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Full text of "History and family record of the "John" family 1683 to 1964 : the descendants of John Phillips and Ellen, his wife from Haverfordwest, Prembrokeshire, Wales"

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HISTORY AND FAMILY RECORD OF THE "JOHN" FAMILY 
1683 TO 196^ 
THE DESCENDANTS OF JOHN PHILLIPS AND ELLEN, HIS WIFE 

FROM 
HAVERFORDWEST, P PEMBROKE SHI RE, WALES 






GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY 

OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST 
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 

FEB 151967 ?9818 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



Forward - Writers Preface 



Geneology Traced 

John Phillips and His Posterity to 1"^ 66 -------------- 1 

Early Sketches ------------------------ 1 

The Quaker Movement --------------------- 1 

A Brief of Eliza John and Her Diary ------------- 2 

Early History ----------- ------------- 2 

Folson Club Library in Louisville, Kentucky --------- 3 

Friends Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania ----- 3 

Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania ------------------- 4, 

William Penn ------------------------- 5 

Letter from William Penn ------------------- 6 

Some Early Pennsylvania Laws ----------------- 7 

Early History and Names -- ----------------- 7 

Early History and People - Lucretia Mott ----------- 8 

Lionville --------------- ----------- 9 

History Statistics ------ ---------- ----- 10 

West Chester Historical Society of Pennsylvania ----- 10 

Friends Meeting House, Philadelphia ----- ----- 10 

Chester County Courthouse ----- ------ -_-- n 

The Griffith Family 11 

Early History -------- ----- -_---_ ---- 12 

Wales 1^ 

Pennsylvania -------- ----- ------ _--- i^ 

Early History of Chester County ---- ------ _--- i/^ 

Map of Chester County ---- ----- ------ ---_ 16 

Some of the Johns that were in the Census of Pennsylvania, 17*: ----- 17 

Chart - The First Census Taken in Pennsylvania -------- 18 

Chart - The John Family 19 

Chart - Our Connections from John and Ellen Phillips ----- 23 

Geneology of our Ancestors ------------------ 2Z^ 

Early Burial Grounds --------------------- 25 

Transfer of Deeds 26 

The Phillips -- 27 

The Quaker Movement in Wales ----------------- 27 

First Generation of John Family --------------- 28 

Isaac John and His descendants ---------------- 29 

Robert Fulton 32 

Samuel John, Senior and his Wife and Children -------- 32 

Isaac John -------------------------- 34- 

Court house in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania ------------ 35 

First Generation ---------------- ------------ 36 

Griffith John, Senior, The Emigrant - ------------ 37 

Second Generation from Griffith, Senior and Ann Willlajns John- ^0 

Griffith John, Senior's Will ^2 

West Chester Historical Society ---------- ---- 

Goshen Meeting Marriages ----------- _--- ^2 

Uwchlan Meeting ---- ----------- ---- 1^2. 



Page 

Swart limore Quaker College in Pennsylvania --------- ^.3 

Blinkley Papers, Folson Club, Louisville, Kentucky - - - - /_^3 

Robert John ------------------------ /,3 

The Todd Family 4-5 

Second Generation --------------------------- 4.7 

The Second Generation of oui'' Line. Griffith John, Senior - 48 

Griffith, Junior and Sarah (Lloyd) John's Children - - - — 49 

Wedding Certificate ---------------- --- 52 

Griffith John, 2nd. Pictures 01 title 54 

Some Early History and Happenings ------------- 64 

Ebenezer and Sarah John ------------------ 65 

Map of Columbia County - ----------------- 616 

Qui' Erajich of the John Family - Griffith, Junior - ---------- 68 

and Samuel John - Abia John ---------------- 68 

Abia and Martha John ---- --------------- 69 

Abia, Senior and Martha John's Children and Descendants - - 70 

Descendants of Abia John --------------- -- 72 

Abia, Senior and Martha Jolin's Cliildren - continued - - - - 74 

A Section of Eliza John's Diary, I84J 79 

Abia, Senior and Martha John's Children, continued - - - - 86 

Perry and Rebecca Underwood John's Children -------- 86 

Friends Meeting House ------------------- 87 

The Old Family Bible 88 

Looking Back ----- __-_-_------------ 89 

Poem - Looking Back - ------------------ 90 

A Letter Written by Griffith Jolm to His Cousin Sarah (John) 

Burch - (4 letters) 93_95_96-97 

Pictures - 

Quaker Log Meeting House --------------- 99 

Uwchlan Friends Church ---------------- loo 

Uwchlan Friends Cemetery --------------- loo 

Pictui^es of Family 

Jehu John and Patience Jolin -------__---_--- loi 

Ruben John and Sophia John ---------------- 102 

Lorenzo John and Lucretia John ------------ -101--102-103 

Clark John and Johanna John ------__----__-- 104 

Clark John and Gladys Jokn ----------__---_ 105 

The Mettlers -_---_______ _______________ 106 

Our Branch of the "John" Family from Abia and Martha John (Abia, the Son 

of Griffith Jolm, Junior) Jehu Jolm -------------I---- 107 

Fifth and Sixth Generation from Ruben and Sophia John and 
Children - 

Ruben John ---------------------- 108 

Ruben and Sophia Jolm's Children and Grandchildren - - I09 
Isaac M. and Catherine (Vastine) John's Children and 

Grandchildren ---------__------_- - 112 

Map of Franlclin County, Iowa ---------------- I15 

Map of Douglas County, South Dakota ------------ 116 

Homestead Certificate No. 6OII --------------- I17 

Register of Deeds ------- -_-----_-_____ 113 



XI 



Page 

Fourth ajid Fifth Generations - Jehu John -------____ 119 

Their Move to Illinois ---------_--_____ 119 

Fifth and Sixth Generations from Jehu and Patience John 

Lorenzo T. and Lucretia E. John and Their Descendants ----- 121 

Old Farm House - Boyhood Home and Lorenzo T. John ------- 123 

A Little Dakota History -----_-_----_-----_- 124, 

Lorenzo T. John ------------------------ 12^ 

Lucretia Elmira John __-----_------__---__ i2C 

Children of Lorenzo T. and Lucretia E. John ---------- 127 

Cynthia A. John ----_------_-_--- -___ 127 

Eighth Generation from Charles B. and Frances M Scott.- 128 

Laura V. John ---------------------- 129 

Seventh and Eighth Generation -Branch from La^ora V. and 

Ransom D. Harvey ------------------ 130 

Eighth Generation from Ada E. and Grover Ruegsegger - I3I 

Kai'k Monroe John -----------__----_--- 132 

Rachel A. (Pence) John, Wife of Mai-k M. John ----- 13/^ 

Mark M. and Rachel A. John's Children and Grandchildren 13^ 

Edna Irene John -__--------------_---_ 136 

Fourth Branch of the Sixth Generation from Lorenzo 

T. John and Lucretia John --------------- 136 

Children and Grandchildren of Edna I. (John) and T. H. 

Hendricks ----------------------- 137 

Poem by Rev. T. H. Hendricks -------------- 139 

Carrie L . John ---------------------- 1/^Q 

Fifth Branch of Sixth Generation from Lorenzo T. John - 1^0 

Bert W. John __------ 1^0 

Sixth Branch of the Sixth Generation from Lorenzo T. 

and Lucretia John ------------------ ±/^o 

Seventh Generation from Bert W. and Fannie E. John - - 1/J. 

Milton Ross John ---------------- -_- 1^3 

Seventh Generation of Sixth Generation from Lorenzo T. 

and Lucretia E. John ----------------- 14,3 

Clark E. Johrn ---------------------- I46 

Eighth of Sixth Generation from Lorenzo T. and Lucretia 

E. John and Their Descendants ------------- I4.6 

iii 



Page 

Kiraber LeRoy John 

Second of Fifth Generation from Jehu and Patience John - - - I64. 

Cephas Day John 

Third of Fifth Generation from Jehu and Paticence J r.-hn and 

his Descendants ----------------------- lo5 

Sarah Mai'tha Jo Ian 

Fourth of Fifth Generation from Jehu and Patience John and 

Her Descendants ----------------------- 168 

Ann Eliza John 

Fifth of Fifth Generation from Jehu and Patience Johm and 

Her children ------------------------- 171 

Edmund J . John 

Sixth of fifth Generation from Jehu and Patience John and his 
Descendants -------------------------- 173 



Notes from the Writer --------------------------- 182 



IV 



FORWARD 
WRITERS PREFACE 



Histories are undertaken and written for various reasons 5 some for material gains, 
some for the gratifying those vitally concerned in them, while others write 
histories because they wish to draw historical facts out of the dim past into 
the light and thus produce them for the benefit of all who may be concerned 
and wish to ponder over them. 

1 was interested in our ancestors and the times that they passed through while 
hewing out a home in those early years. Therefore, 1 took upon myself the task 
that called for a lot of work, research and time to secure out of the past all 
that 1 much wanted to know about their pioneer life and the conditions in those 
early years . 

Their early history was hallowed in a purpose greater than just the material 
things of time, and getting a home on earth. It was forged in the fire of 
burning faith in their God. Many of oui' ancestors cajne to this comitry in 
those early years with but one goal in their minds, namely^ to advance the 
Kingdom of their Lord and Master. It would be impossible to understand their 
religious fervor and zeal of our early settlers v/ithout knowing their religious 
background. 

I am retired and past the three score and ten years. During this retirement 
1 have been working many hours on this history, and even before my retirement 
1 worked many hours on it . 

To the best of my knowledge, this history is correct. There have been many 
years passed under the bridge of time since our first ancestors came from 
Wales, placing their feet on the banks of the Deleware River, where the great 
city of Brotherly Love (Philadelphia) now stands. 

This has been a most trying and difficult task getting this data together. 
Their births, when they were married and to whom they were married, their 
early movements and their deaths; took a lot of research to gather and compile 
this material in many different ways from people and places. I have tried to 
get all of this data correct. Should there be any errors as to dates, etc., 
please forgive as this could happen, as mistakes can be made by anyone and I 
am no exception. 

Most of our early ancestors that emigrated from Wales to North America in 
those early years were Quakers and zealous workers in their church and real 
helpers to all that were in need of help in anyway. This was the standard set 
by our early ancestors . 

When they first settled there in North America, about all there was for them 
to make a living was to raise their food and raiment from their farms. But, 
as the years went by, some branched out in different lines of vocations. Some 
becaiae doctors, others became inventors, lawyers, judges, supreme court judges, 
teachers, principals and superintendents of schools, and both men and women 
preachers of the Gospel. 

These were some of our first ancestors. They set a good example for the 
generations to follow in this wonderful land of ours. May the ones to follow 
be as good and energetic as were our forefathers. 



GENEALOGY TRACED 
JOIM PHILLIPS AND HIS POSTERITY TO I966 

The contents of this history and family record was collected from old Pibles 
and courthouses all over the United States of America; from a copy of the original 
record that Lorenzo T. Joim obtained about the year of 1850; from libraries, 
genealogies and historical places of information; and by my ■^^friting to people in 
England and Wales. Also, I took sketches from Eliza John's diary (she was the 
daughter of Abia John) which Elizabeth B. Heritage of Mulica Hill, New Jersey 
copied for me. Elizabeth Heritage also copied for me the family record of 
Griffith John, Senior (the emigrant) from Griffith Joh-.i, Junior's Bible. She 
Took pict'ureE of this Bible and the family records from it and I copied parts 
of letters from Griffith John (the son of Peri-^; John) to his cousin Sarah (Joli-'i) 
Burch of Rockford, Illinois. I copied some from Don John's history papers in 
the Folson Club Library in Louisville, Kentucky, and from his papers in the Newbury 
Library in Chicago, Illinois. I obtained material by going through the country 
where o^ur ancestors settled when they came from Wales in 1709. 

I also obtained material from the Quaker Historical Meeting House and their 
genealogy on East Arch Street n?ar the Independence Hall in Philadelphia, and 
at the Swarthmore Quaker College in Swarthinore , Pennsylvania. The Quakers had 
most of the records of births, marriages, deaths and history of those early 
people. I received much material from those to whom I had written in regards 
to this history. This data was gathered and compiled by me, Clark E. JohLi, of 
1360 Prospect Avenie, Long Beach, California. I started in 1935 and am still 
working on it in 1966. 

I .a.Ti indebted to the contributors w'nich have helped me to interpret events with 
coPifidence that the interpretation will stand. I am also indebted to many 
histories and historians for much in this book, for the basic work, monographs 
and manuscript wliich I have used, I can only give thanks collectively. 

EARLY SKETCHES 

Joh_i Phillips and Ellen, his wife, were the first of our ancestors to come from 
Pembrokeshire, Wales. It is thought that they came from in or near Haverford- 
west . 

In an early date, this part was peopled -vith English Colonists, and was called 
"Little England". The English spoken there was a dialect peculiar to that 
locality. It is thought that our ancestors spoke both the Welch and the 
dialect . 

T HE QUAKER MO V Ei^NT 

In I657, George Fox came to Wales and traveled as far northward as Beaijmaria, 
accompanied by John ap-John and preached the new doctrine with wonderful 
success. EveryAwere in Wales the effects of the meetings were seen and 
Wales was soon alive with Quakers. 

Many of these converts in after years cam? to William Penn's colony on the 
shore of the Delaware River and settled in the 4.0,000 acre tract of land 
that Williajn Perm had s-orveyed for the Welch Quakers. This land was called 
"The Welch Barney". 



Thore is an old family Bible that Gr iffith John., Jiinior had and it is the family 
record of his father's family, G riffith John , Senior's children and others. 
This Bible was handed down several times. In I960, it was in the hands of Mary 
(John) Heritage of Mulica Hill, New Jersey. 



In education, industry and practical ability these Welch people had few 2<: 
among the early settlers. They were not only ministers, but the first st; 
men, the first lawyers and the first physicians. 



quals 
ates- 



There were no paupers depending on charity nor on William Penn, but they were 
self reliant men and women with ample fortune in their hands seeking a home 
and liberty where they could worship God after their o-^/?.! desire. 

A B RIEF OF ELIZA JOHN AND HER DIARY 

This material was transcL^ibed from the original manuscript by Elizabeth Heritage 
for me. She is the daughter of Mary (Joka) Heritage of Mulica Hill, New Jersey, 
and shs has the original manuscript. 

Eliza John, th? twelfth child of Abia and Martha John, was born on the 29th of 
May, 1812, near Bear Gap, ShamokLn (now called Ralpo ) Township, Northumberland 
County, Pennsylvaaia. She was an active member of the Roaring Creek Quaker 
Meetings. This Meeting House and the school house ware buMt by Eli^.a's 
brothers, Elida and Perry John. Eliza's father, Abia John, was the first school 
teacher ii this section. He was the grandson of Griffith Johji, Senio_r. 

Eliza John never married. After the death of ner father, she and her sister, 
Sarah John, lived together until her death on the fourth of December, 1863. 
Eliza's diary gives a cross section of life, as she records the births, marriages 
and deaths. The diary also gives dates when certain members of the family 
emigrated farther west. She had a quaint way of making personal comjnents and 
voicing bits of homey philosophy as she records daily happenings. 

KARLY__HIST_0_M 

I took from the "Binkley Papers", out of Don John's records in the Folsoa Club 
Library in Louisville, Kentucky, parts of a letter by Mrs. Alma (John) Woodson, 
w-.-itten in 1910, Her address was Route 2, Box Z^67 , Indianapolis, Indiana. When 
I was in Indianapolis in I960, I tried my best to locate some of her relations, 
but I was not successful. 

Quote from part of a letter: "John Phillips John, his wife Ellen ot- Eleanor 
and their sons Robert or Thom^as, Samuel and Griffith John, living in Pembroke- 
shire, Wales. (It is thought in the Parish of Haverfordwest). According to 
tradition, Robert or (Thomas) who died without issue, was possessed of'^a great 
fort'une which was to be divided to his brothers' issue sne hundred years after 
his death. It ir stated vhat his estate was invested in the East India Tea 
Company and had reached an enormoi-^ amo-.mt . The one hiuidred years had elapsed 
many years ago and the money is supposed to be in Chancery waiting for the 
heirs to present their claims of proof" Chancery is a division of the High 
Co'irt of Justice in Great Britian where the affairs of those who have died are 
conducted. 

She -writes in 1890, "Johji W. Bravans of Swansea, Wales, wi.-ote thus to Dr. J.J. 
John of Shamokin, Pennsylvania: "My mother's brother who lives in Pembrokeshire 
Wales, had sea-ched th.-rough all the various Parish Chu-ches and interviewed' all' 
the Rectors and Vica-s who he is personally acquainted with and ne can trace 
our family Jo_hi^ back for the last th^ee or fo^or hun<ired years She says my 



mother belongs to the same family of Johns that went to North America 181 years 
ago and consequently we are most positive that we are of the same family". 

She went on to say, "my ancestors, the Johns were gentlemen farmers , living six 
to fourteen miles from Haverfordwest, 1 am most positive that if you will most 
kindly give the exact Parish of Samuel and Griffith John, the sons of John Phillip 
John, emigrants from Pembrokeshire, Wales that settled in Goshen, Chester County, 
Pennsylvania, as to their births, and also where their estates were located, my 
uncle is most sure that he could trace it. And could find out if John Phillips 
John had more children than these three sons". 

In 17 09, Samuel and Griffith John, sons of John Phillip John, emigrated from 
Pembrokeshire, Wales, and settled in Goshen, Chester County, Pennsylvania, 
(Goshen is now in Lancaster County by an act of the General Assembly on the 
I'Oth of May, 1729). 

Mrs. Persis (Agnew) Brown, of 2233 Sherman Avenue, Evanston, Illinois, the 
daughter of Mable C. and Albert E. Agnew, great granddaughter of Issac John, 
and great-great-grandaughter of Ruben and Sophia (Mettler) John, wrote this to 
me in 19f'7. Quote: "I fo\ind this in the Newbury Library in Chicago, Illinois, 
where John Griffith arrived on the ship 'C proline' in Virginia in the year of 
1628." 

He changed his name to Griffith John. He was from Wales. She says that he 
was our first ancestor in America. She thinks that he must have been the one that 
had the old Welch Bible from Wales with the Will to an estate of something like 
$60,000,000.00 in Wales. 

FOLSON CLTO LIE^RARY IN LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 

There was an Isaac John, who had a son named James John, and he married Catherine 
Lettell, and to them were born eleven children, namely 5 

1. Elizabeth John, born on the 11th of July, 1800. 

2. Sarah John, born on the 16th of January, 1802. 

3. William John, born on the 6th of September, 1805. 
U, Nancy John, born on the 20th of June, 1807. 

5. Catherine John, born on the 26th of January, 1809. 

6. Daniel John, born on the 3rd of March, 1812. 

7. Samuel John, born on the 5th of December 181^-. 

8. Martha John, born on the 1st of May, 1817. 

9. Thomas M. John, born on the 3rd of September, 1819. 

10. Caroline M. , born on the l5th of March, 1822. 

11. Roda E. John, born on the 6th of September, 1824. 

FRIENDS SWARTHMORE COLLEGE, SWARTHl'IORE, PENNSYLVANIA -SWARTHMORE MEETING MEMBERS 

Baldan John and Lynda, his wife --------------- 31 - 32 

Edward John and children ------------------- 133 

Hol]orsall John ----------------------- 77 

Ruben John and family -------------------- 155 - 116 

Lucie John, Grace and children -------------- — 99 - 100 

Longstruth John, Jane and children --- — --------- 17 

Lewis John and children ------------------- 131 

Mirth John and Mary and chiildren -------------- 71 - 72 



BLOOMSHURGII , PENNSYLVANIA 
p'rom the Record of Deeds in the Courthouse 

Abia John, Deed Book, Vol. 1, page ,^00, Dite of Deed 30th of December, 1813. 
Date registered gi^h of November, 181^. Catawissa Township, Columbia County, 
Pennsylvania. (Grantor — Joseph Atkinson). 



Hiram Jolin, Deed Pook, Vol. i- , page ^00. Date of Deed 7th of May, 1830. 
Registered on the 7th of May, 1830. Catawissa TownsMp, Columbia County, 
Permsylvania. 



James John, Deed Book Vol. 11, page UU7-. Date of Deed 30th of March, 18^8, 
Date of registration 18.^8. Mt . Pleasant Township in Columbia County, 
Pennsylvania. 



Eliza John, Deed Book, Vol. 11, page %9 . Date of Deed 10th of August, l$,p . 
Date registered, l^th of Mai'ch, 18^9. 



There was a Hanah John and a Herman in the Deed Book at the coui^thouse in 
Bloomsbiirg and some other Johns listed. 



West Chester Historical Society, speaks of a John Phillips and William Phillips 
brothers. They were born in Pembrokeshire, Wales. John Phillips married Jane 
Townsend. He died on the 24th of September, 1820. Their children were, namely; 
1. Elizabeth, 2. Mary, 3. Sarah, 4.. Margaret, 5. David, 6. James, and 
7. Phillip Phillips. 



Some early families listed in the records in the Public Library in Philadelphia. 

A Griffith Jones was probably the first white man to own land in what is now 
the town of Richland in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. In 16f9, he purchased 
several hundred acres in or near the North Wales settlement, but others got a 
claim on it before he did, so he lost out on that claim. But in l7ol and 17o6 
he did buy a thousand acres where Richland towti now stands. At that time it 
was called the "Great Swamp" , but it tuinied out to be a very rich soil. 



WILLIAM PENN 













f' 


WILLIAM PENN 

Early Years 





As ouj- early ancestors had such close dealings with William Penn, I believe 
it would be of interest to write about some of his early life in England, 
and the part he had in the making of Pennsylvania's first history. 

I took this from the Historical Society and the Swarthmore Quaker College 
in Philadelphia and Swarthmore, Pennsylvania. 

The Providence owed most of its liberties to William Penn. He was the son 
of an English Admiral, William Penn, Senior. He was born in London in the 
year of 1644-- -^"t first he was a member of the Anglican Church. He was 
schooled in Oxford College, and was a vigorous boatsman and student. He 
commenced drifting into Quakerism. His father heard of his interests in 
Quakerism and he tried to pursuade him to give up his interests, but was 
unable to do so and finally disinherited him. 

The pressing wants of the exile were relieved by his mother's love. But, 
he was soon in prison for his religious work. He was quartered in a tiny 
room in the prison tower under a roof where it was cold in the winter and 
hot in the summer. 

Bishop London conveyed the message to Penn by way of Cook Gardner, that 
he was to appear before Fair on all the city to confess or be a prisoner 
during the rest of his life. Gardner brought back the reply of "Thou 
mayest tell my father, whom I know will ask thee, these words that this 
prison cell shall be my grave before I will budge a bit for I owe no mortal 
man my conscience. I have no need to fear as God will make amends for all. 
These who use force in these religious persecutions, mine forgive, and they 
can never be right." 



In 1663, his father relenting obtained his release. Again he was arrested 
and at the trial the jiory acquitted him. The judge sent the jury back to 
their room saying, "We will have a verdict or we shall starve for it". They 
did starve for forty-eight hours and they still said, "not guilty". A fine 



was given to the jury and William Penn was ordered back to jail, 
paid the fine and William Penn was back at the Quaker Meetings. 



His father 



Willlfon Ponn'n te;;timony, "Though I know Him not from the beginning, yet I 
knew Him, that in which neither beginning of days nor end of life. In the eternal 
light : know Him and have often sweat fellowship with Him, therein to my great 
refreshment, even in the gloomy and dark days". 



His father, oir 



William Penn, on his dying bed said, "Son William, I am weary 
I would not live over my life again if 1 could command it with 

This troubles 



of this world 

a wii'h, Tor the snares of life are greater than the fears of death 

me. Uhl have a care of sin which is the sting both of life and death". 



Then 



said, "William let nothing in this world tempt you to wrong your conscience, 
will be a feast to dwell on in a day of trouble". Then thinking of England, 
he said, "God will judge you, old England." 

His last words to his son were, "Son William, if you and your friends keep to 
your plain way of living and preaching, you will make and end of Priest to 
the end of the world. Bury me by my mother, live in love and God will bless 
you all. William, you have chosen the better part." 

William Penn was sent by the King, Charles II, to take charge of the Providence 
of Pennsylvania in 1682. He sailed up the Delaware River with one hundred 
emigrants and under a big elm tree Ms famous treaty was made with the Indians 
and there grew up the great city of Philadelphia, which in three years had 
six hundred houses. 



he 
That 



The state of Pennsylvania was named by King Charles II in honor of William Penn 
and was called at first the Providence of Pennsylvania. 

The following I copied from the book "History of Chester County". In 1683, 
William Penn bought 4.0,000 acres of land from the Indians for the Quakers. 
For this land he gave them: 



150 fathoms wampum 

14 blankets 

15 guns 

3 great kettles 
15 small kettles 
32 pounds of powder 
15 shirts 
30 bars of lead 

7 pairs of shoes 

6 caps 
12 gimlets 

6 dressing knives 



15 pairs of scissors 

3 papers of beads 
If) axes 
18 glasses 

15 combs 

5 papers of red lead 

16 pairs of stockings 
15 tobacco boxes 

15 tobacco tongs 
15 coats 
15 knives 
15 hose 



and a quantity of yardage goods . 

A LSTTTER BY WILLIAM PENN TO THE PEOPLE OF CHESTER AND DELAWARE COUOTIES 

I took this from the Library in Philadelphia, from a book entitled 
"Heathecte's History of Chester County, Pennsylvania". 

Letter from V/illiam Penn 

April, the 8th, 1681, King Charles II, made the grant of Pennsylvania. By this 
letter, my friends, I wish you all happiness, here and hereafter. These are to 
let you know that it has pleased God, in His Providence to cast you within my 
lot and care. 



It is a business that, though I never undertook before, yet I know that God 
has given me an understanding of my duty and an honest mind to do it uprightly. 

I hope that you will not be troubled at our change and the King's choice, for 
you are not fixed at the mercy of any Governor that comes to make his fortune 
great, and if you will, you shall be governed by laws of youj-" own making, and 
live a free and sober industrious people. 

I shall not usurp the right, or oppress any person. God has furnished me with 
a better resolution, and has given His grace, to keep it. In short, whatever, 
sober and free men can reasonably desire for the security and improvement of 
the happiness, I shall heartily comply with, and I beseech God to direct you 
in the way of righteousness to you and your children. 

Signed - William P'enn 

SOME EARLY PENNSYLVANIA LAWS 

The Bible was to be associated with the oath taken by every civil officer and 
witness. It was to hold its unsectarian place in the schools. The Lords Day 
should be kept. The Chaplains of Congress and Assemblies were to be Christians. 
They used the King James version as their Bible in the schools and churches. 

In 1681, William Perm sent Thomas Holmes, a surveyor, to establish a site for 
a town. And in 1682, the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia was laid out. 

Saying of William Perm. "There is a faith that overcomes the world, and there 
is a faith that is overcome by the world." 

EARLY HISTORY AND NAMES - PENNSYLVANIA 

There is an account of a Griffith Jones tract in Bucks County. He built a shelter 
by the side of a leaning rock, and in this rude dwelling was born the first wliite 
child in that settlement. They named the boy child after his father Griffith 
Jones. He was born on the I2th of October, 1681. 

There was a Griffith John that came from Wales in 1712, and settled on a farm 
about a mile west of Conserville, Chester County, Pennsylvania. His children bore 
the name of "Jones". He died in 1753, and was buried in the Great Valley Baptist 
burying ground. He had a brother by the name of Henry John. 

The names of his children were: 1. Samuel Jones, 2. William Jones, 3. Thomas 
Jones, and J^. Margaret Jones (she married an Evan James and their homestead 
went to their son John James). 

There was an Abraham Griffith that bought a portion a this Griffith John's 
land in Bucks County in 17 08. One of the signers of the papers was a John 
Phillips. (I do not know for sure whether this was our ancestor, John Phillips 
or not ). 

There was another Griffith family that was connected with our ancestors by 
marriage (I believe) and they could be by blood relation also. There were 
three brothers that came from Wales in 1715. Their names were: 1. Thomas 
Griffith, 2. Griffith Griffith and 3. John Griffith. Their father's name was 
Griffith John. They married into the Sharps, Fosters, Thomases, and Cadwalader 
families as did our ancestors. Several of our ancestors had names like theirs. 
Thomas Griffith was the keeper of the Great Britian's Seal for Pennsylvania and 



and was Judge of the Supreme Court. He wae Mayor of Philadelphia at one 
t inie . 

Griffith Griffith married Given Thomas and to them were born these children: 
1. Evan Griffith, 2. Amos Griffith, 3. Levi Griffith, and ^. Rebeka 
Griffith, 

Griffith Griffith died in 1770, and at the time of his death he was the 
possessor of great wealth. The brothers had an old Welch Bible with a 
family record in it. This family of brothers were all college bred men 
with a considerable amount of wealth. 

There was quite a number of our ancestors in the Great Revolutionary War. 

In looking through the records in the courthouse in West Chester, Pennsylvania, 
I found where names had been somewhat mixed up. They had Jones instead of 
Jv-hn on the same piece of land in Uwchlan Township. In the records Thomas 
Jones, Samuel Jones, and Griffith Jones were listed, but the records should 
read Thomas John, Samuel John and Griffith John. The description of this 
land was alike and names changed. 

There were some families in Wales at one time that had but one name. They 
would distinguish one from the other by being known as the son of another 
person. Thus, if a person bearing the name of William, had a son named 
Thomas, another person named Levi, had a son named Thomas also, their sons 
would respectively be called or known as Thomas, the son of William and 
Thomas the son of Levi. 

It was the custom with some in southern Wales, as was our ancestors, for 
their sons to take their father's Christian name for their last name. When 
John Phillips emigrated to this country, their sons took their father's 
first name, JOHN, for their last name and that name was never changed and 
still is JOHN. 

EARLY HISTORY AND PEOPLE 

Lucretia Mott 

Lucretia Mott, was the real founder and soul of the Woman Rights Movement 
in this country. She also worked with President Lincoln to free the slaves. 
Her husband's name was James Mott. 

She was also a great worker with the Quakers taking part in their meetings. 
She was a noted speaker. Eliza John, in her diary, often mentions being 
at the Meeting in Philadelphia, and said that they were wonderful meetings. 

In 1956, I was in the Old Meeting House (where Eliza John attended Lucretia 
Mott's meetings) and also the Historical Library next door on Arch Street. 
(This is not far from the Independence Hall). 

I looked through the old records of our ancestors there. The Quaker lady 
that helped me was so nice and accomodating. She spent a lot of her time 
helping me. The books were old and fragile. Some of the handwriting was 
our ancestors. 



LIONVILLE 

I took the following from the records in the Library in Philadelphia 

"History of Chester County" 

"Whereas Dennis Whelen^ at the sign of the Red Lion, in the County of Chester, 
hath purchased a considerable interest in lands at the place aforesaid, which 
is so situated on the Provznell Road leading from Philadelphia to Harris' 
Ferry, where several other considerable roads also meet and join same, as 
near the Unchlan Meeting House, as to render the situation very suitable 
for a town, consideration whereof the Dennis Whelen, has laid out a number 
of lots to accommodate the appliers or tenants may be served with dry and 
wholesome lots. The conveniences are so large that several hundred builders 
or tenants can be served. 

Those of them laid out are 60 by 250 feet, proposed to be let at three dollars 
per annum yearly rent, or the value thereof, with a condition that the tenants 
may purchase when they please, upon paying twenty years rent. 

This town to be called "Welch Place" after a place in V/ales , from David Lloyd's 
home place. (He was formerly owner of this land). 

It is proposed that the twenty tenants come and enter into the necessary 
articles to seciire the tenants in their possession, with streets and C. 

It may be fiirther observed that the place aforesaid proposed for the town be 
situated in a populous part of the county where numerous travelers dally 
passing and repassing, and saw mills, merchants, mills on everyside of the 
same, not far distant, stone, timber, and other materials and minerals for 
building and C. . Persons of one religious society, to the number of twenty 
taking so many lots in said place, shall have an acre of land freely given, 
for a place to worhip, burying ground and school house, provided they make 
timely application. 

A plan of the beginning of the allotment is to be the Main Street and to be 
enlarged to eighty feet wide. It further proposed that upon the tenants taking 
up to two hundred of said lots, they shall be entitled to ten acres of ground 
for a Common, clear of rent". 

Signed - Dennis Whelen 

The expectation of l-^r. Whelen was not realised and instead of a large and 
popiilated town the Welch Pool, we have the pleasant village of Lionville in 
Uwchlan Township. This was where Griffith John, preached so many years. 
He was buried in the burying grounds there. His farm is nearby. General 
Washington's headquarters were in a large square house across the street. 



HISTORY FTATISTICS 

West Chester Historical Society of Pennsylvania 
Samuel and Margaret John, the Emigrants 

Children 

Mary John, born on the 19th of December, 1709. 

Samuel John, Junior, born on the 22nd of November, 1711. Married Ann Jenkins, 

Margaret John, born on the 2nd of Jaxiuary, 1713. 

David John, born on the 30th of November, 171^. 

Ellen John, born on the 26th of Februai-y, 1718. 

Daniel John, born on the I2th of February, 1720. 

Jacob John, born in 1716. 



Griffith and Ann John, 
the Emigrants 

Children 



Ann John, born on the 3rd of October, 1715. Married John Benson. Died 1790. 

Rachel John, born on the 28th of December, 1717. Married James Benson. Died 1760. 

Joshua John, born on the 31st of January, 1720. 

Hannah John, born on the 19th of January, 1723. 

Jane John, born on the 2nd of September, 172!;. 

Abel John, born on the 22nd of July, 1727. 

Griffith Jolin, born on the 26th of August, 1729. 

Esther John, born on the 3rd of January, 1731. 

Robert John, born on the 22nd of July, 1734,. 

Sarah John, born on the 28th of June, 1734.. 

Asa John, born on the l4,th of September, 17^.0. 

Ruben John, born on the 20th of December, 174.2. 



Friends Meeting House Located 
at Foui'th and Arch Streets, Philadelphia 

Historical Society 

Goshen Meeting. Joshua John, the third child of Griffith John, and Rachel, 
his wife . 

Children 

Israel John, born on the 13th of May, 17^7, 

Elizabeth John, born on the If.th of August, 174,9. 

Sibilla John, born on the I5th of August 17^3. 

Griffith John, born on the end of May, 1755. 

Aimer John, born on the 22nd of August, 1756. 

Joseph John, born on the 20th of September, 1757. ^L l •' ■ ■ ^' 

Ann John, born on the 2nd of K.arch. 175 8. J 

Thomas John, died in March, 1731. 



10 



CHESTER COUNTY COURTHOUSE 

Transfers (Book C 2. Page 9.) 

Griffith John, from David Lloyd in 1715. ?old in 1787. 

Thomas John from Elizabeth Howell in 1731. 

Samuel John from William Sweny 1863. 

Sidney John from Robert Mercer in 1858. 

Samuel John from Elizabeth John in 1832. 

Samuel John from William Currie in 1767. 

Samuel John from Christian Miller in 1792. 

Ruthanna John from Minnie M. Hayes in 1914.. 

Ruben John from John Rotter in 1856. 

Rees John from James David in 1833. 

Rachel John from Daniel Hasted in 1830. 

Newman John from Edwin B. John in 1908. 

Minerva John from Jacob Heffelinger in 1854. 

Luman John from John Massey in 1870. 

Levi John from Philip Miller in 1813. 

Levi Jolin from Abraham Waggonsetler in 1813. 

Keech John from David H. Speakmon in 1813. 

Katherine John from Chester Trust Company in 1819. 

Joseph John from Minnie M. Hayes in I9I4. 

Jasten John. 

Joseph John from Thomas J. Janny in I884. 

John J . John. 

Jerome John - Jeffery John 

Jehu John from Jole Ryle in I846. 

Jane John. 

Jana John. 

Jehu John from John Finney in 1822. 

Jehu John from Philip Lewis in 1777. 

Joshua John. 

Iwin John. 

Horace John. 

Henry John. 

Hillery John. 

Hannah John. 

George John. 

Gates John. 



THE GRIFFITH FAMILY 



The pedigree of William Griffith, John Griffith, son of Griffith John, of the 
Parish of Llanddewi, Brefi in the County of Cardigan South Wales, who moved 
to Chester County, Pennsylvania, in the early part of the 18th century. 
Complied in South Wales by Thomas Allen Glenn. 

He married Mary John of Uwchlan Township. Daughter of Samuel John of Uwchlan. 
The ones that signed the wedding papers were: Daniel John, Samuel John, 
Margaret John, Griffith Griffith, Gwen Griffith, Griffith John, another 
Samuel John, Elinor John, William John, Evan John, Joshua John and some others 



11 



John Griffith war. the son of Griffith Hugh. There were thi^ee sons: David 

Griff; 

John. 



Griffith, William Griffith and John Griffith. David had a son named Griffith 



From Don John's papers in the Newbui-y Library in Chicago, Illinois. The paper 
of Georgrena Holland Binkley, give an account of a letter to Abia and Maj-tha 
John. She was a granddaughter of Robert John, son of Jehu, son of Robert, 
the son of Griffith John, the preacher. 



The Quakers were a God fearing and God loving people. Their ministers received 
no pay. They made their living outside of the church. They believed in a free 
gospel and preparing in life for death. 

The emigrants that came to North America at that time were not a pauper class of 
people. They did not depend on William Penn or anyone else for charity, but 
were self reliant people with ample fortunes in their hands, seeking a home and 
liberty. 



Upper Uwchlan was originally owned by the Cox Company and it comprised 30,000 
acres of land. They did not pay the taxes so 4,67 acres were sold by Sheriff 
Nichols to David Lloyd, and it was confirmed to him by deed on the 24.th of 
February, 1717-18. 

EARLY HISTORY 

The first Quaker Meeting was held in Chester County, Pennsylvania, and held in 
Robert Williams' home in 17 0^. (He was the father-in-law of Griffith Johin , 
Senior , and father of Ann (Williajns) John, his wife. 

Robert Williams was the first settler. He was called the "King of Goshen." 
The township of Uwchlan was organized in 1704.. The word means " higher 
up" and was taken because the ground was a little higher. The Meetings were 
held in Welch as most of the people were Welch. 

It is said that Robert Williams fire for his fireplace went out one time as 
did John Cadwalader' s . In those eai^ly days they had to go a long way to 
borrow some fire so that they could get their fire started again. 

Dm-ing the Revolutionai^y Wai^, the John f.amlly went tlirough extra hard times. 

One of the great battles. Battle of Brandywdne in 1776-77, lead by George 

Washington and his gallant troops, fought on or near the John farm to keep 

the British army back. In this battle of Brandywine, General George Washington's 

army was beaten, but the E;rltish had heavy losses also. Washington's army 

had 900 killed and wounded while the British had 100 killed and 40O wounded. 

The tomi of West Chester, where most of the British came from at that time 
was known as Tm-kes Head. ' 

Washington first used the Birmingham Friends Meeting House for his officers ' 
quarters and temporary hospital. This place is now called Mi^s . Biddies Lawn 
Later the ai^my withdi^ew to the Uwchlan Friends Meeting House. They asked 

12 



for the key and it was refused so they broke the door in. They used this 
meeting house for a temporary hospital and the burying grounds for a 
temporary camp ground. 

So the Friends held Meetings in George Thomas's home for awhile. In a book 
in the Los Angeles Public Library, history of Chester County, it shows the 
picture of the Uwchlan Friends Meeting House. It was on the 11th of September 
that the army first used this Meeting House. Then in the awful winter of 1777, 
the army withdrew to Valley Forge, about fifteen miles from the John farm. 
General Washington and his army suffered about everything that long hard winter, 
They had very little food and not enough clothes to keep them warm that long 
cold winter. 

The army would go out over the country for miles around forging, as they called 
it, getting things from the farmers. The John family had to get along ^^rith 
^^fhat was left . 



The first meeting of Friends was held on the 28th of May, 1712, in Uwchlan 

Township. It was held in Cadwalader's home and the following persons were 
sent to the Monthly Meeting on the 8th of March, 1716. 

Joseph Hely Hugh Davis Griffith John Thomas Davis 

James Pugh Isaac Vernon Peter Togler Thomas James 

Thomas John Joseph Phillips Samuel John John Cadwalader 

Thomas Fell Robert Benson Calwalader Jones David Cadwalader 
Samuel Phillips 



The town of Philadelphia was plotted and a constitution was drawn up in 1681, 
guaranteeing Religious Freedom and Universal Suffrage. 



There was a Welch Prince of Wales in the early days that was well liked by 
the name of Griffith. That is why so many of the Welch people took the name 
of Griffith. 



There was a Jesse John, a descendant from a Welch family, that was born in 
Vincent Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania, on the l/^th of March, 177o. 
I think he was a descendant from Ruben John. He was an officer in the War 
of 1812-15. 



After the war Governor Snyder appointed Jesse John, Clerk of the Courts in Chester 
County. Then in I8I4., there was a bank opened in Chester County, authorized 
by the State Assembly. He was one of the nine officers appointed to have 
charge. He was Clerk of Courts for nine years. He moved to Muskingum, Ohio, 
in later years. He died on the 2lst of May in 1861, at the age of 91. He 
was a devout Baptist. 



There was a Charles John of Pottstown, Chester County, Pennsylvania. He 



13 



waP a great-grandron of Asa John, and Asa was the first child of Abia John, 
and Martha, his wife. Abia was the sixth child of Griffith John, Junior. 



There was a David John in Chester County, Pennsylvania. I think he was a 
son of Samuel Jolm. He was one of the men appointed by the Justice of the 
Peace on the 1st of August, 1777, to take account of all the wheat, flour, 
and other things in stores in Chester County during the Revolutionary War. 



There was a Cynthia D. K. Webster near Coatsvllle, Chester County, Pennsylvania. 
She was a daughter of Abia John, Junior, the son of Asa John. She was great- 
ly interested in tracing the "John" family. 



Among the early settlers in Chester County, there was a Margaret John, and 
also Elizabeth John, Evan John, and Reese John. They belonged to our family 
of ancestors but I am not sure just how they are connected. 



WALES 

Wales is a peninsula and lies in the southwest corner of Great Britain Island. 
It is 137 miles long. There are thirteen countries, or shires in Wales. 
No one knows how long men have lived in what Is now Wales . Tools along 
the coast show that primitive men lived there at least 12,000 years ago. 
The first inhabitants were short dark haired people. 

The Welch were religious people. A kind and helpful people to those around 
them. They were good singers. 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Pennsylvania was named after William Penn. The name means Penn's woods. 

It became a state on the I2th of December, 1787. About 78 years after 
our first ancestors arrived in Pennsylvania. 

The battle of Gettysburg in the Civil War, July 1st, 2nd, and 3rd of 1863, 
lasted three days and had about ^.0,000 causalties. 

EARLY HISTORY OF CHESTER COUNTY 

"Providence had brought us here safe. What wilt I should call this place"? 
William Penn asked his friend, Robert Pearson, when in 1682, the English 
owner first looked upon this portion of his vast holdings in the New World. 
Robert Pearson answered, "Chester", in honor and memory of his home in 
England. So it was that Chester County became, with Bucks and Philadelphia 
Counties, one of the first three counties in Pennsylvania. 

The original Chester County extended east from Susquehanna to the Schuylkill 
River, south to what was to become the Mason-Dixon Line, which in 1763, was 

U 



established ending the confusion of farmers in that area who did not know 
whether they lived in Chester County, Pennsylvania or in the state of 
Maryland. 

From its earliest days, Chester County's rivers, woods, gentle rolling hills 
and fertile soil have strongly attracted men to settle and to establish homes 
and to live on those richly productive farms and later to set up businesses 
and industries to meet the needs of a fast growing population. 

Among the nice early homes that were built was the Longwood, the George Pierce 
House, built in 1730. This Longwood home took its part in history in the 
years before the Civil War when Rachel Pierce offered her home as a "station" 
in the Underground Railroad. This estate was purchased in 1906, by the 
du Fonts and it became the Longwood Gardens, renowned for its fountains and 
conservatories. Visitors are attracted from all over the world. 

The Old Kennett Meeting House, built in 1710, is remarkable for its solid 
masonry. Its lawn was the scene of General Maxwell's surprise attact on 
the British in the battle of Brandywine in the month of September, 1777. 

In 1786, West Chester became the County Seat and the first session of Court was 
held two months later. That year marked the election of the first three 
county commissioners; John, Joseph Gibbons and James Moore. I got data from 
the records in this Courthouse in 19$7, from old deed record books in the 
basement . 

