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HISTORY 



OF THE 



CITY OF SPOKANE 



AND 



SPOKANE COUNTRY 

WASHINGTON 



From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



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SPOKANE-CHICA GO-PHILADELPHIA 

THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1912 



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TH 1 NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LI3RARY 

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Biographical 

GRAHAM BARCLAY DENNIS. 

Continuous progress has characterized the career of Graham Barclay Dennis. 
His intellect early grasped the eternal truth, that industry wins, and industry be- 
came the beacon light of his life. Whatever he has undertaken has found him 
determined in execution and watchful of all opportunities pointing to legitimate 
success, and today he is prominently connected with most important corporation 
and business interests, being numbered among Spokane's capitalists. He was 
born in London, England, June 1, 1855, his parents being Mend en hall John and 
Sophia Dennis. His father, also a native of London, was a man of most liberal 
education and scholarly attainments, having been graduated from Oxford and 
Heidelberg Universities. He was a linguist of notable powers and his life was 
largely devoted to the work of the Presbyterian ministry. His wife was German 
descent and during the early boyhood of their son Graham, they came with their 
family to the United States, first to Boston, Massachusetts, and finally settling in 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Graham B. Dennis pursued his education in the public schools of the latter 
city until he reached the age of fourteen years, when he began learning the more 
difficult lessons in the school of experience. He was employed in both Cincinnati 
and in Dayton, Ohio, but a brief period sufficed to indicate to him how valuable is 
education as a factor in success. He therefore resumed his studies, pursuing a 
course in the year 1873-4 at Bethany College in West Virginia. In 1875 he be- 
came city editor of the Dayton (Ohio) Daily Journal and after two years spent 
in that capacity, was made business manager of the paper, which he thus con- 
ducted for two years. During the succeeding six years he was associated with 
different business enterprises in Dayton and brought his inventive genius into 
play in producing and successfully introducing an electrical postage-stamp can- 
celler. In the further development of his business affairs, he became the head of the 
firm of G. B. Dennis & Company, comprising the organization of stock companies, 
stocks and discounts, and at the same time, he established, published and edited the 
Farmer's Home, an agricultural newspaper. His identification with the north- 
west began in May, 1885, at which time he arrived in Spokane, the same year 
becoming actively interested in real estate and mining, and in the publication 
of the Spokane Miner, a sixteen-page paper devoted to the mining interests of 
the northwest, which at that time were in their infancy. He likewise organized 
the Muscovite Mica Mining Company, in which he enlisted Chicago capital, to 
develop the great mica mines in Idaho. In 1887 he built in Spokane the first 
electric railway of the northwest, and the first west of Chicago, known as the 
Ross Park Street Railway Company, of which he was for two years the pres- 
ident. One of the largest enterprises with which he has been closely associated 

5 



6 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

was the organization of the Old Dominion Mining & Milling Company for the 
development of properties in Stevens county, and of which company he is still 
the president. He has the ability that enables him to see the possibilities in a 
project of large proportions and to direct its interests in the best possible man- 
ner toward securing results desired. Upon the organization of the Northwestern 
Mining Association, on the 2nd of October, 1895, he was chosen its president and 
continued in that position for several years. In the following year he was made 
its delegate to the parliament of British Columbia at Victoria, and had the distinc- 
tion of successfully opposing the proposed two per cent tax on the gross output 
of the British Columbia mines. In 1897 he was one of the committee appointed 
by the international mining congress to prepare a revision of the federal mining 
laws, and in that connection was instrumental in drafting the memorial to the 
United States congress. His mining interests have brought him into active asso- 
ciation with various companies, invariably holding the position of president. In 
1898 he was chosen president and treasurer of the Insurgent Gold Mining Com- 
pany of Republic, Washington, and still retains that position. Mr. Dennis has 
for many years been a director in the Exchange National Bank of Spokane, and 
president of the Warehouse & Realty Company, a one million dollar corporation. 

While his private business interests have been extensive and of a most im- 
portant character, Mr. Dennis has also been connected with various enterprises 
of a public or semi-public character, which have become valuable and significant 
features in the development and upbuilding of the northwest. From 1886 until 
1888 he was a member of the city council of Spokane and aided in shaping its 
formative policy during that early period. In 1890 he became a member of the 
board of public education and served as chairman of its committee on buildings, 
constructing the first high school and five district school buildings in Spokane. 
In the same year, he became the organizer and first vice president of the Spokane 
Industrial Exposition, which did much to stimulate trade and business conditions 
in this part of the Inland Empire. For a number of years, he served as one 
of the trustees and as a member of the executive committee and treasurer of the 
Jenkins University. The foresight and untiring efforts of Mr. Dennis, resulted in 
1902, through him as the author, in the formation of the Publicity Committee, an 
important organization comprising the representative citizens of Spokane. Its 
work has been extensive in making known world-wide, through the daily press and 
magazines, the resources and advantages of Spokane and the Inland Empire, the 
expense of exploiting the resources of the country amounting to forty thousand 
dollars a year. Mr. Dennis' firm faith in the country and its future constitutes 
his inspiration for the work in which he has been engaged in spreading broad- 
cast a knowledge of the country and promoting specific interests and projects 
which have had important bearing upon its material growth and progress. 

On the 20th of May, 1879, Mr. Dennis was united in marriage to Miss Hester 
L. Bradley, a daughter of Captain John Bradley, and to them have been born. a 
son and two daughters; Howard B. who married Josephine Wilhelm; Essie Mernie, 
the wife of Edward R. Dickson; and Julia B., the wife of Roy C. Lammers, by 
whom she has one child, Graham Dennis Lammers. 

While most important and extensive business and public connections have claimed 
the attention of Mr. Dennis, yet it is not as a financial success that his character 
appeals most to those who have known, and still know him; nor is it his genial 
and warm-hearted manner that has earned him enduring friendships. It is his 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 7 

broad-minded, public spirit, his fearless initiative in undertaking public work and 
his indomitable energy in carrying worthy projects to a successful culmination, 
that command the deep regard of his fellow citizens. Among his public acts 
were liberal subscriptions to various important enterprises — bonuses to secure 
projected railways, contributions for parks, hospitals, schools. And he was not 
a subscriber alone, but a leader and coworker in advancing worthy movements, 
giving of his time and brain, as well as of his financial resources, to make for a 
greater city and a grander commonwealth. His unfailing generosity, his zeal for 
work and his executive ability have entailed on him endless service as chairman of 
committees for public purposes, and have brought him honors the more dignified 
because conferred on him, by whom preferment has never been sought. 

The most recent, and the crowning honor of his lifetime, was tendered him on 
September 26, 1906, on the occasion of his election by acclamation to the distinc- 
tion of the first presidency of the Pacific Northwest Development League, a public 
enterprise conceived by the representative men of four sovereign states, to promote 
their common interests. 

The spirit that has characterized the entire career of Mr. Dennis has con- 
sidered first, good citizenship; thereafter, reasonable concern for private interest. 
And only too often the private interests have suffered, to promote the common 
weal. Such a character is more than a good citizen; he is a public benefactor — a 
type that free America, perhaps, has developed in more generous plenty than any 
other country. 



JAMES MONAGHAN. 



Inseparably interwoven with the history of Spokane is the name of James Mon- 
aghan, who from the time that he first arrived here in frontier days down to the 
present time, has left his impress upon the substantial development and upbuild- 
ing of the western empire. Today he is a leading factor in financial circles and 
at different times he has been closely associated with the mining interests and 
railroad building of the northwest. His birth occurred in Belturbet, Ireland, Sep- 
tember 22, 1839, his parents being John and Mary Ann (O' Riley) Monaghan of 
that place. He was the youngest of three children and was only three years of 
age when left an orphan. He afterward made his home with his maternal grand- 
parents until seventeen years of age, when the interesting reports which he heard 
concerning the United States led him to sever home ties and cross the Atlantic 
to the new world. He took up his residence with his brother, a New York physician, 
with whom he remained for some time but he heard the call of the west and in 
1858 made the trip to the Pacific coast by way of the isthmus of Panama, reach- 
ing Vancouver on the Columbia river in May. His financial condition rendered it 
imperative that he gain immediate employment and he secured a position in con- 
nection with the operation of a ferry on the Des Chutes river near The Dalles, 
Oregon. He was also employed in connection with the sailboats of the Upper 
Columbia, which in those days controlled the traffic, and he secured a position on 
the Colonel Wright, which was the first steamboat that sailed on the Columbia from 
Wallula to Calilo. He was also connected with the operation of a ferry across 
the Spokane river about twenty-one miles below the present city of Spokane, and 
finally purchasing it, continued in that business until 1865, when he built the 



8 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

bridge over the river, which is now known as the La Pray bridge, named in honor 
of Joseph La Pray, who purchased it from Mr. Monaghan. While thus engaged 
Mr. Monaghan planted the first apple trees in Spokane county. His name is asso- 
ciated with many of the "first events" and his labors have given impetus to vari- 
ous lines of activity which have constituted the foundation upon which the present 
progress and prosperity of the city and county rests. 

Since first coming to Washington Mr. Monaghan has spent practically his en- 
tire time in this state. In 1869 he became identified with the business interests 
of Walla Walla and while living there in 1871, was married. Immediately after- 
ward he removed to what is now Chewelah, in Stevens county, although at the time 
there was no town and the work of settlement had scarcely been begun in that part 
of the state. He purchased land from the Indians and conducted a trading busi- 
ness, ultimately founding the town. In 1873 he became a merchant of Colville, 
then the principal town of northeastern Washington and also secured the govern- 
ment contract for handling mails and furnishing supplies to the troops. His activ- 
ity later included public service of an important character. He filled the office 
of county superintendent of schools, county commissioner and justice of the peace, 
discharging his duties with a promptness and fidelity that won him the commenda- 
tion of all concerned. He also made arrangements with the quartermaster's de- 
partment for moving supplies and equipment from Colville down the Columbia 
river to Foster Creek, now Bridgeport. When the survey of the river was made 
by Lieutenant Symonds, of the United States army, the name of Monaghan Rapids 
was given to that portion of the stream near the mouth of the Nespelem river. 
He made the transfer of the government property and supplies from the army 
camp at Lake Chelan across the country to the site of Fort Spokane, and finding 
Walla Walla a more convenient place from which to conduct his business opera- 
tions he removed his family to that city, which had been the early home of his 
wife. The frontier post of Spokane was established in 1882 and Mr. Monaghan 
became the post trader, and at the same time became associated with C. B. King. 
Both were equally interested; Mr. Monaghan conducted the store at Fort Spokane 
and Mr. King the store at Fort Sherman, on Lake Coeur d'Alene. In 1888, fol- 
lowing the discovery of the mines,, he was associated with Mr. King and others in 
putting on the first steamers on the Coeur d'Alene and also laid out the city of 
that name. The following year they built the first wagon road from Kingston to 
the Murray mining camp and also made the original survey for an electric road 
from Coeur d'Alene to Spokane. Selling his interests to D. C. Corbin and others 
in 1886, Mr. Monaghan then returned to Spokane, where the family home has since 
been maintained, although at different times business interests have called him 
into other districts. He was one of the organizers of the corporation which in 
1888 began the building of the Spokane Falls & Northern Railway, having the 
line surveyed the following year, after which Mr. Monaghan sold his interest to 
Mr. Corbin. He was also one of the original owners of the Cariboo Gold Mines 
in British Columbia, personally superintending the work and was president of the 
company until 1898, when he sold his stock. The financial panic of 1898 caused 
him severe losses but with indomitable courage and energy he has recovered from 
these and is today one of the substantial citizens of Spokane, where in financial 
circles he is well known as a director of the Union Trust Company and also of 
the Traders National Bank. 



.IAJIKS MONAOHAN 



• T p £ i> £ « i .. ' ••» ' 



L 







SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 11 

It was on the 80th of November, 1871, in Walla Walla, that Mr. Monaghan was 
married to Miss Margaret McCool, a daughter of Robert and Margaret McCool, 
and a native of Donnamore, County Donegal, Ireland. She was born August 12, 
1852, and her death occurred in Spokane, April 22, 1895, her loss being deeply 
deplored by many friends as well as her immediate family, for her attractive social 
qualities and kindly spirit had endeared her to all who knew her. Mr. and Mrs. 
Monaghan were the parents of six children: John Robert, born in Chewelah, 
March 26, 1873, and who died near Apia, Samoa, April 1, 1899; Margaret Mary, 
whose birth occurred in Colville, January 31, 1876; Ellen Rosanna, who was born 
at Fort Spokane, November 12, 1885; James Hugh, who was born in Spokane, 
November 10, 1888; Agnes Isabel, born November 9, 1891, in Spokane; and Charles 
Francis, who was also born in this city, August 12, 1894. 

In the development of Spokane James Monaghan has taken a most active and 
helpful part and is still alert to the opportunities of promoting the growth and 
substantial improvement of the city. He was one of the fifteen freeholders who 
drafted the new charter of Spokane in 1891 and was chosen city commissioner. 
He came to the west when the Indians were more numerous than the white set- 
tlers, when hardships and dangers were the lot of every pioneer but he recognized 
the opportunities of the new country with its undeveloped resources and taking 
advantage of these he has steadily advanced in the business world, making a most 
creditable record in the management of his affairs and in the attainment of suc- 
cess as the years have gone by. At the same time he has been closely associated 
with the public life of the community in the support of projects and measures for 
the general good and he stands today ad one'etf t&odg sturdy citizens who have been 
the builders of the great state of Washington/' 



I » 



JOHN ROBERT MONAGHAN. 

A crisis ever tends to bring out the true characteristics of an individual: it will 
show the weakness of one and the strength of another, for the spirit of courage 
responds wherever there is need. We are led to this train of reflection through 
contemplating the life record of John Robert Monaghan, whose valor and nobility 
of charatcer have placed his name on the roll of heroes of whom America has every 
reason to be proud. He had been reared upon the frontier where men were rated 
by their true worth and where the best and strongest in men is brought out and 
developed. His birth occurred at Chewelah, Stevens county, Washington, March 
26, 1873, his parents being James and Margaret (McCool) Monaghan, of whom 
mention is made elsewhere in this volume. His parents desired to give him supe- 
rior educational advantages under the auspices of the church to which they be- 
longed, but the facilities for Catholic instruction were limited in Washington in 
those days, so that the boy at the age of eleven was sent to the school of the Chris- 
tian brothers — St. Joseph Academy, at Oakland, California. He, attended that 
school and also another brothers' school in Portland, Oregon, until the Jesuit 
Fathers established Gonzaga College in Spokane in 1887. He was then enrolled 
as one of the first eighteen students and after four years spent in that institution 
he took the examination held in Spokane in 1891 for the Military Academy at West 



12 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Point and the Naval Academy at Annapolis, receiving the highest percentage in. 
each of these examinations, so that he was entitled to make his choice of appoint- 
ments. Although it was his original wish to go to West Point, he generously waived 
that preference in favor of the next applicant, the son of an old army officer who 
heartily desired the appointment. 

John R. Monaghan then entered the Naval Academy, from where he was credit- 
ably graduated in 1895, being the first representative of the many from the state of 
Washington to graduate from that school. His experiences as a member of the 
navy were interesting and varied and were notable by reason of his unfaltering 
loyalty to duty on every occasion and in every situation. He first went upon a 
two years' cruise in the Pacific on the flagship Olympia, during which time he visited 
the Hawaiian Islands, Japan, China and other ports in Asia. Later he received 
his commission as ensign and was assigned to the Monadnock and afterward to the 
Alert, both also of the Pacific squadron. On the latter vessel in the fall of 1897 
and the early part of 1898 he made two successful voyages to Central American 
ports, engaged in survey work in connection with the proposed Nicaragua canal. 
After being transferred to the Philadelphia he participated in the ceremonies at 
Honolulu, attending the annexation of the Hawaiian Islands, in August, 1898. He 
next made a brief cruise in Central American waters but returned in January, 1899, 
and anchored in the harbor of San Diego, California. 

While there Mr. Monaghan was visited by the members of his family. Some 
time before his father had urged him to leave the navy and engage in business, 
but the Spanish war was then in progress and he felt it his duty to continue in the 
service. Again reaching San Diego the father urged him to resign, but at this 
junction came the news of serious troubles in Samoa, affecting American interests, 
and the Philadelphia was ordered to proceed thither with all dispatch. Reaching 
Apia early in March, it was found that the situation was an acute one, the two 
rival chieftains, Malietoa and Mataafa, contending for supremacy. The three signa- 
tories to the Berlin agreement, respecting Samoa, the United States, England and 
Germany, were all represented by warships in the harbor. The decision of the 
American and English commanders made Malietoa king, and Mataafa was ordered 
to disperse his forces but defied the injunction and continued hostilities. Troops 
were accordingly landed from American and English ships, and on the 15th of 
March a bombardment was begun which lasted intermittently for two weeks, but 
had only slight effect, the enemy retiring into the bush. On the 1st of April a con- 
certed movement was made by the allied land forces, Lieutenant Lansdale of the 
Philadelphia commanding the American party with which Ensigu Monaghan had 
been serving since it had been put ashore. The march was through a densely 
wooded country, where Mataafa's men were in ambush in large numbers. The fol- 
lowing account of this encounter has been given: "Under a deadly fire which could 
not be replied to with advantage, especially as the only piece of artillery (a Colt 
automatic gun) brought by the marines had become disabled, a retreat was sounded. 
While this was in progress Lansdale received a wound in the leg, shattering the 
bone. In the confusion of the retreat he had been left in the rear, with only Mon- 
aghan and three or four privates. He was carried some distance, when one of the 
privates was shot to death, and soon afterward the others fled, leaving Monaghan 
alone with him. Although urged repeatedly by Lansdale to save himself (as testi- 
fied by the last of the men to leave), he steadily refused and stood his ground, 



JOHN B. MONAGHAN 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 15 

awaiting assistance. Presently others who had been in the rear came up and in 
their tarn departed. The next day the bodies of Lansdale and Monaghan were 
found lying together in the jungle. Captain White of the Philadelphia in his offi- 
cial report wrote: 'It is in evidence most clear that when Ensign Monaghan dis- 
covered that Lieutenant Lansdale was wounded he used his best endeavors to con- 
vey him to the rear and seizing a rifle from a disabled man made a brave defence; 
but undoubtedly he fell very shortly after joining Lansdale, and the hostiles, 
flushed with success, bore down on our men in this vicinity. The men were not in 
sufficient numbers to hold out any longer and they were forced along by a fire 
which it was impossible to withstand. But Ensign Monaghan did stand. He stood 
steadfast by his wounded superior and friend, one rifle against many, brave man 
against a score of savages. He knew he was doomed. He could not yield. He died 
in the heroic performance of duty.' " 

The remains of Ensign Monaghan were brought back to the United States on 
the Philadelphia and interred in Spokane, where every honor was paid his mem- 
ory. On the 25 th of October, 1906, a bronze statue was unveiled in Spokane, by 
his sister, Agnes, which was given by the citizens of the state of Washington. 
The torpedo boat destroyer which was launched February 18, 1911, was named 
in honor of Ensign Monaghan and his sister, Nellie, christened the boat. A life 
of great promise was terminated when in that tropical country he closed his eyes 
forever in death, after displaying a heroic devotion to his commander and to the 
cause which he served that is unsurpassed in the history of military action among 
American troops. It has been said ttrat/'Memory is the only friend that grief can 
call its own." It is indeed a precious "memory that remains to the parents, for there 
was never a blot on his scutcheon, and the story of his heroism may well serve as 
an inspiration to the American, youth., 

Rev. H. L. McCulloch, S. J., has recorded the life history in a book, which he 
wrote and published and following we quote some of the excerpts: 

Father Forestier says: "During this war many events have caused us pain 
and grief and many a wound has been left on our hearts, but perhaps the one we 
have felt most acutely and which is the most indelible is the death of Ensign 
Monaghan/' 

Cadet Sweet says: "Monaghan's death is especially a personal loss to me, 
as we had been close companions in these trying events. I have lost a brother, 
tried and true." 

Mr. Justice Gordon, speaking at Olympia, in Robert's native state, on the 
Fourth of July, exclaimed: "You will search history in vain for the record of any 
act of bravery to excel that of Spokane's Ensign Monaghan at Samoa, presenting 
as it does to the world an object lesson in heroism and friendship. Such an act 
perfumes the pages of history and renders it enchanting, and wherever language is 
spoken or history is written, his name shall shine on, like the stars of God, forever 
and ever." 

Admiral B. H. McCalla, then captain, in the U. S. Navy, renders a splendid 
tribute to our hero. At that time having been asked to tell of the most inspiring deed 
of ship or man that ever came to his notice, to stimulate interest in naval affairs, 
he said: "In reply I beg to state that I know of nothing finer, or more courageous, 
or more heroic, than the act of Ensign J. R. Monaghan, who on April 1st, last, while 
attached to the Philadelphia, and forming one of a landing force in Samoa, alone 



16 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

remained with his wounded commanding officer, and gave up his life in an attempt 
to rescue him from the enemy." 

Ex-Senator Wilson says: "The nobility of this young hero shone forth. In 
front of him was certain death. Behind him a sure avenue of escape. But at his 
side, begging him to save himself, while there was yet time, lay his superior officer 
and friend. He never wavered. His high sense of duty and that great moral 
courage with which he was endowed, would not permit him to desert his post in 
the hour of danger. Lieutenant Lansdale begged him to retreat and save himself. 
This he would not do, and bravely and manfully he stood, defending at the peril 
of his own young life, the fast ebbing life of his commander and friend. Calmly 
and deliberately he waited the onset of his savage foes, and with empty revolver 
and cutlass in hand, he died, as was his wish to die, with his face to the foe in de- 
fense of his friend, his flag, and his country." 

Father Paul Dethoor, S. J., says: "Ensign Monaghan shall live in the memory 
of America and England, in the memory of Gonzaga and Annapolis, and in the 
hearts of his countrymen. But our greatest consolation is, thanks to the Christian 
education given him by his parents and teachers, that his death crowned a life of 
unswerving fidelity to the principles and duties of his religion. We know that 
human glory can not reach beyond the grave, but that only a life of faith is avail- 
able before God. Such was the life of young Monaghan." 



CAPTAIN JAMES GRAHAM. 

Often it has been said that death loves a shining mark, and this finds its ex- 
emplification in the fact that Captain James Graham was called from the scene 
of earthly activities when a comparatively young man of forty years. His career 
had been marked by steady and continuous progress resulting from the wise use 
of his time, his talents and his opportunities, and gradually he had advanced from 
a humble position in the business world to one of prominence, not only in the con- 
trol of individual interests but also as a factor in public thought and opinion for 
he held advanced views upon many questions which are now regarded as of vital 
and significant interest in the history of the country. 

He was born December 25, 1866, in Crossreagh, County Monaghan, Ireland, and 
at the age of twelve years accompanied his parents to America. They made their 
way at once to the west, settling in Walla Walla, Washington, where they remained 
for a short time and then removed to Colville, this state. 

For a time Captain Graham was a mail carrier, his route being from Colville 
to Spokane, Washington, and then he entered the employ of Louis Ziegler, a hard- 
ware merchant, securing this position through the influence of his uncle, James 
Monaghan, a very wealthy and influential resident of Spokane, who felt a deep 
interest in James Graham, his favorite nephew, with whom he largely took the 
place of father. After two years spent in the employ of Mr. Ziegler, Captain 
Graham entered the service of his uncle, Mr. Monaghan, who at that time was a 
post trader at Coeur d'Alene. He served in various capacities, his constantly 
developing ability winning him recognition in successive promotions. He acted 



JAMES GRAHAM 



.;• ■«'.•' ..lHKARTf 

I ** v- Lt *t>X 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 17 

as purser on the boats on the Coeur <T Alene lake and river, and also had charge 
-of the office at the old mission, looking after supplies sent to the army post and 
mines. He was at different times expert accountant for several mining com- 
panies as well as for S. S. Glidden and the Liebes- of San Francisco. 

In 1894 Captain Graham was appointed registrar of the United States land 
•office at Coeur d* Alene, a position which he held during the succeeding four years. 
During that time he devoted the hours which are usually termed leisure to the 
study of law, being advised at times concerning his reading by the Hon. Robert E. 
McFarland, who was then attorney general for the state of Idaho, Captain 
Graham's preliminary education had covered perhaps not more than six months' 
instruction in the public schools. He was truly a self-educated as well as self- 
made man. He possessed a responsive mind and retentive memory, and from 
each experience of life learned the lessons it contained. Moreover, he read broadly 
and thought deeply, and thus laid the foundation for the study of law, displaying 
notable ambition and courage in his efforts to educate himself for the legal pro- 
fession under circumstances and conditions which would have utterly disheartened 
many a man of less resolute spirit and determination. In 1897 he was admitted 
to practice before the supreme court of Idaho and entered upon the active work 
of the profession in which he would undoubtedly have attained an eminent position 
had death not claimed him. In the year in which he began practice — 1897 — he was 
appointed by Governor Stuenburg as one of the delegates to the Trans-Mississippi 
Congress. 

Captain Graham had already become prominent as a factor in political circles. 
It was but natural that a man of his* fenlperament and studious disposition should 
become deeply interested in the -political situation and conditions of the country and 
take active part in support of such measures and movements as he deemed valuable 
factors for public progress. He became one of the most notable campaign speakers 
of the northwest and often went outside the state limits in aid of his party. His 
appointment to the Trans-Mississippi Congress was in recognition of his broad 
knowledge of matters which would naturally come up for discussion there. The 
meeting was held at Salt Lake City, Utah, in July, 1897, on which occasion Cap- 
tain Graham made one of the most notable speeches heard in the congress, in 
which he advocated reciprocity, to which at that time very little thought was given. 
On that occasion he said: "I have never been more impressed with the greatness 
of my country and the genius of its founders than when I look at this congress 
and reflect upon the vast area it represents — not a section but an empire ; a country 
greater in extent, more prolific in the possibilities of her productions, than the 
Roman empire at its extremest extent. I am also mindful of the fact that, had 
we clung with the pertinacity which it deserved to the line of 54—40 embraced in 
the Louisiana purchase, instead of accepting the 49th parallel, we now would have 
had the vast mineral region of British Columbia. This empire was the result of 
a purchase of eleven millions. 

"The relation that the Trans-Mississippi occupies, and particularly the state 
which I represent, to that disputed area north of the 49th parallel and south of 54 — 
40 is of peculiar moment. I verily believe that had the genius of Jamestown landed 
in San Francisco bay and the genius of Plymouth Rock at the mouth of the Colum- 
bia, it would have been centuries before the settlers of America would have crossed 
the Sierras and the Rockies to settle the wastes and plains. 



18 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

"Nine years after '49 the sons of California were opening up to the world the 
interior of British Columbia, Cariboo and Fraser river. This influx showed the 
possibilities in the production of the precious metals, and the reflex led to the 
wonderful discoveries of Idaho, Montana, Washington and eastern Oregon. I 
hazard the assertion that had it not been for these adventurers, the wonderful pos- 
sibilities of that section would never have been shown to our cousins on the other 
side of the line marking British Columbia. 

"Our English cousins have, in my humble judgment, established a wise system 
of mining legislation, and have cut off that thing known as 'extra-lateral rights,* 
and every encouragement is given to the foreigner. The only requirement is that 
the prospector take out a free miners' license, costing five dollars, and renew it 
each year. 

"The result of this in the last four years has been astounding. From Trail to 
Kootenai and from the line to Cariboo the eye is everywhere fretted with the min- 
eral stake. The American miner has been everywhere. The minister of mines 
reports the silver production in British Columbia in 1895 at $977,229 and in 1896 
at $2,100,000, despite the low price. The copper in 1895 was worth $47,642 and 
in 1896 $169,926. Lead in 1896 amounted to $721,384, coal to $2,818,962 and 
gold to $1,788,206. The influx of American capital and American miners in that 
region has increased the total value of all mining products from $2,608,608 in 
1891 to $7,146,425 in 1896. All the large mines, the Le Roi, Slocan Star, the Reco 
and others are owned, opened and developed by Americans. In 1896 in Spokane, 
Washington, three hundred and sixty-three companies were organized with a 
total capital of $800,925,000, for operation in the mines of British Columbia, and 
Americans have put their capital into railroads and smelters there. 

"With this data, what is our true policy to this American section situated in 
a foreign country that should belong to us ? What is the best policy to protect Amer- 
ican rights and interests there? Our English cousins mean to be just but hostile 
legislation here brings retaliatory measures there. Can we, or should we, place 
a high protective tariff upon ores from that country which naturally seek an out- 
let through ours? 

"If a tariff is forced upon them they will retaliate with an export dutf on 
the rich gold and copper ores, keeping them away from our smelters. Reciprocity 
should be cultivated, but under it we are stared in the face with the fact that 
our reciprocity can only be with England, which means that free trade with Engp- 
land would be extorted from us. Again, I cannot see where lead ores need any 
protection. In the Coeur d'Alenes six miles, almost contiguous, produce more in 
tonnage and value of lead-silver ores than all of British Columbia, and I have 
never found how a tariff on lead has ever helped these people. In 1886 to 1889, 
without a tariff on lead, their ores brought six cents per pound; with a tariff of 
one and one-half cents, under Harrison, lead fell from three to four cents per 
pound. 

"As to our commercial relations: Our cereals and garden produce these people 
must have, and a schedule of prices can be arranged under the genius of reciprocity. 
The whole policy is to avoid unfriendly relations with these peculiar people who 
are more of and for us than they are for the English or the English manufacturer. 
If, however, unfriendly legislation on our part should breed hostile legislation on 
theirs, and the miners' license should be abrogated, and Americans were com- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 21 

pelled to abjure their allegiance in order to invest their money, let us remember 
that this energy would invite the adventurous to the fields south of the line under 
our own flag. 

"Let us frame those laws which will secure for us the realization of the 'mani- 
fest destiny' of the American people. Their destiny has guided them to the west, 
and the reflux has swept them north and south and will not be consummated until 
Columbia shall stand upon her own waterways through the isthmus in Central 
America and can claim in one vast homogeneous people the entire area from her 
waterway in the isthmus to 54 — 40." 

This speech of Captain Graham naturally drew to him the attention and in- 
terest of prominent men throughout the country and would undoubtedly have 
paved the way to positions of high honor had he been spared to accept such. In 
the following year — 1898 — when the Spanish- American war broke out, his services 
were deemed so valuable that he was tendered the office of major of the First Idaho 
Infantry by Governor Stuenburg, but as he felt others were better qualified for 
the position than himself he declined to accept. He did, however, accept the posi- 
tion of quartermaster for the regiment with the rank of first lieutenant, and after 
he had gained more experience in the field as a soldier in the Philippines, he was 
promoted to the captaincy of Company C, First Idaho Infantry, which position 
he was filling when mustered out of service. He was elected county attorney of 
Kootenai county, Idaho, in 1900, and acted in that capacity until he resigned be- 
cause of failing health. Soon after his return from the war he became ill 
and did not again recover his health, passing away on the 15th of August, 1906. 
In the meantime he had resumed the practice of law and also conducted some busi- 
ness interests, purchasing the water and light plant at Coeur d'Alene, which 
he reorganized and established upon a profitable basis. 

It was on the 17th of February, 1896, in Spokane, Washington, that Captain 
Graham w,as married to Miss Teresa M. Kildea, a daughter ok Patrick and Maria 
(Crowder) Kildea, of Fingal, Ontario, Canada. Mrs. Graham now occupies one 
of the handsome residences of Coeur d'Alene, commanding a charming view of 
Coeur d\Alene lake. The place is called Villa Glendalough, after a famous villa 
in Qpunty Wicklow, Ireland, the birth place of her mother. 

Captain Graham was a member of the Elks Lodge, No. 228, of Spokane, and 
also held membership with the Catholic Order of Foresters at Walla Walla. His 
life was notable in its devotion to public and private duties. Unassuming in man- 
ner he was neither flattered by the honors of public office nor tempted by its emolu- 
ment, preferring the more familiar duties within the range of his accustomed 
activities. On one occasion he was nominated by acclamation as democratic can- 
didate for congress but declined to make the race, feeling he could serve his own 
and the people's interest better at home. He was endowed by nature with keen 
mentality, but the development of his powers was due to his own ambition and 
utilization of every opportunity that presented itself. There were in him the qual- 
ities which enabled him to overcome difficulties and obstacles and make continuous 
advancement, actuated by a laudable ambition that recognized the obligations of 
the individual to choose only those things which are most worth while and which 
renders the life of each one of greatest service in the world's work. 



22 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

JAMES H. TAYLOR. 

James H. Taylor, mayor of Wallace and also manager of the Coeur d'Alene 
Iron Works of this city, was born in Bury, Lancastershire county, England, in 
1869, and is a son of Timothy and Jemima (Mellowdew) Taylor. The parents 
emigrated to the United States in 1870, settling in Philadelphia, where the father 
passed away. The mother subsequently joined her son in Idaho, and since 1906- 
has been making her home in Wallace. 

As he was only an infant when his parents brought him to the United States,, 
James H. Taylor was reared in Philadelphia. When old enough to begin his edu- 
cation he entered the public schools of that city, remaining a student therein until 
he was thirteen. He then entered the woolen mills of his home city, working there 
until he was seventeen years of age when he was apprenticed to the millwright's 
trade. He worked at this for about two and a half years, when he applied himself 
two years to the trade of pattern making, following this occupation in Philadelphia 
until 1889. In 1890 he came west, first locating in Anaconda, working at his trade 
there and in Butte for two years; he went from there to the Snake river, taking 
up ranching. At the end of seventeen months he returned to Anaconda and resumed 
his trade, which he followed there and in Butte and also in Colorado until 1896. 
In the latter year he came to Wallace, remaining one year and then went east for 
about one year. In 1 899 he returned and leased the iron works which he has man- 
aged since. This company was incorporated on May 1, 1906, under the name of 
the Coeur d'Alene Iron Works, with Mr. Taylor as manager. They do a general 
foundry and manufacturing business and are the only concern of the kind in the 
northern part of Idaho, and have the largest plant of any similar company in the 
state. Under the competent management of Mr. Taylor they have greatly increased 
the scope of their activities which has necessitated increasing their capacity, and 
output as well as the number of their employes. , 

In June, 1911, Mr. Taylor was married to Miss Hadwig Sheave, a daughter of 
William Sheave of this city. Fraternally Mr. Taylor is a member of the Benevo- 
lent Protective Order of Elks, being affiliated with Wallace Lodge, No. 381, and 
also of the Eagles. His political support is given to the republican party and he 
takes a deep interest in all municipal affairs. He was councilman from his ward 
for three terms and in April, 1911, was the successful candidate for mayor of the 
city, his period of office expiring in 1918. While discharging his duties as a repre- 
sentative of the citizens of his ward, he gave evidence of possessing rare capability 
and efficiency in matters of public trust, and thus far the same qualities have dis- 
tinguished him as head of the municipal government. 



JAMES ALFRED WAYNE. 

James Alfred Wayne, who for the past three years has been county attorney 
of Shoshone county, is one of the brilliant and promising young members of the 
legal fraternity of Wallace. His birth occurred at Houghton, Michigan, on the 
5th of December, 1880, his parents being Benjamin Franklin and Mary Ann 
(Quirk) Wayne, the father of American extraction, and the mother a native of 
the Isle of Man, but now a resident of Spokane. His father was one of those who 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 23 

responded to the country's call in the '60s, going to the front with the Twenty-fifth 
Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. 

Although a native of Michigan, James Alfred Wayne spent a large portion of 
his boyhood and youth in Iowa, acquiring his preliminary education in the public 
schools of Alta, that state. After graduating from the high school in 1899 he en- 
tered the University of Minnesota, where he pursued a law course, being gradu- 
ated with the degree of LL.B. with the class of 1903. He was admitted to the 
bar soon thereafter and began his professional life as a member of the legal depart- 
ment of the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie Railroad, continuing in the 
service of this company until 1904. Believing that the west afforded a wider field 
and greater opportunities to a young man, Mr. Wayne then came to Wallace, where 
he established an office and engaged in general practice. Possessed of more than 
average capabilities, he soon won recognition by reason of his skill in untangling 
legal technicalities and discovering the minor points upon which the decision of a 
case so often hinges. Mr. Wayne is well qualified both by nature and training for 
the profession he has elected to follow, his keen mental faculties, fluency of expres- 
sion and quick reasoning powers most ably serving him in all forensic encounters. 
In November, 1908, he was elected county attorney and reelected to the same office 
at the expiration of his term in 1910. During the period of his incumbency his 
manner of handling the county's cases has at all times met with the full expecta- 
tions of his constituency, serving not only to sustain but strengthen their confidence 
in the wisdom of their choice. 

In September, 1910, Mr. Wayne was united in marriage to Miss Alice M. Wade, 
a daughter of James H. and Ella Wade of Mullan, Idaho, the parents being among 
the pioneer settlers of this section, having located here in 1884 and ever since 
making it their home. 

Mr. Wayne is a stanch republican in his political views, deeming the policy of 
that party best adapted to sustain the highest interests of the majority. He is an 
active member of the Knights of Pythias, having passed through all of the chairs, 
and also of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, Wallace Lodge, No. 331. 
Besides his professional duties and official responsibilities, Mr. Wayne is now acting 
as secretary of The LaClede Mining Company and is vice president of the Amal- 
gamated Stockholding Company of Wallace, while he served as a director of the 
Wallace National Bank of Wallace for one year. Although he has only passed 
his thirty-first year, in all of his various connections, both commercially and legally, 
Mr. Wayne has given conclusive proof of possessing those qualities that make the 
success of his career in almost any field assured. 



JOHN J. NICHOLSON. 



John J. Nicholson, present sheriff of Shoshone county, was born in Ireland, on 
the 9th of August, 1 860, and there spent the first eighteen years of his life. A desire 
to see the world and find the greater opportunities that he felt must be awaiting him 
somewhere prompted the young man to come to America, and in 1878 he took pas- 
sage for the United States, landing in New York city. During the first few years 
of his residence in this country John J. Nicholson applied his energies to railroad con- 



24 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

struction work. In 1897 he decided to come west, locating in Wallace, where he 
turned his attention to mining and prospecting. He met with a fair degree of suc- 
cess in his undertaking and now is the owner of some very promising zinc claims on 
the west fork of Placer creek. 

In 1905 Mr. Nicholson became a member of the city police force, serving in this 
capacity for three years. He discharged his duties with a fine sense of conscientious 
obligation, and in 1908 was appointed by Sheriff John F. Moffatt to act as his deputy. 
The ability he displayed in this connection brought him before the notice of the gen- 
eral community and at the next nomination his name was placed on the ticket as the 
democratic candidate for the office of sheriff. He carried the election and has been 
the incumbent of the office of sheriff since November, 1910, his term expiring in 1912. 
During the year of his service Mr. Nicholson has fulfilled the responsibilities of his 
department in a manner highly satisfactory to his constituency and the community 
at large. 

Asbury Park, New Jersey, was the scene of the marriage of Mr. Nicholson and 
Miss Ella Burke, also a native of Ireland, the event occurring in 1882. Of the union 
of Mr. and Mrs. Nicholson there have been born four children, one of whom is de- 
ceased, those living are as follows: Mary, who was born in 1885, the wife of George 
A. Morrison, of Murray, Idaho ; Thomas, who married Miss Mamie Beal of Wallace, 
born in 1889; and Alice, who was born in 1892, the wife of Lawrence Carroll, of 
Wallace. 

In his political allegiance, Mr. Nicholson has always been loyal to the principles 
of the democratic party, deeming its policy best adapted to subserve the interests of 
the nation. His fraternal relations are confined to his membership in the Loyal 
Order of Moose, of Wallace. Mr. Nicholson is one of the public-spirited, progres- 
sive citizens of the county, to the interests of which he is ever loyal, contributing his 
quota toward promoting its development on every possible occasion. 



EDWARD HERBERT JAMIESON. 

The history and development of a city depends upon its progressive merchants, 
manufacturers and professional men — those who capably control important busi- 
ness interests and at the same time cooperate in the upbuilding and benefit of the 
city at large. Of this class Edward Herbert Jamieson was a representative. He 
ranked with the foremost business men of Spokane, was also classed with its public- 
spirited citizens and his investigation and research along various lines also won for 
him qualification with the scientists of the northwest. There was much of interest 
in his life record which began at Ambala, in the British East Indies, January 12, 
1852, and closed at Spokane on the 21st of December, 1909. His parents were 
Jesse Mitchell and Elizabeth (McClary) Jamieson. On his father's side he was of 
Scotch and on his mother's of Scotch-Irish lineage. The former was sent as a 
Presbyterian missionary to India and after twenty-five years devoted to preach- 
ing the gospel to the people of that district he brought his family to the United 
States, establishing his home in Monmouth, Illinois, in 1863. There he accepted 
the pastorate of the First Presbyterian church and continued active in the ministry 
for a long period. 



:. H. JAMIESOS 



TIL** * t".*NuA I i£**| 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 27 

While the family were residents of Monmouth, Edward Herbert Jamieson pur- 
sued his education there in the public schools and in Monmouth College, from which 
he was graduated with the B. A. degree in 1871, while three years later he received 
from his alma mater the Master of Arts degree. After his college days were over 
he spent some time in teaching school and was for several years principal of the 
high school in Keithsburg, Illinois. His early identification with business interests 
on the Pacific coast was in the capacity of educator, his first position being that of 
principal of the high school at San Jose, California. In the meantime he took up 
the study of law which he pursued in a thorough and systematic manner until ad- 
mitted to the bar upon examination before the supreme court at San Francisco. 
In 1882 he removed to Spokane, the town, then in its infancy, containing only a 
small population yet having in its situation and natural resources the elements of 
its future greatness. He remained a resident of Spokane until called to his final 
rest, and during the early years of his residence here engaged in the practice of 
law. However, business interests gradually claimed his time and attention. He 
recognized and utilized the opportunities for judicious investment in property and 
eventually putting aside his law practice entirely gave his attention to the super- 
vision of his realty interests. At an early period of his residence in Spokane he 
erected several business blocks, two of which were destroyed by the fire of 1889. 
In 1890 he erected the fine Jamieson building, at the corner of Riverside avenue 
and Wall street, which is still one of- the ornaments of -this city. He also owned 
much land in the surrounding country apc( his resiclejrice and estate, "Five Pines/' 
uear Piedmont, on the Spokane and Inland ' Railroad, ranks as one of the finest 
private places in the state. ' 

Mr. Jamieson was first married to, Mljss "Iflatti^ A. Reid in 1876, who died in 
February, 1880, and they had one daughter, Mattie Mabel, who on September 7 
1904, married Norman Roscoe Totten, engaged in the real-estate business in Spo- 
kane. Two children were born to them, namely: Edward Jamieson Totten, born 
July 2, 1906; and Elizabeth M. Totten, born June 10, 1908. On July 4, 1881, Mr 
Jamieson was united in marriage at Boonville, California, to Mrs. Ida (Hoag) 
Haskins, a daughter of Dr. M. R. and Laura J. (Morgan) Hoag. They were both 
pioneers of Ohio, having come from Connecticut at an early age with their parents. 
Dr. Hoag was a noted physician of Ohio, and practiced surgery and medicine for ovei 
forty years at Lodi, Medina county, Ohio. Five children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Jamieson: Josephine Janette, living at home; Edward H., also at home; 
Arthur M., who died in infancy; Evelyn Elizabeth, attending Wellesley College; 
and Irene Kathryn, attending high school in Spokane. 

Mr. Jamieson was always regarded as a public-spirited citizen and his labors 
were an element for general progress and improvement although never in the path 
of office-seeking. He was especially interested in education and contributed lib- 
erally toward the establishment of Spokane College, serving as president of the 
college council at the time of his death. His own private library was one of the 
finest in the northwest and included many rare volumes, he being noted for his 
discriminating taste and appreciation as a collector. He was also a lover of nature 
and had comprehensive knowledge of botany. He was likewise fond of art, of 
mnsic and of travel, and in fact was in close touch with all of those varied interests 
which are uplifting and beneficial forces in life. His friendship was ever deep 

and sincere and his hospitality cordial. His political allegiance was given to the 
vol n- 2 



28 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

republican party save at local elections, where he cast an independent ballot. He 
was one of the organizers of the Presbyterian church of Spokane and contributed 
liberally to its support He was numbered among the few prominent business 
men who survived the financial panic of 1898, retaining an untarnished name. His 
contribution to the world's work and progress was a valuable one. While he won 
success it was never gained at the sacrifice of others' interests and never to the 
exclusion of activity along those lines which take men from the more sordid field 
of business into those paths of life which mean advancement and improvement. 
He knew the joy of life because he chose the things which count for most in intel- 
lectual advancement and character development. 



JOHN BERRY SLATER. 

Of sturdy Hollandish and Welsh descent John B. Slater, of Colville, has shown 
that he possesses many of the most notable traits of his ancestors and ranks as a 
leading attorney of eastern Washington. He has practiced at Colville for more 
than twenty years and is also extensively interested in business affairs. He is a 
native of Yreka, California, born April 10, 1860, a son of James and Sarah Jane 
(James) Slater. The parents were pioneers of the Pacific coast, arriving in the 
west early in the '50s. The mother died in 1867, when the subject of this review 
was seven years old, and the father passed away in 1901. The ancestors on the 
paternal side emigrated to America from Holland with Peter Stuyvesant in 16S0 
and the great-grandfather of our subject participated in the Revolutionary war. 
The mother's ancestors were of Welsh nationality and the first of the family to 
arrive in the new world settled in the Carolinas about the time of the Revolutionary 
war. 

John B. Slater received his early education in the public schools of Oregon 
and attended Santiam Academy for two years, clerking in a drug store after school 
hours. At the age of twenty he went to Sprague, Washington, and for two years 
was connected with the coppersmith's department of the Northern Pacific Railway. 
He began business on his own account as a druggist at Heron, Montana, in 188S, 
and the year following, while still the owner of the store, went to the Coeur d'Alene 
mines in Idaho but remained there only a short time. After returning to Heron 
he closed out his business and went to Medical Lake, Washington, where he owned 
a drug store for one year. While at that place he purchased the Medical Lake 
Banner, a local newspaper, and four months later, on August 20, 1885, moved the 
outfit to Colville and changed the name of the paper to the Stevens County Miner, 
which he conducted for four years. This was the first regular newspaper published 
north of Spokane, in Stevens county. In February, 1886, Mr. Slater was appointed 
postmaster of Colville by President Grover Cleveland and installed the first post- 
office equipments in this place, including call and lock boxes. He filled the office 
of postmaster to the general satisfaction of the people for four years. In 1886, 
the same year in which he was appointed postmaster, he was elected probate judge 
of Stevens county, which then included territory which has been divided up into 
several counties. The office of probate judge he also filled for four years. In the 
meantime he had studied law and was admitted to the Washington bar in June, 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 29 

1890. In the fall of the same year he was elected prosecuting attorney of Stevens 
county and filled that office for two years. He has ever since applied himself to 
the practice of his profession, in which he has been highly successful. For seven 
years past he has also been interested in the lumber and sawmill business. From 
the time of arriving at manhood Mr. Slater has been an ardent supporter of the 
democratic party and has been prominent in its councils. In 1888 he was secretary 
of the state territorial convention which assembled at Spokane and in 1901 was 
appointed by Governor Rogers as member of the state board of audit and control. 
In the latter part of 1901 he made a trip to California and remained in that state 
for several months, returning home in 1902. 

On the 11th of September, 1889, Mr. Slater was married, at Lebanon, Oregon, 
to Miss Florence E. Ballard, a daughter of Dr. David W. Ballard. They have 
one son, Ronald Ballard, who was graduated in 1911 from the Colville high school. 
Hie parents of Mrs. Slater came to Oregon early in the '50s. Her father was 
graduated at the Cincinnati College of Medicine and was very successful as a prac- 
titioner in the early days of Oregon and was acquainted with General U. S. Grant, 
when the latter was in command at Fort Vancouver. He served as governor of 
Idaho and superintendent of Indian affairs in that territory for seven years. 

Mr. Slater is also numbered among the pioneers and now fills the office of sec- 
retary of the Stevens County Pioneer Association. He is also a member of the 
public and high school boards of Colville, these boards being separate organiza- 
tions. Fraternally he is identified with the Masonic order and is past master of 
Colville Lodge, No. 50. He has taken the thirty-second degree and is a member 
of the consistory. He is also a member of the Knights of Pythias and the Modern 
Woodmen of America, being a trustee of the local lodge in the orders last named. 
A man of great industry and perseverance, and possessing unusual public spirit, 
Mr. Slater has assisted very materially in promoting the welfare of the county 
and state and is one of the highly respected citizens of Washington. He has dis- 
charged his duties as a lawyer as well as those of a private citizen with the utmost 
fidelity and has set an example eminently worthy of imitation by old and young. 
It is men of this class that reflect credit upon the state and are truly deserving of 
the honor and esteem of their fellows. 



CHARLES H. PUTNAM. 

Charles H. Putnam, superintendent of the shops of the Great Northern Railway 
at Hillyard for ten years past, comes of a noted family in America and in the course 
of a useful and busy life has displayed many of the qualities that made his ancestors 
famous. He was born at Fitchburg, Massachusetts, September 14, 1868, a son of 
Henry O. and Sarah A. (Smith) Putnam, the former of whom was born January 10, 
1841. The mother died in September, 1899. Mr. Putnam is descended from John 
Putnam, who with his wife Priscilla emigrated from Abbot-Aston, England, in 1 684, 
and settled at Salem, Massachusetts. He was the great-grandfather of General 
Israel Putnam and an ancestor' of Colonel Rufus Putnam, chief engineer of the Ameri- 
can army during the Revolutionary war. Rufus Putnam's elder brother, John, spent 
his life at Sutton, Massachusetts, and was by trade a scythe maker. His son John 



30 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

followed in the footsteps of his father and worked for several years at his trade in 
Peterboro, New Hampshire. He subsequently moved with his family to Hopkinton, 
and in that place Salmon W. Putnam was born December 10, 1815. At the age of 
eight years the son Salmon left home to earn his own living and worked for several 
years as bobbin boy in a cotton factory at New Ipswich. Later he obtained employ- 
ment in a manufacturing establishment at Lowell, Massachusetts, and was appointed 
overseer of a spinning room when he was only seventeen years of age. Two years 
later he engaged in the machine business with his brother John at Mason Village, 
New Hampshire, and in 1838 opened a shop at Fitchburg under the title of J. & S. W. 
Putnam. He showed remarkable mechanical genius and among his inventions may 
be mentioned the universal or self -adjustable box and hanger, the feed rod for en- 
gine lathes, movable and adjustable table for upright drills, etc. He secured no pat- 
ents upon his inventions and those devices were appropriated by others and have 
since come into general use. The machine shop was destroyed by fire on December 
7, 1849, and the accumulations of ten years were swept away, there being no insur- 
ance. The next year, however, the shop was rebuilt. In 1858 Mr. Putnam organized 
a stock company under the name of the Putnam Machine Company, of which lie 
served as president and general manager during the remainder of his life. He was 
a remarkably fine mechanic and ingenious inventor and displayed unusual enterprise 
and ability in his business. He died on the 23d of February, 1872, and is remem- 
bered not only on account of his mechanical talents but as one of the leaders in the 
manufacture of machinery in New England. He was a thirty-second degree Mason, 
and a member of the commandery and shrine. 

Mr. Putnam, whose name stands at the head of this sketch, received his early edu- 
cation in the public and high schools of Fitchburg and later became a student of the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, graduating from that noted institution in 
1889. He became an apprentice in the shops of the Putnam Machine Company and 
advanced through various grades until he was appointed chief draftsman of the en- 
gineering department. On account of over application his health gave way and he 
was obliged to retire from active work. He spent a year traveling and a similar 
length of time "roughing it" in Wisconsin. Having recovered his accustomed strength, 
he entered the employ of the Great Northern Railway at St. Paul as draughtsman 
in the office of the superintendent of motive power. His ability soon attracted atten- 
tion and four months later he was appointed shop superintendent at St. Cloud, Min- 
nesota, a year later being sent to Great Falls, Montana, in a similar capacity. Since 
1901 he has been in charge of the shops at Hillyard. The Putnam Machine Company, 
to which reference has been made above, is now the second largest concern of its kind 
in the country and Charles H. Putnam still retains an interest in it. The active man- 
agement is under the control of the surviving sons and grandsons of S. W. Putnam, 
and George Rufus, our subject's brother, holds a position of trust in the company. 

In June, 1901, Mr. Putnam was married, at St. Paul, Minnesota, to Miss Mary B. 
Clark, a daughter of Charles H. and Martha (Pierce) Clark, and to this union two 
children have been born : Martha Clark, who is now attending the public schools ; and 
Henry Homer, aged six years. Politically Mr. Putnam is in hearty sympathy with 
the republican party and religiously he adheres to the Unitarian faith. He has in a 
large measure inherited the mechanical talents of his ancestry and, as he is a good 
judge of human nature, he has been highly successful in the management of an im- 
portant department giving employment to many men. He was fortunate in securing 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 31 

an excellent education and its advantages have been manifest in the ease with which 
he has solved many problems arising in his work. As an enterprising and loyal citi- 
zen he is greatly respected, and the spirit of helpfulness with which he has ever been 
actuated has gained for him the confidence and good-will of his fellowmen. 



WILLIAM R. BAKER. 



Minnesota has contributed many of her most prominent sons to Washington, who 
have ably performed their part in the great work of redeeming the forest and prairie 
and building up the business, financial, educational and religious institutions of this 
state. Among the number may be named William R. Baker, who for nearly three 
years past has filled the office of cashier of the Bank of Colville. He is a native of 
Hastings, Minnesota, and was born August 20, 1876, being a son of Charles A. and 
Helen S. (Rogers) Baker. The parents were pioneers of Minnesota, arriving in 
that region in 1856 during the territorial days. The father died in 1890 and the 
mother passed away in 1909. 

William R. Baker, whose name stands at the head of this sketch, possessed ad- 
vantages of education in the public schools of Hastings and later was a student for 
four years of the high school at St. Paul. In 1 895 he went to San Jose, California, 
and engaged in fruit raising for nearly three years, coming to Colville, Washington, 
in 1 897, where he was connected with the mercantile business for twelve years. He 
sold out January 1, 1909, and since that time has filled the position of cashier of the 
Bank of Colville, being also a member of the board of directors of that institution. 
He takes great interest in the study of financial matters and is now vice president 
of Group No. 1 of the Washington Bankers Association. He has attained a gratify- 
ing measure of success financially and is the owner of considerable real estate in 
Colville. 

On the 10th of September, 1902, Mr. Baker was married to Miss S. L. Cranney, 
a daughter of Thomas Cranney, and they have two children, William R., Jr., and 
Clement C. The father of Mrs. Baker was very prominent in earlier years in Wash- 
ington. He was a member of the territorial legislature and of the state constitutional 
convention, also holding many county offices. In 1874 he served as deputy grand 
master of Masons of Washington. 

Mr. Baker also is greatly interested in the Masonic fraternity and has held most 
of the important offices in the various branches of the order in Washington. He is 
past master of Colville Lodge, No. 50, F. & A. M., past high priest of Colville Chap- 
ter, No. 20 R. A. M., of Colville; Spokane Council, R. & S. M.; a member of Cata- 
ract Commandery, No. 3, K. T. ; Oriental Consistory, No. 2, Scottish Rite Masonry ; 
and El Katif Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. He served as representative to the Grand 
Lodge in 1901, filling the office of chairman of the committee on representative ex- 
penses. He was junior grand warden of the Grand Lodge in 1906 and in June, 1909, 
was elected grand master of Masons of the state of Washington, a position which he 
occupied with great acceptance to members of the order for one year. He served 
as grand patron of the Order of the Eastern Star of Washington from 1904 to 1905 
and is now a member of the Association of Past Grand Masters. In addition to his 
activities as a Mason he holds membership in the Odd Fellows and the Woodmen. 



32 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Politically he is an adherent of the republican party, whose principles he believes 
to be of great importance in the promotion of the prosperity of the country. He has 
served as delegate to state and county conventions but has declined all political offices* 
except that of postmaster at Colville, to which he was appointed by President Mc- 
Kinley in 1900 and reappointed by President Roosevelt, filling the office to the entire 
satisfaction of the people until 1909. He was proffered the position of deputy bank 
examiner of Washington but declined this and other offices, preferring to concentrate 
his attention upon his business. He is a sincere believer in the Christian religion and 
is a member of the Congregational church of Colville. In the discharge of his many 
responsibilities Mr. Baker has shown an energy and clearness of judgment which 
have reflected upon him and his associates the highest credit. A man of genial nature 
and pleasing address, his friends are numbered by the legion and, as he is known to 
be true to every trust, it requires no prophet to foretell his advancement to any 
position in the financial or business world to which he may aspire. 



PATRICK C. SHINE. 



A remarkably successful career has been that of Patrick C. Shine since he 
entered upon the practice of law as a member of the Spokane bar. He was born 
in County Limerick, Ireland, December 25, 1868. His parents were Michael and 
Ellen (Conners) Shine, who sent their son to the hedge school of the locality, subse- 
quently to the National village school at Athea, and finally he completed his edu- 
cation at the College and Civil Service Academy of Limerick city. He was book- 
keeper for J. P. Newsom & Company of Limerick for three years thereafter. 

He was one of a large family and in 1885, he came to America joining his brothers 
and father in Kansas City, Missouri, where he worked for a time as street car con- 
ductor for the Metropolitan Street Railway Company. He next entered the employ 
of the Union Pacific Railroad, and in 1887-8, filled the office of deputy county col- 
lector of Jackson county, Missouri. Ambitious to have broader opportunities in 
other fields, he took up the study of law during that period, devoting all of his 
leisure hours to the mastery of the principles of jurisprudence. On leaving the 
office of deputy county collector of Jackson county, he returned to the Union Pacific 
Railway as statistic clerk and assistant cashier at Kansas City and from that point 
was transferred to Huntington, Oregon, as cashier for the joint agency of the 
Oregon Short Line and Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company. Subsequently , 
he filled various positions with the latter company in all its departments. In 1894 
he came to Spokane where he was employed by the Union Depot Company. 

Mr. Shine had no sooner become a resident of this city than he severed his resi- 
dence relations with Kansas City which he always theretofore claimed as his home. 
Edwin McNeill, then president of the Iowa Central Railway, offered him a respon- 
sible position with that road, but Mr. Shine refused to leave the west and continued 
in his less lucrative position at Spokane. Edwin McNeill, who was then prospec- 
tive reorganizer of the Union Pacific system with headquarters at Portland, promised 
him the position of superintendent of a prospective division between Spokane, 
Washington, and La Grande, Oregon. Meantime by and with the encouragement 
of the superintendent of the Union Depot, Mr. Shine became a member of the 




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SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 35 

American Railway Union, and was promptly elected its secretary and treasurer. 

This affiliation changed his coarse completely and forced him into politics which 
became the stepping stone to his chosen profession. He was cashier and chief 
deputy county treasurer under George Mudgett for two consecutive terms. After 
he had successfully passed the required examination for admission to the bar, in 
January of 1899, he was appointed local counsel for his old employer, the Oregon 
Railroad & Navigation Company. Later, at the instance of the legatees of the 
McNeill estate, he was appointed administrator with will annexed of the estate of 
Edwin McNeill, who died in New York. Other interests connected with his now 
extensive clientele have made him an official of various real-estate holding corpora- 
tions. He has served as British Columbia Commissioner for the past ten years. 
He was always active in politics and was chairman of the Peoples' Party central 
committee, chairman of the executive committee, of the Fusion Party, composed of 
populists, democrats and silver republicans, in 1896, when John R. Rogers was 
elected governor of the state of Washington. Since then he has been mentioned for 
various appointive political positions, but he has never accepted one. At the present 
time he is not affiliated with any political organization, although he keeps well in- 
formed on the questions and issues of the day and advocates such measures and 
principles as he believes will prove helpful in municipal and general government. 

On March 15, 1904, Mr. Shine was married, at San Francisco, California, to 
Miss Mary Louise Gomm, a native of Savannah, Georgia, and they now have two 
children, Patrick and Mary. Mr. Shine belongs to the Spokane Club and is a life 
member of the Spokane Amateur Athletic -Club. He. believes that trusts and labor 
organizations are fundamentally the same in principle and that both should be con- 
trolled by federal regulations. He has the social qualities, the ready wit and at- 
tractive personality, characteristic of the people of the Emerald isle, combined with 
the ambition and enterprise so common in the west, and these qualities have made 
him popular as a man and successful as a lawyer. 



PATRICK J. GEARON. 



Patrick J. Gearon, who is treasurer of the J. F. Howarth Company and also has 
extensive property and mining interests in Wallace, was born in Illinois in 1 862, his 
parents being John and Bridget (Hines) Gearon. 

When Patrick J. Gearon was still in his infancy his parents removed to Iowa, 
and there he was educated and reared to manhood. He left the parental roof at the 
age of seventeen years and came west seeking his fortune, in common with many 
other lads. He first located in Jefferson, Montana, and was employed for a year 
in the Gold Quartz Mill at that point, after which he engaged to furnish the mill 
charcoal, and did so for eighteen months. In 1 883, during the days of the first gold 
excitement, he came to the Coeur d'Alene mining district, subsequently going to 
Eagle City, Idaho, at the forks of the Pritchard and Eagle creeks, where he engaged 
in placer mining for five years. Later he continued his prospecting at both Burke 
and Mullan, this state, and there he also engaged for a time in the general contract- 
ing business. In June, 1 890, immediately following the great fire, he came to Wal- 
lace and engaged in the saloon business until 1903, when he bought a half-interest 



36 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

in the Ryan Hotel, and has ever since been connected with this hostelry. When the 
J. F. Howarth Company was organized in August, 1911, Mr. Gearon was made 
treasurer: He is largely interested in many of the mining companies of the district 
and he is also owner of the Carter House property on Hotel street, Wallace. 

On the 20th of November, 1891, Mr. Gearon was united in marriage to Miss 
Sarah Carter, a daughter of Daniel Carter of Minnesota. Of the union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Gearon there has been born one son, John, whose birth occurred in September, 
1892. 

Mr. Gearon is one of the capable business men of the city as well as one of the 
successful. Such prosperity as has been awarded him, must be entirely attributed 
to his own effort, as he started out as a youth with no capital save his own determina- 
tion and inherent ambition to get along and by sheer force of will and energy he has 
attained his desire. 



THOMAS A. LE PAGE. 



Occupying an honored position in the commercial world, which he has earned 
through his wisely applied effort, Thomas A. Le Page may be named among the 
successful men of eastern Washington. He was for a number of years identified 
with the furniture business at Hillyard and as he possesses energy and sound busi- 
ness judgment his labors have met with gratifying returns. He was born at Carl- 
ton, Minnesota, a son of A. J. and Isabel (Nelson) Le Page, the former of whom 
was born in 1 862 and the latter two years later. The family is of French and Scotch- 
Irish descent and the ancestry has been traced back for five centuries in France. 
Mr. and Mrs. Le Page were the parents of three children: Thomas A., of this 
sketch; Floy, who is now completing her education in Europe; and Marguerite. 

In the public schools of Duluth, Minnesota, Thomas A. Le Page secured his 
early education. He came to Spokane with his parents in 1896 and prosecuted his 
studies further at Gonzaga College. After leaving this institution he entered the 
employ of Tull & Gibbs, furniture dealers of Spokane, and continued with this firm 
for five years, in the course of which time he gained a good practical knowledge of 
business which he has been able to apply to excellent advantage. After severing his 
connection with his employers Mr. Le Page assisted in organizing the Moore & 
Le Page Furniture Company of Hillyard, which began under favorable auspices 
and proved a success from the start. Two years later he sold out and organized 
the Hillyard Furniture Company, of which he was the head for five years. He 
then sold out once more and subsequently organized the Le Page Furniture & 
Hardware Company, which is now one of the flourishing concerns of Hillyard 
and, being conducted according to up-to-date ideas, gives promise of even more 
satisfactory returns in years to come. He is also financially interested in other 
mercantile establishments of the city but devotes all of his time to his furniture 
and hardware business. He marches in front rank of those who have at heart 
the welfare and progress' of the city and as one of Hillyard's boosters was instru- 
mental in founding the Chamber of Commerce, of which he acted as the first presi- 
dent. Mr. Le Page has applied himself with marked success to mercantile pursuits 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 37 

and has also devoted his attention to mining, being at the present time interested 
in valuable properties in the Priest Lake copper country. 

In politics Mr. Le Page is independent, preferring to support the individual 
rather than to cast his ballot in behalf of any political organization. He takes an 
active interest in the election of competent men to office and recognizes that a pub- 
lic official should exercise the same energy and good judgment in the discharge of 
his duties as in private affairs. A member of the Knights of Columbus and Red 
Men, Mr. Le Page can claim many friends in those orders. He has gained a prom- 
inent place in the estimation of his associates and the public, and richly deserves the 
good- will of the people, irrespective of political or other affiliations. 



CHARLES ADAMS. 



One of the enterprising younger members of the business circles of Colville is 
Charles Adams, vice president of the Colville Loan & Trust Company and the Bank 
of Chewelah, in addition to which he is financially interested in other activities of 
Stevens county. His birth occurred in Mason, Michigan, on the 16th of June, 
1877, his parents being Ira W. and Sophia (Van Houten) Adams. His father 
passed away in 1908, but the mother, who has attained the age of sixty-seven, is 
still living and continues to make her home in this state. Ira W. Adams originally 
came from New York state, whence he removed to Michigan, residing there until 
1887, when he came to Washington, thereafter making this state his home. In both 
the paternal and maternal lines our subject is descended from American ancestry, 
his forefathers having located in this country during colonial days. 

The education of Charles Adams was begun at the usual age in the common 
schools of Michigan and completed in those of Washington, his student days being 
terminated at the age of fifteen years when he became a wage earner. His first 
year in the business world was spent in Portland, Oregon, whence he removed to 
Spokane, where for three years he was employed by Mitchell, Lewis & Staver. In 
1896 he went to Fairfield, this state, and engaged in the hardware business for 
two years, but at the expiration of that period he returned to Spokane. During 
the following eighteen months he was in the employ of the J. I. Case Threshing 
Machine Company, leaving their service to enter that of the American Steel & 
Wire Company, being connected with the Spokane branch of the latter concern for 
one year. His next removal was to Loon Lake, this state, where he engaged in 
farming for a year, when he came to Colville to take the position of assistant 
county treasurer. He filled this position for four years, at the end of which time 
he was elected treasurer for a similar period. Following the expiration of his term 
of office, he became identified with the Colville Loan & Trust Company, acquiring 
an interest in this institution on the 1st of January, 1911, since which time he 
has held the office of vice president. In addition to his other interests Mr. Adams, 
with several others, owns a large marble quarry in the vicinity of Colville, the 
operation of which gives every promise of proving most lucrative. 

He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, being affiliated with the chapter and 
the Order of the Eastern Star, and he also belongs to the Odd Fellows, Rebekahs, 
Knights of Pythias and Eagles. In politics he is an ardent republican and is 



38 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

prominently identified with the local faction, being at the date of sketch cha irm an 
of the county committee. Mr. Adams has the utmost confidence in a great agricul- 
tural and industrial, as well as commercial, future for Washington and is one of 
the enthusiastic workers in the local Chamber of Commerce. A man of clear judg- 
ment and initiative who has always been found thoroughly trustworthy and respon- 
sible in both his public and private life, Mr. Adams is favorably regarded and 
highly esteemed by his associates in both business and social circles. 



JAMES CLARK. 



History was formerly a record of wars and conquests but has become a record 
of business activity and of man's utilization of natural resources. In this connec- 
tion the life work of James Clark is notable. He came to America when a youth 
in his teens and gradually worked his way upward until he became one of the con- 
spicuous figures in mining circles in the west and in fact his name was known 
throughout the length and breadth of the country. Prosperity did not come to him 
as the result of fortunate conditions or circumstances, but because of his keen sagac- 
ity, manifested in judicious investments and the careful conduct of his business 
interests. 

He was born in Ireland in 1849 and died on the 8th of August, 1901. Within 
that period he accomplished that which would be a credit and honor to the life of 
any individual. His parents were James and Mary Clark, and while spending his 
youthful days in the parental home he pursued his education and thus laid the 
foundation for his later advancement. Favorable reports reached him concerning 
business conditions in the new world and he was but seventeen years of age when 
he with his brother, Patrick Clark, came to the United States. They made their 
way westward to Butte, Montana, and while Patrick Clark became associated with 
Marcus Daly as foreman in the development of the Alice mine and later in the 
opening and operation of the Anaconda mine, James Clark worked as a miner and 
day by day added to his knowledge and experience of the business. Later he made 
his way to the Coeur d'Alene district where he was also engaged in mining, and 
eventually he became interested in mining property at Rossland, British Columbia, 
being superintendent of the well known War Eagle mine. He was afterward one 
of the original discoverers of Republic camp, locators and owners of the Re- 
public and other mines there and from its sale realized a handsome fortune. As 
the years passed he became recognized as an expert on mining property and its 
possibilities, and the soundness of his judgment was proven in his splendid suc- 
cess, making him one of the wealthy men of the northwest and one of the best 
known representatives of mining interests in the entire country. 

Mr. Clark was married in Butte, Montana, in 1883, to Mrs. Charlotte (Will- 
man) Toner, a daughter of Henry and Alicia (Foy) Willman, of Ireland. They 
have three children: Agnes, at home; Patrick of the Traders' National Bank, in 
which institution the estate has large holdings of stock; and Catherine, at school. 
The family circle was broken by the hand of death, when on the 8th of August, 
1901, Mr. Clark passed away. His political allegiance was given to the democratic 
party and fraternally he was connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of 



JAMES CLARK 



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SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 41 

Elks. He was a devout adherent of the Roman Catholic church. His friends 
found him a very witty man, quick at repartee and a most congenial and entertain- 
ing companion. He possessed the characteristic versatility and ability of people of 
his nationality and his record is a credit alike to the land of his birth and the land 
of his adoption. In business his associates and colleagues found him reliable as well 
as enterprising and progressive, and his efforts were ever of a character that con- 
tributed to the general development and consequent prosperity of the northwest 
as well as to his individual success. 



CHESTER A. GORDON. 

Chester A. Gordon, manager of the Coeur d'Alene Hardware Company, is one 
of the enterprising and promising young business men of Wallace, of which city he 
has been a resident for the past six years. He is a native of Illinois, having been 
born in Chicago on February 1, 1882, and is a son of Harry J. and Emma (Cowin) 
Gordon. When our subject was a lad of about six years the parents removed west, 
locating in Spokane in 1888. The father, who was an engineer, ran the dummy 
engine on Cook's railroad in that city, and during the great fire of 1889 he was 
instrumental in assisting many people to get away from the vicinity imperiled by 
die flames, many unquestionably owing their lives to his timely assistance. A few 
months later he passed away, his demise occurring late in the year of 1889. 

After the death of the father the mother with her family returned to Chicago, 
and there Chester A. Gordon finished his education. When old enough to go to 
work he laid aside his text-books, and applied himself to assisting his mother inas- 
much as he became at least self-dependent. His first position was that of office boy 
with the M. D. Wells Company, a wholesale boot and shoe house of that city. He 
was only fifteen years of age at this time, but showed such willingness and ability in 
the discharge of the various tasks assigned him that the firm promoted him f ron» time 
to time in accordance with the efficiency he displayed until he had attained a good 
position. He withdrew from their employment in 1905 and came to -Wallace to 
become bookkeeper for the Coeur d'Alene Hardware Company. This company 
was incorporated in 1892 under the management of W. W. Hart, who in 1883 became 
identified with the hardware and mining-supply business in the west and who was 
long associated with J. R. Marks in this business in Billings, Montana; Murray, 
Idaho; and Spokane, Washington. The Coeur d'Alene Hardware Company was 
under Mr. Hart's management from the time of its organization until his death in 
1910, and it is unquestionably due to his unremitting energy, initiative and thorough 
knowledge and understanding of the requirements of the business that the company 
forged ahead until it is now the largest concern of the kind in the northwest. They 
carry a complete stock of mining machinery and supplies necessary for the opera- 
tion and maintenance of mines, as well as a large stock of general hardware. Their 
policy has always been to supply all things needful to any worthy or reliable min- 
ing concern in times of difficulty, and it is unquestionably due to this fact that 
many of the important companies that are now thriving and prosperous were able 
to develop or tide over great financial difficulties. Following the death of Mr. Hart, 
in 1910, Mr. Gordon was promoted to take his place, as manager, and has ever 



42 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

since continued in that position. It is a responsible and difficult position, requiring 
clear judgment, business sagacity and executive ability of more than an average 
order, but thus far Mr. Gordon has at all times proven fully equal to the demands 
made upon him. 

Mr. Gordon has made many friends during the period of his residence in Wal- 
lace and is highly esteemed. He is a member of the Elks, belonging to Wallace 
Lodge, No. 331, B. P. O. E., and takes an earnest interest in the work of the 
order. He is meeting with financial success in his various undertakings, being 
interested in a number of mining properties in the district, and his future as gauged 
by his past gives every assurance of being most promising. 



JOHN W. GRAHAM. 



John W. Graham is the president and treasurer of the John W. Graham Com- 
pany, conducting an extensive establishment as paper dealers and stationers. The 
business has developed from a small beginning and is the visible evidence of the 
enterprising spirit and reliable, progressive methods of him who stands at its head. 
He has been a resident of Spokane since the spring of 1889, arriving here when about 
twenty-nine years of age. His birth occurred at Rockport, Indiana, March 24, 1860, 
his parents being Robert and Sophia (Stocking) Graham. He was left an orphan 
when quite young, pursued his education in the public schools of his native town and 
started to earn his living by selling papers. Subsequently he conducted a news stand, 
adding periodicals to the sale of papers, and by this venture he gained knowledge 
of the paper trade to some extent, so that it was a logical step in his career when, 
following his removal to Minneapolis, in 1 885, he secured employment in a stationery 
establishment, thus gathering preliminary experience in the field of business in which 
he has since operated so successfully. He there continued until the spring of 1889, 
when he came to Spokane, securing a position in the periodical and stationery store 
of Sylvester Heath. This establishment was completely destroyed in the big fire 
of August of that year and Mr. Heath then determined to retire from the business 
and devote himself to other interests. Mr. Graham, with prescience sufficient to rec- 
ognize what the future had in store for this great and growing western country, then 
resolved to engage in business on his own account and opened up with a three- 
hundred-dollar stock of stationery and paper in a small sloping tent borrowed from 
Mr. Heath which stood on Monroe street on the site opposite the Spokesman's Re- 
view building, and upon the ground where Mr. Heath's' building now stands. Mr. 
Graham was accorded a good patronage from the beginning and the following spring 
occupied half of a store in Mr. Heath's building. In September, 1890, the business 
had grown to such an extent that he removed to the Great Eastern block, now known 
as the Peyton block, at the corner of Riverside and Post streets. At first he occupied 
but half of the store but subsequently bought out the occupants of the other half 
and as his business still continued to grow took in the next store where he carried on 
his commercial undertaking until 1 898, occupying two full stores at that time when 
the building was almost completely destroyed by fire. In the fall of 1 900 the John 
W. Graham Company removed to their present location. The spacious, three-story 
building they occupied was consumed by fire in August, 1910, and replaced by the 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 43 

splendid five-story building, in which they now carry on their business and which 
extends through from Sprague avenue to First avenue, their store being one of the 
most splendidly equipped in the Inland Empire. Their wholesale building, situated 
on the Spokane Right of Way measures one hundred and fifty feet front, by one hun- 
dred and twenty feet deep, and is three stories in height, being built five years ago. 
In 1896 the John W. Graham Company was incorporated with the founder of the 
business as president and treasurer. The stock has been increased until now there is 
a paid-up capital of five hundred thousand dollars and the corporation is one of the 
most flourishing in this part of the country. They sell anything made of paper and 
fheir business throughout eastern Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana is carried 
on by a force of ten salesmen. Throughout the twenty-two years of its existence 
the enterprise has constantly grown and developed along substantial lines, due to a 
harmonious working-together of employer and employes, many of whom have been 
longer in the service of this company than any other men in any store in Spokane, and 
the success of the undertaking has won for Mr. Graham recognition as one of the 
foremost merchants of eastern Washington. 

In Spokane on the 28th of October, 1891, Mr. Graham was married to Miss 
Alta Burch, a daughter of Dr. and Laura (Havermale) Burch, of this city. Her 
father was one of the early pioneers here and his wife is a daughter of the Rev. 
Samuel G. Havermale, who took up his abode in Spokane in 1875. Mr. and Mrs. 
Graham have a daughter Molly, born April, 1904, and they reside at No. 607 South 
Monroe street, which residence was erected by Mr. Graham, in 1907, and is set in the 
most spacious and beautiful lawns in the city. He has taken a prominent part in the 
work of the Chamber of Commerce and is always ready to do anything that will help 
Spokane or the Inland Empire. He has never been actively identified with politics 
nor held political office but was one of the directors of the Young Men's Christian 
Association, at the time the new building was erected and assisted in raising the 
funds for the same. He belongs to the Elks Lodge, No. 228, and to the Spokane 
Club and the Spokane Amateur Athletic Club. A man of pleasing personality, he 
makes friends wherever he goes. Aside from a genial and courteous disposition the 
sterling traits of his character are manifest in his determination, his adaptability and 
his persistency of purpose which have constituted the foundation of his present suc- 
cess in the commercial world. 



WILLIAM L. SAX. 



William L. Sax, who is serving his second terra as mayor of Colville, in addition 
to the discharge of the duties of which office he is also conducting an abstract busi- 
ness, was born in Schoharie county, New York, on the 26th of July, 1864. His 
parents were Peter and Rebecca (Richtmyer) Sax, both of whom are now deceased, 
her father having passed away in 1905 and the mother in 1893. In the maternal line 
he is descended from one of the old Dutch families of the Empire state. 

After the completion of his preliminary education, which was acquired in the com- 
mon schools of Kansas, William L. Sax engaged in teaching. When he had acquired 
sufficient means he took a course in the State Normal school at Emporia, Kansas, 
continuing to attend this institution at various periods until he was twenty- four years 



44 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

of age. He was compelled to depend upon his own efforts for further study and 
taught school between times, in order to acquire the money to defray the expenses of 
his education. His close application, hard study and confinement undermined his 
health and he was forced to seek another climate, so he went to Colorado and spent 
a year in the mountains. In 1888 he came to Washington, locating near Spokane 
where he engaged in teaching, later following the same vocation in both Spokane and 
Stevens county until 1896. In the latter year he withdrew from the work of the 
school room to take the position of deputy county treasurer. After serving in this 
capacity for two years he was elected county superintendent of schools, discharg- 
ing the duties of this office with rare efficiency and satisfaction for five years. 

In 1901, he bought an abstract business that has since been incorporated as 
the Stevens County Abstract Company. He continues to be identified with this com- 
pany and is recognized as one of the most capable men in this line in the city, his 
books being complete in every respect and kept up to date with the county records. 

On the 12th of January, 1892, Mr. Sax was married to Miss Minnie A. Morgan, 
a daughter of Newell C. Morgan, a veteran of the Civil war, and unto them have been 
born two sons: Karl, who assists his father in the abstract business; and Paul, who 
is still in school. 

Fraternally Mr. Sax is a Mason, having taken the degrees of the blue lodge, and 
he also belongs to the Odd Fellows and has filled all of the chairs in the latter 
lodge. In his political views he is a socialist and takes an active interest in all 
municipal affairs, having filled the mayoralty chair since 1909. He was elected to 
this office on both occasions on an independent ticket, and has made a most efficient 
and generally highly satisfactory executive. Mr. Sax is a. member of the Chamber 
of Commerce, of which he has been president, and takes an active interest in all of 
the work of this organization, being one of the progressive citizens of the community 
whose support is accorded to every movement advanced to promote the public welfare. 



EUGENE V. BOUGHTON. 

Eugene V. Boughton, one of the capable representatives of the legal profession 
in Coeur d'Alene, where he has been .engaged in practice for the past five years, 
was born in Quincy, Michigan, on December 21, 1875. His parents, William H. 
and Julia E. (Ball) Boughton, were well known farming people of Saginaw 
county, that state. The father was one of those brave, patriotic men who offered 
his services to his country at the opening of the Civil war and remained at the 
front until the close of hostilities. 

Eugene V. Boughton attended the common and high schools in the acquirement 
of an education, and, after graduating' from the high school, entered the mercantile 
business at Evart, Michigan, in the employ of Davy & Company. Subsequently 
he was made manager of their branch store at Leota, Michigan, where he remained 
for over a year. He then decided to launch out into an independent business ca- 
reer, and in partnership with S. E. Sayles he established two stores at Custer and 
Greenland, Michigan, respectively, operating the same until the summer of 1908, 
he disposed of his interests and matriculated in the university at Ann Arbor, grad- 
uating with the degree of LL. B. with the class of 1906. He was admitted to the 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 45 

• 

bar at Lansing, Michigan, the same year, and immediately thereafter came to 
Coeur d'Alene, believing that better opportunities were here afforded for a young 
attorney than were to be found in the more thickly populated districts of the middle 
west. A man of good presence, intelligent and practical he made a favorable im- 
pression from the very first, and consequently met with little or no difficulty in 
building up a good practice and now has a well established clientage. Mr. 
Boughton's preparation for his work has been very thorough, and in addition to 
this he has a logical mind, fine reasoning faculties and an exceptionally good com- 
mand of English, all of which are of inestimable value and are absolutely indis- 
pensable to a successful legal career. He is conscientiously devoted to the interests 
of his clients and exercises exceeding care and precaution in the preparation of 
his cases, overlooking none of the minor points upon which the decision of a case 
so often hinges. His arguments are always especially strong, each point following 
in its regular sequence and presented in a strong, forceful manner that is most con- 
vincing. 

Mr. Boughton was united in marriage on the 21st of June, 1899, to Miss Eda 
Sayles, a daughter of Joseph and Nettie Sayles of Evapt, Michigan, the former of 
whom for many years was judge of Osceola county. Three children have been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Boughton, as follows: Irma Bcrnadine, whose birth occurred 
at Ann Arbor, Michigan, on June 1, 1905; Donald James, who was born at Coeur 
d'Alene, on the 29th of January, 1908; and Robert Eugene, born on March 1, 1911. 
The family home is located at No. 1111 North First street, this city, where they 
have a very pleasant and attractive residence. 

In matters of faith both Mr. and Mrs. Boughton are Presbyterians, and fra- 
ternally he is a member of the Knights of Pythias and the Masons, having taken 
the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite. He is past venerable master of the 
Lodge of Perfection, and belongs to Idaho Consistory, No. 3, S. P. R. S.; and he 
is also a shriner, holding membership in El Katif Temple, Spokane. Mr. Bough- 
ton's devoted attention to the interests of his clients, his unquestionable integrity 
and his broad and comprehensive knowledge of civil law have all combined in es- 
tablishing him among the attorneys of recognized prestige in Kootenai county. 



LEE B. HARVEY, M. D. 



The medical profession of Stevens county finds a worthy representative in Dr. Lee 
B. Harvey, who has been located at Colville for eleven years past and has gained a 
reputation which is not confined within the limits of the state of Washington. He 
comes of good Scotch and English ancestry and was born in Montgomery, Alabama, 
October 12, 1868, a son of Z. and Jane (Emerson) Harvey. The father died in 1892 
and the mother passed away one year later. The ancestors of our subject on the pa- 
ternal side were early Scotch and English settlers in the United States, a grand- 
uncle serving with high credit in the Civil war. 

In the public schools of his native state Lee B. Harvey received his preliminary 
education. Subsequently he became a student of the University of Alabama, from 
which he was graduated with the degree of A. B. Having decided to devote his life 
to the healing art, he entered the medical department of the University of St. Louis 



46 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

and after pursuing the regular course was graduated in 1900 with the degree of M. 
D. Immediately after receiving his diploma he came to Colville and has since ac- 
tively engaged in practice at this place. In 1904 he went to Chicago and took a post- 
graduate course of three months in Cook County Hospital, under the auspices of the 
University of Chicago. Two years later he pursued a similar course at the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania and in 1908 visited the celebrated Mayo Brothers at Rochester, 
Minnesota, and spent several weeks at their hospital, observing their methods and 
gaining valuable information as to the most successful methods in surgery. In 1905 
Dr. Harvey built the Colville Sanitarium, of which he is manager and owner. This 
institution is strictly modern in all its appointments and is considered one of the most 
complete establishments of the kind in the northwest, its patrons being attracted 
from a wide region tributary to Washington. 

On the 3d of October, 1891, Dr. Harvey was married to Miss Cora Goakey, a 
daughter of Joseph Goakey, who is a prominent farmer of the Columbia river region. 
Politically Dr. Harvey adheres to the democratic party, believing that its principles 
are highly conducive to the prosperity of the country. He has taken the interest of 
a patriotic citizen in public affairs and served as mayor of Colville from 1900 to 1909, 
when he resigned, proving one of the most efficient officials the town has known. He 
also has filled the positions of city and county health officer and discharged his duties 
with the highest efficiency. He is a stanch believer in the great principle of broth- 
erhood and has taken various degrees of Free Masonry including those of the com- 
mandery and shrine. He was master of Colville Lodge, A. F. & A. M., for four 
years. He belongs to the Odd Fellows and has passed through all the chairs of the 
subordinate lodge in that order, being also a member of the Knights of Pythias and 
Woodmen of the World. He is a constant student, a close and accurate observer, 
and he has spared no pains or expense in securing instruction under acknowledged 
masters in medicine &nd surgery. The ability he has shown in his practice and the 
interest he has taken in his patients have been productive of a gratifying degree of 
success and he ranks today as one of the most prominent physicians in this part of the 
state. 



JAMES NETTLE GLOVER. 

No history of Spokane would be complete without extended reference to James 
Nettle Glover who as the first permanent settler, as the first merchant and as the 
promoter and supporter of many interests which in subsequent days have advanced 
the welfare and progress of the city well deserves to be known as "the father of 
Spokane." His life history in detail would prove as interesting as any wrought by 
the imagination of a writer of fiction. It would be the story of travel through the 
primeval forests, of difficulties and dangers encountered and of obstacles over- 
come. Moreover, settlement in a new country always calls out the resourcefulness 
of the individual in meeting existing conditions. Mr. Glover was at all times ready 
for any emergency and on more than one occasion his quick wit and keen insight 
enabled him to master what seemed a difficult situation. Less than forty years 
have wrought the transformation that has developed Spokane from the tiny hamlet 



JAMES N. GLOVER 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 49 

into the splendid modern city of the present day, and with this work Mr. Glover 
has been -more or less associated. 

He was born in Lincoln county, Missouri, March 15, 1837, a son of Philip and 
Sarah (Koontz) Glover, who were of French and German ancestry respectively. 
They became pioneer settlers of Missouri when it was still under territorial rule, 
and were married there in 1818. The father, who was born in 1795 and was reared 
in Maryland, devoted his entire life to farming. He inherited a number of slaves 
and took seventeen of them with him to Missouri in 1817, but becoming convinced 
of the injustice of holding human beings in bondage, he gave them their freedom 
in 1846. That he was a kind and tolerant taskmaster is indicated by the fact that 
one old negro, Travis Johnson, insisted on remaining with the family even after 
their arrival in Oregon, to which state they decided to remove after their eldest son, 
William, had already settled within its borders. In the early part of 1849, there- 
fore, when James N. Glover was twelve years of age, they started from a place 
near Independence, Missouri, traveling with wagon and ox team which the negro 
Johnson drove. They were six months and one day upon the road, and after reach- 
ing the northwest the father secured a donation land claim of six hundred and 
forty acres about five miles from Salem, in Marion county, Oregon. Immediately he 
undertook the task of developing a farm and thereon resided until his death, which 
occurred December 12, 1872. The negro to whom he had given his liberty was em- 
ployed by his former master to cut ten thousand rails and other service at times 
kept him busy and gave him a comfortable living. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Philip Glover 
eleven children were born of whom three .sons, and *three daughters are now de- 
ceased, while those still living are: James, Ji^^f*. thfelrfeview; Philip, who is living 
in Oregon at the age of eighty-two years ; Samuel, eighty years of age, living with 
his brother James in Spokane; Charles Peyton, a, resident of Portland, Oregon; 
and John W., living in Spokane. .,..••***' 

The story of life upon the frontier is a familiar one to James N. Glover who 
shared with the family in the usual pioneer hardships and experiences. He re- 
mained with his father in Oregon until twenty years of age and in 1857 made his 
first business venture, taking a quantity of apples to the Yreka mining district in 
northern California. Not being able to dispose of them in the way anticipated, he 
rented a room and opened a fruit store, continuing at that place for a year. On 
selling out he returned to Oregon and during the succeeding two years lived with his 
father, who worked at the carpenter's trade. He carefully saved his earnings and 
in the spring of 1 862 began operations in the mining districts of eastern Washing- 
ton and northern Idaho, the labors of eight years bringing him fifteen thousand 
dollars. On the expiration of that period he became associated at Salem, Oregon, 
with the Hon. Richard Williams, of Portland, and J. N. Matheny, of Salem, in the 
building and operation of the first steam ferry running between Marion and Polk 
counties in Oregon, and continued in the business until 1872, when the property 
was sold. Mr. Glover was also engaged in shipping apples from Salem to San 
Francisco and had been somewhat active in the public life of the city, serving as a 
member of the board of aldermen and filling the position of city marshal of Salem 
in 1868. In the spring of 1878 he left Salem, accompanied by J. N. Matheny, and 
started for the Palouse and Spokane valleys, traveling by rail to Portland and thence 
by water to Lewiston, Idaho, where they arrived on the 2d of May. After purchas- 
ing two cayuse ponies and such outfit as they could strap to their saddles, they 
Vol 



50 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

started out on an exploring expedition through the wild and undeveloped country. 
There was restlessness among the Indians and in southern Oregon the Modoc war 
was in progress. For days they rode through the region known as the Inland Empire 
and only once in long distances would they come across an inhabited little log cabin. 
On hearing of Spokane Falls they made that their destination, arriving on the 11th 
of May. They found two squatters, J. J. Downing and S. R. Scranton, both of 
whom were anxious to dispose of their property. Sometime before Mr. Downing 
had agreed to sell his squatter's rights to a man named Benjamin, who had paid 
four hundred dollars on the purchase price but was unable to complete the pay- 
ment. Mr. Glover and Mr. Matheny offered Downing two thousand dollars to vacate 
and let them locate upon the land provided the first payment of four hundred dollars 
should go to Mr. Benjamin, that being the amount he had paid to Mr. Downing. The 
deal was at length arranged and upon that basis and then leaving Mr. Scranton in 
charge of the falls Mr. Glover and his companion returned to Oregon. They believed 
that there was opportunity for the establishment of a profitable business at this 
point and entered into partnership with C. F. Yeaton. Together the three men placed 
orders for all necessary machinery and with this returned to Spokane Falls on the 
29th of July. In the meantime Mr. Scranton had become involved in some trouble 
with the officers of the law and was a fugitive, hiding in the surrounding country. 
Mr. Glover, who remained in Oregon for a time to settle up affairs there, arrived at 
the falls, on the 19th of August, traveling in a lumber wagon from Wallula Junction. 
Being told of Scranton' s hiding place he met the man, purchased his squatter's 
right for two thousand dollars and thus gained clear possession to the falls. It was 
impossible to know if they were on government land open to free settlement or on a 
section granted the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, for at that time no survey 
had been made. The sawmill, however, was built and kept in operation where the 
Phoenix Sawmill now stands, and Mr. Glover also opened a general merchandise 
store which was the first in this city, its site being the present location of the Wind- 
son building on Front avenue. When a squad of surveyors under government con- 
tract came to survey lower Crab creek and ran a base line to Spokane Falls Mr. 
Glover had the satisfaction of finding that he was in the section open for settle- 
ment. Some time afterward he built another store where the Pioneers block now 
stands, on the corner of Howard and Front streets. Trading was carried on with 
the Indians and with a few white settlers who had ventured into this part of the 
country. Mr. Glover's partners became discouraged at the outlook and in 1876 he 
purchased their interests in the business and property so that he became the owner 
of one hundred and sixty acres situated in what is now the very center of the city, its 
boundaries being Sprague avenue on the south, Broadway on the north, Bernard street 
on the east and Adams street on the west. Up to that time no settlers had come to 
join him at Spokane, his former partner Matheny having gone to Utah and Yeaton to 
Oregon, and thus Mr. Glover was left alone at the falls. 

It certainly required a courageous spirit to face the conditions in which he found 
himself — solitary and alone — without any immediate indication that changes would 
occur leading to the upbuilding of a city or even a village in his vicinity. In June, 
1877, the Nez Perces war broke out and in order to entice the young warriors of 
the Spokane tribe to join them a band of twenty-five or thirty Nez Perces came to 
the falls, camping near Mr. Glover's store and engaging in their war dance night 
after night. All of the white people of the surrounding country had gathered into 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 51 

the store for safety, sleeping on the floor and benches, and a number of settlers 
living at a point forty miles to the west made their way to "Big Island" where 
the Great Northern now stands. Mr.- Glover watched the war dance for a few 
nights and, realising that something must be done, he called a number of old Spo- 
kane Indians who had been trading with him for years and had a plain talk with 
them, reminding them of the Indian war of twenty years before, when Colonel 
Wright executed a number of their people, destroying their property and leaving 
them in misery from which they never recovered. Mr. Glover ended by telling the 
Indians that "if the visitors don't go away before the sun is over our heads (noon) 
I am in close touch now with the boys who wear the brass buttons." This had the 
desired effect and before noon of the same day the Nez Perces braves had gone to 
the gorges of the river. In intimating that he could summon the United States 
troops Mr. Glover felt it would strengthen his case but had no idea that the soldiers 
were near, as it happened, however, that very day Colonel Wheaton of the regular 
army marched into the Spokane settlement with his entire regiment, and ever after- 
ward the Indians accredited Mr. Glover with great foresight and knowledge. After 
a few weeks' stay here the troops, with the exception of Companies H and I, pro- 
ceeded to Palouse City. About the same time General Sherman passed through the 
Spokane settlement with his escort, on the way from Fort Benton to Vancouver, 
Washington, via Walla Walla, and was entertained by Mr. Glover who asked that 
the companies be returned here, and when General Sherman reached Walla Walla 
he gave orders for the troops to spend the winter at Spokane. In the following 
summer, 1878, the soldiers built Fort Coeur d'Alene, twenty-eight miles away, 
and as this furnished protection for the district, Spokane began to attract attention. 

In his business undertakings Mr. Glover prospered, for some years conducting 
a profitable trade with the fort. The real growth of the city, however, dates from 
the fall of 1879, at which time the Northern Pacific Railroad Company gave out the 
contracts for the extension of its line to Spokane. A construction train, the first 
to enter this place, arrived in June, 1882, and with the advent of the railroad the 
future of the city was assured, owing to its excellent location and the fact that 
the surrounding country could be profitably cultivated. During the early period of 
settlement Mr. Glover disposed of much of his land at a very low figure, in some 
cases giving away lots to those who would build upon them. He gave forty acres 
to Frederick Post on condition that he would build a grist mill, and this site is now 
occupied by the building of the Washington Water Power Company. As early as 
January, 1 878, he had caused the first survey of the town plat to be made, acting as 
chain carrier as there were not sufficient men in the neighborhood to do the work. 
Subsequently he named all the principal thoroughfares: Washington street, &r 
George Washington; Stevens street, for Governor Isaac Stevens; Howard street, 
for General O. O. Howard ; Sprague avenue, for J. W. Sprague, the general super- 
intendent of the western division of the Northern Pacific Railroad; Post street, 
for Frederick Post; Monroe, Adams, Lincoln and Madison for the presidents; and 
Mill street because the first mill was erected thereon. 

As the city grew it naturally followed that Mr. Glover should have voice in 
its management, and in 1883 he was a member of the city council, while in 1884-5 
he served as mayor. Then again he was called to the council in 1898 and once 
more in 1902, so that he has taken an active part in shaping municipal affairs. His 
business, too, developed with the passing years and for a considerable period he 



52 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

continued in merchandising. In November, 1882, upon the incorporation of the 
First National Bank of Spokane he was one of the principal stockholders and served 
as its president for ten years, but in the great financial panic of 1898 the bank was 
obliged to suspend, at which time it was estimated that the loss of Mr. Glover 
amounted to one million five hundred thousand dollars, or twice as much as any other 
citizen. The courageous spirit which he had ever manifested throughout the period 
of his residence in the northwest did not desert him now, nor did he lose faith in the 
city and its future, and it is a pleasure to his many friends to know that in the inter- 
vening years to the present time he has regained substantial property interests and 
now has good realty holdings that return to him a gratifying annual income. 

Mr. Glover was married in Spokane to Miss Esther Emily Leslie, a daughter of 
Samuel C. Leslie. He was the first Mason of Spokane, and is a Knight Templar, 
while in the Scottish Rite he has attained the thirty-second degree. He belongs to 
the Spokane Club and to the Chamber of Commerce. He practically bore all the 
expense of building the First Episcopal church and many other churches are greatly 
indebted to him because of his donation of land or generous contribution in money. 
He has been most liberal in his gifts to the Orphanage Home, to the Young Men's 
Christian Association and to various charitable and benevolent works, and in fact 
it would be difficult to name any department of activity which has been of real 
benefit to Spokane that has not profited by his cooperation, encouragement and 
support. As long as the city stands the name of James Nettle Glover should be 
honored, for with wonderful prescience he foresaw the future and recognized the 
possibilities of the district, and with unfaltering faith labored to promote the inter- 
ests and upbuilding of this section. Thus today he manifests a contagious enthu- 
siasm regarding the northwest and in as far as possible enters into every project 
for the public good with zest and zeal. 



/. 



ROBERT BENTON PATERSON. 

Robert^^enton Paterson, whose resourceful business ability and undaunted 
energy has brought him to the presidency of the Spokane Dry Goods Company and 
also into close connection with some of the foremost financial enterprises of the city, 
belongSjpto that class of men who find keen pleasure in successfully solving complex 

%trade^)roblems and in coordinating forces into a unified whole. He is eminently a 
i ojF business sense and easily avoids the mistakes that come to those who, though 
possessing remarkable faculties in some respects, are liable to erratic movements that 
result in unwarranted risk and failure. He is a man of well balanced mind, even 
temperament and conservative habit, and also possesses that kind of enterprise which 
leads to great achievement. He has been a resident of Spokane since the summer 
of 1889, arriving here when a young man of about twenty-four years. His birth 
occurred in Washington, Iowa, November 18, 1865. His parents were David and 
Ella (Van Dyke) Paterson, the father of Scotch descent and the mother of Dutch 
lineage, being a representative of the well known Van Dyke family of Holland. 
David Paterson was a merchant of Washington, Iowa, and subsequently engaged in 
a similar line of business in Algona, that state. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 53 

After mastering the elementary branches of learning in the public schools of Al- 
gona Robert B. Paterson continued his education in the Iowa College at Grinnell, but 
left school at a comparatively early age to become a factor in commercial circles, in 
which he has found scope for his industry and enterprise — his salient characteristics. 
He was first employed as a clerk in a dry-goods store and afterward became con- 
nected with the mercantile business at Charles City, Iowa. He made his initial step 
as proprietor of a store when but nineteen years of age, entering into partnership 
with J. M. Comstock, his former employe at Algona, with whom he was associated in 
the establishment of a dry-goods store at Charles City, Iowa, where they conducted 
a successful business from 1884 until 1889. Their attention, however, was directed 
to the west with its constantly broadening opportunities and with the hope that suc- 
cess awaited them on the Pacific coast they made their way to Spokane in the summer 
of 1889. Under the firm stvle of Comstock & Paterson the business was estabb'shed 
and conducted and the well known name of The Crescent became a household word 
in that section of the country. They opened their store August 5, 1889, the day fol- 
lowing the great fire which practically wiped out the business center of Spokane, 
and from the beginning their success was assured. Gradually the retail trade of the 
Crescent store has increased until it has for some time been at the head of the lead- 
ing dry-goods and department stores in the Inland Empire. The business was in- 
corporated in 1895 under the style of the Spokane Dry Goods Company for the pur- 
pose of conducting a jobbing business in dry goods, but the name "Crescent" was re- 
tained for the retail house. The Spokane Dry Goods Company's trade extends 
throughout western Oregon, Montana, Idaho and all parts of Washington, and it is 
one of the largest wholesale dry-goods concerns in the state. 

The record of Mr. Paterson has ever commanded the admiration and respect of 
his colleagues and contemporaries. It is well known that he never makes engage- 
ments that he does not fill nor incur obligations that he does not meet. He has de- 
veloped his business along the legitimate lines of trade, carrying a stock adequate to 
the needs and demands of the public, and bringing his establishment into prominence 
through judicious advertising and also by reason of a well selected line of goods. 
Moreover great care has been maintained in the personnel of the house, in the meth- 
ods pursued and the character of service rendered the public, and upon these things 
has been built the substantial success which has placed the Spokane Dry Goods Com- 
pany in its present enviable position. Mr. Paterson is now the president of this 
company and of the Crescent Department Store and vice president of the Dry Goods 
Realty Company which is a holding company for their real estate. Into various 
other fields he has directed his efforts and now has voice in the management of a 
number of important financial enterprises, being a director of the Spokane Eastern 
Trust Company, the Union Trust Company, the Western Union Life Insurance Com- 
pany, the Warehouse & Realty Company and numerous others. He is a member of 
the Spokane Club, the Spokane Country Club and the Chamber of Commerce of Spo- 
kane, and of the Arkwright Club of New York — indications of his social qualities 
and of his popularity among many friends in this city. Business and social interests, 
however, have not made entire claim upon his time and attention. He holds mem- 
bership in the First Presbyterian church and is a most active worker and generous 
supporter of the Young Men's Christian Association, serving at the present time as 
president of the Spokane organization and as a member of the executive committee 
of the state organization. 



54 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

On the 31st of December, 1888, occurred the marriage of Mr. Pater son and Miss 
Henrietta I. Davidson, of Charles City, Iowa, and unto them have been born two 
children, Genevieve M., born June 23, 1890; and Robert A., born July 19, 1901. He 
is a typical American citizen and a splendid example of American manhood and chiv- 
alry. While he has won success in business, this has constituted but one phase of his 
life. He has been a student of the sociological, political and economic problems of 
the country and concerning such endeavors to keep abreast with thinking men. He 
has recognized the duties and obligations as well as the privileges of citizenship and 
therefore Spokane has found him active in indorsement and aid on various projects 
for the city's welfare and growth. 



EDWIN TRUMAN COMAN. 

The position of Edwin Truman Coman in banking circles in Washington is in- 
dicated in the fact that he is the youngest man ever elected to the presidency of the 
State Bankers Association, which honor came to him in 1905. His active connec- 
tion with banking interests is now broad and includes the presidency of the Ex- 
change National Bank of Spokane, in which city he is now making his home. He 
came to the coast from the middle west, his birth having occurred in Kankakee, 
Illinois, May 25, 1869. His father, Daniel Franklin Coman, was a representa- 
tive of one of the old families of Massachusetts and wedded Rosilla J. Thresher, 
whose ancestors were among the early settlers of New Hampshire. 

Edwin T. Coman pursued his early education in the public schools of his native 
town and afterward attended the Michigan State University at Ann Arbor and also 
the Washington and Lee University at Lexington, Virginia. He was admitted 
to the bar of the Supreme Court of Virginia, and later in Illinois and Washington. 
He then continued in active practice until twenty-seven years of age and in the 
meantime he had removed westward to Washington having, in 1894, settled in 
Colfax, Whitman county. In 1897 he was chosen cashier of the First National 
Bank of Colfax, whose business was developed from a deposit of less than one 
hundred thousand dollars to a half million in a few years. In 1905 the First Na- 
tional Bank and the Colfax National Bank were consolidated and of the new in- 
stitution Mr. Coman became the vice president and manager. His ability in bank-' 
ing was becoming widely recognized in financial circles, and in 1907 he was elected 
as vice president and manager of the Exchange National Bank of Spokane and 
removed to this city, where he has since made his home. In the intervening period 
he has been elected to the presidency of the bank and his connections also include 
the presidency of the First Savings & Trust Bank of Whitman county, of the Bank 
of Endicott, the Bank of Rosalia, Plummer State Bank of Plummer, Idaho, and the 
vice presidency of the National Bank of Palouse. Mr. Coman has made many 
public addresses principally on financial subjects. He has spoken before the 
Bankers Association of Idaho, Oregon, Montana, and three times before the asso- 
ciation of Washington. In 1908 he was elected trustee of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, which position he held until 1911, when he was elected president. He is 
also president of the council of Spokane College. 



