, in anatomy, microscopy and operative sur- 
gery on the cadaver, devoting special attention to skin, genito-urinary, kidney and 
bladder diseases and gynecology. In Berlin he worked under such eminent spe- 
cialists as Nitze, Casper, Wossidlo, Thumen, Landow, Lewin, Joseph and Pick, 
while his studies in Vienna were under the direction of Drs. Zukerkandl, Finger, 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 63 

Halban^ Tandler^ Ziegler and Christofoletti and in London he continued his work 
under Drs. Freyer, Harrison and Fenwick. Dr. Klussman was greatly benefited 
by the courses he pursued while abroad and also by the hospital experience, but 
neyertheless he felt that there were many physicians in his native land who could 
assist him still further and in 1907 he spent some time in the Post Graduate School 
and also the Polyclinic School and Hospital of Chicago, receiving certificates from 
both institutions. He has an unusually fine equipment, particularly for a man of 
his age, and is meeting with unqualified success in his practice. During the period 
of his residence here he has had ample opportunity to demonstrate his ability both 
as a physician and surgeon, and has effected results in both that have created for 
him much more than a local reputation. He is frequently called out of the city on 
consultations and also to perform operations, while patients come to him from all 
over the northwest and even as far away as British Columbia. Genito-urinary 
troubles have always engaged much of his time and attention, and he has pursued 
various courses under the best specialists in this country and Europe on diseases of 
this nature, while the past year he has specialized in abdominal surgery. Dr. Kluss- 
man has a very lucrative practice and has succeeded in acquiring quite extensive 
property holdings since locating here. He is the owner of one hundred and thirty- 
five acres of valuable orchard land, planted in apples, twelve miles south of Kettle 
Falls on the Columbia river, all of which is under irrigation, and he also owns 
other real estate, his different holdings aggregating about seventy-five thousand 
dollars. 

Dr. Klussman was married in 1897, to Miss Elda A. Rice, a daughter of Frank 
L. Rice a prominent contractor of Shelby, Ohio, who has constructed many miles 
of macadam roads through his state ' of such excellence that he has become widely 
known in this connection, being regarded as one of the best men in this line in the 
country. Two children have been bom to Dr. and Mrs. Klussman, Richard M., 
whose birth occurred in 1898; and Helen V., who was born in 1899. The family 
reside at No. 514 South Bernard street, where Dr. Klussman owns a most attractive 
property. 

Fraternally he is affiliated with the Order of Foresters of Spokane, and al- 
though he takes an active interest in all public and municipal affairs, the greater 
part of his time and attention is absorbed by his large practice, the development of 
which has undoubtedly been largely promoted by his conscientious devotion to the 
interests of his patients to the exclusion of all personal considerations. 



WILLIAM H. PANXON. 

William H. Pannon, present mayor of Hillyard who for the past three years 
has been traveling engineer for the Spokane division of the Great Northern Rail- 
road, was bom in Buffalo, New York, October 31, 1863, a son of Thomas and 
Mary (Corcoran) Pannon. The father, who was a veteran of the Civil war, serv- 
ing under General Hancock, passed away in 1871. The mother, however, sur- 
vived for twenty-five years thereafter, her demise occurring in 1896. 

The boyhood of William H. Pannon was spent in his native city in whose public 
schools he began his education, completing it in the high school of Rochester, New 



64 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

York, from which he was graduated with the class of 1878. Immediately there- 
after he became self-supporting, and during the succeeding four years followed 
various activities in his endeavor to find something that he was by nature qualified 
for and cared to adopt for a life vocation. In 1882 he went to St. Paul, Minne- 
sota^ and there entered the employment of the Great Northern Railroad Company. 
The next five years he worked as a fireman on an engine running out of Crookston, 
Minnesota, in which capacity he served with such a degree of efiiciency that he 
was promoted to the rank of engineer, with headquarters at Breckenridge, Minne- 
sota. At the end of twelve years he was sent by the company to Hillyard, con- 
tinuing to discharge the duties of an engineer until 1908, when he was promoted 
to the position of traveling engineer, in which capacity he is still serving. 

At Breckenridge, Minnesota, on the 18th of January, 1887, was celebrated the 
marriage of Mr. Pannon to Miss Mary Daly, a daughter of Bartholomew and 
Mary Daly, and they have become the parents of three daughters: Mabel, I^ouise 
and Florence. 

The family are communicants of the Roman Catholic church and Mr. Pannon 
is a member of the Knights of Columbus. He also belongs to the Brotherhood 
of Locomotive Engineers and has twice been the delegate from the local order 
to the national conventions, once when they met at Los Angeles, California, and 
again at Memphis, Tennessee. His political support Mr. Pannon gives to the 
democratic party, the policy of which receives his full indorsement. He has high 
ideals of the responsibility of citizenship and has always given much attention to 
municipal affairs, having represented his ward in the city council for seven years 
just prior to his election to the mayoralty chair. Possessing keen foresight and 
business sagacity Mr. Pannon long ago recognized the wonderful agricultural pos- 
sibilities afforded in the northwest and has accordingly invested his earnings as 
he was able from time to time in farming lands. He now has a one-third interest 
in eight hundred acres of irrigated land in the vicinity of Lewiston, Idaho, that is 
being operated under the name of the Pannon-Buckley Company. Mr. Pannon 
is highly regarded in Hillyard, where he has many friends, having in both his 
public and private relations manifested the loyalty, trustworthiness and efficiency 
that have characterized him during the twenty-nine years he has served the com- 
pany by whom he is still employed. 



FRANK D. GARRETT. 



Frank D. Garrett, engaged in the real-estate business with offices in the Hyde 
block, is one of the extensive landowners of Washington. He was born in Hardin 
cbunty, Iowa, on the 12th of October, 1864, his parents being Frank and Mary J. 
(Strahorn) Garrett, both of whom are prominent among the pioneers of Iowa and 
are still living. 

Mr. Garrett of this review received his education in the public schools of Iowa 
until he was fifteen years of age. At that time he left his native state and removed 
west to Pendleton, Oregon, where he accepted employment on a large ranch for seven 
years, during the greater part of which period he acted as foreman. He thus be- 
came acquainted with many of the essential features of the cattle business and 



F. 1). CARRKTT 



THE ^tw luhK 

Jl-UauC UiiKAUY 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 67 

subsequently he engaged in that enterprise near Sprague^ Washington, for three 
years. The winter of the last of these three years was a particularly severe one 
and he had the misfortune to lose the greater part of his stock, when in two nights 
ten thousand sheep disappeared. But his determination and grit were undaunted 
and he immediately engaged in agricultural pursuits and for seven years success- 
fully cultivated his farm near Sprague. Again he exercised the same diligence and 
careful application to the duties at hand which he had displayed in his previous 
undertakings and the success with which he met was more than compensatory. He 
disposed of this property and since 190^ has engaged in the real-estate business in 
Spokane. His various undertakings have proved so lucrative that he has been able 
from time to time to purchase considerable land in Washington. At present he is 
the owner of four thousand acres in the Palouse country and of several valuable 
holdings in Spokane. He has further extended his activities by associating himself 
with the Coeur d'Alene Empire Mining Comptiny, of which he is at present serving 
as president. Since becoming a resident of Spokane eight years ago, he has well 
proven his worth as a business man, as a judge of real-estate values and as a trusted 
adviser in business circles. 

In Medical Lake, Washington, on the 8d of July, 1889, Mr. Garrett was mar- 
ried to Miss Anna Teal, a daughter of David H. and Rachel Teal. To them two 
children have been bom: Forest, who is attending college at Pullman, Washington; 
and Hazel, who is a student at the Lewiston Normal School at Lewiston, Idaho. 
Mr. Garrett exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of 
the republican party. He holds membership in Spokane Lodge, No. 228, Benevo- 
lent Protective Order of Elks. He has attained notable success and this has fol- 
lowed as the logical sequence of his labors, his careful study of the development of 
a rapidly growing country and his integrity. His record may well serve as a source 
of inspiration and courage to others, showing what may be accomplished by one 
who has determination and energy. He has proven his worth as a factor in the 
business world and the position which he occupies is a creditable one and one in- 
volving much responsibility. 



JOHN B. BLALOCK. 



In the year 1879 the firm of Cannon & Warner were freighting through the 
Spokane country, and as a passenger upon one of their wagons, John B. Blalock 
arrived in the city of Spokane, which has since been his home. The city, however, 
at that time was in its embryonic stage — its inhabitants being engaged in trade with 
the Indians, or busy with the task of developing land. Since that day he has 
been an interested witness of the growth and progress of this section and success 
has attended him, making him now the owner of considerable valuable property in 
the city, where his first place of business was a little one-story building, only four- 
teen by twenty-eight feet. 

Mr. Blalock was bom in Sevier county, Tennessee, July 21, 1856. His father, 

J- M. Blalock, was a native of South Carolina and died in the year 1906. He 

removed from Charleston, his native city, to Tennessee and reared his family, but 

at the time of the Civil war the household was broken up. His wife, who bore the 
Vol m— 4 



68 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

maiden name of Massie Carr^ was born in Tennessee and died soon after the close 
of the war, in 1868. 

John B. Blalock was reared to manhood in his native county, receiving such 
educational advantages as the common schools of the day afforded but at the age 
of twenty-two years, or in 1878, he started for the west. He journeyed by rail 
to san Francisco, thence made his way by boat to Portland and by rail to Walla 
Walla, after which he came to Spokane with a freighting team, as previously stated. 
Soon afterward he purchased for one hundred and fifty dollars a lot on Front street, 
just west of Howard, upon which he erected a small one-story building, fourteen 
by twenty-eight feet. There he conducted a shoe business, his first stock of goods 
being that of a firm which had failed at Colfax. In 1880, he invested four hun- 
dred and thirty dollars in a site forty feet square on the northwest comer of Howard 
and Riverside, and the following year he erected on his lot on Riverside a one- 
story frame building, twenty by forty feet, into which he moved his stock of shoes. 
In 1882 he erected a store building for rental purposes on the remainder of his 
property, and soon afterward he purchased the lot and building adjoining him 
on the west for six hundred and fifty dollars. Moving his stock into that build- 
ing, he afterward razed the building at the corner and in 1886 there erected a 
four-story structure, with basement. This was the first four-story building in the 
city and was soon leased to the First National Bank, the rental being three hundred 
dollars per month. 

The success which Mr. Blalock won in his real-estate operations caused him in 
1887 to dispose of his shoe business to N. B. Dolan, and concentrate his entire 
attention upon his real-estate operations in partnership with R. C. Hyde. They 
purchased and handled a large amount of city property, making many improve- 
ments thereon and erecting numerous buildings. They purchased of Mrs. H. T. 
Cowley a tract of land, which they platted as the Cazenovia addition, so named 
after Mrs. Cowley's daughter. In the great fire of 1889 Mr. Blalock^s losses 
amounted to about twenty-five thousand dollars. The year following he built the 
Blalock block at the southwest comer of Stevens and Sprague streets, a six-story 
brick structure, costing, with the ground upon which it stands, two hundred and 
nine thousand dollars. His prosperity continued until about 1893, when, like many 
others, he lost much of his holdings during the wide-spread financial panic that 
swept over the country. However, with resolute spirit he continued his efforts 
and has since continued to deal in real estate, largely handling farm lands. In 
this success has again attended his labors. He next located a tract of land near 
Twin Falls, Idaho, all of which is planted to alfalfa. He is also heavily interested 
in the W. & B. A. Investment Company, holding real estate in Spokane and vicinity, 
including the Metropole apartment house. Of this company Mr. Blalock is the 
manager. He is likewise the owner of property at Prince Rupert, British Columbia. 

On the 27th of October, 1884, in Spokane, Mr. Blalock was united in marriage 
to Miss Martha Hyde, a daughter of Mrs. S. S. Hyde and a sister of former Con- 
gressman S. C. Hyde and of R. C. Hyde of this city. Mr. and Mrs. Blalock have 
one son, Shirl H., who is looking after his father's interests in Idaho. 

Fraternally Mr. Blalock is a Mason, holding membership with Oriental Lodge 
No. 74, and he also belongs to Oriental Consistory, No. 2, S. P. R. S. While he 
has never been an active worker in political circles, he votes with the democratic 
party believing that its principles are most conducive to good government. He has 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 69 

always been prominently identified with matters pertaining to the welfare and 
progress of the city^ has been a liberal contributor to railroads and to public im- 
provements generally and has also given generously to churches and projects for 
the social and moral advancement of this section. His long residence in Spokane 
enables him to speak with authority relative to anything concerning the history 
of the city and lie is one of the most favorably known of her residents^ his good 
qualities having won him the kindly regard of a large circle of friends. 



J. A. TALKINGTON. 



J. A. Talkington^ the present mayor of Harrington^ is one of the well known 
pioneer ranchmen of Lincoln county^ having located here in 1 889. He was bom and 
reared on his father's farm in the vicinity of Jenny Lind^ Arkansas^ his natal day 
being the 6th of November, 1861. In the paternal line Mr. Talkington is de- 
scended from New England colonial ancestry, his forefathers having been numbered 
among the early English settlers in that section. His great-grandfather, Stephen 
Talkington, in his early manhood moved from his New England home to Kentucky, 
whence his son, Edward Talkington, removed in 1827 to Arkansas. In the latter 
state in 1831 occurred the birth of Joseph Talkington, the father of our subject, 
who there engaged in farming during his entire active life. For his wife he chose 
Miss Rebecca A. Kirk, a native of Tennessee, her birth there occurring in 1838. 
Although the Talkingtons had long been residents of the south at the breaking out 
of the war, they were northern sympathizers, and Joseph Talkington valiantly 
gave his services in defense of his country's flag. 

Bom and reared on his father's farm, J. A. Talkington pursued his education 
in the public schools of his native state, and such times as he was not there en- 
gaged, assisted his father in the operation of the homestead. Upon attaining his 
majority he left school and spent a year traveling through the south. When he 
returned home he again resumed his agricultural pursuits and for two years there- 
after gave his undivided attention to the cultivation of the fields. In common with 
many other young men he was strongly drawn to the west, his long line of pioneer 
ancestors having bred in him that spirit of conquest, characteristic of those, who . 
fonn the advance guard of civilization in the development of the nation. There- 
fore, he left the parental roof in 1887 and in January of the next year located in 
Los Angeles, California, where he engaged in the feed business until April, 1889, 
when he came to Lincoln county. Feeling that he desired to become a permanent 
resident of the country he flled on a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres, 
ten miles south of Davenport, that he cultivated for five years. He subsequently 
disposed of this and thereafter engaged in the buying and selling of real estate 
mitil 1901, when he purchased a ranch of seven hundred and eighty €icres a mile 
cast of Harrington. During the ensuing five years he resided there with his family, 
giving his undivided attention to the operation of his fields. Although it is still 
cultivated under the personal supervision of Mr. Talkington since 1906 he has 
been living in Harrington, having removed here in order to give his children the 
benefit of the schools. He is meeting with most excellent success in ranching, his 
fields being given that careful attention that always assures an abundant harvest, 
the quality being fully equal in every respect to the quantity. 



70 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

On the 23d of December, 1886, Mr. Talkington was united in marriage to 
Miss S. V. McMillian, a daughter of W. A. McMillian, a native of Florida, who 
subsequently became a well known educator of Arkansas. Of this union there have 
been born the following children: Brant, Pleas, Leonard, Floyd, Willard, Em- 
mett and Jessie, all of whom are still in school. 

* Mr. Talkington is a member of the Knights of Pythias fraternity, and in pol- 
itics he is a republican. He has always taken a prominent interest in local govern- 
mental affairs and in 1900 ran for representative but was defeated. He was elected 
to the office of mayor in December, 1910, and during the period of his service lias 
discharged his responsibilities in a manner to meet with the commendation of the 
municipality. In common with the majority of the citizens of this section of the 
state, Mr. Talking^n has the most unbounded faith in a great future for his county, 
to the interests of which he is ever loyal, enthusiastically championing every move- 
ment that he feels at all likely to redound to the development of its resources. 



A. G. AVERY. 



Mr. A. G. Avery, of the law firm of Post, Avery & Higgins, was born in Moravia, 
New York, June 6, 1860, an only son of Benjamin L. and Ruth (Pickens) Avery, 
both natives of New York, and is the present-day representative of an ancestral 
line which runs back through Averys of Groton, Connecticut, of Revolutionary fame 
and Captain James Avery of colonial days, to good old England. 

Mr. Avery's acknowledged faculty of always being one of the leaders of the 
professional and social life of the community in which he lives, had its origin in a 
similar triut in his father, who was at different times, postmaster, president of 
Genoa, New York, and president of the Civil war veterans of the counties of Cayuga, 
Seneca and Wayne in that state, he having served in the Ninth New York Heavy 
Artillery in that war. 

After some years at the academy at Genoa and at home under a private tutor, 
he entered the office of Richard C. Steel, of Auburn, New York, in 1 888, to study 
law, whence he went to the law school of the University of Michigan, where he was 
graduated in 1886, being admitted to the bar the following year at Buffalo. He 
then returned to Genoa, where he successfully survived the first twelve months of 
a young lawyer's practice. Here he married in February of 1888 Miss Evelyn 
Young, the daughter of a prominent citizen of the home town and one of his old 
schoolmates. Leaving his father, mother and sister at Genoa, he and his bride 
came to Spokane, where he opened an office in 1888. 

He later practiced two years, from 1891 to 1898, in partnership with Frank 
T. Post. From 1893 to 1900 he was again alone; but combined his practice, in 
the latter year, with Mr. Post and Thomas B. Higgins, having meanwhile served 
two terms as corporation counsel of Spokane from 1897 to 1901, at the time when 
Spokane began its first paving local improvements. 

The profession of the law has rightly been said to be a jealous mistress since 
those who would gain her favor must give her their undivided devotion. Mr. 
Avery's recognition of, and compliance with, this demand have won the goddess' 
unhesitating and unqualified approval. This is in part evidenced by the fact that 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 71 

he^ when alone^ and his present firm^ have enjoyed the professional confidence and 
employment of a goodly number of the northwest's best citizens^ among which 
are fomid both the rich and the poor^ the corporated and the unincorporated. The 
federal government in 1905 recognized the results of liis devotion to the law by 
his appointment as United States attorney for the eastern district of Washington^ 
which place he held till 1910 when^ from the increased business of the iirm^ he 
felt compelled to ask the government to appoint some one in his stead. 

Mr. Avery's ability^ his professional achievements^ his genial personality and 
his reputation for sterling character have been recognized by numerous public 
admowledgments. At different times he has been chosen president^ of the Wash- 
ington State Bar Association, of the Spokane County Bar Association, of the Wash- 
ington State League of Republican Clubs, of the Spokane Club, of the University 
Club of Spokane, of the Spokane Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion, and governor of the Washington Society of Colonial Wars. 

Finally, bis home life has not been less happy, since Mr. and Mrs. Avery, their 
dan^ter Ruth, and their hospitable home on West Sixth avenue have long enjoyed 
the warmest regard of all their wide acquaintance among that class of the com- 
munity's citizens who represent its best thought and life. 



ALBERT P. WOLVERTON. 

This has been termed the age of commercialism and the record of the present 
indicates that it is an age of notable business enterprise and achievement. Espe- 
daUy is this true in America where the great national resources of the country 
are by no means exhausted and the ambitious, progressive man can therefore find 
opportunity to gain through his labor those things which nature has provided for 
his use, or in the field of manufacture and of purchase and sale secure equal chance 
for successful business activity. Albert P. Wolverton was one of Spokane's resi- 
dents who gave substantial evidence of industry, persistency and capable manage- 
ment in the conduct of real-estate transactions. He was a native son of the north- 
west, having been bom in Polk coimty, Oregon, September 17, 1855, and came of 
a family of English ancestry that was established in America early in the eighteenth 
century. His father, John B. Wolverton, was bom in Mount Pleasant, Ohio, De- 
cember 4, 1822, and having arrived at years of maturity was married, November 
25, 1847, to Mary J. Nealy, whose birth occurred May 1, 1825. For a time they 
were residents of Iowa and in 1855 started from that state for the Pacific coast. 
He became one of the pioneers of Polk county, Oregon, where for many years 
he devoted his attention to farming and eventually lived retired in Monmouth. 
There on the 4th of December, 1901, his seventy-ninth birthday anniversary was 
celebrated, at which time he was still a hale and hearty man. He lived to celebrate 
«ie more birthday anniversary, passing away December 29, 1902. His wife sur- 
vived him for about seven years and died September 20, 1909. In their family 
were seven children of whom Albert P. was the fourth in order of birth. Of these 
Charles, Bruce, Otis, Grant and Mrs. Josie C. Byrd are all living, while Albert 
P. and William have passed away. 



72 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Albert P. Wolverton was reared upon the home farm, there remaining until 
twenty-four jears of age, after which he pursued a college course and was grad- 
uated from the scientific department of Monmouth College. In 1880 he came to 
Spokane accompanied by his brother William Marshall Wolverton, and after look- 
ing over the situation, which they believed held forth good promises, they pur- 
chased a fifty-six foot lot where the Holland block now stands. This occurred 
February 22, 1882, and the purchase price was but three hundred and fifty dollars. 
Spokane was not then a city of modem improvements but was a frontier town just 
emerging from villagehood. The brothers erected a two-story brick block thirty 
by sixty feet where the Wolverton block now stands and opened there a stock of 
hardware. Theirs was the first brick structure erected in the city. After two 
years Albert P. Wolverton sold his goods to his brother and two years later pur- 
chased the property and organized the Spokane Hardware Company of which he 
was manager for two years. Ill health then caused him to sell out, after which he 
operated quite largely in real estate. In March, 1884, in connection with M. 
Conlan, he purchased one hundred and fifty-five acres and platted Wolverton & 
Conlan's addition. In 1889 he erected the Temple Court, also the Grand Central 
Hotel and several residences, and his purchase and sale of property at different 
times added not only to his own income but also to the business development of 
the city. All of his undertakings prospered by reason of his sound judgment and 
capable management. He became one of the original stockholders of the Ross 
Park Street Railway and assisted in every way possible in the upbuilding of the 
city. 

On the 14th of March, 1888, Mr. Wolverton was united in marriage to Miss 
Lula Miller, a daughter of Lewis and Amelia (Schweiger) Miller, both of whom 
were natives of Germany but were married in New York. They came to America 
in 1852 and in 1862 made their way to Oregon by way of the water route around 
Cape Horn, settling in Albany, Oregon, where Mr. Miller followed the blacksmith's 
trade and became a prominent citizen. He and his wife celebrated their golden 
anniversary April 29, 1905. Mr. and Mrs. Wolverton became the parents of three 
children: Vernice A., who was born January 5, 1889, and died August 26, 1892; 
Vance Albert, born October 5, 1890; and Margaret, born March 2, 1894. The 
death of the husband and father occurred in Los Angeles, California, on the 22d 
of November, 1907. In 1904 he went with his family to southern California, 
spending a portion of his time at Redlands and the remainder largely at Santa 
Monica. From the latter place he went to Pamona in September prior to his 
death, which resulted directly from an operation, the shock of which he could 
not stand on account of severe heart trouble and his weakened condition caused 
by stomach trouble. He was prepared for the end, however, having put all of his 
business affairs in order, and with loving words for his family upon his lips he 
passed away. He was most widely and favorably known in Spokane and enjoyed 
the warm friendship of all whom he met in fraternal relations. He was a mem- 
ber of Imperial Lodge, No. 134, the Unique Encampment, No. 32, I. O. O. F., 
the Woodmen and the Eagles. He always manifested a citizen's interest in pol- 
itics and during the campaign of 1896 served as chairman of the silver republican 
party. At one time he was the candidate for the nomination of county assessor 
and was highly recommended for the office by his friends and by the press who 
spoke of him in terms of praise and high regard. He was a member of the Chris- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 73 

tian church and governed his entire life by its teachings. He ever spoke kindly 
of his fellowmen^ was charitable in disposition and was ever ready to extend a 
helping hand to those who needed aid. His life was so honorable and his principles 
80 manly that he won respect and confidence wherever he went and it was with 
the deepest regret that his fellow townsmen heard of his demise^ knowing that 
Spokane had thus lost a good citizen^ his associates a faithful friend and his family 
a devoted husband and father. 



MOSES A. PHELPS. 



Moses A. Phelps, of Spokane, is a prominent representative of the lumber in- 
terests of the northwest. In all that he undertakes he displays an aptitude for 
successful management and his business methods are such as will bear close in- 
vestigation and scrutiny. The width of the continent separates him from his birth- 
place, for he was bom in Franklin county, Massachusetts, December 11, 1858. 
The Phelps family is of English origin but was established in New England at 
an early period in the colonization of the new world. His father, W. H. Phelps, 
was bom in Hubbardston, Massachusetts, engaged for many years in the lumber 
bosiness and was prominent in public affairs in Wendell, Franklin county, Massa- 
diusetts, where he long made his home. He wedded Mary N. Needham, who was 
a native of Wendell, and a representative of an old New England family of Eng- 
lish lineage. Mrs. Phelps now resides in Foxboro, Massachusetts, but the death 
of W. H. Phelps occurred in 1893. Their surviving children are: Moses A.; 
William J., a wholesale hay and grain merchant of Worcester, Massachusetts ; and 
Elmyra, who is the widow of H. E. Wells and resides at Foxboro, Massachusetts. 

At the usual age Moses A. Phelps beg^n his education as a public-school student 
and also studied to some extent in private schools. He was first employed in con- 
nection with the hay and grain business in Franklin, New Hampshire, and sub- 
sequently went to Boston, where he was engaged in the wholesale hay and grain 
bosiness for two years. In 1886 he arrived in Spokane and has since been con- 
nected with the lumber trade of this city, operating under the name of the M. A. 
Phelps Lumber Company, successors to the firm of Phelps & Wadsworth. Their 
ofiees are in the Empire State building and they have an extensive plant, owning 
and operating mills at Cusick, which have a capacity of sixty thousand feet of 
bnnber daily. Mr. Phelps is an excellent judge of standing timber as well as of 
the finished product, and his executive ability and the careful management of his 
interests have brought him substantial and gratifying financial returns. 

When Mr. Phelps came to Spokane there were only five or six buildings on 
the north side of the river across which there was but one bridge, that of Post 
street. He furnished the lumber for the second bridge which was built across Di- 
vision street. The first electric light station was then under the Galland-Burke Brew- 
ing Company's little building and when that was removed Mr. Phelps furnished the 
hunber for the second plants which was built where the Washing^n Water Power 
Company's Post street station now stands. Where the Review building is now 
located there was a church that was removed to Broadway and the leading hotel 
was where the city hall now stands, with the First National Bank just across the 



74 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

comer. The hotel was conducted by W. C. Gray and was a popular hostelry, al- 
though it would not compare very favorably with the attractive modem hotels of 
the present. Within a few years a wonderful change has occurred and fine modem 
buildings now occupy the sites that were then vacant or were covered with shacks. 
Mr. Phelps is also a director in the Fidelity Bank^ one of Spc^ane's foremost finan- 
cial institutions. 

In 1887^ in Greenfield^ Massachusetts^ Mr. Phelps was united in marriage to 
Miss Netta W. Sheldon^ a daughter of George B. Sheldon^ a farmer living near 
Greenfield, and a representative of an old New England family. Two children have 
been bom unto Mr. and Mrs. Phelps: Ralph S.^ who is engaged in the lumber 
business ; and Marion^ a student at Brunot Hall. Mr. Phelps has a life membership 
in the Spokane Athletic Club^ is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution 
and is also a member of the Inland Club. His wife belongs to the Esther Reed 
Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and was state regent of 
that association for several years. She is much interested in club work^ being a 
member of the Cultus Club. Few men are more prominent or more widely known 
in the enterprising city of Spokane than Moses A. Phelps. He has been an impor- 
tant factor in business circles and his prosperity is well deserved^ for in him are 
embraced the characteristics of an imbending integrity^ imabating energy and in- 
dustry that never flags. 



GEORGE M. FORSTER. 



Few of the important enterprises which have contributed to the upbuilding of 
the Inland Empire have not benefited by the cooperation and assistance of George 
M. Forster. Added to his business ability, which made him a factor in the con- 
duct of many successful enterprises, there was a nobility of character which won 
him the respect and honor of all with whom he was associated. He was born in 
Dundas^ Ontario, Septembei: 19, 1845, a son of Walter and Mary Forster, both 
of whom were natives of Scotland, but at a later date came to America and set- 
tled in Canada. They were farming people, connected with agricultural pursuits 
throughout their entire lives. 

George M. Forster supplemented his public-school education by a course in 
the law department of the St. Louis (Missouri) University, from which he was 
graduated in the class of 1878. He then entered upon the practice of law in that 
city, following his profession there for more than five years, when, in September, 
188S, he left the Mississippi valley for the northwest. Sometime after his arrival 
in Spokane he formed a partnership with Colonel W. W. D. Turner, which firm 
was later increased by the admission of Judge George Turner, under the style of 
Turner, Forster & Turner. Later Judge Turner became associated with Frank 
H. Graves, and thereafter upon the retirement of Colonel Turner from active 
practice, in 1891, a partnership was formed with W. J. C. Wakefield under the 
firm name of Forster & Wakefield, which was continued until the death of Mr. 
Forster. During all this period Mr. Forster was recognized as an able lawyer, 
and was connected with much important litigation. He was strong in argument, 
clear in his reasoning and logical in his deductions. With almost intuitive percep- 



GEORCK M. >X)R8TKB 



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1 I. ^t N / V - s i^<, , OmI 



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SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 77 

tion he seemed to recognize the connection between cause and effect, however 
obscure, and his ready mastery of the principles of jurisprudence enabled him to 
make correct application of the legal points to the salient features in his cases. 

It was not alone, however, in the field of law that he gained distinction, for 
his work in other connections was of an equally prominent and important char- 
acter. He was one of the original incorporators of the LeRoi Mining & Smelting 
Company, and for many years its president. This company developed and oper- 
ated the LeRoi mine at Rossland, British Columbia, one of the largest producers 
in that district. He was an early stockholder in the Centennial Mill Company, 
as well as other manufacturing, mining and financial concerns that featured in the 
opboilding and development of the Inland Empire. In all of these enterprises 
Mr. Forster took an active and vigorous interest and had a voice in their manage- 
ment and control. 

Mr. Forster was twice married. He first wedded Miss Helen Witherspoon, of 
Detroit, Michigan, and unto them was born a daughter, Adah, who is now the 
wife of J. N. Matchett, a resident of Spokane. On the 29th of October, 1900, 
Mr. Forster married Mrs. M. C. (Kelliher) Spencer, a daughter of M. M. and 
Catherine (Cronin) Kelliher, of whom mention is made elsewhere in this volume. 

The death of Mr. Forster occurred February 12, 1905, and the passing of few 
has been more deeply regretted in all the northwest. His salient qualities were 
such as to endear him to his companion^ , in. ^soqial; Jife and to his business asso- 
ciates. His political allegiance was giy^n.;tp' the republican party and he always 
kept well informed on the questions ; and issues of the day, though he did not seek 
nor desire office. He possessed a keen sense of humor and a deep love of nature. 
He found enjoyment in the forests and by the stream-, and in the beauty of flow- 
ers. He was a Mason, a life member of the Spokane Amateur Athletic Club, and 
belonged to and took and active part in several other clubs and organizations 
which form a part in the early history of the city. Generous in personal life to a 
fault, and of a genial disposition, he made and kept a host of friends who mourn 
his demise. 



AUSTIN CORBIN, II. 



In the twentieth century, other things being equal, the men, of affluence are 
the stronger force in the progress of the world. Austin Corbin, II., of this review, 
has the good fortune of belonging to a family that has been prominent in the up- 
building and development of the northwest through the establishment and control 
of many important business enterprises and stimulated by the example of his 
father and others of the name he has continued active in the work they have in- 
stituted and has proven his force and resourcefulness in business circles. 

He was bom in Denver, Colorado, September 24, 1863, and is a son of Daniel 
Chase Corbin, of whom extended mention is made elsewhere in this volume. His 
father is prominently associated with irrigation and land projects, with railway 
and other important interests in the northwest, and under his direction Austin 
Corbin has received his business training and is now vice president of all of the 
companies which his father has established here. In their management and control 



78 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

he has shown himself possessed of excellent executiye ability^ administrative di- 
rection and initiative spirit and what he undertakes is accomplished by reason of 
his resolute will and his resourcefulness. 

On the 2d of May^ 1894^ Mr. Corbin was married to Katharine Benham, a 
daughter of Lucius and Mary G. (Trumbull) Benham. Their home has been 
blessed with two interesting little daughters^ Mary Louise and Katherine. Mr. 
Corbin has never taken an active part in politics nor held public office^ feeling that 
. his time and energies are fully occupied with his business affairs. He is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic order and of the Spokane Club, and the circle of his friends 
in Spokane is almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintance. He does not 
seek to figure in any public lig^t other than a business man and in that connection 
he is certainly proving his worth and capability. 



WILLIAM DOLLAR. 



William Dollar, who organized the Exchangee National Bank of Coeur d'Alene, 
of which he is president, has been successfully identified with various enterprises 
since locating here twelve years ago. He was born in Ottawa, Canada, on October 
10, 1859, and is a son of William and Mary (Easton) Dollar. 

But few of the advantages deemed essential for a successful business career 
fell to the lot of William Dollar, who became self-supporting at the age of twelve 
years. He was put to work on a farm, where he remained until he was eighteen, 
and such schooling as he received was obtained at irregular intervals during that 
period. In 1877 he gave up farm work and went to western Canada, where he 
was employed in the lumber camps until 1885. In the latter year he came to 
the United States, following the same occupation in the lumber regions of northern 
Michigan for four years. He was ambitious and not being satisfied to continue an 
employe all of his life, he decided to go into business for himself. Being enter- 
prising and industrious as well as practical in his ideas, he met with little diffi- 
culty in inspiring others with confidence in his abilities and soon began contract- 
ing in the lumber districts of Michigan. This business successfully engaged his 
entire time and attention for ten years, and in 1899 he came to Coeur d'Alene, 
where he orgranized the Coeur d'Alene Lumber Company. He continued to operate 
this until September, 1901, when he sold his interests in the lumber business and 
organized the Exchange National Bank, of which he has ever since been president. 
The qualities that distinguished him as a business man characterize him as a finan- 
cier, in which capacity he has proven to be equally efficient and successful. From 
time to time he has extended his banking interests, and is now president of the 
Kootenai State Bank of St. Maries, Idaho, and of the Commercial State Bank of 
St. Joe, Idaho; both of them well established and fiourishing institutions. Pos- 
sessing keen foresight and clear judgment, Mr. Dollar early realized that real 
estate in this section of the country was going to advance greatly in price and 
made very judicious investments and today is the owner of several pieces of valu- 
able property, and is the president of the Coeur d'Alene Investment Company, the 
owners of the Idaho Hotel of this city. In addition to his other official duties, Mr. 
Dollar is also treasurer of The Stack Gibbs Lumber Company of Idaho, which 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 79 

is practically his only remaining connection with the lumber interests. He is one 
of the citizens of Coeur d'Alene, who should be given the entire credit for his 
soecess; as he has never been accorded any assistance in his various undertakings 
other than is given to every business man of recognized capabilities^ not having 
had the benefit of influential family or financial connections at the beginning of 
his career. His initiative, powers of organization and executive ability enable him 
to carry to a successful issue anything he may undertake, and to this fact can be 
attributed much of his success. He not only readily recognizes opportunities but 
possesses the faculty of creating them by dominating conditions, rather than per- 
mitting them to control his endeavors. 

Mr. Dollar has a very pleasant residence at 816 Sherman avenue, this city, 
which is most graciously presided over by his wife, who prior to their marriage 
on the 17th of January, 1906, was Miss Christina A. Play far. One child has been 
bom to Mr. and Mrs. Dollar, William A., whose birth occurred on the 28d of 
December, 1906. 

Fraternally Mr. Dollar is connected with the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, belonging to Spokane Lodge, No. 228, Spokane; and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows of Coeur d'Alene. He is also a worthy exemplar of the 
Masons, having taken thirty-two degrees in the Scottish' Rite. He holds mem- 
bership in Kootenai Lodge, No. 84, F. & A. M. ; Idaho Consistory, No. 8, S. P. R. 
S. ; and he is also a knight templar and a shriner, belonging to £1 Katif Temple, 
Spokane. Mr. Dollar is one of the public-spirited and enterprising citizens of the 
town, in the development of which he takes an active interest and is an enthusiastic 
member of the Coeur d'Alene Commercial Club, being treasurer of this organiza- 
tion. It is to men of his type that the west is indebted for its wonderful develop- 
ment and marked advance in the various lines of human activity; their initiative, 
optimism and tireless energy having enabled them to promote the interests of the 
country both commercially and industrially in an almost phenomenal manner. 



PETER J. GERLACH, M. D. 

Dr. Peter J. Gerlach bore the reputation of being one of Spokane's most promi- 
nent physicians, his broad knowledge of scientific principles that underlie the prac- 
tice of medicine, bringing him substantial success. He was bom in Kingston, New 
York, July 9, 1858, and his life record covered the intervening years to the 28th 
of July, 1898. He was the third of the four children of Philip and Lucinda Gerlach, 
both of whom died when their son Peter was quite small, the father, who was a 
steamboat captain, having been drowned while in command of his vessel. 

Dr. Gerlach pursued his early education at Schenectady, New York and after- 
ward attended Rutgers College at New Brunswick, New Jersey. He engaged in 
teaching school and in teaching writing in order to earn a sum of money sufficient 
to enable him to attend college and study medicine. He began preparation for his 
profession in Oberlin College and afterward attended a medical college in Cin- 
ciimati, Ohio, from which he was graduated with the class of 1886. He then en- 
tered upon the practice of medicine in that city, and the following year came to 
the west settling in Spokane, here to continue to practice his profession with ex- 



80 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

cellent success^ becoming recognized as one of the city's most capable and promi- 
nent physicians. He always kept in touch with advanced methods, was careful in 
the diagnosis of his cases^ and as the years passed, won a very satisfactory prac- 
tice. During the great fire in 1889 he suffered heavy losses, but with his firm 
purpose and unfaltering determination, he soon recuperated. However, once again 
he met severe losses through fire. He added to his success, through careful in- 
vestment in city real estate, and thus not only manifested his faith in the future 
of Spokane, but he also profited by his sound judgment in regard to property in- 
vestment; he likewise became an owner of two fine ranches. 

On the 17th of April, 1882, Dr. Gerlach was married to Mrs. Lena Xietert, 
daughter of Jacob and Lena (Dearing) AUgeyer, who came from Germany to 
America locating in Chillicothe, Ohio, where the father became prominent in the 
shoe business. By a former marriage, Mrs. Gerlach had two children: Lorraine 
Nietert, now living in Oakland, California; and Harry F. Nietert of Spokane. 

In his political views Dr. Gerlach was a republican, and was very active, not 
only in the work of the party, but also in the support of many movements for the 
general good. He was a lover of art and possessed considerable artistic ability 
and talent, teaching art at one time in Aberlin College. He was interested in all 
the movements which tend to uplift and benefit humanity. He held membership 
in the Methodist church, and was identified with several fraternal organizations. 
He became affiliated with the Knights of Pythias in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1886, and 
was afterward a member of Fall City Lodge No. 40, of Spokane, in which he 
served as chancellor and was one of its trustees. He was also a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows^ while professionally^ he was connected with 
the Coimty and State Medical Societies. His life was ever upright and honorable, 
winning for him the respect and confidence of all who knew him. He deserves 
much credit for what he accomplished in a business way, for he started out in life 
empty-handed, and at all times gained the respect and confidence of his fellowmen. 



VALENTINE W. BRASCH. 

In the electrical field of business Valentine W. Brasch has made his mark and 
in the attainment of individual success has also contributed to public prosperity. 
His present connection is that of secretary and treasurer of the Spokane Pressed 
Brick Company, which was organized in 1910. He was born in Toledo, Ohio, 
December 9, 1875, the son of Valentine and May Margaret Brasch, both of whom 
were natives of Germany. The mother is now deceased but the father is living 
retired in Spokane. At the time of the Civil war he espoused the cause of his adopted 
country and as a soldier of an Ohio regiment went to the front. Unto him and 
his wife were born the following sons and daughters: Valentine W., Joseph, a 
builder of Spokane; William, living in Vancouver, British Columbia; Henry, of 
Nevada; Mrs. George Hedger, Mrs. Lillian Cuthbert and Mrs. Paul Heiser, all 
of Spokane; and Mrs. Blanche Flinn, of Fresno, California. 

During the boyhood of Valentine W. Brasch his parents removed from Ohio 
to North Dakota and thence to Spokane, and in the various places of their resi- 
dence the son pursued his education in the public schools. He came to this city 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 81 

with his family in 1889 and, entering business life, was employed for a short time 
in the jewelry store of E. J. Hyde. He was afterward with W. H. Stowell and 
C. M. Fassett in the assaying and drug business until the firm dissolved, and later 
was connected with Mr. Stowell until 1906. He then turned his attention to min- 
ing and for the past two years has also been the secretary and treasurer of the 
Spokane Pressed Brick Company. He is likewise the secretary and manager of 
the Togo Mining & Smelting Company, of which he was one of the organizers. 
They own property in the Cedar canyon district of, Stevens county, having three 
hundred and twenty acres of mineral lands now under development. They have 
three thousand feet of tunnel shaft and open cut but the lack of transportation 
facilities is suspending active preparations in connection with the property. The 
values are in gold, silver and copper, assays showing from one to one hundred and 
fifty dollars in the upper levels, while the lower levels show good values. The main 
tunnel is now in ten hundred and fifty-six feet and cuts quite a number of veins 
and ledges, the values running from one to twenty- five dollars. In 1910 all their 
buildings were destroyed by fire and they are now retimbering and in the present 
year, 1912, will replace the buildings. This will be easy of access from the pro- 
posed new extension of the Great Northern Railroad from Marcus up the Colum- 
Ina river. They had a few shipments made to the Granby smelter and the car- 
load lots averaged ten per cent copper. The officers of the company are M. Isbister, 
president; William H. Stowell, treasurer; John T. Davie, of the Davie Brick 
Company, vice president; and V. W. Brasch, secretary and manager. 

In addition to his mining interests Mr. Brasch was also one of the organizers 
of the Spokane Pressed Brick Company in 1910. It is capitalized for two hun- 
dred thousand dollars and the plant was erected three and one-half miles north 
of Hillyard, on the main line of the Great Northern. They constructed a spur a 
mile from the Great Northern to the plant site, which is located on a very large 
bed of brick-making material, electricity furnishing the motive power for the opera- 
tion of the plant. This was installed in such a manner as to operate in one part 
of the plant entirely independent of the other parts^ the Washington Water Power 
Company extending a high tension line to the plant for its operation. Work has 
been going on since February, 1911, the market being in Spokane and the sur- 
rounding country. They manufacture both common and pressed brick and it is 
the intention of the company to double its capacity in 1912 so that they will be 
able to turn out sixty thousand bricks per day. They make a granite or sand lime 
brick and this feature is a fact of great importance in the uniformity, size and 
coloring of the output. The brick is flat with true edges which are neither warped 
or bent. Their product has been used in the new Telephone building ; in the Great 
Northern shops at Hillyard; in the Mead High School; the Hillyard Young Men's 
Christian Association building; the Brant building on North Monroe street, Spo- 
kane; the Shaefer building on Brown street; the Close In apartment on Fourth 
and Cedar streets; and many others. Of the company J. F. Elliott is president 
and general manager, with George C. Gates as vice president and Valentine W. 
Brasch as secretary and treasurer. In addition to his business interests already 
mentioned Mr. Brasch is connected with the Alaska United Copper Exploration 
Company, in the Copper river district^ and is interested in Washington properties 
and in the Coeur d'Alenes. 



82 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

On the 80th of September, 1893, in Spokane, was celebrated the marriage of 
Valentine W. Brasch to Miss Mamie Santarre, a daughter of Frank Santarre, of 
Cloquet, Minnesota. The family attend the Catholic church, and Mr. Brasch 
gives his political allegiance to the democratic party. Socially he is connected with 
the Spokane Athletic Club. He started out in the world as a clerk and has grad- 
ually worked his way upward, building the ladder on which he has climbed through 
his industry, his determination and his capability. History in Spokane and in 
the Inland Empire is yet in the making and Mr. Brasch is numbered among those 
who are writing their names upon its pages. 



EUGENE ENLOE. 



Among the men upon whom Medical Lake depends for its business prosperity 
and financial development, none stand more prominent than Eugene Enloe. He was 
bom in Bond county, Illinois, on the 24th of April, 1851, his parents being Thomas 
B. and Sarah (Cline) Enloe, the death of the former having occurred in 1859, the 
latter still making her home in Illinois. 

During his boyhood and youth Eugene Enloe attended the public and high 
schools of Illinois until he was twenty years of age. At that time he started farm- 
ing and continued in that pursuit for two years, after which he began his active busi- 
ness career by entering the merchandise business at Woburn, Illinois. After con- 
ducting this enterprise for six years, and subsequently a similar business in Green- 
ville, Illinois, for three years, he taught school for a period of six months, at the 
end of which time he took charge of a coal mine at Smithboro, Illinois. But the 
west was fast opening up and gave promise of careers surpassing anything the east 
or the Mississippi valley could offer, and Mr. Enloe being particularly energetic 
and enterprising, gave up his mining position in Smithboro and came to Medical 
Lake. After remaining in that town for a short period he went on to Wenatchee, 

t 

Washington, where he engaged in the hotel business for one year before return- 
ing to Medical Lake and opening up a general merchandise store. At this time he 
had practically nothing but a few dollars and a team of horses. His holdings in 
fact were so small he was forced to mortgage his house for his first stock of goods, 
but his keen discrimination, his sound judgment and his excellent management 
were prominent even at this early day and he soon had built up a business which 
brought him not only a large degree of success but was also highly profitable. It 
was not many years before this forceful, energetic and ambitious man had increased 
his business to such an extent that his total annual sales amounted to one hundred 
thousand dollars. He did not stop at one undertaking, however, but devoted the 
hours which are usually termed leisure to look up further investments which might 
prove profitable. It seemed to him that real estate was one of the investments 
which would pay best, and he in consequence purchased property to such an extent 
that he now owns practically half of Medical Lake. In 1907 he sold his business 
Interests at Medical Lake and organized the Big Bend Light & Power Company 
with a capital stock of three hundred thousand dollars, he being the owner of one 
third of the stock. This company has stations throughout the Big Bend country. 
In June 1910 he formed another corporation known as the Grangreville Electric 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 83 

Light & Power Company^ which extends its operations throughout the central sec- 
tion of Idaho. So rapidly are both these companies expanding that at the present 
time all Mr. Enloe's time is taken up in their behalf, he being an officer in each. I 

He was also the orgranizer and the first president of the First National Bank of 
Medical Lake^ but after he had launched this institution upon a sound basis he sold 
his interests, feeling that the other companies in which he was a stockholder re- 
quired his whole attention. The safe conservative policy which he has inaugurated 
in all enterprises with which he has connected himself, commands itself to the 
judgment of all, and has been in a large degree the reason for the great growth 
of these organizations. 

At Woodbum, Illinois, on March 30, 1872, Mr. Enloe was united in marriage 
to Miss Clara M. Moss, the daughter of Lemuel S. and Sarah Moss. They are 
the parents of seven children, namely : Ethel, deceased, who was married to O. Per- 
kins; Maud, who wedded E. Bowman; Lulu B., who is married to J. Drew; Edith, 
who is the wife of H. Ellis ; Myrtle, who is the wife of Dr. J. A. Allen ; Raymond, 
who is attending school at Spokane ; and Keith, who is attending school at Medical 
Lake. 

In politics Mr. Enloe gives his support to the republican party, believing its 
policies are most conducive to good government. He has been very active in this 
party and has served as mayor and councilman several times. He has been at- 
tentive to all the details of his business, and has been mindful of all indications 
pointing to prosperity and advancement, and from the beginning has always had 
faith in the ultimate success of his undertakings. He has gained wealth and promi- 
nence for himself, and yet that has not been the only goal for which he has been 
striving, for he belongs to a class of representative American citizens who promote 
the general prosperity while advancing individual interests. His public spirited- 
ness is attested by the cooperation he gives to every movement tending to promote 
the social and material welfare of his community. 



PETER ERICKSON. 



Peter Erickson, president of the J. T. Davie Brick Company, which in its con- 
tinuous development and expansion has come into control of one of the most impor- 
tant productive industries of Spokane, the plant, however, being now located at 
Meade, was born at Galva, Henry county, Illinois, a son of Eric and Christina 
(Jaderburg) Erickson, both of whom were natives of Sweden, where they were 
reared and married. On coming to this country in 1854 they settled at Galva. The 
family numbered four daughters and two sons, who are now living in various parts 
of the country. In 1 865 the parents removed to Madrid, Boone county, Iowa, where 
the father followed farming, but both are now deceased. 

Peter Erickson spent his youthful days in his native county and enjoyed such 
educational opportunities as the public schools afforded him. Much of the year was 
devoted to the labors of the fields for he assisted his father in the farm work until 
the spring of 1888, having in the meantime accompanied the family to Boone county, 
Iowa. He was twenty-five years of age when he left the parental roof arid came 
west to Spokane, arriving in April of that year. Here he entered the employ of 



84 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

J. T. Davie, a brick manufacturer, with whom he has since been connected. That 
he was capable and faithful was indicated in the fact that promotions followed 
until 1889, when he became a partner in the business, and when the company was 
incorporated in 1904 he was elected to the presidency. He is furthermore asso- 
ciated with industrial interests as one of the directors of the Bergman Clay Manu- 
facturing Company, manufacturers of sewer pipes and brick. 

On the 8th of November, 1885, Mr. Erickson was united in marriage to Miss 
Martha A. Dobkins, a daughter of George W. Dobkins, of this city, and unto them 
have been born four sons, John Walter, Charles Franklin, Harry and Morris, the 
eldest now fifteen years of age. The family reside at E. 917 Augusta avenue. Mr. 
Erickson belongs to Spokane Lodg^, No. 34, F. & A. M., and both he and his wife 
are connected with the Eastern Star, living lives in harmony with the teachings of 
Masonry concerning the brotherhood of mankind. Mr. Erickson deserves much 
credit for what he has accomplished in life for he started out empty-handed and 
has made his labor and his perseverance count for much as factors in industrial 
circles. He has well earned his success which now places him with the representa- 
tive business men of the city. 



AMASA B. CAMPBELL. 



Amasa B. Campbell, who passed away on the 16th of February, 1912, was one 
of the foremost mining operators in all of the northwest, being associated with John 
A. Finch under the firm name of Finch & Campbell. He was one of the owners 
in some of the most valuable mining properties of the Inland Empire and various 
other business interests felt the stimulus of his cooperation. 

His birth occurred in Salem, Ohio, April 6, 1845, and he was a son of John 
A. and Rebecca Perry (Snodgrass) Campbell. The family numbered ten chil- 
dren, of whom Amasa B. Campbell was the youngest, his father dying before the 
birth of this son. At the usual age he entered the public schools of Salem and 
began work in a grain and wool commission business at the age of fifteen years. 
It will thus be seen that no special advantages or influence aided him at the outset 
of his career. Indeed he was forced to prove his own worth and he placed his 
dependence upon the substantial qualities of industry, determination and integrity., 
recognizing the fact that there is no royal road to wealth. 

At the age of twenty-two, in the year 1867, Mr. Campbell went to Omaha, 
Nebraska, where he accepted a position with the Union Pacific Railroad, with which 
he continued until the completion of the line. In 1871 he obtained his first mining 
experience in Utah and thus laid the foundation for his subsequent prosperity. 
He continued in that state until 1887, when he came to Spokane and entered into 
partnership with John A. Finch. This relation was maintained until the death of 
Mr. Campbell and the operations of the firm in the development of mining property 
placed them in a position in advance of all others. They were first owners of 
the Gem mine in the Coeur d'Alene district and later, associated with friends of 
Milwaukee and Youngstown, Ohio, they organized the Milwaukee Mining Com- 
pany, of which Mr. Campbell was president and Mr. Finch secretary and treas- 
urer. For over twelve years they successfully operated that mine and in 1891 



AMAKA B. CAMPlilCLL 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 87 

began the equipment and development of the Standard mine and subsequently of 
the Hecla mine^ both of which are still paying large dividends. Mr. CampbeU 
was also president of these, with his partner as secretary and treasurer. They 
began operations in British Columbia in 1898, when they entered the Slocan dis- 
trict, opening and developing the Enterprise and Standard mines, which are still 
paying properties. There was hardly a successful mining enterprise in the whole 
district in which they were not interested financially and otherwise, and no firm 
did more to develop the mining industry in the Inland Empire. The firm name 
of Finch & Campbell became synonymous with the important mining activities of the 
northwest. Mr. Campbell was also a director of the Traders National Bank, a 
heavy stockholder in the Spokane & Eastern Trust Company and of the Washing- 
ton Water Power Company, serving as director of the latter for a number of 
years but at length resigning on account of failing health. He gave the land on 
which the Carnegie library of Spokane was erected, it now being worth one hun- 
dred thousand dollars. 

On the 26th of March, 1890, at Youngstown, Ohio, Mr. Campbell was united 
in marriage to Miss Grace M. Fox, a daughter of George R. and Mary R. (Camp- 
bell) Fox, of Canton, Ohio. To them was bom one daughter, Helen. The family 
residence, one of the beautiful homes of Spokane, is situated at No. 2S16 First 
avenue and was erected in 1898. 

Mr. Campbell belonged to the Masonic fraternity and his life record was in 
harmony with the teachings of the craft. Mr. Campbell was one of Spokane's 
millionaires and yet there were lew* m^n 'who so entirely lacked the pride of 
purse. He judged his fellowmen not by wealth biit by individual worth, and true 
worth on the part of anyone could win his friendship and regard. 



JAMES W. ROUSE. 



James W. Rouse, engaged in the real-estate business in Spokane, specializing 
in dty property, has placed upon the market several additions, which are now 
hting developed into attractive residence districts of the city. Since starting out 
in life on his own account, he has advanced steadily step by step and each position 
to which he has attained has brought him a broader outlook and wider opportuni- 
ties. He came to the northwest in connection with railway service. He is a son 
of New England, his birth having occurred in Rockland, Maine, January 24, 
1859. His ancestry in both the paternal and maternal lines is traced back to Scot- 
land. His great-grandfather was Captain Rouse, who served in the Revolutionary 
war and was captured by the British, but managed to make his escape at a place 
which has since been called in his honor. Rouse Point. Dr. James William Rouse, 
the father of him whose name introduces this review, was bom in Virginia and 
became a successful practicing physician. He was also prominent in his home 
locality in other ways, especially as a political leader of the democratic party. At 
the time of the Mexican war he enlisted for active service with the American 
army, went to the front as a surgeon with the troops under General Shields and 
when that commander was injured, dressed his wounds. His first and last days 
were spent in the south, for he died in Arkansas in 1903, but for many years in 



88 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

the interim he was a resident of Rockland^ Maine. In early manhood he wedded 
Mary Elizabeth Titus, who was bom in Nova Scotia, and died in 1900. Seven of 
her brothers were Union soldiers in the Civil war, and afterward became sea cap- 
tains and later prominent shipbuilders. Her father also occupied a leading posi- 
tion in connection with that business at Rockland, Maine. Those oi the family 
who are still living are yet residents of Rockland. 

James W. Rouse had a brother, Frank Rouse, who died at Pontaine Point 
of yellow fever, while serving as a member of Company K of the Seventy-first 
New York Volunteers, which command charged at San Juan Hill, in the Spanish- 
American war. Another brother, George Rouse, was drowned at sea with all the 
ship's crew. He left Australia and since the time when his ship sailed from port, 
has never been heard from. In the family were the following daughters: Mrs. 
Mabel Freeman, who is now living at Colorado Springs, Colorado; Lizzie, the 
wife of Frank Miller, of New Orleans, president of the Audubon Society ; Jennie, 
the wife of Albert Winslow, an alderman of Rockland, Maine; Avis, the wife of 
Senator J. Henry Cochran, a millionaire of Williamsport, Pennsylvania; and Mrs. 
Minerva Hayward, whose husband is a farmer at Holden, Maine. 

James W. Rouse pursued his education in the academy at Lee, Maine, and 
first engaged in railroad work in connection with the locomotive department of the 
New Bnmswick & Canada Railroad. He was afterward with the Atchison, Topeka 
& Sante Fe Railroad and later became a conductor on the Burlington line of the 
Chicago, Burlington Sc Quincy Railroad. He next filled a similar position on the 
Northern Pacific and also on the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific. In railway 
circles he gradually worked his way upward and at length was given charge of 
the maintenance work of the Canadian Pacific Railroad at Nelson, British Colum- 
bia, and in 1901 of the Oregon Railway Sc Navigation Company, which is now 
the Oregon & Washington line. He resigned from the latter in February, 1910, 
to engage in the real-estate business, to which he has since given his attention under 
the name of the J. W. Rouse Company. He conducts a general real-estate busi- 
ness, yet specializes in city property. He put upon the market the Lincoln View 
addition of fifteen acres at Twenty-ninth avenue and Southeast boulevard, which 
was divided into seventy-two lots; also the Rouse addition at Thirteenth and 
Southeast boulevard, dividing an acre into ^ve lots. He has also bought and sold 
quite extensively in Roosevelt addition and built his home two blocks from the 
Boulevard car line, on Eighteenth avenue. He also has extensive property hold- 
ings in the southeast part of the city and in his real-estate operations principally 
handles his own properties. There are few who become residents of the northwest 
who do not at some time become interested in mining, and Mr. Rouse has been no 
exception to the rule. In 1879 he went into Washington Gulch for the Elk City 
Gold Mining Company and was in charge of the hoisting worics. During all the 
twenty-eight years of his railway service there was never an injury occurred to a 
passenger or to a train with which he was connected, and he was never in the court 
room except to report on cases in which others were concerned. He has belonged 
to the Order of Railway Conductors for a quarter of a century and is still an active 
and valued member. In politics he is a liberal democrat and was a member of the 
first grievance committee that ever waited on the president of a railroad . in the 
United States, being named one of six to visit the president of the Union Pacific 
and attempt to secure the adjustment of certain matters. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 89 

In Febmary, 1888, in Pueblo, Colorado, Mr. Rouse was united in marriage to 
Miss Emma M. Haile, a daughter of Amos Haile, a native of Gouverneur, New 
York, and a distant relative of Senator Hale, of Maine. The former is of Scotch 
descent By ox team the family removed to Nebraska, when the Civil war was in 
progress, his daughter Emma at that time being an infant. He staked out a claim 
of thiee hundred and twenty acres, where Lincoln, Nebraska, now stands, and 
became identified with the pioneer development of that locality. He died of sun- 
stroke when the present Mrs. Rouse was seven years of age. 

George Haile Rouse, son of Mr. and Mrs. James W. Rouse, is associated with 
his father in the real-estate business and is proving himself a most enterprising 
and pr(^essive young man. He was graduated from the Spokane high school with 
the dass of January, 1908, and afterward entered the University of Washington, 
from which he was graduated with the highest honors. While in the high school he 
won every point in athletics for three successive years and for two years was man- 
ager of the football team and during 1907, while manager, held the championship 
of the northwest. He was also captain of his high school track team and held the 
record for the fifty-yard dash made in five and two-fifths seconds. He made that 
time at the Spokane fair grounds in 1906, and also at Walla Walla in May, 1906. 
While in the university he was also a member of the track team and was very pop- 
alar in athletic circles and also among the whole student body of the school. On 
the 8th of July, 1911, he married Dorothy J. Roche. They reside on Sixteenth 
street and Southeast boulevard, where George H. Rouse has erected an attractive 
home. The only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James W. Rouse is Avis Ann, the wife 
of W. N, Poole, manager of the Yale Columbia Lumber Comp>any, of Nelson, 
British Columbia, and a prominent lumberman throughout the northwest. 

Mr. Rouse is a member of Tyrian Lodge, No. 96, F. & A. M., also of the Owls 
and of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon, a college fraternity. The firm of Rouse & Son 
is today a prominent one in real-estate circles, by reason of the extent and im- 
portance of its members' operations, their comprehensive knowledge concerning 
realty values and their straightforward dealing in all business transactions. 



HARRY C. HAYES. 



The Inland Empire has developed most rapidly during the past two decades 
and great tracts of land hitherto uncultivated and undeveloped have been placed 
upon tile market and have been converted into farms, or used as town sites. Set- 
tiers from all parts of the country have flocked to this region and the real-estate 
man has had splendid opportunity to win success in his operations and also to 
further public progress in guiding the settlement and development of the district. 
It is in this connection that Harry C. Hayes has become known, having sold large 
tracts of land in the Inland Empire. 

He was bom in Peshtigo, Wisconsin, June 28, 1875. His father, H. L. Hayes, 
claims descent from English ancestry and from those who participated in the 
straggle for independence in the Revolutionary war. Two of his brothers were 
soldiers of the Civil war. H. L. Hayes was born in Ontario, Canada, but in early 
life became a resident of Peshtigo, Wisconsin, and lost both his parents there. 



90 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

He passed through the great fire which burned over that section of the country 
and he also contributed to the pioneer development of the state. He and his wife 
are now living in Spokane and are well known in the city. The latter bore the 
maiden name of Delia Sage and was born in New York. The sons of the family 
are: Raymond^ an engineer on the Northern Pacific; George R.^ of Spokane; and 
Harry C; while the daughters are: Mrs. W. T. Murphy and Miss Marjorie Hayes, 
both residing in Spokane. 

The family removed from Wisconsin to South Dakota and there Harry C. Hayes 
pursued his education in the high school and university at Vermilion^ that state, 
being graduated in 1893. His first business experience was as editor and part 
proprietor of the Record^ a weekly paper at Hector^ Minnesota. He spent two 
years there and then went to Minneapolis^ where he worked on the Tribune and 
Journal for three years. In 1900 he came to Spokane and for four years was 
engaged in the limber business, after which he returned to the journalistic field, 
being connected with the Review until 1909. He then organized the Progressive 
Realty Company, Incorporated, of which he became the president, and has since 
operated in real estate. While he handles all kinds of property, he has largely 
dealt in farm lands and has sold a large amount of land throughout the Spokane 
country. He has thoroughly acquainted himself with property values, knows the 
possibilities for development, understands what the future has in store and is 
enabled to g^ve his clients what they desire. 

Mr. Hayes at the time of the Spanish- American war enlisted in the Thirteenth 
Minnesota Volunteers but on account of illness was mustered out. He is pleasantly 
situated in his home life, which had its inception in his marriage, in June, 1899, to 
Miss Freda Schoenbeck, a daughter of Fred Schoenbeck, who was an active partici- 
pant in the work of putting down the Indians at Mankato, Minnesota, when that 
district was upon the frontier. Five children have come to bless this home: Harold, 
Rupert and Lloyd, all in school; and an interesting pair of twins, Arden and 
Ardath. 



JOHN T. DAVIE. 



If information is desired concerning the early history of Spokane, John T. 
Davie is one who may well be consulted concerning events which have left their 
impress upon the annals of the city, for he arrived here in 1879 when its popula- 
tion numbered about two hundred. He had faith in its future and time has demon- 
strated the wisdom of his belief. He arrived in Spokane empty-handed and 
throughout all the intervening years he has been connected with brick manufactur- 
ing here, being now secretary and treasurer of the J. T. Davie Brick Company, 
one of the important productive enterprises of the city. 

He was born January 25, 1851, in the Orkney islands, of Scotland, and his 
parents were Malcolm and Catherine (Robertson) Davie. The father was for a 
period of seven years in the service of the Hudson Bay Company and traveled 
throughout the northwest and British Columbia about 1885. It was this that 
brought to John T. Davie his first knowledge of the west as gleaned from stories 
related by his father. His education was acquired in Scotland and for a time 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 91 

he engaged in clerking in a dry-goods store, but he felt that the outlook there was 
limited and on attaining his majority he came to the United States, landing at 
Boston, Massachusetts, whence he made his way to Martha's Vineyard, where he 
learned the brick-manufacturing trade. For two years he there remained and in 
June, 1874, came to the Pacific coast, settling first at Nappa, California, where he 
continued in the same business and also engaged in the manufacture of paving 
blocks conmionly known as Belgium blocks. While residing in California he heard 
mnch concerning the Spokane country as early visitors to this district recognized 
its possibilities and its natural resources and spread abroad the story concerning 
its advantages. This led Mr, Davie to determine to try his fortune in the Inland 
Empire and in 1879 he started by steamer to Portland and thence made his way 
up the Columbia river. He arrived in Walla Walla, Washington, in the fall of 
that year and not having sufficient money with him to p^y his transportation by 
stage he walked the remainder of the way to Spokane, where he arrived on the 
15th of November, 1879. The town was small but he recognized the fact that 
it had an excellent situation and that its growth would probably be rapid. Ac- 
cordingly he perfected arrangements to engage in business here and the following 
spring established a brick manufactory which he has since conducted. His busi- 
ness has grown year by year and the office of the company is still maintained in 
Spokane although in 1902 the plant was removed to Meade, Washington, where 
he has a splendidly equipped establishment, utilizing the most modem process and 
the latest improved machinery. His shipments are now extensive and almost from 
the first the business has been upon a paying and profitable basis. 

After his arrival in Spokane Mr. Davie was instrumental in having a brother 
and sister come to this city. The former, William Davie, died here in 1901, 
and the sister, Jane, is now the wife of R. C. Aim, of Spokane. He also educated, 
supported and brought to this country his two nieces, who are now Mrs. J. W. 
Tabor, of Wallace, Idaho, and Mrs. R. M. Cole, who lives on Peone prairie. 

Mr. Davie attends the Unitarian church and fraternally is connected with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and with the Elks Lodge, No. 228. In poli- 
tics he has always been a republican and served as councilman during Mayor Drum- 
heller's administration. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and co- 
operates heartily in all of its carefully organized movements for the benefit of 
Spokane and its various measures to bring to the notice of the world the advantages 
of this city and of the surrounding district. 



DAVID LA BAU, M. D. 



Specializing largely in surgery, in which connection he does much work at 
Sacred Heart Hospital, Dr. David La Bau has achieved marked success. He was 
bom in Stoutsberg, New Jersey, March 4, 1858. Of that city his parents, David 
and Elizabeth (Wert) La Bau, were also natives. The father traced his ancestry 
badt to the French Huguenots. The family was founded* in America in 1 620, and 
when the colonies attempted to win independence from the mother country, mem- 
bers of the family aided in the Revolutionary war. David La Bau devoted his 
Hfe to farming and was thus engaged to the time of his death in 1907. He had 



92 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

long survived his wife^ who passed away in 1863^ and who was of English lineage^ 
although representing a family that was planted on American soil in colonial 
days. Dr. La Bau has two brothers: Wesley L.^ who makes his home in Boston, 
although he is temporarily at Lewiston, Idaho; and John W., who is a resident of 
Sumpter, Oregon. 

Liberal educational advantages were given Dr. La Bau^ who attended Columbia 
University, where he won his professional degree in 1880. His connection with 
the medical profession in Washington dates from 1883. He visited Spokane tliat 
year but registered in Franklin county. After practicing for some time in Colville, 
he removed to Nelson, British Columbia, where he continued for nineteen years, 
establishing his home there in 1887. He again came to Spokane in 1908 and in 
the four years which have since come and gone has built up a large practice. He 
has always kept thoroughly informed concerning the advanced work of the profes- 
sion, reading broadly and following the work of eminent physicians and surgeons 
in their investigations and research. He has shown particular skill in the field of 
surgery and has practiced largely in that field at Sacred Heart Hospital. 

On the 26th of November, 1896, in Portland, Oregon, Dr. La Bau was united 
in marriage to Miss Maude Scott, a cousin of the late Harvey Scott, proprietor 
and editor of the Oregonian. They now have one child, Donna Elizabeth La Bau, 
who is in school. Dr. La Bau is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and of 
the Inland Club. In politics he is a republican but without ambition for office. 
Fraternally he is a Mason, belonging to a Masonic lodge in British Columbia, to 
the Knights Templar commandery at Rossland, British Columbia, and to the con- 
sistory and Mystic Shrine at Spokane. He has had ample opportunity in bis 
practice to exemplify the beneficent spirit of the craft and countless cases could 
be dted where he has aided his brethren of the order. He places his professional 
duties before all else and discharges them with a sense of conscientious obligation, 
and yet finds time for those social interests and activities which contribute so much 
to the joy and pleasure of life and constitute an even balance for business. 



ROBERT J. KIRK-PATRICK. 

With the rapid development of the northwest when each year brings many citi- 
zens to this section of the country, the real-estate business is a most important one, 
its representatives enabling newcomers and those already residents here to secure 
such property and make such investments as they desire. It is in this business 
that Robert J. Kirk-Patrick is now putting forth his energies most effectively, 
largely specializing in business property and high class residences. He was bom 
in Lebanon, Tennessee, January 29, 1 869, and has every reason to be proud of his 
ancestry, coming from one of the well known old southern families. Back of this, 
too, there is an ancestry honorable and distinguished, the family living many cen- 
turies ago in Scotland. The motto on the family crest was derived from a reply 
which one Kirk-Patrick made to Robert Bruce. On a certain occasion he rushed 
up to Bruce and asked: **What's the matter?" Bruce responded: "I killed a 
Jesuit," whereupon Kirk-Patrick said: "I make sure." The crest shows a lifted 
hand and dagger and underneath the motto, "I make sure." Three brothers of 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 93 

the name^ leaving their home in Scotland^ came to the new world, one settling in 
Virginia, another in Pennsylvania and a third in Ohio. Lapley J. Kirk-Patrick, 
the father of Robert J. Kirk-Patrick, was descended from the Virginia branch 
of the family. He was born in Tennessee and served as a soldier in the Con- 
federate army under General Howard, and one of his brothers was also a soldier 
in the Civil war. He married Nannie Davis, who was bom in Lebanon, Tennessee, 
a daughter of Mrs. Elizabeth Davis, who was one of the very early settlers of 
that place and also very prominent there. She was bom in North Carolina, Sep- 
tember 16, 1799, and died February 23, 1899, when almost one hundred years 
of age, having outlived all of her children. The Davis family in America, too, 
antedated the Revolutionary war and was of English descent. The death of 
Lapley J. Kirk-Patrick occurred in January, 1881, and four years later, in 1885, 
his wife passed away. In the family were ^ve sons and one daughter. One of 
the sons, Forrest Kirk-Patrick, is now engaged in merchandising in Nashville, 
Tennessee. 

Robert J. Kirk-Patrick, another son, pursued his education in the Cumberland 
University at Lebanon, Tennessee, but long prior to completing his course he had 
entered business circles, being employed in his uncle's mercantile house of that 
city at the time when he was so small that a board was placed so that he could 
walk upon it and thus bring him sufficiently high above the counter to transact busi- 
ness. In 1882 he left Lebanon, going to Nashville where he entered the whole- 
sale business, being but sixteen years of age when he was sent upon the road as a 
traveling salesman. For five years he was thus employed but at Chattanooga, 
Tcmiessee, he left the road, declaring that never again would he work for any man, 
and he never has. Since that time he has continued in business independently. He 
entered the real-estate field in Chattanooga and afterward became general agent 
for the New York Life Insurance Company which he represented for two and a 
half years, or until 1889. On the 15th of June of that year he arrived in Wash- 
ington, D. C, where he conducted a general real-estate and insurance business, 
meeting with excellent success in his undertakings there. One of his last deals 
netted him twenty-two thousand ^ye hundred dollars as the result of three days' 
woik. 

In 1905 Mr. Kirk-Patrick visited the Lewis and Clark Exposition at Port- 
land and the same year came to Spokane, where he established his home and turned 
his attention to the development of mining interests in the northwest. He be- 
came connected with the International Copper Company of Washington, the 
Graham-Ross Mining Company of Idaho and the Olinghouse Company of Nevada. 
In cfmnection with others and as a member of the Graham- Ross Company he worked 
the famous Anaconda Mine. He also erected a one hundred stamp mill on the 
Olinghouse and put up a mill on the Idaho property but has since disposed of 
his interests in Idaho, although he is still connected with the Olinghouse, a free 
milling properly thirty-five miles from Reno. On withdrawing from active con- 
nection with mining operations he engaged in the real-estate and loan business and 
has specialized in business opportunities and high class residences. He has made 
it a pdnt to further acquaint himself with properties upon the market and is re- 
garded as an expert valuator of real estate, thoroughly acquainted with all market- 
ahle holdings. In the year 1910 he sold property to the amount of more than a 
half million dollars, including the Green building, the purchase price of which 



94 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

was two hundred and twenty thousand dollars. He is also interested in the Pal- 
mer Union Oil Company of Los Angeles^ California^ comprising eighteen hundred 
and thirty acres of proven oil lands^ lying north of the Palmer gushers. The 
company has five wells, one of them producing Bye thousand barrels daily. 

When in Washington, D. C, Mr. Kirk-Patrid^ became a member of New Jeru- 
salem Lodge, No. 9, F. & A. M. He has never been actively interested in politics 
and maintains an independent position, voting for the candidate whom he regards 
as best qualified for office. He holds membership in the Presbyterian church and 
his aid can ever be counted upon in cooperation with projects for the public good 
along material, intellectual, civil and moral lines. He finds his chief source of 
recreation in riding. He has ever been a lover of horses and has continuously acted 
as manager of the horse show of Spokane. He may be seen any day driving a 
fine team through the streets of Spokane yet he never allows pleasure to inter- 
fere with business, although he is cognizant of the fact that concentration upon 
business to the exclusion of all else produces a warped and one-sided development 
His interests and activities have therefore reached out into other lines and he 
stands today as a splendid example of what may be accomplished not only in the 
business field but also in the attainment of those things which broaden one's vision 
and add incentive and interest to life. 



C. T. HANSEN. 



Charles T. Hansen, secretary of The Day & Hansen Security Company, needs 
no introduction to those who are familiar with the history of financial enterprises 
and land projects in the northwest. His initial spirit has made him a leader in 
much that has been successfully accomplished along those lines, and because of 
his extensive circle of acquaintance his life history cannot fail to prove of inter- 
est to many of our readers. 

He was bom at Sioux City, Iowa, April 6, 1871, a son of Nels M. and Isabel 
Valhor Hansen, of that city. Both parents were natives of Norway, and after 
coming to Sioux City engaged in merchandising. They died within a few weeks 
of each other when their son Charles was but thirteen years of age. The daugh- 
ters of the family were: Louise, who died in 1898; and Helen, the wife of William 
T. Day. 

In the public schools of Iowa, Charles T. Hansen was educated, and for a 
time attended the Highland Park College at Des Moines. After spending a period 
in farming, he entered the employ of W. T. Day & Company, general merchants 
at Castana, Iowa, and has ever since been associated with William T. Day io 
various enterprises, a most harmonious relation existing between them, the labors 
of one ably seconding and rounding out the efforts of the other. 

In 1894 he accepted the position of assistant cashier in the Castana Savings 
Bank, and in 1898 was elected cashier, which position he successfully filled until he 
removed to Spokane in 1906, to become active in the management of the Washing- 
ton I^and Company, of which he was secretary and treasurer. Mr. Hansen was 
one of the organizers of said company, established March 1, 1902, with head- 
quarters at Waterville, Washington, with a paid-up capital of one hundred and fifty 



['. T. HANSEN 






'it<ARY 






I. tJf \ 



»-..N^^ 



• tO^l 



L 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 97 

thousand dollars, which was increased in 1906 to five hundred thousand dollars^ 
and the headquarters of the company removed from Waterville to Spokane, when 
Mr. Hansen moved to Spokane and became active in the management of said com- 
pany. The Washington Land Company purchased large tracts of unimproved land 
in Douglas county, and some idea of the extent and importance of their operations 
may be gleaned from the fact that in six years they broke out and improved over 
sixteen thousand acres of land. 

Mr. Hansen was associated with William- T. Day, his brother-in-law, in a co- 
partnership of Day & Hansen in Monona county, Iowa, where they were large 
owners and developers of farm lands. They also established the Turin Bank, at 
Turin, Iowa, which they sold January 1, 1908. Early in the year 1908 they dis- 
posed of about three thousand acres of their Iowa land, and organized The Day 
& Hansen Security Company, with a paid-up capital of one million dollars which 
took over all the interests of Day & Hansen, including The Washington Land 
Company. This company operates extensively in improved farm property, and 
is among the most progressive in their line. The company has purchased within 
the last three years over thirty-two thousand acres of land in Powell county, 
western Montana, which is all under fence and improved, and over ten thousand 
acres in cultivation. 

They also own and control Bve banks, including The Waterville Savings Bank 
of Waterville, Washington, of which Mr. Hansen is president; The National Bank 
of Oakesdale, Washington; Blair & -Genrpti'h^^^lit^fs, of Helmville, Montana; 
The Castana Savings Bank, of Castana, jLgwa;'^p^ The Moscow State Bank, of 
Moscow, Idaho, of all of which institutions Mr. Hansen is a member of the board 
of directors. The company has established a ^arge mortgage-loan business in 
eastern Washington, northern Idaho, and w^tern* Montana, and the attraction of 
said secjtions of the country as a loaning field is one of the principal factors that 
led to the organization of the company. 

On the 15th of August, 1901, Mr. Hansen was married to Miss Elsie Day, 
daughter of Joseph B. P. and Sophia (Thomas) Day, of Castana, Iowa. They 
reside at No. 1117 Eighth avenue. 

Mr. Hansen is a member of the Spokane Club and the Spokane Country Club. 
He has become well known in the northwest through his extensive and important 
operations in land, and prominent connection with financial interests. The firm 
of The Day & Hansen Security Company is regarded as one of the most con- 
servative and progressive of this section. 



SOFUS B. NELSON, D. V. S. 

• 

Dr. Sofus B. Nelson, professor of veterinary science at the Washington State 
College, and also state veterinarian, was bom at Veile, Denmaric, December 21, 
1867, a son of Nels P. and Marie Beartelson, both of whom were natives of Den- 
mark, where the father died in 1876 and the mother in 1911. In the family were 
Aree sons and three daughters. The two brothers of Sofus B. Nels<Mi are resi- 
dents of this country, Peter B. Nelson living in Calgary, Canada, while Nels P. 
Nelson makes his home in Brewster, Washington. The two sisters are Anna and 



98 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Ingeborg^ still residents of Veile^ Denmaric^ the third sister having died quite 
young. 

For two or three years Dr. Nelson pursued his education in the common schools 
of his native country and afterward became a student in the public schools of 
Avoca, lowa^ where he passed through consecutive grades until he became a high- 
school student. In 1886 he entered the Iowa State College and was graduated in 
1889 with the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Surgery. In 1890 he held the posi- 
tion of house surgeon in the veterinary department of the Iowa State College. 

On the 14th of December^ 1890^ Dr. Nelson came to Spokane and opened an 
office in the Granite blocks practicing continuously until February^ 1893^ when he 
went to Europe and became a special student in the Royal Veterinary College of 
Copenhagen. In July^ 1893^ he returned to Spokane^ where he resumed practice, 
following the profession in a private capacity until the spring of 1895^ when he 
was elected professor of veterinary science at the Washington State College. He 
also became veterinarian at the experiment station and his election to that posi- 
tion carried with it the office of state veterinarian and a member of the state board 
of health. For two years, in the '90s, he was secretary of the state board. 

The department of veterinary science was established in Pullman in 1900 in 
connection with the state college and the first class was graduated in 1902. Since 
that time a class has been graduated each year, with the exception of 1903. Two 
years ago the provision was made that the senior class should be conducted in 
Spokane and to provide for this a building was constructed on Indiana and Kalispell 
streets. It is fully equipped and all of the latest and most improved appliances that 
money can buy have been secured. They treat on an average from eighteen hun- 
dred to two thousand patients per year, including cattle, dogs and horses. It is 
the purpose of the dc^partment to give the young men of today the highest pos- 
sible scientific and practical training necessary to fit them for the work of veterinar- 
ians. In addition to his duties as teacher and head of the department. Dr. Nelson 
has been especially interested in the work of eradicating tuberculosis in domesti- 
cated animals in this state and in the development of the stock industry in Wash- 
ington. He was a delegate to the tuberculosis congress in Washingt<m, D. C, in 
1908, and presented a paper that was very noteworthy. He has written and spoken 
much concerning the various methods of eradicating tuberculosis, also upon the 
subjects of a sanitary milk supply and the general sanitary condition of farms. 
His addresses are based upon broad scientific knowledge, keen observation and 
practical experience. For twenty years he has been a member of the American 
Veterinary Medical Association and has done important work on its executive com- 
mittee. 

In November, 1895, Dr. Nelson was married to Miss J. Ettchen Uhden, a 
daughter of Charles Uhden, a wholesale commission merchant of Spokane. Her 
mother belonged to the Habicht family, whose ancestry can be traced back to the 
year 1400, representatives of the name having been actively connected with Martin 
Luther in the period of the reformation. Mrs. Nelson was associated for a num- 
ber of years with the Fortnightly Club at Pullman and was quite active in its 
work. She has always been a great student of literature and therefore was ac- 
corded a prominent position in the club to which she belonged. Dr. and Mrs. 
Nelson attend the Congregational church and he is a Mason, holding membership 
with Whitman Lodge, No. 49, F. & A. M., at Pullman, the chapter at Colfax, and 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 99 

the consistory and Mystic Shrine at Spokane. For twenty years he has been a 
member of the Woodmen of the World and is also identified witli the Scandinavian 
Brotherhood of America. In politics he is a republican and while he keeps well 
informed on the questions and issues of the day prefers to give his support to well 
o^panized private rather than to political interests and activities. He aids in pro- 
moting public progress as a member of the Chamber of Commerce and is well 
known socially in Spokane as a member of the Inland Club. He stands as one 
of the foremost representatives of the profession in the entire west^ his broad 
knowledge making his opinions an authority upon the questions connected with 
veterinary science. 



JOHN DICKINSON SHERWOOD. 

Few of the important public enterprises of Spokane have failed to profit by the 
cooperation and substantial indorsement of John Dickinson Sherwood who is a 
western man by birth, training and preference and yet a Harvard graduate. His 
record stands in contradistinction to the views of some well known business men 
of the country that college training does not equip one especially well for life's 
practical duties and responsibilities. Mr. Sherwood was bom in San Francisco, 
Califomia, October 12, 1860, a son of Benjamin F. and Almira T. (Dickinson) 
Sherwood. The father removed from New York city to California in 1852 and 
was there engaged in mining and in the commission business. He died in 1875 
and is still survived by his widow who now makes her home in New York city. 
They were residents of San Francisco, however, during the boyhood and youth of 
John D. Sherwood, who through that period was a pupil in the public and high 
schools of San Francisco and later supplemented his preliminary course in Har- 
vard College, from which he was graduated A.B. with the class of 1888. Believ- 
ing that the west offered broader opportunities than the older and more conserva- 
tive east he came to Spokane shortly after the completion of his college course 
and joined E. Dempsie in a mercantile enterprise, on the east side of Howard 
street between Front and Main avenues, under the firm name of Sherwood & 
Dempsie. Success attended them but in three years Mr. Sherwood sold out to 
his partner and entered the real-estate business. Since that time he has been 
dosely associated with Spokane's upbuilding and development along various lines. 
His business activities have all been of a character that has contributed to public 
progress and prosperity as well as to individual success. In 1885 he became as- 
sociated with Frank R. Moore, Fred Chamberlain, William Pettit and others in 
organizing the first electric light company and installed the plant in the C. & C. 
mills, taking .a contract to light the city with arc lamps. This was really the 
Docleus of what later became the Washiujgton Water Power Company. Mr. Sher- 
wood's name is also connected with the building of the first cable street railroad 
here, a line extending from the Monroe street bridge out Boone to the army post 
and also another extending south on Monroe to Thirteenth street and east on Thir- 
teenth for &ye blocks. The company bought the Spokane Street Railway from 
Brown & Cannon and in 1891 abolished the cables, thereafter using electricity 
as the motive power. The same people were organizers of the Washington Water 



707074 



100 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Power Company^ the various companies being consolidated in 1899 and all taken 
over by the Washington Water Power Company of which Mr. Sherwood was the 
vice president. Prior to itna he had served as president of the Spokane Street Rail- 
way and was a director of the Washington Water Power Company for over twenty 
years. His labors have thus been an effective force for the upbuilding, develop- 
ment and improvement of Spokane. He also built the Northwest boulevard and 
the Southeast boulevard and was one of the citizens who helped establish the 
army post at Sp<^ane, contributing most generously to that cause. Just prior to 
the fire he had completed the erection of a six-story structure known as the "Wash- 
ington building" on the present site of the "Sherwood building" on Riverside 
avenue. This was the highest building in the city at that time and was the second 
to have elevator service. It was destroyed by fire in 1889 with a loss of some sixty 
thousand dollars to Mr. Sherwood, but with undaunted purpose he set to work 
to retrieve his lost possessions and in accomplishing this the public has been a 
direct beneficiary for his labors have always been an element in general progress. 
For a considerable period he was very prominent in the Chamber of Commerce and 
was its first vice president. 

On the 25th of November, 1896, Mr. Sherwood was married to Miss Jose- 
phine B. Come, a daughter of Joseph and Anna (Reppert) Come, of Marietta, 
Ohio. They reside at No. 2941 Summit avenue, Mr. Sherwood having erected this 
residence in 1898. He belongs to the Spokane Club and to the Harvard Club 
and in the latter organization maintains pleasant relations with those who also claim 
Harvard as their alma mater. He has never been actively interested in politics 
to hold office and yet few men in private life have done more for the city's welfare. 
ELis thorough college training prepared him to use his native talents to the best 
advantage and developed in him that judgment which has enabled him to make 
wise selection of those forces, factors and interests which prove of greatest value 
and effectiveness in the business circles and in the world's work. 



H. H. McCarthy, m. d. 

Dr. H. H. McCarthy meets all of the requirements of a capable physician. 
When a lawyer is brusque and crabbed the public usually feel that it is because 
he is engaged with intricate problems of jurisprudence; when a minister is un- 
approachable and austere it is believed to be because he is occupied with questions 
beyond our mental ken; but from the physician is demanded not only broad scien- 
tific knowledge correctly applied but also the genial and sympathetic manner which 
inspires hope and courage. In none of these requirements is Dr. McCarthy lacking, 
which accounts for the fact that although a young man he is now at the head of a 
large and growing practice. 

He was born in Clayton county, Iow&, March 4, 1878, his parents, D. W. and 
Mary (Kelleher) McCarthy, there residing upon a farm. They removed to Ply- 
mouth county, Iowa, where the son pursued his preliminary education, which was 
supplemented by study in the University of Chicago prior to entering upon his 
professional course in Rush Medical College of that city, from which institution 
he was graduated as a member of the class of 1902. A broad and valuable prac- 
tical experience came to him in two years* service as interne in Alexian Brothers' 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 101 

Hospital^ Chicago^ and in the spring of 1905 he became a resident of Spokane^ 
where he has since followed his profession. He has a well equipped office and, 
moreover, has a mind alert to all the opportmiities and the responsibilities of the 
profession. He makes good use of the former in his efforts to check the ravages 
of disease and at all times fully meets the latter. Today he has a large practice 
in the conduct of which he is very successful and is now well and favorably known. 
In addition to his professional practice he is now serving as surgeon for the Mil- 
waukee Railroad. 

On the 17th of August, 1910, Dr. McCarthy was married to Miss Frances 
Cattingham, a daughter of L. B. Cattingham, of Portland, Oregon. He has fra- 
ternal relations with the Woodmen of the World and the Knights of Columbus, 
and as a dub man he is known in the city through his membership relations with 
the University and Spokane Amateur Athletic Clubs. His association with the 
Spokane County Medical Society, which elected him to its presidency in 1909, 
keeps him in touch with the advance of the profession, as research^ experiment 
and investigation are bringing to light valuable truths having an important bearing 
upon the work of the physician and surgeon. 



FRED MILLER. 



Eloquent, forceful, learned, Fred Miller is distinguished as one of the most 
eminent criminal lawyers of the northwest. In other branches of practice, too, he 
is able, as is evidenced in the many favorable verdicts which he has won for his 
cHents. He was bom in Claric county, Missouri, August 23, 1867, and in both the 
paternal and maternal lines comes of English ancestry, while in the family there 
is also an admixture of Scotch and French. His father, Jacob Miller, was bom 
in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and died in 1897. His wife, Mrs. Caroline 
(George) Miller, also a native of the Keystone state, is now living in Seattle. Her 
father was a relative of Henry George, the renowned single tax advocate. By her 
marriage she became the mother of four sons and a daughter, the others in addi- 
tion to Fred Miller being: H. J., in Seattle; Martin J., a Methodist minister living 
in Seattle ; Clifford, a resident of Pacific county, Washington ; and May, the wife 
of Warren Crookshank, of Davis county, Iowa. 

As a student in Lewis College, at Glasgow, Missouri, Fred Miller prepared 
for the ministry. He also attended a business college at Kansas City, and think- 
ing to find business life more suited to his tastes and talents, he abandoned the plan 
of entering the ministry and became a newspaper reporter. He afterward spent 
tiirec months with Jesse James, Jr., in the "Blowing Up of Pompeii," and for nine 
months was secretary to Senator Burton at Abilene, Kansas. His identification 
with the northwest dates from 1890, at which time he became clerk in the land 
office at Yakima, Washington, where he remained for two years. He afterward 
spent nine months as clerk for the superintendent of the Cascade division of the 
Northern Pacific Railroad and on the expiration of that period took up the work 
of court reporting at Yakima and Ellensburg. While thus engaged he read law 
and in 1898 was admitted to the bar. For a time he was employed in the office of 
Henry I. Sniveley at North Yakima and engaged to some extent in newspaper work 



102 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

until 1899; when he came to Spokane. He was connected with the Yakima Herald 
and Epigram as part owner but on locating in this city took up the practice of law, 
forming a partnership with F. C. Robertson, under the firm name of Robertson 
& Miller. They conducted a general law practice and their dioitage is today large 
and of a distinctively representative character. Mr. Miller was one of the first 
attorneys for the Coeur d'Alene miners in the troubles which occurred in 1899 
and was one of the attorneys for Moyer, Haywood and Pettibone in the Governor 
Stuenenberg murder trial, the result being the acquittal of the three men whom 
he defended. He has been connected with most of the prominent murder trials in 
Spokane county but has usually practiced in opposition to corporations. In the 
trial of a case he marshals his evidence with the skill and precision of a military 
commander. He never seems to lose sight of any point which has bearing upon his 
case and gives to each point its due relative precedence. He has remarkable ability 
in tracing the course of events connected with any case and in his presentation of 
his case is strong and logical, being seldom if ever at fault in the citation of prin- 
ciple or precedent. In the Stuenenberg murder trial the attention of the whole world 
was drawn thereto and Mr. Miller gainec) a national reputation in his work for 
the defense. 

