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HISTORY 



OF THE 



CLASS OF 1903 



YAIvE COLLEGE 



Edited by 
ZIEGLER SARGENT 

Class Secretary 



TRIENNIAL 



YALE UNIVERSITY 

New Haven, Connecticut 

1906 



THE TUTTLE, MOREHOUSE ft TAYLOR PRESS. 



PREFACE. 



The material for the following pages has been gathered in 
leisure moments during the past three years, most of it since 
November 1905, when the Qass was formally notified of what 
was required. The response to the editor's calls has been gener- 
ous and prompt, and the letters, too numerous for individual 
acknowledgment, expressing appreciation of the work in hand 
have lightened a burden that might easily have beccwne irksome. 
Where possible a man's own account of his doings since under- 
graduate days has been quoted from his class letter. The editor 
has tried to exercise care in these citations and asks you to be 
charitable about errors of judgment. Thanks are here extended 
to the authors of the contributed articles and obituary sketches. 
Outside of the Qass, much assistance has been rendered by Mr. 
Clarence S. Day, Jr., Secretary of the Class of '96, and by Mr. 
Everard J. Thompson, of the Yale Alumni Weekly, who besides 
other courtesies loaned the cut of Connecticut Hall. In the 
selection of illustrations the endeavor has been made to recall 
a few familiar scenes and to indicate some of Yale's outward 
changes since the graduation of 1903. The double page Trien- 
nial pictures were made by Mr. Robert Keep Qark. An 
asterisk (*) before a name denotes decease. 

August 31, 1906. 



CONTENTS. 



Page 
Suggestions for Letters i 

Undergraduate Years 2 

Graduation 4 

Class Poem 6 

Qass Oration 9 

Ivy Ode 12 

Yale since 1903 15 

The Triennial Reunion 19 

Triennial Songs a6 

The Qass Boy 37 

Biography 29 

The New York Dinners: 

The First Dinner 318 

The Second Dinner 319 

The Third Dinner 331 

The Qass of 1492 333 

Yale Alumni University Fund 325 

Class Secretary's Financial Report 326 

Financial Report 1903 Triennial Committee 327 

Class Bibliography 328 

Necrology 330 

Statistics 33i 

Locality Index 34© 

Addenda 34^ 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



The Campus (looking south) Frontispiece 

Qass Day, June 22, 1903 facing page 10 

Connecticut Hall (old South Middle) " " 16 

Triennial Group " " 20 

Daniel Edwards Kennedy, Jr., the Class Boy " " 27 

Yale Field, June 26, 1906 " " 56 

Triennial Pictures between pages 96, 97 

Vanderbilt Hall facing page 156 

The Campus (looking north) " " 168 

New buildings between pages 224, 225 

Thomas Edward Wilde facing page 306 



SUGGESTIONS FOR LETTERS. 



pi ftny of the letters refer by number to these suggeations, so they are inserted here for 
convenience of reference.] 

I. Residence and occupation since leaving college (give date of leaving 
college). Dates and places of entering business or profession, names 
of firms or partners, together with kind of business. 

a. Married? Date and place of wedding; maiden name of wife in full; 
her father's name, occupation and residence; names in full of chil- 
dren, if any, with dates and places of birth; also give dates and 
places of deaths of any children. 

3. Post-graduate work, or studies in other institutions after leaving Yale. 

Where? How long in each institution; if professional or technical, 
the line of study pursued (i. e, law, electricity, etc) ; degrees, honor- 
ary or in course, received and expected; from what institutions, 
giving date. 

4. Books, pamphlets, or articles published, with exact titles and dates and 

places of publication. 

5. Membership or affiliation with organizations; social, religious, politi- 

cal. Work done in politics ; what position of honor, trust, or profit 
have you held? Give dates of appointment or election to the same 
and term or tenure. 

d. Journeys in this or foreign countries. 

7. Your permanent address, where letters, etc., may be sent with the cer- 
tainty of their being forwarded to you. 

& Any other circumstances in your career of interest to the Qass. Don't 
be afraid to write too much. Any information about any other 
fellows in the Class, which you think the Class would like to know, 
but which modesty, etc, prevents these fellows from telling. 

^ Any plans you may have, involving important changes for you in the 
future. 



UNDERGRADUATE YEARS. 



The Class of 1903 entered Yale September 28, 1899, and 
finished the course Commencement Day, June 24, 1903. Ac- 
cording to the college catalogues it had 337 men in Freshman 
year, 313 in Sophomore, 299 in Junior and 313 in Senior year. 
The increase in Senior year was due to the admission of 22 
graduates of other colleges. Five men died during the course: 
Maurice Fitch Hawks, Charles Tracy Brown, Henry Ide Root, 
Thomas Edward Wilde and Edward Warren Dorman. 

The chief event of the four years was the Bicentennial Cele- 
bration in October of Junior year. Nineteen Hundred and 
Three was the first freshman class to enter under Presi- 
dent Hadley's administration and witnessed the erection of 
University (Dining), Memorial, Woolsey, Woodbridge, Fayer- 
weather. University Clinic and Byers halls. In the summer 
of 1 901 North College, Lyceum and the Treasury build- 
ing were removed, leaving South Middle the only building 
within the quadrangle. The Forest School was established 
in March 1900. The Class witnessed the expansion of the 
elective system. Opportunities were given to academic seniors 
to take five hours of law studies and later courses in the Scien- 
tific School and Medical School. Senior year was made entirely 
elective and 1903 was the first class to have electives in Sopho- 
more year and the first to enjoy a wholly elective Junior year. 
The Sophomore Faculty as a separate faculty ended with the 
Class of 1902. The scheme of grading in A, B and C courses 
was introduced and the consequent classifying of courses 
in a few large groups in order to oblige a man to take 
advanced courses and to prevent him from confining himself to 
a narrow group of subjects. The services of morning prayers 
were first conducted by faculty chaplains during our Freshman 
year. Prof. J. Willard Gibbs died just before our graduation. 

The sophomore societies were abolished with the Qass and 
the junior fraternities extended to Sophomore year. The Elihu 



Undergraduate Years. 3 

Club was founded by members of 1903 in the winter of Senior 
year and the Pundits were revived in the Class. The Dramatic 
Association was successfully launched during Freshman year. 
Fence rushing was stopped, or at least limited to a short snow- 
ball fight between the lower classes on Washington's Birthday. 
The "2.25" athletic rule was abolished. The college politics 
which had entered into the election of the athletic managers was 
overcome indirectly by the abolishing of the sophomore societies 
and directly by choosing at the University meeting an assistant 
manager from the two men selected by the sophomore class. 
The retirement of bicycle racing as an intercollegiate sport 
occurred in 1902. In the four main branches of athletics there 
were four crew victories and four seasons of defeat in baseball. 
Yale defeated Harvard in two out of the four football games 
and tied a third, and won three times from Princeton. Two of 
these teams will go down in Yale history as unusually remark- 
able. In track athletics we won the IntercoUegiates twice and 
defeated Harvard twice. 

Nineteen Hundred and Three was the second Yale class to 
graduate more than three hundred men, and except for 1900 is 
the largest ever graduated. 



GRADUATION. 



By C. J. Waddell. 

The peroration of the Qass of 1903 — Commencement week — 
was in keeping with the all too brief four years during which 
the class had been addressing the Yale world: first from 
the tables in "Billy's"; later inaugurating President Hadley, 
and, as a finale, announcing the number of boat lengths between 
the Yale stems and the Harvard bows at New London on June 
twenty-fifth. Yet as the four years were ending even the 
innate modesty of the class would claim that 1903's contribu- 
tion to Yale had not been entirely vocal. Hard work well done 
briefly summarizes the life of the class. And Commencement 
week was a time of retrospection which blended through those 
June days into eager anticipation of the future. 

As the week had approached there had been an increasing 
appreciation of the fact that it would probably be the last time 
that the entire class should ever be together. It was to be the 
parting of the ways when the members of the class should 
leave the campus as alumni. "Alumni" — ^the word sounded 
venerable and almost impossible. A gradual transition was 
desired : Seniors ; then young grads., and when the hair should 
be silvered with gray or gone — ^alumni. The class was knowing 
the regret of which should be bom the joy of class reunions. 
And so Commencement • week came with its contrasts — gala 
colors in the high lights of the picture ; mellow tones of pathos 
in the shadows. The reunion classes contributed revelry to 
the week; the Class of 1903 felt the minor chord of the 
closing days and inclined more towards revery. Yet there was 
little opportunity for the gratification of that desire while 
every man was tacking for a safe exit between the Scylla of 
furniture packers and the Charybdis of Commencement week, 
with its continuous performance of events. 

The record of 1903's Commencement week is printed in 
its entirety only in the memory of every member of the class. 



Graduation. 5 

With ink and paper there can be given but an index to that 
better and life-enduring record. The programme here sketched 
outlines the picture ; the soft brush of memory will fill in the 
colors. 

The annual Commencement exercises of the University 
began on Friday afternoon, June 19, with the Townsend prize 
oratorical contest in Battell Chapel, in competition for the 
DeForest Prize Medal. The speakers and their subjects were: 

David Benjamin Updegsaff, Mt. Pleasant, Ohio— "The Moriscocs." 
Habold Terry Clark, New Haven, Conn. — "Japan Among the 

Nations." 
Douglas Maxwell Moffat, Scranton, Penn. — "Mormonism." 
Harry Root Stern, New York City— "Tolstoi's Russians." 
Joseph Fairbanks, St Johnsbury, Vt— "The United States in 

European Politics." 
Allen Cleveland Bragaw, Hartford, Conn. — "Japan Among the 

Nations." 

Harry Root Stern was awarded the medal. 

The Senior Qass supper was held at Branford Point on 
Friday evening. The Supper Committee consisted of: Henry 
C. Holt, Chairman; William Frew, E. P. Townsend, W. B. 
Weston and W. O. White. 

At 8 o'clock, Saturday evening, June 20, the dedication 
exercises of Woolsey Hall and the Newberry Organ were held. 

The Baccalaureate Address was delivered at 10.30 a. m., 
Sunday, June 21, in Woolsey Hall, by President Hadley. 

At 5 p. M., Sunday, June 21, in Woolsey Hall, Professor 
Harry B. Jepson gave a recital with the Newberry Organ. 

The Presentation Exercises of the class were held at 11 a. m., 
Monday, June 22, in Battell Chapel, President Hadley pre- 
siding. The Class Poem was given by Howard Albert 
Plimimer of New York City, and the Class Oration by Robert 
Hall Ewell of Washington, D. C. 



History of the Class of ipo^. 
CLASS POEM. 

LUX YALENSIS. 

Let memory's voiceless song ring back its chimes 
To ages past and celebrate the day 
Rose-garlanded and decked with wreath of bay — 
Recall anew the times 
When Yale was but a dream for dreamer's play. 

Unhewn its porphyry, unreared its shrine, 
Where thronging worshippers with idle scroll 
Should make their pilgrimage and there unroll 
A parchment bright with sign 
Inscribed to cheer the striver to his goal. 

The gray twilight of blending centuries 
Had laid its shadows slowly one by one, 
In vesper offering, and in orison 
That through its presages 
The pathway to the land of truth be won. 

The twilight, too, had merged in darker hue 
As midnight spread its sombre conquest wide 
From vale to peak, from shore to mountainside, 
And flaunting gsAly flew 
In sable colours far in vaunted pride. 

The challenge waved; the gage of battle thrown 

Defiant on the lists its answer wrest 

When gently, softly gleaming one star pressed 

Its way through clouds, alone, 

And shed its heraldry from east to west 

'Realm of a golden prophecy, awake! 

Birth of a nobler hope and nobler name 

Are thine to-day. Hurl forth thy lance aflame 

With radiancy and break 

Night's shadowy bondage with the dawn's acclaim.' 

The heavens respond; a fountain bursts in stream 
And shaft of gold that dart across the gray, 
Gleam, shine, sweep on and joyous win their sway, 
In ecstasy supreme. 
From waving leaf to tossing silver spray. 



Graduation, 

A sheaf of rainbows falls in golden shower 
Flashing its crescent splendor from the height 
On mission to unveil a vision bright — 
'Tis Yale! each wall, each tower, 
Each portal burnished in the matin light 

So came the light of truth from heavenly wold 
To touch and waken to reality 
Brave Yale, the symbol of regality. 
And in her templed mould 
To trace fair emblems of eternity. 
***** 

Yon skyward- reaching turrets, coronets 
That crown the pinnacle and seem to rise 
Aloft and onward through the baffling skies, 
Piercing the parapets 
Of mist that dim the valiant st river's eyes : 

Ye taught us this; no earthly barrier waits 

To thwart the loftier deed; the path leads higher; 

Each summit gained unmasks new crag and spire. 

Courage, fling wide the gates I 

Mount upward, upward to the stars ! Aspire 1 

Yon sturdy vines that clasp unfailingly 
Throughout the wintry storm and sunmier sun 
The courtyard wall, with tendrils interspun, 
And so unceasingly 
Bid silent token to thy benison: 

Thy gift hath been to consecrate the heart 
That wreathes its loyalty from friend to friend 
In vines of love, seeking no richer end 
Than chance to serve, its part 
The kingliest bond to guard and to forfend. 

And thoughts of reverence quietly arise 

Before the olden edifice that tells 

Of grandeur where each crumbling brick but swells 

Its majesty, defies 

Each stab of time and all unkindness quells. 

Nobility may carve its blazonry 

In rock that moulders slowly into dust; 

But though its legend fade from outward crust 

An inner masonry 

Aye keeps inviolate its sacred trust. 



History of the Class of ipoj. 

All honor thine, but hallowed deeper yet 
That sanctuary where each pilgrim goes, 
The lowliest and the best, to pluck the rose — 
The crimson calumet 
Of love and all the gladness love bestows. 

Old fence 1 Long may thy sympathy unite 

Thy comradeships in faithful, tender strand, 

Man with man, heart with heart, and hand with hand» 

And grace the distant night 

With echoes from a bygone minstrel band. 

The melodies grow soft, the voices fail — 
But ere they break still may a singer raise 
In humble tribute one last song of praise, 
Exalt the name of Yale, 
Her golden memories, her golden days. 

***** 
Down through the arching aisleways of the past 
The light of Yale still shines and lingers there. 
While hearts with sorrow laden breathe a prayer 
That ever, till the last. 
Its lustre may live on undimmed and fair. 

The cup is filled, and ages drain full deep 

Their inspiration and their hope divine 

From chalice brimming o'er with memory's wine — 

Tis here! Brave hearts, but steep 

Thy manlihood with bounties from this shrine. 

The silver clarion rings, the gates are flung 1 

The helmet and the scimitar attest 

A hero's grasp— 'tis thine. ' Ride on, thy crest 

A-wave through lands unsung, 

A golden light to guide thee on thy quest 



k 



Graduation, 



CLASS ORATION. 

THE CLASS OF I903 IN ITS RELATION TO THE YALE SPIRIT. 

We are prone to regard the completion of our college course as a 
graduation from Yale, when in reality it is the occasion of our accept- 
ance into full membership in Yale. The relation to our college through- 
out the remainder of our lives is to be that of membership. This carries 
with it certain responsibilities. To meet these we must be true to the 
teachings and influences which have surrounded us in our undergraduate 
life. The influence of our college life which we most deeply cherish 
is that which, for want of a more comprehensive term, we call Yale 
Spirit It is our duty to remain faithful to this; the responsibility is 
the greater because we now enjoy the privilege of full membership in 
Yale. Perhaps no two would define this feature of our college in the 
same words, but we all know (hat it exists and has been the inspiration 
of our class throughout the four years. By Yale spirit we certainly 
do not mean a few rough and tumble fights between the classes, such as 
occur between Sophomores and Freshmen on Washington's Birthday; 
nor the gathering of the classes at the fence ; nor pandemoniac shouting 
at athletic meets; although all these doubtless strengthen this feeling. 
In its essence it is a spirit of altruism. Incorporated in this characteristic 
of Yale life are both negative and positive virtues; virtues of omission 
and commission. It does not eliminate personal ambition. It recognizes 
that personal ambition is a necessary element in the world's progress. 
But it demands that ambition shall not degenerate into selfishness, and 
so come to conflict with the interests of class and college. It is this spirit, 
the traditional Yale spirit, which is so much needed in the outside 
world. Probably there never was a time in the history of the country 
when a practical application of this spirit was more needed than the 
present. In the first half of our nation's history we proceeded along 
the lines laid down by so great spirited yet conservative statesmen as 
Washington and Jefferson, Hamilton, Madison, and Marshall. Our 
progress was slow and normal, but there was no sacrifice of high motive 
and principle. In the past fifty years we have changed. The age in 
which we live is primarily the age of commercialism. The vast and 
rapid development of the nation has to a considerable extent meant 
the domination of material prosperity over the higher virtues. 

Yale has at the same time evolved. Had she not, we would all 
unite to condemn her. For to meet the demands upon her, Yale mnst 
adapt herself to the rapid development of the nation. In this adaptation 
to the new conditions, we look with regret upon certain changes, but 
we must accept them because they have been inherent to this growth. 
The Old Brick Row has almost disappeared and with it some features 
dearly cherished by earlier graduates. No longer the President knows 
all the members of a class by face and name. No longer can all the 
members of a class associate so intimately or be bound so closely 



/ 



lo History of the Class of 1903, 

together. The life of simplicity and democracy, and the intense class 
feeling, so characteristic of older Yale, has suffered through the increased 
numbers, the more complex and varied interests in the newer Yale. 
But have the evils so manifest in our country's development secured 
sovereignty over the Yale spirit? I believe not This spirit is not 
simply a tradition to be resurrected at Bicentennials. It lives in the 
Yale of to-day as it lived in the Yale of our fathers. We do not for 
a moment overlook the evils in our college life. We admit that for 
the sake of conservatism there is too often a suppression of individual-' 
ity. We admit that there is too much indiscriminate criticism. We 
admit that there is too much seeking for social prestige, that too 
many men destroy the better part of themselves in striving for social 
recognition. We admit that at times we lack a feeling of responsibility; 
that we pay too little heed to culture and intellectual pursuits. These 
evils may seem great, but they are almost entirely on the surface. They 
form but a trifling part of the Yale life. We had not been long in 
Freshman year before we learned that. Yale had no place for the 
selfish man; that Yale had no place for the man who proposed to 
elevate himself at the expense of his fellows. We quickly discovered 
that Yale demanded an equal chance for all without discrimination. 
Personal ambition was recognized and furthered, but it was not allowed 
to run rampant; it was not given free license to do as it pleased. It 
is true that Yale has changed; it is equally true that the essence of 
the Yale traditional spirit remains a power in the undergraduate life 
of to-day. The Yale spirit is needed in the activities in which we 
shall engage. It is needed in business, in the professions, in the 
religious, social and political life of the nation. Outside men are 
striving in bitter rivalry to obtain social recognition, political prominence, 
and to add a few more dollars to their bank account. We need to revert 
to a Puritan sturdiness of character. We may smile at their crudeness; 
we may scoff at their bigotry; but we are not men if we fail to 
appreciate and admire their tenacity of purpose and the boldness with 
which they clung to their ideals and convictions. We are not men if 
we fail to honor those little bands of immigrants which landed at 
Jamestown in 1607 and at Plymouth Rock in 1620. They were men 
of high principle; men of "faith and works." They had a true love 
of country, a deep devotion to God. 

In the outside world in which we are about to take an active part, 
the Yale spirit demands that we do nothing to antagonize the interest* 
of society, and that, in addition, we do all in our ability to aid society 
in the problems it has to face. If we are true Yale men we shall take 
the Yale spirit with us and give to others the benefit of its influence. 

To the President: The Class of 1903, Mr. President, was the first to 
enter under your guardianship. To you we are indebted because you 
have kept the Yale spirit a power in the four years of our undergraduate 
life; because you have kept before us the true Yale ideals; because 
you have stood unflinchingly for manliness in Yale. We propose to 



n 

Qi 

> 



I 




I 



Graduation. 1 1 

pay this debt, sir, by taking this influence with us into the life which 
we now enter. 

Classmates: It is incumbent upon us to be true to Yale, to be true Yale 
men. This occasion is not a parting from Yale, but, rather an oppor- 
tunity and pledge to take Yale with us, and to spread her ideals and 
influences among our fellow men. We are not now being sent out 
from Yale, but she is receiving us into full membership. Yale shall 
not be a remembrance of the past, but a dominating spirit to g^ide 
and govern our thoughts and actions so long as we live. 

The Qass Day exercises were held at 2 p. m., Monday, June 
22, in an amphitheatre erected to the north of South Middle. 
The members of the class were seated in the pit of the amphi- 
theatre and followed the custom of smoking long-stemmed clay 
pipes during the reading of the histories. Rain caused an 
adjournment to the Hyperion Theatre for the reading of the 
last two histories upon the programme, which was as follows : 

Song "Here's to Good Old Yale, drink her down." 

History Carroll J. Waddell, Ottawa, Kansas. 

Song "Integer Vitae." 

History George S. Arnold, New Haven, Conn. 

Song "Amici." 

History Augustus K Oliver, Pittsburg, Penn. 

Song "Drinking Song." 

History Erastus Coming, Albany, N. Y. 

Song. "Dear Old Yale." 

The Committee in charge of the Class Day arrangements 
consisted of Albert R. Lamb, Chairman; S. Russell Bogue, 
George B. Chadwick, Stuart B. Sutphin and Frederick W. 
Wilhelmi. 

At the conclusion of these exercises the members of the 
class formed in line and marched around the campus to the 
Chittenden Library, where the Qass Ivy was planted. The 
sprig of ivy had been taken from Saybrook, the birthplace of 
Yale College, and the spot where it was found was as near as 
possible to the site of the old college. The Ivy Committee 
was composed of George S. Hurst, Chairman; Arthur M. 
Collins and Orion J. Willis. 

The Ivy ode, written by Herbert C. Kelly, was stmg to the 
air of "Integer Vitae." The ode follows : 



f 



12 History of the Class of 1903, 



IVY ODE. 

Parvulam plantam teneram seramus, 
Imbribus terraeque hodie tribuamus, 
Qua calentis solis arnica blande 
Lumina rident 

£t futuris murus apertus annis 
Aulaeis pendentibus occuletur, 
£t virens murus foliis struetur 
Murmura lallans. 

Huic tenui plantae similes, adomat 
Quae rudes crescens lapides nitore, 
Sic foras nos iam veniamus omnes 
Lumina mundo. 

Long^m O amplectare, hedera undulata, 
Saxa inexorabilis 1 O diuque 
Nostri almae matris amoris acris 
Dulcis imago I 

The annual Commencement Concert of the University Glee, 
Banjo and Mandolin Qubs was given in Woolsey Hall at 8.15 
Monday evening. 

The Senior Promenade of the graduating classes of both 
the Academic and Sheff. Departments was held in the gym- 
nasium immediately after the concert. The Senior Promenade 
Committee consisted of Stuart B. Sutphin, Chairman; Brower 
Hewitt, G. B. Chadwick, D. R. McKee, Jr., W. P. Johnston, 
H. C. Holt, William Frew, A. M. Collins, and P. F. Mann. 

At ID A. M., Tuesday, June 23, the Commencement alumni 
meeting was held in Alumni Hall. 

Tuesday, June 23, at 3 p. m.^ about seven thousand people 
gathered at Yale Field to witness the annual Commencement 
week base ball game with Harvard. The first six innings of 
the game were played in a driving rain which had soaked the 
Field and formed pools upon the diamond. Under the cir- 
cumstances the game was remarkably free from errors. The 
game was won by Harvard by a score of 10 to 6. 

Commencement Day was Wednesday, June 24. At 10 a. m. 
a procession of officers, graduates, candidates for degrees and 
invited guests was formed on the campus and on its arrival at 



Graduation. 13 

Woolsey Hall, after a march through the Green, the Com- 
mencement exercises were held. The order of exercises was 
as follows: 

I. Prelude Choral and Fugue David Stanley Smith. 

For Orchestra and Organ, the Organ Part played 
by Composer. 
II. Prayer. 

III. Psalm LXV York Tune. 

Note. — At the opening of the first college in New 
Haven, in 1718, the congregation united in singing the 
first four verses of Psalm LXV, in Stemhold and 
Hopkins' version. 

IV. Address by the President 

V. Announcement of Prizes. 

VI. Landkennung Edward Grieg. 

Male Chorus, Orchestra and Organ. The Baritone 

Solo by Mr. Leonard Sanford Tyler. 

VII. Presentation to the President and Fellows by the Deans 

or Directors of the Respective Faculties of Candidates 
for Degrees upon Examination; with the Conferring 
of Degrees, in the following order : 
Bachelors of Arts, Masters of Arts, 

Bachelors of Philosophy, Masters of Laws, 

Bachelors of Fine Arts, Masters of Science, 

Bachelors of Music, Mechanical Engineer, 

Bachelors of Laws, Masters of Forestry, 

Bachelors of Divinity, Doctors of Medicine, 

Doctors of Philosophy. 

VIII. Presentation to the President and Fellows by Professor 

Perrin of Candidates for Honorary Degrees; with 

the Conferring of Honorary Degrees. 

IX. Ein Feste Burg Martin Luther. 

X. Benediction. 
XI. Military March Edward Elgar. 

Six hundred and ninety-one degrees were conferred. 

The Alumni met for their Commencement dinner at 2 p. m., 
Wednesday, in the University Dining Hall. 

From 9 to II p. m.^ Wednesday, President Hadley received 
the graduates with their families and other invited guests in 
Memorial Hall. 



f 



14 History of the Class of ipoj. 

On Thursday, June 25, at New London, three Yale bows 
crossed the finish line with more than enou^ margin to spare. 
The results of the races were briefly as follows : 

Four-oared race — ^Yale first by three lengths; time 10 min- 
utes 59% seconds; Harvard's time, 11 minutes io}i seconds. 

Freshman eight-oared race — ^Yale first by two and one-half 
lengths ; time 9 minutes 43^^ seconds ; Harvard's time, 9 min- 
utes 52 seconds. 

University eight-oared race — ^Yale first by two and three- 
quarters lengths; time 20 minutes 19^ seconds; Harvard's 
time 20 minutes 29% seconds. 

Commencement week may be said to have ended when the 
chimes of Battell Chapel sounded midnight of Thursday. After 
the evening's celebration at New Haven of the day's victories 
at New London the class of 1903 adjourned not sine die but until 
reunions such as this of 1906, when the never-ending thread is 
taken up again and the Commencement week of 1903 and the 
four short years which preceded it are reviewed with their 
wealth of memories. 



k 



YALE SINCE 1903. 



By G. S. Arnold. 

A Yale Professional School is, to one who has graduated 
from the college, like a thick soup after a good dinner — ^to 
enjoy it one must forget the past. Because I have tried to put 
aside collegiate activities, doubtless this dissertation will 
resemble Caspar Whitney's remarks on football by being — ^to 
express it mildly — somewhat inaccurate. 

Yale, when 1903 had filtered away, was, of course, a ring 
with the gem gone. This makes it seem incomprehensible that 
the spirit of improvement and progress, with which the Uni- 
versity became imbued on or about September 26, 1899, did not 
reach its culmination on or about June 23, 1903, — and indeed 
has not yet done so. More significant changes have taken 
place in the last ten years than in many preceding, and of these 
ten the last three have not been in any way the least. Physic- 
ally, the advance has been manifest to anyone who has cared 
to read the catalog, or who has been in New Haven. But 
intellectually and morally the advance, though not so patent, 
has been just as great. 

The material changes are many. South Middle is, through 
what we must now admit to be the wise and well-timed solicita- 
tion of Judge Baldwin and the other alumni who paid for the 
renovation, no longer the derelict of the campus. As Connecti- 
cut Hall it has a simple colonial aspect for which the apology 
of sentiment is not necessary. Around Chittenden Library 
there is the San Francisco of a time from which the new 
Library is soon to rise. Those of us who were Pundits, and 
most of the rest of us, will regret the certain downfall of the 
old Library — Yale's greatest claim to architectural glory — ^but 
its asterisk is soon due. Over on the Oval stands Lampson 
Lyceum, and (shades of Stevy!) in front of it is a flower 
garden. Say ye. men of 1903, would not a mighty harvest of 



1 6 History of the Class of ipo^, 

gourds and beans and cucumbers have sprouted up in the night 
time had it been there in our ribald Senior year? 

Over in Sheffdom, one new Vanderbilt dormitory has long 
since resounded with the good cheer of belated Moryites, and 
next to Byers Hall another is rising. On Hillhouse Avenue, 
fair in its brown sandstone, but motorish of odor, stands the 
new Kirtland Laboratory. The Hammond Laboratory on 
Mansfield Street is still another witness of the growth of Sheff. 
and the well-deserved generosity of its patrons. But the great- 
est addition to the University had been the greater part of 
Hillhouse square, — now Yale's Park, where men in Lincoln 
green fussing nursemaids disport themselves on bright days. 
No small additions, these, for three years. 

The size of the classes both in college and in the professional 
schools, has increased greatly — the growth in Sheff., especially 
to one who does not consider its practical advantages, is 
astounding. Then, too, on warm July nights one may see a 
strange new species of co-ed on the campus flitting from tree 
to tree and cooing to a strange new species of student — mig^- 
tories these, in Yale's new Summer School. But in the main 
there is little froth to blow away before reaching the real 
growth ; it is substantial. 

Pride in numbers, to be sure, is a cheap pride. Yet we may 
have an honest and cherishable pride in the fact that, in spite 
of increasing numbers in the classes and of the desire for them, 
the intellectual requirements are higher, and the moral stand- 
ards even more sanely established and respected than ever 
before. While this does not mean that Mory's is falling into 
desuetude, nevertheless excessive drinking is much less common 
than it once was. The drunkard and the cribber are not yet 
ostracized, but against these people a steady sentiment is grow- 
ing. Indeed, it is unfortunate, in reference to the latter, that 
the classes before whom the question has arisen have been so 
timid as to refrain from advocating the honor system, and have 
thereby put upon the College and University a stigma — as they 
certainly have done by voting that the time is not yet ripe — 
which in the minds of most faculty members is unjustified. 

Because of, rather than in spite of, its increasing size, the 
University has become more closely welded together. Sheff. 



Yale since ipoj. 17 

has extended its influence into what was formerly regarded as 
the academic circle of activities. Her representation on publica- 
tions and committees has doubled since 1903, and, considering 
the probability that there will be more Scientific than Academic 
Freshmen next year, will be undoubtedly be larger. 

The Society system in the Academic department is some- 
what changed. Zeta Psi is now upon an equal footing with 
the three older Junior fraternities. More radical is the pro- 
posed system (of which I know only through rumor) of four 
Freshman societies, to include the entire class, and to be 
restrained from overboisterousness by their proximity to Dwight 
Hall, where the odor of sanctity will drown or at least dis- 
courage the odor of beer. 

Athletically, — I bring coals to Newcastle — ^Yale has had two 
championship football teams, two crews, one track team and 
one baseball team of like degree. Had Yale done more some 
magazines would surely have exploded. But the interest in 
athletics, has, it seems to me, declined markedly in the last three 
years; or, perhaps more accurately, the desire to turn out a 
winning team is not so all-absorbing. This commentary is 
made with some hesitation, for it may well be that the writer 
has been less and less in a position to construe the signs truly. 
But certainly I am deceived if the enthusiasm is as high, or the 
disappointment in a defeat as poignant, as it was six, or even 
three, years ago. 

Outside of the undergraduate departments much has been 
done. Perhaps the most noticeable thing is the drawing 
together of Town and Gown. True, the impression which one 
receives from the New York newspapers is decidedly otherwise, 
but that is due to the custom which certain of the New Haven 
press have to "yellow^' the slightest student disturbance. The 
two elements have never, in reality, been more in harmony. 
During the past year many meetings, open to the public, have 
been held on Sunday afternoons in Woolsey Hall for the discus- 
sion of political and economic questions. This courtesy of the 
University has been received with so thorough and honest 
appreciation that it seems impossible (though apparently at 
present it has been decided otherwise) that over-finely drawn 
religious scruples will be allowed to interfere with an action 
so manifestly helpful. No university purpose is so strictly a 



1 8 History of the Class of 1903. 

university purpose as the broadcasting of learning, and never 
have Yale's efforts to this end met with so g^eat success. 
Approximately the same effect has been produced by the open- 
ing of Woolsey Hall, without entrance fee, for the intercollegiate 
debates. The immense audiences — z large portion of which 
are workingmen — are a satisfying evidence of New Haven's 
interest in and appreciation of the University and its work. 

Of the changes of personnel in the University only a few can 
be mentioned. Yale has lost heavily through death — Wayland, 
Penfield, Beecher and A. S. Wheeler being some of those taken 
in the last three years. Through resignations, the Philosophy 
Department has entirely changed. Many of the yoimger 
instructors have accepted preceptorships at Princeton. On the 
administrative side Mr. McClung is now Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity. 

Financially, the University in 1904 had the unpleasant 
experience of facing a large deficit, due undoubtedly to 
abnormal building expenditures. But many gifts, chief of 
which is that of Mr. Rockefeller, supplemented by an ever- 
increasing alumni fund, are solving the difficulties. 

What has been written is at best a mere category, and it 
lacks even the merit of completeness. A hundred changes, like 
the abolition of the entrance requirements in Greek, the forma- 
tion of the many Senior clubs, and changes in the corporation, 
either because they have come under rib suitable head, or 
because the writer is ignorant of them, have not been mentioned. 

The aims and tendencies of the University are the same, 
though more pronounced because of the addition of many 
lecture courses by outside men, as when we were undergrad- 
uates. These purposes — ^perhaps it is trite to mention them — 
may not be those of other universities, but they certainly are 
Yale's; — ^to mould valuable Americans rather than great 
scholars ; to produce for the country large numbers of its best 
citizens, rather than a few who are preeminent. 



THE TRIENNIAL REUNION. 

By Thomas Hooker, Jr. 

"Oh there's Nineteen Two and there's Nineteen Four, 

And there's going to be a lot of nineteens more, 
But Nineteen Three is the best company 
That ever came into the University." 

"Until Triennial" we had said with the last handshakes and 
Triennial was already a great certainty in the vague paths of the 
future, when the trumpet sounded and with loins well girded 
we stepped forth from Yale into the great arena outside. Few 
plans were made, few jobs taken without the thought of getting 
back to New Haven for the last June days of 1906, and three 
annual dinners at the Yale Qub attended by the fortunate wage- 
earners of that neighborhood and a few stray mug-hunters who 
were lured from the west into the race for the long distance cup, 
only served to whet the appetite of those present and to 
strengthen the resolve of all others to be on hand in New Haven 
when the roll was called. 

The advance guard of the Triennial band began to gather at 
the Yale Club Thursday and Friday before Commencement, 
and by Saturday morning handfuls of 1903 commenced to make 
an appearance upon Chapel Street and the Campus. A great 
1903 banner strung across the front of Osbom Hall bore greet- 
ing to the first arrivals and soon the steps underneath showed 
here and there faces that we all knew well and could still recog- 
nize in spite of signs of advancing years, and as increasing num- 
bers bred confidence there was a tuning up of motley voices 
and the old songs were unburied once more. By boat and train 
the returning prodigals drifted into town and by late afternoon 
the Class was present in such numbers that the New Haven 
Register was already reviving the glories of the Jolly Eight 
and the Pewees and the mysteries of the Penny Club. With 
some the first visit was to Louis Linder and the "Temple Bar," 
others hastened to investigate the heralded changes of Savin 
Rock and Momauguin, while others were content to stroll up to 



20 History of the Class of ipoj. 

the Campus to sit and smoke and talk and await the next 
arrivals. By night small groups were dining at Mory*s and 
discussing the last news from Gales Ferry, or cutting capers at 
the "White City" which now blossoms at Savin Rock. 

Sunday was a day of '*Auld Lang Syne" — without chapel — 
and the salts repaired to the Yacht Qub and the harbor, others 
recollected one Walter Scott and the merits of the Waverly 
Inn, and for still others the Campus was the seat of attraction, 
and there were called up the stories and life of those four golden 
years when we had worked and played together, and grown 
some under the wing of mother Yale. And there we went over 
the interests that had come since graduation, and swapped news 
of those classmates too far away to get back. The Campus was 
little changed. Old South Middle rehabilitated in approved 
colonial style at one end of the Campus and appearing under the 
"nom de plume" of Connecticut Hall, and Durfee at the other 
end, we found vying with each other in the proud possession 
of bath tubs, while over by Chittenden ground had already been 
broken for a section of the new library. Across at the end of 
Berkeley court a new creature of architectural triumph greeted 
us in Lampson Hall, where now is housed that mirthless depart- 
ment, the Dean's Office. Beneath this unfamiliar hall flourishes 
in bold and dazzling array a mighty flower bed that in its short 
life in the Yale world has proved itself far better acclimated 
to its surroundings than that ill-starred sun dial which contended 
with a peevish fate under our unfortunate chaperonage. Over 
on the Campus beneath the elms that have withstood the ravages 
of the Forestry School we found patches of that well remem- 
bered grass, ill used but still unconquered, which lines the walk 
that runs from Vanderbilt court to the Fence and the scene of 
our grandest ball-tossing exhibitions. Stretched at length on 
the greensward with the old buildings raising their roofs about 
us and the chapel clock chiming out the quarter hour, it was easy 
to feel at home again and to dream that the old days had come 
back. With the old two-rung fence beneath us and the pipes of 
yore again in commission, the spirit of hidden song was stirred, 
and Sunday evening, clustered in front of Durfee, a familiar 
group was singing the good refrains that we had made echo 
through the rooms at Mory*s in the winter and across the 
Campus on nights in Spring. 



m 
as 

2 
> 

r 
a 

X 

o 




The Triennial Reunion, 21 

Triennial had its official opening on Monday, and all morning 
long the committee kept open house in A i Osborn, where con- 
vict stripes of latest cut were distributed to a clamorous throng 
eager to achieve fame, and by noon convicts of every size and 
degree of depravity were boldly stalking at large in the heart 
of the city, openly defying the **Zouaves" of 1900, who a few 
hours earlier had been disastrously routed upon the Campus by 
the Triennial ball players under the able leadership of Charlie 
Littlefield. More sails upon the harbor, jaunts into the country, 
gatherings at Louis* to toy with mutton chops and golden bucks, 
and more raids upon the White City, where the convicts soon 
made themselves the center of attraction and elicited riotous 
applause by their dexterity on the roller skating floor, and other 
like games of chance, made Monday pass all too soon. And still 
the stragglers were coming into town. Monday afternoon had 
come Class day, in the evening the concert of the musical clubs 
and later the Senior Promenade. Feeling against the convicts 
seemed to have fermented among the door keepers at the latter 
function, and stripes we were told would not let us in, so with 
some excellent harmony at the fence and arousing the echoes 
of the night with the songs of the chain gang and Sing Sing the 
Class broke up until the morrow. 

With the coming of Tuesday morning the corner from Osborn 
to the New Haven House was gay and congested with a throng 
of Zouaves, Buster Browns, Japanese representatives and Con- 
victs and the gala day dawned fair. After the general Alumni 
Meeting the Class gathered for its business meeting in A i 
Osborn, which was packed to the doors. Reports were read 
from the Triennial and Alumni Fund committees, and the Secre- 
tary reported the deaths of three members: Irving McDonald, 
Walter Sullivan and Dave Cory. With the election of a Sexen- 
nial committee the Class adjourned to Osborn Hall steps, where 
various photographers did their best to immortalize the 1903 
triennial costume. 

By half past one the long chain gang had formed upon the 
Campus under the direction of Oliver and his assistants, and 
soon after, single file and lock step, each with his hands on the 
shoulders of the man before, left legs lifted high with the weight 
of blue balloons that dangled from the ankle, two hundred 
convicts passed through the Cheney-Ives gateway and, turning 



2 2 History of the Class of ipo^. 

into Chapel Street, began the dusty march to the field and the 
scene of Harvard's coming discomfiture. Broken by numerous 
halts but accorded rounds of applause from the passing crowds 
the long march was made, and just before three o'clock ten 
thousand people on the grandstands and other reunion classes 
already gathered on the field joined in deafening applause as the 
Class of 1903, heralded by music and led by Joe Thomas and 
Bert McCormick back to back on a decrepit white horse with 
convict trappings on legs and tail, turned the comer of the 
left field bleacher and its long swinging line of stripes made its 
triumphal journey to home plate. Two hundred strong, the line 
advanced unbroken save only where in the center in a large cage 
borne aloft by four dusky sons of Africa, one "Steve," too 
dangerous to be allowed entire freedom, supplied with all known 
instruments for jail breaking, toiled valiantly and fiercely to 
effect his escape. A temporary halt near third base proved 
complete disaster, for the scouts of 1900 catching sight of the 
stripes from the direction of first, charged across the diamond, 
and rapidly unlimbering a cannon retrieved their baseball defeat 
of Monday and with one carefully executed shot swept down 
the convict ranks to a man, amid the tremendous applause of the 
spectators. But the shattered line soon formed again and once 
more the march began. Arrived at the center of the grandstand, 
the prison cage, weakened by the cannonading and Steve's per- 
sistent efforts, gave way, and the prisoner darted away to obtain 
his freedom, but immediately the Class swarmed in wild disorder 
upon the diamond to cut him off and escape was impossible. 
His capture made, the chain gang took up its position on the 
grass and a few vacant seats which no one else seemed to want 
in deep right field, there to witness the downfall of the sons of 
Harvard. Chairman "Gus" Oliver showed his accustomed 
versatility all through the afternoon, slavishly catering to the 
wants of the band and ministering to the thirsty with untiring 
zeal and a studied disregard of the affair that was progressing 
upon the diamond. The afternoon was perfect, and the game 
a good one, ending to our complete satisfaction in the tenth 
inning, when Jackson did much to remove the cover from the 
ball by a long hit in the direction of the track house. Imme- 
diately the reunion classes poured out upon the field and 1903 as 
a body was soon running home runs about the bases in a way that 



The Triennial Reunion. 23 

put all previous playing to shame. Leap frog, dancing, spasms 
of "Omega Lambda Chi" and other mild forms of exercise 
continued until exhaustion set in, and then with a short wait, to 
get our second wind, the return march to the city was begun 
and the dusty road retravelled. Arrived there, the Qass fell 
into lock step again and repaired to the home of President Had- 
ley, who received us with sorrow as a horrible example of what 
Yale men had come to under his administration. 

At seven o'clock the Class proceeded to the Young Men's 
Republican Club for the Triennial dinner, where headed by the 
band we made a tour of the hall in lock step and then sat down 
to a repast well worthy to be chronicled for its high good fellow- 
ship and conviviality and withal a certain dignity. There the 
"Class Boy Cup" was duly and fittingly presented to Dan Ken- 
nedy, Jr., who however as well as his father was unfortunately 
unable to be on hand. Four black-faced artists secured at great 
expense so worked upon the feelings of those present that more 
than one "got a feeling in his feet just like St. Vitus dance," and 
Pete Famum graciously gave a performance that will go down 
in the annals of the Qass as unsurpassed. The dinner was 
served expeditiously and well, and to a successful close. After 
promiscuous waltzing had been indulged in by the Class as a 
body, the line formed again, and with a final passage of the ban- 
quet hall tripped down the stairs to the street at an early hour, 
and heavily laden with sticks of red fire and roman candles 
marched up to the Campus in brilliant array, the first class to ap- 
pear. There we found a huge bonfire only waiting to be touched 
off and soon the flames were shooting skyward and 1903 was 
celebrating the first Commencement baseball victory over Har- 
vard it had witnessed as a class. The mass of flames shortly 
assumed such proportions that trees began to burn in a number 
of places and later firemen were called to protect them. Little 
by little the other reunion classes, proclaimed by music and 
illuminated by red fire, joined us in the work of celebration and 
the Campus became a scene of much festivity and brilliancy. 
The presence of a refreshment wagon served to keep up the 
spirits of the drooping ones and the jollification continued on 
until a late hour, and it was in quite the wee small hours when 
the dying embers were finally deserted and the last convicts 
slipped off the fence and sought their borrowed beds. 



i 



24 History of the Class of J903, 

Wednesday jnorning the Class had dwindled perceptibly, and 
all costumes had been laid aside, but quite a number of the fel- 
lows gathered at noon for the Altimni Dinner that followed the 
Commencement exercises and the next day even more made the 
journey to New London to see the heartbreaking race that was 
lost to Harvard. Triennial was over, — Triennial that had been 
dreamed of so long had come and gone in a moment. It was a 
great testimony to the spirit of 1903 that at the reunion in New 
Haven in June 1906 208 men were back, the largest attendance 
that any triennial class has yet mustered. Men came veritably 
from the ends of the earth to be present in New Haven those 
precious days, and those who could not come were missed and 
will be doubly welcome in 1909. Doctors, lawyers, teachers, 
kings of finance, all were counted present and came from every 
comer of the map. Freeman travelled 5000 miles from Portu- 
gal to be present those few June days; Melcer in California 
found at the last moment he could come for a few hours, and 
arriving too late for the ball game we were able to welcome him 
when we sat down to dinner that night; while McCormick 
and Porter hazarded the very existence of the political and 
social structure of Illinois to join the ranks in New Haven. 
Surpassing the rosiest dreams of anticipation, substantiating 
to the letter the accredited spirit and good fellowship of 1903, 
Triennial will long remain a bright spot in the memory of those 
who were there and resolve all who were absent to be on hand 
when the roll is called in 1909. 

The following were present: — Alsop, Anderson, Archbald, 
G. S. Arnold, Atwater, C. R. Auchincloss, Bacon, Baldwin, Bar- 
ber, Beardsley, Bennethum, Benton, Berman, Bill, Bishop, Black, 
Bloomer, Blount, Bogue, Bond, Bowers, Brady, Brereton, Bris- 
tol, Burdett, Cameron, Campbell, Carter, Chadwick, H. T. Clark, 
R. K. Clark, Clement, Cochran, Coffey, Coleman, Conant, Con- 
diet, Coming, Cowling, Crowe, Cushman, C. O. Day, Jr., Denno, 
Dodge, Donohoe, Draper, Dreisbach, Dunham. DuPuy, DuVal, 
Ellsworth, Everts, Fairbank, Fairbanks, Farnum, Farrel, Fergu- 
son, Ferry, Fitch, Fitzgerald, Foster, Fox, Freeman, Frew, Fris- 
bie, Fulton, Furst, Gaines, Gans, F. C. Gilbert, G. B. Gilbert, 
Gleason, Goodwin, Goss, Granniss, Green, Greene, Haas, 
Hackett, Hamlin, Hart, Hart j en, Hartridge, Hazard, Hedges, 
Hess, Hileman, C. Hitchcock, Jr., Hooker, Howard, Hurst, 



The Triennial Reunion, 25 

Hyatt, Irvine, H. James, D. K. Johnston, W. P. Johnston, N. R. 
Jones, Kelly, Kent, Kingman, Kirtland, Lamb, Lane, Langley, 
Leach, Leonard, Lewis, L'Hommedieu, Littlefield, Lyon, Lyons, 
McCormick, McKesson, MacLane, MacLean, Mann, J. Mar- 
shall, M. Mason, Melcer, Mills, Minor, Moffat, C. A. Moore, Jr., 

F. W. Moore, Moulton, Mulford, Mullen, Munson, Nesmith, 
Ney, Ogden, Oliver, Ostby, Parsons, Peckham, Perkins, Pierce, 
Hummer, Pomeroy, Porter, Pratt, Rankin, Reynolds, S. W. 
Rhoads, Richards, Richardson, Roberts, Robinson, Roraback, 
Rosenthal, Sanford, Sargent, Sawyer, Schley, B. M. Smith, 

G. A. Smith, W. B. W. Smith, Somers, Stauffer, Stern, Stevens, 
Stevenson, Stillman, Stuart, J. B. Sullivan, Sutphin, Sweet, 
Sykes, Terriberry, Terrill, Thacher, J. B. Thomas, Jr., E. V. 
Thompson, G. J. Thomson, Thorstenberg, Townsend, Tren- 
holm, Tulin, Tyler, Utley, VanderPoel, Van Deventer, Van Dyke, 
Van Tassel, Vestling, Waddell, Wait, Wakefield, Waldron, 
R. W. Walker, W. B. Walker, H. M. Wallace, Waring, A. W. 
Warner, Washington, E. F. Webster, Wescott, Whitcomb, H. S. 
White, J. R. White, W. O. White, Wickwire, Wilhelmi, Wil- 
liams, Willis, Winch, Wing and Woodbine. 

Seventy-eight were present at the Alumni Dinner on June 27 : 
Anderson, G. S. Arnold, Bacon, Baldwin, Bennethum, Black, 
Bond, Brereton, Bristol, Burdett, Cameron, Campbell, H. T. 
Clark, Coleman, Corning, Cowling, Cushman, C. O. Day, Jr., 
Donohoe, Dunham, Farnum, Ferry, Freeman, Gans, Gleason, 
H. G. Greene, Haas, Hackett, Hamlin, Hart, Hazard, Hedges, 
Hileman, Howard, Irvine, D. K. Johnston, N. R. Jones, Kent, 
Kingman, Kirtland, Leonard, Lewis, L'Hommedieu, Lyon, 
McKesson, D. B. MacLane, Mann, Melcer, Moffat, Nesmith, 
Ogden, Pratt, Rankin, Reynolds, Richardson, Roraback, San- 
ford, Sargent, Schley, W. B. W. Smith, Somers, Stauffer, 
Stevenson, Sutphin, Sweet, Terriberry, Thorstenberg, Tulin, 
Van Dyke, Waddell, W. B. Walker, H. M. Wallace, Waring, 
Washington, J. R. White, Williams, Willis and Woodbine. 



26 History of the Class of 1903, 

TRIENNIAL SONGS. ' 

Everybody works but the convicts 
And we're in jail all day; 
We live on bread and water 
Just to pass the time away; 
We walk in chains and lockstep 
In stripes of blue and white, 
But they won't see us in Sing Sing. 
We're out of sight ! 
The d d old convicts! 

Plummer. 



Take me back to Sing Sing, 

Bring my ball and chain. 

Call the prison barber; 

Give, O, give me back my stripes again. 

Put me in my little cell, 

Bolt and bar the door, 

As you used to do when I was in before, 

When I was in before. 




DANIEL EDWARDS KENNEDY, JR. 

Aged 2 Years. 



THE CLASS BOY. 



To the Members of Yale 1903: 

With the class baby, his mother and father extend to each 
and every member of the Qass of Nineteen Hundred and Three 
their deepest thanks for the cup voted to Daniel Edwards 
Kennedy, Junior, at the Triennial banquet. In return we wish 
to repeat to all, what we have at different times told to the few 
whom we have seen since g^duation, that beside the hearth in 
the home of the Class Boy there will always be a seat reserved 
for those of 1903 who wish to partake of the hospitality that 
we can give them. Come as informally as you would drop into 
a room on the campus, do not wait for the specific invitation, 
and we will talk over the old four years and all that they con- 
tained, and with a little curly-headed fellow for the most 
attentive listener we will try and tie up the old broken threads 
of good fellowship. 

As is quite natural, you are probably anxious to hear some- 
thing about the yoimg man whom you have honored. In keep- 
ing with the lucky star under which he was bom he very early 
learned to prefer Yale to any other University. He has a 
liking for the blue and his eyes follow his liking. His first 
athletic exercise of note was a low tackle — ^but unfortunately 
he mistook a toy for a ball and an asphalt walk for the gridiron. 
But then he has the right spirit. Whatever his defects may be, 
and we hope he has some, he is probably going to be more or 
less of a diplomat in the periodic Yale-Harvard arbitrations, 
which we deduce from the fact that his doctor was a Harvard 
College and Harvard Medical graduate. The doctor will live 
to regret the day if he ever sees the Class Boy of 1903 one of 
the men to defeat old Harvard. 

It was our intention to send a few words of greeting to the 
Qass to be read at the banquet, but not being sure that it 
would be the proper thing to do and being ignorant of the 



J 



28 History of the Class of ipoj. 

presentation ceremonies, we did not do so. Our class secre- 
tary has given us this opportunity to make up for our omission 
and we sincerely hope that you all will feel that we have done so. 
In closing we can only repeat our invitation to you all. We 
hope you will some day see the Boy and judge for yourself 
whether or not he is worthy of our class. With best of wishes 
for the health and prosperity of you all, we are 

Very sincerely yours, 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Edwards Kennedy. 



BIOGRAPHY. 



Charles Roberts Aldrich (B.A. 1903) was bom in Fort 
Wayne, Ind., March 5, 1877, prepared for college at Phillips 
Academy, Andover, Mass., and entered Yale with the Qass of 
1902 in the fall of 1898. He was taken ill while travelling in 
Europe in the summer of 1899 and remaiqed abroad for a year, 
returning in 1900 to join the Class of 1903 at the beginning of 
Sophomore year. 

His father, Charles H. Aldrich, a lawyer of Evanston, 111., 
and Solicitor-General of the United States during President 
Harrison's administration, is the son of Hamilton Aldrich and 
Margaret (Sherwood) Aldrich, and received his B.A. from the 
University of Michigan in 1875. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Helen Urania Roberts, 
is the daughter of D. H. Roberts and Clarissa (Twitchell) 
Roberts. 

In college Aldrich was successively Secretary and Treasurer, 
Vice President and President of the Cercle Franqais, was a 
member of the Pundits and of Psi Upsilon. He received 
special two-year Senior honors in English and held a Second 
Colloquy Senior appointment. 

Shortly after graduation he published with L. S. Kirtland as 
co-editor, Thonias Deloney: his Thomas of Reading and Three 
Ballads on the Spanish Armada. 

He writes from Keith Smith's (Yale 1902) Ranch, Linwood, 
Uintah County, Utah, under date of March 20th: "Here is 
the information you wish, or at least part of it. I am sorry I 
have no better account of myself to give; but I have been ill 
practically ever since graduation. We all took our Senior 
years differently, you know: I dissipated in English literature 
to the tune of forty-two hundred pages a week ; and the result 
was more disastrous than ever an overdose of Wein, Weib, 
Gesang could have been. I started in studying law at North- 
western, but broke down with strain of the optic nerves and 
nervous prostration. About half a year later, down on a ranch 



30 History of the Class of 1903, 

in Texas, just as I was getting to feel a little fit once more, 
my broncho turned a somersault and lit on me. Ever since 
then I have been endeavoring to recover from this accident." 

His address he gives as 618 Home Insurance Building, 
Qiicago, 111. 

Francis Johonnot Oliver Alsop (B.A. 1903) was bom in 
Middletown, Conn., May 6, 1881, prepared at the Groton 
(Mass.) School, and entered college in 1899. 

His father, Joseph Wright Alsop, M.D., who died in June 
1891, was born in New York City, August 30, 1838, was a 
member of the Class of 1858, S.S.S., was Connecticut State 
Senator and Representative, and Lieutenant Governor in 1890. 
He was the son of Joseph Wright Alsop, of New York, of the 
firm of Alsop & Co., merchants of Valparaiso, San Francisco 
and New York, and of Mary Alsop (Oliver) Alsop. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Winthrop 
Beach, died in 1889. She was the daughter of Hunn Car- 
rington Beach and Mary Charlotte (deKoven) Beach. 

Two brothers preceded Alsop at Yale: Joseph W. Alsop 
(1898 S.) and John deK. Alsop (1902). Hon. Samuel W. 
Dana (Yale 1775) was a great-great-uncle. 

In college he was pitcher on the Freshman Baseball Nine, 
played on the University Golf team, and was a member of 
He Boule, Delta Kappa Epsilon, and Scroll and Key societies. 
He held a Second Colloquy Junior appointment and the same 
Senior appointment. 

He writes: "In September, 1903, I started on a trip around 
the world with A. D. Dodge and B. M. Smith, both of our 
class. We crossed the continent by way of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway and after a few weeks spent in Southern Cali- 
fornia, sailed for the Orient. In crossing the Pacific we 
touched at Honolulu, and then went to and through Japan, to 
Shanghai, Hong Kong and neighboring Chinese ports, and to 
Manila, when we took a trip in the Island of Luzon. From the 
Philippines we went to Singapore, to and through Java, back 
to Singapore, and on to Calcutta, stopping en route at Penang. 
From Calcutta we crossed India to Bombay stopping at many 
places on the way, and from Bombay we sailed through Suez 
to Cairo, whence we went to Italy, where I left Smith (Dodge 



Aldrichj Alsop, Anderson, C. T, Andrews. 31 

having already left us and gone to Borneo with G. A. Goss, 
'03), and returned to the United States via England, getting 
here in the summer of 1904. I wrote a few articles about my 
trip which appeared in the Springfield Republican, Los Angeles 
Weekly Times, Outing, and the Metropolitan Magazine. In 
August 1904, I went to Santa Barbara, Cal., where I was 
engaged in helping a relative with his business affairs, and 
in working in the Santa Barbara County National Bank. I 
returned east in the spring of 1905 and a month later started 
to work in Boston for the firm of S. D. Bush & Co., brokers 
and dealers in cotton, where I am still (January 1906) occupied. 
My business address is 71 Kilby St., Boston, Mass., and my 
home address is 2 Brimmer St." 

Luther Anderson (B.A. Bethany Coll. 1899, B.A. Yale 1903, 
MA. Yale 1904) was bom in Lindsborg, Kan., March 20, 
1880, prepared for college at Bethany Academy, Lindsborg, 
Kan., and after graduating from Bethany College entered the 
Qass at the beginning of the Senior year. 

His father, John Israel Anderson, a farmer of Lindsborg, 
was bom in Upland, Sweden, December 23, 1852, the son of 
John Anderson, a Swedish merchant who came to America in 
1867, and of Margreta Helena (Phersdotter) Anderson. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ida Carolina Hultman, 
is the daughter of John Hultman, a Swedish farmer who came 
to America in 1868, and of Brita Katrina (Nilsdotter) Hult- 
man. 

Anderson held a High Oration Senior appointment in college, 
and since graduation has been studying history in the Yale 
Graduate School. 

His present address is 254 Crown St., New Haven, Conn. 
His home address is Lindsborg, Kan. 

Charles Tubbs Andrews (B.A. 1903) was bom in Penn Yan, 
N. Y., March 12, 1881, prepared at the Penn Yan Academy and 
entered college in September 1899. 

His father, John Tuttle Andrews (Union 1864), a lawyer 
and one time postmaster of Penn Yan, was bom in North Read- 
ing, Schuyler County, N. Y., March 9, 1842, the son of Edwin 
C. Andrews of Dundee, N. Y., and of Luzetta (Ward) 
Andrews. 



32 History of the Class of ipoj. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Arvilla Raplee, died 
August 5, 1902, and was the daughter of Ira Raplee, a Penn 
Yan merchant, and of Polly (Smith) Raplee. 

A brother, Edwin C. Andrews, graduated from Yale in 1900. 

In college Andrews was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, held a 
High Oration Junior appK)intment and an Oration Senior 
appointment. 

He writes : "Have been with John T. Andrews & Company, 
paper manufacturers, since graduation. Am now in charge of 
the mill.'' 

His address is Penn Yan, N. Y. 

Theodore Andrews (B.A. 1903) was bom November 29, 
1882, in Albany, N. Y., prepared for college at the Albany 
Academy, and entered with the Class. 

His father, Horace Andrews, Jr., a civil engineer residing in 
Albany, was bom March 19, 1852, in New Haven, Conn., 
graduated from the Sheffield Scientific School in 1871, received 
his civil engineer's degree in 1872, and was from 1886 to 1889 
City Engineer of Albany. He is the son of Horace Andrews 
(Yale 1841) and Julia Russell (Johnson) Andrews. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Adeline Louise Downer, 
died December 8, 1893, ^"^ was the daughter of Samuel Robert- 
son Downer, of New Haven, and Charlotte Root (Forbes) 
Downer. 

Besides his father and grandfather, Andrews' great-grand- 
father. Prof. Ethan Allen Andrews, graduated from Yale in 
1810, and an uncle, Ethan A. Andrews, from the Sheffield 
Scientific School in 1881. 

In college he held an Oration Junior and Oration Senior 
appointment, and received a first grade Berkeley premium in 
Latin composition Freshman year. 

He writes : "For the first two years since Jime 1903 I have 
lived at 125 Lancaster St., Albany, when at home ; and that is 
still my 'fixed and permanent' address. I was, however, study- 
ing architecture at Columbia, with considerable vim perhaps, 
but not enough enthusiasm. A year ago I decided that there 
were more men who were willing to work wanted in the ministry 
than in architecture, so I became a candidate for Holy Orders 
under the Episcopal Bishop of New York. Last fall I entered 
the General Theological Seminary of the Episcopal Church, in 



T, Andrews, Archbald, 33 

New York, with the class graduating in 1908. I have not 
definitely committed my mind to the foreign or any other mis- 
sion field as a sphere of work, but it is probable that I will not 
stay in this vicinity after ordination. 

"During the summers I have done a little office work in 
architecture, as well as some field work with my father in 
surveying. In the summer of 1904 my father and I were abroad 
two months, visiting England, France, Belgium and Holland 
in a more or less Bohemian fashion ! The only work I seem to 
have done in politics has been to vote." 

His present address is care General Theological Seminary, 
17s 9th Ave., New York City. His home address is 125 
Lancaster St., Albany, N. Y. 

Hugh Archbald (B.A. 1903) was bom in Scranton, Pa., 
October 30, 1880, prepared at the Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Mass., and entered with the Class. 

His father, Robert Woodrow Archbald, presiding judge of 
the 4Sth Judicial District of Pennsylvania, was bom in Car- 
bondale, Pa., September 10, 1848, graduated from Yale in 1871, 
and resides in Scranton. He is the son of James Archbald, for 
many years civil engineer for the Delaware, Lackawanna and 
Western Railroad, and of Elizabeth (Frothingham) Archbald. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Baldwin Can- 
non, is the daughter of J. B. Cannon and Anna (Miller) Cannon. 

Besides his father Archbald numbers among his Yale rela- 
tives a brother, Robert W. Archbald, Jr., (1898) ; and James 
Archbald, Jr., (1887), Joseph A. Archbald (1888 S.), and Rev. 
Thomas F. Archbald (1896), first cousins. 

He graduated with a Second Colloquy Senior appointment, 
"and since leaving New Haven I have done nothing but study 
more or less faithfully at the School of Mines at Columbia. 
I expect to get through the course some time next summer 
(1906) and will then look for a job, where I may draw some 
of the worldly wherewithal according to the principles of 
success which I am now learning. The summer after gradua- 
ting I worked for Stevenson and Knight, mining engineers at 
Scranton, Pa., in order to see what mining was actually like. 
I am not engaged nor have I been in the past, but am heart- 
whole and ready to be plucked." 

Permanent address : 236 Monroe Ave., Scranton, Pa. 
3 



34 History of the Class of 1903, 

George Stanleigh Arnold (B.A. 1903, LL.B. 1906) was born 
in New Haven, Conn., April 3, 1881, prepared at the Hillhouse 
High School, New Haven, and at the PhilHps Academy, 
Andover, Mass., and entered college at the beginning of Fresh- 
man year. 

His father, George Sumner Arnold, a merchant of New 
Haven, died November 7, 1888. He was bom at New Haven, 
Conn., April 16, 1846, the son of Ebenezer Arnold, a merchant 
of New Haven, and of Ann Eliza (Sears) Arnold. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Evelyn Greenwood 
Thomson, was the daughter of Amos H. Thomson, a farmer of 
Bethlehem, Conn., and of Lucinda (Harrison) Thomson. 

Arnold's Yale relatives include a brother, Harold S. Arnold 
(1900), and four cousins: Joseph H. Townsend (1885), E. S. 
Lewis (1899S. and 1902), Dudley P. Lewis (1903) and A. L. 
Hull (190S). 

In college he was financial editor of the Yale Literary Maga- 
sine, Secretary of the University Football Association, a Class 
Historian, member of the Pundits and of Chi Delta Theta and 
Zeta Psi societies. He took Honors in English Composition 
Sophomore year, and held an Oration Junior appointment and a 
First Dispute Senior appointment. 

He writes : "I have been leading a double life — Dr. Jekylling 
as a student in the Yale Law School, Mr. Hydeing as an Instruc- 
tor of English in Sheff . Now it might be supposed that staying 
in New Haven is a continuation of the joys of college, especially 
when one is intimately connected with two ancient and honor- 
able branches of the University. Be disillusioned. It is a 
continuation analogous to arising at six o'clock on a foggy win- 
ter morning and beholding steins broken or half-filled, to remind 
one of the night before. Or again, it is like eating yesterday's 
Welsh rarebit warmed over. 

"I was about to pass over suggestion two, but on second 
thoughts I feel it necessary to justify myself in the eyes of 
Teddy and the Class. I admit that, although 'a Miss is good — 
once in a while,' I have let my naturally timid disposition lead 
me away from the broad and wide way leading to fussing. 
Moreover love's labor costs, and hard food for Midas will have 
none of me. Further, it is a settled maxim of the habitues of 
the Graduates Club that 'Where there's a wife there's a rope/ 



G. S, Arnold^ S, N, Arnold. 35 

and though I realize that *Good game is she who hath great 
riches' to one who frets at living on faith, hope and charity — 
(mostly charity) — still I feel that I am not quite ready to enjoy 
a happy home, even if by some accident I should find a maiden 
so foolish as to accept. Still, you will see by the deep thought 
conveyed in the above maxims that I have given the matter much 
thought. 

"I have been studying law and know the difference between a 
demurrer and a referendum. The Harvard Graduates Maga- 
zine to the contrary notwithstanding, I wish to recommend the 
Yale Law School as one of the most satisfactory institutions for 
the study of law that I can imagine. I shall be glad to honor 
it by accepting an LL.B. from it in June. Joking aside, I think 
that we of the Academic Department habitually underrate the 
advantages of the Yale Law School. If there were space I 
should be tempted to enter into a rather long eulogy of it. 

"I have published nothing except six sets of examination 
papers. I have, however, been Chairman of the editorial board 
of the Yale Law Journal. My journeys have been confined 
to two trips to the Hudson Bay regions, and one to Cambridge. 

"This, I think, is a complete account of my doings up to 
date. I am undecided as to my future residence, oscillating 
between Hoboken, the Philippines, Walla Walla, Seattle and 
Oshkosh. I hope that I shall not allow my aesthetic desire for 
euphony to interfere with my professional prospects. Letters 
sent to 36 Dwight Street, New Haven, Conn., will reach me. If 
not, address care Pluto." 

August 20, 1906, Arnold entered the law office of Talcott H. 
Russell, 42 Church St., New Haven, Conn. 

Stanfield Nichols Arnold (M.E. Columbia 1905) was bom 
July 26, 1882, in New York City, prepared for college at the 
Berkeley School, New York, and entered with the Class. 

His father, John Harvey Vincent Arnold, who died March 
30, 1901, was a lawyer, one time President of the Board of 
Aldermen, also Surrogate of New York City and County. He 
was bom in New York, July 28, 1838, the son of John Arnold, 
a shipowner and trader with the far East, and Maria Teresa 
(Harvey) Arnold. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Josephine Augusta 



36 History of the Class of 1903, 

Ormsby, died May 11, 1905. She was the daughter of Leonard 
Ormsby, a New York merchant, and Gertrude (Roberts) 
Ormsby. 

In college Arnold was a member of the Freshman Basket- 
ball team, was Captain of the Fencing team in Freshman and 
Sophomore years and held a Second Dispute Junior appoint- 
ment. He left college at the end of Sophomore year. Of his 
career since leaving Yale he writes : ■ 

"As you know I left Yale at the end of Sophomore year, my 
father's death determining me to strike out at once into the line 
I had intended to follow, — ^therefore in the fall of 1901 I 
entered the School of Mines at Columbia. I should have 
finished the four years course in three years but for an attack 
of typhoid which laid me up half a year. So, instead of grad- 
uating with the class of 1904 I received my degree of Mechani- 
cal Engineer in February 1905 and am registered with that 
class. While in Columbia I joined the Delta Tau Delta fra- 
ternity. So I entered the world two years later than my real 
class, all of whom were, doubtless, earning princely salaries 
while I was looking for a job. I found that 'job' with the 
Stirling Boiler Company of New York and began my education 
with the ultimate object of being employed in their tropical 
trade. Firstly it was necessary to learn thoroughly the process 
of sugar manufacture, so on February 4th (1905) I went to 
Porto Rico and spent six months at the Sucherie Central Coloso. 
I shall not enlarge on the experience since this is a polite letter, 
and an expurgated account of those six months would fail to 
convey my sentiments. There were two other white men at 
the Central — the sugar boiler who was fat, uneducated and 
quoted Shakespeare, and the Chief Engineer who was from 
Brookl)^ — ^need I say more? The first three months, not 
recognizing my analogy to the man who tried to hustle the East, 
I nearly had apoplexy trying to make the unhappy natives work. 
Thereafter, perceiving that the wiley Porto Rican was sitting 
down, watching me hustle, I subsided, took to pajamas and 
cigarillos and eventually became the laziest man on the planta- 
tion. During this time I assert that I did not have one square 
meal — ^there was a grill room in San Juan which I owned while 
waiting for my return steamer. My first meal there is a matter 
of history. At any rate from a chronic weight of a hundred 



Arvine. 37 

and thirty pounds on the island I jumped to a hundred and 
fifty before reaching New York — the trip consumed five days. 
Can you figure where most of my time on board was spent? 
I then entered the services of the Stirling Company in earnest 
and have since installed somewhat over seven thousand horse 
power of their boilers all over the country bounded by New 
York, Boston, Cleveland, Columbus and Pittsburg. This is, 
of course, merely the dog-work of engineering, but valuable 
as independent experience and, on the whole, amusing in its 
variety. When one has learned to handle a gang of 'hunkies' 
who neither talk or understand English without losing his 
temper — well — something has been accomplished. I do not 
expect to remain long with this company, only until I have 
gained such knowledge as their class of work affords, then I 
am going into railroading ip. Canada or Oregon. My one hope 
is that I shall be near enough to New Haven next spring to 
join the old class at its reunion. I only spent two years at Yale 
and took a degree at Columbia, but there is never a question as to 
which is my college. In view of possible change of business 
my surest address will be the Yale Club (30 West 44th St.), 
New York." 

William Brown Arvine (B.A. 1903) was bom at South 
Manchester, Conn., November 24, 1879, prepared at Hopkins 
Grammar School and Hillhouse High School, New Haven, 
Conn., and entered college in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Earlliss Porter Arvine (B.A. Yale 1869, LL.B. 
1871), a lawyer and at one time Assistant City Attorney of New 
Haven, was born at Woonsocket, R. I., April 19, 1846, the son 
of the Rev. Kazlitt Arvine, a graduate of Wesleyan University, 
and of Mary A. (Porter) Arvine. He resides at 1169 Chapel 
St., New Haven, Conn. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Alice Jane Strong, was 
the daughter of Artemas Strong and Jane (Brown) Strong of 
South Manchester, Conn. 

Arvine numbers among his Yale relatives besides his father 
a brother, Earlliss Palmer Arvine ('99 Law School), and 
another brother, Edward Kazlitt Arvine (1903 S.). 

In college he was a member of Chi Delta Theta and grad- 
uated with a First Colloquy Senior appointment. 



38 History of the Class of 1903. 

He writes: "After taking my B.A. in 1903 I taught Greek 
and English for a year at the Military School in Norwalk, Conn. 
After that I entered my father's law office in New Haven as 
a student. In the fall of 1904 I took exams, at the Yale Law 
School and was admitted to the middle (second year) class. 
After completing that year of study I was taken ill and was not 
able to return to the law school to graduate. This last year 
1905-6 I have worked for my father and plugged law as much 
as my eyes would let me. This coming fall I may take the 
Connecticut bar exams, or I may settle with friends in Cali- 
fornia. That question the condition of my health this fall will 
decide." 

His business address is care E. P. Arvine, First National 
Bank Building, New Haven, Conn. His residence is 11 69 
Chapel St., New Haven. 

Morton Atwater (B.A. 1903) was bom at Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y., January 11, 1882, prepared for college at the Phillips 
Academy, Andover, Mass., and Riverview Academy, Pough- 
keepsie, N. Y., and entered with the Class. 

His father, Edward Storrs Atwater (Yale 1875), was born 
in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 10, 1853, the son of John Phelps 
Atwater (Yale 1834) and of Jane (Phelps) Atwater. He is 
President of the Farmers and Manufacturers National Bank of 
Poughkeepsie. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Caroline Park Swift, 
was the daughter of Charles Warner Swift and Mary S. (Mess- 
ier) Swift. 

Beside his father and paternal grandfather, Atwater's Yale 
relatives include his great-great-grandfather Eleazar Storrs 
(1762), a great-grandfather, Jeremiah Atwater (1793), and a 
great-grandfather, Henry Swift (1804). 

He graduated with an Oration Junior appointment and a 
Dissertation Senior appointment. 

He is now with the firm of Shearson, Hammill & Co., brokers, 
71 Broadway, New York City. His residence is 74 Madison 
Ave. His home address is Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Douglass Henry Atwill (B.A. 1903) was born in Burling- 
ton, Vt., June 4, 1881, prepared at the Central High School, 
Kansas City, Mo., and entered with the Class. 



Atwater, Atwill, C, C. Auchincloss, 39 

His father, the Right Reverend Edward Robert Atwill, 
Bishop of Kansas City (Columbia 1863, D.D. University of 
Vermont), is the son of Robert Edward Atwill and Margaret 
Elizabeth (Bonesteel) Atwill. He resides at 1709 Linwood 
Boulevard, Kansas City, Mo. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Whiting, is the 
daughter of William Whiting and Mary (Christian) Whiting. 

Atwill graduated with a Second Dispute Junior and the same 
Senior appointment. 

He writes in November 1905: "My life since college days 
has been a quiet and uneventful one with no facts of interest. 
The first year out, partly for the experience and partly to relieve 
financial stress, I worked in Kansas City, Mo., with the Kansas 
City Gas Company for nine months, and then in line with my 
former purpose came to Cambridge to prepare for the ministry 
in the Protestant Episcopal Church. I have now spent a year 
and a half here and have one year yet after this one is past, 
before I begin active practical work. I have done very little 
outside work unless you would count as such my work here 
among the missions of Cambridge. My permanent address is 
1709 Linwood Boulevard, Kansas City, Mo." 

His address in Cambridge, Mass., is 8 Lawrence Hall. 

Charles Crooke Auchincloss (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 
1906) was born September 24, 1881, in New York City, pre- 
pared for college under a private tutor and entered in the fall 
of 1899. 

His father, Edgar Stirling Auchincloss, who died March 13, 
1892, graduated from New York University in 1867 and was the 
son of John Auchincloss, a New York merchant, and of 
Elizabeth (Buck) Auchincloss. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Maria La Grange Sloan, 
was the daughter of Samuel Sloan and Mary (Elmendorf) 
Sloan. 

Besides his cousin, Charles Russell Auchincloss of our Qass, 
his Yale relatives include four brothers: Edgar S. (1896), 
Hugh (1901), Gordon (1908), and James C. (1908); three 
uncles: Frederick L. Auchincloss (1871), John W. Auchincloss 
(1873 S.), and Hugh D. Auchincloss (1879); and another 
cousin, J. Howland Auchincloss (1908). 



40 History of the Class of ipoj. 

In college Auchincloss was substitute on the Freshman crew, 
an accident taking him out of the boat a week before the Har- 
vard race, a member of the College crew in 1901 and of the 
winning University Four-oar in 1903. He was an editor of the 
Pot'Pourri and was a member of He Boule, Psi Upsilon and 
Scroll and Key societies. He graduated with a First Colloquy 
Senior appointment. 

He was married in Boston, Mass., on Tuesday, June 19, 1906, 
to Miss Rosamond Saltonstall, sister of Mr. and Mrs. Neal 
Rantoul of Boston. He went abroad for his wedding trip 
and expects to start the practice of his profession in New York 
in the fall. 

He writes : "Since graduation IVe been here at the Harvard 
Law School. This is my last year. The summer after gradua- 
tion I travelled abroad for a time with Russell [Auchincloss] 
and on his going home, with Harry Potter. The summer after 
my first year here I travelled abroad with G. Auchincloss, 1908, 
and four others here in my class at the school. Last summer 
I worked six weeks in the law firm of Strong & Cadwalader, 
40 Wall St., New York Cit>', and then went to Murray Bay, 
Canada, for about a month." 

His home address is 24 East 48th St., New York City. 

Charles Russell Auchincloss (B.A. 1903) was born Novem- 
ber 24, 1 881, in New York City, prepared for college at the 
Cutler School in New York and entered in September 1899. 

His father, John Winthrop Auchincloss (Yale 1873 S.), ^s a 
member of the firm of Auchincloss Brothers, New York 
merchants. He was born in New York, April 12, 1853, the son 
of John Auchincloss and Elizabeth (Buck) Auchincloss. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Joanna Howe Russell, 
is the daughter of Charles Handy Russell, a New York 
merchant, and of Caroline (Howland) Russell. 

Numerous Auchincloss relatives have attended Yale: a 
brother, J. Howland (1908); two uncles, Frederic L. (1871) 
and Hugh D. (1879) ; and five first cousins, Edgar S. (1896), 
Hugh (1901), Charles C. (1903), Gordon (1908), and James 
C (1908). 

In college Auchincloss was Secretary and Treasurer of the 
Freshman Navy, a member of the Sophomore German Com- 



C. R. Auchincloss, Bacon, 41 

mittee and Junior Promenade Committee, a member of He 
Boule and on its Compaign Committee, Chairman of the Psi 
Upsilon Campaign Committee and a member of Scroll and Key. 
He held a Second Dispute Junior appointment and First Col- 
loquy Senior appointment. 

He was married May 25, 1905, in Middletown, Conn., to Miss 
Helen Pickering Russell, daughter of Samuel Russell. 

He writes : "After graduation I went abroad for two months, 
travelling in England and on the Continent, and going as far 
north as Sweden. Upon my return, about October ist, 1903, 
I entered the office of the then North American Trust Company 
as one of the receiving teller's assistants and continued with 
them for about six months. I then entered the office of a 
Stock Exchange house, and after being with them in various 
capacities for about six months more, I bought a seat on the 
New York Stock Exchange, and have been engaged in active 
business as a broker ever since, not being connected with any 
firm as a partner, but doing business for other brokers and firms 
on the floor of the Exchange." 

His address is 20 Broad St., New York City. 

Ernest Fairbanks Bacon (B.A. 1903) was born in Oberlin, 
Ohio, August 6, 1879, and entered Yale in Sophomore year from 
Gates College, Neligh, Neb. 

His father, Rev. Joseph Fletcher Bacon, was born in Cole- 
brook, Pa., June 19, 1850, received his B.D. degree (Congrega- 
tional) from Oberlin in 1881 and at present resides in Mendon, 
111. He is the son of Ebenezer Bacon. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Margaret Eliza Shaw, 
was the daughter of Abram Shaw and Rachel (McCandless) 
Shaw. 

Bacon was married on November 24, 1904, in Yankton, S. D., 
to Miss Grace Esther Felber, a graduate of Yankton College in 
1903* daughter of James J. Felber, now deceased, of Yankton, 
S. D. 

He writes: "J^ly i, 1903, saw me at work for the Cable Co., 
piano manufacturers of Chicago, in their factory at St. Charles, 
111., learning the business. September i, 1904, they moved me 
to the Chicago factory of the company to become familiar with 
the construction of a better grade of pianos. February i, 1906, 



42 History of the Class of 1903. 

they sent me to the factory of the Mason & Hamlin Co. to learn 
how the best pianos are made. In learning I have had to take 
my place in the factories and learn by actually making the piano 
myself. My object is to become a superintendent of a piano 
factory. 

"November 24, 1904, 1 was happily married and the happiness 
continues. 

"The only organization with which I have become affiliated 
since graduation is the Masons. 

"The most permanent address I know of is care Mason & 
Hamlin Piano Co., Cambridgeport, Mass." 

Thome Baker (B.A. 1903) was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
June 20, 1881, prepared at the Woodward High School, Cincin- 
nati, and entered college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Charles W. Baker, a lawyer and a graduate of the 
University of Pacific, was bom in Cincinnati, the son of Rev. 
Greenbury Ross Baker and Maria C. (McCracken) Baker. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Helen Thorne, 
was the daughter of William F. Thome, a merchant of Cincin- 
nati, and of Sarah (Collins) Thorne. 

In college Baker was Secretary and Treasurer of the Yale 
Union and held a First Dispute Junior and First Dispute Senior 
appointment. 

He writes: "I have been attending regularly at the Cincin- 
nati Law School, passed the State bar examinations in Decem- 
ber, was sworn in as attorney and am waiting for the course at 
the Law School to end in May before beginning the practice of 
law in my father's office. I have been dabbling in business and 
politics on the side." 

In November 1905 he was an unsuccessful candidate on the 
Republican ticket for the Ohio General Assembly. His business 
address is 1516 Union Trust Building, Cincinnati, Ohio. He 
lives at Reading Road and Oak St. 

Burton John Baldwin (B.A. Wesleyan 1902, B.A. Yale 
1903) was bora in Woodbridge, Conn., April 5, 1875, prepared 
at the Hopkins Grammar School, New Haven, Conn., and at 
the Mt. Hermon (Mass.) School and entered Yale at the 
beginning of Senior year. 



Baker, Baldwin, Barber. 43 

His father, John Jeremiah Baldwin, a farmer of Wood- 
bridge, was born in Woodbridge September 28, 1852, the son 
of Abner Spencer Baldwin and Mary Ann (Camp) Baldwin. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ellen Frances Baldwin, 
was the daughter of Parsons Baldwin and Mary Jane 
(Crofton) Baldwin. 

Baldwin graduated with a Second Colloquy Senior appoint- 
ment. During the summer of 1906 he was preaching in the 
Sixth Presbyterian Church, Newark, N. J. 

He writes, November 1905 : "The year after graduation was 
spent at the Yale Divinity School ; after that I came here to 
Union Seminary and roomed with Dick Edwards, Yale 1901. 
Needless to say the year was pleasantly spent. I have also 
been taking work at Columbia in Sociology under Prof. Gid- 
dings and may take an A.M. this year. Am sorry, indeed, not . 
to be able to report favorably along the matrimonial lines. 
But have not as yet given up hope ! 

"Spent the summer of 1903 in Northfield, 1904 working for 
the Home Missionary Society in Minnesota and in travel in 
the middle west, 1905 preaching near Burlington, Vt. Pre- 
ceding the last election in New York I went on the stump for 
Jerome. 

"Any mail address to Union Seminary, 700 Park Ave., New 
York City, will be forwarded to me. I graduate next May 
from Union and expect to enter the ministry of the Congre- 
gational church. Have been> thinking of late of the Yale 
Mission in China as a possible field of work." 

Walter Lewis Barber, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was bom January 
21, 1881, in Waterbury, Conn., prepared at the Waterbury High 
School and entered Yale in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Walter Lewis Barber, M.D., who resides in 
Waterbury, is the son of Benham Barber and Alice (Wilson) 
Barber. He was born in Harrington, Conn., June 26, 1851. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Fannie Maria Gaylord 
Hart, died January 30, 1881, and was the daughter of Albert 
H. Hart and Fannie Maria (Gaylord) Hart. 

In college Barber was a member of Zeta Psi. Since leaving 
Yale he has been studying medicine at Johns Hopkins Medical 
School. His present address is 1705 Fairmount Ave., Balti- 
more, Md. His home address is Waterbury, Conn. 



44 History of the Class of 1903, 

Perley Ernest Barbour was born October 7, 1879, i^ Haver- 
hill, Mass., prepared for Yale at^Thayer Academy, South Brain- 
tree, Mass., and entered with the Class, leaving college at the 
end of Sophomore year. 

His father, John Barbour, was born in Windsor, Vt, April 
24, 1845, is the senior member of the Brockton, Rand Co., 
leather supply manufacturers, residing at Braintree, Mass. He 
is the son of Charles H. Barbour and Orilla (Lamphere) Bar- 
bour. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Malissa Ann Hanson, 
was the daughter of Edmund Hanson and Rebecca (Emery) 
Hanson. 

In college Barbour was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Zeta 
Psi, and held a High Oration Junior appointment. 

He was married October 14, 1901, at Quincy, Mass., to Miss 
Mary Augusta Graham, daughter of John R. Graham, General 
Manager of the Public Works Company of Bangor, Me. He is 
now superintendent of the Brockton, Rand Co., leather supply 
manufacturers of Brockton, Mass. His residence is 8 Bigelow 
St., Quincy, Mass. 

Will Tilden Barker (B.A. 1904) was born November 16, 
1877, in Farmington, N. H., prepared at Phillips Academy, 
Exeter, N. H., and entered college in the fall of 1899. He 
left the Class in January 1903, to finish the course with the 
Class of 1904. 

His father, Hiram Hayes Barker, was born December 2, 
1851, in Farmington, N. H., where he now resides, a retired 
shoe manufacturer. He is the son of Hiram Barker and Maria 
(Hayes) Barker of Farmington, N. H. 

His mother, whose maiden name was May Ella Pearey, is 
the daughter of Robert Knight Pearey, a shoe manufacturer and 
Civil War veteran who died in 1882, and of Mary Amanda 
(Beals) Pearey. 

Barker was substitute catcher on the Freshman Baseball team. 

His present address is 42 Abbott St., Worcester, Mass. His 
home address is Farmington, N. H. 

Glover Beardsley (B.A. 1903) was born Ang^ist 19, 1881, 
in Auburn, N. Y., prepared for college at the Hotchkiss School, 
Lakeville, Conn., and entered in the fall of 1899. 



Barbour, Barker, Beardsley, Becker, 45 

His father, William Porter Beardsley (Yale 1874), a banker, 
was bom August 4, 1852, the son of Alonzo Glover Beardsley 
and Anna Phillips (Porter) Beardsley. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Weld Porter, is 
the daughter of Samuel Quincy Porter of Unionville, Conn., 
and Maria (Hulbert) Porter. 

Beardsley*s Yale relatives besides his father include two 
imcles, A. G. Beardsley, Jr., (1875) and Porter Beardsley 
(1886), and numerous cousins. In college Beardsley was Busi- 
ness Manager of the Yale Daily News, and a member of Delta 
Kappa Epsilon and the Elihu Club. 

He writes: "On leaving New Haven I entered the shops of 
the Otis Elevator Company at Yonkers, N. Y. I spent two 
years in the shops and engineeering department of that company 
and am now with the same company at their New York office, 
17 Battery Place. I am endeavoring to get a business educa- 
tion." 

His present address is care the Yale Club, 30 West 44th St., 
New York City. His home address is 102 South St., Auburn, 
N. Y. 

Arthur Charles Becker (B.A. 1903) was bom September 25, 
1880, in Belleville, 111., prepared for college at Smith Academy, 
St. Louis, Mo., and entered with the Class. 

His father, Charles Becker, a retired stove manufacturer and 
banker, Treasurer of Illinois 1888-90, was bom in Rocken- 
hausen, Bavaria, June 24, 1840. He is the son of Urban Becker 
and Anna (Spross) Becker. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Louise Fleischbein, died 
December 4, 1905, and was the daughter of Jacob Fleischbein, 
and Louise (Lutz) Fleischbein. 

In college Becker was Manager of the University Gymnastic 
Association. 

He writes : "After leaving New Haven in June 1903 I spent 
the summer in fishing and hunting in northern Wisconsin. Late 
in September I entered the St. Louis Law School, but was 
obliged to leave after a few weeks there owing to an injury 
received playing football, and remained at home in Belleville, 111., 
until my recovery from the injury. In January 1904 I entered 
the employ of Hibbard, Spencer, Bartlett & Co., Chicago, 111., 



46 History of the Class of 1903, 

wholesale hardware merchants. I remained with the above firm 
until October 1904, when my brother and myself purchased the 
Osceola Hardware Company, which we are at present conduct- 
ing with a fair measure of success and lots of hard work. 
Socially I am a member of the Elks and politically a Republican 
but have held no office." 

His present address is Osceola, Iowa, His home address is 
513 East B St., Belleville, 111. • 

Joseph Lewi Bendell (B.A. 1903) was born in Albany, 
N. Y., April 19, 1880, prepared for college at the Albany 
Academy and entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Herman Bendell, M.D. (Albany Medical College 
1862), was bom October 28, 1843, ^^ Albany, the son of Edward 
Bendell and Hannah (Stem) Bendell. Dr. Bendell is an ear 
and eye specialist, has been President of the Medical Society of 
the County of Albany and of the State of New York and is a 
professor in the Albany Medical College. He was one time 
President of the Board of Public Instruction of the city of 
Albany and was a surgeon in the Union army in the Civil war. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Wilhelmina Lewi, is 
the daughter of Joseph Lewi and Bertha (Schwarz) Lewi. 

Bendell graduated with a First Colloquy Senior appointment 
and has since been attending the Albany Medical College, from 
which institution he expects to graduate in 1907. He was one 
of the assistant prosectors in anatomy, session of 1904-5, and 
President of the Freshman class in the Medical College. His 
address is 178 State St., Albany, N. Y. 

Claude Garfield Bennethum (B.A. 1903) was bom January 
14, 1881, in Harrisburg, Pa., prepared at the Harrisburg High 
School and St. Stephen's Rectory of Harrisburg, and entered 
with the Class. 

His father, William H. Bennethum, of the firm of Dives, 
Pomeroy & Stewart, merchants of Harrisburg, was born Sep- 
tember 24, 1856, in Reading, Pa., the son of William H. 
Bennethum and Mary (Kerns) Bennethum. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Eugenia Haliday Bain- 
bridge, was the daughter of John Bainbridge and Jane (Hali- 
day) Bainbridge. 



Bendell, Bennethum, Benton, Bergen, Berman, 47 

In college Bennethum was a member of Phi Gamma Delta, 
held a First Colloquy Junior appointment and a Second Dispute 
Senior appointment. Since leaving college he has been in th^ 
retail dry goods business with William Donaldson & Co. of 
Minneapolis, Minn., and since Triennial with the advertising 
department of Dives, Pomeroy and Stewart. His address is 
2009 North 3d St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Josiah Henry Benton (B.A. 1903) was born February 10, 
1881, in Branford, Conn., prepared at Hopkins Grammar 
School, New Haven, Conn., and entered college with the Class. 

His father, George Talcott Benton, a farmer of Branford, 
was bom in New York City October 13, 1846, the son of Orsmer 
Benton and Mary C. (DeRevere) Benton. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ellen Foote Stedman, 
was the daughter of Harry R. Stedman and Betsey (Foote) 
Stedman. 

Benton held in college an Oration Junior and the same 
Senior appointment. He is now with The Royale Glass Jar 
and Bottle Company (merchants), 11 Broadway, New York 
City. 

He writes : "I put in a year and a h^lf at the Colorado School 
of Mines at Golden, working in the mines for two summers. 
Came home a year ago in March and after running a farm last 
summer, started in the glass jar business first of the year." 

His home address is Branford, Conn. 

Martin Henry Bergen (B.A. 1903) was born June 2, 1879, 
in Hartford, Conn., prepared at the Hartford Public High 
School and entered college with the Class of 1902, joining 1903 
at the beginning of Sophomore year. He is the son of Jeremiah 
Patrick Bergen, who died December 27, 1887, and of Maria 
Louise (Tynan) Bergen. 

