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Full text of "A history of the 313th field artillery U.S.A."

AHISrORYOF 

IE 3i3!n FIELD ARTILLERY 



A History 0/ the 

313th Field Artillery 

U. S. A. 




NEW YORK 

THOMAS Y. CROWELL COMPANY 

1920 








;icL S 7f'^ I 



PRrNTED BY 

RAND McNALLY a COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



THIS BOOK IS DEDICATED BY THE 

Officers and Enlisted Men of the 313th Field Artillery 

TO THE 

MEMORY OF THEIR COMRADES WHO GAVE 
THEIR LIVES IN ACTION 

n n n 

Headquarters Company 

CAPTAIN GEORGE WAYNE ANDERSON, JR RICHMOND VA 

CORPORAL ALLEN G. LEWIS GERRARDSTOWN, W. VA 

PRIVATE EDMUND C. HARRISON CHARLESTON, W. VA. 

Battery A 

CORPORAL WILLIAM B. NEEL BAYARD W VA 

PVT. 1 CL. GRADY M. McCLURE YORK, S C 

PRIVATE DAYTON DOVE RIVERTON W VA 

PRIVATE RAYMOND L. HARMON BRANDYWINe! W. VA 

PRIVATE OLIN L. SHILLINGBURG ARMSTRONG, W. VA. 

PRIVATE WALTER W. WATSON BROAD TOP CITY, PENNA. 

Battery B 

CORPORAL CARL SIMMONS BELINGTON W VA 

MECHANIC WILBUR S. MOORE GRAFTON W. VA 

PVT. 1 CL CLIO B. McKEEVER BEARD W VA 

PRIVATE JOHN I. KRAMER BELINGTON, W. VA 

PRIVATE ANDREW L. MATHEW VOLGA W VA 

PRIVATE THOMAS S. RILEY WESTOn! W. VA. 

Battery C 

SERGEANT GEORGE NEWALLIS ELIZABETH N J 

SERGEANT BERT H. HICKMAN CALVIN W VA 

PRIVATE GEORGE F. RICHARD PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 

PRIVATE MARION R. RUTLEDGE POE W VA 

PRIVATE BENJAMIN H. SPARKS RICHWOOoi W. VA. 

Battery D 

CORPORAL RANDALL G. KETTERMAN ELKINS W VA 

PVT. 1 CL. JOHN I. BELL MIFFLINTOWN, PENNA. 

PRIVATE JESSE W. KESTER BURNSIDE, PENNA. 

Battery E 

CORPORAL JOHN E. KRAFT FRAMETOWN, W. VA 

CHF. MECH. ROY S. SHANHOLTZER LEVELS W VA 

PRIVATE ELMER L. WILEY HUNTERS RUN, W. VA. 

Battery F 

CORPORAL LUTHER H. GREEN SUTTON W VA 

CORPORAL ARTHUR D. BRADY FRENCH CREEK, W. VA. 

CORPORAL BROADWAY R. LOWE GANDEEVILLE, W. VA. 

CHF. MECH. JOHN J. MANSFIELD PIEDMONT W. VA 

COOK PEARLEY B. HOWES FRENCH CREEK. W. VA. 

PRIVATE FRANK CALASCIONE NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

PRIVATE CHARLES E. WANNER SHARPSBURG, PENNA. 




Eegimental p. C. in Mouzay 



Foreword 



A NY narrative will, of necessity, appeal differently to those who have been 
/ \ participants in the events recorded therein and to those who have not. 
^ ^It is hoped, however, that all those of either class into whose hands this 
volume may come will find in it enough of interest to justify its compilation. 

For the members of the 313th Regiment of Field Artillery, A. E. F., this book 
is primarily intended — it is a record of their organization and operations. It is 
not believed that these men will need a written history to preserve the memory 
of experiences which must be unforgettable. But it is thought that in years to 
come they will always find both pleasure and pride in recalling, through the 
stimulus of these pages, incidents of the days spent in the service of the A. E. F. 
whose clear recollection might otherwise become blurred by the passing years. 

There is much that a bare and unimaginative narrative of this sort does not 
tell of the regiment's life. It does tell of the days when the regiment was 
organized at Camp Lee during the autumn of 1917 and of the period of training 
throughout the following winter. It tells of the departure for France and the 
pleasant days spent in Redon in the summer of 1918. It records the participation 
in the greatest battles in which American troops have ever engaged. It shows 
that in the Meuse-Argonne it fought with six different divisions, and without 
relief or rest, for forty-seven days — a record for consecutive fighting that was 
excelled by no organization in the American army and was equalled, probably, 
only by the other regiments of the brigade. 

It tells of the return from the front and of the winter spent in the little 
villages of Argenteuil, Pacy and Ancy-le-Libre, of the preparations for home- 
coming and of the return to America. 

But it cannot recite the many other things which will be among the most 
lasting memories of all: — the rumble of the guns along the road at night, the 
shuffling columns of infantry passed in the dark, the rain and mud, the utter 
fatigue of men and horses hauling ammunition night after night, the overwhelm- 
ing roar of a great barrage, the whistle of approaching shells, the crackle of 
machine guns, the humming of airplanes overhead, the strange and funny inci- 



VIII 



FOREWORD 



dents that lightened serious hours— all these and many others are things that 
cannot be described j^et cannot be forgotten. 

To every observant and thoughtful American who was not in the army the 
swift process whereby miUions of men who had lived under conditions which 
were absolutely removed from all military experience or knowledge and which 
had emphasized the privilege of individual thought and action, were transformed 
into organized, trained and disciplined troops, must always remain one of the 
miracles of American endeavor. 

To the men who were the subject of this process the marvel was not so 
apparent. For them, the wonder of the result was lost sight of in the crowded 
days of its accomplishment. But thousands of persons who were not in the 
army find in this transformation one of the greatest wonders of the war. To 
them, it may be, that this volume will be of interest as the history of a typical 
American regiment of our great National Army. 

In reading this volume, which is but the bare record of the regiment's 
organization and operations, one is apt to overlook certain facts which constitute 
the real interest in the organization's history. 

The members of this regiment who had any military experience prior to the 
war were a negligible number. Practically the entire personnel of the organization 
was inducted into the service from civil life during the autumn and winter of 
1917. They came to Camp Lee from their work in stores and offices and mines 
and farms with no knowledge whatever of even the most fundamental military 
customs and usages. Yet within a year thereafter they were veteran troops of 
the highest order. Until they reached France in June, 1918, they had never 
seen a 75 mm gun. Yet within a few months they were handling that weapon 
in battle with a degree of efficiency and an accomplishment of result attained 
ordinarily only after years of training. 

These men came from civil life, each with the American sense of individuality 
and right of self-judgment. Yet within the organization there developed, together 
with a high standard of personal conduct, an excellent discipline — a discipline 
based on willingness and confidence, but none the less genuine and effective. 
It is doubtful if in any organization there ever existed a finer degree of mutual 
trust and affection between officers and enlisted men than in the 313th F. A. 
The men had for their officers, almost without exception, respect and affection 
with complete confidence in their leadership; officers had for the men complete 
trust and affection and abounding pride. 



FOREWORD IX 

It is believed that conditions existing in the 313th F. A. were largely typical 
of those existing throughout the American army. And it is suggested to those 
who wonder at the efficiency of America's hastily-constructed army that they 
may find the answer in this: — the phj^sical and mental tests applied to the men 
recruited for the army were such that those accepted were, as a whole, of a high 
type of manhood. The.se men were, as individuals, familiar with America's 
purposes and ideals in going to war, were in sympathy with them, and were eager 
to have a part in bringing about Germany's defeat. They, therefore, with entire 
willingness, submitted themselves to the rigors of army life, yielded to the 
direction of constituted authority, appUed themselves to learning the details of 
soldiering with the idea that these were the things to be done in order to accom- 
plish a task on which their hearts were set. 

The wonder of this change from inexperienced civilians to remarkably effec- 
tive soldiers is almost matched by the manner in which this great army has again 
been assimilated into civil life. 

But the men who return to civil life are not the same as when they first put 
on O. D. To their neighbors, their friends, their families they may seem un- 
changed; even to themselves they may seem so. But no one can go through the 
furnaces of war without being of finer mold. 

That this change will be exemplified in the making of a broader and higher 
sense of the duties of citizenship seems inevitable. And these men will be 
citizens who will disregard trivialities and imaginarj^ barriers to strike at the 
heart of things, who will think less of self than ever before, who, having learned 
the power that is wielded by numbers of men intelligently organized, will seek to 
direct this power to civic betterment. And, if they have learned from their 
experience any lesson, it must be this: — that, having risked their lives in war for 
certain ideals, they must not allow these ideals to be jeopardized by neglect or 
indifference in civil life. 

If any member of the 313th F. A. who has come back from France needed to 
be taught that his duty to America only began with the war, he would find his 
lesson in the memory of those comrades who did not come back — those to whom 
this book is dedicated, who staked their lives and won. Though we laid them to 
rest within the woods and on the hillsides of the heights of the Meuse, we must 
remember that their lives were given not solely that the Bois des Ogons might be 
cleared or Andevanne ridge be taken, but in order that America might be left 
free and unendangered to work out the aims for which the Republic was founded. 



X FOREWORD 

Our duty is to cherish and uphold in civil life the things they died for 
in war. Above all it is to believe and contend that the maintenance of 
liberty and right and justice is a matter of such importance to mankind that 
no sacrifice or sorrow is too great to endure for it. 

Every cross in the cemetery at Romagne is a monument to the truth 
that the highest degree of righteousness is so to believe in the right that 
you are willing to give your life that it may prevail. 




CONTENTS 

Page 
Foreword yj, 

By Captain John Paul 

PART ONE 

Chapter I The Organization of the Regiment 1 

By Colonel Charles D. Herron 

Chapter II Camp Lee 3 

By 1st Lieutenant David G. Ackerman 

Chapter III U. S. S. Siboney 7 

By Captain Donald D. Geary 

Chapter IV Training of the Regiment in France 12 

By Captain Eben J. D. Cross 

PART TWO 

Chapter I The First BattaUon Reconnaissance 18 

By Major Shelton Pitney 

Chapter II Barrage of September 26, 1918 24 

By Captain Francis W. Crandall 

Chapter III Hill 281 3I 

By Captain Henry S. Baker 

Chapter IV Gercourt 35 

By Captain George D. Penniman, Jr. 

Chapter V Dannevoux 42 

By Captain Joseph G. Peppard 

Chapter VI Second Phase of the Attack 49 

By 1st Lieutenant Thomas L Crowell, Jr. 

Chapter VII Ferme de la Madeleine, or Sunday, October 20, 1918 58 

By Captain Edwin F. A. Morgan 



XII CONTENTS 

PART TWO— (Continued) p^^^ 

Chapter VIII Second Phase— Continued 62 

By 1st Lieutenant Thomas I. Crowell, Jr. 

Chaptee IX November First 66 

By Captain Robert W. Perkins 

Chapter X Grande Carree Farm 76 

By Captain Robert T. Barton 

Chapter XI E Battery on November First 80 

By Captain Theodoric A. W. Gilliam 

Chapter XII From Grande Carree Ferme to Blanc Fontaine. The Second 

BattaUon at the Finish 83 

By 1st Lieutenant Paul P. Crosby 

Chapter XIII Bantheville to Mouzay 88 

By 1st Lieutenant George M. Englar 

PART THREE 

Chapter I Apres la Guerre 98 

By 1st Lieutenant Donald B. Fullerton 

Chapter II Route Order — Being Just Some Reflections of the Moment 114 

By Major John Nash 

Chapter III War Diary 140 

Chapter IV Guns Out of Action. Losses in Horses. Rounds Fired. 

List of Casualties 188 

Chapter V Letters, Orders, Citations 203 

Chapter VI Record of Events 223 

Chapter VII Regimental Roster 229 

A Map History of the 313th Field ArtHlery, September 26, 1918 

to November 11, 1918 (see pocket) 

By 1st Lieutenant Edward B. Burwell, Jr. 




Colonel Charles D. Hereon 



CHAPTER I. 
The Organization of the Regiment 

ON AUGUST 3, 1917, the War Department issued a general order 
authorizing the organization at Camp Lee, Virginia, of a regiment of 
Field Artillery to be known as the 313th Field Artillery, of the 155th 
Brigade of the 80th Division. 

On August 23 the regiment began its official existence through the assign- 
ment to command of Colonel Charles D. Herron, Field Artillery, National Army. 
Colonel Herron chose as officers for the regiment the graduates of the First 
Training Battery at Fort Myer, Virginia, and these officers reported for duty on 
August 27, 1917. A few days later, a few enlisted men, transferred from the 
Regular Army, reported for duty, and in September came the first men of the 
draft. 

The officers of this regiment were the product of the first officers' training 
camps of the war — the men whose indignation over the deviltrj^ of the Hun first 
came to white heat, and who had in the highest degree that prompt decision 
fundamental to all jiioneers and a jewel of great price in an officer. 

The rank-and-file of the regiment were the selected men of the north-eastern 
counties of West Virginia, chosen by the operations of the Draft Law — the act 
so aptly designated by the President as "the volunteering of the Nation as a 
whole." They were a law-abiding, self-respecting and wholly tractable body of 
men. Their zeal to learn and to serve was always an inspiration to their officers. 




313 F. A. Headquartehs 




Reuimentai, Street at Camp Lee 



CHAPTER II. 
Camp Lee 

FOR most of us the life at Camp Lee was the real beginning of our military 
experience. All but a very few of the officers were assuming the responsi- 
bilities of command for the first time, and certainly the long lines of men 
in civilian clothes, who were reported at division headquarters during the latter 
l)art of September and October, were taking their first faltering steps in an entirely 
strange environment, out of which the same men were to come, a few months 
later, no longer a group of individual citizens but a division of our National Army. 

It was on the 27th of August, 1917, that the regiment was organized by 
means of the first formal muster. The work of constructing a regiment of field 
artillery out of the requisite number of men began at that time, for it was then 
that our commanding officer. Colonel Charles D. Herron, known as "Uncle 
Charley" to the initiated, in addressing the assembled regiment told us all why 
we were there and outlined the task confronting us. 

A regiment is scarcely built of men alone,but at the outset that seemed to be 
the prospect. Practicallj^ everything was lacking in equipment, and in order to 
function as such, a regiment of field artillery needs guns, horses, harness, signal 
and fire control apparatus, to say nothing of the personal equipment requisite 
for each man. 

It might be added that the condition of being fully equipped as laid down 
by an official pamphlet known as the Equipment Manual, is a state ever striven 
for but never reached. However, clothes and equipment alone never made a 
soldier, and there was much to be done so that when the long promised uniforms 
arrived the men, after putting them on, might act as well as look the part. The 
"school of the soldier," the "school of the squad," as laid down in F. A. D. R., 
calisthenics, military courtesies, guard duty according to M. I. G. D., to say 
nothing of the ever changing details of organization of the various parts of a 
battery had to be gone over and mastered. 

Work settled down to the routine of carefully planned schedules of intensive 
training, interrupted by innumerable and apparently unavoidable details, such 



4 CAMP LEE 

as psychiatric examinations — supposed to determine the comparative usefulness 
of each individual — campaigns for the sale of Liberty Loan bonds and endless 
paper work in connection with War Risk Insurance and allotments of pay, both 
voluntary and compulsory. Sometimes it seemed as though every factor in our 
national life was taking a hand in the destinies of this new army. 

The atmosphere began to brighten towards the end of the year, and every 
one was able to devote more time to the studj^ and practice of field artillery 
and less to the minutiae of what may be classed under the general heading of 
attendant circumstances. To each battery had been issued a sufficient number of 
artillery carriages of one sort and another, including even antiquated 2.9 inch 
relics of the Spanish war, to enable the cannoneers to learn the rudiments of 
standing gun drill and to become familiar with the materiel they were to handle. 

Horses began to arrive in small lots from the remount station where they 
had been held in quarantine. The drivers were dividing their time between 
horse exercise, grooming by detail, stable building and drivers' drill, with the 
aid of wooden sleds to represent carriages. To the sleds rope traces were attached 
and the drivers, combining the attributes of man and horse took positions as 
lead, swing and wheel pairs, and learned to guide their carriages even before 
some of them knew how to ride properly. This ingenious arrangement was 
resorted to because of the temporary lack of horse equipment. In fact, before the 
horses themselves began to arrive, many a prospective driver might have been 
seen learning to mount and dismount on a dummy animal made of several 
lengths of timber and a barrel. 

There was little that was not simulated in those first few months before 
winter set in. The weather became quite severe and obliged us to curtail out-of- 
door drill and to inaugurate all sorts of schools when it was impossible to use the 
drill field continually. 

The stables required endless attention during these weeks, as they were 
situated on low ground which had been heavily wooded and needed much 
drainage and building up. The blasting out of old stumps was taken care of in 
true artillery style, and furnished striking illustrations of the probable error and 
dispersion of a dynamited stump. An occasional road hike which not infrequently 
developed into a spirited rabbit hunt over the frozen farm lands about camp, 
as well as outside drill whenever the weather permitted, made up our winter's 
work. During this time both men and officers had an opportunity for short 
leaves of absence from camp and its duties. 




('(JURAL AT Camp Lee 




The Stable Area 




1'arade in Petebsburg 




Review at Camp Lee 




Battery C;oi-\(j into Actiox, Dutch Vt.w, \'.\., Mauch, 1918 




Volley Fire 




o13th Camped on an Old Confederate Battery Position at Dutch Gap 




The Picket Line and Corral at Dutch Gap 



CAMP LEE 5 

In the early spring the time came when there was a sufficient amount of 
harness among the various batteries to move the four available three inch guns 
with caissons and limbers full of ammunition out to the Camp Lee target range 
for our first service practice. Thanks to the commander under whose tutelage 
we had been studying all winter, Major Fred. C. Wallace, than whom no one of 
us has seen a more capable artillery officer, and thanks to our good fortune in 
being able to profit by the mistakes of one of our neighboring regiments in its 
initial firing, we were well prepared. With our maps carefull}^ checked over the 
range, and gun positions selected, the battery was brought up, wire laid to the 
OP, the range cleared, the data sent down and the first shot with its accompany- 
ing warning of "On the way" was fired. It burst within about twenty-five 
yards of the target, thrilling every embrj^o artilleryman who was there to see. 

From that time on training went swiftly. There was much to be accom- 
plished by every one in order to speed up the functioning of the batteries as a 
whole, and the stimulus of frequent target practice where the results of one's 
labor could be appreciated by the increased accuracy of the fire was a source of 
great satisfaction. Weeks not spent on the range were devoted to the solving 
of tactical problems, the practice of constructing gun emplacements and bomb 
proof OP's, the practice as well as the theory of topography, the use of ground 
panels in working with airplanes, the laying of theoretical telephone nets; and, in 
the evenings, to the constant struggle with buzzers, probabilities, firing data and 
corrections of the moment. During these strenuous months there were several 
officers of the French army, who, having learned their lessons in the grim school 
of war, assisted us and piloted us through the mysteries of artillery technique as 
developed by three years of trench warfare. 

One of the happiest recollections of the time at Camp Lee is of the spring 
days on the Dutch Gap Range. Our camp was situated in a beautiful pine grove 
on the banks of the James. It had been the position of Parker's Battery in the 
Civil War and the mounds and embankments were still extant. This shady, 
sandy spot proved a welcome break from the swirling dust of Camp Lee. The 
range was much more extensive than the Camp Lee artillery range, and being 
only twelve miles away, was easily accessible. The targets were on an island 
where souvenir hunters could pick up, besides the fragments of our own shells, 
relics of the battles of over fifty years before. With numerous battery positions 
and observation posts and with night firing and the working out of various 
problems, training progressed with enormous bounds. Scouting parties dashed 



6 CAMP LEE 

mounted around the country, reel carts worked up and down the roads, and 
plodding men with map-boards were everj^where to be met. 

When we had almost made up our minds that we would have to remain in 
the United States all summer, suddenly, in the middle of May, came the order to 
get ready for immediate embarkation. Tree-planting and everything else was 
suspended and we started packing up. New equipment was drawn and some of 
the old turned in. The horses had been turned in, too, but they had caught a 
bit of the overseas spirit and one day came stampeding back from the remount 
station to their old quarters. The express companies were deluged with packages 
of things to go home. Friends and relatives came flocking to Camp Lee, and the 
whole regiment bubbled with the eagerness of going. 




At Dutch L.,-.i 



r 





3i;ith KlKl.U ARTILLERY. CAMP LEE. VA. 







o 

Z 

a 

a 
s 




COLDXEL HeHROX and IjTUKli (JlFICERS OBSERVING FiRE FROM OlD FEDERAL POSITIONS 




" Set! Ready ! " D Battery :313th F. A. Waiting for Command to Fire from Old Federal 
Positions Overlooking the James River 



CHAPTER III. 
U. S. S. "Siboney" 

THE trip to France was the first move we made as a regiment although we 
had been organized for nearly nine months. It was the long looked-for 
event which would graduate us from elementary training and place us 
among the fighting divisions on the battlefields. Consequently the news that we 
were to make preparations in earnest for a speedy departure caused consider- 
able excitement and a certain sense of satisfaction throughout the camp. It also 
dissipated the unpleasant prospect of spending a hot and dusty summer drilling 
at Camp Lee, an outlook calculated to dull the ardor of the best of us. 

My impression of the days immediately preceding our departure is that we 
did an enormous amount of difficult work in a very short time. But I have no 
doubt that were we called upon to do the same thing today we could accomplish 
it twice as quickly and with half as much worry. Orders came thick and fast, pre- 
ferably during the night, requiring all manner of work done at once and reports 
made thereon during the next ensuing quarter of an hour. As a result work was 
being done all day and all night under unusual pressure. At length after every- 
thing had been done, undone and re-done in as many different ways as the War 
Department and division and brigade headquarters could devise, we were ready 
to take our departure, which we did by waj^ of the back road — a singularly 
inglorious path to a bright future. 

The 1st Battalion and Headquarters Company left our area early on the 
morning of the twenty-fifth of May. We boarded a train on a siding in camp 
which took us directly on to the dock at Norfolk. The transport lay alongside 
and after a brief delay we went on board. The remainder of the regiment, the 
305th Ammunition Train and a part of the 305th Sanitary Train arrived in the 
course of the afternoon, and towards evening we cast off and went down to 
Hampton Roads where we anchored for the night. There we found warships 
and several transports which were to be members of our convoy. 

Our transport was the "Siboney," built by the Ward Line for passenger service 
but taken over by the Government when partially completed and converted into 



8 U. S. S. "SIBONEY" 

a transport with standees, washrooms and two mess halls. The latter were 
totally inadequate in size. The ship had made but one trip across before this 
and was consequently quite clean. For the same reason it was much disorganized 
with a crew badly in need of discipline. It was over-crowded — there must have 
been thirty-two hundred men on board, counting the crew — and this, coupled 
with the lack of organization and an inexcusable propensity to roll, no matter 
how calm the sea, made for a certain amount of discomfort. 

In explanation of the disorganization there is much to be said. There were 
but four regular naval officers on board — the Captain, the Engineer, the Execu- 
tive and the Paymaster. The last-named is, in the navy, in addition to what his 
title implies, the supply officer of the ship. The "Siboney" was put into commis- 
sion with these officers, a few reserve and merchant marine officers, and a crew 
gathered from all parts of the navy, and sent on its first voyage almost immedi- 
ately. It had returned to New York for supplies, as it was only partially supplied 
when placed in commission, and had arrived in Norfolk the same morning that 
we came on board. Oil was being taken on on one side while we were loading 
ourselves and our possessions on the other. But the need for ships was urgent 
at that time and such a situation was excusable. 

The next morning the entire convoy weighed anchor and sailed away. We 
found we numbered ten transports, the "Siboney," the "Mongoha," the "Huron," 
the "Mercury," the "Tenedores," the "Americus," the "Mallory," the "Hender- 
son," the "Teneriffe" and the "Von Steuben." The cruiser, "North Carolina," 
led the way and there was a new destroyer which was going across for duty. 
They were all the protection we had from the navy so far as we could see. The 
transports all had guns, however, the "Siboney" had four five-inch guns and 
depth bombs on the stern. But when the second evening arrived and the "North 
Carolina" made a wide circle, signaled good-bye and sailed away westward for 
home, we felt very much alone and unprotected and began to suspect that the 
loudly-proclaimed protection of the navy was propaganda in its most unhappy 
form. 

That same night there was a dense fog, and we crept along in imminent 
danger of colliding with another transport. We were following the "Von 
Steuben" closely when there was a sudden blast of whistles and lights were shown 
for an instant by several of the transports. It seems that the "Americus" had lost 
its place in line and had suddenly loomed up out of the fog cutting across our bow 
between us and the "Von Steuben." A collision was somehow averted. Many 



U. S. S. "SIBONEY" 9 

days later we learned that the fog was possibly a blessing in disguise, for that 
very night the German submarines were busy off our coast and sank several 
small ships near the spot where we were blowing our whistles and showing our 
lights to keep from sinking one another. 

We were no sooner at sea than it was impressed upon us that we must 
organize for an attack by U-boats. The officers were called together and the 
whole thing was explained to them. It seemed comparatively simple but the 
first drill proved otherwise. Every man was assigned by card to a place in a boat 
or on a raft by which he was to escape if the ship were torpedoed. There were 
".stations" about the ship Avhere each of these small boatloads was to assemble 
whenever an alarm was given. The plan was explained to the men as well as 
possible. 

Then we set out to practise. The crj', "All hands take station for abandon 
ship," was given, bells were rung and confusion reigned. As luck would have it, 
it seemed as though all the men in the bow of the ship had been given cards 
assigning them to places in the stern and those in the stern had been assigned to 
places in the bow. Everybodj^ upstairs had a station down below and everybody 
below had to come up. To make matters worse most of us were as yet unable to 
go about the ship without getting lost. The drill took us the greater part of the 
afternoon the first time we tried it, and then many of us never got to our right 
stations. 

There was a re-arrangement of some of the assignments after the first 
experience, and as we were called upon to practise twice daily, at sunrise and 
again at sunset, we gradually became quite proficient and could get to our stations 
and back with little or no disorder. These occasions, I might add, were further 
complicated by the rule that you had to bring your life-preserver with you. 

The trip was uneventful so far as wind, weather and submarines were 
concerned. The "Siboney," we were told, was capable of travelling much faster, 
but as it was necessary to go in convoys we were compelled to travel at the speed 
of the slowest. As it was, the Italian ship would often be missing when dawn 
came, and the rest of the convoy would have to wait a good part of the morning 
while the destroyer went in search of her. 

One afternoon we stopped in mid-ocean for target practice, one transport 
towing the target while another fired at it. 

At length we entered the danger zone and our precautions were greatly 
increased. Life-preservers were carried at all times; movies — we had had them 



10 U. S. S. "SIBONEY" 

several times — were prohibited; the gun crews slept at their guns; the ships zig- 
zagged constantly, and last and worst of all, stand-to's were begun earlier in the 
morning and continued later into the night. Every five or six feet along the side 
of the ship rope ladders or knotted ropes were hung to reach the water and a 
watch of over two hundred men was maintained day and night, standing at the 
rail in all parts of the ship. 

The officers were required to maintain a watch in the crow's-nest during the 
entire voyage, a duty whose danger was greatly increased when the mast and 
ladder were given a coat of fresh paint. The generous use of fresh paint in 
inconvenient places seems to be the one irresistible temptation in the life of a 
sailor. 

There was an increasing sense of anxiety as we advanced into the danger 
zone. Up to that time we had felt quite secure, due partly, I presume, to the 
fair weather and warm sunshine and partly to the languid gait at which we pro- 
ceeded on our way. But as we felt ourselves coming close to land again and saw 
the increased precautions we again began to feel that we were very much unpro- 
tected with only the one destroyer. Each morning it was rumored that we should 
be met that day by destroyers and conducted to port in safety. But when evening 
came and we were still alone we began to speculate on the possibility of a hitch 
in the navy's plans. Finally, a little after stand-to on the morning of the 6th of 
June, dots appeared on the horizon. They increased in size until we found 
ourselves surrounded by a flotilla of American destroyers which took up positions 
on all sides of us, several of them cutting back and foi'th across our path ahead 
so that we were completely encircled by them. The atmosphere at breakfast 
that morning was quite a change over the day before. 

The next morning the convoy split, some of the ships turning northward 
toward Brest and the rest of us heading south to Bordeaux. In the middle of the 
afternoon a dirigible balloon came out to meet us and shortly afterwards we 
sighted land, then two aeroplanes and several small naval vessels. Toward four 
o'clock we passed Royan, a beautiful little town at the edge of the sea with white 
houses and colored roofs clean and bright in the afternoon sun, in marked con- 
trast to the overcrowded ship in which we had now spent two weeks. 

A little later we entered the mouth of the Gironde River, the sea gate closed 
behind us and we went up the river past American and allied ships of all kinds 
riding at anchor. Farther on we anchored for the night and for the first time 
enjoyed a brightly lighted ship. Early in the morning we proceeded up the river 



U. S. S. "SIBONEY" 



11 



to Lormont where we docked at the American-built docks and immediately 
went ashore with all our belongings. Followed a march of a few kilometers and 
one o'clock found us installed in Camp Genicart. 

Genicart was called a "rest camp" and it lived up to its name better than 
any place we have been before or since. Five days were spent there unmarred 
by the usual necessity for a thorough police of the camp before it was fit to live 
in. All we had to do was draw rations and get our meals. Some opportunity 
was given to visit Bordeaux. I should note also that it was at Genicart that the 
officers donned Sam Browne belts and overseas caps. 

At the end of the week we moved to Redon and it is here that our history in 
France really begins. 





■^^i^ 




U. S. 8. hillluM.V 



CHAPTER IV. 
Training- of the Regiment in France 

THE actual training of the regiment in France did not begin until June 16, 
1918, when it arrived at Redon. As soon as detraining was completed the 
1st Battalion marched to Saint Nicolas where the major part of the bat- 
talion was billeted in and around an abandoned factory building with enough space 
in near-by fields for gun parks. The 2d Battalion took over the town of Avessac, 
about ten kilometers outside Redon, where Batteries E and F were billeted. Bat- 
talion headquarters, with Battery D, occupied a large chateau outside the town. 
Colonel Herron established his headquarters in Redon itself on Rue Notre Dame 
and the Supply Company on Rue de Codilo. After the first few days, during 
which the billets were put in shape, training began in earnest. French harness 
was issued and Lieutenants Zinkham, Adams and Shryock with one hundred 
forty (140) men and as many service records were sent after horses. 

On June 20 seventeen officers and fifty-nine men went to Coetquidan to take 
the courses in specialists' training in radio, firing charts, machine gun, telephone 
and 75mm materiel. The courses were reported to be excellent and all those 
who attended the school returned with reluctance. Lieutenant Stophlet became 
a gas expert by taking a six day schooling in gas defense, and took over the gas 
training of the regiment. Masks were issued under his supervision and were 
tested in improvised gas chambers erected in Redon and Avessac. 

On June 24 a school of all non-commissioned officers of the brigade was 
established in the hall over the market at Redon and was run, together with a 
telephone school, for the instruction of men who were unable to attend the school 
at Coetquidan. 

The training of the batteries now took scheduled shape with improvised 
mounted drill for drivers, talks on 75mm materiel for cannoneers and field work 
for the battery details. A great deal of work was done in gas masks as the brigade 
required that masks be worn two or three hours daily when the men were actually 
at work in order that they might become accustomed to working in them. 

On July 2 the horse details returned bringing 257 animals to the regiment. 
The horses were issued to the different organizations from Saint Nicolas, greatly 



TRAINING OF THE REGIMENT IN FRANCE 13 

to the 1st Battalion's benefit. The horses were in very poor condition, having 
been bought wherever possible from the French farmers, and a great deal of 
trouble was experienced later in keeping them available for duty. The quality 
of the forage was bad and exposure to the weather on the open picket lines 
brought on a good deal of influenza. 

On July 4 the entire brigade was assembled in Redon and passed in dis- 
mounted review before General d'Amade of the French Army who followed the 
review with a short talk to the officers and followed that by kissing General Heiner 
on both cheeks. Colonel Herron acted in the capacity of brigade commander 
and Major Newman as regimental commander. 

As soon as the horses had been distributed and each battery had received 
a complete firing battery of French 7omm materiel, mounted drill became part 
of the schedule, and half of each day was devoted to road work in the form of 
battery problems which involved the battery details as well. At this time the 
entire regiment was in the finest shape since its inception. The men were well 
fed and in good health and the weather was excellent for drill. Schools for 
officers had been in progress in Redon almost from the time of the arrival of the 
regiment and were conducted by officers who had been in action and who were 
conversant with French materiel and methods of fire. Colonel Herron by example 
had kept the regiment's officers constantly alert and in consequence the men 
were anxious to terminate training and be ready for actual service. 

On July 5 Lieutenant Buford was promoted and assigned to the Supply 
Company and Lieutenant Geary, who was promoted at the same time, became the 
Personnel Adjutant. All available time was now put into getting the gun crews 
of the batteries familiar with the French 75mm. Instruction in materiel was 
given by both commissioned and enlisted instructors assigned to the regiment, 
and in a very short time the men began to express a preference for it over the 
United States 3 inch. In consequence the gun crews were soon in as good shape 
as they had been on the Dutch Gap Range at Camp Lee. 

On July 20 the regiment experienced its greatest loss when Colonel Herron 
was ordered to report to General Headquarters and was relieved of command of 
the regiment. The progress which had been made since organization was due 
to his experience, great farsightedness and exceeding thoughtfulness toward 
every member of his command. It had been hoped that he would command the 
regiment through action but the great need for staff officers necessitated his 
assignment elsewhere. Colonel Charles Ferris was assigned to command the 



14 TRAINING OF THE REGIMENT IN FRANCE 

regiment but did not report until July 27. In the interim Lieutenant Colonel 
Tidball, of the 315th F. A.,was in command. On July 25 Major Oliver Newman 
was ordered to report to General Headquarters and gave over command of the 
2d Battahon to Captain Nash. 

Two days after the arrival of Colonel Ferris the 2d Battalion was unexpect- 
edly ordered to leave Avessac and join the 1st Battalion at Saint Nicolas. Since 
the town was already full, shelter tents were pitched and the 2d Battalion 
remained in fields in the neighborhood until the regiment left that area. Most of 
the following days were spent in watering horses and in equitation. The new 
commanding officer laid great stress on draft and no stress at all on proficiency 
in handhng the guns themselves. 

Orders were received for the regiment to proceed to Camp Meugon near 
Vannes, on August 10 for service practice and final instructions before actually 
going to the front, all equipment to accompany the organization. While 
preparation was in progress the following officers were ordered to report to Brest 
for immediate return to the United States on instruction duty: Captain Christian, 
Lieutenants France, Brooke, Bontecou, Sharp, Davidson, Foster, Becket, Burke, 
Amberson and Versteeg. On the same date Lieutenants Sheehan, Steigler and 
MacRae were assigned to the regiment. On August 10 camp was broken at 5.30 
A. M. and the regiment took the road for Camp Meugon. The horses stood up 
well and the weather remained good during the whole trip. Camp was made 
the afternoon of the 10th at Beganne, on the Uth camp was made at Muzillac, 
on the 12th at Thek, and on the 13th the regiment passed through Vannes 
and arrived at Meugon at about 2.30 P. M. 

The most memorable features of the hike were the daily stampedes to water 
and the manoeuvers of the regimental band. 

Barracks and stables were immediately occupied at Meugon and a combined 
gun park for the regiment in the rear of the stables was established. Training was 
started the following day and for the next month was kept up with the greatest 
intensity. Each morning two batteries fired on the range and in the afternoon 
two more relieved them. The two remaining batteries of the regiment held 
gun drill and horse exercise at camp and supplied details necessary for the 
maintenance of the camp. Service practice began at 7.30 in the morning which 
necessitated a start at 5.30. 

Due to the thorough training of the respective firing batteries of the regiment 
at gun drill the regiment was able to commence service practice two days after 




Redox 




St. Nicolas 



^^ 




Colonel Otto L. Brunzell 



TRAINING OF THE REGIMENT IN FRANCE 15 

its arrival at camp, thus eliminating the elementarj^ work and cutting the 
training period to an unusually short time. The range itself was large enough 
to allow both regiments of light artillery and the one regiment of 155mm to fire 
at the same time. Instruction was given from observatories in rear of the gun 
positions, one instructor for each battalion of officers. Contrary to the practice 
of the school, both mornings and afternoons were devoted to firing, and this was 
a factor in cutting the training period. Schools in orientation and telephone 
were carried on for officers and non-commissioned officers in afternoons and 
evenings. Instruction in one subject or another was constantly in progress, and 
very little time was left for recreation. Gas drill was not neglected and two 
hours daily were spent in masks. This was probably the most objectionable 
part of the training, but proved to be invaluable when the front was reached. 

On August 20 Lieutenant Colonel Brunzell reported for duty with the 
regiment and assumed command practically at once. On August 23 Major F.J. 
Dunnigan reported, thus giving the regiment its full quota of field officers for the 
first time in its history. 

On August 30 the officers of the Regiment, led by Colonel Ferris, gave a 
dinner to Colonel Welsh and the officers of the 314th F. A. at the Cafe de la Paix 
in Vannes. This was the last social function indulged in by the officers of the 
regiment before its departure for the front. On September 5 the entire regiment 
started on the brigade problem given at the termination of the course of instruc- 
tion at the school. Battery positions were selected and occupied after nightfall 
and the drivers received their first experience in night driving. The problem 
continued for two days and ended in a barrage in which the whole brigade partici- 
pated. Return to camp was effected on the afternoon of September 7. 

From this date until the 13th such preparations as were necessary for 
entraining were made and on that date the first contingent was loaded at the 
Quay in Vannes. 




Getting One Ready for Jerry 




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CHAPTER I. 
The First Battalion Reconnaissance 

ON SUNDAY, September 22, 1918, the 313th Fie'd Artillery was encamped 
in the Bois de Ville, about four kilometers south of Verdun. The 
other elements of the 155th Artillery Brigade were in the woods near by, 
and the infantry of the 80th Division was en route from the vicinity of Souilly. 

The Division had been assigned to the 3d Corps, whose mission it was to 
attack as the right Corps of the 1st American Army, "the right flank protected 
by the Meuse River" and the left flank passing to the east of Montfaucon, an 
objective which fell to the lot of the 79th Division of the 5th Corps. 

The attacking divisions of the 3d Corps, from right to left, were the 33d, 
80th and 4th. Thus it came about that the "jumping-off" place for the 80th 
Division was the Ruisseau de Forges (hereinafter called the "creek"), which 
runs from west to east at the foot of the northern slope of le Mort Homme. The 
divisional attack was to embrace Bethincourt, a ruined village lying just within 
the German lines on the northern bank of the creek, and to continue in the 
direction of magnetic north over Hill 281, through Gercourt and the Bois 
Jure in the valley beyond, and to pass to the left of Dannevoux, through Bois 
Dannevoux on Cote Dannevoux, to its objectives on the Meuse River, where 
that river bends and runs east and west for a short distance opposite Vilosnes. 
The left flank of the division would then rest on BrieuUes exclusive. As the event 
proved, Brieulles was very exclusive for the best part of the next month. 

Brigadier-General Brett's infantry brigade, the 160th, was chosen to make 
the attack for the 80th Division, with the 159th Brigade in reserve. One battalion 
of the 319th Infantry, Major Holt, and one battalion of the 320th Infantry, 
Major O'Bear, assumed the burden of the attack of the brigade, with the other 
battalions of those regiments in support. The 1st Battalion of the 313th Field 
Artillery, Major F. J. Dunnigan, was assigned the duty of "accompanying bat- 
talion," to go with and be under the orders of General Brett. The latter, after 
some consideration, ordered two guns to accompany Major Holt, two guns to 
accompany Major O'Bear, and the other two batteries of the battalion to accom- 




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THE FIRST BATTALION RECONNAISSANCE 19 

pany the General himself and be ready for action as he saw fit. 80 much has 
been said in order to set the scene for the theme of this chapter : The reconnais- 
sance made by officers of the 1st Battalion in preparation for the attack. 

As the battalion was not to participate in the firing of the barrage which 
was to precede the attack nor in any of the general preparatory fire, but was to 
advance with the infantry as fast as possible and be ready to assist them from 
hastily chosen positions as soon as they should meet strong resistance, one 
question immediately assumed an importance greater than that of any other and 
properly demanded corresponding attention, namely, by what road should the 
battalion proceed in order most successfully to kee]) jmce with the infantry. To 
keep up with the infantry was the mission ; to discover the means of accomplishing 
this mission was the essence of the reconnaissance. In what position to conceal 
the firing sections, combat train, ammunition dumps, forage and rations during 
the hours before the attack, and in what shelter to place the horses and men in 
case of counter preparation by the German guns, where to locate the kitchens, 
and a score of similar troublesome questions, necessarily became subordinated 
to the prime question of the road of advance. This, assumedly, was the common 
thought of all those engaged in the reconnaissance. 

Accordingly, Major Dunnigan, his Adjutant, Captain Pitney, the three 
battery commanders. Captains Penniman and Perkins and Lieutenant Peppard, 
and the battalion telephone officer, Lieutenant Crowell, set out from the Bois de 
Ville at 1 A. M. on Monday, September 23, in General Brett's limousine, loaned 
by him for the purpose, and by 3 o'clock had alighted in what had once been 
Chattancourt, a village reduced to brick and mortar as completelj' — I venture 
to say — as any in France. 

A study of the maps had shown that there were but three roads leading 
north within the divisional sector. One of these ran from Chattancourt over the 
eastern slope of le Mort Homme and seemed to be the least promising of the 
three for the reason that it was shown as "unimproved" for more than half of 
the distance to the creek. The second road passed over the western slope of le 
Mort Homme, and the third led north from Esnes, converging with the second 
just south of Bethincourt. But a more important discovery than the location 
of roads was that the only bridge over the creek, as shown on the map, was the 
one leading into Bethincourt, and was to be reached by either of the two roads 
last mentioned. Therefore the first road described should have been discarded 
at once. 



20 THE FIRST BATTALION RECONNAISSANCE 

Taking first the center road, that just to the left of le Mort Homme, Major 
Dunnigan led the way north for perhaps a kilometer. On either side were old 
shell holes of from two to five feet in depth and from four to ten feet in diameter, 
each hole giving way to another in such perfect continuity that there was never 
room for more than a single person to pass between holes. Usually each hole was 
composed of two or more smaller ones. The road was passable for light artillery, 
but the brief description of the ground given above suffices to show that the 
fields were quite impassable. In addition, two old trench systems and two belts 
of barbed wire were passed, as were many loose strands of rusted wire, scattered 
over the slopes of le Mort Homme by the heavy fighting of 1916. 

In spite of these conditions and while still more than two kilometers from the 
bridge into Bethincourt, the first mistake was made. The road was abandoned 
and all stumbled for a short distance toward the crest of le Mort Homme on the 
right. The announced purpose was the location of battery positions into which 
to move prior to the expected attack, a matter of secondary importance. Finding 
this impracticable, the party retraced its steps to the road and returned to 
Chattancourt without having found out whether the road was passable all the 
way to the bridge shown on the map and without knowing whether the bridge 
existed in fact, although it was almost certain that it did not. 

As suggested hereinbefore, the next choice should have been the road leading 
north from Esnes: first, because it led to the only bridge over the creek, and, 
second, because it was shown as "improved" throughout its entire course. In 
spite of the fact that Lieutenant Peppard, in particular, urged these reasons for 
the more westerly road, the next start was made on the road running north from 
Chattancourt to the east of le Mort Homme, following an arrow gauge ammuni- 
tion railway apparently long disused and abused by the French. The termination 
of the road was soon reached. The railway ran off to the left and the right, and 
the road ran off into more shell holes of greater magnitude than those already 
described. 

Instead of returning to the road first tried and pursuing it to a conclusion 
and instead of trying the road out of Esnes, the party pursued its ascent to the 
summit of le Mort Homme (on the left), in and out of trenches and shell holes 
and through the wire. On the crest, an abandoned telephone dugout was found, 
into which the band made its muddy way for the purpose of being able once more 
to strike a light and consult its maps. 

After a rough orientation made below ground. Major Dunnigan ordered his 




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ESNES 




A AND B Battery Positions, Esnes, September 25th, 1918 



THE FIRST BATTALION RECONNAISSANCE 21 

Adjutant and the three battery commanders to advance down the forward slope 
of le Mort Homme and find positions. Lieutenant Crowell was to make a 
reconnaissance for the purpose of determining where his telephone wire should 
be laid. The battalion commander himself remained to search for command 
posts. After stumbling for about an hour through what had obviously been the 
storm center of the Crown Prince's attacks, the four officers in search of positions 
chose a shell hole in which to hold a conference. It was suggested and agreed 
by all that, assuming that the most ideal battery position on the whole front 
could be found on the forward slope of le Mort Homme, it would be absolutely 
impossible to reach it with a single firing section drawn by all the horses of a 
battalion. The party therefore returned to the point of common separation 
and made that report to Major Dunnigan. It was pointed out that the only way 
to select batterj' positions on such a front was to choose the best road, follow it as 
far as possible and make the best of the shell holes on either side of the road for 
putting the pieces into position. 

Convincednowof the impracticability of the forward slope of le Mort Homme, 
the whole ])arty retraced its steps for the second time to Chattancourt where 
Major Dunnigan, taking Lieutenant Crowell with him, entered the machine 
and returned to the Bois de Ville for the reason that day had begun to dawn and 
it was inadvisable for as many as six officers to wander about together. Night 
hours had been utilized in compliance with a corps order forbidding movement 
of personnel during the day time within a certain radius of the front. The full 
benefits were not derived from this order because of the presence of the co- 
operating French artillery. Two things had been proved: first, that the easterly 
road over le Mort Homme was not feasible for an advance of artillery; and, 
second, that a night without moon or stars is at best a poor time for a reconnais- 
sance. 

With one or more sleepless nights behind each of them and with no part of 
the mission accomplished, the four remaining officers stopped at the kitchen of 
an infantry unit in a support trench, begged hot coffee and used part of their 
reserve rations. They then set out on foot for Esnes, turned north along the road 
already described, with the sworn intention of following it as far as possible 
and of ascertaining whether it was passable for artillery. Battery positions could 
await the determination of that question. 

All knew that as soon as the last spur of Hill 304 (on their left) had been 
crossed, Bethincourt would lie in the valley a little more than a kilometer ahead 



22 THE FIRST BATTALION RECONNAISSANCE 

of them, but after the last spur had been passed and for several hundred meters 
thereafter, in spite of continued search on the part of all, Bethincourt did not 
make itself apparent. This caused no inconsiderable worry to the members of 
the expedition and it was finally thought wise to lie in a shell hole, spread out 
the maps and study them with a \'iew to ascertaining the real location of 
the party. Only two solutions suggested themselves: first, that the officers had 
lost their way, or, second, that the map was wrong. It is not necessary to state 
which solution was the more probable. 

In point of fact neither was correct. After reassuring themselves by reference 
to communication trenches, second line trenches, roads and contours that they 
could put the point of a pencil on their exact position, it was found that Bethin- 
court should be less than a kilometer away. Field glasses were quickly produced 
and with their aid the ruins of Bethincourt, for the most part but a few feet 
high, were seen nestled in the mist of the valley. Inexperience had nearly caused 
an innocent jaunt into the German lines. 

Realizing that they were within most effective machine gun and rifle range 
from the German positions shown on the map, the officers were suddenly reluctant 
to return as they had come. So, with full equipment, consisting of field glasses, 
gas mask, haversack containing rations, etc., map case, belt with spare cartridges, 
automatic, first aid pouch, overcoat and steel helmet, they started to crawl on 
their empty stomachs through the grass, hopping and rolling from hole to hole, 
in search of a communicating trench. Just as all appreciated that real endurance 
was required and as all were pitying the plight of a doughboy, an explosion was 
heard from within the German lines. One of the officers who had received some 
instruction in the firing of gas shells by artillery and whose words therefore 
carried great weight with the others of no experience in that line, shouted "Gas!", 
the first of many false alarms that filled the ensuing days. Off came helmets 
and out came masks and the writer, for one, forgot all his instructions in the haste 
that seemed so expedient. In not exceeding five minutes the last mask (that 
of the writer) had been adjusted and the crawling journey was continued. 

After an interminable time, a point was reached whence it was thought safe 
to make a dash for the nearest communication trench on the side of Hill 304, and 
from there the reconnaissance was pursued, but not until enough courage had 
been regained to remove the masks and reflect upon the absurdity of having 
donned them. All reahzed that training is worth a tenth, experience, the 
other nine. 




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One of Battery A's Anti-Aircraft Guns in the Bois db Chapitre 



THE FIRST BATTALION RECONNAISSANCE 23 

This much had been learned — that the road from Esnes to Bethincourt was 
the road over which the advance would have to be made, that there were no good 
battery positions along that road in the true sense of the word, and that the 
bridge into Bethincourt — which existed on the map— had been destroyed as if it 
had never existed. It would therefore be necessary to call upon the engineers to 
build a new bridge during the night preceding the attack. 

Being well on their way and, as they thought, fairly near their advanced 
posts and first line trenches, they stopped long enough to select an observation 
post and then returned by communication trench toward Esnes. After a hike 
of something more than a kilometer, they were called to an abrupt halt by an 
American sentry. It occurred to one of the party to question this sentry and it 
developed that the sentry was the most advanced American outpost. In other 
words, since the sector had become quiet, No Man's Land had increased corres- 
pondingly in width until it was now approximately four kilometers from the most 
advanced German outposts to the most advanced American outposts. The 
whole morning and part of the night before had been spent between them without 
encountering or being subjected to any danger, for the reason that the Germans 
had been doing on their side what the French, and, subsequently, the Americans, 
were doing on our side — holding the line thinly and organizing in depth. 

Battery positions were now located more definitely and a rough plan of 
laying telephone wire from the positions to the observation post already chosen 
was mapped out. To be sure, it was not apparent for what pressing purpose the 
selection of an observation post had been ordered, in view of the fact that an 
advance was to be made before the battalion fired a shot. 

Stopping long enough to beg a noonday meal, the party returned a third 
time to Chattancourt, where they were to have met a motor sent by Major 
Dunnigan to pick them up. Their arrival was after the appointed hour, however, 
and there was no motor on hand. They were, therefore, confronted with the 
necessity for a march of twenty kilometers. A large part of the trip was made on 
foot and the balance was accompHshed by begging rides from truck drivers and 
messengers with motorcycles and side cars. The report of the day's work was 
made to Major Dunnigan and Lieutenant-Colonel Brunzell at dark on the 
evening of the 23rd of September, with somewhat less candor, perhaps, than it is 
hereinbefore set out. 




Road Leading to Hill 304 (in Background) 




Regimental P. C. September 25th, 191S— Montzeville-Chattancourt Road 



CHAPTER II. 
Barrage of September 26, 1918 

THE military situation in Europe in the fall of 1918 demanded that the 
United States launch an offensive of its own. The allied counter-attack of 
July 18 was still in progress and gaining ground all along the line north of 
Rheims; the German armies were being repulsed slowly but surely. The advan- 
tages to be gained by the American army's taking part immediately were tre- 
mendous. With the enemy already giving way, a strong American blow might 
prove a decisive factor. It was a psychological moment which could not be lost 
in spite of the fact that no major operations had been contemplated for the 
American Expeditionary Forces until 1919. Our troops were largely inexperi- 
enced and many units but partly trained. 

On account of communication and supply from French ports of debarkation, 
the American zone of operations became the southern part of the western front. 
On this front two possible campaigns presented themselves; first an offensive 
against Metz and the coal and iron fields of the Briey district from which the 
Germans were obtaining the greater part of their raw material for munitions; 
secondly, a thrust north between the Meuse River and the Argonne forest with 
the important railroad connections at Sedan and Mezieres as objectives. The 
cutting of these lines of communications would force the German armies in the 
Champagne to withdraw to the north through Liege and Namur or risk capture. 

Either one of these plans required a preliminary operation — the reduction of 
the Saint Mihiel salient — in order to eliminate the threat of an enemy attack on 
the flank. The Saint Mihiel attack was therefore planned in great detail far 
ahead. Its execution on September 12 and 13 was as clean cut as any operation 
attempted by the Allies. 

Hardly had the line been straightened out on this front, than the bulk of the 
American troops were moved north toward Verdun i n preparation for what was now 
chosen as the main American operation, the Meuse-Argonne offensive. If the 
signing of the armistice on November 11 had not interfered, the Metz and 
Briey campaign would have followed the Meuse-Argonne campaign about the 





2d Battalion Positions Behind le Mort Homme, September 25th, 1918 



~1 




Hill 281, Looking North 



BARRAGE OF SEPTEMBER 26, 1918 25 

middle of November. It is a question whether the Germans did not expect up to 
the last moment that the American Army would attack in September east of 
Verdun instead of north. 

The attack on September 26, 1918, by the American 1st Army was made in 
conjunction with the French 4th Army on a front of 65 kilometers from the Meuse 
to the Suippe. It was a part of the general offensive from Verdun to the North 
Sea, being the hinge on which the line was swinging. The American sector 
extended from the Meuse north of Verdun at Forges, west 30 kilometers to the 
western edges of the Argonne Forest. On the American left was the French 4th 
Army; on the right, on the east bank of the Meuse, the French 17th Corps. Our 
order of battle from right to left was the 3d Corps from the Meuse to Malancourt, 
with the 33d, 80th and 4th Divisions in the line and the 3d Division in corps 
reserve; the 5th Corps from Malancourt to Vauquois, with the 79th, 37th and 
91st Divisions in line and the 32d Division in corps reserve; and the 1st Corps, 
from Vauquois to Vienne-le-Chateau, with the 35th, 28th and 77th Divisions in 
line and the 92d in corps reserve. The 1st, 29th and 82d Divisions constituted 
the army reserve. 

The 80th Division in the center of the 3d Corps was to attack the German 
line at Bethincourt and drive through to the corps objective, on this front, 
Dannevoux Ridge, 8 kilometers north of departure. 

The American Army objective to be reached eventually in the action ex- 
tended along the Meuse from Sivry-sur-Meuse to Brieulles and thence northwest 
touching the northern edges of the Bois de Foret and Bois des Rappes. The 
divisional zone of action ran roughly, on the following axis — Fromereville, Ger- 
monville, Bois de Bourrus, Chattancourt, Cote 295 (le Mort Homme), Bethin- 
court, Cote 281, Bois de Sachet and Bois de Dannevoux. At the "jump off" along 
the Ruisseau de Forges, the sector was about 2000 meters wide, or 1000 meters 
on either side of the ruins of Bethincourt. From Hill 281, the sector broadened 
until it was from 4000 to 5000 meters wide on Dannevoux Ridge. The attack 
was to be delivered in column of brigades, the 160th Brigade leading; regiments 
were to be side by side in column of battalions, the 319th Infantry on the right 
and the 320th Infantry on the left. The advance was to proceed at a rate of 100 
meters in four minutes through the enemy first hne of resistance on Hill 281 and 
his second line in the southern edge of the Bois d'en dela and the Bois Jure. 
After taking this second position the hne was to be re-organized and advanced to 
the corps objective. 



26 BARRAGE OF SEPTEMBER 26, 1918 

The divisional artillery consisted of the following units : — 75nim caliber ; — 
313th Field Artillery, sLx batteries; 314th Field Artillery, sLx batteries; 228th 
Regiment (French), nine batteries; 2d Battalion, 76th Field Artillery, three 
batteries. 155mm caliber; — 315th Field Artillery, sixbatteries, and 1st Battalion, 
289th Regiment (French), two batteries. The plan of artillery employment was 
as follows: From H-6 hours to H-3 hours, army and corps artillery were to 
deliver a harassing and interdiction fire upon the enemy's rear areas. From H-3 
hours to H hour the divisional heavy artillery was to join the army and corps 
artillery in counter battery and destructive fire. At H hour the light artillery 
was to lay down a standing barrage on the Boche front lines. This was to be 
maintained at the rate of 100 rounds per gun per hour from H hour to H+24 
minutes during which time the infantry attacking battalions were to advance 
to it. Then the barrage was to become a rolling barrage advancing at the rate of 
100 meters in four minutes, and sweeping through the first hostile position to 
a depth of about 4000 meters. Between the first and second hostile positions the 
support of the infantry devolved upon the 228th Regiment and the 315th Field 
Artillery and the 1st Battalion, 289th Regiment. During this phase of the 
action, the 313th and 314th Field Artillery were to advance into new positions 
and take up the support of the infantry beyond the German second line of resis- 
tance. 

The 1st Battalion, 313th Field Artillery and one company of the 305th 
Engineers were attached to the 160th Brigade, as accompanying guns and 
infantry batteries. It was planned to use the engineers in getting the guns over 
the Ruisseau de Forges. The first platoon of C Battery under Lieutenant 
Morgan, was attached to the leading battalion, 319th Infantry; thesecond platoon 
under Lieutenant Penniman to the leading battalion, 320th Infantry, A and B 
Batteries as infantry batteries were under command of Brigadier-General Brett, 
160th Brigade. These two batteries were to be in position near Esnes but 
were not to take part in the barrage. C Battery was to be limbered and hitched 
on the Esnes-Bethincourt road to follow the infantry at H hour. A and B 
Batteries were to advance as soon as the road forward was possible. 

The 2d Battalion, 313th Field Artillery, was assigned a part in the barrage. 
The battalion barrage front extended from a point in the town of Bethincourt on 
the Bethincourt-Gercourt road west for 600 meters, this being approximately 
the center of the divisional sector. The barrage zone extended in a magnetic 
north direction directly over Hill 281 and on to the limit of range about 1000 



BARRAGE OF SEPTEMBER 26, 1918 27 

meters short of the Bois de Sachet. The rate of fire was to be 100 rounds per gun 
per hour. An OP for the 1st BattaUon was estabhshed on Hill 304 and for the 
2d Battalion on le Mort Homme. These OP's were not used as the artillery was 
not allowed to register ])rior to the attack and during the attack the fog and smoke 
prevented observation. 

During the night of September 25 and 26 the complete occupation of the 
sector by all arms was effected. Those batteries of the 313th Field Artillery 
which had not gone into position moved forward from the Bois de Bourrus. 
The 1st Battalion occupied positions in the open near Esnes, A and B Batteries 
about 800 meters north of Esnes and defiladed by Hill 304, C Battery off the 
Esnes-Bethincourt road about one kilometer northeast of Esnes in a position of 
readiness. Battery D, 2d Battalion, joined Batteries E and F, which a few nights 
before had moved into old French emplacements 400 meters north of the Mont- 
zeville-Chattancourt road about midway between the two towns and in rear of 
Hill 295 (le Mort Homme). E and F Batteries occupied side by side well- 
organized positions which bore evidence of having been registered on by the 
Boche when their former occupants were present. D Battery took up a position 
in the open between E and F, barely defiladed from Montfaucon. 

The 305th Engineers were assigned the work of constructing a cut-off road 
from the Chattancourt-Esnes road to the Esnes-Bethincourt road, Esnes lying 
outside of the divisional sector. In the original plan of action the division was 
to advance via the Chattancourt-le Mort Homme-Bethincourt road. When 
it was discovered that this road existed only on the map, the division axis of 
traffic was changed via the new cut-off on to the Esnes-Bethincourt road. In 
addition to building the cut-off during the night, the engineers repaired the 
Esnes-Bethincourt road, cut the wire in no man's land and laid foot bridges for 
the infantry across the swampy marsh land of the Ruisseau de Forges. A bridge 
into Bethincourt suitable for trucks and artillery was also constructed and 
finished by 9.00 A. M. on the morning of the 26th. 

The infantry moved forward early in the evening of the 25th. Regiments 
marched between 15 and 20 kilometers from the rear forest areas where they had 
been in bivouac for several nights. Movement was very difficult; the traffic, 
both troop and transport, taxed to the limit the capacity of the roads and trench 
systems of the sector. Infantry, artillery, engineers, supply trains, ammunition 
trains, sanitary trains and engineer trains were moved as far forward as possible 
in anticipation of the attack. Fortunately the Boche artillery maintained only 



28 BARRAGE OF SEPTEMBER 26, 1918 

the customary harassing and interdiction fire on roads. Our artillery fire during 
the early evening consisted likewise of desultory shelling, in order to keep the 
enemy in ignorance as long as possible of the attack. 

At 11.30 P.M., September 25, the long range army and corps artillery opened 
a destructive, harassing and interdiction fire on the Boche. From the forward 
battery positions the effect was as of an intense electric storm accompanied by 
continued thunder claps. The horizon in the rear was clearly outlined by a quiver- 
ing glow reaching up into the sky. The volume of sound became a roar rising 
and falling in tone. If there was an increase in the German artillery fire it could 
not be noticed on account of our own gun fire. At 2.30 A.M., September 26, the 
155 millimeter howitzers of the divisional artillery commenced fire upon Boche 
trench systems and battery positions. The artillery area behind Dead Man's 
Hill and Hill 304 was brightly lighted during the remainder of the night by the 
flare from the muzzles of the guns. The sharp crashes of these batteries added a 
new note to the undertone of intense artillery fire. 

H hour was at 5.30 A. M. The army, corps and division heavy artillery 
continued harassing and destructive fire through the night. Enemy artillery 
fire was very light. At 5.30 A. M. the barrage started as a standing barrage 
along the entire front of sixty-five kilometers. It was placed on the advanced 
German positions. The 80th Division infantry advanced from 5.30 A. M. to 
5.54 A. M. across the Forges Brook as close to the barrage as possible. The line 
was then formed to follow the barrage as it rolled forward over Hill 281. At 
5.54 A. M. artillery ranges were increased, 50 meters every two minutes, and the 
barrage began to creep. The infantry moved ahead at the same time, following 
the curtain of shells which kept the Boche down in his dugouts and hid our 
advancing line from German machine gunners and artillery observers. 

There was practically no enemy resistance in the first 3000 meters of the 
advance. In almost every case the Boche, forced to his dugout by the destructive 
fire of the night, gave up willingly. On Hill 281, German machine gunners hiding 
below ground until our first line had passed over the position, emerged with their 
machine guns and fired on our infantry from the rear. 