Mr. Miller is financially interested in the Coeur d'Alene mines and has realty 
holdings in Idaho, Virginia and Washington. The only political position which he 
has ever held was that held on Governor Rogers' staff. However, he was formerly 
active in the work of the democratic party and has been repif^esentative in the 
county and state conventions. He has also served on the county and state cen- 
tral committees but has never been an aspirant for office. At the time of the 
Spanish-American war he organized a company that wished to go to the Philip- 
pines and was elected its captain. Troops, however, were not called out and it 
was at that time that the governor appointed Mr. Miller to a position on his staff, 
with the rank of colonel. Fraternally he is connected with the Spokane Lodge of 
Elks, No. 228. In all of the activities with which he has been connected he has 
been called to leadership, having the ability -and the personal qualities which fit 
one for gaining a large following. His professional career whether in journalistic 
effort or in the law has been marked by continuous advancement and increasing 
ability. 



RALPH HENDRICKS, M. D. 

While one of the more recent arrivals among the medical profession in Spokane, 
Dr. Ralph Hendricks has already gained recognition as one whose knowledge and 
practical ability merit a liberal patronage. He is a western man by birth, training 
and preference and is imbued with the enterprising sprit which is characteristic 
of the Pacific coast country. His birth occurred in Eugene, Oregon, May 30, 1 870, 
his parents being Elijah B. and Elizabeth (Blew) Hendricks. His father went 
to Oregon from Illinois in 1848 and was for a time engaged in farming, but in 
1882 left that state and established his home at Cheney, Spokane county, Wash- 
ington, where he opened a drug store. He was thus identified with the commercial 
interests of that place for a considerable period but is now living retired in Cheney. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 103 

The public schools of Cheney afforded Dr. Hendricks his early education^ which 
was supplemented by study in Cheney Academy, and he later attended the Uni- 
versity of Washington. His choice of a life work fell upon the profession of 
medicine and in preparation for practice he entered the University of Louisville, 
at Louisville, Kentudcy, from which he was graduated with the class of 1896. He 
began practice at Cheney and afterward removed to Medical Lake, but sought a 
still broader field of labor in 1907 on his removal to Spokane where he has since 
followed his profession. His work is characterized by a thoroughness and efficiency 
which have brought good results. His reading has been broad and he is very 
careful in the diagnosis of his cases, so that his judgment is seldom if ever at fault. 
He keeps in touch, too, with the advanced work of the profession through the pro- 
ceedings of the Spokane County and Washington State Medical Societies, and the 
American Medical Association, in all of which he holds membership. 

On the 18th of July, 1896, Dr. Hendridcs was united in marriage to Miss Mamie 
Pomeroy, of Cheney, Washington, a daughter of Dr. Francis A. and Mary Pomeroy, 
of that city. They have two children. Royal and Dorothy. In Spokane they have won 
many friends, the hospitality of a large number of the attractive homes of the 
city being freely accorded them. Dr. Hendricks has become identified with sev- 
eral fraternal organizations, holding membership in Spokane Lodge, No. 34, F. 
& A M. ; and Opportunity Lodge, I. O. O. F. He is also connected with the Elks 
Lodge, No. 85, of Salt Lake City. His manner is genial and cordial and is the 
expression of an unfeigned interest in his fellowmen. In all of his practice he 
is actuated by a spirit of helpfulness which, added to his broad scientific knowledge, 
is winning for him continued progress. 



C. HARVEY SMITH. 



C. Harvey Smith, a Spokane architect, owes his success, which is creditable 
and enviable, entirely to his own efforts, for he has never been associated with a 
partner and has won his clientage through his ability and trustworthiness. He was 
bom May 7, 1868, in Kansas, and is the only son of Hugh A. and Rose (Miner) 
Smith, both of whom were natives of Illinois. The mother belonged to an old 
Virginia family of Irish descent, while the father came of Scotch ancestry although 
the early American representatives of the family settled in Virginia in pioneer 
times. Hugh A. Smith served for four years and two months as a soldier of the 
Ci^il war, espousing the cause of the Union and going to the front with the 
Twenty-first Illinois Volunteers. He was a contractor and resided in the Spokane 
country for eighteen years but passed away in October, 1910, at the age of 
seventy-three years. His widow still survives and is now living in Canada. Their 
only daughter is Ada, the wife of Sidney Luther, a farmer of Calgary. 

C. Harvey Smith was educated in Illinois, pulrsuing a public-school course 
mitil graduated from the high school. He afterward worked with his father at 
cwitracting until twenty-two years of age, when he took up the study of archi- 
tectore. In 1888 he came to Spokane, then a young man of twenty years, and es- 
tablished business on his own account as an architect and builder, in 1898, in 
which line he has since been engaged. He has always operated alone and his 



104 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

individual worth has* gained him the wide recognition and prosperity which are 
now his. He has erected many residences and business blocks in this city and 
throughout the Inland Empire and has also done considerable school work. Among 
others he erected the high school at Cewalah, the high school at Mullen^ Idaho, 
and the courthouse of Twin Falls^ Idaho. He also built a number of schoolhouses 
in southern Idaho and a number of business blocks in the city of Spokane^ in- 
cluding that owned by E. H. Stanton at the corner of Hamilton and Mission 
streets. He has been the architect for between five ^nd six hundred residences in 
Spokane and has built practically all over the Inland Empire. In his fifteen or 
twenty years' practice his name has become known throughout the country. His 
work is always characterized by the utmost thoroughness^ by promptness in ex- 
ecution and by reliability in living up to the terms of the contract. As he has 
prospered in his undertaking he has made investment in other directions and is 
now the owner of irrigated land in southern Idaho^ has mining interests in Nevada 
and real estate in Elko county. He also owns land in the northern part of Idaho, 
together with his residence at Opportunity. 

On the 6th of January, 1889, Mr. Smith. was united in marriage to Miss Olive 
Walker, a daughter of George Walker, of Bethany, Illinois, who belonged to a 
prominent family of that place. Her father came from Kentucky and was of 
Scotch descent, while her mother was a native of Germany. Five children have 
been born unto Mr. and Mrs. Smith, namely: Grace, who married Harry Hodges, 
of Lake Creek, Idaho; and Gretchen, Hu^, Stella and Katherine, all now in 
school. 

Mr. Smith always exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and 
measures of the republican party and while he has worked for his friends he 
has never accepted office for himself. He is a member of the S]>okane Architect- 
ural Club, thus coming into close contact with the members of his profession and 
the high ideals toward which they are striving, and he likewise belongs to the 
Chamber of Commerce. 



WILLIAM T. DAY. 



William T. Day, president of The Day & Hansen Security Company, of Spo- 
kane, is a prominent figure in the financial circles of the northwest. Endowed 
with unusual business instinct and foresight, he early saw the future of the un- 
occupied western lands, and has been a great factor in their development. 

He was born May 8, 1865, at Castana, Iowa. His father, Joseph B. P. Day, 
a native of Maine, became a settler of Iowa in 1855, and was one of its prominent 
and influential citizens. His mother, Sophia Thomas Day, was born in Missis- 
sippi, and with her family came north in the late '40s. As a surveyor and agent 
for the American- Immigrant Company, his father became very familiar with lands 
and land values, which was not the least element in the education of his son. 

After attending the public schools at Castana, Mr. Day continued his education 
at the Southeastern Iowa Normal School at Bloomfield. He became actively con- 
nected with the business interests in his home town as a general merchant, con- 
tinuing in that line for about eight years. In 1892 he turned his attention to 



WILLIAM T. DAY 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 107 

banking and organized the Castana Savings Bank^ of which he became cashier, 
serving in that capacity until 1898^ when he was elected to the presidency, which 
position he still fills. A large farm mortgage business was carried on in connec- 
tion with the bank. 

In the fall of 1901, Mr. Day came to Washington, bought a large tract of 
land in Douglas county, and on the 1st day of March, 1902, he and his associates 
organized The Washington Land Company, with headquarters at Waterville, Wash- 
ington. The enterprise " was capitalized for one hundred and fifty thousand dol- 
lars, which was increased to five hundred thousand dollars, in 1906, when the 
headquarters of the company were removed from Waterville to Spokane. This 
company owned large tracts of unimproved land in Douglas county, and an idea 
as to the magnitude of their undertaking may be gained from the fact that in 
six years they broke out and developed more than sixteen thousand acres of land, 
about half of which has been sold. Mr. Day and Mr. Charles T. Hansen, his 
brother-in-law, were associated in the copartnership of Day & Hansen, and were 
large owners and developers of land in Monona county, Iowa. They established 
and operated The Turin Bank of Turin, Iowa, which they sold January 1st, 1908. 
They also disposed in that year of over three thousand acres of their Iowa land, 
and on the 1st of March, 1908, organized The Day & Hansen Security Company 
of Spokane, Washington, with a paid-up capital of one million dollars, which took 
over all the interests of Day & Hansen, including The Washington Land Com- 
pany. At that time Mr. Day moved to Spokane, and became actively identified 
with the business, and has since made the city his home. The company operates 
extensively in improved farm property^^-and-'ther'ate'Jamong the most progressive 
in their line. ■ , . - . . ^ : . 

During the past three years the cbtopariy "Has purchased over thirty-two thou- 
sand acres of land in Powell county, western Montana, which is all improved and 
over ten thousand acres is now under irrigat1.6n./^ JVhile. developing their land pro- 
jects, the company also became prominent factors in financial circles throughout 
the northwest, and own controlling interest in Rve banks, including: The Castana 
.Savings Bank, of Castana, Iowa; The Waterville Savings Bank, of Waterville, 
Washington; The National Bank of Oakesdale, also in this state; The Moscow 
State Bank, Moscow, Idaho ; and Blair & Company, Bankers, Helmville, Montana. 
The company has established a large mortgage-loan business, and deals in high- 
grade bond issues and other selected securities. 

Mr. Day's connection with business enterprises, is as follows: president of 
The Day & Hansen Security Company, and of The Castana Savings Bank; and 
vice president of The National Bank of Oakesdale, The Moscow State Bank, and 
Blair & Company, Bankers. 

On the 15th of August, 1888, at Mapleton, Iowa, was celebrated the mar- 
riage of Mr. Day and Miss Helen Hansen, the daughter of Nels and Isabel Han- 
sen of that city. It is his brother-in-law, Charles T. Hansen, who is closely as- 
sociated with him in his business enterprises. Mr. and Mrs. Day have one daugh- 
ter, Sophia Isabel, who is a graduate of the Girls Collegiate School of Los Angeles, 
Mid also has been a student for two years at Wellesley College, Massachusetts. 
The social position of the family is an enviable one, and their attractive home is 

justly celebrated for its warm-hearted hospitality. 
voLm-^ 



108 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIBE 

* 

In politics Mr. Day is republican^ always voting for men and measures of the 
party^ but has not been an active worker in its ranks since coming to Spokane. 
He belongs to the Spokane Club and the Spokane Country Club^ and has won 
popularity in these organizations by reason of those sterling traits of character, 
which in every land and clime awaken confidence and warm regard. It is doubt- 
ful in his whole life if he ever weighed an act in the scale of policy^ but in busi- 
ness has followed a straightforward course and in the legitimate channels of trade 
and financial activity has gained success that places him* with the prominent and 
representative men who are the real upbuilders of the northwest. 



HARVEY SMITH, M. D. 



Dr. Harvey Smith, physician and surgeon, whose capability in the line of his 
profession is supplemented by executive force, keeii discrimination and administra- 
tive ability in the line of promoting business projects of importance, was bom in Nova 
Scotia, January 15, 1874, his parents being Sidney Holmes and Agnes (Rae) 
Smith who were also natives of Nova Scotia. The mother was of Scotch descent 
and the father belongs to one of the old pioneer families of his native country 
which originally came from Londonderry, Ireland. He is still a resident of Nova 
Scotia where he is engaged in merchandising, but his wife died in 1883. In their 
family were six sons and a daughter, namely: Harvey; Stenson, who is living in 
Cape Briton, Nova Scotia; George, of that country; Clarence; who is located in 
St. Paul, Minnesota ; Geddie and Watson, both of Nova Scotia ; and Jesse, now the 
wife of D. W. McDonald, of Nova Scotia. 

Dr. Smith supplemented his early education by a course in the Picton Academy 
of Nova Scotia from 1891 until 1893. He afterward attended McGill University, 
Montreal, where he won the degrees of M. D. and C. M. in 1897. In the mean- 
time he had received a license for teaching but always regarded the practice of 
medicine as his ultimate goal and entered upon that work in Londonderry, Nova 
Scotia, where he remained for fifteen months. In November, 1900, he arrived in 
Spokane where he has since engaged in general practice and is meeting with a 
highly gratifying success. He does a large amount of surgical work and his ability 
in that direction as well as in the practice of medicine is marked. Two years' 
connection with the Royal Victoria Hospital of Montreal and one year in Lynn 
Hospital, of Massachusetts, brought him broad practical experience which qualified 
him for the onerous and responsible duties that have since devolved upon him. 
He is constantly reading and studying in order to promote his efficiency and ever 
holds to a high standard of professional ethics which has been one of the factors 
in winning for him the high regard that is entertained for him by his professional 
brethren as well as by the general public. Aside from his professional activities 
he has business interests of importance on the Pacific coast. He is interested in 
oil wells at Colinga, California, is a free holder in Spokane and is a stockholder 
in the Traders National Bank, the Citizens Savings & Loan Society and in the 
International Casualty Company. He is, moreover, interested in a high line ditch 
which is a government project in Kittitas county, which will cover six hundred 
acres that he owns and which he intends to set out to fruit trees. This ditch is 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 109 

expected to be completed in two years and will be from sixty-five to seventy miles 
in length and will cover ninety thousand acres. When completed this will mean 
much in the development and improvement of an extended area. 

On the 15Ui of January^ 1902^ in Spokane^ Dr. Smith was united in marriage 
to Miss Jennie Burgess^ of Nova Scotia. They attend the First Presbyterian 
chnrch and Dr. Smith gives his political support to the republican party. He 
belongs to the Spokane Athletic Club and to the University Club^ and is a mem- 
ber of and medical examiner for the Royal Highlanders. In his professional 
capacity he is also connected with several insurance companies^ being one of three- 
medical examiners for the Washington Union Life Insurance Company, medical 
examiner for the Canadian Life Insurance Company, for the Western Union Life 
Insurance Company and for the Bankers Life Insurance Company. He served 
at one time on the staff of the Deaconess Hospital, lecturing to nurses, and he 
belongs to the Spokane County Medical Society, the Washington State Medical 
Society and the American Medical Association. Through the proceedings of these 
bodies he keeps in close touch with the most advanced work being done by the 
profession and he eagerly embraces every idea or method that he believes will have 
]u«ctical value in his chosen life work. With a nature that never could be content 
with mediocrity he has advanced steadily in his calling until he has long since left 
the ranks of the many and stands among the more successful few. 



THOMAS A. RUSSELL, M. D. 

Dr. Thomas A. Russell, who in his professional capacity is a representative 
of various corporations,, is engaged in practice as a member of the firm of Dutton 
k Russell, their main offices being in the Peyton building, in Sp<^ane. He was 
bom in Valley Field, Quebec, September 9, 1871, a son of Thomas and Rebecca 
(Gordon) Russell. The father was a contractor and builder and in 1872 crossed 
the boundary line into the United States, settling first in Michigan and afterward 
fc^owing his profession in various places. At length he took up his abode in 
Seattle where he became general manager of the Tenino Sand Stone Quarries. He 
Vemained in active business until he reached the age of seventy years, after 
which his son, Dr. Donald G. Russell, who was formerly a medical practitioner of 
Spokane, became the president and general manager of the quarries. 

To the public school system of Michigan and the Winthrop high school of 
Minneapolis Dr. Thomas A. Russell is indebted for the early educational priv- 
ileges which he enjoyed. Having determined upon the practice of medicine as his 
life work, he entered the Barnes Medical College at St. Louis, Missouri, from 
which he was graduated in 1895. He had previously spent his summer vacations 
in Spokane with his elder brother. Dr. Donald G. Russell, who was practicing here 
at that time. He made his first visit in 1892 and after winning his degree in 
St. Louis Dr. Thomas A. Russell returned to Spokane to become his brother's 
partner in medical practice. He remained for a year but realizing that he needed 
further professional training and discipline, he entered Jefferson Medical College 
of Philadelphia where he studied through the two years, 1896 and 1897. He then 
opened an office at Mellen, Wisconsin, where he spent four years, at the end of 



110 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

which time he again came to Spokane to join his brother whose health was failing. 
For a few years he continued in general practice here but in 1906 formed a partner- 
ship with Dr. Willard O. Dutton and together they follow railroad construction 
work^ establishing hospitals and attending to the ill and injured for the contract- 
ing firms of Porter Brothers^ P. Welch & Company, Grant Smith & Company, 
Caughren & Woldson, Winters, Boomer & Hughes, and A. D. McDougal & Sod 
Company. They operate all over the northwest and as far east as North Dakota. 
The professional work of the firm is often of a most intricate and arduous nature 
and Dr. Russell keeps in touch with the progress of the profession through his 
membership in the Spokane County Medical Society and the Washington State 
Medical Society. 

On the 29th of August, 1894, at Hudson, Wisconsin, was celebrated the mar- 
riage of Dr. Russell and Miss Martha Stout, a daughter of Philemon and Mary 
Stout, of Oswego, Kansas. They now have one son, Gordon Russell. Mrs. Russell 
is a member of the First Presbyterian church and Dr. Russell holds membership 
m the Elks lodge at Ashland, Wisconsin, and the Odd Fellows lodge at Mellen, 
that state. He also belongs to the Inland Club and the Spokane Amateur Athletic 
Club and is interested in manly athletic and outdoor sports, realizing the neces- 
sity of recreation in the preservation of an even balance with heavy professional 
duties. 



MILTON D. HALL. 



Milton D. Hall has a business record that any man might be proud to possess 
for through the development of his native powers and talents he has* worked his 
way upward from a humble clerkship to rank with the most prominent and pro- 
gressive merchants of Spokane, being vice president and general manager of the 
Grote-Rankin Company of this city and Seattle. 

His life record had its beginning in Glen, Montgomery county, New York, 
November 19, 1868, his parents being Cornelius D. and Nancy (Vunk) Hall^ the 
former a merchant of Glen. Sent as a pupil to the public schools when about 
six years of age Milton D. Hall at length laid aside his text books to begin busi- 
ness life as a salesman in a store at Fonda, New York. In this way he gained a 
knowledge of merchandising that enabled him to win success when he went upon 
the road as traveling salesman for a dry-goods house. The west with its limitless 
opportunities, however, attracted him and, believing this the most advantageous 
field for a young man, he came to Spokane in March, 1892, here joining his 
brother, Jay V. Hall. They became associated with F. W. Branson in organizing 
the Crystal Ice Company, of which Milton D. Hall was a director and vice presi- 
dent. The business steadily grew, their attention for several years being devoted 
to the erection and development of ice plants in various parts of the country, 
operating at Butte, Montana, and later at Washington, D. C. Subsequently the 
business was sold out to the American Ice Company and in 1902 Milton D. Hall 
returned to Spokane where he purchased an interest in the Grote-Rankin Com- 
pany, of which he was elected a director. He was also made buyer for the 
crockery department and manager of the sales force on the floor. He brought 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 111 

to this business the same keen discrimination and spirit of enterprise which he 
had displayed in other connections and soon acquainting himself with the busi- 
ness in all of its departments^ was well qualified to enter upon the duties of 
manager here when^ in 1905^ Mr. Rankin went to Seattle to assume management 
of a branch house which the Grote-Rankin Company opened in that city. In 
1907 Mr. Rankin sold his interest to the company^ of which Mr. Hall then became 
general manager and vice president of the company, while his brother, W. D. 
Hall, is now manager of the Seattle branch, which is one of the most complete 
house furnishing stores on the Pacific coast. 

On the 8th of October, 1895, Milton D. Hall was married to Miss Carrie C. 
Clark, a daughter of Giles W. and Charlotte D. Clark of this city, who were 
pioneers of Spokane, arriving in 1884. Here the father died November 15, 1908, 
at the age of seventy-two years. Mr. and Mrs. Hall have become the parents 
of three children, Richard M., Dorothy Helen and Wilson Clark. 

To his home and business interests Mr. Hall largely devotes his time and 
energies. He exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures 
of the republican party but otherwise is not active in politics. He is, however, a 
director of the chamber of commerce and a cooperant factor in the substantial re- 
sults which have been accomplished by that organization for the benefit of Spo- 
kane. His labors in this and other directions have redounded to the credit and up- 
building of the city, while his activities along business lines have brought him to 
an enviable position in connection vrith the trade interests of the Spokane country. 



JOSEPH F. MORTON. 



Joseph F. Morton, attorney at law, engaged in general practice, was born in 
Brooklyn, New York, March 24, 1882, a son of Edward F. and Rose (Connolly) 
Morton, both of whom were natives of Ireland and are now residents of Spokane. 
The father was taken to New York during his infancy and for many years lived 
in the state of New York, spending much of the time at Syracuse, where he en- 
gaged in teaching school for seventeen years. In 1882 he came to Spokane and 
here directed his energies largely to farming and to business interests at Spokane 
Bridge. He was living on his ranch at the time of the great fire in 1889. He 
owns a building on Sprague avenue, consisting of three storerooms and the Taft 
Hotel and other property in the city, having made wise investments of his capital 
in real estate. At the present time he is living retired in Spokane. His wife's 
sister was Mrs. M. M. Cowley. Mr. Cowley is one of the directors of the Traders 
National Bank. The brother and sister of Joseph F. Morton are: Edward W., 
general bookkeeper of the Traders Bank; and Alice A., who is residing in Spo- 
kane. The father is one of the members of the Pioneer Society, having been a 
resident here from early days and an active factor in the work of general develop- 
ment and improvement. 

After acquiring his early education in the common schools of Spokane, to 
which city he was brought during his infancy, Joseph F. Morton continued his 
education in the Gonzaga College. He prepared for the bar in the pursuit of a 
law course in the Georgetown University at Washington, D. C, and was graduated 



112 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

with the LL. B. degree in 1907. He then tods: the regular law examination and 
was admitted to the bar before the supreme court in the District of Columbia. 
In the same year he returned to Spokane^ was admitted to practice in this state 
and. has since followed his profession. For a time he was in partnership with 
John M. Gleeson under the firm name of Gleeson & Morton^ this relation con- 
tinuing from 1908 until the 1st of January^ 1911. Mr. Mort<m has since prac- 
ticed alone^ gi^ng his attention to general law^ and although one of the younger 
members of the bar^ has won a reputation that many an older practitioner might 
well envy. He is a member of the Inland Club. In his political views Mr. Morton 
is a republican and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day 
but has never sou^t nor desired office. He prefers to concentrate his energies 
upon his practice^ which is continually growing in volume and importance. 



FRANCIS W. GIRAND. 

While engaged in the general practice of law Francis W. Girand s]>ecializes 
to some extent in that branch of the profession which has to do with land titles 
and has been connected with considerable important litigation of that character. 
Like almost every state in the Union^ Texas has furnished its quota of citizens 
to Washington and among this number is Mr. Girand^ who was bom in Austin, 
Texas^ April 1^ 1866. His father^ for whom he was named^ was bom in Christian 
county^ Kentucky^ and is descended from an old family of French origin that was 
founded in America during colonial days. He was a first cousin of the Hon. 
Andrew P. McCormick, judge of the United States circuit court of appeals of the 
fifth circuit, and having removed to that state Francis W. Girand, Sr., was ap- 
pointed by Judge McCormick to the position of clerk in the United States court 
of the north district of Texas, which position he filled for thirty years, and upon 
his retirement his. son W. D. Girand succeeded to the office. For ei^teen years 
Andrew P. McCormick was judge of the United States district court and was then 
advanced to the United States court of appeals. During the Civil war F. W. 
Girand, Sr., served for three years as a soldier of the Confederate army. In 
early manhood he wedded Anna Crozier; who was born in Nashville, Tennessee, 
and was descended from an old southern family of Irish lineage. Her father was 
distinguished as a United States marshal under President Polk and served for six 
years as state comptroller. The death of his daughter, Mrs. Girand, occurred in 
1894 while Francis W. Girand, the father of our subject, passed away in Novem- 
ber, 1909. Their sons and daughters who constituted the family circle were 
Francis W., of this review; W. D., clerk of the United States court at Abilene, 
Texas; J. B., who at the age of twenty years was elected district surveyor of the 
Oldham land district and afterward became territorial engineer of the territory 
of Arizona; Andrew and John, both of whom are merchants of Abilene, Texas; 
and Ada Lee, the wife of T. B. Griffith, a resident of Terrell, Texas. 

In the public schools of his native city Francis W. Girand, of Spokane, began 
his education and also attended private schools of Austin. He afterward took 
up the study of law there with Judge R. F. Arnold as his preceptor and on the 
11th of August, 1887, was admitted to the bar. He afterward removed to Gra- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 113 

ham, Texas^ to which city the federal court had been removed^ and remained in 
active practice there for twelve years, but thinking to find still broader and better 
opportunities in the most northwesterly state of the Union he came to Washington 
on the 24th of August, 1899. He has since been practicing alone in Spokane, con- 
ducting a general law practice, and has paid more attention to land-title litigation 
than to any other department, attaining a proficiency in this field that has largely 
made him authority upon the questions involved therein. 

On the 28Ui of December, 1896, Mr. Girand was married to Miss Lulu O'Don- 
ndl, of Texas, and they have two children, Francis Arthur and Florence Ada, 
both in school. Mr. Girand is an active advocate of democratic principles and 
has served as delegate to party conventions both in Texas and Washington, at- 
tending state conventions in Texas. He was selected one of the campaign speak- 
ers of the state committee of Texas and in Washington by the county committee. 
He possesses considerable oratorical ability and has a faculty of presenting his 
views in clear, concise and logical form, while the strength of his argument never 
fails to elicit attention and seldom fails to convince, whether upon the political 
hustings or in the discussion of legal matters before the courts. 



JOHN T. COOPER. 



Among the native sons of Ireland who have sought and won success in the north- 
west John T. Cooper was numbered. He possessed the versatility, the adaptability, 
and the undaunted energy characteristic of the people of his race and these quali- 
ties were used to excellent advantage in his business career. He was bom in Sep- 
tember, 1839, in Cork, Ireland, and died on the 18th of June, 1889, his life record 
therefore scarcely encompassing a half century. His parents were John and 
Ellen Cooper, the former a navy officer of the British army. Their family num- 
bered ten children, to whom were given good educational opportunities, John T. 
Cooper pursuing his studies in the schools of Ireland, supplemented by a course 
in Dublin College. He studied medicine in that institution, thinking to make its 
practtce his life work, after which he came to America. He followed the pro- 
fession in various localities for some time and later became assistant surgeon in 
the United States army, being located at Fort Cameron, Utah. After serving about 
one year in that capacity he opened an office at Silver Reef, Utah, for the private 
practice of medicine, and later removed to Butte, Montana, where he remained for 
one year, displaying considerable ability in diagnosing his cases and caring for the 
important work which professional duties brought upon him. 

About this time excitement waxed very great in the mining country at Murray, 
Idaho, and Dr. Cooper, with others, entered the field, prospecting and mining. He 
was associated with the late John M. Burke, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere 
in this volume, and was one of the original owners of the famous Bunker Hill 
and Sullivan mine, his associate in this being a man of the name of O. O. Peck. 
The sale of this mine was made in May, 1887, by John Wardner, the purchaser 
being Simon Reed, of Portland, and the purchasing price one million, ^ve hun- 
dred thousands dollars, of which Messrs. Cooper and Peck received seventy-six 
thousand dollars as their share. This was one of the richest mines of the west and 



114 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

its output made the fortunes of many millionaries. Following the disposal of his 
interest to Mr. Reed^ of Portland^ Dr. Cooper removed to Spokane and afterward 
lived retired, having given up his professional practice. The remainder of his 
days were si>ent in the enjoyment of well earned rest. He passed away two years 
later and his death occasioned the deep regret of all who knew him. 

In 1878 Dr. Cooper was united in marriage in Salt Lake City to Miss Adalena 
Meeks, who survives him, together with a daughter, Caroline E. Two children of 
the marriage are now deceased — Francis H. and John Edward. 

Dr. Cooper's life was guided by high and honorable principles to which he 
was always most faithful. The Episcopal church found in him a consistant mem- 
ber and in early life he was also a member of the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men. His political allegiance was given to the democratic party but he never cared 
for public office. He loved camp life and outdoor sports, was a great traveler and 
possessed a particular fondness for nature and for children. His home was ever cel- 
ebrated for its warm-hearted hospitality and his associates ever found him a most 
congenial companion. He held friendship inviolable and was always loyal to every 
trust reposed in Bim, so that those who came in contact with him knew him worthy 
of all esteem. 



REV. THOMAS J. PURCELL. 

# 

One of the most widely known and deeply venerated representatives of the 
priesthood of the Roman Catholic church in this section of Idaho is Father Thomas 
J. Purcell of Coeur d'Alene. Not only has he done most notable work for the 
church by bringing new souls into the faith, but he has established schools and 
churches, thus bringing the refining and restraining influences of life to the mining 
and lumber camps of this section. 

His birth occurred in Aberdare, Glamorganshire, South Wales, December 7, 
1860, his parents being Daniel and Johanna M. (Prendergast) Purcell. They 
were both natives of Ireland, but at the ages of about sixteen or eighteen they mi- 
grated to Wales, where they met and were subsequently married. Aberdare was 
the family home until 1869, when the father emigrated to the United States in 
quest of health. Here he was joined by his wife and children two years later, but 
in three months thereafter he passed away. 

Although he was only a lad of eleven years when his father died, Thomas J. 
Purcell was compelled to lay aside his text-books and lend his assistance in main- 
taining the family. He entered the coal mines of Tioga county, Pennsylvania, 
where he was continuously employed for eleven years, but at the expiration of that 
period his health was so completely shattered that he was compelled to live in the 
open air. The physicians insisted upon a change of climate, so he started west- 
ward, arriving in Nebraska on Thanksgiving day, 1882. He obtained work on a 
farm until February, 1883, when he resumed his journey, reaching Denver, Colo- 
rado, on March 1, penniless. He was considered a victim of the dread white 
plague and it was impossible for him to obtain employment, even being refused an 
opportunity to work for his board. Yet these besetting trials and terrible hardships 
proved a blessing in disguise, compelling him to sleep wherever night overtook 



REV. THOMAS J. PL'RCELL 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 117 

him, and the invigorating air of the mountains healed the diseased tissues of his 
lungs' and restored his vitality. Not finding any employment^ he set out for Ogden^ 
tramping the greater part of the way^ occasionally riding on freight trains between 
Denver and Granger, Utah when such opportunity offered. From that point on, 
however, he walked the entire distance. Upon reaching his destination he imme- 
diately sought work, and was shipped out of there as a laborer on the Oregon 
Short Line, which was then under course of construction. He worked for two 
months and then went to Virginia City, Montana, walking from there to Bozeman, 
where he arrived on July S, 1883. While located there he worked during the 
saouner months as a brickmaker for the old pioneers Tracy and Sam Ruffner, 
while in winter he was employed by Nelson Story. In September, 1884, he left 
Bozeman and went to Spokane, where he joined Father Joset, S. J., and Father 
Cataldo, S. J., whom he accompanied to the De Smet Mission in Kootenai county. 

He had always been an ambitious youth and had never fully relinquished the 
dream of his childhood, which had been to enter the service of the church. How- 
ever, he possessed other admirable traits of character, and when the needs of those 
dear to him necessitated his laying away his books, he expressed no regrets. Many 
times must he have found it difficult to restrain his rebellious spirit during those 
long years in the mines, where he daily and hourly overtaxed his strength and for 
weeks at a time never saw the sunshine. The joy, the happiness that is considered 
to be the inalienable right of every child was denied him, but he thus purchased 
it for many another child and so has received his reward. Unquestionably one of 
the great secrets of the wonderful success- of Father ; Purcell can be attributed to 
his understanding and appreciation of conditions surrounding the unfortunate and 
his ready and heartfelt sympathy for those in trouble. During the first four years 
of his residence at the mission he taught the Coeur d'Alene Indians, while pursuing 
his classical studies under the instruction of the Tethers, who gave him private 
lessons. It was discouraging at first, as for many years his entire time and atten- 
tion had been devoted to physical labor, but he possessed a fine mind and excellent 
powers of concentration and soon was making rapid progress. In 1888 he was sent 
to Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, to continue his studies, but he could not endure 
the climate, and owing to the state of his health in March, 1889, was compelled to 
return to Spokane. He took a position in Gonzaga College, that city, where he 
taught until June, 1890. In August of that year he went to Montreal and taught 
for a year in St. Lawrence College, during which period with the aid of a private 
tutor he was able to complete his classical course. He was then qualified to begin 
his ecclesiastical studies, and in September, 1891, entered the Grand Seminary 
at Montreal. 

On the 20th of December, 1896, he was ordained a priest and on May 1, 1897, 
was assigned by the bishop of this diocese to the parish of Coeur d'Alene. At that 
time the parish covered practically five thousand, six hundred square miles, com- 
prising the counties of Kootenai and Bonner — with the exception of the Coeur 
d'Alene reservation — and for a period of nine years a portion of Spokane. He 
completed the church at Bonner's Ferry, which had been started by Bishop Glo- 
ricux of Boise, and he erected another one at Rathdrum, the latter being, the first 
brick church edifice in the Idaho diocese. It was in process of construction for 
some time and was dedicated in 1892. Father Purcell possesses abundance of 
energy, and is a most enterprising and enthusiastic worker, no task connected with 



118 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

his work being too stupendous for him to undertake its commission and successfully 
carry it through to completion. He next built a church at Priest River, while 
ground was acquired and buildings were under construction, to provide the people 
of Harrison and Post Falls with places of worship. The work of the parish devel- 
oped so rapidly under his capable direction that in 1893 it was necessary to divide 
it with Rev. James F. Kelly, who has ever since been priest in Bonner county. In 
1893 he brought to Coeur d'Alene Sisters of the order of the Immaculate Heart of 
Mary from Scranton, Pennsylvania, and in September, of that year, they estab- 
lished a school. Their temporary building was only forty-six by fifty-six feet, and 
they had an enrollment of sixty-three pupils. The attendance increased so rapidly 
that their quarters were soon entirely inadequate to meet the demands. Recognis- 
ing and appreciating their needs, Major J. J. O'Brien, one of Coeur d'Alene's 
philanthropic, retired residents presented them with a block of ground, and when 
the military reserve was sold at public auction Father Purcell bid in the hospital 
and administration buildings, and had them removed to the grounds Major O'Brien 
had donated on the comer of Coeur d'Alene avenue and Ninth street. They were 
subsequently converted into a convent and school, which now has an attendance of 
three hundred pupils. 

Owing to the rapid increase in the Catholic population of Coeur d'Alene, in 
1897, Father Purcell was obliged to relinquish the missions of Kootenai county, 
and devote his entire attention to the work of the city. When he first capie to this 
parish in 1897 it contained but seventy-five Catholic families, and now Coeur 
d'Alene alone has three hundred and fifty Catholic families or about twelve hun- 
dred followers of the faith. He has been tireless in his efforts to extend the work 
and increase the number of communicants. When he arrived here, realizing that 
the Catholics of the future were the children of the present, he gave no thought 
to procuring a residence for himself or suitable quarters in which to hold services, 
but immediately began searching for a building adapted to the needs of a school. 
Subsequently quarters were procured that served temporarily for religious pur- 
poses, and in June, 1909, ground was obtained and excavations started for their 
present beautiful church. On the 22d of August, 1909, Bishop Glorieux laid the 
comer stone and, in the following October, work on the superstructure was com- 
menced. This was completed on May 1, 1910, and was permitted to stand until 
November, of that year, when contracts were let for the interior decorations. Their 
new building was occupied on the 5th of March, 1911, but was not entirely com- 
pleted until the 1st of November and was dedicated on Decoration Day, 1912. It 
is one of the most beautiful churches in the northwest, and was completed at a 
cost of forty-six thousand dollars. The interior decorations are especially fine and 
all of the appointments are of a superior quality, and it seats one thousand people. 

Not often is it given to any one to see such wonderful results from work in 
fourteen years as Father Purcell is witnessing from his labors. He is now able 
to realize that those long, hard years of his early manhood were not fruitless by 
any means. . Although he began his life work at an age when the majority of men 
are quite well established, he has accomplished more during the single decade of 
his service than many consummate in a life time. He is now at the zenith of his 
powers and the future contains for him great promise and much assurance of yet 
greater opportunities. During the period of his connection with this field he has 
made many friends among both Catholics and Protestants, who despite the differ- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 119 

ence in their faith revere and hold in the highest esteem the man, his belief and 
the purpose to which he has dedicated his life — the service of humanity. Father 
Purcell attributes much of his success to the Jesuit Fathers of Gonzaga College, 
whose advice he has sought and followed in all important matters. He is always 
ready to respond to a call, ^whatever its source, carrying cheer and comfort to 
rich and poor alike as did He, in whose footsteps he is following. 



HON. GEORGE W. SHAEFER. 

Hon. George W. Shaefer, state senator from Spokane and a leading attorney 
of the city, has during the period of his residence here labored effectively and 
earnestly for municipal progress and improvement, upholding as well the political 
and legal status of the state. Many tangible evidences of his devotion to the 
general good can be cited and the worth of his work will be evidenced in the develop- 
ment of this sketch of his life. He was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, 
September 10, 1862, his parents being Conrad and Pauline (Clements) Shaefer. 
The father was a whitesmith and also engaged in farming. 

Having attended the public schools of his native city, George W. Shaefer con- 
tinued his education in St. Mary's Academy and afterward received commercial 
training in Bryant & Stratton Business College of Charleston, West Virginia, 
from which he was graduated. When he was nineteen years of age his parents 
removed with the family to Charleston, West Virginia, where his father engaged 
in the lumber business, with George W. Shaefer, as his associate and assistant. 
While thus engaged he also took up the study of law and in 1895 he removed to 
Des Moines, Iowa, where he completed his law course and was admitted to the 
bar in 1897. He then located for practice in that city, where he remained until 
the fall of 1908, when he came to Spokane, where he has since continued to follow 
his profession. In no other calling does advancement depend more largely upon 
individual merit and ability and, recognizing this fact, Mr. Shaefer has been a close 
student of the science of law and is seldom, if ever, at fault in the citation of 
principle or precedent. His practice has connected him with much of the im- 
portant work of the courts and his ability is evidenced in the many verdicts which 
he has won favorable to his clients' interests. In addition to his law practice Mr. 
Shaefer is the secretary and treasurer of the Western Construction Company and 
thus interested in the management of an important industrial undertaking. 

In the public life of the city Mr. Shaefer has also long figured prominently 
and is a recognized leader in the ranks of the republican party, which in the spring 
of 1909 elected him a member of the city council. He was a member of the civic 
water commission that installed the system of wells whereby the city of Spokane 
is supplied with spring water instead of drawing its supply from the river. He 
also took a very active part in the worjc of the commission that was appointed to 
select and secure water-power rights for the city of Spokane, having in view the 
city ownership in the furnishing of power and light to the population. This com- 
mbsion has recommended a site at Pend d'Oreille and Priest river and it is hoped 
that within the next few years the city will by municipal ownership be able to 
supply power and light at very reasonable rates. Mr. Shaefer also became actively 



120 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

concerned in the contest for grade separation at the time the Milwaukee^ St. Paul 
& Puget Sound Railway and the North Coast Railroad were granted permission 
to enter the city. Aside from his effective labors in behalf of municipal projects 
Mr. Shaefer is now actively concerned in efforts to promote the best interests and 
welfare of the commonwealth as a member of the state senate^ to which he was 
elected on the republican ticket in the fall of 1910. He at once was accorded a 
position of leadership in the upper house, being now an active member of the 
judiciary committee and chairman of the committee on memorials and enrolled 
bills. 

On the 18th of December, 1895, at Des Moines, Iowa, Mr. Shaefer was mar- 
ried to Mabel Braderick Meservey, a daughter of John and Lois (Dungan) Brad- 
erick, of that city. Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Shaefer, George A. 
and Stella, the latter the wife of Edward J. Beard, of Spokane. During the period 
of his residence here Mr. Shaefer and his wife have been members of the First 
Congregational church of Spokane and he also belongs to the Chamber of Com- 
merce, the Inland Club, the Knights of Pythias and the Spokane Tumverein. They 
reside at No. 225 Seventeenth avenue and are well known socially. 

Regarded as a citizen and in his social relations Mr. Shaefer belongs to that 
public-spirited, useful and helpful type of men whose ambitions and desires are 
centered and directed in those channels through which flow the greatest and most 
permanent good to the greatest number. In his public service in connection with 
both municipal and state affairs he brings to bear the sound judgment of the 
business man who believes in practical business methods in the conduct of both 
city and state business. While well grounded in the political maxims of both 
schools, he has also studied the lessons of actual life, arriving at his conclusions 
as a result of what may be called his post-graduate studies in the school of affairs. 



JOSEPH H. BOYD. 



With the development of industrial activity in the northwest Spokane has 
come in for a full share of those business interests which are ever a factor in gen- 
eral growth and prosperity because of the large number of men employed and 
the large amount of capital thus kept in circulation. Every successful business 
undertaking therefore becomes a factor in the city's advancement, and the place 
which is occupied by the National Iron Works in Spokane is a prominent one. 
Of this important industrial concern Joseph H. Boyd is the president and gen- 
eral manager. His has been an eventful and interesting career, for his experi- 
ences have been most varied. He was born in Devonshire, England, January 6, 
1842, his parents being John and Martha Boyd. He was left an orphan when a 
little lad of six and at the age of nine years went to sea as an apprentice. In the 
ensuing seven years he touched at almost every port of importance on the face 
of the globe and gained comprehensive knowledge of the world and its peoples 
and from the experiences of life learned many valuable and oft times difficult 
lessons. When in the harbor at San Francisco, at the age of sixteen, he deter- 
mined to leave the sea and for a short time remained in that city but soon after- 
ward made his way to British Columbia, attracted by the gold discoveries on the 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 121 

Frazier riyer. This was in 1858. Later he was to be found in lumber camps 
of the Puget Sound country for a few years^ and arduous and unremitting toil 
tao^t him much concerning life's values and those things which are most worth 
while. In June, 1861, he went of Orofino, Idaho, the first mining camp in that 
state, there making his headquarters during the succeeding decade, in which he was 
engaged in mining. His efforts were gradually rewarded with a measure of suc- 
cess and with the capital acquired in that manner he went to Portland, Oregon, 
where he engaged in a real-estate and investment business and also became finan- 
cially interested in the Vulcan Iron Works. 

For twelve years Mr. Boyd was a resident of Portland and in 1883 came to 
Spokane, where he entered commercial circles as a hardware merchant under 
the name of the J. H. Boyd Hardware Company. He had built up a substantial and 
gratifying trade, when, in 1889, his entire stock was destroyed in the great fire 
which swept over Spokane, leaving him with a loss of forty thousand dollars 
above his insurance. His ability as a business man and his well known trustworthi- 
ness enabled him to obtain credit with manufacturers and he again started in 
business, admitting John W. Goss to a partnership. In 1890 they consolidated 
with HoUy-Mason-Marks & Company, Mr. Boyd becoming a director of the new 
firm, with which he continued until 1897, when he disposed of his interests. Ten 
years before he had brought his iron work machinery from Portland and incor- 
porated the present company, of which he has continuously served as the presi- 
dent, while in 1890 he also accepted the position of general manager and has 
since concentrated his energies upon the control of this enterprise and the ex- 
pansion of its trade relations. The company's output includes gasoline and steam 
engines, ^boilers, elevators, architectural iron, quartz mills and crushers, con- 
centrators, ore cars, buckets, and general mill and mining machinery, wrought 
iron, iron and brass castings, etc. Their plant was originally located on the island 
in the river, where business was conducted for twenty years, but in 1907 a re- 
moval was made to their present site at the corner of Division and Catalbo streets, 
after they had erected there one of the most complete plants of this kind in the 
northwest. Of Mr. Boyd it has been said: "He is possessed of unusual executive 
ability and owes his wealth and prestige as a manufacturer solely to his own 
energy and good judgment and to his splendid faculty for managing large enter- 
prises." In addition to his manufacturing activities in Spokane he has large min- 
ing interests in Coeur d'Alene. 

Mr. Boyd has never sought progress in other fields outside of business and 
yet his fitness for office and leadership in different relations have been recognized 
by his fellow townsmen, who practically forced him into the office of councilman. 
He served as city alderman for two years and during the latter year was presi- 
dent of the coimcil. While he does not desire political preferment his position 
regarding political questions has never been an equivocal one, for he has ever been 
a stalwart, advocate of republican principles. He belongs to Spokane Lodge, 
No. 84, F. & A. M. and to All Saints Episcopal church, in which he has been a 
vestryman. 

It was on the 9th of August, 1871, in Portland, Oregon, that Mr. Boyd was 

united in marriage to Miss Mina Epperly, a daughter of John and Louisa C. 

(Graham) Epperly, who were pioneer settlers of Butteville, Oregon, where Mrs. 

Boyd was bom. By her marriage she has become the mother of three children: 



122 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Graham Boyd, who is secretary of the National Iron Works; Edith L., who re- 
sides with her parents in Spokane; and Edna M., deceased. 

Mr. Boyd certainly deserves much credit for what he has accomplished. He 
started out in life handicapped by a lack of advantages that many boys enjoy. 
Yet as the years passed on he learned many valuable lessons in the school of ex- 
perience and there awakened in him the ambition to make the most of his time 
and opportunities and gradually he has advanced, overcoming obstacles which 
have utterly discouraged many men, and today he is recognized as one who pos- 
sesses excellent ability as an organizer and has the power of coordinating seem- 
ingly diversified elements into a unified and harmonious whole. His personal 
popularity is due in large measure to his unfeigned cordiality, while his courtesy 
is unfailing and his integrity is above question. 



WILLIS A. RITCHIE. 



It is perhaps a trite saying that there is always room at the top and yet if 
this truth were really apprehended by the individual, statistics perhaps would not 
give as they do today the fact that the percentage of failures amounts to about 
ninety of those who attempt to conduct an independent business venture. Under- 
standing that the path of opportunity is open to all and that advancement depends 
upon the individual, his industry, his close application and his unfaltering deter- 
mination, Willis A. Ritchie has throughout his business life placed his dependence 
upon those qualities and has, therefore, reached a position of more than local 
prominence as an architect of the northwest. He has been a resident of Spokane 
since January, 1892, and during this period constant demand has been made for 
his services in the field which he chose as his life work and in which he has pro- 
gressed far beyond the point of mediocrity. 

He was born in Van Wert county, Ohio, July 14, 1864. His parents, John 
E. and Margaret J. (McCoy) Ritchie, were at that time living upon a farm, 
although his father had previously become a member of the legal profession. Dur- 
ing the very early boyhood of his son Willis he removed to Lima, Ohio, where for 
twenty-five years he continued in the practice of law and then went upon the 
bench, serving as judge of the common pleas court at Lima for ten years. Pro- 
fessional ability and his personal worth gained him high rating as a representative 
of the legal profession in his county. There he died in 1908, having for about 
thirteen years survived his wife, who passed away in 1895. 

After acquiring his more strictly literary education in the public and high 
schools of Lima, Willis A. Ritchie turned his attention to the study of architecture, 
pursuing a course outlined- by the superintendent of architecture of the United 
States treasury department. He added to theoretical knowledge broad practical 
experience but never attended any technical schools. In 1885 he removed to 
Kansas and while practicing his profession at* different points in that state main- 
tained his headquarters at Winfield. He was at that time but twenty-one years 
of age but already his ability in the line of his profession was supplemented by 
keen discrimination and sound judgment that won him a creditable place in busi- 
ness circles. He had branch offices at Arkansas City and Wellington and super- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 128 

vised the erection of the new Federal building at Wichita^ Kansas^ costing two 
hundred and fifty thousand dollars. His identification with the northwest dates 
from 1889^ at which time he became a resident of Seattle^ there remaining for 
three years. During that period he devoted all his attention to public buildings 
and among some of the most prominent that he designed and supervised are the 
King County Courthouse of Seattle ; the Whatcomb County Courthouse, at Belling- 
ham; the Jefferson County Courthouse, at Port Townsend; the Clarke County 
Courthouse, at Vancouver, Washington; the Thurston County Courthouse, at Olym- 
pia; and the original building of the Soldiers* Home, at Orting, Washington. 
Coming to Spokane in January, 1892, he at once opened an office and the work 
which he had previously done in the state commended him to the patronage of the 
public here. Soon the contracts awarded him were making a heavy demand upon 
his time and energies. The evidences of his skill and ability are found in the 
Spokane County Courthouse, the City Hall, and many of the beautiful homes of 
Spokane. He was also the builder of the Girls* Dormitory and Science Hall at 
the Idaho State University and he planned and supervised the building of the 
present state capitol, at Olympia. He is a constant student of that which bears 
upon his profession, early becoming familiar with all the recognized styles of good 
architecture, and has developed many original and attractive plans in the erection 
of the public and private buildings that he has erected in the northwest. 

Mr. Ritchie has been married twice. On the 14th of July, 1887, at Winfield, 
Kansas, he wedded Etta Reid, a daughter of A. Lawson and Alice A. Reid, of that 
dty. Mrs. Ritchie died in Spdiiane in 1901, leaving a son, John Reid Ritchie, who 
was bom in 1894 and is now attending school here. An elder child, Margaret, 
who was bom in 1888, had died in infancy. In September, 1902, Mr. Ritchie 
was again married, his second union being with Merriam P. Williamson, a daugh- 
ter of Frank F. and Etta Williamson, of Olympia. • Her father was one of the 
pioneers of this state. He engaged in the lumber business and was the first to 
log with steam power on the Pacific coast. The Ritchie family residence is at 
No. 119 Seventh avenue. 

Mr. Ritchie was formerly an active worker in the ranks of the republican 
party but does not take a prominent part at the present time. The demands of 
his business have been constantly greater and his advancement, which was as- 
sured by reason of his close application, laudable ambition and thorough under- 
standing of the scientific principles underlying his work, has placed him in a 
prominent position among the architects of Spokane. 



OSCAR CAIN. 



Oscar Cain, filling the position of United States attorney for the Spokane dis- 
trict, was bom on the 25th of Masy, 1868, in Ringgold county, Iowa, a son of 
Robert and Sarah (Brown) Cain, who in 1867 removed from Ohio to Iowa. The 
father had previously served as a soldier in the Union army during the Civil war, 
enlisting in the Sixty-fifth Ohio Infantry. After ten years' residence in the Hawk- 
eye state Robert Cain took his family to lola, Kansas, where they resided until 
1892. 



124 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Oscar Cain began his education in the public schools of Iowa and continued 
his studies in Kansas^ in a broad general knowledge laying the foundation for his 
professional learning. He took up the study of law in an attorney's office of lola 
and was admitted to the bar on the 2d of Aprils 1892^ passing the required exami- 
nation before the supreme court at Topeka^ Kansas. Immediately afterward he 
came to the northwest and for one year was engaged in teaching school in the Willa- 
mette valley in Oregon. In February, 1893, he removed to Walla Walla where he 
entered upon the practice of law and in his chosen calling made rapid advance. 
During the period of his residence there he served for three terms as city attor- 
ney and was also for two terms prosecuting attorney of Walla Walla county. This 
brought him wide and valuable experience and the ability which he displayed in 
handling important litigation that came to him in his official as well as in private 
connection led to his appointment on the 17th of August, 1910, as United States 
attorney for the eastern district of Washington, which position he is now filling, 
with residence in Spokane. 

On the 27th of June, 1901, Mr. Cain was married to Miss Abbie Waterman, of 
Walla Walla, a daughter of Samuel and Jane Waterman, of that city, who were 
pioneer settlers there, coming in 1861. Mr. and Mrs. Cain now have a daughter 
Lois, eight years of age, and they reside at No. 1204 South Cook street, where 
he purchased a pleasant residence. In politics he has always been a republican, 
interested in the welfare of the party and thoroughly informed concerning the 
vital issues and questions of the day. His social relations are with the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks, the Woodmen of the World and the Spokane Club. His 
own intellectual attainments make him a congenial companion in those circles where 
well read men discuss the questions of the day and his close application and broad 
study in his profession have gained him high standing as a representative of the 
Washington bar. 



HARRY OCHS. 



One of the foremost citizens of Harrington is Harry Ochs, who has resided in 
Lincoln county for twenty-seven years, during which time he has made extensive 
and lucrative speculations in lands in this section. In addition to his valuable 
realty holdings he was one of the founders of the First National Bank of Har- 
rington, of which he has ever since been president. 

Mr. Ochs was formerly a subject of Germany, having been bom in Prussia, 
on December 19, 1854, his parents being Sebastian and Martha Ochs. He was 
reared and educated in the city of Frankfort, following which he entered the Ger- 
man army, in which he served for three years. He was discharged in 1879 and 
very soon thereafter decided to come to America, believing that he would here find 
better opportunities for advancement than were available in his own country, 
and in 1880 he took passage for the United States with California as his destina- 
tion. During the first four years of his residence in this country he followed va- 
rious pursuits in the latter state, but at the expiration of that time, in 1884, he 
came to Lincoln county and here he has ever since been located. When he first 
came here he filed on a homestead, two and a half miles south of the present site 



HARRY (X:HS 






t • 






-J Oi 






SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 127 

of Mohler, but as he had but limited means it was necessary for him to work for 
other ranchmen in the vicinity in order to acquire the money to improve his land 
and place it under cultivation. In common with a large number of the pioneers he 
endured many hardships and privations, and encountered innumerable difficulties 
and obstacles before he became established. He was very ambitious, however, and 
possessed too much energy and determination of purpose to accept defeat and 
eventoally won by reason of his persistent perseverance. By working for others 
until he had enough money to enable him to live, while he was placing his own 
ranch under cultivation^ he made a start, and for some years thereafter he continued 
to hire out to other settlers in that locality, in order to obtain the means to further 
improve his own property. He often times became very much discouraged, for 
the early years were very hard, but he prospered with the passing of time and 
was able to extend his holdings imtil he now owns between five and six thousand 
acres of fine wheat land that he is renting. He early recognized the wonderful 
possibilities this country afforded, and made judicious investments in land that 
he has since sold at a large advance over the original cost. No expense has been 
spared in the equipment and improvement of his home ranch, where he has erected 
a fine residence that is provided with every modem convenience and comfort. Mr. 
Odis has always been a public-spirited man and has been financially interested in 
the devolopment of various local enterprises. In 1908, together with others he 
organized the First National Bank of Harrington, now one of the substantial and 
thriving financial institutions of the county, in which he is the largest stockholder. 
Before this bank was organized he served for years in the capacity of president of 
the State Bank of Harrington. ... .* . ^^ 



4 . . 'V A ' 



Mr. Ochs was married in April, 190^j^;ta l^t^.'^-fiidma (McCallup) Owen, who 
is a native of Illinois. Three children have been born of this marriage, Martha E., 
Harry L., and Clyde, while Mrs. Ochs has twp^ daughters by a former marriage, 
Edith and Grace Owen. The family re,3\de ^ii' iid.ttiikgton. 

The religious faith of Mr. Ochsf is manifested through his membership in the 
German Lutheran church, while his political support is given to the republican 
party. He is held in high esteem throughout the county, where he is widely known, 
baring always manifested the highest principles and unquestionable integrity in 
all of his transactions. The success of Mr. Ochs but serves to substantiate the 
frequent assertion that there are unlimited opportunities for enterprising and 
industrious young men in this country if they will only persevere in their efforts 
to seek them. His achievements have been won through his individual endeavors, 
as he came to America practically empty-handed and has never been given any 
assistance save such as is accorded every man of recognized worth and integrity. 



FRANK B. GREGG. 



The term progress might be regarded as the keystone of the character of Frank 
B. Gregg. It has been manifest in all that he has undertaken and particularly 
in his business associations. Keen judgment, too, has enabled him to quickly dis- 
criminate between the essential and the nonessential and in utilizing the former he 
has worked his way -steadily upward in the printing business, which he chose as 

TtLID-f 



128 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

the field of hia activity^ having now one of the most extensive, best equipped and 
most liberally patronized job printing establishments of the northwest. He was 
bom in Elmira, New York, July 31, 1850, a son of George and Hannah M. (Barr) 
Gregg, both of whom were natives of the Empire state. The Gregg family is of 
Scotch-Irish lineage and was represented in both the Revolutionary and Civil wars. 
George Gregg died in 1870 and was long survived by his wife, who passed away 
October 1, 1910. She was born in Norwich, New York, and also came of a family 
that was actively connected with the Revolutionary and Civil war contests. The 
Barrs, however, came originally from England. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. 
George Gregg was celebrated in January, 1849, and in May, 1871, some time after 
the death of her first husband, Mrs. Gregg became the wife of Edward Rutledge, 
who passed away July 26, 1911. The two uncles of our subject are Samuel W. 
and Henry M. Barr, both Civil war veterans and now living retired in Beloit, Wis- 
consin. 

Frank B.- Gregg was but a young lad when his parents removed to the middle 
west and in the public schools of the Badger state he pursued his education. His 
connection with the printing trade began January 19, 1865, when he accepted 
the position of "devil" and newsboy at Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin. Gradually he 
worked his way upward, his ability and faithfulness winning recognition, and for 
twelve years he was manager of the Chippewa Herald, which was organized and 
owned by the late General George C. Ginty, one of the most prominent men of the 
state and one of the best known editors of the middle west. In 1888 Mr. Gregg 
removed to Superior, Wisconsin, where for fourteen years he published the Superior 
Wave. In 1894 a printers* strike occurred in that town in connection with the 
Telegram and Leader, mom\ng and evening papers, resulting in March of that 
year in the publication by the printers of the town of a paper called the Daily 
News. This was published and printed by Mr. Gregg from March until August 
of that year and in the latter month the other two papers again took on a force 
of union printers. Mr. Gregg has been a member of the Typographical Union 
for thirty-eight years, joining it in Minneapolis while working on the Tribune in 
1873. He has always been one of the active men of the organization and is an 
earnest lover of its principles. He was also one of the officers of the State Press 
Association and always one of its active members during the period of his resi- 
dence in Wisconsin. He left that state in June, 1902, to establish his home in 
Spokane, where he purchased the Quick Print from Winship & Ogden and has 
since conducted it. He carries on a general job printing business in all lines of 
printing and has won continuous success. The business was established by a man 
of the name of Wilcox about seventeen years ago and the publication was called 
the Quick Print. This is one of the best equipped offices west of Chicago and every 
kind of job printing is done, including bank work and bonding. The output is 
ever neat, many times artistic and at all times suitable for the occasion demanded. 
Mr. Gregg has kept abreast with the improvement that has been continually made 
in the printing business and the work of his office is the exemplification of that 
which is highest and best in the "art preservative" of arts. He is also a director 
of the National Bank of Conamerce and he occupies an enviable and prominent 
position in business and financial circles, owing not alone to the success he has 
achieved but also to the straightforward business policy to which he has ever closely 
adhered. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 129 

On the 17th of December, 1879, in Manchester, Iowa, Mr. Gregg was united 
in marriage to Miss Eva L. Day, a daughter of Colonel George A. Day, who is 
a second cousin of Judge Day of the superior bench. The Day family was repre- 
sented in the Revolutionary and Civil wars and was of English origin. The Rev. 
Alvah Day, grandfather of Mrs. Gregg, was a Presbyterian minister, and she 
holds membership in the Presbyterian church. They have three children: Eliza- 
bedi, Paul and Percy. The two last named are attending school. 

Mrs. Gre^ is a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution and 
Mr. Gre^ belongs to Spokane Lodge, No. 34, F. & A. M., also to the consistory, 
the commandery and El Katif Temple of the Mystic Shrine, in which he has held 
office. He has also occupied several chairs in the blue lodge and was an officer in 
both the chapter and commandery in Wisconsin. He assisted in organizing the 
chapter in West Superior and was its first scribe. He cooperates willingly and 
helpfully in the work of the Chamber of Commerce of Spokane and is also a 
member of the Spokane Athletic Club. He likewise belongs to the Young Men's 
Christian Association and his interests are broad and varied and at all times are of 
a nature which contribute to the advancement and uplift of the community and the 
mdividual. He has been a close student of many of the economic, sociological and 
political problems and in these, as in his chosen life work, keeps abreast with the 
best thinking men of the age. 



CHARLES E. SWAN. 



Charles E. Swan, who in the earlier part of his professional career specialized 
in the field of railroad law, has given his attention to general law practice since 
coming to Sp>okane. He is now a member of the firm of Cannon, Ferris & Swan, 
a firm that ranks with the foremost practicing at the Spokane bar. He was born 
in Brooklyn, New York, October 22, 1867, and was one of a family of six chil- 
dren whose parents were David E. and Mary (Buttle) Swan. The father, who 
was bom in the state of New York, represented an old New Engleind family of 
English descent. Throughout his business life he was an accountant and died 
in 1892. His widow, a native of Ireland, is now living in St. Paul, Minnesota. 
The brothers of our subject are: William F. Swan, who is engaged in the insurance 
business in Philadelphia; and David Arthur Swan, a lumber merchant of Tacoma. 
The three sisters are: Mary A., the wife of Leonard Brisley, of Minneapolis; 
Mabel D., the widow of Charles P. Eastman, residing at Merriam Park, Minne- 
sota; and Edith S., who is now with her mother in St. Paul but was formerly 
a teacher of domestic science in the normal school at Madison, South Dakota. 

Reared on the Atlantic seacoast, Charles E. Swan pursued his education in the 
common schools of Montclair, New Jersey, and subsequently mastered a three 
years* course in the college of law of the University of Minnesota, attending night 
classes. He was graduated in 1896 and in June of that year was admitted to prac- 
tice in the courts of Minnesota and in 1909 was admitted to practice in the courts 
of Washington. Long before he entered upon the study of law, however, he had 
made his initial step in the business world, having in 1882 entered the auditor's 
office of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company at St. Paul. There he continued 



130 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

for a year, after which he spent four years in the employ of Auerbach, Finch & Van 
Slyck, wholesale dry-goods merchants. He next entered the service of the Chicago, 
Burlington & Northern Railroad, now a part of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 
Railroad system, being employed in the auditor's office and also in connection with 
the freight department. He afterward entered the office of the general claim agent 
of the Northern Pacific Railroad at St. Paul, where he was employed successively 
as clerk, stenographer and chief clerk until 1897, when he became traveling claim 
agent of the road, with headquarters at St. Paul, his territory extending as far 
west as Butte, Montana. In October, 1898, he resigned and took a position with 
the legal department of the Minneapolis & St. Louis Railroad Company at Minne- 
apolis. He was also claim agent of that company and was with them for four years, 
after which he resigned and reentered the service of the Northern Pacific Railroad 
Company as district claim agent at Helena, Montana. This was in January, 1903, 
and he there remained until the 1st of June, when he was transferred to Spokane 
by the same company as district claim agent, in which position he remained for 
four years, or until the 1st of July, 1907, when he became claim agent of the 
Inland Empire system of Spdcane. That remained his business connection until 
the 1st of April, 1909, when he became associated with the law firm of Cannon 
& Lee and on the 1st of September, 1910, the law firm of Cannon, Ferris, Swan & 
Lally was organized, Mr. Lally later dropping out of the firm. Their position at 
the bar is a most creditable one and the varied abilitv of the different members 
enables the firm to successfully handle work in all depiartments of the law. 

Mr. Swan was united in marriage, at Merriam Park, Minnesota, to Miss Flor- 
ence M. Brainard, a daughter of Frank L. Brainard, one of the early settlers of 
St. Paul, Minnesota. ' She is descended from a family founded in America prior to 
the Revolutionary war — a family of English descent — and by reason of the part 
which some of her ancestors took in the struggle for independence she now holds 
membership with the Daughters of the American Revolution. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Swan have been bom three children, Ruth, Helen and Florence, aged respectively 
ten, four and two years. Mr. Swan belongs to the Inland Club, the Independent 
Order of Foresters, the Spokane Transportation Club and the Chamber of Com- 
merce — associations which indicate much of the nature of his interests. His life 
has been one of well directed activity and personal ability has brought him to the 
creditable position which he occupies today in connection with the professional 
interests of his adopted city. 



ALFRED M. CRAVEN. 



Alfred M. Craven is best known to the public, perhaps, in professional and 
political relations, having been a dominant and beneficial force in both lines. In 
other connections, too, however, he is widely known, being cordially received in 
the best social circles in Spokane where intelligent men are gathered in the dis- 
cussion of leading and vital questions. He was born in Mankato, Minnesota, 
October 11, 1865. His father, John G. Craven, a native of Indiana, was descended 
from an English family that was founded on American soil in 1670. Mary 
Craven, a cousin of one of his ancestors became the wife of Edmund Andross, the 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 131 

first English governor of New York. On the other side of the Atlantic the an- 
cestry can he traced hack to 1456^ the ancestral home being in Yorkshire^ England. 
The great-grandfather of Alfred M. Craven was Thomas Craven, who with his 
brother John was enrolled as a member of the associated company of Warwick 
township, Bucks comity, Pennsylvania, for service in the Revolutionary war, Au- 
gust 21, 1775. The former was with General Washington at Trenton and at 
Brandywine, while his brother John was made a prisoner of war and incarcerated 
at Philadelphia for more than three months. The grandfather of Alfred M. 
Craven served as a captain in the Indian war that broke out during the progress of 
the War of 1812. Both the father and grandfather were prominent abolitionists 
and became in 1845 the founders of the Eleutherian College at College Hill, In- 
diana, a chartered institution known as an abolitionist college. It had for its 
motto: "Free to all without regard to sex or color.'* John G. Craven not only 
was a teacher and proprietor of one of the old-time private academies of Indiana 
bat was also connected in a similar way with educational work in Iowa. He was 
a candidate for presidential elector on the free soil ticket of 1852 whicli was 
headed by the name of Martin Van Buren. He died in 1898 and was survived 
for two years by his wife, Mrs. Martha (Wilson) Craven, who passed away in 
1895. She was bom in Ohio and belonged to an old Scotch Pres'byterian family. 
Her grandfather. Captain Hutton, entered the Revolutionary war from South 
Carolina and was captain of a company from that state under General Marion in 
his campaign again Tarleton. Mrs. Craven was also granddaughter of Major John 
Gaston, who served in a Pennsylvania regiment during the war for independence. 
It was in his honor that Gastonville in Washington county, Pennsylvania, was 
named. His father was murdered by the Indians in the French and Indian war, 
while John Wilson, another ancestor of Mrs. Craven, was in the siege of London- 
derry, Ireland, in 1689. The first of the family to come to America was his son, 
John Wilson, who settled in Pennsylvania^ In the family of Mr. and Mrs. John 
G. Craven were ^ve sons: Alfred M.; Edwin W. and Herman W., who are mem- 
bers of the Seattle (Washington) bar; Arthur J., an attorney of Bellingham, 
Washington; and Roger C, who for twenty years has been on the editorial staff 
of the Omaha World Herald. 

Alfred M. Craven was educated in his father's academy at Irving, Iowa, and 
in the State University at Iowa City, from which he was graduated in 1888 with 
the degree of B. A. In preparation for the practice of law he pursued a partial 
course in the same university and also continued his reading in the office of Henry 
H. Craig, of Kansas City, where he was admitted to the bar on the 11th of 
January, 1889. About the middle of April of that year ^Mr. Crav^a* came to 
Washington and after a week spent in Spokane went to Whitman county, practic- 
ing his profession for six months at Palouse City. In the spring of 1890 he re- 
moved to Colfax where he practiced for eight years, and then came to Spokane. 
For a year he was in partnership with Judge Norman Buck, now deceased, and 
for two years practiced in partnership with Judge H. W. Canfield, while in Col- 
fax. He now engages in general practice yet did much corporation work in Spo- 
kane prior to accepting office. In politics he has always been a stalwart republican 
and while in Colfax served as a delegate to conventions but was never active as 
a political worker. In April, 1911, under the new commission form of govern- 
ment, he was appointed corporation counsel. Two years prior to that time Mr. 



132 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Craven had been a candidate for judge, on which occasion four judges were to 
be elected, he receiving the fifth highest vote. 

In Portland, Oregon, on the 29th of September, 1909, occurred the marriage 
of Mr. Craven and Miss Melina Saux, a daughter of Raymond Saux, who was a 
pioneer of Idaho and in 1870 built the Raymond House at Lewiston, Idaho. Mrs. 
Craven was bom at Warren, Idaho, when that place was a flourishing placer mining 
camp. Mr. Craven lives in a very attractive home at E 1903 Twelfth avenue. He 
belongs to Oriental Lodge, No. 74, F. &. A. M., and is also a Royal Arch Mason. 
He belongs likewise to Spokane Camp, No. 99, W. O. W., is a member of the 
Sons of the Revolution, a member of the Inland Club and a charter member of 
the University Club and for a number of years has been an active member of 
the Spokane Athletic Club, in the work of which he still takes considerable inter- 
est. His activities have never been self-centered; he has ever realized that life 
means more than mere individual interests, and has cooperated in many move- 
ments which tend to solve vexing problems of the age and place before men higher 
ideals of the individual purpose and of citizenship. 



THOMAS L. CATTERSOX, M. D. 

Dr. Thomas L. Catterson, who has won distinction in hospital as well as pri- 
vate practice, has for several years specialized in surgical work and the marked 
ability which he has displayed in this field establishes him through the consensus 
of public opinion in a foremost position as a representative of the medical pro- 
fession of Washington. He has been a resident of Spokane since 1887 but three 
years before had established his home in, Spokane county. His birth occurred in 
Geneva, New York, February 6, 1857, his parents being William and Mary (Long) 
Catterson, both of whom were natives of Scotland and on coming to the United 
States settled at Geneva, New York. There the father engaged in farming for 
a considerable period, but both he and his wife have now passed away. 

After leaving the public schools of his native city Dr. Catterson continued his 
education in Hobart College there, and with a good classical education to serine 
as the foundation of professional knowledge he took up the study of medicine in 
the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and afterward continued his course in 
the Detroit College of Medicine, from which he was graduated in 1887. He then 
turned his face westward, believing that better opportunities for advancement 
could be secured in this great and growing Pacific coast country. Already he had 
visited the Spokane country in 1884 and had located at Cheney, where his brother- 
in-law, B. C. Van Houten, was filling the position of county auditor. After eigh- 
teen months' residence in Cheney he had returned to Detroit to complete his medi- 
cal education and following his graduation he opened an office in Spokane in 1887. 
For a number of years he continued in general practice but the ability which he 
displayed in surgical work and his deep interest in that branch of practice led 
him to more and more largely concentrate his energies upon that department of 
the work, and for several years past he has specialized in surgery, being regarded 
as one of the foremost representatives of this branch of the profession not only 
in Spokane but in all eastern Washington. For twenty years he has served as a 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 133 

member of the staff of the Sacred Heart Hospital and from 1888 until 1890 in- 
elusive he was county physician of Spokane county. He has also served as presi- 
dent of the board of health and is in hearty sympathy with the attitude of the 
profession in regard to the dissemination of a general knowledge of the laws of 
health, believing it far better to prevent disease than to check it. He was one of 
the organizers of the Spokane County Medical Association and at all times has 
done everything in his power to advance the efficiency of the medical fraternity, 
discharging his own professional duties with a sense of conscientious obligation. 

In October, 1876, Dr. Catterson was married to Miss Addie Van Houten, a 
daughter of Abraham and Mary (Collins) Van Houten. Mrs. Catterson passed 
away in Spokane in March, 1897, leaving a daughter, Evelyn, and in November, 
1898, Dr. Catterson was again married, the second union being with Annie E. 
Goodner, of this city. They reside in a beautiful residence at No. 2025 Fourth 
avenue, which he erected in 1903 and which is situated almost opposite Coeur 
d'Alene Park. In 1903 he erected the Geneva apartments at the corner of Fourth 
avenue and Maple street, so naming them in honor of his old home town, and in 
addition he owns considerable other real estate in the city, having judiciously made 
investment in Spokane property which has been continually rising in value for a 
number of years. 

His political allegiance is given to the republican party but, while he has neve* 
aspired to hold office, he has been interested in the vital principles of government 
and in the significant questions of the day, keeping, therefore, well informed on 
the issues that divide the two parties. In Masonry he has attained high rank, as 
is indicated in his membership in El Katif Temple of the Mystic Shrine. Of 
Oriental Lodge, No. 74, F. & A. M., he has served as a past master. At all times 
he has exemplified in his life the beneficent and the benevolent spirit of the craft. 
His practice gives him ample opportunity to embody in his work the principles 
of the fraternity and many there are who could bear testimony to his brotherly 
kindness in an hour of need. Nature gifted him with strong mentality and he 
has used his powers in a serviceable life wherein the public has been a direct 
beneficiary. 



RICHARD M. BARNHART. 

Richard M. Barnhart was a brilliant member of the Spokane bar, his record 

being at all times a credit to the profession which he represented. Throughout 

the period in which he engaged in the practice of law he manifested a loyalty to 

his clients' interests that became proverbial and in every relation of life he 

stood for those things which- are most worth while and gave his support to those 

interests which are of most value in the life of a community. He was bom in 

Decorah, Iowa, September 22, 1869, and his life record covered the intervening 

years to the 1st of March, 1910. He was a son of John H. and Marie (Bibbins) 

Barnhart, the former a native of the state of New York, while the mother was 

^rn in Indiana. On removing westward they settled in Iowa, where the father 

engaged in farming and stock raising. In his boyhood days Richard M. Barnhart 

remained at home with his parents, spending his childhood in Decorah and at- 



134 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

tending . the high school at Esterville, Iowa. In the meantime he was employed 
in a local bank and thus obtained his first business experience. Later he went to 
Valparaiso^ Indiana^ where he spent one term in college and he also spent one 
term in school at Ada, Ohio. He afterward completed his education in the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, where he pursued the study of law and was graduated with 
the class of 1889. He was considered a very brilliant student and finished a 
three years' course in the Michigan university in two years. 

In the fall of 1899 Mr. Barnhart decided to come to the west, thinking that he 
would have better business opportunities in this growing section of the country. 
He chose Spokane as the scene of his future labors and following his arrival in 
this city entered the office of Judge Moore, prosecuting attorney of Spokane, under 
whom he acted as deputy for ^ve years. He was ambitious, energetic and deter- 
mined and during that period he gained broad practical experience in the work 
of the courts and promoted his own ability so that in 1904 he was elected prosecut- 
ing attorney. The faithfulness and efficiency which he displayed during his first 
term led to his reelection, so that he filled the office for two terms, making an ex- 
cellent record in that position. He then entered upon the private practice of law 
in January, 1909, in partnership with George A. Lee, and continued with great 
success until his untimely death which occurred March 1, 1910, in a railroad ac- 
cident in which nearly one hundred lost their lives. 

On the 29th of April, 1903, in Spokane, Mr. Barnhart was united in marriage 
to Miss Victoria Devor, a daughter of Joseph B. and Martha (Starr) Devor, who 
were natives of Ohio and on removing westward settled in Elkhart, Indiana, where 
the father became a prominent banker and leading citizen. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Barnhart was bom one son, Richard Devor Barnhart. 

In his political views Mr. Barnhart was a republican, interested in the wel- 
fare and success of his party and active in support of the measures and movements 
for the benefit of the city. His fraternal relations were with the Masons and the 
Knights of Pythias and he held membership in the First Presbyterian church, to 
the teachings of which he was always loyal. He was a man of studious habits, 
read broadly and thought deeply and he kept well informed on the leading ques- 
tions of interest of his day. He was (me of the most progressive and successful 
attorneys of Spokane and in the practice of law made a creditable record. He 
carefully prepared his cases and was logical in his arguments and enjoyed the 
high regard of his professional brethren as well as of those whom he met in the 
relations of social life. 



HON. WILLIAM E. CULLEN. 

In the history of the northwest no name is regarded with greater honor and 
prominence than that of William E. Cullen, who remained for a number of years 
as a leading representative of mining law in this section of the country. He was 
also well versed on railroad and other branches of corporation law, his opinions 
coming to be regarded as authority upon questions relative to those branches of 
jurisprudence. He rose to a position, of distinction because he wisely, faithfully 
and conscientiously utilized the powers with which nature endowed him, and among 



W. E. CULLEN, SR. 



, '"^.^ >E.V y„,,^- 



■•Ul 



• • •- ». L i>| , 

"--1 I _ '- ''»^,A 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 187 

those who have left their impress upon the legal history of the northwest none have 
been more faultless in honor^ fearless in conduct or stainless in reputation. He 
resided in Spokane for only a comparatively brief period but was a resident of 
this section of the state for many years. 

His birth occurred in Mansfield, Richland county,. Ohio, June SO, 1888, his 
parents being among the pioneer residents of that state. The ancestry is tr;iced 
back in the paternal line to Scotland, whence the great-grandfather of Judge Cullen 
came to America, leaving the city of Edinburgh in 1768 to become a resident of 
the new world. He was a man of fine intellectual attainments and scholarly habits, 
was a Greek professor and in that connection was for some time a member of the 
faculty of one of the early colleges of Pennsylvania. He was the father of John 
Cullen and the grandfather of Thomas W. Cullen, and the latter was the father of 
William E. Cullen of this review. Thomas W. Cullen engaged in the manufacture 
of woolen goods in Pennsylvania and was there married in 1887 to Miss Isabel 
Morrison. Thirty years later they removed to Ohio, where their remaining days 
were passed, the father's death occurring when he had reached the age of seventy- 
seven years, while the mother passed away at the age of sixty. Their religious 
faith was that of the Protestant Episcopal church and their lives were ever in 
harmony with their professions. 

William E. Cullen was reared amid the refining influences of a good Christian 
home and was the eldest in a family of six children, to whom the public schools of 
his native town afforded them their early educational privileges. He afterward 
had the benefit of three years* study in what is now known as Kenyon College, a 
celebrated Episcopal institution at Gambier, Ohio. The west with its limitless 
opportunities attracted him and following his graduation he went to Minnesota, 
where he was appointed superintendent of instruction for the Winnebago Indians, 
his ancle. Major Cullen, being the Indian agent for the entire northwest. Two 
years were devoted to that work but during that period he determined to enter 
apon the practice of law, hoping to find in it a more congenial and profitable field. 
The trend of his mind was naturally analytical, logical and inductive and he felt 
that there would be sustained interest for him in the preparation and conduct of 
cases and in the solution of intricate and involved legal problems. 

In 1860 Mr. CuUen entered the office of Judge E. Flandreau, at that time asso- 
ciate justice of the supreme court of Minnesota, and there continued his studies 
under most effective direction until 1862, when he was admitted to the bar. He 
shared in the experiences of frontier life during his residence in Minnesota and 
served as second lieutenant in a company of state troops at the time of the Indian 
uprising of 1862, which reached its climax in the fearful massacre at New Ulm. 
The company to which he was attached did active duty in suppressing the Sioux 
Indians, and when his military aid was no longer needed Mr. Cullen turned his 
attention to the active practice of law, opening an office at St. Peter, Nicollet county, 
Minnesota, where he became associated with Major S. A. Buell, a brother of Gen- 
eral Don C. Buell. This connection was maintained until 1866, when Mr. Cullen 
started on the overland journey to Montana, traveling by ox team with a party 
that made the trip under command of Captain James Fisk and arrived in Helena 
m August. 

Mr. Cullen at once opened an office in that city and sdon gained recognition 
as a lawyer of wide knowledge and ability. His services were in constant requisi- 



138 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

tion in the trial of cases and in counsel and he also took active part in shaping the 
early history of the district through political activity. He was chosen to represent 
the district in the legislative assembly, which at that time numbered but seven 
members and was the first to convene subsequent to the annullment of the laws of 
1866. At later dates and on different occasions, when the country was more thickly 
settled, Mr. Cullen again represented his district in the territorial and state leg- 
islatures and was identified with the work of framing many of the laws which now 
have place on the statute books of the state and constitute a firm foundation for its 
present high legal and pM>litical status. 

As the years passed Judge Cullen progressed in his profession until he occupied 
a position of distinctive precedence and prominence. In 1876 he became a part- 
ner of Colonel W. F. Sanders, one of the most distinguished members of the bar 
of the state. Later he was associated with George F. Shelton and afterward 
with Governor J. K. Toole, all distinguished representatives of the legal frater- 
nity in the northwest. He likewise served as division counsel for the Northern 
Pacific Railroad Company from the time its line entered the state of Montana in 
1881 until it was reorganized in 1897. As its chief representative in Montana he 
passed through many exciting periods in its history, from the time when General 
Grant drove the golden spike at Gold Creek, Montana, through its many vicissitudes, 
including in its later years the troublesome seizure of trains by the Coxey army and 
the great sympathetic strike of 1894, which completely tied up its property, and 
finally through its passage into the hands of receivers and its final sale to the 
present reorganization. 

Professional service, which also brought Judge Cullen into more than local 
prominence, was his work as general counsel for F. Augustus Heinze during the 
long legal contest which he waged with the Amalgamated Copper Company for 
many years at Butte, Montana, resulting finally in victory for his client. The 
judge was one of the organizers and a large stockholder of the Powell Sanders 
wholesale grocery company of Spokane. 

The political offices which Judge Cullen filled were always directly or indi- 
rectly in the path of his profession, being connected with framing or with the in- 
terpretation of the law., He was the first attorney general of the state of Mon- 
tana and also its first adjutant general. In politics he was a recognized supporter 
of the democratic party but felt that his professional duties should be precedent 
to all else and thus took comparatively little active part in political work. A con- 
temporary biographer has written of him: "In his chosen field of mining law few 
men were his equals and he has left a deep imprint upon the mining laws and 
decisions of the country. His ability was recognized by the public and the pro- 
fession and was the outcome of close study, thorough preparation of his cases, keen 
analysis of facts and the logical application of the law. Before a court or jury 
he entered easily and naturally into an argument; there was no straining after 
effect, but a precision and coolness in statement, an acuteness and strength in 
argument which few |>ossessed, marked him as of a mind trained in the severest 
school of investigation and to which analytical reasoning was habitual. Such 
decisions as Black vs. Elkhorn Mining Company and Lewis vs. Northern Pacific 
Railroad Company, in the supreme court of the United States, were from their 
beginning great legal battles and were fought by him on points which were then 
new in the history of litigation then existing in this country. For a period of 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 139 

twenty-one years he conducted for the Montana Mining Company, the owner of 
the famous Drum Lummon mine at Marys ville, Montana, the bitter litigation ex- 
isting between it and the St. Louis Mining Company of Montana, and in the end 
fell a victim to his ardor in fighting this litigation. The last trial of this case, in 
Helena, Montana, where he conducted it, lasted for a period of over three months, 
in the year 1905, and he wore himself out during the course of this trial, although 
on account of his rugged health the effects of exhaustion did not disclose themselves 
for a long time to come and not until he was before the supreme court of the United 
States, in arguing this case for the Montana Mining Company in December, 1907, 
when he was stricken down by an attack of heart disease from which he never 
recovered.** 

Judge Cullen spent the last few years of his life in Spokane, to which city he 
removed with his family in 1899, and here entered into partnership with F. M. 
Dudley, under the style of Cullen & Dudley, a connection that was maintained un- 
til his life's labors were ended. He was always very devoted to his family, and his 
was a happy home life which had its inception in his marriage^ in 1868^ in Helena, 
to Miss Corlin V. Stoakes, who was a native of New York, a descendant of the 
Lawrence family and a daughter of Clarence B. Stoakes, for a long time a promi- 
nent attorney of New York city. Mr. and Mrs. Cullen became the parents of ^ve 
children, of whom three are yet residents of Spokane. The mother of these chil- 
dren died on the 18th of January, 1911. 

He considered no effort on his part too great if it would promote the hap- 
piness and welfare of his wife and children and his was a nature that shed around 
it much of the sunshine of life. His friends, and they were many, found him a 
most congenial companion and one, too, with whom association meant expansion and 
elevation. Death came to him in September, 1908, and thus passed from the scene 
of earthly activities one who had long been prominent in the northwest. Success 
and honors came to him in merited recognition of his personal worth and ability. 
He was recognized as the peer of the ablest members of the bar in this section of 
the countrv and his life was rich in all the traits of honorable manhood and 
citizenship. 



WILLIAM J. DOUST. 



Wilham J. Doust, chief of police by appointment of Mayor Pratt in October, 
1910, and also president of the Cascade Laundry j^ and secretary and treasurer of 
the Spokane Laundry, has made a creditable record in both commercial and official 
circles. Mr. Doust was born at Syracuse, New York, November 21, 1857, his 
parents being William and Sarah (Green) Doust The father, who was a mer- 
chant of that city, passed away a number of years ago. Spending his youthful 
days in his parents* home, William J. Doust was sent to the public schools, pass- 
ing through consecutive grades to the high school, and when his school life was 
ended entered business circles in the operative department of the New York Cen- 
tral Railroad as fireman on a locomotive. 

In March, 1879, Mr. Doust went to Leadville, Colorado, where he remained 
for ten years, engaged in mining. His residence in the Spokane country dates 



140 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

from 1887 and for twelve years following his arrival he was engaged in ranching, 
having taken up a homestead claim at what is now known as Green Bluff, sixteen 
miles northeast of the city of Spokane. Throughout the period of his residence in 
this district he has been more or less actively connected with public affairs and 
at different times has been called to office. In 1 889 he received an appointment as 
clerk of the board of comity commissioners, which position he filled for sixteen 
months. He then turned his attention to general merchandising at Hillyard and 
continued in that position until elected sheriff of Spokane county on the republi- 
can ticket, in 1901. His first term of service received indorsement in reelection 
in 1908, so that he served in all for four years, retiring from the office as he had 
entered it, with the confidence and good-will of all law-abiding citizens. He next 
engaged in the laundry business in which he is still interested. He is today presi- 
dent of the Cascade Laundry and is also identified with the Spokane Laundry as 
its secretary and treasurer, while in the Pearl Laundry he is a stockholder. The 
excellent record • which he made in the sheriff's office naturally drew to him the 
attention of Mayor Pratt when a chief of police was appointed, and in October, 
1910, Mr. Doust was named for the position. He has thoroughly organized the 
department and is doing everything in his power to maintain law and order and 
free the state from all criminal acts. 

On the 6th of December, 1879, Mr. Doust was mwried at Leadville, Colorado, 
to Miss Kittie P. Shoudy, a daughter of Henry and Ellen Shoudy, of Syracuse, 
New York. They have &ve children: Edwin H., now manager of the Cascade 
Laundry; William J., inanager of the Pearl Laundry; Minnie E., living at home; 
Kittie, the wife of Claude McDonald, of Spokane ; and Walter, who is still in school. 

The family attend the Central Baptist church and reside in a pleasant home 
at No. 1018 Montgomery avenue. Mr. Doust has many fraternal relations and 
in the different organizations to which he belongs is popular. His membership is 
inTyrian Lodge, No. 96, F. & A. M.; the Elks Lodge, No. ^28; the Modem Wood- 
men of America ; the Woodmen of the World ; the Ancient Order of United Work- 
men; and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is likewise a member of the 
Inland Club. Those who know him find him approachable and genial and he is 
never an unwelcome guest save where there is something to be found that will not 
bear dose investigation and scrutiny. He regards a public office as a public trust 
and it is well known that no trust reposed in William J. Doust has ever been 
betrayed. 



EDGAR G. TAYLOR. 



Where irrigation is the paramount question of the day relative to the develop- 
ment of the vast acreage in the Inland Empire, it is interesting to know something 
of the pioneer work accomplished by real-estate men in that line. In this con- 
nection due relative precedence must be given to Mr. Taylor, whose efforts have 
been largely the means of placing upon the market and putting under water much 
of the land of this district that is now of great value. This, too, has been the 
means of adding largely to the population of Spokane and its adjacent territory. 
In no region of the northwest today are there found more attractive and better 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 141 

improved irrigated tracts and none more productive than those of which Mr. 
Taylor has had charge or has been interested in. He had the prescience to discern 
what the future had in store for this great and growing country and, seeing the 
possibilities for its development through the process of irrigation^ he has put 
forth most effective effort to secure the introduction of an irrigation system that 
shall be adequate to all needs. He has operated continuously in the real-estate 
field since coming to Spokane, having taken up his abode in this city in April, 1900. 

His birthplace was in Mowersville, Pennsylvania, and his natal day was 
January 14, 1862. He was reared upon the home farm of his father, Samuel 
Taylor, who represented an old New England family of German descent. His 
mother, too, who bore the maiden name of Mary Ann Sentman, was bom in the 
Keystone state and was of German lineage. She died in the year 1876. Samuel 
Taylor, the father, in addition to his farming interests became a stockholder in 
the Lurgin Mutual Fire Insurance Company, of which he was one of the organ- 
izers and directors^ and also acted as adjuster foi; the company until his death. 
Unto him and his wife were born ^ve sons and three daughters: Edgar G. ; W. 
S., a lawyer of Los Angeles^ California; John M., who is living on the old home- 
stead at Mowersville^ Pennsylvania; Robert H., a Presbyterian minister living at 
Ash Grove, Missouri ; I^rank E., who is preaching for the Presbyterian church at 
Tusculum, Tennessee; Clara, the wife of J. F. De Haven, a farmer of Mowers- 
ville, Pennsylvania; Mary E., the wife of A. O. Bishop, a retired farmer of Cham- 
bersburg, Pennsylvania; and Emma J., the wife of Mr. Kyle, also a retired farmer 
of Chambersburg. 