Before the close of the 18th century, roads were established stretching 
across the country. Opened in 1795, was America's first turnpike road, 
the Lancaster Pike Road crossed Chester and Delaware Counties. Inns sprang 
up to accommodate the travelers. One, the General Warren Inn, was known 
during the Revolutionary War as the Loyalist House, frequented by such 
guests as Major John Andre, the British spy, who with Benedict Arnold, 
sought to betray West Point to the Cro'«m. Another Inn contributing to the 
Revolutionary history was Turkes Head Tavern in West Chester. This Inn 
served as a hospital for the wounded American and British soldiers. The 
Red Rose Inn's (near West Chester) rental to be paid to the decendants of 
William Penn, was specified in 1731, to be one red rose yearly. This custom 
still is observed by the Inn's present owner. Industries also played a part 
in the early history. One of the early industries in the 18th Centur-y, 
meeting both the needs of peace and those of war, was the Reading Furnace 
Farm, manufacturer of Benjamin Franklin's popular Franklin Stoves. They 
supplied cannons for use in the Revolutionai'"y War. The peaceful pursuits 
of mills that had mushroomed along the rivers, like Stoods Mill, on Lenape 
Road, provided flour for Washington's army during the Revolutionary War. 



15 






Griffith John - (The Emigrant) 
Farm from W. Penn. 




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16 



SOME OF THE "JOHNS" THAT WERE IN THE 
FIRST CENSUS TAKEN IN PENNSYLVANIA 
1790 



17 



THE FIRST CENSUS TAKEN IN PENNSYLVANIA - 1790 

These are the names of some of the "John" family that were 
in the first census that was taken in Pennsylvania 





Free 


wnite males 


Free 


white 


Free white 


Name 


16 ye 


■ars and 


males 




females in- 




over 


including 


under 




cluding 


5 head 




head 


of family 


16 ye, 


ars 


of 
family 




Head of Family 


Nc 


1. Townships 




No. 


No. 


County Slaves 






Not returned 














in Townships 










David John 


1 


II 




2 




Bedford 


Mary John 


- 


II 




5 






Abia John 




Uwchlan 




2 


1 


Chester 


Ruben John 


2 


11 




2 


5 


(1 


Griffith John 


1 


II 




^, 


6 


II 


David John 


7 


Charlston 




1 


3 


11 


Phillip John 




W.Whiteland 




2 


2 


n 


David John 


1 


East Town 




^ 


2 


It 


Griffith John 


1 


W. Whiteland 




1 


2 


fi 


James John 


k 


Vincent 




A 


3 


II 


Jared John 




Pikeland 




1 


A 


11 


Owen John 


1 


Kennet 




_ 


2 


II 


Rees John 


3 


Coventry 




5 


3 


II 


Thomas John 


3 


Trediffrin 






2 


II 


James John 


3 


George 




1 


2 


Fayette 


John John 


1 


Springhill 




1 


3 


II 


John John 


1 


Ti-yon 




3 


A 


Fi^anklin 


Samuel John 


1 


Montgomery 




1 


A 


Franklin 


William John 


1 


Montgomery 




5 


3 


II 


George John 


2 


Portion S. 
of River 
Jeniate 




3 




Mifflin 


Isaac John 


1 


Not returned 
in to\.mships 




3 




Northumberland 


Peter Jolin 


2 


Lower Dublin 




2 


6 


Philadelphia 


Able John 


1 


Tyron 




2 


2 


York 


Joseph John 


1 


Tryon 




^ 


3 


York 


Ickes John 


3 


Cumberland 




K 


A 


York 


Obra John 




Cumberland 








York 


John John 


1 


Bav-y 




_ 


1 


York 


John John 


1 


Pleading 




U 


2 


York 


Jno Knisily John 1 


Dover 






1 


York 


Patterson John 


2 


Cumberland 




- 


3 


York None 



18 



THE "JOHN" FAMILY 



JOHN PHILLIPS 



TAMUEL FR. AND MARTHA JOHN 

1. Mary L,. David 7. Jacob 

2. Samuel , Jr. 5. Ellen 8. Rebecca 

3. Margaret 6. Daniel 



GRIFFITH. SENIOR AND ANN (WILLIAMS) JOHN 



SAMUEL JR. AND ANN JENKINS 

1. Martha ^. Dor ah 7. Samuel, 3rd 

2. Ruth 5. Isaac 8. Ebenezer 

3. Lydla 6. Mary 

ISAAC AND MARGONA (BONG) JOHN 

1. Jacob Z,,. Isaac 7. Samuel 

2. Mary $. Abraham 8. Margaret 

3. Ann 6. Sarah 9. David 

10. George 

ABRAHAM AND MARY (FLICK) JOHN 

1. Stacy 4-. LeVin'e 7. Sarah 

2. George 5. Angeline 

3. Hiram 6. Marty 

STACY AND MARY (YOCUM) JOHN 

1. J . C. John 

2. Jonas Wesley John 



JONAS WESLEY JOHN 

1. Bessie l^.. Ralph 

2. Ida 5. Daisy 

3. David 6. Jacob 



RALPH JOHN 



7. Sally 



Arm 

2. Rachel 

3. Joshua 
U. Hannah 



Jane 
Abel 
Griffit h, Jr 



6, 
7, 

8. Esther 



9. 

10. 

.11. 

12. 



Robert 
Sarah 
Asa 
Ruben 



GRIFFITH JR. AND SARAH (LLOYD) JOHN 

1. Rebekah 4. Mary 7. Grace 

2. Asa 5. Abia 8. Mary, 2nd 

3. Hannah 6. Rachel 9. Leah 

ABIA AND MARTHA (JOHN) JOHN 

1. Asa 6. Lydia 11. Jehu 

2. Hiram 7. Sarah 12. Elixa 

3. Emily 8. Jesse 13. Perry 
U. Griffith 9. Elida 

5. Ruben 10. Samuel 

RUBEN AND SOPHIA (MgfTLER) JOHN 

1. Mary Ann Z,. Isaac 7. Lucretia 

2. Martha S. Allen 8. Harvey 

3. Melinda 6. Franklin 9. Sarah 



John) 



LUCRFJIA E. JOHN (See Lorenzo T, 
JEHU AND PATIE NCE (HOUSEWEART) JOHN 



1 . Amanda 

2. Lorenzo T . 

3. Kimber L. 
Z^. Cephas D. 



y . Sarah M. 

6. Anne E. 

7 . Edmund J . 

8. Verdilia E. 



GEORGE AND MARTHA (MEANS) JOHN 
1. Elizabeth (John) Sterner 

FROM GRIFFITH JOHN. SENIOR 
RUBEN JOHN (Son of Griffith, Senior) 

1. Martha 2. Robert 3. Townsend Z^. Israel 5. Ann 6. Hannah 7. Sarah 8. Pamela 

MARTHA (JOHN) JOHN 

1. Asa 2. Hirajn 3. Emily 4. Griffith f - . Ruben 6. Lydia 7. Sarah 

8. Jesse 9. Elida 10. Samuel 11. Jehu 12. Eliza 13. Perry 

2. ROBERT JOHN 
1. Levi John 

LEVI JOHN 

1. Edwin Bridget John 

EDWIN BRIDGET JOHN 
T] William John 



19 



LORENZO T, AND LUCRETIA E. JOHN 

1. Cynthia A, CYNTHIA A. (JOHN) SCOTT 

2. Laura V. LAURA V. (JOHN) HARVEY 

3. Mark M. MARK M. JOHN 

U. Edna I. EDNA I. (JOHN) HENDRICKS 

5. Carrie L. CARRIE L. JOHN 

6. Bert W. BERT W. JOHN 

7. Milton R. MILTON R. JOHN 

8. Clark E. CLARK E. JOHN 

1. Cynthia and John Scott 

To them was born Charles B. Scott 

Charles E. Scott and Frances M. Scott had four boys; 

1. Lewis G. 2. Francis E. 3. Ray J. J^. Merton 

To Lewis G.and Helen (Gleason) Scott was born Phyllis 
Ann Scott. 

Francis B. Scott did not marry, 

To Ray J. and Deliah (Harris) Scott was born Ray J. 
Scott. 

Merton JC and Tome (Sekiguck) Scott. 

2. Laura V. John and Ransom D. Harvey 
To them was born Ada E. Harvey. 

They also adopted two children, Victor and Nina. 

1. Ada E. Harvey married Grover Ruesegger and they had four children. 

1. Clara (Ruegsegger) and Orlyn Elwood had foui^ cMldren: 

Oral Kenneth, Mai'gene, Jerry and Linda Kay. 

2. Vale and Mildred (Burlen) Ruegsegger and to them was born 

one son, James Ray. 

3. Lloyd E. Ruegsegger and Bette (Gordon) Ruegsegger had one 

child, Allen K. Ruegsegger. 

I,. Arlis Ruegsegger was killed by an automobile in 1928. 

2. Victor Harvey and Ardus (Fisher) Harvey had the following childi^en: 

1. Gladys Jean Harvey who mai'ried Roger Bird. 

2. Julia Mae Hai^vey who marriea Joseph Utech and they had thi^ee 

daughters: Bertie Ann, Barbara, and Linda Utech. 

3. Florence Harvey. 

^' '''""Bettv'JTH T"""^^^ ^T""^ ^"^'^"^^ ^^ ^° ^h^^ ^^^ b°^^^ one child, 
Betty Ruth Lemicke who married William M Marmont 

They had three childi^en; Nancy Ruth, Wendy Lee and Mai^sha Ann 



20 



3. Mark axid Rachel (Pence) John 
To them were born two childi-en. 

1. Harry D. died in childhood. 

2. Myrtle G. (John) who married Ernest A. Anderson. 
To them were born five children. 

1. Lowell A. Anderson married Frances Eerny. To them 

was born Merldel F. and she married G, Daniels and they 
had the following children: Byron, Vickl, Douglas. 

2. Lee C. and Ruth (Oliver) Anderson. To them were born two 
children: Janle and Jerre Ann. 

3. Dudley A. and Lois (Wilson) Anderson. To them were born 
Stephen and Rebecca. 

4.. Mark M. and Frances (Cranberry) Anderson. To them was 
born Judith Anderson. 

5. Bruce A. and Barbara (Gates) Anderson. To them were born 
two children: Garold and Charil. 

4,. E dna 1 (John)axLd T. H. Hendricks 
To them were born three children. 

1. Vera 2. Erma M. (Died in childhood) 3. Paul L. Hendricks 

Vera E. married Hai^vey L. Jordon and to them were born two 
children. 

1. Frances L. who died in eai'ly life. 

2. John H. Jordon who married Katherlne Schultz, and 
they had the following children: 

1. Beatrice 2 James 3 Vera 4. Robert Jordan. 

2. Paul L. and Sylvia Hendricks had one child, Terry J. Hendi^lcks, 

5. Carrie L. John died when she was twelve yeai^s old. 

6. Bert W. and Fannie E. (Jordon) John 
To them were born foui' childi^en. 

1. Oscar C. and Hazel (Johnson) John. They have no children. 

2. Roy M. and Mildred (Morningstar ) John. They have no children. 

3. Floyd and Edna (Snyder) John. To them were born four children. 

1. Leona L. 2. Leland L. 3. Llla L. 4-. Lyle L. John 

4. Cora L. (John) and Floyd Maurer. To them was born one child, 
Myron Maui^er . 

7. Milton R. and Edith L. (LaVanway) John . 
To them were born three children. 

1. Jesse R. and Effe (V/hltehead) John. 

To them was born one child, Elols H. John. 
See page lUU. 

21 



2. Leo D. and Ellda (Mero) John. They had one child Beverly 

who married Robert Geeson. 
Leo D. John married the second time. Her name was Alice Hankins . 

3. Verna R. (John) and Mark Jerrow. To them was born one child named 

Shirley and she married Allen Graham and they had the following 

children: 

1. Russell 2. Lawrence J. 3. Allen R, 

8. Clark E. and Johanna (Olsen ) John 

To them were born five children* namely 1. Morris V., 2. Percy L. 
3. Joyce J., 4,. Opal M. , and Elva L. John. 

Morris V. John and Margaret Erla (Imbrie) John had one child Cheryl. 
Percy L. and Laura E. (Sanderson) John. They have adopted two children, 

namely; Larry D. and 2. Jeanice M. John. 
Joyce and Mable E. (Andrews) John. To them were born four children, 

namely; 1. Sylvia J., 2. Karen M. , 3. Miriam L., and /,. Clark J. John. 

Opal M. (John) and Charlie R. Newman, Jr., To them were born two children 
namely; 1. Joan 0. and 2. Richard C. Newman. 

Elva L. (John) and Frank Newman. To them were born two children, 
namely; 1. Robert 0. Newman and 2. Carole M. Newman. 



This is the last of the children and grandchildi^en from Lorenzo T. and 
Lucretia E. John. There is a family record farther back in this book. 



THE REST OF JEHU AND PATIENCE JOHN'S CHILDREN 

2. KIME;ER L. JOHN 

He never married. He died in Maryville, California. 

3. CEPHAS D. JOHN 

To Cephas D. and Lizzie (McGregor) John were born four children 
Namely; Agnes G., Mannie V., Roda E., and Nellie B. John ' 

U. SARAH M. JOHN 

To Sarah M. (John) and John Lurch were born seven children, namely 
1. Georglana, 2. Judson 3. Willard, 4. Preston, ^. . Nellie. 6 Jessie 
and 7. Mildred Bui'ch. ' ' 

5. ANN ELIZA JOHN 

To Eliza (John) and A. E. Biglow, were born two children, namely 
1. Frank C. and 2. Blanch (Yule) Bigelow. ' 

6. EDMUND J. JOHN 

To Edmund J. and Sarah B. (McKinstry) John were born eight children 
namely; 1. Patience E. , 2. Mary H. , 3. Walter 0., 4. Elizabeth, ' 
5. Gertrude, 6. Ralph, 7. Joseph F. and 8. Estella B. John. 

V. VERDILLA E. JOHN 

To Verdilia E. (John) and Polaske D. Riggins were born three childi^en 
namely; 1. Lesley L. , 2. Carroll, and 3. Verdilia E. Riggins. ' 

22 



OUR CONNECTION? FROM JOHN AND ELLEN PHILLIP? 



?AMUEL. SMIOR AND MARGARET JOHN 



GRIFFITH, ?ENIOR AND ANN JOHN 



I 



1. 


Mary 


5. Ellen 




?amuel, Jr. 


6. Daniel 


3. 


Margaret 


7. Jacob 


k. 


David 


8. Rebecca 



1. 

2. 
3. 
U. 

5. 
6. 
V. 
8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 



1. 
2. 
3. 
k. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 



Rebekah John 
Asa John 
Hannah John 
Mary John 
Abia John 



1. 


Ann 


2. 


Rachel 


3. 


Joshua 


k. 


Hannah 


5. 


Jane 


6. 


Abel 


7. 


Griffith. Jr. 


8. 


Esther 


Q 


Robert 


10. 


?arah 


11. 


Asa or Morton 


12. 


Ruben 



1. Martha John 



Rachel John 
Grace John 
Mary John 
Leah John 



Asa John 
Hiram John 
Emily John 
Griffith John 
Ruben John 



Robert John 



1. Levi John 



1. Edwin John 



1. William John 



Lydia John 
Sarah John 
Jesse John 
Elida John 
Samuel John 
Jehu John 



1. Mary Ann 

2 . Mart ha 

3. Melinda 

4. Isaac 



6. 

7. 



Allen 

Franklin 

Lucretia 



Hai'vey 
Sarah Jane 



Elisa John 
Perry John 



1. Lorenzo T. 



2. Cephas 

3. Sarah 
A. Ann 

5 • Edmund 

6. Verdilia 



Cynthia A. 
Laura V. 
Mark M. 
Edna 1 . 
Cai-ry L. 
Bert W. 
Milton R. 
Clark E. 



1. 
2. 
3. 
k. 

5. 



Morris V. 
Percy L. 
Joyce J. 
Opal M. 
Elva L. 



23 



GENEALOGY OF OUR ANCESTOR? 

Ralph George Phillips and John Phillips, his Son. 

Ralph George Phillips, and their children, najnely; 1. Susanna, 2. John, 
3. Edwin, /+. George, Jr., ?. Lydia, i, Drona, 7. Mary, 8. Rebecca, and 
9. Lyda Phillips. 

John and Ellen Phillips and their children, namely; 1. Samuel, 2. Griffith, 
Senior, 3. Thomas or Morton, 4. Robert John. These last three I am not 
sure of. - C.E. John. 

Griffith John, Senior and Ann (Williams) John and their children were, 
namely; 1. Ai-m, 2. Rachel, 3. Joshua, ^. Hannah, 5. Jane, 6. Abel, 7. 
Griffith, Junior . 8. Esther, 9. Robert, 10, Sarah, 11. Asa, and 12. 
Ruben John . 

Griffith, Junior, and Sarah (Lloyd) John, and their children, namely; 

1. Rebekah, 2. Asa, 3. Hannah, l^. Mary, 5. Abia, Senior, 6. Rachel, 7. Grace, 

8. Mary, 2nd, and 9. Leah John. 

Ruben and Lydia (Townsend) John, the I2th child of Griffith, Senior, and 

Ann (Williams) John, and their children, namely; 1. Martha, 2. Robert 

3. Townsend, ^. Israel, 5. Anna, 6. Hannah, 7. Sarah, and 8. Pamela John. 



Abia and Martha Jolm , and their children, namely; 1. Asa, 2. Hiram, 3. Emily 
U. Griffith, 5. Ruben, 6. Lydia, 7. Sarah, 8. Jesse, 9. Elida 10. Samuel, ' 
11. Jehu, 12. Eliza, and 13. Perry John. 

Ruben and Sophia (Mettler) John, and their children, namely; 1. Mary Ann 

2. Martha, 3. Mellnda, U. Isaac, f : . Allen, 6. Franklin, 7. Lucretla, 8. Harvey. 

and 9. Sarah John. ' ' 

Jehu and Patience (Houseweart) John and their children, namely; 1. Lorenzo 

2. Kimber, 3. Cephas, l^. Sarah, s. Ann E., 6, Edmund, and 7. Verdilia John] 

Lorenzo and Lucretia John and their children, namely; 1. Cynthia A 2 Laura 

3. Mark M., Edna I., 5. Carrie L., 6. Bert W., 7. Milton R. , and s! Clark E.' 
John. 



Lorenzo and Lucretia John's children and grandchildren's record. 

Cynthia A. (John) Scott. One child. Charley B. Scott. 
Laura V. (John) Harvey. One child. Ada E. Harvey 
Mark M. John. Two children. 1. Harry D. John, died in childhood. 

2. Myrtle G.(John) Anderson 

Edna I. (John) Hendricks. Tto-ee children. 1. Vera E. (Hendricks) Jordan 

2. Erma M. Hendricks, died in 

childhood. 

3. Paul L. Hendricks 



2U 



'Carrie L. John. Died at the age of 12. 

Bert W. John. Four children. 1. Oscar C. Johin, 2. Roy M. John, 

3. Floyd W. John, l^. Cora L. (John) Moiu-er 
Milton R. John. Three children. 

1. Jesse R. John, 2. Leo D. John, and 

3. Verna (John) Jerrow. 

1. Morris V., 2. Percy L. 3. Joyce J. 
^. Opal M. (John) Newman, Jr. and 5. Elva L. 
(John) Newman. 



Clark E. John. Five children, 



EARLY BURIAL GROUNDS 

QUAKER. At Bear Gap, Northumberland County, 
Pennsylvania 

1 was there in 1958. This place was not taken care of and there were weeds, 
brush and trees all over the graves and grounds. The old Friends Meeting House 
has been torn down and gone, the rocks that it stood on are still there and 
trees are growing where it stood. The schoolhouse that stood by is no 
more, and I could not find the cei'ietery in the brush. 

A lady, Mrs. Leon Pensy"' , that lives on a farm near by, helped to find the 
cemetery and some of our cn.'esvors' graves. The markers were small and 
uiider the vines and brush. 

We foimd the following: 

Amous John, died on the 7th of October, 1851. 

Abia John, born on the l^^th of November, 1811. Died the 18th of December, 

1883, age 72. 
James G. John, born on the 11th of December, 1801. Died the 10th of 

July, 1873, age 72. 
Perry John, born on the 28th of March, 1815. Died the 5th of September, 

1895, age 80. 
Samuel John, born in 178<:'. Died in 1866. Age 80. Son of Dradem C. John. 



Quaker: Catawissa, Columbia County, Pennsylvania. 

I was there in 1958. This burying groimd was in fine shape, nice grass and 
well taken care of. The old Quaker Log Meeting House was kept in nice shape 
and they open it up every so often for the people to see. A Mrs. Roai'-ing showed 
me over the grounds. Pictui^e of church on page 99. 



John, born on the 2Cth of 



I found names on tombstones of our ancestors. H. E 

November, 1828. Died the 2/^th of May, 18C;6. Stacy John, I could not read the 

dates. Mary John, wife of H. G. John, died the 8th of March, 1880. Age 



;3. 



E. Britton John, born in 18^8. Died the l^th of July, 1872. Age 2U. Hiram 
John, 1 could not make the rest out. Abraham John, born the 20th of September, 
1705. Died the 2^th of September, 1789. Mary John, wife of Stacy John, I 
could not read the dates. Mary L. John, wife of Jesse John, born in 1821. Died 
the 2Z^th of November, 1861. Age ^0. Isaac John, born in 1783, died 17th of 
January, 18/^4- Age 61. J. Wesley John, born in 18^0. Died in 1908. Age 68. 
David John 1 could not read the dates. 



25 



Roaring Creek, Quaker, Columbia County, Pennsylvania. 

I was here in Roaring Creek in 1958. It lies back on a hill from Roaring Creek 
and this cemetery is kept up in nice shape. The blue grass is nicely cut. I 
believe that Griffith John, Junior, was buried in this cemetery, but I could 
not find the marker. I did find Is.aac Kester's grave. Mary John, daughter 
of Ruben and Sophia John married a Kester. 



Uwchlan Quaker, Chester County, Pennsylvania. 

Johnathon Phillips died in 1799. Leah Phillips died in 1879. Butler Phillips, - 
John Phillips in 1862, Ruthann Phillips in 1862, Joseph Phillips, John Phillips 
in 1866, David Phillips in 1872, Sarah Phillips in 1866 and Thomas Phillips in 
1891. I found one John but could not see the date. This cemetery is not kept 
up and there is tall grass all over it. The stone wall is in good shape around 
it. General George Wf^shington's army used this cemetery for a temporary camp 
ground in the Revolutionary War. His troops destroyed some of the markers. Our 
first ancestors were buried in this cemetery. 



TRANSFER OF DEEDS 

:kford, lllj 

Courthouse 



Rockford, Illinois 



Thomas John, 2lst of October, 185A. Lot ^ and 5, Block 29, East Rockford. 

Wesley John, 4.th of February, 1852. 

Abia John, November 18th, 185-4. Lot 7, Block 9, Winnebago, Illinois. 

Luke John, 29th of May, 1858. 

George H. John, I7th of May, 1858. 

Richard John, from Edwin John, l2th of October, 1858. 

William John, 6th of October, 1852. 

Thomas John, 28th of February, 1852. 

Luke John, I7th of May, 1858. 

Richard John, I2th of October, 1858. 

William John, 6th of October, 1858. 

Gary John 

Isaac Johii, from John Van Natrick on the 20th of September, 1865. 

Lot 4., block 9, Winnebago, Illinois. 
Danne John 
Jehu John, from James Payrne, 1st of August, 1865. Sundin S. 35-T-27 R in 

Illinois . 
Jehu John, from Osmon Hutchison on the 8th of February, 1868. The S W i of 

9-26-11. ' 

Isaac John, from Richard Rees , on the 19th of October, 1869. Lot 5 in Block 

2^. Robertson Old Winnebago, Illinois. 
Patience John, to Joseph D. Wai^ner on the 1st of April, 1875 part of S.W.:^ of 

Section 32, Township 26, Range 11. 
Lydia John to Mosses Barilett , on the 22nd of December, 1875. 
Elizabeth John, to Sopphronia W. Daughtery on December, 20th, 1876. 

(This is Winnebago County) 



26 



Dixon, Illinois 
Lee Coionty 

Jacob John 

Elida A. John 

Edwin John and wife and Elida John, on the 8th of September 1882 the 

S. W. i- of the S.E. ^ of Section 13 - 20 - S. ' ' 
Edwin John, Rachel and K. E. John and wife, on the Ifth of December 1883. 
Elida John, to Edwin John and wife, on the 8th of September 1882. ' 
Rachel and H. E. John to Edwin John on the l^th of December' 1883! 
Ruben John and wife to James Goodrick on the 26th of April 'l876.' 

5 acres in 2^ N. E. :j. ' ' 

Franklin John to Theadore Wilson on the 2nd of February 1888 the S E 
N.E. 8. N. W. i Pt. N. E. c, ' j, , . . 

Ruben John and wife to Alfred A. Beede, on the 28th of April 1888 Pt . N.E. 
Edwin John, Elida John and wife, on the 8th of September 1882. ' 
Elida John, to Edwin John, on the 2nd of January, 1889. 



THE PHILLIPS 

There was a Ralph Phillips who came from Wales to the United States of America 
on the 23rd of January, 1685. He bought several hundred acres of low land in 
Bucks County, Pennsylvania where the city of Richlandtown is now located. This 
land was not considered worth much at that time, but in later years this land 
turned out to be wonderful soil. Ralph Phillips was one of the first settlers 
in Bucks County. I was in Bucks County in 1958, and it is a beautiful town and 
country now. 

Ralph Phillips children were as follows: 1. Susanne, 2. John, 3. Edwin, /,. George, 
Junior, 5. Lydia, 6. Drona, 7. Mary, 8. Rebecca and 9. Lyda Phillips. 

This Ralph Phillips was the ancestor of John Phillips on the distaff side and 
John Phillips was the father of Samuel, Senior and Griffith John, Senior. 

It is regretted that we cannot find out more of the history of our first 
ancestors in Wales as to births, marriages and the account of deaths. With 
my going through records and writing all over this country and Wales this 
information seems shrouded from us. 

John and Ellen Phillips were God loving people and at an early date were attached 
to the Church of England. 

The Quaker Movement in Wales 

About the time of John and Ellen Phillips, the Quaker movement was well under 
way in Wales. The Phillips, no doubt, heard of the new Religious Society, Fox, • 
William Perm, and their co-workers. In fact the first introduction of Quakerism 
in that part of Wales was through the efforts of a "John", a north Wales apostle 
of Quakerism in that principality. 

This event bears so closely upon the history of the "John" family as to require 
a fuller explanation. 



27 



In 1653, Morgan Lloyd was the Priest of Wrexham, a large parish in North Wales. 
He tegan hearing a great deal about the new religious sect. He sent two reliable 
men of his congregation to North Wale? to "try the Quakers" and bring a report 
to him. The result of this mission is given by George Fox in his Journal as 
follows : 

"When these triers came among us, the power of the Lord over came 
them, and they both were convinced of the truth, so they stayed 
sometime with us and then returned to Wales, where afterwards 
one of them departed from his convincement , but the other, whose 
name was John ap John, abode in the truth and received a gift in 
the ministry to which he continued to be faithful." 

I coiild not find out if John and Ellen Phillips , and others of their family 
came to North American when their sons Samuel, Senior, and Griffith John . Senior 
did, or how many children they had. There are some that quotes that others did 
come, but I am not able to find any clear record to prove this. This is what 
they quote: "1. Samuel, born in 1680; 2. Griffith , born in 1683; 3. John, born 
in 168f'5 ^- Eai'ah, born in 1687; f ■ . Robert John, born in 1689." 

There was a Thomas John, whose name appears several times on papers with Samuel 
and Griffith John . And there was a Marton John who built the first home in 
Armstrong County. They may have been brothers too. 

It was the custom in that part of Wales for the sons to take their father's 
given name. So, when Samuel, Senior, and his brother Griffith, Senior, came 
to this country they took their fathers 's first name for their last name. They 
made no changes in their names here in North America. 

FIRST GENERATION OF JOHN'S 

Samuel Jolin, Senior 
(Also see page 32 ) 



Samuel John, Senior was born in or neai^ Haverfordwest Pembrokeshlrp Wales 
the year of 1680. He was the oldest cMld of John and Ellen Phillips. 

He was educated for the Chi-istian ministry in the Church of England. Being 
informed by those who knew him, he was a sober youth, religiously inclined 
and was concerned for an inward acquaintance with the Lord, when desire being 
after that which is substantial, he continued seeking for many years. 



m 



He, 



with others, of his family and neighbors, left Wales in the fall of 17 08 
on a slow sailing vessel for North America. They landed in February 1809 ' 
at the hai^bor or on the banks of the Delawai^e River where Philadelphia now' 



stand 



.They settled in Chester County, north of Downingtown. This town was started 
m 1/0^. It owes it name to Thomas Downing who had a sawmill there and it 
was first _ called Milltown. Ellen John, the fifth child of Samuel and Margai^et 
John married William Downing of that Downing family. 

This part of North America was controlled at that time by William Penn under 
Great Britain and was called the Providence of Pennsylvania. David Lloyd 
the keeper of the Great Seal of that part of Pennsylvania, opened for sale, 
thr^n nnn ^wo pieces of land that he bought in 1703-09, ( a part of' 
the 40,000 acres of land William Penn had surveyed for the Welch Quakers) The 



28 



two pieces of land contained one thousand six hundred and sixty six acres. The 
tract that this was taken from was called the Welch Tract, David Lloyd's tract 
was called, the Welch Barney. The Welch Tract covered 62 square miles In 
Chester and Delaware Counties. This was surveyed in 1681, Lloyd's In IVlf , and 
was in Uwchlan and Goshen Townships. 

Samuel John, Senior, and Griffith John, Senior, with some others were the first 
to buy and settle there. Others were; James Pough, Cadwalader John or Jones, 
Robert Benson, David Cadwalader, John Evans, John Davis, Morris Rees , David 
Evans, Rees Jones, Humphry Lloyd, Noble E'-utler, Joseph Phillips, David Davis 
and the Phillips family. 

Soon after coming to this country, Samuel joined the Quakersor Friends as they 
are sometimes called. He had for quite sometime been under some convincement 
of the principle of the truth as held by them, and being measurably faithful 
to the manifestation of grace received. The Lord was pleased to bestow upon 
him a dispensation to preach in which he believed. He labored faithfully and 
became a sound and able minister. His setting in for divine worship was solid 
and exemplary often in silence. Though at times when moved thereto, doctrine 
hath dropped from him as the dew, and his speech distilled as the small rain to 
refresh the hungry and thirsty soul. 

He was an example of plainness and moderation. His conversation was weighty 
and instructive, also very encouraging to those who were well minded. 

Lots of small sayings were found among his papers which appear as the product 
of his private meditation on Heavenly things. 

It was his lot to pass through divers baptizing and afflicting circumstances, 
occasioned by him of some who ought to have been a comfort to him in his 
declining years. He bore with patience. He retained his greatness to the 
last with a pleasant and happy frame of milnd. 

He often expressed himself in deep sensible and affecting manner to those who 
visited him. during his last weakness, which continued for a considerable time, 
being confined at home through bodily infirmity and old age for near two years 
before his decease. He quickly departed this life on the 16th of November, 
1766, in his 87th year. He was a minister nearly fifty-four years. 

He was buried on the 18th of the same month, when a solemn meeting was held, 
wherein the overshadowing of truth was measurably felt, under the influence 
whereof the unruly warned and the feeble minded conforted. 

ISAAC JOHN AND HIS DESCENDANTS 

The sale of land continued. Witnessed that Isaac John, for and in consideration 
of the sum of five hundred and eighty pounds, eighty shillings and nine pence 
by him paid Christian Dewold. 

Description ; Beginning at pine tree, then by land of Charles Gough, east 
one hundred and eighty-four perches to stone, north sixteen perches to a post, 
then south ninety perches to a chestnut tree, south eight degrees, west seven 
perches to a hickory tree, then north one hundred and eighty two perches to 
the place of starting. This was a portion of the 312 acres patented to Isaac 
John when he first moved there. 

There were no white people living in that part of Columbia County when Isaac 

29 



John first settled there. There were lots of Indians. The little Borough of 
Catawissa, joining them, was an Indian town. 

The hardships that they had to go through in those eai'ly years v;ere really 
something and in so many ways too. There were but few places to get supplies, 
and not much money to buy with. In the year, 1778, they were driven out 
from their homes twice by the Indiaias. (I was at that place in 1958, and I960.) 
When the thirteen colonies had their money depression after the Revolutionary 
War, they lost a hundred pounds in Continental Cui^rency, which was a big blow 
to them. But through it all, they raised their large families in that log 
house and that wild count I'y, 

He lived there the rest of his life and was burled in that Borough of Catawissa, 
Quaker burying ground. He died on the I7th of Januai^, 18^4, at the age of 9Z^.' 

Isaac and Margona (Bong) John, Descenaants. 

Jacob Jolin, the first child of Isaac and Margona (Bong) John, was born 
(no record) in 1778. 

MaiT John, the second child of Isaac and Margona (Bong) John was born 
on the loth of Mai^ch, 1780. 

Ann John, the third child of Isaac and Margona (Bong) John, was born on 
the (no record) in 1781. 

Isaac John, Junior, the fom^th child of Isaac and Mai^gona (Bong) John, 
was born on the (no record) in 1783. 

Abraham John, the fifth child of Isaac and Mai^gona (Bong) John, was born 
on the 2Qth of September, 1785. 

He mai-ried Mary Flick and to them were born seven childi-en 
namely; 1. Ftacy, 2. George, 3. Hiram, /,. Levine , 5. Angeline, 
6. Mary A. and 7. .Sarah John. Angeline married Samuel John, 
the son of Abia and Martha John. 

Abraham John's children 

Stacy John, the first child of Abraham and Mary (Flick) 
John, was born in his grandf athers 's old log 
hous e . 

He married Mary Yocum, the daughter of John Yocum. 
To them were born at least two sons and their 
names were J. C. John and Jonas Wesley John. 

Stacy John was a medical doctor and stood at the top of 
the medical profession in Eloomsburg, Fennsylvania. He 
combined with his medical knowledge a sympathy and 'kindness 
of character which greatly endeared him to those who were 
m need of his service and his constant contacts with his 
patients and their sufferings had so broadened his life as to 
render him capable of taking part in all the activities of 
the city where he established his home. Dr. Stacy John 
was born on the l5th of February. 1813. ' 

30 



J. C. John, son of J. Stacy and Mary (Yocutn) John, 
was born in his great grandfather's 
(Isaac John) old log homestead. He was 
a doctor and he lived and had his practice 
in Funbury, Northumberland Ccunty, Pennsyl- 
vania. He had a large practice and stood 
at the top of his profession in medicine 
with the doctors around there. 

Jonas Wesley John, the son of Stacy and Mary (Yocum) 
John, was born also in his great grand- 
father's old log house in the year ^.f" ig^^o. 

J. W. John married Sarah Ero-wn and to them 
were born seven children, namely; 1. Bessie 
2. Ida, 3. David, 4,. Ralph, f . . Daisy, 
6. Jacob and 7. Sally John. 

He was a lawyer and on the 12th of January, 
1904., he was elected to the Supreme Coui^t 
as a Judge. He was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church and was a great temperance 
worker . 

He died in 1908. He was bui^ied in the 
Friends birrying grounds at Catawissa 
County, Pennsylvania. 

Ralph John, the foui-^th child of J.W. and 
Sarah (Brown) John, was born on the 20th 
of December, I8V0, in Main Township, 
Columbia County, Pennsylvania. He studied 
law and then practiced law in Blooms burg. 
He was the leading attorney there. 

George John, was the tenth child of Isaac and Margona (Bong) John. He 
married Martha Means. To them were born the following 
children; 

1. Jane - married James Grimer 

2. Elisabeth - married John Sterner 

3. Martha - married John DeWitt 
4.. Mary - married Isaac McKamy 

To Elizabeth (John) Sterner were born nine cMldren. 

1. George Sterner, Junior 

2. James Sterner 

3. Wilber Sterner 
4.. Lloyd Sterner 

f . Alice Sterner 

6 . Caroline Sterner 

V. George Sterner, Junior 

8. Esther Sterner 

9. Catherine Sterner 



31 



Lloyd P. Fterner, the fourth child of John and 
Elizabeth (John) Fterner married Nora M. Finney 
on the &th of July, 1898. She was related to 
the Fulton family and in recognition of this 
relationship, she was invited to the Hudson-Fulton 
celebration in New York City, in September, 1911, 
as a special guest . 

Lloyd P. Sterner was born on the third of November, 
1858, near Orangeville, Pennsylvania. To Lloyd P. 
and Nora M. (Finney) Sterner were born three 
children, namely; Robert Pulton Sterner, 2. Alas 
Pawine Sterner, and 3. James Henry Sterner. 

Lloyd P Sterner was for many years supervising 

pi'incipal of the schools of Blooms burg, then he was 

made District Superintendent of the Borough of 

Blooms burg Schools. Professor Lloyd Sterner 's 

mother was a "John", so he is a member of the John 

family. He was a descendant of Isaac John, who 

was one of the pioneers of Columbia County Pennsylvania. 



ROBERT FULTON 

Robert Fulton was born on the 1/^th of November, 1765, in Little Britain, Lancaster 
County, Pennsylvania. His father died when he was but three years old and his 
mother was left with five children. Robert did not have much education and did 
not like school. Besides he had to work to help his mother with the fajnily. 
When he was ten years old, he said to his teacher, "That his head was full 
of his own ideas, that there was no room for storage of old dusty books". He 
was a drawer and painter in early years and then turned to inventing. Some 
of thethings that he invented were: submarine, sky rocket, iron bridge conduit, 
canal locks and the steam boat and had an English patent in 1787. James Watt 
worked with him for a while. 

He married Harriet Livingston. He died February 2^, 1815, in New York. 



SAMUEL JOHN. SENIOR AND HIS WIFE AND CHILDREN 

Samuel John's wife was Margai'et. I could not find any record of her maiden name 
or where she was from. Their children were: 

1. Mary 2. Samuel, Junior 3. Margaret 4. David S. Ellen 6. Daniel 
7. Jacob 8. Rebecca 

Mary Johm, the first child of Samuel, Senior and Mai-garet John, was 
born on the 19th of December, 17 09, in Chester County, 
Pennsylvania. About ten months after their arrival in 
North America Maa-y was born. She married John Griffith 
on the 31st of September, 1737. 

Samuel Jolin, Junior . the second child of Samuel, Senior and Margaret 



32 



John, was born on the 22nd of November , 1711, in Chester 
County, Pennsylvania. He married Ann Jenkin. They had 
a Quaker wedding. 

Their Wedding 
First, Samuel John, Junior and Ann Jenkin declared their 
intentions of marriage at the Uwchlan Monthly Meeting on 
August I4., 1737. A committee was appointed to make in- 
quiry regarding the engagement . At the next Monthly 
Meeting, if the report being favorable, they were permitt- 
ed to proceed in marriage. The marriage certificate and 
record shows, Samuel John and Ann Jenkins, both of the 
same place, Uwchland Township, Pennsylvania. 

Samuel John, Junior, son of Sajnuel John, Senior, and 
Ann Jenkin, daughter of Evan Jenkin, were married at a 
Meeting appointed for that purpose at the Uwchlan Meeting 
House, on October 1^, 1737. 

The witnesses and signers were: 

Samuel and Margaret John - The parents 
Evan and Sarah Jenkin - The parents 
Mary Pough 

John and Margai'-et Evans 
Ellen John 
Elizabeth Jenkin 
and twenty others. 

Samuel . Junior and Ann (Jenkin) John's children were: 

1. Mert or Mai''tha, born in 1739, Chester County, Pennsylvania. 

2. Ruth, born on the 2/ith of June 17/^1, in Chester County. 

She married Job Pough on the I5th of November , 1759. 

3. Lydia, born on the 7th of September, 17^5, Chester County, 

Pennsylvania. She married John Maulsby on May 21, 
1766. 

l^. Dorah, born on the 8th of March, 17^8, Chester County, 
Pennsylvania. 

5. Isaac, born on the 19th of December, 17^.9, Chester County, 

Pennsylvania. He married Lydia Thomas on the 19th 
of December, 1765. He died on the I7th of Januai"-y, 
I84.4.. (More of this record on page 3^ ) 

6. Mai-y, born on the 11th of August, 1751. 

7. Samuel, the 3rd, born on the 18th of September, 1753, 

Chester County, Pennsylvania. He married Ann Pemrose, 

8. Ebenezer , born on the 7th of September, 1755. He married 

Sarah Baley in Tennessee. To them were born eleven 
children, namely; 



33 



1. S^^jnuel 

2. Elisha (Died in Illinois) 

3. Jacob (Died in Oregon) 
L,. David 

^. Isaac 

6 . Ann 

7. Elizabeth 

8. Katharine 

9. Ruth (Died in Iowa) 

10. Sarah (Died in Oregon) 

11. Ebenezer John, Junior (It mentions in the abstract 

of wills in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, 
page 61, Vol. XV. Pubs. Ado of Pennsylvania, that 
they were childi-en of Famuel and Elizabeth, his 
first wife. ) 

Margaret John, the third child of ."^amuel, Senior and Margaret John, was born 
on the 2nd of January, 1713, Chester County, Pennsylvania. 
She married John Evans on the 8th of October, 1733, at the 
Uwchlan Meeting House, It is stated by some that she married 
the second time to a Mi". James. 

David John, the foui-'th child of Samuel, Senior and Margaret John, was born on 
the 30th of November, 171^, Chester County, Pennsylvania. He 
married (I do not have this record). He was the supervisor of 
roads in Chester County, Pennsylvania. He died on the 2nd of 
December, 1734., 

Ellen John, the fifth child of Samuel, Senior and Mai-gai^et John, was born on 
the 28th of Februai^, 1716, Chester County, Pennsylvania. She 
married Downing at the Uwchlan Meeting House on the iQth of 
October, 17^. He was of the Downing family that gave the 
name to the Borough of Downingtown in the County of Chester, 
Pennsylvania. He was a miller. Williajn and Ellen (John) 
Downing had a son born on the 25th of March, I7f9, and he 
married Rebecca Starr at East Sadbury Meeting House on the 
2/ith of April, 1781. 

Daniel John, the sixth child of Samuel, Senior and Margaj^et John, was born 
on the 12th of February, 1720, Chester County, Pennsylvania. 
He married Elizabeth Rees , the daughter of James Rees , on the 
eleventh of March, 17z^3, at the Uwchlandl4eeting House. 

Jacob John, the seventh child of Samuel, Senior, and Margaret John was- 
born on the (no record), 1722. 

Rebecca John, the eighth child of Samuel, Senior, and Margai^et John, was 
born on the (no record). She married Stephen Phillips. 

Samuel Joiin, Junior's Children 

ISAAC JOHN 

Isaac John, the fifth child of Samuel, Junior and Ann (Jenkin) John the 
grandson of Samuel and Margai^et John, was born on the 19th of December 17^9 
Chester County, Pennsylvania. He married Lydia Thomas in Chester County. ' 

3A 



He moved first to Berks County when his parents moved. Then in 1772 he 
moved to Catawissa Valley, Columbia County. He was the first white man to 
live in Main Township. There was a man by the name of John Evans had settled 
farther north in 1770. Others settled in the valley later. He had bought 
300 acres of heaAry timber land. 

He built a one and a half story log house on this land. To get to the upstairs 
they used a ladder outside to get to a door on the roof. He cleared part of 

the land so they could raise crops. Evan Owens and John Doan settled there 
a little later. 

The Catawissa Creek ran thi^ough Isaac John's farm, and it reached to the 
Susquehanna River on the north. 