Beyond Hill 281 the terrain sloped away in open meadows to the Bois de 
Sachet. In this woods, in the Bois Jure on the right and the Bois d'en dela and 
the Bois de Septsarges on the left, the enemy had an organized machine gun 
defense which slowed up the advance considerably. This line of resistance was 
admirably placed. It was beyond the barrage zone of our light artillery and 



BARRAGE OF SEPTEMBER 26, 1918 29 

cleverly located to take advantage of ground forms and cover. The attack 
against the position was carried on from the middle of the morning through 
the afternoon. It involved the employment of skirmish line tactics and advances 
by small elements under covering fire. The enemy was driven back into and in 
some cases through these woods during the early afternoon. A great number of 
Germans fell back to Dannevoux Ridge itself during the action. 

The barrage fired by the 2d Battalion was completed about 8.00 A. M. The 
limit of range had been reached and the movement of the battalion to a position 
on Hill 281 in support of the infantry was ordered at once. Combat trains, lim- 
bers and transport came up from the echelons and the battalion moved out on 
the Chattancourt-Esnes road before 9.00 A. M. in order F, D and E Batteries. 
Duck boards were placed on each caisson at the engineer dump on the Montze- 
ville-Chattancourt road. These were expected to be used in crossing the Ruisseau 
de Forges but later were not found practicable for heavy transport. 

The 1st Battalion preceded the 2d Battalion, C Battery being the first 
wheeled traffic over the engineers' bridge at Bethincourt at 9.00 A. M. The 
movement forward was under very trying circumstances. On account of the 
great amount of traffic, the one road to Bethincourt was badly congested. The 
advance was made in spasmodic starts and stops. Despite the engineers' work 
the road had a capacity of only one stream of transport. Small arms ammunition 
and artillery were to have the right of way behind the infantry. Actually, every 
kind of troops and trans])ort attempted to use this single axis of travel. There 
were engineers, machine gun carts, German prisoner convoys, ambulances, motor 
trucks, infantry, artillery, staff officers, and motorcycle messengers. As a result 
the batteries moved forward through Bethincourt very slowly and reached the 
crest of Hill 281 between twelve and one o'clock. 

Reconnaissance showed that our front line was in the Bois de Sachet and 
Bois Jure and that any movement over Hill 281 was under observation from the 
front and right flank. From the front we were subject to artillery and machine 
gun fire and from the right flank to artillery fire from the Cotes de Meuse. Posi- 
tions were therefore occupied on the reverse slope of Hill 281. The 1st Battalion 
minus C Battery which had followed the infantry over Hill 281, was on the right 
of the Bethincourt-Gercourt road and the 2d Battalion on the left. From these 
positions, with OP's in the trench systems on Hill 281, fire with observation was 
possible as far as Dannevoux Ridge and on the east bank of the Meuse above 
Sivry-sur-Meuse to Haraumont and the Bois de Chaume. 



30 



BARRAGE OF SEPTEMBER 26, 1918 



Fire was delivered during the afternoon upon the towns of Dannevoux and 
Sivry-sur-Meuse, the bridge at Vilosnes and the enemy hne in Bois de Septsarges 
and Bois de Dannevoux. A Battery took under fire a German 77 sniping from 
Dannevoux Ridge, scattered the gun crew and put the gun out of action. General 
Brett made a report of the effect of the shell fire on this piece after the infantry 
had taken the position. 

During the afternoon of the 26th the infantry executed an advance on the 
left of the Bois Jure, filtered in behind the Germans between the Bois Jure 
and Bois de Dannevoux, captured a large number of prisoners and occupied 
Dannevoux Ridge. This completed the capture of the corps objective in the 
80th Division sector. The 80th and 33d Divisions accomplished the corps mission 
during the first twenty-four hours of attack. 




Bethincourt, le Mort Homme in the Distance 



CHAPTER III. 

. Hill 281 

THE batteries of the 2d Battalion arrived on Hill 281 with nothing more 
serious to overcome than a few road jams due to the tremendous amount of 
traffic. German prisoners and wounded streaming back, and ammuni- 
tion, food, kitchens and reserves going forward, with the wreckage of battle and 
the dead on both sides of the road, gave our first real view of the immensity of 
a "big push." 

On the reverse slope of Hill 281 the battalion halted in column and, as speci- 
fied in F. A. D. R., the battery commanders rode forward for their mounted recon- 
naissance. With Major Nash in the lead and his EC's following close behind, 
the little company rode over the crest to examine the situation. A battery of 
German 77's was evidently waiting for this very move, for as the officers appeared, 
"Whizz Bang!" and the whole band found itself occupying the most convenient 
shell holes, while a surprised and somewhat scared horse-holder beat a hasty 
retreat with the animals. 

The German gunners were evidently enjoying themselves immensely, for 
they kept up their sniping as the party progressed. When they had reached 
fairly safe fox-holes the group halted for a little consultation. Captain Barton 
stuck his head up out of one fox-hole and called, "Say, Eben, come over here 
a second;" Lieutenant Cross's head appeared out of another hole and he an- 
swered, "If you want to speak to me you come over here." 

Orders were received to fire on Dannevoux, where the infantry was being 
held up by machine guns in the town, and the battalion went into position in 
line about 800 meters below the crest of Hill 281. The German planes were still 
very active and this move was somewhat hurried by a Boche flying over and 
dropping flares above our column. Later two more came across and made 
straight for "sausages" which were directing the fire of the heavies. They burned 
two of them and then flew back over our guns, machine-gunning the echelon. 

Near our guns were old German trenches and a few dugouts which were 
utilized for protection for the cannoneers in case of heavy shelling. Farther 



32 HILL 281 

forward on the top of the hill was an elaborate and strong system of trenches and 
dugouts which made excellent OP's and PC's. That the infantry was able with 
so few losses to drive the Germans out of this stronghold speaks volumes for the 
effectiveness of the supporting artillery fire. The whole hill was thickly pock- 
marked with shell holes, from 75's to those of the big naval guns. Immense 
supplies of machine gun and artillery ammunition as well as an unlimited number 
of hand grenades and signal rockets were left here by the retreating Boche. Some 
lucky soldiers dined on sauerkraut and potatoes and many wrote home on 
Jerry's postcards and writing paper. 

On the afternoon of the 26th heavy zone fire was delivered with good effect 
on call from the infantry. This continued so heavily that guns had to be drenched 
with water and laid off at intervals to prevent overheating. The bridgehead and 
orchard at Vilosnes were also taken under fire and many cross-roads harassed. 
Due to this heavy firing and the congestion of roads some difficulty was experi- 
enced in keeping up the supply of ammunition, and here the hard and persist- 
ent work of the B lieutenants and drivers made itself felt. Few people give the 
credit that is due to the man who works all night, every night, on shelled cross- 
roads and ammunition dumps to bring up the required quota for the next day's 
firing. 

From the OP's German guns could be seen while firing and several of these 
were silenced. Battery A received the personal thanks of General Brett for 
knocking out one of these that was causing the infantry much trouble. One 
afternoon Captain Barton located a German battery by observation of its flashes 
on the east bank of the Meuse near the Bois deChaume (Point 321800-281200). 
The position was verified as an old established position. F Battery opened at 
about 3.00 P. M. with counter battery fire and the enemy fire ceased. At 5.00 
P. M. E Battery's OP located the same German battery in action and opened on 
it, causing it again to cease fire. 

Between 8.00 and 9.00 P. M. that night the same battery was again observed 
firing. This time E and F Batteries opened together with a carefully arranged 
fire and the battery was not observed in action again. 

Every battery commander in the neighborhood had his OP on the top of 
the hill and also any observing instrument he happened to possess. When the 
weather was good the hill fairly bristled with telescopes, monoculars and aiming 
circles. One fine bright day a Cadillac — white collars, shiny boots and spurs — - 
appeared for a short inspection. 




2d Battalion Positions on Hill 'isi 




A Battery O. P. in Old German Trenches Along Crest of Hill 281 




German "88" on Dannbvoux Ridge Put Out of Action by Battery A, September 26th, 1918 




Same Gun, Different View 



HILL 281 33 

The regiment was extremely lucky in this position on Hill 281 as regards 
losses. We were very poorly sheltered and crowded into a very small space 
so that every precaution had to be taken, especially against gas. Sentries were 
stationed at each dugout and batter}^ position and nobody ever accused them 
of going to sleep on the job. They couldn't sleep so they wouldn't let any of the 
rest of us do so. Gas alarms spread over the hill like wildfire three or four times 
every night and could be heard going on to the SOS behind and Switzerland and 
the North Sea on either side. Private Kragh of F Battery awoke to one of these 
alarms and to his consternation could not find his mask. He reached frantically 
for all in sight but somebody beat him each time. In desperation he ran, still 
holding his breath, to the picket line, found his horse, and triumphantly returned 
with a horse gas mask stretched over his face, just in time to hear Lieutenant 
Crosbie yell disgustedly, "Remove masks, there's no gas here." Aggravating as 
they may have been, these frequent alarms were excellent drill and it is due to 
the good lessons and drills impo.sed by the gas NCO's that the regiment had so 
few gas casualties when they did meet this form of attack. 

If in modern warfare one had only to fight it would not be so hard, but when 
not firing there was always lots of work to be done. Ammunition was the 
hardest problem but camouflage ran it a close second. The echelons occupied 
the slope of one hill and the gun positions another and for two days both were 
absolutely uncovered from aerial observation. Much work was required to 
camouflage new positions near the old ones, and while the others fired, the guns 
were moved singly to these new positions before the Germans opened on them. 
Like the gas "non-coms" the camouflage "non-coms" rendered excellent service 
and saved the regiment many casualties by their hard and persistent work. 
Whatever had to be done was well done by these mountaineers and miners, 
and the officers of this regiment believe that no better soldiers can be found 
anywhere than in the mountains of West Virginia. 

Near the crest of the hill the Germans had abandoned a battery of 77 's, 
having only time to take the sights with them. Near by was an unlimited supply 
of ammunition and these guns were fired constantly at Germany by cannoneers 
from different batteries of the brigade. With the ammunition were many basket 
carriers which were tried out by our cannoneers in carrying our ammunition. 
They were not very successful and were soon abandoned with many other 
things. The horses had begun to sicken and die from very limited forage and 
watering facilities and overwork. Batteries lost three and four horses per day 



34 HILL 281 

and as each horse died somebody's equipment had to be left behind. The men 
simply increased the weight of their packs and carried on, in later moves carrying 
their packs, holding up the horses and assisting in pulling and pushing the 
carriages over rough ground and up hills. 

On Hill 281 we had our first experiences with German traps, and while a few 
casualties were suffered the chief effect was to lessen considerably the ardor of 
many souvenir hunters. Four or five men were seriously injured from examining 
German equipment left behind and a lesson was well learned that was probably 
worth what it cost. A German bayonet was wired to a hand grenade and when 
it was picked up the grenade exploded causing a wound. Hand grenades were 
left in communicating trenches and in the entrances to dugouts. The result of 
all this was that everybody came to view wires and such things with too much 
caution to fool with them. 

On September 27 the entire army objective within its sector was taken by 
the 80th Division. That same night the infantry was relieved by the reserve 
brigade of the 33d Division. Our fire was in support of the 33d Division until 
we rejoined the 80th for the attack on the morning of October 4 in a new sector, 

Colonel Wise, in his "Brief History of the 80th Division," says, "Du ing the 
first phase of the offensive the 80th Division, opposed by three entire hostile 
divisions and various Landsturm Battalions, had advanced 9 kilometers and 
captured 35 officers, 815 other ranks, 16 pieces of artillery, 7 minenwerfers, 77 
machine guns and a large quantity of ammunition and stores, including over 
5,000,000 rounds of small arms ammunition and 5000 boxes of grenades. In 
addition,an entire ammunition dump on the bank of the Meuse,with stores valued 
at $10,000,000 was captured. The achievement of the division had been a most 
extraordinary one, so that though its own allotted role had been fully performed 
it was now called upon to assist two other divisions — the 4th and 37th." 

While our infantry went to the support of these two divisions, the artillery 
brigade remained to support the 33d Division. 



CHAPTER IV. 
Gercourt 

BATTERY C, designated as the accompanying guns for the attacking infantry 
brigade, took up a position near Esnes about 10.30 the night of Septem- 
ber 25, 1918. Little sleep was had that night under the strange influence of 
our barrage which opened at 11.00 P. M. at about one-third strength, increasing 
about 2.00 A. M. the morning of September 26, to two-thirds strength, and about 
5.00 A. M., to full strength, with every French and American gun of large and 
small caliber firing at deathly speed. It was in this thundering roar and under 
the muzzles of 155's that the battery hitched up and a few minutes after 5.00 
A. M. was proceeding along the Esnes-Bethincourt road in the wake of the 
advancing infantry. 

The first and second gun sections and the fifth caisson section commanded 
by Lieutenant E. F.A. Morgan were supporting the 1st Battalion, 319th Infantry; 
the third and fourth gun sections and the sixth caisson section commanded by 
Lieutenant John A. D. Penniman were supporting the attacking battalion, 320th 
Infantry. 

The battery had not proceeded far when it was held up by a battalion of 
75's firing directly across the road, and because of the intricate old trench system 
there it was impossible to skirt them and go ahead. The battalion of 75's was 
firing a rolling barrage at the rate of one round per gun every thirty seconds, 
covering the infantry's advance, and could not cease firing. 

After some delay arrangements were made with them to have all of the 
guns fire at once, and during the thirty second interval before the next shot, 
carriage by carriage we galloped across their front and down the hill toward 
Bethincourt. 

While these arrangements were being made the battery was halted directly 
behind a French 75mm battery also engaged in firing the barrage. Our gun crews 
watched them with horror as they broke all rules of the drill regulations. The 
crews had no more than a sergeant and four men to each, and these men were 
taking turns eating while the remaining men doubled up on the duties of the crew. 



36 GERCOURT 

The nonchalance and ease with which the French smoked, ate and talked as 
they fired caused our then green, muchly fed-on-drill-regulations men to look 
aghast. They almost shouted in protest when they saw a shell stick on entering 
the breech and beheld Number 2, instead of carefully extracting it with the 
ramrod, pick up another shell and with its base drive home the stuck shell. 

Much wiser the battery passed across the old No Man's Land and saw the 
sea of shell holes, broken trees, acres of wire entanglements and broken farm 
implements, such as mowing machines, hay rakes and the like. Forges Brook 
was soon reached and here was a second halt. The bridge across it had been 
blown up and our engineers had not completed the building of a new one for 
which a steady stream of lumber and steel rails was being brought up by men and 
mule teams. 

It was then that we saw^ the first German prisoner being marched back to 
the rear by a proud infantryman. Soon after they began to come back in groups 
of twenty and thirty. The prisoners were all young and a large proportion wore 
glasses; some had intelligent faces, some very unintelligent. Many wore Red 
Cross brassards. Later we found machine gunners dead in their nests with these 
same brassards on their arms or in the act of being put on. One prisoner in passing 
stepped far enough out of line to pat the tubeof one of our guns andsay"Kamerad." 

All of them made comments on the camouflage paint on the American caissons, 
evidently the first American materiel they had seen and much lighter in color 
than that used by the French or the Germans. 

The barrage was still continuing in its intensity; hundreds of shells 
were singing overhead. The engineers were working with excellent skill and 
speed against great odds and on marshy ground. In a short time they had the 
bridge completed, and, as the last plank was laid in position, our first carriage 
rolled over, the first piece of wheeled material to enter Bethincourt in four long 
years. 

From there on we thought the going would be easy, but it was not. In spite 
of the work done ahead of us by the engineers, and the detachment of ammuni- 
tion train men who were attached to the battery for this pioneer work, the road 
through Bethincourt was still a series of shell holes, fallen stone walls and 
barbed wire entanglements, into which the horses and carriages continually 
slipped and fell with barbed wire twisted around the horses' legs, tearing the 
flesh. To expedite matters the infantry reserves which were now coming up 
pitched in to work filling holes and with their clippers cleared away the wire 




Gercoukt and Bois Jdke from Hill 281 




Gerco€RT, Bois JrRE in the Distance, Showing Field of Firi' m < J'.attery When it Sniped 
AT German Machine Gun Nests, September 2t)TH, 191S 




C Battery's Position in Gebcourt (One Plat-j jn ix liuixs to Left of Auto) 




BocHE Machine Gun in the Edge of the Bois Jure 



GERCOURT 37 

entanglements. With this assistance we again started on our way taking the 
Bethincourt-Gercourt road, the axis of march of the infantry and the road upon 
which we were to be found by our runners. We had sent two runners with each 
of the infantry battahon commanders to act as agents of Uaison to bring us word 
as to where the infantry was held up and what assistance it needed. 

A heavy fog had been hanging in the valley over Forges Brook all the 
morning. Under its cover our operations had been obscured from the enemy 
planes. Now it lifted as we approached the top of Hill 281. Here we were 
again stopped while we filled in a trench in order to cross with the carriages. 
On all sides of us here lay signs of recent fighting. German equipment was 
scattered everywhere, helmets, rifles, hand grenades and ammunition. On 
one side of the road lay a German officer dying from a bayonet wound; on the 
other side of the road lay a German soldier nearly dead from a bayonet wound in 
his stomach. Near this German lay the first American dead we had seen, a 
sergeant in the 319th infantry. The top of Hill 281 is spotted with a system of 
trenches and dugouts from which intermittent streams of frightened Germans 
came pouring, calling "Kamerad." 

Scenes like this were everywhere in the near foreground, but just ahead over 
the next hill could be seen the two lines of skirmishers, ours attacking from the 
open fields, the Germans in the southern edge of Bois Jure and Bois de Sachet, 
not surrendering but contesting hotly every inch of ground. Just then we received 
a message from the infantry saying that they were getting along well and the 
enemy giving away. With this news we pushed ahead over the now filled trench 
along the road towards Gercourt, finally inilling off the road and stopping on the 
reverse slope of the hill just north of 281. 

From the crest of this hill we could see our infantry entering the Bois Jure 
and Bois de Sachet. We sent our scouts out to keep in touch with the infantry. 
The scout who went to the 320th Infantry was told to signal back with semaphore 
flags to us on the hill whether the attack was progressing, and "Yes" or "No," 
whether we were needed. After he had found the infantry major in the woods the 
scout came out in the field and bodly unfurled his flags and began signalling. He 
got out two letters — "N-0" — when machine gun bullets began raining at him, 
one passing through his right arm. Later he reported orally the rest of the 
message. 

By now our infantry had entered the woods and we, from our point of 
vantage, could see scattered groups of Germans running out of the northern edge 



38 GERCOURT 

of the Bois Jure. Thinking that we could possibly do a little damage by firing 
on these fleeting targets we were just going into action when our attention was 
attracted to a column of artillery pulling out of the Bois de Sachet and winding 
its way slowly up the steep slope towards the Bois de Dannevoux. Through our 
field glasses we were unable to determine whether it was a French or German 
battery, but a Major who rode up just then assured us it was a French battery 
of accompanying guns and was well forward where we should be. He ordered 
us not to fire. As the battery ahead came more in view we decided it was a 
German battery and confirmed our beliefs by observing with the BC telescope 
which we set up. We missed the opportunity of our lives for firing on fleeting 
targets when we did not open fire because we could not get the Major's permis- 
sion. He was busy searching and turning over to some passing infantry a group 
of fifteen or twenty Germans who came streaming out from a series of dugouts 
just behind us. When he finally did look through the high powered glasses 
he realized his mistake, but by then the column had passed out of sight over 
the hifl and was not seen again. 

While this was going on we saw an airplane approaching us from the north 
flying at a very low altitude. It circled over our heads so closely that we could 
see plainly the observer's face and the German cross on the wings and then he 
flew north again. It returned again and this time fired a three ball signal rocket 
when he was just above us. We had hardly given the command to the battery 
to move off when shells began to fall near us and we did just get away before they 
opened up a heavy fire on us in answer to the signal from the airplane. 

At this point the battery divided, the first platoon going over to the east 
behind the Bois Jure, where the 319th Infantry were fighting, and the second 
platoon to the west behind the Bois de Sachet where the 320th Infantry were 
fighting. The second platoon, on arriving in the Bois de Sachet, found the 
advance of the infantry held up by the great number of enemy machine guns scat- 
tered through the woods. To help this situation we fired a raking fire ahead of 
our lines and kept the advance going until nightfall. An echelon was established 
that night with scattered Germans on all sides of us, Germans who had been passed 
over by the infantry and had not yet been cleaned up by the "moppers up." 
The drivers and one caisson corporal, who did his work mounted, chased and 
caught prisoners until it was too dark to see. This same caisson Corporal was 
wounded just about dusk that evening. As he was taking his section to water, 
an enemy plane attacked his column of horses, and after firing its machine gun, 




TiiENCH Alun<; .Southeun ICijce of Bois JuKii 




Two liuciiE 7/ s ix LD(iE OF Bois Jure 
(One Destroyed by Our Barrage; the Other Blown Up by Retreating Germans) 




C Battery's Posiiimn r, M^is db .Sachet 




J'art of the Bois Sachet (Snowixf; Belgian Guns CAPTunEo and Used by the Boche) 



GERCOURT 39 

let fall a series of bombs. A fragment of a bomb wounded the Corporal while he 
was firing at the plane with his pistol. Men in that section said the plane was so 
close they used the aviator's goggles as a bull's eye. The following morning, that 
of September 27, following a barrage laid down by our platoon, the infantry 
advanced to their objective. 

The first p'atoon, after the sub-division referred to above, worked over to the 
east and took up a position in the ruins of the village of Gercourt. This was the 
first village captured by us that had recently been occupied by the Germans, who 
had apparently used it as a depot for supplies to be used in the trenches ahead. 
In the main street there stood a German ambulance, a royal affair with most 
modern equipment, leather upholstering, and a Mercedes engine. It was un- 
damaged by shell fire and seemed to have been abandoned when the gasoline 
supply was exhausted. On both sides of the streets the cellars had been converted 
into dugouts which were filled with bed sacks, trench knives, hand grenades, 
dynamite, rockets. Very i:)istols and other signal and engineer property. One 
deep concrete dugout was filled with medical supplies, A. T. S., Red Cross band- 
ages and rows of bottles of medicines which were noticeable particularly because 
most of the labels bore the name of a Chicago concern. In one corner in the 
middle of a stack of boxes the Boche had a cage of rabbits. In the top of the old 
church tower we found a machine gun situated so that it could efficiently enfilade 
the main approach into town. Throughout the streets there were spigots and 
running water. 

While the platoon was going into position, communications were being laid 
to the OP in the front lines. The scouting party which had gone ahead experi- 
enced some difficulty in finding the infantry major. Leaving the small knoll just 
north of Hill 281 they worked over to the south edge of the Bois Jure, while the 
line of skirmishers was just ahead of them in the woods. They worked around 
to the west edge where the infantry were lying prone and just about five meters 
away from' the Germans. Our infantry was advancing man by man and as each 
one rushed forward he was fired upon by machine guns and snipers. Our scouting 
party was fired upon in the same way and under this fire worked forward through 
the tall grass. They were inquiring as to the location of the Major but were not 
able to get any definite information. They worked over to the east into the 
Bois Jure, while on all sides our sharpshooters were rising on one knee and 
picking off opposing snipers and machine gun nests. In the woods at last our 
party felt safe and stood up to advance but were driven down again by the soft 



40 GERCOURT 

whistle of bullets too close for comfort. An infantry scout who had just left the 
Major said he would lead us where he was but that we must be careful. We 
found him only after passing over an open stretch of ground swept by bullets 
and he was lying behind a small mound of earth within calling distance of a 
Boche machine gun nest. Our troubles were caused by this nest and many 
others like it firmly implanted in the path of our advance, in the center of a 
broad open space where they had a perfect field of fire. The Major called for 
assistance in destroying them and it was for this purpose that the guns went into 
action in Gercourt and the lines were laid forward to the OP in the front lines. 

At the point where the OP was established the ground was high and over- 
looked the patches of nests at such an angle that we were able to see the Boche 
helmets moving around in them. Upon these we opened fire. The guns had been 
laid by looking along the line of metal and the third shot registered with a target 
hit. From then on we opened with volleys of six or ten rounds, shifting deflection 
by two or three mils and range by twenty-five meters to sweep from one group 
of nests to another. The demoralizing effect upon the Germans was perfect. 
As direct hits were made in the center of a nest, blowing it to pieces, those in the 
near-by nests scattered like scared rabbits to the four corners of the wind. This 
was the opportunity our doughboys were waiting for, and as the fleeing Germans 
zigzagged in their course they were picked ofT one by one by our rifle fire. 
Infantry officers near us could not lose such an opportunity to fire on such a target, 
and, in their enthusiasm, snatched rifles from their men and added to the German 
slaughter. The excitement of those few hours, the afternoon of our first day at 
the front, was intense, yet the destruction of life, the fear and horror in the faces 
of the Germans, and the pain in their movements as the wounded tried to 
drag themselves to shelter and safety was depressing. It was the first day; 
would it be different, later on? In after days we gloated over our wanton 
destruction. 

Of course the enemy artillery at this time was not asleep, and, attracted 
to the spot where we were and where the infantry snipers were continually firing, 
they opened up on us with 77's. Once we were forced to abandon our OP, but 
only long enough to look through the infantry's monocular observing instrument 
to pick up the location of a few remaining nests, which we finally cleared out 
before darkness ended our activities. A little later that night the infantry 
advanced over that ground, cleaned up, and with little opposition reached their 
objective, the bank of the Meuse opposite Vilosnes. 



GERCOURT 41 

The next few days can be described in few words. Our infantry had reached 
their objective, we had no barrage to fire, but devoted our time to firing on fleeting 
targets which hved up to their name and were fleet. 

Life in the valley of Gercourt village and in the Bois de Dannevoux, where we 
established our OP, was similar to the life of old position warfare, a game of hide 
and seek, for from "the right bank of the Meuse" even our battery could be seen 
if not heard. Little peace did "Jerry" give us, and three times did we move our 
guns only to find them registering on us, bombing us and looking at us from planes, 
balloons, and "the right bank of the Meuse" every time we opened fire. Our casu- 
alties were light but oiu- worries great as they always are when you know the 
other fellow "has the drop" on you, but we pulled through the difficulties of 
broken communications and the usual troubles thereby entailed. Finally we 
left our position near the Belgian guns in the Bois de Sachet, our third position, 
for our new position in Bois dc Septsarges. 



CHAPTER V. 
Dannevoux 

AT THREE o'clock on the afternoon of September 27, 1918, Captain Pitney 
/ \ issued the following order to A Battery, 313th F. A. 
^ *■ You will move forward at 4.00 P. M. to Dannevoux Ridge, reporting 
to Major Montague of the 319th Infantry. 

The position to be occupied was just under the crest of the ridge and to the 
right of the road, in a little orchard. 

As the battery moved over the crest of Hill 281, the valley of the Meuse 
came into sight. Clear and distinct rose the hills to the east; at their base a 
silvery thread marked the Meuse River, the dividing line between the armies. 
The road wound down through Gercourt, passing one of C Battery's platoons 
in position in the ruins of the town. A little beyond the town the friendly 
shelter of the Bois Jure enclosed the road. At the north edge of the woods the 
road dipped down into the town of Dannevoux and thence up over the ridge of 
Dannevoux. The town was under shell fire. 

The first section went forward alone, the remaining sections following 
each other with five to ten minute intervals. All cleared without mishap 
except the second section whose piece turned over while passing a mine 
crater on the road. The road was under observation from the German side. 
Sergeant Frank and his six cannoneers righted the piece and they moved 
forward without further mishap. 

On arriving at the position the guns were hurriedly placed in the scant cover 
of the orchard and the limbers moved off into the woods to the west. Shells were 
dropping over the ridge occasionally in sort of a "where do you go" fashion — 
nothing close. Both reels of telephone wire had been shaken off the caissons in 
the advance, so a "bucket brigade" of runners was formed for liaison to the OP 
on the crest. Major Montague had requested us to "get those whizz-bangs," so, 
just at dusk, the battery with the guns pointed somewhere in Germany let loose 
five salvos. The Germans ceased firing so the following message was sent to the 
rear: 



DANNEVOUX 43 

Brunzell. 

We have silenced the enemy artillery but believe that they are moving 
back to take up other positions. Still suggest keep regiment on west of Bois 
Jure as this point is too easily swept with enemy artillery and only two thousand 
meters from front line, which lies on this side of the river and makes it nearly 
absolutely necessary to put artillery on crest of hill without defilade in order to 
hit enemy. A position farther back will give much better range and protection. 
See sketch on other side. Peppard. 

A few hours later the supposedly silenced guns astonished A Battery, as 
yet but a neophyte in the game of war, by opening with spurts of harassing fire, 
and they continued it for the rest of the night. 

At midnight, Lieutenant Gregory and his detail got through the gas and 
shell fire in Dannevoux, bringing their usual "on the job" telephone line. The 
moon shone in fits and sjjurts as the clouds drifted across its face. The valley 
to the rear glistened in a cloud of mist and gas. On the front slope an occasional 
incendiary shell burst with huge balls of fire and red streamers. Major Montague 
advised that his outposts reported Germans forming for a counter-attack. The 
battery with the help of Lieutenant Barton Harvey and his detail of forty 
ammunition train men spent the remainder of the night rolling Number 2 and 
Number 3 pieces forward to the crest of the hill, digging them in and carrj'ing 
up ammunition. In the morning the positions were found to have been poorly 
selected as they did not cover the sector in front of Vilosnes. 

The following message was despatched to the rear : 

Brunzell. 

We are in a very tight place. The enemy is cros.sing us with his fire from 
angles of nearly 3200 mills. On my right rear (south east) can see the flash of 
gun before shells arrive, believe as far back as le Mort Homme. 

We arc well camouflaged, moved Number 2 and 3 guns up on crest ready to 
support infantry. They will be spotted as soon as open fire. There are two 
guns still in old position (217100-382470.) They are in plain view to the rear 
from the very distant bank of the Meuse and although well camouflaged, would 
very easily be seen if fired. On account of the above it is my best judgment not 
to fire unless absolutely necessary. The two guns moved to near crest lie in edge 
of small woods to right and cover bend in river from Vilosnes to the west at 
ranges of 1500 meters and up. 

The enemy has shelled Dannevoux all night. Started ration cart back with 
Lieutenant Sheehan and Lieutenant Densmore who reported back at dawn, 
"too heavily shelled to pass." Figure, if return, to swing up valley to west and 
miss town, that is if you desire my withdrawal. Believe it imperative to with- 
draw and get into position to west of Bois Jure or farther back, leaving OP here. 
Await your orders. Peppard. 



44 DANNEVOUX 

The next morning was spent in a vain attempt to locate the "whizz-bangs." 
They were somewhere down there in the valley two kilometers away. One 
could hear the report of the gun followed immediately by the bursting of the 
shell. Sergeant Mowery was wounded in the head by a shell fragment while 
working near the OP. The infantry expected a counter-attack. The following 
message was received at 9.45 A. M. : 

C. O. Art. accompanying Inf. 

SOS barrage line N. edge river Meuse from 7042 to 9944. SOS signal 6 
star white rocket. Above message sent to Art. of Brigade. You hold your field 
piece barrage line on Rail Road. Do not open your barrage until enemy 
reaches Rail Road. Montague. 

The message was replied to as follows : 

We are about to try to shoot up the whizz-bangs. It will disclose us, of 
course. Do you wish us to hold fire pending barrage or shall we go ahead with 
this other job? Where can we look for your white star rocket? Ackerman. 

The following message came in answer to the above : 

Put whizz-bangs out of commission. Infantry can take care of enemy in 
bottom land if you clean out whizz-bangs. You have my authority to move your 
guns farther to rear when your present position is disclosed. Keep your OP on 
this hill. Montague. 

At about eleven o'clock Number 4 gun was rolled up by hand to the crest 
of the hill looking over Vilosnes. Lieutenant Fullerton reported to Major Monta- 
gue as a brigade artillery observer, Lieutenant Ackerman landed in the gunner's 
seat. The first few rounds were lost. After each of these shots Lieutenant Acker- 
man would pop up out of his seat, squint over the shield and shout out, "Did 
you see that one, Pep." Soon they were breaking in a long low building at the 
edge of the river. At that time the Germans opened up in retaliation. One could 
see the flash of the German gun firing from the corner of heavy woods to the east 
of Vilosnes. A fragment of its first shell clipped oflf a three inch pole in the 
camouflage fence at the muzzle of Lieutenant Ackerman's piece. Luckily his 
gun stood in a small depression, a sort of saucer, forty to fifty meters wide. The 
German shells either hit the edge of the saucer or passed over to explode in the 
woods behind. Lieutenant Ackerman fired a few rounds into the corner of the 
woods and then crossed the road to observe fire, while Private Gordon Flanagan 
took his place. The German gun in the woods ceased firing and Private Flanagan 
turned to another target. 




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Bois de la Ccte Lemont and Briedlles 



DANNEVOUX 45 

In the mean time a German gun had opened up from the direction of 
BrieuUes. Its shells were passing through the edge of the Bois de Dannevoux 
and came into the Number 4 gun on the crest from the left rear, with a greater 
angle of fall than the gun from the woods near Vilosnes had had. Most of the 
first fire from this gun near Brieulles was short or off in deflection. 

The rest of the men in the battery, together with Lieutenant Harvey's men, 
were strung out on the road carrying ammunition from the old position up to the 
gun on the crest. The "overs" were coming most uncomfortably close to the road. 
Private O. E. Simpson was wounded. A short way to the east of the road Privates 
Dove, Ryan, Watts, Ickes and Garlitz were wounded. Private Dove mortally. 

It was at this time that word came up that the infantry was falling back 
through the old battery positions. Number 1 gun was rolled up on the road and 
direct fire opened on Sivry-sur-Meuse at a rate that fairly made the tube sizzle. 
The Germans replied from the hill behind Sivry. It was necessary to move the 
gun down the road forty yards to some friendly camouflage. In a small trench 
to the rear a number of infantrymen had formed. They were presumably the 
men who had fallen back through the battery. The platoon was ordered forward, 
by Lieutenant Peppard, to cover the expected counter-attack. This counter- 
attack never came. After firing about two hundred rounds per gun the crews 
were called away from the two guns on the crest. The German guns near 
Brieulles had gotten adjusted on Number 4 gun and were making it uncomforta- 
bly hot for the crew. 

The A Battery men who manned the two pieces on the crest were as follows. 
Number 4 gun firing on Vilosnes : — 

Section Chief and Number 2, Sergeant Domenico M. Reda, Sergeant 
Austin C. Keister; Gunner, Private Gordon D. Flanagan; Number 1, 
Private first-class Alfred J. Schell; Number 3, Private Charles E. Frye; 
Number 4, Private Harry E. Hoover; Number 5, Private Casper H. Hasley, 
Private first-class Dennis J. Schell, Private Thomas W. Swisher. 
No. 1 gun firing on Sivry-sur-Meuse: — 

Section Chief, Sergeant James L. Pitsenbarger; Gunner, Corporal Wil- 
liam B. Neel; Number 1, Private first-class Isaac B. Halterman; Number 3, 
Private Arthur C. Stillfox; Number 4, Private Olin L. Shillingburg ; Number 
5, Private Walter W. Watson, Private first-class Lloyd L. Clair; Acting 
Number 5 and cooling gun with water. Corporal James E. Slusher, Private 
first-class, Ole C. Kester. 



46 DANNEVOUX 

At dusk, orders having been received, the battery moved off to the rear 
into the Bois Jure, and retired for the night amidst the usual soothing rain. 
At 4.00 A. M. the Germans dropped twenty or thirty 150's on top of the position. 
Sergeant Clancy of the 305th Ammunition Train was instantly killed. In the 
late afternoon of the same day a German plane flew over at a little above th^ 
height of the trees and directed fifty or sixty "GI cans" into the battery. The 
observer could be plainly seen leaning out over the side of the plane. The total 
casualties were five horses, one caisson, one kitchen range and one water wagon. 

The next night the battery took position just off the Gercourt-Nantillois 
road, near the Bois de Sachet. C Battery was in position near an old German 
battery of captured Belgian guns in the latter woods. 

On the afternoon of October 2 German planes detected this position of C 
Battery and a German battery opened fire. Corporal Bodoh of C Battery tells the 
story as follows : 

"On October 2, while located in the Bois de Sachet, we had just finished a 
thirty minute shoot when Fritz sent a shoot back at us that was so good we were 
ordered to leave the guns and seek shelter in our dugouts. While heading back 
for that spot Sergeant Bert Hickman was wounded and called for aid. The call 
was promptly answered by the following men: Corporal Brizius, Private first- 
class Nieder, Private first-class Sergent and Private first-class Geer. Brizius 
and Sergent carried the wounded man behind a tree, Geer ran for first aid, Nieder 
went back to the guns for a stretcher, and Jerry still kept up his shelling. 

"Carrying the wounded man down the road they stopped behind a French 
truck to rest but a first aid man told them to try to get Sergeant Hickman into a 
trench near-by where he could be treated fairly well. As the men moved on they 
stopped to rest occasionally, and on the first rest about fifty yards away, they 
saw a shell strike the spot which they had just left. On later examination they 
found it had passed through the top of the truck and landed on the exact spot 
where they had stood." 

An ambulance was secured and Sergeant Hickman was sent to the rear, but 
later he died of his wounds. 

It was on this same afternoon that Captain Pitney, then commanding the 
1st Battalion, was wounded. Sergeant McGarr of Headquarters Company tells 
how this happened as follows: 

"It was the afternoon of October 2, a very bright sunny afternoon on the 
front, that Captain Pitney told me, when I reported to him, that he and I would 



DANNEVOUX 47 

take a little walk, as he called reconnaissance. Hixon PC (1st Battalion Post of 
Command) was situated in a dugout in the Bois de Sachet and at this date the 
battalion was suporting the 129th Infantry whose PC was in the Bois de Danne- 
voux, north of the village of Dannevoux. That afternoon our mission was to 
make a reconnaissance to the infantry PC where we had a liaison officer doing 
observation work, with whom the Captain wanted to talk. After starting 
from Hixon we passed C Battery's guns which were in the south-eastern 
corner of the Bois de Sachet. Just as we were passing near the position 
Jerry threw over one of those GI's which hit and damaged one of the guns 
and also got a man. 

"We continued through the woods and passed the village of Dannevoux and 
were ascending the grade to the Bois de Dannevoux when Jerry commenced to 
throw 77 's filled with shrapnel. The Captain said they were getting the range on 
some infantry kitchens which were sending up a few fumes of smoke. If that was 
so the shells were bursting very short, for they exploded over our heads and close 
to us, shrapnel raining around us and a few balls falling on our helmets. Of 
course we ducked low to the ground. We remained there a few minutes until he 
stopped throwing shrapnel and then we continued on our way. 

"Just as we entered the Bois de Dannevoux Jerry commenced throwing 77 
he's. As each one burst we ducked low, but the third one lit too close and two 
pieces hit Captain Pitney in the left foot. 

"He said that he was not hurt seriously and told me to continue to the 
Infantry PC with a message and that the 129th Infantry first aid sergeant, who 
had just appeared would take care of him. I delivered the message and on re- 
turning I found him lying where I had left him. With the aid of a forked stick 
which he used on one side and me on the other we descended the hill far enough 
to get out of the shell fire. There the Captain gave me a message to deliver to 
Hixon PC and told me he would await my return with help and some kind of a 
conveyance. 

"The officer at Hixon told me there was an ambulance at the road a few 
meters below, so I got the ambulance driver to start for the hillside where I had 
left the Captain. We found the road so muddy along the slope of the hill that it 
was impossible to bring the ambulance, so I dismounted and ordered a C Battery 
man, who was working on a telephone line to help me carry the Captain home. 
When we got to where I had left him we found two men from the 129th Infantry 
first aid station dressing his wound. The four of us took turns carrying Captain 



48 



DANNEVOUX 



Pitney on a stretcher about three kilometers to Hixon PC, where we gave him 
hot coffee before he went to the rear in the 1st BattaUon spring wagon." 

Captain Penniman took the place of Captain Pitney as 1st BattaHon com- 
mander and Lieutenant Morgan assumed command of C Battery. The next day 
the batteries moved again, a change which will be told about in the next chapter. 





German Pill-13ox neau .Septsarges 



2d Battalion P. C. in Bois du Cunel 



CHAPTER VI. 
Second Phase of the Attack 

80th division 

ON THE afternoon of October 3 the 313th received orders to move to the 
support of the 80th Division in its new sector in front of Montfaucon, 
the Nantillois-Cunel Sector. The division had been assigned a narrow 
front of scarcely two kilometers along the Nantillois-Cierges road, running east 
and west through Nantillois. It was a difficult sector with the mission of taking 
the strong Bois des Ogons. 

Just at dusk the 2d Battalion and B Battery started to leave their position 
on Hill 281. As soon as E Battery, which was leading the column, started over 
the crest of the Hill it was taken under fire from the east bank of the Meuse. It 
was direct fire, first a short, then an over, another over, and then a shell right 
under the trail of the third piece, badly damaging the piece and mortally wound- 
ing Corporal Kraft. The firing battery got over the hill and went at a trot 
across country to the Gercourt-Septsarges road, the horses of the wounded section 
bleeding badly. The rest of the column had been notified by Captain Crandall 
to turn back. The enemy fire shifted from E Battery to the road at the crest of 
the hill and took effect in a first aid station there. 

The battalion column proceeded by another route, across country along the 
south side of Hill 281 to the Bethincourt-Cuisy Road, which was a one-way road 
from front to rear. Somehow, in spite of frequent blocks in the traffic, this road 
was traveled, through Cuisy to Septsarges, two favorite targets of the Boche, 
and then to the Bois de Septsarges, where positions had been previously selected. 

A and C Batteries had had uneventful marches from their positions in the 
Bois de Sachet. The firing battery of E had arrived, the wounded horses giving 
out as they reached the positions. 

This was the first time and the only time that the whole regiment fought 
from the same position. All the batteries were together, almost in line. The 
1st Battalion pieces were echeloned in the western edge of the Bois de Septsarges, 
B and C side by side and A shooting over them. There was excellent cover in 



50 SECOND PHASE OF THE ATTACK 

the woods and excellent defilade, but the field of fire was limited. The 2d 
Battalion was located in a little strip of woods just west of A Battery. They 
had fine cover and good defilade and a large field of fire. The men had cover in 
fox-holes near the guns and in parts of an old trench system in the Bois de Sept- 
sarges. Access was good to both positions from roads in rear and excellent eche- 
lons were established in the Bois de Septsarges. 

The first night in these positions a large quantity of gas mixed with HE 
was thrown in. Officers had to plot the barrage while wearing their masks and the 
men got the guns into position, dug trail holes, made trail logs, etc., similarly 
handicapped. 

The attack which was made on the entire army front on the morning of 
October 4 was the commencement of the second phase of the Meuse-Argonne 
offensive, a period which lasted until the first of November. The initial attack 
accompHshed no such sensational results as the attack of September 26, but it 
nevertheless won important advantages. The period following was of hard 
fighting over difficult terrain, of tearing down the enemy opposition bit by bit, 
until finally the Kriemhilde Stellung was pierced and our army first phase line 
reached. The opposition from the Kriemhilde Stellung in our sector was from 
numerous machine gun nests and pill boxes, cleverly placed in patches of woods 
from which they could sweep a large field of fire with deadly effect on our infantry 
coming across the opens. Hostile artillery fire often enfiladed our positions from 
the east bank of the Meuse. 

The second phase of the attack meant for the 313th barrage after barrage 
and continual harassing fire and frequent moves. The regiment helped support 
five different infantry divisions to obtain their objectives. The objective in our 
sector was a line west to east from Bantheville through the northern edge of the 
Bois des Rappes, northeastern edge of Clairs Chenes and Cote 299 (See Map). 

At 5.45 A. M. on October 4, the infantry, 159th Brigade (less one battalion 
of the 318th Infantry) attacked the Bois des Ogons. The Division was in liaison 
with the 4th Division on the right and the 3d Division on the left. The 313th 
had delivered before H hour destruction fire on certain strong points. In helping 
to cover the attack (it must be remembered that the 314th and 315th F. A. and 
attached artillery units were working in support of the same infantry as the 313th) 
we delivered a rolling barrage through the Bois des Ogons to the Cunel-Brieulles 
road from 5.25 to 8.15 A.M. B Battery was then ordered forward as infantry 
battery to cross roads south of Cunel, but being unable to proceed to this point 




1st Battalion Positions, Northwest of Nantillois 




2d Battalion Positions near the Bois de Beuge, West of Nantillois 



SECOND PHASE OF THE ATTACK 51 

as it was still in the enemy's hands the battery was put in action south of Nan- 
tillois and fired upon machine gun strong points. 

In the first attack the infantry advanced at a considerable distance behind 
the barrage due to the fact that the troops had to reach their unreconnoitered 
assembly positions in the dark. Upon reaching the line of Hill 274 the first wave 
was met by very heavy machine gun fire from the north, northeast and east. 
Part of this fire enfiladed the attacking line. A few troops reached the edge of 
the Bois des Ogons but no advance could be made beyond this position during 
the dsij. In addition to high explosive and shrapnel the enemy also threw over 
a great many gas shells in the vicinity of Nantillois and the ravines around this 
town. 

A new attack was ordered by the division commander for the afternoon of 
the 4th. A rolling barrage was executed through the Bois des Ogons at 5.30 P. M. 
B Battery delivered its barrage from its forward position. The battery was 
subjected to harassing fire and later in the day was adjusted upon by airplane. 
Although there were many casualties among the infantry near its position the 
battery had no casualties in either men or horses. Being unable to execute an 
SOS barrage from this position (minimum range 2500 meters which was 800 
meters beyond the enemy front line) the battery withdrew to its former position 
in the Bois de Septsarges. The attack on the afternoon of the 4th, made in 
conjunction with tanks was a failure. The troops filtered into the Bois des Ogons, 
however, under cover of darkness. They were not able to organize and hold 
fonvard ground due to the machine gun and artillery fire. The southern edge of 
the woods was held during the night. 

Another attack was planned for the morning of October 5. Preparation 
fire was delivered by the regiment from 5.00 to 6.00 A. M. and a rolling barrage 
from 6.00 to 8.00 A. M. with 50 meter jumps at three minute intervals. The 
infantry attack did not succeed and the troops maintained their position south 
of the woods during the day, despite heavy shelling. At four in the afternoon 
the attack was again resumed, supported by the divisional artillery. In this 
attack our line was advanced to the northern edge of the Bois des Ogons without 
heavy casualties. The advance came as a surprise to the enemy, being executed 
partly under cover of darkness. 

On the 6th the regiment delivered three different shoots of harassing fire, zone 
and searching fires and the last a standing barrage. During the first of these in 
the early morning the Number 3 gun of B Battery burst and Acting Corporal 



52 SECOND PHASE OF THE ATTACK 

Thomas S. Riley was killed, the first man in the regiment to be killed outright. 
Private John I. Kramer was mortally wounded and Private first-class Mike 
Santalucia severely and Private first-class Gorman Strasler sUghtly wounded. 
They were carried by their comrades until they met an ambulance, over a 
kilometer from the woods, the trip being made under gas and shell fire, the men 
at times having to wear their masks. The men who carried the wounded were, 
Sergeant Manford, Corporal Alderton, Privates first-class Cade, Gosnell, 
McMurdo and Singer and Privates Glass, McKeever and Ross of B Battery and 
Privates Sutphin and Coggins of the Medical Detachment. 

On the night of 6-7 October the 160th Infantry Brigade relieved the 159th 
Brigade in the front line. From 4.00 to 5.45 A. M. on October 7 the regiment 
gassed BrieuUes. This strongly fortified town enfiladed our infantry positions. 
The 4th Division had found it impracticable to take Brieulles by storm as it 
would be gradually surrounded with the breaking of the Kriemhilde Stellung to 
the west. Our fire upon Brieulles was at a rate of three mustard shells and one 
HE after five minutes of prehminary lethal. Reports from the infantry indicate 
that this fire was very effective. 

The infantry, as soon as they had taken the Bois des Ogons, began to organize 
the captured ground. Patrols were sent out by the front line troops and it was 
verified that the enemy continued to hold strongly the woods north of the 
Bois des Ogons. Several pill boxes were located along the edge of these woods. 
Enemy works were also located and these targets were turned over to the artillery. 
Lieutenant Burwell was our liaison officer at infantry headquarters and was in 
constant communication with the regiment over two telephone lines and by 
runner. 

Both battalions had OP's and there was also a regimental OP on the edge 
of the Bois de Brieulles, overlooking the Bois des Ogons, Bois de Fays, Bois de 
Malaumont and the Bois de Foret. The guns were registered at odd moments. 
Our positions were under intermittent shell fire day and night, considerable gas 
being used. A balloon from the right bank of the Meuse could look down on the 
2d Battalion position and one day adjusted upon it. The Boche occasionally 
dropped 210's into the Bois de Septsarges which w^as full of men. There were 
occasional casualties in men and horses. One day A Battery's kitchen was 
adjusted upon with airplane and the water cart was put out of business. 

The regimental telephone men were kept busy with a long and troublesome 
line to brigade headquarters in Cuisy. The 1st Battalion men were continually 



SECOND PHASE OF THE ATTACK 53 

working on their two lines to infantry headquarters. Frequent reconnaissances 
were made by officers to look over the infantry situation and try to secure better 
OP'S. 

At this time extended and difficult hauls were being made by the combat 
trains each night for ammunition. It was necessary to go to the corps dump at 
Cuisy, a hot place, and the roads were under continual shell fire. The decrease 
in horse power had been steadily getting worse and was due to the fact that all 
the horses in the regiment had been suffering from influenza when the attack 
began and had been completely exhausted by the wearing hauls for ammunition 
and forage, and by lack of sufficient feed. The roads were heavy with mud. 

On the 9th it was learned that strong enemy positions were located north 
of Cote 299. Several other enemy strong points and batteries were identified 
along the front of the sector, the artillery was placed upon these strong points 
and every effort was made to prepare the way for an advance. At 3.30 in the 
afternoon the infantry formed in rear of our barrage. There had been fifteen 
minutes of previous artillery preparation. Our infantry, in close liaison with 
the right of the 3d Division and the left of the 4th Division advanced and at 
night our lines had reached the line of La Ville au Bois Ferme. The barrage 
lasted seven hours. The Cunel-Brieulles road was made the objective for the 
night and this position was reached and held. During the night some of the 
infantry filtered through the woods south of Cunel, surprised the garrison of 
the town and took two battalion staffs consisting of 30 officers and 60 men, but 
were forced back to their former position by strong enemy artillery and machine 
gun fire. The right of the line slipped through and took some trenches north of 
the Cunel-Brieulles Road. 

Shortly after midnight the 1st Battalion of the 313thmoved via Septsarges 
and Nantillois to new positions in the south edge of the woods northwest of 
Nantillois and in front of the Bois de Beuge, between the infantry supports and 
reserves. This move of 7 kilometers was made without reconnaissance. It was 
necessary to select positions, locate the guns, figure the barrage and establish 
communication to be ready to support the infantry attack at 7.00 A. M. 

Just as day was beginning to break Captain Penniman and the battery 
commanders rejoined the waiting column The carriages moved forward through 
the mud and the batteries went into position under cover of the morning mist. 
Another half hour and we would have been under observation from the east 
bank. At H hour our guns began to bark. The infantry formed in rear of our 



54 SECOND PHASE OF THE ATTACK 

barrage, but, just at H hour the enemy laid down an annihilating fire of artillery 
on the left of the lines, seriously cutting up the attacking troops. The right of 
our lines and the re-organized left went forward and made slight gains. At the 
end of the day they had not been able to maintain a position north of the Cunel- 
Brieulles Road. 

The 2d BattaUon had fired the barrage from the Septsarges position and 
afterwards had sent a party to reconnoiter for new positions. In the early evening 
the battalion left for the new positions which it had selected near the Bois de 
Beuge, proceeding via Septsarges and Nantillois. 

During the night our infantry was relieved by the 5th Division infantry 
and the 155th Field Artillery Brigade was assigned to support the latter. 

From October 4 to 12 the 80th Division had advanced to a depth of four 
kilometers, taking prisoner 30 officers and 102 men, capturing 23 pieces of artillery 
and 22 machine guns, besides considerable ammunition. 

It had engaged the following units : — 
5th Bavarian Reserve Division 
28th Division (The Flying Shock Division) 
236th Division 
115th Division 
5th Pioneers Landsturm Battalion. 

The total casualties had been 139 officers and 3,412 men. 

The positions of our 1st Battalion northwest of Nantillois were excellent. 
The guns were in a little basin just below^ the crest of the hill and had complete 
defilade from enemy balloons. Camouflage nets were used as the trees were 
small — practically nothing but brush. Access was difficult, the Nantillois-Cunel 
Road being under observation from the east bank and the road in from this 
being deep with mud. Echelons were established near the battery positions 
and the horses kept ready for an expected move forward. 

The 2d Battalion was located in the open between the 1st Battalion 
and the Bois de Beuge, E Battery a few hundred yards in rear of and to 
the right of the 1st Battalion on the reverse slope of Hill 268, D and F 
Batteries near the Bois de Beuge. Camouflage nets were used, the men having 
shelter in fox-holes alongside of the guns. There was excellent defilade from 
everything except balloons on the east bank of the Meuse. Access was very 
easy from the Nantillois-Cierges Road. Excellent echelons were established in 
the Bois de Beuge. 




\ ii;\v Lookim; Down thk Slopes ok C'utk 202 'I'owakds Bkikui.i.es 




Bois DE Beuge from Nantillois-Cierges Road 




2; 



SECOND PHASE OF THE ATTACK 55 

It was necessary for both battalions to make long hauls for ammunition, 
from the old position at Septsarges and from the corps dump at Cuisy, before 
the latter was moved to Septsarges. Later on, battalion dumps were estabUshed 
on the road near the positions. 

5th division 

The 5th Division did not attack until the 14th of October. In the meantime 
our fire was intermittent as ordered from regimental headquarters. Regimental 
headquarters were down in Nantillois, that town where no one lingered longer 
than was necessary, where the smell of gas was always present and where shelling 
was always expected. On the 13th an SOS barrage was called for and delivered 
by all the batteries of the regiment at about four o'clock in the afternoon. The 
infantry reported that this barrage proved effective in stopping an attempted 
counter-attack and that it caught the Germans with effect when they were 
attempting to return to their own lines. 

The enemy order of battle on our front was in an extremely confused condi- 
tion due to his efforts to fill gaps in the line and to hold strong points. Some 
regiments were far removed from the main portions of their divisions while 
others were actually split into isolated elements. This confused situation was 
particularly noticeable in the vicinity of Cunel. It was evident that the 
enemy considered this area either the weakest or most important point in his line. 

Our area was shelled intermittently day and night. The 1st Battalion lost 
a considerable number of horses killed. B Battery lost a ration cart. E Battery 
received a number of shells in its area and suffered casualties. One morning a 
French battery near by was adjusted upon from the east bank of the Meuse and 
a battery of the 314th suffered in similar manner. 

In spite of the proximity of the kitchens and the consequent advantages of 
regular and hot meals, an increasing number of cases of diarrhoea was reported 
each day in the command. 

On the morning of the 14th of October the American army again attacked. 
It was the mission of the 3d Corps to push its attacking division through to 
Grande Carree Farm and the high ground a kilometer north and northwest of it, 
and to continue. This attacking division would assist the attacking division of 
the 5th Corps, on the left, to reduce the Bois de Bantheville. 

The attacking division in the 3d Corps was the 5th Division, with the 3d 
Division in support. It was to drive northwest through the line held by the 



56 SECOND PHASE OF THE ATTACK 

supporting division between Cunel and Romagne, attacking between the lines 
Bois de la Pultiere— Bois des Rappes— Rau de Cheline and Romagne-sous- 
Montfaucon— Bois de Bantheville, along the axial line Bois de Cunel-Banthe- 
ville-Grande Carree Farm. One brigade was to make the assault and one 
regiment was so to manoeuver as to enter the Bois de la Pultiere and the Bois 
des Rappes from the southwest and west. 

The 155th F. A. Brigade was assigned to support the 5th Division together 
with part of the 4th F. A. Brigade, part of the 3d F. A. Brigade and some attached 
units. 

Before the attack the army and corps artillery were concentrated on certain 
enemy strong points. The brigade heavies worked on the Sunken Road near 
Bantheville and other strong points. From 5.30 to 6.30 in the morning the 
313th delivered a gas concentration fire in the Bois des Rappes, Bois de la 
Pultiere and the Bois de Clairs Chenes. This fire was of mustard and phosgene. 
At 8.30, H hour, the infantry formed up in rear of the barrage. Our batteries 
fired a rolling barrage from 8.30 to 11.00 through the Bois des Rappes. It rolled 
with 50 meter jumps at the rate of 100 meters in 5 minutes to the end of the table 
where it remained 30 minutes. The guns were firing 100 rounds an hour. 

During the firing of the barrage a shell landed in a pile of empties near the 
second piece of A Battery. Corporal Neel, the gunner, and Privates Shillingburg 
and Watson were killed. Private McClure was mortally wounded and Private 
Stillfox was slightly wounded. Private Misiewicz, the other man serving the 
gun, was struck on the helmet by a shell fragment but was not injured. The 
quadrant was broken in the hand of the chief of section. He was given another 
squad and in ten minutes, Lieutenant Ackerman, who had been standing just 
behind the section when the accident occurred, received the report from Sergeant 
Yanuscavicz that his gun was back in the barrage. 

Our infantry advanced and took the Bois de la Pultiere after a fierce fight. 
The 9th Brigade suffered heavy losses by fire from across the Meuse in accom- 
plishing this and were held up by machine gun nests in the southern edge of the 
Bois des Rappes. 

On the 15th the attack was continued to exploit the successes of the previous 
day. The 9th Brigade of the 5th Division again attacked the Bois des Rappes, 
at 7.30 A. M. Before this time the 313th took part in a standing barrage to 
enable the infantry to form from 7.20 to 7.30 o'clock. At the latter hour the 
barrage started to roll at a rate of 100 meters in ten minutes. The guns were 



SECOND PHASE OF THE ATTACK 



57 



shooting 100 rounds an hour as on the day before. The infantry could not keep 
up with the barrage and it was stopped before schedule time. The infantry were 
still encountering strong machine gun nests in the Bois des Rappes They 
occupied some of the woods and one patrol was reported to have gained the 
northern edge of the woods. This patrol was said to have included a major and a 
number of men. No runners could get through to or from them. 

The 10th Brigade, which was to have continued the attack to the Grande 
Carree Ferme, had been stopped by heavy counter barrage and cross fire. Its 
flank was unprotected from the Bois des Rappes. 

The 5th Division prepared to hold the ground occupied and by the use of 
patrols to clean up and solidify its front, digging in along lines offering perfect 
security. In pursuance to an order of defensive preparation, to organize in depth 
for resistance, the 1st Battalion moved after dark on the 16th, via Nantillois and 
Montfaucon to a position near Montfaucon on the Montfaucon-Septsargcs road. 
The caissons continued to haul back ammunition after this move. During the 
next few days ammunition was hauled from several old positions. The battalion 
could not fire because it was out of range. The men secured a much needed rest 
and their health began to improve. Shelling of an observation balloon in close 
proximity to the positions resulted in a few casualties. On the 18th of October 
Captain Crandall reported as 1st Battalion commander. 

The 2d Battalion, from its position in front of the Bois de Beuge, delivered 
occasional fires. On the 17th it directed harassing fires on enemy working parties 
and on the 18th it assisted in laying down a box barrage on the borders of the 
Bois des Rappes. In the meantime the infantry did not advance. 




French Tank South of Bois des Ogons 




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CHAPTER VII. 

Ferme de la Madeleine or Sunday, 
October 20, 1918 

'ADELEINE FERME means many different things to us. For 
instance, to most of us it was a disaster, but to some, while it was that, 
the finding of a piano made hfe seem not quite so black after all. To 
the mess sergeants of the 2d battalion it must have been a considerable strain, for 
they were suddenly called on to feed twice their numbers, and that when food 
of any sort was very scarce. On the other hand, they say "every cloud 
has a silver hning," and I believe it in this case, for had we not been 
badly shelled at the Ferme, we should have gone on as we were ordered, 
and what would have happened to us on the north side of the Bois de Cunel 
would have been many times more disastrous. Therefore, while the very 
name, "Madeleine Ferme," will always mean something to every man in this 
regiment it will call up different recollections to each, and as it is impos- 
sible to tell all, I will give only a brief account from the information I 
have at hand. 

On Saturday, October 19, the 1st Battalion was in position on the Mont- 
faucon-Septsarges road, within two hundred meters of Montfaucon itself. No 
one knew why we were there. Some thought for a rest, but the Germans evidently 
thought otherwise, and they shelled us two or three times daily just to prove 
that they were right. Others thought that we were there to get cleaned up, but 
they were soon convinced that only pigs could get clean in mud holes, and at 
that time they were not willing to admit that they were pigs. Therefore they all 
gave up and admitted that no one knew why they were there. However, they 
all did know one thing, and that was that we positively would move somewhere 
at some time tomorrow. No orders had been received, but we had something 
far more definite than orders, for orders are usually changed. Well, the real 
secret was that tomorrow would be Sunday, and we always moved on Sunday. 
Therefore you could not have gotten any one to bet even a Napoleon franc that 
we would not move. 




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FERME DE LA MADELEINE OR SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1918 59 

The expected happened, but sooner than expected. At four o'clock Sunday 
morning orders were received to move at once to take up positions near and west 
of Cunel to support an attack by the 5th Division, the attack to begin at 7.00 
o'clock. The batteries moved out in the order B, C, A, at extended intervals 
over the Montfaucon-Nantillois-Cunel road. The battalion telephone detail 
preceded the batteries and laid a line forward to the infantry support, south of 
Cunel. The day was foggy and rainy and while nearly every one had gotten hot 
coffee before we left, nearly every one was grouchy. 

At about eight o'clock the head of the column had reached Madeleine 
Ferme without anything unusual happening. The column was then halted to 
allow a reconnaissance to be made to determine the possibility of advancing to 
Cunel through the enemy's barrage which was being laid down on our infantry 
support line on the ridge south of Cunel. The reconnaissance took some time, 
due to the heavy barrage, and the pleasant German custom of sniping at mounted 
men, or groups of men, with 77's, which of course made it necessary for the 
officers to run and flop repeatedly and then lie in the shell holes to recover their 
breath. The batteries remained on the road and watched the shells burst just 
east of it, and also ahead in the Bois de Cunel. 