In the old Pine Grove school at Mowersville, Pennsylvania, Edgar G. Taylor 
pursued his education and upon the home farm he received practical training in 
the work of the fields, continuing to assist his father until 1881, when, at the age 
of nineteen years, he left home and went to Marshalltown, Iowa. He was em- 
ployed upon a farm near Haverhill, Iowa, from June until December and then 
returned to Pennsylvania, entering the employ of the Geiser Manufacturing Com- 
pany of Waynesboro, that state. He served an apprenticeship as a machinist in 
that employ from 1882 until 1885 and in December of the latter year returned to 
Marshalltown, where for two years he was employed as a machinist by the Iowa 
Barbed Wire Company. Subsequently he removed to Dubuque, Iowa, where he 
remained for two months as machinist for the Iowa Iron Works Company. In the 
fall of 1887 he went to Boone, Iowa, as machinist for the Chicago & Northwestern 
Railroad Company and in December, 1887, accepted the position of foreman of 
the branch lines that centered at Carroll, Iowa. Subsequently he was promoted to 
the position of division foreman of the Chicago & Northwestern at Council Bluffs, 
Iowa, continuing at that point until June, 1895, when he was appointed master 
mechanic for the western Iowa division of the Chicago & Northwestern, acting 
in that capacity until the 1st of February, 1900. 

In April of tbe latter year Mr. Taylor came to Spokane and at once entered the 
real-estate field, in which he has since carried on his operations. He entered into 
partnership with J. T. Cochran, with offices in the Mohawk block, and in 1902 
he formed a partnership with C. L. Glenn, making a specialty of farm lands 
tributary to Spokane. In 1904-5 he operated alone under the firm name of E. G. 
Taylor & Company and in 1906 secured the agency of the Spokane Canal Com- 
pany, representing the Otis Orchards in the Spokane valley. He purchased and 



142 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

also sold all of the land for that company and since taking charge has located 
over three hundred families in that part of the district. The rapid settlement of 
the region has led to the establishment of schools and churches, while commercial 
clubs, literary societies and kindred organizations have been formed and all of 
those things which contribute to progress along social, intellectual, material and 
moral lines have been instituted. In December, 1909, Mr. Taylor merged his 
business with the firm of Becher & Thompson and with C. F. Young, since which 
time he has been vice president of the Spokane Valley Irrigated Land Company, 
which has made a specialty of handling Spokane valley lands, including property 
at Pasadena, West Farms, Otis Orchards, East Farms, Greenacres and East Green- 
acres. Their combined efforts have located over six thousand people in the Spo- 
kane valley. Altogether they have thirty-five thousand acres in their control, on 
which they expect to locate fifty thousand people. Seventy-five per cent of the 
land sold is being improved, orchards have been established which are now a com- 
mercial feature and comfortable modern bungalows have been built, displaying the 
most attractive styles of architecture of this class. There are now over a thousand 
acres in bearing orchards, producing from three hundred to five hundred dollars 
an acre annually. When all the land is improved it will be capable of returning 
from seventeen to twenty million dollars annually and all this has been done in 
eight years in the transformation of a barren desert. The water supply is fur- 
nished from Newman, Fish and Liberty lakes and the Spokane river at Postfalls 
and all is imder the gravity system. Within from ^ve to ten years this land will 
all be sold and will have been brought under a high state of cultivation. It is 
capable of yielding products that sell from one hundred to three hundred dollars 
per acre between trees while they are coming into bearing. The district has be- 
come settled by a class of people who are now permanently located and are find- 
ing happiness and prosperity in their new homes. They are people who have 
known the comforts of the east and represent the highest social and intellectual in- 
terests. The automobile is largely used in place of the carriage and all of the 
conveniences of life are to be found among the people who are occupying these 
districts. Prior to the time that the irrigation system was extended to the land it 
required ten acres to produce the feed for one horse or one cow and the valuation 
was ten to fifteen dollars per acre. Since water has been provided the products 
bring from one hundred to three hundred dollars per acre, whereby it has been made 
possible for a family to be comfortable and live well upon &vc acres. The average 
amount, however, is ten acres to a family. 

In June, 1889, at Carroll, Iowa, Mr. Taylor was united in marriage to Miss 
Jennie Niswonger, a daughter of M. L. Niswonger, one of the leading merchants 
of that place. He was of German descent and was a soldier of the Civil war, 
going to the front with a Pennsylvania regiment. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor have 
become the parents of two sons and two daughters: Lynn E., who is with the 
Liberty Park Grocery Company; Lee E., who is with the Ornamental Iron Works, 
of Spokane; and Marie and Margaret, who are students in the high school. In 
his political views Mr. Taylor has always been a republican, while his religious 
faith is that of the Presbyterian church. He holds membership with the Chamber 
of Commerce and for some time was a member of the board of managers of the 
150,000 Club. He was also treasurer of the Otis Orchards Commercial Club for 
some time and is a man of aptitude in business so that his cooperation is a valued 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 143 

factor in public projects which have for their object the welfare €ind progress of 
the entire district. Keen insight has always enabled him to recognize possibilities 
and ambition has prompted him to utilize them to the best advantage^ so that his 
labors have brought him substantial and well merited success. Spokane has every 
reason to number him among her representative citizens. 



HIRAM ROTHROCK. 



When one reviews the history of pioneer life and experience in the west he is 
continually reminded of the old saying that "truth is stranger than fiction." Like 
every individual, Hiram Rothrock passed many days in prosaic devotion to his 
business and yet in his active career he had many interesting and sometimes 
thrilUng experiences incident to travel and residence in a frontier country. 
While living in the Spokane valley he devoted his energies to farming which 
he continued to follow until about two years prior to his deaths when he removed 
to the city of Spokane. He was born in Lewiston, Pennsylvania, January 20, 
1840, and died on the 16th of October, 1901. His parents were the Rev. Abraham 
and Mary (Bashore) Rothrock, the former at one time a well known bishop of 
the church. The son attended the public schools of his native state until he reached 
the age of sixteen years, when he removed to Dixon, Illinois, and soon afterward 
entered upon preparation for the ministry as a student in Mount Morris Academy. 
He also attended Dixon College for a short time, after which he returned to 
Pennsylvania and, still with the thought of entering upon a professional career, 
studied medicine and dentistry at Hiram College and later at Williams College. 
About that time he removed with his parents to Lawrence, Kansas, where his father 
settled up>on a farm. 

Hiram Rothrock was there living at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war 
and on the 20th of August, 1862, aroused by a spirit of patriotism, he enlisted at 
Lawrence as a member of Company A of the Ninth Kansas Cavalry, going to the 
front under Captain Earl and later serving under Captain Steel as a member of 
the Second Division of the Seventh Army Corps. He participated in the battles 
of Kane Hill, Pea Ridge and numerous other engagements, everywhere acquitting 
himself with honor and courage, and following the cessation of hostilities was 
mustered out at Devall Bluff, Arkansas, June 21, 1865. His father was shot on 
the 21st of August, 1863, by Quantrell, during the raid which that famous guer- 
rilla made on Lawrence, Kansas. He survived for &ye years but his death was 
the effect of the wound received at that time. 

When the war was over Hiram Rothrock rejoined the family at Lawrence and 
divided his time between the practice of his profession, stock-raising and the various 
duties of farm life, continuing his residence in that locality imtil April, 1878. 

While living in the Sunflower state Mr. Rothrock was married at Lawrence, 
Kansas, in 1867, to Miss Suzannah Raffe, a daughter of William and Nancy 
(Bassler) Raffe, both of whom were of old Virginia and Pennsylvania families. 
Her grandfather, John Raffe, was bom in Jamestown, Virginia, and was a soldier 
in the War of 1812, while her great-grandfather, William Ballinger, won distinction 
by his valorous service in the Revolutionary war. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Rothrock 



144 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

were born four children: Edward, who married Mary Hadley, of San Francisco, 
and who for many years has been identified with the Chronicle; Ethel, a well 
known school teacher of this city; William H. and Elwood, both deceased. 

Continuing his residence in Kansas until 1878, Mr. Rothrock then started with 
his family and a party for California, reaching Calistoga in the early part of 
April, of that year. On the 20th of May they started on an overland trip to the 
north, passing up the Sacramento valley and up Pitt river and eventually reaching 
central Oregon, where they arrived after a seven weeks' trip, having passed 
through the territory of hostile Indians three days before the massacre at Warm 
Springs and Umatilla. For a brief period Mr. Rothrock and his family remained 
at The Dalles and for a short time rested in Walla Walla and Colfax before coming 
to Spokane. Here he homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of land seven miles 
southwest of Spokane and devoted his energies to general agricultural pursuits, 
becoming one of the substantial farmers and valued citizens of his community. 
His labors wrought a splendid transformation in the appearance of his farm which 
he converted into rich fields that annually returned to him a substantial income. 
There he resided until 1899, when he retired to quiet life, making his home there- 
after in the city until his demise. 

Mr. Rothrock voted with the republican party where national questions were 
involved but cast an independent local ballot, regarding only the capability of the 
candidate in city and state elections. His hearing was largely injured during 
the war and he always hesitated to enter into any public service, yet his influence 
was always on the side of progress and improvement. However, he served as 
overseer of the poor, as school director and as township trustee for 'many years. 
His honesty was proverbial and he was a faithful member of the Brethren church 
in his earlier days, while later he attended services of the various denominations. 
He was essentially a home man and at his own fireside was ever a hospitable host, 
doing everything to contribute to the pleasure and comfort of his guests. His 
character and reputation were above reproach and when we review the honorable 
record of such men as Hiram Rothrock we are reminded of the words of the im- 
mortal Lincoln, who said: "There is something better than making a livings — 
making a life." 



FRANCIS A. POMEROY, M. D. 

A successful physician and a public-spirited and enterprising citizen, Dr. Fran- 
cis A. Pomeroy, of Cheney, has demonstrated his ability and enjoys the entire confi- 
dence of the community, where he has made his home for twenty-seven years past. 
He belongs to the type of men who add courage and dignity to their vocation and 
are rightly looked upon as leaders wherever they are known. Bom in Salt Lake 
City, Utah, January 10, 1849, he is a son of F. M. and Irene V. (Haskell) Pome- 
roy. The mother died in 1857, when her son Francis was eight years of age, but the 
father, who was one of the pioneer men of the west, survived until 1902, passing 
away at an advanced age. 

Francis A. Pomeroy possessed good advantages of education in the pubUc 
schools of his native city. Later he decided to devote his attention to the practice 



DR. F. A. POMEROY 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 147 

of medicine and^ having made the necessary preparation^ he matriculated at Rush 
Medical College of Chicago^ Illinois^ remaining one year and was graduated from 
the Long Island College Hospital of Brooklyn^ New York^ in the spring of 1883^ 
after a two-years' attendance. Having inherited the pioneer characteristics of his 
father^ he came to Washington and located at Cheney in 1884. He successfully 
engaged in practice until 1898 and in 1898 and 1894 went to London^ England^ and 
pursued a post-graduate course under masters of medicine and surgery in the g^eat 
hospitals and institutions of that city. Returning to his adopted town^ he renewed 
his practice in 1894 and has continued as one of the leading physicians and surgeons 
of this section since that time. In 1890 he established a drug store^ which he con- 
ducted in his own name for seventeen years^ when he admitted a partner^ and the 
business has since been managed under the title of the Cheney Drug Company. 
It is now one of the most flourishing drug concerns in the county. Dr. Pomeroy 
was also one of the organizers of the Cheney Brick Company and at present is the 
presidept of the company^ the other officers being C. A. Ratcliffe^ secretary and F. 
M. Martin^ treasurer. They manufacture a building brick which is sold all over 
the district^ and their capacity is fifty thousand per day. The Doctor takes a warm 
interest in public affairs and has at various times served in the city council^ as mayor 
of Cheney and as member of the school board of district No. 20. He is also inter- 
ested in mining and is the owner of various tracts of land in Spokane county. 

On the 10th of January^ 1885^ in Paris^ Idaho^ he was married to Miss Mary A. 
Richj a daughter of C. C. Rich. To this union two children have been born: Mary 
L., who is now the wife of Dr. Ralph Hendricks^ of Spokane; Jane R.^ who married 
A. Remington^ of Seattle. In politics Dr. Pomeroy, supports the democratic party, 
believing that its principles are best adaptpjj , ta. aribsilVe the welfare of state and 
nation. He is a valued member of the.Masoku^. i>rder and the Knights of Pythias. 
He is a true friend of education, as has been shown by his interest in the upbuilding 
of the Cheney Normal school, he being pne of^y:^ .most' earnest supporters. An inde- 
fatigable student of all matters pertaining. .te^hi^'Ji^rbfession, he spares no pains or 
expense in arriving at a satisfactory solution of the problems that arise from day 
to day in an extensive practice. Thoroughly conscientious in the discharge of his 
responsibilities, he has won an enviable reputation and there are few men in this 
part of the state who can claim a larger number of friends and personal admirers. 



JOHN PATTISON. 



The life of John Pattison has been an eventful one in which high honors of 
a political and legal character have been conferred upon him. His practice has 
connected him with some of the most impK)rtant cases tried in Washington and 
his clientage is now large and of a distinctively representative character. He does 
iH>t obtrude the fact that he is essentially a self-made and a self-educated man and 
jet it is a fact of which he may well be proud, for his inherent force, his laudable 
ambition and determined purpose have brought him to the creditable position 
which he now occupies as one of Spokane's leading lawyers. 

His. birth occurred in Albany, New York, January IS, 1859, his parents being 

John and Elizabeth (Storment) Pattison, the former a native of the state of New 
Vol. ra— s 



148 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

York and the latter of Ireland. The father was also of Irisn lineage and the 
family was established in America prior to the Revolutionary war. To one branch 
of the family belonged Robert and John Pattison, both governors of states. At 
the time of the Civil war John Patdson^ father of our subject^ enlisted in a Penn- 
sylvania regiment^ was captured and confined in a Confederate prison until he was 
a physical wred^. He was then sent home and his death resulted^ in 1866, from 
the sufferings that he had undergone. His widow long survived hlm^ passing away 
in 1911. 

Owing to his father's early death John Pattison^ of this review, was denied 
many of the opportunities which he might otherwise have enjoyed. His school 
training was limited to one year but in the school of experience he has learned 
well the lessons which were set before him. In April, 1881, he arrived in Whit- 
man county, Washington, and was employed in the commissary department in con- 
nection with the construction of the first road in Whitman county — ^the line of the 
old Oregon Improvement Company. In the fall of that year he removed to Col- 
fax where he was engaged in the hotel business for two years, or until 1883, when 
he was elected territorial justice of the peace in Whitman county, presiding over 
that court for seven years. During that period he made good use of every leisure 
moment for, in addition to the experience which he gained as justice of the peace, 
he read law at every available opportunity and was admitted to the bar at Col- 
fax in 1890. There he continued in the piactice of law until April, 1909, when 
he removed to Spokane. For eight years he was associated in law practice with 
E. T. Trimble and for three years in Colfax his partner was his son, Paul Pattison, 
who is now prosecuting attorney of Whitman county. 

After removing to SpK)kane John Pattison still continued his office in Colfax 
for a time in connection with his son Paul. He has always engaged in the general 
practice of law and while in Colfax there occurred what was probably the most 
noted lynching in the history of the northwest. This was during the trial of a 
man of the name of Parker for the murder of a Mr. Cooper, and Judge Sullivan 
was the presiding judge. Mr. Pattison was assisting in the prosecution and when 
the prosecution rested its case on Friday night the people took Parker and a 
man named Ed Hill and hung them, dragging the men right by the jury, through 
tlie courtroom and out of the window to meet their fate at the hands of the crowd 
below. Judge Sullivan then called in the jury and said he had been unofficially 
informed that the defendant Parker had been taken out of the jail and hanged. 
He called on the deputy sheriff and jailor to testify and the court finding Parker 
dead. Judge Sullivan discharged the jury. Mr. Pattison also defended one Smith 
accused of the murder of a young man named Hayden, and had hard work to 
save his life although the defendant was innocent. Mr. Pattison had to have Smith 
bound over for trial and in the meantime arrested another man whom the mob 
threw out of the window of Judge McDonald's courtroom, and he also was hanged. 
Smith was discharged for he established his innocence as soon as the mob had 
quieted down. The same night a man named Blackie was lynched. The mob would 
have some one in the courtroom place a rope around the neck of the man wanted 
and then those outside would pull the man out of the window before those inside 
could collect their wits. Such was the condition that existed about three decades 
ago when summary justice was often administered. The efforts of able lawyers 
and other law-abiding citizens, however, at length prevailed. Mr. Pattison is 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 149 

regarded as one of the strong criminal lawyers practicing in Spokane and is equally 
proficient in other departments of the law. 

In political circles his name is also well known. He is a democrat yet was a 
delegate to the first republican convention held after th6 admission of Washington 
to the Union. A change in his political views, however, led him to ally himself 
witii the democracy. He has frequently been a delegate to county and state con- 
ventions and has served as chairman of several of the latter. He has also been 
a member of city, county and state central committees and has been selected as 
campaign speaker by both state and national committees. For two terms, in 1907 
and 1908, he was mayor of Colfax and whether in office or out of it his influence 
has been a potent element in political activity, largely advancing the interests of 
the party he supports. In 1908 he was nominated for governor by the democratic 
party by direct primaries and, opposing Cosgrove, polled at that election the larg- 
est vote ever cast in this state for a democratic candidate for governor. 

Mr. Pattison's social prominence in connection with a number of fraternal or- 
ganizations has also made him widely known. He is one of the head managers 
of the Woodmen of the World, with headquarters at Denver, Colorado, having 
already occupied the position for four years with two more years to serve. He 
belongs to the blue lodge and chapter of Masons and of the former has been worship- 
ful master. He is likewise connected with the Order of the Eastern Star, the 
Knights of Pythias, the Improved Order of Red Men and the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen. He belongs also to the Inland Club and his religious faith is 
indicated by the fact that he is a member of the First Baptist church. 

On the 7th of June, 1885, in Colfax, Mr. Pattison was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary Cairns, a daughter of the Rev. James Cairns, the oldest Baptist min- 
ister on the coast, now living retired. Her brother, the Rev. George Robert Cairns, 
is pastor of the Central Baptist church. Mr. and Mrs. Pattison have become the 
parents of a son and three daughters: Paul, who is now prosecuting attorney of 
Whitman county and is well known throughout the Inland Empire ; Greta, a teacher 
in the Hillyard schools ; and Mattie and Mary, at home. In his social, fraternal 
and professional connections Mr. Pattison has done much to mold the policy and 
shape the destiny of Washington, particularly in the Inland Empire, and in all 
C(Mmections his life has been actuated by public spirit and earnest desire to pro- 
mote the welfare of the state along lines of lasting benefit. 



JOHN E. BLAIR. 



John E. Blair, attorney at law in Spokane, was bom in Mercersburg, Penn- 
sylvania, on the 12th of October, 1875, a son of Dr. John L. and Mary (Ander- 
son) Blair. Under the parental roof he spent his boyhood days and in his native 
town acquired his early education which was supplemented by a course of study 
at Harvard University. He was graduated from the law department of that institu- 
tion in the class of 1898, and immediately began the practice of his profession in 
Bo8t<m. After remaining in that city for two years he went to Grand Forks, North 
Dakota, where he was a member of the faculty of the University of North Dakota 
in the law school. He made for himself a creditable place in the ranks of the 



150 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

faculty and was soon called to Stanford University as a lecturer in the law depart- 
ment of that institution. 

While there he made the acquaintance of his present partner^ James T. 
Burcham^ who was also a lecturer in the law department. They decided to give 
up their professorships and accordingly^ in 1904^ came to Spokane to engage in 
general practice. Mr. Blair is widely known for the care with which he prepares 
his cases. In no instance. has his reading been confined to limitations of the ques- 
tions at issue but has encompassed every contingency and provided not only for 
the expected but the unexpected as well which happens quite as frequently in 
courts as out of them. Since he has been a member of the legal fraternity of this 
city he has acted as assistant corporation counsel and later as corporation counsel. 
His ability also won public recognition when he was a member and secretary of 
the conmiittee that drafted the new city charter which was adopted under the 
present commission form of government. 

Mr. Blair was married at Grand Forks, North Dakota, June 10, 1903, to Miss 
Elsie Mary Bushee, a daughter of Byron Bushee of that city. They have two sons, 
John £., Jr.y and Robert Bushee. 

Mr. Blair is an independent in politics and his interest in the affairs of the 
community is that of a public-spirited citizen who realizes the opportunities for 
progress and improvement, and he labors to achieve what may be attained in this 
direction. 



ARTHUR W. DAVIS. 



Arthur W. Davis is a member of the law firm of Davis & Rhodes, thus occupy- 
ing a prominent position in professional circles, and as a member of the board of 
education he is equally well known. His labors have been directly a beneficial 
influence in connection with the Spokane public schools and his service in this con- 
nection has made him recognized as the right man in the right place. He was bom 
in Maynard, Iowa, November 16, 1873, a son of William E. and Helen Josephine 
(Wells) Davis. The father was born in Wales and represents one of the old fam- 
ilies of that little rock-ribbed country. He is now residing in Maynard, Iowa, as 
is his wife, who is a native of Pennsylvania. Her father was a lawyer and a mem- 
ber of the state legislature. Her mother belonged to the Halleck family and was 
a relative of General Halleck of Civil war fame. Mr. and Mrs. William E. Davis 
became the parents of ^ve sons and three daughters: George L., a farmer re- 
siding at Filer, Idaho; Walter W., who practiced law until his health broke 
down, since which time he has followed farming at Kettle Falls, Washington; 
Ben, a professional baseball player and farmer; Irving R., assistant corporation 
counsel of Spokane, of whom mention is made on another page of this volume; 
Arthur W., the subject of this sketch; Lena E., the wife of Grant E. Finch, a 
professor in the Montana State Normal School; Jessie, who married J. L. Seaton, 
a professor in the South Dakota University; and Charlotte H., general secretary 
of the Young Woman's Christian Association at Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Arthur W. Davis, having completed his literary education in the Upper Iowa 
University at Fayette, Iowa, from which he was graduated with the B. S. degree 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 151 

in 1893, entered upon the study of law in the State University of Iowa but in the 
interim was connected with the profession of teachings having served as principal 
at Montour, Iowa, from the fall of 1893 until January, 1895. During the re- 
mainder of the school year of 1895 he was principal of the high school at Rock 
Rapids, Iowa, and in the fall of that year went to Fonda, Iowa, to become prin- 
cipal of the schools, in which position he continued until elected county superin- 
tendent of Pocahontas county, Iowa, in which position he remained from 1897 
until 1899. He regarded the office, however, merely as an initial step to other 
professional labor for it was his ambition to become a member of the bar and to 
this end he attended the State University of Iowa, passed his examination and 
was admitted to the bar in January, 1901. He afterward practiced law at Fonda, 
Iowa, for more than four years, or until the fall of 1905. 

At that date A. W. Davis came to Spokane and formed a law partnership with 
his brother, Walter W. Davis, under the firm name of Davis & Davis. After two 
years his brother withdrew on account of ill health and A. W. Davis was joined 
by another brother, Irving R. Davis. Upon the latter's appointment as assistant 
corporation counsel A. W. Davis was joined by Harry A. Rhodes in a partnership 
that is now existing. They conduct general law business and are the attorneys for 
the Modem Woodmen of America. Among their clients are a number of real- 
estate firms and in their practice they specialize somewhat in the law pertaining 
to land. In six years they have built up an excellent clientage more particularly 
along the line of individual than corporation practice. The court records indicate 
their success for they have won many favorable verdicts. 

Mr. Davis has also been active as a leader in republican circles since age con- 
ferred upon him the right of franchise and has done much effective campaign 
work. In Iowa the state conunittee selected him as speaker and he was a delegate 
to two state conventions there, being one of those who helped to nominate Cum- 
mings for governor. He served on the county central committee in Iowa. In the 
fall of 1907 he was elected a member of the Spokane board of education and was 
reelected in the fall of 1908 for a three years* term. He has been president of 
the board since January, 1911, and as its chief officer has guided its interests in a 
manner that has reflected credit upon the city and its educational system. The 
present organization is known as the building board for they have let contracts 
for the erection of many fine school buildings in this city including the Lewis and 
Clark high school, a fireproof brick, terra cotta and reinforced concrete structure 
which was erected at a cost of ^ve hundred thousand dollars; the North Central 
high school, a brick and terra cotta, four hundred thousand dollar structure, and 
a nmnber of ward schools. Among these are the Adams, containing four rooms; 
the Audubon, twelve rooms; Columbia, four rooms; Cooper, eight rooms; Frances 
Willard, twelve rooms; Franklin, eight rooms; an addition of Rve rooms to the 
Grant school; the Hamilton, twelve rooms; the Jefferson^ eight rooms; Logan, four 
additional rooms; a four-room addition to the Longfellow; a four-room addition to 
the Roosevelt; Sheridan, twelve rooms; Stevens, sixteen rooms; and Hays Park, 
four rooms. In addition the present school board has purchased eighty acres south 
of the city and constructed a parental school. The plant consists of a main building 
for thirty boys, a schoolhouse, an irrigating plant and a number of outbuildings. 
They have thoroughly equipped this and put it in operation and now have about 
thirty boys there. The plan is working cut according to the ideas promoted and 



152 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

fostered at its inception and is proving a most successful undertaking in providing 
a home and training for boys who cannot be taken care of in the public schools. 
During Mr. Davis' connection with the school board there has been a great in- 
crease in attendance, about twenty thousand pupils being now cared for in the 
public schools. Within the last four years there has been an increase of about 
six thousand pupils. While Mr. Davis' greatest public work has perhaps been 
done in connection with the schools he has also labored earnestly and effectively 
along other lines for the benefit and welfare of the city. He is an active member 
of the Chamber of Commerce and is serving on its educational committee. He 
is interested in the moral progress of Spokane and is a faithful member of the 
Pilgrim Congregational church. He exemplifies in his life the beneficent spirit 
of Masonry and has passed through all of the chairs in the blue lodge and is now 
a past master. He also holds membership with the Royal Arch Masons and the 
Order of the Efiustem Star and belongs to the Royal Highlanders, the Woodmen 
of the World and the Modem Woodmen of America, and of the last named is state 
lecturer. 

On the 24th of December, 1900, Mr. Davis was united in marriage to Miss 
Florence A. Carpenter, daughter of J. D. Carpenter, a general merchant of Fonda, 
Iowa. Their two children, Rachel and John B., are both in school. The life his- 
tory of Arthur W. Davis is the record of continuous and intelligently directed 
activity. He has always been actuated by laudable ambition which permitted him 
in early manhood to provide the means necessary for his university law course. 
He has ever placed his dependence upon the substantial qualities of indefatigable 
industry and enterprise, knowing that they lead to progress, and while he has won 
a place among the prominent lawyers of Spokane, he has also found time to co- 
operate in public work^ ever recognizing the duties and obligations as well as the 
privileges of citizenship and laboring along those lines which mean the material, 
intellectual, social and moral uplift of the race. 



HAL J. COLE. 



Among the men who have been called to public ofiice in Spokane and who have 
proven their ability in the prompt, faithful and capable performance of their du- 
ties, is numbered Hal J. Cole, now register in the United States land office. Since 
attaining manhood he has been closely associated with the business interests of 
the northwest and has been active in several connections which have conserved 
the welfare and development of this section of the country. Oregon numbers him 
among her native sons, his birth having occurred in Douglas county, April 28, 
1856. Five years before, in the fall of 1851, his parents, James and Louisa 
(Leeper) Cole, had removed from California to Oregon, having since 1849 resided 
in the former state, where they had taken up their abode on coming from Mis- 
souri to the Pacific coast. The father was a native of Kentucky, and his wife of 
Tennessee. In early manhood he took up the study of medicine and for many 
years continued in active practice as a physician and surgeon. Following his ar- 
rival in Oregon he took a prominent part in republican politics, doing much to 
formulate the policy of that party and promote its growth and influence. Thus 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 153 

he left the impress of his individuality upon the history of the state. Both he and 
his wife have passed away some years ago. 

Hal J. Cole, who was one of a family of eight children, &ve sons and three 
danghters, attended the public schools of Douglas county and afterward became 
a student in Christian College of Polk county, Oregon, from which he won his 
Bachelor of Science degree on his graduation with the class of 1876. His atten- 
tion was then given to agricultural pursuits on Iiis father's farm and to school- 
teaching, which profession claimed his attention for two or three years. He next 
entered the railway mail service and afterward was employed by the Wells Fargo 
Express Company, which he represented in the Spokane agency until the com- 
pany was forced to withdraw from the Northern Pacific lines in 1886. For six- 
teen months thereafter he held the position of deputy collector of customs at Little 
Dallas, Stevens county, but on the expiration of that period again came to Spokane, 
where he served as deputy under E. H. Hindiff, who was the sheriff of the county. 
In May, 1889, he was appointed Indian agent for the Colville Indian Agency, 
which included the Spokane, Coeur d'Alene and Colville reservations, his head- 
quarters being at Miles, Washington, where he remained for more than four years 
and then retired on the 1st of August, 1893. 

There are few men who escape all connection with mining interests in the 
northwest and Mr. Cole is no exception to the rule. With the development of the 
mining properties there comes a desire to almost every individual to seek his for- 
tune in that field, ajid Mr. Cole was identified with mining operations in the 
boundary country until 1897, when he went to the Klondike. A year later he 
returned but in 1900 again made his way to Nome, Alaska. After a brief period, 
however, he again became identified with mining interests in the Spokane district. 
Since the 1st of May, 1904, he has filled the position of register of the United 
States land office, has carefully systematized his work and is prompt, accurate 
and faithful in the discharge of the duties that devolve upon him. 

On the 23d of December, 1883, occurred the marriage of Mr. Cole and Miss 
Addie Mires, a daughter of John H. and Anna (Deardorff) Mires, of Douglas 
county, Oregon, who were pioneer residents of that state. The only son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Cole is Carl H., who is now a dvil engineer in southeastern Alaska. 
Mr. Cole belongs to the Elks lodge of Spokane and to the Woodmen of the W^orld. 
He is a man of refined tastes and retiring disposition, to whose nature ostentation 
and display are utterly foreign. 



DANIEL W. TWOHY. 



Daniel W. Twohy, a prominent banker, claiming little recognition for the suc- 
cess which has placed him in the presidency of the Old National Bank of Spokane, 
was born in northern Michigan in 1 864. The public schools of that state afforded 
him his educational privileges and he entered business life in connection with the 
Northwestern National Bank of Superior, Wisconsin. There he gradually worked 
his way upward, passing through intermediate positions to the presidency of the 
institution. Liberal training and broad experience were therefore his when he be- 
came identified with the financial interests of Spokane in 1902. He removed to this 
city to accept the presidency of the Old National Bank here, and soon after his 



154 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

arrival he organized the Union Trust & Savings Bank^ of which he has since been 
the president. The former is by far the most important financial institution of 
Spokane and in 1910 the bank erected a fifteen-story building which is one of the 
fine office structures of the west. The bank is capitalized for one million dollars 
and has resources amounting to ten million. The Union Trust & Savings Bank has 
a capital of &\e hundred thousand dollars and^ like the older institution, has met 
with continuous success, being founded upon safe, conservative business principles 
and governed by a progressive policy. 

In 1904 Mr. Twohy was united in marriage to Miss Sue Bell, a daughter of 
Harry C. Bell, of Spokane, and they have three children, Daniel W., Henry B. 
and Frank P. The family residence at No. 22 Sumner street, was erected by Mr. 
Twohy in 1907 and is one of the fine homes of the city. Mr. Twohy has never 
taken active part in politics, feeling always that he had no time for interests out- 
side of his banking business. His cooperation, however, can always be counted 
upon in a quiet way for progressive public measures and he is a member of the 
Chamber of Commerce, the Spokane Club and the Spokane Country Club. He has 
come to be recognized by colleagues and contemporaries as a man whose judgment 
is sound, his sagacity keen, his enterprise and determination unfaltering, and a 
business carer which will bear the closest investigation and scrutiny has brought 
him to a conspicuous and honorable position in financial circles of the northwest. 



FREDERICK P. GREENE. 

Frederick P. Greene is widely recognized as one of the prominent figures in 
the Inland Empire. Work that he has done in various lines has contributed to 
this, but perhaps the most important feature of his public service is that which 
had to do with the bill creating a state bureau of inspection of offices and accounts. 
He spent much time in formulating and securing the passage of this bill, which is 
without doubt the most beneficial piece of legislation as regards the taxpayers at 
large that has ever been put upon the statute books of the state. This work alone 
would entitle Mr. Greene to recognition as a public benefactor and yet in other 
connections he has equally well proven his worth in support of measures that have 
direct benefit upon general progress and improvement. 

Mr. Greene was born in Oil City, Pennsylvania, on Christmas day of 1864, 
his parents being Dennis S. and Sarah M. (McCray) Greene. Both were natives 
of Pennsylvania and the father was of English descent. The family, however, was 
early established on American soil, the great grandfather of our subject having 
been born in Rhode Island, while his last days were spent in the Keystone statf 
and his remains interred in Youngsville. The parents of Mrs. Sarah M. Greene 
were from the north of Ireland and represented old Scotch-Irish Presbyterian 
families. Dennis S. Greene followed the occupation of farming as a life work. 
Among his ancestors were those who enlisted from Rhode Island in the struggle 
for independence and when the Civil war broke out, true to the ancestral example, 
he manifested the same patriotic spirit as a soldier of the One Hundred and Tenth 
Pennsylvania Volunteers. In the family were but two sons and one daughter, the 



F. P. GREENE 



1- 

1 1 



I ■ h 



i'H-;AHY 




SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 157 

brother of our subject being Harry M. Greene, master mechanic of The American 
Rolling Mills Company's steel plant at Middletown, Ohio, while the sister is 
Blanche, the wife of G. A. Waldo, connected with the auditor's office in Spokane 
cottnhr. 

In the acquirement of his education Frederick P. Greene attended the high 
school of Youngsville, Pennsylvania, and the Northwestern Business College of 
Kansas City, Missouri. He also pursued the normal and collegiate courses of 
Chautauqua by correspondence and through attendance at summer schools. Soon 
after starting out in the business world he was employed for a year and a half 
as deputy postmaster in Youngsville, Pennsylvania, and then left the east for 
western Kansas, where he engaged in merchandising for two years. On the ex- 
piration of that period he removed to southern Missouri, where he conducted a 
lumberyard for two years, and subsequently he went to Kansas City, where he 
acted as principal in the commercial department of the National Business College. 
This was not his first experience as a teacher, however, for he had also taught 
school in Warren county, Pennsylvania, before leaving the east. While in southern 
Missouri he had been admitted to the bar and practiced law for two years, but fol- 
lowing his removal to Kansas City again took up educational work. On leaving 
that place he went to Ritzville, Washington, in 1898, and was principal of the 
schools at Ritzville and also editor of the Ritzville News for a year. Later he 
was located at Burke, Idaho, where he served as head accountant for the Tiger 
Mercantile Company in 1896. In 1900 he came to Spokane and obtained the posi- 
tion of accountant with the Hazelwood Dairy Company until 1903. He was then 
office manager for the Wonder Department" St^i^^u^^l January, 1907, at which 
time he became auditor of Spokane qouptja filing* tliej position until the 1st of 
May, 1909, when he resigned to becoi^e manager of the ^okane Title Company. 
This was in May, 1910. He then engkged in public, ^quditii^g and accounting until 
the first of January, 1911, since whicl^ tip^§. Jhe 'has -bben* treasurer and director of 
the Western Empire Insurance Company. In this field, as in all others in which he 
has entered, he is meeting with success, for he has determined purpose and unfalter- 
ing energy which conquer obstacles and ultimately reach the desired goal. 

In his political views Mr. Greene has ever been a stalwart republican, stanchly 
advocating the principles which he believes most conducive to good government and 
taking a helpful part in campaign work. In Spokane he has served as a member 
of the city central committee and has been a delegate to many city and county con- 
ventions. He was called to the ofiice of auditor in 1906 and a public expression of 
approval of his course came to him in his reelection in 1908. As stated, probably 
his most important service has been in preparing and securing the passage of the 
bill creating a bureau for the inspection of ofiices. The taxpayer has reason to feel 
grateful toward him because of the benefit to be derived from this bill. It has al- 
ready resulted in the discovery of many irregularities and has been the cause of 
many officials having to return money both to counties and cities. Mr. Greene has 
been the recipient of warm congratulations over what has been accomplished and 
the work has only commenced. Governor Hay personally expressed his satisfaction 
over the manner in which the bill kept a check on tax accounting methods. The bill 
was passed in 1909, after much preliminary work, its object being to provide for 
a uniform system of public accounting and for the auditing of accounts of all public 
offices. The work of the bureau has thus far been very effective, proving that great 



158 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

good may be accomplished in this manner. Mr. Greene was offered the appointment 
of head of the bureau but declined. As president of the County Auditors' Associa- 
tion he was enabled to do much for his bill in making known its purposes and its 
possibilities. There was much opposition but after a hard fight the bill passed the 
house by a strong majority. In the senate there was strenuous opposition^ yet suc- 
cess ultimately crowned the project. Mr. Greene personally sent out over five thou- 
sand pieces of mail in two years when working for the measure. At the start he 
met nothing but discouragement, everyone declaring it an impossibility to get the 
bill through as the "state house crowd would kill it." However, he succeeded ul- 
timately in winning confidence and support and was appointed chairman of the legis- 
lative committee and the drafting of the bill was placed in his hands. That was just 
after the legislature of 1907 adjourned and Mr. Greene then started in to create 
public sentiment in favor of the bill, so the people would fully understand what it 
meant and would be prepared to work for it in the session of 1909. He first se- 
cured copies of all existing legislation from every general assembly in all the states 
of the Union as well as all states which had adopted the uniform system. The next 
year he submitted the bill and delivered a paper before the auditors* association. 
This paper was printed in booklet form for distribution and he then secured the 
cooperation* of the state grange through C. B. Kegley, its president, and by per- 
sistent campaigning and publicity measures created a demand for the legislation so 
strong that the bill eventually became a law. He appeared before the senate com- 
mittee and was on the floor an hour and a half talking and answering questions. In 
1903 he was appointed a member of the state board of accountancy by Governor 
Mead and has since held that position, in which connection he examines and licenses 
public accountants. In December, 1909, he was elected a member of the city board 
of education for a three years' term. 

In addition to the public and private interests which have claimed the time and 
energies of Mr. Greene he is also connected with mining, being largely interested in 
a British Columbia property, where a mill is being erected, near Tatlayoco lake in 
the Nanaimo district. The base is antimony, carrying gold and silver, and it is ex- 
pected that the property will be a very paying one. 

Mr. Greene is a member of the Masonic lodge, the consistory, the commandery 
and the Mystic Shrine, thus having taken high rank in both the York and Scottish 
Rites. He is also a trustee of the Masonic temple. He belongs to the Knights of 
Pythias lodge, in which he has passed all of the chairs, and is at the present writ- 
ing grand inner guard of the grand lodge of the state of Washington. He likewise 
belongs to the Inland Club, the Rotary Club and the Chamber of Commerce and is 
widely known in the business and social circles of the city. 

In 1890, in Van Buren, Missouri, Mr. Greene was united in marriage to Miss 
Clara L. Clay, a daughter of Robert Clay and Adelaide (Vance) Clay. Mr. Clay 
is a lumberman of Van Buren and a representative of an old southern family. Mrs. 
Greene had one unqle in the Union army and others who were soldiers in the Con- 
federate army. Both the Vance and Clay families from which she is descended on 
the maternal and paternal lines were old and prominent families of Kentucky. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Greene have been born three children, Hazel Annie, Nellie .Lois and 
Lawrence Clay. 

Mr. Greene is certainly entitled to twofold prominence, because of what he has 
accomplished in the business world and in behalf of the public welfare. His labor 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 159 

has been largely of a character that has brought no return save the consciousness 
of duty well performed^ and with this he is content. He recognized a need and he 
met it and the state at large is profiting by his labor. In business^ too^ when he 
has seen something to be done he has not hesitated in the performance of the duty^ 
and resolute wiU^ determined purpose and honorable intention have carried him 
forward to success in his different undertakings. 



JOSEPH A. BORDEN. 



Joseph A. Borden, treasurer of the Shaw & Borden Company, is numbered with 
that class of Spokane's citizens who have the best interests of the country at heart 
and labor earnestly and effectively for the development and progress of the Inland 
Empire. His success in business, too, illustrates his activity, enterprise and sound 
judgment along the line which he has chosen as his life work. He is treasurer 
of the extensive printing establishment of the Shaw & Borden Company on River- 
side avenue, controlling one of the largest plants in their line in this section of the 
country. 

Mr. Borden was born at Camden, Indiana, October, 19, 1862, his parents 
being George D. and Sarah J. (Ginger) Borden. The father was a merchant and 
served through the Civil war in the One Hundredth Indiana Volunteers. The 
son pursued his education in the public schools of Dunkirk^ Indiana, and after- 
ward went to Washington, D. C, where he was employed in the government 
printing office for a period of &ye years, during which time he pursued a three 
years' law course at Georgetown University, from which he was graduated in 
1889 with the degree of Master of Law. On the expiration of that period he 
removed to Colby, Kansas, where he engaged in law practice for a year, and in 
March, 1890, he arrived in Spokane, since which time he has given his attention 
continuously to the printing business, forming a partnership with John H. Shaw 
mider the firm name of the Shaw & Borden Company. The business was incor- 
porated in 1894 with a capital of twenty thousand dollars and something of the 
growth of their business and its present magnitude are indicated in the fact that 
the capital stock has since been increased to two hundred and fifty thousand dol- 
lars. This firm is one of the most progressive in its line in the Inland Empire. 
They conduct a large retail stationery and office goods store and do all kinds of 
magazine and catalogue work in their printing establishment, both departments 
of their business being thoroughly equipped. The store was first located in the 
old Heath building on Monroe street, whence a removal was made to the Spokane 
National Bank building at the corner of Howard and Riverside, which is now 
known as the Rookery. Since 1908 they have occupied their present site and the 
business is one of the foremost undertakings of its kind in the northwest. 

While Mr. Borden has been actively engaged in the development and control 
of this enterprise, he has at the same time been an important factor in many 
activities which have contributed to the upbuilding and welfare of Spokane and 
is ready to do anything that will promote the interests of the city or of the Inland 
Empire. He was a charter member of the Chamber of Commerce and served on 
its first board of trustees. He was chairman of the first Pacific coast printers' 



160 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

cost congress, which was held at Portland, Oregon, in February, 1911, and was 
also chairman of the third international printers' cost congress, which was held at 
Denver, Colorado, in September, 1911. He is now the third vice president and a 
member of the executive committee of the United Typothetae of America and has 
charge of their affairs on the Pacific coast. He has every reason to be proud of 
the fact that he is the only member of the executive committee in the far west — 
an honor well deserved. In the line of his chosen business he is known from one 
coast to the other and ranks as one of its most prominent representatives. 

Mr. Borden is a member of the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained 
high rank, and is now a member of El Katif Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He 
spent ten years in active work in the chairs in all of the York Rite bodies. He 
belongs also to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 228, and 
to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is likewise a member of the 
board of governors of the New England Club. There always seems back of him 
a reserve force on which to draw and his resourcefulness enables him to meet any 
exigency or opportunity that arises. He has worked out along progressive lines, 
whether for the benefit of individual or community interests, and manifested a 
spirit of initiation in connection with many projects which have been helpful to 
the city or which hav? contributed to the result of placing him in a foremost posi- 
tion as a representative of the printing interests of the country. 



CHESTER F. YOUNG. 



Nature is practical in her gifts- and yet in no instance do they come ready at 
hand. She demands the cooperation of mankind in the conversion of what she 
offers into marketable material. The broad prairies, rich valleys and almost limit- 
less forests of the northwest offered untold wealth to those who would exercise 
industry, perseverance and determination in utilizing the resources offered. To 
those who put forth diligence and perseverance the rewards were certain, as is 
indicated by the prosperous condition of this great Inland Empire. Chester F. 
Young has been one of the most potent forces in the development of this section 
of the country. As one of the pioneers in irrigating he demonstrated what could 
be accomplished in promoting the fertility of the region and his labors were equally 
effective in bringing population to the district and in increasing values and pro- 
duction. 

His life history had its beginning on the 11th of October, 1863, in Peoria county, 
Illinois, his parents being Francis H. and Eleanor (Smith) Young, both of whom 
were of English lineage, representing families founded in America prior to the 
Revolutionary war. The Young family was established in New England and 
Francis H. Young was bom in Connecticut. He enlisted for service in the Civil 
war but was not accepted, owing to physical disability. He now makes his home 
in Ottawa, Kansas, where he is living retired. His wife, who was born in Penn- 
sylvania, died in 1911. She had five brothers who were soldiers of the Union army, 
all members of Illinois regiments. 

Chester F. Young was the only child born of his parents' marriage but he 
has a half sister, Carrie, now the wife of Albert Fonts, of Ottawa, Kansas. His 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 161 

edncation was acquired in the schools of his native state and he was married and 
started out in life for himself at the early age of twenty-one years. It was in Chari- 
ton, Iowa, on the 14th of June, 1884, that he wedded Emma L. Speck, a daughter 
of C. G. S]>eck, now deceased, who was of German descent and devoted his life 
to farming in Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Young have become the parents of three daugh- 
ters, Helen, Jean and Ruth, all attending school as pupils of Our Lady of Lourdes. 
Mr. and Mrs. Young began their domestic life upon an Iowa farm and farm- 
ing largely occupied his attention until 1889. However in the meantime he 
had resided in various localities. He lived for two years in Chariton, Iowa, 
and then went to Ottawa, Kansas, where he spent the succeeding year. He then 
returned to Iowa, continuing his residence in that state for three years. He first 
came to Washington in 1888 and spent five years in this state. While in the north- 
west be purchased land in Colfax where he carried on farming for about six years. 
On the expiration of that period he returned to Ottumwa, Iowa, and afterward 
went to Missouri, where he resided for two years. Again he became a resident of 
Iowa and began buying and shipping horses and also purchasing and selling real 
estate. He was thus connected with the business interests of the middle west until 
be once more came to the Pacific coast in 1898. About 1901 Mr. Young became 
associated with the Oregon Land & Water Company at Portland and he is probably 
the first man who ever went upon the road in order to sell real estate. He after- 
ward formed a partnership with a Mr. Neeley and began the development of the 
famous Greenacres district. About half of the property had been sold when 
they took charge and when they disposed of the remainder they then opened East 
Greenacres, comprising about three thousand acres. When two-thirds of this had 
been sold D. C. Corbin bought out the Spokane Valley Land & Water Company 
and Mr. Young afterward sold land for Mr. Corbin for a year. He then became 
associated with H. J. Neeley in selling the land of Opportunity. Several years 
before, about 1898, the government wished to take the valley as an encampment 
ground but at length decided not to do so. This was felt as a calamity by people 
of the district but it has proved to be entirely the opposite. As encampment ground 
it would have yielded only a fraction of what it has brought as orchard land, to say 
noddng of the amount which would have been lost in population. After dispos- 
ing of Opportunity Mr. Young and Mr. Neeley became purchasers of Orchard 
avenue, consisting of four hundred and ten acres, of which they sold one hun- 
dred and ten acres to the city. The remaining three hundred acres were divided 
into one hundred-acre tracts and then sold. On the 8th of December, 1909, the 
Neeley- Young Company merged with the Becher & Thompson Company and were 
also joined by E. G. Taylor who was selling Otis Orchards. That gave the com- 
bine the control of the land in Spokane valley under the gravity system of irriga- 
tion and during the period in which they were handling the Spokane valley land 
they were instrumental in securing its settlement by six thousand peo'ple. In the 
spring of 190S there were twenty-eight hundred acres of the valley owned by 
four dairy farmers and today there are three hundred homes on that one tract, 
beside two box factories, two lumberyards, two pickle factories, two blacksmith 
shops, two churches and a new schoolhouse, and the price of the land has ad- 
vanced from two hundred and fifty dollars per acre to fifteen hundred dollars per 
acre. 



162 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

In handling all the properties with which he has been connected Mr. Young has 
been a most helpful factor in promoting the methods of development which have ad- 
vanced values and added much to the attractiveness of this region. He was one of the 
pioneers of the irrigation movement whereby thousands of acres of arid lands have 
been reclaimed and converted into fine farms, the products of which add thousands 
upon thousands of dollars to the wealth of the state each year. Mr. Young now lives 
in the northwest comer of Opportunity, about six miles from the city, this district 
having telephone connection, electric lights and mail delivery from Spokane. He has 
many private interests apart from his company associations, including the ownership 
of &ye hundred acres of wheat land and fifty acres in the Spokane valley. He has 
made a most notable record in his real-estate operations, having sold more land in 
the Spokane valley than any other one man, and he has also handled extensive 
property interests in Idaho and Montana. Mr. Young is now secretary of the Spo- 
kane Valley Irrigated Land Company, Inc., of which D. M. Thompson is president; 
E. G. Taylor, vice president; and Phil T. Becher, treasurer. Their principal prop- 
erties are Pasadena, Greenacres, East Greenacres, West Farms, East Farms and 
Otis Orchards. They disposed of Hazelwood, twenty-seven hundred acres, for the 
Hazelwood Company, practically the entire amount now being sold. 

Mr. Young exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures 
of the republican party but never seeks nor desires office. He is a blue lodge Mason 
and a member of the Chamber of Commerce, but his interests and activities are 
largely concentrated upon his business affairs which, however, have been of a char- 
acter that have contributed to general prosperity and progress as well as to in- 
dividual success. He has never feared to venture where favoring opportunity has 
led the way and his sound judgment has placed correct valuation upon such op- 
portunities. As he has steadily advanced in his business career he has come into 
important connections with the northwest and his name deserves prominent mention 
among those who have been leading factors in promoting the development of this 
section of the country. 



EPHRAIM P. PENFIELD, M. D. 

The west has often been spoken of as the country of the young man and one usu- 
ally finds that it is the younger generation that leaves home and utilizes the re- 
sources and opportunities of the new country, yet character and ability will come 
to the front anywhere and, recognizing this fact, Dr. Ephraim P. Penfield did not 
hesitate to remove to Spokane after he had passed the half century milestone on 
life's journey. He came to this city in the spring of 1890 and here followed his 
profession until his death, his skill winning him recognition that was manifest in a 
large and satisfactory practice. 

He was bom in Fairfield, Huron county, Ohio, April 5, 1833. His father, Sam- 
uel Penfield, was a descendant of one of the old Connecticut families and, migrat- 
ing westward, established his home in Huron county, Ohio, where he followed both 
farming and merchandising. He was a man of decided purpose and unfaltering 
determination and never hesitated to espouse a cause which he believed to be right 
On account of his advocacy of anti-slavery and of prohibition he was put out of 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 163 

the Baptist church. When saner opinion prevailed, however, he was asked to re- 
sume his connection with the congregation and that he was a broad-minded man is 
indicated by the fact that he did so, generously forgiving those who had previously 
opposed him. He married Clara Woodfield and their son. Dr. Penfield, had the 
opportunity of attending school in Fairfield, Ohio, and afterward of becoming a 
student in a seminary at Norwalk. He then went to Cleveland to prepare for a 
professional career, entering Hahnemann College, from which he was graduated 
on the completion of the regular course. He located for practice in Newark, Ohio, 
where he remained for six years, subsequently removing to Bucyrus where he ulso 
continued in practice for a number of years, his experience and his continued read- 
ing adding to his broad knowledge and efficiency. At length, believing that the 
west held opportunities for the middle-aged as well as the young, he decided to 
establish his home in Spokane, where he arrived in the spring of 1890. He felt 
that the outlook was good and soon after his wife and family joined him — in De- 
cember of that year. Here he continued in the practice of medicine until his death, 
becoming one of the best known and most honored physicians of Spokane, holding 
at aU times to a high standard of professional ethics. 

It was on the 15th of April, 1857, in Fairfield, Ohio, that Dr. Penfield was 
united in marriage to Miss Louisa A. Smith, a daughter of Jonathan H.' and Be- 
linda A. (Holmes) Smith, formerly of Tompkins county. New York, where her 
father followed farming and merchandising. Dr. Penfield is now survived by his 
wife and three sons, as follows : James W., of Spokane ; Arthur E., engaged in the 
mining business at Wardner, Idaho; and Dr. C. S., who is one of the most promi- 
nent and successful practicing physicians of this city today. 

Death called Dr. Penfield on the 9th of September, 1902, when he was in the 
seventieth year of his age. His political views were in accord with the principles 
of the republican party which he supported from the time age conferred upon him 
the right of franchise. He belonged to the Odd Fellows Society, and was a man 
of firm belief and conviction, never faltering in his loyalty to a course which he be- 
lieved to be right. He was a lover of his home and all that was beautiful, was very 
fond of music, possessed scholarly attainments and habits and was most deeply 
interested in his profession from both the scientific and humanitarian standpoints. 
He enjoyed the companionship of people of kindred interests and ever held friend- 
ship inviolable. A man of marked individuality, the development of his character 
was based upon high and manly principles and there was in all of his life history 
no page that would not bear scrutiny. 



FRANK BANNON LYNOTT, D. D. S. 

Dr. Frank Bannon Lynott is one of the more recent acquisitions to the dental 
profession of Spokane, where he is meeting with excellent success. He was bom 
in Louisiana, Missouri, October 17, 1882, and is a son of N. J. and Catherine (Ban- 
non) Lynott, both of whom are deceased, the father having passed away in 1884 
and the mother in 1889. 

Left an orphan at the age of seven years in the acquirement of his education 
Frank Bannon Lynott first attended the public schools of his native state. After 



164 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

the completion of his preliminary education he decided to adopt the profession of 
dentistry. He matriculated in the dental department of the Washington University 
of St. Louis^ being graduated from this institution with the degree of D. D. S. 
with the class of 1904. As soon as he was licensed to practice he opened an office 
in St. Louis that he maintained for two years. At the expiration of that period he 
decided to come to the northwest, believing that he would here find better oppor- 
tunities as the competition was less keen and the country was rapidly increasing in 
population. He has an office in the Peyton building and during the five years of 
his location here has succeeded in building up a very good practice. Dr. Lynott 
is a most efficient representative of his profession and is held in high regard not 
only by those who have sought his services but among his fellow practitioners. 

x\t Denver, Colorado, on the 19th of October, 1910, Dr. Lynott was united in 
marriage to Miss Bernice Tinsley, a daughter of T. L. and Betty Tinsley. 

Dr. Lynott is a member of the Inland Club and he also belongs to the Spokane 
Amateur Athletic Club, while he maintains relations with his professional brethren 
through the medium of his connection with the National Dental Association and 
the Washington State, Spokane County and Spokane Dental Societies. He is well 
known and highly esteemed among the members of the three latter organizations, 
having served as secretary and treasurer of the state society and as president, 
secretary and treasurer of the Spokane society. Such official connection with or- 
ganizations of the size and importance of these is rather unusual for a young man 
of his age, as he has but recently passed the twenty-ninth anniversary of his birth. 
Dr. Lynott is meeting with more than average success in his profession and his 
many friends prophesy for him a brilliant future. 



LOREN L. RAND. 



Loren L. Rand, an architect who has followed his profession in Spokane since 
1888, was bom in Amesbury, Massachusetts, in December, 1851, a son of William 
H. and Mary Ann Bartlet (Long) Rand. The father was for many years engaged 
in carriage manufacturing at Amesbury, where he still makes his home. At the usual 
age the son began his education as a pupil in the public schools there and later 
supplemented his early opportunities by a course of study in the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology at Boston. He entered upon the practical phases of his 
professional career in Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he opened an architects' 
office, remaining there until he removed to Minneapolis, whence he came to Spo- 
kane in 1888 and has been one of the leading architects of the city throughout all 
the intervening years. Among some of the earlier residences which he designed 
were those of Judge Nash, E. L. Powell, H. F. Belt and S. Heath. He designed 
the first four-story building erected in Spokane after the fire, known as the Tidbal 
block, and some of the more recent business buildings which stand as monuments 
to his skill and ability are the Riverside avenue and the Main street additions to 
the Crescent store, all of the buildings for the Spokane Dry Goods Realty Com- 
pany, the Marble bank building, now occupied by the Union Trust & Savings Bank, 
and others. He has also erected twelve or fifteen school buildings, including the 
new Lewis and Clarke high school, which has but recently been completed and 



LOREN L. RAN'D 



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I '■^ 



Ut. ■« 



ti ^vjt 



^:.'^l*''Or;j 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 167 

wfaidi is the finest school building in the northwest; also the Roosevelt^ Long^ 
fellow, Stevens, Cooper, New Franklin, Audubon, Frances Willard, Hayes Park, 
Adams and Jefferson school buildings. He was the architect and builder of \ike 
Hawthorne, McKinley and Logan schools. He likewise designed the First Presby- 
terian chunc^, which has been built only a few years and which is perhaps the finest 
in the Inland Empire. He has been the architect and builder of a number of 
hotels and other prominent structures and his designs always have the feature of 
utility and comfort combined with the artistic 

On the S^th of September, 1876, Mr. Rand was united in marriage to Miss 
Luamia O. Rice, a daughter of Stanford Rice, of North Adams, Massachusetts. 
They had three children : Morris W., who is associated with his father in his pro- 
fession; Lena May, the wife of S. E. Cardiff, of Spokane; and Ethel Belle, who 
died at the age of ten years. The family reside at No. 2529 Maxwell street. Mr. 
Rand belongs to Oriental Lodge, No. 74, F. & A. M., and has attained the thirty- 
second degree of the Scottish Rite in Oriental Consistory, No. 2, and is a char- 
ter member of El Katif Temple of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is a past 
president of the Sons of the American Revolution and he has reason to be proud of 
a patriotic ancestry, his father being a descendant of the old Wentworth family of 
New England, while his mother was descended from Josiah Bartlet, who was one 
of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. In his own career he has made 
a creditable record. He entered a profession in which only merit and ability win 
advancement and his thorough preliminary training and long experience have quali- 
fied him for important duties in this direction. - ^ . , 



. < 



CHARLES MARVIN' FASSfilTv 

- • 

Charles Marvin Fassett is now city commissioner of Spokane, where he has also 
figured prominently since 1 889 as an assayer and chemist. His ability in that direc- 
tion has brought him wide renown and his activities in that line have extended as 
far as Korea. New York claims him as a native son, his birth having occurred at 
Elmira, December 28, 1858, his parents being Samuel Montague and Ruth Clara 
(Marvin) Fassett. The grandfather, Philo Fassett, settled in northern Pennsyl- 
?ania when that district was an almost unbroken wilderness. In early manhood 
Samuel M. Fassett followed the occupation of farming but afterward removed to 
Ebnira, New York, and about 1886 became a resident of California, where he en- 
gaged extensively in orange growing. Subsequently he removed to Nevada, where 
he conducted lumber and banking interests. He is now living retired, although he 
is still financially connected with lumber and banking activities. He is a well pre- 
served man although he has passed the eighty-fourth milestone on life's journey. 
His wife passed away in March, 1911. The only daughter of the family is Mrs. 
Julia Bender, the wife of Charles T. Bender, for years cashier of the Washoe 
County Bank of Reno, Nevada. 

The only son, Charles Marvin Fassett, was educated in the public schools of 
Ebnira, New York, and made his initial step in business in connection with a retail 
drug store. By progressive and logical steps he advanced until his broadening in- 
terests led him to take up the study of mining and chemistry in the mining camps 

Vol III-S 



168 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

of Nevada in 1879. He perfected himself along those lines, added to his know- 
ledge by practical experience and in 1887 opened the Commercial Chemical Lab- 
oratories of Reno. In 1889, just after the great fire, he came to Spokane and or- 
ganized the C. M. Fassett Company, assayers and chemists. Their business also 
included metallurgical designing and the construction of machinery for the extrac- 
tion of ore. In this field Mr. Fassett has since been recognized as one of the leaders 
in the northwest and his reputation, extending far and near, lias led to his being 
called into many fields for service along those lines. In 1900 he built the first 
cyanide gold mill in Korea. It is situated near the Manchurian frontier and was 
the first ever erected in Asia. In his particular line of business Mr. Fassett has 
thoroughly covered the field, gaining comprehensive knowledge of everything bear- 
ing upon his chosen life work, and to broad scientific knowledge he adds most 
thorough practical training and experience. 

In San Francisco, on the 1st of January, 1884, Mr. Fassett was married to Miss 
Edith May Benham, a daughter of Isaac T. and Melina C. (Roe) Benham. Her 
father was one of the early contractors and builders of Spokane. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Fassett have been born a son and daughter. Lewis Montague, who died in 
Spokane, in 1906, at the age of twenty-two years, was very prominent in school 
athletics, having been manager of the various football and other athletic teams of 
the high school. He was, moreover, popular because of his genuine personal worth 
and a bronze tablet has been erected to him in the gymnasium of the high school. 
The daughter, Katherine M., is with her parents in their attractive home at No. 
420 Coeur d'Alene avenue. Mr. Fassett belongs to the Inland Club and to the 
Spokane Amateur Athletic Club. Aside from his business he is perhaps most widely 
known because of his activity and valuable service along political lines. He has 
always been a stalwart republican and in 1885 was a member of the Nevada state 
legislature. In Spokane he has served as a member of the school board for three 
years and of the library board for two years. He was also president of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce for one year and was elected city commissioner under the new form 
of government in the spring of 1911. He accepted this position at a great sacrifice 
to his personal interests but felt that it was his duty as a citizen to faithfully per- 
form the tasks to which public demand had called him. He has ever recognized the 
obligations as well as the privileges of citizenship, but while he prefers a quiet 
place in the backgroimd to the glamour of publicity his ability in achieving results 
has made his cooperation sought and has brought liim into prominence from which 
he would naturally shrink were less desirable ends in view. The scope of his in- 
fluence has reached far beyond his special field of labor and yet he stands as one 
of the most prominent representatives in the field of his chosen life work. 



CHARLES P. LUND. 



Charles P. Lund, a member of the Spokane bar and also well known in business 
circles, having voice in the management of several important corporate interests, 
was born at Fargo, North Dakota, March 17, 1876. His father, Olof Lund, a na- 
tive of Sweden, came to Spokane as a young man and is now living retired in this 
city. His wife, Mrs. Elna Lund, was born in the same country and they became 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 169 

the parents of two sons and four daughters: Charles P.; Peter, living in British 
Colnnibia, where he is engaged in the lumber business; Matilda, the wife of D.L. 
Nelson, a merchant of Helena, Montana; Emma, the widow of F. S. Jewett, who 
makes her home in Calgary, Canada; Sarah, the wife of W. L. Darling, who is 
engaged in the real-estate business in New Westminster, British Columbia; and 
Ellen, the wife of Harold Darling, secretary of the Lund Land & Development 
Company of Cranbrook, British Columbia. 

Reared under the parental roof, Charles P. Lund supplemented his preliminary 
education by study in the University of Michigan, winning his Bachelor of Arts 
degree upon graduation with the class of 1896. Spokane has practically been his 
home since 1889, as the only break in his continuous residence came when he pur- 
sued his university course. He entered upon the practice of law here in 1896 and 
some years later formed a partnership with L. R. Hamblen. Subsequently the 
firm style of Stern, Hamblen & Lund was assumed and afterward that of Hamblen, 
Lund & Gilbert. In January, 1909, Mr. Lund withdrew from the partnership snd 
has since continued in practice alone. His ability is widely recognized, for he is 
able to base his arguments upon the thorough knowledge of and familiarity with 
precedents and to present a case upon its merits, never failing to recognize the 
main point at issue and never neglecting to give a thorough preparation. His pleas 
have been characterized by a terse and decisive logic and a lucid presentation rather 
than by flights of oratory, and his power is the greater before court or jury from 
the fact that it is recognized that his aim is ever to secure justice and not to en- 
shroud the cause in a sentimental garb or illusion which will thwart the principles 
of right and equity involved. 

Mr. Lund's activities also exteiiS to the Security National Bank at Cheney, 
Washington, of which he is a director, and he is likewise a director of the Wash- 
ington Brick, Lime & Sewer ^ Pipe Company. 

Mr. Lund was married in Spokane in 1902, to Miss Anna Porter Ewart, a 
daughter of Robert Ewart, who is now living at Hoquaim, Washington, where he 
is engaged in the lumber business. He is one of the pioneer residents of the coun- 
try and is a son of Captain Ewart, now postmaster at Colfax, Washington. The 
mother of Mrs. Lund also represents one of the prominent old families of the state, 
her father, John C. Davenport, having been closely and actively identified with the 
growth of the western country. Mr. and Mrs. Lund have two children: Rosalie 
Alaine, nine years of age; and Robert Ewart, four years of age. The parents have 
many friends in Spokane and with the public interests of the city Mr. Lund has 
been closely associated, his aid and influence being ever a factor for general prog- 
ress and improvement. The cause of education finds in him a warm friend and he 
is now serving as trustee of the Cheney Normal School at Cheney, Washington. 
He was first appointed to this position in 1904 and has served continuously save 
for a period of two years. His political allegiance is given to the republican party 
and he has always taken an active interest in politics, having at different times 
been a delegate to city, county and state conventions. He has served as a delegate 
to all state conventions since 1 902 and from time to time has been a member of the 
county central committee and also of the city central committee. His labors are of 
a practical character and arise from a firm belief in the efficacy of republican prin- 
ciples as factors for good government. Those who know Mr. Lund find him social, 
genial and affable and under all circumstances he is thoroughly dependable. He 



170 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIBE 

* 

belongs to Imperial Lodge, I. O. O. F. at Spokane, the Spokane Lodge, No. 228, 
of Elks, the Spokane Club, the University Club, Spokane Athletic Club and the 
Chamber of Commerce. His interests are wide and varied and he looks at life 
from a broad standpoint, keeping in touch with the advanced thought of the day 
and laboring effectively and earnestly for public progress, his efforts combining 
high ideals with practical service. 



EDWIN WHEELER HAND. 

Edwin Wheeler Hand has held many positions of public trust and has been an 
active leader in republican ranks. He is now enjoying a lucrative practice as a 
prominent Spokane attorney, confining his attention largely to civil law along the 
lines of mechanics' liens, land titles, etc. His life has been imbued with the enter- 
prising spirit which was the factor of progress in the middle west and which is now 
contributing so largely to the upbuilding of the Pacific coast country. His birth 
occurred in Columbia county, Wisconsin, May 28, 1 859. His father, Jesse F. Hand, 
was bom in Columbia county. New York, and was of English lineage, representing 
a family that was founded in Connecticut in the early part of the eighteenth century, 
so that from colonial days down to the present, members of the Hand family have 
been numbered among American citizens. Following his removal from the Empire 
state Jesse F. Hand became a resident of Columbia county, Wisconsin, and while 
he devoted his time and energies to agricultural pursuits, he was also a prominent 
and influential factor in public affairs and represented his county in the state legis- 
lature in 1865. For thirty years he was a postmaster in Columbia county and after- 
ward filled the same position at Phillips, Wisconsin, for four years. He was deeply 
in sympathy with the Union cause at the time of the Civil war, served as recruit- 
ing officer in his county and largely recruited the Tenth Wisconsin Regiment 
His last days were spent as a resident of Spokane, where he passed away in 
1899. In early manhood he had wedded Mary Wheeler, who was bom in 
Cuyahoga county, Ohio^ and died in Wisconsin in 1892. Her father was a dis- 
tinguished attorney and at one time served as lieutenant governor of his state. 
Mrs. Hand was a descendant of the well known Harper family, famous in con- 
nection with the border wars. Her ancestors landed in Connecticut earlv in the 
eighteenth century on coming from England to the new world, and both the 
Harper and Wheeler families were represented in the Continental army m the 
struggle for independence. Among the sons of the family of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse F. 
Hand, Willis is an attorney of Kearney, Nebraska; George, who was corporal of 
Company D of the Tenth Wisconsin Infantry and was captured at the battle of 
Chickamauga, was incarcerated in a Confederate prison in Virginia and afterward 
at Andersonville, where he died in 1 865 ; Harper died in Wisconsin, and Elias died 
in infancy. The daughters of the family are: Antoinette, the deceased wife of T. 
H. Hatch, of Wisconsin; Martha, the wife of Frank B. Gould, of Reward, Cali- 
fornia ; Alice M., the wife of William S. Hatton, a farmer and fruit raiser of Grand 
Valley, Colorado; and Isabelle, the wife of Cicero Bishop, of Reward, California. 
Edwin W. Hand supplemented his common-school education, received in his 
native county, by a course of law in the University of Wisconsin, from which he 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 171 

was graduated in 1887. In the meantime he had engaged in educational work^ 
teaching school for three terms^ and just before he attained his majority he en- 
tered the office of registrar of deeds^ in which he continued for one year. During 
the succeeding year he was a pupil in the Oshkosh (Wis.) Normal School and after- 
ward went to Phillips, Wisconsin, where he formed a partnership with his brother 
Willis for the conduct of real-estate and insurance business. There he remained 
until 1890 and then entered upon the practice of law, being admitted before the 
Price county circuit court and subsequently by the supreme court of Wisconsin. He 
continued a member of the bar of his native state until September, 1894, when he 
went to Wallace, Idaho. There he practiced until April, 1897, when he came to 
Spokane. He was alone for a time but subsequently formed a partnership with 
Charles A. Fleming, now city clerk, under the firm name of Hand & Fleming. He 
afterward joined E. W. Taylor and John W. Graves in a partnership relation 
under the firm style of Hand, Taylor & Graves. After a year this was dissolved 
and Mr. Hand was again alone but was afterward associated with E. O. Connor 
under the firm name of Connor & Hand. They were together for two years, after 
which Mr. Hand was again alone for a year, at the end of which time he became 
associated with Benson Wright in a partnership that was maintained for three years. 
He has since practiced independently in the field of general law, although giving 
especial attention to mechanics' liens, land titles and similar law work. He has 
conducted important mining litigation in Idaho and has had some criminal practice 
in Wallace and at the present writing has been retained in connection with mining 
litigation in Shoshone county, Idaho. 

While residing in Phillips, Wisconsin, Mr. Hand served for one term as city 
attorney and afterward at Wallace, Idaho, served in the same office, and resigned 
preparatory to his removal to Spokane. He was also a member of the city eoundl 
of Spokane for a term of two years and in 1902-8 was president of the council, in 
which connection he exercised his official prerogatives in support of various pro- 
gressive municipal measures. He is an insurgent republican, standing for principle 
but not for partisanship when it works to the detriment of the majority and for the 
benefit of a few machine leaders. In early life he was quite active in political 
circles and served on different committees. In Wallace, Idaho, he was chairman 
of the republican county convention three times, serving in 1 896, the year in which 
Bryan was the silver candidate. He has also served as a delegate to the county 
nominating conventions and has ever labored to promote the interests of his party 
in as far as he has believed that it would subserve the interests and welfare of the 
general public. 

On the 5th of July, 1897, at Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, Mr. Hand was united in 
marriage to Miss Lola A. Willis, a daughter of James R. and Enuna R. Willis, and 
unto them was bom, August 24, 1898, a daughter who is now in school. On the 
23d of May, 1907, in Spokane, Mr. Hand wedded Miss Alma L. Tischer, a daugh- 
ter of Herman and Louise Tischer. Her father, now deceased, was a painter and 
musician and served as a soldier in an Iowa regiment during the Civil war. 

Fraternally Mr. Hand is a Mason, holding membership with Spokane Lodge, 
No. 84. He jmned the order in the lodge at Phillips, Wisconsin, and served as its 
jnnior and senior deacon. He also holds membership with the Order of the Eastern 
Star, is a charter member of Excelsior Camp, No. 54, M. W. A., held the office of 
secretary for three years, was venerable counsel one year and was trustee for several 



172 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

years. He is a member of Moose Lodge, No. 161, and is an active and helpful 
worker in the Bethel Presbyterian church, in which for five years he has served as 
an elder. Following his removal to Spokane there has come to him the recognition 
which always meets personal worth and ability. He has gained a good clientage 
and has come to be known as a public-spirited and progressive citizen whose aid 
has featured prominently in support of various worthy public projects. 



HARRY C. HAYWARD. 



Harry C. Hay ward is a name to conjure with in Spokane. The fact that he 
advocates any measure or movement is sure to win for it a large following, such is 
his personal popularity and the confidence reposed in his judgment. He is never 
too busy to be cordial and never too cordial to be busy. As a theatrical manager 
he has ministered constantly to the pleasure and happiness of others and at the same 
time he has played well his part on the stage of life. He claims London, England, 
as the place of his nativity, his birth having there occurred January 3, 1853. His 
parents were Harry Oxford and Emma (Lee) Hayward, the former an officer of the 
British army. That the son came naturally by his interest in theatrical affairs is 
indicated in the fact that his mother was an actress. But when a young lad he was 
left an orphan and the direction of his life devolved upon himself. 

His education was acquired in the schools of the city of London, where he at- 
tended the Blue Coat School. He was but thirteen years of age when he began to 
earn his living as call boy at the Queen's theater in London and later he went to 
the Eagle theater to play pantomime and sprite parts. He was afterward connected 
with the Marylebone and when seventeen years of age he determined to go to 
Australia. When about to sail, however, he changed his plans and came instead to 
America, making his way to Philadelphia, where he engaged to play comedy roles 
in the Chestnut street theater. Ambitious to receive the direct returns of his own 
labor, he shortly afterward organized a company which he took upon the road as 
far as Texas. He then returned to New York and afterward sailed for the West 
Indies and Brazil as ticket agent with a circus. Following his return to America 
he once more went upon the road with a company, but the venture proved unsuccess- 
ful financially and in Nevada the company disbanded. Gradually he made his way 
upward to Walla Walla and in 1881 came to Spokane to accept the position of first 
chief clerk of the engineering department of the Northern Pacific Railroad in this 
city, opening the first railroad office here. Ever appreciative of opportunities and 
readily rec(^nizing such, he has constantly enlarged the scope of his activities by 
the improvement of advantages which others might not have utilized but passed 
heedlessly by. He had been connected with the railway interests of Spokane for a 
year when he opened the first gun and ammunition store of the city, building up a 
flourishing business, from which he turned, however, to again enter the theatrical 
field as manager of a playhouse as soon as there was a sufficient population in 
Spokane to support it. 

He brought to the city the first theatrical attraction in 188S. At that time 
Emma Abbott was in the west playing The Bohemian Girl, and Mr. Hayward booked 
her for Spokane. There was nothing in the town which in the least resembled a 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 173 

theater, so he engaged a warehouse that stood on the northeast comer of Riverside 
and Post streets. A local paper in writing of this said: "The audience paid two 
dollars each for reserved seats on gang plows and farm implements. Nail kegs in 
the rear were a trifle cheaper. It was a fifteen hundred dollar house altogether." 
From that time forward Mr. Hay ward has given his attention almost exclusively 
to theatrical management and interesting tales of his experiences in the early days 
are recorded. Ahout 1888 there were two theaters in Spokane, the Falls City and 
the Concordia. Louis Morgenstern came to Spokane as advance agent for Gus 
Levick, who was then playing in the west in Hoodman Blind. Those who were 
backing him financially had had trouble over terms with the Falls City theater and 
Mr. Morgenstern determined to teach the local management a lesson. In the office 
of the Grand Hotel he approached a young man and asked for the manager of the 
Falls City opera house. The young man answered: "I'm the manager;" whereon 
Morgenstern, after introducing himself, said: "Well, we'll never pay your terms 
to show here." The young man in question was Harry Hayward, who replied 
quietly: "All right; you won't show in the Falls City house .'^" "No; I'll get the 
other house. Who's the manager of it?" Whereupon Mr. Hayward again an- 
swered: "I am." Naturally the advance agent had to come to terms and there- 
upon he interrogated Mr. Hayward concerning whom he should see to make other 
necessary business arrangements. To his query as to the city treasurer, the man- 
ager of the Grand Hotel and the manager of the transfer compwmy, he received in 
each case the answer: "I am;" and was nonplused when he finally said: "Then 
direct me to the city bill poster;" and Harry Hayward replied: "I'm the man." 
Mr. Hayward was all this and much more in the enterprising town which was be- 
ing developed by the side of the falls. He is as popular today when Spokane has 
a population of many thousands as he was when it had but a few hundreds, for all 
who know him give him their friendship. 

Mr. Hayward was married in Milton, Oregon, in March, 1880, to Miss Clara 
M. Kohlhauff, a daughter of William R. Kohlhauff, and they now have six children: 
Louise, Frederick, Ralph O., Margaret, Marie and Kathryn, all at home with the 
exception of the eldest daughter, who is the wife of R. B. Trousdale. 

While in his native land Mr. Hayward was in the English volunteer service as 

a member of the First Surrey Artillery. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity and 

the Elks lodge and is also a member of the Spokane Club. In politics he is an 

earnest republican and in 1883 was elected city treasurer of Spokane, while in 1909 

he was chosen to represent his district in the state legislature. A conversation that 

occurred on the streets of Spokane one day illustrates something of Mr. Hay ward's 

position and popularity. A friend, meeting another, said: "Who do you think is 

going to the legislature from the second district.'^" "I don't know. Who is it.f^" 

"Harry Hayward." "Who said so.?^" "He did." And the result of the elecUon 

showed that he knew. It is said that he did not make a speech, answer a question 

or attend a meeting during the campaign ; but the people knew the man in whom 

they placed their confidence, knew that he was to be relied upon to work for the 

hest interests of the majority, and not only sent him to ^he general assembly but 

would have reelected him had he not declined to serve. They had tested him at 

the time of the great fire in 1889, when he was given entire charge of the relief 

work. Some men came out of that work with besmirched records but Harry C. 

Hayward proved equal to the trust even in the slightest detail and did for Spokane 



174 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

a work which will never be forgotten by those who were residents of the city at 
that time. He has been termed a Chesterfield in manner and there is about him a 
polish and courtesy most attractive. It is not a veneer^ however. It has its root in 
the very essence of his nature and has made him a dependable man under all 
circumstances. • 



SYLVESTER G. MORIN. 

Because of its rapid upbuilding, Spokane offers an excellent field to the con- 
tractor whose work is characterized by thoroughness and whose ideas embody pro- 
gressive and artistic elements. Well qualified to execute all that is best in architec- 
ture, Sylvester G. Morin has been closely associated with building operations in 
Spokane during the past decade, having come to the city in 1902. 

He was bom August 11, 1877, at Bedford, Quebec, Canada, his parents being 
John G. and Mary Ann (O'Shea) Morin, both of whom were natives of Quebec, 
and are now residents of Bedford. The father comes of a pioneer family known 
during the early days of the French settlement of Quebec, while the mother is of 
Irish lineage. Her father, Daniel O'Shea, who was an own cousin of Daniel 
O'Connell, took a leading part in the troubles in Canada in 1887. He, too, repre- 
sented one of the pioneer families of Quebec. John G. Morin, now ei^ty-three 
years of age, is a retired farmer and contractor, who for many years figured prom- 
inently in the history of his city, where for seventeen years he served as a member 
of the city council^ acting as its president during a large part of that time, and 
thus largely shaping its destinies. Unto John G. and Mary Ann Morin were bom 
five sons and five daughters, the brothers of our subject being: John B., now de- 
ceased; Joseph N., of Holyoke, Massachusetts; F. G., who makeshis home in Trail, 
British Columbia; and Edward J., a contractor residing in Spokane. The daughters 
of the family are: Addie E., deceased; Emma E., the wife of T. A. Moore, of 
Bedford, Quebec; Roseanna, the wife of August Berthiaume, also of Bedford; 
Christy, the wife of J. A. Bessette, of Providence, Rhode Island ; and Celia J., the 
wife of D. W. LeBlanc, of Bedford. 

Sylvester G. Morin, whose name introduces this record, pursued his education 
in the schools of Bedford, Quebec, and in Holy Cross College, Farnham, graduating 
from that institution with the class of 1898. When his college days were over he 
returned to his father's farm and devoted two years to further work in tilling the 
fields and caring for the crops. He then took up the mason's trade in that district, 
and at New York city, and afterward came to the Pacific coast country, visiting 
Trail and Rossland, British Columbia, in 1890. For a year he worked at his trade 
and then located at Ritzville, engaging in contracting at both Ritzville and Wenat- 
chee, Washington. He was in Ritzville for eighteen months, during which time he 
spent a year in looking over the coast and also visiting Montana and Idaho. He 
finally decided to locate permanently in Spokane and since 1902 has made his home 
in this city. 

Mr. Morin has had charge of the masonry construction at the building of Sacred 
Heart Hospital, also White's Hotel and the Wonder Department Store. He then 
became associated with Charles Jasper under the firm name of Jasper & Morin and 



'■■ ■> 



IHl iNEW Y';KK 

PUbLlC LIBRARY 






V. 






SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 177 

WIS thus engaged in business for two years but since that time has been alone. 
While in partnership relation the firm built the Antler's Hotel^ the Western Union 
Life Insurance buildings the Jones & Pettit building at Madison and Sprague 
avenues^ the Como Hotel on Main avenue^ the apartment house at the corner of 
Broadway and Adams^ and the Gardner apartments on Third avenue; they re- 
modeled the John W. Graham building and also the building at the northwest comer 
of Riverside and Post, owned by Mr. Chamberlain^ and several others. Since the! 
dissolution of the partnership Mr. Morin has had the contracts for the erection of 
the Imperial Trading building at Second and Stevens streets, the Benson apart- 
ments on Fifth avenue, and is now building the addition to the Spokane county jail, 
and has several other contracts on hand. He is likewise interested in several manu- 
facturing industries and his activity in business circles has gained him a prominent 
position as a representative of industrial interests here, while he also owns city and 
residence property. 

Mr. Morin took an active part in politics while in Canada and here gives his 
allegiance to the republican party, but has not been a political worker since lo- 
cating in Spokane. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons, belonging 
to Oriental Lodge, No. 74. He is a member of the Builders' Exchange and also a 
member of the Chamber of Commerce, and his activities and interests largely center 
along the line of business and laudable ambition, prompting him to put forth earnest 
effort in the attainment of success. Attractive styles of 'alrchitecture as well as sub- 
stantial construction are features of his work, and his business integrity has been a 
source of his success. 






LYNDON K. ARMSTRONG. 

Lyndon K. Armstrong is the editor and proprietor of the Northwest Mining 
News, the only mining periodical published in Montana, Idaho and Washington. 
Underlying his work as a journalist he has practical experience and broad scientific 
knowledge concerning the subject handled and has made his publication of value to 
the mining community and a factor in the development of the rich mineral resources 
of the northwest. His labors have been a distinct impetus to work of this charac- 
ter and to its allied interests and he has a wide acquaintance among prominent min- 
ing men of the northwest, who recognize in him one of the leading representatives 
of mining in this section of the country, his comprehensive knowledge enabling him 
to speak with authority upon questions relative to the development of the mines 
and utilization of the ore. He was bom in Waukesha county, Wisconsin, Septem- 
ber 26, 1859, a son of J. A. and Laura E. (Hollebaek) Armstrong, both of whom 
were natives of the state of New York. The mother, who died in 1906, was of 
Holland Dutch descent, although the establishment of the family in America ante- 
dated the Revolutionary war. Her grandfather was a soldier of the War of 1812. 
J. A. Armstrong, who comes of English and Scotch lineage and also represents a 
family that was founded in America during the colonial epoch in our history, is 
now living retired in Minneapolis. He was county auditor and for several years 
served as a member of the state legislature of Minnesota, taking active and help- 
hil part in shaping the public pjolicy of county and commonwealth. He visited the 



178 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

northwest before the city of Spokane had been dreamed of^ making a journey to 
this section in the '60s. For a time he was with Fremont. He traveled first to 
California and then came up through the Walla Walla, Lewiston, Warren and Flor- 
ence districts and afterward returned to Wisconsin. In his family were two s(ms and 
eight daughters, the brother of our subject being R. O. Armstrong, of Minnesota, 
who is engaged in the automobile business. 

In the common schools of Minnesota Lyndon K. Armstrong pursued his educa- 
tion and then went to the territory of Dakota and afterward to Montana. Subse- 
quently he established his home in the state of North Dakota where he engaged in 
the drug business. While in Montana he had been engaged in mining and from 
that time to the present has been interested in mining operations and all that per- 
tains to the development of the mineral resources of the northwest. In February, 
1890, he arrived in Spokane and engaged in mining in this district. He is inter- 
ested in mining properties in every one of the northwestern states and in British 
Columbia, has been mining engineer and at three different times has published min- 
ing journals. He purchased a paper called the Northwestern Mining Review in 
1892 and in 1893 bought the Spokane Miner. They suspended publication and he 
then established a paper which he called Mining, continuing to issue this for sev- 
eral years, but suspended publication in October, 1903. About 1908 he took the 
editorial management of the Northwest Mining News and early in the year 1911 
purchased the paper which is now the only mining periodical published in the dis- 
trict covered by the states of Montana, Idaho and Washington. This is now in its 
seventh volume and has a large circulation among mining people, bringing into 
concise and tangible form the mining news which is of value to all who are engaged 
in the undertaking. Mr. Armstrong's long experience has made him particularly 
well qualified for the work of editing a paper of this character. His ability led 
to his selection to take charge of the state mineral exhibit at the Pan-American and 
Trans-Mississippi expositions and on several occasions he has had charge of the 
mineral exhibits at local fairs. 

Mr. Armstrong organized the first mining exchange ever established in Spc^aue 
with Warren Hussey, of the Spokane National Bank, as president and himself as 
secretary. Every bank had a membership, including the Spokane National, the 
Washington National, the Traders National, the First National, the Citizens Na- 
tional and the Cannon's State Banks. This was organized in 1 890 for the purposes 
of exploiting the mineral resources and maintaining a library and reading room. 
It eventually became an active stock exchange board, was taken over by the city 
to be made a part of the Chamber of Commerce which ultimately discontinued it, 
owing to the success of the Bureau of Information. 

Perhaps nothing can better establish Mr. Armstrong's position as one of the 
foremost representatives of mining interests in the northwest than the citation of 
his membership relations. He belongs to the American Institute of Mining En- 
gineers, the Canadian Mining Institute, the American Electro-Chemical Society, 
the American Mining Congress, the American Society for the Advancement of Sci- 
ence, the Northwest Mining Association and the Mining Men's Club. He has been 
especially interested in the exploitation of the mining interests of this section of 
the country and maintains the best library on mining, geology and metallurgy in 
the northwest. He also belongs to the National Geographic Society, the Western 
Conservation League and the Chamber of Commerce and in the last nan^ed is serv- 
ing as chairman of the mining committee. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 179 

Mr. Armstrong has been married twice. He first wedded Charlotte J. Grandy, 
who died in May, 1886, leaving a son, Halbert Armstrong, who is now assisting 
his father in newspaper work. In November, 1896, in Spokane, Mr. Armstrong 
wedded Lulu E. Hyatt, a daughter of M. Hyatt and a half-sister of D. C. Britt, 
who was formerly editor of the Chelan Leader. Mr. and Mrs. Armstrong are par- 
ents of two daughters, Helen and Marian, who are in school. The family are well 
known socially in Spokane, their home being the center of a cultured society circle. 
Mr. Armstrong is a republican in his political views, is well informed concerning 
the leading questions and issues of the day and has represented his party in city, 
county and state conventions. It is characteristic of him that he masters with thor- 
oughness everything that he undertakes and this trait in his character has led to 
his close study of the mining proposition from every possible standpoint. He is 
thoroughly acquainted with the great scientific principles which underlie or have 
bearing upon his chosen field of labor. Geography, geology, chemistry — all have 
promoted his efficiency, as well as the broad practical experience which has come 
to him in his management and ownership of mining properties. He is numbered 
among those who are assisting largely in bringing into material form the hopes of 
the progressive citizens for the upbuilding of a great inland empire. 



CHARLES E. MALLETTE. 

Operating in the field of real estate, Charles E. Mallette has handled important 
properties and at the same time has been connected with mining interests of the 
northwest. He was born in Illinois, November 4, 1861, a son of Henry and Marion 
(Curtis) Mallette, both of whom were natives of England. The father repre- 
sented an old English family but chose to cast his lot with the residents of the new 
world and lived in various sections of this country to the time of his death, which 
occurred in 1869. His widow still survives and is now a resident of Victoria, Brit- 
ish Columbia. The two daughters of the family are Mrs. G. Bollinger and Mrs. 
Lillian Fox, the latter a resident of San Jose, California. 

Charles E. Mallette was partially educated in San Jose, to which place the fam- 
ily removed about 1864. He also spent some time in the university at Santa Clara 
and when his school days were over turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. 
Later he removed to Victoria, British Columbia, where he entered the lumber busi- 
ness and subsequently began dealing in real estate, continuing in that field in Vic- 
toria for six years, or from 1884 until 1890. He was quite successful in his under- 
takings there and extending his efforts to other districts, became one of the princi- 
pal owners of Port Angeles, Washington, where he established his home. With the 
development and upbuilding of the place he was prominently identified, was instru- 
mental in installing the water works and was also interested in the light plant 
and in a sawmill there. In connection with H. Lutz he was one of the incorporators 
of the present Bank of Clallam County, and was its cashier for three or four years. 
He resided at Port Angeles from 1890 until 1897, but while his enterprise was a 
prominent factor in the upbuilding of that place, it largely proved his financial ruin, 
for the widespread financial panic of that period brought him heavy losses. How- 
ever, he still retains some of his interests there. He afterward located in Nelson, 



180 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

British Columbia^ where he was engaged in the wholesale grain and hay business 
for a year and a half. In January^ 1899^ he arrived iii Spokane and has since 
operated in real estate. He makes a specialty of handling big properties^ yet con- 
ducts a general real-estate business and is interested in mining in the Coeur D'Alene 
country and also in Tuolumne county^ California. In the Coeur D'Alene district 
he is interested in the Stewart and Snowstorm mines and is a stockholder in many 
others. He is a man of resolute purpose and his determination and energy have 
brought him the success which is now his. 