In college Bergen was a member of the track team. Since 
graduating he has been with the National Biscuit Company and 
is now foreman in their Nabisco Works, 409 West 15th St., 
New York City. He is living at 328 West 22d St., New York. 
His home address is 84 Hudson St., Hartford, Conn. 

Pemberton Berman (B.A. 1903) was bom in Baltimore, Md., 
June 23, 1882, prepared at the Berkeley School, New York City, 
and entered with the Qass. 



48 History of the Class of 1903. 

His father, J. Berman, M.D., resides in Washington, D. C. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Patty Pemberton, was 
the daughter of John Clifford Pemberton and Martha Ogle 
(Thompson) Pemberton. 

In college Berman was an editor of the Yale Literary Maga- 
zine and won the Lit, medal in 1902 with an essay entitled "The 
Prose of Heinrich Heine." He was a member of Phi Beta 
Kappa and Chi Delta Theta, won the John Hubbard Curtis prize 
in Senior year and held a Philosophical Oration Junior appoint- 
ment and a High Oration Senior appointment. 

He is now in the trust department of the Bowling Green Trust 
Company, 26 Broadway, New York City. He lives at 226 West 
78th St., New York. 

James Milton Betts (B.A. 1903, LL.B. 1905) was born April 
9, 1878, in Newtown, Conn., prepared for college at the New- 
town Academy, Bridgeport High School and St. Johnsbury 
Academy, and entered Yale in 1899. 

His father. Dr. Ralph Nathaniel Betts, Jr., was bom in 
Woodbury, Conn., in 1842, resides in Sandy Hook, Conn., is a 
dentist and also a merchant of the firm of Betts & Betts. He 
is the son of Dr. Ralph Nathaniel Betts, Sr., also a dentist, and 
Anna (Plowman) Betts. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Jane Elizabeth 
Hough, was the daughter of Gustavus Adolphus Hough, of 
Sandy Hook, and of Jane (Daniels) Hough. 

In college Betts held a Second Dispute Junior appointment 
and a first Dispute Senior appointment. Henry Bristol (Yale 
1874) is a distant cousin. 

He writes : "Since I left Yale 1903, I went for two years to 
the Yale Law School, graduating in 1905. In September 1905 
I became associated with Marsh, Winslow & Wever, lawyers at 
III Broadway, New York City. My permanent address would 
be Sandy Hook, Conn., where my father lives, and from there 
mail would be forwarded to whatever place I happened to be. 

"Really, that is about all there is to tell except that I eat, 
drink and sleep the same as others." 

His present address is 79 Winthrop St., Brooklyn, N. Y., or 
care Marsh, Winslow & Wever, 1 1 1 Broadway, New York City. 



Betts, Bill 49 

Alfred Hoyt Bill (B.A. 1903) was bom May 5, 1879, i^ 
Rochester, N. Y., prepared at the Faribault (Minn.) High 
School and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Edward Clark Bill, who died May 11, 1892, was 
bom July 11, 1846, in Brooklyn, graduated from St. Stephen's 
College, Annandale, N. Y., in 1870, and the Seabury Divinity 
School (Episcopal) of Faribault in 1873. He was a profes- 
sor of Homiletics and Liturgies in the Seabury Divinity School 
and resided in Faribault, Minn. He was the son of Charles E. 
Bill, of Brooklyn, and Mary (Treadway) Bill. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Eliza H. Hoyt, died 
September 23, 1900, and was the daughter of Alfred Hoyt, of 
Rochester, N. Y., and Sarah (Rogers) Hoyt. 

In college Bill was a member of Zeta Psi and held a First 
Dispute Senior appointment. He was married June 30, 1903, 
in Plainfield, N. J., to Miss Florence Dorothy Reid, daughter 
of Samuel Reid, a retired tobacco manufacturer. A son, Alfred 
Reid Bill, was born March 5, 1906. 

He writes: "Since leaving college I have followed no regular 
occupation or business. I have done quite a bit of studying on 
literary and historical lines and striven without success at 
literary labor. My legal residence has been 528 Fifth St., 
Faribault, Minn., altho I lived last year in Plainfield, New 
Jersey. 

"As to my marriage the statistical sheet enclosed herewith 
gives the necessary information. It also states that I am doing 
non-resident work for the degree of M.A. in English at Yale. 

"I have published nothing, being restrained by unenthusiastic 
publishers. I am a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church 
and a member of the Vestry of the Parish here in Faribault, 
by virtue of which office I belong to the Smaller Chapter of the 
Cathedral of Our Merciful Saviour. The Board of Directors 
of the Faribault Public Library claims me as its own. My term 
as vestryman began in 1901 and expires at Easter this year. As 
a director of the Library I was appointed in December last and 
serve until 1908. 

"As to journeys, I have been once to Canada, made three little 
journeys into the south and penetrated the Mediterranean as 
far as Cairo. 

, "My permanent address is Faribault, Minn. Letters will also 
4 



50 History of the Class of 1903. 

be forwarded to me from the Yale Club (30 West 44th St.), 
in New York. 

"I can foresee small likelihood of change. Even the wild idea 
of a sudden capture of the Muse of Prose Fiction brings with 
it no desire to change my way of life, which suits me as well 
as that of the next man or the next hundred men I know of. 
For such a boast the Fates ought surely to bring disaster if they 
know their business." 

Avard Longley Bishop (B.A. Acadia College, Nova Scotia, 
1901, B.A. Yale 1903, M.A. 1904, Ph.D. 1906) was bom March 
4» 1875, i^ South Williamston, Nova Scotia, prepared for col- 
lege at the Lawrencetown (Nova Scotia) Academy and entered 
Yale 1903 at the beginning of the Senior year. 

His father, William Bishop, who died in October 1898, was 
born in November 1828 in Williamston, Annapolis County, 
Nova Scotia, and was a farmer. He was the son of George 
Bishop, a farmer of South Williamston, and Diadama (Long- 
ley) Bishop. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Ann Morse, is 
the daughter of Abner Morse, a farmer of Nictaux West, 
Annapolis County, Nova Scotia, and Margaret (Hicks) Morse. 

In Yale Bishop was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and 
graduated with a Philosophical Oration Senior appointment, 
being the 17th. in rank in the Class. 

He writes (December 1905) : "Since graduating with '03 I 
have been pursuing graduate work in the Department of Eco- 
nomics, at Yale, leading toward the degree of Doctor of Philos- 
ophy. I have fulfilled all requirements for the degree except- 
ing the thesis, upon which I am now working and in case I get it 
completed I shall hope to get the degree in June '06. Took 
the M.A. in course in 1904. 

"In June 1904 I was fortunate enough to be appointed an 
Instructor in the Department of Economics while still carrying 
on my studies as a graduate student, and this year my appoint- 
ment was renewed. 

"Being still single, my conjugal condition is the same as at 
graduation, nor have any books, pamphlets, etc., gone to press 
from my pen to swell the deluge of yearly issues, of which few 
deserve the title of literature. 



Bishop, Black. 51 

"I presume the above contains all you require to know about 
my doings since leaving college. As I was with the Class but 
one year, and met comparatively few of the fellows of '03, any- 
thing further I might add would not be of general interest. 

"Mail addressed to Yale Station is sure to reach me 
promptly." 

And later : 

"In reply to your letter of Jan. 31st I would say that the article 
you referred to as being in the Register on December 20, 1905, 
re Commercial Museum is correct in every particular. As 
regards my connection with this valuable collection, I would say 
that I was appointed by the University to confer with the U. S. 
Government re getting commercial materials to illustrate the 
courses in Commercial Geography, etc. We expected then 
(summer of 1905) that the process would be a slow one. The 
idea of trying to secure the exhibit of the Agricultural Depart- 
ment at the Lewis & Clark Exposition at Portland, Ore., was 
entirely my own. I thought of it on one of my trips to Wash- 
ington last August and when I referred the scheme to the Uni- 
versity they backed me up in it. I went ahead, and in spite of 
numerous applications for it, I eventually 'landed' it for Yale. 
It is a very valuable collection of materials; besides we got 
about $4000 worth of display cases with it — all free of charge. 
I hope this may give you all the information you require. 

"Perhaps you may have noticed that I am to give a course 
of lectures in the Yale Simimer School on Commercial Geog- 
raphy; also that I have been recently elected as a member of 
the Yale Chapter of the Sigma Xi." 

His present address is Herrick Hall, Yale University, or 120 
York St., New Haven, Conn. His home address is Lawrence- 
town, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia. 

Robert Lounsbiuy Black (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 1906) 
was bom September 15, 1881, in Cincinnati, Ohio, prepared for 
college at the Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and entered 
college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Lewis Cass Black (Delaware 1874), a lawyer 
of Cincinnati, was bom in Lancaster, Ohio, September 9, 1847, 
the son of Benjamin Black and Susan (Himes) Black. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Abigail Lounsbury, 



52 History of the Cla^s of 1903, 

was the daughter of the Rev. D. W. Lounsbury and Emeline 
(Wood) Lounsbury. 

In college Black was an editor of the Yale Literary Magazine, 
was a member of Chi Delta Theta and of the Pundits. In 
Sophomore year he won the C. Wyllys Betts Prize and received 
honors in English Composition. He held a Dissertation Junior 
appointment and graduated with a Dissertation Senior appoint- 
ment. 

He writes (Jan. 16, 1906) : "Since graduation I have been 
engaged in the study of the law. The first year I spent at the 
Cincinnati Law School and these last two I have been in Cam- 
bridge at the Harvard I^w School. I hope to get an LL.B. 
here next spring. 

"During the summer after Senior year I went to California 
as a member of the Federal Bureau of Forestry, where I worked 
on the Eucalyptus gloves for three months. Last summer I 
lived on a ranch in North Dakota, in pursuit of health. 

"The Outlook published an article of mine on 'The Forest 
Service' in the' September (1905) monthly number. McClure's 
Magazine has recently accepted a short story, but the time of 
publication and the title I know not. It was last known to me 
under an alias of The Reckoning' but it will probably suffer a 
re-christening. 

"I expect to settle down in Cincinnati, Ohio, after I have 
graduated here. My address will be 1603 Union Trust Build- 
ing, where I shall practice law as much as possible." 

His residence is Baker Place, Madison Road, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 

Arthur George Blaisdell (B.A. 1903) was born April 29, 
1880, in Goffstown, N. H., prepared for college at Phillips 
Academy, Exeter, N. H., and entered with the Class. 

His father, Frank Blaisdell, M.D., was born in Goffstown in 
1852, graduated from Dartmouth College in 1876 and is at 
present a physician and surgeon residing in Goffstown. He is 
the son of Stephen Blaisdell and Amanda (Marshall) Blaisdell, 
a granddaughter of Chief Justice Marshall. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Anna Isabel White, is 
the daughter of George N. White, a descendant of Peregrine 
White, the first white child bom in New England, and of Mary 
H. (Chandler) White. 



I 



Blatsdell, Bloomer. 53 

In college Blaisdell held a Dissertation Junior and Senior 
appointment. Since graduating he has reported for the Boston 
Journal, has been with the Mutual Life Insurance Company at 
their New York office, and is now office manager for an adver- 
tising and publishing house : Benjamin Lillard & Co. 

His present address is care Benjamin Lillard & Co., 108 
Fulton St., New York City. His home address is Goffstown, 
N. H., where he asks that all communications be sent. 

Howard Jasper Bloomer (LL.B. 1903) was born October 3, 
1872, in Burlington, Iowa, prepared for college at the Hopkins 
Grammar School of New Haven and at the University School 
of Norwalk, Conn., and entered with the Class, leaving at the 
end of Freshman year to enter the Yale Law School. 

His father, Edgar Bloomer, a carpenter and builder of Nor- 
walk, was born in Marlborough, N. Y., July 29, 1846, the son 
of Edgar Bloomer and Catherine (Osborn) Bloomer. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Clementine Benedict, 
was the daughter of Benjamin Benedict and Emily (Palmer) 
Benedict. 

He writes: "Answering your questions in accordance with 
the circular enclosed I will say — I left the Qass of 1903 at the 
close of the Freshman year. I then entered the Yale Law 
School and graduated in 1903. In September 1903 I entered 
the law offices of A. C. Shenstone, 11 Broadway, New York 
City, and remained there until October 1904, when I entered 
the legal department of the Travelers Insurance Company of 
Hartford, Conn. I remained with that company until June ist, 
1905, when I entered the general practice of law, entering the 
firm of Bryant, Case & Bloomer — I being the junior partner of 
the same. 

"I hold membership in the following organizations : Phi Delta 
Phi and Corbey Court, Y.L.S. ; St. John's Lodge, No. 4, F. and 
A. M. of Hartford ; United Spanish War Veterans ; The Naval 
and Military Order of Spanish American War; The Military 
Order of Foreign Wars; The Navy League of the United 
States; The Hartford Oub; Lieutenant Commanding 2nd 
Division, C. N. G. ; The Hartford Yale Alumni Association. 

"Probably some of the above mentioned organizations are 
immaterial, in which case strike them out. I send as complete 
a list as possible, as I understand that is what you want." 



54 History of the Class of 1903. 

His business address is 904 Main St., and his residence 171 
Warrenton Ave., Hartford, Conn. 

William Alexander Blount, Jr., (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Uni- 
versity of Alabama 1904) was born May 23, 1879, i^ Pensacola, 
Fla., prepared at St. Paul School, Garden City, L. I., and entered 
with the Class. 

His father, William Alexander Blount, a graduate of the 
University of Georgia, Class of 1872, LL.B. 1873, is a lawyer of 
the firm of Blount & Blount and is now a State Senator of 
Florida. He is the son of Alexander Qement Blount and Julia 
Elizabeth (Washington) Blount. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Cora Nellie Moreno, is 
the daughter of Fernando James Moreno and Maria Louise 
(Tattine) Moreno. 

A brother, Fernando Moreno Blount, was a member of the 
Qass of 1904 Yale. 

In college Blount was quarterback of the Freshman Football 
team, right fielder of the Freshman nine, substitute on the Uni- 
versity nine, a member of the Apollo Glee Club, University Glee 
Qub and Dramatic Association. He was a member of H6 
Boule, Alpha Delta Phi and the Elihu Club and held a First 
Colloquy Junior appointment and a Second Dispute Senior 
appointment. In Senior year he coached the 1906 Freshman 
eleven. 

After graduation he entered the law department of the Uni- 
versity of Alabama, also acting as coach of their football team. 
He is now a partner of his father and brother in the law firm of 
Blount & Blount, jyi South Palafax St., Pensacola, Fla. His 
residence is 28 East Wright St. 

Samuel Russell Bogue (B.A. 10)03) was bom July 18, 1879, 
in Truxillo, Peru, prepared for college at the North Division 
High School, Chicago, 111., and at the Polytechnic Institute, 
Brooklyn, N. Y., and entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Virgil Gay Bogue, was born July 19, 1846, in 
Canton, N. Y., is a graduate in the class of '69 of the Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute of Troy, N. Y. He is a civil engineer 
and Vice President of the Western Pacific Railway, residing at 
440 West End Ave., New York City. He is the son of George 
C. Bogue of Canton, N. Y. (wholesale dairy supplies), and 
Mary (Perry) Bogue. 



Blount, Bogue, Bond. 55 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sybil Estelle Russell, 
is the daughter of John Leslie Russell, a lawyer of Canton, 
N. Y., and of Mary (Clark) Russell. 

In college Bogue was stroke of the Freshman crew, rowed 
number four in the University crew in 1901, and stroked the 
University crew in Junior and Senior years. He was a member 
of the Dramatic Association, Alpha Delta Phi and the Qass 
Day Committee. After graduation he studied law in the New 
York Law School and is now practising with the firm of Rus- 
sell & Hartridge, 149 Broadway, New York City. His resi- 
dence is 440 West End Ave., New York City. 

Robert Elias Bond (B.A. 1903) was born February 15, 1880, 
in Kohala, Hawaiian Islands, prepared for college at the Law- 
renceville (N. J.) School and entered with the Class. 

His father, Elias Cornelius Bond, was born May 21, 1846, in 
Kohala, is a graduate of Oahu College of Honolulu, and is a 
retired sugar planter and manufacturer. He is the son of the 
Rev. Elias Bond, D.D., a graduate of Bowdoin and an early 
missionary to Hawaii, and of Ellen (Howell) Bond. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Alice Roll Moyle, is 
the daughter of James W. Moyle, a California "forty-niner," 
and of Angeline S. (Hughes) Moyle. 

William L. Bond (Yale 1875) is an uncle. 

In college Bond was Chairman of the Courant, substitute 
coxswain of the Freshman crew, a member of the Freshman 
Glee Club and of the College Choir. 

He writes : "Two days after Commencement, 1903, I started 
in business in New York City as office boy and general goat 
of the Cardinal Company, manufacturing stationers, formerly 
at 156 Fifth Ave. At about the same time I entered The House 
of Mirth' and saw it from attic to cellar, more as a spectator 
than as one of its characters, though, of course, one cannot 
entirely eliminate himself from any true story of which he is 
such an active spectator. 

"During that first sunmier I moved up a peg to be bookkeeper 
and cashier and then treasurer of the company. The following 
spring, 1904, I was made general manager of the company. It 
was a small affair — a sub-company of one of the largest manu- 
facturing concerns of its kind in the country. With my duties 



56 History of the Class of 1903. 

as treasurer I was brought into the most intimate knowledge of 
the finances both of the parent company and of the owner of 
both companies. 

"During the reign of terror, frenzied finance and consequent 
ruin, a year and a half later, of their owner and his companies, 
I had much valuable experience and got hold of much invalu- 
able information. Before the crash came, I had spotted a 
golden nugget of opportunity to be snatched by the right 
person from among the ruins, and during the summer of 1905 
I got the option on sufficient treasury stock and minority stock 
combined to give me control of the Essex Paper Company of 
Holyoke, Mass., a corporation under the laws of the state of 
Massachusetts, incorporated in 1895 for the manufacturing of 
writing tablets, pads, etc., and all kinds of stationery. To go 
back: In February 1905 I moved with the Cardinal Company 
from New York City to Watertown, N. Y., where I resigned my 
office in August 1905. Thereafter, until October 9th, 1905, 
when I started in here, I was hustling to put through my deal 
here in Holyoke and getting my capital for the deal. I am now 
apparently settled at last in my own factory for an indefinite 
time to come. I like the paper business and particularly the 
financial end of it. Since I took charge here our financial rat- 
ing has been raised from 'TD' to *SC' Bradstreet. My perma- 
nent address is care Essex Paper Company, Holyoke, Mass. 

"In New York City I joined the Yale Club and the Brick 
Presbyterian Church." 

His business address is care Essex Paper Company, and his 
residence 315 Maple St., Holyoke, Mass. 

Edward Charles Bowers (B.A. 1903) was bom June 10, 
1881, in Westfield, Mass., prepared for college at the Westfield 
High School and entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father, George R. Bowers, was born January i, 1856, 
in Westfield, is with the Eastern Cigar Company, manufacturers, 
and is the son of George Bowers and Mary (Welch) Bowers. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Annie Cecilia Keefe, is 
the daughter of James Keefe and Mary (Cotter) Keefe. 

He writes: "I started with Huvler's in Albany immediately 
after graduation and left them after about a year to go with 
Acker, Merrall & Condi t Co., but came back here last June 



n 









B^n.l ^B 




1 

1 

i 


Bw^ * ■ 91 


Ik 


^^^H V^^H 


Wjffi^ 




T 




i 


n|)j^ 


i 







Bowers, Brady, Bragaw, 57 

(1905) and will undoubtedly remain in this business for some 
time." 

His address is care Huyler's, 508 Fifth Ave., or 56 West 37th 
St., New York City. His home address is Westfield, Mass. 

Charles Arnold Brady (B.A. 1903, LL.B. New York Law 
School 1905) was bom in Norwich, Conn., January 29, 1882, 
prepared at the Norwich Free Academy and entered college with 
the Class. 

His father, John Arnold Brady of Brady and Saxton, retail 
merchants of Norwich, Conn., was born in St. Armand, Prov- 
ince of Quebec, Canada, the son of Patrick Brady, a farmer of 
Canada, and of Margaret (Quinlan) Brady. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Jane Corcoran Gordon, 
was the daughter of Michael Gordon, a farmer, and of Mar- 
garet (Moore) Gordon. 

In college Brady was a member of Beta Theta Pi and grad- 
uated with a Second Colloquy Senior appointment. 

He writes, August 1906: "After receiving my degree at the 
New York Law School and passing the bar examinations in 
June 1905, I obtained a position (really a job) as examiner 
with the Lawyers Title Company of New York and stayed with 
them until March of the present year. Since then I have been 
out for myself and have managed to support myself. About 
the first of August I was beginning to feel quite respectable 
when I was forced to come home because of illness. Expect 
to go back on September i to try again. Just after our gradua- 
tion in 1903 I spent a little over three months in Europe. Spent 
my time in England, Holland, Belgium, France, Switzerland 
and Italy, sailing from Naples about the 20th of September 
1903." 

His business address is 132 Nassau St., Suite 604, New York 
City. His home address is P. O. Box 84, Norwich Town, Conn. 

Allen Cleveland Bragaw (B.A. 1903) was bom October 31, 
1881, in Hartford, Conn., prepared at the Hartford Public High 
School and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Isaac Bragaw, was born in Orange, N. J., March 
18, 1857, resides at 343 Windsor Ave., Hartford, and is in 
real estate and brokerage. He is the son of Isaac A. Bragaw 
and Elizabeth (Way) Bragaw. 



58 History of the Class of 1903, 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Adelaide King, 
is the daughter of Charles King of Hartford and Maria Allen 
(Olmsted) King, a descendant of John Adams and Ethan Allen. 

In college Bragaw won a Henry James Ten Eyck third prize 
in Junior year, won a Townsend Premium Senior year, and held 
a First Colloquy Junior and Senior appointment. 

He writes : "I did not get my LL.B. After a year at Harvard 
Law School and one at Columbia, I passed my New York Bar 
examination in June last (1905) and was admitted at the fall 
term of the Court. I decided to accept this position (Law 
Department, Title Guarantee and Trust Co. of Brooklyn) I now 
hold, in preference to a third year at law school and took up 
my work here October 3, 1905. Have been fortunate and 
things look pretty well." 

His residence is 20 East 94th St., New York City. 

Samuel Mason Brereton (B.A. 1903, M.A. 1904) was born 
May 6, 1877, i^ Dundalk, Ireland, prepared for college at the 
Mt. Hermon (Mass.) School and entered college with the Class. 

His father, George Brereton, was bom in Croghan, Kings 
County, Ireland, in 1849, resides at 8 Baldwin Place, New 
Haven, and is in the furniture business with H. F. Blogg. He 
is the son of John Brereton and Sarah (Hanlon) Brereton. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Maria Smallman, is 
the daughter of James Smallman and Alicia (Fumey) Small- 
man. 

In college Brereton won a first grade Berkeley premium in 
Latin Composition Freshman year and a Lucius F. Robinson 
third prize in Latin Senior year. He held an Oration Junior 
and an Oration Senior appointment. 

He writes : "In the fall of 1903 I returned to college and took 
up special work in Classics in the Graduate School, receiving 
the M.A. degree in June 1904. In the fall of 1904 I came 
to Mercersburg Academy to teach under a three-year contract.'' 

His present address is Box 25, Mercersburg, Pa. His home 
address is 8 Baldwin Place, New Haven, Conn. 

Raymond Paul Brinkman was born December 20, 1880, at 
Great Bend, Kansas, prepared for college at the Kansas City 
(Mo.) Central High School and entered in the fall of 1899, 
leaving in the middle of Junior year. 



Brer et on J Brinkman, Bristol. 59 

His father, George Lewis Brinkman, who died July 23, 1902, 
was bom in Boliver, Ohio, November 7, 1843, was a member 
of the class of 1865 of the State University of Ohio and at one 
time was a member of Congress from Kansas. He was with 
the Kansas City Milling Company. He was the son of Joseph 
Brinkman, a farmer, and a German by birth, who came to this 
country when nine years old, settling in Ohio, moving to Kansas 
in 1874, and of Mary (Zutavern) Brinkman. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Alice Prescott, is the 
daughter of the Rev. William Prescott, first of Massachusetts 
and later of Iowa, and of Mary (Harris) Prescott. 

He writes: "Replying to yours with sheet to be filled out, 
wish to say that I haven't much to tell. When I got the news 
that my father was very sick, I left college and started home. 
I left dear old Yale on the 13th of February, 1902, and reached 
home on the 15th, went to work in this business, which was 
my father's business, and have been at it ever since. In January 
1903 the Board of Directors made me secretary, which position 
1 have held ever since. I have been thinking of changing and 
going in the cattle business somewhere further west, and expect 
to carry my plans out in the near future." 

And later, August 1906: "I have about completed arrange- 
ments to go in with S. W. Noggle Wholesale and Manufactur- 
ing Company, a firm that manufactures grocers' and bakers' 
supplies. At any rate I will get out of the Kansas City Mill- 
ing Company, as we have sold out and I am closing up this 
concern. 

"My address for the present will be 323 West Armour 
Boulevard, Kansas City, Mo." 

Ralph Bristol (B.A. 1903) was bom in Ansonia, Conn., 
August 23, 1881, prepared for college at the Taft School, Water- 
town, Conn., and Holbrook's Military Academy, entering with 
the Class. 

His father, Charles Edward Bristol, of the Bristol Drug Com- 
pany, and formerly postmaster of Ansonia, was bom in Derby, 
Conn., October 21, 1847, the son of Charles Bristol, a manufac- 
turer of Derby, and Harriet (Bradley) Bristol. He resides 
in Ansonia. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Frances Ellen Bar- 



6o History of the Class of 1903, 

tholomew, is the daughter of Jeremiah H. Bartholomew, a 
manufacturer of Ansonia, and Polly H. (Root) Bartholomew. 

A brother, Theodore Louis Bristol, graduated from Yale in 
1893, 2i"d another brother, Charles Edward Bristol, was a 
member of the Class of 1896. 

In college Bristol was a member of Psi Upsilon, Wolf's Head, 
and of the Cap and Gown Committee. 

He writes : "During July after graduation I attended the life 
insurance class of the Equitable Life Assurance Society, 
immediately after which I left for the West to spend a couple 
of months on the ranch of Smith Bros. & Field in Utah, the 
firm being composed of two Yale men and a Harvard man. 
The ranch life proved too attractive and my stay in the west was 
extended until the following March. 

"Very soon after returning east I went into the employ of 
the Waterbury Parrel Foundry & Machine Co. and am still with 
this concern. Letters addressed to me at Waterbury, Conn., in 
care of this concern will reach me." 

His residence is 45 Prospect St., Waterbury, Conn. 

John Shaw Broeksmit (B.A. Coe College 1901, B.A. Yale 
1904) was born February 12, 1881, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and 
prepared for college at the Coe Academy of Cedar Rapids. 

Broeksmit entered the Class in Junior year. He was forced 
by illness to leave college, returning to take his degree with the 
Class of 1904, holding a dissertation Senior appointment. 

His father, John Cornelius Broeksmit, was born in Zeirikzee, 
Holland, January 25, 1825, was formerly General Auditor of the 
Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern Railway, and now 
resides at Cedar Rapids. He is the son of Adrian Broeksmit 
and Gertrude (Switzer) Broeksmit. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Laura Shaw, is the 
daughter of John Shaw and Sophia (Fisk) Shaw. 

He writes: "At once on graduating from Yale in 1904, I 
went down to New Mexico, where I remained on a sheep ranch 
for seven months. This post graduate course did a whole lot 
for me in more ways than one. It furnished me experience of a 
new and novel nature, such as is not included in the curriculum 
at college. It was interesting business, but poor living for any 
long period. 



Broeksmit, C. T. Brown. 6i 

"Last February (1905) I came up to Cedar Rapids, my home, 
and went to work for the Merchants National Bank. I began 
at the bottom of the pile, by washing windows and scrubbing 
floors. All the money that fell on the floor went to me, and for 
a while it was pretty poor picking. However, the bank and I 
have been getting along very nicely, and there is every prospect 
of our signing a lease for another year of partnership. 

"I have not been able to see many of the College fellows, for 
they are not numerous in these parts. Last February I got 
into Chicago for the Yale shindig when President Hadley came 
out, together with Judge Rowland, and gave us a most interest- 
ing time. I certainly hope that a similar deal will be pulled off 
this winter, and I will surely attend. 

"I can only say that the Class of 1903 has my best wishes, 
wherever they are, and I hope that your work of getting up a 
Triennial Record will be thoroughly successful." 

His address is Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

* Charles Tracy Brown was born March 4, 1882, in New 
York City, and died July 21, 1900, in Quogue, L. L, of typhoid 
fever. 

His father, Francis Gordon Brown, who died December 21, 
1905, was born in New York City, November 17, 1846, the son 
of Francis Brown and Eliza (Tracy) Brown, graduated from 
the Columbia School of Mines in 1867, and was by occupation a 
merchant. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Julia Noyes Tracy, is 
the daughter of Charles Tracy (Yale 1832) and Louisa (Kirk- 
land) Tracy. 

A brother, Francis Gordon Brown, Jr., graduated from Yale 
in 1901. 

Charlie Brown started his preparation for Yale at Groton 
School. He came into the school in the fourth form, entering 
thus as a stranger into a class that had been together for three 
years. But his enthusiasm for both work and play and his 
simple straightforwardness of character soon won a leading 
place for him among his companions. 

By his sixth form year he had risen high in his studies, had 
become a promising athlete, and had gained a prefectship, a 
coveted honor and one seldom conferred upon a boy who had 
been so short a time in the school. 



62 History of the Class of ipo^. 

He entered Yale without a condition, and immediately took 
a leading place in the Class of 1903 by being made one of its 
marshals at the inauguration of President Hadley. His reputa- 
tion as a football player had gone before him, and he lived up 
to it by staying on the 'Varsity squad the greater part of the 
season and playing with his class team in its more important 
games. And as the year went on he maintained his prominence 
in athletics by gaining a seat in the Freshman crew. Yet with 
all his devotion to sports, his studies were not neglected, 
for throughout the year he kept a stand that bordered on Phi 
Beta Kappa. At Dwight Hall too he was an interested worker 
and was one of the leaders of 1903's Y. M. C. A. 

Though he achieved so much in that one year and sprang so 
soon to a place of such prominence at Yale, he maintained 
throughout a simplicity of character and sweetness of disposi- 
tion that won him friends wherever he turned. There was 
scarce a man in his class who had not a good word for Brown, 
and there were many men, whose good fortune it was to be 
closely related with him, who considered him the one man in 
the Class to whom they could look for an example and from 
whom they might receive words of sincere praise in their 
achievements, and of equally sincere sympathy in their failures. 
Taken all in all, we may well say that while Charlie Brown was 
with us, he was the best loved man among us. 

To-day as we call up our memories of him, and remember the 
pang that we all felt at his death in the summer of our Fresh- 
man year, we still feel that our appreciation of his character 
is best expressed now, as it was upon the day that we drew up 
our resolutions on his death by these words : 

"E'en as he trod that day to God, 
So walked he from his birth, 
In simpleness and gentleness 
And honor and clean mirth." 

F. J. O. Alsop. 

Thomas Marshall Howe Brown was bom in Pittsburg, Pa., 
August 5, 1881, prepared at the Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Mass., and at the Shadyside Academy, Pittsburg, and entered 
with the Class, leaving in the winter of Senior year. He is the 
son of James W. Brown of Pittsburg. A brother, Charles Mar- 
shall Brown, graduated from Yale in 1891. 



T. M. H, Brown, Bumstead, 63 

In college Brown was a member of the Apollo Glee Club. Ill 
health caused him to leave college in the winter of Senior year. 
Since then he has been trying to regain his health and, except 
for the summer of 1903, which he spent at the Muskoka Lakes, 
Canada, he has been at Bum Brae, Cliffton Heights, Delaware 
County, Pa. 

Ralph Willis Bumstead (B.A. 1903) was bom in Atlanta, 
Ga., April 24, 188 1, prepared for college at the Boston (Mass.) 
Public Latin School and entered Yale with the Class. 

His father. Rev. Horace Bumstead, D.D., (Yale 1863) was 
bom September 29, 1841, in Boston, was Major of the 43d 
Regiment of U. S. Colored troops in the Civil War and is now 
President of Atlanta University. He is a son of Josiah Free- 
man Bumstead and Lucy Douglas (Willis) Bumstead. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Anna M. Hoit, is the 
daughter of Albert Gallatin Hoit and Susan Ann (Hanson) 
Hoit. 

Bumstead's Yale relatives include an uncle, N. Willis Bum- 
stead (1855), two great uncles, Nathaniel P. Willis (1827), the 
poet and author, and Richard Storrs Willis (1841), and a 
brother, Arthur Bumstead (1895). Professor Henry A. Bum- 
stead of Yale is a distant cousin. 

In college Bumstead was a member of the Cross Country 
team, and the track team, winning third place in the two-mile 
run in the Harvard games in Junior year. He held a Second 
Colloquy Junior appointment and a Second Dispute Senior 
appointment. 

He writes : "I began my business career in the field of finance 
under the employ of G. H. Nolte, of Boston, a State St. broker 
and officer of a few small corporations such as the Alvan Clark 
& Sons Corporation (makers of astronomical instruments). 
My experience in that office for somewhat less than two years 
was of a fairly instructive sort, inasmuch as it involved the 
handling of a considerable variety of clerical work and book- 
keeping; but it didn't seem to offer suitable prospects for 
advancement and therefore led me to make a change during last 
summer which proved to be still more instructive but far less 
permanent. I took a position with Pettigrew, Bright & Co., 
members of the Boston Stock Exchange. Up to this time I had 



64 History of the Class of 1903, 

a constantly intensified interest in work of a very different 
nature, viz., mechanical and electrical engineering and invention, 
and had carried this interest far enough to secure the protection 
of a *U. S. patent pending' with over fifty claims allowed for the 
invention of an automatic stock quotation board to be operated 
by means of the 'tickers' now used in brokers' offices. 

"The start that I had made in the field of finance, modest 
tho it was, coupled with my lack of training and experience in 
engineering pursuits, deterred me from recognizing my aptitude 
for the latter as I did after comparing it with my work in the 
stock business. The critical moment came, however, when I 
ceased to regard the bird in the hand as worth two in the bush. 
I simply pulled up stakes and came to California with the idea 
that here there would be good opportunities for making a new 
start and here I wanted to live for various reasons. A few days 
after my arrival, the field had been scanned and I had accepted 
what has since proved to be a most desirable position for my 
new career in the field of engineering. While my work as a 
draughtsman is already recognized as valuable to the California 
Gas and Electric Corporation, I hope soon to put into play the 
technical knowledge I am acquiring by outside study as well 
as by close observation of the work I have in hand." 

His residence is 109 13th St., Oakland, Cal. 

Ralph Howard Burdctt was born February 27, 1880, in 
Hartford, Conn., prepared at the Hartford Public High School 
and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Charles L. Burdett, who died February 22, 1902, 
was a patent attorney, born in Nantucket, Mass., in 1848, the 
son of Thomas Burdett and Charlotte (Prescott) Burdett. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Lucy Weeks Stock- 
bridge, died September 28, 1896, and was the daughter of John 
Stockbridge and Emily (Weeks) Stockbridge. 

Since leaving college he has been with the Factory Insurance 
Association of Hartford and now he holds the position of 
Inspector. 

His address is care Factory Insurance Association, Hartford, 
Conn. 

Robert Grey Bushong (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Columbia 1906) 
was bom in Reading, Pa., June 10, 1883, prepared at the 
Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and entered with the Class. 



Burdett, Bushong, Calmer. 6$ 

His father, Jacob Bushong, died September 24, 1896, and 
was the treasurer and general manager of the Reading Paper 
Company. He was born in Reamstown, Lancaster County, 
Pa., October 26, 1823, the son of PhiHp Bushong and Elizabeth 
(Grey) Bushong. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Lillie Roberts, was 
the daughter of Anthony Ellmaker Roberts and Emma (Bush- 
ong) Roberts. Mrs. Roberts was a first cousin of our class- 
mate's paternal grandfather. 

A brother, John Roberts Bushong, graduated from Yale in 
1900. 

In college Bushong was Manager of the University band, 
held a First Colloquy Junior appointment and a First Dispute 
Senior appointment. Since graduation he has studied law at 
Columbia and has been editor of the Law Reviezv, His address 
is 232 North 5th St., Reading, Pa. 

Erwin Minscl Calmer (B.A. 1903) was born in Joliet, III, 
March 31, 1880, prepared for college at the Joliet High School 
and entered with the Class. 

His father, Michael Calmer, who died April i, 1903, was 
born in Stuttgart, Germany, in 1841, was a merchant and mill 
operator, also interested in real estate, with the firms of M. 
Calmer Dry Goods Company and Joliet Tin Plate Mill. 

His mother's maiden name was Therese Minsel. 

In college Calmer was a member of the Fencing team, also 
its captain, and held a Second Colloquy Junior appointment. 

He was married in Chicago, 111., July 24, 1905, to Miss 
Florence Briggs Terhune, a graduate of Smith and daughter of 
the late Richard Terhune, a mining engineer and a graduate of 
Columbia in 1870. 

He writes: "Am at present in the store here. The M. Calmer 
Dry Goods Company, of which I have one-quarter interest. On 
leaving college I travelled through our west, British Columbia 
and Mexico, then went to Golden, Colo., School of Mines. 
Left there on account of bad health at Christmas and went to 
Wyoming hunting and doing any old thing. In some way I 
joined the Pinkerton Detective agency after a month there and 
became a 'frontier detective' working through Wyoming, Utah 
5 



66 History of the Class of 1903. 

and Nevada. I stayed with them until January 10, 1905, at 
which time I was freezing to death, or nearly so, in Nevada. At 
that time the death of my wife's father called me east again 
and I decided to learn the dry goods business. Married — ^settled 
down— that's all." 

His address is Joliet, 111. 

Edward Herbert Cameron (B.A. Acadia 1900, B.A. Yale 
1903, M.A. 1904, Ph.D. 1906) was born in Yarmouth, N. S., 
January 24, 1875, prepared at the Milton High School, Yar- 
mouth, and entered Yale at tlie beginning of Senior year. 

His father, William Jack Cameron, of the Geo. S. Taylor 
and Company, tailors of Yarmouth, was bom at River John, 
Nova Scotia, in 1848, the son of Hugh Cameron and Elizabeth 
(Brown) Cameron. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Elizabeth Allen, 
was the daughter of Herbert Allen and Mary (Valentine) 
Allen. 

In college Cameron was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and 
Sig^a Xi. He held a Philosophical Oration Senior appoint- 
ment, graduating fifteenth in rank. 

He writes : "Since graduation in 1903 I have been pursuing 
a post graduate course at Yale in the department of philosophy. 
I expect to take Ph.D. degree in June. Published an article 
in Yale Psychological Studies, Volume I, New Series, in 
collaboration with W. M. Steele, 1903. 

"My permanent address is Yarmouth, N. S." 

James Noel Howard Campbell (B.A. 1903, LL.B. 1906) 
was born December 25, 1881, in Hartford, Conn., prepared at 
the Hartford Public High School and entered college in Sep- 
tember 1899. 

His father, James Campbell (M.D. University of Vermont 
1871), who died in 1899, was a professor in the Yale Medical 
School from 1886 to 1899 and was for a time President of the 
Board of Health of Hartford. He received the honorary degree 
of M.A. from Yale in 1891. He was bom in 1846, the son of 
James Campbell and Esther C. (Oris wold) Campbell. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Cornelia Petibone, 
was the daughter of William F. Petibone and Augusta E. 
(Fenton) Petibone. 



Cameron, Campbell, Carter. 6j 

Several cousins have attended Yale: Ernest W. Campbell 
(1893 L.S.), Frederick W. Campbell (1902), James L. Good- 
win (1902) and Howard Goodwin (1906). 

In college Campbell was a member of Phi Gamma Delta and 
held a Second Colloquy Junior appointment and a Second Dis- 
pute Senior appointment. 

He writes November 1905: "There is very little that I can 
record as accomplished since graduation that could be of any 
interest to the class, but I will try to answer the suggestions you 
enclosed seriatim: 

"i. Residence since leaving college — 333 York Street, New 
Haven, Conn. No business. 

"2. Not married. 

"3. Post graduate work — I am taking the prescribed course 
in the Yale Law School leading to the degree of LL.B. I was 
so fortunate as to receive Second Year Honors. I expect to 
graduate in 1906. 

"4. No publications. 

"5. Hartford Golf Club, Hartford, Conn. 

"6. No journeys. 

"7. Permanent address: 2 Congress Street, Hartford, 
Conn." 

And later (June 30, 1906) : "I was yesterday admitted to the 
bar of Hartford County and am now permanently located in 
Hartford, where I expect to enter on the practice of law in the 
fall. My home address is unchanged, viz : — 2 Congress Street, 
Hartford, Conn." 

Loren Russell Carter (B.A. 1903) was born in Waterbury, 
Conn., July 9, 1880, prepared at the Waterbury High School and 
entered with the Class. 

His father, Loren Russell Carter, who is in the real estate 
and investment business, was born in Warren, Conn., in October 
1854, the son of Russell Carter, a farmer, and of Laura L. 
(Hill) Carter. 

His mother's maiden name was Irene E. Hendrick. 

Earle B. Carter (Yale 1907 S.) is a brother. 

Since graduation Carter has studied law at Harvard. He 
expects to take the Connecticut bar examinations in December 
1906 and to practice in Waterbury. His address is 11 East 
Main St., Waterbury, Conn. 



68 History of the Class of ipo^, 

George Brewster Chadwick (B.A. 1903) was born June 11, 
1880, in Brooklyn, N. Y., prepared for college at the Brooklyn 
Latin School and at the Brooklyn High School and entered with 
the Class. 

His father, Charles Noyes Chadwick (Yale 1870), was bom 
June 18, 1849, i^ Lyme, Conn., is President of the C. N. Chad- 
wick Co., manufacturers of children's underwaists and boys' 
shirtwaists. He is chairman of the Board of Trustees of the 
Froebel Academy of Brooklyn, was a member of the Brooklyn 
Board of Education from 1886 to 1899 and a director of the 
Brooklyn Public Library from 1897 to 1899. He was Water 
Commissioner of New York City in 1905. He is a son of Daniel 
Chadwick (Yale 1845), United States District Attorney for 
Connecticut, and of Ellen (Noyes) Chadwick. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Alice Ann Caruth, is 
the daughter of James Caruth and Mary Ann (Meeke) Caruth. 

Chadwick numbers among his Yale relatives, besides his 
father and grandfather, a brother, Charles (1897), an uncle, 
Ernest Chadwick (1891), and two cousins. Chief Justice Waite 
(1837) and Judge Richard Waite (1853). 

In college Chadwick played half back on the University Foot- 
ball team for four years, being captain in Senior year of one of 
the strongest teams which ever represented Yale, was a member 
of the Freshman Glee Club, Apollo Glee Club, University Glee 
Club, Senior Promenade Committee, and Class Day Committee. 
He was a member of He Boule, Psi Upsilon and Skull and 
Bones societies. 

He writes: "After I graduated from Yale in June 1903 I 
spent the summer at the country home of my father, Lyme, 
Conn., recuperating from the strenuousness of Senior year. 
That fall I went on to New Haven and was field coach for the 
football team. After Thanksgiving I left the east and entered 
the employ of the Southern Railroad Company, St. Louis and 
Louisville Division. I spent about a month in the Superinten- 
dent's office, Princeton, Ind., and from there about the middle of 
January 1904 I was transferred to the local office. East St. 
Louis, 111. After spending about eight months there, in which 
I was transferred around in the different departments, I 
decided that it was wisest for me to leave the railroad. 

"In August 1904 I came with the Simmons Hardware Com- 



Chadwick, Chapin. 69 

pany, St. Louis. I took a preparatory course through stock, 
and through several of the different departments, such as the 
Sales Department. Then I went down to Texas and travelled 
with another of Simmons' salesmen for about two months. On 
my return to St. Louis in March 1905 I was put in the Adminis- 
trative Department as assistant to the General Manager and the 
General Superintendent. I have since remained in that position. 

"My plans are now such that I intend to remain with the Sim- 
mons Hardware Company. My permanent address will be 
Simmons Hardware Company, St. Louis, Mo. Nothing very 
exciting has happened to me. It has simply been hard work 
from the time I began business right on. I am not married 
nor engaged, and there seems to be no immediate prospects of 
either." 

His present residence is 3707 Westminster Place, St. 
Louis, Mo. 

Carl Mattison Chapin (B.A. 1904) was born July 30, 1879, 
in Waterbury, Conn., prepared for college at the Taft School, 
Watertown, Conn., and entered with the Class. He left college 
at Christmas, 1899, returning to complete the course with the 
Class of 1904. 

His father, Charles Frederic Chapin (Yale 1877), is the 
editor of the Waterbury American, and was born August 3, 
1852, at South Hadley Falls, Mass. He is the son of Enoch 
Cooley Chapin and Harriet (Abbe) Chapin. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Katharine Mattison, 
died July 10, 1905. She was the daughter of William P. Mat- 
tison and Sarah (Stickle) Mattison. 

In college Chapin was Chairman of the Courant and editor of 
the Record, playing first base on the 1904 Freshman nine, was 
a member of the Second Baseball team in his Junior year and 
coached the 1907 Freshman team. He was a member of Alpha 
Delta Phi. 

He was married June 29, 1904, at Woodmont, Conn., to Miss 
Edith DeMaris Adams, daughter of the late Warren A. Adams 
of Manchester, Vt. He is at present in newspaper work with 
the New England office of the Associated Press, 293 Washing- 
ton St., Boston, Mass. He resides at loi Elm St., Somerville, 
Mass. Hia home address is 35 Fairview St., Waterbury, Conn. 



70 History of the Class of 1903. 

Eliot Round Clark (B.A. 1903) was born November 13, 
1881, at Shelburne, Mass., prepared at the Hartford (Conn.) 
Public High School and entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Rev. George Larken Clark (Amherst 1872), is 
a graduate of the Union (Congregational) Theological Semin- 
ary, and was bom in Tewksbury, Mass., in 1849, the son of 
John Clark, a farmer of Tewksbury. 

His mother's maiden name was Emma Frances Kimball. 

In college Clark won a DeForest Mathematical prize and a 
second grade Berkeley premium in Latin Composition Fresh- 
man year, the Lucius F. Robinson Latin second prize in Sopho- 
more year, was a Woolsey scholar, also Daniel Lord scholar. 
He was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi and Phi Kappa 
Epsilon, and held a Philosophical Oration Junior and the same 
Senior appointment, graduating third in the Class. 

He writes : "Expect degree of M.D. in 1907 from Johns Hop- 
kins. Have studied medicine since leaving college. Perma- 
nent address, Wethersfield, Conn. Expect to be a dispenser of 
piUs." 

His present address is Johns Hopkins Medical School, Balti- 
more, Md. 

Harold Terry Clark (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard Law School 
1906) was bom in Derby, Conn., September 4, 1882, prepared 
at the Ansonia (Conn.) High School and at the Hillhouse High 
School, New Haven, Conn., and entered college at the begin- 
ning of Freshman year. 

His father, William Jared Clark, is General Manager of the 
Foreign Department of the General Electric Company of New 
York. He was born July 20, 1854, in Derby, Conn., the son of 
Merritt Clark (coal business) and of Mary Anne (Hodge) 
Clark. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Josephine Terry, 
was the daughter of William Terry, M.D., a Civil War veteran, 
and of Maria Roxanna (Slocomb) Terry. 

Clark's Yale relatives include two brothers, William Merritt 
Clark (1901S.) and Robert Lincoln Clark (1906), and two 
first cousins, George Clark Bryant (1895) and Ralph Hodge 
Clark (1909). 

In college he played left tackle on the Freshman eleven, was 



E. R. Clark, H. T. Clark. 71 

a Class Deacon and President of the Y. M. C. A. He won a 
Townsend Premium and was on the Class Picture Committee. 
He was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha Delta Phi and 
Skull and Bones societies. He held a Philosophical Oration 
Junior appointment and a Philosophical Oration Senior appoint- 
ment, graduating seventh in rank. 

He writes, January 1906: "The years since graduation have 
been busy, pleasant and uneventful. Upon leaving Yale I went 
to Europe, expecting to spend some time there studying lan- 
guages arid then start in business in New York. The summer of 
1903 was spent in traveling. In September I settled down in 
Dresden and for several weeks worked very hard on German. 
I went to Berlin, intending to make a long stay. While there I 
suddenly decided to study law, caught the first steamer home 
and went at once to the Harvard Law School. The greater 
part of the past three years has therefore been spent in Cam- 
bridge. The summer of 1904 was spent in traveling about this 
country, to Maine, the Berkshires, Adirondacks, Vermont, 
Detroit, St. Louis, etc. The summer of 1905 I spent in Europe, 
Scotland, Norway, England, France, Switzerland, Italy, Sicily. 
On the 1903 trip to Europe I visited Belgium, Germany, Swit- 
zerland, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Turkey, Austria, Hungary. 

"At the Harvard Law School I have been elected a member 
of the Choate Chapter of the legal fraternity of Phi Delta Phi. 
Am also president of the Alpha Delta Phi Alumni Association in 
the graduate schools of Harvard University. This consists of 
Alpha Delta Phi men from all the different colleges. I hope to 
receive the degree of LL.B. from Harvard this June. I am also 
a candidate for a non-resident M.A. from Yale in German but 
have done nothing toward that thus far (save paying twenty-five 
dollars). 

"My only work in a political way has been looking up a few 
candidates for city offices in Cambridge on behalf of the Good 
Government Association and acting as volunteer watcher at 
the polls in Boston on election day. Neither of these items 
amount to anything. 

"A permanent address to which mail can be sent is 12 South 
Cliff St., Ansonia, Conn." 

And later: "It has become finally settled that next year I 
shall be with the law firm of Squire, Sanders & Dempsey, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. I am to start work on August first." 



72 History of the Class of 1903, 

Harry Henderson Clark (B.A. 1903) was bom in Winches- 
ter, Tenn., August 6, 1880, prepared at the Winchester Normal 
College and entered Yale at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Rufus Anthony Clark, is the President of Win- 
chester Normal College, is Vice President of a bank and also 
a farmer of Winchester, Tenn. He was born in Pelham, Tenn., 
November 20, 1846, the son of James Anthony Clark, a farmer 
of Pelham. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ellen Elizabeth Hender- 
son, died May 21, 1892, and was a daughter of Mark Henderson, 
a merchant of Winchester, Tenn. 

Orion J. Willis (1903) is a cousin. 

In college Clark won a Henry James Ten Eyck second prize 
in Junior year, the Thacher prize in Junior and Senior years, 
was a member of the Interclass Debating team in 1900 and of 
the Interdepartment team of 1901. He was a member of Phi 
Beta Kappa and Zeta Psi, was President of the Yale Union 
and a Class Historian. He held a Philosophical Oration Junior 
appointment and a High Oration Senior appointment. 

Since leaving college he has had several occupations, including 
insurance, private tutoring and working in a broker's office. He 
is Secretary of the Louisiana Yale Alumni Association. His 
present address is care Round Table Club, Jackson Ave., New 
Orleans, La. His home address is Winchester, Tenn. 

Kilbum Dickinson Clark (B.A. 1903) was born in Detroit, 
Mich., April 17, 1878, prepared for college at Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., and entered with the Class. 

His father, William Wallace Clark, of Syracuse, N. Y., was 
born May 6, 185 1, in Mendon, Rutland County, Vt., the son of 
Anson Giffin Clark and Abigail (Kilburn) Clark. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Helen Mar Slocum, 
died October 10, 1881, and was the daughter of Volney Peleg 
Slocum and Helen Mar (Almy) Slocum. 

A brother, William W. Clark, Jr., graduated from the Shef- 
field Scientific School in 1903. 

In college Clark was an editor of the Yale Daily News, a 
member of the Freshman Glee Club and Chairman of the Zeta 
Psi Campaign Committee. 

Of his career since he writes: "I went with the Harbison- 



H. H., K. D., R. K., S, C. Clark. 73 

Walker Refractories Company early in January 1904, and after 
a brief period at one of our Pennsylvania works went on the 
road selling ( ?) fire bricks in Indiana, Michigan, the copper 
country, and in Ontario. In the early summer of 1905 I came 
to Portsmouth as assistant to Sales Manager of the Portsmouth 
Harbison-Walker Co., which is part of the Refractories Com- 
pany, and have been here since except for occasional trips in 
Virginia, West Virginia and Ohio. 

"My permanent address is care of the Portsmouth Harbison- 
Walker Co., Portsmouth, Ohio." 

Robert Keep Clark (B.A. 1903, S.B. Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology 1905) was born in Chicago, 111., July i, 
1879, prepared at the Chicago University School and entered 
college in September 1900. 

His father, George Mark Clark, of the George M. Clark & 
Co., manufacturers of stoves, was born in Westminster, Vt, 
June 10, 1841, the son of Mark Qark and Sarah (Hall) Clark. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Elizabeth Keep, 
is the daughter of Rev. Theodore John Keep (Yale 1832) and 
Mary Anne (Thompson) Keep. 

Besides his maternal grandfather, Clark's Yale relatives 
include a great-grandfather, Rev. John Keep (1802), a great- 
great-grandfather. Judge Nathan Hale (1769), and a first 
cousin, Robert P. Keep (1903). 

Clark entered college Sophomore year and held a First 
Dispute Junior appointment and a Second Dispute Senior 
appointment. 

He writes : "I had two very satisfactory years at the Boston 
Tech. The summer of 1904 my sister and I were abroad for 
four months, spending most of our time in Italy and Greece." 

His address is 460 Dearborn Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Stephen Carlton Clark (B.A. 1903) was born in Coopers- 
town, N. Y., August 29, 1882, prepared at the Cutler School, 
New York City, and entered with the Class. 

His father, Alfred Corning Clark, died April 6, 1896. He 
was born in 1849, resided at Cooperstown and was the son of 
Edward Clark and Caroline (Jordan) Clark. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Scriven, 



74 History of the Class of Jpoj. 

married October 4, 1902, Bishop Henry Codman Potter of New 
York. 

Clark graduated from college with a Second Colloquy Senior 
appointment. Since graduation he has studied law, first at 
Harvard and more recently at Columbia. He was in 1906 
admitted to the bar in New York City. His business address 
is 2381 Broadway, New York City, and his residence is 
Cooperstown, N. Y. 

Allen Thomas Clement (B.A. 1903) was born in Rutland, 
Vt., January 23, 1881, prepared for college at the St. Paul 
School, Concord, N. H., and entered in the fall of Freshman 
year. 

His father, Waldo Park Clement (B.S. Norwich University 
1872), is a banker and broker of the firm of Clement & Smith, 
New York. He was born July 21, 1851, in Rutland, Vt, 
the son of Charles Clement, a marble producer and banker, and 
of Elizabeth (Wood) Clement. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Hannah Allen Thomas, 
was the daughter of Allen Mason Thomas, a merchant of Wick- 
ford, R. I., and Charlotte Proctor (Smith) Thomas. 

Four uncles preceded Clement at Yale: Elisha S. Thomas 
(1859), Nathaniel P. S. Thomas (1868), Aaron S. Thomas 
(1869), and Allen Mason Thomas (1877 S.). 

In college Clement was a member of the Apollo and University 
Banjo and Mandolin clubs. He was a member of Alpha Delta 
Phi. 

He writes: "After convincing the Faculty to affix a B.A. to 
my name in June 1903, I went direct to Westhampton, L. I. 
But the strain of this honor was too great and I had been there 
but a few weeks when I came down with typhoid. Nine weeks 
in bed left me in a condition which required about two years 
to completely recover health. 

"On November 11, 1903, I started out on a trip through the 
west, in company with five other men. We were gone six 
weeks, during which time we visited all the boundary states, 
with one or two exceptions. Returning to New York, I stayed 
here a few weeks, and then went south with my family to 
spend the remainder of the winter on an orange grove at 
Georgiana, Fla. 



Clement, Coard. 75 

"In the early fall of 1904 I started in business in the cashier's 
department of Strong, Sturgis & Co., stock brokers. I 
remained with the above firm until August 31st, 1905. On that 
day my father started a new firm, 'Clement & Smith', taking me 
in as junior partner. I have managed to keep this position to 
date. 

"Permanent address — 143 West 71st St., New York City." 

George Franklin Coard was born in Chittenango, N. Y., 
October 3, 1880, prepared for college at the Military Academy, 
Montclair, N. J., and entered with the Class, leaving in Fresh- 
man year. 

He is the son of John J. K. Coard, manager of the A. C. 
Yates & Co., clothiers of Philadelphia, who was bom in Berlin, 
Md., in 1845, 2tnd of Emily (Phillips) Coard. . 

He writes from Shanghai, China, under date of December 22, 
1905 : "As the English are the predominant power here, we 
always get the telegraphic reports about the English games but 
never any of the good game of American football, and I can 
assure you that I am more than pleased to have the clippings 
you have been so good as to send, especially when they bring the 
good news of Yale's victories. It is still the same old 'Yale 
spirit' that teaches us never to give up that has brought Yale 
though successes and reverses and made her the greatest uni- 
versity in the world. 

"If the Class of 1903 follows your 'Suggestions for Letters' 
I am sure we will have some very interesting reading matter. I 
wish that I had anything of interest about myself to tell you, 
but as it is I haven't, so I shall be brief. 

"I regret very much that I was unable to stay and finish the 
course at Yale but such was the case, and, after six months at 
Amherst, I entered business in New York with the firm of 
Smith, Gray & Co. Later I entered the employ of E. J. 
McMichan & Co., New York, but left there in the beginning 
of the year 1902 to go out to Honolulu on my own account. 
The prospects there were not the best, so I went through Japan, 
China and Hongkong to Manila, where I entered the service of 
the Philippine Civil Government as Property Clerk for the 
Department of City Schools. After seven months I was forced 
to leave Manila on account of illness and have been in Shanghai 



76 History of the Class of 1903, 

since that time. Entered the employ of the Standard Oil Com- 
pany here in August 1903 and stayed with them until going into 
business for myself in the fall of 1904. At that time I went 
into partnership with a Belgian named Rene del Arbre, but sold 
out to him this last summer, and have been conducting my busi- 
ness alone since that time. 

"I was married at the Consulate General of the United States 
in Shanghai on June 29th, 1904, to Florence Edna Smith, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Smith of San Francisco, Cal. 

"This is about all the news I can give you and will leave it 
to your discretion to use such portions as you may need. I 
am endeavoring to settle my affairs here sufficiently to be able 
to return to America this spring, if not for good at least for a 
long enough time to get my lungs filled once more with some 
good American ozone ; and as my headquarters will doubtless be 
New York, I hope I may have the pleasure of dropping in on 
you at New Haven and having a good 'look see.' I am going 
to try and time it that I may be there for the Triennial, as I 
should like to be there when the other fellows are back again. 

"I am going to add one more line in the name of humanity to 
young men, and that is if you know of or hear of any fellows 
who have the foolish and deluded idea of coming out to this 
country for business, use all your influence to keep them in Gk)d's 
country. Our own country is big and good enough and fine 
enough for all our young men to work and expand in without 
their having to come out here, where all is a delusion and a 
snare. 'Gk) west, young man' may be an excellent motto, but 
'don't go so far west that you get to the Far East,' ought to be 
added." 

His present address is care U. S. P. O., Shanghai, China. 
His permanent address is care Mrs. H. F. Johnson, Plain- 
field, N. J. 

Nathaniel Haviland Cobb was born in Walden, Vt., October 
II, 1879, prepared for college at the St. Johnsbury (Vt.) 
Academy and at the Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn., and 
entered with the Class. 

His father, George Whitefield Cobb, a farmer of Danville, 
Vt., is the son of Luke Cobb and Lucy (Bailey) Cobb. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Caroline Weeks, is the 
daughter of Peasley Weeks, a Vermont farmer. 



Cobb, Cochran, 77 

In college Cobb was a member of the Dramatic Association 
and of Beta Theta Pi. He divided with MacLane and Howard 
the Winston Trowbridge Townsend prize in Freshman year. 
He left college in February 1901 to go abroad to study art. 
Three of his pictures have recently been accepted by the Paris 
Salon des Beaux Arts. 

He writes: "There is little to tell of myself since leaving 
New Haven. I left about the middle of Sophomore year and 
have since been painting in Paris, Florence, Venice, Rome, 
Capri, and in Tunis. At present I am again established in 
Paris, where I shall remain indefinitely." 

His address is 122 Rue d'Assas, Paris, France. 

Gifford Alexander Cochran (B.A. 1903) was born in 
Yonkers, N. Y., December 12, 1880, prepared for college at the 
St. Paul School, Concord, N. H., and entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father, William Francis Cochran, was with Alexander 
Smith & Sons Carpet Company of Yonkers, and was born in 
New York City, October 29, 1833, the son of Alexander Gif- 
ford Cochran, a merchant of New York City and Amsterdam, 
N. Y., and of Sarah (Phillips) Cochran. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Eva Smith, was the 
daughter of Alexander Smith, a carpet manufacturer of Yon- 
kers, and of Jane (Baldwin) Smith. 

Two brothers, Alexander S. Cochran ( 1896) and William F. 
Cochran (1898 S.), and a first cousin, John Sanford (1874), 
preceded Cochran at Yale. 

In college he was a member of the Freshman, Apollo and 
University glee clubs, and was a member of He Boule, Alpha 
Delta Phi and Wolf's Head societies. 

He was married February 14, 1906, to Miss Mabel Heyward 
Taylor, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. James Madison Taylor of 
Philadelphia. 

He writes in January 1906: "I think the statistical blank- 
covers most of the news I can give you of myself. I have been 
living in Yonkers and New York since graduation. Have been 
in business with the Alexander Smith & Sons Carpet Company 
and expect this will be my business for life. Nothing of much 
interest to report beyond this. No journeys, no literary work, 
no positions of trust or political influence. A few class 



78 History of the Class of 1903, 

weddings with the accompanying celebrations, etc. I expect 
to make my permanent home in New York, 12 East 55th St., 
but letters addressed to Yonkers, N. Y., will always reach me." 

James Ryle Coffey (B.A. 1903) was born in New Haven, 
Conn., July 11, 1881, prepared at the Hillhouse High School of 
New Haven and entered with the Class. 

His father, Lawrence John Coffey, a mason contractor, was 
born in New Haven in 1851, the son of James Coffey and 
Bridget (Flannigan) Coffey. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Jennie HoUoran, was 
the daughter of John Holloran, a painter, and Ellen (Costello) 
Holloran. 

He writes under date of January 8, 1906: "In reply to your* 
letter asking for information regarding my actions since leav- 
ing college will say as follows. The following year I entered 
the Yale Medical School as' a Freshman. I have since com- 
pleted two years at that school and am now in the midst of my 
third year. At the completion of my second year I spent two 
months as interne on the Boston Floating Hospital. I have 
just spent three weeks in the Society of Lying-in Hospital of 
New York. This comprises all my doings since leaving Yale. 
Sorry that I have nothing more of interest." 

His address is 17 Autumn St., New Haven, Conn. 

Louis Garfield Coleman (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 1906) 
was born in Springfield, 111., August 6, 1881, prepared at the 
Springfield (111.) High School and at the Lawrenceville (N. J.) 
School and entered college in September 1899. 

His father, Louis Harrison Coleman, a loan and investment 
banker of Springfield, was born in Hopkinsville, Ky., Septem- 
ber 2, 1842, the son of Hardin H. Coleman and Barbara Ann 
(Hopper) Coleman. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Jennie Bush Logan, 
died May 19, 1891, and was the daughter of Judge Stephen 
T. Logan, a partner of Abraham Lincoln from 1841 to 1844, 
and of America T. (Bush) Logan. 

Coleman's Yale relatives include a brother, Christopher B. 
Coleman (1896), and a first cousin, Logan Hay (1893). 

In college he was Assignment Editor of the Yale Daily News, 



Coffey, Coleman, Collens. 79 

Treasurer of the Christian Association, Chairman of the Class 
Picture Committee and won a Berkeley premium in Latin Com- 
position, second grade, in Freshman year. He was a member 
of He Boule and Delta Kappa Epsilon societies, and held an 
Oration Junior appointment and the same Senior appointment. 
Since graduation he has been studying law at Harvard, 
graduating last June. In the summer of 1906 he entered the 
law office of Brown, Wheeler, Brown and Hay, 309-311 South 
6th St., Springfield, 111. 

Arthur Morris Collens (B.A. 1903) was born in Cleveland, 
Ohio, November 4, 1880, prepared for college at the Hillhouse 
High School of New Haven, Conn., and at the Hotchkiss 
School, Lakeville, Conn., and entered with the Class. 

His father, the Rev. Charles Terry Collins, who died Decem- 
ber 21, 1883, graduated from Yale in 1867, took his B.D. degree 
at Andover Theological Seminary, and at the time of his death 
lived in Cleveland, Ohio. He was born in Hartford, Conn., 
October 14, 1845, ^^^ son of Charles Collins and Mary (Terry) 
Collins. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Abby Wood, was 
the daughter of Moses H. Wood and Abby Sawyer (Wesson) 
Wood. 

Besides his father, Collens* Yale relatives include two brothers, 
Charles (1896) and Clarence L. (1896 S.), also a cousin, 
Atwood Collins (1874). He also claims "a great something 
uncle in 1761, David or Timothy Collens, I forget which." He 
may refer to the Rev. Timothy (1718). 

In college he was an editor of the Yale Daily News, Treas- 
urer of the Senior Promenade Committee, played on the Uni- 
versity Tennis team in the spring of Senior year and on the 
Class Hockey team. He was a member of Psi Upsilon. He 
was Secretary and Treasurer and later President of the German 
Club and held a Second Colloquy Junior appointment and a First 
Colloquy Senior appointment. 

He writes: "After graduation in 1903 I started work 
immediately with my uncle, William Allen Butler, Jr., being 
placed by him for the experience in the brokerage firm of Geo. 
P. Butler & Bro. until October ist, 1903, from which date until 
January 15th, 1905, I assisted Mr. W. A. Butler, Jr., in the 



8o History of the Class of 1903. 

management of trust estates and funds, with offices at 54 Wall 
St., New York City. Whife in New York roomed with Ralph 
Melcer at 33 West 45th St. and with Melcer and 'Dud' Lewis 
at the Spring Street Presbycterian Church Neighborhood House 
at 239 Spring St. 

"January i6th, 1905, I accepted the position of Secretary 
and Assistant Sales Manager of the International Acheson 
Graphite* Company of Niagara Falls, N. Y. Last fall I 
resigned my position in Niagara Falls to accept an assistantship 
to the Inspector of the New York Ijle Insurance Company's 
Agencies in New York City, witfe bffice at 42 Broadway, and 
Hugh Rankin as a roommate at 415 Lexington Ave. 

"In February resigned from the New York Life, not however 
at the request of the Insurance Investigation Committee, but to 
take my present position as one of the two Pittsburg managers 
of the Fulton and Bessemer office buildings, Phipps Power 
Plant and other Phipps properties in Pittsburg. Am living at 
9 Dunmoyle Place with a Lehigh 190 1 man, a Beloit graduate, 
Berne Evans, '99, E. T. Noble, '99, George Lyon, 1900, and 
Ralph H. Schneelock, '01 Mus." 

Address: Bessemer Building, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Walter Guthrie Collins (B.A. 1903) was born in Leadville, 
Col., February 17, 1880, prepared for college at the New York 
Military Academy, Cornwall, N. Y., and entered in the fall of 
1899. 

His father, Samuel Guthrie Collins (mining), who resides 
in Denver, was born in Yazoo County, Miss., February 6, 1846, 
the son of Lemuel P. Collins, a planter, and of Phoebe (White) 
Collins. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Emilie Browning, is the 
daughter of Rev. William Garretson Browning, a Methodist 
minister of Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and Sussana Rebecca (Webb) 
Browning. 

Two uncles preceded Collins at Yale, Dr. William W. Brown- 
ing (1872) and Professor Philip E. Browning (1889). 

In college Collins was an editor of the Record and a member 
of Delta Kappa Epsilon. He held a Second Dispute Junior and 
the same Senior appointment. 

He writes: "My life since leaving college in 1903 has been 



Collins. 8 1 

devoid of pyrotechnics. For the first few months after gradua- 
tion I wasted considerable time pondering on how best to set the 
world on fire, but like many others I surmise, I encountered so 
many wet blankets lying around in convenient places that my 
attempts at arson were soon abandoned. I discovered that a 
degree of B.A. from Yale alone did not enable a very ordinary 
individual like myself to create much of a conflagration. And 
so in due time emerging from my house of dreams, I started out 
in search of experience and a meal ticket. I have also been 
attempting to find out wherein my talents lie, — if indeed I have 
any, — ^and thereby to plot my future course. In all these I have 
been only partially successful. So far I have managed to con- 
sume three commonplace meals a day, and I believe I have 
accumulated considerable experience, — ^but as to my future I 
must confess I am very much at sea. 

"The first year after leaving New Haven I spent in the law 
offices of Wells & Chiles, in the hope (or rather, it was the hope 
of my father) that I might become so infatuated with the 
spirit of the law that I would be willing to put in three more 
years of earnest study and emerge with a LL.B. attached to 
my name. However, lack of sufficient enthusiasm for the legal 
profession coupled with a desire to be independent financially 
as well as mentally and physically, prompted me to turn my 
energies into another channel. 

"I became afflicted with the germ of journalism, and for a 
year past I have been connected with the editorial department of 
the Rocky Mountain News, — one of our morning daily publica- 
tions, a democratic organ owned by Senator Thomas M. Pat- 
terson, one of Colorado's chief trouble-makers, and a man whose 
strenuous and pugnacious personality has, I believe, made him a 
national character. I have done a little of everything on the 
paper and several encouraging advancements make me, modest 
as you know I am, believe that I have made good. And while 
I have not been dining daily on small birds and large cold 
bottles, I have subsisted comfortably on simple fare and an occa- 
sional good cigar. 

"I have been in the newspaper business just long enough to 

feel its fatal fascination, and at the same time to realize that 

the game is not worth the candle. Gruelling work, uncivilized 

hours (from 3 p. m. to 3 a. m.) and disproportionate pay, with 

6 



82 History of the Class of 1903. 

the continual uncertainty of the security of one's position and 
the tramp life, — moving from one place to another, which is 
necessary for one to get far ahead, — all these and more combine 
to make one with my tastes and inclinations wish to seek new 
fields of activity. 

"And so I feel that I am on the eve of another change, — ^but 
what it will be I cannot now say. It may not come, at least not 
for some time, and again it may come to-morrow, for in this 
business one hardly knows what a day may bring forth. A 
change of management, or a change of city editors, frequently 
means a change of the entire personnel of the staff. At the 
present writing I am filled with a desire to try my luck in the 
northwest, and am hoping to get an opportunity to enter the 
employ of a firm dealing in municipal and corporation bonds, 
but more definite information on that point I cannot give at 
present. 

"No, I am not married, nor have I any prospects of being 
compelled to purchase meal tickets for some other man's 
daughter. I have taken no post-graduate work, have written no 
books, have not journeyed in foreign lands, have taken no active 
part in social, religious, or political organizations, and have na 
information about other members of the Class which they would 
not confide to our worthy secretary. 

"What I believe would be called my permanent address is 
care Howard B. Collins, Leadville, Col., but unless I should 
make violent changes in my plans a letter would reach me 
addressed to the Cornwall Apartments, Denver." 

His business address is care News-Times Publishing Com- 
pany, and his residence, 921 East 13th Ave., Denver, Col. 

George Kimball Conant (B.A. 1903) was born in St. Louis^ 
Mo., June 29, 1881, prepared at the Smith Academy, St. Louis, 
and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Theodore Pearson Conant of the Sligo Iron Store 
Company, importers and jobbers in iron, steel, heavy hardware, 
etc., in St. Louis, was born August 5, 1850, in Irasburg, Vt., the 
son of Samuel Davis Conant, now of La Crosse, Wis., and 
Louisa Ann (Pearson) Conant. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Josie May Kimball,. 



Conant, Condict. 83 

died April 7, 1884, and was the daughter of the late George 
Washington Kimball and Helen Rachel (Hager) Kimball of 
St. Louis. 

In college Conant was Leader of the Apollo Banjo and 
Mandolin Club and a member of the University Banjo and 
Mandolin Club. He was a member of Alpha Delta Phi. 

He writes: "Since leaving college in 1903 have been living 
with my father at 4479 Washington Ave., St. Louis, and have 
been working for the Sligo Iron Store Company. I worked in 
the stock for about a year and since that time have been in the 
office. Question 2 — Am still a member of the Bachelor's Club 
with no signs of removal. 3 — No P. G. work. 4 — No publica- 
tions. 5 — No connection with any social, religious or political. 
6 — No journeys. Three weeks vacation at Lake Geneva. 
7 — Permanent address, care Sligo Iron Store Company, or 4479 
Washington Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 8 and 9 — Nothing doing." 

Philip King Condict (B.A. 1903) was born in Newark, N. J., 
October 20, 1880, prepared at The Hill School, Pottstown, 
Pa., and entered college in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Stephen Albert Condict, is a retired manufacturer, 
has been Vice President of the Orange Valley Building and 
Loan Association and a member of the Newark Board of Trade. 
He was bom in Newark October 22, 1849, the son of Stephen 
Hayes Condict, leather merchant and banker of Newark, and of 
Sophia (King) Condict. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Clara Agnew, is the 
daughter of the Rev. John Holmes Agnew, the first President of 
Ann Arbor University, and of Sarah Emeline (Taylor) Ag^ew. 

An uncle, Lewis E. Condict, graduated from Yale in 1869. 

In college Condict was a member of the University Tennis 
team, winning with Plummer the University doubles champion- 
ship in the fall of 1902 and spring of 1903. He was a substitute 
on the Swimming team and a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. 
He graduated with a Second Colloquy Senior appointment. 

He writes in December 1905: "After returning from our 
European trip, which was one of the brightest and happiest 
spots in my career, as you well know, I started work in the fac- 
tory of the Western Electric Company in New York the latter 
part of October 1903. In about six weeks I was taken into the 



84 History of the Class of 1903, 

office and was there until three weeks ago, when I was trans- 
ferred to the Philadelphia branch. Here I am, reigning under 
the title of Assistant Chief Clerk. At present I plan no alarm- 
ing moves for the future. Aside from my work I have had 
time for practically nothing and have no political offices or 
presidency of trust companies to add to the fame which is 
rapidly enveloping many of our good classmates. I am looking 
forward with keen joy to Triennial. I am writing on the 
bureau in my present lodgings and my arm is now thoroughly 
worn out." 

His business address is care Western Electric Company, i ith 
and York Sts., Philadelphia. His residence is 249 South 15th 
St., and his home address is Tremont Place, Orange, N. J. 

Erastus Coming (B.A. 1903) was born in Albany, N. Y., 
October 22, 1879, prepared for college at the St. Mark's School, 
Southboro, Mass., and at the Albany Academy, and entered with 
the Class. 

His father, Erastus Coming, who died April 9, 1893, was 
engaged in the steel business and later, when ill health forced 
him to abandon all active business, he devoted himself to natural 
history, having at the time of his death a rather remarkable 
private collection of butterflies, moths and insects of various 
descriptions. He was bom in Albany, N. Y., May 29, 1852, the 
son of Erastus Corning, an ironmaster of Albany, and of Ger- 
tmde (Tibbits) Corning. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Grace Fitz-Randolph 
Schenck, was the daughter of Rev. Noah Hunt Schenck of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., and of Anna Pierce (Pendleton) Schenck. 

Coming's Yale relatives include a half brother, S. D wight 
Ward (1903), and two half uncles, Parker Corning (1895) and 
Edwin Corning (1906). 

In college Corning was a member of the Dramatic Associa- 
tion for four years, being Vice President in Junior year and 
President in Senior year, taking the chief male part in the 
annual plays. He was a member of He Boule, Psi Upsilon and 
Skull and Bones. He was a Class Historian and graduated with 
a Second Colloquy Senior appointment. 

He writes: "(i) Since leaving college in June 1903 I have 
lived with my family at 281 State St., Albany, N. Y. In the 



Corning, Cory, 85 

fall of 1903 I entered the Albany Medical College, which is the 
medical department of Union University, and since that time I 
have been engaged in the study of medicine. 

"(2) I was married on May 17, 1906, at Washington, D. C, 
to Miss Edith Harlan Child, who at that time was living with her 
grandfather, Mr. Justice Harlan of the United States Supreme 
Court. She is the daughter of the late Frank Luius Child 
(Brown 1870), who was engaged in the practice of law and in 
the real estate business in Worcester and later in Boston, Mass. 

"(3) Expect to graduate from Albany Medical College in 
May 1907 with degree of M.D. 

"(4) 'Retention Cyst and Diverticulum of the Vermiform 
Appendix,' published in Albany Medical Annals for December 
1905. 

"(5) While in Albany I have become a member of the 
Albany Country Club and of the University Club of this city. 
I have also joined the Medical School fraternity of Nu Sigma 
Nu. Beyond voting when occasion offered or when inducement 
was sufficient, I have engaged in no political work. 

"(6) I have made no journeys in this or any other country 
beyond my usual summer trips to Canada, where my family have 
a cottage. 

"(7) My permanent address is 355 State St., Albany, N. Y. 

"(8) Nothing doing with the exception of the above men- 
tioned facts. 

"(9) My own plans for the future are to continue the 
study of medicine until I get my degree. After that to do post 
gpraduate work if circumstances permit, either in this country 
or abroad. One plan for my future which I consider of 
the greatest importance is to attend the Sexennial Reunion." 

♦David Uzal Cory (B.A. 1903) died in Englewood, N. J., 
August 28, 1905. 

On August 2d, 1905, Cory was suddenly attacked with appen- 
dicitis and underwent an operation the next day. Peritonitis 
was found to have set in and during the next three weeks two 
other operations were necessary, but though everything possible 
was done it was too much for one man's strength, and the end 
came very peacefully on Sunday night, August 28th. Through- 
out his whole sickness Dave showed that wonderful good nature 



86 History of the Class of 1903, 

and consideration of the feelings of others with which his 
friends are familiar, and during all that hard month, with the 
odds so against him, he kept his courage and made a splendid 
fight for life. He wanted to live for the sake of his family, 
who were especially dear to him, and for the promising future 
for which he had so well prepared himself, but when he saw that 
he had to give that all up he did not think of himself but of his 
mother who was with him, and when death came he had nothing 
to fear. Dave's entire life was pure and true and manly and I 
am sure others feel as I do, sincerely proud to have been his 
friend. 

He was bom at Englewood, N. J., June 5, 1883, prepared 
for college at the Englewood School for Boys and entered in 
1899 without conditions. 

His father, David Uzal Cory, Sr., who died July 13, 1901, 
was a furnace manufacturer residing in Englewood. He was 
bom in Morristown, N. J., July 10, 1847, the son of Uzal Cory, 
a furnace manufacturer, and of Susan Pratt (Dodge) Cory, 
a sister of William E. Dodge. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Punnett Wickes, 
was the daughter of Eliphalet Wickes, identified with the oil 
business in Albany and New York, and of Ellen (Parmelee) 
Wickes. 

Cory numbered among his Yale relatives a brother, Robert 
Haskell Cory (1902), an uncle, Robert C. Haskell (1858), a 
great-grandfather, Rev. Thomas S. Wickes (1814), and a 
cousin, Henry P. Wickes (1900). 

Of his record at Yale the Qass does not need to be told. The 
1903 men who were present at the funeral services August 30th 
wrote of him as follows : 

"Those who knew David Uzal Cory will always remember his 
Christian manliness. His was a well-rounded character, with 
earnestness of purpose in everything he believed or undertook 
and narrowness in nothing. At Yale University he won the 
respect of the whole class of 1903 by his ability and character, 
and the true friendship of many of its members on account of 
those qualities which endeared him to all with whom he came in 
close contact. As a student he won recognition by an election 
as Treasurer of the honorary society of Phi Beta Kappa. He 
also won a Berkeley premium, the Scott prize in French and a 



Cory. 87 

third Ten Eyck premium. The other phases of college life were 
not neglected, as he was fond of all sports and entered heartily 
into them. In the religious life of the University he took a 
prominent stand, serving on several of the Y. M. C. A. com- 
mittees and being active in mission and Boys' Club work, for 
which he was especially suited on account of his straightforward 
earnestness and personal magnetism, which attracted and held 
all those among whom he worked. 

"Many have lost a friend whose place can never be filled, for 
David Cory's friendship, when once given, could always be 
relied upon, and was a g^ ft to be prized on account of his 
unselfish personal interest in those for whom he cared and his 
unfailing good humor combined with quiet dignity. His true 
manly life was a help to all near him and will never be forgotten 
by those who knew him." 

On July i6th, 1903, Dave entered business life in New York 
City with the firm of B. H. Howell Son & Company, wholesale 
sugar merchants. The same capability and earnestness of pur- 
pose which characterized his college course won for him rapid 
advancement and an exceedingly promising future. His busi- 
ness associates who attended the funeral universally expressed 
admiration and respect both for Dave's personal and mental 
worth. 

Dave was in my mind the best type of Yale man. He was 
proud of being a member of 1903 and the Class equally has 
every right to be proud of him. 

Arthur Morris Collens, 

At the Triennial Meeting of the Class, June 26, 1906, the 
following resolutions on his death were adopted : 

Forasmuch as it has pleased Almighty God in His wise Provi- 
dence to remove from us our beloved friend and classmate, 
David Uzal Cory, whose purity and nobility of character, true 
friendship and unselfish and unswerving loyalty remain as an 
example to all of us ; be it 

Resolved, That we extend our sincere and heartfelt sympathy 
to his family, and that a copy of these resolutions be sent them 
on behalf of the Class and entered in the class records. 
(Signed) 

Harold T. Clark, 
Frank C. Gilbert, 
Hugh Rankin, 

for the Class of 1903. 



88 History of the Class of 1903. 

Donald John Cowling (B.A. Lebanon Valley College, 
Pennsylvania, 1902, B.A. Yale 1903, M.A. 1904, B.D. 1906) 
was bom at Trevalga, Cornwall, England, August 21, 1880, 
prepared at the DuBois (Pa.) High School and at the Berlin 
(Ont.) Collegiate Institute, and entered Yale at the beginning 
of Senior year. 

His father. Rev. John Parsons Cowling, a United Brethren 
clergyman, of Tyrone, Pa., was born in Cornwall, England, 
April II, 1853, the son of Robert Cowling and Mary (Parsons) 
Cowling. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Kittow Stephens, 
was the daughter of William Stephens and Mary Ann (Kittow) 
Stephens. 

At Lebanon Valley College Cowling played left end on the 
college football team for two years, was manager of the base- 
ball team, was President of the Y. M. C. A. and of his Class 
in Junior year. He graduated from Yale with a Philosophical 
Oration Senior appointment, being 19th in rank, and is a member 
of Book and Bond. 

He writes: "Since graduation I have been doing graduate 
work in Philosophy here at Yale — I received an M.A. in 1904 — 
was given a Douglas Fellowship in the Academical Department 
1904-5 and was appointed assistant in Psychology 1905-6. In 
connection with this work I have been taking courses in the 
Divinity School and I expect to receive B.D. there next June 
(1906). As for the future, I expect to teach Philosophy as my 
life work." 

And later, August 1906: "I have recently decided to accept 
the position of Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Biblical 
Literature in Baker University, Baldwin, Kansas, and from 
September ist on that will be my address. Last June I received 
the degree of B.D. (magna cum laude) from the Yale Divinity 
School." 

His home address is Tyrone, Pa. 

Alexander Craighead was born in New York City March 30, 
1880, prepared at the Groton (Mass.) School and entered with 
the Class, leaving at the end of Freshman year.. 

His father, Horace Craighead, a manufacturer of New York, 
was bom in 1846 in New York, the son of Robert Craighead 
and Helen M. Craighead. 



Cowling, Craighead, Cramer, 89 

His mother, whose maiden name was Frances Rose, was the 
daughter of William W. Rose and Appolonia M. Rose. 

In college Craighead played half-back on the Freshman 
eleven. 

He writes: "My career since leaving college at the end of 
my Freshman year has not been particularly diverse, for I went 
into the banking house of Cuyler, Morgan & Co. the following 
fall and have been there ever since. I am not engaged, married, 
or in danger of being so just yet, despite rumors to the 
contrary." 

His business address is care Cuyler, Morgan & Co., 44 Pine 
St., New York City. His residence is 152 West 91st St. 

Hiram Walter Cramer (B.A. Western College, Toledo, 
Iowa, 1902, B.A. Yale 1903) was bom in Marshalltown, Iowa, 
November 9, 1878, prepared at the Bagley High School and 
entered Yale at the beginning of Senior year. 

His father, Gerardus James Cramer, a farmer of Bagley, 
Iowa, was bom in Schuylerville, N. Y., August 6, 1856, the son 
of Hiram Cramer and Calista (Deyoe) Cramer. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Matilda Jane Barker, 
was the daughter of Walter Barker and Jane (Ingersol) Barker. 

Cramer graduated from Yale with an Oration Senior ap- 
pointment. 

He writes: "The greater part of the year after graduating 
from Yale I spent in the Yale Law School. I was forced to 
leave there by the fatal illness of one of my family. I left the 
Law School in February and went to Los Angeles, where I 
remained until the latter part of April. I then retumed to 
Toledo, Iowa, where I was employed as a hardware clerk until 
November of that year. In November 1905 I entered into a 
business partnership with P. K. Rebok and the firm succeeded 
to a well established hardware and implement business in 
Toledo. I am at present time spending all my time in the 
management of this business, Rebok and Cramer. Although 
the time I spent at Yale was short and I felt the sting of being 
a 'ringer,' I have a fine regard for the institution and the class 
of men that is being made there." 

His home address is Bagley, Iowa. 



90 History of the Class of 1903. 

James Pigott Cronan (B.A. 1903) was bom May 20, 1880, 
in New Haven, Conn., prepared for college at the Hillhouse 
High School and at the Hopkins Grammar School and entered 
with the Class. 

He is the son of Patrick James Cronan, a retired manufac- 
turer of New Haven, and of Ellen (Pigott) Cronan, who died 
February 22, 1899, the daughter of Patrick Pigott and Margaret 
(Dennehy) Pigott. 

An uncle, James P. Pigott (1878), and a brother. Urban 
Cronan (1906), are among Cronan's Yale relatives. 

In college he was a member of the Dramatic Association and 
of Psi Upsilon. The first year after graduation he spent at 
Lehigh University studying mining engineering. He is now 
with the Yonkers and Nepperhan Realty Company, Nepperhan, 
N. Y., and reports that he is "earning a modest living." His 
home address is 455 Orange St., New Haven, Conn. 

Earle Rosman Crowe (B.A. 1903) was born in Chicago, 111., 
September 19, 1881, prepared for college at the Hotchkiss 
School, Lakeville, Conn., and entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father. Rev. Winfield Scott Crowe, a graduate of North- 
western University, is pastor of the Church of Eternal Hope 
(Unitarian) in New York, and was bom November 15, 1850, 
in Warren County, Ind., the son of William Crowe (slock 
farmer and shipper) and Martha (Young) Crowe. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Clara Knaur, was the 
daughter of S. G. Knaur, of Lafayette, Ind., and Louise (Daw- 
son) Knaur. 

In college Crowe was the Freshman Gymnast and graduated 
with a Second Colloquy Senior appointment. 

He was married June i, 1905, in East Orange, N. J. to Miss 
Katharine M'Clellan Higgins, daughter of Thomas Higgins, 
manufacturer and importer of glue and gelatin and a member of 
the Yale Class of '63. 

He writes: "Since leaving college have had two business 
connections. July ist, 1903, became assistant to James R. Hay, 
real estate agent and specialist, 71 Broadway. September ist, 
1904, became identified with System as New York Manager. 
Am now Advertising Manager — ^there are two, Mr. Walker for 
the west and I for the east — out of joint managership. Have 



Cronan, Crowe, Curran, 91 

met with some success in separating people from their money 
and sell 'white space.' 

"My residence address is 68 South Washington Square, New 
York City, business address care System, i Madison Ave., New 
York City." 

♦Thomas Hemy Curran (B.A. 1903) died June 3, 1903. 

Just when we were preparing to take our last examinations 
as undergraduates in New Haven there came the sad news of 
the death of Thomas Henry Curran, better known to us all as 
"Tom" Curran. Little did we realize that while we were enjoy- 
ing life to the full, during the precious spring months of Senior 
year, that one of our classmates, although steadily growing 
weaker from consumption, was fighting a battle against death 
itself in order to graduate with us. The story of the struggle 
is told in the following words by a member of his family : — "He 
contracted la grippe in January 1903, and from that tubercu- 
losis developed. He clung to his work at college until March 
1903, when forced to give up by his physicians. He kept 
informed, through his friends, of the work his classes were 
doing and until the books were taken away from him continued 
to study, his one aim being to obtain his degree. He received 
notice from the Faculty on the morning of June 2d that his work 
warranted a degree without further study. Then the end was 
a question of but a few hours." No words need be added. The 
simple story is filled with pathos inexpressible. 

Tom Curran was born in New Haven, Conn., November 25, 
1882. The only schools which he attended were St. John's 
School and Hillhouse High School. 

His father, Michael Curran, a funeral director and embalmer, 
died May 17, 1885. He was a charter member and the first 
treasurer of the Knights of Columbus. He was bom in County 
Leitrim, Ireland, June 17, 1844, the son of Patrick Curran, a 
farmer, and of Jane (McKiernan) Curran. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Anne Byrnes, 
was the daughter of William Byrnes, a steamboat captain, and 
Elizabeth (Deering) Byrnes. A brother, Harry A. L. Curran, 
is a member of the Class of 1907. 

Such in brief is the outline of the life that ended on June 3, 
1903. It was a life full of kindness and bravery. In the early 



92 History of the Class of ipoj. 

death of Thomas Henry Curran our Class lost a most loyal 
member and Yale a thoroughly devoted son. 

Harold T. Clark, 

Kenneth William Curtis (B.A. 1903) was born at Belvidere, 
111., April 3, 1881, prepared at the Franklin School, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and entered with the Class. He is the son of Rev. 
Henry Melville Curtis (Western Reserve 1871), a Presby- 
terian clergyman and a trustee of the University of Cincinnati, 
and of Eva (Goss) Curtis. 

A brother, Melville G. Curtis, graduated from Yale in 1897. 

In college Curtis was substitute on the Freshman Baseball 
team and on the University Golf team. He was also a member 
of the Class Golf team and held a Second Colloquy Junior 
appointment. 

He writes : "Since leaving Yale beg to state that in the fall 
of 1903 I joined the family of my uncle, William E. Curtis, 
Special Correspondent of the Chicago Record-Herald, and 
accompanied him on a trip around the world. Trip being via 
England, France, Spain, Italy, Egypt, India, Burma, Straits 
Settlements, Singapore, Hong Kong, Philippine Islands, China, 
Japan and back to U. S. 