Finally the fog began to clear up and it was decided to move the batteries 
under the cover of the Bois de Cunel and just west of Madeleine Ferme which 
was used as a first aid station. 

Just after all the carriages had been moved in, the Germans opened a terrific 
fire on the road, Madeleine Ferme itself, and the area in which the battaUon was 
waiting. At this moment the reconnaissance party returned, having found it 
impossible to move the batteries along as far as Cunel, and being doubtful if 
positions could be taken in the northern edge of the Bois de Cunel. Therefore 
we could not move forward and were really in a terrible fix. So the command was 
given to unhook traces, which was done in faster time than it has ever been done 
by any organization in the United States Army. 

A very good description of what then happened is given by Corporal Bodoh 
of C Battery. It is as follows : — 

"We were ordered into a field on the side of the road and bordering the 
Bois de Cunel, when Jerry started to shell the field. Here this battery showed 
what they were made of. 

"The order came to unhook horses from limbers and fourgons and it was 
speedily done. Then a shell hit near us and Private Rutledge was hit by a piece 



60 FERME DE LA MADELEINE OR SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1918 

of it. He fell but would not let go of his horses. When he found he could not 
get up, he called for aid and received almost instant attention to his cry from 
Sergeant Brooks and Privates Taylor and Mollohan who made him turn loose 
his horses, while asking him where he was hit. His answer was "My leg is shot 
off " They cut off a bridle strap to tie up his leg and stop the circulation. Then 
they carried him to the first aid station at Madeleine Ferme. 

"Here also Sergeant Newallis was wounded with Private Richards and Chief 
Mechanic Darnell. Darnell was wounded in the foot while running to the first 
aid station for a stretcher for Sergeant Newallis. After being wounded he met 
his chum, Mechanic Floyd, and said, 'I got it,' and then hurried to the first 
aid station, where he wanted to go back with the stretcher, but was not allowed 
to as he was more seriously wounded than he knew." 

The casualties were — Captain George D. Penniman, Jr., wounded, five 
men wounded, of whom Sergeant George Newallis, Privates Rutledge and 
Richards subsequently died, twenty horses killed, one A Battery gun put out 
of action, and several caissons damaged. These casualties were very light 
considering the number of shells falling in such a small space, and the fact that 
there were so many men, horses, and carriages in this area. It is to be explained 
largely by the fact that the ground was extremely soft, in fact almost swampy, 
and therefore the shells buried themselves deeply before exploding, making 
larger holes in the ground, but throwing out fewer fragments of the shell itself. 

Now to turn for a moment to a few of the more personal sidelights of this 
affair. Lieutenants Penniman and Sheehan after the horses were unhitched 
made extraordinary speed for the Bois de Cunel, and there for want of a better 
hole, they plunged into a large shell hole waist deep with water. Now about 
this time Lieutenant Ackerman was seen running along, and he saw the two first 
named in their comfortable, safe and palatial shell hole. There were of course 
many holes of equal size and comfort near at hand, but after all no hole is quite 
so safe if you are the only one in it. So Lieutenant Ackerman decided that he 
would make a run for Lieutenant Penniman's "Palace." Jerry thought other- 
wise and began dropping them around him. At this moment Lieutenants 
Penniman and Sheehan decided that as good field artillery officers, they should 
get the practice of calhng shorts and overs on the fleeting target. They did so, 
and first you would hear the shell coming, then you would see Lieutenant Acker- 
man lie flat on the ground, and finally a voice from the shell hole would announce 
"Short!" But this was not all, for those living in the shell hole, finally began to 




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Madeleine Farm and the Bois des Ogons Looking South from the Bois de Cdnel 








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B and C Batteries' Positions in the Bois des Ogons 




FERME DE LA MADELEINE OR SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1918 



61 



bet whether the next one would be a short, an over or a target. The amounts won 
and lost have never been stated, but Lieutenant Ackerman finally arrived safely, 
and Lieutenants Penniman and Sheehan are to be given credit for establishing a 
"School of Fire" which completely pushes Fort Sill and others off the map. 

There was a famous piano at Madeleine Ferme. Bugler Wernz of C Battery, 
after telling of the shelling, says — "I started up through the field between the 
two woods and the mud was so thick that I tried to mount my horse and could 
not get my foot up to the stirrup. I saw a shell burst on my way up. It killed 
a horse belonging to another battery. When I tied my horse up there I got 
with one of my friends. Private Steele, a driver. We started to look around a bit, 
when we saw some German camps. We started to investigate as all soldiers do. 
To our surprise we found a piano in one of the huts . It seemed like home . I played 
pieces on the piano. When we left there to find our outfit we went a short distance 
and met some more of our friends and invited them to go back and have a little 
more music; but when we returned, to our surprise, one of the Hun shells had 
blown the end out of the piano. As we went down to the woods a little piece, I 
saw one of our corporals coming with Private Richards on his back. He was 
fatally wounded. We made a stretcher out of a ladder and took him to the first 
aid station." 

The batteries were re-assembled in the woods south of the Bois de Cunel. 
That evening about dusk, the guns and caissons were withdrawn and A Battery 
went into position to the east of the Nantillois-Cunel road and B and C Batteries 
west of it. The health and spirits of all were low, due to hard work, cold weather, 
rain and canned food. We slept in spite of our discomforts, and so came the end 
of a perfect day. 



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CUNEL-ROMAGNE RoAD 




Regimental P. C. in Cdnel 



CHAPTER VIII. 
Second Phase — Continued 

ON THE 20th of October the 5th Division captured more of the Bois des 
Rappes and on the 21st reports showed that the capture of this piece 
of woods was completed. On the 22d the 90th Division had completed 
the relief of the 5th Division by 8 o'clock in the morning. The 89th Division 
on our left had completely taken the Bois de Bantheville, and so, in order to 
straighten out our front, it was necessary to take Bantheville and Bourrut and 
the high ground north of these towns. This was the mission of the 357th 
Infantry which was to attack on the afternoon of the 23d. 

It was a cold, fall morning when Lieutenant Peppard and I went up to the 
OP on Hill 280 above the Cunel-Romagne Road. Lieutenant Burling and 
his men were glad to see us. They had had a cold night with lots of shelling and 
frequent breaks in the line. The latter was "out" so we sphced it and put in new 
wire for the last half mile. A system of relay testing-in stations had been in- 
stalled to keep the line working. "Hixon Operator" was the answer to our ring 
and we were ready for business. Not so the weather — that morning mist which 
had so often befriended the 313th was that day doing a good turn for the Boche. 
It hung low in the whole valley, blotting out of view the Bantheville and Ande- 
vanne Roads where we had hoped to have good sniping. 

Sergeant Mowery set up his instruments and Lieutenant Peppard prepared 
his OP Diary. We were in the front line so had to keep down — an occasional 
put-put of a machine gun over beyond the Bois des Rappes and a dead infantry- 
man curled up behind our pit reminded us that we would have to be patient. 

Gradually towards noon the mist began to lift, we could see the cross-roads 
that was to be the registration point. 

"Hixon, give me Peppard Station; Mr. Ackerman, take this message." 

A few minutes passed, and then, "On the way," and the shell sang overhead 
and burst out below. 

"Right 10,2600." 

"On the way." 




Positions of A and C Batteries, October 24th-31st, 1918 




View to North from 1st Battalion O. P. Above Komagne-Cunel Road 



SECOND PHASE— CONTINUED 63 

And so the work proceeded gradually, gun after gun, until all the batteries 
had been registered. In the meantime the mist had almost cleared away. 

We saw a platoon of Bodies moving into the woods. Too late! They were 
gone before the command could be sent down to the guns. Then two Germans 
appeared carrying boards up the road. The first shot was pretty close but my 
"Left 10" put the next ones into the woods and the Jerries made a clean get- 
away. Two more men appeared on another road and Lieutenant Peppard 
dropped a few around them. 

By this time the sun was high, the mist had entirely cleared and targets 
were scarce. A Boche balloon was up over yonder; an allied plane, off for a 
reconnaissance over the Boche lines, passed close overhead. We squirmed 
around on our stomachs over the edge of the trench and peeked through the 
barbed wire to try to see something to shoot at. All was as quiet as could be in 
the German lines. 

At about half past two our guns began to drop shells around Andevanne 
and Aincreville. We could hear them coming from away back, passing overhead 
and into the woods beyond. Then the 75's began to work on Bantheville, Bourrut, 
Aincreville and the region around Grande Carree Ferme. Clouds of smoke and 
dust from shattered masonry rolled up from the streets. The German guns 
answered with a few in Cunel, knocking the church steeple down. 

We turned around and saw our infantry forming up above the Cunel- 
Romagne Road. The men took their places and the line moved up the hill, 
up and past us and down on the other side. They got over the crest before the 
Germans opened. We saw them get down low when the machine guns began 
to rattle. Our own machine guns were supporting them from the northern edge 
of the Bois des Rappes. Then the German SOS shells began to whizz over, 
intended for the second wave which was forming up on the other side of the road. 
The supports came in, the machine gun fire out in front grew more distant and 
a detail went by with a couple of chow pails. The sun went down and our relief 
came. Out ahead the front was ablaze with rockets. We crawled stiffly out of 
the pit, no longer in the front line, for the 90th Division had taken Bantheville. 

For the eight days following the 313th was busy selecting and organizing 
new positions and delivering such fires as were called for by the infantry. Prep- 
arations were also made for the next drive which was to be made against the 
Freya Stellung. Reports of prisoners showed that our harassing and interdiction 
fires were very effective. The health of the regiment began to improve. An 



64 SECOND PHASE— CONTINUED 

echelon had been established by Headquarters Company to which exhausted 
men could be sent for rest and care. 

On the 24th of the month the grouping of the 313th and 314th F. A. under 
command of Lieutenant Colonel Brunzell was terminated. Lieutenant Colonel 
Brunzell resumed command of the 313th F. A. On this day reconnaissances 
were made by the 1st Battalion commander and battery commanders for more 
forward positions and the battalion moved in the evening to positions just north 
of the Cunel-Romagne Road. These positions were excellent, so excellent that 
other artillery units, one after another, came piling in with us. The 315th F. A, 
put a battery in right behind our C Battery that at minimum range would just 
clear the camouflage nets. A Battery of 8 inch "Hows" made life miserable for 
us. There was excellent defilade here and easy access from the road with good 
cover for the men in caves and fox-holes. A and C Batteries were in the open 
under camouflage nets. B Battery's position was even better, for the guns were 
echeloned in a little ravine to the east, where there was better cover and less 
company. 

With so many men swarming around the area of these positions concealment 
was almost impossible and the crews of the 8-inch Hows brazenly pitched shelter 
tents. Enemy airplanes operated over the area with apparent impunity, using 
machine guns and some bombs, and it is still a mystery why we weren't shelled 
more than by the occasional intermittent fires that came our way. The bulk of 
the enemy fire of large caliber still continued to come from the east bank of the 
Meuse. 

On the 25th an SOS barrage was called for and delivered by both battalions. 
The AIS Report is quoted as follows: 

After considerable artillery preparation following a heavy barrage which 
began at 17.00h and lasted till 17.25h the enemy attacked (estimated with 
two battalions) from Grande Carree Ferme to Bourrut. Our defensive barrage 
was very effective. The enemy attack broke down under it. As he retired the 
barrage lifted and caught him, inflicting heavy casualties, shown by the number 
of bodies remaining on the field. 

The enemy infantry showed considerable nervousness as if expecting an 
attack, especially on the front of the 90th Division's left regiment. Throughout 
the night there was continuous sending up of flares and on three occasions a 
barrage. 

While firing the next to the last round of the SOS barrage one of the pieces 
of Battery F blew up, killing Corporal Lowe, the gunner, and wounding Privates 



^: .i*r 




t'VNEL, FROM THE KlUCE NoRTH OF CUNEL-KOMAGNE lioAD 




Interior of Church at Cunel 




H 
H 

O 
Id 

n 

H 

o 

H 
U 

o 



SECOND PHASE— CONTINUED 65 

Miller and Cochrane. The Battery was preparing to move to a new position at 
the time of the accident. At 6.30 that evening the 2d Battalion moved up the 
Nantillois-Cunel Road, past Madeleine Ferme, going into position north of 
the Bois de Cunel, on the reverse slope of a hill west of the road. These positions 
were good except for the fact that access was difficult over a very muddy road 
along the edge of the woods which occasioned much difficulty in the supply of 
ammunition. Positions were in the open and camouflage nets were used. Men 
had cover in fox-holes around the guns and in dugouts under old shacks in the 
Bois de Cunel. The echelons were left in the Bois de Beuge. 

While in this position the 2d Battalion was subjected to considerable sheUing 
of large caliber. 210's dropped near the guns and in the woods. A shell lit one 
day, the 26th of October, on the position of D Battery. Corporal Ketterman, 
Corporal McComas, and Privates first class Graham, McCormick, Emswillerand 
Schmoj^er were seriously wounded and Private first class Kines was slightly 
wounded. Sergeant Coberly, Sergeant Foley and Privates first class Bell and 
Sayre quickly volunteered to carry two of their comrades to aid. The trip of a 
kilometer and a half was made under shell fire and through gas. Corporal 
Ketterman's mask had been lost when he was hit and Coberly offered him his. 
Corporal Ketterman refused. He died the next day of the wounds he had received. 

A large shell landed one day near the telephone central and every wire went 
out. E Battery's kitchen was missed by a few yards. 

The battalion had an OP from the ridge north of the Romagne-Cunel Road 
from which they could register. 

Another SOS barrage was fired on the afternoon of October 31 by both 
battaUons. During the evening preparations were made for the attack of the 
next day. The 1st Battalion's mission was a barrage. The 2d Battalion had 
received orders to support the 360th infantry, F Battery to be accompanying 
guns, D and E Batteries to be infantry batteries. Battery F was to be under 
the direct command of Major Allen of the attacking battalion and Batteries 
D and E to be attached to the 360th Infantry regiment. Major Nash was ordered 
to report to the Post of Command of the commanding officer, 360th Infantry. 
At seven-thirty in the evening the battalion moved out. The chapters that 
follow tell of what happened in the third and last phase of the battle. 



CHAPTER IX. 
November First 

TOWARD the end of October, the great drive paused and massed its forces 
for the knockout blow. The 90th Division held the line from the north- 
western edge of the Bois de Bantheville to Aincreville, a distance of about 
five kilometers. The 155th Field Artillery Brigade, in support, was assisted by the 
16th F. A. with two battalions of 75's, and a French Regiment, the 250th R.A.C.P. 
with three battalions of 75's. Crammed back of the crest that runs parallel to and 
just north of the Cunel-Romagne road, within a distance of two kilometers, were 
no less than seventy-six cannon. These talked in all languages, from the rumble 
and roar of the English-built eight inch howitzers, to the wicked snort of the 
French 75, and there were chattering anti-aircraft machine guns galore to round 
out the variety of sound. 

The Germans had three divisions in this sector, a third-rate division and two 
crack divisions thrown in to retrieve lost ground. At least three field artillery 
regiments were identified. The enemy's position was the Freya Stellung, the 
last stand in the Hindenburg line. It was hastily organized, but was of great 
natural strength, and with fox-holes and organized shell holes was going to be 
hard to disintegrate. The orders were to hold until the last man, and no with- 
drawal position was suggested. 

The terrain presented three ridges running northwest across the sector and 
separated from each other by two brooks, the Ruisseau de Cheline and the Ruisseau 
de I'Etaillon. The first of these ridges was crowned by the Grande Carree Ferme, 
a strong point . Patches of woods and sunken roads gave good machine gun shelter 
for the enemy throughout the sector, but his predominating advantage was the 
fact that these ridges rose to the left and were those covered by the Bois d'Ande- 
vanne and de Carpiers. The edge of these woods hid artillery and machine guns 
that could shoot down the ravines and along the crests with the best artistic 
effect. 

To prevent this necessitated a turning movement — the edge of the woods to 
be taken first and the attack across the open timed upon that. The 360th 



NOVEMBER FIRST 67 

Infantry was given the left of the sector to drive through and clear the woods, 
while the 359th Infantrj^ holding the pivot on the right, would advance across 
the open as the enfilading fire from the woods was smothered. All available 
artillery was to participate in the thorough preparation fire; for three minutes 
before the jump-off, the entire front was to be enveloped in a curtain of fire that 
would conceal the plan of attack, and then at H hour, when the infantry went 
over, all guns would concentrate on the woods on the left in a big barrage that 
would finish Boche resistance. 

This was the setting — and here was the menu concocted to suit equally the 
most delicate and the most hardy Boche palate. For hors-d'oeuvres he received 
phosgene and mustard gas mixed in tempting proportions and served chiefly 
in the woods to the left. This was from ten-thirty to eleven P. M., on the night 
of October 31. Then, to show our generosity, .seconds of the same dish were served 
from 2.00 to 2.30 A. M. on the same spot. Four battalions of light aitillery, 
including our own participated, shooting two rounds per gun per minute, and the 
heavy regiment one round per minute. The quantity of deadly gas put over on 
that humid night was sufficient to drench the whole woods and every likely 
position, and must have rendered life insufferable. 

But this was only an appetizer and the entrees for the repast next appeared. 
These took the form of a destructive shoot beginning at 3.30 A. M., when 
high explosive shells began to drop in every spot in the terrain that might 
constitute a point of resistance or harbor a machine gun or a 77. The 2d Battalions 
of 313th and 314th Field Artillerj' had been shoved too far forward to join in at 
this time, but the 1st Battalions of these regiments, the heavy regiment, the 
French regiment and the 16th Field Artillery for one hour and fifty-seven minutes 
plastered the wooded heights around Andevanne, the Bois d'Andevanne and the, 
Grande Carree Ferme, Hill 243, a commanding wooded knoll to the north-east 
the two ravines traversing the sector and every important patch of woods through- 
out it. The lights shot 100 rounds per gun per hour, and the heavies at half that 
rate. In addition, the 3d Field Artillery Brigade was invited to participate in 
this portion of the menu with both gas and high explosives, operating mostly 
on the right. 

This took us up to within three minutes of 5.30, H hour, the time set for the 
appearance of the chef-d'oeuvre of the whole feast. During the three minutes 
that awaited its appearance, all guns swung into their SOS barrage and covered 
the entire sector uniformly in such a way that the Germans could not know 



68 NOVEMBER FIRST 

just what was coming next, or where it was coming. Assuming, of course, that 
after they had partaken of the preceding courses they were still eagerly anticipat- 
ing the feature of the feast. 

This feature was the barrage that started at the Grande Carree Ferme and 
swept into the Bois d'Andevanne, extending about eight hundred meters into 
the woods and about five hundred meters into the open, scraping out the edge of 
the woods that threatened our sector, then going on over the heights of Andevanne 
and down into the forest beyond. About seventy 75's and twenty-four 155's 
took part. The barrage was about 1200 meters wide and advanced in four waves, 
each following the other at two hundred and fifty meters interval. Its depth 
was thus eight hundred meters, and it rolled forward a distance of five kilometers. 

Picture a German machine gunner comfortably ensconced in his fox-hole on 
the edge of the Bois d'Andevanne with his machine gun trained down the 
Ruisseau de Cheline to catch on the flank any doughboy that might try to go 
forward. This open Indian warfare just suits our Boche machine gunner. 
He believes the old days of artillery concentration are over, and if a barrage should 
be laid down, he will grovel low until it passes on and then pop up serenely to 
open on the infantry following it — the American infantry that he had found 
easy to kill but hard to stop. Imagine that, though somewhat surprised, he had 
successfully weathered the gas attack that soaked the earth with poison, and the 
destructive shoot that shattered it with explosive. 

Instead of an ordinary barrage he gets first a wave of 155's, hissing over from 
the howitzers, searching out dead spaces, vomiting black smoke, exploding in 
blasts that rock the ground, destroy consciousness and blow out a spray of saw- 
toothed slivers of steel, each more deadly than Achilles' sword. 

This passes on. If our gunner, still alive, bobs up to look for targets, he 
finds none, but in a short fifteen minutes the second wave of the barrage approaches. 
This time it consists of low bursting shrapnel from the French regiment, breaking 
overhead in the air with an appalling ping, shooting straight down into the fox- 
holes, and rendering low crouching futile. Mixed with this comes smoke shell, 
blinding him and adding to all the terror that might come, the terror of the 
unseen. 

Fifteen minutes to speculate on what might come next, and then the third wave. 
This is more like the traditional barrage — a curtain of fire formed by 75's deliver- 
ed from our battaUon and two of the French batteries. High explosive 75 shells, 
small, but tremendously potent, deadly accurate, bursting in a blinding crash 



NOVEMBER FIRST 69 

and a cloud of black smoke, with a crack and a rending of metal that undermines 
the nerves, smashes the morale and makes the stoutest soldier an ineffective wreck. 
Fifteen minutes more and the final wave of the big barrage — 75's again, exactly 
twice as many as before, cleaning up the last crevice, reaching into the farthest 
hole, crumpling up the remotest resistance — a compact, smooth, certain wave of 
destruction, slow, stately, non-stoppable, daring our machine gunner to live 
through it. Double-daring him, for just behind comes the 90th Division dough- 
boy with fixed bayonet, thirsting for blood, with cool, sure eye seeking game for 
his rifle. 

If this has not satisfied the Teuton machine gunner, the one million one 
hundred and fifty thousand American machine gun bullets fired on that morning 
and entered on the menu as side dishes, would suiely have satiated his appetite. 

But he and his compatriots had enough. The big barrage of November 1 
snapped the Freya Stellung, wrecked forever the enemy hold on this part of 
France and broke the Boche heart, sending him scurrying back in a foot race to 
the Rhine. The artillery's share appears in the statement of a German battalion 
commander, captured in this sector on that day: 

"I lay in an open ravine, and by intense fire our machine guns were destroyed. 
The artillery was silenced, possibly because the crews had been gassed. The 
enemy artillery picked their objectives fortunately. October 31 at 11.00 P. M. 
they shot over gas shells — I think phosgene. The casualties in the company 
nearest me were 40 out of 80. The enemy artillerj^ fire was so intense that it 
shattered the morale of the men." 

General Pershing, reporting on the day's attack to the War Department, 
said — "Our increased artillery force acquitted itself magnificently in support of 
the advance." 

The 90th Division operation report, summarizing the attack says: 

The Division attacked and won the Freya Stellung — a very strong natural 
position crowned with many guns from 77's to 210's. The losses incurred in this 
were disproportionately small, considering that the 88th, 28th, and 27th Divisions 
were in turn knocked out. The latter two are i-ated first class divisions. It is 
beUeved that the manoeuvering of this division and the well-handled artillery 
are largely responsible for the relatively small losses. 

The work of the gun crews had been arduous. They had started at 11.00 
P. M., and shot practically continuously until 12.30 on the afternoon of the 



70 NOVEMBER FIRST 

next day. Battery B was fortunate in having a company of engineers volunteer 
to carry ammunition. They were proud to help feed the 75's — wicked little 
animals with a nasty bark and deadly bite. The guns had full rations that day 
for ammunition was abundant, and the rate called for was the maximum prescrib- 
ed. But even at that, some of the chiefs of section, remarking that if two rounds 
per minute were good for the Boche, three rounds would be better, fed their guns 
an even more liberal allowance. In the neighborhood of 4500 rounds per battery 
were consumed and not a gun in the battalion failed to function. 

The 75, the Angel of France, for it had saved France and civilization more 
than once, again showed itself worthy that all the world do it reverence. Where 
is the machine that has the stamina to stand the punishment it receives, and then 
go through a strain like this with a staying power that finds it always ready to 
deliver its sure, killing blow? 

Some idea of the feat executed in the seven hour barrage alone is gained by a 
glance at the barrage table followed by one of the guns. 

Barrage Fired on November 1, 1918, by Third Section, 
Battery B, 313th F. A. 





Actual Time 








Series 


From 


To 


Deflection Site Range 


Remarks 


1 


5.30 


5.36 


L 278 100 3700 


Short Fuse 


2 


5.36 


5.42 


RIO 


3800 




3 


5.42 


5.48 


RIO 


3925 




4 


5.48 


5.54 


RIO 


4100 




5 


5.54 


6.00 


R8 


4250 




6 


6.00 


6.06 


RIO 


4375 




7 


6.06 


6.12 


RIO 


4-525 




8 


6.12 


6.18 


Rll 


4650 




9 


6.18 


6.23 


R12 


4775 




10 


6.23 


6.28 


R12 


4875 




11 


6.28 


6.33 


R8 


4975 




12 


6.33 


6.48 


R8 


5050 




13 


6.48 


6.54 


R7 


5150 




14 


6.54 


7.00 


R8 


5275 




15 


7.00 


7.06 


R8 


19'11" 


Long Fuse 


16 


7.06 


7.12 


R8 


19'40" 





HOW TO STOP THE WAR. 

Do your part to pal an end to the war! Put an end to 
^rour part of it. Stop fighting! That's the simplest way. 
you c^n do it you soldiers, just stop fighting and the war 
will end o*f its own accord. You are not 'fighting for anything 
anyway. What does it matter to you who owns Metz or 
Strassirarg you never saw those towns nor knew the people 
in them, so what do' you care about them? But there is a 
Jiaie town back home in little old United States you 
would like to see and if you keep on fighting here in the hope 
of getting a look at those old German fortresses you may 
never see home again. 

The only way to stop the war is tc stop fighting. 
That s easy. Just quit It and slip across «No Man's Land» 
and join the bunch that's taking it easy there waiting to be 
exchanged and taken home. There is no disgrace in that> 
That bunch of American prisoners will be wefcomed just as 
warmly as you who stick it out in these infernal trenches. 
Get wise and get over the top. 

There is "nothing in the glory of keeping up the war. 
But think of tlie increasing taxes you will have to pay the 
longer the war lasts the larger those taxes at home will be. 
Get wise and get over. 

All the fine words about glory are tommy rot. You 
haven't got any business fighting in France. You would 
better be fighting the money trust at home instead of fighting 
your fellow soldiers in grey over here where it doesn't really 
matter two sticks to you how the war goes. 

Your country needs you,- your family needs you and 
you need your life for something better than being gassed, 
shot at, deafened by cartnon shots and rendered unfit physic 
cally by the miserable life you must live here. 

The tales they teli you of the cruelties of German prison 
camps are fairy tales. Of course you may not like being 
a prisoner of war but anything is better than this infernal 
place with no hope of escape except by being wounded after 
whic^ you will only be sent b.ick for another hole in your body 

Wake up and stop the wjir! Yo" can if you wjnt to. 
Your government does not mean to stop the war for years 
to corne and the years are going to be long and dreary. 
Xou better come over while the going is good. 



-•SHX-*- 



German Propaganda Distributed prom Airplanes 







ROMAGNE SOUS MoNTFAUCOX, UCTOBEK 29th, 1918 





1st Battalion Positions on Bantheville-Remonville Road 



NOVEMBER FIRST 



71 



Barrrage Fired on November 1, 1918 


, by Third Section, 






Battery B, 313th F. 


A. 










(Continued) 








Actual Time 








Series 


From 


To 


Deflection Site 


R.\NGE 


Remarks 


17 


7.12 


7.18 


R8 


20'05" 




18 


7.18 


7.24 


R7 


20'25" 




19 


7.24 


8.30 


R7 


20'40" 




20 


8.30 


8.36 


R8 


21'00" 




21 


8.36 


8.42 


R7 


21'34" 




22 


8.42 


8.48 


R8 


22'04" 




23 


8.48 


8.54 


R8 


22'38" 




24 


8.54 


9.00 


R8 


23'15" 




25 


9.00 


9.06 


R8 


20'05" 


Short Fuse 


26 


9.06 


9.12 


R8 


20'33" 




27 


9.12 


9.18 


R8 


21 '04" 




28 


9.18 


9.24 


R7 


21'28" 




29 


9.24 


9.30 


R8 


21'50" 




30 


9.30 


9.36 


R7 


22'16" 




31 


9.36 


9.42 


R8 


22'38" 




32 


9.42 


9.48 


R8 


23'03" 




33 


9.48 


9.54 


R7 


23'27" 




34 


9.54 


10.00 


R8 


24'00" 




35 


10.00 


10.06 


R8 


24'31" 




36 


10.06 


10.12 


R7 


25'10" 




37 


10.12 


10.18 


R7 


25'32" 




38 


10.18 


10.24 


R8 


26'06" 




39 


10.24 


10.30 


R 24 100 


5100 


(D Shell) 


40 


10.30 


10.36 


R8 


5175 


R. Y. Fuse 


41 


10.36 


10.42 


R7 


5175 




42 


10.42 


10.48 


R7 


5225 




43 


10.48 


10.54 


RIO 


5325 




44 


10.54 


11.14 


R9 


5375 




45 


11.14 


11.22 


RIO 


5425 




46 


11.22 


11.30 


RIO 


5425 




47 


11.30 


11.38 


RIO 


5500 







Actual Time 




Series 


From 


To 


Deflection 


48 


11.38 


11.46 


RIO 


49 


11.46 


11.54 


RIO 


50 


11.54 


12.02 


R8 


51 


12.02 


12.10 


R9 


52 


12.10 


12.18 


R9 


53 


12.18 


12.26 


R9 


54 


12.26 


12.30 


RIO 



72 NOVEMBER FIRST 

Barrage Fired on November 1, 1918, by Third Section, 
Battery B, 313th F. A. 

(Continued) 

Site Range Remarks 

18'04" 
18'16" 
18'33" 
18'51" 
19'08" 
19'26" 
19'53" 

Starting with an artificial site of 100 and short fuse, the range was expressed 
in meters. Then changing to long fuse and running off the range disc, the 
gunner's quadrant was used. Then back to shor.t fuse, and finally, the long range 
D shell with the artificial site, justified the range disc again. That was soon 
exceeded and the gunner's quadrant was employed until a range of 8400 was 
reached and the barrage stopped. The true site was figured in the range. The 
barrage was rolled forward at the rate of 100 meters in six minutes, five minutes, 
and eight minutes according to the difficulty of the terrain. The line followed 
by the roll of the barrage was well to the left of the guns so that a continual 
shift of deflection to the right was necessary. 

During the barrage, the battery positions on the Cunel-Romagne road were 
harassed with 77's, 150's and 210's. Luckily few casualties resulted in the 
1st Battalion, but the battery of heavies from the 315th that was immediately 
behind A and C Batteries had shells light on three of its guns, putting one out 
permanently and causing heavy casualties in the gun crews of all. 

The barrage was laid down in front of the 360th Infantry, but the 1st 
Battalion was assigned to the 359th Infantry and joined in the barrage because 
the advance on the left was vital to the work of the 359th on the pivot. But after 
the barrage, it would be called on for more direct support. While the barrage 
was in full swing, the battalion commander and the three battery commanders 
went forward to take a look at the battlefield and reconnoiter advance positions. 

They went on foot, as usual, because horses were scarce and riding was not 
popular. Going over the crest that defiladed the batteries, they advanced along 



NOVEMBER FIRST 73 

the Cunel-Bantheville road, taking frequent shelter because of the vicious 
sheUing of the roads and the entire valley of the Brook Andon. Thej^ crossed 
the bridge rebuilt that night over this brook and proceeded up the Grande Carree 
Ferme ridge. Here they met the infantry support and were warned to keep low 
because of machine gunners. The chief nuisance, however, was the gas that 
was shot over continually and made progress painful, and also there was sufficient 
HE to render resorts to fox-holes often incumbent. Parties of Boche prisoners 
running in big, vulnerable columns were dodging their own shells over on the 
right and just about this time the Germans were shelling the northern edge of 
the Bois des Rappes. For some reason they laid down a beautiful, absolutely 
opaque cloud of white smoke in front of the woods. 

The reconnaissance party pushed forward into the ravine formed by the 
Ruisseau de Cheline in the hope of finding a defiladed position from which they 
could shoot northeast. The ground however was extremely bogg.y and all 
routes of approach were under easy observation. 

A company of infantry was dug in in this location at the time. They w^ere 
ordered forward to the top of the crest as the reconnaissance party left, and 
almost simultaneously, the enemy artillery began searching the ravine. 

There was a man in Battery B that should have been along. He always 
cariied a little note book in which he made an entry for every dead German 
that he saw. He would look for them, high and low, and walk miles to find 
a "Bush" carcass and make a corresponding tally in his book. But south of 
the Cunel-Romagne Road the battlefield had shown a heart-breaking pre- 
ponderance of American dead to German. Attacking in greater numbers, 
resisted chiefly by machine guns and artillery, and never surrendering, the 
Americans left battle-fields in whose color scheme olive drab predominated. 
But here was one changed in complexion for the better, and the bottle green 
of the Boche dead showed thiee times for the American once. Well-massed 
artillery and lavish and effective prodigality in the expenditure of high explo- 
sive shells cannot but have economized lives this day. American blood and 
treasures were poured out without stint, but American treasure was now 
saving American blood. 

Coming back, the reconnaissance party was forced off the Andevanne- 
Bantheville road by heavy shelling and passed within a few hundred meters of 
the spot where, unknown to them. Captain Anderson was lying dead and Captain 
Gilliam unconscious. Crossing the Remonville road west of Bourrut, they 



74 NOVEMBER FIRST 

spotted possible positions and then took the main road back through Romagne 
to the batteries, arriving shortly after the barrage was finished. 

Tii-ed out, and knowing the work that their men had gone through, they 
hoped for a good meal and at least a few hours' rest. They found instead orders 
to move immediately. Battery B had alread}^ struck its camouflage nets, got its 
guns out of position and been put on the road. 

"Move? Where?" 

"Up front somewhere." 

So off went the battery through Romagne, through Bantheville and to the 
left through Bourrut, in the broad daylight, with wide intervals between the 
carriages, hoping that the shelling of the roads had stopped. 

It hadn't. 

The Bantheville-Remonville road, where positions had been tentatively 
picked out, was raked mercilessly with 150's. A company of engineers had just 
been shelled off with many casualties, and farther progress was impossible. The 
carriages were brought up one at a time, the horses unhitched and sent rapidly 
to the rear, the pieces placed on the side of the road and digging in commenced, 
as proper in the event that no better position be found. While two of the battery 
officers were gazing at a very likely position a little beyond, it was peppered with 
ISO's, and their disappointed eyes easily visualized the effect on the pieces that, in 
their imagination, they had already installed. 

Meantime, work on the position in the road had continued in spite of the 
vigorous protest of an engineer who claimed that we would obstruct traffic. 
Shelling diminished in intensity, and it looked as though a dash down the 
Remonville road would succeed. A and C batteries came up and passed through. 
So the pieces were got out, as many men put on them as could secure a hold, 
and they were trundled laboriously, painfully, with heart-breaking slowness up 
the road and into position just north of it. A big Boche shell hit squarely in the 
road in front of one of the carriages, but by a miracle only one casualty occurred. 
Nothing could have been more vulnerable than an artillery carriage on the road, 
hand drawn, men swarming around for all the world like ants moving a fruit 
seed. And these men had been in the drive for thirty-five days, and had fired the 
battery all the night before and all day long. 

But the pieces had to be got into position to snarl and snap at the Boche 
heels and keep him marching in the right direction. Aiming stakes had to be 
placed, ammunition carried, trails dug in, camouflage nets erected, the guns 



NOVEMBER FIRST 



75 



laid, communication established, and holes dug for the men. The rest of the 
great American advance was coming up and positions were going to be at a 
premium. One battery went in where the chemical warfare section had planted 
a long, dangerous row of gas projectors, squat, silent, ominous, but too short in 
reach to deliver their blow before the Boche had faded out of range. Their 
wiring was cut and enough of them were removed to make room for the pieces, 
while all prayed, soldier fashion, that a shell wouldn't land on the damn things 
and send the gas oozing. 



."U. 




Capt. Walter E. Gabd 
AT THE 1st Battalion P. C. 

CUNEL-ROMAGNE ROAD 




Battery F, November ]st 



CHAPTER X. 
Grande Carree Farm 

FOR five weeks the American Army had been steadil.y forcing the Hun 
back to the Meuse and learning on the field of experience, until, on the first 
day of November, 1918, it reahzed its traditions and drove the foe far from 
his soft billets, pianos and electric lights, back to the bleak hills overlooking the 
rich valley which for four years he had called his own. 

Just as the doughboy had become skilled in flanking a machine gun nest, so 
the artilleryman had adapted himself to the new warfare which was neither 
trench nor open but a combination of the two. He had learned that after all 
every one didn't drown to death from gas and that tracks leading to a gun position 
did not spell certain destruction in the morning even if Fritz from his plane 
threw monkey-wrenches at the gun squad. He had learned the methods 
of the Boche and how, if two GI Cans came tumbling over at 2 A. M. 
one night, they would tumble over at the same hour for many other nights. 
He knew the scream of the minenwerfer, the whistle of a seventy-seven, 
the bark of a whizz-bang and the drone of a rolling kitchen. He could tell 
which were going over, which would fall short, when it was wise to run for 
a fox-hole and when to don a gas mask. He had watched the French and 
learned to burrow like a rabbit, to salvage elephant iron, boards, blankets, 
a stove and dig a home. He could tie his team to a tree, put his harness 
on a limb, and yet, in the middle of the night, harness and hitch in five 
minutes, hunt an unknown cross-roads in the dark and rain and fill his caisson 
with Martha, Utah or Mary. He could splice in the dark and take sundodge 
b,y the flash of the guns. Or he could fire the first shot of an SOS barrage 
before the rocket had died. In short, fighting had become an every day job 
and he a finished fighter. 

So it was that the artillerj^ hit its stride in the last big drive and to the 
313th was given the post of honor, the toughest job on the line, the job of helping 
to[break the hinge so that the whole long line from the sea to the Meuse would roll 
back like a great door and let the Allies into Hunland. And 313 went to it, 




BocHE Machine Gun Nest near Grande Carree Farm 





Bois DE Bantheville, Looking Southwest from Concrete Pill Box at Grande Carree Farm 



GRANDE CARREE FARM 77 

knowing that it supported a division equalled only by its own, for the 90th also 
moved forward only. 

Hallowe'en Night — and there never was such a Hallowe'en! — found the 
2d Battalion moving out of the Bois de Cunel, past shell-ridden Romagne, past 
the G. P. F.'s and the heavies, past the lights, up through the Bois de Bantheville, 
almost to the front line. Batteries D and E stopped in the woods while F went 
on forward and into position ready to fire on Grande Carree Farm should any 
German machine gunner survive the barrage and hold up the advance at that 
point. 

The 2d Battalion was assigned to the support of the 360th Infantry and 
Battery F was to accompany the 3d Battalion wlion it went over the top the 
next morning. The line followed the Bantheville-Remonville Road past the 
Bois de Bantheville and Grande Carree Farm. From the latter it was possible 
to see the hills and country over which the attack was to advance, past Ande- 
vanne and the woods on the heights beyond. H hour was 5.30, and thereafter 
the attack was to progress by bounds with intervals in which to re-organize and 
allow the units on the left to catch up. 

Fritz was nervous that night — he sensed trouble. Five runners went for- 
ward to the front line to join the infantry Major; one stumbled over a mass 
of cut telephone wires and Fritz searched the area with HE, gas and incendiary. 
An engineer sergeant, reconnoitering a route through the woods for the guns, 
hit some brush and the woods were filled with mustard. 

At one o'clock the hour for slightly gassing the German positions arrived. 
East and west, as far as one could see, the night suddenly lit with the flashes 
of a thousand guns, and the barks of hundreds of 75's were drowned in the roar 
of the heavies. The secret was out; Fritz kncAv that another D day had arrived; 
that his aeroplane-spread invitations to come over and go home with him had 
been declined and he must fight for his beer garden and linden tree. 

His artillery knew the game and art of hitting a road in the middle of the 
night. His guns raked the area for two thousand and more meters behind the 
lines Avhile horses quivered and men hugged fox and shell-holes. Toward morning 
the shelling increased. Privates Boyer and Berkowitz were struck by splinters 
and sent to the dressing station. The line connecting the guns and the infantry 
major was cut repeatedly and as often repaired 

At 5.30 a thousand and odd more American guns joined in the deluge, 
a hundred machine guns from the near-by woods swept the front with the hail 



78 GRANDE CARREE FARM 

of thousands of bullets. The cannoneers went to their pieces, the drivers to their 
teams and the 360th went over the top. 

Privates Addis and Sefrick were wounded. The second wave dug in above 
the guns. The Boche fire increased. Corporal Luther Green and five of his 
horses were killed by one shell; Cook Howes and Private Calascione mortally 
wounded by another. And still no word to fire. 

At 6.30 E passed unseeing, bent only on getting forward. Fifteen minutes 
more and the word came back that Grande Carree Farm was passed and the 
attack was resting at the Grande Fontaine. 

The interval had come in which the guns were to be moved forward. For- 
ward they went, in the same tracks that a German battery had made ten days 
before. A dense smoke hid the movement from Fritz. Across the Remonville 
Road where the line had been a short hour before, in a ravine and into position. 
The limbers whirled around and took cover under a bank by the road while 
shells ricocheted and burst, short, over and beyond, but did no harm. And 
still no word to fire; still no targets to be seen because of the battle pall of smoke. 
More time passed uncounted. A hurried conference between two Majors and a 
battery commander in a nitch in a hill. From Andevanne machine gun fire was 
coming; from the woods and heights beyond more machine gun fire and artillery. 
The decision, a passage of lines, Andevanne flanked on either side while artillery 
searched the town, more artillery on the woods above through which the barrage 
had passed. 

The smoke lifted. 

"Lay on me, Plateau 14, Drum 100. Open 20, Site O, Shell, Normal Charge, 
Long Fuse, Battery Right, 3000. Short, short, short. 3200. Over, over, over. 
Open 10, five rounds sweeping by three turns, 3100." 

Again and again these five rounds swept through the town until a runner 
came. 

"The town is flanked, cease firing." 

Then came the command to shift to the woods beyond and to Hill 243, 
while the infantry followed closely, leaving a platoon to mop up Andevanne. 

About noon Fritz had ceased his searching fire of the battery position to 
concentrate on reserves that were moving forward. When fire was opened on 
243, he returned, first searching the OP and seriouslj^ wounding Corporal Craig. 
Then he turned his attention to the guns, but without harm save to one piece 
which afterwards wore a wound stripe. 



GRANDE CARREE FARM 79 

Suddenly his fire ceased and word came that the objectives had been 
taken. A fog replaced the morning's smoke; then darkness covered the battle- 
field while Fritz hastened for the Meuse, hard pressed by patrols. 

The hinge was broken. 

For the German, Grande Garree Farm is a bitter recollection. For the 2d 
Battalion it is a rich memory. Among the West Virginia Hills, among Pennsyl- 
vania's cities, coal fields and rich farms, stories of that Hallowe'en, ever growing 
in imagination, will thrill the hearts of a new generation. Often will come the 
query, "Papa, was there anybody else in the war besides 313?" 

Three days later the guns were laid on Stenay. Another week and the 
Hun had made his last fight, destroyed his last home, fired his last shot. 

Peace had dawned. 



CHAPTER XI. 
E Battery on November First 

ORDERS were received on October 30, 1918, that Battery E should 
operate as an infantry battery, co-operating with the 360th Infantry, 
90th Division, in an attack which was scheduled for some date within 
the next few days. 

The front line, in the sector assigned, at this time ran through the Bois de 
Bantheville just south of the Bantheville-Remonville road and south along 
the eastern edge of the Bois de Bantheville bending in an easterly direction 
just north of the town of Bantheville which was in our hands. 

The Battery was ordered to follow the infantry as closely as possible and 
to take up a position on Grande Carree Ferme as soon as the infantry 
had taken it. 

Reconnaissances were rftade on October 30 and on October 31, and it was 
decided, upon approval of the battalion commander,to establish an ammunition 
dump in the Bois de Bantheville on the night of October 30, and to move the 
Batteiy up to the same position the following night. These two moves were 
made in spite of the heavy shelling of the area of approach to the front lines and 
the small number of serviceable horses still remaining in the Battery. 

The following account of events, taken only from memory, will always remain 
fresh in the minds of the officers and men who were present with the Battery 
during this strenuous period, and the comrades who gave up their lives in this 
mission still live in the remembrance of all of us who were with them when 
they made the supreme sacrifice for their country on the field of battle while 
performing their duties with the true spirit of the American soldier. 

At about 19.30 hrs. October 31, the Battery moved out of position near the 
northern edge of the Bois de Cunel (x 309053 y 284260) and proceeded west over 
a trail to the Romagne-Cierges road, thence through Romagne taking the 
northwest fork at the church, past an old cemetery, to trail fork F5849, thence 
northwest to road fork 5062, through the Bois de Bantheville to 5966 where the 
Battery was parked for the night. The carriages were parked on the side of the 



E BATTERY ON NOVEMBER FIRST 81 

road and the horses and men were scattered around in the woods on both sides of 
the road. 

During the night the area was gassed and shelled with GI cans but there 
were no casualties among either horses or men. 

At 3.30 hrs. on November 1, the barrage, which is said to be the heaviest in 
history, opened, and at 5.30 the horses were hitched and everything put in 
readiness to move when ordered. At 6.15 the following order was received from 
the battalion commander. 

6.10 a. m., 1st Nov., '18. 
To Gilliam; E 

Move out at once and take up position on Grande Carree Ferme. Keep in 

touch with me by runner. 

Nash. 

The Battery moved out at exactly 6.15 and proceeded around the edge of the 
Bois de Bantheville over Hill 255 to a position just south of the Bantheville- 
Remonville road (x306840 y288060). During this movement the carriages 
maintained distances of twenty-five meters and passed through a heavy offensive 
counter-preparation fire which extended from Grande Carree Ferme to the Fond 
de Vere. This fire was particularly heavy on the top and forward slope of Hill 
255 and was composed mostly of high explosive and gas of 150 calibre. The torn 
condition of the ground and the poor condition of the horses made the progress 
very slow for the greater part of the way, but the intensity of the enemy fire 
from the top of Hill 255 on \vas such that the carriages were brought down the 
hill at a gallop and placed into position with all possible dispatch. 

During this march Private Elmer L. Wiley of Hunter's Run, West Virginia, 
was killed; Chief Mechanic Roy S. Shanholtzer of Levels, West Virginia, was 
mortally w^ounded; Private John C. Morphet of Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania, 
seriously wounded; Corporal Lemuel A. See of Bass, West Virginia, Privates 
Harley J. Combs of Kirby, West Virginia, Charlie A. Bussey of Sutton, West 
Virginia, Lawrence J. Miller of Boswell, Pennsylvania, Ira L. Dawson of 
Berkeley Springs, West ^'irginia, Howard B . Strickland of Mclntyre, Pennsylvania , 
John Conley of Orlando, West Virginia, Edward Ellard of Minooka, Pennsyl- 
vania, and Fridolin J. Staud of Elkins, West Virginia (Medical Corps attached 
to the Battery) were all slightly wounded. 

After the Battery was put into position a reconnaissance was made and an 
observation post established on the forward slope of Hill 271 . This OP command- 



82 



E BATTERY ON NOVEMBER FIRST 



ed an excellent view of Andevanne and the line of hills to the north and northeast. 
Telephonic communication was established with the Battery and was attempted 
with the battalion post of command, but on account of the heavy shelling this 
Une to the battalion was never open for communication and all communication 
with battalion was by runner. 

Information was received from the battalion commander that heavy 
machine gun fire from Hill 243 was giving our infantry considerable trouble, 
and we were called upon for support. Fire was opened immediately, and while 
conducting this fire a direct hit was received in the OP and Captain George 
Wayne Anderson, Jr., Adjutant 2d Battahon, of Richmond, Virginia, was killed; 
Captain Theodorick A. W. Gilliam, commanding Battery E of Norfolk, Virginia, 
Sergeant Harry A. Dailey of Martinsburg, West Virginia and Corporal Gilbert 
H. Whitford of Great Cacapon, West Virginia, were slightly wounded. 



5 




ViLLERS 



CHAPTER XII. 

From Grande Carree Ferme to Blanc Fontaine 
The Second Battalion at the Finish 

AS THE sun went down on November 1, quiet settled over Grande Carree 
/ \ Ferme. After the excitement of the 1st we could hardly realize that in 
^ ^ our sector the battle was over, and we went to bed or rather lay down 
to sleep, fully expecting a night of strafing, but, instead, with darkness came the 
rumble of traffic along the road beside our battery positions and we awoke in 
the morning to find that we were in the SOS. The change was a pleasant surprise 
but there was little comfort in it. We know too well what it meant to move. 
By noon the day following, November 3, our orders came, and Major Nash with 
the batter}^ commanders went forward to select new position north of Villers. 
Before dark the Battalion was on the road, F Battery leading with D and E 
following in order. Lieutenants Muzzy and Reynolds with the Battalion wagon 
and the ill-fated medical cart were somewhere ahead. 

The first hour of march was fine and ended with the head of the Battalion 
turned north through Aincreville. Here we halted with a line of trucks ahead. 
Frederick Palmer, the war correspondent, says that there was a gun stalled in the 
road. There was no stalled gun, but a whole regiment of motorized but not 
motor-drawn G. P. F.'s. Major Cooper of the 315th Engineers did heroic work 
that night, but the blockade did not finally break until long after midnight, the 
jam in the mean time extending from Villers through Aincreville to Bantheville and 
Romagne. The rain fell steadily and at times heavily, but there was one consola- 
tion, the enemy guns were silent. Word came that we had lost contact with the 
Boche and for the first time since our arrival at the front we saw automobiles 
carrying lights. The SOS was crowding us out. 

By four o'clock in the morning the head of the battalion cleared Villers and 
after an hour's delay, caused by a gun of B Battery, 314th Field Artillery, stalling 
in a shell hole, it proceeded to position in the Ravin du Fond de Theisse. 

After passing Villers we came again into the zone of shell fire. Light shells 
were falling intermittently along the road ahead and on our right the Boche was 



84 FROM GRANDE CARRfiE FERME TO BLANC FONTAINE 

shelling heavily the crossings of the Meuse. Just as we were turning off the road 
to our positions on the left, a direct hit on an E Battery caisson limber exploded 
a box of long fuses. The effect was spectacular but the damage remarkably 
light. A column of flames shot upward illuminating the whole valley and reveal- 
ing the terrified cannoneers who had been marching alongside. It appeared as 
though a whole section must have been blown to pieces, but as a matter of fact only 
two men were wounded, one horse injured and the caisson limber itself destroyed. 

Our stay in the new position was brief, but the most comfortable that 
we had enjo3'ed since the drive began. Our echelons, sheltered in a deep 
ravine, were practically safe from shell fire, wood and good water were 
abundant, and all about we found quantities of German material with which 
to make ourselves comfortable. The battalion and battery PC's were in 
comfortable frame shelters that the enemy artillery had occupied only two days 
before. Of course our quarters were not safe, but they were too tempting to 
be passed by. Our own idea was to "hole up" here for the winter but the army 
had other plans. 

During the first morning we delivered some fire but the enemy was retreating 
so rapidly that we soon had orders to cease firing. At the time part of the guns 
were firing west of north and others south of east, directty over the battalion PC. 
To an outsider it might have seemed as though we were surrounded but as a 
matter of fact we were merely striking out with both hands at once. With our right 
we were supporting a crossing of the Meuse at Dun, while with our left we 
were breaking up enemy strongholds on the west bank. The general situation 
was not new, for throughout the drive we had had the Boche constantly on our 
right flank although we seldom returned his fire. On the night of the 5th we re- 
ceived orders to move. 

Bois Boulain is memorable in the annals of the 2d Battalion because it was 
there that we saw the end of the war. From the day we detrained at Souilly and 
"took to the woods" (Bois de Chatel) in the wet of a gray dawn until after the 
armistice, our advance had been a series of jumps from bois to bois. Some, like 
Bois Bourrus, where the combat train took shelter the night of September 25, 
were mere patches of brush and blasted snags of trees; others like Bois de 
Septsarges, still contained patches of standing timber, but all afforded us the 
necessary cover for horses and material. As we advanced the amount of standing 
timber increased, but it was not until the day that we arrived at Bois Boulain 
that we found whole tracts of uncut forest. 




Batteuy K's Limber near \illehs 




Positions of the 2d Battalion near Villers-Devant-Dun 




D AND F Battery Positions, Bois Boulain 




Battekv E's Position near Bois Boulain 



FROM GRANDE CARREE FERME TO BLANC FONTAINE 85 

We reached Bois Boulain on the evening of November 6, after a dajdight 
march from the vicinity of Villers, the first daylight march that we had taken 
since Hill 281. Major Nash and his staff with the battery commanders and 
battery commanders' details on foot, had arrived at noon. Battery F, by doubling 
its teams on the shell-torn dirt road north of Andevanne and taking a short 
cut through Tailly, arrived by mid-afternoon, while Batteries D and E and the 
Medical Detachment, following the metal road through Remonville, came in an 
hour before dark. 

For once we had an opportunity to break and make camp by daylight. The 
batteries took up positions at once, but as we had no call for fire we spent a 
quiet night disturbed only by the enemy's intermittent shelling of the Beauclair- 
Stenay Road, a kilometer to our left. 

During our six days' stay at Boulain we delivered no fire of importance, but 
on two occasions the Boche made things lively for us. The first was shortly after 
noon on the 7th when Captain Barton innocently adjusted on a patch of woods 
that later investigation showed concealed not only a kitchen in full equipment 
but also two batteries of artillery. Fritz resented this and immediatelj^ swept 
with zone fire the whole of Bois Boulain, from our forward OP to the road. 

Luckily we escaped any serious damage this time, but on the afternoon of 
the 8th we were less fortunate. In this shelling by 77's Privates John I. Bell and 
Jesse W. Kester of D Battery were killed and Privates Clifton Edwards of D 
Battery and Howard Bennett of F Battery were Avounded. There were some cas- 
ualties also among our horses, and but for the fact that E Battery had moved 
its echelon a few hours earlier they would have been heav3\ The old echelon 
was raked with fire. 

As usual Barton PC was sure that Hind PC was blown to pieces and Hind 
was equally confident that Barton PC was in fragments. Both, however, escaped 
damage except that a direct hit put an end to Dr. Reynolds' medical cart. C. C. 
Pills, iodine and bandages flew in all directions and a fragment of shell, 
piercing the Doctor's bedding roll, left a mark on his Sam Browne belt that may 
lead him into story telling. We, of course, know where the belt was when it was 
hit, but the girls at home — well it will make a good story anyhow and we won't 
tell unless he repeats it so often that he begins to believe it himself. 

For days rumors of peace had been flying across the front. Ever since the 
attack on November the first we had realized that the German had lost his hold 
and that our lines were advancing rapidly and that the end, though far away, 



86 FROM GRANDE CARRfiE FERME T(^ BLANC FONTAINE 

was definitely in sight. Nevertheless, we were hardly prepared for the announce- 
ment that the armistice had actually been signed. During the night before the 
guns had kept up a desultory firing on the roads leading out of Stenay and at 
daylight were just completing the firing when an e.xcited courier from battalion 
headquarters rushed in to tell us the good news. 

"Cease firing! The armistice is signed!" 

A hush settled over Bois Boulain. Far to the east, across the Meuse, we 
could hear the roar of a battle that continued until after ten o'clock but for us 
the war was finished. It may be that we did some cheering but we were too 
deeply happy (and tired) to make any noise. 

We did build fires. After fifty days of concealed fires and no fires at all, we 
were free to build all the fires we wanted. Fuel was abundant and bonfires 
blazed on every side. That night for once we warmed up. Wherever one looked 
he could see the blaze of camp fires. It was then that we realized how war had 
changed since the days of our forebears, changed because of the long range gun 
and aerial observation. To them such fires were an ordinary part of camp life; 
to us they were a luxury. 

Our few days of comparative quiet gave us an opportunity to observe 
more of our surroundings than had previously been possible. It also enabled 
the Battery to bring up from previous positions all their men and equipment. 
The daylight march from Villers had revealed glimpses of beautiful land rolling 
along the Meuse, forest covered hills rich in autumn colors, and rich fields that 
for three years had been cultivated by the Boche. We were now so far back of 
the old organized battle line that we found on every side evidence of recent 
civilian occupation, and in Tailly we saw baby carriages that had been left 
beside the road by their owners in their haste to escape the shifting line of battle. 
We saw much, too, of the havoc wrought by our own aitillery From our posi- 
tions in Bois Boulain we were able to make interesting trips forward to the edge 
of the woods from which we could see Stenay and the east bank of the Meuse. 
The Germans had already evacuated the valley immediately in front of us but 
they knew that we occupied the counter slopes and while we were there they were 
dropping shells along the water front in Stenay. The woods themselves were 
full of German plunder hastily abandoned, and during our stay the battahon 
commander detail was busy sorting out salvage signal equipment, telephones, 
buzzers, hand reels, etc The mess sergeants, too, were busy, and added Boche 
potatoes, beets and cabbage. Our days of dried vegetables were at an end. 




Bois Bdii.AiN, LooKiNi; North from Halles 




BouLAiNE Farm 




> 

O 

Z 



O 



H 
o 
z 



Oh 



FROM GRANDE CARRfiE FEKME TO BLANC FONTAINE 87 

It was on the llth that we paid our first visit to P'eime Boulaine. Some one 
had discovered there a barn full of hay, and as our horses were shoit of forage we 
began to carry it over, but presently an infantry officer who had two horses 
stabled there placed a guard over it and refused to let us have it. We never 
found out exactly what his reason was, for surely there was hay enough for all of 
us, but when E Battery encountered the difficulty Lieutenant FuUerton solved 
it for the time being by arranging with the infantry officer to let each of his 
drivers carry over an arm load of hay. The infantry officer thoughtlessly forgot 
to ascertain how many drivers E Battery had or how they might be identified 
and as a result we drew all the hay we needed. 

During the forenoon of the llth, we received word from Regimental Head- 
quarters to make ourselves as comfortable as possible for an indefinite stay. Major 
Nash and several of the battery officers investigated Boulain Farm and decided 
that it would be best for the whole battalion to mo\T into the old chateau and its 
many outbuildings. That night most of the battalion officers moved in, and. for 
the first time in several weeks, slept in beds. Fortunately the clean-up jjrepara- 
toiy to moving in was postponed till the next day. "Fortunately," because during 
the night orders came for us to move, and at ten o'clock the next morning the 
battalion was on the road to Blanc Fontaine. 

For the first time since we left training camp we were on the road as a batta- 
lion. And such a battalion we were! Not an individually mounted man in the 
column! Major Nash and Captain Barton in the lead were on foot, with a miscel- 
leneous following of battalion and battery detail men; then came the guns and 
caissons with four horses each, followed by kitchens and water carts. It was a 
battalion of artillery such as never was on paper, but for all that we were that 
day at the height of our efficiency, and, had the necessity arisen, could have 
gone into immediate action without flurry or confusion. 

The day was mild and clear and in spite of our long march we arrived in the 
barracks at Blanc Fontaine before dark. Our way had taken us back over part 
of our old trail, and then east across the Meuse at Sassey, back down the east 
bank of the canal, pass Regimental Headquarters at Mouzay, where, for the 
first time since we detrained, we saw civilians, and on to the Blanc Fontaine 
barracks where a new chapter begins. 



CHAPTER XIII. 
Bantheville to Mouzay 

THE reconnaissance and occupation of the 1st Battalion position along 
the Bantheville-Remonville road in broad dayUght was a new method of 
warfare that 313 tried on the Boche It worked admirably and the night 
of November 1 found the battalion comfortably situated along the road and all 
the "GI cans" going "over" and hitting on the ridge that paralleled the road. 
Due to the diminishing number of horses it was necessary to haul ammunition 
all night with the same horses that had moved the guns and a small supply of 
ammunition forward during the day. 

From this position a barrage was fired through the village of Villers, and fire 
was subsequently delivered on strong points in that vicinity. The battalion 
commander, who was with Colonel Sterling of the 360th Infantry, conducted 
some of the firing. The close co-operation that existed between the battalions 
of the 313th and the infantry at that time prompted the following letter. 

180th INFANTRY BRIGADE 

American Expeditionary Forces. 

8 November, 1918. 
From: C. 0. 180th Infantry Brigade. 
To: C. 0. 313th F. A. 
Subject: Operations of Nov. 1st and 2d. 

1. I desire to thank you most heartily for the very excellent support 
rendered by your regiment to this Brigade during the successful operations 
of Nov. 1st and 2d. 

2. As far as I could see the liaison between the Infantry and Artillery 
was as nearly perfect as it could be made. Co-operation was at all times free- 
ly offered and easily secured. Response to calls for artillery fire was prompt 
and effective. I feel that to a very great extent the success obtained by the 
Brigade was due to the efficient support rendered by your Regiment. 

3. In the name of the officers and enlisted men of the 180th Infantry 
Brigade, I thank you. 

U. G. Alexander, 
Brigadier General, U. S. A. 



BANTHEVILLE TO MOUZAY 89 

The night of November 2, a raiii}^ cold night hke most of them, found 
the gun crews tired out by two days and a night of ahnost continuous firing, 
and the horses exhausted in the echelons near Madeleine Ferme, five kilometers 
in the rear. Jerry A\as quiet and everyone was looking forward to a good 
night's rest. 

By this time, however, we had learned that there was no rest in "this man's 
army," and we felt that something was sure to happen. It did. At 9.30 that 
night the 179th Infantry Brigade was given the mission of following up the brilliant 
successes obtained by the 180th by passing through their lines and attacking to 
capture all the densely wooded high ground extending along the west bank of 
the river from Halles to the south. By IIP. M. the plan of attack was formulated 
and orders given for the 1st Battalion, 313th F. A., to go into position near 
Chassogne Farm, and fire a rolling barrage through the Bois de Mont beginning 
at 8 A. M. 

It looked like a hopeless proposition, for the roads to the echelons were almost 
impassable due to the mud and the congestion of ambulances, supply and ammuni- 
tion trucks. The battery commanders went forward in the pitch darkness and 
rain to look for battery positions, and messengers on foot and mounted were 
sent to the echelons. The battalion broke camp and by 5.30 the horses and lim- 
bers arrived. The column moved out in the darkness to Bantheville and thence 
to Aincreville, over the shell-torn road that had not been used since the attack 
of November 1 . Here it was met by the battery commanders and the batteries 
were directed into the selected positions, just west of the Aincreville-Villers road, 
about 500 meters north of Aincreville. 