On the 12th of April, 1882, in San Jose, California, Mr. Mallette was united 
in marriage to Miss Mary A. Johnson, a daughter of W. J. Johnson, a farmer and 
pioneer of California, who went to that state in 1849. The three children of this 
marriage are: Mrs. H. M. Dean, of Spokane; Ethel, who is a graduate of Wash- 
ington University of the class of 1910; and Lester, who is a student in the high 
school at Spokane. Mrs. MaUette is a member of the Congregational church and 
presides graciously over her hospitable home. Mr. Mallette holds membership with 
the Spokane Athletic Club and with Spokane Lodge, No. 34, F. & A. M. He like- 
wise belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Victoria and to the Elks 
lodge in Port Angeles. He is a member of the Spokane Stock Exchange, of which 
he was one of the incorporators and in which he has continuously served as an 
officer. He acted as its president in 1909 and is now secretary-treasurer. While 
living in Port Angeles, he served as mayor for two terms and was president of the 
Chamber of Commerce there for four or five years. He has long been active in 
politics as a supporter of the democratic party and has been a delegate to county 
and state conventions. He has also served on the county central committee and does 
all in his power to further the interests of the party in which he believes. It is a 
well known fact that Charles E. Mallette stands firmly in support of his principles 
and his life exemplifies the high purpose of the Masonic fraternity and is an ex- 
ample of good citizenship as well as of business enterprise. 



STANLEY EVERETT HODGEN. 

Stanley Everett Hodgen, president and manager of the firm of Hodgen & Com- 
pany, Ltd., was bom in Thomasburg, province of Ontario, Canada, in May, 1880, 
and is a son of James and Rebecca (Sayers) Hodgen. 

In the acquirement of an education Stanley Everett Hodgen attended the public 
and high schools of Ontario. Upon attaining his maturity he began his business 
career, his first position being a clerkship in a wholesale grocery house in Grand 
Forks, North Dakota. The following year he gave this up in order to become a 
traveling salesman for the O. J. Barnes Company, also of Grand Forks, with whom 
he remained until June, 1908. He then came to Idaho to take a position in the 
wholesale depwirtment of the Lewiston Mercantile Company of Lewiston. The firm 
quickly recognized the young man's ability and trustworthiness and when assigned 
a stock of goods at White Bird, deemed him the one best qualified to take charge 
of the business. He took possession of the place in 1904, organizing the White 
Bird Mercantile Company which he most successfully conducted for four years, dur- 
ing that time acquiring the greater pK>rtion of the stock of the company. Two years 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 181 

after going to White Bird, in 1906, he formed the Hodgen-Brown Cattle Company, 
which he managed for two years when he sold out his interest to his partner, Mr. 
Brown. After disposing of his interests in White Bird he came to Spirit Lake, or- 
ganizing the firm of Hodgen & Company, Ltd. This was incorporated in Septem- 
ber, 1908, with S. E. Hodgen, president and manager; G. D. Hodgen, secretary and 
treasurer; and D. MacKenzie of St. Paul, Minnesota. This company has prospered 
ever since its incipiency, and is now recognized as one of the flourishing enter- 
prises of the city. In January, 1911, Mr. Hodgen extended his activities by the 
organization of the lone Mercantile Company, of lone, Washington. This is a 
general mercantile concern with S. E. Hodgen as president; C. B. Hodgen, man- 
ager; and John Warner. 

On the 26th of December, 1907, Mr. Hodgen was married to Miss Gertrude D. 
Alexander, a daughter of A. E. Alexander of Grangeville, Idaho. 

Mr. Hodgen is a member of the Inland Club of Spokane, and fraternally he is 
connected with the Odd Fellows, being a member of the White Bird Lodge of which 
he was treasurer during the period of his residence there. Although he is only a 
little more than thirty years of age, Mr. Hodgen has proven, through his capable 
management of every enterprise with which he has be^n connected, that he is des- 
tined to become one of the affluent business men of northwestern Idaho. 



WARREN E. SHUCK. 



Mining and real-estate interests have occupied the attention of Warren E. Shuck 
during the greater part of his business career, but he has now subordinated the 
latter to the former and is now largely engaged in the development of the Lawerence 
property at Clark's Fork, Idaho, the work being done under the name of the Law- 
erence Mining & Milling Company, of which he is secretary-treasurer. He was 
bom in Minnesota, February 19, 1880. His parents, John S. and Anna M. (Bar- 
ron) Shudc, were natives of Indiana and of England, respectively, and both died 
in the year 1 897. The former was of German descent and was living in Indiana at 
the time of the Civil war. He enlisted on the 17th of, August, 1862, as a member of 
Company E of the Indiana Infantry, and after the close of his military service re- 
moved to Minnesota. In the various localities in which he lived he was recognized 
as a leading and influential citizen. At one time he was editor of the Nance County 
Journal at Fullerton, Nebraska, and for a number of years he filled the office of 
probate judge in Jackson county, Kansas. He became editor of the Mantorville 
Express at Mantorville, Minnesota, and was elected county attorney of Cass county, 
that state. His fellow townsmen ever recognized him as a public-spirited citizen 
and knew he always subordinated partisanship to patriotism. Gordon R. Shudc is a 
graduate of the University of Minnesota and is an electrical engineer, connected 
with the Westinghouse people at Seattle, Washington. The two daughters of the 
family are: Mrs. Ivadelle Gibb, the wife of the Rev. John D. Gibb, of Madelia, 
Minnesota; and Mrs. Edith Ehrisman, of Rushmore, Minnesota. 

Warren E. Shuck completed his public-school course by graduation from the 
hi^ school at Holton, Kansas, and afterward was graduated from the academic 
department of the University of Minnesota in 1904, and from the law depart- 



182 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

ment in 1906^ at which time he won the LL. B. degree. Prior to his graduation 
from the university, however, he followed the profession of school teaching for one 
year in Kansas and one year in Minnesota, and subsequent to his graduation he en- 
gaged in the real-estate and mining business. His identification with the northwest 
dates from 1906, in which year he arrived in Spokane and established a general 
real-estate business but subordinates that to his mining interests. In this connec- 
tion he has principally engaged in the development of the Lawerence property at 
Clark's Fork, Idaho. The business is incorporated under the name of the Law- 
erence Mining & Milling Company, with Joseph Reed as president; Smith Hilliard, 
vice president; and W. E. Shuck as secretary-treasurer. They own nine claims in 
the group and are about ready to install a concentrating mill. The values are lead 
silver and they have developed to a depth of six hundred feet in the lower levels 
and have done one thousand two hundred feet of work in the various surface work- 
ings. They have cut a No. 1 vein to the depth of three hundred feet and it is a 
true fissure vein. They have drifted on it four hundred feet and all the way the 
ore runs from two and a half to ^ve and a half feet of milling ore, with consider- 
able shipping ore mixed in. Mr. Shuck is also interested in the Senator Mining & 
Milling Company, of which he is secretary-treasurer, and which now has its prop- 
erty under development, having already a three hundred to four hundred foot tun- 
nel. This promises good returns and its officers are the same as those of the Law- 
erence company. In addition, Mr. Shuck has other mining interests in the Coeur 
d'Alenes. 

His study of the political questions and issues of the day has led him to give 
his support to the republican party. He is a member of the Spokane Athletic Club 
and of the Spokane Mining Association, and in these different connections his per- 
sonal worth has won recognition in warm friendships. During the six years of his 
residence in the northwest he has gained a wide acquaintance and has here found 
the opportunities which he sought. His labors, carefully and intelligently directed, 
are bringing him good returns and he has every reason to hope that more than ordi- 
nary success will be his in his mining operations in this district. 



GEORGE M. COLBORN. 



George M. Colbom is a Spokane dealer in real estate, largely handling business 
property and suburban acreage. He was born in lola, Kansas, August 7, 1875, a 
son of Josiah F. and lola (Friend) Colborn, the former of whom was a native of 
Indiana and the latter of Virginia. The father, born February 7, 1829, came of 
Scotch-German ancestry and the family was establislied in America prior to the 
Revolution, in which representatives of the name took part. He also had military 
experience, being connected with the militia in pioneer times in fighting Indians in 
Kansas. He and his wife located upon a farm in the Sunflower state when that 
state was being opened up for settlement and the town of lola was named in her 
honor, their land covering the townsite. The death of Mr. Colborn occurred June 
16 1904, at Wallace, Idaho, his wife surviving until January 25, 1911. The inter- 
ment of both took place at lola, Kansas. She had a brother who was an officer 
in the Civil war while among her ancestors were those who fought in the war for 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 183 

independence. By her marriage she became the mother of the following named: 
Nell F., of Spokane; Madeline^ the wife of D. C. McKissick, of Wallace, Idaho; 
Luella E., the widow of W. P. Northrup, of Murray, Idaho; Alice C, the widow of 
Winfield Scott, of Wallace, that state ; Robert Curtis, who passed away at the age of 
nineteen years; and Jennie, who married E. H. Moffitt, of Wallace, Idaho, and died 
in 1909. The other member is George M. Colbom, of this review. 

At the usual age the last named entered the public schools of lola, continuing 
his study there until he had become a high-school student. He afterward attended 
a business college at Fort Scott, Kansas, and then took a position as stenographer. 
His identification with the northwest dates from 1 892, when he located in Wallace, 
Idaho, remaining in that and other different towns until 1899, when he came to 
Spokane. Here he entered the real-estate field as an employe of the firm oi Cook 
& Clark, and afterward was with Fred B. Grinnell, acquiring an interest in the busi- 
ness with which he was associated until he sold out in 1907. He then embarked in 
business on his own account and has so continued to the present day. His clientage 
has come to him in the field of business and suburban property, which he buys and 
sells, and he is handling Colborn and Morgan Acre Park addition just north of 
Hillyard, which consists of six hundred and forty acres, the tract being under the 
pumping system of irrigation, forty thousand dollars being expended in putting in 
this system. All of the land has been sold except a hundred-acre tract. About one 
bondred families are now living on this and the districts which have thus far been 
cultivated have been planted to orchards and gardens. 

When Mr. Colbom arrived in Spokane his cash capital consisted of one hundred 
and fifty dollars. He borrowed seventy-five dollars to make the purchase of a lot 
in the Cannondale addition on which he began raising chickens. Almost from the 
outset his business prospered and as his financial resources increased he found it 
possible to remove from Cannondale to College avenue, where he secured better 
quarters. He afterward came to Manito Park where he has a beautiful home on a 
prominent corner that faces the park for a length of one hundred and fifty feet. 
Mr. Colbom assisted in promoting Manito Park addition. In a grove which is now 
a part of the park, in 190S he met J. P. Graves, Dave Ham and another gentleman 
and they agreed to form a company and gave authority to the firm of Fred B. Grin- 
nell & Company, of which Mr. Colbom was a member, to prosecute the work and 
develop that part of the country. The company had purchased all of the unplatted 
land owned by Francis Cook and Charles Reeder, turning it over to the above firm 
for sale. No residence district of Spokane has been better developed in as short a 
space of time. In 1904 Mr. Graves made the offer of a hat, suit and wagon if fifty 
houses were built in the district before May, 1905. The work was undertaken and 
within the time set seventy-five houses had been built. The meeting in the grove 
resulted from the fact that those gentlemen wished to consult with Mr. Colborn 
and Mr. Grinnell as real-estate experts as to the advisability and possibility of 
transforming it into a part of the city. The work was accomplished and he won 
the reward. One hundred acres of Manito Park have been deeded to the city and 
that district is rapidly developing, becoming one of the most attractive portions of 
Spokane. 

On the 3 1st of July, 1897, Mr. Colborn was united in marriage to Miss Lulu V. 
Gilbert, of Kellogg, Idaho. The father was one of the early residents of this dis- 
trict, coming to Spokane from Minnesota prior to his removal to Kellogg in 1884. 



184 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Colborn have been bom three daughters^ Jessie^ Helen and 
Jean^ of whom the two eldest are now attending school. 

Mr. Colborn exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures 
of the republican party but has never been an aspirant for office. He belcmgs to the 
Chamber of Commerce and finds recreation and interest in his membership in the 
Spdcane Club and the Spokane Athletic Club^ of which he is a life member. He 
has won and well merits the title of a self-made man. No fortunate circumstances 
aided him at the outset of his career. He has worked along the lines of persistent^ 
earnest labor^ has ever been watchful of opportunities and in their utilization has ad- 
vanced toward success. His work^ too^ has been of a character which has contrib- 
uted in no small measure to Spokane's progress and improvement. 



HON. JAMES ALLEN PERKINS. 

High political honors might have been won by James Allen Perkins had his ambi- 
tion centered along that line, but he has preferred to utilize the opportunities of- 
fered in business and gain his success in the development and conduct of projects 
which have contributed to general prosperity as well as to individual success. 
The consensus of public opinion names him as one of the most useful, representa- 
tive and honored residents of Colfax and Whitman county and because of this 
his life history cannot fail to prove of interest to many of the readers of this 
volume. 

Illinois claims Mr. Perkins as a native son, his birth having occurred in Belle 
Plaine, Marshall county, September 7, 1841. His parents were Joel B. and 
Margaret (Burt) Perkins, who were among the earliest settlers on the Pacific 
coast, having crossed the plains with an ox team in 1852. They settled in the 
vicinity of Oregon City in the Willamette valley and subsequently became resi- 
dents of Benton county, Oregon, where they remained until 1861. That year 
witnessed their arrival in Washington, taking up their abode in Walla Walla 
county, where the father purchased a tract of land adjoining the present town 
of Waitsburg. His energies were there devoted to the development and improve- 
ment of a good farm and the work of reclaiming the wild land was further ad- 
vanced through the efforts of James Allen Perkins, who took up a preemption 
claim adjoining his father's place. However, he afterward sold his right to that 
property and purchased the tract upon which the town of Huntsville now stands. 
In July, 1870, Mr. Perkins and Thomas J. Smith, who was elected state senator 
from Whitman county upon the admission of the state, settled on the land at the 
junction of the north and south branches of the Palouse river, agreeing between 
themselves as to boundaries, for the United States survey had not then been 
made. After they had together put up thirty tons of wild hay and had taken to 
their land the materials necessary for building their houses, Mr. Smith withdrew, 
leaving Mr. Perkins with no other company than his employes. However, the 
warm personal friendship formed between the two men years ago has always been 
maintained and Mr. Perkins afterward secured a neighbor in H. S. Hollings- 
worth, who in the spring located on the land vacated by Mr. Smith. The two soon 
afterward began the erection of the first sawmill in the region north of the Snake 



J. A. PERKINS 



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* ' ^ ** 






•■ )f 



..••:• 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 187 

river, east of the Columbia and west of the Rocky mouiitains^ and in various 
other wavs took active part in the development of the district^ both along material 
and political lines. 

When an act of the territorial legislature organized Whitman county during 
the winter of 1871-2, Mr. Perkins was appointed one of the commissioners to 
locate the county seat. Colfax, for the town had even then been platted and 
named, was the location chosen, and the decision of the commissioners was sus- 
tained by the voters at the next regular election. Mr. Perkins had for some time 
been recognized as a leading and forceful factor in community affairs and in 
1870 had received an offer from Superintendent Ross, at Fort Simcoe, to look after 
Indian matters in the Yakima country. He had declined the position, however, 
preferring to cast in his lot with the town which was just springing into existence 
on his land. His decision was fortunate for the little city as well as for himself, 
as since that date he has proven a most active and prominent factor in the work 
of general progress and improvement. His capital has been given freely to- 
ward its upbuilding and all of his activities have proven elements in its growth 
and advancement. Specific proof of the value of his labors is found in the fact 
that he was. one of the incorporators of the Washington & Idaho Railroad, which 
has had an immeasurable effect upon the development of the agricultural and 
mineral resources of the two states whose names it bears. He turned his atten- 
tion to the field of banking when in 1881 he purchased from C. C. Linnington 
the Bank of Colfax, remaining sole proprietor thereof until 1886, in which year 
A L. Mills was admitted to partnership. Four years passed and O. E. Williams 
then became the partner of Mr. Perkiiisi.tfpd^'tiie 3BH<3cessor of Mr. Mills. The 
bank has always been conducted on silf^^.ec^^el^v'i^ti.Vii JiJies and has constituted a 
potent force in the financial stability of this section. Mi!^. Perkins has also oper- 
ated quite extensively in real-estate as lopal ., agei:ijt for ^the Oregon Railway & 
Navigation Company and the Northern;' •P^dfici-ltdlia^iajtCl Company, representing 
the latter since it has placed its land on the market. 

Mr. Perkins was married in Whitman county, in 1878, to Miss Jennie Ewart, 
daughter of Captain James Ewart. Mr. and Mrs. Perkins are parents of four 
children, namely: Minnie B., who in November, 1899, married L. L. Tower, a 
mining engineer, residing at Northport, Washington; Myrtle M., who in June, 
1896, became the wife of Charles E. Scriber, cashier of the Second National Bank 
of Colfax; Stella, who is the wife of N. B. McDowell and lives in Spokane; and 
Sumner £. The three daughters were all educated at Mills Seminary in Oak- 
land, California. 

Mr. Perkins delivered the first Fourth of July address which was ever held 

in Spokane, in 1874, to an audience which was composed of people living within 

a radius of fifty to sixty miles from Spokane, which at that time numbered only 

seven families as its inhabitants. After the address a prominent lady stepped 

Qp to him and remarked: "Mr. Perkins, I wish I had the faith that you must 

have to enable you to paint so vivid a word picture of the great future that lays 

before Spokane." Mr. Perkins now tells his friends that the predictions he made 

in 1874 have been realized in the Spokane of today. Even two years before this 

event, in 1872, Mr. Perkins was called upon to address an audience on the same 

day in Colfax. 

With all of the varied activities of home and business life, Mr. Perkins has 
Vol m— 10 



188 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

never been neglectful of his duties and obligations of citizenship and has been 
a close and thorough student of the political signs' of the times. His influence 
and efforts have extended beyond city and county into state politics and his opin- 
ions have long carried weight in republican councils. In the session of 1879 he 
represented Whitman county in the territorial legislature^ and public approval of 
his course would undoubtedly have been given him in a reelection had he not 
declined to again stand for office. He has been a delegate to territorial conven- 
tions^ chairman of the republican county central committee^ a member of the ter- 
ritorial committee and was one of the members of the first town council of Col- 
fax. The appreciation of his fellow townsmen for his worth, ability and progress- 
ive citizenship is indicated by the fact that he has four times been chosen for 
mayor of Colfax and once without an opposing vote. He was an alternate delegate 
to the national convention which nominated James A. Garfield for the presidency 
and in 1892 was a delegate at large to the national republican convention which 
met at Minneapolis. In August of that year Mr. Perkins was strongly urged 
by many to allow his name to be used in connection with the candidacy for gov- 
ernor but he steadily refused. Many believe that he would have received the 
nomination had he cared for it, and a nomination at that time would have been 
equivalent to an election. Again his friends urged him to become a candidate for 
the positi^on of United States senator in 1893, but he would not consent as long 
as Hon. J. 6. Allen was before the legislature as a candidate. His ambition has 
not been in the line of office seeking and yet no man is more mindful of his duties 
of citizenship nor labors more earnestly and effectively to promote public prog- 
ress. Every phase of his public as well as of his private life is above reproach 
and even those who hold adverse political opinions have naught to say against the 
man. He is naturally courteous and cordial and these qualities have won him 
friends wherever he is known, and the fact that those who have known him long- 
est are his warmest friends is an indication of an honorable and well spent life. 



JUDGE WM. A. HUNEKE. 

Judge Wm. A. Huneke, who is a distinguished jurist of Spokane, was born Au- 
gust 12, 1864, in Cincinnati, Ohio, a son of John and Christine (Ringen) Huneke. 
The father, who was a native of Germany, was a Methodist minister for many years. 
He was one of the home guard during the war and was in the government employ in 
the postal department in Europe before coming to America. His death occurred in 
1897. The mother was of German descent and died in 1868. To their union five 
children were born: William A., of this sketch; Louis, who is head bookkeeper for 
J. F. Fletcher & Company, of Chattanooga, Tennessee; Albert J., who is manager 
of a mining company at Tyrone, New Mexico; Mrs. E. P. Lurker, of Evansville, 
Indiana; and Mrs. Amelie C. Kloenne, who is residing in Logansport, Indiana. 

William A. Huneke pursued his early education in the public schools of Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, and subsequently was a student at Wallace College, Berea, Ohio, where 
he took a course in the classics and from which institution he was graduated with the 
degree of A. B. Later he matriculated in the law department of the University of 
Michigan, and was graduated therefrom with the degree of LL. B. As soon as he 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 189 

was admitted to the bar and thus qualified to practice before the courts he opened 
an office in Louisville, Kentucky^ and began practicing law and serving as collector. 
He remained there for one year but in the fall of 1 889 came to Spokane where he 
has since been located. His ability and learning soon brought him into prominence, 
and in the courts he gave proof of his power in coping with the intricacies of the 
law and presenting his cause with clearness and force^ so the majority of his auditors 
were brought to his point of view through his logical statements and persuasive ele- 
ments. He was elected judge in 1904 and reelected in 1 908. At present he has 
charge of department 2. Since he has been connected with the Spokane bar he has 
been in partnership with various members of the legal fraternity of this city. His 
first partner was Fred P. Fisher, with whom he practiced for two or three months. 
Later he entered into partnership with Mark F. Mendenhall, with whom he remained 
for two years. After practicing alone for some time he became associated with R. 
J. Danson on the 1st of January, 1896, their partnership holding for nine years, un- 
til Mr. Huneke was elected to the bench. Aside from the attention he gives his pro- 
fession he has also interested himself in mining. 

One the 28th of December, 1899, Mr. Huneke was married to Miss Laura Grace 
Cook, a daughter of Isaac Cook of Spokane. The father, who is of English descent, 
traces his ancestry back to Governor William Bradford. Throughout his active ca- 
reer he was a minister and was at various times president of different colleges. He 
is now living retired. Mr. and Mrs. Huneke have become the parents of three chil- 
dren: Bradford, deceased; Helen and John. 

In politics Mr. Huneke gives his support to the republican party, and before his 
election to the judgeship was active in political circles and served as delegate to 
county conventions. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. He is widely acknowledged as a man of strong intellect and 
superior ability whose learning constitutes an ornament to the Spokane bar. 



GEORGE S. BAILEY. 



A splendidly equipped mining property is that of the Ozark Mining & Milling 
Company of which George S. Bailey is the manager. It has all the necessary ad- 
jnncts for successful operation of its claims and its work is being carried on along 
profitable lines. For the onerous duties which devolve upon him in this connection 
Mr. Bailey was well trained, having been graduated as a mining engineer at Scran- 
ton, Pennsylvania. He was bom in Galena, Illinois, August 10, 1861, a son of J. 
R. and Mary (Harris) Bailey, both of whom were natives of London, England, 
and representatives of prominent and well known English families. The father was 
actively engaged in business at Galena, Illinois, for twenty-five years and was a man 
of considerable local influence and distinction, representing Jo Daviess county in 
the Illinois legislature and filling other positions of trust and responsibility in the 
community. The Harris family were among the earliest to secure homesteads in 
the vicinity of Galena and the foimding of the family in America antedates the 
Revolutionary war. The brothers of Mrs. Bailey were soldiers of the Civil war. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Bailey were bom ^ve sons and four daughters: George 
S.; Albert, who is a resident of Dalton, South Dakota; William, living in Yankton, 



190 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

South Dakota ; Frank, a resident of Parker, thai state ; Edward L., whose home is 
in Marion Junction, South Dakota; Lizzie, the wife of J. E. Oliver, of Mankato, 
Minnesota; Alice, the wife of A. L. Greene, of Hanover, Illinois; Maggie, the wife 
of James McAllister, of Parker, South Dakota; and Hattie, the wife of W. S. 
Sanderson, of Bellevue, Iowa. 

George S. Bailey pursued his preliminary education in the coomion schools of 
Galena, Illinois, and was graduated as a mining engineer at Scranton, Pennsylvania, 
with the degree of M. E. Throughout the greater part of his life he has been con- 
nected in one capacity or another with mining interests. However, he was en- 
gaged in merchandising in Montana for three years, after which he spent four 
years in that state in connection with the mines. He afterward went to Lewiston, 
Idaho, where he continued for twelve years, and since 1910 has been a resident of 
Sf>okane. He has followed mining engineering and done general consulting work 
yet has devoted most of his time to the management of different properties. For 
three years he was general manager for the Wild Goose Rapids Mining Company of 
Wallowa, Oregon, owners of a copper mine which Mr. Bailey largely developed. 
He afterward became manager of the Black Jack gold mine on Salm<Hi river in 
Idaho where he remained for three years. Subsequently he took charge of the 
Ozark Mining & Milling Company as manager and has had the oversight of this 
property for three years. Its holdingps are located at Pierce City, Idaho, and the 
company is milling free gold. There are seven claims in the Ozark, nine in the 
Wild Rose and six in the Cameron properties and the mill has a capacity of one 
hundred tons and is located on the Wild Rose property. It is operated to its fall 
capacity and the average run is about nine tons. The depth is now ^ve hundred 
and sixty feet by means of a cross-cut tunnel. This represents an expenditure of 
about one hundred and twelve thousand dollars on the property and they have nine 
hundred thousand dollars blocked out and ready for the mill. The lead shows at 
five hundred and sixty feet depth and is forty-two feet in width, being broader than 
on the surface but of a different character of ore, having more base, so that it will 
necessitate the leading process in its handling. The Wild Rose was formerly owned 
by W. S. Wilkinson, of WaUa Walla, and M. A. Ellis, of Pierce City, and paid to 
tJiem dividends of about one hundred thousand dollars before it was taken over bj 
the Ozark Company. The Ozark claim was formerly owned by John Gaffney, one 
of the pioneers of Idaho, and was operated by him until the 1st of September, 1905, 
paying him upwards of sixty thousand dollars. The Cameron is now under devel- 
opment and the company expects to spend on the three properties in the year 1912 
about seventy-five thousand dollars. Mr. Bailey is also interested in mining prop- 
erties in the state of Montana and in southern Oregon. He is the vice president of 
the Sunrise Gold Mining Company, owning property at Pierce City, and he is also 
interested in many other undeveloped properties both in Idaho and Oregon. His 
college training gives him an excellent working knowledge and his broad experience 
has continuously called forth his skill and ability so that his labors have been a 
potent force in the development of the rich mineral resources of this section. 

In 1884 Mr. Bailey was united in marriage to Miss Rosa B. Larson, of Yank- 
ton, South Dakota. Mr. Bailey was again married at Great Falls, Montana, in 
1891, his second union being with Miss Minnie L. Cox, a daughter of John W. Cox, 
of Hillsboro, Iowa. The only child of this marriage is Murrell Bailey. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 191 

In his political views Mr. Bailey is an earnest republican and does whatever he 
can to further the interests of the party and promote its welfare. He has served 
as a delegate to county and state conventions in both Montana and Idaho and t^as 
dty alderman of Clarkston^ Washington^ for two years^ or from 1902 until 1904. 
He was also for two terms school trustee at Pierce City, Idaho, and he indorses 
all of the practical plans and projects for the benefit of the communities in which 
he has lived. He became an Elk while in Lewiston and also attained the Knight 
Templar degree in the commandery at that place, having previously been initiated 
into Masonry as a member of the lodge at Clarkston, Washington. His friends, and 
they are many, find him a genial, social gentleman, appreciative of good comrade- 
ship and always loyal to those who merit his high regard and his confidence. 



ROBERT L. DALKE. 



Robert L. Dalke, engaged in the real-estate business with offices in the Jamieson 
building in Spokane, was bom in Tomah, Wisconsin, August Id, 1873. The name 
indicates his German lineage, his parents, Edward C. and Augusta (Kert) Dalke 
both being natives of Germany. The mother was brought to the United States when 
quite young and passed away in this country in 1887. The father still survives 
and is now living retired in Spokane. The only daughter of the family is Mrs. 
T. H. Rieger, of this city. 

Robert L. Dalke, the only son, pursued his education in the public schools of 
Eau Claire, Wisconsin, and afterward studied law in that city and in Marinette, 
Wisconsin. He felt at the time that his services would be of more use if exerted 
in other lines, yet he devoted nine long years to the mastery of the principles of 
law and has found that his knowledge thereof has proven of practical benefit and 
value to him in later years. He first came to Spokane in October, 1 899, and opened 
a real-estate office six months after his arrival. He formed a partnership with J. 
Lawyer and W. H, Keman, with whom he continued for seven years, conducting 
an extensive business in promoting suburban properties. He was financially inter- 
ested and instrumental in putting upon the market the Pine Grove Terrace and 
South Side Cable additions and also conducted a general real-estate business, in 
wfaidi he has specialized since the dissolution of the partnership in 1906. In the 
intervening years he has practiced alone and has become well known as a real- 
estate broker, largely advertising, promoting and selling his own properties. He 
has handled real estate both in Sf>okane and elsewhere and has done as much as 
any one man in this city in his line of work, while none has more intimate knowl- 
edge of the properties upon the market and their real value. The first year in 
which he was alone his commissions amounted to eight thousand dollars. His ac- 
tivities have never abated and in buying and selling real estate he has gained a wide 
and favorable acquaintance. 

His political activity has also made Mr. Dalke well known for he is a loyal 
advocate of whatever he believes to be right and the principles of the republican 
party have found in him a stalwart champion. He has labored for its success and 
has represented his party in both county and state conventions. For four years, 
from 1907 until 1910 inclusive, he was councilman of Spokane from the fourth 



192 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

ward. This period was notable by reason of the constructive measures which were 
introduced. It was during that time that most of the bridges were built and im- 
portant work was done on the extension of the water and sewer systems, including 
the installation of the Grand Trunk sewer system, the pipes of which are from nine 
to twelve feet in diameter. One of the councilmen who fathered the measure was 
Mr. Dalke, who suggested to the engineer that the Grand Trunk system be on the 
north side in order to operate necessary drainage. He was likewise a member of 
the council when the franchise to the Nortii Coast and Milwaukee railroads was 
granted and while one of the city fathers the Mission, Washington, Olive and How- 
ard street bridges were built and the plans made and work ordered for the Mcmroe 
street bridge. As a public official Mr. Dalke discountenanced useless expenditure 
but never believed in retrenchment to the extent of crippling public progress and 
improvement. He believes in advancement at all times and feels that Spokane's 
public work must be in keeping with the growth of the city which has been brought 
about through private enterprise and industry. 

In Menominee, Michigan, in October, 1899, Mr. Dalke was united in marriage 
to Jennie L. Brown, a daughter of Mrs. James Esler, of Varna, Ontario, and unto 
them have been bom two children, Gertrude L. and Robert L., who are in school. 
Mr. Dalke is a member of the German Lutheran church and his wife holds mem- 
bership in the Presbyterian church. Their interests are as one in their desire for 
the moral development of the conununity and their aid and influence are given along 
that line. The military chapter in Mr. Dalke's life history covers between two and 
three years' service as a member of Company L, Third Regiment of the Wiscon^ 
National Guard. Fraternally he is connected with the Modem Woodmen and with 
the Royal Highlanders and in strictly social lines is a member of the Inland Club. 
For about thirteen years he has been a resident of Spokane and in that period he 
has proven his worth as a business man and citizen, never neglecting private in- 
terests for public affairs nor concentrating his attention so closely upon the former 
that he neglects his* obligations of citizenship. 



E. TAPPAN TANNATT. 



In making a selection of those men, sketches of whose lives should go to make up 
the biographical portion of this work, the author has used great care to select none 
but such as have in some measure left "footprints on the sands of time," or who 
have, by their lives and labors, aided materially in making this the great center of 
commercial, industrial and mining activity which it is today. In this connection 
mention should be made of E. Tappan Tannatt, a civil and hydraulic engineer, 
whose work has been of an important character not only in Spokane an<l the Inland 
Empire, but also in Montana, in California and in Hawaii. He was bom in Man- 
chester, Massachusetts, September 16, 1864, his parents being General T. R. and 
Elizabeth Foster (Tappan) Tannatt, the former a native of the state of New York, 
and the latter of Manchester, Massachusetts. They now reside at No. 1311 Seventh 
avenue in Spokane, and General Tannatt is retired. Their only daughter, Miriam 
H., is the wife of Dr. C. K. Merriam, a retired physician of Spokane. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 193 

Mr. Tannatt, whose name introduces this record^ pursued a course in the Uni- 
rersity of Illinois and in Washington State College^ being graduated with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science and Electrical Engineer. He became connected with 
engineering parties in the early development work of the Oregon Railway & Naviga- 
tion Company^ being thus engaged from 1881 until 188S on the line to Huntington. 
He was also with the Oregon Improvement Company in the development of the 
western country and later entered the University of Illinois. However, in 1886, 
he returned to the northwest to take up engineering work and in 1891 was elected 
county surveyor of Latah county, Idaho, which position he filled for two years. He 
also followed engineering in that state and for further training along professional 
lines entered the Washington State College at Pullman, where he spent three years, 
being graduated in 1898 with the degree of B. S. E. E. He next went to Portland, 
where he passed the examination for lieutenant in the United States Volunteer En- 
gineers. He was commissioned by President McKinley and approved by the senate 
for important service in that connection, and at the close of the Spanish-American 
war he accepted a position as engineer in charge of the civil department of the 
Waialua Agricultural Company at Honolulu. He served through the period of 
development work covering two years and resigned to take a position as managing 
engineer of the Oahu College Trustees. They were doing a large amount of en- 
gineering development work, developing an addition to Honolulu, placing the city 
water works and building an electric line, of which he had charge from its inception 
to its completion. He opened an engineer's office in Honolulu and engaged in devel- 
opment irrigation work on the islands, constructing the then largest dam and gravity 
system in the Hawaiian group, at Waiamea and Waialua. Closing that work, Mr. 
Tannatt returned to the United States and opened an engineer's office in the Em- 
pire State building in Spokane. A year later, however, he accepted a position as 
professor of civil engineering in the Montana State College and engineer in charge 
of the Montana irrigation department of the experiment station. While there he 
wrote a large number of bulletins on engineering topics and was the man who dis- 
covered and reported upon the effect of alkali on Portland cement. At the end of 
five years he returned to Spokane and opened offices in the Empire State building, 
where he is now located. He is president of the Jordan-Tannatt Engineering Com- 
pany at Helena, Montana; also president of the Tannatt- Allen Company, an en- 
gineering company of Spokane, that makes a specialty of hydraulic and irrigation 
work with contract to install the same. They have installed pumping plants for the 
Spokane Brewing & Malting Company, the Blalock Fruit Company of Walla Walla, 
and many smaller plants. Mr. Tannatt is personally carrying on consulting en- 
gineering work and is consulting engineer for the city of Pomeroy and also the city 
of Waitsburg. 

His bulletin on the effect of alkali uf>on Portland cement attracted world-wide 
attention and resulted in the establishment of a plant for the manufacture of alkali- 
proof Portland cement at Denver Colorado, by the Colorado Portland Cement Com- 
pany. When he first issued his statement concerning alkali Mr. Tannatt was 
subjected to much unkind criticism but the government today agrees with the facts 
which he presented. He made over five thousand tests before he proved the truth 
of his theory. The bulletin published by Professor Edwin Burke of the Montana 
experiment station shows chemical reaction is now recognized as a fact. Cement 
failures that were credited to poor work were shown to be due to the action of 



194 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

alkali on the cement and manufacturers and builders are now taking precaution 
against failure from this cause.. Sea water was also included in this discovery and 
its action is identical with that of alkali. 

While a member of the Second United States Engineering Corps Mr. Tannatt 
was stationed at the Presidio in San Francisco and also at Honolulu and did much 
work on the present Camp McKinley and also on the preliminary surveys at Pearl 
harbor. 

In 1890, at Farmington, Washington, Mr. Tannatt was married to Miss Vir- 
ginia Carlton, a dau^ter of Captain J. F. Carlton, a Civil war veteran, now 
residing at Kendrick, Idaho. Their four children are: Hazel, who is a gradu- 
ate of the State Normal School at Cheney and is now teaching history and domestic 
science at Reardon, Washington; Carlton, Miriam and Virginia, all in school. 
The parents are members of the First Presbyterian church and Mr. Tannatt is 
a teacher of a class of boys in the Sunday school, in the work of which he is 
much interested. Fraternally he is a Mason, belonging to Pacific Lodge, No. 288, 
at Honolulu. He is also connected with the United Spanish War Veterans and 
in politics is a republican. He to<^ an active part in politics in Idaho and was 
elected county surveyor on the republican ticket. While in Hawaii he was much 
interested in what is known as the home rule republican party and was instrumental 
in the appointment of the senate investigating committee. He laid before senator 
Mitchell the conditions and the report of the commission which was practically 
the same as the letters written to Senator Mitchell upon the subject. Outside 
the field of politics, however, Mr. Tannatt's most important public service has 
been done. His discoveries concerning Portland cement and the engineering 
projects with which he has been connected have constituted valuable and im- 
portant elements in the progress and improvement in this section of the country. 
His work is of far-reaching influence and value and entitles him to prominent 
recognition as a citizen and civil engineer. 



O. G. LABEREE. 



Never courting notoriety nor publicity but quietly and persistently pursuing 
his way with well defined plans and strong purpose, O. G. Laberee has reached 
a notable position among the most prominent mining and railway men of the 
northwest. His record needs no especial elaboration nor commendation; it speaks 
for itself for his labors have been an element in the utilization of the great nat- 
ural resources of this section of the country and therefore the source of the coun- 
try's development and prosperity. From each experience in life he has learned 
the lesson therein contained. 

Mr. Laberee belongs to that class of representative and ambitious men who 
have crossed the border from Canada into the United States where competition 
is greater but where advancement is more quickly secured. He was born on a farm 
in Melbourne county in the province of Quebec in 1864, his parents being Ben- 
jamin R. and Mary Jane (Wakefield) Laberee, the former of French Huguenot 
and Irish lineage and the latter of English descent. The first member of the 
Laberee family in America left France at the time of the persecution of the 



O. 0. LABEREE 






I 






SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 197 

Hngaenots and went to Ireland. He married a daughter of that country and 
some jears afterward with his wife and two sons sailed in his own vessel, loaded 
with merchandise, for the new world, landing at or near Boston. Soon afterward 
he secured a homestead in Massachusetts but had not long been a resident of New 
England when both he and his wife met death at the hands of the Indians. One 
of the sons escaped but the other was captured by the red men and taken to Que- 
bec, where he was held as a prisoner for about a year. He finally escaped in the 
innter and traveled through one hundred miles of wilderness before reaching a 
settlement. At length, however, he arrived in Eastern Townships, Compton 
county, in the province of Quebec, where members of the Laberee family have 
since lived. 

Thoroughness characterized O. G. Laberee in the acquirement of an education 
and has been one of his salient characteristics in later life. After leaving the 
high school he looked about him for a favorable business opening and in the year 
1884, when twenty years of age, decided to try his fortune on the Pacific coast, 
traveling westward with a carload of thoroughbred cattle over the Northern 
Pacific Railroad, which was only partially completed at that time. As a cattle 
breeder he became well known in the west but still more important interests were 
to claim his attention as in the recognition of opportunities he has extended his 
efforts into the fields of mining and railroad building. 

It was in the year 1895 that Mr. Laberee became a resident of Spokane. He 
had acquainted himself with the reports concerning the Roslyn mining camp of 
British Columbia and after paying ^ visit thereto h6', lltvested in several mining 
properties of that district, including, the Califor^jiia, Mascot and Eldorado, also 
becoming a large owner of the Josie. He was the first Canadian investor in prop- 
erties of that district. He then returned to eastern Canada and it is admitted 
that it was his influence which cau^d_jp£^OjjVpth*er.,prpnlinent capitalists to pur- 
chase mining interests at Roslyn and vicinity, particularly the Goodrum and Black- 
stock interests, the investments of which included the War Eagle and Center Star, 
while Governor Macintosh, also influenced by Mr. Laberee, made investments for 
the Whitacre Wright Syndicate. 

Mr. Laberee's judgment concerning the material resources of the northwest 
has proven to be remarkably sound and his insight keen. After a visit made to 
Boundary Creek, British Columbia, he purchased the Knob Hill mine and a large 
interest in the Old Ironsides, two of the principal properties of the Granby Con- 
solidated Mining Company, these properties constituting the basis upon which the 
company was formed. He remained a stockholder in the company for many 
years and derived from his interests a most gratifying profit. He disposed of his 
Roslyn interests in 1898, soon after the Knob Hill and Old Ironsides properties 
were placed upon the market in eastern Canada. He was also the organizer of 
the MoUie Gibson Mining Company which owns and is operating the MoUie Gib- 
son mine in the Slokane country. At about the same time he purchased the Virtue 
mine at Baker City, Oregon, which has a record of having paid over three million 
dollars in dividends. He also became the owner of the Cumberland mine at Silver 
City, Idaho, and formed the Virtue Consolidated Mining Company with a capital 
of three million dollars, the stock of which was easily sold to eastern investors 
for Mr. Laberee's name in connection with such properties had come to be re- 
garded as a guarantee of their worth. His investments in 1899 included the pur- 



198 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

chase of a half block of ground between Coeur d'Alene avenue and Third avenue^ 
fronting Coenr d'Alene Park in Spokane, whereon he began the erection of his 
palatial residence which was completed in 1900 at a cost of one hundred and 
fifty thousand dollars. 

He became in 1901 active in the organization of the International Coal & 
Coke Company, owning coal lands at Coleman, Alberta, and through his repre- 
sentation Canadian capitalists were induced to purchase the controlling interests. 
Mr. Laberee, however, has remained as a large shareholder of the company which 
for several years past has been paying regular dividends. After the formation 
of that company and the sale of much of its stock he joined Andrew Laidlaw in 
the purchase of fifty-two thousand acres of coal land situated in the Crow's Nest 
Pass district fifty miles north of Michel, British Columbia. Again he was in- 
strumental in inducing the investment of eastern capital in the organization of the 
Imperial Coal & Coke Company, capitalized for four million, five hundred thou- 
sand dollars. After disposing of his interests in that connection in 1907, Mr. 
Laberee secured control of the Pincher Creek Coal Mining Company, owning 
properties two and a half miles from the town of Pincher Creek, Alberta. Since 
he has secured controlling interest in this company he has steadily prosecuted 
development work with the result that the company is now ready to begin a pro- 
duction that will place it on a steady dividend-paying basis. The controlling in- 
terest in the corporation is held by Mr. Laberee and R. D. Miller, also of Spokane. 

Mr. Laberee has in connection with railway interests become even more widely 
known. In 1909 he was appointed receiver of the Alaska Central Railway Com- 
pany on the request of the bond-holders who had commenced foreclosure proceed- 
ings. This is a railroad project from Resurrection Bay to the Matanuska coal 
fields and the Yukon river. When Mr. Laberee assumed change as receiver only 
fifty miles of road had been completed. He added to this twenty-one miles, giv- 
ing general oversight to the construction work, so that the line is now seventy-one 
miles in length, and in less than a year he had successfully wound up the busi- 
ness of the company with credit to himself and satisfaction to all interested. 

Directly after the sale of the Alaska Central Railway Company Mr. Laberee 
incorporated the Alaska Northern Railway Company under the laws of the state 
of Washington with a capital of thirty million dollars, and with head offices in 
Seattle. This company purchased the Alaska Central Railway from the bond- 
holders and is now awaiting development concerning the government's attitude 
in relation to Alaska ere taking further steps to build the road. However, the 
company keeps the part of the line now in existence in good repair and operates 
it for about eight months in the year. At one time Mr. Laberee was an extensive 
stockholder in the Washington Water Power Company. His present connections 
are with the Pincher Creek Coal Mining Company and the Alaska Northern Rail- 
way Company. Of both of these he is serving as president and of the latter he 
is also general manager. He is also an investor in a large number of Alaska 
gold and copper properties. Indeed if it were known he has been the moving 
spirit in consummating many important business deals and operations which are 
now accorded to others. As previously stated, however, he works quietly, finding 
his reward in the joy of accomplishing what he undertakes. For intricate and in- 
volved business problems he finds ready and correct solution and with almost 
intuitive prescience seems to grasp every point in the case, coordinating all forces 
so as to produce a harmonious, unified and resultant whole. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 199 

On the 19th of August^ 1887^ Mr. Laberee was united in marriage to Miss 
Rose Clark of Olympia, Washington^ and they have two children^ Ben R. and 
Gladys. Those who meet Mr. Laberee in social connections find him an enter- 
taining^ genial^ social gentleman. He is popular in the membership of the Lamb'si 
Club of New York city^ the Spokane Club and the Spokane Country Club^ and in 
the Arctic Club and Rainier Club of Seattle^ Washington. An analyzation of his 
hfe work shows him to be a most forceful man of ready resources. He has a 
keen eye that seems to see to the very center of possibilities and to grasp every 
detail of a situation^ yet he says little about what he has accomplished and works 
as quietly as if he were engaged upon some project of minor importance. 



JAMES C. BROAD. 



James C* Broad, a contractor largely engaged on public work, displays in his 
business connections marked executive ability and keen insight, combined with a 
thorough knowledge of all that pertains directly to his chosen field of labor. He 
was bom in England, October 19, 1865, the only son of William and Maria Broad, 
who were also natives of that country, where the mother still resides. The father 
died in 1866 and Mrs. Broad afterward became the wife of Thomas Pierce, by 
whom she had six children: William, Thomas, Albert and Bessie, all residents of 
Spokane; Annie, who is the wife of John Toms, also of this city; and Carrie, living 
in England. 

In the public schools of his native country James C. Broad pursued his educa- 
tion and first became connected with mining in Cornwall, England. He afterward 
engaged in the butchering business for a year and in 1884, then a youth of nineteen, 
crossed the Atlantic and made his way to Chicago, where he conducted a butchering 
business for two years. He went to British Columbia at the time of the building of 
the Canadian Pacific Railroad and there continued for a year, after which he spent 
the succeeding six months in Chicago. He next went to Omaha, Nebraska, where 
he remained for three months and spent a half year in Kansas City before his re- 
moval to Telluride, Colorado. He was there engaged in mining until he came to 
Spdcane. Here he began general contracting and has continued in this place to 
the present time. For about three years, from 1889 until 1892, he was engaged on 
contract work for the Washington Water Power Company, being thus employed at 
the time it was consolidated with the Edison Electric Illuminating Company. He 
did construction work for that corporation and also did the construction work for 
the Arlington Heights Street Railway Company and the City Park Transit Com- 
pany in the building of an electric railway. For the past fifteen years he has been 
largely engaged in the execution of city contracts, building waterworks, sewers and 
doing street grading. He put in the north side force mains and a twenty-eight-foot 
force main from the pumping station to Division street. He also graded Seventh 
avenue, Maple, Ash, Walnut, Perry and Nora streets. In sewer work he built the 
sewer for No. 4 district for seven miles; in No. 5 district in the fifth ward, three 
miles ; No. 7 district, in the first ward, three miles ; also the sewers in Second, Fourth 
and Fifth avenues, Jefferson street, Sprague and Grand avenues, McClellan street. 
Twenty-sixth street. Thirteenth, Fourteenth and Sixteenth streets. Wall and How- 



200 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

ard streets^ Cataldo avenue^ Washington street^ Spofford avenue^ Maxwell, Nora. 
Sinio, Sharpe, Stevens, Dean, Gardiner, Boone, Kalispell, Normandy, Atlantic, 
Montgomery, Mansfield and Mission streets. He put in the drainage in Brown's 
addition for about six miles and also the Cannon Hill drainage for about five miles. 
He also installed the sewer system at Moscow, Idaho, extending for twenty milcii; 
the waterworks at Potlatch; the waterworks at Davenport; and the waterworks at 
Wilbur. Mr. Broad is also interested in the Snowstorm Mining & Milling Com- 
pany of which he is a director. This property is located in Idaho' and is now mak- 
ing shipments. He is also interested in the Rambler-Cariboo in British Columbia 
and the Stewart in Idaho. He is a freeholder and is one of Sf>okane's foremost citi- 
zens who has witnessed much of its growth and progress. He was residing here 
during the time of the great fire in 1 889 and recalls many interesting details of that 
disaster. 

Fraternally Mr. Broad is a prominent Mason, holding membership in the lodge, 
chapter, council, commandery and consistory, also in the Mystic Shrine and the 
Order of the Eastern Star. He likewise belongs to the Spokane Athletic Club and 
politically he is an active republican who recognizes the obligations as well as the 
privileges of citizenship and strives to advance the public welfare through the adop- 
tion of f>olitical principles that are permanent factors in good government. His 
business interests, his political activities, his Masonic connections, have all brought 
him into prominence as a leading citizen of Spokane and in an analyzation of his 
life record it is found that his success has its root in close application, thorou^ 
preliminary training and promptness and reliability in the execution of his con- 
tracts. Such a man naturally enjoys public confidence and wins the high regard 
and warm esteem of his fellowmen. 



ALBERT HELD. 



Albert Held, a Spokane architect, with offices in the Realty building, was bom 
at New Ulm, Minnesota, March 25, 1866, a son of Albert and Christine (Stupp) 
Held, of that city. The father was a contractor and builder and still makes his 
home there. The son pursued his education in the public schools and in the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, which he attended for two years, pursuing the technical 
course. He then followed his calling as a draughtsman in various places in Minne- 
sota and when the disastrous Spokane fire occurred in the fall of 1889 he realized 
that there would be much building in the city and opened an office here and has 
since occupied a leading position in the profession in the Inland Empire. He 
designed the Holly-Mason building — the first real fireproof structure in Spokane, 
— ^the Palace department store, the Home Telephone building, the North Central 
high school, the Marshall- Wells Company storehouse, the Realty building, the ter- 
minal station and all the work on the Inland Empire system. He was also tiie 
architect of the new gas works, the Centennial Mills, St. Luke's HospHtal, the 
State Veterinary Hospital and the entire interior of Sacred Heart Hospital above 
the third floor, and among Spokane's fine apartment houses he designed the new 
Knickerbocker apartments for Graham B. Dennis, the finest ever erected in the 
far west, and also the San Marco and Breslin apartments. Among the early resi- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 201 

dences which were built after designs that he made were those of James Clark^ C. 
H. Reeves, E. D. Sanders and William F. Zimmermann, and he was also the archi- 
tect of the Webster and Lincoln schools. In addition to his profession he is a 
director of the Exchange National Bank. 

On the 14th of October, 1903, in Spokane, Mr. Held was married to Mrs. 
Kate C. Logan, a daughter of I. T. and Melinde C. Benham, of this city. 

In politics Mr. Held is independent, nor has he ever been an office seeker but 
recently has been appointed a park commissioner. He is a prominent member of 
the Chamber of Conmierce and in the summer of 1911 represented Spokane and 
the state of Washington on the Boston Chamber of Commerce official tour of Eu- 
rope for the purpose of creating an interest in the old world in the fifth congress 
of the International Chamber of Commerce to be held in Boston, in 1912. Mr. 
Held belongs to Imperial Lodge, No. 34, I. O. O. F., to the Spokane Club and 
is a life member of the Sjjokane Amateur Athletic Club. He was one of a com- 
mittee of fifteen of the Spokane Club who acquired the site and assisted in rais- 
ing the funds to erect the new clubhouse. Evidences of his skill and ability are 
seen on all sides in Spokane and with the upbuilding of the city that has sprung 
into existence since the time of the fire he has been closely associated. 



FRITZ MARSCHANTE. 

Frita Marschante is proprietor of the Pacific Hotel and is equally well known 
in financial and mining circles, being a heavy stockholder in some of the leading 
mining conq^anies operating in the northwest. He was bom in Strassburg, Ger- 
many, January 29, 1874, and his parents, John and Anna Marie (Hoffman) 
Marschante, were also natives of that city, where they still reside, the father being 
now retired from active business. He is of French descent and a representative 
of a prominent family. He served as a soldier under the emperor Napoleon III 
and has various mementos in recognition of his bravery and loyalty. He was on 
active duty much throughout the time of his connection with the army and was a 
non-commissioned officer. In days of peace he devoted his time as wine grower 
and dealer and was the owner of large vineyards until his substantial success en- 
abled him to retire from active life. His wife, too, belongps to a leading fam- 
ily of southern Germany, her people being at one time the richest in that part of 
the country and owners of large forests. Michael and Charles Marschante, 
brothers of Fritz Marschante, are still residents of Germany and have been sol- 
diers in the army. The only daughter of the family who is living in America is 
Lonise, now the widow of Victor Dessert, and a resident of Spokane. The other 
daughter, Mary, is the wife of George Entzminger and they make their home in 
Gennany. 

In the public schools of his native city Fritz Marschante pursued his educa- 
tion to the age of sixteen years, when he came to the United States, arriving in 
Spokane in 1890. Here he first secured employment in the Pacific Hotel and has 
occupied nearly every position in connection with the conduct of the hostelry of 
which he is now the proprietor. In 1905 he secured a lease on the building and 
has since been conducting the hotel with excellent success, making it one of the 



202 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

popular houses of the city^ to which is accorded an extensive patronage. Aside 
from this Mr. Marschante is interested in the Traders National Bank of Spokane 
and is widely known as a representative of mining interests. He was one of the 
promoters of the Jack Waite Mining Company^ of which he is a director^ he and 
his associates purchasing for two hundred and fifty thousand dollars the property 
which lies in the Coeur d'Alene mining district and comprises three claims and a 
fraction. This is a silver lead property which is listed and shipments are made 
to International^ Utah; and to Salida^ Colorado. The company is capitalized for 
one million^ five hundred thousand dollars^ and sold one million^ four hundred 
thousand shares. No treasury stock, however, is offered now. The present officers 
of the company are: Robert Sheffels, president; J. P. Schroeder, vice president; 
and Albert A. Piller, secretary-treasurer. 

In addition to his connection with the Jack Waite Mining Company, Mr. 
Marschante is the vice president of the Bear Top Orofino Consolidated Mining 
Company and was one of the promoters of the Orofino, which merged with the Bear 
Top, making a group of twenty-one claims. They are shipping four hundred and 
fifty tons per month at the present time and the output is constantly on the in- 
crease. This is a lead silver property located in the Coeur d'Alene district and the 

» 

officers of the company are: Dr. George Rohrer, president; F. Marschante, vice 
president; and Joe N. Thenes, secretary-treasurer. Mr. Marschante is still in- 
terested in the Blade Horse mine, of which he was at one time a director. This 
is also a lead silver property in the Coeur d'Alenes and there are nine claims in 
the group. He is likewise interested in several other mining ventures and in addi- 
tion he owns a section of land in Stevens county, which is a hay farm under cul- 
tivation. Into industrial circles he has also extended his efforts, being now a 
stockholder and the vice president of the Crescent Wooden ware & Box Manufactur- 
ing Company, which is a profitable enterprise, manufacturing all kinds of wooden- 
ware and boxes. Its officers are : Reinhard Martin, president ^nd treasurer ; Fritz 
Marschante, vice president; and Meyer Rosenberg, secretary and manager. The ex- 
tent and importance of the business interests of Mr. Marschante indicates some- 
thing of his ability, his enterprise and his initiative spirit. 

On the 19th of October, 1902, in Spokane, Mr. Marschante was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Florence La Pray, a representative of one of the oldest white fam- 
ilies of Stevens county, Washington. Her father, Joseph La Pray, located in that 
county in 1859 and built the La Pray toll bridge twenty-five miles down the river. 
In pioneer times he hauled freight, using several teams in this way between Walla 
Walla and ColviUe. Mr. and Mrs. Marschante are the parents of two children, a 
son and daughter, Fritz and Marion. 

Mr. Marschante is a freeholder of Sf>okane and in politics is an active re- 
publican, representing his party at different times in state conventions and doing 
all in his power to promote its growth and insure its success. He belongs to the 
Ancient Order of Red Men and the Foresters of America, also to the Inland Club 
and to the Chamber of Commerce. While his business activities have been of 
constantly growing importance, he has found time to cooperate in public meas- 
ures for the general benefit of the community and his efforts on the whole have 
contributed to the progress and upbuilding of this section of the state. His rec- 
ord furnishes a notable example of a self-made man, as from the age of sixteen 
years he has been dependent upon his own resources, working his way upward by 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 203 

means of indefatigable industry and unfaltering determination. In every position 
which he filled he proved his worth and gradually came to a place where he was 
ahle to control important interests. From that time his efforts have been of con- 
stantly broadening scope and he is recognized now as a man of force in the busi- 
ness and mining circles of the northwest. 



EDWARD J. ROBERTS. 



Edward J. Roberts^ general superintendent of the Spokane International Rail- 
way Company, is one of the prominent civil engineers of the northwest, being 
thoroughly familiar with the great scientific principles which underlie his pro- 
fession and with the active work incident to the various departments of civil en- 
gineering. He has always been prompted by laudable ambition and the high ideal 
of service which he placed before himself has been reached. Throughout his life 
he has been identified with the Missouri valley country or the far west He was 
bom on a farm in Columbia county, Wisconsin, September 9, 1857. His parents, 
Evan W. and Elizabeth (Williams) Roberts, were long identified with agricultural 
interests there. Upon the old homestead the son was reared, being afforded the 
(^portunity of supplementing his early education, acquired in the district schools 
of his native county, by study in Ripon College of Ripon, Wisconsin. Following 
his graduati(m from that institution, in 1880, he turned his attention to railroading 
and tiiroughout his entire life has directed his efforts in this broad branch of labor. 
His first position was that of axman on the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and 
Omaha Railroad, but the following year, in 1881, he came west with the Northern 
Pacific Railroad Company, then engaged in construction work and in locating crews. 
He made his headquarters at Glendive, Montana, and was first employed as a 
leveler but afterward became assistant construction engineer and subsequently 
locating engineer. In 1883 he went to the Canadian Pacific Railroad and aided in 
locating their line through the Selkirk mountains. In 1884 he was in charge of the 
location and construction of that road, continuing his work on the completion of the 
mainline until the latter part of 1885. * In the succeeding winter he was locating en- 
gineer with the St. .Paul & Duluth Railroad and in 1887 was appointed chief 
engineer of construction in charge of all surveys and construction on an extension of 
the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba, now the Great Northern Railroad, from Mi- 
not, North Dakota, to Great Falls, Montana. The building of this railroad extension 
of Bve hundred and fifty miles in six months was the record for rapid railway con- 
stmction in the United States. At that time Mr. Roberts was a young man of but 
twenty-nine years yet he completed the longest stretch of railroad in the shortest 
time of anyone who had undertaken a similar work. His plans were well formu- 
lated, the work carefully systematized and the results achieved brought to him the 
attention of railway builders and men throughout the country. 

Mr. Roberts' connection with Spokane dates from 1888, in which year he visited 
the dty and made the survey for the Spokane & Eastern from Davenport to the 
Colombia river. The following year he took up his permanent abode here and 
joined D. C. Corbin as chief engineer of the Spokane Falls & Northern Railroad 



204 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

and has since been associated with Mr. Corbin in all of his enterprises. Among 
the roads which they have built are the Nels<m & Fort Shepherd^ in British Col- 
umbia; the Columbia & Red Mountain Railroad; and the Spokane International 
Railroad. After Mr. Corbin sold the Spokane Falls & Northern^ Mr. Roberts was 
made general manager of the Sweeny mines^ in the Coeur d'Alene district These 
included the mines that were afterward consolidated under the name of the Federal 
Mining Company and Mr. Roberts became the first general manager. At this 
writing, in 1911, he is general superintendent for the Spokane International Rail- 
way Company; the Corbin Coke & Coal Company, of British Columbia; president 
of the Union Iron Works of Spokane; and a director of the Exchange National 
Bank and of the Union Trust & Savingps Bank. 

Mr. Roberts was married on the 13th of December, 1883, to Miss Mary Tracy, 
a daughter of J. M. and Rebecca (Davis) Tracy, of Liverpool, England. Her 
father was a noted railroad contractor and to<^ a prominent part in the construc- 
ti<m of the Siberian Transcontinental Railway. Mr. and Mrs. Roberts now have 
five living children: Edward J., Jr., of Corbin, British Columbia; William T., a 
civil engineer of Sp<^ane; John A., a student of this dty; Marian Elizabeth; and 
Daniel Corbin. One son, Paul, was drowned in October, 1910, when twenty-tiirec 
years of age. The family reside at No. 1923 First avenue. Mr. Roberts has never 
been interested in politics nor is he identified with any fraternal organizations. He 
belongs, however, to the Spdume Club and has many friends in its membership. 
His ability and the importance of his business connections have brought him into 
prominent identification with the development and upbuilding of the northwest. 



DAVID P. JENKINS. 



There came to the northwest in an early day men of prescience, who were able 
to recognize something of what the future had in store for this great and growing 
western country. Recognizing the advantages due to situation and natural re- 
sources, they exemplified their faith and hope in their works and upon that 
foundation builded their fortunes. Among the strongest of the enterprising men 
who saw in Spokane opportunities for the future, David P. Jenkins was num- 
bered. In the years which have since followed he has not only gained prom- 
inence and success for himself but has also contributed in notable measure to the 
upbuilding and progress of the city of Spokane, and his name is indeed an hon- 
ored one here and his work will remain as a monument for generations to come. 

David P. Jenkins was bom on a farm near Mount Pleasant, Jefferson county, 
Ohio, August 25, 1823, his parents being Israel and Elizabeth (Horsman) Jen- 
kins. The father was a native of Virginia but was an orthodox Quaker, and as his 
religious belief and principles were in direct opposition to slavery, he left home in 
early manhood and started on the trail over the Alleghany mountains, crossing 
the Ohio river at Zane's Landing into a free territory. He bought land and 
planned for the building of a cabin, after which he returned to Virginia and far- 
ther completed arrangements for having a home of his own by his marriage. Two 
years later he brought his wife to his claim in Ohio and as the years passed 
became a prosperous farmer. By his first marriage he had eight children, of whom 



DAVID P. JENKINS 



f — : 









SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 207 

David P. Jenkins was the youngest^ and by a second marriage there was bom 
one son. 

It was upon the old home farm in Ohio that David P. Jenkins was reared^ and 
the common schools of the neighborhood afforded him his educational privileges^ 
supplemented by a course in the Mount Pleasant Seminary, a Quaker institution. 
He took up the study of law when eighteen years of age in the office of General 
Samuel Stokely, of Steubenville, Ohio, being there a fellow student with Samuel 
Wilson, afterward a distinguished lawyer of San Francisco. He completed his 
legal studies in the Law School of Cincinnati and in the winter of 1844 was ad- 
mitted to the bar, after which he engaged in practice for some time in Cincinnati. 
Subsequently he was located at Hennepin, Illinois, and at La Salle, that state, 
and was making satisfactory progress in his profession when the Civil war broke 
out. Governor Yates without his knowledge or consent commissioned him major 
of the First IllincHS Cavalry, which was the first cavalry regiment organized west 
of the Alleghany mountains. Putting aside all personal and professional con- 
siderations he entered the service and was with his regiment until it disbanded in 
1862, when he returned to Illinois. The governor then authorized him to assist 
in recruiting the Fourteenth Illinois Cavalry, of which he was commissioned lieu- 
tenant colonel and during the greater part of the succeeding three years he was 
in command of the regiment and took part in many of the most important en- 
gagements and events of the war until after the surrender of General Joseph E. 
Johnston, when, at his request, he was discharged from the service. 

On again entering the legal profession Mr. Jenkins practiced for three years 
in Knoxville, Tennessee, and was afterward located for a time in Logansport, In- 
diana, and in Georgetown, Colorado. .-He came to. Washington at the suggestion 
of Major General Milroy, who at that tjmc was Uni^d States Indian agent for 
the territory, and for six years thereafcei* was a resident of Seattle. The reports 
which reached him concerning eastern'; Washington, especially in connection with 
the approaching completion of the Northern Pacific -Rail way, led him in 1879 
to visit this part of the state. He proceeded up the Columbia river and thence 
overland and settled in Spokane, where he became owner of one hundred and 
fifty-seven acres of valuable land, on which he built a home, thus being estab- 
lished as one of the principal property owners at the beginning of the development 
of the city. His keen sagacity enabled him to recognize the possibilities here and 
appreciating something of what the future had in store for this great and grow- 
ing western country, he cast in his lot with Spokane's settlers and has since been 
an active contributor to its progress and improvement. His homestead covered 
the area comprised within the boundaries of what are now Howard and Cedar 
streets and extending from the Spokane river northward to a point beyond Mallon 
avenue. Out of this district he gave to the city the site of the present court- 
house, comprising a full city block. He also gave the ground for the old Spokane 
College but this reverted to him when the school passed out of existence from 
lack of support. He also gave the ground for the Plymouth Congregational church 
and parsonage at the comer of Adams and Mallon avenue, although he was not 
a member of the church. His daughter, Mrs. Rue, however, attends that church. 
The Jenkins Institute, which he established, has already had liberal support from 
Him and probably will receive still more in the future. This school was founded 
by Colonel Jenkins and meets a need in educational training. It offers vocational 

TtLIII— U 



208 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

courses^ because young men must be specially trained to make their way in the 
world. It is the object of the institute to make its students efficient both in skill 
and character and to this end an excellent teaching force has been secured^ all 
being men of experience^ who are experts in their various lines and who inspire 
as well as instruct their pupils. Colonel Jenkins gave to the school a permanent 
endowment fund of fifty thousand dollars and the project is one dear to his heart. 
Colonel Jenkins has always taken a great interest in the Young Men's Christian 
Association and the Jenkins Institute has back of it the spirit of that organiza- 
tion in its attempt to surround boys at the critical and formative period of their 
lives with such influences and aids as will develop a robust physical, mental and 
moral manhood. 

For a number of years Colonel Jenkins maintained a large farm at Chewelah, 
Stevens county, and there gave the land on which to erect a high school, which 
has been called the Jenkins high school. He also made a gift of five thousand dol- 
lars to establish a school of domestic science, with the proviso that the city or 
other citizens raise a similar amount. 

On the 28th of November, 1849, Colonel Jenkins was united in marriage at 
Granville, Illinois, to Miss Hannah Lobdell, the third daughter of George A. and 
Almira Austin (Preston) Lobdell, of that place. Mrs. Jenkins died in Ohio, in 
July, 1879. They had three children: Annie M., who was bom in Hennepin, Illi- 
nois, and died in La Salle, that state, in 1858; George M., who was bom in Hen- 
nepin, and died in Spokane in 1904; and Emma F., who was bom in La Salle, 
Illinois, and is the wife of William H. Rue, who came from Englishtown, New 
Jersey, and is now a resident of Spokane. By her marriage there are two daugh- 
ters, Annie and Mabel Rue. The former is the wife of Charles D. Robinson, of 
Spokane, and they have two children, Frances and Dorothy. The younger daugh- 
ter, Mabel, resides with her mother at No. 1914 Ninth avenue in Spokane. 

Colonel Jenkins is now in his eighty-ninth year, and while no longer an 
active factor in the business world, the "precious prize of keen mentality" is 
yet his and he still feels a deep interest in the world's progress and what is 
being accomplished. He has ever been a public-spirited and loyal citizen of 
Spokane, contributing in large measure to the various projects and movements 
for its upbuilding and one need but review his history to know how sincere and 
helpful an interest he has taken in the work of general advancement. His name is 
inseparably interwoven with the records of Spokane and he certainly deserves 
mention as one of its upbuilders. His life has ever been faultless in honor, fear- 
less in integrity and stainless in reputation, and thus he has come to old age 
with the high respect of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



JULES LYLE PRICKETT. 

In the business career of Jules Lyle Prickett, now a prominent representative 
of mining interests in Spokane, all days have not been equally bright. Indeed he 
has seen the gathering of storm clouds which have threatened disaster and has 
met the force of the financial storm yet, undeterred by this, he has with resolute 
purpose continued on his way, retrieving bis lost possessions and working steadily 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 209 

upward until he has reached a high plane of affluence. His record is another proof 
of the fact that the west offers almost boundless opportunities to the man of deter- 
mination who is not afraid of work. 

He was born in Edwardsville^ Illinois, April 18, 1855, and is a son of John 
A. and Elizabeth M. (Baemsbach) Prickett, the former a prominent banker and 
business man of Ed wards ville, where he conducted the private bank of J. A. 
Prickett & Son and also operated a flour mill having a daily capacity of one 
thousand barrels. He had served as captain of a company in the Mexican war and 
was severely wounded at the battle of Buena Vista, having been carried off the 
field in the same ambulance with Jefferson Davis. He lived, however, to enjoy 
many years of business activity and prosperity, his death occurring in 1897, while 
his wife survived until 1909, also passing away in Edwardsville. They were the 
parents of two sons and three daughters: Jules L. ; Harris E., now of Seattle; 
Minnie, the wife of Cyrus Happy, of Spokane; Jessie, the wife of W. W. Green- 
wood, of Seattle; and Clara, the wife of W. H. Jones, of Edwardsville, Illinois. 

In the public schiools of his native city Jules L. Prickett pursued his early 
education and afterward went to Germany, where he attended the technical schools 
of Darmstadt. When his education was completed he returned to the United 
States and joined his father in the banking business, remaining at Edwardsville 
mitil 1888, when he came to Spokane, where he also became a factor in banking 
circles. He was a director and the second heaviest stoddiolder in the First National 
Bank of Spokane, of which James N. Glover was the president and the principal 
stockholder. Mr. Prickett also organized and became the largest stockholder of 
the Spokane Savings Bank and served as its cashier. These institutions collapsed 
in the financial panic of 1898, Mr. Prickett losing every dollar that he had. The 
Spokane Savings Bank paid the depositors in fuU, but Mr. Prickett did not realize 
a penny on his holdings. He afterward turned his attention to mining interests 
and was the secretary for a number of years of the Cariboo mine in British Co- 
lumbia and one of its stockholders, which venture led him to become interested in 
many other mining properties. He has also been actively connected with busi- 
ness projects of Spokane. He was one of the original incorporators and stock- 
holders of the Washington Water Power Company and acted as director thereof 
for a number of years. His keen sagacity enables him to usually foretell the out- 
come of any business situation and on the whole his life has been crowned with 
success that places him now with the substantial residents of Spokane, his labors 
contributing to the development and material prosperity of the northwest as well 
as to his individual interests. 

Mr. Pridcett resides at No. 825 Seventh avenue with an interesting little 
family. He was married September 28, 1892, to Miss Mary Estelle Sherlock, of 
Portland, Oregon, who is a daughter of Samuel and Rose Sherlock, pioneer resi- 
dents of that city. They have three children: Lois Elizabeth, Mary Estelle and 
Jules Lyle, Jr. 

Mr. Prickett belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, holding mem- 
bership in Lodge No. 9 of St. Louis. He is also affiliated with the Knights of 
Pythias and he belongs to the Spokane Country Club and was one of the organizers 
and for three terms the president of the Spokane Club. He votes with the re- 
publican party but aside from this is not active in politics. The concentration of 
his energies upon business affairs precludes great activity along other lines, and 



210 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

in the control and development of his interests his record contradicts the old adage 
that opportunity knocks but once and proves the fact which every individual should 
recognize — ^that every day and every hour holds its opportunity and that the faith- 
ful performance of the duty that lies nearest at hand fits one for the duties of suc- 
ceeding days. Undeterred by failure and by obstacles^ he resolutely set his face 
toward the goal of success and has made a good record in the race of life. 



CYRUS KNAPP MERRIAM, M. D. 

The progressive spirit which has always €u;tuated Dr. Cyrus Knapp Merriam 
in the practice of his profession has made him the pioneer in introducing advanced 
methods. He is the first in Spokane to utilize antitoxin in the treatment of 
diphtheria^ and many other tangible evidences of his progressive spirit might be 
cited. 

Dr. Merriam was born in Houlton^ Maine, in 1848, a son of Lewis and Mary 
Ann (Foss) Merriam. The Merriam family was established in America about 
1848, and on the other side of the Atlantic the ancestry can be traced back to 
1400. The present form of the name is a corruption of Meryhm, or Meryham and 
the family seat was at Hadlow, County Kent, England. Representatives of the 
name in America participated in the Revolutionary war and members of the 
Merriam family were publishers of Webster's dictionary. Dr. Merriam's boyhood 
days were spent upon a farm and in his father's sawmill, only a portion of each 
year being given to the attainment of an education. In his early boyhood he 
picked wool on the farm for the manufacture of garments in the family mill. At 
length the farm was sold and the family removed two miles distant, wiiere stood a 
sawmill which the father had built on the north branch of the Meduxnekeag. This 
was sold in 1861 and the family again located on a farm. Three of the children 
of the household responded to the country's call during the Civil war and others 
started out to establish homes for themselves. It was not until 1871 that Dr. 
Merriam had opportunity of supplementing his early education by study in Colbj 
University at Watervile, Maine, where he became a member of the Delta Kappa 
Epsilon fraternity. He earned the expenses for his first term by river driving 
during the previous spring, having charge of a crew of men. It was only after a 
severe struggle in order to meet the expenses of his college course that he was gradu- 
ated in 1875, winning the Bachelor of Arts degree. Seven years later his alma 
mater conferred upon him the Master of Arts degree in recognition of the excellent 
original work which he had done in the meantime. Most of the expense of his 
university course "^as met by teaching during the vacations, yet he always says 
that he owes much to the kindly advise and financial aid of an older brother who 
was then an officer and is now a retired major general of the United States army. 
For some time his study and teaching alternated. He became sub-master in the 
Oliver Grammar School and teacher of penmanship in all the grammar schools of 
Lawrence, Massachusetts, and while thus engaged pursued a course of reading un- 
der Dr. Chamberlin of that city. During the winter of 1 876 and 1 877 he was high- 
school teacher in Rockport, Maine, and his earnings at that point enabled him to 
continue his medical preparation in Bellevue Hospital at New York. He studied 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 211 

the following summer mider Dr. Burnham^ a prominent surgeon of Lowell, Massa- 
chusetts, and also had the benefit of Dr. Benoit's instruction, but completed his 
medical education in the medical department of the University of the City of 
New York, now Columbia College, from which he was graduated in February, 
1879. While in that institution he received private instruction in physical diagnosis 
from Professor A. L. Loomis, and in surgery from Professor John B. Darby, earn- 
ing high commendation from both for aptitude and skill. His first year's prac- 
tice was in partnership with Dr. Benoit and his income for the twelve months 
barely met his expenses. At the end of that time he was appointed acting assistant 
surgeon of the United States army and on the 13th of March, 1880, was assigned 
temporarily to duty at Vancouver Barracks, in what was then the territory of 
Washington. For eight years he was connected with the United States troops in 
the department of the Columbia, and was frequently in the field with soldiers 
who were directed to look after the welfare of the friendly Indians as well as to 
curb the renegades of Chief Moses' and Chief Joseph's bands and the Kalispells, 
In this connection Dr. Merriam was stationed at different times at Camp Chelan, 
White Bluffs, Fort Colville, Fort Coeur d'Alene (now Fort Sherman) and at Fort 
Spokane. Much of the time he was post surgeon and was highly complimented 
by Surgeon General John Moore, U. S. A., for efficient work and care in the treat- 
ment of critical cases. He learned many valuable lessons on the frontier and his 
work again proved the truth of the old adage that "Necessity is the mother of in- 
Tenti(Mi." Among other things he improvised a rawhide jacket splint with a de- 
tachable jury mast for supporting the head in cases of Pott's disease of the ver- 
tebral colunm, which admirably met the requirements and possessed the desirable 
qualities of strength, lightness and durability. He witnessed many of the events 
of pioneer life brought about through the lawlessness that so largely existed on the 
frmtier, one of his early unpleasant experiences being the witnessing of the hang- 
ing at Colville, in 1881 or 1882, of an Indian who had killed a saloon keeper. Dr. 
Merriam having been appointed as medical officer to determine when life became 
extinct. 

Dr. Merriam severed his connection with the army in December, 1887, and lo- 
cated in Spokane, where he has been very successful in building up a desirable 
practice. He was one of the founders of the Spokane County Medical Society 
and served as its secretary for the first two years. He also took part in the org^- 
iiation of the Washington State Medical Society, over which he presided as presi- 
dent in 1890 and 1891. He is likewise a member of the American Medical Asso- 
datimi. In addition to a large private practice he has for eight years served on 
the staff of the Sacred Heart Hospital of Spokane but for many years has devoted 
bis energies almost exclusively to his profession and has long ranked among the 
leading physicians of the coast. 

In June, 1905, in Spokane, Dr. Merriam was united in marriage to Miss Miriam, 
the only daughter of General and Mrs. Thomas R. Tannatt. Her father was one 
of the pioneers of the northwest, prominently known in this section of the country. 
Dr. and Mrs. Merriam have one daughter, Elizabeth Tannatt. Theirs is a hos- 
pitable home, its good cheer being greatly enjoyed by many friends. He is also 
a freeholder in Spokane and has been in the mining business since 1 896, being an 
officer in several mining corporations, his interests lying in the Elk City district 
of Idaho, in Old Mexico, and in British Columbia. In politics he is a republican 



212 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

but has never taken an active part in the work of the party. He has, however, 
been deeply interested in the welfare and progress of the northwest and his co- 
operation can always be counted upon as an asset in Spokane's advancement and 
improvement. Yet, preeminently he is a physician and one whose high ideals of 
professional service have gained for him a prominent place among the physicians 
and surgeons of Spokane. 



EDGAR F. GRAVES. 



The remarkable development of the northwest deserves to rank with the seven 
wonders of the world. Men of the east with all the culture and training of the 
older section of the country have recognized the almost limitless possibilities of 
the Pacific coast district and have come here to utilize the natural resources in the 
upbuilding of their individual fortunes and at the same time their labors constitute 
a forceful and effective element in the development of the region in which they 
labor. Of this class Edgar F. Graves is a well known representative and his busi- 
ness activity has constituted an important element in the real-estate operations that 

4 

have been carried on in Spokane and throughout the Spokane country. 

He was bom in Panama, New York, June 2, 1864, a son of Lorenzo C. and 
Louisa (Moore) Graves. The family removed here in 1878 and located just west 
of Spokane on a ranch at what is now Meadow Lake. The father devoted his 
energies to the development of that property, carrying on general agricultural 
pursuits and at the same time he served for a number of years as justice of the 
peace, his continuation in the office being indicative of the fact that his decisions 
were fair and impartial. He and his wife now make their home in Los Angeles, 
California, and he has retired from active business. Their family number seven 
children, the brothers and sisters of Edgar F. Graves being: John W., now a 
practicing attorney of Sp>okane; Glen C, a commercial traveler; Walter, a drug- 
gist of eastern Oregon; Melville, who is engaged in the real-estate and insurance 
business in San Francisco; Lola, the wife of D. H. Anderson, of Sp>okane; and 
Pansy, who married Clifton Gilbert, a business man of Los Angeles. 

Edward F. Graves supplemented his public-school education, acquired in his 
native town, by three years' study in the high school of Lowell, Michigan, and not 
content with the opportunities already afforded him he attended the Episcopal 
Academy of Spokane, following the removal of the family to the west. This was 
the first private school in eastern Washington and many of the pioneers of SpK>kane 
obtained their education there. For a brief period he engaged in teaching school 
during the years 1881-2 and then turned his attention to civil engineering, being 
engaged in the survey for the Northern Pacific Railroad for a few years. This 
work took him into the various sections of the northwest, after which he returned 
to Spokane and secured a homestead near Medical Lake, devoting five years to 
the development and cultivation of that property. When Mr. Graves had secured 
the title to his homestead he came to Spokane and engaged in the real-estate and 
loan business. He had closely studied the situation, recognizing the fact that 
each year would bring a large number of people to the west and believing that real- 
estate dealing would prove a profitable source of income. Time has attested the 



k 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 213 

wisdom of his opinion in this regard^ for from the beginning he met with unusual 
success and has become recognized as one of the foremost real-estate operators in 
the Spokane country. Ranching^ however, has always proved to him an attractive 
business and not wishing to sever his connection with that line entirely he purchased 
several farms in the Lalouse country and in the Meadow Lake district. Again and 
again he has added to his holdings until his possessions now aggregate eight thou- 
sand acres which are being placed upon the market by the Hanaeur-Graves Com- 
pany in five and ten acre tracts. This company was organized in 1907 with Mr. 
Graves as the president and he is further operating along the same line as the 
vice president of the Meadow Lake Orchard Company. In his real-estate deal- 
ings he is attempting to develop the region for commercial orchard purposes and 
the district is proving very valuable because of the productiveness of the fruit 
trees which have here been set out, some of the finest apples and other fruits of 
the northwest being here raised. 

On the 1st of January, 1884, occurred the marriage of Mr. Graves and Miss 
Hallie D. Davis, a daughter of James W. and Harriet D. (Sillamon) Davis, who 
were pioneer residents of this section. They became parents of eight children, 
namely: Ethel, the wife of Garrett Anderson, of Medical Lake; Grace, who mar- 
ried Allyn E. Post, of Coulee City, Washington; Emma, Edgar F., Jr., Edwina, 
Howard and Dorothy, all living at home; and John W., who passed away in 1909 
at the age of sixteen years. The family reside at No. 1117 Tenth avenue, where 
Mr. Graves erected a pleasant home in 1907. 

He has never been actively interested in politics nor has he ever aspired to 
pc^tical office. He belongs to Imperial Lodge, No. 184, I. O. O. F., but his time 
is mostly given to the development and improvement of the lands which the com- 
pany is placing upon the market. They now have over three thousand acres in 
orchards, one thousand six hundred acres at Waver ly and Fairfield. Already they 
have sold many tracts which are being converted into fine orchards and indeed many 
of these orchards are now in splendid bearing condition although the trees are 
yet young. Mr. Graves and his associates in the company have made a. careful 
study of the character of the soil and recognize its adaptability for the production 
of fruit and vegetables. He is himself much interested in agricultural and hor- 
ticultural pursuits and his labors along those lines have constituted an example 
for others, indicating what may be accomplished when the raising of fruit, grain 
and vegetables is conducted according to the best improved and scientific methods. 



WILLIAM B. PICKRELL, M. D. 

Dr. William B. Pickrell, physician and surgeon, whose time and energies are 
concentrated upon his professional duties, thereby being productive of excellent 
results, was bom in Sangamon county, Illinois, January 19, 1878. His parents 
were James H. and Margaret T. (Bedford) Pickrell, also of Sangamon county, 
his father a well known and prominent resident of Illinois. He had a wide ac- 
quaintance among leading agriculturists throughout the country, being one of the 
most famous breeders of shorthorn cattle in the United States. He owned a 
famous herd and his prominence in that connection is indicated by the fact that 



214 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

he became president of the American Shorthorn Breeders Association^ which posi- 
tion he filled for many years. His interests^ too^ were of a broad and varied 
nature as is indicated by the fact that he was made one of the trustees of the 
University of Illinois. It is said that he had almost as wide an acquaintance 
throughoat the United States and Europe as any man with the exception of Grant 
and Roosevelt, and his popularity was well deserved for he was very cordial in 
manner and appreciative of the good qualities of others. Moreover, he was re- 
sourceful, energetic and progressive in business and did much to improve the 
grade of cattle raised in the United States, thus contributing in substantial measure 
to the prosperity of the agricultural class. 

After pursuing his preliminary education in the public and high schools of 
Chicago, Dr. Pickrell studied mechanical engineering for a time in the Armour 
Institute of that city, but changing his plans, he decided to become a member 
of the medical profession and to this end became a student in the Dunham 
Homeopathic College of Chicago, where he was graduated in 1898. For several 
years he practiced at Springfield, Illinois, and then pursued another course in 
the Chicago College of Physicians and Surgeons, from which he was graduated in 
1906. Thinking that the west furnished better climatic conditions together with 
business opportunities he came to Spokane in that year and has since developed a 
constantly growing practice. He is a man of quiet and retiring disposition and 
habits but his recognized personal worth and professional ability have gained for 
him the respect and good will of all who knew him. He belongs to the Spokane 
County and Washington State Medical Societies and is also a member of the 
American Medical Association. 

At Springfield, Illinois, on the 14th of March, 1900, Dr. Pickrell was united 
in marriage to Miss Frances Taylor, a daughter of Dr. I. H. and Irene (Constant) 
Taylor, of that city. They have two daughters, Dorothy K. and Irene. Dr. Pick- 
rell belongs to Oriental Lodge, No. 74, F. & A. M., but is connected with no clubs 
and is not actively interested in politics, preferring in his leisure hours to devote 
his time to the interests of his home and family. 



OLIVER HALL. 



Oliver Hall, who is now serving his third term as state senator from this dis- 
trict, has been a resident of Colfax for the past thirty-four years. He was bom 
in St. Lawrence county, New York, on the 17th of February, 1852, and is a son of 
Luman and Lydia (Crossett) Hall, the father, a native of Vermont and the mother 
of the state of New York. 

During the early childhood of Oliver Hall his parents removed to Canada, but 
subsequently located in northern Wisconsin. He began his education in the com- 
mon schools of Canada, and completed it in those of Wisconsin and of Mankato, 
Minnesota, where the family later resided. He terminated his school days at the 
age of eighteen years, in 1870, and thereafter gave his entire attention to farming. 
From then until 1876 he was associated with his father in ag^ cultural pursuits in 
Minnesota, but in the latter year they came to Washington. When they first re- 
moved to this state they located in Seattle, where they resided for a year ; then came 



OLIVER HAIX 






t ^ '' *' ^ '"* r UNI 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 217 

to Colfax. Here the father and son engaged in the manufacture of wagwis and 
buggies and also sleighs^ this being the first industry of the kind north of the Snake 
river. This enterprise was operated under the firm name of L. Hall & Son until 
the father's death in 1880, after which Oliver Hall conducted the business under 
his own name. Various activities engaged the attention of Mr. Hall during the 
pioneer days and in addition to the wagon and carriage business he also sold pumps 
and windmills from 1877 to 1900. Possessing much foresight and sagacity, he has 
always had the faculty of recognizing and utilizing to his advantage opportunities 
not discernible to the less resourceful individual, and to this can be attributed much 
of his success. Agricultural pursuits have strongly attracted Mr. Hall for many 
years, and he is now devoting his time to farming and fruit growing. 

During the long period of his residence in Whitman county, Mr. Hall has taken 
an active and helpful interest in all public affairs, particularly those of a political 
nature. He casts his ballot for the men and measures of tlie republican party and 
for several terms was a member of the Colfax council, while from 1894 to 1902 
he was a member of the state senate from this district. His services in this ca- 
pacity were rendered with a rare degree of efficiency, and were generally satis- 
factory to the community at large, so that in 1910 he was again sent to the senate, 
his present term expiring in 1914. Here as elsewhere Mr. Hall has manifested the 
initiative and strong powers of organization and executive ability that have always 
characterized him in the direction of any undertaking. He was a most valuable 
acquisition to the commercial circles .of- -Colfax- duripg- the early days, and to his 
perspicacity, resourcefulness and dfetemftfiitiorf i>f "pi^rpose can be attributed much 
of the development of that period, i Fratfei'iiany he is affiliated with Hiram Lodge, 
No. 21, A. F.* & A. M.; Colfax Chapter, No. 8, R. A. M;; and Colfax Lodge No. 4, 
K. P., of which he is past grand chancellftt ' and* p^3t. supreme representative. He 
also belongs to the Ancient Order 'of United Workmen, being past grand master 
and past supreme representative of this organization; and he is a past dictator of 
the Order of Moose. He has been an enthusiastic member of the Colfax Commer- 
cial Club since its organization, and he is also affiliated with the Inland Club of 
Spokane. Enterprising and public-spirited ,Mr. Hall is one of the popular men of 
the county, where by reason of his loyalty to his friends and the community, and 
his straightforward, upright transactions he is held in high esteem by all who know 
him. 



MERTON E. JESSEPH. 



Merton E. Jesseph, who is assistant prosecuting attorney, was bom June 7, 
1871, at Cold water, Michigan, a son of Rev. L. E. and Leora (Sinclair) Jesseph, 
who were bom in Rochester, New York, and Michigan respectively. The father 
is of English descent and his parents came to this country shortly after the Re- 
volutionary war. They first settled in Massachusetts but later removed to Roch- 
ester, New York. Prior to the Civil war they removed to Coldwater, Michigan. 
Rev. Jesseph was a Congregational minister for thirty-four years and at the time 
of his death, which occurred on the 15th of December, 1905, at Kettle Falls, he 
was serving as mayor at that town. He came to Colville on the 1st of April, 1893, 



218 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

to assume the pastorate of the Congregational church. He remained in that city 
for three or four years, then located in Fairfield where he remained four years. 
During his residence in those places he frequently preached in Spokane. After 
giving up that charge he located in Harrington, where he remained the five years 
previous to his removal to Kettle Falls. He preached in that town until the time 
of his death, which occurred about five years later. His mother was a member of 
the Hart family, many of whose members distinguished themselves in the pro- 
fessional world. Mrs. Jesseph, the mother of our subject, is at present residing 
in Colville. Her maternal grandfather was a member of a prominent Scottish 
family and her mother was an Adams, the daughter of a cousin of President 
Adams. Her maternal grandfather served in the Revolutionary war and subse- 
quently in the Mexican war. To Mr. and Mrs. Jesseph six children were bom: 
L. E., who is now serving his second term as auditor of Stevens county; Mer- 
ton, who is the subject of this review; L. C, a member of the law firm of Jesseph 
& Grinstead, of Colville; Ward, who is cashier of a bank at Edwall, Washington; 
Edith, the wife of Bliss Phillips, county treasurer of Stevens county; and Flora, 
who is residing at home. 