"Met numerous classmates in Europe. Met 'Brock' Smith 
and Alsop in Singapore, 'Bill' Taylor in Manila, 'Yellow' Goss 
and 'Steve' Clark in Japan and many others of other classes. 
Trip lasted about a year. On return took a job as office boy in 
Rogers, Brown & Co., at four dollars per — also ran errands. 
Worked there for four months and in the beginning of 1905 
came to Columbus to take a position with the Columbus Piano 
Company (manufacturers), of which company Paul Linden- 
berg, '03, is General Manager." 

His address is care Columbus Piano Company, Columbus, 
Ohio. His residence is Dennison Hotel. His home address 
is 103 East Auburn Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Ephraim Clarence Cushman (B.A. 1903, LL.B. New Yoric 
Law School 1905) was bom in Shelton, Conn., April 5, 1881, 
prepared for college at the Ansonia (Conn.) High School and 
entered at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Qarence Eugene Cushman, of Brooklyn, N. Y., 



Curtis, Cushnian, Davidson, 93 

with Wilkinson Brothers & Co., paper makers, was born Sep- 
tember 28, 1856, in Amherst, Mass., the son of Ephraim Cush- 
man and Elizabeth (Rankin) Cushman. . 

His mother, whose maiden name was Isabelle Cannon, was 
the daughter of Edward Cannon and Ann (Duane) Cannon. 

In college Cushman was a member of the Freshman Glee Club 
and of the College Choir and graduated with a First Colloquy 
Senior appointment. 

He writes: "The following fall (1903) I entered the New 
York Law School and also the law office of H. S. Sayers & 
Louis F. Perl, leaving that office in February 1904. I completed 
the first year in Law School in June 1904 and entered the office 
of Stern, Singer & Barr, attorneys at 309 Broadway, New York 
City, and remained there until July 1905. I completed my 
second and final year at New York Law School in June 1905, 
receiving the degree of LL.B., passed the examinations for the 
New York Bar the same month and was admitted in July 1905. 
In July 1905 I entered the office of Archibald C. Shenstone, 
attorney at 40 Pine St., New York City, and remained there until 
February 19, 1906, when I entered the Jamaica office of the 
Title Guarantee & Trust Company as an examiner in the law 
department, where I am at present located. I have lived for a 
little over two years at my present address, 63 Linden St., Brook- 
lyn, and expect to remain here for some time to come, and any 
mail matter, etc., will reach me there. 

"In February 1905 I was raised as a Master Mason in George 
Washington Lodge, F. & A. M., at Ansonia, Conn., but have 
joined no other organizations." 

Merit Lancaster Davidson (B. A. 1903) was bom in Lex- 
ington, Ky., September 15, 1882, prepared at the Columbia 
Institute, New York City, and entered college with the Qass. 

His father, John Hull Davidson, a hotel keeper of New York 
City and a former mayor of Lexington, Ky., was born in Lex- 
ington August 23, 1856, and was the son of James Thompson 
Davidson, a merchant of Lexington, and of Catherine (Hull) 
Davidson. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Magdalen Davis Lan- 
caster, was the daughter of Merit Proctor Lancaster, a merchant 
of Lexington, and of Anne Elizabeth (Skillman) Lancaster. 



94 History of the Class of 1903. 

He writes: "I returned to New Haven in the fall of 1903 
and studied law until the following April, when, thinking I 
saw an opportunity for success in the hotel business, I tried my 
hand at the 'Royal Arms' in New York City. I did not make 
a success of that venture and in June of 1905 I accepted a posi- 
tion in the Auditing Department of the Chicago Tribune, where 
I am now located. I can't say that the world has used me badly 
but I expect greater things in the fall, when I shall return to 
New York and go into business for myself, most probably the 
hotel business once more." 

His address is care Madison Avenue Hotel, Madison Ave. and 
92d St., New York City. 

Charles Orrin Day, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was born in Williams- 
burg, Mass., October 18, 1880, prepared at the Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., and entered college with the Qass. 

His father, Rev. Charles Orrin Day, was born in Catskill, 
N. Y., November 8, 1851, graduated from Yale in 1872, received 
the honorary degree of M.A. from Yale in 1891, that of D.D. 
from Dartmouth and also from Iowa in 1901. He is Presi- 
dent of the Andover Theological Seminary. He is the son of 
Charles Henry Day, a lawyer of Catskill, N. Y., and Sarah 
(Porter) Day. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Hiland Hull, is 
the daughter of A. Cooke Hull, M.D., of Brooklyn, and Harriet 
(Hill) Hull. 

Rodney D. Day (1903) is a second cousin. 

In college Day was a member of the University Banjo and 
Mandolin Club for four years, being President in Senior year. 
He was a member of Psi Upsilon. 

He writes: "I entered the Harvard Medical School in the 
fall of 1903, having spent part of the summer after graduation 
in taking a course in chemistry at the same. Since I have been 
in Boston have lived at Technology Chambers, Irvington St., 
rooming the first year with P. F. Mann and B. A. Pierce, and 
last year and this year with P. F. Mann. Have been in the 
school ever since, spending a good portion of each summer in 
doing hospital work of various kinds. Expect to graduate from 
the school in June 1907." 

His present address is 211 Technology Chambers, Boston, 
Mass. His home address is Andover, Mass. 



C. O. Day, R. D. Day, Denno. 95 

Rodney Dean Day (B.A. 1903, M.E. Cornell 1906) was 
bom in Catskill, N. Y., February 22, 1881, prepared for college 
at the Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn., and entered in the 
fall of 1899. 

His father, Jeremiah Day, Secretary of the Catskill Savings 
Bank, graduated from Yale in 1873 and from the Albany Law 
School in 1878. He was born in Catskill, N. Y., September 10, 
1 85 1, the son of Jeremiah Day, nephew of President Jeremiah 
Day of Yale, and of Emily C. (Day) Day. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Fanny Spencer, was the 
daughter of Henry Spencer and Mary (Jerome) Spencer. 

C. O. Day, Jr., (1903) is a second cousin. 

In college Day was a member of the Freshman Glee Qub, 
of the Apollo Banjo and Mandolin Club, and of the University 
Banjo and Mandolin Club. He was also a member of Psi 
Upsilon. 

He writes: "Since I graduated (June 1903) I have been 
taking mechanical engineering at Cornell University and, God 
and the Faculty willing, I will get an M.E. degree in June com- 
ing (1906). Where I will go when I finish here to enter into 
engineering work I cannot as yet tell. I only wish I could." 

In June 1906 he accepted a position with the Westinghouse 
Machine Co. of East Pittsburg. His present address is 814 
Coal St., Wilkinsburg, Pa. His home address is Catskill, N. Y. 

Willard Joseph Denno (B. A. 1903, M.D. Columbia 1906) 
was born in Castleton, Vt., August 25, 1876, prepared for col- 
lege at the Rutland (Vt.) English and Classical School and 
entered with the Class. 

His father, Gustave Ernest Denno, is a superintendent of a 
machine shop in Castleton. He was born in Shoreham, Vt, 
February 4, 1852, the son of Joseph Denno and Mary (Brown) 
Denno. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Roxana Adella Hos- 
kins, was the daughter of Henry Hoskins and Roxana (Chand- 
ler) Hoskins. 

In college Denno was a member of Sigma Xi and held a 
First Dispute Junior appointment and a Dissertation Senior 
appointment. 

He writes : "I have little of special interest to write you in 



96 History of the Class of 1903, 

regard to my checkered career since leaving college. Fve been 
studying medicine at the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
here in New York ever since graduating from Yale in 1903. 
Expect to get my M.D. in June 1906. I have been elected to 
membership in Nu Sig^ma Nu fraternity at P. & S. I am 
neither married nor engaged and have no children. 

"Letters sent to Castleton, Vermont, will always be forwarded 
to me. I expect to practice medicine in New York." 

In June 1906 he obtained the first place in the General 
Memorial Hospital, io6th St. and Central Park West, New 
York City, which will be his address for the next eighteen 
months. 

Robert Emmet Digney (B.A. 1903, LL.B. New York Law 
School 1905) was bom February 12, 1880, at Yonkers, N. Y., 
prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and 
entered in September 1899. He is the son of John M. Digney, 
a lawyer of White Plains, N. Y., and of Sarah (Murphy) 
Digney. 

Digney writes: "After leaving college I attended the New 
York Law School, graduating therefrom in 1905 with the degree 
of LL.B. I was admitted to the Bar in New York State in July 
1905 and have since been and am still engaged in the practice 
of law at White Plains, Westchester County, N. Y., as a member 
of the law firm of Digney & Horton, of which firm my father, 
John M. Digney, is the senior member." 

His address is White Plains, N. Y. , 

Arthur Douglas Dodge (B.A. 1903) was bom in New York 
City August 30, 1879, prepared for college at the Westminster 
School, Dobbs Ferry, N. Y., and Blake's School, New York 
City, and entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Arthur Murray Dodge, who died in 1896, 
graduated from Yale in 1874. He was born in New York City 
October 29, 1852, the son of William Earle Dodge and Malissa 
(Phelps) Dodge. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Josephine Marshall 
Jewell, was the daughter of Hon. Marshall Jewell and Esther 
(Dickinson) Jewell. 

Dodge's Yale relatives include two brothers, Marshall J. 



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Digney, Dodge, Donohoe, Dorfnan. 97 

(1898) and Murray W. (1899), and two uncles, D. Stewart 
Dodge (1857) and George E. Dodge (1870). 

In college he was a member of He Boule, Delta Kappa 
Epsilon, and Scroll and Key societies. 

He writes : "I haven't much to tell except that after leaving 
college I journeyed around the world for thirteen months. I 
am now at Westminster School teaching and find it most inter- 
esting." 

His present address is Simsbury, Conn. His home address is 
Weatog^e, Conn. 

Edward Alfred Donohoe (B.A. 1903, LL.B. 1905) was bom 
in Lynn, Mass., December 15, 1880, prepared for college at the 
Lynn Classical High School and entered in September 1899. 

His father, John Francis Donohoe, was bom in Waterford, 
Ireland, February 27, 1849, ^^^ son of Patrick Donohoe and 
Johanna (Dunn) Donohoe. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ellen Manning, was the 
daughter of John Manning, a retired contractor, and of Ellen 
(Horgan) Manning. 

In college Donohoe held a Second Colloquy Junior appoint- 
ment. He entered the Yale Law School in 1903, graduating in 
1905. He is now practising law with the firm of Hurlburt, 
Jones and Cabot, Exchange Building, 53 State St., Boston, 
Mass. He lives at 28 Johnson St., Lynn, Mass. 

♦Edward Warren Dorman it was my good fortune to know 
more intimately, I suppose, than any of the rest of the Qass did ; 
and I am glad to have a chance to pay a tribute to one whom 
few of the Class ever had a chance to appreciate. 

He was bom at Stratford, Conn., on Friday, March 27, 1880, 
the son of John M. Dorman, a blacksmith, and died at the same 
place on September 27, 1901 ; thus living twenty-one years and 
six months to a day. 

He began his education at the Center School in Stratford 
and his life there was uneventful. He graduated thence in 1896 
and entered the Bridgeport High School. There he began to 
display his ability. He completed the four year course in three 
years; was an editor of the school paper, the High School 
Student, and a member of the High School fraternity of Alpha 
7 



98 History of the Class of 1903. 

Delta Sigma. At his graduation he was one of the six selected 
to compete for the Bamum Prize. On this occasion he dis- 
played that ability for public speaking which distinguished him 
at Yale, and which would have won him laurels had he lived 
to follow his chosen vocation, the law. 

He entered Yale in 1899 with our class. Owing to the fact 
that he did not reside at the college but commuted daily, he 
did not have a large circle of acquaintances; but those who 
knew him in the Freshman Union will recall his power as a 
speaker and his pleasing but reserved personality. He was 
chosen as one of the three representatives of our class for the 
Freshman-Sophomore Debate in the spring of 1900; ,and I 
remember the comment of a professor: "That fellow Dorman 
will make a splendid public speaker some day." 

Soon after the opening of our Sophomore year, he left college, 
intending to remain away a year. In November, however, he 
was induced to go to Wesleyan. Although he entered so late 
in the year, he had a very successful year there both in his 
scholarship and socially. He was elected to Delta Kappa 
Epsilon. 

This chronicle ends the short chapter of his life. But for his 
untimely death, Ed would have lived to be an honor both to 
Yale and Wesleyan. 

Harry H. Clark. 

Walter Landon Douglass (B.A. 1903, Ph.B. 1904) was born 
in New London, Conn., January 10, 1882, prepared at the Bulk- 
ley School, New London, and entered college in September 1899. 

His father, William Francis Douglass, who died February 4,. 
1892, was the son of John Douglass and Jane (Destin) 
Douglass. 

His mother's maiden name was Annabel Lamphere. 

A brother, Edward N. Douglass, is in the Class of 1907,. 
Sheffield Scientific School. 

In college he won a DeForest mathematical third prize in 
Freshman year, and held a Dissertation Junior appointment and 
a First Dispute Senior appointment. 

The first year after graduating he studied mining engineering 
in the Sheffield Scientific School, receiving the degree in course. 
Since June 1904 his occupation has been "mines and mills in 



Douglass, Draper, Dreisbach. 99 

Nevada, Arizona, Utah, Colorado, Idaho, British Columbia, and 
Montana. I also harvested in Washington a while and packed 
across the Mohave Desert." At present he is a "miner, etc." 
at the St. Lawrence mines, Butte, Mont., one of the properties 
of the Anaconda Copper Mining Company. He is "studying 
practical mining at first hand." His present address is 14 West 
Copper St., Butte, Mont. His home address is care Mrs. 
Annabel Douglass, New London, Conn. 

Trusten Polk Draper (B.A. 1903) was born October 20, 
1880, at Wilmington,, Del., prepared at the Hotchkiss School, 
Lakeville, Conn., and entered with the Class. He is the son of 
James Avery Draper, M.D., of Wilmington, Del., and of Mary 
(Polk) Draper. 

A brother, James Avery Draper, Jr., graduated from Yale in 
1895. 

In college Draper was a member of Alpha Delta Phi. 

He is Assistant Superintendent in Blooming Mill Department 
on day turn of the Republic Iron & Steel Company, Youngs- 
town, Ohio. His residence is 250 Lincoln Ave., Youngstown, 
Ohio. His home address is iioi Market St., Wilmington, Del. 

John Martin Dreisbach (B.A. 1903) was born at Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa., November 26, 1879, prepared for college at Phillips 
Academy, Andover, Mass., and entered with the Class. 

His father, Martin Luther Dreisbach, was born September 6, 
1843, at Lewisburg, Pa., the son of Martin Dreisbach and Eliza- 
beth (Kleckner) Dreisbach. He is with the Macan Jr. Com- 
pany and resides at 225 Reeder St., Easton, Pa. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Susan Butz Horn, was 
the daughter of Melchoir H. Horn and Matilda (Heller) Horn. 

In college Dreisbach was President of the Freshman Boat 
Club, Secretary and President of the Yale Navy, a Class 
Deacon, member of the Dwight Hall Executive Committee, also 
of Apollo Glee Club and Triennial Committee. He was Chair- 
man of the campaign committees of Kappa Psi and Delta 
Kappa Epsilon, a member of Skull and Bones, and held a First 
Colloquy Junior and the same Senior appointment. 

He writes: "On July 5, 1903, I came to Easton, Pa., and 
started in the belting business with George C. Macan, Jr., and a 



loo History of the Class of IQ03, 

few months later we formed a partnership. Originally cotton 
belt (Scandinavia) was the only article which we handled. 
Our success with this article was so marked that we decided to 
broaden our lines and are now doing a general mill supply busi- 
ness, handling a full line of supplies and a number of mechanical 
specialties. Our aim and intention is to develop a profitable 
business along lines named and our progress thus far indicates 
success. Our office is at 224 Ferry St. We are at the heart of 
the cement industry and accessible to many cement plants 
within a radius of 25 miles, where our particular cotton belting 
is especially adaptable. My particular connection with the firm 
comprises some office work but principally traveling among the 
manufacturers of this territory. There are now connected with 
this firm (The Macan Jr. Company) six persons besides Macan 
and myself (two salesmen and four office force). 

"I was married June 24, 1904, in Elmira, N. Y., to Miss Laura 
Claire Dartt, daughter of James Frank Dartt, a manufacturer of 
Elmira. We came direct to 714 Cattell St., Easton, Pa., where 
we continue to live. 

"My father and family moved to Easton from Wilkes-Barre, 
Pa., since my coming here and are now living at 225 Reeder St. 
My wife and myself are members of the College Hill Presby- 
terian Church and teachers in the Sunday School, of which I am 
Assistant Superintendent. 

"Aside from this unexciting but pleasant office, I am only an 
ordinary citizen. I find my life here extremely pleasant and 
hope for success along lines beg^n." 

Herbert Lathe Drury (B.A. 1903, M.A. Harvard 1904) 
was born in Worcester, Mass., October 25, 1880, prepared for 
college at the Worcester High School and entered in the fall of 
1899. He is the son of William Henry Drury, a merchant who 
died August 31, 1889, and of Sarah (Lathe) Drury. 

In college he received an honor in English composition 
Sophomore year, held a Second Dispute Junior appoint- 
ment and an Oration Senior appointment. Since graduation he 
has been studying in the Harvard Graduate School. His M.A. 
degree was taken in English work. He is now taking a 
post graduate course in history. His present address is Walter 
Hastings Hall, Cambridge, Mass. His home address is Newton, 
Mass. 



Drury, Dukeshire, Dunham. loi 

Stanley Clifford Dukeshire (B.A. Acadia University 1898, 
B.A. Yale 1903) was bom at Maitland, Nova Scotia, February 
28, 1874, prepared at the Annapolis (Nova Scotia) High School 
and entered Yale in the fall of 1902. 

His father, William Riley Dukeshire, a farmer and at one 
time Postmaster of Maitland, was born in Kempt, Nova Scotia, 
in 1839, and is the son of John Dukeshire and Mary (Wiswell) 
Dukeshire. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Clara Mullens, was 
the daughter of John Mullens and Charlotte (Harlow) Mullens. 

Dukeshire graduated with a High Oration Senior appoint- 
ment. He writes: **I am at present teaching mathematics in 
Collegiate School (private)," 241 West 77th St., New York 
City. His residence is 23 West 70th St., New York City. 
His home address is Maitland, Annapolis Co., Nova Scotia. 

Donald Austin Dunham (B.A. 1903) was born at Hartford, 
Conn., March 22, 1881, prepared at the Hartford (Conn.) 
Public High School, and entered with the Class. 

His father, Sylvester Clark Dunham, at one time a student 
of Mount Union College, Ohio, was born in Mansfield, Conn., 
April 24, 1846, the son of Jonathan Lyman Dunham, one of the 
founders of the town of Greeley, Colo., and Abigail (Eldredge) 
Dunham. He is President of the Travelers Insurance Company 
of Hartford and a director of several banks, and resides at 830 
Prospect Ave., Hartford, Conn. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Mercy Austin, 
was the daughter of James Harvey Austin, M.D., of Bristol, 
Conn., and of Emily (King) Austin. 

He writes: "Yours received with request for a letter, and I 
will take up each heading separately as they appear in the 
printed suggestions which you enclose. 

"(i) Left college June 1903. Lived at 830 Prospect Ave., 
Hartford, since November 18, 1904. Prior to that at 17 Mar- 
shall St. Have been with Travelers Insurance Company since 
July 1st, 1903, and am now an underwriter in liability insurance. 

"(2) Nothing doing. 

"(3) Found out that I could get an M.A. at Trinity College, 
Hartford, by taking a few courses, and started in to take the 
work in modern languages, and do the required work in two 



I02 History of the Class of 1903, 

years, at the same time keeping up my work with the Travelers. 
It proved more than I could swing, and although I stuck it out 
for a year, the combination of work and study was too much 
for me and I was not only compelled to give up the idea of 
continuing my college work, but to take a good vacation and 
rest up. 

"(4) Nothing doing. 

"(S) Joined Yale Club of New York, Yale Alumni Associa- 
tion of Hartford, and Hartford Goli Club. 

"(6) In summer of 1904 made a tour in Europe, visiting 
England, France, Germany, Holland, Belgium, Switzerland and 
Italy. Met 'Jack' Freeman in Munich, and had a great reunion. 

"(7) Permanent address: 830 Prospect Ave., Hartford, 
Conn. 

"(9) My plans for the future are to stick to liability 
insurance and The Travelers, and make a success of it, if it is in 
me to do so." 

Harry Wilfred DuPuy (B.A. 1903) was born in Allegheny, 
Pa., September 27, 1880, prepared at The Hill School, Potts- 
town, Pa., and entered with the Qass. 

His father, Herbert DuPuy (C.E. Lehigh University 1878), 
a capitalist residing at 646 Morewood Ave., Pittsburg, Pa., 
was the son of Charles M. DuPuy and Ellen (Reynolds) 
DuPuy. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Amy Susette Hostetter, 
was the daughter of David Hostetter and Rosetta (Rickey) 
Hostetter. 

His Yale relatives are an uncle, Harry M. Hostetter, of the 
Class of '78, and a brother, Charles Meredith DuPuy (1908). 

In college DuPuy was Captain of the Gun team. President 
of the Gun Club, a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon and Wolf's 
Head societies and held a First Colloquy Junior and the same 
Senior appointment. 

He writes: '*! started life by taking a vacation. We usually 
end it the same way, but there aren't enough in between. I 
sailed on the good ship Oceanic, bound for Liverpool, on July 
1st, with a representative collection of members of the Class. 
The summer was spent on the Continent, visiting Paris, Venice, 
Berlin, and other masterpieces of the Old World. Most of the 



DuPuy, 103 

trip was in the company of Tyler and Schley. We made a very 
careful study of the former, who developed into a fine example 
of that little known biped, The Engaged Man. He eats not, 
neither does he sleep, and Lazarus in all his misery was not as 
sad as one of these. But finally the steamer mercifully took him 
home, and I think he believes the Statue of Liberty to be the 
greatest masterpiece in Europe. 

"After the departure of Schley I was lured by the Scotch 
mists to take a trip through the Caledonian Canal. This dif- 
fers from the Semicircular Canal in that it goes up and down 
instead of round and round. I finally reached Edinburgh. 

"Edinburgh was started by the man mentioned in the Bible 
who builded his house upon a rock. He may also have used 
whale-oil to keep his lights burning under a bushel, but his 
descendants employ Scotch whiskey, which is why Curfew rings 
lights out at nine o'clock, so that the fuel may be put to a 
better use. 

"At the conclusion of this trip I was persuaded by relatives 
living in Cambridge, where two uncles were connected with the 
university a'S professors, to enter this seat of learning and pose 
as a student again. I consented to this proposal, and, at the 
beginning of the term in October, enrolled myself as an under- 
graduate in Trinity College. The newest building there is about 
a hundred and fifty years old and I had a room in one of the 
most modern, dating from some time in the eighteenth century. 
It was on the campus, or Great Court, and my principal occupa- 
tion from the beginning was keeping it warm. The problem 
was how to heat all the cold air blowing through all the cracks 
in all the windows of three rooms with one coal fire. I did not 
succeed, and therefore I am now almost as healthy as an 
Englishman. 

"I will not describe the courses which I took. They were not 
many. I believe I had twelve hours a week. At Cambridge no 
one has a very large schedule of lectures, as most of the work is 
done with tutors. I dispensed with the tutors. I remember a 
lecture in political economy and one in 'petrology'. If there 
were more subjects I have forgotten them. They have no 
courses in literature and history, so I was pretty well limited to 
classics and mathematics, neither of which were very strong 
favorites. Finally, at the end of the term, I decided that I had 



I04 History of the Class of J903. 

had enough of colleges for a while, and, having had a final 
glimpse of an English one, I resolved to see what work was like. 

"I returned home in December, and, after a trip to Alabama, 
took a position with the Pennsylvania Rubber Company, with 
which I have been connected since February 12th, 1904. In 
the summer of 1905 I went abroad and motored for two months 
through England and western France accompanied by my 
family and part of the time by one Henry James, soon to depart 
this Hfe and become a doctor. God give him patients! 

"I have attended a number of alumni gatherings in the past 
three years ; among them two dinners of the Western Federation 
of Yale Clubs at St. Louis in 1904 and Chicago in 1905, a 
dinner of the Pittsburg alumni and the Oass dinner in New 
York. 

"There you have my past and present, and if I live to grow 
up you will see me at Triennial, which will be my future." 

His business address is Jeanette, Pa. His residence is 646 
Morewood Ave., Pittsburg, Pa. 

George Gilbert Durante Jr., was bom in Bethel, Conn., 
December 19, 1881, prepared at the Norwalk (Conn.) Univer- 
sity School and entered with the Class, leaving at the end of 
Sophomore year. 

He is the son of George Gilbert Durant, a retired hat mer- 
chant, and of Alice Thompson (Benjamin) Durant, who died 
April 21, 1901. 

Since leaving college Durant has been in the hat business in 
Bethel, Conn. 

Clive Livingston DuVal (B.A. 1903) was born May 2, 
1879, ^^ Brooklyn, N. Y., prepared for college at the Berkeley 
School, New York City, and at the Brooklyn Latin School and 
entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Horace Clark DuVal, of the firm of DuVal, Greer 
& Co., New York bankers and brokers, is also Vice President 
of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company, Vice President of the 
Mechanics Bank of Brooklyn and trustee and director of a 
number of corporations, etc. He was born July 4, 1851, the 
son of William DuVal and Caroline Nichols (Clark) DuVal. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ida Livingston Frost, 



Durant, DuVal, Earnshaw. 105 

is the daughter of Joseph B. Frost and A. E. L. (Bogardus) 
Frost. 

In college DuVal was President of the University Athletic 
Association, a member of the track team, of the Junior Prom- 
enade Committee and of the Triennial Committee. He was on 
the campaign committees of Kappa Psi and Psi Upsilon, and 
was a member of Scroll and Key. He held a First Colloquy 
Junior appointment and the same Senior appointment. 

He writes: "After leaving college I made a trip around the 
world occupying six months, to January ist, 1904. During 
January and February I was in Arizona inspecting mining 
properties. In July and August I travelled in Europe, and in 
the fall of 1904 I became connected with the wholesale coal 
firm of Geo. D. Harris & Company. Of literary work I have 
done nothing unless you may call literary work the publication 
of a page of my photographs in Leslie's Weekly of December 
28th, 1905. The pictures are of Constantinople. June, July, 
August and September 1905 I spent in travel in Roumania, 
Turkey and Greece principally, and I expect to sail on January 
16 (1906) for Gibraltar with the intention of visiting Spain and 
later Italy. My permanent address is 709 Madison Avenue, 
New York City. 

"In 1905 I became a Mason and am a member of Holland 
Lodge of N. Y." 

Leslie's Weekly published on April 19, 1906, photographs 
taken by DuVal of Mt. Vesuvius in eruption. On July i he 
became a member of the firm of DuVal, Greer & Co., bankers 
and brokers, 74 Broadway, New York City. 

Wilton Adams Earnshaw was born in Greenport, N. Y., 
February 15, 1881, prepared at the Lowville (N. Y.) Academy 
and entered with the Class, leaving at the close of Sophomore 
year. 

His father. Rev. Joseph Westby Earnshaw (Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary 1876), is a Presbyterian clerg>^man of Lowville. 
He was bom in Sheffield, England, January 9, 1846, the son of 
John Earnshaw and Harriet (Holmes) Earnshaw. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Annie Dudley Adams, 
was the daughter of Grovernon Stevens Adams, a lawyer and 
graduate of Hamilton, and of Nancy Usher (Cone) Adams. 



io6 History of the Class of 1903. 

Three uncles have graduated from Yale : Dr. Robert C. Cone 
(1837 M.S.), Rev. Luther H. Cone (1847) and Edward W. 
Cone (1851). 

Since leaving Yale Earnshaw has been studying mining en- 
gineering at Lehigh University, and was elected a member of 
Delta Upsilon fraternity. He expects to get his mining en- 
gineer's degree in 1906. His probable permanent address is 
Lowville, N. Y. 

John Eliason (B.A. 1903, LL.B. University of Pennsylvania 
1906) was bom in Chestertown, Md., July 19, 1882, prepared 
at the Hopkins Grammar School, New Haven, Conn., and 
entered college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Wilbur Eliason (of the Qass of 1874 Yale), a 
farmer, was bom in Chestertown, January 31, 1853, the son of 
Thomas Wilson Eliason and Mary (Walker) Eliason. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Comegys Brown, 
was the daughter of Hiram Brown and Mary Comegys 
(Merritt) Brown. 

A brother, Eldridge Lyon Eliason (1901), and an uncle, Dr. 
John Eliason (1869), are Yale graduates. 

In college he was substitute center on the Freshman Football 
team and held a Dissertation Junior appointment and a Disserta- 
tion Senior appointment 

He writes, December 1905: "I am at present studying law 
at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. In 1906 I expect 
the degree of LL.B. Have been here since leaving Yale. Am 
a member of Sharswood Law Club and legal f ratemity of Phi 
Delta Phi. Permanent address, Chestertown, Maryland. Ex- 
pect to practice law in Philadelphia." 

His address is 1222 Stephen Girard Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bradford Ellsworth was bom October 31, 1880, at New 
Hartford, Conn., prepared for college at the Hotchkiss School, 
Lakeville, Conn., and entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father, William W. Ellsworth, was born October 30, 
1855, at Hartford, Conn., the son of Oliver Ellsworth. He 
is the Secretary of The Century Company, publishers, and 
resides at 64 West 46th St., New York City. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Helen Yale Smith, was 
the daughter of Morris W. Smith and Julia (Palmer) Smith. 



Eliason, Ellsworth, Engelhardt, 107 

Ellsworth numbers among his Yale relatives an uncle, 
Frederick W. Davis (1877), and "various cousins." In college 
he was a member of the Freshman Glee Club, the Apollo Glee 
Club and the University Glee Qub, and of Alpha Delta Phi. 

Ellsworth was married December i, 1904, in New York City 
to Miss Juliet Inness, daughter of George Inness, Jr., the artist, 
of New York City. A son, George Inness Ellsworth, was 
bom December 27, 1905. 

He is connected with Brewster & Co., carriage manufac- 
turers, Broadway and 47th St., New York City. His residence 
is 14s West S9th St. 

Nickolaus Louis Engelhardt (B.A. 1903) was bom at 
Naugatuck, Conn., October 8, 1882, prepared for college at the 
Naugatuck High School and entered with the Class. 

His father, George John Engelhardt, was bom in Frankfurt 
on the Main, Germany, in 1853. He is with the Goodyear 
India Rubber Glove Manufacturing Company and resides at 
Woodland St., Naugatuck, Conn. 

His mother's maiden name was Helen Theresa Deubel. 

A brother, Fred Engelhardt, is in the Class of 1908 S. S. S. 

In college Engelhardt published the Yale University Calendar, 
and held an Oration Junior appointment and a Dissertation 
Senior appointment. 

On June 14, 1905, he was married to Miss Bessie Edna 
Gardner, at Auburn, N. Y., the daughter of Willard S. Gardner, 
who is with C. E. Crouse & Co. (grocers), Syracuse, N. Y., and 
lives in Auburn, N. Y. Mrs. Engelhardt graduated in 1903 
from the American University of Harriman, Tenn. 

He writes: "The year 1903-04 I spent at Newport, R. L, 
striving to instruct the young idea how to sprout at the Qoyne 
House School. The next school year brought with it a better 
proposition at the Haverford (Pa.) School. Here I have been 
ever since with the exception of a summer (1905) spent in 
Maine in charge of ten boys — canoeing, fishing, camping, etc. 
It seems little, but then the world has been good enough to me to 
furnish me the best and nicest of little wives to share my good 
fortunes and so we rest content." 

And later, August 1906: "Occupation changed since last 



io8 History of the Class of 1903. 

letter — or rather place of occupation. Begin work in Septem- 
ber as head teacher in German in the Academic High School, 
Auburn, N. Y. Address: 71 Seymour St., Auburn, N. Y. 
Am pleased also to record another class girl, Helen Gardner 
Engelhardt, born April 30, 1906." 

John Kuhn Evans (B.A. 1903) was born in McKeesport, Pa., 
July 4, 1880, prepared at the Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., 
and entered with the Class. 

His father, James Evans (Washington and Jefferson 1861), 
is the President of the National Bank of McKeesport. He was 
born November 24, 1840, in McKeesport, the son of Oliver 
Evans, a farmer and business man of McKeesport, and of Mary 
Ann (Sampson) Evans. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Rebecca Elizabeth 
Stotler, was the daughter of David Stotler, a farmer and busi- 
ness man of Pittsburg, and of Eleanor (Mellon) Stotler. 

Evans' Yale relatives include a brother, Thomas M. Evans 
(1898), and a first cousin, Berne H. Evans (1899). I" college 
he was a member of Eta Phi and Alpha Delta Phi societies. 
After graduation he took a position in the National Bank of 
McKeesport, and is now studying at the Pittsburg Law School 
in the Class of 1907. His address is S. Huey St., McKees- 
port, Pa. 

George Bamett Everts (B.A. 1903) was bom at Michi- 
gamme, Mich., November 5, 1880, prepared for college at the 
Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn., and entered with the Class. 

His father, William Peter Everts, was born at Ore Hill, Conn., 
the son of Peter P. Everts and Tryphena (Barnett) Everts. 
He is the Secretary of The Salisbury Cutlery Handle Company 
and also Postmaster of Salisbury, Conn. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Jennie Knox, 
is the daughter of Henry Gilbert Knox and Sarah (Bearcroft) 
Knox. 

In college Everts held a First Dispute Junior appointment 
and a Dissertation Senior appointment. 

He writes: "I entered the employ of the Bridgeport Land & 
Title Company, November 12, 1903, in the capacity of collector 
of rents, and have continued with them in the same capacity 



Evans, Everts, Ewell, 109 

since — thus bearing out *Gus' Oliver's little fling at me in the 
Class History. It is fair work and is guaranteed to develop 
one's nerve. I delayed answering your letter because at the 
time I was contemplating making a rather important change in 
my life — 1. e, from business to professional life — but circum- 
stances, both financial and physical, seem to have effectually put 
up the bars between that change and me ; so methinks it's the 
business life for mine." 

His business address is care The Bridgeport Land & Title 
Company, or P. O. Box 675, Bridgeport, Conn. His residence 
is 90s Lafayette Street. 

Robert Hall Ewell (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 1906) was 
born September 28, 1880, in Milbury, Mass., prepared at the 
Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and entered in the fall of 
1899. 

His father, Rev. John Lewis Ewell (Yale 1865), is Professor 
of Church History, Hebrew and Greek in Howard University. 
He lives at 325 College St., Washington, D. C. He was born 
September 4, 1840, in Byfield, Mass., the son of Samuel Ewell 
and Mary (Stickney) Ewell. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Emily Spofford Hall, 
died May 15, 1906, and was the daughter of William Hall and 
Emily (Spofford) Hall. 

Eweirs Yale relatives include his father and three brothers. 
Dr. Arthur W. (1897), John L., Jr. (1897) and Rev. William 
S. (1901). 

In college he was on the debating team against Harvard in 
1902 and 1903 and an alternate in 1900. He debated against 
Princeton in the spring of 1901 and the fall of 1901 and was 
an alternate in 1900. He won the Thacher prize twice and a 
second prize in elocution in Sophomore year. He was Vice 
President, also President of the Yale Union, was Qass Orator, 
and was a member of Psi Upsilon and of the Elihu Club. He 
held an Oration Junior appointment and a First Dispute Senior 
appointment. 

He writes in December 1905: "I entered the Harvard Law 
School in the fall of 1903 and hope to get the degree of LL.B. 
from that school in 1906. I am a member of the Pow Wow and 
Phi Delta Phi clubs in the Harvard Law School. The summer 



no History of the Class of 1903, 

of 1905 I worked in the banking house of Brown Brothers & 
Company in New York City. I was Treasurer of the Ticket 
Department of the Yale Football Association during the fall 
of 1905. I have not made any definite plans for the future. 
The location of a domicile for the years to come and the 
matrimonial question are problems which still haunt me and 
remain to be solved." 

And later : "I got my LL.B. from Harvard Law School this 
June. September ist I shall report for duty at the law office of 
Merrill & Rogers, 31 Nassau St., New York City." 

Antonio Pandelli Fachiri was born August 23, 1880, in New 
York City, prepared for college at the Cutler School, New 
York City, and at the Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn., and 
entered with the Qass, leaving at Easter of Freshman year. 

He was the son of Pandelli Y. [Hypatius] Fachiri, who died 
February 9, 1903, and who was for twenty-five years head of the 
New York house of Ralli Brothers, merchants of London. 
He was bom in Smyrna in 1839. He resided during different 
periods in Bombay, London and New York. 

His mother*s maiden name was Hariclee Ralli. 

He writes : "It is only the persistent efforts of our energetic 
Secretary that g^ves me courage to bring myself before you in 
this way. Had I covered myself with glory or done brave deeds 
that would have done credit to the fair name of 1903, I would 
need none of the repeated entreaties of the Class Secretary to 
launch forth in a modest (?) recital of my doings since I left 
you in the spring of 1900. As it is I reluctantly give you *the 
story of my life.' 

"I started in business in the autumn of 1900 and was with 
the New York branch of Messrs. Rallj Brothers until October 
1904. Then at a week's notice, I was sent by the firm to India 
via Vancouver, Japan, China, etc. — a most interesting trip from 
every point of view. (It was owing to the suddenness of this 
trip that I did not have time to say *good-bye' to any of my 
friends, and I very much fear that many of you did me the 
injustice of thinking it was indifference on my part that made 
me leave without seeing any of you.) 

"After spending three months in India (in the pursuit of 
knowledge regarding 'affairs commercial') I left for London 



Fachiri, Failing. iii 

and started with the London firm (head office) of Messrs. 
Ralli Brothers. Here I am in 'dear old London', and although 
I miss my friends and New York very much indeed, nevertheless 
there is something about London which makes one grow fonder 
of it the more one sees of this wonderful city. 

"You see, dear friends, there is not much to boast of in my 
last six years' existence, and I advise you to have your revenge 
on the Class Secretary for causing me to launch forth. Some 
of you may have already achieved success in your careers. As 
for myself I realize more fully, as each year goes by, how much 
there is to learn and how little I know of business. Perhaps 
some day at a grey-haired reunion of 1903 I may be able to say 
that I have 'climbed the dizzy heights', but not till then, I fear. 

"Here's to *good old Yale,' and though the rest of my days will 
most probably be spent in Europe, I'll never forget my Alma 
Mater nor the true friends that I made while at Yale. Of 
course it was a bit of luck that the one year I was at Yale I 
should have had the privilege of being in 1903. N'est ce past 
Do not forget me and sometimes at your reunions drink a toast 
to the Absent One." 

Fachiri's address is care Messrs. Ralli Brothers, 25 Finsbury 
Circus, London, E. C, England. 

Eklward Josiah Failing (B.A. 1903) was born in Portland, 
Ore., May 18, 1881, prepared for college at the Portland 
Academy and entered with the Class. 

His father, James Frederick Failing, a retired hardware 
merchant, formerly of Corbett, Failing & Robertson of Port- 
land, was born in New York City March 24, 1842, the son of 
Josiah Failing, a former mayor of Portland, and of Henrietta 
Legge (Ellison) Failing. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Jane Johnson Connor, 
was the daughter of John Connor (school teacher, merchant 
and banker), and of Martha Maria Bancroft (Whittlesey) 
Connor. 

Failing's Yale relatives include a brother, John Connor Fail- 
ing (1900), and two cousins, Henry F. Connor (1893 S.) and 
Henry R. Failing (1907). 

He held in college a Dissertation Junior appointment and a 
Dissertation Senior appointment. 



112 History of the Class of ipoj. 

He writes: "Since I left college after graduation I have 
been learning the general hardware business with my father's 
old rivals here, the Honeyman Hardware Company, doing both 
a retail and wholesale business. I have been in about every 
department except the buyers' and at present (December 1905) 
am in the city sales room. I began work July 27, 1903. I 
am a member of the University Club here, an organization of 
one hundred and eighty odd members, of whom twenty odd 
are Yale men, three having been President. In October 1904 
I was elected to the Club Council and in 1905 was promoted to 
Secretary. I have done no work in politics except in one cam- 
paign for state officers, when I did a little precinct work in the 
primaries for the Simon or anti-Mitchell wing of the Republi- 
can party. I have been too busy to knock around much or to 
travel at all, and nothing has happened to tell about. My 
permanent address is 243 nth St., Portland, Ore." 

And later: "Please change my business address from care 
Honeyman Hardware Company to care Failing, Haines & 
McCalman, 88 and 90 Front St., Portland, Ore., of which I am 
a director and Secretary. This firm is successor to Corbett, 
Failing & Robertson, Inc., and is engaged in the wholesale hard- 
ware business.*' 

John J. Mitchell Fairbank (B.A. 1903) was born in Chicago, 
111., April 9, 1879, prepared for college at the Smith Academy, 
St. Louis, Mo., and at the Betts Academy, Stamford, Conn., 
and entered in September 1899. 

His father, Lemuel Gulliver Fairbank, who died October 20, 
1904, was a Civil War veteran and a manufacturer of furni- 
ture. He was the son of Josiah Fairbank, of Boston, and of 
Sarah Elizabeth (Gulliver) Fairbank. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Lucinda Elizabeth 
Mitchell, was the daughter of John J. Mitchell of St. Louis, 
one time President of the Chicago & Alton Railroad, and of 
Caroline Elois (Bayles) Mitchell. 

In college Fairbank was a member of the University Banjo 
and Mandolin Club and of Delta Kappa Epsilon. He is at 
present cashier of Hamlin, Thompson & Sheldon, brokers, 60 
State St., Boston, Mass. His residence is 636 Beacon St., 
Boston, Mass. 



Fairbank, Fairbanks, Farnum, Farrel, 113 

Joseph Fairbanks (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 1906) was 
bom in St. Johnsbury, Vt, January 12, 1881, prepared at the St. 
Johnsbury Academy and entered in September 1899. 

His father, William Paddock Fairbanks, who died December 
15, 189s, was of the E. and T. Fairbanks & Company, scale 
manufacturers of St. Johnsbury, Vt. He was bom in St. Johns- 
bury, July 27, 1 84 1, the son of Joseph P. Fairbanks and Almira 
(Taylor) Fairbanks. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Rebecca Pike, was the 
daughter of Robert Pike and Huldah (Johnson) Pike. 

An uncle, Rev. Edward T. Fairbanks, graduated from Yale 
in 1859. 

In college Fairbanks received honors in English composition 
in Sophomore year, a Henry James Ten Eyck second prize in 
Junior year, and a Townsend Premium in Senior year. He 
was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Beta Theta Pi. He held 
a High Oration Junior appointment and the same Senior 
appointment. 

He writes, August 1 1 , 1906 : "I am just commencing law prac- 
tice here in St. Johnsbury and expect to stay here. At present 
I am with the firm of May and Hill. I succeeded in drawing a 
degree from the reluctant law school in June." 

Peter Elting Famum» Jr., was bom in Port Jervis, N. Y., 
March i, 1880, prepared for college at the Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., and entered with the Class. 

His father, Peter Elting Famum of Port Jervis, N. Y., was 
bom in Gilbertsville, N. Y.. May 10, 1840, the son of George 
Farnum and Diana (Zearfoss) Famum. 

His mother's maiden name was Mary Conkling. Augustus 
Thompson (Yale 1896 S.) is a relative. 

In college he was a member of the Freshman Glee Oub, 
University Glee Oub, College Choir and Alpha Delta Phi. 
Since graduation he has been with the New York Life Insurance 
Company, 611 Broadway, and lives at the Yale Qub, 30 West 
44th St., New York City. 

Franklin Farrel, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was bom in Ansonia, 
Conn., August 27, 1881, prepared for college at the Hopkins 
Grammar School, New Haven, and at the St. Paul School, 
Concord, N. H. 
8 



114 History of the Class of 1903. 

His father, Franklin Farrel, is President of the Farrel 
Foundry and Machine Company of Ansonia. He was bom 
February 17, 1828, in Waterbury, Conn., the son of Almon 
Farrel and Ruth Emma (Warner) Farrel. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Lillian Clarke, is the 
daughter of Wilson H. Clarke and Julia Elizabeth (Cable) 
Clarke. 

George C. Bryant (Yale 1895) is a brother-in-law, and Alton 
Farrel (1902) is a first cousin. 

In college Farrel was a member of Eta Phi, Delta Kappa 
Epsilon and the Elihu Club. Since graduation he has been with 
the Farrel Foundry and Machine Company and writes : 

"I have not accomplished any illustrious feats of bravery or 
mental exertion since leaving college, choosing rather a modest 
life of some work and much pleasure combined." 

His address is Ansonia, Conn. 

William Ferguson (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 1906) was 
born in Talcottville, Conn., November 2, 1882, prepared at the 
South Manchester (Conn.) High School and entered college in 
the fall of 1899. 

His father, William John Ferguson, a mechanic with Cheney 
Brothers, South Manchester, was bom in Belfast, Ireland, in 
August 1853, the son of James Ferguson and Elizabeth Fergu- 
son. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Bryan, was the 
daughter of John Bryan and Jane Bryan. 

A brother, David Ferguson, is now in Yale in the Class of 
1908. 

In college Ferguson held an Oration Junior appointment and 
an Oration Senior appointment. 

He writes in January 1906: "In the fall of 1903 I entered the 
Harvard Law School and expect to get my LL.B. in 1906, ♦, e. 
next June. That comprises, I think, the total of my career since 
leaving Yale." 

His home address is Box 251, Manchester, Conn. 

Mansfield Ferry (B.A. 1903) was born in Chicago, 111., 
June 21, 1882, prepared for college at the Hopkins Grammar 
School, New Haven, Conn., and at the Taft School, Watertown,. 
Conn., and entered with the Class. 



Ferguson, Ferry, 115 

His father, Charles Herbert Ferry (Yale 1872), formerly 
with the Latrobe Steel and Coupler Company, at present resides 
in New York City. He was born in Utica, N. Y., September i, 
1851, the son of William Henry Ferry, a banker, and of Mary 
Ann (Williams) Ferry. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Emily Dwight Mans- 
field, was the daughter of John William Mansfield, a banker, 
and of Mary Antoinette (Macumber) Mansfield. 

Ferry numbers among his Yale relatives, besides his father, 
an uncle, William H. Ferry (1868), and several cousins, Stanley 
Dwight (1876), Frank F. Ferry (1900), John F. Ferry 
(1901 S.), Montague Ferry (1901 S.), and Horace F. Ferry 
(1906). He also claims Elihu Yale as a great something uncle. 

IVi college he was a member of Psi Upsilon, and held an 
Oration Junior and the same Senior appointment. 

He writes: "Had I not just been going over criminal indict- 
ments, your documents would have made me afraid to look into 
them more closely ; and now that I have read them and reread 
them, there is precious little that I can do for your obituary 
record. I am hard to kill but find that fight the only one in 
which I have been engaged. I have not yet refused any offices 
of honor, trust or profit, and am hoping that sometime there 
may be one of the latter for me to accept. I am glad to see by 
the space you devote to engagements and allied subjects that 
you are a firm believer in one phase of President Roosevelt's 
policy, and am sorry that modesty, etc., prevents me from being 
at the head of the Class with statistics on this subject. 

"Since leaving college on Commencement Day, 1903, my 
domicile has been at Winthrop Hall, Cambridge, but my resi- 
dence I have always kept at 183 Lincoln Park Boulevard, 
Chicago. I was at the Harvard Law School for some months 
in 1903-04. when general debility, locating specifically in my 
eyes, compelled me to leave the chill of Cambridge for a 
warmer clime, but I returned in the autumn of 1904 to again 
htgin legal studies and have been hammering at the law ever 
since, with the result that at the end of next year (1907) I hope 
to get a degree of J.D. though it may be only an LL.B., just 
as the faculty decides. I cannot give the exact title and date 
and place of publication of anything of literary merit published 
by me: the nearest approach to those heights is an editorship 



ii6 History of the Class of 1903. 

of the Harvard Lazv Reznezv, wherein alleged legal drippings 
drip monthly. 

"As for politics: Last Tuesday I got out some convicts to 
vote for *Joey' Beale, who was elected alderman in Cambridge, 
and who taught us crimes last year and next year is to teach 
us where laws conflict. If you call clubs social organizations, I 
am a member of the Graduates' Club, New Haven, the Yale 
Club, New York, and the Onwentsia, and Saddle and Cycle clubs 
in Chicago. 

"Travels: After graduation, together with many other will- 
ing birds of passage, I found myself on the H. M. S. Oceanic, 
and Porter and I spent the summer together in Europe, much 
of the time with Tyler and Schley, and some of the time close 
to a place that rhymes with 'hotel', as we thought when we were 
in Greece and Constantinople. On leaving the Harvard Law 
School in the spring of 1904 *Ike' Hazard and I punctured a 
few American bicycle tires along the shores of the Loire and 
Brittany. 

"183 Lincoln Park Boulevard, Chicago, will always reach me. 

"Even five weeks thought can recall nothing further to me to 
serve as the slightest foundation for further drool; in other 
words, I am dry as Sahara." 

His address for the coming school year is 48 Brattle St., 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Morton Cross Fitch (B.A. 1903, LL.B. New York Law 
School 1905) was bom in New York City June 18, 1881, pre- 
pared for college at the Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and 
entered college with the Class. 

His father, Ashbel Parmelee Fitch (Columbia Law School, 
also attended the German universities of Jena and Berlin), died 
May 3, 1904. He was Representative in Congress 1887-1894, 
Comptroller of New York City 1894- 1898 and President of the 
Trust Company of America from 1899 ""^1 his death. He 
was the son of Edward Fitch, a lawyer of Malone, N. Y., and 
New York City, and of Fannie (Parmelee) Fitch. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth A. Cross, 
was the daughter of George Cross and Julia A. (Lewis) Cross. 

Fitch's Yale relatives include two brothers, Ashbel Parmelee 
Fitch (1898) and Littleton Holmes Fitch (1906). 



Fitch, Fitzgerald. 117 

In college he was an editor of the News and was Secretary of 
the University Baseball Association and Manager of the College 
Baseball team 1901-1902. He was a member of Psi Upsilon 
and the Elihu Qub. He held a Second Colloquy Junior 
appointment and a First Colloquy Senior appointment. 

He writes : "Since leaving college I have studied law at the 
New York Law School, graduating there last June (1905). I 
passed my bar exams, the same month and was admitted to 
practice. For the past two years I have been connected with 
this office, which, under the firm name, Ashbel P. Fitch, Mott & 
Grant, has continued the business built up by my grandfather 
and father. My brother Ashbel, '98, is the head of the firm and 
Mr. Fred E. Grant, '91 at Yale, is a member. 

"I am not married. I am not engaged. I have published no 
books or pamphlets ; have done no political, social or religious 
work and hold no particular positions of honor, trust or profit 
that I can recall. Neither have I made any notable journeys in 
this or foreign countries. I have simply studied law and have 
not found time for any of the various other things above men- 
tioned, although some of them sound very good to me. It is 
my intention to stay right here in this office until I retire from 
business, die or am bounced. 

"At the law school I was a member of the Dwight Chapter 
of the legal fraternity of Phi Delta Phi, along with brothers 
Theron R. Strong, Russell Bogue and Ralph Melcer. I believe 
that I held the office of Tribune of the Chapter during my 
Senior year, but it was not a position of 'trust or profit' and the 
'honor' connected with it was rather dubious. In the hands of 
a life insurance president it might have been made a position 
of 'profit'. " 

His business address is 32 Nassau St., New York City. His 
residence is 759 West End Ave. 

Edward Harold Fitzgerald (B.A. 1903, B.D. Episcopal 
Theological School, Cambridge, Mass., 1906) was born in Mil- 
ford, Conn., August 29, 1881, prepared for college at the Hop- 
kins Grammar School, New Haven, Conn., and entered with the 
Class. 

His father, the Rev. John Henry Fitzgerald (St. Stephen's 
College, Annandale, N. Y., 1859), an Episcopal clergyman of 



ii8 History of the Class of 1903, 

Hebron, Conn., was the son of John Fitzgerald and Catherine 
(Burns) Fitzgerald. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Helen Maria Roberts, 
was the daughter of John Dewitt Roberts, an architect of New 
Haven, and Louisa (Coe) Roberts. 

Two uncles, the Rev. Walter C. Roberts (1873 S.) and 
Edward K. Roberts, M.D., (1878 S.); and a brother, John 
Henry Fitzgerald, Jr., (1908) are among his Yale relatives. 

In college Fitzgerald held an Oration Junior and the same 
Senior app>ointment. "" 

He writes : "In the fall of 1903 I entered the Episcopal Theo- 
logical School, Cambridge, Mass., to study for the ministry, 
leaving college June 1903. The studies have been along the 
line of those usual in theological schools. I expect to graduate 
in June 1906 with the degree of B.D. (in course). 

"My permanent address is Hebron, Conn. 

"In connection with the work in the Theological School, I 
have had charge of a mission in East Milton, Mass., and also 
during the summers of 1904 and 1905 at North Scituate Beach, 
Mass. 

"Next fall, if I receive an appointment which is practically 
certain, I expect to go to Hankow, China, as a missionary. I 
will work there in connection with the Episcopal mission center- 
ing at Hankow. In this mission Rev. D. T. Huntington, '92, 
is working. So we have the nucleus of a Yale Club right there. 
The Yale Mission is within reach too, I think, though I haven't 
much idea of the distances there as yet. Anyhow Yale is repre- 
sented in Central China, and 1903 will be." 

Minton Fluhrcr (B.A. 1903) was born in New York City, 
February 25, 1882, prepared at Dr. Holbrookes School, Sing 
Sing, N. Y., and entered college in September 1899. 

His father, William Francis Fluhrer, M.D., was born in 
Providence, R. I., December 22, 1846, the son of John Christo- 
pher Fluhrer and Julia (Greiner) Fluhrer. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Emily Caroline Pull- 
man, was the daughter of James Lewis Pullman and Emily 
Caroline (Minton) Pullman. 

Since graduation Fluhrer has been studying law in the Colum- 
bia Law School and expects to take his degree in 1907. 

His address is 604 West 114th St., New York City. 



Fluhrer, Foster. 119 

Picrrepont Beers Foster (B.A. 1903) was bom in New- 
Haven, Conn., December 9, 1878, prepared for college at the 
Hopkins Grammar School, New Haven, Conn., at the St. 
Paul School, Concord, N. H., and by private tutor. He entered 
with the Class of 1902, joining 1903 at the beginning of Fresh- 
man year. 

His father, William Law Foster (LL.B. Yale 1865), who died 
in 1881, was born in New Haven, Conn., April 20, 1844. He 
was the son of Pierrep>ont Beers Foster and Stella (Bishop) 
Foster. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Elizabeth Board, 
was the daughter of Edmund Kingsland Board and Abigail T. 
(Heard) Board. 

In college Foster was Chairman of the Class Cup Committee, 
was a member of Zeta Psi and held a First Colloquy Senior 
appointment. 

He writes: "On leaving college in June 1903, I was married 
on June 27th in Plainfield, N. J., to Elizabeth Plummer Bowen, 
daughter of Henry Elliott Bowen, who resides in Plainfield, 
and is connected with the advertising department of the New 
York Herald. After four months spent in travelling in Europe, 
I came back to New Haven, where I remained until February. 
On February nth, I started on a three months' trip through 
Mexico and California, stopping at the World's Fair in St. 
Louis on my way home. From May until September the time 
was largely spent in automobiling, and on September ist, 1904, 
I settled down at 235 Bishop St., New Haven, entering law 
school at the end of the same month, continuing the study of 
law to the present time. Now in the middle of the year, I 
expect to finish my course at the Yale Law School, and after 
that have no definite plans. 

"I have a daughter, Elizabeth Pierrepont Foster, who was 
born August ist, 1905. 

"At present I am president of the Lovell Manufacturing 
Company, a corporation which has been organized to manufac- 
ture chain from steel wire. The company is not in full running 
condition yet, but we hope it soon will be. 

"My permanent address is Exchange Building, New Haven, 
Conn." 



I20 History of the Class of 1903. 

James Irving Fowler was born in Glens Falls, N. Y., Sep- 
tember II, 1880, prepared for college at the Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., and entered in September 1899. 

His father, Joseph Fowler, of the Joseph Fowler Shirt & 
Collar Company of Glens Falls, died in October 1898. He was 
bom in Chestertown, N. Y., in 1840, the son of Charles A. 
Fowler and Mary (Baker) Fowler. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Coolidge, died 
in 1895. 

Albert N. C. Fowler (Yale 1894) is a relative. Fowler left 
collie at Christmas of Freshman year and has since lived in 
Glens Falls. He is now Treasurer and General Manager of the 
Fowler Collar Co. 

Alan Fox (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 1906) was bom in 
Painted Post, N. Y., November 18, 1881, prepared for college 
at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and entered college with 
the Qass. 

His father, Alanson Jehiel Fox, who died October 29, 1903, 
was President of the Lumbering Company, Manistique, Mich., 
and was a partner in Fox, Weston & Bronson, of Painted Post, 
Steuben County, N. Y. He was a tmstee of the University of 
Rochester, Vassar College, and Kalamazoo College, and was 
President of the Board of Trustees of Rochester Theological 
Seminary. He was bom in Glens Falls, N. Y., November 8, 
1832, the son of Norman Fox and Jane (Freeman) Fox. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Cornelia Stebbins, was 
the daughter of Philander Wright Stebbins and Marietta (Ham- 
lin) Stebbins. 

Fox's Yale relatives include an uncle, Henry H. Stebbins 
(1863), and four first cousins, Howard Fox (1894), Alanson G. 
Fox (1900), Allen Stebbins (1902) and Henry H. Stebbins, Jr. 
(1904). 

In college he was President of the University Football 
Association, was a member of the Dramatic Association, and 
was on the debating team against Harvard in 1903. He was a 
member of Phi Beta Kappa, Psi Upsilon and of the Elihu Club. 
He won a first prize in Elocution in Sophomore year and the 
Thacher prize in Senior year. He was President of the Fresh- 
man Union, and held a High Oration Junior appointment and 
a High Oration Senior appointment. 



Fowler, Fox, Freeman. 121 

He writes, December 15, 1905 : "Since leaving college I have 
been at Harvard Law School. Expect to graduate this June 
(1906) with degree of LL.B. Only thing out of usual run 
have done here was to spealc upon the Harvard Debating team 
against Princeton this year, and get beaten. Of the three 
Harvard speakers, Abe Tulin and I were two. Abe, however, 
was kept from the final debate by a very serious illness. 

"On my father's death in 1903, I was made a director of the 
Chicago Lumbering Company of Michigan, and of the State 
National Bank of North Tonawanda, N. Y. I spent the summer 
of 1905 traveling with my mother in Italy. My only political 
work has been investigation of candidates' record, carried on 
for the Boston Good Government Association. 

"My permanent address is 63 Alfred Street, Detroit, Mich. 
I expect to enter a law office there this coming fall." 

John Ross Freeman (B.A. 1903) was bom in Franklin, Pa., 
December 9, 1880, prepared for college at the Haverford (Pa.) 
Grammar School and entered at the beginning of Freshman 
year. 

His father, Lewis Ross Freeman, was bom at Murfreesboro, 
Tenn., August 28, 1848, the son of Smith Freeman and Martha 
Rebecca (Butler) Freeman. He is a lawyer of Warren, Pa., 
and is also interested in various lumber companies, coal com- 
panies, railroads, etc. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Florence Dale, was the 
daughter of John A. Dale and Eliza Jane (Richardson) Dale. 

In college Freeman was a member of the Dramatic Associa- 
tion and its Secretary, and graduated with a Second Colloquy 
Senior appointment. 

He writes, December i, 1905, from Madrid, Spain: "After 
leaving college I took a short business course in New York and 
on August II, 1903, sailed for Germany, reaching Berlin about 
the 19th. I stayed in Berlin until March 1904, studying German 
and incidentally following some lectures at the University of 
Berlin. George Tillson and Harold Sawyer were in Berlin at 
the same time and I saw a great deal of the former. 

"Leaving Berlin in March 1904 I spent a month in traveling 
and reached Munich about April. There I had the pleasure of 
staying in the same pension with Prof. Phelps. My time in 



122 History of the Class of 1903, 

Munich was pretty well occupied, as I continued my study of 
Gentian, heard some lectures at the University and for four 
months worked in the office of the general agent for Bavaria 
of the Hamburg-American Line as a volunteer. I left Munich 
September i, 1904, spent another month traveling and reached 
Paris October i. Remained seven months in Paris studying 
French and then went to Ouchy, Lausanne, Switzerland, to 
spend the summer and continue my study of French. I left 
there about August ist, 1905, traveled a month and reached 
Madrid about September i, where I am hard at work, learning 
Spanish and incidentally meeting with the greatest hospitality of 
any country I have yet visited. H. F. Sheets and I roomed 
together here until he was called to Lisbon to direct New York 
Life affairs in Portugal. In short, since graduation I have been 
learning to speak German, French and Spanish, and, all things 
considered, feci fairly well satisfied with the progress I have 
made. 

"I am planning my work with but one object in view — that 
of being in New Haven for Triennial next June and shall be 
greatly disappointed should anything prevent my doing so. 
Needless to say, I am looking forward to it with the keenest 
pleasure. 

"3. My courses of study in the University of Berlin and 
Munich were chiefly along the lines of Commercial Law but I 
was at no time a candidate for a degree. 

"5. I have joined the *Atenco Cientifico y Literario ' of 
Madrid. 

"6. Since reaching Europe I have visited about seventy-five 
places in Germany, Bohemia, Austria, Hungary, Northern Italy, 
Switzerland, Holland, Belgium, France and Northern Spain. 
I hope before reaching home to visit Southern Spain, North 
Africa, Sicily and Southern and Central Italy, sailing from 
England. 

"7. My permanent address is care L. R. Freeman, Warren, 
Pennsylvania, and anything sent there is sure to reach me. 

"9. My future plans are still undecided though I expect to 
enter business of some sort either at home or abroad as occa- 
sion may require. United States Consular service is also 
under consideration but is scarcely more than a possibility." 



Frew, Frisbic. 123 

William Frew (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Western University of 
Pennsylvania 1906) was bom in Pittsburg, Pa., November 24, 
1881, prepared at the St. Paul School, Concord, N. H., and 
entered college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, William Nimick Frew (Yale 1876), was born in 
Pittsburg, July 10, 1854, the son of William Frew and Martha 
E. Frew. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Emily Wick Berry, was 
the daughter of George A. Berry and Sarah L. Berry. 

In college Frew was a member of the Senior Promenade 
Committee, of the Class Supper Committee and of the Board 
of Governors, also Secretary, of the University Club. He was a 
member of He Boule and Delta Kappa Epsilon campaign com- 
mittees, and of Scroll and Key. He held a Second Colloquy 
Senior appointment. 

He writes, November 1905: "Since leaving college I have 
spent most of my time in Pittsburg reading law in the offices 
of Dalzell, Scott and Gordon and attending the Pittsburg Law 
School, from which I hope to graduate in the spring just before 
Commencement. My offices of profit, honour, etc., have been 
nil, as this studying has been about all I can attend to. I was 
one of the crowd who went abroad the summer of 1903 and 
had a fine trip. My matrimonial prospects are likewise nil. My 
whole attention along that line is .in seeing that my friends get 
the proper start, so I expect to attend Triennial unencumbered 
by any domestic cares." 

And later : "I received the degree of LL.B. from the Western 
University of Pennsylvania and took my examinations for 
admission to the bar (from which we do not hear until Sep- 
tember, unfortunately) and when admitted expect to practice in 
Pittsburg." 

His business address is at present 450 Fourth Ave., Pittsburg. 
His residence is Fifth Ave., East End. 

Leonard Welles Frisbie (B.A. 1903) was born in Hartford, 
Conn., September 15, 1881, prepared for college at the Hotch- 
kiss School, Lakeville, Conn., and entered at the beginning of 
Freshman year. 

His father, Charles Gillette Frisbie, died November 21, 1893. 
He was born in Windsor, Conn., January 3, 1854, the son of 



124 History of the Class of 1903. 

L. T. Frisbie and Caroline (Gillette) Frisbie, and was a dealer 
in hides and leather and manufacturer of by-products. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Belle Welles, was the 
daughter of Leonard Welles and Lucy (Carter) Welles. 

Frisbie's Yale relatives include a first cousin, F. F. WooUey 
(1906 S.), and a second cousin, E. W. Frisbie (1902). 

He writes: "Since leaving Yale my life has been compara- 
tively uneventful. I entered the employ of the Travelers Insur- 
ance Company in the fall of 1903 and have been with them ever 
since, at present being employed in their Liability Claim Depart- 
ment." 

His residence is 690 Prospect Ave., Hartford, Conn. 

William Shirley Fulton (B.A. 1903) was bom in Waterbury, 
Conn., November 23, 1880, prepared for college at the Hotch- 
kiss School, Lakeville, Conn., and entered Yale with the Class. 

His father, William Edwards Fulton, is the President and 
Treasurer of the Waterbury Farrel Foundry & Machine Com- 
pany, machine manufacturers, residing at 150 Hillside Ave., 
Waterbury. He was bom August 8, 1852, in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
the son of William Grant Fulton and Eliza (Edwards) Fulton. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ida Ellena Lewis, was 
the daughter of Edward Cuffin Lewis and Harriet M. (Phip- 
peny) Lewis. 

Two brothers, Lewis Edwards Fulton (1901) and Irving 
Kent Fulton (1906), have graduated from Yale. 

In college Fulton was a broad jumper on the track team, 
winning in 1902 first place in the California games, and in 1903 
first place in the Princeton games, second place in the Harvard 
games and third place in the Intercollegiate games. He was 
leader of the Apollo Banjo and Mandolin Club and a member 
of the University Banjo and Mandolin Club and was Secretary 
in 1902 of the Yale Athletic Association. He was a member of 
He Boule, Alpha Delta Phi and Wolf's Head societies. 

He was married January 10, 1906, at Waterbury, Conn., to 
Miss Rose Hinckley Hayden, daughter of the late Edward 
Simeon Hayden. 

He writes: "Went abroad on July ist (1903) with Gif, Hen, 
Gus, Dip, Yellow and about ten others on a pleasure trip. We 
had it. Returned early in September and hung around until 



Fulton, Fur St, Gaines. 125 

October 5, when I started work in the Waterbury Machine 
Company as an apprentice. Endured that job until the spring 
of 1904 (five months), when I took a short trip south — Palm 
Beach, Havana, etc. After returning got a job in the office 
of the Waterbury Machine Company, where I am still. 

"In January 1906 am to be married to Miss Rose Hayden and 
after a short trip expect to live at 170 Hillside Ave. The 
future looks pleasant if not brilliant." 

He is Treasurer of the Waterbury Machine Company. 

Arnold Samuel Furst (B.A. 1903, LL.B. New York Law 
School 1905) was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., January 31, 1882, 
prepared for college at the Hasbrouck Institute, Jersey City, 
N. J., and entered in September 1899. 

His father, Myron Jaffe Furst, a merchant of Jersey City, 
died January 19, 1902. He was bom in Brooklyn, N. Y., Sep- 
tember 13, 1858, the son of Solomon Furst and Bertha (Jaffe) 
Furst. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Betty Liebmann, died 
November 6, 1899. She was the daughter of Joseph Liebmann 
and Fanny (Liebmann) Liebmann. 

Michael Furst (Yale 1876) is an uncle. 

Furst graduated with a Second Colloquy Senior appointment 
and studied at the New York Law School for two years, graduat- 
ing therefrom in 1905. He is now attorney and counselor at 
law in the office of his uncle, Michael Furst, 215 Montague 
St., Brooklyn, N. Y. He lives at 349 Central Park West, New 
York City. 

Thomas Jefferson Gaines, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was bom in New 
York City September 29, 1879, prepared at The Hill School, 
Pottstown, Pa., and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Thomas Jefferson Gaines, an insurance broker 
of New York, was born in New York April 28, 1848, the son of 
Thomas Jefferson Gaines and Emeline (Jackson) Gaines. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Martha Augusta Huyler, 
was the daughter of David Huyler and Abigail Ann (De Klynn) 
Huyler. 

David H. Gaines (Yale 1899 S.) is a brother. 

Gaines was married in New York City November 16, 1904, 



126 History of the Class of ipoj. 

to Miss Lucy Thorndyke Froment, daughter of Frank Living- 
ston Froment, an iron and steel merchant. A son, Thomas 
Jefferson Gaines, 3d, was bom October 23, 1905. 

For six months after graduation Gaines was in the Bank of 
the Metropolis. He has since been an insurance broker with 
his father with an office at 76 William St., New York City. He 
resides at 1070 Madison Ave., New York City. 

Julius Cans (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Columbia 1906) was bom in 
New York City, October 17, 1879, prepared for college at the 
Hyde Park High School, Chicago, 111., and also by private tutor 
and entered with the Class. 

His father, Samuel Gans, was bora in Winterswyck, Holland, 
May 30, 1842, the son of Abraham Gans and Betsy (Poppers) 
Gans. He is President of the Samuel Gans Company, engaged 
in fire salvage, marine, etc., and wholesale jobbers, and resides 
in Chicago, though at present in Brussels. 

His mother, whose maiden name is Lena Frankenhuis, is the 
daughter of Solomon Frankenhuis and Sarah (Marchand) 
Frankenhuis. 

Gans graduated with a Second Colloquy Senior appointment. 
He writes (February 16, 1906) : "The Saturday after 
graduation I sailed for Europe, returning the first week in Octo- 
ber following. On my return I entered the first year class of the 
Law School of Columbia University. During the summer of 
1904 I was employed in the office of McGowan & Stolz, attor- 
neys of Syracuse, N. Y. Last summer (1905) I was with the 
firm of Burke, Jackson & Burke, attorneys of Chicago. 

"Married? No. I have bets with three fellows that they 
precede me into the matrimonial state. I am wilUng to take 
on all comers — this states sufficiently my prospects and inten- 
tions in conjugal affairs. 

"This is my third year at the Columbia Law School. I expect 
to receive the degree of LL.B. this coming June ( 1906) . 

"While in Chicago last summer I wrote several editorials and 
articles for the Chicago Law Journal, but not knowing that 
their dates and titles would ever be of value or interest to anyone, 
I made no endeavor to preserve either. 

"I have no 'affiliations with organizations, social, etc.,' worth 
mentioning, outside, of course, the Yale clubs of New York 
City and Chicago. Have done no work in politics. 



Gans, F. C. Gilbert. 127 

"During my summer in Europe immediately after graduation, 
I spent most of my time in Brussels, my parents having taken up 
their residence in that city. From the capital, I traveled over 
the greater part of Belgium, which is densely populated, and 
possesses many great industries, and other things of great 
interest. I spent about three weeks in England, visiting Lon- 
don, Stratford, Oxford and other towns. Two weeks in Hol- 
land, and a few days in Germany finished my journey. I was 
abroad about four months, perhaps a bit more. The trip was a 
combination visit to my parents, and vacation. I care little for 
sightseeing, finding greater amusement and benefit in mingling 
with the people as far as possible, and observing their views and 
manner of living. One of the results of this and another jour- 
ney was that I learned to speak French, German and Dutch 
quite fluently. 

"Letters will certainly reach me if addressed to 207 East 
Madison Street, Chicago, 111. 

"My career so far has been uneventful and uninteresting, as 
you see. Of course, it took me some months to adjust myself 
to New York, after the years of ideal life in New Haven. After 
graduation from Law School, I expect to return to Chicago, 
where I will enter the law offices of Burke, Jackson and Burke. 
The senior member of the firm was formerly a member of the 
Appellate Court of Cook County. He has for many years been 
a close friend of my father, and therefore takes considerable 
interest in my welfare. Entering a high class law office, with 
good backing, I hope by hard work not to become a public 
charge and that our class will never have occasion to feel 
ashamed that I graduated with it. A Yale man should perhaps 
be expected to promise more but never less." 

Since receiving his LL.B. he has entered the law offices of 
Burke, Jackson and Burke, 140 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. He 
expects to take his Illinois bar examinations in October 1906. 

Frank Cameron Gilbert (B.A. 1903) was born in Tweed, 
Canada, February' 19, 1880, prepared for college at the Boys 
High School, Brooklyn, N. Y., and entered in the fall of 1899. 

He is the son of Abel Henry Gilbert, a broker, residing at 
684 St. Mark's Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y., who was bom in Hastings 
County, Ontario, Canada, October 4, 1850, the son of Abel R. 
Gilbert, a farmer, and of Mary (Hampton) Gilbert. 



128 History of the Class of 1903. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Martha M. Ostrom, 
died in March 1884, and was the daughter of Henry Ostrom, 
a farmer, and of Elizabeth H. (Foster) Ostrom. 

Gilbert numbers among his Yale relatives four brothers, Fred 
Macdonald Gilbert (1898), Harry Douglas Gilbert (1904 S.), 
Percy Macauley Gilbert (1909) and Charles Howard Gilbert 
(1908). 

In college he was a member of the College Baseball team, of 
the Apollo Banjo and Mandolin Club and of Psi Upsilon, and 
held a Second Dispute Junior and Second Dispute Senior 
appointment. 

He writes : "Since leaving college in June 1903, I have spent 
my time in Young Men's Christian Association work. One 
year at Lehigh University as secretary and the rest of the time 
here in the city as an Associate Secretary of the Students' Qub, 
Intercollegate Branch of New York City. In all probability 
I shall change my occupation sometime this year, starting upon 
a business career." 

And later, August 1906: "I am now in the Treasurer's office. 
Metropolitan Museum of Art, 82d Street and 5th Avenue, New 
York. My home address is now 1372 Union Street." 

George Burton Gilbert (B.A. 1903) was born in Thomaston, 
Conn., September 28, 1881, prepared for college at the Thomas- 
ton High School, and entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father, George Colton Gilbert, was born in Thomaston, 
Conn., July 2, 1858, the son of George William Gilbert and 
Elizabeth (Thomas) Gilbert and resides in Thomaston, where 
he is engaged in farming. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Woodward 
Judd, was the daughter of Garwood Burton Judd and Minerva 
Pierpont (Woodward) Judd. 

In college Gilbert held an Oration Junior appointment and a 
High Oration Senior appointment. 

He writes : "This is my third year in the Johns Hopkins Medi- 
cal School and I expect to receive the degree of M.D. in June 
1907. Am a member of the Yale Alumni Association of Mary- 
land and of the Johns Hopkins Track team for the past two 
seasons. The life of a medical student is bound to be rather 
limited and we are more or less existing now for the sake of 



G. B. Gilbert, Gillespie, Gleason. 129 

future usefulness and success we hope to attain. Hence I have 
little to report and will close, hoping, for your sake, that my 
letter is the last one in." 

His present address is iii Jackson Place, Baltimore, Md. 
His home address is 24 High St., Thomaston, Conn. 

Edward Lathrop Gillespie (B.A. 1903) was bom in Stam- 
ford, Conn., November 13, 1881, the son of Edward T. W. 
Gillespie. He prepared at the Stamford High School and 
entered at the beginning of Freshman year. 

In college Gillespie won a first grade Berkeley Premium in 
Latin Composition Freshman year, and held a First Dispute 
Junior appointment and a First Colloquy Senior appointment. 

He is with Gillespie Brothers, publishers, Stamford, Conn. 

William White Gleason (B.A. 1903) was born in Delhi, 
N. Y., December 29, 1882, prepared for college at the Rugby 
Military Academy, New York City, and entered at the beginning 
of Freshman year. 

His father, John Blanchard Gleason (Yale 1876), a lawyer 
of New York, was born in Delhi, N. Y., August 19, 1855, the 
son of William Gleason, also a lawyer of Delhi, and of Caro- 
line (Blanchard) Gleason. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Annie Elizabeth White, 
was the daughter of Seth H. White (B.A. Brown University), 
a lawyer of Delhi, N. Y., and of Ophelia (McDonald) White. 

An uncle, Lafayette B. Gleason (1885), preceded Gleason at 
Yale. 

He graduated with a Second Dispute Junior appointment and 
a Second Dispute Senior appointment. 

He writes : "When I graduated with the Qass in June 1903 
I had not decided upon what line of work I would enter. I 
rather inclined to the law on account of my father being a law- 
yer but thought I would take a vacation and decide at my leisure. 
Accordingly I went with my family to the country, where I spent 
July and most of August. But with nothing definite in view I 
became dissatisfied and decided to come to New York and try 
to find something to do. 

"Finally, about the end of August 1903, I took a position in 
the bookkeeping department of Acker, Merrall and Condit 
9 



130 History of the Class of ipoj. 

Company at 135 West 426 Street. When the time of opening 
of the law school came around I decided I would remain in 
mercantile life. After a short stay at bookkeeping I was placed 
in Mr. A. E. MerralFs office, where I had charge of the elec- 
tricity and telephone contracts, the bonding of all employees, 
etc. In September 1904 I became an assistant buyer and have 
held that position since then. 

"I joined the Yale Club at once and have found it most enjoy- 
able, as I have through it kept the acquaintance of many class- 
mates whom otherwise I would probably not have seen and have 
met many other fellows there. I am a member of the Republi- 
can Organization in New York but, outside of voting at all 
elections and primaries and being a delegate to a district con- 
vention, I have not taken a very active part. 

"Ever since graduation I have lived at my home, 350 West 
71st Street, New York City." 

Irvine Goddard was born in Widnes, England, June i, 1878, 
prepared for college at the Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., 
and entered at the beginning of Freshman year, leaving at 
Christmas of Sophomore year. 

His father, Ralph Goddard, who died in February 1890, was a 
Civil Engineer and resided in Widnes, England. He was the 
son of James Goddard and Sarah Goddard. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Stafford, 
died in September 1885, and was the daughter of Joseph Staf- 
ford and Elizabeth Stafford. 

While in college Goddard was a member of the Dramatic 
Association. ^^ 

He was married September 27, 1905, at Mt. Pleasant, Tenn. 
to Miss Gertrude Brashear Craik, daughter of Joel Tucker 
Craik (Kentucky University 1865), a civil engineer of Mt. 
Pleasant. 

He writes : "Since leaving college, 'Christmas 1900, I went as 
Assistant Superintendent of the Subscription Department, Book- 
lovers Library. I remained with this firm until the following 
summer. The summer I spent at Nantucket in preparatory 
study for entrance in September at the General Seminary, New 
York. I remained at the Seminary two years, but owing to a 
breakdown had to come south. After several months at the 



Goddard, Goodhue, Goodwin. 131 

University of the South — while there I was initiated into the 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity — I was ordained Deacon in the 
University Chapel June 24, 1903. I left the University in July 
to take up my work as Curate at the Church of the Advent, 
Nashville, Tenn. Eight months later I became Rector of the 
Church of the Holy Cross, Mt. Pleasant, Tenn. On September 
18, 1904, I was ordained Priest in the Cathedral at Memphis, 
Tenn., and coincident with my ordination to the Priesthood I 
was elected Canon and member of the Chapter of the Christ 
Church Cathedral, Louisville, Kentucky. I accepted my elec- 
tion and acted in that capacity twelve months — ^then came here to 
Owensboro as Rector of Trinity Church, October i, 1905. 
While in Louisville I was a member of The Pendennis, Tavern 
and Commercial clubs." 

His address is The Rectory, Owensboro, Ky. 

Willis Elbridge Goodhue (B.A. 1903) was bom in Brook- 
field, Conn., December 23, 1867, prepared for college at the 
State Normal School, Buffalo, N. Y., and entered Yale at the 
beginning of Junior year, coming from Brown University. 

His father. Rev. Jonathan Elbridge Goodhue (Yale 1852), 
an Episcopal clergyman, died March 17, 1895. He was bom 
in Deerfield, N. H., April 15, 1824, the son of Joseph Goodhue 
and Dorothy (Greene) Goodhue. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Esther Amelia Hawley, 
was the daughter of Daniel Booth Hawley, of Hawleyville, 
Conn., and of Olive Hawley. 

Since graduation Goodhue has taught school. He was first 
Principal of the Shelton (Coon.) High School and is at present 
Principal of the High School at Norwalk, Conn. His perma- 
nent address is Newark, N. Y. 

Francis Spencer Goodwin (B.A. 1903) was bom in Hart- 
ford, Conn., October 19, 1878, prepared under private tutor and 
at the St. Paul School, Concord, N. H., and entered Yale in 1898 
with the Class of 1902, joining 1903 at the beginning of Fresh- 
man year. 

His father. Rev. Francis Goodwin, D.D., is a member of the 
firm of J. J. & F. Goodwin, real estate, is a director of several 
corporations and a tmstee of Trinity College. He was bom in 



132 History of the Class of 1903. 

Hartford September 25, 1839, the son of James Goodwin and 
Martha (Willard) Goodwin. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Alsop Jackson, 
was the daughter of Charles Jackson and Lucy (Morgan) 
Jackson. 

Goodwin's Yale relatives include two brothers, W. B. Good- 
win, of the Class of 1890, and C. A. Goodwin (1898), and a 
first cousin, W. L. Goodwin (1897). 

In college he was a substitute on the Freshman Crew and a 
member of Eta Phi, Alpha Delta Phi and of the Elihu Qub. 
Since graduation he has been in the real estate business with 
J. J. & F. Goodwin, 783 Main St., Hartford, Conn., and lives 
at 103 Woodland St. 

George Augustus Goss (B.A. 1903) was bom in Waterbury, 
Conn., April i, 1881, prepared at the Hotchkiss School, Lake- 
ville. Conn., and entered college in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Chauncey Porter Goss, was bom in 1837 in Pitts- 
ford, N. Y., the son of Ephraim Goss and Mary (Brockway) 
Goss. He is president of the Scoville Manufacturing Company, 
manufacturers of machinery, of Waterbury, Conn. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Caroline Ketcham, was 
the daughter of Cornelius Ketcham and Caroline (Ryan) Ket- 
cham. 

A brother, John Henry Goss (1894), preceded Goss at Yale. 

In college he played left tackle on the University Football 
team in Junior year, right guard in Senior year, was a Cup man, 
member of the Class Cup Committee, and on the Board of 
Governors of the University Club. He won second place in the 
shot put in the Harvard games in 1901 and was a member of 
the track team for three years. He was a member of Eta 
Phi, Psi Upsilon and Scroll and Key societies. 

He writes : "I do not think of anything of much interest to 
write except what you know. Heard the other day that the 
Royal Geographical Society of London has given me an 
F.R.G.S., that is, has made me a Fellow, for a paper on Mt. 
Kini Balou, British North Borneo, called 'Exploration of Mt. 
Kini Balou.' I believe the other Americans in it are some 
Harvard and University of Chicago professors, an admiral and 
a general or two, and four or five common citizens like myself." 



Coss, Granniss, 133 

He is connected with the Scoville Manufacturing Company, 
Waterbury, Conn. 

Robert Andrews Granniss, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was born in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., January 23, 1880, prepared for college at the 
St. Paul School, Concord, N. H., and entered with the Class. 

His father, Robert Andrews Granniss (Brooklyn Collegiate 
and Polytechnic Institute 1857), Vice President of the Mutual 
Life Insurance Company of New York, was bom July 28, 1840, 
in Brooklyn, N. Y., the son of George Benjamin Granniss, a 
wholesale merchant, and of Laura Ann (Dunham) Granniss. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Florence Peters, was 
the daughter of Charles Peters, a lumber and shipping merchant, 
and of Phoebe (Dyer) Peters. 

A great uncle, Hon. John A. Peters, late Chief Justice of 
Maine (B.A. 1842, LL.D. 1893), preceded Granniss at Yale. 

In college he was a member of the Board of Governors of the 
University Club and of the Race and House Committee of the 
Yale Corinthian Yacht Club. He was a member of Kappa Psi, 
Alpha Delta Phi and of the Elihu Club. 

He writes: "After leaving college in the first week of July 
1903, I took a well earned rest and did not enter upon my busi- 
ness career until the first of September the following fall. I 
then entered the firm of Pease & EUiman, real estate brokers, 
and held the office of Assistant Secretary and member of the 
Board of Directors. From that time on for over a year I 
worked at the real estate business, especially along the line of 
loaning money on bond and mortgage. On October i, 1904, I 
was made Vice President and given a considerable amount of 
interest in the business, besides taking charge of the down-town 
office, 49 Liberty Street, where I have since made my business 
headquarters and expect to be for some time to come. 

"In April 1905 I visited the City of Mexico with several other 
gentlemen in order to look over the situation there and to get 
ideas and suggestions in regard to the running of office build- 
ings in that city, also took in some smaller cities in the Republic 
of Mexico, and came back with the impression that the country 
was growing very rapidly and that there were large opportuni- 
ties for the establishment of most any business enterprise on 
conservative lines. The trip was very interesting from start 



134 History of the Class of ipoj, 

to finish, and put me in touch with many well known men of 
financial reputation. 

"I have been residing at Morris Plains, New Jersey, which is 
the home of my family, since leaving college, coming to New 
York every day to attend to my business. I still keep in touch 
with the doings at New Haven, and go up there from time to 
tune." 

Charles Douglass Green (B.A. 1903) was bom in Columbus, 
Ga., June 3, 1882, prepared for college at the Morse and Rogers 
School, New York City, and at the Lycee du Harve, France, 
and entered at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Douglass Green, a banker and broker, was bom in 
Greenwich, Va., October 30, 1855, the son of Charles Green, a 
bank president and cotton merchant of Savannah (bom in Kent 
County, England), and of Lucy (Hunton) Green. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Laura Riddle Tewks- 
bury, was the daughter of Munroe George Jewell Tewksbury, 
M.D., of Manchester, N. H., and of Laura (Riddle) Tewksbury. 

In college he was a member of the Dramatic Association, of 
Alpha Delta Phi, and of Wolf's Head. He held a Second Dis- 
pute Junior appointment and a Second Colloquy Senior appoint- 
ment. 

He writes : "Since leaving college I have been in the banking 
business, first with the New York Tmst Company, and then with 
Kean, Van Cortlandt & Company. I also joined Squadron A 
immediately upon leaving college, and in September 1904 had 
the pleasure of taking part in the army maneuvers held near 
Manassas, Virginia. There were 30,000 troops engaged and the 
work was very instructive and interesting as we served along- 
side of regulars and were attached to the isth U. S. Cavalry 
and so of course under regular army officers in squadron and 
regimental work. We also were President Roosevelt's escort at 
his inauguration last March. 

"I took a trip to Europe last spring in connection with a paper 
company in which I am interested. I had typhoid fever this 
winter, which makes the second time, as I had it once before 
coming to college." 

His business address is 30 Pine St., New York City. His 
home address is 150 West 59th St. 



Green, Greene, Griffin, 135 

Herbert Gouvcmcur Greene (B.A. 1903) was born in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., November 6, 1881, prepared for college at the 
Black Hall School, Lyme, Conn., and entered with the Class. 

His father, Joseph Warren Greene (B.A. 1868, LL.B. Colum- 
bia 1870) was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., November 2, 1846, the 
son of Joseph Warren Greene and Mary Augusta (Smith) 
Greene. He is a lawyer of the firm of Arnold & Greene. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Julia Strong Sherman, 
died July 12, 1895, and was the daughter of Benjamin Upson 
Sherman and Arabella Munson (Taylor) Sherman. 

A brother, Joseph Warren Greene, Jr., graduated from Yale 
in 1899. 

Greene held in college a First Dispute Junior appointment 
and a First Dispute Senior appointment. 

His business address is care New York Telephone Company, 
55 Franklin St., and his residence is 115 Willow St., Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

Henry Farrand Grriffin (B.A. 1903) was bom January 28, 
1880, in Detroit, Mich., prepared for college at the Phillips 
Academy, Andover, Mass., and at the Nichols School, Buf- 
falo, N. Y., and entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Patrick Henry Griffin, was bom in Rochester 
August 5, 1851, and is with the New York Car Wheel Company, 
manufacturers, and resides at 190 Summer St., Buffalo, N. Y. 
He is the son of Thomas Francis Griffin and Anna Elizabeth 
(O'Rarke) Griffin. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Louise Belle McKenna, 
was the daughter of William Alexander McKenna and Arabella 
Lewis (Brewster) McKenna. 

A brother, W. A. Griffin, graduated in the Class of 1904 S. 

In college Griffin was a member of Chi Delta Theta, editor of 
the Yale Literary Magazine and of the Courant. He was a 
member of the Pundits and in Junior year won the John Hub- 
bard Curtis prize. Since graduation he has been with the New 
York Car Wheel Company of Buffalo. 

He writes : "Nothing ver>' startling has happened to me since 
leaving college. Have worked a little, loafed a little and gen- 
erally had a good time. Have done no post graduate work, 
published nothing, done no organization work, gone abroad once, 
and my permanent address is 190 Slimmer Street, Buf- 
falo, N. Y." 



136 History of the Class of 1903, 

Otto Harry Gruner was born in New York City May 30, 
1880, prepared at the Blake School, New York City, and entered 
with the Class, leaving college at Christmas 1899. 

He is the son of Siegfried Gruner, a member of the New 
York Cotton Exchange, who died December 7, 1897, and of 
Annie J. Gruner. He was married January 7, 1903, in New 
York City to Miss Katharine Hayes Drake, daughter of Simeon 
J. Drake. 

Gruner is a broker and a member of the New York Stock 
Exchange, with an office at 20 Broad St., New York City. 

John George Haas, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was bom in Carlysle, 
Pa., Jime 21, 1881, prepared for college at the Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., and entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father, John George Haas, was bom in Niimberg, Ger- 
many, May 9, 1849, the son of Henry Haas and Margaretha 
(Haas) Haas. His business is that of army uniforms and 
equipments, the main store being located at 39 East Orange St., 
Lancaster, Pa., with branch stores in New York City and Wash- 
ington, D. C. He resides at 41 East Orange St., Lancaster, Pa. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Charlotta Quade 
(deceased), was the daughter of Ludwig Quade and Anna 
Maria (Niemyer) Quade. 

Haas held in college a Second Colloquy Junior appointment 
and a Second Dispute Senior appointment. 

He writes: "Since leaving Yale, I have studied two years 
at the New York Law School and June 19, 1905, passed the bar 
examinations of this state. During the same two years I acted 
as New York Manager in my father's New York store. The 
business is that of army uniforms and equipments. I am now 
holding the same position, and shall continue to hold it.. Some 
time in the year 1906 I will be connected with some down-town 
law firm. I am a /nember of the Yale Club of this city, and 
make that my residence (30 West 44th Street). My per- 
manent address is that of my home, 41 East Orange Street, 
Lancaster, Pa.*' 

His business address is 256 Fifth Ave., New York City. 

John Francis Hackctt (B.A. 1903, M.D.C.M. McGill 1906) 
was born in Meriden, Conn., July 6, 1881, prepared for college 
at the Meriden High School and entered at the beginning of 
Freshman year. 



Gruner, Haas, Hackett, Hamlin, 137 

His father, John Hackett, was born in Dublin, Ireland, about 
1848 and resides at 29 Griswold St., Meriden, Conn. He is with 
the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company. 