EDWIX T. COMAX 



• THr M-'-A vjft K 






SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 57 

On the 10th of March, 1897, Mr. Coman was married to Miss Ruth Martin, a 
daughter of Robert and Catherine (Tull) Martin, of Carrollton, Missouri, the for- 
mer of whom was a pioneer banker. They now have three children, Edwin Truman, 
born May 18, 1908; Robert Martin, born December 81, 1905; and Catherine, born 
July 11, 1909. Mr. Coman holds membership in St. Paul's Cathedral of Spokane 
and he is a member of its vestry. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons and 
has attained the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite, also holding degrees as 
Knight Templar and in the Mystic Shrine. From his college days he holds mem- 
bership in the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity, Virginia Beta Chapter. His social nature 
finds expression in his membership in the Spokane, Spokane Athletic, Spokane 
Country, Inland and University Clubs. 



LEONARD E. HANSON, M. D. 

Dr. Leonard E. Hanson, one of the capable, younger representatives of the 
medical fraternity in Wallace, was born at Deer Park, Wisconsin, on the 2d of 
April, 1879, and is a son of John and Caretta M. (Abrahamson) Hanson. This 
worthy couple have another son, Walter H. Hanson, who is mentioned elsewhere 
in this work. 

Reared at home Dr. Hanson acquired his early education in the public schools 
of his native state, later entering the University of Minnesota, where for two years 
he took the academic and pharmaceutical course.,; • ■ Having decided to become a 
physician he subsequently matriculated in the medical' department of the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, being awarded the degree of M. D. with 
the class of 1908. In order to better qualify J)imself for the duties of a practitioner, 
immediately following his graduation Dr. Hanson entered the Pennsylvania and 
Blockley Hospitals at Philadelphia, where he served an interneship for three 
months. Following the expiration of his period of service he came to Wallace and 
established an office and has ever since engaged in the general practice of medi- 
cine and surgery. He early had occasion to demonstrate his ability both as a 
physician and surgeon, displaying such rare skill and perfect understanding of both 
branches of his science that he has met with little difficulty in building up a good 
practice. In May, 1910, he became associated with Dr. Max T. Smith in the 
establishment of the Hope Hospital of Wallace, a private institution devoted to 
the treatment of both surgical and medical cases of a general nature. In addition 
to his large private practice, Dr. Hanson is surgeon for the Oregon & Washington 
Railroad & Navigation Company, Hercules Mining & Milling Company, Custer 
Mining Company, Copper King Mining & Smelting Company, Coeur d'Alene Iron 
Works, Clearwater Mining Company, C. & R. Mining Company, Ivanhoe Mining 
Company, Idora Mining Company, Index Mining Company, Lucky Calumet Min- 
ing Company, Marsh Mining Company, Tiger Hotel Company, and Tamarack & 
Chesapeake Mining Company. During the period of his residence in Shoshone 
county Dr. Hanson has filled the office of coroner, having entered upon his duties 
on January 1, 1909, and retiring at the expiration of his two-year term, having 
discharged his responsibilities with creditable efficiency. Although he has not 
long been engaged in practice, he has become recognized as an able physician, his 



58 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

long experience as a druggist and his thorough preparation together with his 
natural qualifications, giving him the assurance that inspires confidence in all who 
come under his attention. 

Dr. Hanson has never married. He is a worthy exemplar of the Masonic or- 
der, being a member of Shoshone Lodge, No. 25, F. & A. M. ; Wallace Chapter, No. 
9, R. A. M. ; Coeur d'Alene Commandery, No. 5, K. T. ; and also the Order of the 
Eastern Star. He is an Elk, and is affiliated with Wallace Lodge, No. £31, B. P. 
O. E. ; and belongs to the Knights of Pythias, Wallace Lodge, No. 9. During hit 
student days at the University of Pennsylvania he joined the Greek letter fra- 
ternity Alpha Kappa Kappa, and also the Acacia fraternity. He is a member of 
the National Geographic Society, and maintains relations with the members of 
his profession through the medium of the H. C. Wood Medical Society of Phila- 
delphia, American Medical Association, Idaho State Medical Association and Koo- 
tenai, Bonner and Shoshone County Medical Societies. At the time of the Spanish- 
American war he was trumpeter of Battery B, Thirteenth Minnesota Light Ar- 
tillery, which regiment was sent to Cass Lake, Minnesota, to quell the uprising 
among the Indians at that point, when Major Wilkinson was killed with twenty of 
his men, and in recognition of this service they were not sent to Manila. The fu- 
ture of Dr. Hanson in his profession would seem to be most promising. He is a 
progressive man, applying himself conscientiously to the study of all current papers 
and periodicals pertaining to his science, discarding the old methods for the new 
whenever he is firmly satisfied that the tests have proven without a doubt the ef- 
ficacy of the later discovery. 



DANIEL MORGAN. 



The history of the development and progress of the west, particularly that of 
the Inland Empire, is replete with the stories of individuals who have contributed 
their part in empire building; of those who braved the hardships of the wilderness 
and frontier and made possible the greater advancement and progress of the 
generations to follow; of those of later years who, recognizing the possibilities, 
looked far into the future and saw the state peopled with the most contented and 
prosperous people in the world. To these men the picture was an alluring one 
and in the fullness of their convictions they sought to be contributing factors in 
the upbuilding and growth that was so sure to follow. The majority of them have 
been successful beyond their most sanguine expectations and while some have 
not been attended with the same success, a tribute to their memory is due for the 
efforts they have put forth in behalf of progress. To the others whose efforts have 
been crowned with success the picture has taken material form and almost in 
reach they can see the glorious fruition of their hopes. Although a comparatively 
young man, one of those who stands forth prominently in the ranks of the suc- 
cessful is Daniel Morgan, whose activities in the Inland Empire have embraced 
a number of important projects, among which was the promotion and building of 
the town of Lamont on the Seattle, Portland & Spokane Railroad in Whitman 
county. It is a model town on a magnificent site and Mr. Morgan proposes to 
make it the "greatest little town in the United States." At the present writing 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 59 

the town of Lamont has a population of about six hundred and every convenience 
of a city of many thousands has been instituted. Its buildings are substantial and 
in all the work in laying out the town much attention has been paid to the beau- 
tiful and to the artistic. Parks are a most important feature and every effort is 
being exerted to bring them to a high state of beauty and perfection. The town 
owns its own water system and furnishes fire protection that is equal to those of 
large cities. Some idea of the completeness of the system may be gained when it 
is understood that the people of Lamont are granted the same fire insurance rates 
that are granted the city of Spokane. The town has a schoolhouse which was 
erected at a cost of thirtv thousand dollars: contains free baths and has a manual 
training department; is equipped with a fine library and it is proposed to estab- 
lish an agricultural school and later to promote the country life movement. Mr. 
Morgan has been the prime factor in promoting all of the improvements and hopes 
to constantly add other ones to the town. The town of Lamont is to him his most 
interesting work and although he has been and will be actively engaged in other 
projects, he hopes to be a factor in bringing the town to that state of development 
that will justify him in the statement that "Lamont is the greatest little town 
in the United States." 

To all of his work Mr. Morgan brings the western enthusiasm and energy with 
which he has been imbued from his childhood, for he is a native of Benton county, 
Oregon, his birth having there occurred on the 28th of February, 1869. His par- 
ents, Seth and Margaret (Hamilton) Morgan, came across the plains from Illinois 
in 1847 and settled in this state, the former engaging in stock-raising and ranch- 
ing. At the present writing he is a resident of The Dalles and is numbered 
among Oregon's honored pioneers. 

Daniel Morgan secured his early education in the public schools of Wasco 
county, Oregon, but the "wanderlust" caused him to run away from home in his 
boyhood days, after which he spent some time in visiting the early settlements 
in eastern Oregon. He learned the saddlery trade but felt that its scope was too 
limited to satisfy his ambtition and in 1880 he took up his abode in Oaksdale, 
Washington, with the intention of becoming an attorney. He read law in the 
office in that town for some time but became interested in the development of 
real estate and farm lands to which he devoted his entire attention. In that un- 
dertaking he was successful from the beginning, and recognizing its possibilities 
he began to look about him for a broader field in which to operate. In 1906 he 
came to the city of Spokane where he formed a partnership with George M. Col- 
born and at once proceeded to develop what is now known as the Colborn and 
Morgan tract. Success attended this enterprise and he then proceeded to the 
development of what is known as the Morgan acre tract, adjoining the city of 
Spokane. This was an innovation in the methods of development in this section 
and like all of his previous efforts was successful from the start. The tract was 
divided into acre lots and, being within easy reach of the city, offered a particu- 
larly attractive proposition to the prospective purchaser. He had no difficulty 
in readily disposing of the property and the owners, whose business took them to 
the city, found both remuneration and pleasure in cultivating their own crops. 

After disposing of the Morgan acre tract Mr. Morgan's next venture was that 
of promoting and building the town of Lamont to which reference has already 
been made. Aside from laying out, developing and building the city he is presi- 



60 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

dent of the Lamont State Bank which he organized soon after the establishment 
of the town. He is also president of the general mercantile firm of C. W. Hollis 
& Company, of Lamont, and is the owner of a thousand acre farm in Whitman 
county, which* is all under cultivation. 

On the 19th of November, 1892, Mr. Morgan was married to Miss Jessie May 
Smith, of Pendleton, Oregon, a stepdaughter of Thomas Winn, of that city. 
They have three children: Ray S., a graduate of the high school with the class 
of 19 JO, is president of the alumni and at the present time is assistant cashier of 
the Lamont State Bank. The father's idea is to train the boy in banking and 
finance and is satisfied from the showing already made by his son that he will 
make his mark' in the financial world before the lapse of many years. Mr. Mor- 
gan's other sons are: William Lloyd, a student, and Daniel, Jr. 

Mr. Morgan holds membership with the Knights of Pythias and has passed 
through all of the chairs of the local lodge. He is also a member of the Spokane 
Club, the Spokane Country Club and the Spokane Amateur Athletic Club. He 
belongs to the Chamber of Commerce and is interested in all of its projects and 
movements for the development and improvement of the city. He has lived too 
active a business life to become identified with politics and has merely exercised 
his right of franchise in going to the polls on election days. He is much interested 
in modern scientific farming and was recently elected one of the managing govern- 
ors of the International Dry Farming Congress. In this as in other things in his 
life he has studied the question from every possible standpoint and he is looking 
forward to large results which may be obtained through the scientific methods 
that are being introduced in the development of land where the rainfall is scant. 
His business activities have never been of narrow or restricted interests and re- 
sults but have always constituted elements in general progress and prosperity as 
well as of individual success. His life record illustrates in no uncertain manner 
what may be accomplished through individual effort without the assistance of fam- 
ily, friends or financial resources, and his life history proves that success is am- 
bition's answer. 



J. EUGENE ST. JEAN, M. D. 

Dr. St. Jean, the sole owner and manager of the Wallace Hospital, the largest 
institution of Ihe kind in the state of Idaho, was born at Adamsville, province of 
Quebec, Canada, on the 30th of May, 1875, his parents being Ludger and Sophia 
(Vautrim) St. Jean. 

Reared in his native land Dr. St. Jean after the completion of his preliminary 
education matriculated in the Laval University, at Montreal, where he pursued a 
medical course, being graduated with the degree of M. D. in 1896. VeTy soon 
thereafter he came to the United States, locating at Anaconda, Montana, where he 
engaged in practice for about a year, coming to Wallace in 1897. Dr. St. Jean 
readily built up a practice here, his winning personality and pleasing manner 
gaining him patients, whom he retained by reason of his skill and ability. In 1905 
he purchased the Wallace Hospital, a private institution, designed for the care and 
treatment of general medical and surgical cases. It contains accommodations for 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 61 

one hundred patients with operating room and laboratory of most modern equip- 
ment, and the most approved apparatus for the care and treatment of all cases 
likely to come under supervision. There is a large corps of the city's most skilful 
surgeons and physicians and eleven permanent nurses on the staff, and he also 
maintains a registered training school for nurses. Dr. St. Jean has a branch re- 
ceiving hospital at Warden, under the direction of Dr. T. R. Mason, and another 
at Burke in charge of Dr. Charles A. Dettman. In addition to his large private 
practice he is surgeon for the Federal Mining & Smelting Company, Frisco Min- 
ing Company, Hecla Mining Company, Success Mining Company, Pittsburg Lead 
Mining Company, Gold Hunter Mining & Smelting Company, Beartop Mining 
Company, Black Horse Mining Company, Caledonia Mining Company, Stewart 
Mining Company, Jack Waite Mining Company, Lead Silver Mining Company, 
Roanoke Mining Company, Rose Lake Lumber Company, and several minor com- 
panies, all located in the Coeur d'Alene district. As the county has no regular hos- 
pital it maintains a ward in the Wallace Hospital for its indigent patients. 

Dr. St. Jean was married on the 18th of February, 1901, to Miss Phedora Na- 
deau, a daughter of J. A. Nadeau, a large real-estate owner and prominent citizen 
of Butte, Montana. 

Dr. and Mrs. St. Jean are communicants of the Roman Catholic church, and 
he also belongs to the Knights of Columbus of Wallace, and the Elks, being a 
member of Wallace Lodge, No. 331, B. P. O. £., while his membership in or- 
ganizations of a more purely social nature is confined to his affiliation with the 
Inland Club of Spokane. He keeps in touch with his fellow practitioners through 
the medium of his connection with the American Medical Association, North Idaho 
Medical Association and the Kootenai, Bonner and Shoshone Counties Medical 
Society. Dr. St. Jean has rapidly come to the front during the fourteen years 
of his residence in Wallace and is, like the majority of people in this vicinity, in- 
terested in a number of mining companies. He is meeting with the most gratifying 
success both in his private practice and in the management of his hospital, and 
owing to his skill both as a surgeon and physician is acquiring far more than a 
local reputation. 



ARTHUR L. PORTER. 



Arthur L. Porter is the secretary of the Western Lumberman's Association with 
headquarters in Spokane. For the past twelve years he has been connected with the 
lumber trade, giving him a wide acquaintance with the business in all of its various 
phases, while from his broad experience he has derived the power that enables him 
to carefully and successfully direct important interests. He was born in Muscatine, 
Iowa, July 14, 1873, his parents being George W. and Laura A. (Van Buren) Porter. 
His father was at one time business manager of the Muscatine News-Tribune and 
after a long connection with that paper is now conducting a job-printing office of his 
own in that city. 

In Muscatine, Arthur L. Porter obtained his education in the public schools and 
when he had put aside his text-books, secured employment in a wholesale grocery 
house after which he was connected with the Muscatine Oatmeal Company for a 



62 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

• 

number of years, having charge of its sales department in seven states. He next 
entered the employ of the Roach & Musser Sash and Door Company in the capacity 
of confidential clerk to Mr. Roach, taking charge of the outside investments. In the 
spring of 1902 he was sent to Spokane as treasurer of the Musser Lumber Company, 
with which concern he continued until the organization of the Western Retail Lum- 
berman's Association in 1903. At the outset he was elected secretary and has con- 
tinuously served in that capacity, having active voice in the management and 
direction of the business and bringing to bear, in the solution of its complex prob- 
lems, the knowledge gained from long experience in the lumber trade. On the 1st 
of January, 1904, he organized a mutual insurance company for retail lumbermen 
only. This was incorporated under the name of the Lumbermen's Mutual Society 
and the business of the company now covers the entire northwest with Mr. Porter 
as secretary, treasurer and general manager. They have been largely instrumental in 
directing lumbermen to Spokane and their business has constantly developed from a 
small beginning until it has assumed extensive proportions. They now have over one 
thousand lumber yards, represented with an insurance of over four million five hun- 
dred thousand dollars, with a surplus of more than forty thousand dollars. 

On the 16th of May, 1899, Mr. Porter was united in marriage at Muscatine, Iowa, 
to Miss Ellen D. Roach, a daughter of William M. and Sarah Roach, of that place. 
Mr. Porter became a member of the Masonic lodge in Muscatine and holds member- 
ship in the Spokane Club, Lumberman's Club and the Hoo Hoos, an organization of 
lumbermen. Throughout his life his attention and activities have largely been con- 
centrated upon his business. He is not a man of precarious genius and therefore 
liable to erratic movements which often result in unwarranted risk or failure. He 
is, however, persistent and determined, correctly valuing his own capacities and pow- 
ers and accurately judging of life's contacts and experiences. These qualities have 
made him a strong factor in the department of business upon which he has con- 
centrated his efforts. 



HARRY M. HOWARD. 



While yet a comparatively young man, there are few residents of Spokane more 
familiar with its history through the period of almost its entire development than 
is Harry M. Howard. His early experiences made it particularly easy for him to 
know all there was to be known concerning Spokane, and with an observing eye 
and retentive memory he has watched the changes that have occurred and can relate 
in interesting manner the story of events which have left a deep impress upon the 
history of the city. He is now engaged in the real-estate business, with offices in 
the Exchange Bank building, but difficult and strenuous effort was required to 
bring him to his present enviable position among the substantial and successful 
business men of the city. 

He was but eleven years of age when he came to Spokane with his parents, 
Martin J. and Jennie D. (Leach) Howard. The father was a building contractor, 
who in 1883 left the old home in Wisconsin and came with his family to the terri- 
tory of Washington. Here in company with Frank A. Johnson the father erected 
the first pretentious business structures of Spokane. They were associated in the 



H. M. HOWARD 






Aj T w *< 






SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 65 

erection of the Frankfort block and Mr. Howard also built the Pacific Hotel and the 
residence of J. J. Browne, now occupied by R. E. Strahorn. The father, however, 
was not long permitted to enjoy his new home, in Spokane, his death occurring here 
in 1886. The journey westward was a most interesting one to the boy, who noted 
with keen zest all points upon the way. There were two feet of snow on the ground 
when the family left Wisconsin in December and they arrived in Spokane to find 
the air balmy, with no sign of snow. Through the succeeding five winters snow was 
an almost unknown thing here, but great climatic changes have occurred in this 
region. 

Harry M. Howard continued his education, begun in Wisconsin, as a student 
in the public schools of this city, but had been here for only a brief period when 
he started in the business world, becoming delivery boy for the grocery firm of D. 
B. Ide & Son, then located at the corner of First and Howard streets. At that 
time Howard was the principal street of Spokane, with a few cross streets extend- 
ing to the Northern Pacific Railroad. The place was more of a trading post than 
a well established town and was visited frequently by groups of men in buckskin 
clothing, belted with cartridges and knives. All of the north side of the city was 
laid out in farms and the three grocery dealers of the town refused to deliver goods 
into the wilderness, in the district at what is now Broadway and Monroe streets, 
unless an order for thirty dollars' worth had been given. For a year and a half 
Mr. Howard remained with the grocery firm and then began selling the Daily 
Chronicle on the streets of the city. He met all of the trains — there were two each 
day — and had no difficulty in disposing of his papers, because there was then a 
heavy immigration and people wished to know something of 1 the country into which 
they were coming. The paper sold for ten or fifteen cents. After a time Mr. How- 
ard purchased the exclusive right for the Chronicle circulation, employing two boys 
to help him to deliver and sell papers and thus laid the foundation for his later 
success not only in the profits that accrued but in the business experience which he 
gained and in the knowledge of the city which he acquired, his alert, receptive mind 
enabling him to thoroughly appreciate the situation and its opportunities. After a 
year in the newspaper field he was employed as night clerk in the Western Union 
office under A. D. Campbell, and later he returned to the grocery business. At the 
time of the great fire he managed to save a half wagon load of groceries for his 
employer, who was absent from the city. The years of his youth thus passed in 
earnest, unremitting toil, and at the age of seventeen he entered the mail service, 
being one of the city's first four mail carriers, his route being all the district west 
of Post street. Three years' service had brought him to the position of superintend- 
ent of carriers, his service being virtually that of assistant postmaster. He was 
afterward for ten months in charge of the mail on a steamer between Seattle and 
Whatcom, but with the exception of this brief interval he has resided continuously 
in Spokane since his arrival here in 1883. Later he was again engaged in the gro- 
cery business for a period and then became bookkeeper in a laundry, leaving that 
employ to establish a collection agency, which gradually developed in its scope until 
he entered the real-estate field. He was first employed as a salesman by a real- 
estate firm at a salary of eighty dollars per month. He noted, however, the profits 
that were made in this business and resolved that his labors should more directly 
benefit himself. Accordingly he opened a real-estate office and has since engaged 
in the purchase and sale of property, becoming recognized as one of the foremost 



66 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

real-estate men of the city. He is now disposing of a tract containing six hundred 
lots, on which he has placed improvements to the amount of one hundred and eight- 
een thousand dollars. He also has a side interest which produces a substantial reve- 
nue, having in 1907 purchased a fruit and chicken ranch of ten acres, on which is 
found one of the oldest orchards in this part of the state. The place is about a half 
mile north of the city limits. The orchard is planted to cherries and was set out 
about twenty-two years ago. In 1911 one tree produced five hundred and forty 
pounds of cherries. On the chicken ranch are about fifteen hundred blooded chick- 
ens and eggs are sold only for breeding, while to some extent business is done in 
the sale of broilers. This place, splendidly equipped in every particular, is called 
the Sunny side Poultry Farm. 

On the 10th of August, 1893, Mr. Howard was united in marriage to Miss Tena 
R. Muhs, a daughter of John and Marie (Masonbrink) Muhs, of Spokane county. 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard have two children, Montague J. and Burdette A., who are 
attending school and reside with their parents in a beautiful home at 03405 Audu- 
bon Drive, which Mr. Howard erected in 1910. He belongs to the Chamber of 
Commerce and also holds membership in Mount Carlton Lodge, No. 103, I. O. 
O. F., Beta Camp of the Woodmen of the World and the Independent Order of 
Foresters. Because of his long residence in Spokane, his activity in business and 
a naturally social nature he has a very extensive acquaintance. His record indi- 
cates that after all no matter what the advantages furnished by the schools or early 
environment each individual must formulate, determine and shape his own character 
and career. This Mr. Howard has done and through careful utilization of oppor- 
tunities has steadily progressed to a prominent position in business circles. 



HON. WILLIAM H. PLUMMER. 

Whatever else may be said of the legal fraternity it cannot be denied that mem- 
bers of the bar have been more prominent actors in public affairs than any other 
class of the community. This is but a natural result of causes which are manifest 
and require no explanation. The ability and training which qualify one to practice 
law also qualify him in many respects for duties which lie outside the strict path 
of his profession and which touch the best interests of society. Holding a position 
of precedence among the members of the bar of Spokane, William H. Plummer has 
also been prominent in political circles in the state and has served as a member of 
the Washington senate. 

His birth occurred in New England, for he is a native of Westboro, Massachu- 
setts, born August 19, 1870. His parents were John D. and Sarah Plummer, the 
father a shoe manufacturer at Westboro, in which city the son spent his boyhood 
and youth. His early education was supplemented by a course in the State Normal 
school at Cortland, New York, and Cornell University, and he made preparation 
for the bar as a student in the law office of Warren & Kellogg, of Cortland. He 
has resided west of the Mississippi since 1888, in which year he settled at Albu- 
querque, New Mexico, and was later admitted to the bar there. He had not yet 
found the location which he sought, however, and in 1889 he came to the northwest, 
establishing his home in Colfax, Whitman county, Washington, where he opened an 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 67 

office for the general practice of law, which he followed in that city and in Farm- 
ington for three years. In the spring of 1892 he came to Spokane and feels that 
he has no desire to make another change of residence, for here he has found business 
opportunities which he sought, and the proof of his ability as a lawyer is seen in 
the large and growing clientage accorded him. In 1895 he became corporation 
counsel for the city and filled that position for two years. In 1896 he was elected 
to represent his district in the state senate as a candidate of the silver party and 
served for four years in the upper house of the general assembly, during which pe- 
riod he was elected president pro tern to preside over the senate, and also pre- 
sided over the joint session of the house and senate. He was likewise chairman of 
the judiciary committee of the senate and in that as in other connections he did 
important work for the state. In politics he is a republican, well versed in the ques- 
tions and issues of the day, and his advocacy of the party has been an element in 
its growth and success. 

On the 3d of November, 1909, Mr. Plummer was married to Miss Verna L. 
Charest, a daughter of Dumas and Idell Charest, of Phillipsburg, Montana. He has 
attained high rank in Masonry, having taken the thirty-second degree of the Scot- 
tish Rite, and he also belongs to El Katif Temple of the Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. He has likewise membership connections with the Knights of Pythias, the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Spokane Club. He is now concen- 
trating his energies upon his profession and while undoubtedly he is not without 
that honorable ambition which is so powerful and useful as an incentive to activity 
in public affairs, he regards the pursuits of private life as being in themselves abun- 
dantly worthy of his best efforts and he gives to his clients the benefit of marked 
talent, broad learning and unwearied industry. 



LOUIS G. KELLER. 



The beneficial effect of a sound education when it is backed by a worthy ambition 
is clearly illustrated in the lives of many of the most, successful men of America. A 
younger generation is now coming upon the stage and it is the opinion of competent 
authorities that as time passes these young men will be able to give a good account 
of their stewardship. In the class designated is Louis G. Keller, who is now en- 
gaged in the hardware business at Colville. He was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, Sep- 
tember 5, 1881, a son of Louis E. and Louisa (Brunswick) Keller. The mother 
died in 1889, but the father is still living and has reached the age of fifty-seven 
years. There is fighting blood in the family, as is indicated by the fact that the 
grandfather of our subject was a soldier in the Mexican war. 

Louis G. Keller received his preliminary education in the public schools of his 
native city and later entered Woodward high school, from which he was graduated 
in 1900. In July of the same year Mr. Keller came to Spokane, Washington, and 
a short time afterward went to the Big Ben country, where he was employed for a 
year in a general mercantile store owned by his uncle. He attended the University 
of Colorado for one year and at the end of that time returned to the Big Ben coun^ 
try and took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres. After two more years 
of attendance at the University of Colorado he was graduated, receiving the degree 



68 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

of LL. B. in 1905, and in the same year he was admitted to the bar of Colorado. 
However, he believed that eastern Washington presented superior advantages and 
he engaged in the real-estate business at Spokane for one year,, at the same time 
recuperating his health. He spent a year in the Big Ben country and in 1907 lo- 
cated at Colville and associated in the hardware business with a Mr. Stannus, under 
the firm title of the Stannus Keller Hardware Company. The members of the firm 
are energetic and competent and the patronage has increased from year to year, the 
business now being one of the most flourishing of the kind in the country. Mr. 
Keller in addition to his investment in the store is the owner of ten acres of land 
near Colville and one hundred and sixty acres in the Big Ben country. 

Politically he has ever since he reached manhood supported the republican 
party and in 1910 was a member of the republican county central committee. Fra- 
ternally he is connected with the Masonic order and the Knights of Pythias, and 
he is also a member of the Phi Delta Theta college fraternity. He takes great 
interest in the promotion of all movements for advancing the welfare of the com- 
munity and is a valued member of the Colville Chamber of Commerce, of which 
he was president in 1910. While attending school he was a cadet and in his senior 
year was elected captain, which is considered the highest honor that can be be- 
stowed upon any pupil in that institution. Judging by what he has accomplished, 
the confidence of his young companions was not misplaced and Mr. Keller can ap- 
parently look forward to a constantly widening field of endeavor. From the outset 
of his active business life he has steadily progressed and the high esteem in which 
he is held by the people of this section is convincing evidence of his personal worth. 



ALBERT LAURANCE FLEWELLING. 

Albert Laurance Flewelling was born in a log house on a small farm near the 
town of Hanover, Michigan, October 26, 1861. His father, Abram P. Flewelling, 
was of sturdy Welsh stock, tracing his ancestry back to the last king of Wales. His 
mother, whose maiden name was Rosana Sprague, was of Scotch-Irish parentage 
dating back to the early settlement of America before the Revolution.' 

The early life of A. L. Flewelling was spent on a farm near Lansing, Michigan. 
He was educated in the public schools, and at an early age he began school teaching. 
At the same time he began reading law, spending his vacations and spare time in a 
law office. He was admitted to the bar in open court in the month of November, 
1886, and the next spring he began the active practice of law at Crystal Falls, 
Michigan, in the heart of the great Lake Superior iron district. During his early 
practice he became identified with a number of the strongest mining companies of 
the district and later was associated with Corrigan-McKinney & Company of Cleve- 
land, Ohio, who at that time were the largest independent producers of iron ore in 
America, and for fifteen years immediately preceding the year 1906 he was General 
Counsel for that concern and acquired for himself through training he received by 
reason of his affiliations a large amount of mineral lands in Michigan, which he 
still owns. 

In March, 1906, Mr. Flewelling came to Spokane as general manager of the 
Monarch Timber Company of Idaho and the Continental Timber Company of 



A. L. HEWKI,l,IX(i 



Ji O U —A w •— . J L- . i U 1 



1 m'**, U *•'. * 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 71 

Washington and purchased the home which he now occupies at 2120 Riverside ave- 
nue. Under his management these companies purchased very large tracts of tim- 
ber land in the Panhandle of Idaho and in northwestern Washington and when the 
holdings of these companies were purchased by the Milwaukee Land Company Mr. 
Fie welling became and still is the vice president and general manager of the last 
named company, with its principal western office in the Old National Bank Build- 
ing in Spokane. 

Mr. Fie welling is a republican in politics and a thirty-second degree Mason, a 
member of the Spokane Club and the Spokane Country Club and also the Ranier 
Club and the Arctic Club of Seattle. He is director in the Spokane & Eastern Trust 
Company and the Union Trust & Savings Bank of Spokane. 

On May 10, 1887, Mr. Flewelling was married to Lottie A. Weatherwax, who is 
also an attorney, and for many years was associated with her husband in active 
legal work. They have only one child, a daughter, born in 1888, Eethel F. Sander- 
son, wife of C. B. Sanderson, now living in Spokane. 



BYRON N. WHITE. 



A glance at the history of past centuries will indicate at once what would be 
the condition of the world if the mining interests no longer -had a part in the indus- 
trial and commercial life. Only a few centuries ago agriculture was almost the only 
occupation of man. A landed proprietor surrounded himself'' with his tenants and 
his serfs, who tilled his broad fields, while he reaped the reward of their labors; 
but when the rich mineral resources of the workr wef e 'placed upon the market, in- 
dustry found its way into new and broader fields, minerals were used in the pro- 
duction of hundreds of inventions and business conditions were revolutionized. When 
considering these facts we can in a measure determine the value bestowed upon man- 
kind by the mining industry. Byron N. White is numbered among those who are 
connected with the development of the rich mineral resources of the northwest. He 
▼as born in Ontario, Canada, June 7, 1851, a son of John M. and Elizabeth White, 
who removed to northern Michigan when their son Byron was about three years of 
age. The father there engaged in mining and other business enterprises. He was 
a millwright by trade and also built concentrators. 

His son, Byron N. White, attended such schools as the district afforded and at 
the age of thirteen years began work in the mines. In 1870 Mr. White was engaged 
in mining in Colorado placer gold mines, and remained for a year. He became with 
Mr. Angus Smith, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, interested in the opening and one of the 
owners of the Aragon mine, an iron-bearing property on the Menominee range, and 
was manager of the company for about two years. He next opened and developed 
the Smith mine on the Crystal Falls range, which was also an iron-bearing property 
and was owned by Angus Smith. Mr. White continued his operations on the copper 
and iron range and was very successful. In the winter of 1891 he came west to 
spend the winter months on the coast and escape the severe climate of northern 
Michigan. With a mind appreciative of every opportunity, while looking around 
he became interested in the Slocan Star mine, located at San don, British Columbia, 
and with a syndicate purchased this property for the Byron N. White Company. 



Tfti n- 



72 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

He is the president and general manager of the company, and the results of their 
operations are too well known to need special comment or commendation. He is 
also president and general manager of the Yukon-Pueblo mines in Alaska, where he 
spends a part of his time. In Spokane he is one of the directors of the Exchange 
National Bank. 

Mr. White is a member of all the different branches of Masonry, including the 
Mystic Shrine, and also belongs to the Spokane Amateur Athletic Club. He is now 
well known as one of the capitalists of the city whose operations in the mining 
districts of the west have been an element of public progress and prosperity as well 
as of individual success. 



LAWRENCE L. LEWIS. 



By dint of unremitting application, always bearing in mind the remote goal to 
which he was tending, Lawrence L. Lewis has patiently mounted the ladder round 
upon round' until he stands today a recognized factor in western educational circles, 
and a prominent member of the Idaho bar. A native of Illinios, he was born in 
Marion, Williamson county, November 30, 1870, his parents being William T., and 
Anne Ary (Howell) Lewis. After the usual grammar and high-school education 
he attended Valparaiso University, at Valparaiso, Indiana, and was graduated from 
that institution in 1894, receiving the degree of B. S. He then entered the teaching 
profession accepting the position of principal of the high school in his native town, 
and remained ther« one year, returning to Valparaiso University for post-graduate 
study, remaining until January 1, 1896. He then departed for the west, arriving 
in Heppner, Oregon, on April 13, 1896, and made his residence in that locality dur- 
ing the summer of that year. Being elected to the position of superintendent of 
schools in Pendleton, Oregon, he removed thither, teaching school during the ensu- 
ing year. By this time Mr. Lewis had already established for himself the reputa- 
tion of being a progressive educator, well prepared for "his work and energetic and 
determined in the execution of his duties, and was thereupon called to take the chair 
at the head of the science department in the Eastern Oregon State Normal school at 
Weston, Oregon. This position he filled with much credit to himself and to the 
permanent benefit of the school, since his liberal policy in the organization of the 
department of science and the thoroughly modern equipment which he was largely 
instrumental in securing, have advanced the reputation of the school in no small 
degree. 

From the time when he made his earliest plans in regard to the future Mr. 
Lewis had in mind ultimately to enter the law as his profession, and being at length 
prepared to gratify his desire, he left Weston, Oregon, and entered the law school 
of the University of Michigan in the fall of 1899, receiving his -degree of LL. B. 
in 1902. He then returned to the west where his services in the educational field 
were again needed, and in 1903 he founded the high school at Canyon City, Grant 
county, Oregon, teaching there during the years 1903-4 and 1904-5. He holds a 
life diploma as a teacher from the state of Oregon, and is vitally interested in the 
problems of modern education and the development of the school system in the 
state of his adoption. In February, 1906, he took up the practice of law, beginning 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 73 

his career in Baker City, Oregon. On July 8th, of the same year, he came to Coeur 
d'Alene, Idaho, where he opened a law office and established a practice which has 
been steadily increasing in scope and importance. In 1907 he was appointed by 
United States District Judge Frank S. Dietrich the referee in bankruptcy for the 
county of Kootenai, state of Idaho. Mr. Lewis, who is a member of the bar of the 
supreme courts of Michigan, Oregon and Idaho, and also of the United States 
courts, has built up his reputation in the law by his conscientious regard for the 
ethics of his profession quite as much as by his excellent handling of the cases 
entrusted to him and his vigilance in safeguarding the interests of his clients. 

In his political views Mr. Lewis is a conservative, being a republican of the old 
school, and in fraternal circles he is connected with the Masonic order, holding 
membership in Weston Lodge No. 65, F. & A. M., Weston, Oregon, and Blue Moun- 
tain Chapter, No. 7, R. A. M., of Canyon City, Oregon. He is also identified with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows through Weston Lodge No. 58. As one of 
the prominent residents of Coeur d'Alene he takes an active interest in the civic 
welfare of his community and also in the advancement of its commercial growth, 
supporting financially and with his encouragement every measure that will con- 
tribute to the public good. 



DON F. KIZER. 



In the eight years of his connection with the bar Don F. Kizer has made substan- 
tial progress and is now practicing as partner of the firm of Pugh & Kizer. He is 
yet a young man but the position which he has attained as a member of the legal 
fraternity might well be envied by many an older practitioner. He was born at 
Paris, Ohio, August 28, 1880, a son of Frank and Mary Kizer of that city, who in 
the year 1 890 brought their family to Spokane. The father became prominent as a 
leader in the republican party here and served as city commissioner under Mayor 
Powell, filling the office from 1892 until 1894 inclusive. His death occurred in 
Spokane in 1900. 

At the usual age Don F. Kizer had begun his education in the public schools of 
Ohio and following the removal to Spokane continued his studies here until he 
entered upon preparation for the bar as a student in the State University of Michi- 
gan at Ann Arbor. He was graduated with the class of 1904 and the same year was 
admitted to practice in the courts of Washington. Soon afterward he was appointed 
deputy prosecuting attorney under R. M. Barnhart and served as chief deputy 
under F. C. Pugh, retiring from the office on the 81st of December, 1910. On the 
following day he entered into partnership relations with Mr. Pugh in forming the 
present firm of Pugh & Kizer, and they have already gained a clientage that places 
them in a satisfactory position among the representatives of the Spokane bar. Mr. 
Kizer is also the vice president of the Armstrong Machinery Company, manufactur- 
ers of ice machines and refrigerating machinery, one of the largest plants west of 
the Mississippi river. 

On the 12th of October, 1905, occurred the marriage of Mr. Kizer and Miss May 
Edith Armstrong, a daughter of the late Major James M. and Lida B. Armstrong, 
of this city. They now have one child, Edith, born April 12, 1907. Mr. Kizer is 



74 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

not a club man nor is he associated with fraternities. He votes with the republican 
party and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day, but otherwise 
concentrates his energies upon his professional duties and is most devoted to the in- 
terests of his clients. He spares no labor in the preparation of his case and enters 
the court well fortified for defense as well as attack. 



GILBERT B. IDE. 



One of the most active and useful citizens of Colville is Gilbert B. Ide, whose 
name introduces this sketch. This position he has earned by his untiring interest 
in promoting the growth of his adopted town and his willingness at all times to as- 
sist in advancing the welfare of his county and state. Few men in eastern Wash- 
ington have been as successful in attracting the attention to the advantages of this 
portion of the state as a place of residence or business. He was born in Marquette 
county, Wisconsin, January 27, 1856, a son of Frederick and Atlanta (Glover) Ide. 
The parents were pioneers of Wisconsin, arriving in that state from Massachusetts 
and Vermont respectively. One of their sons gave his life in defense of the Union 
at the time of the Civil war, being a member of the Twenty-fifth Wisconsin Infan- 
try. The father died in 1898 and the mother passed away four years later. 

Gilbert B. Ide received his early education in the public schools of his native 
state and subsequently attended Durand Academy in Pepin county for two years. 
He assisted his father on the home farm until twenty-three years of age and then, 
in 1880, emigrated to this state. For one year he engaged in farming in the Palouse 
country and then took up his residence in Spokane, where he was identified with 
the livery business. In 1885 he came to Colville and built the Columbia livery stable, 
which he conducted for one year. The following year he was elected sheriff of 
Stevens county and was reelected two years later, serving for two terms to the 
general satisfaction of the people regardless of their political affiliations. .He also 
was ex-officio assessor of the county form 1888 to 1890. In 1898 he purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres of land near Colville and at intervals until 1899 gave his 
attention to farming. He opened the Colville Hotel in 1892 but was forced to close 
his place in 1 898, at the time of the panic. In 1 899 he entered the real-estate busi- 
ness with his father-in-law, Jacob Stitzel, and has ever since been closely identified 
with this line, displaying judgment and discrimination which have met with merited 
recompense. 

On the 80th of January, 1889, Mr. Ide was married to Mrs. Kathrine (Stitzel) 
Backus, and to this union six children have been born, namely, Marjorie, Mary, 
Jessie, Martha, Fred and Lilian. The father of Mrs. Ide is now deceased. He was 
a prominent member of the community and at the time of his death was United 
States land commissioner. This office is now filled by Mrs. Ide. 

Politically Mr. Ide gives his support to the republican party, of which he is an 
earnest advocate. He filled the office of chairman of the republican county central 
committee from 1888 to 1890 and in 1889 was a delegate to the republican state 
convention at Tacoma. He has also attended several county conventions in a simi- 
lar capacity and has at all times shown the interest of a patriotic citizen in the elec- 
tion of competent men to office. Fraternally he is connected with the Masonic order, 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 75 

being past master of Colville lodge, and he also belongs to the Woodmen of the 
World. He is an active member of the Chamber of Commerce and is first vice 
president of the Federation of Commercial Clubs of Stevens county. He was instru- 
mental in the establishment of the county fair grounds and was manager of the 
county fairs for ten years, until 1910, when he resigned. He was also commissioner 
from Stevens county for the Alaska- Yukon Exposition and was superintendent of 
exhibits for the county during the period of the exposition, accomplishing much 
good in securing settlers for this region. He has met with deserved success in his 
business and, as he possesses a genial and companionable nature and has been 
faithful in the discharge of every duty, either public or private, it may be truly 
said of him that he represents the substantial citizenship of Stevens county. 



ALBERT VICTOR CHAMBERLIN. 

Albert Victor Chamberlin was the founder of the American Trust Company of 
Coeur d'Alene, of which he has been secretary and treasurer and also manager ever 
since its organization. To Mr. Chamberlin likewise belongs the distinction of being 
the first man to come into the town with outside money, for the purpose of reviving 
and stimulating the commercial and industrial interests of the community. 

A native of Ohio, bis birth occurred in the city of Cleveland on July 15, 1871, 
his parents being Anson Bartlett and Martha Melissa (Bishop) Chamberlin. The 
father was for many years in the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
Railroad, having been ticket agent at Milwaukee for over forty years, but he is now 
living retired. In the maternal line, Albert V. Chamberlin traces his ancestry back 
to Oliver Cromwell, his grandfather, one of Ohio's pioneers, being a direct de- 
scendant of the founder of the British commonwealth. 

In the acquirement of his education Albert Victor Chamberlin attended the 
common schools, completing his course in the high schools of Milwaukee and Min- 
neapolic. Feeling that he was qualified to commence the heavier responsibilities 
of life, at the age of seventeen years he laid aside his text-books and began his 
business career. His first position was in a bank in Minneapolis, where for eighteen 
months he discharged the duties of a clerk with efficiency and intelligence. He 
subsequently become bookkeeper and accountant for a railroad company in Milwau- 
kee, withdrawing to take the position of sales manager for a lumber company in 
northern Michigan. In 1893 he decided to see what the western coast offered to a 
man of bis capabilities and located at Seattle, where he remained for two years. 
At the expiration of that time he returned to the middle west, remaining there 
until 1899. In the latter year he came to Coeur d'Alene and organized the Gun- 
derson & Chamberlin Lumber Company, purchasing the McFarland sawmill. A 
few months later he disposed of the enterprise to the Coeur d'Alene Lumber Com- 
pany, whose plant is now located on the site of the old McFarland mill. Mr. 
Chamberlin then turned his attention to the real-estate and insurance business, 
which proved to be very remunerative, and in 1906 organized the American Trust 
Company, ever since devoting the greater part of his energies to its its development. 
He still has some valuable property interests in the state and he also owns some 
timber lands in Oregon. When the Exchange National Bank of this city was or- 



76 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

■ 

ganlzed he was appointed cashier, and for a time he was also one of the directors 
of this institution. He has always been one of the enterprising and progressive 
citizens of the town, the population of which numbered only between three and 
four hundred when he first located here, and has been officially identified with va- 
rious thriving activities. 

Mr. Chamberlin was united in marriage on the 24th of December, 1896, to Miss 
Daisy H. M oiler, a daughter of C. F. J. M oiler, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for many 
years the Danish consul at that point. They have become the parents of four chil- 
dren, as follows: Galord, whose birth occurred in 1898; Frederick Bishop, whose 
natal day was in 1900; and Will Mathews and Martha Virginia, twins, who were 
born in 1903. The Chamberlin home, which is one of the social centers of the com- 
munity, is located at No. 1017 Fourth street, this city. 

Fraternally Mr. Chamberlin is identified with the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica, and for the past nine years has been clerk of the local camp. He is also a 
thirty-second degree Mason and is affiliated with the Idaho Consistory, No. 3, S. P. R. 
S. A. A. and El Katif Temple, Spokane. He has but recently been appointed master 
council of Kodash and is a trustee of the Masonic Temple Association. Political 
activities have always engaged much of Mr. Chamberlin's attention and during the 
entire period of his residence here he has been connected with the government of 
the city. For four terms he represented his ward in the council, and acted for a 
while as justice of the peace, while he was mayor for three years, assuming the re- 
sponsibilities of this office in 1901. That he has discharged his duties with efficiency 
is manifested by the length of his term. His support is always given to the men 
and measures of the republican party and he has several times been state commit- 
teeman. As he has high standards regarding the duties and responsibilities of 
citizenship, Mr. Chamberlin always finds the time to advance the interests of the com- 
munity by assisting in promoting any movement that he feels will advance the 
welfare of the majority of the inhabitants. He is an enthusiastic member of the 
Commercial Club, and is most zealous in his efforts on its behalf. At the present 
time he is a member of the board of directors of this organization and he is also 
treasurer and a director of the Coeur d'Alene Merchants Association, while his 
connection with organizations of a more purely social nature is confined to his mem- 
bership in the Inland Club of Spokane. Success has attended the efforts of Mr. 
Chamberlin since he located in Coeur d'Alene and he is a man who would be an 
acquisition to any community, not only because of his disinterested public services, 
but because of the capable and intelligent manner in which he directs any enterprise 
with which he is connected, the strength and progress of any town depending 
upon the resourcefulness and sagacity of its business men. 



JAMES M. COMSTOCK. 



James M. Comstock, whose life history constitutes a most creditable chapter in 
the trade annals of Spokane, is now well known in business circles here, as vice 
president of the Spokane Dry Goods Company and president of the Dry Goods 
Realty Company. It may seem trite to those familiar with his life history to say 
that he has advanced from a humble position to one of prominence in the business 



JAMES M. COMSTOCK 



' ' li I i 



L 



-V <,*r 






SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 79 

world, but it is only just to record in a history that will descend to future genera- 
tions, that his has been a record which any man might be proud to possess. He 
has never made engagements that he has not kept, nor incurred obligations that he 
has not met, and his record at all times commands the admiration and respect of 
colleagues and contemporaries. 

Mr. Comstock is numbered among the worthy citizens that New York has fur- 
nished to the state of Washington, his birth occurring in Rome, September 6, 1888, 
and in 1846, he accompanied his parents, George and Eliza (Paine) Comstock, on 
their removal to Wisconsin, which at that time was largely an undeveloped wilderness. 
The family settled in Summit township, Waukesha county, and there amid the usual 
scenes and conditions of pioneer life James M. Comstock was reared, pursuing his 
early education in the district schools and aiding in the work of the home 
farm through the summer months. He later had the advantage of educational train- 
ing in Carroll College at Waukesha and when the Civil war broke out he enlisted in 
the First Wisconsin Cavalry, which he joined on the 14th of August, 1861, his ser- 
vice covering three and one-half years. He went to the front as a private and was 
mastered out with the rank of captain. He did duty as provost marshal on the staff 
of General E. M. McCook, of the First Division Cavalry Corps, Army of the Cum- 
berland, at the battle of Chickamauga. Later he participated in the winter campaign 
in eastern Tennessee, in which fighting occurred nearly every day. In February, 
1864, he was sent with about two hundred and fifty. men^ from east Tennessee over 
the Blue Ridge mountains into the valley *«f Hh^ " Hi wassee river to the town 
of Murphy, located in the southwestern pa-rfcoi Ntofli -Carolina, and from there he 
was sent to old Fort Hembries for the purpose of gathering up Confederates on fur- 
lough. The command then returned to easJL Tennessee and joined Sherman's army 
on the campaign to Atlanta and remained »w1£h' tl&fc' eoimmtod until the surrender of 
Atlanta. During this campaign he participated in the battles of Buzzards Roost, 
Resaca, Dallas, Kenesaw Mountain and Peach Tree Creek. He accompanied Gen- 
eral McCook on his raid to the rear of Atlanta and after that movement was com- 
missioned by General George H. Thomas to return to Nashville, Tennessee, and re- 
oganize, mount and equip all of the dismounted cavalry to be found in that locality. 
He had succeeded in getting about two hundred men when the Confederate general, 
Joe Wheeler, came up to a point within six miles of Nashville and for a period of 
twenty days kept the whode northern force chasing him until they finally succeeded 
in driving him across the Tennessee river. Mr. Comstock's command then returned 
to Nashville but shortly afterward the Confederates, under the command of General 
Forrest, made another raid into the southern portion of the state and again the Union 
troops drove them back into Alabama. Mr. Comstock next rejoined his regiment at 
Cartersville, Georgia, whence he was sent to Louisville, Kentucky, where the term of 
his enlistment expired in December, 1864. He then returned to his Wisconsin home 
and in January, 1865, reenlisted and was recommissioned captain of Company F of 
the First Wisconsin Cavalry. He then went to Nashville but was unable to join his 
regiment, which was on campaign duty in Alabama and Georgia. 

When mustered out at the close of the war Captain Comstock settled at Ocono- 
mowoc, Wisconsin, where he carried on general merchandising until 1 87*2. He then 
removed to Algona, Iowa, and continued in that business for eighteen years, during 
which period he took a very prominent part in the affairs of the city, serving for a 



80 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

number of years as a member of its council, while for one term he filled the office 
of mayor. He also acted as a member of the school board until he left Iowa, about 
1 890, and was for years president of the Northern Iowa Normal school, which was 
located at Algona. 

Mr. Comstock first visited Spokane in 1884 as the guest of A. M. Horton, who 
was then editor of The Chronicle. In January, 1889, he again reached this city, 
arriving at about 11 o'clock in the morning. Before 4 o'clock in the after- 
noon of the same day he had purchased property on Main street, having deter- 
mined to locate permanently. In July of the same year he returned here, bringing 
with him R. B. Patterson, with whom he had formed a partnership under the firm 
style of Comstock & Patterson. They opened a retail dry-goods store, renting a 
room in the Crescent building, on Riverside avenue, just east of the Review build- 
ing. Their entire stock was placed in the new building on the evening of August 3, 
1889, and on the next day the entire business section of the city was destroyed by 
fire. The flames advanced to within a block of their new store and were there 
checked, leaving the establishment of Comstock & Patterson as the only dry-goods 
store in the city. The business grew very rapidly, the firm prospering in their 
undertakings, and as the country developed they extended the scope of their ac- 
tivities by the establishment of a wholesale department. In 1904 the Spokane 
Dry Goods Company was organized and took over the entire business, Mr. Com- 
stock remaining as vice president of the company. The retail branch is conducted 
under the name of The Crescent and is one of the most complete department stores 
in the west. From the beginning the project has proven a remunerative one and 
at the present writing they are erecting a large addition to the retail store. The 
Spokane Dry Goods Company also has a mammoth wholesale building of its own 
on the railroad tracks, erected a few years ago. The labors of Mr. Comstock have 
constituted a most important element in the growth and expansion of the trade, 
for his judgment is sound, his sagacity keen, and his industry and enterprise un- 
faltering. The officers of the Spokane Dry Goods Company are also the owners of 
the Dry Goods Realty Company, which owns and controls all of the property and 
buildings of the former organization. 

On the 29th of March, 1866, Mr. Comstock was united in marriage to Miss 
Elizabeth Annis, a daughter of Chauncy L. and Lydia (Allen) Annis, of Oconomo- 
woc, Wisconsin. They have two children: Josie, the wife of Eugene A. Shadle, 
of Spokane, and May, at home. Mr. Comstock finds pleasure and recreation in 
several fraternal associations. He is a past commander of Sedgwick Post, G. A. R., 
and was assistant acting adjutant general of the department of Washington and 
Alaska, under Commander Norman Buck, in 1896. He is also president of the 
Northwestern Veteran's Association and he belongs to Tyrian Lodge, No. 96, F. & 
A. M. His religious faith is that of the First Unitarian church, in which he has 
served as a trustee for more than twenty years. The worth and value of his public 
services in Spokane are widely acknowledged. He served as a member of Spokane 
city council from May, 1894, to May, 1899, and during that time was president of 
the council for three years. Mr. Comstock was a persistant advocate of the use 
of water meters from the time he entered the city council to the close of his adminis- 
tration as mayor, in fact was almost absolutely alone in the advocacy of the use of 
meters for a number of years. At the present time the city council have adopted 
what Mr. Comstock advocated at that time and have come to see the wisdom and ad- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 81 

vantages of installing such a system. In May, 1 899, he was elected mayor for a term 
of two years, during which period he instigated and, through his intelligent and per- 
sistent efforts, completed many improvements, such as paving Sprague and First 
avenues and the following streets from the Northern Pacific right of way to the river : 
Monroe, Lincoln, Post, Wall and Stevens, Riverside avenue having been paved 
while he was president of the council. The water system was greatly improved and 
enlarged during this period. 

In 1910, accompanied by Mrs. Comstock and their daughter, he spent three 
months in Japan, studying the agricultural, economic, manufacturing and financial 
interests of the empire. During that time they visited all of the leading cities from 
Nagasaki on the south to Nike on the north. In his travels through Japan, Mr. 
Comstock noted especially the great advancement that nation is making,^ particularly 
in their economic, manufacturing, railroad and ship building interests. He found 
the Japanese a peaceful people and their history during the past four hundred 
years shows that they have had only two wars with foreign nations, one with 
China and one with Russia. In Mr. Comstock's opinion should trouble occur be- 
tween the United States and Japan, it will be the fault of the United States gov- 
ernment, as Japan's slogan is: "Peaceful commercial relation with all nations." 

The family residence is at No. 1106 Ninth avenue and one of its attractive 
features is its large and well selected library. Mr. Comstock is a man of scholarly 
attainments and of much literary ability, and has delivered and prepared many 
lectures and readings. One in particular, a comparison between General Grant and 
Frederick the Great, has been delivered on many occasions and has awakened wide- 
spread attention throughout the country. He has also been a close student of 
Shakespeare for many years, devoting much time not only to the reading of the 
plays but to everything bearing upon the subject, and he claims, with many others, 
that Shakespeare never wrote what is accredited to him. His reading and study has 
at all times covered a wide range and on the social, political and economic questions 
of the day he keeps abreast with the best thinking men of the age. He finds his 
companionship among people of kindred tastes and interests. His career has been 
remarkably successful, chiefly by reason of his natural ability and his thorough in- 
terest in a business in which as a young tradesman he embarked. There is one 
point in his career, covering twenty-two years in Spokane, to which all the old set- 
tlers refer, and that is whether as a wholesale merchant or in other relations of life, 
Mr. Comstock has always been the same genial, courteous gentleman, whose ways 
are those of refinement and whose word no man can question. 



LAWRENCE EVERT WORSTELL. 

Lawrence Evert Worstell, who is now serving his third term as probate judge 
of Shoshone county, has been a resident of Idaho since he was a lad of eleven 
years. His birth occurred at Jacksonville, Switzerland county, Indiana, on July 
13, 1878, his parents being William and Ella (Hitchens) Worstell. His father at 
the age of fourteen years enlisted in the One hundred and fortieth Indiana Volun- 
teer Infantry and went to the front in defense of his country, being discharged with 
the rank of corporal. Together with his wife and family, William Worstell removed 



82 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

from Indiana to Denver, Colorado, in 1883, and there the mother died in 1886. 
Three years later with his six children the father came to Idaho, locating in Mur- 
ray. He was married again in 1889 to Miss Mary Ginn of Murray, Idaho. Mr. 
Worstell was a capable business man and was successfully identified with the furni- 
ture, interests of Wallace and Kellogg, Idaho, until his death, on the 80th of Decem- 
ber, 1906. 

It was in the public schools of Denver, Colorado, that Lawrence Evert Worstell 
was first introduced to the elements of English learning, his preliminary education 
being completed in the public schools of Idaho. Having decided to become an attor- 
ney, he subsequently entered the Leland Stanford Junior University at Palo Alto, 
California, from which institution he was awarded the degree of LL. B. with the 
class of 1908. Returning to Wallace he was admitted to the bar, but resumed his 
connection with commercial activities by again becoming associated with his father 
in the furniture business. He continued to be so identified until elected probate 
judge of Shoshone county, in 1906, since which time he has given his principal 
attention to the duties of his office. He is still connected with the furniture busi- 
ness, however, as president of The Worstell Furniture Company, of Wallace, and 
secretary of The Worstell Thornhill Company of Kellogg, Idaho. 

On the 8th of November, 1896, Mr. Worstell was united in marriage to Mrs. 
Alice E. Duffy, of Bessemer, Michigan. Both Mr. and Mrs. Worstell are com- 
municants of the Episcopal church, and fraternally he belongs to the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks, being affiliated with Wallace Lodge, No. 881. His politi- 
cal allegiance Mr. Worstell gives to the republican party, believing its policy best 
adapted -to subserve the interests of the majority. In addition to his county office 
since 1909, Mr. Worstell has been a member of the city council. As incumbent of 
the office of probate judge he has discharged his duties in a manner to meet with 
the general approval of the public at large, as is attested by the length of his period 
of service. He is held in high esteem and regard not only in Wallace but in the 
entire county, where he is widely known and has many friends, the majority of 
whom have known him since boyhood. 



WILLIAM J. C. WAKEFIELD. 

William J. C. Wakefield, who ranks high among the prominent lawyers of the 
Spokane bar, has engaged in practice in this city since May, 1889, and his con- 
stantly increasing ability has brought him continuous recognition in a large and 
distinctively representative clientage. He has concentrated his time, energies and 
attention upon his professional duties and the work that he has done as advocate 
and counselor indicates clearly his familiarity with the principles of jurisprudence 
and an analytical power that enables him to correctly apply those principles to 
the question under consideration. 

While a resident of the west for more than a quarter of a century, Mr. Wake- 
field is a native son of New England, his birth having occurred in Ludlow, Windsor 
county, Vermont, on the 4th of September, 1862. The family was founded in 
Massachusetts during the early colonial epoch in the history of this country, and 
the great-great-great-grandfather, Jonathan Wakefield, of Sutton, Massachusetts, 



W. J. C. WAKEFIELD 



; THE .%,.","" . ; '"J 







■ • » I. j 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 85 

took up arms in defense of his country during the French and Indian war, serv- 
ing in the expedition under General Amherst against Ticonderoga and Crown Point 
in 1759. That the spirit of liberty was strong within him and that the same spirit 
was inculcated in his family is indicated by the fact that six of his sons were sol- 
diers in the Continental army during the Revolutionary war. One of these, Samuel 
Wakefield, was a member of the Lexington company that at the first alarm marched 
on the 19th of April, 1775, out upon the little green in the center of the town to 
meet the British forces that demanded immediate surrender. He was a member 
of the company commanded by Captain John Putman, attached to Colonel Ebenezer 
Larned's regiment, and he continued in the service until September 17, 1779. The 
line of descent to William J. C. Wakefield is traced down from Samuel Wakefield, 
through his son Samuel, who removed from Massachusetts to Newport, New Hamp- 
shire, Alpheus Wakefield, who was a resident of Ludlow, Vermont, and Luther 
F. Wakefield. The last named spent his entire life in Ludlow, where he followed 
the pursuits of mechanic, miller and farmer. He married Lorinda L. Place, a 
native of northern Vermont, and also a representative of an old New England 
family. 

Their son, William J. C. Wakefield, acquired his early education in the district 
schools of Chittenden and Windsor counties, Vermont, and afterward attended the 
Black River Academy of Ludlow, where he prepared for college, then entering 
Dartmouth College, from which he was graduated with the class of 1885. The 
west with its limitless opportunities attracted him and on the completion of his 
college course he became a resident of Austin, Nevada, where he engaged in 
teaching school. The hours which are usually termed leisure were devoted by 
Mr. Wakefield to the study of law under the direction of Judge McKenna of that 
place, and he completed his legal studies in the office of Archer & Bowden, fol- 
lowing bis removal to San Jose, California. ' Early in 1889 he was admitted to 
the bar in San Francisco and then turned to the northwest Pacific country, decid- 
ing upon Spokane as a favorable location. Accordingly, in May, he arrived in 
this city, which has since been his home and the scene of his professional labors 
and achievements. In November, 1889, he formed a partnership with Judge L. B. 
Nash, which was maintained until the spring of 1892, when Mr. Wakefield suc- 
ceeded Colonel W. W. D. Turner in the firm of Turner & Forster, the style of 
Forster & Wakefield being then assumed. In 1905, following the death of George 
M. Forster, Mr. Wakefield organized with A. W. Witherspoon the present firm 
of Wakefield & Witherspoon, which is today regarded as one of the most promi- 
nent and successful in the city. Mr. Wakefield has largely represented clients 
who have been prominently connected with the development of eastern Washing- 
ton, northern Idaho and western Montana. He is well versed in all departments 
of the law and upon his professional service has concentrated his attention to the 
exclusion of all political activities. Since 1890 he has held the office of master 
in chancery of the United States court. He is an officer or director in many cor- 
porations that are active in the development of this section of the country and 
his relations to the northwest is that of contagious enthusiasm which has led to his 
support of many projects and measures of public benefit. 

On the 10th of June, 1896, Mr. Wakefield was united in marriage to Miss 
Louise Ammann, a daughter of Arnold and Caroline Ammann, formerly of Spring- 
field, Illinois. They now have an interesting family of two daughters and three 



86 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

sons, Louise, Channing, Helen, Newton and William. The family are prominent 
socially and Mr. Wakefield is also well known in athletic circles and is equally 
interested in educational projects which have for their object the intellectual 
progress of the community. For years he was identified with the National Guard 
of Nevada and Washington, retiring from the latter with the rank of lieutenant 
colonel and chief signal officer. He is recognized as a man of well rounded char- 
acter whose interests are varied and who at all times keeps in close touch with the 
trend of modern thought and progress. 



RAY M. HART. 



Prominently associated with many of the business interests which have helped 
to boom the commercial importance of the more recently developed portions of our 
great northwest, Ray M. Hart has been a significant factor in the upbuilding of 
Coeur d'Alene. Born in Ionia county, Michigan, June 20, 1878, he acquired his 
education in the common schools of his native locality. When eighteen years of 
age he began work, securing employment with the Frank Brothers Implement Com- 
pany, at Colfax, Washington, and after two years was engaged as bookkeeper and 
cashier in the firm of Lippett Brothers, general merchants in Colfax. He remained 
with them five years when he removed to Bozeman, Montana, where he engaged in 
business in partnership with D. J. Morton, establishing a dry-goods store. Two 
years later the firm dissolved partnership, the store was sold and Mr. Morton re- 
turned to Ireland, while Mr. Hart secured a position as a traveling salesman for a 
wholesale dry-goods company of St. Louis, Missouri, in which capacity he continued 
to serve for ten years, until 1908, and during this period became financially inter- 
ested in a number of general merchandise stores throughout Montana, mainly at 
Billings and Lewistown. He is still president of the Hart Albin Company of Bil- 
lings, Montana, and is also interested as stockholder in a large number of banks 
situated in various parts of this western country. On February 9, 1909, when the 
Blackwell Lumber Company was organized, with headquarters at Coeur d'Alene, 
Mr. Hart became secretary and treasurer of this concern and hi consequence came 
to Coeur d'Alene, where he has remained in the same capacity ever since. He 
is interested in many other enterprises, being a director in the American Trust 
Company of Coeur d'Alene and in the Panhandle Lumber Company of Spirit Lake, 
a director likewise in the Idaho and Northern Washington Railroad Company and 
in the Railway Land and Improvement Company, and a stockholder in the Port- 
land Cement Company of Metaline Falls, Washington. Always ready to help in 
any project that might aid in securing better transportation facilities for the peo- 
ple living in the remoter localities and in making the larger towns more easily acces- 
sible to the rural dwellers, Mr. Hart was largely instrumental in securing the con- 
struction of the first electric railroad in Montana, organizing the Gallatin Valley 
Electric Railway, a rural line running from Bozeman, Montana, of which corpora- 
tion he was president until the road was sold to the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget 
Sound Railroad Company. Always alert for every chance to build up his commer- 
cial interests and to enlarge the sphere of his activities, he has availed himself of 
every opportunity held out to him and now is accounted one of the foremost busi- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 87 

ncss men of Coeur d'Alene, enjoying an ample income from his investments and 
possessing unlimited credit among his associates in the financial world. 

On August 27, 1908, Mr. Hart was married to Miss Blanche Blackwell, a 
daughter of F. A. Blackwell of Coeur d'Alene. They are the parents of one child. 
The Hart home at No. 820 Sherman avenue, is one of the handsome residences in 
tiie town and is frequently the scene of social gayety and mirth. Mr. Hart has 
been a Mason since the year in which he attained his majority, having joined Hiram 
Lodge, No. 21, F. & A. M., of Colfax, Washington, and he is also a member of 
Lodge No. 468, B. P. O. E., of Bozeman, Montana. In his political affiliations he 
is a republican. Always adhering to high standards of business ethics, Mr. Hart 
has attained his success justly and by reason of his own efforts and keen discrimi- 
nation. Large in his view of a situation he is the type of man who has supplied the 
leaven that has created the western spirit of indomitable determination and ability 
to win. 



•Ci 



GEORGE SELWIN ALLISON, M. D. 

While the practice of medicine is the real life work of Dr. George Selwin Alli- 
son, he has also engaged in real-estate dealing in Spokane and is the owner of con- 
siderable valuable ranch property in eastern Washington. He was born in Louisi- 
ana, Missouri, July 22, 1848, a son of J. C. and H. M. Allison. His educational op- 
portunities in early youth were those afforded by the district schools of his native 
town where he pursued his studies until he reached the age of fifteen years, and 
then attended the Cherry Grove Seminary of Abingdon, Illinois, for three years. 
A glance over the broad field of business in its different agricultural, industrial, 
commercial and professional phases, led him to the determination to make the prac- 
tice of medicine his life work and he entered the St. Louis Medical School, now the 
Washington University, from which in due time he was graduated with the class 
of 1871. He at once sought to put his theoretical knowledge to the practical test 
and entered the office with Dr. W. C. Duncan, with whom he remained for two 
years and then opened an office in Macon county, Illinois, where he remained for 
about ten years. Ambitious to attain the highest degree of proficiency he went to 
New York in 1881 and pursued a special course of study in the Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College, and was graduated from that institution in the class of 1881, be- 
ing now numbered among its alumni. 

It was in July, 1882, that Dr. Allison arrived in Spokane where he has been in 
practice constantly since and is the oldest resident physician of this city. There 
was only a very limited population when he took up his abode here and with the 
growth of the city his practice has increased until it is now very extensive and of 
in important character. He has improved the opportunity for judicious investment 
and profitable sale of real estate, and now has much property in Spokane, together 
with a ranch of seven hundred and eighty acres at Latah, Spokane county, on which 
he raises stock, wheat and all that goes to make up a model farm. The place is situ- 
ated forty-three miles from the city, and his son, Walter S. Allison, now twenty- 
six years of age, is in charge of the farm. Dr. Allison is an enthusiast on the sub- 
ject of the future of Spokane county and is always ready to join in any movement 



88 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIEE 

that promises to prove of practical worth in its development and upbuilding. He 
is likewise president of the Conservative Land & Investment Company, owning 
thirteen thousand acres of land in Benton county, one thousand acres of which are 
under cultivation. 

On the 2d of May, 1876, at Mount Zion, Illinois, occurred the marriage of Dr. 
Allison and Miss Ellen £. Mariner, a daughter of Professor William and Agnes 
Mariner, both natives of Lebanon, Tennessee. Her father was a teacher by pro- 
fession and about 1880 came to Washington to join the faculty of the Walla Walla 
College. He was thus connected with the educational development of the state un- 
til his death, which occurred in Spokane in 1894. Dr. and Mrs. Allison have three 
living children: Walter S., who as stated manages his father's ranch; Ida G., the 
wife of John D. Johnson, of Spokane; and Mabel P., who is the wife of James E. 
Bailey, of this city. The family residence is at No. 1208 Eighth avenue and was : 
erected by Dr. Allison. In politics he has always been a stalwart republican but 
the only office that he would ever accept was that of member of the school board, 
on which he served for three years, beginning in 1905. He has ever taken an active 
interest in educational matters and the cause of the public schools finds in him a 
splendid friend. He holds membership in the Westminster Congregational church 
and for many years was one of its trustees. His influence is always on the side of 
progress and those things which relate to the material, intellectual, political and 
moral development and welfare of the city. 



OTTO HANSEN. 



Otto Hansen, a railroad contractor whose business activity has also included 
considerable irrigation work, has his offices in the Paulsen building in Spokane al- 
though his operations in construction work call him into various localities. Careful 
consideration of the facts indicate that the Teutonic race has constituted an im- 
portant element in the upbuilding of the northwest. Of this Mr. Hansen is a 
representative. He was born in Holstein, Germany, June 3, 1868, and is a son of 
Detlef and Mathilde Hansen. The father was a farmer and once visited America, 
making the trip in 1898. It was seven years before this year that Otto Hansen 
came to the new world. He had been educated in the public schools of the father- 
land and on crossing the Atlantic to America settled in St. Paul, where he made his 
initial step in business circles as a clerk in a general mercantile store. Thus 
he was employed for four years, after which he resigned his position and entered 
the service of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, going to Tacoma, where he 
remained for ten years in the engineering department. He was engineer of main- 
tenance between Ellensburg and Portland, called the Pacific division, and remained 
with the railroad company until 1900, when he resigned to engage in railroad con- 
tract work on his own account. His labors in this connection have since been of an 
important character, his patronage steadily growing until his business interests have 
assumed large and profitable proportions. He made his headquarters at Kenne- 
wick, Washington, for about three years and then came to Spokane in 1907. He 
has also done considerable irrigation work, taking important contracts of that 
character. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 89 

On the 6th of November, 1899, Mr. Hansen was united in marriage to 
Catherine Anne Reese, a daughter of Reese J. and Anne Reese, of Tacoma, Wash- 
ington. Mr. and Mrs. Hansen have two children, Reese Detlef and Catherine 
Mathilde. Mr. Hansen belongs to the Spokane Club and to the Spokane Amateur 
Athletic Club. His residence in America now covers a period of over twenty-five 
years and he feels that he has never had occasion to regret his determination to 
come to the new world, for here he has found the opportunities which he sought, 
and by determination and energy has steadily advanced in business until the ex- 
tent and importance of his operations have placed him in a creditable position in 
business circles. 



CHARLES A. SOLBERG. 

Charles A. Solberg is conducting an extensive and profitable enterprise as a 
dealer in men's furnishings at Wallace. He was born in Norway in 1860 and lost 
his mother when but a year and a half old. His education was acquired in his 
native land, and in 1880 he crossed the Atlantic to the United States, settling at 
Winona, Minnesota. There he secured employment in the general mercantile store 
of the A. L. Porter Company, remaining in that department for six years. On the 
expiration of that period he entered the grain department of the same concern, buy- 
ing grain for their mill for four years. In March, 1890, he came to Spokane, ac- 
cepting a position as salesman for Mr. Hanover of the I. X. L. Clothing Company. 
In that that capacity he acted for five years, and during that period made occasional 
visits to the Coeur d'Alene district. In 1896 he settled at Gem, Idaho, remaining 
there for about two years, when he came to Wallace, which has been his place of 
residence continuously since. For seven years he was employed by J. W. Tabor and 
in 1907 purchased a half interest in the business of H. McKinley, forming the firm 
of McKinley & Solberg, devoted exclusively to the sale of men's furnishings. This 
relation was maintained with mutual pleasure and profit for four years, or until 
May 8, 1911, when Mr. Solberg purchased his partner's interest and has since 
been the sole proprietor of the establishment, conducting the business under the 
name of C. A. Solberg. He is a member of the Scandinavian Brotherhood. The 
hope that led him to leave his native land and seek a home in America has been 
more than realized. He found the opportunities he sought — which, by the way, are 
always open to the ambitious, energetic man, — and making the best of these he has 
steadily worked his way upward. 



DRS. CHARLES R. AND HERBERT C. MOWERY. 

Among the highly successful younger members of the medical profession in Wal- 
lace must be numbered Drs. Charles R. and Herbert C. Mowery, who located here 
in 1905. They are of German parentage, as the name would suggest, and were 
born and reared in Ottumwa, Iowa, in the public schools of which city they ac- 
quired their preliminary education. They subsequently pursued a classical course 
at the Iowa State University, at Iowa City, after which they matriculated in the 



90 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

medical department of the Creighton University at Omaha, Nebraska, this institu- 
tion conferring upon them the degree of M. D., upon the completion of their pro- 
fessional studies. In 1908 they came to Idaho, locating in Wardner, where for two 
years they were associated in practice with Dr. Franz. When Dr. St. Jean bought 
the Wallace Hospital in 1905 they came here, and for five years thereafter were on 
the staff of that institution. They had leave of absence, however, in 1908 and 1909, 
and went abroad, pursuing post-graduate courses in the hospitals of London, Vienna, 
Berlin and Paris. In 1910 they severed their connection with the Wallace Hos- 
pital and joined the staff of Providence Hospital, with which institution they con- 
tinue to be identified. They are well qualified for the duties of their profession 
both by reason of their thorough preparation and natural aptitude, possessing the 
mental characteristics and personality so essential to success in this of all voca- 
tions. They have met with good success during the period of their residence in 
Wallace and have built up lucrative private practices in addition to their hospital 
work. 

They have neither of them ever married. They are actively identified with a 
number of fraternal organizations, holding membership in the Elks, Wallace Lodge, 
No. SSI, B. P. O. E.; and the Eagles and the Red Men, all of this city. They are 
also affiliated with the Masonic order, belonging to Wardner Lodge, No. 34, A. F. 
& A. M.; the Knights of Pythias, Galena Lodge, No. 12; and the Woodmen of the 
World, all of Wardner. Their connection with associations of a professional nature 
is confined to their membership in the Pacific Coast Association of Railway Sur- 
geons. They are held in high regard in Wallace both professionally and socially 
and would seem to have most promising futures, judging by their success as practi- 
tioners since locating here. 



JULIUS A. ZITTEL. 



Julius A. Zittel, a Spokane architect, whose developing powers have brought 
him to a position where recognized skill and ability place him with the foremost 
representatives of his profession in the Inland Empire, is now a member of the 
firm of Zittel & Rigg and has followed his chosen calling in this city since 1887. 
The name indicates his German birth and nativity, his natal year being 1869. He 
was thirteen years of age when he crossed the Atlantic to America, residing for 
a time in Chicago, where he studied architecture in a large office of that city until 
he came to Spokane. He was about eighteen years of age when, in 1887, he 
arrived in Washington and secured employment with H. Preusse, who was already 
established as a leading architect of this city. For six years he continued in the 
office and the recognition of his constantly increasing ability led to his admission 
to a partnership in 1898, and they continued in business under the firm style of 
Preusse & Zittel until 1910. In the intervening period of eighteen years they de- 
signed and superintended the construction of many of the finest buildings in 
Spokane, including the Gonzaga College and the Victor block. They were also the 
architects who designed the new city hall, St. Aloysius Catholic church and the Car- 
negie Library building. Mr. Zittel, moreover, is connected with the building in- 
terests of the city as vice president of the Citizens Building & Loan Association. 



JL'LU'S A. ZITTEL 









*; i v- „ 



* ' ^ * 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 93 

He has been a close student of his profession and is thoroughly familiar with the 
great scientific principles which underlie his work, while in design and execution 
the work embodies many of the most artistic conceptions. 

In 1889 occurred the marriage of Mr. Zittel and Miss Alice Shanks, a daugh- 
ter of Robert and Marion Shanks, both pioneers of the county. They have one 
child, Eunice I. M., born in 1898, who is attending school. Their acquaintance 
in Spokane is a wide one and their circle of friends is almost coextensive therewith. 
Mr. Zittel possesses many of the sterling characteristics of the German race, in- 
cluding the thoroughness and perseverance as well as artistic temperament which 
have made the Teutonic people an important element of progress in various parts 
of the world. 



GEORGE T. CRANE. 



George T. Crane, president of the Crane Shoe Company, follows well formu- 
. Uttd plans in the conduct of his business and meets every emergency that arises 
with a resourcefulness that enables him. to conquer difficulties and bring to success- 
ful conclusion whatever he undertakes. His birth occurred in Cascade, Dubuque 
county, Iowa, September 8, 1854, his parents being Peter F. and Nancy (Elliott) 
Crane. His parents were pioneers of Iowa to which state they had removed from 
Batavia, New York. During his youthful days George T. Crane was a pupil in 
, the public schools of his native county and then, seeking the broader business op- 
portunities of the city, made his way to Chicago, obtaining employment in the 
wholesale house of Benham, Trumbull & Company, with whom he remained until 
1882. Thinking to find still better advantages in the west where competition was 
not yet so great and where rapid development offered an excellent field, he came to 
Spokane and established a hardware store on Howard street, between Front and 
Main avenues, conducting his enterprise under the firm name of George T. Crane & 
Company until 1884. On the discovery of gold in the Coeur d'Alene district he 
disposed of his mercantile interests and went to the mines in the vicinity of Mur- 
ray, Idaho, where he engaged in placer mining through the summer. He became 
convinced, however, that his fortune was not to be made in that field and returning 
to Spokane he again entered commercial circles by purchasing an interest in the 
firm of Taylor & Sharkey, dealers in agricultural implements, with whom he re- 
mained for about two years. On the opening of the Wardner camp he made his way 
there and in partnership with E. C. Gove established a general mercantile store, 
opening with the first stock of goods in the camp. The business was conducted 
under the firm style of Gove & Crane until 1892, when the junior partner sold out 
and went to Rossi and, British Columbia, being there at the opening of that camp. 
In partnership with Frank C. Loring and F. E. Snodgrass he purchased and de- 
veloped the Josie mine, afterward selling out to the British syndicate that pur- 
chased and consolidated many mines in that district. Their old mine is now known 
as the Le Roi No. 2. 

Mr. Crane returned to Spokane in 1896 and purchased an interest in the shoe 

rtore of Henry Hill, afterward organizing a stock company under the name of the 

.Hill Shoe Company, of which he became president. In 1898 their store was re- 

VoL n— 6 



94 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

moved from its original location at the corner of Sprague and Howard streets to 
519 Riverside avenue, where the business has since been conducted. In 1905 Mr. 
Crane purchased the Hill interests and changed the name to the Crane Shoe Com- 
pany, being today at the head of the largest and finest retail shoe store in the 
northwest. The business has constantly expanded until the volume of trade is now 
most gratifying and the reputation of the house is unassailable. 

In his home life Mr. Crane finds the enjoyment which constitutes an even bal- 
ance to his various business cares and responsibilities. He was married August 31, 
1876, at Ottawa, Kansas, to Miss Margaret Wright, of that place, and they now 
have two sons and a daughter: Earl B. and Frank G., who are identified with their 
father in business; and Marguerite, the wife of John G. MacDonnell, of Boston, 
Massachusetts. Mrs. Crane was a daughter of William and Rose (McKittrick) 
Wright, of Ottawa, Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. Crane now reside at No. 817 South 
Adams street, where he built a pleasant residence about four years ago. They are 
prominent members of the Christian Science church in which Mr. Crane has served 
as a trustee for several years. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity and in Orien- 
tal Consistory, No. 2, S. P. R. S., he has attained the thirty-second degree. He has 
also been more or less active in politics, recognizing the duties and obligations as 
well as the privileges of citizenship. His views accord with the prinicples of the 
republican party and in 1884 he was elected upon that ticket to the city council. 
Through the succeeding years he was a member of the Spokane school board and 
in 1907-08 represented his district in the state legislature. He is a statesman with 
an eye to practical results and not glittering generalities. His party fealty is not 
grounded on personal prejudice. He is thoroughly familiar with the great issues 
which divide the two parties that have roots extending down to the very bedrock 
foundation of the republic. He has also studied the lessons of life and has arrived 
at his own conclusions, the result of which may be called his post-graduate studies 
in the school of affairs. Such men, either in office or out, are the natural leaders of 
whichever party they may be identified with, especially in that movement toward 
better politics which is common to both parties and which constitutes the most 
hopeful political sign of the period. 



FRANK E. PETERSON. 



Jn Frank E. Peterson are found many of the sterling qualities which character- 
ize the nation of which he is a representative. He displays the persistency of 
purpose and the thorough reliability that have ever marked the Swedish people. In 
his business career, by means of his perseverance and unfaltering energy, he has 
made continuous and creditable progress. He was born in Smolan, Sweden, Oc- 
tober 1, 1874, a son of John and Johanna Peterson, who in the year 1876 brought 
their family to America and, like many of the emigrants from that land, sought a 
home in Minnesota. They first located at Red Wing and the father who had learned 
cabinet making in his native land, continued to work at his trade. 

The son, Frank E. Peterson, was sent to the public schools and when he had mas- 
tered the branches of learning therein taught, he acquired skill in the carpenter's 
trade, which he followed for a few years in Red Wing. Subsequently he sought a 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 95 

broader field of labor in Fargo, North Dakota, where he spent one year, but still not 
satisfied that he had reached the place which would give him the best opportunities, 
he came to Spokane in the Spring of 1898. Since then he has never wished to change 
his residence, for the business conditions here offered him what he sought. More- 
over, his intellect had early grasped the eternal truth that industry wins, and in- 
dustry has ever been the guiding force of his life. Following his arrival in Spo- 
kane he engaged in business with G. L. Weber and J. A. Creutzer, under the firm 
name of G. L. Weber & Company, in the general building and contracting business. 
The first residence which they erected was that of the late Judge W. E. Cullen, on 
Pacific avenue. Mr. Weber died after about two years, and following the retire- 
ment of Mr. Creutzer from the firm, Mr. Peterson continued his building operations 
alone for a time and success attended his efforts, important contracts being awarded 
him, for he had given proof of his ability, enterprise and straightforward methods. 
Among some of the buildings which he has erected are: the Dessert building, at 
the corner of Bernard and Riverside; the Stevens school; the new Franklin school, 
and the administration high school building and many others. He has also made 
several large additions to other schoolhouses and has erected a number of residences 
and similar buildings. He is now a director and treasurer of the Colonial Build- 
ing Company and as a general contractor his work is contributing much to the 
general improvement of the city. He is also known in financial circles of the city 
as a director of the Scandinavian- American Bank. 

On the 28th of January, 1907, in Spokane, Mr. Peterson was united in marriage 
to Miss Ida May McClure and unto them has been born a son, John Lawrence. They 
occupy a pleasant home at 01428 Lincoln street, which Mr. Peterson erected in 
1905. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Spokane Ama- 
teur Athletic Club, the Rotary Club and the Chamber of Commerce, associations 
which indicate much concerning the nature of his interests and his activities outside 
of the strict path of business. Those who meet him find that he possesses many of 
the qualities which awaken admiration and give rise to warm friendships. He 
started out in the business world with no false ideas concerning the way of attain- 
ing success. He early realized that diligence is the root of all honorable advance* 
ment and by reason of his persistent purpose and the skill which he has constantly 
displayed, for he has continually studied the business in its various phases, he has 
gained the liberal patronage which is accorded him and which is certainly well 
merited. 



MARSHALL M. TAYLOR. 

A resident of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, for the past seven years, Marshall M. 
Taylor has materially contributed to the growth and commercial development of 
this city, having in his capacity as real-estate operator had a large share in plat- 
ting the newer portions opened for building purposes. He was born in Jackson 
county, May 17, 1862, a son of Stephen L. and Cecelia (Dupuy) Taylor, the father 
being for many years occupied in running a grist mill near Fulton, Iowa. Marshall 
M. Taylor obtained his education in the common schools of Jackson county, Iowa, 
and in 1886 came west with his brother John B. Taylor, locating in eastern Oregon. 



96 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Later he removed to Cheney, Washington, where he was city marshal for a period 
of two years. He then engaged in the clothing business with his brother, but after 
a time sold out and left Cheney for Wallace, Idaho, where the brothers conducted 
a clothing business for nine years. In 1904 they came to Coeur d'Alene and organ- 
ized the Lake City Hardware Company but sold out the controlling interest after a 
year and a half, in order to devote their entire time to real-estate transactions. 
They have been very successful in this last venture and since commencing their 
real-estate operations have laid out the following additions to Coeur d'Alene: Tay- 
lor, Lake Shore, College and Taylor's Park additions; Fruitland, a suburb and 
irrigation tract, and also Lawrence Park addition, being laid out in ten-acre tracts. 
Mr. Taylor has a natural turn for business, and is spirited and energetic, alive to 
the many opportunities open to men who are not afraid to take a venture and who 
possess the qualities which win success. 

Mr. Taylor was united in marriage at Cheney, Washington, on November 23, 
1893, to Miss Edith Hubbard, a daughter of H. H. Hubbard, now of Coeur d'Alene. 
The Taylor residence is situated in the Lake Shore addition on the lake front com- 
manding a beautiful view of Coeur d'Alene lake, and with its great sweeping lawns 
and the substantial boathouse it makes one of the most striking and attractive places 
in the city. 

In his political predilections Mr. Taylor is republican. He was elected to the 
common council of the city, in April, 1911, to serve for a term of two years. Fra- 
ternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias, having served through all the 
chairs of the Cheney lodge at Cheney, Washington, and is now a member of the 
Coeur d'Alene lodge of the same brotherhood. Since his connection with local 
business interests Mr. Taylor has become known for his spirit of enterprise and 
his tireless energy, being progressive in his policy and quick to act when the occa- 
sion demands. 



JAMES MONTGOMERY PERRY. 

Among the retired ranchmen of Spokane county who deserve prominent men- 
tion in this work should be named James Montgomery Perry, who located at Cheney 
thirty-four years ago and is, therefore, one of the pioneers of this section. He was 
born in New York state, April 20, 1846, and is a son of Oren and Margaret (Tabor) 
Perry. The father died in 1852, when his son James was six years of age, but the 
mother survived until 1901. 

James M. Perry received his early education in the public schools of the Empire 
state. After leaving school he worked on a farm and continued there until twenty 
years of age. He then went to Holley, New York, and secured employment in a 
flour and feed store. After giving up this position he came westward to Nebraska, 
where he applied himself to farming for seven years. Believing that the Pacific 
coast presented more favorable inducements, he removed to California, remaining, 
however, only a short time in that state. He next became a resident of Oregon and 
worked in a sawmill for two years. In 1877 he arrived at Cheney and took up a 
preemption claim of one hundred and sixty acres. Subsequently he purchased 
tracts of eighty, two hundred and forty and four hundred and forty acres respec- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 97 

tively, thus becoming the owner of nine hundred and twenty acres of land in Spo- 
kane county. He applied himself successfully to farming until 1905, when he dis- 
posed of a portion of his land and bought property in Cheney. On account of ill 
health he retired from active operations and has since made his home in town. In 
1910 he sold four hundred and forty acres but still retains two hundred and forty 
acres, which be rents to other persons. 

On March 4, 1874, Mr. Perry was married to Miss Marie C. Salisbury, a daugh- 
ter of Ackland Salisbury, whose ancestors were pioneers of New York state. Mr. 
and Mrs. Perry are the parents of one child, Grace, -who is the wife of L. C. Van 
Patten. In politics Mr. Perry supports the republican party. He has been an 
active worker in its behalf and has attended many county conventions at Spokane. 
He belongs to the Masonic order, and has served as chaplain of the lodge at Cheney. 
He was also for many years a member of the Commercial Club of Cheney. 

He has witnessed many changes in eastern Washington. When he located in 
Spokane county the country in this region was largely uninhabited except by In- 
dians and wild animals, and settlers were often in danger from outbreaks of the 
savages. Twice Mr. Perry and his family were forced to leave Cheney on account 
of Indian scares, going the first time to Spokane and the second time to Colfax and 
on to Walla Walla. Conditions have changed, — the railroad, the telegraph and the 
wonderful conveniences of an inventive age assisted in the rapid march of progress 
and today Spokane county is within ready access of the best markets and the peo- 
ple enjoy all the desirable comforts and luxuries of modern life. 

Mr. Perry showed rare public spirit at the time when the bill for the support 
of the State Normal school was vetoed, when he with a number of others signed 
notes to prevent the school from closing until the state appropriation could be made. 
His daughter is a graduate of that school. Mr. and Mrs. Perry became members 
of the Methodist church in 1884, and ever since have been very prominent in 
church and temperance work. Both have served as officers in the church, and Mrs. 
Perry is an officer in the Ladies' Aid Society. She is a member of the Order of the 
Eastern Star, as is her daughter and her son-in-law, having lately been elected sec- 
retary of the local Masonic lodge. It is largely to the pioneers that the people of 
eastern Washington owe the blessing they now enjoy and no one of that noble 
class is more sincerely respected than James M. Perry. 



WILLIAM S. LEWIS. 



William S. Lewis is a practicing attorney in Spokane and is the author of various 
historical articles pertaining to eastern Washington. He was born at Hamden, 
Delaware county, New York, July 21, 1876, and in 1884 came to the west with his 
parents, William A. and Fannie B. (Shaw) Lewis who in that year brought their 
family to Washington. William S. Lewis, then a lad of eight years, entered the 
public schools here and passed through consecutive grades to his graduation from 
the high school. He afterward became a pupil in the Leland Stanford Junior 
University of California, where he pursued the study of law and following his re- 
turn to Washington was admitted to practice before the bar of this state in 1898. 
He has since followed his profession and is now associated with his brother, Marshall 



98 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

L. Lewis. They have been accorded a good clientage, which -is indicative of the 
fact that their work in the courts is satisf atcory to those who employ them. They 
are careful and painstaking in the preparation of cases, and strong argument and 
logical deduction are features in the presentation of their causes before court or jury. 
On the 16th of January, 1911, William S. Lewis was united in marriage to Miss 
Hildegarde J. Johannessen, a daughter of Carl J. Johannessen, of this city. Mr. 
Lewis is a man of considerable literary ability, as is evidenced by the historical 
articles which he has written pertaining to the history of eastern Washington. In 
politics he has always been a. republican and is now allied with the progressive 
wing of the party, but has never been a candidate for office, preferring the retire- 
ment of private life to the publicity of the political field. 



OLIVER NELSON BELL. 

Oliver Nelson Bell is one of the well known real-estate dealers in Colville, hav- 
ing for the past six years been identified with L. M. McFarland in the operation of 
the Colville Land Company. He is a native of Iowa, his birth having occurred in 
Belknap, Davis county, that state, on the 10th of November, 1858, his parents being 
Charles R. and Sarah A. (Scoles) Bell. When he was a youth of sixteen the 
family residence was changed to Salem, Oregon, while two years later they became 
citizens of Latah, Washington. Here the mother passed away in 1891, but the 
father is still living in Hamilton, Montana, having attained the venerable age of 
seventy-five. 

Reared in the country Oliver Nelson Bell devoted the winters of his boyhood 
and youth to the acquirement of an education in the common schools, first in Iowa 
and later in Oregon, while in summers he worked on the farm. After the mastery 
of the common branches he gave his undivided attention to agricultural pursuits, 
remaining under the parental rjoof until he was twenty-two years of age. He then 
left home to begin his independent career and going to Latah, Washington, filed on 
a timber claim, afterward a homestead and then bought railroad land until he 
owned a section. He and his father bought the first threshing machine north of 
Colfax. They did the first threshing on the Coeur d'Alene Indian reservation and 
were there before the new mission was built by Old Cataldo or Josette. Mr. Bell 
and his father also constructed the first wagon road across what is now known as 
Rock Creek valley, running from Latah across the reservation to Farmington, 
landing on Coeur d'Alene lake. For eight years thereafter he devoted his energies 
to the cultivation of his land and the raising of stock, withdrawing from these pur- 
suits to engage in the livery business, in connection with which he also dealt in real- 
estate. He was a resident of Latah until 1898, with the exception of a brief period 
in 1884, during the mining excitement, when he went to Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. 
After closing out his interests in Latah, Mr. Bell again took up his residence in 
this state, locating at Bossburg, where he engaged in the livery and stage business, 
which occupied his attention until 1905, and compelled him in the interest of the 
business, to travel extensively in both British Columbia and Washington. Upon 
leaving Bossburg, Mr. Bell came to Colville where he has ever since been located. 
During the period of his residence here he has met with good success in the pursuit 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 99 

of his business, which has developed in a most gratifying manner and is among the 
thriving ones of the town. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bell attend the Methodist Episcopal church, while they devote 
much time and money to promoting the temperance cause in this county, Mr. Bell 
having been one of the most prominent factors in abolishing the liquor traffic in his 
community. He and his wife both take an earnest interest in all movements tended 
to promote the moral and intellectual welfare of the community, while he is a gener- 
ous contributor toward all church and charitable work whether under the auspices 
of his own denomination or that of some other. They have one son, Hugh M., at- 
tending the North Western University at Shenandoah, Iowa. Mr. Bell belongs to 
the Chamber of Commerce and the Stevens County Pioneer's Association, while in 
politics he is a democrat; although he takes a helpful and active interest in all munic- 
ipal affairs, he has not been an office seeker, but on the contrary has consistently 
declined to accept any public honors at the hands of his constituency. Fraternally 
he is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, by the principles of 
which organization he has always striven to direct his life in both his public and 
private relations. Mr. Bell's efforts have been rewarded in a substantial way and 
in addition to his thriving business and property interests he is a stockholder in the 
New Golden Crown Mining Company, in the First Thought mining district in this 
county. His interests are thoroughly identified with those of Stevens county in 
the development and upbuilding of which he freely gives his aid and cooperation. 



HENRY C. ADAMI. 



Henry C. Adami, residing in Wallace, is the superintendent of the sampling 
works of the Federal Mining & Smelting Company. His birth occurred in Helena, 
Montana, on the 28th of April, 1879, his parents being Henry and Elizabeth (Maas) 
Adami. About 1870 the father emigrated from Germany to the United States, set- 
tling in Helena, Montana, where he did a freighting and real-estate business. 
Going back to the fatherland, he was there married and then again crossed the At- 
lantic and returned to Helena, where he continued in the business of rock quarry- 
ing and acquired considerable real estate. He still makes his home at Helena, and 
has attained the age of about fifty-eight years. 

Henry C. Adami obtained his education in the grammar and high schools of 
Helena and after putting aside his text-books secured employment as a bookkeeper. 
In 1897 he began the study of assaying, chemistry and mining engineering with 
Braden Brothers of Helena, with whom he remained for two years. On the expira- 
tion of that period he became assayer and chemist for Thomas Cruse, of the cel- 
ebrated Bald Mountain mine at Marysville, Montana, but resigned at the end of 
eight months to take the position of assistant assayer for the Peck Concentrating 
Company of East Helena, Montana. In a short time he was made the chemist of 
the concern, with which he remained for eight months, then becoming timekeeper 
and top foreman at the Gagnon mine in Butte, Montana, under the supervision of 
William Ward. After thus serving for another period of eight months he became 
identified, in 1901, with the Northwestern Sampling Works at Wallace, Idaho, then 
owned and operated by G. D. Potter and C. M. Witloff. In May, 1902, these gentle- 



07073 



100 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

men sold their plant to the Mine Owners' Association, with which Mr. Adami 
continued as chief assayer. In October, 1902, when the Mine Owners' Association 
sold the plan to the American Smelting & Refining Company, our subject remained 

* _ 

therein, acting as assayer and chemist for the Mine Owners' Association and M. E. 
Fisher, representing the American Smelting & Refining Company. In October, 1903, 
the American Smelting & Refining Company sold the plant back to the Mine Owners' 
Association and Mr. Adami was appointed its superintendent. In the spring of 
1906, when the Federal Mining & Smelting Company acquired all the interests of 
the Mine Owners' Association, including the sampling works, Mr. Adami continued 
to do all the assaying and also superintended the operation of the plant, making all 
settlements for ore at that place. From that time to the present he has remained a 
valuable and trusted representative of the company. 

On the 8th of June, 1904, Mr. Adami was united in marriage to Miss Rowena 
McDiarmid, a daughter of J. C. McDiarmid, of Wallace, Idaho, who was one of the 
early pioneers of the Coeur d'Alene district, coming to Murray, Idaho, with the first 
gold rush. During the troublesome times in that district he served as deputy 
sheriff under Angus Sutherland. Mr. and Mrs. Adami have one daughter, Dorothy, 
who was born in 1907. 



COLONEL WILLIAM R. ABERCROMBIE. 

Colonel William R. Abercrombie, military commander, scientist, explorer and 
promoter of various important business projects which have been of almost in- 
calculable value in the development of the northwest, was born at Fort Ridgely, 
Minnesota, August 17, 1857. His father, General John J. Abercrombie, who was 
born in Baltimore, Maryland, was a graduate of the West Point Military Academy 
of the class of 1822 and after fifty-five years' service in the United States army 
retired in 1877. He won distinction and honors in connection with service in the 
Indian wars, participating in the Seminole and the Black Hawk wars, also the 
Mexican and the Civil wars. In the last named he passed through all of the grades 
from that of second lieutenant to general officer. Through previous generations 
this military trait has been traced, the family being descended from Ralph Aber- 
crombie, of the English , army, who settled in this country after the battle of 
Ticonderoga. Of the three sons of General John J. Abercrombie two served in 
the army and one in the navy. The eldest son, J. J. Abercrombie, who became 
captain of artillery, is now retired and is living in Chicago, where he is conduct- 
ing a brokerage business. Ensign F. P. Abercrombie, who was in the volunteer 
service, is now division superintendent of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The two 
daughters are: Mrs. W. E. Goodman, living at Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia; and 
Mrs. John Cole Rutherford, of Park, New Jersey. 

Colonel William R. Arbercrombie, whose name introduces this review, was edu- 
cated in Queen's county, Long Island, New York, pursuing his course in Flower 
Hill Academy. He became connected with the United States army at the age of 
nineteen years and was commissioned second lieutenant in the Second Infantry 
by General Grant in March, 1877. In July of that year he came to the Pacific 
coast to take part in the Nez Perce war. He went from Atlanta, Georgia, to San 



COL. W. R. ABERCROMBIE 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 103 

Francisco, thence by boat to Portland and by river steamer to Lewiston, from 
which point he marched to Spokane Falls. Here in October the regiment was divided 
and Company E, of which Colonel Abercrombie was then second lieutenant, took 
its station at Fort Colville. Two companies built log cabins there while another 
company went to the Palouse country and the remainder of the troops went to 
Coeur d'Alene. In 1878 Colonel Abercrombie took part in the Bannock Indian 
war and the following year was quartermaster of an expedition into the Moses 
country in what is now known as the Great Bend, and encamped at the mouth 
of Foster creek on the Columbia river through the winter of 1879-80. In the 
spring of the latter year he proceeded by boatf down the Columbia river and began 
building a post at Lake Chelan. Owing to the roughness of the country that post 
was afterward abandoned in the fall of 1880, and Colonel Abercrombie was ap- 
pointed to duty at the mouth of the Spokane river, where he acted as quarter- 
master and commissary. 

In 1882 trains began running to Fort Coeur d'Alene and with many of the 
events which have marked the upbuilding of this section of the country since that 
time Colonel Abercrombie has been closely associated. In 1882 he was detailed 
to take the census of Indians on the Colville and Moses reservations, and in 1883 
he made a survey of Pend d'Oreille river and Pend d'Oreille lake to the forty-ninth 
parallel and in 1 884 commanded his first expedition into Alaska, locating the Copper 
river delta. Two years later he conducted an expedition and made a survey of the 
Priest river country and from 1886 until 1896 was stationed at Fort Omaha, Ne- 
braska. He participated in various Indian campaigns throughout the west and 
was called out for active duty at the time of the riots in Chicago, in Butte and 
in other places. In 1897 he was stationed at Fort Harrison, Montana, and made 
surveys between the forty-seventh and forty-ninth parallels, and from the one 
hundred and ninth to the one hundred and .eleventh meridians, which included the 
Miras Indian reservation and other public „ lands. In 1898 he was quartermaster 
of the Reindeer train which was attached to the expedition for the relief of des- 
titute miners in the Yukon country in Alaska, and after the completion of that 
work, in the same year, he commanded the Alaska exploration expedition, No. 2, 
for the exploration of the Copper river valley with a view to discovering and lo- 
cating an all-American route from tide water on Prince William's Sound to the 
international boundary between Canada and the United States, and Belle Isle and 
the Yukon river. 

In 1889 Colonel Abercrombie commanded the Copper river exploration ex- 
pedition operating from Port Valdez, Alaska. He discovered and located an all- 
American route from Port Valdez to the Tanana river, and the same year was 
appointed chief engineer of the department of Alaska and construction engineer 
of the trans- Alaskan military road. From 1899 until 1901 he was engaged as 
constructing engineer of the trans-Alaskan military road from Valdez to the Yukon 
river, covering four hundred and eighty miles, and in 1902 he was acting engineer- 
ing officer of the department of the Columbia at Vancouver Barracks, Washington. 
In 1908 he was in service in the Philippine islands and in 1905-6 was on recruit- 
ing duty in the northern part of the state of New Jersey. In 1907 he was com- 
mander at Fort Reno, Oklahoma, and in 1908 was on foreign service in the Philip- 
pine islands, while in 1910 he was commander at Fort Wright, at which point he 
retired from active service and came to Spokane to make his home. He continued 



104 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

in active military duty for thirty-three years, spending ten years, summer and 
winter, in tents. He is now connected with mining projects, having owned min- 
ing property since 1884. This is located at Cornucopia, Oregon, and he is also 
chief engineer of development in the Willapa Harbor, in Pacific county. He has 
gold and silver bearing properties and the company is now operating a twenty 
stamp mill. Colonel Abercrombie is also interestd in the Willapa-Pacific Town- 
site Company, the town site being located in Willapa county, at the mouth of the 
Willapa river about two miles south of South Bend. His long and varied experi- 
ence in engineering work during his connection with the army well qualifies him 
for important duties that are now devolving upon him in this connection. 

Colonel Abercrombie was the first soldier that came into the town of Spokane 
and the first man he met in the settlement was James Glover. The Indians had 
been dancing and making merry for a week before his arrival. Being a good fisher- 
man he obtained promise from the commanding officer, General Wheaton, allow- 
ing him to go ahead of the command so he could fish. At that time there were 
only about three houses in the town and these mere shacks. In front of one was 
sitting a big, handsome fellow who called to the colonel as the latter went by, and 
he noticed that the man did not look very happy. His expression changed, how- 
ever, to one of joy when in response to his question as to how many soldiers were 
behind the Colonel he was informed that there were about seven hundred. The 
man was Mr. Glover and Colonel Abercrombie afterward learned that he had not 
slept for several nights and it was a question when the sun went down whether 
he would ever see it rise again, for the Indians were getting excited and 
were showing marked signs of hostility. Colonel Abercrombie became well 
acquainted with the early settlers including James Monaghan, Cowley, Dumheller, 
Gray, Yetson, Post and a host of others, and it was this that induced him finally 
to settle in Spokane. As he said, he "learned to know these men as one only can 
in days when their worldly possessions were represented by a sack of flour and 
a slab of bacon." It is in such days when privations are great and hardships are 
many that the real nature of the individual is seen and in those pioneer times men 
learned to know each other for what they were really worth in character and ability. 
It was because of the strong friendships which he formed in those early days that 
Colonel Abercrombie returned to Spokane to make this city his home. 

It was on the 18th of October, 1886, in New York city, that Colonel Aber- 
crombie was married to Miss Lillian Kimball, a daughter of General A. S. Kimball, 
of the United States army, under whom he had served as department quarter- 
master at Vancouver Barracks, Washington, when the General was chief quarter- 
master of the department of the Columbia. Mrs. Abercrombie is a Daughter of 
the American Revolution. By her marriage she has become the mother of two 
daughters, Frances K. and Clara De Normandy, both of whom are now students 
at Brunot Hall. 

Colonel Abercrombie's club relations are extensive and indicate his high stand- 
ing in the different localities where he has resided for any length of time. They 
are also indicative of the nature of his interests. He belongs to the National Geo- 
graphic Society, the Geographic Society of Philadelphia and the Explorers Club 
of New York, of which he is a charter member. He is likewise a charter member 
of the Army and Navy Club of New York, is a member of the Arctic Brotherhood 
of Alaska, the Army and Navy Club of Manila, the Spokane Club, the Spokane 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 105 

■Country Club, the Officers Club of Fort Wright, the Historical Society of Penn- 
sylvania, the Tillicum Club of Valdez and the Wanderers Club of Hong Kong, China. 
His have been thrilling experiences which can never come to one whose interests 
are confined to a single locality or whose efforts are concentrated along a single 
line of business. In fact, in purpose and in activity he has reached out over con- 
stantly broadening fields, meeting with such experiences as have caused him to 
place a correct valuation upon life and its contacts. He has preserved a splendid 
balance between the physical, mental and moral development and his friendships 
are largely with those whom experience and ability have raised above the ordinary 
level of life. 



JACOB STITZEL. 



Some men are born with ability so comprehensive that they succeed in anything 
they undertake. They have a clear discernment, a wise discrimination and a well 
balanced judgment not possessed by ordinary individuals. They inspire confidence 
in others and when they need assistance in any undertaking it is forthcoming. They 
do not seem to be hampered by difficulties to which others bow and they appear to 
be the natural leaders in their respective communities. To this class belonged Jacob 
Stitzel, of Colville, now deceased, who was for twenty years United States court 
commissioner and served in many important public and private positions of honor 
and trust. He was a native of Pennsylvania, born at Gettysburg, in 1831, a son of 
John and Sarah (Smith) Stitzel. 