At 7.58 the data was given to the guns, and at 8 A. M., H hour, the entire 
battalion simultaneously started the barrage. What we thought impossible had 
been accomplished, and the infantry moved into the Bois de Mont under our 
protecting fire. By 1 P. M. they were nearing Montigny and at 3.45 P. M. had 
advanced to the high ground between Mont-devant-Sasseyand Sassey-sur-Meuse. 

The developments of November 3 were the most astonishing that we had 
witnessed. At 6.30 that morning, while the battery commanders were making 
their reconnaissances, Aincreville was vigorously bombarded and the positions 
selected were in "No Man's Land." At 4 P. M. the road through Aincreville 
and by our positions was a solid mass of traffic moving forward, including the 
big 155 G.P.F.'s and observation balloons propelled by trucks. In less than twelve 
hours we were in the SOS. 



00 BANTHEVILLE TO MOUZAY 

For the first time we realized that the enemy before us was routed and not 
yielding ground merely for tactical reasons in order to take up strong positions 
east of the Meuse. From the amount of work that had been done on new gun 
positions and dugouts it was evident that he had calculated on holding this high 
ground during the winter. The attacks of the last three days had completely 
baffled him and his forces had broken. The continuous lines that held for four 
years were no more and it was with difficulty that our patrols kept contact with 
their rear guards until the river was reached. 

Enemy airplanes continued their activity practically unhampered over the 
positions and along the Aincreville-Villers Road. Four bombs struck on the ridge 
in rear of the positions, causing casualties. Very few shells fell near the batteries 
during the day, and that night the men slept on top of the ground for the first 
time since September 24. 

On the 4th the battalion remained in position with the guns laid on Dun-sur- 
Meuse. The echelons were established along the Ravin de I'Etaillon in rear of the 
positions. Clean underwear and socks and some new clothing were brought up 
in the afternoon, and the men had an excellent opportunity for a bath in the 
brook. An observation post was organized in the Bois de Babiemont. 

The 90th Division was ordered to prepare to press the pursuit across 
the Meuse in the general direction of Stenay and Brouennes. In compliance 
with these orders Colonel Brunzell pushed forward and on November 5 estab- 
lished a regimental observation post on the heights in rear of Halles, about nine 
kilometers north of the battery positions. From this place an excellent view of 
the east bank of the Meuse could be obtained. The enemy could be seen with- 
drawing from the Stenay-Mouzay line towards Baalon, but machine gunners 
had been left in these towns and along the canal between these places. The guns 
swept the broad valley with their fire and made a crossing of the river difficult 
if not impossible. The artillery fire from the enemy batteries situated on the 
east bank was intense and the MUers-Montigny-Halles road was under constant 
bombardment. It was on this road, a short distance south of Montigny, that 
Colonel Robert S. Welsh, commanding the 155th Field Artillery Brigade, was 
instantly killed by shell fire on the morning of November 5. 

In accordance with the plan to pursue the enemy on the east side of the river 
and seize the bridgeheads at Stenay and Sassey, the 1st Battalion was ordered, 
at 2 A.M. on November 6 to move out at daybreak and go into position in the 
vicinity of Halles. The battalion and batter}'- commanders went forward mounted 




AiNCREVILLE 




1st Battalion Positions near Aincreville, Chassogne Farm in the Distance 




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BANTHEVILLE TO MOUZAY 91 

for the reconnaissance of the position. Due to the heavy shelling of the Villers- 
Montigny-Halles road it was closed to traffic, and the route followed, while much 
longer, was perfectly defiladed from enemy territory and balloons. The battalion 
proceeded from Aincreville by Chassogne Farm to Villers, to Andevanne, to 
Tailly by Les Tuileries and thence to Beauclair where the column was met by 
the battery commanders and halted until darkness should allow the selected 
positions to be occupied. 

The morale of the troops was never better than on the morning of that 
march, for then we saw the indisputable evidence of the effect of the artillery 
work of November 1. Gruesome though they were, the Boche bodies that filled 
the shell holes, and, mangled by shell fragments, lay strewn along the Villers- 
Andevanne road, gave silent testimony to the success of our barrage on the morn- 
ing of the great attack. Some of the shell holes had been organized as machine 
gun nests, and the German gun crews, instantly killed by the exploding shells, 
sat dead by their guns. In the woods north of Andevanne a number of German 
batteries, ranging in size from the 77's to 210 howitzers, were in position. The 
thorough gassing of these woods, prior to the barrage of November 1, had made 
it impossible to put the guns into action or to bring up the horses to get them out. 
Along the road through the woods was a 210 howitzer with 14 dead horses hitched 
to it. A German wagon, full of stores and drawn by four horses had been hit by 
a shell and upset, the horses killed. Countless dead horses, covered with mud 
from the passing traffic, lay where they had fallen. A battery of 155 Longs was 
still in position at Les Tuileries with the guns laid and the shells on the trail, 
fused and ready to be fired. 

The road itself was almost impassable due to the shell holes. The exhausted 
condition and small number of our horses made progress difficult until the Bois 
de Barricourt was passed. At times it was necessary to put the caisson teams on 
the guns to get them through the mud. Major General Allen, commanding the 
90th Division, commended the regiment on the manner in which the march was 
made under difficult circumstances. 

From the Bois de Barricourt through Tailly to Beauclair the country was 
beautiful and had not suffered serious damage during the war. The "No Man's 
Land" of four years had been crossed and one could see that the Hun had occu- 
pied France's most fertile soil. 

The battery positions selected at Halles were occupied after dark, A and C 
Batteries in the southern edge of the town, B Battery in an orchard that had been 



92 BANTHEVILLE TO MOUZAY 

a German ammunition dump, 300 meters north of the town. The command 
post of the Regiment and the 1st BattaUon were estabhshed in Halles and the 
observation post, previously situated on the heights in rear, was connected by 
telephone with all the batteries. 

That night the 357th Infantry succeeded in getting a patrol across the 
river at Wieseppe and fastened a cable on the east bank of the Meuse. This 
cable later became the support for a pontoon bridge, over which many of the 
troops crossed. During the night the ammunition dump in rear of B Battery 
was hit by a shell and set on fire. Sergeant Manford, asleep behind a pile of 
powder cases,was severely burned and sent to the hospital. The blaze evidently 
attracted the enemy artillery on the east bank of the river as the B Battery 
position was heavily shelled during the remainder of the night. 

On the night of November 7 the Battalion fired at targets designated by the 
infantry, including a working party along the river bank and an enemy battery 
in action near Stenay. During the night of November 8 intermittent fire was 
delivered on prominent cross-roads on the east bank of the river in order to 
interfere with the enemy's plan of retreat. 

In Halles was a large church with an immense Red Cross painted on its 
roof — it had been used as a hospital. Near the church was a cemetery with rows 
of fresh graves, many of them of men wounded in action in the fighting of October 
1 to 15, who had died in the hospital. Several of the fresh graves had no mark at 
all and two were only partially filled before the hasty retreat. Immediately 
after withdrawing from the town the Germans had shelled it. Several of the 
shells fell in the cemetery and one crashed through the roof of the church. 

On November 9 the corps gave warning that the enemy was likely to with- 
draw from the river and all preparations should be made for a crossing. The 
work of getting the artillery across was difficult. We were nearly opposite 
Stenay, but the bridge there had been blown up in eight different places and the 
valley flooded. The foot bridge at Wieseppe could not be used for artillery. 
The only available crossing was at Sassey where only one section had been blown 
out of the bridge and could be quickly repaired. This was eight kilometers south 
of us and it necessitated using the Montigny road that was still being shelled. 
At 1 A. M. the 1st Battalion was designated as the unit to make the crossing and 
was ordered to report to General Alexander at the Sassey bridge at 7 A. M. The 
batteries took the road at 4 A. M. and proceeded by way of Montigny, and Mont- 
devant-Sassey to Sassey,arriving at the appointed hour. The infantry that was 




C.M'TAIX HnnEKT \V. I'eHKINS, BATThin 11, AT THE FliONT 




In I'osiTioN North of Mouzay 




Looking it Over on Paper 



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BANTHEVILLE TO MOUZAY 93 

to precede us had not arrived liut the General ordered the battahon to go forward 
under cover of a dense fog that enveloped all movements, and to take up a 
position in the vicinity of Mouzay. So at 7 o'clock on the morning of November 
10 we crossed the Meuse, that formidable barrier that was the enemy's last 
natural line of defense in France, without which he could not maintain the 
lines of communication which supported the greater part of his army along the 
Western Front. 

The road along the river to JMouzay was reported as unsafe, due to mines, so 
it was necessary to follow the route south along the river to Milly and thence to 
Mouzay by way of Lion-devant-Dun and Charmois. Due to heavy shelling in 
the town of Mouzay the Battalion was halted for about an hour just outside the 
town while positions were selected. We took advantage of the halt to consume 
quantities of sugar beets and raw cabbages from the fields — here was a food supply 
that submarines were unable to attack — and though uncooked they tasted delici- 
ous after the 22 kilometer hike with only "corn willie" as a foundation. 

At eleven o'clock the battalion was in positions just east of the cemetery in 
Mouzay and reported ready to fire. 

In Mouzay we saw for the first time civilians that had been under German 
domination for four years. About five hundred residents of the town had remained 
during the time the town was held by the Germans. We saw only a few as 
we entered the town, but learned from them that the remainder were down in 
deep caves and cellars with a supply of food to last until the Germans had been 
diiven out of range. 

We learned also that the previous night, notwithstanding the fact that the 
population had no gas masks, the Germans had gassed Mouzay, causing casual- 
ties among the inhabitants. These civilians, after the long period of oppression 
by military authorities, were amazed when they saw the Americans and the 
bigness of heart that characterizes the American soldier in dividing his mess 
with a hungry French "garcon." 

Orders were received to be prepared for an attack at 5.30 the next morning, 
and the barrage tables were compiled during the night. The orders were sub- 
sequently changed and at 9 A. M. orders were issued to cease firing and that 
hostilities would end at 11 A. M. Shortly after this order came down Mouzay 
was lightly shelled and preparations were made to retaliate by firing on cross- 
roads east of Baalon. The data was prepared but the guns were not fired due 
to a cancellation of orders. Then, at eleven o'clock of the eleventh day of the 



94 BANTHEVILLE TO MOUZAY 

eleventh month, came that dehghtful silence that told us the Boche had realized 
his defeat and the day of reckoning was approaching. 

The armistice found the 1st Battalion across the river, thirty kilometers 
beyond the point where we had gone "over the top" on September 26, at the 
beginning of the greatest battle of the war. 

Immediately after the armistice the time was spent in cleaning equipment 
and getting suitable billets for the men and horses. Reveille, retreat, inspections 
and "Squads right" began once more, and the first rumors as to when we were 
going home were discussed. Five months we have followed the same program. 

As for the rumors about going home — well, we still discuss them. 

During forty-seven days of continuous fighting the 313th won the distinction 
of serving throughout the Meuse-Argonne offensive without a day's relief. During 
this offensive one officer and fifteen men were killed in action and seventeen men 
died of wounds; nine officers and 121 men were wounded. We delivered fire to 
help support the infantry of the following divisions: 3d, 4th, 5th, 33d, 80th and 
90th. The following letter from the Commanding General, 90th Division, 
which we helped to support from October 21 until the armistice, to the Command- 
ing General of the 155th Field Artillery Brigade, shows the character of the sup- 
port rendered. 

HEADQUARTERS 155TH FIELD ARTILLERY BRIGADE 
American Expeditionary Forces. 
France. 
General Orders No. 19. 

15 November, 1918. 

It is with much pleasure that the following letter is published for the 
information of this command. 

HEADQUARTERS NINETIETH DIVISION 

American Expeditionary Forces 
14 November, 1918. 

From: Commanding General. 

To: Commanding General 155th Field Artillery Brigade. 

Subject: Services with 90th Division. 

1. I desire to make of permanent record the exceptionally valuable 
services of your brigade in the carrying of the Freya Stellung from Ande- 
vanne through Villers-devant-Dun to the Meuse River, and subsequently 



BANTHEVILLE TO MOUZAY 



95 



in the crossing of the river and taking of the Stenay-Baalon hne inchiding 
both towns. 

2. The bold, aggressive, and effective work of the 155th Brigade through- 
out this period and its deep barrage of November 1 , made the infantry work 
against two enemj' shock Divisions, 28th and 27th, especially detailed to 
hold that position, possible witli a minimum of losses. 

3. It gives me very great pleasure to exi)ress the sincerest thanks of 
the 90th Division for the essential support rendered it by the 155th Brigade. 
Much of this work was due to the late Colonel Robert S. Welsh, who com- 
manded during the earlier days of this period. 

Henry T. Allen, 

Major General. 

By Command of Brigadier General Bryson. 

George P. Hawes, Jr. 
Lieutenant Colonel, 
Adjutant. 




Positions of Batteries A and C at Halles 




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CHAPTER I. 
Apres la Guerre 

WHILE the drivers were bringing the wheeled materiel of the 2d Battalion 
to Blanc Fontaine via Sassy, the dismounted men were marching by a 
shorter route. They crossed the Meuse River at Villefranche on a 
little one-way, one-man pontoon bridge. 

Arriving at the barracks in the early afternoon of November 12 the batteries 
selected their new homes and policed them. About sundo^^•n the drivers arrived. 
As a special concession we were allowed to park the guns provided they were in 
position under camouflage and ready to fire by daybreak. Every one had a 
bunk for the first time in two months but it didn't take two minutes to show that 
we had not forgotten how to use them. 

We were inspected the next morning at 7.30. Everything was satisfactory 
except for the fact that some uniforms were dirty, there was a little dirt on a 
few pieces of harness, all the horses were skinny and the 2d Battalion detail 
horses were not groomed. F Battery being in the same stable received the 
buck silently. Our preparedness and fighting potentiality, as shown in the gun 
positions, however, saved the day. 

With the armistice two days behind us, the enemy thirty miles ahead of us 
and still retreating, and friendly observation balloons well in advance of our 
location, we had gone into a position that was ideal for such an inspection. The 
battalion was echeloned in depth inside the enclosure of Blanc Fontaine (exact 
co-ordinates on any German map), base pieces located, OP and PC established, 
and an SOS barrage calculated with one kilometer of front line assigned to 
each battery. Had the pieces been fired F Battery would have suffered from 
D, D from E, and the barracks from all three. 

What appeared the most pleasing feature was the fact that the men 
were so busy polishing. Its barrage guard carefully posted, one battery showed 
its industry by taking down and cleaning all four breech-blocks at the same time. 
Our nets were up and we were camouflaging in the broadest sense of the word. 
This was the turning point in the career of the regiment. Heretofore it had 




Presk.\taii(i.\ of American Im.ac to Major General Henry T. Allen, 90th Division, 

BY THE Mayor of Modzay 




The Y. M. C. A. in Mouzay 



APRES la guerre 99 

camouflaged what it was accomplishing but from now on it busied itself covering 
its sins and omissions. 

The following Intelligence report was turned in from one of the post bellum 
Posts of Command. 

Confidential and Secret Headquarters, 1st Army, A. E. F. 

For distribution by Acroplaiu' Second Section, (Jeneral Staff. 

SUMMARY OF UNINTELLIGENCE 

Noveailjer, 10, 191S 
Part I 

I. General Depressions of the Day. 

The enemy reacted violently all over the sector; west of the Meuse our attacks were 
successful. East of the Meuse our attacks were successful. \'iolent counter attacks hy 
the enemy appear to have caused us to adjust our lines slightly to a depth of .ten kilometers. 

The (lay was quiet. Otherwise nothing to report. 

The enemy appears to place his main reliance on machine guns, infantry, artillery 
and aeroplanes to resist our attack. This is taken as an indication of something very 
significant, namely, the tremendous shortage among the enemy of all other branches. Other- 
wise thei'e is nothing to report. 

Two men were seen entering a ravine near Shulietly. This confirms prisoners' 
statements of a general withdrawal. 

On the right the enemy are extremely nervous. They showed tiieir nervousness l)y 
raiding our trenches and throwing hand grenades at us. 

II. Enemy Front Line. 

The enemy line follows ours in a general way except in one or two jilaces where it 
runs south of it. West of the Meuse it runs in an easterlj^lirection to the left (inclusive). 
Thence it runs east of the Meuse in the opposite direction (exclusive). Thence it runs in a 
northeast direction (inclusive) turning due east for 200 m. Thence due south for 200 m. 
From here on, there is no change. This has not l)een contirnied. 

III. Enemy Infantry Activity. 

The enemy infantry were extremely active during the day, jumping up and down and 
climbing trees. A number of nests have been ol^served in the Bois de Bandylegs. Perhaps 
it is safe to venture the assumption that they were made by machine guns. 

IV. Enemy Artillery Activity. 

The artillery now opposite our front reatlily lends itself to two nuiin groupings: 
(1) The East Meuse Grouping, (2) The West Meuse (Jrouping. It is very significant 
that since the beginning of the attack all batteries reported in action have been in one of 
these two groups. 

Careful study of the terrain above the river Meuse separating the country on the right 
of it from the country on the left of it. The country varies from hilly to flat with woods 
and open spaces. Roads run between the towns. All conditions make the country 
suitable for the artillery which we are safe in presuming is there. 



100 APRfiS LA GUERRE 

During the day (and night) the firing all appeared to come from a northerl.y direction. 
The preponderance of fire was from 77's, 105's and ISO's. Some gas and HE was used. 

A battery at J-0000 was reported by a prisoner. This was confirmed by photographs 
which show nothing at this point. 

Nancy-Anne was shelled with duds during the afternoon. Battery J 7.11 was immedi- 
ately counter-batteried. This shelling was apparently effective, for toward morning the 
shelling stopped. 

V. Enemy Disorder of Battle: 

A prisoner of the 12th Muleskinners recently captured confirms the belief that this 
is not the 12th Muleskinners at all, but the 115th Schuverpests. Order of battle confirmed. 

A prisoner from the 11th Janger Wulkers states that his regiment was recently 
disbanded and transferred into a Flaljberdapper Battalion. Order of battle confirmed. 

The 23.33 Kuks have been replaced by the 17th Kaks. Order of battle confirmed. 

The 499th Geshbdeeit has been identified as the 844th Butterbaats. They recently 
came from the Useub front. Order of battle confirmed. 
Condition of Enemy Units. 

Prisoners report that the 420th Landwafe Division now opposite our front is composed 
entirely of one-legged men impressed into the service from the great Sourrkrout factories 
at Essen. This and other documentary evidence indicates the terrible disorders in 
German}'. 
Enemy Intention. 

The enemy intend to fall back on the Kursenblanc-Stelluno (shown on captured map 
dated Api-il, 1918). From here the.y will fall back into the Meuse. There is every indica- 
tion that a stand will be taken at La Trine. 

After this they intend to run like hell. 

VL Two men were seen to come down the Harricourt-Barricourt road and enter a small 

wooden hut at 322x11.4. This is thought to indicate a rehef. 

Railways: No unusual activity observed. Most of the railroad seemed to remain 

in the same place during the day. 
Roads: An old man in a wheel-chair going from Bar-devant-Meuse to Bar-demore- 

Meuse tends to confirm the belief of a general retreat. 

At 12.64hr 600 men going from Andevanne to Vandyanne. 

< At 13.64hr 600 men going from Vandyanne to Andevanne. 

It is thought that this move was made by the enemy with a view to increasing the 
circulation of his troops. At 16.82hr, 12 wagons, believed to be a battery, on the Ancj'- 
Buzancy road going in both directions. The visibility was very poor during the night. 

Vn. Enemy Works: 

Fox-holes and occasional rat -holes have been observed in front of the Bois de Bois 
woods. 

A captured German map has been found showing a new Stellung. This stellung is 
indicated by a line drawn across it in pencil. This is undoubtedly the point on which 
• the enemy will fall back Thursday. The map fails to show the stellung east of the river. 
We have drawn in the missing portion on the attached map. 

A study of recent photographs confirms the presence of the Meuse River as shown on 
the Plan Directeur. 



APRfiS LA GUERRE 101 

VIII. Enemy Aerial Activity. 

The enemy was very active during the periotl, particularly on the right and left 
and in the center. Otherwise there was nothing to report. 

IX. .1/ iscella neoxis . 

Extract from a captured German document: 

"I received your letter and was glad to hear that you are sending an extra pair 
of knitted socks. Since I put on the last pair, you sent me, six months ago, I have 
never been without them. 

(Signed) Wilhelm. 

This is uiulouhtedly a message in code from the Kaiser and is thought to contain the 
order to fall hack on the Kursenhlanc Stellung thus confirming our previous assumption. 
Order of l)attle confirmed. 

X. Activity of Our Own Troops. 

Our troops spent the day tightening up their lines and improving their positions 
which were very awkward. 

XI. Our Aerial Activity. 

The dampness made the day impossilile for aeroplanes. In spite of this our aero- 
planes were up in great numbers. Our scout patrol of three planes met 20 Fokkers. The 
Fokkers immediately burst into flames and crashed. 

Lieutenant Dunwiddy l)rought down a balloon at dawn. Owing to the darkness 
Lieutenant Dunwidily brought down one of our own balloons. Luckily it was an old one. 
The observer jumped but was not seen to land. Confirmation is requested. 

Requisitions for all shortages of clothing and ecjuipment were turned in at 
noon, the 13th of November, in order that we might be able to accompany the 
90th Division into Luxembourg. However, at 2 A.M. of the 15th orders were 
received to send 33 men per battery, practically all horses with harness, and a 
few caissons to the 47th F. A. Brigade. As that column of ragged men and 
worn-out horses left at 7 A. M. we watched them with mingled feelings. Although 
those who remained \\'ould get a good rest with a speedier return home, yet we 
had lost the interest and honor of a triumphal march into Germany. The 90th 
Division, one of the best of those with which we had fought, would l^e 
accompanied by artillery which had never seen action. 

Each organization was now reduced to two officers, about 120 men and two 
to four horses, but had its full complement of materiel. 

After the Supply Company had assumed responsibility for all the left over 
pieces of horse flesh in the regiment we started training for our second campaign 
— the offensive SOS with its three major engagements, the Battle of Cooties, 
the Champagne Attack and the Pursuit of Discharges. This training specialized 
in sanitation, camouflage, bunk fatigue and inspections. 



102 APRfiS LA GUERRE 

Inspectors had not honored us by their presence on the front but \\e were 
soon to learn that the nearer you got to the coast the more numerous they became. 
The chmax was reached at Brest where there were so many we had to double 
time to pass them all in a week. 

At Mouzay a set of showers had been rigged up where the whole regiment 
was able to bathe for the first time in two months. Clean clothes were issued 
and an attempt made to decootieize. 

Here the two battalions became acquainted once more. On the 11th the 
1st Battalion had been in Mouzay, where it remained in position until the 
materiel was turned in at Dun-sur-Meuse on the 18th. Every one began to think 
of home, rumors were thick, and a zealous "Squads right" period resulted. 

At first drills were in preparation for that Christmas parade in New York. 
As time slid by the scene shifted to Paris; then to New Year's in New York or 
in Paris ; then to a review by General Pershing outside Paris ; then to a reception 
in Washington, D. C, the latter part of January. Finally rumor said that 
G. H. Q. not only was uninformed as to any intentions concerning us, but had 
lost the 155th Brigade from its records. 

This rumor was confirmed when the railhead at Dun was moved, leaving us 
alone in No Man's Land. Our friends in the 90th Division had moved into 
Germany, followed by others, while some divisions had passed in the opposite 
direction. Visions of founding a New America with Stenay as its capitol sprouted, 
but on investigation there were so many applications for billets in the chateau 
of the Crown Prince that the project had to be abandoned. 

Shortly after the armistice Miss Margaret Wilson visited Blanc Fontaine 
and on November 20, President Poincare thanked us in person for our services. 
The bands of the 313th and 315th combined to add festivity to the occasion. 
It was here also that we were initiated into Y. M. C. A. vaudeville in the form of 
two pleasing musical programs. Possibly much of the attraction lay in the oppor- 
tunity of just seeing American girls once more. Regimental Memorial Services 
were conducted by Colonel Brunzell on November 24, at Blanc Fontaine. 

Thanksgiving Day came, but the rumored turkey had to be carved with a 
can opener. A few weeks later we read the following headline in a Paris paper : 

"TURKEY SERVED TO ALL SAMMIES IN PARIS." 
Orders to move finally arrived. Some organizations marched to Dun while 
others hopped trucks. When the batteries left Mouzay they looked like dough- 




fe-:: 



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Hkoimental HKAmn akteks in Argbnteiui. 



-V:at^ 




Ancy le Libre 




Argenteuil 




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Climbing Up to the Drill Field Above Argenteuil 



APRfiS LA GUERRE 103 

boys, bristling with Boche rifles and other souvenirs, but it was a simple matter 
to pick out those who had marched all the way to the railhead, when we lined 
up to entrain on December 5. 

On our trip northward we had been too busy both mentally and physically, 
to pay much attention to the destruction and desolation the war had brought 
to the Meuse Valley. Now, as we rolled toward Verdun we realized to its fullest 
extent this aspect of the war. Small i)iles of stones were all that remained of 
what had been quaint stone villages in 1914. For miles, hills and valleys pre- 
sented a continuous kaleidoscope of shell craters, trenches, dugouts and barbed 
wire entanglements. All canal locks and bridges were blown up. Rows of tree 
stumps lined the roads and canals where wonderful avenues had either been 
chopped away to open fields of fire or shot down by heavy artillery, leaving a 
mass of twisted splinters pointing in every direction. That five hours' ride through 
one of the most famous battlefields of France was depressing but intensely 
interesting. The wisdom of passing up the right bank of the Meuse in September 
was now ajiparent, for it was a network of steep slopes. 

In spite of some kegs which rolled off a northbound train on to ours during 
the night we managed to arrive at Nuits-sous-Ravieres late in the afternoon of 
December 6. After the materiel had been unloaded the 1st Battalion marched 
to Argenteuil, arriving there at midnight, while the 2d Battalion marched and 
rode in trucks to Ancy-le-Libre. Due to a slight slip a 1st Battalion bugler and 
orderly, accompanied by his officer's musette bag, rode in state on E Battery's 
rolling kitchen to Ancy. Here he was unavoidably^ detained for two days which 
exi)lains why a certain officer of the 1st Battalion missed reveille twice and went 
unshaven for 56 hours. 

Major Nash had arrived with the dismounted men of the 2d Battalion at 
four o'clock in the morning. 

Leaves were now thrown oj^en, but, as a result of inspection, were again 
closed indefinitely to the whole brigade on December 14. Life at the front had 
left its mark on our uniforms so we settled down to the quiet life of French rural 
towns with lessons in riding white mule as the main divertisement. 

Most French villages are built either on the top of a hill or down in the 
bottom of a valley, scarcely ever on a slope, the location apparently depending 
on whether the dominant motive was protection or industry. 

Ancy-le-Libre is such a typical town, its stone houses huddled together 
at the foot of the hill which separates it from Ancy-le-Franc. Where the 



104 aprEs la guerre 

buildings are not actually constructed together they are connected by stone 
walls set with mud and protected from rain by a top layer of stone slabs or tiles. 
To Americans the general appearance is attractive. All buildings are either 
in the natural stone color or else of gray stucco and the general impression is 
one of uniformity, solidity and permanency. It is a relief not to see the cheap 
wooden houses so common in the States, varying in color and idea (or lack of 
idea) of construction, with no conception of type or purpose and scarcely a trace 
of permanency. As is generally the case the main street or Grande Rue is fairly 
straight, level and in good repair. The other thoroughfares seem to have been an 
after-thought in laying out the town, for they are mere alley-ways, wdnding and 
hilly, some with outlets while many are blind. 

Ancy-le-Libre could boast of all the distinguishing buildings and ear marks 
of a rural town, the church, the mairie, the chateau, the wash-house on the stream, 
three buvettes, and, in front of each home, that barometer of wealth in which 
cheeses are buried to ripen. Heating systems for dwellings consisted of open 
grates. Running water was an unheard-of luxury. Lighting arrangements dur- 
ing the period when we were "over there" were confined to tallow candles or an 
occasional kerosene lamp. 

Wood was scarce, weather cold and rainy (the sun treated us three days 
out of four months) so we attempted to drive gloom away. Result : much drill 
in going over the top riding white and brown mule through lightning, armed 
with potato-mashers, GI cans, whiz-bangs and other deadly weapons. A few 
premature bursts occurred, thus increasing the amount of cracked stone for the 
roads, but on the whole the drills were successful and generally came to a close 
with an orderly retreat. This was a nocturnal form of work as no normal person 
will jump off in broad daylight. 

A fe\\- kilometers of muddy road ran from Ancy-le-Libre to Argenteuil where 
Regimental Headquarters and the 1st Battalion were billeted. The orders that 
sent them there must have read, "Keep in a cool, damp place." The sun refused 
to shine and Argenteuil was located in low bottom lands. The only way to keep 
from thinking too much about going home was to keep busy. Early in January 
the arrival of a fine lot of new American horses helped considerably. 

Each morning they were brought down to the water before regimental 
headquarters, which was located in the chateau near the pond, was thoroughly 
aroused. The pond with the village wash house near by, was a common meeting 
place for the people of the village. An old man with a stick under one arm and 



APRfiS LA GUERRE 105 

coat collar turned up, a dog following behind his clumping sabots, would stop 
to swap "i?ons jaur.s" with an old woman in a burlap apron, while the cows, up 
to their bellies in the water, quenched their morning thirst. ]\Iesdemoiselles 
passed with wheelbarrows loaded down with the day's wash which they would 
scrub and jiound in the icy water, as they knelt in little wooden boxes 
by the pond's edge till it seemed as if their hands would freeze off and their 
knees break. 

After water call the usual morning i^rogram of mounted drill, gun drill, 
specialist instruction and grooming was followed. Occasionally a tactical pro- 
blem would create a diversion, and the details would go out mounted or in trucks 
to establisli OP's, PC"s, pick battery positions, string wires, and reminisce on 
"How we did it on the Front." 

On some of these problems a first battalionite would meet a second battalion- 
ite and discuss the latest dope on "sailing" or compare the wonders of Nice with 
those of Cannes, Aix-les-Bains and other garden spots of France which had been 
visited on leaves. 

Afternoons were largely devoted to athletics on the high flats above Argen- 
teuil. Baseball games, horse wrestling and races, soccer, caisson races and various 
other events brought everybody out and made the afternoons pass quickly. 
Horse jumps were built and the broad open fields were excellent for cross-country 
rides. Occasionally there was a review or other formal ceremony. 

In the evenings there was always a warm fire over in the Vin Rouge Shops 
or in the Chaplain's Hut. At the latter some good shows were staged and always 
the building was packed with soldiers, the French people outside looking through 
the windows. Amateur night generally produced some latent talent which was 
either warmly welcomed or more warmly urged to remain latent forever there- 
after. The Hole in the Wall sold apples, nuts, cakes, etc., while the Lake Side 
and Mme. Coley's became popular resorts for thirsty sinners. Strict rules were 
enforced regarding drinking hours, so that the Mesdemoiselles of the Lake Side 
had to serve in the harness shop opposite the Chaplain's chateau out of hours. 
Mme. Coley was better off, as she possessed a back door, while the guard was 
posted at the front only, looking out. When her shop was placed "out of bounds" 
it is reported she received more trade than ever as every one was then introduced 
to the back entrance. Possibly Madeleine, the Belle of the Town, had something 
to do with the popularity of the place. There were other celebrities such as Mme. 
Brakeman who took care of the R. R. crossing, etc. 



106 APRfiS LA GUERRE 

Nor was Ancy-le-Libre void of the eternal feminine and interesting men. 
Who will forget that most respected lady, Mme. Cornevan or the Mesdemoiselles 
Desiree, Suzanne, Zalia, Jeanne, and last, but by no means least, Fannie, with her 
continuous Mona Lisa smirk. Then there was Mile. Imbert, who attended to 
cows and chickens by day and danced by night. The crimson beak of Monsieur 
Cognac (who always was in a good humor and insisted in warming every one with 
his good natured pats on the back, his fire and everything) was a sort of light- 
house, warning off the uninitiated. There were many others in both towns but 
the above were the most prominent characters. 

Days in Ancy-le-Libre were spent in much the same fashion as in 
Argenteuil. One tactical problem stood out above all others. That was the 
one with the Battalion PC and the various Batterj^ OP's located on top of 
that steep hill by the pistol range, so steep in fact that it took a couple of 
falls out of some officers' dignity in the ascent. Later on, in February, we had 
woi'k on the range. 

Probably the three main benefits derived from the range were a divertise- 
ment for the artillerj^ a job to occupy other troops in mending shell-torn roads 
and a good basis of claims for the French. I remember one inhabitant turned 
in a claim for 500 francs for damage to property from artillery firing. When, 
jjinned down he admitted that he had not visited his property since the firing, 
that it was not in the range but bordered on it and that he desired to cover damage 
which he feared might have occurred. 

Battalion horse shows to select entries for the Division Show were held during 
the last ten days of January. In the show Battery B took 2d, with its prize 
gun crew, and repeated the performance in the Corps Show later. Some other 
prizes were taken but for some reason or other little significance was attached 
by most of the men to the winning or losing. 

On February 7, after a week of practice. Battery C showed the regimental 
and battalion commanders of the brigade how simple open warfare would be if 
the rules of Fort Sill were followed. About the same time Battery B was turned 
over to the division in an attempt to work out and systematize the duties of an 
accompanying battery and to co-ordinate the different arms along lines brought 
out in the recent war. 

All officers of the regiment celebrated Lincoln's Birthday by attending the 
second exhibition in gas and chemical warfare. Few who were there will forget 
what a marvelous pyrotechnic display it was or will ever have any desire to be 




(Ill (IN THK Range 




"On the Way!' 




l.\ i.itvBODv'.s Betting on Feather Legs 




S(ii I 1,11 M-,Ai( Am.i.x nouiL 



APRfiS LA GUERRE 107 

in a place where those long streamers of molten metal can reach them. A corps 
inspection of all gas masks was held on February 13. 

On March 10, there was an issue to various infantry units in the division 
of one section from each battery in the regiment, accompanied by an officer selected 
not for his knowledge of artillery but for his diplomatic qualities, to work out 
problems for accompanying gun.s. We spend a pleasant ten days being "farmed 
out," during which time it was reported that most of the sections were able to 
squeeze in one problem, some baseball, pistol practice and white mule. Judging 
from the amount of practice the infantry seemed to think we needed they must 
have been well pleased with the artillery work on the front. 

Suddenly, on March 20, all sections were ordered back to their batteries 
to turn in the materiel at Nuits-sous-Ravieres. For some of us this necessitated 
travelling 45 miles in one day, but when we finally turned in at 9 P. M. it was 
with a great feeling of satisfaction, for a new basis for home rumors had been 
established. 

When the best of the horses in the regiment had been picked out for the 6th 
Division all other animals were shipped from Pacy railhead on Sunday, March 23. 
Three days later General Pershing reviewed the whole division on the hill between 
Ancy-le-Libre, Gland and Pimelles. It was cloudy overhead and muddy under- 
foot but nothing could worry us now — it was certain we must move soon. Owing 
to the condition of the roads puttees were encrusted with mud but this was 
corrected by merely turning them inside out, wrapping the mud against our legs. 
The various regimental colors and standards were decorated, the division passed 
in review, General Pershing addressed the officers and non-commissioned officers, 
the troops marched back to their respective towns — and the French submitted 
claims for damage done their fields. 

Prior to our entraining on March 30 at Pacy railhead every one put in a 
busy week of reconstruction, repairing buildings and walls to settle claims in 
order to get clearance. Stable floors, walls, doors, mangers, lofts, partitions, 
'"n everything" were put in where they had been worn or eaten away by the 
horses. Billets were repaired and garden walls, settees, and gates were patched 
up or rebuilt. Some of the damage was caused by the "soldats Americains" 
while other was due to ordinary depreciation. What could not be repaired was 
settled by barter when possible. If that could not be arranged francs were the 
final appeal. Lieutenant Lynch made the prize bargain by settling a large claim 
with a pair of his discarded shoes. We received claims for flooring, broken 



108 APRfiS LA GUERRE 

windows, soiled wall paper, stolen wood, smashed pianos, broken glasses and lamps 
in the buvettes, spoiled jars of pork, bullet holes in vineyard houses, trampled 
fields of stones, damage to crops which might have been planted, stolen kegs of 
wine, in fact everything except the dead cats which were attributed to hungry 
soldiers but not charged for. It is worthy of note here that M. Cognac was the 
largest property holder we had to deal with and that he was the only one who 
flatly refused to submit any claims other than that the soldiers would not accept 
freely enough of his hospitality. Finally everything was settled and the whole 
Regiment entrained with the exception of Battery F, left behind for final 
policing. 

The cold gray dawn of April 1 found us in Chateau-du-Loir. There had been 
little sleep on the train. As soon as the cars had been cleaned up by candle light — 
it was 4.30 A.M. — the organizations were marched to their new billets. First 
Battalion and Headquarters were scattered through the town while the 2d 
Battalion and Supply Company were assigned to the American barracks close 
to the railroad. Practically all men of the 2d Battalion turned in immediately, 
but were rooted out rudely an hour later with orders to burn all straw from the 
beds and to put bed sacks in the Serbian Barrel before using. Cooties had been 
discovered in the barracks, which were found by daylight to be in a disgustingly 
dirty condition. This was the Le Mans area where we, who were already free 
from cooties, were shipped to decootieize. It was discouraging to say the least, 
but by 7 A.M. Major Vail had the decootieizer working, and by 9 A.M. the 
barracks had been disinfected, the bed sacks steamed, and the situation seemed 
under good control. Battery F detrained at 11 P. M. that night. 

While we were at Argenteuil and Ancy-le-Libre Colonel Brunzell left us to 
go to an Artillery School at Treves. We regretted seeing him go. He had been 
with the regiment throughout its service at the Front and it was unfortunate 
that we had to lose him. Captain Paul's early forced return to the States pre- 
sented us with another loss which was felt just as keenly for he had been with 
the regiment since its formation and was its Adjutant for the greater part of the 
time. He had been selected for this position by Colonel Herron, whom all the 
officers had had the honor and pleasure of seeing on December 20, 1918, when 
he paid us an all-too-short visit. Lieutenant Colonel Gruber now assumed com- 
mand. 

From the first of April till we were discharged life was nothing but one damn 
inspection after another. The hardest part of it was that for each inspection a 



APRES la guerre 109 

man must show a clean suit of underclothes. He was supposed to wear reasonably 
clean ones. If he changed he couldn't show a clean suit until those he removed 
had been washed, as each soldier had only two suits. If a man didn't change he 
couldn't expect to wear clean clothes always and he ran a slight chance of inviting 
trouble or cooties. The result was few clothes were changed as the chances are 
an inspector will not discover soiled clothes on you as readily as he will when they 
are laid out in a sho\\'-do\\'n. 

Between the large inspections little ones were staged to keep our hand in. 
We were inspected for cooties, equipment (supply and condition), physical, 
paper work, police, discipline, and even for liquor in canteens. The first large 
inspection was held by Lieutenant Colonel Gruber on April 5. On the 16th 
we entertained the division inspectors and on the twenty-first the big show was 
put on foi- the A. E. C. It was a wonderful sight with the whole regiment lined 
up on the .side of the hill near Battery C's tents. New commands such as, 
"Bully Beef-RIGHT DRESS," were instituted and everything was in line down 
to the extra shoe laces and that famous can of Dubbin which came to be the pass 
word for boarding the transport. "If you haven't got your dubbin, you can't 
get by." Mirrors and other small required articles were picked up from one man's 
layout, after the inspectors passed, and then re-appeared in other necessary spots 
which had not yet been inspected. Everything was declared satisfactory while 
one inspector even said it was a pleasure to see such an organization. 

A few men were absent due to the shot of Lippo-vaccine which was French 
and amounted to nine shots in one. A good many abscesses were formed from 
the juice, the only men immune from them being those who claimed that if 
they wanted to have any of the advertised diseases in civil life they didn't see 
why the government wouldn't let them. On this ground they cautiously went 
into a corner of the infirmary and carefully squeezed the serum out again. 

A baseball series with the 314th Regiment was scheduled on the 26th, 27th 
and 28th of April. There had been a great deal of interest shown in the game 
prior to this. Each organization had backed a team and B Battery finally won 
the regimental championship from E Battery with Corporal Weitzel in the box 
against Sergeant Coffendaffei-. All battery hatchets were now buried in an attempt 
to form a regimental team \\'hich could beat any other, and we did. The first 
game went to 314 by a very close margin. The second we took, leaving a row of 
GI can craters in our wake, and the third brought a large crowd of howling fans 
on to the field. Much interest was aroused and a great deal of money was put 



no APRfiS LA GUERRE 

up. It was reported that even the junior umpire risked his money against that 
of some enhsted men in the 313th. Here we will tactfully draw the curtain. 

Battery photographs were perpetrated on May 3 on the athletic field, and 
the regimental picture was taken two days later in the Place de Ville. One in- 
spection of note was held the 7th of May. All outfits marched to the baseball 
field, "Open Ranks" was given and then "Prepare for Cootie Inspection." At 
this command shirt buttons were secured, all other buttons unbuttoned and 
belts unbuckled. It was a sort of "Prepare for Action," except that the aprons 
were not dropped until the inspector approached the victim. He, the inspector, 
was accompanied by two MC attendants who pulled the man's shirts over his 
head thus releasing his grip on his belt. The inspector was thus enabled to see 
each man's underclothes, his neck, shoulders, chest, "'n everything." Reports 
on this inspection showed a 100% for the regiment. That afternoon General 
Cronkhite reviewed the 313th and 314th Regiments, our last official parade. 

A dance for the enlisted men was held on May 8 and the officers committed 
an offence under the same name on the ninth. 

After submitting to rumors which had put us "on the way" almost every 
day since the 18th of April, we finally managed to board a train for Brest at noon 
the 10th of May, arriving in the port the following day. It was our last ride in 
csLYsof ihe"40 hommes, S chevaux". To Colonel Hawes belongs the credit for 
bringing us safely home without mishap. He was the last of our commanding 
officers, and was assigned to the regiment in April. 

Brest was systematized. The regiment marched out to Pontanezen and 
into clean barracks. We were there to enjoy what the Army bulletins prove is 
the finest summer resort in France, 50 miles of boardwalk, the best meals in 
France, and as many seconds as the human capacity will allow. They can afford 
to do this because if a man becomes too fat all that is necessary is to put him 
through Bath House No. 2 just once. On May 12 the regiment went through 
at the rate of 1000 men a minute and came out hot but clean, with many new 
articles of clothing — whatever was necessary to make everybody completely 
and presentably outfitted. 

Two nights later details of 55 men and one officer were called for from most 
of the batteries. Trucks were provided at 6.30 P. M. to start these details on 
their tour of the liveliest spots of Brest. New occupations were investigated, 
policing troop trains as they arrived, smashing baggage, cleaning warehouses, 
folding bedsacks, loading ships, but the first prize went to the men who unloaded 




? T .-ai" >■ ■'J«^*_«*riy 





kwim; ( 'hateau do Loir 




'If You Haven't Got Your Dubbin, You Can't Get By 




Getting Back Uvr Appetites on the Zeppelin 




The Sou'wester We Met Coming Home 



APR£S la guerre 111 

and loaded coal all night in their new clothes. We arrived back at camp in time 
for reveille to find that the day for Preliminary Pack Inspection had come. 
Twenty-four hours later A and B Batteries boarded the U. S. S. "Zeppelin" 
while the remainder of the regiment endured its Final Pack Inspection. 

By noon, May 17, every one was on board. Before the sun had set we had 
glided down the river between those beautiful green banks which set off so wonder- 
fully the light stone chateaux with their massive walls, and had passed the white 
lighthouse on the crest of the bluflf at the point of the right bank. As the steamer 
ploughed through the waves westward bound, the mouth of the river seemed to 
grow smaller until finally it closed behind us sealing the shore of France and our 
experiences on the continent. 

Those experiences are locked in each man's memory in a different light and 
color, impressed upon each one when his mind (though dormant frequently) 
was bent on another aspect of the same situation. So different are men in the 
things which they observe that the same event recounted by two men may seem 
like two entirely separate happenings. If, however, this book brings out enough 
to recall to each member of the regiment a few details of those general lasting 
impressions which he received "over there," it will have served its purpose. 

It may also give a faint idea of what we accomplished to those who were not 
so fortunate as we and who wonder why some of us don't talk. For their benefit 
be it said that there is a certain sanctity about a battlefield. Then, too, a soldier 
holds dear certain accomplishments but naturally is backward about mentioning 
them. There are other morbid memories he would like to forget and he does not 
like to prolong their existence in his own mind or start them in the minds of 
others. Those things which the average man is willing to mention are the little 
things which are shortest lived in the world of memory. 

As we descended the staircases to go below we realized we were on a naval 
transport. There were signs "FRESH PAINT" on the railings and sailors were 
just putting the finishing touches of gray to the posts at the foot of each stair, 
just where you naturally grab in ascending or descending. When we were 
finally seated for mess all doubt was taken away. The ground swell hit us the 
first night and then for three days we headed into a good blow. Complaints 
about mess were much more scarce and there seemed to be no danger of the 
provisions giving out even if we had to stay on board a month. 

By the fifth day out almost every one was on his feet again. Lieutenant 
Burling had been put in charge of mess and Lieutenant Pickrell of police. In 



112 APRfiS LA GUERRE 

order to get out of the hold the enUsted men kept the former of the two officers 
busy with apphcations for KP and the latter with requests for permission to 
keep the "floor clean around the winding machines." 

About the only unusual event on the trip was the navy method of policing 
a man who has not been accustomed to the use of soap and water in what you 
might call an intimate way. A negro of the crew was discovered who either 
belonged in this category or else had lived too long on the other side and had lost 
his bottle of toilet water. All the other duskies were lined up on deck, the band 
played and a large crowd gathered to witness the mystic rites. A piece of canvas 
was laid on deck, the unhappy coon stripped, and assumed a prone posi- 
tion on the cloth. Hot water, soap and sand were applied with deck and scrub- 
bing brushes until the job was complete. Then an application of cold salt water 
from the hose cleared away the debris and revealed a pinkish bronze figure in 
the center of the scrubbers. No repetition was necessary while we were on board. 
In spite of the dangers of the railings and the rigging we finally sighted Cape 
Henry the morning of the 28th of May. We floated quietly up the bay among 
the vessels of the battle fleet, a few tug boats buzzing around us, and docked 
at Newport News. Happy crowds of friends and patriotic citizens cheered as 
we stepped on to American soil once more. A short, hot march ended in Camp 
Stuart. This was very different from Argenteuil for it was extremely warm and 
it was dry in more than one sense of the word. 

It had been understood that we had been brought home to parade in Rich- 
mond. Scarcely any one had the shghtest desire to accomplish such a feat, as 
most of the enlisted men came from West Virginia or Pennsylvania, while only a 
very few were particularly interested in Richmond. The Governor of West 
Virginia was notified by wire that all the brigade really wanted was to be dis- 
charged as soon as possible so that families might be visited without delay. To 
the disgust of a minute fraction of the command the Governor arranged to have 
the parade cancelled and every one discharged tout de suite. 

While we waited in Camp Stuart we went through the delouser and then 
received two uniforms of cotton OD, new underclothes, and almost every one 
a new pair of field shoes, soon to be discarded by many for something more 
ornamental. Before we left Ave gave the camp and port inspectors an opportunity 
to pass judgment on our appearance. 

A pleasant trip by boat to Hopewell and thence by train (real coaches for 
every one) put the regiment back in Camp Lee on June 2. There a wild paper 




U. S. S. Zeppelin 




On the Docks at Newport News 




U. S. Money Again- 




Prepare for Inspection 



APRfiS LA GUERRE 



113 



work party ensued. One man expressed the sentiment of many when he said 
"I don't see why it takes so many papers to get me out when it only took one 
httle blue card to get me in." 

On the oth every one was physically inspected. 

At noon of the 6th the regiment existed; at 3 P. M. it had vanished. The 
barracks were deserted and practically every soldier was on his way home, full 
of the happiest thoughts he had experienced since he left that spot. As each 
man had stepped to the table, answered "Here," received his pay and his dis- 
charge he had been automatically 

"DISMISSED." 




1st Battalion Billets at St. Nicolas 



CHAPTER II. 

Route Order — Being Just Some Reflections 

of the Moment 

"/ have written the tale of our life, 

For a sheltered people's mirth, 
In jesting guise — but ye are wise 

And ye know what the jest is worth." 

— Kipling. 

That Mandolin Guy 

IT WAS raining in France that afternoon. Yea Bo! And the road which led 
to Nantillois, where dwelt Otto, "Jawn" and Emory et als, was knee-deep 
in the damp soil of Sunny France. 

It was a blue day too. Sam said it was and Sam knew. Only Sam's blue in 
them days was usually indigo due to many rapid and disconcerting movements 
he had been in the habit of making daily, and of which details had best be left 
unrecorded. And, besides, he was short of tobacco and Hilden had been "out" 
all morning. 

Guess that was why I was walking to Nantillois. But I was, nevertheless, 
and it was a low afternoon. I'll say it was. It was just as low as cold tomato 
slum, ammunition reports — and train — the rain, mud, Jerry, and thoughts of 
the dear old U. S. A. could make it — regardless of Cowardin. 

And so I plodded sadly along that gummy, sunken highway. 

To the left, the heavies lined the roadside, bellowing an occasional laconic 
message northward through the mists — and receiving intermittent but snappy 
replies. 

The cannoneers of the outfit had dug themselves comfortably in under the 
bank and were enjoying more or less the life of the era. But there was one 
particular member of that gay and gallant foot-locker and bedding-roll band of 
fighting men with whom this short narrative is particularly concerned. 



ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 115 

He had hewn himself fiom the attractive dead-space area of that high claj- 
bank, a niche of a home. It was a fox-hole of meagre dimensions in which he was 
snugly ensconced, with barely room for his body with knees doubled up almost 
under the chin. Extending from the top of the mansion, much after the style 
of the awnings in front of the shops of merchants, was his shelter-half which 
shed the rain in sheets from his abode. 

He was half sitting on his little shelf, overseas cap on the back of his head, 
grazing the roof, and a mandolin in his lap. Honest to Gawd, a mandohn in his 
lap! 

His fingers nonchalantly clinked upon the strings. His half smiling face 
bore a far-away look as there tinkled from his instrument, "How you gonna keep 
him down on the farm after he's seen Paree?" He hadn't seen it and maybe 
never would. 

I stopped and stared in astonishment for a moment. 

He did neither. 

I was kinder sore for a brief space at the levity of the youth, 'cause I was 
low— awful low. But I melted and finally grinned— a broad grin of admiration 
and delight. 

And he grinned too. 

And then I wandered sadly on to Nantillois with the strain still ringing in 
my ears — on to Nantillois to bum cigarettes from "Jawn" and to alibi my midday 
ammunition report. 

But before I left I could have hugged that Mandolin Guy— if he had let me. 
A Frenchman would have kissed him on the cheeks. 

The Regular 2 A. M. Disturbance 

Some night I'm going to murder the operator 
Some morn you're going to find him decease, 
'Cause I'm going to take his tele-kit 
And bust his bloomin' head with it, 
And spend the rest of the night in peace. 

Ting-ling-ling-ling! 
"Hello! Hello!" 
Ting-ling-ling-ling! 
"Hello! Hello! Hell!" 



116 ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 

Ting-ling-ling-ling-ling! 

"Hello, Buzzard! For sake wake up!" 

"Gimme Barton, Cross, and Crandall in turn. 

"Hello! Barton One? 

"Barton there? 

"Well, get me some officer! 

"Is that you, Rip? 

"Send five men and a non-com to the cross-roads at once to handle 
ammunition. 

"Ten men down there already, and those five you sent day before yesterday 
never came back. 

"That's all right. Send 'em anyway. 

"Put the drivers and the cooks on the guns then. 

"Yes; tell 'em to report to Miller. 

"S'longRip." 

Ting-ling-ling-ling. 

"All right, Buzzard. Now gimme Cross. 

"Hello! Is 'at you Eben? 

"That's all right, you'll do, Gherlardi. 

"Send 

"Hello! Hello! What the ! 

"Hello, Buzzard! 

"Line's out? ' 

"Hey Sam! Sam! SAM! Get up out of that hay! 

"Line to Cross is out. 

"Aw, I know it ain't your fault, but see what the 's the matter, will yer. 

I know the battery's responsible. 

"Go on to sleep, Muzzy, I ain't talking to you. 

"Runner! Runner! Sergeant Tabler — Hoke — Corporal Smith — Lehman — 

runner ! Runner! What the 's the matter with this 

detail anyway. 

"Naw, Muzzy, I didn't say gas. Take that thing off. Runner! 

"For Gawd's sake, Edwards, where's the gang? Take this message to 
Lieutenant Cross. Line's out." 

Ting-ling-ling-ling! 

"Hello, Buzzard! Try Crandall. 



ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 117 

"Hello! Mr. Crandall there? 

"No? Any officer there? 

"No? Well, get somebody toot sweet. Where's everybody, anyhow? 

"Oh, hello, Foxie! Send five men and a non-com to the cross-roads at once 
to handle ammunition. 

"Yes, I know all about those ten men — and all the rest of 'em. Send 'em 
anyhow. 

"Well, if you haven't got men to shoot the guns, don't shoot 'em. That's 
all! Good-bye!" 

Ting-ling-ling-ling! 

"Hilden calling? 

"All right, put 'em on. 

"Hind One at the i)hone. 

"I did too! Sent you ammunition report at ten o'clock this morning! 
Situation report too! 

"Well, I sent it anyhow! 

"Aw, tell Brigade Headquarters to — — — ! 

"Say, 'Jawn,' got any lemon drops? 

"Thanks! 

"Any peace dope? 

"Say, by the way, 'Jawn,' we haven't had a grain of oats since Tuesday. 

"Aw, I ain't crying, but these plugs are starving to death. Say, tell old 
Otto for me will yer. 

"All right, do the best you can for us. S'long, 'Jawn'." 

Ting-ling-ling-ling! 

"Cross in yet. Buzzard? 

"All right. 

"Say, Armstrong — 

"Oh, is that you, Eben? 

"Got the message, did you? 

"Diarrhoea? 

"So's Sam. Me and Muzzy too. Tough luck, kid. Get Doc Reynolds to 
give yer some pills. 

"That ammunition detail gone out yet? 

"Oh, well, if you haven't got enough men to shoot the guns, don't shoot 'em. 

"Oats and hay? 



118 ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 

"Just been trying to get some. 

"Hope so. 

"No, don't expect anything else before morning, but you know them birds 
at'Hilden." 

Ting-hng-hng! 

"Barrage sentinel? 

"Well, what's up? 

"Rockets? 

"Barrage signals? 

"Well, if they ain't barrage signals, forget it." 

Ting-ling-ling-ling! 

"Buzzard, gimme Barton. 

"Hello! Say, Bob, that you? 

"Send somebody up to that tree to tell that guy what a rocket is, will yer! 

"Oats and hay and bread? 

"I know. Bob, I can't help it. I'm sorry but I'm trying to get all that stuff. 

"Say, how much 'Susie' you got? 

"Got plenty of 'Georgia' too? 

"All right. 

"No, I don't expect anythmg else tonight, but you know them birds at 
Hilden." 

"Line to Hilden's out. Sir—" 

"Sam-m-m-m ! !" 

That Night of Barrages 

For the benefit of any of the uninitiated into whose hands these lines may 
perchance fall, we will say that a barrage is no simple curtain of fire, raised and 
lowered in the wink of an eye, but a creature of much thought and cool calcula- 
tion, sharply defined and carefully prepared, in the interest of our somewhat 
narrow, but greatly to be admired friend, the doughboy. 

To my fellow artilleryman, however — well, barrage is just his middle name 
and no explanations are necessary. 

The goldurn doughboy, however, calls for barrages like he would for wheat 
cakes in Childs. He did so at Hill 281 on that memorable night of September 26, 
1918, and he had one hell of an appetite, too, not to speak of his sitting all over 
the restaurant. 



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313th in Camp 



ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 119 

"Stack o' wheats. Dunnj^, toot sweet. Right over here by Vilosnes or 
thereabouts," he said in the early evening of that day, and Hilden writhed and 
tore its hair. 

"Where are you sitting," asked Dunny, politely gnashing his teeth. 

"Oh, right about along here or hereabouts" replied the bombers and grena- 
diers, emitting numerous and curious coordinates; "and we want security for 
the night." 

"Hilden swore, got out its zinc ruler, pondered and groaned, and a few 
moments later, the weary BC's were chewing their hard pencil stubs and 
spitting lead, mils and meters all over the shop, and trying to make four rounds 
of HE cover about 800 meters. 

And after a laborious process (they were green in those days) they sent 
their data to the guns, and rolled up in their blankets to await the rockets or 
dayhght. 

No such luck. Neither came. 

But another barrage did. 

"We are not here, we are there," said our pals. 

And another string of figures sprawled out over the 1/20,000, while the 
harassed BC's lit their candles, and moaned and plotted and wrenched in 
what was supposed to be the environs of Dannevoux or thereabouts. 

Another cute little curtain of fire came forth, held in readiness for the 
prowling beast of counter-attack. But it died in infancy. 

"We didn't mean for you to shoot where we told you to shoot just now, but 
just a little bit ahead of where we wanted you to shoot before that, only not so 
far up on the right. 

"For the love of Mike" exclaimed Niles, and wielding his sturdy millimeter 
blade, he set the BC's once more on their ears with a brand new species of 
coordinates. 

They screamed and fell to it, producing SOS Number 3. 

"Tear up Number 2," said Gherlardi to Cross, with tears in his eyes, "but 
don't let me see you do it." 

And then they waited. It came. 

"Prepare SOS barrage on line K-umpty-two, umpty-seven to Q-umpty- 
nine-4-11-44. We ain't where we thought we was." 

And the BC's shrieked and figured furiously, while the chiefs of section 
hung limp on the trails. 



120 ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 

And still they came. It rained barrages, while the various nomad tribes of 
doughboys played blind man's buff, and the EC's with their expert accountants 
ground them pitifully out and wriggled with agony through the devious Lambert 
grids and contours. 

And so it continued. 

If they were slow on the range at Meugon, it's a cinch they were some speed 
artists after this night of intensive training. 

On the 4.00 A. M. call, Barton and Haskins gasped and expired, frantically 
clutching a Verdun-B. Crandall was missing and I found him later asleep on his 
ammunition at the battery, hoping it would explode. 

If I had beUeved for a moment it would, I should certainly have crawled in 
beside him. 

And yet they say we sometimes shoot short. 

Well, maybe! 

French for Short 

A CERTAIN top-sergeant at Avessac: — "Hey you! Get a move on yer 
now and slick that pair up. Snap out of that 'parade rest' and don't 
take all week about it, either." 
Voice from the picket line: — "Toot sweet." 

A certain top-sergeant at Avessac — (thirty minutes later) : — "How 'bout that 
pair of plugs I was telling yer 'bout just now. Ain't yer got them skates groomed 
yet?" 

Voice from the picket line: — "Fineesh." 

A certain top-sergeant at Avessac: — "Well, if it ain't a clean job, it's K. P. 
for you till 'fini la guerre.' Did yer give 'em a good one? Did yer?" 
Same quiet voice from the picket line: — "Beaucoup." 

That Pontoon and Them Mules 

The little town of Bethincourt, torn and shattered by four years of intense 
"preparation" and retaliation, particularly during the futile and agonizing efforts 
of the German Crown Prince towards Verdun, was ground and pulverized during 
the night of September 25-26 when a hurricane of American artillery fire swept 
over its already obliterated streets and alleys, preceding our doughboys on the 
start of that crushing drive toward the Meuse. 



ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 121 

A steam roller could have done no more. It was no longer the semblance of 
anything save its previous military habitation, as evidenced by the twisted 
and tangled wire of the Boche, and the litter of the battlefield. 

Little Forges Brook wound its tortuous way through the devastation, its 
waters stained with the powder and gas of bursting shell and the half obliterated 
remains of things that once had breathed the breath of life. 

The barrage of the 2d Battalion had screamed and slashed its vicious course 
through Bethincourt in the dim dawn of the 26th, leading the doughboys to 
distant objectives, and had ceased at 7.20. Other batteries took up the task at 
this point, while we hurriedly limbered and moved forward on the heels of the 
fast flying infantry, now beginning to outstrip the fiery cover of its supporting 
guns. 

The head of the battalion filed out over the churned and battered roads of 
France, alive with engineers who feverishly sought to make the way smooth 
and clear for us. Through long lines of German prisoners we moved across the 
old No Man's Land and came to Bethincourt. Save for a momentary tangle 
with the combat train of a neighboring regiment, so far our ])rogress had been 
good. That was because we were early on the road. 

We crossed Forges Brook on a brand new bridge. We came to the center 
of the one-time town and abruptly halted. Not that we were tired; not that 
Jerry was using this route; not that the faithful engineers had not cleaned the 
shattered debris from the fairway. Nay, brother, none of these. 

But a pair of homely American mules, in close but ineffectual liaison with a 
huge pontoon, crosswise the road, were most effectually blocking all forward 
movement. 

Whether it was fatigue, pure cussedness, or just plain, ordinary bolshevism, 
I never exactly learned, but the pontoon was ponderous and knowing the usual 
patriotism of the breed, I leaned toward the former explanation. 

"I ain't no engineer, and this ain't my job," said a sweating doughboy of 
the 80th Division. "They just rung me in on this, but there ain't no mule in 
the world can pull that thing." 

And he tugged at the lines, and a sample of mule talk that would have rocked 
a cathedral to its foundations and shamed the devil poured forth volubly. To no 
avail. 

Various near-expert skinners in and out of the column loaned their tongues 
and brawn and advice. But Maude and her compatriot remained adamant. 



122 ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 

Everybody fretted and fumed, everybody offered suggestions, and everybody 
swore. The artillery was badly wanted and the artillery was stuck for fair. 

And Bethincourt was beginning to be in the SOS at that hour. 

A lieutenant of engineers then showed a wee bit of authority. Alas ! All of 
his prestige and influence in the company fled in a twinkling, and the jam 
continued unabated. 

"Them mules is hyphenated," remarked a lead-driver who had failed in the 
general endeavor. "They ain't got no business in the American army. Sergeant 
Jones couldn't budge them guys. Look at de ears on 'em." 