His mother's maiden name was Maria Taylor. 

A brother, Joseph Thomas Hackett, was a member of the 
Class of 1899 Yale. 

He writes: "There has been nothing unusual in the last 
three years except perhaps the unusual monotony of the medical 
student. No marriages, births, etc., can be recorded in my 
family history. The only thing is that I got the M.D.C.M. all 
right, and that was what I was after. I have a position as 
intern^ in St. Francis Hospital, Hartford, Conn., and intend to 
stay here at least a year. After that I do not know, perhaps 
the deluge. 29 Griswold Street, Meriden, Conn., will reach me 
until further notice." 

Chauncey Jerome Hamlin (B.A. 1903, LL.B. University of 
Buffalo 1905) was born in Buffalo, N. Y., January 11, 1881, 
prepared for college at The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa., and 
entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Harry Hamlin, was a member of the Class of Yale 
1876. He resides at 1014 Delaware Ave., Buffalo, N. Y., and 
is the son of Cicero J. Hamlin and Susan (Ford) Hamlin. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Grace Enos, was the 
daughter of Laurens Enos and Mary (King) Enos. 

In college Hamlin was left guard on the Freshman eleven and 
substitute tackle and right guard on the University Football 
team. He was a member of the Sophomore German Committee 
and Floor Manager of the Junior Promenade Committee. He 
was Keeper of Archives of Phi Beta Kappa, Chairman of the 
campaign committees of He Boule and Alpha Delta Phi, a mem- 
ber of Skull and Bones, and a member of the Class Cup Com- 
mittee. He held a High Oration Junior appointment and an 
Oration Senior appointment. 

He was married April 4, 1904, at Buffalo, N. Y., to Miss 
Emily Gray, daughter of the late David Gray, newspaperman 
and author. A son, Chauncey Jerome Hamlin, Jr., was bom 
March 31, 1905, in Buffalo. A daughter, Martha Hamlin, was 
born May 25, 1906, in Buffalo. 

He is practicing law in Buffalo, with the firm of Rogers, 
Locke and Babcock. 



13^ History of the Class of ipo^. 

He writes: "In response to your circular letter would say 
that since graduation I have led the life of most young law 
students. I attended the Buffalo Law School and clerked in the 
law office of Rogers, Locke and Babcock at the same time — for 
two years — taking and passing the New York bar examinations 
last spring (1905). Succeeded in capturing a couple of prizes 
in the Law School — second Clinton prize for high stand and 
first Daniels prize for the best essay on the pleasing subject of 
The Power of the Federal Congress to Regulate Corporations/ 
The essay, by the way, has been published in the Brief, volume 
v., number 425. I suppose I can therefore pose as an author. 

"The most interesting work I have been engaged in has been 
in connection with the Municipal League of Buffalo, an 
organization whose purpose is to clean up the common council 
of our city by the publication and dissemination of accurate 
information about the candidates for the various city offices. 
As the balance of power is evenly divided in Buffalo, the work 
of the League has been surprisingly effective in this the first 
year of its existence. We succeeded in ousting half a dozen of 
the worst of the grafters. 

"There is little more news to tell except that young Chanr is 
fine and healthy." 

His business address is 28 Erie St., Buffalo, N. Y. His resi- 
dence is 789 West Ferry St. 

Francis Joseph Handel (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Buffalo 1905) 
was born in Buffalo, N. Y., September 17, 1879, prepared for 
college at the Buffalo High School and entered at the beginning 
of Freshman year. 

His father, Francis Handel, died in December 1890. He was 
born in Buffalo, N. Y., and was the son of Francis J. Handel. 

His mother's maiden name was Victoria Fougeron. 

A brother, Louis Walter Handel, graduated from Yale in 
1906. 

He writes : "I entered the Buffalo Law School in the fall of 
1903, graduating therefrom in 1905. I passed the New York 
State Bar examinations in June 1905, and opened an office at 
317 Mutual Life Building, Buffalo, N. Y., October i, 1905. 
While in attendance at the law school I became a member of the 
legal fraternity Phi Delta Phi." 

His home address is 227 Linwood Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 



Handel, Hardy, Hargis, Harmount 139 

George Bradley Hardy was bom in Bangor, Maine, October 
22, 1880, prepared at the Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn., 
and at the Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and entered with 
the Qass, leaving in March 1902. 

He is the son of Amos Everett Hardy, a Register of Probate, 
and of Edith Maria (Morison) Hardy, who died in December 
1900. 

After leaving Yale, Hardy spent three months in Bangor at the 
University of Maine and then entered the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology in Boston, which he left in June 1904. His 
address is Bangor, Maine. 

Robert Richards Hargis was bom in Frankfort, Ky., July 6, 
1882, prepared for college at the University School of Kentucky, 
at Louisville, and entered in the fall of 1899, leaving in March 
of Freshman year. 

His father, Hon. Thomas Frazier Hargis, Associate Justice of 
the Kentucky Supreme Court 1880-1882, Chief Justice 1882- 
1886, is deceased. He was born in Moorhead, Rowan Co., Ky., 
June 22, 1842, the son of John Wickliffe Hargis, a lawyer, 
and Elizabeth (Weddington) Hargis. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Lucy Stewart Norvell, 
was the daughter of Judge John S. Norvell and Emily (Sum- 
mers) Norvell. 

Since leaving college Hargis has been with the Chicago, 
Indianapolis & Louisville Railway, Monon Route, and has risen 
to the position of Contracting Freight Agent at Louisville. 
June I, 1906, he was appointed Chief Clerk and Division Freight 
Agent. He lives at 430 West St. Catherine St., Louisville, Ky. 

William Loomis Harmoimt (B.A. 1903) was bom in New 
Haven, Conn., January 15, 1881, prepared for college at the 
Hillhouse High School, New Haven, and entered with the 
Qass. 

His father, Adoniram Judson Harmount, was born in New 
Haven, Conn., in 1850, the son of William Simpson Harmount 
and Jane (Morgan) Harmount. He is a lumber merchant of 
the George M. Grant & Company of New York City, residing 
in Pine Orchard, Conn. He has been a member of the New 
Haven Board of Education. 



140 History of the Class of 1903. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Ann Loomis, is 
the daughter of Merril Loomis and Caroline (Hunt) Loomis 
of New Haven. 

An uncle, Joseph A. Graves (1872), and two cousins, Arthur 
H. Graves (1900) and Mortimer H. Ailing (1893 S.), graduated 
from Yale. 

In college Harmount was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and 
held a High Oration Junior appointment and an Oration Senior 
appointment. 

He writes: "Since leaving college I have been tutoring in 
private families, during the school year of 1903-4 at Pittsburg, 
Pa., and since then at Westcliffe, Colorado. I have finished my 
work at Westcliffe, Colorado, and am not yet located, for next 
year. I am not married nor have I done any post graduate 
work. My journeys in this country have been limited to a trip 
to Plorida in 1904 and two trips to Colorado. My permanent 
address is Pine Orchard, Conn." 

Alfred Lucius Hart (B.A. 1903) was born December 10, 
1880, at Waterbury, Conn., prepared for college at the Taft 
School, Watertown, Conn., and entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father. Jay Hisscock Hart, of Piatt Brothers & Com- 
pany, manufacturers of Waterbury, was bom in New Marl- 
borough, Mass., December 11, 1847, ^^^ son of Alfred Hart, 
a farmer and manufacturer of Hartsville, Mass., and of Louise 
(Nettleton) Hart 

His mother, whose maiden name was Bertha Louise Piatt, was 
the daughter of Clark Murray Piatt, an inventor and manufac- 
turer of Waterbury, Conn., and of Amelia (Lewis) Piatt. 

Lewis A. Piatt (Yale 1879) is a relative. 

In college Hart was a member of Zeta Psi. 

He writes: "The suggestions are answered on the fourteen 
by ten mostly, except, of course, my plans— get rich and remain 
good and happy." 

He is a solicitor for The Century Company, publishers, 33 
East 17th St., New York City. His residence is 230 West 75th 
St. His home address is 50 Buckingham Ave., Waterbury, 
Conn. 

Henry Friedgen Hartjen (B.A. 1903, LL.B. New York Law 
School 1905) was born in New York City July 23, 1882, the son 



Hart, Hartjen, Hartridge, Hawks, 141 

of John Hartjen. He prepared at the Lawrenceville (N. J.) 
School and entered with the Class. 

He held in college a Second Colloquy Junior appointment 
and the same Senior appointment. 

He writes : "Left college June 1903. Entered legal profes- 
sion August 1905. Spent two years at New York Law School, 
from which I received degree of LL.B. Affiliated with Delta 
Xi, legal fraternity.^ Howard Lodge, Masonic Order. Repub- 
lican Club and Yale Club of New York City. Fifth Presby- 
terian Church. Young People's Association. Twenty-seventh 
Assembly District Club. Political work: On the stump 1903, 
1904, 1905, Citizens Union Superintendent of Watches down- 
town districts 1903, Leader of 15th Assembly District Citizens 
Union 1903, member of Hearst Law Committee 1905. Perma- 
nent address, 260 West 57th St., New York City." 

He is with the law firm of Seymour, Seymour & Megrath, 80 
Wall St., New York City. 

Julian Hartridge (B.A. 1903) was born in Jacksonville, 
Fla., July 15, 1881, prepared for college at the St. James School, 
Maryland, and entered with the Qass. 

His father, John Earle Hartridge (University of Georgia 
1872), a lawyer of Jacksonville, Fla., is the son of Theodore 
Hartridge, M.D., and Susan (Livingston) Hartridge. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Susan Fatio L'Engle, 
was the daughter of F. F. L'Engle, a civil engineer, and of 
Charlotte (Porcher) L'Engle. 

A cousin, C. W. Hartridge, graduated from Yale in 1887. 
Hartridge is a lawyer of the firm of John E. Hartridge & Son, 
Jacksonville, Fla. 

♦Maurice Fitch Hawks died of appendicitis at the Yale 
Infirmary Thursday, March 29, 1900. His illness was a very 
brief one, as up to the previous Sunday he had seemed in per- 
fectly good health. On the afternoon of that day he felt suf- 
ficiently unwell to consult a physician and at intervals during the 
following night had attacks of severe illness. Monday morning 
he was removed from his room to the Infirmary, and that night 
it was thought best to perform the operation. From this he at 

* Hartjen was President of the chapter in igo4-o5> Lewis in 1905-06, 
and Richards has been elected to serve for 1906-07. 



142 History of the Class of IP03. 

first rallied well and till Wednesday much hope was entertained 
for his recovery. Wednesday night, however, he grew weaker 
and Thursday morning at 11 o'clock he passed away, heart 
failure being the immediate cause of his death. The news of 
their loss came as a great shock to his friends and classmates, 
who had no thought but that he would be restored to them. It 
cast a deep gloom over the campus which was not soon removed. 
He was the first of the Class to go, and there were few who 
in the short time already spent in college had made for them- 
selves more friends. 

Maurice Fitch Hawks was bom in Buffalo, N. Y., December 
4, 1880, an only son. 

His father, Edward Clinton Hawks, a lawyer of Buffalo, died 
February 2, 1906. He was bom July 26, 1846, the son of 
Thomas Sidney Hawks and Hester Ann (Layton) Hawks. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Amanda Smith, was 
the daughter of Eli Botsford Smith, of Buffalo, and of Maria 
Wiley (Woehole) Smith. 

He began his education at Miss Dunstan's Private School 
in his native city. In June 1898 he graduated from the Buffalo 
Central High School and a year later from Phillips Andover 
Academy, where he completed his preparation for college, enter- 
ing Yale the following September. During his school and 
college course he displayed his characteristic energy and enthu- 
siasm as a student, maintaining a high standard of work, 
besides taking a prominent place in the various interests, social 
and otherwise, with which he was surrounded. During his 
life at Buffalo he was a member of many associations, including 
the Buffalo Field Club and the local chapter of the Children of 
the American Revolution, holding in the latter, since its founda- 
tion, the position of Vice President. 

At Andover he became greatly interested in debating and 
subsequently was elected President of the Philomathean Debat- 
ing Society, by which organization he was presented with a 
gavel at the close of the year. He was also a member of the 
school Banjo and Mandolin Clubs and acted as Class Historian 
in the Class Day exercises in June. At Yale he continued his 
work along the same lines. He became Secretary of the Fresh- 
men Union, and a member of the Apollo Banjo and Mandolin 
Club. He was Secretary of the Yale Buffalo Club and at the 



Hawley, 143 

time of his death was a prominent candidate for the editorial 
board of one of the college publications. Few men in the Class 
had accomplished more. 

It was not alone for his industry and ability that Maurice 
Hawks was respected and admired. He was beloved for his 
sincerity, modesty and thoughtfulness for others. No man had 
higher ideals, more lofty ambition or tried harder to do what 
he thought right ; no man was more ready to sacrifice himself 
to serve the interests of a friend. One of his marked character- 
istics was his love for the beautiful in nature. He had been 
accustomed to spend his summers at the seashore, Wingaersheek, 
West Gloucester, and all who knew him well will remember 
his enthusiasm and pleasure in describing the days passed there. 

Maurice Hawks lived long enough to let us know him as he 
was. His past life was the index of what he would have been 
had he lived. Though we miss him from our number, though 
we cannot take him by the hand as in our college days, we know 
that with him now and in the future, all is well. 

"So his life has flowed 
From its mysterious urn, a sacred stream 
In whose calm depth the beautiful and pure 
Alone are mirror'd; which though shades of ill 
May hover round its surface, glides in light 
And takes no shadow from them." 

C. O, Day, Jr. 

Bronson Hawley was bom in Bridgeport, Conn., April 19, 
1880, prepared at the St. Paul School, Concord, N. H., and 
entered with the Class, leaving in the fall of Freshman year. 

His father, Alexander Hawley, Treasurer of the Bridgeport 
Savings Bank, was born in Bridgeport September 5, 1843, ^^ 
son of Bronson Hawley, a sea captain, and of Rebecca (Burr) 
Hawley. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Susan Hubbell Waller, 
died April i, 1898, and was the daughter of George B. Waller, 
formerly President of the City National Bank of Bridgeport, 
and of Susan (Hubbell) Waller. 

Two brothers preceded Hawley at Yale, George W. Hawley 
(1896 S.) and Samuel M. Hawley (1899). 

He is at present connected with the Seattle Lumber Company 
of Seattle, Wash. His address is mi Harvard Ave., Seattle, 
Wash. 



144 History of the Class of 1903, 

Rowland Hazard (B.A. 1903) was born in Peace Dale, R. I., 
October 29, 1881, prepared at the Taft School, Watertown, 
Conn., and entered with the Class. 

His father, Rowland Gibson Hazard (Brown 1876), is Presi- 
dent of the Peace Dale Manufacturing Company, woolen manu- 
facturers, of the Semet-Solvay Company and of the By-Pro- 
ducts Coke Corporation, and is a trustee of Brown and Welles- 
ley. He is the son of Rowland Hazard, a manufacturer of 
Peace Dale, and of Margaret (Rood) Hazard. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Pierrepont Bush- 
nell, was the daughter of Rev. George Bushnell (Yale 1842) 
of New Haven, Conn., and of Mary Elizabeth (Blake) Bushnell. 

In college Hazard was a member of the College Choir, the 
University Glee Club, Alpha Delta Phi and the Elihu Club. 

Since graduation he has been with the Peace Dale Manufac- 
turing Company, woolen manufacturers, with the Semet-Solvay 
Company in Chicago and more recently at the latter's plant in 
Syracuse, N. Y. He had an operation for appendicitis the first 
week in July 1906 and is spending the summer of 1906 in Peace 
Dale recuperating. He expects to return to Syracuse. His 
address is Peace Dale, R. I. 

Samuel Frank Hedges (B.A. 1903, LL.B. New York Law 
School 1905) was born in Greenport, L. L, December 3, 1879, 
prepared for college at the Williston Seminary, Easthampton, 
Mass., and entered at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Samuel Parker Hedges, is a manufacturer of 
boilers and machines, and has been also connected with various 
public service corporations of Greenport. He was bom in 
Sagaponack, L. I., in 1845, the son of Robert Hedges, a carpen- 
ter and farmer of Bridgehampton, L. I., and of Phoebe 
(Parker) Hedges. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Berio Smith, was 
the daughter of Angelo Berio Smith, a whaling captain. 

In college he held a First Colloquy Junior appointment and a 
First Dispute Senior appointment. 

Hon. Henry P. Hedges (Yale 1838) is a cousin. 

Hedges is practising law with the firm of Phelps, Evins & 
East, 30 Broad St., New York City, and lives at 245 West 23d 
St His home address is Greenport, L. I., N. Y. 



Hazard, Hedges, Henry, Hess, Hewitt. 14S 

Ell Ray Henry (B.A. Washburn College 1902, B.A. Yale 
1903) was born in Cameron, La., June 12, 1879, prepared at the 
Washburn College Academy, Topeka, Kan., and entered Yale 
at the beginning of Senior year. 

His father, Samuel P. Henry, died in 1902. He was a 
graduate of Franklin College, Athens, Ohio, and was a Louisi- 
ana State Senator and Representative. 

Henry graduated from Yale with a Second Dispute Senior 
appointment and has since been in the Calcasieu National 
Bank of Lake Charles, La., holding now the position of Auditor. 

Jerome Sayles Hess (B.A. 1903) was born in New York 
City, June 17, 1882, prepared for college at the Dwight School, 
New York City, and entered with the Class. 

His father, Charles Augustus Hess, a graduate of the New 
York University Law School in 1879, was bom in New York 
City May 17, 1857, the son of Loeb Hess and Hannah Hess. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ida Doctor, was the 
daughter of Max Doctor and Bertha (Sayles) Doctor. 

In college Hess was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Zeta 
Psi. He held a Dissertation Junior appointment and a High 
Oration Senior appointment. He is a lawyer in the office of his 
father, Charles A. Hess, 50 Pine St., New York City. He lives 
at the Spencer Arms, Broadway and 69th St., New York. 

Brewer Hewitt (B.A. 1903) was bom in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
April 28, 1881, prepared for college at the Brookl)m Latin 
school and entered college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Thomas Browning Hewitt (Yale 1864), is a 
lawyer. He was born in North Stonington, Conn., September 
9, 1842, the son of Denison Hewitt and Mary P. (Browning) 
Hewitt. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Amanda Evelyn Brower, 
was the daughter of John H. Brower. 

A brother, Thomas D. Hewitt, graduated from Yale in 1899. 

In college Hewitt rowed on the Freshman crew and on the 
University Four Oar in 1901 and 1902. He was a member of 
the Senior Promenade Committee and of the Triennial Com- 
mittee. He was a member of Kappa Psi, Alpha Delta Phi 
and Skull and Bones societies, and graduated with a Second 
10 



146 History of the Class of 1903. 

Colloquy Senior appointment. Since graduation he has been 
with the Southern Railway Company, at Princeton, Ind., room- 
ing until recently with Henry C. Holt. His home address is 
122 Remscn St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Albert Hileman (B.A. 1903, Ph.D. 1906) was bom in 
Frankstown, Pa., January 18, 1879, prepared at the Phillips 
Academy, Andover, Mass., and entered with the Class. His 
father, Albert Hileman, deceased, was a farmer. 

In college he was a member of SJgma Xi and held a First 
Dispute Junior appointment and a Dissertation Senior appoint- 
ment. 

Since graduation he has been studying in the Yale Graduate 
School, receiving his Ph.D. degree in June 1906. The title of 
his thesis was "The Determination of Fluorine Eliminated as 
Silicon Fluoride." He has since taken a position with the 
Harrison Brothers and Company, manufacturing chemists, 35th 
St. and Grays Ferry, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Theodore Edward Hill was born in Williamstown, N. C, 
October 30, 1879, prepared at the Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Mass., and entered with the Class, joining 1904 in the fall of 
1900. 

His father, Edward Hill, died in 1881. He was a black- 
smith and was the son of Edward Hill and Caroline Hill. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Rosetta Keyes, was the 
daughter of Malachi Keyes and Penelope (Hyman) Keyes. 

He writes: "I was graduated with the Class of 1904 of the 
Academic Department. During the following year I was ill, 
suffering from an operation, performed just one week after 
graduation, for appendicitis. Being of poor health as pre- 
viously mentioned, I was compelled to surrender all ambitious 
endeavor to further my studies. I have been engaged in the 
office of Rufus Lewis Perry^ counselor-at-law, 375 Fulton St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y., since September of 1905, as managing clerk, 
at the same time studying law preparing to practice in the 
New York City courts. I have not had the means, health nor 
time to turn my attention seriously towards the realm of Cupid 
and hence cannot reply to any questions referring thereto. 
Letters may be sent to the above office address." 



Hileman, Hill, C, Hitchcock, H. M. Hitchcock. 147 

Charles Hitchcock, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was born in Narra- 
gansett Pier, R. L, August 25, 1881, prepared for college at the 
Pomfret (Conn.) School and entered at the beginning of Fresh- 
man year. 

His father, Charles Hitchcock, M.D., (Brown 1869) was 
bom in Providence, R. I., the son of Charles Hitchcock and 
Olivia George (Cowell) Hitchcock. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Frances Lapsley, was 
the daughter of David Lapsley and Anna (Welsh) Lapsley. 

In college Hitchcock was for two years captain and for four 
years a member of the University Golf team, was winner of the 
Intercollegiate golf tournament in Junior year, was University 
golf champion three times and Captain of the University Hockey 
team. He was a member of Eta Phi, Delta Kappa Epsilon and 
Wolf's Head societies, and held a Second Colloquy Junior 
appointment. 

He writes : "As to a 'nice long letter,' I am afraid it is impos- 
sible simply from lack of material. I am neither divorced, 
married nor engaged, nor do I hope to be ; one mouth to feed 
is quite enough at present and the complaints from that organ 
are as untuneful as were my efforts at college to get on any of 
the glee clubs. So in my case no news is neither good nor bad 
news." 

Hitchcock is with Lohrke, Rosen & Co., bankers, 30 Pine 
St., New York City. His residence is 57 West 36th St., New 
York. 

Harold Morley Hitchcock was born in Cleveland, Ohio, 
November 10, 1878, prepared at the University School of Cleve- 
land and at the St. Paul School of Concord, N. H., and entered 
with the Class, leaving at the end of Freshman year. 

His father, Peter Marshall Hitchcock, died June 9, 1906, was 
in the iron, steel and coal business, was Vice President of the 
Society for Savings of Cleveland and a trustee of Lake Erie 
College. He was the son of Reuben Hitchcock (Yale 1826) 
and of Sarah (Marshall) Hitchcock. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Wilcox, was the 
daughter of Aaron Wilcox, a banker, and of Eliza (Morley) 
Wilcox. 

Besides his grandfather, Hitchcock's Yale relatives include 



14S History of the Class of 1^03. 

three brothers, Charles W. Hitchcock (1903 S.), Reuben Hitch- 
cock (1897 S.), Lawrence Hitchcock (1898), and a great- 
grandfather, Peter Hitchcock (1801), Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court of Ohio. 

For a time after leaving college he was connected with the 
O. & J. Railroad, Branch of the M. K. J. Railway Company at 
Ada, I. T. At present he is Sales Manager of the Lincoln 
Electric Manufacturing Co. of Cleveland, Ohio. His home 
address is 861 Prospect St., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Harry Oliver Hofstead (B.A. Taylor University 1900, B.A. 
Yale 1903, M.A. Yale and the University of Maine 1904) 
was bom in New York City February 5, 1877, prepared at the 
Brooklyn (N. Y.) High School and at the Centenary Collegiate 
Institute, Hackettstown, N. J., and entered Yale at the beginning 
of Senior year. 

His father, John Evers Hofstead, who died in 1904, was a 
dry goods merchant. He was bom in 1846, the son of John 
Hofstead. 

His mother's maiden name was Elizabeth Everitt. 

Hofstead graduated with a Second Colloquy Senior appoint- 
ment. He was married before coming to Yale to Miss Mabel 
Marshall Higgins, daughter of Walter Dewitt Clinton Higgins 
(jewelry business). Mrs. Hofstead died January 18, 1904, 
leaving a daughter, Helen Mildred Hofstead, who was bom 
August 14, 1901. 

He writes: "I put in the year 1904 as student at Bangor 
Seminary, Bangor, Me., and at the University of Maine. 
Served same year as Superintendent of Public Schools, Anson, 
Me. Was ordained to the gospel ministry in the Congrega- 
tional Church, North Anson, Maine, June 1904, Rev. President 
Beach, D.D., President of Bangor Seminary, Rev. Smith Baker, 
D.D., of the Williston Qiurch, Portland, Maine, and the Rev. 
Charles Harbutt, Secretary of the Missionary Society, Portland, 
Maine, taking part in service. During one year of the pastorate 
at North Anson the membership of the church was doubled. 
The state secretary reported to state conference that the actual 
working strength of the church was nearly trebled. 

"Last year I returned to Yale and put in the year in post 
graduate work, while I am now pastor of the Congregational 



H of stead, Hogan, Holbrook, 149 

Church at Sanford, Maine. Other calls have come to me, but 
have preferred to remain here. I am in hopes of returning to 
New Haven to pursue studies for another year or two in order 
to obtain the best equipment for Christian service." 
His address is Sanford, Me. 

Thomas Nicholas Hogan was born in Hartford, Conn., 
December 6, 1879, prepared for college at the Hartford Public 
High School and entered at the beginning of Freshman year. 
He left at the end of Junior year and spent a year in the Yale 
Law School, returning to college as a Senior in the Class of 
1904. 

His father, Matthew Hogan, of the Hogan Manufacturing 
Company and at present Connecticut State Senator, was bom 
in Ireland in June 1844, the son of William Hogan and Margaret 
(Sullivan) Hogan. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ann Hanley, was the 
daughter of John Hanley and Mary (Ryan) Hanley. 

Hogan is at present engaged in the law business with Edward 
D. Robbins, 793 Main St., Hartford, Conn. Business took him 
to a ranch in Norwich, Kan., for a large part of last winter. 
His home address is 53 Grove St., Hartford, Conn. 

Charles Sumner Holbrook (B.A. 1903) was born in New 
York City March 28, 1881, prepared for college at the Has- 
brouck Institute, Jersey City, N. J., and entered with the Class. 

His father, Charles Amos Holbrook, New York City Manager 
of the Edward Miller & Co., manufacturers of lamps and brass 
goods, was born in Chester, Hampden County, Mass., February 
7, 1851, the son of Sumner Holbrook and Laurania W. (Parke) 
Holbrook. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Anna Laura Stevens, 
was the daughter of William Stevens, a farmer and stock 
raiser of Chester, Mass., and of Laura A. (Pease) Stevens. 

David S. Holbrook (Yale 1872) is an uncle. 

Holbrook is at present in the milling business with the Port- 
land Flouring Company, 224 Stark St., Portland, Ore., and 
resides at 214 King St. His home address is 162 Belmont Ave., 
Jersey City Heights, N. J. 



ISO History of the Class of 1903, 

Henry Chandler Holt (B.A. 1903) was born in Spuyten 
Duyvil, N. Y., January 13, 1881, prepared at the Phillips 
Academy, Andover, Mass., and entered college in September 
1899. 

His father, George Chandler Holt (B.A. Yale 1866, LL.B. 
Colimibia 1869, LL.D. Yale 1904), is Judge of the United States 
District Court, Southern District of New York. He was bom 
in Mexico, Oswego County, N. Y., December 31, 1843, the son 
of Hiram Holt, M.D. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Louise Bowen, 
was the daughter of Henry C. Bowen, a merchant and editor of 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Holt's Yale relatives include besides his father two brothers, 
Hamilton Holt (1894) and Stuart Holt (1899), a brother-in- 
law, R. D. Reed (1896 S.), four uncles, C. W. Bowen (1873), 
H. W. Bowen (1878), J. E. Bowen (1881), F. D. Bowen 
(1884), an uncle by marriage, R. B. Richardson (1869), and 
two first cousins, Henry S. Mathewson (1890) and Gardner 
Richardson (1905). 

In college Holt played center on the Freshman football team, 
was substitute center on the University football team in Sopho- 
more year, and regular center during Junior and Senior years. 
He was on the Senior Promenade Committee and was Chairman 
of the Class Supper Committee. He was a member of Delta 
Kappa Epsilon and Skull and Bones societies, and held a First 
Colloquy Junior appointment and a First Colloquy Senior 
appointment. 

He writes, August 1906: "i. Left college in June 1903 
and entered the Southern Railway at Princeton, Ind., November 
i> 1903. I remained at Princeton until a couple of months ago. 
I am still with the Southern Railway but am not located any- 
where in particular. I am at Birmingham, Ala., as much as any 
place, although I travel all over the Southern system. I am 
with the transportation department. 

"2. I am not married. Do not know my wife's maiden 
name, or anything about her father's full name, occupation, 
etc. Also I have no children. 

"3. I did no post-graduate work and have obtained there- 
from no degrees. 

"4. I have published no books, pamphlets or articles. 



Holt, Hooker. 151 

"5. I have became affiliated with no organizations, social, 
religious or political. I have done no work in politics and have 
held no positions of trust, honor or profit. 

"6. I have made no journey in foreign countries. In this 
country I journey about 1000 miles a week, so will not trouble 
you with the various places I have visited. 

"7. My permanent address is 'Roseland,' Woodstock, Conn. 
Letters, etc., if postage is prepaid, may be sent there with the 
certainty of their being forwarded to me. 

"8. There are no other circumstances in my career of inter- 
est to the Class. I am afraid to write too much. I can give 
no information about any other fellows in the Class which I 
think the Class would like to know but which modesty, etc., 
prevents those fellows from telling, because I never see any 
members of the Class. 

"9. Any plans which I may have involving important 
changes in the future are rather vague, consisting chiefly of 
being promoted to a better position than I now have." 

Thomas Hooker, Jr., (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 1906) was 
bom in Woodbridge, Conn., July 26, 1882, prepared at the Hop- 
kins Grammar School, New Haven, Conn., and at the Taft 
School, Watertown, Conn., and entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Thomas Hooker (Yale 1869), President of the 
New Haven Trust Company and Vice President of the First 
National Bank, was a member of the Board of Education of 
New Haven from 1894 to 1904. He was bom in Macon, Ga., 
September 3, 1849, ^^e son of the Rev. Richard Hooker and 
Aurelia (Dwight) Hooker, a sister of President Dwight of 
Yale. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Augusta Bowles, 
was the daughter of Samuel Bowles. Editor of the Springfield 
Republican and of Mary (Schermerhorn) Bowles. 

A brother, Richard Hooker, graduated from Yale in 1899, 
and a cousin, Winthrop E. Dwight, graduated in 1893. 

In college Hooker was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon and 
graduated with a First Colloquy Senior appointment. Since 
graduation he has been taking the regfular course at the Harvard 
Law School, rooming with Mansfield Ferry in Winthrop Hall, 
Cambridge. He passed the Connecticut and the Massachusetts 



152 History of the Class of 1903. 

bar examinations last June and on August i started practicing 
in the office of White, Daggett & Tilson, 42 Oiurch St., New 
Haven, Conn. He lives at 233 Qiurch St., New Haven, Conn. 

Sidney Upson Hooper (B.A. 1903) was born in Brookline, 
Mass., May 5, 1880, prepared for college at the Black Hall 
School, Lyme, Conn., and entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father, William Eldward Hooper, died June 16, 1892. 
He was born September 22, 1846 in Bridgewater, Mass., the son 
of ApoUos Hooper and Sarah Capen (Ames) Hooper. He 
resided in Brookline, and was Treasurer of the Home Savings 
Bank of Boston. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Florence Maxwell 
Upson, died October 19, 1895. She was the daughter of Edwin 
Upson and Priscilla (Maxwell) Upson. 

Hooper's Yale relatives include three first cousins: Charles 
Upson Clark (1897), John Kirkland Clark (1899) and George 
Maxwell Clark (1901), and two second cousins, William Max- 
well (1885) and Robert Maxwell (1887). 

He writes : "After leaving New Haven I went into the Audi- 
tor's office at the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad 
and stayed there 15 months (June 30, 1903 — September 24, 
1904). September 26, 1905, I took up work in the Division 
Superintendent's office of the Great Northern Railway Company 
at Larimore, N. D., and since that time have been filling various 
minor positions in various parts of this state, finally landing up 
as night yard master at Williston, N. D., December i (1905). 
There is really nothing which can be said concerning the past 
two and one-half years' work except that I have simply been 
accumulating railroad experience which I hope will some day be 
of value. I came west to get into the practical operating side 
of the work I had chosen, and can say that I am getting my fill. 

"While at times the progress seems slow and discouragement 
enters in, on the whole I am satisfied and intend to see it 
tlirough. The desolation of this outlandish region prevents 
my helping you out with any information regarding the rest of 
the Class. I hope now to get on for the big event this coming 
June, but may find it impossible when the time comes." 

His address is care Great Northern Railway, Williston, N. D. 
His home address is 545A Quincy St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Hooper, Houghteling, Howard, 153 

Francis Stockbridge Houghteling (B.A. University of the 
South, Sewanee, Tenn., 1903) was born in Chicago, 111., Febru- 
ary 4, 1882, prepared for college at the St. Paul School, Con- 
cord, N. H., and entered Yale at the beginning of Freshman 
year, leaving in the fall of 1900 to enter the University of the 
South. 

His father, James Lawrence Houghteling (PhB. Yale 1876, 
honorary M.A. 1901), of the firm of Peabody, Houghteling and 
Company, bankers, was born in Chicago, November 29, 1855. 
He was the son of William D. Houghteling and Marcia E. 
(Stockbridge) Houghteling. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Lucretia Ten Broeck 
Peabody, is the daughter of Francis B. Peabody and Harriet C. 
(Ten Broeck) Peabody. 

Houghteling's Yale relatives include two brothers, James 
Lawrence Houghteling, Jr. (1905), and William Houghteling 
(1908 s.), and four uncles, O. F. Aldis (1874), F. S. Peabody 
(1881S.), A. S. Peabody (1895) and the late H. B. Butler 
(1876 S.). 

At the University of the South he was Editor-in-Chief of the 
Sewanee Purple and Lit. and was a member of the golf team 
and of the intercollegiate debating team. 

He writes : "I have had a very uneventful life since leaving 
Yale in the fall of 1900. I immediately entered the University 
of the South and took a degree after three years honest effort 
While there, I had a very good time and was more or less inter- 
ested in a good many things. After graduation I entered the 
bond department of Peabody, Houghteling and Company, 164 
Dearborn Street, Chicago, and have been there ever since. Last 
winter I was sent on business to California. During the past 
year I have been in bad health a good deal of the time, but am 
much better now and expect that another winter on the Pacific 
coast will put me in fine shape for matrimony and the further 
pursuit of the almighty dollar." 

His residence is Virginia Hotel, Chicago, 111. His home 
address is Winnetka, 111. 

Lawrence Augustus Howard (B.A. 1903, LL.B. 1906) was 
born in Hartford, Conn., October 15, 1882, prepared for college 
at the Hartford Public High School and entered in the fall 
of 1899. 



154 History of the Class of 1903. 

His father, Arthur Ethelbert Howard, was born in Mansfield, 
Conn., February 12, 1855, the son of Ephraim Howard and 
Lucinda L. (Place) Howard. He is Special Deputy Collector 
of Customs in Hartford. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Adelaide Bagley, 
was the daughter of Leverett S. Bagley, of East Haven, Conn., 
and of Ann Elizabeth (Hallock) Bagley. 

In college Howard divided the Winston Trowbridge Town- 
send Prize with MacLane and Cobb in Freshman year. He 
held a First Colloquy Junior appointment and a Dissertation 
Senior appointment. 

He writes: "Early in the September after I graduated I 
commenced as a teacher of English in the Bloomfield High 
School, Bloomfield, N. J., remaining there during the school 
year. The summer following, 1904, I spent as a student in the 
law office of Sperry and McLean, Hartford. Late in September 
of that year I moved back to New Jersey and became teacher 
of English, principally in the Short Hills School, Short Hills, 
N. J., living in South Orange and commuting to New York 
every evening to attend lectures at the New York Law School. 
By dint of studying at odd moments and on Sundays, I managed 
to pass off my law work decently, and at the end of the year 
gave up my job in school, or, to be more correct, got fired. 

"The summer of 1905 I spent in the above named law office. 
In the fall I managed to pass off a number of hours extra at the 
Yale Law School and entered as a Third Year man. I am there 
now and hope to take my LL.B. next June ( 1906) . After that 
I shall probably begin practice for myself in Hartford." 

And later : "I took the degree of LL.B. from the Yale Law 
School last June, and am now practicing law, for myself, at 
Room 69, JEtna Life Building, Hartford, Conn., in the office 
of Sperry and McLean." 

He lives at 218 Wethersfield Ave., Hartford, Conn. 

Norman Churchill Hull (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 1906) 
was bom in Pittsfield, Mass., August 5, 1881, prepared at the 
Pittsfield High School and at the Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Mass., and entered with the Class. 

His father, James Wells Hull, President of the Berkshire Life 
Insurance Company of Pittsfield, is a member of the State Board 



Hull^ Hunt, Hurst 155 

of Health. He was born in New Lebanon, Columbia County, 
N. Y., September 20, 1842, the son of Charles Williams Hull 
and Lucina Ann (Churchill) Hull. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Helen Edwards Plun- 
kett, was the daughter of Thomas Fitzpatrick Plunkett and 
Harriet (Merrick) (Hodge) Plunkett. His Yale relatives 
include a brother, Edward Boltwood Hull (1906), an uncle, 
William R. Plunkett of the Class of 1854, and a cousin, Edward 
Boltwood (1892). 

In college Hull was a member of the University Chess team, 
held a Second Dispute Junior appointment and the same Senior 
appointment. He spent the last three years studying in the 
Harvard Law School, has recently been admitted to the Massa- 
chusetts bar and expects to practice in Pittsfield. His address 
is 40 Appleton Ave., Pittsfield, Mass. 

Roy Arthur Hunt (B.A. 1903) was bom in Nashua, N. H., 
August 3, 1881, prepared at the Shadyside Academy, Pittsburg, 
Pa., and entered college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Alfred Ephraim Hunt (S.B. Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology 1876), is President of the Pittsburg 
Reduction Company, manufacturers of aluminum. He was 
bom in East Douglass, Mass., March 31, 1855, the son of 
Leander Hunt, a manufacturer, and of Mary (Hanchett) Hunt. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Maria Tyler McQues- 
ten, was the daughter of Joseph McQuesten, a farmer, and of 
Elizabeth (Lund) McQuesten. 

In college he held a Dissertation Junior and Senior appoint- 
ment. Since graduation he has been with the Pittsburg Reduc- 
tion Company, now occupying the position of Superintendent of 
the Stamping Department of their Kensington Works. His 
residence is "B" St., Oakmont, Pa. 

George Sinclair Hurst (B.A. 1903) was bom in New York 
City March 10, 1876, prepared for college at the Mt. Hermon 
(Mass.) School and entered at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, George Gilfillan Hurst, a compositor with Bul- 
linger & Company of New York City, was bom October 16, 
1842, the son of Joshua Hurst and Frances (Bilyea) Hurst. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Emily Amanda Sinclair, 



156 History of the Class of 1903, 

was the daughter of James Sinclair and Martha (MacMurray) 
Sinclair. 

In college Hurst was a member of the College Choir and of 
the Freshman, Apollo and University Glee clubs. He was 
Chairman of the Ivy Committee, and was a member of Zeta Psi 
and of the Elihu Club. 

He writes: "Since graduation my life has been mighty 
commonplace. I have been connected with the Ycde Alumni 
Weekly, chiefly in the business department. A couple of times 
the monotony of soliciting and writing advertisements has been 
broken, once when I went for a month to Arizona in the inter- 
ests of a copper mining company. I went with Burnett Good- 
win, '99 S., in the winter of 1903. The mine was located in the 
wildest part of the Territory and we were obliged to drive 85 
miles from the nearest railroad station — ^Tucson. We had no 
guide but had been furnished a map of the section which deceit- 
fully showed us a straight trail from Tucson to camp. We 
were supposed to reach a mountain resort, Oracle, the first 
night, but in good tenderfoot fashion we got off the trail about 
sundown and soon found ourselves enveloped in blackness on 
a sheer desert without so much as a tree or shrub or stream of 
water in sight, much less a human habitation. We had a two 
days' supply of food and mineral water in the wagon but noth- 
ing for the horses. Goodwin, who knew less, if possible, than I 
about the habits and diet of horses, tried to feed them 'Uneeda' 
biscuits and sardines. They wagged their heads dolefully. I 
tried to give them 'Shasta' water out of the crown of my felt 
hat, but they bit at me. We decided at 9 p. m. to go into 
bivouac. Accordingly we took the horses out of the harness, 
tied them to the stern of the wagon and climbed upon the seat 
and wrapped each other up in a two by three lap robe. We 
were soon driven into action, however, by the impatience of the 
horses and a terrific north wind. We hitched up the steeds 
again and decided to start back whence we came. The sand 
blew into the wagon tracks we had made a few hours before 
and we had frequently to get down on all fours with lighted 
matches to hunt for the trail. We rode a short distance but the 
horses had become so weak that they couldn't pull us any 
further so we got out, opened a bottle that cheered the animals 
and nearly inebriated us and proceeded to walk. This we kept 



I 



Hyatt. 157 

up with varying fortunes till 5 a. m., when the horses ran away. 
In chasing them I fell headlong into a cactus bush and had to 
be pried out by Goodwin after he had caught the team. At 
eight o'clock in the morning we fell upon a Mexican ranch and 
left our horses there, and hiring another pair, were driven back 
to Tucson. After a sleep of about twenty-four hours we got 
our nerve back and started out again. Two days later we 
arrived in camp, where the story of the tenderfooters is still 
occasion for laughter. 

•'I am expecting to became interested with Mr. L. S. Welch, 
'89, in an enterprise independent of the Weekly and hope to 
'break ground' for it in a few months." 

His address is Box 175, New Haven, Conn. His home 
address is Danbury, Conn., R. F. D. 22. 

Roswell Bishop Hyatt (B.A. 1903) was bom in Meriden, 
Conn., March 28, 1881, prepared for college at the Meriden 
High School, and entered at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Isaac Beach Hyatt, died April 28, 1906. He was 
at his death Secretary and Treasurer of The Little, Somers 
and Hyatt Company of Meriden. He was one time Commander 
of the Merriman Post G.A.R., and later Department Commander 
of Connecticut. For many years he was Chief of the Meriden 
Fire Department and President of the Connecticut State Fire- 
men's Association. He was born in Norwalk, Conn., February 
2, 1848, the son of Roswell Hyatt and Ann Elizabeth (Curtis) 
Hyatt. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Jennie Maria Bishop, 
was the daughter of Charles Lewis Bishop and Emily Maria 
(Cochrane) Bishop. 

A brother, Willard Curtis Hyatt, graduated from Yale in 

1905. 

In college Hyatt was a member of the University Basketball 
team four years, being Captain in Senior year. He was a 
member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

He writes : "My letter must necessarily be brief, for I have 
simply been 'plugging along' since leaving New Haven, and it 
would be rather hard to elaborate upon that. I started in at the 
mills of the Qairton Steel Company, Clairton, Pa., and stayed 
there from August 1903 until Christmas of the same year. In 



iS8 ' History of the Class of 1^03, 

January I went to the Fred Macey Company in their New York 
store, but left in June and came here (The Little, Somers & 
Hyatt Company, decorators, Meriden, Conn.). There is hardly 
anything more to say. I manage to keep fairly busy for sixteen 
hours a day, and am quite contented." 

His business address is 67 East Main St., Meriden, Conn. 
His residence is 177 Liberty St. 

William Lome Irvine (B.A. 1903, M.D. 1906) was bom 
June 22, 1879, i" Marais, Manitoba, Canada, prepared at the 
Bathgate (N. D.) High School, and entered college with the 
Class. 

His father, Thomas Irvine, a farmer of Mill Creek, Manitoba, 
was bom in 1857 in Winchester, Ontario, Canada. He is the 
son of David Irvine, also a farmer, and Sarah (Smith) Irvine. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Ann Smirl, was 
tlie daughter of George Smirl, a Canadian farmer, and of Mary 
(Barkley) Smirl. 

Irvine was a member of Sigma Xi and held a First Dispute 
Junior appointment and an Oration Senior appointment in 
college. 

He writes, November 28, 1905: "Since graduation I have 
attended the Yale Medical School and expect to graduate from 
there this next June. I leave here March i, 1906, for a two 
year service as interne on the house staff of the Rhode Island 
General Hospital at Providence. This will be my address for 
the next two years. Plans for the future following these 
two years are not yet matured. 

"If it is of any interest I might say that I have been on the 
editorial board of the Yale Medical Journal for two years and 
I am now Chairman of that board for the present year." 

And later : "I took the degree of M.D. at Yale last June. I 
am on the house staff of the Rhode Island Hospital and expect 
to be here for the next eighteen months." 

His home address is Mill Creek, Manitoba, Canada. 

Henry James (B.A. 1903) was bom in Baltimore, Md., Sep- 
tember 24, 1880, prepared at the St. Paul School, Concord, 
N. H., and entered college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Nathaniel Willis James, of N. W. James and Com- 



Irvine, H, James, W: H. James, Jennings, 159 

pany, lumber merchants, was born in Baltimore, Md., January 
3, 1853, the sw of Henry James and Amelia (Gate) James. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Francis Ranson, was the 
daughter of Ambrose Robert Ranson. 

Four uncles preceded James at Yale: Henry A. James 
(1875), I^r. Walter B. James (1877), Norman James (1890) 
and R. C. James (1894). 

In college he was a member of Kappa Psi, Delta Kappa 
Epsilon and Wolf's Head societies. 

Since graduation he has been studying at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York City, 
from which he expects to take his degree in 1907. His present 
address is 527 Madison Avenue, New York City. His home 
address is Baltimore, Md. 

William Heberd James was born July 28, 1880, in Kansas 
City, Mo., prepared at the Central High School of Kansas City 
and entered in the fall of 1899, leaving in Sophomore year. 

His father, Luther Tillman James (Brown 1873), o^ *^ T. 
M. James & Sons, Kansas City china merchants, was bom in 
Kentucky, the son of T. M. James and Sarah (Woodward) 
James. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Heberd, was the 
daughter of William Heberd. 

T. M. James (Yale 1898) and D. L. James (1902) are rela- 
tives. 

James was married September 30, 1903, to Miss Aileen 
Stevens, daughter of E. A. Stevens, a real estate broker of 
Kansas City. A daughter, Virginia Aileen James, was bom 
September 29, 1904. 

After leaving college he spent four months traveling in 
Europe. He is a member of the firm of T. M. James & Sons, 
china merchants of Kansas City, Mo. 

Richard Gundry Jennings was born in Bradford, Pa., Sep- 
tember 17, 1880, the son of Edward H. Jennings, prepared at 
the Shadyside Academy, Pittsburg, Pa., and entered with the 
Class. He left college at Christmas 1899 and returned the fol- 
lowing fall for two years with the Class of 1904. In college he 
was fullback on the 1904 Freshman eleven and was a member 



i6o History of the Class of 1903, 

of Alpha Delta Phi. Since leaving college he has been with 
his father in the firm of E. H. Jennings and Brothers, oil pro- 
ducers, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Donald Kent Johnston (B.A. 1903) was born in New York 
City December 17, 1881, prepared at the Hotchkiss School, 
Lakeville, Conn., and entered college at the beginning of Fresh- 
man year. 

His father, Henry Phelps Johnston (Yale 1862), Professor of 
History in the College of the City of New York, was born in 
Trebizond, Turkey in Asia, April 19, 1842. He was the son of 
Thomas Pinckney Johnston, a missionary to Turkey, and of 
Mary Ann Cassandra (Howe) Johnston. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Kirtland 
Holmes, was the daughter of Joseph Holmes and Maria (Sel- 
den) Holmes. 

Johnston numbers among his Yale relatives two brothers, 
Henry Selden Johnston (1896) and John Holmes Johnston 
(1899 S.), and a first cousin, C. H. Walker (1899). He is 
also a descendant of the Rev. Thomas Buckingham of Saybrook, 
one of the founders of Yale College. 

In college he won a McLaughlin Memorial second prize in 
English in Freshman year, was a member of the Executive Com- 
mittee of Dwight Hall, a member of the Pundits, President of 
the Berkeley Association and held a Second Dispute Junior 
appointment and a First Dispute Senior appointment. 

He is at present studying in the Episcopal Theological School 
at Cambridge, Mass., preparing to enter the ministry. His 
home address is 221 West 49th St., New York City. 

Franklin Allen Johnston was born January 22, 1880, at 
Orange, N. J., prepared at the Berkeley School, New York City, 
and entered college in the fall of 1899. 

His father, William John Johnston, was born in Ballycottin, 
Ireland, in 1856, the son of John Johnston. He is of the firm of 
W. J. Johnston Company, New York City, who publish the 
Mining Magazine, and of the John C. Cochran Co., publishers 
of the American Exporter, 

His mother, whose maiden name was Martha Armstrong 
Allen, was the daughter of William Allen of Greenwich, Conn. 
She died in 1888. 



D, K. Johnston, F. A. Johnston, W. P. Johnston. i6i 

In college Johnston was for two years Manager of the Dra- 
matic Association. 

He was married June 2, 1906, in New York City to Miss Daisy 
Bell RobinsQn, daughter of the late Rhys Harvey Robinson, a 
London (England) stock broker, and a niece of Mr. Greet of 
the Ben Greet Company. 

He writes, May 5, 1906: "After leaving college I was 
engaged in newspaper work for one year and have spent two 
years with Mr. Greet. My work with him has brought me in 
contact with college officials, professors and students in all parts 
of the country, as our company is the only one which gives per- 
formances directly under university auspices. Unless I go to 
England to be married, I will surely be on hand for Qass Day 
next month." 

Johnston is the Business Manager of The Ben Greet Company 
of English Players. His address is 774 West End Ave., New 
York City. 

William Poyntell Johnston (B.A. 1903) was born in Wil- 
mington, Del., October 6, 1881, prepared at Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., and at the Protestant Episcopal Academy, 
Philadelphia, Pa., and entered college at the beginning of Fresh- 
man year. 

His father, Tilghman Johnston (Polytechnic College, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., mining engineer), a lawyer, was born in Wil- 
mington, Del., November 10, 1852, the son of William Poyntell 
Johnston and Jane (Tilghman) Johnston. 

His mother's maiden name was Frances Sillyman. 

A brother, Tilghman E. Johnston, graduated from the Shef- 
field Scientific School in 1905. 

In college he played on the Freshman eleven, rowed on the 
University Four-Oar crew in 1903, and was on the Senior 
Promenade Committee. He was a member of Kappa Psi, Psi 
Upsilon and the Elihu Club, and held a Second Colloquy Junior 
appointment and a Second Colloquy Senior appointment. 

He writes: "Since that memorable June of 1903 when the 
'best class ever' went forth to do or die, yours truly has resided 
in Wilmington, Del., and my chief occupation has been that of 
student-at-law and office boy. The first year after graduation 
I used to drop in occasionally at the University of Pennsylvania 
II 



i62 History of the Class of ipoj. 

Law School for a few lectures, but the strain was too great and 
I gave up the law school work and stuck to the office altogether. 
On May 3, 1906, I passed the bar examinations successfully and 
have now changed from student to attorney-at-law. I am not 
certain just yet about changing from office boy. I am associ- 
ated with my father, Mr. Tilghman Johnston, and our offices are 
at 4 West 9th Street. I am not married yet, so query number 
two can be passed without further remarks. I have not trav- 
eled very extensively during the past three years with the 
exception of returning to New Haven every time the occasion 
or chance was given me. Most of my time has been spent in 
this city. My permanent address will be 4 West 9th Street, 
Wilmington, Del." 

Joshua Henry Jones, Jr., (B.A. Brown 1903) was born in 
Orangeburg, S. C, November 22, 1876, prepared at the Colum- 
bus (Ohio) High School and entered in the fall of 1899, leaving 
Yale at the end of Freshman year. 

His father, Rev. Joshua Henry Jones, D.D., (Claflin Uni- 
versity, Orangeburg, S. C, 1885), was bom in Orangeburg, in 
October 1856, is President of the Wilberforce (Ohio) Uni- 
versity and was for six years a member of the School Board of 
Columbus. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Paine Martin, 
died April 24, 1885. 

Jones was married in Fall River, Mass., December 13, 1905, 
to Miss Helen Regina Courtney, daughter of Henry Edward 
Courtney. 

He writes: "I left Yale in 1900. Was at Brown till 1903, 
graduating there. I took a position with the Providence News 
as Sporting Editor the summer of 1903. On staff of Philadel- 
phia North American same fall. Am about to publish small 
book Trom a Reporter's Note Pad' and to publish a wedcly 
newspaper, the 'Union Advocate'." 

His address is care of the Evening News, 124 Washington 
St., or 270 Pine St., Providence, R. I. 

Nicholas Ridgely Jones (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 1906) 
was born in Springfield, 111., November 27, 1881, prepared at the 
Shattuck School, Faribault, Minn., and entered college in Sep- 
tember 1899. 



/. H. Jones, N. R. Jones, Keep. 163 

His father, James Treat Jones, Clerk of the U. S. Court of 
Springfield, 111., was bom in Tremont, 111., in 1843, the son of 
John Albert Jones and Anne Maria (Major) Jones. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Jane Maria Ridgely, was 
the daughter of Nicholas Ridgely and Jane Maria (Huntington) 
Ridgely. 

In college Jones was an editor of the Yale Record, and a 
member of the University Banjo and Mandolin Qub. He was 
a member of Phi Beta Kappa and held a High Oration Junior 
appointment and an Oration Senior appointment. 

He writes: "Have spent the three winters in Cambridge at 
the Harvard Law School. Summer of 1903 traveled abroad, 
England, France, Germany, etc., regulation tour. Summer of 
1904 spent in New York State and Springfield, 111. Summer 
of 1905 traveled through the Canadian Rockies, Pacific coast 
cities and CaHfomia, Colorado, etc. Nothing else is even as 
worthy of mention as these facts. Future address probably 
Springfield, 111., with a strong possibility of Chicago." 

His home address is 806 South 6th St., Springfield, 111. 

Robert Porter Keep (B.A. 1903) was bom in Easthampton, 
Mass., April 7, 1882, prepared at the Norwich (Conn.) Free 
Academy and at the Ludwig Georg Gymnasitmi, Darmstadt, 
Germany, and entered college at the beginning of Sophomore 
year. 

His father, Robert Porter Keep (B.A. Yale 1865, Ph.D. 
1869), who died June 3, 1904, was for a time United States 
Consul to Greece and was Principal of the Norwich Free 
Academy. He was bom in Farming^on, Conn., April 26, 1844, 
the son of Rev. John Robinson Keep (Yale 1834) and of 
Rebecca (Porter) Keep, sister of President Porter and daughter 
of Rev. Noah Porter (Yale 1803). 

His mother, whose maiden name was Margaret Vryling 
Haines, died January 7, 1893, and was the daughter of Richard 
T. Haines and Francina (Wilder) Haines. 

R. K. Clark (Yale 1903) is a second cousin. 

In college Keep was Vice President of the German Club, a 
member of Phi Beta Kappa, and on various Dwight Hall Com- 
mittees. He held an Oration Junior appointment and a Philo- 
sophical Oration Senior appointment, graduating eleventh in 
rank. 



1 64 History of the Class of 1903, 

He was married June 21, 1906, at Andover, Mass., to Miss 
Rose Anne Hardy Day, daughter of the Rev. Charles Orrin Day 
(Yale 1872), President of the Andover Theological Seminary, 
and sister of C. O. Day, Jr., (Yale 1903). 

He writes, December 10, 1905 : "Immediately after graduat- 
ing in 1903, I went to Europe, visiting friends in various cities 
of Germany en route to Geneva, Switzerland, where I matricu- 
lated at the University and did work there at the summer school 
(Ecole de Vacances). Met Steve Clark (1903) with a big 
camera and Charlie Pratt (1903) with a lot of girls in tow. 
Early in September 1903 I got back to this blessed country and 
came up here to Andover, teaching French and Latin the first 
year. George Richards (1903) was also here then, teaching 
mathematics. The following summer, 1904, Richards and I 
cruised from the first of July till the middle of August, starting 
from Chatham on Cape Cod and working westward as far as 
New Haven and Bridgeport, and then back again via Sag Har- 
bor and Nantucket. This year I am head of the Grerman depart- 
ment here at Phillips Academy and I expect to be here for some 
time to come. 

"I have enrolled as a member of the Yale Graduate School, 
and am trying to find time for some work in Grerman literature, 
tending toward an M.A., but am afraid the M.A. won't be forth- 
coming very soon. 1903 is always represented very well at the 
monthly meeting of the Boston Yale Club, which I try to attend 
always. So in that way I have kept in pretty close touch with 
various fellows and old Andover boys. Yale 1903's are fre- 
quently coming back here, and they always look me up. Only 
ten days ago Dud Lewis and Ralph Melcer were here. 'Cupe' 
Day gets out to his home here nearly every Sunday from the 
Harvard Medical School, where, by the way, he seems to be 
making a name for himself." 

His address is care Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. 

Herbert Cassius Kelly (B.A. 1903) was bom in New Haven, 
Conn., August 16, 1881, prepared at the Hillhouse High School, 
New Haven, and entered college in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Ossius William Kelly (B.A. Yale 1870, Ph.B. 
1872), City Engineer of New Haven, was born May 10, 1848, at 
Pleasantville, Venango County, Pa., the son of John Kelly and 
Sarah (Zeigler) Kelly. 



Kelly, Kennedy J Kent 165 

His mother, whose maiden name was Frances Elizabeth Hart, 
was the daughter of William Hart and Milly S. (Linsley) 
Hart. 

In college Kelly won the second Winthrop prize in Junior 
year and was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. He was author of 
the Class Ivy Ode and graduated with a High Oration Junior 
and a High Oration Senior appointment. 

He is at present teaching at the Smith Academy, St. Louis, 
Mo., and is living at 5923 Clemens Ave. His home address is 
209 Norton St., New Haven, Conn. 

Daniel Edwards Kennedy (B.A. 1903, M.A. 1906) was bom 
in New York City, August 27, 1879, prepared at the Hamilton 
Institute of New York and entered with the Class. He is the 
son of William L. Kennedy and Margaret (Edwards) Kennedy. 

He was married June 30, 1903, in Nashua, N. H., to Miss 
Elizabeth Florence Lord, daughter of Thomas Lord. A son, 
the 1903 Class Boy, Daniel Edwards Kennedy, Jr., a picture 
of whom appears on another page, was bom May 17, 1904. 

Since graduation Kennedy has lived at 17 Devon Road, 
Chestnut Hill, Mass., pursuing studies in English literature 
leading up to the Master of Arts degree. 

Francis Stanley Kent (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 1906) 
was bom October 20, 1880, in Providence, R. I., prepared at the 
Qassical High School, Providence, and entered college in the 
fall of 1899. 

His father, Edwin Francis Kent, of the S. B. Champlin Com- 
pany, manufacturing jewelers of Providence, was bom in Attle- 
borough (now North Attleboro), Mass., January 7, 1848, 
the son of Francis B. Kent and Abigail (Lewis) Kent. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Emma Stanley, was the 
daughter of John H. Stanley and Cornelia (Draper) Stanley. 

A brother, Edwin Stearns Kent, graduated from the Shef- 
field Scientific School in 1904. 

In college Kent was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, and held 
a High Oration Junior appointment and a High Oration Senior 
appointment. 

He writes : "I was admitted to the Massachusetts Bar Febm- 
ary 23, 1906, graduated from Harvard Law School June 28, 
1906, and after September 4, 1906, I expect to be with the law 



1 66 History of the Class of 1903. 

firm of Brandeis, Dunbar and Nutter, 161 Devonshire Street, 
Boston, Mass. My residence address is 891 Massachusetts 
Avenue, Cambridge, Mass." 

James Barry Kilbum (B.A. 1903, LL.B. New York Law 
School 1905) was bom in Malone, N. Y., May 28, 1880, pre- 
pared at the Franklin Academy of Malone and entered college at 
the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Frederick Douglass Kilburn, a lawyer not now 
in active practice, has been Superintendent of Banks in the State 
of New York. He was born in Clinton County, New York, July 
25, 1850, the son of Henry G. Kilbum and Sophronia (Evans) 
Kilburn. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Qara Mary Barry, 
was the daughter of James Barry and Clarissa (Church) Barry. 

Kjlburn graduated from college with a Second Colloquy 
Senior appointment. He spent two years at the New York Law 
School and is now practicing with the firm of Gifford, Hobbs, 
Haskell & Beard, 5 Nassau St., New York City. He lives at 
13s West 95th St. His home address is Malone, N. Y. 

Douglas Brooks Kimball (B.A. Harvard 1904) was born in 
Salt Lake City, Utah, October 6, 1881, the son of Edwin Kim- 
ball, deceased. He prepared at the St. Paul School, Concord, 
N. H., and entered college in the fall of 1899, leaving in March 
1900. He was at Yale a member of Beta Theta Pi. He spent 
the next five years at Harvard, four of them in the college and 
one in the law school. The year 1905-1906 he spent in the 
Law School of Boston University. 

His home address is 124 Sixth East St., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Eugene AUerton Kingman (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 
1906) was born September 3, 1880, in Providence, R. L, pre- 
pared at the Classical High School, Providence, and entered 
college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Eugene Kingman (B.A. Yale 1866, M.D. Colum- 
bia 1870), a physician of Providence, was born at Quincy, 111., 
August 8, 1843, *^ son of Lucius Kingman, a lawyer of 
Quincy, 111., and of Lucia (Holmes) Kingman. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Lucia Collins, was the 



Kilburn, Kimball, Kingman, Kinney. 167 

daughter of Frederick Collins, a manufacturer of Quincy, HI., 
and of Mary Louise (Allen) Collins. 

Besides his father, a brother, Dr. Lucius C. Kingman (1900), 
is a graduate of Yale. 

In college he was Business Manager of the Yale Courant, and 
held a Second Dispute Junior appointment and a First Colloquy 
Senior appointment. 

He writes, December 25, 1905 : "The following sums me up: 
three years at Harvard Law School with summers in the law 
office of Edwards and Angell of Providence, R. L I hope to 
spend the rest of my days in the practice of law. Present 
address: 519 Angell Street, Providence, R. L" 

Joseph Newcomb Kinney (B.A. 1903, LL.B. University of 
Cincinnati 1906) was bom in Cincinnati, Ohio, November 20, 
1881, prepared at the Franklin School, Cincinnati, and entered 
college in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Charles Dutton Kinney (transportation), was 
bom in Cincinnati in 1852, the son of Joseph Newcomb Kinney, 
who was engaged in railroading in Vermont, and of Altha 
Louise (Dutton) Kinney. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Jeannette Grove, was the 
daughter of Martin Grove, a farmer of Ohio, and of Jane (Coff- 
man) Grove. 

In college Kinney was a member of the University Orchestra, 
and held a First Colloquy Junior appointment and a Second 
Dispute Senior appointment. 

He writes, November 1905 : "In the fall of 1903 after return- 
ing from Colorado, where I spent part of the summer, I entered 
the Cincinnati Law School. Have been studying law there ever 
since. The summer of 1904 I again spent in the west, part of , 
the time prospecting for coal in northwestern Colorado. Last 
summer I was in Europe during the early part of the sum- 
mer traveling in France, England, and Scotland with my eldest 
sister, who had spent the preceding winter in Paris. As for 
the plans you speak of, I intend to take the Ohio bar examina- 
tions next month. There are also numerous other plans, but 
they are too vague just at present to be of interest to the Class. 
That in brief is a sketch of my doings and wanderings since 
leaving New Haven." 



1 68 History of the Class of ipoj. 

His business address is 706 Traction Building, Cincinnati, 
Ohio. He lives at 1423 East McMillan St., Cincinnati. 

Lucian Swift Kirtland (B.A. 1903) was born in Poland, 
Ohio, October 13, 1881, prepared at the St Paul School, Con- 
cord, N. H., and entered with the Class. 

His father. Cook Fitch Kirtland, a banker, died April 28, 1897. 
He was bom in Poland April 27, 1828, the son of Henry Tur- 
hand Kirtland and Maria (Fitch) Kirtland. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Harriet Spalding Swift, 
was the daughter of Lucian Swift and Sarah (West) Swift. 

His Yale relatives include his great grandfather, Zephaniah 
Swift (Yale 1778), Chief Justice of Connecticut, two g^eat 
uncles, Judge Rufus P. Spalding (1817), and Jared P. Kirt- 
land (M.D. 1815), and a second cousin, Charles P. Hine (1898). 

In college Kirtland was an editor of the Record, substituted 
on the Freshman crew and was a member of Alpha Delta Phi. 
He held a Second Colloquy Junior appointment and a Second 
Dispute Senior appointment, graduating with special honors in 
English. Shortly after graduation he published with C. R. 
Aldrich as co-editor, Thomas Deloney: his Thomas of Reading 
and Three Ballads on the Spanish Armada, 

He writes : " As compositors are howling for copy and as we 
have a joyous young strike on hand, my brain action is hard to 
get in running order, as you will recognize when you read the 
accompanying blank. 

"i. After leaving college (1903) I went home for a month 
and then started on a trip with Wilson Wing, Erling Ostby and 
Byron Pierce, sailing from San Francisco July 30. Visited 
Honolulu, Japan, China, the Philippines, Singapore, Penang, 
Ceylon, India, Egypt, France and England. 

"Started to work in Minneapolis in April 1904, as reporter on 
The Minneapolis Journal, Was on the Journal until Sep- 
tember, 1905, when I became editor of The Housekeeper and 
in October was elected Vice President and Director of The 
Housekeeper Corporation, publishers and printers. Have done 
some independent writing, bringing in slight pecuniar^' reward. 

"2. Unmarried and seemingly no prospects. 

"3. Am taking post graduate work under Prof. Reed, in 
absentia for M.A. in English literature. Degree expected June 
1906. 



H 
X 



2; 

a 

o 




Kirtland, Knox, Lamb, 169 

"4. Thomas of Reading, reprint from i6th century prose 
romance, J. F. Taylor & Company, New York, July 1903. No 
record of articles. 

"5. In newspaper work did my little to elect Governor John 
A. Johnson of Minnesota and Mayor Haynes of Minneapolis. 

"6. See I. 

"7. Permanent address : Poland, Ohio. 

"8. Nothing. Snowed under as far as knowing what others 
in the Class are doing. 

"9. Expect to work until I am thirty-five and then will suc- 
cumb to 'Wanderlust.' " 

Herman Warren Knox was born in Washington, D. C, 
October 11, 1881, prepared at the St. Paul School, Concord, 
N. H., and entered with the Class of 1902, joining 1903 at the 
beginning of Sophomore year. He left college in March 1901. 

His father, John Jay Knox (Hamilton 1848), who died 
Febniary 9, 1892, was at one time Comptroller of the Currency. 
He was born in Knoxboro, Oneida County, N. Y., in 1829, the 
son of John J. Knox and Sarah (Curtis) Knox. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Caroline Elizabeth Todd, 
was the daughter of William B. Todd and Elizabeth (Cillers) 
Todd. 

A brother, Irving G. Knox, graduated from Yale in 1900. 

In college Knox was a member of the Apollo Glee Club, of 
Eta Phi and Psi Upsilon. He is now in charge of the Govern- 
ment Department of Manning, Maxwell and Moore, Inc. 
(machinery and railroad supplies, etc.), 85 Liberty St., New 
York City. His home address is 56 East 77th St., New York 
City. 

Albert Richard Lamb (B.A. 1903) was born in Waterbury, 
Conn., April 22, 1881, prepared at the Taft School, Watertown, 
Conn., and entered with the Class. 

His father, George Burton Lamb, General Superintendent of 
the Waterbury Parrel Foundry & Machine Company, was bom 
October 8, 1848, the son of George Lamb and Mary (Johnson) 
Lamb. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ida Belle Johnson, was 
the daughter of Benjamin H. Johnson and Mary E. (Hall) 
Johnson. 



lyo History of the Class of 1903, 

Richard Steele Lamb (Yale 1899 S.) was a cousin. 

In college Lamb was Chairman of the News, Chairman of the 
Junior Promenade Committee, and Chairman of the Qass Day 
Committee. He was on the Board of Governors of the Uni- 
versity Club and Assistant Manager of the Bicycle team in the 
last year of its existence. He was Chairman of the Eta Phi 
Campaign Committee and a member of the Campaigpi Com- 
mittee of Psi Upsilon, and a member of Skull and Bones. 

Since graduation he has been studying medicine in the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New 
York. He has roomed for the past two years with Henry James 
and A. J. Waring. His present address is 527 Madison Ave., 
New York City. His home address is 161 Hillside Ave., Water- 
bury, Conn. 

Theodore Twyford Lane (B.A. 1903, LL.B. New York Law 
School 1905) was born July 26, 1880, in New York City, pre- 
pared at the Flushing Institute and the Flushing High School, 
Flushing, N. Y., and entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Theodore Edward Lane, is General Agent for 
New York of the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Company. 
He is the son of James A. Lane and Mary A. Lane. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Isabel Anna Gilpin, was 
the daughter of John Gilpin and Mary D. Gilpin. 

In college I^ne held a Second Dispute Junior appointment 
and a Second Colloquy Senior appointment. 

Under date of December i, 1905, he writes: "Left New 
Haven about June 30, 1903, for home ; loafed about three weeks, 
then entered the law offices of King and Conyngton in July 1903. 
Began attending the New York Law School 'on the side' in 
October 1903 ; graduated June 1905. October 14 succeeded in 
deceiving the Committee on Character for the Second Depart- 
ment, and was admitted to the New York bar and am now 
practicing law with the firm of King and Conyngton, 170 Broad- 
way, New York City. In June 1905 was elected a director of 
the New River Lumber Company ; in July was elected a director 
and Secretary and Treasurer of the Marine Construction 
Company. Permanent address is 25 Franklin Place, Flush- 
ing, L. I., N. Y. Am a member of the Flushing Institute 
Association and Yale Qub, New York City. Plans for the 
future, — to stir up strife and turmoil and profit by the resulting 
litigation." 



Lanej Latimer, Langley. 171 

William Clark Langley (B.A. 1903) was born in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., July II, 1882, prepared for college at the St Paul School, 
Garden City, L. I., and entered in September 1899. 

His father, William Henry Langley, of W. H. Langley & 
Company, merchants of 105 Worth St., New York City, was 
born in Massachusetts in 1842, the son of William C. Langley. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mara Belle Shepard, 
was the daughter of George M. Shepard. 

In college Langley was a member of the Bicycle team and 
elected Captain for Senior year. He held a First Dispute 
Junior appointment and a Second Dispute Senior appointment. 
He is at present a member of the firm of Clark, Grannis and 
Lawrence, stock and bond brokers, 10 Wall St., New York City. 
His residence is 127 Remsen St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Charles Myron Latimer (B.A. 1903) was bom in Newing- 
ton. Conn., October 21, 1880, prepared at the New Britain 
(Conn.) High School and entered college at the beginning of 
Freshman year. 

His father, Franklin Carrol Latimer, a retired farmer of 
Los Angeles, Cal., was born in Newington, Conn., August i, 
1835, the son of Erastus Latimer, a farmer of Newington, and 
of Sarah (Webster) Latimer. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Deming Wells, 
was the daughter of William Wells, a farmer of Newington, 
and of Cornelia (Deming) Wells. 

An uncle, Charles Clinton Latimer (1856 M.S.), and a first 
cousin, Heman C. Whittlesey (1880), preceded Latimer at 
Yale. 

In college he was a member of the Freshman Glee Club and 
of the track team, and held a Second Dispute Junior appoint- 
ment and a First Dispute Senior appointment. 

He writes, January 31, 1906: "Nothing remarkable or start- 
ling has, as yet, come to pass in connection with my career since 
leaving college. Shortly after graduation I started west and, 
going by a northern route, spent some time on a large stock 
ranch in Montana, hunting, fishing, etc., sports which are quite 
interesting and worth while in places where hunters are scarce 
and game plentiful. From there I went on, stopping at Tacoma, 
Portland, San Francisco, etc., and finally reached Los Angeles, 



172 History of the Class of 1903, 

where I have lived most of the time since then. Since coming 
here I have been connected with the California Fruit Agency, 
the Los Angeles Mills (flour mills) and now have taken a posi- 
tion with the firm of Edwards and Winters, real estate and 
building. I have not yet considered the subject of matrimony 
seriously and have no immediate prospects of so doing. 

"Southern California can boast a very flourishing Yale Club, 
which holds an informal dinner about every two months and a 
formal one annually during the winter. Occasionally an imex- 
pected classmate strays in to these meetings, but 1903 men are 
rather 'seldom' in California, most of the club members being 
older graduates. Rev. Arthur Phelps (Billy's brother) is 
preaching here and is a member of the Club." 

His business address is care Edwards and Winters, Laughlin 
Building, Los Angeles, Cal. His residence is 2516 East ist St. 

George Sidney Leach (B.A. 1903, LL.B. 1905) was bom 
in Worcester, England, November 13, 1878, prepared at the 
Gloversville (N. Y.) High School and entered college in the 
fall of 1899. 

His father, Charles John Leach, is foreman of the John C. 
Allen and Sons Glove Manufacturing Company of Glovers- 
ville. He was bom in Yeovil, England, December 29, 1854, 
the son of Henry Leach, of Worcester, England, and of Lucy 
(Ranford) Leach. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Emma Cooper, was the 
daughter of Richard Cooper and Anne (Upton) Cooper. 

In college Leach was a member of Phi Beta Kappa. In 
Junior year he held the Scott-Hurtt scholarship and also won 
the Scott prize in German, holding a Philosophical Oration 
Junior appointment. In Senior year he was holder of the 
Thomas Glasby Waterman scholarship, graduating fifth in 
rank with a Philosophical Oration Senior appointment. 

He writes, January 24, 1906: "The first summer after grad- 
uation — I mean the summer of 1903 — I spent nearly two 
months tutoring fellows for entrance to Yale. That fall I 
entered the Yale Law School, from which, as the blank states, I 
graduated last June. In June 1905 also I took the New York 
bar examinations, and was admitted in September. This last 
summer I again engaged in tutoring for a month. In October 



Leach J Leonard, LeVally. 173 

1905, I came down to New York and entered the office of J. 
Frederic Kemochan, 44 Pine St., and am still with him. My 
plans for the future are uncertain. So far as I can see, I shall 
live in New York indefinitely, the main object, at present, 
being to earn a living." 

He lives at 2001 Fifth Ave., New York City. 

George Everson Leonard (B.A. 1903, LL.B. New York Law 
School 1905) was bom December 13, 1879, ^^ Syracuse, N. Y., 
prepared at the Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and entered 
college in the fall of 1899. 

His father, George Samuel Leonard, the son of Samuel 
Leonard and Louise M. (Ryle) Leonard, is in the New York 
State Banking Department. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Charlotte Everson, was 
the daughter of George Everson and Caroline (Strong) Ever- 
son. 

In college LecMiard was a member of the Freshman Glee Club, 
the University Glee Club, the University Banjo and Mandolin 
Qub, and of the College Choir. He was a member of Alpha 
Delta Phi and held a Second Dispute Junior and the same Senior 
appointment. 

He writes : "Attended New York Law School, from which I 
received degree of LL.B. Member of the legal fraternity of 
Delta Chi. Admitted to the bar of New York State and formed 
a partnership with Walter B. Walker (Leonard and Walker, 
42 Broadway). (Nothing much doing either.)" 

He lives at 2350 Broadway, New York City. 

Howard Roderick LeVally was bom in Chicago, 111., July 
5, 1882, prepared at the Harvard School, Chicago, 111., and 
entered college at the beginning of Freshman year, leaving in 
June 1900. 

His father, Jonathan Reams LeVally, a member of the 
Chicago Board of Trade, was bom September 15, 1853, ^^ 
Ridgeway, Ohio, the son of James Jeflferson LeVally, a farmer, 
and of Emeline (Wilklow) LeVally. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Henrietta Jane Jones, 
was the daughter of John David Jones, a merchant, and of 
Mary E. (Williams) Jones. 



174 History of the Class of 1903, / 

A brother, Norman W. LeVally, was a member of the Class 
of 1902 Yale. 

He writes : "As you know, I did not graduate with the Class, 
leaving at the end of Freshman year. Upon my arrival home, 
I decided on a western trip and left at once to take part in an 
irrigation company promoted by two of my uncles, John H. 
Jones and Joseph A. Simpson. This was in the central part 
of Wyoming. Nearly a year was spent out there and then I 
returned to Chicago to enter the employment of one of the big 
mercantile houses. This however was short-lived, for I readily 
saw that it held no prospect for anyone who wished to make 
any more than a good living. After leaving the above concern 
I became a salesman for the Shaw Walker Company, 151 
Wabash Ave., Chicago. 

"On October 18, 1905, I was married in Chicago to Miss 
Florence Dennis Pierce, daughter of Mr. William Lewis Pierce 
(University of Chicago 1865), a real estate broker." 

LeVally's residence is 4466 Lake Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Dudley Payne Lewis (B.A. 1903) was bom in Springfield, 
Mass., January 26, 1879, prepared at "The Elms," Springfield, 
Mass., and at the Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and 
entered Yale with the Class of 1902, joining 1903 at the begin- 
ning of Freshman year. 

His father, George Smith Lewis, of the Springfield Republic 
can, was bom in Middletown, Conn., March 17, 1842, the son 
of George Smith Lewis and Mary Ann (Hubbard) Lewis. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ellen Maria Sears, 
was the daughter of Elisha Sears, a teacher and farmer of 
Middletown, Conn., and of Esther Southmayd (Hendley) 
Sears. 

Lewis's Yale relatives include a brother, Elisha S. Lewis 
(1899 S. and 1902), and three first cousins, Joseph H. Town- 
send (1885), Harold S. Amold (1900) and G. S. Arnold 

(1903)- 

In college Lewis was a class deacon, a member of the Execu- 
tive Committee of Dwight Hall, of the Cap and Gown Com- 
mittee and of Alpha Delta Phi. 

He writes: "Directly after Commencement I took a little 
trip with Gene Kingman. We started at Providence, R. I., on 



Lewis, 175 

the fourth of July, went through historic towns of Massachu- 
setts, and, after camping, fishing, swimming and exploring 
along the way, we arrived at Genets summer home in the White 
Mountains, where I was royally entertained. After a visit 
there we went over into Vermont and Joe Fairbanks met us 
and bid us welcome in the name of the Green Mountain State. 

"In the 1903 Summer number of the Yale Alumni Weekly 
appeared an article I wrote describing the portraits of Yale 
'Lit.' editors which with Stanleigh Arnold I collected during 
Senior year for the *Lit.' rooms. 

"The first of October I began a year's work with the Rev. 
H. Roswell Bates, who is minister in charge of the old down- 
town Spring Street Presbyterian Church in New York. While 
his assistant I lived at the Church Neighborhood House, 239 
Spring St., and much to my delight Arthur CoUens and Ralph 
Melcer both came down and we all became members of the 
church together. Throughout the year the hard work was 
much brightened by the occasional visits of members of our 
class, between thirty and forty of whom spent a night with us. 
Among those most often welcome were Alec. Craighead and 
Dave Cory. During the summer with the two other assistants, 
Princeton men, through the cooperation of the Tribune Fresh 
Air Committee we aided two hundred children to enjoy a two 
weeks outing in the country. Among our most interesting 
experiences were those which occurred during our outdoor 
services, conducted then for the first time in the hundred years 
history of the church. Gathered about a little portable organ 
we held gospel services on the street corner. On some Sunday 
evenings between two and three hundred men, women and 
children were attracted by the singing and by the messages of 
the speakers. Never was there a word of interruption, and 
before the summer ended, our friends, the policemen, joined in 
the singing. Thus was shown the appreciation of the practical 
work we were accon^plishing during those hot stmimer months. 
In such a work one comes into touch with all classes of society 
and while there it was convincingly proved to me that the 
most cultured, the most refined, and enlightened people all over 
New York are heart and soul interested in just such church 
and settlement work, and that much of such work could not be 
done were it not being aided constantly in a thousand ways by 



176 History of the Class of 1903. 

well known men and women whose names never appear in 
print. 

"While at Spring Street I did some writing. The Outlook 
for February 6, 1904, contained 'Wage-Earners' Opinions of 
the Church' and tlie Sunday School Times of June 25, 1905, 
published 'Mary Origgie's Part in the Success.' 

"When my year came to an end I entered New York Law 
School, where I am now looking forward to my LL.B. in 
June. Along with law I have still been engaged in the work 
at Spring Street Church and I am now rooming with Ralph 
Melcer at 244 Spring Street, the new Neighborhood House 
which was dedicated in October by Jacob Riis. 

"I am a member of the Yale Club, of the legal fraternity 
Delta Chi (am President of the New York Law School Chap- 
ter, succeeding Hart j en and being followed in office by 
Richards) and a member of the Students' Club, in which I 
have seen the excellent work Frank Gilbert has been doing 
this year." 

Lewis expects to take the New York bar examinations in 
October 1906 and later the Massachusetts examinations. His 
address in Springfield, Mass., where he expects to settle per- 
manently, is 746 State St. 

Charles Hammond L'Hommedieu (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Uni- 
versity of Michigan 1906) was bom in Jackson, Mich., May 4, 
1880, prepared at the Central High School, Detroit, Mich., and 
entered college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Richard Henry L'Hommedieu, General Manager 
of the Michigan Central Railroad, was bom in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
December 30, 1850, the son of S. S. L'Hommedieu, first Presi- 
dent of the C. H. and D. Railroad, and of Alma (Hammond) 
L'Hommedieu. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Angelina Catherwood 
Marston, was the daughter of Thomas Marston, of Felix & 
Marston, woodenware merchants of Chicago, 111., and of Emma 
(Catherwood) Marston. 

L'Hommedieu's Yale relatives include two uncles, Charles H. 
L'Hommedieu, of the Class of 1870, and Thomas B. Marston 
(1879), and three cousins: Henry Ledyard (1897), Augustus 
C. Ledyard (1898), and Hugh Ledyard (1908). 



UHotnmcdicu, Lindenberg. 177 

In college he held a First Dispute Junior appointment and a 
First Dispute Senior appointment. 

He writes: "In the fall after graduation I entered the law 
department of the University of Michigan and graduated last 
June with the degree of LL.B. June 21, 1906, I was admitted 
to the bar and am at present in the office of Russel, Campbell 
and Bulkley, 604 Union Trust Building, Detroit, Mich. 

"My work has kept me somewhat closely confined to the wilds 
of Michigan, but managed to get down to see the football game 
at Cambridge last fall and to note the ravages which the perni- 
cious influence of Harvard had made upon the 1903 men who 
were sojourning there. It was a lamentable spectacle. 

"Nothing of any real importance has happened to me since I 
left Yale. I am still unmarried and have attained to no celeb- 
rity, either in politics or out of them. My greatest achieve- 
ment was undoubtedly being runner-up in the long distance cup 
competition at the dinner in 1905, where 'Rat' Corning was about 
to award the cup to me when some officious person told him that 
Minneapolis was west of Detroit, much to his astonishment. 
The best feature of those long distance cup competitions is the 
amount of geographical knowledge which the chairman is 
forced to acquire. I will close with the statement that I am 
gradually increasing in circumference along the equator. If 
any men of our class happen to be wandering through Detroit 
I shall always be glad to see them." 

He lives at 933 Jefferson Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Paul Lindenberg (B.A. 1903) was bom in Columbus, Ohio, 
December 30, 1879, prepared at the Columbus (O.) Latin 
School and entered college with the Class. He is the son of 
Charles Herman Lindenberg, President of M. C. Lilley and 
Company, furniture manufacturers of Columbus, and of Sarah 
( Robbins ) Lindenberg. 

Two brothers, C. R. Lindenberg (1895 S.) and Frank H. 
Lindenberg (1899 S.), and two cousins, George W. Lindenberg 
(1902) and Otto H. Lindenberg (1899S.), preceded him at 
Yale. 

In college he held a Second Dispute Junior appointment and 
a First Colloquy Senior appointment. 

He was married May i, 1905, to Miss Helen Tallmadge, 
12 



ijS History of the Class of ipoj. 

daughter of Darius Tallmadge, a hardware merchant of Colum- 
bus. A daughter, Elizabeth Lindenberg, was born February 
6, 1906. 

He writes : "Greetings ! Ken Curtis is here in business with 
me. Best Luck!" 

He is General Manager of the Columbus Piano Company, 
482 North High Street, Columbus, Ohio. His residence is 
R.F.D. No. 5, Columbus. 

Charles William Littlefield (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 
1906) was bom in Rockland, Maine, December 27, 1880, pre- 
pared at the Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and entered 
college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Charles Edgar Littlefield, a lawyer and congress- 
man from Rockland since 1899, is the son of the Rev. William 
H. Littlefield and Mary (Stevens) Littlefield. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Clara Nichols Ayer, 
was the daughter of William Ayer, a farmer. 

In college Littlefield was Captain of and played first base on 
the Freshman nine, was substitute on the University nine, and 
held a Second Colloquy Junior appointment and a Second 
Dispute Senior appointment. He was a member of Eta Phi, 
Delta Kappa Epsilon and Scroll and Key societies. 

He writes, December 1905 : "I came up here to Cambridge 
and entered the Law School the next fall after I got through 
in New Haven in 1903. That summer and the two that fol- 
lowed, 1903-4-5, I have been in the summer hotel business in 
Castine, Maine, assisting to run a tavern with my cousin, W. 
A. Walker. Outside of that I have not done anything but be 
good. I have not been married and consequently have no 
children. I have already said that I have been doing post 
graduate work here in law for the past two and a half years, 
and if fortune favors me as it has up to date, I expect to take 
the degree of LL.B. in June 1906. 

"Unfortunately all my books, pamphlets, etc., have been 
rejected. While up here I have joined the legal fraternity so 
called of Phi Delta Phi, I think. I have done nothing in politics 
and have held no position of honor that I know of. I have 
taken no journeys to foreign lands. Letters will be sure to 
reach me if sent to 96 Limerock St., Rockland, Maine. I 



Littlefield, Lockwood, Long. 179 

don't think of anything else about me or anybody else that 
would interest the Class. I haven't fully decided yet where I 
will go on leaving the law school, but I think the chances are 
rather in favor of my settling in New York City." 

And later, August 1906: "I received an LL.B. from Har- 
vard in June last and am now in the office of Hughes, Rounds 
and Schurmann, 96 Broadway, and am living at 80 Washington 
Square, New York City." 

Franklin Lockwood (B.A. 1903) was bom in New York 
City April 3, 1881, prepared at the Brooklyn (N. Y.) Latin 
School and entered college in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Stephen O. Lockwood (Albany Law School 
1870), of Crane and Lockwood, was born in Marathon, N. Y., 
September 29, 1848, the son of the Rev. Daniel T. Lockwood, 
a Baptist clergyman, and Ann Augusta (Franklin) Lockwood. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth D. Stevens, 
was the daughter of Edmimd Stevens and Mary Jane (Walsh) 
Stevens. 

Lockwood is at present junior law clerk in the office of 
Crane and Lockwood, 46 Wall St., New York City. His home 
address is 17 East 57th St. 

Arthxir Channing Long (B.A. 1903, B.S. Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology 1905) was bom in Sharon, Mass., April 
8, 1882, prepared at the Roxbury (Mass.) High School and 
entered at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Fred Dwight Long, of Long Brothers, Sharon 
merchants, was bom in Sharon January 5, 1857, the son of 
John Long and Louisa (Packard) Long. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Juliette Amelia Gooch, 
was the daughter of Samuel Gooch and Elizabeth Wales 
(Dickerman) Gooch. 

Dr. Loring B. Packard (Yale 1899) is a relative. 

In college Long was a member of Phi Gamma Delta and 
held an Oration Junior appointment and an Oration Senior 
appointment. He spent two years at the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology and is now with the Boston Dairy Company, 
484 Rutherford Ave., Charlestown, Mass., as chemist and 
bacteriologist. His permanent address is Sharon, Mass. 



i8o History of the Class of 1903. 

Willard Armstrong Lyon (B.A. 1903) was born in Middle- 
town, N. Y., February 10, 1880, prepared at the Hotchkiss 
School, Lakeville, Conn., and entered college at the beginning of 
Freshman year. 

His father, Charles Torrey Lyon, who died September 18, 
1887, was a member of Armstrong and Lyon, Middlctown 
merchants. He was born in Ashford, Conn., May 27, 1846, the 
son of Willard Lyon and Harriet (Pearl) Lyon. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Julia Armstrong, was 
the daughter of Lewis Armstrong and Ellen A. (Robertson) 
Armstrong. 

In college Lyon held a Second Dispute Jvmior appointment 
and a First Dispute Senior appointment. 

He is at present with the First National Bank of Middletown, 
N. Y. His home address is 44 East Ave., Middletown, N Y. 

Randolph Lyons (B.A. 1903) was bom in New Orleans, La., 
August 31, 1881, prepared for college at the Taft School, 
Watertown, Conn., and entered Yale at the beginning of Fresh- 
man year. 

His father, Isaac Luria Lyons, of the I. L. Lyons and Com- 
pany, Limited, wholesale druggists, was born in Charleston, 
S. C, May 31, 1857, the son of I. C. Lyons, a merchant of 
Columbia, S. C, and of Louise E. (Hart) Lyons. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Eva Jonas, was the 
daughter of George Jonas and Rosalie (Black) Jonas. Mr. 
Jonas was President of the Canal Railroad of New Orleans. 

Irving Luria Lyons (Yale 1900 S.) is a brother. 

In college Lyons was a member of the Dramatic Association, 
of Kappa Psi, Psi Upsilon and Wolf's Head. 

He writes: "After leaving college I came to New Orleans 
and entered the Tulane Medical School. Last summer I went 
up to Boston and took some courses in Clinical medicine. 
Have had no time for politics. Am a member of a number of 
clubs here." 

His address is 2344 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans, La. 

John Hart McAlamey was bom in Harrisburg, Pa., May 8, 
1881, prepared at the Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn., 
entered college with the Class of 1902 and was a member of 1903 
during Freshman year. 



Lyon, McAlarney. i8i 

His father, Mathias Wilson McAlarney, proprietor of the 
Harrisburg Publishing Company, died December 5, 1900. He 
left Bucknell College to go to war, and was Provost Marshal 
from 1861 to 1865. He was for twelve years Postmaster of 
Harrisburg. He was bom in Mifflingburg, Pa., June 7, 1840, 
the son of John McAlarney and Catharine (Wilson) McAlarney. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ada Hoffman, was the 
daughter of Jacob D. Hoffman and Eve (Romberger) HoflF- 
man. 