He married the second time to Margona Bong. Isaac John had these children 
namely: ' 

1. Jacob John, born in 1778 

2. Mary Davis John, born March 10, 1780. 

3. Ann John, born in 1781. 
U. Isaac John, born in 1783. 

5. Abraham Jolrm, born in 1785. 

6. Sarah John, born in 1787. 

7. Samuel John, born in 1789. 

8. Margaret John, born in 1791. 

9. David John, born in 1792. 
10. George John, born in 1793. 

COURTHOUSE IN ELOOMSBURG , PENNSYLVANIA 

Deed Book, Page ^93, 1797. Sale of a portion of Isaac John's farm, Isaac John 
and his wife to Charles Dewold. This indentui-e made this I5th day of January 
m the year of our Lord, one thousand seven hundred and ninty-seven, between ' 
Isaac John of Catawissa Township, Columbia County, Pennsylvania with Margaret 
his wife, on one part and Charles and Christeen Dewold of Bethlehem town ' 

Northumberland Coimty, Pennsylvania. ' 



35 



FIRST GENERATION 

OUR BRANCH OF THE "JOHN" FAMILY 
FROM 
JOHN AND ELLEN PHILLIPS 

GRIFFITH JOHN, SENIOR 
THE 
"EMIGRA-NT" 



36 



OUR FIRFT GENERATION Of JOHN'? 

[FFITH JOHN, ?EI 

"THE EMIGRANT?" 



GRIFFITH JOHN, SENIOR 



Griffith John Senior, was born in or near the Parish of Haverfordwest, in 
the principality of Pembrokeshire, Wales, in the year of 1683. He was the 
son of John and Ellen Phillips, and they were descendants of Ralph Phillips 
(on the distaff side) who came from Wales to North America in 1^8f , and 
settled in Bucks County. Pennsylvania. 

Griffith with his brother Sajnuel John, (and probably others of their family 
and others from that part of Wales), emigrated to North America starting in 
the fall of 1708, in a sailing vessel and after several months on- the Atlantic 
Ocean, on the 11th of Februai^, 17 09, tired ani weary from that long and hard 
voyage. They had gone through bad storms and they had been short of food and 
fresh water, but they were thankful to God that they were able to reach this 
promise land and so glad to get out from the oppression that they had to 
suffer in Wales from the tyranny of the British Nobles and come to a place 
where they could have their religious freedom. They were mostly Quakers. 

Griffith John, in his youth, was an earnest seeker .after righteousness and 
he became measurably convinced of the principles of truth as held by the 
Quakers or Friends, by pursuing William Penn's key to Christian knowledge 
before he had much outward acquaintance with them. Coming over to this 
country when a young man, he soon joined the Friends in their religious 
fellowship and being faithful to the manifestations of Divine Grace in his 
heart he had the gift of the ministry bestowed upon him, which, together 
with his exemplary life and conversion manifested him to be a Heaven minded 
man, much redeemed from the love and spirit of this world. 

He was not anxious about the increase of outward riches, but was content 
with a small share therof . He thankfully received only so much as served 
for bodily support with great simplicity and plainness. Being a testimony 
against all superflxoity and everything tending to exalt the mind of man to 
promote worldly greatness in any degree, he sought above all the Kingdom 
of Heaven and the righteousness thereof. 

He was a lover of peace among his brothern and in his neighborhood and by 
precept and example, labored to promote it, being at times concerned, by 
travel about on foot , even in advanced age , to his friends houses , paying 
short visits in true Christian love, and dropping weighty and edifying hints, 
at sometimes, tending to stir up the pure mind and scarcely anything being 
said by him but what had a tendency that way. 

He was a remarkable and worthy example, in constant and earl;> attending 
religious meetings, until upward of ninety years of age. With weakness and 
infirmity he was confined at home and under went great bodily affliction 
with true Christian fortitude and resignation to Divine Will, patiently 
waiting his change which was on the 29th of the sixth month, 1778, age 
about ninety-five. He had been a minister for neai^ly 70 years. 

Griffith John, Senior, married Ann Williams, the daughter of Robert and 
Gwen Williams, on the twenty-third day of the seventh month in the year of 
I7I4., in Chester County, Pennsylvania. 

Griffith John, Senior, made Ms first declai^ation for marriage at the Monthly 

31 



Meeting in Goshen on the 26th of May, 111^. A committee of Peter Tayler 
and Hough Davis was appointed to investigate. On Jiine 30th, the committee 
having reported favorable, the couple renewed their declaration. Permission 
was granted for their marriage. 

At the ne>rt meeting on the 23rd of July, 171^;, the marriage was performed 
in an orderly manner and oui^ ancestors started out on their married life 
together and lived together about sixty years in happiness until death separat- 
ed them. 

To Griffith, Senior and Ann (Williams )John, were born twelve children: 



1. Arm 

2. Rachel 

3. Joshua 
4. . Hannah 



5. Jane 9. Robert 

6. Abel 10. Sarah 

7. Griffith, Junior 11. Asa 

8. Esther 12. Ruben 



(Detailed record on page ^0 ) 

Robert Williams, the father of Ann (Williams) John, came from Wales to North 
America at an early date. He married Gwen Cadwalader in the home of Hugh 
Roberts, a noted Quaker. He was called or known as "The King of Goshen," in 
early history. 



Ann (Williams) John , the wife of Griffith, John, Senior, died on the thirteenth 
day of the first month in the year of 1782. Age 82. She out lived her husband 
about four years . 



Both she and her husband, Griffith, Senior, 



were buried in the Uwchlan Friends 
burying ground beside the Meeting House, where they had so labored for their 
Master so many yeai^s. 
all that have "done well" will hear the "well done". 



They lie there to await the final Resurrection, when 



I was there in 1957 a:id 1938. Their graves were not marked, but were most 
likely marked at time of burial. The burying ground was not taken care of. 
The high stone wall around the ground was in perfect shape. The old Quaker 
Meeting House still stands there. It's stone walls were in good shape but 
other parts of the building shows age. It has not been used for a great 
number of years. It stands there in memory of those faithful ones who spent 
their lives for God and the betterment of their fellow men. 

This Quaker Meeting House was used by General George Washington's men for a 
temporary hospital and the burying ground for a temporal^ place to camp for 
the sick and wounded soldiers. Some soldiers were buried there. On January 8, 
1778, the medical officers of the Continental Army asked for the key to the 
Meeting House for its use and they were refused. They forced their way into 
the Meeting House, The Friends held their meetings at George Thomas's home. 

When^I was there in Uwchlan, the big frame house across the street from the 
Meeting House was still standing where George Washington had his Quai^ters 
dui'ing the Revolutionary War. This is located in Lionville, Chester County, 
Pennsylvania. ' 

All of Griffith, Senior, and Ann (Williams) John's children grew to mature 
age, except a boy who died in childhood. In later yeai^s most of their 
childi^en moved to other parts of the state, except Griffith John, Junior , 
who remained on the old homestead neai^ Uwchland. He took care of Ms parents 



in their declining years. The old home farm was willed to him. 

Griffith John, Senior nor his brother famuel John, Senior, coiild never 
speak English free from a strong tinge of their native tongue. The 
early Meetings were held with the Welch speaking. 

Griffith John, Senior, bought 100 acres of land about twenty-five miles 
west of Philadelphia, and one and one-half miles west of Lionville, and 
settled there in iVli^. 

The first settlers in this tract in Uwchlan Township, Chester County, 
Pennsylvania, were: Dpvid Cadwalader, John Evans, James Pough, Cadwalader 
John or Jones, Robert Benson, John Davis, Morris Rees, David p.utler, 
Rees Jones, David Davis, Evan Evans, Samuel John, Griffith John , Thomas 
John, and the Phillips family. 

Record of Deeds 

Quote: "David Lloyd, through William Penn* the Governor of 
Pennsylvania, by patent, and the Seal of the 
Providence bought two parcels of land on the 
gth of November, 17 03, and in 17 09, in Goshen 
and Uwchlan Townships, Chester County, Pennsylvania. 
These two parcels contained one thousand six hundred 
and sixty-six acres of land. 

Griffith John 

David Lloyd to Griffith John, on the 2nd of June in the year 
of' our Lord, 1715, between David Lloyd of Chester County, 
Pennsylvania, and his wife, of the one part, and Griffith John , of 
Uwchlan Township, of the same county, you are the second part 5 
William Penn, the Governor of Pennsylvania by patent, signed 
by Conveyancer of Property, Griffith Owens, Thomas Story and 
James Logan." 

Transfer of Land for Uwchlan Meetin g - Public Library in Philadelphia, PennsylvaxLia . 

John Cadwalader of Uwchlan, by deed on the 2nd of June, 1715, purchased of 
David Lloyd, Chester County, Pennsylvania, 2f0 acres of land. Then on tne 
16th of January, 1716, sold to Thomas Fell all that tenement and plantation, 
where Y" S", John Cadwalader dwells, "excepting out of tnese presents a 
piece of ground on "Y" side of the Kings Road which Y" S" John Cadwalader 
alloted for a burying ground and to set a Meeting House for Y 2 people 
called Quakers. James Pough and Samuel John, were appointed overseers of 
the Meeting on the 29th of August, 1716. 

They built a small log Meeting House which they used a great many years. Then 
in 1756, their membership had increased so they built a large stone Meeting 
House beside the burying ground. They called this place "The Friends Uwchlan 
Meeting House". In a few years they did some remodeling and built a high 
stone fence around the grounds. Isaac Lewis and David Owens left a small 
legacy in 1771, towards the walling the Uwchlan cemetery. And at the same 
time Thomas Evans gave them more land to enlarge the grounds. Joseph 
Phillips gave about $^00. 00 and James Speary gave $250.00 to help wall 
the cemetery. 

39 



Uwchlan was spelled at one time "Youchland and Youghland" . The Uwchlan Monthly 
Meetirgsbegan on the Sth month in 1716. The representatives from 1716, to 
1720 were: Joseph Helsby, James Pough, Thomas Fell, Thomas John, Hugh Davis, 
Isaac Vernon, Pamuel John, Calwalader Jones, Joseph Phillips, Robert Benson, 
Griffith John , Peter Tayler and Fajnuel Phillips. 

SECOND GENERATION 
FROM 
GRIFFITH. FENIOR AMD ANN (WILLIAMF) JOHN'? CHILDREN 

Arm John 

Arm John, the first child of Griffith, Senior and Ann (Williams) John , was 
born on the third day of the tenth month, and the seventh day of 
the week in the year 1715, in Uwchlan Township, Chester County, 
Pennsylvania. She married John Benson in 1739. She died on the 
second day of the twelfth month in the year of 1790. Age 75. 

Rachel John 

Rachel John, the second child of Griffith, Senior and Ami (Williams) John , 
was born on the twenty-eighth day of the twelfth month, in the 
year of 1717, in Uwchlan Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. 
She married James Benson in 17^,2. She died on the elventh day 
of the ninth month, in the year of 1760, and on the fifth day 
of the week about nine in the morning. Age ^3. 

Joshua John 

Joshua John, the third child of Griffith, Senior and Ann (Williams) John , 
was born on the thirty-first of the first month, and the 
sixth day of the week, in the year of 1721, in Uwchlan Township, 
Chester County, Pennsylvania. He married Rachel Davis on the 
3rd of October, Yl Ut . He died in I8O4,. Age 67. 

Hannah John 

Hannah John, the fourth child of Griffith, Senior and Ann (Williams) John , 
was born on the nineteenth day of the first month, and the third 
day of the week, in the year of 1723, in Uwchlan Township, Chester 
County, Pennsylvania. She married John D.vis in 17^3. She died 
in 180i^. Age 85. 

Jane John 

Jane John, the fifth child of Griffith. Senior and Ann (Williams) John , 
was born on the fifth day of the second month, and the second 
day of woek, in the year of 1725, in Uwclilan Township, Chester 
County, Pennsylvania. She mai-ried Enock Meredith in 1753. She 
died on the seventh day of the ninth month, and the second day 
of the week, in the year of 1795, Age 7o. 

Abel John 

Abel John, the sixth child of Griffith, Senior and Ann (Williams) John , 
was born on the twenty-second day of the seventh month and the 
sixth day of the week, in the year' of 1727. He married Mai^ 



Fisher in 1755, He died In the year of 1801. Age 74,. 

Griffith John^ Junior 

Griffith John, Junior, the seventh child of Griffith, Senior and Ann (Williams ) 
John, was born on the twenty-sixth day of the eighth month, and the 
first day of the week, in the yeai- of 1729. in Uwchlan Tc-mship, 
Chester County, Pennsylvania. 

He married Sarah Lloyd on the thirteenth day of the third month, 
in the yeai- of I7f 2. He diea in 1811, and was buried" in the 
Roaring Creek Quaker burying ground, Columbia County, Pennsylvania. 
Age 82 wanting five days. 

( A more complete record on page 4-8 ) 

Esther John 

Esther John, the eighth child of Griffith, Senior and Ann (Williams) John , 
was born on the third day of the first month, and the sixth day 
of the week, in the year of 1731, in Uwchlan Township, Chester 
County, Pennsylvania. She married a Mr. McClean. She was 
married the second time to a Mr. Fyle, She died in the eleventh 
month of the year 1811. Age 79. 

Robert John 

Robert John, the ninth child of Griffith, Senior and Ann (Williams) John , 
was born on the twenty-second day of the seventh month, and the 
first day of the week, at eight in the morning, in the year 
of 1734,, in Uwchlan Township, Chester County, Fermsylvania. He 
married Asenith Phillips in 1759. He died in the yeai" of 1760. 
Age 26. 

Sarah John 

Sarah John, the tenth child of Griffith, Senior and Ann (Williams) John , 
was born on the first day of the ninth month, and the second 
day of the week, in the year of 1736, in Uwchlan, Township, 
Chester County, Pennsylvania. She married a Mr. William Dillon 
in 1773. She died in 177^. Age 38. 

Asa John 

Asa John, the eleventh child of Griffith. Senior and Ann (Williams) John , 
was born on the fourteenth day of the ninth month, and the sixth 
day of the week, in the year of 174,0, in Uwchlan Township, 
Chester County, Pennsylvania. He died in childhood. 

Ruben John 

Ruben John, the twelfth child of Griffith, Senior and Ann (Williams) John , 
was born on the twentieth day of the first month, and the sixth 
day of the week, in the year of 1743, in Uwchlan Township, 
Chester County, Pennsylvania. 

He married Lydia Townsend, the daughter of John and Joanna 



Townsend, Her mother was born in Trent Ptafforshire, England. 

He married the second time to Jane Yociom in 1802. He died on 
the eleventh day of the twelfth month, in the year of 1823. 
Age 81, 

( A list of his children are on page /^^ ) 

GRIFFITH JOHN, SENIOR'S WILL 

Ann John, his wife to have the east room of the house, wood cut of proper 
length, 1 good cow, 15 bushels of wheat, (ground) and brought 
to her house) ^ of all the dried apples, 6 pounds of good wool, 
and 20 shillings of Pennsylvania currency paid yearly, all house- 
hold goods their value and disposal, and if she chooses to move 
away all household goods and 15 pounds of Pennsylvania currency 
paid yearly. 

2. Son Joshua to have 25 pounds of Pennsylvania currency. 

3. Son Abel to have 15 pounds of Pennsylvania currency. 
I^., Son Ruben to have 15 pounds of Pennsylvania currency. 

5. Daughter Hannah (John) Davis to have 15 pounds of Pennsylvania currency. 

6. Daughter Jane (John) Meredith to have 15 pounds of Pennsylvania currency. 

7. Daughter Arm (John) Benson to have 15 pounds of Pennsylvania currency. 

8. Daughter Esther (John) McLean to have 15 pounds of Pennsylvania currency. 

9. Grandson Jehu John, son of Robert John, to have 10 shillings when he is 21. 

10. Four grandchildren, James, Eenjajnin, Joudtion, and Ann (John) Benson, 

children of Rachel (John) Benson, to have 10 shillings each. 

11. Uwchlan Monthly Meeting to have 10 shillings for the use of the poor. 

12. Son of Griffith John, Junior, the executor, to have the plantation, 

reserving house and lot on which Ruben John resides for his use. 

West Chester Historical Society 
Goshen Meeting Mai^riages 

John Griffith of Uwchlan, to Mary John, August 31, 173/,. 
Margaret John, of Samuel John, to John Evans, October 1^,, 1737. 
Anna Jenkins, of Evan, to S'smuel John, October 6, 1733. 
Samuel John, to Samuel John, to Ann Jenkins, October I4, 1737. 
Owen John, son of William John, to Sarah Jones, March 30th, 1738. 
Ellen John, of Samuel John, to William Downing, October 10, 17^1. 
Daniel John, of Samuel John, to Elizabeth Rees , November 20, 17^42. 
Sarah John, widow of Owen John, to Thomas Martin, April 7, 1750. 
Griffith John , son of Griffith John , to Sarah Lloyd, May 13, 1752. 
Abel John, son of Griffith John, to Mary Fisher, October 8, 1755. 
Thomas John, son of Owen John, to Elizabeth Hoops, May 1, 1765. 
S.arah Jones, of Cadwalader Jones, to Owen John, March 13, 1752. 
Thomas Martin, of John Martin, to Sarah John, April 7, 1750.' 
Elizabeth Rees, of James Rees, to Daniel John, November 20, 17/^5. 

Uwchlan Meeting 

William Dillon, son of Richard Dillon, to Sarah John, May 20, 17^5. 

Cornelious Garret son, to Hannah John, August 5 1791. 

Isaac John, son of Samuel John, and Ann John,'{o Lydia Thomas, June 19, 1765. 

A.2 



Lydla John, of Famuel and Ann John, to John Kanlshy, May 21, Ylit. 
Sibllla John, of Joshua John, to William Coopes, Jiine 25, 1V78. 
Sarah John, of Joshua John, to Edwards Jones, September 20, 1787. 

Swarthmore Quaker College in Pennsylvania 

There was an early settler in Pennsylvania named Griffith John, and his 

children took their fathers given name Griffith for their last name. 

This Griffith John, was from Marion Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. 

John Evans was from William John of Gwognedd, and Robert Owens was a 
cousin of Griffith John. 

Blinkley Papers, Folson Club, Louisville, Kentucky 

There was a Griffith John and Ann, his wife, had a son by the name of 
Robert John, born on the 22nd of July, 1734., and died on the 7th of 
September, 1760. Age 26. He was disowned by Uwchlan Monthly Meeting 
for marrying out of the Friends Meeting. 

They had a son named Jehu John, born on the 2nd of December, 1759, in 
Chester County. His mother's name before marriage was Asenith Phillips. 

Jehu John married Elizabeth Davis, in Chester County, on the 8th of 
November, 1781. And to them were born eight children, namely^ 



Robert, Junior , born the 16th of March, 1783, 



Naomi, born in 1786. 

Lydia, born on the 29th of October, 1788. 

Enock, born on the 7th of February, 1791. 

Asenith, born on the 20th of May, 1793. 

Jehu, Junior, born on the 5th of January, 1796, 

Elizabeth, born on the 3rd of August, 1799. 

Isaac John, born on the 2Sth of July, 1802. 

Robert John 
Robert John , son of Jehu and Elizabeth John, had seven chiildren. 

1. Nancy John, born on the 30th of January, 1810. 

2. Emily John, born on the 9th of October, 1811. 

3. Maria John, born on the 26th of April, I8I4,. 

4. Elizabeth John, born on the 24,th of October, 1816. 

5. Rachel John, born on the 30th of September, 1818. 

6. Robert G. John, born on the 19th of August, 1820. 

7. Mary Asenith John, born on the 2lst of April, 1828. 

Ruben and Lydia (Townsend) John, to them were born these children, namely; 

1. Martha John, born on the I5th of October, 1768. 

2. Robert John, born on the 28th of February, 1771. 

3. Joanna John, born on the 20th of January. 1773. 
4.. Pamela John, born on the 24th of June, 1775. 

5. Ann John, born on the 26th of December, 1776. 

6. Sarah John, born on the 5th of November, 1778. 

7. Phoebe John, born on the 23rd of July, 1780. 

8. Lydia John, born on the 3rd of Jime, 1782. 



9. Townsend John, born on the 20th of February, 178^!^. 
10. Isaac John, born on the 16th of December, 1787. 

Joshua John, son of Griffith and Ann John, married Rachel Davis on the 
3rd of October, 17^5. To them were born these children 
namely; ' 

1. Libe John, born on the 25th of December, 17^5. 

2. Sarah John, born on the 13th of May, lip . 

3. Elizabeth John, born on the Ijth of August, 17^9. 
U. Fibilla John, born on the 3rd of August, 1753. 

5. Griffith John, born on the 2nd of May, 1755. 

6. Abner John, born on the 22nd of August, 1757. 

7. Rachel John, born on the 22nd of June, 1759. 

8. Isaiah John, born on the I2th of July 1761. 
Hannah John, born on the I5th of July, 1763^ 
Ann John, born on the 7th of August, 1765. 



9 
10 



The wT-iter of this history was at the place and over the ground where 
Griffith John . Senior, and his family lived and worked in those early 
years, to the old Friends Meeting House, and the burying ground by the 
church where they were buried. What a thrill it did give me to stand 
where they stood. I was there in 1956-57 and 58. 

If this generation and the next generation would get back to more of 
the Christian living, more prayer and Bible reading there would be 
less crime in our land. 



The Birmingham Quaker Meeting House was used by General Washington during 
the Revolutionary War for his quarters for a while. Afterwards he had 
his quarters in Lionville across from the Uwchlan Quaker Meeting House 
The Birmingham Meeting House was built in 1722, 

The early settlers there made their own clothes. They grew the flajc and 
raised the sheep for wool. They made the tliread, wove the cloth and 
home manufactured it into garments. 

The Welch Quakers that settled in Uwchlan Township at that time rested 
not with loaded guns and drawn swords within their reach neither did 
they have a shivering sentry on guard. From the very first there were 
friendly relations with the Indians. 

George Phillips , one of the first settlers in Bucks County at Richland- 
town, Pennsylvania, came from Wales to North America on the 23rd of 
January, 1683. Of this family was Griffith John , who was born in 
Pembrokeshire, Wales, 1683, came to North America landing in Phila- 
delphia on the 11th of February, 1709. He was one of the first 
pui-chasers in a Welch Colony that was Icnown as the "Welch Barnev" 
on the 23rd of July, 171^. ' 

The Indians in that part of Pennsylvania at that time of the coming of 
the white men were known as the Algonquian Tribe. Their chief was 
Wengebone. He signed the papers of sale to William Penn when he bought 
that 40,000 acres from the Indians. 



Sarah H. John, the tenth child of Griffith John, Senior married Morris 

Wilson. There was a Griffith John that married Sarah Cope. There was 

a Samuel John, son of V.P. John. Also there was an Agnes (Dundore) 

John. There was a John married to Fannie Fox. A S-rah Lucretia Johii and a 

John John and others connected with our ancestors in one way or another. 

I cannot quite connect them. 

On Edgemont Street in Chester, Pennsylvania, is a small bullying ground. 
It is located on a business street between two store buildings and it 
lies on ground about eight feet above the sidewalk. It was established 
in 1683. It has a retaining wall in the front. In this bur-ying ground 
is burled David Lloyd and his wife, with others of that day. 

Many of the traits of character, determination, self sacrifice, valor 
industry and a simple trust in God that made it possible for those 
pioneers to convert a wilderness into a civilized land, are still re- 
flected in the lives of so many of their descendants. 

Lincoln's ancestors were Quakers. His birth place was called "Sinking 
Springs Farm". It was three miles south of Hodges Mill in Harden County 
Kentucky. His mother was Nancy (Hanks) Lincoln and his father was 
Thomas Lincoln. 



The Todd Famil y 

^ n W. Todd, mai-ried Elizabeth Pergin, the daughter of Samuel and Sarah 
;Esslck) Pergin, on the 16th day of May, 183^. To them were born eight 
children, namely; 1. Sally Todd, 2. Jeanette Todd, 3. Mai^ Todd, 4. Ann 

Todd, 5. James Todd, 6. Emarette Todd, 7. John Todd and 8. Samuel Todd. 

Sally Todd married Jesse Rogers. 

Jeanette Todd married William Kranser. She married the 

second time to Trastress B. Ives. 
Mary Todd married Abraham Lincoln. 
Ann Todd married Benton Ives. 
Emarette Todd married Edwin G. John. 
Clara V. Todd married Samuel Unfleld. 
Johin Todd was born in Wallls Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. 

He paid his father $200.00 for his time till he was twenty-one, 

There was a John Walter that married J.J. John's widow. And there was 
a Eliza John, who was the mother of Dr. J. G. John, a prominent doctor 
in Shamokin, Pennsylvania. 

Ruben John, the twelfth child of Griffith, Senior, and Ann (Williams) J_ohn, 
married Eliza Lydla Townsend. And to them were born eight children, 
namely; 1. Martha who married Abia John, Senior, 2. Robert, 3. Townsend, 
/^.^ Israel, 5. Ann who married Ezra H^yes, 6. Hannah who married Abraham 
Griffith, 7. Sarah H. married George Yanney. Sarah and George Yanney had 
a daughter named May Ann Yanney and she married Franklin Jefferis. She 
died in 1891. 

Levi E. John, the son of Robert John, the grandson of Ruben John, was 
born in Uwchlan Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. He was a brick 
layer by trade. He married Eliza Ann Retrue and to them were born four 
children, namely; 1. Edwin Bridget, 2. Robert, 3. Ann M. and ^. Hem^ielba 
John. 

U5 



Edwin Bridget John, son of Levi E. and Eliza John, was born in Uwchlan 
Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania, on the 1st of June, 1835. He 
was a blacksmith by trade. He was a member of the Dunkard or Brethern 
Church. He was a Civil War Veteran and a private in Company H. 124, of 
Pennsylvania. He held several county offices and was a Republican. 
He married Mary Ann Landis , who was born on the 15th of December, 184.2. 
To them were born six children, namely; 1. William L. 2. Ella, 3. Amanda, 
4. Harvey E. 5. Norman R. and 6. Frank M. John. 

Daniel Landas, the father of Mary Ann (Landas ) John, the wife of Edwin B. 
John, married Elizabeth (Todd) Jones. These Jones came to North America 
in 1712. 

There is a little graveyai^d near Egal, Chester County, Pennsylvania, that 
has a walled up grave with a plaque on the side with these Jones names 
on it . 

Mary Ann (Landas) John was a cousin of Mary (Todd) Lincoln, the wife of 
President Abraham Lincoln. Daniel Landas married the first time to 
?ai-ah (Whitman) Jones of Hall, Massachusetts. Fhe probably died shortly 
after her marriage. 



4-6 



SECOND GENERATION 

OUR BRANCH OF THE "JOHN" FAMILY 
FROM 
GRIFFTTH, SENIOR AND ANN JOHN 
GRIFFITH JOHN, JLINIOR 



^7 



THE SECOND GENERATION OF OUR LINE 

GRIFFITH JOHN. JUNIOR 

7. Griffith John, Junior, seventh child of Griffith, Fenior and Ann 
(Williams) John was born on the twentieth day of the eighth month, 
on the first day of the week, in the year, 1729. On his parents' 
old homestead that they bought from William Perm, through David Lloyd 
in 1715, in Uwchlan Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania, he was 
born. 

He spent his early years helping his parents on the farm. He got an 
education in the school near there and stayed with his parents till 
after he was grown. 

He, with his parents, went through very hard times in those early years 
as they had so little to do with. He was in the Revolutionary War and 
one of the great battles of the war, the Battle of Brandywine, with 
General George Washington and his army was fought near their farm 
against the British troops. 

At the age of 23, he married Sarah Lloyd, the daughter of Humphry and 
Hannah Lloyd. He was married on the thirteenth day of the third month 
in the year of 1752, They both being Quakers or Friends, they had a 
Quaker wedding. Their belief and form of marriage was: "The Quakers 
believed "God" and "He" alone can rightfully join man and woman together 
in the bonds of marriage". So when a Quaker couple wishes to marry, 
the bride to be, goes before the woman's monthly Meeting and the husband 
to be, goes before the men's monthly Meeting of the Quakers, with a 
petition to this effect; "With Divine permission, and the approval of the 
Friends, we the undersig'ned intend marriage with each other." 

The Meeting appoints two men and two women to investigate the couple. 
After the thirdMeeting, if the report is favorable, the couple goes 
to the front and facing each other and repeat 5 "In the presence of the 
Lord and his assembly, I take this woman, (or this man) to be my wedded, 
(wife or husband), they then take their right hands and repeat; "with 
Divine assistance, to be a loving (husband or wife), until death shall 
separate us." 

This is read by the ones appointed; then all that were there would sign 
the wedding certificate. Then they were wished God's guidance on their 
life's joui'-ney together. 

(A copy of Griffith, Junior and S.-^rah (Lloyd) John's marriage certificate 
is on page 52). They recommend that all weddings be held on the 
we ek days . 

To them were born the following nine children: 

1. Rebekah, 2. Asa, 3. Hannah, /,. Mary, 5. Abia, 6. Rachel, 7. Grace, 
8. Mary, 2nd. and 9. Leah John. 

(Detailed on pages 49-51 ) 



A8 



Sarah (Lloyd) John, wife of Griffith, Junior and daughter of Humphry and 
Hannah Lloyd was born on the twenty-fifth day of the first month and the 
fifth day of the week, in the year 1736, in Northumberland County, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

She was struck with the palsy on the thirteenth day of the sjxth month in 
the year of 1796. She lost the use of her tongue, hand and her right foot. 
She remained speechless and helpless until the 2/^th and died at 12:0/^ A.M. 
Was buried the 25th of the same month. Age 66 years /^ months and 18 days. 

After Sarah (Lloyd), Griffith Junior John's wife died he moved from Chester 
to Northumberland County with his son, Abia John. 

Griffith John, Junior died on the twenty-first day of the eighth month at 
four o'clock in the morning in the year of 1811. Age eighty-two years lack- 
ing five days. He was buried in the Roaring Creek Meeting House cemetery, 
which is about one mile north of Numida, in Columbia County, Pennsylv.ania. 

He had lived a long and useful Christian Life, and was a good example and 
blessing to his fellow men in trying to make this a better world. 

He out lived his wife, Sarah, about sixteen years. 

GRIFFITH. JTOIOR AND SARAH (LLOYD) JOHN'S CHILDREN 
Rebekah John 

1. Rebekah John, the first child of Griffith, Junior and Sarah (Lloyd) John , 
was born on the sixteenth day of the third month and the sixth day of the week, 
in the year of 1753, recorded in Goshen Meeting. 

She married a Mr. Harvant on the second of the fifth month, 177£>. She 
married the second time to Thomas Davis, on the third day of the twelfth month 
in 1788. 

She died on the twelfth day of the eighth month in 1815, of herna in her 
groin. She was buried on the thirteenth day of the eighth month in 1815. Age 
sixty-five years, five months and four days. 

Asa John 

2. Asa John, the second child of Griffith, Junior and S^rah (Lloyd) Jjhn , 
was born on the twenty-first day of the first month, the tliird day of the week, 
at seven o'clock in the forenoon, in the year of 1755. 

He died of smallpox, on the second day of the eighth month at half -past 
eleven o'clock in the forenoon in the year of 1758, on the twentieth day of his 
sickness. Age three years, six months and twelve days. 

Hannah John 

3. Hannah John, the third child of Griffith, Junior and Sarah (Loyd) John, 
was born on the twenty-eighth day of the sixth month, the third day of the 
week at five o'clock in the afternoon, in the year of our Lord, 1757. Recorded 
In Goshen Meeting. 

A9 



fhe married David Phillips on the eighth day of the eighth month in 
111 2. To them were born eleven children. Namely, 1. Asa, 2. Rebecca, 
3. David, /,. Abia, 5. Stephen, 6. William, 7. John, 8. Daniel, 9. Griffith, 
10. Parah, 11. Hannah Phillips, 

Hannah (John) Phillips, wife of David Phillips, died on the sixteenth 
day of the eleventh month, in the year of 1829, and was buried at Catawissa, 
Pennsylvania, at the age of seventy-two years, four months and eighteen days. 

Judge M. J. Phillips of Sullivan County, Pennsylvania, was a son of 
Griffith Phillips and Hannah (John) Phillips' son. 

Asa Phillip, Hannah (John) Phillips first child was born on the first 
of the fifth month in 1851. Parts of this I took from the Los Angeles Public 
Library Book of Colimibia County, Pennsylvania, No. 2. 

Mary John 

Z^. Mary John, the fourth child of Griffith, Junior and Sarah (Lloyd) John . 
was born on the second day of the tenth month, and the third day of the week, 
at half past eight o'clock in the year, 1759, recorded at Goshen. She died on 
the twenty-ninth of the fifth month, about twenty minutes after three in the 
morning, 1767. Mortification on her left foot which lasted twelve days. She 
was eight years six months and 26 days old. 

Abia John 

5. Abia John, the fifth child of Griffith John. Junior and Sarah (Lloyd) 
John, was born on the twenty-sixth of the eleventh month, the fifth day of the 
week, at 2 o'clock in the afternoon in the year 1761. 

He married Martha John on the eighth of the fifth month, in the year 
1788. He died on the twenty-seventh of the fourth month, in the year 1838 
at half past one o'clock in the afternoon, on the sij-ith day of the week. 

Age seventy-six years, five months and one day. He was bui-led in 
the Friends burying ground at Catawissa, Columbia Country, Pennsylvania. 

His wife Martha John , died on the tenth of the eleventh month, 18^0. 
Her age was seventy-nine. She also was buried in the Catawissa burying grounds, 

To them were born tliirteen childi^en, namely, 

1. Asa (See page 70 ) 8. Jesse (See page 76 ) 

2. Hiram (See page 7^ j 9. Elida (See page 76 ) 

3. Emily fSee page 7^ ) IQ. Samuel (See page 76 ) 
U. Griffith, the third (See page 7^) 11. Jehu (See page 77 ) 

5. Ruben ' (See page 75) 12. Eliza (See page 78 ) 

6. Lydia (See page 75) 13. Perry (See page 86 ) 

7. Sarah (See page 75 j 

Griffith John, the 3rd is Don John's branch of the John family. 
A more complete record of Abia John is found on page 69. 



50 



Rachel John 

6. Rachel John, the sixth child of Griffith, Junior and farah (Lloyd) John , 
was born on the twenty-fifth day of the seventh month, on the foiirth day of 

the week, at eleven o'clock in forenoon, in the year of 176^. 

She married John Eenholty on the twenty-ninth of the third month in the 
year of 1798. They had at least one son named Abia Eenholty. 

Grace John 

7. Grace John, the seventh child of Griffith, Junior, and Sarah (Lloyd) Jchn , 
was born on the twenty-eighth day of the second month, and the seventh day of 

the week, at half past two in the afternoon, in the yeai" of 1767. 

She married Thomas Davis on the foui^th day of the fourth month in 1778. 
Mary John 

8. Mary John, the eighth child of Griffith, Junior and Sarah (Lloyd) John , 
was born on the twenty-sixth of the twelfth month, and the third day of the 
week in the morning, and the year of 176'^'. 

She married Nathaniel Eennet, on the seventh day of the nineth month in 
the year of 1795. 

Leah John 

^' . Leah John, the nineth child of Griffith, Junior and Sarah (Lloyd) John , 
was born on the second day of the week, in the morning, in the year 1773. 
She married Isaac Mellon on the twenty-fifth day of the first month, and in 
the year Yl^-:^ , 



GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY 

OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST 
OF U\nER-DAY SAINTS 

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63 



rOME EARLY HIFTORY AND HAPPENINGS 

Blooms burg, Pennsylvania, the County Seat of Columbia County, is just north 
of the Pusquehanxia River. In this town is one of the largest carpet mills in 
North America. 

Before the Revolutionary War, Columbia County was a camping ground for the 
Shawnee Indians. 

It was named "Columbia" because of the patriotic son of Joseph Hopkins, "Hail 
Columbia". 

The road from Reading to Sunbury was called, "The Kings Highway," and this 
is the road from Chester County to Northumberland County, that Abia John and 
family came over when they moved to Northumberland from Chester County in 
1795. 

There was a man by the name of Francis Yarnell, an early settler in the east 
part of Pennsylvania, who was a surveyor. He did lots of the siorveying in 
that part of the country. In 1770, Francis Yarnell sui-veyed the first wagon 
road across the mountains to Fort Augusta, just below the noith and south 
forks of the Susquehanna River. Up to that time all the supplies for the 
Fort were brought by boat in the river. He finished this road in 1771, and 
this road went by a place then kno^wn as Taylertown. This is where Yarnell 
in 1768, bought a lot of land, paying $50,000.00 for it. He bought this 
land from the Indians. He built a hotel there. 'wThen Abia John and family 
emigrated from Chester County to Northumberland County, they all stayed over 
night at this hotel. He married Mary Lincoln, the great aunt of President 
Lincoln. They died and were both buried in a small enclosiore near the forks 
of the Susquehanna River, and now the fence and graves are not cared for and 
it is a pitiful sight. Griffith John, the son of Perry John, wrote about 
this in a letter to his cousin, Sarah (Lloyd) Bixrch in Rockford, Illinois. 

Lydia John, the sixth child of Abia and Martha John , married Amos Yarnell 
in 1825. 

Fort Augusta is now surrounded by the City of Sunbury. It was one of the 
earliest trading posts in Northimiberland. (I was there in this fort 
building in 1958). It was also an Indian trading post. The town was first 
called Shamokin, but the town of Shamokin now is several miles south-east 
of Fort Augusta and Sunbury. 

The towns of Shamokin and Mt . Carmel are in the center of the great coal 
fields. This is where my parents came from. (My father worked in the 
coal mines as a boy. ) 

The first discoveries of coal was by Neche Allen, who in 1790, was out hunt- 
ing. He took what he thought was a black rock and laid pieces of this rock 
around to build a fire in. Then he laid down to rest and sleep. When he 
awoke he found that what be thought was black rock was burning. 

Thomas Edison lighted the first building that was ever lighted in the city 
of Sunbury. The birilding was torn down and a big hotel is standing on that 
place now. It is called the Edison Hotel. 

The wages in the coal mines in 1830 were $3.00 to fv^.OO a week and for long 
hours. The work was not steady either. 



The earliest railroad in Fchuylkill County, Pennsylvania, was built in 1830, 
by Pteven Girard who financed it. It was only completed from Danville to 
Pottsville. The rails were wood, reinforced with strips of iron. The cars 
were drawn with horses. Mr. Girard died so the railroad was never completed, 
Eliza John, in her diary, speaks of riding on this train part of the way 
to Philadelphia. 

The Friends or Quakers were the earliest religious organization that held 
Meetings in Chester County, Pennsylvania. As early as 1675, they held 
Meetings in Chester (then Upland), and after 1677, their meetings were 
held at regular intervals . 

The Friends petitioned the Chester Meeting in 1712, to hold worship in a 
private home. They built a log Meeting house later. "This is where our 
first ancestors went to Meetings." 

Battle of Clouds, the greatest military engagement of the entire American 
Revolutionary War, would have taken place on the 16th of September, 1777, 
near the hamlet of Goshen, had it not been prevented by a tremendous cloud- 
burst that soaked the ammunition of both armies so they could not fight. 
(It was called the Battle of the Clouds). 

The Battle of Brandywine was fought on the property of Gideon Gilpins . He 
put in a bill to the British Government for $502.06', for damages. 



EBENEZER AND SARAH JOHN 



Ebenezer John was born on the 7th of July, 1755. He was the Sth and youngest 
child of Samuel, Junior and Ann (Jenkin) John. He married Sarah Ealey in 
Tennessee. To them were born these children, namely; 1. Samuel, 2. Elisha, 
3. Jacob, ^. David, 5. Isaac, 6. Ann, 7. Elizabeth, 8. Katherine, 9. Ruth, 
10. Sarah, 11. Ebenezer John, Junior. 

Samuel John the oldest child of Ebenezer and Sarah (Ealey) John, was 
born in Tennessee, and he moved to Ohio. He married Elizabeth Beals. 
To them was born these children, namely; 1. Dalllah, 2. Friscilla, 
(She married Samuel Wells), 3. Jesse, L,. Jonathan (he married Sapphire 
Piper), 5. Samuel (He married Elizabeth Barton), 6. Ebenezer (He married 
Mary Piper), 7. Elizabeth (She married a Mr. Arnet), 8. Jesse John was 
born 5/25/1819 (He married Belinda Wyatt on the 7/15/18/^1). 

To Jesse and Belinda (Wyatt) J:;hn, were born these children: 

1. James R. - He married Ann McKinney. He married the 

second time to Rebecca Billows. 

2. Isaac died in infancy, 

3. Mary E. - She married John Dawson. 

L^. Ebenezer - He married Mary E. Kepner. 
5. Jesse - He married Mary Richardson on 10-31-1867. 
To them were born these children, namely; 

1. Belinda F. - Died in infancy. 

2. Adda May John - She married Oscar Reed. 



65 



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67 



OUR BRANCH OF THE "JOHN" FAMILY 
FROM 



GRIFFITH, JUNIOR AND SARAH JOHN 



AEJA JOHN 



68 



AEIA AND I4ARTHA JOHN 
Third GeneTation from Griffith John, the Emigrant 

Abia John , the fifth child of Griffith, Junior, and Sarah (Lloyd) John , 
was born on the 26th of December, 1761, on the old original farm of his 
ancestors near Lionville , Uwchlan Township, Chester Coionty, Pennsylvania. 

He grew to manhood on their farm, helping his parents while going to school. 
He spent a lot of his spare time in study, so he obtained a good education, 
compared with a lot of the people of these days. With his other studies, he 
took up surveying and conveyancing of property and other things. 

He was a man of more than ordinary ability. In his early twenty's he took 
up teaching. One of the schools that he taught was in West Bradford Township, 
Chester, Co-unty, Pennsylvania. He was paid eight shillings or $1.92, for 
each child for a period of three months in the winter time. He was obliged 
to teach reading, writing and cyphering. 

He married Martha John, daughter of Ruben and Lydia (Townsend) John, on 
the &th of May, 1788, in Chester County, Pennsylvania. While he still lived 
in Chester County, they had three children born to them, namely; 1. Asa T., 
2. Hiram, 3. Emily John. They later moved to Northumberland County, and 
there they had ten more children born to them, namely; 4.. Griffith, the 
third, 5. Ruben, 6. Lydia, 7. S^rah, 8. Jesse, 9. Elida, 10. Pamuel, 11. Jehu , 
12. Eliza, and 13. Perry Juhn. 

Martha's mother, Lydia, was Lydia Townsend before she married. Martha married 
Griffith John, Senior's youngest child, Ruben. Martha was a hard working 
wife and mother of her large family. Besides her work at home, she gave a lot 
of time to work in her church, the Quakers. 

In the ye.ar of 1795, Abia's father, Griffith John , J unior , helped them move 
from their old home in Chester County, up to Northumberland County. His 
father took Abia , his wife Martha and all their effects. They took two of 
three children they had at that time and they left their second child Hiram, 
with his grand parents on his mother's side, Ruben and Lydia Jolin. They pick- 
ed him up later. Asa, their oldest child was seven and the third child was 
Emily, age three. 

They started north on what was a long hard trip at that time. They had a two 
horse wagon and they followed the Great Road as it was called at that time. 
This road was surveyed by Francis Yarnell, who was one of the early settlers 
north of there. His wife was Mary Lincoln, One of the Yarnells at a later 
date married the daughter of Lydia John, the sixth child of Abia John. 

This road took them over the Mahony and Locust mountains, on past where the 
town of Mt . Carmel is now located, then on down into the valley past where 
the town of Shamokin now stands. They stopped at Yai-nell's Tavern one night. 
The first night in Northumberland County they stayed at Hotel Fisher. Then 
traveling on the next morning and by the next afternoon they reached their 
stopping place at John Adam Gilger's place where they rented a room upstairs. 
They stayed in this room while he built a log house on the timber land that 
he had bought before. It was on the 8th of May, 1795, when they landed there. 

There were lots of wild animals roving thi-ough the woods all around them and 

69 



they would howl and screech tkrough the night. That part of the country for 
a long way north and west was nothing much but timber and Indians. 

After he had part of his timber land cleared so he could raise some crops, 
he would take what he could spare over bad mountain roads with a two horse 
wagon about seventy miles to Reading, Pennsylvania. There he would exchange 
it for food, cloth and the things that they had to have on their farm. They 
did not have much to live on and to do with in those early years. 

He was a man of great determination and with his education that he had and 
being a surveyor and a conveyancer of transfers , he succeeded and worked up 
a large business. 

Goveinor Fnyder of Pennsylvania appointed him as the Justice of the Peace in 
1809, which he held till 1830. He was held in high esteem by the Courts and 
the attorneys of Simbury. He became an extensive land holder in that part 
of the coimty. 

He took an active part in raising the money for and secui^ing the Center Turn- 
pike Road in 1802. It is said that he had charge of the western division, 
being from Paxinos to funbury, which is about thirteen miles. 