And the moments sped by, as did likewise a couple of Boche planes rat-tat- 
tatting us frantically to speedy action. The writer tried his trembling hand. 
The mules didn't budge. Then, goaded to rapid work, he swelled out his chest — 
as far as it would swell — and with one eye on 'them planes' and the other on the 
mess in front, used the majesty of his fresh and glittering gold leaves. 

"Come on, now, get a detail and get this jam clear. We gotta get through. 
Snap it up!" 

And then spake the humble guardian of the transport in our path. 

"Tain't no use for you to fret and git impatient, Major. This here pontoon 
is for the Meuse river at Vilosnes. You can't cross till we git there." 

For the benefit of those who may not know, suffice it to say that the desti- 
nation stated above was some nine kilometers forward and the Meuse was not 
crossed till November 5 at Dun. 

At this stage willing hands joined in the debate, grabbed the" obstructionists" 
and shoved them into the rubble, and the column trotted on. 

Dike Gilliam says he saw that pontoon on the outskirts of Bethincourt on 
November 1, when they were carting him back in an ambulance. 

He didn't notice no mules. 

Hallowe'en, 1918 

I shall never forget the night of October 31-November 1, 1918. It was the 
last night I spent with my pal and adviser, George Wayne Anderson. 

We had worked side by side for the few weeks just passed. We had slept 
and eaten and planned and laughed and grumbled together. He was a wholesome 
comfort and support in the trying days of the last big push and typified all that 
was great and good in the incomparable American soldier. 




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313th en Route 



ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 123 

And so I shall never forget that last night that we slept fitfully side by side 
in the little shelter in the woods of Bantheville, waiting for the dawn of a day that 
brought for us a final and crushing American victorj^, and for him, a soldier's 
grave in the little town of Nantillois. 

We talked and tossed and dozed under that roar and scream of American 
shells, and the terrific reply from the enemy that carried off, among others, 
another brave soldier and friend, Corporal Lewis, and made of Bantheville Woods 
a nightmare and a horror. 

It was in the early hours of the morning just before the last big "jump off" 
that George Wayne turned to me and said : 

"Gee, ain't this a hell of a Hallowe'en." 

And I as emphatically agreed. 

It was! 

" Old Virginia Never Tires " 

Sartelle Woods, 3.00 A.M., September 25, 1918. A long column of infantry 
plodded slowly along toward the Bois de Bourrus. The doughboj'^s were concen- 
trating for the morning of the 26th, creeping slowly forward from wood to wood 
by night, startled now and then by the occasional harassing shell which the Boche 
hurled nervously over on the highAvays back of Verdun. 

He was scenting the impending blow upon his front. 

I had come a long and roundabout way through Montzeville and Sivry la 
Perche, from the battery positions near le Mort Homme, to the new echelons 
established that night in the Bois de Sartelle. 

The side-car — God rest its soul — lay punctured and helpless on the roadside. 

I had wandered for hours in the woods, finding almost every outfit in the 
A. E. F. but my own. That was always the way. So I sat disconsolately down and 
watched the troops trudge by. 

"What outfit is that?" I asked. 

"318th Infantry," replied a voice from beneath tons of rifles, blankets, and 
bully beef. 

And then their transport hove into sight, led by an escort wagon upon whose 
cover appeared this comforting sign: — 

—OLD VIRGINIA NEVER TIRES— 
I stared and wondered. 

"Well, maybe she don't," I mused. "But I was from Virginia once, and if 
she don't, then I certainl}'^ am from Missouri this night." 
And off I sadly trudged to beat the woods again. 



124 ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 

Enter Lolotta 

We had been taught camouflage until we were red, white, and bkie in the 
face and could imitate poppies and field mice. We had practised the art in all 
its phases. We could make a gun look like a fruit stand, and the cannoneers 
resemble inoffensive barber-poles that would have brought the Boche over in 
scores for shaves. We could have marched into Berlin and have been welcomed 
as a travelling circus come to bolster up the fast slipping morale. 

Why, we could have made "Bunnie" Burwell look like "Shell" Pitney back 
at Meu§on. 

In fact we were "camoufleurs extraordinaires," and practised what we 
preached. 

And so into the lines we went one fine September night, leaving nary a 
trail behind us, and snuggled down tight in such wise that a plane could not have 
told us from that sorrowful French landscape into which we had ingeniously 
blended. 

And then Lolotta came. 

We saw her first in the early hours of the 25th, chugging her laborious way 
through the jam between Esnes and Montzeville, the cigarette butts of her 
chattering crew glowing in the darkness. We didn't know, however, that she 
was headed in our particular locality. 

But when the sun was well on its daily grind across the heavens of France, 
beaming beautifully upon the hills of the Meuse, and observation was lovely, 
she chugged slowly up behind, and came to a halt on our left flank, almost in our 
laps — hub to hub. 

We got a "close up." She was a six-inch long, the kind that hurled death 
and destruction way back where Jerry could get a bath and take off his tin hat 
occasionally. 

And with her came her court and retinue, singing and frisking in full view of 
Montfaucon and a Boche balloon, and flaunting themselves in the early sunlight . 

We wept into our camouflage nets. 

In vain we protested. In vain we pointed to the "sausage" close up on our 
front. In vain we read to them the creed of their very own camouflage belief, 
which they had taught us. 

They only smiled, a patronizing smile, upon our childish fears, admired the 
"camouflage americain" and then — kindled their kitchen fires! 

Ouch! Par exemplel 



ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 125 

We raved, hurried below, and crawled beneath the bunks to await the squall. 

It came that afternoon — and so did our new friends — right behind us — 
casually remarking, however, that the Boche had observed a working party on 
the road to our left, and that Lolotta was getting just a few "wild ones." 

It was merely a flurry, however, and we could have forgiven them this, 
only— 

Lolotta went off with a roar at 2.30 next morning, her vicious nose laid 
northeast right over our command post. 

That first blast dou.sed the candles, tore up maps, and slapped us in our 
several "fronts and centers" like a paddle. 

The second aggravated the spasm within our midst, knocking out partitions 
and raining dirt from the roof. It caught "Bunnie Burwell" just entering, and 
catapulted that shocked and astonished young gentleman into our quiet social 
circle like a football. He was a 2d Lieutenant in them days too. 

The third, quickly following — 

— sounded like a dim, distant pop-gun — 

as we heard it in Crandall's dugout, far away on the right flank. There, 
bag and baggage, we had sought refuge, holding our heads and stomachs, 
waiting to die — fighting perhaps — when they came up over the covering crest. 

War was truly hell! 

Direction of Fire ! Please ! 

The Boche was going north in those days, north and a trifle east, and making 
pretty good headway. We had gouged him out of Aincreville, Andevanne, and 
Villers, and the Clerys, Big and Little, Montigny, Halles and numerous other 
strongholds of the palmy days, when they were driving nails in Hindenburg 
and eating Smithfield ham in Berlin. 

They had swayed on November 1, tottered on the 2d, and crumbled and 
faded away on the 3d, fleeing northeast to the welcoming protection of the river. 
And they had come to bay along the Meuse, to catch the breath that later was 
denied them, and to try to patch their shattered lines. 

We followed precipitately after, and the 2d battalion pulled up at a little 
ravine about a kilometer south of Montigny and dropped our trails early on the 
morning of the 4th. We had been driving north, fighting north for days, and so 
we naturally presumed that we would continue climbing the same old Lambert 
Grid, and picked our cover accordingly. 



126 ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 

We dug in under a beautiful crest, rolled in our 75's, poked their vicious noses 
in a general northeast direction, and waited for calls. 

They started at daylight. 

"Lay two batteries on Dun-sur-Meuse," said the first, and "Fire 20 rounds 
of HE on trench system at Hill 205," said the second, in quick order. 

"All right on 205 but nix on Dun," we replied. "It can't be did." 

Two hundred and five was due north like a gentleman. Dun was southeast. 

But I knew the answer before it came. 

"Don't give a damn, do it any way." 

So while Gherlardi pounded northward, Barton and FuUerton wept, apolo- 
gized to their chiefs of section, somehow turned their guns in our faces, and 
prepared to plaster Dun. 

On our right, a French outfit had twelve guns boxing the compass. 

We didn't know exactly what to do, but everybody dug in deeper any way, 
and shivered and waited. 

And then that little lieutenant from the 315th came up. 

"Please, Sir," he said, "I want to put in some 155's. Would you mind 
telling me your direction of fire?" 

"It all depends on which side you are fighting, brother," we replied in 
sickly fashion. "We have all kinds and you can take your choice. Look out for 
Villers, however; our ration dump is there; and Liggett's in Souilly, and Pershing's 
in Chaumont." 

We saw him with his aiming circle, half an hour later, throwing fits on the 
Montigny road, and allowing as how he'd fight the next European war in Mil- 
waukee. 

Muzzy Does A General Grant 

It was in that same little ravine south of Montigny on that very same morn- 
ing that Muzzy did his "General Grant," only Muzzy used both eyes instead of 
one, and then failed to accomplish his purpose. 

I had made a hurried trip on a truck to Villers to do some lobbying for 
forage and rations, and to inquire — just casual-like — in which direction the 
Third Corps thought it was moving. A call for fire came while I was there and 
I sent it to the guns and hurried back to the batteries. 

I arrived just in time to hear the last round echoing through the hills of the 
Meuse. 



ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 127 

Muzzy was sitting rigid by the telephone, both eyes wide open, and close 
enough to a still smoking 75 to have rammed his fist into the muzzle. 
"Did we fire," I inquired, just by Avay of polite conversation. 
"Not a round since you left," he replied. 
But Muzzy hadn't slept for two nights. 
So I didn't scold — just pitied. 
Buzzard will bear me out. 

Doc's Medical Cart — et Cetera 

We travelled light along the Meuse. The farther we went, the lighter we 
travelled. We were learning, sadly but surelj', the sorrowful lessons of mobility, 
as each succeeding day saw our horse power dwindling, and we salvaged in the 
direct order of dire necessity. 

We began to cast off at Meu^on, training down for the fight as it were, and 
called ourselves the "light" artillery. 

We didn't know the meaning of the word. 

We trimmed closer at Souilly railhead, and we thought ourselves well-nigh 
naked at Bois de Ville as we hurled another carload of "necessities" on the salvage 
dump. Quick night marches were rapidlj' weaning us from our extra horseshoes 
and the like, and those American caissons were hanging heavy on our hands. 

And so into the lines we went, two blankets, a shelter-half, and a haversack 
as our personal limit. A toothbrush even was irksome and a burden. Every- 
thing else mostly was ammunition. 

Yes, Doc Reynolds stripped, too — only Doc had to have a cart to carry his 
pills. 

And thereby hangs our tale. 

Speaking of Doc, you know I always liked Doc, particularly after that hot 
bath he gave me in Cunel Woods, from a lard can, October 28 — my first since 
September 14 — even if he did burn my "right rear" on his little German stove. 
'Member Doc? 

But back to the baggage. 

From Meu^on on September 14 to Boulain Woods on November 7, we 
plodded, hiking and fighting and salvaging painfully and furiously— and the 
medical cart kept the pace and parked beside the PC entrance. 

Boulain was a paradise until the afternoon of the 9th. 

And then they shelled us. It was a hurricane while it lasted. 



128 ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 

One whiz-bang was a bull's-eye, fair and square on Doc's little cart. It 
disappeared in a cloud of pills, lint, and iodine. 

The storm over, we rose out of the mud to take stock. From what re- 
mained of the tattered medical material Muzzy and Sam identified a 
BEDDING ROLL marked:— 

1st lieutenant HAROLD I. REYNOLDS, M. R. C. 
313th field ARTILLERY, A. E. F. 
HOLD — 12 POUNDS 

It had contained, so the debris tended to indicate : — 
1 mattress 

1 cot 

6 blankets, wool 

2 uniforms, wool, O. D. 
2 boots, dress, pairs 

2 shoes, field, pairs 
6 socks, wool, pairs 

1 overcoat, wool, 0. D. 

2 shirts, wool, O. D. 
6 undershirts, wool 

6 drawers, wool, pairs 
12 jam, blackberry, cans 
'N everything. 

He said they belonged to Baggs but — we didn't find no souvenirs. 
Doc was travelling light. 

Cross Had Thirteen and a Half Hours— "Ke-roust" 

For the attack on the morning of September 26 they passed out the barrages 
after an artillery conference with General Cronkhite at the headquarters of 
General Brett at Germonville, about 3.30 P. M. on the afternoon of the 25th. 

That was a memorable meeting for more reasons than is deemed proper to 
be stated here. 

We were advised that H-Hour would be at 5.30 in the morning. 

I jumped into a waiting side-car and hurried to the battery positions near le 
Mort Homme, and there I slipped the dope to three anxious battery commanders. 



ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 129 

"5.30 A.M. tomorrow," I whispered in the ear of Cross, and handed him a 
handful of elaborately decorated tracing paper. 

He gave just one glance and fairly shrieked. 

"What! Tomorrow morning? And just thirteen and a half hours to figure 
it?" 

And a week later this same Eben Cross was getting 'em just as bad at 5.00 
A. M. and shooting 'em on the dot at 5.30 without a whimper. 

The First Prisoner — November First 

The doughboys brought in many prisoners, taken in fair combat. But, 
giving them all the honor that is their due, it cannot be denied that the artillery 
barrage reaped its own little harvest of German fighting men who found them- 
selves trapped in its murderous paths. 

Caught amidst thick curtains of fire, thej' tired quickly of war and fairly 
rushed in to be tallied and questioned. 

The barrage on November 1 was laid in four thick waves at 250 meter inter- 
vals. A perfect torrent of 75's and 155's poured upon the landscape, over a 
kilometer in depth, and crept slowly forward. 

Imagine existence in such an area. 

Firing had barely started before the Boche began to filter through in droves, 
and come in, their hands high above their heads. 

Ten minutes after the "jump off," a flying figure, in huge helmet and un- 
accompanied, appeared around the corner of the woods and tore into the PC of 
the 360th Infantry. Breathless, he knelt upon the ground, his hands clasped in 
supplication. I hate Germans, but I pitied that poor guy. He was nothing but a 
child . He was told to get up — that no harm would befall him. 

And then they asked him where he was when the attack started. He amazed 
his interrogators by pointing on the map to the woods west of Andevanne, and 
insisted that that was the place. If was more than three kilometers and he had 
done it in ten flat, cross-country, through that hurricane of fire, in German boots. 
His muzzle velocity must have been enormous; — and he looked it. 

Captain Paul Heldorf 
I do not know who Captain Paul Heldorf is — if he is — or where he is from, 
and probably never shall. And what's more, the lack of such knowledge will 



130 ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 

never disturb me in the least. But nevertheless the name of that bird, for me, will 
always be associated with peace— sweet peace— cease firing and rest for the weary . 

We were in Boulain Woods on the night of November 10. On our right 
the 90th had crossed the Meuse at Sassy and was working up the right bank with 
the 5th. On our left the 89th and 2d at that very moment were desperately 
striving to turn the trick, and remnants of the 90th with the 2d Battalion were 
holding on the banks opposite Stenay, the artillery giving aid and what comfort 
it could in the midnight struggle to the left of us. 

It was a hectic night. The air was surcharged with rumors of peace and 
German ammunition. 

We had heard of a German delegation coming to Foch, but that was all. 

About midnight, Meyer Martin picked a message from Eiffel right out of 
the ozone. It was French and in "clear." 

"From the German plenipotentiaries," it said, "to the German High Com- 
mand." 

"Please cease fire on the Hirson-La Cappelle road. Captain Paul Heldorf 
is waiting to cross the lines. French fire on this front ceased at sixteen hours, 
but German fire still continues." 

It may not have been exact, due to a combination of the French language 
and a battalion wireless, but it was near enough, and Eiffel kept repeating it. 
We scented a real rumor this time. 

Later came another: — "Captain Heldorf is crossing in allied plane carrying 
two white flares. Do not fire on it." 

It was like election night, only we were the candidates. 

Others came in French and German, which we could not fathom, and we 
never learned of the outcome of Mr. Heldorf's endeavor. 

But we did get the final returns on the telephone at 7.40 in the morning 
It came from Brigade Headquarters, from my friend, poor Fred Colston, who 
succumbed to pneumonia about a week later. 

"It's all over Jack," he said, "An armistice has been signed and will go into 
effect at eleven, but you are to cease fire at once." 

"D" battery just at the moment sent a final scream of victory over on the 
road back of Stenay. 

I emitted one rich but undignified yell, and dished the news to the batteries. 

A moment later a roar from 500 throats rent the heavens above Boulaine. 

The war was over. 



ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 131 

On Dit 

That mysterious, devious, and exceedingly well informed "Mr. They," 
who, from the time whence the memory of man runneth not to the contrary, has 
said more startling and interesting things of varying veracitj^ than all the story 
books and histories combined, was exceedingly active and loquacious in the 
United States, both before and during our participation in the recent unpleasant- 
ness overseas. 

But we venture to assert that he was handsomely out-distanced by his friend 
and compatriot," Monsieur On," who was so noticeably in evidence in France 
during our two-stripe period, both before and after 11.00 A.M. on November 11. 

He was perhaps at his best — or worst, shall we say? — in October, 1918. 
Probably more rumors were wafted along on the martial breezes of the ]\Ieuse- 
Argonne front during that period than at any other stage of our operations, due 
of course to the fast approaching signs of ostensible repentance in Berlin. 

"Rumor" has been wrongfully and ungallantly symbolized as a female and 
accordingly prefixed with a "Dame." 

Idle gossip! 

For in France it was personallj^ conducted by the great American doughboy, 
and there was nothing feminine about him. 

It could be divided technically into two major periods: — 

1 — The "When do we go to the front?" period; and 

2 — The "When do we go home?" period; with various sub-divisions such as 
"When do we eat?" and "When do we get relieved?" Each of these inquiries 
had numerous and sundry intricate and interesting solutions and ramifications. 
But we prefer here to wander on loosely and indiscriminately^, like a trench mortar 
barrage. 

Rumor was the life and zest of the front. 

"M. On," along our part of the line, kept close and intimate company with 
the cross-roads MP. In one twenty-four hours, the MP saw or heard from passers- 
by, every item of interest in his and adjoining sectors, and imparted his knowledge 
freely. This was of course in addition to his other duties of winning the war and 
directing southbound travellers toward the north. You could run most any old 
rumor to an MP almost any old time you went out on the trail. 

"That MP down there says," was always good for a hair-raiser. 

One of our first big ones, however, came from other sources. 



132 ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 

"They" said we were going to a training area when we entrained for the 
front. But we detrained at Souilly to the sound of honest-to-Gawd barrages 
and were in 'em before we knew it. 

The 79th Division took Montfaucon with its catacombs of German dugouts. 
Several days later, after the "mop-up," "they" said it harbored 40,000 well-fed 
Boches in its subterranean passages, waiting for the signal to attack us in the 
rear. They never did. 

One afternoon in October some 150 GI cans fell on this same eminence, 98 of 
which by actual count, failed to explode. 

Duds? 

Never! 

"They" said that the shells were armed with 72-hour fuses, and three days 
later I couldn't get a runner for regimental headquarters past Nantillois. But the 
upheaval never arrived. 

"They" said the 1st Battalion was being relieved for a rest when they left 
the little woods north of Nantillois one night for a position farther back, but the 
next day they were literally shot off the road while bound up to Cunel, kilome- 
ters forward. 

On numerous occasions, "they" said that the area behind us fairly swarmed 
with French, British and American Cavalry, waiting for the "critical" moment. 
None came. 

And then William told Woodrow war was cruel and wrong, and that he had 
been trying to think of that word "enough" for four weary years — and we were 
swamped with rumors of peace. This was in October, too. 

A captain of infantry, coming out of the lines one morning, told his men, 
"they" said, that the war would be over before the outfit went back. That 
bunch must have been tired as hell. 

"The French battery on the right is betting two-to-one that there won't 
be a shot fired after midnight, Sunday," was the prize winner. Had this been 
true, the French cannoneers would have hocked their shirts and wrist watches, 
because at 12.15 Monday morning, heavy hostile cannonading on our right, left, 
and center announced to a weary, waiting world that the greatest of all wars — 
was still on. 

It still continued on, too, and peace dope still continued to come in 
every species and variety, each succeeding rumor, however, being promptly 
nailed to the cross, until November 11 set us at our ease. But the big 



ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 133 

one which went the rounds on the 7th never reached our neighborhood. 

A brief, but very brief, interval of reports on our prospective occupation of 
Germany followed the armistice. All of them were knocked in the head by the 
arrival of the 165th Field Artillery Brigade from southern France where they 
earned the honor of crossing the Rhine without ever having fired a shot. The 
343d, 344th and 345th F.A. regiments, hauling their guns by hand, mule, horse, 
and gasoline, to be "in at the death," relieved us, and joined the 90th Division 
at Stenay, about the middle of November. 

From that moment on, "they" said we were going home. Everj' officer, 
non-com and private in the regiment had his own pet theory and that of his 
pal in Division Headquarters, Avho was close to the "Gineral," and they aired 
them most tantalizingl3\ 

"They" started soon enough to parade us in New York on Christmas Day, 
but the world knows that the good old "Zeppelin" sailed from Brest on May 17, 
and even then, in the agony of light heads and weak stomachs, "they" speculated 
outrageously on our arrival and muster-out. 

The bug reigned sujiieme until the very end. 

And speaking of rumors, on dit: 

That Henrj' Baker fell from grace — and a bicycle. 

That Eben Cross was hell on MP's. 

That the 313th gave a "dance" at Chateau du Loir. 

That Tom Shryock "held" Montfaucon. 

That Nice was some burg. 

That Sam was Town Major but Frank Casella did the work. 

That "accompanying guns" was great stuff — in the SOS. 

That Doc Reynolds owned Tonnerre, and "Timothy" Armstrong, Paris. 

That Dewey Penniman just doted on Bar-sur-Aube. 

That war is grand and gle-orious — at a base port. 
Oui, out! On dit, on dit' 

Davy Clears the Crest 

We were in Septsarges Woods in the early days of October. We sneaked in 
in the dead of night, thrashed about in the woods and dense underbrush, rank 
with the odor of stale gas, and prepared to shoot at daylight in the morning. 

Dave Ackerman, "cheer leader" for "A" Battery, dropped his trails in the 
tangled undergrowth, nonchalantly juggled his aiming circle, squinted at a few 



134 ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 

stars through the scanty openings above, and laid his pets in the general direction 
of the Bois des Ogons. 

Then, all set, he sHcked back his locks, finished his correspondence, nibbled 
a bit of chocolate, and waited till dawn. 

At 5.30 sharp he "blooied" away on his first message to Madeleine. 

A short screech followed the roar of the guns and, an instant later, a terrific 
crash almost overhead sent down tops of shattered trees and shell splinters all 
over the neighborhood. 

Dave remained dignified in the pandemonium, shifted a bit, and banged 
away once more, bringing down another carload of virgin forest. 

He traversed back and cut loose with a third, and we could hear the shells 
singing far out in the misty morn to their objective — without hindrance. 

Davy was "clearing" the crest. 

"Minimum range in a forest ain't nothin' to a good executive," remarked 
Dave, after the squall, to a host of inquiring friends. 

360 Takes 243 

By four o'clock in the afternoon of November 1, after a full day of intense 
fighting, the 360th Infantry of the 90th Division were firmly astride their day's 
objectives and consolidating for the night. It had been a day of terrific combat 
and the attacking units were "all in." 

About half past four came a message from corps headquarters : 

"Hill 243 enfilades the position of elements on your right," it said, "and 
must be taken this night." 

It wasn't a welcome order by any means to regimental headquarters, and 
worse than that to the commander of the front line battalion to whom it was 
relayed for execution a few moments later, good soldier though he was. 

We could not hear his comment upon its receipt, but we did know that 243 
was a sharp commanding eminence, thickly wooded, and really more than 300 
meters in height in spite of its map title. We also knew it was beyond 
the day's objective of troops who had fought hard and well since dawn, who 
were wet, muddy, dog-tired, and hungry, and who had barely a handful left 
remaining of that battaUon, 1,000 strong, who had gone out against Grande 
Carree Farm, Hill 278, and Andevanne, earlier in the day. And, besides, dark- 
ness was coming on. 



ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 135 

And so,while we didn't hear what he had to say, we could form a pretty fair 
estimate of that young doughboy's state of mind. 

"It's a corps order," was all the comfort that the operations officer could 
give him. 

And so we waited. 

About five-thirty came this laconic message from the front lines: 

"Am on Hill 243. There was nobody on it." 

To complete the story, it might be added that two 77's quite deserted, 
however, were on 243, and two German gun crews with full teams came confident- 
ly up the hill at dawn to remove them — and were gathered in intact. 

The Wine Line 

In so far as we have been able to learn no claim has ever been filed, strange 
though it may seem (we don't expect any at this late date), and the following 
brief report is the only remaining evidence, extant, on the subject. But the fact 
remains that one cask of Vin Rouge is missing in action in France, and D 
Battery is credited with the "salvage." 

It happened this way. 

Second Battalion headquarters, D and E Batteries, and George and 
Dewey Penniman's huskies of the 1st Battalion were returning early in December 
from what had been the American front, to rejoin the 80th Division. We had 
entrained at Dun-sur-Meuse about noon and the long train of boxes and flats 
had rolled, per the best principles of fire, 200 meters every four minutes, until 
the shadows of dusk found us somewhere south of Verdun, and close beside 
another train of flats and "Hommes Forties" bound north. 

We had been "standing on this line" according to schedule for fifteen or 
twenty minutes when a distinct odor of the national beverage became quite 
strong and unmistakable in the neighborhood. The atmosphere finally became 
so suspiciously vinous and alluring that an investigation was ordered. 

It revealed the fact that a French flat, piled high with casks, had stopped 
directly opposite the kitchen car of D Battery, and only one cask was missing, 
but a French sentinel was operating on the others with a rubber tube and 
a bucket. 

An auburn haired officer of the outfit so reported but further this deponent 
sayeth nothing. So the matter rested. 



136 ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 

An hour later at the next stop, through an opening in the main entrance of 
the "officers' pullman," a large can was quietly thrust into the straw. 

It was brimful of Vin Rouge. 

The hand behind it was hurriedl,y withdrawn, and we were never able to 
discover the perpetrator of this "outrage." 

On a small slip of paper attached to the can, however, was scribbled this brief 
direction : 

"FOR TIM." 

We "examined" the evidence — and decided to pursue the investigation no 
farther that night. 

But in the morning — we were shocked to find D Battery serving mess in 
two lines, one for coffee and the other for wine, with the former astonishingly 
outnumbered. 

This was too much — in broad daylight and right in the station too — so we 
closed up the joint with visions of an unpleasant aftermath and numerous em- 
barrassing "endorsements in writing hereon." 

Our fears of complications however were quickly allayed shortly after bj^ a 
most comforting member of the American train crew. 

"Don't you worry sir," he said, "none of them cars ever gets through this 
area. Soon as they're all tapped we bills 'em back empty." 

That was the final endorsement. 

Gas -s-s-s-s-s! 

One close friendship, born of the war, was severed November 11, and, strange 
though it may seem, brought joy to the hearts of the American Expeditionary 
Forces. For the gas mask went into the discard this date and that inseparable 
companionship of the American fighting man with this wicked little wartime 
contraption ceased happily and forever. 

It is safe to say that no article of the soldier's paraphernalia in France was 
so uniformly disliked and yet so jealously guarded and cared for. It is also equally 
safe to assert that his first thought, when he learned on the morning of the 11th 
that Willie had thrown the sponge into the Rhine, was — 

"Here goes the old gas mask!" 

It didn't weigh much but it sure seemed that a great burden had been lifted 
from our chests and shoulders. 



ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 137 

But pest though it was, the great American soldier clung tenaciously to it, 
and even if he did "forget" to use it at times, and used only the mouth-piece 
at others to save his nose, strange creature that he was, he slept upon it nights 
and cursed vehemently his luck when misplaced or appropriated by a pal. 

The ordinary or garden variety of mask — for the benefit of homefolks— 
was a sort of canvas bag which held a tin box of magic chemicals, and connected 
by a rubber tube to the face-piece of rubber and glass, a mouth-piece, a valve, 
and horror of horrors, the rubber tweezers, which gripping the nose affectionately, 
forbade all thought of breathing through that organ. 

It was awful, simple awful. Ask anybody. 

There was another tj^pe for the highbrows and battery executives, somewhat 
easier, Tisso by name, after the bird who concocted it, but we never saw anybody 
but Sam and Henry Baker wearing 'em down our way. Sam wore both, but then 
he had three guns, too, and never shot anything but a rat inadug-out inCunel. 

There were masks for the horses which some drivers have been known 
to wear in a pinch. We usually got them on the "animules" once, but — never 
again. But that's another storj'^ which Rip Crosbie can tell you about. 

Masks, however, of themselves, while bad enough, were aided and abetted 
in their discomforting endeavors by the gas which they were designed to circum- 
vent. 

There were several species of gas familiarly prevalent at the front and possess- 
ing various and sundry degrees of harassing qualities. 

The first and most persistent, of course, was that packed neatly into hostile 
shells, which when deftly dropped into friendly areas, emitted fumes, both dan- 
gerous and obnoxious, and quite er-er-er annoying. 

The second was that which wafted consistently from the tail ends of gasoline 
propelled vehicles, causing not infrequent and unnecessary alarm to throat and 
nostrils. 

The third arrived nightly in intelligence reports from G-2; and the fourth 
gushed intermittently from Brigade Headquarters. 

The latter three were amusing but harmless. 

We were gas mask veterans all right when we \\-ent into the lines, but most of 
our practice with this weapon of torture and defense had been in the pure and 
fragrant atmosphere of Brittany, unsullied save for the occasional fumes of cider 
and "white mule." We had slept, and eaten, and fretted, and slobbered, and 
fought the mimic battles of training days in masks, and had spent hours, and 



138 ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 

days, and nights with them, but knew Uttle of the real article save for those few 
highly illuminating facts disseminated by the Stophlet school. 

But we were gas-shy nevertheless, and worked our klaxons and tin-pans 
overtime for the first few days in the lines before we learned to distinguish the 
real cry of "wolf." 

We got our first alarm in the 2d Battalion early on the morning of September 
26, and frantically donned our masks against the odors of a 155 banging away 
on our left and cigarette smoke in the dug-out. Dike Gilliam and Foxie Crandall 
sounded the tocsin on this occasion and came near starting the rolling barrage 
an hour too soon by their weird and raucous cries of "Gas-s-s-s." 

Tim Armstrong was sick in the bunk and we had to grab him by his "red 
thatch roof" and force the pincers on his nose, much to his disgust. 

Tim was kinder Flu-ish and wanted to be gassed. 

And then they came every five minutes on the night of the 26th. Every rattle 
within ten kilometers or more was passed on and floated over towards Hill 281, 
causing a wild scramble into masks, and muttered, muffled imprecations against 
the enemy and his methods. We slept in fitful installments, and slobbered 
intermittently on our rubber mouth-pieces. The gas non-coms maintained an 
air of learned dignity, and sniffing the atmosphere cautiously, would pronounce 
it uncontaminated (never had been) and authorize a removal of that pressing 
little band around the brow. 

But we were learning, and in a few days gas shells which fell near Arras and 
Rheims were not bothering us much in the neighborhood of Verdun, and alarms 
from channel ports passed on over us unnoticed and rattled and klaxoned on 
their way to the Swiss border. 

Our noses and nerves were becoming educated. But we became too educated 
after days at the front, callous from much war, and grew lax and somewhat de- 
fiant. We demanded a good healthy sniff before we would flip the tin-hat and 
duck in. 

This attitude was dangerous at times for we frequently found ourselves with 
a chestful before we knew it, and then swore by all that was good and holy that 
the mask leaked, and said awful things about Stophlet and his crew. 

And then, too, the ever thoughtful Germans didn't always announce the 
title of a shell in advance. You could tell a regular one by its peculiar behavior 
in flight, but the Boche were inconsiderately wont to fire a regular HE shell 
in which the gas was a "ringer," and you choked while watching for the frag- 



ROUTE ORDER— BEING JUST SOME REFLECTIONS 



139 



merits. "Gas" also was an ever-ready ailment of those who "tired" of life in the 
lines. But there was none of that in our circles and we won't dwell upon it here. 

Gas was an ever present danger at the front, but like all other things the 
great American soldier gleaned humor from everything that came his way. It 
had its light side. 

It swooped down thick in Cunel one afternoon while the "One John" Paul, 
quite naked and coiled like a snake in an old iron kettle, was killing time, cooties, 
and all records for sanitation with a wee bit of water and a big cake of Fels- 
Naptha. 

I leave the rest to your fertile imaginations my friends and countrymen. 
I am no artist and words fail me. But gee it was great! 

But it wasn't ever thus. We had our daj'S. 

For instance — 

The whole brigade plus a few French batteries thrown in, on October 7, 
shot mustard and phosgene into the little town of Brieulles from four to six A. M. 

For the cannoneers of the 313th F. A. that was one of the grandest and most 
glorious mornings of the entire war. 




Bridge Over the Meuse at Stenay, Destroyed by Germans 



CHAPTER III 
War Diary* 

14, 15 and 16 September, 1918 

During these days the regiment entrained at Vannes, six trains, with schedule 
stops at Redon, Rennes, Laval, Chatres, Villeneuve, Montereau andSt.Florentin_ 
The Regiment entrained with 63 officers and 1471 men. At St. Florentin further 
orders were received to proceed to Souilly. American troops took charge of the 
trains at St. Florentin. The first train detrained at Lemmes; all others at Souilly. 
After unloading, the first train marched to the Bois de Chatel via Souilly, arriving 
there at about 4h, September 16. 

17 September, 1918 

1st Battalion detrained at 5.30h. A and C Batteries camped in woods near 
station during daylight. B Battery proceeded to Flabas Farm in the Bois de 
Chatel between Heippes and St. Andre, where they were joined by A and C 
Batteries after dark. Owing to the congestion and poor condition of the roads 
this movement took from three to six hours. 

Colonel Charles J. Ferris relieved from command of the regiment. Lieuten- 
ant Colonel O. L. Brunzell assumed command. 

18 September, 1918 

2d Battahon detrained and joined the rest of the regiment in the Bois de 
Chatel after dark. 

19 September, 1918 

At 19.20h orders were received from Brigade Headquarters to move at once 
to the Bois de Chapitre. The regiment moved out at 22.30h in the following 
order : — 

Regimental Headquarters, Headquarters Company, Supply Company, 
Batteries C, A, B, D, E and F. Route was via St. Andre, Ippecourt, Julvecourt, 
Vadelaincourt to Bois de Chapitre. 

2d Lieutenant Walter T . Armstrong transferred to hospital sick. 

• This diary is incomplete because full data was not available in some instances. 



WAR DIARY 141 

20 September, 1918 

Batteries E and F and Supply Company, delayed because of bad roads, had 
stopped at a woods, Queue de Mais. They arrived at 5.00h. 1st Lieutenant 
Ellard M. Colgan, accidentally injured, transferred to hospital. 

21 and 22 September, 1918 

In bivouac in the Eois de Chapitre. Battalion and Battery Commanders make 
reconnaissances in the vicinity of Dead Man's Hill and Hill 304 to locate old 
French battery positions and new positions into which to move. 

23 September, 1918 

Officers 60 Weather — Rain. 

Men 1459 Roads— Heavy. 

Health — Good. 

Camp — Bivouac. 

In bivouac — Bois de Chapitre. 

Reconnaissance begun the previous night by 1st Battalion Commander and 
BC's continued until 15.00h when positions on Esnes-Bethincourt road were 
selected. 

2d Battalion (less Battery D and Battalion Detail) went into position for 
first time as follows — on Hill 275 behind le Mort Homme, below Trench Kleber. 
Battery E x = 318.800 y = 271.110 Map 

Battery F x = 315.580 y = 217.120 Verdun A 

Roads were congested. 
Infantry Operations 

In bivouac in neighboring woods. 
Enemy activity 

Occasional shelling of cross-roads, and towns of Bethelainville and Mont- 
zeville. 
Fire Delivered 

None. 
Casualties 

None. 

24 September, 1918 

Officers 44 Weather — Clear. 

Men 1406 Roads— Heavy. 

Health— Good. 

Camp — Bivouac . 



142 WAR DIARY 

Regiment moved from the Bois de Chapitre to Bois des Sartelles, about 
4 kilometers, leaving at 21h and arriving at 1.30, September 25. Roads were 
badly congested with traffic. 

1st Battalion had left camp at 19.30h and proceeded to Bois de Bourrus by 
way of Germonville, Captain Penniman in command of the column. March 
delayed by other traffic. At Fromereville, which was being shelled, the battalion 
suffered its first casualties, Private Alexander T. Graham of C Battery being 
slightly wounded. The Battalion went into bivouac in the Bois de Bourrus at 
O.BOh after a march of 10.5 kilometers. 

2d Battalion PC was established at M8511. 

D Battery left Bois de Chapitre at 18h to take up position with the rest of 
the battalion but owing to the great congestion and frequent jams on the roads 
dayhght began to break before the position was reached, and it was necessary 
to pull the carriages off the road and camouflage them at M8404. A guard was 
left there and the personnel, together with the horses, were taken back to the 
woods near Montzeville to wait for darkness again. 

Ammunition was hauled by combat trains of battery F to its position. 

Infantry Operations 

Preparation for attack. 

Enemy Activity 

Intermittent shelling of roads, cross-roads, etc. 

Fire Delivered 
None. 

Casualties 

Graham, Alexander T., Private, Battery C, slightly wounded. 

25 September, 1918 

Officers 44 Weather — Clear. 

Men 1406 Roads— Heavy. 

Health— Good. 

Camp — Bivouac . 

Orders received for attack on the following morning. Regimental PC 
moved forward at IS.OOh and established in dugout F8 (Verdun B-318.600- 
270.550) at engineer dump at cross-roads about midway between Chattancourt 
and Esnes. 



WAR DIARY 143 

1st Battalion 76 F. A. put under command of Lieutenant Colonel Brunzell 
Group No. l-313th F. A. and 314th F. A. placed under command of Colonel 
Robert S. Welsh, 314th F. A. 

Personnel Detachment with battery clerks and band left with baggage in 
Bois des Sartelles. Supply Company remained there also. Headquarters Com- 
pany echelon moved to Bois de Bourrus with advance detachment of Supply 
Companj\ 

1st BattaHon 313th F. A. broke camp at 17.00h and took up following 
positions : — ^ 

A and B Batteries .x = 316.000 y = 271.500 Verdun A and B 

C Battery x = 316.700 y = 271.400 

A and B were in position to fire. C was held in readiness to advance. Caissons 
refilled near Esnes and OP established on Hill 304 in front line trenches, but no 
registering done. 

2d Battalion established an OP at M8932 on le Mort Homme. 
D Battery took the road again as soon as it was dark and went into position 
with the rest of the battalion as follows.— 

D Battery x = 318.720 y = 271.080 Verdun B 

2d Battalion echelons established in Bois de Bourrus at S0686 Artillery 
preparation by Army and Corps artillery began at 23.30h. 

1st Lieutenant Stuart C. Adams detailed as liaison officer with the attacking 
infantry. ^ 

Infantry Operations 

Occupation of positions. 

Enemy Activity 

Occasional shelling of roads, and towns of Chattancourt, Bethelainville and 
Montzeville. 

Fire Delivered 

None. 
Casualties 

Wilson, C;iarence B, Mechanic, Battery A, slightly wounded. 

26 September, 1918 

Officers 43 Weather— Rain. 

Men 1401 Roads— Poor. 

Health — Good. 

Camp — Bivouac. 
80th Division attacked at 5.30h. 



144 WAR DIARY 

1st Battalion 

C Battery moved forward shortly after H hour as accompanying guns with 
leading battalions of 160th Brigade. Advanced via Esnes-Bethincourt-Hill 281 
road to Gercourt where first platoon under Lieutenant Morgan went into position 
in Gercourt (84.91) and second platoon under Lieutenant Penniman went into 
Bois Sachet (65.89). 

OP established in northern edge of Bois Jure. 

A and B Batteries as infantry batteries followed C Battery and went into 
position near crest of Hill 281 near right of road as follows. A (76.70) — B (77.65). 

Battalion PC and Battery OP's established on crest of Hill 281. 

M Battalion 

After completing barrage 2d Battalion proceeded at 8.00h west along 
Chattancourt-Montzeville road to cross-roads M8404, thence northwest along 
Esnes road to engineer road at 74.06, thence north to road-fork M7019, thence 
along Bethincourt-Gercourt road to positions on reverse slope of Hill 281 as 
follows : — 

D x = 317.490 y = 276.600 

E x = 317.240 y = 276.600 Map— Verdun B 1/20,000 

F x = 317.350 y = 286.640 

Battalion PC and Battery OP's located on crest of Hil 281 at M7269. 

Regimental PC established on Hill 281 at 317.300-276.950. 

Headquarters Company and advance detachment Supply Company moved 
to Hill 281. 

At 8.00h Colonel Welsh assigned as operations officer to Brigade Head- 
quarters. Colonel Brunzell assumed command of Group I, Major Dunigan of 
the regiment and Captain Pitney of 1st Battalion. 

Infantry Operations 

160th Infantry Brigade attacked at5.30h. By noon had overcome resistance 
of enemy machine gun nests in Bois de Forges and Bois Jure, and was approaching 
corps objective. Strong opposition developed about 5.00 p. m. During the 
evening a second attack was made, and by midnight the 160th Brigade had 
reached the army objective near Dannevoux, establishing the right of the 
Division on the west bank of the Meuse. 318th Infantry went to support 4th 
Division on left. 



WAR DIARY 145 

Enemy Activity 

Resistance of the infantry with machine gun nests and artillery fire. Light 
shelling of our areas. Airplanes worked on our roads and areas with machine guns. 
C Battery subjected to counter battery fire. 2d Battalion machine gunned when 
going into position. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

C Battery fired with effect on enemy strong i)oints and machine gun nests 
southwest of Bois de Dannevoux and Bois de Septsarges. A and B Batteries 
delivered intermittent fire from Hill 281. A Battery destroyed German 77 sniping 
from Dannevoux Ridge. (See letter from C. G., 160th Infantry Brigade.) 

2d Battalion. 

Rolling barrage completed at 7.20h. 

All batteries of 2d Battalion delivered fires through afternoon on Dannevoux 
and Bois de Dannevoux and through the night intermittently on bridge head at 
Vilosnes and on Sivry. 
CasuaUies 

Adams, Stuart C, 1st Lieutenant, Headquarters Comjjany, severely wounded 

Patterson, Harry C, Private, Headquarters Company, severely wounded. 

Darsie, Hugh D., Corporal, Battery C, shghtly wounded. 

Hickman, Willard B., Corporal, Battery C, slightly wounded. 

Walker, Ulysses G., Private first class. Battery C, slightly wounded. 

Brown, Miles, Private, Battery F, slightly wounded. 

37 September, WIS 

Officers 43 Weather — Fair. 

Men 1401 Roads— Poor. 

Health — Good. 
Camp — Same. 

80th Division continued attack. 

Much congestion of the axial road, heavy rains and cold winds made supply 
difficult. 

A Batter}^ moved forward at 16h to the Bois de Dannevoux to act as 
accompanying guns. Position was taken on Hill 294 at 78.25. 

Lieutenant Gregory and regimental telephone detail laid a line from regi- 
mental headquarters forward to Dannevoux ridge to maintain communication 
with the forward batteries. 



146 WAR DIARY 

Infantry Operations 

160th Infantry Brigade made third attack and captured army objective 
within its sector. Left flank refused to maintain connection with division 
on left. During night relieved by reserve brigade of 33d Division. 80th Division, 
less 318th Infantry and Artillery, moved to Bois Montfaucon in reserve. 

Enemy Activity 

Heavy shelling of infantry line. Light shelUng of ridge of Hill 281, apparently 
with gun of 150 caliber on the east bank of the Meuse in the BoisdeConsenvoye. 

Fire Delivered 

All batteries on Hill 281 registered from OP's. 

A barrage was fired by A and B Batteries at 15.30h on south river bank 
by Vilosnes. A Battery fired from Dannevoux ridge on enemy battery positions. 
B and C Batteries delivered intermittent fires. 

All batteries of 2d Battalion delivered intermittent fire on the bridgehead at 
Vilosnes. 



Casualties 




None. 




28 September, 


1918 


Officers 


43 


Men 


1397 



Weather — Fair. 
Roads — Poor. 
Health — Good. 
Camp — Unchanged. 
Regiment fired in support of 33d Division. 

Two guns of A Battery rolled up on Dannevoux ridge to fire with direct 
laying on Vilosnes and Sivry. Enemy shell fire from front and left flank finally 
caused withdrawal of these guns from exposed position after they had fired about 
400 rounds. 

A Battery moved to positions (77.06) in the Bois Jure at midnight. 
C Battery moved into position (77.06) in the Bois Jure after dark. 
B Company of the 305th Ammunition Train attached to the 1st Battalion 
had assisted during last three days in carrying ammunition to positions, reeling 
up telephone wire, etc. 

Supply Company arrived at Hill 281. 

1st Lieutenant Donald S. Stophlet, Regimental Gas Officer, appointed 
Regimental Ammunition Officer. 



WAR DIARY 147 

Infantry Operations 

Improvement of positions and exploitation of successes. 
Enemy Activity 

Crest of Hill 281 and vicinity to right of Bethincourt shelled. 
Fire Delivered 

A Battery fired with direct laying on enemy battery positions near Vilosnes 
and on Sivry. Infantry reported two German guns near Vilosnes silenced. 

2d Battalion delivered O. C. P. fire throughout the night as on the 26th. 

Concentrated fire on enemy positions in orchard north of Vilosnes was also 
deUvered by all batteries. A short barrage was laid down for the infantry north- 
west of Gercourt 12.45h to IS.OOh. 
Casualties 

Dove, Dayton, Private, Battery A, mortally wounded. 

Ickes, Edward, Private, Battery A, severely wounded. 

Ryan, John J., Private, Battery A, severely wounded. 

Garlitz, Frank E., Private, Battery A, slightly wounded. 

Simpson, Oliver E., Private, Battery A, slightly wounded. 

Watts, Frank, Private, Battery A, slightly wounded. 

Hanson, Wilbur, Private, Battery B, slightly wounded. 

Bean, Arthur C, Private first class, Battery B, severely wounded. 

Barrett, Thomas, Private, Battery C, slightly wounded. 

29 September, 1918 

Officers 43 Weather— Rain. 

Men 1393 Roads— Heavy. 

Health— Fair. 
Camp — Fox-holes and dugouts. 

No change in general situation. 

Reconnaissance made by officers of A and C Batteries for new positions, 
and at IQ.OOh the following positions were occupied. 

A Battery, Gercourt-Septsarges road (63.90). 

C Battery, Bois de Sachet, (70.86). 

Excellent cover for the personnel at these positions in old German dugouts. 
Infantry Operations 

Infantry consolidating positions up to Meuse River in vicinity of Bois de 
Dannevoux and opposite Vilosnes. 



148 WAR DIARY 

Enemy Activity 

Positions of A and C Batteries in Bois Jure shelled by heavy cahber gun at 
4.00h. 2d Battahon positions shelled by the enemy without effect. 

Fire Delivered 

B Battery from Hill 281 delivered harassing fire upon enemy lines. 

Intermittent fire delivered by all batteries of the 2d Battalion on Vilosnes 
and orchard north of the town. Harassing fire on enemy OP's and positions on 
east bank of Meuse also dehvered. 

Casualties 

Mowery, Chester C, Sergeant, Battery A, slightly wounded. 
Arndt, Thomas L., Private, Battery C, slightly wounded. 
Vaughan, George M., Private, Battery C, sKghtly wounded. 

SO September, 1918 

Officers 43 Weather — Rain. 

Men 1389 Roads— Heavy. 

Health — Fair. 
Camp — Unchanged. 
No change in the general situation. 
Great aerial activity. 

A Battery established OP on Hill 262 from which it could observe the east 
bank of the Meuse from Vilosnes to Haraumont. 

Fire Delivered 

A Battery registered, using OP. 

In 2d Battalion intermittent fire delivered during night on Vilosnes and 
harassing fire as requested by the infantiy delivered by all batteries. 

■Casualties 

Flanagan, Gordon D., Private, Battery A, slightly wounded, 

1 October, 1918 

Officers 43 Weather— Rain. 

Men 1386 Roads— Heavy. 

Health — Fair. 

Camp — Unchanged. 
1st Battalion PC moved forward from Hill 281 to the Bois Sachet. 



WAR DIARY 149 

Enemy Activity 

Intermittent shelling in vicinity of 1st Battalion. 

About 30 rounds were fired upon B Battery on Hill 281 between 12.00h and 
IS.OOh. 

The 2d Battalion positions were shelled by the enemy causing casualties. 

The Germans held the high ground on the north and east banks of the 
Meuse. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

A and C Batteries fired for registration in the afternoon. A Battery fired 
harassing fire during the night. B Battery conducted harassing fire on bridge- 
heads at Vilosnes and Sivry during the night. 

2d Battalion. 

Intermittent fire was delivered by the battalion on Vilosnes and the orchard 
north of it. 

Casualties 

Kisela, John A., Private first class, Battery D, shghtly wounded. 
Marquess, Bradford, Sergeant, Battery D, slightly wounded. 
Riffle, Roy, Sergeant, Battery D, slightly wounded. 
Swiger, Anthony W., Private first class, Battery D, slightly wounded. 
Wigal, Fred, Private, Battery E, slightly wounded, 

2 October, 1918 

Officers 42 Weather— Rain. 

Men 1384 Roads — Heavy. 

Health— Fair. 

Camp — Unchanged. 

Reconnaissance made by regimental and battalion commanders to select 
positions in front of Montfaucon. Tentative positions selected in the Bois de 
Septsarges. 

Captain Shelton Pitney was wounded in the foot while making a reconnais- 
sance in the Bois de Dannevoux. He was evacuated immediately and Captain 
Penniman took command of the 1st Battalion. Lieutenant Morgan succeeded 
to the command of C Battery. 

The 2d Battahon established communication with an OP on Dannevoux 
Ridge. 



150 WAR DIARY 

Enemy Activity 

Cote 262, near A Battery positions shelled with HE time shell. 

C Battery subjected to heavy enemy fire and one gun put out of action with 
casualties in men as well. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

A Battery registered. 

2d Battalion 

Intermittent fire delivered on enemy batteries. Light firing Ijy all the 
batteries of the battalion during the night. 

Casualties 

Pitney, Shelton, Captain, 1st Battahon CO, severely wounded. 
Belcher, WiUiam E., Corporal, Battery B, slightly wounded. 
Hickman, Bert H., Sergeant, Battery C, mortally wounded. 

3 October, 1918 

Officers 42 Weather— Fair. 

Men 1383 Roads— Heavy. 

Health— Fair. 

Camp — Fox-holes and dugouts. 
Orders received to move to support of 80th Division in sector north of 
Montfaucon. 

Mounted reconnaissance made by regimental, battalion and battery com- 
manders, and positions in southwest corner of Bois de Septsarges, found the 
previous day definitely chosen. 

1st Battalion moved at dusk, A and C Batteries via Gercout-Septsarges 
Road, B Battery with 2d Battalion column, into positions as follows: — 
1st Battalion PC x = 3I4.100 y = 280.350 

Battery A x = 311.030 y = 280.350 

Battery B x = 313.880 y = 280.270 

Battery C x = 313.920 y = 280.287 

Echelon in Bois de Septsarges. 

Battery E, leading 2d Battalion column, taken under fire crossing crest of 
Hill 281. 3d piece damaged and casualties among men and horses. Firing 
battery proceeded across country and via Gercourt-Septsarges road, remainder 



WAR DIARY 151 

of column turned around south side of Hill 281 — across field, through Rau de 
Billomont to Bethincourt-Cuisj^ road, thence to Cuisy, thence to Septsarges — 
to road-fork 3590, along north fork to road fork at M3697 thence along east fork 
to Bois de Septsarges where battalion went into positions as follows : — 

2d Battalion PC at G4102. 

Battery D x = 313.892 y = 297.982 

Battery E x = 313.810 y = 279.920 

Battery F x = 313.987 y = 280.123 

Echelon in Bois de Septsarges near G4o03. 
Headquarters Company echelon moved to liill in rear of battery positions. 

Infantry Operations 

Preparation for attack. 

Enemy Activity 

2d Battalion column sniped at over Hill 281. Large quantity of gas thrown 
into Bois de Septsarges. 

Casualties 

Kraft, John E., Corporal, Battery E, mortally wounded. 

4 October, 1918 

Officers 42 Weather — Rainy. 

Men 1381 Roads— Fair. 

Health — Fair. 
Camp — Bivouac. 
Regiment supporting attack of 80th Division on Bois des Ogons. 
Regimental PC established in incomjilete German dugout in Bois de Sept- 
sarges (Verdun A3 14000-280200). 

Supply Company remained on Hill 281 above Bethincourt. 
Regimental OP established in edge of Bois de Brieulles overlooking Bois des 
Ogons, Bois de Fays, Bois de Malaumont and Bois de Foret. 
1st Battalion OP reconnoitered. 
2d Battalion OP established at G3315. 
B Battery forward as infantry battery. Returned to old position after dark. 

Infantry Operations 

80th Division attacked at 5.30h on Bois des Ogons, Bois de Malaumont 
towards Cunel and 4th Division heavily engaged in Bois de Fays on our right. 

80th Division infantry reach south edge of Bois des Ogons. 

Attack continued at 17.30h with further gains. 



152 WAR DIARY 

Enemy Activity. 

Great aerial activity with advantage to the enemy. 

B Battery subjected to harassing fire and adjusted upon with airplane. 

Firing 

1st Battalion. 

Destruction fire before 5.30h upon following points — 

Woods and trenches between 0223 and 0526. 

Woods and shelters between 0125 and 0327. 

Edge of woods between 0626 and 1226. 

Hospital and Ferme de la Madeleine. 

Cemetery 0532. 

Rolling barrage from 5.25h through Bois des Ogons to Cunel-Brieulles 

Road. 
B Battery fired on machine gun points as infantry battery. 
Rolling barrage on Bois des Ogons at 17.36h. 
C Battery fired 80 rounds on northwest corner of Bois de Fays. 

2d Battalion. 

Rolling barrage north of Nantillois from 5.30h to S.OOh. 
Intermittent fire throughout rest of day. 
Rolling barrage on Bois des Ogons at 17.36h. 

Casualties 

Boblett, Henry W., Corporal, Headquarters Company, slightly wounded. 
McVey, Zepha T., Cook, Headquarters Company, slightly wounded. 

5 October, 1918 

Officers 42 Weather — Clear. 

Men 1379 Roads— Fair 

Health — Poor. 
Camp — Unchanged. 

1st Battalion laid telephone line to infantry headquarters. 1st Battalion 
OP established. 

Telephone fine laid to regimental OP, but impossible to maintain it long 
enough to adjust fire. 

Great decrease in horse power. Battery F had 1 1 horses die, evacuated 10 
and lost 1. 

Infantry Operations 

80th Division infantry reached northern edge of Bois des Ogons after attack 
of 6h had been resumed at 1 S.OOh. 



WAR DIARY 153 

Enemy Activity 

Our areas shelled during day with HE and with gas at night. 
Enemy planes active, especially against our balloons. 

Fire Delivered 

All batteries delivered preparation fire from 5h to 6h. 

Rolling barrage from 6h to 8h with 50 meter jumps at 3 minute intervals. 

Casualties 

Kilpatrick, Harrison J., Corporal, Battery E, slightly wounded. 

6 October, 1918 

Officers 42 Weather — Clear. 

Men 1374 Roads — Fair. 

Health — Poor. 

Camp — Unchanged . 
Telephone line to Regimental OP in order and guns adjusted. 
1st Battalion OP moved on account of shell fire. 
2d line to infantry headquarters laid by 1st Battalion. 
B Battery's 3d piece burst by premature explosion. 

Infantry Operations 

Organizing positions. 

Enemy Activity 

Positions under heavy shell fire, day and night, some gas used. Strip of woods 
in rear of 1st Battalion positions shelled. A Battery water cart damaged. Enemy 
firing on cross-roads near Battery E was not effective. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

Standing barrage on trench system north of Bois des Ogons. Fire 
begun at 19.15 and continued till 19.30h. 

2d Battalion. 
D Battery. 

Harassing fire on trench system in Bois de Cunel, 9 to lOh. 
Intermittent fire on Bois de Cunel 10-1 Ih. 
Standing barrage in the Bois de Cunel 19h. 

E Battery. 

Harassing fire on trench system in Bois de Cunel 8.50 to 10.20h. 
Zone fire on Bois de Cunel 12.50 to 13.50h. 
Standing barrage in the Bois de Cunel 19h. 



154 WAR DIARY 

F Battery. 

Harassing fire on road G0948. 

Searching fire on trench system in the Bois de Cunel. 

Standing barrage 18.45h. 

Casualties 

Riley, Thomas S., Private, Battery B, Killed in action. 
Kramer, John I., Private, Battery B, Mortally wounded. 
Santalucia, Mike, Private first class. Battery B, severely wounded. 
Manford, Bernard H., Sergeant, Battery B, slightly wounded. 
Strasler, Gorman, Private first class, Battery B, slightly wounded. 
Woodford, Hugh L., Private, Battery B, slightly wounded. 

7 October, 1918 

Officers 43 Weather — Fair. 

Men 1372 Roads— Fair. 

Health — Poor. 

Camp — Digging-in continued. 
Regimental OP maintained and two more batteries adjusted. 
Difficulties experienced in supply and transport of ammunition and rations 
due to bad condition of horses. 

1st Lieutenant Emory H. Niles appointed Captain. 

Infantry Operations 

Organizing positions. Heavy fighting in Bois de Malaumont and region 
of Madeleine Ferme. Very heavy enemy fire at 4.00 p. m. with counter attack 
which failed. 

Enemy Activity 

Heavy shelling of regimental area with guns of large calibre, most of the 
shots over, falling along road south of Bois de Septsarges. Hostile airplanes very 
active. 

Fire Delivered 

All batteries gassed BrieuUes from 4h to 5.45h. Our fire rate one HE and 
three mustards after first five minutes of lethal. 

Intermittent fire throughout the day on calls from infantry. Intermittent 
fires, standing barrages and harassing and searching fires executed on Bois de 
Cunel, the trench system therein and on road F0448 (Dun-sur-Meuse). 

Casualties 

Sparks, Benjamin H., Private, Battery C, killed in action. 
Connell, John J., Private, Battery D, slightly wounded. 



WAR DIARY 155 

8 October, 1918 

Officers 42 Weather — Rain and Hail. 

Men 1372 Roads— Wet. 

Health — Poor. 

Camp — Unchanged . 
2d Lieutenant Leonard D. Densmore detached from regiment. 

Infantry Operations 

Troops organized and prepared for further attack on Madeleine Ferme and 
Bois de Malaumont. 5th Corps attacked Bois de Cunel and regiment delivered 
fire in their support. 

Enemy Activity 

Aerial activity with enemy having advantage. 

Fire Delivered 

Harassing fire and fire on machine gun nests delivered in Bois de Cunel. 
1st Battalion batteries registered. 

Casualties 

Burwell, Edward B., Jr., 1st Lieutenant, Headquarters Company, severely 
Avounded. 

Wanner, Charles E., Private, Battery F, mortally wounded. 

9 October, 1918 

Officers 41 Weather — Rain. 

Men 1372 Roads — Heavy. 

Health— Poor. 

Camp — Unchanged. 
Regiment helped support attack of 80th Division. 
1st Battalion received orders to prepare to move forward. 
Horses continued to die from disease and overwork. 

Infantry Operatioy^s 

80th Division attacked on Madeleine Ferme, Bois de Malaumont and 
Bois de Foret at 15.40h. 5th Corps attacked on our left on Bois de Cunel and 
Trench Mamelle and heights west of Romagne-sous-Montfaucon and the 
Romagne-Cunel road. 4th Division attacked on right. 

80th Division reached Cunel-BrieuUes Road. 



156 WAR DIARY 

Fire Delivered 

Rolling barrage fired by all batteries from 15.30 to 22.30h to support attack 
of 80th Division on Madeleine Ferme, etc. 

2 SOS barrages delivered by 2d Battalion. 

Casualties 

Flanagan, Hillery B., Sergeant, Battery A, slightly wounded. 

10 October, 1918 

Officers 41 Weather — Clear. 

Men 1367 Roads— Poor. 

Health — Poor. 
Camp — Bivouac in shell holes and trenches. 

Supported attack of 80th Division. 

Regimental PC moved to Offizierheim, in Nantillois (Verdun A 311.300- 
281.00). 

Headquarters Company echelon moved to hill behind Nantillois. Supply 
Company remained at Septsarges. 

At Ih the 1st Battahon moved via Septsarges and Nantillois, 7 kilometers, 
to positions northwest of Nantillois as follows: — 
A x = 309890 y = 281540 

B x = 309820 y = 281580 

C x = 309960 y = 281460 

PC and echelons established near battery positions. 

At 18.30h the 2d Battalion moved via Septsarges and Nantillois and 
Nantillois-Cunel Road to road fork F9909. Batteries went into position as 
follows : — 

D x = 309714 y = 280970 

E x = 309910 y = 281340 

F x = 309960 y = 281005 

PC and echelons established in Bois de Beuge. 
1st Lieutenant Edward B. Burwell, Jr., evacuated. 

Infantry Operations 

Infantry of 80th Division made attack from Cunel-Brieulles Road. 
80th Division reheved during night by 5th Division. 

Enemy Activity 

2d Battahon received intermittent hostile fire causing two casualties in 
Battery F. 



WAR DIARY 157 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

Rolling barrage from 7h to ll.Ooh. At this time the standing barrage was 
changed to intermittent fire which was kept up for several hours. 

2d Battalion. 

Rolling barrage from 7h to llh. 

E Battery delivered one SOS barrage north of Cunel. 

Casualties 

Rensel, WilUam A., Private, Battery B, slightly wounded. 
Sotok, John A., Private, Battery E, shghtly wounded. 
Grim, LeRoy, Private first class. Battery F, severely wounded. 
Tenney, Charley, Sergeant, Battery F, slightly wounded. 
Stein, Edward C, Private, Supply Company, slightly wounded. 

11 October, 1918 

Officers 39 Weather— Rain. 

Men 1367 Roads— Poor. 

Health— Poor. 