He writes: "In the early part of July 1900 I assumed charge 
of the Harrisburg Publishing Company under the direction of 
my father until his death in December of that year, and from 
then on until April of 1901 took care of the estate's interests in 
that company. I then received an appointment in the Internal 
Revenue Service for the 9th District of Pennsylvania but found 
that there was too much politics mixed up with that game 
and, not having the age to vote, politics were not entirely 
interesting. In February of the following year I accepted a 
position in the traffic department of the Pennsylvania Tele- 
phone Company and was afterwards appointed a local manager 
for the Clearfield, Pa., district. In September 1903 I located 
with the Harbison- Walker Refractories Company of Pittsburg 
at their Cambria County plant and enjoyed something over 
three months strike-breaking and handling the foreign legion 
until my transfer to their Pittsburg Sales Department in Decem- 
ber of that year. J. R. Robinson and K. D. Dark joined the 
Sales Department in January and with Stirling Bell formed a 
little coterie of Yale men. In March of 1905 I accepted a 
position with the Thomas Reese, Jr. Company, Inc., engineers 
and contractors, to take charge of the financial and business end 
of their Lebanon plant, and will probably remain here until the 
first of the year, when I hope to return to Pittsburg. 

"Nothing of especial interest to the Qass has happened to me, 
I am neither married nor on my way to it, and there is too much 
of the 'Wanderlust' in my veins to allow me to settle down for 
some time to come. And that same restlessness will probably 
be the means of my getting back to the Qass reunion this com- 
ing spring (1906). Count me in on anything there is and 
believe me, that though I was only fortunate to be with 1903 for 
one year, yet in that time I met many men I am anxious to 
see again." 



1 82 History of the Class of ipoj. 

His present address is Lebanon, Pa. His home address is 
1622 N. Second St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Harvey Childs McQintock (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 
1906) was bom in Pittsburg, Pa., July 16, 1882, prepared at 
the Shadyside Academy, Pittsburg, and at the Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., and entered at the beginning of Freshman 
year. 

His father, Oliver McClintock (Yale 1861), of the Oliver 
McQintock Company, wholesale carpet merchants of Pittsburg, 
was bom in Pittsburg October 20, 1839, the son of Wash- 
ington McClintock, a wholesale carpet merchant of Pittsburg, 
and of Eliza (Thompson) McClintock. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Clara Courtney Childs, 
was the daughter of Harvey Childs, a wholesale boot and shoe 
merchant of Pittsburg, and of Jane Bailey (Lowrie) Childs. 

Besides his father, McClintock's Yale relatives include two 
brothers, Norman McClintock (1891) and Walter McClintock 
(1891), a brother-in-law, Thomas Darling (1886), and four 
uncles, Albert H. Childs (1861), Walter L. McClintock (1862), 
Frank T. McClintock (1865) and Thompson McClintock 
(1870). 

In college McQintock played fullback on the Freshman 
eleven, was substitute on the Freshman crew, and held a Second 
Colloquy Junior appointment and a First Colloquy Senior 
appointment. He was a member of Kappa Psi, Delta Kappa 
Epsilon and of the Elihu Qub. 

He writes, December 1905 : "Expect to get an LL.B. from the 
law department of Harvard University next June, and then 
start in practicing law in some office in Pittsburg, Pa., in the 
fall ( 1906) . Expect to take my bar examinations for the State 
of Pennsylvania in December of 1906. My permanent address 
is and will be Amberson Avenue, Pittsburg, Pa. While in the 
law school I have been rooming with the Toby Peckhams (i.e. 
human and canine) in 3 Winthrop Hall, this hall being the 
abode of a number of fellows in our class. My father owns 
a cottage at the Huron Mountain Club, Marquette, Mich., 
where I expect to spend the summer of 1906, and probably any 
other vacation which I am able to get in future summers." 



McClintock, McCormick, McCulloch, 183 

Robert Rutherford McCormick (B.A. 1903) was bom in 
Qiicago, 111., July 30, 1880, prepared at the Groton (Mass.) 
School and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Hon. Robert Sanderson McCormick, is a grad- 
uate of the University of Virginia and the present United States 
Ambassador to France. He was Secretary of the United States 
Legation at London, Ambassador to Austria and Ambassador 
to Russia. He was born in Virginia in 1850, the son of 
William McCormick and Mary (Grigsby) McCormick. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Catherine Medill, was 
the daughter of Joseph Medill, of Chicago, and of Catherine 
(Patrick) Medill. 

McCormick's Yale relatives include a brother, Joseph Medill 
McCormick (1900), and foiw cousins: R. H. McCormick, Jr. 
(1900), J. M. Patterson (1901), McCormick Blair (1906) and 
Chauncey McCormick (1906). 

In college he was , Treasurer and later President of the 
University Club. He was on the campaign committees of 
Kappa Psi and Alpha Delta Phi and was a member of Scroll 
and Key. 

After leaving college he studied law at Northwestern Univer- 
sity. In March 1904 he was nominated by the Republican 
party for Alderman in the Twenty-first Ward of Chicago. The 
vote in the election was McCormick (Republican) 4,153 and 
Sheahan (Democrat) 3,571. In November 1905 he was elected 
Pi^sident of the Sanitary District of Chicago, the vote being 
McCormick (Republican) 87,443 and Wenter (Democrat) 
79,676. 

He writes: "As to my life since graduating from college, 
which has been neither so interesting nor so successful as you 
seem to think, if you were to say that I have felt obliged to 
spend ninety per cent, of my time in saloons and the remaining 
ten per cent, in bar-rooms, you would about have it correct." 

His business address is Security Building and his residence 
12 Washington Place, Chicago, 111. 

Earl C. McCuUoch (D.D.S. College of Dental and Oral 
Surgery, New York, 1903) was born in Central Bridge, N. J., 
July 12, 1878, and prepared at the Gloversville (N. Y.) High 
School. He entered Yale with the Class, leaving in November 
1900 to study dentistry, and graduated first in his class. 



184 History of the Class of 1903, 

His father, Charles McCulloch (M.D. Albany Medical Col- 
lege 1877), died October 5, 1898. He was born in Coeymans, 
N. Y., in 1845, the son of William C. McCulloch. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Antoinette Terwilliger, 
was the daughter of Christopher V. Terwilliger and Dorothea 
(Joslin) Terwilliger, who are both living, aged eighty-seven 
and eighty-three respectively. 

A brother, Charles Ramsey McCulloch, is now in Yale, a 
member of the Class of 1909. 

He writes: "I left Yale in November of 1900 and entered 
a dental college in New York, from which I graduated in 1903. 
After practicing for two years in New York I removed last 
summer (1905) to Gloversville, where I am now located." 

His address is 161 Bleecker St., Gloversville, N. Y. 

♦Irving McDonald (B.A. 1903) died November 15, 1903. 
It is a duty associated with much grief to write of the death of 
a classmate, but when that classmate has been a lifelong friend 
and companion the duty becomes a sorrowful one indeed. 

Irving McDonald was born in St. Joseph, Mo., November 5, 
1881, prepared at the St. Joseph High School and at the Taft 
School, Watertown, Conn., and entered college with the Class. 

His father, John Irving McDonald (Yale 1878), of the R. L. 
McDonald & Company, wholesale dry goods and manufac- 
turers of men's furnishings of St. Joseph, was bom in St. 
Joseph June 11, 1858, the son of Rufus Lee McI>onald and 
Mary Ann (Wilson) McDonald. Mrs. R. L. McDonald was 
the daughter of General Robert Wilson, United States Senator 
from Missouri. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Frank Haskell Fanning, 
was the daughter of Frank Fanning and Sarah (Scott) 
Fanning. 

A great uncle, John Wilson, graduated from Yale in 1847. 

Irving McDonald's life in college is more or less familiar to 
us all. While not a student in the strict sense of the word, he 
always maintained a high standing in his class and did so with 
the ease and apparent absence of effort which marks the quick, 
ready and absorbing mind. When his interest was aroused he 
showed a wonderful capacity for work and originality of 
thought. These mental qualities had already begun to assert 



McDofiald, McDonough, 185 

themselves in his short business career after college and a life 
full of every promise of success was ended by his sudden death 
five months after graduation. He died the victim of an unfor- 
tunate accident, which left sorrowing his family, friends and 
the entire community in which he lived. 

In his home he was the idol of his father and mother and 
loved and admired by his brother and sister. To know him was 
to love him, is the story of his social life. There never was a 
truer friend or a more genial and pleasant companion. It has 
been nearly three years since his death, yet among his intimate 
circle of friends his name is still fresh and his absence a lasting 
regret. His companionship was always sought, for he was 
truly a radiating focus of life, good will and happiness. He 
possessed a kind, generous and singularly unselfish disposition, 
ever ready to sacrifice his own pleasure for the enjoyment of 
those he loved. He was brave and honorable in every act; 
courteous and gentlemanly in all his associations with men. 
These noble traits of character endeared him to all who knew 
him and the Class of 1903 together with his many other friends 
will ever honor and cherish the memory of Irving McDonald. 

John Barrow Motter. 

At the Triennial Meeting of the Class, June 26, 1906, the fol- 
lowing resolutions were adopted : 

Whereas, It has pleased God in His infinite wisdom to 
remove from among us our beloved friend and classmate, Irving 
McDonald, be it 

Resolved, That his untimely death came as a shock and sur- 
passing grief to his friends, and that in behalf of the Class we 
hereby desire to convey to his family our keen sorrow and great 
sense of loss ; and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to his 
family and entered in the records of the Qass. 

Alfred H. Bill^ 
WiLLARD A. Lyon, 
J. R. Wait, 

for the Class of 1903. 

James Patrick McDonough (B.A. 1903, M.F. 1905) was 
bom in New Haven, Conn., October 29, 1881, prepared at the 
Hillhouse High School, New Haven, and entered college in the 
fall of 1899. 



1 86 History of the Class of 1903. 

His father, Francis McDonough, a machinist with the New 
York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Company, was bom 
in Hartford, Conn., in 1857, the son of James McDonough and 
Susan (Munsey) McDonough. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Catherine Donnelly, 
was the daughter of Patrick Donnelly and Mary (Keefe) 
Donnelly. 

McDonough held in college a Second Colloquy Junior appoint- 
ment and a Second Colloquy Senior appointment. 

He writes : "Have attended the Yale Forest School for two 
years and since graduation have been in the employ of the 
Chicago Lumber and Coal Company, doing their engineering 
work, at present at their plant situated in Warren, Ark." 

His home address is 38 Hallock St., New Haven, Conn. 

Andrew Duncan Mcintosh (B.A. Highland University 1899, 
B.A. Yale 1903) was born in Troy, Kansas, November 14, 1880, 
the son of Duncan Mcintosh of Chicago, 111. He entered Yale 
at the beginning of Senior year and graduated with a High 
Oration Senior appointment. He is now teaching in the Taft 
School, Watertown, Conn. 

David Ritchie McKee, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was bom in Wash- 
ington, D. C, June 6, 1879, prepared at the St. Paul School, 
Concord, N. H., and at the Phillips Academy, Exeter, N. H., 
and entered college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, David Ritchie McKee, now retired, for many 
years Washington Agent of the Associated Press, was born in 
Wheeling, W. Va., September 17, 1842, the son of Redick 
McKee and Eliza (Ritchie) McKee. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Frances Elizabeth 
Dunn, was the daughter of William McKee Dunn, M.C., Judge 
Advocate General, U. S. A., and of Elizabeth (Lanier) Dqnn. 

McKee's Yale relatives include his grandfather, William 
McKee Dunn (M.A. 1835), a great uncle, Alexander Lanier 
(1844), and two brothers, Lanier McKee (1895) and McKee 
Dunn McKee (1896). 

In college he was a member of the Senior Promenade Com- 
mittee, head Cheer Leader, and Commodore of the Corinthian 
Yacht Club. He was on the Freshman and Apollo Glee clubs. 



Mcintosh, McKee. 187 

and was a member of Eta Phi, Delta Kappa Epsilon and the 
Elihu Club. 

He writes: "Although my career has not been one to cause 
Teddy the Strenuous to single me out from among the other 
pikers for special distinction, here goes. Immediately after 
graduation I hied me to the coal regions of Pennsylvania to a 
burg called Scranton, where I entered the employ of the Lacka- 
wanna Railroad in the coal mining department. For one year 
and a half I was disguised as the human mole in the bowels of 
the earth, arising winter and summer alike at the bewitching 
hour of 5 130 A. M. In college I used to think how hard it was 
to go to chapel at 8:10, but in comparison to this period of day 
it was a dream of paradise. During the mining period I found 
my knowledge of geology extremely useful in deciphering the 
footprints of the many strange animals that lived many years 
ago. I would not dare to spell any names. Finally I came to 
the conclusion that my golden future was more or less becoming 
buried, and having an opportunity to come to Qiicago did so. 
I entered the employ of the Western Steel Car and Foundry 
Company, a large company manufacturing freight cars. The 
plant is about thirty miles from Chicago, situated in the middle 
of the prairie, and a more desolate, God-forsaken place I never 
saw. However, I went out there and lived and worked in the 
shops from January until June, doing a little of everything from 
working on a lathe on the night shift in the machine shop to 
stuffing waste in journal boxes, at a munificent renumeration 
of twenty cents an hour, however gaining my object, a detailed 
knowledge of car construction. In June I was transferred to 
the city office in the purchasing department and was there 
until the first of December 1905, when I took a position with 
the present company. The T. H. Symington Company, Railway 
Exchange Building, Chicago, in their sales department, hand- 
ling railway supplies. The present job is the best I have had, as 
it takes me around the country and does not cause me to be 
painted to the chair, classed with the countless army of pale- 
faced clerks. My permanent address is Yale Qub, 30 West 
44th St., New York City. I am a member of the Saddle and 
Cycle Qub and of the Union Club of Chicago." 

His present residence is 30 Walton Place, Chicago, 111. His 
home address is 1753 Rhode Island Ave., Washington, D. C. 



1 88 History of the Class of ipoj. 

Cameron Mackenzie (LL.B. New York Law School 1906) 
was bom in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., September 7, 1882, prepared at 
the Lawrenceville (N. J.) School and entered college with the 
Class, leaving at the end of Sophomore year. 

His father, James Cameron Mackenzie (Lafayette 1878), 
headmaster of the Lawrenceville School from 1882 to 1899 ^uid 
since of the Mackenzie School at Dobbs Ferry, was born in 
Aberdeen, Scotland, August 15, 1852, the son of Alexander 
Mackenzie, an officer of the Black Watch, and of Katherine 
(Cameron) Mackenzie. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ella Smith, was the 
daughter of Richard Smith (insurance), and Sarah (Mills) 
Smith. 

He writes: " I left Yale at the end of Sophomore year and 
immediately went to work as a reporter on the New York Sun. 
I remained there two years and in the spring of 1903 set oflF 
for Central and South America. For nearly a year I traveled 
through various republics and upon my return devoted six 
months or so to marketing the material which I had obtained^ 
though my success was not up to my hopes by any manner of 
means. Nevertheless I determined upon a newspaper and 
magazine career and determined by way of training to put in a 
couple of years at law. Accordingly I registered at the New 
York Law School. There I met a number of 1903 men, Leon- 
ard, Lewis, Melcer, Fitch, etc., and joined the Delta Chi fra- 
ternity in which there were several 1903 fellows. Last June I 
passed the examinations and continued my reading this year. 
I will finish this June and expect to go on the staff of some New 
York daily." 

And later, August 1906: "I am an LL.B., one of the New 
York Law School products, and at present am on the telegraph 
desk of the Evening Sun, 170 Nassau Street, New York City. 
Address: The Benedict,' 80 Washington Sq. East, New York." 

Donald McKesson (B.A. 1903) was bom June 2, 1881, at 
Monmouth Beach, N. J., prepared at the St. Paul School, 
Concord, N. H., and entered college at the beginning of Fresh- 
man year. 

His father, John McKesson, Jr. (College of the City of New 
York, Class of 1859), of McKesson and Robbins, wholesale 



Mackenzie, McKesson, Mc Knight, 189 

druggists of New York City, was born in New York City April 
21, 1840, the son of John McKesson, a New York merchant, 
and of Maria McKesson. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Leila Sweetser Forbes, 
was the daughter of John Elias Forbes, a merchant of New 
York City, and of Laura S. Forbes. 

He writes, March 22, 1906: "My life since graduation has 
been most uneventful. To take up by paragraphs according to 
your suggestions: 

"i. Residence since leaving college, 247 Fifth Ave., New 
York (winter) ; Monmouth Beach, N. J. (summer). I started 
in the drug business in my father's firm of McKesson and 
Robbins immediately after graduation and am still with them. 

"2. I have not yet been led into matrimony nor have I yet 
selected names for any of the children I might have, should 
such honours be thrust upon me. 

"3. I have been able to do no post graduate work. 

"4. No publications. 

"5. I am a resident member of the Yale Club. I was elected 
an active member of Company K, 7th Regiment, N. G. N. Y., 
on October i, 1903, and have done one hundred per cent, of 
duty with that organization since. 

"6. I went to St. Louis for the Fair there, but have scarcely 
been away from New York City. 

"7. Permanent address: 91 Fulton Street, New York City. 

"8. Have not had time to get into trouble. 

"9. I expect to move my regular residence to 'Roaring Brook 
Farms', Chappaqua, N. Y., in the course of this or next month. 
The most excitement the future seems to hold out is turning up 
at New Haven for Triennial." 

Robert Lewis McKnight (B.A. 1903) was born in Spring- 
field, Mass., June 30, 1880, prepared at the Hotchkiss School, 
Lakeville, Conn., and entered college in September 1899. 

His father, John D. McKnight, who died December 20, 1890, 
was in tfie real estate business with J. D. and W. H. McKnight 
of Springfield. He was born in Truxton, N. Y., January 28, 
1834, the son of Charles McKnight and Almira (Qapp) 
McKnight. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Elizabeth Hub- 



190 History of the Class of 1903. 

bard, was the daughter of Hiram Williams Hubbard and Mary 
Sloane (Galpin) Hubbard. 

S. T. Mcknight, Jr., (Yale 1907) is a cousin. 

In college McKnight played second base on the Freshman 
and College nines. He was a member of Eta Phi, Delta Kappa 
Epsilon and Wolf's Head societies. 

Of his doings since graduation he writes: "As far as I can 
make out the most I have done and the most successfully is 
being sick. Malaria immediately after college closed until 
October had me guessing and then a good four months siege 
of typhoid occupied me until March 1904, when I foolishly 
started in work too soon at the American Pin Company at 
Waterbury. In May I had appendicitis and had it picked out, 
and in November 1904 had an operation of my leg, resulting 
from the typhoid fever. Left the American Pin Company in 
April 1905 in poor health and with F. Farrel, Jr., went to Cuba 
for a short time and then to Fort Hancock, Texas, where I 
was with Kid Aldrich on his place there — irrigation business — 
Gratz Dent (1902 S.) also. On my way out stopped over with 
Walter Sullivan. He was working hard and seemed to be 
perfectly happy. Returned in the fall of 1905 and since then 
have been trying to keep well, and have just returned (March 
igo6) from Cuba and Jamaica. My plans for the future 
depend upon the state of my health." 

His business address is 137^^ State St., Springfield, Mass. 
His home address. Glen Road, Springfield. 

Donald Bradford MacLane (B.A. 1903, B.D. Union Theo- 
logical Seminary 1906) was bom in Steubenville, Ohio, January 
19, 1882, prepared for college at the Hillhouse High School, 
New Haven, Conn., and entered in September 1899. 

His father. Rev. William Ward MacLane, D.D., (B.A. Black- 
bum 1871, Ph.D. Yale 1889), is a Congregational clergyman 
of New Haven. He was born in Pennsylvania in 1846, the son 
of John McLane and Julia A. (Fisher) McLane. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Frances Robinson, 
was the daughter of William W. Robinson (Yale 1842) and of 
Frances (Robbins) Robinson. 

Besides his grandfather, MacLane's Yale relatives include 
two brothers, John F. MacLane (1900) and Stanley R. Mac- 



MacLane, Mac Lean, 191 

Lane (1906), and two cousins, Robbins Anderson (1899) and 
Howard Robbins (1899). 

In college he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and held a 
Philosophical Oration Junior appointment and a Philosophical 
Oration Senior appointment, graduating fourth in rank. He 
divided with Cobb and Howard the Winston Trowbridge Town- 
send prize in Freshman year and was the Learned Scholar 
in Senior year. 

He writes : "The only item additional is that throughout my 
Seminary course I have assisted the ministers in the Church 
of the Sea and Land (Settlement and Presb)rterian Church in 
New York). The summer of 1904 I spent there. The sum- 
mer of 1905 I preached in a parish in Vermont, East Corinth." 

His home address is 33 Howe St., New Haven, Conn. 

Henry Coit MacLean (B.A. 1903) was bom in Litchfield, 
Conn., November 15, 1881, prepared at the Hotchkiss School, 
Lakeville, Conn., and entered college at the beginning of Fresh- 
man year. 

His father. Rev. Allan McLean (Yale 1865), a Congrega- 
tional clergyman, died April 21, 1882, in Jacksonville, Fla. He 
was born in East Granby, Conn., November 17, 1837, the son of 
the Rev. Neil McLean, of Simsbury, Conn., and of Emiline 
(Barbour) McLean. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Fanny Maria Coit, was 
the daughter of Henry R. Coit, of Litchfield, and of Frances E. 
(Olmstead) Coit. 

Allan MacLean (Yale 1900) was a brother. 

In college MacLean was a member of the Apollo Banjo and 
Mandolin Club and of the Dramatic Association. He held a 
Second Colloquy Senior appointment. 

Since graduation he has been with the United States Express 
Company in their Correspondence and Claim Department, 49 
Broadway, New York City, holding the position of Correspond- 
ent and Claim Agent. 

He writes : "This letter head will tell you how I have occupied 
myself since graduation and it has left me very little time for 
anything else. As you know, I spent the summer after leaving 
New Haven traveling in Europe, England and Scotland. I got 
back in October and started to work for the United States 



192 History of the Class of 1903, 

Express Company early in November 1903. I am not married 
and do not expect to be at present. These few facts with a bit 
of society life account for the past three years." 

His business address is 555 West 23d St., New York City* 
His residence and home address is loi Park Ave. 

Arthur Manierre (B.A. 1903) was bom in Evanston, 111., 
April 29, 1 88 1, prepared for college at the University School, 
Chicago, and entered at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, George Manierre (Yale 1868), is a member of the 
firm of Dibblee & Manierre, real estate, and is a life trustee of 
the Field Museum and of the Newberry Library of Chicago. 
He was born in Chicago February 5, 1845, the son of Judge 
George Manierre and Ann Hamilton (Reid) Manierre. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ann E. Edgerton, was 
the daughter of Alfred Peck Edgerton, M.C., and of Charlotte 
(Dixon) Edgerton. 

Manierre's Yale relatives include three brothers: Louis 
Manierre (1901), Alfred Edgerton Manierre (1902) and 
Francis Edgerton Manierre (1907), and a cousin, Edgar 
Edgerton Swartwout (1891). 

In college he was on the University Gun team and was Secre- 
tary and Treasurer of the Gun Club. Since graduation he has 
been with the Pullman Palace Car Company. 

His address is 61 Bellevue Place, Chicago, 111. 

Paul Ford Mann (B.A. 1903) was born in Hartford, Conn., 
February 12, 1881, prepared at the St. Paul School, Concord, 
N. H., and entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Dr. Matthew Darbyshire Mann (Yale 1867), is 
a surgeon and is also a professor in the University of Buffalo 
Medical School. He was born in Utica, N. Y., July 12, 1845, 
the son of Charles A. Mann, a lawyer of Utica, and Emma 
(Bagg) Mann. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Pope, was 
the daughter of Daniel Newhall Pope and Charlotte Sitgreaves 
(Cox) Pope. 

Besides his father, Mann's Yale relatives include four bro- 
thers: Arthur S. (1899), Matthew D., Jr. (1906 S.), Allen N. 
(1908) and Richard L. (1909 S.). Joseph R. Swan (1902) is 
a first cousin. 



Manierre, Mann, /. Marshall, 193 

In college he was a member of the Senior Promenade Com- 
mittee and of the Class Picture Committee. He was a member 
of He Boule, Psi Upsilon and Wolf's Head societies, and 
graduated with a Second Colloquy Senior appointment. 

After graduation he entered the employ of the Force Food 
Company of Buffalo, N. Y., manufacturers of cereals. In 
January 1904 he entered the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, Boston, Mass., where he studied architecture until June 
1906. He went abroad just after the Triennial Reunion to 
continue his studies in Paris, where his address is care the 
American Express Company. His home address is 37 Allen 
St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

John Marshall (B.A. Bethany College, W. Va., 1902, B.A. 
Yale 1903, LL.B. West Virginia University 1904) was bom in 
New Cumberland, W. Va., July 28, 1881, and entered Yale at 
the beginning of Senior year. 

His father, Oliver S. Marshall (Bethany 1878), is a lawyer 
and a trustee of Bethany College. He is at present State 
Senator and from 1899 to 1901 was President of the West Vir- 
ginia Senate. He is the son of James G. Marshall, a West 
Virginia lawyer, and of Louise (Miller) Marshall. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Tarr, died in 
1887, and was the daughter of Campbell Tarr and Nancy (Ham- 
mond) Tarr. He was a delegate to the Richmond Convention, 
withdrawing with several other Union supporters and later 
serving as the first Treasurer of West Virginia. 

Marshall graduated from Yale with a First Dispute Senior 
appointment. He was married in Wheeling, W. Va., January 
25, 1906, to Miss Rebecca Cooper Paull, daughter of Joseph 
Fry Paull, President of the Wheeling Stamping Works. 

He writes : "After leaving college in June 1903 I attended the 
Law School of the West Virginia University, receiving the 
degree of LL.B. in June 1904. After a few months further 
.study in my father's office in New Cumberland, W. Va., I came 
to Parkersburg, and became associated with Judge Reese Bliz- 
zard, United States Attorney for the Northern District of West 
Virginia. Judge Blizzard's private practice is mainly confined 
to railroad and corporation law. I am Secretary and Treasurer 
of the Parkersburg Dispatch-News Company, publisher of the 
13 



194 History of the Class of 1903, 

Parkersburg Dispatch-News, This paper is a recent consoli- 
dation of the two morning dailies here, and is the leading 
Republican organ in the State. When I find time I contribute 
ponderous editorials and have also been writing a West Vir- 
ginia political letter to Gus Oliver's Sunday Pittsburg Gazette. 
I am associate counsel with Judge Blizzard for the Cairo and 
Kanawha Railway Company. 

"My home address is 802 Juliana Street ; my business address 
is Federal Building, Parkersburg, West Virginia." 

Milton Louis Marshall was born in Auburn, N. Y., August 
17, 1880, prepared at the Auburn Academic High School and 
entered college in September 1899, leaving at the end of Soph- 
omore year to enter business. 

His father, Louis Marshall, of L. Marshall and Son, clothiers, 
was bom in Geinsheim, Bavaria, Germany, June 10, 1846, 
the son of Louis Marshall and Rosa Marshall. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Emma Hays, died 
March 26, 1901, and was the daughter of Abraham Hays and 
Fanny Hays. 

In college Marshall held a First Colloquy Junior appointment. 

He writes: "My activities have been confined to one 
branch — business. At the end of Sophomore year I left college 
to go into my father's store. It is gratifying to be able to 
report some measure of success. From a humble start, I have 
been gradually learning more and more of the business, and my 
responsibilities have been correspondingly increased. In 
September last I was admitted to an interest in the firm. The 
success of the business has shown itself to the public in the 
shape of a large, finely equipped, up-to-date store which we 
have recently fitted up and moved into. We now have the 
finest store in this section of the country and are in a position 
to handle the largest and best trade in our line. 

"As to politics, engagements, marriages, etc., I am com- 
pelled to report 'nothing doing.' I feared that the honor of 
being the father of the 'class boy' would be begrudged by some 
whom faculty restrictions kept from the competition and so 
decided not to take advantage of the two years' start I had." 

His business address is 131 Genesee St., Auburn, N. Y. His 
residence is 6 Westlake Ave. 



M. S, Marshall, E, B, Mason, M. Mason. 195 

Elmer Brown Mason (B.A. Princeton 1903) was bom in 
Deer Lodge, Mont, September 30, 1877, prepared at the 
University School, Qiicago, 111., and entered with the Class, 
leaving at the end of Freshman year, going to Princeton. 

He was the son of Roswell Henry Mason, of Chicago, a 
Civil War veteran and one time Surveyor General of Montana, 
and of Mary (Brown) Mason. 

Mason's Yale relatives include a brother, Roy M. Mason 
(1902), and "all the other Masons." 

After graduating from Princeton he entered the publishing 
house of Harper and Brothers. He is now a real estate broker 
located at 35 Nassau St., New York City. His residence is 53 
Washington Square, New York. His home address is 25 
Walton Place, Chicago, 111. 

Macdonell Mason was bom in New York City Febmary 9, 
1882, prepared at the Pomfret (Conn.) School and entered with 
the Class, joining 1904 in Christmas of Sophomore year and 
leaving Yale in the fall of 1902. 

His father, Alfred Bishop Mason (Yale 1871), President of 
the Cauca Railroad Company, Colombia, was bom in Bridgeport, 
Conn., Febmary 23, 1851, the son of Roswell Mason and Harriet 
Lavinia (Hopkins) Mason. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Murdoch, was the 
daughter of Rev. David Murdoch of New Haven, Conn., and of 
Julia (Porter) Murdoch. 

Mason's Yale relatives include an uncle, Henry B. Mason, 
(1870), and six first cousins: Edward H. Mason (1892), Hunt- 
ington Mason (1897), Maurice Mason (1901), Norman Mason 
(1902), Lawrence Mason (1904) and Calhoun Mason, class of 

1905. 

He writes, April 1906: "i. Left college November 10, 1902. 
Spent until April 21, 1904, in Mexico as a member of the firm 
of Mason and Mason, comprised of Alfred Bishop Mason, '71, 
Edward H. Mason, '92, James R. Trowbridge, '94, and myself. 
On June 4,* 1904, I entered the employ of Courtlandt Babcock 
and Company, 44 Pine Street, New York, as a bond and note 
salesman. Left them in August 1905, and sailed for Colombia 
November 18, 1905. Crossed the continent of South America 
on a mule, arriving here Febmary 19, 1906, and expect to stay 
here. 



196 History of the Class of 1903. 

"2. Not married. 3. No P. G. woric. 4. Never published 
an3rthing. 5. No organizations — no politics. 6. Life all spent 
journeying. All over Mexico and across Colombia since leav- 
ing Yale. 

"7. Permanent address : care Ferrocavril del Causa, Buena- 
ventura, Colombia, South America. 

"8. No other circumstance of any interest to anybody, except 
that I survived the earthquake of January and February last 
which killed thousands along this coast. 

"9. My plans for the future are of two kinds : ( i ) Expect to 
stay here. (2) Hope to get away." 

He is Secretary to the President of the Cauca Railroad Com- 
pany, Buenaventura, Colombia. 

Ralph Hill Melcer (B.A. 1903) was born in San Francisco 
July 4, 1880, prepared at the Thacher School, Nordoff, Cal., 
and at the Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and entered 
college with the Class. 

His father, William Melczer (mining), died March 28, 1904. 
He was bom September 2, 1847, ^^^ ^^ ^^^ t™^ of his death 
resided in Palo Alto, Cal. 

His mother's maiden name was Elizabeth Hughes. 

In college Melcer was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon 
and Sigma Xi, and held a Second Dispute Junior appointment 
and a First Dispute Senior appointment. , 

He writes: "The fall of 1903 I came to New York to live 
and commenced work in the comptroller's office of the Ameri- 
can Locomotive Company. Remained there till January of 
1904, when I left to go into the actuary department of the 
New York Life Insurance Company. My father's fatal illness 
in March of that year called me to California, where I stayed 
till the following fall. Returning then to New York, I decided 
to study law and entered the New York Law School, where I 
have been pretty steadily ever since. May get my degree this 
spring. During the siunmer of 1905 I helped organize the 
Frank Hagny Company, contractors, of New York, with whom 
I am still, to some extent, connected. 

"Art Collins roomed with me at 33 West 45th Street when 
we first came to town, and soon Bill Tyler and Hugh Archbald 
came to live at the same place. After a month or two Dud 



Melcer, Metsger, Mills, 197 

Lewis got Art and me to go down to live in the Settlement 
House at 239 Spring Street, where he was one of the assistants. 
I have been there ever since except for the trips west. Art 
left a year ago to go into business in Niagara Falls ; and Dud> 
too, left for a year, but had to come back last fall, at which 
time we resumed the New Haven partnership. I could tcU 
you a lot about Art, but I don't dare." 

And later: "My address from now on will be 1133 Broad- 
way, New York, where I am holding down the job of Vice 
President and chief slave of Frank Hagny Company, con- 
tractors and engineers for heating and power work." 

William Creorge Metzger (B.A. 1903) was bom in Logans- 
port, Ind., November i, 1879, prepared at Georgetown, Wash- 
ington, D. C, and by private tutor and entered college with the 
Class. 

His father, William George Metzger, was bom in Winesburg, 
Holmes County, Ohio, October 7, 1837, and died June 8, 1897. 
He was Vice President and Treasurer of the Metzger Linseed 
Oil Company of Chicago and Toledo. He was the son ol 
John Frederick Metzger and Christina Magdalene (Smith) 
Metzger. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sophia Cecilia McCabc, 
was the daughter of John McCabe and Sophia (Jennings) 
McCabe. 

He writes : "I have spent my time since graduation in Fair- 
mont, West Virginia, with the Fairmont Coal Company, 
learning how to mine and handle bituminous coal. I haven't 
very much time for an)rthing else but work." 

He is shipping clerk and timekeeper for the Fairmont 
Mining Machinery Company. 

His business address is Box 637, Fairmont, W. Va. His 
residence is 617 Fairmont Ave. 

Henry ESdmund Mills (B.A. 1903) was born in Columbus, 
Ohio, September 11, 1879, prepared at the Columbus Central 
High School and entered college at the beginning of Freshman 
year. 

His father, Charles Wilmer Mills, died September 14, 1886, 
the son of Henry Z. Mills and Cinthia (Lamb) Mills. 



19^ History of the Class of 1903. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Evalena May Gares, 
was the daughter of Edmimd Gares. 

In college Mills held a Second Colloquy Jimior appointment 
and graduated with a Second Dispute Senior appointment. 

He writes : "Since leaving college I have lived for the most 
part at Columbus, Ohio, my home town. For a short time I 
varied the monotony by existing in a small mining town in 
southeastern Ohio called Santoy. On starting in real work 
I connected myself with the New England Coal Company and 
the Northern Fuel Company. These companies operate mines 
in the bituminous coal fields of Ohio. Started in with these 
people in October 1903 and have been with them ever since. 
Our offices are at Columbus, Ohio. 

"In religious way have done nothing. Just continued along 
in the church of my fathers, Presbyterian. Some people 
thought I should be made to do something or at least have 
that appearance, so I was chosen a deacon and I am still 
serving in that capacity. 

"Immediately upon leaving college I took a three months' 
trip abroad, visiting England, Scotland, Belgium, Holland, 
France, Switzerland, Italy and Germany. Of course to cover 
all this ground I had to hasten continually and therefore did 
not see any of these countries as thoroughly as I would have 
liked to. One of the most pleasant parts of my trip was the 
frequent meeting with Yale men, especially men of my own 
class. I met Condict, Sargent, James and DuPuy in London, 
in Paris ran across Jeff. Gaines, Jones, and Brady, and in 
Dresden met Harold Clark. These are but a few of those 
whom I had the good luck to meet. 

"All mail sent to 120 Woodland Avenue, Columbus, Ohio, 
will probably reach me^ sooner or later. My present address is 
801 Wyandotte Building, Columbus, Ohio." 

James Bradford Minor (B.A. 1903) was bom in Covington, 
Kentucky, May 26, 1882, prepared at the Franklin School, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and entered college with the Class. 

His father, James Ramsey Minor, of The Minor and Dixon 
Company, wholesale grocery merchants of Covington, was 
bom in Cincinnati in 1849, the son of Thomas H. Minor, a 
wholesale grocer of Cincinnati, and of Rebecca (Baldridge) 
Minor. 



Minor, Moffat. 199 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Elizabeth Ernst, 
was the daughter of William Ernst, a banker and railroad 
official, and of Sarah (Butler) Ernst. 

A brother, William Ernst Minor, graduated from Yale in 
1900. 

In college Minor was the Coxswain of the University Four- 
Oar crew in 1902, Coxswain of the University crew in 1903 and 
Coxswain of the College crew at Annapolis in 1903. He was 
a member of Kappa Psi, Delta Kappa Epsilon and Wolf's Head 
societies. 

He writes: I have been sticking close to Covington, Ken- 
tucky, since I left college, with the exception of a four months 
trip out west in Utah and Wyoming. Have been with my 
father in the wholesale grocery business. The Minor and Dixon 
Company, 212-214 Vine Street, Cincinnati, acting as sales 
manager and one of the directors." 

He lives at 2nd and Gurrard Sts., Covington, Ky. 

Douglas Maxwell Moffat (B.A. 1903, M.A. 1904) was born 
November 16, 1881, in Stanhope, N. J., prepared at Lawrence- 
ville (N. J.) School and entered college at the beginning of 
Freshman year. 

His father, Edward Stewart Moffat (B.A. Princeton 1863, 
M.M.E. Columbia 1868), died August 4, 1893. He was Adjunct 
Professor of Mining and Metallurgy in Lafayette College from 
1868 to 1870 and at the time of his death President of the Lacka- 
wanna Iron and Steel Company, Scranton, Pa. He was the 
son of James Clement Moffat, a professor of the Princeton 
Theological Seminary, and of Ellen (Stewart) Moffat. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Anna Robeson M'Cart- 
ney, was the daughter of Judge Washington M'Cartney, Profes- 
sor of Mathematics and Mental and Moral Philosophy at 
Lafayette and of Mathematics and Modern Languages at Jef- 
ferson College, and of Mary Elizabeth (Maxwell) M'Cartney. 

In college Moffat won in Junior year a Henry James Ten 
Eyck third prize, won a Townsend Premium in Senior year, and 
held an Oration Junior appointment and a High Oration Senior 
appointment. He was on the track team, winning third place 
in the half mile run in both the Princeton and Harvard games 
in 1903. He was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Chi Delta 
Theta, and Delta Kappa Epsilon. 



2 00 History of the Class of 1903. 

He writes: "The first year after leaving college, 1903-04, 
I studied in the English department of the Yale Graduate School 
on the Scott-Hurtt Fellowship. In 1904 I received an M.A. 
degree for this work. During this year I was a member of the 
track team. The second year, 1904-05, 1 studied at the Harvard 
Law School. I have done this also the third year, so far. 

"As for 'articles published', I have had two verses published : 
'The American College' in The Reader Magazine for August 
1905, and 'St. Cecilia' in The Reader Magazine for January 
1906. 

"My permanent address is 306 Quincy Ave., Scran ton, Pa. 
After finishing at the Harvard Law School I expect to practice 
law in Scranton." 

Walter Chafey Moodie (B.A. 1903) was bom in Los Gatos, 
Cal., May 21, 1882, prepared at the St. Johnsbury (Vt.) 
Academy, and entered college with the Class. 

His father. Rev. Royal Corban Moodie (Yale 1878), is a 
Congregational clergyman. He was born in Craftsbury, Vt., 
June 19, 1852, the son of Robert Moodie and Augusta Phebe 
(Blanchard) Moodie. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Carrie Augusta Root, 
was the daughter of Moses Root and Mary Ann (Blanchard) 
Root. 

In college Moodie held a Dissertation Junior appointment and 
a Dissertation Senior appointment 

His present address is West Tisbury, Mass. 

Charles Arthur Moore, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was born in Lynn, 
Mass., June 23, 1880, prepared at the St. Paul School, Concord, 
N. H., and entered college with the Class of 1902, joining 1903 
at the beginning of Sophomore year. 

His father, Charles Arthur Moore, President of Manning, 
Maxwell and Moore, machinery and machinists supplies of New 
York, was born in West Sparta, Livingston County, N. Y., 
September 19, 1845, ^^ ^" ^f William Ropes Moore, a farmer 
of Livingston County, N. Y., and of Caroline (Van Nest) 
Moore. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Campbell, was 
the daughter of John Kyse Campbell, a farmer of Norwalk, 
Ohio, and of Elizabeth (Sheffield) Campbell. 



Moodie, C, A. Moore, F. W. Moore, 201 

A sister married Colby Mitchell Chester, Jr. (Yale 1897 S.). 

In college Moore was a member of Eta Phi, Psi Upsilon and 
of the Elihu Qub. Since graduation he has been with Manning, 
Maxwell and Moore, machinery and machinists supplies, 85 
Liberty St., New York, holding now the position of Secretary. 
His residence is 512 Fifth Ave., New York. 

Frank Wood Moore (B.A. 1903) was bom in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., August 21, 1881, prepared at the Pingrey School, Eliza- 
beth, N. J., and at the Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn., and 
entered college in September 1899. 

His father, Robert Martin Moore, who died February 12, 
1896, was born in Cape Town, South Africa, March 17, 1840, 
the son of Benjamin Moore. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Virginia LaFayette 
McDonald, was the daughter of William McDonald and Mary 
E. (Willis) McDonald. 

Two cousins. Rev. George H. Bottome (1883) and Harry H. 
Bottome (1893), are Yale graduates. 

In college Moore was a member of the University Glee Oub 
for the four years, being Leader for one year, and was Presi- 
dent of the Freshman Glee Club. He was Recording Secretary 
of the Y. M. C. A. and a Qass Deacon. He was also President 
of the Freshman Baseball Association, Chairman of the Cap and 
Gown Committee, a member of Eta Phi, Alpha Delta Phi and 
Skull and Bones societies and held a Second Colloquy Junior 
and the same Senior appointment. 

He writes : "The only exciting thing that has happened was 
Chan. Hamlin's wedding. I am neither engaged nor married, 
nor are there any prospects along that line. I have spent a 
year studying in Auburn, a year in New Haven as Secretary of 
Dwight Hall, and am now serving my second year at Auburn. 

"As far as I can see the rest of the Class are getting married 
as quickly as their girls' parents can support them and doing 
their best to refute the race suicide theory. Those who are not 
married mostly are studying law. 

"The only plan I have in mind is to be in New Haven bright 
and early for Triennial and stay there till the last bell rings. 

"My permanent address is 214 Edgar Place, Elizabeth, N. J. 
Mail will be forwarded from there." 



202 History of the Class of 1903, 

Daniel Harris Morgan (B.A. 1903) was born in Springfield, 
Mass., January 14, 1879, prepared at The Hill School, Potts- 
town, Pa., and entered college with the Class. 

His father, the late Elisha Morgan, was bom in Northfield, 
Mass., September 7, 1834, the son of Elisha Morgan. He was 
connected with the Morgan Envelope Company and later Presi- 
dent of the American Writing Paper Company. 

His mother's maiden name was Sarah Grant. 

In college Morgan was a member of Psi Upsilon and of the 
Pundits. Alfred Leeds (Yale 1887) is a brother-in-law. 

Since graduation he has been taking care of real estate and 
acting as executor of his father's estate, dipping also into 
politics. 

His business address is 53 Hillman St. and his residence is 
273 State St., Springfield, Mass. 

John Barrow Motter (B.A. 1903) was born in St. Joseph, 
Mo., September 7, 1881, prepared at the St. Joseph High School 
and entered college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Joshua Motter, of the Toothe, Wheeler and Motter 
Mercantile Company, was bom November i, 1846, in Williams- 
port, Md., the son of Isaac Motter, a farmer of Washington 
County, Md., and of Mary (Snively) Motter. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Kate Augusta Barrow, 
was the daughter of John E. Barrow, a merchant and stock 
broker of New York City, and of Katherine (Gingrey) Barrow. 
A brother, Samuel Isaac Motter (Yale 1896), and a cousin, 
E. C. Smith (1886), are relatives. 

In college Motter was Captain of the Gun team and held a 
Second Dispute Junior appointment and a First Dispute Senior . 
appointment. 

For the first two years after graduation he' was with the 
National Bank of St.' Joseph. In the fall of 1905 he started 
in with the Toothe, Wheeler and Motter Mercantile Company, 
wholesale dry goods merchants of St. Joseph. He lives at loth 
and Charles Sts., St. Joseph, Mo. 

John Richard Moulton (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 1906) 
was born in Salem, Mass., September 27, 1881, prepared at the 
Salem High School and entered in September 1899. 



Morgan, Matter, Moulton, Mulford. 203 

His father, Henry Percy Moulton (Amherst 1865), died Sep- 
tember 5, 1904. He was United States District Attorney for 
Massachusetts, and was born in North Beverly, Mass., Novem- 
ber 27, 1844, the son of Augustus Moulton and Augusta (Pres- 
sey) Moulton. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Harriet Ellen Stocker, 
was the daughter of John Stocker and Nancy Goodrich (Fos- 
ter) Stocker. 

Moulton has been studying law at Harvard for the past three 
years and is spending the summer of 1906 in Europe. His 
address is 10 Mall St., Salem, Mass. 

Frank Burroughs Mulford was born in East Orange, N. J., 
June 13, 1880, prepared for college at the Kansas City (Mo.) 
High School, and entered at the beginning of Freshman year, 
leaving college during the fall of 1900. 

His father, Timothy Mulford, Manager of the Goodyear 
Rubber Company, was bom in East Orange, N. J., January 26, 
1853, the son of Timothy Whitfield Mulford, a wagon manufac- 
turer of East Orange, and of Phoebe Louise (Baldwin) Mul- 
ford. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Frances Bur- 
roughs, was the daughter of Thomas Burroughs, a contractor 
of Brooklyn, N. Y., and of Emma Louise (Bartholomew) Bur- 
roughs. 

Two brothers, Timothy Whitfield Mulford (1901) and 
George Herbert Mulford (1904), graduated from Yale. 

He writes, December 11, 1905: "It sounds pretty good to 
hear about reunion, and unless something unforeseen turns up 
yours truly will be in New Haven next summer (1906) to sing a 
few songs, etc. It is pretty hard to live out here and read about 
the Class dinners held in New York and not be able to attend, 
so you see I have a good deal to make up. I have put in six 
days a week since January i, 1901, with the Goodyear Rubber 
Company and don't own it yet. Haven't married or had any 
chance and prospects are not very bright in that line. Yale was 
enough for me, so didn't try any further. 

"Yale Alumni Association and the Missouri Hunt and Polo 
Club are my chief forms of recreation. I have stayed pretty 
close to my own fireside. Letters will reach me care Goodyear 
Rubber Company, Kansas City, Mo. 



204 History of the Class of 1903. 

"Brink and I have reunions once in a while, especially when 
Chap Stevens comes this way. It is pretty hard to write any 
startling news from this part of the country except train rob- 
beries and Indian massacres and they won't interest the Qass, 
I am afraid." 

He is a salesman with the Goodyear Rubber Company. He 
lives at 1 42 1 Broadway, Kansas City, Mo. 

Arthur Daniel Mullen (B.A. 1903) was born in New Haven, 
Conn., August 17, 1880, prepared at the Hillhouse High School, 
New Haven, and entered college in the fall of 1899. 

His father, John Mullen, a member of the New Haven Fire 
Department, was born in New Haven, September 23, 1842, the 
son of Francis Mullen and Margaret A. (Cahill) Mullen. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Anna O'Keefe, 
was the daughter of Edmund O'Keefe and Margaret Morrison 
O'Keefe. 

In college Mullen held an Oration Junior appointment and a 
Dissertation Senior appointment. 

After graduation he entered the employ of the Travelers 
Insurance Company of Hartford as Cashier of their branch 
office in Columbus, Ohio. September 27, 1905, he took a posi- 
tion in the office of Sargent and Company, hardware manufac- 
turers of New Haven, and remained there about ten months, 
when he returned to the insurance business. His address is 
711 Howard Ave., New Haven, Conn. 

Walter Starbuck Munson was born in Utica, N. Y., April 14, 
1879, prepared for college at the Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Mass., and entered at the beginning of Freshman year, joining 
1904 in the fall of 1900, and leaving college in October 1902. 

His father, Alfred Hooper Munson of Munson Brothers Com- 
pany, mill supplies, Utica, is the son of Edmund Munson, a 
foundryman and engineer of Utica. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Maria Antoinette Star- 
buck, was the daughter of George H. Starbuck, a foundryman 
and engineer of Troy, N. Y., and of Emeline (Watson) 
Starbuck. 

In college Munson was a member of Eta Phi and Alpha Delta 
Phi. 

Since leaving college he has been with Munson Brothers 



Mullen, Munson, Ne smith, NewhalL 205 

Company, mill supplies. He lives at 36 Brinckerhoff Ave., 
Utica, N. Y. 

Ralph Howard Nesmith (B.A. 1903) was born in Brooklyn, 
N. Y., August 7, 1880, prepared at the Polytechnic Institute, 
Brooklyn, and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Henry Edwin Nesmith, Jr., of the Nesmith and 
Constantine Company, was bom in Brookl)^, the son of Henry 
Edwin Nesmith and Sarah (Macomber) Nesmith. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Mann Macomber, 
was the daughter of James Brown Macomber and Sarah 
(Mann) Macomber. 

In college Nesmith was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon, 
and held a First Colloquy Junior appointment and a Second 
Dispute Senior appointment. 

He is now Assistant Marine Engine and Boiler Draughtsman 
in the League Island Navy Yard. His business address is 
Steam Engineering Department, Navy Yard, League Island, Pa. 
His residence is 4808 Chester Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. His 
home address is 265 Washington Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Aimer Mayo Newhall (B.A. 1903) was bom in San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., May 14, 1881, prepared at the Mt. Tamalpais 
Military Academy, and entered collie at the beginning of 
Freshman year. 

His father, Edwin White Newhall, of H. M. Newhall and 
Company, was bom in San Francisco May 7, 1856, the son of 
Henry Mayo Newhall and Sarah Ann (White) Newhall. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Fanny Sillman Hall, 
died May 17, 1881. She was the daughter of Aimer Ives Hall 
and Mary Amelia (Hall) Hall. 

Two uncles, Henry Gregory Newhall, a member of the Qass 
of 1875 S., and William Mayo Newhall (1876 S.), attended 
Yale. 

In college Newhall was a member of Phi Gamma Delta, and 
graduated with a Second Colloquy Senior appointment. 

He writes : "After our Commencement in 1903 my brother 
and I todc a ten weeks chase about Europe. Made a very hurried 
but very enjoyable trip through France, Germany, Pmssia, 
Austria, Italy, Switzerland, England and Scotland. We made 



2o6 History of the Class of 1903, 

a fast trip, stopping only in the larger cities except in Italy and 
Switzerland, where we stopped at several of the lakes for a bit. 
Our object was to cover all the ground we could before my 
brother had to return to college that fall, and we think we did 
pretty well. On our return I stayed a couple of weeks with my 
relatives in the East and then returned to San Francisco. 
Shortly after I got home we moved our residence from San 
Rafael, where we had lived several years, to our city home. Late 
in November 1903 I was offered the position of Cashier of our 
firm, H. M. Newhall & Company (my uncle and father mem- 
bers), shipping, commission, importing, insurance, fire and 
marine, etc., etc. This I held until about a year ago (May 
1905). We got a new cashier and I was transferred to tem- 
porary manager of the marine insurance while the manager 
went to London to see the home companies. Upon his return 
(August 1905) the private secretary resigned and I temporarily 
took his place. This lasted until nearly January before we 
could get another man trained to that position. On the first 
of the year I was given charge of the Spice Import Department 
and this has kept me more than busy ever since. The several 
changes I have made during the past year have been of great 
benefit to me, but have surely kept me jumping. The experience 
has helped me greatly, and I consider that I have been fortunate 
in having the opportunity to make these changes and learn the 
different ends of the business. 

"You undoubtedly have taken considerable interest in the late 
fire in our city, and read many g^phic accounts of the worst 
side of the troubles. That side is the only one they put in the 
papers. We have all had our losses, and many severe, but in 
point of loss of life the disaster has been nothing to what it 
might have been if the earthquake had occurred a few hours 
earlier or later. The people here are putting their shoulders 
to the wheel and before long things will be the same as before 
the 'flood.' Financially many people have been heavy losers, 
but there has been no panic or trouble of any kind here. Most 
of the local securities have dropped, but very little, and 
some not at all. Property values are higher than ever to-day. 
In fact everything here is in a most flourishing condi- 
tion. Our family, although hit severely, are in many ways 
much more fortunate than many of our friends. While 



Ney, Nichols. 207 

together with the rest our office was burned to the ground, all 
the company's books and papers escaped with only a severe 
scorching. Since the fire we have been extremely busy getting 
things straightened out and getting our new temporary building 
put up. It has been so difficult to get around that it takes us 
twice as long to accomplish half as much. It has been my plan 
and hope for three years to be with you and the fellows to-mor- 
row (June 26, 1906), but earthquakes and fate have been 
against me this time. However, in the course of another three 
years I hope Ho have my work so arranged that I can get away. 
I sent Gus Oliver my contribution and regrets some time since, 
but as much as I had hoped it has been impossible for me to get 
there. 

"My permanent address will be after July i, 1906, 114 Battery 
Street, San Francisco, Cal." 

Paul Sprague Ney (B.A. 1904) was bom in Hartford, Conn., 
August 13, 1880, prepared at the Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, 
Conn., and entered college in September 1899, leaving at Christ- 
mas to return again with the Class of 1904. 

His father, John Marshall Ney, senior member of the J. M. 
Ney and Company, manufacturers of Hartford, was bom in 
Lorraine, France, the son of John Ney. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Clarke, died 
Januarys, 1901. 

In college Ney was a member of the College Choir, 1904 
Freshman Glee Club, was Leader of the Apollo Glee Qub and on 
the University Glee Club. He is a member of the Qass of 
1904 Triennial Committee and of Psi Upsilon and Wolf's Head 
societies. 

He is at present junior member of J. M. Ney and Company, 
manufacturers in gold and silver, etc., 265 Asylum St., Hartford, 
Conn. He lives at 1015 Asylum Ave., Hartford. 

James Knight Nichols (B.A. 1903) was bom in Milwaukee, 
Wis., March 28, 1881, prepared at the Lawrenceville (N. J.) 
School and entered college in the fall of 1899. 

His father. Rev. Gideon Parsons Nichols (Union College 
i860), was bom in Windsor, Mass., in 1837, the son of James 
Nichols, a farmer. 



2o8 History of the Class of Jpoj. 

His mother's maiden name was Delia Briggs Nichols. She 
was the daughter of a clergyman who served as chaplain in the 
Civil War. 

Two brothers, Robert H. Nichols (1894) and Henry J. 
Nichols (1899), are Yale graduates. 

In college Nichols was a member of the Freshman Glee Club, 
editor of the Yale Daily News and a member of Delta Kappa 
Epsilon. 

He writes: "I was employed by the Hartford Courant of 
Hartford, Conn., from the Sunday after Commencement until 
September i, 1905. I left there to study law at Harvard, where 
I hope to be allowed to remain and graduate (in 1908) and add 
a bachelor of laws degree to the long list of trophies won by 
1903 from Harvard, excluding the freshman football game. 

"My permanent address is 95 Carroll Street, Binghamton,. 
N. Y." 

William Penn Nixon, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was born in Chi- 
cago, 111., December 17, 1881, prepared at the Chicago Latin 
School and entered with the Class. 

His father, William Penn Nixon (Farmers' College, Rich- 
mond, Ind., 185s, LL.B. University of Pennsylvania 1857), is 
United States Collector of Customs at Chicago. He was bom 
in Fountain City, Ind., in March 1832, the son of Samuel 
Hubbard Nixon and Hannah (Hubbard) Nixon. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Elizabeth Duf- 
field, was the daughter of Charles Duffield, a podcpacker of 
Louisville and Chicago, and of Sarah Elizabeth (Qoon) 
Duffield. 

Nixon held in college an Oration Junior appointment and 
a Second Dispute Senior appointment. 

In the fall of 1903 he entered the Northwestern University 
Law School, remaining there four months. He is now a travel- 
ing salesman of Marshall, Field and Company, wholesale dry 
goods, 200 Adams St., Chicago. He lives at 177 Lake View 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Alfred Trecartin Ogden (B.A. 1903) was born July 18, 
1880, in Brooklyn, N. Y., prepared at the Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., and entered college at the beginning of Fresh- 
man year. 



Nixon, Ogden, Oliver, 209 

His father, Alfred Ogden, of the Ogden Realty Company 
of New York, was bom in England July 31, 1848, the son of 
John Ogden and Catherine (Robinson) Ogden. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Kate Trecartin, was the 
daughter of John Trecartin and Henrietta (Hall) Trecartin. 

In college Ogden was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon, 
and held a Second Colloquy Junior appointment and a Second 
Dispute Senior appointment. 

He writes, April 1906: "I put down my occupation on the 
class statistics, ranching, as that was what I was doing at the 
time I received your letter. I am now giving all my time to 
the real estate work. Since leaving college I have been in Texas 
most of the time on the ranch, with the exception of about eight 
months when I was working with Lawrence and Company, New 
York City, commission merchants. I am not married but have 
hopes. Of course you know I have not done any post-graduate 
work ; I never did any work in that line. I have written several 
letters but no books or pamphlets. I am afraid I have been 
a little lax in my religious work. As for journeys, I have had 
two very disagreeable trips to Texas, but have not been out of 
this country. 

**You can address me at 41 Park Row or 80 Washington 
Square, New York City. I have a few plans for the future but 
they are not for publication as yet." 

Augustus Kountze Oliver (B.A. 1903) was bom in Pitts- 
burg, Pa., July 19, 1881, prepared at the St. Paul School, Con- 
cord, N. H., and at the Shadyside Academy, Pittsburg, and 
entered college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, George Tener Oliver (Bethany College, W. Va., 
1868), was bom in Ireland, the son of Henry William Oliver 
and Margaret (BrowTi) Oliver. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Dorothea 
Kountze, was the daughter of Christian Kountze and Margaret 
(Zerby) Kountze. 

Oliver's Yale relatives include a brother, George Sturges 
Oliver (1899), and thirteen first cousins: John C. Oliver 
(1885 S.), Henry Oliver (1885 S.), Charles Oliver (1907), 
Daniel Leet Oliver (1907 S.), Berne H. Evans (1899), Harold 
Kountze (1907), W. DeLancy Kountze (1899), Barclay W. 
14 



210 History of the Class of 1903, 

Kountze (1897 S.), Charles B. Berger (1888S.), George B. 
Berger (1888 S.), William B. Berger (1893 S.), W. F. B. 
Berger (1899), and George B. Berger (1908). 

In college he was a member of the Hockey team, editor of 
Yale Record, a Class Historian, Chairman of the Triennial 
Committee, a member of Kappa Psi, Psi Upsilon and Wolf's 
Head, and held a First Colloquy Junior and the same Senior 
appointment. 

He writes, November 29, 1905 : "In accordance with your 
request that your 'fellow-classmates' write you as soon as possi- 
ble, I make haste to put pen to paper and, through you, to inform 
the rest of the anxiously-awaiting students of the noble Class 
how I have been behaving since I crawled from the shade of 
the elms into the fierce glare of sunlight which all those who 
enter into the arena of this hard, cold world must encounter. 
So far, however, I have not been 'investigated'. 

"Answering your questions in order: (i) I left college 
to the best of my reccJlection late in June 1903 and traveled for 
several months in Europe with Bill Frew, Harry Potter, Shirley 
Fulton, et al. Returning to the paternal roof-tree at 1044 South 
Negley Avenue, Pittsburg, Pa., I ensconsed myself beneath 
it, and sallied forth occasionally to look for a job. Finally (and 
here 'modesty' causes me to say that it was probably because 
my father owned the paper) I was hired at what seemed to me 
to be an extremely low salary as a reporter on the Pittsburg 
Chronicle-Telegraph. After reporting for somewhat over a 
year I went to work in the composing room, then for a time 
acted as assistant night editor on the Pittsburg Gazette, an 
affiliated morning newspaper. Last June the proprietors of the 
paper (my father and brother), recognizing my real worth, put 
me in the business office, where, it was expected, I could do less 
actual harm than in any other position. Upon my youthful 
shoulders were placed the titles of 'Secretary' of the Pittsburg 
Chronicle-Telegraph and 'Assistant Secretary' of the Pittsburg 
Gazette. And here I am at present, waiting patiently for the 
Triennial Reunion. 

"(2) Married? Unfortunately no, but you never can tell, 
though just at present the outlook is discouraging. 

"(3) No post-graduate work of any kind. 

"(4) My literary ability has been confined almost entirely 



O'NeilL 211 

to writing up ministers' meetings and golden weddings for the 
daily paper, and I have not even contemplated having these 
outbursts gathered into book form. 

"(S) Member of Yale Club, New York City, Pittsburg 
Golf Club, Allegheny Country Club, University Club, Pittsburg, 
Duquesne Club, Pittsburg. 

"(6) In Europe three months, summer of 1903. West 
Indies one month, winter of 1905. 

"(7) Permanent address: Care Pittsburg Chronicle-Tel" 
graph, Pittsburg, Pa. 

"(8) As my attention to business since graduation has been 
all-absorbing (though Bill Frew and Don Thompson may 
laugh) I consider Question No. i a sufficient answer to this 
query. I am not acquainted with any fellow-classmates who 
are overburdened with modesty. 

"(9) I would answer this but it might upset the stodc 
market." 

And later, August 1906: "Since I wrote my Triennial letter 
to you I have again changed my job. If you have me in type 
it isn't worth while changing what you have, but I am now 
Secretary of the Pittsburg Gazette-Times, Secretary of the 
Pittsburg Chronicle-Telegraph and Advertising Manager of the 
Gazette-Times." 

His residence is South Negley Ave., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Daniel Lawrence Joseph O'Neill (B.A. 1903, LL.B. 1905) 
was born in East Hartford, Conn., July 29, 1879, prepared at the 
East Hartford High School and at the Hartford Public High 
School and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Francis O'Neill, a moulder, tobacco raiser and 
farmer of East Hartford, was bom in County Leitrim, Ireland, 
May 10, 1838, the son of Daniel L. O'Neill and Susan J. Cook 
O'Neill. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Anne McGuirl, was the 
daughter of Hugh McGuirl and Mary (Foley) McGuirl. 

In college O'Neill held an Oration Junior appointment and an 
Oration Senior appointment. 

Since graduation he studied law at Yale for two years and 
is at present an Investigator and Adjuster of the Travelers 
Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. His residence is 
Hockanum, Conn. 



212 History of the Class of 1903. 

Frederick Lorraine Orlady was bom in Huntingdon, Pa., 
February 27, 1880, prepared for college at the Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa., the Hotchkiss 
School, Lakeville, Conn., and by private tutor, and entered with 
the Qass, leaving during Freshman year. 

His father, George Boal Orlady, a graduate of Washington 
and Jefferson College, Pennsylvania State College and of the 
Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, has been Judge of 
the Superior Court of Pennsylvania since 1895. He was bom 
in Petersburg, Pa., February 22, 1850, the son of Henry Martin 
Orlady, M.D., a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, 
and of Martha Caldwell (Boal) Orlady. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Irvin Thompson, 
was the daughter of Hardman Phillips Thompson, M.D., a 
graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, and of Martha 
(Irvin) Thompson. 

He writes : "The years since I left college have been mostly 
spent on the outside of life. 1900 was spent in Arizona, travel- 
ing about. 1901 was spent in the study of the law. 1902 and 

1903 were spent in New Mexico in charge of the construction 
work of the Santa Fe Central Railroad, I being in the employ 
of the Pennsylvania Development Company. Part of 1903 
and 1904 was with H. S. Kerbaugh on railroad construction. 

1904 was spent in the Law School of the University of Penn- 
sylvania, where I took a special course. 1905 finds me in' an 
office in Pittsburg: Dalzell, Scott and Gordon, 450 Fourth 
Avenue, where I have the pleasure of having Billy Frew for a 
fellow student. 

"Huntingdon, Pa., is my permanent address, the old family 
home is there, and letters will always be forwarded. My only 
affiliations with organizations are Mount Moriah Lodge of 
Masons, Standing Stone Chapter of Masons and Delta Chi, 
legal fraternity. My plans now are centered upon becoming 
a member of the Allegheny County bar." 

His present address is 6016 Walnut St., Pittsburg, Pa. 

William Robert Orthwein (B.A. 1903, LL.B. St. Louis 
Law School 1905) was bom in St. Louis, Mo., October 16, 1881, 
prepared at the Smith Academy, St. Louis, and entered college 
at the beginning of the Freshman year. 



Orlady, Orthwein, Ostby. 213 

His father, William David Orthwein, President of the Kin- 
lock Telephone Company and of the William D. Orthwein 
Grain Company, was bom in Stuttgart, Wurtemburg, Germany, 
Februar>' 9, 1841, the son of Frederick Charles Orthwein and 
Louise (Lidle) Orthwein. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Emily Thummler, was 
the daughter of Trangoth Thummler and Sophia (Schlueter) 
Thummler. 

In college Orthwein was a member of the Swimming team. 
Water Polo team. College Baseball team and of the Dramatic 
Association, and held a Second Colloquy Senior appointment. 

He was married in St. Louis December 27, 1905, to Miss 
Nina Kent Baldwin, daughter of Kent Kane Baldwin of the 
W. B. Bingham Hardware Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 

He writes: "After graduating in 1903 I came back to St. 
Louis, attended the St. Louis Law School for two years and 
graduated in Jime 1905 as the President of my class. I am now 
practicing with the firm of Blodgett and Davis. I have also 
taken quite an interest in our big athletic club here, known as 
the Missouri Athletic Club, and have had the honor to be elected 
to its Board of Governors for a three-year term. I am also 
chairman of its athletic and swimming committee. 

"While in Law School I invested a bit of money and engaged 
in the automobile business. We have the St. Louis agency for 
the 'Packard', 'Franklin', 'Stevens Duryea' cars, and I am 
pleased to say are doing very well. In company with E. P. 
Hellmuth, Harvard 1904, I got up and edited a history and 
complete resume of our athletic club in the shape of a year 
book of two hundred pages this spring. My permanent address, 
where mail will surely be forwarded to me, is 15 Portland Place, 
St. Louis, Mo. You see I have dabbled in pretty much every- 
thing since leaving college." 

Erling Cornelius Ostby (B.A. 1903) was bom in Provi- 
dence, R. I., October 13, 1880, prepared at the Providence 
English and Classical School and at the Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., and entered college in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Engelhardt C. Ostby, of the Ostby and Barton 
Company, manufacturing jewelers, of Providence, was bom 
in Christiania, Norway, the son of Christian Ostby, a manu- 
facturer of Norway, and of Josephine D. (Paulson) Ostby. 



214 History of the Class of 1903. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Lizzie Macy Webster, 
died November 26, 1899. She was the daughter of Charles 
A. Webster, a merchant of Providence, and of Sarah B. 
(Arnold) Webster. 

In college Ostby was a member of the University Hockey 
team and of Alpha Delta Phi. 

He is with the firm of Ostby and Barton Company, manu- 
facturing jewelers, in their New York office at 13 Maiden Lane, 
New York City. His residence is the Yale Qub, 30 West 44th 
St., New York City. His home address is 61 Cooke St., 
Providence, R. I. 

George Grant Parkhurst was born in Oswego, N. Y., 
October 12, 1881, prepared at The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa., 
and entered college in September 1899, leaving in June 1900. 
He later returned and completed Sophomore year with the Qass 
of 1906. 

He is the son of George W. Parkhurst of Buffalo, N. Y. 

He is at present living in Buffalo at 560 Delaware Ave. 

George Henry Parr was bom in Albany, N. Y., April 25, 
1880, prepared at the Albany Academy and entered college 
with the Class, leaving during Sophomore year. 

His father, Henry Parr, proprietor of the Abbey Hotel, Glen- 
mont, was bom in Grand Duchy Hesse Darmstadt, June 8, 
1848, the son of Heinrich Parr, a soldier and farmer, and of 
Marie (Rohledder) Parr. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Johanna Francis 
Wachter, was the daughter of John Wachter, a Civil War veteran 
and proprietor of the National Hotel, Albany, and of Katherine 
(Wollensack) Wachter. 

He writes : "After leaving Yale I attended the Albany Law 
School for one year, accepting the kindness of Mr. Lewis R. 
Parker to use his books and remain in his office during that 
period. Then once more returned to the labors of my earliest 
attempts in the business of my father. 

"I am not married but have determined to produce second 
class animals, i, e. horses, cattle, etc., in many instances more 
useful and easier to keep than a wife, by the looks of published 
divorces. No engine of advancement is moving with the rate 



Parkhurst, Parr, Parsons, 215 

that my bodily fuel will produce steam for under the direc- 
tion of my mind as the throttle. I am enrolled as a member 
of Jay Chapter law fraternity Phi Delta Phi." 
His address is Glenmont, Albany, N. Y. 

Charles Seymour Parsons (B.A. 1903) was born in Akron, 
Ohio, February 4, 1882, prepared for college at the Rectory 
School, New Milford, Conn., and at the Western Reserve 
Academy, Hudson, Ohio, and entered with the Class. 

His father, William Cheney Parsons (Western Reserve Col- 
lege 1863), a manufacturer of Rutland, Vt, was bom in Brim- 
field, Portage County, Ohio, February 19, 1841, the son of 
Edward Parsons, a farmer of Brimfield, and of Qementina 
(Janes) Parsons. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Day Seymour, 
was the daughter of Nathan Perkins Seymour, a professor of 
Latin and Greek in Western Reserve College, and of Elizabeth 
(Day) Seymour. 

Parsons' Yale relatives include a brother, William Edward 
Parsons (1895), a grandfather, Nathan Perkins Seymour 
^1834), a gr^at uncle, Thomas Mills Day (1837), and several 
cousins, Thomas Mills Day, Jr. (1886), Arthur Pomeroy Day 
(1890), Clive Day (1892), and Charles Seymour (1908). 

In college he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, winning a 
Benjamin F. Barge Mathematical first prize in Sophomore year. 
He held a High Oration Junior appointment and a High Ora- 
tion Senior appointment and in Senior year was a member of the 
University Whist team. 

He writes : "During my Senior year at New Haven I decided 
to make mechanical engineering my profession. Through Pro- 
fessor Richards, the head of that department in ShefF., I obtained 
a position in the draughting room of the Riter-Conley Manu- 
facturing Company of Pittsburg, and about the middle of July 
1903 I left Connecticut to take up my work. While with this 
concern I was in their Gas Department and obtained a good 
knowledge of the construction and equipment of a modem gas 
plant. I also grew familiar with the details of the work in 
a large draughting room. 

"In March 1904 through Jimmy Putnam I heard of an open- 
ing with the Colonial Steel Company, also of this city, at their 



2i6 History of the Class of Jpo^, 

plant twenty-five miles clown the Ohio. Their master mechanic 
was looking for a draughtsman and after talking the work over 
with him I decided to accept the position. My work was right 
out in the mill and gave me a very good chance to get the practi- 
cal experience that I wanted. Any time when I was not busy 
with my own work I spent in learning what I could about the 
manufacture of crucible steel, which was their specialty. Being* 
in personal contact with the master mechanic a good deal of the 
time, I made myself familiar with his work, and when, after I 
had been there a year, he was laid up for a month as the result 
of an accident, I was able to look after a large part of his work 
during his absence. While working with the Colonial Steel 
Company, I lived at New Brighton, a town of about 10,000, and 
had the distinction of being the only Yale man there although 
there were several others in other parts of the county. In 
August 1905 I left and took a position with the A. Garrison 
Foundry Company of the South Side, Pittsburg. This company 
made a specialty of rolling mill construction, for which my ex- 
perience at the Colonial Steel Company was a very good prepara- 
tion. My work there was also in their draughting room, but it 
was a much more responsible position. Most of my time with 
them was spent on the plans for a 'three-high universal mill' 
which they were building for the National Tube Company. In 
November I received an appointment as assistant night in- 
structor in mathematics in the Carnegie Technical Schools of 
this city. They are giving a five-year night course in the vari- 
ous branches of engineering which will correspond to their three- 
year day course. The night course (three evenings a week) is 
designed for men who are unable to give up their time to take 
the day course. Many of the men were over thirty years old 
and held responsible positions. For three months I spent the 
day in the draughting rooms and three evenings a week at the 
school buildings teaching. About the ist of February, 1906, 
Mr. Hamerschlag, the Director of the Carnegie Technical 
Schools, offered me a position in his office, which I decided to 
accept, keeping on with the teaching evenings. So I left the A. 
Garrison Foundry Company and up to May ist my work was 
that of Acting Purchasing Agent and from then on has been that 
of Acting Registrar. On return from my vacation in July I 
expect to take up my work as engineering assistant, in connec- 



Partridge J Patterson. 217 

tion with the equipment for the new buildings which are to be 
erected this fall. I expect to obtain valuable experience with 
my new work, which will fit me for a good position inside of a 
year or two. If in that time a good opening with the Schools 
should appear I may be permanently connected with them, 
although I do not expect to do any teaching. I think that I 
have covered my occupation and plans for the future. The 
answers to questions 2, 3 and 4 are a blank, as I am not married, 
have done no post-graduate work and have written nothing that 
will be published except for this letter. I am a member of the 
Yale Alumni Association of Pittsburg and of the Engineers 
Society of Western Pennsylvania. My permanent address is 
care Carnegie Technical Schools, Pittsburg, Pa. I will keep 
them posted as to my address in case I should leave, so that any- 
thing addressed in their care will always reach me. I hope 
that I have written enough, as I see you have called my attention 
to the sentence 'do not be afraid to write too much.' " 

And later: "A change in my plans has come about rather 
suddenly. After October 15, 1906, I expect to be with Ralph 
Melcer in the Frank Hagny Company, heating and ventilating 
contractors, 1133 Broadway, New York City. After that date 
all letters should be addressed there." (See Addenda.) 

John Hinsdale Partridge was born in Norfolk, Conn., June 
18, 1880, prepared at the Enfield (Conn.) Public High School 
and entered in September 1899, joining the Class of 1904 in 
1900. He left Yale at Christmas of 1902. 

His father, Frank Henry Partridge, of the F. H. Partridge 
and Son, Rockville, Conn., laundry, was bom in Winchester, 
Conn., January 10, 1850, the son of John Partridge and Mary 
Ann (Freeman) Partridge. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ida Lemira Ferguson, 
was the daughter of William James Ferguson of Canaan, Conn., 
and of Lura (Rood) Ferguson. 

Partridge is at present in the laundry business with the firm 
of F. H. Partridge and Son, 69 Brooklyn St., Rockville, Conn. 
He lives at 60 Elm St. 

William Leslie Patterson (B.A. Acadia 1902, B.A. Yale 
1903, M.A. 1904), was born in Amherst, Nova Scotia, Decem- 



2i8 History of the Class of 1903. 

ber 24, 1881, prepared at the Amherst High School and entered 
Yale at the beginning of Senior year. 

His father, Charles Edward Patterson, a manufacturer, was 
born in Amherst, N. S., in 1845, ^^^ son of James M. Patterson 
and Marie (Cahill) Patterson. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Jane Elizabeth Bowser, 
was the daughter of E. B. Bowser and Ruth M. (Cahill) 
Bowser. 

Patterson graduated with an Oration Senior appointment. 

He writes: "In 1903-4 I was a member of the Graduate 
School of Yale University and held the Eldridge Fellowship 
and was Assistant in Political Economy in Yale College. I 
received in 1904 the degree of M.A. from Yale University. In 
1904-1905 I was a member of the First Year Class in the Yale 
Medical School. In 1905-1906 I entered Boston University 
Medical School as a Second Year student, where I am at present. 
Member of Phi Alpha Gamma, Boston University. 

"Permanent address always, Amherst, Nova Scotia." 

Oscar Columbus Payne (B.A. Baylor University, Waco, 
Texas, 1902, B.A. Yale 1903) was born January 15, 1881, at 
Rome, Ga., prepared at the Burleson College, Greenville, Texas, 
and entered Yale at the beginning of Senior year. 

His father, Jesse Neal Payne, a farmer of Waco, was bom in 
Franklin County, Georgia, June 15, 1852, the son of N. M. 
Payne, a farmer of Georgia, and of Sara (Guess) Payne. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sara Elizabeth Isbell, 
was the daughter of W. F. Isbell, a Georgia farmer, and of 
Mary E. (Gamer) Isbell. 

Payne was married August 9, 1904, at Crockett, Texas, to 
Miss Mittie Royall Baker, daughter of Murdock Mcintosh 
Baker, a farmer of Crockett, Texas. 

He writes: *'Since leaving Yale I have taught one year at 
Crockett and one at Lovelady, Texas, in the public schools. 
The year ending I have been editor of The Houston County 
Times, an independent weekly newspaper, and have also supplied 
as pastor of the Crockett Baptist church. I leave the last of 
August 1906 to enter the Theological Seminary of Baylor Uni- 
versity at Waco, Texas." 

His address is Crockett, Texas. 



Payne, Peckham. 219 

Wheeler Hazard Peckham (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 
1906) was bom in Newport, R. I., August 2, 1880, prepared at 
tlie Black Hall School, Lyme, Conn., and entered college with 
the Qass. 

His father, Walton Milderberger Peckham,. at present resides 
at 2y Rue Pierre Charron, Paris, France. He was bom in New 
York City, the son of Walter Hazard Peckham, M.D., and 
Margaret Augusta (Milderberger) Peckham. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Marie Louise Chese- 
brough, was the daughter of Robert John Chesebrough (Yale 
1817) and Anne (Birmingham) Chesebrough. 

In college Peckham played right tackle on the Freshman 
eleven and was a member of Kappa Psi, Delta Kappa Epsilon 
and the Elihu Club. 

He writes : "On graduating from college I spent the summer 
abroad. Returned in September and entered the Harvard Law 
School. During the Christmas holidays 'Steve' Clark and I 
took a short trip to Canada. On completing the year at the 
Law School I worked in Brown Brothers and Company, bankers, 
59 Wall Street, New York, from July 5 to September 19, then 
went with 'Bob' Granniss to the St. Louis Exposition, spending 
a week there, during which timewewere joined by 'Bear' DuPuy 
and 'Rubberfoot' McCormick (at the time an alderman of Chi- 
cago) . Then another year of the Law School, at the end of which 
time I went to camp with the First Corps Cadets Massachusetts 
militia, which I joined the first year up here, at Westfield, 
where all the troops were mobilized under General Miles. 
I then went abroad, returning last September, and started 
in the last lap (I hope) of law school endeavor. I forgot to 
mention that I have been rooming with 'Ginger' McQintock and 
that we have retained the same apartments all three years, as they 
are the best the house affords. I expect the degree of LL.B. or 
J.D. (they haven't decided which it will be, probably the for- 
mer), J.D. standing for Doctor of Jurisprudence. In politics, 
I arose one morning at four o'clock this winter (it was very 
cold) in order to be a 'watcher' at the polls in the municipal 
election of Boston. On arriving out in Charlestown I found 
that my services were of no value and was told so. Came home 
rather discouraged. The only permanent address I can give at 
this time is 3 Winthrop Hall, Cambridge, Mass., as my plans for 



2 20 History of the Class of 1903. 

the coming year are unsettled. I expect to be present at Trien- 
nial, go to camp again and then abroad for the summer. What 
I will do on my return in the fall is uncertain. 

"Toby, Jr., has been attending the law school with me and has 
been spending the summer with 'Mort' Fitch and *Dusty' Miller, 
1904. He is just as good as ever." 

And later, August 1906: "Until I let you know of a perma- 
nent address, please send all communications care Mrs. W. G. 
Steel, 'Cresheim,' Mt. Airy, Philadelphia, Pa." 

Julius Deming Perkins, Jr., was born in Litchfield, Conn., 
June 4, 1880, prepared at the Taft School, Watertown, Conn., 
and entered at the beginning of Freshman year, leaving Yale 
during Junior year. 

His father, Julius Deming Perkins, of Litchfield, was bom 
in Litchfield March 16, 1830, the son of Charles Perkins, a 
lawyer, and of Clarissa (Deming) Perkins. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Margaretta Warner 
Dotterer, was the daughter of Davis H. Dotterer, a civil 
engineer, and of Anne Emlen (Warner) Dotterer. 

He writes : "The 'suggestions for letters' you sent me is soon 
answered : ( i ) Residence for past two years, Colorado. Left 
college about November i, 1901. Entered law office of 
Thomas H. Hardcastle October i, 1905, as an employee only. 
(2) Does not apply to my case. (3) Entered Colorado Col- 
lege at Colorado Springs March i, 1904, and remained about 
two and a half months studying principally mineralogy, but 
also took a course in English. Entered the Law School of the 
University of Denver on October i, 1905. No degrees taken. 
(4) Have no literary aspirations. (5) Member of *Town 
and Gown Golf Club' at Colorado Springs from about Decem- 
ber I, 1903, to June I, 1904, when I resigned. Elected a mem- 
ber of The Denver Country Club' February 18, 1905, and of 
The Overland Park Club' July 7, 1905, of both of which I am 
still a member. No political experiences. (6) Was in Europe 
during April, May and June 1903. (7) Permanent address: 
The Lindens,' Litchfield, Conn. (8) and (9) I have done 
nothing but loaf about till this fall, and my plans are altogether 
too uncertain to write about." 

His present address is 1068 Pearl St., Denver, Col. 



Perkins, Pierce. 221 

Byron Ainsworth Pierce (B.A. 1903) was born in Altmar, 
N. Y., April 12, 1880, prepared at Phillips Academy, Andover, 
Mass., and entered college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, William Polleys Pierce of the James Pierce 
Leather Company, manufacturers of Olean, was born in Med- 
ford, Mass., July 5, 1841, the son of John Pierce, a shipbuilder 
of Med ford, and of Charlotte Maria (Cutter) Pierce. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Converse Pear- 
son, was the daughter of John Fay Pearson, a violin maker 
of Wobum, Mass., and of Martha Maria Converse (Caldwell) 
Pearson. 

In college Pierce was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon and 
held a First Colloquy Senior appointment. 

He writes: "Shortly after graduating in 1903 I left New 
York (July 15) with Erling Ostby, Wilson Wing and Lucian 
Kirtland (1903) and Richard Blanding, Brown 1903, an old 
Andover chum, for a trip around the world. We went west 
across the continent and sailed from San Francisco. In San 
Francisco we met Kenneth Schley and Sam Reeves, 1902 S., 
just returning from a trip around. We stopped at Honolulu, 
where a Yale dinner was given in honor of our party. We spent 
some time in Japan and China. While in Japan the members 
of our party formed themselves into the Knights of the Royal 
Dragon and adopted appropriate insignia. We proceeded by 
boat from Hong Kong to the Straits Settlements, Ceylon, Ara- 
bia, Egypt, to Marseilles, thence via Paris and London to New 
York again. We arrived at our homes just in time for Thanks- 
giving dinner. The trip was a glorious success. 

"On January 12, 1904, I went to Boston in the employ of the 
J. B. Pearson Company, a manufacturing and wholesale mercan- 
tile house, of which my uncle is president, to gain some business 
experience. I remained there until the middle of the following 
October, when I decided to learn the leather business in my 
father's factory in Olean, N. Y. After a short course in book- 
keeping in Burdett*s Business College in Boston, I began work 
in Olean, November 14, 1904. While in Boston I roomed with 
Charlie Day and Paul Mann, both 1903. I remained in Olean 
until July 1905. At that time owing to working in damp rooms 
I had contracted rheumatism, and on being overcome by the heat 
one day, July 14, I was compelled to stop and abandon the fac- 



222 History of the Class of 1903. 

tory work. I spent last summer recuperating on the St Law- 
rence River with my family. In September, while on my way to 
Boston in search of a position in a wholesale leather store, I 
yisited Erling Ostby in Providence, was offered a position with 
Ostby and Barton Company, manufacturing jewelers, and soon 
after accepted it, starting work on October 11. I am now most 
pleasantly situated at very agreeable work among friends." 

His business address is care Ostby and Barton Company, 118 
Richmond St., Providence, R. I. His residence is 56 Waterman 
St. His home address is 316 Laurens St., Olean, N. Y. 

Claude Meek Pitcher was bom in Scranton, Pa., January 20, 
1880, the son of Charles R. Pitcher. He prepared at the School 
of Lackawanna, Scranton, and entered college with the Class, 
leaving at Christmas 1899. 

He is a member of the Lackawanna bar with an office at 306 
and 307 Commonwealth Building, Scranton, Pa. His residence 
is 141 5 Price St., Scranton. 

Howard Albert Plummer (B.A. 1903) was born in New 
York City October 18, 1881, prepared at the Berkeley School, 
New York City, and entered college at the beginning of the 
course. 

His father, John Franklin Plummer, was born in Boston, 
Mass., October 2, 1840, the son of Nathaniel Plummer and 
Agnes (Pennell) Plummer. He is a capitalist and was Govern- 
ment Director of the Union Pacific Railroad under President 
Harrison, 1889-1893. He has been an active organizer and was 
the first President of the Business Men's Association of New 
York City, also Treasurer of the Republican County Committee 
in 1888. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Emily Maria Atkins, 
was the daughter of Joshua Atkins and Emily (Hews) Atkins. 

A brother, John Franklin Plummer, Jr., (1891) preceded him 
at Yale. 

In college Plummer was Secretary and Treasurer of the 
Freshman Baseball Association. He was a member of the Uni- 
versity Tennis team for the four years and its Captain, winning 
with S. L. Russell (1902 S.) the Intercollegiate Doubles in 1901. 
He won the University championship twice in singles and 



Pitcher, Plummer, Pomeroy, 223 

three time in doubles and was also President of the Intercol- 
legiate Tennis Association. He was editor of the Courant and 
Banner, Treasurer of the Junior Promenade Committee, Class 
Poet and a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Chi Delta Theta, Kappa 
Psi, Alpha Delta Phi and Wolf's Head societies. He held a 
High Oration Junior appointment and an Oration Senior 
appointment. 

He writes: "As to a class letter, you must realize that the 
lower rungs of the ladder of success are not apt to be the most 
eventful and since I am still *heart-whole and fancy-free' I have 
no alluring details to give you in answer to number two. I 
started in after graduation with the North American Trust Com- 
pany, which was merged last year with the Trust Company of 
America, now about the largest trust company in New York. 
Since March I have had the complete charge of the Foreign 
Exchange Department with the title of 'Manager* thereof — tak- 
ing care (or trying to) of our foreign relations, foreign drafts, 
letters of credit, etc. Have published no works of art except 
the song, 'Everybody Works but the Convicts.' As to number 
five, am at present on the House and Admission committees of 
the Yale Club. My permanent address is 135 Broadway, New 
York City. Most eventful circumstance since graduation 
undoubtedly was the Triennial at New Haven." 

He lives at 7 East 43d St., New York City. 

Horace Burton Pomeroy (B.A. 1903, M.A. 1906) was bom 
in Troy, Pa., June 3, 1879, prepared at the Lawrenceville (N. J.) 
School and entered college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Charles Burton Pomeroy, a retired farmer of 
Troy, was born in Troy April 11, 1839, *^ son of Ebenezer 
Pomeroy, of Coventry, Conn., and Bradford County, Pa., and 
of Laura (Brewster) Pomeroy. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sopha Webber, died 
April 23, 1905, and was the daughter of Lorenzo Webber, of 
Vermont and New York, and of Jane Albina (Welch) Webber. 

In college Pomeroy was a member of the University Banjo 
and Mandolin Qub and of Psi Upsilon. He held a Second 
Dispute Junior appointment and the same Senior appointment 

He writes : "I still continue with the Bankers Trust Company, 
7 Wall Street, New York City. The business is agreeable, and 
although progress is not as fast as desirable, yet hope and ambi- 



224 History of the Class of IQ03. 

tion keep tlie ball a-rolling — ^the same old story I suppose 
throughout the Class." 

He lives at 103 Clark Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

George French Porter (B.A. 1903) was born in Chicago, 
111., July 26, 1 88 1, prepared at the Lawrenceville (N. J.) School 
and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Henry Homes Porter (railroads), was born 
in Machias, Me., December 7, 1835, the son of Rufus King 
Porter and Lucy Lee (Hedge) Porter. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Eliza Thayer French, 
was the daughter of George Haskell French and Elizabeth E. 
(Thayer) French. 

In college Porter was a member of Psi Upsilon and held a 
Second Colloquy Junior and a Second Colloquy Senior appoint- 
ment. H. H. Porter, Jr., (Yale 1898 S.) is a brother and 
George S. Isham (1881) a brother-in-law. 

He writes : "The summer of 1903 I spent abroad, returning 
in September, and the winter of 1903-1904 at the Northwestern 
Law School in Chicago. I had no intention of becoming a 
lawyer but simply wished the general information for its value 
in business, and I have found it ver>' useful. The following 
summer I spent in Europe and returning in the early fall went 
into my father's office to imbibe a general knowledge of business 
in general and his affairs in particular. 

"In the spring I became connected with the Chicago Transfer 
and Qearing Company and the Chicago Union Transfer Rail- 
way Company as director, secretary and treasurer. My father 
is largely interested in these properties, which are not in active 
operation, thus explaining my connection. My outside interests 
are not worth thinking of ; have taken considerable interest in 
Bert McCormick's campaign and in non-partisan organizations 
for clean municipal politics. Am sailing for Europe again 
February 27, 1906, but sincerely hope to be back for Triennial.*' 

His business address is Room 1622, 143 Dearborn St., 
Chicago, 111. His residence is 311 Erie St. 

Henry Potter (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Washington University, 
St. Louis, 1905) was born in St. Louis, Mo., October 4, 1881, 
prepared at the St. Paul School, Concord, N. H., and entered 
college in the fall of 1899. 




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BYERS. MEMORIAL. UNIVERSITY. SOUTH SHEFF. KIRTLANU. 



Porter, Potter, Pratt. 225 

His father, Henry Saunders Potter (Yale 1872), is President 
of the St. Louis Steel Barge Company. He was born in Madi- 
son, Ind., June 10, 1850, the son of Russell Potter. 

His mother's maiden name was Margaret Lionberger. 

In college Potter was on the University Hockey and Golf 
teams, winning the University golf championship in the fall of 
1902. He was a member of He Boule, Alpha Delta Phi and 
Scroll and Key societies. Clarkson Potter (Yale 1901) is a 
brother. 

He is now holding the position of Chief Clerk of the Treas- 
ury Department of the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad, 
904-10 Frisco Building, St. Louis, Mo. He lives at 5814 
Cabanne Avenue. 

Charles Franklin Pratt (B.A. 1903) was bom in Hartford, 
Conn., September 10, 1880, prepared at the Hartford Public 
High School and entered college in September 1899. 

His father, Charles William Pratt, a dealer in ladies' cloaks, 
suits and furs, Hartford, Conn., was born in Saybrook, Conn., 
December 8, 1851, the son of Charles Augustus Pratt, a builder 
of Saybrook, Conn., and of Mary E. (Randall) Pratt. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ella Barnard Cone, 
was the daughter of Sylvanus Franklin Cone, a farmer of Hart- 
ford, and of Delia Maria (Barnard) Cone. 

Pratt's Yale relatives include a brother, Warren Cone Pratt 
(1909), an uncle, William R. Cone (1830), and three cousins, 
James B. Cone (1857), Charles E. Gross (1869) and Charles 
W. Gross (1898). 