They were strong Quakers and both were great workers in their Meetings. It 
is said that Martha had more than common ability. 

Abia John's family moved from their first home farm that they bought in 1795, 
to a farm that he bought in 1823. All their children from Elida on down, 
lived in this place. Their first farm was timber land. This piece was the 
land that be bought when he moved from Chester Co-unty to Northumberland 
County. 

Martha died on the lOth of November, 184,0. She was bui^ied in the Friends 
burying grounds in Columbia County, Pennsylvania. Age 7'^. 

Abia John, her husband, died on the 27th of April, 1838, and was buried in 
Catawissa bui^ying grounds. Age 77. 

A more complete record of their children is found on page 70-74.-75-76-77-86) 

By I922, Abia and Martha John had 78 grandchildren. 

ABIA PENIOR AND MARTHA JOHN'S CHILDREN AND DESCENDANTS 

I. Asa Townsend Jolm 

Asa T. John the first child of Abia and Martha John, was born on the 10th of 
December, 1788, in Chester County, Pennsylvania. 

When he was seven years old his parents moved from Chester County to North- 
umberland County, in 1795. They took him and his sister Emily with them to 
the new home, leaving their brother Hiram with his grandpai^ents for a time. 
When they were settled they brought Hiram home. 

Asa grew to manhood in Northumberland County on his parent's farm and finished 
his schooling there. 

At the age of 23 he married Mary Thomas, on the 2nd of January, 1811. To them 

70 



were born seven chlldrenj n,3jnely, 1. Abia, 2nd., 2. Enoch, fwho died 
early in life), 3. Townsend, (died at the age of 20), Z^. Joseph T. (He 
was the Chief Burgess of Mount Carmel), f ■ . Ann, (mai-ried John Kester), 
6. Jesse G., and 7. Amos Y. John. 

Asa Townsend John died on the 2nd of Februai"y, 1868. Age 80. 

I took this from Bell's History of Northumberland County, "The Bear Gap 
Meeting House", page 1185, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Quote: "In 1796, a tract of land was conveyed by George Miller to Abiah 
John of Chester County. Abiah John arrived in this section in 1795. 

The Fociety of Friends was represented in this territory from as early as 
1795, but no local Meetings were organized until I84.O. At that time Elida 
and Perry John and a number of Friends residing in that locality who were 
formerly connected with the Meetings in Catawissa, and Roaring Creek, were 
sepai-ately constituted. A schoolhouse and subsequently Krickbauma's Mill 
were used as places of worship until a church was built". 

The early settlers not only built churches but they also built schoolhouses . 
A log schoolhouse was built probably as early as 1810 near where they built 
the Quaker Meeting House later. 

Bell's History continued. Quote, "In the deed to Willi.am Ki^ickbauma from 
Gilger, executors, a plot of ground on which was erected a schoolhouse, and 
was expected. It was mostly likely that this ground and school came about 
as a result of the efforts of John Adam Gilger." 

This John Adam Gilger 's place is where Abia John, Fenior stayed when he first 
moved to Northumberland County. 

The Quaker records at Swart hmore College in Pennsylvania gives the following: 

In 18^0, the Shamokin Friends requested an Indulged Meeting for worhip , 
to be held on the first day of the week in the schoolhouse near Asa T. 
John's home, for the ensuing six months; which the Meeting united with 
and appoints Benjamin Sharpless and William Thomas, a committee to 
attend the opening of the said Meeting. 

Woman's meeting concurring, appoints Mary Ellis and Sarah Hughs to join 
the committee of men Friends. 

"On January the 1st, 1.SUU\ Asa T. John, granted to Hiram, Elida and Perry 
John, Trustees, for five dollars, an acre of land for the sole use and 
benefit of the Religious Society of People called Quakers, residing in 
said township and vicinity, to the onely use and care from said trustees 
forever. " 

This group called themselves. The Roaring Creek Monthly Meeting of the 
Friends . 

The contract for the building of the Meeting House was given to Asa T. 
John and the first Meeting in the new building was held in June, 184.5. 

William Cleaver from Chester County was the first to preach there, and 
Ruben John, also preached at that Meeting. The Meeting was actually 

71 



established on the 6th of September, 18^5. To this Meeting House 
came many of the great and near great among the Quakers. 



DEPCENDANTS OF ABIA JOHN | 



I. Ara, genlor and Mary Ann (Thomas) John's Descendants 

Abla Jolm, 2nd., the first child of Asa T. and Mai^ Ann fThomas) John, 
was born on the l^th of November, 1811, In Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. 

He was the first school teacher in Fhajnokin (now Ralpho ) Township, North- 
umberland County, Pennsylvania. He also was a tanner. His leather was In 
great demand all over the country. 

He died on the 18th of December, 1885. Age 72. He was burled In the Friends' 
burying ground near the Meeting House at Bear Gap. 

He married Jane E. Teats, daughter of John Teats. To them were born eight 
children, namely; 1. Daniel T., 2. Henry, 3. Mary Ann, l^. Asa T., 2nd, 
5. Lloyd, 6. Cynthia, 7. Joslah E. and 8. Jeremiah M. John, 

The record of Abla, 2nd, and Jane E. (Teats) John's 
children are as follows : 

Daniel T. John 

1. Daniel T. John, the first child of Abla T. and Jane E. (Teats) 
John, was born on the 11th of June, 1833. He lived In Nebraska 
at one time. Eliza John often speaks of him in her diary. 

Henry John 

2. Henry John, the second child of Abia, 2nd, and Jane E. (Teats) 
Jolm, was born on the 23rd of September, 1835. He grew up and his 
school was in Northumberland County. He was in the Civil War, 
132nd Pennsylvania , (Vol. 1862) - 6th Co. H. Pa. Cav. 

He was a merchant. He married Mary E. Johnson, the daughter of 
Silas and Eliza (Rink) Johnson in June, 1863. 

To them were born six children, namely; 1. ?llas Curtin John (of 
Seattle, Washington), 2. Charles L. John, 3. Clarence E. John, 
4,. William H. John, f . . George W. John, and 6. Milton John. All 
boys . 

Mary Ann John 

3. Mary Ann John, the third child of Abia, 2nd, and Jane E. (Teats) 
John, was born in 1837. 

As a T . , t he 2nd . 

U. Asa T. John, the fourth child of Abia, 2nd, and Jane E. (Teats) 
John, was born on the 5th of January, 183*^'. He was in the 
Civil War, the l^th U.P. Regulars. Died in 1863, at Fairfax, 
Virginia. Age 2U. 

Lloyd Tarrison John 

5. Lloyd Tarrison John, the fifth child of Abla, 2nd and Jane (Teats) 
John, was born on the 22nd of December, I84.O. He lived in 

72 



Nebraska at one time. 

Cynthia John 

6, Cynthia John, the sixth child of Abia 2nd and Jane E. fTeats ) 
John, was born in 18^2. She married D. K. Webster, fhe lived 
at one time in Coatsville, Chester County, Pennsylvania. She 
was greatly interested in the "Jolin" family history. 

Josiah Elwood John 

7. Josiah E. John, the seventh child of Abia the 2nd. and 
Jane (Teats) John, was born on the 23rd of January, 184.5', 
in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. He died in August, 
192Z^. His wife Hannah Elizabeth John, died several years 
before he did. They were both burled in the Methodist 
Church cemetery near Bear Gap, Nort humberland, County , Penn- 
sylvania. 



To Josiah E. and Hannah E. John were born ttoee children 
namely; Carrie, William and Blanche. 

1. Carrie E. John, the first child. 

She married a Mr. Miller and to them were born 
three children, namely; 

1. Laura Miller. Her name is Mrs. Charles Erogen. 

2. Allen Miller 

3. Howard Miller 

2. William Elwood John, the second child of Josiah E. 

and Hannah E. John. 

His wife's n.ame was Hannah Rachel John, and to 

them were born eight children, namely; 

1. Mildred John. She married a Mr. Stine. 

2. Calvin Abiah John 

3. Judge Auten John 

Ly. Mable Marie John. She married a Mr. Kreischer. 
(She supplied me v^fith some of this 
material for my record). She went to 
Quaker Meetings and taught Sunday School 
there at the Bear Gap Meeting House. Her 
parents owned the farm house farther up 
the hill from the Meeting House. (Joseph 
John oVvTied the farm a little farther down 
toward the Church at one time. 

5. William Shannon John 

6. Samuel Josiah John 

7. Mary Jane John. She married Mr. McKechney. 

8. Dorothy Mae John. She married a Mr. Klase. 

3. Blanch John, the third child of Josiah E. and Hannah E. 

John, married a Mr. Leisenring and to them were 
born four children, namely; 

1. Clair Leisenring 

2. Elizabeth Leisenring 

3. Evelyn Leisenring 
4-. Marjorie Leisenring 

Jeremiah Moore John 

8. Jeremiah M. John, the eighth child of Abia 2nd and Jane E. (Teats) 
John, was born on the 29th of January, 18^8. He died in 1936. Age 

73 



APIA. PENIOR AND MARTHA JOHN'P CHILDREN. CONTINUED 
Fee page 50. 

II . Hiram Townsend John 

Hircam T. John, the second child of AM a. Fenior and Martha John , was born 
on the l/^th of August, 1790, in Chester County, Pennsylvania. And in 1795, 
his parents moved to Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. They left him 
with his grandparents on his mother's side (Ruben and Eliza John). He joined 
his parents later. 

At the age of 2/^, he married Farah Miller. This was on the 20th of May, I8I4,. 

He married the second time to Elizabeth Miller. To them were born ten children, 
namely; 1. James, 2. Wesley, 3. Abia, ^. Jonathan 5. Mary P., 6. Martha, 
(Fhe married Franklin John), 7. Ledwedlyn, 8. William 1., (He died on the 20th 
of March, 1926, age 80.), 9. Lydia, and 10. Ira John. 

They moved from Pennsylvania to Illinois in May, 1852. He died in 185:. Age 66. 

Their daughter Mary P. John, married Alford Temlins and to them were born three 
children, namely; 1. Milta Temlins, 2. Mary Joseph Temline and 3. Anna E. 
Temlins . 

Hiram T. and Elizabeth John had a granddaughter that lived in Woodbury, N.J. 
and she was the daughter of James John (Hiram's first child) and the wife of 
Warn Underwood. Her name before marriage was Tansar Eliza John. 

III. Emily John 

Emily John, the third child of Abia, Fenior and Martha John , was born on the 
23rd of January, 17C'2, in Chester County, Pennsylvania. 

Fhe moved with her parents from Chester County to Northumberland County in 
1795. 

Fhe had her schooling in Northumberland County and grew to womenhood on her 
parent's farm. This farm was covered with timber when her parents first settled 
there. Their house was made of logs. 

She married Abishi Thomas on the 31st of May, 1827. To them was born a daughter. 
Emily was married before to Levi Hughes on the 11th of April 1811. And to this 
marriage was born a son. Emily died in 1871. Age 79. 

Emily had a granddaughter that lived in Mellvill, Columbia County, Pennsylvania. 
Her name was R. Ann Kester. 

IV. Griffith John 

Griffith John, the fourth child of Abia, Fenior and Martha John, was born 
on the 6th of Feptember, 17'I5, in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. 



He grew to manhood on his parents farm and his schooling was in this area. 
When he was 21, in 1816, he married Rachel Miller. He moved to Ohio in 1817. 
where he made his future home. He died in 1856. 

To them were born five children, namely; 1. Jesse J, John( he married a Mary 

u 



Roush, and to them was born a son named Jesse Clinton Emerson John. 
Clinton Joim married Frances Idora Strawbridge and to them was born a 
son named Don D. Jolm, whose home was in Louisville, Kentucky. He died in 
1957.) I, Clark John, was in his home a few weeks after his death. He had 
been working on the "John" family history. 

2. Abiah John (Son of Griffith John and Rachel Miller) 

3. Martha John (Daughter of Griffith and Rachel) 
U. Jehu John (Son of Griffith and Rachel) 

S. Pauline John (Daughter of Griffith and Rachel) 

V. Ruben John 

Ruben John, the fifth child of Abia, Senior and Martha John, was born on the 
2lst of March, 1798, in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. 

He had his ear^ly schooling in that pai^t of the country and grew to manhood on 
his fathers ' farm. 

He married Sophia Mettler, the daughter of Phillip and Mary Kettler. on the 
^th of May, 1820. 

He died on the 26.th of February, 1880, in Illinois. Age 82. He was buried 
in the Quaker Meeting House burying grounds at Dixon, Illinois. 

His wife, Sophia (Mettler) John, died on the 7th of March, 1887, at Dixon, 

and was buried in the same burying ground that her husband was buried. Age 86. 

To them were born nine children, namely; 1. Mary Ann, 2. Martha, 3. Melinda, 

4.. Isaac M. 5. Allen, 6. Franklin, 7, Lucretia E., 8. Harvey, and 9. Sarah John. 

( A more complete record of them is found on page 109 ) 

VI. Lvdia John 

— v. 

Lydia John, the sixth child of Abia, Senior and Martha John, was born on the 
20th of October, 1799, in Northumberland County. Pennsylvania. Her early 
schooling was near her parent's farm where she helped them with their work. 

When she was grown she married John Wolverton on the 11th of October, 1818. 
She married the second time to Amos Yarnell on the 25th of May, 1825. 

She died on the I2th of October, 1862. Age 73. 

To Lydia (John) and Amos Yarnell were born four children, namely; 1. Samuel 
larnell, 2. Evan Yarnell, 3. Sarah Yai^nell and 4.. Amanda Yarnell. 

Sa.-ah or Sally Yarnell, the third child of Lydia (John) and Amos Yarnell, 
ma^-ried Edv;in Bloom, on the 18th of January, 1855. 

VII. Sarah John 

Sarah John, the seventh child of Abia, Senior and Martha John, was born on 
the 20th of August, 1801, in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. On her 
parents farm she was born and this farm was willed to her and her sister. She 
had her schooling there and lived there all her life. 

75 



5:he never married. After her parents died she and her sister Eliza John 
lived together there quite awhile, She died in 1880. Age 79. 

VIII. Jesse J. Jolm 

Jesse John, the eighth child of Abia , Fenior and Martha John, was born on 
the 9th of 'March 1803. He went to school and grew to manhood in North- 
umberland and Columbia Counties, Pennsylvania. He married Eliza Hicks 
on the 16th of October, 1828. 

To them was born at least one son, namely; Jesse John, Junior, when he 
was grown he became a doctor in Phamokin for years. He married Elizabeth 
Ki'ick on the 13th of March, 18?^. 

Jesse John's wife Eliza (Hicks) John, died on the 2nd of September, 1829, 
at the age of 26, f- months and 23 days. She was married less than a year. 

Jesse John, was a teacher and a surveyor. He died on the 2nd of September, 
1829. ■ Age 26. He was bm-ied in Catawissa Friends burying ground. 

IX. Elida John 

Elida John, the ninth child of A bia, Senior and Mai^tha John , was born on the 
29th of August, 1805, in Northumberland Country, Pennsylvania. 

He went to school neai" Bear Gap and grew to manhood helping his parents on 
the old homestead. He married Sarah Huges on the 3rd of October, 1826. 
To them were born ten children, namely; 1. Palemon ( he became a noted 
doctor after he had finished his schooling), 2. Edwin, 3. Martin, ^. Abia, 

5. Hugh, 6. Ruthanna. 7. Chalklet, 8. Sarah^ 9. George, and 10. Emily John. 

Dr. Palemon John also was the founder of the Blooms burg Rep. paper and was 
a member and worker in the Friends Meeting. 

Elida John, worked to free the slaves and was a great temperance worker. . 
He died in 1883. Age 78. 

X . Samuel John 

Samuel John, the tenth child of Abia, Senior and Mai'tha John , was born in 
the 27th of February, 1807, in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. 

He spent his eai^ly years on his parents farm and around that part of the 
country. 

At the age of 26, he married Angeline John, at Catawissa. She was the fifth 
child of Abraham and Mary (Flick) John, a descendant of Samuel John, Senior 
the emigrant, and older brother of Griffith John, Senior . He married on 
the l,th of April, 1833. He died in 1870. Age 63. 

To them were born nine children, namely; 1. Kersey, (he married Diadem 
Zimmerman) (he died in March, 1861^, 2. Leai'tis, (he died in 185^), 3. 
Vianna, ^. Ulisses F. ( he died in 1900), 5. Jefferson ( he died in 1877), 

6. Clara ( mai-ried a Mir. Bird and they had a daughter that lived in Blooms buirg, 
Pennsylvania and a son in Shamokin, Pennsylvania), 7. Roselda, 8, Sarah, 

9. Mary John ( she married Emry Rover and to them'were born two sons, namely 
Lever Rover and Rollins Rover) Rollins Rover was a Methodist Preacher. 

76 



Clara (John) Eird Smith died in November, 1925. 

Samuel John, was a manuf actui^er of stoves and plows. In IBUh^, he was appointed 
by President Polk as postmaster of the Borough of Shamokin and he served in 
this capacity for two years. 

He was in the coal mining industry and in 1867, he was one of those that 
secui'ed a charter for a railroad leading from Shamokin. 

In 1832, the state legislature of Pennsylvania appointed him one of the commiss- 
ioners of Donville and Pottsville Railroad. 

He was cashier of the Shamokin Bank at one time and director of the Shamokin 
Banking Company. 

Mr. Samuel John was a man of determination and temperate habits and he often 
spoke of this as one of the characteristics of which he owed his activity and 
good habits . 

He named his home "Mount Comfort". Upon the anniversary of his seventieth 
birthday in the presence of his family and a few chosen friends who came to 
celebrate the event, said, "I have no recollection of spending an evening 
at a dance, a frolic or any other place of dissipation of foolery." I never 
used strong drink, ale or portar as a beverage as I know it was dangerous. 
I never used tobacco in anyway as I knew it was filthy habit and detrimental 
to the health. I have never played games of cards or chance or hazard 
as I felt it was demoralising." Unquote. 

He was a member of the Methodist Church. (1 took this from Pennsylvania 
Historical Society Library in Philadelphia, History of Northumberland 
County, Pennsylvania. ) 

N. E. John 
_The follo'vjing was taken from the History of Northumberland County. Pennsylvania , 

N. E. John, son of Samuel and Angeline John, was born on the I5th of Cctober, 
1835. He was an attorney and capitalist of Shamokin, Pennsylvania. 

He also was in the store, coal and banking business. He was one of the promoters 
of the mining of coal in Shamokin, Pennsylvania. 

He married Agnes Dondore on the 9th of October, 1867. To them were born these 
children: 

1 . Howard 

2. Flora 

3. Samuel, Junior 
Z^. Sarah John 



':'- 1 . Jehu John 
Jehu John, the eleventh child of Abia, Senior and Mai'-tha John , was born on the 
11th of February, 1810, in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. 

His schooling was at Shamokin where he grew to manhood helping his pai-ents on 
the farm and working in the coal mines. 

He married Patience Houseweart, the daughter of Solomon Houseweart, on the 
2nd of October, 183^, in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. They moved to 

77 



Illinois in the yeai- of 18^6. He died on the 23rd of September, 1863, in 
IllinoiE. Age ':/i years, 7 months and 12 days. 

To Jehu and Patience (Houseweart) John, were born eight children, namely; , 

1. Amanda was born on the IGth of August, 183^. Lived only 3 houi^s . , 

2*. Lorenzo Thornton born on the 5th of December, 1835. i 

3. Kimber LeRoy was born on the 15th of October, 1838. 

l^. Cephas Day was born on the 23rd of September, 18^1. 

5. Sarah Martha was born on the 27th of December, 18-43. 

6! Ann Eliza born on the I7th of May, 18^6. 

l\ Edmund James was born on the 5th of October, 184,8. 

8. Verdila Elmira John, was born on the 31st of July, 1851. 

A more complete record is found on pages 121 and I64,. 

XII. Eliza John 

Elisa John, the twelfth child of Abia. Senior and Martha John , was born on 
the 29th of May, 1812, near Bear Gap in Shamokin Township, now called Ralpho , 
two miles north of Bear Gap near Kingborm's Mill, Northumberland CoiHity, 
Pennsylvania. 

She never married. She was a great worker in the Friends Meetings and she 
spent a great deal of time visiting the sick and helping them all around 
in that part of the country. 

She lived a good life and God called her to her eternal reward on the 20th 
of December, 1863, at the age of 51. She was buried in Northumberland 
County, Pennsylvania. 

After her parents Abia and Martha died, she and her sister Sarah lived 
together on the old homestead farm. Her pai^ents willed the homestead to 
them and they rented the farm land out. This old farm of Abia ' s had a 
large log house of one and one-half stories and had some outside built-ins. 
It was north of Bear Gap aiid south of Shamokin Gap. Perry John and family, 
Abia and Martha John's youngest son, moved into part of the house and Eliza 
and Sarah had the other part. He stayed there until he had his own home 
built . 

There were one hundred and thirty acres in this farm. In 185/|., they said 
their farm was appraised at $3,300.00 - 3'4.,/iOO. 00. They later bought 
two acres from theii- uncle, Asa John. This land was just across from 
Asa's. They rented an upstairs room in his home and rented their old 
home and farm. They lived with Asa until their new home was built. Their 
brothers built the new hom.e for them. Eliza called their new home "Fairview" . 
They moved into it on the 20t.h of May 1851. Asa, Hiram, Elida, Samuel, Perry 
and Adam Gelger and John Vastine, and their wives helped them move in. 

They had a cow, pigs, chickens, and they raised quite a lot of fruit and 
vegetables . 

The farm that they received from their parents was the farm that Abia. Senior 
had bought when he first moved from Chester County, in 1795. 

Eliza was a hard worker, both in her home and in her church. She kept a 
diary of births, marriages, deaths, and notes of other things in and 
around there and about different Meetings that were held. She would go 

78 



to Philadelphia to special Meetings that were held, and she sometimes 
would describe the way she would have to travel. She went by horse 
drawn stages, horse drawn trains andsteam trains . She would change from 
one to another. It was a big trip in those days. In 1958, I drove this 
same trip in a few hours. (C.E. John) 

Some of the Meetings that she went to in Philadelphia, Lucretia Mott 
woiild be there. She thought a lot of her. Lucretia Mott was a great 
and good woman in her day. She worked with President Lincoln trying 
to free the slaves and she also was a great worker in the Quaker Meetings. 
She was a member of the Bear Gap Meeting in Ralpho Township. She said, 
"going to meeting in one place they had to drive over plank roads for 
seven miles". 

Frank John, son of Uncle Samuel John, stayed all night with them on the 
last of August, I849. 

A SECTION OF ELIZA JOHN'S DIARY 

isq 

5th month, 1st. 18/^1. I went to Shamokin and stayed over right at brother 
Jehu's. Next day was very stormy. Williajn Underwood and Joseph Iddings 
came to our house and stayed overnight, while I was away from home for 
which I was sorry. Next day they were at o"ur Meeting which was fine and 
large. They were on their way to the Yearly Meeting of Friends. We 
heard of the death of Edward Lionville of Catawissa; a valuable friend. 
Next day Casper Heartman was laid low in the grave, a worthy Methodist. 
One that will be very much missed in this neighborhood. 

5th month. 5th and fourth of the week. Elida, Samuel, Perry and myself 
left for Philadelphia. Just after sunrise we passed through Bear Gap in 
the Little Mountain. Then over the Big Mountain and had a beautifuil prospect 
of the valley between the mountains. Next we crossed the Locust Mountains. 
We stopped to feed at lO'oclock at Peter Klein's Tavern, ten miles from Bear 
Gap. Then we crossed the Broad Mountain and had a romantic prospect for 
many miles around. We passed through New Castle, a little town that has 
gone down and looks shabby. We saw the railroad along the Incline Plain. 
It was a curiosity and very steep. Next we passed a powder mill, then 
through St. Clairville and on to Port Carbon, a handsome thrifty town. We 
saw a number of coal mines. Then on to Pottsville, the largest town I ever 
saw. We eat at Mortimer's Hotel. I was introduced into a room where a friend 
from Baltimore by the name of Husband was teaching boys to write. After they 
had finished their task, they all went away. I was told he gave ten lessons for 
a dollar. It was a rainy afternoon, therefore, I had not as good a chance of 
seeing around. We traveled eight miles to Orwigsburg and stayed all night at 
Michael Greaf 's tavern, which was close by the Courthouse. We saw the likeness 
of eight presidents. Next morning early, we started and passed a Mill that 
had been biornt down last summer, but it is rebuilt. There were iron works 
there too. We passed through Port Clinton which has perhaps 30 or ^VO houses 
and a foundry. A railroad from Tamaqua reaches this point and a canal, but this 
is a dull lifeless place, it seemed to me. Below there, we saw a big dam, 
but did not get a fair sight of the tunnel. They are making a railroad from 
Pottsville to Reading. We stopped at Hamburg at John Bailey's Inn for break- 
fast. We traveled eleven miles that morning and had an excellent breakfast 
of shad, sausage, ham and eggs. 

79 



Then we traveled on to Madln Creek and arrived at our king Friend James 
and Sarah Starr's about one o'clock and took some dinner there. They 
have'^flve children. They Informed us that 17 Friends had passed there 
on their way to the city. About two o'clock we started again and passed 
Madln Creek Friends Meeting House and some excellent buildings and de- 
lightful farms. We saw the Wright girls home, five sisters of them. 
The buildings we passed are chiefly stone, neatly finished off. Limestone 
houses look better than those built of common stone. 

We traveled over the Oley Hills which were very rough indeed and with dis- 
tressingly bad roads. We passed Friedensburg, a beautiful little town, 
the buildings were chiefly of stone. The houses were small and neat. Stores, 
taverns and so forth. We came to Exeter and passed the Friends Meeting 
House there, then on to John Lee's near Nonocacy Creek, We had traveled 
16 miles from Starr's over awful roads. We arrived at Lee's just before 
dark. We were kindly received and entertained by them. We had traveled 
35 miles that day. 

Next morning John Lee brought us out to Reading Turnpike. Then we saw 
beautiful farms, chiefly stone buildings, some were plastered, some rough 
cast. We traveled in sight of the Schuylkill and railroad for some distance. 
We passed through Douglasville where the road turns off to Forrest and 
Chester County. Also passed through Pottstown, a most delightful situated 
town where the noted Ruthann Rutter was raised. I thought of her and 
wondered which house she lived in. Saw a splendiid white house on a little 
hill with a walk on top and porches around the house. We heard afterwards 
it was called Pott's folly. 

We passed the Trappe , Jeff ersonville and also passed the Perklomen Bridge, 
a wonderful sight. Here the Turnpike forks, one goes to Norrlstown, the 
other goes to Germantown. Saw the railroad bridge over a creek. I thought 
it was nearly as long as a river bridge. The bridges here are chiefly stone, 
walled up on each side. The name of the stream the bridge is over and who 
built it and what year and so forth was on the bridge. We eat at Peter 
Buckersin's in Limerick Township. At length we arrived at Norrlstown, the 
largest and most splendid I had yet seen. 

We stopped to eat at a Stage Office, Brother Perry and I walked down to the 
Cotton Factory, a most wonderful sight. They were cai^ding, spinning, and 
weaving. They told me there were between one and two hundred hands at work, 
men, girls and boys. They said one loom could weave about /^O yards a day. 
It looked like 8 or 10 cent muslin. One girl told me it was to be sent 
to Philadelphia and printed for eleven penny bit calico, I was sorry the 
time was so short that we could not view more of the curiosities in the 
factory. We traveled on to Plymouth and found where Septimus Woods lived. 
Perry and myself turned there. Elida went on to Philadelphia. It being a 
distance of 13 miles to the city from there. Septimus Woods lives on the 
Turnpike that is called the Reading Turnpike, leading to Germantown. 
(That is part of rlxlladelphia now). Well, we were welcomed by them. 

This was Elisa's first trip to Meetings in Philadelphia. 



SKETCHES FROM ELIZA JOHN'S DIARY 
I have a copy of this Diary, copied for me by Elizabeth Heritage. (C.E, John) 

80 



Abla John, the first child of Asa and Mary (Thomas) John, was married to 
Rebecca Asper in Ohio on the I7th of March, 1852. 



Jesse John, the third child of Asa and Mary (Thomas) Johin, was married tc 
Mary Marks on the 11th of March, 1853. 



On the 1st of May, 18?2, Eliza John stayed over night at Jehu and Patience 
John's in Fhamokin. 



Mary P. John, married Alfred Tomline on the 12th of January, 1852. 



There were a lot of the John relations living near Fhamokin and Roaring 
Creek in Columbia and Northumberland Counties, Pennsylvania. In 1850, 
there were Ruben, Asa, Jehu , Hiram, Eliza, Sarah, Abia, Fenior, Abishai, 
Samuel, Perry John, with their families and a lot of others. 



There was a Elida John, son of Abia, John and a John E. Kester that married 
Mary Ann John, the daughter of Ruben and Sophia John, and there was a James 
John, the son of Hiram John. He died on the 11th of March, 1852. All 



of these lived around there, 



Dr. Palemon John, son of Elida John, married Jessie Carr on the 3rd of 
November, 1860. There was a Mary Ann John, that married R. H. Walter, 
on the 4th of May, 1854. 



After the death of their parents, Eliza and Farah John, lived together on 
their farm until they built a house on a piece of ground nearby. 



Eliza John, quotes some prices in 1854. ?he paid 25-2 cents for a bed, 
she said that was monstrous high for two. 37-g- cents for dinner, '.^eat 
in 1855, was $2.25 a bushel. Rye $1.20. Euckwheat $1.00. Corn $1.00. 
Hay $20.00 a ton. Butter 20 cents a pound. Eggs at l4c a dozen. 



There was a Leartis John son of Samuel John, there was a Anietia, Verna 
and Reese John, children of one of the John's there. Amos John, son of 
Asa John, died on the 26th of July, 1851. Leartis John died in 1854. 
Franklin John had typhoid fever in 1854. 



81 



On the 12th of May, 1853, Mllinda, Lucretia and ?arah John stayed all 
night at Perry's and in the morning went over to Eliza's and Sarah's for 
breakfast , 



Edwin John, son of Elida John married Rachel E. Eves on the 26th of 
November, 1857. 

Eliza speaks quite often about a town called Petersburg, They would 
go there to the train. I found out that it is now called Elysburg. 



Griffith John, (the son of Abia and Mai-tha John) , and Abia John from Ohio, 
and Jehu and Patience and their youngest daughter Verdilia, visited Eliza 
and Farah John on the 23rd of October, 185?. 

Joseph John, son of Asa John, married fara Williams on the 6th of February, 
1862 and Kersey John, son of Famuel John, married Droden Zimmermen on 
the 2Sth of Mai-ch, 1861, and on April l^th they moved to the farm. 



Kimber, Cephas and Jefferson John, started to W?r in 1861. This was on 
the 21st of April 1861. 



Mary Jane (John) Yocum, died on the 27th of February, 1861. There was a 
large funeral. 

Abia G. John, went to war on the 2i^th of October, 1861. Fhe says that 
there were a lot going now. 



Perry John, took his son Griffith John, to Roaring Creek to see about 
getting a school to teach. He got the Eck School. 



Fhe was at John Davis' to the funeral of Johanna Home. Fhe was of John 
Phillips family, Eliza's cousin. 



Lydia T. Jefferson, Eliza's cousin came to see her on the 12th of August, 
1862. 

Dr. Jesse John, married Elizabeth Krick in February, 1854.. 

Griffith John's widow, Rachel John, died on the 2/{^th of July, 1862. Fhe 
was Eliza's cousin. 

Mary Ann John, married Isaac Troxler on the 4.th of May, 185A. 

82 



Allen John is in a strange way, he thinks that he is going to die, and 
is not ready or prepared. He was Ruben ' s son and this was on the 27th 
of February, 1863. 

Leartis John, on the 8th of September, 185A, said that he had his peace 
made with God and was ready to go . 



Ruben John , preached his farewell sermon at the Bear Gap Friends Meeting 
on the 1st of May, 1855, and left for Illinois the next day. 



Osborn Williams and family paid their last visit to Eliza and Sarah John 
before leaving for Illinois. This was on the 1st of April, 1857. 



James M. John, son of Hiram John, and Sai^ah (Miller) John, passed away on 
the 10th of January, 1852. 



Eliza John was a hard worker. In her diary she mentions so often about 
her planting and digging potatoes, and her garden work, hauling straw, 
picking apples, and some of her folks hauling them for her. 



Besides she spent so much time at Meetings near home and to other places, 
some as fai" as Philadelphia. 

In her diary she mentions often about the weather, heavy rain storms, hail 
and lightning and snow storms, having to break the roads out so they could 
get through. 



Moving day. April 1st., 1852. Hiram John moved to Abishai John's. 
Peter Yocum moved to Hiram's . Abia John moved to Peter Yocum's and Jacob 
Conrad to Abia John's old fai^m. 



Jehu John's wife's father Solomon Houseweart left Pennsylvania for Illinois 
on the 26th of September, 18ZQ. Eliza John went with them as fai" as 
Petersburg, Pennsylvania. 



Isaac John, the fourth child of Ruben John, and Leartis John, the second 
cliild of Samuel John, were converted at Meeting on the 13th of December, 
1851. Friends Meeting. 



83 



Their friends and relations would visit with each other a lot. They woiild 
have meals together and stay over night. They seemed to have such good times 
together. 



Eliaa Jolm made trips to Philadelphia to big Meetings. Sometimes she would 
have to change from trains to stages and horses. She paid 12-g- cents a piece 
for beds. 

She bought a cow from Sophia King for ;|15.00, on the 20th of January, 1862. 
George John, son of Elida John, started to war in April, 1861. 



Allen John paid Eliza John his last visit before going to Illinois. I believe 
Ruben and family went to Illinois at the same time, for Eliaa said that she 
was sorry to see Ruben's girls go. This was about the time that Elida and 
S,amuel John left for Illinois. They may have all gone together. This was 
on the 19th of May, 18^7. Daniel John moved about the same time. He had 
a brother by the name of Asa Josiah John. 



July 1, 18^9. James Andrews, Elizabeth Newport and Mary Hallowell, with 
Elida John came here on a family visit. They had an opportunity with Sarah 
and I first, and said a great deal to both of us, being encouraging if we 
would only be faithful. 

When they went to Perry's family, they invited us down. She spoke a great 
deal to James Smith making him out for a great man in the glorious cause 
if he would be faithful to manifested duty to war for righteousness and be 
a captain of a little band, to be a leader, a pioneer to pull down and build 
up again. 

They stayed all night. Next morning they went to Abia John's and at four 
o'clock had a meeting and a memorable one it was. (That sounds like it 
could have been the early Salvation Army). This was in 18J+9 . James Smith, 
Isaac John, and Elizabeth Van Horn and I walked to meeting. Good many there. 
Then we went to Elida John's after meeting. Abia C. John brought us home. 

The loth. Went to Catawissa Preparative Meeting, and then to Roaring Creek 
to Jolin Lee's. After supper I went to Eleanor Lee's and stayed all night. 
Ne>rt day we went to Amos John's home, and from there to Meeting. A good many 
there. 



September 16, 1850. Next day after dinner Margaret Tietsworth was here at 
Asa's spinning wool. 



The 19th. This being our Meeting Day, quite rainy, there was a number there. 
Rebecca preached nice. 



8^ 



22nd. It was our first day meeting. Ruben preached nice, also Ferry and 
Rebecca. 



2fth. Rebecca and I went to the farm for fruit. That night we were a"*" a 
peach cutting at Elida's. I stayed all night at Perry's and it was a very 
stormy night. Next morning it was worse but it broke about noon. 



October 1, 1850. I put an answer to a letter from EEjnuel Yarnell in office 
at Bear Gap, then went to Abishai John's and ate watermellon. 



10-9-1850. I was at Samuel's helping quilt. 1 saw a great animal show at 
Bear Gap^ on the 26th. 



26th. I saw two elephants, two ponies and 17 or 18 wagons; one with 8 horses. 
at the animal show. 



10-28-1850. I went to Abia John's to pick winter apples. 



11-5-1850. I and Asa John went to our farm to get a load of apples, 



12-27-1850. Went to the fai-m for a load of corn. 



1-1-1851. We were invited to Samuel John's to a carpet sewing and to 
eat roast goose. 



End of Eliza's Diary Quotations 



AEIA, FENIOR AND I-IAIiTHA JOHN'F CHILDREN 
(Fee Page 50) 

XIII. Perry J ohm 

Perry Jckn the thirteenth child of Abia, Senior and Martha Johji, was born 
on the 28th of Mai'ch, 1815-, in Fhamokin Toimship, Northumberland County, 
Pennsylvania. 

He was born on his parent's farm and went to school and grew to manhood 
right around those parts. 

When he was 22, he married Anne Eves in September, 1837, and to them was 
born one child. Namely, Ezra John who died in youth. 

Anne (Eves) John, Perry's wife died in 1859. 

He married the second time to Rebecca Underwood, who was a Friends Minister 
as was her husband, Perry John. 

To them were born thi^ee childi^en, namely; 1. Griffith, 2, Zepheniah, and 
3. William John. 

Rebecca (Underwood) John, Perry's wife died in 1877 and Perry on the 5th 
of September, 18'-'5 . Age 80. He was buried in the Friends burying ground 
near Bear Gap by the Meeting House, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. 
(I was at this burial ground in 1958, and it is in bad shape, brush and 
trees all over the ground - C.E. John) 

Perry John was a wheelwi'ight by trade and a minister of the Friends for a 
good many years. He organized the Quaker Meeting at Ralpho about 18*^5. 

He manufactured wagons and the like in Catawissa and Paxinos , Pennsylvania, 
for over thirty years . 

He moved into his new home on the Z^th of August, 18^9. He used the ground 
floor for his wagon shop ujitll he built his shop. 

PERRY AND REP.ECCA (UNDFIIWOOD) JOHN'S CHILDREN 

Griffith John, the second child of Perry John, and the first child of Perry 
and Rebecca (Underwood) John, was born on the l7th of October, 18-43, in 
Northumberland, County, Pennsylvania. 

When he was a little past six, he had his first experience of going to 
school. This was in the yeai" of 1849, <aiid the name of the school was 
"The Cross Roads School". There were quite a few of their relations going 
to that school at that time; 18 including himself, namely, 

Elida John had six - 

1. Hough, 2. Ruthann, 3. Chalkly, 4.. Sarah E. , 5. George G., 6. Lydia. 

Samuel John had five - 

1. Leai^tis, 2. Ulyssess F. 3. Kersey, 4. Jefferson and 5. Viaima A. John. 

Hiram John had five children - 

86 



1. Martha, 2. William, 3. Llewillyn, l^. Harriet and 5. Rahamah John 

Asa John's grandson Toivmsend John was going there also. 

Griffith John grew to manhood while working on his parents farm, and going 
to school and finishing his education. He then started teaching school. One 
of his first schools was the Eck Fchool, near Roaring Creek and the Kingbanis' 
Mill. 

FRIENPg MEETING HOUFE 

The people from the M. E. Chui-ch asked for the use of the Fi^iends Meeting 
House near Bear Gap, to start a Union Sunday School, which was granted. 
They put Griffith and his brother William John, in chai^ge of it. This 
continued for a long time. In 1906', the people that attended Sunday School 
there put a new shingled roof on it at their own expense. There were several 
church groups worked together there. 

In August, 1913, Griffith John, sold out in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, 
and moved to Mickleton, New Jersey. This town is just a fevj miles from Millica 
Hill where his brother William John was now living. He made his home there 
for the rest of his life. 

He never married. He was a great worker in the Fi^iends or Quaker Meetings. 

He taught a large Bible class in Mickleton until near the end of his life. 

The last fex^f years his legs became weak 5 his friends would push him in a 
wheel chair to his Bible class, and where he wished to go. 

He composed quite a number of poems. They were mostly about the people, 
place and things that he had seen as he traveled around about his old home, 
school and church. 

"1 put one of his poems in this history about the school and Meeting House 
near Bear Gap on page 90 . I stood on the same ground where he stood, 
when he composed this poem. I tried to take the same view. - " - C.E. John. 

After his brother, William John, passed away, their scn-in-law, Benjamin 
Heritage, invited him and William's mother-in-law, Ruth H. (Roberts) Jolrin, 
to come and live in their home, which they did. He then offered his home in 
Mickletovm for sale on the 30th of April, 1926. 

He went home to his reward on the 28t.h of February, 1928, at the age of 
85 . He lived a victorious life . 

Zepheniah John, the third child of Perry John, and the second child of 
Perry and Rebecca (Underwood) John, was born in Northumberland County, 
Pennsylvania. He died in youth. 

William Underwood John 

William U. John, the fourth child of Perry John, and the third child of 
Perry and Rebecca Underwood John, and the youngest brother of Griffith John, 
was born in Northumberland Coionty, Pennsylvania. 

He also grew to manhood on his parents farm while going to school. In later 

years he moved to Mullica Hill, New Jersey, where he spent the rest of 

his life. He was born in 184,7, and passed away on the 20th of March, 1926. Age 79 

87 



He married Ruth H. Roberts in 1875. To them were born foui' children, 
namely 1. Mary Ann Jefferies, 2. Rebecca Alice, 3. Ruth Hannah, and 
U. Rachel Ellen John, She was called home on the Ist of June, 1961. 

Mary Ann J. John, the first child of William U. and Ruth W. (Roberts) 
John, married John Omar Heritage. And to them was born at least a 
son 'named Benjamin Paul Heritage. He married Mary Deshong Bell, 
and their home was in Mullica Hill, New Jersey. i I was there in 19^7- 
C. E. J.lrn). 

To Benjamin P. and Mary D, (Bell) Heritage was born four children. 

1. Elizabeth Bell Heritage was born on the I7th of January, 1939, 
in New Jersey. (Fhe did history copying for me in 1957-58-60 - 
C.E. John). Fhe was married to Norman James Farquhar, on the tenth 
of February, 1962, at Mullica Hill, New Jersey. 

2. Benjajnin Paul Heritage, Junior, was born on the lOth of December, 
19/^2. He was not at all well for several years and passed on to 
his reward on the 17th of September, 1951. Age 19. 

3. Margaret Heritage was born on the 18th of June, 1945. 

4. Jonathan William Heritage, was born on the 26th of May, 194,6. 



THE OLD FAMILY BIBLE OF GRIFFITH JOHN, JUNIOR 
The old family Bible that Griffith John, Junior (the seventh 
child of Griffith John, Senior, the emigrant), that had the 
records in, was left in the care of Ruben John, the fifth child 
of Abia John, then to his youngest brother Perry John, and 
after he passed away it was put in the care of Benjamin P. 
and Mary (Bell) Heritage who were Willi,am John's grandchildren 
in Mullica Hill, New Jersey. 



88 



LOOKING BACK 

Griffith John, the second child of Perry and Rebecca John, and grandson of 
Abla and Martha John , was among the last of the John family to move away 
from Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. As the years went by the Quakers 
and most of the John's moved to other parts of the country, and the older 
ones died, until there were very few of them left. He was the youngest 
brother of Ruben, Jehu and Perry John, and Eliza Jolm was a sister. She 
kept a wonderful diary of dates and events of her day, 

Griffith John composed a lot of poems about different things and places that 
he had to do with. 

His uncle Asa T. John, sold a piece of land to the Quakers for a place to 
build a Meeting House. Perry John was one of the trustees to look after 
it, and Asa T. J_hn had the contract to build it. There was a log school 
house close by it . I believe that this was the school that my mother, Mirs . 
Lucretia Elmira John, went to in her early days. 

One of the poems that Griffith wrote was about this Quaker or Friends Meet- 
ing House and the school. 

The Poem is on the following page. 



LOOKING BACK 

Entitled: Friends Meeting House, near Bear Gap 

The modest Meeting House of which I write, ] 

There on i flat topped hill's commanding height, • 

The Meeting House where Friends once used to meet, 

Stands i;i the nook, a pleasant retreat. j 

And with prevailing quiet around; t 

Bright scene where Nature's still abound. J 

Now fronting Fouth, a gentle slope extends ] 

Just to the road. Beyond the prospect ends, '', 

Closed by a narrow belt of branching trees 

Where summer charmes and leafy verdure please ■ j 

While to the North East Broad varied fields are green, ' 

With cultivated crops all growing bright and green. j 

In sight a farm home still mute the view. 

Hard by the traveled way which passes through. 

And farther off the higher hills arise j 

In massive form to meet beholding eyes. 