In 1837 he removed with his parents to Carlisle, Ohio, and at the age of ten 
years secured employment in a store, where he continued for three years. Later 
he occupied similar positions at Addison and Troy, Ohio. He possessed very limited 
advantages of education at the public schools but he was a man of fine powers of ob- 
servation, which in a large measure compensated for his early lack of educational 
training. At the age of eighteen, desirous of seeing the world and yielding to the 
gold excitement, he started for the Pacific coast and it was on this journey that he 
undertook his first great responsibility. A thousand people about to leave the 
Missouri river found themselves without a leader and a vote resulted in the selec- 
tion of Jacob Stitzel as commander of the expedition. Although he had not yet 
arrived at the age of manhood, he accepted the position and discharged his duties 
during the long and toilsome journey over the plains and across the mountains in a 
way that indicated these hardy pioneers had made no mistake in selecting a beard- 
less youth as their leader. He arrived at Sacramento in September, 1849, and for 
fourteen months engaged in mining on the American river with fair success. In 
October, 1850, he attended the first meeting of California pioneers at San Fran* 
cisco, and during the same month came north to Astoria and made the trip from 
that place to Portland in a rowboat. Soon afterward he associated in business with 
Judge Piatt of Oregon City and also took up a donation claim of three hundred 
and twenty acres in Clackamas county. After spending six years farming he re- 
moved to Portland and engaged in mercantile pursuits, being identified from 1861 
to 1866 in the lumber business. In 1864 he was elected sheriff of Multnomah 
county and was reelected two years later, serving four years. After retiring from 



106 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

this office he engaged in the real-estate business and was instrumental in introducing 
the first foreign capital to Oregon. In 1872 he went to Washington, D. C, on a 
special political mission to secure public appropriation for Oregon and was suc- 
cessful even against the influence of congressional representatives, Oregon being 
then a democratic state. In 1874 he was appointed deputy collector of customs 
for eastern Washington and northern Idaho, with headquaters at Fort Colville, a 
position which he held until 1880, when he was appointed clerk of the United 
States circuit court of Colville. While serving as clerk he filed upon a tract of land 
near Colville, which he disposed of a few years ago at a very handsome figure, thus 
rounding out his declining years in comfort. In 1883 Mr. Stitzel was elected to 
the territorial legislature and served four years in the senate. At the conclusion 
of his legislative term he was again commissioned as clerk of the United States 
court and remained in that position until the admission of Washington as a state in 
1889, when he was elected clerk of the superior court, serving one term. Owing to 
his great efficiency in handling government business he was appointed United States 
court commissioner in 1892, a position which he filled for nearly twenty years, per- 
forming his duties in a manner that secured the very best results for the public 
service. 

Mr. Stitzel was married in Clackamas county, Oregon, to Miss Mary W. Hal- 
prunner. Of their children four survive. Martha A., the widow of the late General 
Evan Miles, of San Francisco; Mary E., who is the wife of A. H. Moor, of Ta- 
coma; Kathrine S., who married Gilbert S. Ide, of Colville, a record of whom ap- 
pears elsewhere in this work; and James H., of Colville. 

Mr. Stitzel died January 22, 1911, having arrived at the age of four score 
years. In politics he adhered to the republican party, and was one of the most 
prominent workers in its behalf in Stevens county. He was chairman of the state 
republican convention in 1883 and presided over many important political gather- 
ings. He was offered the post of minister to China by President Grant but de- 
clincd it. For three years in the early '70s he was chief of the mounted police in 
Washington, D. C. Fraternally he was identified with the Odd Fellows and Re- 
bekahs, being a member of the former fifty-three years, and of the latter for fifty- 
two years. His only request in his last days was that he should be buried by those 
organizations. He assisted in organizing the Stevens County Pioneer Association 
and was its first president. He was for many years an active member of the Con- 
gregational church and was a man of pronounced tendencies though not given to in- 
truding his opinions upon others. 

The funeral services of this good man and citizen drew the largest attendance 
known in Colville. Rev. G. H. Wilbur, who had been pastor of the church of which 
Mr. Stitzel was a member, had charge of the exercises and in the course of his re- 
marks he said: 

"Thus passes from our midst a man beloved by all, whose life was worth while 
and whose memory must be preserved. His home, -his heart, his very life was 
wrapped up in this section. He believed in Stevens county and spread the doctrine. 
His innate kindliness won the hearts of newcomers. His counsel won the respect 
of residents. His life was a tribute to the principles of honesty, truthfulness and 
helpfulness. It avails nothing to mourn his death. The fact that he has ceased 
to be is not nearly so important as that he has been — that he has lived to a purpose 
— that he has worked and his work has been found good. This country was a wilder- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 107 

ness when he first viewed it, but before his death he saw the portals of time swing 
open and disclose a country born of freedom and teeming with healthful life and 
industry — partly the result of his own efforts. This country — his country — bears 
the impress of his activities. Let his name be carried down to succeeding genera- 
tions as one to be revered. Let him be remembered as a master builder." 

The following resolution adopted by the bar association of Stevens county elo- 
quently expresses the sentiments of the legal fraternity as to the work and character 
oi Mr. Stitzel : 

"Inasmuch as one of the oldest and most honorable citizens of Colville has 
passed from our midst and gone to join the other pioneers of the west, who have 
journeyed on to that great unexplored country, from whose bourne no traveler re-, 
turns; 

"And inasmuch as this citizen, whose loss to the community can hardly be 
estimated at this time, has lived among us, honored and respected for so many 
years, it seems right and proper that this court, the bar of Stevens county, and the 
officers of the court should take cognizance of the passing of one of our foremost 
citizens : 

"Resolved, That we as members of the bar of Stevens county, together with the 
judge and officers of this court should and do seize upon this opportunity to honor 
the character and memory of our departed friend, and in token of our appreciation 
of the life and character of Jacob Stitzel, in token of the respect with which we 
have ever regarded him, in token of the sympathy which we feel for the bereaved 
family who mourn his loss and in consideration of his services as one of the earliest 
officers of this court, that the members of the bar of this county and the officers of this 
court stand while his honor adjourns the labors of the court for a season to enable 
all to pay their respects to the memory of the departed." 



JOHN B. TAYLOR. 



Since coming west twenty-five years ago, John B. Taylor has been closely asso- 
ciated with his brother, Marshall M. Taylor, in various business enterprises meeting 
with like success as a reward for steadfast application and competent management. 
He is four years his brother's junior, having been born April 22, 1866, in Jackson 
county, Iowa. His parents were Stephen L. and Cecelia (Dupuy) Taylor, who lived 
in Iowa where the father operated a grist mill near Fulton. He obtained his educa- 
tion in the schools of Jackson county, Iowa, and at Valparaiso University, in Val- 
paraiso, Indiana, after which he took a commercial course in a business college in 
Chicago. In 1886 he came west with his brother, Marshall M., and located for a 
short time in eastern Oregon. Later he engaged in the clothing business in Cheney, 
Washington, removing from there to Wallace, Idaho, where they conducted a similar 
business for nine years. In 1904 he came to Coeur d'Alene and with his brother or- 
ganized the Coeur d'Alene Hardware Company, selling this after a year and a half 
in order to engage in the real-estate business. They have been very prosperous in 
this venture and have platted a large number of new additions in Coeur d'Alene, sell- 
ing city lots, and ten-acre tracts for fruit-raising purposes. Mr. Taylor is interested 
in various other financial enterprises in addition to his real-estate business. He is 



108 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

vice-president of the Exchange National Bank of Coeur d'Alene, and also of the Bank 
of St. Joe, of St. Joe, Idaho, and is a stockholder in the Bank of St Maries, of St. 

Maries, Idaho. 

Fraternally Mr. Taylor is affiliated with the Masonic order, being a member of 
that lodge at Wallace, Idaho. He is also a member of the Commercial Club of Coeur 
d'Alene. 



WILSON C. KIPP. 



Wilson C. Kipp, president and treasurer of the Pohlman-Kipp Company, pro- 
prietors of a confectionery, ice cream parlor and tea room, is in this connection at 
the head of one of the popular business enterprises of Spokane. Moreover, he has 
important landed interests as secretary and treasurer of the Interstate Irrigation 
Company. He was born in Cresco, Iowa, November 30, 1869, a son of Wilson D. and 
Elizabeth J. (Turner) Kipp. The father was the proprietor of a general mer- 
cantile store in Cresco and was one of the pioneer residents of Iowa, where he con- 
tinued to make his home until the spring of 1888 when he came to the coast, residing 
at Healdsburg, California, for about six months. On the expiration of that period he 
came to the Spokane country, settling on a homestead claim in Lincoln county in 
1899. Since that time he has been identified with the agricultural development of 
the Inland Empire. His family numbered four sons and a daughter, Harold T., 
Robert H., Charles T., Emma J. and Wilson C, all now residents of Spokane. 

"In the public schools of New Hampton, Iowa, Wilson C. Kipp pursued his edu- 
cation and through his boyhood days worked with his father, thus receiving a thor- 
ough business training and early learning the lesson that industry wins, so that in- 
dustry has been the beacon light of his life. He was a young man of about nineteen 
years when the family came to the west and soon after the removal from California 
he went to Davenport, Washington, entering the employ of Knapp-Burrell & Com- 
pany, an agricultural implement house, whom he represented as a traveling salesman 
throughout the Inland Empire for six years. In 1895 they retired from this field and 
Mr. Kipp together with W. W. Redhead who had been their general agent here, took 
over the business under the firm name of Redhead & Kipp. After three years Mr. 
Kipp sold out to his partner and in 1898 joined J. V. Pohlman in establishing their 
present business in the Whitten block, at the corner of Post street and Sprague ave- 
nue. In 1900 they removed to their present quarters, at No. 720 Riverside avenue, 
an estimate of the volume of the business is indicated in the fact that they serve about 
five thousand persons daily. Of the company Mr. Kipp is the president and treas- 
urer and the progressive methods which he has instituted have been one of the salient 
factors in the continuous and substantial growth of the business. Moreover, he is the 
secretary and treasurer of the Interstate Irrigation Company, which owns over two 
thousand acres of irrigated land at Hayden Lake, Idaho. 

Mr. Kipp belongs to Spokane Lodge, No. 34, F. & A. M.; Spokane Lodge, No. 
228, B. P. O. E.; to the Spokane Club; and he is a life member of the Spokane Ama- 
teur Athletic Club. His unfeigned cordiality and social nature render him popular 
not only in the immediate circles of his friends but also in business circles. In his 
business life he has been a persistent, resolute and energetic worker, keeping his hand 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 109 

steadily upon the helm .of his commercial interests and strictly conscientious in his 
dealings with debtor and creditor alike. Keenly alive to the possibilities of every 
new avenue opened in the natural ramifications of trade, he has passed over the pit- 
falls into which unrestricted progressiveness is so frequently led and has focused his 
energies in directions where fruition has been resultant. 



WALTER J. SULLIVAN. 

Walter J. Sullivan has worked his way steadily upward to a position of promi- 
nence in business circles, being now president and manager of the Wallace Produce 
Company, the only concern of its kind in the Coeur d'Alene district. His birth oc- 
curred at Orillia, Ontario, Canada, on the 5th of January, 1882, his parents being 
John and Mary (Cosgrove) Sullivan. He supplemented his early education by a two 
years' academic course in the Toronto University and in 1900, when a youth of eight- 
een, entered the employ of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company as a clerk in their 
office at Moorhead, Minnesota. Six years later he was acting as their ticket agent at 
Fargo, North Dakota. In 1906 he went to Winnipeg, Manitoba, as city ticket agent 
for the Soo Line, there remaining for about a year and a half. Late in the year 1907 
he came to Wallace, Idaho, as the Wallace agent of the Northern Pacific Railroad 
Company, serving in that capacity for twelve months. In 1908 he entered the ser- 
vice of the Wallace Produce Company, then under the management of Fred J. Day, 
acting as bookkeeper for one year. In 1909 having demonstrated his fitness for the 
position, he was made manager of the concern and on the 1st of January, 1911, was 
chosen president, the other officers being as follows: J. W. Tabor, vice president; 
and R. T. IMllworth, of Spokane, secretary and treasurer. The Wallace Produce 
Company, an incorporated concern, handles produce of all kinds and is the only 
enterprise of this character in the Coeur d'Alene district. 

On the 18th of August, 1906, Mr. Sullivan was united in marriage to Miss Jane 
Christianson, of St. Paul, Minnesota. Fraternally he is identified with the Knights 
of Columbus at Wallace, being now the deputy grand knight. His life record is an 
excellent illustration of the fact that in America there is opportunity for all and that 
labor is king in this land, for his untiring diligence has been the key which has un- 
locked for him the portals of success. 



HARVEY NEIL STRONACH. 

The position of secretary of the Cheney Normal school calls for sound judgment 
and good business capacity as well as knowledge of human nature and practical ex- 
perience in the world. These qualities are possessed by Harvey Neil Stronach, hence 
his marked success in connection with the school. He is a native of Halifax, Nova 
Scotia, born December 29, 1879, being a son of William P. and Jessie (Ray) Stro- 
nach both of whom are deceased. The family originated in Scotland and ancestors 
of the subject of this review were early settlers of Nova Scotia. The grandfather 
and one other person received as a reward for services Hye hundred acres of land 



110 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

apiece near Margaretsville, Annapolis county, Nova Scotia. The mountains of 
that region still bear the name of Stronach. The father and great-grandfather 
were engaged in the general mercantile business and shipbuilding. They became 
wealthy but loss most of their fortune through the great depression in sailing- 
ship values. 

Mr. Stronach, whose name stands at the head of this review, received his prelim- 
inary education in the public schools of Nova Scotia and later became a student of 
the Middleton high school, from which he was graduated in 1897. He attended the 
Truro Agricultural College and the National Business College, graduating from the 
latter in 1904. Believing that conditions were more favorable for an ambitious young 
man in the United States than in Canada, Mr. Stronach came to Spokane and from 
1905 to 1909 filled the position of principal of the Commercial department of the 
Northwestern Business College of that city. He then went to Lewiston, Idaho, and 
taught for one year in the high school. At the end of the time named he came to 
Cheney and has since served as secretary of the normal school, discharging his duties 
in a manner which has been highly acceptable to the trustees and patrons of the insti- 
tution. He is also purchasing agent for the school. He is greatly interested in the 
development of eastern Washington and is owner of a tract of irrigated land near 
Havden lake. 

Politically Mr. Stronach supports the candidates and principles of the republican 
party. He is a valued member of the Masonic order and also of the Order of the 
Eastern Star. While at Spokane he was connected with the Amateur Athletic Club 
and the Business Men's Club of the Young Men's Christian Association. Being a 
man of unusual energy and great perseverance in anything he undertakes, he has won 
his way to the front in the state of his adoption and is known as one of the wide-aWake 
and responsible citizens of Cheney. That the circle of his influence will be greatly 
enlarged in years to come is the confident prophecy of his friends. 



WILLIAM J. NICKERSON. 

William J. Nickerson, while conducting a general real-estate business, largely 
handles his own properties. While he is now developing and conducting an 
extensive business in the purchasing and sale of realty he has also been most 
active as a factor in promoting the progress and advancing the civilization which 
has taken Spokane and this section of the state out of the pioneer class, placing 
the city with all of its advantages, opportunities and improvements on a par with 
the cities of the older east. His birth occurred near Coburg, Ontario, Canada, 
August 8, 1848. His father, Ephraim Andrew Nickerson, also a native of that 
country, was descended in the maternal line from a family represented in the 
Revolutionary war. His mother's ancestors were from Amsterdam, Holland, and 
in the early colonial epoch settled on the Hudson river where the Van Rensselaers 
also located. She was taken prisoner by the Indians and held in captivity for a 
long time but was afterward released. Her father, however, was kept as a prisoner 
by the Indians for seven years and her adopted brother, when captured, was killed 
and un jointed from his toes to his hips, the pieces of his body being thrown down 
before his foster father. Ephraim Andrew Nickerson, born and reared in Canada, 



W. J. NICKBRBON AND FAMILY 



u 



it) .' ' ' . ' 



; ( 



JL- * 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 113 

resided for a number of years in Iowa, where he filled the office of justice of the 
peace and school director and held other positions of public trust. \t was in 1855 
that he became a resident of Manchester, Delaware county, Iowa, where he en- 
gaged in farming and in following that pursuit he provided a comfortable living 
for his family. He died in 1892 but is still survived by his wife, who is living 
in Spokane at the advanced age of ninety-one years. She bore the maiden name 
of Elizabeth Ash and was born in Canada, where she was married though she was 
reared in the United States. 

William J. Nickerson was a young lad when the family left Canada, going 
first to Illinois and thence to the vicinity of Manchester, Iowa, where the father 
purchased land, the family there residing until 1868. On the 1st of June, 1864, 
they went to Oakland, California, making the long trip across the plains, and 
William J. Nickerson attended school in Alameda and afterward became a col- 
lege student at San Jose and Santa Clara, being graduated in the latter city in 
1865. In that year he went to San Francisco, where he engaged in the shipping 
and forwarding business, first being employed as porter for the firm of Moss, 
Beadle, Goodall & Perkins. From that position he was advanced through inter- 
mediate positions to that of chief bookkeeper and had general charge of the busi- 
ness in the office until 1874. For a short time he engaged in the commission busi- 
ness on his own account in partnership with a man named Danzell. In 1888 he 
made his way to Washington and afterward to Plaza, Washington, and during 
the succeeding eighteen years was closely connected with mercantile interests of 
that place. He also served as postmaster there for sixteen ^years, from 1892 until 
1908. Seeking a still broader field of labor he N rfcmovdd from Plaza to Spokane 
where he has since engaged in real-estate and- mining* interests. Like most of 
the men who have lived in the northwest he had at different times been closely 
associated with mining and the life of the camps in all of its different phases was 
familiar to him. He went to Idaho in • 1 888, going over the "Jackass" trail and 
digging a way through the snow, being thirteen days on that trail. He pur- 
chased what was then known as the Charles Dickens mine but is now called 
the Idaho Knickerbocker mine, a very fine property which is now shipping its 
product. He also purchased placer mining ground on Trail creek and was 
very successful in working it. In the fall of 1884 he was there joined by his 
wife. Conditions seemed very crude at times and yet there was a hospitality which 
made life enjoyable. At the first dance held there the men dressed in miner's 
clothes with long-topped boots, but everybody greatly enjoyed the ball. There 
was no school in the district and to meet this need Mr. Nickerson and others organ- 
ized a school, getting up entertainments in order to meet the expenses. They pro- 
duced such plays as "Uncle Tom's Cabin," and it is said that "dollars fairly rained 
upon the stage" until they had money enough to build a schoolhouse and pay the 
teacher. The town was then called Beaver but the name has since been changed 
to Delta. While at Plaza Mr. Nickerson filled the office of justice of the peace. 

With advancing years and the changes in conditions Mr. Nickerson wished to 
become a factor in the city life with its broader business opportunities and re- 
moved to Spokane, where he has since conducted a general real-estate business al- 
though much of the property which he handles he purchased outright. He is still 
interested in the Idaho Knickerbocker and the Royal Copper Mining Companies, 

of which he is secretary-treasurer. He is also interested in the Valley Mining 
vol n— e 



114 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Company and other mining property near Valley, Washington, and he likewise 
owns property near Princeton, British Columbia, comprising twenty-four claims. 

In 1872, in Solano county, California, Mr. Nickerson was united in marriage 
to Miss Alice E. Patterson, a daughter of Robert Patterson, of Solano county, 
formerly of Pennsylvania, and a representative of one of the old American fam- 
ilies. They have become parents of three children: William Harley; Claude 
Robert; and Pearl E., who is the wife of John Moore, of Mount Vernon, Wash- 
ington. 

While residing in California Mr. Nickerson served in the state militia for five 
years as a member of Company A, of the First Regiment of the California Na- 
tional Guards of San Francisco. He was also made a Mason in San Francisco 
lodge. In politics he is a republican and has been a delegate to various county and 
state conventions of his party. At different times he has held local offices and 
was very active as a political leader in Idaho during the early days. He is now 
identified with the Chamber of Commerce and has ever kept in touch with the 
trend of modern progress, becoming a cooperant factor in the projects and move- 
ments which have brought about the present day civilization and prosperity. 



JOHN RICKEY. 



John Rickey, who has been successfully identified with the dairy interests of Col- 
ville for the past sixteen years, has also been a factor in public life here, having 
served an unexpired term, to fill a vacancy, and two full terms as treasurer of Stevens 
county. He was born in Knox county, Ohio, on the 19th of October, 1844, and is a 
son of Foster and Nancy (Bowles) Rickey. The father, who was one of the pioneer 
agriculturists of Ohio, passed away in 1851 and the mother survived until 1863. 

The common schools of Ohio and Illinois equipped John Rickey for the responsi- 
bilities of life by providing him with a good, practical education. At the age of eight- 
een years he left Illinois and went to Iowa, engaging as a farm hand. Two years 
later he again started westward, locating in California, where he spent a similar time, 
working in a flour mill. In April, 1866, he came to the Colville valley and engaged 
in prospecting in the mines, devoting the majority of his time to this occupation dur- 
ing the next ten years, two of which he spent in British Columbia. In 1872 he took 
up a homestead in the vicinity of Colville, operating his land in connection with his 
other activities for twenty years and set out the first orchard in Stevens county three 
miles below Kettle Falls, in 1 874. It was this orchard that revealed to the settlers 
the suitability of the land and climate for that purpose and it has been resultant in 
the present large acreage in this district devoted to that pursuit. In 1887 he em- 
barked in the general mercantile business in Colville, continuing in this line for about 
eighteen months. He was appointed county treasurer in 1889 to fill an unexpired 
term of one year, at the expiration of which period he was elected to the same office, 
being reelected in 1892. When he withdrew from public life in 1894, he engaged 
in the dairy business, which he followed for three years. At the end of that time 
he retired but the following year again resumed the operation of his dairy and has 
ever since been identified with the business. He has a fine place, well equipped with 
all modern appliances and conveniences for the work of dairying, in which he is 
meeting with good returns. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 115 

On the 9th of October, 1882, Mr. Rickey was united in marriage to Miss Delphine 
Jeanette, a daughter of Frank Jeanette, a resident of Stevens county. Of this union 
there have been born nine children, seven of whom are living, as follows : Foster, who 
married Hazel Jameson; Ida; Meta; Iona; Nora; Bertha, ajid Orpha. Those de- 
ceased are Walter, and an infant who was not yet named. 

In his political views, Mr. Rickey is a republican, and besides filling the office of 
treasurer he served for several years as justice of the peace while a resident of Kettle 
Falls precinct, when living on his homestead. He has also been a delegate to a num- 
ber of county conventions, always having been prominent in his party. Mr. Rickey is 
a member of the Stevens County Pioneers Society, and has always taken an active and 
helpful interest in all matters pertaining to the public welfare and the development of 
the community. 



JOHN MATTYSHOCK. 



The hardware and implement business of Hillyard finds a worthy representa- 
tive in John Matty shock, who is also largely interested in mining and is known as 
one of the substantial men of the community. He was born near Breslau, Ger- 
many, June 12, 1877, a son of Frank and Agnes (Smichly) Matty shock. The 
father died in 1908 and the mother passed away one year previously. 

John Matty shock passed his boyhood under the paternal roof and in the public 

* 

schools of his native land secured the rudiments of an education. At the age of 
fourteen he emigrated to the United States and after landing at New York pro- 
ceeded directly to Labolt, South Dakota, where he secured employment as a section 
hand on the Great Northern Railway. After working for a year, he went to 
Thompson, North Dakota, and followed the same work, proceeding a year later to 
Benson, Minnesota, at which place he filled the position of section foreman. He 
performed his duties so acceptably, that after two years he was promoted to the 
position of inventory inspector of the Breckenridge division, but occupied his new 
office only two months, when he was sent to Breckenridge as yard foreman. Per- 
ceiving the importance of additional education, he became a student in a business 
college at Sauk Center, Minnesota, and after one winter at this institution returned 
to the railway service as section foreman at Kerkhoven, Minnesota. Once more 
he gave up outdoor labor and entered a business college, and after completing a 
course at Minneapolis he went to Murdock, Minnesota, to fill a position as section 
foreman. He occupied the same position for six months at Browns Valley, Minne- 
sota, and at the end of that time went to Havre, Montana, and for ten months was 
stationary engineer at the roundhouse. His next employment was as handy man 
at the roundhouse at Hillyard, Washington, a position which he filled for three 
years. Having decided to give up the railroad business, he located on one hundred 
and sixty acres of land near Jennings, Montana, but after five years' residence 
returned to Washington and for two years was engaged in government service in 
the navy-yard at Bremerton. In 1909 he returned to Hillyard and associated with 
M. H. Gordon in the hardware and implement business. The firm has been highly 
successful and as the partners are both men of good business judgment and under- 
stand the wants of the public in everything pertaining to hardware and implements, 



116 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

the outlook is indeed bright for a steady increase of prosperity. In 1910 Mr. 
Mattyshock filled the office of secretary and treasurer of the Idaho Consolidated 
Mining Company and he is interested in a number of mines in this part of the 
country. 

On January 2, 1911, Mr. Mattyshock was married at Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, to 
Miss Mamie Edwards, a daughter of pioneer farmers of this country. Politically 
Mr. Mattyshock is independent. He belongs to the Knights of Columbus and the 
Elks and can claim many friends in those organizations as well as outside of secret 
societies. He is an active, industrious and progressive man and is now fairly 
launched in a successful business which gives promise of gratifying returns in 
years to come. He is honored and respected wherever his name is known and ranks 
as one of the popular citizens of Hillyard — a man who has been true to every 
obligation and whose word is to him as binding as his bond. 



HON. GEORGE TURNER. 

Among Spokane's citizens who have figured in national affairs Hon. George 
Turner is prominent. His public service has rested upon the firm basis of a wide and 
thorough knowledge of the law and he has never regarded a public office as a per- 
sonal asset to be used for the promotion of individual interests but rather as a 
trust to be sacredly guarded for the benefit of his country and his constituents. While 
in the courts he has been an important factor in the interpretation of the laws and 
in congress he has aided in formulating the legal principles which constitute the 
stable forces of the nation. It would be difficult to point out that period of his life 
which has been of greatest benefit to his fellowmen, for as supreme court justice of 
Washington during territorial days, as a member of the constitutional convention of 
the state, as a member of the United States senate and in diplomatic service his 
work has all been fruitful of good results. 

Judge Turner was born in Edina, Knox county, Missouri, February 25, 1850, a 
son of Grenville Davenport and Maria (Taylor) Turner. His parents in 1825 had 
removed from Kentucky to Missouri and had cast in their lot with the pioneer set- 
tlers of the latter state, where they maintained their residence until called to their 
final rest. The father, who was a cabinetmaker by trade, came of English and 
Dutch ancestry, while his wife, a daughter of George and Maria Taylor, was rep- 
resentative of a family of Scotch-Irish origin that had settled at an early period in 
the part of Virginia which is now West Virginia. 

About 1859 Grenville D. Turner removed with his family to Lebanon, Laclede 
county, Missouri, and his son, George, then a lad of nine years, became a pupil in 
the public schools, but his education was interrupted owing to the fact that the 
schools were obliged to be closed when Missouri became the scene of conflict between 
contending armies in the Civil war. His father and all of his brothers promptly 
espoused the cause of the Union and served with the volunteer soldiers in the north- 
ern army. Judge Turner also proved his worth to his country in that trying hour 
for, although but thirteen years of age, he became a military telegraph operator in 
his home town of Lebanon, continuing at that work until the end of the war. He was 
in the south during the reconstruction period and passed the examination for admis- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 117 

siod to the bar at Mobile, Alabama, in 1868, although but eighteen years of age. The 
same year he entered upon the active practice of law in Mobile in connection with a 
friend, Charles E. Mayer, and displayed such ability in the conduct of cases that in 
1874 the republican party of Alabama named him as its candidate for the office of 
attorney general of the state. Such was his personal popularity and the confidence 
reposed in his ability that he polled a very large vote, being defeated by only a 
small majority. Again and again at different periods in his life he has been called 
from private practice to public service. From 1876 until 1880 he filled the position 
of United States marshal for the southern and middle districts of Alabama and in 
the latter year and again in 1884 he was chairman of the Alabama delegation in the 
republican national convention, giving his support in 1880 to General Grant as the 
. presidential nominee. 

Judge Turner's identification with Washington dates from 1884, in which year 
he was appointed associate justice of the supreme court of this territory. He was 
assigned to the fourth district, which included the greater part of eastern Wash- 
ington, and had first made his home in Yakima but in 1885 removed to Spokane, 
where he has since resided. He proved himself the peer of the ablest members who 
have sat upon the supreme court bench of this state, but in 1887 he resigned his ju- 
dicial position to enter upon the private practice of law as a member of the firm of 
Turner, Foster & Turner. That association continued until 1890, when he became 
senior member of the firm of Turner Graves & McKinstry, so continuing until his 
election to the United States senate in 1897. He is now practicing in the firm of 
Turner & Geraghty, a foremost one in the ranks of the legal profession in the state. 
His opinions while on the bench showed great research, industry and care and ex- 
pressed a solidity and an exhaustiveness from which no members of the bar could take 
exception. While well grounded in the principles of common law when admitted to 
practice, he has continued through the whole of his professional life a diligent student 
of those elementary principles that constitute the basis of all legal science. He has 
been connected with few business interests outside the strict path of his profession, 
yet was one of the men largely interested in the celebrated Le Roi mine in British 
Columbia. 

The bent of Judge Turner's active mind has made him take a lively pleasure in 
the study of the science of government and because of this his labors have been par- 
ticularly effective and beneficial in public offices to which he has been called. In 1889 
he rendered valuable service as chairman of the judiciary committee in the conven- 
tion which was called to form the state constitution of Washington and left the 
indelible impress of his individuality upon the organic law of the state. In his politi- 
cal relations he acted with the republican party until 1 896, when he supported Wil- 
liam Jennings Bryan on the silver issue. In the following year he was elected United 
States senator from Washington and in that office served for the full constitutional 
term, retiring in 1903. Presidential appointment made him a member of the Alaska 
boundary tribunal, which met in London in the summer of 1903 and settled the 
Alaskan boundary dispute befween the United States and England. In 1910 he 
received from Secretary of State Root the appointment as leading counsel of the 
United States in the northeastern fisheries arbitration at the Hague. Upon his retire- 
ment from the state department Mr. Root became a participant in the case, where- 
upon Mr. Turner insisted upon withdrawing as leading counsel in favor of Mr. Root. 



118 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

The case was opened for the United States by Mr. Turner, following Sir Robert 
Finley, who opened for Great Britain, each occupying eight days. 

On the 4th of June, 1878, in Montgomery, Alabama, Mr. Turner was united in 
marriage to Miss Bertha C. Dreher, a daughter of George and Catherine (Scheiss) 
Dreher, the father a native of Saxony and the mother of Switzerland. They came to 
this country at an early day and were married in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and later 
removed to Alabama. His social and fraternal relations are with the Masons and the 
Elks, the Spokane Club, the Spokane Athletic Club, the Spokane Country Club, and 
the Metropolitan Club of Washington, D. C. Association with him means expansion 
and elevation. He has throughout his life been a close student of men and affairs 
and his analytical power has brought him clear understanding of both. This same 
power has enabled him at all times to see below the surface of things in his consid- , 
eration of vital state and national questions and to correctly determine the possible 
outcome of a critical situation. The judicial trend of his mind has kept him free 
from personal bias or prejudice in his public acts and his course has at all times 
sustained the honor of state and country without the sacrifice of the rights of other 
lands. A gracious presence, a charming personality and profound legal wisdom all 
combine to make him one of the most distinguished and honored residents of the 
state of Washington. 



WARNER COBB. 



Warner Cobb, deceased, was born in Breckinridge county, Kentucky, October 
7, 1832. The family is of Scotch lineage, having been founded in America by 
his grandfather, who came from Scotland and settled in Virginia. The birth of 
his father, Jesse R. Cobb, occurred in Bedford county, Virginia, and throughout 
his life he followed the occupation of farming. He died, however, in 1839, and 
was long survived by his wife, Mrs. Sallie (Lamb) Cobb, who was born in Camp- 
bell county, Virginia, representing one of the pioneer families of that state, and 
died in Fairfield, Washington, in May, 1889. 

Warner Cobb acquired his education in the public schools of Illinois and Iowa 
and made his initial step in the business world as a farmer in the latter state, but 
in five years removed to Clark county, Missouri, where he also carried on general 
agricultural pursuits. Later he went to California where he spent six years, re- 
siding there from 1852 until 1858. He then returned to Missouri where he engaged 
in farming until 1861, at which time he enlisted in the Confederate army and 
served for three years. He was first a member of Company H of the Missouri 
State Guard for six months, and then joined the Confederate forces that were with 
General Price at Lexington. He participated in the battle at that place, also at 
Prairie Grove and in other smaller engagements, remaining at the front until dis- 
abled by a broken collar-bone in 1864, when he was honorably discharged. 

Following his military service Mr. Cobb went to Illinois, where he engaged 
in farming for two years, and then purchased a tract of land in Bates county, 
Missouri, upon which he resided until 1880. In the spring of that year he came 
to Washington, bringing his family across the plains in wagons. At length they 
reached Hangman Creek and Mr. Cobb bought a relinquishment and filed on a 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 119 

homestead. The nearest place where he could purchase goods then was at Colfax, 
about forty-five miles away, Spokane at that time boasting only of a little trading 
store. He gave his attention to the development and further improvement of the 
farm until the spring of 1905, when he sold out and came to Spokane, having -in 
the meantime served for a number of years in public office. In 1882 he was elected 
probate judge of Spokane county on the democratic ticket and filled that position 
for two years. In 1886 he was elected for a two-years' term to the office of county 
commissioner and in 1910 was again chosen county commissioner, in which capacity 
he served until his death which occurred August 9, 1911. A democrat in politics 
from the time when age conferred upon him the right of franchise, he had been a 
delegate to many county and state conventions, and was a member of the county 
central committee, doing all in his power to promote the growth and secure the 
success of democracy. 

In January, 1867, in Jackson county, Missouri, Mr. Cobb was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Alice Carter, a daughter of Joseph Carter, who was a farmer and 
a representative of a pioneer family of both Kentucky and Missouri. Seven chil- 
dren have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Cobb, as follows: Nevada, the wife of W. 
C. Clark, a government employe in the collector's office at Nashville, Tennessee; 
Elizabeth, who married J. C. Lodge, of Tacoma, Washington, where he is engaged 
as bookkeeper for a lumber company; Jesse T., a farmer of Montana; Joseph E., 
who is married and resides in Northport, Washington, where he carries on mining; 
John P., following agricultural pursuits in Malheur county, Oregon; James W., 
who married Miss May Cleary and is serving as deputy assessor of Spokane county*, 
and Cordelia Ann, the wife of H. C. Worley, a druggist of this city. 

Mr. Cobb belonged to Fairfield Lodge, No. 342, F. & A. M., and held nearly 
all of the offices in the organization, save that of master. He was a member and 
president of the Spokane County Missouri Club for three years, until the time of 
his death. He was recognized as a public-spirited and progressive citizen and 
was thoroughly loyal to the interests of Spokane and his adopted state. The city 
had a population of only two hundred when he arrived here and he witnessed its 
growth to its present proportions. The village has been converted into a city of 
many thousands with every kind of commercial, industrial and manufacturing en- 
terprises, while all the educational advantages known to the older east are also 
to be found here. Mr. Cobb was very enthusiastic in his support of the city and 
of the northwest and in the discharge of his public duties proved himself thor- 
oughly loyal to the state. 



LYMAN F. MILLER. 



A descendant of Revolutionary ancestry and of good fighting stock, Lyman F. 
Miller, of Deer Park, fearlessly performed his duty as a soldier in the Union army 
and has also ably discharged his responsibilities as a private citizen and a public 
officer. A native of Vermont, he was born September 1, 1844, his parents being 
Julius W. and Harriet E. (Field) Miller. The father died in 1895 and the mother 
passed away many years previous, in 1852. The grandfather of our subject on the 



120 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

maternal side was a captain in the war of 1812 and ancestors of the family have been 
traced as far back as Colonial times. 

Lyman F. Miller was taken to Wisconsin when he was eight years old and re- 
ceived his preliminary education in the public schools of that state and Illinois. In 
response to the call of President Lincoln he enlisted in Company C, One hundred and 
sixth Illinois Infantry, and served in the Civil war under General Sherman, under 
General Grant at Vicksburg, and under General Steele in Arkansas. After receiv- 
ing his honorable discharge he went to Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, and was engaged 
in a mill, doing millwright work and filing. In 1871 he engaged at his trade as 
millwright at Lebanon, Missouri, and became half-owner in a mill. After three years 
he went to Marshalltown, Iowa, and followed his trade for eight years in that place. 
He then took up his residence at Bartlett, Nebraska, where he became quite promi- 
nent, serving as county surveyor for four years. He removed to Kinbrae, Minnesota, 
at the end of the time named and followed his trade there, also filling the position 
of mayor of the town for six years and postmaster for eight years. Believing that 
the northwest offered more favorable inducements than he perceived in Minnesota, 
he came to Washington and was for three years a resident of Newport, where he en- 
gaged as a millwright, and from there he removed to Deer Park, where he has since 
remained. He has prospered in his work at this place and is now superintending the 
construction of the new high school building. 

On the 2d of April, 1868, Mr. Miller was married in Wisconsin, to Miss Harriet 
C. Cook, a daughter of Jacob Cook. Her ancestors were among the first German set- 
tlers of New York state. Mr. and Mrs. Miller became the parents of the following 
children: Edward, who married Cora Shipman; Ida M., who is the wife of W. J. 
Drake; Laura E., now Mrs. H. A. Noyse; Nellie H., who married J. Moore; and 
Myrtle. The mother of these children died in 1888. Mr. Miller has given his sup- 
port to the republican party ever since he arrived at manhood and is now serving as 
mayor of Deer Park. He is not identified with any religious denomination but is an 
attendant of the Congregational church. Fraternally he is connected with the Odd 
Fellows and has passed through all the chairs of the subordinate lodge, being at the 
present time chaplain of Deer Park Lodge. He is also a member of the Rebekahs and 
of the Grand Army of the Republic. As is indicated by the various offices he has 
filled, Mr. Miller is highly active and efficient in anything he undertakes. He has 
never shirked responsibility and as he is a man of good judgment and tact he has 
been successful in many important undertakings. He sees no reason to regret estab- 
lishing his permanent home in Deer Park, as here he has found friends and is recog- 
nized as one of the most useful men of the community. 



FRED H. OLIVER. 



Many corporate interests have been promoted and stimulated by the enterprise, 
business activity and executive ability of Fred H. Oliver, who is now largely en- 
gaged in the development and sale of mining properties and is an officer in a num- 
ber of mining companies. His life record had its beginning in New York state 
on the 27th of April, 1862, He is one of a family of seven children, having one 
brother and five sisters. His parents were William H. and Elizabeth (Shaw) 



F. H. OLIVER 









•>« — . . t 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 123 

Oliver, both of whom were born in Maine. Both were of English descent and be- 
longed to families that were represented in the Continental army during the 
Revolutionary war. The mother died in 1881 but the father still survives and 
now makes his home in Spokane. Of their children Frank G. is now a resident 
of Colorado Springs, Colorado, and the five sisters are: Mrs. F. E. Snodgrass, 
of Los Angeles, California; Mrs. Paul Brown, of Portland; Mrs. George Bey- 
stone, of Eau Claire, Wisconsin; Mrs. Fannie Devitt, of Denver, Colorado; and 
Mrs. F. R. Fiske, the wife of Dr. Fiske, of Spokane. 

The youthful days of Fred H. Oliver were passed in Eau Claire, where he 
passed through consecutive grades in the common schools and became a high-school 
pupil. He entered business life in connection with lumber interests in California, 
whither he went in 1879, and there was connected with the lumber trade until 
1882, when he removed to Spokane. He was here engaged in mining until 1888 at 
which time he was appointed Chinese inspector and served for two years. The 
next office to which he was called was that of deputy United States marshal, in 
which he also served for two years, and later he was appointed state road com- 
missioner by Governor McGraw and served for two years. Since his retirement 
therefrom he has been connected with mining interests, devoting his time to both 
the development and sale of mining properties. He is largely interested in British 
Columbia, Ontario, Canada, and in southern Oregon properties, and as an official 
has voice in the management of a number of these. He is president of the Salmon 
River Gold Mining & Milling Company of British Columbia, is president of the 
Fairview Copper Mining Company of O^^rio^ present of the Big Four Develop- 
ment Company of Nevada; president #£ Jj*4 j §oulJbe*»jl Oregon Water Power Com- 
pany, of southern Oregon; and also! has many other mining interests. The Fair- 
view Copper Mining Company has ?its property,, twenty-five miles from the silver 
camp of Cobalt in northern Ontario... •^Fkey'haYe' * a' body of copper ore carrying 
three per cent copper and heavy excess of iron, together with eight-tenths of one 
per cent nickel. It is being developed by diamond drilling and they have al- 
ready gone down four thousand feet with diamond drills and have reached a depth 
of fourteen hundred feet. The plant of the Southern Oregon Water Power Com- 
pany lies in Lake county, Oregon, five miles from the California line. The minimum 
horse power it is proposed to develop is twenty-one hundred and the maximum is 
twenty-six thousand. They hope to have the first three units of seven hundred 
horse power each in operation in the latter part of 1912. They can thus dispose 
of this at Lake view and other small towns of that district. It is presumed that a 
great deal of the power will be used in pumping. The company is incorporated 
for three hundred thousand dollars under the laws of the state of Washington 
with head offices in Spokane. The officers are F. H. Oliver, president; Dr. F. R. 
Fiske, secretary-treasurer; with Dayton H. Stewart, George McDonald, of Coulee 
City, and M. R. Jennings, of Edmonton, Alberta, as directors. 

In his political views Mr. Oliver is a republican and has been an active party 
worker in Spokane and Stevens county, but the importance of his business interests 
precludes personal activity along that line. He has represented his party in both 
county and state conventions, was a member of the first state convention at Walla 
Walla and served on the Stevens county central committee. His fraternal rela- 
tions are with the Elks Lodge, No. 228. 



124 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

On the 18th of May, 1891, Mr. Oliver was united in marriage to Miss Eliza- 
beth McCallum, a daughter of D. W. McCallum, of Mendocino county, California, 
who was one of the pioneers of that state and is now representing his district in 
the general assembly. His parents were Canadians of English descent. Mr. and 
Mrs. Oliver have two daughters, Mildred and Margaret, who are both students 
in the high school. The family is well known socially and their circle of friends is 
an extensive one. Mr. Oliver is a splendid representative of that class of citizens 
who find in the conditions of the west the broader opportunities that call forth 
enterprise and determination. He recognizes the chances for the progressive busi- 
ness man to develop the country and utilize its splendid natural resources and he 
is taking his part in this work which promises good results both to the individual 
and to the communities in which his activities are called forth. 



NOAH DAVID SHOWALTER. 

There is no doubt that the teacher is one of the most important forces in the 
progress of the world and the successful teacher deserves the respect and honor 
of all friends of humanity. Noah D. Showalter, principal of the Normal school 
at Cheney, is a conscientious and progressive educator and deserves prominent 
mention in a work relating to Spokane county and the men who have contributed 
most to its development. 

He is a native of Cass county, Nebraska, born February 22, 1869, a son of 
Noah and Nancy (Shoopman) Showalter. His ancestors came from Leipsic, Ger- 
many, in an early day and settled in Southwestern Pennsylvania, which is still 
considered the old homestead of the family. The grandfather on the paternal side 
moved south into old Virginia, where he reared a family of nine children. He 
became a pioneer on the frontier in the United States, and moved west into Illinois 
during the early settlements in the northwestern territory. The grandfather on 
the maternal side also settled in central Illinois soon after the war of 1812, and the 
uncles, six in number, in the same line of descent, were all soldiers in the Civil war. 
Three of them are now living and are prominent members of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. 

The father of our subject took no part in the Civil war, as it was necessary 
for him to remain at home because of his wife's physical condition, although he 
was through life a patriotic and a liberty-loving man. He began his work as a 
minister in the Primitive Baptist church at the age of twenty-four and occupied 
the pulpit from that time until his death, which took place during his eightieth 
year. He lived on a farm with his family and this was their direct means of sup- 
port. The mother is still living and has reached the age of sixty-nine. Ten chil- 
dren were born to this union, of which our subject was the oldest son. 

Noah D. Showalter received his common-school education in the country, but 
came west in 1891, when he was yet a very young man. He subsequently attended 
school at the State Normal school, at Ellensburg, at the University of Moscow, 
and graduated from the Lewiston Normal school in 1899. Following this he at- 
tended the State College at Pullman, Washington, where he received his master's 
degree in the department of economics, science and history. His first teaching 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 125 

was in the country schools of Whitman county, from which place he went to serve 
as principal of the schools of Farmington, Washington. After being at this place 
for four years, he was elected as city superintendent of the Oakesdale schools, 
where he remained for two years. He was then elected county superintendent of 
the schools of Whitman county, an office which he filled for two terms. In 1909 
he came to the Normal school at Cheney as head of the rural school department, 
and the year following was elected as principal, a position which he has since held. 

Mr. Showalter has also been successful in business affairs, and believes that 
every teacher should be directly interested in the business world, as well as to 
keep in touch with the latest and best ideas in education. He owns two wheat 
farms, a twenty-acre apple orchard in the Columbia river valley, has considerable 
interest in the mining property in the Coeur d'Alenes, and owns five acres in the 
North wood addition to Spokane. He has shown clearness of judgment and a dis- 
crimination as a business man, which gives bright promise of gratifying financial 
returns. 

On the 12th day of March, 1891, at Kingman, Kansas, Mr. Showalter was 
married to Miss Arra Belle Thomas, a daughter of James M. and Nancy Thomas, 
whose home was in Green county, Pennsylvania. To this union five children have 
been born: Royce L. ; Vera Kathleen; Carrol Adel, who is deceased; Virginia 
Belle; and Noah D., Jr. 

In politics, Mr. Showalter supports the principles of the republican party. 
He was a member of the central republican committee for a number of years, and 
has many times acted as a delegate both to county and state conventions. He is 
an active worker in all progressive movements which aim to promote the general 
welfare, and at the present time is a member of the Spokane Chamber of Commerce 
and the Cheney Commercial Club. Fraternally he is identified with the Woodmen 
of the World. 

Mr. Showalter is especially interested in the rural-school problem, and in all 
his work in the Normal school he emphasizes the great need of raising the rural 
school to a higher standard of efficiency. He is one of the pioneer workers in this 
line and his plans worked out in many country-school districts have proved to be 
most successful in setting higher standards for the community. Earnest, energetic, 
and progressive in his profession, he has devoted his best abilities to the instruc- 
tion of boys and girls, the preparation of young men and women for the active 
duties of life; and he takes a great pride in preparing teachers in the Normal 
school who will measure up to the highest requirements and carry forward the 
educational work of the state in the most effective manner. He is president of the 
Washington Educational Association and justly ranks among the leaders in educa- 
tional circles of the northwest. 



FRANK R. CULBERTSON. 

While Frank R. Culbertson is now identified with the commercial interests of 
Spokane as president of the Wonder Department Store, one of the large and at- 
tractive mercantile enterprises of the city, he is widely known throughout this sec- 
tion of the country because of his former activity in mining and his efforts in 



126 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

that direction constitute a valuable asset in the development and substantial im- 
provement of this section of the country. He has ever had firm faith in the future 
of this district and therefore has never hesitated to make investments and thus 
promote the business enterprise which is always the foundation of a country's 
growth. The course he has followed in all of his business life is such a one as 
will bear close investigation and scrutiny and is an object lesson of what may be 
accomplished when determination and energy lead the way. 

Mr. Culbertson is a native of Lawrence county, Ohio, born April 2, 1858. His 
father, Cambridge C. Culbertson, was one of the pioneer manufacturers of pig 
iron in Ohio and was among the first to open up the Hanging Rock iron district 
of that state. His business interests were extensive and of an important character 
and he remained an active factor in connection with industrial and financial enter- 
prises of that region up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1898. In 
early jnanhood he had married Emily A. Rankin, who survived him for about thir- 
teen years, passing away in 1911, being eighty-eight years of age. 

In his youthful days, Frank R. Culbertson was a pupil in the public schools 
of I ronton, Ohio, but the desire to enter the business world led him to put aside 
his text-books when fifteen years of age and accept a position with a surveying 
party. The business spirit was strong within him and his ability was manifest 
in the fact that when but sixteen years of age he took a contract from the county 
to build five miles of county road, which project he carried to successful comple- 
tion. He next engaged in the management of a company store for one of the iron 
blast furnace companies of that place, which he conducted successfully for three 
years. Ever ready to take a forward step as the way opened, he next engaged 
in the mining and contracting business, successfully executing a contract to mine 
five thousand tons of iron ore. He has ever seemed to know just when and where 
and how to put forth his efforts to produce the best results and at the same time 
to secure the best possible cooperation of those who have been in his employ. His 
next venture connected him with the wholesale grocery trade at Ironton, Ohio, 
where he remained for three years and then sought a still broader field of labor 
by opening a wholesale grocery house in St. Paul, Minnesota, in 1881, under the 
name of the Glidden-Griggs Company. The business is still conducted under 
the name of the Griggs-Cooper Company and is the largest wholesale grocery 
house west of Chicago. 

In the spring of 1885 he transferred the field of his operations to the north- 
west, still in connection with S. S. Glidden, his father-in-law. The latter purchased 
a controlling interest in the Tiger mine, situated in the Coeur d'Alene district, at 
Burke, Idaho, and Mr. Culbertson became general manager of the mine, which was 
the first quartz property to be discovered in the Coeur d'Alene district. Thus 
from the very outset Mr. Culbertson was closely associated with the development 
of mining interests in this section and the value of his work is inestimable. When 
the Coeur d'Alene excitement was at its height in 1884, Mr. Glidden was operating 
at Thompson's Falls, at that time the main gateway of the mining section. He 
secured an option on the Tiger mine and in the spring of 1885 he and Mr. Cul- 
bertson sold their joint interest at St. Paul for the purpose of locating permanently 
in this part of the country and devoting their undivided attention to the develop- 
ment of the Tiger mine, which, after a thorough investigation showed a big ton- 
nage of low-grade ore. The problem that confronted them was to devise some 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 127 

means of getting the ore out of the mine and to a convenient place for shipment. 
To this problem Mr. Culbertson and Mr. Glidden bent their attention and largely 
solved it by building a wagon road fifteen miles in length to connect with . the 
Thompson's Falls road. The hauling, however, was all done by teams and the 
method was found to be impracticable on account of the great cost of transporta- 
tion in that way. They then attempted to secure other means of transportation 
from Coeur d'Alene city up the south fork of the lake. At that time a steamer was 
being operated on the lake between Coeur d'Alene and the Jesuit Mission. Messrs. 
Glidden and Culbertson succeeded in interesting some prominent business men of 
Spokane in making a survey of the route from the mines to Burke, Idaho, and 
this was really the initial step in the building of the railroads in the Coeur d'Alene 
district. The same fall D. C. Corbin began operations in the neighborhood in the 
building of the road to Wardner. The following year the Northern Pacific & Ore- 
gon Navigation Companies were attracted by the tonnage of the Coeur d'Alene 
mines and both started to build to Wardner, the Northern Pacific from Missoula 
on the east and the Oregon Navigation Company from Tekoa. Being assured that 
these railway lines would reach Wallace, Messrs. Culbertson and Glidden began 
the building of a railroad from their mines to Wallace, which they afterward sold 
to D. C. Corbin and he in turn to the Northern Pacific. The Tiger mine in which 
they had invested became one of the valuable properties of the Coeur d'Alene dis- 
trict and Mr. Culbertson acted as general manager from the development of the 
mine at grass roots until they had sunk a shaft to the depth of eighteen hundred 
feet. In* 1889 the property was sold to Charles Sweeny. 

The work which Mr. Culbertson and Mr. Glidden did for the development of 
the Coeur d'Alenes cannot be overestimated, for they were almost the first moneyed 
people to enter the district and use their capital in developing the country. At the 
same time Mr. Glidden was conducting a banking enterprise in Spokane and while 
Mr. Culbertson spent much of his time in Coeur d'Alene, he also made frequent 
visits to Spokane, coming at least once a month and has the right to claim that he 
is one of its pioneers. The sale of the Tiger did not conclude his activities in the 
field of mining, for in 1900 he became associated with Charles Sweeny in the 
development of mining properties in California, where he remained for three years, 
in 1904 he returned to Spokane and became connected with the commercial affairs 
of the city by purchasing a controlling interest in the Wonder Department Store, 
which is one of the most extensive and best equipped stores of this character in 
the inland Empire. They have been located in their present quarters since 1905 
and have a splendidly equipped establishment, while the large line of goods which 
they carry is attractive to the public as indicated in the large and growing trade 
which they now enjoy. Mr. Culbertson is also one of the directors of the Spokane 
Title Company. Energy has been the foundation of his advancement and intelli- 
gent direction of his labors and investments have brought him to the present cred- 
itable position which he occupies as a business man of Spokane. 

At Chattanooga, Tennessee, on the 16th of February, 1881, Mr. Culbertson 
wedded Miss Jessie B. Glidden, a daughter of Steven S. and Sue M. Glidden, who 
were then living at Chattanooga, Tennessee, but came to St. Paul in 1882 with 
Mr. Culbertson and in 1885 they both came to the northwest, Mr. Glidden taking 
active part in the development of this region as indicated in the foregoing para- 
graphs. The only child of this marriage is a son, S. Glidden Culbertson, who is 



128 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

a student here. They reside At the Westminster Hotel. Mr. Culbertson has at- 
tained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite in Masonry and is also a 
member of El Katif Temple of the Mystic Shrine, of Spokane. He belongs to 
Wallace Lodge, B. P. O. E., and is popular among the membership of the Spokane, 
Spokane Country, Inland and Spokane Amateur Athletic Clubs. 

His high standing in business circles of the city is indicated by the fact that 
he is now the vice president of the Chamber of Commerce. In his entire life he 
has looked beyond the exigencies of the moment to the possibilities and opportuni- 
ties of the future and in his connection with the Chamber of Commerce is putting 
forth most earnest and effective effort, to advance Spokane's interests and give to 
the city all those requirements that will be demanded in its rapid growth. He has 
never sought nor desired office and the public work that he has done has largely 
been of a nature that has brought him no pecuniary reward, yet has made exten- 
sive demand upon his time, his thought and his energies. In the business world 
opportunities that others have passed by heedlessly, he has noted and improved 
and his record proves that success is ambition's answer. 



SYDNEY S. BEGGS. 



Sydney S. Beggs, engaged in the express and transfer business in Colville, has 
been a resident of Stevens county for twenty-one years, during a large portion of 
which time he has been more or less prominently identified with political activities. 
He was born in Hastings county, province of Ontario, Canada, May 8, 1858, a 
son of Andrew L. and Mary Ann (Gregory) Beggs. His father, who was a min- 
ister of the Methodist Episcopal church, was actively engaged in the preaching of 
the gospel until his death in 1897. The mother passed away in 1871. Although 
he is a native of Canada, Sydney S. Beggs' ancestors on his mother's side came 
from the United States, his grandfather having been born in New York in the 
year 1800; on his father's side he is of Scotch descent. The grandfather was a 
lumber merchant in New York but received the most of his stock from Canada, 
the timber being cut in the woods there and shipped to Montreal and Quebec to 
be sawed. 

The early boyhood of Sydney S. Beggs was spent in his native country where 
he began his education, this being completed in the schools of Nebraska, which 
he attended until he was thirteen years of age. The energies of the youth were 
then turned to farming, in which occupation he was associated with his father 
until he was eighteen and from that time until he was thirty he engaged in farming 
for himself in Nebraska. He moved to Washington territory in 1888 and first 
located in the vicinity of Brents, now called Creston, and there worked in a saw- 
mill for three years ; then went to Rathdrum, Idaho, for a year, following the same 
occupation. At the end of that period he came to Stevens county and filed on a 
homestead of one hundred and sixty acres. He spent the succeeding six years 
there, during which time he worked in the sawmills and harvest fields, devoting 
such time as he could spare in clearing and improving his land. Disposing of his 
holding in 1902 he bought one hundred and sixty acres of land near Colville.. that 
he cultivated until 1909. He met with good success in his agricultural pursuits 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 129 

during that time and added to his holdings another quarter section. In 1909 he 
withdrew from farming and coming to Colville has ever since resided here and 
has been engaged in the express and transfer business since July, 1910. 

On the 8th of May, 1880, Mr. Beggs was united in marriage to Miss Edna 
T. Beedy, the event occurring at Wilbur, Nebraska. Mrs. Beggs is a daughter 
of Frederick E. Beedy and the niece of one of Minneapolis' first mill owners. She 
had four brothers, all of whom were in the Civil war and four sisters. Five chil- 
dren have been born unto Mr. and Mrs. Beggs: Grace S., who married W. P. 
Townsend; Garland C, who chose for his wife Elva Twitchell; Mozelle and 
Stewart, who are deceased; and Leo F. ; all of the living children residing in Ste- 
vens county. 

In his political views, Mr. Beggs is a democrat and has always taken an active 
interest in county governmental affairs. He first served as county treasurer, being 
elected in 1896 and was reelected in 1898, and in 1906 he was elected county 
commissioner, filling this office for four years. While serving in the latter capac- 
ity he was a delegate to the commissioner convention in Tacoma in 1908; Olympia 
in 1909; and Yakima in 1910. In the latter year, in February, he was also a 
delegate to the State Good Roads Convention at Aberdeen, Washington, and in 
November of the same year was a delegate to the annual convention of the Good 
Roads Convention in Walla Walla. In addition to his various other public serv- 
ices, Mr. Beggs served two terms as field deputy county assessor, and has been 
state and congressional committee man for Stevens county at the democratic con- 
ventions since 1908. He is a member of the county central committee at the pres- 
ent and has occupied that position a number of times, acting as chairman on three or 
four occasions. He is an active member of the Independent Order of Foresters 
and the Odd Fellows fraternity, having filled all of the chairs in the latter organ- 
ization. At the present time he is chairman of the building committee of the new 
Odd Fellows temple, now under construction in this city. He has always been one 
of the popular members of his lodge and in 1902 was representative to the Grand 
Lodge at Bellingham, Washington. Mr. Beggs has always taken an earnest inter- 
est in all organizations for the promotion of the county's development and is now 
serving as one of the board of directors of the Stevens County Producers' Associa- 
tion. He has always taken an active part in the Colville Commercial Club and while 
not a member is affiliated with them and assists in boosting all public projects. He is 
one of the public-spirited, enterprising citizens of Colville whose personal interests 
are at all times identical with those of the community at large, in the promotion 
of which he seems tireless. 



ROBERT W. COLLINS. 



Engaged in the real-estate business and also handling insurance and loans, Robert 
W. Collins, of the firm of this name, has built up a flourishing commercial enterprise 
in Coeur d'Alene within the past seven years, meeting with unusual success in his ven- 
ture. He was born in Nashville, Tennessee, in 1848, and was a son of John and 
Elizabeth P. (Johnson) Collins. The father died when Robert Collins was only a few 
years old and in 1852 the mother with her eight children removed to northeastern 



130 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Missouri. In this locality Robert W. Collins acquired his education in the common 
schools, beginning farming at an early age. In 1&79 he started a grocery and hard- 
ware business in Atlanta, Missouri, in which he continued for three years. 1882 saw 
his removal to Nelson county, North Dakota, where he became a builder and con- 
tractor and conducted a livery business, meeting with success in the seven years of 
hif residence there. He then set out for the west continuing his building and con- 
tracting business in various places during the following years, in Helena, Montana, 
from 1889 to 1893; in Anaconda, Montana, from 1893 to 1899; and in Butte, Mon- 
tana, from 1899 to 1902. During his residence in Anaconda, from 1893 to 1897 he 
had charge of the building of bridges and buildings, in the construction of the Butte, 
Anaconda & Pacific Railroad, between Anaconda and Butte. In 1902 Mr. Collins 
came to Coeur d'Alene and here resumed his building and contracting business, but 
in 1904 discontinued it and engaged in the real-estate and insurance business exclu- 
sively, winning a large measure of success in this undertaking. The firm Robert W. 
Collins, Real Estate & Loans, is one of the largest firms of its kind in this section of 
the country and is conducted by Mr. Collins and his partner, John Christ, the latter 
being the present city clerk and police judge of Coeur d'Alene. 

In 1871 Mr. Collins was married to Miss Johanna Snell, of Macon county, Mis- 
souri, who passed away a year and a half later. He was again married in 1 873, this 
union being with Miss Martha R. Sprinkle, a daughter of Zeno and Elizabeth 
Sprinkle, of Macon county, Missouri, and by her had ^ve children of whom three are 
living: Ada Elizabeth, the wife of Milton E. Spencer; Lola Rivers, the wife of 
Charles A. Reid of Spokane, Washington; and Ruby J., living with her parents in 
Coeur d'Alene. 

Since his election to the office of tax collector in 1 873, in Macon county, Missouri, 
Mr. Collins has been actively interested in politics and has served as public official in 
many varied capacities. During his residence in Nelson county, North Dakota, he 
was deputy United States marshal, county sheriff, and chairman of the county com- 
missioners. He was mavor of Coeur d'Alene from 1904 to 1905 and has filled other 
offices of honor and trust. Efficient in the administration of business affairs, Mr. 
Collins has a comprehensive grasp of details and is also thoroughly competent in 
handling large situations involving the solution of intricate problems. Among his 
business associates he is regarded as conscientious and trustworthy, never stooping 
to do anything not in accord with the highest standards of business ethics. 



J. W. BINKLEY. 



J. W. Binkley of Spokane has been associated with various interests which 
have constituted elements in the growth and progress of Spokane and the surround- 
ing country. He now occupies a prominent position in financial circles as president 
of the North Pacific Loan & Trust Company, in which connection he is a partner 
of Jacob R. Taylor. He was born in Ontario, Canada, July 10, 1856, his parents 
being George and Mary (Rymal) Binkley. He had the advantage of liberal educa- 
tional training, attending the Collegiate Institute of Ontario and afterward the To- 
ronto University, in which he took up the study of law, pursuing his course until 
qualified for practice. After leaving college he made his way direct to this state, 



J. W. BINKLKY 



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SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 133 

settling first in Seattle. He was admitted to the bar at Tacoma in 1883 and the 
same year came to Spokane, where he formed a partnership with his cousin, Jacob 
R. Taylor, which relation has since been maintained. They entered at once upon 
the active practice of law and made steady progress in that field but have gradu- 
ally withdrawn to concentrate their energies and attention upon other business in- 
terests. Mr. Binkley served as probate judge of the county in 1885 and 1886, 
having been elected on the democratic ticket, but for some years he has not taken 
an active part in politics aside from exercising his right of franchise. More and 
more largely his efforts and activities have been concentrated upon his business 
affairs and he is now president of the North Pacific Loan & Trust Company, which 
deals entirely in farm mortgages and handles foreign capital from Holland. The 
firm have now loaned on these mortgages over one million dollars. They first or- 
ganized the Northwestern & Pacific Mortgage Company in 1884, it having a con- 
tinuous existence until 1896? when it was taken over by the Northwestern Hypo- 
theek Bank, subsequent to which time they organized their present business under 
the name of the North Pacific Loan & Trust Company. In this way Mr. Binkley 
has contributed much toward the upbuilding, progress and improvement of this dis- 
trict and his progressive work has also been done as the president of the first and 
second fruit fairs which were ever held here. 

In 1880 Mr. Binkley was married to Miss Josephine Clarkson, of Ontario, who 
died in Spokane. They had one daughter, Ethelyn, who is the wife of Aubrey L. 
White, of this city. Mr. Binkley belongs to the Chamber of Commerce and in more 
strictly social lines is connected with the Spokane- Club, the Spokane Amateur 
Athletic Club and the Spokane Country ; Club. 



WILLIAM HUNTER BROWNLOW. 

William Hunter Brownlow, who founded the Chewelah Independent, which, 
together with his sons he edited for five years, was born in the vicinity of La Crosse, 
Wisconsin, his natal day being the 7th of September, 1860. His parents are Joseph 
and Frances L. (Kellow) Brownlow, formerly residents of Wisconsin, but now 
living in Yakima, the father having attained the venerable age of seventy-eight 
and the mother of sixty-eight years. 

Reared on his father's farm, William Hunter Brownlow attended the common 
schools of Mindoro, Wisconsin, in the acquirement of a preliminary education, 
being supplemented by a two-years' course in the normal school at Genoa, Nebraska. 
He completed his education in 1 879, at the age of nineteen, and turned his atten- 
tion to farming, devoting his energies to this occupation for two years in Nebraska. 
At the end of that time he came to Washington, becoming a resident of Ellensburg, 
where for twenty years he engaged in operating a grist mill and also in mining. 
Owing to the state of his health he was forced to withdraw from active work in 
1899, and believing that the climate of Alaska would prove beneficial he went to 
that northern country to spend a year. Upon his return he settled in Prosser, 
Washington, and engaged with his sons in the newspaper work for four years, be- 
fore coming to Chewelah, where he was associated with them in founding and pub- 
lishing the Independent until about a year ago, when he turned the management 
vm. n— 7 



134 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

of the paper entirely over to his sons, but on the retirement of A. T. Brownlow, he 
again took charge of the Independent as manager and editor in the latter months 
of 1911. All the time he was engaged in newspaper work, Mr. Brownlow was 
constantly trying to promote and develop the mining industry in the locality by 
interesting capitalists throughout the country. He is still very much interested 
in mines and mining, and having been more or less actively identified with the 
work for nearly a quarter of a century is well informed and is regarded as an 
authority, owing to his wide and varied experience. He was one of the first men 
in the state to write exhaustively on the natural resources of this part of the coun- 
try for eastern papers and periodicals, his efforts along this direction unquestion- 
ably having been productive of results. 

On the 20th of September, 1879, Mr. Brownlow was united in marriage to Miss 
Jane J. Truman, the event being celebrated at Genoa, Nebraska. Mrs. Brownlow, 
who passed away on the 27th of June, 1910, was a daughter of George and Susan 
Truman, and was one of the last members of the Society of Friends. Eight chil- 
dren were born unto Mr. and Mrs. Brownlow: Gertrude S., who became the wife 
of W. D. Smith; Alexander T., who married Irene Toner; William K., who is asso- 
ciated with the Independent; Ralph A., who married Iva Mowatt; and Truman Y., 
Arthur W., Helen and Alta M. 

The political views of Mr. Brownlow coincide with the principles of the demo- 
cratic party, for whose candidates he always casts his ballot. He has taken an 
active interest in municipal affairs during his residence in Chewelah and served 
for four years as mayor, having entered upon the duties of that office in January, 
1906. Mr. Brownlow has been an enthusiastic promoter of the town at all times 
and is a member of the Commercial Club, to all of the efforts of which association 
he gives his support and cooperation. Although he has not long resided in Chew- 
elah he has won and retained the esteem of its best people, who hold him in high 
regard because of his many substantial personal qualities and high standards of 
citizenship. 



ORRIS DORM AN. 



Orris Dorman, whose contagious enthusiasm has been a factor in the upbuilding, 
settlement, development and progress of the west, is justly classed with the represen- 
tative business men of Spokane, where he has important realty holdings. He is here 
engaged in the real-estate, investment and banking business, his association with the 
latter being that of vice president of the Fidelity National Bank. His birth occurred 
in Sigourney, Iowa, April 28, 1871, and he is therefore yet a young man. His salient 
qualities include the enterprise and ambition of youth and in the conduct of his affairs 
he brooks no obstacles that can be overcome by persistent and earnest purpose and 
effort. His father, Hiner Dorman, was a native of Indiana and represented an old 
Pennsylvania family of German descent. He devoted his life to farming, save for 
a period of nearly four years, when he served as a private in the Thirty-third Iowa 
Infantry, during the Civil war, his regiment being attached to the Army of the Mis- 
sissippi. His mother was a descendant of General Morgan of Revolutionary war 
fame. Hiner Dorman was united in marriage to Miss Martha Knox, a cousin of 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 135 

* 

James Knox Polk, at one time president of the United States. She is living in 
Ritzville, Washington, and is of English descent. Her father's name figured prom- 
inently in connection with the family tree, of which Press Knox was a leading repre- 
sentative. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hiner Dorman there were born three sons and three 
daughters: Orris; Ortho, who is associated with his brother in the real-estate busi- 
ness and who married Alice Jay; Jess, a newspaper man, residing at Calgary, Al- 
berta, Canada; Lois, the wife of John M. Woehr, the owner of an orange ranch at 
Redlands, California; Alice, the wife of V. A. Chargois, of Ritzville, Washington; 
and Lou, who is making her home with her mother in Ritzville. 

Orris Dorman was a young lad when brought by his parents to Washington in 
1887, and in the common schools and the Normal school of Cheney he pursued his 
education. He then turned his attention to the newspaper field, becoming connected 
with the Ritzville Times, continuing in that field from 1895 until 1898. During the 
succeeding three years he was- connected with mercantile and real-estate interests in 
that place, and in 1903 he came to Spokane, where he concentrated his energies upon 
real-estate investments and banking. Here he devotes much time to financial inter- 
ests as vice president of the Fidelity National Bank. He first became associated with 
real-estate interests, when in 1 897 and 1 898 he invested heavily in unimproved lands 
in the Big Bend and Palouse country. This formed the basis for his present exten- 
sive holdings. With a keen insight into what the future held for the wheat country, 
he wisely made his purchases of property. He was one of the first to advocate the 
advisability of investing in those districts and at an early day would frequently go 
aboard an immigration train from the east with dodgers, which referred to the hidden 
wealth of the virgin soil. His belief in the country and his activity in exploiting its 
resources were the cause of much of the material development of this part of the state. 
He has been the means of bringing much money into the country, peopling a vast 
tract of semi-arid land, which has been converted through the labors of the settlers 
into one of the garden spots of the world. Mr. Dorman still owns finely improved 
wheat ranches in Whitman county and time has proven the wisdom of his judgment 
and his investments. His stock in the Fidelity National Bank also brings him a 
good annual dividend and he has had active voice in the management of the bank as 
its vice president since January, 1911. Some idea of the volume of business trans- 
acted by this bank may be gained from the fact that the deposits in June, 1911, were 
one million, five hundred and twenty thousand, three hundred and fifty-one dollars, 
and sixty-two cents, while on the 7th of January of the same year they were only one 
million, one hundred and eight thousand, one hundred and thirty-nine dollars, and 
twenty-four cents, showing a gain in five months of four hundred and twelve thous- 
and, two hundred and twelve dollars, and thirty-eight cents. The capital stock is two 
hundred thousand dollars, the surplus and undivided profits fifty-four thousand, 
nine hundred and thirty-five dollars, and eighty-six cents, and there is in circulation 
two hundred thousand dollars. The bank is certainly in a most healthy condition 
and its business activity and success are attributable in no small degree to the efforts 
of Mr. Dorman. Mr. Dorman is also connected with the firm of Dorman Brothers 
as president, and he is vice president of the Otis Orchard Company, president of the 
Newman Lake Canal Company, and secretary of the Inland Securities Company. 

He does not concentrate his energies, however, upon business affairs alone but 
cooperates in many movements having direct effect upon the general welfare, upbuild- 
ing and prosperity of the community. He is a director of the Young Men's Christian 



136 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Association of Spokane and has ever taken a most helpful interest in its work during 
the two years of his connection therewith. In politics he is an active democrat and 
was elected chairman of the county central committee in 1910, but press of business 
made it impossible for him to accept the position. Frequently he has been a delegate 
to the city, county and state conventions, and he does all in his power to promote the 
growth and insure the success of the party. He cooperates in the projects for munic- 
ipal progress that find their root in the Chamber of Commerce and no movement 
for the welfare of Spokane seeks his aid in vain. Fraternally he is connected with 
Spokane Lodge, No. 228, B. P. O. E. and he is a member of the Inland Club. He 
attends the Christian church. 

On the 9th of March, 1898, at Walla Walla, Washington, Mr. Dorman was 
married to Miss Etta E. Zaring, a daughter of Alvin and Mercy Zaring, the former 
a pioneer of that country and now a retired orchardist, who came across the plains 
in 1862. The. mother is long since deceased. As the name indicates, the family is 
of German descent. Mr. and Mrs. Dorman have become the parents of four chil- 
dren: Donald O., aged twelve; Dorothy M., aged ten; Martha A., aged eight, and 
Richard A., aged six, all now in school. For twenty-five years Mr. Dorman has 
been a resident of Washington and has therefore witnessed much of the growth and 
development of Spokane and the surrounding country. That he has made wise use 
of his time and opportunities is evidenced in the success which has come to him, and 
that the course he has followed is consistent with the highest principles of manhood 
and citizenship, is indicated in the warm regard which is uniformly extended to him. 



RALPH CARLTON DILLINGHAM. 

Without any special advantages at the outset of his business career Ralph Carl- 
ton Dillingham has steadily advanced and the steps in his orderly progression are 
easily discernible. No unusually fortunate conditions awaited him but with de- 
termined purpose and laudable ambition he has met competition in honorable manner, 
has proven his worth and today receives the reward of indefatigable and honorable 
effort in his position as a partner in the leading wholesale and retail paint business 
in the inland empire. He was born at Thomaston, Maine, June 12, 1867, so that 
the width of the continent separates him from his birthplace. He is one of the three 
sons of Edward L. and Elizabeth (Carlton) Dillingham, who were also natives of 
the Pine Tree state. The father is still living in Thomaston, where he is engaged in 
general merchandising. He represents an old New England family of English lin- 
eage. In his home town he has been active in political work and is now serving 
as selectman of his village. His wife, who was also of English descent, although the 
Carlton family was founded in New England at an early day, died in Maine in 1 869. 
The only brother of our subject is George Dillingham, who is now associated with 
him in business in Spokane. 

At the usual age Ralph C. Dillingham entered the public schools of Thomaston, 
mastered the work in successive grades and eventually became a high-school pupil. 
His early business training was received in his father's store, in which he clerked 
for two years and then went to Chicago. He was in the employ of Wadsworth, How- 
land & Company, paint manufacturers, for three years and in November, 1889, came 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 137 

to Spokane, where he entered business circles as a wholesale and retail dealer in 
paints, forming a partnership with Charles H. Jones, which relation has since been 
maintained under the firm style of Jones & Dillingham. For twenty-two years this 
firm has existed and they are today the leading and largest paint house in Washing- 
ton on the east side of the mountains. They established a retail enterprise but soon 
began the manufacture of paint, selling to the wholesale trade, and they also manu- 
facture art glass and mirrors and are jobbers of plate glass. Aside from his com- 
mercial interests Mr. Dillingham has many important business connections in Spo- 
kane and has been a large investor in real estate, his property holdings now returning 
to him a gratifying income. 

On the 8th of June, 1892, Mr. Dillingham was married in Spokane to Miss Edith 
Paine, a daughter of George W. Paine, a real-estate dealer of Spokane, who repre- 
sents an old Maine family but lived for a time in Illinois before coming to Washing- 
ton. Mr. and Mrs. Dillingham have two daughters, Evelyn and Elizabeth, both of 
whom are students in Brunot Hall. The family have a beautiful home justly cele- 
brated for its extensive and warm-hearted hospitality, and the parents are very prom- 
inent socially. Mr. Dillingham enters with zest into the interests and work of the 
Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scot- 
tish Rite, also holding membership in the Mystic Shrine. He belongs also to the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows and Spokane Lodge, No. 228, B. P. O. E. He is 
interested in politics as a supporter of democratic principles, has been a delegate to 
citv conventions and was nominated for the office of citv councilman, but a democrat 
has never been elected in his ward. He holds membership in the Chamber of Com- 
merce and is interested in its various projects for Spokane's welfare and upbuilding. 
He is now the president of the Spokane Club, a member of the Spokane Country 
Club, the Spokane Athletic Club and the Spokane Tennis Club, all of which indicate 
something of the nature of his interests and recreation. He is at all times alert to 
the interests of his business and to the welfare of the city and labors as earnestly 
for the one as for the other. 



JULIUS STOHLE. 



Julius Stohle, prosperous owner of a well equipped meat market in Medical Lake, 
Washington, was born in Germany, January 5, 1877. His father, Melchior Stohle, 
died in 1907, while his mother, whose maiden name was Paulina Haas, is still living. 
Passing his childhood under the parental roof Julius Stohle obtained his education 
in the puMic schools of his native locality, where he was trained in accordance with 
the rigid but thorough and disciplinary rules of the German educational system. At 
the age of fourteen years he crossed the Atlantic locating with his uncle at Alton, 
Illinois, and there learned the butcher trade, at which he worked for five years. He 
then left Alton and from that time until 1903 he worked at his trade in a number of 
different places, in California, Oregon and Montana. He purchased a butcher shop 
in Medical Lake, Washington, in 1903, which he has conducted ever since, meeting 
with much success in his enterprise. He is competent in his work and conscientious 
in his dealings with his customers, so that he enjoys a large and steady patronage. 



138 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

With an eye to the future he has invested his savings in western lands, owning a tract 
of two hundred and sixty acres of rich farm land near Medical Lake. 

Mr. Stohle was married to Miss Augusta Vaas, on February 20, 1908, at Cheney, 
Washington. They are the parents of a son, Louis. Mr. Stohle and his wife worship 
in the Catholic church and in his political faith he votes with the republicans. Com- 
ing to America in 1891 when a mere boy, Mr. Stohle gives evidence of what a new- 
comer to our shores may do in a comparatively short space of time provided he has 
good j udgment, is not afraid to work, is temperate and thrifty in his habits and can 
recognize the opportunities which are everywhere open to the earnest young man who 
is determined to win his wav. 



GEORGE E. STONE. 



George E. Stone is now serving as sheriff of Spokane county and during his resi- 
dence in this district, covering nearly twenty years, has been a prominent factor 
in the development of the country, his activities being largely directed toward the im- 
provement of farming lands lying adjacent to the city of Spokane. He was born 
at Avon, Livingston county, New York, December 7, 1861, and is a son of George S. 
and Susan Jane (Streeter) Stone, both of whom were natives of New York, but are 
now residing in Spokane county. They are descended from old New England 
families and both the paternal and maternal grandfathers of Mr. Stone were soldiers 
of the war of 1812, Ebenezer Stone serving with the rank of colonel, while Hazelton 
Streeter was a drummer. 

During the boyhood of George E. Stone, his parents removed with their family 
from New York to Wisconsin, and his education, begun in the common schools of the 
former state, was continued under public instruction in the latter and also in the State 
Normal school of River Falls, Wisconsin. The winter months were devoted to the 
acquirement of his education, while the summer months were given to work upon 
his father's farm. When about twenty, years o,f age he began teaching school in St. 
Croix county, Wisconsin, but later turned to railroading as a locomotive fireman and 
steam shovel engineer, working at the latter pursuit during the summer months, while 
in the* winters he was a fireman upon the road. While thus engaged he resided at dif- 
ferent times in Minnesota, Nebraska, Colorado, Wisconsin and northern Michigan. 
He first visited Spokane in February, 1889, and finding here the fairest land he had 
ever seen, concluded to make his home here. He did not feel however, that he was 
financially able to carry out his plans and therefore returned once more to the occu- 
pation of firing and shoveling, sending his money back to Spokane for the purchase 
of land and in February, 1892, with his brother-in-law purchased four hundred 
and eighty acres, becoming a permanent resident of this district, making his way 
beyond Deep Creek, where he engaged in farming for nine years. In 1901 he sold 
his interest in the four hundred and eighty-acre tract and took up his abode in the 
city, where he became connected with a crematory company, acting as its secretary 
and treasurer for eight years dealing during this time also quite extensively in real 
estate. The crematory was then turned over to the city and is now the Spokane 
Crematory. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 139 

After disposing of some of his real-estate holdings in the city, Mr. Stone pur- 
chased land near Rock ford, which he cleared and placed under cultivation. Not long 
afterward he invested in other property, becoming the owner of a tract four miles 
from Deep Creek, which he also cleared and planted. In this way he contributed 
largely to the material development of the district in which he was located, but 
closing out his farming interests, he purchased land on Third street in the south- 
eastern part of the city, and also twenty lots with a nice residence on Nora avenue, 
and various other pieces of property. He has taken an active interest in civic mat- 
ters and through his efforts much has been accomplished in the improvement of 
streets in- the localities where he was interested. 

Appreciative of the privileges of citizenship and believing it the duty of every 
individual to support his honest opinions in regard to the vital questions and issues of 
the day, Mr. Stone has taken active part in political work and his fellow townsmen, 
recognizing his worth and ability, have on several occasions called upon him to fill 
positions of public trust. For six years, from 1884 until 1890, he was justice of the 
peace of Deep Creek precinct. Prior to 1896 he gave his political allegiance to the 
republican party but since that time has advocated democratic principles. He has 
been a delegate to nearly every county convention since residing in Spokane county 
and has also been chosen as a delegate to two or three state conventions, including 
the democratic state conventions held in Ellensburg and Tacoma. In 1908 he was 
candidate for sheriff against F. K. Pugh, on which occasion he was defeated, 
although he ran twenty- four hundred votes ahead of his ticket. In the fall of 1910 
he was once more the opponent of Mr. Pugh and won out with a clear majority upon 
official count of nineteen hundred votes. He is employing business methods in the 
conduct of his office and is endeavoring to give the taxpayers the best administration 
possible. He has been successful in his private affairs and has done all in his 
power to promote the mining interests of the district, backing his opinions with finan- 
cial support. He was one of the men who received material remuneration for their 
confidence in the Sullivan Company in the Fort Steele mining district, in British 
Columbia. 

On the 15th of December, 1887, in Hammond, Wisconsin, Mr. Stone was married 
to Miss Daisy V. Gates. They are well known socially in Spokane and the adjoin- 
ing districts and have gained many friends during the period of their residence in 
this part of the state. 



FREDERICK V. PHINNEY. 

Frederick V. Phinney, one of the reliable citizens of Coeur d'Alene, is the pres- 
ent incumbent of the office of county surveyor of Kootenai county. He was born 
September 5, 1872, at Areola, Illinois, his parents being George B. and Bessie 
(Goodall) Phinney. His father was a civil engineer and followed this calling 
throughout his life, assisting in the construction of various railroads in almost 
every section of the country from Massachusetts to California. 

Frederick V. Phinney obtained his education in the grammar school of his native 
locality and in the high school of Fort Scott, Kansas, after which he attended the 
University of Kansas at Lawrence, that state. He began active work as levelman 



140 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

in Utah on the construction of what was then called the Utah, Nevada & California 
Railroad, but is now known as the Salt Lake, Los Angeles & San Pedro Railroad. 
He remained with this company two years when he returned to Fort Scott, Kansas, 
where he became assistant city engineer, a position which he held for several years. 
In 1899 he went to Wallace, Idaho, and engaged in mining engineering, continuing 
in this occupation for eleven years. He then came to Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, in 
January, 1910, and established himself in the business of surveying, finding much 
demand for his specialized knowledge of engineering and surveying. In November 
of the same year he was elected to the position of county surveyor for a term of 
two years. As a public official he has demonstrated his ability to serve the public 
good in a most efficient manner and to the complete satisfaction of the residents 
of the county who find him altogether obliging, and whenever called upon to appeal 
to his judgment or his technical knowledge have entire faith in the accuracy of 
his conclusions. In deference to his thorough equipment he has been appointed a 
member of the examining board of engineers for the state of Idaho. 

On December 19, 1905, Mr. Phinney was united in marriage to Miss Minnie 
Key, a daughter of Thomas Key of Clarks, Nebraska. They reside in a pleasant 
home at No. 611 Garden street, Coeur d'Alene, where they are often the center 
of a merry group of guests who find much enjoyment in their cordial hospitality. 
In Masonic circles Mr. Phinney occupies an honored place. He is a thirty-third 
degree Mason, secretary of Kootenai Lodge, No. 24, F. & A. M., the secretary of 
all the Scottish Rite bodies in Coeur d'Alene, and also deputy of the inspector gen- 
eral of the Scottish Rite of northern Idaho. Socially he finds recreation in the 
Commercial Club of Coeur d'Alene in which he is a popular member. He is a 
loyal friend and well liked by all who know him for his straightforward, unde- 
monstrative nature, and the kindly spirit which he manifests toward all. 



AUBREY LEE WHITE. 



Aubrey Lee White is one of the prominent and successful men of the Inland 
Empire who have grappled with big problems in finance, who have capably di- 
rected and managed mining and railroad interests and have won brilliant success 
in everything they have undertaken. Mr. White has not specialized as many have 
done but has extended his efforts into many directions, finding ample reward in 
every line for his industry, perseverance and determination. Nevertheless business 
represents but one phase of his character and interests. Regarded as a citizen 
and in his social relations he belongs to that public-spirited, useful and helpful 
class of men whose ambitions and desires are centered and directed in those chan- 
nels from which flow the greatest and most permanent good to the greatest num- 
ber. His civic pride has led to tangible efforts in all movements for the city's 
progress and he has also been a pioneer in the development of irrigation interests, 
making personal sacrifice and devoting much time and money to bringing water 
to the arid lands, improving their productiveness and having moreover the satis- 
faction of seeing such districts reclaimed, becoming second to none in fertility in 
the world. Much of his work in behalf of Spokane has been in the direction of 
the "city beautiful." He has been a cooperant factor in the Municipal League and 



At'BHKY I,KK WHITE 



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SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 143 

in kindred movements and marches in the front rank of those men who have up- 
held the welfare of the city and its people. 

Mr. White is a native of Houlton, Maine, born February 17, 1869. His father, 
George White, was a native of New Brunswick and died in 1885, after having 
throughout his business life followed the occupation of farming. The well known 
"Guide to Plymouth" which gives a full account of the Pilgrim fathers and their 
descendants shows the name of White to be a corruption of the name Wise, which 
was of Holland origin. The family was established on American soil on Long 
Island and the great-great-grandfather of Aubrey L. White was an itinerant preacher 
and a loyalist who served as chapalin in King George's army. In recognition of 
his services to the crown King George gave him a grant of sixty acres of land in 
the Keswick district of New Brunswick which he afterward exchanged for property 
at Hodgdon, Maine, which his father owned. The Guide to Plymouth gives an 
account of Perigrine White, together with mention of the cradle in which he was 
rocked, for he was the first white child born on the American continent. The 
founder of this branch of the family was William White, who came from Plymouth 
•as a passenger of the Mayflower. In the maternal line Aubrey L. White comes of 
English lineage. His mother, who bore the maiden name of Jane Maria Beards- 
ley, was born in New Brunswick and died in 1878. She was a daughter of Ralph 
Beardsley, who married a Miss Curry from Scotland. The grandfather, John 
Bcardsley, was the fourth of the Johns of the family in direct line to become 
identified with the Episcopal clergy. Captain. John- Beardsley, the great-great- 
grandfather of Mrs. White, was in '.the.* JBngMsn 'service with the troops of King 
George in the Revolutionary war andt)ij$ .Mother, L^vi Beardsley, was at one time 
lieutenant governor of the state of New York. 

Aubrey Lee White was one of a family of- four daughters, all of whom are now 
deceased, and six sons, of whom five. arfe yet living. His early education was 
acquired in the common schools of Houlton, Maine, and later he attended the 
Ricker Classical Institute which was a preparatory school for Colby College. After 
leaving school he went to Woodstock, New Brunswick, where for eighteen months 
he was engaged in the furniture business but at the end of that time severed his 
trade relations with the east and made his way direct to Spokane, arriving in 
the fall of that year. Here he was first employed by Arend & Kennard in the 
market business on Sprague avenue where the book store of J. W. Graham now 
stands. He was with that house for four years, covering the period of the great 
fire, and when he left the establishment he resigned the position of manager of 
the book department to engage on his own account in partnership with Jay P. 
Graves in the mining business. Returning to the east Mr. White opened an office 
in Montreal, Canada, and became interested in the organization and development 
of the Old Ironside and Granby properties. For six years he remained in the east 
representing the Spokane interests in the New York, Montreal and Philadelphia 
offices. During the latter years of his residence in New York he was identified 
with Mr. Graves in interesting capital in the development and financing of the 
Spokane Traction Company and with Mr. Blackwell and Mr. Graves he also be- 
came interested in the Coeur d'Alene electric railway. Throughout the period of 
his residence in the northwest he has always seemed to readily recognize the oppor- 
tunities here to be secured and the possibilities for the upbuilding of the country. 
His efforts have been an important factor in the substantial growth of the north- 



144 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

west as well as in the promotion of his individual success. He was associated with 
Mr. Graves in the Spokane & Inland Company and finally in the reorganization 
of the three companies named into the Inland system under the corporation name 
of The Inland Empire Railway Company with J. P. Graves as president, Mr. 
White as vice president, and Waldo G. Paine as second vice president, with Clyde 
M. Graves as manager and director. These officials resigned when the Great 
Northern system took over the road in June, 1911, with Carl Gray as president. 
The Great Northern about a year ago bought the controlling interest. Mr. White 
has had the satisfaction of seeing the system which was instituted with practically 
nothing develop into a railway line two hundred and forty miles in length, proving 
the greatest source of development in the district that it traverses. 

In connection with Mr. Graves and others Mr. White owned a large area of 
land and gave ninety acres of it to Spokane for a park which is called Manito, 
and purchased the old Cook line extending up Riverside avenue to the park. This 
street railway constituted the nucleus from which has resulted the organization of 
the Spokane Traction Company, the business of which they have developed, ob- 
taining a franchise and extending their lines until they now have forty miles of* 
street railway. Their activity in railway matters has been the means of adding 
from twenty-five to thirty thousand population to the city, so that these gentlemen 
deserve prominent mention among those who are regarded as the builders and pro- 
moters of Spokane. In all of his business operations Mr. White has never waited 
until the need was a pressing one but has anticipated conditions that would arise 
and has therefore been prepared to meet the conditions ere the inconvenience and 
discomfort of a situation were strongly felt. 

It would be almost impossible to mention all of the business projects which 
have felt the stimulus and have profited by the cooperation of Mr. White, for his 
activities have been of a most diverse character and of notable magnitude. After 
his return from the east he became a director of the Spokane Valley Land Com- 
pany which owned Green Acres, East Green Acres and other valuable properties 
which they afterward sold to D. C. Corbin. They were very desirous of inducing 
people to settle along the line of the Coeur d'Alene railway and Mr. White took 
the matter in hand, bringing it to a successful termination. Mr. White was a di- 
rector of the Spokane Canal Company which irrigated Otis Orchards and did all 
he could to encourage the enterprise but sold his interest after having it well 
established. It was he who first demonstrated that the valley was capable of 
being irrigated and proved the productiveness of its soil. His business connections 
further extended to the Traders National Bank and the Granby Company which 
carries with it the Hidden Creek properties, and in both of these he is a director. 
He is also largely interested in many other valuable mining properties both proved 
and unproved and has extensive real-estate holdings in and near Spokane. 

Business affairs, however, represent but one phase of Mr. White's activity, for 
he has never selfishly centered his interests upon his own personal concerns. He 
has never been neglectful of the duties of citizenship and has been a most active 
factor in utilizing the opportunities for the city's development, improvement and 
adornment. His political support is given to the republican party and during all 
the period in which he has been so busily engaged in the management of large 
financial projects he has still found time to advance civic improvement. He be- 
came largely interested in city questions while a member of the Municipal League 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 145 

of New York and when he came to Spokane his knowledge of civic affairs was 
used in the inception of the 150,000 Club. At a meeting of this club he suggested 
a "City Beautiful Club" and of the new organization he was made president. He 
has done much for the city in various ways, including the inception and promotion 
of the playgrounds movement, making the first subscription to the fund and becom- 
ing the first officer. Through the assistance of the Chamber of Commerce a charter 
amendment was passed by the city creating a non-partisan park board and ten men 
were appointed, of which Mr. White was one. He was then chosen president of 
the board and still fills the office. The board is composed of ten of the most sub- 
stantial citizens and business men of Spokane, vitally interested in the city's wel- 
fare and at the same time having the business ability to utilize practical and 
effective efforts in the attainment of desired ends. They have increased the park 
area from one hundred and seventy acres to twelve hundred acres and have had one 
nullion dollars park bonds voted. By personal solicitation Mr. White has secured 
four hundred acres for park purposes and the board has spent only one million 
dollars doing all of the work in the parks. For five or six years Mr. White was a 
director of the Chamber of Commerce and was a member of its publicity com- 
mittee, the work of which attracted many people to Spokane and added materially 
to the population of the city. He regarded Spokane as in its formative stage and 
believed that acreage for park purposes should be secured at that time — breathing 
places for the people to be purchased while land was comparatively cheap instead 
of waiting until the price was almost prohibitive. Upon that belief he has always 
based his labors and the citizens of Spokane will ever have reason to feel grateful 
to him for his efforts in this connection. 

While the veil of privacy should ever be drawn around one's home relations 
with all their secret ties, it is well known that Mr. White's home is a most attractive 
and happy one and that warm-hearted hospitality is freely accorded to the many 
friends of the family. He was married in Toronto, Canada, in 1905, to Miss 
Ethelyn Binkley, a daughter of Judge J. W. Binkley, now of Spokane, her mother 
being a member of the Clarkson family of Toronto. Mrs. White is of English 
descent and % B. A. of Cornell University. Mr. and Mrs. White have become par- 
ents of three daughters, Mary Jane, Elizabeth Binkley and Ethelyn Louise. 

Mr. White is a believer in the Episcopal faith and his family attend the services 
of that church. He recognized the fact that well rounded character is based upon 
normal physical, mental and moral growth. He is a believer in clean living and 
in athletics and he has done much along those lines. He feels that every life needs 
its periods of recreation, its study hours and its time for quiet, thoughtful medita- 
tion. He has membership relations with the Spokane Club, the Spokane Riding 
and Driving Club, the Spokane Country Club and the Spokane Amateur Athletic 
Club. He also belongs to the St. James Club and the Mount Royal Golf Club of 
Montreal, the Union League Club of New York, the Santa Barbara Club of Cali- 
fornia and the Coeur d'Alene Boat Club. He is a life member of the Masonic 
fraternity, having taken the degrees of Royal Arch Masonry, of the Knight Templar 
Commandery, of the Consistory and of the Mystic Shrine. He is a past chancellor 
of the Knights of Pythias, has passed through all of the chairs of the uniform 
rank and is past captain in the division. He likewise holds membership with the 
Dramatic Order of the Knights of Khorassan. He has been a strong supporter 
of many organizations including the American Civic Association and the Municipal 



146 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

League, and was an officer of the latter in New York. His activities have reached 
out to the various vital interests of life and while in business he has won that suc- 
cess which comes of aptitude for management, close application and keen discrim- 
ination, he has also made his work of usefulness and value to the world in many 
directions, especially in upholding the standards of manhood and citizenship. In 
his life there have entered the distinctive and unmistakable elements of greatness. 
He is endowed with a rugged honesty of purpose, is a man of independent thought 
and action, one whose integrity and honor are so absolute as to compel the respect 
and confidence of his fellowmen, one whose life has been filled with ceaseless toil 
and industry, while his motives are of that ideal order that practically make his 
life a consecration to duty and to the measure of his possibilities for accomplish- 
ing good. 



ROY HOLLISTER KINGSBURY. 

Roy Hollister Kingsbury, of Wallace, holds the position of supply agent of the 
Federal Mining & Smelting Company, purchasing all supplies for the various mines 
owned by the concern. His birth occurred at Yankton, South Dakota, on the 19th of 
January, 1877, his parents being Theodore A. and Frances M. (Hollister) Kings- 
bury. The father was an early pioneer settler of the Dakotas, being employed in the 
United States land office at Watertown, South Dakota, and later, in 1884, becoming 
a clerk in the Dakota state legislature. He passed away in 1889, leaving a widow 
and two children, a son and daughter. Immediately afterward the daughter came 
to Spokane as the Spokane representative of a South Dakota firm, acting as a public 
and court stenographer. In August, 1891, the mother and son also came to Spokane, 
being among the pioneers of the new city which was then recovering from the great 
fire. The mother still resides in Spokane, but the daughter is married and makes her 
home in Chicago. 

In the acquirement of an education Roy H. Kingsbury attended the schools of 
Watertown, South Dakota, and Spokane, Washington. Under the instruction of his 
sister he gained a comprehensive knowledge of stenography and in 1894 entered the 
employ of Bravender & Keats (Echo Roller Mills) of Spokane, whom he served for 
five years as stenographer and bookkeeper. In 1899 he became connected with the 
lumber trade as stenographer and bookkeeper for the Washington Mill Company of 
Spokane, with which concern he remained until January, 1900, resigning his position 
to become stenographer for F. R. Culbertson, of Burke, Idaho, who was manager of 
the Tiger-Poorman mine, then owned by the Buffalo-Hump Mining Company. When 
that concern was sold to the Empire State-Idaho Mining & Developing Company he 
remained with the latter firm, which was under the management of W. Clayton 
Miller, being- employed as a stenographer at Burke until the 1st of September, 1903, 
when the Empire State-Idaho Mining & Developing Company was absorbed by the 
Federal Mining & Smelting Company. At that time he was given charge of the 
Wardner office of the Federal Mining & Smelting Company, at their Last Chance 
mine, remaining at Wardner until April, 1906, when he was transferred to the Wal- 
lace office of the concern to take charge thereof as the successor of Mr. North. At 
the time of the consolidation of the Spokane and Wallace offices of the Federal mining 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 147 

& Smelting Company he took the position of supply agent, attending to the purchase 
of supplies of all kinds for the various mines belonging to the company. He is still 
ably discharging the duties devolving upon him in that connection and is a valuable 
attache of the concern which he represents. He is also interested with Dr. St. Jean 
in the ownership of the Wallace Hospital and is likewise the secretary and treasurer 
of the Seelig Grocery Company, of Wardner and Kellogg, Idaho, owning one- fifth 
of the stock of that company. 

About 1895, while living in Spokane, Mr. Kingsbury became a non-commissioned 
officer of Battery A, Washington National Guard, remaining with that command un- 
til mustered out of service at the opening of the Spanish-American war. Owing to 
a slight illness at that time, he was unable to join the new regiment which was formed 
to take active part in the conflict. 

On the 20th of February, 1901, Mr. Kingsbury was united in marriage to Miss 
Bertha L. Henderson, a daughter of John Henderson of Sprague, Washington. A 
son was born to them on the 2d of December, 1908, but passed away on the 29th of 
May, 1910. Mr. Kingsbury belongs to the Holy Trinity Episcopal church of Wal- 
lace and to the Inland Club of Spokane and is also a member of Wallace Lodge, No. 
331, B. P. O. E. His life has been guided by the most honorable principles and his 
self-reliance and unfaltering industry, combined with his integrity, constitute the 
salient features in his success. 



A. EUGENE WAYLAND. 

The prosperity of a community does not depend upon the machinery of govern- 
ment nor even upon the men who are called to public office, but rather upon those who 
are upholding the public stability through the establishment and careful and honorable 
conduct of legitimate business enterprises. From the time of his arrival in the 
northwest, in 1901, A. Eugene Wayland has been imbued with the true spirit of the 
pioneer. He is progressive and allows no obstacles to brook his path in carrying 
out the ideas and plans which he regards as essential for the country's best develop- 
ment. He has blazed the trail for others to follow in manv sections of the Inland 
Empire not only in farming but also in the development of coal lands and the conduct 
of other business enterprises, success attending him in all of his ventures because 
of his determined spirit and straight-forward methods. His location on the Pacific 
coast, in 1901, did not prove to be a permanent one as he later had to return to the 
east for two years, but he never lost sight of the fact that the west held the oppor- 
tunity for progressive men, remembering further that Spokane had made strong ap- 
peal to him as the most favorable place on the coast to put into tangible form the 
plans which he had made for his own business development. 

Washington has drawn her citizenship from all parts of the country. Every 
state in the Union has furnished her quota of men and Mr. Wayland is among those 
who have come to the northwest from Tennessee, his birth having occurred in Knox- 
ville, on the 13th of August, 1877. His father was William H. Wayland, a native of 
Virginia and a representative of an old New England family of Scotch- Irish ancestry. 
The grandfather of A. E. Wayland became one of the prominent settlers of eastern 
Tennessee, and the family established and developed many large plantations in the 



148 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

south. William H. Wayland, long connected with agricultural interests in the south, 
is now living retired in Knoxville. It was subsequent to his removal to that section 
of the country that he met and married Mary M. Goddard, who was born in Tennes- 
see and belonged to one of the leading pioneer families of that district. The God- 
dards are of French and English origin and the family was represented in the Ameri- 
can army during the Revolutionary war. Later representatives of the name removed 
from Virginia to Tennessee. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Way land were born three sons and 
six daughters. The two brothers of our subject were David G. and D wight A. 
Wayland. The daughters of the family are: Lillie, Anna, Edith, Mamie, Carrie and 
Elsie, all residents of Knoxville with the exception of the first named, who is the 
wife of Richard M. Caldwell, of Oklahoma City. 

A. Eugene Wayland supplemented his early education by a course in the Univer- 
sity of Tennessee at Knoxville and in 1901, when a young man of twenty- four years, 
he sought the opportunities of the northwest, making his way to Tacoma where he was 
employed during the period that he was investigating the subject of suitable irriga- 
tion. He afterward returned to Chicago where he spent a year in the grocery busi- 
ness and on the 1st of October, 1903, settled in Spokane. Here he began operating in 
the real-estate field in connection with R. G. Belden and, watchful of opportunities 
pointing toward success, the following year he incorporated the International Devel- 
opment Company for the purpose of mining coal in British Columbia. The scope 
of their operations was also extended to include extensive farming interests in the 
Inland Empire and the development of some large tracts of land in southern Utah. 
They were likewise the pioneers in the San Juan oil fields of southern Utah whicn are 
now being extensively developed. They have very large interests there, having put 
down the first well in that district, since which time they have developed a number of 
flowing wells. They also put down the first artesian wells in San Juan county and 
have two flowing wells there at the present time. The business of the company has 
ever been of a nature which has contributed in substantial measure to growth and 
progress in the district where they have worked. They were the pioneers in open- 
ing the coal fields of the north fork of Michel Creek in the Crow's Nest country, and 
to facilitate the development of that property they secured a charter for build- 
ing a road in the valley and have partially completed a steam road, standard gauge, 
which when finished will be fourteen miles in length. This will enable them to mar- 
ket the output of their mines without difficulty. One of the salient features in Mr. 
Wayland *s success is that he has never been afraid of earnest, hard work, and during 
the period when initial effort was being put forth to develop the mines, he never hesi- 
tated to perform any task necessary, engaging in the packing and in other labor that 
was helpful in advancing the projects in which they were engaged. They now have 
four properties there, one of them proving to be the largest coal proposition in the 
west, and furthermore Mr. Wayland and his associates have the distinction of open- 
ing up some of the largest coal measures in that district. Business is carried on under 
the name of The Crown Coal & Coke Company with Mr. Wayland as its secre- 
tary-treasurer, his associate officers being: C. L. Butterfield, of Moscow, Idaho, as 
president; A. Hopson, of Walla Walla, as vice president; and Charles L. Hower, 
second vice-president. 

Any enterprising man with keen insight and sagacity recognizes the wonderful 
possibilities offered in the natural resources of this section of the country and does 
not usually confine his operations to a single field but extends his efforts to various 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 149 

• 

activities, the tangible results of which are seen in the already splendidly improved 
districts. In the extension of his business connections Mr. Way land has become inter- 
ested in a development company which is successfully cultivating six hundred and 
forty acres of land in the Alberta district, of Canada, eighteen hundred acres near 
Kohlotos, six hundred and forty acres near Eureka, Washington, and three hundred 
and twenty acres near Helix, Washington. They are also improving two fruit tracts 
of twenty- four acres near Milton, Oregon, which have already been brought into ex- 
cellent condition. Mr. Way land is likewise interested in a fine hog ranch in Idaho, 
consisting of six hundred and forty acres all in alfalfa. From this ranch they sell 
about one thousand hogs annually. Further investment has made him one of the 
owners of a property of seven thousand acres in San Juan county, Utah, on which 
with an equipment of thirty-six head of horses and necessary machinery, a splendid 
wheat tract is being developed. The caterpiller engines are used and no effort or ex- 
pense are spared in making this one of the best wheat-producing ranches in the dis- 
trict. Mr. Way land and his associates are also improving one thousand acres of fruit 
land in the same county, using artesian wells for irrigation, and in so doing accom- 
plishing a notable engineering feat, for they traced the water by means of geological 
formation and struck it within fifty feet of where they had believed it to be. They 
have also invested considerable money in the Coeur d'Alene district in development 
work and have holdings there at the present time. 