Merton E. Jesseph pursued his education in the public schools of Douglas, 
Michigan, and there prepared to enter Elmira College at Greenville, Illinois. 
After leaving the latter institution he taught school in Pleasantdale, Kansas, 
Stevens county, Washington, and Rock Creek valley in Spokane county, having 
come to this state with his father in 1898. Three years later he returned to Col- 
ville, where he had previously read law and had been admitted to the bar on the 
24th of November, 1894. He resumed his practice and remained in Colville until 
Ferry county was created. He removed to Republic in 1898 and in 1901 was 
elected prosecuting attorney of Ferry county. He served one term and in April, 
1903, came to Spokane, where he took up the practice of law in partnership with 
Adolph Munter. This firm continued for three years, at the end of which time 
Mr. Jesseph began practicing independently. He has concentrated his energies 
chiefly upon criminal law, specializing in its various lines. After spending about 
two years in Mexico he was appointed assistant prosecuting attorney of Spokane 
in the spring of 1911, a position which he holds at the present time. He has also 
interested himself in mining operations. When he was but eighteen years of age 
he went to Telluride, Colorado, and associated himself with various mining opera- 
tions in that vicinity. He is also interested in Republic properties and in connec- 
tion with some of his friends he operated the Young America at Bossburg under 
lease. During his two years' residence in Mexico he became interested in prop- 
erty there and spent considerable money in developing mining tracts in Guana- 
juato. He is still interested in the Young America at Bossburg. 

In April, 1896, at Rockford, Mr. Jesseph was married to Miss Ida Creighton, 
a daughter of Dr. J. R. Creighton and a sister of Glen B. Creighton, county as- 
sessor. The father's death occurred in 1907, in Spokane, where he was a prom- 
inent general practitioner. During the Civil war he served as surgeon and sub- 
sequently resided in both Kansas and Rockford before coming to Spokane. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Jesseph four sons have been born: Merton R. and Glen Leonard, 
aged fifteen and nine respectively; and Louis and Don, who are six and three 
years of age respectively. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 219 

In politics Mr. Jesseph is a democrat and while manifesting that interest which 
always indicates loyal and progressive citizenship he has never been a politician 
in the sense of seeking office as a reward for party fealty excepting in such in- 
stances as will give him opportunity to make use of his legal talents. In the cam- 
paign of 1898 he was a candidate for the office of prosecuting attorney of Stevens 
county and he took an active part in every campaign from the time the right of 
franchise was bestowed upon him until 1904. When N. S. Pratt was candidate 
for mayor he took an active interest in promoting his election and was closely 
associated with him during his term of office. Mr. Jesseph represented his party 
in a number of county and state conventions ard served as secretary of the dem- 
ocratic county central conmiittee of Stevens county in 1894, and during the cam- 
paign of 1904 covered the territory of Spokane county with Judge Prather. He 
was also a member of the county central committee for the five years previous 
to the spring of 1911. He is prominently mentioned in connection with the superior 
judgeship in 1912. In 1890, while he was residing in Pueblo, Colorado, he was 
a member of the National Guard of Colorado. He also holds membership in the 
order of the Moose, the Inland Club and the Chamber of Commerce. As a speaker 
he is strong and forcible, clear in expression and always commanding attention. 
His mind^ too, has been trained in the severest school of reasoning imtil close in- 
vestigation has become habitual with him. By reason of personal worth, profes- 
sional skill, political responsibility and his close conformity to a high standard of 
ethics in both private and public life he has gained a prominent place in the re- 
gard of those who know him. 



CARROLL SMITH, M. D. ' 

In the seven years of his practice as a physician and surgeon Dr. Carroll 
Smith has been located in Spokane and his standing with the profession is in- 
dicated in the fact that for four years of this period he has been honored with 
election to the office of secretary of the Spokane Medical Society. His birthplace 
is far off, for he is a native of Conover, North Carolina, his natal day being No- 
vember 27, 1878. His parents, William P. and Candace C. (Stine) Smith, re- 
moved from Conover to Rosalia, Washington, in 1892, and the father is now a 
prominent ranchman of Whitman county, taking an active and helpful part in the 
promotion of the ag^cultural and stock-raising interests of that section. 

In his youthful days Dr. Smith was a pupil in the public schools of North 
Carolina and afterward continued his studies at Oakesdale, Washington. It was 
bis ambition and intention to become a member of the medical profession and to that 
purpose he entered the University of Idaho for a preparatory course, matriculating 
subsequently for the medical course at the medical department of Northwestern Uni- 
versity at Chicago, graduating with the class of 1904. In the fall of the same 
year be came to S]>okane and opened an office, having since remained in this city. 
His work has won gratifying recognition in a constantly growing practice and 
two years ago he was made chief medical inspector of the public-school children, 
having been one of the originators of this admirable system for the prevention of 
disease in Spokane. In manner he is genial and the hopeful attitude which he 



220 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

maintains often proves most inspiring in the sick room. He seems to recognize 
the mental as well as physical condition of his patients and knows just how to 
direct thought so as to give nature the best opportunity to utilize remedial agencies 
in the restoration of health. That the medical profession of Spokane have ap- 
preciation for his ability and his strict conformity to professional ethics is indi- 
cated in the fact that, beginning in 1907, he was annually elected for four succes- 
sive terms to the oflSce of secretary of the Spokane Medical Society, of which he 
is a member. He likewise belongs to the Washington State Medical Society and 
the American Medical Association. 

Dr. Smith also holds membership in the Spokane Country Club and the Uni- 
versity Club. He is well known in this city where he has won many friends, the 
simple weight of his character and his ability carrying him into important profes- 
sional and social relations. 



CARL A. PEARSON. 



Willingness to apply themselves to the tasks which come to hand and practical 
economy are qualities characteristic of those of Swedish origin. These qualities 
are essential to anyone to enable him to meet the conditions he finds in the business 
world and pave the way for a prosperous career. They are salient characteristics 
of Carl A. Pearson, whose birth occurred in Sweden, on the 6th of September, 
1860. He is a son of Carl and Helena (Peterson) Pearson, both of whom were 
also bom in Sweden. The father, whose death occurred in 1908, was actively 
connected with lumber interests and was also one of the incorporators of the first 
match factory. He was prominently known in his precinct, occupying a position 
corresponding to that of mayor in one of our American cities. The mother is a 
descendant of a prominent family and during her residence in Dunkehallar was 
well known for her charity work. At present she is residing in Jonkoping. They 
were the parents of three children: Carl A., the. subject of this review; P. O., 
who is residing in Sweden; and Anna, who is the wife of A. G. Anderson, a con- 
tractor of Seattle. 

Carl A. Pearson received more than ordinary educational advantages. After 
pursuing the course of studies offered in the common schools he entered the high 
school of Jonkoping, from which he was graduated and subsequently was in civil 
service in his native land for six years. He also entered the army for the required 
two years' service. At the age of twenty-one years he came to America and im- 
mediately located in the northwest. He first engaged in railroading for the North- 
em Pacific but after being in their employ for six years entered the hotel business 
at Superior, Wisconsin. After being thus employed for fifteen years he came to 
Spokane in 1901 and has since been engaged in the real-estate, mining and timber 
buying and selling business. He sold vast quantities of timber in Idaho and does 
a general real-estate business, dealing both in inside and outside property. His 
operations cover territories in three states, Washington, Idaho and Oregon. His 
ambition has led him to seek opportunities also in the mining business and he is 
interested in the Mineral Hill Mining Company of Porthill, Idaho, of which organ- 
ization he is secretary and treasurer. This property has been under development 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 221 

and some of its ore is about ready for shipment. There are nine claims, their 
ralne being in copper, silver and lead. They are well equipped with shafts and 
sereral tunnels to a depth of two hundred and seventy-five feet. Andrew Stenseth, 
of Spokane, is president of the company and M. Strandberg, also of Spokane, is 
vice president. It is incorporated for a million and a half under the laws of the 
state of Washington, its head offices being in this city. Mr. Pearson is also inter- 
ested in other mining properties and has been the medium of many transfers. He 
was one of the organizers of the Surety Investment Company and is at pgresent 
serving as its president and manager. This company deals in general real estate, 
mines and timber lands. When Mr. Pearson came to this country he brought with 
him those qualities — perseverance and economy — which could not help but assure him 
of eminent success. Having been equipped with a good education before leaving 
Sweden, he used this training to good advantage in this country and engaged in 
such pursuits as those with less scientific training might have found unsatisfactory. 
At the time of his arrival in the Spokane country he found little more than a com- 
paratively insignificant civilization but, believing in its future expansion and great- 
ness, he was confident that he would not go amiss in confining his energy and efforts 
to this vicinity. 

At Superior, Wisconsin, Mr. Pearson was married, in October, 1898, to Miss 
Hilda Sward, a daughter of Gustav Sward, of Sweden. They had twin daughters^ 
of whom Alfhild survives. In politics Mr. Pearson gives his support to the re- 
publican party and during his residence in Wisconsin was very active in political 
drdes. He served on county and state committees and as delegate to state con- 
ventions. He also held the position of supervisor in Douglas county for two years. 
His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Swedish Lutheran church 
of this city. Mr. Pearson is one of the few freeholders of Spokane and as such 
enjoys the privileges which are accorded to a few of the early residents of this 
city. His officers are at 120% Wall street. 



JOHN HENRY SHAW. 

John Henry Shaw, who is president of Shaw & Borden Company, one of the 
largest stationery, printing and engraving houses in Spokane, and dealers in bank 
supplies, is a native of New England. He was reared in the eastern states and 
there pursued his education in the public schools. As soon as he put aside his 
text books he learned the printer's trade, and has since managed and edited sev- 
eral publications. Previous to coming to the state of Washington he was in the 
government employ in Washington, D. C, for several years. In 1890 however, 
he left the east and came to Washington where he helped establish the firm of 
which he is now president. He has been a resident of this city for several years 
daring which time his ability has won public recognition on various occasions when 
he has received appointments on commissions which have id do with the upbuild- 
ing of this section of the country. He was one of the honorary commissioners ap- 
pointed by the Chamber of Commerce of Spokane and he was a member of the 
delegation from the Associated Chambers of Commerce of the Pacific Coast which 
went to China in the interests of the general business of the western section of the 



222 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

country and to see what could be done to establish closer and better trade rela* 
tions between this country and the far east. It is due to the Spokane Chamber of 
Commerce that Mr. Shaw went with Mr. Held of the Boston Chamber of Com- 
merce when that association asked that Massachusetts be represented^ the gov- 
ernor of Washington appointing Mr. Held. Mr. Shaw was also a member of the 
committee which went to Europe to invite the Chambers of Commerce of Europe 
to attend the international meeting of the Chamber of Commerce of 1912 which 
is to, be held in Boston. While they were abroad they spent some time in examin- 
ing the trade relations and in visiting the various manufacturing and commercial 
centers of the continent. 

Fraternally Mr. Shaw is a Mason. He has been coronated a thirty-third 
degree Mason of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite^ and has served as grand 
commander of the Knights Templar of his state. Vitally alive to the questions 
and issues of the day he is always ready to give to his city that service which is 
due as a public-spirited citizen. 



CHARLES F. EIKENBARY, M. D. 

Dr. Charles F. Eikenbary has become recognized as one of the foremost prac- 
titioners of orthopedic surgery on the Pacific coast and his continuous study has 
kept him abreast with the most advanced representatives of that branch of the 
profession. He is actuated in all of his professional service by high ideals and 
by broad humanitarian principles and his labors have brought him a measure of 
success that is indeed creditable, desirable and well deserved. He was born in 
Eaton, Ohio, January 30, 1877, a son of Peter S. and Calista E. (Crandall) Eiken- 
bary. His father was very prominent in republican politics in Ohio and for years 
filled the office of recorder, his continuance in the office being evidence of the 
faithfulness and ability with which he discharged the duties that devolved upon 
him. He was afterward made steward of the state hospital at Dayton, Ohio, and 
is now living retired at Eaton. 

After mastering the branches of learning taught in the public and high schools 
of Eaton, Dr. Eikenbary entered the Miami University at Oxford, Ohio, and on 
a foundation of broad literary learning has builded the superstructure of his pro- 
fessional knowledge. He was a student in Rush Medical College of Chicago for 
a four years' course, which he completed in 1903. He afterward went to New 
York and served for one year as interne in the New York Hospital for Ruptured 
and Crippled. On the expiration of that period he returned to Chicago where he 
practiced his profession for three years, coming thence to Spokane in the spring 
of 1907. While he has broad general knowledge of medicine and surgery he has 
specialized in his reading and in his work in orthopedic surgery and at the pres- 
ent time limits his practice to that field. He is the only specialist in this line 
between Seattle and St. Paul and has built up a very large practice, patients 
coming to him from a wide territory. His ability is acknowledged by those prom- 
inent in the profession and such has been his research and investigation that his 
opinions have come to be largely regarded as authority upon anything relating 
to his special branch. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 223 

On the 5th of October, 1904, Dr. Eikenbary was married in Eaton, Ohio, to 
Miss Edna Fisher, a daughter of Judge Elam and Mira (Still) Fisher. They 
reside at No. 603 East Ermina avenue and have two children, Calista and Edna. 
Dr. Eikenbary belongs to Tyrian Lodge, No. 96, F. & A. M., but is not active in 
dub life nor in political circles. He has preferred rather to concentrate his en- 
ergies upon his professional duties and is a member of the Spokane County and 
Washington State Medical Societies and the American Medical Association. How- 
ever Dr. Eikenbary has not been unmindful nor neglectful of his public duties 
and so well is his interest in civic affairs understood by his fellow citizens that in 
December, 1911, he was honored by election to membership on the board of edu- 
cation of the city of Spokane. He has very wisely, industriously and conscienti- 
ously developed the talents with which nature endowed him and the unremitting 
industry which he has displayed in acquainting himself with the principles of the 
profession has brought him to a conspicuous, prominent and honored position in 
connection with his chosen life work. 



LEE WEEKS. 



Lee Weeks, who is interested in promoting mines and whose offices are in the 
Realty building, was born in Vermilion, South Dakota, February 26, 1876, a son 
of Canute and Caroline (Nelson) Weeks, of Norwegian and Scottish lineage re- 
spectively. The father, who is at present residing in Vermilion, is a land owner 
and capitalist, the foundation of whose fortune was laid in the purchase and sale 
of land and cattle. He arrived in the territory of Dakota at the age of nineteen 
years and later joined Company B, Dakota Volunteers, as lieutenant, serving dur- 
ing the Indian wars. He has been a member of the state legislature since South 
Dakota's admission to the Union. He is a director of the Clay County National 
Bank and of the First National Bank, and has served as regent of the University 
of South Dakota. Throughout the state Mr. Weeks is well known because of 
the responsible positions of trust and political preferment which he has held. The 
mother, who was bom in New York, died in 1895. Her brothers took part in the 
Civil war and her sister is a member of the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion. To Mr. and Mrs. Weeks six children have been bom: Lee, who is the 
subject of this review; Nelson, county auditor and clerk of Vermilion, South 
Dakota; Martin, who has charge of the home farm at Vermilion; Mamie, the wife 
of Charles C. Gunderson, a railroad attorney of Vermilion ; and Anna and Nellie, 
both of whom also reside at Vermilion. 

Lee Weeks made his home in South Dakota until 1907. He pursued his edu- 
cation in the public schools of that state and subsequently was a student in the 
University of South Dakota, from which institution he was graduated with the 
degree of LL. B. in 1898. After the completion of his college course he remained 
at home until 1907, when he came to Spokane and engaged in the real-estate, in- 
surance and loan business, representing his father's interests in the latter. He 
has been engaged in this business up to the present time and his operations are 
principally along the lines of loans, insurance and buying and selling acre tracts. 
His success has been remarkable. 



224 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Mr. Weeks brought the Story Homeward tracts, which are situated west of 
Spokane on the Medical Lake Railroad, on the market, and has disposed of one 
hundred and thirty acres. He also put the Vineland acre tracts on Moran Prairie, 
southwest of Spokane, on the market. This property is almost entirely disposed 
of. But he has not confined his interest to real estate. He is also dosely con- 
nected with various mining propositions, assisting in the development of mines in 
New Mexico and acting as general manager of the Jalisco Gold Mining Company. 
The property of this company consists of two claims in the state of Jalisco, 
Mexico, one of which, the North Extension, contains about forty acres of ground, 
and the other, the South Extension, about fifteen acres. Between these two tracts 
there lies one of the richest gold mines in the state of Jalisco. Mr. Weeks is also 
vice president of the Lost Horse Company in southern Idaho, the property of 
which consists of three silver and copper claims, all now under development. Al~ 
though the ore is low grade there are large bodies of it and the company has 
shipped quantities of it to Salt Lake. That Mr. Weeks is interested in industries 
other than real-estate and mining is evidenced by his position as manager and 
director of the Multitype Machine Company and his secretaryship of the Farmers 
Union Realty Company. These various business enterprises have brought him 
substantial success and he is today enjoying not only the personal satisfaction 
which is felt by every man who succeeds in his business undertakings but is also 
reaping the financial reward which is his as a result of the earnest and per- 
sistent labor which he has expended according to the most modern and scientific- 
ally approved methods. 

Mr. Weeks is a democrat and has served as delegate to both county and state 
conventions. He was at one time assessor of Clay county. South Dakota. His 
religious faith is indicated by his membership in the" Episcopal church. Fra- 
ternally he holds membership in the Masonic order of South Dakota and the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows at Pocatello, Idaho. He is also a member of the 
University Club of South Dakota. Realizing at an early point in his career that 
success depends upon the individual and not upon his environment, he has devel- 
oped his native talents by exercise in the active affairs of business life and has 
long since passed beyond the ranks of the many. He stands today among the 
successful few. 



JOSEPH EDWARD GANDY, M. D. 

Dr. Joseph Edward Gandy, a Spokane capitalist, whose identification with the 
city dates from the spring of 1880, has through his business activity proven a most 
potent factor in the work of upbuilding and development here. The evidences of 
his sound business judgment and judicious investments are found in many of the 
substantial buildings of Spokane and his devotion to the public welfare is evi- 
denced by the fact that he was one of the organizers of the Chamber of Commerce 
and has been a substantial and generous supporter to a large number of public 
projects. 

Dr. Gandy was bom at Sheboygan, Wisconsin, August 24, 1847, a son of 
Thomas and Minerva (Ross) Gandy. In the year 1848 the father removed from 



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SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 227 

Philadelphia to Wisconsin when he engaged in teaching school^ in farming and in 
other occupations. His wife was a descendant of Edward Carpenter Ross^ who 
came to this country from Scotland in 1670 and settled in Vermont. Subsequently 
representatives of the family removed to Ohio and in 1836 when a young girl, Mrs. 
Gandy accompanied her parents to Linn county, Iowa. She afterward made a 
visit to Wisconsin and there met Thomas Gandy who sought her hand in mar- 
riage. They resided for a few years in the Badger state and then removed to 
Linn county, Iowa, in 1849. It was in that county that Dr. Gandy largely spent 
his youthful days and acquired his preliminary education in the district schools. 
On the 10th of May, 1864, he responded to the country's call for troops, enlisting 
in Company D of the Forty-fourth Iowa Infantry when a mere boy in his teens. 
With that command he served until the close of the war and took part in several 
engagements in Mississippi, Tennessee and Alabama. He was one of the youngest 
soldiers of the northern army but his fearlessness and loyalty were equal to that 
of many a veteran of twice his years. 

When the war was over Dr. Gandy returned home and completed a classical 
course in Cornell College at Mount Vernon, Iowa, from which he was graduated 
in 1870. He then took up the study of medicine in the University of Michigan 
at Ann Arbor and was graduated from the medical department with the class of 
1878. For two years thereafter he practiced at Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and in 1875 
arrived in Washington, settling first in Tacoma, where he engaged in practice for 
five years. In 1879, when a member of the territorial legislature from Pierce 
county, he supported and was a leading ^actotf i^ the; dii-ision of Stevens county, 
thereby creating Spokane county a^* tettig0i^rijl(y< j^st^Sblishing the county seat 
at Spokane Falls, which was later removed to Cheney. 

Dr. Gandy dates his residence in 9pokanp,froir\^tbe sprihg of 1880, at which time 
the population of the city numbered '.but'two' hundred arid fifty. It had already 
entered upon a period of rapid growth, however, for in the previous year its in- 
habitants had numbered but one hundred. There were only three stores in the 
settlement and the little village showed every evidence of being upon the frontier. 
Dr. Gandy at once purchased a plat of land near the corner of Howard and Front 
streets, where the Union block now stands, and thereon erected a building. Since 
that time he has been very active and prominent in the building operations of the 
city and the evidences of his progressive and enterprising spirit are seen in many 
of the substantial structures here. In 1883 he was associated with Moore & Gold- 
smith, R. W. Forrest and E. B. Hyde in building the first Union block of Spo- 
kane, which was the second brick building erected in this city and stood at the 
southeast comer of Howard and Front streets. The year after his arrival here 
Dr. Gandy was also appointed surgeon for the United States army and filled that 
position for two years, at the end of which time he resigned to continue in the 
private practice of medicine until 1889. His building operations have long con- 
tinued and have been an important feature in Spokane's development. Among 
some of the later structures which he has erected were the two Union blocks, the 
building now occupied by Tull & Gibbs, the Gandy block on Sprague avenue and 
the new Hotel Willard, which is at the comer of First and Madison streets and 
is one of the modem hostelries of the northwest. He has also figured in con- 
nection with financial affairs here, for he was one of the organizers of the Ex- 
change Naticmal Bank, also of the Citizens National and the Big Bend National 

Bank of Davenport. The last two, however, are now out of existence. 
Vol. m— 12 



228 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

The life history of Dr. Gandy if written in detail would present a most faith- 
ful picture of pioneer conditions and experiences in this section of the country. 
In 1877 together with five other men he made a trip on horseback from Tacoma 
to the Yakima and Pasco country. They crossed the Cascade mountains and fol- 
lowed the McClellan path through Natches Pass to old Yakima City. From that 
point they traveled all over what is now Klickitat and Benton counties, coming out 
on the Columbia river and thence returning to Yakima. This was during the 
period of the Nez Perces uprising. There are few men capable of s{>eaking with 
as much authority upon matters connected with the history of eastern Washing- 
ton as Dr. Gandy, for not only has he been an interested witness of all the events 
and changes which have occurred but has also been an active factor in the work 
that has wrought the wonderful transformation which has evolved the splendid 
civilization of the present day from the wilderness of pioneer times. Moreover, 
he has been active in shaping the political history of the state, for in 1877 he 
was first elected a member of the territorial legislature from Pierce county, in 
which he served a term of two years. Following the admission of the state to 
the Union he was elected a member of the general assembly in 1889, in 1890 and 
in 1893. He was a member and the first president of the Spokane city council 
in 1882, serving one year. In 1884 and -1885 he was chairman of a committee 
which was organized for the purpose of collecting funds and building good roads, 
eight thousand dollars being secured in three months, and he had charge of the 
expenditure. So satisfactorily was the work accomplished that the farmers solidly 
supported the measure to remove the county seat from Cheney back to Si>okaDe, 
which was accomplished by a large majority. In 1885 and 1886 Dr. Gandy was 
one of the principals in raising by subscription one hundred and seventy-five 
thousand dollars to build the Seattle, Lake Shore & Eastern Railroad into Spo- 
kane; was a member of the committee; and subscribed one thousand dollars be- 
sides personally soliciting funds. In 1887 he was a large subscriber to the Great 
Northern Railroad fund for the purpose of buying the right-of-way for that road 
through Spokane and also Mr. Corbin's railroad in 1898, this being the Spokane 
Falls & Northern, which was subsequently absorbed by the Great Northern — ^the 
Hill system. About 1896 he also subscribed largely for the fund to purchase the 
ground for Fort Wright. In politics Dr. Gandy has always been a stalwart re- 
publican, believing firmly in the principles of the party as factors in good gov- 
ernment, yet never placing partisanship before the general welfare nor personal 
aggrandizement before the public good. 

Dr. Gandy has been married twice. By the first marriage there were two 
children: Hon. Lloyd E. Gandy, a prominent attorney of this city; and Mary 
Leona Gandy, now living in Seattle. On the 28d of January, 1902, Dr. Gandy 
wedded Harriet Ross, widow of the late Andrew J. Ross. He maintains pleasant 
relations with his old army comrades through his membership in Sedgwick 
Post, G. A. R., of which he is a past commander, and at the present time is medi- 
cal director of the department of Washington and Alaska. He belongs to the 
Masonic fraternity and was a charter member and the first vice president of the 
Spokane County Medical Society. He was one of the organizers of the Chamber 
of Commerce and is prominent in the Pioneer Society, which he served as presi- 
dent in 1910. No history of Spokane and the Inland Empire would be complete 
without extended and prominent representation of Dr. Gandy, for his record as a 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 229 

soldier^ as an official, as a medical practitioner and as a business man has been 
so honorable that he has gained the confidence and good-will of all with whom 
he has been brought in contact, his private activities and his public service win- 
ning him high encomiums from his fellowmen. 



J. GLEN HARBISON, M. D. 

While one of the younger medical practitioners of Spokane, Dr. J. Glen Harbi- 
son has given proof of his knowledge and ability in the line of his chosen profes- 
sion and has thereby won substantial recognition of his ability in a growing 
practice. He was bom at Springfield, Illinois, July 12, 1881, and is a son of 
William H. and Ida E. (Sanner) Harbison, the former an architect and con- 
tractor of Springfield. He directed his son's education which was acquired in the 
public and high schools of his native city. In a review of the different profes- 
sions and commercial and industrial interests in search of a congenial life work. 
Dr. Harbison at length determined to enter upon the practice of medicine and 
in preparation therefor became a student in Hahnemann Medical College of Chi- 
cago, in which he completed the regular four years' course and was grculuated in 
the class of 1905. His first actual experience came to him as interne in the Cook 
County Hospital of Chicago, where he remained for a year and a htdf. He then 
pursued a post-graduate course in the medical department of the University of 
IllincMs, which granted him a diploma in 1907. In the summer of the same year 
he came to Spokane where he has since followed his profession and has a growing 
practice. College training today supplies young men with knowledge that previ- 
ous generations had to acquire through the slow and painful process of practical 
experience, and splendidly equipped for his profession. Dr. Harbison has had no 
difficulty in convincing the public of his ability and winning a fair share of the 
pubhc patronage. 

Along professional lines Dr. Harbison is connected with the Spokane County 
Medical Society, the Washington State Medical Society and the American Medical 
Association. He also belongs to the Royal Highlanders and his religious faith is 
evidenced in his membership in the Central Christian church. 



JAMES A. McLEAN. 



James A. McLean, who has been interested in engineering feats in the north- 
west since 1887, was born in Canada, east of Toronto, on the 8d of June, 1866, a 
son of John and Isabella (Clark) McLean, both of whom were natives of Scot- 
land. The father died in 1906 at the age of eighty. The mother removed to 
Canada as a pioneer in 1888, when she was but sixteen years of age. Her death 
occurred in 1908. To their union seven children were born: James Archibald, 
the subject of this sketch; Alexander, a resident of Oakland, California; Samuel 
A., who resides in Chesaw, Washington ; John N., a resident of Nez Perce, Idaho ; 
Alice Isabella, the wife of Charles Spotswood, of San Jose, California; Maggie, 



230 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

the wife of John Blaine^ of Toronto, Canada; and Catherine Jean, who is the wife 
of Charles Steffins, also of Toronto, Canada. The paternal grandfather of James 
A. McLean served for twenty-one years in the British army and was captain of his 
company for many years and participated in several important battles. 

James A. McLean pursued his education in the common schools of Canada. 
When he had completed his studies he removed to Montana and was employed in 
railroad construction work. In 1887 and 1888 he was engaged in building rail- 
road for the Montana Central between Butte and the ttmnel. After completing 
this piece of work he went to the Coeur d'Alene country and built railroad for 
the Northern Pacific known as the Missoula cutoff. While in that part of the 
country he was also engaged in opening up the Grouse mine on Chloride Hill. 
In 1892 he moved to the west side of the Cascade mountains and built a portion 
of the Great Northern main line. In 1 893 he built a portion of the Fort Shepherd 
& Nelson Railroad near Nelson, British Columbia. The following year he went 
to California and engaged in building a railroad from Monterey to Fresno and 
subsequently he moved to Shasta county, where he built a road from Keswick to 
Iron Mountain. In the autumn of 1896 he went to Trinity county, California, 
and erected eleven and a half miles of five-thousand-inch fiume and nine thousand 
feet of tunnel. This undertaking covered a period of about two years and at the 
expiration of that time he went to British Columbia, where he took a construction 
contract on the Columbia & Western between Brooklyn and Gladstone. After 
completing this he went to Idaho, building a portion of the Clearwater Short Line, 
then purchased a sawmill and took out one hundred thousand ties for the North- 
ern Pacific Railroad. He then engaged in building railroad at Republic, Washing- 
ton, and also at Rexford on the Great Northern. In the fall of 1906 he discon- 
tinued his connections with the railroads and entered the mining business. He 
acquired the Grant Consolidated Copper Mining Company, owning property at 
Chesaw, Washington. It comprises a group of ten claims, to which he has added 
^ve more since he has been managing the company. They have developed twelve 
hundred feet of underground workings and have a hundred horse power plant, 
drifting at a depth of six hundred feet. The values of twelve car loads have six 
per cent copper and four dollars in gold and silver. One vein is fifty- four feet 
between the walls and the other is twenty-four feet between the walls. It has a 
granite foot wall, a lime-hanging wall and diorite filling. To Mr. McLean falls 
the task of developing this property and blocking out the ore. His exceptional 
ability is showing itself in the success he is having in finding the veins and bring- 
ing the ore to the surface. As soon as the railroad is extended to the property he 
will begin shipping the metal. He has also other mining interests and in these 
he is meeting with similar success. 

On the 29th of December, 1897, Mr. McLean was married at Sacramento, 
California, to Miss Miriam W. Govan, a daughter of James and Elizabeth Govan. 
The father came to California from Philadelphia and is descended from the Scotch 
family from whom the town of Govan, in Scotland, derives its name. He moved 
to California as a pioneer and died at the age of eighty-three years, being the 
oldest member of the Veteran Odd Fellows some fifty years standing. His wife 
survived him three years and died at the age of seventy-nine years. Mr. and 
Mrs. Govan were the parents of nine children, those surviving being: William, 
an officer in the state capital at Sacramento, California; Robert, a mining pro- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 231 

moter and capitalist of Tonopah^ Nevada; Elias, who is connected with real- 
estate and banking interests at Sacramento^ California; Agnes, the widow of 
Thomas B. Hall, whr was a wholesale merchant of Sacramento, California; Jean- 
nle W., who is engaged in educational work in Sacramento, California ; and Miriam, 
who became the wife of James A. McLean, of this review. To Mr. and Mrs. 
McLean four children have been born: Miriam, Elise, Robert Govan and 
Jean. Mr. McLean gives his political support to the republican party* 
The family attend the Presbyterian church. Mr. McLean is prominent 
in Masonry, holding membership in Lodge No. 10, F. & A. M.; Nez Perce 
Consistory of Lewiston, Idaho; and El Katif Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of 
Spokane. He also belongs to the Illinois Conmierdal Men's Association. He is 
regarded as one of the most prominent mining promoters in Spokane and the 
benefits which many of his fellow citizens have derived from his advice have won 
him a large circle of admirers. 



THOMAS HYE. 



Thopoas Hye is engaged in the real-estate business in Spokane and is also in- 
terested in the Spokane Taxicab Company, the Northwestern Drug Company 
and other enterprises. This, however, does not cover the extent of his activities, 
which are many, and are of an important character, contributing to the develop- 
ment and progress of the communities, in which they are located. Mr. Hye is 
recognized as an alert, enterprising business man, and his determined purpose 
enables him to carry forward to successful completion whatever he attempts. 

A native of Rhode Island, Mr. Hye was born in Providence, February 20, 
1868. His father, Frank Hye, was of Irish lineage, but was a natire of Provi- 
dence and became a prominent and influential resident of his home town, where 
he served as city councilman. He was a soldier of the Civil war, with the Second 
Rhode Island Infantry and continued at the front throughout the long struggle. 
His death occurred in 1898, while his wife survived until 1905, passing away in 
Spokane. She bore the maiden name of Catherine Golden and was bom in Ire- 
land. She belonged to a prominent Irish family that later became well known 
in Rhode Island, where many representatives of the name are still living. The 
tiiree brothers of Thomas Hye are: Frank, who is connected with the mining in- 
dustry at Elk City, Idaho; Leo, who is night cashier with the Washington Water 
Power Company; and William, with the Spokane Taxicab Company. The sisters 
are: Mrs. Mary Carlin, of Spokane; and Mrs. Agnes Plummer, who is now travel- 
ing in Europe. 

In the common schools of his native city Thomas Hye mastered the branches 
of learning, which usually constitute the public-school curriculum, completing his 
studies in the high school at Pawtucket, Rhode Island. Turning to business life 
he first engaged in merchandising in Bernalillo, New Mexico, and afterward 
turned his attention to mining in that state in 1879. He subsequently was again 
identified with mercantile pursuits until 1884, when he entered the employ of a 
mining company in Copper City, New Mexico, which pursuit claimed his atten- 
tion for five years. In 1889 he went to Denver, Colorado, where he spent almost 



232 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

a year, and in September, 1890, located at Farmington, Washington, where he 
again conducted a mercantile enterprise. In 1892 he bought out the Farmington 
Trading Company, conducting business until March, 1897, when he disposed of 
bis stock and removed to Spokane. His first identification with business inter- 
ests here was as proprietor of a billiard hall in the basement of the Rookery build- 
ing, the first exclusive billiard hall in the city. 

* In 1899, Mr. Hye made a trip to Dixie, Idaho, to open some mining property, 
and there with his associates built two mills and did considerable development 
work. Mr. Hye still retains his interest in the North Star Group there. For the 
past nine or ten years he has been engaged in the real-estate business, trading, 
buying and handling his own properties. He makes a specialty, however, of trad- 
ing and exchanges, and has become well known as an operator in real estate in 
Spokane. At one time he owned the Albion block on Howard street, also the Franc 
block on Front avenue, which was afterward torn down by the Chicago, Milwau- 
kee & St. Paul Railroad Company. He has also owned several apartment houses 
on Post and Third, and on Augusta and Lincoln streets. He buys and sells all 
the time and his operations here have been an important feature in real-estate 
activities in Spokane. 

Aside from his Spokane interests, Mr. Hye is a heavy stockholder in a group 
of mines in Coeur d'Alene, now being developed, the property being locatal on 
Eagle creek, near Murray. He also owns much other mining stock and he is in- 
terested in the Washington Brick & Lime Company, the Idaho Lime Company 
and in other corporations and business projects. He is one of the heaviest stock- 
holders in the American Manufacturing Company, making pumps, water wheels 
and wrenches, with a factory on Division street. They are in control of fourteen 
different patents and they also put out a rotary pump. In fact all of the things 
manufactured are made from their own patents, including current motors, wrenches 
and other devices. Of this company, which is incorporated for two million dol- 
lars, Mr. Hye is the secretary and treasurer, with Charles L. Kik, of Spokane, 
as president; and Walter L. Elkins, of Spokane, as vice president. Mr. Hye is 
likewise interested in the Patent Holding Company, owning the Diamond Cai^ 
riage Works, and in the Inland Improvement Company, operating in land in and 
near Spokane. He is also vice president and one of the largest stockholders of 
The Iceless Refrigerator Company. 

On the 1st of June, 1896, at Farmington, Mr. Hye was married to Miss Mattie 
Fultz, a daughter of Matthew Fultz, a pioneer of California and of Washington, 
who crossed the plains to the former state in 1849, and came to Washington at 
a very early day. He was of German descent and is now deceased. Mrs. Hye's 
mother, who after her first husband's demise married David Delaney, is an adopted 
daughter of Marcus Whitman and one of the survivors of the dreadful Whitman 
massacre. Mrs. Delaney *s sisters are: Mrs. Kate Pringle, deceased, who was 
prominently known in the northwest; and Mrs. William Helm, of Portland, 
Oregon. 

In politics Mr. Hye is a democrat and active in the party work. He has 
served as delegate to county and state conventions and as a member of county and 
state central committees, acting in the former capacity, and has done much to 
aid his friends in obtaining office. He belongs to the Knights of Pythias lodge, 
in which he has filled all of the chairs and is now a past chancellor and past 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 233 

deputy grand chancellor. In the Odd Fellows society he has also filled all of the 
chairs in the local lodge, is a past grand and past chief patriarch. In the Wood- 
men of the World he is past counselor commander and he belongs to the Eagles 
and to the Chamber of Commerce. He went to New Mexico in the pioneer epoch 
in the history of that state and became largely familiar with frontier life there, 
owing to the unsettled condition of the country, the Apaches being very trouble- 
some at that time. Since then he has been connected with pioneer experiences in 
Tarions sections of the country and his labors have always constituted an effective 
element for progress and improvement. 



ROBERT C. SWEATT. 



Robert C. Sweatt, a Spokane architect whose well developed powers have 
foond expression in the erection of some of the fine buildings of the city, was 
bom in Chicago, December 8, 1872, a son of John B. and Elsie L. (Carlisle) 
Sweatt, who were then residents of Chicago and since 1903 have made their home 
in Spokane, where the father is engaged in the contracting and building business. 

In the public and high schools of his native city the son acquired his educa- 
tion and pursued his architectural course in Columbia University of New York 
city. He afterward went to Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, where he followed his 
profession for about three years. In 1904 he came to Spokane, where he entered 
into partnership with Lewis R. Stritesky, under the name of Stritesky & Sweatt, 
the junior partner being in charge of the designing department, while Mr. Stri- 
tesky superintended and building operations. In 1906 the firm was dissolved, 
since which time Mr. Sweatt has practiced his profession alone. Among the princi- 
pal buildings which the firm designed and erected were the Shoshone county court- 
house at Wallace, Idaho, the Westminster apartments of this city and the Schade 
Brewery Company's buildings. Since the dissolution of the partnership Mr. 
Sweatt has designed the new Peyton building, the Children's Home, the Lever 
Hotel and the Knights of Pythias temple here, and one of the more recent of his 
works has been the Spokane County Tuberculosis Hospital. He is also the oiS- 
cial architect of the school board and under his supervision the city is making plans 
to completely revolutionize their future school buildings. 

Mr. Sweatt has never held public ofiice but has been actively identified with 
the insurgent republican party and was one of the leaders in the contest for a 
commission form of government. He was a member of the committee and chair- 
man of the sub-committee on meetings that directed and carried on the fight and 
finally succeeded in securing the adoption of the commission plan. 

Mr. Sweatt is pleasantly situated in his home life, having been married on the 
SOth of September, 1896, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Miss Jennie Odegard, 
of that city, a daughter of John and Maren Odegard. Her mother is still living 
but her father, who was a teacher and educator by profession, has been dead 
several years. 

In Masonry Mr. Sweatt has attained the Knights Templar degree and he 
also belongs to the Knights of Pythias lodge. He is a member of the Inland 
Club, the Spokane Society of Social and Moral Hygiene, is a director of the 



234 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Town and Country Club and a trustee of the First Universalist church. He is 
also a member of the Chamber of Commerce, a member of the executive committee 
on the first Enakops carnival and a member of the executive committee who will 
have charge of the new Auditorium to be erected in Spokane. He has entered into 
all progressive public measures and is a champion of the city and her welfare. 



EDWARD JAMES CANNON. 

Well versed in all departments of the law and especially proficient in corporation 
law, Edward James Cannon by the consensus of public opinion is placed in a fore- 
most position among the distinguished attorneys of Spokane and at the same time 
is active in control of important invested interests. He was born on a farm near 
Wamerville, Juneau county, Wisconsin, February 21, 1866, a son of James and 
Eliza (Noonan) Cannon, both of whom were of Irish lineage. The maternal grand- 
parents were both natives of Ireland and Michael Noonan, the grandfather of Eliza 
(Noonan) Cannon, was a civil engineer and overseer of public works in the south 
half of Ireland during the famine times. His wife reached the remarkable old age 
of one hundred and nine years. James Cannon has devoted his life to farming 
and now makes his home in Cresco, Iowa. His family numbered eleven children, 
the brothers of Edward James Cannon being: Harry, who is a prominent physician 
and surgeon of St. Paul; John M., an attorney of Ritzville, Washington; George, 
who is practicing law in Minnesota; and James, who is engaged in the insurance 
business in Minneapolis. The daughters of the household were: Mary, the wife of 
M. A. Montague, who is engaged in the land business in Iowa; Lyda, the wife of 
P. M. Daly, in the interior department of Washington, D. C. ; Marcella, the wife 
of Thomas Gerraghty, an attorney of Valdez, Alaska; Margaret, the wife of Frank 
J. O'Rourke, of Freeport, Illinois, who is assistant editor of a daily paper there; 
and Theresa and Katherine, at home. 

When Edward J. Cannon was a lad of eight years the family removed to the 
Hawkeye state and following the acquirement of his more specific literary education 
he went to St. Paul, Minnesota, in the fall of 1887 and there entered upon the study 
of law in the office of Thompson & Taylor, who directed his reading until his ad- 
mission to the bar on the 1st of June, 1890. He then entered upon the practice of 
his profession in St. Paul, where he remained until January 1, 1906, when he came 
to Spokane, having received the appointment of division counsel for the Northern 
Pacific Railroad Company for that portion of the line extending from Paradise, 
Montana, to the Columbia river and including all of its branches. In this capacity 
he still continues and at the same time is counsel for the Spokane, Portland & Seattle 
Railroad from Pasco eastward. In addition he practiced in partnership with Arthur 
B. Lee, the firm pursuing a general practice and enjoying a high reputation for 
ability in the profession. Since that time changes have occurred in the firm and 
there are now six lawyers in the office. They represent seven of the casualty com- 
panies doing business in Spokane and Mr. Cannon is also attorney for the First 
National Bank of Hillyard and the National Bank of Commerce of Spokane. As 
division counsel of the Northern Pacific he has twelve hundred miles of road under 
his legal direction and is legal adviser for altogether two thousand miles of road. 



EDWARD J. CANNON 



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SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 237 

In addition to his other railway connections he is attorney for the Camas Prairie 
Railroad and the Washington^ Idaho & Montana Railroad. In the field of corpor- 
ation law his work has been of a very important character. He is also attorney 
for the Stanton Padding Company and attorney for various irrigation companies^ 
and probably no firm in Spokane has a more extensive corporation practice. They 
employ their own court stenographer and their own claim agent. Outside the strict 
path of his profession Mr. Cannon has extended his efforts into other fields and is 
now president of the First National Bank of Hilly ard and a director of the National 
Bank of Commerce of Spokane. He is also president of the New World Life In- 
surance Company and acts as its counsel. He is the owner of one hundred and sixty 
acres of land^ on Half Moon prairie^ which is devoted to the raising of fruit. 

On October 9^ 1890, at St. Paul, Minnesota, Mr. Cannon was married to Miss 
Helen L. Appleton, a daughter of James B. and Louise (Walker) Appleton, of 
Osage, Iowa. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Cannon, Louise 
Marie, Helen Eliza and Marcella. At 416 East Rockwood boulevard is situated the 
family home, over which Mrs. Cannon graciously presides and where she dispenses 
cordial hospitality to the numerous friends of the family who are wont to gather 
there for many a pleasant hour. 

Mr. Cannon is well known in social connections as a member of the Spokane, 
Spokane Country and Inland Clubs and is a life member of the Spokane Athletic 
Club. He likewise belongs to Spokane Lodge, No. SS8, B. P. O. E., and the Eaiights 
of Columbus, in which he has held all the chairs. He is also connected with the 
Chamber of Commerce and his cooperation i^. given to every movement instituted by 
that organization for the benefit and upbuilding otth^ city. His entire life has been 
characterized by continuous advanceni|ent. Every step in his career has been a for- 
ward one and the thoroughness with which he has mastered every task and per- 
formed every duty constitutes the secret of his success. In the law he has never 
failed to give careful preparation and a keen analytical mind enables him to readily 
determine the salient points in a case and apply legal principle and precedent cor- 
rectly. In the field of business, too, his sound judgment has manifested itself in 
judicious investment and the wise control of his interests. 



W. J. KOMMERS. 



At the age of fourteen years W. J. Kommers could not speak a word of the 
English language; today he occupies an enviable position in the world of finance 
as a representative of banking interests in Spokane. The heights to which he has 
risen in his business career indicate a life of intelligent and well directed activity 
and a thorough mastery of the tasks he has undertaken. He was bom in Mount 
Calvary, Wisconsin, January 13, 1872. His father, Mathias Kommers, was bom 
in Germany and was the son of a prominent German citizen and military officer. 
In early life Mathias Kommers came to the new world and for many years was 
engaged in general merchandising but is now living in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. 
He had one brother who served in the Civil war and was wounded in the strife. 
Mathias Kommers was united in marriage to Margaret Wolf, a native of Mount 
Calvary, Wisconsin, and a member of a family that was represented in the Revo- 



238 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

lutionaiy war and also in the Civil war. She^ too^ is of German descent and it 
was the language of the fatherland that w'as spoken in the Kommers home^ where 
the family included five sons and three daughters^ the brothers of our subject 
being: Adolph^ now of Spokane; Louis, living in Wabeno, Wisconsin; Alphonse, 
a resident of Antigo, Wisconsin; and the Rev. Joseph Kommers, of Hortonville, 
Wisconsin. The sisters are Mary, Angeline and Anna, all residents of Fond du 
Lac, Wisconsin. 

W. J. Kommers was educated in Mount Calvary, a resj^cted rural community 
of German settlers, to the age of fourteen years when he was sent to Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, where he attended the Pio Nono College, pursuing a commercial course, 
which was completed by graduation with the class of 1889. The following year 
he accepted a position as bookkeeper for a hardware company in Superior, Wis- 
consin, where he remained for a year, when the Northwestern National Bank was 
formed with Mathias Kommers as one of the stockholders, and his son, W. J. 
Kommers, was given the position of messenger in the bank, to serve the fif st year 
without salary. He remained with that institution in various capacities for twelve 
years, serving during the last four years as its cashier. In 1902 he came to 
Spokane to join D. W. Twohy, who with his associates was at that time perfecting 
the purchase of the Old National Bank. He has since been connected with these 
gentlemen, becoming assistant cashier but having more particularly in hand the 
interior organization and development of the bank. He spent much of his time 
in advertising the institution and bringing it to public notice, had charge of the 
working force and systems of the bank and assisted also in the credit department. 
In the fall of 1909 the growth of the bank made it necessary to find new quarters 
and the new site and the erection of a building for the Old National Bank and all 
the details were placed in charge of Mr. Kommers. The volume of business that 
developed in this connection was so great that he was practically disassociated 
with the work of the bank in the conduct of his daily interests for the next two 
years, his labors only ending with the complete rental of the building and an 
organization developed to operate it. Prior to this undertaking he was given carte 
blanche for three months and traveled all over the country, studying architecture 
and planning the details of the bank and its offices. His suggestions and ideas 
were accepted, for the officials recognized that he thoroughly knew the needs of 
the bank and possessed, moreover, knowledge concerning the requirements of 
office tenants in the city. The responsibility ef fixing the rental space of every 
square foot in the immense building and putting it on a paying basis was his. 
His work was completed on the 1st of January, 1911,. when the Old National 
Bank moved into its new home. Without relinquishing his position as assistant 
cashier of the Old National Bank and also continuing to serve as assistant secretary 
of the Old National Bank Building Company, Mr. Kommers was elected to the 
cashiership and directorate of the Union Trust & Savings Bank, an institution 
allied to the Old National Bank and conducted under practically the same owner- 
ship. He is so engaged now and is serving the same interests. He has always 
displayed special fitness for the building up of organizations to rank with the 
representative business enterprises of the northwest and has given special atten- 
tion to the question of publicity, believing that judicious advertising is one of the 
potent elements in success. To bring to the knowledge of the people the institu- 
tions which he has represented, their purposes, their plans and their merits, has 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 239 

been on^ of the chief features of his business activity^ as for instance when the 
first column of steel was set for the Old National Bank building fifty per cent 
of the space in the building had already been rented and signed up. Architects 
say that this is a record unprecedented in the annals of office building erections 
and Mr. Kommers has won a deserved reputation thereby. 

On the 21st of September, 1897, in Superior, Wisconsin, Mr. Kommers was 
united in marriage to Miss Louise Klinkert, a daughter of J. A. Klinkert, retired, 
of Superior. Mr. and Mrs. Kommers have become parents of three children: 
Wilham A., Henry K. and Margaret, all in school. The religious faith of the 
family is that of the Catholic church. Mr. Kommers is president of a German 
club, a newly organized society called the Spokane Arion Society, composed of 
the representative Germans of the city. He is also a member of the Spokane 
Athletic Club and the Inland Club, is vice president of the Loyola Athletic Club 
and a trustee of the Knights of Columbus. He belongs to the Chamber of Com- 
merce and in politics is a republican where national issues are involved but at 
local elections casts a ballot independent of party affiliation. His entire life has 
been characterized by a continuous progress that has brought him to an enviable 
position in financial circles. He has made a most thorough study of business con- 
ditions and opportunities and has contributed not a little to the success of the 
banking interests with which he is connected. His colleagues and contemporaries 
recognize his force and ability and entertain for him the warm regard which is 
ever the expression of a recognition of individual merit and worth. 



JAMES B. VALENTINE. 

Working at the forge in his early boyhood, then advancing slowly but steadily 
and surely step by step as he proved his worth, ability and enterprise, James B. 
Valentine is today at the head of several important business projects in SpK)kane 
and at the same time his labors have constituted a factor in public progress. His 
woric in securing the appropriation for the opening of the Columbia river from 
BridgepK)rt to Kettle Falls is indeed commendable and the value of his labor in 
this connection can hardly be overestimated. It is characteristic of him that all 
through his life his private interests and public work have been given their due 
relative pro]K>rtion of time and effort. 

One the 26th of January, 1868, James B. Valentine first saw the light of day 
in Scotland. His parents, Stewart and Isabella (Grieve) Valentine, were also 
natives of Scotland and representatives of old and well known families of that 
country. The father died in March, 1908, and the mother on December 28, 1911, 
in Montrose, Scotland. In the family were four sons and two daughters: James 
B.; Charles W., a resident of Heppner, Oregon; David and George, who are liv- 
ing in Scotland ; Mrs. Jane Stone, a widow, residing at Montrose ; and Elizabeth, 
the wife of Thomas Falconer, of Elzell, Scotland. 

James B. Valentine was educated in the common schools of Scotland and in 
that country learned the blacksmith's trade, devoting four years to its mastery. 
He afterward spent a year in Edinburgh and then came to the United States. For 
a 8h(Mrt time he remained in Boston, Massachusetts, but in 1886 became a resident 



240 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

of etistern Oregon. For two years he followed his trade, proving himlself not 
only a capable but also a reliable workman. In January, 1888, however, he went 
overland to the Big Bend country, where he took a preemption and timber claim 
eighteen miles northeast of Waterville. There he continued to work at his trade 
on his own account until the fall of 1 892, when he was elected to the office of sheriff, 
occupying that position until the spring of 1897. He then removed to Bridgeport, 
where he engaged in the hotel business until the spring of 1898, when he became a 
resident of Spokane. Just before his removal to this city he organized the Bridge- 
port Land Company, owning thirty-two hundred acres, and was actively engaged 
in the development of that project as general manager until after they brought 
water to the district and all of the ditches were finished. He still retains his 
official connection with the enterprise and is also secretary of the Bridgeport De- 
velopunent Company, owning seventeen hundred acres just outside of Bridgeport. 
When success has been achieved in one project he extends his efforts to still other 
fields and is now closely and prominently associated with various business enter- 
prises, which are important elements in the work of general development and 
improvement here. He organized the Arctic Cold Storage Warehouse Company 
in March, 1909, becoming its vice president, and in April, 1911, organized the 
Merchants Produce Company, of which he is the president. Both companies are 
incorporated. He handles cold storage products and the warehouse has a capac- 
ity of one hundred and fifty carloads for cold storage and two hundred and fifty 
carloads for dry storage. The Merchants Product Company conducts a general 
commission business and ships east and to all parts of the country, mixed and 
straight carloads of fruit. Like most of the settlers of the northwest, Mr. Valen- 
tine was at one time interested in mining, having done some prospecting in 1890 
and 1891 but afterward he retired from that field. He is interested in the Wash- 
ington Bond & Mortgage Company, of which he was one of the organizers, in the 
spring of 1910, and of which he is the secretary and treasurer. This company 
has commodious quarters in the Empire State building and deals principally in 
Washington farm loans. He is likewise connected with the Bridgeport Highlands 
Orchard Company, owning property six miles north of Bridgeport. 

In his political views Mr. Valentine is a stalwart republican, active in the party 
which he has represented in county and state conventions and also serving as a 
member of the county and state central committees. He filled the office of sheriff 
of Douglas county from 1893 until 1896, inclusive. It was then a new and gen- 
erally lawless district and he saw some hard service and had considerable experi- 
ence in the four years in which he filled the office but he succeeded in reducing law- 
lessness and crime to a minimum and many of his official acts have made history 
in that county. Perhaps his most important public service has been done as one of 
the river commissioners, appointed by the state government in 1909 for a term of 
two years. In that connection he was instrumental in securing an appropriation 
of fifty thousand dollars for opening up the Columbia river from Bridgeport to 
Kettle Falls. He worked, as a member of the commission for about a year and a 
half on the river, purchased the steamer Yakima and good equipment and in the 
meantime secured a one hundred thousand dollar appropriation from the govern- 
ment, with the understanding that the commission would loan the boat and its 
equipment for the service. This they did and in addition returned five thousand 
dollars to the government when the work was completed. Steamers are now run- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 241 

ning between the points named and the work of opening up the river has been of 
immense valae to the district. The accomplishment of this task is due to quite 
an extent to Mr. Valentine^ whose public spirit prompted him to give his time 
and effort to a work which he recognized as most essential in the development of 
the district^ affording cheap and excellent shipping facilities. 

In October, 1899, Mr. Valentine was married to Frances Scully, of Wenatchee, 
Washington, a daughter of William D. Reeder, an old soldier and pioneer of that 
country, and a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. The four children of 
this marriage are : Isabella, Etta and James, who are in school ; and Howard, at home. 
The family attend the Presbyterian church and Mr. Valentine is a member of the 
blue lodge of Masons at Waterville and of the shrine and consistory at Spokane. 

* 

He is also a member of the Spokane Lodge of Elks, No. 228. He has returned to 
Scotland for a visit to his old home, friends and family, but has the strongest at- 
tachment for the land of his adoption and its institutions, recognizing the fact that 
this is a land of opportunity where the road to usefulness and success is open to 
aU. A man should never be judged solely by what he has accomplished but also 
by the distance between his present position and his starting point. The record 
of Mr. Valentine viewed in this way shows his life of industry to be one indeed 
worthy of emulation, admiration and respect. Starting out as a boy at the anvil, 
he is today active in the control of many important projects which are factors in 
the progress and upbuilding of the northwest. 



SAMUEL H. FRIEDMAN. 

In a history of Spokane's self-made citizens, mention should be made of Samuel 
H. Friedman, who established his home here in 1890 and in the intervening years 
to the time of his death made steady progress in a business way, owing to his in- 
defatigable energy, his firm determination and keen sagacity. He was born in 
Illinois, January 14, 1865, and pursued his education in the public and high schools 
of Atlanta, that state, until he reached the age of fourteen years, when he became 
clerk in a general mercantile store. Gradually he worked his way upward and 
from his earnings saved such sums as he could each year until in 1887 he had ac- 
quired an amount sufficient to enable him to engage in merchandising on his own 
account. 

After three years, however, he disposed of his interests in the middle west and 
came to the Pacific coast, settling in Spokane, where he established a loan business. 
In 1891, in company with P. E. Fisher and A. J. Reise, he purchased the Cascade 
Laundry, then a small plant with only a few employes and but one delivery wagon. 
The business prospered, however, and grew steadily. They not only controlled a 
large portion of the trade of this city and surrounding district but also established 
branch offices in many of the towns of eastern Washington and Idaho and were 
given the patronage of the dining and sleeping cars of the Great Northern Rail- 
road Company. Mr. Friedman was ever alert and watchful, carefully guarding the 
interests of his business, and his reliable methods and the excellent work which 
^W8 turned out by his establishment constituted the chief forces in its success. He 
^''W an enterprising, progressive man, possessing the determination and energy 



242 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

needful for upbuilding and maintaining a large business undertaking. He became 
one of the trustees of the Spokane Laundry Association and was a member of the 
executive conunittee of the Oregon & Washington Interstate Laundry Association. 
He continued actively in business until his death. 

In Atlanta^ Illinois^ on the 19th of November^ 1884^ Mr. Friedman was mar- 
ried to Miss Lillie M. Reise^ a native of that town and a daughter of Augustus J. 
and Elizabeth (German) Reise^ who were both natives of Germany and on com- 
ing to America settled in Atlanta^ Illinois, the father devoting his life to farming 
in that part of the state. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Friedman was bom a daughter, Helene 
E., now the wife of W. Lament Barnes of the Fidelity Bank. 

The death of Mr. Friedman occurred on the 28th of August, 1904. Fraternally 
he was prominently identified with the Masonic order, holding membership in 
Tyrian Lodge, No. 96, F. & A. M., the Royal Arch chapter and the council, and he 
was also a life member of the Spokane Amateur Athletic Club. His political 
allegiance was given to the democratic party and he took an active and helpful 
interest in the welfare of the city. He was one of the best known men of Spokane 
and all who came in contact with him recognized that he was most kindly in spirit. 
His genial disposition won him the love of many and his well spent life proved that 
success is ambition's answer. 



CHARLES H. MERRIAM. 

In the practice of law and in the field of real-estate operations Charles H. 
Merriam has won more than local recognition. He is closely associated with the 
work of upbuilding the west and yet he has never been so busy with his individual 
interests that he could find no time for cooperation in military affairs or public 
projects. He is now giving much of his time to a railway project which if com- 
pleted will mean a valuable asset in the opening up and development of the great 
region lying between Portland and Spokane. The entire width of the continent 
separates Mr. Merriam from his birthplace, for he is a native of Maine, bom No- 
vember 10, 1859. He was reared to manhood in that state and in the acquirement 
of his education completed a high-school course and afterward spent three years 
in study in the University of Maine. In 1 887 he went to Fort Robinson, Nebraska, 
where he served as assistant mechanical engineer for a time, and then proceeded 
to Fort Laramie, Wyoming, where he served as chief mechanical engineer until 1 889. 
That year witnessed his arrival in Spokane where he entered upon the study of 
law under the direction of his brother, Willis H. Merriam. A few years were de- 
voted to a further course of reading and in 1891 he was admitted to the bar of 
Washington. He entered upon the active work of the profession and was steadily 
building up a good practice in Washington and Idaho, when his labors were inter- 
rupted by his service in the Spanish-American war. With the outbreak of hostili- 
ties between this country and Spain he enlisted in Company A of the First Regi- 
ment of Washington Volunteers, leaving Spokane on the 80th of April, 1898. 
He was mustered into the service on the 9th of May and on the 28th of October, 
left San Francisco for Manila, where he arrived on the 2d of December. He was 
stationed in the Paco district of Manila and on the 19th of January, 1899, was 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 243 

transferred to Company h, participating with that command in all of the engagements 
of the First Washington^ his services being characterized by faithfulness and valor. 
He received special mention from Colonel WhoUey and also a written recommenda- 
tion for a commission in the volunteer service^ in recognition of the distinguished 
aid which he had rendered at the capture of Pateros on the 14th of March, 1899. 
He was one of eight who brought boats up the Pasig river in the face of a murderous 
fire for the purpose of conveying the remainder of the command across, and assisted 
in making the crossing, the regiment being under fire all the time. 

With the other members of his company Mr. Merriam was mustered out No- 
Tember 1, 1899, at San Francisco, whence he made his way to Spokane and resumed 
the practice of law. He reached this city on the 6th of November and in January, 
1900, was appointed deputy county clerk under James L Drain, afterward adjutant 
general of the state. He continued in that office until January 15, 1901, when 
he formed a partnership with Charles F. Uhlman under the firm name of Uhlman 
& Merriam for the conduct of a real-estate business. In that connection he was one 
of the organizers of the railroad company known as the Spokane & Columbia 
River Railroad Company, of which he was elected secretary-treasurer. They ob- 
tained the water-power site now being improved by the Washington Water Power 
Company near La Prey bridge, known as Long Lake. Later Mr. Merriam sold 
his interest for Eve thousand dollars. Since then he has largely been connected 
with the mayor's office, especially with Herbert C. Moore, acting in the capacity 
of his private secretary. He was also clerk for two terms in the state legislature, 
both in the house and the senate. Mr. Merriam has always been prominently iden- 
tified with the republican party and has been a popular campaign speaker, doing 
much to further the interests of the organization. He is now particularly active 
in connection with the development of Spokane and the Inland Empire, doing 
everything in his power to promote the welfare of this portion of the country. At 
the present time he is laboring earnestly to promote the electric railway enter- 
prise, involving in the neighborhood of eight million dollars. If the project is car- 
ried out successfully it will mean the expenditure of twenty million dollars and 
will connect Spokane and Portland. In the meantime he continues in the practice 
of law and in his real-estate operations and is interested also in promoting an irriga- 
tion project in connecticAi with the railway project. He is likewise interested in 
mining and is engaged in the development of a gold and silver property on Palmer 
Mountain, Okanogan county, Washington. 

On the 1st of May, 1901, in Jackson, Michigan, Mr. Merriam was united in 
marriage to Miss Katherine Westren, a daughter of Philip D. and Elizabeth 
Westren, the former a farmer of Jackson. They now have one child, Jennie E. 
Merriam, bom May 22, 1902. Mr. and Mrs. Merriam hold membership in St. 
Matthew's Episcopal church, in the work of which he is much interested. He is 
a member of the church club, is chorister of the church and is a licensed lay reader 
under the bishop. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which 
he has filled all of the chairs, and is now a past grand. He also belongs to Gen- 
eral Charles King Camp of the Spanish War Veterans and at one time served as 
chaplain but has resigned. His preliminary military experience came to him be- 
fore the Spanish-American war for prior to going to the Philippines he had been 
appointed captain of Company G, of the Second Regiment of the National Guard 
of Washington, serving with that rank until he resigned in order to remove to 



244 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Idaho and practice law. He is also affiliated with John A. Logan Camp^ No. i, of 
the Sons of Veterans^ of which he has served as past captain. He likewise holds 
membership with the Eaiights of Malta and the Junior Order of United American 
Mechanics. In politics he has always been an active republican^ giving loyal sup- 
port to the party in his efforts to secure the adoption of its principles which he 
deems most conducive to good gpovernment. His activities and interests have thus 
covered a broad field and have been especially effective factors in promoting the 
interests of the community and the state along many lines. He is a man of marked 
enterprise^ laboring earnestly in behalf of whatever he undertakes^ and his sound 
judgment^ guiding his indefatigable industry^ brings to successful conclusion many 
of the projects with which he is associated. 



MARK WOOD MERRITT. 

Notable among the proprietors of heavy landed interests in Washington is Mark 
Wood Merritt, of Rosalia, Whitman county, now living a life of comparative re- 
tirement. He was bom in Pike county, Missouri, October 4, 1854, his parents be- 
ing Thomas and Susan (Suddreth) Merritt, both natives of Virginia. The Merritt 
family is of French origin, the grandfather, Nicholas Merritt, and the great-grand- 
father both having been born in France. The latter took part in the Revolutionary 
war and the grandfather, who settled in Maryland, was a soldier in the War of 
1812. 

Mark Wood Merritt was educated in the common schools of Pike county, Mis- 
souri, and pursued his studies until 1878, when he devoted his entire time to as- 
sisting his father in the work of the farm, thus continuing until 1877. In that year 
he rented a farm in Missouri and continued farming on his own account in that 
state until the spring of 1882, when he decided to remove to Whitman county, Wash- 
ington. After arriving in this state he settled two miles east of Rosalia where he 
took up one hundred and sixty acres of government land and from time to time in- 
creased his holdings until he now possesses eight hundred acres in that community. 
He also owns twenty thousand and eighty acres in Douglas county, Washington. 
He has given a great deal of attention to the raising of stock, his specialty being 
the breeding of fine horses of which he owns one hundred and fifty-three head. 
During his active career as a horse breeder he achieved a national reputation hav- 
ing sold his horses in all parts of the United States. Another important branch of 
his farming activity was dairying, his operations along that line being quite exten- 
sive. Beside the heavy landed interests Mr. Merritt possesses, he is also a director 
of the First National Bank of Rosalia, a director in the Rosalia Telephone Com- 
pany and a director and the president of the Rosalia Supply Company. 

Mark Wood Merritt was married to Miss Edna Wells in Pike county, Missouri, 
in 1878. She is a daughter of William E. and Martha (McCoy) Wells, both na- 
tives of the state of Missouri. To this union were born four children: Henry, re- 
siding in Whitman coimty, who is married and has two sons; Martha, the wife of 
Allen McClaine, of Pearl, Washington, and the mother of two daughters; Richard, 
yet at home; and Jesse, who died at the age of nineteen years. 



M. W. MERRITT 



I,* *-• — — -»• - -- — " •— *^ 



. - i . •' i'. t^ 1 1 



Lj 



— - _^ «(r' 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 247 

The political allegiance of Mr. Merritt is given to the democratic party ^ for 
the measures and candidates of which he always casts his vote and he has held the 
office of road supervisor for eight years. He also takes a great interest in educa- 
tional matters^ having been a member of the local school board for twelve years. 
Fraternally he is a member of the Masonic order and of the Woodmen of the World. 
He is also active in his membership in the Commercial Club of Rosalia. 

Prime factors which have conduced to the attainment of Mr. Merritt's unusu- 
ally prosperous and useful business career have been his great business ability^ his 
ontiring industry^ his habits of economy and the wise direction and management 
of the properties which he began to accumulate comparatively early in Ufe. He 
started out in the business world single-handed and alone to carve a career which 
logically followed as the result of his own well directed efforts along business lines. 
He had the courageous spirit in abundance and was not afraid to make investments 
which his common sense and intuition told him would prove profitable. He reveled 
in work^ took a keen interest in the management of his business affairs and gave 
unflagging attention to all the details which a business life entails. After serving 
his community and in fact the district at large in the useful ways outlined above 
Mr. Merritt has been enabled at a comparatively early time in life to retire from 
the active and more onerous duties which he followed long and successfully. In 
return he is now enjoying life, surrounded by an extensive circle of warm personal 
and business friends among whom he has always been held in the highest esteem 
and regarded with the greatest respect. " 

< • . . ■ 



* 4 



* 

Developing business conditions have made commercial training a necessity. In 
this age when everything is done with a rush and where rapid and accurate results 
must be obtcuned in order to meet competition each individual should be thoroughly 
qualified for the duties which devolve upon him, and to meet the need for thoroughly 
trained help the commercial college has been established. Today the Northwestern 
Business College of Spokane is regarded as one of the foremost educational institu- 
tions of the northwest and as its president Mr. Higley has given to this section of 
the country a school of particular merit. He has lived in Washington for fourteen 
years, having come to Spokane in 1897. He was then a young man of about 
thirty years of age, his birth having occurred in St. Charles, Minnesota, November 
24, 1867. His parents were Francis M. and Maria E. (Chamberlain) Higley, of 
that dty, where his father conducted business as a hardware merchant save that 
at the period of the Civil war he res]K>nded to the country's call for aid and served 
at the front with Brackett's Battalion of the Fifth Iowa Cavalry. He passed away 
many years ago, but the mother of our subject is still living. 

As a public-school student of Minnesota, Miles M. Higley passed through con- 
secutive grades until he became a high-school student and later he attended the 
Gem City Business College of Quincy, Illinois. Recognizing the need for busi- 
ness training among the young people of the country, he went to Marinette, Wis- 
consin, where he opened a commercial school, which he conducted with gratifying 
success from 1889 until 1897. In the latter year he sold out and came to Spokane, 



248 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

thinking to find a still broader field of labor in this rapidly growing section of the 
country. He purchased the Northwestern Business College from its founder, E. 
H. Thompson, and inmiediately began to reorganize and build up what is uniformly 
conceded today to be the best business college in the northwest. In 1899 the com- 
pany was incorporated with Mr. Higley as president and general manager and 
Clinton P. Brewer as secretary. The faculty now numbers ten instructors, day 
and evening classes are maintained and there are three distinct courses of study. 
Their attendance numbers about seven hundred pupils each year, coming to them 
from the Dakotas, Montana, Oregpon, Idaho, Washington, Oklahoma and British 
Columbia. It is estimated that the college is the means of bringing from one hun- 
dred and fifty thousand to one hundred and seventy-five thousand dollars to Spo- 
kane each year. The system of instruction is most thorough and graduates are 
qualified to take up responsible positions in the business world. Already many of 
their students are making for themselves creditable names and positions as factors 
in the commercial life of this and other cities. 

On the 19th of April, 1897, Mr. Higley was married to Miss Mae F. Shields, 
of Marinette, Wisconsin, a daughter of Charles £. and Josephine (Wilson) Shields, 
of that city. They were pioneer residents of the Badger state, where Mr. Shields 
was engaged in the lumber trade. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Higley have been born a 
daughter and a son, Florence Lucille and Warren, who are with their parents 
in a beautiful suburban home which stands on a block of fourteen acres at Glenrose. 
Its hospitality is proverbial and its good cheer is enjoyed by their many friends. 
Mr. Higley is greatly interested in the welfare of Spokane, proof of which is found 
in his earnest cooperation with the various projects and plans of the Chamber of 
Commerce for the upbuilding of the city. He belongs to the Rotary Club and to 
Imperial Lodge, No. 134, I. O. O. F., but is perhaps best known ou^tside of bis col- 
lege connections in the Masonic fraternity, his membership being with Spokane 
Lodge, No. 84, A. F. & A. M.; Spokane Chapter, No. 2, R. A. M.; Spokane 
Council, No. 4, R. & S. M.; Cataract Commandery, No. 8, K. T. ; Oriental Con- 
sistory, No. 2, A. A. S. R.; and El Katif Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. He has 
ever held to high ideals in the conduct of the college and has the ability to inspire 
pupils and teachers with much of his own zeal and interest in the work. 



MARTIN B. CONNELLY. 

That the life record of Martin B. Connelly should find place oh the pages of 
Spokane's history is due to the fact that he has been greatly interested in the 
upbuilding of the Inland Empire and has taken an active part in many projects 
and measures relating to its welfare and improvement. He is numbered today 
among the most successful real-estate men and financiers of this section, accom- 
plishing what would be the crowning work of a life of much greater duration 
than his. He is now chairman of the board of directors and the vice president of 
the Washington Trust Company and is officially connected with a number of the 
more important corporations of the city. He was born in Portage, Wisconsin, 
October 15, 1862, a son of Patrick and Honora (Quinn) Connelly, both of whom 
were natives of County Galway, Ireland. The father, who was a railroad con- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 249 

tractor, died in 1867 and the mother passed away in 1892. The other members 
of the family in addition to Martin B. Connelly are: Patrick H., who is now in- 
terested in mining in Australia and makes his home at Sydney; and Bridget, who 
is the wife of Patrick A. Geraty, of La Crosse, Wisconsin. 

Martin B. Connelly pursued his education in the public schools of Wisconsin 
and Minneapolis, supplementing the work of the grades by the high-school course, 
afterward receiving instruction in two business colleges — the La Crosse and the 
Curtis Business College of Minneapolis. For a year and a half he engaged in 
reading law in Minneapolis and at the age of nineteen years he became inter- 
ested in real-estate dealing in that city, since which time he has continued to 
handle property both on his own account and for others. He remained in the 
real-estate business in Minneapolis for five years, within which time he platted 
^\e additions to the city. He also operated extensively in property in Minnesota, 
the Dakotas and Wisconsin and in January, 1889, he arrived in Spokane, where 
he connected himself with Arthur D. Jones. He was afterward alone for a time 
and later was joined by R. L. Webster in a partnership that was continued under 
the firm name of M. B. Connelly & Company, Inc. Operations were carried on under 
that style until 1902, when Mr. Connelly, J. Grier Long and R. L. Webster in- 
corporated the Washington Trust Company, merging the business interests of 
Mr. Long, who became vice president and treasurer, and Mr. Webster, who be- 
came secretary, while Mr. Connelly naturally assumed the duties of president of 
the Washington Trust Company and so continued until January, 1911, when he 
resigned and took charge of the board of directors, also becoming vice president. 
Mr. Long succeeded to the position of president and treasurer and Mr. Webster 
still remains as secretary. In addition to its other interests the company has 
operated . extensively in real-estate, principally in business properties and in their 
care and management. They also conduct a general insurance and loan department 
and have made for themselves a most prominent position in financial circles. Mr. 
Connelly has been interested in th^ construction of a number of large business blocks, 
their rental and management, and is interested as an officer and director in several 
investment companies. He is also the vice president and a director of the Union 
Savings Bank, the president of the Security Investment Company, vice president 
and director of the Washington State Realty Company, a stockholder in the Penn 
Mortgage Investment Company, a director and manager of the Guardian Invest-, 
ment Company treasurer and director of the Washington National Life Insurance 
Company, a director in the Fidelity Building & Loan Association of which he 
was president until he resigned, the treasurer and director of the Riverside Park 
Company, and treasurer and director of the Lincoln Investment Company. The 
value of his services and of his judgment in these different connections is widely 
recognized, for it is well known that his plans are carefully formulated and are 
executed with dispatch. 

On the 20th of June, 1900, in Seattle, Mr. Connelly was united in marriage 

• 

to Miss Emma M. Patton, a native of Pennsylvania, and unto them have been 
bom three children, James Bartley, Margaret Amanda and MarUia Josephine. 
Mr. Connelly gives his political indorsement to the republican party but has 
neither time nor inclination for active political service. He is, however, a mem- 
ber of several of the leading social organizations of the city, including the Spo- 



250 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

kane Club^ the Spokane Country Club and the Spokane Athletic Club^ of which 
he is a life member. In Masonry he has attained the thirty-second degree of the 
Scottish Rite in the consistory and has become a noble of El Katif Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine. His name is also on the membership rolls of the Knights of 
Pythias order and he belongs to the Chamber of Commerce. In this and other 
connections he has labored effectively and earnestly for the welfare and upbuild- 
ing of Spokane and the Inland Empire and takes an active interest in civic mat- 
ters^ supporting every public movement looking toward improvement and pro- 
gress. What he says he will do^ he does. Men regard his spoken word with as 
much respect and faith as they do his written contract and the success that he 
has achieved and the results which he has accomplished indicate that he is able 
to pass judgment upon many vital questions^ especially concerning real-estate and 
financial problems. Such a record cannot but' inspire admiration^ for it is notable 
even in this country of large and important undertakings. 



WALKER L. BEAN. 



Walker L. Bean who has been closely associated with commercial and other 
business interests and is now giving his attention to real estate^ specializing in 
business properties, was bom January 28, 1862, at Waukesha, Wisconsin. His 
father. Walker L. Bean, Sr., was born January 11, 1832, in Chesterfield, New 
York, and became a Wisconsin pioneer. The family to which he belonged is of 
Scotch descent and was represented with the Continental troops in the Revolution- 
ary war. Walker L. Bean, Sr., became a lieutenant in the Civil war, serving with 
the Twenty-eighth Wisconsin Infantry, and died at Columbus, Kentucky. Our 
subject had one uncle, Irving M. Bean, who was a captain in the Civil war, and 
another uncle. Colonel Sidney A. Bean, who was killed in the battle of Baton Rouge. 
The family, as indicated, has a most creditable military record, loyalty ever hav- 
ing been one of their marked characteristics as manifest in active duty and unfalt- 
ering courage on the battlefield. 

The mother of our subject bore the maiden name of Elizabeth J. White. Her 
people were of English descent and some of her ancestors fought for liberty in the 
Revolutionary war. Mrs. Bean was born in Windsor, Vermont, and died in Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin, in January, 1911. Following the death of her first husband, 
Mrs. Bean had become the wife of Rev. Thomas G. Watson, a pioneer minister 
of Spokane, of the Presbyterian faith. He erected the old church where the Re- 
view building now stands and was one of the most prominent divines in this sec- 
tion of the country, being held in highest respect by all, regardless of creed or 
religious belief. He died in October, 1908, but the impress of his individuality 
still remains upon those who came under his teaching. 

Walker L. Bean supplemented his public-school education by a course in Car- 
roll College at Waukesha, Wisconsin, where he was graduated in 1882. He was 
interested in the stories which reached him concerning the west, and, believing 
this to be the land of promise and of opportunity, he came to Spokane in 1883 and 
opened the first large grocery store of the city. He made the trip on the first 
passenger train over the Northern Pacific Railroad from the east and his store 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 251 

was the first up-to-date grocery in the first brick building of Spokane. He also 
has the distinction of having shipped the first groceries ever sent by railroad to 
Spokane from the east. Prior to the building of the line everything had to be 
sent by way of San Francisco. His shipment found a ready and liberal patronage 
and it was not long before Mr. Bean was enjoying a large ^nd profitable trade. 
Later he extended his operations into other fields^ becoming associated with S. 
G. Haverhill in building the first oatmeal mill ever erected in the west, its location 
being on Howard street, just across from the Echo mill. His next undertaking was 
in tiie real-estate business, in which he engaged about 1887. He has since continued 
to deal in properties and at one time was associated with Henry W. Augustine un- 
der the firm name of Augustine & Bean, but most of the time has been alone, con- 
ducting his business under the style of Walker L. Bean & Company. Mr. Bean 
was associated with D. T. Ham and Henry W. Augustine in the ownership of the 
Rookery block for a number of years but at length that property was sold and in 
connection with Mr. Ham he purchased the Lindelle block, sixty by one hundred 
and eighty feet and four stories in height, on a double comer at Washington, River- 
side and Sprague streets. Mr. Bean has largely engaged in dealing in business 
properties, including warehouse properties, and he owns and handles much vacant 
business property. He is thoroughly informed concerning realty values and has 
made judicious investments for himself as well as for others. 

On the 28th of January, 1886, in Murray, Idaho, Mr. Bean was united in 
marriage to Miss Kate Hussey, a daughter of Warren Hussey, at that time a 
banker of Murray, Idaho. The four children of this marriage are: Margaret, 
who is a graduate of Smith College; Warren H., who after graduating at Cornell 
engaged in farming in Alberta, Canada; and Dorothy and Kathryn, who are at- 
tending school. 

In his political views Mr. Bean is a republican but is not active. He has never 
sought oflSce but in different ways has contributed to the upbuilding and improve- 
ment of the city, especially during the critical period when many grew faint hearted 
regarding the future of Spokane. He became a charter member of the Spokane 
Club but afterward withdrew. He belongs to the Chamber of Commerce and is 
interested in its varied projects for the welfare and upbuilding of the city. He 
is a member of the Young Men's Christian Association and is serving on its edu- 
cational committee. In all matters pertaining to the advancement of Spokane his 
work has at all times been characterized by a spirit of helpfulness and guided by 
practical judgment so that the results achieved have constituted salient forces to 
that end. 



CARL HUGO JABELONSKY. 

Carl Hugo Jabelonsky, an architect of Spokane, who is a splendid example 
of the men of foreign birth who have found in the new world business conditions, 
that have enabled them to develop and utilize their powers and talents, and thus 
win success, was born in Sweden, April 10, 1879. His parents, Anders and Elsa 
(Akesson) Jabelonsky, were also natives of that country, where they still reside, 
the father being a retired railroad man. The three brothers and three sisters of 



252 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Carl H. Jabelonsky are Nels, Olaf, Arwid, Elsa, Hedwig and Hanny, all residing 
in Sweden. 

Spending his youthful days in the land of his nativity^ Carl Hugo Jabelonsky 
was educated in the Malmoe School of Technical Trade^ from which he was grad- 
uated in 1897^ receiving the degree similar to that of civil engineer in the United 
States. During the summer he pursued his studies and until 1899 was employed 
through the remainder of the year by the city and harbor department of Malmoe 
as draftsman and assistant engineer. From April until September^ 1899^ he was 
engineer with the Olands New Cement Company, in charge of the harbor works 
and buildings, and at the latter date entered upon the study of engineering works 
in Europe, to which he gave his time until the succeeding May. From February, 
1901, until January, 1905, he was draftsman and designer and was in charge of 
structural steel contracts for J. B. 8c J. M. Cornell Company, of New York City, 
having come to the United States at the former date. In that connection he had 
charge of the buildings of the navy department in the Charleston Navy Yards, 
superintended the steel construction for the Metropolitan Railroad Company of 
New York at Yonkers, had charge of the steel work for the New York Chamber 
of Commerce and also superintended the steel construction of a number of the 
sky scrapers of the metropolis, including buildings twenty-two stories in height. 
His work also was done in connection with a number of leading apartment houses 
and manufacturing plants. For three months he was with Thomas Edison de- 
signing the steel structure for his cement plant, and from February, 1905, until 
June, 1906, was with the Westinghouse, Church 8c Kerr Company, engineers of 
New York city, designing a number of buildings, both steel and reinforced con- 
crete, especially manufacturing plants. 

From June, 1906, until January, 1907, Mr. Jabelonsky was with the New 
York Central Sc Hudson River Railroad and designed a number of buildings for 
the corporation, including roundhouses and warehouses, also bridges, working in 
both steel and reinforced concrete construction. He was afterward, from Jan- 
uary until August, 1907, with the General Electric Company at Pittsfield, Massa- 
chusetts, as assistant engineer in charge of the drafting room, and designed a 
number of steel and reinforced concrete manufacturing buildings. At the latter 
day he was promoted, remaining with the company until February, 1908, with 
headquarters at Schenectady, New York, as architectural engineer in charge of 
the preliminary layout for the proposed plant at Erie, Pennsylvania. This plant 
when completed will cost thirty million dollars. For four months Mr. Jabelonsky 
was temporarily assigned to the American Concrete Steel Company at Newark, 
New Jersey, in order to study and acquaint himself with the latest methods in 
concrete building construction. 

In May, 1908, Mr. Jabelonsky came to Spokane and his first work was as 
superintendent of construction on the Washington Mill, the plans for which were 
made by Architect Robert Sweatt. Mr. Jabelonsky then opened an office of his 
own as architect and engineer, and has designed a number of the large and smaller 
buildings in Spokane and tributary territory. He was the designer of the Hotel 
Majestic, which was erected at a cost of one hundred thousand dollars; the Hoban 
building, a six-story structure costing twenty-two thousand dollars; the Reiff 
building, at thirty thousand dollars; two buildings for ^Ir. Goldberg, costing fifty 
thousand dollars; the Dooley block, at twenty thousand dollars; and the Spokane 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 253 

Soda Bottling Works costing forty thousand dollars. He has also designed ahout 
fifty residences in Spokane and vicinity. He was associated with Mr. Goodwin 
who built the Castle Hill Manor for B. M. Francis, and did extensive landscape 
architecture and construction of street and part systems for the Castle' Hill Land 
Company. At the present time* he has in hand a number of important construc- 
tions and, in addition to his extensive architectural, engineering and building 
operations, he is interested in mining properties in British Columbia, including 
the Morning Bell and Golden Scepter. 

On the 1st of August, 1908, Mr. Jabelonsky was married to Miss Thyra 
Elizabeth Gunhilda Osterberg, a daughter of Carl Osterberg, a business man of 
Sweden. They belong to the Swedish Lutheran church and their home, which they 
own, is a hospitable one, its good cheer being greatly enjoyed by the many friends 
whom they have gained during their residence in Spokane. Mr. Jabelonsky is a 
republican and is identified with several organizations in Spokane, especially those 
in which his fellow countrymen hold membership. He is now the secretary 
of the Swedish American League, is chairman of the finance committee of the 
Scandinavian Brotherhood of America and is an associate member of the American 
Society of Civil Engineers. He also belongs to the American Society of Swedish 
Engineers and is a fellow of the Spokane Architect Club. He has gained promi- 
nence and renown in his profession, his ability, placing him in an enviable posi- 
tion as is indicated by the importance of the work he has done in both the east and 
the west. His thorough training in Sweden, his study of engineering problems 
in the different important cities of Europe and his long experience in America have 
well qualified him for the important and onerous professional duties which devolve 
upon him. 



RONALD A. GREENE, M. D. 

Dr. Ronald A. Greene, a well known physician specializing in his practice in 
the treatment of the eye, ear, nose and throat, was born at Salt Lake City, Utah, 
April 27, 1877. His parents were John and Olivia (Anderson) Greene, both 
natives of Sweden. The father came across the plains in the '50s, settling at Salt 
Lake City, where he engaged in business as a contractor and builder. He repre- 
sented a prominent family of his native country and possessed many of the sterling 
characteristics of the Swedish j>eople. His death occurred in Salt Lake City in 
August, 1911, when he had reached the age of eighty years, and his wife passed 
away there in April, 1911, at the age of eighty. In addition to Dr. Greene, the 
members of their family were: Oliver B. and George E., both of whom are resi- 
dents of Salt Lake City; Emma, the wife of J. F. Bledsoe, also of Salt Lake City; 
and Jennie, the wife of J. C. Alter, of the same city. 

After pursuing his studies in the high school of his native city, Dr. Greene 
completed his more specifically literary course in the University of Utah, while his 
professional training was received in the Northwestern University Medical School 
of Chicago, from which he was graduated M. D. in 1901. He added to his theoretical 
training the benefit of a year's connection as house surgeon of the Illinois Eye and 
Bar Infirmary of Chicago and afterward became one of the instructors in Rush 



254 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Medical College of that city on diseases of the eye and ear. He likewise was one 
of the teachers of the Northwestern University Medical School^ treating diseases 
of the eye, ear and nose. He spent some time at the Chicago Polyclinic and 
his continuous study, reading and practice promoted his knowledge and skill. Re- 
turning to Salt Lake City, he there remained for five years and in December, 1909, 
came to Spokane, where he has since practiced. During his first year in Salt Lake 
City he was in partnership with Dr. J. C. E. King, the health commissioner, and 
served as his assistant in office. He specialises in the treatment of diseases of the 
eye, ear, nose and throat and has done much important hospital work, being now 
oculist and aurist to the Spokane Orphanage ; a member of the medical staff of the 
Children's Home ; and consulting nose and throat specialist of the Spokane Tuber- 
culosis Sanatorium. He is likewise a member of the teaching staff of the Sacred 
Heart Hospital and he belongs to both the county and state medical societies of 
Washington and also the Pacific Coast Oto-Opthalmological Society. 

In Salt Lake City, in May, 1904, was celebrated the marriage of Dr. Greene 
and Miss Louise Rowe, a daughter of W. H. Rowe, formerly assistant superintend- 
ent of the Zion Cooperative Mercantile Institution and also president of the Bear 
River Valley Irrigation project. He was director general of the Utah exhibit at 
the Alaska- Yukon Exposition and was a very prominent and influential resident 
of Salt Lake and one of its pioneers. He is descended from English ancestry. The 
two children of Dr. and Mrs. Greene are Phillip Burkland and Ronald Rowe, six 
and four years of age respectively. 

The Doctor is an independent republican and is a valued member of various 
organizations. He has held office and is a member of all the different branches 
of the Odd Fellows society and is now a captain in the Patriarchs Militant He 
also belongs to the Moose, the Woodmen of the World, the Scandinavian Brother- 
hood of America, and to the Chamber of Commerce. He holds membership in the 
Young Men's Christian Association and in the Manito Presbyterian church, of 
which he is an elder. He has always been a worker along lines that have been 
factors in character building. His purposes and ideals of life have ever been 
high and in his profession he has ever worked toward advanced ideals, progressing 
ever toward the goal of perfection. His professional labors have ever had a strict 
scientific basis, which he has been able to apply with intelligence and substantial 
results to the needs of his patients. 



JOHN RAYMER. 



John Raymer, banker and merchant, has contributed in substantial measure to 
the business development and growth of Reardan and at the same time has been an 
active factor in political circles, honored with election to the office of representative, 
while in his home community he has been continuously in office since the organisa- 
tion of the town. He was born in Calhoun county, Michigan, June 15, 1856, and is 
a son of Peter and Mary (Bates) Rajnner, both of whom were natives of New York, 
whence they removed to Michigan where the father followed the occupation of 
farming. 



JOHN RAYMER 







;. , 



J. ' ' i i.i^ L.A D :\ j-i 1> I 






SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 257 

John Raymer spent his early youth in his parents' home^ attending the public 
schools of Calhoun county^ Michigan^ but at the age of fifteen left home and sought 
employment in the lumber camps of the northern part of the state. That he was in- 
dustrious and faithful is indicated by the fact that he warked for one company for 
seven years and for four- years he served as foreman. In 1884 he came to the west 
with Seattle as his destination and after remaining there for a short time made his 
way to Vancouver Island. He next went to Spokane and in December, 1885, re- 
moved to Davenport, where he engaged in farming for a year or two. On the ex- 
piration of that period he turned his attention to the lumber business which he fol- 
lowed north of Davenport, and in 1888 he purchased a half interest in a sawmill 
which he afterward removed to north of Mondovi. In 1890 he sold that business 
and came to Reardan, where in partnership with O. A. Menger he opened the first 
hardware store in the town. The enterprise prospered and after four years Mr. 
Raymer purchased his partner's interest, conducting the business alone. In 1901 
he erected the present large brick building which he now occupies and he has also 
built three warehauses and extended the scope of his commercial activities by add- 
ing to his store a line of furniture. His establishment is one of the best equipped 
and the largest in the county and in addition to its conduct Mr. Raymer figures 
prominently in financial circles as a stockholder and director of the Reardan Ex- 
change Bank, while in 1911, following the death of Mr. Moriarty, he was elected 
president of that institution. In 1906 John Raymer with several other gentlemen 
organized the Chamokane Lumber Company, of which he serves as president. This 
company owns sixteen thousand acres of land in Stevens county and a sawmill in 
Lincoln county. His business interests are thus of a character that contribute 
krgely to general progress and prosperity as well as to individual success. 