The hills make rugged work of Nature's Seen, 

With wooded sides all clad in garb of green, ^ 

And pierced by glens irregular and wild. 

Amid the rock and earth around them piled. 

Then at one point in Northern view 

Appears the Catawissa Mountain blue. 

Then looking Westward are the forest bounds, 

Almost encroaching on the Meeting Grounds, 

Which spread o'er hillside and the plain below, I 

When Chestnut, Maple, Oak and Pine in contrast grow. 

Our homeward road leads down a gentle rise. 

From out the felting trees to open skies, 

To level stretch high up along the slope. 

Whence Fouthwai'd, one takes in the Country's scope. 

Now from the road there's wid'ning space 

Of forest cleared far down the Hillside Face 

The long descent becoming very steep. ' 

Then forms the border of a ravine deep. 1 

The wooded Mountain South with color blue \ 

And even height sets limits to the view. 

Put Pear Gap breaks this length of Mountain Crest 

And adds it's feature bold to all the rest. 

Appearing large, imposing to the sight. ,! 

To yield a Nature lovers keen delight . 

Where through the Gap appears some fields confined 

By neighbor's woods with Mouiitains still behind , 

While from the Gap extends a narrow vale, 

And shows with changing Scene a rugged dale, '' 

Through which in course the sounding waters flow 

Well known as Roaring Creek is there below. 

Right there at foot of steep descending hill. 

Beholding you look do;,ni on Kingbannis Mill. ,' 

Off to the left on rising ground I 

VJith open fields spread wide around, , 

The M. E. Church is painted coat of white, J 

Stands by itself amid the landscape bright. 

If you direct your gaae toward the East 

90 



You see extending for twelve miles at least 

Along the Mountains to it's curving rim 

Farm after farm, the farthest growing dim 

Which clearly show the features of a border fair 

That grows more pleasing when the sunshine lights it there. 

Here oft clouds shadows fleck the lower land 

Or climb the sloping heights in ev'ry hand. 

They follow each in idle chase and slow, 

In patches of inconstant shade they go. 

Let us now to the Meeting House retrace 

Our steps in easy daunting pace. 

The Gro-unds then reached we then review the Past 

They fill our minds arising Thick and fast. 

Those thoughts which take us back to years gone by. 

When joyful life was young and hopes were high. 

Within that House how oft an hour we spent. 

As objects of parental care content, 

And free from anxious Thought and all concern 

About the future or the days return. 

In ministrations call our Father heard 

In speech direct give forth the Spoken Word. 

And Mother too in her persuasive tone 

Set forth the truth that all must own. 

Advise fell from their lips and counsel true, 

Outlined the course the Christian should persue. 

These things in riper age impressed us more 

When we could feel there force and think them o'er. 

Then reason too confirmed undaunted fact, 

That something hangs on each and ev'ry act. 

What'er we do in stand for good or ill, 

The plan Divine to thwart or to fulfill, 

To make us strong or lead us to defeat, 

In trials, disappointments we may meet: 

Which 'tis just and proper we should need. 

For life's a field of labor learn to know, 

In which with hope and faith to better grow. 

While so we seek the highest and the best. 

The sense of being right will give us rest. 

We'll view the little gathering of Friends 

That long ago there religious ends 

Their service to perform assembled here 

With purpose good and true and all sincere. 

On facing seat the brothers through with look intent, 

Conclusive showed their minds on worship bent . 

Those were Elida, Perry, Asa too 

That here with faith their Strength they might renew. 

Abia, Asa's son was faithful to attend 

And kept it up till near his end. 

And William Thomas mostly came whose portly form 

Seemed suited well to weather ev'ry wind and storm 

His broad and open face betrayed no anxious thought 

With kindly ways and good intentions fraught 

And Uncle Abishai bent with weight of passing years 

In meeting often pleased to take his place appears. 

His head was whitened o'er with silver hair 

His face was marked by lines of age and care. 

John Walter then to seek the quiet seemed content 

91 



As straight to his corner by the window went . 

John Kester with ready smile and easy turn 

The benefit of Meeting did not spurn. 

But Joseph John was sure each Sunday to attend 

And to the friendly interest himself to lend. 

There Uncle Sammy often found a seat 

In time long past, thus his brothers there to mest. 

THE WOMAN SIDE OF THE HOUSE 

Our Mother with Aunt Sarah and Polly grace 

The fronting seat as they serenely sit in place. 

Their open faces tell that calm composure reigns 

Within their minds which strong religious hope sustains. 

Aunt Emily though old was frequent there 

When storm was absent and the Weather fair. 

And Aiont Eliza to her faith was true 

For in the cause did all that she could do. 

Aunt Sally too was sometimes seated there 

In days of brightness and wai^m Sujumer air. 

She ever wore a calm contented look 

Her words and deeds of great good sense partook 

And other worthy women also came 

Whom I'll now pass by and not stop to name 

The girls and boys sat on the benches back 

l^^lose presence there the Meeting did not lack. 

A few yards nearer the Western Wood 

From Meeting House, an old log building stood, 

But long unused, abandoned to decay. 

The roof was bad, the shingles blown away, 

The windows void of sash, like Vacant Stare 

Of sightless eyes, looked out on prospect fair. 

The open entrance bai^ren no man nor beast, 

It's public use and service long had ceased. 

But there it was reminder of the Past, 

Whose log built walls defied the storm and blast . 

Here once a school was kept and teachers taught 

Dispensed that little knowledge then was sought. 

Griffith John 

"Things have changed, the old mill on Roaring Creek is no more. The old stage 
coaches ai^e a thing of the past. The old log school house and chui-ches have 
been replaced with new. The old timers are either dead or have moved to 
other parts. But their memories still remain. 

I received these poems from letters written from Griffith John to his 
cousin Sarah (John) Bui^ch in Rockford, Illinois'.' - C.E. John. 



A LETTER WRITTEN BY GRIFFITH JOHN TO HIS CCU?IN gARAH (JOHN) EURCH 



Mlckleton, N. J. 
September 6th, 1922. 

Dear Cousin: 

Your letter received, glad to hear from you. I have for a long time 
been Interested in the genealogy of our John family. 

Grandfather, Abia John had seventy-eight grandchildren enumerated as 
follows : 

Asa F. had six children 
Hiram had thirteen children 
Emily had two children 
Griffith had twelve children 
Ruben had nine children 
Lydia had four childi-en 
Jesse J. had one child 
Elida had ten children 
Jehu had seven children 
Samuel had ten children 
Perry had four children 

My brother William and I, living. The others died in childhood. Asa 
married Mary Thomas. Hiram twice married, first to Sarah Miller and the 
second time to Elizabeth Miller. Emily twice married, first to Levi Hughes, 
second time to Abishai Thomas, she had a son by the first, marriage, and a 
daughter by the second. 

Griffith to Rachel Miller. I do not know that she was any relation to 
Uncle Hiram's wives. 

Ruben married Sophia Mettler , Lydia married, first to John Wolverton, 
second time to Amos Yarnell. She had no children by the first husband. 

Jesse J. married Eliza V. Hicks. Had a son Jesse J. Elida married 
Sarah Hughes. Samuel married Angelina John, a descendant of Samuel John, 
a brother to our great-great grandfather Griffith John. 

Jehu John married Patience Houseweart. Perry married twice, first to 
Anna Eves, and second time to Rebecca Underwood. The mother of William and 
I. 

Griffith John, the emigrant, was born in Pembrokeshire, the south western 
county of Wales, in 1683. He came over in 1709 and settled in Uwchlan 
Township, Chester County,- Pennsylvania. 

He married Ann Williams and had twelve children.. He died in 1778; was 
a minister among the Friends. Grandmother John's grandmother, Joanna 
Townsend, was born at E"urton-on-Trent , Staffordshire, England. 

Death has claimed the greater number of the 78. Of Uncle Elida 's 10, only 
3 are left. Of Uncle Sammy's, 3 living out of 10. Uncle Asa's children all 
deseased. Aunt Emily's likewise, and nearly all of Uncle Ruben's. I don't 
know how many of Uncle Griffith's are alive; it has been so long since we have 



heard anything from them. 

One of Uncle Hiram's grandchildren, lives In Woodbin-y, five miles from 
here. She was the daughter of James John, and Is the wife of Warner Underwood. 
She was Tamar Eliza John, before marriage. 

We now have visiting us a grandson of Uncle Asa, Joslah John and a married 
daughter. He was a younger brother of Daniel John who lived among your 
people in Illinois. Omar Heritage, William's son-j.n-law, is this day taking 
them on an automobile trip through a portion of South Jersey, so they can 
enjoy viewing the scenery of the country, and note the appearance once of 
the towns they pass through. 

This part of New Jersey is thickly settled, and dotted with towns. A 
short distance above Mlckleton, is Clarksboro and a little beyond that, on 
the road to Woodsburys is Moi:mt Royal. Woodsbury has about 7,000 inhabitants. 
Paulsboro has 2,500 and it is four miles west and Swedesboro four miles to 
the south has about the same number. Mullica Hill, foui- miles to the east 
is larger than Mickleton, but not nearly as fine a looking place. 

The farther off .are Woodstown, Bridgeton, Pitman, Glassboro, Hardinvllle, 
Elmer, Davetown and C. 

I enclose a Poem composed by me seven years ago describing Mlckleton. I 
do not claim that it is an;ything extra in the way of poetry, but it suited 
me to write it in verse, as I thought I could handle the subject better, and 
with greater brevity in bringing out the points, than in prose. I am not 
the only one of the Johns that took a hand in verse making. Grandmother 
John wrote a Poem describing her feeling on coming to Northumberland County, 
Pennsylvania, to live. Grace Davis, one of the grandfather's married sisters, 
gave vent to her feeling in poetic strain. 

Several of Uncle Elida's children :iow and then wrote in rhyme, or at 
least did something in that way. Martha Ann, his oldest daughter, produced 
a collection of Poems which were full of feeling, descriptive and to the 
point. These she had published. 

Cousin George made some good hits in a humorous rhyming way. Uncle Sammy 
also wi^ote a few .articles in this line, but they were nothing but humorous 
strains contained in those sketches. 

Once William and I attended teachers institute in Shamokln: put up .at 
Uncle Sammy's. In the evenings he would take us over to his office and 
besides telling of his experience in teaching, he would read these poetic 
productions of his to us. 

With kind regards, 

Griffith John 



94 



A LETTER WRITTEN BY GRIFFITH JOHN TC HIS COUSIN FRBAE (JOHN) BURCH 



Mickleton, N. J. 

loth mo. and. I9I6. 

Dear Cousin 

(Sarah (John) Burch) 

In answer to thy request for Information regai-ding oirr old I^ieeting House 
and the one at Roaring Creek, and the Meeting held in each, I am able to 
furnish the following data: 

Our Sharaokin Meeting as it was originally called, was started in the 
fall of 18^0, being at first held circulatory at Uncle Asa's, Uncle 
Elida's,and at the residence near Paxinos, where our folks and Aunt Sarah 
and Eliza then lived. 

In the summer of I84.5 , the Meeting House was built. Uncle Asa gave the 
ground and had the contract of putting it up. The first meeting held in 
the House was Q-7-184.5 . Benjamin Sharpless and some other Friends attended 
the opening on that date, which set it up as an established Meeting. 

After the decease of Cousin Abia in 12 mo. 1883, we discontinued going to 
the Meeting House, there being no one to meet with us and mother's declining 
health obliged us to take this step. 

So from that time on, we held our Meetings at home, and held them there 
regularly up to the date of our coming to New Jersey in 1913. 

That laid down our Bear Gap Meetings. In 1st mo. 1883, we changed the 
name to Bear Gap Meeting because Shamokin Township was divided and our 
section of it was named Ralpho , and as Shamokin Meeting was no longer in 
Sharaokin Township, it was thought to be misleading to call it by that name 
so we changed to Bear Gap. 

I should have said the Meetings were regularly held at our home, with the 
exception of several years while we were connected with the Sunday School. 
We held oui- First Day Meetings at the Meeting House. 

Roaring Creek Meeting House was built in 1796, and the Meeting established. 
The removal of Uncle Ruben to Illinois in 1855, the decease of James Strikes 
and Rawland Hughs in I860, and Samuel Hampton old and decrepit who died 
about lSC/^., caused the discontinuance of the Meeting at the Meeting House. 

It was then held at the residence of Martha and Ellen Ler, familiarly 
known as Patty and Nellie. 

In 1861, it was held at Enock Kesters', then it was at Mary Ann and Rachel 
Cherington's until Mary Ann's death in 1878, after which it went to Enock 
Kesters' home. Enock died in 188^. His widow Ruthanna kept it going at her 
home till the time of her death in 1901. Her sister Mary, the widow of Lawson 
Hughs, opened her house, when it was kept up by Asa, Minta and Elwood Kester, 
daughter and son of Enoch and Ruthanna until I9IO. 

Since then they held the Monthly Meeting circulatory at their own home, 

95 



Cherington Kester's home, Ruben Beaver's home and Grant Beaver's home. 
The regular First Day Meetings in 191u. Roaring Creek Monthly is done 
for, and will not last much longer. 

I shall now fill out this account with a few extras from the Minutes 
of Roaring Creek Monthly Meeting. 12. mo-13th - 18^8. Benjamin Hughs 
requests to be received into membership. Warington Quarter to appoint 
some Meetings. Elida John is appointed to visit him on the subject. 

I was clerk for some years preceding 18^8. I hope there was much 
benefit received from thy treatment at the Hospital. It is a great 
blessing to keep well. My being somewhat of a cripple is a considerable 
handicap to ray getting about, especially going up and down steps, but I 
am favored still with the aid of a cane to take my walks along the different 
roads, a mile is generally my limit. Once and a while 1 have walked up to 
Clarksburg a mile away. Tho the last time 1 did this, I had the opportunity 
of riding back. 1 .am glad the Meeting H use is so convenient and has not 
put in steps. My health is good, and 1 have such surroundings for which 
1 am very thankful. 

With kind regards to thee and family. 

Your cousin 

Griffith John 

A LETTER WRITTEN BY GRIFFITH JOHN TO HIF COUFIN FARAH (JOHN) EURCH 

Mickleton, N. J. 

October 23rd, 1922 

Dear Cousin: 

I had word from R. Anna Kester to whom 1 wrote, that our Grandmother's 
Poem had been in her possession but it was lost. Fhe could not find it 
anywhere . 

I will send another poem of mine. "The Friends' Meeting House near Bear 
Gap". The description of those met together, applies to a time, after 
Uncle Hiram and family moved to Illinois which was in the spring of 1852. 

0\ir father and mother. Perry and Rebecca John were regular attendants, rain 
or shine. Also Uncle Elida and Aunt Farah. They generally came to Meeting 
with a carriage load bringing a number of their children. 

Uncle Fammy was often present before they moved to Fhamokin in IS?*-"'. Aunt 
Angeline tho a Methodist would get there now and then. Feveral of their 
children would often walk, the mile and a half, along with Uncle Elida' s 
boys. Joseph John, Uncle Asa's son, though not a member, was regularly 
with us. Abia ,and Ann, Uncle Asa's daughter, joined with Friends. ?he 
married John Kester. 

The other children, Townsend, Amos, and Jesse G. never belonged. John 
Walter married Eliza, J.J. John's widow. They had three children. Eliza 
was the mother of Dr. J.J. John, a prominent man of Fhamokin. 

For a number of years the attendance there was not l.>low 35. After a time 

96 



in consequence of the passing away of some of the old members, the removal 
of others to different places, there was none left outside of our family. 

There is now not a single Friend in that neighborhood. The House then for 
some years was closed. In 1506, several members of the Bear Gap Methodist 
Church applied to us for the use of our Meeting House to start a Sunday 
School. Asked brother William and 1 to take charge of it. So we set up 
a Union Sunday School composed of Methodist, Lutherns, Presbyterians, and 
Friends. They all entered whole heartedly into the work and we had an 
interesting Sunday School. William became Superintendent and I taught a 
class. Part of the time, we used Cooks Lesson Leaves and later the Lutheran 
Lesson Leaves . 

Friends then had not been in the way of making use of music and singing in 
any part of their religious work, but we agreed not to exclude it. They 
were very much pleased with these concessions, so much so that they bought 
the shingles and put a new roof on the building at their own expense. 

They continued the school for some years after we left in 1913, to settle 
in New Jersey. They had been in the way of holding an annual picnic on 
the beautiful grounds patronized by the whole community. 



With kind regards . 
Griffith John 

A LETTER WRITTEN BY GRIFFITH JOHN TO HIS COUSIN SARAH (JOHN) BURCH 

Mickleton, N. J. 

November 12th, lo23 

Dear Cousin: 

October has turned us over to November and the bright coloring of the 
leaves is passing, and many of them are down littering the yards and the 
walks bordering the street, which necessitates some raking. We have had 
here scarcely any frost till November came in. Since that, there has been 
three frosts that were quite heavy and killed the white potato tops, which 
up to this date were quite fresh and green ( the late ones). 

How natural it is to look back on the past, particularly of our earlier 
lives. In thinking of many things, I call up memories of our good old aunts 
and their doings. But I was more intimately associated with Aunt Sally, as 
we call her, and Aunt Eliza. The Uncles also come in for my regard. 

On this account I was interested in Aunt Eliza's diary. Many of the 
circumstances narrated there I have a partial recollection of, and besides 
it posted me in dates, marriages and deaths of individuals, many of whom 
lived in oirr old neighborhood, as well as, other acquaintances. 

She also gives accounts of her attendance at Friends Meetings, and the 
ministers who attended them. Aunt Sally and Eliza were always good to 

97 



William and myself, so therefore we retained an affectionate remembrance 
of them. 

After they left the old farm they rented a room in Uncle Asa's residence 
for more than a year. In 18^0, they had a house built on two acres that 
they bought of Uncle Elida which included a three quarter acre piece of 
woods at the end farthest east from the road. 

This lot was on the northern side of a road expending toward the east. 
We lived on the south side of this road only a short walk from their residence, 
They also had a stable built in which they kept a cow which they pastiored 
with Uncle Elida 's stock. They also kept chickens. 

They moved to this home in 18' 1, and two or three years later sold their 
farm. Brother William and myself were often there and frequently played 
in the woods . 

These aunts were readers of the Friends Intelligence. But Aunt Eliza 
had so much on her hands; household work, giving attention to the fine 
garden she kept, and the yard full of flowers, cultivating a truck patch, 
and looking after other affairs that she fell behind reading Intelligence. 
Once she was two months behind, so she had me to come over in the evenings 
and read, beginning at seven o'clock and reading till nine in which time, 
I would read one number thi-ough. In eight nights reading them, brought 
her up to date. 

With all this she was faithful in attending Friends Meetings, Aunt Sally 
could tell so much of grandfather's family affairs as well as neighborhood 
doings. Besides she had read in newspapers or in old Almanacs a number of 
curious and amusing stories, which at times she used to relate, and they 
always interested me. She had such a faculty or grace in telling those 
stories that they greatly pleased and impressed the listeners. 

In the early part of 18^-6, Alford Temlins, who married Mary P. John, 
Uncle Hiram's daughter, brought his three motherless children; Melita, Mary 
Josephine, and Anna Elizabeth, around to find places for them. Mary the 
mother had died. Aunt Sally and Eliza took Anna Elizabeth. Uncle Elida 's 
took Mary Josephine. Uncle Abisha's made a home for Melita Temlins. In 
two years Mary J. died. Anna E. Lived with Aunt Sally and Liza till 186/+, 
the year after Aunt Liza died. She then went to live with an aunt in New 
York, and finally homed with her father in La Salle in Illinois. The last 1 
heard of her, she married Phillip Moyer, and they removed to Mtino, Canada. 
I don't know what Melita did after she left Uncle Abishai's near Bear Gap. 

In 1851, Aunt Phoebe, she was grandmother John's youngest sister. 1 
remember her. She appeared to be a fine dignified old lady. She visited 
Aunt Sally and Eliza and the rest of us during 1854^, and a part of 1855. 

Uncle Israel John, grandmother's youngest brother, was ai-ound amongst 
us and boarded at Aunt Sally's. He had two sons, Samuel and Ruben who 
lived near or at West Chester, Chester County, Pennsylvania. Israel John 
was always pleasant and sociable. 

In I864., after Aunt Eliza's passing away. Aunt Sally came to live in our 
family, and was with us till the early part of I88O. Aunt Sally always 
appeared contented and never out of humoui". Just before she died she had 

98 



her senses and was in a happy frame of mind. 

Aunt Eliza was a kind faithful sister and took the best kind of care 
of Aunt Sally who was afflicted often with severe attacks of asthma, but 
after she came to live with us, she was not troubled with it. 

I was interested in looking over the program of the Rockford Woman's 
Club. William's second daughter, Rebecca, a member of our family, had a 
breakdown in health, and was obliged to quit her school and inside her a 
tumor appears to be the cause of her trouble. She was taken to Dr. 
Underwood's Hospital at Woodbury for treatment. We hope she will be 
restored to health. 

With kind regai^ds . 

Griffith John 



QUAKER LOG MEETING HOUSE 
Gatawissa, Golumbia Gounty, Pennsylvania 
See Page 25 




99 ■ 



UWCHLAN FRIENDS CHURCH 



UWCHLAN FRIENDS CHURCH 
(Rear View) 





UWCHLAN FRIENDS CEMETERY 





^r^^: 






s?^:'^ 



"^w'^^m 



^ii^itii^^ij^smm^mmi^ 



*>^:- ' ■ ■ n- - 



100 



Jehu John 



husband of 



Patience (Houseweart) John 



.«y - 





Lorenzo T. John 
Son of Jehu and Patience John 




.^^ 



•!<? 







101 



Ruben John husband of Sophia (Mettler) John 





Lucretia E. John 

daughter 
of Ruben and Sophia JohJi 




102 



Lorenzo T. John husband of Lucretia E. (John) John 



>^' 



% 







103 



Clark E. John and wife Johanna Olsen John 




Clark E. John son of Lorenzo T. John and Lucretia E. John 



104. 



Clark E. John 



Gladys Danielson John 




Clark E, John remarried on December 18. I960 



105 



THE METTLERS 



Phillip Mettler, was born on the 11th of January, 1763. His wife Mary 
(Allen) Mettler, was born on the 29th of November, 1765. They were 
the parents of Sophia (Mettler) John. Sophia was born on the 31st of 
March. 1801. She married Ruben John and they were the parents of 
Lucretia E. John. 

To Phillips and Mary Mettler were born twelve children, namely* 

1. Ruben Mettler, born on the 1st of November, 1786. 
Died on the 1st of August, 1802. Age 16. 

2. Levi Mettler, born on the 7th of March, 1788. 
Died on the 20th of June, 1863. Age 75. 

3. Anna Mettler, born on the 2f'th of January, 1790. 
Died 

4. Mary Mettler, born on the 11th of August, 1792. 
Died on the 1st of February, 1825. Age l)!) . 

5. William Mettler, born on the 2nd of November, 179/C. 
Died on the 11th of September, 1871. Age 77. 

6. Moses Mettler. born on the 8th of Januai-y, 1796. 
Died on the . (I have no record of death. 

7. Daniel Mettler, born on the IQth of April, 1799 
Died on the 13th of December, 188^. Age 85. 

8. Sophia Mettler, born on the 31st of March, 1801. 
Married Ruben John on the /^th of May, 1820. 
Died on the 7th of March, 1887. Age '86. 

9. John Mettler, born on the 13th of July, 1803. 

10. Susana Mettler, born on the 23rd of February, 1806. 

11. Rachel Mettler, born on the 28th of March, 1808. 

12. Phillip Mettler, born on the (No date of birth) 

Died on the 2^1 h of April, 1837. 



106 



OUR BRANCH OF THE "JOHN" FAMILY 
FROM 
ABIA AND MARTHA JOHN 

(ABIA, THE SON OF GRIFFITH JOHN, JUNIOR) 

•JEHU JOHN 



107 



FIFTH AND SKTH GENERATION 
FROM 
RUBEN AND SOPHIA JOHN AND CHILDREN 

RTOEN JOHN 

Ruben John, the fifth child of Abia and Martha John, (see page 19) was born 
on the 21st of March, 17C'8, in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. 

He grew to manhood in Columbia and Northumberland Counties, helping his 
parents on their farm. He married Sophia Mettler, the daughter of Phillips 
and Mary Mettler, on the /^th of May, 1820. 

To them were born nine children, namely, 1. Mary Ann, 2. Martha, 3. Melinda, 
U. Isaac M. S. Allen, 6. Franklin, 7. Lucretia E., 8. Harvey and 9. Sarah 
Jane John. ( A more detailed records on pages 109 to 11/,, inclusive. 

Ruben John was a Quaker or Friends preacher. All the fajnily were earnest 
church workers in the Friends Meetings. Ruben, his brothers, and other 
Quakers first held their meetings in a log schoolhouse near Bear Gap. This 
schoolhouse was near Asa John's (Ruben's uncle) until they built the Meeting 
House later. This was near the edge of the three counties, Northiomberland, 
Columbia and Schuylkill. On the 1st of January, 184^, Asa John granted to 
Hiram, Elida and Perry John, for the sum of five dollars (^5.00) one acre of 
land for the sole use and benefit of the Friends in that district. They 
first called this place, "The Friends Monthly Roaring Creek Meeting of Friends". 

The contract for the building of the Meeting House was let to Asa John and 
the first meeting in the new Meeting House was in June, 184,5, and Ruben John 
was one of the first to preach in the new church. The Friends were always ready 
and waiting to help anyone that needed help in sickness or other ways. 

Ruben John, and his family, or at least part of his family, moved from their 
old home in Pennsylvania to Illinois in 1855. He sold their farm on the first 
of April, then had the sale of their personal things on the 19th of April. He 
preached his last and farewells ermon first of May, 1855. He left the next day 
for Illinois. Their daughters, Lucretia and Sarah Jane stayed all night at 
their aunts' Eliza and Sarah John's home and after eating their breakfast there, 
they all started on that long trip. Eliza, in her diary said, "she hated to 
see them go as they may never see each other again". 

The way of travel at that time was not good. I am not sure just how they made 

their trip, but their son Isaac John and his family left by covered wagon train 

with others from Illinois about the time Ruben did. They may have gone all to- 
gether. 

Ruben John, and family settled in Ogle County, near Dixon. He farmed for a 
living and at the same time preached for the Quakers or Friends for many years. 

He died on the 26th of February, 1880, at the age of 82. His wife, Sophia 
John, outlived her husband seven years. She died on the 7th of March, 1887, 
at the age of 86. She was born on the 31st of March, 1801. Her name before 
marriage was Sophia Mettler. 

108 



They were both buried in the Quaker Burying ground at Dixon, Illinois. Not 
far from tlieir farm home where they had lived so many years. 

RUBEN AND SOPHIA JOHN'S CHILDREN AND GRANDCHILDREN 
See Page 108 

Mary Ann John 

Mary Ann John , the first child of Ruben and Sophia (Mettler) John, was born 
on the 23rd of November, 182'J, in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. 

She married John Kester and to them were born two children, namely, 

1. Sarah Jane 

2. Ruben Kester 

Mary Ann (John) Kester, died on the l4,th of March, 1*^'03, in the state of 
Illinois. Age 83. 

Marth John 

Martha John , the second child of Ruben and Sophia (Mettler) John, was born 
on the 21th of March, 1823, in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, on her 
parents farm near Bear Gap and Roaring Creek, and grew to womanhood there. 

She married Osborn Williams, on the 20th of March, 184^8, in Pennsylvania. 

To them were born three children, namely, 1 Comley 

2. Ruben (See page 110) 

3. Anna Williams 

They moved from Pennsylvania to Illinois on the 1st of April 1855, about the 
time that Isaac John and some others did. The others went by covered wagon 
train. Before they left they went and bid goodbye to Sarah and Eliza John 
and others of their friends . 

Martha John died on the 20th of April, 1909. Age 86. 

Her husband Osborn Williams, died on the 8th of July, 1884^. 

Martha (John) and Osborn Williams' Children and Grandchildren 

Comley Williams, the first child, was born on the 15th of 

December, 1850, in Columbia County, Pennsylvania. 
He married Cot en Hays on the 7th of February, in 
1873. Coten (Hays) Williams was born on the 22nd 
of January, 1855 . 

Comley died on the 11th of December, 1933, in 
Arcadia, California, at the age of 83. His wife Coten 
(Hays) Williams, died on the 23rd of the same month 
at Arcadia, at the age of 81. Their bodies were 
taken back to Dixon, Illinois for burial. 

To Comley and Coten (Hays) Williams was born one 
child, a son, namely; Osborn Williams. He was 
born on the 20th of October, 1881, in Illinois. 

109 



Osborn Williams, son of Comley and Coten 
Williams, married Frances ¥., McCleary. 
She was born on the 22nd of January, 1885. 

Their address in 1958, was 2911 Mataro Street, 
Pasadena, California 



Ruben Williams, the second child of Martha (John) and Osborn 

Williams, was born on the lZ^th of August, 1855, 
in Illinois. He married on the 6th of December, 
1873. He died on the 2(jth of November, 1907, in 
Illinois . 

Anna Williams, the third child of Martha (John) and Osborn Williams, 
was born on the 7th of May, 1862, in Illinois. She 
married Emanuel H. Rickard on the 29th of September, 
1882. To them was born one child- Clark William 
Rickard and he married Pearl Rice. To them was born 
one child, Maureen Margaret Rickard. 

Melinda John 

Melinda John, the third child of Ruben and Sophia H^lettler) John, was born 
on the 27th of November, 1826, in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, and 
grew to womanhood there. 

She married a Mr. Washborn and to them was born one child, namely, Minnie 
Washborn and she married a Mr. Kipp. To them were born two sons. Both 
deceased. (1 did not learn their names- C.E. John) 

Melinda John Washborn married the second time to a Mr. Harder and to that 
marriage was born one child, namely; Clara Violette Harder. She married a 
William Patton. He worked at one time for Isaac John in his wagon factory. 

To William and Clara V. (Harder) Patton, were born six children, namely; 
1. Gertrude, 2. Julia, 3. Ruth, /^. Paul, 5. Harry and 6. Clyde Patton. 

Melinda (John) (Washborn) Harder died on the 2;4th of April, 1914, in the 
state of Illinois. Age 8*^'. 

Clyde Patton, the sixth child of Melinda (John) Patton, passed away on the 
15th of Februaiy, I960, at Orlando, Florida and was b-ui^ied at Winnebago, 
Illinois . 

Isaac M. John 

Isaac M. John , the fourth child of Ruben and Sophia (Mettlf-r) John, was born 

on the 12th of October, 1827, near Bear Gap, in Northumberland County, 

Pennsylvania. He grew to manhood on his parents' farm and got his schooling 

there in those parts. 

'When he was 23 he worked for Uncle Perry John, in his wagon shop as a wheel- 
wright from 1850 to 1853. His shop was on the first floor of his home in 

110 



Paxinos in Northumberland County^ and he had a wagon shop at Catawissa in 
Columbia County. He operated wagon-building factories for a great many 
years. 

He married Catherine Vastine, the daughter of John and Sarah Vastine, on the 
1st of February, 1853. 

To them were born six children, namely; 1. Emma, 2. Lima, 3. Ellen, 4.. Charles, 
5. Ann and 6. Allen John. (Details of these children on pages 112-113. ) 

Going West 

In 1853, Isaac M. John, Catherine E. (Vastine), his wife, and all the Vastine 
family including her parents, John and Sarah Vastine, their sons and daughters, 
their in-laws and grandchildren, started for the west from their old home near 
Bear Gap, Northumberland County, in a covered wagon train. This was a long 
trip over the rough unfinished country roads to Illinois. I believe they were 
with others in that wagon train. 

Isaac first settled near Westfield Corners, south of Winnebago, in the County 
of Winnebago, Illinois. He later moved into the town of Winnebago where he had 
a wagon making shop. He was famous as a wagon maker in that part of the country. 
He had the one end of his shop for the wood work and he hired a blacksmith who 
had the other end of the shop for the iron work. This building where he had his 
shop, was originally the first schoolhouse in Winnebago and the bell in the belfrey 
was used for the fire bell for a great many years. 

He built his home next door to his shop on Benton Street. During the Civil War 
he would help the slaves to escape by hiding them in the shop in the daytime 
and let them go in the night. 

In later years he added machinery to his business and had a big business. 

'When he first settled near Westfield Corners, not far from Rock River, most of 
the land was covered with timber but the open places had tall prairie grass. 
The grass, it is said, was a tall as a horse sometimes. 

He was converted on the 13th of December, 1851, in a Quaker Meeting that was 
being held near Bear Gap. His cousin, Leartis John (Samuel John's second 
child), was converted at the same time. Isaac John always remained a Quaker. 

His first wife, Catherine E. (Vastine) John, was born on the 17th of February, 
1832, in Pennsylvania. She was called Home on the 17th of December, 1865. 
Age 33. 

Isaac M. John, married the second time to Mi-s. Anna Brown. She had two daughters 
by her former marriage, namely; Fanny Brown and Ca.roline Brown. Fanny Brown 
married James Coil and they had two sons, Floyd and Dorsey Coil. Caroline 
Brown married Aljnon Newton and they had a daughter named Viola (Newton) Wynters. 

Isaac M. John was called to his Final Reward on the 3rd of February, 1906, 
from Winnebago , Illinois . Age 79 . 



Ill 



ISAAC M. AND CATHERINE (VASTINE) JOHN'F CHILDREN AND GRANDCHILDREN 

1. Emma John 

Emma John, the first child of Isaac M. and Catherine E. Vastine John, was born 
on the 9th of October, 1853, in Pennsylvania. She married Francis M. Stine, 
and he was born on the 9th of July, 1851. She died on the 19th of July, 1942. 
Age 89. Her husband died on the 26th of May, 1921. Age 70. 

To them were born three children, namely; 1. Lois Stine, born in 187^, 
and she died in 1878. Age I^. 

2. Mable C. Stine, was born on the 1st of January, 1876. 
She married Albert Agnew on the IZ^th of September, 1898. 
She died on the 27th of January, 191^. Age 38. 

To Mable and Albert Agnew, was born one child, namely; Persis R. 
Agnew. She was born on the 30th of November, 1900. She married 
Chester R. Brown, on the 25th of November, 1920. Her husband was 
born on the 5th of November, 1893. To them was born one child, 
namely Jacqueline Brown. She was born on the ^th of October, 
1921. She married Floyd Geith on the 25th of November, l^i^.3. 
They had one child named Stephen Geith, who was born on the 
nineth of December, 194.6. 

Mable G. (Stine) Agnew married the second time to Lansing 0, 
Squiers on the 26th of February, 1937, There were no children by 
this marriage. 

3. Earl Leroy Stine, the third child of Emma (John) and Francis M. 
Stine, was born on the 23rd of March, 1883. He married Loiiise 
Beecher. To them was born one child, namely; Francis B. Stine, 
on the 14th of January, 1907. He married Frances Burkett . They 
had two adopted children. 

2-3- Lima and Ellen John 

Lima John, the 2nd and 

Ellen John, the 3rd, children of Isaac and Catherine (Vastine) John, died 

when quite young. 

4. Charles Jotm 

Chai-les John, the fourth child of Isaac M. and Catherine (Vastine) John, was 
born in 1862. He died in 194.2, in July. I don't know who he married, but 
he had three children. -C.E. John. 

1. Velma John, 2. Charles John, Junior, and 3. Clara John. 

Charles John moved out west to Salt Lake City, Utah, early in life. He died 
in Kansas City, Missouri. He visited with some of his family back east awhile 
before he died. 

5 . Ajina John 

Anna John, the fifth child of Isaac and Catherine (Vastine) John, was born 
in December, I864. He died about 195 0. She married Frank Tritle. To them 

112 



were born three children, namely; 1, Hazel Tritle, (she died in babyhood) 
2. Leon Tritle and 3. Mary Ellen Tritle. 

Ellen Tritle married Mr. Breased and they had a daughter named Jean 
Breased and Jean married a Mir. Erusse. 

Mrs. Mary Ellen (Tritle) Breased 's address in 195? was 910 Emerald in 
Madison, Wisconsin. Frank Tritle's address \-ias 956^, Finehurst Avenue 
in Detroit, Michigan. 

6. Allen John 

Allen John, the sixth child of Isaac M. and Catherine fVastine) John, was born 
in 1867. He married Cora Roberts, or Woodworth, and to them was born a 
daughter named Bertha Jane John. Bertha married James T. Wright. They have 
a daughter named Ethel Wright and she married Mr. Kimkle . They have a daughter 
named Karyl Kimkle. 

Ruben and Sophia John's Childi^en and Grandchildren - Continued 

Allen John 

Edward Allen John , the fifth child of Ruben and Sophia (Mettler) John, was born 
on the 23rd of June 1830, in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. I believe 
he moved from Pennsylvania to Illinois at the same time that his parents did 
in May 1855. I think that they went by horse and covered wagon. 

He married a Cleaver girl. To them were born two children, namely, 

1. Alis John 

2. Wilber John who never married. 

Wilber died in Nahaska County, Iowa and was bui-ied in the 
Winnebago Cemetery at Winnebago, Illinois. 

Franklin John 

Franklin John , the sixth child of Ruben and Sophia (Mettler) John, was born 
on the 1st of June, 1833, in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. He grew 
to manhood there. He married Harriet John. They first moved to Illinois, 
then to Nebraska near Creighton, Brunswick and Plainview. Their last known 
address was Creighton, Nebraska. They had seven children, namely; 1. Alice, 
2. Sarah Sophia, 3. Elvin, 4. William Lemnel, 5. Levi Lester, 6. Elida Franklin, 
and 7. Thomas Wesley. 

Alice married a Mir. Murphy. She lived at Blair, Nebraska, about 1897. 

Levi Lester John, the fifth child of Franklin John, had a daughter 
named Marie John, who married a Mr. Prather , Marie Prather lived at 
one time at Route No. 1. Box 578, Manette, Washdngton. 

Franklin John died on the 6th of August, 1912. Age 79. 

"I have tried in vain since 1935, to locate some of Franklin's children or 
grandchildren. I even went over the parts of the country where they lived 
and found where their farm was, but could not find any trace of any of them."- 
C.E. John. 



113 



Lucretia E. John 

Lucretla E. John , the seventh child of Ruben and Sophia (Mettler) John, 

was born on the 19th of December, 1836, in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. 

She, with her parents, moved from Pennsylvania to Illinois when she was 19 

years old. She stayed at her Aunt Eliza and Sarah John's the last night 

before they left for Illinois. Her younger sister, Sarah John, was there with 

her. 

Lucretia married Lorenzo T. John. Their record is on page 121 . To them were 
born eight children, namely; 1. Cynthia, 2. Laura V., 3. Mark M. , ly. Edna I., 
5. Carrie L. 6, Bert W. , 7. Milton R. and S.Clark E. John. 

Lucretia E. John passed on to her Heavenly reward on the l&th of June, 1907, 
in Mitchell, South Dakota. She was 70 years, 5 months and 29 days old. 

T . Harvey John 

Truman Harvey John , the eighth child of Ruben and Sophia (Mettler) John, was 
born on the 20th of February, 1839, in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. 
He moved with his parents from Pennsylvania to Illinois in 1855, when he was 
16 years old. 

He was a brilliant student. His long hours of study caused his death. He 
died on the 18th of July, 1858. Age 19. 

Sarah Jane John 

Sarah J . John , the ninth child of Ruben and Sophia (Mettler) John, was born 
on the 25th of May, I84.I, in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. She also 
moved with her parents from Pennsylvania to Illinois in 1855. She was I4, 
years old. 

She married John P. Kester. To them were born three children, namely; Henry 
Kester, Amy Kester, and Roy Kester. 

Sarah (John) Kester died on the 31st of July, IQll. Age 70. 



This is all of the children and grandchildren of Ruben and Sophia John. 



IIA 



GENERAL HIGHWAY AND TRANSPORTATION MAP 

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118 



Fourth and Fifth Generations 

Jehu John 

Jehu Jolin, the eleventh child of Abia and Martha John, was born en the 11th 
of February, 1810, in Columbia County, Pennsylvania, on his parents farm. 
This farm was covered with timber when his father Abia John bought and moved on 
it in l7C'f , but it was mostly cleared when Jehu was bcrn. This farm was locat- 
ed near Pa>:onis and not far from where Roaring Creek and Shamokin now are 
located. 

He married a Patience Houseweart on the 2nd of October, 1834.. She was the 
daughter of Soloman Houseweart. They moved to Schuylkill County on the 25th 
of September, 184,6. Then on the 2nd of October. 184.9, they started on their 
long and hard move from Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania to Winnebago County, 
Illinois, with their six children that they had at that time. 

To them were born eight children, (Jehu and Patience (Houseweart) John), 
namely ; 

1. Amanda born on the 10th of August, 1835. ("Lived three hours) 

2. Lorenzo T. John 

3 . Kimber L . 

4. Cephas D. 

5. Sarah M. 

6. Ann Eliza 

7. Edmund J. 

8. Verdilia E„ John 

More details on page 121 and page I64 

Their Move to Illinois 

Jehu and Patience John, and their six children that they had at that time, 
started from Schuylkill County on their first lap to Philadelphia about I5 
miles. They took all their belongings with them. One of their relatives 
took them in a two horse wagon over rough roads. 

Second lap. From there they took the train about 225 miiles to Albany, New 
York. 

The third lap from Albany to Buffalo, they went via the Erie Canal on a house- 
boat pulled by horses on the bank of the canal. This canal is 323 miles long, 
and the fare was 1-|- cents a mile and the houseboat traveled one-half a mile 
per hour. It took eight years to dig this canal. 

The fourth lap was across the great lakes, through the edge of Canada, across 
the State of Michigan, into Lake Michigan'and into Chicago, where they were met 
by friends . 

Fifth lap was made by horses and wagons. Their friends took them over un- 
improved roads about one hundred miles to Winnebago County, west and north of 
.Chicago, near where the city of Rockford now stands. There were only ten miles 
of railroads out of Chicago at that time. The country between Chicago and 
Winnebago County was open prairie. 

Jehu bought a farm that already had a double log house on it. There was no lock 
on their door, but there was a hole bored in the door and they had a rope through 

119 



the hole to raise the wood latch on the inside. They would pull the rope in 
at night so that no one could get in. This farm was one mile west of Westfield 
Corners in Winnebago County. 

There were some bad storms on the Great Lakes when they were crossing on their 
journey from Pennsylvania. The boat crew would roll barrels back and forth so 
the boat would not capsize. This was a real daring trip for Jehu and Patience 
John to start on such a long trip in the fall of the year with that lar-ge family. 
The oldest was only fourteen years old. 

They were happy among the early pioneers in their new place of abode, helping 
to hew out a farm and living. ^I was at the farm in 1958. This was a nice 
farm and had a big house and barn. The remains of the log house are still 
there. - C.E. John) 

Jehu and Patience John, taking their youngest daughter, Verdilia, made a trip 
back to Pennsylvania on the 23rd of October, 1856, from Ohio. They took the 
widow of Griffith John, Rachel (Miller) John - her husband was the grandson 
of Abia John, senior. They visited Perry and Eliza John and all their other 
relatives and friends. 

Jehu Jolin gave a Bible lectixre at the old Friends Meeting House at Bear Gap 
while there. A lot of their old neighbors attended. 

One evening while they were sitting aroiind the fire in Perry's house, Jehu 
told stories of his western experiences that made them all laugh. 

Patience (Houseweart ) John made a short visit back to Pennsylvania a few years 
later when she was a widow. 

When they were about to move from Pennsylvania to Illinois, on the 26th of 
September, 18/^9, Jehu and his family stayed overnight at his brother's Perry 
John. They went and got Jehu's father-in-law, Soloman Houseweai^t, and they 
all stayed there all night. Next morning they bid good-bye and started on 
their journey back to Illinois. Griffith John, the son of Perry John, went 
with them as far as Petersburg (now called Elysburg). Abia John, Asa's son, 
took their likeness before they departed. Eliza John, said "they all felt 
so lonely as they might never see each other again." 

Jehu John, died on the 23rd of September, 1863, and was buried in the Winnebago 
Cemetery in Illinois. 

Jehu John, is of the fourth generation and his first son Lorenzo T. John, is the 
fifth generation and his children were the sixth generation of the Johns. 