Mr. Way land votes with the republican party but has never taken active part 
in politics, owing to the demands of his varied business interests. Those who meet 
him socially find him a genial, courteous gentleman and he is well known to the mem- 
bership of the Spokane and Spokane Athletic Clubs, and also in the Chamber of Com- 
merce. He stands with those men to whom opportunity is ever an incentive for re- 
newed and persistent effort, who find pleasure in solving intricate business problems 
and in working out means and methods for meeting any condition that exists. With 
determined purpose he has steadily advanced beyond the goal of success and his 
operations, conducted on a mammoth scale, have constituted an important factor in 
the growth and development of the Inland Empire. 



HENRY MICKELS. 



The newspaper business is constantly attracting men from the various walks 
of life, many of whom find in this work a pleasant and profitable occupation. To 
this class belongs Henry Mickels, editor and proprietor of the Free Press of 
Cheney. He became identified with the publication of newspapers many years 
ago and is recognized as one of the thoroughly experienced and capable men in 
this line in the northwest. A native of Winneshiek county, Iowa, he was born 
August 27, 1871, a son of E. and Christina Mickels. The mother died in 1873 
and the father in 1901. 

Mr. Mickels of this sketch was educated in the public schools of his native 
state. He depended very largely upon his own efforts in his boyhood in securing 
an education, attending school in winter and working at such occupation as he 
could find in summer, in order to meet the necessary expenses. He was a student 
of Decorah Institute of Decorah, Iowa, and the University of North Dakota. At 



150 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

the age of eighteen he began teaching school and continued as a teacher for twelve 
vears in Traill, Cass and Grand Forks counties, North Dakota, with the exception 
of two years when he was a student at the University of North Dakota. He was 
also interested in a small newspaper at Portland for two years while teaching 
school and owned a paper at Northwood, North Dakota, for one year, and at Hal- 
stad, Minnesota, for the same length of time. In 1899 he came west to Idaho 
and spent two years prospecting in the mountains. However, he discovered that 
he was more interested in the newspaper business than in prospecting for gold 
and silver and, accordingly, he came to Cheney in 1902 and purchased the Sentinel 
and Free Press, consolidating the two papers into one publication which he has 
since successfully published as the Free Press. 

On the 1st of November, 1901, Mr. Mickels was married in North Dakota to 
Miss Marie Rauk, a daughter of O. K. Rauk. Mr. Mickels is an active worker 
in the development of Spokane county and is a valued member of the Commercial 
Club of Cheney. He is also a member of the Odd Fellows and has proved himself 
to be eminently efficient in promoting the general welfare. He conducts his paper 
on a liberal and progressive basis and the popularity of the Free Press is evidence 
of his ability in meeting the wants of an intelligent and discriminating class of 
readers. Judging by the respect in which he is held by the community it is evident 
that he chose wisely when he selected Cheney as his home. Being a man of pleas- 
ing appearance and fine address, he has made many friends and ranks among the 
leaders of the country press of Washington. 



LAUCHLIN MacLEAN. 



Lauchlin MacLean, commencing his career as a railroad man, in which connec- 
tion he won success, and advancing from that into the real-estate field, is now a 
leading factor in the development and sale of irrigated lands, being today one of 
the best known and most prominent irrigationists of the west. He has not con- 
fined his efforts alone to Spokane and vicinity but has also promoted many other 
projects throughout the Inland Empire and if, as has been often stated, "that man 
is blessed who makes two blades of grass grow where one had grown," Mr. Mac- 
Lean has contributed much to general progress and has merited the prosperity 
which has crowned his own labors. He was born in Tyne Valley, Prince Edward 
Island, July 24, 1856. His parents, Donald and Sarah (Ellis) MacLean, were 
also natives of that island, the former born near Port Hill and the latter at Bed- 
ford, of Scotch and English descent respectively. The MacLean family went to 
Prince Edward Island from Mull, Scotland, and Donald MacLean became a very 
prominent and influential citizen there, serving as one of the three judges of that 
district, a judgeship in that locality being equivalent to a seat on the superior 
court bench in the United States. He was also very active in the Presbyterian 
church, in which he served as a deacon and treasurer for thirty years. He died in 
1891 and the same year his wife passed away. Her family were shipbuilders and 
went to Prince Edward Island from Bedford, England. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Don- 
ald MacLean were born five sons and eight daughters: William, a farmer living 
at Northam, Prince Edward Island; Hugh, a farmer of that locality; James Ed- 



k 



LAUCHLIN MacLEAN 



I 

* ** ' \ I L» " ■ 



s. 






SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 153 

ward, an agriculturist of Tyne Valley; Dan, living on the old family homestead; 
Emily, the wife of Alexander McArthur, a farmer of Northam; Mary Ann, the 
wife of Lauchlin McNevin, a tanner and harness manufacturer of Tyne Valley; 
Rachael, whose husband, Mr. Horn, is a farmer of Elmsdale, Prince Edward 
Island; Maggie, Mina and Minerva, all of whom married farmers on Prince Ed- 
ward Island; and Mrs. Caroline McAusland and Sarah Horn, both deceased. 

The other son of the family is Lauchlin MacLean, who was educated in the 
public schools of his native isle and until he reached the age of fifteen years re- 
mained on the old homestead. He then worked as water boy for a contractor on 
the Prince Edward Island Railway, which was then being built, and subsequently 
he spent three years as a stone cutter and builder, thoroughly acquainting himself 
with the trade during that period. When the road was completed he had charge 
of a section as foreman for three years and then came to the west. He spent two 
years with an engineering party on the Burlington & Missouri River Railroad at 
Beatrice, Nebraska, after which he proceeded to Cheyenne, Wyoming, and obtained 
a position as brakeman on the Union Pacific Railroad, being thus employed for 
six months. Later he was promoted to the position of conductor and ran a train 
on that line for two and a half years. 

Mr. MacLean became connected with the Northern Pacific Railroad Company 
at the time when the eastern terminus of the west end of its line was just east of 
what is now Plains, Montana, and was one of the first conductors during its con- 
struction. Following the completion of the line he ran a passenger train on the 
Montana division until the company started to build its line from Pasco to Ellens- 
burg. He acted as conductor of thejconstruction trjrin connected with laying the 
track from Kiona to Ellensburg, aftekr which be, retiire^vftpm railroad service. Dur- 
ing the succeeding two years he was general agent for the -Home Accident Company 
of San Francisco for the territory of Washington and % at the end of that time formed 
a partnership with Major Fred R. R^ed, ii<Jyr iit •seiffeh&n' Idaho, in the real-estate 
and insurance business at North Yakima, ' entering that field in 1886. The town 
was owned by the Northern Pacific Railroad Company and he had full charge of 
the town site and all the Northern Pacific lands in that district In February, 
JS90. he came to Spokane, arriving here shortly after the fire. 

In this city Mr. MacLean entered the real-estate business, in which he contin- 
ued for two years, but the "wanderlust" was not yet satisfied and he removed to 
Chelan Falls in what was then Okanogan county. There he laid out the town 
rite of Chelan Falls, remaining at that place until the autumn of 1900, during 
which period he not only managed the town site and conducted his real-estate inter- 
ests but also owned the hotel, the ferry boat and in addition occupied his super- 
fluous energies in managing his stock ranch near Chelan Falls. He still owns the 
stock ranch of one thousand acres. In November, 1900, Mr. MacLean removed to 
Wenatchee and acted as agent for the Northern Pacific land department, selling 
land in Chelan and Douglas counties. In 1901 he promoted the high line ditch at 
Wenatchee, an immense irrigation project covering at that time eight thousand 
acres. In June, 1903, he returned to Spokane, organized the Spokane Canal Com- 
pany and promoted what is now the famous Otis Orchards, one of the garden spots 
of the Inland Empire and destined to be one of the greatest producing centers of 
the northwest. He continued as president and general manager of the company 
until April 24, 1911, and in the development of that project six thousand acres 

YoL n— 8 



154 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

were irrigated. Since coming to Spokane he has also organized the Methow Canal 
Company and built the high line canal of the Methow valley, which covers four 
thousand acres. Three years ago, in 1908, he formed a partnership with Harry 
L. Irwin, of Chicago, and purchased the Fruit Land Irrigation Company at Kettle 
Falls and completed the last nineteen miles of ditch line. He is still president of 
that company, whose line waters eight thousand acres of land. In June, 1910, he 
bought out the Garden Valley Irrigation Company and still owns that system in 
Ferry county, on the west side of the Columbia river, near Kettle Falls, irrigating 
in that connection four thousand acres. Mr. MacLean has closely studied the sub- 
ject of irrigation and his efforts have been a most practical element in the devel- 
opment of the Inland Empire in the reclamation of wild lands and the conversion 
of arid tracts into regions of productivity. Mr. MacLean is also well and widely 
known in connection with farming and ranching interests, being now president of 
the Sheep Creek Land Company, which planted one thousand acres in Stevens 
county to alfalfa and put in a complete irrigating system to cover it. On his ranch 
up the Columbia river which he still owns he has two hundred acres under irriga- 
tion by means of the gravity and pump system. He is also interested in other 
companies — all irrigation enterprises of great importance and all under develop- 
ment. The soil of this region is naturally very fertile and the only thing required 
is the water supply to make the land extremely fruitful. Recognizing these facts, 
Mr. MacLean has promoted many projects to bring about the desired results and 
his labors are attended with success. His efforts have not only brought him 
financial reward but have constituted a most important factor in the development 
of this section of the state, the entire public being thus indirectly benefited owing 
to the fact that emigration is constantly attracted to this section and thus values 
in all lines of business are advanced. 

Home life, social interests and political activity have all had their place in 
the life of Mr. MacLean. He was married January 15, 1888, to Miss Laura G. 
Stone, a daughter of Nathan N. Stone, of Vicksburg, Mississippi, and her grand- 
mother was a first cousin of Horace Greeley. They now have one son, Donald, 
who was born February 22, 1904, and resides with his parents at their home at 
Otis Orchards. Mr. MacLean has always voted with the republican party and has 
been very active in its support, deeming its principles most potent forces in good 
government. He has been a delegate to various conventions, both county and state, 
principally from Douglas, Chelan and Okanogan counties. He has always assisted 
materially in all elections and takes a keen interest in the growth and success of his 
party. Fraternally he is a Mason, having been made a member of Alexander 
Lodge, No. 5, Prince Edward Island, under the Grand Lodge of England. He 
later demitted to Cheyenne, Wyoming, and afterward became a charter member of 
the lodge under dispensation at North Yakima, which afterward was consolidated 
and became Lodge No. 24, of North Yakima. He demitted from there to join 
Lodge No. 34, of Spokane, after the reorganization following the great fire, and 
became one of the charter members of the Masonic lodge at Wenatchee. His 
membership is now in Oriental Lodge, No. 74, Spokane, and he is also a Royal 
Arch Mason, while both he and his wife are connected with the Order of the 
Eastern Star. He likewise holds membership with the Knights of Pythias at 
Wenatchee, was the first president of the Eagles there and is still a member of 
the aerie. His membership relations with the Elks is in Everett, Washington, he 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 155 

being the first Elk from the central part of this state to place his membership 
there. He belongs also to the Spokane Club and is a valued member of several 
organizations which have for their object the advancement and development of 
the northwest and the exploitation of its resources and opportunities. He belongs 
to the Chamber of Commerce, of which he was a director for six and a half years 
bot resigned in 1910. He has been a director of the National Apple Show since 
its organization and was also chairman of the Spokane county committee of the 
Alaska- Yukon Exposition at Seattle. He has attended six national irrigation con- 
gresses and by reason of the extent and importance of his business along that line 
his opinions have largely come to be regarded as authority concerning irrigation 
projects. The influence and benefit of his work are inestimable and the worth of 
his service no one doubts, as he has taken cognizance of the conditions and needs 
of this part of the country and in meeting the latter has contributed in large 
measure to the development of the country which is fast rivaling any section of 
this broad land in its productiveness. 



FRED FLINT. 



In Fred Flint Spokane has a citizen who possesses remarkably keen sagacity 
and foresight and when others were holding vacillating opinions concerning future 
values he boldly supported his own views and never lost an opportunity to invest 
in real estate in this city. With intuitive perception and wisdom he selected the 
right locality and his keen judgment has been proved in the constantly increasing 
valuation of his property. Moreover, he is one of the few who came through the 
never-to-be-forgotten period of financial depression in 1893 without losing a dol- 
lar, although he carried heavily mortgaged property before the pressure ceased. 
With the return of better days, however, he was able to release his property from 
mortgages and is today the owner of valuable realty interests, largely handling his 
own property in the conduct of his present extensive and growing real-estate business. 

Mr. Flint is one of New England's native sons, his birth having occurred in 
Troy, Vermont, May 22, 1856. His parents were Fred and Elvira (Richardson) 
Flint, the former of Irish and the latter of Scotch descent. There were three 
brothers of the name of Flint who came from Ireland and took part in the Revolu- 
tionary war, one settling in Vermont, another in Maine, and a third in Massachu- 
setts. It is from the Vermont branch of the family that Fred Flint of this review 
is descended. His father was for many years engaged in the hotel business in 
the Green Mountain state and owned the stage line which in early days ran through 
Vermont. He was also engaged in farming and was thus active in business in his 
locality for many years. He died in 1885, while his wife, surviving for three 
years, passed away in 1888. It was her grandfather who established the Richard- 
son family on American soil. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Fred Flint, Sr., were born three 
sons, of whom Frank J. is now in business with his brother Fred in Spokane, while 
Albert is living on the old home farm in Newport, Vermont. 

In the public schools of his native state Fred Flint of this review pursued his 
education and when he left New England, in 1877, he went to California, believ- 
ing that he might have better opportunities upon the less thickly settled and more 



15 6 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

rapidly growing Pacific coast. He secured a position as clerk with Kelley Broth- 
ers, a mercantile house in San Francisco, with which he remained for two years, 
and subsequently he went to San Diego, California. At that time the California 
Southern Railway was being built and he secured a position with the company as 
commissary, continuing in that employ for eighteen months, when the road was 
sold to the Southern Pacific. He then returned to San Francisco where he spent 
the succeeding year, after which he removed to Seattle, where, in 1882, he opened 
a real-estate office. Three years later he came to Spokane and instantly became a 
factor in real-estate circles here. He was first associated with Fred B. Grinnell, 
in 1886, with whom he was connected for eight months. He then started out inde- 
pendently and has since been alone. In 1908 he organized the business under the 
name of the Flint Investment Company, for the purpose of conducting a general 
real-estate business, and in the intervening period he has negotiated many of the 
most important property transfers that have occurred in the history of the city. 
Some of his deals have been particularly interesting. In 1887 he purchased a lot 
on the south side of Front street, between Bernard and Browne, for which he 
paid forty-five hundred dollars. It was improved with a brick residence and later 
he removed another house to the same lot. In 1909 he there erected a brick hotel, 
fifty by one hundred and forty-two feet, and four stories in height, after which 
he leased it for ten years at one thousand dollars per month, thus receiving for the 
entire decade one hundred and twenty thousand dollars. The building cost him 
thirty-two thousand dollars and is now paying him seven per cent interest on one 
hundred and fifty thousand dollars. It is called the B. M. & R. Hotel. Another 
one of the business transactions which indicates Mr. Flint's keen sagacity and 
capable management had its beginning in 1885, when he purchased two lots, one 
hundred by one hundred and forty-two feet, on the southeast corner of Front 
and Browne streets for five thousand dollars. In thirty days he sold of this fifty 
by one hundred feet on the alley for seventeen hundred and fifty dollars, and a 
portion fifty by ninety-two feet, on the inside, facing on Front street, for seven- 
teen hundred and fifty dollars, reserving the remainder, fifty by ninety-two feet 
on that corner, fifteen hundred dollars representing his investment for that corner. 
In 1910 his wisdom in reserving the corner was indicated when he refused fifty 
thousand dollars cash for the property — a notable increase over the fifteen hundred 
dollar investment. In 1902 he purchased the southwest corner of Sprague avenue 
and Ivy street, securing a tract, one hundred and fifty by one hundred and seven 
feet, for seven hundred and seventy-five dollars. In the spring of 1910 he was 
offered and refused twenty-five thousand dollars, such had been the increase in 
valuation in the short space of eight years. In 1904 he purchased the southwest 
corner of Second avenue and Arthur streets, securing one hundred by one hundred 
and forty-two fret for four hundred and twenty-five dollars, and in February, 1911, 
he refused sixty-five hundred dollars for this property. He has made many similar 
investments throughout the city with a corresponding increase in values and al- 
though in the panic of 1893 he was carrying about thirty thousand dollars' worth 
of property on which was a mortgage of eight thousand dollars, he managed to 
pass through the troublous times without suffering any loss. He is now president 
of the Flint Investment Company, Incorporated, and his position as a leading busi- 
ness man and safe investor has long since been demonstrated. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 157 

On the 2d of April, 1890, Mr. Flint was united in marriage to Miss Alice L. 
Gray, a daughter of Captain Mark Gray, of Boxport, Maine. Mr. Flint belongs 
to the Independent Order of Foresters, also to the Spokane Club and the Inland 
Club. He is likewise a member of the Chamber of Commerce and in pontics is 
a republican but has never found time to put aside business cares even for a brief 
moment to enter actively into politics. When he left New England he was com- 
paratively without financial interests, having little more than was necessary to 
bring him to the coast. Today he is numbered among Spokane's capitalists and 
his record indicates what may be accomplished through the wise use of time and 
opportunities when enterprise, industry and intelligence form the basis of success. 



ZACH STEWART. 



Zach Stewart is a faithful custodian of the public funds and since 1909 has tilled 
the office of county treasurer, his reelection coming to him as the expression of pub- 
lic faith and confidence on the part of his fellow townsmen. He was born in Miami 
county, Ohio, October 19, 1864, a son of Er. and Eliza (Gephart) Stewart, who 
were likewise natives of the Buckeye state and are now residents of Pine Village, 
Indiana. The father is descended from an old North Carolina family, whose estab- 
lishment in America antedates the Revolutionary war, Scotch colonists of the name 
having come to the new world and founded the family on this side of the Atlantic. 
The father of our subject was a soldier of the Civil war and for many years followed 
farming but is now living retired. His wife belonged to an old family of Hollandish 
origin that was also established in America in colonial days. Her father was a resi- 
dent of Pennsylvania before his removal to Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart became 
the parents of three sons and two daughters: Zach; Joseph A., who is deputy county 
auditor of Spokane; Wiltiam, a farmer of Troy, Ohio; Mary, the wife of Harry Mc- 
Kenzie, who follows farming near Attica, Indiana; and Mabel, the wife of A. J. 
McKenzie, of Chicago. 

In the common schools of Warren county, Indiana, Zach Stewart acquired his 
early education and afterward attended De Pauw University, at Greencastle, In- 
diana. He was reared to farm life, early becoming familiar with the duties and 
labors incident to the devolpment of the fields. He afterward took up the profession 
of teaching in Warren county, Indiana, and to that work devoted his energies, until 
he came to Spokane in April, 1889. He at once became identified with educational 
interests here, serving one year as principal of the Spangle school, but in 1891 left 
the schoolroom to establish a grain business at Plaza, Washington. In the fall of 
1894 he was elected superintendent of schools of Spokane county, which position 
he acceptably filled until 1 897. He then became a teacher in the city schools of 
Spokane and was thus identified with the educational interests of the city until 1903, 
serving for four years of that time as principal of the Garfield school. In 1903 he 
was elected county auditor and served until 1907, after which he spent about two 
years in farming. In 1909 he was elected county treasurer and in the fall of 1910 
was reelected for a two-years' term, his incumbency in the office to continue until 
January, 1913. 

Mr. Stewart is a republican, active in the ranks of the party and has been a dele- 
gate to the county convention. Some idea of the high regard in which he is held by 



158 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

his party may be gathered from the fact that at the last election there was no oppo- 
sition in the nominating convention and practically no opposition at the polls, the 
democrats placing no name upon their ticket as a candidate for office. For four 
years Mr. Stewart has served as a member of the city board of education. His in- 
terest in the public schools is unfaltering and his efforts have been of a practical and 
tangible character in promoting the welfare and progress of the schools and in 
raising the standard of public instruction. 

On the 7th of April, 1891, Mr. Stewart was married to Miss Annie Jackson, who 
lived near Pine City, Whitman county, her father, John Jackson, having been a 
pioneer farmer there, dating his residence in that locality from 1877. Mr. and 
Mrs. Stewart are the parents of five children: Harriet, at home; Mabel, Donald, 
Mary and Margaret, all of whom are attending school. The family attend the Vin- 
cent Methodist Episcopal church and Mr. Stewart is an exemplary representative 
of the Masonic fraternity, holding membership in Tyrian Lodge No. 96, A. F. 8c A. 
M., of which he is a past master. He is likewise a member of Red Cross Lodge, K. 
P., and a past chancellor commander. He has been honored with election in the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, being a past noble grand of Samaritan Lodge No. 
52. He belongs to the Spokane Athletic Club and is a member of the Chamber of 
Commerce, in which organization are gathered the representative men of the city 
who desire to promote public progress and who uphold the principles and projects 
that work for the continuous and substantial growth of the city. 



JOHN A. NEAVILLE. 



The veterans of the Civil war who willingly risked their lives in defense of the 
Union are entitled to the gratitude of all lovers of liberty. Their numbers are each 
year diminishing but their deeds will stand out more gloriously in proportion as the 
years descend into eternity. Of the old soldiers now living in Spokane county John 
A. Neaville, of Deer Park, is one of the most favorably known. He is a native of 
Council Hill, Jo Daviess county, Illinois, and was born January 31, 1844. His 
father, John D. Neaville, died in 1853, and his mother, whose maiden name was 
Maria L. Meredith, passed away in 1846. The father was of good pioneer stock and 
participated in the Black Hawk war under Captain Abraham Lincoln, afterward the 
great war president of the United States. The grandfather of our subject on the 
maternal side was also a fighter and served as major in the United States army. 

Mr. Neaville of this review received his early education in the common schools of 
Wisconsin and subsequently became a student of Tafton Academy and was graduated 
from that institution. In response to the call for men to protect the flag, he enlisted 
in the Civil war in Company F, Tenth and Forty-ninth Wisconsin Volunteers, and 
performed his duty in the field for three years, participating in many of the impor- 
tant battles and movements of the war. During this time he learned many lessons 
which can be acquired only by contact with men and which had an important effect 
in shaping his character. He became a school teacher and taught for twenty-two 
years in Wisconsin, also serving for four years as treasurer of Grant county. In 
1893, having heard of the great development which was taking place in the north- 
west, he came to Spokane, Washington, and maintained an office as pension attorney 
for five years and for three years was superintendent of the county poor. In 1901 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 159 

he located in Deer Park as pension attorney, but after three years went to Colville, 
where he spent a short time, and then returned to Deer Park. Here he has been 
appearing in behalf of clients in the justice courts and for three years past he has 
filled the office of justice of the peace, discharging its duties in a manner that meets 
the hearty approval of the best people of the community. 

On the 14th of September, 1875, Squire Neaville was married at Potosi, Wiscon- 
sin, to Miss Myra Goodrich, a daughter of David Goodrich. To this union four 
children have been born: Anna, who is married to Roy R. Grove; James D., who 
married Sarah Crowel; Libby M., who is now Mrs. O. L. Olson; and J. Rae, who 
married Miss Flora Ellsworth. Squire Neaville is an earnest advocate of the repub- 
lican party and has served as delegate to county, state and congressional conventions. 
He was one of the delegates in Wisconsin, who first presented Robert M. La Fol- 
lctte, of Wisconsin, for important public office. Fraternally he is identified with the 
Masonic order and also with the Grand Army of the Republic. He is an attendant 
of the Congregational church and is a generous contributor to religious and all other 
worthy causes. As a young man he was a true soldier and in all his acts as a citi- 
zen he has aimed faithfully to discharge his duties to his state and to his f ellowmen. 
He ranks today among the most respected citizens of Spokane county — a position he 
has earned by a life of unselfishness and willing service in behalf of others. 



ARCHIBALD MacCORQUODALE. 

Archibald MacCorquodale, district freight and passenger agent at Spokane for 
the Oregon 8c Washington Railway & Navigation Company, was born in Inverness, 
Scotland, April 6, I860. His parents, John and Margaret MacCorquodale, were 
likewise natives of the land of hills and heather and are still living there. They 
arc both representatives of old families of that country and throughout the period of 
his connection with business interests the father has always followed farming and 
stock-raising. In the family are four sons : Roderick, who is now connected with the 
Railway Steel Spring Company, of New York; Donald, who is with the Malmera 
Anglo- Argentina Company at Buenos Aires, Argentina ; and James, who is connected 
with the Highland Railroad in Scotland. 

The other son of the family is Archibald MacCorquodale, of this review, who pur- 
sued his education in the schools of Inverness, Scotland, attending the high school 
there. Throughout his entire life he has been connected with railway service, entering 
the employ of the Highland Railroad at Inverness on the 7th of May, 1880. Be- 
lieving that the new world offered broader and better opportunities, he sailed for 
Canada in July, 1883, and his first position on this side of the Atlantic was that of 
freight clerk of the Grand Trunk Railroad at Quebec, while later he occupied a 
similar position at Bellville and Brockville, Ontario. On severing his connection with 
the Grand Trunk he went to Utica, New York, on the 26th of January, 1 886, and 
was employed by the Utica 8c Black River Railroad as clerk in the general freight 
office until March, 1891. From that point he went to Oswego, New York, and was in 
the service of the Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg Railroad until he came to the 
west in 1 893. Here he entered the service of the Oregon 8c Washington Railway 8c 
Navigation Company as clerk in the general freight office and in May, 1899, was 
made traveling freight agent, which position he filled acceptably until September, 



160 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

1905, when he was chosen chief clerk of the general freight office at Portland. In 
May, 1906, he became general agent of the freight department at Portland and on 
the 1st of February, 1907, was made district freight agent at Spokane, and in May, 
1910, became district freight and passenger agent at Spokane, which position he still 
fills. This is a record of rapid and deserved promotion which shows his adaptability 
for railway service and the excellent record which he has made in his chosen field. 

Mr. MacCorquodale has two daughters: Helen, now in school; and Margaret, 
who is in California. He belongs to St. Andrews Society of Portland, Oregon, and 
also to Clan Macleay of the same city. He holds membership with the Elks Lodge 
at Moscow, Idaho, and his membership relations in Spokane are with the Spokane 
Club, the Spokane Country Club, the Spokane Athletic Club, the Inland Club and 
the Chamber of Commerce. Politically he is a republican but neither time nor in- 
clination have allowed him to seek or hold office. He has a wide and favorable 
acquaintance among the leading residents of the city, a fact indicated by his club 
relations and the cordiality with which he is everywhere received. He has strong 
attachment for the land of his birth but even a stronger feeling for the land of his 
adoption which has been the scene of his business activities, giving him the oppor- 
tunities that, well improved, have brought to him a creditable and remunerative po- 
sition in railway circles. 



CHARLES JASPER. 



Denmark has furnished a valuable class of citizens to the new world. Thev 
have brought with them from the old country the unremitting energy and per- 
severance characteristic to that nationality, and in a great majority of cases have 
attained success in the management of varied business affairs. To this class be- 
longs Charles Jasper, who is now engaged in the general contracting business and 
has offices in the Peyton building. He came to America in 1882 when a young 
man of but seventeen years, his birth having occurred in Denmark in 1865. His 
parents were Peter and Maren (Jensen) Jesperson. 

On the home farm in Denmark Charles Jasper spent the days of his boyhood 
and youth and attended the common schools. From time to time he heard interest- 
ing reports concerning America, its business conditions and its opportunities, and 
at length these proved to him an irresistible attraction, and leaving behind him his 
parents, brothers and sisters he departed for Hamilton, Ontario. For three years 
he resided in that city and worked as a cabinet-maker, but in 1885 removed to the 
United States, settling first at Grand Forks, North Dakota and engaging in the 
carpenter's and builder's business. He was thus engaged for three years before 
coming to Spokane in 1888 and started at once in the general contracting business. 
He had previously learned the rudiments of the building science, and having ambi- 
tion and courage, after arriving in this city he directed his attention almost entirely 
to the erection of large buildings in Spokane and adjoining cities. The first build- 
ing he erected was the Concordia Hall, which was located at the corner of Second 
and Jefferson streets but which has since been destroyed by fire. This piece of 
work showed his ability to the prospective builders of Spokane, and from that 
time he has always enjoyed a large patronage. He has since erected many promi- 
nent buildings, the most recent of which is the Eiler building at the corner of 
Sprague avenue and Post street. In Lewiston he built the Weisgerber building and 



CHARLES JASPER 






i -- . 



"V* ; ^«k 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 163 

Weisgerber brewery, and at Tekoa he erected the Sisters Academy. Among the 
forty or fifty buildings which he has erected in Spokane the Western Union Life 
building stands out prominently as one of his best pieces of work, while others 
are the White Hotel, the Jones & Pettit building, the John W. Graham building, the 
Spokane & Eastern Trust Company's building and the Pantages Theater building. 
In 1906 Mr. Jasper was married to Miss Emily F. Brown, a daughter of George 
W. and Mary (Enittle) Brown, of Port Carbon, Pennsylvania, and a grand-daugh- 
ter of Dr. G. W. Brown, a well known physician of Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania. 
Mrs. Jasper is an accomplished dramatic reader, and is well known in that respect 
to the public in Spokane, where she has frequently given recitals which attest her 
unusual ability. Mr. and Mrs. Jasper reside in an artistic home at South 919 
Adams street, where, because of their hospitality and high social qualities, they 
receive many friends. Mr. Jasper has now been a citizen of the United States for 
thirty years and he never feels he has any reason to regret his determination to 
leave his father's valuable and well developed farm in Denmark to seek his fortune 
on this side of the Atlantic, for he has here met with remarkable success in his 
business and has made many friends whose regard and companionship make lite 
pleasant for him. 



LOUIS CARLTON JESSEPH. 

Louis Carlton Jesseph, who since 1900 has been a member of the bar of the 
state of Washington, is one of the <»apaJJ^ 'yonnger 4 members of the legal fraternity 
of Colville. He is a native of Michigan^fcts -birth having occurred in Shiawassee 
county, on October 13, 1877, and a\ son of Leonard E. and Leora (Sinclair) Jes- 
seph. The father passed away in 1^905, whiie th^mother, who is fifty-nine years 
of age, is living. On both sides oiir tftfbject is descended from America's early 
colonial families, among his mother's ancestors being numbered John Quincy Adams 
and John Hancock. 

The early years in the life of Louis Carlton Jesseph were spent in Michigan 
and Illinois, whose public schools he attended, completing his education in the high 
school of Spokane, Washington. Having decided to become an attorney following 
his graduation, he entered the law office of Graves, Wolff & Graces, where* he 
pursued his legal studies for four years, being admitted to the bar in 1900. Imme- 
diately following he went to Republic, this state, where he became associated with 
his brother, M. E. Jesseph, in the practice of his profession, under the firm name 
of Jesseph & Jesseph, this connection continuing for two years. In December, 
1902, he came to Colville and in the following March opened an office. In March, 
1907, he formed a partnership with F. L. Grinstead, the firm being known as Jes- 
seph & Grinstead. They have now been associated together for practically five 
years, during which time they have succeeded in building up a practice that be- 
speaks success, both members of the firm having proven themselves to be thor- 
oughly efficient and trustworthy in every respect. An analytical mind, studious 
habits and rare powers of concentration have been instrumental factors in for- 
warding Mr. Jesseph's professional attainments. He is careful and thorough in 
his preparation of his cases, cautious and alert in the presentation of his cause and 



164 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

in his arguments his deductions follow in logical sequence. He is always able to 
open a case with the confidence and assurance that in his preparations he has ex- 
hausted every available resource in the acquirement of his authority as based upon 
precedent. 

In this city on the 4th of September, 1901, Mr. Jesseph was united in marriage 
to Miss Flora Dingle, a daughter of P. B. Dingle, who is one of the pioneers of 
Stevens county, having located here about twenty-six years ago. Of this union 
there have been born two children: Georgia and Joseph. 

Fraternally Mr. Jesseph is united with the Masonic order, being a member of 
the chapter and a past master of the blue lodge. He is also a member of the 
Knights of Pythias. In his political views he is a democrat and is now represent- 
ing his ward in the city council, while from 1904 to 1908 he served as city attor- 
ney, the responsibilities of which office he discharged in a manner highly creditable 
to himself and his constituency. 



WILLIAM WAYNE DICKSON. 

William Wayne Dickson, who is assistant postmaster at Chewelah, and is iden- 
tified with various mining interests in this section, has the distinction of having been 
the first mayor of the town. He was born in Piedmont, Missouri, on the 1st of 
December, 1856, and is a son of Thomas M. and Elizabeth (Chitwood) Dickson. 
The father passed away in 1905 but the mother is still living and has attained 
the venerable age of seventy-two years. 

The boyhood and early youth of William Wayne Dickson were spent in his na- 
tive state, his education being obtained in the public and high schools of Piedmont. 
Following his graduation in 1875 he engaged in teaching for two years and then 
came to Washington, locating in Garfield county, in 1877. He filed on a preemp- 
tion and timber claim and for sixteen years thereafter gave his undivided attention 
to the cultivation and improvement of his land. Disposing of his property at the 
end of that time he came to Springdale, Washington, and clerked in a general mer- 
cantile store. A few years later he removed to Chewelah and established a mer- 
cantile business that he most successfully conducted until 1905, when he withdrew 
from commercial activities and has ever since given the greater part of his time 
and attention to mining operations. He is quite extensively interested in mines 
and mining and is treasurer and a director of the Blue Star Mining Company. In 
connection with his other duties for the past year Mr. Dickson has been filling 
the position of assistant postmaster, the responsibilities of which office he has dis- 
charged in a very satisfactory manner. 

On the 26th of April, 1881, at Piedmont, Missouri, was celebrated the marriage 
of Mr. Dickson and Miss Mary C. Reed, a daughter of Thomas and Carolyn Reed. 
Five children have been born unto Mr. and Mrs. Dickson. Susie, who graduated 
from Galudetta College at Washington, D. C, and is now teaching in the State 
School for the Deaf at Salem, Oregon, is the wife of T. A. Ludstrom, also a mem- 
ber of the faculty of that institution. The next two in order of birth are Flossie 
and Frankie, who graduated from the normal school at Cheney, this state, and are 
now teaching. Hilda and Wayne, the two youngest members of the family, are 
attending high school. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 165 

The religious views of the family are manifested through their affiliation with 
the Congregational church. Fraternally Mr. Dickson is a Mason, having taken the 
degrees of the blue lodge, and he is past venerable consul in the Modern Woodmen 
of America and present treasurer of the local lodge. He also belongs to the 
Chewelah Commercial Club, while his political support he gives to the democratic 
party. He has always been prominently identified with municipal affairs and 
after the expiration of his term as mayor served as a member of the council for 
two years, then was elected mayor for another term. Educational matters have 
always engaged much of Mr. Dickson's attention and for the past twelve years he 
has been a member of the school board, and has given valuable service in this 
connection, having been one of those who organized and promoted the development 
of the Union high school of Chewelah. During the period of his residence here 
Mr. Dickson has won the esteem of the community, by reason of his faithful dis- 
charge of all matters of trust and his high standards of citizenship, as these alone 
would make him an acquisition much to be desired in any town. 



HON. WILLIAM CARY JONES. 

A most earnest and discriminating student of vital questions of the day, a force- 
ful and eloquent orator, Hon. William Cary Jones has won distinction in the national 
halls of legislation and at the same time has maintained his place as a distinguished 
representative of the Washington bar, having served as attorney general of the state, 
while in private practice he has been connected with important litigation that has 
evoked decisions which have become precedents in judicial history. Spokane more- 
over is indebted to him for plans and projects that have contributed directly to her 
progress. 

Mr. Jones is a native of the Empire state, having boen born at Remsen, Oneida 
county, New York, April 5, 1855, a son of Rev. William and Maria (Vaughan) Jones, 
both of whom were natives of Wales, in which country they were reared and married. 
The father had a most extensive acquaintance among people of Welsh nativity or 
descent from the Mississippi river eastward to New York. He was an ideal type 
of the Christian minister, broad and liberal in his views, far in advance of his times, 
loyal in his faith and beloved by all with whom he came in contact. In a letter writ- 
ten to his son, W. C. Jones, by Dr. H. O. Rowlands, the well known pastor of Cal- 
vary church at Davenport, Iowa, the following tribute was paid to the memory of the 
Rev. Jones. The letter in part reads: "Few men ever made such an impression on 
me as your honored father. As I write these words, his large, dark, benignant eyes 
rise before me and, well, I'll write no more except that to me he is even to this day 
an ideal type of the true minister — dignity without formalism, courteous without 
obsequiousness, kindness without patronage, reverential without pharisaism, social 
without levity, — a prophet of God and a man among men. I thank God I met him ! 
As a religious man he was loyal to his faith, the faith, rather, of deep convictions, of 
sympathetic nature and a thorough Baptist." Both Rev. and Mrs. Jones passed 
away in 1893 at the age of seventy-eight years, the wife surviving her husband but 
three months. Their family numbered only two sons, the brother of our subject be- 
ing Dr. Samuel Jones, a practicing physician at Frazee, Minnesota. 



166 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Hon. William Cary Jones, reared in a home of culture and refinement, where 
character was valued above all else, there laid the foundation for the success and 
prominence to which he has attained in later years. His public school course was 
completed by graduation from the high school at Salem, Wisconsin, in 1873, after 
which he attended the seminary there. He was for two years a student of the 
University of Wisconsin at Madison, and then entered the Wisconsin Law Univer- 
sity from which he was graduated with the class of 1876. The same year he was 
admitted to the bar at Madelin, Minnesota, and at once entered upon the practice 
of law in association with F. D. Joy, now a resident of Glendora, California. Mr. 
Jones followed his profession in Madelin until the spring of 1883, when he came 
to Washington on a pleasure trip but without thought of making the state his place 
of permanent abode. He remained for a time in Cheney while court was in session 
and after its adjournment secured a cayuse and started out, accompanied by Mr. 
Levison, a reporter for the Oregonian, and Mr. Woodbury, who was a reporter 
for the Lincoln County Gazette and also editor of the Chronicle. They made the 
trip through the Colville valley and down the Columbia river to Camp Spokane ; 
after which they proceeded up the Spokane river to the city — then village — of 
Spokane. At that time there were two farm houses on the north side of the river 
and only two white women in the Colville valley. After reaching Spokane Mr. 
Jones met on the streets of the city W. R. Andrews, a prominent member of the 
bar, who had offices in both Spokane and Cheney. He insisted that Mr. Jones should 
give him professional assistance for a month as he was overwhelmed with business. 
This temporary relationship proved to both that they could work together in har- 
mony and accordingly a law partnership was formed between them under the firm 
style of Andrews & Jones, the relation being maintained until Mr. Andrews removed 
to Medford City in the latter part of 1885-. This firm drafted the charter when 
Cheney was incorporated as a city in 1884 and Mr. Jones became the first city at- 
torney there and continued in the office for some years after he removed to Spo- 
kane. In 1886, however, he was elected prosecuting attorney for this district and 
in the following January came to Spokane where he formed a partnership with 
Judge H. E. Houghton and Frank H. Graves under the firm name of Houghton, 
Graves & Jones, which continued until Judge Houghton's election to the state sen- 
ate and Mr. Jones' election to the office of attorney general of Washington in 1889. 
For eight years after the admission of the state to the Union Mr. Jones continued 
to fill that position in a most acceptable manner, for his patriotic devotion to the 
newly created state was supplemented by marked ability as a lawyer, his power in 
that connection having its root in comprehensive understanding of the principles of 
jurisprudence. About 1901 he formed a partnership with Judge George W. Belt 
and Judge P. F. Quinn under the firm name of Jones, Belt & Quinn, which was 
continued until Mr. Jones was elected congressman at large in 1896, together with 
James Hamilton Lewis. Following his retirement from the national halls of legis- 
lation he resumed practice alone and followed his profession independently until 
1906, when he became a partner of A. W. Salisbury. This connection, however, 
was of short duration and Mr. Jones was then again and has since been alone. 

His record as attorney general, as a lawyer in private practice and as a member 
of congress is fraught with much important service in which the public has been a 
direct beneficiary. One of the most valuable features of his attorney generalship 
was the thwarting of the efforts of various corporations and individuals of Puget 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 167 

Sound in their attempts to steal the tide lands of the Puget Sound, particularly in 
the district near Tacoma and Seattle. In the case of Prosser versus the Northern 
Pacific, the latter secured an order from Judge Hanford restraining the harbor- 
line owners from filing a plat of the harbor line, claiming it would be a cloud upon 
its title and making claim that the property involved was worth over seven million 
dollars. Mr. Jones demurred to their bill and when Judge Hanford overruled the 
demurrer, Mr. Jones appealed from this decision to the supreme court of the United 
States, which dismissed the bill on the ground that it was not a taking of property 
within the meaning of the federal constitution. In the case of Bolby versus Shively, 
which originated in Oregon and involved the same question, and which was argued 
and submitted together with the Prosser versus Northern Pacific Railroad case, 
Judge Gray wrote an exhaustive opinion on its merits and the court held unani- 
mously that the state was absolute owner of the bed of all her harbors up to the 
line of ordinary high tide. This decision effectually and forever settled the ques- 
tion so far as Washington was concerned. Seattle at the present time is trying to 
get back some of the property the city gave away, wanting it for a municipal wharf. 
Another case of widespread interest with which Mr. Jones was connected involved 
a section of school land in the heart of Tacoma — the state versus McBride. The 
latter attempted to locate that section as placer-mining ground. The case was argued 
five times before the commissioner general of the land office and the secretary of the 
interior, and on motion for review the case was decided emphatically in favor of the 
state's hard-fought legal contention, in which Mr. Jones was as usual victorious. 
The last time it was argued was in 1897 after Mr. Jones had ceased to be attorney 
general and was occupying a seat in congress. It is against the rules of the de- 
partment and the law for any congressman to practice before the interior depart- 
ment, but in view of the fact that the two counsel who had been associated with 
Mr. Jones early in the case, namely Judge Calkins and Judge Haines, of the 
Seattle bar, were both dead, and there were two very voluminous records which 
would take new counsel many months to familiarize themselves with, a special dis- 
pensation was made authorizing Congressman Jones to argue the case. The argu- 
ment lasted six days. 

In his discussion of questions of national importance Mr. Jones has aroused the 
attention, interest and commendation of many of the most distinguished statesmen 
of the country. On the 22d of February, 1898, while a member of congress, Mr. 
Jones made a speech on the money question and on the 24th he saw United States 
Senator Jones, of Arkansas, who was chairman of the democratic national com- 
mittee, and who selected the speech of Congressman Jones for campaign purposes, 
preferring it to one already prepared on that subject, and afterward sent out 
one million copies for general distribution. Mr. Jones of Nevada stated that the 
speech of the Washington congressman was the best that had ever been made on 
that subject In it he had used a large chart to show the consequence of the decline 
in silver and wheat, from which circumstance he gained the sobriquet of "What 
Chart Jones." When Mr. Jones made his speech in congress on battle ships Wil- 
liam Sterritt, now editor of the Galveston (Texas) News, was in the reporter's gal- 
lery and said that for the first time in twenty years every reporter dropped his 
pencil to listen to the speech. The subject came up on the 1st of April, 1891, in 
connection with the naval appropriation bill. Cannon of Illinois offered an amend- 
ment striking out ten million dollars from the fifteen-million-dollar appropriation 



168 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

for battle ships and appropriating it for smaller craft for quick service. He said 
that the first engagement would demonstrate that the battle ships were not worth 
that amount for scrap iron, and after the battle of Santiago three contracts were 
cancelled. 

During his service as attorney general his work in many respects was notable. 
While filling that office he ruled the Bible out of the schools, on the 18th of Sep- 
tember, 1891, rendering a decision that Bibles could not be read as a part of the 
public-school exercises. He has ever been fearless in defense of his convictions 
and his position has never been an equivocal one. While his early political alle- 
giance was given to the republican party and he was elected on its ticket as attor- 
ney general in 1889 and again in 1892, he became an advocate of the free coinage 
of silver in 1896 and in that year was elected congressman on the fusion ticket, 
called the people's party ticket, as a silver republican. In congress he affiliated, as 
did all the silver republicans, with the democratic party and occupied the seat next 
to Champ Clark on the democratic side of the house. 

In 1900 Mr. Jones was employed on some special work for F. Augustus Heinze 
in Butte, in connection with certain mining litigation. He made the campaign in 
1900 throughout the state with Joseph K. Toole and in 1902 with F. A. Heinze in 
a special car. This campaign was replete with interesting events and was the most 
spectacular campaign in the history of Montana. While in that state in 1902 Mr. 
Jones delivered a speech on monopolies which aroused great enthusiasm, and was 
quoted and discussed throughout the country. He spoke of the erroneous impres- 
sion prevalent in regard to trusts, that they were a new feature in the public life 
and that some new remedy for them must be found. He said that the word trust 
was merely a new name for an old crime ; that as used today it means a combination 
made between men for the purpose of creating a monopoly and the latter was as 
old as human greed, as ancient as human avarice. He went back to the time of Zeno 
in support of this statement and proved it. He told of the trust at the time of the 
Revolutionary war when a few men dictated the price to be paid for necessities, 
and how the Pennsylvania legislature not only broke up the combine but took steps 
to punish the men concerned therein. Mr. Jones depicted the story of the continuous 
struggle of the people of England to overthrow the little trusts of that day, and the 
legislation that had been enacted on the subject, and of the effecive work of Lord Coke 
in behalf of the people. Mr. Jones also expressed his personal belief that few 
people of America realize the extent to which the wealthy men of the United States 
have been planning for their own financial aggrandizement and the ruin of the 
country. In brief, he depicted in brilliant argument and forceful words existing 
conditions and oncoming events and what he said would happen has all come to 
pass, as he foretold down to the smallest detail. In regard to his speech on mo- 
nopilies Senator Miles Poindexter wrote Mr. Jones a long letter in June, 1911, in 
which he stated that in view of the present situation of affairs, the present discus- 
sions on the subject and the issue raised between the opinion of the supreme court 
and Justice Harlan's dissenting opinion, the speech was one of the most remark- 
able declarations he had ever read; that it could be taken for a discussion of its 
most recent phases. Senator Poindexter agreed entirely with the views set forth 
by Mr. Jones in that speech and said that the trust question was the great over- 
shadowing issue of the present. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 169 

On the 12th of October, 1887, Mr. Jones was married to Miss Eosa Marvin, 
who was then county school superintendent of Spokane county, a daughter of W. 
R. Marvin, retired. When elected county school superintendent she was filling the 
office of county auditor of Lincoln county. She comes of an old New England 
family and her father was a soldier of the Civil war while some of her ancestors 
served through the Revolutionary war. Five children have been born unto Mr, 
and Mrs. Jones: Vaughan M., private secretary of the manager of Scrips McCrea; 
Richard L., a reporter on the Daily Chronicle; Helen M., who graduated from the 
Spokane high school and was editor of the High School Annual; Florence M., now 
a pupil in the high school; and William Cary Jones, Jr., also pursuing his educa- 
tion. The family have lived in the same house probably longer than any other 
resident of Spokane, having since 1889 made their home at No. 1807 Riverside 
aTenue. They attend the meetings of the Unitarian Society, of which Mr. Jones 
is a member. He belongs to the blue lodge, chapter, consistory and Mystic Shrine 
in Masonry, and has been orator of the order part of the time. He also holds mem- 
bership in Elks Lodge, No. 228, of Spokane. While in Washington he was a 
member of the Army and Navy Club, in Butte was a member of the Silver Bow 
Club, and in Helena of the Montana Club. His life work has by no means reached 
its fruition in the world. He is still a close student of the living issues of the day, 
and his opinions, publicly or privately expressed, carry considerable weight and 
influence. Added to the intrinsic element of character are the high professional 
attainments of the man, his fine mind and his power as a leader of public thought 
and action — and along this line there must be accorded due consideration for Wil- 
liam Cary Jones and a recognition of the high prestige which he has gained. 



FITZHERBERT McCULLOUGH. 

FitxHerbert McCullough, engaged in the general real-estate business in Spo- 
kane, has been a resident of this city from the period of its villagehood, arriving 
here in 1883, long before its population had reached the thousand mark. He was 
born in Brockville, Canada, September 6, 1854, and his parents, William and 
Eunice McCullough, were also natives of that country. The father, who was of 
Irish descent, became a manufacturer of Brockville and was also prominent and 
active in civic matters, serving as a member of the school board and in other pub- 
lic connections. He died in that city in August, 1885, having for a long period 
survived his wife, whose death occurred August 4, 1866. 

FitzHerbert McCullough pursued his education in the graded and high schools 
of Brockville and afterward became connected with a surveying party having in 
charge the surveying of a road out of Montreal which is now owned by the Canadian 
Pacific system. He was then about seventeen years of age. The following year 
be entered the London branch of the Bank of Montreal at. London, Ontario, spend- 
ing between eight and nine years in that institution. He resigned his position to 
tour the country with his father in the summer of 1882. This brought him knowl- 
edge of the west and in 1883 he came to Spokane. There was a town near the 
Falls of about one thousand inhabitants and to some extent outlying districts were 
claimed and were being placed under cultivation, yet on the whole this was a wild 



170 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

and unimproved region. For two or three years Mr. McCullough was engaged in 
the piano business and then turned his attention to real estate, in which he has 
since been engaged, handling in the meantime much property and negotiating many 
important realty transfers. 

On the 31st of December, 1890, Mr. McCullough was united in marriage in Spo- 
kane to Mrs. Henriette Campbell, of this city, who died February 13, 1909. Mr. 
McCullough has two stepdaughters, Edna and Effie Campbell. In his political 
views he is a republican but has never been an aspirant to office. He belongs to 
the Chamber of Commerce — a manifestation of his interest in all that pertains to 
the city's business development and to its improvement and progress along every 
line, for that organization has as its object the broader interests of the city. That 
Mr. McCullough has met with a substantial measure of success in his undertakings 
is indicated in the fact that he has continuously remained in one line of business. 



HERMAN PREUSSE. 



Herman Preusse, now living retired, was for many years the senior partner of 
the firm of Preusse & Zittel, architects of Spokane. He received most thorough 
professional training in Germany, his native country, and has contributed perhaps 
more largely to the upbuilding of Spokane in his line of business than any other 
one man, being today the oldest architect in the profession in this city. 

He was born in Germany in 1847, a son of Carl Victor and Victoria Preusse. 
He was only three years of age when his father died and his mother afterward 
became the wife of Wilhelm Mehl, a leading architect, so that Mr. Preusse had 
excellent opportunity to begin preparation for his profession at a very early age. 
He was a lad of thirteen years when he went to Halle on the Saale river and in 
the famous institution of that city studied for three years, after which he returned 
home and had the practical experience of three years' service and instruction in 
his stepfather's office. He then resumed his studies in the noted college of archi- 
tecture at Holzminden and such was his standing that he was sent by the faculty 
of that institution to superintend the construction of the large Bessemer steel works 
in Osnabruck. After completing the work there he came to America, realizing that 
in this country, which was only sparsely settled comparatively and yet was enjoy- 
ing rapid growth, he would find better and broader opportunities than could be 
secured in the more thickly settled and older European countries. He arrived in 
New York in June, 1870, and at once made his way to Chicago, where he found 
employment in the North Chicago Rolling Mills, but shortly after the great fire of 
1871 he was compelled to leave that city on account of ill health. He then visited 
the various western states and territories and finally settled in San Bernardino, 
California, where for some time he conducted a thriving business. He afterward 
lived in San Francisco for a time and subsequently established his home in Sterling, 
Kansas, whence he went to Kansas City, Missouri. 

In 1882 Mr. Preusse came to Spokane, where he began the practice of his pro- 
fession and is today the oldest architect of this city in years of continuous connec- 
tion therewith. He has seen the development of Spokane from a population of one 
or two hundred to the leading city of the Inland Empire and one of the most promi- 



HKHMAX 1'RKl'ySE 



« 



* *■ *t 






"■•* «^'*AR 






SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 173 

nent cities of the Pacific coast. Many of the imposing buildings which were de- 
stroyed by the fire of 1889 were designed by him and erected under his supervision. 
Since this he has made plans and specifications for a large number of the finest 
business blocks and residences and other buildings in this city and eastern Wash- 
ington. In 1898 he admitted J. A. Zittel to a partnership and they also em- 
ployed an assistant. Mr. Preusse has devoted the efforts of a lifetime to the study 
and practice of his chosen profession and as a natural result of such concentration 
he is in the front rank among the architects of the state. Economy, practicability, 
utility and beauty all enter into his work and whether following a unique style or 
building according to modern construction, comfort and convenience are always 
matters of consideration in his plans. As he has prospered in his undertakings he 
has made judicious investment in farm property, for agriculture and horticulture 
have always been matters of interest to him. He has owned four farms, each of 
which contained one hundred and sixty acres, and under his supervision these have 
been highly improved. This, however, has been but a side issue or interest in his 
life, for he has devoted himself almost entirely to the practice of his profession. 
Among some of the best known buildings which he has designed are the Auditorium 
block, the Jamieson block, Blalock building, Fernwell block, Granite building, 
Ziegler building, Victoria Hotel, Hotel Pacific and many other structures. He 
designed the first permanent buildings of Gonzaga College and the School of 
Science of Pullman. In fact, the starting of the latter institution was due entirely 
to his efforts. 

Mr. Preusse has been twice married,. .While-a- resident of Sterling, Kansas, he 
wedded Miss Rosa Cole, a native of P^flfcsfy Ivahia/ who. died in Spokane, April 17, 
1897, leaving four children, namely:* ^GHgrf- Ma/ 'atoT' Florence Augusta, who were 
educated in an eastern university; Carl Victor; and Arnold Bismarck. Mr. Preusse 
believes in educating his children w^ll and^ipe1tfts*to give them every possible ad- 
vantage in that direction. On the l8£A&-(3ctobe~r; 'IS 10", he was married to Mrs. 
Emma (Keller) Wilke, a daughter of Dr. S. and Marie (Wingender) Keller, who 
came from Germany at an early age and settled in Wisconsin. Her father, how- 
ever, is now a retired physician of Spokane and her mother died nearly thirty years 
ago. Mrs. Preusse has two brothers, and one sister, who are numbered among the 
pioneers of this region. Socially Mr. Preusse is affiliated with the Knights of* Pythias 
and the Elks and he is a public-spirited citizen who takes a commendable interest 
in every enterprise for the promotion of the general welfare but is especially in- 
terested in educational matters. 



HON. WILLIAM M. RIDPATH. 

The activities in which the Hon. William M. Ridpath has engaged have been of 
a varied character, but at all times the trend of his career has been upward and with 
each forward step he has had a broader outlook and wider opportunities. Today, 
as owner and proprietor of the Hotel Ridpath, he occupies a leading position in busi- 
ness circles of Spokane. His birth occurred in Putnam county, Indiana, October 14, 
1845, his parents being Abraham and Sally (Matthews) Ridpath, both of whom were 

Virginians by birth. The father, who devoted his life to the occupation of farming, 
v*. n— » 



174 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

passed away in the early '70s, having for a number of years survived his wife, who 
died when her son William was but twelve years of age. His brother was John Clark 
Ridpath, the. famous historian who died in the Presbyterian Hospital at New York, 
July 81, 1900. 

The early educational opportunities which William M. Ridpath enjoyed were 
those offered by the district schools of Putnam county. He was not yet eighteen years 
of age when, on the 20th of June, 1868, he offered his services to the government, 
his patriotic nature having been aroused by continued attempt of the south to destroy 
the Union. He enlisted for six months as a member of Company H, One hundred and 
fifteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, but served for eight months and eight days, 
after which he was mustered out at Indianapolis. At once he reenlisted, becoming a 
member of Battery E, First Indiana Heavy Artillery, with which he served until 
July 26, 1865, when, the war having closed, he was honorably discharged at New 
Orleans. In the meantime he had become convinced of the necessity of further edu- 
cation as a foundation for success in life and upon his" return to the north entered 
Asbury University at Greencastle, Indiana, from which he was graduated with the 
class of 1870. He then taught school but regarded this only as an initial step to 
other professional labor, for while thus engaged he took up the study of law and 
following a course of thorough preliminary reading was admitted to the bar at Brazil, 
Indiana, on the 1st of June, 1872. For about ten years, or until June, 1882, he 
continued in active practice in that place, and in the meantime also became recognized 
as one of the local leaders of the republican party, which in 1 8£0 elected him to the 
state legislature as the representative of Clay, Putnam and Hendricks counties. He 
served as speaker of the house for the regular and special sessions of 1881 and proved 
himself a capable parliamentarian, discharging his duties unbiased by partisanship 
or personal prejudice. In May, 1882, he received from President Arthur appoint- 
ment to the position of Indian agent for the Yankton-Sioux Reservation on the Mis- 
souri river and at once entered upon his duties in the northwest, there continuing 
until the summer of 1885, when he resigned. Immediately afterward the department 
appointed him agent to the Quapaw Reservation in the Indian territory, where he 
remained until November, 1886, when removed by President Cleveland, because of 
his political views. 

Col. Ridpath has been a resident of Spokane since March 17, 1888, and for twelve 
years was here engaged in the practice of law, having as his associates in partnership 
during that time the late Judge R. B. Blake, Judge H. E. Hoton and Judge J. W. 
Marshall. By Governor Miles C. Moore he was appointed prosecuting attorney and 
served for one month during territorial days and following the admission of the 
state into the Union was continued in office until January 1, 1891. His public ser- 
vice also included membership on the board of control under Governor Rogers. In 
politics he has ever been a stalwart republican, unswerving in his allegiance to the 
party because of a firm belief in the efficacy of its principles as factors in good gov- 
ernment. His unbending integrity of character, his fearlessness in the discharge of 
his duties and his appreciation of the rsponsibilities that have rested upon him have 
been such as to make him a most acceptable incumbent in the offices which he has 
filled, and his worth then as now was widely acknowledged. 

In the meantime Col. Ridpath became interested in mining properties of the north- 
west as one of the principal owners and promoters of the famous Le Roy mine, of 
which he remained treasurer until it was sold to the British syndicate. From time to 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 175 

time he has made extensive investments in real estate until now his property holdings 
are very large, and in 1899 he built the Hotel Ridpath, which is one of the best 
hotels of the city, remaining still its owner and proprietor. 

On the 9th of February, 1875, while living in Indiana, Mr. Ridpath was married 
to Miss Sarah J. Cole, a daughter of Robert S. and Mary J. (Hutton) Cole, of Mount 
Pleasant, Iowa. Their three children are: Dr. Paul C. Ridpath, of Chicago; Mary, 
the wife of John D. Ankeny, of Walla Walla, Washington ; and Nellie, who makes her 
home in Chicago. Mr. Ridpath has never been a club man but maintains pleasant 
relations with his old army comrades through his membership in Reno Post, G. A. R., 
and is also in hearty sympathy with the principles and purposes of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, to which he belongs. His has been a notable career inasmuch as he has 
worked his way upward to a prominent position in business and financial circles and 
also by reason of the excellent service which he has rendered in public office. He is 
justly accorded a place among the prominent and representative citizens of Spokane, 
for he belongs to that class of men whose enterprising spirit is used not alone for 
their own benefit; he also advances the general good and promotes public prosperity 
by his ably managed individual interests, thus placing this section of the country 
on a par with the older east. 



ALBERT W. ANDERSON. 

Albert W. Anderson, who for the past five years has represented Stevens county 
in the state senate, is one of the enterprising citizens of Chewelah, who despite the 
many demands made upon his time by his various personal and official responsi- 
bilities, it always able to give his cooperation and assistance in promoting any move- 
ment that will forward the development of the community. He was born in Gales- 
burg, Illinois, on the 17th of August, 1870, and is a son of Charles F. and Betsy 
(Lewis) Anderson. The father who is one of the pioneers of Washington is still 
living at the age of sixty-nine years, but the mother passed away in 1878. 

The boyhood and youth of Albert W. Anderson were spent in the town of his 
birth, whose public schools he attended in the acquirement of an education until he 
was fourteen. Laying aside his text-books he began to make his own way in the 
world, and during the succeeding four years was employed in the shops of the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company, where he learned the painter's 
trade. He subsequently worked for a short time in both Peoria and Chicago, and 
then came to Washington, locating in Stevens county in 1889. He took up a home- 
stead west of Addy, and later, after three years' travel through California and 
Washington, he settled at Addy, Washington, where he worked in a general mercan- 
tile store until 1902, when he erected a sawmill that he operated for four years. Dis- 
posing of his property at the expiration of that period he organized the Addy Mer- 
cantile Company, which enterprise he most successfully conducted until May, 1911, 
when he became associated with others in founding the Bank of Chewelah. Al- 
though he is still president of the Addy Mercantile Company, and a member of its 
hoard of directors, the greater part of Mr. Anderson's time is devoted to the dis- 
charge of his responsibilities as cashier of the bank, of which institution he is also 
a director. He is recognized to be one of the most capable business men of the 



176 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

county, possessing the powers of organization and executive ability that enable 
him to carry to a successful issue anything he undertakes. 

Mr. Anderson was married on the 22d of June, 1902, to Miss Frances Plowman, 
a daughter of Henry and Etta Plowman, of Addy, Washington. Her parents 
were among the early settlers of Minnesota, the father having been a member of 
the legislature oi that state for about twelve years. Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. 
Anderson there have been born two children: Dorothy and Paul. 

Mr. Anderson has taken the degrees of the blue lodge of the Masonic frater- 
nity and he also belongs to the Odd Fellows and the Woodmen of the World. In 
politics he is a republican and has served his municipality and county in various 
public capacities, having been called to the state senate, in 1906, and reelected in 
1910. Mr. Anderson has always been one of the enthusiastic promoters of the 
state and its utilities, and together with Senator Meyers introduced a bill in the 
senate in 1909, asking for an appropriation from the state of fifty thousand dol- 
lars for the improvement of the Columbia river between Bridgeport and Kettle 
Falls. This was conceded and Mr. Anderson was appointed chairman of the com- 
mission appointed by the governor to take charge of the work. They bought and 
fitted up the steamer Yakima, beginning operations in November of that year. 
Their efforts resulted in such valuable and permanent improvements that their 
work was indorsed by the Spokane Chamber of Commerce, through whose influ- 
ence another appropriation of one hundred thousand was obtained from the federal 
government for further work. An enthusiastic member of the Chewelah Commer- 
cial Club, Mr. Anderson has always been one of the active and energetic citizens 
whose personal interests have at all times been identical with those of the commu- 
nity, in promoting the advancement of which he has been, a tireless and constant 
worker. 



HARRY L. COHN. 



Although one of the more recent additions to the Spokane bar Harry L. Cohn 
has already proven his right to rank with those men whose comprehensive under- 
standing of the law and correct application of its principles entitle them to ad- 
vancement and success in this field. He was born in Palmyra, Missouri, December 
26, 1874. His father, Morris L. Cohn, was a native of Germany and became well 
known in educational circles as a member of the faculty of the University of Ber- 
lin. In commercial circles he was also known through his active connection with 
merchandising. It was subsequent to his arrival in the new world that he wedded 
Bertha Marks, who was born in Germany and is now living in Omaha, at the age 
of sixty-five years. She represents one of the old families of Chicago, her father 
having been one of the pioneer merchants of that city. Two branches of the busi- 
ness which he established are still to be found there. The death of Morris L. Cohn 
occurred in 1893. Unto him and his wife were born four sons and three daughters: 
Harry L.; J. P., who is the owner of the baseball team at Spokane; L. M., a mer- 
chant of Omaha, Nebraska; A. B., a traveling salesman living in San Francisco; 
Anna, who is the widow of P. H. Stepp and makes her home in Kansas City, Mis- 



i 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 177 

souri; Jean, the wife of Fred M. Raymond, a wholesale fruit dealer of North 
Yakima; and Rae, who married Carl Furth, a merchant of Omaha. 

The removal of his father's family from his native town of Palmyra, Missouri, 
to Clifton, Kansas, enabled Harry L. Cohn to pursue his education in the schools 
of the latter place and his preparation for the bar was made as a student in the law 
office and under the direction of Judge Nathan V. Harlan, of York, Nebraska. 
Thorough preliminary training qualified him for admission to the bar of Nebraska 
in the spring of 1896. He located for practice in Lake City, Colorado, where for 
two years he filled the office of assistant district attorney. In 1 899, however, he re- 
turned to Nebraska and settled at Omaha, where he formed a law partnership with 
his former preceptor, Judge Harlan, there continuing in practice until 1904, when 
he received appointment to the position of first assistant district attorney for the 
third division of Alaska. He continued in that position for two years and a half 
and during the last year of the time filled the office of district attorney ex officio, 
owing to the illness of Judge Harlan. Mr. Cohn has been numbered among the 
practitioners of Spokane since the fall of 1907, when he entered into partnership 
relations with Harry Rosenhaupt and Bruce Blake, under the firm name of Cohn, 
Rosenhaupt & Blake. The third member of the firm withdrew the first year but 
the relationship with Mr. Rosenhaupt still maintains. Mr. Cohn continued in the 
general practice of law, preparing his cases with care and precision and presenting 
his cause before the courts in a clear and forceful manner. His success is the best 
evidence of his ability and the large clientage accorded him is indicative of the fact 
that he has won a creditable position as a representative of the Spokane bar. 

On the 30th of April, 1906, at Omaha, Mr. Cohn was married to Miss Ella 
Rosenfeld, a daughter of Jacob Rosenfeld, who was a merchant of Council Bluffs, 
Iowa. The family is of Roumanian descent and was established in Iowa in pio- 
neer times. Mr. and Mrs. Cohn have one daughter, Helen L. Mr. Cohn holds 
membership in the Progress Club and in Masonry has attained the thirty-second 
degree of the Scottish Rite, holding membership in Oriental Consistory, S. P. R. S., 
and also in El Katif Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S. He votes with the republican party 
and has neither the time nor inclination for office holding, preferring to concentrate 
his energies upon his growing law practice. 



THEO HALL. 



In a state in which the women exercise the right of franchise on the same level 
and with the same qualifications as those governing their brothers at the polls, one 
is by no means surprised to find as a. natural accompaniment to their recently won 
rights that they are also enjoying the privilege of holding public office. In a few 
isolated cases, however, women have held positions of trust as servants of the com- 
monwealth years before they won their final victory in securing the ballot, and of 
this number Miss Theo Hall, the present incumbent of the office of postmaster of 
Medical Lake, Washington, is a representative. 

A native of Albany, Wisconsin, she is a daughter of Dr. John C. and Theodate 
(Stack pole) Hall. Her father, who was a man of considerable note in his day, 



178 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

was born at Langdon, New Hampshire, May 21, 1821, and was a direct descendant 
of Peregrine White, distinguished for having first beheld the light of day on the 
voyage of the Mayflower. Dr. Hall's parents removed to Maine when he was a 
young boy and in the common schools of that state he obtained his early education, 
later attending Yarmouth Academy and Westbrook Seminary. In 1852 he was 
graduated from the medical department of Harvard University with the degree of 
M. D., and immediately after his marriage in the same year he took his bride to their 
new home in the west, settling at Monroe, Wisconsin, where he began to practice 
medicine. During the Civil war he entered the ranks of the Union army with the 
Sixth Wisconsin Volunteers, occupying the position of assistant surgeon. He served 
three years during which time he was advanced in recognition of the faithful perform- 
ance of his duties and his invaluable service on the battlefield and in hospital wards. 
Before the close of the war he was surgeon-in-chief of the famous old Iron Brigade 
and served until the end, when he returned to Wisconsin and resumed the practice 
of his profession. Ever conscientious in his recognition of the responsibilities of citi- 
zenship he was elected to the state legislature as senator from his district, acting in this 
capacity from 1870 until 1872 and for a number of years was president of the 
examining board for pensions at Madison, Wisconsin. In 1892 he brought has 
family west, making his home in Medical Lake, Washington, where he was ap- 
pointed to the examining board for pensions, being associated in his duties with Dr. 
Olmstead and Dr. Luhn. After a life unselfishly devoted to the cause of humanity, 
alleviating the sick and diminishing suffering, Dr. Hall passed away at his home 
in Medical Lake, November 29, 1896, at the age of seventy-five years. 

Miss Theo Hall obtained her education in Monroe, Wisconsin, and after her 
graduation in 1881 taught school in her home town during the following two years. 
She then went to Nebraska where she lived upon a preemption claim for six months. 
Later she went to the far west and bought out the Medical Lake Ledger, which she 
edited for one year when she received the appointment of postmaster at Medical 
Lake, in 1893, and has occupied this position ever since. Miss Hall is a woman of 
unusual strength of character, possessing initiative, determination and executive 
ability, qualities which are in keeping with the spiirt of the west. Just in her 
judgments of others and always charitable she has a host of friends who are proud 
of her success and are sincerely devoted to her interests. 



GEORGE A. FELLOWS. 



One of Cheney's pioneer citizens, who has tirelessly devoted his energies to the 
development of the town along the various lines of community welfare is George A. 
Fellows, who first located here twenty-nine years ago. During the long period of 
his residence he has been in the employ of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, 
the greater part of the time in the capacity of station master, but despite the exac- 
tions of his position has always found time to give most efficient service in various 
public offices. He was born at Snow Point, Nevada county, California, on the 23d 
of January, 1860, and is a son of George and Ann Marie (McCabe) Fellows. 

His father was one of the early pioneers of California, having crossed the plains 
* to the gold fields in the vicinity of Sacramento in 1 848. There he engaged in pros- 



SPOKANE AND* THE INLAND EMPIRE 179 

pecting and mining until 1852, when he returned to St. Joe, Missouri, by way of 
the isthmus of Panama. He remained there but a few months, however, joining a 
party of eighteen and coming back to the coast the same year. They brought with 
them a large herd of horses and returned by way of the isthmus, the journey 
consuming nine weeks. The animals required much care and attention and this 
undertaking was connected with great risk, but turned out well worth while finan- 
cially, as they were able to sell for one thousand dollars a span upon their arrival 
in Sacramento. Mr. Fellows resumed his mining operations again, meeting with 
excellent success, having soon acquired a capital of more than a half million. He 
had extensive holdings in quicksilver mines, but after the Langley failure disposed 
of his interests to a French syndicate. Having the most implicit faith in the future 
of the state, both as an industrial and agricultural center, owing to its innumerable 
natural advantages, he invested heavily in real estate. After disposing of his mining 
interests, be turned his attention to agricultural pursuits and was successfully en- 
gaged in farming until 1879. He then sold his property interests in California and 
came to Washington, buying six sections of railroad land that he operated until 1903, 
when he withdrew from all active work and retired to Mount View, California. There 
he and his wife continued to live until they passed away in 1905, the father dying 
in May and the mother in the July following. They were the parents of fifteen 
children, thirteen of whom are living and reside either in the state of Washington 
or California. 

George A. Fellows was reared in his native state and completed his education in 
the University of California, being graduated from that institution with the class 
of 1879. Immediately after leaving college he entered the employ of the Southern 
Pacific Railroad Company, in the capacity of traveling auditor between San Fran- 
cisco and El Paso, Texas. In 1880 he took up station work, being located at San 
Francisco, Stockton and Los Angeles during the succeeding two years. He withdrew 
from the service of this company, in 1882, and entered that of the Northern Pacific, 
coming to Cheney as night telegraph operator. The following year he was pro- 
moted to the position of day operator and cashier, while in 1885 he became agent, 
which position he has ever since held. Mr. Fellows has large interests in the Shonee 
Mining & Milling Company, of which he is president, and is a stockholder and di- 
rector of the Security National Bank of Cheney. He has always actively partici- 
pated in affairs pertaining to the public welfare, particularly those of his immedi- 
ate community, and is now acting as president of the board of trustees of the State 
Normal school located here. It is very largely due to his efforts that Cheney is now 
rated as a city of the third class, the advanced rating having been secured while he 
was serving as mayor in 1909 and 1910. Mr. Fellows was again elected mayor of 
Cheney, on December 5, 1911, on the Good Government ticket, for aT)ne-year term. 
His majority was two hundred out of a total vote of three hundred and fifty-nine, 
and a total registration of five hundred and twenty-nine. 

This city was the scene of Mr. Fellows' marriage on the 28th of September, 
1898, to Miss Mabel J. Harris, a daughter of John A. Harris. They are the parents 
of two children : Irwin, who is deceased, and Arthur, who is attending school. 

The family affiliate with the Congregational church and fraternally Mr. Fellows 
is a worthy exemplar of the Masonic order, of which he is a past master. He has 
taken thirty-two degrees in the Scottish Rite and is identified with the consistory, 
Knights Templar and the shrine. He also belongs to the Knights of Pythias, and 



180 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

has passed through all of the chairs in that lodge. In his political views Mr. Fel- 
lows is a republican, giving his unqualified indorsement to the principles of that 
body for whose candidates he always casts his ballot. Mr. Fellows is descended from 
a long line of American ancestors, his forefathers having emigrated to this country 
from England and located in Ipswich, New Hampshire, in 1638, and he considers 
this to be the greatest country in the world, but having been born and reared on the 
Pacific coast, he naturally deems the west to be the best part of this great country. 
He is loyal in his allegiance to the interests of both his town and county and is one 
of the active and enterprising members of the Commercial Club, the efforts of 
which he most enthusiastically champions on all occasions. 



THOMAS REDDING TANNATT. 

Thomas Redding Tannatt, now living retired in Spokane, was born at Verplanck 
Point on the Hudson river in New York, September 27, 1888. His father, James 
S. Tannatt, died in 1848 and was long survived by his wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Mary C. Gilmore and died in 1891. The grandparents of Thomas R. Tan- 
natt came from Scotland, near Lake Dunbarton. At the time of the Stuart rebellion 
all their lands were confiscated and in return they were given large tracts of land 
in Canada, near Ottawa. Accordingly they came to America and the grandfather 
named the town of Paisley, Canada. He lived to the very venerable age of one 
hundred and two years. James S. Tannatt was at one time a partner of Chauncey 
Depew's father in the ownership and operation of steamship lines on the Hudson 
river. He was a prominent whig during the Clay campaign and for four years he 
filled the position of purveyor at the Brooklyn navy yard. 

In the absence of public schools Thomas R. Tannatt attended an academy at 
Peekskill, New York, now known as the Peekskill Military Academy, and while 
there was a schoolmate of Chauncey Depew. He was only ten years of age when 
his father died and at that time he was sent to New Hampshire, where he worked 
on a farm during the summer months and attended school during the winter seasons 
for six years. The next three years he served as an apprentice at bridge building 
and large construction work in Salem, Massachusetts, and during his three years 
apprenticeship for three evenings of each week during the last two years, he at- 
tended an evening school for instruction in mathematics, drawing and civil engin- 
eering. He then accepted a position as assistant resident engineer on the water 
works at Jersey City, New Jersey. He filled that position until nearly twenty-one 
years of age,* when he was tendered an appointment to the West Point Military 
Academy from the Essex district of Massachusetts and was there graduated in 
1858, being the seventh in rank in his class. While at West Point he rose to the 
captaincy of Company D, Cadets Battalion. Upon graduation he was commissioned 
as brevet second lieutenant, unassigned, and ordered to Fortress Monroe, Virginia, 
as instructor in use of the Ballistic pendulum and, by war department order, made a 
member of an artillery board, with the late Generals Barry and Ord, "to revise 
and establish a new table of ranges, for all guns in service, and others submitted by 
the secretary of war." This board was the first to determine ranges for the "Par- 
rott," "Hotchkiss" and "Hexagonal guns" not then in service. Subsequently he 



GEN. THOMAS R. TAXXATT 



r~r ; 



. * 4 " • •-** 

*~— ■- — .-V;* " - 4 ' 'v»*-# 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 183 

acted for one year as judge advocate of court martials and on special duty was then 
appointed second lieutenant of Battery M, Fourth United States Artillery. He 
joined his regiment at Fort Randall in South Dakota in June of 1860. 

In April of 1861 three of the five batteries at Randall were ordered east under 
the command of the late General Getty. On June 5, 1861, Lieutenant Tannatt 
found himself the only commissioned officer at his post, save the surgeon; his com- 
manding officer declining to renew his oath of allegiance to the United States, de- 
serted the post, to join the Confederate army with rank of Brigadier General. On 
Christmas day of that year Lieutenant Tannatt crossed the Missouri river with two 
batteries and made a twenty-eight-day march to St. Joseph, Missouri, where he 
joined Major General Buell and moved with him to Louisville, Kentucky, where 
be was placed in command of Artillery Park at the fair grounds and also appointed 
inspector and assistant chief of artillery on General Buell' s staff. He remained 
with that commander until they reached Huntsville, Alabama, when he was ordered 
to report to Governor Andrew of Massachusetts, after which, upon the request 
•f Governor Andrew, General Barnard, chief of U. S. engineers, and General 
Barry, chief of artillery, he was transferred to the First Massachusetts Heavy 
Artillery and assumed command of his brigade consisting of his own regiment and 
the Second New York Heavy Artillery, occupying five forts on the south side of 
tiie Potomac. He had been made colonel of the Sixteenth Massachusetts Volunteer 
Infantry and this regiment had been previously raised by Lieutenant Tannatt as 
colonel. The appointment made Mr. Tannatt a senior colonel in the Army of the 
Potomac. He engaged in the battle of . Malverrr Htll and other engagements up 
to the battle of Fredericksburg. While Jthere'iie supervised the construction of Fort 
Whipple (now Fort Meyer), and also J^otV*<?/ ih Smith. 

During the Gettysburg compaign Colonel Tannatt was in command of forces 
«outh of the Potomac, extending from lChaiit^rfdgp-ta .near Alexandria, and had 
under him five regiments of heavy artillery~arid "fHree regiments of one hundred day 
men from Pennsylvania. When General Grant took command Colonel Tannatt was 
ordered to select a brigade and join the Army of the Potomac, doing so on the third 
day of the Battle of the Wilderness. Three days after the engagement he was 
given a new brigade, consisting of the First Massachusetts, Third and Fifth Mich- 
igan and Fourth Wisconsin Regiments. These were known as the Second Brigade, 
Third Division, Second Army Corps, and in command General Tannatt took part 
in the battles of the Wilderness, Cold Harbor, North Anna, Spottsylvania Courthouse, 
Plank Road and several others. On the 14th of June, 1865, he was wounded in 
the battle of Petersburg, was sent to a hospital and later sent home. While he was 
convalescing, the war closed and he sent his resignation to Washington. His had 
been a splendid military record, both before and through the period of the war, 
and he was well entitled to release from further service. 

In 1866 General Tannatt went to Colorado and engaged in making reports con- 
cerning mines for New York parties, which resulted in his return to the eastern 
metropolis and entering upon a three years' contract with six New York companies 
to act as resident engineer and general manager of their mines. He continued 
in that connection for five years, when his health failed and he returned to Massa- 
chusetts. Later he went to Tennessee, where he leased a state railroad thirty-five 
miles long and engaged in constructing thirty-five miles additional. When that was 
completed he returned to Massachusetts, where he met Henry Villard and in the 



184 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

fall of 1877 came to the Pacific coast as Mr. Villard's confidential man. After 
seven months he returned to New York, where he continued with Mr. Villard for 
a year and then again came to the Pacific coast, where he invested in one hun- 
dred and fifty thousand acres of land for eastern capitalists. Some of this was 
purchased from the Northern Pacific in Whitman county. He also invested at 
Seattle and likewise purchased large tracts of land in the Grand Ronde valley of 
Oregon. General Tannatt was representing a company of which Mr. Villard was 
the head and which built and still owns the lines of the Oregon Railway & Navi- 
gation Company. All this land was controlled under the company name of the 
Oregon Improvement Company, with General Tannatt as manager and agent for 
eleven years. He then resigned his position to give his attention to fruit-raising 
at Farmington, having eighty-one acres in trees. He continued to develop and im- 
prove that property until 1907, when he retired, having the year previously pur- 
chased a home in Spokane, and in 1909 he sold his land at Farmington. 

General Tannatt was the organizer and for four years the president of the East 
Washington Horticultural Society and for six years was regent at the Washington 
State Agricultural College. He owns considerable stock in the Trustee Company 
of Spokane and has attractive investments which return to him a good income. 

At Manchester, Massachusetts, April 17, 1860, General Tannatt was married 
to Miss Elizabeth F. Tappan, a daughter of Colonel Eben and Sally Tappan. 
Their two children are: Eben T., an engineer by profession, who has an office 
in the Empire State building; and Miriam, the wife of Dr. C. K. Merriam. General 
Tannatt and his family are prominent socially and are well known on the Pacific 
coast. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and in 1886-7 was 
commander of the Loyal Legion of Oregon. He was for two consecutive years 
mayor of Walla Walla. He also holds membership with the Knights of Pythias 
and is a member of All Saints Cathedral. He is today one of the eight oldest liv- 
ing graduates of West Point His has been indeed an eventful career, in which 
many exciting and interesting incidents and events have occurred. Since the war 
his efforts have been an important factor in the development and progress of the 
northwest, the value of his service being recognized by all who know aught of the 
history of this section of the country. 



ALPHONSO C. EDWARDS. 

In a perusal of the history of men whose lives have been spent on the Western 
frontier, one cannot but appreciate the force of the statement that truth is stranger 
than fiction. N o tale of the novelist could present a character delineation more varied 
or more eventful in experiences than have come to Alphonso C. Edwards, who in 
the course of an active life has traveled extensively over the United States and 
Mexico. He knows the care-free life of the Western cowboy, has shared in the 
dangers of warfare with the Indians and at times has taken part in the less spec- 
tacular but usually more remunerative business interests which constitute the foun- 
dation for commercial stability and prosperity in well organized communities. 

Mr. Edwards started upon life's journey in Wisconsin on the 10th of June, 
1851, his parents being Amos H. and Eliza C. (Grant) Edwards, both of whom 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 185 

were natives of New England, the former having been born in Vermont in 1814, 
while the latter's birth occurred in New Hampshire. Mrs. Edwards was a first 
cousin of General Grant and was descended from ancestry that came to America 
from Scotland during the colonial days. The family of Edwards is an old and 
prominent one of New England and traces its lineage back to Wales. Amos H. 
Edwards devoted his life to educational work and reached the venerable age of 
ninety years, passing away in 1904. The brothers of Alphonso C. Edwards are 
Altaire H., who was a member of the First Wisconsin Cavalry and lost his life 
daring the Civil war; Charles P., who became a judge in one of the Nebraska courts 
and died in San Diego, California; Eo. R., a contractor living at Kearney, Ne- 
braska; S. E., who is engaged in the hotel business at Ainsworth, Nebraska; Bert 
E., a contractor of Portland, Oregon; and Ivers C, who is engaged in the contract- 
ing business in Denver, Colorado. There was also one sister, Ella C, widow of 
Isaac Henthorn, who, during his life, was a fruit grower of Bentonville, Arkansas. 

During his early boyhood days Alphonso C. Edwards left his home in Wisconsin 
and went to Kansas, and his education, begun in the common schools of the former 
state, was continued through the opportunities afforded in the public-school system 
of the latter. He afterward took up the printing business and subsequently spent 
three years as a cowboy on the plains, riding the range from Texas, Kansas and the 
Indian Territory. During this period he had considerable experience in fighting 
the Indians and tells some interesting tales of his encounters with the red men, 
which appealed to him as pleasurable at that day, for he little thought of the seri- 
ousness of the situation. Tiring of cowboy life, he returned to the printing busi- 
ness which he followed in Arkansas and Tennessee and later went to Nebraska for. 
one year, there devoting his attention to agricultural pursuits. He then reentered 
the journalistic field, becoming publisher of the Kearney Gazette, a strong Demo- 
cratic paper, at the same time publishing the Shelton Clarion, an independent paper, 
and also the True Citizen of Kearney, which was published in the interests of the 
temperance movement His initial step in merchandising was made in partnership 
with John D. Seaman in the wholesale shipping of hay from Kearney to Denver and 
later he became engaged in mining, being for two years associated with Brick 
Pomeroy. On the expiration of that period he went to Stout, Colorado, where he 
conducted a sutler's store for the Union Pacific Railroad, and later at Belknap, 
Montana, he conducted the business of the Belknap and Eagle City Transfer Com- 
pany, making trips from Belknap to the mines. 

Mr. Edwards' identification with Spokane began on the 29th of January, 1884, 
and soon afterward he established a grocery store on Sprague and Howard streets, 
conducting it for a year. He then took charge of the circulation department of the 
Old Review, under Frank M. Dallam, occupying that position until the Review 
was purchased by Hon. Patrick Henry Winston, Willis Sweet and associates. It was 
then that Mr. Edwards turned his attention to the real-estate business, insurance 
and mining, all of which have claimed his attention more or less since that time. 
In 1894 he was appointed commissioner to Alaska by President Cleveland and re- 
mained in that country for three or four years, his headquarters being on the Island 
of Kodiak, just across the Alaskan peninsula from Behring Sea, when in August, 
1907, he retired from the office and returned to Spokane. While on the return trip 
as a passenger on the steamer Mexico he was shipwrecked and for twenty- four hours 
was in the life-boat without food or water. Afterward he was for three days on an 



186 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

island and was finally taken up by the steamer City of Topeka and brought to 
Seattle. It was an awful experience and one never to be forgotten. The compass 
which he and his companions had was so rusty that the needle would not revolve. 
The Mexico went down in five hundred feet of water when the fog was so thick 
they could see nothing and their only guide was the waves of the sea to tell 
them which way they were drifting. At length, however, Mr. Edwards found him- 
self once more in Washington, and came from Seattle to Spokane where he has 
since been speculating in real estate and mining, his operations in the fields of min- 
ing having been largely in Chelan county. He is also interested in mining in a 
general way, operating and promoting, buying and selling mining property, his 
holdings being in Chelan, Stevens and Ferry counties, Washington, and in the Seven 
Devils of Idaho. His real-estate transactions in Spokane have been of an impor- 
tant and extensive character. He purchased property one hundred by one hundred 
and forty-two feet, at the corner of Riverside and Bernard streets, for eight hun- 
dred dollars, and afterward sold this for eighty thousand dollars. The corner lot 
at Brown and Riverside streets which he purchased for one thousand dollars he 
afterward sold for twenty-seven thousand dollars. His attention is now principally 
given to the purchase of property and the sale of houses on the installment plan, 
thus assisting many people in getting homes when they could not do so if the entire 
purchase price had to be paid outright. He has erected over two hundred hpuses 
which he sold in this manner, a number of them being at Hillyard, and among his 
purchasers have been many men employed in the railway shops. 

In Helena, Arkansas, on the 29th of January, 1871, Mr. Edwards was married 
to Malinda Jayne McWhorter, a ward of John M. Palmer, of Illinois. She died 
March 31, 1899, leaving a son, Chester, who was the first newsboy on the streets 
of Spokane and is now one of the city detectives. On the 24th of December, 1901, 
at Tacoma, Washington, Mr. Edwards was again married, his second union being 
with Permelia Johnson McCoy. Mr. Edwards is one of the oldest members and the 
present treasurer of the Pioneer Society and has continuously held office in the or- 
ganization, serving at different times as secretary, treasurer and trustee. He was 
one of the founders and is still a director of the Spokane Humane Society. It has 
ever been characteristic of Mr. Edwards that he has sought justice in every rela- 
tion of life and that at many times this has been tempered with the higher attri- 
bute of mercy. He is called the father of Samaritan Lodge No. 52, I. O. O. F., 
which is the largest and financially the strongest lodge in the state of Washington. 
He acted as its first noble grand and was its first representative to the grand lodge 
of the state. He is also a past president of the Local Aerie and a member of the 
Grand Aerie of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, in which he still has his member- 
ship. He is numbered among the progressive men who in the Chamber of Com- 
merce are laboring through united effort to promote the upbuilding of Spokane. 
In politics he has ever been a democrat, and in the fall of 1910 was a candidate for 
lieutenant governor, his opponent being Governor Hay. Although defeated he ran 
far ahead of his ticket, a fact which indicates his personal popularity and the con- 
fidence reposed in him by the voters of the state. In early days he served on the 
state central committee and at different times has been a delegate to county and 
state conventions of the democratic party. The religious faith of Mr. Edwards is 
manifest in his attendance at the services of the Christian Science church. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 187 

There are few men today who can speak with better authority concerning the 
history of the west and its upbuilding than can Alphonso C. Edwards. He saw this 
district when the seeds of civilization had scarcely been planted on the Pacific coast, 
and he has traveled from Point Barrow, the most northern point of land belonging 
to the United States in the Arctic Ocean, through to the City of Mexico and all 
through the mountains of the coast and Rocky ranges before the railroad was built. 
He has traveled on horseback throughout the Rocky Mountain mining districts, 
camping along the way, and has visited over thirty states of the Union. Before the 
railroad was built he started from Spokane with Charles P. Oudin, making his way 
downward through Idaho, and went from Lewiston a distance of one hundred and 
fifty miles south on horseback, through an unexplored country, with nothing but 
the course of the rivers for their guide. Such a trip into the wilds has always 
been a source of delight and interest to him. He loves to get into close touch with 
nature and never seems to feel the loneliness which often impresses a city man when 
he travels into the wilds. Mr. Edwards rejoices, however, in what has been ac- 
complished in the development and improvement of this section, and has lived to see 
property in Spokane and this district increase in value from a few dollars per acre 
to many thousands. His own prosperity has come to him in a measure through 
this advance in land values and it also is the tangible evidence of his judicious in- 
vestments and keen business discernment. 



ASA V. BRADRICK. 



Asa V. Bradrick, one of St. Maries' capable and progressive business men and 
the secretary, treasurer and manager of the Milwaukee Lumber Company, was born 
in Union county, Indiana, on October 26, 1 864, and is a son of Mahlon and Sarah 
(Warman) Bradrick. 

He attended the common schools of Union county in the acquirement of an edu- 
cation up to the age of eighteen years, when he laid aside his text-books and entered 
the employ of the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton Railroad Company in the capacity 
of agent and operator at the various stations on their line. He remained in their 
service for twelve years, during four of which he was also county clerk of Union 
county. In 1 894 he withdrew from the railroad business and went to Connersville, 
Fayette county, Indiana, where he devoted his energies to the breeding and raising 
of stock, at the same time publishing a paper in Connersville. He continued in 
these occupations for three years and then went to Shelbyville, Shelby county, Indi- 
ana, there establishing a daily and weekly newspaper, known as The Jeffersonian. 
This publicatoin received favorable pubbc notice because Mr. Bradrick used its 
columns to expose political graft, his being one of the first papers in the state to 
make public denunciation of this nefarious practice. 

He remained in Shelbyville until the fall of 1901, when he came to Idaho, lo- 
cating in Priest River, where he became associated with others in the organization of 
The White Pine Lumber Company, of which he was secretary. After being identi- 
fied with this enterprise for about three years, he disposed of his interests and in 
1904 went to Spokane, Washington. In connection with W. H. Gerhart, of Omaha, 
Nebraska, he established a wholesale lumber business, the second concern of the 



!88 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

kind to be operated in Spokane. Five years later he removed to St. Maries and 
organized the Milwaukee Lumber Company, with Fred Herrick of Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin, as president, W. D. Harrigan of Fulton, Alabama, as vice president, and 
Asa V. Bradrick as secretary, treasurer and manager. It is a well organized and 
thoroughly established industry, having the only steel and concrete mill in the 
northwest. Their plant is thoroughly modern in every respect, the planing mill 
being operated by electricity, while they furnish light and power to the city of St 
Maries. It is the first company to have entered into extensive contracts with the 
government for timber and they are now building twenty miles of logging road, 
branching off from the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound Railroad, thirty miles 
east of St. Maries, by means of which they will be able to reach large bodies of 
timber for which they have contracted. Their mill has a capacity of two hundred 
and fifty thousand feet per day, and cut forty million feet of Idaho white pine dur- 
ing the first year of operation. 

Mr. Bradrick was married on the 13th of May, 1885, to Miss Harriet Macdou- 
gal, a daughter of Alex and Amanda Macdougal, of Union county, Indiana. Of 
this union there were born two children: Quincy, who was born in 1889 and died 
in 1907, and Asa W., who was born in 1891 and is a student of the Washington 
State College of Pullman, Washington. 

Much attention has always been given by Mr. Bradrick to all church and public 
work, and while living in Spokane he was affiliated with the First Methodist Episco- 
pal church. He was a member of the building and finance committee that raised 
the funds for the rebuilding of their church edifice following its destruction by 
fire in 1907, while at that time he was also a trustee of the Young Men's Christian 
Association, rendering much assistance to this organization in their efforts to get 
the funds for their present building. As trustee of the One Hundred and Fifty 
Thousand Club of Spokane he gave efficient service, and he proved to be a most 
capable chairman of the committee that raised the money for the building of the 
Children's Home of that city in 1908, raising forty thousand dollars in one day. 
Mr. Bradrick always contributes generously of both his time and money in promot- 
ing any philanthropic movement, not as a matter of duty but as availing himself of 
a privilege that affords him pleasure. 



PHILIP CASEY. 



Railway service presents great attractions to men of alert and energetic nature 
and thousands of the most competent young men of America have found in the 
railway business a satisfactory channel for the exercise of their talents and ener- 
gies. Of this number is Philip Casey, who is now agent for the Great Northern 
Railroad at Hillyard. He was born at Rockland, Michigan, June 26, 1870, a son 
of John and Katherine (Dunne) Casey. The father was a lover of the Union and 
served valiantly in the Civil war. He died in 1888 and the mother passed away in 
May, 1884. 

Philip Casey lived at Rockland until four years of age, when the family moved 
to Champion, Michigan. He attended school until fifteen years of age and then 
began working a? a telegraph messenger boy, at the same time acquiring a knowl- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 189 

edge of telegraphy. A year later he became operator for the Duluth South Shore 
& Atlantic Railroad. He then attended the Spencerian Business College, of De- 
troit, Michigan, for one year, and after leaving this school accepted a position in 
the office of Robinson & Company, a wholesale boot and shoe house, of that city, 
and remained for eighteen months. On account of the death of bis father, he re- 
turned home and became telegraph operator and ticket clerk for the Duluth South 
Shore & Atlantic Railroad and the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul, for three years. 
Withdrawing from this position, he removed to Superior, Wisconsin, and there 
became connected with the Great Northern Railroad Company as clerk in the 
freight office, and remained in this position for six months. 

He was next employed in the auditor's office of the Great Northern Railway at 
St Paul as revising clerk and continued there for one year. After leaving St. 
Paul he served for eight years as agent at Bonners Ferry, Idaho; for ten months 
at Wilson Creek, Washington ; and for six and one-half years at Bellingham, Wash- 
ington. Since September, 1909, he has been agent at Hillyard and, as he possesses 
a fine address, good business capacity and understands every detail pertaining to 
his office, he has made many friends for the railway company and ranks among 
the most popular men of this section. 

In 1898, at Duluth, Minnesota, Mr. Casey was married to Miss Eva Stewart, 
and to this union four children have been born, Edward, Helen, Philip and Robert, 
the three eldest of whom are now attending the public schools. Mr. Casey is not 
identified with any political organization but is a member of Knights of Columbus 
and a supporter of all movements that have for their object the promotion of the 
best interests of the community. Starting as a boy upon his own resources, he 
has held closely to principles of truth and justice, at all times performing his 
doty to the best of his ability, and it may be said of him that he has added not 
only to the comfort and happiness of his own family but to the advancement of all 
with whom he has had business or social relations. 



BRADFORD S. SHEIRE. 

The effect of conscientious application backed by a worthy ambition to advance 
to a place of responsibility is clearly shown in the record of Bradford S. Sheire, 
cashier of the First National Bank of Hillyard. A native of Detroit, Michigan, 
he was born January 17, 1860. His father, Romaine Sheire, was a soldier for 
the Union in the Civil war, enlisting in Company F. First Michigan Engineers, 
under Colonel Ennis. He participated in the battle of Mills Spring and many 
minor engagements and also marched with Sherman's army to the sea. He died 
in 1904. The maiden name of the mother of our subject was Elvira Hopkins. 
Jeremiah Mead, the great-grandfather, was also a soldier. He served in the Rev- 
olutionary war as a private in Captain Matthew Van Benschoven's Company, Colo- 
nel Dink Brinkerhoff's Regiment, which was the Second Regiment of Dutchess 
County Militia of New York state. 

Mr. Sheire of this sketch received his preliminary education in the public schools 
of St. Paul, Minnesota, and later became a student of the St. Paul high school, 
from which he was graduated in 1878. At the age of eighteen he began learning 



190 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

the painter's trade at St. Paul and entered the employ of the Great Northern Rail- 
way in that state, and continued with this company until 1895. In the year last 
named he was transferred to Hilly ard as foreman of the paint shop for the same 
road, a position which he filled for thirteen years. In 1908 he was appointed 
assistant cashier of the First National Bank of Hilly ard and discharged his duties 
so acceptably, that in April, 1911, he was advanced to the position of cashier. This 
office he has filled to the entire satisfaction of the directors and patrons of the 
institution, and owing to his special aptitude for the position he has assisted mate- 
rially in promoting the interests of the bank. 

On the 4th of August, 1881, Mr. Sheire was married at St. Paul to Miss Fran- 
ces A. Gibbs, a daughter of Darius S. Gibbs. The father in his younger days 
served in the Mexican war in the same company as Ulysses S. Grant, who was 
then a second lieutenant. Later Mr. Gibbs wore the uniform of the blue in the 
great Rebellion under General Grant. Mr. and Mrs. Sheire are the parents of 
four children : Mary A., now Mrs. P. R. Flanagan; Alice L. ; Elvira; and Mabel M. 

Politically Mr. Sheire supports the republican party and served as city clerk 
of Hillyard from 1907 to January 1, 1909. He belongs to the Sons of Veterans 
and the Sons of the American Revolution and also is an active member of the Odd 
Fellows. He has passed through the various chairs of the subordinate lodge and 
encampment and is a past grand and a past chief patriarch. In addition to mem- 
bership in the orders named he is identified with the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, the Modern Woodmen of America and is a member of the Hillyard 
Chamber of Commerce, serving as its treasurer. In religious matters he is affili- 
ated with the First Baptist church, of which he is a member. He is a man of good 
business capacity, acknowledged integrity of character, and also possesses an 
energy and progressiveness which are prominent attributes of leaders in all lines 
of endeavor. He has won a gratif}ing measure of prosperity and is recognized as 
a reliable and substantial citizen whom to know is to honor. 



HARRY S. MARTIN, M. D. 

In a thorough preparatory course and later in post-graduate work, Dr. Harry 
S. Martin laid the foundation for the success and progress which he has attained 
as a practitioner of medicine and surgery. For fourteen years he has followed 
his profession in Spokane, at all times keeping in touch with the advancement that 
is being made by those who are regarded as leaders in this field. He was born. 
April 80, 1856, in the city of Guelph, Ontario, his parents being Peter S. and 
Elizabeth (Hall) Martin, both of whom were natives of England. The father's 
birth occurred in Nottinghamshire, while the mother was a native of Berkshire. 
She was descended from one of the old families of central England but Peter S. 
Martin represented a family that came originally from Normandy with William 
the Conqueror, at which time the name was spelled Martyne. Peter Martin was 
a farmer and stockman and in the year 1851 crossed the Atlantic in a sailing vessel 
to Canada, where he carried on general agricultural pursuits and also took a some- 
what active part in public affairs, serving as councilman and registrar of Welling- 
ton county. He died in 1888, while his wife passed away in 1898. The two 



DR. HARRY S. MARTIN 



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SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 193 

brothers of Dr. Martin are: Frank M., M. D., who is a graduate of Toronto Uni- 
versity and now resides at Dundalk, Ontario; and George Martin, who is manag- 
ing a farm at Valley ford, Washington. He wedded Mary Gerrie, two of whose 
brothers married daughters of the Martin family. The three sisters of Dr. Martin 
are: Ada, the wife of James McKee, who is engaged in the real-estate business 
in Vancouver, British Columbia, their daughter, Mrs. Hindley, being now the wife 
of Spokane's mayor; Emma, the wife of the Rev. Andrew Gerrie, residing in Tor- 
rington, Connecticut; and Martha, the wife of Rev. John P. Gerrie, who is now 
editing a newspaper at Stratford, Ontario. 

Dr. Martin devoted his youthful days largely to the acquirement of an educa- 
tion, attending the high school at Fergus and at Mount Forest, Ontario, and later 
the Ottawa Normal School. His medical education was obtained in Victoria Uni- 
versity at Toronto, Ontario, where he won his professional degree. His first ap- 
pointment was that of resident physician in the Toronto General Hospital and 
subsequently he embarked upon an independent practice near Guelph, Ontario, 
where he remained for eleven years. He next went to Chicago, where he spent nine 
months in pursuing post-graduate work in the Northwestern and Rush Medical 
Colleges and in a post-graduate school of medicine on Dearborn street. In May, 
1897, he arrived in Spokane and in July of the same year took the state board 
medical examination, after which he at once entered upon active practice, in which 
he has since continued. He is ever careful in the diagnosis of cases and his judg- 
ment is sound and reliable. His work has commanded the respect of his profes- 
sional brethren, who appreciate his close conformity to ahigh standard of profes- 
sional ethics and the ability which he displays # "in # .tW administration of remedial 
agencies. He is now secretary of the? strfif^of tjie Saeittfi Heart Hospital, which 
is the pride of Spokane, and has occujjrea the position for several years. He was 
also the first city bacteriologist of Spokhne, instituting; Jthe movement for the estab- 
lishment of the department and made ai fine XQcpcd -as 'the incumbent thereof. 

On the 24th of June, 1886, occurred the marriage of Dr. Martin and Miss 
Margaret L. Brown, a daughter of Dr. M. J. Brown, of Detroit, Michigan, now 
deceased. Her father was a cousin of Frances Folsom, who became the wife of 
Grover Cleveland. He belonged to a well known old family and was distinguished 
for his service in the Union army. . Dr. and Mrs. Martin have two sons: Douglas 
Ewart, nineteen years of age, now attending Whitman College ; and Frank McPher- 
son, eight years of age, attending the public schools. 

Dr. Martin is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and is interested in all 
its plans and movements for the development of the city, the exploitation of its 
resources and for the promotion of its material interests. His political support is 
given to the republican party and he is identified with many fraternal organizations, 
including the Masonic, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen, the Knights of Pythias, the Woodmen of the World and the 
Canadian Order of Foresters. He has been a noble grand in the Odd Fellows lodge, 
a master workman of the Workman's lodge, and medical examiner of the Wood- 
men of the World. In more strictly social lines he is also well known as a member 
of the Spokane Club and the Country Club and as a life member of the Spokane 
Athletic Club. He is an enthusiastic member and one of the directors of the Young 
Men's Christian Association and for several years served on the finance committee 
daring the time the present building was erected. His life has been an expression 

VoL U— 10 



194 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

of many notable principles and he is well known as an exemplary representative 
of the various societies to which he belongs and which have their root in beneficent 
purpose. In his professional service he has ever held to high ideals. With him 
sound judgment has never been sacrificed to hasty opinion and while he manifests 
a progressive spirit in adopting new ideas and improvements, he has never been 
quick to discard old and time tried methods which have had their root in long ex- 
perience and bear the sanction of sound judgment. 



JOHN K. McCORNACK. 



The steps in the orderly progression of John K. McCornack are easily dis- 
cernible and have brought him from a comparatively humble position in the business 
world to an important place in financial circles, for he is now vice president of the 
Union Securities Company of -Spokane, in which connection he displays a thorough 
knowledge of the banking business in every particular, with ability to coordinate its 
affairs and extend its connections. He has always been a resident of the Pacific 
northwest, his birth having occurred upon a farm near Eugene, Oregon, April 4, 
1863. His parents were Andrew and Maria (Eakin) McCornack, both of whom 
were natives of Scotland, the mother being a direct descendant of the royal house 
of Stuart of Scotland. The father belonged to an old Highland Scotch family with 
an almost irreproachable record. It is said that none of them ever became wealthy 
and none of the name were ever accused of a crime. The ancestry can be officially 
traced back to 1260 and they held Scotch leases from 1310 to 1836. Honesty and 
integrity, loyalty and truth were among their marked characteristics and none who 
knew them could speak of them but in terms of respect and esteem. On coming to 
America Andrew McCornack, Sr., settled first in Elgin, Illinois, and afterward 
Andrew McCornack, Jr., crossed the plains with horses and ox teams in 1852, 
bringing with him his wife and five children. That was the year during the period 
of gold excitement on the Pacific coast, when emigration was heaviest, and they 
suffered the usual hardships and privations incident to such a trip. At length, how- 
ever, they reached Oregon and the father took up the occupation of farming near 
Eugene. He was a public-spirited man who served as school director and in other 
local offices and also represented his district in the Oregon legislature. His death 
occurred in 1871 and his wife passed away about thirty years later. The six 
brothers and five sisters of John K. McCornack are as follows: Walter R., who 
was a farmer and stockman and also sheriff of Lane county, Oregon, is now de- 
ceased. Edwin A. is a resident of Eugene, Oregon. William A. is a retired physi- 
cian living in Oakland, California. Eugene P. is engaged in the practice of law 
in Salem, Oregon. Herbert F. is a retired physician and fruit grower of Eugene, 
Oregon. Frank H. is engaged in the lumber business at Klamath Falls, Oregon. 
Helen I. is the wife of J. G. Stevenson, of Eugene. Nettie M. is the wife of Charles 
M. Collier, also of Eugene. Agnes M. is the wife of Dr. E. P. Geary, of Portland, 
Oregon. Mary E. is also living in Eugene, and Leathe is the wife of Frank Wells, 
of San Francisco. 