On the 4th of May, 1 892, occurred the marriage of Mr. Ra3nner and Miss Hattie 
Latham, a native of Canada, and they have four children, Norman, John C, Nelson 
and Elisabeth. The parents are widely and favorably known in Lincoln county and 
Mr. Raymer is regarded as a valued member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows in which he takes an active part. His political allegiance is given to the demo- 
cratic party and in 1900 he was elected on its ticket to represent Lincoln county in 
the house of representatives where he served for one term. That he has the con- 
fidence and good-will of his fellow townsmen is indicated by the fact that he has 
continuously served in the city council since the organisation of the town. He has 
been a liberal subscriber to all enterprises and a generous supporter of all public 
movements of his town and county and has thus maintained an even balance in his 
life with his well directed business affairs which have made him one of the most suc- 
cessful men in Lincoln county. 



HON. EDWIN H. ESHLEMAN. 

This is preeminently the age of the young man. Business conditions and 
public affairs call for the enterprise, energy and determination of the young, and 
college training has given them the knowledge which should accompany other 
<IQalities and which trains the mind for a ready selection of that which is es- 
sential, vital and valuable. Possessing the requisite qualities for leadership. 



258 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Edwin H. Eshleman has made for himself a notable position in business circles 
and has become recognized as one of the political leaders of the Inland Empire, 
being the present representative of his district in the state legislature. In Spokane 
he is operating extensively in real estate as the president of The Eshleman-Burr 
company, and the story of his activity and his rise is an interesting one. He was 
born at Washington, D. C, November 8, 1878, his parents being Edwin M. and 
Emma L. (Hansell) Eshleman. His father, formerly of the United States coast 
survey is now living retired in Washington, D. C. His wife was a daughter of 
Emerick W. Hansell, who was with Secretary of State Seward on the night of his 
attempted assassination. Mr. Hansell was stabbed in defending Mr. Seward. 

Edwin H. Eshleman received his education in Washington, D. C, but with the 
outbreak of the Spanish-American war he put aside his text-books and enlisted 
as a member of Company K, First Maryland Volunteers, with which he served for 
about eight months, when the command was mustered out. Entering business, 
circles, he became an employe of the Wood-Harmon Company, the largest real- 
estate operators in the United States, and after some time spent in their service 
came to the west with the determination to help build up the rich, yet undevel- 
oped country. Today he is recognized by his friends and many clients as an 
empire builder, having taken active and helpful part in the development of this 
section of the countrv. When he left New York he became associated with The 
Jacob-Stine Company, of Portland, Oregon, as their sales manager. This com- 
pany does an enormous real-estate business and is known as one of the largest 
firms operating on the Pacific coast, but realizing the immense possibilities and 
the opportunities in Spokane, Mr. Eshleman determined to locate in this city and 
for a brief period was identified with The Fred B. Grinnell Company. All this 
time he was actuated by the desire and hope of one day engaging in business on 
his own account and, feeling that his experience was now sufficient to justify him 
in his step, he organized the business which is now conducted under the name of 
The Eshleman-Burr Company. The present partners in the business are among 
the youngest men who as proprietors are operating in the real-estate field of Spo- 
kane today. They have displayed many of the methods of the pioneer, in that they 
have initiated new ways and methods for conducting the business. The Spokes- 
man-Review wrote of them: 

"Since the inception of this company perhaps there are no two young men in 
Spokane who have shown more marked ability in thfe real-estate field. They are 
the type of men who attempt great things and make good, accomplishing more in 
the short space of time they have been in business than they really anticipated." 

It has been the business of The Eshleman-Burr Company to handle large real- 
estate projects in Spokane, and they have always been chary in the propositions 
they have offered the people, seeing to it that nothing but the most meritorious 
projects were sold through their offices. Among the local additions which this 
firm has been successful in selling to the investing public are West Kenwood, 
Irvington Heights, North Audubon Park, Mount Pleasant and numerous others 
which have proved to be property worthy of investment for the reason that in 
the short space of time that has elapsed since, values in all these additions have 
rapidly increased to the benefit of those who purchased these properties. 

It goes without saying that the great success attained by this firm is due not 
only to the integrity, fairness and ability to select property that would be profit- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 259 

able for the people to buy, but their progressive methods and businesslike way of 
transacting deals has played an important part in bringing them to the front as 
a real-estate corporation that is now classed among the best by the most con- 
servative people in the northwest. 

Their labors have been a most effective element in the upbuilding and im- 
provement of the northern section of the city, where they are now handling Mount 
Pleasant, having within a very short space of time sold their lots to the value of 
more than one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. They have ever made it their 
role to handle only such tracts as include the improvements. These improve- 
ments include cement sidewalks, parking strips, graded streets, curbing and city 
water. Purchasers do not hesitate to determine upon a location where such im- 
provements have been or are being made and the firm always holds to the rule 
that they will handle property of no other class. The Eshleman-Burr Company 
have met with continuous success in their operations. Their business today has 
reached extensive proportions and the success which has come to the firm is but 
the merited reward of persistent, earnest labor, unfaltering energy and progres- 
sive methods. 

On Christmas day of 1899, in Alexandria, Virginia, was celebrated the mar- 
riage of Mr. Eshleman and Miss Mary McGinley, daughter of Patrick McGinley 
and Kathrine McGinley, nee Worthington, a granddaughter of George D. Worth- 
ington, the first colonial governor of Florida. Mr. and Mrs. Eshleman now have 
two children, Edwin M. and Dorothy Lee. He belongs to various fraternal and 
social organizations, having become a member of Columbia Lodge, No. S, A. F. 
&. A. M., in Washington, D. C, and of the Elks lodge in Elmira, New York. He 
also belongs to the United Spanish War Veterans, and in Spokane his membership 
is in the Inland Club and the Spokane Amateur Athletic Club. He has been 
particularly prominent during his residence here as a member of the Chamber of 
Commerce, serving on a number of iis most important committees, including the 
membership committee. It was largely due to his activity that the chamber se- 
cured larger quarters, and his efforts have been equally effective in accomplishing 
its purpose of making known the possibilities and opportunities of the city and 
surrounding country, and of promoting the upbuilding and improvement of Spo- 
kane. Mr. Eshleman is also recognized as a leader in the republican ranks in 
the Inland Empire and in November, 1910, was elected a member of the state 
legislature. His study of vital questions and issues of the day has been compre- 
hensive and as a member of the state legislature he stands loyally in support of 
legislation which he deems of essential worth to the commonwealth. 



WESLEY C. STONE. 



The commercial interests of Spokane find a worthy and well known represent- 
ative in Wesley C. Stone, who is conducting a large and profitable drug business 
in this city. He also has other business interests, being president of the People's 
Inrestment Company and a director of the Land Title Savings Bank. He was 
lH>m in Cazenovia, New York, September 13, 1860, a son of Lafayette Stone, who 
Was also a native of the Empire state and died in 1908. He traced his lineage 



260 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

back to the early settlement of Connecticut and was of English descent. On the 
distaff side Wesley C. Stone also comes of English ancestry^ although the family 
was founded in America in colcmial days and sent representatives to the Revolu- 
tionary war. The maternal gprandfather was a resident of New Jersey but was liv- 
ing in New York when his daughter^ Maria Wilson^ who became the wife of 
Lafayette Stone^ was bom. She died in 1873^ leaving but three children^ the 
surviving daughter being Lucy, now the wife of Myron Drury, of Oswego, New 
York. 

The son, Wesley C. Stone, spent his youthful days in his native town and was 
educated in Ac Casenovia Seminary and in the Oswego State Normal School of New 
York and Cornell University. At the age of eighteen years he entered upK>n the pro- 
fession of school teaching, which he followed until forty years of age. For three 
years he taught in the rural schools of the Empire state and then entered upon graded 
school work at Fulton, New York. He afterward became principal of the schools of 
Oswego Falls, New York, and later went to Theresa, New York, where he was prin* 
cipal of the Union Free School for three years. 

Mr. Stone dates his residence in Washington from 1890, when he arrived at 
Cheney at the opening of the normal school at that place. He became one of its 
teachers, at which time its faculty numbered but four. This was the first normal 
school in the state and Mr. Stone was elected vice principal in 1892, serving for Bvt 
years or until 1897, when the school was temporarily closed for a year because of 
lack of funds. Mr. Stone then came to Spokane and engaged in the drug business 
but in 1 898 resumed his school work, spending three years as a high-school teacher. 
He then again entered the drug trade in Spokane and now has a well equipped and 
well appointed establishment at No. 424 Sprague avenue. He has never ceased to 
feel a deep interest in the Cheney Normal School, which during its early history 
put forth a strenuous struggle for existence. At one time the faculty went eighteen 
months without pay. and Mr. Stone took an active part in the work of securing an 
appropriation for the school, which was finally accomplished. In the educational 
field he has contributed much to Washington's progress and was very active in the 
county and state teachers' associations, especially in the former, having a place on 
its programs for ten years as one of the instructors in Spokane. For the last twelve 
years he has successfully managed his drug business. He is recognized as a re- 
sourceful business man whose energy enables him to carry forward to successful 
completion whatever he undertakes. 

On the 15th of July, 1891, in Helena, Montana, Mr. Stone was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Emma Grigson, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Grigson, of Fulton. 
New York. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Stone were bom three daughters: Elsie, Ruth and 
Mabel, all high-school students. 

Mr. Stone belongs to the Druggists' Association of Spokane and is prominent in 
Masonry, holding membership in Spokane Lodge, No. 34, F. & A. M. ; in Spokane 
Chapter, No. 2, R. A. M.; Spokane Council, No. 4, R. & S. M.; Cataract Com- 
mandery. No. 3, K. T. ; and all of the Scottish Rite bodies up to and including the 
thirty-second degree. He has likewise crossed the sands of the desert with the 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine and in the different organizations he has filled many 
offices, being a past master of the lodge, past high priest of the chapter, past thrice 
illustrious master of the council and past eminent commander of the commanderv. 
In the state organisations he has also attained prominence and recognition, being 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 261 

a past grand master of the grand council^ while at the present writing he is grand 
high priest of the Royal Arch Masons. In the moral progress of the commmiity he 
is also deeply interested^ being an active worker and faithful member in the St. Paul's 
Methodist Episcopal churchy of which he served for several years as president of 
the board of trustees. For a period of three years he served as a valued member of 
the board of education. His influence has been strongly felt along lines leading to 
the material^ intellectual and moral progress of the city and he seems at all times 
imbued with the spirit of enterprise which is the foundation of the marvelous history 
of the northwest. 



HENRY W. NEWTON. 



Henry W. Newton is engaged in the general insurance loan and real-estate busi- 
ness as a member of the Guernsey-Newton Company, Inc. He is likewise very 
prominent in musical circles, nor have his efforts been withheld from those projects 
which are helpful factors in the city's progress and improvement. His activity 
along these various lines renders him a valued and representative resident of Spo- 
kane and in all things he manifests a public-spirited devotion to the general good. 
The width of the continent separates him from his birthplace, which was a farm 
in South Carolina, his natal day being August 22, 1869. He is a son of Larkin and 
Roth M. (Wellborn) Newton, both of whom were natives of South Carolina and of 
En^sh descent, the latter, however, representing one of the old families of Vir- 
ginia. The Newton family was founded in the United States when this country 
was still numbered among the colonial possessions of England. Larkin Newton 
was prominent in his home locality and took an active part in educational work and 
in politics. He was a farmer and lawyer and was known as Major Newton because 
of his early connection with the local militia organization. Afterward he enlisted 
for service in the Confederate army, in which he was a cavalry officer. He died in 
1890 and was long survived by his wife, who passed away in 1909. In their family 
were the following named: Dr. J. C. C. Newton, D. D., Ph. D., now of Kobe, Japan; 
Marion, a farmer of Pendleton, South Carolina; Josephus, who is engaged in the 
newspaper business, covering all the southeast for a publishing house of Nashville, 
Tennessee; Mrs. Olivia Evatt, who is a widow and resides in Columbia, South Caro- 
lina, where she is teaching in the Columbia Orphanage School; Lulu, the wife of 
Henry Martin, a prominent farmer and merchant of Pickens county. South Caro- 
lina; and Henry W., of this review. 

The last named spent the first twenty years of his life on his father's farm with 
the usual experiences that fall to the lot of the farm boy. He completed his literary 
education in the Honea Path Academy of South Carolina with the class of 1890 
and was liberally educated in music in Chicago and New York, where he studied 
voice, developing the splendid talents with which nature endowed him. Mr. Newton 
first made his way west of the Mississippi when in 1891 he became a resident of 
Kansas City, where he engaged in the piano business. In 1894 he went to Chicago, 
where he conducted a similar enterprise. While associated with the Weber piano 
people he pursued the study of music, thus developing his native talents. After 
three years' residence in Chicago he disposed of his stock in the piano business of 



262 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

the McDonald, Newton Company and took up the profession of voice culture. In 
addition he became well known as concert singer and choir director, having charge of 
the music of St. James Methodist church, the leading church of that denomination 
in Chicago. He was also director of the vocal department of the Wesleyan Meth- 
odist College at Bloomington, Illinois. 

Mr. Newton's identification with the northwest began in 1903, when he settled 
in Idaho and joined his father-in-law, O. E. Guernsey, in the mining business in 
the Seven Devils district on Snake river, a property in which Mr. Guernsey was 
interested, with headquarters at Lewiston. Mr. Newton established a 'mortgage 
loan business for his father-in-law and later extended the scope of the undertaking 
by opening real-estate and insurance departments. The business was organized 
under the name of the Lewiston Loan & Trust Company, Inc., Mr. Newton becom- 
ing vice president with Mr. Guernsey as president. Five years later they sold 
out and removed to Spokane, seeking the broader field of labor offered in this city. 
Here they have operated under the name of the Guernsey-Newton Company and 
conduct a general insurance, loan and real-estate business. In the insurance field 
they represent the Royal of Liverpool, the Scottish Union and National of Edin- 
burgh, Scotland, the Colonial of Hartford, Connecticut, the Philadelphia Under- 
writers, the Maryland Casualty Company, the Fidelity Deposit Company of Balti- 
more, and are general agents for eastern Washington and northern Idaho for the 
two last named. They make real-estate loans in the Inland Empire under the 
direction of Mr. Guernsey and the various branches of their business are growing 
and returning substantial profit. Mr. Guernsey remains as president of the com- 
pany with Mr. Newton as vice president and general manager, J. Riley Chase, 
treasurer, George H. Schafer, secretary, and Daniel Morgan, trustee. The busi- 
ness is capitalized for twenty-five thousand dollars and they have gained a good 
clientage during their connection with Spokane. 

Mr. Newton is deeply interested in all the various plans and projects for the 
development and upbuilding of this section of the country. He has studied the 
problems which Washington must solve because of climatic and soil conditions and 
is taking an advanced stand upon many important questions. He served as the 
executive chairman of the board of governors for the state of Washington for the 
fifth international dry congress held in Spokane in October, 1910, on which occa- 
sion there were present delegates not only from all sections of the United States 
but also from twelve or fourteen foreign countries. An active member of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce, he has served on the entertainment and membership committees 
for three years. He was chairman of the city beautiful committee, which did 
splendid work resulting in the one million dollar bond issue for city parks, succeed- 
ing A. L. White in this position. He has indeed been a cooperant factor in the 
work for Spokane's development and improveinent and in all that he does is actuated 
by a spirit that none questions. His political allegiance is given to the republican 
party but without desire for office. 

On the 4th of April, 1903, in Dubuque, Iowa, Mr. Newton was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Grace Guernsey, a daughter of O. E. Guernsey and an accomplished 
musician and pianist who is a graduate of the Mount Vernon Seminary of Wash- 
ington, D. C. She finished her education by travel, covering Europe, Mexico and 
Canada. Her musical tastes constitute a bond of sympathy and interest between 
Mr. and Mrs. Newton in addition to their many other phases of congenial com- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 263 

panionship. They have ane son, EUery Willis Newton, now six years of age. Mr. 
Newton is well known in Masonic circles, having taken the thirty-second degree in 
the Scottish Rite, and is also a member of the Mystic Shrine. He likewise belongs 
to Elks Lodge, No. 228, of Spokane, to the Spokane Club and the Inland Club. He 
was reared a Methodist. He holds a prominent position in musical circles in Spo- 
kane, as he has done in other cities where he has made his home, and contributes his 
services as musical director of a chorus of male voices, now in its third year, known 
as the Mendelssohn Club. His public activities and his prominence in musical 
circles constitute an even balance to his business life, making his a well rounded 
character and constituting him a man of broad, liberal and progressive interests. 



FRED C. KIELING. 



Fred C. Kieling, who is now living retired in Chewelah, has been a resident of 
Washington for forty-four years, during which period he has been associated with 
various activities. He was bom in Germany on the 4th of August, 1846, and is a 
8on of Albert C. and Johanna (Frohlich) Kieling, both of whom are now decease^, 
the father having passed away in 1887 and the mother in 1893. 

During his boyhood and youth Fred C. Kieling lived in the vicinity of Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin, where he worked on a farm and attended the district schools 
until he had attained the age of fifteen years. In 1863 he went to Michigan and 
worked in a sawmill for a short time, after which he returned to Wisconsin and 
enlisted as a drunmier boy in the Forty-fifth Wisconsin Infantry, receiving his 
discharge in July, 1865. After spending a few months in Chicago and Milwaukee 
he went to Leavenworth, Kansas, apprenticing himself to the butcher's trade. In 
April, 1866, he again started westward, crossing the plains to Washington, and 
locating at Walla Walla in the fall of that year. During the succeeding two years 
he farmed and freighted, except during the winter months of 1 867 and 1 868, 
when he had charge of the postoffice at Snebly Bridge^ eight miles north of the 
present city of Spokane. The duties of this position were not arduous as the 
country was but sparsely settled and the mail which was carried on snowshoes and 
horseback was largely composed of letters. When he first located near Spokane 
there were only about six other white settlers between Hangman creek and Rath- 
drum, these being "Stonewall" Jackson on Moran Prairie ; Charles Kindle at Rath- 
drum ; Bob Dper, Jack Fisher and Joe Harron, this side of Post Walls ; Old Camille, 
a French Canadian. In the spring of 1868 he removed to Colville, remaining there 
for ^ve years. During that time he worked for the man who had the government 
meat contract, drove cattle for a Mr. Oppenheim and for a time served as deputy 
treasurer. In 1871 he filed on a homestead and his entire time and attention was 
devoted to its cultivation during the period of his residence in 1873-74. Removing 
to Colville later, he became associated with a friend in filling a government meat 
contract for four years, following which, in the spring of 1878, he engaged in 
freighting flour from Colville to the soldiers at the post at Lapawa, Idaho. 

In 1880 Mr. Kieling was elected sheriff and assessor of Stevens county and 
after discharging the duties of these offices for four years he returned to his farm, 
continuously residing there until 1904, when he disposed of it and moved to 



264 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Chewelah. Here he engaged in the meat business until 1909 when he withdrew 
from the more active interests of life and has ever since been living practically re- 
tired^ simply giving his attention to the supervision of his perscmal affairs. Min- 
ing operations have always largely engaged the attention of Mr. Kieling^ who is in- 
terested in the Windfall Mining & Milling Company and the Rattle Snake Min- 
ing & Milling Company. 

On the 28d of January^ 1871^ Mr. Kieling was united in marriage to Miss 
Rubina A. Brown^ a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Brown of Chewelah^ her 
mother having been the first white woman in' Stevens county. Mr. Brown came to 
the Colville valley in 1854 from the Red River of the North in Canada^ taking up 
a homestead just north of Addy. At that time Mrs. Kieling was only three years 
old. Mr. Brown and fifteen others volunteered and joined Colonel Wright in Spo- 
kane. Three children were born unto Mr. and Mrs. Kieling: Albert^ who mar- 
ried May Bunker, now deceased, and has one child, Harold H. ; Ellis H., who chose 
for his wife Mamie Elfris and also has one son, Kenneth £. ; and Calvin F., who 
married Elva E. Alkier and has one child, Morris C. 

The family affiliate with the Congregational church, and Mr. Kieling belongs 
to the Grand Army of the Republic, while his political support he gives to the 
democratic party. He is not only one of the pioneers of Stevens county but of the 
state of Washington, which has developed from little more than a wilderness into 
one of the nation's great commonwealths during the period of his residence. 



WILBUR SIMPSON YEARSLEY. 

Wilbur Simpson Yearsley, vice president of the firm of Ham, Yearsley & Ryrie, 
has been a resident of Washington for the past nineteen years, during the greater 
portion of which time he has been identified with the business interests of Spokane. 
He is a native of Pennsylvania, his birth having occurred in Westtown township, 
Chester county, on the 22d of April, 1866, his parents being Washington and Jane 
(Lewis) Yearsley. In both lines he is of Quaker extraction, his father's family 
having emigrated to America in 1684, as members of William Penn's colcmy, while 
his maternal ancestors came to this country from Wales during the early colcmial 
days. His mother, who celebrated the seventy-ninth anniversary of her birth on 
the 10th of September, 1911, is now a resident of Spokane and makes her home with 
her son at 2017 Mallon street. 

Wilbur Simpson Yearsley was educated in the public schools of his native town 
and later for a time studied at Woralls Academy at West Chester, Pennsylvania. 
He then took a course in the Pierce Business College at Philadelphia, from which 
he was graduated in 1886. He began his business career in a general merchandise 
store at Westtown and while there he devoted his spare hours to reading law under 
the direction of Alfred P. Reid, of West Chester. For six years he was identified 
with various occupations but still continued his law studies, being admitted to the 
Chester county bar in June, 1892. On the 1st of the following July he came to 
Spokane as examiner for the Pennsylvania Mortgage Investment Company, being 
retained here in that capacity until 1905. When this company retrenched, follow- 
ing the panic of 1893 and 1894, he was located at Colfax, this state, where he had 



WILBUR S. YEARSLEY 



' "> 






SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 267 

charge of the business in Whitman and Garfield counties and also that of Latah 
and Ne« Perce counties^ Idaho. Two years later, in 1897, his duties were in- 
creased by the addition of the business of Yakima, Kittitas, Adams and Franklin 
comities, Washington, all of which he cleared up in 1899 and turned it over to the 
Spokane office. For two years thereafter he engaged in the land and loan business 
on his own responsibility but in 1901 he became associated with D. T. Ham and 
C. L. Hoffman and together they organized the Palouse Land Company, which they 
operated until 1906. In August, 1907, together with David J. Ham, Donald Ryrie 
and Shirley S. Philbrick he incorporated the company of Ham, Yearsley, Ryrie & 
Philbrick for the purpose of a general investment business but in 1908 Mr. Phil- 
brick retired to look after personal business. Since then the firm has been conducted 
under the name of Ham, Yearsley & Ryrie, with D. T. Ham, president; Wilbur S. 
Yearsley, vice president; K. Murray, secretary; and D. Ryrie, treasurer. They do 
;: general fire, liability and indenmity insurance business and they also handle land, 
loans and investments and collectively and individually they are financially iden- 
tified with various local enterprises. Mr. Yearsley has quite extensive interests and 
at the present time is president of The Inland Empire Paper Company, vice presi- 
dent of The Liberty Lake Land Company and International Power Company, while 
he is also president of The Industrial Development Company and The Klickitat Co- 
lombia River Irrigation Company. He is one of the enterprising and progpressive 
business men of the city and is meeting with excellent success in his various under- 
takings. ,. ^», ;■.: 

Political activities have alway&'ibQgag^ ;mir<^h;oi the attention of Mr. Yearsley, 
although he has never been an office seeker, and his support is given to the den^o- 
cratic party. He was on the democratiic ,€;lepto]ral tidcet of this state during the 
Palmer and Buckner campaign an4wMe*i>eisiding in Whitman county he was chair- 
man of the democratic central committee. Fraternally he is identified with Thomp- 
son Lodge, F. & A. M., of eastern Pennsylvania, and his connection with organiza- 
tions of a more purely social nature is confined to his membership in the Spokane 
and Inland Clubs of this city. Mr. Yearsley has never married and makes his 
home at 2017 MalloB street. He is an enthusiastic admirer of the northwest and 
has unlimited faith in the marvelous possibilities it offers, commercially, industri- 
ally and agriculturally, owing to its many natural advantages and the spirit of en- 
ergy that characterises its citizens. He avails himself of every possible opportu- 
nity to advance its interests by championing every progressive movement inaugurated 
in Spokane and giving his cooperaticm to forwarding the development of the various 
public utilities. 



WILLIAM MULHALL. 



William Mulhall, a member of the real-estate firm of Mulhall Brothers, whose 
offices are located at No. 110 Stevens street, Spokane, was bom in Grundy county, 
Illinois, in 1862, and is a son of James and Ann (O'Leary) Mulhall. The father 
was a well known farmer and stockman of Illinois until 1890, when he removed to 
Wa, and there he passed away in December, 1902. 



V«L m— 14 



268 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

The preliminary education of William Mulhall was obtained in the common 
schools, following which he pursued a course in Bryant & Stratton Business Col- 
lege at Chicago. After his graduation from this institution he went to Iowa, where 
he began his business career as head of the real-estate department o( the Bank of 
Northwestern Iowa at Alton, that state. He was identified with this concern for 
three years, and then removed to Rock Valley, Iowa, where he was associated with 
others in the organization of the Farmers' Bank of Rock Valley, of which his 
brother John was president and he was cashier. This became one of the well es- 
tablished and flourishing banking institutions of the county, and Mr. Mulhall was 
identified with it during the succeeding fifteen years. At the expiration of that 
period he disposed of his interest and resigning his position went to Sioux City 
and once more engaged in the real-estate business. He continued in this line at 
that point for three years, and at the end of that time, in 1902, he came to Spokane, 
and has ever since made this city his home. During the first nine years of his resi- 
dence here, Mr. Mulhall devoted the greater part of his attention to the develop- 
ment of his fine stock ranch, on Camas prairie, Idaho, in the vicinity of Grangeville. 
He has two thousand acres of land there and is breeding and raising thoroughbred 
horses, cattle and hogs. On the 1st of August, 1911, Mr. Mulhall together with 
his sons, Emmet and Earl, organized the real-estate firm of Mulhall Brothers, and 
they are making a specialty of Camas prairie lands and farm loans. Although 
they have only been engaged in business for a few months, their prospects are prom- 
ising and they have already put through several important deals. 

In September, 1888, Mr. Mulhall was united in marriage to Miss Ida Pardon, a 
daughter of John Pardon of Andover, New York, and to them have been born four 
children: Emmet L., who was bom in 1889; Earl A., whose birth occurred in 1890; 
Agnes M., born in 1895; and William P., Jr., who was born in 1902. The family 
home is located at No. 1200 Grand boulevard, this city, where they have a very 
comfortable and attractive residence. Fraternally Mr. Mulhall is identified with 
the Knights of Columbus. 



LINNEUS LINCOLN WESTFALL. 

While engaged in the general practice of law at Spokane Linneus Lincoln West- 
fall has specialized to some extent in patent litigation, and in this connection has 
secured a large clientele. He was born in Macomb, Illinois, April 5, 1865. His 
ancestry is traced back to one of the old New York families whose establishment 
in America antedates the Revolution, in which representatives of the name took 
part. The family came originally from Westphalia, now a part of Germany, and 
the surname was originally spelled Westphal, but was changed to conform to the 
English spelling. His father. Dr. Beverly R. Westfall, was born in Troy, New 
York, and died in Spokane, August 3, 1889. He devoted his life to the profession 
of medicine and enjoyed a large practice. He came to Spokane in 1883 and during 
his residence here served as councilman from the fourth ward. With remarkable 
foresight he recognized the possibilities for the building of a large city here and 
while a member of the council offered a resolution to buy the water power for two 
hundred thousand dollars, which would have included all of the holdings of the 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 269 

present Washington Water Power Company. His resolution was defeated, how- 
erer, because other members of the council contended that it would bankrupt the 
dty. Soon after his arrival Dr. Westfall purchased property on North Monroe 
street and he said that if Spokane would purchase the water power a city would 
be developed that would reach from the hill on the south to Little Baldy on the 
north. Had his plan been carried out Spokane would have been richer by many 
millions of dollars, but unfortunately he could not convince his colleagues in the 
council that his ideas were of practical value. During the Civil war he organized 
a company in Illinois for service at the front and was chosen its captain, but on ac- 
count of the serious illness of one of his sons he had to resign and did not go to 
the front. He married Ellen E. Hays, who was born in Kentucky and died in Illi- 
nois in 1883. She was of Irish descent although the family was planted on Ameri- 
can soil prior to the Revolutionary war. In the family were five sons and two daugh- 
ters: Frank C, a farmer at Twin Falls, Idaho; Ralph B., a farmer at Prosser, Wash- 
ington; Leland D., a nurseryman of Portland, Oregon; Linneus L., of this review; 
Hugh H., proprietor of a cafe in Denver, Colorado; Sarah S., the wife of Dr. F. M. 
Martin, of Maryville, Missouri; and Myra, the wife of William Hayes, of Los 
Angeles, California. 

In the common schools Linneus Lincoln Westfall began his education and after- 
ward attended the Illinois Normal School and Business College at Macomb. He 
pursued the study of law in the office and under the direction of C. F. Wheat, of 
that city, teaching school a portion of the time as he preferred earning his own way, 
and was admitted to the bar in Illinois in August, 1887. "In February, 1888, he left 
the middle west and came to Spokane and on the 12th of that month opened an office 
on Monroe street near the courthouse on the north side. In the great fire of 1889 all 
of the law offices save his were destroyed. He remained at his original location 
until 1890 when he removed to the south side and occupied an office in the center of 
the city. In the meantime he did a great amount of office work and record search- 
ing until after the street car system was installed and he removed his place of busi- 
ness to the south side of the river. He has always practiced alone and while he 
continues to engage in general practice he has to some extent specialized in patent 
litigation. He has also given considerable attention to real-estate law and titles, 
representing a number of corporations, and is owner of an interest in the Guaranty 
Title Company. His work is largely along technical lines for real-estate and patent 
litigation turn more to the scientific and technical sides of law practice. He greatly 
enjoys this phase of the profession. Mr. Westfall is a member of a society the 
members of which investigate, study and keep in touch with the latest development 
of psychic nature, the laws suggested thereby and their application to physical and 
mental healing, deriving conclusions from actual experimental work in connection 
with the hjrpothesis laid down by Hudson and other scientific writers. 

During the early days before Spokane had a paid fire department Mr. Westfall 
was president of the Washington Volunteer Hose Company No. 8, and was thus 
serving at the time of the great conflagration of 1889. The company had only three 
hand hose carts at that time and were working with a part of the hose when a num- 
ber of men came along and took off the balance of the hose and their cart ai^d they 
never saw them again. The men of the company realized that they were working 
at a hopeless task as very little water was obtainable, but still they kept on fighting 
the fire until the end, unwilling to admit defeat. The fire could have easily been 



270 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

put out by one of the chemical engines now owned by the city. The townsmen had 
no idea of the danger before them until they saw the blase j .mp to the dome of the 
Pacific Hotel and when that was ignited it seemed as though a current of air sprung 
up that was on a line from the original fire to the dome of the hotel and then drew 
the flames down to the business section. Mr. Westfall retained his membership with 
the company until a paid fire department was established. 

He holds membership with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Woodmen of the World and in the latter has filled all of the chairs and was twice in- 
terstate delegate^ serving in the convention which was held in Colorado in 1908 and 
again at Los Angeles in 1905. He belongs also to the Inland Club and to the Cham- 
ber of Commerce and at one time was a director of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation. In his political views Mr. Westfall is a republican^ actively interested in 
the party and its success^ and has frequently been a delegate to the city and county 
conventions. He has also served on both city and county conunittees and has fre- 
quently delivered campaign addresses in behalf of his party. 

On the 2d of October^ 1890^ in Spokane^ was celebrated the marriage of Mr. 
Westfall and Miss Adelaide Mickel^ a daughter of Judge P. D. Mickel, a prominent 
attorney of Spokane and at one time attorney for the city of Sp(Jcane, but now de- 
ceased. He came to this city in 1886 and was a representative of an old New York 
family of German descent. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Westfall have been bom two chil- 
dren, Elbert L. and Ethel B. The f anally attend the Presbyterian church, of which 
they are members. Thoroughness has always characterized him in every re l ation 
of life, enabling him in his school days to lay a good foundation for his future suc- 
cess. In his preparation for the bar he studied diligently and mastered the great 
basic principles of jurisprudence. The same quality has characterized him in all 
of his professional service, making him one of Spokane's able and successful law- 
yers, particularly prominent in the field of his special lines. 



DAVID BEMISS. 

Along with the rapid development of Washington in a material way, through 
the utilization of its natural resources and the establishment and conduct of im- 
portant business enterprises, there came an equal desire for advancement in educa- 
tional lines. The state was largely settled by an intelligent, progressive and enter- 
prising class of citizens from the east who recognized the value of intellectual 
training and called to the schools of the state men of marked capability and e£Bciency 
in educational work. Among this number was David Bemiss, who for ten years 
was superintendent of the Spokane schools, which he largely raised to the high 
standard of excellence now maintained. 

He was a native of Ontario, Canada, bom January 8, 1840, and his parents 
were Orrin and Phebe (Crawford) Bemiss, natives of New York. The father 
was a farmer by occupation and to his son afforded excellent educational oppor- 
tunities, which were improved to good advantage. David Bemiss remained a pupil 
in the public schools until seventeen years of age, when he entered upon the pro- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE ' 271 

fession of teaching, ^'year later he became a student in an academy with inten- 
tion to prepare for cidtege^ and in 1861 he matriculated in Toronto University, 
from which he received his Bachelor of Arts degree upon graduation with the 
class of 1865. The following year he won his Master of Arts degree and also the 
silver medal in natural science. Throughout his entire life he was connected with 
educational work. On the completion of his university course he was called to the 
saperintendency of the public schools of Clinton, Michigan, where he remained 
for four years. During the succeeding year he was a teacher at Birmingham, that 
state, and was then elected superintendent of the city schools of Coldwater, Mich* 
igan. During his incumbency in that position the standard of education was raised 
until the right of certification was accorded these schools by the University of 
Michigan — ^a privilege never extended to any but institutions of the highest rank. 
Not only were Mr. Bemiss' labors felt as a progressive intellectual force in the 
towns mentioned but also constituted an element for educational advancement 
throughout the state, for he became distinguished as an institute worker and lec- 
turer and in 1877-8 was president of the Michigan Association of City School Su- 
perintendents — A position that indicated the high regard entertained for his ability 
by his coworkers. In 1878 he became superintendent of the public schools of 
Manistee, Michigan, which also improved under his supervision until they became 
affiliated with the University of Michigan. He continued there as sui>erintendent 
and as a member of the board of education Cor nine years and in 1887 accepted the 
saperintendency of the schools of Fort Scott, Kansas, where he remained for two 
years. 

On the expiration of that period Professor Bemiss resigned to come to Spokane 
and during the decade between 1889 and 1899 labored indefatigably to place the 
schools of this city on the highest possible educational plane. He was constantly 
studying out new methods to improve the schools and add to their efficiency in 
preparing boys and girls for the responsible duties of later life. He introduced 
many valuable measures and plans in connection with the schools and also exerted 
a powerful and beneficial influence in the educational development of the state. 
Thoroughness and ability marked his career and he continued one of the chief ex- 
ponents of high standards of scholarship until his death. Two years before his 
demise, however, he retired from active connection with the profession and in much 
needed rest spent his remaining days upon his farm near the dty. His standing 
in professional circles was indicated by the fact that he was appointed by the State 
Teachers Association to organize a state reading circle, of which he for a time 
served as president. He was also a member of the state board of education and 
served as president of the Washington State Teachers Association. He became 
a member of the national council of education, an organization of sixty members, 
including leading educators from all parts of the United States. His reputation 
in his profession was by no means local. He was regarded as one of the ablest ex- 
ponents of the public school system of the country and he had the power to inspire 
others with something of the same zeal and interest which actuated him in his work. 

In Canada, in 1 866, Professor Bemiss was united in marriage to Miss Phebe M. 
Page, a native of Canada, and unto them were bom four children: Catherine M. ; 
Dr. C. D. Bemiss, a prominent dentist of Spokane, who married Miss Mary Craw- 
ford, of Spokane, by whom he has two children, Richard C. and Catherine C. ; El- 



272 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

bert V. Bemlss^ who is engaged in the box manufacturing business in Spokane ; and 
Florence R. 

Death severed the family circle when on the 16th of February, 1902, Professor 
Bemiss was called from this life. He had never been remiss in the duties of citizen- 
ship but always kept well informed concerning the questions which were of vital 
and significant interest to city, state and nation. He was an active republican and 
he was equally earnest in his support of the First Presbyterian church, in which 
he served as an elder. In his own home he was a most hospitable host, ever friendly 
and courteous, yet possessing that dignity which forbade undue familiarity. He 
enjoyed travel, which was to him a means of rest and recreation, and it is almost 
needless to say that many of his most pleasant hours were spent in his library in 
association with men of master minds of all ages. While his intellectual superior- 
ity placed him above the great majority of his fellows, there was in him neverthe- 
less an abiding human sympathy that kept him in close touch with his fellowmen 
and won him the confidence, good will and honor of all who knew him. 



HARLEY LEWIS HUGHES. 

» 

Harley Lewis Hughes, editor of the Labor World and widely known as a lead- 
ing socialist of the northwest, was born in the Willamette valley of Oregon on the 
10th of June, 1871. His father, William C. Hughes, of Irish descent, was a native 
of Missouri and is now living in Thornton, Whitman county, Washington, where be 
follows the occupation of farming. He became one of the pioneers of the north- 
west, making his way from Missouri across the plains to Oregon in 1854. He mar- 
ried Rosella Matoon, who was born in Indiana and was brought across the plains 
when only a year old, her parents casting in their lot with, the early settlers of Ore- 
gon in 1855. Mr. and Mrs. William Hughes became parents of three sons and a 
daughter. The brothers of our subject are Hosea D. and Charles M., both of whom 
are farming at Thornton, and the sister is Maud C, the wife of W. C. Baker, a 
grain merchant and farmer of Thornton. 

In the public schools of Whitman county Harley Lewis Hughes pursued his edu- 
cation prior to entering Colfax College, and when his school days were over he be- 
came connected with the newspaper business in St. John, Washington, where he 
remained for six months. He afterward conducted the first newspaper in Harrison, 
Idaho, called the Harrison Ensign, there remaining for a year, after which he be- 
gan the publication of the Silver Star at Gem, Idaho. His next newspaper venture 
was in the publication of the Idaho State Tribune at Wallace, Idaho, and from 
1896 until 1900 he was editor and publisher of the Basin Progress, at Basin, Mon- 
tana. He eventually left the newspaper field to become identified with other busi- 
ness pursuits but in 1906 entered into active connection with the well known Labor 
World of Spokane. In 1901 he was a reporter on the Spokesman Review and in 
1902 and 1903 was organizer for the American Labor Union. In December of the 
latter year he established a printing business in which he became associated with 
Coates Brothers in August, 1906. In the previous March he was engaged by the 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 273 

labor organizations of Spokane to manage and edit the Labor World and has since 
poblished that paper, conducting business under the firm name of Coates, Hughes 
& Coates. He ever stands in support of the many rather than the few and believes 
in a more equal division of labor and responsibility and of the wealth that accrues 
from labor. 

Mr. Hughes' close study of the political, social and economic questions of the 
day has led him to become identified with the socialist party in the work of which 
he takes an active interest, being frequently a delegate to its city, county and state 
conventions. He was also the first candidate of the socialist party for mayor in 
Spokane, being nominated in 1902, and he was a member of the third legislature of 
the state of Idaho in 1905-6. 

On the 3d of August, 1 898, Mr. Hughes was married at Basin, Montana, to Mrs. 
Emma A. Howe, nee Axtell, a daughter of Dr. Axtell, of Troy, Pennsylvania. They 
have twin sons, Harry and Edwin, who are attending school. Mr. Hughes is well 
known in a number of fraternal organizations, being prominently identified with 
the Eagles and a member of the grand aerie. He was also worthy president of the 
Spokaiie Aerie and has been twice district grand worthy president. He likewise 
holds membership with the Knights of Maccabees and tlie Ladies of Security. His 
interest in public affairs and his ready sympathy for the unfortunate are testified 
to by his membership on the Spokane Charities Commission. He has been a close 
and discriminating student of the questions of the day, of existing conditions and 
of the probable outcome of important issues, and his editorials which bear on the 
labor world have attracted widespread attention and have awakened earnest thought 
among his readers. 



G. G. RIPLEY. 



G. G. Ripley, who has been engaged in the general practice of law in Spokane 
since 1908, was bom in Iowa, March 27, 1876. His ancestors came from the north 
of Ireland in the early part of the seventeenth century and representatives of his 
family fought for the independence of the nation in the Revolutionary war. His 
grandfather served under General Winfield Scott and was a gunner on the Consti- 
tution in the War of 1812. 

His father, Elias Pinckney Ripley, was born in Rock Springs, Maryland, July 
21, 1887, and is now living in Spokane at the age of seventy-five years. He, too, 
has a creditable military record. He removed to Iowa in 1854 and, although he 
was injured in early life, he served under Adjutant General Baker in the Iowa 
Reserves and held the position of United States enrolling officer. He was also a 
zealous member and officer of the Union League. He entered upon the practice of 
law in Ackley, Iowa, and at one time was magistrate in Wright county, that state. 
He also served as postmaster for a number of years, his commission being signed 
by General Grant. He has made his home in the northwest since 1910 and is now 
enjoying a well earned rest in Spokane. In early manhood he wedded Mary E. 
Groff, who was bom in Illinois and is of Holland and French Huguenot ancestry, 
although early representatives of her family came to America prior to the Revolu- 
tionary war. Mrs. Ripley also survives and she and her husband are now com- 



274 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

fortably located in Spokane. In their family were two daughters: Lena, the wife 
of Walter W. Fox, a merchant of Iowa ; and Florine, the wife of Edwin Serverancc, 
a civil engineer of Montana ; while one son, Lloyd Glen, died at the age of eighteen 
years. 

G. G. Ripley, the only surviving son, attended the high school of Belmond, 
Iowa, and afterward the Iowa State Normal, where he won the degree of Bachelor 
of Didactics. He was afterward graduated from Dral^e University at Des Moines 
with the degree of LL. B. in 1902. He engaged in teaching school both before 
and after attending the Normal, devoting three years to the professicm. Later he 
became a traveling salesman and subsequently entered upon the practice of law, 
having been admitted to the bar in Iowa in 1902. He then practiced for a time 
in Belmond but came to Spokane in 1903 and in the intervening period to the pres- 
ent time has largely engaged in practice alone. While he is familiar with all 
branches of the law, he is specializing in equity and corporation work, representing 
a number of corporations. He also represents a number of mining companies and 
is familiar with the legal principles which bear upon this branch of practice. 

Mr. Ripley was united in marriage to Miss Clyde Estelle Shepherd, of Si>o- 
kane, a daughter of John and Josephine Shepherd, of Van Wert, Ohio, the former 
now deceased. Mrs. Ripley is a represeiltative of an old and prominent family 
of Kentucky and by her marriage she has become the mother of two daughters, 
Margaret Shepherd and Virginia Florine. 

The parents are of the Episcopal faith, holding membership in All Saints 
Cathedral, and Mr. Ripley belongs also to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has 
attained high rank, being a Consistory Mason and Mystic Shriner, as well as Knight 
Templar. He has served as an officer in various branches of the order and has 
also assisted in conferring the work. He likewise belongs to the Knights of Pythias 
lodge, the Young Men's Christian Association, Business Men's Association, the 
Inland Club — connections which indicate much of the nature of his interests and 
the rules which govern his life. He is an active member of the Republican Pro- 
gressive League and has represented his city and county in conventions. He also 
served as a member of the county central committee during the election of 1911, 
took an active interest therein and was one of the first to support Senator Poin- 
dexter. He is a man of resourceful ability, determined and energetic, and what 
he undertakes in any direction he accomplishes. He stands for that which is high- 
est and most serviceable in the activities which go to make up human existence and 
which are features of general progress and improvement and in his chosen pro- 
fession, wherein advancement is only secured through individual merit, he has 
worked his way steadily upward. 



ARTHUR D. JONES. 



Arthur D. Jones is the president of Arthur D. Jones & Company, the oldest 
as well as the largest real-estate firm in Spokane. He has been at the head of 
this institution continuously since 1887 and has built it up from one desk to one 
of the strong institutions of the city, occupying half of the ground floor space of 
the Arthur D. Jones building with an office entirely finished and furnished in im- 
ported mahogany. 



ARTHUR n. JONKS 



Ij 






\ 

i 



\ -— 



. *■ .' . S./A , ,0'.. J 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 277 

Mr. Jones was born in Michigan^ September 25, 1859, and was educated in 
the common schools and at the State College at Iowa City^ Iowa. After a short 
experience as a school teacher and solicitor for a magazine, he toolL a position 
with the advertising department of the Chicago Morning News, where he re- 
mained for five years until failing health brought him to Spc^ane. 

Since 1887 he has been closely identified with the development of the city 
and country both in conjunction with general public enterprises and through his 
own initiative. Conspicuous among the records of his work in Spol^ane are the 
derelopment of Hillyard, Richland Park, The Hill, Cannon Hill Park and a 
number of other additions in Spokane as well as suburban properties. His com- 
pany is - local agent for the United States Mortgage & Trust Company and The 
Mortgage Bond Company, of New York, and also loaning agents for two of the 
great New York life insurance companies. The business includes real-estate, 
rental, loan and bond departments, banks, etc. He is manager of numerous land 
companies in which he is financially interested and is a stock holder in four 
Spokane banks and in other enterprises. 

Mr. Jones was married December 25, 1887, to Miss Ada M. Stinson, and has 
two sons and one daughter. In politics he is a liberal republican, and, although 
he has been keenly interested in political affairs, the only office he ever held or 
tried for was that of city councilman for a three-year term. 

Mr. Jones literally grew up with Spokane. When he started in business in 
tliis city, his capital consisted of very little money and the city contained only a 
few thousand people. For over a quartev- of-a-e^tiH^ he has watched the city 
grow and assisted in its growing, ^nd lifs ow^f^drj^iln^S have prospered with it. 



1 "^ w • ' ' • 



JOHN AYtARD TINCH:- 

John Aylard Finch is the senior partner t>f the firm of Finch & Campbell, who 
have done more to develop the mining industry of the Inland Empire than any other 
firm in this district. He was bom in Cambridgeshire, England, May 12, 1854, a 
son of William and Sophia (Aylard) Finch, who came to the United States about 
1862 and for many years were residents of Cleveland, Ohio. A brother of our sub- 
ject, W. E. Finch, is also a resident of Spokane. In the parish school of Soham, 
Cambridgeshire, England, John A. Finch began his education but was only eight 
years of age when the family came to the United States and his studies were con- 
tinued in the public schools of Cleveland, Ohio. When his text-books were put 
aside he became connected with iron and steel manufacturing in Cleveland and after- 
ward continued in the same line of business at Youngstown, Ohio. Subsequently he 
Went to Montreal with an importing firm engaged in the importation of iron from 
England. He was next located in Chicago as manufacturers' agent, still continuing 
in the iron trade. In the spring of 1881 he determined to go to the west to enjoy 
what he believed would be better business opportunities than could be secured in 
the older and more conservative east. Accordingly he proceeded to Denver and 
afterward to Leadville, Colorado, where he remained for a year in mining. On 
the expiration of that time he returned to the iron business in Ohio but in the sum- 



278 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

mer of* 1887 came to Spokane and began to acquire mining property in the Coeur 
d'Alene region of northern Idaho in connection Mrith A. B. Campbell. 

As associates in mining enterprises Finch & Campbell purchased the Gem mine 
in the Coeur d'Alene district and then organized the Milwaukee Mining Company 
in connection with capitalist friends of Milwaukee and Youngstown, Ohio, Mr. 
Campbell becoming president and Mr. Finch secretary and treasurer of this com- 
pany. They operated the mine most successfully for more than twelve years and 
in 1891 began the development of the Standard mine, which they opened and 
equipped. Later they opened the Hecla mine, both of which have paid several 
millions in dividends and are still being operated and are paying handsome divi- 
dends. Mr. Finch became secretary and treasurer of both, with Mr. Campbell as 
president. In 1898 they extended their operations into British Columbia, going to 
the Slocan district, where they opened and developed the Enterprise and Standard 
mines, which are now leading properties of that locality. In fact Finch & Camp- 
bell are among the leaders in mining and developing in the whole Inland Empire. 
They recognized the fact that nature was lavish in her gifts in regard to the min- 
eral resources of the country and notable sagacity and sound judgment have en- 
abled them to so place their investments that splendid returns have generally ac- 
crued from their development of mining property. They have seldom been identi- 
fied with mining interests that have not proven profitable. Their activities have 
been not only a source of gratifying individual success but have also constituted 
one of the most potent forces in the development of the mining industry and conse- 
quent prosperity of the entire district. For many years Mr. Finch has also been 
leading factor in financing and controlling other important business enterprises. 
He is the president of the White & Bender Company and of the Coeur d'Alene 
Hardware Company, both of Wallace, Idaho; president of the Blalock Fruit Com- 
pany of Walla Walla; and president of the National Lumber & Box Company of 
Hoquiam, Washington, with Mr. Campbell, as vice president of these companies. 
The last named enterprise was established in 1901 and is today one of the largest 
of its kind in the northwest. Mr. Finch is a trustee of the Union Trust Company 
and also an officer and director of many other companies, the long list including 
many of the most important business interests of the Inland Empire. 

On the 3d of September, 1896, in Chicago, Mr. Finch was united in marriage 
to Miss Charlotte R. Swingler, a daughter of M. M. and Fannie Swingler, of Spo- 
kane, who came to this city in 1884. Mr, Finch is a director of the Country Club 
but does not belong to any fraternal orders. He was the first president of the 
club and has maintained deep interest in the organization. He has likewise been a 
member of the Spokane Club since 1894 and is a life member of the Spokane Ama- 
teur Athletic Club. He belongs to the Episcopal church, is one of the trustees of 
St. Luke's Hospital and has given liberally toward charitable and benevolent work. 
He donated the site for the present hospital and also the land for the Children's 
Home on Northwest boulevard. Politically he has always been a republican and 
served as a member of the state senate in the first general assembly of Idaho in 
1891. Four years later he came to Spokane, where he has since made his home and 
during the period of his residence here he has not been active in politics. In 1897 
he erected his present palatial home, which is one of the finest in the northwest. 
While he has come to rank with the millionaires of this section of the country, his 
path has never been strewn by the wreck of other men's fortunes and the secret of 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 279 

his success is found in his keen discrimination^ his close application and his ex- 
ecutive force. His business activity has constituted an important element in gen- 
eral development and prosperity and his own success has enabled him to often ex- 
tend a helping hand to those less fortunate and to do effective and important work 
for the alleviation of those upon whom fate has entailed suffering or hardships. 



SEABURY MERRITT. 



Seabury Merritt, who in the practice of his profession has come to be regarded 
largely as an authority on land law in the northwest because of his wide study along 
those lines and the important litigated interests of this character which he has 
conducted, was bom in Frankfort, Indiana, August 28, 1866. He is one of a fam- 
ily of three sons and two daughters and his parents were Samuel and Elizabeth 
(Gaskill) Merritt, natives respectively of Ohio and Indiana. The father came of 
English ancestry although the family was planted on American soil prior to the 
Revolutionary war. The father throughout much of his life engaged in merchandis- 
ing and in*the grain business, and in the year 1860 he was elected sheriff of Clinton 
county, Indiana, receiving more votes than were given Lincoln. He served as a 
trustee of the schools for sixteen consecutive years while his incumbency in the 
sheriff's office covered the period of the Civil war. He married Elizabeth Gaskill, 
who was likewise of English lineage and belonged to one of the old American fam- 
ilies antedating the war for independence. She died in 1896, just nineteen days 
before the death of her husband. Of their sons John W. is now associated with 
his brother Seabury in the practice of law in Spokane, and William A. is a book- 
keeper of this city. The two sisters are: Emma, now the wife of John J. Blair, 
chief dispatcher of the Northern Pacific Railroad at Spokane; and Jennie M., who 
is living with her brother. 

In the common schools of Indiana, Seabury Merritt pursued his early education 
while spending his boyhood days upon his father's farm. He early became familiar 
with the work of plowing, planting and harvesting and continued to assist in the 
cultivation of the old homestead until 1888, when he embarked in the hardware and 
implement business in which he continued for three and a half years. In the latter 
pert of 1891 he began reading law and while thus engaged at Frankfort, Indiana, 
also conducted an insurance and abstract business. He was admitted to practice in 
1895 and followed his profession alone in his native state until 1900, when the oppor- 
tunities of the west attracted him and he came to Spokane, where he became the 
successor to Judge Wallace Mount, in the firm of Mount & Merritt, the judge being 
elected to the supreme bench. Until 1906 that firm remained as Merritt & Merritt 
but in that year Hugo E. Oswald was admitted to a partnership under the firm style 
of Merritt, Oswald & Merritt. They conducted a general law practice, specializing, 
however, largely in land and titles. They represented the Oregon Mortgage Com- 
pany and other mortgage companies and have been attorneys for many corporations 
including Ham, Yearsley &• Ryrie ; the Big Bend Land Company ; the Oregon Mort- 
gage Company; the Pacific Northwest Investment Society; the E. H. Stanton Com- 
pany; and the Mohler Union Warehouse Company. Mr. Merritt is recognized as 
having comprehensive knowledge of land law on account of the vast number of titles 



280 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

he has been called upon to examine. Like almost all who come to the northwest^ he 
is interested in its development and is the owner of an irrigated orchard of forty- 
five acres^ all in apples^ on the Columbia river^ twenty-eight miles above Wenatchee 
and known as the Hossier Apple Ranch. In addition to this, Mr. Merritt owns 
Spokane property and his holdings outside of the city include timber land in British 
Columbia and in different sections of the western part of the state. He is like- 
wise interested in mining operations in Idaho and is thus contributing to the ma- 
terial development and prdgress of the Inland Empire. However, the practice of 
law is his real life work and the firm of which he is a member has a more extensive 
practice in the eastern part of the state than any other firm of attorneys here, their 
legal business extending to Lincoln, Adams and Douglas counties. 

Mr. Merritt is well known in Masonic circles as a member of the commandery 
and Mystic Shrine, and has served as senior warden in the blue lodge. He be- 
longs also to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 228, has filled all 
of the chairs in the local lodge of Knights of Pythias, has been past chancellor for 
several years and has represented Spokane Lodge in the grand lodge. He is like 
wise connected with the Fraternal Order of Eagles and is a ^valued member of the 
Spokane Club^ the Inland Club and the Chamber of Commerce. Mr. Merritt is a 
republican and was an active member of the central committees of city, county and 
state when in Indiana and a delegate to city, county and state conventions both in 
Indiana and Washington. In his native state he did considerable campaign work and 
since coming to the west has been a candidate for congress in the third Washington 
district in 1910, in the primary, but insurgency caused the republican defeat. He 
stands always as a fearless defender of the principles or cause in which he believes 
and his position upon political questions has therefore never been an equivocal one. 
During the twelve years of his residence in Spokane he has become widely known 
and the power which he has displayed in his law practice places him in a foremost 
position among the members of the Spokane bar. 



FRANK ROSE, M. D. 



Dr. Frank Rose, physician and surgeon, of Spokane, was bom in Ontario, Can- 
ada, October 25, 1869. His father, Lawrence Rose, a native of Oxfordshire, Eng- 
land, became a pioneer resident of western Ontario where he engaged in the milling 
business, becoming the owner of a flour mill there. His death occurred in 1885. 
Representatives of the family to which he belonged have lived at Deddington, 
England, for the last five hundred years and for several centuries have been con- 
nected with the milling business there. The mother of Dr. Rose bore the maiden 
name of Hannah Phin and was bom at the old family homestead in Ontario, 
Canada, which is called Kennaquhair. 

It was in the Guel{^ Collegiate Institute that Dr. Rose pursued his more 
specifically literary education, after which he entered the University of Minnesota 
to pursue a medical course and was graduated M. D. in 1901. Broad practical 
experience came to him in one year's service in Asbury Hospital and he after- 
ward received clinical instruction in Chicago and New York for a period of three 
months. He next came to Spokane where he has since followed his profession. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 281 

and the liberal practice accorded him is the best evidence of his capability and 
the consensus of pablic opinion concerning his equipment for and devotion to his 
chosen life work. He is a member- of the County Medical Society , of which he 
has served as vice president and treasurer^ and he belongs also to the State Med- 
ical Society^ in which he is a member of the judicial counsel. 

Dr. Rose has filled the office of city bacteriologist and is now a member of the 
play ground commission. Perhaps his most important public service in the nature 
of his profession has been in connection with the development of the water supply. 
When the city decided to change its water system from the river to wells in the 
Spokane valley^ Dr. Rose and the board of health, with Mayor Moore, went on a 
trip of inspection to ascertain the source and volume of the water supply and 
the quality of the water in the Spokane valley. After a very careful investigation 
both as to the quantity and quality. Mayor Moore and Dr. Rose decided to sink 
wells near the waterworks and thus supply the city. It has been found through 
sabsequent experience that they were not only wise but correct in their decision 
for the supply and quality of the water have far surpassed all their expectations 
based on that investigation. The bacteriological examinations, made twice each 
uKHith for several years, have confirmed the earlier examination as to the purity, 
and Spokane can well boast of having the finest and purest Water of any city in 
the world. The supply has never failed and as high as forty million gallons 
have been pumped at one time without any appreciable diminution of the water 
in the wells. The water is presumed to come from the entire watershed of the 
Spokane valley and is filtered through sand and gravel, reaching the consumers 
in perfect purity. It is unique in that this is the only great water supply of that 
character in the world, although Long Island has somewhat the same character 
but not to the same extent. Dr. Rose modestly gives Mayor Moore and the board 
of health the credit for securing and developing the water supply and system, 
but he should share with the mayor and the board of health the credit and honor. 
On the 16th of September, 1899, Dr. Rose was married to Mrs. Annie Win- 
chester. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, having taken the degrees of the 
lodge, the consistory and the Mystic Shrine. His political allegiance has always 
been given the republican party and his religious faith is that of the Episcopal 
diurch, his membership having been in All Saints' cathedral for seven years dur- 
ing which period he has also held the office of vestryman. His life work has in- 
deed been of benefit and value to his fellowmen and all of his professional duties 
are discharged with a conscientious sense of obligatioii. 



B. M. FRANCIS. 



B. M. Francis, whose real-estate operations not only cover Spokane but also 
various other districts of the northwest, was bom December 25, 1865, in Pontiac, 
Midiigan, a son of John and Mary Rose Francis, natives of Pontiac and Eng- 
land respectively. The latter is a resident of Frankfort, Michigan, but the father 
died in 1886. He was a representative of an old New England family of English 
descent and was a leading and influential resident of his home town where he 
served as alderman and in other local offices. His family numbered two sons and 



282 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

three daughters; B. M.^ of this review; L. R.^ engaged in the automobile business 
in Detroit, Michigan; Miss Ethel M. Francis, residing in Spokane; Lulu M., who 
married Clark Long, of Havillah, Washington; and Edna, the wife of Eph Slade, 
of Michigan. 

In the schools of Saginaw, Michigan, B. M. Francis pursued his education 
and for a short period was a student in the Chicago College. He entered business 
circles in connection with the jewelry trade when but a boy, and when he had 
mastered the trade in Michigan he went to Chicago where he was employed for 
two years. He afterward removed to Elmira, New York, and later to Philadel- 
phia where he taught engraving in the Horological Institute for four years. On 
the expiration of that period he made his way westward to Butte, Montana, in 
1892, and spent four years in that place as an employe in a jewelry store. In 1896, 
at Missoula, Montana, he became proprietor of a jewelry store, continuing at that 
point for five years. At that time he engaged in the real-estate business and his 
activities along that line increased more and more while during the last eight or 
nine years he gave a great deal of his attention to mining. In Missoula he formed 
a partnership with W. J. Rhodes under the firm name of Francis & Rhodes for the 
conduct of a real-estate business and in 1907 opened an office in Spokane which 
he maintained for 'some time. While in Butte he became associated with three 
others and leased the Homestake mine which iie successfully operated for a year 
and a half. His real-estate interests are now in Bozeman, Missoula and Spokane, 
in all of which places he has platted additions. In Spokane Mr. Francis has 
platted Spokane Terrace and Spokane Park, doing this work under partnership 
connections. In Missoula he platted a subdivision of Homevale, Glenwood Park 
and East Missoula, and in Bozeman he purchased the old Butte addition to the 
town. Since the dissolution of the partnership he has independently platted Em- 
pire Heights, which he sold to Mr. Van Velsor, and Castle Hill, which he now 
owns. Mr. Francis has obtained some substantial returns from his mining as 
well as his real-estate interests and has contributed as well to the general progress 
and development of communities in which he has operated. 

On the 4th of May, 1891, in Philadelphia, Mr. Francis was married to Miss 
Maggie R. Bishops a daughter of George Bishop^ a shoe manufacturer, and they 
have one son, Delbert M.^ who is now attending high school. Mr. Francis is num- 
bered among that class of energetic men whose advancement is attributable en- 
tirely to earnest and persistent labor. He started out with no special advantages 
but proved his worth in the business world and gradually progressed until he be- 
came a merchant of Missoula. As he prospered he extended his investments in 
real estate and mining property and his work has been a valuable force in the 
general growth and development of the northwest. 



ROBERT H. COSGROVE. 

Various projects have contributed toward the promotion of a knowledge of 
the Spokane country, its resources, its advantages and its possibilities, but none 
have been more effective in this connection than the Interstate Fair, of which 
Robert H. Cosgrove is secretary. It has been a stimulating influence in fruit- 
raising and stock-raising, giving impetus to the efforts of those who are thus en- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 283 

gaged in holding before them the highest standards and also in bringing a notice 
of the work accomplished to the country in general. 

Mr. Cosgrove is a native of Minnesota^ born July 11, 1876. His parents were. 
C. N. and Elizabeth (Bradley) Cosgrove, the former born in the state of New 
York and the latter in Wisconsin. The father has at different times held public 
office in the various communities where he has resided. He served as mayor of 
Le Sueur, Minnesota, and for twenty-five years was connected with the Minnesota 
State Fair, occupying all positions f^om manager to president. He is of Irish 
descent and his wife is of English lineage, although her ancestors came to Amer- 
ica during the early period of colonization and were represented in the Revolu- 
tionary war. Robert H. Cosgrove is a brother of Edward B. Cosgrove, who is 
now in business in Kansas City, Missouri. His sisters are: Cora, who is the wife 
of George W. Strand, a nurseryman of Taylors Falls, Minnesota; and Ethel C, 
who is living in Porto Rico and is engaged in teaching school. 

Robert H. Cosgrove attended the high school of Le Sueur, Minnesota, and the 
University of Minnesota, in the class of 1898. He then turned his attention to 
the hardware business in Le Sueur and afterward became connected with ranch 
interests at Mandan, North Dakota. During the same period he was connected 
with the Minnesota State Fair and in 1904 came to Spokane to take charge as 
secretary-manager of the Spokane Interstate Fair, with which he has since been 
connected. His labors here have been more than gratifying, producing results 
beyond the expectations of those who sought his cooperation. One of the first 
exhibits of this kind in Spokane was held on East Sprague street in 1890 but the 
building burned and nothing more was done until 1894, when Herbert Bolster, 
now deceased, and John L. Smith, the president of the Spokane Interstate Fair, 
organized what was known as The Spokane Fruit Fair. This was held at River- 
side and Washington streets, on the present site of the Fogelquist clothing store, 
from the S^th to the 27th of October, 1894, with Judge J. W. Binckley as presi- 
dent. The succeeding year Mr. Bolster had charge of the fair, which convened 
September SOth and ended on the 5th of October. The dates chosen in 1896 were 
from October 6th to 17th, with F. W. Smith as secretary and manager, and again 
in 1897 it continued for two weeks, beginning October 5th, in the old Auditorium 
groimds, with Mr. Bolster as secretary and John A. Finch as president. Again 
the fair was held at the Auditorium grounds in 1898, from the 4th to the 15th of 
October, with the same o£Bcers, and in 1899 Dr. E. D. Olmsted served as president, 
with Mr. Bolster as secretary, and the dates were from October 3d to 17th. From 
October 2d to October 16th, 1900, with W. E. Hawley as manager, the fair was 
again held at the Auditorium grounds, but the equipment there was so expensive 
that those interested incorporated the Interstate Fair for twenty-five thousand 
dollars and, borrowing ten thousand dollars more, purchased fifty-one acres of 
land east of the town and thereon held the eighth annual exhibit in September, 
1901, with H. W. Peel a^ president and Herbert Bolster as secretary-manager. 
From the 6th to the 14th of October, 1902, the fair was again a feature of Spo- 
kane's activities, with Mr. Peel as president and George H. Martin as secretary- 
manager. The former continued as president with H. G. Stimmel, now deceased, 
as secretary and manager in 1 903, and the fair was held from the 5th to the 1 3th 
of October. In 1 904 it was opened on the 3d and continued to the 9th of October, 
with Mr. Peel as president and R. H. Cosgrove as secretary-manager. The same 



284 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMr / 

officers continued through 1905 and 1906, the fair being h*Ad in the former year 
from the 9th to the 15th of October and in the latter from the 24th of September, 
to the 6th of October. George T. Crane had succeeded to the presidency, with 
Mr. Cosgrove still as manager, when the fair was held from the 28d of Septem- 
ber, to the 5th of October, 1907. It was opened on the 5th of October, 1908, and 
lasted for five days, with the same officers as in the previous year, and they con- 
tinued also through 1909, the fair being held from the 20th to the 25th of Septem- 
ber. Mr. Crane was succeeded by John L. Smith, with Mr. Cosgrove as secretary, 
and the fair extended from the 8d to the 9th of October, 1910. It lasted for six 
days in 1911, beginning on the 2d of October, with the same officers. The fair 
was established with the idea of encouraging agricultural and horticultural pur- 
suits and has grown to remarkable proportions, the average attendance during 
the first year of Mr. Cosgrove's residence here being forty-six hundred per day, 
while in 1910 the average attendance was eighteen thousand six hundred. The 
total number of entries for priases in 1904 was one thousand five hundred and 
eighty-one and in 1910 six thousand eight hundred and nineteen. This is now the 
largest fair of the kind west of St. Paul and has been a stimulus to fruit-raising 
and stock-raising interests in the northwest. 

Mr. Cosgrove is well known in fraternal, social and club connections. He 
has taken the degrees of the York and Scottish Rites in Masonry, belonging to 
the conmiandery and the consistory, and is a member of the Mystic Shrine. He 
was also senior warden of the blue lodge while in the east. His college fraternity 
is the Phi Gamma Delta and he is a member of the Spokane Club, the Spd^ane 
Country Club, the Spokane Athletic Club, the Inland Club and the Rotary Club. 
Mr. Cosgrove was married November 27, 1911, to Miss Leora K. Gentry, of 
SpdLane. 



MARCUS D. WRIGHT. 



Occupying a place in the foremost ranks of those who have made a fortune in 
the development and exploitation of the timber lands of the west is Marcus D. 
Wright, who resides at Hayden Lake, Kootenai county, Idaho. A native of the Mis- 
sissippi valley, he came west in 1871, at the age of twenty years, his birth having 
occurred in Bowling Green, Kentucky, April 16, 1851. His parents were John W. 
and Mary (Gibson) Wright, the former a prominent Baptist minister of Kentucky. 

Marcus D. Wright obtained his education in the common schools of Kentucky 
and at the age of sixteen years entered business life as a salesman 'for a pump ccm- 
cern in St. Joseph, Missouri. He was employed in this capacity for four years when 
he gave up his position and went west, locating in Montana. There he conducted a 
freighting business in summer and drove a stag^ during the winter for the follow- 
ing six years. In 1877 he accompanied General Sherman on his tour of inspection 
of all the frontier posts, covering the territory extending from Montana over the 
old Mullen road to Walla Walla, Washington. Subsequently he resided in Colfax, 
Whitman county, Washington, where he drove a stage until 1878. In that year he 
came to Spokane and engaged in the livery business, buying out the stable owned by 
James N. Glover. In 1881 he gave up this enterprise and went to Idaho to look 
over the prospects for an investment in real estate. Finding a suitable tract of land, 
he purchased a half-interest in forty acres from C. W. Wood and on that site laid 



SI. D. WRIGHT 



ihUliLlC LfSkAHVi 

[ 1 

I I 

^" ■■—■>— i n 1^ 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 287 

out the town of Westwood, now known as Rathdrum. In conjunction with George 
fi. Wannacott he called a meeting of the residents of this locality and organized 
Kootenai county. He was appointed the first assessor and tax collector^ as well as 
deputy sheriff^ serving in these positions until the first general elections of the county. 
In October^ 1882^ during the great mining excitement in this section of the country^ 
Mr. Wright took the first pack train into Pritchard Creek, Eagle City, Idaho. Two 
jears later he engaged in business at Rathdrum, Idaho, conducting a general mer- 
cantile establishment and also contracting to railroads for the sale of timber and ties. 
The latter branch of his business increased so rapidly that he discontinued his gen- 
eral mercantile establishment and has since that time concentrated his entire atten- 
tion upon the lumber business, furnishing lumber supplies mainly to the Northern 
Pacific Railroad. Within the last twenty-three years he has supplied approximately 
twenty million ties which, at a rough estimate, would be sufficient, if laid end to end, 
to circle the globe. He was also financially interested in the First National Bank of 
Coeur d'Alene, of which he was president for several years, resigning in 1910 in or- 
der to devote his undivided attention to his lumber interests. 

On March 18, 1881, Mr. Wright was united in marriage to Miss Bertie Piper, a 
daughter of Dr. John J. Piper, of Peone Prairie, Washington, who was for twelve 
years one of the county commissioners of Spokane county, Washington. Mrs. Wright 
passed away in 1901, being survived by her husband and seven children, two sons and 
five daughters. In 1903 Mr. Wright was again married, his second union being with 
Mrs. Marie Bennett, a stepdaughter of A. M. Cannon, of Spokane, Washington. Fra- 
ternally Mr. Wright is connected with the £l|fs^ ^o^e, No. 228, of Spokane; the 
Knights of Pythias of Coeur d'Alene, and. the Odd'Fellwr;8 of Coeur d'Alene. The 
Wright home is known as one of the handsonie residences of this locality, being 
situated at Hayden Lake, on one of the fi/i^st f^rpas in the state of Idaho, a tract 
of land comprising about six hundred_ae«efiK^f*'Ji' e(^ a fish preserve covering 

an area equivalent to one hundred and sixty acres, which is filled with black bass 
and trout, and affords some of the finest opportunities for fishing in the state. 
Never losing sight of the goal which lay before him, Mr. Wright has been stead- 
fast in the pursuit of his ideals and by dint of close application and unceasing 
effort has won his reward in the generous measure of success which has been his. 



JOHN M. DUNN. 



John M. Dunn is one of the foremost representatives of the real-estate inter- 
ests in Spokane. He was bom on the 9th of June, 1865, at Columbia, New Hamp- 
shire, a son of Thomas and Jemima (Temple) Dunn. The father was a promi- 
nent agriculturist of New Hampshire and also took an active part in the political 
activities of his native state. He always gave his support to the republican party 
and served as a representative in the New Hampshire state legislature from Coos 
county for two years. The mother's death occurred when her son John was but 
eleven years of age. To their union two daughters and ^ve sons were bom, all 
of whom remained in the east with the exception of the subject of this review. 

John M. Dunn pursued his education in the public schools of his native town 
and subsequently was engaged in agricultural pursuits before taking up railroad- 

VoL m— 16 



288 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

ing. Having heard of the opportunities the west offered to the energetic and deter- 
mined^ he decided to leave his native state and locate permanently in the north- 
west. By hard work he had accmnnlated forty-three dollars. With this money as 
his capital he set out for St. Paul^ Minnesota^ from which city he worked his wa^ 
to Havre^ Montana^ arriving there about the time that the Great Northern Rail- 
road had been extended to that city, which consisted of two tents. As there did 
not seem to be much prospect for work there he continued his journey to Great 
Falls, Montana, where he arrived on the Idth of November, 1888. He re- 
mained in that city for eight years, being employed throughout the greater part 
of his residence there in the wholesale grocery business. Subsequently he re- 
moved to Butte and engaged in mining, later becoming foreman and superintend- 
ing the erection of the three largest sheet iron smoke stacks that have ever been 
put up in the west. Thrift and energy were among the salient characteristics of 
his nature and were fast winning him financial success. By saving his money he 
was able to return to Helena and engage in the retail meat-market business. Shortly 
afterward he opened another store in Great Falls. Both of these enterprises netted 
him considerable money before he disposed of them and came to Spokane in 1901. 
Immediately upon his arrival in this city he engaged in the real-estate business 
under the firm name of Dickson & Dunn, Mr. Dunn serving as president. They 
were very successful in their various ventures and opened the Didcson & Dunn 
orchard tracts, four miles north of Hillyard. This property consisted of two 
hundred and forty acres. They also dealt extensively in local real estate. In 
1910 Mr. Dunn sold his interest to Mr. Dickson and has since devoted his entire 
time and attention to the management of his private real-estate holdings, which 
consist mostly of homes and similar income properties. What he has accomplished 
shows his business ability and power and, arguing from the past, his friends predict 
for him a still more successful future. 

Mr. Dunn was married, at Great Falls, Montana, on the 14th of February, 
1897, to Miss Lena B. Elliott, a daughter of George and Barbara Elliott, of Fargo, 
North Dakota. They reside at No. ddd Euclid avenue. Mr. Dunn holds mem- 
bership in the Methodist church and fraternally is a member of Spokane Lodge, 
No. 228, B. P. O. E.; Red Cross Lodge, K. P., in which order he has passed 
through all the chairs and has twice been representative to the grand lodge; the 
Dramatic Order of the Knights of Khorassan; Tyrian Lodge, No. 96, F. & A. M.; 
the Modern Woodmen of American; and Spokane Aerie, No. 2, F. O. E. 



WILLIAM A. HALTEMAN. 

William A. Halteman, of Spokane, who is now filling the office of United States 
marshal for the eastern district of Washington, was born in Da3rton, Ohio, June 
27, 1860, and came to this state in 1890. He first located at Port Townsend, where 
he became interested in real estate and also owned a third interest in the Townsend 
Leader, which at that time was an eight page daily. While at Port Townsend he 
was elected to the state legislature in 1895 and two years later removed to Spokane 
and became interested in mining. In 1904 he went to Ferry county and had direct 
supervision of the Meteor mine for four years. While there he was again called to 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 289 

public office, being elected to the legislature from Ferry county in 1907, and the 
following year was selected as executive commissioner of the state of Washington at 
the Alaska- Yukon-Pacific Exposition. 

Mr. Halteman was married on the 29th of February, 1892, to Miss Elizabeth 
Frazicr, of Peoria, Illinois, and both hold membership in the Baptist church. , 



JOHN HUSTON CLARKE. 

John Huston Clarke, senior partner of the firm of Clarke & Eaton, well known 
hardware dealers in Whitman county, has been prominently identified with the com- 
mercial activities of Lacrosse for the past six years. His birth occurred in Knox 
county, Illinois, on the 5th of February, 1868, his parents being William Y. and 
Mary (McCormick) Clarke, both natives of Ireland. 

The son of a farmer, John Huston Clarke was reared in the country, acquiring 
his early education in the district schools. After leaving school he assisted his 
father in the operation of the farm until he had attained his majority, but as agri- 
cultural pursuits were not altogether to his liking he entered the State Normal 
School at Peru, Nebraska. He was graduated from this institution with the class 
of 1894, and for three years thereafter engaged in teaching in that state. In 1897 
he came to Elberton, this county; where he taught until 1900, when he decided to 
withdraw from this profession and identify himself with commercial activities. He 
became associated with Hugh Eaton and they established a hardware store in El- 
berton, which they conducted under the firm name of Clarke & Eaton. This enter- 
prise flourished in a most gratifying manner from its inception, and five years later 
they extended the scope of their activities by founding a store in Lacrosse. As it 
proved to be as lucrative as their first establishment, in 1908 they opened another 
branch at Endicott. Since then they have sold the store in Elberton and now con- 
centrate their efforts upon the operation of the two last established. They are both 
enterprising and industrious men, of practical ideas and progressive methods and are 
nombered among the prosperous and representative business men of the county. 
Owing to their capable and intelligent direction of their interests they have succeeded 
in building up an excellent patronage, that is constantly increasing, their business 
showing a marked growth from year to year. They carry a full and well selected 
stock of shelf and heavy hardware as well as farming implements in their stores, 
that they offer at reasonable prices, the quality of their goods being fully commen- 
surate with what is asked. Gracious and courteous in their treatment of patrons 
they strive to accommodate and please all, believing that a well satisfied customer 
is the best medium of advertising. 

At Spokane, Washington, in 1906, Mr. Clarke was united in marriage to Miss 
Blanche B. Howell, a native of the state of Illinois, and a daughter of Charles H. 
and Mary (Holland) Howell, who were born and reared in West Virginia. Two 
children have been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Clarke, Mary Caroline and John Howell. 

Mr. Clarke is affiliated with Lacrosse Lodge, No. 155, A. F. & A. M., in which 
he has held all of the chairs ; and Colfax Chapter, No. 84, R. A. M. He is also a 
member of the Modem Woodmen of America and has held all of the offices in the 
local camp. He votes the republican ticket, but has never aspired to public honors 



290 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

or the emoluments of office^ having preferred to give his undivided attention to his 
business. Mr. Clarke's commercial career in Whitman county has been character- 
ized by the foresight and sagacity that invariably lead to the goal of success, when 
concentrated upon a definite purpose. In his transactions he has always been found 
absolutely honorable, his integrity being above question, and he is held in high es- 
teem by all who have had dealings with him. 



HARRY GREY DE PLEDGE. 

Harry Grey De Pledge, who has been cashier of the First Trust & Savings Bank 
ever since its organization six years ago, was born in England on the 16th of Feb- 
ruary, 1860, and is a son of Jonathan and Emily (Grey) De Pledge. 

Reared in his native land, when old enough to choose a vocation Harry G. De 
Pledge decided to follow the sea, so upon leaving school he went on a naval cadet 
training ship to qualify for the merchant marine. He went to sea in 1875, serving 
as midshipman for four years. At the expiration of that period, in 1879, he passed 
his examination for second mate, but the following year he joined a colony that was 
coming to the United States. They located in Iowa, but Mr. De Pledge only re 
mained with them for about a year, removing to San Francisco in 1881. Upon his 
arrival in the latter city he entered the service of one of the steamship companies 
and sailed on the Pacific until 1882, when he returned to Iowa and worked for Close 
Brothers, land agents. In 1883 he again came west, locating in Portland, where for 
a time he was employed in railroad surveying. Later he was appointed depatv 
county surveyor of Multnomah county, Oregon, and was the first to claim the right 
to the waters of the Bull Run which now supply Portland. Two years thereafter, 
in 1885, he joined a party of engineers who were surveying for the railroad through 
Colfax, and upon his arrival here Mr. De Pledge decided to locate. He obtained a 
position with Elnapp, Burrell Sc Company as manager of the first grain house here. 
He retained this position until 1887, and then removed to Pullman and engaged in 
the grain business. The venture prpved to be successful, but at the end of a year 
he undertook to construct and manage two warehouses at that point for the Northern 
Pacific Railroad Company. In 1889, Mr. De Pledge returned to Colfax and en- 
tered the bank of Perkins & Mills. The following year he became cashier of the 
Bank of Pullman, continuing in this capacity after the reorganization of this in- 
stitution in 1891 into the First National Bank of Pullman. He remained there un- 
til 1894, when he resigned and became associated with O. E. Young in the gprain 
business at Pullman, under the firm name of De Pledge & Young. In 1898, Mr. 
De Pledge was appointed deputy treasurer of Whitman county, and returned to 
Colfax, where a year later he became assistant cashier of the First National Bank. 
Upon the organization of the First Trust & Savings Bank in 1905, he was made 
cashier and has ever since been retained in this capacity. He is also a stockholder 
and a member of the board of directors of this institution and is a stockholder of the 
Western Union Life Insurance Company, and is likewise financially interested in a 
fire insurance company. 

Portland, Oregon, was the scene of Mr. De Pledge's marriage in 1890 to Miss 
Jane S. Crockett. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. De Pledge, Ruth 
Grey, Cedric Grey, Cuthbert Crockett and Desmond Gerald. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 291 

The parents are members of the Episcopal churchy and fraternally Mr. De 
Pledge is affiliated with the Masonic order^ being treasurer of the blue lodge and 
past high priest of the chapter^ and he also belongs to the Knights of Pythias. In 
his political views he is a stanch republican and is now and has been for several 
terms city treasurer^ and he is also clerk of the school boards and for many years 
was a school director. He takes much interest in the development of Colfax. 



LAURENCE RANKIN HAMBLEN. 

Laurence Rankin Hamblen is a member of the firm of Hamblen & Gilbert^ 
attorneys at law^ engaged in general practice although specializing to some ex- 
tent in corporation law^ in which connection they have a large and representative 
clientele. Mr. Hamblen was bom at Rondout^ New York^ May 15, 1874^ his 
parents being Charles E. and Charlotte (Pinkham) Hamblen. The mother's peo- 
ple were among the earliest settlers of Nantucket, Massachusetts, and it was there 
her birth occurred. The father, also a native of the Old Bay state, was descended 
from English ancestors who settled in America about 1650. The family was rep- 
resented in the Revolutionary war and Charles E. Hamblen was numbered among 
the defenders of the Union cause in the Civil war as a member of Company H, 
Thirty-eighth Massachusetts Infantry. He participated in a number of important 
engagements including the battle of Cedar Creek. During the latter part of his 
Ufe he was engaged in the real-estate business in Spokane, where his death occurred 
in 1889. His wife survived until 1904 and the living sons and daughters of the 
family are: Laurence R. ; Robert N., who is engaged in the practice of medicine 
in Spokane; Elizabeth, who is the wife of William Shaw and resides in SpcJcane; 
and Mabel R., also living in this city. 

In the public schools of Minneapolis Laurence R. Hamblen pursued his early 
education and afterward entered the Methodist College of Spokane; which he at- 
tended until 1892. He had come to this city with his parents in 1887. After 
leaving the Methodist College he was employed here for two years and then entered 
the University of Michigan, from which he was graduated in 1896 with the LL. B. 
degree, having pursued the full law course whereby he was qualified for active 
work at the bar. He entered upon the practice of law in Spokane in the fall of 
1896 as a member of the firm of Hamblen & Lund. Later changes in the part- 
nership have led to the adoption of the firm name of Hamblen, Lund & Gilbert 
and afterward to Hamblen & Gilbert. They have a large and satisfactory general 
practice and have also been attorneys for the North Coast Railroad for the past 
two years and are now division attorneys for the Oregon- Washington Railroad & 
Navigation Company. 

On the 10th of September, 1904, was celebrated the marriage of Laurence R. 
Hamblen and Miss Frances Gilbert, a daughter of F. W. Gilbert, now deceased, 
who was the general superintendent of the Northern Pacific Railway Company 
at St. Paul. The three children of this marriage are Charlotte, Herbert M. and 
Mary G. Mr. Hamblen has spent the major part of his life in Spokane and is 
widely and favorably known to the majority of its citizens. He has watched with 
interest the progress of events which have marked the development and growth 



292 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

of the city and in various ways has contributed to the work of general improve- 
ment and upbuilding. While in college he became a member of the Delta Chi 
and is now a member of the Spokane Club. He is in thorough sympathy with the 
work of the Chamber of Commerce^ in which he holds membership^ and through 
political channels he has done much active and valuable public service. He votes 
with the republican party and has attended city^ county and state conventicms^ 
being known as a delegate to the conventions at Spokane and Tacoma. He has 
also acted as a member of the city^ county and central committees and believes 
that party organization should be made the means of procuring good government 
and a righteous administration of the laws. In 1907 he was appointed to the 
position of corporation counsel for a term of two years. These were stirring times 
in the history of the city when excitement was often intense, for at that time 
Spokane entered upon its great work of reform, cleaning out the cribs, closing the 
saloons on Sunday and turning a watchful eye on all gambling. Mr. Hamblen as 
corporation counsel was closely associated with this work and then, as at all times, 
his influence was strongly on the side of law and order, reform and progress. 



CHARLES WILLIAM HESS. 

Charles William Hess, who has been identified with the business interests of 
Colfax for the past eight years, was born in Fulton, Illinois, on the 17th of October, 
1863, and is a son of John G. and Catherine (Murphy) Hess, the father a native of 
Germany and the mother of Ireland. 

During the childhood of Charles William Hess his parents removed to Janes- 
ville, Wisconsin, in the public schools of which city he began his education. Later 
they returned to Illinois, settling in Joliet, where he continued his studies, until 
their next removal to Grand Island, Nebraska. When he was sixteen years of age, 
he left school and went to work as a member of a railroad construction gang at 
Emporia, Kansas, and from there on was self-supporting. As he was energetic and 
performed such tasks as were assigned him with more than average intelligence and 
efficiency, his worth was readily recognized and he was promoted at various times, 
continuing in the service in the west and south until 1898. In the latter year he 
was offered a position as division roadmaster on the Oregon Railway & Navigation 
Company, at Colfax, which he readily accepted. He remained in the employment 
of this company until 1904, when he came to the conclusion to give up his position 
as a dependent and to go into business on his own account and to that end purchased 
the cigar and tobacco store of C. A. Cary, of this city. In the conduct and develop- 
ment of his own business he has manifested the same qualities that have character- 
ized him as an employe and he is meeting with success in his business. 'He is pro- 
gressive and enterprising in his methods, courteous and accommodating to his pat- 
rons and keeps a class of goods that is fully commensurate with the prices,, all of 
which facts have assisted him to build up a profitable trade. 

Plattsburg, Missouri, was the scene of the marriage of Mr. Hess on the 20th of 
January, 1892, to Miss Hallie N. Smith, a daughter of E. T. and Emma (Tillery) 
Smith, both natives of Kentucky, and they have become the parents of one son, 
Edwin A., who is a resident of Spokane. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 293 

Fraternally^ Mr. Hess is identified with the Masonic order^ being a past senior 
deacon of Hiram Lodge^ No. 21^ A. F. & A. M.; past high priest of Colfax Chapter^ 
No. 8, R. A. M.; and past patron of Washington Chapter, No. 16, O. E. S. He is 
also a member of Colfax Lodge, No. 4, K. of P. The political views of Mr. Hess 
conform to the principles of the democratic party for which candidates he casts his 
ballot save at municipal elections, when he gives his support to such men as he 
deems best qualified to subserve the interests of the community irrespective of party 
lines. He is a man who is entitled to the full credit for his achievements, as he has 
been entirely dependent upon his own resources since he was a youth of sixteen 
years, and his advancement must be attributed to his personal efforts. 



ROBERT CRAMPTON McCROSKEY. 

Robert Crampton McCroskey, a well known retired agriculturist of Whitman 
countj', who for many years has been actively identified with banking circles in both 
Pallman and Palouse, was bom in Monroe county, Tennessee, on the 10th of March, 
1815. He is a son of John and Priscilla (McCray) McCroskey, both natives of Ten- 
nessee. The family originally settled in Virginia and there they were prominent in 
early colonial times. 

In the acquirement of his education, Robert Crampton McCroskey attended the 
common and private schools of his native state until he had attained the age of seven- 
teen years. In 1862, he laid aside his text-books and enlisting in the Thirty-first 
Arkansas went to the front in defense of the Confederacy. He enlisted as a private, 
but although he was very young he early gave evidence of possessing the force and 
energy as well as executive ability entitling him to a more responsible position, and 
he was promoted until he became captain of his company. Owing to his seniority he 
was subsequently placed in command of the Fourth and Thirty-first regiments and 
the Fourth Battalion of Arkansas Volunteers, which he lead in the battles of Frank- 
lin, Nashville and Bentonville and other minor engagements. Soon after his re- 
turn home in 1865, he entered Croton College in Tennessee, from which he was 
graduated in 1868. The following autumn he engaged in teaching, continuing to 
follow this profession in his native state until 1 870, when he removed to California, 
locating in Monterey county. There he resumed teaching, being actively identified 
with this vocation until 1874, when he was elected superintendent of schools in 
Monterey county. He served in this capacity for six years, at the expiration of 
which time he purchased one hundred and ten acres of land and turned his atten- 
tion to ranching. His efforts in this direction prospered and he was later able to 
extend his holdings by the addition of another two hundred and fifty acres. In 
1887, he disposed of his interests and came to Whitman county, buying one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land at twenty dollars per acre in the vicinity of Garfield, 
where he makes his present home. He is a man of progressive ideas and intelli- 
gence, who has most capably directed his undertakings and has been rewarded 
with corresponding success. Having unlimited confidence in the future of this 
state with the development of its rich natural resources, he invested heavily in 
real estate and is now the owner of over two thousand acres of valuable land, that 
is under high cultivation. In 1909, Mr. McCroskey withdrew from the active work 



294 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

of the fields and turned the operation of his ranch over to his sons and has ever 
since been living retired. Although his principal interests have been along the 
lines of farming and real estate^ he has been identified with various other local en- 
terprises, and in 1890 was associated with others in the organization of the Gar- 
field Hardware & Mercantile Company of which he was president for several 
years. The following year, in 1891, he assisted in the organization of the Bank 
of Garfield and was one of the directors of this institution until they were forced 
out of business by the panic. At the present time he is the president and a director 
of the Pullman State Bank and also the Palouse National Bank of Palouse. 

At Madisonville, Tennessee, in September, 1882, Mr. McCroskey was united 
in marriage to Miss Blanche Houston, a native of Tennessee and a daughter of 
Joseph E. and Eliza (Hair) Houston, likewise natives of that state, while in the 
paternal line she is descended from the same branch of the family as Sam Houston. 
Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. McCroskey, as follows: Robert Cramp- 
ton, Jr., who married Miss Helen R. Wesco, of Portland; Joseph Houston, who 
married Miss Marion Flood, of Spokane; Gladys, who is a student at the Wash- 
ington State College; and Blanche M. and Earl McCray, who are still attending 
school. 