Lorenzo T. John's children were namely 



1. Cynthia A., 2. Laura V., 3. Mark M. , ^. Edna I., 5. Carrie L, 
6. Bert W., 7. Milton R, and 8. Clark E. John . 



5 



120 



FIFTH AND SIXTH GENERATIONS 
FROM 
JEHU AND PATIENCE JOHN 
LORENZO T. AND LUCRETIA E. JOHN AND THEIR DESCENDANTS 



The records of Lorenzo T. John's brothers and sisters and their descendants 
will be fouiid on pages 16^ through 181. 



Lorenzo Thornton John , the first child of Jehu and Patience John , was born on 
Saturday, the 5th of December, 183?, in Shamokin Township, Northumberland 
County, Pennsylvania. (There was a baby girl Menda, born before him but she 
lived only three hours). 

His early schooling was in Shamokin and Schuylkill schools. When he was but 
a boy he worked in the coal mines in that locality. His family moved into 
Schuylkill County east of Shamokin County for a time, then in 184.9, they 
decided to sell out and move from Pennsylvania to Illinois. Tliis was in the 
fall of the year and there were no laid out roads. This wq^ a big under- 
taking for them in those early years to start on such a long trip with their 
large family. His father had a sale of their property. After the sale, they 
stayed at Perry John's, his youngest brother's farm house over night. His 
father Jehu brought Lorenzo's father-in-law Soloman Houseweai^t, so they were 
all together that night. The next morning Lorenzo's aunts, Eliza and Sarah 
John, with others, went with them as far as Petersburg (now called Elysburg) 
before saying goodbye. They took pictui^es of each other. The ones left were 
CO lonely as they did not know if they would ever see their faces again. 

They went by horse drawn wagon about a hundred miles over the dirt roads to 
Philadelphia. From there they took the train to Albany, New York. From 
Albany they had a new experience as they traveled the Erie Canal, a distance 
of about 200 miles by horse drawn boat. The horses walked along the bank of 
the canal to Buffalo, New York. Then they went by boat over the Great Lakes 
and were overtaken by a storm which nearly capsized the boat. The crew moved 
the cargo from side to side to keep the vessel from capsizing. They then 
went through the edge of Canada, across the state and over Lake Michigan into 
Chicago, Illinois, which was a small toiAm at that time. Chicago had only ten 
miles of railroads . 

Friends met them in Chicago and took them to Winnebago County about one hundred 
miles. I think that there was no Winnebago town at that time. His parents 
bought a farm close to where the city of Winnebago now stands. On this farm was 
a double log house. There was no lock on the door. A rope through the door 
to a wooden latch inside made the lock complete. Pulling the rope at night 
made a secure door lock. There was a store, post office, and church about a 
mile from the farm, which was called Westfield Corners. 

In July of 1956, the writer (C.E. John) was at this old farm that Jehu John, 
the father of Lorenzo John, bought when he first moved from Pennsylvania in 
the year of I84.9. This was quite a thrill for me to be able to see and to 

121 



stand on the ground of that farm that was so long ago their property. 

Lorenzo T. John was married to Lucretia Elmira John, in the city of Eeloit, 
Wisconsin on the 2nd of July, 1856. To this union were born two children 
while living in Illinois, namely, Cynthia and Laura. E±y. children were born 
in Iowa, namely; Mark M. . Edna I., Carrie, E-ert W. , Milton R. , and Clark E. 
John, the last of the Lorenzo T. John family. 

The Lorenzo T. Johns were among the first pioneers to settle in Ingham Town- 
ship Franklin County, Iowa. They carved out a home near the West Fork of 
the Cedar River . 

The legal description of this farm was: the north-west one fourth of section 
16; Township 93; and Range 19. 

In 1858, Ingham took in what is now West Fork, then in 1868, it was divided, 
the north half was named West Fork and the south Ingham. Ingham Township 
was named after one of the early settlers by the name of George N. Ingham. 
The first election was held in the home of Simon Selix. 

There was a post office opened on Lorenzo T. John's farm, called the Ingham 
Post Office. The government appointed Lorenzo T. John as Postmaster. This 
was in 1858, which post he held till 187^', when they opened a post office in 
the new town of Sheffield about seven miles distant and Ingham post office 
was closed. Besides Lorenzo T. John being the Postmaster and running the 
fai'm, he held several offices. 

It was while living on this farm at West Fork that he was converted and soon 
after his conversion applied for license to preach the Gospel in the United 
Brethern Chiorch. He was soon granted that privilege to work for his Master 
and after filling several appointments in Iowa, he moved further west. 

Two of his brothers lived with their families in Franklin County. They were, 
Cephas D. and wife Elizabeth and Edmund J. John and wife Sarah John. 

Going Farther West 

In the year of I884., after selling their property, he started west with his 
wife. Lucretia and six of their children. They went by way of the Chicago 
Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad from Iowa to Dakota Territory. He hired a 
freight car and loaded his stock and belongings and shipped them to Kt . Vernon, 
Dakota. He hauled his goods twenty miles across prairie dirt roads to the 
new home in Douglas County. Their oldest daughter and husband, Cynthia and 
John Scott and baby son Charley, had moved out there previously and had taken 
up a homestead of I6O acres. 

Mr. L. T. John filed on a I6O acre homestead adjoining the Scott farm on the 
west. He received the government patent or deed from Washington, D.C., on the 
13th of September, 1891, signed by President Benjamin Harrison. (This patent 
has been in the hands of the writer (C.E. John) since the year of 1962.) 

The description of this farm was;, the southeast quarter, section 29. Township 
100, and range 63. On the 7th of March, 1892, he bought a 160 acre farm across 
the road south of his other farm from Mr. Henry Degees. The description of this 
farm was: the northeast quarter of section 32, to\^msMp 100 and range 63. 
Lorenzo T. John's fai-m was a mile from Choteau Creek. In the early days before 
they had a deep well drilled they di^ove the cattle to this creek for water. 

122 



OLD FAP-M HOUFE 

BOYHOOD HOME 
OF 
LORENZO T. JOHN 



DOUGLAS COUNTY, SOUTH DAKOTA 







ik'm^*^*r ^'^xis» ■<".i'4 






The writer (C.E. Juhn) was back to this old farm in 1959. The same well was 
producing the same amount of nice soft water as it did fifty years before. 
This well is over three hundred feet deep, two inches at the top and one inch 
at the bottom. 



123 



A Little of Dakota's History 

In 1861 this region included Wyoming, Montana and part of Idaho and Yankton 
was the capital. When the Johns moved to Dakota it was a separate territory. 
On the 2nd of November, 1892, it was divided into North and South Dakota, mak- 
ing the thirty-ninth and fortieth states. 

This area was an open prairie country when the ?cotts and Johns settled in 
Douglas County. There was a small pioneer town on a hill southwest of the 
John's farm, called Grand View. It was the County ?eat of Douglas County 
and was the only place where they could get supplies and their mail. After 
several years the C. M. and St. Paul railroad built a line from the town of 
Tripp to five miles south of Grand View and built a town called Armour, Most' 
of the stores and homes were moved to the new town. This town later became 
the County Seat. In I960, there was nothing left of old Grand View. The 
state of South Dakota placed a nice stone plaque on the groiind in memory of 
that old Pioneer town. 

In South Dakota Lorenzo T. John followed the same line as he did in Iowa, 
working on his farm through the week days and Sundays he had several preach- 
ing appointments. 

He was elected Presiding Elder over all the United Brethern Churches in the 
southern part of South Dakota and Nebraska. This engagement he filled for 
several years. He was elected twice as delegate to the general conference 
in the east . 

In the fall of 1897, he leased his farm to his son Bert, and he bought a home 
in Mitchell, South Dakota, which was about 30 miles southeast of his farm. 
This home was on the corner of Seventh and Rowly Street. He would make the 
trip to and from the farm quite often by horse and buggy over dirt rocky roads 
and at, times by wagon with loads of grain. He was a slow driver as he walked 
the horses most of the time. 



Lorenso T. John 



Last Sickness, 



He continued to preach part time until the fall of 1906. when he began to feel 
his health giving away. He went to his Dr. Clyde Bobb. The doctor noted his 
failing health, so called a council with other doctors. They thought best for 
him to go to the Mayo Brothers Clinic Hospital in Rochester, Minnesota, for 
further examination. On the fth of June, 1907, he made the trip. His doctor, 
Clyde Eobb, accompanied him. 

The examination revealed the cause of his illness to be cancer in the lower 
part of the stomach. The Mayo Clinic doctors advised. of his condition, but 
advised against removing the growth, but if he desired they would perform 
surgery which might prolong his life for a time. They also stated that there 
was a possibility that he might not live thi^ough the operation. He requested 
that they perform the surgery which they did. After the operation he gradually 
wealcened and the doctors thought best for him to return to his home in Mitchell 
South Dakota. 



His oldest daughter Cynthia and son Mark, who had been with him at the hospital, 
accompanied him home on the train. He continued to grow weaker until at 12 noon 
on the 29th of June, 1907, he went on to his Heavenly Home. 

124 



While all the children gathered around the bed, he said to them: "I have 
fought a good fight. I have finished my course. I have tried to be a 
faithful and obedient servant of Jesus Christ. 1 have made mistakes 
I know, yet 'He' knows that I tried my best to serve 'Him'". 

He was buried by the side of his wife Lucretia, who passed away just eleven 
days before him. He was buried in Graceland Cemetery, Lot 3, Block 10, 
in the second division, Mitchell, South Dakota. 




Funeral . 

The funeral was held at the First Methodist Church in Mitchell, South Dakota. 
Rev. H. P. Wilkinson, the pastor, conducted the service and Rev. Eligah 
Tillotson preached the eulogy. His text was on the 10th to the 20th verse 
of the sixth chapter of the book of Matthew, 

Songs were: Thy Will Be Done - Shall We Meet Beyond the River - 
Come ye Disconsolate. 

Music by the Misses Noble and Green, Mr, Krates and Mr. Morris, 

125 



The pallbearers were; ? . H. Morgan, Erick Jensen, George Toland, James Arney, 
William Anderson and William Duncan. 

This ended a long and faithful life which was spent first for God, then for his 
family and country. 

Ruben and Fophia John's Daughter 

Lucretia Elmira John 

Lucretia Elmira John, the seventh child of Ruben and Sophia John, was born on 
Saturday, the 19th of December, 1836, in Roaring Creek Township, Columbia 
County, Pennsylvania. 

She moved with her parents from Pennsylvania to Illinois in May of 1853, or 
1856. Her schooling was in Columbia County. They settled in Ogle County, 
Illinois . 

With all my searching I could not find how her parents moved from Pennsylvania 
to Illinois. Probably as most of them did in that day by overland in caravans. 

There were two children born to them while living in Illinois, namely; 
Cynthia A. and Laura V. John. 

In 1866, they with the two children and effects moved overland by horses and 
covered wagon from Illinois to Franklin County, Iowa. 

She was married to Lorenzo T. John on the 2nd of July, 185?, in the city of 
Beloit , Wisconsin. She and her husband made their home in northern Illinois. 

She worked hand-in-hand with her husband making a home for the family in that 
frontier country near the West Fork of the Cedar River. She did her part 
raising their large family of eight children, having little money or other 
things to do with. She made all their clothes by hand. Also everything 
to eat was raised by hand. 

In I884., they sold their home in Franklin County, Iowa and moved by train to 
Dakota territory, which later became the State of South Dakota. There in 
this new frontier she again went through hardships and toil. She never 
had the modern things to enjoy that the women of today seemingly cannot get 
along without. Her's was the hard way. 

For a number of years h?r health was quite poorly, but she did not complain 
but kept on with the work in the home. The hardships of early pioneer years 
commenced to tell on her. 

When they moved from the home farm to Mitchell, life was easier for her and 
she had more time to sit and do some resting. 

Last sickness- 

Her husband Lorenzo, was taken to the Mayo Hospital in Rochester, Minnesota, 
for a medical examination. He was operated on but the cause was not removed. 
This mental and nervous strain was too much for her weakened body and she 
would walk to and from the postoffice to get the latest mail from the hospital 
regarding his condition in Rochester. The postmaster told her to call at the 
office and not wait for the delivery. 

126 



While retui'-ning from the postoffice one morning v;ith the latest news froni 
her husbandj on >'bnday the I7th of June, she was taken very ill. In a little 
over twenty-four houi"s on the 18th of June, 1>0V, God took her to that City 
not made with hands, where pain, sorrow, toil and sickness never comes. She 
was ready and waiting for this change for a great many years. £he did not 
have a chance to say goodbye to her husband here on earth, but she was over 
on the other side to welcome him a few days later. 

When her husband was brought home from the hospital, he asked where she was, 
and was told that she had gone on. He realized that he would soon meet her 
over there. She was called home just eleven days before he was. 

For nearly half a century she had been a member and worker in the United trothern 
Church. She was kind and devoted mother and friend to all who knew her. Her 
life on the frontier and the life as a minister's wife showed a true example 
of what a Christian shoiild be. 

To Lorenzo T. and Lucretia E. John, were born eight children, namely, 1. Cynthia 
A., 2. Laura V., 3. Mark M., 4.. Edna I., t . Carrie L., 6. Eert W., 7. Milton R. , 
and Clark E. John. 

Lucretia E. John's Funeral 

The funeral was held at the First Methodist Church in Mitchell, South Dakota. 
Rev. R. D. Harvey had the service. The pastor Rev. E. Wilkinson and Rev. Eligah 
Tillotson assisted. 

The songs were: My Latest Sun is Skinking Fast, Looking this Way, and Asleep in 
Jesus. The text - 2nd Corinthians ::1. 

The pallbearers were: S. E. Morgan, Erick Jenson, George Toland, James Ai-ney, 
William Anderson and William Duncan. 

She was buried in Graceland Mem.orial Cemetery, Lot No. 3, Block No. 10, in the 
second division, Mitchell, South Dakota. Age 70 years, ,^ months, and 29 days. 

CHILDREN OF LORENZO T. AND 
LUCRETIA E. JOHN 

Cynthia Arielia John 

Cynthia A. John, the first cliild of Lorenzo T. and Lucretia E. John, was born 
on Sunday, the 3rd of February, 1860, in Eyron Township, Ogle County, Illinois. 

She moved with her parents from Illinois to Franklin County, Iowa, when she was 
but six years old. They went in a covered wagon and this wagon was made by her 
uncle Isaac John, who was a wagon maker. She grew to womanhood helping on the 
farm and walking a long way to her school in those long cold winters. At the 
age of twenty, she married a young man that lived not far from their home, by the 
name of John W. Scott. This took place on the 16th of June, 1880, on her parents' 
farm in Franklin County, Iowa. Rev. M. M. Taylor pastor of the United Erethern 
Church officiating. 

They moved from Iowa to a new coiontry, Dakota, where they took up a Government 
homestead in the north part of Douglas coimty near Chateau Creek. 

127 



To them was born one child, namely; Charles B. Fcott. 

Cynthia A. John married the second time to C.A. Christlieb on the 15th of July, 
1897 in Mason City, Iowa, where her home was at this time. Her husband, 
C.A.' Christlieb, died on the 2nd of June, 1909, in Mason City, and was buried 
there . 

Cynthia John married the third time to Edward Eells on the 1/^th of November, 
1911 at Racine, Wisconsin, by a minister there at that place. They moved 
to northern Minnesota where they bought some farm land and lived there till 
the 12th of May, 19^0, when the call came at four in the morning, for her to 
leave this life forever and go to the Eternal. 

She was buried in the Poplar Grove Cemetery, Maylon Township, Marshall County, 
Minnesota, Rev. E. L, Tongseth, pastor of the Free Lutheran Church had the 
service. Her age 80 years, 3 months and 9 days. 

Charles Eernet S cott 

Charles E. Fcott, the only child of Cynthia A. Fcott and John W, Scott, 
was born on the 2''th of April, 1881, in Frajiklin County, Iowa. 

When he was but a small child, he moved with his parents from Iowa 
to Dakota, Douglas County, where he lived for a number of years. In 
the meantime his mother had moved to Iowa, living in Mason City, 
and in 189'?, Charles went with his Uncle Bert W. John, and Frank 
Schribner in a covered wagon drawn by horses to Iowa, where he finished 
his schooling. He worked around Mason City at various jobs. 

On the first of March, 190f , he married Frances Maude La Vanway at 
Hanlentown, Cerro Gorda County, Iowa. In later years they moved to 
Wisconsin to a farm and from there they moved to the state of 
Washington. 

Frances M. (LaVanway) Scott, the daughter of Frank and Sarah Jane 
LaVanway, was born on the l4,th of August, 1883, in Moody County, 
South Dakota. 

To them were born foui- boys, namely; 1. Lewis, C. 2. Francis E., 
3. Ray J, and U. Mertin JC Scott. 

Charles E. Scott was called from this life from the Harbor View Hospital 
in Seattle, Washington on the 23rd of December, 1955. He and his wife 
celebrated their Golden Wedding Anniversary on the 1st of March, of 
t hat ye ar . 

His age was 1 1^ years, 7 months, and 28 days. He was ready for this 
Heavenly call. He was buried in the Washington Memorial Cemetery, 
164.4.5 Pacific Highway, South, near Seattle, Washington. 

EIGHTH GENERATION 

From Chai'les E. and Frances M. Scott 

Lewis Clark Scott 

128 



Lewis C. gcott , the Tirst child of Charles B. and Frances M. Scott 
was born on the 9th of February, 1906, at Fertile, Cerro Gorda 
County, Iowa. He married Helen Zanise (Glass) Gleason on the 19th 
of February, 1937. He was married the second time to Viola Mae 
Zimmer on the Uth of May, 19^9, at Enumclaw, Washington, at the 
Presbyterian Church. 



To Lewis C. and Helen (Gleason) Scott was born one child, namely; 
Phillis Ann Scott, born on the I5th of March, 19^1, at the Wilmeth 
Private Hospital, River Falls, Wisconsin. 

Francis Eujnet Scott 

Francis E. Scott , the second child of Charles E. and Frances K. 
Scott, was born on the 6th of September, 1908, in Mason City, Iowa. 
He never married. His career was in the United States Army all 
over the world. 

Ray John Scott 

Ray J. Scott , the third child of Charles B. and Frances M. Scott, 
was born on the 9th of March, 1918, in Mason City, Iowa. He 
married Deliah Jane Harris from Spokane, Washington, on the 11th 
of March, 19/i4, in Fairbanks, Alaska. 

To them were born three children, namely; 

1. Judy E. Scott, born on the 7th of August, 19^7, in 
the Saint Joseph Hospital, Tacoma, Washington. 

2. Ray J. Scott, born on the 3rd of October, 195 0. in 
the Saint Joseph Hospital, Tacoma, Washington. 

3. Debra Lynn Scott, born on the 31st of January. 19f5, 
in the Saint Joseph Hospital, Tacom.a. Washington 

Merton JC Scott 

Merton JC Jo hn, the fourth child of Charles E. and Frances M. Scott, 
was born on the 5th of February, 1925, in Oilman, Wisconsin. He 
married Tume Sekiguck on the 3rd of December, 1953, at the United 
States Army American Consul's Office in Japan. He was in the United 
States Army in Japan at that time. 

Laura Vianna John 

Laura V. John, the second child of Lorenzo T. and Lucretia E. John', was born 
on Saturday, the 19th of September, 1865, in Eyron Township, Ogle County, 
Illinois . 

She v.dth her parents moved from Illinois in 1866, to Franklin County, Iowa, in 
a covered wagon drawn with horses. Her schooling was in a small country school- 
house not far from their farm. She grew to womanhood on this farm. 

In 188^, her parents moved from Iowa still farther west to Dakota Territory, where 
they took up a Government homestead of 320 acres of prairie land and made it into 
a farm home. The location was in Garfield Township, Douglas County, just south 
of Choteau Creek. She made this her home till her marriage. 

She married Ransom D. Harvey, son of Rev. D. M. Harvey, on the 2Z^th of November, 

129 



1892. Fhe was married by her brother-in-law Rev. T. H. Hendricks, at her 
parents' farm home in Douglas County, Fouth Dakota. 

To them was born one child, namely; Ada Ethel Harvey. They also had two 
adopted children; Victor and Nina G. Harvey, 

Her parents sold their farm in Fouth Dakota in 1910, and moved to Flathead 
Co-unty, Montana, where they bought a farm six miles north-west of Kalispell. 
They spent the rest of their lives on this farm. They were members of a 
church in town. 

Their Deaths 

Laura V (John) Harvey was called to her Heavenly Home from this home in the 
early hours of the morning of the 3rd of June, 1936. ?he was stricken 
with paralysis in August, 1928, and was an invalid until her death. She 
was buried on the 7th of June, 1936, in the Conrad Memorial Cemetery east 
of Kalispell, Lot No. 2213, section H. Her age was 72 years, 8 months, and 
lA days. 

The services were conducted by Rev. W. H. Sandy and Rev. H.C. Stark in 
Wagnor and Campbell Chapel. Mrs. Elisenson sang and Miss Mirriel at the 
Organ, the pallbearers were James Bogart , Clint O'Neal, Milton Stiles, 
Oscar Gust af son and Howard Knapp. 

Ransom D. Harvey, husband of Laura V. (John) Harvey, died on the 29th of 
May, 1939, at Kalispell, Montana. 

He was also buried in the Conrad Memorial Cemetery at Kalispell. Age 79 years, 
8 months , and 12 days . 

SEVENTH AND EIGHTH GENERATION 

Branch from Laura V. and Ransom D. Harvey 

Ada Ethel Harvey 

Ada E. Harvey, the only child of Laura V. and Ransom D. Harvey, 
was born on the 18th of October, 1895, on her parents farm in 
South Dakota. 

In 1910. she with her parents moved from South Dakota to Flat- 
head County, Montana. 

On the 2nd of April, 1913, she married Grover Ruesegger. Rev. 
Bates performed the wedding ceremony. To them were born four 
children, namely; 1. Clara, 2. Vale, 3. Lloyd, and 4.. Arlis 

Ada E. (Harvey) Ruegsegger died on the 2^th of May, 1928, in a 
hospital in Kalispell, Montana. She was bix^ied in the Conrad 
Memorial Cemetery. She was a member of the Chi^istian Church 
in Kalispell. Her age 32 years, 7 months, and 7 days. 

Grover Ruegsegger, husband of Ada E. (Harvey) Ruegsegger, died 
on the (date not known). He also was buried in the Conrad 
Memorial Cemetery where his wife was buried. 



130 



EIGHTH GENERATION 

From Ada E. and Grover Ruegsegger 

Clara E. Ruegsegger 

Clara Ruegsegger, the first child of Ada E. and Grover 
Ruegsegger, was born on the 8th of January, 191/i, on her parents 
farm in Flathead County, Montana. Fhe married Orlyn Elwood 
on the 16th of July, 1934-, in the town of Poison, Montana. 
To them were born four children, namely; 1. Oral K. , 
2. Margene, 3. Jerry, and 4. Linda Kay. 

1. Oral Kenneth Elwood, born on the 27th of April, 
1937. He died on the Ifth of October, 19S2, in 
Kalispell, Montana. 

2. Margene Elwood, born in March, 1939, in Kalispell. 

3. Jerry Elwood, born in December, 194,0, in Kalispell. 

4. Linda Kay, born on the 5th of March, 1945, in Kalispell. 

Vale Ruegsegger 

Vale Ruegsegger, the second child of Ada E. and Grover 
Ruegsegger, was born on the 2nd of September, 1915, in Flathead 
Co"unty, Montana. He married Mildred Burlen on the 3rd of 
September, 1940, in Great Falls, Montana. ( I have the 
account of but one child), namely, James Ray Ruegsegger, born 
on the loth of November, 1943. 

Lloyd Ruegseg ger 

Lloyd R. Ruegsegger, the third child of Ada E. and Grover 
Ruegsegger, was born on the 11th of November, 1918, in 
Flathead County, Montana. 

He married Bette Gordan on the 13th of June, 1943, in Montana, 
1 have the account of one child, namely; Allen E. Ruegsegger, 
born on the 30th of October, 1943. 

Arlis Ruegsegger 

Arlis Ruegsegger, the fourth child of Ada E. and Grover 
Ruegsegger, was born on the 27th of June, 1923, in Flat- 
head County J Montana. 

She was killed by an auto as she got out of her parents' car in 
front of her grandparents home. This was on the I7th of November, 
1928. A car came by and ran over her. She was buried in the 
Conrad Memorial Cemetery, Kalispell, Montana. 

Her age was 5 years, 4 months and 20 days. 

Laura V. Harvey and Ransom D. Harvey's Adopted Children 



131 



Victor Harvey 

Victor Harvey, was born on the l?th of March, 1893, in Mitchell 
J'outh Dakota. He went through the first World War in Europe. 
He was gased quite badly in the war. He married Ardus Fisher in 
the year of 1931 or 1932. Ardus Fisher was born on the 23rd of 
October, 1906, in Mitchell, South Dakota. 

To their marriage were born three daughters, namely; 1. Gladys Jean, 
2. Julia Mae, and Florence. 

1. Gladys Jean Harvey, was born in 1933. fhe married 
Roger Bird on the I7th of August, 1957. 

2. Julia Mae Harvey, was born in 193^,. She married 
Joseph Utech on the 20th of June, 1952. 

3. Florence Harvey was born in 1939. 

Nina Glady Harvey 

Nina G. Harvey, was born on the 1st of January, 1903. She married 
Rupert Lemicke on the 6th of September, 1922, at her parents' farm 
home in Flathead County, Montana. To them was born one child, 
namely; Betty Ruth Lemicke. 

1. Betty Ruth Lemicke was born on the 2Sth of June, 1923, 
in General Hospital, Shelby, Montana. She married 
William M. Marmonh on the 3rd of October, 194-4. To 
them were born three children, namely; 1. Nancy Ruth, 
2. Wendy Lee, and Mai-sha Ann. 

1. Nancy Ruth Marmont , born on the 20th of January, 1945. 

2. Wendy Lee Marmont, born on the 7th of July, 1949. 

3. Marsha Ann Marmont, born on the 11th of March, 1956. 

Mark Monroe John 

Mark Monroe John, the third child of Lorenzo T. and Lucretia E. John, was born 
on Sunday, the lOth of December, 1865, in a stone house of the neighbors about 
two miles north of his parents farm. Their log house on their farm was not 
finished yet . 

West Fork and Ingham was all one township at that time and was called Ingham 
Township, and this was in Franklin County, Iowa. Whei he ^is a young man, he 
moved with his parents to Pence Grove in Cerro Gordo County, where his father 
was the pastor of a circuit in the United Erethern Church. 

Mark and his two sisters, Laura and Cynthia, went back to the f.arm in Franklin 
County and ran the farm there. Then in I884., he moved with his parents to 
Dakota, where they took up a 320 acre Government Homestead of prairie land. 
He worked on the farm till he was 21. He then went to Idaho and worked in 
the mines one summer coming home in the fall. Next summer he worked on the 
farm until in the fall of 1887, he with two of his sisters, Laura and Edna, 
drove to Iowa in a covered wagon and horses. 

On the 27th of September, 1888, he married Rachel A. Pence at Pence Grove, in 

132 



Cerro Gordo Coimty, Iowa, by Rev. Mitchell pastor of the United Erethern 
Church. They first lived in Mason City. He worked as a builder and on 
the railroad in 1839. They moved to Chicago, Illinois. Mark and his 
brother Ross worked at carpenter work elevating the Chicago Milwaukee and 
?t . Paul Railroad. He worked in this for three years. They moved back to 
Mason City, Iowa, where he built houses to sell. 

In 1903, he took up a Government Homestead .rlaim of I60 acres in Hide Cciinty, 
South Dakota, working at carpenter work while holding down the claim. After 
proving up on this land, they moved back to Mason City, Iowa, then in the 
fall of 1905, they went to Long Beach, California for the winter. Then in 
1910, they moved to Long Beach to make their home there. He worked at 
carpenter work for awhile then went into the apartment house business until 
in 194-0 and 19^1, he sold out and retired. 

He bought an own your own apartment at 360 West Ocean Avenue, Long Peach, 
and this was his home until I960, when God called him home to his Heavenly 
Home. In 1952, he and his wife Rachel, his brother Clark and wife Johnanna, 
and their daughter Elva, were on th-^ir way to Yosemite National Park. This 
was on the 22nd of July. While going down a long grade, the brakes quit 
working. The grade was steep and winding on the mountain side. The car 
turned over on its top and the occupants were injured. Mark had both of his 
hips broken and had to lie on his back in traction for approximately two 
montlis in the Mariposa Hospital. Then he was put into a cast and brought 
home to Long Beach in an ambulance and then stayed in the cast for another 
mont h . 

His wife, Rachel, passed away while in the hospital there in Mariposa, California. 
Myrtle, their daughter, who had come up to help look aftet her parents, stayed 
with her father as he was not able to attend the funeral. Myrtle thought best 
to stay with her father instead of attending the funeral. The fimeral was 
held in Long Beach, California. 

Mark and Rachel had their sixty-fourth vredding anniversary while they both 
were in the hospital, eighteen days before she passed away. He outlived 
her about eight years . 

God called him Home from the Harbor General Hospital near Torrance, California, 
at 2 P.M., on Monday, the 1st of February, I960, He was taken to the hospital 
on Saturday evening and the next Monday he just went to sleep to this world 
without moving. 

His daughter, Myrtle (John) Anderson, his brother Clark, and two doctors were 
at his bed when the end came. He had lived a long and useful life and was 
a true Christian. He had been a member of the First Methodist Church in 
Long Beach, California, for about fifty years. Rev. W. L. Collins of the 
First Methodist Church had the funeral. Rev. Collins had Rachel, his wife, 
funeral too. The funeral' was held at Mottels and Peeks Funeral Parlors. Mrs. 
Caxolyn Niefeldt sang: Beyond the Sunset and In the Garden. Gene Dtiskill at 
the Organ. His grandson, Rev. Dudley B. Anderson, offered prayer. Four of 
his grandsons, Lowell, Lee Bruce, and Mark Anderson and two of his brothers 
Clark son's Percy and Joyce John, were the pallbearers. They were the sazne 
ones at his wife's fu:ieral. He wa:.- bioi'ied in Sunnyside Memorial Park, Long 
Beach, California, beside his wife. His age 94-, 1 month, 20 days. 



133 



Rachel A. (Pence) John, Wife of Mark M. John 

Rachel A, John, wife of Mark M. John, and daughter of John and Louisiana Pence, 

was born on the 16th of April, 186S , at Pence Grove, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa. 

She married Mark M. John on the 27th of September, 1888, at Pence Grove. 

To them were born two children, namely, 1. Harry Dudley John and 2. Myrtle G. 

John. 

Rachel A. (Fence) Jshn, wife of Mark M. John, passed to her Heavenly Home from 
the Fremont Hospital at Mariposa, California, on the 9th of October, 1952. Her 
husband and daughter was there with her when the call came. Her husband was 
still a patient there and their daughter Myrtle, was with thea to give them aid. 
Her funeral was held at Mottell and Peek in Long Beach, California. Rev. W. L. ■ 
Collins had the service and Rolla Alford sang. Rachel John was buried in the 
Sunnyside Memorial Park Cemetery in Long Beach, California. In her early days 
she was a member of the United Brethern Church. After coming to Long Beach 
California, she united with the First Methodist Church of Long Beach. Her age 
83 years , 6 months , and 6 days . 

Mark M.__a nd R achelA. Joh n's Children and Gr a ndchildren 

Harry Dudley John 

1. Harry Dudley John, the first child of Mark M. and Rachel A. 
(Pence) John, was born on the 20th of November, 1890, at 
Pence Grove, Iowa. He died on the 16th of May, 1891. Age 
5 months, 26 days. He was buried at Pence Grove, Iowa. 

Myrtle Grace John 

2. Myrtle G. John, the second child of Mark M. and Rachel A. 
(Pence) John, was born on the 19'th of April, 1893, in Mason 
City, Iowa. She went vdth her parents to Chicago in 1898, 
and to South Dakota in 190f , then to Long Beach, California, 
in ICflO. 

In I'r'l^-, she married Ernest A. Anderson at E^akersfield, California. 
Her husband worked in the oil fields there. Then on a farm at 
Elimont he worked. They had a chicken ranch and then moved to 
Long rieach, California, where her hu.sba'id worked in the ship- 
yards during the war. After the war he want to building houses 
for contract. Finally, he went into the freight trucking business 
from Long Beach to San Francisco, California. 

Ernest A. Anderson, husband of Myrtle G. (John) Anderson, and 

son of August A. and Mame Anderson, was born on the 28th of August, 

189?, in Hall, Washington. He was called to his Heavenly Home on 

the l6th of October, 1936, near Salinas, California, when a car 

ran into his big truck. He and two others were burned to death. 

He was buried in the Westminister Cemetery in the County of Orange, 

California. 



134 



FROM MYRTLE AND ERNEST MDERSON 

EIGHTH GENERATION 

Lowell Arthur Anderson 

1. Lowell A. Anderson, the first child of M;yT.-tle G. (John) 
and Ernest A. Anderson, was born on the 31st of March, 
1916', in Modesta, California 

He grew to manhood in Long Beach, California. He finished 
his schooling in Long Beach, and he helped his father at 
carpenter work and trucking. 

He married Frances Berny in San Diego, California on the 
27th of March, 1936. They built a home at 3211 Baltic 
Avenue, Long Beach, He lived at that place till in 1962, 
they built a home near Willow and Long Beach Boulevard. 
To them were born two children, namely 5 

1. Meridel Frances Anderson, born on the I6th of 
February, 1937, in Long Beach. She mai'ried Gen 
Daniels at her parents home in Long Beach. 

To them were born three children, namely* 
1, Byran, 2. Vicki, and 3. Douglas Daniels 

2, Martin Alan Anderson, born on the 21st of February, 
1941 . 



Lee Clinton Anderson 



Lee C. Anderson, the second of Myrtle G. (John) and Ernest A, 
Anderson, was born on the 23rd of October, 1917, in Long 
Beach, California. 

He grew to manhood in Long Beach, After finishing his educa- 
tion he worked with his father at carpenter work. He was 
a cook on a merchant ship during World War II, He married 
Ruth Oliver at the First Nazarene Church on East 10th Street, 
Long Beach, on the 26th of May, 1939, by Rev, Williajns, the 
pastor. To them were born two children, namely; 

1. Jan_e Anderson 

2. Jerie Ann Anderson 



Dudley E.yron Anderson 



3. Dudley B. Anderson, the third child of Myi'tle G. and Ernest A. 
Anderson,, was born on the 21st of September, 1921, in Long 
Beach, California. He grew to manhood there and finished his 
schooling in Long Beach. Then he studied for the ministry in 
Pasadena, California and received his license to preach the Gospel, 



135 



He married Lois Wilson at 3:30 p. m. in the Nazarene Church, 
10th and Olive on Sunday, the 13th of July, 19AA. 

To them were born two children, namely; 

1. Stephen M. Anderson, born on November 8, 194-7, 

2. Rebecca Anderson, born on September 7, 1953. 



4. Mark M. Anderson, the fourth child of Myrtle G. (John) and 

Ernest Anderson, was born on the I6th of June, 1923, in Long 
Beach, California. He had his schooling in Long Beach. His 
work has been mostly in aircraft. 

He married Frances Cranberry in New Orleans, Louisiana, in 
September, 1945. To them was born one child, namely; 

1. Judith Anderson, born on the 1st of April, 194-7. 



Bruce Alan Anderson 



Bruce Alan Anderson, the fifth child of Myrtle G. (John) 
Anderson, was born on the 9th of March, 1925, in Long Beach, 
California. He grew to manhood in Long Beach and his school- 
ing was in Long Beach, He married Barbara Gates on the 16th 
of September, 19/+8, in Pasadena, California. To them were 
born two children, namely; 

1. Ceroid Anderson 

2. Charil Anderson, born on the 26th of December, 1952. 



FOURTH BRANCH OF SIKTH GENERATION 
FROM LORENZO T. AND LUCRETIA JOHN 

Edna Irene John 

Edna I. John, the fourth child of Lorenzo T. and Lucretia E. Jotin, was born on 
the 19th of October, 1868, in West Fork Township, Franklin County, Iowa. She 
was born on Monday. She moved with her parents from Iowa "uo Dakota Territory 
when she was 16 years old. She lived on the farm most of the time. She worked 
out some in hotels in Armour and other places. 

She was married to Rev. T. H. Hendricks, on the 3rd of September, 1890, by 
Rev. C. A. Clark, at her parents' farmhome ten miles north of Armour, near 
the Choteau Creek, Douglas County, South Dakota. 

To them were born three children, namely; I. Vera E., 2. Erma M. and 3. Paul 
Lyle Hendricks. They are the seventh generation. 



136 



Her husband, Rev. T. H. Hendricks passed away to his reward on the 13th 
of May, 1923, in New Ulm, Minnesota, and was biiried there. He had two 
children from a former marriage, namely; 1. Edna and 2. Grace Hendricks. 

Edna Irene (John) Hendricks, the widow of Rev. T. H. Hendricks, was married 
for the second time to Charles Herbert Reed on the l/^th of Janua.ry 1932, 
by Rev. Books, a pastor there in Yuma, Arizona. 

Charles H. Reed died on the morning of the 21st of February, 19/^0, at the 
Seaside Hospital, Long Beach, California. He was buried in the Sunnyside 
Mausoleum, near Long Beach, California. He was a member of the First 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Edna I. Reed died on the 13th of August, 19-41, at 8:^45 p.m. in the Los 
Alamitos Rest Home a few miles east of Long Beach. Her step-daughter, 
Edna Hendricks and Bertha Milned, took the body back to New ULm, Minnesota, 
for burial where her first husband was buried. The burial took place at 
City Cemetery, New Ulm, Lot 582 out of 9^. The Rev. of the Methodist 
Church officiated at the funeral. 

Her age was 72 years, 9 months and 24. days. She was a Christian about 
all her life. 

Rev. T. H. Hendricks' Children 
by a Former Marriage. 

Edna M. Hendricks 

1. Edna M. Hendricks, the first child of Rev. T. H. Hendricks, was 
born on the 19th of May. 

2. Grace E. Hendricks, second child of Rev. T. H. Hendricks, born on 
the 10th of September. 

She married Arthur Scribner in 1908. To them were born five 
children, namely; 1. Pearl, 2. Alfred, 3. Loris, 4.. Dorothy, 
and 5 . Verna Scribner 

Children and Grandchildren of Edna I. (John) and T. H. Hendricks . 

Vera Elmira Hendricks 

1. Vera E. Hendricks, the first child of Edna I. (John) and T. H. 
Hendricks, was born on the 23rd of April, 1892, in the Methodist 
Episcopal Parsonage in Alpena, South Dakota, where her father was 
the pastor of the church. 

She moved with her parents to Iowa, where her father had several 
chiorch appointments as pastor. They later went back to South 
Dakota and in 1908, they all moved to Kalispell, Flathead Valley, 
Montana. 

Her folks raised a large garden and he had several preaching 
appointments near Kalispell. 

It was in Kalispell where Vera met her husband to be, H. Lloyd 
Jordan, the son of Mr. and Mjps. G. A. Jordan. They were married on 

137 



the 11th of August, 1911, by Rev. F. A. Armstrong, the pastor 
of the First Methodist Episcopal Church. The wedding took 
place at her parents' home in Orchard Park Addition, Kalispell. 

To Vera E. (Hendricks) and Lloyd H. Jordan were born two 
children, namely, 1. Frances and 2. John H. Jordan. 

Harvey Lloyd Jordan 

H. Lloyd Jordan, the husband of Vera E. (Hendricks) Jordan, was 
born on the 10th of February, 1890, on his parents' farm east of 
Armour, South Dakota. They moved to Kalispell, Montana. 

He was employed in an ice-cream factory parlor. After this employ- 
ment he started to clerk in the J. C. Penny Store in Kalispell. 
After working there awhile, he was assistant manager under Mr. 
Edwards in a new store at Hibbing, Minnesota. Later he opened a 
J. C. Penny Store at New Ulm, Minnesota. He was with the J.C. 
Penny Company for 34- years; 26 of which he was a manager. 

Harvey Lloyd Jordan was called to his Heavenly Home from Santa Rosa, 
California, on the 10th of November, 19^8. He was interred in the 
cemetery at New Ulm, Minnesota, where his daughter Frances was 
buried. She had preceeded her father in death by nineteen years. 
His age was 58 years and 9 months. 

Vera E. and H. Lloyd Jordan's Children and Grandchildren 

Frances L. Jordan 

1. Frances L. Jordan, the first child of Vera E. (Hendricks) 
and H. Lloyd Jordan, was born on the 28th of September, 1913, 
in Kalispell, Monatana. She was called Home from New Ulm, 
Minnesota on the 6th of March, 1929, and was buried in the 
cemetery at New Ulm. Her age 15 years, 6 months, and 8 days. 

John H. Jordan 

2. John H. Jordan, the second child of Vera E. (Hendricks) and 
H. Lloyd Jordan, was born on the 10th of December, 1929, 

in Hibbing, Minnesota. 

After he had finished his public schooling, he took courses 
through several colleges and medical school. After 
graduation he took his internship in one of the hospitals 
in San Francisco, California. He started his practice 
in Santa Rosa, California, where he is one of the leading 
doctors . 

He married Katherine Shults of Pl;yTnouth, Michigan, on the 
11th of August, 19itl, by Dr. Fredrick A. Landrum. Their 
wedding was on the 29th, the anniversary of the groom's 
parents. 

To Dr. John H. and Katherine (Shults) Jordan were born 
four children, namely, 



138 



1. Beatrice Ann Jordan, born on the I4,th of August, 19^.4., 
In San Francisco, California. 

2. James L. Jordan, born on the 18th of May, 19^8, in 
San Francisco, California 

3. Vera H. Jordan, born on the 17th of February, 1950, 
in Sf^inta Rosa, California 

4. Robert L. Jordan, born on the 3rd of January, 1952, 
in Santa Rosa, California. 



Erma May Hendricks 



2. Erma May Hendricks, the second child of Edna I. (John) and 
Rev. T. H. Hendricks, was born on the 31st of July, 1895, at 
the Methodist Episcopal Church Parsonage in Basset Iov;a, 
where her father was the pastor. 

She died on the 5th of September, 1896, at Parrls, Iowa, while 
her father was the pastor there. She was burled in Mason City, 
Iowa. Her age 1 year, 1 month and l^. days. 

A Poem by Her Father Rev. T. H. Hendricks 

Erma thou was bright and fair 
In thy transient stay below. 
Bright blue eyes and golden hair 
Filled our home with sweetest glow. 

In thy home beyond the blue. 
With the bright, angelic host. 
Thou art waiting sweet and true. 
For the friends who loved thee most. 

Sad the parting yesterday. 

Tears flowed fast and hearts were torn. 

But on the bright, golden day, 

God will give a glorious morn. 

Now we're waiting, Erma, dear 

For the time that soon will come. 

With the summons to appear 

"Mid the blest in Father's Home. 

Heavenly ties are growing strong, 
For the years will soon be past. 
And the time will not be long, 
Darling, we shall meet at last. 

Meet where parting shall be o're. 
In the Mansions of the King. 
Weeping past forever more. 
But with angels then to sing. 



139 



Paul Lyle Hendricks 

3. Paiol Lyle Hendricks, the third child of Edna I. (John) and Rev. 
T. H. Hendricks, was born on the 26th of March, 1895, at Parris, 
Iowa, where his father was the Methodist Episcopal pastor. 

He moved with his parents to South Dakota, then from there to 
Kalispell, Montana. After several years they moved to Hibbing, 
Minnesota, where he had charge of the electric work in the 
iron mines. This position he had for a great many years. 

He married and had one child, namely; 1. Terry John Hendricks, 
who was born on the 20th of May, 1936, in Hibbing, Minnesota. 

FIFTH BRANCH OF SIXTH GENERATION 
FROM LORENZO T. AND LUCRETIA E. JOHN 

Carrie Lorena John 

Carrie L. John, the fifth child of Lorenzo T. and Lucretia E. John, was born on 
the 22nd of February, 1871, on her parents' farm in West Fork To-wnship, 
Franklin County, Iowa. She was born on Wednesday. 

She took sick and after everything was done that could be done, God called her 
to her Heavenly Home, on the 27th of April, 1883, from the United Brethern 
Parsonage at Pence Grove, Cerro Gordo County, Iowa. She was buried in the 
West Fork Cemetery, Lot 96, South Block 8x16 — 191 West, Franklin County, Iowa. 