Camp — Unchanged . 
155th Field Artillery Brigade supported the 5th Division. 
Transportation difficult because of diminishing strength of horses. 
2d Battalion established ammunition dump at Road Forks G0611. 
1st Lieutenant James A. Wooten evacuated. 

Infantry Operations 

5th Division continued relief of 80th Division. 

Enemy Activity 

Considerable shelling of our areas. 

Fire Delivered 

Light intermittent firing during day and night. 

Casualties 

Buford, Walter, Captain, Supply Company, slightly wounded. 
Wooten, James A, 1st Lieutenant, Supply Company, slightly wounded. 

13 October, 1918 

Officers 39 Weather — Cloudy. 

Men 1367 Roads— Heavy. 

Health — Poor. 

Camp — Unchanged . 



158 WAR DIARY 

Supply Company moved to Septsarges, position on right of Gercourt- 
Septsarges road. 

Infantry Operations 

5th Division completed relief of 80th Division Infantry. 

Enemy Activity 

Heavy shelling of our areas, especially during afternoon and night. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

Standing barrage was fired in the afternoon, all batteries taking part. 
In the early evening data was figured for a new barrage and the guns laid with 
this data, but it was not used, and later the guns were relaid with the normal 
SOS barrage. 

2d Battalion. 

Rolling barrage delivered north of Cunel from 6.45h to lO.SOh. 

Casualties 
None. 

13 October, 1918 

Officers 39 Weather — Rain. 

Men 1367 Roads— Poor. 

Health— Poor. 

Camp — Unchanged. 
Increasing number of cases of diarrhoea in the command. 

Infantry Operations 

5th Division prepared for attack. Repulsed counter-attack at 16.00h. 
Reported our barrage very effective in breaking up the counter-attack and 
catching the Germans when attempting to return to their own lines. 

Enemy Activity 

Counter-attack on our front at 16.00h, which was a failure. 
1st Battalion positions heavily shelled in early morning. 

Fire Delivered 

SOS barrage delivered by all batteries at 16.00h. Very effective. 

Casualties 
None. 



WAR DIARY 159 

14 October, 1918 

Officers 39 Weather — Rain. 

Men 1362 Roads— Poor. 

Health— Poor. 

Camj) — Unchanged. 

Supported the attack of the 5th Division on C\niel and Bois des Rappes. 
Reconnaissances for positions near C'unel unsuccessful. 
Shell hit near A Battery's 2d piece. Piece undamaged but casualties in crew. 
B Battery's ration cart destroyed by shell fire. 

Infantry Operations 

5th Division, supported by the 3d Division, attacked Cunel and the Bois 
de la Pultiere taken. Held \\\) by machine gun nests in southern edge of Bois 
des Rappes. 

Enemy Activity 

Intermittent shelling of our areas. 

B Battery of 314th, in position near us, heavily shelled with effect. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

Gas concentration in Bois de Pultiere, 5.30h to 6.30h. 

Rolling barrage through Bois de Pultiere and Bois des Rappes, 8.30h 
to llh. 50 m(^t(M- jum]is at rate of 100 meters in 5 minutes, 100 rounds per 
gun. 

2d barrage fired from 15.50h to 17.30h. 
2d Battalion. 

Gas concentration in Bois de Pultiere 5.30h to 6.30h. 

Rolling barrage through Bois des Rappes (same time and rate as 1st 
Battalion. 

Light OOP and harassing fire in the afternoon. 
SOS barrage line 0367-0066. 

Casualties 

Neel, William B., Corporal, Battery A, killed in action. 
Shillingburg, Olin L., Private, Batterj^ A, killed in action. 
Watson, Walter W., Private, Battery A, killed in action. 
McClure, Grady, Private first class, Battery A, mortally wounded. 
Stillfox, Arthur G., Private, Battery A, slightly wounded. 
Zarnoch, Alexander J., Private, Batterj^ A, slightly wounded. 



160 WAR DIARY 

Cassett, Charles, Private, Battery B, severely wounded. 

Barrett, Brooks, Corporal, Battery B, slightly wounded. 

Straley, Harley V., Private first class. Battery B, sHghtly wounded. 

Blume, Lawrence E., Corporal, Supply Company, slightly wounded. 

15 October, 1918 

Officers 39 Weather — Rain. 

Men 1359 Roads— Poor. 

Health — Poor. 

Camp — Unchanged. 
Very rainy day. 
Supported attack of 5th Division on Bois des Rappes. 

Infantry Operations 

The infantry of 5th Division continued the attack of the day before. Some 
of the Bois des Rappes occupied. One patrol reported to have reached the 
northern edge. 

Enemy Activity 

Intermittent shelling of our areas. 

Fire Delivered 

All batteries delivered standing barrage 7.20h to 7.30h. Rolling barrage 
from 7.30h stopped before schedule time. It was to have advanced 100 meters 
in 10 minutes till H plus 50 when it was to have been advanced 200 meters 
and continued till H plus 110. 

Harassing fire executed intermittently during the day. 
Casualties 

Harmon, Raymond L., Private, Battery A, mortally wounded. 
Halterman, Isaac S., Private first class. Battery A, slightly wounded. 
Perkins, Robert W., Captain, Battery B, slightly wounded. 
Boggs, Lester A., Corporal, Battery B, shghtly wounded. 
Fitzwater, Oscar, Corporal, Battery E, slightly wounded. 
McGuire, Francis P., Private, Battery E, slightly wounded. 

16 October, 1918 

Officers 39 Weather— Rain. 

Men 1352 Roads— Poor. 

Health — Poor. 

Camp — Unchanged. 
Day comparatively quiet. 



WAR DIARY 161 

In pursuance of a new order of defensive preparation 1st Battalion moved 
after dark via Nantillois and Montfaucon to a position near Montfaucon on 
Montfaucon-Septsarges Road as follows: — ■ 
A x = 31 1880 y = 278220 

B x = 31 1790 y = 278200 

C x = 31 1940 y = 278250 

Caissons continued to haul back ammunition from forward position after 
move. 

Roads very bad on account of continuous rains. 

2d Battalion remained near the Bois de Beuge. 

2d Lieutenant Donald B. FuUerton transferred from A Battery to E Battery. 

Infantry Operations 

5th Division to hold the ground now occupied and by use of patrols completely 
to clean up and solidify its front, digging in along lines to ensure security. 

Enemy Activity 

Very little artillery fire in our area. 

Fire Delivered 
No firing. 

Casualties 
None. 

17 October, 1918 

Officers 39 Weather— Rain. 

Men 1352 Roads— Very bad. 

Health — Poor. 
Camp — Unchanged. 

1st Battalion combat trains moved ammunition from several old positions. 

1st Battalion echelons moved back near battery positions. 

Animals in bad condition because of continuous working. 

OP established on high hill above positions. 

Captain Francis W. Crandall assigned to command of 1st Battalion; Cap- 
tain George W. Anderson, Jr., assigned as 2d Battalion Adjutant; 2d Lieutenant 
Henry E. Muzzy relieved as Acting Adjutant, 2d Battalion; Captain George D. 
Penniman, Jr. relieved of command of 1st Battalion and returned to command of 
Battery C; Captain Emory H. Niles assigned to command of Headquarters 



162 WAR DIARY 

Company vice Captain George W. Anderson relieved; Lieutenant Henry E. 
Muzzy appointed Regimental Reconnaissance Officer vice Captain Niles. 
Headquarters Company echelon established in Bois de Montfaucon. 

Infantry Operations 

Organization of positions. 

Enemy Activity 

Comparative quiet in the morning. Considerable activity in the afternoon. 
Shelling in our areas. Shelling in 1st Battalion area mostly duds. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 
No firing. 

2d Battalion. 

Light harassing fire on working parties. 

Casualties 
None. 

18 October, 1918 

Officers 38 Weather— Fair. 

Men 1348 Roads— Poor. 

Health — Poor. 
Camp — Bivouac, wet. 

Captain F. W. Crandall reported for duty as 1st Battalion Commander. 
1st Battalion improved positions and combat trains continued to haul 
ammunition from positions northwest of Nantillois and from Bois de Septsarges 

Infantry Operations 

Consolidating positions. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battahon. 
No firing. 
2d Battalion. 

Assisted in laying down box barrage on borders of the Bois des Rappes, 
from 13h to 15h. 

Casualties 

Mathew, Andrew L., Private, Battery B, killed in action. 

Simmons, Carl, Corporal, Battery B, killed in action. 

Cawley, John, Private, Battery D, slightly wounded. 

Baldwin, Personette G., 2d Lieutenant, Battery F, sHghtly wounded. 



WAR DIARY 163 

19 October, WIS 

Officers 38 Weather— Fair. 

Men 1345 Roads— Muddy. 

Health— Poor. 
Camp — Unchanged. 

Day quiet. 

Corps Sector unchanged but divided into two divisional sectors, the 5th 
Division holding the west sector and the 3d Division holding the east sector. 
77th F. A. (75's) and Lst Battalion 13th F. A. (155's) attached for support of 
5th Division. 

Regimental PC moved from Nantillois to Montfaucon (Verdun A 311300- 
278500) about 14h and established in German dugout northeast of town. 

1st Battalion unable to fire because out of range. 

Coordinates of possible 1st Battalion battery positions in divisional sector 
north of parallel 85 (Dun-sur-Meuse) were submitted. These positions were 
400 meters to east and slightly north of Cunel. 

Infantry Operations 

Prepared for attack. Enemy front line 400 meters from southern edge of 
Bois des Rappes. 

Enemy Activity 

During early morning shelling of observation balloon near 1st Battalion 
positions caused casualties. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 
No firing. 

2d BattaUon. 

SOS barrage delivered for the infantry at 18.00h. 

Casualties 

Vanderpool, Mathew, Private, Battery A, slightly wounded. 
Hanna, Lester, Private, Battery C, slightly wounded. 
Simmons, Lakie B., Private, Battery C, slightly wounded. 

W October, 1918 

Officers 38 Weather— Cloudy. 

Men 1345 Roads—Muddy. 

Health— Poor. 

Camp — Unchanged . 

5th and 3d Divisions attacked at 7.00 A. M. 



164 WAR DIARY 

In anticipation of infantry advance 1st Battalion 313th F. A. ordered 
at 4.00 A.M. to proceed to positions near Cunel. Battalion moved out via 
Montfaucon-Nantillois-Cunel Road. Battalion detail preceded the battalion 
and laid a telephone line to infantry support line. Battalion unable to advance 
through enemy fire to Cunel and was shelled off road near Madeleine Ferme at 
9.00h. About twenty horses were killed and one A Battery gun put out of action. 
Casualties in men as listed below. 

Between IS.OOh and 24h Batteries moved into positions in the Bois des Ogons 
as follows : — 

A x = 310.285 y = 282.855 

B x = 310.120 y = 282.400. 
C x = 310.110 y = 282.395 

Battalion PC x = 309.500 y = 284.000 

2d Battalion helped support attack of 5th Division. 

Infantry Operations 

5th and 3d Divisions attacked on Bois des Rappes, Bois de Clairs Chenes 
and Hill 299. 5th Division zone, the Bois des Rappes. Part of this piece of 
woods was occupied. 

Enemy Activity 

Desperate resistance of our infantry in Bois des Rappes. 

1st Battalion column heavily shelled near Ferme de la Madeleine. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

No firing. 

2d Battalion. 

Intermittent fires. 

Standing barrage from 6.45h to 7h on line — 
309.880 to 310.200. 
280.520 to 286.600. 
Standing screen from 7.00h to 8.33h on line — 

8785 to 9493. 
Harassing fire on Bois des Rappes from 18.00h to 20.00h. 

Casualties 

Smith, Arlie C, Private first class, Battery A, slightly wounded. 
Newallis, George, Sergeant, Battery C, mortally wounded. 
Rutledge, Marion R., Private, Battery C, mortally wounded. 
Richard, George F., Private, Battery C, mortally wounded. 
Penniman, George D., Jr., Captain, Battery C, slightly wounded. 
Darnall, Arlo G., Chief Mechanic, Battery C, slightly wounded. 



WAR DIARY 165 

21 October, 1918 

Officers 40 Weather — Cloudy. 

Men 1345 Roads— Muddy. 

Health — Poor. 
Camp — Unchanged. 
Regiment supported attack of 5th Division on Bois des Rappes. 
5th Division relieved by 90th Division and 155th F. A. Brigade assigned to 
latter. 

Comprehensive orders for organization received from the 90th Division. 
1st Battalion dug in and imjjroved positions. 

Supi:)ly Company moved to position near Nantillois on right of Montfaucon- 
Nantillois Road. 

2d Lieutenants Fritjofe Reishus and Benjamin J. Rosenthal attached to the 
regiment. 

5th Division attacked on Bois des Rappes at 1 1 .30h and completed its capture. 
This completed capture of Kriemhilde Stellung. 

During night the 179th Brigade of 90th Division relieved the 10th Brigade 
of 5th Division. 90th Division ordered to improve position for farther advance. 

Enemy Activity 

Enemy attitude showed no intention of withdrawing on left bank or giving 
ground on right bank of Meuse. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

No firing. 

SOS line through 8975-9376. 
2d Battalion. 

Harassing fire on Bois des Rappes 5.30h to 7.30h. 

Standing barrage from 11.25h to 11.30h on east and west line 86.9 

through Bois des Rappes. 

Barrage on east and west line 87 through Bois des Rappes from 11.30 
to ll.SOh. 

From ll.SOh to 13.30h fired upon area on Bantheville-Aincreville road 
around point 09.88 

From 8.55h to 19.55h one battery fired on cross-roads 05.83 and another 
battery fired on line 02.78 to 99.79. 

Casualties 
None. 



166 WAR DIARY 

22 October, 191S 

Officers 40 Weather— Fair. 

Men 1340 Roads— Muddy. 

Health — Poor. 
Camp — Unchanged . 

Relief of 5th Division by 90th completed at 8h. 

Day quiet, 90th Division organizing for attack. 

1st Battalion OP occupied by Lieutenant Morse from 15h to 17h and by 
Lieutenant Burling from 17h to 5h, under fire intermittently. 

Infirmary established at Headquarters Compam^ echelon in Bois de Mont- 
faucon. Health improved. 

Captain Walter E. Card returned from DS and assigned a.s 1st Battalion 
Adjutant. 1st Lieutenant Wm. C. Coulbourn and 2d Lieutenants Richard 
Ashton and Richard B. Cobb relieved of duty with regiment to go to Aerial 
Observers' School, Tours. 1st Lieutenant Henry S. Baker and 1st Lieutenant 
Eben J. D. Cross on D8 as artillery instructors at Camp de Souge. 

Infantry Operations 

Relief of 5th Division completed and 90th Division organized for attack. 

Enemy Activity 

Infantry patrol reported considerable enemy activity in Bantheville. Inter- 
mittent shelling of area in which was 1st Battalion OP, breaking our communica- 
tions continuously. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

Fire on trench system of the enemy and on Bantheville-Aincreville 
Road near Aincreville delivered from 5.45h to G.OOh. 

One SOS barrage. 

SOS hne F8774-8375. 
2d Battalion. 

Fire delivered on well at 97.77 from 5.45h to 6.00h; also on roads and 
areas north of Bois des Rappes. 
Intermittent harassing fire during rest of day. 

Casualties 
None. 



WAR DIARY 167 

28 October, 1918 

Officers 35 Weather — Fair. 

Men 1335 Roads— Muddy. 

Health — Improving. 
Camp — Unchanged. 

Lieutenant Pej)pard registered the 1st Battahon from OP during morning; 
sniped at small groujis observing effect. 

155th F. A. Brigade supported attack of 90tli Division infantry on Banthe- 
ville and Bourrut. Our fire a concentration on Aincreville, Bantheville, Ande- 
vanne, Grande Carree Ferme, roads and areas. 

Infantry Operations 

357th Infantry captured Bantheville and Bourrut, and high ground north and 
northwest of towns, with slight casualties. 

Enemy Activity 

1st Battalion OP under shell fire, HE, intermittently. Intermittent machine 
gun fire in vicinity of 1st Battalion by enemy planes. Some bombing. 2d 
Battalion areas shelled. 

Increased enemj^ aerial activity. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

lO.OOh to 11.30h, adjustment of batteries on 77-77. 

12.00h to 14.00h, fire delivered by A Battery on small groups of enemy 
in area between Andevanne and Mllers. 

14.45h to 17.00h, fire on Bois d'Andevanne and Aincreville. 

19.30h to 2().00h, concentration on southern edge of Bois d'Andevanne. 

SOS barrage delivered. 
2d Battalion. 

During the day harassing and zone fires on areas in vicinity of Grande 
Carree Ferme, Bantheville and Andevanne. 

Fire continued during night. 

Casualties 

Ware, Aaron, Private, Battery B, slightly wounded. 
Bozek, Frank J., Private first class, Battery E, slightly wounded. 
Hofifman, Earl F., Private, Battery E, slightly wounded 
Leonard, Patrick J., Private, Battery E, slightly wounded 
McAnany, John J., Private, Batterj^ E, slightly wounded. 



168 



WAR DIARY 



2A October, 1918 

Officers 35 Weather— Fair. 

Men 1331 Roads — Improving. 

Health — Improving. 
Camp — Old infantry dugouts, bivouac. 

Plan of defense received and necessary fires prepared. 

Grouping of 313th and 314th under command of Lieutenant Colonel Brunzell 
terminated. Lieutenant Colonel Brunzell resumed command of 313th F. A. 
1st Battalion EC's reconnoitered for positions near Cunel-Romagne road. 
At IS.OOh the 1st Battahon moved via Nantillois-Cunel road and Cunel- 
Romagne Road to positions just north of Cunel-Romagne Road, as follows:^ 
Battalion PC x = 308375 y = 285160 

Battery A x = 308480 y = 285625 

Battery B x = 309095 y = 285240 

Battery C x = 308580 y = 285 1 85 

The number of horses in the Battalion had fallen from 315 on September 17th 
to 119 at this date. Each battery was reduced to from 25 to 30 animals which 
could be used to move guns. 

Infantry Operations 

Exploitation of success of October 23. 

Enemy Activity 

Artillery comparatively active. No balloons up because of poor visibility. 
Decreased enemy aviation. A few patrols over the lines but none over rear areas. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

From 10.45h to ll.OOh, A and B Batteries fired upon enemy line from 
7289 to 6989, C on Grande Carree Ferme north of Bantheville. 

From 11.43h to 11.53h the battalion fired on enemy position 150 meters 
north of Bourrut-Aincreville Road, from 9083 to 8586-3 rounds per gun per 
minute. 

From 12.37h to 1.26h, OCP fire at the command of Hilden 1. 
2d Battalion. 

Harassing and concentrated fire delivered as called for. 
Casualties 
None. 



WAR DIARY 169 

25 October, 1918 

Officers 35 Weather — Fair. 

Men 1326 Roads— Fair. 

Health — Fair. 

Camp — Old infantry dugouts, etc. 
1st Battalion improved its positions. Ammunition brought up by combat 
trains. Echelon moved to x = 310.265, y = 282.860 near Bois des Ogons. 

2d Battalion, Number 1 piece in Battery F exploded when firing the next to 
last shot of SOS, causing three casualties. 

2d Battalion moved at 18.30h via Xantillois-Cunel Road to positions on 
reverse side of hill just north of Bois de Cunel as follows: — ^ 

Battery D x = 308.981 y = 284.283 

Battery E x = 309.053 y = 284.260 Dun sur Meuse 1/20,000 

Battery F x = 309.220 y = 384.280 

2d Battalion echelons were left in the Bois de Beuge. 

Infantry Operations 

Improvement of positions. Repulsed counter-attack. 

Enemy Activity 

Showed considerable nervousness as if expecting an attack. Increased air 
activity and artillery fire. Artillery fire very heavy in afternoon evidently in 
preparation for attack which he made at 17h from Grande Carree Ferme to 
Bourrut. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

SOS barrage from 17.18h to 17.38h. 

2d Battalion. 

SOS barrage from about 17.30h to 17.40h. 
This barrage was reported very effective. 

Casualties 

Dougherty, Edward, Private, Battery B, slightly wounded. 
Friend, Opha B., Private, Battery E, severely wounded. 
Lowe, Broadway R., Corporal, Battery F, killed in action. 
Cochran, Robert, Private first class. Battery F, slightly wounded. 
Miller, Dayton G., Private first class, Battery F, slightly wounded. 



170 WAR DIARY 

26 October, 1918 

Officers 36 Weather— Fair. 

Men 1326 Roads— Fair. 

Health — Fair. 
Camp — Unchanged . 

Regimental PC moved at about 14.00h from Montfaucon to a German frame 
building in woods just above Madeleine Ferme. (Dun-sur-Meuse 309.740- 
285.150). 

Lieutenant Colonel 0. L. Brunzell appointed Colonel and assigned to regi- 
ment. Lieutenant Colonel Wm. R. Gruber assigned to regiment, but did not 
report for duty. 

1st Battalion improved positions and hauled ammunition. 

2d Battalion improved its positions and shelters, and hauled ammunition. 

Infantry Operations 
No report. 

Enemy Activity 

Our Regimental PC shelled considerably by guns of large caliber. Artillerj' 
fire intermittent day and night on Cunel-Romagne Road and the crests north 
and south of this road, also on Cunel and Romagne — considerable gas — blue 
cross, mustard and phosgene. 

2d Battalion positions shelled by enemy with gas and HE. A direct hit 
obtained on D Battery's position, causing serious casualties. 

Enemy planes increasingly active and able to reconnoiter our lines with 
apparent ease. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

Batteries registered in afternoon. 
2d Battalion. 
No firing. 

Casualties 

Barnett, John C, Private, Batter}^ C, slightly wounded. 
Ketterman, Randall G., Corporal, Battery D, mortally wounded. 
Emswiller, Eugene N., Private, Battery D, severely wounded. 
Graham, Kester E., Private first class. Battery D, severely wounded. 



WAR DIARY 171 

!McComas, Virgil, Corporal, Battery D, severely wounded. 
]\IcCormick, Elzie G., Private first class, Battery D, severely wounded. 
Schmoyer, Harvey T., Private first class, Battery D, severely wounded. 
Kines, Xorman W., Private first class, Battery D, slightly wounded. 

27 October, 1918 

Officers 36 Weather— Clear. 

:Men 1316 Road.s— Fair. 

Health— Fair. 
Camp — Unchanged . 
1st Battalion ammunition dumps located on Romagne-Cunel road near 
positions. 

2d Battalion — D Battery located dump on Romagne-Cierges Road, E and 
F Batteries had dumps on Nantillois-Cunel Road. 

Infantry Operations 

Improvement of positions. 

Enemy Activity 

Enemj' planes continued to operate over positions throughout the day; 
enemy continued to hold complete control of the air. Harassing fire along the 
Romagne-Cunel road, a number of shells among 1st Battalion batteries. Harass- 
ing fire with gas and HE delivered on Bois de Cunel near 2d Battalion positions 
without effect. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

14h to 16h, B and C Batteries registered, A did not complete registration 
because of poor visibilit3^ C Battery fired at and dispersed enemy platoon. 
2d Battalion. 

Slight harassing fire as requested by the infantry. 

Casualties 

]\IcLaughlin, Lawrence M., Corporal, Headquarters Company, slightly 
gassed. 

Brill, Clinton M., 1st Sergeant, Battery A, slightly wounded. 

Cullers, Bernie G., Corporal, Battery A, sUghtly wounded. 

White, Hubert V., Sergeant, Battery F, slightly wounded. 



172 , WAR DIARY 

28 October, 191S 

Officers 36 • Weather— Clear. 

Men 1313 Roads— Fair. 

Health— Fair. 

Camp — Unchanged. 
Headquarters Company echelon moved to Ferme de la Madeleine. 
1st Lieutenant' Donald S. Stophlet evacuated injured. 
1st Lieutenant Isaac Dougherty from B Battery to F Battery. 

Enemy Activity 

Visibility poor and no enemy activity observed. Our areas subjected to 
zone fire at intervals, gas and HE of light and heavy caliber. Slight effect on 
B Battery. 

Enemy order of battle west to east. 

109th Body Grenadier Regiment — 40th Fusileer Regiment — UOth Grena- 
dier Regiment of 28th Division. 

Fire Delivered 

Harassing fire as requested by the infantry. 

C Battery fired about 32 rounds gas into Andevanne from 16.00h to 16.15h. 

Casiinlties 

Dadisman, Claude A., Corporal, Battery B, slightly wounded. 
McMilhan, James E., Corporal, Battery B, slightly wounded. 
Small, Samuel C, Private, Battery B, sUghtly wounded. 

29 October, 1918 

Officers 35 Weather — Clear. 

Men 1309 Roads— Fair. 

Health— Fair. 

Camp — Dugouts improved. 
Regimental PC moved from Ferme de la Madeleine at about loh to Cunel 
where it was estabUshed in Chateau de Cunel (Dun-sur-Meuse 309.750-285.150). 

Enemy Activity 

1st Battalion areas about A and C Batteries shelled intermittently, about 
40 rounds of 77's. 

2d BattaUon positions shelled in the afternoon with effect. 



WAR DIARY 173 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

Fire delivered on transports and small groups of enemy observed oii 
Andevanne-Villers and Andevanne-Tailly road. 

B Battery fired on an OP on Hill 243 (Effect later observed when our 
line included this OP). 

C Battery fired on trench system at A 8215. 
2d Battalion. 

Harassing fire on Grande Carree Ferme, Chassogne Ferme and 
Andevanne. 

E Battery adjusted. 

Casualties 

Owens, Thomas H., Corporal, Headquarters Company, sliglitly wounded. 

Brady, Arthur D., Corporal, Batter}' F. killed in action. 

Mansfield, John J., Chief Mechanic, Battery F, killed in action. 

Wilmoth, Orval G., Private, Battery F, slightly wounded. 

Hornkohl, Alex. C., .Jr., Private first class. Medical Detachment, slightly 
wounded. 

30 October, 1918 

Officers 35 Weather — Clear. 

Men 1309 Roads— Fair. 

Health— Fair. 
Camp — Unchanged. 
Total horses in 2d Battalion as follows : — 

Battery D, 44; Battery E, 50; Battery F, 57; total, 141. 

Infantry Operations 

Preparations for attack. 

Enemy Activity 

Enemy infantry very alert and nervous. Slightest movement in our lines 
brings up flare along front. Enemy shell fire from right front near all batteries 
of 1st Battalion. 



17-1 WAR DIARY 

Fire Delivered 
1st Battalion 
A Battery. 

13.00 to 13.30h, fired on OP at 7916. 
B Battery. 

14.00 to le.OOh, fired on enemy OP. 
15.00 to 15.15h, fired on group of men. 
2d Battalion. 

Light harassing fire on Grande Carree Ferme. 

Casualties 

ColUck, Joseph C, Private, Battery E, slightly wounded. 

31 October, 1918 

Officers 35 Weather— Clear. 

Men 1309 Roads— Fair. 

Health— Fair. 
Camp — Unchanged. 

Preparations for attack on November 1 , of Andevanne and heights north 
and northeast thereof, being parts of Freya Stellung. 

2d Battalion received orders to support 360th Infantry on following day as 
follows: Battery F as accompanying guns; Batteries D and E as infantry 
batteries. 

At 19.30 2d Battalion left positions and proceeded to positions west of 
Bantheville as follows: due west across country to the Cierges-Romagne Road, 
thence along NW fork passing cemetery to trail-fork F5489, thence NW 
along trail to road-fork F5062, thence along NE fork to F5986, where D and E 
Batteries bivouacked for the night. At 24h F continued along road to F6779, 
where it likewise bivouacked. 

1st Lieutenant Isaac Dougherty attached to Battery F; 2d Lieutenant 
Harold W. Haskins to SD with 155th F. A. Brigade; 1st Lieutenant Walter T. 
Armstrong unable to accompanj^ Battery D on account of sickness; 2d Lieu- 
tenant Ghelardi in command of Battery D. 

Horses received in 2d Battalion as follows: — 

Battery D, 26; Battery E, 30; Battery F, 37. 

Total horses in Battalion as f oUows : — 

Battery D, 73; Battery E, 92; Battery F, 92. 



WAR DIARY 175 

Infantry Operations 

All troops in position before midnight, 360th Infantry on left and 359th 
Infantry on right, echeloned in depth. 

Enemy Activity 

Enemy lines reported to be extremely nervous. 
Artillery fire on B Battery's positions caused casualties. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

SOS barrage at 5.45h. 
Gas preparation at 22h. 

2d Battalion. 

SOS barrage from 5.53 to 6.03h. 

Casualties 

Moore, Wilbur S., Mechanic, Battery B, killed in action. 
Seltzer, Nevin R., Private, Battery B, slightly wounded. 
Wheeler, Charlie, Private, Battery B, slightly wounded. 
Withrow, Foza A., Private first class, Battery B, slightly wounded. 
Marquess, Bradford, Sergeant, Battery D, slightly wounded. 

1 November, 1918 

Officers 33 Weather— Cloudy. 

Men 1283 Roads— Good. 

Health — Fair. 
Camp — Fox-holes. 
90th Division attacked Andevanne and heights at 5.30h. 
1st Battalion had mission of concentration fire and barrage. 
1st Battalion PC moved to Headquarters 359th Infantry under command of 
Colonel Sterling. Reconnaissance made by 1st Battalion Commander and B C's 
during attack for new positions. 

From 14h to 18h batteries moved via Romagne and Bantheville to positions 
on Bantheville-Romagne Road as follows: — 

A Battery x = 307.225 y = 287.870 

B Battery x = 307.380 y = 287.800 

C Battery x = 307.300 y = 287.830 



176 WAR DIARY 

2d Battalion mission: F Battery, accompanying guns; D and E, Infantry 
Batteries. All batteries skirted Bois de Bantheville and moved into position 
near Grande Carree Farm, as follows:— 

D Battery x = 306.790 y = 288.330 at 7.30h 

E Battery x = 306.840 y = 288.060 at 6.30h. 

F Battery x = 306.710 y = 288.400 at 6.45h 

OP on Hill 271. 

2d Battalion had 12 horses killed and 24 wounded on this day. 
2d Battalion received twelve replacements, divided equally among batteries. 
1st Lieutenant Henry E. Muzzy to 2d Battalion as Adjutant. 1st Lieuten- 
ant Thomas J. Shryock to Regimental Headquarters as reconnaissance officer. 

Infantry Operations 

Attack a complete success, Andevanne and heights taken with heavy enemy 
losses. 

Enemy Activity 

1st Battalion positions intermittently under shell fire. 2d Battalion moved 
into position through stiff OOP fire. Enemy's preparations for defense counter- 
acted by our attack. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

From 2.00h to 2.30h concentration of tear gas and phosgene on 
southern edge of Bois d'Andevanne. 

From 3.30h to 5.30h, destruction fire on following areas : heights north- 
west, north and northeast of Andevanne; Bois d'Andevanne and rectangular 
woods northwest of Grande Carree Ferme. 

From 5.30h to 12.30h, a deep rolling barrage extending from Grande 
Carree Ferme northeast above Andevanne to east and west line 293000. 
2d Battalion. 

Fired until dark on areas and machine gun nests which were holding 
up the advance of the infantry. 

Casualties 

Anderson, George W., Jr., Captain, Headquarters Company, killed in action. 
Harrison, Edmund C, Private, Headquarters Comaany, killed in action. 
Lewis, Allen G., Corporal, Headquarters Company, killed in action. 
Williams, Klase, Private, Headquarters Company, slightly wounded. 



AVAR DIARY 177 

Casualties — continued 

Kennedy, Edward, Private. Battery A, severely wounded. 
Conrad. Herbert M., Private first class, Battery B, slightly wounded. 
Lott, Marion E.. Private first class, Battery C, slightly wounded. 
Cart, Walter H., Private, Battery D, slightly wounded. 
Pratt, John A., Private first class, Battery D, slightly wounded. 
Wiley, Elmer L., Private, Battery E, killed in action. 
Shanholtzer, Roy S., Chief Mechanic, Battery E, mortally wounded. 
Gilliam, Theodorick A. W., Captain, Battery E, severely wounded. 
Morphet, John C., Private, Battery E, severely wounded. 
Bussey, Chark\y A., Private, Battery E, slightly wounded. 
Conley, John, Private first class. Battery E, slightly wounded. 
Dailey, Harry A., Sergeant, Battery E, slightly wounded. 
Dawson, Ira L., Private first class, Battery E, slightly wounded. 
Ellard, Edward, Private, Battery E, slightly wounded. 
Miller, Lawrenct> J., Private, Battery E, slightly wounded. 
See, Lemuel A., Corjjoral, Battery E, slightly wounded. 
Strickland, Howard B., Private, Battery E, slightly wounded. 
Whitford, Gilbert H., Corporal, Battery E, slightly wounded. 
Green, Luther H.. Corporal, Battery F, killed in action. 
Calascione, Frank, Private, Battery F, mortally wounded. 
Howes, Pearly B., Cook, Battery F, mortally wounded. 
Addis, Robert H., Private, Battery F, severely wounded. 
Craig, William H., Corporal, Battery F, severely wounded. 
Berkowitz, Moe, Private first class. Battery F, slightly wounded. 
Boyer, Howard W., Private, Battery F, slightly wounded. 
Pell, George A., Private, Battery F, slightly wounded. 
Sefrick, Andrew, Private first class, Battery F, slightly wounded. 
Stand, Fridolin J., Private, Medical Detachment, slightly wounded. 

2 November, 1918 

Officers 33 Weather — Rain. 

Men 1282 Roads— Fair. 

Health— Fair. 
Camp — Fox-holes. 
1st Battalion acting in liaison with CO 359th Infantry helped support attack 
and capture of Villers-devant-Dun. 



178 WAR DIARY 

Supply Company moved to position in rear of Regimental P C in Cunel. 

2d Lieutenant Fritjofe Reishus attached to Battery E. 

Major Francis J. Dunigan relieved of assignment to the regiment 

Infantry Operations 

Capture Villers-dcvant-Dun. 

Enemtj Activity 

Enemy artillery comparatively inactive and apparently withdrawing. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

Destructive fire executed before daylight upon Villers and enemy 
strong points. 

Rolling barrage fire at 7.30h over Villers. 

Fire delivered on machine gun strong points and as designated by 
infantry during day. SOS barrage laid down. 
2d Battalion. 

Summary of fire, Battery D. 

10.50 to 12.30h, zone fire on Hill 321. 

14.44 to 15.14h, harassing on Le Herbillon woods. 
Battery E. 

11.20 to ll.SOh, harassing on target at (x = 308.600 y = 292.050). 
12.10 to 12.30h, sweeping fire on Hill 321. 

14.46 to 15.25h, searching fire on Le Herbillon woods, range increased 
300 meters after firing 30 minutes. 
Battery F. 

10.45 to 11.30h, sweeping fire on Hill 321. 

14.45 to 15.15, searching fire on Le Herbillon woods. 
Casualties 

Eitle, Paul C, Private, Battery C, slightly wounded. 
Zimmerman, George F., Private, Battery D, slightly wounded. 

S November, 1918 

Officers 32 Weather — Rain. 

Men 1282 Roads— Poor. 

Health — Fair. 

Camp — Fox-holes. 



WAR niARY 179 

Regimental PC moved at 7.30h to Grande Carree Ferme (Dun-sur-Meuse 
306.700-289.000), about 12.00h, moved to Villers-devant-Dun (309.550-201.850). 

1st Battalion moved into positions near C'hassogne Farm and 500 meters 

north of Aincreville at 7.30h, as follows: — 

A x = 309.800 y = 289.300 

B x = 309.820 y = 289.010 

C x = 309.980 y = 289. 110 

2d Battalion barrage started at H hour, 8 o'clock, tliscontiuued because 
troops of 89th Division filtered over into sector of 90th Division. A new barrage 
was figured and commenced in right of sector as shown in summary of "Fire 
Delivered" (below). At 13.00h, reconnaissance party went forward to find new 
positions in vicinity of Villers-devant-Dun. The Battalion movetl out at 
15.00h, southeast along Bantheville-Remonville Road to Bantheville, thence 
west to Aincreville, thence north along Aincreville-Mllers road to Ravin du 
Fond de Thei.sse, where ]-)ositions were occu]iied at 5.30h, 4 November, 1918. 

Infantry Operations 

179th Infantry Brigade passed through lines of 180th Brigade and attacked, 
capturing h(>ights from Halles to Meuse. Cajiture completed the capture of 
the Freya Stellung. Advance rapid, contact witli the enemy regained at Sassey. 

Enemy Activity 

Enemy continued to retreat. Delivered desultory shelling. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

Rolling barrage fired from 8.00h to ll.OOh, through the Bois de Mont. A 
Battery used 3 guns, B, 3 guns and C, 2 guns. 
2d Battalion. 

D Battery. 

Barrage from 8.00h to 9 40h. 

Barrage from 12.00h to 12.56h. 

E and F Batteries. 

Barrage from 8.00h to 8.40h. 

Barrage from 12.00h to 12.56h. 

Casualties 
None. 



180 WAR DIARY 

If. November, 1918 

Officers 32 Weather— Clear. 

Men 1271 Roads— Fair. 

Health— Fair. 

Camp — Dugouts and buildings. 
Colonel Brunzell established OP on heights above Halles. 
1st Battalion in position near Chassogne Ferme laid on Dun-sur-Meuse. 
OP established near Bois de Bubiemont, G1596. 

Positions occupied by the 2d Battalion at 5.30 were as follows : — 
D x = 310.330 y = 292.670 

E x = 310.385 y = 292.680 Dun-sur-Meuse 1/20,000. 
F x = 310.430 y = 292.700 

2d Battalion PC established at B1327 in the Bois de Mont. 
Just before these new positions were reached a direct hit destroyed E Battery 
4th piece caisson limber and caused two casualties. 

Supply Company moved to Aincreville-Villers Road near Villers. 
2d Lieutenant Alfred D. Gill attached to Battery E for duty. 
Infantry Operations 

90th Division held line Halles-Sassey, bulk of its forces on high ground. 
Patrols out along the river. Prepared to press pursuit across the river. 89th 
Division on left advanced through Foret de Dieulet, 5th Division on right had 
established bridgehead at Dun-sur-Meuse. 

Enemy Activity 

Enemy continued his retreat. Airplanes active over roads and towns in 
our forward areas. Four airplane bombs near 1st Battalion positions caused one 
casualty. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

No firing. 
2d BattaUon. 

Harassing fire at very slow rate delivered throughout the day by Battery 
D upon request from infantry. 

Battery F fired upon trench system at B3189 near Bois de Boulain 
from 10.45 to 12.30h — intermittent fire at a slow rate. 

Battery E did not fire but was laid on Dun. 



WAR DIARY 181 

Casualties 

McKeever, Clio B., Private first class, Batterj^ B, mortallj^ wounded. 

Hosey, Lemon L., Private, Battery C, slightly wounded. 

Paulson, Fred, Private, Battery C, slightly wounded. 

Mansell, Byron, Private, Battery E, severely wounded. 

Jenkins, James V., Private first class, Batterj^ E, slightly wounded. 

5 November, 1918 

Officers 32 Weather— Rain. 

Men 1268 Roads— Poor. 

Health— Better. 
Camp — Unchanged . 

Colonel Robert S. Welsh, commanding 155th F. A. Brigade killed by shell 
fire on the Montign.y-Villers road. Colonel William Tidball succeeded to the 
command. 

2d Battalion Commander made reconnaissance for positions forward of 
Montigny. 

Headquarters Company echelon moved to road-forks 2 kilometers north of 
Villers. 

Infantry Operations 

Vigorous patrolling and improvement of positions. 

Enemy Activity 

Enemy retreating very rapidly from Stenay-Mouzay-Milly line. Enemy 
rear guard on line Stenay-Mouzay to bank of canal due east of Sassey. Retreat 
appeared to be general and with all possible speed. Towns and roads in our 
forward areas heavily shelled. Montigny and roads south of Montigny under 
particularly heavy fire. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 
No firing. 
■ 2d Battalion. 
No firing. 

Casualties 

Dillon, John J., Private, Battery A, slightly wounded. 
Wallace, Samuel D., Private, Battery A, shghtly wounded. 



182 WAR DIARY 

6 November, 1918 

Officers 32 Weather— Cloudy. 

Men 1268 Roads— Poor. 

Health — Improving. 
Camp — Unchanged. 
Regimental PC established in Halles (310.500-297.700) at 12.30h. 
The 1st Battalion moved out at 7.00h, and proceeded via Villers-Andevanne- 
Beauclair to positions near Halles. The Battalion and Battery CO's preceded 
the column to select the positions. Column was held up from 14h to 16h near 
Beauclair, then proceeded under shell fire from Beauclair to Halles. Positions 
were as follows: — 

A x = 310.605 y = 297.510 
B x = 310.400 y = 298.350 
C x = 310.560 y = 297.530 
The march of 17 kilometers was hindered by bad roads from Villers to 1 
kilometer north of Andevanne and by great shortage of horses. 
Battalion PC in building next to Regimental PC. 

The 2d Battalion moved at 9h, SW along Villers-Montigny road to Villers- 
devant-Dun, thence west to road-fork A7712, thence along north fork to Tailly, 
thence northeast through Beauclair to road-fork B1393, thence southeast to 
B2289, where batteries went into position as follows : — 
D x = 312.432 y = 298.980 

E x = 312.420 y = 298.960 
F x = 312.480 y = 299.220 

Battery F, which was in the lead, was held up for more than an hour in 
Beauclair while bridge over Ravin de Wiseppe at B1592, which had been blown 
up by enemy was repaired. 

Advance reconnaissance party preceded batteries going cross country through 
Bois de Montigny, Bois de Halles and Halles-Boulain road to reconnoiter the 
positions. This position was well advanced, being only 1 kilometer from front 
line. 

2d Battalion PC established at B3390, 

Infantry Operations 

Patrols active towards Stenay. Patrol crossed the river at Villefranche and 
fastened cable to east bank. 5th Division reported in Brandeville and Vilosnes. 



WAR DIARY 183 

179th Brigade disposed as follows: — 

357th Infantry, 1st Battahon between Sassey and Montigny, holding bridge- 
head at Sassey. 2d Battalion along railroad between Villefranche and Wiseppe. 
3d Battalion between Montigny and Villefranche. 

358th Infantry, 1st Battalion and 2d Battalion. 1 kilometer south of Laneu- 
ville. 3d Battalion in Le Chenois. 

Enemy Activity 

Occasional shelling of our roads and areas. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

No firing. 
2d Battalion. 

No firing. 

Casualties 

Manford, Bernard H., Sergeant, Battery B, slightly wounded. 
Skaggs, William E., Corporal, Battery B, slightly wounded. 

7 November, 1918 

Officers 32 Weather — Rain. 

Men 1268 Roads— Poor. 

Health — Good. 

Camp — Unchanged. 
1st Battalion OP established on heights above Halles at 0273. 
Combat trains brought up ammunition. 

2d Battalion OP established at 13.9-00.3 on forward slope of Hill 205 with 
excellent observation on Stenay and east bank of Meuse. 
Visibility poor and guns were adjusted with difficulty. 
Combat trains brought up ammunition. 

1st Lieutenant Walter T. Armstrong returned to Battery D for duty. 
2d Lieutenant Alfred D. Gill detailed as liaison officer with the infantry. 

Infantry Operations 

Vigorous patrolling and organization. 

Enemy Activity 

Light shelling of our areas. 



184 WAR DIARY 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

From 18.30h to 18.40h, fire on working partj^ southwest of Stenay, 
and upon battery position reported b}^ the infantry at 314.900-302.780. 
Infantry reported fire of this battery ceased. 
2d Battahon. 

From 10.40 to 10.50 concentrated fire delivered by D and F on 2d 
Battery positions reported by the infantry at W 7435 17.4-03.5. 

W 8818 18.8-01.8 

Map Stenay 1/20,000. 

From 17.15 to 17.20, harassing fire by Battery F. 
Infantry reported this fire very effective. 
Casualties 
None. 

8 November, 1918 

Officers 32 Weather— Rain. 

Men 1268 Roads— Poor. 

Health — Good. 

Camp — Unchanged. 
2d Battalion medical cart detroyed by a direct hit. 

Infantry Operations 

Constant sniping along the river. 

Enemy Activity 

Halles shelled lightly. Strong searching fire through the Bois de Boulain 
swept through all the battery positions of the 2d Battalion, causing casualties. 

Enemy infantry held right bank of Meuse with small posts of machine guns 
and occasionally with trench mortars and one pounders. No aggressiveness but 
very alert. 

Fire Delivered 

A Battery registered one gun at 15.30h on point 7817. 

Between 22h, November 8, and 5.30h, November 9, intermittent 
harassing fire delivered upon points 5923-5926-5829. 
2d Battalion. 

From 14h to 14.05h concentrated fire delivered by Battery D on enemy 
battery position as designated by infantry at 7535. 



WAR DIARY 185 

Casualties 

Bell, John I., Private first class, Battery D, died of wounds. 
Kester, Jesse W., Private, Battery D, died of wounds. 
Edwards, Clifton L., Private, Battery D, slightly wounded. 
Bennett, Howard W., Private first-class, Battery F, severely wounded. 



.9 November, 1918 

Officers 32 Weather— Cloudy. 

Men 1261 Roads— Poor. 

Health— Good. 
Camp — Unchanged. 
Day quiet with some counter battery work on enemy positions in Bois de 
Chenois. 

Infantry Operations 

Contact with enemy kept up by vigorous patrolling. At 20h, 357th Infantry 
crossed Meuse. At 23h, 358th Infantry crossed Meuse. Foot-bridge put in 
at Villefranche. 5th Division held Mouzay. 

Enemy Activity 

Reports indicated that the enemy had withdrawn to the northeast and 
halted on heights about 2 kilometers east of Stenay, north of Baalon, north of 
Remonville, etc. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 

See 8 November. 
2d Battalion. 

From 18.25 to 18.30h, concentrated fire delivered by Battery D on 
enemy position designated by infantry. 

From 11.45 to 12.30h, harassing fire as requested by infantry on woods 
by Battery F. 

From 18.15 to 18.30h, sweeping fire deUvered by Battery F on target 
W7714 to 8405. 

Casualties 

Gimber, Charles, Private, Battery B, slightly wounded. 



Ige WAR DIARY 

10 November, 1918 

Officers 32 Weather — Misty. 

Men 1260 Roads— Muddy. 

Health — Good. 
Camp — Billets and dugouts. 

Regimental PC established in Mouzay at 9h. 
1st Battalion received orders at Ih to cross Meuse at 7h at Sassey. 
The Battalion took road at 4h and proceeded via Milly and Lion-devant-Dun 
to Mouzay. Positions were taken near Mouzay as follows: — 

A x = 318.220 y = 299.095 
B x = 317.960 y = 299. 170 
C x = 318.080 y = 299.120 

1st Battalion PC established in house in Mouzay. 

Infantry Operations 

357th Infantry in position along edge of Bois de Chenois looking toward 
Baalon. 358th Infantry, after heavy resistance at Blanc Fontaine, entered 

Stenay. 

Enemy Activity 

Mouzajr and roads shelled lightly. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 
No firing. 

2d Battalion. 

Battery E, 9.53h to 10.20h, sweeping fire on W8827. 

Battery F, 9.30h to lO.OOh, sweeping fire on W8939. 

Harassing fire at slow rate delivered through night and early morning 
of November 11 on cross roads at 15.9-01.5 and 15.7-01.9, and along west 
road between Stenay and Cervisy. 

Casualties 
None. 



WAR DIARY 187 

11 November, 1918 

Officers 32 Weather— Cloudy. 

Men 1260 Roads— Fair. 

Health — Good. 

Camp — Unchanged. 

1st Battalion prepared data for barrages to be fired with an attack at 5.30h, 
but this was subsequently cancelled. 

At 9.00h, orders issued to regiment to cease firing as an armistice was to go 
into effect U.OOh. 

Remainder of day spent in both battalions in caring for the horses and clean- 
ing material. Guns were kept laid on SOS lines and officers on duty in OP's 
during daylight hours. 

2d Battalion reconnoitered Boulaine Ferme Avith a view to moving entire 
Battalion there. 2d Battalion PC moved to Boulaine Ferme. 

2d Lieutenant Personnette G. Baldwin from wounded to duty. 

Supply Company moved across river opposite Sassey. 

Infantry Operations 

Stenay and Baalon reported completely mopped up and the Brigade in 
readiness to attack in direction of Montmedy before llh. 

Enemy Activity 
Retreat. 

Fire Delivered 

1st Battalion. 
None. 

2d Battalion. 

See 10 November, 1918. 

Casualties 
None. 



CHAPTER IV 

Guns Out of Action. Losses in Horses. 
Rounds Fired. List of Casualties. 

25 September, 1918^11 November, 1918 

Guns Out of Action 
1st Battalion. 

A Battery. 

One from 20 October to 1 November. 

(Sweeper plate badly damaged by shell fragment.) 

One from 1 November to 11 November. 

(Faulty recoil.) 
B Battery. 

One, 6 October. 

(Premature explosion of HE Shell, lAL Fuse.) Replaced by 

new piece, 17 October, 1918. 

C Battery. 

One from 2 October to 8 October. 

(Recoil leak, cylinder punctured by shell fire. Elevating mechanism 

damaged.) 

Two from 1 November to 4 November. 

(No. 1 Recoil Leak, front plug damaged by shell fire; No. 2 Recoil 

Leak, cause unknown.) 

2d Battalion. 

D Battery. 

One from 10 October to 11 November. 

(Front plug defective. Repair Shop replaced it with a piece with 

flaw in tube.) 
E Battery. 

One from 3 October to 6 October. 

(Badly damaged by German shell.) 



LIST OF CASUALTIES 189 

Guns Out of Action — continued 
F Battery. 

One, 25 October. 

(Premature explosion of HE-D Shell with RY fuse.) Replaced 
by new piece on November 3. 
Rounds Fired. 

1st Battalion. Approximately 68,658. 
2d Battalion. Approximately 68,000. 

Losses in Horses — Killed in Action, Died of Disease and Exposure and Evacuated. 

Horses Mules 

1st Battalion 223 

2d Battalion 267 

Headquarters Company Supply 

Company 67 5 

Total Losses 557 5 

24 September, 1918—11 November, 1918 

Casualties 

Killed in Action 16 

Died of Wounds 17 

Severely Wounded 23 

Slightly Wounded 108 

Total 164 

LIST OF CASUALTIES 
Headquarters Company 
Killed in Action 
Anderson, George W., Jr., Captain, 1 November, 1918. 

Killed by a shell while conducting fire from an OP on Hill 271 in region of 
Grande Carree Ferme. 
Harrison, Edmund C, Private, 1 November, 1918. 

Instantly killed by a shell fragment, while reeling wire at 1st Battalion 
Telephone Central near Romagne-Cunel Road. 



190 LIST OF CASUALTIES 

Killed in Action — continued 
Lewis, Allen G., Corporal, 1 November, 1918. 

Killed by a shell fragment near dug-out of 360th Infantry PC in the Bois 
de Bantheville. 

Severely Wounded 

Adams, Stuart C, 1st Lieutenant, 26 September, 1918. 

Wounded in the heel by a shell fragment while on liaison duty with the 

infantry. 
Burwell, Edward B., Jr., 1st Lieutenant, 8 October, 1918. 

Badly gassed in the Bois des Ogons while acting as liaison officer with the 

infantry. 
Patterson, Harry C, Private, 26 September, 1918. 

By the accidental discharge of a German rifle. 

Slightly Wounded 

Boblett, Henry W., Corporal, 4 October, 1918. 

By a shell fragment in the Bois de Septsarges. 
Lehman, Earl L., Private first class, 13 October, 1918. 

By a shell fragment while on duty as a runner. 
Owens, Thomas H., Corporal, 29 October, 1918. 

Gassed slightly while on duty as a runner. 
McLaughlin, Lawrence M., Corporal, 27 October, 1918. 

Gassed while shooting trouble on a telephone line over ridge south of 

Romagne-Cunel Road. 
McVey, Zepha T., Cook, 4 October, 1918. 

Hit by three machine gun bullets from an airplane, near Bois de Septsarges. 
Williams, Klase, Private, 1 November, 1918. 

By a shell fragment while on duty as a runner. 

1st Battalion Headquarters 

Pitney, Shelton, Captain, 2 October, 1918. 

Wounded in the foot by two shrapnel balls while on a reconnaissance near 
the Bois de Dannevoux. 



LIST OF CASUALTIES 191 

BATTERY A 
Killed in Action 
Neel, William B., Corporal, 14 October, 1918. 

Killed by a shell which landed near the 2d piece while they were firing a 
barrage from above Nantillois. 
Shillingburg, Olin L., Private, 14 October, 1918. 

Same circumstances as Corporal Neel (above.) 
Watson, Walter W., Private, 14 October, 1918. 

Same circumstances as Corpoial Neel (above.) 

Mortally Wounded 

Dove, Dayton, Private, 28 September, 1918. 

Wounded by a shell in the Bois de Dannevoux. The same shell wounded 

four other machine gunners while they were all at their posts. 
Harmon, Raymond L., Private, 15 October, 1918. 

Wounded by a shell fragment while guiding an ammunition train between 

Montfaucon and Nantillois. 
McClure, Grady, Private first class, 14 October, 1918. 

Wounded bj^ the shell which killed Corporal Neel. 

Severely Wounded 
Ickes, Edward, Private, 28 September, 1918. 

Wounded by the same shell that wounded Private Dove. 
Kennedy, Edward, Private, 1 November, 1918. 

Wounded in two places by shell fragments. Was returning from his gun 

after completion of gas barrage of that morning. 
Ryan, John J., Private, 28 September, 1918. 

Wounded in the foot by the same shell that wounded Privates Dove and 

Ickes. 

Slightly Wounded 

Brill, Clinton M., 1st Sergeant, 27 October, 1918. 

Caisson ran over his arm, while bringing up ammunition. 
Cullers, Bernie G., Corporal, 27 October, 1918. 

By a shell fragment at the battery eche'on. 
Dillon, John J., Private, 5 November, 1918. 

Caisson ran over his foot. 



192 LIST OF CASUALTIES 

Battery A — Slightly Wounded — continued 
Flanagan, Gordon D., Private, 30 September, 1918. 

By accidental gun-shot in the Bois Jure. 
Flanagan, Hillery B., Sergeant, 9 October, 1918. 

Finger cut off in recoil of piece, while firing a barrage from the Bois de 

Septsarges. 
Garlitz, Frank E., Private, 28 September, 1918. 

Wounded in the leg by the same shell that wounded Dove and the other 

machine gunners. 
Halterman, Isaac S., Private first class, 15 October, 1918. 

Finger cut off in the recoil of the piece, while firing a barrage. 
Mowery, Chester C, Sergeant, 29 September, 1918. 

By a shell fragment while laying wire in the Bois de Dannevoux. 
Simpson, Ohver E., Private, 28 September, 1918. 

Wounded in the legs bj^ the same shell that wounded Dove and the other 

machine gunners. 
Smith, Arlie C, Private, 20 October, 1918. 

Shell fragment near Ferme de la Madeleine. 
Stillfox, Arthur G., Private, 14 October, 1918. 

Wounded by the same shell that killed Corporal Neel. 
Vanderpool, Mathew, Private, 19 October, 1918. 

By a shell fragment near the observation balloon at Montfaucon. 
Wallace, Samuel D., Private, 5 November, 1918. 

By shell fragment when reporting to the battery for duty. 
Watts, Frank, Private, 28 September, 1918. 

By a shell fragment while canying ammunition in the Bois de Dannevoux. 
Wilson, Clarence B., Mechanic, 25 September, 1918. 

By the explosion of a hand grenade which was struck by his entrenching 

tool while digging in near Esnes. 
Zarnoch, Alexander J., Private, 14 October, 1918. 

By accidental gun-shot. 

BATTERY B 

Killed in Action 
Mathew, Andrew, L., Private, 18 October, 1918. 

Killed by a shell fragment while driving after ammunition west of Nantillois. 



LIST OF CASUALTIES 193 

Battery B — Killed in Action — continued 
Moore, Wilbur S., Mechanic, 31 October, 1918. 

Killed by a shell fragment near positions on Romagne-Cunel road. This 

shell caused casualties to a mechanic and two gunners. 
Riley, Thomas S., Private, 6 October, 1918. 

Was gunner of the gun which exjiloded in the Bois de Septsarges. 
Simmons, Carl, Corporal, 18 October, 1918. 

Killed by the same shell that killed Private INIathews. 

Mortally Wounded 
Kramer, John I., Private, 6 October, 1918. 

Explosion of the gun which killed Private Riley. 
McKeever, Clio B., Private first class, 4 November, 1918. 

Hurt by airplane bomb north of Aincreville. 

Severely Wounded 
Bean, Arthur C, Private, first class, 28 September, 1918. 

Severely gassed while driving his team, hauling ammunition north of Hill 281. 
Cassett, Charles, Private, 14 October, 1918. 

Hit by a shell fragment while bringing up the ration cart. 
Santalucia, Mike, Private first class, 6 October, 1918. 

Wounded by the gun explosion in the Bois de Septsarges. 

Slightly Wounded 
Perkins, Robert W., Captain, 15 October, 1918. 

Hit by a shell fragment north of Nantillois. 
Barrett, Brooks, Corporal, 14 October, 1918. 

Hurt by the same shell that seriously wounded Private Cassett. Corporal 

Barrett's horse was killed under him. 
Belcher, William E., Corporal, 2 October, 1918. 

Shot through the foot by a German officer south of Hill 281. Belcher killed 

the officer. 
Boggs, Lester A., Corporal, 15 October, 1918. 

Leg broken in fall on way to Septsarges. 
Conrad, Herbert M., Private first class, 1 November, 1918. 

Hit by a shell fragment near the Bantheville Road. 



194 LIST OF CASUALTIES 

Battery B — Slightly Wounded^continued 

Dadisman, Claude A., Corporal, 28 October, 1918. 

Gassed slightly in the Bois des Ogons. 
Dougherty, Edward, Private, 25 October, 1918. 

Finger injured while cleaning gun west of Nantillois. 
Gimber, Charles, Private, 9 November, 1918. 

Hit by shell fragment at Halles. 
Hanson, Wilbur D., Private, 28 September, 1918. 

Slightly gassed while stringing wire north of Hill 281. 
Manford, Bernard H., Sergeant, 6 October and 6 November, 1918. 

Struck by shell fragment in the Bois de Septsarges. Burned by powder in 

German dump at Halles. The powder was ignited by a shell. 
McMillian, James E., Corporal, 28 October, 1918. 

Wounded in Nantillois, on way to Septsarges. 
Rensel, William A., Private, 10 October, 1918. 

Wounded by shell fragment north of Nantillois. 
Seltzer, Nevin H., Private, 31 October, 1918. 

Wounded by the same shell that killed Mechanic Moore. 
Skaggs, William E., Corporal, 6 November, 1918. 

Struck by shell fragment at Halles. 
Small, Samuel C, Private, 28 October, 1918. 

Gassed when a mixture of gas and HE was thrown into the Bois des Ogons. 
Straley, Harley V., Private, 14 October, 1918. 

Wounded by shell fragment while driving his pair north of Nantillois. 
Strasler, Gorman, Private first class, 6 October, 1918. 

Wounded by the explosion of the gun that killed Private Riley. 
Ware, Aaron, Private, 23 October, 1918. 

Hit by shell fragment south of Madeleine Ferme. 
Warner, Geo. B., Private. 

Gassed and wounded by machine gun bullets while with the infantry. 
Wheeler, Charlie, Private, 31 October, 1918. 

Wounded by the same shell that injured Corporal McMillian. Wheeler's 

horse was shot from under him. 
Withrow, Foza A., Private first class., 31 October, 1918. 

Wounded by the same shell that killed Corporal Moore. 
Woodford, Hugh L., Private, 6 October, 1918. 

Gassed at ammunition dump in Septsarges. 



LIST OF CASUALTIES 19.5 

BATTERY C 
Killed in Action 
Sparks, Benjamin H., Private, 7 October, 1918. 

Killed by a shell fragment in the Bois de Septsarges. 

Mortally Wounded 
Hickman, Bert H., Sergeant, 30 September, 1918. 

Battery positions in the Bois de Sachet were subjected to heavy shell fire and 

Sergeant Hickman was wounded by a fragment. 
Newallis, Cleorge, Sergeant, 20 October, 1918. 

Hit l)y a shell fragment when the 1st Battalion was shelled near Madeleine 

Ferme. 
Rutledge, Marion R., Private, 20 October, 1918. 

Wounded by a shell fragment near Madeleine Ferme. He held his team until 

relief came. 
Richard, George F., Private, 20 October, 1918. 

Hit by a shell fragment near Madeleine Ferme. 

Slightly Wounded 
Penniman, George D., Jr., Captain, 20 October, 1918. 

By a shell fragment near Madeleine Ferme. 
Arndt, Thomas L., Private, 29 September, 1918. 

Gassed as a result of frequent exposure. 
Barnett, John C, Private, 26 October, 1918. 

Accidentally wounded with a rifle. 
Barrett, Thomas A., Private, 28 September, 1918. 

Hit by a shell fragment in the Bois Jure. 
Darnall, Arlo G., Chief Mechanic, 20 October, 1918. 

Wounded at Madeleine Ferme. 
Darsie, Hugh D., Corporal, 26 September, 1918. 

Wounded by a fragment of a hand grenade that had been run over by a 

caisson on hard ground. 
Eitle, Paul C, Private, 2 November, 1918. 

Slightly gassed, face and eyes, with mustard gas. 
Graham, Alexander T., Private, 24 September, 1918. 

First man in the regiment to be wounded. Shell fragment through the helmet. 



196 LIST OF CASUALTIES 

Battery C — Slightly Wounded — continued 
Hanna, Leslie, Private first class, 19 October, 1918. 

Hit by a shell fragment near observation balloon at Montfaucon. 
Hickman, Willard B., Corporal, 26 September, 1918. 

Wounded by an aerial bomb in the Bois de Sachet. 
Hosey, Lemon L., Private, 4 November, 1918. 

By a shell fragment on way back to echelon for ammunition. 
Lott, Marion E., Private first class, 1 November, 1918. 

Shell fragment through the helmet on Romagne-Cunel Road. 
Paulson, Fred, Private, 4 November, 1918. 

Wounded on the way to the front to report for duty. 
Simmons, Lakie B., Private, 19 October, 1918. 

Hit by a shell fragment near observation balloon at Montfaucon. 
Vaughan, George M., Private, 29 September, 1918. 