He writes : "Two days after graduation I sailed for Antwerp 
for a trip through Europe. During the trip I was in the follow- 
ing countries: Belgium, Holland, Germany, Austria, Italy, 
Switzerland, France and England. Most of my time was spent 
in visiting the art galleries and cathedrals, with various excur- 
sions to special points of interest. Many were the pleasant 
meetings with Yale men everywhere, both men of 1903 and of 
other classes. The name of Yale was the cause of many a 
pleasant evening which otherwise would have been dull. 
Through the name of Yale I also met many Oxford and Cam- 
bridge men who had many questions to ask of Yale and 
Harvard. I returned home the latter part of September just 
IS 



2 26 History of the Class of 1903. 

in time to begin the busy season in my father's store, where 
I started in at the bottom. Now I hold a position second only 
to my father. Since I graduated I missed just one big game 
at New Haven and I am lodcing forward to the biggest game 
of all next June (1906)." 

His business address is 73-77 Pratt St., and his residence 466 
Farming^on Ave., Hartford, Conn. 

James Osborne Putnam (B.A. 1903) was bom in Buffalo, 
N. Y., July 30, 1880, prepared at the Hill School, Pottstown, 
Pa., and entered college with the Class. 

His father, George Palmer Putnam, Secretary and Treas- 
urer of the Perth Amboy Terra Cotta Company, was bom in 
Buffalo, N. Y., in 1842, the son of James Osborne Putnam 
(Yale 1839). 

His mother, whose maiden name was Agnes Adelia Hall, 
was the daughter of Edward J. Hall and Mary (Hoy) Hall. 

Among his Yale relatives are two brothers, George Palmer 
Putnam, Jr., (1896 S.) and Edward Hall Putnam (1904 S.); 
five uncles: E. J. Hall (1873 S.), W. C. Hall (18758.), Gil- 
bert Colgate (1883), Samuel Colgate, Jr., (1891) and S. R. 
Hall (1895 S.) ; and two cousins: W. C. Hall, Jr., (1904) and 
E. J. Hall, Jr. (1906 S.). 

In college Putnam held a Second Colloquy Senior 
appointment. 

He writes: "After spending two months vacation your 
humble servant took a position in The Colonial Steel Company, 
Pittsburg, Pa. This event took place September i, 1903. 
During my connection with that company I filled several posi- 
tions. At first I was sort of general utility man, then invoice 
and voucher clerk and finally assistant paymaster. As time 
went on a number of things which had at first not come to my 
attention thrust themselves upon me. All the good positions 
in the company were held by members of the president's family 
and such secondary positions as others held were underpaid. 
So it was necessary to either get into the family or leave the 
company. After due deliberation yours truly decided on the 
second alternative and resigned his position in March 1905. 
New York for a month and then off to seek my fortune in the 
'Golden West'. At present the fortune does not seem to be 



/. O. Putnam, /. F. Putnam, Rankin. 227 

materializing, but we are still young. The only club or organi- 
zation of any kind to which I belong is the Kansas City Country 
Club. 

"Letters will always reach me if addressed care Missouri 
and Kansas Telephone Company, Kansas City, Mo. If it is 
possible, next June will see me in New Haven, but at present 
it looks as though I would have to forego the pleasure of 
attending our Triennial." 

His residence is 3724 Baltimore Ave., Kansas City, Mo. His 
home address is 216 West 70th St., New York City. 

John Person Putnam (B.A. 1903) was bom in Columbus, 
Ohio, July 26, 1880, prepared at the Columbus Latin School and 
entered college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, David E. Putnam (Marietta 1864), who is in the 
real estate and banking business in Columbus, was bom in 
Jersey, Licking County, Ohio, February 23, 1842, the son of the 
Rev. Charles Marsh Putnam (Yale 1826) and of Abby (Edger- 
ton) Putnam. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Susan Euphemia Ram- 
sey, died in 1900. She was the daughter of John Ramsey, a 
farmer of Columbiana County, Ohio, and of Keziah (Hamilton) 
Ramsey. 

. Besides his grandfather, Putnam's Yale relatives are his great 
grandfather, David Putnam (1793), and a great uncle, Douglas 
Putnam of the Class of 1826. 

He writes : "Three days after graduation I went to work with 
the Columbus Buggy Company, and have been with them ever 
since. Have taken but one vacation of ten days in the last three 
years. I doubt if many other members of the Class can show a 
longer period of work since leaving college. Am living at home 
with my father, 61 South 6th Street, Colimibus, Ohio." 

Hugh Rankin (B.A. 1903, M.A. 1904) was bora in Nassau, 
N. Y., May 30, 1881, prepared at the Newark (N. J.) Academy 
and at the Mt. Pleasant .Academy, Ossining, N. Y., and entered 
college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, the Rev. Isaac Ogden Rankin (Princeton 1873), 
literary editor of the Congregationalist and of the Christian 
World, was bora in New York City November 22, 1852, the son 



228 History of the Class of 1903, 

of Rev. Edward E. Rankin (Yale 1840) and of Emily (Watkin- 
son) Rankin. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Martha Clark, was the 
daughter of Rev. Perkins K. Clark (Yale 1838) and of Hannah 
Smith (Avery) Clark. 

Besides his grandfathers, his Yale relatives include an uncle, 
Edward Perkins Clark (1870), and three cousins: Charles U. 
Clark (1897), John K. Clark (1899) and George M. Qark 
(1901). 

In college Rankin was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Zeta 
Psi societies. In Sophomore year he took honors in English 
Composition and held in Junior and Senior years the Thomas 
Glasby Waterman Scholarship. He won the Bennett prize in 
1903. In Junior year he held a Philosophical Oration Junior 
appointment and received honors in Economics in Junior and 
Senior years. He was Salutatorian of the Qass. 

He writes : "I spent the college year after we graduated in 
the Graduate School at New Haven rooming with Douglas 
Moffat. He was assistant in English, I in Political Economy. 
This meant in my case at least no actual teaching, some marking 
of papers and an opportunity to get to know in a different way 
from in college some of the professors. The year was as dif- 
ferent from the preceding ones as two years could be in the 
same place and surroundings but was a very pleasant one. 
There was a crowd who ate together of graduate students, 
young instructors and graduates, including several of our own 
class — George Hurst, Tony Waring, Bob Smith, Harry Van De- 
venter — which especially made the life pleasant. At the end of 
the year I got an M.A. in Political Economy or Economics, I 
can't recall which, but I don't believe there is much difference. 

"Through August and September of 1904 I was at Ebens- 
burg, Pa., tutoring two boys who had a total of twenty condi- 
tions and wanted to get in Yale that fall. They got in, greatly 
to my relief, and not a little to my surprise. Then I took Octo- 
ber off, spending part of the time in a trip to Maine, where 
Harold Clark, Robert Black, Alan Fox. and I spent a few days 
at a cottage of Harold's out on Cape Elizabeth. 

"On November i I began work in the Auditor's and Fourth 
Vice President's office of the New York Central as main office 
boy. Here I became a shark on copying letters in a letter press. 



Rankin. 229 

dealing with that part of the general public which had business, 
real or alleged, at our office, and answering more bells and 
buzzers than anyone who has not heard them all go off at once 
could have any idea of. Not long after I began there, I had an 
opportunity to go to the Railroad Gazette, which I did, largely at 
the advice of Mr. Marshall L. Bacon, the Auditor, a man of the 
Henry P. Wright type, on January i, 1905. Since that time I 
have been associate editor under Ray Morris (1901). In this 
position I have naturally had a good many articles published, 
some of which have also been published in other papers after- 
ward, one in a recent number of the Weekly. I have also had an 
article on the 'Railroad Situation Present and Future' in the 
New York Times Annual Financial Review (January 7, 
1906) and an editorial (not under my name of course) in the 
Commercial and Financi<il Chronicle (July 29, 1905) on 
'Government Railroad Policy in Canada.' In connection with 
my work last summer I spent three weeks getting acquainted 
with the railroad situation in Chicago and two or three weeks 
more traveling and seeing western railroads, going as far west 
as the Pacific slope of the Continental Divide, some 125 miles 
west of Denver on the new 'Moffat' road, the Denver, North- 
western and Pacific. This trip, which included crossing the 
divide 11,660 feet, I took with 'Lottie' Collins, with whom I had 
a fine visit in Denver. He is a reporter on the Rocky Mountain 
Times and when I was out there had the police 'run,' which in- 
volved being 'Johnny on the spot' in case of accident or crime. 
In consequence he rode in the ambulance more than in the 
street cars. With one exception (I believe) he had not seen 
a classmate between the time he left the East soon after we 
graduated to the time I got out there. 

"Another reunion that I think is worth mentioning is the 
'Table 12' reunion which we had at Cambridge at the time of 
the Harvard game the fall of 1905. Of the thirteen members 
of the table ten were there — Alan Fox, Harold Clark, Robert 
Black, Douglas Moffat, D. K. Johnston, Eugene Kingman, 
Arthur Collens, Dudley Lewis and Ralph Melcer. Heimie 
Butts (1902 S.) would have come if he had not arranged to get 
married that week before he knew about the reunion. Stanleigh 
Arnold was too busy doing three men's work teaching in Sheff . 
and taking all the honors in sight in the Law School to get off 



230 History of the Class of 1903, 

even for those two or three days, and Charles Parsons could not 
tear himself away from Pittsburg. 

"My permanent address for the present at least is Peekskill, 
N. Y. This is not my current address, which is 83 Fulton 
Street, New York, but a place where letters may always be sent 
Not Poughkeepsie or Newburg." 

John Dougan Rea (B.A. Earlham College 1902, B.A. Yale 
1903, M.A. 1905) was bom in Minneapolis, Kansas, September 
20, 1880, prepared at the Richmond (Ind.) High School and 
entered Yale at the beginning of Senior year. 

His father, Robert Morgan Rea (M.D. College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, New York, 1865), was born in Hackettstown, 
N. J., March 10, 1846, the son of William Rea, M.D., and Mary 
(Valentine) Rea. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Cora Georgia Anderson, 
was the daughter of George Anderson, a farmer of Venice, 
Ohio, and of Harriet (Rees) Anderson. 

In college Rea was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and held 
a Philosophical Oration Senior appointment, graduating six- 
teenth in rank. 

He writes : Since leaving Yale I have been engaged in teach- 
ing at Farmington, Conn., for two years, doing at the same time 
graduate work at Trinity and Yale. Received my M.A. last 
June. For the present school year have been teaching Latin 
in the Winchester High School. Have not gotten engaged, 
into politics, or in jail." 

His residence is The Randolph, Winchester, Indiana. His 
home address is Richmond, Indiana. 

John Joseph Reilly (B.A. 1903, LL.B. New York University 
1906) was bom in Mineville, Essex County, N. Y., November 
6, 1880, prepared at the Colgate Academy, Hamilton, N. Y., and 
at the Fairport (N. Y.) High School and entered college with 
the Class. 

His father, Bernard Reilly, who died in 1891, was bom in 
Ireland in 1851 and was a mining engineer and tunnel construc- 
tionist. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Margaret Flynn, is 
deceased. 



Rea, Reilly, Reynolds. 231 

In college ReiUy was an alternate on the Sophomore Debating 
team, won honors in social science and held a Second Colloquy 
Junior appointment and a Second Dispute Senior appointment. 

He writes: "'Since leaving college in 1903 I have lived one 
year in Rochester, N. Y., where I was working as wholesale 
manager for Brown Brothers, who have the largest nursery busi- 
ness in that city. In October 1904 I came to New York and 
entered the Law Department of New York University, where 
I shall have taken two years of law study in Jime 1906 and from 
which school I hope to get the degree of LL.B. in June of this 
year (1906). I expect to remain in New York City for a year 
or two after leaving the Law School and at the end of that 
time move to some smaller city. The only organizations with 
which I have become affiliated since leaving college are the 
Intercollegiate branch of the Y. M. C. A. at 129 Lexington 
Avenue, and the Delta Chi legal fraternity. Any letters directed 
to 129 Lexington Avenue, New York City, will reach me for 
some time to come." 

James William Reynolds (B.A. 1903) was bom in St. 
Louis, Mo., June 15, 1879, prepared at the Smith Academy, St. 
Louis, Mo. and entered college in the fall of 1899. 

His father, George Delachaumette Reynolds (University of 
Illinois 1859), of the law firm of Reynolds and Reynolds, St. 
Louis, was Lieutenant Colonel, U. S. V., 1860-1865, and U. S. 
District Attorney, Eastern District of Missouri, 1888-1893. He 
is the son of William Morton Reynolds and Anna (Swan) 
Reynolds. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Julia Vogdes, was the 
daughter of Augustus Summerfield Vogdes and Maria Cornelia 
(Evans) Vogdes. 

A brother, George Vogdes Reynolds, graduated from Yale 
in 1901. 

In college Reynolds was on the Freshman Glee Club, Apollo 
Glee Club and was President of the University Glee Qub. He 
was Treasurer of the Sophomore German Committee and a 
member of the Junior Promenade Committee, also Secretary of 
the Corinthian Yacht Club. He was a member of Eta Phi, 
Alpha Delta Phi, and Scroll and Key societies, and held a 
Second Colloquy Senior appointment. He edited and pub- 



232 History of the Class of 1903, 

lished in collaboration with Thomas G. Shepard, 'Yale Melodies', 
a collection of Yale songs covering the period between 1893 and 
1903. 

He is in the Bond Department of the Commonwealth Trust 
Company, Broadway and Olive Sts., St. Louis, Mo. He lives 
at 4239 Lindell Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 

Samuel Wheaton Rhoads (B.A. 1903) was born in Lake 
Carey, Pa., July 19, 1882, prepared at the Taft School, Water- 
town, Conn., and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Samuel R. Rhoads, who died in May 1882, was 
born in Williamsport, Pa., May 24, 1853. 

His mother's maiden name was Jessie Evelyn Wheaton. 

In college Rhoads was a member of Zeta Psi and held a 
Second Colloquy Junior appointment. F. W. Wheaton (Yale 
1877) is an uncle. 

Since graduating he has been studying law and has been in 
the office of Woodward, Darling and Woodward, 24 Coal 
Exchange, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

His residence is 85 Carey Ave. 

Joseph Foster Rhodes (B.A. 1903) was bom in Chicago, 
111., November 18, 1881, prepared at the Harvard School, 
Chicago, The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa., and at the St. Paul 
School, Concord, N. H., and entered college at the beginning 
of Freshman year. He is the son of John Foster Rhodes and 
Margaret White (Patterson) Rhodes. 

He was married February 14, 1906, in Pasadena, Cal., to 
Miss Louise Pierce Bond, daughter of Joseph Bond of Chicago, 
111. 

October i, 1903, to July i, 1904, Rhodes was with the Geo. 
A. Fuller Construction Co. of New York. November i, 1904, 
he started in with the Blow Planing Mill, Pasadena, Col., later 
becoming secretary and manager. In September 1905 he formed 
a partnership in the contracting business : Brandt and Rhodes, 
412 Byrne Building, Los Angeles, Cal. His residence and per- 
manent address is 336 Bellevue Drive, Pasadena, Cal. 

George Huntington Richards (B.A. 1903) was bom in 
Bath, Maine, August i, 1882, prepared at Leal's School, Plain- 
field, N. J., and entered with the Class. 



Rhoads, Rhodes, Richards, Richardson, 233 

His .father, the Rev. William Rogers Richards, D.D., (Yale 
1857), is the pastor of the Brick Church of New York City. 
He is the son of Rev. George Richards (Yale 1840) and of 
Anna Maria (Woodruff) Richards. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Charlotte Barrett Blod- 
get, was the daughter of Henry Blodget (Yale 1848), a mis- 
sionary to China, and of Sarah Franklin (Ripley) Blodget. 

Richards' Yale relatives, beside his two grandfathers, include 
three uncles: George Richards (1872), Henry Blodget (1875), 
and Dickinson W. Richards (1880). 

In college he took honors in English Composition in Sopho- 
more year, won the Henry James Ten Eyck Prize in Junior 
year and held a First Dispute Junior appointment and a Second 
Dispute Senior appointment. 

He writes: "My history since graduation is brief. Taught 
mathematics for two years at Phillips Andover. Entered New 
Yoric Law School October 3, 1905, hoping for a degree of LL.B. 
two years from that date. 14 East 37th Street, New York Gty, 
is both temporary and permanent." 

Roland George Dwight Richardson (B.A. Acadia 1898, 
B.A. Yale 1903, M.A. 1904, Ph.D. 1906) was born in Dart- 
mouth, Nova Scotia, May 14, 1878, prepared for college at the 
Lawrencetown (N. S.) High School and entered Yale at the 
beginning of Senior year. 

His father, George Richardson, who died November 2, 1898, 
was a teacher. He was born May 14, 1828, at Isaac's Harbor, 
Nova Scotia, the son of Rev. George Richardson and Sarah 
(Williams) Richardson. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Rebecca Newcomb, was 
the daughter of Judson Newcomb, a farmer and merchant of 
Nova Scotia, and of Greselda Detchmann (Archibald) New- 
comb. 

In college Richardson won a DeForest mathematical prize 
and was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Sigfma Xi societies. 
He graduated with a Philosophical Oration Senior appointment, 
being thirteenth in rank. 

Since graduation he has been studing in the Yale Graduate 
School, taking his Ph.D. in 1906. He is an instructor in mathe- 
matics in Yale University and resides at 120 York St., New 



234 History of the Class of ipoj. 

Haven, Conn. His present address is 821 Yale Station, New 
Haven. His home address is Lawrencetown, Nova Scotia. 

Harry Albert Rightmire (B.A. 1903) was bom in Fairport, 
N. Y., October 15, 1881, prepared at the Fairport High School 
and entered with the Class. 

His father, Nathan Albert Rightmire, Superintendent of the 
Monroe County Chemical Company, formerly Mayor of Fair- 
port, was bom in Berkshire, N. Y., September 4, 1841, the son 
of Squire Rightmire and Persis (Raymond) Rightmire. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Anna Burns, died 
August 13, 1892, and was the daughter of Patrick Burns and 
Alice (Anderson) Bums. 

In college Rightmire held a First Colloquy Junior appoint- 
ment and the same Senior appointment After graduation he 
took a position with the Fourth National Bank of New York 
and then with the National Bank of Commerce of New York. 
He "left the National Bank of Commerce January i, 1905. 
Since that time I have been with the American Chemical Manu- 
facturing and Mining Company, manufacturers of inks, wax, 
shoe polishes, etc. I was first in Minneapolis, Minn., then in 
Chicago and I have now been several months in Philadelphia. 
I will undoubtedly be there some time, but might change most 
any time. I like my work very much and am getting on nicely." 

His address is 840 Salem Ave., Elizabeth, N. J., or Fair- 
port, N. Y. 

Stephen Garrett Roach was born in New York City May 
18, 1880, prepared at the Wilson and Vail School, New York, 
and entered with the Class, joining 1904 at the end of Freshman 
year. He left college at Christmas 1901 and returned in the 
fall of 1902 for one term. 

His address while in college was care Mrs. Sarah E. McPher- 
son, Langham Hotel, 657 Fifth Ave., New York City. His 
present whereabouts are unknown. 

George Roberts, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was born in Hartford, 
Conn., November 3, 1880, prepared at the Hartford Public 
High School and entered college with the Class. 

His father, George Roberts, formerly President of the Hart- 
ford Carpet Company, was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., December 



Rightmire, Roach, Roberts. 235 

20, 1845, the son of George Roberts, for many years President 
of the Hartford Carpet Company, and of Elmira (Evans) 
Roberts. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ida Marsh Hamilton, 
was the daughter of Henry Hamilton and Harriet Emmeline 
(Marsh) Hamilton. 

Roberts' Yale relatives include an uncle. Gov. Henry Roberts 
(1877), and a cousin, J. T. Roberts (1905). 

In college he was a member of the Dramatic Association, 
Superintendent of the Bethany Mission, and Manager of the 
Cross Country Association. He was a member of Psi Upsilon 
and held a Second Dispute Junior appointment. 

He writes: "J^^^ twenty-something, 1903, did not see me 
a Yale graduate as it did most of my classmates. For I was one 
of ten who preferred a more distinctive diploma dated the Ides 
(perhaps it was the Kalends, ask the Latin Faculty) of Novem- 
ber. But the night that saw so many in the bosoms of their 
families as a Yale 'alumni' (as a United States Senator once put 
it) saw me studying until 9 a. m. the next morning for the 
exam, that p. m. I passed it, so no more of that. 

"My next act was to go to a boy's camp on the shores of the 
Delaware, where I spent nine weeks teaching the 'young idea 
how to shoot,' fish, walk, swim, etc., etc. Of course I was at the 
same time learning how to be a father in case any one should 
ever consent to share a home with me. 

"The fall saw me starting in on the straight and narrow path 
which one walks in a theological seminary. I have been there 
ever since and graduate (on graduation day, faculty willing) 
this May (1906) to take up a church and parish of my own. 
I already have the latter two (but am not a 'Reverend' as yet). 
They may be called a by-product of my seminary work. My 
three years here have changed me — ^a change which I trust may 
be noticed at Triennial time. I do not fold my hands nor act 
like Carrie Nation when I smell tobacco smoke, but the cares 
of a pastorate are, I believe, already showing themselves in my 
outward appearance. 

"My second summer saw me again leading a camper's life 
in Pennsylvania; but before I went there I taught school in 
Ossining (Sing Sing) N. Y. — (Not in a striped suit!). My 
only comment on those six weeks is that I am glad I don't have 



236 History of the Class of 1903, 

to always teach unruly boys. As one of my pupils left me to 
enter West Point, you may hear of me when he is a distinguished 
general in 1950. That same summer saw me traveling hur- 
riedly, briefly and lonely to the St. Louis Fair, only to quickly 
return and continue to learn how to be good and make others 
good. 

"The third summer saw me 'loafing* on Long Island Sound 
playing tennis with thirteen-year-old lassies and sailing with 
Spen Goodwin. The reason for my thus idling away three 
months was — ('tell it not in Gath,' for it may not be believed) — 
because I was tired out from overwork, and needed a rest, and I 
can show a bona fide doctor's certificate to back my own words. 

"As to the future — but why talk of that? I haven't it yet, 
and never will have it. 

"My permanent address is 63 Washington Street, Hartford, 
Conn. My address after May (1906) remains with those as 
yet unknown to me who will call me to them before that date. 
In the meantime I study hard (honestly!) waiting for that 
date — and for the Triennial a month later." 

And later: "The only addition to my humble conditions of 
life are graduation from Union Theological Seminary on May 
15, 1906, — without any attendant suffixes to my name. June 27 
I began my work here as stated supply of the . Presbyterian 
church of Teaneck, N. J. After October I shall be ordained 
and hence a full-fledged pastor. My address is Teaneck, Engle- 
wood, N. J. Nihil faciens amatorially." 

John Randolph Robinson (B.A. 1903) was born in Balti- 
more, Md., November 11, 1879, prepared at the St. Paul School, 
Q)ncord, N. H., and entered college at the beginning of Fresh- 
man year. 

His father, John Moncure Robinson (Harvard 1856 S. and 
Virginia 1857), who died in 1893, was President of the Sea- 
board Air Line, serving during the Civil War as Colonel in the 
Confederate army. He was bom in Philadelphia, Pa., the son 
of Moncure Robinson (railroads) and of Mary (Biddle) 
Robinson. 

His mother, whose maiden name was M. Champe Conway, 
died in 1901. She was the daughter of Charles Conway, a 
physician of Richmond, Va., and of Ellen (Bradfute) Conway. 



, Robinson, Rogers, Roome. 237 

In college Robinson was Chairman of the Sophomore German 
Committee, a member of the Junior Promenade Committee, and 
of the Triennial Committee. He was an editor of the Pot- 
Pourri, sl Cup man and on the Board of Governors of the 
University Club. He was on the campaign committees of Eta 
Phi and Alpha Delta Phi and was a member of Scroll and Key. 

He is at present the New York agent of the Harbison- 
Walker Refractories Cwnpany of Pittsburg, Pa., with an office 
in the Life Building. He lives at 19 West 31st St. His per- 
manent address is the Maryland Club, Baltimore, Md. 

Cleveland Rogers (B.A. 1903) was bom at Cornwall-on 
the-Hudson, N. Y., February 11, 1880, prepared at the St. Paul 
School, Concord, N. H., and entered with the Class. 

In college he was a member of Zeta Psi and held a Disserta- 
tion Junior appointment and an Oration Senior appointment 

Since graduation he has been studying law at Harvard. He 
was taken sick last winter and is at present recuperating in 
Wakefield, R. I. 

William Joumeay Roome, Jr., was bom in Plainfield, N. J., 
December 27, 1880, prepared at Leal's School, Plainfield, and 
entered college with the Class, leaving in November of Junior 
year. 

His father, William Joumeay Roome (B.S. New York Uni- 
versity 1878) is in the real estate business and also President 
of the Excelsior Savings Bank of New York. He was bora 
in New York June 20, 1857, the son of William H. Roome and 
Adelaide (Miller) Rowne. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Marsh Sandford, 
was the daughter of Joseph W. Sandford and Mary Jane 
(Lewis) Sandford. 

In college Roome was a member of the Apollo Banjo Qub 
and Zeta Psi. Howard LeC. Roome (Yale 1907) is a brother. 

He was married on leaving college November 4, 1901, in New 
York to Miss Florence Louise Weed, daughter of the late Henry 
Frank Weed, formerly of Weed and Brother, wholesale dry 
goods, of New York. A first son, Sandford Roome, was born 
February 8, 1903. A second son, William Joumeay Roome, 
3rd, was bom December 4, 1905. 



f 



238 History of the Class of 1903. 

Roome is in the real estate business in the office of his father, 
II West 34th St., New York, and is also director and Secre- 
tary and Treasurer of the Sandford Realty Company. His 
present residence is 41 Sycamore Ave., Plainfield, N. J. 

♦Henry Idc Root died January 17, 1901. He was bom 
in Brooklyn, N. Y., March 2, 1882. His family soon afterwards 
moved to New Haven, and it was there that he prepared for 
college, graduating from the Hillhouse High School at the head 
of his class. 

His father, William Judson Root, who died December 3, 1892, 
was a mechanical engineer. He was bom in New Haven, 
Conn., October 28, 1844, the son of Rev. Judson Adoniram Root 
(Yale 1823), a Congregational clergyman, and of Emily M. 
Peck Root. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Louisa Kilbum, 
was the daughter of George Kilbum, a cotton manufacturer 
of Lonsdale, R. I., and of Laura (Hooper) Kilbum. 

A brother, Robert Kilbum Root, graduated from Yale in 
1898 and an uncle. Rev. Nathaniel W. T. Root, in 1852. 

On entering college he divided with Harry Van Deventer the 
Hugh Chamberlain Prize for the best entrance examinations in 
Greek. In the Freshman year he won the McLaughlin Prize 
in English composition. In general scholarship he stood near 
the head of the Class. He mingled very little with his class- 
mates, partly because he lived at home, but chiefly because his 
tastes differed from theirs. He delighted in long walks 
through the country, and he devoted much time to a loving 
study of literature, music, and art. 

In his Sophomore year he was troubled with insomnia, 
brought on presimiably by overwork. On the evening of Jan- 
uary 17th of our Sophomore year he left his home soon after 
dinner. Later a note was found in his room in which he con- 
fessed that he meant to take his life, and in which he asked his 
mother's forgiveness. Early the next morning his body was 
found in a vacant lot near his room on Grove Street. He had 
drunk carbolic acid. Resolutions were drawn up and sent to his 
family, signed for the Class by a committee consisting of D. B. 
MacLane, W. B. Arvine, G. R. Tillson, H. C. Kelly, W. S. 
Searles, and H. T. Clark. 



Root, Roraback, 239 

Harry had few friends, but those who knew him will never 
forget the influence of his personality. He carried into all his 
work a profound scholarly spirit. He lived much in the realm 
of music, poetry and art, and showed a rare and lofty taste in 
all three, being possessed with a passion for what was noblest 
and best in them. And the same high ideals with which he 
tested Art he carried into his whole life. He was extremely 
conscientious and sensitive, and morbidly conscious of his 
own shortcomings. So his high ideals at once separated him 
from his fellows and made him dissatisfied with himself. This 
fact together with his insomnia explains his end as much as 
such a thing can be explained. 

Donald B, MacLane. 

Joseph Clinton Roraback (B.A. 1903, LL.B. 1905) was 
bom in Canaan, Conn., February 14, 1882, prepared at the 
Robbins School, Norfolk, Conn., and by private tutor and 
entered college in September 1899. 

His father, Alberto T. Roraback, has been Judge of the 
Superior Court of Connecticut since 1897. He was bom in 
Sheffield, Mass., August 23, 1849, the son of John Christian 
Roraback and Maria (Hoysradt) Roraback. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Minnie Elizabeth Hunt, 
was the daughter of Edward P. Hunt and Mary E. (Peet) 
Himt. 

Albert Edward Roraback (Yale 1902) is a brother. 

Wbile in the Yale Law .School he played center for two 
years on the University Football team. 

He writes : "After graduation in June 1903 I was somewhat 
undecided as to whether or not I should go to the Yale Law 
School or Harvard Law, but along the middle of September, 
when I was about to make up my mind to enter Harvard Law, 
I received a letter from Captain Rafferty requesting me to 
report in New Haven the following Monday for early football 
practice. I got the fever immediately and decided to return 
to Yale to study law and play football, the former predomina- 
ting in my thoughts of course. 

"To be brief, as I know you would prefer, I did the required 
law work in two years and graduated June 1905 from the Yale 
Law School and about the same time passed the Connecticut 



f 



240 History of the Class of 1903, 

bar examinations and was admitted to the bar July 6, 1905. I 
intended not to begin work until fall, but business became so 
pressing in my uncle's office, where I intended embaricing into 
the profession, that I found myself about the middle of July 
head over heels in abstracting titles and the like. I have worked 
since then in the office of my uncle, J. Henry Roraback, Canaan, 
Conn." 

Arthur Jesse Rosenthal (B.A. 1903) was bom in New Yoifc 
City, June 22, 1882, prepared at the Hotchkiss School, Lake- 
ville, Conn., and entered college at the beginning of Freshman 
year. 

His father, Jesse Rosenthal, a retired merchant, was bom in 
New York City January 15, 1851, the son of Joseph Rosenthal, 
of J. Rosenthal and Company, importers, and of Caroline 
(Fleishman) Rosenthal. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Emma Bernard, was 
the daughter of Benjamin Bernard, a dry goods merchant of 
New York City, and of Sarah Fredericka (Wurzburg) Bernard. 

In college Rosenthal was a member of the Gun team, and 
held a Second Dispute Senior appointment. 

He writes: "I left Yale about July 4, 1903, after every 
possible excuse for remaining longer was exhausted. I spent 
the next six months camping and hunting in the Adirondadcs, 
New Foundland and New Brunswick. Started in work on 
November 23, 1903, as an office boy at Ladenburg, Thalmann 
and Company, 25 Broad Street, New York City, foreign and 
domestic bankers and brokers, and am still there. I regret that 
as yet I cannot furnish the names of any partners. 

"I am not married. My only study has been technical and 
connected with my business, t. e. railroad work, theoretical, 
practical and financial. My course has been planned entirdy 
by myself, and although I have studied with practical and theo- 
reftlr^l men I have not taken a definite course or one that would 
leaid to a degree. My only publications have consisted in writ- 
ing lists of bond offerings and bond descriptions the real nature 
of which is advertising. 

"I belong to the Yale Club here in New York and the New 
Rochelle Yacht Club. Have been a delegate to various 
Republican and citizens' Union conventions, but have not had 



Rosenthal^ Roivell, Russell. 241 

time to really take an active interest in politics. On my hunting 
trips I have been all through the maritime provinces of Canada 
and New Foundland. On railroad inspection trips I have been 
south to Birmingham, north to Montreal and west to the coal 
regions of Pennsylvania. 

"My permanent address is 9 East 6ist Street, New York City, 
My future plans are to keep whacking away at it, so that at 
some future reunion I will be in a position to report a list of 
my partners, including one of the feminine variety." 

Carleton Ferriss Rowell (B.A. 1903) was bom in St. 
Louis, Mo., June 25, 1882, prepared at the Rugby Academy, 
St. Louis, and at the Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and 
entered with the Qass. 

His father, Clinton Rowell (Dartmouth 1863), a lawyer of 
Rowell and Ferris, St. Louis, was bom in Concord, Vt., Novem- 
ber 12, 1838, the son of Guy Carleton Rowell and Clarissa 
(Rankin) Rowell. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Caroline Maria Ferriss, 
was the daughter of Charles Ferriss and Mercy (Macomber) 
Ferriss. 

Since graduation Rowell has been studying law at the Wash- 
ington University, St. Louis. His address is 4579 West Pine 
Boulevard, St. Louis, Mo. 

Henry Moore Russell, Jr., (LL.B. University of Virginia 
1903) was bom in Wheeling, W. Va., July 6, 1879, prepared 
at the Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and entered Yale 
with the Qass of 1902, joining 1903 at the beginning of Sopho- 
more year. He left college in June 1901. 

His father, Henry Moore Russell, a graduate of Georgetown 
and a lawyer of Russell and Russell of Wheeling, was bom 
in Wheeling April 5, 1881, the son of Charles W. Russell of 
Wheeling and Baltimore, a member of the Confederate 
Congress, and of Margaret (Moore) Russell. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Matilda Heiskell, died 
in 1892, and was the daughter of Otho Heiskell, of Wheeling, 
and of Matilda (Paxton) Heiskell. 

Russell was married at Wheeling April 25, 1905, to Miss 
Eleanor Letitia Brice, daughter of Sylvester L. Brice, who is in 
16 



242 History of the Class of J 903, 

the newspaper business in Wheeling. A daughter was bom 
May 8, 1906. 

He graduated fram University of Virginia Law School in 
1903 and is now practicing with his father in the firm of Russell 
and Russell, 1421 Chapline St., Wheeling, W. Va. His resi- 
dence is 146 South Penn St. 

Henry Clarence Sanford (B.A. 1903) was bom in Bridge- 
water, Conn., April 16, 1875, prepared at the New Milford 
(Conn.) High School and at the Newtown (Conn.) Academy 
and entered the Class of 1904 in the winter of our Junior year, 
becoming a member of 1903 at the beginning of Senior year. 

His father, Horace Nehemiah Sanford, died September 1889. 
He was a farmer of Bridgewater, where he was bom January 4, 
1841, the son of Henry Sanford and Anna (Canfield) Sanford. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Dora M'Call Kasson, 
was the daughter of George M. Kasson, of Bethlehem, Conn., 
and of Lucretia M. (Turner) Kasson, 

Sanford was a member of the College Choir and graduated 
with a Second Colloquy Senior appointment. 

He writes, December 1905: "I graduated June 1903, then 
returned to my home in Bridgewater, Conn. April 21, 1904, 
I entered the employ of the National Biscuit Company, 15th 
Street and loth Avenue, where I have been ever since. I intend 
to take up 'agriculture' again at my home town (Bridgewater, 
Conn.) April i, 1906, for I like it and copy Lincoln's aphorism, 
'If people like that sort of thing then that's the sort of thing 
they like.' 

"I made my 'journey to foreign countries' before I went to 
Yale, in 1 900-1 901, when I went to India via England, France, 
Port Said, Aden, Colombo (Ceylon), returning the same way, 
with side trips to Palestine and Egypt. Am going again as soon 
as I raise the price." 

And later, April 14, 1906: "My address is now Bridgewater, 
Conn., and will be so permanently." 

Ziegler Sargent (B.A. 1903) was born in New Haven, Conn., 
December 10, 1881, prepared at the Hopkins Grammar School, 
New Haven, and entered with the Class. 

His father, Henry Bradford Sargent (Yale 1871 S.), is 



Sanford, Sargent, 243 

Vice President of Sargent and Company, hardware manufac- 
turers of New Haven, and a member of the Yale Corporation. 
He was treasurer of the Yale Field for the first twenty years. 
He was bom in New York City March 4, 1851, the son of 
Joseph Bradford Sargent, President of Sargent and Company, 
formerly Mayor of New Haven, and of Elizabeth Collier 
(Lewis) Sargent. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Harriet Amelia Oaks, 
was the daughter of Charles Henry Oaks, a merchant of New 
Haven, and of Rhoda (Miles) Oaks. 

Sargent's Yale relatives, besides his father, include a brother, 
Murray Sargent (1905), six uncles: Henry A. Oaks (1875), 
Edward R. Sargent (1880 S.), Joseph D. Sargent (1881 S.), 
G. Lewis Sargent (1881S.), Russell Sargent (1884 S.) and 
John Sargent (1904 S.) ; three uncles by marriage: Bruce Fenn 
(1877 S.), William A. Rice (1886 S.), and Samuel H. Fisher 
(1889) ; a first cousin, Frederick P. Miles (1876 S.), and a great 
something grandfather, Rev. Timothy Collins (1718). 

In college he was a member of the Freshman crew, a sub- 
stitute on the University crew in 1901 and stroke of the College 
crew in 1902. He was on the University Tennis team the 
spring of 1903 and held a First Colloquy Senior appointment 
He was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon and of the Elihu 
Club. 

He writes: "After seeing Pierre Foster safely married, I 
took a trip abroad with Condict, sailing from New York on June 
30, 1903, on the good ship Armenian for parts unknown (to 
us). During our three months European travels we made addi- 
tions to our party which included two Williams men, a Prince- 
ton and a Harvard man, also a delightful band of Condict's 
relatives of various ages. We soaked our feet in London rains, 
took many exhilerating tramps in Switzerland, filled ourselves 
in Germany with Wagnerian opera and Munich beer, and lodced 
at Paris. We returned home about the first of October in the 
Kaiserin Maria Theresa, a rocking horse with a beautiful name. 

"At the present writing my chief occupation since graduation 
seems to have been the cwnpilation of this book. I began work 
October 19, 1903, as hurry clerk in the Superintendent's office 
of Sargent and Company, hardware manufacturers, and have 
been hurrying ever since." 

His address is 247 Church St., New Haven, Conn. 



i 



2 44 History of the Class of 1903. 

Harold Merriam Sawyer (B.A. 1903, M.A. 1906) was bom 
in Troy, N. Y., June 2, 1882, prepared at the Bridgeport (Conn.) 
High School and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Walter W. Sawyer, was born in Providence, R. I., 
in 1855, the son of Andrew Sawyer and Mary C. (Filer) 
Sawyer. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Alice Lilian Merriam, 
was the daughter of John O. Merriam and Sarah Maria 
(Potter) Merriam. 

In college Sawyer was a member of the University Orchestra, 
and held a Second Dispute Senior appointment. 

He writes: "Immediately after Commencement I sailed for 
Europe accompanied by my parents. The summer of 1903 was 
spent in travel and in study in Freiburg in Germany. In Octo- 
ber I went to Berlin, and I was engaged in work at the univer- 
sity there two semesters. The work I did was specialization in 
history, and for this work (it was submitted to Prof. Adams and 
by him to the M.A. committee) I am to be awarded the M.A. 
degree in June (1906). I remained in Berlin until July 1904, at 
which time we did some more traveling, sailing for America late 
in August. 

"Shortly after my return to this country I entered the Harvard 
Law School, where I am at present. During the summer of 
1905 I went to Europe with a Law School classmate, returning 
again in the fall to resume work at Harvard. I would gladly 
give you information in regard to future plans had I anything 
definite in view. This much I am able to say. I expect to 
practice law in some one of the States of the Union. Beyond 
that I cannot say what the future has in store for me." 

His permanent address is care Burr and Knapp, Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

Lewis Albert Sayre (B.A. 1903) was born in New York City 
September 18, 1881, prepared at the St. Paul School, Garden 
City, L. I., and entered college in the fall of 1899. 

He is the son of Lewis Hall Sayre, a lawyer of New York. 
In college he was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

After graduation he entered the Columbia Law School. He 
was obliged to give up his law school studies, however, on ac- 
count of an accident he had in the winter of 1905, resultant of 



Sawyer, Sayre, Schley. 245 

slipping and falling on the ice. In Columbia he was a member 
of the Temple Moot Court Club. He is now in the brokerage 
business in New York. His address is 228 West 44th Street, 
New York City. 

Reeve Schley (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Columbia 1906) was bom 
in New York City April 28, 1881, prepared at the St. Paul 
School, Concord, N. H., and entered college with the Class. 

His father, William T. Schley of the law firm of Bliss and 
Schley, was born in Canandaigua, N. Y., August 19, 1840, the 
son of Evander Schley and of Olive Hawley (Higbee) Schley. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Antoinette Reeve, 
was the daughter of Gen. Isaac Van Duzer Reeve, a veteran of 
the Seminole, Mexican and Civil wars, and of Elizabeth (Shep- 
ard) Reeve. 

Schley's Yale relatives include an uncle, Charles McC. Reeve 
(1870), and three first cousins: Chaloner B. Schley (1900 S.), 
Kenneth B. Schley (1902 S.) and Evander B. Schley (1904 S.). 

In college he was Captain of and number seven on the Fresh- 
man crew, editor of the Banner, Manager of the Hockey team 
and a member of the University Tennis team. He was a mem- 
ber of Kappa Psi, Psi Upsilon and Wolf's Head societies. In 
Junior year he won a Henry James Ten Eyck third prize, and 
held a First Colloquy Junior appointment and a First Colloquy 
Senior appointment. 

He writes: "After graduation I spent the following summer 
traveling in Europe with W. B. Tyler and H. W. DuPuy (1903). 
As there were a number of our class abroad at that time we 
were seldom alone. In the fall I entered the Columbia Law 
School, New York City. In June 1905 I took my examinations 
for the New York bar, which I was fortunate enough to pass. 
During that summer C. L. DuVal (1903) and I took a most 
interesting trip to Constantinople, Asia Minor and Greece. 
Returning in the fall I was admitted to practice at the bar, but 
continued at the Columbia Law School in order to get my 
degree, LL.B. The course is three years." 

In the summer of 1906 he entered the law office of Lord, Day 
and Lord, 49 Wall St., New York City. He lives at 17 West 
52d St. 



I 



246 History of the Class of 1903. 

William Schroed^r, Jr., was born in New York City June 22, 
1880, prepared at Dr. Julius Sach's School, New York City, and 
entered college at the beginning of Freshman year, leaving at 
the close of Junior. 

His father, Carl Schroeder, died March 12, 1888. He was 
a silk importer of William Schroeder and Company, New York 
City. He was bom in Crefeld, Germany, the son of William 
Schroeder, a silk merchant. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Pauline Andreae, was 
the daughter of Otto Andreae, of Central Valley, Orange 
County, N. Y., and of Gertrude (Gale) Andreae. 

In college he held a Dissertation Junior appointment. 

He writes: "i. Occupation: Silk business, at 469 Broome 
Street. Left college at end of Junior year, 1902, having still 
five hours to pass before receiving degree. Hope to pass these 
oflf at earliest convenience. Since then have been in the above 
business, William Schroeder and Company. 

"2. Am not married. 

"3, 4, and 5. No post-graduate work ; not connected with any 
other institutions or publications. Member of Company B, 71st 
Regiment, National Guard, New York. 

"6. Two trips abroad since leaving Yale, through Holland 
and Germany ; purely business trips. 

"7. Residence address uncertain. Mail sure to reach me at 
469 Broome Street, care William Schroeder and Co., or i West 
81 St Street, New York City." 

William Sperry Searles (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Cleveland Law 
School 1906) was bom in Mansfield, Ohio, September i, 1880, 
prepared at the West High School, Qeveland, Ohio, and entered 
college in September 1899. 

His father, the Rev. Francis Marion Searles (Ohio Wesleyan 
University 1863), died in November 1885. He was a Methodist 
minister and was born in Hinckley, Ohio, February 22, 1840, 
the son of Hurom Searles, a farmer, and of Velina (Kellogg) 
Searles. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Ellen Sperry, was 
the daughter of Chilion Sperry, a farmer, and of Sylvia Ursula 
(Gee) Sperry. 

In college Searles won a Berkeley Premium in Latin Composi- 



Schroeder, S carles, Sheets. 247 

tion, second grade, in Freshman year, was the Learned Scholar 
in Sophomore and Junior years and the Scott-Hurtt Scholar in 
Senior year. He was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, held a 
Philosophical Oration Junior appointment and a Philosophical 
Oration Senior appointment, graduating sixth in rank. 

He writes, December 1905: "It needs only a few words to 
give you my life since leaving New Haven in 1903. At once 
entering the office of the Cleveland Electric Railway, I have been 
there continuously till the present time. Although advanced 
twice I am yet in a very subordinate position, a victim of the 
soulless corporation. Along with the office work I have been 
carrying on law studies, one year at Western Reserve University, 
and the last two at a night school. I intend to take the bar 
examinations in the coming June. Pray for me. I blush to 
own that many of the old names of college life and the associa- 
tions are slipping from my memory, but I hope the Triennial will 
revive them all. I am not married nor has my life contained 
anything other than I have mentioned of interest to the Class or 
posterity. I have seen very few of the fellows, much to my 
regret." 

And later : "Graduated from Qeveland Law School in June, 
degree of LL.B. Admitted to the bar of Ohio in June 1906." 

His address is 10 The Manhattan, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Harold Frank Sheets (B.A. 1903) was born in Rochelle, 
111., May 3, 1883, prepared at the Northwestern Academy, 
Chicago, 111., and entered the Class of 1904 from Northwestern 
University at the beginning of Sophomore year, joining 1903 in 
Senior year. 

His father, Rev. Frank D. Sheets (Northwestern University 
1880), was born in Mt. Morris, 111., October 25, 1859, the son of 
Col. B. F. Sheets and Alice Victoria (Hill) Sheets. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Minnie Louisa Ellin- 
wood, was the daughter of Marvin B. EUinwood and Anna 
(Bryce) EUinwood. 

In college Sheets was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and held 
a High Oration Senior appointment. 

He writes: "Since leaving college I have been continuously 
in the employ of the New York Life Insurance Company, hold- 
ing various positions, from office boy to director of said com- 



248 History of the Class of 1903, 

pany's branch in Portugal. I have been stationed during this 
period of time at the following points: Chicago, Havana, 
Bilbao, Madrid, and Lisbon, with intermittent sojourns in Paris 
and London. 

"My business has so occupied my time that I have been unable 
to pay any attention to the gentler sex, and consequently have 
made no entangling alliances, either permanent or for a ten year 
period as suggested and advocated by George Meredith. 

"My literary efforts have consisted in various short articles 
on the business and social conditions of the countries in which I 
have been located. Said articles have been published in the 
local papers of my home town and caused a great sensation. 
My journeys in foreign countries are as above stated. I expect 
to go to Brazil and the Argentine Republic in January of 1906. 
While in Madrid I had the pleasure and honor of rooming with 
John R. Freeman (1903). He has been residing since gradua- 
tion in various parts of France, Germany, Austria and Switzer- 
land. I may add that he has become an excellent linguist 

"I wish to say by way of closing that for over a year I had the 
distinction of being the only Yale graduate in the land of the 
Don, i. e, sunny Spain, and that there is a large field for Yale 
missionary work which should direct itself towards the suppres- 
sion of the bull fight and the inculcation of American *do it 
newness.' " 

His address is 99, Rua d'El Rei, Lisbon, Portugal. His home 
address is 614 Peach St., Rockford, 111. 

Joseph Martin Skrable (B.A. Western College, Iowa 1902, 
B.A. Yale 1903) was born in Elberon, Iowa, November 28, 1880, 
the son of John Skrable. He entered Yale at the beginning of 
Senior year, graduating with an Oration Senior appointment 

Since graduation he has studied law at Harvard. Illness pre- 
vented his taking his LL.B. degree in June 1906. He is spend- 
ing the summer of 1906 abroad and expects to practise in Iowa. 
His address is Elberon, Iowa. 

Brockholst Mathewson Smith (B.A. 1903) was born in 
Providence, R. I., October 17, 1881, prepared at the Providence 
High School and entered college at the beginning of Freshman 
year. 



Skrable, B, M. Smith, G. A. Smith. 249 

His father, George Mathewson Smith (Brown 1869), is the 
Treasurer of the Eagle Mills, manufacturers of cotton goods. 
He was born in Providence in 1849, ^^^ son of Amos Dennison 
Smith and of Amy Ann (Mathewson) Smith. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Elizabeth Taft, 
was the daughter of Royal Chapin Taft and Mary (Armington) 
Taft. 

In college Smith played left field on the Freshman nine, was 
a member of the College nine and a substitute on the Hockey 
team. He was a member of Eta Phi, Psi Upsilon and Scroll and 
Key societies. He held a Second Colloquy Junior appointment 
and a First Colloquy Senior appointment. 

After leaving college he traveled for a year with F. J. O. 
Alsop and A. D. Dodge around the world. He has since been 
with the Eagle Mills, manufacturers of cotton goods. His 
address is Box 1413, or 165 Hope St., Providence, R. I. 

George Arthur Smith (B.A. 1903) was bom in Hartford, 
Conn., December 15, 1880, prepared at the Hartford Public 
High School and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Edwin Jones Smith, Sheriff of Hartford County, 
was Fire Commissioner for twelve years, President of Fire 
Board six years, and for twenty-five years was a retail merchant. 
He was born in Washington, Conn., June 19, 1844, the son of 
David Tilton Smith, a merchant of Hartford, and of Maria 
(Jones) Smith. 

His mother, whose maiden, name was Sarah Henrietta Moses, 
died May 6, 1890, and was the daughter of Luther Moses, a 
blacksmith of Hartford, and of Mary (Lamson) Moses. 

In college Smith was a member of the Dramatic Association 
and held a Second Dispute Junior appointment and a Second 
Dispute Senior appointment. Henry D. Smith (Yale 1908 S.) 
is a step-brother. 

He writes : "There still remain a great many rocky and laby- 
rinthine paths for me to traverse before I launch out in the high- 
way. The October following graduation I entered the medical 
department of Johns Hopkins University. Here I have done 
little except study, study, study in an endeavor to acquire 
honesty, truth, accuracy and thoroughness in medicine. Often 
dark and threatening clouds have crossed my path, but these 



> 



250 History of the Class of 1903. 

were soon dispelled and the sun shone brighter than ever. I 
expect to get my M.D. in June 1907, and then serve an interne- 
ship in one of the large hospitals for a year or two. After that 
my future plans are undetermined. The present has enough 
in store for me to think about. Any letters sent to 42 Seyms 
St., Hartford, Conn., will reach me until June 1907, or they may 
be sent to iii Jackson Place, Baltimore, Md." 

Lowell William Smith was bom in Casnovia, Mich., March 
19, 1878, prepared at the Albion (N. Y.) High School and 
entered college in September 1899, leaving in Freshman year. 

His father, William M. Smith, a farmer of Albion, N. Y., 
was born in Albion October 22, 1849. He was the son of Col. 
Russell Smith, and of Lidia (Warren) Smith. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Rosetta E. Blanchard, 
was the daughter of Chandler Blanchard, a farmer, and of Lucy 
(Lindsley) Blanchard. 

Smith was married in Rochester, N. Y„ October 28, 1905, to 
Miss Alice Shearer, daughter of Frank Shearer, a dentist. 

He writes : "As you remember, I was in college but one year. 
In January 1901 I enlisted in Detroit, Mich., to go to the Philip- 
pines. Was sent to Presidio, San Francisco, where our regi- 
ment was drilled for about five weeks, and was then sent on to 
Manila. I was in 'L' Company, 26th Infantry. Sailed on trans- 
port Sheridan February 16, 1901, and returned in July via Japan 
aboard the transport Logan, On the way over we stopped at 
Honolulu for three days. This gave us a good opportunity to 
see that place. Reached Manila March 19, 1901, and it was 
during the time that we were in Manila Bay that Aguinaldo was 
taken prisoner. 

"My regiment was stationed for the larger part of the time 
in southern Luzon, but we served for nine months, during the 
Samar campaign, on the Island of Samar under Gen. Smith. 
We helped capture Gen. Larbau, the Filipino leader. For a 
large part of the time I served on special duty in the quarter- 
master and commissary departments and Adjutant's office. My 
regiment was engaged in several small skirmishes, but I was 
under fire but once. On the return home a favorable oppor- 
tunity was given for seeing something of the life in Japan. We 
stopped in Nagasaki three days. I spent some time in Fort 



L. W. Smith, R. S. Smith, W. B. W. Smith. 251 

Brown, Texas, after returning to the United States and was 
discharged there. 

"After returning east I studied medicine for a year in the 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, but did not continue it on 
account of my health. Went west for a few months and came 
back much benefited. Last October I married and have taken 
up farming. My health is better living an outdoor life and I 
am doing fairly well, so will probably continue farming, making 
a specialty of fruit growing." 

His address is Albion, N. Y. 

Robert Seneca Smith (B.A. 1903, M.A. 1905, B.D. 1906) 
was born in Claremlon, Vt., November 18, 1880, prepared for 
college at the Rutland (Vt.) English and Classical Institute 
and entered in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Seneca Eugene Smith, a farmer of Clarendon, 
was bom in Clarendon October 20, 1852, the son of Nathan 
Smith and Alzina (Button) Smith. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Martha Fuller Everest, 
was the daughter of Heman Everest and Theresa (Ewing) 
Everest. 

In college Smith was a member of the Freshman Glee Club, 
a member of Zeta Psi and Vice President of Phi Beta Kappa. 
He won a second Henry James Ten Eyck prize in Junior year, 
held a Philosophical Oration Junior and the same Senior 
appointment, graduating ninth in rank. 

For the last two years he has been University General Secre- 
tary of the Y. M. C. A. and has also studied theology in the 
Yale Divinity School, graduating in June 1906. 

He was married since Triennial to Miss Emma Wyman Kings- 
ley, daughter of J. H. Kingsley of East Qarendon, Vt. 

His permanent address is Qarendon, Vt. 

William Burr Wright Smith (B.A. 1903) was born in 
Bridgeport, Conn., September 16, 1881, prepared for college at 
the University School, Bridgeport, and entered with the Qass. 

His father, Eli Couch Smith, died January 9, 1901. He was 
bom in Greens Farms, Conn., December 16, 1850, the son of 
Horace Smith and Mary Elizabeth (Couch) Smith. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Elizabeth Wright, 



252 History of the Class of 1903. 

was the daughter of WiUiam Burr Wright and Mary (Sanford) 
Wright. 

Daniel Sanford Smith (Yale 1901 S.) is a brother. 

Smith is in manufacturing with the Wheel and Wood Bend- 
ing Company of Bridgeport. His business address is 171 John 
St., or P. O. Box 552, Bridgeport, Conn. His residence is 304 
Beechwood Ave. 

Levings Hooker Somers (B.A. 1903) was bom in Green- 
wich, N. Y., September 10, 1881, prepared at the Auburn 
(N. Y.) High School and entered college at the beginning of 
Freshman year. 

His father, Warrington Somers (Dartmouth 1877), a 
teacher in the Auburn High School, was born in July 1849, the 
son of Bartholomew Gilbraith Somers, a farmer, and of Mar- 
garet (Harvey) Somers. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Addie Hooker, 
was the daughter of Rev. Levings Hooker Hooker and Sarah 
(Blanchard) Hooker. 

In college Somers was a member of the Freshman Glee Club 
and held a Second Dispute Junior appointment and a Second 
Dispute Senior appointment. Carl W. Somers (Yale 1906) is 
a brother. 

He writes: "Very few of your suggestions for this letter 
apply to my case, for I have been since graduation leading the 
humble, humdrum life of a school teacher in an academy in a 
very small village. The academy is large and the woiic plenti- 
ful so I have no time for outside interests, and beside the small 
town offers none. My work has been mostly in mathematics 
with some Latin. One pleasant phase of my work has been in 
the association of our classmate, Sam Brereton, who has been 
in the work here for the last two years. My plans for the future 
are at present air castles. They may involve an early change of 
location and field of labor, with a year's study and travel abroad. 
These, however are just idle dreams of spare moments. My 
permanent address is 22 Westlalce Avenue, Auburn, N. Y." 

His present address is Lock Box 7, Mercersburg, Pa. 

George Phelps Spencer (Ph.B. 1903) was born in Water- 
town, N. Y., September 23, 1878, prepared for college at the St. 
Paul School, Concord, N. H., and at the Holdemess School, Ply- 



Somers, Spencer, Stauffer. 253 

mouth, N. H., and entered with the Class. He left during the 
fall term of Freshman year and entered the Sheffield Scientific 
School the following September. 

His father, James Decker Spencer, M.D., is a physician and 
surgeon (Doctors Spencer, Bibbins and Pierce), graduating 
from the Bellevue Hospital Medical College in 1870, and was 
one time President of the Medical Society of the State of New 
York. He was born in Denmark, Lewis County, N. Y., April 
14, 1849, the son of Henry Gordon Percival Spencer, ^.D., of 
Watertown, a surgeon in the War of 1812, and of Deborah 
(Mallery) Spencer. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Frances Eleanor Phelps, 
was the daughter of George Benjamin Phelps, a railroad con- 
tractor of Watertown, and of Agnes (Phillipson) Phelps. 

In college Spencer was President of the 1903 Freshman Foot- 
ball Association, was a Cup man. Vice President of the Uni- 
versity Club and a member of Delta Psi. 

He writes : "Started to work the following autumn, October 
26, 1903, in the St. Regis Paper Company's mill at Deferiet, 
N. Y., February 20, 1905, was transferred to Toggarts Com- 
pany's paper mill at Felts Mills, N. Y. November 18, 1905, 
took charge of the Petoskey Paper Fibre Company's sulphite 
mill at Petoskey, Michigan. Left February i, 1906. I do not 
know just where I shall go next, either North Carolina or 
Maine." 

His address is 59 Washington St., Watertown, N. Y. 

Frederick Randolph Stauffer (B.A. 1903) was bom in Read- 
ing, Pa., August 28, 1881, prepared at the Reading High School, 
and entered Yale in September 1899. 

His father, Abner Keely Stauffer (Franklin and Marshall 
College 1858), a lawyer, was born in Boyertown, Pa., October 
II, 1836, the son of Judge John Stauffer and of Elizabeth 
(Keely) Stauffer. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary High Keim, died 
August 2, 1891, and was the daughter of John H. Keim, a 
banker of Dubuqu€, la., and of Martha Elizabeth (Randolph) 
Keim. 

In college he was a member of the University Banjo and 
Mandolin Club, a member of Alpha Delta Phi and was Business 



254 History of the Class of ipos. 

Manager of the Yale Record. He held an Oration Junior 
appointment and the same Senior appointment. John K. Stauf- 
fer (Yale 1895) is a brother. 

He writes: "On October i, 1903, I began the study of law in 
the office of Baer, Snyder and Zieber in Reading, Pa,, and at 
the same time took the position of court reporter for the Read- 
ing Herald, which I held until May i, 1904. In the fall of the 
same year I took part in the presidential campaign, being one 
of the speakers for the Republican County Committee, and have 
been in various campaigns since. In the spring of 1905 Herbert 
R. Green (1887) and I organized the Yale Club of Reading, of 
which I have since been Secretary. 

"December 4 and 5, 1905, I passed my examinations for 
admission to the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania and the courts 
of Berks County and was admitted to practice on February 13, 
1906. Have opened an office for the general practice of law at 
521 Court St., Reading, Pa." 

He lives at 1513 Hill Road, Reading, Pa. 

Warren Merrill Steele (B.A. Acadia University 1902, BA. 
Yale 1903, M.A. Yale 1904) was bom in Amherst, Nova 
Scotia, November 20, 1876, prepared at the Horton Collegiate 
Academy, Wolfville, N. S., and entered Yale at the beginning 
of Senior year. 

His father, the Rev. David Allen Steele (Acadia 1865), was 
bom in St. John's Wood, London, England, the son of John 
Steele, a government revenue officer, and of Mary (Hebb) 
Steele. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Whitman, was 
the daughter of Spinney Whitman and Martha Whitman. 

After graduation Steele entered the Yale Graduate School 
to study philosophy. He received the M.A. degree in 1904 and 
then accepted the chair of philosophy in Furman University, 
Greenville, S. C. 

He was married August 30, 1904, in Amherst, N. S., to 
Miss Charlotte Beatrice Fuller, daughter of Robert Charles 
Fuller, a pharmacist of Amherst. A daughter, Sophie Marian 
Steele, was born September 28, 1905. 

He writes: "My work is most congenial. Greenville is the 
*pearl of the Piedmont in the land of the sky,' but it is a dusky 



Steele, Stern. 255 

pearl — there are lots of those in the South! — ^and the pros- 
pects are not all sunny, but for the most part the opportunities 
cannot be excelled on this continent. The South is coming." 

His address is care Furman University, or 418 Choice Ave., 
Greenville, S. C. 

Henry Root Stem (B.A. 1903, LL.B. and M.A. Columbia 
1906) was bom in New York City September 22, 1882, pre- 
pared at Morse's School, New York City, and Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., and entered college in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Simon Hunt Stern (Columbia Law School 1869), 
of the law firm of Stern and Rushmore, New York City, was 
born in Richmond, Virginia, October 13, 1849, the son of Meyer 
Stern and Diana (Hunt) Stern. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sara Stem, was the 
daughter of David Stem, a merchant, and of Rose (Mender- 
son) Stem. 

A brother, Walter Thomas Stem (1899), preceded him at 
Yale. 

In college Stern was on the Hockey team, was Chairman of 
the Yale Record, and a member of the Freshman Glee Qub. 
He was Secretary and Treasurer of Cercle Francois, Manager 
of the first French play and a member of the Dramatic Asso- 
ciation. He won in Senior year the DeForest Prize Medal. 
He was a member of Psi Upsilon and held a First Dispute 
Junior appointment and a Second Dispute Senior appointment. 

He writes: "i. (a) Residence. 986 Fifth Avenue, New 
York, since 1903. I forget just what date I left college but it 
was as long after graduation as I could decently make it. (b) 
Occupation. Law student at Columbia during academic year — 
work in law office during summer — and on my own hook when- 
ever I have had the chance. Will enter employ of law firm 
of Stem and Rushmore permanently, I hope, next June (1906). 
My father is senior partner, other members, Charles E. Rush- 
more and Eldon Bisbee. Nature of business — managing estates, 
commercial and banking law. 

"2. As you are probably bored to extinction with attempted 
witticism in answer to this question, I will merely answer — 
nothing doing. 

"3. Have been studying for an LL.B. at Columbia Law 



256 History of the Class of 1903. 

School and have also taken the total of about ten hours a week 
in the Columbia School of Political Science during the three 
years since graduation. I expect next June to get an LL.B. 
and an M.A., the latter for political science. This is all con- 
tingent on passing final law examinations and on finishing a 
political science tliesis. 

"4. Various unsigned articles in editorial department of 
Columbia Law Review, since January 1905. 

"S- (21) What do you mean by social organizations ? Danc- 
ing classes or clubs? (b) Religious — None, (c) Politics, 
yes. I don't know whether you could call being elected at the 
primaries to the Democratic Convention Committee of the 29th 
District and subsequently to the General Committee of the 
same, also to the Osceola Club Ball Committee of 'de twenty- 
nint', offices of honor, trust and profit. Of course the honor 
is immense, but so far there has been a large absence of trust 
and profit. However, if my meteoric rise in politics continues 
I may yet be the proud possessor, in the course of years, of a 
job in the street cleaning department. I am a member of the 
legal fraternity of Phi Delta Phi and President of the Temple 
Moot Court Club at Columbia. 

"Seriously though, in the course of the last year I have taken 
a good deal of interest in politics. Was one of the organizers 
of the Columbia Political Club and am Vice President and 
Chairman of the Executive Committee of said club, which is 
similar in object and character to the City Government Club at 
Yale. Have just returned from Washington from an inter- 
view which Roosevelt accorded to the various delegates of these 
college clubs, of which interview you may have heard. 

"6. No journeys except between ii6th Street and Wall 
Street. This last fall though took a month's trip off, about ten 
days in Laurentian district in Canada for trout, and then into 
New Brunswick along the Tobique River in the moose country 
with Bill Ray and Jim Pierce, a couple of '98 men. Splendid 
shooting and fishing ; got a bull moose and lots of small game, 
Hope to get back there for a week in June for some salmon 
fishing. 

"7. Permanent address : care Stem and Rushmore, 40 Wall 
Street, New York City. 

"8. (a) Nothing else I can think of except being elected 



Stevens, Stevenson. 257 

an editor of the Columbia Law Review and passing my bar 
examinations last June (1905). Haven't been arrested yet for 
violating the speed laws, haven't eloped with any chorus girls 
nor have I yet stopped a runaway horse or saved a baby from 
drowning." 

And later: "I received a degree of LL.B. from the Columbia 
Law School last June and also an M.A. from the School of 
Political Science, for which the aforesaid faculty charged me 
respectively $25 per, and which I am now prepared to sell to 
any respectable party at a liberal discount." 

John Henry Stevens (B.A. 1903) was bom in Alton, N. H., 
January 28, 1880, prepared at the Phillips Academy, Exeter, 
N. H., and entered with the Class. 

His father, Nathaniel Stevens, was a lumber merchant. 

After graduation Stevens took a position with the North 
American Trust Company, New York City, and rose to be 
a teller. He has recently taken a position with William A. 
Read and Company, bankers, Pine and Nassau Sts., New York 
City. (See Addenda.) 

John McAllister Stevenson, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was born in 
Pittsfield, Mass., August 26, 1881, prepared at the Pittsfield 
High School and at the Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn., 
and entered college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, John McAllister Stevenson of the Qass of Yale 
1869, is Secretary of the Berkshire Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany and a member of Stevenson and Company, insurance 
agents of Pittsfield. He was born in Cambridge, Washington 
County, N. Y., August 31, 1846, the son of John McAllister 
Stevenson, a lawyer of Cambridge, N. Y., and of Seraph Huldah 
(Newton) Stevenson. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Hattie Cooley, was the 
daughter of Samuel Mather Cooley, a merchant of Pittsfield, 
and of Almira Louisa (Tillotson) Cooley. 

Stevenson's Yale relatives include two brothers, Louis Til- 
lotson Stevenson (Yale 1906 S.) and Holland Newton Steven- 
son, 2d (1908 S.) ; a great grandfather. Rev. Timothy Mather 
Cooley, D.D. (1792), and an uncle, Arthur N. Cooley, of the 
Class of 1878. Rev. Samuel Mather, one of the founders of 
Yale, is an ancestor. 
17 



258 History of the Class of 1903, 

Stevenson received the DeForest Mathematical prize in 
Sophomore year, and held an Oration Junior appointment and a 
Dissertation Senior appointment. 

He writes: "After Commencement I reached my home in 
Pittsfield and there lay dormant, almost comatose, for several 
months. On November 30, 1903, I started in with the Stanley 
Electric Manufacturing Company in Pittsfield, which had been 
recently acquired by the General Electric Company. I had 
worked there the summer before Senior year. I started on 
assembly work and learned to build transformers, generators, 
switchboards and instruments. After about eight months' work 
or in July 1904, 1 left them temporarily, or took a seven months' 
vacation. This was partly because work was very slack, partly 
because my brother Louis was very ill and my own health had 
not kept up. I must say, though, that work has agreed with me 
very well despite the so-called long ten hour days and that now 
I am ever so much stronger, healthier and capable of better 
work with brain and body than I ever was in school and collie. 
I did take a look in at other jobs, e. g, the insurance actuaries, 
which I found well filled long ago, but found in fact that I 
really wanted to be an electrical engineer. I started again in 
March at the Pittsfield works, now the Stanley-G. I. Electric 
Manufacturing Company. At the end of April I was trans- 
ferred to the Lynn works of the General Electric Company and 
began testing motors. In September they sent me to the Wind- 
sor works, late the Eddy Electric Company, to test electric 
automobile motors. I was there three months and returned to 
the Lynn works, where I have been testing the Curtis steam 
turbine generators. I shall be in this same line until June and 
after that the rest of my testing course at Lynn will probably 
take up the rest of the year. It is a three years course here, 
but how long I shall keep on it is for those over me to decide. 
I then hope to get some engineering or executive position at 
Lynn, Pittsfield or in one of the Company's various district 
offices. Even if they turn me adrift I shall have then acquired 
that mythical thing known as a technical education and be on a 
par with any of the output of the rate shops of Cornell and 
Massachusetts Tech. I want to say that this is no education, 
though it is a fetish that exists in the minds of many educators 
and employers, especially those over me. But I am going to 



StUlman. 259 

show them engineering is a profession. An engineer should be 
an educated man, yes, even an academic man, and conversely 
an academic man should be an engineer if he so choose. This 
is the Pittsfield Idea. It was for this that Gordon McKay left 
his millions to Harvard University and it is for this that I, etc. 
I don't regret my four years as a loss, nor ever can because I 
have learned things Tech. men cannot even think of. I will 
say that Sheff. is the coming school because it is scientific not 
technical, that they are right when they say that shop work 
should be learned in shops. In advanced studies I have taken up 
a course of graduate work in absence, as is our privilege, for 
an M.A. This includes the electricity course I took extra in 
SheflF., some more mathematics and mathematical physics. I 
hope to finish it by June (1906), but most likely it will go over 
another year, perhaps longer, for I get very little leisure. In a 
literary way I have done nothing beyond what has been publicly 
confided to the Class, though I have interests in other channels. 
Joining the Institute of Electrical Engineers is not a recognition 
of any ability or achievement but simply a willingness to pay so 
much and receive their publications. I see Norman Hull and 
the Harvard Law men every week whittling their minds down 
to a long thin needle or dagger to try and probe into the holes 
in your outward semblance." 

And later, August 1906 : "Please kill my Lynn address in the 
Record, as I will have a different one when I get back." 

He was elected an associate member of the American Institute 
of Electrical Engineers June 14, 1905. His home address is 
28 Reed St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

Ralph Griffiths Stillman (B.A. 1903) was born in New York 
City February 21, 1882, prepared at the Pingry School, Eliza- 
beth, N. J., and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Frank Moody Stillman of F. M. Stillman Com- 
pany, contractors, was bom in Brooklyn, N. Y., in 1853, the 
son of William Mix Stillman, a shirt manufacturer, and of 
Sarah (Moody) Stillman. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Caroline Amelia Grif- 
fiths, was the daughter of John Griffiths, a farmer of Ottawa, 111. 

Stillman divided with R. K. Qark a Benjamin F. Barge 
Mathematical third prize and held a Dissertation Junior and a 



a6o History of the Class of 1903, 

Dissertation Senior appointment. Edward Stillman (Yale 
1902 S.) is a cousin. 

He writes : "I entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
here in New York in the fall of 1903 and since that time my 
chief occupation has been the endeavor to keep up with my class 
in that institution and not perish in the attempt. If I hold out 
until the spring of 1907 I expect, with the grace of Columbia 
University, to be the proud possessor of an M.D. The occupa- 
tion is all-absorbing and aside from it I have done little. I did 
take a three weeks course in the Lying-in Hospital last summer 
and followed it by a trip south to Jacksonville and North Caro- 
lina to cool off after my work in East Side New York. 

"My only political work was as a ward worker in my home 
town, Rahway, N. J., in the fall of 1904. Our party was com- 
pletely overwhelmed and I gracefully retired, upon the sugges- 
tion that I was the hoodoo. Since that time I have not 
attempted to break out into any side lines at all and have led a 
calm and unventful existence. I still hold residence and vote 
in Rahway, N. J., which is my permanent address." 

Charles Henry StoU, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was bom in Lex- 
ington, Ky., September 19, 1882, the son of Charles Henry StoU. 
Before entering Yale he was a member of the Class of 1901 
Kentucky University. His address is care the Socorro Com- 
pany, Elmendorf, N. M. (See Addenda.) 

Thcron Roundel! Strong (B.A. 1903, LL.B. New York 
Law School 1906) was born in New York City October 30, 
1881, prepared at the St. Paul School, Concord, N. H., and 
entered college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Theron George Strong (Rochester 1868), a law- 
yer of New York, was bom in Palmyra, N. Y., August 14, 1846, 
the son of Hon. Theron R. Strong, M.C., Judge of the Supreme 
Court and of the Court of Appeals of New York, and of 
Comelia (Barnes) Strong. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Martha Howard Pren- 
tice, was the daughter of John H. Prentice, of Brooklyn, and 
of Sarah N. (Davis) Prentice. 

Strong's Yale relatives include a brother. Prentice Strong 
(1901), an uncle, Payson Merrill (1865), ^ind two cousins, 
Arthur J. Slade (1892 S.) and George T. Slade (1893). 



StoU, Strong, Stuart, Sturgis. a6i 

In college he rowed Number two on the Freshman crew, 
was stroke of the College crew in 1901 and stroke of the Uni- 
versity Four Oar in 1901. He was a member of the University 
Banjo and Mandolin Club and of Psi Upsilon. 

Since graduation Strong has been studying law, interrupted 
for nearly a year by a severe illness. He received his degree 
from the New York Law School in 1906 and is at present 
practicing with the firm of Merrill and Refers, 31 Nassau St., 
New York City. He lives at 29 East 65th St., New York. 

William Roy Stuart (B.A. 1903) was born in Cleveland, 
Ohio, April 27, 1878, prepared at the Oberlin (O.) Academy 
and entered Yale from Oberlin College at the beginning of 
Junior year. 

His father, William Frazer Stuart, who was in the carriage 
business, was bom in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, May 4, 1851, 
the son of William F. Stuart and Elizabeth (Johnson) Stuart 

His mother, whose maiden name was Agnes Roy, was the 
daughter of Peter Roy and Katherine (Galloway) Roy. 

In college Stuart held a Second Dispute Senior appointment. 

He writes: "As soon as I graduated I sailed for Europe, 
where I made an extensive tour of the continent along with some 
other Yale men. Returning in October of the same year, I took 
a position as Assistant Cashier of the New York Life Insurance 
Company at Qeveland, Ohio. I remained in Cleveland five 
months and was then sent by above named company to Cuba 
to take a position in their Santiago office preparatory to going 
as one of their representatives to Spain. I remained in Santi- 
ago seven months and then returned to this cotmtry to accept 
the position I have at present. Cashier of the ^tna Life Insur- 
ance Company at Yonkers. This past year I have taken up 
the study of law at the New York Law School and hope to get 
my degree and be admitted to the bar in June 1907. I think 
this rounds out my experiences." 

He lives at 108 Warburton Ave., Yonkers, N. Y. His home 
address is Cleveland, O. 

Thomas Sturgis, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was born in New York 
City July 18, 1881, prepared at the Pomfret (Conn.) School and 
entered college in September 1899. 



262 History of the Class of 1903. 

His father, Thomas Sturgis, a Civil War veteran, has been 
a state senator of Wyoming and Fire Commissioner of New 
York City. He is a banker of Strong, Sturgis and Company 
of New York, and was bom in Hingham, Mass., in 1846, the 
son of William Sturgis, a New York merchant, and of Elizabeth 
Knight (Hinckley) Sturgis. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Helen Rutgers Weir, 
was the daughter of Col. Robert Weir, U. S. A., and of Susan 
Martha (Bayard) Weir. 

In college Sturgis was a substitute on the University Hockey 
team, played on the University Tennis team in the spring of 
1903, and was a member of Eta Phi and Psi Upsilon societies. 

He writes, December 1905: "Shortly after leaving college 
I went in to work for Strong, Sturgis and Company, bankers, 
New York, and worked for them nearly two years. I threw 
up the job last July and since then have been doing nothing, 
loafing in and around New York. I am thinking of g^ing 
back to Wall Street about February or March of next year, but 
I have made no definite plans." 

His address is 138 East 36th Street, New York City. 

Jeremiah Barrett Sullivan (B.A. 1903, M.D. 1906) was 
bom in New Haven, Conn., October 19, 1880, prepared at the 
Hillhouse High School,, New Haven, and entered college in 
September 1899. 

His father, Daniel F. Sullivan, was bom in Ireland in 1851, 
the son of Jeremiah Sullivan and Mary (Fitzpatrick) Sullivan. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Marguerite Barrett^ 
was the daughter of John Barrett and Anne (Winters) Barrett 

In college Sullivan held a Dissertation Junior appointment 
and a Dissertation Senior appointment. Since graduation he 
has studied medicine at Yale, graduating in 1906 with honors. 
He has also been elected a member of Sigma Xi. November 
I, 1906, he expects to go to the Rhode Island Hospital, Provi- 
dence, for two years. His address is 245 Washington Ave., 
New Haven, Conn. 

♦Walter Sullivan (B.A. 1903) died on the night of July 
12, 1905. He was on his way from San Francisco to the 
Philippine Islands to visit his sister, the wife of Col. J. L. 



/. B, Sullivan, IV. Sullivan, Sutphin. 263 

Clem, U. S. A., at Manila. He was lost overboard from the 
steamship Manchuria when near Honolulu. He was bom in 
Indianola, Texas, October 15, 1881, the son of Daniel Sullivan 
of the D. Sullivan & Company, bankers of San Antonio, and 
of Annie (Cotter) Sullivan, now deceased. 

He first attended St. Mary's College at San Antonio, Texas, 
then went to Rock Hill College near Baltimore, and before 
coming to Yale at the beginning of Junior year, spent a short 
time at Harvard and Georgetown universities. He entered his 
father's banking firm immediately after graduation and at the 
time of his death held the position of Assistant Cashier. 

Though Sullivan entered late in the course he was elected in 
the spring of Junior year a member of Alpha Delta Phi. A 
classmate writes of him: "Sully was so confoundedly sensi- 
tive that it was hard for the average man at college to get to 
know him even passably well, but the men who did finally 
succeed in getting past his reserve certainly never had a 
better, truer friend. He was very unselfish in every way and 
what few enemies he had were made by his quick temper and 
the very impulsiveness which was at the bottom of his attrac- 
tiveness to his friends." 

At the Triennial Meeting of the Class, June 26, 1906, the 
following resolutions were passed on his death : — 

"In the death of Walter Sullivan, we, his classmates, have 
sustained an irreparable loss. His genial and unselfish dispo- 
sition made him widely beloved, and his frank and manly 
character commanded universal respect. 

"Resolved: That we extend our sincere and heartfelt sym- 
pathy to his family in their bereavement, and 

**Resolved: That a copy of these resolutions be sent to his 
family and that a copy be published in the Triennial Record.' " 

W. A. Blount, Jr., 
Henry James, 
Carles A. Moore, Jr., 

for the Class of 1903. 

Stuart Bruen Sutphin (B.A. 1903) was born in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, November 26, 1881, prepared at the Walnut Hills High 
School, Cincinnati, and entered college at the beginning of 
Freshman year. 



264 History of the Class of 1903. 

His father, Isaac Vanness Sutphin, a graduate of Delaware 
(O.) College, was born in Middletown, Ohio, November 22, 

1849. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Katharine Priscilla 
Brady, died April 30, 1891. 

Two brothers, Dudley Vanness Sutphin (1897) and Samuel 
Brady Sutphin (1899 S.), preceded him at Yale. 

In college Sutphin was a member of the Freshman and Apollo 
Glee clubs, played full back on the Freshman Football team and 
was a Cup man. He was Chairman of the Senior Promenade 
Committee, a member of the Class Day Committee and of 
Kappa Psi, Delta Kappa Epsilon and Skull and Bones societies, 
and held a Second Colloquy Junior appointment and a Second 
Colloquy Senior appointment. 

He writes : "As you know, when I graduated I entered The 
I. V. Sutphin Company, paper makers' supplies and iron, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, and have been with them ever since and will 
probably stay for some time to come. I lived by myself the 
first year and then went to live with my brother and sister-in- 
law where I am now. I have not been back at New Haven 
since graduation but went on to Chan Hamlin's and Jack Dries- 
bach's weddings, two events not soon to be forgotten. Am 
sorry I seem to be unable to follow their example but such is 
life in the far west. However I may buck up and show some 
speed later on. I have spent most of my time looking after 
one J. B, Minor and I can assure you that it has kept me pretty 
busy. I spent the first summer after leaving college with 
Harv. McQintock and he has probably told you of our thrilling 
adventure in the waters of old Lake Michigan. Then I had 
another adventure last spring when my horse fell on me and 
broke my foot. But enough of the accidents of life. Other- 
wise I have been most happy and contented and don*t feel a 
bit older than when I left except for a few hard business 
knocks which we all probably have run into. You will probably 
think I am younger when you see me at Triennial as I am 
looking forward to what might be termed 'A Time.' " 

His business address is 935 West 5th St. and his residence 
2915 Vernon Place, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Paul Bailey Sweet (B.A. Washburn College 1902, B.A. 
Yale 1903) was bom in Topeka, Kansas, February 9, 1881, 



Sweet, Sykes. 265 

prepared at the Topeka High School and entered Yale at the 
beginning of Senior year. 

His father, Timothy Bailey Sweet, a capitalist of Topeka, 
was born April 11, 1841, the son of Lorella Sweet and Mary 
Wooster (Bailey) Sweet. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Annie Eliza Brown, 
was the daughter of William Brown and Susan Bradford 
(Finley) Brown. 

Sweet graduated from Yale with an Oration Senior appoint- 
ment. 

He writes : "After leaving Yale in June 1903 I spent a little 
over a year with my father in looking after the property 
interests of the family. After returning from the St. Louis 
Fair I entered the Bank of Topeka October i, 1904, where I 
lasted just three months. January i, 1905, I entered the office 
of the Counseling Engineer, Mechanical Department of the 
Achison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway system. On October 
1 1 1905* the 'powers that be' saw fit to promote me to be chief 
clerk, in which capacity I am continuing my labors," 

His residence is 231 Topeka Ave., Topeka, Kansas. 

George Edmund Sykes (B.A. 1903) was bom in Rockville, 
Conn., June 4, 1880, prepared at the St. Paul School, Concord, 
N. H., and entered college in September 1899. 

His father, George Sykes, President of the Hockanum 
Company, woolen manufacturers, was the son of John Sykes, 
a manufacturer of Yorkshire, England, and of Harriett 
(Durrans) Sykes. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah A. Fitton, was 
the daughter of James Fitton, a manufacturer of Lancashire, 
England, and of Mary (Watson) Fitton. 

He writes: "My residence has always been in Rockville, 
Conn., and the shack on the corner is called 'Elsmere'. Since I 
left college my occupation has been varied. First I entered a 
woolen mill and learned the trade. Starting in by sorting wool 
and ended up by helping to run the place until my father died. 
Then I got married and traveled for a while and now I have 
bought out the Hartford Pulp Plaster Corporation and am 
trying to put it on a good basis. I am Secretary and Treasurer 
of the Corporation and sometimes work at it. 



266 History of the Class of 1903. 

"I left college I think the day after I received my sheep- 
skin 1903. The dates and places of entering business are as 
follows: in 1903 I entered the employment of my father and 
left that business December 23, 1904. I entered the Hartford 
Pulp Plaster Corporation in April 1905 and have A. L. Hills 
for a partner. 

"In answer to question 2, 'Married?' Yes. It took place 
April 6, 1904, in Dorchester, Mass. My wife was Bemicc 
Dean Heath and her father's full name is Edwin Lansing 
Heath, confidential Secretary to President Wood of the Ameri- 
can Woolen Company in Dorchester, Mass. Refuse to tell the 
names of the children, also the dates of their birth. 

"During 1904 I traveled through France, Germany, Switzer- 
land, Holland, England, Scotland and America in an automobile, 
including a trip to California and return and even saw the 
Mormons. Rockville is my permanent address and any letters 
sent there will reach me safely." 

Harlan Couch Taylor (B.A. 1903) was born in Guilford, 
Conn., August 22, 1882, prepared at the Middletown (Conn.) 
High School and entered college with the Class. 

In college he held a Second Colloquy Junior appointment and 
a First Colloquy Senior appointment. 

Since graduation he has been with the National Biscuit Com- 
pany, loth Ave. and 15th St., New York City. 

William Hendrickson Taylor (B.A. 1903) was born in Bur- 
lington, N. J., April 5, 1878, prepared at the Pennington (N. J.) 
Seminary and entered with the Class. 

His father, William George Taylor, died in 1882. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ella Frances Smith, 
died in March 1899, and was the daughter of Isaac Thomas 
Smith and Ann Eliza (Parker) Smith. 

In college Taylor was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, held a 
High Oration Junior appointment, and a High Oration Senior 
appointment. 

He writes: "After the boat race the year we graduated I 
spent Sunday with some friends and on Monday entered the 
service of the International Banking Corporation at forty dollars 
per month, expecting to spend eighteen months in New York 



H. C. Taylor, W. H. Taylor, Terriberry. 267 

and six in London before coming out east. I was pushed 
through the different departments and before six months was 
over was billeted for the Orient, the first American sent out by 
the Corporation. Visited our branches at San Francisco, Yoko- 
hama, Shanghai and Hong Kong with a side trip to Canton, 
where we soon afterward opened up a branch. Since arriving 
here (Manila) my promotion has been more rapid than I dared 
hope and on August of the past year I received my promotion 
as a senior officer of the Corporation, a promotion I had hoped 
would come at the end of five or possibly three years if I made 
good in that time. At present I am second in the Branch and 
have full charge of the office, and I think that is all there is to it. 

"If nothing unforeseen happens I expect my life will be spent 
in the International Banking Corporation. I have had several 
flattering offers at much higher salaries to leave but I entered 
the Corporation almost at its incipiency and I want to see it 
through. So that any letters addressed to the head office at 
60-62 Wall Street, New York, will be reasonably sure of reach- 
ing me. 

"I am sorry I must miss the Triennial Reunion but I will be 
with you all in thought. I am planning already to be present at 
the next one, however, for at that time I will be on my year's 
leave. I might add that I like the life very much out here. 
Every moment is filled. Business is increasing daily for us in 
spite of the hard times prevalent in the Islands so that I fear our 
gain is at the cost of our competitors, but it is a great game, 
the kind that makes or breaks a man, and I like it." 

William Kenney Terribcrry (B.A. 1903) was bom in Glen 
Gardner, N. J., June 23, 1880, prepared at LeaFs School, Plain- 
field, N. J., and entered college at the beginning of Freshman 
year. 

His father, Andrew Miller Terriberry, of Terriberry and Ken- 
ney, merchants of Somerville, N. J., was born in Junction, N. J., 
June 5, 1854, the son of Nathan Terriberry and Margaret 
(S tires) Terriberry. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Pickel Kenney, 
was the daughter of William J. Kenney and Eleanor (Queen) 
Kenney. 



268 History of the Class of 1903. 

In college Terriberry held a Dissertation Junior appointment 
and a Dissertation Senior appointment. William S. Terriberry 
(Yale 1893) is a first cousin. 

He writes, December 1905: "I have been existing in New 
York City as a medical student at the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, and last spring passed the New York State partial 
examinations in that subject, so I am half a doctor in the sight 
of the law. A year from next spring I expect to receive my 
M.D. from Columbia. No, I am not married nor have I even 
taken steps toward following Al Lamb's lead. My first year in 
P. and S. I became a member of Iota Chapter of Nu Sigma Nu 
and have acted as Secretary of that chapter ever since. My 
permanent address is Somerville, New Jersey, and anything sent 
there will be forwarded to me." 

Menter Bradley Tcrrill (B.A. 1903, M.A. 1906) was bom 
in Moberly, Mo., February 11, 1868, prepared at the Winchester 
(Tenn.) Normal School and entered college at the beginning 
of Junior year. 

His father, James William Terrill, a teacher, was born in 
Moberly, Mo., March 16, 1837, the son of Benjamin Terrill and 
Delilah (Crisler) Terrill. 

His mother's maiden name was Bettie Bradley. She died in 

1873. 

In college Terrill was a member of the College Choir and won 
the Cobden Club medal in 1903. He was the Valedictorian of 
the Class. 

He was married November 18, 1891, in McMinnville, Tenn., 
to Miss Ada Thurman (B.A. North Texas Normal College, 
Denton, Texas, 1901), daughter of O. M. Thurman, a merchant 
of McMinnville. 

He writes : "A statement of my whereabouts and work, since 
graduation in 1903, is of necessity quite brief. I taught mathe- 
matics for two years at The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa., and 
returned here this year for graduate work. I hope to receive 
the degree of M.A. at the coming Commencement (1906). My 
plans for the future will locate me in Dallas, Texas, where I 
shall open in September a small preparatory school for boys." 

His address is Swiss Avenue, Dallas, Texas. 



Terrill, Thacher, ti, F, Thomas. 269 

Ralph Huntington Thacher (B.A. 1903) was bom in 
Albany, N. Y., November 23, 1881, prepared at the Albany 
Academy and entered college in September 1899. 

His father, Ralph Wheeler Thacher (Hamilton 1859), died 
February 27, 1903. He was in the grain commission business 
and was also President of the Albany Art Union. He was bom 
in Brockport, N. Y., April 24, 1839, the son of Ralph Thacher 
and Jerusha (Harrison) Thacher. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Louise Clinton Hunting- 
ton, was the daughter of Henry Huntington and Harriet 
(Douw) Huntington. 

, In college Thacher was a member of Psi Upsilon and held a 
Second Dispute Junior appointment and a First Colloquy Senior 
appointment. 

He writes, January 1906: "I entered the employ of Tacks 
Manufacturing Company of Utica, N. Y., in August 1903 and 
did a good deal of traveling for the firm for about a year. 
Through the next year I did some traveling and some inside 
work. In July 1905 I resigned and in August went into the 
car shops of the U. and M. V. Railway Company and have been 
there ever since. At present I am night foreman of one of the 
barns." 

And later, August 1906: "Since I last wrote you I have 
changed my occupation and for several months past have been 
with the Central New York Telephone and Telegraph Company. 
The main office is at Syracuse, N. Y., and anything addressed to 
me there will reach me although my home address still remains 
26 Kemble.Street, Utica, N. Y." 

Herbert Franklin Thomas was bom in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
December 13, 1880, prepared at the St. Paul School, Garden 
City, L. L, at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and at the 
Albany (N. Y.) Academy and entered with the Qass, leaving 
at Christmas 1899. He returned in the fall of 1900 for one 
term with the Class of 1904. 

He is the son of Orlando Frank Thomas, President of the 
Consolidated National Bank of New York, of the Hudson Tmst 
Company of New York and of the Bank of Wayne, Lyons, 
N Y., and of Emma (Van Cleaf ) Thomas, who died in 1896. 

Thomas was married September 18, 1900, to Miss Amanda 



270 History of the Class of 1903. 

Wallace Caskie, daughter of the late Col. Robert A. Caskie of 
Richmond, Va., a graduate of the University of Virginia. 

He writes: "Since leaving college I have been in business, 
first on the Pacific coast, at Seattle, where I remained for one 
year, acting in the position of assistant secretary and treasurer 
of the Pacific Steel Company, a corporation with headquarters 
at Seattle, Washington. After leaving there I came east and 
went to work with the Empire Trust Company of New York 
City, and remained there for some time, the exact length of 
which I do not recollect. 

"I became a member of the New York Stock Exchange on 
July 9, 1903, and established the firm of Thomas and Ryan, 
which was terminated at the expiration of our agreement and 
succeeded by the firm of Thomas, Maclay and Company, 71 
Broadway, New York City, composed of Robert Maclay, Harold 
H. Weekes and myself. We do a banking and brokerage 
business." 