John K. McCornack pursued his early education in the public schools of Eugene 
and afterward attended the state university, from which he was graduated in 1882. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 195 

His first work was at government surveying, in which he engaged while yet attend- 
ing college, spending five months of the year in the field and the remainder of the 
time at his studies. Later he entered the state land office at Salem, Oregon, as chief 
clerk, remaining there for two years, after which he went to California. He spent 
two years in that state, employed on construction work in Mendocino county, and 
in the winter months attended business college. He then returned to Salem, spend- 
ing a short time in the land office, and later entered the United States Land Office 
at The Dalles about 1886. There he worked as chief clerk for a year, after which 
he secured a position as bookkeeper in The Dalles National Bank, remaining there 
until July, 1889. At that date he went to Palouse, Washington, where he organized 
the Security State Bank, of which he became a director and cashier, having exclu- 
sive charge of the bank from its opening in September, 1889. After a time he was 
elected to the presidency and at all times was its manager until his removal to 
Spokane in May, 1910. In January of that year he was elected vice president and 
general manager of the Union Securities Company and came to Spokane to seek a 
broader field of usefulness for his industry and enterprise, which are his dominant 
qualities. 

While in the Palouse country Mr. McCornack filled the office of city treasurer 
and mayor. His time, however, was devoted principally to the bank, although he 
also operated largely in saw milling and was the owner of considerable farm land 
there, the greater part of which was under cultivation, most of it being planted to 
grain. He also owned a large amount of timber land. He still retains the presi- 
dency of the Security State Bank, is president of the Lewiston National Bank of 
Lewiston, Idaho, and president of the Idaho Trust Company of Lewiston. The 
Union Securities Company, of which he is vice president and general manager is 
incorporated for one million dollars and owns large interests in thirty-two banks 
located throughout the Spokane country and its trading zone — the district known 
as the Inland Empire. The organizers believed that such a project would be profit- 
able, but the main object was to raise the standard of banking by careful manage- 
ment and auditing and through close supervision from the head office. The directors 
are F. A. Black we 11, J. A. Caughren, Jay P. Graves, T. J. Humbird, T. L. Green- 
ough, John Porter, Fred B. Grinnell, J. K. McCornack and D. W. Twohy, the last 
named being president. The investors in this company are among the best known 
and successful business men of the northwest who, wishing to invest in bank stocks, 
but feeling the responsibility in the banking business and the necessity of closer 
attention and more full knowledge than their other interests allowed them to give 
to this class of investments, conceived the idea of an investment company to hold 
and look after bank stocks. They believed that by using the best manager they could 
get for their company as a sort of adviser for the various banks in which they 
should be or become interested, the best auditor obtainable, and the best system of 
reports, they could safeguard the banks in the system much better than acting singly 
in their ownership, and probably both raise the standard of banking and at the 
same time make equal, if not greater, profits. However, the main objects were 
safety in bank-stock investments, and this of course would mean safety to deposi- 
tors, as well as ability to properly care for borrowers. The details of the Union 
Securities Company were quickly worked out, the company formed in 1909, and 
Mr. McCornack elected vice president and general manager late in that year In 
that position Mr. McCornack has made a notable record, wisely developing his na- 



196 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

tive talents and powers and so using his opportunities that he has reached a promi- 
nent position and one that contributes as well to the financial stability of the north- 
west. 

In January, 1888, Mr. McCornack was married to Miss Mary F. De Huff, a 
daughter of P. W. De Huff, a retired resident of The Dalles and one of the pio- 
neers of Oregon who crossed the plains with the earliest settlers and took charge 
of the first steamboat on the upper Columbia river running from Lewiston. Mr9. 
McCornack crossed the plains when a young girl. Unto Mr. and Mrs. McCornack 
have been born two children: Robert De Huff, who is in the State University at 
Eugene, Oregon; and Helen, now a student in the Spokane high school. Mr. Mc- 
Cornack holds membership in several fraternal and social organizations, belong- 
ing to the Odd Fellows lodge, in which he has passed all the chairs, the Knights of 
Pythias and the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He also has membership 
relations with the Spokane Club, the Spokane Country Club and the Inland Club. 
In politics he is a republican and was always an- active worker in party ranks 
until the last few years. He has been a member of the county committee, has been 
a delegate to county and state conventions and was mayor of Palouse for three years 
and treasurer for three years. The demands of his banking interests are now too 
heavy to allow active participation in politics, especially as an office holder, but do 
not preclude his cooperation in various movements of good citizenship whereby the 
welfare and upbuilding of the city are advanced. 



WILLIAM G. BURCH. 



William G. Burch is successfully engaged in business as a member of the sta- 
tionery firm of J. W. Tabor & Company of Wallace, owning a half interest in the 
enterprise. His birth occurred at Walla Walla, Washington, on the 18th of June, 
1876, his parents being Dr. B. F. and Laura (Havermale) Burch. The father, a 
physician by profession, came to Walla Walla from Illinois and later took up his 
abode in Spokane. He was the original proprietor of the Hotel Spokane, and was 
at one time one of the most extensive property owners in Spokane. The maternal 
grandfather of our subject came to that city in 1875, took up a homestead and 
began its development, but at the time of the Indian troubles there was obliged to 
remove his family to the island. The mother of William G. Burch was one of the 
very few white women in Spokane during the Indian unrest. She still makes her 
home there and is well known and highly esteemed throughout the community. 

William G. Burch obtained his education in the schools of Spokane and when a 
youth of fourteen secured employment in the stationery establishment of John W. 
Graham, his brother-in-law. At the end of six years he became a traveling repre- 
sentative for Mr. Graham, remaining on the road for twelve years. In 1908 he 
came to Wallace, Idaho, and purchased a half interest in the stationery concern of 
J. W. Tabor, who had been conducting the business for twenty years. The firm 
is now known as J. W. Tabor & Company, and Mr. Burch has proven an active fac- 
tor in its continued growth and success. 

On the 18th of July, 1899, in Chicago, Illinois, Mr. Burch was united in mar- 
raige to Miss Harriette Spoor, a daughter of George E. Spoor, who took up his 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 197 

abode among the pioneer settlers of Spokane, but later removed to Chicago. Mr. 
and Mrs. Burch have one son, Wallace Spoor, whose natal day was June 17, 1900. 
Mr. Burch is a member of Spokane Lodge No. 228, B. P. O. E., and also belongs to 
the United Commercial Travelers Association. There has been nothing sensational 
or unusual in his life history, which has been characterized by devotion to business 
duties and cares. At all times his actions have been sincere, his manner unaffected, 
and whether in commercial or social circles he deserves the respect of those with 
whom he comes in contact. 



JULIUS GALLAND. 



Julius Galland is president of the Northwest Loan & Trust Company, of Spo- 
kane, and in this as well as in other business connections has become widely known 
in this section of the country. He has always resided on the Pacific slope and the 
spirit of enterprise and progress characteristic of this section of the country has 
continually been manifest in his active life. He was born in Oregon, February 14, 
1860, his parents being Solomon and Adelaide (Goodman) Galland, both of whom 
were natives of Prussia, but the latter was reared in England. She is now living 
in Spokane, having for many years survived her husband, who died in 1883. In 
early youth he left his native land for Australia, and afterward became a resident 
of California, arriving in that state in 1851. There he engaged in merchandising, 
conducting a store in San Francisco during the days of early mining excitement 
and of heavy emigration to that state. About 1858 or 1859 he went to Oregon, but 
in the meantime returned to Australia during the mining excitement there. He 
stood very high in Masonic circles. The three brothers of Julius Galland are: 
Theodore, who was president of the Northwest Loan & Trust Company, but died 
in May, 1908; and Adolph and Samuel, who are vice president and secretary re- 
spectively of the same company. 

The brothers have always been associated closely in their business relations. 
Like the others, Julius Galland was educated in the public schools and academies of 
Oregon, and took up the study of law, preparing especially for railroad and cor- 
poration work under Senator Joseph N. Dolph. One year after his admission to 
the bar he came to Washington, arriving in the Palouse country in the spring of 
1883. He took charge of a general mercantile business at Farmington and became 
associated with his two brothers, opening a store in Palouse in the fall of 1888 
under the name of Galland Brothers. They further extended their activities by 
establishing a store at Wallace, Idaho, in the spring of 1889, and in the spring of 
1891 they closed out their holdings in Palouse and Farmington preparatory to com- 
ing to Spokane, having decided upon a removal. Here they established a brewery 
business and in the fall of 1891 they disposed of their store in Wallace. In the 
*ame fall they began the erection of a building for the Galland Burke Brewing 
Company and had the plants fully in operation by June, 1892. In 1902 the Gal- 
land Burke plant was sold to the Spokane Brewing & Malting Company. It was 
four years after this that the Galland brothers organized the Northwest Loan & 
Trust Company, which is entirely within their ownership and control, with Clar- 
ence J. Smith as cashier. The business has a capital of one hundred thousand dol- 



198 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

lars with a surplus of about seventy thousand dollars. • Its remarkable success for 
a new institution has awakened the admiration of bankers throughout this section 
of the country. Its policy maintains an even balance between conservatism and 
progressiveness and, carefully safeguarding the interests of depositors, the bank is 
making rapid strides toward success. The brothers are also largely interested in 
the Holland Horr Mill Company, and with that company own lumber across the 
river. They are also interested in the Spokane Title Company as directors. 

Samuel Galland was born January 1, 1869, in Butteville, and was educated in the 
public schools and the high school of Portland. Adolph Galland was born August 
17, 1865, at Butteville, and was educated in the same manner as his brothers. 
The former was married in June, 1907, to Miss Edith Hexter, of Portland, Oregon, 
a daughter of Levi Hexter, now deceased, who was in the wholesale hardware busi- 
ness as a member of the firm of Hexter, May & Company. Unto Samuel Galland 
and his wife have been born two children, Samuel and Theodore. Adolph Galland 
was married June 8, 1898, to Miss Maude Reubens, a daughter of Louis Reubens, 
now living retired in Spokane. 

In addition to their other interests the three brothers are stockholders in a 
brewing plant at Wallace, Idaho, and in the Gambrinus Brewing Plant of Portland, 
Oregon. Julius Galland is a member of the Masonic fraternity and for thirty 
years has been a Royal Arch Mason. Both Samuel and Adolph Galland are life 
members of Spokane Lodge, No. 228, B. P. O. E., and Julius and Adolph are char- 
ter members of Tyrian Lodge, A. F. & A. M. All three brothers are members of 
the Spokane Athletic Club and Julius Galland is a member of the Chamber of 
Commerce. In politics he has always been a republican, active in the work of the 
party, and has been a delegate to city and county conventions. He is a business 
man of progressive spirit and unfaltering determination, who accomplishes every- 
thing that he undertakes and steadily works his way upward to success, employing 
modern business methods and wisely utilizing every opportunity that comes to hand. 



ADOLPH DONART. 



Adolph Donart, who established a floral and hothouse business at Coeur d'Alene 
in 1909, is now at the head of the most extensive enterprise of this character in 
northern Idaho. His birth occurred at Charlottenburg, Germany, on the 29th of 
August, 1880, his parents being William and Augusta Donart In 1882 they 
crossed the Atlantic to the United States, settling in Minnesota, where the father 
was engaged in business as a contractor and brick mason. In 1909 he left that state 
and joined his son Adolph at Coeur d'Alene, where he and his wife have since lived 
in honorable retirement. 

Adolph Donart obtained his education in the public schools of Minnesota, and 
began working at the floral business when between twelve and thirteen years of 
age. He was subsequently employed by florists in Minnesota, Colorado, California 
and Washington and thus became thoroughly familiar with the science of horticul- 
ture. In 1909 he came to Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, and founded his present establish- 
ment, now conducting the foremost enterprise of this kind in northern Idaho. He 
has over twenty thousand square feet under glass, comprising ten hothouses equipped 



I 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 199 

with all modern improvements. He raises both flowers and hothouse vegetables, 
supplying a large demand in Spokane and likewise making shipments throughout 
all parts of northern Idaho. 

On October 5, 1911, Adolph Donart was married to Miss Genevieve Taylor, 
a daughter of Chipman Howard and Hannah Taylor, of Coeur d'Alene, the cere- 
mony taking place in Spokane. Mr. Donart has won a gratifying measure of 
prosperity for one of his years and it is safe to predict that a bright future lies 
before him. 



JOHN MUSE BURKE. 



Among the men whose names figure prominently in connection with the develop- 
ment of mining interests in the northwest was John Muse Burke. He started out 
in life practically empty-handed but steadily worked his way upward, energy and 
determination proving the basis of his success, which was also due to his recogni- 
tion and utilization of opportunity. He was a native of Virginia, born September 
18, 1842, his parents being Thomas and Isabel Burke. The father was prominent 
and well known as the owner of a Virginia plantation on which he kept a number 
of slaves. He died when his son John was but five years of age and the mother 
passed away a few years later, leaving the boy an orphan. He was reared and 
educated by an uncle, John W. Burke, of Alexandria, Virginia, and acquired con- 
siderable knowledge of those fundamental branches of learning which are most 
essential as factors in success in later life. His uncle then placed him in a bank- 
ing establishment in Alexandria where he remained for several years, thus receiv- 
ing his practical business training. He next went to Memphis, Tennessee, where 
be was engaged in banking for a short time, and removed thence to Omaha, Ne- 
braska, where he entered the banking house of Kountze Brothers, with whom he 
continued until the building of the Union Pacific Railroad into Salt Lake City. 
Mr. Burke then made his way westward with supplies, following the road into 
the Mormon citadel, after which he became interested in mining properties in that 
locality. Subsequently he was engaged in mining, smelting and merchandising in 
southern Utah where he remained until 1883, when he left that district, going to 
Murray, Idaho, during the gold excitement. He remained at that point for two 
years and was not only active and prominent in business circles but also became 
recognized as a leading worker in the ranks of the democratic party, upon whose 
ticket he was chosen to represent Shoshone county in the state legislature at Boise, 
Idaho. 

Ever watchful of business opportunities and recognizing advantages which others 
passed heedlessly by, Mr. Burke became interested in the development of lead 
mines in Idaho and was afterward very active and prominent in the promotion of 
mining and other business interests in that state. That he was regarded as a lead- 
ing figure there is indicated by the fact that the town of Burke was named in his 
honor. He remained a resident of Idaho until 1887, when he came to Spokane, 
where he located permanently. He continued there in the mining business and 
it was he that handled the Tiger, Bunker Hill, Emma and Last Chance properties, 



200 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

which now belong to the Federal Mining Company. He was also interested in 
mining in Kaslo and Rossland, British Columbia, and varied and important busi- 
ness pursuits occupied his attention until his death, which occurred while he was 
on a visit in Pennsylvania, on the 13th of September, 1908. For a considerable 
period he figured as one of the most prominent representatives of democracy in 
Idaho and was the candidate of the party for governor of that state during the 
Cleveland administration. 

On the 12th of September, 1872, in Salt Lake City, Mr. Burke was united in 
marriage to Miss Sarah Greenig, a daughter of Daniel and Sarah (Allen) Greenig, 
who were natives of Philadelphia and in 1850 came westward to Salt Lake City, 
where the father engaged in merchandising. Mr. and Mrs. Burke became the par- 
ents of one son, Daniel J., who is now engaged in mining. He married Estelle 
Bennett and they have two children, Daniel B. and Sarah A. An adopted daugh- 
ter, Sarah Eva Burke, is now making her home with Mrs. Burke in Spokane. 

In religious faith Mr. Burke was an Episcopalian and his fraternal relations 
were with the Masons and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He was very 
charitable and possessed all of the charming characteristics of a southern gentle- 
man — big-hearted, kind, liberal and very courteous. He gave freely of his means 
to those who needed assistance and again and again reached out a helping hand to 
fellow travelers upon life's journey. He was also ever ready to speak a word of 
encouragement or advice and his own example was an inspiration to others, showing 
what may be accomplished when determination and energy lead the way. 



JACOB R. TAYLOR. 



For more than twenty-eight years the firm of Binkley & Taylor has maintained 
a continuous existence, the partners being J. W. Binkley and Jacob R. Taylor, 
whose connection with the bar and operations in financial circles have constituted 
an important and forceful element in the general growth and prosperity of Spokane 
and outlying districts. The birth of Mr. Taylor occurred in Ontario, Canada, on 
the 21st of December, 1854, his parents being George and Margaret (Rymal) 
Taylor. In pursuing his education he spent some time as a student of the Collegiate 
Institute at Brantford, Ontario, and afterward prepared for the bar as a law stu- 
dent in Toronto University. On crossing the border into the United States he 
made his way to Denver, Colorado, where he took the required examination and 
was admitted to the bar in 1882. He then came to the northwest, with Seattle as 
his destination and in that city was joined by his cousin, J. W. Binkley. After a 
brief period in Seattle and a short stay in Tacoma they decided upon Spokane as 
a favorable location, and opened a law office, continuing in general practice for a 
time but later turning their attention to financial interests, organizing in 1884 the 
Northwestern & Pacific Mortgage Company under which name they carried on 
business until 1896. This was then taken over by the Northwestern & Pacific 
Hypotheek Bank and was followed by the organization of the North Pacific Loan 
& Trust Company. They deal entirely in farm and city mortgages and handle for- 
eign capital, mostly from Holland, having invested more than one million dollars 
in mortgages in this district. 



J. R. TAYLOR 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 203 

Mr. Taylor is a prominent Mason, holding membership in Spokane Lodge, No. 
84, F. & A. M.; Spokane Chapter, No. 2, R. A. M.; Cataract Commandery, No. 
Z, K. T. He is a thirty-second degree mason in Oriental Consistory, No. 2, Scottish 
Rite and belongs to El Katif Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He also has member- 
ship relations with the Spokane Club and the Chamber of Commerce. 

On the 11th of February, 1892, Mr. Taylor was married to Ada L. Martin, a 
daughter of Mrs. Jennie Martin, of this city, and they now have three children, 
Margaret J., Binkley R. and John R. They reside at No. 1805 Sixth avenue, where 
Mr. Taylor built a pleasant home in 1894. In his business life he has been a per- 
sistent, resolute and energetic worker, possessing strong executive powers, and added 
to a progressive spirit, ruled by more than ordinary intelligence and good judg- 
ment, there has been a native justice which has expressed itself in correct principle 
and practice. 



THOMAS STUART GRIFFITH. 

Thomas Stuart Griffith is the vice president of the wholesale grocery house 
of Benham & Griffith, one of the largest establishments of this character in the In- 
land Empire. He is likewise owner of the Glen Tana farm, which is known 
throughout the country because of its model equipment and also because of the fame 
of the Glen Tana kennels. Mr. Griffith^ was 'born in, Toronto, Canada, July 22, 
1862. He is the brother of the RevifGfeoT^e' ^P. (jriffith, an Episcopalian clergyman 
of Chicago, and these two were the, only children of Thomas and Lillie (Taylor) 
Griffith, both of whom were also natives of 'Toronto,.. Canada, and are now residents 
of Los Angeles, California. The father^ who for many years was a wholesale grocer 
but is now living retired, is of Welsh-English descent, while the mother is of Irish 
lineage, representing an old family of Canada, where they are extensive property 
owners, her father at one time owning nearly all of Toronto. 

Thomas S. Griffith pursued his early education under the direction of a tutor 
until qualified to enter the Upper Canada College of Toronto. When his education 
was completed he engaged with H. C. & C. Durand & Company, wholesale grocers 
of Chicago. Later Francis J. Kenneth, a son-in-law of Mr. Durand, established a 
commission business on the Chicago Board of Trade under the firm name of Mc- 
Cormick, Kenneth & Day. They had a big trade and opened branch offices with 
the first private wire out of Chicago to New York and St. Louis. Mr. Griffith did 
all the private business for this firm and other mammoth business enterprises of the 
middle west, continuing with them until he came to Spokane in March, 1888. At 
that time he entered in the retail grocery business, which he conducted alone for 
six months under the firm name of Thomas S. Griffith & Company. At the end of 
that time the name of the firm was changed to Benham & Griffith, and they entered 
into the wholesale grocery business. They were the first wholesale grocers to sell 
goods exclusively to retailers. Merchants at that time bought their goods in Port- 
land and the wholesale grocery house in which Mr. Griffith was a partner had to 
establish for itself a name and reputation in this district and to build up its trade 
from the slightest beginning. In fact retailers had to be educated to buy goods in 
Spokane. Yet, although this was the first wholesale grocery house here, their sales 



204 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

the first year probably amounted to about three hundred thousand dollars. Other 
wholesale houses were later established, and all of the wholesale grocery 
interests here now do a business amounting to eight million dollars per year, prov- 
ing an important feature in the commercial development and activity of the city. 
In 1889 the house of Benham & Griffith was destroyed by fire, at which time their 
location was on the present site of the Bank of Montreal. After the fire they re- 
moved to Post street and Railroad avenue, there remaining until 1908, when they 
located at their present quarters at No. 150 Spokane International Right of Way. 
They leased the property from D. C. Corbin and built a warehouse for themselves, 
one hundred and seventy feet long, facing the river, with a depth of one hundred 
and fifty feet to the railroad tracks. L. T. Benham is the president of the company, 
with Thomas S. Griffith, as vice president; Albert Benham, as treasurer; and R. 
L. Fry as secretary. Their business covers a radius of one hundred miles and they 
enjoy a most extensive wholesale trade, but with the new freight rate, which has 
just been gained, they will cover a much larger territory. 

Mr. Griffith is the owner of the celebrated Glen Tana farm, the largest on the 
Little Spokane river, and adjoining the grounds of the Spokane Country Club. 
It consists of two thousand, two hundred and eighty acres and he controls seven 
miles of the Little Spokane river. The name of Glen Tana is today known through- 
out the United States. The dairy is thoroughly equipped in the most modern and 
progressive manner and one of its famous products is the Glen Tana bottled milk 
for babies, for which they milk three hundred Jersey cows. This was the first 
thoroughly sanitary dairy in Spokane and is considered one of the best, — by many 
regarded as the best — dairy of the Inland Empire. Upon the farm is to be found 
the largest number of springs upon an equal area in the state of Washington, there 
being one hundred and eighty-three upon this tract. There he established the fa- 
mous Glen Tana kennels, and the collie dogs here raised have been shown through- 
out the United States, winning more medals than any dogs shown from any other 
kennels in the United States. Mr. Griffith has largely advertised Spokane in this 
way. He has been an importer of dogs from Scotland and England and his ken- 
nels are among the largest in the United States. They have been removed to 
Tekoa, Washington, since the establishment of the Country Club. Mr. Griffith is 
a lover of horses and owns many fine registered animals. In earlier days he had 
some of the finest horses of the northwest, selling as high as from five to six 
thousand dollars. He organized the Spokane Gentlemen's Driving Club, of which 
he was president, and races were held every Saturday afternoon, which were quite 
an event to which every one looked forward. They were all gentlemen drivers and 
no one could attend except on invitation. In those days A. J. Ross, C. S. Penfield, 
H. G. Stimmel, Justin Leonard and. other prominent early settlers had matinee 
races and drove their own horses, this being a favorite pastime among the early set- 
tlers. Racing continued for five or six years, at which time Tom Jefferson, a horse 
fancier, was very prominent here. 

In addition to his mercantile and farming activities, with their kindred interests, 
Mr. Griffith has been concerned in many activities of a semi-public character. He 
is now a director of the Spokane Interstate Fair and was one of its organisers, as 
well as of the Chamber of Commerce. Of the latter he is now serving as a director 
and he was vice president in the early days when A. A. Newbery was president and 
Mr. Reeves secretary, while their meetings were held in a little room of the Spo- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 205 

kane Hotel building after the fire. Mr. Griffith has always taken a great interest 
in the freight-rate contest which started about twenty years ago, and in behalf of 
the work went to Portland and to San Francisco to take testimony with Senator 
George Turner, an attorney, in rate cases. Fifteen or seventeen years passed be- 
fore the Interstate Commission obtained some concessions and the fight has since 
been kept up until the recent passage of the new freight rate. In the early days 
the most prominent business firms in the town were the Hally, Mason & Marks Com- 
pany and the Benham & Griffith Company. They always took a prominent part in 
all public matters and gave their support to all practical measures for the benefit 
of the city. 

Mr. Griffith was one of the organizers of the Spokane Gun Club and was also 
one of the organizers and is now vice president of the Inland Club. For many 
years he has been a member of the Spokane Club and also of the Spokane Country 
Club. His political allegiance is given to the republican party but the honors and 
emoluments of office have had no attraction for him. 

In September, 1892, in All Saints church, in which they hold membership, Mr. 
Griffith was united in marriage to Miss Charlotte Brown, of Spokane, a daughter 
of George and Louisiana Brown, formerly of Br ant ford, Ontario. Mr. and Mrs. 
Griffith have become parents of a daughter, Tannis, which is an Indian word 
meaning "our daughter." She is now attending school in Stanley Hall, Minne- 
apolis. Mr. Griffith belongs to that class of men who have come to the west well 
equipped with a liberal education and business experience and have recognized the 
opportunities and possibilities before them here. In his business life he has been a 
persistent, resolute and energetic worker. 



WILLIAM CHANDLER GRAY. 

William Chandler Gray is one of the best known men of the west in connec- 
tion with railroad construction and his activities closely allied him with the early 
history of California. All of the important railroad work of an earlier day there was 
done by him and remains now as a monument to his ability. Since coming to 
Washington his labors have been equally valuable as factors in the upbuilding and 
progress of this state and in Montana he has also left the impress of his individu- 
ality by the part which he has taken in its material development. He was one of 
the first men to plant Old Glory at the head of the famous Alder Gulch. His name is 
inseparably interwoven with the web and woof of Spokane's history, for he was 
one of the organizers of the city and county of Spokane and a member of its first 
city council. He thus aided in shaping its formative policy and in laying the 
foundation upon which has been built the present greatness and prosperity of the 
city. While mammoth business enterprises have claimed his attention he has found 
time and opportunity to cooperate in movements looking to the welfare and growth 
of the communities in which he has lived and labored and Spokane owes him much 
as one of her foremost builders. 

Mr. Gray was born in Harmony, Maine, November 17, 1844, a son of James 
and Helen (McNutt) Gray. The father, a native of Vermont, was of Scotch de- 
scent, belonging to a family founded in America prior to the Revolutionary war. 



206 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 



The mother, born in Maine, was of Irish lineage. James Gray conducted business 
for a long period as a manufacturer of carriages at Bangor, Maine, and there passed 
away in 1869 while his wife survived until 1887. In the family were three sons 
and three daughters: William C; Samuel S., who is living at St. Johns, Oregon; 
Columbus, a resident of Hudson, Maine; Fannie, the wife of Frank Mercer, a 
property owner at Spirit Lake, Idaho; Emma, living in the east; and Lavoney, 

now deceased. 

After attending the common schools William C. Gray continued his education 
in the Pacific Business College at San Francisco. He had left the Pine Tree state 
when a small boy and at the age of sixteen had entered the army as a member of 
Company I, Fourteenth Maine Regiment. This was in the fall of 1861 and he 
served for nine months at Augusta, Maine, after which he was sent home on ac- 
count of illness. Later he made his way westward to^ Michigan, where for a time 
he was associated with E. M. Avery in the lumber business. In the winter of 1863 
he crossed the plains and in the spring of the following year went to Virginia 
City, Montana, aiding materially in the development of that rich mining region. 
He helped to make the pole on which was unfurled the first American flag ever 
raised at the head of the famous Alder Gulch. In the fall of 1864 he went to 
California with Stanford and Crocker and assisted in building the old Central 
Pacific Railroad from Sacramento to Salt Lake. He was also engaged in the con- 
struction of the road from Sacramento to Redding and likewise erected the Redding 
Hotel by the depot just before the Modock war. During his connection with rail- 
road work he was assistant superintendent of construction and later was superin- 
tendent under General Strowbridge. He had in charge the building of the railroad 
from Oakland to San Leandro in 1869 and did the excavation work for the ship- 
yards at Oakland Point where the Alameda, El Capitan and the Oakland ferry 
boats were built. At the time of their construction those were the finest ferry 
boats in the world. Mr. Gray also took the superintendency for filling up Reclama- 
tion bay at Potrero, a work that lasted two years and on which one thousand men 
were employed. They filled in sixty acres from Townsend street in San Francisco 
and his work now is and has been for years part of San Francisco's busiest thor- 
oughfares. Mr. Gray also began the building of the Southern Pacific Railroad in 
each direction from Los Angeles and through the city but before completing the 
work had to return to Redding to enter upon work in connection with the hotel. 
He was prominently engaged in railroad construction for fourteen years or until 
1878, when he undertook the gigantic contract of draining fourteen thousand acres 
of swamp land in Shasta county for Senator Boggs, of Colusa, and A. V. Moore, 
of San Francisco. 

Mr. Gray came to Spokane in August, 1878, and erected the first hotel in this 
city where the city hall now stands, remaining as its proprietor for nine years, at 
the end of which he leased it to S. S. Bailey and Mr. Frees, but in 1888 it was 
destroyed by fire. He afterward erected the Windsor Hotel which he rented to 
the same gentlemen until that, too, burned down on the 4th of August, 1889, in the 
big fire which practically wiped out the business district of Spokane on that day. 
After leasing his hotel Mr. Gray purchased a large farm in Stevens county, at 
Gray's Station, which was so named in his honor, being situated on the line of the 
railroad between Springdale and Valley. He spent much of his time there for 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 207 

eleven years, passing his summers on his ranch where he followed farming and 
stock-raising, and mining. 

While a resident of Stevens county Mr. Gray became a candidate for state sen- 
ator on the citizen's ticket. His name had not been printed on the ticket, so he 
devised the plan of using stickers to serve in balloting for him. He was defeated 
by only one vote, holding an extensive vote which plainly indicated his personal 
popularity and the confidence reposed in him. There was much discussion in the 
party at the time. The auditor and others became engaged in a fight about the 
party to be printed first on the ticket. The supreme court ordered the auditor to 
pot Mr. Gray's name on the ticket but he would not do so, claiming that he should 
have had ten-days notice and that as he had only had two he could not comply with 
the order. He was then arrested for contempt of court but won his suit on account 
of the ten-days notice as required by law. It was at that election that Manse, the 
populist candidate, was elected by one vote. 

After disposing of his interests in Stevens county, Mr. Gray came to Spokane 
for the purpose of building six miles of the Spokane & International Railway from 
Summit to Naples, nine miles from Summit to Athol and six miles from Summit 
to Rathdrum. He also built ten miles of the Lewiston branch of the Northern 
Pacific, at which time he was conducting business under the firm name of Gray & 
Chapman, his partner being John W. Chapman. Since then he has built a por- 
tion of the coal road for D. C. Corbin in British Columbia at Crow's Nest Pass. 
This is fourteen miles in length, of which Mr. Gray built half. In the meantime 
he has resided continuously in Spokane, supervising his own investments and affairs 
which are of an extensive and important character. He is now a director of the 
National Bank of Commerce and has other investments and interests. He still 
has a railroad building outfit at Lewiston Junction on the Snake river and will 
probably engage in other railway work. 

In politics Mr. Gray has ever been a stalwart champion of the republican party 
and an active worker in its ranks. He was serving as a member of the city council 
when Spokane and Spokane county were organized. The county of Spokane was 
formed by Captain Wells of Rock Creek and Andrew Lafay of Medical Lake, and 
Mr. Gray was one of the first councilmen appointed by the governor to organize 
the city of Spokane when R. W. Forrest was mayor. While appointment called 
him to the office of councilman for the first term he was later reelected for a second 
terra and four times afterward was chosen by popular suffrage for that position. 
The first city council was composed of: A. M. Cannon, now deceased; Jack Squires, 
who is engaged in mining in British Columbia ; Jean Hyde, living in Santa Bar- 
bara, California; and Mr. Havermale, deceased. At that time roads and bridges 
were built by private subscription, in which manner the roads to Kalispel, Colville 
and Coeur d'Alene were constructed, Mr. Gray being the most liberal contributor 
to the project. He has always been actively and helpfully interested in every 
movement for the upbuilding of the city and district and is now a cooperant factor 
in the work of the Chamber of Commerce in exploiting the advantages of Spokane 
and in furthering its interests. 

In October, 1873, Mr. Gray was married to Miss Clara F. Smiley, a daughter 
of Foster F. and Sarah (Richardson) Smiley. The father was one of the pioneers 
of California and conducted business at Marysville, that state, and made his home 
in Indian Valley. He had been in early life a resident of Maine but had crossed 



208 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

the continent to the Golden state. One of the brothers of Mrs. Gray is W. H. 
Smiley, an attorney at law at Spokane, while another brother in connected with the 
immigration bureau at Seattle and a third brother is in Oroville, California. 

Mr. Gray is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at San Fran- 
cisco, connected with Lodge No. 17, which was the original Odd Fellows organiza- 
tion in that state, meeting in the old temple on Montgomery street, at which time 
Pickering, the original editor of the Call, and Ralston, of the California Bank, were 
both members. A ttfe of marked activity and usefulness has brought William 
Chandler Gray to a prominent position among the business men of the northwest 
and none more rightly deserves the honor and respect accorded him than Mr. Gray. 
No story of fiction contains more interesting chapters than can be found in his life 
record but space forbids an extended account of these. He has met all of the 
hardships and experiences incident to railroad building in a pioneer district and 
his labors have been a most important element in the reclamation and improvement 
of the great west. 



EVAN ENOCH. 



Twenty- four years ago Evan Enoch arrived in Spokane county and he may con- 
gratulate himself on selecting this county as his home for here he has found friends 
and has also accumulated a competency. He is a native of Wales, born at Cardi- 
gan, Aberavon, January 25, 1865, a son of Job and Mary (Charles) Enoch. The 
father was born May 18, 1841, and the mother September 21, 1842. In their fam- 
ily were six children, all of whom are now living, the youngest being thirty-two 
years old. One of the sons is a Congregational minister in Wales. 

Evan Enoch was educated in the common schools of his native country, con- 
tinuing at his studies until fourteen years of age. He then began working on a 
farm but at the age of nineteen, being a young man of ambition, energy and a 
great desire to accomplish something in the world worthy of the name, he emigrated 
to the United States, reaching Dakota, May 10, 1884. He spent three years at 
farm labor and in 1887 came to Spokane and was employed for four years on a 
farm near that city. In 1889 he took up his homestead near Deer Park and two 
years later established his residence upon his farm. Here Mr. Enoch became ac- 
quainted with and attached to Mr. Short and Mr. Crawford and this friendship re- 
sulted in his becoming one of the Short & Crawford Lumber Company, their minds 
all running in the same channel. Afterward the company became the Standard 
Lumber Company and he was elected vice president and director and he is 
taking an active part in the latter concern. These positions he still holds. The 
company is one of the most flourishing organizations of the kind in Spokane county. 
He is also vice president of the First State Bank of Deer Park and owns consid- 
erable property in Deer Park and vicinity. 

On the 23d of January, 1901, Mr. Enoch was married to Miss Alice Hopkins, 
a daughter of Brayton Hopkins, record of whom appears elsewhere in this work- 
To Mr. and Mrs. Enoch five children have been born, Mary E., Grace H., Ruth 
L., Blodwen M. and Alice L. Mr. Enoch takes the interest of an intelligent and 
wide-awake citizen in public affairs and in the selection of competent men for 
office. He votes in support of the republican party and is now serving with gen- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 209 

eral acceptance as councilman of Deer Park. He is a firm believer in the Bible 
and is a consistent member of the Congregational church. Having early become 
imbued with high ideals, he made a favorable start in his contact with the world 
and is known as one of the reliable and straightforward men whose word may be 
implicitly accepted and whose influence is always exerted in behalf of the best 
interests of the community. He believes in the practical application of the Golden 
Rule in all the affairs of life and as he is strictly honorable in his dealings, he 
truly merits the gratifying success with which his efforts have been crowned. 



JARED A. ROCHFORD. 



Jared A. Rochford, who is one of the able representatives of the legal profes- 
sion in Colville, has been a resident of this ,city for the past fourteen years. A 
native of Kankakee, Illinois, his birth occurred on February 16, 1860, his parents 
being Michael and Lydia A. (Bellamy) Rochford. His father, who was a veteran 
of the Civil war, during the first two years of the Rebellion was a member of 
Company I, Michigan Volunteers, but later he joined Company D, First United 
States Cavalry and was an aide-de-camp to General Sheridan. He saw much 
active service, participated in thirty-eight conflicts, among them being many of the 
notable battles of the war. Mr. Rochford passed away in 1894. The mother of 
our subject was a woman of rare culture and education, and a distant relative of 
the well known American author, Edward Bellamy, whose book "Looking Back- 
ward" created quite a sensation about eighteen years ago. Mrs. Rochford was a 
physician and well known in Kansas, where she was actively engaged in the prac- 
tice of her profession until her death in 1908. 

The education of Jared A. Rochford was begun in the public schools of Michi- 
gan but was completed in those of Kansas, to which state he accompanied his par- 
ents, who located there during his early youth. He graduated from the high 
school at Abilene, in 1882, and very soon thereafter took a position with the Santa 
Fe Railroad Company, working for them at intervals for the next three years. At 
the same time he was preparing himself for the legal profession by attending pri- 
vate law classes until admitted to the bar in 1885. Immediately thereafter he 
became associated with John D. Hayes, an attorney of Oberlin and they practiced 
together during the next three years under the firm name of Hayes & Rochford. 
Mr. Rochford severed his connection at the end of that time and came to Washing- 
ton and in the fall of 1888 he located in North Yakima as a member of the firm of 
Rochford, Jones & Newman. Upon his election to the office of prosecuting attor- 
ney of Yakima county in 1890 the partnership was dissolved, but he resumed his 
practice when he withdrew from public life four years later, remaining a resident 
of North Yakima until 1 897. He then removed to Colville and formed a partner- 
ship with Messrs. Nordike and Stayt, their business being conducted under the 
name of Nordike, Rochford & Stayt. Two years later Mr. Rochford withdrew from 
this connection and began practicing alone, which he has ever since continued to do. 
He is an able representative of his profession and during the period of his residence 
here has most efficiently filled the chair of prosecuting attorney of Stevens county, 
having been the incumbent of this office during the years 1907 and 1908. 



210 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

North Yakima was the scene of the marriage of Mr. Rochford, on June 10, 
1894, to Miss Nellie L. Stedman, a daughter of Charles R. Stedman. Five children 
have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Rochford: Claire, who is deceased; Ruth; Ynex; 
Rose M.; and Jared A. They own one of the most beautiful residences in Col- 
ville, over which Mrs. Rochford presides in a most charming manner, graciously 
extending the hospitality of their home to their many friends. 

A stanch democrat in his political views Mr. Rochford was a delegate to the 
state convention in Spokane in 1909 and he has many times represented his district 
at county conventions. He is a worthy exemplar of the Masonic fraternity, being 
a past master of the blue lodge, while he was one of a commission of five sent by 
the Grand Lodge of Washington to the World's Masonic Congress at Chicago in 
1893. He is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and also belongs to 
the Knights of Pythias, being a past chancellor, by courtesy. Mr. Rochford has 
been very successful in his practice and in addition to his fine residence owns the 
ground and building where his office is located. He is held in high regard in Col- 
ville both by reason of his professional ability and because of his high standard 
of citizenship and constant effort to promote the best interests of the town, county 
and state on every possible occasion. 



ADELBERT M. DEWEY 

Adelbert M. Dewey was born in Lewis county, New York, in 1857, the son 
of Milton and Permelia (Riggs) Dewey, his father being a country schoolmaster 
and 'squire of the village in which he lived. At the age of six he moved with his 
parents to Binghamton in the same state, where he attended the public schools un- 
til fourteen years of age, when he was indentured as an apprentice to learn the 
printing and newspaper business in the office of the Broome Republican, being asso- 
ciated with the two men who later organized what is now known as the Associated 
Press. After five years work as apprentice and journeyman, the future Spokane 
business man travelled extensively over the country, working in most of the larger 
cities as a newspaper and job compositor, in both of which he is said to have been 
highly skilled as a workman. Later he settled in the city of Detroit, where he be- 
came the proprietor of a publishing house and edited and published several trade 
and technical journals. 

When quite a young man, Mr. Dewey became an active student and writer on 
economic subjects. This led him to engage in what was at that time called the 
"reform movement," and he was associated with T. V. Powderly and others in 
the Knights of Labor and kindred organizations having for their object the uplift- 
ing of humanity. He edited the Journal of United Labor at Philadelphia, and 
gave to that paper a position second to no other in the economic field, with a 
greater weekly circulation than all others of its class in the United States com- 
bined, reaching more than five hundred thousand persons with each issue. Mr. 
Dewey was also an active official of the Typographical Union for many years, and 
is still a firm believer in the men who do the work of the world, but thinks they 
should organize and meet changing conditions with changed methods, and that the 
workers should do their striking on election day and at the ballot box. 



A. M. DEWEY 



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SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 213 

The temperance reform movement always found an aggressive supporter in 
the student printer, and he was for two years the high chief ruler of the Order of 
Recabites in North America, traveling extensively as a lecturer on temperance and 
other subjects. 

In 1884 Mr. Dewey retired from all these various activities and entered the 
public service at Washington as an expert in the field service of the department of 
labor. His labors brought him to the state of Washington, and he early determined 
to make Spokane his future home. On the occasion of his first visit to the Inland Em- 
pire Mr. Dewey invested heavily in a copper mining prospect in Okanogan county 
and later came here to take over the management of the corporation, purchasing 
a home on Cannon Hill. His activities since coming to Spokane include the promo- 
tion of the Okanogan Electric Railway, the Okanogan Irrigation & Improvement 
Company, the management for five years of the Q. S. Mining Company, besides 
being a director in several other industrial enterprises operating in Spokane. At 
the time of this writing Mr. Dewey is also the proprietor of the Alexandria Hotel, 
a select family hotel in the residence district of Spokane. 

In fraternal circles Mr. Dewey is an active member of the Masonic Order and 
Elks, and is an advocate of the spirit of fraternity as an antidote for the tendency 
of the day toward commercialism in all things. He is a man of family, with a son 
of thirty and a daughter eleven years of age. , 



WILLIAM W. PALMER, 

William W. Palmer is one of the* tobs'tatotial citizens of Bossburg, where he 
has extensive property interests and is also conducting a general mercantile busi- 
mess. He was born in Morgan county, Inttfaha, on, the 26th of February, 1862, 
and is a son of William L. and Esther- (Asher) Palmer. The father passed away 
in 1891, but the mother is still living at the venerable age of seventy- four years. 

When William W. Palmer was a small lad he was taken to Kansas, to whose 
public schools he is indebted for his education. At the age of fifteen his student 
days were terminated and during the succeeding twenty years he worked at farm- 
ing in Missouri, Kansas, Washington and Oregon. He first became a resident of 
Washington in 1882, when he settled in the vicinity of Walla Walla, where he 
resided for two years. At the end of that time he removed to Oregon, and there 
engaged in farming for six years. His next removal was to Spokane, where for 
a year he was identified with the wood* business. In 1896 he located in Clayton, 
this county, and worked in the lumber camps for nine months, when he withdrew 
from this occupation to enter the service of the Spokane Falls & Northern Railroad 
Company. While in their employ he worked in the capacity of section foreman, 
extra gang foreman and roadmaster, all along their line. He gave up the railroad 
service on July 15, 1908, and came to Bossburg, where he has been operating a 
ranch and conducting a general mercantile business ever since. Mr. Palmer has 
been very successful, and since settling here has acquired quite extensive property 
interests. He owns a fine ranch of fifty acres, that is well improved and under 
high cultivation, and some residence and business property in the town. He is 
president of the Palmer Trading Company, the stock of which is all held by him- 



214 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

self and wife and a Mr. Richardson. His rise in the business world is the culmina- 
tion of long years of persistent effort and tireless energy. He has encountered 
many defeats and hardships but he does not belong to the type of mankind whose 
ambition is killed by reverses, but on the contrary they only proved incentives to 
greater effort. 

Bossburg was the scene of Mr. Palmer's marriage to Miss Clara Clowe, a 
daughter of J. W. Clowe, on the 17th of September, 1901, and they have become 
the parents of one daughter, Marjorie, who is attending school. Mrs. Palmer, who 
is a native of Canada, was left an orphan at a very early age, her mother having 
died at her birth, while her father passed away a short time afterward. His death 
occurred in Australia, where he had been commissioned on some official business by 
the British government. She has a brother who is a veteran of the Spanish- Amer- 
ican war. He has extensive interests in China, where for some time he was sta- 
tioned as a vice consul of the United States government, and at present he is inter- 
ested in the American Importing Company, which has headquarters in Peking, 
China. She also has a brother, Robert Clowe, who is a locomotive engineer in 
Australia, living in a suburb of Melbourne. 

Fraternally Mr. Palmer is an Odd Fellow and has passed through all of the 
chairs. At the present time he is financial secretary of Bossburg Lodge, No. 104. 
He takes an active interest in the development of Stevens county, as well as in 
promoting the progress of Bossburg, and is an enthusiastic member of the Commer- 
cial Club. His political views accord with the principles of the republican party, 
and he is now acting as commissioner from the second district of Stevens county, 
having entered upon the duties of this office in 1910. In the same year he was a 
delegate to the state convention at Tacoma, and he has several times represented 
his party at the county conventions. He is one of the estimable citizens of the 
town, who can always be depended upon to meet his obligations in both public and 
private life, as has been manifested during the period of his residence. 



HON. JACOB HOOVER. 



Hon. Jacob Hoover left the impress of his individuality upon the public life 
of Spokane and the state of Washington as an eminent lawyer, a successful banker 
and a public-spirited legislator. Moreover he was numbered among the pioneer 
residents of this city, having come to Spokane in 1882 when this district was 
largely undeveloped and the population of the city numbered but a few hundred. 
He is, however, a western man by birth as well as by training and preference. He 
was born in Washington county, Oregon, February 9, 1846, a son of Jacob and 
Matilda Hoover. His father was one of the earnest residents of the Pacific coast 
who came to this section from the east. He made an overland trip in 1842 — six 
or seven years prior to the time when the discovery of gold in California brought 
so many people to the west. He took up his abode in Washington county, Oregon, 
where he secured a homestead and cultivated the same, carrying on general agri- 
cultural pursuits. Only a comparatively few years before had the expedition of 
Lewis and Clark opened this territory to immigration, and he found here a district 
in which the Indians were far more numerous than the white settlers and in which 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 215 

it seemed that the seeds of civilization had scarcely been planted. Since that time 
members of the Hoover family have been active in promoting the material devel- 
opment and progress of the northwest. 

Jacob Hoover pursued his education in the district schools, but advantages at 
that time were very meager and when he had mastered the branches of learning 
taught in his home district, he sought opportunity elsewhere, going to the Pacific 
University, from which he was graduated with the class of 1866. In 1868 he went 
to Olympia, Washington, where for a short time he engaged in teaching school, and 
during that time among his pupils was the lady who afterward became his wife. 
He regarded school teaching, however, merely as an initial step to other profes- 
sional labor and in preparation for the bar began reading law under the direction 
of the Hon. Elwood Evans, who directed his studies until 1 869, when he was ad- 
mitted to practice at Olympia, Washington. He then opened an office at Steila- 
coom, Washington, where he followed his profession for several years. At the 
same time he became deeply interested in the political situation of the country and 
fearlessly espoused the democratic cause, and upon the party ticket was elected, 
in 1874, to represent Pierce county in the state legislature. That his first term 
received the indorsement of the general public was indicated by his reelection in 
1876, but he did not serve on account of removing from that district. He then 
located in Colfax, Washington, where in 1878 he opened a law office. It was not 
long before he had become prominent as a party leader in that section and in 1880 
was elected to the legislature from Whitman county. His reelection followed in 
1882 but again he failed to serve for a second term because of his removal from 
the state. 

Mr. Hoover turned from politics and the law to give his attention to banking, 
establishing the Colfax Bank in 1880 in partnership with John Burke. After about 
a year, however, they sold out and Mr. Hoover removed to Lewiston, Idaho, where 
he organized the Bank of Lewiston but soon disposed of his interest in that insti- 
tution and in 1882 came to Spokane, where he resumed the practice of law, becom- 
ing junior partner in the firm of Allen & Hoover. Later by the admission of a 
third partner the firm style was changed to Allen, Hoover & Allen, and in that 
connection Mr. Hoover continued as an active representative of the bar until 1886, 
when he again retired from practice and once more entered banking circles as the 
organizer of the Traders' National Bank, of which he became the cashier. In 1888 
he sold his interest in that institution and the following year became the organizer 
of the Exchange National Bank, of which he was president until his death, on the 
11th of July, 1898. 

Mr. Hoover was married at Steilacoom, Washington, September 18, 1875, to 
Miss Ella A. Harman, a daughter of Hill and Bathaline (Clendenning) Harmon, 
tile former a native of Maine and the latter of New Brunswick. The father made 
the long voyage around Cape Horn to Oregon in 1849, settling at Port Gamble on 
Paget Sound, where he engaged in the lumber business. In 1851 his wife came to 
the west by way of the isthmus route. She was the second white woman in the 
Puget Sound terrtiory and Mrs. Hoover has the distinction of being the first white 
woman born on Puget Sound. Mr. and Mrs. Hoover became the parents of three 
children: Bathaline, now the wife of John H. Hemphill, a prominent and well 
known real-estate man of Spokane ; Jacob Wesley, who is engaged in the real-estate 



216 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

business in this city ; and Hill C, of Tacoma, who married Emma Griner, of Buck- 
ley, Washington. There is one grandchild, Margaret Lucille Hemphill. 

Mr. Hoover was prominent in Masonry, having attained the thirty-second de- 
gree of the Scottish Rite. He always remained an active advocate of democratic 
principles and his opinions always carried weight in the councils of his party. In 
addition to his service as a legislator he had served as mayor of Spokane for one 
term, having been elected to that office in 1890. He belonged to the Episcopal 
church, in which he served as senior warden, and in the work of which he took an 
active and helpful interest. He was a man of firm convictions, never faltering in 
his allegiance to what he believed to be right, and his character and reputation 
were above reproach. He greatly enjoyed music and travel and was particularly 
fond of his home and the companionship of friends of kindred tastes and interests. 
He stood as a high type of American manhood and chivalry, exemplifying in his 
life those principles for which the west stands — the west which, in greater degree 
than any other section of the country, judges a man by his individual worth and 
ability. 



MANOAH S. TAYLOR. 



Manoah S. Taylor, a resident of Chewelah, gives his undivided time and atten- 
tion to the cultivation of his ranch, which is located near here. He was born in 
Washington county, Indiana, on October 1, 1841, and is a son of Andrew and 
Juliet (Martin) Taylor, both deceased, the father having passed away in 1860, 
and the mother in 1887. 

The youthful years of Manoah S. Taylor were not distinguished by any unusual 
event or startling occurrence but were passed in the quiet routine characteristic 
of the rural communities. In the acquirement of an education he attended the dis- 
trict schools in the vicinity of his home until he possessed a sufficient understanding 
of the common branches to enable him to assume the heavier responsibilities of 
life. At the age of eighteen years he began farming in his native state, continuing 
to follow this vocation there until 1866, when he removed to Kansas. After engag- 
ing in agricultural pursuits there for ten years, he again started westward, in 
January, 1877, Washington being his destination on this occasion. The trip across 
the country at that period was long and difficult and also fraught with many dangers 
and hardships, but Mr. Taylor was too accustomed to pioneering to be deterred by 
such possibilities, and so started on his westward journey, coming by way of Cali- 
fornia. He arrived in Walla Walla, July 1, 1877, and on July 1, 1879, filed on one 
hundred and sixty acres of land, twenty miles northwest of Medical Lake, devot- 
ing his entire time and energy to the cultivation of this property until October, 
1910, when he disposed of his homestead and came 'to Chewelah. Here he owns a 
very pleasant residence and five acres of land in town- and a ranch near by that 
he is cultivating. Mr. Taylor has been very successful in his various undertakings 
and has acquired considerable property throughout this part of the state. He has 
made a careful study of orcharding and is thoroughly familiar with all fruits 
adapted to the soil and climatic conditions of this section of the country, and has 
a considerable part of his land planted to orchards. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 217 

Salem, Indiana, was the scene of Mr. Taylor's marriage on the 16th of March, 
1865, to Miss Sarah C. Weiler, a daughter of Isaac Weiler. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Taylor there were born three children: Mary, James and Hattie, all of whom are 
now deceased. 

Mr. Taylor, who is a past member of the Good Templars, gives his political 
support to the prohibition party, thus expressing his views on the liquor question. 
He was a member of the Grange and is now a member of the Farmers' Union of 
Chewelah. Both he and Mrs. Taylor are active members of the Christian church, 
having been converted and joining that church before their marriage, and they 
take an earnest and helpful interest in the work. During the period of his resi- 
dence in the state he has traded quite heavily in real estate, feeling assurred of the 
promising future Washington is now beginning to experience. The place near Med- 
ical Lake which he homesteaded is one of the points of interest in the Inland Em- 
pire, as it has belonged to the holdings of three different counties. The original 
county was Stevens; after the first division it was Spokane county and after the 
second division it became Lincoln county. Since he first located here thirty-five 
years ago, Mr. Taylor has been the interested observer of a wonderful example of 
empire building, Washington having during that time developed not only into one 
of the great states of the west but of the nation, its natural resources and wonderful 
possibilities both agriculturally and industrially just becoming recognized. 



ALFRED JONES. 



Alfred Jones is a member of the firm of Jones & Levesque, architects of Spokane, 
and his career has been successful chiefly by reason of his natural ability and his 
thorough insight into the profession in which he embarked at the outset of his 
business life. He was born in Chicago, Illinois, July 26, 1872, his parents being 
David and Margaret (Pearson) Jones. The father was a brick manufacturer of 
prominence in that city, where he continued in business until 1890, and then re- 
tired to enjoy the fruits of his former toil. His last days were spent in Spokane, 
where he passed away in 1909 at the age of eighty-one years, having long survived 
his wife who had died many years before. 

As a public-school student in Chicago, Alfred Jones mastered the branches of 
learning, which are considered indispensable elements in the attainment of suc- 
cess in life and when sixteen years of age, made his start in the business world, 
entering the employ of W. W. Boyington & Company, architects, who ranked with 
the leading firms in that line of business in Chicago. His efficiency and capabil- 
ity are indicated by the fact that he remained with that house for six years, after 
which he spent two years with similar concerns in Chicago. Ambitious to make 
more rapid advancement he started in business for himself and soon afterward 
determined to try his fortune in the west. Reaching Spokane he opened an office 
in August, 1899, and has since followed his profession in this city, making con- 
tinuous advancement by reason of his natural and acquired ability which has 
brought him into important relations with the profession that he has always fol- 
lowed. Evidences of his skill are seen in the Kemp & Heberts store, the Kempis 
apartments, the Espanola apartments, the Fairmont hotel, the Frederick and the 



218 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Tokyo apartments, all of which he designed, together with many beautiful resi- 
dences including the homes of Charles White, Ortho Dorman and many others. 
Mr. Jones also designed and was financially interested in the company that in- 
stituted the first moving picture showhouse in Spokane. They operated under the 
name of the Spokane Scenic Theater Company and opened the Scenic Theater at 
First avenue and Stevens street. Subsequently they built the Empress Theater. 
Mr. Jones was secretary and treasurer of the company and later promoted another 
organization known as the Arcade Amusement Company of which he was president. 
This company built the Arcade Theater on Riverside avenue. On the 1st of January, 
1910, Mr. Jones formed a partnership with Joseph T. Levesque and the firm of 
Jones & Levesque today occupies a very prominent position among the leading 
architects of the city. 

Mr. Jones resides at East 917 Eighth avenue. On the 6th of November, 1896, 
in Chicago, he married Lillian V. Ashfield, a daughter of Henry and Sarah Ashfield, 
of this city. They now have two sons, Alfred B. and Harold B. Mr. Jones is 
identified with a number of fraternal organizations including the Highlanders, 
of which his wife is also a member, the Woodmen of the World and the Tribe of 
Ben Hur. He does not seek public office nor has he ever taken an active part in 
political affairs yet he is not remiss in the duties of citizenship and displays a 
public spirit in his cooperation with many measures for the public good. 



CLEMMENS AUGUST TRIMBORN. 

Clemmens August Trimborn, well known as a prominent business man of Spo- 
kane, with offices at No. 832 Old National Bank building, was born June 19, 
1863, in the city of Cologne, Germany. Well descended and well bred, he received 
from his ancestry qualities and characteristics that have constituted salient fea- 
tures in his steady progress throughout life. He came to America in 1886, a young 
man of twenty-three years. He had been educated in leading colleges of Ger- 
many and France for his parents, Cornelius Baldwin and Antoinette (Pauli) Trim- 
born, were anxious that he should have every possible advantage in an educational 
way. His father was a distinguished citizen of Germany and a member of the 
German parliament or reichstag, being a recognized leader of the center or Cath- 
olic party. The same seat in the German government is now filled by a brother 
of our subject. 

Reading and reports made Clemmens A. Trimborn conversant with the op- 
portunities and advantages of the new world and in 1886, after making a trip 
around the world, he established his home in New York, where for a year he oc- 
cupied a position as foreign correspondent in connection with an exporting house. 
He then went to Oakland, Nebraska, where he remained for six months and dur- 
ing the succeeding year was in San Francisco. He afterward spent two years in 
Japan and India and then returned to Europe but soon again made his way to 
the new world and once more located at Oakland, Nebraska, where he entered 
the banking business in 1890 under the firm name of Wells & Trimborn. He was 
thus associated with the financial interests of that place until May, 1904, when 
he returned to his native city where he resided for a year and a half. On the 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 219 

expiration of that period he came directly to Spokane, arriving in November, 1906, 
and daring the five years of his residence here he has engaged in the investment 
business. His interests are of such a nature that he contributes to public pro- 
gress and the development of the country as well as to individual success by the 
conduct of a growing and important business. 

Mr. Trimborn was married in Oakland, California, on the 4th of April, 1891, 
to Miss Barbara Scholl, a daughter of Michael and Susanna Scholl, the former a 
California pioneer of 1849. A portrait of him adorns the Pioneers Hall of that 
city and with the work of early development and progress in California he was 
closely associated through the period when order was just being brought out of 
chaos and when the improvement of the state was in its formative period. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Trimborn are: Cornelia Mildred, born in 1892; Felice 
Antoinette, 1895; and Francisca Elizabeth, 1902. The family reside at No. 
846 Over Bluff road in an attractive home which Mr. Trimborn erected in 1910. 

Mr. Trimborn is a member of the Spokane Club and is well known in this city 
where business activity and ability and attractive social qualities have gained 
for him high regard and warm friendships. He is a man of liberal culture whose 
extensive travels have brought him broad knowledge and stored his mind with 
many interesting incidents and reminiscences. These enrich his conversation and 
from a well-stored mind he brings a pointed anecdote or apt illustration. His 
friends — and they are many — find him a most genial companion and his pop- 
ularity increases as the circle of his acquaintance widens. 



FRANK M. ROTHROCK. 

Macaulay says that the history of a country is best told in the lives of its 
people and in this delineation of the progress of Washington there is much of 
intense interest, for there are many evidences of the possibilities for successful 
attainment in the life record of the citizens of Spokane and other districts of the 
state. In her natural resources the northwest has offered many opportunities to 
the ambitious, determined man and many alert, energetic citizens have taken ad- 
vantage of these opportunities and from a humble position in the financial world 
have worked their way steadily upward to the plane of affluence. Of this class 
Frank M. Rothrock is a notable example. He is closely associated with indus- 
trial and financial interests as the president of the Rothrock Land & Live Stock 
Company, secretary of the Tamarack & Chesapeake Mining Company, the Hercules 
Mining Company, and a director of the Exchange National Bank, of Spokane 
and the Wallace National Bank of Wallace, Idaho. 

He was born at Wyandotte Cave, Indiana, July 29, 1870, a son of Harrison 
W. and Alice (Miles) Rothrock. His education was acquired in the public schools 
of his native town and after spending the first twenty-four years of his life in the 
middle west he determined to seek his fortune upon the Pacific coast and in 1894 
took up his abode in Wallace, Idaho, where he engaged in the butchering business. 
He also became interested in mining operations and success attended his efforts. 
Since 1904 he has made his home in Spokane, whither he came with his family, 
having since maintained his residence here. He is now extensively engaged in 



220 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

raising stock, having a large stock ranch near Ellensburg, in Kittitas county. 
The rich valley lands offer excellent inducements to the stockman and Mr. 
Rothrock has placed upon his ranch high grades of sheep, cattle, hogs and 
horses, for which he finds a ready sale on the market. By far the most important 
branch of his business constitutes sheep breeding and raising. This enterprise is 
conducted under the firm name of the Rothrock Land & Live Stock Company, of 
which he is the president and which includes in the scope of its business real- 
estate deals. Mr. Rothrock is also the president of the Washington Wool Grower*' 
Association and takes a very active part in the promotion of live stock interests 
of any kind. For a number of years he has been connected with the Spokane 
Chamber of Commerce and takes great interest in the expansion of its objects. 
In the management of his business affairs he has seemed to know every possible 
opportunity and to so direct his affairs that at each point in his career the utmost 
possibility for successful accomplishment at that point has been attained. 

On the 26th of June, 1895, Mr. Rothrock was married, at Wallace, Idaho, to 
Miss Minnie E. Snyder, a daughter of Jesse and Frances E. (Mauck) Snyder, 
of Medimont, Idaho. They now have two children, Zena, born February 15, 1901, 
and F. Wallace, born June 12, 1903. Mr. Rothrock takes no part in politics or 
in club life and, in fact, is a man of most retiring disposition, shunning publicity 
of all kinds, preferring to let his life work speak in its results. 



LOUIS ZIEGLER. 



Louis Ziegler, a man who "stood foursquare to every wind that blows," a man 
whose nobility of character and integrity of action placed him above the majority of 
his fellows, was for many years a resident of the northwest and continuously con- 
tributed to its development not only in a material way but in that upbuilding of 
high ideals which constitutes the real basis of a country's progress. He was born 
at Kettrick in Rhenish Bavaria, Germany, July 17, 1887, and was in his fifteenth 
year when he accompanied his parents on the long voyage across the Atlantic 
The family home was established in Ohio and some time afterward Louis Ziegler 
went from there to Maysville, Kentucky, where he learned the wagon-maker's 
trade. Three years were spent south of Mason and Dixon's line, after which he 
returned to Ohio and for two years followed his trade in Russellville. He then 
went to Bloomington, Illinois, where he worked at wagon making until 1 859 and in 
that year he established business on his own account, opening the first wagon and 
plow manufactory at Chenoa, McLean county, Illinois. Success attended the new 
enterprise and in 1865 he was enabled to invest six thousand dollars in the erection 
of a new factory building, but disaster overtook him in 1870 in its destruction by 
fire. His losses were so great that he was not able at once to resume business 
and for two years he occupied the position of sergeant at arms in the Illinois state 
senate. He then returned to his native land, which had in the meantime, by the 
fortunes of the Franco-Prussian war, become incorporated in the newly formed 
German empire. 

The year 1878 again witnessed Mr. Ziegler's arrival in Illinois, where he once 
more embarked in business, forming a partnership with John Dehner for the pur- 



LOUIS ZIEGLER 



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{Rtf-lC LIBRARY 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 223 

chase of the Chenoa flour mill, which they operated until 1876, when again his sav- 
ings were sacrificed to the fire god. The following year he erected a new flour 
mill in Chenoa but again he suffered heavily through Are in March, 1878, leaving 
him without the means for reconstruction. He spent the next seventeen months in 
the settlement of his affairs and in the conduct of a grain trade at Chenoa. While 
his business did not prosper, owing to no fault of his own, he rose steadily in the 
regard of his fellow townsmen as a man of reliability, worthy of confidence and 
regard, and in appreciation of his personal qualities they called him to public 
office. He served as justice of the peace from 1861 until 1865 and in 1869 was 
elected mayor, giving to the city a businesslike, progressive administration that 
led to his reelection for a second term. He also became prominent in Masonic 
circles there, joining Chenoa Lodge, No. 292, F. & A. M., of which he was elected 
master in 1861, thus serving for twelve years. He became the first high priest of 
Chenoa Chapter, No. 148, R. A. M., and filled the position for five years, beginning 
in 1870, and again after an interval. He joined Yates City Consistory, A. F. & 
A. M., of Peoria, and from 1862 until his departure from the state was a member* of 
the grand lodge of Illinois, of which he served as senior grand warden in 1878-9. 
In political circles, too, Mr. Ziegler made his presence felt. In an address de- 
livered at the time of his death, John Arthur, at one time grand master of the 
Masonic lodge of Washington, said of Mr. Ziegler: "In the state of Illinois, 
amongst a population almost wholly American by nativity, the young German 
loomed into prominence as a thorough/ strident of ' public questions and a forceful 
advocate of his views and sentiments: . He' had. diligently studied the English lan- 
guage and the historians, poets, orators, philosophers and publicists who wrote 
and spoke in it. He had come to* speak- at-. without a perceptible trace of foreign 
accent. His power as a logical' exponent of tepriblican principles, aims and pol- 
icies attracted attention; and his friendship was cultivated and valued by such 
great chiefs of that party as Senator Shelby M. Cullom, General John A. Logan, 
Governor Richard Oglesby and General John McNulty, who had singled him out 
as one of the rising leaders of the party in those strenuous days when only strong 
men forged to the front; indeed, Brother Ziegler was by nature, temperament and 
conscious power quite unfitted to be a follower anywhere or in any cause." 

On the 25th of December, 1862, occurred the marriage of Louis Ziegler and 
Miss Margaret Jane Sample, a lady of rare excellence and beauty of character who 
belonged to a prominent Illinois family. They became the parents of three children 
but William Henry is the only son and the only one now living. The daughter, Jen- 
nie Louise, died only a few months after her marriage, and Frederika Louisa died 
in March, 1 872, at the age of five years. 

When fire had three times laid waste his property at Chenoa, Mr. Ziegler re- 
solved to try his fortune elsewhere and came to the northwest, arriving at Spokane 
Falls in August, 1879. Here he at once made and carried out plans for entering 
into business life thus providing for his family, and at the same time he affiliated 
with the Masonic organization of Spokane, joining Spokane Lodge, which was then 
under dispensation. With the granting of its charter he became its first worshipful 
master and during the greater part of his after life he was a prominent member 
of the grand lodge of this state, serving in various offices. He was elected to the 
position of grand marshal and when the grand lodge convened for the first time in 
Spokane, which was still known as Spokane Falls, June 4, 1884, he was elected 



224 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

deputy grand master. In 1885, at the meeting of the grand lodge in Tacoma, he 
was chosen grand master. That he was a man of eloquence and had great love for 
his adopted home in the northwest is indicated by words which he uttered on that 
occasion, speaking of the Puget Sound as "a place of exquisite beauty and delight, 
one of the most lovely inland seas upon the earth, teeming with abundance of 
delicious fishes and all kinds of molluscan delicacies of rarest flavor. No people on 
earth," he continued, "are so especially favored by munificent nature as our people 
who are vouchsafed homes on this delightful sea. Upon the bosom of these placid 
waters ride the ships of all nations, taking and bringing the products of the earth 
for barter and exchange. But if we raise our eyes and look, we will behold, on our 
right, the mighty Cascade range, with fir-clad hills and snow-capped mountains 
piercing the clouds, with heads of perpetual ice, forming a formidable barrier, 
which separates this magnificent Mediterranean of the Pacific from our Inland 
Empire of most fertile fields, where the husbandman reaps the richest of rewards 
for honest toil." 

*He was reelected grand master and on the 1st of June, 1887, opened in Van- 
couver the thirteenth annual communication of the grand lodge. A splendid and 
scholarly rhapsody on the Columbia river, flowing at their feet, makes the foreword 
of his message a veritable classic. In fervent and glowing language he follows the 
great river's course from the dark forests and snow-clad mountains of British 
Columbia into Idaho, Washington and Oregon, and finds it emblematical of the 
varied duties of human life. "Taking its way," he says, "through the winding 
and intricate labyrinths which mark the course of human events, and through 
which all men are destined to pass, — by aid of the clue of reason and understand- 
ing, if we but persevere in the proper discharge of our duties, we shall emerge 
from the mysterious recesses of intellectual darkness and enter that state of light 
and wisdom which is bestowed as an inheritance of perpetual keeping on those who 
are faithful to every trust and obedient to the laws and duties of true manhood." 
Throughout all the years of his connection with Masonry he cherished a most 
lofty conception of the order, its purposes and its work. 

Mr. Ziegler remained throughout his life a student of the classics, an associate 
of the master minds of all ages. Again we quote from the address of Mr. Arthur, 
who said: "Louis Ziegler never completely rallied from the shock and the grief 
caused by his wife's death. If man was ever spoiled by the assiduous, unremitting 
care and thoughtful attentions and services of a loving and devoted wife, he was 
that man; and when she left him he felt very much alone in the world and very 
helpless in his own well equipped home. His old strong, aggressive spirit grad- 
ually left him; he often said that he was lagging superfluous on the stage; Reed 
and Haller and other intimate friends of bygone days had passed to the realms 
beyond; a new generation had sprung up and willingly assumed the burdens for- 
merly borne by himself and his friends and associates; the city in which he had for 
years known every man, woman and child was now filled with strange faces from 
all parts of the world ; he had (among the very few) saved all his property from the 
general wreck of the panic years, 1898-1897, and had well-nigh discharged all of 
the erstwhile heavy incumbrances upon it; his son had taken his place in the active 
management of affairs; he himself had nothing to do but while away the hours in 
the silent company of his favorite authors, whose merits, beauties and philosophy 
his neighbors were too busy to consider or discuss with him ; he viewed with horror 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 225 

the very possibility of becoming a useless and decrepit old man, detailing his aches 
and pains to an unsympathetic world ; he felt that his life work had been success- 
fully and satisfactorily done and that he ought not to remain to cumber the earth; 
and so, in the splendid young city where we are holding this annual communication, 
which he had nursed in its infancy and zealously and ably assisted in developing 
from a hamlet of a couple of hundred persons to a commercial mart having a popu- 
lation exceeding one hundred and fifteen thousand, Louis Ziegler, grand master of 
Masons in Washington from June 4, 1885, to June 8, 1887, resigned his soul to the 
Grand Architect of the universe at the hour of 8:50 o'clock in the afternoon of 
Sunday, January 15, 1911, after an illness of ten days. * * * In one of his 
letters to me from Germany, Brother Ziegler says: 'I am here in the land of Wil- 
helm, Bismarck, Luther, Goethe, Schiller and Friedrich der Grosse and hosts of 
other famous men. It is indeed interesting in the greatest degree. As you know, 
I am not particularly bound to any country or people but have a hearty apprecia- 
tion of all/ This last expression is a true index to his exceptional broadmindedness 
and his rare exemption from national bias cr sectarian prejudices. He was the 
friend of all peoples and of all religions. When the Jesuit missionaries from the 
Colville Indian reservation, in the days before railroad communication was estab- 
lished, came, weary, worn and dust-laden, to Spokane Falls for the necessary pro- 
visions and funds, it was to the home of Louis Ziegler, the German Lutheran, that 
they first betook themselves ; there they found hearty welcome and good cheer and 
remained until their mission was accomplished; and from that generous and hos- 
pitable home they never went away empty-handed. 

"At the funeral of Mrs. Ziegler three years ago I was impressed with the 
manifestly sincere grief of the Catholic priests who attended the beautifully simple 
ceremonies at the residence, and with the large attendance of the Roman Catholics 
of Spokane ; and I made inquiry as to the cause. Everybody was able to tell me. 
The scene was reproduced at his own funeral; and as I repeated the Masonic ser- 
vice of sorrow in the same place, the members of the ancient church were among 
the most deeply affected mourners. Many of them expressed to me afterward 
their profound appreciation of the sublimity and grandeur of our ritual and their 
love and admiration for their departed friend. 

"On previous visits to the Ziegler home I had the pleasure of meeting there the 
Jewish rabbi, whose learning and ability were highly prized by Brother Ziegler 
and who, I found, was a frequent visitor and showed in every way that he knew 
himself to be among warm and trusted friends. Everyone who liked to talk of the 
higher things of life found delight in that home. Brother Ziegler had studied 
with deepest interest the works of the great religious masters of all ages and 
climes; — he could almost 

Behold each mighty shade reveal'd to sight, 

The Bactrian, Samian sage, and all who taught the right. 

"His memory to the last was uncommonly retentive and accurate; and he had 
at his fingers' ends the contents of his extensive and well selected library. A 
stranger hearing him in the discussion of religious, philosophical, literary, poetical 
or historic subjects would be sure to conclude that Brother Ziegler belonged to one 



226 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

of the learned professions and could not all his life have been an active business 
man ; but like our great merchant, Alexander T. Stewart, who read a portion of Hor- 
ace's Odes every morning before going to his store; George Grote, the historian of 
Greece; Samuel Rogers, the poet; and Sir John Lubbock, the philosopher and 
scientist — all three of whom were bankers — Brother Ziegler did not allow the 
exactions of business to absorb and monopolize his intellectual activity and powers. 

"It will readily be understood that a man who steadily cultivated his mind on 
those high lines and was of massive build and dominating personality, was a 
formidable antagonist in this grand lodge and that he generally had his way. 

"He was a veritable Rupert of debate and a bulwark of old-fashioned Masonic 
principles. Withal he was an able and sagacious business man. As soon as he 
could close his affairs in Illinois after the loss of his flouring mill by fire, he came, 
in August, 1879, to Washington territory and sought the wheat-growing country of 
the Walla Walla valley; but after seeing the little village which was growing up 
beside the mighty cataracts of the Spokane river, he decided that the potential 
motive power of those cataracts would in time attract capital and industries and 
compel the rise of an important commercial center; and here he started in the 
hardware business and laid the foundations of a fortune. He retired from store- 
keeping in 1886. After the destructive fire of 1889, which swept the business dis- 
trict of the young city, and the fourth from which he suffered, he was the first 
man to start a brick building; and the Ziegler block still stands as a testimony to 
his confidence and his foresight. As might be expected from a man of his calibre, 
he was a generous, gracious and forbearing landlord. No bill for rent was ever 
presented to a tenant. The arrears might run for months, and no allusion was 
made to them. Nobody asked for a written lease; Brother Ziegler's word that the 
tenant could stay as long as he wished was known by everybody to be as good as 
a bond. For over twenty years the same man has been the janitor of the block; 
and the engineer and the yardman have held their positions for over eight years. 
They all feel more like the retainers of a feudal chieftain of old than latter-day 
employes. Indeed, there was in Brother Ziegler a good deal of the spirit of the 
feudal lord. His home belonged to everybody, and it was sacred to hospitality. 
He delighted to have the friends and neighbors around him and to make them 
happy. Proud of Lord Bolingbroke's close friendship, Alexander Pope exclaims: 

'Here St. John mingles with my friendly bowl 
The feast of reason and the flow of soul/ 

So it was at the Ziegler home ; it was entertainment of the lofty kind when kindred 
spirits gathered there; and the brighter they were, the more highly did they priie 
the remarkable intellectual resources of their host. 

"In an address which I had the privilege of delivering to you in this city in 
June, 1906, on our deeply beloved grand secretary, Thomas Milburne Reed, I 
adverted in these words to a circumstance which you will pardon me for recalling: 
'Another wish very dear to his heart was fulfilled. Fifteen or twenty years before, 
a fraternal compact was made between three past grand masters of Washington: 
Colonel Granville O. Haller, U. S. A., of Seattle; Hon. Louis Ziegler, of Spokane 
(past senior grand warden of the grand lodge of Illinois) ; and Hon. Thomas Mil- 
burne Reed, of Olympia, that one or other of the survivors should conduct and 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 227 

perform the Masonic ceremony at the burial of the departed. Brother Haller 
passed away first, and Brother Ziegler officiated. Brother Reed followed next. 
When we informed Grand Master Miller of the compact, he gracefully and gen- 
erously invited Brother Ziegler to take his place and conduct at the grave the 
Masonic ceremonies over the remains of his dear and departed friend. The mag 
nincent attendance of Masons from all corners of Washington will not soon forget 
the words of philosophy, love and eulogy so touchingly pronounced on that occasion 
by the last survivor of the three parties to the compact. They were worthy of 
Reed and worthy of Ziegler. Par nobile fratrum.' 

"With the remains of our dear friend consigned to the tomb, a similar compact 
was entered into between Brother Ziegler and myself. When I saw that his end 
was approaching, I apprised Grand Master Neterer of the compact. Upon learn- 
ing of Brother Ziegler's death, and with that fine courtesy and warm Masonic 
spirit so eminently characteristic of him, our grand master promptly appointed me 
as his special deputy to convene the grand lodge at Spokane and conduct the 
Masonic burial services over the remains of our departed brother. On January 
19th we buried him with grand lodge honors. 

"Thus passed away a Mason of the old school and a character of classic mould 
and proportions. Louis Ziegler possessed in high degree the virile qualities, mental 
equipment and moral courage which go to make leaders of men. He was one of 
the most earnest, vigorous and highly gifted of our grand masters, and he made 
upon Washington Masonry an impression that will not soon be effaced. Peace 
to his ashes !" 



JAMES P. McGOLDRICK. 

James P. McGoldrick is the president of the McGoldrick Lumber Company 
and as such a representative of the industry which has constituted the largest 
source of revenue to the northwest. He was born at Dubuque, Iowa, December 
17, 1859, his parents being Patrick and Mary McGoldrick, both of whom were 
natives of Ireland, whence they came to America in 1837, making their way west- 
ward to Iowa. The father engaged in the hotel business until 1867, when he re- 
moved with his family to Stillwater, Minnesota. There he turned his attention 
to the lumber business and became one of the pioneer citizens and business men 
of that district. The household numbered three sons and three daughters. 

The usual experiences of the school boy came to James P. McGoldrick who 
in the acquirement of his education passed through consecutive grades until grad- 
uated from the high school of Stillwater, Minnesota, in 1878. He began business 
life as the local reporter for the St. Paul Globe and in 1880 went to the city of 
St Paul where he entered the employ of the lumber firm of C. A. Smith & Com- 
pany as sales manager but resigned that position after a year, to enter upon a 
similar connection with the firm of Walker, Judd & Veazie, with whom he re- 
mained until 1885. He then became manager for the Jefferson & Kasson Com- 
pany, with whom he remained until January 1, 1900. All through this period he 
entertained the hope of one day being able to engage in business on his own ac- 
count and at length he felt that his experience and his careful expenditure justi- 



228 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

fied him in starting upon an independent venture. Accordingly he organized the 
McGoldrick Lumber Company with headquarters at Minneapolis and as a natural 
sequence of the fact that a large portion of the lumber which he handled came from 
eastern Washington, in the spring of 1906, he removed to Spokane and organized 
the McGoldrick Lumber Company of this city, purchasing the mill site and yard 
of A. M. Fox & Company. They have since greatly enlarged their plant and im- 
proved it in many particulars until it is one of the biggest and best equipped in 
the northwest. The yards and mill properties cover sixty acres and are situated 
on the Spokane river almost in the heart of the city. The sawmill and planer 
now have a capacity of forty-five million feet per year as compared with fifteen 
million at the time of Mr. McGoldrick's purchase, showing that the business has 
increased threefold. The capacity of the dry sheds is about five million feet. Most 
of their standing timber is in the Panhandle of Idaho and consists of Idaho white 
western soft pine, fir and larch. The volume of the business has continuously in- 
creased and shipments are now made as far east as Pennsylvania and New York. 
Mr. McGoldrick now concentrates his energies upon his western interests, having 
sold out in Minneapolis when 'he removed to Spokane, and at the present writing, 
in addition to being president of the McGoldrick Lumber Company, he is also 
president of the Adams River Lumber Company of Chase, British Columbia, and 
of the Royal Lumber Company of Nelson, British Columbia, and is a director of the 
Old National Bank of Spokane, the Union Trust & Savings Bank and the Western 
Union Life Insurance Company. 

On the 15th of August, 1888, Mr. McGoldrick was married at St. Paul, Min- 
nesota, to Miss Eliza McArdle, a daughter of Thomas and Mary McArdle of that 
city. The five children born of this marriage are: Edward A., proprietor of the 
Empire Garage of Spokane; Carroll J. and Milton T., pursuing their education; 
and Margaret and Helen, at home. The family have recently removed to a beauti- 
ful new home which Mr. McGoldrick has erected on Rockwood boulevard. He 
holds membership with the Knights of Columbus, with the Spokane and the In- 
land Clubs and is a trustee of the Chamber of Commerce and now chairman of 
its publicity committee. In this connection he is doing much to expand the re- 
sources and promote the interests of the city. He is truly a western man in spirit, 
with firm faith in the future of this great and growing country and his own record 
shows that his faith has been well placed. He possesses a progressive spirit ruled 
by intelligence and good judgment, a deep earnestness impelled and fostered by in- 
domitable perseverance and a native justice which expresses itself in correct prin- 
ciple and practice. 



JAMES GLENDINNING. 

In his later years James Glendinning filled the office of superintendent of forest 
reserve for Idaho, under appointment of President McKinley, although the last 
few months of his life were spent in retirement. He became a resident of Spokane, 
in 1899, when appointed to the position designated, and through the period of his 
residence here won the kindly regard and good-will of a large majority of his 
fellow citizens. He was often found in those circles where intelligent men were 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 229 

gathered in the discussion of significant and vital questions and they found in him 
an associate whose thought went far beyond the superficial and whose opinions 
were worthy of attention. Mr. Glendinning was a native of Scotland, his birth 
having occurred in Dumfriesshire, July 81, 1844. His parents were Robert and 
Margaret (Blacklock) Glendinning, also natives of the land of hills and heather. 
His education was acquired in the schools of Scotland and at the age of twenty 
years, his parents having died in the meantime, he crossed the Atlantic to New 
York citv, where he lived with a brother and continued his education as a student 
in the Cooper Institute, from which in due course of time he was graduated. Be- 
lieving the west held better opportunities than could be secured in the older and 
more conservative east, he turned his face toward the setting sun, traveling by rail 
as far as Leavenworth, Kansas. There he outfitted with a six-mule team and 
started overland toward the Pacific coast, journeying over mountain and plain until 
he reached Virginia City, Montana, where he resided for a short time. In 1865, 
attracted by the gold discoveries, he left that state for Idaho, establishing his home 
at Salmon, where in connection with his brother-in-law, George L. Shoup, who was 
afterward senator from Idaho, he entered into merchandising and mining, in which 
he continued until 1884. The undertaking, capably and honorably conducted, won 
substantial success and Mr. Glendinning also became largely interested in the cattle 
industry. He recognized good business opportunities and improved them to the 
best advantage and so directed his energies that substantial results accrued. In 
1884 he left Salmon, Idaho, and went to Salt Lake City, where he entered the 
hardware business, continuing there for about fourteen years. He served as mayor 
of that city for one term, and also as a member of the Utah legislature and was 
prominent and active in its public life, his spirit of enterprise being ever exercised 
for the benefit of the community with which he was identified. In 1 899 he came to 
Spokane and was appointed superintendent of the forest reserve for Idaho by 
President McKinley. Well fitted for the position owing to his knowledge of the 
northwest, he was continued therein until he retired a short time prior to his death, 
which occurred March 28, 1902. 

On the 21st or October, 1872, in Salmon, Idaho, Mr. Glendinning was united 
in marriage to Miss Margaret Shoup, a daughter of Henry and Ann (McCain) 
Shoup. The father was a farmer near Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Glendinning were born seven children. Malcolm, now city editor of the 
Spokesman's Review, married Miss Veda Morton, of The Dalles, Oregon, and 
they have one child, Eleanor Blacklock. Elizabeth is the wife of Marion Cum- 
mings, of Spokane. Robert, now located at Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico, married 
Margaret Donnellan, of Salt Lake City, and they have two children: Virginia M. 
and Bonita Roberta. Bradwardine is the wife of Lee Ward, of Washington, Penn- 
sylvania, and they have one son, James G. ' Arthur is chief clerk to the superin- 
tendent of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company at Spokane. Margaret is at 
home, and Halbert Glendinning is deceased. 

In his political views Mr. Glendinning was a republican active and prominent 
in the party, his opinions carrying weight in its local councils, while his efforts 
contributed to its success. He attended the Episcopal church and he attained the 
thirty-second degree in Masonry, that fraternity finding in him an exemplary rep- 
resentative, while he was one of the charter members of the Salt Lake City Lodge 
of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He also belonged to various other 



230 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

orders when in Salt Lake City. Among his characteristics was his love of literature 
and he was a wide reader and assimilated what he read, storing his mind with 
much useful and interesting information. He appreciated comradeship and held 
friendship inviolable and, wherever he went, he won the good-will and kindly re- 
gard of those with whom he came in contact because his interest in his fellowmen 
was deep and sincere and his pleasure in their society genuine. The news of his 
death was received with deep regret on the part of many and his own household 
lost a devoted and loving husband and father. 



THOMAS A. MOAR. 



Thomas A. Moar is a successful man whose intelligently directed industry and 
unfaltering perseverance have constituted the rounds of the ladder on which he has 
climbed to the plain of affluence. He was born on Prince Edward Island, November 
8, 1844. His father George Moar, was a native of the Orkney islands, on the north 
coast of Scotland, and emigrated to Prince Edward Island in the year 1808, and 
married Jane M. H. Norton in 1825. She was born in Londonderry, Ireland, in 
1806, and emigrated in the year 1819 with her father, the late John Norton, Esq. 

Thomas A. Moar was one of a family of twelve, of whom six are still living. 
He received his education at Brudenell River, Prince Edward Island, and on hav- 
ing attained his majority he struck out for himself working at the carpenter trade 
for a short time. Not being satisfied with that work he removed to Newfoundland, 
where he went into business with his brother who owned a schooner of eighty tons 
in which he traded and fished between Newfoundland and Labrador, making yearly 
trips up the St. Lawrence river to Quebec, where supplies were purchased. 

During the six years spent in that isolated and primitive country he had many 
novel experiences, being called upon to perform the marriage ceremony, to christen 
the infants and bury the dead. Becoming dissatisfied with his occupation in the 
coasting trade, he decided to go west and in the year 1878 arrived in Chicago, 
where for a year he worked at his trade. Still heeding the call of the west, the 
succeeding year found him in Denver, but being fascinated by the glowing accounts 
of California and the Pacific coast, the following year found him in San Francisco, 
where for a number of years he managed work for one of the largest contractors 
in the city, finally becoming a leading contractor on his own account. But the 
spirit of adventure was not yet subdued and the year 1889 saw him headed north. 
Arriving in Spokane, November 8, of that year, he was immediately given a crew 
of men and put to work on the Auditorium Theater which was then one of the finest 
buildings west of Chicago. 

In 1895 he was united in marriage to Miss Almeda J. Bell, daughter of John 
Bell, of Prince Edward Island, and of Scotch descent. They have one son, T. 
Edgerton Moar, who is now a student in the high school. 

As a contractor Mr. Moar ranks among the best in the state, his advice being 
sought by many prospective investors. Spokane and the state of Washington have 
always appealed to him. When he came to Spokane it was but a village, but to him 
its location and surroundings appeared advantageous and promising as no others. 
This brought him to the conclusion to cast his career and life with that of 



THOMAS A. MOAR 



r 



M v* wi^ 



I 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 233 

the country and its people with the result that his expectations have been more 
than realized. Comparing the village of 1889 with the magnificent city of today, he 
feels proud to have been connected with the development of this giant young city 
and predicts for it a grand future. 



WILLIAM STONE McCREA. 

In a history of the business interests of Spokane mention should be made of 
William Stone McCrea, the senior partner in the insurance and loan firm of Mc- 
Crea & Merry weather, and also an officer in various corporations which are prov- 
ing effective elements in the city's growth and in the development of this part of 
the state. His birth occurred at Belgrave, Huron county, Ontario, Canada, Au- 
gust 13, 1870, his parents being John and Jane (Pierce) McCrea, who in 1883 re- 
moved to Rathdrum, Idaho, where the father engaged in business as a timber con- 
tractor and also conducted a general merchandise store. Four years later, how- 
ever, he was killed in a railroad accident, after which the mother returned to 
Ontario with her children, eight in all. There they are now living with the ex- 
ception of William Stone McCrea and one brother, Robert McCrea, who resides 
at Sandpoint, Idaho, where he is filXingpthe "position 6$ county auditor. 

At the usual age William Stone; ^M^C^a became ajpupil in the public schools 
of Ontario and later attended the high school at Sault St. Marie. Following the 
removal of the family to Idaho he assisted his father in the store at Rathdrum 
until after the latter 's death, when he* returned with the mother to Canada, but 
the spirit of the west was in his veins and, believing that greater opportunities 
could be secured on the Pacific coast, he made his way to Spokane in 1889, at 
that time a young man of about nineteen years. Here he entered the employ of 
the Spokane Loan, Trust & Savings Bank, having charge of the insurance de- 
partment until the great fire which in that year largely wiped out the city. He 
next accepted the position of bookkeeper with the firm of Ross & McLean, insur- 
ance agents, with whom he continued until 1892, when he entered into partner- 
ship with Walter G. Merryweather under the firm name of McCrea & Merry- 
weather and opened a general fire insurance, loan and real-estate office. The busi- 
ness has grown rapidly and substantially for both members of the firm are popular 
and capable and now their business is, without doubt, the largest of the kind in 
the city. Mr. McCrea like his partner is thoroughly informed concerning realty 
values, all property that is upon the market and the indications which point to 
an advance in price. In handling property for himself and for clients he has 
made judicious investments, bringing gratifying financial returns. He has by no 
means, however, confined his efforts to one undertaking but has extended his labors* 
into various other fields and a number of important business concerns have profited 
by the soundness of his judgment and his keen discrimination, for as a director 
he has voice in the management of the Spokane & Eastern Trust Company, the 
Washington Water Power Company, the Prairie Development Company and also 
in the Bay View Town Site & Water Company, of which he is the secretary. 

That his efforts are not extended entirely for his own benefit is shown in the 
v«l n— is 



234 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

active work which he has done in support of the projects put forth for the benefit 
of the city by the Chamber* of Commerce, of which he is a director. 

The home life of Mr. McCrea presents to him many attractions. He was mar- 
ried on the 29th of October, 1895, to Miss Katharine Brook, a daughter of Henry 
and Kesia Brook, of this city. They now have three children, Katharine, Mary 
Helen and William Sylvester. The family reside at No. 725 South Maple street 
in a pleasant home erected by Mr. McCrea in 1900. They attend the Vincent 
Methodist Episcopal church and Mr. McCrea is prominent in Masonry, belonging 
to Oriental Lodge, No. 74, F. & A. M. ; Cataract Commandery, No. 3, K. T.; 
Oriental Consistory, No. 2, S. P. R. S.; and El Katif Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., 
while the honor of the thirty-third degree has been conferred upon him. He is also 
identified with Samaritan Lodge, No. 52, I. O. O. F.; Red Cross Lodge, No. 28, 
K. P.; and Spokane Lodge, No. 228, B. P. O. E. He finds entertainment and 
recreation through his membership in the Rotary and Spokane Clubs, the Spokane 
Amateur Athletic Club and the Inland Club. He is a typical business man of the 
present day, alert and enterprising, determined and therefore prosperous, and in 
the midst of his important and growing business interests he finds time for the 
social pleasures of life which preserve in him an even balance. 



DAN L. WEAVER. 



Dan L. Weaver is the junior partner of the firm of -Rosenhaupt & Weaver and 
as such needs no introduction to the readers of this volume. The firm for seven- 
teen years has engaged in the real-estate and insurance business and has been in- 
terested in mining and theatrical affairs. The different departments of the busi- 
ness are proving profitable sources of income, owing to the capable management 
and sound judgment of the partners. Mr. Weaver has spent his entire life upon 
the Pacific coast, his birth having occurred at Stockton, California, October 21, 
1871, his parents being Henry W. and Ellen Gertrude (Cooke) Weaver. His 
father was an extensive landowner and very active in the public life of San 
Joaquin county, where he filled the office of county commissioner and held other 
important public positions. 

At the usual age Dan L. Weaver was sent to the public schools and eventually 
became a high-school pupil in Stockton, where he resided until April, 1890, when 
at the age of eighteen years he came to Spokane. Here he at once entered into 
connection with real-estate interests and the fire insurance business and has contin- 
ued in these lines to the present day, covering a period of twenty-one years. In 
1896 the firm of Rosenhaupt & Weaver was formed and they have since been 
prominent in business circles, conducting a general real-estate business, at the 
same time handling valuable mining property. In the theatrical world they are 
well known, for they control the Auditorium, the Spokane and the Empress theaters, 
Mr. Weaver personally managing the Spokane theater for a period of five years. 
In ail business affairs his keen discrimination has told him when, where and how 
to put forth his energies so as to accomplish the best results and in the manage- 
ment of business affairs his judgment is seldom, if ever, at fault even in the 
slightest degree. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 235 

On the 25th of November, 1909, Mr. Weaver was married to Miss Harriet 
Young, a daughter of William H. Young, of Butte, Montana. Both are well known 
socially in this city and Mr. Weaver belongs to Elks Lodge, No. 228, and to the 
Spokane Amateur Athletic Club. He has been particularly prominent in the club 
life here and has been a member and director of the Spokane Club for many years. 
He was appointed treasurer of the building committee, which took charge of the 
erection of the new clubhouse which has recently been opened. This is the finest 
and most expensive clubhouse in the northwest and Mr. Weaver has been per- 
sonally responsible for the success of the undertaking. His efforts are deserving 
of the admiration and praise of his fellow club members, among whom he is very 
popular, having a circle of friends almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaint- 
ance. 



DANIEL M. DRUMHELLER. 

The history of the west, in all the phases of its life and development from the 
mining camp to the modern city, is familiar to Daniel M. Drumheller. He was 
but thirteen years of age when he took up his abode on the Pacific coast and in 
the intervening years has been a witness of every feature of growth and progress 
here, from the time when the lawlessness of the early mining days was checked 
by the determined purpose of men who sought to plant the seeds of civilization 
on the western frontier and utilize the many natural resources of the country for 
their own business advancement and for the welfare and progress of the district 
at large. Spokane numbers him among her earliest citizens, for he dates his resi- 
dence here from 1880. At the present writing he is the vice president of the 
Traders National Bank and has important property and business interests in this 
citv and elsewhere in the northwest. 

Mr. Drumheller was born in Gallatin, Sumner county, Tennessee, March 
25, 1841, a son of Nicholas Lafayette and Eliza (Hollis) Drumheller. He was in 
his infancy when the family removed to Springfield, Missouri, where the father 
died in 1844, his son Daniel being then but three years of age. The latter pur- 
sued his education in the public schools of Springfield to the age of thirteen and 
then went to California to join an uncle who was engaged in the stock-raising 
business in Colusa county in the Sacramento valley. This was in 1854. The first 
wild excitement over the discovery of gold had quieted somewhat and people were 
directing their attention to more conservative business interests and to the future 
development of the country. In 1859 Mr. Drumheller entered the employ of the 
Ben Holladay Pony Express, which at that time carried the mail from St. Joseph, 
Missouri, to Sacramento, and at the same time he furnished supplies to the com- 
pany. There are few men of the west who have not at some time made effort to 
realize a fortune in the mines and Mr. Drumheller was no exception to the rule. 
When the Comstock lode was discovered at Virginia City he joined the rush and 
for a time was engaged in mining there. In the spring of 1861, however, he 
directed his attention to the north and on the 16th of June of that year arrived in 
Walla Walla. Soon afterward he engaged in the cattle business, which took him 
all over the northwest and into British Columbia. In addition to packing he engaged 



236 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

in trading and drove his herds of cattle from place to place until they were dis- 
posed of. Thus his time passed until 1877, when he took up his abode in what is 
known as the Crab Creek country, near Ritzville, Adams county, where he en- 
gaged in the breeding and raising of cattle. In 1880 he came to Spokane, which 
he made his permanent location and, entering the wholesale meat business, formed 
a partnership with W. J. Wilson under the firm style of Wilson & Drumheller. 
His business developed along substantial lines, owing to his long familiarity with 
the trade, and he also became closely identified with the growth and material 
development of Spokane. He was one of the principal organizers of the Traders 
National Bank and has been the only incumbent in the position of vice president. 
His banking activities have also brought him into connection with the Union Trust 
& Savings Bank of Spokane as a trustee, and he is also vice president of the 
Davenport National Bank of Davenport, Washington, and a director of the Ex- 
change National Bank of Reardan, Washington. During the period of his resi- 
dence here he has been one of the heaviest operators in real estate in Spokane, 
opening up many additions to the city, and his property investments here at the 
present time are very extensive. 

Mr. Drumheller has been married twice. On the 8th of October, 1868, he 
wedded Susan Warren, of Walla Walla, who died in Spokane, May 8, 1888. She 
was a direct descendant of General Joseph . Warren of Revolutionary fame. Unto 
this marriage there were born three children: Jerome L., of Spokane, who is men- 
tioned elsewhere in this volume; Albert S., living in the Yakima valley; and Lulu 
H., who resides with her father. In January, 1890, Mr. Drumheller was again 
married, his second union being with Nellie Powell, a daughter of Professor L. J. 
Powell, president of the University of Washington. They have four children: 
Daniel M., a student in the University of California; Burrell V., who is in Al- 
berta, Canada; Fred H. and Joseph, both of whom are in school. The family 
reside in a beautiful home at the corner of Sixth avenue and Cedar street, which 
Mr. Drumheller erected in 1906. He is a Mason, belonging to Spokane Lodge, 
No. 84, F. & A. M.; Spokane Chapter, No. 2, R. A. M.; and Cataract Commandery, 
No. S, K. T. He also holds membership in Spokane Lodge, No. 228, B. P. O. E. 
In politics he has been a lifelong democrat, active in the work of the party, and 
as mayor of Spokane in 1892 gave to the city a practical and businesslike admin- 
istration. He is one of the best known men of the city, respected and honored for 
his conservative methods and sound business judgment. He has met the obliga- 
tions of life with the confidence and courage that come of conscious personal 
ability, right conception of things and an habitual regard for what is best in the 
exercise of human activities. 



PATRICK S. BYRNE. 



Patrick S. Byrne, president of the Byrne Investment Company of Spokane, 
has for twenty-one years been associated with real-estate interests and the develop- 
ment and growth of the city. He was born in New Canaan, Connecticut, June 8, 
1855, and when a lad of five years went to New Rochelle, New York, in company 
with his parents, William and Catherine (Sheedy) Byrne, both of whom were na- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 237 

tives of Ireland, who emigrated to America in early life. The father engaged in 
general merchandising at New Rochelle, New York, on a small scale and during 
his youthful days Patrick S. Byrne aided in the work of the store when not pur- 
suing his education as a student in the public and parochial schools. A few years 
sufficed to convince him that he preferred other pursuits than work behind the 
counter and in 1880 he entered upon the study of medicine in the Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College of New York city, from which he was graduated with the class 
of 1884. Thus well equipped for the active work of the profession he entered 
upon practice in Yonkers, New York. He still holds membership with the West- 
chester county (New York) Medical Society and the Jenkins Medical Society of 
Yonkers, New York, and is also a member of the Spokane Medical Society. 

Dr. Byrne has resided continuously in Spokane since 1889, in which year in 
connection with John H. Lidgerwood and Judge David Glass he purchased Lidger- 
wood Park. He has since been identified with the development of property and with 
real-estate operations and is now conducting business under the corporation name 
of the Byrne Investment Company, of which he is president. He has made a 
close study of realty values and in his operations has done much to improve and 
develop the district of the city where his holdings lie. 

In 1888 Dr. Byrne was united in marriage to Miss Ida Gomm, who was born 
in Savannah, Georgia, a daughter of Adolphus and Louise (Tuthill) Gomm. They 
became the parents of six children, of whom five are yet living: Catherine L., who 
was born in Yonkers, New York, and who is now the wife of Thomas J. Smith, 
assistant postmaster of Spokane; Mary, who was born in Spokane and is now 
deceased; Ruth, who was born in this city and is at home; Cornelius, William and 
Patrick S., all of whom are natives of this city and have attended Gonzaga Col- 
lege, while the daughters have been students in the Academy of the Holy Name. 

Dr. Byrne is a member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, the Knights of 
Columbus and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His political allegiance 
is given to the democratic party and while living in the east he was appointed on 
the insane board of Westchester county. Since coming to the northwest he has 
served as county physician, is now a member of the park board and at one time 
was mayor of Spokane, in which position he gave to the city a businesslike and 
public-spirited administration, seeking its welfare and progress along needed lines 
of reform and improvement. 



ROBERT LEWIS RUTTER. 

Robert Lewis Rutter, one of Spokane's capitalists who in the management of 
important financial interests has displayed ready mastery of the intricate and dif- 
ficult questions which arise in the management of important business concerns, is 
now president of the western Union Life Insurance Company, with headquarters at 
Spokane* His efforts, however, are by no means confined to one undertaking but 
have proven a helpful factor in the successful management of other interests. Mr. 
Rutter was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, January 81, 1867, his parents 
being Levi T. and Sally (Penrose) Rutter, the former a sugar manufacturer. 
Liberal educational advantages were accorded the soif, who was graduated from the 



238 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

University of Pennsylvania in 1886 with the Bachelor of Science degree. He 
there made his initial step in the commercial world in connection with the wool 
commission business of Justice Bateman & Company, of Philadelphia. Gradually 
he has worked his way upward, advancing step by step, each point of progress 
bringing him a wider outlook and better opportunities. His ability as an organizer 
and manager is well recognized and thus he has been called to positions of execu- 
tive control in connection with important interests. He is now the president of 
the Western Union Life Insurance Company; vice president of the Spokane & 
Eastern Trust Company; president of the First State Bank of St. Joe, Idaho; a 
director of the Idaho & Washington Northern Railroad ; and a director of the Title 
Guaranty Company. He finds ready solution for difficult financial problems and 
when one avenue of activity seems closed, carves out another path which leads to 
the goal for which he is striving. 

On the 21st of February, 1892, in Walla Walla, Washington, Mr. R utter was 
united in marriage to Miss Isabel Page, a daughter of Thomas Page, county audi- 
tor of Walla Walla county, and a granddaughter of Governor Gale, of Oregon. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rutter have four children: Frances, Robert L., Carol Penrose and 
Sally Perkins. The family attend the Episcopal church and Mr. Rutter also belongs 
to the Zeta Psi, the Masonic fraternity and the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks. He likewise belongs to the Spokane Club, the Spokane Country Club, the 
Spokane Athletic Association and the Spokane Tennis Club and greatly enjoys all 
athletic and manly outdoor sports. He is a republican of the insurgent order, be- 
ing a believer in the independent policy that does not recognize the domination of 
boss leadership but seeks to make the party the expression of public opinion. His 
interest, however, is not confined to business or to things of pleasure. He has 
been a cooperant factor in many projects for the public good and a generous con- 
tributor to benevolent work. For ten years he was president of St. Luke's Hos- 
pital and was formerly treasurer of All Saints Cathedral. He is thoroughly loyal 
to the interests of the northwest, recognizing the fact that here history is being 
made and that countless opportunities are offered for the upbuilding of a splendid 
inland empire. 



C. HERBERT MOORE. 



C. Herbert Moore is numbered among Spokane's representative men and one 
whose life record should be a stimulus to the effort and ambition of others. A 
prominent New York financier once said: "If you do not succeed, do not place 
the blame upon circumstance or environment but where it belongs — upon yourself. 
If you would win success you must be willing to pay the price of earnest, self- 
denying effort." With a realization of this fact, Mr. Moore entered upon his 
business career and as the years have passed by, he closely watched for oppor- 
tunities which he ever improved to the best advantage. The methods which he 
pursued challenged the admiration and respect of those with whom he was asso- 
ciated and the energy which he displayed won him that recognition which always 
results in promotion. Thus gradually step by step he advanced until Spokane 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 239 

numbers him among her capitalists, and moreover, accords him honor as a citizen 
whose labors have been effective forces in improvement, reform and progress here. 