Gassed in the Bois de Sachet. 
Walker, Ulysses G., Private first class, 26 September, 1918. 

Machine gun bullet through the arm when attempting to wig-wag from the 

Bois Jure. 

BATTERY D 

Mortally Wounded 

Bell, John L, Private first class, 8 November, 1918. 

Serious shell shock after heavy shelling of battery positions. 
Kester, Jesse W., Private, 8 November, 1918. 

Same circumstances as Private Bell. 
Ketterman, Randall G., Corporal, 26 October, 1918. 

Wounded severely in Bois de Cunel when shell exploded almost directly in 

his fox-hole. 

Severely Wounded 

Emswiller, Eugene M., Private, 26 October, 1918. 

Wounded at the same time as Corporal Ketterman. 
Graham, Kester E., Private first class, 26 October, 1918. 

Wounded by the same shell that wounded Corporal Ketterman. 
McComas, Virgil, Corporal, 26 October, 1918. 

Same shell that wounded Corporal Ketterman. 



LIST OF CASUALTIES 197 

Battery D — Severely Wounded — continued 
McCormick, Elzie G., Private first class, 26 October, 1918. 

Same shell that wounded Corporal Ketterman. 
Schmoyer, Harvej' T., Private first class, 26 October, 1918. 

Same shell that wounded Corporal Ketterman. 

Slightly Wounded 

Cart, Walter H., Private, 1 November, 1918. 

Wounded by a shell fragment. Was driving his pair when the battery was 

accompanying the infantry. 
Cawley, John, Private, 18 October, 1918. 

Wounded by a shell fragment in the leg, in the Bois de Beuge. 
Connell, John J., Private, 7 October, 1918. 

Machine gun bullet in the arm. 
Edwards, Clifton L., Private, 8 November, 1918. 

Shell shock. A large caliber shell landed near his dug-out. 
Kisela, John A., Private first class, 1 October, 1918. 

By shell fragment on Hill 281. 
Kines, Norman W., Private first class, 26 October, 1918. 

Shell fragment in back. 
Marquess, Bradford, Sergeant, 31 October, 1918. 

Machine gun bullet from airplane in leg. 
Pratt, John A., Private first class, 1 November, 1918. 

Machine gun bullet from German MG hit him in the hand. 
Riffle, Roy, Sergeant, 1 October, 1918. 

Shell fragment. Hill 281. 
Swiger, Anthony W., Private first class, 1 October, 1918. 

Shell fragment on Hill 281. 
Zimmerman, George F., Private, 2 November, 1918. 

Shell fragment in the leg. 

BATTERY E 

Killed in Action 

Wiley, Elmer L., Private, 1 November, 1918. 

Killed by a shell fragment on way to Grande Carree Ferme. 



198 LIST OF CASUALTIES 

Mortally Wounded 

Kraft, John E., Corporal, 3 October, 1918. 

Hit by many fragments of a shell which exploded under the trail of gun going 

over crest of Hill 281. 
Shanholtzer, Roy S., Chief Mechanic, 1 November, 1918. 

Wounded by the same shell that killed Private Wiley. 

Severely Wounded 

Gilliam, Theodorick A. W., Captain, 1 November, 1918. 

Wounded by fragments of a shell, while conducting fire from an OP on Hill 

271 near Grande Carree Ferme. The same shell killed Captain Anderson. 
Friend, Opha B., Private, 25 October, 1918. 

Hit by a shell fragment, when the ammunition dump near the Bois de 

Beuge was being shelled. 
Mansell, Byron, Private, 4 November, 1918. 

Struck by a shell fragment while driving his pair. 
Morphet, John C, Private, 1 November, 1918. 

Hit by a shell fragment at battery position on Hill 255. 

Slightly Wounded 

Bozek, Frank J., Private first class, 23 October, 1918. 

Hit by a shell fragment when about ten shells fell on the battery position 

west of Nantillois. 
Bussey, Charley A., Private, 1 November, 1918. 

By a shell fragment when the battery was going into position on Hill 255. 
ColUck, Joseph C, Private, 30 October, 1918. 

Wounded by a shell fragment near the Bois de Cunel. 
Conley, John, Private first class, 1 November, 1918. 

Same circumstances as Private Bussey. 
Dailey, Harry A., Sergeant, 1 November, 1918. 

Shell shock, from the same shell that wounded Captain Gilliam. 
Dawson, Ira L., Private first class, 1 November, 1918. 

By a shell fragment when the battery was going into position on Hill 255. 
Ellard, Edward, Private, 1 November, 1918. 

Same circumstances as Private first class Dawson. 



LIST OF CASUALTIES 199 

Battery E — Sliyhtly Wounded — continued 
Fitzwater, Oscar, Corporal, 15 October, 1918. 

Shell fragment broke his leg. Shells falling near ammunition dump near 

battery position. 
Hoffman, Earl F., Private, 23 October, 1918. 

Shell fragment. Same circumstances as Private first class Bozek. 
Jenkins, James V., Private first class, 4 November, 1918. 

Shell fragment. Same circumstances as Private Mansell. 
Kilpatrick, Harrison J., Corporal, 5 October, 1918. 

By small shell fragment in the Bois de Septsarges. 
Leonard, Patrick J., Private, 23 October, 1918. 

Wounded by shell fragment west of Xantillois. Same circumstances as 

Private first class Bozek and Private first class Hoffman. 
McAnany, John J., Private, 23 October, 1918. 

Shell fragment west of Xantillois. Same circumstances as Privates first 

class Bozek, and Hoffman and Private Leonard. 
McGuire, Francis P., Private, 15 October, 1918. 

Shell fragment in the stomach, same time that Corporal Fitzwater was 

wounded. 
Miller, Lawrence J., Private, 1 November, 1918. 

Shell fragment on Hill 255. 
See, Lemuel A., Corporal, 1 November, 1918. 

Shell fragment on Hill 255. 
Sotok, John A., Private, 10 October, 1918. 

Wounded bj' a shell fragment while driving his team. 
Strickland, Howard B., Private, 1 November, 1918. 

Shell fragment on Hill 255. 
Whitford, Gilbert H., Corporal, 1 November, 1918. 

Wounded at the same time that Captain Gilliam was hit. 
Wigal, Fred, Private, 1 October, 1918. 

Horse stepped on hand grenade at echelon on Hill 281. Private Wigal was 

wounded by fragments of the grenade. 

BATTERY F 
Killed in Action 
Brady, Arthur D., Corporal, 29 October, 1918. 

Killed by a shell which lit right in his fox-hole near the Bois de Cunel. 



200 



LIST OF CASUALTIES 



Battery F — Killed in Action — continued 
Green, Luther H., Corporal, 1 November, 1918. 

Killed by a shell that hit in the road near the ration cart which he was 

helping to unload. 
Lowe, Broadway R., Corporal, 25 October, 1918. 

Corporal Lowe was gunner of the Number 1 piece which burst in the Bois de 

Beuge. 
Mansfield, John J., Chief Mechanic, 29 October, 1918. 

Killed by the same shell that killed Corporal Brady. 

Mortally Wounded 

Calascione, Frank, Private, 1 November, 1918. 

Wounded by the same shell that killed Corporal Green. 
Howes, Pearly B., Cook, 1 November, 1918. 

Wounded by the same shell that killed Corporal Green. 
Wanner, Charles E., Private, 8 October, 1918. 

Shell fragment hit him while he was standing in the entrance of a dugout 

near ammunition dump at Cuisy. 

Severely Wounded 

Addis, Robert H., Private, 1 November, 1918. 

Shell fragment cut off his hand. 
Bennett, Howard W., Private, 8 November, 1918. 

Wounded by the fragment of a shell that hit in a tree above him. 
Craig, William H., Corporal, 1 November, 1918. 

Struck by a shell fragment after being shelled out of an OP. 
Grim, Leroy, Private first class, 10 October, 1918. 

Wounded by a shell fragment while firing a barrage. Same shell wounded 

Sergeant Tenney. 

Slightly Wounded 

Baldwin, Personnette G., 2d Lieutenant, 18 October, 1918. 

Hurt by the accidental discharge of a hand grenade. Lieutenant Baldwin 

was on liaison duty with the infantry. 
Berkowitz, Moe, Private first class, 1 November, 1918. 

Hurt by a shell fragment, the same shell that wounded Private Addis. 



LIST OF CASUALTIES 201 

Battery F — Slightly Wounded — continued 

Boyer, Howard W., Private, 1 November, 1918. 

Hit by a fragment of the same shell that wounded Private Addis and Private 

first class Berkowitz. 
Brown, Miles, Private, 26 September, 1918. 

Caisson wheel ran over his foot while coming up Hill 281. 
Cochran, Robert, Private first class, 25 October, 1918. 

Wounded when the gun exploded in the Bois de Beuge. 
Miller, Dayton G., Private, 25 October, 1918. 

Wounded when gun exploded in the Bois de Beuge. 
Pell, George A., Private, 1 November, 1918. 

Wounded by a shell fragment while with the telephone detail. 
Sefrick, Andrew, Private first class, 1 November, 1918. 

Wounded by a fragment of the same shell that wounded Privates Addis and 

Boyer and Private first class Berkowitz. 
Tenney, Charlie, Sergeant, 10 October, 1918. 

Wounded by a shell fragment while faring a barrage near Bois de Septsarges. 
White, Hubert V., Sergeant, 27 October, 1918. 

Slightly gassed. His mask was torn and he did not know it. 
Wilmoth, Orval G., Private, 29 October, 1918. 

Slightly gassed. Had been deafened by a barrage fired at Bois de Septsarges 

and he could not hear the gas alarm. 

SUPPLY COMPANY 

Slightly Wounded 
Buford, W^alter, Captain, 11 October, 1918. 

By shell fragment on south side of Hill 281. 
Wooten, James A., 1st Lieutenant, 11 October, 1918. 

Fragment of same shell that wounded Captain Buford struck Lieutenant 

Wooten in the knee. 

Blume, Lawrence E., Corporal, 14 October, 1918. 

Wounded in the arm by a shell fragment. 
Stein, Edward C, Private, 10 October, 1918. 

Hurt in the eye by the flare-back of his rifle. 



202 



LIST OF CASUALTIES 



MEDICAL DETACHMENT 
Slightly Wounded 

Hornkohl, Alexander C, Private first class, 29 October, 1918. 

Hit by a shell fragment at Madeleine Ferme. 
Stand, Fridolin, Private, 1 November, 1918. 

Hit by shell fragment near Bantheville. 




C Battery Mess Tent, Dutch Gap, Va. 



CHAPTER V 
Letters, Orders, Citations 

I am very proud indeed to have been with the 313th practical!}' throughout its 
history, from early Camp Lee days until it ceased to exist. I have never been 
thrown with a finer, more clean-cut group of men than those who composed our 
regiment. Ours was a unit in which, I think, a Spirit of Brotherhood, Democracy 
and Mutual Helpfulness reigned supreme. All of those virtues of which we, as 
Americans, are justly i:)roud and which are, in the final analysis, practical 
Christianity, it seems to me, were a part of our social life from beginning to end. 
Whether in the training camps, on the march, at the front, or in the long days 
after 11 November, 1918, until our return, a fine, sturdy, steadfast spirit was 
always exhibited. Let us dedicate ourselves as faithfully to the cause of a 
Christian country's development as we did to a Christian country's Ideals and 
Honor. 

Gladstone H. Yeuell, 

Chaplain, 313th F. A. 



HEADQUARTERS ARTILLERY GROUP NUMBER 1 

155th F. A. Brigade 

With advance troops, 80th Division, 

28 September, 1918. 
G. O. Number 1. 

The following is published for the information of all concerned. 

HEADQUARTERS 160th BRIGADE, 80th DIVISION 

26 September, 1918 

To Colonel Brunzell, 313th F. A. 

Commanding Artillery Group of Advance Troops. 

I am sending you the oil can from the trail box of a German 77mm gun 
brought in by one of my staff officers. 



204 LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 

I want to compliment the battery commander who put this gun out of action. 

L. M. Brett, 

Brigadier General 
Commanding Advance Troops, 
80th Division. 

2. This gun was enfilading the main route of advance of the 80th Division 
in the advance west of the Meuse on 26 September, 1918, and was firing effectively. 

Battery A, 313th Field Artillery, commanded by 1st Lieutenant Joseph G. 
Peppard, 313th Field Artillery, took this gun under fire and in about 30 minutes 
had it completely silenced. Upon investigation it was found that three (3) direct 
hits had been made on the gun, one hit on the observation station immediately 
to the left where the German observer was found dead and nine (9) shell holes 
within a radius of twelve (12) yards. 

3. The group Commander is highly pleased with the initiative and energy 
displayed by Lieutenant Peppard and his battery in putting out of actiom 
promptly this hostile gun that was seriously menacing the movements of the 
advance troops of this Division. 

0. L. Brunzell, 

Lieutenant Colonel, 313th F. A., 
Commanding Artillery Group Number 1. 

A TRUE COPY 

John Paul, 

Captain, 313th F. A. 



HEADQUARTERS 90TH DIVISION 
AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES 
2 November, 1918 
Memorandum: 

The Division Commander takes great pride in publishing the following 
telephone message and indorsement congratulating the division on its splendid 
work of 1 November: 
From: Chief of Staff, 1st Army. 
To: Chief of Staff, 3d Corps. 
Date: 1 November, 22.20h. 

The Army Commander desires to congratulate the III Corps and express 
to you his appreciation of the work done this date. He desires that you express 



LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 205 

his appreciation to the 90th Division. Please have this information transmitted 
to all organizations as far as practicable this night. 

(Signed) Drum, 
CK/T 

1st Ind. 

Hq. 3d Army Corps, Amer. E. F., Nov. 1, 1918. To Commanding General, 
90th Division, American E. F. 

1. The Corps Commander desires to add his congratulations to those of 
the Army Commander and express his appreciation of the gallant work of j^our 
Division today. You will comply with the above instructions as to the trans- 
mittal of this information to the organizations. 

By Command of Major General Hines: 

Campbell King, 

Chief of Staff. 
Henry T. Allen, 

Maj. Gen. Commd'g. 
Distribution : 

Company and Battery Commanders 



U. S. ARMY FIELD MESSAGE 
From: Brunzell. 

At: PCHilden. 

Date: 1 November, 1918. Hour: 5 p. m. How Sent: Courier. 

To: Nash at Hind. 

Your positions are OK for the present if you can support the infantry properly 
from there, and as long as the infantry CO is satisfied with Barton's position I 
am. Of course when the infantry moves forward we will have to move too. I 
know you are up against it and you are doing excellent work and getting great 
praise from the infantry and the commanding general. I sent Muzzy out to 
you and will try to get you some one for E Battery. Hixon moved today and 
I know they are up against the same thing. I'm in hopes the corps will succeed 
in counter battery work with more success tomorrow. This is a tough proposition 
and I'd like to make it easier for you but I'm afraid it can't be helped. Do your 
best and that's all that any one can expect of you. Too bad about Anderson 



206 LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 

and Gilliam. I surely am sorry and grieved to hear it. Austria and Turkey have 

signed up for peace. 

Brunzell. 



(Copy) 

180th INFANTRY BRIGADE 

AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES 

8 November, 1918. 
From: C. 0. 180th Infantry Brigade. 

To: C. 0. 313th F. A. 

Subject: Operations of November 1 and 2. 

1. I desire to thank you most heartily for the very excellent support rendered 
by your regiment to this Brigade during the successful operations of November 
1 and 2. 

2. As far as I could see the liasion between the infantry and artillery was as 
nearly perfect as it could be made. Co-operation was at all times freely offered 
and easily secured. Response to calls for artillery fire were prompt and effective. 
I feel that to a very great extent the success obtained by the brigade was due to 
the efficient support rendered by your regiment. 

2. In the name of the officers and enlisted men of the 180th Infantry Brigade 

I thank you. 

U. G. Alexander, 

Brigadier General, U. S. A. 



HEADQUARTERS 90th DIVISION 

AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES 

11 November, 1918 
03 Number 392. 

For: All Commanding Officers. 

I. The following instructions from the III Army Corps are published for 
the information and guidance of all concerned. 

"1. You are informed that hostilities will cease along the whole front 
at 11 hours on 11 November, 1918, Paris Time. 

"2. No allied troops will pass the line reached by them at that hour and date 
until further orders. 



LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATK^XS 207 

"3. All communication with the enemy, both Ijefore and after the termina- 
tion of hostilities, is absolutely forbidden. In case of violation of this order the 
severest disciplinary measures will be immediately taken. Any officer offending 
will be sent to these headquarters under guard. 

"4. Every emjihasis will be laid on the fact that the arrangement is an 
armistice only and not a jieace. 

"5. There must not be the slightest relaxation of vigilance. The troops 
must be prepared any moment for further operations. Sj^ecial steps will be 
taken b.y all commanders to insure the strictest discipline tmd that all troops 
are in readiness and fully prepared for any eventualities. Division and Brigade 
Commanders and Commanders of Corps Units will personallj^nspect all organiza- 
tions with the foregoing in view. 

"By command of Major General Hines; 

C.\M1>BELL KlN(;, 

Chief of Staff." 

II. Orders will be issued later i-egarding changes in dispositions of troops. 

By command of Major General Allen, 

John J. Kingman, 
Distribution: Colonel, C. of S. 

Normal. 



Extract : 

As the end crowns the work, so the last offensive of the Division, beginning 
November 1 and continuing until the armistice was signed, November 11, at 
11 A. M. shows its true value. In this operation the Division drove from the line 
Aincreville-Bantheville through the Freya Stellung (from Andevanne through 
Villers-devant-Dun to the River Meuse) thence to the line including Stenay and 
Baalon, a distance of 14 to 16 kilometers. In addition to hundreds of machine 
guns and thousands of projectiles, etc., the Division captured 21 officers and 951 
men prisoners and 32 cannon as follows: three 210's, eight ISO's, twelve 77's. 
These were taken chiefly from the shock divisions (38th and 27th) sent to check 
the 90th Division and to hold the Freya Stellung at all costs after the 88th 
enemy division had been repulsed with great losses. 

Henry T. Allen, 
Major General Commanding. 
20 November, 1918. 



208 LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 

(Copy) 

HEADQUARTERS 155th FIELD ARTILLERY BRIGADE 

American Expeditionary Forces 
France 

General Orders Number 19. 15 November, 1918. 

It is with much pleasure that the following letter is published for the infor- 
mation of this command. 

Headquarters 90th Division 

American Expeditionary Forces 

14 November, 1918 

From: Commanding General. 

To: Commanding General, 155th Field Artillery Brigade. 

Subject: Services with 90th Division. 

1. I desire to make of permanent record the exceptionally valuable services 
of your brigade in the carrying of the Freya Stellung from Andevanne through 
Villers-devant-Dun to the Meuse River, and subsequently in the crossing of the 
river and taking of the Stenay-Baalon line including both towns. 

2. The bold, aggressive and effective work of the 155th Brigade throughout 
this period and its deep barrage of November 1, made the infantry work against 
two enemy shock Divisions, 28th and 27th, especially detailed to hold that 
position, possible with a minimum of losses. 

3. It gives me very great pleasure to express the sincerest thanks of the 
90th Division for the essential support rendered it by the 155th Brigade. Much 
of this work was due to the late Colonel Robert S. Welsh, who commanded 
during the earlier days of this period. 

Henry T. Allen, 
Major General. 

By Command of Brigadier General Bryson. 

George P. Hawes, Jr. 
Lieutenant Colonel, 

Adjutant. 



LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 209 

HEADQUARTERS 90th DIVISION 

American Expeditionary Forces 

France, 15 November, 1918 

Memorandum No. 919. 

The following is published for the information of the Division. 

Extracts 
II. 

CoMMrNlCATlON FROM THE COMMANDING GENERAL, IST ArMY, 28 OCTOBER, 1918 

"The Army Commander directs that you convey to the Commanding 
General, officers and men of the 90th Division, his appreciation of their persistent 
and successful efforts in improving the line by driving the enemy from Grande 
Carree Ferme and the Bois de Bantheville. 

(Signed) H. A. Drum." 

The Commanding General, 3d Army Corps, Transmitting 
Preceding Communication by First Indorse- 
ment, 29 October, 1918, as follows: 

"The difficulties under which the 3d Corps has labored to improve its 
position have been numerous and great, and the part the 90th Division took in 
establishing the present advantageous position of this corps is deeply appreciated 
by the corps commander and he adds his congratulations to those of the Command- 
ing General of the Army for the vigorous and untiring efforts of the personnel 
thereof, whose resolution and fortitude are worthy of the best traditions of the 

American Army. 

(Signed) J. L. Hines." 

Extract of General Orders Number 42, Headquarters 
3d Army Corps, 11 November, 1918 

"It is with pride and pleasure that the corps commander places on record, 
in General Orders of the corps, the following communication from Headquarters, 
First Army, 10 November, 1918: 

1. The Army Commander has noticed with great pleasure and appreciation 
the excellent work of your corps in crossing the Meuse River and clearing the heights 
to the east of the town of Dun-sur-Meuse. He appreciates fully the difficulties 
involved in this problem and therefore realizes that the results attained reflect 
great credit on your corps and the Divisions included therein. 



210 LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 

He desires me to transmit the foregoing to you and to request that his 
appreciation be transmitted to the officers and men in your corps. 

(Signed) J. L. Hines." 

General Orders Number 43, Headquarters 
3d Army Corps, 12 November, 1918 

1. With the signing of the armistice on November 11, and the enemy suing 
for peace the operations of this corps, begun on September 26, were brought to 
a successful issue. 

2. The 3d Corps has driven the enemy from the Ruisseau de Forges to 
the Meuse, thence turning east has crossed the Meuse in the face of most 
determined resistance between Stenay and Brieulles and continuing its 
resokite advance has forced the enemy to the hne Stenay-Remonville-Peu- 
villers. 

3. In a fruitless effort to stop this victorious drive the enemy threw into the 
hne opposite the 3d Corps his last reserve division (192d) on the western front. 

4. The corps commander feels that his pride and gratification in the achieve- 
ments of the officers and soldiers of the 3d Corps are more than justified and he 
desires to express to them his high appreciation of their gallant conduct and 
to make herewith permanent record of the same. 

(Signed) J. L. Hines." 



Corrected Copy. 

Destroy all previous copies. 

For Official Circulation Only. 

G. H. Q. 
American Expeditionary Forces 
General Orders Number 232. France, December 19, 1918. 

It is with a sense of gratitude for its splendid accomplishment which will 
live through all history, that I record in General Orders a tribute to the victory 
of the 1st Army in the Meuse- Argonne battle. 

Tested and strengthened by the reduction of the St. Mihiel salient, for more 
than six weeks you battered against the pivot of the enemy line on the western 
front. It was a position of imposing natural strength, stretching on both sides 



LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 211 

of the Meuse River from the bitterly contested hills of Verdun to tlio almost 
impenetrable forest of the Argonne; a position, moreover, fortified by four years 
of labor designed to render it impregnable; a position held with the fullest 
resources of the enemy. That position you broke utterly, and thereby hastened 
the collapse of the enemj^'s military position. 

Soldiers of all the divisions engaged under the 1st, 3d and 5th American 
Corps and the 2d Colonial and 17th French Corps — the 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th > 
26th, 28th, 29th, 32d, 33d, 35th, 37th, 42d, 77th, 78th ,79th, 80th, 81st, 82d, 89th, 
90th and 91st Divisions, the 18th and 26th French Divisions, and the 10th 
and 15th French Colonial Divisions — you will be long remembered for the 
stubborn persistence of your progress, your storming of obstinately defended 
machine gun nests, your penetration, yard bj' yard, of woods and ravines, your 
heroic resistance in the face of counter-attacks supported by powerful artillery 
fire. For more than a month from the initial attack of September 26, you fought 
your way slowly through the Argonne, through woods and over hills west of the 
Meuse; you slowly enlarged your hold on the Cotes de Meuse to the east, and 
then, on the 1st of November, your attack forced the enemy into flight. Pressing 
his retreat, you cleared the entire left bank of the Meuse south of Sedan, and 
then stormed the heights on the right bank and drove him into the plain beyond. 

Soldiers of all army and corps troops engaged — to you no less credit is due ; 
your steadfast adherence to duty and your dogged determination in the face of 
all obstacles made possible the heroic deeds cited above. 

The achievement of the 1st Army which is scarcely to be equalled in Ameri- 
can history must remain a source of jiroud satisfaction to the troops who partici- 
pated in the last cami)aign of the war. The American people will remember it as 
the realization of the hitherto potential strength of the American contribution 
toward the cause to which they had sworn allegiance. There can be no greater 
reward for a soldier or for a soldier's memory. 

This order will be read to all organizations at the first assembly formation 
after its receipt. 

John J. Pershing, 

General, Commander in Chief, 
American Expeditionary Forces. 
Official: 

Robert C. Davis, 
Adjutant General. 



212 LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 

G. H. Q. 

American Expeditionary Forces 
General Orders Number 38-A. France, February 28, 1919. 

My Fellow Soldiers: 

Now that your service with the American Expeditionary Forces is about to 
terminate, I can not let you go without a personal word. At the call to arms, 
the patriotic young manhood of America eagerly responded and became the 
formidable army whose decisive victories testify to its efficiency and its valor. 
With the support of the nation firmly united to defend the cause of liberty, 
our army has executed the will of the people with resolute purpose. Our democ- 
racy has been tested, and the forces of autocracy have been defeated. To the 
glory of the citizen-soldier, our troops have faithfully fulfilled their trust, and 
in a succession of brilliant offensives have overcome the menace to our civilization. 
As an individual, your part in the world war has been an important one in 
the sum total of our achievements. Whether keeping lonely vigil in the trenches, 
or gallantly storming the enemy's stronghold; whether enduring monotonous 
drudgery at the rear, or sustaining the fighting line at the front, each has bravely 
and efficiently played his part. By wilhng sacrifice of personal rights; by cheerful 
endurance of hardship and privation; by vigor, strength and indomitable will^ 
made effective by thorough organization and cordial co-operation, you inspired 
the war-worn Allies with new life and turned the tide of threatened defeat into 
overwhelming victory. 

With a consecrated devotion to duty and a will to conquer, you have loyally 
served your country. By your exemplary conduct a standard has been estab- 
lished and maintained never before attained by any army. With mind and 
body as clean and strong as the decisive blows you delivered against the foe, you 
are soon to return to the pursuits of peace. In leaving the scenes of your victories, 
may I ask that you carry home your high ideals and continue to live as you have 
served — an honor to the principles for which you have fought and to the fallen 
comrades you leave behind. 

It is with pride in our success that I extend to you my sincere thanks for 
your splendid service to the army and to the nation. 

Faithfully, 
Official: John J. Pershing, 

Robert C. Davis, Commander-in-Chief. 

Adjutant General. 

Copy furnished to 



Commanding. 



LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 213 

(Copy) 

HEADQUARTERS 155th FIELD ARTILLERY BRIGADE 
American Expeditionary Forces 
France 
Memorandum: 

The following letter of the Commander in Chief will be read at one formation 
of every organization of this command: 

AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES 

Office of the Commander-in-Chief, 

France, March 27, 1919 

Major General Ernest Hinds, 
Chief of Artillery, 
American E. F. 

My dear General Hinds: 

As the time approaches for the return home of the greater portion of the 
artillery of the American Expeditionary Forces, it gives me great pleasure to 
extend to you and to all officers and men under your command my heartiest 
thanks and congratulations for their share in the successful conclusion of the war. 

Rushed to France with but the most preliminary training and here assigned 
to new materiel and unaccustomed methods, they overcame all difficulties by 
their energy, determination and devotion to duty, affording to the infantry that 
powerful support without which success would have been impossible. From the 
earliest days of our active participation in the battle, the officers and men of 
all branches of the artillery won the admiration of our allies. They co-operated 
effectively in stopping the great attacks of the enemy, and in making it possible 
for us to take the offensive. In the Meuse-Argonne operations, they overwhelmed 
him at a critical point in his lines, making possible the advance of our troops, 
which jeopardized his communications and made the surrender or annihilation of 
a large part of his troops inevitable. 

No less deserving of praise is the work of the officers and men of the training 
staffs of the several schools and Training Centers. Deprived of the opportunity 
to serve at the front, they carried on with zeal, energy and efficiency, the instruc- 
tion of the Artillery, a task no less essential than the actual combat work in the 
firing line. 



214 LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 

To all units and individuals under your command I desire to express my 
thanks, and the thanks of their comrades of the American Expeditionary Forces. 
Our interest in their welfare will continue, accompanying to their homes and 

back into civil life. 

Sincerely yours, 

(Signed) John J. Pershing. 

By command of Brigadier General Bryson. 

Chapin Marcus, 
Captain, Field Artillery, 
Acting Adjutant. 



HEADQUARTERS 80th DIVISION 
American Expeditionary Forces 

Bulletin Number 113. France, 14 May, 1919. 

1. The following letter has been received from Lieutenant General Robert 
Lee BuUard, U. S. A., in command of the III Corps, American E. F., during the 
Meuse-Argonne Offensive : — ■ 

"Under the pressure of great events I, at that time commanding the III 
Corps to which the 80th Division then belonged, failed to cite the gallant conduct 
of the Division in making tliree successive assaults with great bravery and 
finally taking and driving the enemy from the Bois-des-Ogons in the great 
battle of the Meuse-Argonne. I cite it now. It was truly admirable. We see 
it now more plainly in the light of the results that followed. 

I ask that this be communicated to your gallant Division." 

2. The following letter has been received from the Adjutant General, G. 
H. Q., American E. F. 

"1. The 80th Division was the only Division which went into line in the 
Meuse-Argonne offensive three times. 

"2. This fact is now a matter of record and is to be incorporated in the final 
report of the Commander-in-Chief, American Expeditionary Forces, to the 
Secretary of War, to be submitted in the near future." 

By command of Major General Cronkhite. 

W. H. Waldron, 
Official: Colonel, General Staff, 

Carl H. Tobey, Chief of Staff. 

Major, A. G. D., 
Adjutant. 



LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 215 

HEADQUARTERS FIRST ARMY CORPS 
American Expeditionary Force 

General Orders Number 12. 18 March, 1919. 

1. The 80th Division, having been instructed to prepare for return to the 
United States, will pass from the command of this Army Corps on 20th March, 
1919. 

2. The 80th Division arrived in France about June 5, 1918. This Division 
trained with the British Troops and was on active duty with them in the Artois 
sector near Arras in July. The Division was in reserve at the battle of St. 
Mihiel, except the 320th Infantry and 315th Machine CJun Battalion which 
took part in the operations of the 2d French Colonial Corps. From September 
26th to 29th, inclusive, the Division attacked at Bethincourt with the 3d Corps 
and advanced 9 kilometers in 2 days. The Division was withdrawn from the line 
for 5 days and again attacked on October 4th at Nantillois. In 9 days of heavy 
fighting through the Bois des Ogons an advance of 4 kilometers was made. The 
Division was withdrawn from the line October 12th for re-equipment and replace- 
ments. The Division moved forward on October 29th and 30th and re-entered 
the line St. Georges-St. Juvin. 

3. The 80th Division passed under the orders of the 1st Corps on October 
23d in the Le Claon-Le Neufour area, west of the Argonne Forest. On Novem- 
ber 1st the Division attacked as the right division of the 1st Corps and in 6 days 
advanced a depth of 24 kilometers. The Division was relieved from the line on 
November 6th, with its patrols on the west bank of the Meuse. From the 18th 
of November to December 1st, the Division marched 221 kilometers to the 15th 
Training Area at Ancy-le-Franc. The artillery of the Division was part of the 
time detached from the Division and was in action at all times from September 
26th, to November 11th. The Division has remained in the 15th Training Area 
until its present order to prepare for embarkation to the United States. 

4. The 80th Division was given difficult tasks on the front line and in ac- 
complishing them made a splendid record. The Corps Commander desires 
particularly to express his appreciation for the soldierly achievements of this 
division during the time it served with the 1st Army Corps. After returning to 
the Training Area where living conditions were not easy and often difficult, 
the spirit of the division has been excellent and has been manifest at all times. 
The Division leaves on the first part of its journey with the Corps Commander's 



216 LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 

congratulations for its excellent record and his wishes for a speedy return to the 
United States and a successful future. 

By command of Major General Wright: 

W. M. Fassett, 
Chief of Staff. 
Official: 
H. M. Nelly, 
Lt. Col., A.G.D., 
Adjutant. 



HEADQUARTERS CAMP PONTANEZEN 
Base Section No. 5, SOS 

5 June, 1919. 
From: Commanding General, Camp Pontanezen. 
To: Commanding General, Base Section No. .5. 
Subject: Commendation — 80th Division. 

1. Having received reports from all departments of the camp testifying to 
the e.xcellent condition and soldierly bearing of the 80th Division commanded 
by Major General Cronkhite which recently passed through this camp on their 
return to the United States, I wish to pass this information on to those who made 
such a good appearance. 

2. The condition of their records, their discipline, cleanliness, and the reports 
on their inspections are of the very best. It has indeed been a pleasure to prepare 
the division for embarkation with such an energetic and willing personnel. 

3. Their stay while in camp marked the beginnings of friendships which it is 
hoped will be cemented by future association. In fact we of the permanent 
personnel at this camp are pleased to have been the host for such a division and 
to have had the chance of assisting them on their return journey. 

4. It is recommended that this letter be given publicity in the states of 
Virginia, West Virginia and Pennsylvania so that the people of those states 
from which the bulk of the 80th Division came, may know of our warm friendship 
for their men. 

(Signed) S. D. Butler, 

Brigadier General, Marines. 



LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 217 

(Copy) 
HEADQUARTERS Iooth FIELD ARTILLERY BRIGADE 
OX BOARD U. S. S. ZEPPELIN 

General Orders Number 14. May 26, 1919. 

1. The Brigade Commander cites the following named men of 313th Field 
Artillery for deeds of heroism and gallantry during the Meuse-Argonne 
Offensive, September 26-November 11, 1918, described after their names: 

Sergeant Frank J. King {2707086), Battery "B," 313th F. A. 

On November 1st, Sergeant King took charge of two ammunition trucks 
and began hauling ammunition forward in contemplation of the move of the 
battalion. He took the trucks down the heavily shelled Romagne-Bantheville 
road and out on the Bantheville-Aincreville road. There one truck broke down, 
but he pushed ahead with the other though under direct observation and subject 
to terrific shellfire. The truck was finally forced to stop at the bridge just 
outside Aincreville where the ammunition was droj^ped and proved of vital 
service when the battery several days later took position north of Aincreville. 

Corporal William G. Edwards (2467993), Headqxmrters Company, 313th F. A. 

For ceaseless and untiring devotion to duty throughout the entire Meuse- 
Argonne offensive, September 26 to November 11, 1918, both as scout on recon- 
naissance and as a runner, displaying conspicuous bravery, with utter disregard 
for his own safety under heavy fire. Particularly on November 1, he carried 
frequent messages to the batteries under heavy shell and machine gun fire. This 
soldier was on duty with 2d Battalion, 313th F. A. 

Sergeant John W. Foley {1S3S943) Battery "D," 313th F. A. 

For conspicuous gallantry on 26 October, 1918, near Cunel, when he volun- 
tarily assisted the carrying of wounded men from battery position to dressing 
station, a distance of a mile over an area shelled with gas and high explosives so 
heavily and continuously that progress was almost impossible. 

Corporal Thomas J. Bell {1833962), Battery "D," 313th F. A. 

For conspicuous gallantry on 26 October, 1918, near Cunel, when he volun- 
tarily assisted the carrjdng of wounded men from battery position to dressing 
station, a distance of a mile over an area shelled with gas and high explosives so 
heavily and continuously that progress was almost impossible. 



218 LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 

Private 1st Class Jonas E. Saijre (1834006), Battery "D," 313th F. A. 

For conspicuous gallantry on 26 October, 1918, near Cunel, when he volun- 
tarily assisted the carrying of wounded men from battery position to dressing 
station, a distance of a mile, over an area shelled with gas and high explosives so 
heavily and continuously that progress was almost impossible. 

Private 1st Class Leland Coberly (1833906), Battery "D," 313th F. A. 

For conspicuous gallantry on 26 October, 1918, near Cunel, when he 
voluntarily assisted the carrying of wounded men from battery position to dress- 
ing station, a distance of a mile, over an area shelled with gas and high explosives 
so heavily and continuously that progress was almost impossible. 

Sergeant Roy L. Bageant (1835279), Battery "F," 313th F. A. 

For conspicuous gallantry and leadership in action throughout the Meuse- 
Argonne offensive. On 27 October, 1918, at the Bois de Cunel he re-organized 
a gun section under hostile artillery fire; on 1 November, at Grande Carree Farm, 
he displayed conspicuous initiative and bravery while taking his section forward 
and into action through a hostile barrage ; during the period 1 November to 1 1 
November, in spite of being physically unfit for duty, he remained in command 
of his section and acted as assistant executive of the firing battery. 

Corporal William M. Craig (1834369), Battery "F," 313th F. A. 

For conspicuous gallantry in action at Grande Carree Farm on 1 November, 
1918. While acting as a battery scout and agent, he made several trips through 
hostile machine gun and shell fire between the advancing infantry and battery 
position, carrying valuable messages. During the afternoon while going from the 
battery position to the OP, Corporal Craig was struck by shell fragments which 
resulted in the loss of an eye and a leg. 

Private 1st Class Joh7i J. Christian (2706181), Battery "F," 313th F. A. 

For conspicuous gallantry in action at Grande Carree Farm on 1 November, 
1918. With complete disregard for personal safety and during an intense enemy 
barrage, Private Christian remained along a telephone wire connecting the 
l)attery position with the infantry and assisted in repairing numerous breaks 
made by shell fire, thus maintaining communication. 



LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 219 

Private 1st Class Graver C. Harris (1834305), Battery "F," 313th F. A. 

For conspicuous gallantry in action at Grande Carree Farm on 1 November, 
1918. With complete disregard for personal safety and during an intense enemy 
barrage, Private Harris remained along a telephone wire connecting the battery 
position with the infantry and assisted in repairing numerous breaks made by 
shell fire, thus maintaining communication. 

Private Edmund C. Harrison (1833362), Headquarters Company, 313th F. A. 
(Killed in action.) 

On the morning of October 11, 1918, he was under heavy shell fire while 
burying a telephone line under the Nantillois-Cunel road west of Nantillois, and 
his bravery was marked and an example to those men who were with him. 

Corporal Christopher B. Bohan (2707863), Headquarters Company, 313th F. A, 

This soldier went out alone on a telephone line on the night of October 27 
1918, and for a great part of the two miles he was under continuous gas and 
shell fire and although made sick by the gas he showed great courage and gallantry 
by continuing his work to establish communication. 

1st Sergeant Joseph L. Harvey (1833198), Headquarters Company, 313th F. A. 

On September 29, 1918, Sergeant Harvey exhibited extraordinary courage 
and gallantrj^ in action by volunteering to go forward to the northeastern edge 
of the Bois de Forges to endeavor to locate hostile guns which were firing effective- 
ly on our infantry. Although his position was heavily shelled all day, he remained 
thei'e with great bravery and located by its flashes the hostile gun which was 
then taken under fire by the 315th F. A. and silenced. 

Corporal Cody H. Bell (1833220), Headquarters Company, 313th F. A. 

Corporal Bell was sent from Halles to the Regimental PC at Villers-devant- 
Dun \\'\t\\ an important message from the regimental commander. With no 
apparent consideration for his personal safety he rode down the Halles-Montigny- 
Villers road which was at that time under a tremendous and deadly accurate 
fire from German heavy artillery and which two hours later was closed by corps 
order. By this gallant conduct he delivered his message and thus prevented 
the 2d Battalion from proceeding by the Villers-Montigny road as previously 
ordered. 



220 LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 

Corporal Harper G. Thomas [1833221), Headquarters Company, 313th F. A. 

On October 6, while acting as switchboard operator in the Bois de Septsarges 
he volunteered to go out and repair lines which were out. He worked splicing 
these lines under an intense fire of high explosive from guns of large calibre, re- 
pairing the lines and re-establishing communication. 

Corporal Allen G. Lewis (1833947), Headquarters Company, 313th F. A. (Killed 
in action.) 
For ceaseless and untiring devotion to duty throughout the Meuse-Argonne 
offensive, September 26 to November 1, 1918, in laying and repairing telephone 
lines under heavy shell fire, displaying conspicuous bravery. On the night of 
October 31-November 1, he was engaged in running line from regimental headquar- 
ters to 2d Battalion headquarters under heavy fire, in the performance of which 
duty he was killed. 

Private 1st Class Early L. Lehman (2965012), Headquarters Company, 313th F. A. 
For ceaseless and untiring devotion to duty as runner throughout the 
entire Meuse-Argonne offensive, September 26 to November 11, 1918, displaying 
conspicuous bravery and a willingness to serve that was an example of all the 
better qualities of an American soldier. On October 13, near Nantillois, while 
carrying a message, was wounded by shell fire and gallantly refused to be taken 
to the first aid station until his message had been delivered three hours later to 
the officer whom he sought. 

Sergeant Frank Yanuscavicz (1833368), Battery ".4," 313th F. A. 

On the 14th day of October, 1918, at 9.00 a. m., Sergeant Yanuscavicz 
exhibited marked courage and gallantry in action by continuing during a barrage 
the firing of Number Two piece after all his cannoneers had been killed or wounded . 
Within ten minutes after a German shell had wiped out the total gun crew 
Sergeant Yanuscavicz selected a gun crew at random from his drivers and mis- 
cellaneous members of the battery and had the gun back in action firing its 
barrage schedule. 

Sergeant Lester B. Sites (1833485), Battery "A," 313th F. A. 

On September 30 and October 1, 1918, Sergeant Sites exhibited marked 
courage and gallantry in action by repeatedly going out under heavy artillery 
fire to repair a telephone line connecting the OP on Dannevoux Ridge with the 
battery position in the Bois de Sachet. During this time the line was out twenty- 
nine times. 



LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 221 

Private 1st Class Clarence V. Youngblood {1833679), Battery "B," 313th F. A. 

On the night of October 18, 1918, ammunition was being hauled from the 
dump at Faj^el Farm to the battery position in Montfaucon, Work of horses 
and drivers had been exceptionally severe, and the inexperienced drivers had 
to be given important tasks. Ground near the dump was very bad because of 
mud, hauling, and shelling, and as the caissons started out the dump was attacked 
with shrapnel. The teams became mixed and the horses went down, plunging. 
The drivers became disorganized. Private Youngblood took charge of the situa- 
tion, forced the men back to their teams, and by his skill and intrepidity got 
the horses on their feet and the caissons out in spite of the fierce rain of shrapnel 
balls. His work throughout the offensive was characterized by remarkable cool- 
ness and untiring energy. 

Sergeant Edwin L. Dulin {1833728), Battery "C," 313th F. A. 

From the 27 to 30 of October, 1918, on the Romagne-Cunel Road, Meuse- 
Argonne front. Sergeant Dulin did, with conspicuous bravery and determination, 
while sick with a high fever, work details of inexperienced men for thirty-six 
hours without rest, in preparing a battery position, under continuous heavy 
shell fire. 

Private 1st Class William S. Pumphrey (1833788), Battery "C," 313th F. A. 

On the 1st of November, 1918, on the Romagne-Cunel Road, Meuse 
Argonne front, Private Pumphrey did, with conspicuous bravery and withou- 
regard for personal safety, remain with and continue the firing of his piece, 
though blinded and choked by heavy fumes of gas, when the remainder of his 
crew were driven away by severe shell fire. 

By Command of Brigadier General Bryson, 

Chapin Marcus, 
Captain, Field Artillery, 
Adjutant. 



222 



LETTERS, ORDERS, CITATIONS 



TELEGRAM 
53rd BJ 32 

Wm Washington D C 130 pm May 29 1919 

Commanding Officer 

43 313 F A Camp Lee Va 

Heartiest congratulations on a safe return from great duty well done. There is no 

better regiment than the 313th. Warmest regards and best wishes for the future 

for all 

C D Herron 

330P 



w 




"Fire! 



CHAPTER VI 
Record of Events 

RECORD OF EVENTS AS SHOWN ON THE RETURNS OF THE 313th 
FIELD ARTILLERY FROM DATE OF ORGANIZATION 
TO DATE OF DEMOBILIZATION 

August, 1917, Camp Lee, Virginia Officers Enlisted Horses 

Men 

Assigned 82 

Attached 4 12 

"Duty: Preparation for organization of regiment." 

September, 1917, Camp Lee, ^'irginia. 

Assigned 36 165 

Attached 31 1035 

(B Batter}^ having 152 out of the 165 assigned) 

October, 1917, Camp Lee, Virginia 

Assigned 60 1389 

Attaclied 6 28 

(12 Officers on DS in Depot Brigade) 
"The command was in quarters duringtheentire month, cngagedintraining." 

November, 1917, Camp Lee, Virginia 

Assigned 61 1351 65 

Attached 5 28 

(12 Officers on DS in Depot Brigade) 
"The command was in quarters during the entire month, engaged in training." 



224 RECORD OF EVENTS 

December, 1917, Camp Lee, Virginia 

Assigned 61 1133 382 

Attached 39 59 

(12 Officers returned to duty from Depot 
Brigade and officers from Second Training 
Camp attached) 
"The command was in quarters during the entire month engaged in training." 



January, 1918, Camp Lee, Virgina. 

Assigned 61 1057 681 

Attached 40 29 

7 enhsted men died of disease. 
"The command was in quarters during the entire month, engaged in training. 



February, 1918, Camp Lee, Virginia 

Assigned 47 1092 826 

Attached 50 35 

3 enhsted men died of disease. 
"The command was in quarters during the entire month, engaged intraining." 

March, 1918, Camp Lee, Virginia 

Assigned 57 1055 808 

Attached 32 36 

2 enhsted men died of disease. 
"The 1st Battahon was on duty at the Target Range, Dutch Gap, Virginia, 

March 15-25/18. The 2d Battahon was on duty at Target Range, Dutch Gap, 

Virginia, March 25-28/18. The balance of the month the command was engaged 

in training." 

April, 1918, Camp Lee, Virginia 

Assigned 57 1244 807 

Attached 30 40 

"2d Battahon on Target Range, Dutch Gap, Virginia, April 27-30/18. 
Command engaged in training during month." (Major Wallace left regiment 
April 19/18.) 



RECORD OF EVENTS 225 

May, 1918, Camp Lee, Virginia 

Assigned 57 1438 807 

Attached 15 43 

I enlisted man died — suicide. 

"May 1-24/18 Command engaged in training. May 1-3/18, the 2d Battahon 
at Target Range, Dutch Gap, Virginia. May 3-8/18, the 1st Battahon at Target 
Range at Dutch Gap, Virginia. May 25-31/18, en route overseas service, 
U. S. A. T. 'Siboney.'" 

June, 1918 

Assigned 55 1431 

Attached 15 43 

" 1-9 June, 1918 the command was on board U. S. A. T. 'Siboney' en route 
for overseas service. Disembarked at Rest Camp Number 2, Genicart, France, 9 
June, 1918. Left Rest Camp Number 2, Genicart, France, 15 June, 1918 and 
arrived at Redon, France, 16 June, 1918 where regimental headquarters was 
established. 16-30 June, 1918 the 1st Battalion was engaged in training at 
St. Nicolas, France. 16-30 June, 1918, the 2d Battalion was engaged in training 
at Avessac, France. 16-30 June, 1918 the Headquarters Company billeted at 
Mussin, France. 16-30 June, 1918 theSupply Company billeted at Redon, France." 

July, 1918 

Assigned 55 1427 763 

Attached 11 43 ■ 

"1-31 July, 1918 the 1st Battalion was engaged in training at St. Nicolas, 
France. 1-29 July, 1918 the 2d Battalion was engaged in training at Avessac, 
France. The 2d Battalion moved to St. Nicolas, 29 July, 1918. 1-28 July, 1918 
Headquarters Company was billeted at Mussin, France and engaged in training. 
29-31 July, 1918 Headcjuarters Company was billeted at St. Nicolas, France. 
The Supply Company was billeted in Redon France, the entire month." 

August, 1918 

Assigned 46 1413 828 

Attached 16 43 

II Officers to U. S. 

"The command was engaged in training at Redon, France, 1-9 August, 1918. 
Left Redon, France, 10 August, 1918 and arrived at Camp de Meugon, France, 
13 August, 1918. The command was engaged in training at Camp de Meugon. 
France 14-31 August, 1918." 



226 RECORD OF EVENTS 

September, 1918 

Assigned 46 1417 830 

Attached 17 227 

"Company E, 305 A. T. attached to regiment. The regiment was engaged 
in training 1-13 September, 1918, at Camp de Meu^on, France. Left Camp de 
Meugon, France, 14 September, 1918 and arrived near Souilly, France, 17 Septem- 
ber, 1918. After a brief rest, the regiment took up its position at the front where 
it was on active duty the remainder of the month." 

October, 1918 

Assigned 45 1290 600 

Attached 11 41 

"This report shows 81 wounded in action and 8 killed in action (no officers 

killed), and 372 horses lost in action or died. The regiment was engaged in 

active duty at the Front the entire month." 

November, 1918 

Assigned 33 998 46 

Attached 6 35 

"This report shows 56 wounded in action, 7 enlisted men killed in action 

and 1 officer killed in action. 12 officers and 265 enlisted men transferred (67th 

F. A. Brigade) and 549 horses lost in action, died or transferred. 

"The regiment was in action on the Meuse-Argonne front 1-11 November, 

1918. During the remainder of the month the regiment was billeted in Mouzaj' , 

France." 

December, 1918 

Assigned 36 1043 45 

Attached 7 38 

"The regiment was billeted at Mouzay 1-4 December, 1918. Left Mouzay, 

France, 4 December and arrived at Argenteuil, France, 6 December, 1918. 

The 1st Battalion and Headquarters Company were billeted in Argenteuil; the 

2d Battalion was billeted in Ancy-le-Libre ; and the Supply Compan^y was billeted 

in Pacy, France the remainder of the month." 

January, 1919 

Assigned 47 1144 578 

Attached 12 38 

7 enlisted men died of disease. 
"The regiment was engaged in training the entire month. 1st Battalion 
and Headquarters Company were billeted in Argenteuil; 2d Battalion in Ancy- 
le-Libre, and the Supply Company in Pacy, France the entire month." 



RFXORD OF EVENTS 227 

February, 1919 

Assigned 43 1352 570 

Attached 11 37 

"Regiment stationed in the same places as the month before. The Regi- 
ment was engaged in training during the entire month." 

March, 1919 

Assigned 46 1313 

Attached 7 36 

1 enhsted man died of accident. 
"The 1st Battahon Headquarters Company, Medical and Veterinaiy De- 
tachments were billeted and engaged in training at Argenteuil, France, 1-30 
March, 1919. Supply Comiiany was billeted and engaged in training at Pacy, 
France, 1-30 March, 1919. The 2d Battalion was billeted and engaged in training 
at Ancy-le-Libre, France, 1-30 March, 1919. 

"Regimental Headcjuarters, 1st Battalion Headquarters, Headquarters Com- 
pany, Medical and Veterinary Detachments and Batteries A B and C left 
Argenteuil, F'rance, 30 March, 1919 and arrived at Chateau-du-Loir, France, 1 
April, 1919. The 2d Battalion Headquarters and Batteries D and E left Ancy- 
le-Libre, France, 30 March, 1919 and arrived at Chateau-du-Loir, 1 April, 1919. 
The Supply Company left Pacy, France, 30 March, [1919 and arrived at 
Chateau-du-Loir, 1 April, 1919. Battery F left Ancy-le-Libre, France, 31 March, 
1919 and arrived at Chateau-du-Loir, France, 1 April, 1919. 

"All the organizations of the 313th Field Artillerj'^ entrained at Pacy 
(Yonne), France." 

April, 1919 

Assigned 

Attached 

1st Casual Co. 

2d Casual Co. 

"The Regiment was stationed at Chateau-du-Loir (Sarthe) the entire month, 
preparing for return to the U. S. It was inspected 21 April, 1919 by Officers 
from Headquarters American Embarkation Center. 

"Received 242 Casuals 26 April, 1919 which were divided into two companies 
designated as the First and Second Casual Companies." 



45 


1300 


7 


36 




120 




122 



228 



RECORD OF EVENTS 



May, 1919 

Assigned 45 1273 

Attached 6 36 

"The Regiment left Chateau-du-Loir (Sarthe), France, May 10, 1919 and 

arrived at Camp Pontanezen (Brest), France, May 11, 1919. Left Brest, France, 

on the U. S. S. 'Zeppehn' for the United States, May 17, 1919 per embarkation 

order Number 226, Troop Movement Office, Base Section Number 5, May 16, 

1919, and arrived at Newport News, Virginia, May 28, 1919. Marched about 

13/2 miles to Camp Stuart, Virginia, where the remainder of the month was spent. 

"First and Second Casual Companies consisting of 242 men were detached 

from regiment." 



June, 1919 

"Regimental Headquarters, Field and Staff Headquarters Company, Supply 
Company and Battery A left Camp Stuart, Virginia, June 1, 1919 and arrived 
at Camp Lee, Virginia, June 2, 1919. Batteries B, C, D, E, F, Medical Detach- 
ment, Veterinary Detachment and Ordnance Detachment left Camp Stuart, 
Virginia, June 2, 1919, and arrived at Camp Lee, Virginia same date. Theprocess 
of demobilization of the regiment began at once and was completed June 6, 
1919. The final disposition of the officers and enlisted men was as follows: 

26 Officers Transferred 

25 Officers Discharged 

206 Enlisted Men Transferred 

1103 Enlisted Men Discharged 




K. P.'s ON Duty 



CHAPTER VII 
Regimental Roster 

September 26, 191 S 

Regimental Headquarters 
Brunzell, Otto L. — Lieutenant Colonel Commanding Regiment; Appointed 
Colonel, 26 October, 1918; 649 23d Street, Ogden, Utah. 

Baggs, Albert N. — Major (Medical); Regimental Surgeon; Abington, 
Pennsylvania. 

Paul, John — Captain; Regimental Adjutant; Harrisonburg, Pennsylvania. 

Anderson, George W., Jr. — Captain Headquarters Company, Regimental 
Operations Officer; Appointed Adjutant 2d Battalion, 17 October, 1918. Killed 
in Action, 1 November, 1918; 1033 Grace Street, Richmond, Virginia. 

Geary, Donald D. — Captain; Personnel Adjutant; 66 Harrison Street, 
East Orange, New Jersey. 

Yeuell, Ciladstone H. — 1st Lieutenant; Regimental Chaplain; 107,114th 
Street, Wheeling, West Virginia. 

Gregory, Tappan — 1st Lieutenant Headquarters Company; Regimental 
Telephone Officer; 69 West Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois. 

Stophlet, Donald S. — 1st Lieutenant Headquarters Company Regimental 
Gas and Ammunition Officer; Evacuated injured, 29 October, 1918. Rejoined 
Regiment, 1 January, 1919; 3616 Charlotte Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri. 

Niles, Emory H. — 1st Lieutenant Headquarters Company, Regimental 
Reconnaissance Officer; Appointed Captain, 28 September, 1918. Appointed 
Captain Headquarters Company and Regimental Operations Officer, 17 October, 
1918; 2010 Edgewood Street, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Coulburn, William C. — 1st Lieutenant Headquarters Company Regimental 
Radio Officer; Relieved of duty with Regiment to go to Aerial Observation School 
at Tours, 22 October, 1918; 100 W. Franklin Street, Richmond, Virginia. 



230 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Headquarters Co. 

Officers 

Anderson, George W., Jr. — Captain; See Regimental Headquarters. 
Gergory, Tappan — 1st Lieutenant; See Regimental Headquarters. 
Shryock, Thomas J., Jr. — 1st Lieutenant; Commanding Company; 16 Lawn 

Ridge Road, Orange, New Jersey. 
Adams, Stuart C. — 1st Lieutenant; See 2d Battalion Headquarters. 
Stophlet, Donald S. — 1st Lieutenant; See Regimental Headquarters. 
Niles, Emory H. — 1st Lieutenant; See Regimental Headquarters. 
Coulburn, William C. — 1st Lieutenant; See Regimental Headquarters. 
Burwell, Edward B., Jr. — 2d Lieutenant; See 2d Battalion Headquarters. 
Burling, Herbert S. — 2d Lieutenant; See 1st Battalion Headquarters. 
Morse, Walter C. B. — 2d Lieutenant; See 1st Battalion Headquarters. 
Crowell, Thomas L, Jr. — 2d Lieutenant; See 1st Battalion Headquarters. 
Cowardin, Samuel P. — 2d Lieutenant; See 2d Battalion Headquarters. 
Muzzy, Henry E. — 2d Lieutenant; See 2d Battalion Headquarters. 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. 

Arnold, Roy F. — Regimental Sergeant Major; Transferred to 0. T. C. at 

Saumur, 6 October, 1918; Waterbury, Vermont. 
Bird, Newman — Regimental Sergeant Major; Dixie, West Virginia. 
Schubert, Henry D. — Band Leader; Ford City, Pennsylvania. 
Custer, Arthur W. — Assistant Band Leader; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Tabler, Carlton Le F. — 2d Battalion Sergeant Major; Martinsburg, West 

Virginia. 
Morrison, Carl F. — 1st Battalion Sergeant Major; Gallagher, West Virginia. 
Cleland, Henry L. — 1st Sergeant; Transferred to O. T. C. at Saumur, 6 

October, 1918; Sandy Lake, Pennsylvania. 
Dobie, Joseph W. — Band Sergeant; Grove City, Pennsylvania. 
Williams, Ralph — Band Sergeant; Greenville, Pennsylvania. 
Baber, Joseph H. — Color Sergeant; Fayetteville, West Virginia. 
Edmonds, John E. — Color Sergeant; Winchester, Kentucky. 
Jaffe, Louis — Supply Sergeant; Reduced to Private, 13 November, 1918. 

Appointed Corporal 7 March, 1919; Montgomery, West Virginia. 
Bowles, Alva B.— Mess Sergeant; Reduced to Private, 14 October, 1918. 

Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Montgomery, West Virginia. 



HEADQUARTERS CO. 231 

X uncommissioned Officers, Etc. — continued 

Sommers, James S. — Stable Sergeant; Somerset, Virginia. 

Harvey, Joseph L. — Sergeant; Appointed 1st Sergeant, 14 October, 1918; 

Harvey, West Virginia. 
Hudson, Homer — Sergeant; Montgomer}^ West Virginia. 
Thrasher, Charles R. — Sergeant; Mount Hope, West Virginia. 
Berrj', Harry A. — Sergeant; Lexington, Virginia. 
Osborne, Delbert O. — Sergeant ; Elkins, West Virginia. 
Charles, George — Sergeant; Pancoast, West Virginia. 
Eskew, William E. — Sergeant; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Sago, 

West Virginia. 
Walker, George C. — Sergeant ; Transferred to 0. T. C. at Saumur, 6 October, 

1918; Lynchburg, Virginia. 
McGarr, Will J. — Sergeant; Sandy Lake, Pennsylvania. 
Potter, Fred — Band Corporal; Oak Hill, West Virginia. 
Johnson, Fritz — Band Corporal; McKeesport, Pennsylvania. 
McMillen, William — Band Corporal; Greenville, Pennsylvania. 
Ward, John M. — Corporal; Appointed Sergeant, 14 November, 1918; 

Havre de Grace, Maryland. 
Lewis, Willis B. — Corporal; Hagerstown, Maryland. 
Smith, John J. — Corporal; Scarbro, West Virginia. 

Solof, David — Corporal ; Appointed Sergeant, 13 November, 1918. Appoint- 
ed Supply Sergeant, 15 November, 1918; Montgomery, West Virginia. 
Trevey, Virgil — Corporal; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Montgomery, 

West Virginia. 
Dick, Homer A. — Corporal; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Martinsburg, 

West Virginia. 
McLaughlin, Lawrence M. — Corporal; Gassed and evacuated, 27 October, 

1918; Frankford, West Virginia. 
Bell, Cody H. — Corporal; Freed, West Virginia. 
Thomas, Harper G. — Corporal; Marlinton, West Virginia. 
Foster, Charles A. — Corporal; Montgomer}^, West Virginia. 
Taylor, Ernest L. — Corporal; Craigsville, West Virginia. 
Ward, Okey V. — Corporal ; Summersville, West Virginia. 
Cross, Elby H. — Corporal; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Phillipi, 

West Virginia. 



232 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. — continued 

Rogers, Roncevert— Corporal ; Oak Hill, West Virginia. 

Wriston, Bertie J. — Corporal; Appointed Sergeant, 14 October, 1918. 

Kingston, West Virginia. 
Mendenhall, William R.— Corporal; Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. 
Lewis, Allen G.— Corporal; Killed in action, 1 November, 1918; Gerrards- 

town, West Virginia. 
Cossel, I. J. — Corporal; Adelaide, Pennsylvania. 
Ware, Bias H. — Corporal; Diana, West Virginia. 
Gibson, George H. — Corporal; Roanoke, West Virginia. 
Marsters, Frank H.— Corporal; Appointed Sergeant, 25 October, 1918; 

Waterford, Pennsylvania. 
Hall, Troy F. — Corporal; Servia, West Virginia. 
Hartman, Austin T. — Corporal; Brandywine, West Virginia. 
Allman, Loomis C. — Corporal; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Hundred. 