Fraternally Mr. McCroskey is affiliated with the Masonic order and the Knights 
of Pythias, being past grand chancellor of the latter, and he also belongs to the 
Artisans. He has always been an enthusiastic champion of the different agricul- 
tural organizations, and is president of the local branch of the Farmers' Union 
and is also officially connected with the county society. He is an active member 
of the Garfield Commercial Club, while his political support he gives to the dem- 
ocratic party, and has always taken much interest in governmental affairs. In 
1890 he was elected to the state senate, serving with efficiency in this capacity for 
three years, while he has been a member of the local school board and since 1897 
one of the regents of the Washington State College. Mr. McCroskey is versatile 
and has the faculty of adapting himself to the needs and requirements of almost 
any position he could be called to, as has been manifested by his efficient service 
in official connections in both business and public life. 



NATHAN M. BAKER, M. D. 

Success always depends upon an intelligent understanding of one's own capacities 
and limitations and the fact that the latter may be eliminated to the same great 
extent that the former can be cultivated. Realizing this Dr. Nathan M. Baker in 
his life work has attained distinction, applying himself closely to the mastery of 
the great scientific principles which underlie the practice of medicine and surgery. 
Moreover, his ability enables him to see the logical relation between cause and 
effect and thus in his practice his labors have been attended with excellent results, 
bringing him into important relation with the medical fraternity. He has practiced 
continuously in Spokane since 1895, having as the basis of his success broad knowl- 
edge of medical principles, acquired in the University of Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Baker was bom September 26, 1859, in St. Peter, Minnesota, a son of 
Nathan M. and Elmina (Perry) Baker. The father was one of the pioneer settlers 
of Minnesota, taking up his abode in that state in 1857. At the time of the Civil 



DR. N. M. BAKER 



The .stw vomk 
UiiLiC LIBKAkYi 




f 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 297 

war he responded to the country's call for aid, enlisting in the Ninth Minnesota 
Infantry with which he did valiant service on the battlefields of the south. 

At the usual age Dr. Baker became a pupil in the public schools of his native 
city and afterward enjoyed the benefit of instruction in the University of Minne- 
sota, from which he was graduated with the Bachelor of Science degree in 1884. 
His professional training was received in the University of Pennsylvania and upon 
his gradaation with the class of 1889 his professional degree was conferred upon 
bim. He spent three years in the State Hospital of Minnesota, during which varied 
hospital practice gradually broadened his knowledge and promoted his efficiency. 
For two years he was assistant superintendent of the State Hospital at St. Peter 
and his work in those connections well qualified him for the onerous and responsible 
duties that have devolved upon him since he entered upon the general practice of 
medicine in Spokane in 1895. His ability has carried him into important profes- 
sional relations. His knowledge of medicine in every line is comprehensive and 
at all times he keeps abreast with the best thinking men of the profession, his 
investigation and research bringing him success beyond that of the average practi- 
tioner. With a nature that could never be content with mediocrity he has advanced 
step by step in his profession and his labors have been of great benefit to his fel- 
lowmen. He holds membership in the Spokane County Medical Society, the Wash- 
ington State Medical Society and the American State Medical Association. 

On the 1st of July, 1895, was celebrated the marriage .of Dr. Baker and Miss 
Minnie J. Bluhm, of Minnesota, and they have two children, Violet E. and Morton 
C. The family reside at £. 945 Mission avenue. Dr. Baker belongs to Oriental 
Lodge, No. 74, F. & A. M., to the Independent Order of Foresters and to the 
University Club. His political allegiance is'tfiten to the republican party and the 
offices he has held have been in the padi of his profession. He served as coroner 
from 1898 until 1902 and for six years was a member of the city board of health. 
He is a gentleman of broad general culture as well as high professional attain- 
ment and finds his friends among the best residents of Spokane. 



GEORGE CLARENCE JEWETT. 

George Clarence Jewett, cashier of the National Bank of Palouse and also at 
this writing in 1912 the mayor of the town, was bom in Wright county,. Minnesota, 
on the 27th of November, 1876. He is a son of Aaron H. and Jane (Emerson) 
Jewett, both natives of Vermont and descendants of well known New England 
families of early colonial days. 

The early years in the life of George Clarence Jewett were passed in his native 
state, to whose public schools he is indebted for the greater part of his education. 
Having decided to pursue a business career he subsequently took a course in a 
commercial college at Mankato, Minnesota, thus more fully qualifying himself for 
the practical duties of life. In 1897 he went to Bordulac, North Dakota, where for 
two years he was engaged in the grain business. In 1 899 he became a bookkeeper 
in the Maple Lake State Bank, continuing to serve in this capacity until the spring 
of 1900 when he removed to Pasadena, California, and took a position in the First 



298 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

National Bank of that city. In July of the following year he once more took up 
his residence in Minnesota^ as a member of the staff of the Second National Bank 
of St. Paul. He resigned this position in July^ 1902^ to enter the employ of Ross 
& Davidson^ well known financiers of North Dakota, where they are operating 
twenty-four banks, entering their service in the capacity of an assistant cashier. 
He proved to be a very efficient and reliable employe and was later promoted to 
the office of cashier, the duties of which he discharged until 1906. In the latter 
year he became associated with R. P. Ward of Waseca, Minnesota, and removed to 
Columbus, North Dakota, where he established the First International Bank. He 
remained there until June, 1909, when he came to Palouse and opened the Na- 
tional Bank of which he has ever since been cashier and one of the stockholders. 
Mr. Jewett is in every way well qualified for the position he holds, not only striv- 
ing to protect the interests of the stockholders but those of the patrons of the bank 
as well, to whom he accords the greatest consideration and this has unquestionably 
been one of the factors in the upbuilding of the institution. 

In North Dakota on the 21st of June, 1904, Mr. Jewett was united in marriage 
to Miss Minnie C. Sander, of Wisconsin, and a daughter of Henry Sander, and 
they have become the parents of four children: Milton A., Viola J., Alta Margaret 
and George Donald. 

Fraternally Mr. Jewett is affiliated with Palouse Lodge, No. 46, A. F. & A. M., of 
which he is treasurer, and he also belongs to the Chapter, R. A. M., of Carrington, 
North Dakota. He has passed through all of the chairs of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to 
Oriental Lodge, No. 26, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His political sup- 
port he gives to the republican party, and although he has been a resident of this 
city but for two years he has made such a favorable impression in the community 
that he has been honored with the highest office of the municipality. He has high 
standards regarding the responsibilities and duties of citizenship and ever since 
granted the right of franchise has taken an active interest in all political affairs, 
and in 1909 was a member of the legislature of North Dakota. During the period 
of his residence here, Mr. Jewett has at all times evidenced the qualities that have 
won him the respect and esteem of all with whom he has had dealings both as a 
public official and business man, his methods of conducting transactions being in 
strict accordance with the highest business principles. 



CHARLES EDWARD MAX. 

Being attracted to Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, as an excellent place of promising 
opportunities for a business man to locate in, Charles Edward Max, in 1906, gave 
up the railroad work to which he had been trained and engaged in the hardware 
and implement business, meeting with such unwonted success during the brief 
period of the past six years that his establishment is now accounted one of the 
largest hardware and implement houses in northern Idaho, and his importance as 
a dealer in this department of the mercantile life of the state is attested by the 
numerous offices to which he has been elected in various hardware organizations. 
He was bom on March 6, 1861, at Tippecanoe, Miami county, Ohio. His father, 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 299 

Samuel Max^ was a descendant of tbe Pennsylvania Dutch and was a most enthu- 
siastic adherent to the Union cause serving throughout the Civil war with Company 
G, Eleventh Regiment Ohio Infantry. His mother, Nancy Elizabeth (Hyatt) Max, 
was of English descent and a daughter of one of the first business men in Tippe- 
canoe, Ohio. 

Charles Edward Max was educated in the grammar and high schools at Tippe- 
canoe, Ohio, and for his first work labored on a farm until 1882. Interested in 
railroad work he took up the study of telegraphy and routine office work and se- 
cured employment with the Big Four Railroad at Troy, Ohio, six miles from Tippe- 
canoe, this being up to that time the farthest distance that he had ever ventured 
from home. In 1883 he entered the employment of the Missouri Pacific Railroad 
Company with headquarters at St. Louis, serving as telegraph operator and agent 
at different points for a year and a half. In 1885 he was sent by the same com- 
pany as division agent on the Cairo branch of their road and in 1886 was ap- 
pointed agent on the main line at Piedmont, Missouri, where he remained fifteen 
years. For the sake of his wife's and his own health he then removed to Rialto, 
Cahfornia, severing his connection with the Missouri Pacific Railroad Company, 
with whom he had been employed for eighteen years, and accepted a position as 
agent for the Santa Fe Railroad in which capacity he acted for £.ve years when he 
entered the hardware business. During all the twenty-four years of his railroad 
service his record was perfect, and for his devotion to duty and his conscientious 
regard for carrying out his instructions and maintaining the company's high stand- 
ard of efficiency he was constantly advanced from position to position without any 
sohcitation on his part. 

Through careful management and with an eye to the future Mr. Max had by 
this time saved of his earnings a sufficient sum to enable him to invest in some 
enterprise that would make him independent and insure him a good income and 
consequently in 1906 he came to Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, and founded the mercan- 
tile establishment known as the Branson-Max Hardware Company of which he 
became president, continuing in this relation with the firm to the present time. Well 
trained in the systematic execution of business details and keeping an ever watch- 
ful eye on the fluctuating conditions of the market and the constantly varying de- 
mands in the industrial and agricultural world he has not only built up his business 
to its present flourishing proportions but has become known as one of the very keen 
and up-to-date business men, whose spirit of enterprise contributes in no small de- 
gree to the growth of the community. 

His popularity and the leading position which he occupies may be gauged by 
the honors which have been accorded him at the hands of his fellow tradesmen. 
He is the president of the Pacific Northwest Hardware & Implement Dealers' As- 
sociation, and also president of the Pacific Federation of Hardware and Imple- 
ment Dealers, an organization which embraces the states of Idaho, Washington, 
Oregon and California, having been elected to the latter position at the last con- 
vention at Sacramento, California, March 15, 1911. He was appointed a delegate 
to the meeting of the National Hardware Association held at Little Rock, Arkansas, 
at which he was greatly instrumental in adjusting some important matters con- 
nected with the hardware business. 

Tbe marriage of Mr. Max and Miss Helen Dunn of Iron county, Missouri, was 
solemnized at Jonesboro, Arkansas, in 1884. Two children were bom of this 



300 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

union: Aureola, born in 1888, who is the wife of Earl Tibbott, of Rialto, California, 
and who now resides in Oregon; and Samuel, bom in 1890, who attends the Uni- 
versity of Puget Sound, where he is studying medicine. Mrs. Max passed away 
in 1900 at Rialto, California, after suffering under a cloud of ill health for some 
time. In 1901 Mr. Max was again married, his second union being with Miss Lucy 
E. Conrey, of Piqua, Ohio, a daughter of Joseph R. Conrey, one of the most suc- 
cessful farmers in Ohio, engaged in scientific farming. By this marriage there is 
a son, Dwyer Edward, bom August 15, 1909. 

' Mr. and Mrs. Max are members of the Methodist Episcopal church of Coeur 
d'Alene and he has been the president of the board of trustees ever since his con- 
nection with this church during his residence in the town. He is prominent in Ma- 
sonic circles, being a member of Kootenai Lodge, No. 34, F. & A. M., and of Chap- 
ter No. 12, R. A. M., of Coeur d'Alene, in which he has held all the offices, and 
Temple Commandery No. 8, of Coeur d'Alene. He was elected grand prelate of 
the Knight Templars of the state of Idaho and, furthermore holds membership in 
El Katif Temple of the Mystic Shrine, of Spokane. Mr. Max is well known 
throughout Idaho and the adjoining section of the country and takes an active part 
in every movement designed to further the welfare of society at large. At the time 
of the great railroad wreck at Gibbs Siding, Idaho^ which occurred on the occasion 
of the opening of the Coeur d'Alene reservation, when thirteen people were killed, 
he was appointed one of the commissioners to decide the cause of the accident. In 
September, 1911, a distinctive honor was conferred upon him by his selection to 
serve as a member of the advisory board of the University of Puget Sound, of Ta- 
coma, Washington. Mr. Max has come into the enjoyment of a substantial income 
by means of incessant and carefully directed activity and owns property in Lafay- 
ette, Indiana, besides the handsome residence in which he lives at No. 822, Garden 
street, Coeur d'Alene. In matters of business as well as in his private relations 
he maintains a standard of honor from which he never departs, believing that hon- 
esty is the best policy, and that a clear conscience is the most desirable joy in life. 



EDWARD HENRY LETTERMAN. 

Among the pioneer citizens of Pullman who have substantially contributed to- 
ward the upbuilding and development of the community must be numbered. Ed ward 
Henry Letterman, who has been a resident of this town for thirty-two years. 
Until recently he has been actively identified with various local enterprises, but he 
is now living retired, his various properties providing him with a handsome income. 
He was bom in Germany on the ISth of March, 1840, and is a son of Jacob and 
Elizabeth (Benton) Letterman, also natives of the fatherland, where the mother 
passed away. 

When old enough to begin his education, Edward Henry Letterman entered 
the government schools of his native country, continuing his student days until he 
had attained the age of fourteen years. His text-books were then laid aside and 
he was apprenticed to the blacksmith's trade, to the mastery of which he diligently 
applied himself until 1857. The entire family desired to found a new home in the 
United States, but circumstances prevented such plans at that time. Edward, how- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 801 

ever, although only a youth of seventeen years had evinced the judgment and fore- 
sight of one many years his senior^ and it was decided that he should go to the new 
world as the family's emissary and become established. The year 1857 saw him 
on his way to America and he arrived here with ten dollars in his pocket, unfamiliar 
with the language and customs of the country, but with a stout heart, that knew 
no fear for the future. He first located in Little Falls, Herkimer county, New 
York, where he obtained work in a dairy at twenty-five cents per day. Hours were 
long and his tasks were heavy, but as twenty-five cents was considered good pay 
for a youth of his age at that time he remained faithful to the work. Anxious 
to bring his people of this country, he denied himself every comfort and sometimes 
even the necessities of life, hoarding every cent until he had accumulated seventy- 
five dollars. This sum he immediately forwarded to his father and soon thereafter 
was joined by him, two sisters and two brothers. By means of thrift, the 
rigid economy and unceasing diligence, he acquired a sufficient sum to purchase 
eighty acres of land in Michigan in 1879. His family immediately thereafter took 
up their residence in the western state, but Mr. Letterman remained in Herkimer 
county until the following year when he joined his family in Michigan. 

He energetically applied himself to the cultivation of the farm until December, 
1861, when he enlisted in Company I of Colonel Berdan's Sharpshooters. His 
baptism of fire was received at Yorkton, following which he engaged in many 
notable conflicts until the battle of Fair Oaks, in which he was wounded. Soon 
thereafter he also fell a victim to typhoid fever and, as soon as he was able to leave 
the hospital^ was sent to Washington, D. C, where he was discharged in 1868. 
Returning home, he gave such assistance as his health and strength permitted in 
the work of the farm until the 24th of August, 1864, when he reenlisted in the 
First Michigan Cavalry, as a member of Company F, under General Custer and 
again went to the front. He remained in the service until the close of hostilities, 
being mustered out at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, on June 16, 1865. 

Again resuming the duties of civil life, during the succeeding two years he 
devoted his entire time and attention to agricultural pursuits on the home farm 
in Michigan. In 1867, he turned his attention to commercial activities and es- 
tablished a lumberman's supply store that he conducted with substantial returns 
for ten years. At the expiration of that period, in 1877, he came to Washington, 
locating at Goldendale, where he engaged in the sheep business. This undertaking 
proved to be a most unfortunate venture, as his herd was caught on the prairies 
by a terrible blizzard and he lost forty-two hundred head of sheep. This calamity 
decided him to withdraw from the business and in 1879 he homesteaded some 
land, upon which he resided until 1882, when he came to Pullman and established 
a hardware and implement store. In the autumn of the following year he dis- 
posed of the store and began buying land, acquiring in all about two thousand 
acres that he laid out in six additions to Pullman. He was always a public-spirited 
man, taking much interest in the community's development and he presented two 
hundred and thirty acres of this land to the state for the Agricultural College, and 
gave seventy-five acres to his frietids. In the meantime, this section of the state 
had become a great grain country and in 1885, Mr. Letterman engaged in the 
wheat business; first, as buyer for the Portland Flour Mills Company; and later 
for the Balfour-Guthrie Company. This departure proved to be a lucrative under- 
^ng, and in one year he sold one hundred and fifty thousand bushels of wheat 



302 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

in the east at an increase of twelve cents over the local market. When the panic 
came in 1898^ it caught Mr. Letterman in its clutches, leaving him practically 
penniless, but he is not of the type of men that are easily vanquished, and resolutely 
he began to reestablish himself in the business world. He again engaged in the 
grain business, buying and selling wheat until 1901, when he invested in lands 
adjacent to Pullman, acquiring gradually very valuable holdings that he has im- 
proved. Having passed the age of three score and ten, Mr. Letterman has now 
withdrawn from the exactions of an active business life, although he looks after 
his property, all of which he is renting. 

At Goldendale, Washington, on Christmas day, 1881, Mr. Letterman and Miss 
Mary E. Tatham were united in marriage. She is a native of the state of New 
York and a daughter of Thomas and Ellen (Woods) Tatham, both of whom were 
bom in England. Ever since granted the right of franchise by naturalization, 
Mr. Letterman has given his allegiance to the republican party. He has always 
taken a personal interest in political activities and in 1892 was state representative 
from this district. In every sense of the word he is a self-made man, such success 
as he has achieved in the long course of his business career being entirely attribut- 
able to his own well concentrated and intelligently directly efforts, as he came to 
this country practically empty handed. His life is but one of the many that have 
conclusively demonstrated that the essential assets for a successful career in 
America are unceasing energy and determination of purpose. 



J. FLOYD TIFFT, D. M. D. 

Dr. J. Floyd Tifft, the present mayor of Colfax, is one of the leading practi- 
tioners of dentistry in Whitman county, where he has been following his profession 
for the past eight years. He was born in Sycamore, Illinois, on the 23d of June, 
1878, and is a son of Elan D. and Josephine (Saum) Tifft, both natives of Illinois. 
The paternal grandfather was John Tifft, who was born and reared in Vermont and 
traced his ancestry back to the early colonial days of New England, his forefathers 
having come to America on the Mayflower. The maternal ancestors came from Penn- 
sylvania, which was the native state of the grandfather, Nicholas Saum. 

Dr. Tifft was reared in his native state to the age of eighteen years, and there 
began his education, which was completed in the high school of Hutchinson, 
Minnesota, where he removed with his parents in 1896. Having decided upon 
a professional career in the choice of a vocation, he matriculated in the depart- 
ment of dentistry in the University of Minnesota, where he pursued his profes- 
sional studies. While in college he took a prominent part in athletics and for 
three years was a member of the football team. He was graduated with the de- 
gree of D. M. D. with the class of 1902, and almost immediately thereafter came 
to the northwest, locating in Seattle there following his profession until he 
came to Colfax. Here he has since been located and, owing to the high standard 
of his work, has succeeded in building up a good following. In the course of his 
residence here he has established a reputation which is most commendable and his 
patronage is remarkable for its size and class. He is in every way a worthy 
representative of his profession, his excellent training in connection with his 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 303 

inherent mechanical skill having united in making him a dentist of much more 
than average ability. 

At Spokane^ this state, on the 5th of June, 1907, Dr. Tifft was united in mar- 
riage to Mrs. Laura E. Ross of Iowa, a daughter of August and Johanna (Gustoff) 
Supper, both of Germany. Dr. Tifft is a member of Hiram Lodge, No. 21, A. 
F. & A. M. and is treasurer of the chapter and likewise a member of Moscow 
Lodge, No. 249, B. P. O. E., and of Colfax Lodge, No. 8, K. of P., in which he 
has passed through all of the chairs, and has twice been a delegate to the Grand 
Lodge. During his university days he joined the Delta Sigma Delta fraternity, 
and he is now identified with the Washington University of Minnesota Alumni 
Association, while he maintains relations with his fellow practitioners through 
the medium of his connection with the Washington State Dental Society. His 
political indorsement is given to the republican party and for three years he was 
a member of the town council and he is now filling the mayor's chair. He has 
always taken an active interest in local politics and is now and has been for some 
time past the 'chairman of the county central committee. Dr. Tifft is a man of 
high ideals and standards that he strives to maintain in his public and profes- 
sional as well as private life and has won the esteem and respect of many of the 
best citizens of the town, who in turn have evidenced their confidence in his worth 
by calling him to the highest office in the municipality. 



CHARLES A. LIBBY. 



Charles A. Libby is proprietor of one of the finest photograph studios in Spo- 
kane and has a business which is most creditable for a young man of his years. He 
has not yet traveled life's journey for a third of a century, his birth having occurred 
in Oljrmpia, Washington, September 19, 1879. His father, George A. Libby, a na- 
tive of Maine, left New England to become a resident of California, where he es- 
tablished his home in 1853. The mother, Elizabeth (Maurer) Libby, a native of 
Germany, came to America in 1867, arriving in Idaho the same year, where she re- 
sided until her marriage in 1869. The father became very prominently and widely 
known in mining circles throughout the western country because of his extensive 
and important operations in connection with the development of mining resources 
on the Pacific coast. His death occurred in 1898. 

In the public schools of the capital city Charles A. Libby began his education at 
the usual age and passed through consecutive grades until his graduation from high 
school, after which he devoted one year to a commercial course. At the age of nine- 
teen years he was employed as a clerk in a clothing store in Olympia and after a 
short time went upon a business trip to Alaska, thus spending the summer of 1898. 
Following the death of his father he came to Spokane with his mother and family, 
consisting of his brother, George H. Libby, who is now associated with the Phelps 
Lumber Company, and two sisters: Addie C, who conducts the Libby Art Studio; 
and Ruth H., at home. 

Following his removal to this city Charles A. Libby secured a clerkship with Ar- 
mour & Company in their branch oflice but after a brief period withdrew from that 
connection and spent one year in the employ of the B. L. Gordon Wholesale Grocery 



304 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Company. He then turned his attention to photography^ establishing his studio in 
1898. By continuous study ^ work and experience he has developed one of the finest 
studios in Spokane^ his work being of the most artistic nature^ manifesting also the 
latest improved processes of the photographic art. His patronage is now extensive 
and its continued growth is assured^ owing to his knowledge of the business and the 
fact that he keeps in touch with improvements that are continuously being made in 
photographic work. 

On the 12th of July^ 1905^ Mr. Libby was united in marriage to Miss Gretchen 
Schlessler^ of St. Paul, Minnesota, and they have one son, Charles, Jr. Mr. Libby 
votes with the republican party. Outside of business hours he gives his time and 
attention to his home, caring nothing for club and society affairs. He holds to high 
ideals in his chosen profession and, working continuously for improvement, has made 
a most creditable busines record. 



EDWARD S. ROSS. 



Edward S. Ross, of the Ross Investment Company, has contributed to the 
development and improvement of the city through well conducted business interests 
that add not only to individual success but also to the public prosperity. His birth oc- 
curred at Penfield, New York, October 26, 1853, and of that state his parents, Oliver 
C. and Betsey (Sherman) Ross, were early settlers. The father devoted his atten- 
tion to farming while in the east and in the year 1884 he came to Spokane with 
his family, which then consisted of himself, wife and two sons, Edward S. and 
George L., both now of this city, and a daughter. The parents have traveled life's 
journey happily together for sixty-two years and now at the advanced ages of eighty- 
eight and eighty-seven years, respectively, are living with their daughter, Mrs. 
Frances Linfield, the widow of George Linfield. 

After acquiring his early education in the public schools of Rochester, New 
York, and pursuing a more advanced course in Rochester Collegiate Institute, 
Edward S. Ross became his father's assistant in farming operations in the Em- 
pire state and was thus engaged until the family came to Spokane in 1884. For 
three years thereafter he did general work in and around the city and then se- 
cured a quarter section of land in the valley, upon which he began market gar- 
dening and fruit growing. He was the first in this section to cultivate asparagus 
and tomatoes for the market and such was the excellence of his products that he 
was soon accorded a good market for all that he raised. He later acquired other 
property adjoining his original tract and while at first this was a long way from 
the city, the boundaries of Spokane have since been extended until his property 
has been included within the corporation limits and is now known as the Rossvale 
addition. For a considerable period Mr. Ross continued the raising of vegetables 
and fruit, and the success of the business enabled him to make investments along 
other lines. Thus from time to time he extended his interests and is now presi- 
dent of the Ross Coal Company, which he organized for the conduct of a whole- 
sale coal business in Spokane. He was likewise the organizer of the Ross In- 
vestment Company and remained as its general manager until 1908 since which 
time he has been its president. He is still interested in the project and the com- 



EDWARD S. I 



■** 



-1.: ■. V •.■■\ak 

;F';:i..;:: i ::-;haky 






SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 307 

pany today has a large clientage. He is also a heavy property owner not only 
in this city but throughout the Spokane country and also has large landed pos- 
sessions in the Kootenai valley. 

On the 4th of September, 1879, Mr. Ross was married to Miss Mary Clark, 
a daughter of Orrin and Jeannette (MiUard) Clark, of Penfield, New York. They 
have become parents of five children: Linfield S., who is acting as secretary and 
treasurer of the Ross Investment Company; Elwyn G., vice president of the 
same company; Orrin Clark, who is an artist, employed by the McDermid En- 
graving Company, of Spokane; Edward Wayland, who is an apprentice in the 
latter company; and Edna, the wife of Laurence M. Parker, of Bonners Ferry, 
Idaho. 

Mr. Ross is a charter member of Grace Baptist church, which his family at- 
tend. He has never sought to figure prominently in club circles or in public 
connections outside of his business interests. He has closely applied himself to 
the tasks that have been his, and since he has successfully accomplished the work 
in hand he has turned his attention to other projects. He has never regarded 
any position as final but rather as the starting point for successful accomplish- 
ment in other directions and through his individual merit, ability, close applica- 
tion and unremitting industry, he has gained a creditable position as one of the 
leading business men of Spokane. 



[ M^ ' '; — *^-^. »'• 



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• ■ . . . .■.< J . ~ m 



JOHN ENOS McFARLAND. ! 

John Enos McFarland, a resident bf ' ftepulSlSc, is" prominently connected with 
mining operations, having made extensive and judicious investment in mining prop- 
erties in his district. He is now a large stockholder and a director in the Republic 
Mines Corporation, and general superintendent of the North Washington Power & 
Reduction Company. He is also interested in the Imperator-Quilp Compahy, The 
Hope Company, the Knob Hill Company and others, all of which indicates his prom- 
inence in this field and his thorough understanding of the business which constitutes 
a basic element in the growing prosperity of the northwest. 

Mr. McFarland was born in Elma, Washington, December 5, 1877. His father, 
Wilbam O. McFarland, died in 1881, after a residence of thirty years in the north- 
west. He crossed the plains to Oregon in 1851 and soon thereafter moved to Che- 
halis county, of which he was the first or second sheriff. In this section of the 
country he married Susanna Slover, who is a native of Oregon and now makes her 
home in Republic. 

John E. McFarland was educated in the public schools of this state and in the 
Blair Business College at Spokane, finishing his course there when twenty-three 
years of age. Previous to attending business college, however, he was engaged in 
the dray and transfer business at Farmington, Washington, and subsequent to his 
college course he entered the employ of the Kettle Valley Railroad Company, of 
which he practically acted as secretary until appointed to the office of county clerk 
of Ferry county, this state. He filled that position for eighteen months, during 
which time he entered into busines relations with J. L. Harper, with whom he has 
since been associated in mining interests. His holdings are now quite extensive 

Vol m— 16 



308 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

and judicious investment and keen sagacity have characterised all of his under- 
takings. He is today connected with some of the most valuable mining properties 
of his district and their operation is returning to him a good income. 

At Colfax, Washington, June 14, IdOS, Mr. McFarland was united in marriage 
to Miss Allie Montgomery and they have three children, Mildred Alice, Jack S. and 
Robert E. In his political views Mr. McFarland is a democrat, active in the local 
party ranks. He has served as secretary of the party campaign committee and of 
the democratic county central committee. He also headed a local option movement 
at Republic but it was defeated. He is a member of the Republic Booster Club, in 
which connection he is doing everything in his power to promote the welfare and 
progress of the town. His religious faith. is tliat of the Christian church and the 
different elements in his life are well balanced factors, leading to the development 
of ft strong and honorable manhood which constitutes him one of the prominent and 
progressive citizens of the Inland Empire. 



WILLIAM ROSS ANDERSON. 

William Boss Anderson, who has been identified with the banking interests of 
Colfax for the past eight years, was born in eastern Tennessee on the 28th of No- 
vember, 1875, his parents being William H. and Louise ( Blankenship) Anderson, 
natives of the same state. 

When he was fourteen years of age William Boss Anderson left the public schools 
and began qualifying for a business career as a clerk in a general mercantile store. 
Becognising the need of further education, at the end of two years he returned to 
the public school for a time and subsequently pursued a commercial course. In 
1S93 he again engaged in clerking, continuing to follow this occupation for three 
years. At the expiration of that time he became a bookkeeper in the Citizens Bank 
of London, Tennessee, but he resigned this position at the end of two years and be- 
came associated with John H. Kimbrough in the general mercantile business at 
Morganton, Tennessee. He had always been most desirous of coming to the north- 
west and so disposing of his various interests in Tennessee in 1903 he removed to 
Colfax. Immediately upon his arrival he entered the employ of the First National 
Bank, continuing in their service for two years. In 1905 the First National Bank 
and Colfa% National Bank consolidated under the name of the Colfax National Bank 
and he was taken over by the new institution. Two years later he became assistant 
cashier of the First Savings & Trust Bank of Whitman county, leaving their em- 
ploy in December, 1909, to become cashier of the Farmers State Bank of Colfai, 
the duties of which position he has ever since discharged. Mr. Anderson owns 
stock in the bank with which he is now identified and he is also interested in the 
se business. 

klorganton, Tennessee, on the 19th of April, 1899, Mr. Anderson was united 
iage to Miss May Kimbrough, a native of that state and a daughter of John 
Ida (Magill) Kimbrough', who were also born in Tennessee. Three daogfa- 
e been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Anderson, Ida Louise, Bessie Boe and Esther 

family affiliate with the Congregational church. Mr. Anderson is a menf 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 809 

ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Woodmen of the World and the 
Knights of Pjrthias, being past chancellor and a member of the Grand Lodge of 
Washington. He belongs to the Commercial Club of Colfax and votes with the re- 
publican party. He has never in the sense of the politician been an office seeker nor 
tried to gain political preferment for any ulterior motive or financial gain, but has 
served as postmaster while residing at Morganton, receiving his appointment under 
President McKinley, and is at present city treasurer of Colfax, being elected in 
1911. During the period of his residence in Colfax, Mr. Anderson has always man- 
ifested high business principles and strict integrity in all of his transactions, and 
has thus won and retained the respect of all with whom he has had dealings. 



HARRY J. NEELY. 



Harry J. Neely, prominently known in connection with irrigation projects and 
real-estate dealing in the Spokane country, is a splendid type of that class of men 
who have the ability to plan and to perform and who are prompt, energetic and 
notably reliable in all business transactions and who recognize and utilize op- 
portunities that lead to general progress as well as to individual success. He was 
bom in Jacksonville, Illinois, March 1, 1867, and is a representative of an old 
American family of Scotch-Irish descent that has been prominent in Pennsylvania 
through many generations. Early records show a deed from William Penn for 
land purchased by a member of the Neely family. Samuel W. Neely, the father of 
Harry J. Neely, was born in the Keystone state and for a time resided in Illinois, 
serving as treasurer of Henry county, that state, for four years. He is now a 
retired merchant of Lincoln, Nebraska. His wife, who bore the maiden name of 
Katherine M. Gamble, was also bom in Pennsylvania and represents one of the 
old families, also of Scotch-Irish origin. She, too, is living in Lincoln and has 
reached the advanced age of eighty years. A son, W. W. Neely, is living in Spo- 
kane, where he is engaged in horticultural work, and a daughter. Sue G. Neely, 
makes her home with her parents. 

Harry J. Neely was educated in the public schools of Woodhull, Illinois, and 
as a boy began learning the printer's trade at Cambridge, Illinois. Subsequently 
he removed to Wyoming, where the winter of 1886-7 was passed and in the spring 
of the latter year he began the publication of the Sheridan Post, a weekly repub- 
lican paper at Sheridan, Wyoming, owned by prominent residents of that place. 
He was thus connected with newspaper interests until November, 1889, when he 
came to Spokane. Here he was first employed in a job printing establishment 
located near the north end of and facing the Monroe street bridge, which was 
then a wooden structure. Before the close of the year, however, Mr. N'eely went 
to Wilbur, Washington, and took a position on the Wilbur Register. A year later 
he purchased the paper and continued its publication for eight years. The country 
was new at the time and he used his publication to further the interests of the 
district, bringing it into public notice and thus exploiting its resources and ad- 
vantages. To do this he thoroughly acquainted himself with the district and its 
property values and came to be largely regarded as an authority upon realty and 
was consulted concerning the purchase of property. Thus he was forced into the 



310 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

real-estate business and after disposing of his paper continued to handle property 
in that locality for four years, returning to Spokane in 1901. Here he opened a 
real-estate office, becoming associated with Governor M. E. Hay and his brother, 
E. T. Hay. While at Wilbur he sold several townships to actual settlers, also pro- 
moted the road up the San Poil river to Republic and built the first ferry in that 
country across the Columbia river. At the opening of the south half of the Col- 
ville reservation he was the first to receive the news and the first to go there and 
give the word that started the dynamite which warned the prospectors to put up 
their notices. While connected with the Hay brothers they developed the Hay's 
Park addition to Spokane and continued to handle farm lands in the Big Bend 
country. The second year after his return to Spokane, Mr. Neely engaged in ir- 
rigation work on his own account, becoming interested in general irrigation pro- 
jects. He also took up the sales agency for a large property on the Columbia 
river and afterward accepted the agency for the Spokane Valley Land & Water 
Company, representing J. C. Cunningham and others. In this connection he dis- 
posed of eighteen hundred acres, selling off East Greenacres and Old Green- 
acres, after which the property was taken over by D. C. Corbin, the present owner. 
About that time Mr. Neely formed a partnership with C. F. Young and C. M. 
Speck and organized the present firm of Neely & Young, Inc., taking over some 
lower land on the Columbia river below Wenatchee. There he installed a pump- 
ing plant and planted all the tract to a commercial orchard, which is just now 
coining into bearing. The district comprised four hundred and fifty-five acres 
but he has since sold a part of it. In the spring of 1905 he took the management 
of the sales agency for the Opportunity property, comprising three thousand acres, 
sold off the land and brought in many of the families now located there. When 
he undertook the work, there were only four families and three school children in 
the embryo village. Over five hundred families are now located there and no- 
where could be found a more contented and prosperous people, for the conditions 
which there exist are ideal. Before the sale of Opportunity was completed the 
firm accepted the sales agency of Hazelwood, west of Spokane, and practically 
sold all of that tract of twenty-six hundred acres. In 1909 they purchased four 
hundred and thirty-six acres a mile and a half east of Spokane and installed an 
irrigation plant, which is the most complete and substantial to be found in any 
little irrigated district in the United States. They called this district Orchard 
Avenue and have practically sold the entire property as suburban home sites. In 
the fall of 1910 Mr. Neely and associates purchased the famous Burrell orchard 
at Med ford, Oregon, comprising six hundred and five acres, nearly all of which 
is in bearing. He went to Chicago and sold the greater part of this to a wealthy 
class, at prices ranging from one thousand to twenty-three hundred dollars an acre. 
In Spokane the firm since its organization has sold property worth approximately 
seven million dollars, this being principally irrigated farm, fruit and hay lands. 
They own twenty-six hundred and forty acres of wheat land in the Big Bend coun- 
try under cultivation, have a tract of timber land in Stevens county and own two 
hundred and ten acres of irrigated lands in the Spokane valley, part of which is 
already in bearing orchards, while the remainder is being developed. Mr. Neely 
is also interested in the Spokane Title Abstract Company. He has been one of the 
most active in development projects in the northwest, owing to an understanding 
of the opportunities and resources of the country and faith in its future. Through 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 311 

his influence many hundreds have obtained homes in this district and the growth 
of the Inland Empire^ especially in that region adjacent to Spokane, is attribut- 
able in large measure to his work, his methods at all times being practical and re- 
sultant. 

At all times Mr. Neely's aid can be gained for any project that he believes of 
practical value and worth in the upbuilding and development of the northwest. In 
1908 he was manager of the Spokane National Apple Show, was one of its organ- 
isers and took a very active part in making the project a success. He is a member 
of the Chamber of Commerce, is one of the active members of the publicity com- 
mittee and has labored to advance the interests and purposes of the organization 
throughout the entire period of his residence in the city. His activity has also 
extended to political circles and he is known as a stalwart advocate of republican 
principles and an active worker in party ranks. He has been a delegate to city, 
county and state conventions from Lincoln county and was one of the thirteen in 
his precinct who stood immovable in support of republican principles while the 
silver movement swept over this part of the country. He has been a member of the 
county central committee and to political work brings the same practical methods 
and sound judgment which have been characteristic of his business career. 

In social and fraternal relations, too, Mr. Neely is well known. He has at- 
tained high rank in Masonry as a member of the consistory and of the Mystic 
Shrine. He also holds membership with the Knights of Pythias, the Dramatic 
Order of the Knights of Khorassan, the Woodmen of the World and the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen. He was a member of the famous 150,000 Club and 
acted as its president in the year 1909. Pleasantly situated in his home, relations, 
he was married at Mondovi, Washington, on Thanksgiving Day of 1890, to Miss 
Florence G. Smith, a daughter of T. N. Smith, a farmer and one of the old-time 
residents of that section, living there since 1883. The three children of this mar- 
riage are: Amy Jane, now a student in Whitman College; and Marguerite and 
Suella, who are attending Brunot Hall. 

In a review of the life history of Harry J. Neely it is evident that personal abil- 
ity and not fortunate circumstances has constituted the basis of his advancement 
and success. Dependent upon his own resources from his boyhood days, his has 
been a strenuous career in which he has based his advancement upon the sub- 
stantial qualities of industry and determination. He has ever regarded the duty 
nearest at hand as the most essential one and in its faithful performance has found 
courage and strength for the succeeding duty. Thus step by step he has advanced 
until he stands today among those who are leaders in the real-estate field in Spokane. 



CHARLES EDWARD HOOVER. 

Charles Edward Hoover, who is one of the prominent general mercantile dealers 
«>f Lacrosse, Whitman county, was born in Indiana, on the 8th of April, 1869, a son 
of Lambert J. and Cynthia M. (Davis) Hoover, natives of Ohio and Indiana re- 
spectively. 

After completing a public-school course, Charles E. Hoover entered the Indiana 
American Normal School of Logansport, Indiana, and in 1888 began teaching school 



812 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

in that state. He remained a resident of the Hoosier state until 1890, when he re- 
moved to Palouse City, Whitman county, where he again engaged in school teaching, 
being for three years principal of the school at Albion. Later, desiring to enter 
apon an independent career, in 1900 he engaged in the grain business at Pullman, 
which enterprise he conducted until five years later, when he removed to Lacrosse 
and in partnership with C. Bowman engaged in the general mercantile business. 
Subsequently he was associated with F. M. Bowman but in 1908 he purchased the 
entire stock and has since been its sole proprietor. His concrete building is one of 
the most substantial in the county and has a floor space of forty by ninely-six feet. 
An extensive business is conducted, the trade increasing year by year, as the most 
modem and progressive business methods are employed. By careful supervision and 
constant attendance upon his work he is able to study the needs of his customers and 
the trend of trade to such an extent that his store is one of the most popular and 
practically arranged in Lacrosse. 

In July, 1902, Mr. Hoover was married, at Pampa, to Miss Lelia Bowman, of 
Pampa, a daughter of D. S. and Rachel (Gilliam) Bowman, both of whom are na- 
tives of Missouri. In 1847 they came as pioneers to California, their arrival ante- 
dating by only two or three years the famous excitement over the discovery of gold 
in that state. To them have been bom two children, Lambert David and Alma Ra- 
chael. Mr. Hoover gives his political support to the republican party. His interest 
in local affairs is indicated by the fact that he has been a member of the school board 
for five years. He holds membership in Lacrosse Lodge, No. 155, A. F. & A. M., 
and in Pullman Camp, No. 118, W, O. W. He has always been interested in the 
social and educational welfare of Lacrosse and his aid can be counted upon to 
further its progressive interests. 



CHARLES LYMAN CHAMBERLIN. 

Charles Lyman Chamberlin, for the past four years a member of the legal fra- 
ternity of Whitman county, was born in Henry county, Ohio, on the 15th of October, 
1866, his parents being Orson N. and Ellen G. (Maxwell) Chamberlin. The 
father, a native of Vermont and the mother of Pennsylvania lived for some years 
in Ohio, whence they subsequently removed to Indiana. The Chamberlin family 
were associated with the early history of New England, the first representative bear- 
ing that name having located there in 1647. They were always loyal and patriotic, 
working for the welfare of their country, and several members of the family partici- 
pated in the Revolutionary war while the Orson N. Chamberlin, the father of our 
subject, participated in the Civil war. 

As he was only a child of two years when his parents removed to Remington, 
Indiana, in 1868, the earliest recollections of Charles Lyman Chamberlin are asso- 
ciated with the latter state. There he was reared and educated in the common 
schools, terminating his student days at the age of eighteen, having always applied 
himself diligently to his lessons. Study being a pleasure to him instead of a hard- 
ship, he seemed to be destined to assume the duties of a teacher and became identi- 
fied with this profession in 1884. Two years later he removed to McLean county, 
Illinois, where he continued to teach but thereafter devoted his leisure hours to the 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 313 

study of law in the office of the Honorable John Sterling, of Bloomington. As he 
had fully resolved to adopt the latter profession for his life vocation, he went^ in 
1889, to Chicago and matriculated in the legal department of the Northwestern Uni- 
versity, from which institution he was graduated in 1890 with the degree of LL. B. 
He was admitted to the bar of Illinois in March of the same year, and soon there- 
after established an office in Chicago, where he engaged in practice until May, 1 892. 
From there he went to Hoopeston, Illinois, becoming associated vnth the Honorable 
Charles A. Allen, with whom he was connected in practice until June, 1 899. His next 
removal was to Pontiac, Illinois, where in connection with his legal work, he con- 
ducted an abstract business until 1906. In the latter year he came to the north- 
west, first settling in Spokane, remaining there until January, 1908, when he came 
to Whitman county. Upon his arrival here he located in Garfield, but in the De- 
cember following he became a resident of Colfax, and has since been engaged in 
practice here. Mr. Chamberlin is very much interested in the development of the 
northwest and has speculated more or less in real estate since locating here, having 
thus acquired several pieces of valuable property. 

Chicago, Illinois, was the scene of Mr. Chamberlin's marriage on the 15th of 
March, 1893, to Miss Sadie W. Hodgkins, a native of the state of Maine, as were 
likewise her parents, Thomas J. and Lemira (Wooster) Hodgkins. One child has 
been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Chamberlin, Dorothy Louise. 

Mr. Chamberlin has always been an active worker in the Methodist Episcopal 
church and is now a member of the official board and superintendent of the Sunday 
school, while his wife and daughter are also interested in the work of the various 
societies and organizations of this church. Fraternally he is a member of the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America, and was delegate to the head camp in 1911 ; the ICnights 
of Pjrthias, of which he is past vice chancellor ; the Pythian Sisters ; and the Grange. 
Political activities have always engaged his attention to a greater or less degree, his' 
allegiance being accorded the republican party, and his fellow townsmen have recog- 
nized his loyalty and worth on several occasions by calling him to public office. 
While residing in Hoopeston, Illinois, in 1895, he was elected city attorney, serving 
in this capacity for four years, and at one time he was also a member of the Illi- 
nois senatorial committee. Since coming to Whitman county he has- discharged the 
duties of prosecuting attorney, his term covering the years 1909 and 1910. Mr. 
Chamberlin is a man of recognized worth and capability, whose upright principles 
and high ideals commend him to the esteem and respect of his fellow citizens. 



EDWIN CHOATE. 



Edwin Choate, a conductor on the Colfax and Moscow division of the Oregon 
Railway & Navigation Company's road, was bom in Chickasaw county, Iowa, on 
the 10th of March, 1871, his parents being James and Mary (Miller) Choate, the 
father a native of Indiana and the mother of Ohio. 

In 1876, Edwin Choate removed with his parents to Kansas and there passed 
his boyhood and early youth. When old enough to begin his education he entered 
the public schools, continuing his student days until he had attained the age of fifteen 
years, when he started out in the world on his own responsibility, obtaining em- 



314 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

ployment as a farm hand and following this occupation for two years in Kansas. 
At the expiration of that time he came to the Pacific coast^ settling in Pendleton, 
Oregon, in 1888, where he was employed as a day laborer. Later in the year he 
came to Whitman county, taking up his residence in Rosalia, and there for a time 
he worked in the harness shop of his brother. Grant S. Choate. He was next em- 
ployed on the Rosalia Rustler, a local weekly, but in 1890 he returned to agricul- 
tural pursuits and during the succeeding year was engaged in the service of a ranch- 
man of that vicinity. In 1891 he went to Tekoa and there obtained work in the 
shops of the Union Pacific Railroad Company, continuing in their service until 1894. 
From there he removed to Spokane and for six years thereafter was employed by 
the Spokane Falls & Northern Railroad. Returning to Tekoa in 1900, he entered 
the service of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company, in the capacity of brake- 
man. Proving to be thoroughly reliable and discharging his duties with efficiency, 
the company recognized his worth and capability two years later by promoting him 
to the position of conductor. He has now been serving in this connection for prac- 
tically ten years, and during that time has proven himself entirely deserving of the 
confidence and trust reposed in him by his employers, by the conscientious and ca- 
pable fulfilment of his duties. In 1908 he removed to Moscow, Idaho, having been 
transferred to the Colfax and Moscow division of the road, and has ever since been 
making this run. 

At Sprague, Washington, on the 22d of March, 1903, Mr. Choate was united in 
marriage to Miss Ivy Wicker, a native of Missouri and a daughter of John and 
Emma (Proctor) Wicker. Fraternally Mr. Choate is affiliated with the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias 
and the Order of Railway Conductors. He is in every way a credit to the service 
he is following, being a man of integrity and honorable motives who discharges to 
•the best of his ability the duties with which he is entrusted, at all times striving to 
protect the interests of his employers. 



BURCHARD H. ROARK, M. D. 

Dr. Burchard H. Roark, county physician of Spokane county and also enjoy- 
ing a large private practice, was born in Lebanon, Indiana, March 6, 1877. His 
is an old American family that was founded in Virginia during colonial days. 
Later the family was established in Kentucky in pioneer times and the grand- 
father of our subject was a soldier of the War of 1812. In this he followed the 
military example of his ancestors who had fought for American independence. 
He removed to Lebanon, Indiana, and there his son, James W. Roark, was born 
and still resides. He ran away from home when about sixteen years of age, join- 
ing the army, for his father was a southerner and therefore did not wish his son 
to take up arms against the south. However, the patriotic spirit of the boy was 
not to be checked in that way and he joined a regiment of Indiana Volunteers. 
Afterward he reenlisted and served throughout the entire war. The family was 
also represented in the Black Hawk war and thus the military history is one of 
which the present generation has every reason to be proud. The mother of Dr. 
Roark bore the maiden name of Amanda Hiestand, and she also was bom in Leb- 



DR. B. H. BOARK 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 317 

anon, Indiana, which is still the place of her abode. Her people were closely and 
prominently associated with the United Brethren, her grandfather being a bishop 
in the church, while one of her relatives, Benjamin Hiestand, assisted in writing 
the discipline of the church. The family name indicates its German origin but 
back to colonial days in America the history is traced, one of Mrs. Roark's an- 
cestors haying served as a colonel in the Revolutionary war. The three brothers 
and three sisters of Dr. Roark are: Jesse E., engaged in the mail service at Ad- 
vance, Indiana; Manuel O., principal of a high school at Aurora, Illinois; Clar- 
ence E., a farmer residing near Lebanon, Indiana; Mollie L., the wife of William 
Gamer, of Lebanon; Sadie E., who married Rev. William Slater, of Bloomington, 
Indiana; and Ruth, who wedded Perry Crane, of Purdue University. 

When he had mastered the work of the common schools Dr. Roark entered the 
University of Indiana and there remained for three years, subsequently matricu- 
lating in Chicago University, from which institution he graduated with honors, 
winning the B. S. degree. On his graduation he received for excellent work an 
appointment to a fellowship in pathology. He also gained rank as a student in 
Rush Medical College, from which he graduated as M. D. in June, 1903. He re- 
ceived the benefit of broad practical experience by a year's service as house sur- 
geon in a Milwaukee hospital and later he located for the private practice of med- 
icine in Jamestown, Indiana. Early in 1907, however, he came to the west and 
in the fall of that year organized the City Emergency Hospital in Spokane with 
the assistance of Chief Rice, and served for two years, -as surgeon of the institu- 
tion. It was he who secured the passage of the ordinance . providing for the hos- 
pital, after which he did most able woi'k until May, 1909, when he resigned. The 
work had its inception in the establishment of the Police Emergency Hospital in 
the city hall, and when the value of the work was .shown he. secured the passage of 
the ordinance that made the hospital, a permanent city institution. Eleven hun- 
dred cases were given emergency aid during the first year, a fact which proved 
how important was the work. In January, 1911, Dr. Roark was appointed county 
physician by the county commissioners and is now occupying that position. In 
addition he does a large private practice and his professional skill, ability and 
comprehensive knowledge are becoming widely recognized. 

In September, 1904, Dr. Roark was united in marriage to Miss Mabel F. 
Bryce, of Indianapolis, a graduate of the University of Indiana with the class of 
1901 and a member of Pi Beta Phi. She is a daughter of George E. Bryce, who 
was president of the Bryce Baking Company of that city for twenty years and 
was a son of Peter F. Bryce, who was an old-time baker and wealthy resident of 
Indianapolis, his business activities there winning him success. The maternal 
grandfather of Mrs. Roark was one of the argonauts who went to California in 
1849 in search of the golden fleece. Dr. and Mrs. Roark have two children, 
Esther M. and James Bryce, aged respectively six and four years. Their social 
prominence is indicated by the cordial hospitality which is extended to them in 
many of the best homes of this city. Their residence is at No. 204 West Four- 
teenth street and they are members of the Presbyterian church. Dr. Roark be- 
came a member of the Masonic fraternity at Lebanon, Boone county, Indiana, and 
his life has ever been an exemplification of the beneficent principles of the craft. 
He belongs to the Spokane Chamber of Commerce and the Spokane Alumni of Phi 
Kappa Psi. His military record is as commendable as that of his ancestors for 



318 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

his patriotism was manifest in his enlistment in Battery E of the Third United 
States Artillery^ in which he served as sergeant throughout the Spanish-American 
war. His cooperation can always be counted upon where the interests of hu- 
manity are at stake. The work he has done in connection with the City Emer- 
gency Hospital of Spokane would alone entitle him to representation in this vol- 
ume and the institution will ever stand as a monument to his efforts and ability. 



WILLIAM HENRY BUTLER. 

William Henry Butler^ who has been connected with the mercantile interests of 
Winona for two years was born in Warren county, Illinois, on the 14th of July, 
1848, and is a son of William C. and Rebecca (Lucas) Butler, both of whom are 
natives of Kentucky. In 1859 the parents removed to Kansas, and in the public 
schools of that state William H. Butler acquired his education, the nearest school 
being thirty-six miles from his home. At the age of eighteen years, in 1866, he 
worked with his father in a flour mill and three years later, in 1869, accepted em- 
ployment in a sawmill in Missouri, working in that state until 1878 when he came 
to Walla Walla, Washington, hiring out as a harvest hand. The next year he re- 
moved to where Pomeroy is now situated and located upon one hundred and sixty 
acres of land, and actively engaged in improving and cultivating the property. 
During the last two years, 1873 and 74, William Butler also taught school but in 
1875 he removed to the northern part of Idaho, where until 1885 he was employed 
in the mines and alsp in conducting a general store. In that year he returned to 
Pomeroy and farmed until 1890 when he located in Spokane and entered the employ 
of the old horse car company. Subsequently he resided in Fairfield and in that town 
was engaged in the livery and hotel business and also conducted a general mer- 
chandise store until 1901 when he returned to Spokane and acted as deputy sheriff. 
Seven years after his arrival in Spokane he purchased the Washington Drug Com- 
pany store in the Madison block, and until 1910 was engaged in conducting that 
enterprise. After disposing of that business he removed to Winona and opened a 
general store which is known as the Butler Supply Company and is conducted by 
W. H. and C. S. Butler. He is still engaged in this enterprise and his is one of the 
most popular and successful stores in the town. His courteous manner and strict 
attention to the wants of his customers have won him a steadily increasing patron- 
age, and realizing that satisfied customers are his best advertisement, he has more 
than an ordinary interest in carrying a stock which meets the requirements of his 
customers. 

On July 28, 1879, Mr. Butler was married to Miss Elizabeth J. Yount of Illi- 
nois, a daughter of Jackson J. and Frances (Deer) Yount, both of whom are na- 
tives of Kentucky. Mr. and Mrs. Butler were the parents of four children : William 
Clyde, of Lincoln county, who is married to Miss Nora Sage and has two children, 
a boy and a girl; Chauncey Stanley, of Winona, who married Miss Daisy Stewart 
and has one daughter; Virgil V. of Winona; and Gladys who is residing at home. 

Fraternally Mr. Butler is connected with Rockford Lodge, A. F. & A. M.; 
Fairfield Lodge, No. 78, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he has held 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 319 

all the chairs; he also belongs to the Grand Lodge of this organization. In the 
various places Mr. Butler has resided his strong personality^ active interest in his 
business undertakings and his personal worth have won him many friends and made 
him a welcome citizen wherever he resided. 



JAMES M. GERAGHTY. 



James M. Geraghty was bom in County Mayo, Ireland, on February 2, 1870, 
whence he accompanied his parents to America in 1880. The family settled in 
Indiana, where they lived until 1892 and where he received his first public-school 
education. In that year they removed to Spokane, Washington. 

Mr. Geraghty undertook the study of law and upon his graduation was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1897. He engaged in practice and also busied himself in the 
political field and was elected as a member of the fifth Washington legislature. He 
also was called upon to serve as corporation counsel for the city of Spokane and 
divested himself of his duties satisfactorily. During a part of United States Senator 
Turner's term he acted as his private secretary and since 1904 has been associated 
with the senator in law practice. 



THOMAS CLARKSON MARTIN. 

Thomas Clarkson Martin, who is conducting an implement business in Pullman, 
is one of the most recent acquisitions to the commercial fraternity of that city, where 
he has become recognized as a man of high personal worth and capability. His 
birth occurred in Pittsfield, Illinois, on April 80, 1 878, his parents being Oliver and 
Elizabeth (Strubinger) Martin, also natives of Illinois. In 1852, Oliver Martin 
crossed the plains to the goldfields of California, residing at different points in that 
state during the succeeding three years. At the expiration of that time he went to 
Oregon and subsequently participated in the Indian wars of the northwest, being 
at Walla Walla valley, at the time of the uprising in 1855 and 1856, under Captain 
A. V. Wilson. The adventuresome life that then prevailed on the coast finally palled 
on the young man and he returned to his native state. He was residing there when 
the Civil war broke out, and responded to the nation's need by enlisting and going 
to the front as a private. After the close of hostilities he returned to Illinois and 
there he passed away in 1875. 

Thomas Clarkson Martin who was only a child of two years when his father 
passed away, left his native state in 1888, coming to the northwest with an uncle, 
T. W. Martin, who located at Ritzville, this state, upon his arrival here. He con- 
tinned his education in the common schools of Adams county, and later pursued a 
course at Whitman College. Upon attaining his majority in 1894, he decided to go 
into business for himself. There was no store at Washtuena and feeling assured 
of its excellent opportunities, he opened a general mercantile establishment there. 
Naturally as he was young and entirely inexperienced, errors of judgment led him 
into mistakes and he encountered obstacles and difficulties that appeared unsur- 
momitable, but the experience he here gained during the first struggling years has 



320 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

been of inestimable value to him all through life. The location proved to be ad- 
vantageous and the business began to pick up^ soon netting him good returns. The 
enterprise was conducted under the firm name of T. C. Martin until 1901, when he 
sold out and engaged in the real-estate business there. His experience in the mer- 
cantile line had ripened his judgment and from the beginning the venture became 
a success. In 1907 he removed to Spokane and continued to follow the real-estate 
business for three years there. At the expiration of that period he again devoted 
his energies to commercial activities and coming to Pullman in the spring of 1911, 
purchased the business of A. B. Baker & Company, implement dealers. Although 
he has been conducting this enterprise for less than a year, Mr. Martin has mani- 
fested those qualities that assure success. He applies himself energetically to his 
business concentrating his entire attention upon its development, and as he carries 
a full line of farming implements and machinery of standard quality and brands, 
his friends all prophesy prosperity for him. 

Dayton, Washington, was the scene of Mr. Martin's marriage on the 28d of 
August, 1896, to Miss Claudia V. Cooper, a native of California. Her father, John 
Cooper, was born and reared in England, whence he, in 1852, came to California 
and there married Miss Sarah E. Hunsicker, the mother of Mrs. Martin, who was a 
native of Missouri and a descendant of an old Virginia family. One child, Doris 
Olga, has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Martin. 

Although he is a democrat in his political views, he was while engaged in busi- 
ness at Washtuena in 1897 appointed postmaster by President McKinley, retaining 
this office until 1901. This is the only public office he has ever held save that of 
clerk of the school board. He is a clever business man, whose standards and meth- 
ods are such as to win him the confidence and support of all with whom he has had 
transactions. 



JOHN ASHFERD SAYLOR. 

John Ashferd Say lor, who is engaged in the implement business, has been iden- 
tified with the commercial interests of Palouse for the past five years. He was bom 
in Missouri on the 14th of February, 1856, and is a son of Sidney H. and Vice 
(Ragsdale) Saylor, the father a native of Indiana. The parents spent the early 
years of their domestic life in Missouri, but in the fall of 1856 they crossed the 
plains to Oregon. 

He was less than a year of age when his parents removed from Missouri and 
the boyhood and youth of John Ashferd Saylor were passed on a ranch amid pioneer 
environments. He was educated in the public schools, and in 1873, at the age of 
seventeen years, left home and crossed the plains into eastern Oregon, where he 
rode the cattle range for four years. At the expiration of that period he returned 
to the home ranch, and invested his capital in sheep, devoting his entire time and 
attention to the business of sheep raising until his removal to Whitman county, where 
he homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of land eight miles northeast of Col- 
fax. He turned his attention to general farming and stock-raising, in which he met 
with substantial returns, devoting his energies to the further improvement and cul- 
tivation of his land for twenty-seven years. His efforts were well rewarded and he 



; 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 321 

sacceeded in bringing his land under high cultivation and making it one of the well 
improved and attractive ranches of the community. In 1906 he withdrew from 
agricultural pursuits and removed to Palouse, and here he has since made his home. 
The year after he took up his residence here Mr. Saylor became associated with W. 
F. Chalenor and together they engaged in the implement business, under the firm 
name of Chalenor & Saylor. They carry a large and complement line of farming im- 
plements and appliances of standard make and as they are both enterprising men of 
practical ideas and are thoroughly familiar with agricultural conditions in this sec- 
tion they are building up a profitable trade. Their business has netted them good 
returns from the beginning and it is constantly increasing. 

Mr. Saylor was married to Miss Clara Petty, of Lane county, Oregon, but shortly 
after coming to Whitman county, his wife passed away in 1886. In January, 1888, 
Mr. Saylor was married again to Miss Mary Broulete of Washington, a daughter 
of Mack and Adeline (Webb) Broulete, and unto them has been bom one daughter, 
Helen, who is at home. 

The family are members of the Christian church in the work of which they take 
an active interest. Fraternally he is afiiliated with the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen and holds the office of guide in the local lodge. His political allegiance he 
gives to the republican party and at the present time he is a member of the town 
council. 

Mr. Saylor has been a resident of Whitman county for thirty-two years, during 
which time he has seen the primitive conditions of pioneering that prevailed when 
he first came here give way to the new order with the westward march of civilization. 
Where there were great stretches of untilled prairies a quarter of a century ago, 
are found today highly cultivated and improved ranches, while mere settlements 
have grown into thriving towns, and villages have been transformed into cities with 
all the comforts and conveniences of modern civilization. 



WILLIAM FREDERICK CHALENOR. 

William Frederick Chalenor, senior partner of the firm of Chalenor & Saylor, 
implement dealers, is one of the well known and prominent citizens of Palouse, 
where he has been actively identified with the business interests for more than 
twenty-one years. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on the 18th of May, 
1860, and is a son of Frederick W. and Margaret J. (Livingston) Chalenor, both 
natives of England. 

Reared in the city of his birth, in the acquirement of his education, William 
Frederick Chalenor attended the public schools until he was fifteen years. He 
laid aside his school books in 1875 and began his business career as an employe 
in a wholesale grocery in Boston. Five years later, at the age of twenty, he re- 
moved to St. Paul, Minnesota, but upon attaining his majority in 1881 he left 
there and went to North Dakota, where he filed on a homestead of one hundred 
and sixty acres. In 1884, he left his claim and went to Helena, Montana, where 
he worked in the mines for three years. At the expiration of that period he came 
to Spokane as an employe of the Northern Pacific Railway Company, but in 1888 
be withdrew from their service and entered that of Burns & Chapman, railroad 



322 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

contractors. He was in charge of construction work for this company until 1890, 
when he came to Palouse to buy grain for the Clark & Curtis Milling Company. 
Three years later he became associated with J. M. Perry in the grain business 
under the firm name of Perry & Chalenor. They met with success in the develop- 
ment of their undertaking and in 1894 extended their activities by putting in a 
stock of farming implements and mcu;hinery. They continued to be associated in 
business until 1896, when Mr. Chalenor purchased his partner's interest. He 
subsequently opened a branch at Oakesdale, this county, that he operated under 
the name of Chalenor & Company, and in 1902 he organized the Palouse Hard- 
ware & Implement Company. He was vice president of the latter enterprise until 
1906, when he disposed of his stock and went into the implement business for 
himself. The next year he sold a half interest in this to Mr. Saylor, and the 
business has ever since been conducted under the name of Chalenor & Saylor. 
They carry a well selected line of farming implements and machinery of the very 
best brands, and as they are both men of wide experience and practical ideas are 
meeting with success. The business has made marked development since it was 
founded six years ago, and they now enjoy an extensive and profitable patronage 
and corresponding returns. 

In 1891, at Palouse, Mr. Chalenor was married to Miss Myrtle M. Smith, a 
native of Illinois and a daughter of Alonzo and Margaret Smith. Six children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Chalenor in the following order: Edgar L., Margery, 
William A., Clifford B., Richard and Esther C. 

Mr. Chalenor is a warden in the Episcopal church in which his family also 
hold membership, and fraternally he is affiliated with Palouse Lodge, No. 46, 
F. & A. M., of which he is past master, while for twenty-one years he has been 
treasurer of Constance Chapter, No. 24, O. E. S. His connection with organiza- 
tions of a more purely social nature is confined to his membership in the Inland 
Club of Spokane. The political views of Mr. Chalenor coincide with those of the 
democratic party, to whose men and measures he gives his support except in 
municipal elections when he casts his ballot for the candidate he deems best quali- 
fied for the office irrespective of party lines. He has served several terms on the 
town council and at the present time he is a member of the school board. Mr. 
Chalenor is one of the highly esteemed men of the town, as in both his public and 
private life he has manifested the upright standards, high sense of honor and 
resolution of purpose that invariably command and hold the respect of all those 
with whom he has transactions. 



ALBERT BENHAM. 



Albert Benham, treasurer of Benham & Griffith Co., entered upon his business 
career well equipped by liberal education for life's responsibilities. He has shown 
a spirit of determination that has enabled him to successfully solve all the in- 
tricate and complex problems that have arisen in business affairs. He was bom 
in Cascade, Iowa, on the Sd of May, 1869, his parents being Lewis and Elizabeth 
(Means) Benham. The father, whose birth occurred in Ashtabula county, Ohio, 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 323 

August 5, 1818^ was descended from Thomas Benham^ a Revolutionary soldier who 
was bom in Connecticut in 1759 and died in Ohio in 1830. It was in 1811 that 
he removed to the latter state^ making his way by ox team and encountering all 
the hardships and privations incident to such a journey at that time. He traced 
his ancestry back to John Benham^ who with his two sons came to America on 
the 30th of May^ 1630^ in the ship Mary and John. Lewis Benham^ the father 
of our subject^ had a twin brother^ a physician by profession^ who was graduated 
from the Western Reserve Medical College of Cleveland, Ohio, and subsequently 
served as a soldier in the Civil war. The latter married Miss Rebecca Van Horn 
and his death occurred in February, 1898. The mother of our subject was born 
in Indiana and was of English descent, though her family have long resided in 
this country, her parents removing from Virginia to Indiana at an early day. 
She is at present a resident of Cascade, Iowa, and is now in her eighty-second year. 
Her husband died in 1888. They were the parents of seven children, of whom 
one died in childhood. The others are: Lucius T., who is a member of Benham 
& Griffith Co. and the father of Mrs. Austin Corbin II, of Spokane; Raymond S., 
who is in business in Chicago and is the father of Mrs. James M. Neff, whose 
husband. Dr. Neff, was formerly an assistant to Dr. Murphy of that city, but is 
now practicing surgery in Spokane; Alice, who died on the 13th of September, 
1901; Isabel who became the wife of John Jackson Fry and died in 1890; Wil- 
liam H., who died in Seattle, 1906, leaving two children, Arthur L. and Pauline; 
and Albert, of this review. 

Albert Benham was a pupil in the common schools of his native state and 
after attending the high school matriculated in Cornell College at Mount Vernon, 
Iowa. He was a student in that institution from 1884 until 1888. In the latter 
year he came to Spokane and engaged in the grocery business with Thomas S. 
Griffith and Lucius T. Benham under the firm name of Benham & Griffith Co. He 
is a man of good business sense and easily avoids the mistakes and disasters that 
come to those who, though possessing remarkable faculties in some respects, are 
liable to erratic movements that result in unwarranted failures. ■ His well planned 
enterprise, his judgment and even-paced energy have carried him forward to the 
goal of success. Mr. Benham is a stanch supporter of the principles and policies 
of the democratic party and holds membership in the Chamber of Commerce of 
this dty. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON LARUE. 

George Washington Larue, president of the firm of George W. Larue & Com- 
pany, real-estate and insurance agents, was born in Randolph county, Missouri, 
on the 80th of October, 1855. His parents were John R. and Charlotte (Barnes) 
Lame, the father a native of Kentucky and the mother of Virginia, but for many 
years they were residents of Missouri, where he engaged in farming. 

When he was old enough to begin his education George W. Larue entered the 
public schools of his native state, completing his course in a private academy. 
His student days were terminated in 1 872 and he returned to the farm, in the cul- 
tivation of which he assisted his father until he was twenty-two. Fully qualified 



324 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

to begin working for himself he left home in 1877 and began his independent agri- 
cultural career. The following year he decided to come to the northwest, believing 
that he would find better opportunities here than in his native state. Upon his 
arrival in 1878 he first located in the vicinity of Walla Walla, where he farmed 
until 1879. He then went to the Big Bend country and filed on three hundred and 
twenty acres of land, but subsequently took the agency for a sewing-machine. He 
continued at this until 1884 when he came to Colfax and entered into partnership 
with John Pattison in the real-estate and insurance business, under the firm name 
of Larue & Pattison. Two years later they dissolved partnership and Mr. Larue 
became associated with A. W. Wisner, under the name of Larue, Wisner & Com- 
pany. In 1888, Mr. Larue was appointed postmaster under President Cleveland, 
but he resigned his office at the end of a year and again went into the real-estate 
and insurance business. The following year, in 1890, he was elected county treas- 
urer, serving in this capacity for two terms, at the expiration of which time he 
again turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, locating on a farm north of Col- 
fax that he operated for six years. In 1900 he came back to town and became 
identified with John K. Eacho, under the name of Eacho, Larue & Company in the 
real-estate, insurance and loan business. At the expiration of three years, Mr. 
Larue purchased the interest of Mr. Eacho, continuing the business alone imtil 
1908, when he took his son, Charles R., into partnership with him, who was, in 
1911, elected to the state legislature from Colfax, the seventh district of Whit- 
man county. George W. Larue has met with success in his undertakings and is 
now president of the Colfax Investment Company, and he was a stockholder and 
director of the Farmers* State Bank. 

At Walla Walla on the 16th of October, 1881, Mr. Larue was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Margaret L. Actor, a. native of this state and a daughter of Herman 
C. and Sarah (Davidson) Actor, the father a native of Ohio and the mother of 
Illinois. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Larue numbers five: Charlotte, who is at 
home; Charles R., who married Miss Sarah Schulerud and has one son; and Mar- 
garet, George Sterling and Lucille, all of whom are at home. 

Mr. Larue is a member of the Woodmen of the World, the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen and the Commercial Club of Colfax. He is a democrat in his 
political views and takes much interest in all matters pertaining to the develop- 
ment of the municipality, has never prominently participated in governmental 
affairs, although he did serve as councilman at large. Mr. Larue has been a resi- 
dent of Colfax during the greater part of the time for twenty-seven years, and is 
widely known throughout the county, where he has many friends who hold him in 
high esteem. 



DANIEL W. TRUAX. 



Daniel W. Truax, who is now following the business of banking, has been prom- 
inently identified, as a successful farmer, merchant and postmaster for several 
terms, with the business interests of Tekoa, Whitman county, since 1888, and in- 
deed is the founder of the town, which he laid out in 1888. He was born in Mon- 
treal, Canada, December 23, 1830, the son of Caleb and Elizabeth (Kendrick) 



DANIEL W. TRUAX 



. rm: ,it-.v yof.k i 






LJ 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 327 

TruaX; the former a native of New York state and the latter of Ireland. The an- 
cestors of the subject of this review are traced back to Holland whence members of 
the family emigrated to America^ settling in the state of New York in 1620. John 
Truax, the grandfather on the paternal side, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. 
Id 1886 Daniel W. Truax went to live with his grandmother, who resided in 
the state of New York, and there he attended school until 1845, when he began 
working on his father's farm in that state, continuing so to do until 1849, when his 
parents removed to Minnesota, where the father took up a homestead. The son con- 
tinned at home assisting his father with the farm work until the spring of 1853, 
when he settled on a quarter section of homestead land and began cultivating it. 
In 1855 he built a sawmill on his homestead and carried on the sawmill business 
in connection with his farming until 1857, when he sold his holdings there and re- 
moved to Wininger, Minnesota, where he again engaged in the sawmill business, a 
vocation which he followed until 1861, when he removed to Hastings, Minnesota, 
and again engaged in the sawmill business. There he remained until 1883, when 
he moved to Whitman county, Washington, and bought forty acres where Tekoa now 
stands. He engaged in the lumber business under the firm name of the Truax Lum- 
ber Company but in 1886 he sold out his lumber business and two years later laid 
out the town of Tekoa. In 1890 he entered the field of banking, becoming the vice 
president of the First Bank of Tekoa. He also embarked in the mercantile business 
in partnership with George D. Brown under the firm name of George D. Brown & 
Company, the title later being changed to that of the Tekoa Mercantile Company. 
In 1906 he sold out his mercantile interests, hfyipg 4i^po8^d rof his banking interests 
in 1894. On August 25, 1902, he incorporated the Tekp^ nState Bank, of which he 
became the president, in which position he is now serving. One of the activities 
which distinguished Mr. Truax while engaged in the iperc^tile business was a plan 
inaugurated by him and his partner during the' hard times following 1893. They 
fomished their customers with one hundred dollar coupons which entitled them to 
that amount of credit at the store, agreeing at the same time to accept all the butter 
and eggs their custoipers could supply. This proved a satisfactory arrangement all 
around, the firm being protected by the country produce receipts and the customers 
who were in hard straits were thus given an opportunity to secure much needed 
supplies. 

At Hastings, Minnesota, in 1853, Mr. Truax was married to Miss Mary A. 
Tmax, who was born in New York, a daughter of Guirshom and Deborah Truax, 
both of whom were natives of the state of New York. To Daniel W. and Mary A. 
Traux four children have been bom. Byron F., of Tekoa, who is married and has 
three children. Amelia E., deceased, who married J. D. Dull by whom she had 
one child, a son. Viola E., who became the wife of Fred Kramer who was acci- 
dentally killed just after marriage. She later married John MacKenzie, by whom 
she has a daughter. Oscar C, now deceased, who married Miss Sadie Wercinck, 
and they became the parents of one son. * The second marriage of Mr. Truax was 
celebrated in Tekoa in 1895, when he wedded Miss Mary A. Anderson, a native 
of Scotland. 

The political allegiance of Mr. Truax is given to the republican party, in which 

he takes an active interest, having filled several important positions of public trust. 

He has served as mayor of Wininger, Minnesota, and for three terms filled the office 

of postmaster of Tekoa, also serving as a member of the school board, as justice of 
vot ro— IT 



328 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

the peace for twelve years and United States commissioner for three years. He is 
a member of the Masonic fraternity^ being a past master of the Blue lodge^ has 
filled all the official chairs of the chapter and also belongs to the commandery and 
the Mystic Shrine. It is not remarkable that a man so intimately connected with 
the business and fraternal life of Tekoa and Whitman county should have an ex- 
tended acquaintance throughout the entire county^ where he is known intimately by 
nearly all the people. The business success which in so large a degree has crowned 
his efforts has been attained in like measure by few other men in Whitman county. 
Possessing a broad knowledge of human nature^ being of a genial disposition^ and 
having large executive ability as well as an unusual mastery of detail^ he has been 
enabled to overcome many apparently unsurmountable obstacles in his path and to 
render effective service to the people of Whitman county in the days when such 
service was of peculiar necessity. The success which he has attained has enabled 
him in later years to be of material benefit to large numbers of worthy people with 
whom he has come in contact and makes him today a potent factor in the advance- 
ment of the interests of Tekoa and community. He is an honored and popular mem- 
ber of the fraternity to which he belongs and throughout the social and business 
circles of Tekoa is held in the highest respect and esteem. 



GARDNER CHAMBERLIN. 

While the real-estate operations of Gardner Chamberlin are extensive, he is 
chiefly handling only his own properties. He was one who recognized the oppor- 
tunities of the west and in their improvement has reached a conspicuous, honorable 
and enviable position in business circles. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 
February 10, 1863, a son of Seth and Sophia Long (Dean) Chamberlin, who were 
natives of New Hampshire and Massachusetts respectively, and of English and 
French descent. Members of the Chamberlin family lock part in the war for inde- 
pendence and one of the brothers of Seth Chamberlin was a soldier of the Civil war. 
The first of the Dean family in America came to the new world prior to the revolu- 
tion and many of them took an active part in that war. An uncle of Sophia Long 
Dean founded the academy at Franklin, Massachusetts, while one of her brothers 
aided in the defense of the Union in the Civil war. The father of our subject was 
a wholesale dry-goods merchant and importer, carrying on business for many years 
on the same site where his father was located, this being on Kilby street, opposite 
the Mason building in Boston. The name of the firm of which he was a member 
was Little, Chamberlin & Company. For several years prior to his death he lived 
retired, however, and made his home with his sons in Spokane. The death of Seth 
Chamberlin occurred October 6, 1903, and his wife had preceded him in death July 
14, 1878. She was a sister of Mrs. William Pettet, of Spokane. 

Dr. Theodore Chamberlin, a brother of Gardner Chamberlin, is a graduate of 
Harvard and is now living in Concord, Massachusetts, being one of the faculty of 
Middlesex school there. Another brother, Frederick Dean Chamberlin. also a grad- 
uate of Harvard, took a prominent part in civic affairs and worked earnestly for the 
welfare of Spokane. He was associated with his brother Gardner in looking after 
his interests here and in connection with other pioneers organized the Electric Light 
Company of Spokane in the fall of 1886, others interested being H. L. Cutter. Frank 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 329 

Rockwood Moore and William Pettet. These gentlemen promoted the interests of 
the company until it was merged into the Washington Water Power Company, 
Frederick Dean Chamberlin having served as its secretary. He died June 12, 
1904, and in his passing Spokane lost one whose labors constituted a vital force 
in progress here from pioneer times. 

Gardner Chamberlin was educated in Boston, attending Charles W. Stone's 
private school, now located on Beacon street but then located on Temple place. 
He entered a broker's office there but in response to his brother's urgent plea 
came to Spokane in 1887. Together they engaged in the commission business on 
Riverside avenue but sold out in the fall of 1888, the business which they estab- 
lished gradually developing into that now conducted under the name of Greenough 
Brothers. On retiring from the commission business Gardner Chamberlin con- 
centrated his efforts upon the control and management of his own property in- 
terests and since the death of his brother has been engaged in that work alone. 
He owns property at the northeast corner of Post and Riverside, at the southeast 
comer of Lincoln and Riverside, at the northwest comer of Sprague and Lincoln 
and has other holdings in both residence and warehouse property. He is also a 
director in the Spokane & Eastern Trust Company and one of its largest stock- 
holders and is financially interested in the Washington Water Power Company. 
Making investments in property here at an early day, his holdings have con- 
stantly increased in value, making him one of the wealthy residents of Spokane. 

Mr. Chamberlin is a member of Spokane Lodge of Elks, No. 228, also of the 
Spokane Club, the Spokane Country Club, the Spokane Tennis Club and the 
Chamber of Commerce. He is secretary and treasurer of the Spokane Humane 
Society, succeeding his brother, Frederick Dean, upon his death in 1904, who had al- 
ways been active in its behalf and to whose efforts much of its present success 
is due. He attends All Saints church and votes with the republican party but 
his activity in political circles is only that of a good citizen. He had the sagacity 
to discern what the future had in store for this great and growing western country 
and in the fullness of time he has gathered the harvest of his labors. 



JAMES W. MORRISON. 



James W. Morrison is one of the enterprising real-estate men of Spokane who 
have made a close study of the condition of the real-estate market and have there- 
fore been able to meet the situations which have arisen and to improve the op- 
portunities which have offered. He is far-sighted and progressive in all his busi- 
ness movements and his labors have proven of marked benefit to the development 
of the city. He was bom near Titusville, Pennsylvania, May 14, 1850, a son of 
John B. and Margaret (McMaster) Morrison. The father was an agriculturist 
and merchant, but after the discovery of oil at Titusville was engaged in that 
business until 1864, when he moved to Kingsville, Ohio, where his death occurred. 
He was well known throughout the northwestern part of Pennsylvania and in 
Ohio as a thoroughly reliable business man. 

James W. Morrison acquired his education in the public schools in Pennsyl- 
vania and later at the Kingsville Academy, of Kingsville, Ohio. After graduating 



830 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

from the latter institution he was engaged for a short time in agricultural pursuits 
and in 1877 removed to Sibley, Iowa where for fourteen years he was engaged in 
the farm implement, hardware and grain business. During his residence in Sibley 
he took a prominent part in civic affairs. He served as mayor of the city for two 
terms and also as justice of the peace throughout the time he resided there. On 
account of ill health he disposed of his interests in that town and in the spring 
of 1891 removed to Washington, locating at Kettle Falls, Stevens county. He 
devoted his whole time and attention to regaining his health and did not enter 
into business until he removed to Spokane in 1898. Since he arrived in this city 
he has been engaged in the real-estate, farm-mortgage and insurance business and 
is one of the leaders in the real-estate and insurance circles of Spokane. He lists 
property throughout the northwest and British Columbia. 

At Jesup, Iowa, Mr. Morrison was married to Miss Mattie Stage, a dau^ter 
of James and Martha Stage. To their union two children have been born: Cline 
J., who is in business with his father; and Earl W. who is now studying archi- 
tecture in Chicago. The latter has displayed remarkable talent in his profession 
and while a boy in the public schools of Spokane designed some of the most at- 
tractive residences in this city, one being for William C. Winters and one for E. 
T. Hay, a brother of the present governor. Later he designed the home of A. 
T. Johnson which was recently disposed of for thirty thousand dollars. He is 
now but twenty-three, years of age, and he intends, after completing his technical 
course in Chicago, January 1, to open an independent office. 

Mr. Morrison has always given his support to the republican party. In addi- 
tion to the offices he held in Sibley he took an active part in political affairs in 
Washington. While a resident of that state he was nominated by acclamation for 
the state senate on the republican ticket, but was defeated by a close margin of 
twelve votes through the fusion of the democratic and populist parties. Since 
coming tx) Spokane he has not taken an active interest in politics nor held public 
office. 

Prompted by a laudable ambition, his labors have at all times been char- 
acterized by thoroughness, and by his mastery of tasks undertaken Mr. Morrison 
has made rreditable advance in business circles and is accorded recognition by 
leading business men as one who deserves classification in their ranks. 



JOSHUA MILES PALMERTON. 

Joshua M. Palmerton, well known as a grain dealer and undertaker at Pull- 
man, Whitman county, manifests in his commercial interests the activity and busi- 
ness enterprise which are characteristic of the age. He was bom in Licking 
county, Ohio, on the 81st of October, 1850, his parents being Miles and Mary 
J. (Seaman) Palmerton, both natives of New York state. He is a grandson of 
Joshua Palmerton, a descendant of the family prominent in Revolutionary times. 
When Joshua M. was one year of age his parents removed to Illinois, and during 
his childhood he attended the public schools in that state until 1859, when he 
was taken by his parents to Missouri. In that state he continued his studies until 
1861 when with his parents he returned to Illinois, there completing his educa- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 331 

tioD. In 1867 he again went to Missouri and while there assisted in the cultiva- 
tion of the home farm. He remained in that state until 1875 when he located on 
Rebel Flat^ Whitman county^ Washington^ and again engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits. Upon his arrival in Washington he immediately began taking an active 
interest in the agricultural possibilities which it presented^ and one year after he 
came he took up a homestead of one hundred and twenty acres on Rebel Flat^ six 
miles south of Colfax. He proved up his claim and resided upon it until 1889. 
In that year he removed to Pullman where he owned six acres of land^ and at 
once entered the employ of the J. fl. Bellinger Grain Company^ having charge 
of their warehouse. The following year he improved his property in town and 
abo added to his real-estate holdings. Later he engaged in the hotel business^ 
building the Artesian Hotels and in 1892 erected the present Artesian Hotel which 
he conducted until 1898. During that time he studied the undertaking business^ 
and at present is conducting an undertaking establishment. In 1911 he bought 
grain for the Farmers' Union Grain Company, and throughout his career in Pull- 
man has been interested in real estate. His activities have extended also into 
other lines, and he was one of the organizers of the Pullman Bottling & Cold 
Storage Company. 

On the 9th of April, 1874, Mr. Palmerton was married to Miss Lily C. Layman 
of Virginia, a daughter of John D. and Ann C. (Ringer) Layman, natives of Vir- 
ginia and Maryland respectively. To their union four children have been born: 
George M., of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, who is married and has one son; William J., 
also of Coeur d'Alene, who is married and has one daughter; Birdie, who is mar- 
ried to Robert Hughes of Honolulu and is the mother of one daughter; and Nellie 
M., who resides in Seattle. 

In politics Mr. Palmerton gives his support to the republican party and has 
been active in its circles. He has served as a member of the school board for 
nearly twenty years, and was at one time a member of the council. His inter- 
ests are always along the lines which tend to moral and educational advancement, 
and during the time the liquor question was a political issue he gave his enthusi- 
astic and ardent support in opposition to the admission of saloons into Pullman. 
He holds membership in the Pullman Chamber of Commerce. Fraternally he be- 
longs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and to the Woodmen of the 
World, in which order he has occupied all the chairs in his local camp. He is a 
progressive and wide-awake citizen, always on the alert for and ready to incor- 
porate in his business the most modern methods, and they have not only enabled 
him to attain prosperity but have also won him a high place in the respect and 
confidence of his fellow citizens. 



CHARLES OSTON WORLEY. 

Well known among the successful men of Whitman county, Washington, is 
Charles Oston Worley, formerly banker, hardware merchant and Indian agent, 
who is now living retired. He was born in Peoria, Illinois, July 18, 1854, a son 
of John J. and Sarah (Bradford) Worley, both natives of Ohio. The parents re- 
moved to Nebraska territory in 1856, where the father conducted an Indian trad- 



332 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

ing store and Charles attended school. In 1864, while the father was in the army 
and the family were left unprotected at home, they were driven out of the town 
by the Indians. On account of the unsettled conditions in Nebraska at that early 
day the family removed to Ohio, where our subject continued his schooling until 
1869, when his parents returned to the west, settling in Kansas. There he as- 
sisted his father with the duties on the farm and attended the common schools. 
Later he became a student in the academy at Council Grove and subsequently en- 
tered the State Normal School at Emporia for one year. In 1875 he journeyed 
to California where he was employed in mill and factory work until the fall of 
1877, when he returned to Kansas and entered upon agricultural pursuits until 
1882. 

In that year, the west again beckoning him, Mr. Worley went to Rockford, 
Spokane county, Washington, and began working at the carpenter's trade and later 
engaged in steam engineering. In 1884 he again returned to Kansas, bringing his 
parents back with him to Rockford, where he continued to follow the carpenter's 
trade until 1896, when he was appointed by the government as steam engineer 
on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation. He then took up his residence upon the reserva- 
tion and continued in his appointed position until 1901, the year in which he was 
given the position of sub-agent of the reservation. He performed his duties faith- 
fully and satisfactorily and continued in that connection until July, 1905, at which 
time he was appointed superintendent of the reservation, a position which he held 
until August, 1909, when he resigned to engage in the banking and hardware 
business in Tekoa, to which place the Indian agency had been removed in 1907. 
Upon his resignation of the office of superintendent he was appointed United 
States commissioner, a position which he still holds. After being connected with 
the bank in which he was first interested until 1911, he sold out, but still retains 
his interest in the hardware business in Tekoa. He was also vice president and 
a stockholder and director of the Citizens Bank of Tekoa. 

Mr. Worley was married in Kansas, August 22, 1878, to Miss Maydee Wash- 
bum, a native of Iowa and daughter of Sylvester and Emmeline (Little) Wash- 
burn, both of whom were born in Illinois. To this union were bom three chil- 
dren : Lawrence, who is at home ; and Frank and William, both deceased. The 
political allegiance of Mr. Worley is given to the republican party, in the affairs 
of which he takes considerable interest. He is now president of the Tekoa school 
board and while in Kansas was a member of the city council of Osage City and 
deputy sheriff and county treasurer of Osage county. In his fraternal relations 
he is a member of the Masonic lodge, of which he is past master, and belongs to 
Tekoa Chapter, No. 18, R. A. M., of which he has been secretary. He is identi- 
fied with the Woodmen of the World and has occupied all the official chairs of that 
order, and also belongs to the Knights and Ladies of Security. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Worley are members of the Christian church, of which he is a trustee and in 
which the family take an active interest, assisting materially in supporting the 
church work and aiding in many ways to make it effective in the upbuilding of 
the religious interests of Tekoa. 

The success in business life which enabled Mr. Worley to retire at a compar- 
atively early age came not by chance but as a result of wisely directed endeavors 
throughout his business career, coupled with those fundamental necessities for 
success — industry, economy and ambition. He may truly be said to be a self-made 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 333 

man^ as he started out in life with nothing but his own hands^ a courageous spirit 
and a healthy body to make his way in the world. During his residence in Tekoa 
he has by his uniformly honorable methods and square dealing earned the confi- 
dence and respect as well as the friendship of a very large proportion of the 
people of Whitman county and he is held in high esteem by all who know him. 



LUCIUS T. BENHAM. 



Lucius T. Benham is numbered among the influential residents of Spokane^ 
where for some years he has been engaged in the wholesale grocery business^ ac- 
tive in control of what was the first wholesale house in the Inland Empire. He 
was bom October 29, 1847, in Ridgeville, Lorain county, Ohio, the son of Lewis 
and Elizabeth (Means) Benham, natives of Ohio and of Indiana respectively. 
The ancestral line is traced back to Thomas Benham, a soldier of the Revolution- 
ary war, who was born in Connecticut in 1759 and died in Ohio in 1880. In 1811 
he removed to that state making his way by ox team and encountering all the 
hardships, privations and innumerable dangers, with which at that time such 
trips through sparsely settled, practically roadless country were fraught — a coun- 
try still infested with the hostile bands of the original inhabitants who looked 
toward the oncoming of the white brothers none too friendly. Back of him the 
line goes to John Benham, who with his two sons came from England to America 
on the SOth of May, 1630, as a passenger on the ship Mary and John. Lewis 
Benham was bom August 5, 1818, and his life record covered the intervening 
years to 1888. His wife still survives and is now living in Cascade, Iowa, in her 
eighty-second year. She is a representative of an old American family of Englisli 
lineage and her parents removed from Virginia to Indiana. In the family of 
Lewis and Elizabeth Benham were seven children, of whom one died in childhood^ 
while Alice, Isabel and William H. are also deceased. The brothers of our sub- 
ject still living are: Albert, who is treasurer of Benham & Griffith Co., and Ray- 
mond S., who is engaged in business in Chicago. 