Mr. Moore was born in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, April 80, 1855, his parents 
being Benjamin F. and Mary A. (Conklin) Moore, the latter a representative of 
the famous Conklin family of Long Island, New York. The father was a pioneer 
of Wisconsin and removed to that state from Maine in 1841. His business inter- 
ests were of a varied nature and included the building of the first steamboat that 
sailed on Lake Winnebago and the Fox river. He was also engaged in the lumber 
business, and the extent and importance of his activities made him well known 
throughout the entire state. 

After mastering the early branches of learning taught in the public schools of 
Wisconsin, C. Herbert Moore spent a year as a student in Hellmuth College, at 
London, Ontario. He then returned to his native city, where he became associated 
with his father and brother in the manufacture of wagons and carriages, continu- 
ing in business for twelve years. Gradually he gained comprehensive knowledge 
of business methods and his expanding powers and talents were manifest in the 
success which came to him in the organization and conduct of important interests 
in the west. He made his way to the Pacific coast in 1887 and spent the winter 
in southern California, but in the spring of 1888 came to Spokane, entering into 
active connection with its business interests as the secretary and treasurer of the 
Spokane Cable Company and also of the Spokane Street Railway Company, the 
latter being acquired from Cannon & Browne, the original franchise holders. At 
this time the cars were operated with horse power, but under the direction of Mr. 
Moore and his associates electricity was introduced as the motive power and many 
other improvements made. He was associated with the two companies until 1893, 
when he disposed of his holdings and concentrated his attention upon other inter- 
ests. He became one of the original stockholders in the Holly-Mason Hardware 
Company and also the Grote-Rankin Company, of which he was secretary for two 
years. For a time he was cashier of the Spokane Hotel and for a period of five 
years was associated with Finch & Campbell, mine owners. The business affairs 
with which he has been associated have prospered, owing in no small degree to his 
ability, keen discernment and progressive spirit, and his labors have at all times 
been an element in public progress as well as individual prosperity. 

On the 3d of October, 1878, at Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, Mr. Moore was united 
in marriage to Miss Jennie S. Galloway, a daughter of Edwin H. and Maria H. 
Galloway, who were pioneer residents of the state. Mr. and Mrs. Moore reside at 
No. 207 Eighth avenue, in an attractive home, which he erected thirteen years ago. 
They are well known in the social circles of the city and the hospitality of the 
best homes of Spokane is freely accorded them. 

Mr. Moore is identified with no clubs or fraternities but is active in matters 
of citizenship and at all times cooperates readily, earnestly and helpfully in mat- 
ters which have contributed to the general welfare and upbuilding of Spokane. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party and upon its ticket he was 
elected in 1907 to the office of mayor. No ambition for political preferment led 
him to accept this office but an earnest desire to serve the people, and one act, if 
no other, of his administration will stand out for all time as a service of signal 
benefit to the city — the closing of its dance halls. Other official labors, however, 
are commendable, for he gave to the city a businesslike and progressive admin- 



240 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

istration. He was instrumental in the establishment of Natatorium Park as a pri- 
vate enterprise while connected with the street railways, but later sold this to the 
company and today it is one of the finest parks in the northwest. He was likewise 
largely responsible in interesting the Washington water power and traction officials 
and a few prominent landowners in donating to the city the tract of land that is 
now the beautiful Manito Park. Many other tangible evidences of his devotion to 
Spokane's welfare might be cited. These, however, are sufficient to indicate his 
deep interest in the city, the cause of which he champions with a contagious en- 
thusiasm. He stands as a high type of citizenship of the west and his business 
record indicates what may be accomplished when with a will, to do and to dare, 
the individual sets himself resolutely to the tasks of life and lets no opportunity 
pass by unheeded. 



EDWARD O'SHEA. 



The military experience of Edward O'Shea constitutes a most interesting 
chapter in his life history, which has at length brought him into close connections 
with financial interests in Spokane as the president of the Spokane Savings & 
Loan Society. He was born in Limerick, Ireland, July 12, 1847, and acquired 
his early education in the schools of that city. He came to America in 1865 with 
his parents and their family, being at that time a youth of eighteen years. Im- 
mediately afterward he joined the regular army, enlisting in Company G of the 
Second Battalion, Thirteenth United States Infantry. He saw about eight months' 
active service in the Civil war and, continuing with the army, was from 1866 until 
1869 in North and South Dakota, participating in the Indian warfare that was 
being constantly waged on the frontier. From 1870 until 1872 he was in southern 
Arizona, campaigning against the Apache Indians under General Stoneman and 
General Crook. The Apaches have ever been recognized as among the most wily 
of the red tribes and this required a method of warfare in which the ordinary sol- 
dier is not usually trained. He cannot meet his foe face to face in the open but 
must constantly be on the watch for a skulking enemy that uses every available 
tree or stone for shelter and employs the methods of surprise and treachery to 
overcome his foe. At length Mr. O'Shea was transferred to the Department of 
the Columbia, with which he continued from 1872 until 1884. For twelve years 
being stationed most of the time at Old Fort Colville and Vancouver, Washington, 
with the Twenty-first Infantry, and during the uprising of the Bannock and Piute 
Indians in 1878 he took part in the campaign, participating in the battle of Uma- 
tilla on the 13th of July of that year. In that engagement the Indians were de- 
feated and turned back. Mr. O'Shea served on the staff of General Evan Miles 
and was recommended in general orders for a medal of honor for distinguished 
services in carrying orders under fire of the enemy. In 1884 he was transferred 
to the Department of the Platte and stationed at Sidney, Nebraska, as sergeant 
major of the Twenty-first Infantry until congress established a new grade of post 
quartermasters, when he was promoted to that rank and transferred to the quarter- 
master's department, serving from 1884 until 1887. He was for a part of the time 
at Fort Sidney, Nebraska, and the remainder of the time at Fort Riley, Kansas, 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 241 

where he had charge of the construction of the new cavalry and artillery schools. 
His health there became impaired and, failing to secure relief, he resigned from 
the service in May, 1887, with the rank of post quartermaster sergeant. 

Mr. O'Shea at once came to Spokane with the intention of taking up his abode 
in the city but soon afterward received appointment from President Cleveland as 
post trader and Postmaster at Fort Spokane, whither he went, there conducting a 
general merchandise business and also engaging in contract work for the United 
States government until the outbreak of the Spanish- American war in 1898, at 
which time the war department abandoned this post. On account of the educational 
advantages which he could secure in Spokane for his children, he decided to remove 
to this city and was thereafter engaged in the real-estate and . insurance business 
nntil 1909, when he retired. He has, however, important investments, as is in- 
dicated by the fact that he is president of the Spokane Savings & Loan Society 
and a director in the Traders National Bank. 

On the 19th of May, 1879, Mr. O'Shea was married at Vancouver, Washing- 
ton, to Miss Mary A. Crommey and they now have two children: Edward J.> of 
Spokane; and Mary Catherine. Since 1880 he has been a member of the Ancient 
Order of Hibernians, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and also belongs 
to the Knights of Columbus, in which for two terms he has been grand knight. 
He holds membership in St. Aloysius Roman Catholic church and takes an active 
interest in its welfare. His life covers a varied and interesting experience, which, 
if written in detail, would furnish many a chapter of thrilling interest. He well 
merits the rest that is now his, because of his long and untiring devotion to his 
adopted country as a representative of its military interests. 



SAMUEL GLASGOW. 



Samuel Glasgow is secretary and treasurer of the Centennial Mill Company, the 
largest enterprise of the kind in the state, and its development is attributable in 
no small degree to his efforts and business discernment. There is no esoteric phase 
in his life history, the secret of his success being found in his close application, 
earnest purpose and unfaltering industry. These qualities have brought him pros- 
perity and have placed him in a conspicuous and honorable position among the 
leading business men of Spokane. He was a young man of about twenty-three 
years when he came to the northwest, his birth having occurred in Laporte, In- 
diana, October 16, 1858. His parents were Hugh and Nancy J. Glasgow, the 
former a successful farmer and stock-raiser. 

At the usual age the son began his education in the public schools and through 
the periods of vacation assisted in the work of the home farm, early recognizing 
the value of industry and determination as factors for successful accomplishment 
in the business world. He felt that the limits and opportunities of farm life were 
somewhat circumscribed, and wishing to enter a broader field of labor, he left 
home and accepted a position in the freight department of the Chicago, Rock Island 
& Pacific Railroad, at Council Bluffs, Iowa. After a few years, however, he de- 
cided that still better advantages could be obtained in the far west and in the 
spring of 1882 arrived in Spokane, where he has since made his home. He found 



242 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

here a small town of comparatively little commercial or industrial importance, yet 
he recognized its advantageous situation, and with people in the west and its fu- 
ture he identified his interests with the growing little city. For the first two years 
he was employed as a clerk in a general store and later obtained his milling ex- 
perience through four years' service as an employe in the Clarke & Curtis mill. 
Finding in this a congenial occupation and one which promised substantial results, 
Mr. Glasgow used the capital which he had saved from his former earnings in the 
development of a business which was established under the name of the Centennial 
Mill Company, his partners in this enterprise being Moritz Thomsen and George 
Pahl. They erected a mill and the business increased rapidly as the country be- 
came more and more thickly settled. Today theirs is the largest business of the 
kind in the state, for they not only operate the Spokane mill but have eleven others 
situated in various parts of Washington. Mr. Thomsen, who is president of the 
company, now makes his home in Seattle and looks after the branch of the busi- 
ness there, while Mr. Glasgow manages the home office, bending his energies to ad- 
ministrative direction and executive control. 

On the 7th of August, 1887, Mr. Glasgow was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
J. McLeod, of San Francisco, California, and they now have one daughter, Ethel 
Leonora Glasgow, who resides with her parents at the Westminster Hotel. With 
appreciation for the high and commendable purposes upon which the fraternal 
organizations have been founded, Mr. Glasgow is connected with Tyrian Lodge, 
No. 96, F. & A. M. ; Oriental Consistory, No. 2, S. P. R. S.; Cataract Commandery, 
No. 8, K.T.; El Katif Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S.; Imperial Lodge, No. 184, I. 6. 
O. F.; and Spokane Lodge, No. 228, B. P. O. E. He is also a member of the 
Spokane Club. He has never taken active part in politics, or held public office, yet 
he is ready at all times to do anything for the advancement of the city and has 
been a cooperant factor in many movements which have been followed by tangible 
results for the progress and upbuilding of Spokane. Moreover, he is one of the 
most popular residents of the city because of his sterling worth and his unfeigned 
cordiality. He is at all times appreciative of good qualities in others and in his 
own life has given proof of the Emersonian philosophy, that the way to win a friend 
is to be one. 



JOHN W. WITHEROP. 



John W. Witherop, a Spokane capitalist whose whole business career has dis- 
played the utmost fearlessness, capability and initiative, was for a long period con- 
nected with the development of the oil fields of Pennsylvania, maintaining an in- 
dependent position in opposition to the methods of the trust. He was born in 
Titusville, Pennsylvania, September 29, 1860, his parents being Peter Titus and 
Olivia J. (Barnsdall) Witherop. His family were among the pioneers in the oper- 
ation of the oil fields of Pennsylvania, owning and drilling the second completed 
oil well in the world, for it was at Titusville that oil was first discovered. In that 
district John W. Witherop was reared and early had the opportunity to witness 
the development of a great industry, for his father continued to produce oil for 
many years. 



JOHN IV. WITHEROP 



r" 









SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 245 

His own interest in the business was thus stimulated, and after the acquirement 
of his education he turned his attention to that field of activity. In his youthful 
days he was a student in th^ Peekskill Military Academy of Peekskill, New York, 
graduating as adjutant of the battalion, and in the Buchtel College of Akron, Ohio. 
He next pursued a law course in the University of Pennsylvania — and was vice- 
president of the class of 1881, — in order that he might have the benefits of a legal 
training in his business, for already the oil interests had become sharply con- 
tested and efforts were being made toward a consolidation which would crush out 
the individual producers and refiners. 

Following his graduation, and admission to the bar of Philadelphia, John W. 
Witherop returned at once to Titusville, where he became a member of the firm 
of Rice, Robinson & Witherop and began producing and refining oil. His partners 
were also men of experience in the business and from the outset the firm became 
recognized as leading factors in the development of the oil fields and in the control 
of the trade. This was in 1881. The following year the Standard Oil Trust was 
organized, and so important had the firm of Rice, Robinson & Witherop become 
that they were offered every inducement to join the newly organized corporation; 
but Mr. Witherop, who had the decisive voice in the management of the business, 
determined to remain independent and for many years successfully fought the trust 
in both the domestic and the foreign trade. 

During the period Mr. Witherop was president of the Independent Oil Refin- 
er's Association of Titusville, Pennsylvania, and as the, head of this association 
and as a member of the firm of Rice, Robinson' & Wittierop* he prosecuted the fight 
against rebates which the railroads we je '"fclvihg* fo the Standard Oil trust, and at 
the same time exacting from the independents excessive rates for transportation to 
seaboard. Such was the condition of qff airs' \vhen, he, undertook this great cause, 
but Mr. Witherop was equal to the occasion and single-handed he fought the rail- 
roads for their discrimination in favor of the, Standard, and for a fair chance and 
square deal for the independents, and he won, as usual. He not only obtained for 
the independent refiners greatly more reasonable rates, but he stopped the rebat- 
ing to the Standard, and on this fairer basis of rates the independent oil refiners 
have ever since competed favorably to themselves with the trust, and owe their 
continued existence, to a very great extent, today to John W. Witherop. There are 
many other cases that he fought out with the Standard trust, and fought well and 
won. One being when the trust tried to freeze out Mr. Witherop's firm in Buffalo, 
bat in a short time he brought the trust to terms, and the business of the inde- 
pendents was put on a profitable basis. This and many other fights he won despite 
all the efforts of the trust magnates to either force the independent oil refiners into 
the combination or put them out of business. At length, however, his health failed 
him and in 1891 he sold his oil interests to his partners and in 1892 came to Spo- 
kane, where he has during the past twenty years, with unremitting action and de- 
termination, exerted his lifelong tendency of curbing the unlawful movements of 
the corporate powers. 

Mr. Witherop was one of the pioneers in the great mining industry of the 
northwest, and as early as the year 1898 he penetrated the wilds of the mountains 
of Washington, Idaho, Oregon and British Columbia, riding on the back of a 
"cayuse" over the old Indian trails, searching for some of the mineral wealth con- 
tained in those vast fields of opportunity. In the early history of the Rossland 



246 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Camp, in British Columbia, Mr. Witherop was one of the large owners of the 
famous Josie mine, and was vice president and a trustee of the company then own- 
ing that property. The Josie adjoins the great Le Roi mine, and is now oper- 
ated by the Le Roi Company, a British corporation. Mr. Witherop owns valuable 
and extensive mining interests in various parts of the northwest, and he is a large 
owner of real estate in Spokane and elsewhere, his most recent purchase being the 
Elks' Temple, which is one of the largest and handsomest blocks in the heart of 
the business section of the city. 

On the 29th of September, 1885, occurred the marriage of Mr. Witherop and 
Miss Belle Rose Andrews, a daughter of William H. and Rose (Eddy) Andrews, of 
Titusville, Pennsylvania. Her father was for years a prominent figure in the re- 
publican party of that state and for a long period served in the state senate and as 
chairman of the republican state committee of Pennsylvania. For some years he 
has resided in New Mexico, from which territory he is now a delegate to congress. 
Mr. Witherop has never become actively engaged in politics, nor has he sought nor 
held public office. He prefers the quiet of home life, and the association of a select 
circle of friends. His residence for eighteen years has been at West 2480 Pacific 
avenue. 



HOMER J. SHINN. 



Homer J. Shinn as the president of the H. J. Shinn Company, of Spokane, is 
at the head of the largest commission and fruit-shipping business in the Inland 
Empire and has demonstrated his initiative spirit and executive force in the es- 
tablishment, management and control of this undertaking. He was born at Quincy, 
Illinois, June 10, 1865, his parents being James and Elizabeth (Reeder) Shinn, 
who, leaving the middle west in 1880, came with their family to the Pacific coast, 
traveling by stage from Wallula Junction, which was then the terminus of the 
railroad. Spokane was their destination and soon after their arrival the father 
made arrangements, whereby he became engaged in stock-raising in Whitman 
county. He afterward returned to the city, where he established a window, door 
and sash manufactory which was conducted under the name of the Spokane Manu- 
facturing Company. He was one of the pioneers of the northwest and one of the 
first to engage in this line of business in the Inland Empire, his industrial and com- 
mercial activity adding much to the development of this section of the country. 
His death occurred here in 1891 and the mother, surviving for about fifteen years, 
passed away in 1906. In their family were six children, namely: Pet, who mar- 
ried William Manning, of Spokane; LeRoy and Horace, both now deceased; Max- 
well, a resident of Grants Pass, Oregon; Wilbur, of Derby, Kansas; and Homer J., 
of this review. 

The last named was a youth of fifteen years when the family came to Wash- 
ington and his education was continued in the public schools here and in Spokane 
College. He was afterward proprietor of the Black Hawk livery stable situated at 
the corner of Main and Howard streets and subsequently the business was removed 
to Riverside avenue, where the Tidball block now stands. Later Mr. Shinn engaged 
in the feed and grain business on Riverside avenue on the present location of the 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE . 247 

I. X. L. store and in 1886 he embarked in the commission business on the present 
site of the Holly-Mason Company building at the corner of Howard street and 
Railroad avenue. Following the great fire of 1889 he removed to his present loca- 
tion at the corner of Howard and Railroad and the business has grown until the 
company today exceeds all other commission merchants and fruit shippers of the 
Inland Empire in the volume of business conducted. They receive fruits from Cali- 
fornia in carload lots, distributing the same all over the northwest and shipping 
immense quantities into Alberta. They are the largest shippers of apples in this 
section, sending large quantities to New York and also to England. The business 
in its present extent and importance is largely due to the efforts and capable man- 
agement of Mr. Shinn whose enterprising spirit overcomes all difficulties and ob- 
stacles and falters not until the goal of success is reached. Mr. Shinn has never 
sought nor desired public office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his busi- 
ness affairs, and is now president of the Keystone Produce Company, of Lewiston, 
Idaho, and the Keystone Fruit Company, of Entiat, Washington, which are sub- 
sidiary companies of the H. J. Shinn Company, the latter owning five hundred and 
twenty acres of very valuable fruit land near Wenatchee, Washington, of which 
one hundred and fifty acres have been planted to pears and apples. 

Fraternally Mr. Shinn is connected with the Masons and has crossed the sands 
of the desert with the Nobles of El Katif Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He also 
belongs to the Spokane Club and to the Inland Club. He is pleasantly situated in 
his home life, having been married on the 25th of July, 1888, in Spokane, to Miss 
Phoebe Barmon, a daughter of Jacob and Sarah Barmon, of Detroit, Michigan. 
The residence of Mr. and Mrs. Shinn is at No. 1405 Eighth avenue and was 
erected by him about two years ago. One has but to read between the lines of this 
review to learn of the determined spirit, unfaltering enterprise and excellent busi- 
ness ability of Mr. Shinn, for from a humble position in the business world he has 
worked his way steadily upward until he is now one of the most prominent repre- 
sentatives of the fruit trade on the Pacific coast. 



DAVID B. FOTHERINGHAM. 

David B. Fotheringham, a Spokane capitalist with offices at 511 Empire State 
building, was born in Cleveland, Ohio, October 19, 1856, a son of William and 
Isabella (Boyd) Fotheringham. The father conducted a general mercantile store 
in Cleveland and afterward removed to Waterford, Pennsylvania, near Erie, where 
his last days were passed, his death there occurring in 1870. The mother long sur- 
vived him and passed away in Spokane in 1888. Their family numbered four 
children. David, Isabella, Jennie and William, but the last three died before reach- 
ing maturity. 

David B. Fotheringham pursued his education in the public schools of Water- 
ford and of Erie, Pennsylvania, and on starting out in life learned the carpenter's 
trade. He was about fourteen years of age at the time of his father's death and 
from that time forward has largely been dependent upon his own resources. The 
rteps in his orderly progression are easily discernible and his advancement has 
come from his ready recognition and utilization of opportunities which others have 



248 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

passed heedlessly by. In 1877 he left Pennsylvania and removed to Denver, Colo- 
rado, where he engaged in the contracting and building business until 1888. In- 
teresting stories from time to time reached him concerning the development and 
growth of the northwest and it was this which led him to establish his home in 
Spokane, where he arrived on the 1st of November, 1888. For many years he con- 
tinued in business here as a building contractor and among some of the most notable 
buildings that he erected here are the Spokane county courthouse, the Washington 
school, the Nettleton school, the Webster school, Hotel Spokane and the M. Seller 
& Company building. He retired from active business six years ago but still acts 
as vice president of the Washington Brick & Lime Company. His patronage for a 
long period was so extensive and his labors so carefully and wisely directed that he 
derived therefrom a substantial annual income that in time gave him the competence 
that now enables him to live retired. 

On the 27th of September, 1882, at Raton, New Mexico, Mr. Fotheringham was 
united in marriage to Miss Mary Jennings, a daughter of Captain William H. and 
Catherine Jennings, of that place. The father was a captain of the United States 
army and after many years devoted to the military service of his country died at 
Raton in '1898. The mother has since made her home with her daughter, Mrs. 
Fotheringham. Unto this marriage there were born four children: William Henry, 
who is engaged in the real-estate business at Cooes Bay, Oregon; David Dalton, 
operating a fruit ranch on Pleasant Prairie; Benjamin Harrison, a student; and 
Bernard Jennings, who is also pursuing his education. The family residence is at 
No. 2128 Second avenue. 

Mr. Fotheringham is a valued member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His 
political allegiance has been given to the republican party since age conferred upon 
him the right of franchise and he is active in its work, doing all in his power to pro- 
mote its growth and secure the adoption of its principles. He served as councilman 
of Spokane in 1888 and in 1891 was called to the office of mayor for a two years' 
term. His loyalty to the best interests of the community is well known and it is 
a recognized fact that his cooperation can always be counted upon to further any 
progressive municipal movement which his sound judgment suggests. During the 
period of his residence in Spokane he has gained a wide acquaintance, winning a 
prominent position not only in business circles but in the regard of his fellow towns- 
men whom he meets in political, fraternal and social relations. 



GEORGE SMITH BROOKE. 

Honored and respected by all, there is no man who occupies a more enviable 
position in business and financial circles in Spokane than George Smith Brooke, 
who is at this writing the head of the oldest banking institution of the city, for 
the Bank of Spokane Falls, which had previously been founded by A. M. Cannon, 
sometime since passed out of existence. Mr. Brooke's insight has been clear, his 
sagacity keen and in the performance of the interests under his control he has 
displayed business ability and integrity that well entitle him to the success and 
honorable name that is now his. He has resided on the Pacific coast since early 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 249 

manhood, although his birth occurred at Dubuque, Iowa, February 12, 1855. His 
father was the Rev. Robert Dunbar Brooke, an Episcopal minister, who was born 
in Maryland and was educated at Princeton University, New Jersey. The mother, 
Mary Watson (Smith) Brooke, was born in Virginia and was the daughter of an 
Episcopal minister. The ancestry of the family can be traced back in direct line 
to Saver de Quincy, one of the barons who signed the Magna Charta at Runny mede 
in 1215. The authenticated lineage of the family goes back through David, king 
of Scotland, and Fergus II to Charlemagne. The family was founded in America 
by Robert Brooke who after his graduation from Wadham College at Oxford, came 
to Maryland in 1650. He was the founder of Charles county and afterward served 
as colonial governor. On the pages of Mr. Brooke's ancestral history also appears 
the names of Colonel Lloyd Beall and General James Slaughter, who were officers 
of the Revolutionary war. His uncle, Lloyd Brooke, was one of the first settlers 
of Walla Walla county and aided in its organization, while another uncle, Isaac W. 
Smith, was acting secretary of state under Governor Stevens. 

Reared in a home of culture, where education and character development were 
rated above ail else, George Smith Brooke was given excellent school advantages 
and is a graduate of Griswold College of Davenport Entering business life he 
was for two years employed as car recorder for the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & 
Northern Railroad Company and in 1874 came to the Pacific northwest. He first 
established his home in Portland, where for four years he occupied the position of 
bookkeeper with the firm of Alien & Lewis, of that city, and during the succeeding 
four years was bookkeeper and passenger agent for the Oregon Steam Navigation 
Company. In the summer of 1874 while purser of a steamer running between Ce- 
lilo and Lewiston, the boat was laid over on Sundays at Wallula and from that 
period he dates his residence in Washington. Ever watchful of opportunities for 
advancement and with laudable ambition to work his way steadily upward, he re- 
moved to Sprague in 1882, recognizing there a favorable opening for a banking 
business. He thereafter became a partner in the firm of Fairweather & Brooke 
and established a banking house of which he became manager, his partner being 
at that time division superintendent of the Northern Pacific Railroad. There were 
only two other banks in Spokane county at the time — a small institution known 
as the Bank of Cheney which had been organized by John C. Davenport, and the 
Bank of Spokane Falls, founded by A. M. Cannon. In 1886 the private banking 
house of Fairweather & Brooke was incorporated as the First National Bank of 
Sprague and in 1896 was transferred by special act of congress to Spokane, the 
name being changed to the Fidelity National Bank of Spokane though it retained 
its original charter number. As both of its predecessors in the banking field have 
since passed out of existence this remains the pioneer banking institution of Spo- 
kane county and from the beginning Mr. Brooke has been its president. To his 
administrative direction, executive control, powers of keen discernment and of 
clear sagacity the success of the bank is due and it now ranks among the foremost 
financial institutions in the northwest. 

On the 8th of November, 1882, Mr. Brooke was united in marriage to Miss 
Julia I. Hill, of Westport, Connecticut, and they have six children, Robert Dun- 
bar, Rebecca, Julia Eltinge, Philip Slaughter, Mary Watson and George Magruder. 

In his political views Mr. Brooke was originally a democrat but since 1896 has 
stanchly supported the republican party. For three terms he served as mayor of 



250 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Sprague, was chairman of the school board for fourteen years and aided in the 
organization of Lincoln county. At the present writing he does not take active part 
in politics because of the demands of an important and growing business, although 
in the duties of citizenship he is never remiss. He holds membership in the Epis- 
copal church and also with the Spokane Country Club and is of social, genial na- 
ture, easily approachable and always courteous. His substantial qualities of man- 
hood and citizenship, his business ability and his sterling worth have gained him 
a high position in public regard. 



CHRISTOPHER C. DEMPSEY. 

Christopher C. Dempsey, who is the owner and proprietor of Hotel Dempsey 
located at 407 Front street, is well known in the business circles of the city as a 
man whose business judgment is demonstrated in the success which has attended 
his efforts. He is a western man by inclination and training and is imbued with 
the progressive spirit which has been a prominent factor in the building up of the 
northwest. His birth occurred in Dodge county, Wisconsin, on the 28th of De- 
cember, 1858, his parents being Connor and Mary (Duffy) Dempsey, the former 
of whom passed away in 1868, while the latter died in Spokane, July 5, 1911, at 
the venerable age of eighty-two years. The father was a prominent agriculturist 
of Wisconsin and for fifteen years was chairman of the town board. During the 
gold excitement in the far west he made a trip to California, leaving in 1852, but 
two years later he returned to Wisconsin and again devoted his time to the develop- 
ment of the farm which he owned. 

Christopher C. Dempsey was educated in the public schools of Wisconsin, but 
during the summer months he was actively engaged in assisting his mother in the 
cultivation of the home farm. When he was twenty-four years of age he desired 
to make hia own way in the world, but before entering definitely upon any career 
wished to see something of the world. He spent a short time in Chicago before 
going to Louisiana ^where he remained before going to the Panhandle of Texas, 
where for two years he worked at surveying. Subsequently he went to Denver 
where he conducted a restaurant for one year, but in the fall of 1888 he came to 
Spokane and has since been one of the active promoters of various business under- 
takings in this city. His first enterprise in this city was engaging in the restaurant 
business on Post street near the Pacific Hotel. Fortune favored him however, 
and just before the fire of 1889 he disposed of this property which otherwise would 
have been destroyed and been a serious loss to him financially. After the fire he 
started another restaurant on Bernard street which he conducted for a year, when 
he removed to Howard and Main streets, and there stayed in business until he was 
elected sheriff in 1896. At the completion of his term of office in 1898, he en- 
gaged in the livery business for one year until January, 1900, at which time he 
disposed of his business and assumed the management of Hotel Dempsey which 
was situated at the corner of Main and Stevens streets. He occupied that location 
until 1905 when he erected the building which is now known as the Hotel Dempsey. 
It is a substantial three-story and basement brick building, covering a ground plan 
of sixty by one hundred and forty-two feet. It contains ample accommodations for 



C. C. DBMPSEY 



JMJj-iL" Liyf\AKf, 



— — — — ■ ■■ ■ ■ « i - ii - w m* 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 253 

many guests, having one hundred and twenty sleeping rooms. Mr. Dempsey has 
many of the salient characteristics necessary for the successful hotel manager — 
geniality, courtesy and consideration for the rights of others. 

On the 26th of September, 1889, Mr. Dempsey was married at Union, Oregon, 
to Miss Mary Ellen Lincoln, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Lincoln of Mis- 
souri. To their union five children have been born: Mary Ellen, whose birth 
occurred on the 19th of December, 1890, and who is a graduate of the Holy Name 
Academy, graduating in the department of vocal music; Josephine, who was born 
on the 18th of October, 1892, and who, since her graduation from Holy Name 
Academy, has been teaching school in Montana; James P., whose birth occurred 
on the 2d of June, 1895, and who is a student in Gonzaga College; Robert J., born 
February 2, 1898; and Lucille K., whose birth occurred on the 23d of December, 
1908. 

Mr. Dempsey is among the faithful and more prominent attendants at St. 
Aloysius Roman Catholic church. He is a life member of Spokane Lodge, No. 
228, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and of the Chamber of Commerce, in 
whose objects for promotion he takes a deep interest. Although he gives his hotel 
the advantages of his personal management and careful supervision he neverthe- 
less takes great pleasure in the society of his family and in the home life for which 
his modern residence at East 928 Sinto avenue is admirably adapted. 



« /. 



• • ■ ■* , 

. . I 'N . ' ' 

I 



BURGESS L. GORDON. 






The growth of Spokane deserves to* be numbered among the wonders of the 
world. About three decades ago there was practically no city here and with 
marvelous rapidity the boundaries of the town have been extended until it now 
has a population of many thousand, its citizenship upon the whole being a pro- 
gressive, energetic class, as is manifest by the splendid buildings, the beautiful 
homes and the growing enterprises. Almost every field of activity is here repre- 
sented. Among the leading commercial interests is the wholesale grocery house 
of B. L. Gordon & Company, of which the subject of this review is the president 
and manager. Under his careful guidance the business is being continually ex- 
panded and within twenty-one years has been developed from a tiny undertaking 
to its present extensive and gratifying proportions. 

Well known and highly respected in the business circles of the city, Mr. Gor- 
don well deserves representation in this volume. His birth occurred in Pike county, 
Missouri, December 19, 1864, his parents being John A. and Texana (Early) 
Gordon, the former a farmer by occupation. The latter was a sister of General 
Jubal Early, a distinguished officer of the Confederate army. 

In the public schools of his native county, Burgess L. Gordon began his edu- 
cation, which was continued in La Grange College, at La Grange, Missouri. After 
putting aside his text-books he engaged in the wholesale grocery business and in 
1885 removed to Socorro, New Mexico, where he continued in the same line of 
trade. But ever alert to favorable opportunities he believed that the Pacific coast 
country offered still better advantages and therefore disposed of his interests in 

the south, coming to Spokane in 1890. Here he at once organized the present firm 
vol n— 13 



254 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

of B. L. Gordon & Company for the conduct of a wholesale grocery business, which 
is located at the corner of Division and Harrison streets. From the beginning 
the new enterprise prospered and its growth has been proportionate to the develop- 
ment of the city. Two years ago he built the present fine building which is now 
utilized in the conduct of a business that has reached extensive proportions, being 
one of the leading establishments of this character in the northwest. Its trade 
relations cover a wide territory and the business policy of the house has ever been 
such as to commend it to the confidence and trust of its many patrons. Mr. Gor- 
don has ever held to a high standard in the personnel of the house, in the line of 
goods carried and in the nature of service rendered to the public. 

On the 12th of June, 1890, Mr. Gordon was married to Miss Raphaelita Simp- 
son, a daughter of George S. Simpson, of Trinidad, Colorado, and a niece of 
Captain Raphael Sknms, . who commanded the famous Confederate warship Ala- 
bama during the Civil war. Mr. and Mrs. Gordon have become the parents of 
three children, Burgess J., Ralph and Charles. The family attend Our Lady of 
Lourdes Roman Catholic church and reside in a pleasant home at No. 601 Seventh 
avenue. Mr. Gordon is not a member of any secret societies but his name appears 
on the membership roll of the Spokane Club and the Spokane Country Club. He 
also belongs to the Chamber of Commerce and his sympathy with its projects for 
the upbuilding of the city is manifest in active cooperation therewith. He possesses 
the enterprising spirit of the west which has been the dominant factor in producing 
the wonderful development of this section. Brooking no obstacles that honest 
effort can overcome, he has steadily worked his way upward until, having long 
since left the ranks of the many, he stands among the successful few. 



ROBERT O. McCLINTOCK. 

The business interests of Spokane are constantly growing until almost every 
enterprise known in legitimate trade is here represented. Prominent among the 
important mercantile interests of this city is the wholesale grocery house con- 
ducted under the name of the McClintock-Trunkey Company, of which Robert 0. 
McClintock is president and manager. He has advanced steadily step by step to 
a creditable position in commercial circles and has made his establishment a stand- 
ard for efficient service and straightforward dealing. His birth occurred in Butler 
county, Ohio, May 17, 1867, so that he has hardly yet reached the prime of life. 
His parents were Robert S. and Sarah (Smith) McClintock, the former a prom- 
inent farmer of that section. 

His youthful days were largely devoted to the acquirement of an education 
as a pupil in the public schools of his native county and also of Hanover College 
at Hanover, Indiana. He made his initial step in the business world, following 
his removal to Marianna, Arkansas, in 1889. There he engaged in the wholesale 
grocery business with his brother-in-law, H. D. Trunkey, continuing in the trade 
there until 1898, when they sold out and came to Spokane, believing that the 
growing northwest offered much better business opportunities. Here they pur- 
chased an interest in the wholesale grocery house of the Boothe-Powell Company 
and soon afterward the firm name was changed to the Boothe-McClintock Com- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 255 

pany. A further change in 1906 led to the adoption of the present firm style of 
the McClintock-Trunkey Company. Each year has witnessed an increase in their 
business, their trade relations extending out in ramifying connections over a large 
territory. They have rebuilt and enlarged their present store, which is conven- 
iently situated at the corner of South Stevens street and the Northern Pacific 
tracks, thus securing the best of shipping facilities. They have made this one of 
the most progressive and attractive wholesale grocery houses in the Inland Empire. 
They conduct a general wholesale grocery business and have recently added a 
most complete line of cigars, pipes and smokers' supplies. Their store is neat and 
tasteful in its arrangement, the work is thoroughly systematized, orders are promptly 
filled and the business methods are such as commend the house to a large and 
growing patronage. The present officers of the company are: Robert O. Mc- 
Clintock, president and manager; H. D. Trunkey, vice president and treasurer; 
Sydney S. McClintock, secretary; Edwin E. McClintock and J. B. Maclin, direc- 
tors. The president of this company is also the president of the Imperial Tea & 
Coffee Company, a subsidiary organization of the McClintock-Trunkey Company, 
which deals exclusively in tea, coffee and spices. 

On the 27th of November, 1895, at Marianna, Arkansas, Mr. McClintock was 
united in marriage to Miss Gay Trunkey, a daughter of Captain Frank and Eliza 
(Power) Trunkey, of that city, and they have two children, Sarah Gay and 
Franklin T. Mr. McClintock has never been interested in politics or held public 
office. He is, however, alive to the duties and obligations as well as the privileges 
of citizenship and his cooperation is often a tangible factor in movements for the 
general good. He is now serving as a member of the publicity committee of the 
Chamber of Commerce, in which connection he is largely exploiting the resources 
and the opportunities of Spokane. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity and also 
to the First Presbyterian church, in which he is serving as a trustee and as a 
member of the session. Prominent among the business men of Spokane, Mr. Mc- 
Clintock has now for thirteen years been closely identified with the history of the 
city as a representative of one of its most important commercial interests. He is 
a man of keen discrimination and sound judgment, and his executive ability and 
excellent management have brought to the concern with which he is connected, a 
large degree of success. The prosperity of the company is certainly due in con- 
siderable measure to its president, who has largely inaugurated its policy. 



COLONEL FLEETWOOD WARD. 

Business conditions in recent years have brought forth the term "promoters" — 
men capable of seeing business opportunities, of handling practical situations and 
of solving intricate business problems. Their capital, too, is used in financing 
business propositions and such men are pushing forward the wheels of progress 
in no uncertain manner. To this class belongs Colonel Fleetwood Ward, who 
makes Spokane his home. He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 6, 
1847, a son of A. F. and Mary (Silvers) Ward, both of whom are now deceased, 
the father having died in 1893 and the mother in 1890. The ancestors of the 
family were early settlers of Pennsylvania, having come to America at the time 



256 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

William Penn established his colony. They settled in Chester county and a great- 
uncle of A. F. Ward was an officer in the Revolutionary war, while Mrs. Ward was 
the niece of a captain of the war of 1812 — captain of a privateer on the sea. He 
was captured and confined in an English prison where he died. Two brothers of 
Colonel Ward were soldiers in the Civil war, one serving with a Kansas regiment 
while the other became a captain of the Third Pennsylvania and afterward served 
as captain in the Twenty-second United States Infantry while subsequent to the 
close of hostilities he became aid-de-camp to General Hancock. 

Colonel Ward was educated in the public and high schools of Philadelphia and 
for a brief period was a pupil in the law department of the University of Penn- 
sylvania. In the meantime, however, after completing his high-school course he 
worked for a Philadelphia banking firm with which he continued for five years, 
and during the last year was manager of their New York office. He then entered 
the University of Pennsylvania, where he remained for a year. On the expira- 
tion of that period he joined General Custer on the plains and was with him for 
a few months as an independent scout, with the now famous Buffalo Bill and also 
with Wild Bill. He left that section of the country to go to Chicago, where he 
was employed for a few months, and was also for a few months in Philadelphia, 
From the latter city he went to Ohio, where he engaged in the milling business 
for three years with his brother-in-law. At the end of that time the brother-in-law 
died, leaving a large estate, and Colonel Ward devoted the succeeding four years 
to its settlement. He then went to the Bowling Green country where he engaged 
in drilling for oil, becoming interested in several oil companies with which he was 
connected until 1886, when they were put out of business by the trust. In that 
year Colonel Ward went to Gallipolis, where he made a contract to pay one hun- 
dred thousand dollars to Petrot, the inventor of the computing scales, for the 
patents governing the scales. He then proceeded to Detroit, where he opened an 
office and organized the first computing scales company known as the Detroit 
Computing Scales Company. Of this he was president until he sold his holdings 
to the Bonney & Smith Manufacturing Company of Dayton, and this was later 
acquired by Camby, the baking powder king of Dayton, Ohio. Mr. Ward then 
went to New York and purchased a seat on the New York Consolidated Stock 
Exchange, with which business he was connected until 1892. He afterward en- 
tered the employ of the W. J. Hayes & Son Bond Company, remaining as manager 
of their New York office for two years. Subsequently he engaged in traveling for 
a short time for the company but severed his connection with that firm to engage 
in mining enterprises with a Mr. Denslow under the firm name of Denslow, Ward 
& Company. Mr. Ward also assisted in organizing the company that chartered 
the steamer Excelsior for the season of 1896 to go from San Francisco to Alaska 
for gold, and Mr. Ward was one of the first to exploit the gold resources of the 
far northwest. He organized the Boston & Alaska Mining Company and later 
the Alaska Gold Syndicate Company, both of which had gold-bearing properties. 
Subsequently the latter company had established offices in Berb'n, Paris and Lon- 
don and for a time enjoyed a period of substantial prosperity. Colonel Ward 
was also one of the organizers of the Cook Inlet Coal Fields Company, one of the 
first to make known the coal deposits of Alaska, the business being a profitable 
one until coal oil was discovered in California, which practically put the company 
out of business as transportation charges from Alaska to San Francisco were too 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 257 

high to allow them to compete with the home product. Colonel Ward was prom- 
inently and actively connected with these interests until 1900, when he severed 
his connection with the Alaska propositions and came to the Colville valley, taking 
up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres and filing on a timber claim at the 
same time. Two years before his arrival in Colville he had organized the Old 
Hickory Mining Company with properties in the Colville valley, and when he 
removed to the district he began to develop this property. On his arrival in 1900 
he also purchased some other mining properties and organized the Butte & Wash- 
ington Mining and Milling Company for their development. Of this company, 
which has property on Kettle river and is doing business today, he is the presi- 
dent and general manager. It was Colonel Ward who located the marble lands 
on the Kettle river, seventeen miles north of Kettle Falls, afterward selling out to 
the well known Kettle River Marble Company. His attention is largely given to 
the interests of the Butte & Washington Mining and Milling Company and he has 
arranged, also, to spend a part of his time at Arden, Washington, for he is vice 
president of the Arden Orchards Company, in which he became interested two 
years ago. He is also a director of the Farmer Jones Mining Company of Idaho, 
and is interested in several mines in the Coeur d'Alene country. 

On the 15th of January, 1872, in Philadelphia, Colonel Ward was united in 
marriage to Miss Sarah Howard and they have one son, Fleetwood, who is en- 
gaged in business in Montreal, Canada. Colonel Ward is a republican and fra- 
ternally was connected with the Knights of Pythias and was a charter member of 
Elks Lodge, No. 52, of Ohio, which was instituted by Tony Pastor. A point of 
interest in Colonel Ward's life is that he copied the first contract for the con- 
solidation of oil refineries between a Mr. ,Logan and J. D. Rockefeller, at which 
time he was reading law in a law office in Philadelphia. He has been interested 
in some sporting events, having pulled in the first eight-oared shell race ever held 
in the country. He also organized the Crescent Boat Club of Philadelphia and 
held the championship swimming medal in that part of the country for three years. 
In his later days he has found excitement and interest in his operations and specu- 
lations in business projects, and has been interested more or less in mining com- 
panies in Montana, Nevada, Colorado, Washington and Idaho as well as in Alaska. 
Moreover, his labors have ofttimes been of a character that have contributed 
largely toward the development of the districts in which he has operated and thus 
to the substantial growth and progress of the community. He has courage, enter- 
prise and sagacity and has won success where many a more conservative man 
would have feared to venture. 



RICHARD DALE MILLER. 

Among those who are active in controlling the financial situation in Spokane is 
Richard Dale Miller, of the bond firm of Eggleston & Company, with offices in 
the Columbia building. His business methods have always been characterized by 
straightforward dealing and through his energy and determination he has reached 
a prominent place in business circles. His birth occurred in Franklin county, 
Pennsylvania, March 8, 1868, his parents being John and Lucetta Miller, farming 



258 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

people of that county. While spending his youthful days under the parental roof 
he attended the public schools of his native county and upon the death of his 
father removed to Lincoln, Nebraska, where his elder brother, John E. Miller, 
was located. He there supplemented his early educational opportunities by a 
course of study in the University of Nebraska and made his initial step in the 
business world as an employe in the First National Bank of Lincoln. He was 
assigned to the position of assistant cashier and remained in continuous connection 
with the bank for ten years, from 1882 until 1892. This gave him comprehensive 
understanding of the various departments of banking and also of the bond busi- 
ness, and upon resigning his position in the First National he opened a bond office 
in Lincoln, where he remained for four years. The opportunities of the growing 
west attracted him and in 1896 he came to Spokane to take charge of the bond 
department of the Spokane & Eastern Trust Company, which position he filled 
through the succeeding decade. He then resigned to become vice president of the 
Exchange National Bank, serving as such in 1907 and 1908. Thinking to find 
a more profitable field of labor as a dealer in bonds, he left the bank and formed 
the present partnership with M. H. Eggleston under the firm style of Eggleston 
& Company. His previous long and varied experience in this field constituted the 
foundation of the success which has since been enjoyed by the firm and which has 
brought them to a prominent position in the financial circles of the city. 

Mr. Miller was married on the 8th of February, 1906, to Miss Nellie Roche, 
of Spokane, who died in 1908, her death being deeply regretted by many friends. 
Mr. Miller belongs to the Masonic fraternity in which he has attained high rank 
as is indicated by the fact that he has crossed the sands of the desert with the 
nobles of El Katif Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He likewise belongs to the Elks 
lodge of Spokane and his name is on the membership roll of the Spokane Club 
and of the Spokane Amateur Athletic Club. He has made many friends during 
the period of his residence in this city and is always a welcome visitor in the club 
rooms. His has been an all-around development and his life has exemplified the 
sterling qualities of progressive citizenship and honorable manhood. 



WILLIAM EDWARD SANDER. 

William Edward Sander, though yet a young man, holds a responsible position 
in business circles as vice president and general manager of the Idaho Mercantile 
Company of Coeur d'Alene, the largest department store in Idaho. His birth oc- 
curred at Coeur d'Alene on the 2d of March, 1886, his parents being Valentine W. 
and Louise F. (Lohmann) Sander. Valentine W. Sander, a native of Hamburg. 
Germany, was brought to the United States by his parents in 1868, when a lad of 
six years, the family home being established in Muscatine, Iowa. There he obtained 
his education and began his business career as clerk in a store. In 1 877 he came to 
Coeur d'Alene and with a small capital, in 1888, established the business which has 
developed into the Idaho Mercantile Company, the largest department store in 
Idaho. Since 1911 the Idaho Mercantile Company has established a branch house 
at St. Maries, Idaho. Mr. Valentine Sander acts as the president of this important 
concern and also has acquired much valuable real estate throughout this section. He 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 259 

was appointed the first postmaster of Coeur d'Alene in 1887 and became one of the 
first trustees of the city when it was incorporated. 

William E. Sander obtained his early education in the public schools of Coeur 
d'Alene, later attended the high school at Burlington, Iowa, and subsequently en- 
tered the University of Washington at Seattle, which in 1907 conferred upon him the 
degrees of Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts. Immediately afterward he 
entered his father's establishment as assistant manager and in 1908 was made vice 
president and general manager of the Idaho Mercantile Company, in which capacity 
he has rendered valuable service to the present time. Outside of this important of- 
fice he acts as the vice president of the Coeur d'Alene Grain & Milling Company. 
A young man of unfaltering enterprise and unmistakable ability, his rise in the busi* 
ness world is assured. 

While attending the University of Washington in Seattle, Mr. Sander met Miss 
Helen McDonald, who was also a student there and who was graduated with the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1908. Their marriage was celebrated in Seattle on the 
1st of September, 1909, and has been blessed with a son, Donald Lohmann, whose 
birth occurred on the 1st of August, 1910. Mrs. Sander is a daughter of Judge F. 
A McDonald, of Seattle. Since her marriage she has resided at No. 88 Park Drive, 
Coeur d'Alene. 

Mr. Sander is a stanch republican in politics and served as president of the city 
council of Coeur d'Alene from 1909 until 1911. In Masonry he has won high rank, 
having attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. He holds member- 
ship in the following organizations: Kootenai Lodge, No. 24, A. F. & A. M.; Coeur 
d'Alene Chapter, No. 8, R. A. M. ; Temple Commandery, No. 12, K. T., of which he 
was junior warden in 1909; Kadosh-Idaho Consistory, No. 8, S. P. R. S.; and Calam 
Temple, N. M. S., of Lewiston, Idaho. He likewise belongs to Queen Esther Chap- 
ter, No. 12, Eastern Star, and the Knights of Pythias, both of Coeur d'Alene, as 
well as the Spokane Club and the Inland Club of Spokane. He is a charter member 
aod trustee of Coeur d'Alene Lodge, No. 1254, B. P. O. E. Of the Commercial 
Club he acts as vice president and fills the same position in relation to the Kootenai 
County Growers Association. In every walk of life he has won the respect and un- 
qualified confidence of those with whom he has come in contact. 



FRANCIS E. LANGFORD. 

In no profession does merit depend more largely upon individual ability than 
in the practice of law, and progress at the bar is therefore indicative of personal 
power in the analysis and presentation of cases. Francis E. Langford is one who 
for the past seventeen years has followed the profession in Spokane. He does not 
specialize in any particular field but continues in general practice and in the 
citation of principle and precedent indicates his comprehensive understanding of 
the science upon which is based the stable existence of every community. He 
was born in London, England, August 22, 1859, and after attending school in the 
northern part of England, completed his education in the university at Bonn, on 
the Rhine, in Germany, rlis father died when he was very young but his step- 
father provided the means of an education and in the improvement of the oppor- 



260 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

t unities thus offered, Francis E. Langford qualified for the later responsibilities 
of life. 

Coming to America in 1882, he entered the employ of the Baltimore & Ohio 
Telegraph & Express Company in the capacity of private secretary to the general 
manager, at Baltimore, Maryland. After a few months he was transferred to 
New York, where he acted in the same capacity to David H. Bates, president of 
the company. It was at this time that the consolidation of telegraph companies 
was brought about and the Baltimore & Ohio became part of the Western Union 
system. Later he spent some time with an importing house but resigned in 1887 
to go to Chicago, there accepting a position of responsibility in the Illinois National 
Bank. He came to the Pacific coast as a representative of banking interests, hav- 
ing in 1891 accepted the position of assistant cashier in the Commercial National 
Bank at Portland, Oregon. In the spring of 1892, however, he resigned his posi- 
tion in the Rose City and came to Spokane. Having decided to study law, he 
began his reading in the office and under the direction* of Cyrus Happy. In 1895 
he was admitted to the bar and was connected with Mr. Happy in law practice 
until 1898, since which time he has been alone. The members of the bar enter* 
tain high consideration for his integrity, dignity, impartiality, love of justice and 
strong common sense. His force of character and natural qualifications have 
enabled him to overcome all obstacles and reach a creditable position as a repre- 
sentative of the legal fraternity in this city. 

Mr. Langford is equally pleasantly situated in his home life. He was married 
on the 28th of April, 1897, to Miss Laura Belle Tilton, a daughter of Frederick 
A. and Hattie G. Tilton, of Spokane, and they now have an interesting little son, 
Frederick. Mr. Langford has been a republican since becoming .a naturalized 
American citizen and although he was quite active in the party ranks has never 
aspired to office. He recognizes, however, the duties as well as the obligations of 
citizenship and cooperates in various moyements and measures for the general 
good. Fraternally he is a Mason and is now a member of El Katif Temple of 
the Mystic Shrine. Since 1892 he has been a member of the Spokane Club and 
is a life member of the Spokane Amateur Athletic Club. He is interested in all 
manly outdoor sports and he sees to it that the periods of rest and recreation are 
such as to preserve an even balance with his professional activity and thus pro- 
duce a well rounded character. 



DAVID SANBORN PRESCOTT. 

No matter in how much fantastic theorizing one may indulge as to the causa- 
tion of success, clear reasoning and close investigation will ever bring to light the 
fact that honorable advancement in business is the result of close application and 
persistency of purpose. To those qualities David Sanborn Prescott owes his rise 
in the business world and while all days have not been equally bright he has now 
won for himself a creditable position in commercial circles, being at the present 
writing secretary and treasurer of the Union Fuel & Ice Co., of Spokane. He 
was born in St. Anthony, Minnesota, now a part of the city of Minneapolis, Janu- 
ary 11, 1859, his parents being Nathan M. and Rozilla M. (Haley) Prescott. The 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 261 

father, who claimed New Hampshire as the state of his nativity, was one of the 
pioneer settlers of Minnesota, taking up his abode in that state in 1858. He there 
engaged in the milling business and in 1860 removed from St. Anthony to Castle 
Rock, Minnesota, while later he established the family home at Herman, Grant 
county, Minnesota, 

David S. Prescott acquired his early education in the public schools of his 
native state and afterward attended Carleton College at Northfield, Minnesota. 
Feeling it incumbent to make for himself a place in the business world, in the 
spring of 1881 he went to Glendive, Montana, where he conducted a drug store, 
remaining there until March, 1887. At that date he visited Spokane and was so 
impressed with the possibilities of the country and its future prospects that he 
returned to Glendive, disposed of his store and in October, 1887, removed his 
family to this city. Here he opened a drug store which he conducted successfully 
for a time until his connection with political interests demanded his efforts in 
other fields. From the first he took an active part in the work of the republican 
party and was soon appointed chief clerk in the county auditor's office. The value 
of his service won substantial recognition, when, in 1892, he was elected county 
treasurer, filling the office during the two succeeding years. He then returned to 
business life, becoming secretary of the Ross Park Electric Railway Company, 
operating the first electric line on the Pacific coast and one of the earliest in the 
country. This now forms a part of the Washington Water Power Company's 
system.' Every change in Mr. Prescott's business connections has meant a step in 
advance and thus the trend of his orderly progression is easily discernible. After 
severing his connection with the Ross Park Electric Company he entered the real- 
estate field in connection with his brother, Fred L. Prescott, with whom he was 
identified in the conduct of a real-estate business under the firm name of Prescott 
Brothers, until he sold out in February, 1911, to his brother. He is likewise 
secretary and treasurer of the Union Fuel & Ice Co. and both branches of his 
business are proving profitable. 

He does not confine his attention, however, solely to commercial interests and 
business projects which promise only individual return, but is likewise active in 
fields where public progress is concerned. He has been honored with the presi- 
dency of the civil service commission of Spokane, an office which he now fills and 
in which important position many of his ideas for the welfare of the public weal 
are transformed into practical measures for the betterment of the city's govern- 
ment. He is now the secretary of the board of trustees of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association and takes a very active part in promoting its welfare and growth. 
He is also a prominent figure in Masonic circles, widely known throughout the 
northwest, and having served for five years as grand lecturer of the state of 
Washington, while at the present time he is grand master of the grand lodge for 
Washington and Alaska. His local membership is with Spokane Lodge, No. 84, 
F. & A. M., of which he is a past master; Spokane Chapter, No. 2, R. A. M., of 
which he is past high priest; Spokane Council, No. 4, R. & S. M.; Cataract Com- 
mandery, No. 8, K. T.; Oriental Consistory, No. 2, A. A. S. R.; and El Katif 
Temple of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

On the 16th of November, 1881, Mr. Prescott was married to Miss Laura 
Betsworth, of Le Mars, Iowa, a daughter of Captain William Betsworth of that 
place, and they now have four children: Ethel F., the wife of D. C. Gibson, of 



262 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Spokane; and Ernest C, Leslie F. and Verna L., all. of this city. Mr. Prescott's 
life has been an active and useful one, resulting in the successful accomplishment 
of whatever he undertakes, not only in a business way but also in other fields of 
activity. His interests have never been self-centered and he is recognized as one 
of Spokane's most public-spirited citizens. 



MICHAEL M. COWLEY. 

Michael M. Cowley, a retired capitalist, is one of the best known men in eastern 
Washington, and the consensus of public opinion places him in a prominent posi- 
tion among those whose lives have won for them the respect, good-will and con- 
fidence of their fellowmen. He has remained in the Pacific coast country since 
the spring of 1 862 and for some years prior to that time was a resident of the west. 
He has thus long lived in a district where men are rated not by wealth but by 
worth and where the opportunity is open for each individual to prove his worth. 
Coming to America practically empty-handed, he advanced step by step as the 
way was open. He always watched for favorable opportunity and in the later 
years of his business activity he was a prominent figure in banking circles in Spo- 
kane. He now resides at 1128 Pearl street, and the fruits of his former toil supply 
him with all of the comforts and some of the luxuries of life. 

The family name indicates his Irish nativity and ancestry. He was born in 
Rathdrum, County Wicklow, Ireland, May 9, 1841, his parents being Hugh and 
Bridget (Byrne) Cowley. The father was the owner of general mercantile stores 
in several different localities of that country and won success through well directed 
business interests. A love of adventure and the opportunities which he believed 
were to be secured in the new world led Michael M. Cowley to leave the Emerald 
isle when fifteen years of age and embark on a sailing vessel for America, where 
he arrived after a voyage of forty-nine days. He landed at New York city and 
proceeded thence to Rochester, New York, where he was employed by a relative 
in a grocery store at eight dollars per month. Two years were thus passed and 
he then started for California but as his funds were not sufficient to carry him all 
the way he proceeded only as far as Leavenworth, Kansas, where a United States 
military expedition was outfitting for the reinforcement of General Albert Sidney 
Johnston in the suppression of the Mormon disturbances. Mr. Cowley entered as 
teamster and was later given clerical work in connection with the expedition, while 
subsequently he was promoted to a position in the sutler's department at higher 
wages. He thus traveled across the plaina and over the mountains with the expedi- 
tion to Benicia, California, and as the original object of the trip had been accom- 
plished the troops were sent to different posts in the west. Mr. Cowley was sent 
to Beall's Crossing in Colorado, afterward Fort Mojave, and remained in charge 
of the sutler's stores until the outbreak of the Civil war in 1861. 

Mr. Cowley permanently took up his abode on the Pacific coast in the fall of 
that year, settling at Portland, Oregon, and in the spring of 1862 went to a mining 
camp at Florence, Idaho, where he engaged in mining until the early part of 1864. 
He also followed merchandising at Wild Horse Creek, in the Kootenai mining 
regions, and at Bonner's Ferry, Idaho. On the 4th of July, 1872, he settled at 



M. M. COWLEY 



I I 

j 

*»_ ■»* 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 265 

Spokane Bridge on the Spokane river, about seventeen miles east of the falls, the 
place being then known as Kendall's Bridge, and later as Cowley's Bridge. He 
continued to conduct a store at that place and at the same time operated the 
bridge and executed government contracts for furnishing supplies to Fort Coeur 
d'Alene. Mr. Cowley has been identified with the upbuilding of Spokane since 
the year of the great fire, entering financial circles here as cashier in the Traders 
National Bank. His capability for the management of important financial interests 
was soon manifest and after five years he was elected to the presidency of the 
bank in which he continued until 1906, when he resigned and retired from active 
life. He still remains a director of the bank, however, and president of the Sav- 
ings society. 

Mr. Cowley was married to Miss Annie Connelly, who was born in Ireland and 
passed away in Spokane, November 24, 1907, leaving two daughters, Mary Frances 
and Eleanor B. The former is now the wife of J. F. Reddy, of Medford, Oregon, 
and has a son and two daughters, while Eleanor B. Cowley became the wife of 
James Smyth, of Spokane, and has one son and one daughter. 

Mr. Cowley belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, at Spokane, 
also to St. Aloysius church. He is one of the few men living who have been iden- 
tified with the settlement of northeastern Washington and the region known as the 
Inland Empire from the earliest tunes. He belongs to the little group of dis- 
tinctively representative business mejn who have been the pioneers in inaugurating 
and building up the chief industries ; br (his stectidn'd'f the country. He early had 
the sagacity and prescience to discein the eminence which the future had in store 
for this great and growing district, ; and acting in accordance with the dictates of 
his faith and judgment he has garnered in the fullness of^time the generous harvest 
which is the just recompense of indomitable industry, integrity and noteworthy 
enterprise. 



WILLIAM H. STANLEY. 

As president and treasurer of the Spokane Canning Company William H. 
Stanley is closely and prominently associated with the productive industries of 
the city, being now at the head of a business of large proportions. He was born 
in New York city, February 4, 1880, his parents being James and Maria Stanley, 
also natives of that city, who now spend a portion of their time in Spokane and 
the remainder in the eastern metropolis. At the usual age William H. Stanley 
entered the public schools and supplemented his general course by a more specific- 
ally literary course in Williams College of Williamstown, Massachusetts, from 
which he was graduated with the class of 1902. On leaving college he came to 
Spokane and in 1908 entered the grocery brokerage business, in which he is still 
interested. Ever alert to the possibilities of business life, he directed his energies 
into other channels in 1906, when he joined in organizing the Spokane Canning Com- 
pany, building a factory at Yardley. Operations were begun in the fall of that year 
and the business was capitalized for twenty-five thousand dollars, with William H. 
Stanley as president, treasurer and general manager. This is the only plant of 
this kind in the Inland Empire and from the outset the business has proved a 



266 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

growing and profitable one, gradually extending its ramifying trade interests over 
a wide territory. The plant now has a capacity of fifteen hundred cases daily 
and in the year 1910 sent out thirty thousand cases, while the output for the year 
1911 will exceed forty thousand. The plant is in operation for about four months 
each year but they expect in 1912 to run the plant for six months in the year. 
Their pay roll averages about eight hundred dollars per week and anything which 
they put out under the name of the Spokane Valley brand is of high grade and 
quality, finding a ready sale on the market. They can all kinds of vegetables, 
fruits and berries and the business is growing steadily. In connection with his 
interest as president and treasurer of the Spokane Canning Company Mr. Stanley 
is also president of the Stanley Investment Company and is a director of the 
Fidelity National Bank. 

On the 10th of June, 1908, occurred the marriage of William H. Stanley and 
Miss Mabel Thorne, of Brooklyn, New York. They have many friends here and 
their own home is justly celebrated for its warm-hearted hospitality. Mr. Stanley 
is well known in club and social circles. In his college days he became a member 
of the Phi Delta Theta and he now belongs to the University, Spokane, Inland 
and Rotary Clubs, the leading social organizations of this city. The wisdom of 
his choice in selecting the northwest as the scene of his activities has been demon- 
strated in the success which has crowned his efforts, making him a well known 
representative of industrial activity in Spokane. 



FREDERICK BURBIDGE. 

The rich mineral deposits of the northwest offer a splendid field of labor for the 
mining engineer and as a representative of that profession Frederick Burbidge is 
now at the head of a substantial and growing business. He was born at Stratford, 
in Essex county, England, April 16, 1864, and was provided with splendid edu- 
cational privileges, for after attending the great institution of learning in his 
native city he became a student at King's College, in London. He was a youth of 
eighteen years when he left his native land for the new world, arriving in 1882 
at New York city, where for some time he was connected with the Orford Copper 
Company. After four years he was sent to Butte, Montana, as manager for the 
Butte Reduction Works, and there remained until 1888, when he came to Spokane. 
Since that time he has been engaged in mining either in this district or in that of 
the Coeur d'Alene. For eight years he was manager of the Bunker Hill and Sulli- 
van mines and is now manager of the Frisco mine. He understands the great 
scientific principles which underlie his work, together with every practical phase 
of the business and his labors have been attended with results highly satisfactory 
to the companies which he represents, as well as a source of gratifying income to 
himself. He is now president of the Coeur d'Alene Development Company, and in 
business matters with which he has been connected displays sound judgment and 
keen discrimination. 

On the 18th of May, 1892, occurred the marriage of Mr. Burbidge and Miss 
Rebecca Florence Williams, a daughter of William and Rebecca Williams, of Seneca 
Falls, New York. They have two children: Norman E., aged eighteen, now a 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 267 

student in Phillips Exeter Academy, at Exeter, New Hampshire; and Beatrice F., 
aged twelve, who is attending Brunot Hall. The family reside at No. 806 Seventh 
avenue. Mr. Burbidge has never been identified with politics or held office, but 
is a well known club man of the city and is popular with his associates in the work 
of the leading social organizations of Spokane. Since 1890 he has held member- 
ship in the Spokane Club, of which he was secretary in 1891-2, and he is also a 
life member of the Spokane Amateur Athletic Club. The business opportunities 
of the new world have been so attractive to him that he has never felt regret over 
leaving his native country. He is thoroughly American in spirit and interests and 
is a typical citizen of the northwest, alert to every opportunity and recognizing the 
fact that in this day of close competition, strenuous effort must be put forth to achieve 
the success which is worth while. 



JUDGE FRANK H. RUDKIN. 

Judge Frank H. Rudkin, who by appointment became judge of the district 
court of the United States for the eastern district of Washington, on the 81st of 
January, 1911, and since January, 1887, has been a member of the bar of this 
state, was born in Trumbull county, Ohio, April 28, 1864. His parents, Bernard 
and Winnifred (Leonard) Rudkin, were both natives of Ireland and are now resi- 
dents of Trumbull county, Ohio, where for many years they have made their home. 
In their family were five sons and one daughter : Frank H. ; Mark L., Edward and 
William B., all of whom are residents of Kinsman, Ohio; John J., living in Kenne- 
wick, Washington; and Mrs. T. A. Collins, whose home is in Greenville, Penn- 
sylvania. 

At the usual age Judge Rudkin entered the public schools of his native county, 
continuing his education in the high school and later in Washington and Lee Uni- 
versity at Lexington, Virginia, where he was graduated L. B. with the class of 
1886. In January of the following year he arrived in Washington and throughout 
his entire professional career has been connected with the bar of this state. He 
practiced law in Ell ens burg and North Yakima until 1900, in which year he was 
elected to the superior court bench from the district comprising Yakima, Kittitas 
and Franklin counties, his term to cover four years. Such was the record which 
he made in that connection that in 1904 he was elected judge of the supreme court 
of the state and served on the bench of the court of last resort in Washington for 
over six years. From 1909 until 1911 he was chief justice of the supreme court 
and was then reelected judge of the supreme court, while on the 81st of January, 
1911, he was appointed judge of the district court of the United States for the 
eastern district of Washington. Devotedly attached to his profession, systematic 
and methodical in habit, sober and discreet in judgment, calm in temper, diligent 
in research, conscientious in the discharge of every duty, courteous and kind in 
demeanor and inflexibly just on all occasions, these qualities have enabled Judge 
Rudkin to take first rank among those who have held the highest judicial office in 
the state and have made him the conservator of that justice wherein is the safe- 
guard of individual liberty and happiness and the defense of our national in- 
stitutions. His reported opinions are monuments to his profound legal learning 



268 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

and superior ability, more lasting than brass or marble and more honorable than 
battles fought and won. They show a thorough mastery of the questions involved, 
a rare simplicity of style, and an admirable terseness and clearness in the statement 
of the principles upon which the opinions rest. 

On the 8d of October, 1908, Judge Rudkin was married to Miss Pearl A. Mor- 
ford, or North Yakima, a granddaughter of John B. Nelson, one of the pioneer 
residents of North Yakima. The Judge is a member of the Spokane Club and those 
who come within the circle of his friends find him a social gentleman of unfeigned 
cordiality, with whom association means expansion and elevation. His successive 
elections to the bench indicate clearly his position as a jurist. An excellent pres- 
ence, earnest manner, marked strength of character, a thorough grasp of the law 
and the ability to correctly apply its principles make him an effective and suc- 
cessful advocate and ensure him equal rank with other distinguished members of 
the court of appeals. His record has at all times conferred honor and dignity 
upon the district that has honored him. 



MYRON ARCHER FOLSOM. 

In a history of the bar of Spokane appears the name of Myron Archer Folsom, 
whose work as an attorney has been of an important character, especially in the 
field of corporation law. He is particularly well known in connection with liti- 
gation of different mining companies and his professional work has made him a 
practitioner before all the state and federal courts upon the Pacific coast. 

The natal day of Mr. Folsom was January 16, 1875, and the place of his na- 
tivity a farm in Dane county, Wisconsin, his parents being Jeremiah and Mary 
(Lyon) Folsom, both of whom were representatives of early New England fam- 
ilies represented in this country since the colonial epoch in our history. At the 
usual age he began his education as a public-school student in Wisconsin and fol- 
lowing the removal of the family to Alexandria, South Dakota, he continued his 
studies there. Still he was not content with the opportunities for intellectual 
advancement thus far afforded him and in 1891, upon the opening of Leland Stan- 
ford Jr. University in California, he entered as one of the first students and was 
graduated in 1896 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In the fall of the same 
year he was admitted to the bar of California, having previously taken up the 
study of law, his thorough mastery of legal principles enabling him to success- 
fully pass the required examination that admitted him to practice before the courts 
of the state. In January, 1897, he opened an office in San Francisco and while 
there assisted in preparing an annotation of the codes of California. He also col- 
laborated with Curtis H. Lindley in the preparation of "Lindley on Mines" and 
edited the ninth edition in three volumes of "Desty's Federal Procedure." 

In the spring of 1899 Mr. Folsom went to northern Idaho and under a re- 
tainer from the state government assisted in the prosecutions resulting from the 
Coeur d'Alene riots. He was also assistant United States attorney in the prosecu- 
tion of the miners for interference with the United States mails. In December, 
1899, he arrived in Spokane, Washington, and became one of the attorneys for 
the Bunker Hill & Sullivan Mining Company and rendered valuable services in 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 269 

connection with the important apex litigation involved. He has tried cases in all 
the state and federal courts of California, Oregon, Idaho and Washington and 
also before the United States supreme court and in recent years his practice has 
been mostly in the United States courts. His knowledge of the law is compre- 
hensive and his deductions logical, while in the application of a legal principle he 
displays marked discernment. His arguments are characterized by a perspicuity 
that leaves no one at sea as to his meaning. 

In December, 1896, Mr. Folsom was married to Miss Maud Wads worth, a 
daughter of Hiram Wadsworth of Spokane, and they have two daughters, Frances 
and Janet. Mr. Folsom is a member of the principal social organizations of the 
city and has been honored with the presidency of the Spokane Club. He is a 
representative of our best type of American manhood and his genuine worth, broad 
mind and public spirit have made him a director of public thought and action. He 
has never sought, nor desired office and in fact has never sought to figure personally 
before the public in any light or any relation outside of his profession, yet his 
influence is felt as a strong, steady, moving force in the social, moral and legal 
movements of the community. 



SIKKO BARGHOORN. 



Sikko Barghoorn, general agent at Spokane for the Netherlands American Mort- 
gage Bank, has in this connection become well known as a representative of 
financial interests in this city and has proven his worth as an enterprising and re- 
sourceful business man. He was born in Groningen, Holland, on the 18th of Jan- 
uary, 1875, and after completing bis education there in the government high school, 
entered the employ of the Netherlands American Mortgage Bank of his native city, 
with which he has since been connected. After a brief period, in which he had 
proven his worth and adaptability, he was sent by the bank to America in 1898 
and made his way direct to Spokane. Soon afterward he opened an office at Pull- 
man, Washington, and later at Moscow, Idaho, but in 1907 took up his permanent 
abode in Spokane, where as representative for the company he has done an ex- 
tensive business in farm mortgages, loaning about three million dollars on farm 
properties in the Spokane country, while about ten million dollars of the company's 
funds have been loaned in the United States. He is also a director of the Spokane 
& Eastern Trust Company and is a prominent figure in financial circles, thor- 
oughly versed on realty values and manifesting keen discrimination in the place- 
ment of investments. 

On the 15th of June, 1902, Mr. Barghoorn was married to Miss Franc Mc- 
Connell, a daughter of Richard D. McConnell, a resident of Moscow, Idaho. Three 
children have been born of this union: Sikko Richard, Catharine Anna and Win- 
ston William. The family home is at No. 825 East Mission avenue, in one of the 
attractive residence districts of the city. Mr. Barghoorn is well known sociallv 
through his membership in the Spokane Club, the Spokane Country Club and the 
Spokane Amateur Athletic Club. He not only easily wins friends but has the 
happy faculty of retaining the warm regard of those with whom he is associated. 
He has proven his worth in the business world, the company which he represents 



270 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

finding him a most trustworthy and capable representative, who has expert know- 
ledge of the realty and financial situation of the section of the country in which he 
operates and therefore makes judicious investments that are proving a source of 
gratifying profit. 



CYRUS HAPPY. 



Cyrus Happy, of Spokane, was born on a farm in Perry county, Illinois, near 
the present city of Duquoin, January 28, 1845, a son of Burgin and Mary (Wil- 
liams) Happy. Both his parents were natives of Kentucky, removing with their 
individual families to Illinois, where they were married. He was reared on the 
paternal farm, receiving in his early years only the educational advantages of a 
country log school, which he attended for three months in the winter seasons until 
the age of fifteen. Owing to the absence of his elder brother in the army it then 
became necessary for him to devote his entire time to the work of the farm. In 
March, 1865, he enlisted, under the last call of President Lincoln, in Company K. 
Eighteenth Illinois Infantry, and he continued in the service until December of 
the same year, when he was mustered out with his regiment. 

After leaving the army Mr. Happy decided to complete his education and 
pursued studies in the academy at Duquoin, Illinois, and then in McKendree Col- 
lege at Lebanon, where he was graduated in the scientific course in 1869. He 
then went to Edwardsville, Illinois (the county seat of Madison county), studied 
law in the office of Gillespie & Springer, and in 1871 was admitted to the bar and 
embarked in practice at that place. For some six years he was in professional 
partnership with Judge David Gillespie (his preceptor in the law), and sub- 
sequently, until 1891, he sustained the same relation with C. N. Travous, who 
had been a student in Mr. Happy's law office and became a practitioner of eminent 
ability and reputation, occupying at the time of his death, in 1908, the position of 
general counsel of the Wabash system of railroads. During his professional ca- 
reer of twenty years in Illinois Mr. Happy enjoyed substantial success and became 
known as one of the representative members of the bar. At all times interested 
in public questions and affairs, he took a somewhat active part in politics. As a 
young lawyer he was twice a candidate for county judge, but except on those 
occasions never ran for political office. In the campaign of 1876 he was a nominee 
for presidential elector on the republican ticket, which was successful at the polls, 
and he joined in formally casting the vote of Illinois for Hayes and Wheeler. 

Owing to failing health Mr. Happy determined to establish himself in the 
northwest and in January, 1891, removed to Spokane, where he has since resided 
and pursued his profession. He is known for exceptional conscientiousness and 
fidelity in his work, and for marked accomplishment and ability in certain technical 
branches of the law which in recent years have become of the very highest im- 
portance throughout the northwestern country. Mr. Happy was among the first 
to foresee the peculiar demands that would be made upon the legal profession by 
the general process of irrigation; and in the department of irrigation law he is 
one of the foremost authorities and practitioners. 



CYBUS HAPPY 



r~: 



i ,„ 












- 1 W VI' 






SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 273 

His special interest in this direction was the outgrowth of extensive observa- 
tion and study of the subject of irrigation as related to agricultural possibilities, 
and of an intimate personal connection with several vital undertakings. In 1902, 
in behalf of clients who had a large financial interest in an irrigation company 
in the Yuma valley, Arizona, he with his law partner devoted much attention to 
the concerns of that company. This led bim to make an exhaustive study of irri- 
gation questions and problems in their historical, legal and practical aspects, and 
he traveled many thousands of miles in the United States and Mexico, examining 
the different systems in operation. As one of the legal representatives of the 
Yuma valley enterprise (known as the Irrigation Land & Improvement Company), 
he has participated actively in the fight for it in the courts and before the United 
States department having jurisdiction of the matter against the practically con- 
fiscatory policy of the United States Reclamation service — a contest attracting wide 
attention because of the governmental methods involved. 

From his earliest residence in Spokane Mr. Happy took an active interest in 
projects for developing the natural resources of the surrounding country. It was 
generally believed that on account of the gravelly nature of the soil throughout 
the Spokane valley irrigation was impracticable on any basis of expectation of 
profit. On the 4th of April, 1901, W. L. Benham, a retired railroad man, filed 
articles of incorporation of the Spokane Valley Land & Water Company; and 
after making appropriations of water in the lakes around the valley, he constructed 
an irrigation canal through a section of- land which he had*- acquired at Greenacres. 
"The experiment (we quote from a piper by Mr. 4 'Hippy) demonstrated that the* 
gravelly soil of Spokane valley makes) the^best irrigating canals and ditches that 
can be made without concrete, and tthat the soil is as responsive to the in- 
telligent application of moisture as: any' 'Soil *Jn' t 'the world." But it was 
exceedingly difficult to overcome the "settled prejudice on the subject. In 
the critical emergency of the company Mr. Happy was one of the first to come 
to its support, and by his money, labor and influence greatly assisted it to be- 
come a success. After the retirement of Mr. Benham he was president of the 
company in the most critical period of its existence, shortly before it was sold 
to D. C. Corbin. He took a leading part also in promoting the success of the 
Spokane Canal Company, constantly rendering it most valuable assistance, and 
is still its legal adviser. He was one of the principal incorporators of the Methow 
Canal Company, in Okanogan county, served for some time as its president, and 
has always been its legal representative. In addition, his firm has charge of the 
legal interests of the Arcadia Land Company. 

To Mr. Happy the people of the Pacific northwest are largely indebted for the in- 
terest now being taken in apple culture on an extensive and scientific scale. Con- 
vinced by his knowledge of the capabilities of the soil of the Spokane valley when 
subjected to intelligent irrigation that it offered special advantages for the culture 
of the apple, he became an enthusiastic advocate of that industry, and there is 
no man to whom a larger share of credit is due for the resulting progress. 

As a citizen of Spokane he is known for high character and ideals and for 
active usefulness, both in connection with the general interests of the community 
and in the private relations and influences of life. He is an accomplished and 
forcible speaker, and has written and published considerable on various topics, 
especially in relation to the substantial advantages and resources of the northwest. 

Vol II— m 



274 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

In politics he has always sustained his relation with the republican party, con- 
tributing to its success by campaign speeches, though as in early life, declining 
to become a candidate for office. His law firm is Happy, Winfree & Hindman, in 
which W. H. Winfree and W. W. Hindman are associated with him. 

Mr. Happy married, in Edwardsville, Illinois, September 11, 1879, Minna 
Mary Prickett, a daughter of John A. and Elizabeth M. Prickett. Their children 
are: Claudine Hunt, who married G. W. Kaufman, now of Marsh field, Oregon; 
Eloise, who wedded Seth Richards, a son of Henry M. Richards, of Spokane, 
Washington; Cyrus, Jr.; and John Harrison. 



HON. FLOYD LORENZO DAGGETT. 

The history of the settlement and development of the Atlantic seaboard is be- 
ing duplicated on the Pacific coast, save that the work here undertaken by pro- 
gressive men has back of it the intelligent understanding of experience and de- 
velopment of several intervening generations, and work that in colonial days 
required many years to accomplish is now done in about the same number of 
months, for experience and invention have brought out skill and ability, so that 
today there is little loss of time or labor. The feature of development in the 
northwest which now most closely occupies the time and attention of Hon. Floyd 
Lorenzo Daggett is the irrigation of hitherto arid lands and thus the reclamation 
of hundreds of acres which through the extension of the water system have been 
converted into richly productive fields. 

Mr. Daggett was born at Dodgeville, Wisconsin, December 16, 1862, a son of 
Pliny A. and Margaret L. (Floyd) Daggett. His parents were pioneer settlers of 
Wisconsin, having settled at Dodgeville in 1855, at the time of their removal 
westward from Attleboro, Massachusetts. The father gave his attention to gen- 
eral farming until 1870, when he engaged in the fire insurance business, securing 
a good clientage in that line. In February, 1889, he came to the Pacific coast 
and thereafter conducted a fire insurance agency in Spokane until 1898, when he 
retired to private life. He is now a resident of Sandpoint, Idaho, but his wife 
died in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1887. During his residence in Spokane he 
was very prominent in Masonic circles and became widely known among the 
leading Masons of this part of the state. 

At the usual age Floyd L. Daggett became a pupil in the public schools of 
Dodgeville and after putting aside his text-books he secured a position in a mer- 
cantile establishment of that city. Laudable ambition prompted him to put forth 
his best efforts in every connection, and progress resulted from his close appli- 
cation and well directed energy. His fellow townsmen, appreciative of his worth 

9 

and ability, called him to the office of town clerk, in which he served for seven 
years and upon the removal of the family to Spokane, he became associated with 
his father in the fire insurance business, under the firm name of P. A. Daggett & 
Company, this relation being maintained until 1898. Floyd L. Daggett then be- 
came sole proprietor of the business and conducted the agency until 1901, when 
he was again called to public office, having been elected city comptroller. He 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 275 

received indorsement of his first term's service in a reelection, which continued 
him in office until May, 1905, when he was chosen by popular suffrage to the 
office of mayor of Spokane, remaining as chief executive of the city for a term 
of two years. Since attaining his majority his political allegiance has been given 
to the democratic party and it was upon that ticket that he was elected. He 
brought to his official duties the same spirit of progress and improvement that has 
characterized all of his business career, and while the incumbent in office he built 
the present reservoir and expended on behalf of the city a half million dollars 
in extending the water system. He was the first to advocate the well system, now 
used extensively in furnishing the city water supply. His public service also cov- 
ered nine years' connection with the school board, from 1897 until 1907, and during 
the same period he was a member of the park commission. From 1901 until 1907 
he served on the library commission and was a member of the committee that super- 
vised the building of the present library. His deep interest in Spokane and its 
welfare has been manifest in many tangible and effective efforts on its behalf. 

At the present writing Mr. Daggett is not connected with any office but is con- 
centrating his energies upon his business affairs which have been of constantly 
growing importance. He was one of the original promoters and incorporators 
of the Arcadia Orchard Company and for three years acted as its president. This 
is the largest orchard irrigation proposition in the United States. Since disposing 
of his interest in that undertaking Mr. Daggett has devoted his time to other irri- 
gated land propositions on a smaller scale and his efforts are proving a potent 
force in the development of the state and the reclamation of the hitherto arid dis- 
tricts. The value of his work cannot be overestimated and thus he is taking active 
and helpful part in the upbuilding of the Inland Empire. 

On the 6th of June, 1886, at Muscoda, Wisconsin, Mr. Daggett was united in 
marriage to Miss Christeena Mclntyre, a daughter of John B. and Cynthia (Alli- 
son) Mclntyre, of that city. Three children have been born unto them but the 
youngest, Bradley, died July 7, 1911, when fourteen years of age. The other two 
are: Gordon F., now a civil engineer of Spokane; and Gus M., who is express 
messenger on the Great Northern Railroad. The family reside at No. 704 Augusta 
avenue. They attend the Vincent Methodist Episcopal church, of which Mr. Dag- 
gett was one of the organizers and of which he has continuously served as a trus- 
tee. He has membership relations with Spokane Lodge, No. 34, F. & A. M.; Red 
Cross Lodge, No. 47, K. P. ; and Camp No. 99, W. O. W. He has long been recog- 
nised as a leader of thought and action in this district and the consensus of public 
opinion places him among the alert and enterprising citizens of Spokane. 



JOHN F. SPANGLE. 



John F. Spangle, who for seven years past has filled the office of postmaster 
of Cheney, is one of the highly respected citizens of Spokane county, a position 
which he has gained by his genial traits of character and his ability as a public 
official. He is a native of Madison county, Illinois, born January 22, 1859, a son 
of William and Christina (Berger) Spangle, the latter of whom died in January, 



276 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

1910. The father served under General W. T. Sherman in the Civil war, being a 
member of the Thirtieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He is still living and has 
arrived at the age of seventy-seven years. 

In the common schools of Illinois John JP. Spangle secured his preliminary 
education. At the age of twelve he came to Washington and spent the winter at 
Walla Walla. The following spring he took up his home on the site now occupied 
by Spangle and may, therefore, be named as one of the very early settlers in this 
section. He engaged in farming until 1885, except for a few months in 1875 when 
he carried the mail on horseback through the Spokane country. About 1888, hav- 
ing decided to give up agriculture, he applied himself to the carpenter's trade, 
in which he continued for eleven years. In 1899 he was appointed clerk of the 
county commissioners of Spokane county, a position which he filled with great 
acceptance for three and one-half years. He has. occupied the office of postmaster 
of Cheney since February, 1904, having been appointed to that position by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt, and four years later was reappointed to the office, the duties of 
which he has discharged to the entire satisfaction of the people and of the officials 
at Washington. 

On the 18th of October, 1880, at Cheney, Mr. Spangle was married to Miss 
Mary A. Cook whose parents were early settlers of Washington. To this union 
three children have been born: Carrie M.; George W., who married Miss Irma 
Le Cornu; and Myrtle E. 

Politically Mr. Spangle has been an earnest supporter of the republican party 
ever since he arrived at manhood and has taken a lively interest in local, state and 
national elections. He was a delegate to the state convention at Ellensburg, in 
1899, and also to the state convention at Spokane, in 1907. Fraternally he is iden- 
tified with the Masonic order and served as worshipful master of Cheney Lodge in 
1904, being also a valued member of the Odd Fellows. He has passed through all 
the chairs of the subordinate lodge of the order last named. Endowed with good 
powers of observation and discrimination, he has made practical use of oppor- 
tunities as they arose and he is today one of the best known men of Cheney. He 
has been connected with the development of this section since his boyhood and no 
man has been more deeply interested in the progress which has been witnessed in 
Spokane county or notes with greater pride the remarkable development which is 
now taking place throughout this region. His life has been governed by honor- 
able principles and his example has been to others an inspiration and support the 
value of which it would be difficult indeed to estimate. 



JAMES L. PAINE. 



No matter in how much fantastic theorizing one may indulge as to the cause 
of success, investigation into the lives of those who have won honorable prosperity 
shows that their advancement is due not to any unusual combination of circum- 
stances, but to the fact that they have improved opportunities which any might 
employ, and that industry, determination and honorable dealing are salient forces in 
winning success. Such has been the record of James L. Paine, now the secretary 
and treasurer of the Spokane Dry Goods Company, engaging in both the wholesale 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 277 

and retail trade. His residence in Spokane covers a period of twenty-one years. 
He arrived here in 1890 when a young man of twenty- four years, his birth having 
occurred in Algona, Iowa, December 14, 1865, his parents being James L. and 
Susan P. (Horton) Paine. After attending the public schools of his native city 
he continued his education in Iowa College at Grinnell, Iowa, and then in Algona 
became associated with J. M. Comstock, who is now the vice president of the Spokane 
Dry Goods Company and is mentioned elsewhere in this volume. At that time he 
was one of the business men of Algona, Iowa, but thinking to find better business 
opportunities in the west he arrived in Washington in 1889 and established the 
enterprise now conducted under the name of the Spokane Dry Goods Company. 
Appreciative of Mr. Paine's services he sought his cooperation in the new field in 
1890 and in 1895, when the company was incorporated under the name of the 
Spokane Dry Goods Company, Mr. Paine was admitted to a partnership and has 
since had active voice in the management of the business. He is now secretary 
and treasurer of the Spokane Dry Goods Company which has both wholesale and 
retail departments of considerable extent, the retail store, which is conducted 
under the name of the Crescent, being one of the most attractive and up-to-date 
department stores in the northwest. The utmost care has been shown in the selec- 
tion of employes and the house has ever maintained a high standard in its personnel, 
in the quality of goods carried and in the character of service rendered to the public. 
In addition to his connection with the dry-goods trade Mr. Payne is also secre- 
tary of the Dry Goods Realty Company, which owns valuable business property 
including the buildings in which the Spokane Dry Goods Company and the Cres- 
cent store are operating. 

On the 23d of June, 1897, in Chicago, Mr. Paine was married to Miss Agnes 
Cowley, a daughter of H. T. and Lucy A. (Peet) Cowley, of this city, her* father 
having been one of the pioneer educators of Spokane and well known as a promoter 
of the school interests of the city. Mr. and Mrs. Paine have two children, Lawrence 
C. and Margaret. The family attend the Westminster Congregational church and 
Mr. Paine is serving as president of its board of trustees. He belongs to Oriental 
Lodge, No. 74, F. & A. M., and to the Spokane Club, and while never taking an 
active interest in politics nor binding himself by party ties, he is interested in pro- 
gressive citizenship and his cooperation can always be counted upon to further 
measures for the general good. His success has its root in the fact that he has 
always continued in the line of trade in which he embarked as a young salesman, 
thoroughly familiarizing himself with the business in every detail and employing 
the most advanced and progressive methods in its conduct. 



WILLIAM G. MALLOY. 



William G. Malloy is a member of the firm of Malloy Brothers, investment and 
real-estate brokers with offices in the Old National Bank building. He has also 
other important interests of a kindred nature and as an officer has voice in the man- 
agement of the various companies with which he is connected, all of which are not 
only proving sources of individual profit but are also factors in promoting general 
development and prosperity. Mr. Malloy was born in Frisco, Utah, November 8, 



278 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE i 

1877, a son of Patrick A. and Catherine Frances Malloy. The father arrived in 
Walla Walla, Washington, in 1864, and was engaged in the cattle business, freight- 
ing and mining and knew this entire section of the country when it was an almost 
undeveloped wilderness, only a few ranchmen and traders having ventured into the 
district where the Indians were more numerous than the white settlers. Through his 
business activity he took active part in the substantial improvement of the west 
where he continued his residence until his death, on Christmas Day, 1900. His 
widow still survives, as do their five children, namely : Catherine, the wife of Bruce 
Clendenning, of Spokane; Ida, who married C. Harry Woodin, also of this city; 
Minnie; John S. ; and William G., of this review. 

The Malloy family has resided in Spokane since 1886, William G. Malloy being 
a lad of eight years at the time of the removal to this city* He attended the public 
schools in this city and afterward entered All Hollow's College at Salt Lake City, 
after which he returned and secured a position as bookkeeper. Later he was con- 
nected for a time with the Northern Pacific Railroad, but ambitious to engage in 
business on his own account turned his attention to the real-estate and insurance 
business in 1900, forming a partnership with Jerome Drumheller, under the firm 
style of Drumheller & Malloy. In 1906 this firm dissolved and Mr. Malloy was 
then joined by his brother under the present firm style of Malloy Brothers, real 
estate and investments. They make a specialty of irrigated lands in the Spokane 
valley and have handled much valuable property, their efforts in this direction being 
effective in inducing many settlers to come to this district whereby the growth and 
upbuilding of the valley has been largely augmented. In addition to his partner- 
ship relation with his brother, William G. Malloy is the president of the Willa- 
pacific Town Site Company, of the Hayden-Coeur d'Alene Irrigated Company and 
the Maple Hill Coal Company. 

Mr. Malloy makes his home at No. 1780 Pacific avenue, where he resides with 
his mother who was one of the pioneers of California, her father having settled 
there during the early period of mining excitement. She was born in Los Angeles 
and made her way up through this country in 1864. She has therefore been a 
witness of the greater part of the growth and development of the west, watching 
great changes that have transformed the Pacific coast into a great empire. Mr. 
Malloy belongs to Spokane Lodge, No. 228, B. P. O. E., and also holds member- 
ship in the Spokane, Spokane Amateur Athletic and the Spokane Country Clubs. 
He has a wide acquaintance and is popular in these different organizations and is 
recognized in business circles as a man of progressive and forceful spirit who 
neglects no opportunity for legitimate advancement in the field of business in which 
he has embarked. 



W. D. VALENTINE, M. D. 



Dr. W. P. Valentine is the oldest continuous boxholder in the Spokane post- 
office, which indicates his connection with the city from early pioneer times, his 
residence here dating from 1884. While he has long stood in the front rank of 
his profession he has also become a prominent factor in mining circles and like 



DR. \V. IX VALENTINE 



I'u-^iC UPkARY 



7*« £N * ^v^DATJMI 



*■*«•«■*■ 



M 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 281 

many of the residents of the northwest has won substantial and gratifying success 
in developing the rich mineral resources of the country. * 

He was born in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, January 22, 1850, and when only 
three years of age was taken by his parents to Ogle county, Illinois. He was 
graduated from the Rock River College in 1870 and continued his studies in the 
Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois, where he won a degree in 1872, 
further supplementing his more specifically literary knowledge by a year's study 
in the Illinois State University, from which he was graduated in 1873. His prepara J 
tion for the practice of medicine was made in the Chicago Medical College and 
in the Pulte Medical College of Cincinnati, completing his course in the former 
in 1875 and in the latter in 1877. He next entered the Physio-Medical Institute 
in Cincinnati and was graduated in 1880. While studying medicine he engaged in 
teaching for a time and was prominent among its educators who raised the standard 
of scholarship in Ogle county until the schools of that county won the gold medal 
at the Centennial Exposition of 1876. 

Dr. Valentine located for practice in Polo, Illinois, where he remained for two 
years, and then removed to Lanark, that state, where he resided until 1884. At 
that time he came to Spokane and in the intervening years has ever maintained a 
foremost position in the ranks of the medical profession in this city. He was on 
the high road to prosperity when the fire of 1889 occurred, bringing to him heavy 
losses. He worked untiringly and heroically to sa.ve property belonging to several 
of his neighbors and then finally turned to save his. own,, carrying out some of 
his office effects which, however, were burned in the street. He was at length 
compelled to flee from his office and on reaching the foot of the stairs found the air full 
of fire, and as he crossed the street Wag -tadly. .burned, besides losing a very 
valuable package of money and securities. A man who crossed just ahead of him 
was suffocated in the street. Such was the effect of this fiery ordeal upon the 
Doctor's lungs and upon the mucus lining of his stomach that for three years he 
was disqualified for active business but finally recovered and resumed practice. 
He has kept pace with the march of improvement that has brought the medical 
profession to its present high standard of knowledge and efficiency. His reading 
has been broad and his investigations and research have placed him with those who 
speak authoritatively upon various branches of the medical science. Moreover, 
his duties have always been performed with a sense of conscientious obligation 
that has won the confidence and trust of his patrons. Dr. Valentine has also be- 
come widely known in connection with mining interests. For several years he 
was the vice president of the Federal Mining & Smelting Company and is now 
a stockholder in various other good propositions including the Elk City Mining 
Company, the Togo Mining Company and the United Copper Mining & Smelting 
Company, of all of which he is a director. He is deserving of the prominence and 
success that have come to him not only by reason of his ability in his profession 
but also because he has proven a valuable factor in many of the activities which 
have counted as of most worth in the upbuilding of the city. 

On the 26th of June, 1909, Dr. Valentine was united in marriage to Mrs. Anna 
M. Hayes, who was also one of the pioneer residents of Spokane. He belongs to 
the Vincent Methodist Episcopal church and is a prominent member of Samaritan 
Lodge, No. 52, I. O. O. F. In fact he has taken the various degrees in Odd Fel- 
lowship and has filled all of the chairs in the order, and also held office in the 



282 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Grand Lodge and the Canton. He is now examining physician for Excelsior Camp, 
No. % 5124, M. W. A., and other camps of the organization, and also of the Royal 
Neighbors of America. He was one of the organizers of the Modern Woodmen 
fraternity and was one of the three who named the order. He likewise belongs to 
Oriental Lodge, No. 74, F. & A. M., to the Brotherhood of American Yeomen, and 
for many years he has been a prominent and active member of the Pioneer Asso- 
ciation. In strictly professional lines his fraternal relations are with the County 
and State Medical Societies, the National Medical Association and the Medical 
Association of Physio-Medical Physicians and Surgeons. On matters of general 
history pertaining to Spokane he may well be consulted for few residents in this 
city have longer remained here and there are indeed few who have been in closer 
touch with the life and interests of the community. 



AARON KUHN. 



The name of Aaron Kuhn is a familiar one in banking circles in eastern Wash- 
ington and, honored and respected by all, no man occupying a more enviable posi- 
tion among the financiers of the state, not only by reason of the success which he 
has accomplished but also owing to the straightforward and reliable methods he 
has ever followed in safeguarding the interests of depositors and in promoting the 
growth and success of the banks with which he is connected. 

Mr. Kuhn was born in Germany, January 25, 1857, and after acquiring his 
education in the public schools there, he came to America in 1878, being at that 
time a youth of sixteen years. The opportunities of the western world had proved 
to him an irresistible attraction and he made his way direct to Salt Lake City, 
where he established a store, engaging in the sale of cigars, stationery and other 
goods. In 1875 he removed to Elko, Nevada, and later became a resident of 
Tuscarora, Nevada, where he engaged in the same line of business until 1878. 
In that year he went to San Francisco, where he continued for about four months, 
removing thence to Pierce City, Idaho, where he conducted a general mercantile 
store until 1883. Disposing of his stock at that place, he removed to Colfax, 
Whitman county, Washington, and began again in the same line. This was a 
pioneer period in the history of the region and he made good use of the oppor- 
tunities which were his and developed his business with the growth of the country. 
Saving his money, he made prudent investment in lands throughout the wheat and 
fruit belt, recognizing that real estate is the safest of all investments. Gradually 
he extended his holdings as his financial resources increased and also developed 
his property, becoming one of the biggest and best known wheat shippers of this 
part of the state, having shipped as high as a million and a half bushels in a single 
season. Thus his business reached mammoth proportions and he continued in 
active connection with Colfax until 1902, when he disposed of most of his interests 
there and removed to Spokane. In 1908 he became associated with Alfred Cool- 
idge and Adolph F. McClaine in purchasing the controlling interest in the Traders 
National Bank, which was then capitalized for two hundred thousand dollars, the 
capital stock, however, having since been raised to a million dollars. He served 
as president of that bank in 1907, 1908 and 1909 and is now a member of its 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 283 

executive committee, spending much of his time at the bank. He is recognized 
as a power in financial circles here, his operations covering a wide territory, for 
he is the president of the Davenport National Bank of Davenport, Washington, 
of the Garfield (Washington) National Bank, of the Bonner County National 
Bank of Sandpoint, Idaho, and a director of the Inland Empire Railway Com- 
pany and of the Spokane & Washington Improvement Company, close corpora- 
tions, which are owners of the Manitou addition. He holds much real estate in 
Spokane and shortly after his removal to this city purchased the Van Valkenberg 
and Holland block on Riverside avenue, remodeling and improving this and trans- 
forming it into one of the fine business structures of the city, now known as the 
Kuhn building. 

On the 8th of May, 1884, at Lewiston, Idaho, Mr. Kuhn was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Leah Grostein, a daughter of Robert and Rosa Grostein, of that city, 
who were pioneers of Lewiston, settling there in 1861, when the discovery of gold 
brought many residents to that district. They had formerly made their home in 
Buffalo, New York. Mr. and Mrs. Kuhn have a daughter, Rena, born in Colfax, 
Whitman county, Washington, now the wife of Carl H. Weil, of Chicago. Mr. 
Kuhn is a Mason who has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite 
and belongs to El Eatif Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He has served as vice 
president of the Temple Emmanuel and is generous in support of the church but 
takes no active part in club life or in politics. His home address is No. 2815 
First avenue. His energies have been concentrated upon his business and his 
varied and important interests have contributed substantially to the growth, de- 
velopment and prosperity of various localities. 



ALFRED E. BARNES. 

Alfred E. Barnes is actively connected with a profession that has important 
bearing upon the progress and stable prosperity of every community, and it is also 
one in which advancement depends upon individual merit and ability. Environ- 
ment nor influence can have but little effect upon the attainment of success in this 
field but broad study, careful analysis and logical reasoning are the concomitants 
which insure success. Ability therefore becomes in a measure prominence, and 
that Mr. Barnes occupies a leading position in the ranks of the legal profession 
is an indication of his learning and skill in his chosen field. He was born in Ashta- 
bula, Ohio, February 6, 1857, his parents being Alfred J. S. and Susan M. (Jef- 
fords) Barnes. His father was engaged in dairy farming in the Buckeye state and 
for more than forty years served as justice of the peace in his home locality, his 
impartial decisions winning him golden opinions from all sorts of people. At the 
time of the Civil war he offered his services as a private to the government, enlisting 
in the Sixth Ohio Cavalry and when his first term had expired he reenlisted as a 
member of the Second Ohio Heavy Artillery, from which he was discharged in 
August, 1866, with the' rank of sergeant. As the result of an accident that occurred 
at Knoxville, Tennessee, during the period of his second enlistment, he was partially 
paralyzed and remained so until his death in 1892. 



284 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

At the usual age Alfred E. Barnes began his education as a public-school student 
in Ashtabula county and afterward went to Ponca, Nebraska, to join his elder 
brother, John B., who is now a member of the supreme court of that state. Alfred 
E. Barnes there took up the study of law, which he pursued while engaged in teach- 
ing school. His thorough preliminary reading qualified him for admission to the 
bar in March, 1879, and for twenty years he continued to practice law at Ponca. 
He was accorded a large clientele and at the same time was regarded as one of the 
leaders of the republican party in that district. He held the office of county at- 
torney of Dixon county, Nebraska, from 1892 until 1894, and was at one time 
candidate for the position of attorney general but was defeated through the activities 
of the railroad interests. 

Mr. Barnes has been a resident of Spokane since September, 1899, at which time 
he entered upon the practice of law under the firm name of Hyde, Latimer & Barnes. 
Following the withdrawal of the senior member, the firm style of Barnes & Latimer 
was assumed but in 1906 this connection was discontinued and Mr. Barnes has 
since practiced alone. He has remained active in ' republican ranks since coming to 
the northwest and during the campaigns has always been called upon to tour the 
state in behalf of his party. He has never held public office here, however, prefer- 
ring to concentrate his entire attention upon his professional duties which are of 
constantly growing importance. While undoubtedly not without that honorable 
ambition which is so powerful and useful as an incentive to activity in public af- 
fairs, he regards the pursuits of private life as being in themselves abundantly 
worthy of his best efforts. Well versed in the learning of his profession and with 
a deep knowledge of human nature and the springs of human conduct, with great 
shrewdness and sagacity and extraordinary tact, he is in the courts an advocate of 
great power and influence. 

Mr. Barnes resides with his family at No. 625 South Pine street. He was mar- 
ried at Ponca, Nebraska, July 12, 1882, to Miss Cornelia A. King, a daughter of 
William King, of Kewanee, Illinois, and they have three children, Eugene A., W. 
Lamont and Edwin King, all of Spokane. Mr. Barnes affiliates with the Masonic 
fraternity but in other ways has not extended his membership relations. His pro- 
fessional and political activities make full demand upon his time and energies, and 
the position of leadership which is accorded him in each is a recognition of his 
ability and worth. 



JAMES D. BUCHANAN. 

James D. Buchanan has been well known for many years in the business cir- 
cles of Spokane where he conducts a large undertaking establishment at Nos. 28 
and 80 Third avenue. His birth occurred in Clark county, Indiana, on the 14th 
of April, 1858, and he is a son of George and Jane (Montgomery) Buchanan, the 
former of whom passed away in 1891. His ancestors were among the early set- 
tlers of America, and Buchanan county, Virginia, received its name from some of 
the earliest members of the family who settled in Virginia. His boyhood days 
were spent in Illinois and there he received his education from the time he was 
seven years of age until he left school at the age of fourteen. At that time he 



J. D. BUCHANAN 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 287 

entered upon agricultural pursuits and continued in that line of work until 1879 
when he went to Walla Walla, Washington, where he remained until March 1880. 
He then went to Spokane and took up a homestead in the northeastern part of the 
town which he farmed until 1889, but as the city grew and opportunities for en- 
gaging in business presented themselves, he gave up his farming and engaged in 
the cigar and tobacco business for some time before entering upon the undertaking 
business, which he has since followed. On December 1, 1911, Mr. Buchanan re- 
moved from Riverside avenue to his new establishment at Nos. 28 and 80 Third 
avenue, where he has one of the finest undertaking establishment in the Inland 
Empire. The building, which was exclusively designed for him, contains a chapel 
and all other rooms and conveniences desirable and its cost was over twenty-five 
thousand dollars. The structure is devoted entirely to this business. 

On the 1st of June, 1897, Mr. Buchanan was married to Miss Ella M. Ryan, a 
daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth Ryan, at Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Two children 
were born to this union, Mary and Catherine, both of whom are attending school. 
In politics Mr. Buchanan is fully aware of the corrupt methods frequently insti- 
tuted by the parties, who are largely under the control of the machine rule, and 
consequently has ever maintained an independent attitude. He is a member of 
Spokane Lodge No. 228, B. P. O. E., the Knights of Columbus, Eagles, Red Men, 
Foresters of America, Moose, JKnights and Ladies of Security, Catholic Order of 
Foresters, Young Men's Institution, and the Ancient Order of Hiberians, of which 
he is state president. In his business and fraternal relations he is both faithful 
and honorable, and his sterling personal worth has gained him warm friends, and 
he is well established in the respect and- oolce m of his fellow-citizens and business 
associates. 1 



X— 



THOMAS H. BREWER. 