SIXTH BRANCH OF SH-TH GENERATION 
FROM LORENZO T. AND LUCRETIA E. JOHN 

Bert W. John 

Bert W. John, the sixth child of Lorenzo T. and Lucretia E. John, was born 
on the 9th of February, 1874-. He was born on Wednesday. He was born in West 
Fork Township, Franklin County, Iowa. 

When he was ten years old, his parents moved from Iowa to Dakota, where they 
took up a homestead of 320 acres of prairie land in Garfield Township, Douglas 
County, one mile south of Choteau Creek. He went to the school that was on 
his parents' farm, and it was one of the teachers that taught there who became 
his wife. He grew to manhood on this farm. 

After he became twenty-one in the fall of 1895, he with a friend (Frank Scribner) 
and his sister's son Charley B. Scott, drove back to Iowa with a two horse 
covered wagon. He spent the summer working around Mason City. The next fall 
he went to Battle Creek in the southern paxt of Iowa. Here he met his former 
school teacher, Fannie E. Jordan, and they were married on the 3rd of December, 
1896, by Rev. Hoan. 

They then went back to South Dakota and he leased his parents' farm in Douglas 
County, which he farmed several years. He took up a Government Homestead of 
160 acres in Hide County. After proving up on this land they moved to Aurora 
County and rented a nice farm there from John Brown. In 1908, or 1909, they 
moved to Flathead County, Montana, where he bought a farm of 160 acres on the 
east side of the valley. He made this his home and in Columbia Falls until in 1923. 

1/^0 



In 1923, Bert John and family left Montana and stopped to visit relatives in 
Eugene, Oregon. About two weeks later, Clark John and family left Montana 
and stopped in Eugene, Oregon, where Bert John and his family took their car 
and drove to California with Clark's family, Bert John and family decided to 
return to Eugene, Oregon, within a few years and settled on a farm near Eugene, 
Oregon, where he spent the rest of his life. 

To them were born four children, namely; 1. Oscar C. John, 2. Roy M. John, 
3. and ^. (Twins) Floyd M. and Cora John. 

Fannie E. (Jordan) John, the wife of Bert W. John, and daughter of Gilbert and 
Mrs. Jordan, was called to her final resting place at 10:15 p.m. on the 19th 
of March, 19/+2, from their home in Creswell, Oregon. She was buried in the 
Rest Heaven Memorial Park Cemetery at Eugene, Oregon. 

Bert W. John, was called to his eternal reward from the hospital in Eugene, 
Oregon, on Monday, the 2Sth of November, I960, At his bedside was his daughter, 
Cora L. (John) Mourer. The funeral was held at Schwering and England Chapel 
at Creswell, Oregon. Internment was in the Rest Heaven Memorial Park in Eugene, 
Oregon, by the side of his wife Fannie (Jordan) Johji who preceeded him in 
death by about 19 years. 

All of his family were still living and were at the funeral. He had five 
grandchildren. He was 86 years, 9 months and 19 days. 

Seventh Generation from Bert W. and Fannie E. John 

Oscar Clyde John 

1. Oscar C. John, the first child of Bert W. and Fannie E. (Jordan) 
was born on the lOth of October, 1897, on his grandfather's 
farm in Garfield Township, Douglas County, South Dakota. 

When he was a boy he moved with his parents to Flathead County, 
Montana. In later years he moved with his parents from Montana 
to near Eugene, Oregon. 

On the 22nd of June, 1940, he married Hazel Johnson at Fall 
Creek, Oregon. Hazel (Johnson) John, the wife of Oscar C. John, 
was called Home on the &th of June, at 8 p.m., 1958, from a 
hospital in Portland, Oregon. 

Roy Melvin John 

2. Roy M. John, the second child of Bert W. and Fannie E. (Jordan) 
John, was born on the 31st of October, 1900, on his grandparents' 
farm in Garfield Township, Douglas County, South Dakota. 

He moved with his parents from South Dakota in 1908 or 1909, to 

the Valley of Flathead, in Montana. After a few years they 

moved to Long Beach, California, in Los Angeles County, California, 

Then in 1925, he moved with his parents to Oregon near Eugene. 

He finished his schooling and then went to teaching school. He has 

followed the teaching profession for a great many years. 



141 



He married Mildred Morrdngstar on the 2Sth of December, 1927. 
Her home was neaa' the little village of Gosherij Oregon. 

Floyd Wesley John 

3. Floyd W. John, the tMrd child of Bert W. and Fannie E. (Jordan) 
John, was born on the 7th of April, 1905, on his grandfathers' 
fai-m in Garfield Township, Douglas , County, South Dakota. (He 
was a twin). 

He moved with his parents from South Dakota to Flathead County, 
Montana, in 1909. Then in the year 1923, he went with his 
family to Eugene, Oregon and then to Long Beach, California. 
They returned to Eugene, Oregon within a couple of years. 

He married Edna Snyder, on the 29th of July, 1933, in Salem, 
Oregon. 

To them were born four children, namely; 

1. Leon L. John, born on the 5th of May, 1937, in Eugene, 
Oregon, She married Patrick Moran on the Sth of 
March, 1958, in Springfield, Oregon. To them were 
born two children, namely^ 

1. Patrick John Moran, born in Oregon. 

2. Paula Lucille Moran, born in Oregon. 

2. Leland Louis John, was born on the 21st of April, 1939, 
in Camas, Washington. He married Judith Phillipson, 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Phillipson, on 

the 18th of August, 1936, in Portland, Oregon. 

3. Lila Louise John, was born on the 12th of October, I9/4I, 
in Eugene, Oregon. 

li,, Lyle Lloyd John, was born on the 31st of January, 194-5, 
in Eugene, Oregon. 

Cora Lucretia John 

4.. Cora L. John, the fourth child of Bert W. and Fannie E. (Jordan) 
John, was born on the 7th of April, 1905, on her grandparents' 
fai^m in Garfield Township, Douglas County, South Dakota. (She 
was a twin). She moved with her pai^ents from South Dakota to 
Flathead County, Montana in 1909, then in 1923, they moved by 
automobile via Eugene, Oregon, to Long Beach, California. They 
came with Clark E. John and his family and they camped out and 
did not drive very far each day and were on the road quite a 
while. They had a wonderful time on this trip. 

Later on she went wj.th her parent back to Oregon, After finishing 
her schooling she taught school for several years. 

She married Floyd Mourer on the 17th of September, 1933, in Eugene, 
She was married by Rev. Francis L. Cook. 

To them was born one child. Namely; Myron Wilber Mourer, who 
was born on the 13th of July, 194.5. 



142 



SEVENTH BRANCH OF SIXTH GENERATION 
FROM LORENZO T. AND LUCRETIA E. JOHN 

Milton Ross John 

Milton Ross John, the seventh child of Li.renzo T. and Lucretia E. John, was torn 
on the 25th of April, 1877, in West Fork Township, Franklin Goimty, Iowa. He 
moved with his parents from Iowa to Dakota Territory in I884, he was but seven 
years old when they took up a U.S. Government homestead of 320 acres of prairie 
land. 

He worked for his folks till he was twenty-one and then went to CMcago, Illinois, 
where his brother Mark was working on the railroad for sometime. 

He married Edith L. LaVanway daughter of Frank and Sarah Jane LaVanway, on the 
2nd of December, 1902, on West Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois. He was married 
by Rev. Christopher, the pastor of the Baptist Church. 

Edith L. (LaVanway) John, was born on the 19th of January, 1877, in Cerro Gordo 
County, Iowa, fifteen miles from Mason City, Iowa. 

After their marriage they moved back to South Dakota and farmed his father's farm 
for a year and then moved to Vona, Colorado, and took up a homestead near there 
in 190^ or 1905. 

Then in 1909, they moved to Flathead Valley, M ntana, where he rented a farm of 
Conrads and then bought a farm three miles west of Kallspell, where he did 
farming and dairying till he retired in 194-6. He took a trip to California 
and through the west one summer. Then he worked in Glacier Park summers until 
he was taken ill in the fall of 194.9, in the Park. 

His daughter, Verna and husband Mark Jerrow, went to the Park and took him to 
Kalispell where God called him to his Heavenly Home on the 1st of September, 
194.9, at the age of 72 years, 4. months and 5 days. 

He had prepared on eai'-th for "The Home Over There". He had been a member of the 
Methodist Church for 39 yeai's. 

The funeral was held at Wagners and Campbell Undertakers in Kalispell, Montana. 
He was buried in the Conrad Memorial Park Cemetery. The Rev. M. E. Van de Mark 
of the Methodist Church had the service. Mr. Don Sheppard sand and Mrs. J.M. 
Carlson was at the organ. 

Pallbearers were: Clinton Huston, Glenn Putman, Oscar Gustafson, J.C. Shew, 
T. S. Perry and J. R. Cochran. 

His wife, Edith, and family were with him when the call came and they were all 
at the funeral. 

To Milton Ross and Edith E. (LaVanway) John, were born thi^ee children, namely; 
1. Jesse Ross John, 2. Leo Dale John, and 3. Verna Ruth John. 

Children and Grandchildren of Milton R. John and Edith E. (LaVanway) John 

Jesse Ross John 
1. Jesse R. John, the first child of Milton R. and Edith E. (LaVanway) 



1^3 



John, was born on the 2nd of June, 1906, on his grandparents' 
fai-m in Garfield Township, Douglas County, South Dakota, near 
the town of Corsica. 

He moved with his parents to Colorado, where his folks took up 

a homestead on the prairie. Then in 1909, they moved to Kalispell, 

Montana, where he finished his schooling and grew to manhood. 

He married Effe Whitehead on the 21st of February, 1927, at Shelby, 
Montana. To them was born one child, namely; 1. Eloise Helen John, 
on the l6th of October, 1929, at Kalispell. When she was grown 
to womanhood she married Charles Allers and to them were born 
seven children, namely; 1. Hargory, 2. Theadore, 3. Patricia, 
^„ Theresa J 5. Kathlyn, 6. Shannee and 7. Charles John Allers. 

Jesse R. John was married the second time to Mildred Bossom on the 

24.th of December, 193^, at White Salmon, Washington. To them 

were born six children, namely; 1. Linda John born Januai^y 30, 1934.; 

2. Ross Ambros, born December 11, 1936; 3. Austin Leo, born 

May 22, 19Z^0; l^. Edith Pearl, born November 27, 19/^2; 5. Jean Marie, 

born February 11, 19$1, and 6. Donna Lee John, born January 6, 1956. 

Linda John married Gerald P. Linch on the 26th of June, 1953. To 
them were born three children, namely; 

1. Blenda, 2. Gloria and 3. Patricia. 

Ross Ambros was born in White Salmon, Washington. He married Tavis 
Wood. To them a daughter was born, Michalle. 

Austin Leo was born in Sacramento, California. He married Barbara 
Jean Foushay. To them was born one daughter, Denise Rene on the 
April, 27, 1959. 

Edith Pearl was born at Oroville , California 

Donna Lee John was born in Concord, California. 

Leo Dale John 

2. Leo Dale John, the second child of Milton R and Edith E. (LaVanway) 
John, was born on the 25th of June, 1911, in Kalispell, Montana. 

He had his schooling in Kalispell. 

He married Elida Mero on the 21st of January, 1933, at 1833 Copper 
Stre-jt , Kalispell . 

He married the second time to Alice Hankins in Portland, Oregon, on 
the fifth of November, 1945. 

Verna R. John 

3. Verna R. John, the third child of Milton Ross and Edith E. John, 
was born on the 17th of October, I9I4., in Kalispell, Montana. 

She had her schooling and grew up to womanhood in and near Kalispell, 
Montana. 



lU 



1 



She was man-ied to Mark Jerrow on the 15th of November, 193^, at 
Poison, Montana, at the south end of Flathead Lake. Their home 
was at 168 Second Avenue, West North Kalispell, in 1958. 

To them were born three children namely: 

1. Shirley Louise Jerrow, born on the ICth of October, 1935, 
in Kalispell, Montana. She married Allen Graham on the 
6th of June, 1954.. They had these children, namely; 

1. Russell Graham, born on the I6th of May. 1955, 
in Kalispell, Montana. 

2. Leach Lin Graham, born on the 18th of April. 
1957, in Kalispell. 

2. Lawrence John Jerrow, the second child of Verna R. and 
Mark Jerrow, was born on the 7th of October, 1937. in 
Kalispell, Montana. 

3. Alan Russell Jerrow, the third child of Verna R. and 
Mark Jerrow, was born on the 17th of May, VikU. in 
Kalispell, Montana. 

He was never real well and on the 7th of February, 
1958, God called him Home. He was buried in the 
Conrad Memorial Cemetery, near his grandfather, Milton 
R. John. His age 13 years, 8 months, and 30 days. 

In 1963, Edith E. (LaVanway) John's address was 168 Second Avenue, West North 
Kalispell, Montana. She made her home with her daughter and son-in-law, 
Verna and Mark Jerrow. 



145 



CLARK E. JOHN 
EIGHTH OF FIXTH GENERATION 
FROM 
LORENZO T. AND LUCRETIA E. JOHN 
AND 
THEIR DESCENDANTS 




1^6 



EIGHTH BRANCH OF SHTH GENERATION 
From Lorenzo T. and Lucretla E. John 

Clark E. John, the eighth and youngest child of Lorenzo T. and Lucretla E. 
John, was born on Sunday the 7th of March, 1880, in his parents' log house, 
in Franklin County, West Fork Township, Iowa. This farm was east of the 
West Fork River and about nine miles east and south of Sheffield. (The 
writer was at this farm in 19f'9. This was his birthplace.) The buildings 
were all gone. 

His father was a minister of the Gospel and a farmer. He preached in the 
United Bret hern Church and had several appointments in Iowa. He moved 
with his parents to Pence Grove and Vinton, Iowa. 

In 1885, his parents sold their farm and moved to Dakota Territory. This 
was before it became the state of South Dakota. They moved by train and 
shipped their things by freight. Clark was less than five years old at 
that time. His oldest sister, Cynthia and family, had already moved out 
there and taken up a Homestead farm of 160 acres. 

His parents took a United States Government Homestead of 160 acres and then 
bought 160 acre farm adjoining it. This was in Garfield Township, Douglas 
County, one mile south of Choteau Creek. The nearest railroad was Mt . Vernon, 
twenty miles north. This was a long way with horses and wagon over rough 
stoney roads. There was a small village five miles from the farm called 
Grand View where they did their trading and got their mail. 

There, through the cold blizzard winters, and the hot dry summers, he grew 
to manhood. His early years in the summer were spent on the prairie herding 
his parents' cattle. This was a lonesome job. At times some other boys 
would bring their cattle and put them together, then separate them when it 
was time to go home. His sister's son Charley Scott was with him part of the 
time. His father would have the cattle put in a fenced pasture on Sundays, 
so they could all go to church and when he got home he would drive the cattle 
to the creek for water. 

The writer was back to South Dakota and the old farm in 1959, and what a change 
had taken place. A big house and barn and other buildings took the place of 
the old ones. The trees had grown large and more of them, but the deep drilled 
well is still pumping the nice soft water that it did fifty years ago. 

In 1897, Clark moved with his parents from the farm in Douglas County to 
Mitchell, Davison County, about thirty miles north-east of the farm, where 
he finished his schooling. He then worked at different lines, carpentering, 
in flour mills, North Western railroad carpenter on depots and baggage man 
for C. M. and St. Paul railroad, and carrying the United States Mail to the 
depots . 

Clark was converted in the Salvation Army on the 2&th of December, 1897, and in 
the following spring on the 13th of March, 1898, was taken into the Army as a 
member and always remained a member . 

He married Captain Johanna Olsen, an officer in the Salvation Army, on the 15th 

of March, 1905, in the M. E. Chiirch parsonage at Springfield, South Dakota. 

His brother-in-law. Rev. T. H. Hendricks, was the pastor officiating at the wedding 



They lived in part of his parents home till he built a home on East 7th Street. 
In 1908, his brother-in-law and family, and his family moved to Kalispell, 
Montana, Flathead Valley, and they shipped a freight car of goods on the 
Great Northern Railroad, They went to Montana on the train. 

He bought a two acre piece of ground in Orchard Park, an addition to Kalispell. 
On this acreage they had fruit and a garden. The buildings on it were a good 
house and barn. Clark built a nice chicken house and raised chickens and he 
worked at carpenter work part time. They also raised rabbits to sell. 

A few years later they bought eighty acres of cut over timber land that had 

a two bedroom log house, log barn and good well and windmill on it. This 

was about eight miles north and east of town. "This is where their daughters. 

Opal and Elva were born". A small portion was cleared and he dynamited stumps 

and cleared some more land so he could raise more feed and have a larger garden. • 

He hired wood cutters to cut cord wood. He would haul the wood to Kalispell 

and sell it on the street. 

They sold this eighty acre timber land and rented several farms in the Valley, 
trying out farming. They had two houses in town at this time. There were two 
others in town that were already sold. In the fall of 1922, they had a public 
auction sale, selling their personal property, their stock, chickens, farm 
machinery and part of their household things. Clark moved his family into one 
of their houses in town and he by himself, went by train to Long Beach, California 
to see how he would like it there. His brother Mark and sister Edna and their 
families were already living there. 

When he left Montana everything was covered with snow and ice. When he landed 
in Long Beach, California, on a summer like day, he went with his sister to the 
street market and saw all kinds of fruit and vegetables out in the open to be 
sold. He fell in love with Long Beach. He worked at carpenter work through 
the winter, then on the first of May he started back to Montana on the train. 
They sold their houses and the rest of their personal things, then they made 
ready for their long trip. The last night they stayed at his brothers home, 
Ross John. Next morning bidding them goodbye, they started for Long Beach, 
California, in two model T Fords, not knowing if they would ever get to see 
each other again. Their son Morris drove one car and he the other. They 
went by the way of Oregon, where his brother Bert and family had already gone. 
From there they drove their car with Clarks to California. They stopped 
nights camping out in tents along the way, arriving near Long Beach the last 
days of July, 1^23. 

Clark had already rented some acreage north of Long Beach, which had some rather 
old buildings on it, and a good well with a power pump, so they could irrigate 
and raise a nice garden. They had chickens and rabbits. He worked at carpenter 
work. The following year they moved into Long Beach, California, renting 
a home on West Fourteenth Street. 

Later they bought a seven room home on West 19th Street, where they lived over 
thirty years. This was at 4.36 W. 19th Street. They lived here until his 
wife, Johanna, passed away in 1955. 

He bought an auto parking ground at 53 Cedar Avenue, Long Beach, California. 
He and his children operated tliis parking ground for about fourteen years. It 
was named Lincoln Auto Park. He worked at carpenter work at times. After 
selling the parking ground, he took the examination for custodian with the 
Board of Education of Long Beach, working at the Board Building and several 

1^8 



schools, the last school being John Dewey on American Avenue. 

To Clark E. and Johanna (Olsen) John, was born five childrex^ namely; 
1. Morris V., 2. Percy L., 3. Joyce J., /^. Opal M., and Elva L. John. 

(Their records are on pages 1^1^ Ijl^, 155, 158 and 159.) 

A PRAYER 

Take my hand and lead me gently, 
Lest my faltering footsteps stray, 
I am prone to ever wander, 
From Thy pathway far away. 

Please, dear Father, stay beside me, 
Let me feel that Thou art here. 
And the world will not be dreary, 
When I know that Thou art near. 

JOHANNA ^CLSEN) JOHN 

Johanna (Olsen) John, the wife of Clark E. John, and the daughter of Amund and 
Sere Olsen, was born on Saturday the 2nd of October, 1875, near the town of 
Trondheim, Norway. 

When she was but a girl of sixteen, she left Norway and came to North America 
with some friends of the family by the name of Helmer Christopherson, who 
lived near Hanson, South Dakota. (North of Yankton). 

She made her home with them when she was not otherwise engaged. 'While she 
was working in a hotel in Yankton, South Dakota, she came in contact with the 
Salvation Army. She attended their meetings and was converted and joined 
them. Later she applied and was accepted for Officers School in Chicago, 
Illinois. After going through the Officers College in the fall of 1899, she, 
as Lieutenant and Captain, assisted and had charge of several corps, until 
she was sent to Mitchell, South Dakota, where she meet and got acquainted with 
her future husband, Clark E. John, the Sargent Major of the Salvation Army 
Corps there. 

Her father passed away in Norway before she left Norway. Her mother and 
brother George and sister Sebena Olsen, came to North America at a later date, 
and lived at the Christopherson' s home. 

Johanna was married to Clark E. John, the son of Lorenzo T. and Lucretia E. John, 
in the Methodist Episcopal Church Parsonage by his brother-in-law. Rev. T. H. 
Hendricks, the pastor there in Springfield, South Dakota. This took place on 
the 15th of March, 1905, The snow was melting so the train was very late 
that Clark was on, so the wedding was delayed until late in the evening.^ 
Mrs. Hendricks, the pastor ' s wife and sister of the groom, had a fine wedding 
dinner ready for them. 

They lived for a while in part of the groom parents' home on 7th and Rowley 
Street, in Mitchell, South Dakota. Later her husband built a new home on 
7th Street and they lived there till in the fall of 1908. She, her husband 
and family moved to Kalispell, Montana. She had two children in Mitchell, 
Morris and Percy and three children in Montana, Joyce, Opal and Elva John. 

1^9 



he 



She was called from this life at 12:10 P.M. on the 2nd of August, in 1955, 
from her home at Z^36 West 19th Street, Long Beach, California, where she 
had lived for the past thirty years, to her Heavenly Home, that she had 
been preparing since she was converted in her teens. 

She had a strenuous life while here in her eai-thly home, but in her Home 
over there, she will have no more sickness, suffering, sorrow or death, and 
she will be able to enjoy the reward that she so faithfully earned while 
here on this earth. 

She lived a true Christian life, and all her children are following in her 
path, and that is what she so prayerfully lived for. 

Her health had not been very good for several years; she had pain and suffer- 
ing a lot. There were nights when she would be in great pain. Her husband 
wo-uld get up to try to help relieve the pain but she would tell him to go 
back to bed and rest and that she would be all right. But of course he would 
stay up with her until the pain eased up or passed away. She was always think- 
ing of others and forgetting herself. 

A few evenings before she received her call, and just before she went to bed, s 
said, "that she wished it was all over and that she was ready and waiting". 

She and her husband, were given a nice celebration by their children and grand- 
children and friends on their Golden Wedding Day, the 15th of March, 1955, at 
the North Long Beach Y.M. C.A., with a nice program of music, speaking, and 
"This is Your Life". There were wonderful refreshments served. 

The Sunday before the celebration, their children gave them a nice dinner and 
presents. This was held at the Hody's Restaurant in Lakewood, California. 

Her Last Sickness and Death 

The last few weeks her daughter's husband Charlie, would bring his wife Opal 
and children to stay with their mother and grandmother. He would bring them 
on his way to work and stop for them on his way home in the evenings, so that 
her mother would not be alone in the daytime. On the day of her passing. Opal 
and her children were with her when she was lying on the bed resting when she 
sat up on the side of the bed. Opal asked her how she felt and she answered 
that not so bad, then she asked her if she would like to have her hair combed. 
She said that would be nice and ^^dthout warning she fell over backwards on the 
bed and was gone. Opal tried to get the doctor, ambulance and her father, who 
was at work, and the phone was busy so she told them it was an emergency, but 
they would not get off the line. They were frantic and the children ran to the 
neighbors to phone. It was so nice that Opal and the children were there with 
her when the call came. They will receive their reward for that kindness. 

She was 79 years and 8 months to the day. The funeral was at Mottell's Funeral 
Parlors, Third and Alamitos, Long Beach, California, at 2 P.M. the 6th day 
of August, 1955. Major Howard E. Sloan, the officer of the Salvation Army, 
Long Beach Corps, had the service and Brigadier William Parkins assisting. 
Mrs. Major Howard Sloan and Lieutenant Mary Gunther sang; Good morning Up There, 
and Under His Wing. Gen Driskill at the organ. 

There was lai^ge display of flowers and a long line of cars went to the cemetery. 
She was buried in the Sunnyside Memorial Park Cemetery, Lot J _ab in Block 160, 

150 



Section Erick, Long Beach, California. The pallbearers were: Roger Green, 
Brack Shinn, Harry Leighton, Edgar King, Marion S-^ank, and C. R. Ke-^man, Senior. 
All her family were at the funeral, and each one helped in making the funeral 
arrangements and what a comfort it was to their father in a time when things 
looked so dark. The Lord will bless them for their part in those trying hours. 

The lines were taken from a ribbon book marker that she had printed to give to 
her soldiers when she was stationed in Iowa. 

SAFE IN JESUS 



The Lord bless thee, and keep thee, 

The Lord make His face to shine 
Upon thee, and be gracious unto thee. 

The Lord lift up His Countenance 
Upon thee, and give thee peace. 

Numbers 6: 24,-25-26 

Safe in the arms of Jesus, 

Safe from the world's temptations, 
Sin cannot harm you there, 

Safe from corroding care. 

Ever Yours, Captain Johanna Glsen 

FIRST BRANCH OF 
SEVENTH GENERATION 

FROM CLARK E. AND JOHANNA (OLSEN) JOHN 

Morris Valentine John, the first child of Clark E. and Johanna (Olsen) John, 
was born on the l^th of February, 1906, in his grandparents' home, seventh 
and Rowley Streets, Mitchell, South Dakota. He was born on Wednesday evening. 

At the age of two his parents moved from Mitchell, to Kalispell, Montana, in 
Flathead Valley of the Rocky Mountains, over the Great Northern Railroad. 

His parents had bought a two acre home in Orchard Park addition to the town of 
Kalispell, where they made their home at first. They later bought eighty 
acres of timber land about eight miles north and east of Kalispell that had 
a two bedroom log house on it. This log house is where his two sisters were 
born. Opal and Elva. 

His first schooling was at the new school across the road from his log home. 
This made it handy for him. This schoolhouse his father built. The school 
was first held in the woodshed until the school building was finished. His 
parents with some others, organized this school district and named the district 
and school. Birch Grove. 

Later his parents sold the eighty acre farm, and rented some farms in Flathead 
Valley, so he went to different schools. Part of the time he drove a pony 
and a buggy in the summer time and a sleigh in the winter. His last school 
in Montana was the high school in Kalispell. 

151 



When he was seventeen his parents moved from Montana by automobile to Long 
Beach, California. They had two Ford cars and he drove one and his father 
the other. They rented some acreage near Clearwater, north of Long Beach and 
he helped raise chickens and a garden. He and his brothers raised rabbits 
to sell. 

He went to Compton High School on the school bus. He graduated from that 
school on the 12th of June, 192/^, and the graduation was held in the American 
Legion Pavilion in Compton. 

He then took a course of study from the International Correspondence School 
in Pennsylvania. He worked at different lines of work and then helped his 
father handling cars in his auto park nights and at times when he was out of 
work. On the 20th of July, 1927, he went to Los Angeles and applied for a 
job and got one with the Telephone Company and he iTOuld come and go to work 
on the Pacific Electric train. In July, 1962, he had worked for them thirty- 
five years. 

He was married to Margaret Erla Imbrie, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John A. 
Imbrie, on the 2fth of November, 193/i, at the Calvery Presbyterian Church, in 
Wilimington, California, by Rev. H. E. Tweedle, the pastor. 

They took their honeymoon on a boat trip from Los Angeles Harbor to San Francisco, 
with their car on the boat with them. Then drove to Vancouver, Canada; returning 
home to Long Beach over land. They made their temporary home at 1/^9 Locust 
Avenue, moving from there to a rented apartment in Alhambra, California. This 
was much nearer his work. Later they built a home and in 1938, they moved 
into it. Their home is on a hill so they have a wonderful view over the valley 
around them. Their home is at 3004, Park View Drive, Alhambra, California. 

To Morris V. and Margaret Erla (Imbrie) John, was born one child, namely; 
Cheryl John. 

MORRIS V. JOHN'S WIFE AND FAMILY 

Margaret Erla (Imbrie) John 

Margaret Erla (Imbrie) John, the i^rife of Morris V. John, and the daughter of 
John Alfred and Jessie May Imbrie, was born on Thiirsday, the 5th of October, 
1905, at Harrisville, Pennsylvania. (A twin). 

Her father, John A. Imbrie, was born on the 7th of March. 1883, and was called 
Home on the 28th of January, 1961. 

Her mother, Jessie May Imbrie, was born on the 27th of October, 1883, and was 
callec Home on the 10th of March, 1935. 

To John A and Jessie M. Imbrie were born six children, namely; 

1. Ida May Imbrie, was born on the 3rd of September, 1903. She was 
called Home in April, 1926. 

2. Mary Edna Imbrie, was born on the 23rd of October, 190/^. She married 
George F. Reynolds. They had four girls, namely; 1. Marilyn Erla 
(Reynolds) Lappe , 2. Helen Imbrie (Reynolds) Billings, Donna (Reynolds) 
Parker and Ann (Reynolds) Young. 

152 



3. Margaret Erla(Imbrie) John , was born on the 5th of October, 
1905. (Twin) She married Morris V. John, the first child of 
Clark E. and Johanna (Olson) John. 

^. Twila Bell Imbrle, was born on the 5th of October, 1905. (Twin) 
Deceased on the 27th of October, 1910. 

5. Ernest DeWltt Imbrle, was born on the 6th of August, 1911. He 
married Sara Elizabeth Martin. To them were born two children, 
namely; 1. Gwendolyn Marie 1' Imbrie ) Per chard and 2. Sally Dee 
Imbrie . 

6. Elizabeth Louise (Imbrie-Towne ) Callaghan, was born on the 27th 
of February, 1920. She had two children, namely, Margaret Louise 
who died in infancy, and Virginia Towne, born July 21, 1939. 



Cheryl John 

Cheryl John, the daughter of Morris V. John and Margaret Erla fimbria) John, 
was born on Siuiday morning, the 23rd of October, 1938, in the Garfield Hospital 
on Garfield Avenue, Monterey Park, Los Angeles County, California. 

Her first schooling was in the elementary school of Alhambra and the Alhambra 
High School. Her college education was at the Colorado College, Colorado 
Springs, Colorado, and the University of Southern California, from which she 
received her Bachelor of Science Degree on the 20th of January, I960. 

After finishing her education at the University of Southern California, she 
began her career as a teacher in the Sierra Park School in Los Angeles, 
California. 

She married Gilbert James Sales on Wednesday evening on the 22nd of June, 
I960, at the Oneonta Congregational Church, 1515 Garfield Avenue, South 
Pasadena, California. The pastor was Dr. Copenhaver. 

To Cheryl (John) Sales and Gilbert James Sales, was born a son Mai'cel J. Sales, 
on Saturday, March 13, 1965, in Pensecola, Florida. 

Gilbert James Sales 

Gilbert James Sales, the husband of Cheryl (John) Sales, and the son of 
Mr. and Mirs. Como Ssles, Junior, was born on the 23rd of June, 1935, in 
Santa Fe , New Mexico. His first education was in the elementary schools 
of Denver, Colorado and the high schools of Los Angeles. He received his 
Bachelor of Arts Degree from the University of Southern California in Los 
Angeles on the 11th of June, 1959. He received his Doctor of Medicine Degree 
from the California College of Medicine in Los Angeles, on the 13th of June, 
1963. Interned at the Los Angeles County Hospital, 1963-196^. He attended 
Navy Flight Surgeons school January 1965 to June 1965 and was assigned to 
overseas duty. 



153 



SECOND BRANCH OF 

SEVENTH GENERATION 

FROM CLARK E. AND JOHANNA JOHN 

Percy Lorenzo John , the second child from Clark E. and Johanna (Olsen) John, 
was born on the l'?th of Jime, 1908, in his parents home on the corner of 
Seventh and Rowley Streets in Mitchell, South Dakota. 

When he was but five months old, he with his parents moved from Mitchell to 
Kalispell, Montana, in November, 1908. They bought two acres of fruit land 
at the edge of town, where they raised garden and chickens. 

Then later his folks bought eighty acres of timber land north and east of 
town. They sold this farm in a few years and rented a farm in what was 
called Helena Flats. He started to school in the school called Helena Flats, 
about a mile from this farm. 

From there they moved to a farm north-west of Kalispell, so he went to the 
Spring Creek School near there. After a few years they moved to a farm three 
miles west of town called the Wai-e Brothers Farm and from there he went to 
Kalispell to school till in June, 1923, his parents moved in town in the fall 
of 1922. Then the last of June, 1923, they started with two Ford cars for a 
new home in California. They had a tent and camped along the way, arriving 
near Long Beach about the first of July, His Uncle Bert John and family 
came with them from Oregon. They all cooked their meals outdoors. 

They first settled near Clearwater and he went to school there. Then to 
high school in Compton by school bus. The following May, they moved to 
Long Beach, where he finished his high school at Polly High in Long Beach. 
He then took a course in the Frank Wiggins School in Los Angeles. 

He with his brother Joyce, had a second hand and new furniture store for 
several years. During the war and afterwards he worked in the shipyards 
out in the harbor. He was the manager of the Good Will Store in Gardena 
for sometijne. 

He took the examination and got a steady job with the City of Long Beach, 
which he has held for a number of years. 

He was married to Laui"a Etta Sanderson, the daughter of Evert G. and Mary 
(Johnson) Sanderson, on the 25th of April, 19^1 at 8 P.M. in the First 
Methodist Church at Fifth and Pacific, Long Beach, California, by the pastor 
Dr. George W. McDonald. He had been on the official board at this church 
for a number of years. 

They have two adopted children, namely; 1. Larry Douglas John and 2. Jeanice 
Marie John. 

1. Larry Douglas John, was born on the 27th of June, 194.6, in the city 
of Long Beach, California. 

2. Jeanice Mai'ie John, was born on the 26th of June, 19?6, in the city 
of Long Beach, California 



15A 



PERCY JOHN'S WIFE LAURA 
AND HER FAMILY 
OF THE SECOND BRANCH OF THE SEVENTH GENERATION 
FROM CLARK E. AND JOHANNA JOHN 

Laura Etta (Sanderson) John 

The parents of Laura Sanderson were Evert G. and Mary (Johnson) Sanderson. 
To them were born eleven children, namely; 

1. George Sanderson, born on the 20th of October, 1909. He married 
Ella Butts. 

2. Elmer Sanderson, was born on the 7th of December, 1910. He 
married Ruth Rosenstock. 

3. Laura Etta (Sanderson) John, was born on the 27th of January, 1912, 
in Arapahoe, Colorado. She was married to Percy L. John, on the 
25th of April 19^1. (More detail with Percy L. John's record). 

4-. Viola (Sanderson) Young, was born on the 29th of March, 1913. 
She married Garland Young. 

5. Cecil Sanderson, was born on the 7th of Januai^y, 191A. He married 
Grace Jager. 

6. GpII Sanderson was born on the 4,th of October, 191^. He died on 
the /!,th of January, 1922. Age 6. 

7. Alice (Sanderson) Clark, was born on the l^th of March, 1918. 
She married Millard Clark. 

8. Athalyn (Sanderson) Bakkene , was born on the ^th of December, 1919. 
She married Johnnie Bakkene. 

9. Nina (S'anderson) Butts, was born on the 30th of May, 1921. She 
married Duane Butts. 

10. An infant born in 192A died in infancy. 

11. Dean Sanderson, was born on the 6th of June, 1926. He married 
Mary Alice Bullis. 

THIRD BRANCH OF 
SEVENTH GENERATION 
FROM CLARK E. AND JOHAITOA JOHN 

Joyce Jay John , was born on the 21st of November, 1910, in his parents' home 
on their two acre tract in Orchard Park addition of Kalispell, Montana. He 
was born on Monday. 

His early schooling was in the rural district of Flathead County and in 
Kalispell, Montana. 

When he was thirteen, his parents and the rest of the family moved from 
Kalispell Montana, to Long Beach, California, with two automobiles. Leaving 

155 



there in the first part of June, and reaching Long Beach, California the last 
of June, 1923. 



■ 5 



His uncle Bert John and fajnily joined with them from Oregon down to Long Beach, 
California. They had tents and camped along the way and they cooked their 
meals out of doors. It was a nice trip and all had a good time. 

They settled first at Clearwater, northeast of Long Beach, on some acre land 
with a good well and power pump on it so they could irrigate their truck 
garden. They raised chickens and rabbits. 

Joyce went to school in Clearwater and then his parents went to Long Beach, 
where he finished his grade school and high school education. He graduated 
from high school on Friday, the 18th of June, 1926. 

He took a coui^se at the Wiggins Trade School in Los Angeles, California. He 
worked at different lines of work, then took up carpenter work. He was a 
lead man in the shipyards during World War II. 

Joyce and his brother Percy were in the second hand store business for several 
years . 

He has played in the Salvation Army Band for many years. He and his wife have 
had charge of the North Long Beach Salvation Ai^-my Sunday School for a great 
many years. 

He married Lieutenant Mable E. Andrews, the daughter of Brigadier and Mrs. 
John W. Andrews, (Mrs. Andrews is now Major Ida Loney) of the Salvation Army 
on Friday evening, the ISth of August, 1939, in the Salvation Army Citadel 
at 329 Locust Avenue, Long Beach, California, by Colonel A. Smeaton. 

Mable Evelyn (Andrews) John 

Mable Evelyn (Andrews) John, wife of Joyce Jay John, and daughter of Brigadier 
and Mrs. John W. Andrews, was born on the 30th of JiJly, 1915, in New West- 
minister, British Columbia, Canada. She was born on Friday. 

She graduated from the Salvation Army Training School in San Francisco, as an 
officer in 1935. She was stationed in several appointments at different 
places. The last one being in the North Long Beach Corps. 

To Joyce J. and Mable E. (Andrews) John, were born foui- children, namely; 

1. Sylvia Joy John, 2. Karen Mae John, 3. Miriam Louise John, and l^, Clark Jay 

John. 



Eighth Generation 
From Joyce J. and Mable E. John 

Sylvia Joy John 

Sylvia Joy John, the first child of Joyce J. and Mable E. (Andrews) John, 
was born on the 26th of July, 19-^0, at 8:30 in t he Cottage Maternity 
Hospital, 1069 Atlantic Avenue, Long Beach, California. 

156 



Her schooling was in the grade and bXi:n .--•.:..•:■. j ■:, '" ' -.i;- 
She graduated from Star Jordan Hi; u ."ilioc'^ o.. . 'i " : .; 

the 13th of June, 1957. She then tooK: \- . _. in . 

several Long Beach florists for S2v?rsj. ..■'-< ■,•-- ..-;- .-_•_-. 

She was married to Paul Wolkersdcrf :-.'r tnr-^ -■ jj\ ', i' ; .. 
eight p.m. on the l&th of May, 19' ^l. ".'' ," ■'•+io" ; . . 

329 Locust Avenue, Long Beach, Califc;- ■■■■■. ■_.,. ., ,\.c, .;-.,j._ 

the officer in charge of the Sal vat .■.'_■■•.' . :" ■■^•k .^jU '^c-. - ' ..-. 

To them were born two children, nainf\:.y ;. ^ .. ^ ,^ .-.rsdcr- 

2. Paul Jay Wolkersdorfer . Mary Ann .... .. \c ■■•r. tnc j. ' 

1963, at the Memorial Hospital^ 2BX Atl:..ni.j A..";-., Ln:. 
Paul Jay Wolkersdorfer was boi;i Augast 17^ "I'-f'-' 



-■' ^ 



Paul E. Wolkersdorfer, the husband ct .v".' i . 
born on the 19th of December, J940, i"- .-..nev 
United States Navy. After his service. ' 
School at Sen Francisco and graduated Jvj'ie _. 
ment with the Salvation Army in Rene,. i'eva<-.: 



2. Karen M. John, the second child of Joyce J, r;',-^ •;AtOe E. ' . 3} Jc\ -^^ 
was born on the 17th of August, 1943. at '^;,:.5 .a.n',, ■■ ^h^-. . .ternity 
Hospital, 1069 Atlantic Avenue.. Long Z-r--:::. "a.Lifcr •:.'-. . 

Her schooling was in the grade and high school; . --''i..g ^■^■■z.c^ . 3he 

graduated from Jordan High School on tl:"- 15''"''- "■--' '" -, 19'1> "'be xhen 
took a three year course in training in the "a.' ' 'n.i.c. Hospital, S'-h.ol 
of Nursing in Los Angeles, California, 

She was married to Gary Evan Bolton, t :8 ,■- cf ¥v . Jrhjn .'-.'._: Ma3.-y 2cLv.on, 
on the 7th of February, 196^, by Capt . ocer. Stillwell, ..he offics"^ 
of the Salvation Army in Long Beach, at ^29 1 oy^st Avenuc , 

To them was born a son on the 9th of September, 1/, 'A, a.t the California 
Hospital in Los Angeles, California, in the mcr^.ing. Hi weighed 8 po-jjads 
and 14 ounces. Namely; Jeffery Alon Bolton 



Miriam Louise Jchx 



3. Miriam L. John, the third child of Joyce J. and Mable E. (Andrews) John, 
was born on the ICfth of April, 1949, at J^iCB 3..r.. in the Cottage 
Maternity Hospital, 1069 Atlantic Aveniiy, L:ng Ber-ch, Calr'f jrnia. 

All her schooling has been in the schools of Long Beach, California 



157 



Clark Jay John 

l^. Clark J. John, the fourth child of Joyce J. and Mable E. (Andrews) •:''-^ 
John, was born on the 11th of June, 1952, at 5:30 a.m. in the -■ ■■-"-'-■ 
Cottage Maternity Hospital at 1069 Atlantic Avenue, Long Beach, •''-'^""'--^- 
California. 

FOURTH OF SEVENTH GENERATION' •■■ -. :--'-^'^^v;,. J.v.joo.i v.^.'c 
FROM CLARK E. AND JOHANNA JOHN ■ ■■•■ ■'- ■^-■■'^■i-- >"^'- 

Opal Mae John , the fourth child of Clark E. and Johanna (Olsen) John, was born 
on Friday morning, the 9th of August, 1912, in her parents' log house on their . 
timber farm, eight miles north and east of the town of Kalispell, Montana, in 
Flathead Valley and Flathead County. 

Her early schooling was in Kalispell City Schools. She and her sister and 
brothers walked three miles to school most of the time in those country roads. 

When she was eleven years old, she with her parents moved from Kalispell to 
Long Beach, California, with two Ford automobiles, starting the first part 
of June, 1923, arriving in Long Beach, California the last of the same month. 

Her Uncle Bert W. John and family went from Oregon with them on down in their 
car, camping out and cooking their meals in their tents. They had a wonder- 
ful time on the way. . . . \. . ' . " . 

They first settled near the little town of Clearwater and on the following 
May they moved to West li+tYi Street, Long Beach, and then her parents 
bought a seven room house at 4,36 West 19th Street, where she lived until she 
was married. '"' '- ' ■''■■■ -■--■-^-- ■- ^y'';^-' 

She went to the grade schools in Clearwater and Long Beach. She graduated 
from high school on Thursday evening, June 19'th, 1932. She graduated from 
Junior College and then went to the University of California at Los Angeles, 
at West wood. 

She married Charles Richmond Newman, Junior, on the 8th of September ,- 1936, 
at the Salvation Army, 329 Locust Avenue, Long Beach, California, They were 
married by Adjutant George Houghton, the officer in charge of Long Beach Corps. 
This was in the evening on Thursday. 

Charles Richmond Newman, Jr. 

Charles Richmond Newman, Junior, husband of Opal M. (John) Newman, son of Chai'les 
R. and Christine E, Newman, was born on the 17th of February, 1908, in Winnipeg, 
Canada. He was born on Monday. Charles and Opal made their home in Seattle, 
Washington, where Charles and his brother Frank, had an upholstering shop until 
September, 194.6. They moved back to Long Beach and he worked at different lines 
and carpenter work until he was made foreman of a large building project. - 

To them were born two children, namely; 1. Joan Opal Newman and 2. Richard 
Charles Newman. 



Joan Opal Newman 

Joan Opal Newman, daughter of Opal M. and Charles R. Newman, was born 
at noon on the ISth of August, 1939, in the St. Lukes Hospital in 
Seattle, Washington. She moved, with her parents, from Seattle to 
Long Beach, California, in September, 19/^6. 

Her first schooling was near Seattle. After moving to Long Beach, she 
graduated from grade school and high school. She graduated in 19f7 
from Jordan High School, North Long Beach. She did clerking in the 
Ardens Store on Pine Avenue, Long Beach. She was employed in 1962, 
as a secretary for the Long Beach State College. She also attended 
Long Beach City College. 