Joseph Brown Thomas, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was bom in 
Boston, Mass., January 3, 1879, prepared at the Blake School, 
New York City, and entered college at the beginning of Fresh- 
man year. 

His father, Joseph Brown Thomas (Wesley an 1872), is the 
son of Joseph B. Thomas and Martha (Seran) Thomas. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Annie Hill, was the 
daughter of Ebenezer Hill and Hannah (Lyon) Hill. 

A brother, Ralph Hill Thomas, graduated from Yale in 1905, 
and a cousin, Ebenezer Hill, Jr., in 1897. 

In college Thomas was a member of the University trade 
team four years and Captain Senior year, winning second place 
in the 120 hurdle and third in the 220 in the Harvard Meet 
1900, fourth in 220 hurdle Intercollegiate Meet of 1902 and 
third place in 220 hurdle Intercollegiate Meet of 1903. He was 
Manager of the Musical Organizations, member of the Junior 
Promenade Committee, Rear Commodore of the Yale Corinth- 
ian Yacht Qub and a member of Eta Phi, Alpha Delta Phi and 
Scroll and Key societies. 

He writes : "Once upon a time, way back in the daric ages, 
about the year 1903 there fluttered forth from Alma Mater's 
protecting wings a pretty cocky little ostrich who has ever since 



/. B, Thomas, T. G, Thotnas, D, Thompson, 271 

been rushing around in an attempt to capture those evasive 
will o' the wisps, Fame and Fortune. Travel, Business, Sport, 
Love have each in turn and together occupied our time and 
thoughts while ambition has been the impelling power and 
success the goal — reached easily at times and then again only 
attained with the keenest pain, anguish but lastly satisfaction 
of conquest Travel in Russia, Persia, Turkey and strange 
places has broadened our view-point. Business of new and 
independent nature has quickened our wits and senses. Sport 
has taken care of our physical manhood, has tended to add 
happiness to life, increase our respect for fellow men and at last 
but not least add zest and vigor and esprit to our everyday 
pursuits. Love is an interesting diversion taken as you will, 
and can but tend to make life the more worth while and round 
out one's striving for success in whatever field that striving 
may lie, — Politics, Literature, Affairs, The Arts. Pax 
Vobiscum" 

His business address is i Madison Ave., New York City, or 
403 Malley Building, New Haven, Conn. His residence is 
Simsbury, Conn., or 763 Fifth Ave., New York City. 

Theodore Gaillard Thomas (B.A. Harvard 1904) was bom 
in Southampton, L. L, August 5, 1880, the son of the late Theo- 
dore Gaillard Thomas, M.D. He prepared at the Pomfret 
(Conn.) School and entered college with the Class, leaving in 
the spring of 1900. The following fall he entered Harvard, 
graduating therefrom in 1904. 

He is at present in the sig^ business with an office at Room 
504, 103 East 125th St., New York City. His residence is 363 
East 135th St. 

Donald Thompson (B.A. 1903) was bom in Allegheny, 
Pa., October 27, 1882, prepared at the Shadyside Academy, 
Pittsburg, and entered college at the beginning of Freshman 
year. 

His father, Oliver David Thompson (Yale 1879), ^ lawyer, 
was bom in Butler, Pa., September 24, 1855, the son of John 
McCandless Thompson, a lawyer of Butler, Pa., and of Anna 
Lauretta (Campbell) Thompson. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Kate Wentworth 



272 History of the Class of 1903. 

Dresser, was the daughter of John Wentworth Dresser, a manu- 
facturer of Castine, Maine, and of Mary Moulton (Adams) 
Dresser. 

In college Thompson played shortstop on the Freshman nine, 
and third base on the University nine. He was a member of 
He Boule, Delta Kappa Epsilon and Skull and Bones societies, 
and held an Oration Junior appointment and the same Senior 
appointment. 

Since graduation he has been studying law in Pittsburg in the 
office of Patterson, Sterrett and Acheson. He took his bar 
examinations in July 1906, and expects to be admitted in 
October. He is now in the office of Rodgers, Blakeley and Cal- 
vert, 1651 Frick Building Annex, Pittsburg, Pa., which he calls 
his permanent address. His home address is 124 Centennial 
Ave., Sewickley, Pa. 

Edwin Vivian Thompson (B.A. 1903) was bom in Louis- 
ville, Ky., November 20, 1882, prepared at the University School 
of Kentucky, Louisville, and entered college in September 1899. 

His father, Edwin V. Thompson (real estate and fanning), 
was bom in Louisville, Ky., in August 1852, the son of Edwin 
V. Thompson and Kate (Therwell) Thompson. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Annie Glazebrook, was 
the daughter of Austin Glazebrook and Lydia (Grinstead) 
Glazebrook. 

In college Thompson was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and 
Zeta Psi societies and held a High Oration Junior and Senior 
appointment. 

He writes: "For several months after graduation I spent 
my time having a good time generally and doing nothing at all. 
In January 1904 I started to work, taking a position and I may 
state a very humble position, with the Union National Bank 
of Louisville, Ky. I remained a banker for several months 
until the ist of May, 1904, when I became connected with the 
engineering department of the Samuel Horner, Jr., Portland 
Cement plant at Riverside Station, Ky. The plant was in the 
process of constmction and I was engaged in field engineering 
work. Remained with the Cement Company until the comple- 
tion of the plant in July 1905 when I became convinced of the 
uselessness of one engaging in engineering without the benefit 



£. V. Thompson, Thomson, Thorstenberg. 273 

of a technical education. Then considered going to Cornell 
for a mechanical course but finally decided to give it up and 
enter a mercantile business. Thereupon in October 1905 
entered the Louisville Grocery Company, wholesale grocery 
of Louisville, in which my family is interested. And am still 
there. Am a member of the Pendennis Qub of Louisville." 
His address is 1407 Third Ave., Louisville, Ky. 

George Jameson Thomson (B.A. 1903) was bom in Wilton, 
Conn., March i, 1880, prepared at tfie Norwalk (Conn.) 
University School and entered with the Class. 

His father, Henry Grinnell Thomson, an artist of Wilton, 
was born in New York City November 24, 1850, the son of 
George Thomson, a wholesale merchant, and of Eva Ann 
(Hagadorn) Thomson. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Agnes Hope Coley, was 
the daughter of David Coley and Jane Catherine (Sturges) 
Coley. 

In college Thomson held a Dissertation Junior appointment 
and the same Senior appointment. 

He writes: "Since leaving college I have taken one year at 
the Yale Law School, i.e. 1903-1904. In the fall of 1904 I 
came to New York, entered the New York Law School and 
also the office of Bowers and Sands, 31 Nassau Street, the latter 
not until the middle of November 1904. I finished my law 
school course in June 1905, and took the bar examinations for 
New York on June 19, 1905. I was admitted to the New York 
bar in the early fall. I have every intention of remaining where 
I now am for some time. 

"Letters addressed to Wilton, Conn., will be sure to 
reach me." 

Herman Justus Thorstenberg (B.A. Bethany College, Kan., 
1902, B.A. Yale 1903, M.A. 1904, Ph.D. 1906) was bom in 
Assaria, Kan., January 10, 1876, prepared at the Bethany Acad- 
emy, Lindsborg, Kan., and entered Yale at the beginning of 
Senior year. 

His father, Carl Thorstenberg, a farmer and stock-raiser of 
Assaria, was bom in Jemshog, Sweden, April 11, 1840, the son 
of Haakan Thorstenberg, a farmer, and of Hanna (Olson) 
Thorstenberg. 
18 



274 History of the Class of 1^03. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Pernilla Bengtson, was 
the daughter of Bengt Nilsson, a farmer of Sweden, and of 
Karin (Olson) Nilsson. 

Thorstenberg graduated from Yale with a First Dispute 
Senior appointment. At Bethany he was an editor of the 
Record, President of the Adelphic Literary Society, oa the 
General Athletic team, and won first and second prizes in 
oratory. 

He writes, December 1905 : "Since graduation I have studied 
history and the social sciences in the Yale Graduate School. 
I expect to win a Ph.D. next Jime and will then resume teach- 
ing as a profession. During the summer of 1904 I visited the 
World's Fair, my home in Kansas, Niagara, etc., travelling 
nearly 4,000 miles. Last summer I travelled twice as much, 
seeing northern Europe, Germany, and England. Besides 
interesting scenery I saw some monarchs, and was dined by an 
English lord. I studied for a month in the libraries and royal 
archives of Denmark to get 'stuff' for my doctor's dissertation, 
which I am now writing on the 'Danish West Indies.' After 
next June send all letters to Assaria, Kan., and they will be 
forwarded." 

And later, August 1906: "I received the degree, Ph.D., from 
Yale last June, and have since then accepted a call to the chair 
of Economics and Sociology at the State University of Okla- 
homa. My address will be (after September i, 1906) Norman, 
Okla." 

George Rexford Tillson (B.A. 1903) was bom in Norwich, 
N. Y., November 13, 1881, prepared at the Montclair (N. J.) 
High School and entered college with the Class. 

His father, George Morton Tillson, a lawyer of Syracuse, 
N. Y., was bom in Norwich, N. Y., in 1841, the son of George 
Tillson. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Helena Rexford, 
was the daughter of Benjamin Franklin Rexford, appointed by 
Lincoln a judge in the Costa Rica dispute, and of Elvira 
Priscilla (Babcock) Rexford. 

In college Tillson was on the College Choir, Freshman dec 
Club and Apollo Glee Club. He was a member of the Pundits 
and Beta Theta Pi. He won honors in English composition in 



Tillson, Townsend, Trenholm. 275 

Sophomore year, and held an Oration Junior appointment and 
the same Senior appointment. Benjamin F. Tillson (Yale 
1905 S.) is a brother. 

Since graduation he has been studying organ music abroad, 
the first two years at Berlin and the last one at Paris. His 
address is care D. H. Rexford, Esq., 80 Broadway, New York 
City. His home address is Montclair, N. J. 

Edward Perry Townsend (B.A. 1903) was bom in New 
York City, August 25, 1881, prepared at the Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., and entered with the Class. 

His father, Edward Townsend, President of the Importers 
and Traders National Bank of New York, was bom in New 
York City July 30, 1848, the son of Oliver Hazard Perry 
Townsend and Phoebe Ann (Geer) Townsend. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Adelaide Louise Tur- 
ner, was the daughter of Myron Turner and Louise (Sherer) 
Tumer. 

Myron T. Townsend (Yale 1899 S.) and Harold Townsend 
(1904S.) are brothers. 

In college Townsend was Secretary and Treasurer of the 
Freshman Football Association, was on the Qass Supper Com- 
mittee and held a First Dispute Junior appointment and the 
same Senior appointment. He was a member of Kappa Psi, 
Alpha Delta Phi, the Elihu Qub and the Pundits. 

He was married at Sagamore, Lake George, N. Y., Sep- 
tember 16, 1905, to Miss Fanny Proddow Simpson (Vassar 
1902), daughter of John Boulton Simpson, of New York City, 
President of the Estey Piano Company. 

Since graduation he has been with the Importers and Traders 
National Bank of New York at 247 Broadway. His residence 
is 306 West 80th St., New York City. 

Arsene LeSeigneur Trenholm (B.A. 1903) was bom in 
Charleston, S. C, November 21, 1880, prepared at the St 
Paul School, Concord, N. H., and entered college at the begin- 
ning of Freshman year. 

His father, William Lee Trenholm (South Carolina College 
1855), died January 9, 1901. He was a banker. President of 
the American Surety Company and of the North American 



276 History of the Class of ipoj. 

Trust Company. He was Comptroller of the Currency during 
Cleveland's first administration and Russian and Italian Consul 
in Charleston. He was the son of George Alfred Trenholm, of 
Charleston, S. C, a cotton merchant and Secretary of the Con- 
federate Treasury, and of Anna Helen (Holmes) Trenholm. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Katherine Louise Mac- 
beth, was the daughter of James Macbeth, a merchant of 
Charleston, and of Mary (Barksdale) Macbeth. 

In college Trenholm held a First Colloquy Junior appoint- 
ment and the same Senior appointment. 

He writes: "Since leaving New Haven I have been com- 
pletely devoted to the task of earning a living. I started to 
work with the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad 
on the first of December, 1903, and have to the present day con- 
tinued with this railroad. I started as night clerk in the yard 
department at Secancus and then was transferred to day work 
at the Newark yard. Now I am car order clerk in the 
despatcher's office at Hoboken. Some men waste several years 
in finding work that is congenial to them. I was lucky enough 
to find at once the kind of work that is entirely suited to my 
tastes." 

His business address is Division Office, Delaware, Lacka- 
wanna and Western Railroad, Hoboken, N. J. His residence 
is 137 East 39th St., New York City. 

John Marshall True was born in Columbus, Iowa, May 24, 
1879, prepared at the Choate School, Wallingford, Conn., and 
entered with the Class, leaving in Freshman year. 

His father, John W. True, a banker and United States Inter- 
nal Revenue Collector of Eureka Springs, Ark., was Postmaster 
of Eureka Springs for eight years and for about ten years was 
Chairman of the Republican State Central Committee for 
Arkansas. He was born in Charleston, 111., the son of Fred- 
erick True, an Illinois farmer, and of Cynthia (Whittington) 
True. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Eliza Marshall, was the 
daughter of Col. Thomas A. Marshall, a Civil War veteran and 
planter of Mississippi, and later a banker in Illinois, and of Ellen 
I. (Miles) Marshall. 

His great-grandfather, Thomas Alexander Marshall, LL.D., 
graduated from Yale in 1815. 



True, Truett, Tulin. 277 

After leaving college True was a bank clerk and then enlisted, 
being sent to Manila, P. I., as a member of Company F, nth 
Infantry, U. S. A. In 1904 he received his commission as 
Second Lieutenant, ist Infantry, with an appointment to the 
staff of the Military Secretary at Washington. On February 
I, 1906, he was transferred to Manila, P. I., for two years. His 
permanent address is care Military Secretary, U. S. Army, 
Washington, D. C. His home address is Eureka Springs, Ark. 

Edward Perry Truett was born in Milan, Ohio, December 
5, 1877, prepared at the Denver (Colo.) High School and 
entered college with the Class. 

His father, Edward Truett, a contractor of Milan, Ohio, was 
bom in Columbia, Tenn., December 10, 185 1, the son of James 
Truett and Anne (Horn) Truett. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Elizabeth Mac- 
Cabe, was the daughter of Patrick MacCabe and Nancy 
(Cameron) MacCabe. 

In college Truett was Class Statistician and editor of the 
Senior Class Book. He was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon 
and held a First Dispute Junior and Senior appointment. 

He writes : "I have been with the Degnon Contracting Com- 
pany since September i, 1903, first in Baltimore and for the past 
year and a half in Brooklyn. That is about all there is to say 
about that. In October 1905 I entered the night school of the 
New York Law School and am plugging along at the law in 
addition to my daily work." 

His business address is 13 Park Row, New York City. His 
residence is 115 South Elliot Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. His home 
address is Milan, Ohio. 

Abraham Tulin (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 1906) was born 
in Besdjez, Russia, March 31, 1882, prepared at the Boys High 
School, Brooklyn, N. Y., at the Bacon Academy, Colchester, 
Conn., and at the Hartford (Conn.) Public High School and 
entered college with the Class. 

His father, Shaia David Tulin, of Tulin, Toft and Tulin, 
wholesale grocers of Hartford, is President of the Hartford 
Hebrew Association. He was bom in Chomsk, Province of 
Grodno, Russia, March 15, 1849, the son of David Tulin, a grain 
dealer and farmer, and of Eva Freda (Bialik) Tulin. 



278 History of the Class of 1903. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Schuhnann, 
was the daughter of Isaac Wolf Schulmann, a merchant, and of 
Rachel Saphira (Shedrontsky) Schulmann. 

In college Tulin was a member of the Dramatic Association, 
an alternate in the Harvard Debate in Sophomore and Junior 
years, and on the executive committee of the Yale Union. He 
held a First Colloquy Junior appointment and a First Colloquy 
Senior appointment. 

He writes, January 1906: "I left college in June 1903, and 
have since then been studying at the Harvard Law School. I 
have lived during the school year in Cambridge, Mass. In 
addition to studying law I have been engaged in the following 
occupations with the following firms and in the following places. 
Some of these things I did during vacation times only, others 
the whole year round. From July to November, 1903, 1 worked 
as advertising solicitor for the Success magazine of New York, 
first in New York and then in Chicago. In November 1903 I 
was employed by the Atlantic Monthly of Boston also as an 
advertising solicitor, and have worked for that magazine ever 
since, with the exception of the stunmer months of 1904. For 
the Atlantic Monthly I work afternoons in and around Boston 
and in New York state and New England during the entire year. 
In July 1904 I was employed by the Louisana Purchase Exposi- 
tion Company of St. Louis, Mo., as a writer in the General 
Press Bureau of the Exposition, supplying World's Fair news, 
stories and articles to most of the newspapers and magazines 
of the United States and also to the press of foreign countries. 
I worked in this bureau for two months, when the Exposition 
Company sent me as commissioner to Oklahoma, and later to 
other states and territories. I travelled through Oklahoma, the 
Indian Territory, Kansas and Missouri. My business was to 
meet the heads of the principal cities and the governors of 
states as the Exposition's official representative, and arrange 
with them for greater and special efforts to make a good show- 
ing of their communities at the Fair. 

"I have now studied for two and a half years in the Harvard 
Law School, and hope to receive the degree of LL.B. in June. 
On March 28, 1905, I represented Harvard in debate with 
Princeton, having won the Coolidge Prize for doing the best 
work in the trials for the team. The award of this prize was 



Tyler. 279 

after the debate restricted by the Harvard Debating Council to 
Harvard undergraduates. I believe I am the only Yale man 
and non-Harvard man who ever took the prize. On December 
15, 1905, Harvard again met Princeton in debate. I was a 
member of the Harvard team as principal. On December 6, 
however, I fell ill, entered the Harvard Infirmary, and stayed 
there in bed till January 9, the alternate speaking in my place 
in the debate. 

"My permanent address, where letters will be forwarded to 
me, is 34 Bellevue Street, Hartford, Conn." 

William Butler Tyler (B.A. 1903) was born in New Haven, 
Conn., March 11, 1878, prepared at the Hillhouse High School, 
New Haven, at the Hopkins Grammar School, New Haven, and 
at the Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and entered college 
with the Class of 1902, joining 1903 at the beginning of Fresh- 
man year. 

His father, William Roger Tyler, of Butler and Tyler, 
wholesale boot and shoe merchants of New Haven, was bom in 
New Haven, the son of Morris Tyler and Mary (Butler) Tyler. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Pierpont Coon, 
was the daughter of Abram Coon and Ann (Husted) Coon. 

Tyler's Yale relatives include a brother, R. P. Tyler (1901), 
an uncle, Morris F. Tyler (1870), and three cousins: Victor 
Morris Tyler (1898), Ernest F. Tyler (Art School), and 
Leonard S. Tyler (1905). 

In college he was on the Freshman Glee Qub, was Leader of 
the Apollo Glee Club, and was a member of He Boule, Delta 
Kappa Epsilon and Wolf's Head societies. 

He was married in New Haven February 18, 1905, to Miss 
Mary Benham Woolverton, daughter of Charles B. Woolverton, 
deceased, of Albany, N. Y., and niece of the late Professor 
Penfield of Yale. A daughter, Elizabeth Pierpont Tyler, was 
born November 27, 1905. 

He writes, January 1906 : "Since leaving college my residence 
has been in New York until March 1905, when I moved to 
Plainfield, N. J., where I am now engaged in peacefully pursu- 
ing a railroad train every morning at 7:45, and being pretty 
consistently lucky. Was with the New York Telephone Com- 
pany for three weeks in November 1903, then went with the 



28o History of the Class of 1903. 

Munson Steamship Line for eight months, and have been with 
the Railway Steel Spring Company since September 1904- The 
company makes steel springs for railroad cars and locomotives, 
and also steel tired wheels for passenger coaches and locomo- 
tives. The summer after graduation I travelled in England and 
Europe for three months with Reeve Schley, meeting many of 
the Class while there and while going and coming. As affairs 
look I think that Plainfield will be my permanent address, and 
letters sent here will be forwarded to me in case I should move 
elsewhere." 

In April 1906 Tyler took a position with the Machine Sales 
Company, 35 Cedar Street, New York City. He lives at 126 
East 9th Street, Plainfield, N. J. 

David Benjamin Updegraff (B.x\. 1903, M.A. Princeton 
1906) was bom in Mt. Pleasant, Ohio, July 17, 1878, prepared 
at the Mt. Pleasant High School and entered Yale at the 
beginning of Sophomore year. 

His father. Rev. David Brainerd Updegraff, a Friends clergy- 
man, was born in Mt. Pleasant in 1830, the son of David Upde- 
graff, a farmer, and of Rebecca (Taylor) Updegraff. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Eliza Jane Qaric Mitch- 
ell, died July 3, 1900, and was the daughter of Rev. Benjamin 
Mitchell, D.D., a Presbyterian clergyman of Mt. Pleasant, 
and of Anne (Dinsmore) Mitchell. 

In college Updegraff was a member of the College Choir, 
won a Henry James Ten Eyck third prize in Junior year, a 
Townsend Premium in Senior year and held a First Colloquy 
Junior and First Dispute Senior appointment. 

He writes: "I have during the past three years done little 
but prepare myself for the ministry. I have spent the whole 
time here in Princeton, where I like the life and the work 
immensely. I supplied a church in Trenton two summers ago 
and last summer took a trip to Oklahoma, where I spent three 
months as a missionary among the whites. My greatest accom- 
plishment I regard as the beginning of two churches out there. 

"I have no wife and therefore no children. I have taken 
post graduate work in the University here and shall get my 
M.A. in June I suppose. I am a member of the best social 
organization I know of — ^the Benham Club — ^the oldest club in 



Updegraff, Utley. 281 

Princeton. My plans for the future are nil. I don't plan — I 
only wait for what happens. It may happen that I shall go 
somewhere as a foreign missionary — perhaps to China or Japan. 
I graduate here in May and after that all is uncertain. I shall 
probably fall into the right place. My permanent address will 
be for some years at least care H. H. Ratcliff, Esq., 137 East 
Gorham St., Madison, Wis." 

And later, August 1906: "I got an M.A. from Princeton in 
June 1906. My occupation is Assistant Pastor of Lafayette 
Avenue Presbyterian Church of Buffalo, N. Y." 

Fred Brown Utley (B.A. 1903) was bom in Rodman, 
N. Y., March 15, 1880, prepared at the Gloversville (N. Y.) 
High School and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Charles Albert Utley, a retired farmer, was bom 
in Rodman, N. Y., September 27, 1849, ^^e son of William 
Wallace Utley and Sophia (McKinstry) Utley. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Jane Brown, was 
the daughter of Orville Brown and Mary (Hallenbeck) Brown. 

In college Utley was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma 
Xi societies. In Freshman year he won the DeForest mathe- 
matical second prize, divided the Benjamin F. Barge mathe- 
matical second prize in Sophomore year with B. Webster, and 
held a High Oration Junior appointment and a Philosophical 
Oration Senior appointment, graduating eighth in rank. 

He writes : "The year following graduation I tutored a young 
hopeful in a private family. The work was not arduous and 
I had a very instructive year as it gave me some little travel 
in this country which I had not before enjoyed. The first 
summer we spent in California going out over the Santa Fe 
route, and returning by way of the Northern Pacific from 
Seattle. The following winter we were south as far as Augusta, 
spending most of the time at Aiken, S. C. 

"After this year's rest I was ready to resume the study of 
medicine with renewed energy and entered the second year class 
at the Physicians and Surgeons, from which institution I hope 
to receive the degree of M.D. in 1907. My present address is 
Student's Club, 328 West 56th Street, New York City; and 
my permanent or home address is 248 Kingsboro Avenue, 
Gloversville, N. Y." 



282 History of the Class of 1903. 

Samuel Oakley VanderPoel, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was bora 
in Albany, N. Y., August 22, 1881, prepared at the Hotchkiss 
School, Lakeville, Conn., and entered college in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Samuel Oakley VanderPoel, M.D., (Rutgers 
1873), has been President of the New York Medical Society 
and of the County of New York Medical Society. He was bora 
in Albany in 1853, the son of S. Oakley VanderPoel and Ger- 
trude (Wendell) VanderPoel. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Haines Halsted, 
was the daughter of William Halsted. 

In college VanderPoel was substitute fullback on the Uni- 
versity eleven, substitute on the Hockey team, and a member 
of Kappa Psi and Alpha Delta Phi societies. William Halsted 
(Yale 1873) is an uncle. 

He was married September 16, 1905, in Southampton, Long 
Island, N. Y., to Miss Mildred Moore Barclay, daughter of the 
late Henry Anthony Barclay. 

He writes, December 1905 : "After graduation in June 1903 
I entered the Central Trust Company of New York to learn the 
business, etc., of banking. Soon after I joined Squadron A, 
N. G. S. N. Y., cavalry, of which I am still a member. I 
remained at the Central Trust for two years, or rather until last 
April, when I was made assistant trust officer of the institu- 
tion. Soon after I had an offer from Taylor and Smith, 
brdcers, 5 Broad Street, to become their manager of the 
main office, New York City, which I decided to accept, and 
here I am plugging along. Last summer I was married to Miss 
Mildred Barclay of New York City, and we are living at Wood- 
mere, Long Island." 

January 2, 1906: "I am now installed as manager of the 
Waldorf-Astoria branch of A. O. Brown and Company, bankers 
and brokers, 30 Broad Street, New York, which I am glad to 
say is quite a jump for me from my last position." 

In the summer of 1906 VanderPoel opened an office for the 
sale of stocks and bonds at 30 Broad Street, New York City. 

Harry Brown Van Deventer (B.A. 1903, M.A. 1904) was 
born in Newark, N. J., August 14, 1881, prepared at the Pingry 
School, Elizabeth, N. J., and entered college with the Class. 



VanderPoel, Van Deventer, Van Dyke. 283 

His father, Andrew K. Van Deventer, Treasurer of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad Company and allied lines, was born in 
Flemington, N. J., November 6, 1854, the son of William K. 
Van Deventer, a farmer of Flemington, and of Eliza (Kinney) 
Van Deventer. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ella H. Riker, was the 
daughter of James B. Riker, a manufacturer of Newark, N. J., 
and of Harriet (Hemingway) Riker. 

In college Van Deventer divided with Root the Hugh Cham- 
berlain Greek prize and won a first grade Berkeley premium in 
Latin composition in Freshman year. In Sophomore year he 
won a special prize for excellence in Latin composition, in 
Junior year first Winthrop prize, and in Sophomore, Junior and 
Senior years the Lucius F. Robinson first Latin prize. He was 
President of Phi Beta Kappa, a member of Psi Upsilon, and held 
a Philosophical Oration Junior appointment and a High Oration 
Senior appointment. 

Since graduation he has been studying Latin in the Yale 
Graduate School, and has held a college fellowship during the 
three years. His present address is 1076 Chapel Street, New 
Haven, Conn. His home address is 531 North Broad Street, 
Elizabeth, N. J. 

Douglass Van Dyke (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 1906) was 
born in Milwaukee, Wis., January 18, 1881, prepared at the 
Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Conn., and entered with the Class. 

His father, George Douglass Van Dyke (Princeton 1873), is 
a lawyer and President of the Pewabic Company. He was born 
in Milwaukee in 1853, the son of J. H. Van Dyke. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Louise Lawrence, was 
the daughter of James Lawrence. 

Van Dyke's Yale relatives include a brother, Lawrence Van 
Dyke (1900), and an uncle, George H. Lawrence (1869). 

In college he was an editor of the Yale Daily News and a 
member of Alpha Delta Phi. He held a Second Colloquy Junior 
appointment and a Second Dispute Senior appointment. 

Since graduation he has studied law at Harvard, receiving his 
LL.B. in June 1906. He is at present in his father's office. 
Van Dyke and Van Dyke, and lives at 44 Prospect Ave., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 



284 History of the Class of J 90 3, 

Ernest Shelton Van Tassel (B.A. 1903) was born in Welles- 
ley, Mass., July 21, 1881, prepared at the Lawrenceville (N. J.) 
School and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Charles J. Van Tassel, who died January 4, 1884, 
was in the insurance business with Van Tassel and Toy, San 
Francisco. He was bom in New York City June 25, 1854, the 
son of James Van Tassel, M.D., a surgeon in the Federal army 
in the Civil War. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Julia Ely Shelton, was 
the daughter of Charles Smith Shelton (Yale 1840), a mission- 
ary to India, and of Henrietta Mills (Hyde) Shelton. 

Van Tassel's Yale relatives include besides his grandfather 
two uncles. Dr. Charles H. Shelton (1877) and Rev. Charles W. 
Shelton (1882 T.S.), and four cousins, Arthur H. Bissell 
(1897), Dr. Shelton Bissell (1897), Henry Wood Shelton 
(1904) and William Shelton (1905). 

He writes: "I arrived in Omaha Saturday, July 25, 1903, 
looking for a job. On Monday the 27th I was told that they 
could probably make use of me carrying stakes, driving them, 
dragging the chain, etc., down in Kansas. I asked Mr. Berry, 
Chief Engineer at that time of the Union Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany, if it would give me experience. Looking the Tenderfoot 
over he remarked dryly: *Oh, yes, it will give you experience 
all right.' So I went down that night and was sent out from 
Kansas City to Lawrence the next day, July 28, where I started 
in at noon time as chainman on an engineering gang. It was 
the summer of the flood and we had plenty of work — and I also 
had 'experience.' Many a time as I was driving '4 ft. grades' 
in the ballast under the hot Kansas sun, did I wish for the cool 
Campus ; at night as I was sleeping in rickety shacks or even in 
depots, as I have done out in the stock country where houses arc 
scarce, it would have seemed paradise to have had a good bed 
once more in 450 Fayerweather Hall; and even 'Commons' 
would have seemed like 'Dels.' in comparison to the grub thrown 
over the oil-cloth counters at most of the places we ate at. So 
that was my beginning at 'forty per.' Of course I had many 
experiences while down there but they could be better told than 
written. Some were comic, some were tragic, — classed in the 
latter was the loss of two men, whom I worked with, in the 
flood. Was in two cyclones, but none of us lost our lives 
though we had a narrow escape in one instance. 



Van Tassel, Vestling. 285 

"In October of the same year the field forces were laid off for 
the winter and having nothing in view I came up to Omaha and 
took an examination for a clerkship in the accounting depart- 
ment. I worked in the freight auditor's office during all that 
winter until March i, when I went to Fremont, Nebraska, to 
take the job of yard clerk. I was shortly put up to bill cleric 
and held the job as long as I was there (thirteen months) ; 
though in addition I managed to pick up the cashier's work, and 
at night I would come down to the ticket office and pick up the 
ticket business. In that way I secured a good knowledge of 
local station work. 

"On January 6, 1905, I was taken sick with appendicitis, 
operated on and didn't get back to work for two months. On 
April I I came to Omaha to accept a job in the Superintendent's 
office, where I have been since. Have taken up the work on the 
different desks in the office and am now doing the work of an 
Assistant Qiief Clerk." 

He lives at 2045 Dodge Street, Omaha, Neb. 

Axel Ebenezer Vestling (B.A. Bethany College, Kan., 1900, 
B.A. Yale 1903, M.A. 1905) was born in Osage City, Kansas, 
June 22, 1879, prepared at the Ludington (Mich.) High School 
and entered Yale at the beginning of Senior year. 

His father. Rev. Qaus Victor Vestling (Augustana Theologi- 
cal Seminary 1872), was bom in Linkoping, Sweden, Novem- 
ber 14, 1845, ^^ son of Anders Erickson and Maria (Vestling) 
Erickson. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sofia Mathilda Swens- 
son, was the daughter of Swen Swensson and Maria (Johnson) 
Swensson. 

In college Vestling was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and 
held a Philosophical Oration Senior appointment, graduating 
fourteenth in rank. 

He writes: "The year after graduation, 1903-1904, I was 
instructor in German at Dartmouth College and the two follow- 
ing years instructor at Yale in the same subject and at the 
same time have been doing graduate work in the Germanic 
department. Received my M.A. degree from Yale in 1905." 

His address is 130 Wall St., New Haven, Conn. His home 
address is 216 Danaher St., Ludington, Mich. 



286 History of the Class of 1903. 

Carroll Johnson Waddell (B.A. 1903) was bom in Ottawa, 
Kansas, September 16, 1881, prepared at the Albany (N. Y.) 
Academy and entered Yale from Hamilton at the beginning of 
Sophomore year. 

His father, Robert James Waddell, died May 23, 1903. He 
was born in Albany, N. Y., November 13, 1844, the son of 
James Waddell and Rachel (Shannon) Waddell. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Sybil Carroll, 
was the daughter of James Carroll and Sarah Francis ( Jenness) 
Carroll. 

In college Waddell was an editor of the Yale Daily News, 
a Qass Historian and a member of Alpha Delta Phi and the 
Elihu Club. 

He writes: "During the summer of 1903 Glover Beardsley 
and I had a month's canoe trip in the Moosehead Lake region 
of Maine. On October i, 1903, I started work in the home 
office of the R. J. Waddell Investment Company at Kansas 
City, Mo., remaining there until November i, 1904, when I 
was elected Secretary of the Company and placed in charge of 
the eastern office at Albany, N. Y. I was with that company 
until January 1906 and then sought the simple life in ranch 
life in Texas. Louis McKnight joined me there in April for 
a three hundred mile riding trip. I returned east in time for 
Triennal and on July 9 entered the New York office of N. W. 
Harris and Company, bankers. Pine Street comer William, 
New York City." 

He lives at the Yale Club, 30 West 44th St., New York. 

Anson Wagar was born in Middlesex, N. Y., November 28, 
1879, the son of James H. Wagar. He prepared for collie 
at the Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and entered with the 
Class, leaving at the end of Freshman year. 

For a short time after leaving college he worked in the freight 
office of the Erie Railroad at Sayre, Pa., and then went west 
He was married in June 1906 to Miss Deedie Sallee of South 
Dakota. At present he is reported to be a government land 
commissioner "or something of that sort." His address is 
care Ziebach, Wagar and Russell, Gregory, S. D. 



I 



Waddell, Wagar, Wait, Wakefield. 287 

James Reynolds Wait (B.A. 1903) was bom in Whitehall, 
N. Y., May 2, 1882, prepared at the Auburn (N. Y.) High 
School and entered college with the Oass. 

His father, Horace Reynolds Wait, a carpet merchant, was 
bom in Amsterdam, N. Y., September i, 1843, the son of 
William Wait, one of the first manufacturers of carpets in 
this country, and of Mary (Haigh) Wait. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Nellie B. Reynolds, 
was the daughter of James L. Reynolds and Lucy (Webster) 
Reynolds. 

In college Wait was a member of Zeta Psi and held a Disser- 
tation Junior appointment and a Dissertation Senior appoint- 
ment. 

He writes: "My time since leaving college has been spent 
mostly in Auburn. Here I have been engaged in business with 
my father, who has real estate interests and who is also a 
merchant. We do a large retail carpet and furniture business 
in the city, and also take f umishing contracts of every descrip- 
tion in all parts of the country. The contract department is 
now under my charge. I also do part of the buying for the 
store. The business is interesting and I am glad to say that 
I like it. Have been spending a good deal of time studying 
up interior decoration, following out a course of study laid 
out for me by a professor in Columbia. In addition to the 
store work, I am also sales manager for the Cayuga Carpet 
Company, which is a mail order house selling carpets at retail 
in all parts of the United States. Business takes me around 
the country quite a bit, and I am in New York frequently, so 
manage to keep track of many a friend in the Class. Sunday 
in Auburn finds me good, and I am doing some Sunday School 
work. Am also a director of the Aubum Y. M. C. A. My 
vacations have been spent in the Adirondacks. Last summer 
Ed. Thompson and I took a trip through the Great Lakes on 
a freighter and enjoyed it very much." 

His business address is 77 Genesee St., Aubum, N. Y. His 
residence is 215 Genesee St. 

Ralph Benford Wakefield (B.A. 1903) was bom in Fair- 
chance, Pa., October 20, 1881, prepared at the Thiel School, 
Greenville, Mercer County, Pa., and entered Yale at the begin- 
ning of Junior year. 




288 History of the Class of 1903. 

His father, Rev. Charles Benjamin Wakefield (Waynesburg 
1874), a Presbyterian clergyman of Greenville, was bom in 
Fayette County, Pa., October 15, 1853, the son of David Hough 
Wakefield, a farmer, and of Mary Randolph (Covert) 
Wakefield. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Annie Benford, was 
the daughter of George Benford, a druggist of Somerset, Pa., 
and of Mary Narcissa (Conley) Benford. 

Wakefield graduated with a First Colloquy Senior appoint- 
ment. 

He writes: "I have lived in Pittsburg, Pa., since leaving 
college in June 1903. I have been studying law and am r^^- 
tered with my uncle, J. A. Wakefield, and am studying in his 
office. I started in the Law School, which is a part of the 
Western University of Pennsylvania, in October 1904. I 
studied in the office a year before starting in the Law SchooL 
I do not graduate until June 1907. 

"I am not married. I have received no d^rees in any other 
institution of learning as yet. I have published no articles, 
books or pamphlets. I have joined no social, religious or politi- 
cal organizations. I have taken no journeys of any moment 
since leaving college. Letters will always reach me at 1102 
Frick Building, or better, Greenville, Mercer County, Pa,, from 
which point they will be forwarded to me wherever I am." 

William Durrie Waldron (B.A. 1903, LL.B. New York 
Law School 1905) was born in Stonington, Conn., June 11, 
1881, prepared at the Montclair (N. J.) High School and 
entered college with the Qass. 

His father, Jonathan Cooke Waldron, a stock broker, was 
bom in Philadelphia, Pa., the son of Nathaniel Waldron, a 
merchant of Philadelphia, and of Emeline (Graham) Waldron. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Clara Ailing Durrie, 
was the daughter of William Augustus Durrie, M.D., (Yale 
1843) 2"^d of Emma (Ailing) Durrie. 

WaJdron's Yale relatives include, besides his grandfather, an 
uncle, William Augustus Durrie (1876), an uncle by marriage, 
Hamilton WalHs (1863), and three first cousins: Alexander 
Hamilton Wallis (1893), Nathaniel Wallis (1897) and Qinton 
Geib Wallis (1897 S.). 



Waldron, J. F. Walker, 289 

In college he was a member of the Cross Country team four 
years, being Captain in Senior year, a member of the track team, 
winning third place in the mile run in the Harvard meet of 1901, 
also a mile runner on the Yale-Harvard International Track 
team. He was a member of Zeta Psi and held a Second Col- 
loquy Junior appointment and a First Colloquy Senior appoint- 
ment. 

He writes : "Upon leaving New Haven two days after Com- 
mencement, I spent the summer at home in Montclair and in 
the White Mountains, and on October i entered the New York 
Law School, with the intention of completing the two years' 
course there and then taking examinations for the New York 
bar. In November 1904 I was received in the office of Opdyke, 
Ladd and Bristow, lawyers, at 20 Nassau Street, New York, 
and from then on had opportunity of observing practice while I 
pursued my own law school studies. On June 10, 1905, I grad- 
uated from the New York Law School with the usual d^jree, 
LL.B., and then took the June bar examinations for New York 
State, hearing favorably from them the middle of July. The 
firm that I had been studying with kept me as a clerk and I 
began work in that office on September 5, trying to solve the 
intricacies of the general practice of law. 

"My home address is 79 North Moimtain Ave., Montclair, 
N. J., which is my present residence." 

James Frederick Walker was bom in Denver, Colorado, 
August 8, 1879, prepared at the Denver High School and 
entered with the Class, leaving at the end of Freshman year 
to enter West Point. 

His father, James Monroe Walker (M.D. St. Louis College 
of Physicians and Surgeons 1867), was born in Virginia Sep- 
tember 29, 1847, the son of Alfred Walker. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Caroline Moses, was 
the daughter of John Moses, who was a writer and historian 
of Illinois, a Civil War veteran and Secretary of Illinois. 

Walker graduated from the United States Military Academy, 
West Point, N. Y., June 13, 1905, standing 38 out of a class of 
114. He received his commission as Second Lieutenant of 
Artillery and is at present stationed at Fort Williams, Portland, 
Maine. His home address is 1265 Broadway, Denver, 
Colorado. 

19 



290 History of the Class of 1903, 

Raymond William Walker (B.A. 1903) was born in West- 
boro, Mass., March 22, 1878, prepared for college by private 
tutor and entered with the Qass. 

His father, Melvin Harvey Walker, a retired shoe manufac- 
turer of Gould and Walker, Westboro, was bom in Westboro 
January 23, 1842, the son of Silas Walker, Jr., and Louisa 
(Everett) Walker. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Annie Moses, was the 
daughter of William Moses and Pamela F. (Kidder) Moses. 

In college Walker was a member of the Freshman Glee Qub, 
the College Choir and Zeta Psi. He was editor of the Courant 
and Record, and held a First Dispute Jimior appointment and 
the same Senior appointment. M. H. Walker, Jr., (Yale 1909) 
is a brother. 

He writes : "Have been in New York in the advertising busi- 
ness since graduation except for a few months spent in recover- 
ing from eye trouble. Am now taking a course in English for 
an M.A. degree from Yale. Am in business with same people 
I went with in October 1903, then called the 'Bates Advertising 
Company.' " 

His address is care Knickerbocker Syndicate, 320 Fifth Ave., 
New York City. He lives at Bryn Mawr Park, Yonkers, N. Y. 
His permanent address is 35 Summer St., Westboro, Mass. 

Walter Bcrtrand Walker (B.A. 1903, LL.B. New York 
Law School 1905) was bom in Brooklyn, N. Y., December 9, 
1881, prepared at the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute and entered 
college in September 1899. 

His father, Walter Nunns Walker, of Hodenpyl and Walker, 
New York City, importers of precious stones, was bom in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., October 17, 1852, the son of James E. Walker 
and Maria (Nunns) Walker. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sadie Dana, died May 
20, 1891. She was the daughter of Daniel Dana of San Fran- 
cisco and of Sarah Phoebe (Cummings) Dana. 

In college Walker was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and held 
a High Oration Junior appointment and a High Oration Senior 
appointment. He received special honors in the social sciences 
in Senior year. 

He writes : "The fall of 1903 I entered the New York Law 



R. W. Walker, W. B. Walker, H. M. Wallace. 291 

Schcx>l. On August 18 of that year I had entered the Law 
Department of the Manhattan Railway Company, which subse- 
quently became the Law Department of the Interborough Rapid 
Transit Company. Thus I was doing office work, and at the 
same time was attending the sessions of the Law School during 
the day-time. This manner of employing my time continued 
until June of this year, 1905, when I was graduated from the 
New York Law School and received the degree of LL.B. 'with 
honor.' George E. Leonard, my partner, likewise received his 
degree 'with honor.' While at the Law School I was a member 
of the Delta Chi legal fraternity. I continued in the employ of 
the Interborough Rapid Transit Company during the summer 
of 1905 and until the first of November, 1905, when I resigned 
to form a partnership with George E. Leonard, my classmate at 
Yale and at the Law School. I was sworn in and admitted to 
the practice of law in the courts of the State of New York by 
the Appellate Division of the First Department on October 9, 
1905. The address which is the best to reach me at is 42 Broad- 
way, New York City." 

He lives at 318 West 88th St., New York City. 

Henry Mitchell Wallace (B.A. 1903) was born in Ansonia, 
Conn., January 12, 1881, prepared at Dr. Holbrook's School, 
Ossining, N. Y., and at the Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., 
and entered with the Class. 

His father, John Bryant Wallace, an electrical engineer of 
Chicago, was born in Ansonia, Conn., July 5, 1858, the son of 
Thomas Wallace and Ellen (Bryant) Wallace. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Mitchell, was 
the daughter of Charles M. Mitchell and Mary Ann (Foote) 
Mitchell. 

Two uncles preceded Wallace at Yale: F. W. Wallace (1889) 
and H. S. Wallace (1901). 

In college he was captain of the Freshman eleven and played 
left end. He was a member of Eta Phi, Psi Upsilon and Skull 
and Bones societies. He has been in brass manufacturing since 
graduation and is now Assistant Superintendent of the Ansonia 
Brass and Copper Company. He lives at 76 North Cliff St., 
Ansonia, Conn. 



292 History of the Class of 1903, 

Walter Franklin Wallace (B.A. 1903) was born in Chicago, 
111., May 9, 1881, prepared at the St. John's School, Manlius, 
N. Y., and entered college with the Class. 

His father, John Florian Wallace, a hardware manufacturer, 
died in July 1886. He was born in Albany, N. Y., in September 
1848, the son of John Florian Wallace. 

His mother, ,whose maiden name was Josephine Mary Hurber, 
was the daughter of John A. Hurber. 

He writes: "i. When I left college in the spring of 1903 I 
was pretty tired of loafing and worse. I immediately started in 
at A. C. McClurg and Company in the publishing department. 
I fancied I had a small drag but quickly discovered that small 
drags are worse than no drags at all. A few months later I 
answered an advertisement in the paper and secured a position 
on The American Artisan and Hardware Record, This is a 
trade paper, reaching the hardware retailers of the country. I 
worked on the paper for over two years and finally rose to a posi- 
tion as managing editor. I expect to leave in about a month 
and take up publishing trade papers on my own hook. 

"4. I have not been honored by having my name appear on 
the title page of any publication, though of course as editor of 
this paper I have often rushed to print. I have contributed 
articles to a number of other trade papers on technical subjects. 
I regret that I cannot give you a list of the papers or even the 
titles of the articles. 

"7. Although I have made very few trips since graduating 
from college and settling in Chicago and though these were only 
short business trips, I have floated from one section of the city to 
the other, from hotel to hotel and back and forth until I believe 
I have had at least eighteen different mailing addresses. I am 
now settled permanently at 87 Astor Street." 

Arthur Allen Ward (B.A. Western College 1901, B.A. Yale 
1903) was bom in Odon, Ind., July 15, 1874, prepared at the 
Preparatory Department of Western College and at Oberlin 
Academy, and entered Yale at the beginning of Senior year. 

His father, Philip Shepler Ward, a farmer, died January 25, 
1905. He was bom in Winesburg, Holmes County, Ohio, 
September 2, 1830, the son of Jesse Ward and Rachel (Shepler) 
Ward. 



W. F. Wallace, A. A. Ward, F. Ward. 393 

His mother, whose maiden name was Margaret Fry, was the 
daughter of Moses Fry and Catherine (Bash) Fry. 

In college Ward held a High Oration Senior appointment. 

He writes, January 1906: "I accept the position of teacher 
of English literature in Jaffna College, Vaddukkoddai, Ceylon, 
and sailed for Ceylon in August 1903, going via Liverpool, 
London, Paris, Geneva, Marseilles and Port Said. I arrived 
at Vaddukkoddai September 20, 1903, and immediately assumed 
my duties trying to awaken in the Tamil youth an appreciation 
of the glories of our language. During the year 1904 I served 
as Secretary of the North Ceylon Union of Y. M. C. A's. I 
expect to sail for the U. S. A. on February 24, 1906, going 
via Hong Kong, Japan and Portland. Permanent address, 
Odon, Ind." 

And later, July 1906: "Early in the present year my term of 
service in Jaffna College being completed I started for America, 
leaving Colombo February 25. I came home via the Pacific 
route, thus completing a trip around the world. En route I 
stopped at Penang and Singapore in the Straits Settlements, 
the magnificent port of Hong Kong, spent a week with a brother 
at Canton, the most populous and dirtiest city in China, then 
north to Shanghai and across to Japan, stopping at Nagasaki, 
Kobi, Yokohama and Tokio. The voyage from Yokohama to 
Seattle was made in the steamship Minnesota, one of the largest 
and most comfortable vessels afloat. There is a possibility that 
I would have been in the San Francisco disaster if I had decided 
to come by that route, as the ship I would have taken reached 
that port only a little time before the earthquake. Am spending 
the summer of 1906 at home, but expect to be off to the tropics 
again in the autumn." 

His address is Odon, Ind. 

Freeman Ward (B.A. 1903) was born in Yankton, S. D., 
August 9, 1879, prepared at the Yankton College Academy, 
entering Yale at the beginning of Junior year, coming from 
Yankton College. 

His father. Rev. Joseph Ward (Brown 1865), a Congrega- 
tional clergyman, died December 11, 1889. He was the founder 
and President of Yankton College. He was born in Perry 
Center, Wyoming County, N. Y., May 5, 1838, the son of 



i 



294 History of the Class of 1903. 

Jabez Ward, M.D., of Perry, N. Y., and of AuriUa (Tufts) 
Ward. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Frances Wood, 
was the daughter of Joseph Wood, a cotton manufacturer of 
Central Falls, R. I., and of Phila Thayer (Freeman) Wood. 

In college Ward was a member of Sigma Xi and held an 
Oration Senior appointment. A brother, Sheldon Ward, was 
in the Qass of 1906. 

He writes : "Ever since graduation I have been doing post 
graduate work in geology at Yale, with the intention of 
ultimately receiving a Ph.D. Have also been assistant in geol- 
ogy, — the first two years in the academic department under 
Prof. H. E. Gregory; this present year over at ShefF. under 
Prof. L. V. Pirsson, and also have been assisting Prof. S. L. 
Penfield and Dr. Ford ia Mineralogy. Besides this 'assisting' 
I have also been teaching geology over at Sheff . this year. The 
summers I have spent in various ways. The first summer, 
1903, I was in the hospital in New Haven nearly all the 
time — typhoid fever. The next summer, 1904, I worked in 
the University carpenter shop. This past summer, 1905, I 
have been working for the Connecticut State Geological Survey. 
I expect to be at Yale for another year at least." 

His address is 569 Yale Station, New Haven, Conn. His 
home address is 512 Mulberry St., Yankton, S. D. 

Samuel Dwight Ward (B.A. 1903) was born in Albany, 
N. Y., April 15, 1880, the son of Samuel B. Ward, M.D. He 
prepared at the Albany Academy, and entered college with the 
Qass of 1902, joining 1903 at the beginning of Sophomore 
year. 

In college Ward played on the 1902 Freshman eleven, was 
substitute half back on the University eleven and a member of 
Delta Kappa Epsilon. Erastus Coming (Yale 1903) is a half 
brother. 

After graduation he took a position in the lumber camp of 
Alger Smith and Company, Knife River, Minn. He left them 
in 1906 to take a position in the electrical department of the 
New York Central Railroad. His address is Room 9, New 
York Central Railroad Company, Grand Central Station, New 
York City. 



S. W. Ward, Waring, A. W. Warner. 295 

Antonio Johnston Waring (B.A. 1903) was born in 
Savannah, Ga., November 27, 1881, prepared at the Lawrence- 
ville (N. J.) School and entered college in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Antonio de Gogorza, deceased, a cotton and 
lumber merchant, also Portuguese Consul, was bom in Carta- 
gena, Spain, July 17, 1852, the son of Antonio de Gogorza and 
Maria (Zuarez) de Gogorza. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Annie Johnston Waring, 
resumed her maiden name of Waring in 1883. She was the 
daughter of James Johnston Waring (Yale 1850) and Mary 
Brewton (Alston) Waring. 

Waring's Yale relatives besides his grandfather include a 
brother, James J. Waring (1904 S.); three uncles, Pinckney 
A. Waring, of the Class of 1881, James Johnston Waring 
(1887), and Thomas P. Waring (1889); and a first cousin, 
W. Frederick Waring (1891 S.). 

In college Waring was chairman of the Yale Literary Maga- 
zine, won a Henry James Ten Eyck second prize in Junior 
year and was the John Bennetto Scholar in Senior year. He 
was Secretary cif Phi Beta Kappa, a member of Chi Delta Theta, 
Psi Upsilon and Skull and Bones societies and held a High 
Oration Junior appointment and the same Senior appointment. 

The first year after graduation he spent in New Haven as 
Secretary of the Academic Department of the Yale University 
Christian Association. He entered the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York City, in the 
fall of 1904 and expects to get his M.D. in 1908. His present 
address is 527 Madison Ave., New York City. His home 
address is 3 Perry St. West, Savannah, Ga. 

Arthur Woodward Warner (B.A. 1903) was born in 
Thomaston, Conn., February 8, 1881, prepared at the Torring- 
ton (Conn.) High School and entered college in September 
1899. 

His father, Henry Randall Warner, who died January 20, 
1891, was in the livery stable business in Thomaston. He was 
bom in Thomaston August i, 1856, the son of Frederic E. 
Warner, a farmer of Thomaston, and of Ruth (Sum) Warner. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Emma Augusta Wood- 
ward, was the daughter of Israel B. Woodward, a banker and 
tanner of Thomaston, and of Caroline (Everett) Woodward. 



296 History of the Class of 1903, 

In college he held a Dissertation Junior appointment and a 
Dissertation Senior appointment. Edward Thomas (Yale 
1899) and Fred W. Laubin (1902 S.) are cousins. 

He writes: "I have been with the Riter-Conley Manufac- 
turing Company since graduation. About half this time has 
been spent in the shops getting practical mechanical experience. 
The rest of the time has been put in as a mechanical draughts- 
man at the Pittsburg offices. I hope eventually to become a 
mechanical engineer." 

His business address is care Riter-Conley Mfg. Co., 55 
Water St., Pittsburg, Pa. He lives at 416 Little St., Sewickley, 
Pa. His home address is Torrington, Conn. 

George Plimpton Warner was bom in Buffalo, N. Y., 
January 15, 1881, prepared at The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa., 
and entered with the Class, leaving in Junior year. 

He was the son of William Carlyle Warner of Buffalo, N. Y., 
and of Mary Sophia (Plimpton) Warner. 

In college he was a member of Zeta Psi. 

He was married in Buffalo, N. Y., April 14, 1904, to Miss 
Emma Pearl Letchworth, daughter of Ogden Pearl Letchworth, 
President of the Pratt and Letchworth Company. 

Warner has been since leaving college with the Pratt and 
Letchworth Company, 189 Tonawanda St., Buffalo, N. Y., 
wholesale hardware merchants, and is at present Assistant 
Superintendent. He lives at 605 Niagara St. 

Irving Henry Warner (B.A. 1903) was born in Fairport, 
N. Y., December 27, 1879, prepared at the Fairport High School 
and entered college in the fall of 1899. 

His father, Samuel Warner, a fruit grower of Fairport, was 
born in the town of Potter, Yates County, N. Y., August 9, 
1843, the son of Samuel Warner, a farmer, and of Magdalene 
(Walters) Warner. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Maria Jane Sammers, 
died August 30, 1893, and was the daughter of Edward Sam- 
mers and Mary (Feakins) Sammers. 

In college Warner was a member of the University Gym- 
nastic team and of the University Band. He held a Second 
Colloquy Junior appointment and a First Colloquy Senior 
appointment. Horace Warner (Yale 1899) is a first cousin. 



G. P., I. H. Warner, Washington, B. Webster, 297 

He writes : "I spent the summer at home after graduation till 
August S, when I went to St. Louis, Mo. The following day I 
began work for the Simmons Hardware Company of that city. 
I worked for them until the ist of November 1905, when I re- 
signed, having occupied positions in several of their depart- 
ments. I left New Haven June 26, 1903. I have never been 
married and dare not entertain such hopes. Have nothing to 
say in answer to 3, 4, 5, 6. My permanent address would be 
Fail-port, N. Y., R. F. D. No. 8. As far as I know my address 
for some time will be St. Mary's, Pa., P. O. Box 122, but perhaps 
the former will be the better address. I will also pass on 8 
and 9. I am at present too unsettled to make any statement as 
to my future." 

George Augustine Washington (B.A. 1903, LL.B. Harvard 
1906) was bom in Wessyngton, Tenn., October 27, 1879, pre- 
pared at the Central High School and Friends Select School of 
Washington, D. C, and entered with the Class. 

His father, Joseph Edwin Washington (Georgetown 1872), 
is a planter of Wessyngton and was a member of Congress from 
1886 to 1896. He was bom in Wessyngton in 1851, the son of 
George Augustine Washington, a planter of Wessyngton, and 
of Jane (Smith) Washington. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Mary Boiling Kemp, 
was the daughter of Wyndham Kemp, a lawyer of Gloucester 
County, Virginia, and of Seigniora Peyton (Boiling) Kemp. 

Washington's Yale relatives include a brother, Joseph E. 
Washington, Jr. (1905 S.), and a brother-in-law, Augustus S. 
Blagden (1901 S.). 

In college he was a member of Alpha Delta Phi. Since 
graduation he has been studying law at Harvard, getting his 
degree in June 1906. 

His permanent address is Wessnygton, Tenn. 

Bradford Webster (B.A. 1903, LL.B. University of Louis- 
ville 1906) was born in Waterbury, Conn., February 18, 1881, 
prepared at the Waterbury High School and entered college at 
the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Daniel Frederick Webster (Dartmouth 1874), 
a lawyer of Waterbury, died October 31, 1896. He was for- 
merly Mayor of Waterbury, and a State Senator. He was bom 



298 History of the Class of 1903. 

in Harwinton, Conn., March 19, 1853, the son of Frederick Buell 
Webster, who died in the Civil War, and of Cornelia (Buell) 
Webster. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Rogers Fox, 
was the daughter of John Bradford Fox, and Hannah H. (Hall) 
Fox. 

A brother, Benjamin Webster, is in the Class of 1907 Yale. 

In college Webster was a member of the Whist team and of 
Phi Beta Kappa. He won the DeForest Mathematical second 
prize in Freshman year, the Lucius Robinson third prize in 
Sophomore year and divided with Utley the Benjamin F. Barge 
Mathematical second prize in Sophomore year. He held a 
Philosophical Oration Junior appointment and a High Oration 
Senior appointment. 

He writes: "i. I left college in June 1903 and spent the 
summer in Waterbury tutoring and studying law. In Sep- 
tember I went to Blees Military Academy in Macon, Mo., which 
I left together with the superintendent and the other nine 
instructors or captains on the academic staff, to work out its 
future destiny without our assistance. I spent the summer of 
1904 in Waterbury tutoring and studying law, and in Sep- 
tember came to Louisville to teach mathematics, history and civil 
government in the University School of Louisville and to man- 
age their athletics and coach the football and basketball teams. 
In August 1905 I discovered what appeared to be good oil land 
in Shelby County, Ky., about thirty miles from Louisville, where- 
upon I leased 250 acres of land, organized the Kentucky Oil and 
Mining Company with $5,000 capital, raised the necessary 
money, purchased a drilling outfit, boiler, and engine, secured 
a field manager and driller and started work about a month 
ago. This well will probably be completed sometime in Janu- 
ary or February. In October I entered the University of Louis- 
ville Law School in the senior class, from which I shall graduate 
next April ( 1906) and start practicing law in Louisville. 

"2. Not married. 

"3. Law ; in University of Louisville Law School, one year. 
Expect to receive the degree of LL.B. next April (1906). 

"4. No publications except a few newspaper articles. 

"5. I am a Mason and a member of Louisville Lodge, No. 
400; a member of Broadway Methodist Church, Louisville. I 



E. F. Webster, Wenner. 299 

have given what little assistance I could to try to throw the 
rotten machine out of power in Louisville by serving as a poll 
worker during the days of registration and election in the tough 
precincts of Louisville this fall. 

"6. My journeys have been all in the United States. I have 
visited Baltimore, Washington, Pittsburg, Chicago, Cincinnati, 
St. Louis, Kansas City, Louisville and Mammoth Cave. 
"7. Permanent address: 900 Fifth St., Louisville, Ky." 
After graduating from the Law School he formed a partner- 
ship with Arthur C. Popham for the general practice of law 
with an office at 605 Louisville Trust Building, Louisville, Ky. 
His home address is Waterbury, Conn. 

Edward Franklin Webster (B.A. 1903) was bom in Rut- 
land, Vt., March 15, 1881, prepared at the Rutland High School 
and entered college in September 1899. 

His father, Edward Harvey Webster, a machinist and master 
mechanic of Rutland, Vt., was bom in Middlesex, Vt, June 27, 
1835, the son of Jonathan Webster and Philena (Currier) 
Webster. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Eleanor Millington, 
was the daughter of John Millington and Rachel (McKinney) 
Millington. 

In college Webster was a member of the Apollo Glee Club, 
a substitute on the University Glee Club and held a First Col- 
loquy Junior appointment and a Second Dispute Senior appoint- 
ment. 

He writes: "Since I left college at Commencement 1903 I 
have been learning the hardware business at the jobbing house 
of the Bronson and Townsend Company, New Haven, Conn., as 
receiving and stock clerk. I started here on July i, 1903, and 
shall probably remain with this concern until at least five years 
are completed, when I shall consider whether or not it is profit- 
able to continue. Owing to the nature of the work I have not 
entered into any outside activities to mention." 

His residence is 1305 Chapel St., New Haven, Conn. His 
home address is 13 Eugrem Ave., Rutland, Vt. 

George Unangst Wenner (B.A. 1903) was bom in Tallula, 
111., October 20, 1881, prepared at the St. John's School, Dela- 



J 



300 History of the Class of 1903. 

field, Wis., and at the Chapin Collegiate Schcx)!, New York 
City, and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Uriah Jacob Omega Wenner, of the Class of 
Yale 1871, who died September 19, 1891, was a lawyer. He 
was Judge of Probate, Salt Lake County, Utah, and was bom in 
Bethlehem, Pa., July 31, 1849, ^^e son of George Wenner, a 
commission merchant and California "forty-niner/* and of 
Sarah Ann (Unangst) Wenner. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Kate Yates Greene, 
was the daughter of William Graham Greene, a banker, and 
of Louisa Hurt (White) Greene. 

Wenner held in college a Second Colloquy Junior appoint- 
ment and a Second Colloquy Senior appointment. An uncle, 
Rev. George Unangst Wenner, g^duated from Yale in 1865. 

He writes : "I spent the summer of 1903 in New York City 
as salesman for the J. B. Williams Company. In September 
I entered the Harvard Law School in the Qass of 1906. By 
the summer of 1904 I began to realize the wisdom of lago's 
famous advice to Cassio, and set out to 'put money in purse.' 
I entered the employ of McArthur Brothers Company, rail- 
road contractors, on July 19, 1904, and remained with them 
until about the first of May 1905. They were building the 
Western Maryland Railroad, and my headquarters were in 
Cumberland, Md. I worked as Assistant Purchasing Agent, 
Time-keeper, Commissary Clerk, Line Rider, Paymaster, had 
charge of four different jobs, ran a canal boat, and branded 
mules. When I left McArthur Brothers I went to Utah, where 
I worked with sheep and cattle and on the Great Salt Lake. I 
'rushed' the Uintah Indian Reservation at its opening in August, 
traveling over six hundred miles on horseback. I got lots of 
glory from this trip but not much else. In September I came 
to Seattle, and entered the senior class in the Law School of 
the University of Washington. I left the Law School about 
the middle of October, continuing the study of law in the 
offices of Shank and Smith. On January 12, 1906, I was 
admitted to the bar and since then have practiced with Shank 
and Smith, 1002 Alaska Building. 

"My plans for the future are unsettled. I shall probably 
either remain in Seattle or go to Alaska. In either event I 



I 



Wescoit, Weston, 301 

shall continue practicing law. My permanent address is care 
the Alaska Club, Seattle, Wash/' 

He lives at 42CX) 14th Ave. N. E., Seattle, Wash. 

Ethan Pryor Wcscott (B.A.1903) was born in Haddon- 
field, N. J., December 14, 1881, prepared at the Williston 
Seminary, Easthampton, Mass., and entered college at the 
beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, John Wesley Wescott (Yale 1872), Judge of 
the Supreme Court of New Jersey, was bom in Waterford, 
N. J., February 21, 1849. 

His mother's maiden name was Frances Pryor. 

Wescott's YaJe relatives, besides his father, include two 
brothers, Harry D. Wescott (1901) and Ralph W. Wescott 
(1906), and two first cousins, Irving Fisher (1888) and 
Herbert W. Fisher (1898). 

In college he was Substitute Pitcher on the Freshman nine 
and on the University nine. He is at present studying law in 
the office of Wescott and Wain, 125 South 5th St., Philadelphia, 
Pa. He lives at Haddonfield, N. J. 

William Bums Weston was born in Whitefield, N. H., 
February 3, 1880, the son of Mrs. Ellen J. Weston. He pre- 
pared for college at the Phillips Academy, Exeter, N. H., and 
entered in the fall of 1899. 

In college he was on the University track team in Freshman 
and Sophomore years, winning second in the mile run in the 
Harvard meets of 1900 and 1901, and second in the mile mn 
in the Intercollegiate Meet in 1901. He was a member of the 
College Choir, University Glee Club, University Banjo and 
Mandolin Club, and of Delta Kappa Epsilon. He held a 
Second Colloquy Junior appointment, was associate editor of 
the Senior Class Book, and a member of the Class Supper 
Committee. 

Since June 1903 he has been connected with several firms: 
Cleveland Grains Drying Company, Qeveland, Ohio, a bond 
salesman with Lamprecht Brothers and Company, Cleveland, 
and is now with the Mason, Lewis and Company, bonds, 60 
Devonshire St., Boston, Mass. 



302 History of the Class of 1903. 

Edwin Reynolds Whitcomb (B.A. 1903) was born in Mil- 
waukee, Wis., April 11, 1881, prepared at the Milwaukee 
Academy and entered college at the beginning of Freshman 
year. 

His father, Henry Franklin Whitcomb, President of the 
Wisconsin Central Railroad Company, was born in Harmon, 
St. Lawrence County, N. Y., June 26, 1848, the son of Henry 
Franklin Whitcomb, M.D., and Maria Lydia (Torrey) 
Whitcomb. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Louisa Margaret Qock, 
was the daughter of James Bamet Clock, a railroad official, 
and of Eliza Jane (Simmons) Clock. 

In college Whitcomb was a member of the Apollo and 
University Glee clubs. Manager of the Basketball Association 
and a member of Alpha Delta Phi. He held a First Colloquy 
Junior appointment and a Second Colloquy Senior appoint- 
ment. Henry Franklin Whitcomb, Jr., (Yale 1906) is a 
brother. 

He writes: "Left college in June 1903. Traveled abroad 
for a few months and then returned to Milwaukee, Wis. 
Entered Wisconsin University October 1903 in civil engineer- 
ing department. Could not stand the pace after pleasant 
memories of Yale and left there December 1903. Entered 
General Superintendent's office, Wisconsin Central Railway, 
January 11, 1904. Worked there and in the Auditor's office 
of same railway until July 1905. Appointed Assistant Train 
Master Wisconsin Central Railway and commenced at that 
August I, 1905. Still in same position. Was made Vice 
President of the Central Wisconsin Land Company of Fond 
du Lac January 1905." 

He was married October 11, 1905, in Kenosha, Wis., to Miss 
Annis Louise Palmetier, daughter of the late Charles Palmetier. 

His business address is care Wisconsin Central Railway, 
Fond du Lac, Wis. His residence is 310 East Division St. 

Howard Sage White (B.A. 1903) was born in Bridgeport, 
Conn., April 10, 1880, prepared at the Taft School, Watertown, 
Conn., and entered college in September 1899. 

His father, Edward Luther White (Yale 1875 S.), died in 
1893. He was bom in Waterbury, Conn., in 1853, the son of 
J. Watson White and Anna S. (Wells) White. 



Whitcomb, H. S. White, /. R, White, W. O. White. 303 

His mother, whose maiden name was Laura Virginia Ogden, 
was the daughter of James L. Ogden and Emily M. (Wandell) 
Ogden. 

White's Yale relatives besides his father include a brother, 
Ogden W. White (1901), and two cousins, W. H. White 
(1900 S.) and G. L. White, Jr. (1901). 

In college he was a member of Alpha Delta Phi and held 
a Dissertation Junior appointment and the same Senior 
appointment. 

Since graduation he has been engaged in brass manufactur- 
ing with the American Ring Company of Waterbury. His 
residence is 21 Qiff St., Waterbury, Conn. 

John Richards White (B.A. 1903) was born in Providence, 
R. I., November 24, 1880, prepared at the St. Mark's School, 
Southboro, Mass., and entered college in the fall of 1899. 

His father, William Wurts White (University of Pennsyl- 
vania i860), a coal merchant of Providence, was bom in Phila- 
delphia November 3, 1842, the son of John Richards White 
and Caroline (Wurts) White. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Kate Merwin, was the 
daughter of EHas Merwin, a lawyer, and of Annie (Childs) 
Merwin. 

William Wurts White, Jr., (Yale 1905) is a brother. 

In college White was a Catcher on the Freshman nine and 
on the College nine. He was a member of He Boule, Psi 
Upsilon and Skull and Bones societies, and held a First Colloquy 
Junior appointment and a Second Colloquy Senior appointment 

After graduation he taught school for one year at the St 
Mark's School, Southboro, Mass., and then went into the coal 
business with his father with the firm of John R. White and 
Son, 27 Weybosset St., Providence, R. I. In the spring of 1906 
he gave up this work on account of health and in October 1906 
he will take up teaching permanently at the St. Mark's School. 

His permanent address is 150 George St., Providence, R. I. 

William Otis White (B.A. 1903) was bom in Terre Haute, 
Ind., June 5, 1879, prepared at The Hill School, Pottstown, Pa., 
and entered with the Class. 

His father, William Harvey White, a lumber manufacturer 



304 History of the Class of 1903, 

of Terre Haute, was born in Mertz, Ind., April 13, 1849, ^^e son 
of Granvel White and Evaline (Smith) White. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Martha Elizabeth 
Murphy, was the daughter of Isaah Murphy and Margaret 
(Williams) Murphy. 

In college White was a member of the Qass Supper Cc«n- 
mittee and of Delta Kappa Epsilon. He held a Second Col- 
loquy Junior appointment and a First Colloquy Senior 
appointment. 

Since graduation he has been in business with his father, 
William H. White and Sons, manufacturers of lumber and rail- 
road ties, 513 Ohio St., Cairo, 111. His home address is 1130 
South Sixth St, Terre Haute, Ind. 

Everett Martin Whittemore was bom in Dennis, Mass., 
February 21, 1874, prepared at the Mt. Hermon (Mass.) School 
and entered college in September 1899, leaving in the fall of 
Freshman year. 

His father, Henry Mastin Whittemore, who is in the painting 
and glazing business, was bom in Dennis, Mass., September 28, 
1841, the son of Hiram Whittemore. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Helen Burckes, was the 
daughter of Martin Burckes. 

Whittemore was married October 16, I90i,in Waterloo, Iowa, 
to Miss Elsie Maud Franklin, the daughter of Charles E. Frank- 
lin, a real estate broker of Kansas City, Mo. A daughter, 
Maud Franklin Whittemore, was born October 3, 1904. 

Since leaving college he has been with the Bumham, Hanna, 
Munger Dry Goods Company of Kansas City and holds now the 
position of Cashier. He lives at 3624 Garfield Ave., Kansas 
City, Mo. 

Willis Savage Whittlesey (B.A. 1903) was bom in Morris, 
Conn., April 18, 1875, prepared at the Mt. Hermon (Mass.) 
School and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Samuel Averill Whittlesey, a farmer of Morris, 
was bom in New Britain, Conn., August 7, 1845, the son of 
David Waller Whittlesey, a farmer, and of Dolly B. (Averill) 
.Whittlesey. 



Whittemore, Whittlesey, Wickwire, 305 

His mother, whose maiden name was Ada Isabel Savage, was 
the daughter of Willis S. Savage, a farmer, and of Ulyssa 
(Morse) Savage. 

In college he was a member of the College Choir and Zeta 
Psi. A great uncle, Gen. Eliphalet Whittlesey (1842), and 
a first cousin, Wilfred W. Savage (1894S.), are among 
Whittlesey's Yale relatives. 

He was married November 17, 1904, at Mile Square Road, 
Yonkers, N. Y., to Miss Emily Henderson Craven, daughter 
of Alfred Craven, the Deputy Chief Engineer of the Rapid 
Transit Commission of New York City and a graduate of the 
United States Naval Academy in 1867. 

Whittlesey is the Treasurer of the Charles E. Sholes Com- 
pany and of the Georgetown Chemical Works, with an office 
at 164 Front St., New York City. He lives at Mile Square 
Road, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Theodore Harry Wickwire, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was bom in 
Cortland, N. Y., April 6, 1879, prepared at the Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., and entered college with the Class. 

His father, Theodore Harry Wickwire, of Wickwire Brothers, 
was bom in Cortland, N. Y., March 30, 185 1, the son of Ray- 
mond Wickwire, a farmer, and of Elmira (Greenman) Wick- 
wire. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Emma Viola Wood- 
mansee, was the daughter of Jere Woodmansee, a farmer, and 
of Harriet (Redfield) Woodmansee. 

Two brothers have also attended Yale : Jere Raymond Wick- 
wire (1906) and Ward Alington Wickwire (1908 S.). 

He writes: "Since leaving Yale with the Qass of 1903 I 
have been employed by Wickwire Brothers, Cortland, N. Y., 
a firm composed of my father and uncle, also three first cousins, 
A. Stilson, E. Stilson and C. Wickwire. The firm manufac- 
tures steel, steel wire rods, wire of all kinds, wire nails, wire 
netting and wire cloth. I am now a director. 

"I was married on October i, 1903, to Sophie Bremner Hedge, 
daughter of Charles Gorham Hedge of Brooklyn, the Vice 
President and Treasurer of the M. K. & T. R. R. system. We 
have not had any children. 

"I am a member of the Yale Club of New York, Secretary 
20 



I 



3o6 ^ History of the Class of 1903, 

of the Cortland Science Club, member of the American Chem- 
ical Society, Syracuse Technology Club, Municipal Civil Ser- 
vice Commission as President at present, director Second 
National Bank of Cortland, director Cortland Water Works. 

"My woric has been with the above firm as Assistant Chemist, 
Chief Chemist and then Superintendent of Open Hearth and 
now I am General Manager of Steel Department." 

His residence is 64 Tompkins St., Cortland, N. Y. 

♦Thomas Edward Wilde was bom January 12, 1879, at 
Fort Madison, Iowa, prepared for college at the Central High 
School, Washington, D. C, and entered Yale with the Class of 
1902. He left after a year to teach school, returning at the 
beginning of Sophomore year as a member of 1903. Soon after 
Christmas he was suddenly taken ill with typhoid fever, and died 
in New Haven, Saturday, February 23, 1901, having been a 
member of the Class for only one term. 

His father, Thomas Arthur Dack (deceased), was of Revolu- 
tionary stock. 

His mother, Emily Jane (Sargent) Wilde, now living at 
Fort Madison, while of English descent, has spent most of her 
life in this country. She is the daughter of Richard Bell 
Sargent, a farmer, born at Barrow-on-Humber, Lincolnshire, 
Elngland, and of Sarah E. (Sheppard) Sargent. 

As a boy he loved the companionship of his mother, with whom 
he read constantly. He early showed a fondness for literature 
and history, and he particularly loved biography. At twelve 
he had begun what he called his "constitution" — ^putting down 
what he read, and what he thought of things going on about 
him. As he grew older he determined to study law either at 
Harvard or at Columbia, with the hope of eventually entering 
political life — holding before himself as an ideal, the highest 
type of statesmanship. His marked fearlessness would have 
proved of great service to him. This trait of character was well 
known to his boy friends, for if they ever did anything which he 
knew to be wrong, he was quick to tell them on what ground he 
stood, and in so doing he never lost their friendship. 

In 1895 his family moved to Washington, D. C, where he 
entered the Central High School. The following tribute, writ- 
ten by a schoolmate and published shortly after his death, shows 




THOMAS EDWARD WILDE. 



% 



Wilde, soy 

plainly the place he held in the hearts of those whom he knew 
in Washington : "Never have I seen him do a thing or utter a 
word that would indicate malice toward any person, or even 
indifference to the feelings of others. Never have I known him 
to take advantage of another's weakness or use an artful evasion 
to escape any responsibility. In fact he had the instinct, the 
training, and the inborn manner of a gentleman. He was 
generous and brave and tender and true. The innate chivalry of 
his nature won him many friends, and so endeared him to them 
that in their hearts his loving memory will abide forever. He 
was a splendid type of Western manhood in his great physical 
strength, mental vigor and moral firmness. He needed a big 
body to hold his big heart, and a fine physique to correspond 
with his healthy mind. It was his great heart and clean mind 
that made his friendship and companionship so wholesome and 
so precious." 

He remained in the high school until the end of junior year, 
when he changed his plans and determined to prepare for col- 
lege at once. Day in and day out, during one of the longest and 
hottest simimers, he accomplished an enormous amount of 
work, and entered Yale in the fall of 1898 with the Class of 1902. 
A teacher who early recognized his exceptional qualities writes 
of his work in preparation for the Yale examinations, — "The 
task was almost superhuman, but he had to pull himself up and 
he did — nothing ever stood in his way when once he made up his 
mind. He had a splendid mind and an excellent memory." 

After Christmas of Freshman year with 1902 he showed his 
spirit and and love for athletics by going out for the crew. He 
stood six feet in height and weighed one hundred and eighty- 
six pounds. In the preliminary work he did well, but on account 
of a severe cold which developed into pwieimionia he was kept 
out of college till after the Easter vacation. By the end of the 
year, notwithstanding his illness, he had made up the work in 
which he had been conditioned on entering — ^handicapped as 
he had been because of but three years of preparation. 

In the fall of 1899 on finding it necessary to give up college 
for a year he taught mathematics and history at Dummer 
Academy, South Byfield, Massachusetts. The work proved 
most enjoyable to him, associated as he was with both Harvard 
and Yale men, and in his diary he wrote, — ^"I have at the most 



3o8 History of the Class of 1903. 

only two days more in this fairyland, and were it not against 
my principles to be sad for any cause, I should certainly be sad 
at leaving here. I wonder if any subsequent year of my life 
will ever be crowded with such pleasant and beneficial experi- 
ences. The study, the teaching, the disciplining, the becoming 
familiar with the workings of an academy from a teacher's 
standpoint, the uplifting associations, the sports, the initiation 
into the social life of a strange place in the role of teacher, the 
habituation to responsibility, the adventures, and the everlasting 
influence of a simple healthful existence, make my heart beat 
with thanksgiving to Him who has thrown all these happy 
things about me. I am not sorry I did not return to college 
last fall, but I will rejoice to return in September." The head 
master of the Academy writes, "His physical size and strength 
conveyed the impression of manly force and character, which 
his conduct well bore out. His frank boyish manner, genial 
open-heartedness and high-minded purity, drew our hearts to 
him. In all of his work he was cheerful but earnest, working 
for the best results with high ideals. He entered into the boys' 
sports with the same good fellowship which he displayed in our 
faculty literary meetings. We constantly remember him and 
frequently recall to one another the enjoyable hours we had 
with him." 

"Ed" Wilde, as he was known in 1902, became a member of 
our Class at the beginning of Sophomore year. He made in 
1903 a few very close friends, but most of his friendships had 
been formed earlier among the members of the class ahead. 
Again he expressed his fondness for athletics by trying for the 
football team, which he enjoyed to the fullest extent. 

Dean Wright has sent this tribute — "I shall never forget 
Wilde. He was an earnest, conscientious student, though not 
a high scholar; rather retiring; always sincere; manly and 
true. He must have been a delightful companion to those who 
knew him intimately." 

While with us his classroom work revealed his eagerness 
to know things and to know them through and through. He 
was one of the small number of men who take an equal and 
serious interest in the widely separated pursuits of mathematics 
on the one hand and literary and linguistic studies on the other. 

It is impossible to remember him without thinking of the 



Wilhelmi, 309 

sweet smile which always lighted his face. Never was there vis- 
ible to his most intimate friends a trace of sorrow or despond- 
ency. His whole-souled infectious laugh was typical, and 
nothing was more characteristic than his perception of the 
humorous side of life. He was appreciative, but not only this, 
he constantly showed his appreciation to those about him. He 
was the sort of fellow whose unconscious influence tended to 
uplift even those who did not know him well, for his outlook 
upon life was always bright and hopeful. He knew the evil 
in the world and in the college world, but he would not allow it 
either to shake his optimism or to enter his own life. 

One of the leading men in the Class of 1902 adds — "His 
judgment of men and of things, though kindly, was keen, and he 
was fitted for knightly service in life's battle. His fellowship 
was genial, his ideals pure. I never have known a man more 
honest and transparent in his friendships and in his daily life. 
I valued him highly as a friend, and 1903 sustained by his death 
a distinct loss." 

Dudley P. Lewis. 

Frederick William Wilhelmi (B.A. 1903) was born in Fort 
Randall, Dakota, September 7, 1879, prepared at the Phillips 
Academy, Andover, Mass., and entered with the Class. 

His father, Louis Wilhelmi, who died April 19, 1886, entered 
the United States army in 1875 and at his death was a first 
lieutenant and adjutant in the First Infantry. He was born in 
Berleburg, Prussia, October i, 1849, the son of Frederick 
William Wilhelmi, a major in the 17th Royal Prussian Infantry, 
and of Wilhelmina Stark (Von Wittenstein) Wilhelmi. Mrs. 
Wilhelmi was the daughter of Prince Ludwig Von Witten- 
stein, an officer under Frederick the Great. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Julia Pauline Malsan, 
was the daughter of Henry Morris Malsan and Sarah Eliza- 
beth (White) Malsan. Mr. Malsan was a great-grandson of 
Robert Morris, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. 
Mrs. Malsan was the granddaughter of Judge Hugh White 
of Whitestown, N. Y. 

In college Wilhelmi played right half back on the Freshman 
eleven and substitute end on the University eleven. He was a 
member of the Sophomore German Committee, the Junior Pro- 



3IO History of the Class of 1903. 

menade Committee, and the Class Day Committee. He was on 
the campaign committees of Eta Phi and Delta Kappa 
Epsilon and was a member of Skull and Bones. 

Since graduation he has been in the lumber business. His 
address is care Walker County Lumber Company, Elmina, 
Texas. 

Lewis Alfred Williams, Jr., (B.A. 1903) was born in Lake- 
side, Ohio, June 24, 1883, prepared at the Mount Pleasant 
Academy, Ossining, N. Y., ^d entered college at the beginning 
of Freshman year. 

His father, Lewis Alfred Williams, of the Publishing Society 
of New York, was bom in Bellevue, Ohio, January 22, 1849, 
the son of David Williams and Rebecca (Elliot) Williams. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Boalt, was 
the daughter of Stephen Boalt and Charlotte M. (Shourds) 
Boalt. 

Since graduation Williams has been in business with his 
father with the Publishing Society of New York, 41 Lafayette 
Place, New York City. He lives at 48 Albert St., Plainfield, 
N.J. 

Orion James Willis (B.A. 1903) was born in Prairie Plains, 
Tenn., January 25, 1878, prepared at the Winchester (Tenn.) 
Normal College and entered Yale at the beginning of Freshman 
year. 

His father, Thomas Henderson Willis, a planter of Man- 
chester, Tenn., was bom in Prairie Plains, Tenn., May 19, 
1855, the son of Peter Willis and Amanda (Amett) Willis. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Clark, was the 
daughter of James Andrew Clark and Emilia (Wilkinson) 
Qark. 

H. H. Clark (Yale 1903) is a first cousin. 

In college Willis was editor of the Pot-Pourri, President of 
the University Baseball Association, a member of the Ivy 
Committee, President of the Southern Club and a member of 
Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha Delta Phi and Scroll and Key societies. 
He held a High Oration Junior appointment and an Oration 
Senior appointment. 

He writes: "On leaving college I began work, or rather 



Williams J Willis, Winch, Wing, 311 

labor, in the mills of my present company (American Sheet 
and Tin Plate Company) at Vandergrift, Pa. The following 
winter I spent in their sales office in New Orleans. I was then 
returned to mill work in Ensley, Ala., where six months were 
spent in open hearth furnace work, after which four months 
were spent in the tin plate mills at Cambridge, Ohio, Bridge- 
port, Ohio, and Wheeling, West Virginia. I then spent a 
month in their general offices at Pittsburg, Pa., before coming 
to their sales office in Chicago, where I am now located." 

His business address is care American Sheet and Tin Plate 
Company, Chicago, 111. His residence is 30 Walton Place. 
His home address is Manchester, Tenn. 

William Ladd Winch was bom in Enfield, Conn., November 
29, 1879, prepared at the Williston Seminary, Easthampton, 
Mass., and entered college in September 1899. 

His father. Rev. George William Winch (University of 
Vermont 1870), is a Congregational clergyman. He was bom 
in Northfield, Vt., August 4, 1845, ^^ son of William Winch 
and Lydia (Nye) Winch. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Hannah Elizabeth 
Ladd, was the daughter of Jabez Ladd and Martha (Wright) 
Ladd. 

Winch entered the employ of the American Writing Paper 
Company of Holyoke, Mass., in the fall of 1903. In Septem- 
ber 1905 he entered the Yale Law School and expects to get 
his LL.B. in 1908. His present address is 114 High St., New 
Haven, Conn. His home address is 57 Pearl St, Holyoke, 
Mass. 

Wilson Gordon Wing (B.A. 1903) was born in Valparaiso, 
Chili, August I, 1 88 1, prepared at Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, 
Conn., and entered college at the beginning of Freshman year. 

His father, Wilson Dorr Wing, a retired lumberman of 
Bangor, Maine, was born in Somerset Mills, Me., the son of 
Wilson Wing, a lumberman of Somerset Mills, Me. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Flint, was the 
daughter of Ambrose Cushing Flint, Register of Probate of 
Bangor for 30 years, and of Caroline (Farnsworth) Flint. 

In college Wing was a member of the University Banjo and 



312 History of the Class of 1903. 

Mandolin Club, and of Alpha Delta Phi. He took special 
honors in Economics, and graduated with a Second Colloquy 
Senior appointment. 

He writes : "Soon after graduation Eri Ostby, Byron Pierce, 
Lucian Kirtland and I, together with a Brown 1903 man named 
Blanding, took a corking trip around the world. We visited in 
the aggregate, Honolulu, Japan, China, Straits Settlements, Cey- 
lon, India, Arabia, Egypt, Italy, France, England and one or 
two small trips. All of us did not go to all the places I have 
mentioned, but some went to some, some to others. We took a 
unique trip in a house boat far into the interior of China and all 
in all received a finishing touch to our college course that 
worked wonders with every one of us. Soon after my return I 
received an offer from an influential man in Boston to come out 
here on a trip to California to look into some fruit interests he 
had out here. I did not expect to be gone more than six wedcs 
but found things in bad shape, took hold and was rewarded by 
being made Superintendent towards the last of the season of 
1903- 1904. The head man of the business having died and left 
affairs much involved, I took charge and practically ran things 
until this last October, when, owing to many complications and 
internal changes in the company I was working for, I left the 
company for good and all, withdrawing from the unhealthy 
excitement and worry of the fruit business here, which was 
throwing me into a rut and also making an old man of me before 
my time. 

"It occurred to me in view of the spare time I had on my 
hands until next June, when I expect to return east, that a 
knowledge of business law would be most practicable and 
valuable in every way, so I have just returned from a visit to 
Stanford University, where I went to see what I could get out of 
a course there. I find that I can get what I want and so will 
be located there for six months, at least, after January i, 1906. 
Have been mixed up in a small way in village politics and was 
elected a director in a water company here, capital over a 
million, and the manager of which is a Yale man, E. P. Newton, 
'97, I think. It made it pleasant for both of us to be associated 
in the same line. The name of the Company is the Temescal 
Water Company, made famous by recent important water litiga- 
tions. Although I am not active in any business at the present 



Wood. 313 

moment I am on one or two directors' boards, principally in the 
drug business. Have not made any fortune yet but have done 
as well as I expected though not as well as I hope to some time. 

"After my law course I may return east to look into one or 
two openings, but my heart is in the lumber business ; it is bred 
in the bone of course, for the lumber industry has called the 
Wing family for four successive generations. In this case I 
may go to Seattle." 

His home address is Bangor, Maine. 

William Basil Wood was born in Tuscaloosa, Ala., May 4, 
1881, prepared at the University School, Nashville, Tenn., and 
entered college with the Qass, leaving at the end of Sophomore 
year. 

His father, William John Wood (Wesleyan University, 
Florence, Ala., 1872), a lawyer of the firm of Blakey and Wood, 
Evansville, Ind., has been Indiana State Railroad Commissioner. 
He was born in Florence, Ala., March 30, 1850, the son of 
Sterling Alexander Milton Wood, a lawyer, and of Lelia (Left- 
wich) Wood. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Eugenie Ringold, was 
the daughter of Henry Morris Ringold, a planter, and of Euphe- 
mie (Story) Ringold. 

In college Wood was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

He writes: "I left Yale in June 1901, the end of Sophomore 
year. September i entered the Division General Freight Office 
of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company at Evansville, 
holding various desks until January i, 1902, when I resigned to 
go to Howell, Ind., with the same company, as Weigh Master, 
Inspector, Yard Clerk and Switchman. December i, 1902, was 
appointed local agent at Eldorado, 111. Held this place until 
August I, 1903. when was promoted to Chief Clerk, to Local 
Freight Agent, Henderson, Kentucky. On April 20, 1904, was 
promoted to position of Local Agent and General Yard Master 
for the Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company at Earling- 
ton, Ky. In August 1905 was appointed Chief Qerk to General 
Agent of Traffic Department of same company at Birmingham, 
Ala. In October 1905 was sent to Louisville, Ky., to handle 
rate desk in General Freight offices of the Louisville and Nash- 
ville Railroad. On December i, 1905, was appointed Contract- 



J 



314 History of the Class of 1903, 

ing Freight Agent of the Illinois Central Railroad Company 
with headquarters at Evansville, Ind., which position I now hold. 

"I am a non-resident member of the Eldorado, 111., City Club, 
Southern Club of Birmingham, Ala., also Country Club of 
Birmingham. I am a resident member of the following Evans- 
ville organizations: Crescent Club, Country Qub, Business 
Association, Accountants' Club, Winston Club, Assembly Qub." 

His business address is 126 Main St., Evansville, Ind. His 
residence is 1054 South First Street. 

George Eklward Woodbine (B.A. 1903) was bom in Bos- 
ton, Mass., April 29, 1876, prepared at the Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Mass., and entered college with the Class of 1902, 
joining 1903, after a year's absence, at the be^nning of Sopho- 
more year. 

His father, Mark Woodbine, was born in Worcestershire, 
England, November 11, 1849, the son of George Woodbine 
and Mary (Mogg) Woodbine. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Maria Townshend, was 
the daughter of Edward Townshend and Mary (Bushell) 
Townshend. 

In college Woodbine was a member of the College Choir, 
1902 Freshman Glee Club and the Apollo Glee Qub. He was 
a member of Phi Beta Kappa and of the Elihu Club, and held 
an Oration Junior appointment and a Philosophical Oration 
Senior appointment, graduating twelfth in rank. 

He writes : "The only facts in my career since leaving college 
that you could make use of are that I have held the Lamed 
Fellowship and Foote Fellowship and have been assistant in 
history while working for a Ph.D." 