In the history of banking in the northwest the name of Thomas H. Brewer de- 
serves prominent place, for he is the president of the Fidelity National Bank of 
Spokane and the Genesee Exchange Bank, of Genesee, Idaho, the vice president 
of the First National Bank of Pullman and of the Security National Bank of 
Cheney, Washington, and is a director of the First National Bank of Coeur d'Alene. 
He has studied banking from every possible standpoint, draws upon broad prac- 
tical experience in the conduct of his interests and has ever recognized the fact that 
the careful safeguarding of depositors' interests constitutes one of the most force- 
ful features in success. Almost the entire width of the continent separates him 
from his birthplace and in the review of his life one is reminded of the statement 
of an eminent lecturer that the strongest and most capable men of the country are 
those who have had their nativity in the east and have sought and utilized the busi- 
ness opportunities that are to be found in the growing west. His birth occurred 
June 28, 1871, in the town of Punxsutawney, Jefferson county, Pennsylvania, at 
that time a very quiet lumbering town. His parents were John Mitchell Brewer 
and Margaret L. (Thompson) Brewer. His father was a lumberman, running rafts 
of hewed timber down the Mahoning creek to the Allegheny river, thence to the city 
of Pittsburg where the timber was sold. In his boyhood days Thomas H. Brewer 



288 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

assisted in a small way in calculating the amount of timber in the rafts, until his 
father's death in 1887. Two years later his mother married again, becoming the 
wife of John E. Reed, a farmer of Moran Prairie, near Spokane. 

A year afterward, in 1890, Thomas H. Brewer left his position as office boy 
with the Rochester & Pittsburg Coal & Iron Company at Walston, Pennsylvania, 
and came to Spokane. He realized the benefit of commercial college training and 
here attended the Spokane Business College during the months of December, 1890, 
and January, 1891, receiving therefrom a graduate's diploma. He then accepted a 
position as bookkeeper with John P. Vollmer, of Lewiston, Idaho, in June, 1891, 
but after two months was transferred to Vollmer, Idaho, now Troy, where for two 
years he acted as bookkeeper and assistant manager of Mr. Vollmer's store. In 
1898 he was transferred to Genesee, Latah county, Idaho, becoming bookkeeper and 
collector in Mr. Vollmer's store at that point and in February 1894, he was ap- 
pointed cashier in Mr. Vollmer's private bank — the First Bank of Genesee. The 
work there was not very arduous, for the bank at that time had less than five thou- 
sand dollars on deposit. In December, 1894, the manager of the Vollmer store 
at Genesee, which was run in connection with the bank, resigned and Mr. Brewer 
was then made general manager of the store, serving in the dual capacity of man- 
ager and bank cashier until August, 1897, when he organized the Genesee Exchange 
Bank at Genesee, Idaho. For eight years he served as its cashier and was then 
elected to the presidency, which position he still fills. Seeking a still broader field 
of operation along banking lines he came to Spokane in May, 1906, as vice president 
of the Fidelity National Bank and two and a half years later resigned and was 
elected vice president of the Exchange National Bank of Spokane. In January, 
1911, he organized a syndicate which took over most of the stock of the Fidelity 
National Bank to which Mr. Brewer then returned as president. In addition to 
his presidency of the Fidelity National and of the Genesee Exchange Bank he is 
vice president of the First National Bank of Pullman, Washington, and of the 
Security National Bank of Cheney, Washington, and is a director of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, and of the Trustee Company of Spokane. His 
ability enables him to readily and successfully solve complex business problems, 
especially in the field of banking. He has been a close student along that line, has 
made himself familiar with the condition of the country and its business prospects 
and his sound judgment of men and affairs constitutes one of the chief forces of 
his success. 

It was in 1904 that Mr. Brewer was married to Miss Winifred Walbridge, a 
daughter of George J. and Ella (Merritt) Walbridge. To Mr. and Mrs. Brewer 
have been born two children, boys, Lawrence Walbridge, in 1909, and Robert 
Thomas in 1911. Mr. Brewer is well known in fraternal and club circles. He 
belongs to Oriental Lodge, No. 74, F. & A. M., and Imperial Lodge, I. O. O. F., 
also to the Spokane Club and the Inland Club. He is likewise a member of the 
Westminster Congregational church of Spokane, is one of the trustees of the Young 
Men's Christian Association and is treasurer of the Spokane Chamber of Com- 
merce, all of which indicates the nature of his interests and the high purpose which 
dominates him in his private and public life. His aid can always be counted upon 
to further any movement for the material and moral progress of the city and for 
its upbuilding and the exploitation of its resources and opportunities. The progres- 
sive steps in his life are easily discernible and each forward move has brought him 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 289 

a broader outlook and wider opportunities. He has never left anything to chance 
but has labored to acquaint himself with every phase of business with which he 
has been connected and thus has gradually advanced to the prominent position 
which he occupies as a representative of banking interests in Spokane. 



E. F. CARTIER VAN DISSEL. 

In business circles E. F. Cartier Van Dissel is notable by reason of his executive 
ability which has been manifest in the organization and management of important 
industrial enterprises. He has been a resident of Spokane since 1897 and is now 
the president of the Phoenix Lumber Company, operating a sash, door and box 
factory. Their enterprise has enjoyed substantial growth, bringing them into close 
connection with the material progress of this city. 

Mr. Van Dissel is a native of Holland, born January 24, 1868. His parents, 
Dr. E. D. Cartier and Mary (Jongeneel) Van Dissel, were also born in Holland, 
▼here the father still makes his home., recognized there as a prominent physician. 
He has engaged in practice for sixty years and in his profession is following in 
the footsteps of his father. His wife died in 1900. In his family are three sons 
and seven daughters, the brothers of our subject being: P. M. Cartier Van Dissel, 
vice president of the Phoenix Lumber Company, who makes his home in Springdale, 
Washington; and Dr. M. C. Cartier Van Dissel, a practicing physician of Hol- 
land. His sisters are: Mrs. E. Kerkhoven, a resident of Spokane; Mrs. Vos, Mrs. 
Warsinck and Mrs. Eling Schwurman, all of Holland; Mrs. A. Klinkert, the wife 
of Dr. A. Klinkert, a physician of Holland; and Miss A. C. Cartier and Miss A. 
Cartier Van Dissel, who also make their home in that country. 

E. F. Cartier Van Dissel pursued his education in Arnham, Holland, and in 
early life engaged in the nursery business. He was married on the 22d of Decem- 
ber, 1890, to Anna Elizabeth (Kolff) Van Oosterwyk, a native of Holland, and, 
wishing to use his time and talents to the best advantage in a business career, he 
soon afterward came to America, believing that its opportunities were broader than 
could be secured in his native land. It was in the year of his marriage that he 
arrived in California where he became manager of the Holland Colony at Fresno. 
Seven years passed in that state and in 1897 he came to Spokane to make a report 
of the possessions of the Amsterdam Trustees Kantoor. The company at that time 
owned the waterfalls which later passed into the possession of the Washington 
Water Power Company. In the development of the interests in his charge Mr. Van 
Dissel in 1898 established the Phoenix Sawmill which was then controlled bv a 
foreign corporation which, however, was changed to a Washington corporation in 
1906. under the name of the Phoenix Lumber Company, of which Mr. Van Dissel 
became president, having previous to that time served as manager. His brother, P. 
M. Cartier Van Dissel, became the vice president, with R. Insinger as secretary- 
treasurer; Frank Post, of the firm of Post, Avery & Higgins as trustee; and l'lver 
Wyn Lang as trustee for the Holland interests. The business has been developed 
along modern lines and the plant now comprises sawmills, a sash and door plant, 
a box factory and planing mills. The capacity is one hundred thousand feet of 
lumber per day. These factories are supplied with the latest improved machinery 



290 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

to facilitate the work. The company also owns seventy thousand acres of timber 
land in Stevens county which they operate at present from their own railroad, bring- 
ing the raw product to the mill. They established business with a capital of thirty 
thousand dollars and something of the growth of their undertaking is indicated 
by the fact that the enterprise is now capitalized for eighty-five thousand dollars. 
Their trade is mostly local although they ship to some extent to the eastern states, 
their output going as far as Pittsburg. The growth of the business is notable even in 
this district of rapidly developing enterprises and its splendid success is attributable 
in large measure to the executive force, keen sagacity and discrimination of the 
president. In addition to his other interests he is a director of the Spokane & East- 
ern Trust Company, of the Western Union Life Company and the Fidelity Build- 
ing & Loan Association, and is interested in North Yakima irrigation projects. 

Mr. Van Dissel is also connected with other projects of a more public character. 
He is now chairman of the board of trustees of the National Apple Show, is a di- 
rector and was one of the organizers of the Interstate Fair and is a trustee of the 
Chamber of Commerce, taking an active interest in the civic matters of the chamber. 
At all times he gives his cooperation to practical and well planned measures for 
the public good and, bringing to bear the wisdom of a practical business man, his 
efforts in behalf of the public progress have been far-reaching and effective. He is 
an enthusiastic advocate of the northwest and its opportunities, and has never re- 
gretted the fact that business interests brought him to the coast, for he here found the 
chances which he sought and has continuously advanced in those fields where energy 
and perseverance, intelligently directed, always reach fruition. Those who meet 
Mr. Van Dissel in social connections find him a genial gentleman of unfeigned 
cordiality and these qualities have made him popular among the membership of 
Spokane Lodge, No. 228, B. P. O. E., the Spokane Club, the Spokane Country 
Club, the Seattle Athletic Club, the Inland Club and the Spokane Tennis Club, 
to all of which he belongs, his membership therein indicating in considerable measure 
the nature of his recreation and interests outside of business. 



THOMAS F. SPENCER. 

Active and energetic, Thomas F. Spencer closely watches every opportunity for 
the attainment of legitimate success and has made constant progress since starting 
out in the business world on his own account. He is now secretary of the Kelley- 
Clarke Company, wholesale grocery brokers, import and export commission 
merchants. He was born in San Francisco, April 24, 1 862, his parents being Aaron 
G. and Mary (Tuite) Spencer, the former a mining engineer of that city, who came 
across the plains from Syracuse, New York, during 1850, and for many years oper- 
ated several placer gold mining companies in the northern part of California. They 
directed the education and training of their son, who was a pupil in the public 
schools, until having passed through consecutive grades, he became a high-school 
student, graduating in San Francisco. When his text-books were laid aside, he 
was employed in the commissary purchasing department and later in the operating 
department of the Southern Pacific Railroad for several years. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 291 

Daring the spring of 1890, with his brother Frank A. Spencer he came to Spo- 
kane and entered into business; this was the first branch founded by that company 
although several others have since sprung into existence. Later they opened and 
established houses in Portland, Seattle and Tacoma, associating, in the three cities 
named, with Charles H. Clarke, and for several years conducted the business as 
Spencer-Clarke Company. Later Frank A. Spencer withdrew, joining as manager 
and junior partner, the old and well known firm of Allen & Lewis, of Portland, 
Oregon, who have been in the wholesale grocery business for nearly half a century. 
On January 1, 1901, the business of the Spencer-Clarke Company of Portland, 
Seattle, Tacoma and Spokane and the house of Philip F. Kelley, of Seattle, were 
consolidated, greatly enlarged and incorporated as the Kelley-Clarke Company, 
under which title they have since conducted the business, in 1905 adding and open- 
ing another house in San Francisco, from which office the business in California is 
handled and conducted. The Kelley-Clarke Company is today one of the largest 
concerns of its kind in the United States, having over one hundred and fifty rep- 
resentatives in the eastern jobbing markets as well as direct resident, and selling 
and buying representatives in all the important European and Oriental cities. They 
make a specialty of all kinds of canned goods and in the year 1911 their sales will 
exceed three million cases; their annual business is approximately thirty million 
dollars. They now have houses in San Francisco, Portland, Spokane, Seattle and 
Tacoma, with associate houses in Los Angeles, New York and Philadelphia. They 
are the sole selling agents for the Northwestern Fisheries Company, operating four- 
teen salmon canning plants in Alaska, as well as selling agents for a number of 
Paget Sound and Columbia River salmon packers, and distributing approximately 
a million cases of salmon annually. They are Pacific Coast representatives for the 
Proctor & Gamble Distributing Company, of Cincinnati, the Beaver Soap Company, 
of Dayton, Ohio, the Merrill-Soule Company, of Syracuse, New York, and Hol- 
hrooks Limited, of Birmingham, England; they are also representing in Oregon, 
Washington and Idaho, the Western Sugar Refining Company, The California 
Fruit Canners Association, the D. Ghirardilli Company, of San Francisco; the 
Louisiana State Rice Milling Company's seventeen rice mills, Spencer-Kellogg 
& Company, Buffalo, New York; Wm. Underwood & Company, of Boston; Towle 
Maple Products Company, of St. Paul, Minnesota; John C. Siegfried & Company, 
of Kobe, Japan; Ball Brothers Glass Manufacturing Company, of Muncie, Indiana; 
The Curtis Olive Company, of California and Godillot & Company of Bordeaux, 
France; and a number of California dried fruit and nut packers. They are also 
representing the Union Bag and Paper Company, Arbuckle Brothers, The Enoch 
Morgan & Sons Company, James Pyle & Sons, the Church & Dwight Company and 
Hills Brothers, all of New York city ; the T. A. Snider Preserve Company, of Cin- 
cinnati; the Postum Cereal Company, of Battle Creek, Michigan; the O. & W. Thum 
Company, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, the Saint Charles Condensing Company, of 
St Charles, Illinois; the Hutchinson Kansas Salt Company, of Hutchinson, Kan- 
sas; Douglas & Company of Cedar Rapids, Iowa; the Cream of Wheat Company, 
Minneapolis; Libby, McNeil & Libby, and the Quaker Oats Company, and Frazer 
Lubricator Company, of Chicago; the Riverside Mills of Augusta, Georgia; the 
Portland Cordage Company of Portland, Oregon, as well and a large number of 
eastern packers of corn, peas, canned fish and vegetables, and a number of large 
cereal and milling companies. The business has been largely built up through the 



292 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

enterprise and efforts of Thomas F. Spencer, who justly deserves to be ranked among 
the representative merchants of the city. 

In 1888 Mr. Spencer was united in marriage to Miss Minnie A. Spencer of San 
Francisco, and they have three children, Mabel, Genevieve and Sybil, who are with 
their parents at 427 Seventh avenue, in a pleasant home which Mr. Spencer built 
during 1907. He has always eschewed public office, and kept himself entirely free 
from any entangling political connections. He is, however, prominent in Masonry, 
having attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite in Oriental Consistory, 
No. 2, S. P. R. S. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce while in organiza* 
tions of a more strictly social character he is well known as a member of the Spo- 
kane Club, the Spokane Country Club, the Spokane Tennis Club and the Rotary Club. 
He is one of those men who 'are never too busy to be cordial, and never too cordial 
to be busy. 



CONRAD WOLFLE. 



Conrad Wolfle, president of the United Copper Mining Company, and also 
interested in the Florence Silver Mining Company, was born in South Dakota, 
September 27, 1871. His father, Conrad Wolfle, a native of Germany, is now liv- 
ing retired in Portland, Oregon, where he established his home in 1890. The 
mother, who bore the maiden name of Anne Mayer, was also born in Germany and 
is a resident of Portland. The sons and daughters of the family are as follows: 
Conrad, of this review; F. R., who is his associate in business; David H., professor 
in the high school at Bremerton, Washington; E. A., a resident of Ains worth, 
British Columbia; Marie, residing in Portland; and Barbara, who married William 
Fredericks, of Irving county, Alberta. 

While a resident of his native state Conrad Wolfle began his education in the 
public schools and afterward continued his studies in Oregon. He first engaged in 
farming, leaving home in 1889, and later he worked on the railroad, his time being 
thus taken up with different pursuits until 1895, when he first arrived in Spokane. 
He went from here to Rossland, British Columbia, where he became actively con- 
nected with mining interests. He worked in the mines and acquired property and 
again in 1897 he came to Spokane. He reported on mines all over the western 
country from Arizona to British Columbia, including Nevada, Idaho, Montana, 
California and Oregon. He organized the Golden Monarch Mining Company in 
British Columbia which was incorporated with Mr. Wolfle as president and man- 
ager; F. E. Robbins, vice president; and C. H. Claudius, secretary and treasurer. 
They own property in Ymir, British Columbia, and after the successful organiza- 
tion and development of that company Mr. Wolfle extended his efforts in other 
directions, organizing in 1905 the United Copper Mining Company of which he 
also became president and manager with W. G. Collins as vice president and Gale 
Smith as secretary and treasury. They own mines at Chewelah, five miles north- 
east of Spokane, there being ten claims in the group. Over six thousand feet of 
underground work has been done, including tunnel, shafts, drifts and up-raises. 
The deepest work is six hundred feet and the width of the ore vein ranges from 
six to twenty-five feet. It has copper and silver values and of the low-grade ore 



COKBAD WOLFLE 



THE NEW YORK 



{PUBLIC LI3RART 



*■"»", LINOX 



! 



■* *ouNO*r»oNf 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 295 

six hundred tons shipped realized ten dollars per ton, while the high-grade ore 
brought from one hundred and seventy-five to two hundred dollars per ton. They 
shipped to Granby, Northport and Trail, making shipment to the last named place 
owing to a shut-down of the other two. The average output is one hundred tons 
per day. They have just completed a one hundred-ton mill for low-grade ores and 
their property is well equipped with all kinds of machinery, electric plants, shops, 
etc. The company also owns three hundred and twenty acres of timber land ad- 
joining. Nearly all the work has been done on the ore and there is now being 
made a tunnel of thirty-five hundred feet which will give a depth of one thousand 
feet , and of this five hundred feet have been completed at the present writing. Mr. 
WolUe is also interested in the Florence Silver Mining Company, owning property 
three miles north of Ainsworth, British Columbia. There are four claims contain- 
ing a splendid body of ore, of galena, silver and lead values. Its property is a 
promising one on which twelve men are now working, and shipment will begin in 
the spring of 1912. The United Copper Company has on its pay roll from thirty- 
five to fifty men and is a close corporation, the greater part of the stock being held 
by Mr. Wolfle, Mr. Collins and Sidney Rosenhaupt. The company has made a 
number of displays at the Spokane and Seattle fairs and has been awarded a num- 
ber of prizes for their exhibits every time they have been placed on display. The 
copper averages from two to three per cent in low-grade ore and in silver from 
eight to fifteen ounces, while in the high-grade ore the copper averages from eigh- 
teen to twenty-five per cent, from two hundred and fifty to three hundred and fifty 
ounces in silver, and from two to fixe*-dollars in gold^ /The recent ore chutes now 
opened, however, are averaging befter^t3ian th6se -formerly worked. Mr. Wolfle is 
interested in other mining ventures \im- owns -in different parts of British Columbia 
several large tracts of land. 

On the 29th of October, 1899 J Mr. 'Wolfle* was married at Ritzville to Miss 
Panline Cook, a daughter of the ReVrCook, minister of the Congregational church. 
Two children were born unto them but both are now deceased. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Wolfle are members of the Westminster Congregational church, in which he has 
served as a trustee for a number of years and in the work of which they are both 
actively and helpfully interested. Fraternally Mr. Wolfle is connected with the 
Maccabees and he is also a member of the Inland Club. His activities touch the 
general interests of society and he is known as a cooperant factor in many projects 
relating to the social, intellectual and moral progress of the community as well as to 
its material development. His ideals of life are high and he shapes his course in 
harmony therewith. 



PATRICK CLARK. 



Clark, one of the best known mining men of the United States, was born 
in Ireland, March 17, 1850. He came to America in 1870 when a young man of 
twenty years, going to California and later to Butte, Montana, arriving there in 
1876, where he became closely associated with Marcus Daly, as foreman of the 
Alice mine. He later opened the Anaconda mine for Mr. Daly in the capacity of 
foreman and was associated with him for seven years. During the succeeding four 



D— 15 



296 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

years he was with ex-Senator Clark, of Montana, in his mining enterprises. Watch- 
ful of opportunity, he came to Spokane in 1887 and opened up the Poor Man mine 
in the Coeur d'Alene district. He was part owner of this and acted as general 
manager. Later he operated at Rossland, British Columbia, where he opened the 
War Eagle mine in association with Messrs. Finch and Campbell of this city. The 
Republic mine was also opened by Mr. Clark. His connection with some of the 
most famous mines of the country renders further comment concerning his position 
in mining circles needless. He has always concentrated his energies upon his min- 
ing interests and has been an extensive investor from British Columbia to Mexico. 
In 1877 Patrick Clark participated in the battle of Big Hole of the Nez Perces 
war, under Senator William A. Clark as major in command, with General Gibbons 
as commander-in-chief. 

In 1881 in Butte, Montana, Mr. Clark was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Stack and they have six children, three sons and three daughters, namely: Ella, 
the wife of Harry Richards, of Spokane; and Rhea, Katherine, Patrick, Jr., John 
Francis and James Blaine, all yet at home. Fraternally Mr. Clark is connected 
with the Elks Lodge, No. 228, of Spokane. His record is one of the notable examples 
of successful achievement attained by men of foreign birth who in early manhood 
have sought the opportunities of the new world. 



FRANK TRUMAN POST. 

Frank Truman Post, of Spokane, was born on a farm near Potsdam, St. Law- 
rence county, New York, April 16, 1862, a son of John Fobes and Harriet (Lillie) 
Post. His paternal lineage is traceable to an early colonial period in New Eng- 
land, and one of his ancestors was Colonel Abraham Post, of Connecticut, who fought 
in the wars against the French and Indians. Both the paternal and maternal grand- 
fathers of Mr. Post, Oliver Post and David Lillie, were natives of northern Ver- 
mont, and, following the movement of emigration westward, went to St. Lawrence 
county, New York, where his father and mother were born, lived and died. His 
father, during the latter years of his life, was president of the First National Bank 
of Canton in that county. 

Mr. Post received his early education in the country schools, was prepared for 
college in the union school of Canton, New York, and was graduated from the St 
Lawrence University in the class of 1888 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
In his junior year he took the Sherman Latin prize and Russell oratorical prize. 
He was a member of the Beta Theta Phi while at the university, and although there 
was then no chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa at that institution he was elected to 
the latter society after his graduation. His alma mater conferred on him the degree 
of Master of Arts. Upon the completion of his collegiate course he studied law in 
the office of Russell, Post & Robinson at Canton and in 1885 was admitted to the 
New York State bar. He then took a special course of one year in the Harvard 
Law School. From December, 1886, to March, 1889, he practiced his profession 
at Lowville, Lewis county, New York. Removing at the date last named to Spo- 
kane, Washington, he soon became known for energy and ability in his profession. 
For some months in 1898 he was corporation counsel, but he resigned that position 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 297 

because of the increasing demands of his private practice. Under the firm style 
of Blake & Post he was in partnership with Judge Richard B. Blake until the lat- 
ter 's death in 1900. He then organized the law firm of Post, Avery & Higgins, 
whicfe still continues, occupying a leading position among the legal copartnerships 
of the state of Washington. Mr. Post's practice has always been in the civil 
branches of the law exclusively, and he has been and is the representative of im- 
portant interests. 

Though his career has been confined strictly to this profession, he has participated 
somewhat actively, as a citizen, in political affairs. He is a prominent republican, 
has frequently figured in state and local conventions of the party, and in 1908 was 
delegate-at-large to the republican national convention at Chicago. He was presi- 
dent of the Spokane County Bar Association in 1909 and 1910, and the Spokane 
University Club, 1910-1911, and is president of the Harvard Club of Spokane, a 
member of the Sons of the Americas Revolution and the Society of Colonial Wars. 

He married, August 17, 1898, Mary C. Phillips, a daughter of Henry A. 
Phillips, of Lowville, New York. They have two children, John Phillips Post and 
Harriet Christine Post, twins, born April 7, 1897. 



WILLIAM J. HINDLEY. 

The machinery of government is of little value if the men who occupy the public 
offices do not have strict regard for the duties and obligations that devolve upon 
them. The life history of William J. Hindley, mayor of Spokane, is that of one 
whose allegiance to the public welfare is unquestioned. In many fields of activity 
be has demonstrated his reliability and capability, all of which recommended him 
to his fellow townsmen as one worthy of high municipal preferment and capable of 
administering the public affairs of a rapidly growing western city. He is still a 
young man, his birth having occurred, November 10, 1872, in the parish house of a 
Congregational church in Ontario, Canada, of which his father, the Rev. John I. 
Hindley, was the pastor. His mother, Mrs. Hannah (Lister) Hindley, was a 
descendant of the famous Lord Lister's family of England and thus William J. 
Hindley has back of him an honorable and distinguished ancestry. His lines of 
life have been cast in harmony therewith, inasmuch as he has made good use of 
time and opportunity and has made his labors a serviceable factor in the world's 
work. He was only fifteen years of age when he crossed the border into the United 
States and supplemented his early public-school course by study in Oberlin College, 
at Oberlin, Ohio. He, too, turned to the ministry and was ordained in 1898, being 
appointed to his first pastorate at Embro, Ontario. He afterward accepted a call 
from the congregation at Guelph, Ontario, and then, after preaching for nearly 
ten years, entered the home missionary field and in 1902 was sent to the 
northwest provinces and territories of Canada. While traveling in the interests of 
the church which he thus represented he often passed through Spokane and learned 
to like the city. The Pilgrim Congregational church here extended to him a call 
in 1908 and, accepting it, he became closely identified with the interests of the city, 
contributing particularly to its moral development and growth during the eight 



298 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

years of his pastorate. On the expiration of that period he stepped from the pul- 
pit into politics and his labors in the latter field brought him at length to the mayor- 
alty. He had always held to the broader thought that the pastor's work concerns 
the interests of the workaday world and became prominent in all public enterprises 
in this city, using his influence to maintain high standards in every connection. It 
was the better element of Spokane's citizenship which called him to the office which 
he is now filling and in which connection he is giving to Spokane a businesslike 
administration, characterized by retrenchment in needless public expenditure and 
by reform and improvement along many lines. Moreover Mr. Hindley has done 
important work in organizing the Associated Charities of which he was the first 
president. He was also the probation officer of the first juvenile court here, giving 
his services in that direction without remuneration. He has also been chaplain of 
the Chamber of Commerce of Spokane. 

On the 2d of October, 1895, at Bellwood, Ontario, Mr. Hindley was united in 
marriage to Miss Ada McKee, a daughter of James and Ada (Martin) McKee, and 
they are now parents of three children, Berta, Margaret and Philip Martin. Mr. 
Hindley is prominent in Masonry and belongs to El Katif Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine. He has had the distinction of being the first clergyman potentate in the 
history of the order. He also belongs to the Elks Lodge of Spokane, No. 228, and 
to Imperial Lodge, No. 184, I. O. O. F. He is an attractive public speaker, hav- 
ing been endowed by nature with a gift of oratory, and receives calls from all parts 
of the Pacific coast to address different bodies upon various questions. His reading 
is broad and his close investigation enables him to speak with authority upon many 
of the vital problems of the day. His pleasing personality also adds to his popu- 
larity and association with him means elevation and expansion. 



CHARLES WILLIAM MOHR. 

The lumber industry was one of the early sources of income to the settlers of 
the northwest and has remained a chief feature in the progress and prosperity here. 
With this field of activity Charles William Mohr has been closely associated for 
more than a quarter of a century, now owning a lumber and shingle mill in Spo- 
kane. His birth occurred in Brown county, Minnesota, April 4, 1860, and he has 
always lived west of the Mississippi, his entire life being imbued with a spirit of 
western progress and upbuilding. His father, John F. Mohr, was born in Ger- 
many, was a farmer and carpenter, and as a young man came to the new world. 
Nearly all of the members of the Mohr family are professional men and are widely 
known. Paul Mohr has an extensive circle of acquaintances in Washington as a 
railroad builder and contractor and was associated with A. M. Kennan in building 
the Palouse road for the Northern Pacific and also the Spokane Falls & Northern 
road. John F. Mohr followed carpentering, did much important work in the north- 
west and led a life of usefulness and activity until his labors were ended in death 
in 1894. Two years later his wife passed away. She bore the maiden name of 
Henrietta Muhs and was also born in Germany. Her father was a distinguished 
soldier of that land and after coming to this country took an active part in sup- 
pressing the Indian troubles in Minnesota. Unto John F. and Henrietta Mohr 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 299 

there were born three sons and a daughter Charles W. ; John A., a farmer, who 
divides his time between Spokane and Ritzville, and married Lizzie Schloman; 
Robert A., who married Edith Beneke and is an electrician for the Washington 
Power Company, living in Spokane; and Edith, the wife of Louis B. Stutz, who is 
engaged in the insurance business in Spokane. 

At the usual age Charles W. Mohr became a pupil in the public schools of his 
native state and after putting aside his text-books he spent a few years in farming 
in connection with his father. Later he turned his attention to the implement busi- 
ness and threshing, which he followed at New Ulm, Minnesota and at Milbank, 
South Dakota. He also devoted a part of his time to general merchandising until 
1883, in which year he came to the Pacific coast, making his way first to California, 
and in June of that year arrived in Spokane. 

Here Mr. Mohr continued in the lumber and threshing business, operating a 
lumber mill and also doing threshing throughout surrounding districts. To this 
work he has practically devoted his attention throughout the period of twenty-eight 
years in which he has lived in Washington. In 1900 he extended the scope of his 
labors by adding a shingle mill in Spokane, which has a capacity of forty thou- 
sand shingles daily. The business has grown steadily and its substantial character 
has brought him a most gratifying return. His mill is located at the corner of 
Adams and Sharp avenue and his plant is well equipped. The first week in which 
he was in Spokane, Mr. Mohr purchased real estate, investing in property just 
south of the Review building and since that time he has bought and sold real es- 
tate more or less. Moreover, he has been an interested witness of the growth and 
progress of the city and relates many interesting reminiscences concerning the rapid 
changes which have made the city of Spokane what it is today, for it had less than 
a thousand population on his arrival. He can recall the time when there was 
nothing on the north side of the river but a few shacks and one crossed the stream 
by means of a little wooden bridge. Foreseeing the growth of Spokane, he has 
invested quite extensively in property and in addition to his mill holdings has large 
real-estate interests here, which return him annually a gratifying income. 

While the business interests of Mr. Mohr have been of growing importance, 
they have not prevented him from taking active and helpful part in many move- 
ments and measures which have contributed to the public good and on various occa- 
sions his fellow townsmen have called him to public office, where he has proven his 
worth in positions of trust and responsibility. He has taken an active interest in 
politics since attaining his majority and has always been an advocate of republi- 
can principles. While living in Brown county, Minnesota, he served as road super- 
visor and for several years he has been city councilman of Spokane, having been 
first elected in May, 1907, while in 1910 he was reelected for a two years' term in 
the fourth ward. The adoption of the new commission form of government the 
following May resulted in the new city commissioners taking charge. He was a 
member of the most important council the city has ever had. During his incum- 
bency many measures of vital importance were passed, among these being one 
which provided for the construction of the Mission avenue bridge, the Olive avenue 
bridge, the Howard street bridge, the Monroe street bridge and two bridges over 
Hangman creek. It was also while Mr. Mohr was a member of the council that 
the whole water system, including stand pipes and reservoirs was established and 
nearly all street paving was done under that administration. The franchises of 



300 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

the Milwaukee and Northern Coast railroads were granted and the old city 
hall was sold and the new site was condemned, while plans for the building 
of the new sewerage system were approved. Mr. Mohr also served as city com- 
missioner for three years and was deputy under Sheriff Pugh during his 
first term. He has been a delegate to county and city conventions, only missing 
twice in twenty-eight years, and several times he has been a member of the city 
central committee and for two years was a member of the county central committee. 
The progressive projects of the Chamber of Commerce for municipal benefit and 
for the promotion of material progress in Spokane received his hearty indorsement 
and he is regarded as one of the valued members of that organization. 

One the 25th of April, 1888, Mr. Mohr was married to Miss Laura A. Stutz, 
a daughter of Conrad Stutz, a tinner and hardware man of Mankato, Minnesota. 
They now have four children: Jesse C, a mechanic, who is operating a shingle 
mill for his father; George W., who is a mechanic and is now employed as sales- 
man at the Standard Garage in Spokane; Frank M., who is a chauffeur with Ham, 
Yeardsly & Ryrie; and Rosella, at home. The family attend the Methodist 
church and their influence is always on the side of right', truth and justice. Such 
in brief is the life history of Charles William Mohr, whose progress throughout 
his business career has followed in the wake of untiring energy and determination. 



JOHN G. CUNNINGHAM, M. D. 

Dr. John G. Cunningham, a distinguished physician and surgeon of Spokane 
and one to whom the country owes much for his interest and practical efforts in 
the development of the Alaska coal fields, was born in Winona, Minnesota, De- 
cember 20, 1872, a son of John M. and Mary A. (Johnston) Cunningham. His 
father was a Minnesota farmer and is now living retired in St. Paul. Notwith- 
standing his eighty years he is still very active and in excellent health. The son 
was provided with liberal educational opportunities and received his professional 
training in Rush Medical College of Chicago, from which he was graduated in 
1897 with the M. D. degree. He entered upon the practice of medicine in that 
city in connection with his brother, Dr. D. H. Cunningham, with whom he remained 
for a year and a half. Thinking, however, the far west would offer a better field, 
he came to Spokane in the fall of 1 898 and here entered upon active practice. He 
has since remained a representative of the profession here and his ability has 
placed him in a foremost place as a representative of the medical profession of 
the northwest. He has made two trips to Europe, traveling extensively over that 
country, doing post-graduate work in various centers of medical learning and 
visiting all the leading hospitals and medical colleges of Europe and America. He 
specializes in surgery, is a member of the staff of the Sacred Heart Hospital of 
Spokane and is the surgeon of the Great Northern Railroad at Spokane. 

Aside from his practice Dr. Cunningham has demonstrated his ability and 
resourcefulness in the field of business, in which prosperity has attended his efforts. 
He is the owner of large tracts of land and city property in and near Spokane 
and is also the owner of a large tract in the Horse Heaven country, being interested 
in the development of about thirty thousand acres there. He is largely responsible 



i. CUNNINGHAM 



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SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 303 

for the development of the Alaska coal fields, being the first one to send an expert 
there, at his own expense, to explore and investigate the coal deposits of that 
country. With his associates he has spent upwards of three hundred thousand 
dollars in the exploitation and development of the coal mines of Alaska and in this 
connection displays marked courage and foresight in bringing to the attention of 
the world the great coal resources of the northwest. He and his associates under- 
took the work in a most systematic manner, planning wisely for the opening of 
the country, the building of roads and the development of this great industry. 
Dr. Cunningham is also interested with his brother, Clarence Cunningham, in 
the Coeur d'Alene mining district. 

In his social relations Dr. Cunningham is widely known as a member of the 
Spokane Club, the Country Club, the Spokane Amateur Athletic Club and the Elks 
Lodge, No. 228, of Spokane. His geniality and his cordiality win him friends 
wherever he goes and he leaves the stamp of his personal worth upon all with whom 
he comes in contact. 

On the 80th of June. 1904, Dr. Cunningham was united in marriage to Miss 
Claudia Petite, of Chicago, and they have a daughter, Margaret Claudia, born 
November 6, 1905. Mrs. Cunningham is a singer of note. She was at one time 
prima donna with the celebrated Bostonians and for the last two years has been 
studying grand opera in Europe with Cotogni, of Rome, as one of her instructors 
and was also a pupil under Professor Herman De Vries, of Paris. She made a 
very successful debut in grand operja h* Rome, Jtta^y, «alsto sang before Queen Mar- 
guerite and received from Italian (foera- managers; most flattering offers to return. 
She found that, contrary to the reports concerning Hie reception of American 
singers by the Italians, she was most fa,vorably fc and enthusiastically received, her 
splendid vocal and dramatic powefv jriiinin£ for *her encore after encore. After 
singing before Queen Marguerita, whom she found very gracious and loveable, the 
queen presented her with a magnificent cluster of American beauties and appeared 
much interested in Mrs. Cunningham's replies to the queen's questions concerning 
her family. She has sung the principal roles in La Sonambula, Rigoletto, Traviata, 
Lucia and Madame Butterfly, and was asked by the Italian composer Storti to 
create the principal part in his new opera Venezia. She also appeared in concert 
in Rome and scored successes which have made her services sought by various 
managers. Dr. and Mrs. Cunningham have a most attractive home at No. 1722 
Riverside avenue and are most prominent in social life in the city, aside from the 
prominence gained by the scientific attainment of the one and the artistic ability 
of the other. 



FRANK JOHNSON. 



Incontrovertible proof of the superior business ability of Frank Johnson as a 
building contractor is found in many of the largest, most substantial and most beau- 
tiful of the buildings in Spokane and this section of the northwest. He has also 
extended the scope of his activities to include the sale of lumber and his twofold 
business is now being carried on under the firm style of Frank Johnson & Son, his 
only son, William F. Johnson, having entered into partnership with him. A native 



304 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

of Holland, he was born at The Helder, June 5, 1845, his parents being Frank 
and Suzanna Johnson. The father was killed in battle in the East Indian islands 
in 1849, while serving as captain of a battery of the colonial troops of the Hol- 
land army. The mother afterward became the wife of Daniel Baker and in 1852 
the family, consisting of Mr. and Mrs. Baker, Frank Johnson and his brother 
John, who is now a lamp manufacturer of Cleveland, Ohio, came to the United 
States. They lived for two years in New York city and then removed to Buffalo, 
where, after mastering the branches of learning taught in the public schools and 
thus preparing for life's practical and responsible duties, Frank Johnson entered 
upon an apprenticeship to the carpenter's trade. He thoroughly mastered the 
business, becoming an expert workman. One of the most important chapters in 
the record of his early manhood covers his service as a soldier of the Civil war. 
When but seventeen years of age he enlisted at Buffalo, on the 14th of August, 
1862, in Company M, Eleventh New York Volunteer Cavalry, which constituted 
President Lincoln's bodyguard. His war record has been written up in the local 
press as follows: 

"The regiment was on detail, directly under the orders of the secretary of war, 
to work in conjunction with the secret service department. It consisted of twelve 
hundred men and while part was detailed for the president's bodyguard, part was 
engaged as dispatch bearers to the front and on patrol duty in the city of Washing- 
ton, D. C. It was the duty of its members to hunt up suspicious spies and maraud- 
ers reported on by the secret service men. They were subject to be called on at 
any moment, day or night. Part of their duty was to reconnoiter the bands of the 
enemy, constantly on the alert at the outskirts of the capital, and thwart the threat- 
ened kidnaping of the president and his cabinet officers. 

"During the summer Mr. Lincoln took up. his abode at the soldiers' home, about 
five miles from the city, to and from which to the White House he had to be care- 
fully escorted every day. 

"After seventeen months on this duty there came an urgent demand for an 
efficient regiment of cavalry from the Department of the Gulf to clear Louisiana 
and the adjoining states of bushwhackers and guerrillas, in consequence of which 
Mr. Johnson embarked March 8, 1864, with his regiment at Alexandria, Virginia, 
for New Orleans, from which city he proceeded to take part in all the important 
engagements of the department. Mr. Johnson was in the heavy operations against 
Mobile, Alabama, which led to its capture April 11, 1865. His last important 
engagement was at Germantown, Tennessee, on the night of April 26, 1865. Mr. 
Johnson had a horse shot under him at Leaf river and was shot in the leg at Baton 
Rouge, Louisiana. He was mustered out at Albany, New York, but discharged at 
Memphis, Tennessee, June 12, 1865." 

With an unstained military record Mr. Johnson returned to his home in Buffalo 
and continued his residence in the east until 1880, when careful consideration of 
the subject of a removal to the west led him to the determination that he would 
try his fortune on the Pacific coast. Accordingly, in 1880 he came to Spokane by 
way of Walla Walla and here began in the contracting and building business. At 
that time the city contained only a few hundred population but, because of its 
rapid growth, it offered excellent opportunities to the carpenter and builder and, 
ever recognizing the fact that the present and not the future is the time to which 
the individual must look for his advancement, Mr. Johnson put forth strenuous and 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 305 

capable effort to establish himself in business circles in this section of the country. 
For a time he was foreman of the building construction crew of the Northern Pacific 
Railroad, with headquarters at Sprague, and was the builder of the original North- 
ern Pacific depot in this city. At this time the government desired to erect Fort 
Spokane at the junction of the Spokane and Columbia rivers and Mr. Johnson was 
engaged to supervise the work under Lieutenant Colonel H. C. Merriam, who is 
dow a retired brigadier general of the United States army. He had supervision of 
the entire building and to that work devoted his attention from 1882 until 1884. 
The enviable reputation which he had won in his chosen field of labor even in that 
early period of his career is indicated in the following letter: 

"Post op Fort Spokane, W. T., Sept 19, 1881. 
To Whom It May Concern : 

The bearer hereof, Mr. Frank Johnson, has been employed for the past two years 
at this post under my command as master builder and it gives me great pleasure to 
state that he has proved himself a thoroughly competent man in that capacity, as 
well as an honorable and reliable gentleman in every respect. He is a man of ex- 
cellent judgment, thorough in all work entrusted to him, and a most skillful manager 
of mechanics and laborers in forwarding work of construction. 

I do not know his equal for the position. 

H. C. Merriam, Lieut. Col. 2nd Inf. Brev. Col. U. S. A." 

It was while engaged in government work that Mr. Johnson formed the 
acquaintance of the Jesuit priests, who visited the fort in order to conduct religious 
services for the soldiers of Catholic faith, and at the request of his Jesuit friends 
he designed and later erected the first Catholic church in Spokane. He also 
erected the first buildings of the Gonzaga College, which today is one of the most 
noted institutions of the entire northwest. He likewise erected the Sisters' School 
of Spokane and built the west wing of the original Sacred Heart Hospital. One 
of the most noted buildings which he erected before the fire was the three-story 
Keats building, which stood on the site of the present Traders Bank building. 
Since the fire of 1889 he has been closely associated with the improvement of Spo- 
kane along architectural lines and evidences of his skill and handiwork are seen in 
the Granite block, the Pacific Hotel, the Holley building, the Mason & Marks 
Company building, now Pantages Theater, and J. J. Browne's residence, which is 
now owned by Robert E. Strahorn. In 1908 he erected the large new office build- 
ing of the Washington Water Power Company. He has admitted his son William 
to a partnership under the firm style of Frank Johnson & Son and they not only 
occupy a foremost place among the building contractors of the city but are also con- 
ducting an extensive and profitable trade as hardwood lumber dealers, exclusively. 

Mr. Johnson was married in Buffalo, New York, on the 22d of June, 1872, to 
Miss Louisa Luke, a daughter of John and Margaret Luke, of that city. Mrs. 
Johnson became very prominent in the Women's Relief Corps in the early days of 
Spokane and her death, which occurred in 1899, was deeply regretted by many 
friends as well as her immediate family. In addition to the son already mentioned 
there are two daughters: Margaret, the wife of Frank Pipgras; and Amelia, the 
wife of George Thomas. Both are residents of Spokane. 



306 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Throughout his entire life Mr. Johnson has maintained the same spirit of loy- 
alty and patriotic devotion to his country that he manifested when on the battle- 
fields of the south and he is the composer and writer of the song "Unfurl Old Glory 
to the Topmast Breeze/' which he completed in 1908 and which has caused him to 
be the recipient of thousands of complimentary letters from all parts of the United 
States. He belongs to Sedgwick Post, No. 8, G. A. R., and his spirit of patriotic 
reverence is also manifest in his membership in the Scott Keyes Memorial Associa- 
tion of the United States. He belongs also to the Jeffersonian Association of the 
United States and to the Pioneer Society of Spokane. He is a life member of the 
Elks Lodge, No. 228, and also holds membership with the Fraternal Order 
of Eagles. That he is interested in the city and its progress is indicated by his 
active cooperation with the projects and plans of the Chamber of Commerce, 
in which he holds membership. His political allegiance is given to the republican 
party and from 1899 until 1908 inclusive he was a member of the city council as a 
representative of the third ward. He acted as chairman of the committee of 
judiciary legislation and was also a member of the committees of license, health 
and police. He exercised his official prerogatives at all times in support of what he 
believed to be for the public good. He has ever placed the general welfare before 
personal aggrandizement and the interests of the many before partisanship. In his 
business life he has adhered to the strictest commercial ethics and his gradual ad- 
vancement has been won at the cost of earnest, self-denying effort and through the 
exercise of superior ability that for many years has caused him to be numbered with 
the leading builders of the Spokane country. 



ELY P. SPALDING. 



Ely P. Spalding, president of the Pacific Timber Preservative Company, was 
born in Chicago, Illinois, April 18, 1862, his parents being William and Maria 
(Sedgwick) Spalding, the former a Board of Trade operator of Chicago for many 
years. The son entered the public schools at the usual age, continuing his studies 
through successive grades until he left the high school to enter business life, and 
for four years he was employed in his native city. He then resolved to seek op- 
portunities elsewhere and went to San Pedro, New Mexico, where he worked in 
the smelter of San Pedro & Canon del Agua Copper Company of that place. Dur- 
ing the three years there passed he thoroughly acquainted himself with all branches 
of mining and assaying. He then returned to New York city and devoted the 
next ten years to the brokerage business. 

In 1890 Mr. Spalding again came to the west, this time settling in the Coeur 
d'Alene country, where he was connected with the old Sierra Nevada Mining Com- 
pany first as assistant assayer and then as assayer for the company. From the 
Coeur d'Alene district he went to Portland, Oregon, and engaged in handling min- 
ing properties in that state for about three years. After a year spent in Alaska 
he returned to the United States and was for some years an examining mining 
engineer, examining and reporting on properties all the way from Mexico to Alaska. 
In 1901 he took a bond on the Monarch mine of Monarch, Idaho, of which he is 
president. He is also president of the Coeur d'Alene-Norfolk Mining & Smelting 



E. P. SPALDING 



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SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 309 

Company and thus continues in close connection with mining interests, with which 
he has so long been identified in one capacity or another. 

His efforts, too, have been extended to other lines, all of which have con- 
stituted features in the general development as well as in individual success. He 
built the Idaho Northern Railroad, which is now a branch of the Oregon & Wash- 
ington Railway & Navigation Company and of which he was vice president and 
general manager up to the time of its sale. He was also vice president and gen- 
eral manager of the Big Bend Water Power Company which is now a part of the 
Washington Water Power Company system and known as the Long Lake project. 
It was sold about two years ago and Mr. Spalding is now concentrating his ener- 
gies largely upon his executive and administrative duties as president of the Pacific 
Timber Preservative Company of which A. M. P. Spalding, his wife, is the secre- 
tary and treasurer. This company treats railroad ties at a lower expense than 
any other process that has been developed and there is every indication, that the 
business will grow to be an extensive one. They have portable plants which they 
can put on cars and take to the place where the ties are found, thus saving the 
expense of having a large central plant and hauling the ties to and from that 
plant In this business Mr. Spalding has an enterprise which is. of a most promis- 
ing character and undoubtedly he will reap the success which has usually attended 
his efforts. 

On the 5th of December, 1906, Mr. Spalding was married to Mrs. Anna M. 
Phillips, and they reside at the Spokane Hotel. -He holds membership in the 
Spokane Club, the Spokane Country! CftnVarfkl 1 file Inland Club and is also a 
member of the Elks Lodge, No. 83 1, »t Wallace, fddho:' The salient points in his 
character have been close application, unfaltering industry and intelligent investi- 
gation of every subject that has come tandef •tois* control in connection with business 
interests. His opinions are regarded w expert authority* upon questions relating 
to the mining interests of the west and he has an extensive acquaintance in mining 
circles. Wherever known he commands the good-will and confidence of those with 
whom he has come in contact and is now accorded a most creditable position in 
the business circles of this city. 



HARL J. COOK. 



Not only in the electrical field of business as newspaper publisher and editor, 
or later as the promoter of irrigation projects has Harl J. Cook become known. 
His work in behalf of those interests which have their root in a broad humanitarian 
spirit has been most effective and beneficial and this alone would entitle him to 
recognition as one of the representative and worthy residents of Spokane. He was 
born in Salem, Iowa, July 11, 1857, and represents one of the oldest families of 
that state, his parents, Isaac and Mary Jane (Bishop) Cook, having located there 
in 1825. The father engaged in contracting and building until 1894, when he re- 
tired from business life and came to Spokane to live with his son Harl J. His 
death occurred in this city in 1909, when he had reached the age of eighty- four 
years, while his wife died several years before in Salem, Iowa. 



310 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

To the public-school system of his native state, Harl J. Cook is indebted for the 
early educational privileges accorded him. Later he had the benefit of instruction 
at Ackworth College, in Ackworth, Iowa, an institution conducted under the auspices 
of the Society of Friends, or Quakers. Later he attended Simpson Centenary Col- 
lege, at Indianola, Iowa, and when he felt that his educational foundation was suffi- 
cient to enable him to make a creditable position in the business world, he began 
learning the printer's trade in the office of the State Leader, at pes Moines, Iowa. 
He was also for a time associated with Mills & Company, publishers of law books 
in that city. Later he devoted a period of six years to teaching school and after- 
ward became associated with the Daily Capital, of Des Moines, Iowa, becoming its 
first city editor. He then transferred his activities to North Dakota, where in 1882 
he embarked in the newspaper business, in which he continued until the spring 
of 1886, when he made his way to Murray, Idaho, and thence came to Spokane. 
At that time the Chronicle was a weekly paper, edited by H. T. Cowley; the city 
was growing rapidly and a daily evening paper was thought to be a necessity, so 
that in company with Major A. E. Routhe and H. T. Cowley, he organized a new 
paper and began the publication of the Evening Chronicle as its editor. About a 
year later he sold his interest and turned his attention to the real-estate business. 
He had been closely watching and studying conditions of the northwest and believed 
that the opportunity for improvement was ripe, becoming one of the first men to 
advocate irrigation in the valley, writing many articles on this subject for his paper. 
He later assisted in the organization of the first irrigation company of this section. 
This was the Spokane Valley Land & Water Company, of which he remained a trus- 
tee until it was disposed of to D. C. Corbin and W. L. Benham, who put the first 
water on the valley. Since that time Mr. Cook has largely devoted his time and 
energies toward the development of new conditions to the city and has thus con- 
tributed much to the improvement and adornment of Spokane. He has been active 
in the development of the Liberty Park, Altamont and Cliff Park additions, the 
last named being the most beautiful residential sections of Spokane. Other parts 
of the city have also been improved through his efforts. He seems to readily recog- 
nize opportunities which others pass heedlessly by, and his labors have been a 
tangible asset in making the city what it is today. 

But while large business projects have claimed the attention of Mr. Cook, his 
interests have not been narrowed down to commercial activities alone. He has 
always been a student of life, has been quick to recognize an obligation and has 
never been neglectful of duty. Over twenty years ago he became one of the found- 
ers of the Spokane Humane Society, which owns its own home, impounds stray 
stock and catches and destroys unlicensed dogs. This is the only institution of the 
kind in the United States that is self-supporting. The present organization is: 
John A. Fitch, president; Harl J. Cook, vice president; and Joseph R. Ruders- 
dorf, secretary and manager. The work is certainly most commendable. It has its 
root in that broad sympathy which has feeling for every living thing. The political 
support of Mr. Cook is given to the republican party and his qualities of leader- 
ship have also made him prominent in that line, so that he was called to public 
office, serving as county assessor in 1895-6. He belongs to the Knights of Pythias, 
to the Spokane Club and the Spokane Amateur Athletic Club. 

Mr. Cook has two daughters: Clara L., the wife of Dr. L. B. Williams, of 
Spokane; and Verna B., who is now studying architecture and interior decoration 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 311 

in Paris, where she has received high praise for her ability during the five years 
in which she has there prosecuted her studies. Mr. Cook has led a most active life 
and. his business balances up with the principles of truth and honor. In fact he 
has always been regarded as the strongest center of the community in which he 
moves. It is men like these that are active factors in every idea and work, that 
helps to develop the success of all big cities and it is to be hoped for the civic pride 
and substantiality of this section that there are many more like him. 



ERNEST C. WOOD. 



Ernest C. Wood, civil engineer, was born in Plymouth, Massachusetts, on the 
«9th of July, 1866, and is a son of Charles T. and Sarah (Harris) Wood, both 
of whom are still living. The great-grandfather Captain Thomas Harris was a 
prominent citizen of Massachusetts and after the Civil war served as one of the 
commissioners who settled the noted Alabama claims. During one of his many jour- 
neys to St. Petersburg, where he was entertained by the czar, he escorted the Grand 
Duchess Olga to a -masquerade ball. Charles T. Wood was a soldier in the Civil 
war where he saw much active service. He is a thirty-third degree member of the 
Masonic Order. 

Ernest C. Wood acquired his early education in the public schools of Boston, 
where he was then residing, and subsequently entered a private school to acquire 
commercial education before entering upon his technical studies at Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. After his education in these institutions had been com- 
pleted he was employed as assistant superintendent of works and civil engineer at 
Forest Hills Cemetery, Boston, during 1886-1887. While holding this position 
he had charge of over one hundred men. In 1887 he came west and continually 
followed civil and mining engineering in Colorado, Utah, Nevada, California, Oregon 
and British Columbia, before coming to Washington nine years ago and accepting 
responsible positions of trust in various large enterprises. From 1905 to 1908 
he was chief assistant city engineer of Spokane, and was in charge of the water 
works construction during the greater part of that period. He built the pump- 
ing plant, force mains and reservoir at Ninth avenue and Pine street, and designed 
and developed the original unit of the underground water supply system. Having 
passed the United States reclamation department civil service examination in sev- 
eral divisions he has been fully qualified to serve as superintendent of construction 
and also as construction engineer. In the engineering circles of Spokane he ranks 
high, and the large patronage which he enjoys attests the recognition which is 
given his ability, his integrity and his conscientious discharge of his duties. He is 
now acting in the capacity of mining engineer for the San Toil Consolidated Com- 
pany, of Republic, Washington. His offices in the Jamieson building indicate the 
large undertakings in which he is constantly engaged. 

On the 8d of February, 1901, Mr. Wood was married to Miss Myra Lutes, a 
daughter of Luther and Sarah (Siverling) Lutes. To this union has been born one 
child, Clifford Cleveland, who is now deceased and interred at Fairmont cemetery 
of this city. Politically Mr. Wood is a progressive republican and a most active 
member in the political circles of the various communities in which he has resided. 



312 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

He has served as assistant treasurer in Aspen, Colorado, in 1888 and 1889, and in 
March, 1911, was a candidate for the office of city commissioner of Spokane. He 
is a firm believer in civic improvement and has done all he could to further the de- 
velopment and improvement of any measures instituted for the public welfare. Hon- 
est, broad-minded, capable and practical, his advice is frequently sought and al- 
ways followed in any measures regarding which he may have been consulted. His 
professional life has not occupied his whole attention as he is devoted to his homes, 
both in Spokane and Newman Lake where he resides during the summer. This 
latter (Owls Head) is one of the beautiful summer residences in that locality and 
has been so built and improved as to give Mr. and Mrs. Wood all the comforts and 
luxuries to which his success has entitled them. 

Mr. Wood is a third degree Mason and vice president and director of the Spo- 
kane branch of The American Mining Congress, and in 1909 served as a delegate 
to the mining congress at Goldfield, Nevada, his appointment being authorized by 
the governor of Washington and Chamber of Commerce of Spokane. 



JOHN LAFAYETTE WILEY. 

Among the men who have been prominent in shaping the political history of the 
democratic party in Washington, is numbered John Lafayette Wiley, who is also 
recognized as one of the strong and able members of the Spokane bar, filling the 
position of prosecuting attorney at the present time. He was born in the village 
of Vermont, Illinois, April 5, 1870. His father, John L. Wiley, a native of Penn- 
sylvania, was a representative of an old New England family that settled in Amer- 
ica prior to the Revolutionary war. They were of Scotch- Irish descent and a num- 
ber of the name rendered valiant aid to the cause of liberty when the colonists at- 
tempted to throw off the yoke of British oppression. John L. Wiley, Sr., learned the 
trade of a carpenter and builder and for many years followed that occupation. He 
died in Spokane September 80, 1911. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Rachel 
Ann Haines, was also born in the Keystone state and belongs to an old New Eng- 
land family that settled in America during colonial days and took part in the Revo- 
lutionary struggle. The Haines were of both German and English descent and 
were connected with the Pennsylvania Quakers. Unto Mr. and Mrs. John L. 
Wiley, Sr., there were born three sons, the brothers of our subject being: Thomas 
H., who is engaged in the real-estate business in Omaha; and Harry M., who is 
devoting his time to the purchase and sale of property in Spokane. 

John Lafayette Wiley, whose name introduces this record, entered the public 
schools of his native state, passing through consecutive grades to the high school 
and afterward attended the Western Normal College of Bushnell, Illinois. He then 
entered the newspaper field, being employed for a brief period on the Times and 
later on the Tribune, of Minneapolis, his services in that connection covering two 
years, after which he took up the study of law. His professional work was done 
in the law department of the University of Minnesota and in Kent Law School in 
Chicago, where he took the appellate court examination in 1894 and was then ad- 
mitted to practice. For ten years thereafter he remained a member of the Illinois 
bar, at the end of which time he came to Spokane, where he has since engaged in 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 313 

the practice of law. In January, 1910, he was appointed assistant corporation 
counsel but resigned that office after his election to the position of prosecuting attor- 
ney on the 8th of November, 1910, for a term of two years. He is thus the incum- 
bent in office and in the discharge of his duties he has won high commendation from 
all concerned. Although this is a strong republican county, Mr. Wiley was elected 
by a majority of twelve hundred, only three other democrats on the same ticket 
being elected to office. Tbis fact is proof of his ability and personal popularity. 
He has always been an advocate of democratic principles and has taken an active 
interest in the affairs of the party since coming to the state, attending both the 
comity and state conventions, including the convention held in Spokane in 1908. 
He is now serving as a member of the county central committee. 

On the 18th of March, 1909, Mr. Wiley was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
H. Martin, of Spokane, a daughter of T. H. and Katherine E. Martin, representa- 
tives of an old Maine family. Her father and mother are now deceased. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wiley have an interesting little son, John L., who is of the third generation 
of that name. Mr. Wiley belongs to the Inland Club and during the seven years 
of bis residence in Spokane has gained a wide acquaintance. It is said that in no 
section of the country is a man rated more entirely by his individual worth and 
merit than on the Pacific coast, and judged by this standard Mr. Wiley has estab- 
lished himself in a position that is commendable and enviable, being recognized as 
a moving force in democratic circles and also as one whose ability before the bar 
entitles him to the political honors which have been conferred upon him. 



FREDERIC PHAIR. 



Frederic Phair, interested largely in improved city property while his efforts 
as a contractor and builder have contributed much to the work of making Spokane 
the beautiful city that it is today, was born in Buttevant, County Cork, Ireland, 
November 27, 1868. His parents were the Rev. John Pickering and Elizabeth 
Phair, the former vicar of the parish of Buttevant and regimental chaplain to the 
troops of Buttevant Barracks. 

Frederic Phair pursued his education in a private school of Dublin, Ireland, 
and in 1888, when a young man of but twenty years, crossed the Atlantic to New 
York city. Having some natural inclination toward wood work, he began car- 
pentering and followed the trade for five years, during which time he attended 
evening lectures and classes on architectural and building subjects at Cooper In- 
stitute in New York. In April, 1888, he married and came immediately afterward 
to Spokane, for he had become convinced that the great and growing western 
country offered better opportunities to young men. He was employed for a short 
time as a journeyman and then entered the contracting and building business on 
his own account His work today stands as a splendid monument to his ability 
and has been an important feature in the improvement and adornment of the city. 
He erected the Paulsen building at a cost of eight hundred and fifty thousand dol- 
lars; the Exchange Bank, one hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars; the Young 
Men's Christian Association building, one hundred and fifty thousand dollars; the 
Masonic Temple, one hundred thousand dollars; the Spokane Athletic Club build- 



314 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

ing, sixty thousand dollars; the Spokane Club, two hundred and fifty thousand 
dollars; the San Marco apartments, sixty-five thousand dollars; the Spokane Dry 
Goods store, one hundred and forty thousand dollars; and others which are notable 
features in the attractive architecture of the city. In 1892 he erected the Idaho 
state building at the Chicago exposition, a large log house costing about twenty- 
five thousand dollars, and in 1896-7-8 he duplicated* this in England for an English 
gentleman at a cost of forty thousand dollars. He is interested extensively in im- 
proved city property and his realty holdings return to him a gratifying income. 
He has kept not only abreast of the times in architecture but has been in the van- 
guard in the northwest, his operations largely setting a standard for activity in 
the field in which he labors. Mr. Phair is financially interested in the Spokane 
& Eastern Trust Company, of which he is a director, and he is -also a trustee of 
Brunot Hall. 

In New York city, on the 18th of April, 1888, Mr. Phair was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Mina Isabel Rogers, a daughter of M. Rogers, of Breagogue House, 
Buttevant, County Cork, Ireland. Their children are Lascelle R. and Harold G. 
The parents hold membership in All Saints Protestant Episcopal church and Mr. 
Phair is warden of All Saints Cathedral. He did active service in behalf of the 
public-school system in this city as a member of the board of education from 1892 
until 1898. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he was 
a member of the county convention that nominated Miles Poindexter, now United 
States senator, for prosecuting attorney for Spokane county. In his fraternal rela- 
tions Mr. Phair is connected with the Masons as a member of the lodge, chapter, 
commandery and Mystic Shrine, and he belongs to the Spokane Club, the Spokane 
Athletic Association, the Spokane Rod and Gun Club and the Country Club. Per- 
sonally popular, he has displayed those qualities which in every land and clime 
win friendship and regard. The steps in his orderly progression in business are 
easily discernible and his even-paced energy has brought him to a prominent place 
in the industrial and financial circles of his adopted city. Moreover, his sound 
judgment causes his opinions to be sought in relation to various private and public 
interests and in all matters effecting the municipal welfare he has manifested a 
public-spirited devotion to the general good. 



LEWIS P. LARSEN. 



History in Washington is in the making. The great broad valleys, fertile plains 
and mountain sides give splendid opportunity for the development of every branch 
of agriculture, commerce and mining and into this great district, rich in its natural 
resources, have come hundreds of enterprising, progressive men from the east, 
imbued with the purpose of wisely using the time and talents in the attainment of 
success through the development of the country. To this class belongs Lewis P. 
Larsen, a capitalist, and the founder and builder of the town of Metaline Falls. 
He was born in Denmark, March 7, 1876, and is a son of Anders and Petrea Lar- 
sen, who still reside in that country. He pursued his education in the schools of 
his native land, taking a technical course and in 1895 he came to America, mak- 
ing his way to Salt Lake City. In that locality he spent about * year as cowboy 



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SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 317 

on a ranch but later secured employment in the mines of that region. His arrival 
in the Spokane country was in 1897, at which time he located at Wallace, Idaho. 
There he followed mining and was connected with' the firm of Larsen & Green- 
ough, one of the prominent mining firms of the northwest. His early educational 
training has proven of immense value to him in the conduct of his business affairs 
in later life. His knowledge and capability soon won him recognition as an expert 
mining engineer and in 1900 he became connected with the Last Chance mine at 
Northport, Washington. In 1905 he discovered the deposits of cement rock at the 
present site of Metal ine Falls and interested F. A. Blackwell and others in the un- 
dertaking, with the result that the Inland Portland Cement Company was organ- 
ized, erected its building at a cost of one million dollars and is today supplying the 
needs of the entire Inland Empire in this particular. Theirs is the largest and 
most complete cement plant in the northwest. Its mills and buildings have a floor 
space of several acres and the plant is most thoroughly equipped with modern 
machinery and with all the facilities that promote the manufacture and the inter- 
ests of the trade. From the time of his discovery of the cement rock here Mr. 
Larsen has not only taken an active part in the upbuilding of the town but has 
been the prime spirit in founding and developing Metaline Fails. He has intro- 
duced the most progressive ideas, putting forth every effort in his power to make 
this an ideal western city. Its site is a notably beautiful one on a picturesque 
peninsula at the confluence of Pend d'Qjttille* river -and Sullivan creek and is the 
northern terminus of the Idaho & WasninAoh Northern Railroad. The town lies 
at a level of one hundred feet above thje nv^r ahfl hks had' a phenomenal growth 
since it sprang into existence during the' summer of 1910.- Thirty-five business 
houses are already in operation, two exbellenVliotels 'a^Tord first-class accommoda- 
tions and civic improvements are being promoted at a rapid rate. The general 
plan of the town was conceived by Mr. Larsen, owner of the town site, and it is 
laid out on strictly modern lines with a beautiful park system and playgrounds. 
It is supplied with electric lines, has a never failing supply of the purest water 
and there is now in process of erection a twenty- five thousand dollar school build- 
ing. The natural contour of the town site lends itself to ideally arranged residence 
districts and a perfectly beautiful system of parks. On the entire west and north 
sides the park slopes to the very water's edge. In laying out the streets the ut- 
most care has been given to preserving the natural beauty of the place. An electric 
light system has been installed and aside from being a director of the Inland Port- 
land Cement Company, Mr. Larsen is now president of the Metaline Falls Water 
Company, also of the Larsen Realty Company, the Larsen Lead Company and 
The Lead & Zinc Company, all business enterprises of ^letaline Falls. He has 
studied methods pursued in town-building elsewhere in the northwest, has improved 
upon plans previously followed by others and has avoided all that is likely to lead 
to difficulties. 

In 1 906 Mr. Larsen was united in marriage at Port Carbon, 'Pennsylvania, to 
Miss Bertha Brown, a daughter of George and Mary Brown, of that city. They 
now occupy a very beautiful home at Metaline Falls, which Mr. Larsen erected in 
1910. He belongs to the Spokane Club and the Inland Club, also of Spokane. He 
has never held or desired office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his busi- 
ness affairs, which are of rapidly growing importance. The town which he has 
founded and which stands as a monument to his enterprise and progressiveness is 



318 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

not only most beautifully situated but lies in the midst of a district of splendid 
natural resources and of agricultural possibilities. He displayed notable sagacity 
and foresight in choosing the location, and the business methods which he is pur- 
suing insure the continual growth and prosperity of this new and enterprising city 
of the northwest. 



SAMUEL RIKA STERN. 



Samuel Rika Stern, a prominent corporation lawyer of Spokane, who has con- 
tinued in active practice in this city since June, 1891, was born in Syracuse, New 
York, July 7, 1855. His father, Abraham Stern, a native of Germany, settled in 
Syracuse on coming to America and was there engaged in the jewelry business. 
He married Rebecca Rika Strauss, also a native of Germany. Her death occurred 
in 1871, while Mr. Stern passed away in 1887. In the family were two daugh- 
ters and one son: Belle, the wife of Joseph Michaels, of Rochester, New York, 
who is at the head of Michaels, Stern & Company, one of the largest clothing firms 
in that section; Ray, the wife of J. M. Wile, a banker of Rochester, New York. 

The other member of the household was Samuel R. Stern, who acquired his 
education in the schools of Syracuse, passing through consecutive grades until he 
became a high-school student. After putting aside his text-books he turned his 
attention to professional interests and became managing clerk for Ruger, Wallace 
& Jenney of Syracuse. When Judge Wallace was appointed United States judge, 
Mr. Stern continued with him, acting as clerk in his office until admitted to the bar 
in his native city. His leisure hours had been devoted to the study of law and 
under the wise direction of Judge Wallace he mastered the principles of juris- 
prudence that qualified him for the active work of the courts. He first engaged 
in general law practice in Syracuse and there remained until June, 1891, when 
he came to Spokane. Here he immediately entered upon the practice of law, in 
which he has since continued. To him has been accorded a large and distinctively 
representative clientage. His legal work as counselor and advocate has been of 
an important character. He is the representative of the Harriman railroad lines 
in Spokane, and has been for about twelve years representing the Great Northern, 
and he has also been connected in his professional capacity with various other 
corporate interests. His standing among his professional brethren is indicated in 
the fact that he was honored with election to the presidency of the State Bar Asso- 
ciation in 1898. 

The only political office that Mr. Stern has ever held was that of assistant 
prosecuting attorney of Onondaga county, New York, but after one year he re- 
signed, having no liking for public office. He is a republican free lance and has 
always taken an active part in the politics of the state of Washington. 

In Rochester, New York, in 1888, Mr. Stern was united in marriage to Miss 
Libbie W. Wile, a daughter of Joseph Wile, the first wholesale clothier of that 
city, and they have one son, Harold Gross, who is a graduate of Cornell Univer- 
sity and a mechanical engineer, who spends his time in Spokane and Seattle, being 
a member of the firm known as the Moran Engineering Company, doing business 
in Spokane, Seattle and North Yakima. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 319 

Mr. Stern is prominent in lodge circles. In Masonry he has attained the thirty- 
second degree of the Scottish Rite, holding membership in Spokane Consistory and 
also with the Mystic Shrine. He is connected with the Knights of Pythias of 
Spokane and is the oldest Elk in the northwest, having joined that order in Syra- 
cuse, New York, when it was strictly an order for actors. He was admitted very 
soon after it was founded about 1880 and in his professional capacity there was 
entrusted to him nearly all of the theatrical litigation of central New York, repre- 
senting in different contests such famous people as Fanny Davenport, William Gil- 
lette, Primrose or West and others. He handled the litigation between the Mal- 
lory brothers and the Frohmans and was the legal representative of the owners of 
many opera houses. Mr. Stern wrote sketches for them which are recorded suc- 
cesses. He possesses marked literary ability and is the author of stories and arti- 
cles which have appeared in the magazines and newspapers. He has been a fre- 
quent contributor to the press when traveling, and when on a trip around the 
world wrote a series of letters which attracted much attention, and elicited favor- 
able comment from the critics. His social nature finds expression in his member- 
ship in the Spokane Athletic Club, the Spokane Tennis Club, the Spokane Trans- 
portation Club, and the Spokane Progress Club. He is also a member of the 
Chamber of Commerce and in connection with its work went to China as a mem- 
ber of its commission, and had the distinction in San Francisco of giving the 
shortest biography of any member of the commission, amounting to only about 
four lines. He is modest, never sounding his own praises, but his work and its 
success in various relations is widely recognized and he is honored by the profession 
and the general public. 



HON. D. C. COATES. 



Hon. D. C. Coates, who is serving as one of the five city commissioners of Spo- 
kane, has resided here only since 1906 but in this brief period has become a promi- 
nent figure in political and labor circles and has made for himself a host of friends. 
Natural ability has fitted him for leadership and organization and the public posi- 
tions which have come to him have been a merited reward for unselfish effort on 
behalf of the people whose interests he holds dearer than his own personal ad- 
vancement. While serving as lieutenant governor of the state of Colorado, his life 
record was published in volume entitled Biography of Colorado, which we here- 
with produce in full: 

"David C. Coates, of Pueblo, lieutenant governor of Colorado, was born in 
Brandon, Durham county, England, August 9, 1868. He was one of eleven chil- 
dren born to George and Mary (Hodgeson) Coates, who immigrated with their 
family to the United States in 1881. His father, who was a skilled mechanic, first 
located at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. The following year he obtained employment 
in the steel works of Pueblo, Colorado, and moved his family to that city, where he 
has since resided. Limited means deprived our subject of a liberal education but 
he made good use of the few years he had in the common schools and availed him- 
self of every opportunity to indulge his love for broad general reading. As is 
natural with a logical mind, his reflections became formulated into theories and 



320 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

those theories in turn eventuated in fixed principles of which his later deeds are 
the sincere expression. His first experience in the^ great world of toil was by his 
father's side in the Pueblo Steel Works, where he learned the initial lesson in the 
injustice to which labor is subjected and began to feel in an indefinite way that 
the producers of wealth should be the owners of that wealth. 

"At the age of fifteen years he left the mills and entered the office of the Pueblo 
Evening Star, learning the trade of a compositor and acquiring a full knowledge 
of the printing business. A few years later, in partnership with his brother, he 
established the Pueblo Press, which he sold out in 1887. He then went to Denver 
and for three years was employed on the Rocky Mountain News. After this he 
had the distinction of being associated in the publication of the first socialistic 
paper issued in this country, the Coming Nation, first published at Greensburg, 
Indiana. In 1896 he formed a partnership with Otto F. Thum and began the pub- 
lication of the Pueblo Courier, the official organ of the labor organizations for the 
state of Colorado. 

' 'Mr. Coates is known as a facile and forceful writer on general topics, but his 
most earnest and effective effort has been in the direction indicated. He was the 
leader of the organization of the Colorado State Federation of Labor in 1896, was 
elected secretary of this organization in 1897, reelected in 1898, elected its presi- 
dent in 1899 and reelected in 1900. In every case he received the unanimous vote 
of the organization. He has natural genius for organization. There is not a camp 
or mine in the whole state that he has not visited, and that there are now more 
than fifty thousand laboring men in Colorado, operating under the regime of unions 
and mutual support, is very largely owing to his unremitting endeavors. 

"In 1896 Mr. Coates was nominated for the state legislature. His election was 
defeated but on so close a ballot "that the case was litigated. The verdict gave him 
a majority of the votes but his opponent retained his seat secure in the possession 
of the electoral certificate. Mr. Coates was a conspicuous figure during the great 
smelter strike in 1899, and its amicable adjustment was largely due to the influ- 
ence of his wise and conservative action. In September, 1900, Mr. Coates received 
the nomination of the democratic and fusion forces for lieutenant governor of Colo- 
rado, to which office he was elected by a plurality of over twenty-five thousand. 
This indorsement and honor came to him unsought and was a most substantial 
tribute to a most worthy character. Those who have known Mr. Coates since his 
boyhood speak of his loyalty and sincere purpose and the remarkable courage and 
ability with which he follows out and urges his convictions. Mr. Coates was mar- 
ried in Denver, October 14, 1890, to Miss Sarah B. Pearce. They have one child, 
a daughter, Hazel Marie, born at La Porte, Indiana, February 1, 1898." 

Before Mr. Coates left Colorado the democrats offered him a renomination for 
lieutenant governor, or the congressional nomination as he might choose, but he 
was entirely out of sympathy with political methods which were then dominant, as 
it seemed that personal interest and not public welfare was the constitution of the 
majority of political leaders in that state. The corruption that was so evident, 
disgusted him so thoroughly that he resolved to have nothing more to do with politi- 
cal management or office there. In 1901 he removed from Pueblo and made his 
home in Denver until 1908, during which period he was for some time acting gov- 
ernor of the state during the absence of Governor James B. Orman. The west, 
however, attracted him and he resolved to become a factor in the upbuilding of the 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 821 

great empire which was springing up beyond the Rockies. He therefore sought 
a favorable business, purchasing the Tribune, a newspaper of Wallace, Idaho, of 
which he took charge in January, 1904. In July, 1906, he was visited by repre- 
sentatives of the Spokesman-Review of Spokane, to whom he sold out, as they de- 
sired to establish a daily paper in Wallace. 

The same year Mr. Coates removed to Spokane and organized the printing 
firm of Coates, Hughes & Coates, in connection with his brother William and H. L. 
Hughes. During the period of his residence in this city he has taken an active in- 
terest in labor and political affairs and is widely recognized as the champion of 
the interest of the many as opposed to the interests of the favored few. In the 
fall of 1909 Mayor Pratt appointed him one of the seventeen members of the pre- 
liminary charter commission to investigate old and new forms and to report in re- 
gard to adopting the new. After three months' investigation the commissioners 
sent in their report in favor of the adoption of the commission form of govern- 
ment and Mr. Coates took an active part in the campaign for the purpose of call- 
ing for an election of fifteen freeholders. When it had been decided upon to hold 
the election he was nominated and elected as a member of the commission that 
formulated the present charter of the city. He has reason to be proud of the fact 
that he is the father of the preferential system of voting. He took an active part 
in the campaign for the adoption of the charter which carried on December 28, 
1910. On the 7th of March, following, he was elected a commissioner on the non- 
partisan ticket, being one of five elected out of ninety-three candidates, receiving 
the third highest when the vote was first taken. He was assigned to the position 
of commissioner of public works and all the city improvements are in his depart- 
ment, including bridges, streets, sewers and asphalt plants. A vast amount of work 
is being done at the present writing, his department representing the spirit of 
progress which is rife in Spokane and is making this one of the most enterprising 
and attractive cities in the Pacific coast country. He believes in "doing the right 
thing and doing it today as well as looking forward to tomorrow." 

Mr. Coates has attended numerous county and state conventions as delegate for 
the populist party and after its absorption in 1892 by the democratic party he 
joined the socialists, with whom he has since been identified. With him principle 
is ever above partisanship and his political activity and service have ever been the 
expression of his deep interest in the general welfare. He has one possession 
which he prizes highly — a gold watch, which bears the inscription "Presented to 
D. C. Coates by the Members, Senate of Colorado, Thirteenth General Assembly, 
1891," each one of the thirty-five members of the senate contributing to the gift. 

On the 14th of October, 1890, at Denver, Colorado, Mr. Coates was united in 
marriage to Miss Sarah B. Pearce, a daughter of Samuel Adams Pearce, who was 
a volunteer from Pennsylvania and fought in the Civil war on the Union side, 
taking part in the battle of Gettysburg and other important engagements. He was 
a representative of an old Pennsylvania family. 

Mr. Coates became a member of the Maccabees in Pueblo, Colorado, and was 
transferred to Tent No. 15, in Spokane. He joined the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks at Wallace, Idaho, and now has his membership in Spokane Lodge, 
No. 2, B. P. O. E. His wife has taken an active part in women's organizations 
and has held many offices in the Ladies of the Maccabees. She is the financial 
secretary of the Spokane Woman's Club and secretary of the Woman's Suffrage 



322 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

League and took an active part in the suffrage campaign in Spokane. Having re- 
sided in Colorado and Idaho, both of which states give women the franchise, it is 
only natural that she should take an active part in the suffrage movement in Spo- 
kane. She is one of the officers in the Woman's N on-Partisan League, which was 
organized to take part in the city elections and which carries on a general educa- 
tional campaign. Mr. Coates belongs to the Social and Moral Hygiene and simi- 
lar clubs and is greatly interested in human welfare work. His sympathies reach 
out to all mankind and a helping hand is ever extended to those who seek to 
climb upward. He has been a close and discriminating student of the political, 
sociological and economic questions of the country and has ever kept abreast with 
the best thinking men of the age. 



CHARLES R. HESSELTINE. 

Charles R. Hesseltine is president of the United Securities Company, a finan- 
cial underwriting and promotion company, and is widely known as one of the 
promoters of the northwest whose labors, capacity for organization and powers of 
direction have constituted an effective and valuable element in the development 
of the northwest. The enterprising spirit characteristic of this section of the 
country and its growth finds expression in his life. He is a western man by birth, 
training and preference, for he was born in Clackamas county, Oregon, December 
20, 1879, his parents being Appolis H. and Elva (Cain) Hesseltine. The father 
crossed the plains with his parents in the early '50s, making the journey from Iowa 
to the Pacific coast. The family first settled in California, where they remained 
for two years and then made their way northward into Oregon. The grandfather 
of our subject was Eli Hesseltine, who became one of the first settlers of Clack- 
amas county and bore an active part in the work of reclaiming that region for the 
purposes of civilization. His son, Appolis H. Hesseltine, built the first saw and 
shingle mill in that county and in other ways the family were closely identified 
with the early improvement there. In 1889, however, they crossed the Cascade 
mountains by team and settled at Wilbur, Lincoln county, Washington, where 
the father did contract work for the Northern Pacific Railroad Company and 
thus bore his share in the development of that section. 

Charles R. Hesseltine acquired his education in the public schools of Clackamas 
county, Oregon, and Lincoln county, Washington, pursuing his studies through 
successive grades until he became a high-school student. Early in his business 
career he traveled all over the west as a representative for a publishing house, 
and in 1902 he took up his residence in Seattle, where he entered the promotion 
field. He possesses marked powers of organization and his administrative direc- 
tion and executive force have been elements in the successful conduct of various 
projects which he has instituted and established. He readily sees and seizes upon 
the opportunity for the establishment of a business that promises success and his 
efforts in this connection have contributed largely to the commercial activity and 
consequent prosperity of the northwest. He organized the Pacific Fish Canning 
Machinery Company, of which he became the secretary and treasurer, and the 
machines of this company are now being used in every thoroughly modern can- 



'. K. HES8ELTINE 



■ — »*l 






SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 325 

nerr in the United States, for one machine will do the work that was formerly done by 
two hundred Chinamen. Mr. Hesseltine has also organized and financed several 
successful campaigns which have resulted in the formation of the Comstock-Golden 
Gate Mining Company, the Washington Meteor Mining Company of Chelan county, 
Washington, and the Rogers- Hesseltine Company, a real-estate holding company. 
In the fall of 1908 he came to Spokane and organized the United Securities Com- 
pany, which does a general financing and promotion business, being the means of 
bringing worthy and financially sound improvements and investments to the atten- 
tion of capital. Thus by bringing together the promoters and men of financial 
standing the business has been operating to the best welfare of the city and many 
substantial structures during the past four years have been erected as the out- 
come of its activity. Mr. Hesseltine has also recently organized the . Iceless 
Refrigerator Manufacturing Company, which is proving to be a paying undertak- 
ing, and one of his recent inceptions is what is known as the Empire State Manu- 
facturing Company, for the purpose of manufacturing a new patented floor scraper. 
Ever since a boy he has been of an inventive turn of mind and shown a natural 
ability as draftsman. This genial gift has found a practical outlet in a number 
of useful articles which are the fruit of his fertile brain, among them a potato 
planter, a device plowing at the same time the ground and planting potatoes. Among 
others of his notable inventions are a mechanical device for the raising and lower- 
ing of buggy tops and an automatic combination breast and wall drill for iron 
and metal work. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and is in thorough 
sympathy with its purpose of instituting publicity measures which will make known 
the advantages of the city and in prompting projects 'for adorning and improving 
apokane in many ways. ', . , 

On the 11th of March, 1907, Mr.vEfesseitirie waV married to Miss Lillian 
Fairbanks, a daughter of William and Katherine Fairbanks, of Rutland, Ver- 
mont, and a niece of ex- Vice President FaiJ^a^sV.^h^ attractive residence of 
Mr. and Mrs. Hesseltine at No. 2506 *CarfieTd road was erected by him in the 
year 1911. 

Mr. Hesseltine has never become actively interested in social orders or clubs, 
preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs. He recognizes 
the fact that the present and not the future holds his opportunity and therefore 
makes each passing hour count for the utmost in his business activities. To build 
op rather than to destroy is his broad policy and not alone has he followed con- 
structive measures but also attacks everything with a contagious enthusiasm that 
has won him the support and cooperation of many. 



HON. HARRY ROSENHAUPT. 



Hon. Harry Rosenhaupt, serving for the second term as a member of the statr 
senate, has long been a recognized leader in political circles in Spokane as well 
as a prominent member of the bar. In both fields laudable ambition, devotion to 
<hity and fitness for leadership have placed him above the majority of his fellows. 
He was born in Peru, Illinois, January 27, 1869, a son of Joseph and Johanna 
Rosenhaupt, of whom mention is made elsewhere in this volume. He became a 



326 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

public-school student in La Salle, Illinois, and for two years attended the Uni- 
versity of Michigan at Ann Arbor, from which he was graduated with the class oi 
1900, the degree of Bachelor of Laws being then conferred upon him. In the 
meantime he had become a resident of Spokane in 1886 and had spent several 
years in clerking and later on connected with the Chicago Clothing Company in 
this city. In various ways he came into closer and closer contact with public in- 
terests and his gradual rise to prominence in connection with the public welfare 
of the city has come to him in marked recognition of his ability and worth. In 
early days he belonged to the volunteer fire department, becoming a charter mem- 
ber of the Tiger Hook and Ladder Company, of which the present chief was then 
captain. Mr. Rosenhaupt was on duty in 1889 when the city of Spokane was prac- 
tically reduced to ashes. Determining upon the practice of law as a life work, he 
spent some time as a student in the law office of Adolph Munter in 1899, and fol- 
lowing the completion of his law course in the Michigan State University he 
formed a partnership with Robertson & Miller, the association being maintained 
until 1910. In the latter year he joined Harry L. Cohn in a partnership under 
the firm name of Cohn & Rosenhaupt, and for a year Bruce Blake was also con- 
nected with them but has now withdrawn. From the outset of his professional 
career he has enjoyed a large and distinctively representative practice that has 
connected him with some of the most important litigation tried in the courts of the 
district. He is recognized as a strong trial lawyer and equally able as a counselor. 

Mr. Rosenhaupt's gift of oratory has not only proved of value in his court 
work but also in his political connections. He is ever ready to support his position 
by intelligent argument that indicates wide reading and research and thorough 
familiarity with the subject under discussion. He has always supported the re- 
publican party and in 1899 was elected to represent his district in the house of 
representatives and again in 1901, so that legislative service was familiar to him 
when in 1906 he was chosen to the upper house from the seventh senatorial dis- 
trict for a four years' term. In 1910 he was reelected senator and during the ses- 
sion of 1911 was chosen chairman of the judiciary committee. He also served on 
the appropriation committee and several other important committees and was the 
author of the Rosenhaupt freight rate bill which was defeated by only one vote. 
He is an active working member on the floor of the senate and in committee rela- 
tions and has done splendid service in his comprehensive investigation of the ques- 
tions under discussion, proving, therefore, a valuable member of the senate. Mr. 
Rosenhaupt has repeatedly been a member of the city and county committees of the 
republican party and also of the executive committee, and has been chosen delegate 
to several state conventions. He was chairman of the city convention when Frank 
Boyd was nominated for mayor and member of the executive committee when E. L. 
Powell was elected mayor. 

Aside from political office Mr. Rosenhaupt has done important public work. 
In 1909 he was largely instrumental in raising the sum of thirty thousand dollars 
for the entertainment of the irrigation congress held in Spokane. He was ap- 
pointed on the committee to receive President McKinley on his visit to the west, 
but owing to the illness of his wife the president was obliged to change his itin- 
erary when he reached San Francisco. Mr. Rosenhaupt also served as one of the 
legislative committee appointed to escort President Taft on his trip through the 
state in 1909 and was one of the arbitration committee acting on behalf of the 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 327 

rights of Spokane when the differences between the people of Spokane and the 
Coear d'Alene miners was being settled. For many years he has been an active 
member of the Sons of Veterans and was head officer for the state of Washington 
in 1901-2, being succeeded in that position by Senator Wesley L. Jones. As a 
member of the Chamber of Commerce he cooperates in all the progressive move- 
ments instituted by that organization for the upbuilding of the city and the ex- 
ploitation of its advantages. He belongs to Spokane Lodge, No. 34, A. F. & A. M., 
and in the consistory has attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. 
He likewise belongs to Spokane Camp, No. 99, W. O. W. ; Spokane Lodge, No. 
228, B. P. O. E. ; and to the B'nai B'rith. Of the latter he is a past president and 
has repeatedly been delegate to the grand lodge. His religious faith is indicated 
by his membership in the Jewish Temple. 

On the 17th of September, 1902, Mr. Rosenhaupt was married to Miss Es- 
telle Mayer, a daughter of Henry Mayer, a business man of Chicago, Illinois, 
and unto this union have been born three children: Julian M., June 15, 1903; Jo- 
hanna May, June 15, 1906; and June Estelle, born June 28, 1908. The history 
of Harry Rosenhaupt is the record of one whose intellectual merit and constantly 
developing powers have brought him to prominence, his worth and ability in his 
profession, in citizenship and in private life being attested by the consensus of 
public opinion. 



RAYMOND E. HOWLETT. 

Raymond E. Howlett, bookkeeper and office manager in the lone mill of the 
Panhandle Lumber Company, was one of the first employes in this plant, which 
has been in operation for the past three years. He was born in Sauk county, Wis- 
consin, on the 7th of August, 1888, and is a son of William and Margaret (Quirk) 
Howlett. The father was a pioneer of the Badger state, having come there from the 
province of Quebec, Canada, in 1855, locating in the lumber region where for 
many years he was employed as a woodsman. 

Reared in the state of his birth, Raymond E. Howlett obtained his education 
in the graded and high schools of Spring Green, Wisconsin, and in the business 
college at Wausau, being graduated from the latter institution in 1906. After the 
completion of his commercial course he was qualified to begin his business career, 
possessing the essential theoretical knowledge necessary to enable him to seek a 
clerical position. In common with the majority of young men, when able to begin 
working for himself he felt an impelling desire to leave the vicinity with which 
he had been familiar since childhood, and to begin his new life amid entirely dif- 
ferent surroundings. This was made possible by his obtaining a position as 
bookkeeper at Eureka, Montana, where he located in 1906, very shortly after his 
graduation from business college. That he was an efficient and thoroughly capable 
employe is manifested by the fact that he continued in the service of this com- 
pany for three years. During that period he obtained the position he now holds, 
coining here when the Panhandle Lumber Company first began to break the ground 
for their lone plant. This is the best equipped and most thoroughly modern saw- 
mill in the world and is operated entirely by electricity. 



328 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Mr. Howlett is a very enterprising and industrious young man, ambitious to 
rise in the world but sufficiently practical to realize that advancement at his age 
must necessarily be somewhat slow, as naturally he has had but little opportunity 
to evidence his powers or latent possibilities. As an employe he is efficient in the 
discharge of his duties conscientiously applying himself to every task in full recog- 
nition of hi 8 responsibilities. 



HON. RICHARD B. BLAKE. 

On the pages of Washington's judicial history the name of Hon. Richard B. 
Blake figures prominently by reason of his service as judge of the superior court 
for the district comprised of Spokane and Stevens counties. He was ever a brilliant 
although unpretentious member of the bar during the period of his connection with 
the profession here, his ability being widely recognized by his colleagues and con- 
temporaries in the practice of law. It was not alone, however, his high standing 
as an attorney but also his high character as a man and citizen that won for him 
the warm regard and honor in which he was uniformly held. He was born in 
Hendricks county, Indiana, March 14, 1850, and died on the 15th of June, 1900. 
His father, John Blake, was a prominent farmer of that county and upon the home- 
stead farm the son was reared to the age of sixteen years, devoting the summer 
months to the work of the fields and the winter seasons to the acquirement of his 
education in the district schools. He afterward went to Danville, Indiana, where 
he pursued a preparatory course of study and then entered De Pauw University, 
from which he won his Bachelor of Science degree, being graduated from that 
institution in 1872. In the meantime he had also taken up the study of law and 
in October of that year was admitted to the bar. He had previously completed the 
classical course in De Pauw University as a graduate of 1870 and in his college 
days became a member of the Phi Gamma Delta. 

Judge Blake entered upon law practice at Danville, becoming junior partner 
of the firm of Hogate & Blake, his associate in practice being later a member of 
the supreme court of that state. For sixteen years Judge Blake continued a mem- 
ber of the Danville bar, making continuous advancement in practice and at one 
time holding the office of prosecuting attorney. The west with its growing oppor- 
tunities attracted him in 1888 and in that year he arrived in Spokane, where he 
opened a law office in connection with Colonel William M. Rid path, with whom 
he practiced until October, 1889. In that year Mr. Blake was elected judge of 
the superior court for Spokane and Stevens counties and remained upon the bench 
for four years, his record as a judge being in harmony with his record as a man 
and citizen, distinguished by the utmost loyalty and by a masterful grasp of every 
problem presented for solution. In 1898 he resumed the private practice of law 
and became senior partner of the firm of Blake & Post, in which connection he 
practiced until his death. He possessed a keen, analytical mind and his presenta- 
tion of his cause was ever characterized by clear reasoning, logical deduction and 
correct application of legal principles. That he had the honor and respect of his 
fellow practitioners in indicated in the fact that he was called to the presidency 
of the Spokane County Bar Association and was elected vice president of the 
State Bar Association. His name was prominently brought forth in connection 



RICHARD B. BLAKE 



■* 









*oU^, U*VX 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 331 

with the candidacy for governor on the silver republican ticket but he expressed 
his unwillingness to leave the active practice of his profession. His name was 
also mentioned in connection with supreme court honors and in 1896 he was 
tendered the democratic nomination for mayor of Spokane but was unwilling to 
enter public life. He always regarded his profession as his chief interest and 
was connected with much prominent litigation, including the case which H. T. 
Cowley brought against the Northern Pacific Railroad, in which Judge Blake acted 
as counselor for the plaintiff. The action was brought to determine the title of 
about one hundred and twenty acres of land and finally the case went to the 
supreme court of the United States, where a final decision was rendered in favor 
of Mr. Blake's client. 

On the 22d of December, 1874, in Danville, Indiana, Judge Blake was united 
in marriage to Miss Antoinette E. Moore, a daughter of Jacob K. and Phoebe 
Moore, both natives of Danville. They became parents of two sons: Jacob M., 
who is a graduate of the Ann Arbor Law School and is now living in San Francisco ; 
and Robert B., who was graduated from the Chicago University and is now a 
leading attorney of this city. The death of Judge Blake occurred in 1900 and in 
his passing Spokane lost a man whom she honored highly as a representative lawyer 
and citizen. He certainly deserved much credit for what he accomplished. He 
started out in life without capital or assistance and won his way to a leading place 
as a representative of the Washington bench and bar. As his labors brought to 
him financial return he made extensive and judicious investment in real estate 
which netted him a handsome profit [ in Jater yeajrs.j M He held membership in the 
Vincent Episcopal church and in mMfps^ #1, tcitizeqsjiip- could always be counted 
upon to further progressive projects) for the public good. He possessed marked 
literary taste and was also a lover of Wisic v , He read broadly and made that which 
he read his own. His life record is Iworthy^of'-studyi. showing the forcefulness of 
industry, persistency and honorable purpose. He was a man who in every rela- 
tion of life was found faultless in honor, fearless in conduct and stainless in reputa- 
tion. 



ELMER DEVANDO OLMSTED, M. D. 

Elmer Devando Olmsted not only enjoys an enviable reputation as a leading 
physician and surgeon of Spokane, but has also been prominently connected with 
civic interests and has been honored with many positions of public trust. Under 
his administration as mayor a vast amount of public improvement was done and 
the work of paving the city streets was initiated. All through the years of his 
manhood his life has been one of untiring activity, fruitful in its results, and for 
almost a quarter of a century his history has been closely interwoven with that 
of Spokane. 

Dr. Olmsted is a native of Davenport, Delaware county, New York, his birth 
having occurred on the 6th of June, 1849. His father, Stephen S. Olmsted, who 
was also born in the Empire state, died at the venerable age of eighty-seven years. 
He was a second cousin of Martin Van Buren, president of the United States, 
and was of Holland descent. In early life he learned the cabinet-maker's trade, 



332 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

which he followed both in the east and after his removal to the west. He was 
also somewhat prominent in local affairs, serving for eight years as postmaster of 
Victoria, Illinois. He married Clara McMorris, also a native of New York, and 
her death occurred about 1885, when she was seventy-five years of age. In the 
family were six sons and four daughters: William H., deceased, who was a 
farmer of Illinois; John R., who was at one time a prominent political leader of 
St. Marys, South Dakota, but is now deceased; James L., who follows merchandis- 
ing in Victoria, Illinois ; Stephen Armstrong, a farmer of North Dakota ; Walter 
Morris, a traveling salesman living in Nebraska ; Mary, who died in infancy ; Phoebe 
A., who was the widow of P. A. Harrington and the grandmother of Dr. W. W. 
Harrington, of Spokane, died at the age of seventy years; Lucy J., the wife 
of William Overlander, of Victoria, Illinois; and Sarah I., the wife of Alfred Waffle, 
also of Victoria. 

The other member of the family is Dr. Elmer D. Olmsted, whose early educa- 
tion was acquired in the common and high schools of Illinois. He was yet a youth 
in his teens when he enlisted for service in the Civil war, in defense of the Union 
cause, but was rejected on account of being under size. Taking up the study 
of medicine, he was graduated from the Missouri Homeopathic Medical College 
of St. Louis with the degree of M. D., and entered upon practice at Plymouth, Illi- 
nois, in 1877. There he remained through a decade and in 1887 came to Spokane, 
where he has since resided. In the disastrous fire which swept over the city in 
1889 he lost all of his personal effects, but his ability and devotion to his profes- 
sional duties won him a constantly growing business and for many years he has 
been regarded as one of the most capable and successful physicians and sur- 
geons of the city. He has been a constai/t student of the science of medicine and 
of the best medical literature, keeping in touch with the progressive work that is 
being done by the most eminent members of the profession. He also promotes 
his knowledge through his membership in the American Medical Association, the 
American Medical Institute and the Spokane County Medical Society of which 
he is now serving as president. He was also honored with the presidency of the 
Washington State Homeopathic Medical Society, to which he still belongs. He has 
served for a term as a member of the board of health of Spokane, is a member of 
the medical staff of St. Luke's Hospital, has served for six years as a member of 
the state medical examining board and has ever taken an active part in upholding 
the standard of practice in this city. He discharges his duties with a high sense of 
conscientious obligation and with strict regard to the ethics of the profession. 

While heavy demands have been made upon his time and attention in the prac- 
tice of medicine, Dr. Olmsted has yet found opportunity for cooperation in many 
public movements whereby the welfare and upbuilding of the city have been pro- 
moted. He has always been in sympathy with republican principles yet not to 
the extent of partisanship that precludes his action with an independent move- 
ment where no issues are involved. He stands for good citizenship and municipal 
integrity above all things and never wavered from his position during his serv- 
ice as mayor of Spokane, to which office he was elected on the citizens ticket for a 
period of two years, beginning in 1897. He advocated many practical measures of 
reform, improvement and progress. During his administration the first city paving 
was done, Riverside and Howard streets being thus improved. It was also during 
his administration that the Chamber of Commerce was organized, Dr. Olmsted be- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 333 

ing one of the most influential factors in effecting the organization. It was a dif- 
ficult undertaking to organize forces in this connection, but when once the work 
was instituted it has been continuously carried forward with results of constantly 
increasing usefulness and value. He was chosen its first president and continued 
as its chief executive officer for &ve years. He afterward continued in positions 
of trust for a long time but the press of personal business finally compelled him to 
resign. Sixteen years ago he took part in the organization of the Spokane Savings 
& Loan Society, of which he is the president. He has been a member of the United 
States pension examining board for eighteen years and for the greater part of the 
time has served as its secretary. He was also president of the State Normal School 
at Cheney, Washington, for a number of years, and is one of those to whom credit 
is due for the completion of the building of that school. He was appointed for 
a six years' term but resigned before it was completed on account of the demands 
of his profession. 

Dr. Olmsted has been married twice and by his first wife had two children: 
Amy Lois, now the wife of Bert Taylor; and Carrie Edna, who was the wife of 
Fred Taylor and died in 1908. On the 15th of May, 1881, Dr. Olmsted was 
united in marriage to Miss Emma L. Sutton, who was born in Illinois. His 
appreciation of comradeship and friendship causes him to enter into social in- 
terests with marked zest. He belongs to the Inland Club and the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks, but is most prominent in the Masonic fraternity, in 
which he has acquired high honors. He has filled most of the offices in the lodge, 
the consistory, and the shrine, serving as master of the lodge for five terms, while 
at the present time he is commander-in-chief of Oriental Consistory, No. 2, S. P. 
R. S., which position he has filled for the past fourteen years. Upon him has been 
accorded the honor of election to the thirty-third degree and he holds the second 
highest office within the gift of the fraternity in Washington as deputy for the 
sovereign grand inspector general for Alaska and Washington, filling the position 
under Ernest B. Hussey. He has many traits admirable and worthy of all praise 
and among his noble qualities is his large capacity for friendship. 



EDWARD B. ZANE. 



Edward B. Zane, who is the agent for the Packard motor cars, with offices at 
the corner of Sprague and Jefferson streets, was born in Philadelphia, on the 7th 
of February, 1 884, a son of Charles S. and Jane (Breece) Zane. The father is a 
prominent attorney of Philadelphia, where the family reside. 

Edward B. Zane pursued his education in the public schools of his native city 
but in 1904 moved to Seattle. He was connected with the engineering department 
of the Moran Ship Building Company, the Seattle Engineering Company and later 
the Seattle Electric Company. In these various positions he acquired a good 
knowledge of engineering and of mechanical construction. In 1907 he became iden- 
tified with the automobile business, being employed by Nute & Keena, who were 
the agents in the northwest for the Packard Motor Company. He came to Spokane 
in 1909 and handled the Spokane business but in June, 1910, he was appointed rep- 
resentative for the entire Inland Empire district. Their show rooms were located 



334 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

first at 1122 First avenue but in June, 1911, they moved to the new rooms which 
were especially built for them. There were then but three Packard motor cars in 
this city but now there are over thirty-five. They are also giving special attention 
to commercial trucks and there are now seven three-ton trucks in use in this city. 
They maintain both a salesroom and service station but do not carry on garage work. 
On the 16th of June, 1909, Mr. Zane was united in marriage, at Seattle, to Miss 
Betty Williams, a daughter of H. R. Williams, of that city. They have one daugh- 
ter, Elisabeth Barbara. Mr. Zane is a member of the Spokane Club and the Spokane 
Country Club. In his business life he displays marked ability in developing and 
increasing the business of the company which he represents and in the constantly 
enlarging patronage accorded this company is seen the success which has rewarded 
his labors. 



CHARLES F. CLOUGH. 



Among the veterans of the Civil war who are now residing in Spokane is num- 
bered Charles F. Clough, who for four years valiantly defended the union cause, 
bravely facing the enemy on many hotly contested battlefields. He has been 
equally loyal to his country in days of peace and has done much important serv- 
ice, especially while filling the office of city councilman and mayor of Spokane. 
He is also prominently associated with business interests in the northwest, being 
an extensive real-estate dealer of Spokane and a stockholder and director in vari- 
ous corporate interests. 

Mr. Clough was born at Cumberland, Rhode Island, December 26, 1848, a 
son of Zera and Sally M. (Cook) Clough. The father, who was born in Connecti- 
cut, belonged to an old New England family, of Scotch-Irish descent, was en- 
gaged for many years in freighting between Providence and Woonsocket, Rhode 
Island, before the advent of the railroads. He died in 1849. His wife, who was 
born in Rhode Island and was of English lineage, died in 1892. Their family 
numbered two sons, the brother of our subject being George H. Clough who is 
now residing in New Bedford, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Clough's educational facilities in early life were very limited, and con- 
fined to country schools during winter terms, like other lads in those days who 
followed farming as a vocation. In 1861 when in his eighteenth year, he re- 
sponded to the country's call for volunteers, the rebellion in the south having 
aroused his patriotic nature and he in the opening year of the struggle joined Com- 
pany E, Fourth Rhode Island Regiment of Volunteer Infantry, serving from the 
8th of September, 1861, until the 25th of July, 1865. He served as a non-com- 
missioned officer in Burnside's campaign in North Carolina in the winter and spring 
of 1861-2, during the siege and capture of Roanoke island, on the 7th and 8th of 
February, 1862, and at the battle of Newbern, N. C, March 14, 1862. Later he 
participated in the siege of Fort Macon, which surrendered on the 25th of April 
of that year, and with most of Burnside's forces was transferred from North Caro- 
lina to Washington, D. C, leaving the old North state on the 5th of July, 1862, 
then being attached to the Army of the Potomac in routing Lee's forces and driv- 
ing them out of Maryland. Mr. Clough participated in the battle of South Moan- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 335 

tain, September 14, 1862, and that of Antietam, on the 17th of September. After 
the rout of Lee's army in Maryland he went to Fredericksburg, West Virginia, 
and was in the battle of that place on the 14th and 15th of December. In the 
early spring of 1 868 his division was transferred to Portsmouth, Virginia, Mr. Clough 
remaining in that country for several months, during which his regiment partici- 
pated in a number of skirmishes near Suffolk, Virginia. Later in that year he was 
transferred back to the Army of the Potomac and his regiment was on detached 
duty several months guarding Confederate prisons at Point Lookout, Maryland. 
Early in the spring of 1864 he was again attached to the Army of the Potomac 
and took part in several engagements near Petersburg. While at Petersburg his 
company was stationed directly in front of the town at the point opposite where the 
rebel fort was undermined, and blown up on July 80, 1 864, being followed by one of 
the noted battles of that year. The regiment was then transferred to Fort Sedg- 
wick, commonly known as "Fort Hell," on the Jerusalem plank road leading to 
Petersburg. They remained there until April 2, 1865, under an almost continuous 
engagement, on the date mentioned a general advance was made on Lee's army, 
resulting in Lee's being driven from Petersburg and Richmond. The Union troops 
followed the Confederate army until the surrender at Appomattox on the 9th of 
April, 1865. Mr. Clough was then transferred to a point near Alexandria, Virginia, 
where he remained until his regiment was sent home to be mustered out in July, 
1865. Following the surrender of Lee and other armies south of there in May, 
1865, there was a splendid military pageant held in Washington, being a review 
of the Army of the Potomac and of Sherman's army which required two full days. 
In this event Mr. Clough participated, being one of the many thousands of the 
hero band who passed up the avenue amid the applause of thousands of people who 
lined the street on each side. 