The removal of the family to Cascade, Iowa, was followed by Lucius T. Ben- 
ham's attendance in the public schools of that place and by a further course of 
study in Cornell College at Mount Vernon, Iowa. He started out in the business 
world in the fall of 1861, when a youth of fourteen years, securing a clerkship 
in the postoffice and in a general store at Cascade. For three years he devoted his 
time to that work, after which he went to Chicago and entered the employ of 
Lemuel Barber & Son, the partners of whom were his uncle and cousin. They were 
in the wholesale grocery and liquor business and with that house Mr. Benham re- 
mained until 1868, when he returned to Iowa, settling at Canton, where he es- 
tablished a general mercantile store. 

It was during the period of his residence there that Mr. Benham was mar- 
ried in June, 1868, to Miss Mary G. Trumbull, a daughter of G. W. Trumbull, 
of Canton, and a member of an old American family. She died in Spokane in 
1889, leaving a daughter, Katherine I., now the wife of Austin Corbin II, of this 
city. 



834 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Mr. Benham continued a resident of Canton^ lowa^ until 1870^ when he re- 
moved to Kansas City^ Missouri^ where he was engaged in the wholesale liquor 
business for two years. Following the Chicago fire he went to that city in the 
fall of 1871 and there continued in the wholesale business until January^ 1889, 
when he came to Spokane and joined forces with T. S. Griffith in organizing the 
firm of Benham 8c Griffith^ proprietors of the first wholesale house in the Inland 
Empire. In this business he has since continued and his progressive and enter- 
prising methods and straightforward dealing have constituted the basis of a suc- 
cess which places him with the wealthy residents of the city. He was also for 
several years a director and stockholder in the Exchange National Bank^ of Spo- 
kane. 

He is a man of considerable local influence^ well fitted by nature for leadership. 
His opinions, carry weight because his sagacity is keen aild his judgment is sounds 
and men have learned to know that what Lucius T. Benham says he will do. He 
gives his political allegiance to the democratic party but is not an active woricer 
in its ranks. He belongs, however, to the Chamber of Commerce and is much in- 
terested in all that pertains to the development of the city, cooperating with the 
Chamber in all of its various projects to promote the upbuilding of Spokane and 
give publicity to its resources and its opportunities. 



ROBERT EASSON. 



No history of Spokane would be complete without mention of Robert Easson, 
who was one of the most popular, respected and worthy residents of the city, re- 
liable in business and active in his cooperation in all progressive public movements. 
He was born in Dundee, Scotland, February 1, 1847. His father, Robert Easson, 
Sr., was a wholesale grocer, and the son received a thorough business education and 
training. His more specifically literary education was acquired in private schools 
of Edinburgh and of Paris. He came to the United States in 1870 and secured 
employment in a large wholesale grocery house in Chicago, devoting ten years of 
his life to the task of mastering the principles and details of that business. On 
the expiration of that period he went to Omaha, accepting a position with the large 
house of Paxton, Gallagher & Company. His ability soon won him recognition and 
he was admitted as junior member of the firm and eventually became the managing 
partner. Under his able direction and control the business of the firm was in- 
creased from two hundred thousand to two million dollars per year. 

Thinking to find a still broader field of labor and wider opportunities in the 
rapidly developing Pacific coast country Mr. Easson came to Spokane in 1890 and 
here established the wholesale grocery house of Hale & Easson. The firm built 
up a large business and prospered but the panic of 1893 came on and the company 
went into liquidation after paying every liability in full. In 1895, having gotten 
his financial affairs here into excellent shape again, Mr. Easson accepted an offer 
from James J. Hogan to go to La Crosse, Wisconsin, and manage his wholesale 
grocery house. He returned to Spokane in the summer of 1897 to look after his 
interests here and on the Sd of May, 1898, was elected secretary of the Chamber 
of Commerce. He regarded Spokane as his permanent place of abode even after 



ROBERT EASSON 



r 









SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 337 

going to Wisconsin and retained his beautiful residence in Lidgerwood^ which he 
had erected and adorned at a cost of about twelve thousand dollars. From time to 
time he made investment in enterprises and business projects in the northwest^ be- 
coming owner of one-fifth interest in the Slocan Boy mines and also had other min- 
ing interests in the Okanogan. 

On the 12th of March^ 1874^ in Chicago^ Mr. Easson was united in marriage to 
Miss Bella Donaldson^ a daughter of Hiram and Agnes Donaldson. Unto this 
marriage were born four children: George, who is now deceased; Bella, the wife of 
Sidney McClintock; Jessie; and Sanford. The eldest son accepted the offer of a 
fine position in Hong Kong, China, and the family had just received a letter in- 
forming them of his safe arrival there when the father's death occurred. Later 
the son also passed away. In September, 1898, Mr. Easson went to Lewiston, 
Idaho, with the Chamber of Commerce excursion. His sudden death was the result 
of a stroke of apoplexy. 

Perhaps no better estimate of his character and of the high regard entertained 
for him wherever he was known can be given than in quoting from the Spokesman 
Review which in its comment on his demise said: "Within ten minutes after the 
death of Mr. Easson mourning streamers were stretched across the streets and 
draped over the arch of welcome by the Lewiston people. Through the local tele- 
phone exchange and by special committee every place of business in Lewiston was 
notified of the appalling event and the proprietors immediately closed their doors. 
Tears clouded the vision of strong men and a sense of personal bereavement was 
seen in every woman's face. The citizens, gfL^^littbji^^drisiped the train in black 
and attached the sad words 'We mourn our Joss^'- within .a mourning border to each 
side of the central coach of the train. Knots of crepe were added to the badges of 
the excursionists and worn by the people of Lewiston. Spokane's sorrow was Lewis- 
ton's sorrow, Spokane's loss was Lewi$ton'» lews.. .The_.two cities were united in 
the one bond of grief. In an hour the remains of Mr. Easson were prepared for 
removal to Spokane. It was a mournful procession that formed for the home- 
ward journey. Eight physicians including Dr. Olmstead and Dr. Grove of Spo- 
kane and Dr. Hamilton, Dr. Morris, Dr. Inman and Dr.. Shaft of Lewiston, were 
the pall bearers. They were followed by the Chamber of Commerce and the busi- 
ness men of Lewiston. There was even a greater throng of people surrounding 
the station to express their sympathy for the afflicted guests than were present to 
welcome them the day before. At a special meeting of the Spokane Chamber of 
Commerce called by President E. D. Olmstead on board the Lewiston excursion 
train the following resolutions were adopted: 



«< *^ 



'Whereas, It has pleased Almighty God to His infinite wisdom to call from 
onr midst, without a moment's notice, our beloved associate and esteemed secretary, 
Robert Easson, 

" 'Whereas, He was taken from us when flushed and happy over the grand 
success of the Lewiston excursion, knowing and probably realizing full well that 
the said success was largely if not entirely due to his individual efforts, therefore 
belt 

*' 'Resolved, that while we bow to the will of the Great Ruler of the Uni- 
verse we fully realize that we have lost our most earnest and faithful worker, that 
Spokane has suffered an irreparable loss in a loyal friend who was always ready 



838 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

to devote his entire time and wonderful energy to any project whose aim was to ad- 
vance the welfare of his adopted home. 

** 'Resolved^ that Spokane Chamber of Commerce extend to the bereaved 
widow and family their heartfelt sympathy and condolence.' " 

Thus passed from this life a citizen whom Spokane felt that she could illy afford 
to lose. He had proven his worth and ability in many ways and had at all times 
commanded the good will and confidence of his fellowmen because his life was up- 
right and honorable^ his actions manly and sincere and his principles high. He 
held friendship inviolable^ was devoted to the welfare of his family and in a word 
possessed all of the admirable characteristics of the upright man and citizen. 

Mr. Easson deserves the credit without doubt of being the originator of the Spo- 
kane's fight for just freight rates. Early in 1891 he was one of the men who 
started Spokane's first freight rate contest before the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission. That first hearing secured Spokane the first and best decision it ever 
received before the commission. This case resulted in a decisive victory for Spo- 
kane but as is well known was set aside by a decision of the United States supreme 
court. When James J. Hill of the Great Northern Railroad approached Spokane 
with a proposition to give that city terminal rates in exchange for a cash payment 
and donation of lands for a right of way, Mr. Easson was one of the most active 
members of the committee to secure the necessary money and property to accom- 
plish the ends that Mr. Hill had promised, and to no one in the city was it a greater 
disappointment than to Mr. Easson when Hill repudiated his part of the verbal 
contract and refused to carry out what he had promised in regard to terminal rates. 
He was the only one who argued and insisted that Hill and the city of Spokane 
should have a written contract but the other members of the committee over-ruled 
what afterward proved to be sound judgment on his part. To Mr. Easson's credit, 
be it said, that he was the only man in the city of Spokane who had the moral cour- 
age to tell James J. Hill to his face that he had deceived and betrayed the people 
of Spokane in refusing to carry out his promise. After the failure to put in ter- 
minal rates as promised, Mr. Easson again took up the agitation to secure for Spo- 
kane what was its just due, and up to the time of his death he never ceased to agi- 
tate this question and to enlist the support of his neighbors to push this case to a 
finish. To mention Mr. Easson's service in this matter, probably nothing better 
can be said than that through his efforts the services of some men in Spokane were 
enlisted in this fight twenty years ago who have never laid down the burden, and 
many of these men who were close personal friends of Robert Easson have felt his 
spirit was with them through the many years they have waged this contest for 
justice and right. 



WILLIAM MARTIN DUNCAN. 

William Martin Duncan, who is at present ably discharging his duties as 
county treasurer of Whitman county, was born in Vallejo, California, on the 7th 
of July, 1872, and is a son of Robert and Mary B. (Martin) Duncan, the former 
a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Iowa. His grandfathers were Samael 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 339 

Duncan of Pennsylvania and George W. Martin, of New Hampshire. The par- 
ents came to Whitman county from California in 1877, and in the country schools 
of Washington William M. Duncan acquired his early education. Subsequently 
he entered the State College of Washington and was graduated with a degree of 
B. S. in the class of 1900. The year following his graduation he taught school, 
and the next year accepted a clerical position in the general merchandise store of 
R. B. Bragg & Company of Pullman. In both of these positions he exhibited a 
ready spirit to work and an ability to master the essential details of his under- 
takings. In 1907 he was elected county auditor to which office he was reelected 
in 1909. Two years later he was elected to the office of county treasurer of Whit- 
man county. 

In November, 1906, in Pullman, Washington, William M. Duncan was mar- 
ried to Miss Almeda Smith, of Iowa, a daughter of W. H. and Mattie (SchuU) 
Smith, the former a native of Arkansas and the latter of North Carolina. To 
their union one child, Emogene, has been born. Politically Mr. Duncan is a mem- 
ber of the republican party, firmly believing its policies to be most conducive to 
good government. He has rendered his party much valuable service and has been 
one of its ablest supporters in the county. In the various offices to which he has 
been elected upon the nomination of the members of his party he has more than 
won their approval for the able conduct of his duties. He holds membership in 
the Moscow Lodge, No. 249, B. P. O. E., Colfax Lodge, No. 4, Knights of Pyth- 
ias, and in the Christian church of Colfax. His business ability and genial man- 
ner enable Mr. Duncan to meet the requirements of his office and serve the public 
in a satisfactory manner. In the fraternal and social circles with which he is 
connected he is highly esteemed, and the number of his friends is almost as large 
as is that of his acquaintances. 



GRANVILLE BOND CARTER. 

Granville B. Carter, early recognizing the fact that success and prosperity 
have their foundations in persistent, honorable and intelligently directed labor, 
has worked his way upward, his rise marked at every step by achievement. He is 
well known in Colfax since he is acting as sheriff of Whitman county. He was 
bom in Adams coimty, Illinois, on the 27th of October, 1854, a son of Joseph W. 
and Rachael (Dorsett) Carter, natives of Pennsylvania and North Carolina re- 
spectively, and a grandson of John and Lindsey (Dorsett) Carter, also of Penn- 
sylvania and North Carolina. 

Mr. Carter acquired his education in the district schools of Illinois, but be- 
cause of his father's death when he was a lad of but seven years, he found it nec- 
essary to put aside his text-books at an early age and contribute to the main- 
tenance of the family home. Until 1873 he assisted his brothers in the manage- 
ment of the home farm, but at that time he rented property for a year, after which 
he again worked on the home farm. In 1878 he rented land in Iowa and was en- 
gaged in its cultivation until the next year, when he removed to Missouri where 
he again took up agricultural pursuits until the spring of 1881. At that time he 
crossed the plains with teams, the trip consuming three months and five days, and 



840 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

located in the state of Washington^ northeast of Colfax. In that district he en- 
tered a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres^ and when he entered upon its 
possession but two dollars and fifty cents remained of his capital upon which to 
support himself during the following winter. He immediately began improving 
his land and until 1898 was actively engaged in its cultivation. In that year he 
removed to Alberta^ Canada^ where be farmed on four hundred and eighty acres 
of land for three years before returning to Whitman county. Here he again en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits^ and was thus occupied for three years when he was 
appointed deputy sheriff. He remained in this office for three years before entering 
upon a business career and engaged in the sale of implements for two years. Fol- 
lowing that he again served as deputy sheriff from 1904 to 1906. In the latter 
year he engaged in the fuel business and conducted that until his election in 1909 
to the office of sheriff of Whitman county. He was reelected and is at present 
serving his second term. In his agricultural pursuits^ business undertakings and 
public offices he has always maintained the strictest integrity^ and his diligent 
application to the duties which have devolved upon him^ and the regard he has 
always held for the opinion and interests of others have won him many loyal 
supporters and firm friends. 

On March 18, 1874, Mr. Carter was married in Quincy, Illinois, to Miss Mary 
£. Shepherd, of Indiana, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Shepherd. To their 
union four children have been born: Grace, who is married to George L. Corner 
of Colfax, and has one daughter; Edgar, who is living in Idaho; Hattie, who is 
the wife of D. V. Emmons of Colfax and the mother of one son; and Arthur, a 
resident of Idaho. 

Mr. Carter gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is con- 
versant with the leading issues of the day. In the offices to which that party has 
elected him he has won the confidence and regard of his fellow voters. In relig- 
ious faith he is a Methodist, and in the church of that denomination he is serving 
as district steward. He also holds membership in the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. As one of the prominent officials of Whitman county he justly deserves 
mention in this volume for he has always been interested in and an earnest advo- 
cate of everything that pertains to public advancement and development. 



FRANK JOSEPH MAHONEY. 

For over a quarter of a century Frank Joseph Mahoney has been identified 
with the commercial interests of Whitman county and is now actively engaged in 
the real-estate and seed business. He was born in Dodge county, Wisconsin, 
September 18, 1866, the son of David and Ellen (Barrett) Mahoney, both of 
whom were natives of Massachusetts. 

The early education of Mr. Mahoney was acquired in the public schools of 
Wisconsin, which he attended until 1878, when his mother moved to Iowa. In 
that state he pursued a course in the high school, after which, in 1884, he began 
learning the carpenter's trade. In 1886, having become interested in the prosper- 
ity of the great northwest, he journeyed to Washington and settled at Colfax, 
Whitman county, where he continued working at his trade until 1890. In that 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 341 

Tear he removed to Tekoa and worked at his trade until 1891, when he rented 
two hundred acres of land adjoining the town site and engaged in the dairy busi- 
ness in partnership with Peter Brown under the firm name of Mahoney & Brown. 
This business he continued until 1893^ when he sold out his interest therein and 
entered the grocery and bakery business in partnership with Charles H. James^ 
the firm name being James & Mahoney. The business was continued in partner- 
ship for a time^ when Mr. Mahoney bought the interest of his partner and con- 
tinued the enterprise independently until the spring of 1895, when he sold out 
and engaged in the real-estate business, a line in which he has since continued. 
Since he has been engaged in the real-estate business Mr. Mahoney has been par- 
ticularly active in connection with the civic affairs of Tekoa. In 1896, in company 
with his brother, E. W. Mahoney, he purchased the Tekoa Lighting Plant and 
ran it under the name of the Mahoney Light & Power Company until 1907, when 
be sold their interests. In that year he laid out two city subdivisions, one known 
as the F. J. Mahoney sub-division of Lombard's addition to Tekoa, and the other, 
the Mahoney-Lieb addition. In 1910 he founded the Cecil Vincent Seed Com- 
pany, of which he is still the proprietor. He is a stockholder in the Citizens State 
Bank and holds membership in the Spokane Chamber of Commerce. 

On January 11, 1907, in Modale, Iowa, Mr. Mahoney was married to Miss 
Mayme H. Kirlin, a daughter of Michael and Mary (Donohue) Kirlin, both na- 
tives of Ireland. Mr. and Mrs. Mahoney are the parents of five children, Cecil 
Vincent, Hilma Lucille, Mildred Veronica, Marian Raymonda and Mary Virginia. 

The political allegiance of Mr. Mahoney is given to the democratic party and 
he has served as city clerk and councilman of Tekoa. Fraternally he belongs to 
the Knights of Columbus and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is a 
member of the Catholic church, in which he is also a trustee. His protracted resi- 
dence in Whitman county, together with his active business carer and his uniformly 
honorable and able methods have long since made him one of the leading business 
men and promoters of Tekoa and given him a wide acquaintance throughout the 
county. He belongs to that progressive class who are contributing largely by 
brain and brawn to advance still further the already large business and conuner- 
cial interests of the northwest, and his faith in this great section is not restricted 
by metes and bounds. His prosperous business life has been the result of his own 
well directed efforts along those lines of industry, economy and prudence which 
characterize the able business men of this age. He is indeed a valuable citizen 
and commands the confidence and respect of the community at large. 



WILLIAM ANSON INMAN. 

William Anson Inman, for thirty-two years a resident of Colfax, where he has 
been prominently identified with the practice of law and the city's judiciary de- 
partment, was born in Alabama on the 22d of January, 1848. His parents were 
William Ritchie and Minerva (Kellogg) Inman, both natives of Tennessee, but 
the paternal line is of Scotch extraction. The father's mother's family, the 
Hitchies, and also the Inmans, trace their descent back to the early colonial days. 



342 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

William Anson Inman accompanied his parents on their removal in 1848 from 
his native state to Indiana^ the schools of which he attended until 1856. Owing 
to the death of his parents he then went to Missouri to make his home with an 
older sister^ . continuing his education in the schools of Springfield, that state, until 
1859. Laying aside his text-books he then entered a printing office to learn the 
trade, but withdrew from this in 1861 to go to the war. He enlisted on the 19th 
of December in Company H, Phelps Missouri Infantry, and went to the ironi, 
being* discharged in May, 1862. On July 4 of that year he reenlisted in the 
Eighth Missouri Volunteer Cavalry, serving until October, 1864. During that 
time he was promoted from second lieutenant to first lieutenant and captain, being 
in command of his company during the last eighteen months of his service. 

In February, 1865, he went to Arkansas to become superintendent of the Freed- 
men's Bureau, in which capacity he served until August, 1868. He was subse- 
quently appcHnted prosecuting attorney of the district *of Jonesboro, holding this 
office until December, 1868, when he was appointed prosecuting attorney of the 
third judicial district at Batesville, Arkansas, serving until February, 1875. In 
July of that year Mr. Inman located in Seattle, Washington, and there engaged in 
the practice of law until February, 1877, when he removed to Port Townsend, where 
he became associated with Charles M. Bradshaw, under the firm name of Bradshaw 
& Inman, with whom he practiced until November, 1879. On the 6th of December 
of that year he arrived in Colfax, and here established an office that he has ever 
since maintained, being one of the oldest practicing attorneys in the city. 

Mr. Inman has been married twice, his first union having been with Miss Han- 
nah A. Crosson of Illinois, the ceremony being performed in Arkansas on the 17th 
of April, 1865. Mrs. Inman, who passed away in January, 1900, was a daughter 
of G. B. and Rebecca (Buchanan) Crosson, the father a native of Ohio and the 
mother of Illinois. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Inman: Maggie, who 
married H. C. Blair, of Spokane, Washington; William C, who is a resident of 
Seattle; Roy C, who is living in Portland; and Frank K., a resident of Spokane. 
In March, 1901, Mr. Inman was again married, his union being with Mrs. M. M. 
(McClellan) Donnelly, of Ohio. 

Politically Mr. Inman is a republican. He has held several public offices dar- 
ing the long period of his residence in Colfax, having been probate judge from 
1880 to 1882, while in 1889 he was reappointed to the same office, which he held 
for two years, being the last probate judge of the county. In 1898 he was made 
prosecuting attorney, being connected with this office until 1901, while he has been 
United States commissioner since 1886. He has also held the offices of city clerk, 
school director and school clerk, his public duties ever having been discharged with 
a rare sense of conscientious obligation. Mr. Inman is prominently identified with 
a large number of fraternal orders, his oldest connection being with the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, which he joined in 1869, his membership being in Lodge, 
No. 4, I. O. O. F., Batesville, Arkansas. He also belongs to Colfax Lodge, No. 7S, 
United Artisans, in which be has been an officer since its organization, while he has 
been an officer of Colfax Lodge, No. 14, Ancient Order of United Workmen, since 
1881, and is a past grand master workman. The Loyal Order of Moose, Colfax 
Lodge, No. 691, also claims him as a member. He has always been one of the 
prominent G. A. R. men of the town, being identified with Nathaniel Lyon Post, 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 343 

No. 19, of which he was once an officer, and he is now a member of the comicil of 
administration of this organization for the state of Washington. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Inman are active members of the Congregational church, of 
which the former at the present time serves as clerk. Mr. Inman has been the in 
terested observer of many changes in the town during the long period of his resi- 
dence here, as well as a prominent factor in the promotion of its development. 



JOHN CALVIN NORTHRUP. 

John Calvin Northrup, who engages in the real-estate business and is also 
extensively interested in mines in this vicinity, has been a resident of Palouse 
for more than twenty-two years, during which period he has been identified with 
various local enterprises. He was bom in Grand Rapids, Michigan, on the 2Sd 
of December, 1855, and is a son of John W. and Phoebe (Pine) Northrup, the 
father a native of Georgia and the mother of Canada. In the paternal line, John 
Calvin Northrup is descended from a long line of colonial ancestors, his family 
having come to this country as passengers on the Mayflower. His parents re- 
moved from their Michigan home to Walla Walla, Washington, in 1860, crossing 
the plains with a wagon and ox-teams, and spending six months en route. They 
resided in this state for eleven years, but at the expiration of that period, in 1871, 
they went to Idaho. There the father acquired some land in the vicinity of Mos- 
cow, and turned his attention to agricultural pursuits with a goodly measure of 
success. 

John Calvin Northrup, who was only a lad of five years when his people came 
to Washington and a youth of sixteen when they removed to Idaho, began his 
education in the public schools of the former state and continued the same in 
those of Idaho. He later supplemented his general learning by a business course, 
paying for his tuition by doing farm work. As is common in the country, he 
began assisting with the work of the ranch while still a young lad, his duties in- 
creasing as his strength developed. In 1874 he became associated with his father 
in agricultural pursuits, this connection continuing until he attained his majority. 
He then homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of land and began ranching 
on his own account. When his efforts in this direction became remunerative, he in 
1878 extended his activities by engaging in the lumber business in the vicinity of 
Moscow. During the succeeding eleven years he conducted his lumber business 
and operated his ranch. He was one of the pioneers in Latah county and had 
the distinction of assisting in the erection of the first residence in Moscow. In the 
spring of 1889 he removed to Palouse to assume the management of a sawmill in 
which he owned an interest. The following year he engaged in the livery business, but 
sold out in 1892 in order to devote more of his time and attention to the real- 
estate business he had opened in 1891. In its development he has met with suc- 
cess, and he is handling a fine line of property and has acquired valuable land. 
Beside engaging in the real-estate market he has invested quite extensively in min- 
^S property and owns stock in claims that he has every reason to feel assured, 
will ultimately pay large dividends. 



344 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

In Moscow^ Idaho^ on Christmas day^ 1878^ Mr. Northrup was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Flora Ashby^ of Oregon, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George 
B. Ashby^ both natives of Missouri. Four children have been bom to Mr. and 
Mrs. Northrup, as follows: Jesse C, who has passed away leaving one son; Zoe, 
the wife of H. C. Johnson, of Republic, Washington; Ernest R., of Palouse, who 
has a son and a daughter; and Nellie W., who is still at home. 

Mr. Northrup is a deacon in the Christian church, in which his wife holds 
membership. Fraternally he belongs to both the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows and has been deputized to the Grand Lodge, and the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. He has filled all of the chairs in both organizations. He is also affil- 
iated with the Knights and Ladies of Security and has held all of the offices in 
the local lodge. His political views coincide with the principles of the democratic 
party, and he casts his ballot in support of the men and measures of this body 
save in municipal elections when he votes for the man he feels is best adapted 
to subserve the interests of the coomnunity. He takes an active interest in all 
local affairs, served for eight years as justice of the peace and police judge, while 
he was a member of the town council for two years, and has also been a member 
of the school board. Mr. Northrup is a man with high standards of citizenship 
and upright principles, who loyally and efficiently discharges every duty with 
which he is entrusted' whether of a private or public nature, and is accorded the 
respect of the community where he has resided for so many years. 



ROBERT PUGH TURNLEY. 

The business interests of Rosalia find a most worthy representative in the 
person of Robert Pugh Turnley, who for nearly twenty years has been conducting 
a general mercantile establishment here. His endeavors have been directed with 
more than average foresight and sagacity and have been rewarded with correspond- 
ing success, and as a result he is now prominently identified with various thriving 
enterprises in this vicinity. He was born in northern Alabama on the 5th of Au- 
gust, 1862, and is a son of William F. and Mary (Houston) Turnley, the father 
a native of Virginia and the mother of Alabama. In the paternal line he is de- 
scended from an old colonial family and his great-grandfather was a veteran of 
the Revolutionary war. 

The education of Robert Pugh Turnley was commenced in the common schools 
of his native state and completed at Bethel College, Tennessee, his student days 
being terminated at the age of seventeen years. In 1879, he began fitting him- 
self for a start in life and during the succeeding two years assisted his father with 
the cultivation of the farm and the operation of a tannery. At the expiration of 
that time, in 1881, he left home and went to Arkansas, where he resided for ten 
years. He first obtained employment as a farm hand at sixteen dollars per 
month, and later ran an engine in a cotton gin. Having become more or less famil- 
iar with this industry, he in 1883 took charge of a cotton gin belonging to W. W. 
Collier at Spadra, Arkansas. As he proved to be efficient and trustworthy, Mr. 
Collier later put him in charge of his farm at Clarksville, that state. In 1885 he 
left Mr. Collier*s service and returned to Lamar, where he ran Thompson Brothers 



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SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 347 

cotton gin for a time and later clerked in their general store. Being a young man 
of tireless energy and temperate habits^ Mr. Turnley had managed to save enough 
out of his earnings^ to start him in business on his accoimt .and^ in 1887^ he and 
his brother opened a confectionary store. He attended carefully and industri- 
ously to the young enterprise, and as a result their undertaking thrived and from 
his share of the proceeds, Mr. Turnley acquired enough capital to buy out his 
brother's interest. He conducted his business alone until 1890, when he disposed 
of the store and went to Alma, Arkansas, where he organized a general mercantile 
business. For a brief period the firm was conducted under the name of R. P. 
Turnley, but he later sold half of his interest to J. T. Jones and the business 
was thereafter known under the name of Turnley & Jones. He withdrew from 
the firm in 1891 and went to Haroldton, to assume the management of a large 
general mercantile store, remaining in charge of this establishment until 1892, when 
he came to Thornton, this county, to take a similar position with Thompson, Holt 
k Company. In June of the following year he resigned his position with the 
latter firm and coming to Rosalia established a general store as a partner of J. F. 
Thompson. This concern was conducted imder the firm name of Thompson & 
Turnley until 1904, when Mr. Turnley purchased the interest of his partner and 
has since been operating his business as. the sole owner. 

During the long period of his connection with the commercial interests of Whit- 
man county, Mr. Turnley has established an enviable reputation as a man of not 
only keen sagacity and sound judgment but of absolute reliability. The methods 
he pursues in the organization and conduct^ of any ^enterprise will bear the closest 
investigation and scrutiny, and never ^seveal aqythilig at all detrimental to his 
reputation. His business is conducted ^n strict accordance with the highest prin- 
ciples of modem commercialism, and che sy^Qip .b^, employs has been bom of 
years of practical experience and close iQlpHMft^gtiop. 14>at It is adequate and well 
conceived is manifested by his prosperity, as in addition to his fine establishment 
in Rosalia he has branches at Maiden and Tekoa. With the development of his 
business, Mr. Turnley extended his activities in other directions and he is one of 
the stockholders and also a director and vice president of the Bank of Rosalia and 
president of the Rosalia Telephone Company and built the first rural line to Pine 
City. He is also a stockholder and director of the Rosalia Water Company and 
the Rosalia Creamery Company, both thriving industries. As an organizer and 
director he has few peers in this section, and his name, mentioned in connection 
with any undertaking, is sufficient guaranty to prospective investors, who on ac- 
count of it feel sure of its successful development. 

At Lamar, Arkansas, on the 27th of January, 1887, Mr. Turnley was united 
in marriage to Miss Laura E. Howard of Georgia, a daughter of Samuel and 
Victoria (Martin) Howard, natives of the same state. Seven children have been 
bom to Mr. and Mrs. Turnley, namely: Selma, the wife of E. B. Field, of Tekoa; 
Robert Pugh, Jr., who is manager of the store at Maiden; and Norma, Howard, 
Bryan, Madge and Blanche, all of whom are at home. 

The family affiliate with the Christian church, in which the parents hold mem- 
bership. Fraternally Mr. Turnley is a member of the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica, the Woodmen of the World and the Masonic order. He has attained high rank 
in the latter lodge and is a member of the shrine. He is a charter member of the 
Rosdlia Business Men's Club, a purely social organization; of the Chamber of 

ToLm— u 



848 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Commerce^ of which he was formerly president; and he is also a member of the 
Inland Club of Spokane. Despite the exactions of his extensive interests he does not 
neglect his civic repsonsibilities and is always willing to assume his share of the 
civic duties, having represented his ward in the town council for several years, 
while in 1909 and 1910 he served as mayor. A stanch dettiocrat in his political 
views, he gives his unqualified indorsement to the men and measures of that party. 
A man of laudable ambition and strong individuality, by reason of his unswerving 
determination and ceaseless energy, Mr. Turnley has achieved creditable success, 
which gives him the added satisfaction of being the result of his own efforts. 



WILLIAM ANDREW NELSON. 

William Andrew Nelson, manager of the Colfax branch of the Gilbert Hunt 
Implement Company, with headquarters in Walla Walla, Washington, was bom in 
Mercer county, Kentucky, September 15, 1877, the son of Andrew S. and Sarah 
(Burrus) Nelson. The Nelson family was established on the American continent 
in ante-Revolutionary days and representatives of the family fought in the war 
which helped to gain independence for the original thirteen colonies. The subject 
of this review is a grandson of William S. Nelson and Edmund Burrus, who were 
long identified with the business and social activities of Virginia. 

William A. Nelson attended the common schools of Kentucky, completing his 
education at the Georgetown College, of Georgetown, Kentucky. In 1896 he began 
working for a machinery house as traveling salesman but later removed to Colorado 
and in that state drove a stage from Hotchkiss to Delta. In 1899 he entered the 
employ of E. H. Dyer & Company, contractors, and was employed in the construc- 
tion of a beet sugar mill at Grand Junction, Colorado. In the fall of the same year 
he returned to his home in Kentucky, assisting his father in his mercantile business 
until the spring of 1900, when he removed to Oklahoma and was there engaged in 
the same line of business until 1902, when he went to Kansas City, Missouri, enter- 
ing the employ of the Dayton Computing Scale Company as traveling salesman. 
The lure of the west, however, proved too strong for him and in the fall of 1903 
he removed to San Francisco, California, and after traveling for some time in that 
state and seeking good business opportunities he settled in Eugene, Oregon, where 
he clerked in a men's furnishing store for about a year. In 1904 he removed to 
Spokane,. Washington, where he entered the employ of the International Harvester 
Company, with which he remained connected until the following year, when he 
came to Colfax, entering the employ of the Enterprise Implement Company. His 
services were so satisfactory that in 1906 he became manager of the company. He 
remained with this firm until 1907, when an opportunity to better his condition, 
offered with the Colfax Implement Company. He was thus employed until 1908, 
when he became manager of the Gilbert Hunt Company's branch implement house 
at Colfax, a position which he still holds. During the period of his career thus far 
he had been saving his money with commendable thrift and now owns the property 
upon which his employer's business is built and is also the possessor of property 
in Spokane. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 349 

In Missouri^ on December 21, 1908, Mr. Nelson was mtirried to Miss Cora A. 
Miller^ a daughter of Theodore and Sarah Miller^ and to this union one daughter^ 
Margaret Pauline^ has been born. In his political views Mr. Nelson is an adherent 
of the democratic party and is now serving as a member of the Colfax city council. 
He is affiliated with the Masonic order and the Woodmen of the World^ and is an 
active member of the Colfax Commercial Club. 

Mr. Nelson^ having had broad experience, has by careful training become a 
most successful manager, being thoroughly familiar with all the details of the imple- 
ment business as well as with all other lines of trade. He gives careful attention 
to his business, is accurate in all matters of detail, affable in manner when mingling 
with customers, and his genial disposition has drawn toward him an unusually large 
drde of close business, social and fraternal friends. He is one of those optimists who 
behave in the west and see its business constantly becoming more important. 



JOHN WESLEY HENKLE. 

Prominently identified with the hardware trade in Tekoa, Whitman county, 
Washington, is John Wesley Henkle, who was bom in Benton county, Oregon, Au- 
gust 14, 1869, a son of Andrew J. and Mary (Woods) Henkle, the former a na- 
tive of Ohio and the latter of Iowa. In 1853 the parents crossed the plains from 
Iowa to Oregon with ox teams, the journey requiring six months. 

The youth of John W. Henkle was spent in Oregon, where his education was 
gained in the district schools in the vicinity of his father's farm. He continued his 
school duties, assisting his father the while, until 1889, when he gave his entire time 
to helping his father on the farm, being thus engaged until 1891. In the latter year 
the family removed to Tekoa, where he, with his father and brothers, engaged in the 
dry-goods business under the firm nan^e of A. J. Henkle & Sons. This business was 
continued for several years but in 1 894, during the hard times, in the northwest and 
all over the country, J. W. Henkle secured employment at anjrthing he could get to 
do until 1 896, when he entered the employ of Henry D. Kay, a hardware merchant. 
Mr. Kay had sold out in 1900 and Mr. Henkle continued with his successors until 
1905. In that year the hardware and furniture firm of Henkle & Schulerud was 
established and from that time forward to the present Mr. Henkle has been identi- 
fied with the hardware trade. In 1909 the firm name was changed to Henkle, 
Schulerud & Company and the following year the business was incorporated under 
the style of the Henkle Hardware Company, S. M. Watson being president, James 
McGrery, vice president, and J. W. Henkle, secretary and manager. Mr. Henkle 
takes time from his business to assist in various enterprises in which Tekoa is in- 
terested and is acting as a director of the Tekoa Carnival Company. 

Mr. Henkle was married, in Farmington, Washington, in July, 1892, to Miss 
Bva Scott, a native of Kansas and a daughter of John J. and Addie M. (Hands) 
Scott, the father being a native of Canada and the mother having been born in 
Kentucky. To this union three daughters were born, Genevieve, Irene and Lucille. 
Mr. Henkle is afiiliated with the republican party and in a quiet way takes con- 
siderable interest in politics. He has been city clerk five terms, a member of the 
school board eight years and clerk of that board for seven years. He is an active 



850 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

member of the Odd Fellows lodge^ in which he has occupied all of the chairs^ and 
in his church affiliations is a member of the Congregational churchy of which he is 
a trustee and in the activities of whidi he takes active part. 

Having for over twenty years been a participant in the business life and inter- 
ests of Tekoa and also having taken an active interest in educational and municipal 
affairs^ Mr. Henkle has become exceedingly well known in Tekoa and community. 
He has succeeded in building up a fine business^ which is being conducted under his 
management^ and in all his dealings he is recognized as being entirely just and 
equitable. His cordiality of manner has gained for him an unusually large circle of 
intimate personal friends and there are probably few people in Whitman county 
who are held in higher esteem than he. He has succeeded on account of the close 
attention which he has given to his business^ his integrity^ which is apparent at all 
times^ his economical habits and the general fitness which his earlier experiences have 
given him for the line which he is now following. 



ALFRED B. WILLARD. 



In the great northwest there are large numbers of successful business men who 
today are affluent and highly respected and useful citizens who have attained their 
present estate solely through their own efforts and by their habits of industry, econ- 
omy and well directed energies in business. Notably among this class is Alfred B. 
Willard, banker, farmer and former hardware merchant of Tekoa, Whitman county. 
He was bom in Boone county, Illinois, August 19, 1852, the son of Henry R. and 
Celestia (Morse) Willard, both natives of the state of New York. 

In the public schools of Illinois Alfred B. Willard received his early education. 
He assisted his father in the work of the farm until 1872 when, the lure of the west 
attracting him, he set out for the Pacific coast and settled in California. During his 
early years in the far west he engaged in the freighting business during the sum- 
mer months while in the fall and winter seasons he followed agricultural pursuits. 
In October, 1878, he removed to Whitman county, Washington, where he took up 
three hundred and twenty acres of government land about one and one-half miles 
south of where Tekoa now stands. One half of this land he took up under the 
homestead act and the other half under the timber culture act. He worked hard 
for several years getting his farm under a good state of cultivation and making the 
necessary improvements. He also increased his holdings until he owned four hun- 
dred and eighty acres. In 1898 crops were a failure — a disastrous blow to Mr. 
Willard — but in the following year crops were good and prices passable for that 
period of almost universal depression throughout the country, which removed much 
of his discouragement of the year before. He continued farming diligently and in 
a well directed way until 1897, when he removed to Tekoa and engaged in the hard- 
ware business in partnership with C. F. Kay, the firm name being Kay & Willard. 
In 1899 he retired from active life to look after his farming interests which have 
now grown to include seventeen hundred and sixty acres of land. Mr. Willard is 
the president and also a stockholder and director of the Citizens State Bank of 
Tekoa and likewise of the Farmers' Union Mill & Grain Company, and a stockholder 
and one of the organizers of the Tekoa Creamery Company. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 851 

In 1899, at Portage, Wisconsin, Mr. Willard was married to Miss Sarah M. Mc- 
Laren, a daughter of James and Sarah (Curtis) McLaren, natives of New York 
and Canada respectively. In his political affiliation Mr. Willard is a republican. 
He has served as school director for several terms and was one of the county com- 
missioners from 1898 to 1904, and he has also been a member of the city council of 
Tekoa. The long and active business life of Alfred B. Willard, together with his 
fairness in business dealings, his strict integrity and the capable manner in which 
be has handled all his business affairs have made him easily one of the most popu- 
lar and valued citizens of the city and county where he resides. Because of the 
success which he has achieved through his own unaided efforts and because of his 
rise to the place in the community which he now enjoys he easily takes high rank 
among the prosperous, respected and eminent citizens of the great state of Wash- 
ington. 



CHARLES WESLEY WALTON, Sr. 

Charles Wesley Walton was born in Iowa, October 18, 1844, a son of Joshua 
J. and Ann (McNab) Walton, both natives of Kentucky, who at the early period 
of 1849 crossed the plains with ox teams to the Pacific coast, settling in California. 
This journey was attended with the usual series of hardships and privations com- 
mon to the lot of pioneers. Charles W. Walton, who was but five years old at the 
time of the removal of the family, attended the public schools in the Golden state 
until the time when his parents went to Oregon in 1852, and in that state he com- 
pleted his education. 

In 1864 he took up the business of mining, which he followed for three years, 
and then went to farming on his own account in Lane county, Oregon, on one 
hundred and sixty acres of land. There he remained until 1879, when he re- 
moved to Rosalia, Washington, renting twenty-four acres one mile south of the 
town which he operated until 1880, when he went to Albany, Oregon, where he 
clerked in a store throughout the spring of that year. He then returned to Rosalia, 
taking up a government homestead of one hundred and sixty acres of land four 
and a half miles northwest of the town. There he took up his abode, except at 
such times as he was engaged in clerking in Cheney and Spokane, particularly dur- 
ing the first year that he lived on the homestead. In this way he accumulated ad- 
ditional funds for the development of his claim. He continued his residence there- 
on until 1886, when he secured a title from the government to this land which he 
then sold and removed to Rosalia, where he embarked in the grocery business. 
After conducting this enterprise for a time he disposed of it and bought one hun- 
dred and sixty acres three miles south of the city. There he lived until 1888, 
when once more he returned to Rosalia and took charge of the business of the 
Tacoma Grain Company and conducted that enterprise until he became interested 
in the Seattle Grain Company, with which he is still identified as agent, not only 
at Oakesdale but also at Fallon, McCoy and Belmont. He still owns his home in 
Spokane, where his family reside in order that the children may have the benefit 
of the school facilities there. 



352 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Mr. Walton was married, on the 2d of April, 1866, to Miss Susie L. Gregg, 
who is a native of Illinois and a daughter of Andrew J. and Dorothy (Baker) 
Gregg, who were born in Illinois and Kentucky respectively. To this union have 
been born seven children, namely: Lena Louise, who died when eleven years of 
age; George P., who is married and has three sons; Mabel, who wedded J. M. 
Hone and has one son and one daughter; Frank D., deceased; Fred B., who is 
married and has one son; Charles W., Jr.; and Chester E., who is married and 
has one daughter. The surviving members are all residents of Spokane. 

In his political allegiance Mr. Walton is a democrat and was for many years 
marshal and constable of Rosalia. He is a member of the Christian church in 
which he is serving as elder and he takes an active interest in the affairs of that 
denomination. Mr. Walton is among the better class of citizens of Whitman 
county, where he has a very large circle of friends and where he is universally 
respected and held in high esteem. 



J. FRANKLIN McCROSKEY. 

Public spirit, strict attention to business and general success along all lines 
of endeavor undertaken, characterize the career of J. Franklin McCroskey, who 
though operating a farm of six hundred and forty acres of land in the vicinity 
of the town is a resident of Oakesdale. He was bom in Monroe county, Tennes- 
see, January 9, 1860, a son of J. P. T. and Mary M. (Gallagher) McCroskey, both 
natives of Tennessee. His boyhood days were spent on the farm ' and in the 
Glenloch Mills, and he received a fair education, attending the common and high 
schools of the county until May, 1879. At that time the parents came west to 
California and in July of the same year moved to what is known as Tennessee 
Flat, Whitman county, Washington, where the father took up a homestead and 
also a claim under the timber culture laws, and there J. Franklin McCroskey re- 
mained, assisting his father until after he had obtained titles to his land from the 
United States government. In 1880 the son began working on the Northern Pacific 
Railroad and was also identified with the Oregon Railway & Navigation Com- 
pany, being thus employed until 1884. During this period, however, in 1882, he 
filed on a one hundred and sixty acre homestead three miles northwest of Oakes- 
dale and after maintaining his residence there and meeting the other requirements 
secured title to this land from the government. He continued increasing his hold- 
ings by purchase until he had six hundred and forty acres, and still owns and 
operates four hundred and eighty acres, most of which is in a high state of culti- 
vation and is equipped with many modern improvements. He has been con- 
nected with the Oakesdale State Bank as a stockholder and has been active in 
business and other circles in Whitman county for many years. 

In Olympia, Washington, on the 25th of December, 1899, Mr. McCroskey was 
united in marriage to Miss Virginia A. Bushnell, a native of Missouri and a daugh- 
ter of Emanuel and Mary (Watson) Bushnell. To them have been born two chil- 
dren, Keith Bushnell and Franklin. In his fraternal relations Mr. McCroskey is 
affiliated with the Farmers Union and the United Artisans. He is a democrat in 
his political faith and is at present a member of the city council of Oakesdale. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 353 

He has long been active in educational matters^ having been a member of the 
school board about twelve years. He is also affiliated with the Methodist Episco- 
pal church, of which he and his wife are active supporters and earnest in their 
cooperation to make that body effective for good in the community. 

Possessing the sterling qualities of industry^ economy and business acumen, 
together with a lively interest in civic, fraternal, educational and church affairs, 
Mr. McCroskey has long been recognized as a conspicuous and valuable citizen 
of Oakesdale and Whitman county. He has a large number of friends and with 
his genial demeanor, his warm-heartedness and his good-fellowship is a favorite 
with the circle in which he moves. 



WILLIAM A. NICHOLLS. 

William A. Nicholls, president of the Big Bend Transit Company, is financing 
and advancing a project for railroad building and the development of water power 
along the Spokane river. He has financed many business propositions which have 
become valuable factors in the upbuilding of the northwest, his keen insight en- 
abling him to see and utilize opportunities which men of less broad vision do not 
grasp. He was born at Beatrice, Nebraska, June 15, 1878, a son of William D. 
and Ada L. (Pellett) Nicholls, of that city, who removed to Spokane in 1894. 
The family numbered four sons and five daughters, namely: Walter J., who is in 
the brokerage business in Spokane ; Leigh, a real-estate dealer in Eugene, Oregon ; 
Gilmore, of Eugene; Clara, the wife of Henry Swan, of Spokane; Marjorie, who 
married Wilbur Wester, of Seattle; Mona, who makes her home in this city; 
William A., of this review; and two who died in childhood. 

William A. Nicholls began his education in the private schools of the east and 
continued his course after coming to Spokane, being graduated from the high 
school here in 1896. The mining and general brokerage business attracted him and 
he has handled the sale of large mining properties all through the northwest, winning 
substantial success in that line. He has been a close student of the mineral re- 
sources of the country, his careful investigation leading to judicious investments 
which have brought him gratifying prosperity. He organized the National Cop- 
per Mine Company, the Nepsic Mining Company and the Nicholls Investment 
Company, which conducted a large real-estate, fire, accident and safety deposit 
vault business. Recently, however, Mr. Nicholls has disposed of his interests in 
the last named company to the Washington Trust Company and is now giving his 
attention to the interests of the Big Bend Transit Company of which he is presi- 
dent. This company has well formulated plans which it is rapidly putting into 
execution, each day witnessing a step in advance of what had been accomplished 
in the previous day. The company now has its survey all made to follow the Spo- 
kane river from here to the junction of the Columbia, having a terminal site at 
this point. They also have a right from the government to develop the water 
power here and are pushing forward their project to completion. Mr. Nicholls 
is notably prompt, energetic and reliable and has in large measure the quality of 
common sense. He has never been actively identified with politics although he 
has always given his support to the republican party since age conferred upon 



354 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

him the right of franchise. He has preferred to give his attention to business and 
public affairs of another character and is a charter member of the Spokane Stock 
Exchange which was organized in 1896. 

Fraternally Mr. NichoUs is connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks^ his membership being in Lodge No. 228. He is a life member of the Spo- 
kane Amateur Athletic Club, belongs also to the Spokane Club and to the Spokane 
Country Club. It would be difficult to forecast his future but it is well known 
that he never regards any position as final. With the accomplishment of a givcD 
purpose he starts out for still larger achievements and the project which he has 
undertaken will undoubtedly in time prove a valuable asset in the work of devel- 
oping the northwest. 



FREDERICK CONRAD ROBERTSON. 

Frederick Conrad Robertson, the subject of this sketch, was born in Livings- 
ton, Paris, Louisiana, February 12, 1865. His father was Edward White Robert- 
son and his mother's maiden name Mary Jane Pope. His father was a prominent 
southern lawyer and statesman and served in the Mexican war, and in the Civil 
war as a Confederate, being colonel in the siege of Vicksburg. He served from 
1876 until 1886 as a member of congress and upon his death was succeeded by bis 
son, S. M. Robertson, who served until 1906. 

Mr. Robertson was educated at the Louisiana State University, leaving in his 
senior year and graduated from the Georgetown Law School at Washington, D. 
C, in 1889. He came immediately to the state of Washington and settled at Port 
Townsend and later at Tacoma. He served as assistant United States attorney 
from 1891 to 1897 doing much trial work for the United States. He moved to 
Spokane in 1897 and has since continuously resided there. From 1899 until 1902 
he was employed as attorney for the Western Miners and defended all of them 
who were incarcerated in the "Bull Pen" and afterward tried in the Idaho courts. 
He afterward went to Washington and represented the miners before the con- 
gressional investigation called at their instance before the military committee of 
the house of representatives, which resulted in the ending of martial law in the 
Coeur d'Alehes and the release of the remaining incarcerated miners who had 
been held in the martial prison of "Bull Pen'* at Wardner, Idaho, some one thou- 
sand five hundred miners being so incarcerated. Mr. Robertson's constant con- 
tention was that martial law and the holding of men by martial order under such 
conditions was unconstitutional and unlawful, when the courts are in the unob- 
structed exercise of their jurisdiction and can administer civil remedies. His 
views were, in the end, accepted and martial control of the Coeur d'Alenes was 
brought to an end by order of President McKinley. 

Mr. Robertson has been active in the legal profession, his practice extending 
into Oregon, Idaho and Washington in which states he has a large acquaintance 
He has taken part in many of the most important trials in Eastern Washington 
and Idaho. Mr. Robertson has been a continual advocate of the ownership of 
public utilities by municipalities and has been prominent in the democratic party 
since his advent into the state. He was a nominee for congress in 1908, but was 
defeated with the balance of the state ticket. 



FREDERICK C. ROBERTSON 



A . " Z • • 1 ■ 



1 1 

! I 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 357 

Mr. Robertson is the father of two sons> Stephen^ of the age of eighteen; and 
Fred, of the age of seventeen. He has a daughter, Lucile, of the age of thirteen, 
by his first wiie, who was Miss Amelia DeLion and who died in 1901. In 1909 he 
was again married to Miss Marie Twist. 

Mr. Robertson has been frequently employed in labor disputes as the attorney 
of local and national unions. 



LOUIS LAFAYETTE HUNT. 

Louis Lafayette Hunt is interested in various business projects in Spokane. He 
was bom in Nashville, Tennessee, July 20, 1869, and is a son of Hamline T. and 
Jennie C. (Gardner) Hunt, both of whom are of English descent. The Hunt fam- 
ily, however, was founded in America in Colonial days and was represented in the 
Revolutionary war. Hamline T. Hunt was bom in the state of New York and when 
young accompanied his parents on their removal from Tennessee to Wisconsin. 
Following his removal to the middle west he was postmaster at Hortonville, Wis- 
consin, for seventeen years. He there engaged in farming and also conducted a 
fire insurance business for thirty years. He served as a soldier of the Civil war 
for about four years, becoming first lieutenant of the Third Wisconsin Light Ar- 
tillery. His last days were spent in ;ICe]^pgg, idahq^ .wjiere he died July 27, 1909. 
His wife, who died in 1881, also re]Jirc^eii^;§n'dl(Jv!tortily that sent some of its 
members to the front in the war for i^idependence. Her father enlisted as a soldier 
of the Confederate army and was killed at, $h^,bajttl^ of Chickamauga. 

Louis L. Hunt is the only survitjngHiiieinbei:^ of hfs family, his sister having 
died at the age of seven years. He was educated in the common and high schools 
and a business college of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and in the State Normal School. He 
was only twelve years of age when he left home and went to Milwaukee, Wiscon- 
sin, and the following year made his way to Chicago where he remained for two 
years. He was afterward at El Paso, Texas, and secured employment with the 3X 
Cattle Company as ranch hand and cowboy. Subsequently he returned to New Or- 
leans and afterward went to Buffalo, New York; Washington, D. C; Philadelphia, 
Cincinnati and Chicago, workin|< in those cities on the Buffalo & Erie Railroad, and 
also making the run out of Chicago to Milwaukee as a newsboy. While residing in 
Chicago he traveled with the W. W. Cole Circus for two seasons, being upon the 
road from 1882 until 1884, visiting all states east of the Mississippi. In the spring 
of 1885 he returned to Chicago and entered the employ of the Wisconsin Central 
Railroad as baggage man and expressman for the American Express Company. In 
the fall of 1885 he removed to Marquette, Michigan, where he entered the service 
of the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic Railroad. After a short time, however, he 
located at Clintonville, Wisconsin, where he was employed by the Chicago & North- 
western Railroad Company and later he went to Duluth, Minnesota, and thence to 
Brainard, where he made his home during the winter of 1886, being employed as a 
brakeman and conductor on the Northern Pacific Railroad. 

On the 5th of May, 1887, Mr. Hunt arrived in Spokane but soon returned east 
as far as Missoula, Montana, and worked for the Northern Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany for two years and five months. He then engaged in mining in and near Mon- 



358 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

tana and Idaho for two years. He also was employed at Bntte in connection with 
the liquor business and in 1892 returned to Missoula where he engaged in business 
until 1899. In 1900 he formed a partnership with George M. Cosgrove and con- 
ducted business at No. Ill Howard street under the firm name of Coagrove & 
Company. For ^ve years he conducted a large cafe in Spokane but in 1905 sold 
out and went to Seattle where he remained for a short time. After returning to 
this city he did not again engage in business until 1909^ when he opened an estab- 
lishment in the Paulsen building where he is now located. He secured the Paulsen 
lease and opened business there on the 22d of June. He has the finest bar in the 
northwest and the best trade in the city. He is also interested, in the Surprise Min- 
ing Company of Pine Creek, near Kellogg, Idaho, conceded to be one of the best 
properties in that district. He is a stockholder in the Spokane Taxicab Company 
and in the Farmer Jones Mining Company of Priest River, the property of which 
is under development and by government inspectors conceded to be one of the com- 
ing gold mines of Washington. He has always been much interested in racing, has 
driven many races and was interested with Mr. Cosgrove in the race-track conces- 
sion from 1903 until 1907. He is also the sole proprietor of a wholesale and retail 
liquor house at the corner of Second and Stevens streets. 

On the 25th of December, 1901, Mr. Hunt was married to Miss Charlotte Louise 
Manning, a daughter of Mr. Manning, of Minnesota, now deceased. She is a sister 
of Thomas J. Manning, superintendent of carriers of the Spokane postoffice, and 
of James Manning, who has charge of the mailing department of the postoffice at 
Minneapolis. Mr. Hunt owns a beautiful home at No. 2026 Manito place, facing 
the park, and also a fine residence on Newman Lake and other property there, 
where he keeps a launch and steel boats. In politics he was formerly a democrat 
but now gives his support to the republican party. He has been active in political 
work, has served as a delegate to county conventions in Missoula and Sp<^ane and 
many installed office holders are indebted to Mr. Hunt for their success. Frater- 
nally he is connected with the Elks Lodge, No. 228, with the Knights of Pythias, 
the Spokane Athletic Club, the Inland Club, the Enakops and the Chamber of Com- 
merce. He has greatly increased his business activities and interests and now has 
many good dividend-bearing business projects. 



SAMUEL W. ANDERSON. 

Samuel W. Anderson is an independent grocer of Spokane, who has met with 
success in mercantile lines and is branching out largely into other fields as one of 
the factors in the establishment and control of an immense plant for the manu- 
facture of white lead, chrome lead, and iron and zinc paint pigments. 

Born in Michigan on the 19th of December, 1864, Samuel W. Anderson is de- 
scended from a prominent Scottish family and his father, James Anderson, now 
living in Spokane at the ripe old age of eighty-six years, was bom in the city of 
Glasgow, whence he came to America at the age of twelve, it requiring at that 
time three months to coiiiplete the voyage across the Atlantic. He has a brother 
two years his senior who is still living in Canada. James Anderson wedded Patience 
Peaslee, who was born in Michigan and was of English lineage, although the fam- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 359 

ily was early established on American soil and sent its representatives to the front 
in the Revolutionary war. Mrs. Anderson passed away about 1892, survived by 
her husband and three children^ of whom Monroe is now a farmer of Alberta, 
Canada, while the daughter is Mr. E. E. Mayer, whose husband is a retired 
fanner of Spokane. 

In the graded and high schools of Michigan, Samuel W. Anderson pursued his 
education and entered business life as clerk in the mercantile establishment of 
Roberts & Beach at Lapeer, Michigan. He afterward spent five years in the em- 
ploy of J. Armstrong, a general merchant, and on the expiration of that period be- 
came connected with the wholesale dry-goods house of A. Krolick & Company of 
Detroit, Michigan, having charge of the dress-goods department. He was after- 
ward with Barnes, Hengerer & Company, wholesale dry-goods merchants of Buf- 
falo, and in the interest of that house traveled through the central part of Michigan 
for three years. 

Following the arrival of Mr. Anderson in Spokane, in 1890, he engaged in 
various occupations, was connected with commission houses and traveled all over the 
west, visiting Denver, Salt Lake City, Seattle and Portland. Eventually he estab- 
lished a permanent residence in Spokane and embarked in the grocery business, 
opening the Eagle Cash Grocery Store in 1894. In this business he has since con- 
tinned, his location being at No. 927 Sprague avenue. He has not confined his at- 
tention and energies to a strict line of trade but has extended his efforts into other 
fields which have been equally important as factors in promoting the business ac- 
tivity and consequent development and prosperity of the city and the northwest and 
is interested to a considerable extent in city property in Spokane and owns one 
thousand acres of fine wheat land in southern Alberta, Canada. 

In 1896 Mr. Anderson was united in marriage to Miss Carrie M. Hetts, of 
Detroit, Michigan, a daughter of Valentine Hetts, who was a wholesale shoe mer- 
chant of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson are now parents of three children, 
Bernadine, Edwin and Katherine. Mr. Anderson is a republican in his political 
convictions. He belongs to the Elks lodge of Spokane, to the Elnights of Pythias 
and to the Inland Club. His friends, and they are many, find him a social, genial 
gentleman whose unfeigned cordiality is the source of his popularity. 



WILLIAM MARSHALL CHAMBERS. 

William Marshall Chambers, the well known grain merchant of Pullman, Whit- 
man county, Washington, was bom in Benton county, Oregon, November 15, 1848, 
his parents, being Roland and Lovisa (King) Chambers, the father a native of Illi- 
nois and the mother of Iowa. Roland Chambers with his family crossed the 
great plains in 1844 with an ox team from Iowa, joining one of the first big trains 
which had about that time begun crossing the great American prairies. On reach- 
ing the Pacific slope he settled in Benton county, Oregon, and it was there that 
the boyhood days of the son, William Marshall Chambers, were spent, and there 
he attended the district schools, acquiring a good common-school education. It 
was also in that place that he received his first training in farm work on the 
homestead of his father. In 1870 he began a course of study in the Philomath 



360 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

College of Benton county, and in 1878, having completed the course, laid aside 
his text-books to enter the employ of the government on the Silets Indian reserva- 
tion as clerk. There he remained until 1877, when he began working on the 
Cascade locks, being employed by the original contractors, Piatt, Chambers, Mc- 
Bean & Company as bookeeper. In 1879 he reentered the service in the em- 
ploy of the government, this time occupying the position of chief clerk of the 
Cascade locks, and remained in that position until 1881. In that year he re- 
moved to Moscow where he became bookkeeper for W. J. McConnell & Company, 
who were dealers in general merchandise. He remained in that position until 
1885, when he removed to Pullman where as one of the partners of McConnell, 
Chambers 8c Company he engaged in the general merchandising business. This 
relationship continued until 1898, in which year as result of the hard times and 
the general depression all over the country and especially the northwest the busi- 
ness was closed out. Mr. Chambers subsequently engaged in the grain business, 
first under the firm name of Chambers, Price & Company and then under liis own 
name. During his business career he has been interested in the ownership of lands 
in the Palouse country, of which interests, however, he has now mostly disposed. 
Mr. Chambers gives his political support to the republican party but he has 
never been an office seeker and has only taken a moderate interest in politics. He 
is a charter member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, Lodge No. 249, 
of Moscow, and he belongs also to the Pullman Club. The business experiences of 
Mr. Chambers have been wide in scope and his undertakings of benefit to the 
communities in which he has resided. He has always been regarded as a splendid 
citizen and has taken an active interest in the welfare of Pullman and assisted to 
the extent of his ability, which has been considerable, in the upbuilding of Whit- 
man county. He has great faith in the northwest, a country in which he sees 
boundless opportunities. He has a very large circle of dose personal and busi- 
ness friends who have always regarded him with the highest respect and esteem. 



WILL G. GRAVES. 



Will G. Graves, a Spokane lawyer of ability and prominence, has had the 
distinction of having been one of only three democratic members of the Washington 
senate, in which he served from 1903 to 1911, and while this precluded any pos- 
sibility of the passage of party measures, it did not prevent his ready and helpful 
cooperation in various projects which looked beyond partisanship to the welfare 
of the commonwealth. His work has indeed been of worth as a factor in the legis- 
lation of the state during the past eight years. He is equally well known in the 
practice of law in Spokane, where a large clientage has been accorded him. He 
was born May 18, 1866, and is the youngest of the four sons of John J. and Or- 
rilla Landon (Berry) Graves. The ancestral records show that the Graves family 
were among the leading colonial families of Virginia, the first representative of 
the name in America being Captain Thomas Graves, who arrived at Jamestown 
as a passenger on the William and Mary, which was the second ship to make the 
voyage, arriving in 1608, the year following the establishment of the Jamestown 
colony. He became a prominent and influential citizen and his name appears on 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 361 

a monament erected ^o commemorate the assembling the first Virginia house of 
burgesses that convened at Jamestown in June^ 1619^ he being one of the mem- 
bers of that body. Representatives of the name continued to reside in Accomac 
county^ Virginia, until after the United States had won her independence. Then 
the great-grandfather of Will G. Graves removed to Boone county, Kentucky, 
where he located on a land grant given him in recognition of services which he 
had rendered to the Canadian government. It was in his honor that Graves 
county, Kentucky, was named. His son was Major Reuben Graves, a soldier of 
the War of 1812, who held the rank of major in Colonel Johnson's regiment in 
the campaign against the Indians, of which the battle of Tippecanoe was the 
chief feature. On that occasion he secured the tomahawk of the famous Indian 
chief, Tecumseh, and it still remains a cherished heirloom in the family to this 
day. He was likewise a distinguished officer of the Mexican war. He continued 
to reside in Kentucky until, wishing to get away from what he regarded as the 
baneful influences of slavery, he removed with his family to Illinois after freeing 
his slaves and disposing of his property in Kentucky. The journey was made 
with a caravan composed of sixteen families and they founded the town of St. 
Marys, in Hancock county. 

His son, John J. Graves, was bom October 18, 1819, at the old homestead, 
on the land which his grandfather had received as a grant from the government. 
He went with his family to Illinois and, devoting his life to agricultural pursuits, 
became one of the large landowners of that part of the state and a helpful factor 
in its development and progress. He subscribed liberally to the stock of the 
Burlington railroad and with his neighbors assisted in building that section of the 
line which extends from Galesburg to Quincy. He married OrriUa Landon Berry, 
a representative of one of the old New England families, her father having been 
Dr. Jonathan Berry, of Grand Isle, Vermont, who was chief surgeon on the 
American flagship at the battle of Plattsburg, in the War of 1812. 

Will G. Graves spent the first twenty-three years of his life in the state of 
his nativity and his experiences and advantages were those which usually fall to 
the lot of the farmer boy. As his father was in very comfortable financial circum- 
stances he was enabled to pursue his education beyond the point of the public 
schools and thus become well equipped for life's practical duties. His elder 
brothers, Frank H. and Jay P. Graves, came to Spokane in 1884 and 1887, respec- 
tively, and their favorable reports of the developing northwest caused Will G. Graves 
to make his way to this section of the country in the fall of 1889. After a brief 
stay in Spokane he went to Ellensburg and, devoting his attention to the study 
of law, was admitted to the bar in 1892. For four years he practiced at that 
place but in the spring of 1896 returned to Spokane, where he formed a partner- 
ship with his brother, Frank H. Graves, a business association which is still main- 
tained, the firm having from the first occupied a creditable and enviable position 
among the practitioners of the city. His business has constantly increased in 
volume and importance and he seems at home in all departments of the law, prov- 
ing a strong advocate and a safe counselor. 

Aside from his profession his most important public work has been in the 
field of legislation. Something of his personal popularity and the confidence re- 
posed in him are indicated in the fact that in 1902, in a strong republican district 
— the sixth — he was elected, a democratic nominee, to the state senate and in 1906 



362 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

he was reelected^ becoming one of three democratic members of that body in 1910. 
During the first two sessions of his service he was chairman of the committee on 
constitution and constitutional revision, and later was made chairman of the 
judiciary committee, in which connection he has rendered valuable service to his 
state. He is not unknown in business circles outside of his profession and is 
now a trustee of the Spokane and Inland Empire Railroad Company, of the Inter- 
national Coal & Coke Company and a director of the Traders National Bank. 
In 1894 Mr. Graves was united in marriage to Miss Rebecca Peek, a daugh- 
ter of Asahel Peek, of Seattle, and they have one surviving child, a son, Paul 
Hyde Graves. Identified with Spokane and the Inland Empire for twenty-two 
years. Will G. Graves has long since established his position as one of the prom- 
inent lawyers and representative citizens who, taking up the work begun by the 
pioneers, has builded upon the foundation which the pioneers laid an imposing 
superstructure of stability and worth that is keeping Washington abreast in all 
the different lines of progress and improvement with the older states of the east. 



CHARLES MORRIS MECKLEM. 

Charles Morris Mecklem, who is successfully engaged in the drug business 
at Palouse, Whitman county, was bom in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, March 22, 1857, 
his parents being Eli and Margaret (Collins) Mecklem, the former a native of 
the state of New York and the latter of Ireland. 

Charles M. Mecklem attended the public schools in Pennsylvania until 1866, 
when he was nine years of age. In that year his parents removed to Ohio and 
there he continued in the public schools and later became a student at the Hayes- 
ville Academy and afterward in the Mansfield Normal School. In 1876 he 
rented a farm and during that same winter took up the profession of school teach- 
ing, which he followed for some time. His father having passed away when be 
was nine years of age, the support of the family early devolved upon him. In 
the spring of 1880 he came to Washington and located twelve miles southeast of 
Colfax, later becoming principal of the Palouse public schools. In 1881 he was 
made assistant principal of the Colfax school but in 1882 he entered G. W. Suther- 
land's drug store as an apprentice and remained there until 1885, receiving in 
that year a certificate as a registered pharmacist. He then became head clerk in 
the Pioneer Drug Store in Colfax. In 1886 he accepted a position as mail clerk 
on a railroad but in the fall of the same year was elected county school superin- 
tendent. In that year he was the only democrat who was elected in the county, a 
fact which shows his popularity among the residents there. In 1889 he moved to 
Palouse and established a drug store under the firm name of Mecklem & Ells- 
worth and continued under that name until 190S, when he purchased the interest 
of Mr. Ellsworth and has since continued in that store under the firm name of the 
Mecklem Pharmacy. He has been very successful in the financial world and 
among his other interests he is a stockholder and a director of the National Bank 
of Palouse. 

At Spokane, in May, 1891, Mr. Mecklem was married to Miss Mary Babb, 
who was born in Iowa, a daughter of John and Margaret Babb. To Mr. and Mrs. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 863 

Meddem have been born two daughters^ Quevenne and Zelva^ both of whom are 
students in the Washington State College. In his political relations Mr. Mecklem 
is a democrat and he has ever taken an active interest in local party measures. 
He is greatly interested in educational work as evinced by the offices he has held^ 
liaving been county school superintendent in 1886 and school director for 
several terms. Fraternally he belongs to the Masons^ having filled all the 
chairs in the local lodge^ and he also belongs to Pullman Chapter^ No. 31, R. A. 
M. He is likewise identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows^ hav- 
ing filled all the chairs in his lodge^ and is a member of the Encampment^ also the 
last representative to the Grand Lodge of the state of Washington. He is identi- 
fied with the Woodmen of the World and with the Improved Order of Red Men. 
Also socially he is a member of the Palouse Business Men's Association. Mr. 
Mecklem's success in the business world is the result of honest endeavor and dis- 
criminating foresight in his business relations. He has made an honorable record 
and is recognized as one of the leading citizens of Whitman county. 



JOHN A. HENRY. 



John A. Henry ^ the extent and importance of whose business interests make 
him one of the prominent real-estate brokers of Spokane, is now operating under 
the firm name of J. A. Henry & Company. He was born in Eureka^ Humboldt 
county^ California, on the 22d of October, 1876, his parents being Francis and 
Phoebe (Davis) Henry. The father, who is of Irish descent, was born in New 
Brunswick, Canada, in 1827. He was one of the pioneer lumbermen of Hum- 
boldt county, and his death occurred in 1907. The mother, who is of English de- 
scent, was also bom in New Brunswick, and is at present living in Eureka, Cali- 
fornia. She has one brother, George L. Davis, who is a prominent banker and 
lumberman of Hoquiam, Washington. To Mr. and Mrs. Henry six children were 
bom: Hiram, George and Wellington, all of whom are living in Humboldt county; 
John A., of Spokane; Mrs. Margaret Getchell of Bay side, California; and Mrs. 
Alfretta Rice, of San Diego, California. 

John A. Henry acquired his education in the public and high schools of Eureka, 
aod later took a course in a business college. After his graduation from the latter 
institution he accepted a position as private secretary to E. G. Eames, general 
manager of the Puget Mill Company remaining there two years at the end of which 
time he entered the employ as secretary of the Grays Harbor Lumber Company, 
an organization which had been brought about by his uncle who had erected a 
mill at Grays Harbor, Washington. After Mr. Henry had occupied that position 
for some time, the firm having changed hands, he became connected with the lum- 
ber interests at Eureka as assistant secretary of the Lumber Association for four 
years. In 1906 he left that city and went to the San Francisco office immediately 
after the remarkable earthquake in that city. He remained there one year before 
coming to Spokane and becoming J. L. Drumheller's private secretary, and secre- 
tary and treasurer of many companies with which Mr. Drumheller was connected, 
among these being the Sand Point Water & Light Company, of which Mr. Drum- 
heller is president and principal owner. Much of the responsibility of this organ- 



864 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

ization fell upon Mr. Henry's shoulders^ and the success which was theirs was due 
to a large degree to his ability. Mr. Henry was affiliated with Mr. Drumheller 
from 1907 to 1909^ and he looks upon these two years as one of the most success- 
ful and profitable periods of his business career. Subsequently he engaged inde- 
pendently in the real-estate business and is at present carrying on a general real- 
estate^ rental and insurance business. He is agent for the Scott-Robertson prop- 
erty^ consisting of the Idaho and Chemical buildings located on Sprague avenue 
between Wall and Howard streets. He deals in both inside and outside property, 
bu3dng and selling, and is today one of the most prominent real-estate brokers in 
Spokane. 

Mr. Henry was a member of the Eureka Reserve Naval Militia for three years 
but was not called to the Spanish war. They cruised up and down the coast as 
auxiliary to the cruiser Badger, during the time that Mr. Henry served as a blue 
jacket. 

At Kennewick, Washington, on the 29th of June, 1907, Mr. Henry was mar- 
ried to Miss Mabel Haney, a daughter of H. B. Haney, a retired agriculturist now 
living in Spokane and one of the pioneers of Kennewick. Mrs. Henry is prom- 
inent in musical circles and at the present time is solo soprano at the First Presby- 
terian church. Before her marriage she studied in Minneapolis Conservatory and 
also at Berkeley, California. 

Politically Mr. Henry is a stalwart republican and has at all times been ac- 
tively engaged in the interests of his party. He served as secretary of the Young 
Men's Republican Club at Eureka, and has been delegate to various county con- 
ventions. He holds membership in the Vincent Methodist Episcopal church, Ori- 
ental Lodge, No. 74, A. F. & A. M. and the Inland Club. He is a shrewd and 
keen-sighted businessman and one who knows real-estate in all its details, and is 
able to conduct his business enterprises so that they turn out to his financial 
advantage and to the benefit of the city. 



KING PRINCE ALLEN. 



King Prince Allen, who has been postmaster of Pullman for the past nine years, 
was born in Ohio on the 9th of November, 1841, and is a son of Ira and Rebecca 
(Calkins) Allen, both members of old colonial families and natives of Vermont. In 
the paternal line he is descended from the same branch of the family as Ethan 
Allen, of Revolutionary fame, while his maternal ancestors came to America on 
the Mayflower. 

The education of King Prince Allen was pursued in the schools of his native 
state until 1851 when he accompanied his people on their removal to Michigan. He 
continued his studies there until the 21st of April, 1861, when he enlisted in Com- 
pany I, Second Michigan Infantry, under Colonel I. B. Richardscm, and went to 
the front as a private. He participated in many notable engagements, including 
the battle of Fredericksburg, the seven-days' fight at Malvern Hill, and the battles 
of Vicksburg, the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, and was slightly wounded on two 
occasions. On the 2dd of July, 1864, he was discharged at Detroit, Michigan, his 
service covering a period of three years and ninety days, having beg^n his military 



K. P. ALLEN" 






*^i -J*- tt f**X 






1 
I 

I 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 367 

career on the 22d of April, 1861. Upon his return to civil life, he entered his fath- 
ers blacksmith shop where h? learned the trade. In 1867 together with a brother 
he returned to Homer, Michigan, and there established a shop which they conducted 
until 1880, when Mr. Allen turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. He en- 
gaged in farming in Michigan and the Dakotas for six years and at the expiration 
of that period took up a quarter section of government land in Dakota which he 
cultivated for a time. Later he resumed his trade, remaining a resident of that 
state until 1 889, when he came to Pullman and established a blacksmith shop, con- 
ducting the same until March, 1902, when he disposed of his business to enter upon 
the duties of postmaster, to which office he had been appointed by President Roose- 
velt, by whom he was reappointed to the same office in 1906 and again by President 
Tafi in 1910. That Mr. Allen has proven efficient and has discharged his duties 
in a manner highly satisfactory to the community at large is manifested by the long 
period of his service. He is in every way well qualified for the office, and fulfills 
his responsibilities with a rare sense of conscientious obligation to the public. 

At Marengo, Michigan, on the 20th of October, 1864, Mr. Allen was united in 
marriage to Miss Susan M. Gerow, a native of the state of New York and a daugh- 
ter of S. X. and Diana (Townsend) Gerow. In the paternal line she is of French 
extraction, her father having been born in France, while her mother is descended 
from one of the old colonial families of New York. The family of Mr. and Mrs. 
Allen is as follows : Ada, who married Judge Thomas Neill of Colfax, by whom she 
has two children ; Wilfred, who is also married and has two children ; Dora, the wife 
of J. C. Taylor, of Dawson, North DakoJta, and. the mother of four children; Ira 
G., of Seattle, who is married and ha^ two' chiWifeih ;- Carrie, who married Henry 
Blanchard, became the mother of one c^iild Atnd has pik^ed away; Delia, who mar- 

« 

ried H, L. Oliver, of Oregon, by whom she has had one child; Fay, the wife of R. 
M. Van Dom, of Pullman; and Karl P., alsto "of- this city. 

Mr. Allen is adjutant and quarterAwster of Whitman Post, No. 53, G. A. R., 
and he was senior vice department commander of the department of Washington 
and Alaska, while in politics he is a republican. He is one of the highly esteemed 
citizens of Pullman, where he has many friends, whose regard he has won and re- 
tained through his personal worth. 



HOMER LEWIS ROUSE. 

Homer Lewis Rouse is one of the well known business men of Garfield, Whit- 
man county, who has identified himself with the commercial interests there, his 
labors not only being a source of profit to himself but constituting an element of 
general prosperity. He has lived in Washington for many years and has been an 
interested witness of its growth and progress. He was born in Cass county, 
Nebraska, on the 20th of May, 1874, and is a son of John S. and Sarah (Scoggin) 
Rouse, natives of Iowa and Wisconsin respectively. His grandfather was John 
Rouse, a native and prominent resident of the state of Iowa. His parents removed 
to Columbia county, Washington, when their son Homer L. was but a child. There 
his boyhood and youth were passed, and the public schools near Pomeroy afforded 
him his educational privileges. The father took a one hundred and sixty acre 

VoL ra— 19 



368 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

preemption claim south of Pomeroy and upon it operated a sawmill. His son im- 
mediately became associated with him in business^ aXd at the age of twelve years 
worked in the woods driving four yoke of cattle. He was thus employed until 
1891 when the family removed to Adams county ^ the father taking up an eighty 
acre homestead and one hundred and sixty acres under the timber culture act. 
Again Homer L. Rouse aided in his father's agricultural undertakings and was 
thus occupied until 1897 when he desired to farm independently. At that time 
he took up a one hundred and sixty acre homestead five miles southeast of Lind, 
Adams county, and so profitably did he cultivate this property that within a short 
time he had increased his holdings to four hundred and ninety acres. During the 
ten years he held this property he was given opportunity to put into practice the 
various theories he had formulated while in his father's employ and to try out 
many of the modern and scientific agricultural principles. In 1907 he disposed of 
his farm and removed to Potlatch, Idaho, where he again engaged in agricultural 
pursuits for one year. Subsequently he removed to Garfield and entered the real- 
estate business in partnership with C. E. Averill, under the firm name of the Gar- 
field Land Company. He is still engaged in real estate and because of his enter- 
prising spirit and untiring efforts he has won a success which attests his knowl- 
edge of property values and the extent of his patronage. 

On the 10th of October, 1898, in Adams county, Mr. Rouse was married to 
Miss Ida Richardson, who is a daughter of Amos and Mary (Griffith) Richardson, 
natives of Wisconsin and Georgia respectively. To this union two children have 
been born, Homer Loraine and Gladys. In political views Mr. Rouse is a demo- 
crat and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day. His relig^ 
ious faith is indicated by his membership in the Christian church. He is regarded 
as a progressive, energetic and prosperous business man, and occupies a very 
prominent position in the commercial circles of Garfield and vicinity, being fre- 
quently consulted on business matters, his advice being always impartial and his 
judgment considered sound. He has aided materially in the , upbuilding and ad- 
vancement of the county and in his private interests has so managed his affairs 
that he has made steady and substantial progress, being now numbered among the 
men of influence of Garfield. 



ROBERT E. M. STRICKLAND. 

Robert E. M. Strickland was born at West Chester, Pennsylvania, August 14, 
1867, a son of Nimrod and Rose (Gould) Strickland of that city. Mr. Strickland 
pursued his early education in the public schools of West Chester. He also at- 
tended the classical academy at that place and subsequently took up the reading 
of law and was admitted to the Pennsylvania bar on the 24th of October, 1888. 
He opened an office in West Chester but thinking that the far west offered better 
opportunities to young men, he came to Washington in January, 1889, and since 
July of that year he has made Spokane his home. He was first attorney for the 
Pennsylvania Mortgage Company, doing business in eastern Washington and 
Idaho, and was made manager of the company in 1892 but resigned this position 
about the 1st of January, 1898. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 369 

In politics he is a gold democrat and in 1892-S was a member of the demo- 
cratic state central committee. He has been a delegate to the city, county and 
state conventions of his party and was the chairman of the Spokane delegation 
which attended the convention in Olympia in 1892, when Snively was nominated. 
He was appointed by Governor McGraw, the second chief executive of the state, 
as regent of the State University at Seattle, serving out his term from 1893 until 
1897. The university building on the shore of Lake Washington was started and 
completed during the time that Mr. Strickland was a member of the board of 
regents. 

For many years he has been secretary and a member of the board of directors 
of the Spokane Club and he is also engaged in the real-estate and brokerage busi- 
ness with offices in the Columbia building. 



JOHN A. DIX, M. D. 



Dr. John A. Dix, practicing successfully in Garfield, is connected with those 
whose labors have set the standard for professional services in this city, for in all 
of his connections with the practice of medicine he has held to high ideals and 
e(mtinually advocated that progression which promotes the efficiency of the mem- 
bers of the medical fraternity. Bom in Ohio, on the 15th of July, 1843, he is a 
son of Clark and Clarissie (Clough) Dix. The Dix family traces its ancestry in 
America to the Revolutionary times. The paternal grandfather, John Dix, was a 
native of Massachusetts but the parents were both born in Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Dix pursued his early education in the public schools of Ohio. When he 
was nineteen years of age he enlisted as a private in Company G, Ninety-fifth 
Ohio Volunteers, for service in the Civil war. He was subsequently promoted 
to the position of second sergeant and during his service was incarcerated at Ander- 
sonvill^ and other prisons for nine months. He received his discharge in June, 
1865, at Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio. After he returned home he again attended 
school but in 1866 removed to Iowa, where he worked as a farm hand and was en- 
gaged in teaching. Industrial pursuits did not appeal to him and he determined 
opon the medical profession as his life work. Accordingly he began studying medi- 
cine, matriculating at the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio. He was 
graduated from that institution in 1871 with the degree of M. D. The same year 
he started to practice in Iowa but in 1878 removed to Nebraska, where he followed 
his profession for three years before taking it up again in Iowa. In 1886 he re- 
moved to Qarfield, Whitman county, Washington, and he has* since that time been 
continuously engaged in the practice of medicine in this city. At the same time 
he opened a drug store, which he conducted until 1911. He did not regard his 
professional education complete when he left college and has ever remained a 
student of the science of medicine and has given proof of his broad learning in his 
professional practice. He now has a very extensive patronage and numbers among 
his patients many of the best people of the city. Aside from his professional du- 
ties. Dr. Dix has been active in politics and has been one of the enthusiastic ad- 
vocates of public improvements in Garfield. At present he is serving as mayor and 
is interested in all the movements that tend* to produce an ideal city. 



370 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Dr. Dix has been twice married. In 1870 he was united in marriage to Miss 
Cynthia Dresser, of Ohio, a daughter of Almond and Electa Dresser. To -their 
union three children were born: Rena, lyho is the wife of Robert Lincoln, of 
Ohio, and the mother of two children; Ross, of Greeley, Colorado, who is married 
and has four children; and Cynthia, the wife of B. R. Williams, of Whitman 
county, and the mother of two children. In 1884 Dr. Dix was married to Miss 
Ida Fay, of Iowa, a daughter of David Fay. To their union five children have 
been born: Emmett, who is residing in Colfax; Ethel, who is living at home; 
Elizabeth, who is the wife of L. B. Mourey, of Garfield, and has one daughter; 
and Jessie and John M., both of whom are residing at home. 

Dr. Dix gives his political support to the republican party. He has served as 
a member of the council for several terms, is at present filling the office of mayor, 
and in 1903 was elected to the legislature. As a Mason he has occupied all the 
chairs in the lodge and chapter. He also holds membership with the Artisans, 
John A. Logan Post, No. 16, G. A. R., of which he was at one time commander, 
and the Whitman County Medical Society. He possesses a most genial nature 
and his cordiality, aflFability and deference for the opinion of others render him 
personally popular and have secured to him a circle of friends almost coextensive 
with the circle of his acquaintance. 



CYRUS EDWARD AVERILL. 

Cyrus Edward Averill, who is engaged in the real-estate and loan business in 
Garfield, Whitman county, in partnership with Homer L. Rouse under the firm 
name of the Garfield Land Company, was born in Maine, on the 2Sd of Augast, 
1860. He is a grandson of Stephen Averill, of Maine, and a son of Henry A. 
and Mehitable (Burpey) .Averill, both natives of Maine. The father was promi- 
nent in the political circles of Washington at an early day and did all the writing 
for the Washington territory legislature in 1852 and 1858. 

Cyrus E. Averill received his education in the public schools of Maine and in 
Battle Creek College in Michigan, which he attended in 1877. In the autunm of 
the following year he returned to Maine and worked on a farm until 1883. In 
that year he went west with his parents and for some time was located in Cali- 
fornia, where he was employed as a bookkeeper for the Pacific Coast Steamship 
Company until 1890. In Los Angeles he took a short course in a business col- 
lege and subsequently opened a grocery store in Pasadena independently, which 
he conducted until 1893, when he removed to Elberton, Washington. In that town 
he opened a store for himself and at the same time kept the books for a lumber 
company until 1897, when he removed to Garfield and engaged in the grocery 
business. He was eminently successful and had already won a large patronage 
when his entire stock and building were destroyed by fire in 1898. This was a 
heavy financial loss to him but because of the previous record which he had made 
as a man to be thoroughly relied upon his creditors came to his assistance and made 
it possible for him to start in business again immediately. He conducted the store 
which he then opened until 1903, when he disposed of it to embark in the real-estate 
business. He at first organized the Garfield Land Company with A. H. Plummer as 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 371 

partner but in 1908 this partnership was dissolved and he associated himself with 
U. W. Hammaker in the real-estate and piano business. Although they were in busi- 
ness together less than two years, they disposed of three carloads of pianos and met 
with an equal degree of success in their real-estate business. In February, 1910, 
Mr. Averill entered into partnership with Homer L. Rouse under the firm style of 
the Garfield Land Company and continued dealing in real estate and pianos. He 
has been one of the most successful real-estate dealers of Garfield and has not only 
shown his high sense of integrity in actual business dealings but has also been a 
valuable assistant and adviser to those contemplating purchasing or disposing of 
properties. He was one of the organizers of the Garfield National Bank and is at 
present a heavy stockholder and a director of that institution. 

On the 24th of November, 1880, occurred the marriage of Mr. Averill to ^liss 
Aimena H. Elsemore, a daughter of Stillman and Clara (Woodman) Elsemore, ot 
Maine. To Mr. and Mrs. Averill seven children have been born: Nellie, died in 
1908, aged sixteen years; Ralph H. and Harrison Morton, both of whom are resi- 
dents of Montana; Violet, who is the wife of Alfred Tufts, of California, and has 
one child ; and Edward, Clara and Kelsey, all of whom are residing at home. 

In politics Mr. Averill gives his support to the republican party and is thor- 
oughly alive to the issues of the day. His prominence in financial and business 
circles gives him the opportunity of exerting considerable influence over the politics 
of the party and he is one of its most loyal supporters. He is a Master Mason, 
belonging to Princeton Lodge, No. 139, Princeton, Maine, and also holds member- 
ship in the Woodmen of the World and the Artisans. His religious faith is indi- 
cated by his affiliation with the Methodist Episcopal church. Since Mr. Averill has 
been connected with the business circles of Garfield he has won that recognition 
which is always given to ability, integrity and an enterprising spirit when intelli- 
gently directed, and the esteem and regard which are his have been gained by a life 
of activity carried out in accordance with the highest ideals of citizenship. 



FRANK H. GRAVES. 



The growth of the northwest has been so rapid and so substantial as to seem 
almost magical and yet there are many men who are still prominent factors in the 
life of Spokane and other sections of the Inland Empire who became connected with 
the district during the primitive period in the history of the city. Among the num- 
ber is Frank H. Graves. He and his associates, utilizing the experiences of the 
past and the wisdom of the ages, have made this city one of the leading metropolitan 
centers of the Pacific coast country, bringing to bear practical judgment and busi- 
ness enterprise in the accomplishment of the task. 

Mr. Graves is a native of Hancock county, Illinois, born June 15, 1857, and, 
tracing his ancestry back various generations, finds that Captain Thomas Graves 
was the progenitor of the family in America, having landed at Jamestown, Virginia, 
in 1608, on the William and Mary, which was the second ship to touch at that port. 
In shaping the destiny of the little Virginia colony he took an important part and 
in June, 1619, was one of the members of the first house of burgesses in Virginia. 
Through successive generations the family were connected with the agricultural de- 



372 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

velopment of that colony^ owning large plantations in Accomac county^ but sub- 
sequent to the establishment of American independence the g^eat-grandfather cast 
in his lot with the settlers who were engaged in the reformation of Kentucky, con- 
verting it from a "dark and bloody ground" into one of the progressive states of 
the Mississippi valley. He there developed a large plantation, receiving the land 
as a grant from the government in recognition of valuable aid which he had ren- 
dered his country when the Revolutionary war was in progress. One of the counties 
of Kentucky was named in his hon'or. His son. Major Reuben Graves, of Boone 
county, Kentucky, made a splendid record in two of the wars of the country, serv- 
ing as major under Colonel Johnson in the Indian campaigns which largely led to 
the suppression of outbreaks among the red men in that part of the state and cul- 
minated in the battle of Tippecanoe, in which Major Graves secured the tomahawk 
of the famous Indian chief, Tecumseh. Later he did equally valuable and valiant 
service in the Mexican war. His opposition to the system of slavery led him to dis- 
pose of his property interests in the south, free his slaves and remove with his 
family to Hancock county, Illinois, being one of a colony of Kentucky people to 
found the town of St. Marys. There he became identified with agricultural interests 
and his son, John J. Graves, who had been born October 18, 1819, on the old fam- 
ily homestead in Kentucky, followed in the business footsteps of his father, added 
to his land until his holdings were extensive, and was prominently connected with 
agricultural interests in that locality. He also subscribed to the stock and aided in 
the building of the first railroad in that section, which was a division of the Burliiig- 
ton, extending from Galesburg to Quincy. His wife, who bore the maiden name of 
Orrilla Landon Berry, represented an old New England family. Her father was 
Dr. Jonathan Berry, of Grand Isle, Vermont, the chief surgeon on the American 
flagship at the battle of Plattsburg, in the War of 1812. 

Their eldest son, Frank H. Graves, attended the district schools until he had 
mastered the elementary branches of learning and later entered Carthage College 
of Carthage, Illinois, in which he completed the course by graduation with the class 
of 1880. Having pursued the study of law, he was admitted to the bar in the same 
year and in the spring of 1882 began practicing in Carthage. But the spirit of en- 
terprise which had led his ancestors in successive generations to migrate from the 
old world to the new, from Virginia to Kentucky, and from Kentucky to Illinois, 
led him to seek the opportunities of the northwest, and on Christmas day of 1884 
he arrived in Spokane, where he opened an office and entered upon the practice 
of law. In years of continuous connection he is one of the oldesf members of the 
Spokane bar and has ever maintained a foremost place among the lawyers practic- 
ing in the courts of eastern Washington. His ability is manifest in the many ver- 
dicts which he has won favorable to his clients. At the same time he has been 
prominently known in other connections, especially in the fields of mining and 
journalism, for he was one of the original owners and a member of the board of 
trustees of the Le Roi mine in British Columbia and in 1897 he became associated 
with Judge Turner, Colonel Ridpath and others in the purchase of the Seattle Post- 
Intelligencer, which they conducted until 1899, when they disposed of the paper to 
the present owners. 

In September, 1882, occurred the marriage of Mr. Graves to M