She was married to Philip J. D-unning , the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
W. Neff of Sacramento, California, in the evening of the l^^th of April, 
1962, at the First Church of the Brethren at 3332 Magnolia Avenue, 
Long Beach, California. Captain Robert Stillwell, the officer in 
charge of the Salvation Army in Long Beach, officiated, 

Philip James Dunning, husband of Joan 0. (Newman), was born on the 
I6th of May, 1942, in the City of San Francisco, California. He 
served in the United States Navy. He attended the Fullerton College 
in Orange County, and is still studying while working as a carpenter. 

To Joan 0. (Newman) and Philip Dunning, was born a daughter, Doreen Kay, 
on February, 2^, 1966. 



Richard Charles Newman 



2. Richard C. Newman, the second child of Opal M. and Charles R. Newman, 
was born on the Sth of Jsinuary, Y)UU, sX 1:30 p.m. in the General 
Hospital in Seattle, Washington (on Marion Street). 

He moved with his parents from Washington to Long Beach, California, in 
September, I94.6. He graduated from the public schools of Long Beach, 
and after they moved to Anaheim, California, he went to school in 
Anaheim, Orange County, California. He attended Fullerton Junior 
College where he graduated in 1963. 



FIFTH OF 

SEVENTH GENERATION 

FROM CLARK E. AND JOHANNA JOHN 

Elva Lucia John , was born on Saturday evening in her parents' log house on 
their timber farm eight miles north and east of Kalispell, Montana, on the 
31st of January, 191Z^. 

Her early schooling was in the city of Kalispell, Montana. She with her 
sister and brothers walked most of the time to school from the farm which was 
three miles west of town. 

When her parents sold out in the fall of 1922, they moved to Kalispell in one 

159 



of the three houses they o-wned. They lived here through the winter while 

her father went to Long Beach, California, to work and look for a new 

place to make their home. ... ^ , ,,- .... . . , ,;,^;. 

In the early summer of 1923, she moved "with her pai^ents, overland to Long 
Beach California. They left her Uncle Ross's place near Kalispell^ Montana, 
the first part of June, 1923, with two Ford cars. Her brother Morris drove 
one car and her father drove the other car. Her Uncle Bert and family drove 
down with them from Oregon to California. There were three cars all tpl(^,. ^^ 
They had a nice tjjne camping out and cooking their meals. -.• ',-^.^u ..:^;..^..- .-,•:,-,-. -^ 

Her parents rented some acreage near Clearwater and she went to school there. 
The next May they moved to Long Beach and rented a house on West I4.th Street. 
The following year her parents bought a home at 4.36 West 19th Street. 

She finished her grade school and high school in Long Beach. She graduated 
from Polly High School on Thursday, at 5 p.m. on June 16, 1932. ..,;.■ -£ /...cv.;'! 

She then took up post graduate work and adult education. She worked at the 
Ferrying Command through the War II. Then she worked at Douglas Aviation 
Corporation and other airplane plants until 1956. __ ^ _^ ;.,..._:.. ..._jj^ 

She married Owen Frank: Newman (a brother of Opal's husband Charles R. Newman), 
in the evening of the 20th of May, 1955, at the Greenwich Wedding Chapel, 
5870 East Second Street, Long Beach, California, by Rev. Geo. W. McDonald, 
minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church. ..,.. ,. , , .^. ..,.-.■■ -■ „....,- ,■; 

They located at the home that her husband had already bought at 3732 Clark 
Avenue, Long Beach 5, California. 

To them were born two children, namely; 1. Robert Owen Newman and 2. Carole 
Marie Newman. ,-.,-.,.. .^ ... ..... :■■,.....-.•■, -.......,...;-., 

Owen Frank Newman ., ... ,, ^ . . ,, 

Owen Frank Newman, son of Charles R. , Senior, and Christine E. Newman, and the 
husband of Elva L. (John) Nevmian, was born on Friday, the ISth of November, 
1910, in Winnepeg, Canada. _. ,_,, ._- _ , ^. „..,... .-„^ ,-...- .,-.;... ^,^,,„.. , -. 

He moved with his parents from Canada to Long Beach, California. In 193^, " 
he with his parents moved to Seattle, Washington, where he and his brother 
Charles were in the upholstering business. 

He was in World War II. After the war he moved back to Long Beach, California, 
where he is in the upholstering business on East 4,th Street, Long Beach, 
California. 



EIGHTH GENERATION "' 

FROM ELVA L. AND OWEN F. NEWI4AN 



1. Robert Owen Ne^^man, was born at 9:17 p.m. on Friday, the 29th of March, 

1957. in the Seaside Hospital on West li^th Street, Long Beach, California. 

2. Carole Marie Newman, was born at 9:10 a.m. on Monday the 13th of October,' 

1958, in the Seaside Hospital on West l^th Street, Long Beach, California. 



The Newman Family 

Mr. Charles Richmond, Senior, was born in 1877, in Yorkshire 
England . 

Mrs. Christine E. (Ledman) Newman, the wife of Charles R. Newman, 
Senior, was born on October 21, 1881, in Manitoba, Canada. 

Mrs. Charles R. Newman, Senior, died in the Community Hospital in 
Long Beach, California, on the 25th of February, 194,8. She was 
buried in the Inglewood Cemetery at Inglewood, California. Major C. 
Thomas conducted the funeral. Age 66. 

To Charles R. and Christine E. (Ledman) Newman, were born three 
children, namely; 1. Charles R. Newman, Junior (Opal John's husband), 
2. Owen FranJc Newman, (Elva John's husband) and 3. Ellen Newman. 
Ellen Newman married Frank Hibbs . 

CLARK E. JOHN AND FAMILY CONTINUED 

Clark E. John, was married the second time to Mrs. Gladys Marie (Gibson) 
Danielson, the daughter of Louis N. and Mary C. (Spain) Gibson, on the 
ISth of December, I960, in the patio and yard of the bride's oldest daughter 
and her husband's home (Emily and Russell E. Todd), at 2137 Albury Avenue, 
Long Beach, California. 

Lieutenant Robert J. Stillwell performed the marriage ceremony. Lieutenant 
Stillwell was the Commanding Officer of the Salvation Army of the Long Beach 
Corps. His assistant. Lieutenant Lee Lindsey, offered the prayer. Mrs. 
Lieutenant Robert Stillwell was at the piano and Sylvia John, the groom's 
granddaughter, sang "I Renew My Covenant With Thee". 

The day was warm and sunny which made an outdoor wedding lovely. It was 
just a family wedding with the bride and groom"s families present. The 
groom's oldest son, Morris V. John, and the bride's oldest daughter, Emily 
(Danielson) Todd, were Best Man and Matron of Honor. 

The bride's daughter and husband, Emily and Russell Todd, gave a lovely 
reception in their patio for the guests present and the groom's daughters 
did the serving. 

The groom's son and wife, Morris and Erla John, drove them to Los Angeles 
and gave them a nice dinner at a restaurant. They went from there to the 
Greyhound Bus Depot and started their wedding trip to Kalispell, Montana, 
where the bride's youngest daughter Peggy and her husband Lieutenant Matt 
E. Brown, are the Corps Officers of the Salvation Army. 

They visited friends and relatives on the way both going and coming back. 
They returned by way of Portland, Oregon, arriving in Long Beach at 5 a.m. 
January, 9, 1961, They lived at the groom's apartment at 619 Cedar Avenue, 
Long Beach, until January I4,, when they took residence at the bride's former 
apartment, 559 East lOth Street. 

They are now living at I36O Prospect Avenue, Long Beach, California. 



161 



Gladys Marie (Danielson) John 

Gladys Marie (Danielson) John, was born on April 21, 1904, at North Platte, 
Nebraska. When she was less than a year old, she and her parents and their 
family and grandparents, left North Platte with two covered wagons for Idaho. 
ShB resided in Idaho Falls, Idaho, iintil she was twelve years of age. They 
then moved to Duboise, Idaho for approximately one year, after which time they 
took up residence in Salt Lake City, Utah. ■ ' -. - ^ 

Her parents became interested in and became members of The Salvation Army. At 
eighteen years of age she assisted Captain and Mrs. George Houghton at The 
Salvation Army Corps in Twin Falls. Idaho, where she applied for and was accept- 
ed as a candidate for Officership in the Salvation Army. -■ ■•'■■■;:■ -■.'-•.■-i--:v e.G.:/-):; 

Entering Training School in San Francisco in the year of 192^-25, she was^ in 
a group that was known as the "Blood and Fire Session of Cadets". = ■ -':-'X-.'-!.-:r::, 

She was commissioned Lieutenant and assisted Captain and Mrs. Houghton in 
Salt Lake City, Utah. She was the Corps Officer for several Corps in the 
Northwest . -~- —-- 

Captain Gladys Gibson married Captain Wendell Danielson in Wenatchee, Washington, 
at the Salvation Army Citadel by Ensign George Houghton, who was attached to 
Divisional Headquarters at Spokane, Washington. In August, 1936, they took ■:■■ 
up residence in Long Beach, California. '■'■'.".'^^ 

Wendell Danielson, was called to his Heavenly Home from his daughter's home _ __ 

on Albury Street, Long Beach, California, on the 2nd of February, 1957. .--'^'IZ^ 

He was buried in Simnyside Memorial Park Cemetery, Long Beach, California. '';■';■':':'. 



To Gladys M. (Gibson) Danielson, was born three children, namely; 1. Emily G. 
Danielson, 2. Chester D. Danielson, and Peggy L. Danielson. 

1. Emily G. Danielson, was born on the 5th of November, 1928, in ''-/^^ 
Spokane, Washington. ^ _... '.-."!! 

She married Russell E. Todd. They have four children. 



■■ ' ■ 1. Patrick J. Todd, born on the 3rd of April 194.8. .■."--;:;:-■ 

2. Kathleen S. Todd, born on the 23rd of August, 1950. 

3. Laurell C. Todd, born on the 20th of October, 1954. 

4. Rebecca D. Todd, born on the 14th of August, 1956. ■"--'•••■■ '"^ 

2. Chester D. Danielson, was born on the 25th of February, 1931, in -' 
Miles City, Montana. '- 

He married Victoria D. Nottle in Long Beach, California. 

To them were born five children. -- -'-■'■•■ '. 

1. David D. Danielson, born on the 7th of June, 1954. ' ' ' 

2. Dawn E. Danielson, born on the 2nd of April, 1957. 

3. Douglas K. Danielson, born on the 19th of August, 1958. 

4. Dennis K. Danielson, born on the 5th of September, 1959. 

5. Doreen Marie Danielson, born on the 20th, May, 1963. 

162 



3. Peggy L. Danielson, was born on the 24th of September, 1938, in 
Salt Lake City, Utah. 

She married Mat hew E. Brown in Sioux City, Iowa. He was the son 
of Edward and Mrs. Deliah Brown. Mat hew E. Brown was born in 
Sioux City, Iowa, on August 23, 1937. He served in the United 
States Navy and is now an officer in the Salvation Army in Olympia, 
Washington. 

To them were born four children, namely 5 

1. Tammy R. Brown, born on the 19th of March, 1958. 

2. Mathew E. Brown, born on the 2Sth of August, 1959. 

3. Delhia M. Brown, born on the 23rd of October, 1962. 
U. William Booth Brown, born on the 2Sth of May, 1965, 

in Centralia, Washington. 



163 



KIMBER LEROY JOHN 
SECOND or FIFTH GENERATION 
"""■ ^ ■■-' ' FROM '■ '■■■■' "■' ■"■" 

JEHU JOHN . ., 
/ , _ AND ... 

■■■-•''^' HIS DESCENDANTS 



SECOND 

BRANCH OF FIFTH GENERATION 
FROM JEHU AND PATIENCE JOHN 

■«■ -it «- ■«- ^- » ^f- ^- it * i<- * iMt- * ^s- -it ■>;- * * •;;- 



Klmber LeRoy John , the second child of Jehu and Patience (Houseweart) John 
was born on the 15th of October, 1838, in Shamokln Township, Northiimberlana 
County, Pennsylvania. 

He was in the Civil War from 1861 to I864,, Company M. 8th Regiment, Illinois 
Cavalry. He was stationed in Washington, D.C. He was in quite a lot of 
the battles during the war. He, with the other soldiers, suffered in the 
cold winters with frozen hands and feet. Some froze to death for they had 
but very little clothing and medical care. 

After the war, Kimber with others, went out to California during the big gold 
rush in 18^9. 

He died on the 3rd of March, 1870, in Marysville, California. 

He never married. 

I stopped at Marysville in 1957, and tried to locate his grave in the old burying 
ground north of town, but of no avail. I did find the death notice in an old 
paper (The Daily Appeal) in the Public Library there. I went to different 
Mortuaries before going to the Library. Quote from paper, "In this city, on 
the 3rd of March, 1870, K. L. John died, age 33, native of Illinois". 

Note: Kimber L. John, visited friends and relations in Northumberland County, 
Pennsylvania in the fall of I860. 



16^ 



CEPHAS DAY JOHN 
THIRD OF FIFTH GENERATION 
FROM 
JEHU JOHN 
AND 
HIS DESCENDANTS 



THIRD 

BRANCH OF FIKTH GENERATION 
FROM JEHU AND PATIENCE JOHN 

* -jf «*-«•»;-» <f * ■«■ V- 

Cephas Day John ^ the third child of Jehu and Patience (Houseweart) John , was 
born on the 23rd of September^ 18^1, in Shamokin Township, Northumberland 
County, Pennsylvania, 

He moved with his parents to Winnebago County, Illinois, when he was but a small 
boy. 

He was in the Civil War and was in the service nearly the ftill time of the war. 
After coming out of the war he was ordained as a preacher which he followed 
the rest of his days. He would farm week days and preach on Sundays. 

He married Lizzie McGregor on the 5th of August, 1871, in Rockford, Illinois. 
To them were born four children, namely; 1. Agnes G., 2. Mannie V., 3. Roda E, 
and 4. Nellie B. John. 

Cephas died on the 21st of July, 1913 and was buried in Pleasant Hope. Age 71 
years, 9 months and 26 days. His wife Lizzie died on the 21st of August, 1937. 
She also was buried at Pleasant Hope. 

Cephas made a visit back to Pennsylvania in the fall of 18^8 and Daniel John 
went with him. 

Children and Grandchildren of Cephas D. and Lizzie John 

Agnes Grace John 

Agnes G. John , the first child of Cephas D. and Lizzie (McGregor) 
John, was born on the 24th of Ncrvember, 1872, in Rockford, Illinois. 

She married Joe S. Hoy on the 17th of November, 1889. To them were 
born seven children, namely; 

1. Stella Hoy, born on the 2Sth of June, 1800. Died the same day. 

2. A boy born on the ^th of March, 1891 and he died on the 9th. 

3. Elizabeth Hoy, born on the 11th of April, 1892. She died on 
the 17th of January, 1894. Age two. 

4. Fannie Hoy, born on the 20th of December, 1894- She married 

165 



Fred Bigman on the 13th of January, 1915. To them were born 
four children, namely; 

1. Mildred Nadine Bingman, born on the 19th of March, 1923. 

2. Eula Faye Bingman, born on the 15th of April, 192i^. 

3. Agnes Merle Bingman, born on the 10th of May, 1926. 

i^. Betty Jean Bingman, born on the 31st of December, 1928. 

5. Goldie Hoy, was born on the 9th of March, 1898. She married 
William Bennett on the 8th of August, 1915, near Norman, Oklahoma. 
To them were born five children, namely; 

1. Ruby Bennett, born on the 26th of January, 1918. She died 
on the 24.th of March, 1921. Age 3. 

2. William Franklin Bennett, Junior, born on the 6th of 
August, 1921. 

3. Velma (Bennett) Harris, born on the 1st of August, 1923. 
U. Neva Jo. (Bennett) Harris, born on the 23rd of February, 

1928. 

6. Sylvia Hoy, was born on the 31st of January, 1905. She married 
David Phillips on the 23rd of November, 1932. To them were born 
three children, namely; 

1. Lena May, born on the 12th of October, 1933. 

She mai-ried Russell Morris on the 17th of June, 1958. 

2. Eai^bara Jo Phillips, born on the 21st of May, 1937. 

She maiTied Winfred Poemocea (Comanche Indian) the 29th 
of November, 1957. 

3. Vera Beth Phillips, born on the 28th of November, 19/i5 . 

7. Joda Hoy, was born on the 19th of May, 1907. She died on the 
13th of October, IC'4,2. Age 35. 

Agnes G. (John) Hoy died the 2nd of March, 1958, and was buried in 
Norman, Oklahoma. 

Mannie Verdilla John 

Mannie V. John , the second child of Cephas D. and Lizzie (McGregor) 
John, was born on the 30th of Mai^ch, 1875, in Winneba.go County, 
Illinois. She moved with her parents from Illinois to Iowa. Then 
after a few years they moved to Pleasant Hope, Missoui^i. 

She married H. L. Biirns . They had no children of their own, but she 
had two step-children, a boy and a girl. 

Their home was in Missoui'i. She died and was bui'led in Pleasant Hope, 
Missouri. I have no other record for her nor for her husband or their 
family. 

Roda Elizabeth John 

Roda E. John , the third child of Cephas D. and Lizzie (McGregor) John, 
was born on the ^th of December, 1878, in the State of Iowa. 

She moved with her parents from Iowa to Pleasant Hope, Missouri. 



166 



She married C. A. Clingman. To them were born two children, namely; 

1. Eft en Clingman. He died and was buried in California. 

2. Alva Clingman. She died and was bui^ied in TixLsa, Oklahoma. 

This is all the Information I have of this family. 

Nellie Blanch John 

Nellie B. John , the fourth child of Cephas D, and Lizzie (McGregor) 
John J was born on the 28th of June^ 1883, in the State of Iowa. 

She moved with her parents from Iowa to Pleasant Hope, Missouri, 
where she spent most of the rest of her life. She iiever married. 

She passed away on the 2Z^th of October, 194-0, and was buried in 
Pleasant Hope, Missoui'i. 



167 



SARAH MARTHA JOHN 
FOURTH OF FIFTH GENERATION 
FROM 
JEHU JOHN 
AND 
HIS DESCENDANTS 



FOURTH 

BRANCH OF FIFTH GENERATION 
FROM JEHU AND PATIENCE JOHN 



Sarah M. John , the fourth child of Jehu and Patience (Houseweart) John, was born 

on the 27th of December, 1843, i- Rush Township, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. 

She moved with her parents from Pennsylvania to Winnebago County, Illinois, when 
she was but six years old. It was a long and hard trip at that time as 
transportation was very poor. On this trip they had several modes of travel; 
horses and wagon, train a short way, the Erie Canal about 250 miles, then by 
boat across the Great Lakes, 

She grew to womanhood in Winnebago County. Her marriage was to John Burch on the 
22nd of January, 1866, at Rockford, Illinois, he owned a big fai^m or farms in 
Winnebago County. John Burch, the husband of Sarah M. (John) was born on the 
3rd of August, 1823 in London, Canada West. He died and was buried in Winnebago 
C emet ery . 

Sarah M. Burch, wife of John Burch, died on the 1st of May, 1937, in Rockford, 
and was buried in the cemetery at Winnebago where her husband was buried. Her 
age 93 years, L, months and 4. days. 

To Sarah and John Burch were born seven children, namely 5 1. Georgiana, 2. Judson, 
3. Willard, 4. Preston, 5. Nellie, 6. Jessie, and 7. Mildred Burch. 

Children and Graxidchildren of Sarah M. and John Burch 

Georgiana Burch 

Georgiana Burch , the first child of Sarah M. (John) and John Burch, 
was born on the 13th of December, 1866 in Elida, Illinois. 

She never mai^ried. 

Judson Burch 

Judson Burch , the second child of Sarah M. (John) and John Burch, 

168 



was born on the 19th of October, 1869, in Elida, Illinois. He moved 
to southern California and lived in S':nta Fe Springs, 'fattier, and 
Santa Monica. 

He married Ann Colder. They had no children. 

Willard Burch 

Willard Burch , the third child of Sarah M.(John) and John Bui-ch, 
was born on the 9th of March, 1872, in Elida, Illinois. 

He married Georgia Sumers on the 15th of September, 1915. Their home 
was in Rockford, Illinois. 

To them were born two children, namely, 1. Barton Somers Burch and 
2. John Warren Burch. 

Willard Burch passed away February 8, 19C6 at Rockford, Illinois, and 
was buried at Lindewood, Illinois. Age 93 year's. 

Preston Burch 

Preston Burch , the fourth child of S^rah (John) and John Burch, was 
born on the 19th of April, 187Zt, in Elida, Illinois. He married 
Maud Simpson. 

To them were born two children, namely; Ramona (E.urch) McCallium, 
2. Kenneth Burch. 

Preston Burch died on the 17th of May, 1908, in Mason City, Iowa, and 
was buried in Winnebago, Illinois. 

His wife Maud died on the 18th of June, 1Q17, in Pasadena, California 
and was burled there. 

Nellie Theresa Burch 

Nellie Theresa Burch , the fifth child of Sarah M.(John) and John Burch, 
was born on the 18th of February, 1876 in Elida, Illinois. She married 
Clarence Wray on the 27th of October, 1903. 

To them was born one child, namely; 1. Merian Wray. 

Nellie T. Wray passed away February 8, 1966, at Sioux City, Iowa, and 
was buried at Iowa Falls, Iowa. Age 89. 

Jessie Burch 

Jessie Burch, the sixth child of Sarah M. (John) and John Eurch, was 
born on the 22nd of January, 1878, in Elida, Illinois. She never 
married. She lived at 1017 North Court Street, Rockford, Illinois. 

Jessie Burch passed away November 17, 1965, at Rockford, Illinois and 
was buried at Winnebago, Illinois. Age 87 years. 

Mildred Burch 

Mildred Btirch , the seventh child of Sarah and John Burch, was born 

169 



on the 27th of May, 1879, in Elida, Illinois. 

She married Thomas U. McGulre on the 1st of November, 1915 

They had no children. 



170 



ANN ELIZA JOHN 
FIPTH OF FIFTH GENERATION 
FROM 
JEHU JOHN 

AND 
HER CHILDREN 



FIFTH 

BRANCH OF FIFTH GENERATION 
FROM JEHU AND PATIENCE JOHN 



•)C ■>^- 7C 



Ann Eliza John, the fifth child of Jehu and Patience (Houseweart) John, was 
born on the 17th of May, 18^6, in Rush Townsliip, Northumberland County, 
Pennsylvania. 

She moved with her parents from Pennsylvania to Winnebago County, Illinois, 
when she was but three yeai^s old. In those early years, there were not as 
many ways to travel and the railroads were quite new and very few of them. 
They had to travel the hard way and had to use several modes of conveyances 
in that long distance to reach their destination in Wimiebago County, Illinois. 
This was in the late fall of the year. She grew to womanhood on her parents 
farm there. 

She married Cyrus C. Bigelow at Elgin, Illinois. They moved to Sardinia, 
New York. 

To them were born two children, namely; 1. Frank C. Bigelow and 2. Blanch 
Bigelow. 

Ann E. (John) and Cyi-us E. Bigelow's children and Grandchildren. 

Frank C. Bigelow 

Frank C. Bigelow , the first child of Ann E. (John) and Cyi^us E. Bigelow, 
was born on the 31st of August, 1873, in or near Sardinia, New York. 

He married Ethel Sherman on the 17th of June, 1908, in the Baptist 
Parsonage in Delevan, New York. 

To them were born four children, namely; 

1. Geneviva I. Bigelow, born on the 2nd of January, 1910, in 
Sardinia, New York. 

2. Charlie Biglow, born on the &th of March, 1911, in 
Sardinia, New York. 

171 



3. Geraldine Bigelow, born on the l&th of December, 1916, in 
Sardinia, New York. 

She married Grant Earl Rodes. He was born on the 1/^th of 
September, 1913, in Glean, New York. They were married 
on the 24.th of October, 1936, at the parsonage in East 
Atirora, New York. 

To them were born three children, namely 5 

1. Gary G. Rodes, born on the 21st of March, 194.0. 

2. Larry Frank Rodes, born on the l^th of April, ISUK' 

3. Jenice Sharon Rodes, born on the 17th of March, 19/^6. 

Frank C. Bigelow died on the 7th of December, 1938, and was birried in 
the Bigelow Mausoleum in Sardinia, New York. 

Blanch Bigelow 

Blanch Bigelow , the second child of Ann E. (John) and Cyrus E. Bigelow, 
was born on the 25th of May, 1876, or 1878, in or near Sardinia, New 
York. 

She married William Henry Porter Yule on the 20th of June, 1901. 

To them were born three children, namely; 

1. Herbert Bigelow Yule, born on the 17th of April, 1902, in 
Schenectady, New York. He died on the 22nd of November, 1916, in 
Colonsay, Saskatchewan, Canada. Age I4, years, 7 months, 5 days. 

2. Blanch Elizabeth Yule, born on the 6th of May, I904., in 
Schenectady, New York, She married George William Boaak on 
the 3rd of January, 1934., in North Battleford, Saskatchewan, 
Canada. 

To them was born one child, namely; 1. Muriel Georgina Bozak, 
born on the 3rd of March, 1935, in Carruthers, Saskatchewan, 
Canada. She married Richard Clifford Jones on the 29'th of 
October, 1958, in Stettler, Alberta, Canada. 

To Muriel and Clifford Jones was born one child, namely, 
Joyce Artha Jones, in Stettler, Alberta, Canada. She was 
born on the 29'th of January, I960. 



172 



EDMUND J. JOHN 
SIXTH OF FIFTH GENERATION 
FROM 
JEHU JOHN 
AND 
HIS DESCENDANTS 



SIXTH 

BRANCH OF FIFTH GENERATION 
FROM JEHU AND PATIENCE JOHN 

* * * *- * *- -i:- *■ *■ ^- •>!■ 



Edmund James John , the sixth child of Jehu and Patience John, was born on the 
5th of October, 18^8, at York Tunnel, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. He 
moved with his parents from Pennsylvania to Winnebago County, Illinois, when 
he was a young boy. He grew to manhood on his parents' farm. 

He married Sarah Bell McKinstry on the li^th of September, 1873, at Hiawatha, 
Kansas. 

Sarah Bell (McKinstry) John, was born on the 22nd of May, 1854., in Mercersburg, 
Pennsylvania. 

To them were born eight children, namely; 

1, Patience E., 2. Mary H., 3. Walter 0., k. Elizabeth, 5. Gertrude, 
6. Ralph E. 7. Joseph F. and 8. Estella Sarah John. 

Edmund J. John, moved from Kansas to southern Iowa; later years he moved to near 
Plankinton, South Dakota. He was called to his Heavenly Home on the 8th of 
June, 1922 and was buried at Plankinton, South Dakota. Age 73 years, 8 months, 
and 3 days. 

Sarah B. (McKinstry) John, wife of Edmund J. John, died on the 15th of November, 
193A, and she was also buried in Plankinton. Age 80 years. 

Edmund J. and Sarah B. John's Children 

Patience E. John 

Patience E. John , the first child of Edmund J. and Elisa E. (McKinstry) 
John, was born on the 5th of July, 187A, in Brown County, Kansas. 

As a small girl she, with her parents, experienced traveling in a 
covered wagon pulled with horses. They went from Kansas to Cerro 
Gordo County, near Sheffield, Iowa. She, inth her parents, moved 
to Missouri for a time and then moved back to near Decator, Iowa. 

173 



She lived here imtil after her marriage. 

She met her future husband, Fred E. Bruner, while living on the farm. 
They were married on the 1st of October, 1892. 

They later moved to Wheatland, Wyoming, where they bought a farm. They 
lived here until her husband's death on the 20th of October, 1928. He 
was buried in Wheatland, Wyoming. He was born on the I2th of January, 
1871, in Iowa. 

Patience and her family moved into Wheatland after his death. 

To Patience E. (John) and Fred Bruner, were born three children, 
namely •, 

1. Edna Blanch Brimer, born on the 30th of September, 189 -i. 

She married Alfred R. Van Aukan. Their home was in Payette, 
Idaho . 

On the 19th of May, 1959, while traveling with her husband 
in Nebraska on a trip to the east, she was killed in a 
car accident near the town of Ogallala, Nebraska. 

2. Bertha Mae Bruner, was born on the 2nd of March, 1897. 

She married John Albin Klassen on the 17th of June, 1955, 
in Wheatland, Wyoming, where they made home. 

3. George Walter Bruner, was born on the 21st of January, 1908. 

On the 19th of August, 1928, he met his death by drowning 
in a lake near Wheatland, while trying to save another 
person from drowning. He was buried in Wheatland. 

Patience E. (John) Bruner, the wife of Fred Bruner, was called to her 
Heavenly Home from the Memorial Hospital in Cheyenne, Wyoming, on the 
30th of April, 1961. Funeral at Methodist Church in Wheatland and 
she was buried in the cemetery where her husband and son were buried. 

Mary Hortence John 

Mary Hortense John , the second child of Edmund J. and Sarah B. (McKinstry) 
John, was born on the 11th of December, 1876, near Sheffield, Iowa. 

She married Perry E. Bruner (brother of Patience's husband) on the 11th 
of March, 1896. 

To them were born two children, namely; 

1. Lena Marie Bruner, born on the 12th of September, 1897. 
She married Ben Harding on the 1st of January, 1917. 

2. Paul Edmund Bruner, born on the 10th of February, 1902. 
He married Leara Phipps on the 1st of January, 1923. 

He died on the 11th of February, 1935. Age 33. 

Perry E. Bruner, husband of Mary Hortense (John) Bruner, was born on 
the 9th of November, 1873. He died on the 15th of June, 1956. Age 73. 

174 



Mary Hortenee (John) Bruner, wife of Perry E. Eruner, died on the 5th 
of February, 1963, in southern Iowa. 

Walter Oren John 

W-dter 0. John , the third child of Edmund J. and Sarah B. (KcKinstry) 
John, was born on the 22nd of June, 1879, near Sheffield, Iowa. 

He married Jennie Martin on the 30th of August, 1900. To them were 
born two children, namely, 

1. Esther John, born on the 6th of Februai^y, 1902. She died 
on the 20th of February, 1902. 

2. Bert Porter John, born on the 9th of September, 190/k He 
was killed in a cyclone on the 25th of June, 1908. Age 2. 

The storm swept over their farm in the night taking them and all of 
their buildings. Walter John was still alive in the morning when the 
fog lifted. The neighbors who lived a few miles away, saw that the 
buildings were gone and they went to the John farm and found the 
wife and baby dead and Walter pinned under some timbers with his 
baby in his arms. Before he passed away he told them about the storm. 
He suffered terribly through the night. 

All three were buried at the same time. Their remains are in the 
cemetery in Plankington, South Dakota. 

Elizabeth John 

Elizabeth John , the fourth child of Edmund J. and Sarah B. (McKinstry) 
John, was born on the 5th of September, 188/^, near Sheffield, Iowa. 

She married Isaac Tolly on the 26th of February, 1902. To them 
were born six children, namely- 

1. Clarence Tolly, born on the 25th of July, 1903. He married 
Hazel Dyer in November, 1926. 

He married the second tijue to Rose Gaines on the 15th of 
February, 194A. He passed away on the 23rd of December, 
1957, in Joplin, Missouri. 

2. Freda Tolly, born on the 2lst of February, 1905, at Mount 
Vernon, South Dakota. She married A. D. Rose on the 13th 
of April, 1923, at Leon, Iowa. 

3. Ethel Tolly, born on the 27th of January, 1907, at Plankinton, 
South Dakota, She married Floyd Sodden on the 25th of 
April, 1925. 

U. Ruby Tolly, born on the 1st of August, 1913, in Stickney, 
South Dakota. 

5. Russell Tolly, born on the 9th of March, 1915, at Decator, 
Iowa. He married Frances Winter on the 11th of April, 

175 



at Des Moines, Iowa, 

6. Robert Tolly, born on the 2/ith of January, 1916, at Decator, 
Iowa. 

He married I^vy Baker of La Roy, Iowa, on the 6th of April, 
19^0, at Des Moines, Iowa. 

Gertrude Florence John 

Gertrude F. John , the fifth child of Edmxind J. and Sarah B. (McKlnstry) 
John, was born on the 11th of August, 1887, at Little River in Kansas. 

She married Charley Nelson on the 22nd of March, 1906. He was born on 
the 6th of April, 1888. He died on the 11th of December, 1950. 

To them were born two children, namely 5 

1. Margaret Nelson, born on the 6th of November, 1913. 
She married Henry Van Ekesen, To them were born three 
children, namely; 

1. A boy baby born and died in 1933. 

2. May Jane Van Ekesen, born on the 11th of January, 
1937. 

3. A boy baby born and died on the 3rd of June, in 
19-^6. 

2. Gertrude Nelson, born on the 18th of November, 1918, 
She married Arthur W.Leisteo on the 18th of March, 194.4,. 
To them were born three children, namely; 

1. Arthur W. Leisteo, born on the 9th of October, 194-4-. 

2. Cheryl Ann Leisteo, born on the 22nd of April, 194-6. 

3. Judy Kay Leisteo, born on the 5th of July, 194-7. 

Ralph E. John 

Ralph E. John , the sixth child of Edmund J. and Sarah B. (McKinstry) 
John, was born on the 19th of January, 1890, at Hiawatha, Kansas. 

He married Bessie Armstron after coming out of War World One, on the 
7th of September, 1919. To them were born seven children, namely; 

1. Thomas John, born on the 23rd of June, 1920, at Timber 
Lake, South Dakota. He was single in I960. He lived 
in Portland, Oregon. 

2. Maria John, born on the 8th of July, 1922, at Timber Lake, 
South Dakota. She married David Pritchard, May 7, 1955. 

3. Ralph Rease John, born on the 23rd of January, 1925, at 
Timber Lake, South Dakota. He married Gladys Walcott . 

U. Helen L. John, born on the 3rd of March, 1927, at Timber 
Lake, South Dakota. She married Bob Bartell in Portland. 

5. Margarie John, born on the l4.th of June, 1928, at Timber 

Lake, South Dakota. She married Floyd Covey at Grants Pass, 

176 



Oregon. 

6. Burrel John, born on the 29th of June, 1930, at Timber Lake, 
South Dakota. Died on the 8th of August 3, 1930. 

7. Charles John, born on the 1st of March, 1932, at the Timber 
Lake, South Dakota. He married Margaret Wilcott on the 31st 
of August, 1950. 

Joseph F. John 

Joseph F. John , the seventh child of Edmund J. and Sara E. (McKinstry) 
John, was born on the 5th of October, 1892, in Decator, Iowa. 

He married Bessie Bendef eldt on the 6th of August , 1915 , in South 
Dakota. To them were born three children, namely; 

1. Joyce Louis John, born on the l^^th of January, 1917, 
at Plankinton, South Dakota. 

She married Randell Hasterman on the 8th of May, 19/C2. 
To them was born one girl, namely; 

1. Betty Mae Hasterman, born on the 6th of 
November, 19^7. 

2. Vera Laye John, born on the 13th of August, 1919, at 
Plankinton, South Dakota. 

She married William G. Gunther on the 26th of September, 
1941, at Waukesha, Wisconsin. To them were born two 
children, namely; 

1. 'Sandra K. Gunther, born on the 21st of June, 194A. 

2. John William Gunther, born on the 19th of 
September, 19^6. (He is a radar man in Minn- 
eapolis, Minnesota. 

3. Shirley Mae John, born on the 2Sth of May, 1921, 
at Plankinton, South Dakota. 

She married Clarence D. Phillips at Great Falls, 
Montana. To them were born three children, namely; 
1.' Judith Ann Phillips, born on the 3rd of 
February, ISUU. 

2. Bonnie Jean Phillips, born on the 12th of 

May, 1946. 

3, Marjorie Lynn Phillips, born on the 5th ol 
July 1947. (Lived in Dutton, Montana. 
Operated a wheat ranch). 

Sarah Estella John 

Sarah E John, the eighth child of Edmund J. and Sarah B. (McKinstry) 
John, was born on the 25th of August, 1895, near Decator. Iowa. 

She married Fred Shottenkirk on the 19th of February, 1916, i^f^^^ 
Dakota. Fred Shottenkirk was born on the 25th of November, 189.. 



177 



To them were born seven chll(±ren, namely, 

1. Violet Shottenkirk, born on the 13th of January, 1917, 
In Lead, South Dakota. 

She married Barney Perle on the 5"th of December, 1936, 
in Lead, South Dakota. 

To them were born three children, namely; 

1. Janice Lue Perle, born on the 28th of June, 1939, 
in Lead, South Dakota. 

2. Mary Alice Perle, born on the 2nd of December, 1945, 
in Deadwood, South Dakota. 

3. Victoria Ann Perle, born in 19/+9. 

2. Dewey Shottenkirk, born on the 28th of November, 1918, 
in Plankinton, South Dakota. He married Mildred E. 
Walters . 

To them was born one child, namely; Duanne Walters. 

3. Earl Shottenkirk, born on the 20th of November, 1920, at 
Presho, South Dakota. He married a girl by the name of 
Bettie (I do not have the last name). She was born in 
1929. 

To them were born two children, namely; 

1. Sue Ann Shottenkirk, born in 194-8. 

2. Earl Shottenkirk, born in 1950. 

J+. Irma Bell Shottenkirk, born on the 27th of March, 1922. 
She married Otha Holland on the 3rd of December, 194.0. 

To them were born thi-ee children, namely; 

1. James Alvin Holland, born on the ^.th of October ,1941-. 

2. Julie Kaye Holland, born on the 12th of February, 194-3. 

3. Bell Estella Holland, born on the 29th of November, 

5. Lyle Jack Shottenkirk, born on the 20th of July, 1923. 
He was adopted by Mr. Popples. 

He married a girl who's first name was Lucille. She was 
born in 1929. 

To them were born three children, namely; 

1. Dennis Lyle Popples, born in 194-7. 

2. Douglas J. Popples, born in 1950. 

3. Larry Dean Popples, born in 1952. 

6. Raye Willard (Shottenkirk), born on the 21st of July, 1925. 

He was adopted by Mr. Solberg. He married Helen Marie 
Clouse . 

To them were born two children, namely; 

1. Arnold Raye Solberge, born in 194-5. 

2. Sharon Marie Solberg, born in 1954.. 

178 



7. Gene Shottenkirk, born on the 2&th of December, 1927. 
He married a Japanese girl in Japan. Her first name is 
Kaye. ( I do not know if they have any children). 

Sara E. (John) Shottenkirk, married the second time to De'^ Wonbourn. 
To them was born one child namely 

1. James Wonbourn, born on the 20th of December, 1933. 
He married a girl by the name of Pauline. I believe 
they have five children. I do not know their names. 

Verdilia Elmira John 

Verdilia E. John , the eighth child of Edmund J, and Sarah B. (McKinstry) 
John, was born on the 31st of July, 1851, at Elida, Illinois. 

She married Polaske D. Riggins on the 24.th of October, 184.7, in West 
Fork ToiAmship, Franklin Coimty, Iowa. 

To them were born three children, namely; 1. Lesley L. Riggins, 
I 2. Carroll Riggins, and 3. Verdilia Riggins. See page 180. 

I She died on the 26th of August, 1883. Age 32. Buried in the West 

Fork Cemetery in Franklin County, Iowa. Her husband died in later 
yeai's at his son's home, Lesley L. Riggins. He was buried by the 
side of his wife in Franklin County. Iowa. 



A Poem Written by Verdilia (John) Riggins 

We All Must Pass Away 

The wind blew very cold indeed. 

The night was dark and drear 

And the fire's cheerful blaze 

Had nothing at all to fear. 

When by my side I heard these words- 

'Listen to me I pray. Prepare yoiu-self 

For another world, for we must all pass away. 

I rose to my feet, and looked around, 

Thinking that I should see. 

The form that spoke those solemn words 

I wondered who it could be? 

I searched the house with no success 

The person had flo-wTi away. 

I thought of the gospel injunctions 

Of the words of warning there. 

And the promise of comfort 

In that better land so fair 

In God's own Holy Word 

I read the other day 

We all must pass away. 



179 



Good friends, I wish to tell you 

That death will come to all- 

Unto the old gray- headed, 

And also to the small, 

So I beg you to take this warning 

For we all must pass away. 

"How True This Is" 



Verdilia E. (John) and Polaske D. Riggins Children and Grandchildren 

1. Lesley Leroy Riggins, first child of Verdilia E. (John) 
and Polaske D. Riggins, was born on the 15th of March, 
1878, in West Fork Township, Franklin County, Iowa. 

He married Clara Banker on the 26th of February, 1908. 
To them was born one child, namely; 

1. Worth Riggins 

Lesley L. Riggins, died with a heart attack while he was 
riding his tractor on his farm near Doughtery, Iowa, in 
1951, at the age of 72. He was buried in the West Fork 
Cemetery. 

2. Carroll Riggins, the second child of Verdilia E. (John) 
and Polaske Riggins, was born on the 3rd of May, 1880, 
in West Fork Township, Franklin County, Iowa. 

She married August Shaffer on the l^th of December, 1909. 

To them were born three children, namely; 

1. Glen Riggins 

2. Melvin Riggins 

3. Irene Riggins 

Carroll Riggins died on the 25th of August, 194.9, at the 
Riverview Hospital, Green, Iowa. Age 69. She was buried 
in the Luther Cemetery, near Green, Iowa. 

3. Verdilia E. Riggins, the third child of Verdilia E. (John) 
and Polaske D. Riggins, was born on the 25th of August, 
1883, in Scott Township, Floyd County, Iowa. 

She grew to womanhood in South Dakota and Iowa. She was 
born on the farm of her parents, ten miles from Marble 
Rock. 



180 



She married Thomas Alfred Hall on the 30th of November 

1903, in Iowa. ' 

To them were born two children, namely 

1. Cora Gladys Hall, born on the 24.th of May, 1905, 
in Wisconsin. She married Leon Therman. No 
children. 

2. Gale Glen Hall, born on the 22nd of October, 1911, 
in Wisconsin. He married Nora Sherman on the 11th 
of August, l':\21. 

To them were born five children, namely; 

1. Lois A., born April 29, 19/^3. 

2. Stanley E., born March 25, 19^6. 

3. Vernon 0., born June 9, 194.8. 

L,. Doloris M., born September 29, 1953. 

Thomas A. Hall died in June, 1952, and was bui'ied in West 
Fork Cemetery, Iowa. 

Gale G. Hall died on the l6th of February, I960. Age 4.9. 



181 



THUS ENDS TWO PIUNDRED AND EIGHTY YEARS OF HISTORY OF THE "JOHN" FAMILY, AND 
THE PORTION THAT THEY HAD AMONG THE FIRST SETTLERS IN THESE, UNITED STATES 
OF AMERICA, THEN ON DOWN THE LINE OF DESCENDANTS TO 1966. 

THE WRITER SAID IN THE FIRST PART OF THIS HISTORY, "THAT HE LIKED HISTORY 
OF ALL KINDS". NOW AFTER GOING THROUGH ALL THE EARLY HISTORICAL RECORDS, 
AND THE PART OUR ANCESI'ORS PLAYED IN THE MAKING OF THIS EARLY HISTORY: IT 
GAVE HIM A SACRED FEELING FOR OUR EARLY ANCESTORS. 

THE FUTURE OF OUR NATION, AND THE PEOPLE IN IT, IS VAILED FROM US AND 
CANNOT BE SEEN. BUT IF OUR PEOPLE KEEP THE FAITH AND PRINCIPLES OF OUR 
FOREFATHERS, AND HAVING THEIR TRUST IN GOD, THE FUTURE WILL BE WELL FOR 
THIS NATION Alffi THE PEOPLE IN IT AND THEY WILL BE MORE THAIM CONQUERORS. 
THIS NATION WILL BE ABLE TO WITHSTAND AGAINST THE ST'ORIviS OF ANY NATION, 
OR ANY OTHER CONFLICT THAT MAY COME AGAINST' THEM. 



182 



My appreciation to the following; 



Mrs. Morris V. John, for helping 
publish the Geneology and History 
of the John Family. 

Morris V. John and Elizabeth Callaghan 
for Reading the Geneology. 



4LAl^rU 



FOR 



MEMORANDA 



FOR 



MEMORANDA 



FOR 



MEMORANDA 



FOR MEMORANDA 



FOR MEMORANDA 



FOR 



MEMORANDA