Soon after being mustered out of the army Mr. Clough and one of his old 
comrades entered the market business, and when he sold out in that line he devoted 
two years to general merchandising at Woonsocket, Rhode Island. He afterward 
engaged in the sale of sewing machines and pianos and from 1874 until 1876 in- 
clusive was largely engaged in handling patent right interests, the business taking 
him to Chicago in 1876. From that point he went to San Francisco, where for 
six years he was employed as a commercial traveler, his first visit to Spokane being 
made while he was thus engaged. He was so impressed with the city and its great 
possibilities that on the 1st of January, 1884, he quit traveling and on the 2d of 
March of the same year located in Spokane. This was during the excitement in 
the Coeur d'Alene mining country, and being attracted by it Mr. Clough spent a 
few months in the mines of that district, returning to Spokane in July, 1884. A 
little later he bought out an established business on Howard street and conducted 
a book and stationery store until 1887. On selling that enterprise he turned his 
attention to the real-estate business, in which he has engaged continuously since. 
There were probably twenty-five hundred people in Spokane when Mr. Clough 
arrived here, and with notable prescience he foresaw the future and made extensive 
investment in real estate, realizing that property must necessarily rise in value 
as the city grew in population. His holdings in 1898, 1889 and 1890 were large 
and he suffered quite seriously through the financial panic of 1898, but succeeded 
in weathering the storm and is now the owner of much valuable realty, his busi- 
ness here being conducted as a corporation. He is also a director of the Commer- 



336 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

rial Orchards Company of Washington and a stockholder of the Washington Brick, 
Lime & Sewer Pipe Company, of the Spokane Title Company and die Peoples 
National Fire Insurance Company of Philadelphia. 

Mr. Clough was married twice and by his first union had one son, Lester F. 
Clough, who was born September 1, 1873, is now married and resides in Oakland, 
California. On the 5th of May, 1903, Mr. Clough married Mildred A. Morgan, 
a native of Saginaw, Michigan, who he claims has proved his mascot, and together 
they are enjoying their beautiful home on "Cannon Hill." He is a member of the 
Spokane Club and the Chamber of Commerce, and cooperates in all of the move- 
ments instituted by the latter and particularly during the city's earlier or formative 
period, he was always a liberal contributor both financially and in energetic effort 
toward the advancement of enterprises that were for the general good and upbuild- 
ing of Spokane. In politics he is a republican and has taken an active part in 
political affairs, frequently serving as a delegate to city and county conventions. 
His fellow townsmen, appreciative of his worth and ability, have called him to 
office and for two years, beginning in 1886, he was a member of the city council 
In 1890 he was elected mayor, entering upon the duties of the office in April of 
that year, and served until April, 1891. This was during the reorganization period 
following the destruction of the business district by fire in 1889. During his 
tenure of office the old charter was abolished and a new one framed. There was a 
vast amount of building and improvement during that year, more being done than 
in any year before or since. The city limits were extended to five times its former 
size, and a great amount of street railway work was commenced that year. The 
old steel bridge at Monroe was also begun and nearly finished that year. He gave 
to the city a businesslike administration, characterized by needed reforms and 
improvement, and his labors were substantial and beneficial elements in the city's 
growth. 



WILLIAM HENRY ACUFF. 

William Henry Acuff is now living retired after long and close association with 
business interests of Spokane, whereby he contributed to the general welfare in 
addition to advancing his individual success. He was born at Gwynedd, Pennsyl- 
vania, October 8, 1846, his home being about sixteen miles from Philadelphia in 
the old Welsh settlement there. At the time that William Penn arrived in that 
state the three corners of the town square at Gwynedd had been in possession of 
the Acuff family for a long period. The ancestry is Welsh and Scotch and the 
parents of our subject were William and Lydia (Ellis) Acuff. The father died 
when his son William was but five months old, his death being occasioned by ty- 
phoid fever when he was twenty-six years of age. The mother lived to the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-two years and passed away in California in 1906. 

William Henry Acuff was an only child and pursued his education in the schools 
of Pennsylvania and Illinois, having accompanied his mother on her removal to 
the latter state when eleven years of age. He afterward returned to Norristown, 
Pennsylvania, where he attended school from 1864 until 1868. He also spent a 
portion of the time on the oil fields in order to earn the money necessary to en- 



W. H. ACUFF 



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SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 339 

able him to continue his education. In 1868 he again went to Illinois, settling 
at Decatur, Macon county, and in that vicinity he followed farming and milling, 
dealt in grain and taught school. Eventually he turned his attention to the lum- 
ber business and organized what is known today as the Decatur Lumber & Manu- 
facturing Company, one . of the important industrial and commercial interests of 
that district. In the spring of 1889 his health failed him and he disposed of his 
interests in the middle west. He then enjoyed a period of rest covering a few 
years and in the spring of 1890 came to Spokane, remaining out of business, how- 
ever, until February, 1892, when he organized the Washington Mill Company, of 
which he became the first secretary. Afterward he was president of the company 
for a period of fifteen years and in July, 1910, having won substantial success in 
the conduct of this enterprise, he retired. He has financial interests in the Trus- 
tee Company of Spokane, of which he has been a director since its organization. 

Asiae from business Mr. Acuff is well known in republican circles where he has 
exerted a wide influence, being well qualified by nature and acquired ability to 
become a leader of public thought and action. In 1896 he was elected on the re- 
publican ticket a member of the city council and served for three years as chair- 
man of its finance committee, while for one year he was president of the council. 
It was during his term that Spokane was nearly bankrupt and it was through the 
good business judgment and careful management of Mr. Acuff that the city was 
able to meet its monthly pay rolls and weather the financial storm. He spent the 
winter of 1904-5 in Washington, D. C, representing the Chamber of Commerce 
in the interest of Spokane, endeavoring^ to assist President Roosevelt in securing 
increased power for the interstate cfcmntftce cbirfm&dibn and aid Spokane in its 
fight for reduced freight rates. The j$dtUk (ridfciilfcs *&# accomplished cannot be over- 
estimated. The campaign was conducted in such a manner that it awakened the 
admiration of business men and maimfact»*er« -all- over the United States. In 
1908 Mr. Acuff went to Japan as a SpolilCn^represehlati^e with the Pacific coast 
commercial commission to look into the trade relations between the two countries. 
His efforts have been most effective in promoting business conditions and in bring- 
ing forth elements that have been far-reaching forces in the growth and material 
upbuilding of the northwest. For many years he was the vice president of the Pacific 
Coast Lumberman's Association and was also president of the local association. 

On the 22d of August, 1871, in St. Louis, Missouri, Mr. Acuff was. married to 
Miss Isabelle Bricker, a daughter of Aaron and Louise Bricker of Decatur, Illinois, 
and they had one daughter, Liilie A., the wife of John C. Neffeler, of Spokane. The 
wife and mother died in this city in November, 1896. Since his retirement from 
business life Mr. Acuff has largely devoted his attention to Masonry which had 
also claimed much of his time and thought previously. He stands very high in 
the order and is a past master of Tyrian Lodge, No. 96, F. & A. M.; past high 
priest of Spokane Chapter, No. 2, R. A. M. ; past thrice illustrious master of Spo- 
kane Council, No. 4, R. & S. M. ; past eminent commander of Cataract Commandery, 
Xo. 3, K. T.; and past commander of Oriental Consistory, No. 2, S. P. R. S. He 
has likewise been awarded the honorary thirty-third degree and is a member of 
El Katif Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is likewise a member of the grand 
council and is one of its deputy grand masters. He is also junior warden of the 
grand commandery and is a past patron of the Eastern Star. He is today one of 

the best known men of Spokane, respected by all. In manner he is modest and 
VoL u— it 



340 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

retiring but the work that he has accomplished speaks for itself. His love of jus- 
tice has expressed itself in correct principle and practice and added to this, the 
salient features of his life have been a deep earnestness, impelled and fostered by 
indomitable perseverance, and a progressive spirit ruled by more than ordinary in- 
telligence and good judgment. 



JOHN MELVILLE GRIMMER. 

The life of John Melville Grimmer is perhaps more varied than that of many, 
for there came to him many interesting and sometimes exciting experiences during 
the period in which he lived a seafaring life. Today he is quietly pursuing the 
even tenor of his way as a business man of Spokane, having organized and de- 
veloped the business that is now conducted under the name of the Grimmer Storage 
& Truck Line. His birth occurred at St. Stephens, New Brunswick, November 27, 
1843, his father being William W. Grimmer, and his grandfather, John Grimmer, 
who were born in the same place near St. Stephens. The family is of German 
origin but early representatives of the family settled in Norfolk, England, and 
thence sailed for New Brunswick. Among the prominent members of the fam- 
ily was Skiffington Grimmer, who became a distinguished lawyer of New Bruns- 
wick; his son was surveyor general of that province and now is attorney general. 
Another member of the family is a distinguished physician of Edinborough, Scot- 
land. The grandfather of John M. Grimmer was justice of the peace for the part 
of the county in which he lived and was appointed by the government collector of 
customs, being head of that department when William W. Grimmer became an 
officer under him. At one time he owned vessels running between St. Stephens and 
the West Indies, conducting his interests under the name of the West India Goods 
& Grocery Business. His son, William W. Grimmer, was supercargo of one of the 
three vessels, Elizabeth Grimmer, Eliza Gillis and the Caledonia, all three of which 
were brigs. The latter, thus closely associated with his father in business and in 
official life, died at St. Stephens in February, 1890, having long survived his wife, 
who passed away in 1856. She bore the maiden name of Mary Ann Buchanan, 
and was born at Oak Hill, Charlotte county, New Brunswick, coming of Scotch 
ancestry. There were two sons of that marriage, the brother of John M. Grimmer 
being Harry Grimmer, a farmer and logger of Oak Hill, New Brunswick. After 
losing his first wife the father married again and had five sons, all living in St. 
Stephens. 

John M. Grimmer attended the New Brunswick schools, conning his lessons 
from books furnished by the British government, all canvas covered. At that day 
the head of a family paid so much for a term of three months' schooling and the 
government paid a certain amount, while the teachers boarded around, going from 
the home of one pupil to another. While the educational opportunities of Mr. 
Grimmer were thus somewhat limited, in the school of experience he learned many 
valuable lessons. His first business experience came to him as clerk in the office 
of Chipman & Bolton, who in connection with the lumber business also shipped 
lumber to Liverpool, St. Stephens at that time being the center of a large lum- 
ber trade. In 1859 Mr. Grimmer shipped on a vessel called the Hibernian and 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 341 

sailed to Dublin. On the return trip he went to Quebec, where he left the ship 
and thence made his way to his native town. In 1861 he joined the bark Florence 
Chipman and then went to Baltimore, where it loaded with a general cargo for 
Liverpool. On that ship he afterward sailed to Boston, Quebec, Montreal and 
then again to Liverpool. He next joined the ship Silesia for Calcutta, proceed- 
ing first to Mauritius island, thence to Calcutta, after which he remained in India 
for two years, returning by way of Cape of Good Hope to St. Helena for orders 
and thence to Fayal Island, where orders were received to proceed to London. 
In that city he joined the P. & O. bark Harrington and sailed for New York, where 
he shipped as second mate on the Zimi, carrying a load of lumber to Liverpool. He 
next joined the ship Echo as second mate and went to Philadelphia with a general 
cargo. Later he was wrecked off Hatteras in the bark Falcon and went into Boston 
under jury masts. On the ship Dame Durden he sailed for Liverpool and returned 
to Philadelphia on the Echo, then one of the largest sailing vessels afloat, acting 
as second mate. Again he was wrecked off Hatteras, losing the main mast and 
shifting the cargo. With an American ship sailing under English colors he went 
to Philadelphia from Quebec, taking on a load of square timber for Liverpool but 
the ship was water logged just eastward of Newfoundland. Twenty-seven men 
and officers were upon it for a week, when they were taken off on a Friday by the 
ship Chaudiere. Having abandoned the ship they were taken to London, the 
Fishermen's Society sending the crew to that place, where they had signed arti- 
cles. In 1865 Mr. Grimmer sailed as quartermaster on a little blockade runner 
and following the close of the Civil war went to Pernambuco, South America and 
thence to Macao and on to Bahia. The ship was chartered by the Brazilian gov- 
ernment, which was at war with Paraguay to run a blockade between Paraguay 
and the upper Brazilian country and carried specie from there to Rio de Janeiro. 
As they did not answer the hail of the fort at Rio they were seized and kept as 
prisoners of war for two months. When the vessel was sold to the Brazilian gov- 
ernment for a dispatch boat the crew deserted and joined a bark, going up the 
Amazon river as far as the vessel could proceed, thence back to Maranhao and 
afterward to Liverpool. At that place Mr. Grimmer joined the ship Cowper and 
in 1868 sailed for San Francisco. In the same year he became master of a 
schooner engaged in the coast trade. 

After some time, however, Mr. Grimmer left that service and went to Eureka, 
Humboldt county, California, where he was united in marriage to Miss Mary C. 
Hadley. He left California overland in the fall of 1880 and went on foot to 
Crescent City, from which point he traveled in the same manner across the moun- 
tains to Grant's Pass, Oregon. He afterward cruised the head waters of differ- 
ent rivers for the Hobbs, Gilmore Box Company, now the Crescent City Mill 
Company, of San Francisco, through the summer of 1880 and in the latter part 
of September started by stage from Ainsworth, which at that time was the west- 
ern headquarters of the Northern Pacific Railway in Spokane, the stage stopping 
at Medical Lake. 

Mr. Grimmer remained in Spokane for two weeks, then returned to Ainsworth 
and began work as bridge carpenter for the Northern Pacific Railway Company. 
In 1881 the carpenter's gang was changed from trestle No. 23 and sent to build 
a bridge at Hangman's creek, where they arrived March 1 1 . Three hundred 
Northern Pacific employes reached there at that time, with John B. McLain 



342 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

as superintendent of construction, and Angus McKenzie as chief builder. Later 
Mr. McLain was succeeded by the resident engineer, H. M. McCartney, as chief 
engineer, while H. W. Fairweather was division superintendent. Mr. Grimmer con- 
tinued with the Northern Pacific until the spring of 1882, when work was con- 
cluded at Sandpoint, Idaho. He then came to Spokane and purchased the Northern 
Pacific Hotel, which he conducted until 1885, but this was not a successful ven- 
ture and after disposing of his interests therein he purchased a truck and team 
and turned his attention to the transportation business, in which he has since been 
engaged. In this undertaking he met with prosperity and is now conducting a suc- 
cessful business under the firm name of the Grimmer Storage & Truck Line. Their 
storehouse west of the Monroe Street bridge is one hundred and fifty by one hun- 
dred and fifty feet and two stories and basement in height. Something of the 
growth of the business may be imagined from the fact that during the busy sea- 
son he uses twenty teams and employs from twenty-six to thirty-six men. When 
he first arrived in Spokane there were no bridges across the river and the only 
means of reaching the other side was by a ferry boat kept by R. W. Forrest, that 
made the crossing above where the Division Street bridge now spans the stream. 
Mr. Forrest was the first mayor of the town. There were few houses on the north 
side of the river and Mr. Grimmer's home, at No. 1848 Broadway, was the first 
brick house built on the north side. He and his wife have seen the town grow from 
an unimportant little village to a city of the first class and recollect many interest- 
ing reminiscences of those early days. There were several Indian scares in 1888 
and one on the 4th of July of that year, which sent the small population of the 
town to cover. Mr. Grimmer remembers the first murder that occurred in Spokane, 
the crime being committed in the little singing and dance house on Howard street, 
when a man named Roblin was shot by one Conover. 

It was on the 20th of September, 1876, in Eureka, California, that Mr. Grim- 
mer wedded Miss Mary C. Hadley, whose father, W. W. Hadley, now living re- 
tired, was a representative of an old New England family and had removed to 
California from Lynn, Massachusetts. The founder of the family in the new 
world came to this country in the Mayflower. Professor Arthur T. Hadley, of 
Yale University, is a distant relative. Some members of the Hadley family took 
part in the Revolutionary war and Mrs. Grimmer is therefore eligible to member- 
ship in the Daughters of the American Revolution. She has the distinction of 
being the first woman to enter Spokane on a train, coming on a construction train 
from Ainsworth near Pasco with the bridge builders who built the Howard Street 
bridge. Mrs. Grimmer was the first lady president of the Pioneer Society. Mr. 
Grimmer was the fourth president of the society and Fred Grimmer, his son, is 
now its secretary. Mrs. Grimmer had two brothers: E. W. Hadley, now a cigar 
manufacturer of San Diego, California; and W. E. Hadley, deceased, who was at 
one time owner of the Horton House at San Diego. Mr. and Mrs. Grimmer have 
four children: Edith, the wife of Frank J. Ginger, a railway mail clerk, of 
Seattle; Fred E., who is in business with his father; Hazel J., the wife of Morris 
Halleck Seymour, a traveling salesman, residing in Seattle; and Marie Ethelyn, 
now attending Washington State University. All three of the daughters are gradu- 
ates of the Spokane high school. The second daughter, Hazel, was born on the 
day, September 8, 1888, when the driving of a golden spike completed the North- 
ern Pacific Railroad. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 343 

In politics Mr. Grimmer has always been a strong republican and attended every 
county convention as delegate and all city conventions with one exception. He 
has also been a member of every state convention except one. He was elected a 
member of the city council in 1 884 and served for one term and he is an* active and 
valued member of the Chamber of Commerce. He belongs to the Masonic fra- 
ternity, was the secretary of the blue lodge years ago, is a member of the consistory 
and has also crossed the sands of the desert with the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 
He belongs also to Spokane Lodge, No. 228, B. P. O. E., of which he has served 
as royal knight, was one of the organizers of Myrtle Lodge, Knights of Pythias, 
and is now the only living charter member and of this lodge he has served as chan- 
cellor. His wife is past matron of Electra Chapter, No. 20, of the Order of East- 
ern Star. In his reminiscences, which cover much of the history of Spokane and are 
most interesting, Mr. Grimmer states that the Spokane race track was located on 
Sprague street, near Wall street in Browne's addition. A quarter of a mile track was 
near where the Princess Theater now stands. He has witnessed practically the en- 
tire growth and development of the city and rejoices in what has been accomplished 
here. His own business has grown as the population of Spokane has increased and 
he merits the success which has come to him not only by reason of the fact that he 
has ably managed his business interests but also because he has taken an active 
and helpful part in the city's development. 



C. HALE KIMBLE, M. T. D. 

C. Hale Kimble, who is the only gymnastic therapeutic practitioner of Spokane, 
has given special attention to orthopedic gymnastics and prophylactic health service. 
His birth occurred in Arizona, on the 20th of September, 1879, his parents being 
Fowler and Anna M. (Bishop) Kimble. For many years the father was actively 
engaged in gold mining promotion throughout the Rocky Mountain district and the 
family resided in various places. Subsequently he disposed of his mining interests 
and returned to New York city but for the past ten years he has been engaged in 
founding and promoting the city of La Gloria, and Bay View, Cuba, where he is 
now making his home. 

C. Hale Kimble was educated in the public schools of New York city and sub- 
sequently entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. 
Early in life he had formed a desire to follow the particular profession which is his 
at present and immediately after completing his studies at the Columbia University 
Medical School he accepted a position as director of physical training in the Young 
Men's Christian Association in New York city. For some time he was director 
of the physical department of that institution and also had an outside office, where 
he engaged in the practice of his profession independently. Because of the exten- 
sive patronage accorded him in the Young Men's Christian Association he soon 
became well known as a successful practitioner and in 1907 he was offered a posi- 
tion as director of the Young Men's Christian Association of this city. He accepted 
that position and served in that connection until the autumn of 1910 and has since 
been a resident of this city. In connection with his work in the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association he also built up a large outside practice and in the autumn of 1910 



344 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

he opened temporary offices in the Kuhn building. When the Old National Bank 
building was finished he occupied suite 817 but as his patronage increased these 
offices proved too small and he removed to the eleventh floor. Within a year he again 
found it necessary to enlarge his offices, so extensive was the patronage accorded 
him. He is working in harmony with the medical profession of the city and takes 
only such therapeutic cases as are referred to him by the physicians of Spokane. 
Among his patients are numbered many of Spokane's most prominent men and 
women, and the excellent results which he has obtained prove his ability and his 
efficiency. Few men who have entered the prophylactic field in this city have estab- 
lished themselves more permanently in the regard of the people. 

On the 10th of September, 1900, Mr. Kimble was married, in New York city, 
to Miss Helen J. Brown, and to them three children were born, Marjorie Winifred, 
Dorothy May and Charles Hale, Jr. Mr. Kimble has never been identified with 
Spokane's political affairs. He holds membership in the First Presbyterian church 
and is connected with the National Physical Educational Association, the Rotary 
Club, the Inland Club and fraternally is an Odd Fellow. In establishing a pro- 
fession which devotes itself primarily to the prophylaxis or prevention of physical 
irregularities and disease he has made a very striking contribution to the therapeutic 
agencies of Spokane, bringing to it the first and only service of its kind in the 
northwest today. His advancement has depended entirely upon individual skill 
and the merit he has gained is of creditable recognition, substantial benefits having 
come to him from his labors. 



DANIEL H. DWIGHT. 



Almost a quarter of a century has passed since Daniel H. D wight came to 
Spokane and in this period he has not only witnessed the greater part of the city's 
growth but has also contributed to its development. A review of his life record 
shows that he is an energetic business man, indefatigable in his efforts to win 
success and yet he gives a due proportion of his time to public service and in the 
offices he has filled has made his work count for much in the sum total of Spo- 
kane's progress and improvement. 

He was born in Dudley, Massachusetts, February 24, 1862. Through more 
than two hundred and fifty years the Dwight family, of English origin, has been 
represented on American soil, John Dwight having settled in Dedham, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1684. Members of the family have since been found in New England, 
including two presidents of Yale College, father and grandson, both of whom 
bore the name of Timothy Dwight. Three of the family were participants in the 
Revolutionary war — Captain William Dwight, who was captain of a company of 
militia raised at Thompson, Connecticut, and Captain Joseph Elliott, who with his 
company participated in the engagement at Bunker Hill. Moses Lippitt, who 
served throughout the Revolutionary war, was wounded and drew a pension in 
recognition of the aid which he rendered his country. 

Daniel Dwight, father of Daniel H. Dwight of this review, was born in Dud- 
ley, Massachusetts, and is now living with his son and namesake in Spokane at the 
very venerable age of ninety-four years. During his active life he followed the 



D. H. DW10HT 






AM**, LFW«X 
T'l Pf N fOoNDAT.CNt 






SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 347 

occupation of farming and was very prominent in public affairs, being called to 
a number of county and state offices. He frequently served as treasurer and select- 
man of his county and was a member of the state board of agriculture. He was 
also a trustee of Nichols Academy of Dudley. He wedded Mary E. Low. Her 
father was Major John Low, who was major of a militia company of Rhode Island, 
his commission making him an officer of the Fifth Regular Rhode Island Militia 
being dated June 17, 1811, so that it is now more than one hundred years old. 
His daughter Mrs. Mary E. Dwight passed away in 1881. By her marriage she 
had become the mother of three children, the sisters being: Susan E., now the wife 
of C. A. Babcock, a retired merchant living in Boston ; and Mary A., the wife of 
W. H. Isaacs, a mining broker of Los Angeles, California. 

Daniel H. Dwight was educated in the common schools of Massachusetts, in 
the high school of his native town and in Nichols Academy, from which he was 
graduated in 1878. He afterward pursued post-graduate work in 1880. He 
first engaged in teaching school at Dudley and afterward acted as private tutor. 
He traveled extensively over the United States with one of his pupils and finally 
settled in Spokane in 1887. Here he at once engaged in the real-estate business 
more as a dealer than as an agent. He bought and sold property, erected buildings, 
and developed his holdings and has always operated alone. At the present time 
he is the owner of considerable valuable realty in Spokane. He suffered from fire 
to some extent in 1889 and witnessed the burning of the town but has lived to 
see its rebuilding on a far grander and more progressive scale than ever before. 
In addition to his real-estate operations- -he- is a director -in the Fidelity National 
Bank. I :•*•• *''• J "' , 

Mr. Dwight is very active in other | ways, Deifig recognised as one of the leading 
republicans of Spokane. He served as} committeeman of the city and of the county, 
was treasurer of the Young Men's RepublicdA/Club' &nd was frequently a delegate 
to city and county conventions. While"*in Dudley, Massachusetts, he was a mem- 
ber of the board of education and took an active and helpful interest in the public 
affairs of that place, being frequently called upon to deliver Memorial Day ad- 
dresses and to act as marshal of parades even when a boy. In 1895 he was 
elected a member of the Spokane board of education, on which he served for three 
years, acting as president of the board during the last two years of that period. 
In 1897 he was a candidate for the legislature on the republican ticket, which, 
however, met defeat in that year, being opposed by a fusion ticket. Nevertheless, 
Mr. Dwight polled a larger vote than was given to the majority of republican can- 
didates, a fact indicative of his personal popularity and the confidence reposed in 
him. By a superior court of appointment he became one of the eminent domain 
commissioners and he is a member of the board of park commissioners but will 
retire in February, 1912. There are eleven members of the board, one going 
out every year. He served on the commission in 1 898-4 and is now serving for the 
second term as park commissioner. He was a member of the city council of Spo- 
kane during the reconstruction period after the great fire and in the midst of the 
ever memorable panic. For a short time he was acting mayor of Spokane. It was 
an arduous time but Mr. Dwight proved equal to- the occasion. New waterworks 
had to be constructed and a great deal of bridge work had to be done, together 
with much improvement of the city streets. Therefore, a policy had to be for- 
mulated and instituted to meet the existing conditions. In all of the reconstruc- 



348 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

tion work Mr. Dwight was actively engaged and his duties were most faithfully 
performed. During his term of office the cantilever Monroe street bridge was com- 
pleted and much other notable public work accomplished. Mr. Dwight recognized 
his own capacities and powers and with faith in the city he formulated the plans 
for public improvement and time has demonstrated the wisdom of his opinions 
and the soundness of his judgment. He avoided every needless expenditure yet 
he did not believe in parsimonious retrenchment that works against the continued 
development and benefit of the city. During his first service on the board of park 
commissioners the Coeur d'Alene Park was the only one which the commissioners 
developed. At that time it was a dense thicket, around which there was a fence 
in order to hold the property in conformity with the promise on which the gift 
of the park was made to the city. Today Coeur d'Alene is one of the beauty 
spots of Spokane — a splendidly developed park which is a never failing delight to 
all. When Mr. Dwight was appointed to fill a vacancy on the board in 1908 there 
was much work to be done, new area having been added to the park system. In 
1910 one million dollars was voted for park bonds, which will enable the board to 
greatly enlarge the park area. Up to this time park improvements have been 
confined largely to Manito, Liberty, Corbin and Hayes parks. Mr. Dwight cer- 
tainly deserves much credit for what he has done in behalf of the city and its im- 
provement. He has not only recognized existing conditions but has looked beyond 
the exigencies of the moment to the possibilities, needs and opportunities of the 
future and has labored not only for this but also for the oncoming generation. 

In 1892 Mr. Dwight was elected a member of the city council for three years 
and in 1898 and 1894 was president of the council and called the first council 
meeting held in the present city hall, situated at the corner of Howard street and 
Front avenue. It was also during his incumbency as president of the council that 
Coxey's army of fifteen hundred passed through Spokane and the general in charge 
called on the council, demanding one thousand pounds of beef, twelve hundred 
loaves of bread and transportation out of the city. The council did not comply 
with the demand but gave them the necessary provisions for the time being and 
the Northern Pacific Railroad Company furnished the transportation in the way 
of box cars. It was while Mr. Dwight was a member of the board that Adlai £. 
Stevenson, then vice president of the United States, visited Spokane on his trip 
to the west, and in his official capacity our subject was one of the committee on 
entertainment. 

Mr. Dwight has been treasurer of the Chamber of Commerce and is active in 
that work which is instituted by the organization for Spokane's improvement. He 
holds membership with the Sons of the American Revolution and has been presi- 
dent of the local chapter. He joined Imperial Lodge, No. 184, I. O. O. F., im- 
mediately after its organization. He is a member of Westminster Congregational 
church and has always been ready to assist in charitable and benevolent work. He 
contributed toward erecting and maintaining the present Young Men's Christian 
Association building and many other worthy enterprises. 

His home life, too, had its inception in Spokane in his marriage, on the 9th 
of August, 1887, to Miss Mary «P. Willis, a daughter of W. G. Willis, a retired 
merchant of Duluth, Minnesota, who removed to Spokane and made this city 
his home. He was born in Dana, Massachusetts, a representative of an old New 
England family, and was a Civil war veteran. Mr. and Mrs. Dwight are the 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 349 

parents of three children: Daniel Willis, born July 21, 1898; Mary E., August 12, 
1895; and Dorothy F., August 26, 1899. All are yet in school. Mr. Dwight has 
a wide acquaintance in Spokane and the number of his friends is almost coextensive 
therewith. Even in his business life he has contributed to the upbuilding and im- 
provement of the city and in public office his labors have been of almost incal- 
culable benefit. While he works toward high ideals, his methods are practical 
and his achievements notable. 



MARK F. MENDENHALL. 

Mark F. Mendenhall, practicing at the Spokane bar, where his keen power of 
analysis and his logical deductions have made him one of the representative and suc- 
cessful attorneys of the city, was born at Millersburg, Pennsylvania, July 7, 1863, 
and is a son of Henry and Katherine Elizabeth (Ebaugh) Mendenhall. His father 
was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, engaging in pastoral work in and 
near Baltimore for a number of years and afterward in central Pennsylvania. He 
was recording secretary of the central Pennsylvania conference for fifteen years 
and during his life transcribed many large volumes of its records which were noted 
for his copy-plate penmanship. His death occurred in 1891 while the mother of 
Mark F. Mendenhall passed away when her son was but four years of age. A 
sister, Florence Nightingale, died at the age of thirteen years, and a brother, James 
Hodge Mendenhall, is now a contractor of Seattle. 

At the time of his mother's demise Mark F. Mendenhall went to live with an 
aunt and uncle in Fleming county, Kentucky, and in the public schools of that state 
familiarized himself with the elementary branches of learning; subsequently he be- 
came a student of the Orangeville Academy, in Columbia county, Pennsylvania, and 
afterward of the Mountain Seminary of Birmingham, Pennsylvania. It was his 
desire to enter upon the practice of law and with this end in view he became a stu- 
dent in the office of Neff & Hicks at Altoona, Pennsylvania, where he continued for 
four vears, when in 1888 he was admitted to the bar in Blair countv, Pennsvlvania. 
He served for two years as assistant principal of the high school of Altoona, teach- 
ing natural science and mathematics, but this was simply an expedient to bridge 
him over to the time when he could depend upon the legal profession as a means of 
livelihood. Since November, 1889, Mr. Mendenhall has practiced continuously in 
Spokane and his work and ability have been evidenced in the successes recorded in 
the courts of Washington and Idaho. His clientage has constantly grown in vol- 
ume and importance and his name figures in connection with many of the leading 
litigated interests in these states. 

Mr. Mendenh all's home life had its foundation in his marriage at Spokane, on 
the 31st of January, 1893, to Miss Helen Brook, a daughter of Henry and Keziah 
Brook, pioneer residents of Spokane who came from Minnesota on one of the first 
through trains over the Northern Pacific Railroad. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Menden- 
hall have been born five children, Marcus, Wesley, Hallam, Porothy Ida and 
Geffry Eugene. The family attend the First Methodist Episcopal church, in which 
Mr. Mendenhall has long been an active member, serving for fifteen years as one 
of its officers and trustees. His fraternal relations are with the Independent Order 



350 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

of Odd Fellows and the Royal Arcanum, and in connection with the latter he has 
been grand regent for the jurisdiction of Washington, British Columbia and Idaho. 
He also holds membership with the United Artisans of Portland, Oregon, and he 
belongs to the Inland Club and the Spokane Amateur Athletic Club. If one would 
find Mr. Mendenhall he must seek him where the best interests of the individual 
and the community are being conserved. He is allied with those forces which work 
for progress and improvement and during the period of his residence in Spokane 
his course has ever commanded the respect and high regard of his fellow citizens. 



HENRY BERNARD LUHN, M. D. 

Dr. Henry Bernard Luhn, who has done considerable important hospital work 
and is equally successful in the private practice of medicine and surgery, was born 
in the state of New York, August 14, 1867. His father, Gerhard L. Luhn, was born 
in Germany and is now living in Spokane at the venerable age of eighty-one years. 
He is a retired major of the United States army, which he joined in 1852. He 
fought in the Mormon war of 1858 and all through the Civil war and in the latter 
was commissioned in 1868. He afterward was on active duty in Wyoming and 
Montana during the trouble with the Sioux Indians, and in 1886 came to Camp 
Spokane with the Fourth Infantry, being thereafter identified with military service 
in the northwest up to the time when he retired in 1895, while stationed at Fort 
Coeur d'Alene. Since that time he has made Spokane his home. He was first pro- 
moted to official rank when made sergeant of the Sixth United States Infantry prior 
to the outbreak of the Civil war. In February, 1 868, he was commissioned second 
lieutenant, Fourth Infantry, and June 24, 1 864, he was promoted first lieutenant of 
the Fourth Infantry, which rank he held until the close of the war. In 1875 he 
was commissioned captain and retired as such in 1895, but by special act of con- 
gress in 1904 was given the title of major. He was with McClellan's command in 
the Army of the Potomac in the battle of Bull Run, participated in the second bat- 
tle of Bull Run, the hotly contested engagements of Gettysburg and Antietam and 
in fact all of the battles in which the Army of the Potomac, under command of 
Generals McClellan, Pope and Meade, was engaged. Subsequently he was with his 
regiment when it became a part of Grant's command and was present at the surren- 
der of General Lee at Appomattox. 

On the 9th of May, 1864, Major Luhn was united in marriage to Catherine Ann 
Von Oltmans, who was born in New York. Her father belonged to a prominent 
Holland family and became the founder of the Williamsburg Savings Bank at 
Brooklyn, New York. Mrs. Luhn is now living in Spokane. In the family were 
two sons. The younger brother, William Luke Luhn, is now captain of the Tenth 
United States Cavalry, stationed at Fort Ethan Allen, Vermont. He was formerly 
teller and cashier in the Citizens and the Old National Bank and went to the 
Klondike in 1897. Returning in 1898, he went to the Philippines as a soldier of 
the Spanish- American war and was adjutant in the First Washington Volunteers. 
When the troops from this state were mustered out he was lieutenant colonel of the 
Thirty-sixth United States Volunteers under General Franklin Bell. After his 
service in the Philippines he was commissioned first lieutenant of the Eleventh 



DB. HENRY B. LUHN 



— 



A« ^ I*, If H9X 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 353 

United States Cavalry and in 1908 was made captain of the Tenth United States 
Cavalry, with which rank he is now serving. There are also three daughters in 
the family: Maria, the wife of Ernest De Lashmutt, of Spokane; Euphemia, the wife 
of George Harris Smith, an attorney for the Oregon Short Line at Salt Lake City ; 
and Catherine, the wife of Captain James E. Fechet, of the Ninth United States 
Cavalry, stationed at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 

Henry Bernard Luhn acquired his preliminary education in the University of 
Notre Dame, Indiana, pursuing a thorough commercial course and afterward finish- 
ing his junior year in the scientific courses. Subsequently he matriculated in the 
University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia in preparation for the practice of medi- 
cine and was graduated from the medical department in 1891, at which time his 
degree was conferred upon him. Following his graduation he spent two years in 
a hospital in Philadelphia as interne and then came to Spokane, where he located 
for practice in October, 1892. He has since followed his profession with increas- 
ing success and is now surgeon for the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company, the 
Spokane, Portland & Seattle Company and surgeon of the Sacred Heart Hospital 
staff. He is also medical director of the New World Life Insurance Company and 
was appointed assistant surgeon of the National Guards of Washington by Governor 
McGraw but resigned about 1905. He has a large private practice and this as well 
as his hospital work has won him a high and well deserved reputation. 

On the 23d of June, 1897, Dr. Luhn completed arrangements for a happy home 
of his own by his marriage to Miss Anne Goodall Higgins, a daughter of a former 
New York citizen, and they have two children : Marion, now thirteen years of age, 
and Catherine, aged twelve years, both (of ^hom *x& students at Brunot Hall. The 
family attend the Roman Catholic church H8*t £iuhn j vdt*& with the republican party 
and is identified with various fraternal {and social organizations, including Spokane 
Lodge. Xo. 228, B. P. O. E., and th$ Knights, of. Columbus. In the former he 
served as exalted ruler and as deputy grnnd^&xaftetl ruler, «nd in the latter was state 
deputy for the state of Washington. In more strictly social lines his membership is 
in the Spokane, the Spokane Country and the University Clubs. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Spokane Amateur Athletic Club, the Military Order of Loyal Legion, the 
Spokane County Medical Society, the Washington State Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association. With him success in life has been reached because 
he has made good use of his time, has improved the talents with which nature en- 
dowed him and has faithfully and conscientiously performed every duty that has 
devolved upon him. The consensus of public opinion regarding his position in the 
medical profession places him in the foremost rank. 



ROBERT INSINGER. 



The extensive banking, real-estate and insurance interests of Robert Insinger 
place him in a prominent position among the successful and enterprising business 
men of this city. He belongs to that class of men who recognize that the present 
and not the future holds their opportunity, and with appreciation of the advantages 
which have come to him he has proven his worth and business capacity by utilizing 
these along legitimate lines leading to success. He is numbered among Spokane's 



354 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

citizens who have had their nativity across the water, his birth having occurred 
in the Netherlands, December 6, 1 862, a son of J. A. Insinger, now deceased. His 
education was acquired in the schools of Holland and in the spring of 1885 he ar- 
rived in western Canada, believing that effort is less hampered in the new world 
than in the old. There he engaged in farming and stock-raising until he came to 
Spokane on the 1st of August, 1897. He arrived in America when a young man 
of twenty-two years and in his undertaking, carefully managed and conducted, 
won success. He came to Spokane as manager of the Holland Bank and since the 
1st of January, 1908, has been manager of the Northwestern & Hypotheek. An 
indication of his excellent business and executive ability is found in the fact that 
he has increased the business of the investment department from two to nearly six 
million dollars in three years. In addition to his connection with the Northwestern 
& Hypotheek he has organized a second company known as the Tweede, North- 
western & Hypotheek, which was formed for the purpose of providing more money 
than one institution could supply. In all of his business affairs he has been watch- 
ful of opportunities pointing to future as well as present success and he has never 
regarded the accomplishment of any task as a final end but rather as the starting 
point for new accomplishment. He is a director of the Phoenix Lumber Com- 
pany, the Spokane Eastern Trust Company and the Spokane Title Company, and 
is vice president of the Western Union Life Insurance Company and of the Trustee 
Company of Spokane. The latter is a trust company which owns some fine blocks 
which have been brought under one management, including the Wolverton, the 
Hyde and Eagle blocks, all situated in the heart of the city. 

Mr. Insinger's wife was in her maidenhood Miss Julia Nettleton, a daughter of 
Hon. William Nettleton, now deceased, and they have one son, Frederic, who is 
attending the United States Military Academy at West Point. Mr. Nettleton was 
one of the pioneer settlers of Minnesota and became the owner of Nettleton's addi- 
tion in Spokane. He was also largely interested in water-power sites in Spokane 
and was very prominent in early days in Duluth, Minnesota. 

Mr. Insinger belongs to the Country Club and the Spokane Club, also to the 
Chamber of Commerce, of which he is now serving as vice president. He is an en- 
thusiastic advocate of the northwest, zealous in his support of Spokane and her 
interests, and at all times manifests the loyalty of public-spirited citizenship. 



GILBERT LEWIS CHAMBERLIN. 

During the twelve years of his residence in Spokane Gilbert Lewis Chamberlin 
has the remarkable record of having built several hundred houses. He is one of 
the most progressive residents of this city and while he has already done much 
for its upbuilding he is at the present time associated with men in a company that 
proposes to handle Spokane property on a still larger scale. At the present writ- 
ing he is president of the Chamberlin Real Estate & Improvement Company and 
president and manager of the Reserve Realty Company. 

Mr. Chamberlin was born at Mokena, Illinois, July 19, 1858, a grandson of one 
of the soldiers of the war of 1812, who was of English descent, and a son of Lewis 
L. Chamberlin, who was born in Henriette, New York, and during his lifetime en- 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 355 

gaged in farming and in directing a large manufacturing enterprise in Wayne 
county, Indiana, he and his brother-in-law, Norton Davis, having owned the con- 
troling interest in the Wayne Agricultural Works of that county. Some time 
prior to his death, which occurred in 1879, he retired from active business. His 
wife, who bore the maiden name of Lucy Calkins, was a representative of the old 
Wilburham, Massachusetts, family of that name, of English descent, and died in 
1861. A brother of Gilbert L. Chamberlin served in Company C, of the One Hun- 
dredth Illinois Volunteer Infantry during the Civil war and was killed at the battle 
of Chickamauga. A sister, Carrie, is now the wife of Milo Smith, a farmer of 
Iowa, while another sister, Flavia, is the deceased wife of George Austin, fore- 
man of the Borden Condensed Milk factory at Brewster, New York. Her first 
husband was a brother of George Austin and died in the hospital at Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, from disease contracted during his service in the army. A third sister, 
Lucy, died in childhood. 

In the common schools of Illinois Gilbert L. Chamberlin pursued his education 
to the age of fifteen years and then entered the academy at Dublin, Indiana. On 
starting out in business life he engaged in farming but afterward conducted a 
real-estate business in northwestern Kansas, and while a resident of that state also 
became a director in two banks, the Oberlin Trust & Banking Company and the 
Western Investment & Banking Company, acting also as manager of the latter. 
In 1898 he went to Los Angeles, California, where he engaged in the building 
business for six years, and in 1899 came to Spokane, where he has since engaged 
in the real-estate business and the erection of homes to be sold on the installment 
plan, conducting this undertaking under the firm name of the Chamberlin Real 
Estate & Investment Company, Inc. The officers of the company are: G. L. 
Chamberlin, president; T. N. Wilson, vice president; E. A. Chamberlin, secretary- 
treasurer; F. S. Ostrander, assistant secretary; H. L. Chamberlin, cashier; E. 
H. Hamm, assistant cashier; E. W. Ostrander, J. C. Barline, E. A. Chamberlin, 
0. C. Jensen, T. N. Wilson, A. E. Gallagher and G. L. Chamberlin, directors. The 
company is incorporated with a capital of one hundred thousand dollars. They 
build homes on the installment plan, affording an opportunity to merchants and 
other business men to secure these on easy payments. In all parts of the city the 
company have erected these homes which at present tot^l several hundred. Today 
the company handles nothing but its own property and for the purpose of carrying 
on its enlarged operations a new company under the name of the Reserve Realty 
Company has been incorporated with a capital of five hundred thousand dollars 
with an issue of five hundred thousand dollars in six per cent gold bonds. All of 
the money from the sale of these bonds will be used for the upbuilding of Spokane, 
the company intending to erect apartment houses and to engage in building opera- 
tions on a more extensive scale. The personnel of the Realty Reserve Company 
is: G. L. Chamberlin, president and manager; O. C. Jensen, vice president; E. A. 
Chamberlin, secretary; Dr. T. N. Wilson, treasurer; H. L. Chamberlin, cashier. 
The directors are O. C. Jensen, J. C. Barline, F. J. Holman, D. K. McDonald, G. 
L. Chamberlin, E. A. Chamberlin and A. E. Gallagher. The companies publish 
a vast amount of attractive literature and beside materially aiding in the progressive 
welfare of the city they promote a saving instinct and have the satisfaction of 
knowing that many of the successful men of today owe their advancement at least 



356 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

in part to the Chamberlin companies whereby they have been enabled to gain 
homes of their own and make a start in life. 

In Kansas City, Missouri, on September 26, 1878, Mr. Chamberlin was united 
in marriage to Miss Annie Wickersham, a daughter of J. G. Wickersham,' of that 
city, who is a native of Dublin, Indiana, but is now living retired on his fruit 
ranch near Los Angeles, California. Mr. and Mrs. Chamberlin have become the 
parents of four children. Ernest A., who is secretary of both the Chamberlin 
companies, married Anna Hull, a daughter of C. B. Hull, a grocer of Union Park. 
Ina, is the wife of W. J. Ballard, president of the Ballard Plannery Company, of 
Spokane. Ruby is the wife of C. E. Romo, station agent of the Spokane Inland 
Railway at Liberty Lake, and Harry is cashier of both the Chamberlin companies. 

Mr. Chamberlin votes with the republican party but has never taken an active 
part in politics aside from exercising his franchise in support of measures which 
he deems of value in good government. He belongs to the Woodmen of the World 
but needs no fraternal nor social connections to make him widely known. His busi- 
ness affairs have gained him a very extensive acquaintance and won for him a promi- 
nent and enviable position in business circles for his labors constitute an effective 
and valuable force in the improvement, development and adornment of Spokane. 



DONALD K. McDONALD. 

The reclamation of the wild lands of Washington is a question that is being 
rapidly solved through the initiative and enterprising spirit of such men as Donald 
K. McDonald, whose keen sagacity and discernment enable them to take full cogni- 
zance of the situation and develop the methods which are most effective in producing 
desired results. Today some of the most highly improved and productive districts 
of the Spokane country owe their development to Mr. McDonald, who has been 
a pioneer in the advancement of irrigation methods, marking out the path that 
others have followed. He was born in Nova Scotia, June 10, 1861, a son of Simon 
and Elizabeth (Kennedy) McDonald, who were also natives of that country and 
were of Scotch descent. The father, who was a farmer by occupation, died in 
1879 and the mother's death occurred in 1910. In the family were five sons and 
six daughters, of whom three are deceased: Hugh D., a resident farmer of Rock- 
ford, Washington ; John Henry, a farmer of Wilsoncreek, Washington ; James W., 
who follows agricultural pursuits at Medical Lake, this state; Simon, who is sim- 
ilarly occupied at Edwall, Washington; Christine, the wife of Robert Carlisle, a 
contractor and builder at Medical Lake; Elizabeth, the wife of John Ross, an en- 
gineer of Haverhill, Massachusetts; and Catherine, the wife of W. F. Vining, an 
engineer of Newton, Massachusetts. 

The other member of the family is Donald K. McDonald, who was educated 
in the Picton Academy of Nova Scotia and afterward engaged in teaching school 
in that country until he reached the age of eighteen years, when he went to Cali- 
fornia. For two years he worked in the woods of Humboldt county and in 1881 
came to Spokane. Here he was employed on the construction of the Northern Pacific 
Railroad as a carpenter until twenty-one years of age, when he filed on a home- 
stead near Edwall and began farming, which pursuit he followed until 1884, when 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 357 

he was elected to the office of county assessor. He continued to till the fields and 
at the same time performed his duties as assessor so satisfactorily that he was 
elected for three consecutive terms of two years each. He also has the enviable dis- 
Unction of being the only assessor of Lincoln county who was ever reelected. In 
1891 Mr. McDonald came to Spokane, where he entered the employ of the Oregon 
Mortgage Company, which he represented for about twenty years, resigning as 
their agent in the fall of 1910. In 1893, in connection with a partner, Mr. Edmis- 
ton, he established a state savings bank and while the period of panic and financial 
depression caused the bank to suspend every depositor was paid in full. Their 
institution was situated on the present site of the Old National Bank of today. 
Since that time Mr. McDonald has given his attention to the mortgage company's 
business and to the development of property. He was associated with R. A. 
Hutchinson in the ownership of a half section of land and to that fact and his own 
initiative the town of Opportunity came into being. Mr. McDonald made up his 
mind that the thing to do with their land was to dig wells and pump water for 
irrigation. Although others tried to discourage him* he believed that the experi- 
ment would be successful and it was, even beyond his most sanguine expectations. 
The results that have been accomplished in that district are marvelous considering 
the short space of time that the work has been carried on, the result being that 
this is one of the garden spots of the state and the town is well named, for it proved 
to be Mr. McDonald's opportunity, bringing him the success which always crowns 
initial effort and indefatigable energy when guided by sound judgment. After he 
had demonstrated the fact that he knew something of land and what it would do, 
he and his partner purchased other property and A. C. Jamison also entered the 
firm, thus adding to the capital with which they could operate. When they had 
secured sufficient land the Power Company agreed to furnish power and the town 
of Vera was established and developed, both Vera and Opportunity being fur- 
nished with power. They have recently acquired another thousand acres of land 
and they have over Rye thousand acres in Vera and Opportunity. This is a 
splendid showing in so short a space of time and it is only the beginning of what 
they plan to do. He is now developing Wilsoncreek property, comprising about 
thirteen hundred and seventy-six acres of swamp land, which is being drained and 
of which about one-half is the property of Mr. McDonald. He expects there to 
raise timothy hay and will experiment extensively with celery and other products. 
He has already introduced Canadian field peas, securing the finest crop ever 
grown in the north. He is enthusiastic in his faith concerning this district and its 
possibilities and time is proving the wisdom of his judgment. His official titles are 
those of secretary-treasurer of the Modern Irrigation Land Company, which owns 
Opportunity; secretary-treasurer of the Vera Company; a director of the Reserve 
Realty Company; a director of the Union Trust & Savings Bank; and a director 
of the Empire Life Insurance Company of Seattle. 

In Spokane, on the 10th of February, 1897, Mr. McDonald was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Maude Seelye, a daughter of H. N. Seelye, now deceased, who was a 
contractor and pioneer of Minnesota. His mother was one of the Stuarts of Scot- 
land and Mr. Seelye was a native of New Brunswick, where he became known in 
business as a shipbuilder. Unto Mr. and Mrs. McDonald has been born one child, 
Vera, a student in the Academy of the Holy Name at Spokane. Politically Mr. 
McDonald is a democrat and has been active in politics, frequently attending 



358 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

county conventions and using his aid and influence in support of the principles in 
which he believes. Fraternally he is a Mason, having attained high rank in the 
order as a member of the consistory and shrine of Spokane. He also belongs to 
the Spokane Club, the Spokane Country Club and the Chamber of Commerce. 
With faith in the country and belief in his own business powers — a belief that time 
has proven tp be well founded — Mr. McDonald has steadily advanced in business 
circles and his operations have not only been a source of substantial individual 
success but also an element in general development, progress and improvement. 



MAJOR JAMES M. ARMSTRONG. 

Spokane is a monument to the business ability and enterprise of such men as 
Major James M. Armstrong, who came to this city in 1888 when its proportions 
were those of a village. He recognized, however, the possibilities for growth and 
development here and became a prominent factor in business circles, active in the 
management of business affairs which have constituted important elements in public 
progress. 

He was born in Washington, Washington county, Pennsylvania, April 28, 1844, 
a son of David and Letitia Armstrong, who were also natives of that place. When 
a little lad of six years he accompanied his parents on their removal to Louisville, 
Kentucky, and six years later the family went to Washington, Iowa. It is a nota- 
ble fact that much of Major Armstrong's life was spent in communities named 
in honor of the "father of his country," for he was born in Washington, Pennsyl- 
vania, lived for a time in Washington, Iowa, and Washington, D. C, and after- 
ward became a resident of the state of Washington. 

Following the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted on the 28th of July, 1861, 
as a private of Company K, Thirteenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and served in the 
Army of the Tennessee for three years, participating in many hard fought cam- 
paigns and engagements, including the battle of Shiloh, the siege and battle of 
Corinth and the siege of Vicksburg. He also took part in the battles of Marietta, 
Peach Tree Creek and Atlanta, and in the last named sustained a gun-shot wound 
in the left leg, which necessitated the amputation of that member, so that he was 
honorably discharged for disability on the 21st of July, 1864. He left Iowa in 
1867, going to Washington, D. C, where he occupied a clerical position in the 
census office of the department of the interior and also acted as chief clerk in the 
land office. While thus engaged he entered upon the study of law in the Columbia 
Law School and was graduated with the class of 1871. 

The year 1880 witnessed the arrival of Major Armstrong in this state. On 
the 20th of April he was appointed by President Hayes to the position of register 
of the land office at Colfax and came to Spokane on the transference of the office 
to this city in September, 1888. He held that position until 1885, after which he 
engaged in the general practice of law for four years, but was again called to public 
office in October, 1889, when elected county clerk. He ably discharged the duties 
of that position for four years and then served as deputy until 1895, when he re- 
signed to become treasurer of the LeRoi Mining Company, which he had aided in 
incorporating in 1890. At the time the mine was sold in 1898 he was treasurer 



J. M. ARMSTRONG 



r — __ 

■ T\iE f*£w <oRK 

pusuc LMHAH 






ON| 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 361 

of the company and a heavy stockholder. He was also interested in the Sullivan 
group and was president of the Wonderful and other mining properties and vice 
president of the Miller Creek group and of the Gem. His investments in mining 
property brought him splendid returns and he also became interested in city prop- 
erty in Spokane, being half owner of the Hyde block and owner of a fine residence 
on the north side. He became one of the most prominent residents of this city 
and took high rank among the men whose enterprise and business ability developed 
and built up Spokane and the surrounding mining region — the great source of its 
wealth and prosperity. 

On the 11th of June, 1878, in Washington, D. C, Major Armstrong was united 
in marriage to Miss Lida B. Murphy, a native of Philadelphia and a daughter of 
Charles and Margaret E. Murphy, the former a descendant of one of the promi- 
nent early English families of this country. Her father was at one time a resi- 
dent of New Jersey and afterward of Philadelphia, becoming an editor of that 
city and later a prominent lawyer. Unto Major and Mrs. Armstrong was born 
a daughter, May Edith, who was born April 17, 1880, and is now the wife of 
Donald Kizer, a practicing attorney of Spokane. They have one daughter, Edith 
Lida Kizer. 

During the last five years of his life Major Armstrong was an invalid, com- 
pelled to spend much of his time within doors, but he was a great reader and his 
books and the companionship of his wife and daughter made the hours pass pleas- 
antly. His political allegiance was given to the republican party and he was al- 
ways regarded as a public-spirited man for it was known that his aid was never 
withheld from all practical public projects and moyemetats. He died September 
lO, 1909, after a residence of twenty-sifyyfefli#\4b ; the ftdrthwest. He was de- 
termined and energetic and his resolute spirit enabled him to carry forward to 
successful completion whatever he undertook. §gciAlly* he was* known as a promi- 
nent member of the Grand Army of the ^egtibBc,*' becoming a charter member of 
John L. Reno Post, of this city, and he was also an Elk. He never allowed the 
accumulation of wealth to in any way affect his relations toward those less for- 
tunate and was always willing to extend a helping hand where aid was needed. 
In the years of his active career he was a strong man in his ability to plan and 
perform and always equally so in his honor and good name. 



WILLIAM S. NORMAN. 

The most lively imagination of the novelist has not pictured more interesting 
tales in fiction than are to be found in the lives of men who have been and are 
active in the upbuilding of the northwest. The opportunities here offered, the dif- 
ficulties encountered, are as great as any which are to be found on the pages of 
literature, and conditions have called forth originality and initiative spirit together 
with the perseverance and determination that lead to victory. One cannot but 
thrill with the story of what is accomplished by resolute, energetic men who are 
making history in the Inland Empire, building from the crude materials that nature 
has furnished the great structures of wealth, intelligence and culture which con- 
stitute the strong elements in the commonwealth. In this connection more than 
vdL n— is 



362 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

passing notice should be given William S. Norman, now one of the most prominent 
hotel men on the Pacific coast, one of the proprietors of the Spokane Hotel, the 
Tacoma Hotel and the North Yakima Hotel. Moreover, he has figured prominently 
in the industrial growth of Spokane city and is still comparatively a young man 
with limitless opportunities for accomplishment yet before him. Mr. Norman is 
a native of England, born January 8, 1859. His parents were George and Honore 
(Thomas) Norman, both now deceased, the former having passed away in 1875 
and the latter in 1 888. The father was the proprietor and editor of two newspapers 
published in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England, and in addition to his efforts 
in the journalistic field he conducted a large printing and lithographing estab- 
lishment. 

William S. Norman's identification with the northwest dates from February, 
1884, at which time he reached Spokane, this being the year of the completion of 
the railroad. He was then a young man of twenty-five years. He looked over the 
country in company with F. Lewis Clark and started to take up railroad lands 
but was unsuccessful in this for his claims were jumped. He afterward worked 
on farms on the Camas prairie and that fall entered upon stenography in the courts 
which were being held at Cheney — the first stenographer who ever lived there. He 
had learned the art of stenographic writing when in England while reporting for 
the papers owned by his father. In this state he reported many important cases 
including that of Holmes versus the Northern Pacific Railway which was one of 
the first damage cases ever tried in the territory, W. C. Jones and James McNaught 
being the attorneys while Judge George Turner presided on the bench. In Feb- 
ruary, 1885, Mr. Norman entered the employ of H. H. McCartney & Company, 
who had the contract for supplying all the hay, grain and produce required by the 
Canadian Pacific Company in the construction of its railroad between the first and 
second crossing of the Columbia river. Incidental to this Mr. Norman supervised 
the building of a steamer called the Kootenai at Little Dalles, about thirty-five 
miles from Spokane, hauling the engines from Lake Pend d'Oreille. These engines 
belonged to the steamer Katie Hallett, which had been sunk in that lake. The 
engines were raised and hauled one hundred and thirty-five miles by bull teams 
over a road which had in parts to *be built before the journey could be resumed. 
The Kootenai was put in commission in April with Mr. Norman in charge of its 
financial interests as purser while Captain Pings ton, one of the old Hudson Bay 
Company men, was in command. Joe and Marcus Oppenheimer largely financed 
this undertaking together with H. B. Sanborn, H. L. Pittock, now manager of the 
Oregonian, Jim Lotam and Harry McCartney. At that time there was only one 
white man on the Columbia river between The Dalles and Revelstoke, a distance of 
two hundred and ten miles, and this was Captain William Moore, a customhouse 
officer of the British government. That season the steamer was used in moving 
fifteen hundred tons of hay, fifteen hundred head of steers and large quantities 
of eggs and canned goods. This transportation project indicated in a measure what 
Spokane might do as the hub of the wheel covering the territory known as the great 
Inland Empire. All manner of difficulties were encountered in the construction 
of the boat, for it was necessary to build a sawmill to get out the needed lumber 
for the building and the ribs of the boat were brought from Portland. The 
Kootenai made twenty-six trips up and down the Columbia and was brought down 
from the Little Dalles to Marcus where the old Hudson Bay post was then located. 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 363 

At that time all the old trading-house buildings were there and William Brown and 
Marcus Oppenheimer were conducting stores at that point, the town of Marcus 
being named after the latter. It was about this time that Mr. Norman wrote a 
series of letters to the Oregonian concerning the legendary lore of the Columbia 
which attracted wide attention. 

In the fall of 1884 the old Dominion mine was discovered and Frank Moore 
put in a milling plant at the Gold Hill mine in the valley. Thirty or forty Chinese 
camps were washing gold on the Columbia and all this in connection with the 
Silver King discovery, at Nelson, British Columbia, attracted an immense amount 
of attention to the district. The steamer took up a great number of people to 
Xelson and in fact the Kootenai became a most important factor in the develop- 
ment of the northwest through the transportation of freight and passengers. In 
the year previous to this the Blue Bell mine was discovered at Kootenai Lake and 
this was the first great quartz mineral discovery of the Kootenais. This mine 
was the Indians' paint store, where were secured the cosmetic colors used to 
adorn and vivify the glories of the Hiawatha. In 1884 this property was ac- 
quired by the Ainsworths and it was here that Hammell, the Cornish miner, who 
had been put in charge of the prospect, was murdered by Sproule, who had put 
forth a claim in the ownership of the property. Sproule was chased by the British 
government in one of the most spectacular man hunts of western history and was 
finally caught, tried and hung in the year 1885. 

After shipping had ceased for the winter Mr. Norman came to Spokane in 
October, 1885, and practiced stenography in the courts of Cheney, where he re- 
ported all important cases. Prominent members of the bar at that time were Frank 
Graves, W. C. Jones, Tom Griffiths, F. A. Bettis, John B. Allen, James McNaught, 
W. R. Andrews, L. B. Nash and J. J. Browne. In the following spring William S. 
Norman formed a partnership with A. A. Newberry, whose story of the west is 
one of the most interesting of the Inland Empire. They handled Northern Pacific 
land and Mr. Norman became assistant secretary to Messrs. Newberry & Cannon 
and Paul F. Moore in the organization of Spokane's first railway — the Spokane & 
Palouse. For a year he served as private secretary and at the same time looked 
after the land business, but as it developed he left the railway service and opened 
an office in the Hyde block on Riverside avenue. In the fall of 1886 Charles Hop- 
kins, who had built the system of telephone lines through the Palouse country, 
largely to aid him in the conduct of two or three newspapers which he owned, or- 
dered the equipment of a telephone exchange in Spokane. Unable to prosecute 
the scheme he sold out to Mr. Norman and S. Z. Mitchell, the latter now one of 
the heads of the General Electric industry of America, Burt Nichols, owner of the 
Xicbols block on Riverside, and Lieutenant Sparling. This new company built 
the exchange in the front part of the real-estate office in the Hyde block, starting 
business with forty subscribers. In the next few months Mr. Norman bought out 
the other members of the company and secured an old government line from Spokane 
to Coeur d'Alene city and the Coeur d'Alene mountains, thus giving the mines 
their telephone connection with the outside world. When D. C. Corbin built the 
narrow gauge road in 1887 Mr. Norman equipped the line with the first copper 
wire used in the northwest. Mr. Norman and Mr. C. B. Hopkins bought the gov- 
ernment line to Fort Spokane in 1887 and, in 1889, consolidated their interests 



364 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

under the name of the Inland Telephone & Telegraph Company, extending lines 
in various directions and including connection with Portland. 

Three years before the Edison Illuminating Company with a capital of sixty 
thousand dollars had a station at the back of the Clark & Curtis and Post mills 
on the site now occupied by the upper station plant of the Washington Water 
Power Company. At the time the president of the latter was William Petti t, and 
the general factotum was Frank O'Connor. Jack Fiskin, who is still with the 
company, was engineer and electrician, while Frank R. Moore, J. D. Sherwood, 
Henry M. Hoyt and Fred Chamberlin were stockholders. In the spring of 1887 
Mr. Norman purchased stock at the solicitation of Frank R. Moore and became 
more or less actively interested in the operation. The power plant was very small 
and the water was often very scarce, and with the approval of his partners Mr. 
Norman started in to get power, which they then believed would be big enough for 
all time. In 1888 he secured option on all the power west of Post street and east 
of Monroe street at a cost of about four hundred and eighty-five thousand dollars, 
including the Clark & Curtis and the Post mills, forming the Washington Water 
Power Company for the purpose of acquiring this property. There were eight 
members to this company and the stock was divided into eight parts. The incor- 
porators were: Frank R. Moore, president; J. D. Sherwood, vice president and 
treasurer; William S. Norman, secretary and general manager; John W. Chapman, 
Cyrus Burns, Herbert Bolster, Henry Brook and William Pettit. They bought the 
property from E. C. Brickell, J. J. Brown, Clark & Curtis, the St. Paul & Spokane 
Water Power Company, represented by Mr. Pettit and one or two others. In 
the fall of 1889 the Washington Water Power Company bought out the Edison 
Electric Illuminating Company and made its connection with A. A. Lowe and W. 
A. White, of Brooklyn, New York, whose families now own the controlling interest 
in the Washington Water Power Company, for funds to construct the dam across 
the river and the station building at the foot of Monroe street. The work was well 
in hand when the great fire of 1889 occurred. Within two hours the entire tele- 
phone system was wrecked but the fire missed the small power station with which 
the Edison Company was supplying power although it burned down all the poles 
and the distributing system. 

At that time the street railway service comprised horse cars on Riverside avenue, 
owned by J. J. Browne and A. M. Cannon, which ran out to the Browne addition 
and back around the Cannon addition. There was a partially completed electric 
street railway known as the Ross Park street railway and extending out Main 
street from Ross Park, with G. B. Dennis as the principal factor. The Spokane 
cable railway had partially built a cable railway including the Monroe street bridge, 
extending from Monroe up Boone street to Natatorium Park and to the ground 
across the river on which is now located the army post. Frank R. Moore, Herbert 
Bolster, J. D. Sherwood, Henry Brook and some of the other large shareholders 
in the Washington Water Power Company were promoters and shareholders of this 
road. The fire naturally brought on consolidation: It resulted in the formation of 
the Inland Telephone & Telegraph Company and the Hopkins & Norman Tele- 
phone systems being all consolidated into one holding company, and a half interest 
in the company was sold to the Sunset Telephone & Telegraph Company which 
then controlled and is still controlling the Pacific states telephone interests of the 
American Bell Telephone Company. The street railways, owing to their fire losses, 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 365 

needed help and a plan was perfected whereby the Spokane cable railway stock- 
holders purchased the interests of the Spokane street railway owned by Messrs. 
Cannon and Browne, and a program of electrifying the system was inaugurated. 
In the spring of 1892 the Washington Water Power Company increased its capital 
and having previously bought out the Edison Electric Illuminating Company, ac- 
quired also the properties of the Spokane Cable Railway Company which had 
extended its cable lines south on Monroe to Fourteenth street where it owned large 
landed interests, and the Spokane Street Railway Company was also included in 
this deal. At a later day the Ross Park Street Railway was taken and still later 
the City Park Transit Line owned by David and Chester Glass and built to ex- 
ploit the Lidgerwood addition. These were consolidated and brought into the 
ownership of the Washington Water Power Company which then controlled all 
lighting and street railway business except the motor line owned by John R. Cook 
running south on Washington street to Cook's addition. The panic of 1898 caused 
the railway interests to suffer severely and in the fall of that year in a town 
of twenty thousand people the average gross daily earnings at times ran as low as 
one hundred twenty dollars or barely enough to take care of the pay roll. Values 
of real estate fell below the amounts of their mortgages and while the Washington 
Water Power Company in some measure weathered the storm and kept out of the 
hands of the receiver all of the original promoters with one exception virtually lost 
their interest in the property. Mr. Norman severed his connection with the com- 
pany in 1896. 

Again his ability, power of organization and initiative spirit were called into 
play in connection with the hotel interests of Spokane. In the bankruptcy of 
1893 the Spokane Hotel had to appeal to its creditors, including the Washington 
Water Power Company, for help and the question was raised whether the hotel 
should remain open or closed. Mr. Norman, however, took over the control of the 
stock and refurnished the hotel. This was four months before the panic, during 
which the business went to pieces and the property passed into the hands of a 
mortgage company and the creditors. Perhaps one of the best evidences of the 
conditions of the times was the fact that in 1894 rather than see the hotel close 
the mortgage company gave Mr. Norman and his brother, Ben Norman, a lease on 
the property practically rent free for the first six months and then for two years 
at five hundred dollars per month. In 1 895 the tide turned, for with the discovery 
of the Le Roi mine mining activity generally made times prosperous. The hotel 
shared in the general revival of business and in 1899 the two Normans, taking in 
as partner Mr. James Breen, the well known smelting operator, who at that time 
had charge of the Le Roi smelters at North port, bought the real estate and build- 
ing and at a later day purchased the adjoining ground from John A. Finch. In 
1900 they remodeled the hotel and made it what it is today — the finest hotel of the 
Inland Empire. The famous Tacoma Hotel was bought in 1905 and at present the 
brothers with their partner are operating a string of hotels in the west under the 
name of the Norman Hotels, Limited. 

Mr. Norman was married April 25, 1889, to Aimee L. Sherlock, a daughter 
of Richard and Rosetta Sherlock and a representative of an old Portland family. 
Her father was a pioneer and merchant there, having made the trip to Portland 
about 1849 or 1850. He was descended from Irish ancestry. Mr. and Mrs. Norman 
have three children, Kathleen, Marjorie and Sherlock. 



366 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

In politics Mr. Norman is a republican and has been a voter in the second 
ward since 1885 but his activities have been more in the line of general business 
development than in politics. He belongs to Spokane Lodge, No. 228, B. P. O. E., 
being one of the first initiated into that organization. In 1889 and 1890 he was 
secretary of tlje Chamber of Commerce and served on the committee which secured 
the subsidies for the Spokane Falls & Northern and the Great Northern Railways. 
In more strictly social lines he is connected with the Spokane Club, the Spokane 
Country Club, the Spokane Athletic Club, Arlington Club of Portland, the Rossland 
Club of Rossland, British Columbia, and the Rocky Mountain Club of New York 
city. In a summary of his life Mr. Norman can be accorded a prominent place 
among the empire builders of eastern Washington, having figured most prominently 
in the industrial growth of Spokane and in the development of railway, telephone, 
telegraph and electric interests, whereby the growth and progress of this section 
have been materially advanced. Possessing broad, enlightened and liberal-minded 
views, faith in himself and in the vast resources for development inherent in his 
country's wide -domain, and specific needs along the distinct lines chosen for his 
life work, his has been an active career in which he has accomplished important 
and far-reaching results contributing in no small degree to the expansion and mate- 
rial growth of the things from which he himself has derived substantial benefits. 



JAMES A. ANDERSON. 



Farming, stock-raising, merchandising, banking, mining, real-estate dealing — 
all have claimed the attention of James A. Anderson, and in each field he has op- 
erated successfully. He is today a prominent figure in financial circles in Spokane, 
is also interested in the Division Street Hardware Company and is the owner of 
considerable valuable property in the Palouse country. He was born in Iowa, May 
14, 1859, a son of John and Margaret (Davis) Anderson, both of whom were na- 
tives of Scotland and were descended from old and prominent Scotch families. Both 
are now deceased, the mother passing away in 1874. Several sons and daughters 
of the family are living in this country. 

The removal of his parents from Iowa to Kansas in his early youth made James 
A. Anderson a pupil in the schools of the latter state and in the high school, where 
he completed his education. He was engaged in farming and stock-raising in Kan- 
sas during the period of his early manhood but came to Washington in 1889 and 
turned his attention to commercial pursuits, becoming a dealer in hardware, imple- 
ments and grain at Rosalia. There he remained until 1906, when he removed to 
Spokane, and the success which he had achieved along commercial lines enabled 
him to become one of the large stockholders in the Spokane State Bank, of which 
he was elected president in 1907. This institution conducts a general banking 
business, with J. A. Anderson as president; H. A. Steinke, vice president; G. W. 
Peddycord, cashier; and H. W. Belshaw, Josh Wilson, J. M. Donovan and J. W. 
Bursell as directors. The bank is capitalized for fifty thousand dollars and has a 
surplus of twelve thousand. A general banking business is conducted and this is 
the only bank on the north side, its location being at the corner of Division and 
Nora streets. The company owns its own home, known as the Spokane Bank building, 



J. A. ANDERSON 



—I 



IPUHLJC LIBRARY 



! 






■ ^ 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 369 

a two-story brick structure, sixty by ninety feet, the first story being used for banking 
purposes, while the second is divided into apartments. The bank has a large out-of- 
town patronage and, based upon safe, conservative principles, is doing a good busi- 
ness. Mr. Anderson is also stockholder in the Exchange and Fidelity Banks, is 
the largest owner in the Spokane State Bank building and holds fifty per cent of 
the stock in the Division Street Hardware Company, of which he is the presi- 
dent. He has also made investment in property, owning one thousand acres in the 
Palouse country all under cultivation, and four hundred and eighty acres under 
cultivation in Alberta and timber lands in Washington. He is one of the largest 
owners of the Belcher Mining Company in Terry county, Washington, and is 
secretary and treasurer of the company. 

On the 27th of October, 1886, in Dunlap, Kansas, occurred the marriage of 
James A. Anderson and Miss Jennie F. Webster, a daughter of Captain Webster, 
who commanded steamboats on the Ohio river. The two children born unto them 
are Bernice, now the wife of Orville Tupper, cashier of the Wilson Creek Bank; 
and Rex, who is now attending high school. 

Politically Mr. Anderson is a republican and is an active and influential worker 
of his party who has served as delegate to county and state conventions and has 
done effective work on the county central committee. He is interested in all that 
pertains to Spokane's progress and upbuilding and because of this has become a 
working member of the Chamber of Commerce. He also belongs to the Inland 
Club and is well known in fraternaU circles, holding membership in Spokane Lodge, 
No. 34, F. & A. M., in Oriental Cpnsastorjr of ^he ,£eattish Rite and in El Katif 
Temple of the Mystric Shrine. While in Rosalia he filled all of the chairs in 
the local lodge save that of master. Hj I>elpixgs to Spokane Lodge, No. 134, 
I. O. O. F., in which he has filled a^^i-the eharrfr and. is now a past grand. He 
has achieved remarkable success, advancing from farmer boy to his present posi- 
tion as banker, merchant and landowner, and his prosperity is a visible evidence 
of intelligence and well directed industry, of determination, perseverance and 
notable ambition. 



GEORGE TILTON DOOLITTLE, M. D. 

Dr. George Tilton Doolittle, who in the practice of medicine has demonstrated 
his ability to cope with the intricate problems that continually confront the physi- 
cian, has based his success upon thorough preparation and continuous subsequent 
study following his graduation from Yale. He is one of New Haven's native sons, 
his birth having there occurred on the 28d of October, 1860. He is a representative 
of one of the oldest New England families, of English descent, his ancestors having 
come to America in the early part of the seventeenth century. His father, Tilton 
E. Doolittle, was also a native of Connecticut, becoming a member of the New 
Haven bar, and was very prominent not only in local affairs but also as a legislator 
in molding the destiny and shaping the policy of the state. Having graduated from 
Trinity College, he was admitted to the bar when only twenty-one years of age. 
Broad educational training, however, qualified him for his work for he not only 
pursued the law course but also the academic course in Trinity. Subsequent to 



370 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

his admission to the bar he located for practice in New Haven and was accorded 
an extensive clientage, being regarded as one of the distinguished attorneys of the 
bar of that city. For seventeen years he filled the office of district attorney of New 
Haven county, resigning that position two years prior to his death, which occurred 
in 1896. He had also been chosen to represent his district in the state legislature 
and his prominence in the ranks of his party was indicated in the fact that he was 
elected speaker of the house. His knowledge of parliamentary practice and his 
love of justice made him a most fair and impartial presiding officer. His wife, 
who bore the maiden name of Mary Cook, survived her husband two years, passing 
away in 1898. She was a descendant of Colonel Thaddeus Cook, of Revolutionary 
war fame, and also of Captain Cook, who took part in the Colonial wars. The 
Cook family, like the Doolittles, has been established in America since the earliest 
period in the colonization of the country. The children of Tilton and Mary (Cook) 
Doolittle were: George Tilton, of this review; John A., who is engaged in busi- 
ness on Long Island, New York; and Sarah D., who became the wife of Dr. P. 
C. Lane, of St. Louis, Missouri, and is now living at the old family home in New 
Haven. 

Dr. Doolittle pursued his early education in the Hopkins grammar school of 
New Haven, - Connecticut, and the Episcopal Academy of Cheshire, Connecticut, 
and prepared for a professional career by a course in the medical department of 
Yale University, being numbered among its alumni of 1884. He afterward spent 
two years in Europe, passing much of the time as a student of medicine in Vienna 
and also some time in Kiel, Germany. He thus came into close touch with the 
advanced methods of many of the distinguished physicians and surgeons of the 
old world and, splendidly equipped for his chosen life work, he returned to Amer- 
ica, practicing for a few years thereafter in New Haven. It was in 1886 that he 
opened an office in his native city and during his residence there he served as a 
member of the board of health and also as health officer. Thinking to find a still 
better field of labor with the rapidly growing and developing west, he came to 
Spokane in 1889 and here began the practice of medicine, serving on the board of 
health for three years and as health officer for two years, his official duties having 
been discharged in addition to a constantly increasing private practice, the im- 
portance of which places him in a creditable position among the prominent repre- 
sentatives of the profession here. He belongs to the State Medical Society and the 
County Medical Society and of the latter has served as president. He was also a 
member of the County and State Medical Societies while in New Haven, Con- 
necticut. In 1905 he was elected a member to the state legislature and also was 
sitting in the city council for a term of two years. 

In his native city, on the 15th of March, 1890, Dr. Doolittle was married to 
Miss May G. Hendryx, a daughter of Andrew B. Hendryx, of New Haven and a 
representative of an old New England family. They now have three sons, George 
H., Andrew B. and Tilton E., all of whom are in school. Dr. and Mrs. Doolittle 
hold membership in the Episcopal church and he is identified with several of the 
clubs and societies of the city. In 1909 he was honored with the presidency of the 
Spokane Club and he belongs also to the Spokane Country Club. While in New 
Haven he was a member of the Quinnipiae Club. He holds membership with the 
Society of the Colonial Wars and his prominence in the organisation known as 
the Sons of the Revolution is indicated in the fact that he has been vice president 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 371 

of the state society. An eminent American statesman is responsible for the state- 
ment that the strongest and most capable men of the country are those who have 
had their nativity in the east and have sought the business opportunities of the 
west, in which section of the country they use the qualities inherited from a 
capable ancestry in the upbuilding of a new empire. Alive to the opportunities of 
the northwest, Dr. Doolittle has cooperated in various projects for the general 
good and at the same time his liberal training at home and abroad and his sub- 
sequent study and experience in the practical work of the profession have placed 
him in a prominent position among Spokane's physicians and surgeons. 



JAMES F. HERRICK. 



Varied and important interests claim the attention and cooperation of James 
F. Herrick, who at different times has been identified with mining and with com- 
mercial and manufacturing enterprises. His efforts are of such a practical char- 
acter as to make his work a forceful and effective factor in the promotion of public 
progress as well as of individual success. He was born in Greenbush, New York, 
December 16, 1854, a son of William H. and Maria (Faulkner) Herrick. The 
Herrick family is of Danish descent; but was founded in New England during the 
early period of American colonization. One of the name served as a colonel in the 
Revolutionary war and Admiral Worden was directly related to the family. Wil- 
liam H. Herrick, born in New York city, became a grain merchant and distiller. 
He resided for a long period in Oswego, New York, where he became recognized 
as a prominent and influential citizen, serving there as mayor, as member of the 
school board and in numerous other offices. He died in 1895 but is still survived 
by his wife, who yet makes her home in Oswego, New York. She was born in 
Greenbush, that state, and represented an old family from Edinburgh, Scotland. 
In their family were three sons and five daughters, the brothers of James F. Her- 
rick being: A. Thomas Herrick, assistant to the president of the Spokane & In- 
ternational Railroad; and W. H. Herrick, a lumber merchant of New York. The 
sisters are: Mary, who is the widow of J. B. Lathrop and resides in Oswego; Louise, 
of Oswego, the widow of J. G. Merriman; Hettie, who is the widow of W. H. 
Weed and lives in Oswego; Fannie, also of that city; and Carrie, the wife of W. 
D. Wheeler, of New York. 

In the Oswego public schools James F. Herrick pursued his education prepara- 
tory to entering college at New Haven, Connecticut. He became associated with 
business affairs in the employ of his father, who was a car manufacturer of Oswego, 
and there James F. Herrick worked at that trade until he turned his attention to 
the lumber manufacturing business at Fulton, New York. Subsequently he dis- 
posed of his interest to the Standard Oil Company and operated their factory for 
eleven years. It was then the largest box factory in the United States and is today 
utilizing one hundred and twenty million feet of boxes per year. 

Mr. Herrick dates his residence in Spokane from 1895, at which time he en- 
gaged in mining in Rossland, British Columbia, acting as manager of the Iron 
Mask, a mine which has now been shipping for over twelve years. He also pur- 
chased an interest in the Buckeye Lumber Company and has since been active in 



372 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

the conduct of the business. They own a sawmill, planing mill and box factory at 
Buckeye, Washington, and something of the size of the plant may be gained from 
the fact that the capacity of the mill is fifty thousand feet of lumber daily and they 
probably cut four million feet in a year for the box factory alone. Their prin- 
cipal output is fruit boxes. The company is a close corporation, with Mr. Herrick 
as president and owner. The business has become an extensive one and the success 
of the undertaking indicates the keen sagacity, sound judgment and wise control 
of the president. 

While still a resident of Oswego Mr. Herrick was married on the 21st of De- 
cember, 1878, to Miss Clara F. Fort, a daughter of Daniel G. Fort, bank cashier, 
collector of the port, mayor of the city and congressman, having thus in different 
important relations proved his worth as a business man and citizen. Mr. Herrick 
is prominent in Masonry, having taken the degrees of the lodge, commandery and 
shrine, and he belongs also to the Spokane Club and the Chamber of Commerce. 
In all the communities in which he has resided he has been recognized as a leader 
of public thought and action. In politics he is an independent republican and 
while in the east filled nearly all of the municipal offices. He was only twenty- 
two years of age when elected mayor of Fulton, New York, and he also served as 
a member of the city council of that place, while in Oswego, New York, he served 
on both the police and excise boards. Whether in office or out of it he has ever been 
recognized as a loyal and progressive citizen who feels that for benefits derived from 
the government adequate return should be made in faithful support of those interests 
and measures which are factors in the general welfare, safeguarding the interests 
of the many. In his business life his course has been marked by continuous ad- 
vancement and each forward step has brought him a broader outlook and wider 
opportunities. Morever, he has never regarded any position as final but rather as 
the starting point for the accomplishment of still larger interests. 



LLOYD S. ROBERTS. 



Lloyd S. Roberts, prominent in financial circles in Spokane as a dealer in 
stocks and bounds and general banking business, which he conducted as a mem- 
ber of the firm of Roberts Brothers up to the time of his death, was born in Ross 
county, Ohio, November 24, 1860, his parents being Albert D. and Rebecca Rob- 
erts, the former a prominent farmer of Ross county. In the public schools of that 
county the son pursued his education to the age of eighteen years, when he put aside 
his text-books to devote his entire time and attention to general agricultural pur- 
suits, which he followed for a few years. He then engaged in the milling busi- 
ness with his brother in Ross county, Ohio, for a few years, after which lie re- 
moved to the middle west, settling in Hutchinson, Kansas, where his business con- 
nection was that of representative for the Winfield Mortgage & Trust Company. 
He occupied that position for two years and in 1888 came to Spokane as representa- 
tive for the same company, continuing in their employ until 1890. 

Mr. Roberts then organized the Washington Abstract & Title Company, of 
which he was president for a year, and also became identified with the Bank of 
Columbia. Later he became cashier of the Brown National Bank, with which he 



LLOYD S. ROBERTS 



/ — — 









* f (ONg 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 375 

• 

was connected for two years, and on the expiration of that period he became one 
of the firm of Roberts Brothers, dealers in stocks and bonds and also conducting a 
general banking business. He was thus associated up to the time of his death. He 
did not confine his attention entirely to that line, for he also organized the firm 
of Powell, Roberts & Finley, of which he was president for two years. He occupied 
a commanding position in banking circles and his ability was recognized by his 
colleagues and contemporaries, who ever expressed admiration for his resourceful- 
ness, his capable management and his executive force. 

On the 25th of August, 1891, Mr. Roberts was united in marriage to Miss Cora 
L. Belt, a daughter of the Hon. Horatio N. and Martha (Tipton) Belt, who are 
mentioned elsewhere in this volume. The children of this marriage are Dorothy L. 
and Marshall A., both of whom are in school. 

In his political views Mr. Roberts was a republican but the honors and emolu- 
ments of office had no attraction for him. He held membership in the Westminster 
Congregational church and in that faith passed away October 28, 1905. He was a 
home-loving man, devoted to the welfare of his family and ever loyal in his friend- 
ships. There were no spectacular phases in his life but his record was none the 
less useful and none the less significant than that of many a man who has been 
more prominently before the public eye. He was ever faithful to duty, whether of 
a public or private nature, and his record indicates what can be accomplished along 
the lines of steady progression when willingness to work, capability and recognition 
of opportunity are numbered among the salient traits of the individual. Desire 
to succeed that he might provide well for his family prompted Mr. Roberts in all 
of his business career and brought him eventually to a prominent position in finan- 
cial circles in Spokane. 



WALDO GRANT PAINE. 

Waldo Grant Paine is regarded as one of the most prominent railroad men of 
the country, having carried through to successful completion all the projects of 
that character with which he has been connected. He paid his first visit to Spokane 
in 1885 and was so well pleased with the country that he determined to make it 
his future home and upon his return to the east shaped all of his plans with that 
end in view. His operations in the northwest have been of decided value in the 
development and upbuilding of the country, for no other agency does so much in 
the direct path of general progress as railroad building and operation. Mr. Paine 
is a native of St. Paul, born June 14, 1863, his parents being Parker and Roselle 
E. (Grant) Paine, both of whom were of English lineage. The Paine family came 
from Suffolk, England, during the colonial epoch in the history of this country 
and William Paine, the grandfather of Waldo G. Paine, was a chaplain in the 
Revolutionary army and also served as a private. His son Parker Paine was born 
in North Anson, Maine, and became a prominent banker of St. Paul, where he 
conducted a private bank and also organized the First National Bank of that city, 
in connection with Horace Thompson. He died in 1 875 and was long survived by 
his wife, who passed away in 1908. She was born in Wapping, Connecticut, and 
came of a family prominent in the Revolutionary war, belonging to the same 



376 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

• 
branch of the family as did President Grant. Their only son was Waldo Grant 

Paine, who, however, had two half-brothers: Franklin, who was captain of sharp- 
shooters during the Civil war, organizing a company at St. Paul and serving through- 
out the period of hostilities, while at the present time he is engaged in the grain 
business in Duluth, Minnesota; and Mark, who is engaged in the lumber business 
in Superior, Wisconsin. 

Waldo G. Paine was educated in the public schools of St. Paul and was gradu- 
ated from the high school with the class of 1878. In the same city he entered 
upon his business career, being connected with a wholesale grocery house from 
1880 until 1889. In August of the latter year he made his way westward to 
Spokane. He had first visited the west in 1883, at which time he went to Glendive 
and Missoula, Montana. In 1885 he visited Spokane and the city with its possibil- 
ities and opportunities proved so attractive to him that he resolved that it should 
one day be his home, and in 1 889 he returned to take up his permanent abode here. 
For the first year he was engaged in the real-estate business with W. O. Nettleton, 
after which he purchased the interest of T. P. Lindsay in the Lindsay Mercan- 
tile Company and with Philip Richmond and James F. Sloan conducted the busi- 
ness under the firm name of Sloane, Paine & Richmond. Later the last named re- 
tired and the business was reorganized under the name of the Sloane- Paine Com- 
pany, so continuing until 1903, when Mr. Paine sold out to Mr. Sloane and 
turned his attention to the railroad enterprises which have meant so much in the 
development of the northwest. Associated with F. A. Blackwell and others, he 
became interested in the building of the Spokane & Coeur d'Alene Railroad and 
with this as his initial step in that field he has continued, his activities and interests 
constantly broadening and the worth of his service, therefore, constantly increas- 
ing as a factor in public benefit. He is now the second vice president and traffic 
manager of the Spokane & Inland Empire Railroad Company, which resulted 
from the consolidation of the Spokane & Coeur d'Alene Railroad, the Spokane & 
Inland Railroad, the Spokane Traction Company and the Spokane Terminal Com- 
pany. They are now operating two hundred and forty miles of railroad and are 
steadily extending the system. 

On the 28d of October, 1889, in St. Paul, Mr. Paine was united in marriage 
to Miss Louise Nettleton, a daughter of William Nettleton, of that city, who was 
one of the early residents of both Duluth and St. Paul, homesteading the town site 
of Duluth. He also became an early resident of Spokane and at one time owned 
half the power of the Spokane river. He also owned and put on the market the 
well known Nettleton's addition. He comes from one of the early New England 
families of English descent. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Paine have been born two sons 
and a daughter: William Nettleton, now a junior in Cornell University; Alan 
Grant, a high-school student in Spokane; and Helen Roselle, who is likewise a 
high-school pupil. 

Mr. Paine is identified with various, clubs and societies, many of which have for 
their immediate object the welfare and upbuilding of the city. He is a director 
of the Spokane Interstate Fair Association, belongs to the Chamber of Commerce 
and is a member of its publicity committee. He is also president of the Spokane 
Transportation Club and belongs to the Spokane Club, the Inland Club and the 
Spokane Country Club. He likewise belongs to the Elks lodge of Spokane, the 
Society of Colonial Wars and the Sons of the American Revolution, serving as the 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 377 

first vice president of that society and ex-president of the local chapter. His in- 
terests and activities are wide and varied and constitute a forceful element of 
public progress as well as of individual advancement. He looks at life from the 
standpoint of a practical, energetic business man who is cognizant of the fact that 
opportunities are open to ail and that the attainment of success depends upon the 
energy, determination and persistency of purpose of him who seeks it. 



A. H. MYERS. 



A. H. Myers, chief of the Spokane Fire Department, is one of the oldest firemen 
of the United States in years of continuous connection with the service. His long 
career in the field began in San Francisco, California, where he became a fire fighter 
forty-seven years ago. He was also the pioneer plumber and steamfitter of the In- 
land Empire, entering upon that work in Spokane in 1 884. He was the second white 
child born in Oakland, Alameda county, California, his natal day being April 30, 
1848. His father was B. K. Myers, who was born in Columbus, Ohio, and crossed 
the plains in 1846 or 1847. He was one of a company of seventy- five who attempted 
to make the journey in prairie schooners but when they reached Utah the caravan was 
set upon by Indians and every member of the party with the exception of B. K. 
Myers and a man by the name of Frank Miller were massacred. These two escaped 
through the brush and after enduring untold hardships succeeded in making their 
way to the coast. Companions in their misfortunes, they then formed a partnership 
and prospected in Placer and other counties, both acquiring large fortunes. They 
afterward went into the cattle business and were associated with the firm of Lux & 
Miller. Subsequently they went to the Black Hills, North Dakota, where they en- 
gaged in the work of boring artesian wells, but their labors there were without residt 
so that they were badly crippled financially. They continued in mining in California 
and as far north as Lewis ton, Idaho, and won two or three fortunes, but like many 
of the California pioneers sunk their earnings again in the attempt to develop other 
mining properties. B. K. Myers became widely known because of his activity in 
political affairs and many times did campaign work on the coast for the republican 
party, the last time entering the field in support of Grant and Colfax, candidates 
respectively for the office of president and vice president. At one time he was largely 
interested in real estate in Oakland and in East Oakland, California, and his death 
occurred in the former place soon after the memorable earthquake of 1907. In 
early manhood he had wedded Harriet Kelly, a daughter of Zeno Kelly, a pioneer of 
California and Oakland's first contracting builder. Mrs. Myers came from Augusta, 
Maine, in a clipper ship around the Horn and after a voyage of six months landed 
at San Francisco in 1847. The ship was loaded with red granite for the first custom 
house built in San Francisco. Mrs. Myers is now living at No. 1412 Twelfth street 
in Oakland in a residence that adjoins the little old home that she occupied a half 
century ago. In the family were two sons, one being Zeno K. Myers, who is manager 
and secretary of the Hawaiian Trust Company, now on the Hawaiian islands, 
where three branch banks have been opened, the principal one being at Hilo. 

The other son, A. H. Myers, was educated in the common schools of his native 
city and began working on his own account when thirteen years of age. He learned 



378 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

the plumber's and steamfitter's trade and a year later was following that pursuit in 
the state of Oregon. Subsequently he had charge of the plumbing and heating of 
the Napa (California) Insane Asylum for a period of five years, occupying that 
position by state appointment, and also had charge of similar work at the Mare 
Island navy yard, and left San Francisco to take a plumbing contract on the Tabor 
Opera House in Denver, Colorado, at that time the finest playhouse in the west. He 
also worked on the Palace Hotel in San Francisco from the time it was begun until 
its completion and has done plumbing work in connection with nearly all of the court- 
houses in California. He also went to Hawaii to put in the first Springfield gas 
machine used in that country and in Walla Walla, Washington, installed the plumb- 
ing and heating systems in the Sisters Hospital and also the plumbing, heating and 
lighting in Small's Opera House in Walla Walla. 

Mr. Myers arrived in Spokane on the morning of Thanksgiving day of 1884, and 
became master mechanic for J. H. Boyd & Company. He installed the first sewage 
system of Spokane and a portion of the first water system, all included in Browne's 
addition, the western part of Cannon's addition and a small portion of that territory 
lying between Division and Bernard streets. After remaining with J. H. Boyd & 
Company for a number of years he purchased the plumbing and steamfittings from 
that firm and embarked in business for himself, organizing the Falls City Plumbing 
& Heating Company which carried on business until early in the year 1889, when his 
establishment was destroyed by fire with the loss of eighty-five thousand dollars. 
Soon afterward he embarked in business again but in a short time disposed of his 
interest in that connection and later opened a shop which he conducted until 1896, 
when the financial stress that brought trouble to so many in that year forced him out 
of business. On the 27th of November, 1896, Mr. Myers was appointed chief of the 
Spokane fire department, in which position he has since continued through all the suc- 
ceeding administrations. His first experience in fighting fire was obtained in San 
Francisco, California, where he became torch boy with the old Tiger Company, Xo. 
2, with its station at that time where the Palace Hotel now stands. He was then 
but sixteen years of age. On the removal of his parents to Oakland he there became 
assistant to Fire Chief D. E. La ^Montana, serving for a number of years in that 
capacity. He was one of the organizers of the Spokane Falls Fire Department, the 
organization being effected July 22, 1887, and hanging over his desk is the original 
roster signed on that evening, containing the names of A. H. Myers, James W. Young, 
Charles Byron, D. S. McCrea, H. G. Gillette, James Mulroy, R. A. Wilson, Harry 
Rosenhaupt, R. B. Dawson, Charles Blanchett, Louis Stratton, Charles Dyer, B. F. 
Wing, J. C. Odell, E. P. Gillette, Hank Greenberg, E. M. Powell, Gus Martin, Lee 
Kelly, Tom Allphin, Charles Schoin, E. L. Swartz, M. Abrahams, and Frank Gillette. 
The majority of these charter members have passed away and the old document re- 
mains as one of Mr. Myers' most prized possessions. Chief Myers has exemption 
papers from both the state of California and the state of Washington. He is a mem- 
ber of the International Association of Fire Engineers and for fifteen years has been 
treasurer of the Pacific Coast Association of Fire Chiefs and among the fire-fighting 
fraternity in the west is regarded as an authority on all matters pertaining to the pre- 
vention and extinction of fires. He is held in the highest regard by insurance men 
and by all who know him in his home city. The Fire and Water Engineering 
Weekly of New York said in an article relative to him: "Chief Myers is a good 
mechanic and has always evidenced great interest in the various improvements in 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 379 

fire-fighting machines and many manufactories today owe their improvement to 
the idea advanced by him. His department is conceded to be one of the best in 
the United States. He is a thorough disciplinarian and yet the men of his de- 
partment look up to him as a child does to the kind and indulgent parent. The 
department consists of eleven stations, one hundred and twenty-five men, seven 
engines, four hook and ladder trucks, two chemicals and eleven hose wagons. 
Chief Myers has recently , added auto apparatus, having placed an auto chassis 
under his eighty-five foot aerial truck." In the fire of 1889 which destroyed the 
business district of Spokane Chief Myers had his department working in a most 
systematic and effective way but because of the nature of the buildings the task 
was hopeless from the first. The conflagration started in an old planing mill that 
was occupied as a horse barn and covered about a half block. A forty-mile gale 
was blowing at the time and carried the flames directly across the alley to the 
wholesale house of the Spokane Drug Company. Mr. Myers describes this as one 
of the shortest and hardest fights of his career. 

In December, 1898, occurred the marriage of Mr. Myers and Miss Winnifred 
Phillips, a daughter of J. L. Phillips, a pioneer carpenter and contractor of Den- 
ver, Colorado. His social relations have brought him a wide acquaintance. He 
became a charter member of Spokane Lodge, No. 228, B. P. O. E., in which he has 
occupied all of the chairs except that of exalted ruler. For twelve years he has 
been a trustee and was especially active in the building of the Elks Temple, and 
on its completion the lodge presented him with a life membership card in recog- 
nition of his services. He holds membership with the Eagles, the Spokane Pro- 
tective Rod and Gun Club and the Inland Club. His military experience is limited 
to that of McClure's Academy in California and the Emmett Guard of San Fran- 
cisco, becoming one of the first members of the latter. Not all days in his busi-* 
ness career have been equally bright, for adversity has at times overtaken him, 
yet on the whole he has prospered and is today the owner of considerable real 
estate in Spokane, besides being interested in a large tract of land known as the 
Kalispell Duck Preserve. His salient characteristics have ever been such as to 
command admiration and regard and in his public service he has ever been actuated 
by a high sense of duty and of efficiency that has made him one of the most dis- 
tinguished and honored fire chiefs of the Pacific coast. 



HARRY J. CARMAN. 



Harry J. Carman, vice president and manager of the Carman Manufacturing 
Company, engaged in the manufacture of mattresses and furniture and also con- 
ducting a wholesale furniture department, has proven his ability in the building up 
of an immense business which covers much of the territory of the northwest. He 
has been a resident of the state since 1891, arriving here when a young man of 
twenty years. His birth occurred in southern Illinois, June 12, 1871, his parents 
being Joseph Lincoln and Mercy Maria (Crane) Carman. In his youthful days he 
pursued a public-school education in Illinois and Kansas and, as previously stated, 
came to the northwest at the age of twenty years in company with his brother, 



380 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

Joseph L. Carman, Jr. They settled at Tacoma, Washington, and Harry J. Car- 
man secured a position as paying teller in the Fidelity Bank. Eventually his 
brother established himself in business under the name of the Pacific Lounge & 
Mattress Company, in Tacoma, and in 1898 Harry J. Carman resigned his position 
in the bank and went upon the road as a traveling salesman for his brother. After 
two years, or in 1895, he removed to Seattle, where he opened a branch house for 
the company, remaining there for six years. In 1898 the company was reorganized 
and incorporated under the firm name of the Carman Manufacturing Company, of 
which his brother, Joseph L. Carman, became president, while Harry J. Carman 
became vice president and manager of the Seattle branch. In 1905 the company 
changed its base of operations to Spokane, purchasing the plant of the Spokane 
Lounge & Mattress Company, which they have since operated. All of their mat- 
tresses are made in Spokane, cotton felt being the material used, and they have 
built up a tremendous business throughout the northwest. Their trade is continu- 
ously growing and their business is today recognized as one of the important indus- 
trial activities of this section of the country. They have also added a line of fur- 
niture and sell only to the wholesale trade. 

On the 9th of November, 1899, at Seattle, Mr. Carman was united in marriage 
to Miss Maude Braden, of that city, and they have two children, Virginia, born 
August 22, 1900; and Helen, born April 18, 1902. Mr. Carman has never been 
interested in politics or held public office but is prominent and active in Masonry, 
belonging to Cataract Commandery, No. 2, K. T., and to El Katif Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of the Spokane and Inland Clubs. His 
social nature renders him appreciative of good-fellowship and his business ability 
has placed him in prominent connection with the manufacturing interests of the 
northwest. He stands as a typical citizen of his section of the country with belief 
in its future and active in cooperation with its affairs which are making its his- 
tory and promoting its upbuilding. 



HARRY GREEN. 



"There's a whole lot of us that are poorer since he's gone, for he was a man 
whose friendship was worth more than money/' was a tribute paid to Harry Green 
when he was called from this life. It was but one of many such expressions that 
were heard on every hand and among all who knew him, for he was a whole-souled, 
generous man, possessed of a large fund of humor and a kindly disposition. 

He was born at Prenn, in the province of Poland, August 10, 1868, and was 
therefore more than forty-seven years of age when he passed away at the Hotel 
Ridpath in Spokane on the 14th of December, 1910. His parental name was Harry 
Gurinsky, which by due process of law he had changed to Green after coming to 
Spokane. After coming to America, when fifteen years of age, he spent several 
years in Texas, where he was engaged in various pursuits, and in 1891 he arrived 
in this city. From that time forward he was particularly prominent in the sport- 
ing circles of the Pacific coast as the owner of fine racing stables, as a breeder of 
fine dogs, as a promoter of baseball and in other ways. The element of chance in 
anything always awakened in him interest and yet he had the qualities, too, of a 



J 



HABRY GKEEN 



r THE >tw YOrK 

jFUbLJC LIBKAKtf 
I 



SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 383 

* 

conservative business man of sound judgment, as was manifest in his investments in 
property and valuable stocks. In October, 1900, he acquired a one-half interest in 
the Club cafe, being an equal partner with Messrs. Scott and Sorg, this relation 
continuing for ten years or until the death of Mr. Green. He owned a racing 
stable for several years, entering his horses for the big stakes offered by the Oak- 
land, Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle and Spokane racing associations. His horse 
Boyalty was the winner of the Seattle and Spokane derbies of 1908. In California 
he was a conspicuous figure for the heavy stakes which he put upon his favorites 
and one of the San Francisco papers therefore called him "The Duke of Spokane," 
which sobriquet clung to him for years. 

It was Mr. Green who took hold of the baseball team of Spokane when it was 
at the bottom of a long list of city teams and promoted its interests until the team 
became a recognized factor in baseball circles in the northwest. In 1902, long 
before baseball had been placed on its present businesslike basis, Mr. Green pur- 
chased an interest in the Spokane Northwestern League Club and as the result of 
his efforts he gave Spokane one of its best and most popular ball teams. He pro- 
moted Spokane's first aviation meet, largely financing the movement which brought 
Hamilton, the well known aviator, to this city. He likewise became interested in 
the theatrical world through his intimate friend, John Considine* of Seattle, and 
was the owner of stock in the Orpheum and the Washington theaters of Spokane 
and also in Vancouver theaters. He was a promoter of boxing contests and the 
owner of one of the finest kennels of the northwest. 

* 

On the 18th of June, 1892, Mr. Green was united in marriage to Miss Emma 
Thatcher, of Spokane, who survived him. together with three brothers, an uncle, 
a cousin and an adopted child, Helene" J. 'He' left his widow most comfortably 
provided for by reason of his well directed investments in business. He at times 
met heavy losses in his sporting interests but no one ever heard him complain of 
this. - • 

When he passed away words of regret were heard on every hand and such trib- 
utes were paid to him as: "I knew him for twenty years and I never knew him 
to do a mean trick." Another said: "Harry Green was the most popular man 
Spokane ever had. He had a personal speaking acquaintance with thousands and 
always a good word for all of them." Another said: "When you say that Green 
was a lover of fine horses and fine dogs, you can pay him no higher compliment, 
for there's always a lot of good in such a man. With animals he was gentle — just 
as he was with his friends." Death came to him after a twelve days' illness with 
pneumonia and impressive funeral services were held in the Eagles Hall, which 
proved entirely too small to accommodate his many friends who gathered to pay 
their last tribute of friendship and respect to him. One of the local papers said: 
"Scarcely less impressive than the outpouring of friends at the funeral exercises 
were the floral tributes. The entire south end of the hall, the rostrum and the casket 
in front of it were literally buried in flowers. There were roses, carnations, 
chrysanthemums, b'lies and smilax worked into the most elaborate designs." Judge 
J. Stanley Webster, president of the order, paid high tribute to him in a brief 
address, saying: "He was both a friend and a brother. He valued liberty, love 
and the truth and was just in his dealings with all men. He believed in the 
hereafter and in God. He did what he thought was right at all times and he has 
gone to his reward." His friends were found in every rank and walk of life, a 
vol n— 1» 



384 SPOKANE AND THE INLAND EMPIRE 

fact which indicated his intellectual hospitality. He had the faculty of putting 
all at ease in his presence and his whole life seemed to radiate good nature and 
kindliness. It is said that he was particularly the friend of the man who is "down 
and out" — a characteristic that is found in few and indicates a nature that is in- 
deed commendable. He was indeed always held in high esteem for his personal 
integrity, his thorough manliness, his whole-hearted spirit and his generosity. 



GEORGE W. LIBBY, M. D. 

Dr. George W. Libby, physician and surgeon, and for twenty-eight years a 
resident of Spokane, was born in Hiram, Oxford county, Maine, January 29, 1850. 
His father, Daniel Jeremy Libby, was a grandson of Daniel Libby, whose life 
record covered the period from 1715 to 1804. He was a resident of Berwick, 
Maine, and a member of the committee of correspondence and safety during the 
Revolutionary war. Daniel J. Libby devoted the principle part of his life to farm- 
ing. He married Mary Chase, a daughter of Gideon and Salome (Lombard) Chase, 
of Standish, Maine, and a cousin of Solon Chase, the greenback candidate for presi- 
dent. The death of Daniel J. Libby occurred in Spokane in 1906, when he had 
reached the advanced age of eighty-six years. He had for two decades survived 
his wife, who passed away in 1886. In their family were two sons, one of whom 
is I. C. Libby, teacher of classics in the Spokane high school. The daughter of 
the family is now Mrs. Samuel' B. Locke, a widow residing at West Paris, Maine. 

Dr. Libby attended the common schools of Cumberland county, Maine, also the 
Westbrook Seminary of Westbrook, Maine, and the Maine Wesleyan Seminary of 
Kents Hill, Maine. In early manhood he also took up the profession of teaching, 
teaching in the common schools both before and after his graduation from the high 
school and later becoming a high-school teacher. His professional training was 
received in the Harvard Medical College and the Bowdoin Medical College, winning 
his M. D. degre