His present address is 245 York St., New Haven, Conn. His 
home address is Harding, Mass. 

Harris Spring Woodman (B.A. 1903) was bom in Auburn, 
Maine, March 11, 1881, prepared at the Columbia Qassical 
Institute, Waterville, Maine, and after a year at Colby entered 
Yale in September 1899. 

His father, Joseph Cushman Woodman, who died January 
II, 1888, was bom in New Gloucester, Maine, the son of Prentis 
Mellen Woodman and Elizabeth (Cushman) Woodman. 



Woodbine, Woodman, Woodruff. 315 

His mother, whose maiden name was Kitty E. Spring, died 
June II, 1881, and was the daughter of Charles A. Spring. 

In college Woodman was a member of Delta Kappa Epsilon. 

Since graduation he Mas been in oil cloth manufacturing in 
Winthrop, Maine, first with the C. M. Bailey's Sons and Com- 
pany and at present with Wadsworth and Woodman. 

John Eastman WoodniCf (B.A. 1904) was bom in New 
York City January 8, 1881, prepared at the St. Paul School, 
Concord, N. H., and entered with the Qass, joining 1904 in 
September 1901. 

His father, Timothy Lester Woodruff (Yale 1879), is the 
President of the Smith Premier Typewriter Company and of 
the Provident Savings Life Assurance Society and was Lieu- 
tenant Governor of New York from 1898 to 1903. He was 
bom in New Haven, Conn., August 4, 1858, the son of John 
Woodruff, M.C., of New Haven, and of Harriet Jane (Lester) 
Woodruff. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Cora Eastman, died 
April 17, 1904. She was the daughter of Harvey G. Eastman, 
Mayor of Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and of Minerva (Clark) 
Eastman. 

In college Woodruff was a member of Psi Upsilon and Wolf's 
Head societies. 

He was married in Columbus, Ohio, May 26, 1905, to Miss 
Eugenie Gray Watson, daughter of the late Otway Watson. 
A daughter was born May 27^ 1906. 

He writes : "I took my degree in June 1904 and spent the first 
summer after graduation in the Adirondacks. I spent the fol- 
lowing winter in traveling about this country a good deal and 
for two months worked in the Smith Premier Typewriter Com- 
pany of Syracuse as an ordinary repair man. I entered the state 
of matrimony in May following and sailed abroad the first week 
of June. On arriving in England we went aboard the yacht 
'Erin' and with that popular English baronet who has tried so 
hard to lift the 'Cup' we spent a week sailing about the waters 
of the Solent. Then we took what I believe to be a record 
breaking automobile tour. We left Paris in our new 'Flat' car, 
which was delivered to us there on July i, and returned to Paris 
on July 28, having been gone just 27 days. During that 



3i6 History of the Class of 1903. 

time we covered 3000 miles, or no miles a day, and 
traversed all of France, Switzerland, Germany, part of 
Austria, all of Holland, Belgium and back through France. 
We took in all the chateau district of France, the 
Gordon-Bennett automobile race in Auvergne, France, 
climbed the two highest passes of the Alps, took in the exposi- 
tion at Liege, Belgfium, and got back to Paris without a hitch 
or breakdown of any serious character. I have read of several 
trips like this one but never of one in which so much ground was 
covered in so short a time. It was also a record breaker in the 
number of punctures, which amounted to 14, which cost us $620. 

"On my return I organized The Pneumelectric Machine 
Company for the manufacture of coal mining machinery, with 
a capital of $500,000. I hope to remain here in Syracuse about 
five years." 

His address is 716 James St., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Howard Spencer Woodward (B.A. Hiram College, Ohio, 
1902, B.A. Yale 1903) was born in Lordstown, Ohio, August 16, 
1877, attended the Preparatory School of Hiram College, and 
entered Yale at the beginning of Sophomore year. He took the 
Sophomore year at Yale, spent the next year at Hiram College 
and returned again at the beginning of Senior year. 

His father, Delbert King Woodward (fruit growing and 
insurance), was bom in Lordstown August 8, 1855, the son of 
Leonard Woodward, a farmer of Lordstown, and of Ann 
(Moherman) Woodward. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Anna Elizabeth Spencer, 
was the daughter of C. B. Spencer, a farmer of Chardon, O., 
and of Sophia (Foote) Spencer. 

In Yale he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, held a High 
Oration Junior appointment and a High Oration Senior appoint- 
ment. In Hiram he was President of the senior class and of 
the D. L. Society. He was the college representative in the 
Ohio Intercollegiate Oratorical Association and the winner and 
representative of the Ohio Association in the Interstate Oratori- 
cal Association. 

He writes : "Nothing of particular significance has happened 
to me since June 1903. Have been in no earthquakes, have 
no children, no wife, am not even engaged — at present — and 



Woodward, Work. 317 

can't tell when I am going to be. Went straight home from 
Yale after graduation and on account of my father's illness 
staid there until February 1904. The rest of that year and 
last year I spent at Harvard in the English department of the 
Graduate School. I remained in Cambridge a number of weeks 
last summer doing some library work, spent some time at home 
and began my woric at the Illinois State Normal University the 
nth of last September. I have to teach thru summer term 
of six weeks and consequently must miss Class Reunion, which 
I was hoping to be able to attend. Think at present there is 
nothing of particular significance even in my plans, which are 
in general to keep better things coming my way and do further 
university work. The how and when and where are problem- 
atical at the present stage of the game. 

"Have seen more or less of a number of the boys since leaving 
New Haven — had a large contingent at Cambridge — ^and Bill 
Searles and I have had a number of good times at Cleveland and 
at my home ; but I think I have no particular revelation to make 
regarding any of them." 

His address is Box 62, Normal, 111. His home address is 
Warren, Ohio. 

Gerald Stanton Work was born in Akron, Ohio, May 28, 
1880, prepared at the St. Paul School, Concord, N. H., and 
entered with the Qass, leaving at the close of Freshman year. 

His father, Alanson Work, who died October 29, 1881, was 
Vice President of the B. F. Goodrich Company. He was bom in 
Quincy, 111., March i, 1842, the son of Alanson Work and 
Aurelia (Forbes) Work. 

His mother, whose maiden name was Henrietta Willcox Lane, 
was the daughter of Anthony Lane and Elisabeth (Willcox) 
Lane. 

Since leaving college Work has been in rubber manufacturing 
with the B. F. Goodrich Company, Akron, Ohio. His address 
is Warkwolde, Perkins Hill, Akron, Ohio. 



THE NEW YORK DINNERS. 



THE FIRST DINNER. 

That spirit which did so much for Yale when the Qass of 1903 
was an undergraduate body evidently remains in the Qass as 
a graduate body. Since the time of the Hadley inaugural pro- 
cession, 1903 has always been noted for the spirit, dash and vim 
with which it did anything it started out to do. 

The dinner at the Yale Club in New York, January 2, 1904, 
proved it. In spite of the fact that the members of the Class 
are widely scattered, never could there have been a more enjoy- 
able affair of the kind. Seventy-six gathered around the festive 
board the day after New Year to give each other and the absent 
friends, many of whom were on the farther side of the globe, 
the toast of the season. 

The eminent medical prodigy and erstwhile thespian, Erastus 
Coming, did himself proud as master of the feast and well were 
his calls for speeches responded to by the following venerable 
graduates of the University. 

1903 at the Bar — ^not any old bar, . Harry Stem. 

Representing his Step Alma Mater. 

1903 in Medicine, . . . A. R. Lamb. 

The sheep has sought pastures new. 

1903 in Society, .... Gifford A. Cochran. 

Put not your trust in dogs — ^nor girls. 

A Blow from Chicago, . R. R. McCormick. 

He toiled not, neither did he spin. 

(This number on the prog^ram proved a real blow — Bertie having 
departed for Panama on a rush order — in spite of the fact that C. A. 
Moore, Jr., dispensed liquid air in place of the dweller on the banks of 
the Chicago river.) 

The Minutes of Our Last Meeting, Ziegler Sargent 

A hard working cuss with a cussed hard job. 

1903 as Viewed from the Faculty, . . . Prof. Williams. 

Would that there were more like him. 



The New York Dinners, 319 

It was the privilege and the pleasure of the Class to have as 
their guest Frank Lea Short, whose stories added greatly to the 
pleasure of the evening. Just previous to the singing of "Bright 
College Years," the "long distance cup" was presented by the 
Toastmaster, amid much glee and keen controversy as to the 
number of ties the various applicants had walked, in their 
endeavors to be present at the dinner. One, Ritchie McKee, a 
mule driver in the Scranton coal mines, having put in a claim 
that he had counted two million, was finally awarded the 
precious trophy. 

The committee in charge consisted of R. A. Granniss, Chair- 
man, B. Ellsworth, C. D. Green, and J. B. Thomas, Jr. 

The following members of the Class were present : — Berman, 
Bogue, Bond, Bragaw, Clement, Cochran, A. M. Collens, Con- 
diet,^ Coming, Cory, Craighead, Ellsworth, Fachiri, Fairbank, 
Fairbanks, Farrel, Fitch, Foster, Fox, Fulton, Furst, Gaines, 
Gleason, Granniss, Green, Greene, Haas, Hamlin, Hazard, Hess, 
Hooper, Hyatt, H. James, D. K. Johnston, W. P. Johnston, 
Knox, Lamb, Lane, Langley, Leonard, Lewis, McKee, McKes- 
son, H. C. MacLean, Melcer, C. A. Moore, Jr., F. W. Moore, 
Moulton, Plummer, Pratt, Rhoads, Rhodes, Roberts, Rogers, 
Rosenthal, Sargent, Sayre, Stem, Stevenson, Stillman, Strong, 
Terriberry, J. B. Thomas, Jr., Townsend, Tulin, Tyler, Upde- 
graff, Utley, VanderPoel, Waldron, S. D. Ward, H. S. White, 
J. R. White, Williams. 

Joseph B, Thomas, Jr. 



THE SECOND DINNER. 

The second annual dinner of the Class of 1903 was held at the 
Yale Club, New York City, on Friday, February 24, 1905. 
Eighty-five members attended. The long distance cup was 
claimed by L'Hommedieu, Minor and Bennethum. It developed 
however, during cross-examination, that the first man had 
travelled on a pass and had stopped on the way. The second 
lost on a similar technicality, and the prize went to Bennethum, 
of Minneapolis, Minn. A hoarse voice naming Yonkers as his 
point of departure was heard at frequent intervals during the 
discussion, but he was excluded from consideration on the 
ground that it was the distance from New York, not from civil- 
ization, that was being measured. 



320 History of the Class of 1903, 

When the "blackmail and tribute committee'* had rifled the 
congregation to their satisfaction, Erastus Corning, toastmaster, 
introduced the Faculty guest of the evening, Prof. Wm. B. 
Bailey. Prof. Bailey's former relations with so large a majority 
of the Class, together with an exceedingly clever and interesting 
speech, brought him most cordial greetings. Mr. Frank Lea 
Short, former coach of the Yale Dramatic Association, was the 
guest of honor. He also was warmly welcomed, and his stories, 
as usual, were full of life, and wit. Ziegler Sargent, Secretary, 
Albert R. Lamb and George S. Hurst represented the Class and 
one at a time stood on his feet and alternated remarks with 
the Class at large. An unexpected speech, probably on the sub- 
ject of rowing, was delivered, a la spirite, by another member 
under inspiration. The poet-laureate of Pittsfield was prevailed 
upon to read an extemporaneous paper, which he did. Some 
one near by said later that it was poetry. 

The Committee, R. A. Granniss, Jr., C. Douglass Green, J. B. 
Thomas, Jr., and Bradford Ellsworth were suitably extolled and 
reharnessed for another year's service. 

WORD-MAKERS. 
Toastmaster, Rat Corning Booth. 
An Advertisement of "Alumni In3urance 

Review and Obituaries," George Hurst. 

"How long, how long, O Lord?"— 6 ft. 4. 

Three Bleats and a Damn, .... by Lamb. 

From Poll's to Yale Dramatics, Frank Short 

"I am Short— but full of spirit." 

American Social Conditions as exemplified 

by 1903. For unsocial conditions see 1902, . Prof. William Bailey. 
"Eighty-three per cent of Vienna's female population 
are not what they should be." 

1903 Notes— Quite a number, Ziegler Sargent 

The following were present: — ^T. Andrews, Archbald,. 
Atwater, Beardsley, Bennethum, Herman, Bill, Bogue, Bowers, 
Qement, Cochran, Condict, Corning, Cory, Craighead, Crowe, 
Denno, Dodge, Dreisbach, DuPuy, DuVal, Ellsworth, Fair- 
banks, Fitch, Fulton, Furst, Gaines, Cans, F. C. Gilbert, Gleason, 
Goss, Granniss, Green, Greene, Haas, Hart, Howard, Hurst, 
Hyatt, Henry James, W. P. Johnston, Knox, Lamb, Lane, Leon- 



The New York Dinners. 321 

ard, Lewis, L'Hommedieu, Lockwood, McKesson, MacLean, 
Minor, F. W. Moore, Mullen, Ogden, Peckham, Plummer, Pratt, 
Rankin, Roberts, Rogers, Rosenthal, Sanford, Sargent, Sayre, 
Schley, B. M. Smith, Stern, Stevenson, Stillman, Stuart, Terri- 
berry, J. B. Thomas, Jr., Trenholm, Truett, Utley, VanderPoel, 
Van Deventer, Waddell, R. W. Walker, W. B. Walker, Waring, 
H. S. White, Wickwire, Williams, Woodbine, and in addition the 
two guests of the evening, Frank Lea Short and Prof. W. B. 
Bailey. 

Joseph B, Thomas, Jr. 



THE THIRD DINNER. 

Sixty-one men sat down to the third annual dinner of the 
Qass of 1903 at the Yale Qub, New York City, Saturday, April 
21, 1906. Much food and some drink were provided by the 
Committee, but, thanks to the generosity of George Sykes, the 
Oass was not allowed to go dry. The reunion was a happy and 
informal one. Three of Africa's best enlivened the game with 
gentle strains of music. "Scut" Ellsworth's yodel had lost 
none of its popularity and was called for again and again. No 
formal toasts had been arranged. The ex-boy actor. Dr. Corn- 
ing of Albany, presided and dispensed liquid air with a siphon 
bottle. He first called upon the guest of honor, Mr. Charles 
J. Fay, '93, who received a warm welcome and whose speech was 
frequently interrupted with applause and other signs of ap- 
proval. Oliver, Chairman of the Triennial, reported that he 
came clean from Pittsburg to tell the Class some news of the 
coming big reunion and to exhibit a real Triennial convict. 
After a few impromptu remarks from Cochran, J. McAllister 
Stevenson, Jr., was called upon to read an original poem which 
he happened to have in his pocket. Chairman Granniss, of the 
Dinner Committee, apologizing for inability to exhibit the Long 
Distance Cup, which had not yet arrived from the engraver's, 
called for candidates. West Lynn (Mass.), Albany, Easton 
(Pa.), Cincinnati, Rockland (Me.), Waterbury, Brooklyn, 
Ansonia (Conn.), Hartford, Cambridge (Mass.), New Haven, 
Philadelphia, Meriden, Pittsburg, and Yonkers all had claims. 
At first Oliver seemed to have it, but when Thorne Baker, from 
Cincinnati (744 miles), speaking at length offered to eat his 
21 



322 History of the Class of 1903. 

hat if he had not come more than 431 miles to attend the dinner, 
the Qass was unwilling to witness such a painful operation, and 
the longest man won. The short distance mug, a beautiful stein 
of massive proportions, was tossed to Hlsworth, who presented 
an unverified claim to a room on the floor below. An unusual 
feature was the informal visits made by several members of 
1904, including WoodruflF, once of 1903. When Winslow, 1904, 
besought by loud applause and cries for "speech," expressed a 
wish for a winning Triennial game, the resulting applause was 
more than half serious, for the Class has been witness to many 
•Commencement basieballl defeats. With a long cheer 1903 
adjourned to the piano to sing the old songs and to talk over the 
coming Triennial. 

Those present were: — ^Baker, Beardsley, Berman, Betts, 
Bloomer, Bowers, Bristol, Clement, Cochran, Condict, Coming, 
Craighead, Digney, Dreisbach, Dunham, DuVal, Ellsworth, 
Farrel, Frisbie, Gaines, Cans, Gleason, Granniss, C. D. Green, 
Haas, Hart, Hartjen, Hess, Hyatt, H. James, N. R. Jones, 
Knox, Lamb, Lane, Leonard, Littlefield, Lockwood, McKesson, 
D. B. MacLane, H. C. MacLean, Oliver, Plummcr, Pratt, 
Roberts, Robinson, Sargent, Sayre, Schley, Stem, Stevenson, 
Stillman, Stuart, Sykes, Terriberry, Townsend, Trenholra, Van 
Deventer, H. M. Wallace, Waring, H. S. White. 



THE CLASS OF 1492. 



The First Annual Qass of 1492 Dinner was held at the Yale 
University Dining Hall on Tuesday, June 26, 1905. Any man 
returning for Commencement week, whose class has not a 
r^ilar reunion, is a member of the "Qass of 1492." The 
name started so long ago that there is conflicting testimony 
as to its origin. At any rate, it is a good scheme, and members 
of 1903 who hereafter return to New Haven in "oflF" years arc 
advised to try it. 

The dinner was excellent, but a little late in starting. This, 
coupled with one or two long speeches, caused a large part of 
the three hundred and fifty alumni present to adjourn to the 
Campus to help celebrate the winning of the baseball champion- 
ship, and thereby to miss Coming's speech, the best of the even- 
ing. Judge William K. Townsend, '71.. presided over what he 
called the dinner of the class of "7 to 2" (referring to the after- 
noon's baseball victory), and Frank H. Simmons, '98, led the 
singing. The toast list contained some of Yale's best names: 
Hart Lyman, '73, William H. Kelsey, ^jy, Howard H. Knapp, 
'82, and Erastus Coming, '03. Two unplanned events caused 
much enthusiasm. The baseball team headed by Captain Bow- 
man appeared after their dinner smoking long fat cigars and 
were greeted with prolonged cheers. The other feature was of 
a diflFerent kind and suggested the "stunts" and the Glee Club 
reunion of this year (1906). William N. Runyon, '92, sang 
two remarkable solos : "Romeo and Juliet" and the "Antigone." 
It is unnecessary to mention the long lists of committees in 
charge; 1903 was ofiicially represented on the committee by 
Henry James. Besides Coming, who sat on the platform, the 
following members of the Class of 1903 were present : Condict, 
Granniss, Hess, Hogan, McQintock, Peckham, Roberts, 
Sargent, Sayre, W. B. W. Smith, and Woodbine. 

The second annual dinner was held at the time of our Trien- 
nial banquet and report makes it even more successful than 
the first. Speech-making has g^ven way to singing and "stunts." 



324 History of the Class of 1903. 

George S. Hurst, 1903, acted as Treasurer this year. With 
the baseball game on Tuesday afternoon, followed by the "1492" 
dinner in the evening, and the Alumni dinner on Wednesday 
noon as prime objects, it is planned to hold annual reunions of 
the Qass of 1903 in New Haven during Commencement week. 



YALE ALUMNI UNIVERSITY FUND. 



Sixteen years ago the Alumni Fund was started with the 
object of permanently endowing the University by means of 
small subscriptions from the entire body of alunmi. This year 
$129,000 wajs raised in this way, about a third of which is given 
to the University for current running expenses. The residue 
is added to the principal which now amounts to over $200,000. 

1903 has thus far done its fair share in this work. During 
the first year after graduation, which is by far the most diffi- 
cult one as the average graduate of one year's standing knows 
little or nothing about the Fund, Howard A. Plummer had 
charge as class agent. He succeeded in obtaining seventy- 
seven contributors for a total of $386.50. Owing to pressure 
of business Plummer tound it necessary to resign his position, 
and the present agent was appointed by the Board of Directors 
of the Fund. In 1905 there were eighty contributors and 
$405.50 was collected. In 1906, it being the year of the 
Triennial Reunion, a special eflFort was made for a larger gift, 
following the example set by other classes, and $626.55 was col- 
lected from seventy-six contributors. This amount, known as 
the Qass of 1903 Fund, is kept separate from the ordinary 
yearly contribution, and is added to only in reunion years. 

To sum up, one hundred and fourteen men have in diflFerent 
years subscribed to the Fund, and a total of $1,418.55 has been 
contributed. This compares very favorably with the contri- 
butions given by the other classes during an equal amount of 
time. It is hoped that the same generous spirit which has 
characterized the gifts from the minority of the Qass may 
make itself felt among a greater number, so that 1903 may 
respond to the needs of Yale with a larger number of 
contributors rather than a larger amount in contributions. 

Reeve Schley. 



CLASS SECRETARY'S FINANCIAL REPORT. 



RxcBirTS. 

From 198 Subscriptions, ..... $1^5.26 

Qass Day Comwittec, .... 528.26 

Senior Promenade Committee, . 176.75 

Interest and increment, .... 473-39 

$2,603.66 

Expenditures. 

To G)nmiission for collecting, .... $57-29 
Printing and circulars, . .41.80 

Postal cards, postage stamps and stamped enrelopes, 72.44 

Letter File Cabinet, 1938 

Card Index, ...... 6.50 

Gass Secretaries Association, . 14.00 

50 Copies Yale Alumni Weekly, . 3.50 

Binder for class statistics, .... 2.50 

I Copy Senior Qass Book, .... 4*00 

$22141 
Investment: $1,500 354% Convertible 

Bonds N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., . $1,74104 
Cash in Savings Banks, 641.21 $2,382.25 $2,603.66 

Attest: ZiEGLER Sasgbnt, 

Class Secretary. 
Audited June 22, 1906. 
George S. Hurst. 



FINANCIAL REPORT 1903 TRIENNIAL 
COMMITTEE. 



Debit 

Received from Subscriptions, .... $1,906195 
" " Z. Sargent for Boat Race Tickets, . 52.50 

Credit. 

To James F. Grady for G>stumes, Banquet, etc, 
H. C. Knapp for Printing and Mailing Orculars, 
Z. Sargent for Boat Race Tickets, . 
Tickets for Ball Game, 
H. C Nicholls for Band, 

Young Men's Republican Club for Hall for Dinner, 

Sloan Typewriting Bureau for Addressing first 

Notices, ...... 

Cash on hand ..... 



$1,95945 



$1,430.50 

43^5 

6soo 

i6soo 

125.00 
100.00 



3.50 



$1,932.25 
$17^0 



C L. DuVal, 
J. M. Dreisbach, 
Browes Hewitt, 
J. R. Robinson, 
A. K. Oliver, 

ChotftHOH, 



CLASS BIBLIOGRAPHY. 



ALDRICH. 

1903. Thomas Deloney: his Thomas of Reading and Three 
Ballads on the Spanish Armada, Edited with Notes and 
Introduction by Charles Roberts Aldrich and Ludan 
Swift Kirtland. N. Y. : J. F. Taylor & Co. 

ALSOP. 

1905. The Holy City of the Hindus. Illustrated with photo- 
graphs by the author. Outing, April 1905. 

1905. The Taj Mahal. Illustrated with photographs by the 
author. The Metropolitan Magazine, October 1905. 

BLACK. 
1905. The Forest Service. The Outlook, September 1905. 

CAMERON. 

1904. Article in collaboration with W. M. Steele in Yale Psy- 
diological Studies. Vol. I. New Series. 

CORNING. 

1905. Retention Cyst and Diverticulum of the Vermiform 
Appendix. Albany Medical Annals, December 1905. 

HAMLIN. 
1905. The Power of the Federal Congress to Regulate Cor- 
porations. Daniels Prize Essay, University of Buffalo 
Law School. Published in the Brief, vol. v., no. 425. 

KIRTLAND. 
1903. Thomas Deloney: his Thomas of Reading and Three 
Ballads on the Spanish Armada. Edited with Notes 
and Introduction by Charles Roberts Aldrich and Lucian 
Swift Kirtland. N. Y.: J. F. Taylor & Ca 



Class Bibliography, 329 

LEWIS. 

1904, Wage-Earners' Opinions of the Church. The Outlook, 
February 6, 1904. 

1905. Mary Origgie's Part in the Success. The Sunday 
School Times, June 25, 1905. 

MOFFAT. 

1905. The American College. Poem. The Reader Maga- 
zine, August 1905. 

1906. St. Cecilia. Poem. The Reader Magazine, January 
1906. 

C. A. MOORE, JR. 

1904. The Political Horoscope. By Lindon W. Bates, Jr., and 
Chas. A. Moore, Jr. 

RANKIN. 

1905. Government Railroad Policy in Canada. An unsigned 
editorial in the Commercial and Financial Review, July 
29, 1905- 

1906. The Railroad Situation Present and Future. New 
York Times Annual Financial Review, January 7, 1906. 

STEELE. 
1904. Article in collaboration with E. H. Cameron in Yale 
Psychological Studies. Vol. I. New Series. 

J. B. THOMAS, JR. 
1903. An illustrated article on Russian Wolfhounds, Rider & 
Driver & Outdoor Sport, December 12, 1903. 

1903. The Ideal Barzoi— Russian Wolfhound. The Illus- 
trated Sporting News, December 26, 1903. 

1904. Untraveled RussicL Illustrated with photographs by 
the author. Outing, April 1904. 



NECROLOGY. 



March 29, 1900. 
July 21, 1900. 
January 17, zpoz. 
February 23, 1901. 
September 27, Z90Z. 
June 3, X903. 
Noyember 15, Z903. 
July Z2, Z905. 
Augfust 28, X905. 



Maurice Pitch Hawks. 
Charles Tracy Brown. 
Henry Ide Root. 
Thomas Edward Wilde. 
Edward Warren Dorman. 
Thomas Henry Curran. 
Irving McDonald. 
Walter Sullivan. 
David Uzal Cory. 



STATISTICS. 



(Closed with the Triennial Reunion, June 1906. The names of men 
who did not graduate with the Qass are printed in italics,) 

B.A. 1903's: Living, 306 

Dead, 4 3X0 

Other memhers: Living, 68 

Dead, S 73 

Total, 383 

DEGREES. 
B.A. 

Yale University, 
1903, Aldrich, Alsop, Anderson, C. T. Andrews, T. Andrews, Arch- 
bald, G. S. Arnold, Arvine, Atwater, Atwill, C. C Auchincloss, 
C. R. Auchincloss, Bacon, Baker, Baldwin, W. L. Barber, Jr., 
Beardsley, Becker, Bendell, Bennethum, Benton, Bergen, Berman, 
Betts, Bill, Bishop, Black, Blaisdell, Blount, Bogue, Bond, Bowers, 
Brady, Bragaw, Brereton, Bristol, Bumstead, Bushong, Calmer, 
Cameron, Campbell, Carter, Chadwick, E. R. Clark, H. T. Clark, 
H. H. Clark, K. D. Clark, R. K. Clark, S. C. Clark, Qement, 
Cochran, Coffey, Coleman, A. M. CoUens, W. G. Collins, Conant, 
Condict, Coming, *Cory, Cowling, Cramer, Cronan, Crowe, 
♦Curran, Curtis, Cushman, Davidson, C. O. Day, Jr., R. D. Day, 
Denno, Digney, Dodge, Donohoe, Douglass, Draper, Dreisbach, 
Drury, Dukeshire, Dunham, DuPuy, DuVal, Eliason, Engelhardt, 
Evans, Everts, Ewell, Failing, Fairbank, Fairbanks, Farrel, Fergu- 
son, Ferry, Fitch, Fitzgerald, Fluhrer, Foster, Fox, Freeman, 
Frew, Frisbie, Fulton, Furst, Gaines, Cans, F. C. Gilbert, G. B. 
Gilbert, Gillespie, Gleason, Goodhue, Goodwin, Goss, Granniss, 
Green, Greene, Griffin, Haas, Hackett, Hamlin, Handel, Har- 
mount. Hart, Hart j en, Hartridge, Hazard, Hedges, Henry, Hess, 
Hewitt, Hileman, C. Hitchcock, Jr., Hofstead, Holbrook, Holt, 
Hooker, Hooper, Howard, Hull, Hunt, Hurst, Hyatt, Irvine, H. 
James, D. K. Johnston, W. P. Johnston, N. R. Jones, Keep, Kelly, 
Kennedy, Kent, Kilbum, Kingman, Kinney, Kirtland, Lamb, Lane, 
Langley, Latimer, Leach, Leonard, Lewis, L'Hommedieu, Lin- 
denberg, Littlefield, Lockwood, Long, Lyon, Lyons, McQin- 
tock, McCormick, ^McDonald, McDonough, Mcintosh, McKee, 



332 History of the Class of 1903, 

McKesson, McKnight, MacLane, MacLean, Manierre, Mann, J. 
Marshall, Melcer, Metzger, Mills, Minor, Moffat, Moodie, C. A. 
Moore, Jr., F. W. Moore, Morgan, Motter, Moulton, Mullen, 
Nesmith, Newhall, Nichols, Nixon, Ogden, Oliver, O'Neill, Orth- 
wein, Ostby, Parsons, Patterson, Payne, Peckham, Pierce, Plum- 
mer, Pomeroy, Porter, Potter, Pratt, J. O. Putnam, J. F. Putnam, 
Rankin, Rea, Reilly, Reynolds, Rhoads, Rhodes, Richards, Rich- 
ardson, Rightmire, Roberts, Robinson, Rogers, Roraback, Rosen- 
thal, Rowell, Sanford, Sargent, Sawyer, Sayre, Schley, Searles, 
Sheets, Skrable, B. M. Smith, G. A. Smith, R. S. Smith, W. B. W. 
Smith, Somers, Stauffer, Steele, Stem, Stevens, Stevenson, Still- 
man, Stoll, Strong, Stuart, Sturgis, J. B. Sullivan, *W. Sullivan, 
Sutphin, Sweet, Sykes, H. C. Taylor, W. H. Taylor, Terriberry, 
Terrill, Thacher, J. B. Thomas, Jr., D. Thompson, E. V. Thomp- 
son, G. J. Thomson, Thorstenberg, Tillson, Townsend, Trenholm, 
Tulin, Tyler, Updegraff, Utley, VanderPoel, Van Deventer, Van 
Dyke, Van Tassel, Vestiing, Waddell, Wait, Wakefield, Waldron, 
R. W. Walker, W. B. Walker, H. M. Wallace, W. F. Wallace, A. 
A. Ward, F. Ward, S. D. Ward, Waring, A. W. Warner, L H. 
Warner, Washington, B. Webster, E. F. Webster, Wenner, Wc§- 
cott, Whitcomb, H. S. White, J. R. White, W. O. White, Whittle- 
sey, Wickwire, Wilhelmi, Williams, Willis, Wing, Woodbine, 
Woodman, Woodward— 310. 

1904. Barker, Broeksmit, Chapin, Ney, Woodruff, ^S, 

Acadia University. 

1898. Dukeshire, Richardson. 

1900. Cameron. 

1901. Bishop. 

1902. Patterson, Steele. 

Baylor University, Waco, Texas. 
1902. Payne. 

Bethany College, Kansas. 

1899. Anderson. 

1900. Vestiing. 
1902. Thorstenberg. 

Bethany College, West Virginia. 
1902. J. Marshall. 



1903. 7. H. Jones, Jr. 

1901. Broeksmit. 

1902. Rea. 



Brown University. 

Coe College. 
EarlJtam College. 



Statistics. 333 



Harvard University. 
1904. Kimball, T. G. Thomas. 

Lebanon Valley College, Pa. 

1902. Cowling. 

Princeton University. 

1903. E. B. Mason. 

Taylor University. 
1900. Hofstead. 

University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. 
1903. Houghteling. 

Washburn College. 
1902. Henry, Sweet 

Wesleyan University. 
1902. Baldwin. 



1901. A. A. Ward. 

1902. Cramer, Skrable. 



Western College. - 



Ph,B. 
Yale University. 



1903. Spencer. 

1904. Douglass. 

S.B. 
Mass. Institute of Technology. 

1905. R. K. Gark. Long. 

LL.B. 
Yale University. 
1903. Bloomer. 

1905. Betts, Donohoe. Leach, Roraback. 

1906. G. S. Arnold, Campbell, Howard. 

Cleveland Law School. 
1906. Searles. 

Columbia University. 
1906. Bushong, Gans, Schley, Stem. 

Harvard University. 
1906. C. C. Auchindoss, Black, H. T. Clark, Coleman, Ewell, Fairbanks, 
Ferguson, Fox, Hooker, Hull, N. R. Jones, Kent, Kingman, 
Littlefield, McClintock, Moulton, Peckham, Tulin, Van Dyke, 
Washington. 



334 History of the Class of J903. 

New York Law School. 

1905. Brady, Cushman, Digney, Fitch, Furst, Hartjen, Hedges, Kilburn, 
Lane, Leonard, Waldron, W. B. Walker. 

1906. Mackenzie, Strong. 

New York University. 
igo6. Reilly. 

St. Louis Law School. 
1905. Orthwein. 

University of Alabama. 

1904. Blount 

University of Buffalo. 

1905. Hamlin, Handel. 

University of Cincinnati, 

1906. Kinney. 

University of Louisville. 
1906. B. Webster. 

University of Michigan. 
1906. L'Hommedieu. 

University of Pennsylvania. 
1906. Eliason. 

University of Virginia. 

1903. Russell. 

University of West Virginia. 

1904. J. Marshall. 

Washington University, St. Louis. 

1905. Potter. 

Western University, Pa. 

1906. Frew. 

B.D. 
Yale University. 
1906. Cowling, R. S. Smith. 

Union Theological Seminary, N. Y. 
1906. D. B. MacLane. 

Episcopal Theological School, Cambridge, Mass. 
1906. Fitzgerald. 

M.A. 
Yale University. 
1904. Anderson, Bishop, Brereton, Cameron, Cowling, Hofstead, Mof- 
fat, Patterson, Rankin, Richardson, Steele, Thorstenberg, Van 
Deventer. 



Statistics, 



335 



1905. Rea, R. S. Smith, Vestling. 

1906. Kennedy, Pomerpy, Sawyer, Terrill. 



1906. Stern. 

1904. Drury. 

1906. Updegraff. 

1904. Hofstead. 

1905. S, N, Arnold. 

1906. R. D. Day. 

190S McDcMionglL 



Columbia University. 
Harvard University, 
Princeton University, 
University of Maine, 

M.E. 
Columbia University, 

Cornell University, 

M.F. 
Yale University, 



M.D. 
Yale University, 
1906. Irvine, J. B. Sullivan. 

Columbia University, 
1906. Denno. 

McGUl University, 
1906. Hackett 

Ph.D. 
Yale University, 
1906. Bishop, Cameron, Hileman, Richardson, Thorstenberg. 

D.D.S. 
College of Dental and Oral Surgery, N, Y. 
1903. McCulloch. 



SUMMARY. 



B.A. Yale 1903, 
Other B.A.'s, 



. 310 M.E., . 

. 31 M.F., . 

341 M.D., . 

Ph.B. and S.B., . 4 Ph,D., . 

LL.B., .... 60 D.D.S., 

B.D., .... 4 

M.A., . . . . 24 Total, 



2 
I 
4 
5 

I 

446 



33^ History of the Class of 1903. 

OCCUPATIONS. 

LAW — G. S. Arnold, Arvine, C. C. Auchindoss, Baker, Betts, Black, 
Bloomer, Blount, Bogiic, Brady, Bragaw, Bushong, Campbell, 
Carter, H. T. Clark, S. C. Clark, Coleman, Cushman, Digney, 
Donohoe, Eliason, Evans, Ewell, Fairbanks, Ferguson, Ferry, 
Fitch, Fluhrer, Foster, Fox, Frew, Furst, Cans, Hamlin, Handel, 
Hart j en, Hartridge, Hedges, Hess, Hill, Hogan, Hooker, 
Howard, Hull, W. P. Johnston, N. R. Jones, Kent, Kilbum, 
Kimball, Kingman, Kinney, Lane, Leach, Leonard, Lewis, 
L'Hommedicu, Littlefield, Lockwood, McQintock, Mackemie, 
J. Marshall, Melcer, Moflfat, Moulton, Nichols, Orlady, Orth- 
wein, Peckham, Perkins, Pitcher, Reilly, S. W. Rhoads, 
Richards, Rogers, Roraback, Rowdl, Russell, Sawyer, Schley, 
Skrable, Stauflfer, Stem, Strong, D. Thompson, G. J. Thomson, 
Tulin, Van Dyke, Wakefield, Waldron, W. B. Walker, Washing- 
ton, B. Webster, Wenner, Wescott, Winch, Wing. 

MEDICINE— W. L. Barber, Jr., Bendell, E. R. Clark, Coffey, Com- 
ing, C. O. Day, Jr., Denno, G. B. Gilbert, Hackett, Irvine, H. 
James, Lamb, Lyons, Patterson, G. A. Smith, Stillman, J. B. 
Sullivan, Terriberry, Utlcy, Waring. 

TEACHING — Bishop, Brereton, Dodge, Dukeshire, Engelhardt, Good- 
hue, Harmount, Keep, Kelly, Mcintosh, Parsons, Rea, Richard- 
son, Somers, Steele, Vestling, A. A. Ward, F. Ward, Woodward. 

MINISTRY— T. Andrews, Atwill, Baldwin, Fitzgerald, Goddard, 
Hofstead, D. K. Johnston, D. B. MacLane, F. W. Moore, 
Roberts, R. S. Smith, Updegraff. 

STUDENTS— Anderson, Bill, Cameron, Cowling, Drury, Freeman, 
Hileman, Kennedy, Terrill, Thorstenberg, Van Deventer, Wood- 
bine. 

ARMY OFFICERS— rri*^, 7. F. Walker, 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS— 5". N. Arnold, R. D. Day. 

MINING ENGINEERS— Archbald, Eamshaw. 

ORGANIST— Tillson. 

POLITICIAN— McCormick. 

DENTIST— McCulloch. 

ARTIST— Cobb. 

ARCHITECTURE— Mann. 

CHEMIST— Long. 

THEATRICAL MANAGER— F. A. Johnston. 

RANCHING AND IRRIGATION— Aldrich, StoU. 

BREEDING AND STOCK RAISING— J. B. Thomas, Jr. 

FARMING— Sanford, L. W. Smith. 

RAILROADING— //argw, Hewitt, Holt, Hooper, M. Mason, Potter, 
Searles, Sweet, Trenholm, Van Tassel, S. D. Ward, Whitcomlv 
Wood. 



Statistics. 337 

INSURANCE—BwrJ^W, Dunham, Everts, Famum, Frisbie, Gaines, 
O'Neill, Sheets, Stuart, I. H. Warner. 

DRAUGHTSMEN— Bumstead, Nesmith, A. W. Warner. 

LlMBER^Hawley, McDonough, W. O. White, Wilhelmi. 

REAL ESTATE — Cronan, Goodwin, Granniss, Latimer, McKnight, 
E. B. Mason, Morgan, Ogden, Roome. 

TELEPHONE— H. G. Greene, J. O. Putnam, Thacher. 

BANKING AND BROKING— Alsop, Atwater, C R. Auchincloss, Ber- 
man, Broeksmit, H. H. Gark, Cement, Craighead, DuVal, Fair- 
bank, C. D. Green, Gruner, Henry, C. Hitchcock, Jr., Houghteling, 
Langley, Lyon, Plummer, Pomeroy, Reynolds, Rosenthal, Sayre, 
Stevens, W. H. Taylor, H, F. Thomas, Townsend, VanderPocl, 
Waddell, Weston, 

PUBLISHING— Gillespie, Hart, Williams. 

NEWSPAPERS AND MAGAZINES— CAa/^t«, W. G. Collins, 
Davidson, Hurst, /. H. Jones, Jr,, Kirtland, Oliver, Payne, 
Rankin, W. F. Wallace. 

MANUFACTURING— Aluminum : Hunt; Biscuits: Bergen, H. C 
Taylor; Brass: Goss, H. M. Wallace, H. S. White; Bricks: 
K. D. Dark, Robinson ; Candy : Bowers ; Car : Manierrc ; Car 
Wheels: Griffin; Carpets: Cochran; Carriages: Ellsworth, 
J. F. Putnam; Collars: Fowler; Cotton: B. M. Smith; 
Electric: Condict, H. M. Hitchcock, Stevenson; Elevators: 
Beardsley; Flour: BnnArman, Holbrook ; Furniture: LeVally; 
Hardware: Mullen, Sargent; Hats: Durant; Jewelry: Ney, 
Ostby, Pierce ; Leather Supplies : P, E, Barbour; Machines : 
Bristol, Farrel, Fulton, McAlamey, Woodruff; Chemicals: 
Rightmire, Whittlesey; Oil Cloth: Woodman; Paper: C. T. 
Andrews, Bond, Spencer; Pianos: Bacon, Curtis, Lindenberg; 
Pulp Plaster: Sykes; Rubber: DuPuy, Mulford, Work; 
Soda: Hazard; Steel: Draper, Willis; Stoves: R. K Dark; 
Wheels: W. B. W. Smith; Wire: Wickwire. 

MERCANTILE— Army Uniforms: Haas; Carpets: Wait; China: 
W, H. James; Clothier: M. L. Marshall; Coal: J. R. White; 
Commission Merchant: Coard; Decorator: Hyatt; Dry 
Goods: Bennethum, Calmer, Motter, Nixon, Whiiiemore; 
Drugs : McKesson ; Glass Jars : Benton ; Groceries : Gleason, 
Minor, E. V. Thompson; Hardware: Becker, Chadwick, 
Conant, Cramer, Failing, G. P, Warner, E. F. Webster; Impor- 
ters : Fachiri, Newhall ; Ladies' Clothier : Pratt ; Machinery : 
Knox, McKee, C. A. Moore, Jr., Tyler; Mill Supplies: 
Dreisbach, Munson; Paper Makers' Supplies: Sutphin; 
Signs: T, G. Thomas; Silk Merchant: Schroeder. 

MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS— Advertising : Blaisdell, Crowe, 
R. W. Walker; Coal Mining: Metzger, Mills; Contractors: 
J. F. Rhodes, Truett; Express Company: H. C MacLean; 
22 



338 



History of the Class of 1903. 



Government Land Commissioner: Wagar; Hotel: Patr; 
Laundry: Partridge; Mining: Douglass; On. Producer: 
Jennings; Transfer Company: Porter; Treasurer's Office, 
Metropolitan Museum: F. C. Gilbert; Trustee: A. M. 
Collens. 

UNKNOWN AND NO OCCUPATION— Borife^, T. M. H. Brown, 
Hardy, Moodie, Parkhurst, Roach, Sturgis. 



SUMMARY. 






Law, 


96 


Army Officers, 


2 


Manufacturing, . 


54 


Mechanical Engineering, 


2 


Mercantile, 


36 


Mining Engineering, 


2 


Banking and Broking, . 


29 


Farming, 


2 


Medicine, 


20 


Ranching and Irrigat 


ion, 


2 


Teaching, 


19 


Organist, 






Miscellaneous Business, 


16 


Politician, 






Railroading, 


13 


Dentist, 






Ministry, 


12 


Artist, 






Students, 


12 


Architecture, 






Insurance, 


10 


Chemist, 






Newspapers and Magazines, 


10 


Theatrical Manager, 






Real Estate, 


9 


Breeding and Stock Raising 




Lumber, . 


5 


Unknown and no occupation 


7 


Draughtsmen, . 


3 






Telephone, 


3 


Total, 


374 


Publishing, 


3 









MARRIAGES. 



Date 

18, 189I 
? 

18, 1900 
14, I9OI 
18, I9OI 

4, 1901 

7, 1903 

June 27, 1903 

June 30, 1903 

June 30, 1903 

Sept. 30, 1903 

Oct. I, 1903 



Nov. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Jan. 



Name 

TerriU 

Hofstead 

H. F. Thomas 

P, E. Barbour 

IVhitiemore 

Roome 

Gruner 

Foster 

Bill 

Kennedy 

W, H, James 

Wickwire 



Wife's Maiden Name 

Ada Thurman 
*Mabel Marshall Higgins 
Amanda Wallace Caskie 
Mary Augusta Graham 
Elsie Maud Franklin 
Florence Louise Weed 
Katharine Hayes Drake 
Elizabeth Plummer Bowen 
Florence Dorothy Reid 
Elizabeth Florence Lord 
Aileen Stevens 
Sophie Bremner Hedge 



No. or 

Children 
Boys Girls 

O 



O 

o 
o 



2 


O 
I 

I 

o 
o 



I 
o 
o 
I 
o 
o 
I 
o 
o 
I 
o 



Statistics, 



339 



Date 

Apr. 4. 1904 
Apr. 6, 1904 
Apr. 14, 1904 
June 24, 1904 
June 29, 1904 
June 29, 1904 
Aug. 9, 1904 
30, 1904 

16, 1904 

17, 1904 

24, 1904 
I, 1904 

18, 190S 

25, 190S 
I, 190S 

25, 190S 

26, 190S 

1, 190S 
14, 1905 

24, 190S 
Sept 16, 190S 
Sept. 16, 1905 

27, 1905 
II, 1905 
18, 1905 

28, 1905 

13, 190S 
27, 1905 
10, 1906 

25, 1906 

14, 1906 
14, 1906 
17, 1906 

2, 1906 
June 19, 1906 
June 21, 1906 
June 1906 



Aug. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Dec 
Feb. 
Apr. 
May 
May 
May 
June 
June 
July 



Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct 

Oct 

Dec 

Dec 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

May 

June 



Name 

Hamlin 

Sykcs 

G. P. Warner 

Dreisbach 

Chapin 

Coard 

Payne 

Steele 

Gaines 

Whittlesey 

Bacon 

Ellsworth 

Tyler 

RusseU 

Lindenberg 

C. R. Auchindoss 

Woodruff 

Crowe 

Engelhardt 

Calmer 

Townsend 

VanderPoel 

Goddard 

Whitcomb 

LeVally 

L, W. Smith 

J, H. Jones, Jr. 

Orthwein 

Fulton 

J. Marshall 

Cochran 

Rhodes 

Coming 

F. A, Johnston 

C. C. Auchindoss 

Keep 

Wagar 



No. of 
Children 

Wife's Maiden Name Boys Gtrla 

Emily Gray i i 

Bemice Dean Heath o o 

Emma Pearl Letchworth o o 

Laura Qaire Dartt o o 

Edith DeMaris Adams o o 

Florence Edna Smith o o 

Mittie Royall Baker o o 

Charlotte Beatrice Fuller o i 

Lucy Thomdyke Fromcnt i o 

Emily Henderson Craven o 

Grace Esther Fdber o 

Juliet Inness i o 

Mary Benham Woolverton i 

Eleanor Letitia Brice o i 

Helen Tallmadge o i 

Hden Pickering Russell o o 

Eugenie Gray Watson i 

Katharine M'Qellan Higgins o o 

Bessie Edna Gardner i 

Florence Briggs Terhtrae o o 

Fanny Proddow Simpson o o 

Mildred Moore Barclay o o 

Gertrude Brashear Craik o o 

Annis Louise Palmeticr o o 

Florence Dennis Pierce o o 

Alice Shearer o 

Helen Regina Courtney o o 

Nina Kent Baldwin 

Rose Hinckley Hay den o o 

Rebecca Cooper Paull o 

Mabel Heyward Taylor o o 

Louise Pierce Bond o 

Edith Harlan Child 

Daisy Bell Robinson o 

Rosamond Saltonstall 

Rose Anne Hardy Day 

Deedie Sallee o o 



49 Marriages; 7 Boys; 11 Girls. 



LOCALITY INDEX 



Alabama. 


Hartford. 


Birmingham. 


Bloomer. 


Holt 


Burdett 




Campbell. 


Arkansas. 


Dunham. 


Warren. 


Frisbie. 


McDonough. 


Goodwin. 




Hackett. 


California. 


Hogan. 


Corona. 


Howard. 


Wing. 


Ney. 


Los Angeles. 


O'Neill. 


Latimer. 


Pratt 


Oakland. 


Tulin. 


Bumstead. 


Hebron. 


Pasadena. 


Fitzgerald 


Rhodes, J. F. 


Manchester. 


San Francisco. 


Ferguson. 


NewhalL 


Meriden. 




Hyatt 


Colorado. 


New Haven. 


Denver. 


Anderson. 


Collins, W. G. 


Arnold, G. S. 


Perkins. 


Arvine. 




Bishop. 


Connecticut. 


Cameron. 


Ansonia, 


Coflfey. 


Farrel. 


Foster. 


Wallace, H. M. 


Hooker. 


Bethel. 


Hurst 


Durant. 


Mullen. 


Bridgeport. 


Richardson. 


Everts. 


Sargent 


Smith, W. B. W. 


Vestling. 


Bridgewater. 


Ward, F. 


Sanford. 


Webster, E. F. 


Canaan. 


Winch. 


Roraback. 


Woodbine. 



Nonvalk. 
Goodhue. 
Pine Orchard. 
Harmount 

Rockville. 
Partridge. 
Sykes. 

Simshury. 
Dodge. 
Thomas, J. B., Jr. 

Stamford. 
Gillespie. 

Waterhury. 
Bristol. 
Carter. 
Fulton. 
Goss. 

White, H. S. 
Watertown. 
Mcintosh. 

Delaware. 

Wilmington. 
Johnston, W. P. 

Florida. 

Jacksonville. 
Hartridge. 

Pensacola. 
Blount. 

Illinois. 
Cairo. 
White, W. O. 

Chicago. 
Qark, R. K. 
Davidson. 
Gans. 
Houghteling. 



Locality Index. 


3 


LeVally. 


LfOuisiana. 


Lynn. 


McG>rmick. 


Lake Charles. 


Donohoe. 


McKee. 


Henry. 


Stevenson. 


Manierre. 


^«i; Orleans. 


Pittsfield. 


Nixon. 


Oark, H. H. 


Hull. 


Porter. 


Lyons. 


Quincy. 


Wallace, W. F. 




Barbour, P. R 


Willis. 


Maine. 


Salem. 


Joliet 


Bangor. 


Moulton. 


Calmer. 


Hardy. 


Sharon. 


Normak 


Portland. 


Long. 


Woodward 


Walker, J. F. 


Springfield. 


Springfield, 


i'afi/orJ. 


Lewis. 


Coleman. 


Hofstead. 


McKnight 


Jones, N. R. 


JTm/Aro/^. 


Morgan. 


Indiana. 


Woodman. 


West Tisbury. 
Moodie. 


Evansville, 


Maryland. 


Worcester. 


Wood. 


Baltimore. 


Barker. 


Princeton. 


Barber, W. L., Jr. 




Hewitt 


Qark, E. R. 


Michigan. 


Winchester. 


Gilbert, G. B. 


Detroit. 


Rea. 


Smith, G. A. 


L'Hommedieu. 


Iowa. 


Massachusetts. 




C^Jar Rapids. 


Andover. 


Minnesota. 


Broeksmit 


Keep. 

Boston. 


Faribault. 


Elberon. 


Bill. 


Skrable. 


Alsop. 


Minneapolis. 


Ojc^<?/a. 


Bacon. 


Kirtland. 


Becker. 


Chapin. 




Toledo. 


Day, C. 0., Jr. 


Missouri. 


Cramer. 


Fairbank. 


Kansas City. 


Kansas. 


Kimball. 


Brinkman. 


Ba/dtc^if. 


Patterson. 


James, W. H. 


Cowling. 

Topeka. 
Sweet 


Weston. 


Mulford. 


Cambridge. 


Putnam, J. 0. 


Atwill. 


Whittcmore. 


Drury. 


St. Joseph. 


Kentucky. 


Ferry. 


Motter. 


Cow»^/<m. 


Kent 


St. Louis. 


Minor. 


Moffat. 


Chadwick. 


Louisville. 


Nichols. 


Conant 


Hargis. 


Sawyer. 


Kelly. 


Thompson, E. V. 


Chestnut Hill. 


Orthwein. 


Webster, B. 


Kennedy. 


Potter. 


Owensboro. 


Holyoke. 


Reynolds. 


Goddard. 


Bond. 


Rowell. 



341 



343 



History of the Class of ipoj. 



Montana. 

Butte 
Douglass. 

Nebraska. 
Omaha. 
Van Tassel 

New Jersey. 

Englewood. 
Roberts. 

Haddonfield. 
Wescott. 

Montclair. 
Tillson. 
Waldron. 
Morris Plains. 
Granniss. 

Plainfield. 
Roome. 
Tyler. 
Williams. 

New Mexico. 
Elmendorf. 
Stoll. 

New York. 

Albany. 
Bendell. 
Coming. 

Albion. 
Smith, L. W. 

Auburn. 
Engelhardt. 
Marshall, M. L. 
Moore, F. W. 
Wait. 

Brooklyn. 
Cushman. 
Greene, H. G. 
Langley. 
Pomeroy. 
Truett. 

Buffalo. 
Griffin. 
Hamlin. 
Handel. 



Parkhurst 


Furst 


Updegraff. 


Gaines. 


Warner, G. P. 


GUbcrt, F. C. 


Cooperstown. 


Gleason. 


Qark, S. C. 


Green, C. D. 


Cortland. 


Gruner. 


Wickwire. 


Haas. 


Flushing, L. I. 


Hart 


Lane. 


Hart j en. 


Glenmont, Albany 


Hedges. 


Co. 


Hess. 


Parr. 


Hill. 


Glens Falls. 


Hitchcock, C, Jr. 


Fowler. 


James, H. 


Gloversville. 


Johnston, F. A. 


McCulloch. 


Kilburn. 


Middletown. 


Knox. 


Lyon. 


Lamb. 


New York City. 


Leach. 


Andrews, T. 


Leonard. 


Archbald. 


Littlefield. 


Atwater. 


Lockwood. 


Auchincloss, C.C 


Mackenzie. 


Auchincloss, C. R. 


McKesson. 


Baldwin. 


MacLane. 


Beardsley. 


MacLean. 


Benton. 


Mason, E. B. 


Bergen. 


Melccr. 


Berman. 


Moore, C. A., Jr. 


Betts. 


Ogdcn. 


Blaisdell. 


Ostby. 


Bogue. 


Parsons. 


Bowers. 


Peckham. 


Brady. 


Plummer. 


Bragaw. 


Rankin. 


Cement 


Reilly. 


Cochran. 


Richards. 


Craighead. 


Robinson. 


Crowe. 


Rosenthal. 


Denno. 


Sayre. 


Dukeshire. 


Schley. 


DuVal. 


Schroeder. 


Ellsworth. 


Stem. 


Ewell. 


Stevens. 


Famum. 


Stillman. 


Fitch. 


Strong. 


Fluhrer. 


Sturgis. 


Fox. 


Taylor, H. C 



Locality Index. 


34 


Tcrribcrry. 


Searles. 


Frew. 


Thomas, H. F. 


Van Devcntcr. 


Jennings. 


Thomas, T. G. 


Columbus. 


McClintock. 


Thomson, G. J. 


Curtis. 


Oliver. 


Townscnd 


Lindenberg. 


Orlady. 


Trcnholm. 


Mills. 


Wakefield. 


Utiey. 


Putnam, J. F. 


Reading. 


Waddcll. 


Portsmouth. 


Bushong. 


Walker, W. B. 


Qark, K. D. 


Stauffer. 


Ward, S. D. 


Youngstown. 


St. Mary's. 


Waring. 


Draper. 


Warner. I. H. 


Penn Van. 




Scranton. 


Andrews, C. T. 


Oklahoma. 


Pitcher. 


Syracuse, 


Norman. 


Sewickley. 


Hazard. 


Thorstenberg. 


Thompson, D. 


Thacher. 




Warner, A. W. 


Woodruff. 


Oregon. 


South Bethlehem. 


Utica, 


Portland. 


Eamshaw. 


Munson. 


Failing. 


Wilkes'Barre. 


WatertOTvn, 


Holbrook. 


Rhoads, S. W. 


Spencer. 
White Plains. 


Pennsylvania. 


Rhode Island. 


Digney. 


Cliffton Heights, 


Providence. 


Woodmere, L. /. 


Delaware Co, 


Irvine. 


VanderPoel. 


Brown, T. M. H. 


Jones, J. H., Jr. 


Yonkers. 


Easton. 


Kingman. 


Cronan. 


Dreisbach. 


Pierce. 


Stuart. 


Harrisburg. 


Smith, B. M. 


Walker, R. W. 


Bennethum. 


Sullivan, J. B. 


Whittlesey. 


Lebanon. 


White, J. R. 




McAlamey. 


Wakefield. 


North Dakota. 


McKeesport. 


Rogers. 


Williston. 
Hooper. 


Evans. 
Mercersburg. 


South Carolina. 




Brereton. 


Greenville. 


Ohio. 


Somers. 


Steele. 


Akron. 
Work. 


Oakmont. 
Hunt 


South Dakota. 


Barberton. 


Philadelphia. 


Gregory, 


Arnold, S. N. 


Condict 


Wagar. 


Cincinnati. 


Eliason. 




Baker. 


Hileman. 


Tennessee. 


Black. 


Nesmith. 


Wessyngton. 


Kinney. 


Rightmire. 


Washington. 


Sutphin. 


Pittsburg. 




Cleveland. 


CoUens, A. M. 


Texas. 


Qark, H. T. 


Day, R. D. 


Crockett. 


Hitchcock, H. M. 


DuPuy. 


Payne. 



344 



History of the Class of 1^03. 



■> 



Dallas. 


West Virginia. 


China. 


Terrill. 


Fairmount. 


Shanghai. 


Elmina, Walker Co, 


Metzger. 


Coard. 


Wilhclmi. 


Parkersburg. 






Marshall, J. 


Colombia, So. Am. 


Utah 


Wheeling. 


Buena Ventura. 


Linwood, Uintah 


Russell. 


Mason, M. 


Co. 




England. 


Aldrich. 


Wisconsin. 


London. 


Logan. 


Fond du Lac. 


Fachiri. 


Johnston, D. K 


Whitcomb. 






Milwaukee. 


France. 


Vermont. 


Van Dyke. 


Paris. 


Clarendon. 




Cobb. 


Smith, R. S. 


Philippine Islands. 


Mann. 


St. Johnsbury. 


Manila. 


PortugaL 


Fairbanks. 


Taylor, W. H. 
True. 


Lisbon. 
Sheets. 


Washington. 






Seattle. 


Ceylon. 


Spain. 


Hawlcy. 


Vaddukkoddai. 


Madrid. 


Wenner. 


Ward, A. A. 


Freeman. 



Locality Index. 



345 



SUMMARY. 



Alabama x 

Arkansas i 

California S 

Colorado 2 

Connecticut 53 

Delaware i 

Florida 2 

Illinois 17 

Indiana 3 

Iowa 4 

Kansas 2 

Kentucky 5 

Louisiana 3 

Maine 4 

Maryland 4 

Massachusetts 29 

Michigan i 

Minnesota 2 

Missouri 13 

Montana i 

Nebraska i 

New Jersey 6 

New Mexico i 

New York 125 

North Dakota i 

Ohio 16 



Oklahoma i 

Oregon 2 

Pennsylvania 30 

Rhode Island 8 

South Carolina i 

South Dakota i 

Tennessee i 

Texas 3 

Vermont 2 

Utah 2 

Washington 2 

West Virginia 3 

Wisconsin 2 

Philippine Islands 2 

Ceylon i 

China i 

Colombia, S. A i 

England i 

France 2 

Portugal I 

Spain I 

373 

Unknown (Roach) i 

Total 374 



ADDENDA. 



D. K. Johnston writes from St. John's Rectory, Logan, Utah, 
September 5, 1906 : "If anyone is curious enough to know any- 
thing of me, say to him that I am doing clerical work among 
the Mormons, and am with Rev. Paul Jones, Yale '02. Last 
siunmer I was in England." 

***** 

Melcer writes, September 4, 1906: "Any information con- 
tained in my last communication to you [see page 197] may 
as well be omitted from record — recent changes !" 

***** 

Parsons writes, September 4, 1906: "I wrote you three or 
four weeks ago stating that I expected to be in New York this 
winter with Ralph Melcer and asking you to insert in the 
Triennial Record [see page 217] that my address after October 
iSth would be care Frank Hagny Company, 11 33 Broadway. 
As my plans are now entirely changed I hope that this will 
reach you before the publication goes to press so that you can 
change it back as it was before. My permanent adddress 
should appear as care Carnegie Technical Schools, Pittsburg, 
Pa." 

***** 

Stevens writes, September 9, 1906 : "Unfortunately I cannot 
g^ve any glowing accounts of myself; have been plugging 
along on a modest salary, yet getting good experience. After 
graduating I went with the Trust Company of America, staying 
there until July 1906. On leaving I entered the banking house 
of Wm. A. Read & Co. in the bond department. At present 
am on the outside, travelling." 

His father, Nathaniel Stevens (deceased), was the son of 
John H. Stevens and Elizabeth (Emerson) Stevens. Stevens' 
mother was the daughter of George Goodell. 



Addenda. 347 

StoU writes, September 3, 1906: "This blank had quite a 
journey around the country before it reached me in this 
jumping off place. Since leaving college I have not been in 
any one place more than two months at a time. I have spent 
most of the time in the south buying timber lands. From that 
I jumped into the wild west and am now at Elmendorf, New 
Mexico, with the Socorro Company, a company which is devel- 
oping lands along the Rio Grande, and incidentally making a 
cow-puncher out of myself." He adds, "Don't 'go west and 
grow up with the country.' " 

His father, Charles Henry StoU (Kentucky University Law 
School 1876), is a lawyer of Lexington, Ky., and is also Presi- 
dent of the Socorro Company. He was bom April 22, 1856, 
the son of George StoU and Mary Jane (Schrugham) StoU. 
StoU's mother, whose maiden name was Nellie Weathers, died 
August 21, 1904. She was the daughter of CosweU Weathers 
and Mary Ellen (True) Weathers. 



I 

I 






YALE J 903 SENIOR CLASS BOOK. 



A few copies of the Yale iqos Senior Class Book remain 
unsold. They may be had at the regular price, five dollars 
($5.00) per copy, expressage twenty-five cents extra. Apply 
to The Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor Co., 123 Temple St., Xew 
Haven, Conn., or to Ziegler Sargent, Class Secretary, 247 
Church St., New Haven, Conn. 



SPECL\L NOTICE. 



You will confer a great favor if you will at once notify the 
class secretary, Zicglcr Sargent, 247 Church St., New Haven, 
Conn., of any and all errors, whether of omission or commis- 
sion, in this book. It is only with the assistance of every 
member of the class that these records can approach accuracy 
and completeness. 



1l 



YALE 1903 CLASS ROLL AND ADDRESS LIST. 



September 1906. 



Giarles R. Aldrich, 618 Home Insurance Bldg., Chicago, IIL 

F. J. O. ALsop, 2 Brimmer St., or 71 Kilby St., Boston, Mass. 
Luther Anderson, 254 Crown St., New Haven, Conn. 
Charles T. Andrews, Penn Yan, N. Y. 

Theodore Andrews, care General Theological Seminary, 175 9th Ave, 

New York City. 
Hugh Archbald, 236 Monroe Ave., Scranton, Pa. 

G. S. Arnold, 24 Dwight St., New Haven, Conn. 

Stanfield N. Arnold, care Yale Club, 30 West 44th St., New York City. 

William B. Arvine, 1169 Chapel St., New Haven, Conn. 

Morton Atwater, care Shearson, Hammill & Co., 71 Broadway, New York 

City. 
Douglass H. Atwill, 8 Lawrence Hall, Cambridge, Mass. 
Charles C. Auchincloss, 24 East 48th St., New York City. 
C. Russell Auchincloss, 20 Broad St., New York City. 
Ernest F. Bacon, care Mason & Hamlin Co., Cambridgeport, Mass. 
Thome Baker, Reading Road & Oak St., Cincinnati, O. 
Burton J. Baldwin, 700 Park Ave., New York City. 
Walter L. Barber, Jr., 1705 Fairmount Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
Perley E. Barbour, 8 Bigelow St., Quincy, Mass., or care Brockton, Rand 

Co., Brockton, Mass. 
Will T. Barker, 42 Abbott St., Worcester, Mass. 
Glover Beardsley, care Yale Club, 30 West 44th St., New York City. 
Arthur C. Becker, Osceola, la. 
J. L. Bendcll, 178 State St., Albany. N. Y. 
Claude G. Bcnnethum, 2009 North 3d St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
Josiah H. Benton, care The Royale Glass Jar & Bottle Co., 11 Broadway, 

New York City. 
M. H. Bergen, 328 West 22d St., or care National Biscuit Co., 409 

West 15th St., New York City. 
Pemberton Berman, care Bowling Green Trust Co., 26 Broadway, New 

York City. 
James M. Betts, care Marsh, Win.slow & Wever, iii Broadway, New 

York City. 
Alfred H. Bill. Faribault, Minn. 
Dr. A. L. Bishop, Yale Station, New Haven, Conn. 
Robert L. Black, 1603 Union Trust Bldg., Cincinnati, O. 
Arthur G. Blaisdell, Goffstown, N. H. 
Howard J. Bloomer, 904 Main St., Hartford, Conn. 



— 2 — 

William A. Blount, Jr., Pensacola, Fla. 

S. R. Bogue, 440 West End Ave., or care Russell & Hartridge, 149 
Broadway, New York City. 

Robert E. Bond, care Essex Paper Co., Holyoke, Mass. 

E. C. Bowers, care Huyler's, 508 Fifth Ave., New York City. 

Charles A. Brady, 132 Nassau St., New York City, or P. O. Box 84, 
Norwich Town, Conn. 

Allen C. Bragaw, 20 East 94th St., New York City. 

Samuel M. Brereton, Box 25, Mercersburg, Pa. 

Raymond P. Brinkman, 323 West Armour Boul., Kansas City, Mo. 

Ralph Bristol, care Waterbury Parrel Foundry & Machine Co., Water- 
bury, Conn. 

John S. Broeksmit, Cedar Rapids, la. 

♦Charles Tracy Brown, died July 21, 1900. 

Thomas M. H. Brown, Bum Brae, Cliffton Heights, Delaware Co., Pa. 

Ralph W. Bumstead, 109 13th St, Oakland, Cal. 

Ralph H. Burdett, care Factory Insurance Asso., Hartford, Conn. 

Robert Grey Bushong, 232 North 5th St, Reading, Pa. 

E. M. Calmer, Joliet, 111. 

Dr. E. H. Cameron, Yale Station, New Haven, Conn. 

James N. H. Campbell, 2 Congress St, Hartford, Conn. 

L. Russell Carter, 11 East Main St, Waterbury, Conn. 

George B. Chadwick, care Simmons Hardware Co., St Louis, Mo. 

Carl M. Chapin, 293 Washington St, Boston, Mass., or loi Elm St., 
Somerville, Mass. 

Eliot R. Clark, care Johns Hopkins Medical School, Baltimore, Md. 

Harold T. Clark, care Squire, Sanders & Dempscy, Qeveland, O. 

Harry H. Clark, care Round Table Club, Jackson Ave., New Orleans, La. 

Kilburn D. Clark, care Portsmouth Harbison-Walker Co., Portsmouth, O. 

Robert Keep Clark, 460 Dearborn Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Stephen C. Clark, Cooperstown, N. Y. 

Allen T. Clement, 143 West 71st St. New York City. 

George F. Coard, care U. S. P. O., Shanghai, China. 

Nathaniel H. Cobb, 122 Rue d'Assas, Paris, France. 

Gifford A. Cochran, 12 East 55th St., New York City. 

James R. Coffey, 17 Autumn St., New Haven, Conn. 

Louis G. Coleman, care Brown, Wheeler, Brown & Hay, 309 South 6th 
St, Springfield, 111. 

Arthur M. Collens, Bessemer Bldg., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Walter G. Collins, 921 East 13th Ave., Denver, Col. 

George K. Conant. 4479 Washington Ave., St Louis, Mo. 

Philip K. Condict, care Western Electric Co., nth & York Sts., Phila- 
delphia. Pa. 

Erastus Corning, 355 State St., Albany, N. Y. 

♦David Uzal Cory, died August 28, 1905. 

Prof. D. J. Cowling, Baker University, Baldwin, Kansas. 

Alexander Craighead, care Cuyler, Morgan & Co., 44 Pine St, New 
York City. 



— 3— 

Hiram W. Cramer, Toledo, la. 

James P. Cronan, care Yonkers & Nepperhan Realty Co., Nepperhan, 

N. Y. 
E. R. Crowe, care System, i Madison Ave., New York City. 
♦Thomas Henry Curran, died June 3, 1903. 
Kenneth W. Curtis, care Columbus Piano Co., Columbus, O. 
E. C. Cushman, 63 Linden St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
M. L. Davidson, care Madison Ave. Hotel, Madison Ave. & gad St., 

New York City. 
C. O. Day, Jr., 211 Technology Chambers, Boston, Mass. 
Rodney D. Day, 814 Coal St., Wilkinsburg, Pa., or Catskill, N. Y. 
Dr. Willard J. Denno, General Memorial Hospital, io6th St & Central 

Park West, New York City. 
R. Emmet Digney, White Plains, N. Y. 
A. Douglas Dodge, Simsbury, Conn. 
Edward A. Donohoe, 28 Johnston St., Lynn, Mass. 
♦Edward Warren Dor man, died September 27, 1901. 
T. P. Draper, care Republic Iron & Steel Co., Youngstown, O. 
Walter L. Douglass, 14 West Copper St., Butte, Mont. 
John M. Dreisbach, 714 Cattell St, Easton, Pa. 
Herbert L. Drury, Walter Hastings Hall, Cambridge, Mass. 
Stanley C. Dukeshire, 241 West 77th St., or 23 West 70th St, New 

York City. 
Donald A. Dunham, 830 Prospect Ave., Hartford, Conn. 
H. Wilfred DuPuy, 646 Morewood Ave., Pittsburg, Pa. 
George G. Durant, Jr., Bethel, Conn. 
Give L. DuVal, 709 Madison Ave., New York City. 
Wilton A. Eamshaw, Lowville, N. Y. 
John Eliason, 1222 Stephen Girard Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Bradford Ellsworth, care Brewster & Co., Broadway & 47th St, New 

York City. 
Nickolaus L. Engelhardt, 71 Seymour St, Auburn, N. Y. 
John K Evans, S. Huey St., McKeesport, Pa. 
George B. Everts, care Bridgeport Land & Title Co., or P. O. Box 675, 

Bridgeport, Conn. 
Robert H. Ewell, care Merrill & Rogers, 31 Nassau St., New York City. 
Antonio P. Fachiri, care Messrs. Ralli Bros., 25 Finsbury Circus, Lon- 
don, E. C, England. 
Edward J. Failing, 243 nth St, Portland, Ore. 
J. J. Mitchell Fairbank, care Hamlin, Thompson & Sheldon, 60 State 

St, Boston, Mass. 
Joseph Fairbanks, St. Johnsbury, Vt. 
Peter E. Famum, Jr., care Yale Qub, 30 West 44th St, New York 

City. 
Franklin Farrel, Jr., Ansonia, Conn. 
William Ferguson, Box 251, Manchester, Conn. 
Mansfield Ferry, Box 275, Santa Barbara, Cal. 
Morton C. Fitch, 32 Nassau St., New York City. 



— 4— 

Rev. Edward H. Fitzgerald, Hebron, Conn. 

Minton Fluhrer, 604 West 114th St, New York City. 

Pierrepont B. Foster, Exchange Bldg., New Haven, Conn. 

J. Irving Fowler, Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Alan Fox, 63 Alfred St., Detroit, Mich. 

John R. Freeman, care L. R. Freeman, Warren, Pa. 

William Frew, Fifth Ave., East End, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Leonard W. Frisbie, 690 Prospect Ave., Hartford, Conn. 

W. S. Fulton, care Waterbury Machine Co., Waterbury, Conn. 

Arnold S. Furst, 215 Montague St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Thomas J. Gaines, Jr., 76 William St., New York City. 

Julius Gans, care Burke, Jackson & Burice, 140 Dearborn St., Chicago, 

111. 
Frank C. Gilbert, care Treas. Metropolitan Museum, 82d St & Fifth 

Ave., New York City. 
G. Burton Gilbert, in Jackson Place, Baltimore, Md. 
Edward L. Gillespie, Stamford, Conn. 
William W. Gleason, 350 West 71st St, New York City. 
Rev. Irvine Goddard, The Rectory, Owensboro, Ky. 
Willis E. Goodhue, High School, Norwalk, Conn. 
F. Spencer Goodwin, 103 Woodland St, Hartford, Conn. 
George A. Goss, care Scoville Mfg. Co., Waterbury, Conn. 
R. A. Granniss, Jr., 49 Liberty St, New York City. 
C. Douglass Green, 150 West 59th St, New York City. 
Herbert G. Greene, 115 Willow St, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
H. F. Griffin, 190 Summer St, Buffalo, N. Y. 
O. H. Gruner, 20 Broad St., New York City. 
John G. Haas, Jr., 256 Fifth Ave., New York City. 
Dr. John F. Hackett, St. Francis Hospital, Hartford, Conn. 
Chauncey J. Hamlin, 789 West Ferry St, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Francis J. Handel, 317 Mutual Life Bldg., Buffalo, N. Y. 
George Bradley Hardy, Bangor, Me. 

Robert Richards Hargis, 430 West St Catherine St., Louisville, Ky. 
William L. Harmount, Pine Orchard, Conn. 
Alfred L. Hart, care The Century Co., 33 East 17th St, New York 

City. 
Henry F. Hartjen, 260 West 57th St, New York City. 
Julian Hartridge, Jacksonville, Fla. 
^Maurice Fitch Hawks, died March 29, 1900. 
Bronson Hawley, nil Harvard Ave., Seattle, Wash. 
Rowland Hazard, Peace Dale, R. I. 
S. Frank Hedges, care Phelps, Evins & East, 30 Broad St., New York 

City. 
Ell R. Henry, Lake Charles, La. 
Jerome S. Hess, 50 Pine St, New York City. 
Brower Hewitt, care Southern Railway Co., Princeton, Ind. 
Albert Hileman, care Harrison Bros. & Co., 35th St & Grays Ferry, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



— 5— 

Theodore E. Hill, care Rufus Lewis Perry, 375 Fulton St, Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
Charles Hitchcock, Jr., 57 West 36th St., New York City. 
H. Morley Hitchcock, 861 Prospect St., Cleveland, O. 
Rev. Harry Oliver Hofstead, Sanford, Me. 
Thomas N. Hogan, 53 Grove St., Hartford, Conn. 
Charles S. Holbrook, care Portland Flouring Co., Portland, Ore. 
Henry C. Holt, "Roseland," Woodstock, Conn. 
Thomas Hooker, Jr., 233 Church St., New Haven, Conn. 
Sidney U. Hooper, care Great Northern Railway, Williston, N. D. 
F. S. Houghteling, Winnetka, 111. 

Lawrence A. Howard, 218 Wethersfield Ave., Hartford, Conn. 
Norman C. Hull, 40 Appleton Ave., Pittsfield, Mass. 
Roy A. Hunt, "B" St., Oakmont, Pa. 
George S. Hurst, Box 175, New Haven, Conn. 
Roswell B. Hyatt, 177 Liberty St., Meriden, Conn. 
Dr. William L. Irvine, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, R. I. 
Henry James, 527 Madison Ave., New York City. 
W. Heberd James, care T. M. James & Sons, Kansas City, Mo. 
Richard G. Jennings, care E. H. Jennings & Bros., Pittsburg, Pa. 
Rev. D. K. Johnston, St. John's Rectory, Logan, Utah. 
Franklin A. Johnston, 774 West End Ave., New York City. 
William Poyntell Johnston, 4 West 9th St., Wilmington, Del. 
Joshua Henry Jones, Jr., 270 Pine St., Providence, R. I. 
Nicholas R. Jones, 806 South 6th St., Springfield, 111. 
Robert P. Keep, Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. 
Herbert C. Kelly, Smith Academy, St. Louis, Mo. 
Daniel Edwards Kennedy, 17 Devon Road, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

F. S. Kent, 891 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 
James B. Kilburn, 135 West 95th St., New York City. 

Douglas Brooks Kimball, 124 Sixth East St., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Eugene A. Kingman, 519 Angell St., Providence, R. I. 

Joseph N. Kinney, 1423 East McMillan St., Cincinnati, O. 

Lucian S. Kirtland, care The Housekeeper, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Herman W. Knox, care Manning, Maxwell & Moore, 8$ Liberty St, 

New York City. 
Albert R. Lamb, 527 Madison Ave., New York City. 
Theodore T. Lane, 25 Franklin Place, Flushing, L. I. 
William C. Langley, 127 Remsen St, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Charles M. Latimer, care Edwards & Winters, Laughlin Bldg., Los 

Angeles, Cal. 

G. Sidney Leach, 2001 Fifth Ave., New York City. 
George E. Leonard, 42 Broadway, New York City. 
Howard R. LeVally, 4466 Lake Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Dudley P. Lewis, 746 State St., Springfield, Mass. 

C. H. L'Hommedieu, 933 Jefferson Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
Paul Lindenberg, care Columbus Piano Co., Columbus, O. 
Charles W. Littlefield, care Hughes, Rounds & Schurmann, 96 Broadway, 
New York City. 



Franklin Lockwood, care Crane & Lockwood, 46 Wall St, New York 

City. 
Arthur C. Long, care Boston Dairy Co., Charlcstown, Mass. 
Willard A. Lyon, 44 East Ave., Middletown, N. Y. 
Randolph Lyons, 2344 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans, La. 
John H. McAlamey, Lebanon, Pa. 
Harvey C. McClintock, Amberson Ave., Pittsburg, Pa. 
Robert R. McCormick, Security Bldg., Chicago, 111. 
Dr. Earl C McCulloch, 161 Bleecker St, Gloversville, N. Y. 
♦Irving McDonald, died November 15, 1903. 

James P. McDonough, care Chicago Lumber & Coal Co., Warren, Ark. 
Andrew D. Mcintosh, Taft School, Watertown, Conn. 
David R. McKee, Jr., care T. H. Symington Co., Railway Exchange 

Bldg., Chicago, 111. 
Cameron Mackenzie, The Benedict, 80 Washington Sq. East, New York 

City. 
Donald McKesson, 91 Fulton St, New York City. 
Robert L. McKnight, Glen Road, Spring^field, Mass. 
Rev. Donald B. MacLane, 33 Howe St, New Haven, Conn. 
H. Coit MacLean, loi Park Ave., New York City. 
Arthur Manierre, 61 Bellevue Place, Chicago, 111. 
Paul F. Mann, care American Express Co., Paris, France. 
John Marshall, Federal Bldg., Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Milton L. Marshall, 6 Westlake Ave., Auburn, N. Y. 
Elmer B. Mason, 53 Washington Sq., New York City. 
Macdonell Mason, care Ferrocavril del Causa, Buenaventura, Colombia, 

So. America. 
Ralph H. Melcer, 244 Spring St., New York City. 
William G. Metzger, Box 637, Fairmont, W. Va. 
H. Edmund Mills, 801 Wyandotte Bldg., Columbus, O. 
James B. Minor, 212 Vine St, Cincinnati, O. 
Douglas M. Moffat, Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Mass., or 306 

Quincy Ave., Scranton, Pa. 
Walter C. Moodie, West Tisbury, Mass. 
Charles A. Moore, Jr., 85 Liberty St., New York City. 
Frank W. Moore, 214 Edgar Place, Elizabeth, N. J. 
Daniel H. Morgan, 53 Hillman St, Springfield, Mass. 
John Barrow Motter, loth & Charles Sts., St Joseph, Mo. 
John R. Moulton, 10 Mall St., Salem, Mass. 
Frank B. Mulford, care Goodyear Rubber Co., Kansas City, Mo. 
Arthur D. Mullen, 711 Howard Ave., New Haven, Conn. 
Walter S. Munson, 36 BrinckerhoflF Ave., Utica, N. Y. 
Ralph H. Nesmith, Steam Engineering Dept., Navy Yard, League Island, 

Pa. 
Aimer M. Newhall, 114 Battery St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Paul S. Ney, 265 Asylum St, Hartford, Conn. 
James K. Nichols, care Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Mass., or 95 

Carroll St., Binghamton, N. Y. 



William P. Nixon, Jr., 177 Lake View Ave, Chicago, 111. 

Alfred T. Ogden, 41 Park Row, or 80 Washington Sq., New York City. 

Augustus K. Oliver, care Pittsburg Chronicle-Telegraph, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Daniel L. J. O'Neill, care Travelers Insurance Co., Hartford, Conn. 

Frederick L. Orlady, 6016 Walnut St., Pittsburg, Pa., or Huntingdon, Pa. 

William R. Orthwein, 15 Portland Place, St Louis, Mo. 

Erling C. Ostby, care Yale Club, 30 West 44th St, New York City. 

George G. Parkhurst, 560 Delaware Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

George H. Parr, Glenmont, Albany, N. Y. 

Charles S. Parsons, care Carnegie Technical Schools, Pittsburg, Pa. 

John H. Partridge, 69 Brooklyn St, Rockville, Conn. 

William L. Patterson, Amherst, Nova Scotia. 

Oscar C. Payne, care Baylor University, Waco, Texas, or Crockett, 

Texas. 
Wheeler H. Peckham, care Mrs. W. G. Steel, "Cresheim," Mt Airy, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
J. Deming Perkins, Jr., 1068 Pearl St, Denver, Col. 
Byron A. Pierce, care Ostby & Barton Co., 118 Richmond St, Providence, 

R. I. 
Claude M. Pitcher, jo6 Commonwealth Bldg., or 141 5 Price St, Scran- 
ton, Pa. 
Howard A. Plummer, care Trust Company of America, 135 Broadway, 

New York City. 
Horace B. Pomeroy, care Bankers Trust Co., 7 Wall St., New York 

City. 
George F. Porter, 143 Dearborn St, Chicago, 111. 
Henry Potter, 5814 Cabanne Ave., St Louis, Mo. 
Charles F. Pratt, 466 Farmington Ave., Hartford, Conn. 
James O. Putnam, care Missouri & Kansas Telephone Co., Kansas City, 

Mo. 
John F. Putnam, 61 South 6th St, Columbus, O. 
Hugh Rankin, care Railroad Gazette, 83 Fulton St, New York City, 

or Peekskill, N. Y. 
John D. Rea, 538 Elm St, New Haven, Conn. 
John J. Reilly, 129 Lexington Ave., New York City. 
James W. Reynolds, 4239 Lindell Ave., St Louis, Mo. 
Samuel W. Rhoads, 24 Coal Exchange, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
Joseph F. Rhodes, 336 Bellevue Drive, Pasadena, Cal. 
George H. Richards, 14 East 37th St, New York City. 
Dr. R. G. D. Richardson, 821 Yale Station, New Haven, Conn. 
Harry A. Rightmire, 840 Salem Ave., Elizabeth, N. J., or Fairport, N. Y. 
Stephen Garrett Roach, care Yale Station, New Haven, Conn. 
Rev. George Roberts, Jr., Teaneck, Englewood, N. J. 
J. Randolph Robinson, care Harbison-Walker Refractories Co., Life 

Bldg., New York City. 
Cleveland Rogers, Wakefield, R. I. 
William J. Roome, Jr., 11 West 34th St, New York City, or 41 Sycamore 

Ave., Plainfield, N. J. 



♦Henry Idc Root, died January 17, 1901. 

Joseph C. Roraback, Canaan, Coan, 

Arthur J. Rosenthal, 9 East 6ist St, New York City. 

Carleton F. Rowell, 4579 West Pine Boul., St Louis, Mo. 

Henry M. Russell, Jr., 1421 Chapline St, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Henry C. Sanford, Bridge'water, Conn. 

Ziegler Sargent, 247 Church St, New Haven, Conn. 

Harold Mv Sawyer, care Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Mass. 

Lewis A. Sayre, 228 West 44th St, New York City. 

Reeve Schley, 17 West 52d St, New York City. 

William Schroeder, Jr., care Wm. Schroeder & Co., 469 Broome St, 

New York City. 
William S. Searles, 10 The Manhattan, Qeveland, O. 
Harold F. Sheets, care A New York Companhia de Seguros de Vida, 99 

Rua d*El Rei, Lisbon, Portugal. 
Joseph M. Skrable, Elberon, la. 

Brockholst M. Smith, Box 1413, or 165 Hope St, Providence, R. I. 
George A. Smith, iii Jackson Place, Baltimore, Md., or 42 Seyms St, 

Hartford, Conn. 
Lowell W. Smith, Albion, N. Y. 
Robert S. Smith, Clarendon, Vt 
William B. W. Smith, P. O. Box 552, or 304 Beechwood Ave, Bridgeport, 

Conn. 
Levings H. Somers, Lock Box 7, Mercersburg, Pa. 
George P. Spencer, 59 Washington St, Watertown, N. Y. 
F. Randolph Stauffer, 521 Court St, or 1513 Hill Road, Reading, Pa. 
Prof. Warren M. Steele, 418 Choice Ave., Greenville, S. C. 
Henry Root Stem, care Stem & Rushmore, 40 Wall St, New York 

City. 
John H. Stevens, care Wm. A. Read & Co., Pine & Nassau Sts., New 

York City. 
J. McAllister Stevenson, Jr., 28 Reed St, Pittsfield, Mass. 
Ralph G. Stillman, Rahway, N. J. 

Charles H. Stoll, Jr., care Socorro Co., Elmendorf, N. M. 
Theron R. Strong. 29 East 6sth St., New York City. 
William R. Stuart, 108 Warburton Ave., or care MtnsL Life Ins. Co., 

Yonkers, N. Y. 
Thomas Sturgis, Jr., 138 East 36th St, New York City. 
Dr. Jeremiah B. Sullivan, 245 Washington Ave., New Haven, Conn. 

(After Nov. /, 1906^ Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, R. I.) 
♦Walter Sullivan, died July 12, 1905. 
Stuart B. Sutphin. 935 West 5th St, Cincinnati, O. 
Paul B. Sweet. 231 Topeka Ave., Topeka, Kansas. 
George E. Sykes, Rockville, Conn. 
Harlan C. Taylor, care National Biscuit Co., loth Ave. & 15th St., New 

York City. 
William H. Taylor, care International Banking Corp'n., Manila, P. L 
William K. Terriberry, Somerville, N. J. 



M. B. Tcrrill, Swiss Ave., Dallas, Texas. 

Ralph H. Thachcr, care Central N. Y. Telephone & Telegraph Co., 
Syracuse, N. Y. 

Herbert F. Thomas, 71 Broadway, New York City. 

Joseph B. Thomas, Jr., Simsbury, Conn., or 763 Fifth Ave., New York 
City. 

Theodore G. Thomas, 103 East i2Sth St, or 363 East X35th St, New 
York City. 

Donald Thompson, 1651 Frick Bldg. Annex, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Edwin V. Thompson, 1407 Third Ave., Louisville, Ky. 

George J. Thomson, care Bowers & Sands, 31 Nassau St., New York 
City. 

Prof. Herman J. Thorstenberg, Norman, Okla. 

George R. Tillson, care D. H. Rexford, 80 Broadway, New York City. 

Edward P. Townsend, 306 West 80th St, New York City. 

Arsene L. Trenholm, 137 East 39th St, New York City. 

Lieut John Marshall True, care Military Secretary, U. S. Army, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Edward P. Truett, 115 South Elliot Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Abraham Tulin, 34 Bellevue St, Hartford, Conn. 

William B. Tyler, 126 East 9th St, Plainfield, N. J. 

Rev. David B. Updegraff, Lafayette Ave. Presbyterian Church, Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

Fred B. Utley, Student's Club, 328 West 56th St., New York City. 

S. Oakley VanderPoel, Jr., 30 Broad St, New York City. 

Harry B. Van Deventer, 531 North Broad St, Elizabeth, N. J. 

Douglass Van Dyke, 44 Prospect Ave., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Ernest S. Van Tassel, care Union Pacific R. R., Omaha, Neb. 

Axel IE. Vestling, 130 Wall St., New Haven, Conn. 

C J. Waddell, care N. W. Harris & Co., Pine St cor. William, New 
York City. 

Anson Wagar, care Ziebach, Wagar & Russell, Gregory, S. D. 

J. R. Wait, 77 Genesee St, Auburn, N. Y. 

Ralph B. Wakefield, 1102 Frick Bldg., Pittsburg, Pa., or Greenville, 
Mercer Co., Pa. 

W. Durrie Waldron, 79 North Mountain Ave., Montclair, N. J. 

Lieut. James Frederick Walker, Fort Williams, Portland, Me. 

Raymond W. Walker, care Knickerbocker Syndicate, 320 Fifth Ave., 
New York City. 

Walter B. Walker, 42 Broadway, New York City. 

H. Mitchell Wallace, 76 North Cliff St, Ansonia, Conn. 

Walter F. Wallace, 87 Astor St., Chicago, 111. 

Arthur A. Ward, Odon, Ind. 

Freeman Ward, 569 Yale Station, New Haven, Conn. 

S. Dwight Ward. Room 9, N. Y. Central R. R., Grand Central Station, 
New York City. 

Antonio J. Waring, 527 Madison Ave., New York City. 

Arthur W. Warner, care Riter-Conley Mfg. Co., 55 Water St, Pitts- 
burg, Pa. 



George P. Warner, 605 Niagara St, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Irving H. Warner, P. O. Box 122, St Mary's, Pa., or Fairport, N. Y., 

R. F. D. No. a 
George A. Washington, Wessyngton, Tenn. 
Bradford Webster, 900 Fifth St, Louisville, Ky. 

Edward F. Webster, care Bronson & Townsend Co., New Haven, Conn. 
George U. Wenner, care Alaska Qub, Seattle, Wash. 
Ethan P. Wescott, 125 South 5th St, Philadelphia, Pa. 
William B. Weston, 60 Devonshire St, Boston, Mass. 
Edwin R. Whitcomb, care Wisconsin Central Railway, Fond du Lac, Wis. 
Howard S. White, 21 Cliff St, Waterbury, Conn. 
J. Richards White, St. Mark's School, Southboro, Mass., or 150 George 

St, Providence, R. L 
W. O. White, 513 Ohio St, Cairo, 111. 
Everett M. Whittemore, care Bumham, Hanna, Munger Dry Goods Co., 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Willis S. Whittlesey, 164 Front St, New York City. 
Theodore H. Wickwire, Jr., Cortland, N. Y. 
♦Thomas Edward Wilde, died February 23, 1901. 
Frederick W. Wilhelmi, care Walker County Lumber Co., Elmina, 

Texas. 
Lewis A. Williams, Jr., care The Publishing Society, 41 Lafayette Place, 

New York City. 
Orion J. Willis, care American Sheet & Tin Plate Co., or 30 Walton 

Place, Chicago, 111. 
William L. Winch, 114 High St, New Haven, Conn. 
Wilson G. Wing, Bangor, Me. 

William B. Wood, 1054 South First St, Evansville, Ind. 
George E. Woodbine, 245 York St, New Haven, Conn. 
Harris S. Woodman, Winthrop, Me. 
John E. Woodruff, 716 James St., Syracuse, N. Y. 
Howard S. Woodward, Box 62, Normal, 111. 
Gerald S. Work, Warkwolde, Perkins Hill, Akron, O. 



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