West Virginia. 
Miller, Seneca B. — Corporal; Reading, Pennsylvania. 
Nine, Edwin F. — Corporal ; Bayard, West Virginia. 
Mahoney, Mike — Corporal; Carlisle, West Virginia. 
Hull, Dewitt — Musician first class; Appointed Band Sergeant, 25 November, 

1918; Grove City, Pennsylvania. 
Tremont, Fausto — Musician first class; Buena Vista, Pennsylvania. 
Fletcher, Everett T. — Musician second class; Vandergrift, Pennsylvania. 
Massie, Philip — Musician second class; Booner, West Virginia. 
Prudence, WiUiam A. — Musician second class; Appointed Musician first 

class, 25 November, 1918; Beaver Falls, Pennsjdvania. 
Weiss, Charles H. — Musician second class; Appointed Band Corporal, 

25 November, 1918; Erie, Pennsylvania. 
Benton, Arthur J. — Musician third class; Appointed Musician second class, 

25 November, 1918; Coraopolis, Pennsylvania. 
Bibb, Leonidas H. — Musician third class; Appointed Musician 2d class, 

25 November, 1918; Oak Hill, West Virginia. 
Crawford, James A. — Musician third class; Appointed Musician 2d class, 

25 November, 1918; Blairfour, Pennsylvania. 
Fahrner, Benjamin — Musician third class; Appointed Musician second class, 

25 November, 1918; Helvetia, West Virginia. 



HEADQUARTERS CO. 233 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. — continued 

Hanvood, Stuart C. — Musician third class; Appointed Musician second 

class, 25 November, 1918; Huntington, West Virginia. 
Lawyer, Herbert R. — Musician third class; Appointed Sergeant Bugler, 

25 November, 1918; Berkeley Springs, West Mrginia. 
Malone, Charles G. — Musician third class; Appointed Musician second 

class, 25 November, 1918; Wilcox, Pennsylvania. 
McElwain, Ivan H. — Musician third class; Sutton, West Mrginia. 
Miller, William A. — Musician third class; Union, West Virginia. 
Pace, Alfonso — Musician third class; Beryl, West Virginia. 
Vokoun, Charles F. — Musician third class; Cleveland, Ohio. 
Weide, Warren E. — Musician third class; Appointed Musician second class, 

25 November, 1918; jNIusician first class, 13 April, 1919; New Castle, 

Pennsylvania. 
Dvuicombe, Fi-ed — Cook; Tiunmond, West Virginia. 
Mc\'ey, Zejiha T. — Cook; Wounded and evacuated, 4 October, 1918; 

Ansted, West Virginia. 
Miller, Alvis — Cook; Jodie, West Virginia. 

Rodes, Virgil B. — Cook; Appointed Sergeant, 13 November, 1918; Appoint- 
ed Mess Sergeant, 15 November, 1918; Oak Hill, West Virginia. 
Starchcr, Harlan — Mechanic; Lobelia, West Virginia. 
Lester, Kyle — Horseshoer; Princeton, West Virginia. 
Robinson, Joseph D. — Horseshoer; Scarbro, West Virginia. 
Lawrence, Frederick — Saddler; Ti'ansferred, 14 November, 1918; South 

Wej-mouth, Massachusetts. 
Cain, Hai'old — Bugler; Richwocd, West Virginia. 

Privates, First Class 

Akers, Lundy W. — Private first class; Ham Creek, West Virginia. 

Beckett, Shelby C. — Private first class; Transferred, 14 November, 1918. 
I^iiiiletonj West Virginia. 

Biggs, Ceorge C. — Private first class; Sleepy Creek, West Virginia. 

Blake, Lawrence W. — Private first class; Transfei-red, 14 November, 1918; 
Hill Top, West Virginia. 

Boblett, Henry W. — Private first class; Wounded, 4 October, 1918, Ap- 
pointed Corporal, 19 November, 1918; Montvale, Virginia. 



234 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates, First Class — continued 

Bowles, Clyde E. — Private first class; Beckwith, West Virginia. 

Corder, Harry J. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 19 November, 

1918; Flemington, West Virginia. 
Flynn, Thomas R. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 14 October, 

1918; Sharon, Pennsylvania. 
Goodall, Clyde H. — Private first class; Sweet Springs, West Virginia. 
Harbison, Rufus L. — Private first class; Cullman, Alabama. 
Holmes, Joshua E. — Private first class; Scarbro, West Virginia. 
Hunley, Robert — Private first class; Elk Ridge, West Virginia. 
Lindley, Thomas T. — Private first class; Minden, West Virginia. 
Peters, Charles R. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 7 March, 1919 

Ferrum, Virginia. 
Richeson, Ernest R. — Private first class; Red Star, West Virginia. 
Scott, John P. — Private first class; Ferrum, Virginia. 
Settle, Jasper H. — Private first class; Page, West Virginia. 
Swackhammer, Dan — Private first class; Benezette, Pennsylvania. 

Privates 

Argabrite, Ralph — Private; Appointed Private first class, 11 November, 

1918; Wheeling, West Virginia. 
Atkins, Noah — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 March, 1919; 

Thurmond, West Virginia. 
Barnhart, Lynn G. — Private; Carmichaels, Pennsylvania. 
Barnhart, Jacob S. — Private; Claysburg, Pennsylvania. 
Barrett, Paul W. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 7 March, 1919; 

Rochester, Pennsylvania. 
Betts, Howard R. — Private; Appointed Musician third class, 25 November, 

1918; Ansted, West Virginia. 
Blencowe, James 0. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Berry ville, 

Virginia. 
Bohan, Christopher B. — Private; Appointed Corporal, 19 November, 1918; 

Orange, New Jersey. 
Bowers, Albert 0. — Private; Duquesne, Pennsylvania. 
Brown, William H. — Private; Parsons, West Virginia. 
Brundage, John F. — Private; Brownsville, Pennsylvania. 



HEADQUARTERS CO. 235 

Private.^ — coiit in ued 

Burns, Robert W. — Private; Appointed Musician first class, 25 November, 

1918; Band Sergeant, 13 April, 1919; Los Angeles, California. 
Buzzerd, Lewis H. — Private; Appointed Corporal, 19 November, 1918 

Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. 
Campbell, Eugene L. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 April, 1919 

Summersville, West Virginia. 
Carr, Francis D. — Private; Appointed Corporal, 19 November, 1918 

Belfont, West Virginia. 
Clark, Samuel M. — Private; Union, West Virginia. 
Coffman, Ray B. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 11 November, 

1918; Edinburg, Virginia. 
Commorata, Mike — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918. 
Cromley, George — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918. 
Daiuto, Frank D. — Private; Appointed Corporal, 7 March, 1919; Martins- 
burg, West Virginia. 
Diehl, Samuel — Private; Claysburg, Pennsylvania. 
Dillon, Ocus W. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Maynor, West 

Virginia. 
Edwards, William G. — Private; Appointed Corporal, 19 November, 1918; 

Eona, Virginia. 
Englert, John W. — Private; East Brady, Pennsylvania. 
Fischer, Charles H. — Private; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Gayle}^, William W.^Private; Richwood, West Virginia. 
Godsey, Alvin — Private ; Glen Jean, West Virginia. 
Harrison, Edmund C. — Private; Killed in action, 1 November, 1918; 

Charleston, West Virginia. 
Hassell, Charles M. — Private; Appointed Regimental Sergeant Major, 

8 November, 1918; Hagersburg, Virginia. 
Heiner, John P. — Private; Appointed Sergeant, 1 October, 1918; Butler, 

Pennsylvania. 
Hengst, Abraham — Private; Appointed Musician third class, 25 November, 

1918; Osterburg, Pennsylvania. 
Higgins, Harold L. — Private; Parkersburg, West Virginia. 
Hoke, Dwight M.— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Ham Creek, 

West Virginia. 



230 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates — continued 

Hutchison, Edgar — Private; Appointed Cook, 25 November, 1918; Mc- 
Donald, West Virginia. 
Kightlinger, Arthur C. — Private; Tidioute, Pennsylvania. 
Kilduff, Edward L.— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918. 
Klingler, William F. — Private; North Catasauqua, Pennsylvania. 
Korss, Jacob — Private; York, Pennsylvania. 
Lachman, Herbert G. — Private; Jenkinstown, Pennsylvania. 
Lehman, Earl L. — Private; Wounded, 13 October, 1918; Appointed Private 

first class, 11 November, 1918; Mount Wolf, Pennsylvania. 
Marshall, Edward C. — Pi'ivate; Appointed Corporal, 19 November, 1918; 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania . 
Martin, Meyer E. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 7 March, 1919; 

Hazleton, Pennsylvania . 
McDermott, George J. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918;Duquesne, 

Pennsylvania. 
McGraw, George T. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 11 November, 

1918; Appointed Corporal, 7 March, 1919; Fayetteville, West Virginia. 
McLean, William H. — Private; Davis, West Virginia. 
McRae, Cecil A. — Private; Evinston, Florida. 
Minari, Ercole — Private; Yohoghany, Pennsylvania. 
Monroe, Clyde — Private; Pennsboro, West Virginia. 
Moore, William F. — Private; Chestnut Hill, Pennsylvania. 
Odatto, George F.— Private; Appointed Musician third class, 25 November, 

1918; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Olcese, Salvador F. — Private; Shamokin, Pennsylvania. 
Owens,Thomas H.— Private; Appointed Corporal,7 March, 1919; Reynolds- 

ville, Pennsylvania. 
Patterson, Harry C— Private; Wounded and evacuated, 26 September, 

1918; Richwood, West Virginia. 
Pickhardt, Ernest J.— Private; Appointed Private first class, 11 November, 

1918; Appointed Mechanic, 9 March, 1919; Chester, Virginia. 
Pond, Ernest L.— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Nutters 

Fork, West Virginia. 
Randolph, William M.— Private; Appointed Private first class, 11 November, 

1918; Moorefield, West Virginia. 



HEADQUARTERS CO. 237 

Privates — continued 

Ranieri, Vito — Private; Appointed Musician third class; 25 November, 

1918; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Rapp, Earnest E. — Private; Minden, West Virginia. 
Richards, Walker L. — Private; Freeland, Pennsylvania. 
Rutledge, Flem N. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 11 November, 

1918; Pax, West Virginia. 
Schrotz, \A'illiam F. — Private; Philadeli)hia, Pennsylvania. 
Scott, Homer — Private; ApiJointed Private first class, 11 No\'eml)ei-, 1918, 

Spice, West Virginia. 
Simon, Horace G. — Private; Appointed Musician third class, 25 November, 

1918; Erie, Pennsylvania. 
Skidmore, Meredith — Pi'ivate; Volga, West Virginia. 
Smith, Lewis N. — Private; New Castle, Delaware. 
Spradlin, Gordon (\ -Private; (ileu Jean, West Mrginia. 
Steger, Charles — Private; Ai)p()iiit('(l Saddler, 9 March, 1919; Chicago, 

Illinois. 
Stephany, Michael G. — Private; Ai)pointed Private first class, 11 November, 

1918; Philadeli)hia, Pennsylvania. 
Strouse, Lewis — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Swartley, Earl A. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 11 N()\-eniber, 

1918; Ai)p()inted Corporal, 19 November, 1918; Lansdale, Penn- 
sylvania. 
Sweeney, Otto — Private; Sun, \\'est Mrginia. 
Taylor, James O. — Private; Parkersburg, West \'irgiuia. 
Thompson, Wilbur N. — Private; Appointed Musician third class, 25 

November, 1918; Oak Hill, West Virginia. 
Uhlman, Fred — Private; Appointed Musician tliird class, 25 November, 

1918; Erie, Pennsylvania. 
W^eiford, Jake R. — Private; Hillsboro, West Virginia. 
Whitehead, Emmet H. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Sharon, 

Pennsylvania. 
Williams, Guy — Private; Appointed Private first class, 11 November, 1918; 

Richwood, West Virginia. 



238 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates — continued 

Williams, Klase — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 1918; 

Hill Top, West Virginia. 
Willingham, Turner L.— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Vander- 

bilt, Pennsylvania. 
Yeager,Granville C. — Private; Transferred to 80th Division M. P. Company, 

21 December, 1918; Belington, West Virginia. 



First Battalion Headquarters 

Dunigan, Francis J.— Major; To C. O. 313th F. A., 26 September to 2-1 
October, 1918; Transferred 2 November, 1918; 1119 F. Street, Sacramento, 
California. 

Pitney, Shelton — Captain and Adjutant, 1st Battalion C. 0., 26 September 
to 2 October, 1918; Wounded and evacuated, 2 October, 1918; 1763 R. Street, 
Washington, D. C. 

Gard, Walter E. — Captain; Assigned as 2d Battalion Adjutant, 23 October, 
1918; Park Place, Orange, New Jersey. 

Donaldson, Samuel W. — Captain, Battalion Surgeon; Transferred, January, 
1919; R. F. D. Number 3, Knoxville, Tennessee. 

Burling, Herbert S. — 2d Lieutenant Headquarters Company, Radio Officer; 
1st Battalion Adjutant, 26 September to 23 October, 1918; Appointed 1st 
Lieutenant, 24 February, 1919; 333 Springfield Avenue, Summit, New Jersey. 

Morse, Walter C.B. — 2d Lieutenant Headquarters Company, Liaison Officer; 
Transferred, 14 November, 1918; View Ridge Road, Washington, D. C. 

Crowell, Thomas L, Jr. — 2d Lieutenant Headquarters Company, Telephone 
Officer; Appointed 1st Lieutenant, 24 February, 1919; 512 Park Street, Upper 
Montclair, New Jersey. 

Headley, Fred C. — 2d Lieutenant Headquarters Company, Gas and Ammu- 
nition Officer; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Phillipsburg, New Jersey. 

Clawson, Earl D. — 2d Lieutenant Veterinary' Detachment; Battalion Veter- 
inarian; Hopewell, New Jersey. 



240 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Battery A 

Officers 

Peppard, Joseph G. — 1st Lieutenant Commanding Battery; Appointed 

Captain, 24 February, 1918; 1101 West 8th Street, Kansas City, 

Missouri. 
Ackerman, David G. — 1st Lieutenant; 206 Boulevard, Passaic, New Jersey. 
FuUerton, Donald B.— 2d Lieutenant; To E Battery, 16 October, 1918; 

Appointed 1st Lieutenant, 24 February, 1919; 520 West 7th Street, 

Plainfield, New Jersey. 
Densmore, Leonard D. — 2d Lieutenant; Detached from Regiment, 8 

October, 1918; Wymore, Nebraska. 
Reishus, Fritjofe; 2d Lieutenant; Assigned, 21 October, 1918; to E Battery, 

2 November, 1918; Transferred, 14 November, 1918. 
Sheehan, Thomas F. — 2d Lieutenant; 545 Main Street, Bridgewater, 

Massachusetts. 

N oncommtssioned Officers, Etc. 

Brill, Chnton M. — 1st Sergeant; Wounded and evacuated, 27 October, 1918; 

Petersburg, West Virginia. 
Kisamore, James E. — Supply Sergeant; Transferred, 9 February, 1919, 

Macksville, West Virginia. 
Hoffman, Benjamin W. — Mess Sergeant; Charlestown, West Virginia. 
Hoover, Joseph — Stable Sergeant; Doe Hill, Virginia. 
Yanuscavicz, Frank — Sergeant; Thomas, West Virginia. 
Banks, Washington G. — Sergeant; Appointed 1st Sergeant, 12 November, 

1918; Shepherdstown, West Virginia 
Reda, Domenico M. — Sergeant; Albert, West Virginia. 
Pitzenbarger, James L. — Sergeant; Brandy wine, West Virginia. 
Clark, Victor E. — Sergeant; Petersburg, West Virginia. 
Keister, Austin C. — Sergeant: Red Creek, West Virginia. 
Flanagan, Hillary B. — Sergeant; Wounded and evacuated, 9 October, 1918; 

Returned to duty, 15 December, 1918; Red Creek, West Virginia. 
Mowery, Chester C. — Sergeant; Wounded, 29 September, 1918; Brushy 

Run, West Virginia. 
Hunter, Edgar J. — Sergeant; Transferred to O.T.C. at Saumur, 28 October, 

1918; Roaring Springs, Pennsylvania. 



BATTERY A 241 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. — continued 

Baugher, Herman J. — Corporal; Appointed Sergeant, 12 April, 1919; 

Elkton, Virginia. 
Puffenbarger, Perlie E. — Corporal; Sugar Grove, West Virginia. 
Goshorn, Chalmers H. — Corporal; McNeal, Pennsylvania. 
Agee, Asa W. — Corporal; Salem, \'irginia. 
Kline, George H. — Corporal; Maysville, West Virginia. 
Neel, William B. — Corporal; Killed in action, 14 October, 1918; Bayard, 

W^st Virginia. 
Raines, Ralph — Corporal; Appointed Sergeant, 14 November, 1919; 

Teterton, West Virginia. 
Sites, Lester B. — Corporal; Appointed Sergeant, 4 March, 1919; Roaring, 

West Virginia. 
Ruhlman, Ross L. — Corporal; Reduced to Private, 18 November, 1918; 

Warren, Pennsylvania. 
Anderson, Howard K. — Corjioral; Aj^pointed Sergeant and Supply Sergeant, 

12 April, 1919; Cambridge Springs, Pennsylvania. 
Barb, Riley L. — Corporal; Parsons, West \'irginia. 
Cullers, Bernie G. — Corporal; Wounded, 27 October, 1918; Transferred, 

3 March, 1919; Mathias, West Virginia. 
Slusher, James E. — Corporal; Charlestown, West Mrginia. 
Rothrock, Millard J. — Corporal ; Johnstown, Pennsylvania. 
Rotell, Anthony — Corporal; Reduced to Private and transferred, 14 Novem- 
ber, 1918; Carbondale, Pennsylvania. 
Burley, Ova M. — Corporal; Transferred hospital, 19 October, 1918; Davis, 

West Virginia. 
Goldie, John W. — Corporal; Lansdale, Pennsylvania. 
Mitchell, Benjamin H. — Corporal; Brandywine, West Virginia. 
Kiser, Early E. — Corporal; Transferred to hospital; Brandywine, West 

Virginia. 
Ross, Floyd 0. — Chief Mechanic; Parsons, West Virginia. 
Jones, James R. — Mechanic; Reduced to Private and transferred, 14 

November, 1918; Altoona, Pennsylvania. 
Robinson, Lloyd B. — Mechanic; Mehoopany, Pennsylvania. 
Wilson, Clarence B. — Mechanic; Wounded and evacuated, 25 September, 

1918; Needmore, West Virginia. 



242 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. — continued 

Johnston, Norman E.— Cook; Charlestown, West Virginia. 
Lipscomb, George D. — Cook; St. George, West Virginia. 
Shreck, Howard E. — Cook; Charlestown, West Virginia. 
Wilt, Homer — Cook; Pierce, West Virginia. 
Lewis, Lester V. — Horseshoer; Petersburg, West Virginia. 
Peck, Russell — Horseshoer; Thomas, West Virginia. 
Yokum, Victor G. — Horseshoer; Petersburg, West Virginia. 
Webster, John L. — Saddler; Charlestown, West Virginia. 
Gordon, George T. W. — Bugler; Charlestown, West Virginia. 
Harman, Denver R. — Bugler; Macksville, West Virginia. 
Simpson, Walter G. — Bugler; Reduced to Private, 24 January, 1919; 
Appointed Private first class, 1 March, 1919; Brandy wine. West Virginia. 

Privates, First Class 

Case, Clarence C. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 4 March, 1919; 

Erie, Pennsylvania. 
Clair, Lloyd L. — Private first class; Thomas, West Virginia. 
Halterman, Isaac B. — Private first class ; Wounded and evacuated, 15 October, 

1918; Returned to duty, 19 January, 1919; Appointed Corporal, 15 

April, 1919;Mathias, West Virginia. 
Keister, Ole C. — Private first class; Red Creek, West Virginia. 
Lipscomb, Cyrus T. — Private first class; Shaflfer, West Virginia. 
Marcus, Raymond L. — Private first class; Charlestown, West Virginia. 
Mason, Stewart A. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal 14 November, 

1918; Maysville, West Virginia. 
McClure, Grady M. — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 14 

October, 1918; Died in hospital; York, South Carolina. 
Monier, Albert — Private first class; Transferred to B. H.; Sharpsburg, 

Pennsylvania. 
Osborn, Hope J. — ^Private first class; Canton, Ohio. 
Schell, Alfred J. — Private first class; Petersburg, West Virginia. 
Schell, Dennis J. — Private first class; Petersburg, West Virginia. 
Sheffer Charles M. — Private 1st class; York, Pennsylvania. 
Smith, Arhe C— Private first class; Wounded, 20 October, 1918; Appointed 

Corporal, 14 November, 1918; Sugar Grove, West Virginia. 



BATTERY A 243 

Privates, First Class — continued 

Stokes, Floyd — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 4 March, 1919; 

Parsons, West Virginia. 
Strawser, Homer C. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 4 March, 

1919; Albright, West Virginia. 
Ware, James H. — Private first class; Transferred, 25 Februarj', 1919; 

Charlestown, West Virginia. 
Williams, Daniel T. — Private first class; Romney, West A^irginia. 

Privates 

Adrian, William, H. — Private; Transferred to hospital, 9 November, 1918; 

Pittstovvn, Pennsylvania. 
Amos, Harry C. — Private; Burnsville, West Virginia. 
Armstrong, Hobart L. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 December, 

1918; Scarbro, West Virginia. 
Auerswald, Carl M. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Karmars- 

ville, Pennsylvania. 
Benner, Robert A. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 December, 

1918; Appointed Corporal, 14 April, 1919; Pleasant Valley, Pennsylvania. 
Bennett, Clem — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Dry Run, 

Pennsylvania. 
Bonincontri, Simone, — Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 December, 

1918; Yatesboro, Pennsylvania. 
Border, William H. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Easton, 

Pennsylvania. 
Bragg, William E. — Private; Sandstone, West Virginia. 
Brosch, Theodore; Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Johnstown, 

Pennsylvania. 
Brown, Lee W. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 15 April, 1919; 

Charlestown, West Virginia. 
Calderara, Giacamo — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Parsons, 

West Virginia. 
Carpenter, Bernard J. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 15 April, 

1919; Hazelton, Pennsylvania. 
Christman, Elmer F. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Shaffer, 

West Virginia. 



244 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates — continued 

Clark, Percy E. — Private; Everett, Pennsylvania. 

Cobbs, Ernest — Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 March, 1919; 

Doe Hill, West Virginia. 
Colston, Robert D. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 15 April, 1919; 

Summit Point, West Virginia. 
Copley, Albert — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Benbush, West 

Virginia. 
Corsaro, Frank — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Parsons, West 

Virginia. 
Crabbe, Rev W. — Private; Charlestown, West Virginia. 
Craig, John M. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 4 March, 1919; 

Homer City, Pennsylvania. 
Dahmer, John — Private, Appointed Private first class, 1 December, 1918; 

Franklin, West Virginia. 
De Hart, Thomas A. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Easton. 

Pennsylvania. 
DeJohn, Frederick W. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Freeland, 

Pennsylvania. 
Dewees, Harry; Private; Appointed Private first class, 15 April, 1919; 

Morristown, Pennsylvania. 
Dice, Luther G. — Private; Franklin, West Virginia. 
Dillon, John J. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 5 November, 1918; 

Returned to duty, 19 December, 1918; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Dipietro, Camillo — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Dolly, Fred— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Teterton, West 

Virginia. 
Dove, Dayton— Private; Wounded and>vacuated, 28 September, 1918; 

Died in hospital; Riverton, West Virginia. 
Eaker, Jesse D.— Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 March, 1919; 

Erie, Pennsylvania. 
Findley, Harvey S.— Private; Appointed Private first class, 15 April, 1919; 

Oramer, Pennsylvania. 
Flanagan, Gordon D.— Private; Wounded and evacuated, 30 September, 

1918; Appointed Corporal, 1 October, 1918; Red Creek, West 

Virginia. 



BATTERY A 245 

Privates — continued 

Folmer, Burley — Private; Appointed Corporal, 14 November, 1918; Davis, 

West Virginia. 
Folsom, Francis W. — ^Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Long 

Island City, New York. 
Frye, Charles E. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 December, 

1918, Rio, West Virginia. 
Gaines, John G. — Private; Hinton, West Virginia. 
Garhtz, Frank E. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 28 September, 1918; 

Returned to duty, 9 December, 1918; Appointed Private first class, 

15 April, 1919; Elk Lick, Pennsylvania. 
Geiger, William A. — Private; Transferred 14 November. 1918; Tivoli, 

Pennsylvania. 
Gilroy, Michael G. — Private; Avoca, Pennsylvania. 
Grabiak, Frank — Private; Appointed Private first class, 15 April, 1919; 

Mt. Pleasant, Pennsylvania. 
Gunning, Michael J. — Private; Natrona, Pennsylvania. 
Harmon, Raymond L. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 15 October, 

1918; Died, 14 October, 1918; Brandywine, West Virginia. 
Hartford, James D. — Private; Ellenton, Pennsylvania. 
Hasley, Casper H. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 15 April, 1919; 

Mt. Lebanon, Pennsylvania. 
Hawkey, George — Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 December. 1918; 

Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 
Heckler, Harry — Private; Died of disease, 5 January, 1919; Freeland, 

Pennsylvania. 
Hinnershitz, Lewis P. — Private; Transferred 14 November, 1918; Reading, 

Pennsylvania. 
Hoover, Harry E. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 15 April, 1919; 

Moyers, West Virginia. 
Huff, Walter F. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 15 April, 1919; 

Reigelsville, Pennsylvania. 
Ickes, Edward — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 28 September, 1918; 

Claysburg, Pennsylvania. 
Keck, Calvin T. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 March, 1919; 

Rome, Pennsylvania. 



246 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates — continued 

Kennedy, Edward — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 1918; 

Appointed Private first class, 15 April, 1919; Mt. Pleasant, Penn- 
sylvania. 
Kimble, Ezra B. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 December, 1918; 

Maysville, West Virginia. 
King, Albert — Private; Weatherly, Pennsylvania. 
Kraft, Hiram P. — Private, Earlington, Pennsylvania. 
Kraft, Paul N. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Reading, 

Pennsylvania. 
Kuhn, Grant L. — Private; Schell, West Virginia. 
Labarr, Ernest W. — Private ; Tunkhannock, Pennsylvania. 
Lanaras, Peter — Private, Reading, Pennsylvania. 
Mallow, Otha A. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 December, 1918; 

Appointed Mechanic, 16 February, 1918; Kline, West Virginia. 
Maloy, Claude F. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Johnstown, 

Pennsylvania. 
McDonald, James W. — Private; Shepherdstown, West Virginia. 
McGuire, Basil H. — Private; Erie, Pennsylvania. 
McWilliams, Hubert I. — Private; Penn Furnace, Pennsylvania. 
Metzner, Arnold — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 31 October, 1918; 

Helvetia, West Virginia. 
Meyers, Charles W. — Private; Pottsville, Pennsylvania. 
Mills, Earl — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Vincennes, Indiana. 
Misiewicz, Anthony F., Jr. — Private; Glen Lyon, Pennsylvania. 
Morofsky, Edward — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Gates, 

Pennsylvania. 
Morral, Irving — Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 December, 1918; 

Appointed Corporal, 14 April, 1918; Mouth of Seneca, West 

Virginia. 
Moyers, Roy R. — Private; Appointed Corporal, 14 April, 1919; Moyers, 

West Virginia. 
Myers, Lester D.— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Dudley, 

Pennsylvania. 
Nagle, Paul O.— Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 December, 1918; 
Sayre, Pennsylvania. 



BATTERY A 247 

Privates — continued 

Notenbaum, Gerald — Private; Hart, ^Michigan. 

O'Brien, Peter J. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 December, 1918; 

Conshohocken, Pennsylvania. 
Painter, Harry E. — Private; Charlestown, West Virginia. 
Peters, William S. — Private; Transferred, January, 1919; Raleigh, West 

Virginia. 
Potocsnak, Steve E. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Portvue, 

Pennsylvania. 
Pruyne, Earl H. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 15 April; 1919; 

Milan, Pennsylvania. 
Rexrode, Emory C. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 December, 

1918; Sugar Grove, West Virginia. 
Reynolds, Patrick W. — Private, Perry, Pennsylvania. 
Rhine, Elmer F. — Private; York, Pennsj^lvania. 
Roy, Arch — Private; Appointed Private first class, 15 April, 1919; Lanes- 

ville, West Virginia. 
Ryan, John J. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 28 September, 1918; 

South Bethlehem, Pennsj'lvania. 
Salow, Carl F. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Erie, Pennsyl- 
vania. 
Saunders, Clarence A. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Iron 

Springs, Pennsylvania. 
Schafer, Marcus — Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 December, 1918; 

Nazareth, Pennsylvania. 
Sears, Charles E. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Headsville, 

West Virginia. 
Seelye, Charles T. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Shillingburg, Olin L. — Private; Killed in action, 14 October, 1918; Arm- 
strong, West Virginia. 
Simpson, OUver E. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 28 September, 1918; 

Returned to duty; Fairport, New York. 
Sites, Olie M. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Teterton, West 

Virginia. 
Skoros, Teofil — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Plymouth, 

Pennsylvania. 



248 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates — continued 

Slifer, Marr L. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Smith, Frank A. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Larksville, 

Pennsylvania. 
Smith,WilUam J. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Susquehanna, 

Pennsylvania. 
Snyder, Clarence — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Sprouse, Cecil C. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Fordwick, 

Virginia. 
Stahlnecker, Lester J. — Private; Watsontown, Pennsylvania. 
Stillfox, Arthur C. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 14 October, 1918; 

Johnstown, Pennsylvania. 
Swisher, Thomas W. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 December, 

1918; Capon Bridge, West Virginia. 
Trumbo, James H. — Private; Brandywine, West Virginia. 
Vanderpool, Mathew — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 19 October, 1918; 

Towanda, Pennsylvania. 
Vincent, Arthur W. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Towanda 

Pennsylvania. 
Wallace, Samuel D. — Private; Wounded, 5 November, 1918; Greensburg, 

Pennsjdvania. 
Warner, Ezra T. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 December, 1918; 

Nome, West Virginia. 
Warren, Dennis E. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 1 December, 

1918; Aspers, Pennsylvania.. 
Watson, Walter W. — Private; Killed in action, 14 October, 1918; Broad 

Top City, Pennsylvania. 
Watts, Frank — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 28 September, 1918; 

Waverly, New York. 
Welker, Jacob C. — Private; Quakerstown, Pennsylvania. 
Werkheiser, Howard J. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Easton, 

Pennsylvania. 
Wheeler, Irvin D.— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Wyalusing, 

Pennsylvania. 



BATTERY B 249 

Priva tes — continued 

Wilent, Maurice A. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Wimer, William G. — Private; Franklin, West Virginia. 

Wingenroth, Harry W. — Private; Wilkensburg, Pennsylvania. 

Woodland, William — Private; Plymouth, Pennsylvania. 

Wyatt, Clifton B. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 15 April, 1919; 

Jeningstown, West Virginia. 
Youngblood, John H. — Private; Great Cacapon, West Virginia. 
Zarnoch, Alexander J. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 14 October, 

1918; Returned to duty, March, 1919; Pittston, Pennsylvania. 
Zellner, Edward C. — Private; Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 
Zoepke, Walter E. — Private; Wopwallopen, Pennsylvania. 

Battery B 
Officers 

Perkins, Robert W.— Captain; Wounded, 15 October, 1918; 2306 West 

Grace Street, Richmond, Virginia. 
Englar, George — 1st Lieutenant; New Windsor, Maryland. 
Dougherty, Isaac — 2d Lieutenant — Appointed 1st Lieutenant, 15 September 

1918; 325 North 3d Street, Millville, New Jersey. 
Morse, Walter C. B. — 2d Lieutenant; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; 

View Ridge Road, Washington, D. C. 
Ashton, Richard — 2d Lieutenant ; 200 High Street, Oxford, Ohio. 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. 

Green, Charles W. — 1st Sergeant; Lansing, Michigan. 

Wood, Glenn O. — Mess Sergeant; Volga, West Virginia. 

Patterson, Charles E. — Supply Sergeant; Richwood, W^est Virginia. 

Bentz, Ralph — Stable Sergeant; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 

Manford, Bernard H. — Sergeant; Wounded, 6 October and 6 November, 

1918; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Byers, Harry L. — Sergeant; Transferred to O.T.C. at Saumur, 28 October, 

1918; Washington, D. C. 
Arthur, Clarence — Sergeant; Beckwith, West Virginia. 
Clark, Edgar E. — Sergeant; Union, West Virginia. 
Canfield, George — Sergeant; Marcus, West Virginia. 



250 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Noncommissioned Oficers, Etc. — continued 

Wyatt, Gordon— Sergeant; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Kuhl, Philip L.— Sergeant; Dodrill, West Virginia. 

Simmons, Claude B.— Sergeant; Moorefield, West Virginia. 

Sarver, William McK.— Glen Ferris, West Virginia. 

Clendenen, Charles C. — Corporal; Appointed Sergeant, 5 March, 1918; 

Seebert, West Virginia. 
Bean, Carl B. — Corporal; Moorefield, West Virginia. 
Clause, Richard G. — Corporal; Falls, West Virginia. 
McMillian, James E. — Corporal; Wounded, 28 October, 1918; Summersville, 

West Virginia. 
Skaggs, William E. — Corporal; Wounded and evacuated, 6 November, 1918; 

Mulvane, West Virginia. 
Stevens, Jacob N. — Corporal; Volga, West Virginia. 
Jenkins, Percy S. — Corporal, Montgomery, West Virginia. 
Belcher, William E. — Corporal; Wounded and evacuated, 2 October, 1918; 

Clay, West Virginia. 
McVey, Warren H. — Corporal; Boomer, West Virginia. 
Fleshman, Dow E. — Corporal; Hot Springs, West Virginia. 
Barrett, Brooks — Corporal; Wounded and evacuated, 14 October, 1918; 

Belington, West Virginia. 
Bobbitt, James S. — Corporal; Muddlety, West Virginia. 
Simmons, Carl — Corporal; Killed in action, 18 October, 1918; Belington, 

West Virginia. 
Nugen, Arnold R. — Corporal; Dempsey, West Virginia. 
Boggs, Lester A. — Corporal; Wounded and evacuated, 15 October, 1918; 

Mouth of Seneca, West Virginia. 
Dadisman, Claude A. — Corporal; Gassed, 28 October, 1918; Phillippi, 

West Virginia. 
Golden, Oscar F. — Corporal, Phillippi, West Virginia. 
King, Frank J. — Corporal; Appointed Sergeant, 19 November, 1918; 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Alderton, Homer L. — Corporal; Davis, West Virginia. 
Stark, Anthony M. — Corporal; Alum Bridge, West Virginia. 
Hymes, William B.— Chief Mechanic; Belington, West Virginia. 
Grayson, Boyd A.— Mechanic; Keyser, West Virginia. 



BATTERY B 251 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. — continued 

Haybeck, Arthur A.— Mechanic; Union City, Pennsylvania. 

Moore, Wilbur S.— Mechanic; Killed in action, 31 October, 1918; Grafton, 

West Virginia. 
Hite, Charles P.— Cook; Warm Springs, Virginia. 
Gillilan, Guy W.— Cook; Lewisburg, West Virginia. 
Taylor, Andrew J.— Cook; Stanley, Virginia. 
Wynne, Hunter W., Jr.— Cook; Toano, Virginia. 
Boyles, Ralph V.— Horseshoer; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Phillippi, 

West Virginia. 
Gainer, Bradford — Horseshoer; Apple Farm, West Virginia. 
McBee, Darnard C— Horseshoer; Phillippi, West Virginia. 
Frame, Hansford E.— Saddler; Tesla, West Virginia. 
Neal, Hubert H.— Bugler; Lewisburg, West Virginia. 
Scott, Earl — Bugler; Erbacon, West Virginia. 
Potter, John L.^Bugler; Appointed Corporal, 14 November, 1918; Williams- 

poit, Pennsylvania. 

Privates, First Class 

Adkison, Dallas C— Private first class; Transferred to SOth Division 
M. P., 28 December, 1918; Buckeye, West Virginia. 

Bean, Arthur C— Private first class; Gassed and evacuated, 28 September, 
1918; Green Springs, West Virginia. 

Butcher, William L.— Private first class; Weston, West Virginia. 

Conrad, Herljert M.— Private first class; Wounded, 3 November, 1918; 
Wilkinsburg, Pennsjdvania. 

Cook, John A. — Private first class ; Circleville, West Virginia. 

Crawford, Fife C— Private first class; Transferred to SOth Division M. P.. 
28 December, 1918; Mill Creek, West Virginia. 

Daniel, Hobart— Private first class; Fayetteville, West Virginia. 

Dashiell, James A. — Private first class; Evacuated sick; Portsmouth, Virginia 

Dilettose, Sam — Private first class; Parsons, West Virginia. 

Gibson, Charies B.— Private first class; Transferred to hospital, 29 Decem- 
ber, 1918; Roanoke, West Virginia. 

Hays, Ray W.— Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 14 November, 1918; 
Harding, West Virginia. 



252 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates, First Class — continued 

Heiss, Emil T. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 14 November, 19 18; 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Hendrickson, Claude B. — Private first class; Appointed Mechanic, 9 Novem- 
ber, 1918; Burley, West Virginia. 
Kesler, Edgar A. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 14 November, 

1918; Clifty, West Virginia. 
La Rue, Graham H. — Private first class; Hillsboro, West Virginia. 
Lewis, Darius — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 14 November,1918; 

Hacker Valley, West Virginia. 
McMillen, James J. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 14 November, 

1918; Elkins, West Virginia. 
McMurdo, William — Private first class; Century, West Virginia. 
Reeds, Francis A. — Private first class; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; 

Sistersville, West Virginia. 
Santalucia, Mike — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 6 October, 

1918; Parsons, West Virginia. 
Shafer, Francis R. — Private first class; Appointed Horseshoer, 17 November, 

1918; Millstone, West Virginia. 
Songer, Don — Private first class; Olcott, West Virginia. 
Straley,Harvey V. — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 14 October, 

1918; Jane Lew, West Virginia. 
Strasler, Gorman — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 6 October, 

1918; Los Angeles, California. 
Withrow, Foza A. — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 31 October, 

1918; Marvel, West Virginia. 

Privates 

Beckwith, Wilfred T.— Private; Appointed Corporal, 14 November, 1918; 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Beisel, George A.— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Bodenschatz, John J.— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 

Bosley, Russel A.— Private; Bonnie, West Virginia. 

Braddick, Mike— Private. 



BATTERY B 253 

Privates — continued 

Brightmore, William — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Brown, Osa O. — Private; Springfield, West Virginia. 

Buchholz, Edward — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Burnside, Loyd — Private; Freemansburg, West Virginia. 

Cade, Porter L. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 1918; 

Belington, West Virginia. 
Cassett, Charles — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 14 October, 1918; 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Champion, Paul T. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 

1918; Battleboro, North Carolina. 
Christman, Adolph — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 
Coleman, James J. — Private ; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Colligan, Harry — Private; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Cooney, Robert J. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 

1918; Erie, Pennsylvania. 
Costigan, Theodore B. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Crom, Louis E. — Private; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Culver, Earl E. — Private; Hightown, Pennsylvania. 
Darrah, Walter J. — Private; Andalusia, Pennsylvania. 
Deitrich, John H. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 

1918; Appointed Corporal, 21 March, 1919; Elimsport, Pennsylvania. 
Dixon, Herbert — Private; Appointed Private first class, 21 March, 1919; 

Minden, West Virginia. 
Donell, Clarence — Private; Long Branch, West Virginia. 
Donovan, William R. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 

1918; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Dougherty, Edward A. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 25 October, 

1918; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Duff, Frank T. — Private; Greensburg, Pennsylvania. ' 

Duffy, Patrick O. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 1918; 

Baltimore, Maryland. 
Dunlap, Raymond D. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 

1918; Duquesne, Pennsjdvania. 
Eicher, Harry — Private; Brownsville, Pennsylvania. 



254 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates — continued 

Ely, William H. — Private; Fallsington, Pennsylvania. 

Evans, James 0. — Private ; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 1918; 

Red Star, West Virginia. 
Fiorentino, Domenico — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 
Fisher, Lawrence, W. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Fitzgerald, Edward — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Fitzwater, James L. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 

1918; Belington, West Virginia. 
Fuci, Frank A. — Private; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Gainer, Chlorus D. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 

1918; Nestorville, West Virginia. 
Gimber, Charles — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 9 November, 1918; 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Glass, Roy G. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Frugality, 

Pennsylvania. 
Goldinger, Andrew M. — Private; Brackenridge, Pennsylvania. 
Gosnell, Charles E. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 

1918; Washington, D. C. 
Gougler, Robert L. — Private; Shillington, Penn.sylvania. 
Gricks, Harry — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Barnesboro, 

Pennsylvania. 
Hankins, Ralph I — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918 — Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Hanson, Wilbur D. — Private; Gassed and evacuated, 28 September, 1918; 

Queen Shoals, West Virginia. 
Hardee, David C. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Four Oaks, 

West Virginia. 
Hickman, James W. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 

1918; Shoemakersville, Pennsylvania. 
Hein, Frederick K. — Private; Evacuated sick; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Hendrickson, John F. — Private; Appointed Mechanic, 9 November, 1918; 

Chester, Pennsylvania. 
Hendrikofski, Albert C— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 



BATTERY B 255 

Privates — continued 

Henry, Gilbert T.— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Mulroy, 

Pennsjdvania. 
Hinkle, Lester — Private; Parsons, West Virginia. 
Hott, David R. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 1918; 

Ruckman, West Virginia. 
Hott, Ira C. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, '1918; 

Shanks, West Virginia. 
Hrabak, Frank — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
HufTnagle, John M. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 

1918; Lewistown, Pennsylvania. 
Jones, Sidney M. — Private ; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 1918; 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Keiser, John W. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 18 March, 1918; 

Belington, West Virginia. 
Keller, Ernest L. — Private; Phillippi, West Virginia. 
Kelly, Thomas S. — Private; Montgomery, West Virginia. 
Kennedy, Edward A. — Private; Bristol, Pennsylvania. 
Kiernan, James J. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Killian, John S. — Private; Ti-ansferred, 14 November, 1918; Shickshinny, 

Pennsylvania. 
Kovler, Victor E. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Kramer, John I. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 6 October, 1918; 

Died in hospital; Belington, West Virginia. 
Kunz, Frank A. — Private; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Lester, David G. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 18 March, 1918; 

Carlton, Georgia. 
Lutter, Frank — Private; Transferred, 14 Novemer, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Margerum, Mark — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Bristol, 

Pennsylvania. 
Mathew, Andrew L. — Private; Killed in action, 18 October, 1918; Volga, 

West Virginia. 
McGann, Frank — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
McGrath, John J. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 



256 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates — continued 

McKeever, Clio B. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 4 November, 1918; 
Died in hospital; Beard, West Virginia. 

McKelvey, Patrick — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 
1918; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Metzger, Henry R. — Private; Danville, Pennsylvania. 

Miller, William R. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Murphy, Dennis — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Neidig, Freeman F. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 18 March, 
1918; Northumberland, Pennsylvania. 

Norbeck, James F. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Pennepacker, Reese B. — Private; Strodes Mills, Pennsylvania. 

Rensel, William A. — Private; Wounded, 10 October, 1918; Sigel, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Rhodes, Sidney E. — Private; MacMullen, Virginia. 

Ricciardi, Peter — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Bristol, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Richards, Jay C. — Private; Blairsville, Pennsylvania. 

Riley, Thomas S. — Private; Killed in action, 6 October, 1918; Weston, 

West Virginia. 
Ritrovitz, John — Private; Plymouth, Pennsylvania. 
Robinson, Hoy S. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 

1918; Replete, West Virginia. 
Roche, James A. — Private; Bristol, Pennsylvania. 
Ross, James H. — Private; Trappe, Maryland. 
Ross, Phil. McK. — Private; Ivydale, West Virginia. 
Ryan, Charles — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 1918; 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Schlecht, Nathan P. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Seltzer, Nevin R.— Private; Wounded and evacuated, 31 October, 1918; 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 

Serafini, Venango — Private; Transferred, 14 November,1918; Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Shanholtzer, Jesse H.— Private; Appointed Private first class, 19; March, 
1919; Kirby, West Virginia. 



BATTERY B 257 

Privates — continued 

Shank, Elmer K. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Danville, 

Pennsylvania. 
Shearer, Samuel L. — Private; Hummelstown, Pennsylvania. 
Shehan, Edgar M. — Private; Lewistown, Pennsylvania. 
Simpson, George J. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Small, Samuel C. — Private; Gassed, 28 October, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Smith, Lawrence H. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Roulette, 

Pennsylvania. 
Smouse, George F. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Henrietta, 

Pennsylvania. 
Snook, Isaac J. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 1918; 

Appointed Corporal, 5 March, 1919; Lewistown, Pennsylvania. 
Snyder, Job H. — Private; Kessel, West Virginia. 
Stanko, Frank J. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Dunmore, 

Pennsylvania. 
Stephenson, Robert E. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 
Taylor, George W. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Thompson, Albert F. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Elk Ridge, 

West Virginia. 
Tremarchi, Giuseppe — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 
Turner, Clyde H. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 1918; 

Weston, West Virginia. 
Ware, Aaron — Private; Wounded, 23 October, 1918; Hamilton, West 

Virginia. 
Wheeler, Charlie — Private; Wounded, 31 October, 1918; Appointed Private 

first class, 9 November, 1918; Adrian, West Virginia. 
White, Dominick J. — Private; Weston, West Virginia. 
Whiteman, William W. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 

1918; Appointed Cook, 11 January, 1919; Romney, West Virginia. 
Wiant, Fleming — Private; Appointed Corporal, 14 November, 1918; 

Burnsville, W^est Virginia. 



258 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates — co ntin ued 

Woodford, Hugh L. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 6 October, 1918; 

Chicago, lUinois. 
Wylondek, John — Private; Chicago, lUinois. 
Yinghng, Fred — Private; Appointed Private first class, 9 November, 1918; 

Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania. 
Youngblood, Clarence V. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 18 March, 

1918; Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. 

Battery C 

Officers 

Penniman, George D., Jr. — Captain; Wounded, 20 October, 1918; Stevenson, 

Maryland. 
Morgan, Edwin F. A. — 1st Lieutenant; Appointed Captain, 24 February, 

1919; Chevy Chase, Maryland. 
Penniman, John A. D. — 1st Lieutenant; 924 Cathedral Street, Baltimore, 

Maryland. 
Gill, Alfred D. — 2d Lieutenant; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Lake 

Geneva, Wisconsin. 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. 

Patterson, Frank H. — 1st Sergeant; Richwood, West Virginia. 

McDonald, Ralph E. — Supply Sergeant; Weston, West Virginia. 

Davis, Ira D. — Mess Sergeant; Summersville, West Virginia. 

Allen, Arthur H. — Stable Sergeant; Tioga, West Virginia. 

Brooks, Dudley T. — Sergeant; Richwood, West Virginia. 

Lambert, George R. — Sergeant; Delphi, West Virginia. 

NewaUis, George — Sergeant; Wounded and evacuated, 20 October, 1918; 

Died in hospital; Elizabeth, New Jersey. 
Dulin, Edwin L. — Sergeant; Transferred to SOS hospital, 2 October, 1918; 

Sutton, West Virginia. 
Bright, James C. — Sergeant; Richwood, Virginia. 
Brooks, George F. — Sergeant; Richwood, West Virginia. 
Hickman, Bert H. — Sergeant; Wounded and evacuated, 2 October, 1918; 

Died in hospital; Calvin, West Virginia. 
Cox, Irvin — Sergeant; Nile, West Virginia. 



BATTERY C 259 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. — contimied 

Gumm, Aaron H. — Sergeant; Transferred to O. T. C. Saumur; Frametown, 

West Virginia. 
Humphreys, Milton H. — Corporal; Reduced to Private and transferred, 

14 November, 1918; Sutton, West Virginia. 
Boggs, Thomas P. — Corporal; Appointed Sergeant, 14 November, 1918; 

Sutton, West Virginia. 
Dorsey, Daniel M. — Corporal; Drennen, West Virginia. 
Wright, Okey H. — Corporal; Appointed Sergeant, 8 March, 1918; Richwood, 

West Virginia. 
Baber, Robert — Corporal; Delphi, West Virginia. 
Gilbert, James W. — Corporal; Tioga, West Virginia. 
Carder, Adam H. — Corporal; Tesla, West Virginia. 
Dorsey, Lutian A. — Corporal; Levisay, West Virginia. 
Green, Oliver — Corporal, Sutton, West Virginia. 
Woods, Carl — Corporal; Beaver, West Virginia. 
Woods, Walter E. — Corporal; Beaver, West. Virginia. 
Darsie, Hugh D. — Corporal; Wounded and evacuated, 26 September, 1918; 

Returned to duty and sent to English University; Homestead, 

Pennsylvania. 
Brizius, Arthur G. — Corporal; Appointed Sergeant, 14 November, 1918; 

Evansville, Indiana. 

Evans, Lytle — Corporal; Appointed Sergeant, 14 November, 1918; Sutton, 

West Virginia. 
Long, Oley M. — Corporal; Sutton, West Virginia. 
Whitney, Fred C. — Corporal; Mayfield, New York. 
Bodoh, Joseph E. — Corporal; New London, Wisconsin. 
Subluskey, Leo A. — Corporal; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 
Groves, George M. — Corporal; Appointed Sergeant, 5 March, 1919; Ophelia, 

West Virginia. 
Miller, George — Corporal; Richwood, West Virginia. 
Hickman, Willard B. — Corporal; Wounded and evacuated, 26 September, 

1918; Strange Creek, West Virginia. 
Lambert, Harry — Corporal; Carl, West Virginia. 
Morton, Arleigh L. — Corporal; Richwood, West Virginia. 
Darnall, Arlo G. — Chief Mechanic; Wounded and evacuated, 20 October, 

1918; Weston, West Virginia. 



260 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. — continued 

Mays, Okey A.— Mechanic; Appointed Chief Mechanic, 15 November, 1918; 
Richwood, West Virginia. 

CoUins, Alvin L. — Mechanic ; Richwood, West Virginia. 

Floyd, Frederick E. — Mechanic; Sutton, West Virginia. 

Adkins, John S.— Cook; Richwood, West Virginia. 

Bleigh, Jacob C. — Cook; Woodbine, West Virginia. 

Montgomery, WiUiam L — Cook; Weston, West Virginia. 

Wilson, Harry — Cook; Weston, West Virginia. 

Burkhammer, Alpha R. — Horseshoer; Weston, West Virginia. 

Davis, Roy W. — Horseshoer; Reduced to Private, 17 January, 1919; Curtin, 
West Virginia. 

Greenleaf, Oscar — Horseshoer; Cedarville, West Virginia. 

Mealey, Darius M. — Saddler; Walkersville, West Virginia. 

Casto, Edgar M. — Bugler; Muddlety, West Virginia. 

Dougherty, Edward F. — Bugler; Reduced to Private, 4 April, 1919; Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Wernz, Joseph — Bugler; Tunnel Hill, Pennsylvania. 

Privates, First Class 

Couger, Emory R. — Private first class; Sutton, West Virginia. 

Crawford, Robert J. — Private first class; Reduced to Private, 4 April, 1919; 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Dorsey, Volley T. — Private first class; Curtin, West Virginia. 
Fitzwater, Jesse — Private first class; Lizenmores, West Virginia. 
Francis, John, Jr. — Private first class; Roanoke, West Virginia. 
Geer, Dwight L. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 5 March, 1919; 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Graham, William H. — Private first class; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Hanna, Lester — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 19 October, 

1918; Beaver, West Virginia. 
Horbury, Orville E. — Private first class; Reduced to Private, 4 April, 1919; 

Transferred, 14 April, 1919; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Jarvis, Roy H. — Private first class; Weston, West Virginia. 
Kelly, Charles W. — Private first class; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Keener, Ed.— Private first class; Canfield, West Virginia. 



BATTERY C 261 

Privates, First Class — continued 

Kerwell, Ray W. — Private first class; Montgomery, Pennsylvania. 

Lawson, John H. — Private first class; Morris, West Virginia. 

Loebel, Lewis — Private first class; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Long, William H. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 8 March, 1919; 

Frametown, West Virginia. 
Lott, Marion E. — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 

1919; Mineral Wells, West Virginia. 
Lynch, Ray — Private first class; Hurst, West Virginia. 
McCartney, R03' C. — Private first class; Weston, West Virginia. 
McClung, Lester — Private first class; Canvas, West Virginia. 
McWilliams, Wesley — Private first class; Turtle Creek, Pennsylvania. 
Moffitt, Robert — Private first clitss; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Mollohan Wilkie — Private first class; Richwood, West Virginia. 
Morrison, Leslie W. — Private first class; Mt. Lookout, West Virginia. 
MuUins, Albert D. — Private first class; Curtin, West Virginia. 
Neil, Kyle — Private first class; Drennen, West Virginia. 
Nieder, Mathew F. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 5 March, 1919; 

Latrobe, Pennsylvania. 
Pfeifer, William O. — Private first class; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Pratt, French R. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 21 March, 1919; 

Weston, West Virginia. 
Pumphrey, William S. — Private first class; Orlando, West Virginia. 
Rosenzweig, Morris — Private first class; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Samples, Lonnie B. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 5 March, 1919; 

Procious, West Virginia. 
Scott, Okey — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 14 November, 1918; 

Birch River, West Virginia. 
Sergeant, Diar F. — Private first class; Clem, West Virginia. 
Shackelford, Edward B. — Private first class; Appointed Mechanic, 4 March, 

1919; Alum Bridge, West Virginia. 
Sparks, Joseph W. — Private first class; Persinger, West Virginia. 
Steel, Okey — Private first class; Holcomb, West Virginia. 
Stott, Clarence W. — Private first class; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Sullivan, Frederick F. — Private first class; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 



262 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates, First Class — continued 

Swisher, Alvin B.— Private first class; Horner, West Virginia. 

Swisher, Fred A. — Private first class; Appointed Horseshoer, 8 March, 1919; 

Horner, West Virginia. 
Swisher, Lindsay S. — Private first class; Horner, West Virginia. 
Taylor, John B. — Private first class; Holcomb, West Virginia. 
Walker, Ulysses C. — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 26 Septem- 
ber, 1918; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Ware, Emery — Private first class; Centralia, West Virginia. 
Williams, Ovid — Private first class; Poe, West Virginia. 
Wyatt, Luther — Private first class; Sutton, West Virginia. 

Privates 

Adkins, Clem M. — Private; Richwood, West Virginia. 

Arndt, Thomas L. — Private; Gassed and evacuated, 29 September, 1918; 

Bitumen, Pennsylvania. 
Bakish, John — Private; Appointed Private first class, 5 March, 1919; 

Shenandoah, Pennsylvania. 
Barnett, John C. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 26 October, 1918; 

Sutton, West Virginia. 
Barrett, Thomas C. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 28 September, 

1918; Cranton, Pennsylvania. 
Bedley, Frank J. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Bennett, George R. — Private; Montoursville, Pennsylvania. 
Binder, John — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Bishop, Redwine — Private; Clinchport, Virginia. 
Boilon, Thurman — Private; Camden, West Virginia. 

Bosenberg, William C. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Bostian, Howard E. — Private; Milton, Pennsylvania. 
Bryan, Russell E. — Private; Montoursville, Pennsylvania. 
Butsavitch, Anthony— Private ; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 



BATTERY C 263 

Privates — contin ued 

Caringi, Vincenzo — Private; Appointed Private first class, 5 March, 1919; 
Berwick, Pennsylvania. 

Carr, Charley M. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 8 March, 1919; 
Nash, Virginia. 

Coleman, Michael J. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Cook, George M. — Private; Transferred, 27 December, 1918; Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Daniels, James — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Delaney, James F. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Dillon, James — Private; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Dinger, Charles P. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 5 March, 1919; 
Richwood, West Virginia. 

Dunn, James — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Edwards, George — Private; Appointed Private first class, 5 March, 1919; 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Eicher, Clarence — Private; Brownsville, Pennsylvania. 

Eitle, Paul C. — Private; Gassed and evacuated, 2 November, 1918; Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Engh, Ralph — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Evans, John H. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Ferguson, William F. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia; Penn.sj'lvania. 

Gallagher, Charles A. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Garrison, Lynn — Private; Lando, South Carolina. 

Garrity, John W. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Gedeon, William C. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 

Gerwig, Lonnie 0. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 5 March, 1919; 
Appointed Corporal, 2 March, 1919; Knapp, West Virginia. 

Ginley, Thomas J. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Graham, Alexander T. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 24 September, 
1918; Returned to duty; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 



264 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates — continued 

Gray, Mansel A. — Private; Ben Bush, West Virginia. 

Hall, Grover C. — Private; Nallen, West Virginia. 

Hamon, Stafford — Private; Beaver, West Virginia. 

Harper, Charles D. — Private; Circleville, West Virginia. 

Hassinger, Frank P. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Herbert, James P. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Hosey, Lemon L. — Private; Wounded, 4 November, 1918; Centralia, West 

Virginia. 
Jackson, Tobe — Private; Griffin, Georgia. 
Kerchner, Andrew — Private; Transferred, 24 December, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Kister, Kenneth K. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Klumpp, Louis J. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Krause, Edward C. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Pecos, 

Texas. 
Lang, William — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Lauber, Herman — Private; York, Pennsylvania. 
Lentz, Clarence E. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Lynn, Robert J. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
MacDougall, Earl — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Mayer, Harry A.— Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
McCarney, Joseph P.— Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 
Middlebrooks, Gary T.— Private; Chipley, Georgia. 
Miller, Frank— Private ; Griffin, Georgia. 
Moses, General G.— Private; Appointed Private first class, 8 March, 1919; 

Pool, West Virginia. 
Munley, Edward J.— Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Nichols, General G.— Private; Osie, West Virginia. 



BATTERY C 265 

Privates — co nt in ued 

O'Connell, James J. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 4 April, 1919; 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

O'Donnell, William J. — Private; Evacuated sick, 28 October, 1918; Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Ost, William — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Osterman, Andrew J. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Perkins, Robert E. — Private; Jennings, West Virginia. 

Pittsenberger, Lovell S. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 5 March, 
1919; Carl, West Virginia. 

Rautzenberg, William C. ^Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Reichert, Gustav H. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Reis, Walter M. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Rhoads, William E. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 

Rich, Charles E. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Richard, George F. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 20 October, 1918; 
Died in hospital; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Richmond, Willie — Private; Levisay, West Virginia. 

Roeder, Frank F. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Rutherford, Alexander — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Rutledge, Marion R. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 20 October, 

1918; Died in hospital; Poe, West Virginia. 
Schoenfield, William F. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Sedler, Edwin C. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 

Sierawski, Henry — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; St. Louis, 
Missouri. 

Simmons, Lakie B. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 19 October, 1918; 
Swiss, West Virginia. 



266 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates — continued 

Sparks, Benjamin H. — Private; Killed in action, 7 October, 1918; Richwood, 

West Virginia. 
Stahley, Archie E. — Private; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 
Stanley, George — Private; Appointed Private first class, 8 March, 1919; 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Stark, Harry C. — Private; Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 
Stein, Morris — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Taylor, Hubert — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Trent, James H. — Private; Tioga, West Virginia. 
Vaughan, George M. — Private; Gassed, 29 September, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Walde, Rudolph J. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 
Walsh, Robert J. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Ward, Francis P. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Whitcomb, Thomas J. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 
Williams, Frazier A. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 5 March, 

1919; Richwood, West Virginia. 
Williams, Robert — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Weston, West 

Virginia. 
Wine, Thomas J., Jr. — Private; Appointed Bugler, 8 March, 1919; Heater, 

West Virginia. 
Young, Walter A. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 



Second Battalion Headquarters 

Nash, John — Major; Commanding Battahon; 1905 North Street, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Adams, Stuart C. — 1st Lieutenant Liaison Officer; Wounded and evacuated, 
26 September, 1918; 160 Mt. Pleasant Avenue, West Orange, New Jersey. 

Miller, Roscoe F. — 1st Lieutenant Gas and Ammunition Officer; Appointed 
Regimental Gas and Ammunition Officer, 28 October, 1918; Morpeth, Ontario, 
Canada. 

Reynolds,Harold L — 1st Lieutenant (Medical) Battalion Surgeon; Appoint- 
ed Captain, 10 March, 1919; Lexington, Georgia. 

Zinkham, George M. — 1st Lieutenant (Veterinarian) Battalion Veterinarian; 
Appointed Captain, 13 November, 1918; 2020 Pulaski Street, Baltimore, Mary- 
land. 

Burwell, Edward B., Jr. — 2d Lieutenant Radio Officer; Appointed 1st 
Lieutenant, 15 September, 1918; Gassed, 8 OctobcM-, 1918 and evacuated, 10 
October, 1918; Returned to duty, December, 1918; Upperville, Virginia. 

Muzzy, Henry E. — 2d Lieutenant; Appointed 1st Lieutenant, 15 September, 
1918; 414 Broadway, Paterson, New Jersey. 

Cowardin, Samuel P. — 2d Lieutenant and Telephone Officer; Transferred, 
14 November, 1918; 901 North 36th Street, Richmond, Virginia. 

Battery D 

Ojficers 

Cross, Eben J. D. — 1st Lieutenant Commanding Battery; To D. S., 22 Octo- 
ber, 1918; Appointed Captain, 24 February, 1919; 114 East Eager 
Street, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Armstrong, Walter T. — 2d Lieutenant ; Appointed 1st Lieutenant, 15 Septem- 
ber, 1918; 1162 Broad Street, Newark, New Jersey. 

MacRae, Colin D. — 2d Lieutenant; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; 
Brooklyn, New York. 



268 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Noncotmmssioried Officers, Etc. 

Hovatter, Orpha G.— 1st Sergeant; Parsons, West Virginia. 

Seitz, Jacob— Supply Sergeant; Elkins, West Virginia. 

Payne, Olin F.— Mess Sergeant; Monitor, West Virginia. 

Kittle, Sheriden L.— Stable Sergeant; Reduced to Sergeant, 5 March, 1919; 

Elkins, West Virginia. 
Dowdy, Ruben L. — Sergeant. 
Graham, Fred— Sergeant ; Transferred to SOS, 11 October, 1918; Elkins, 

West Virginia. 
Weikle, Luther C. — Sergeant; Salt Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. 
Rennix, Clarence C. — Sergeant; Glady, West Virginia. 
Craig, Ether 0. — Sergeant; Peterstown, West Virginia. 
Dean, Charles A. — Sergeant; Transferred to Germany, 7 February, 1919; 

Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Riffle, Roy — Sergeant; Wounded, 1 October, 1918; Pickens, West Virginia. 
Manson, Ralph H. — Sergeant; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Marquess, Bradford — Sergeant; Wounded and evacuated, 31 October, 

1918; Returned to duty, 9 December, 1918; St. George, West Virginia. 
Foley, John W. — Sergeant; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Wilhams, Sidney C. — Corporal; Appointed Sergeant, 7 October, 1918; 

Appointed, Stable Sergeant, 10 October, 1918 ; Peterstown, West Virginia . 
Currence, Hileary — Corporal; Mill Creek, West Virginia. 
Truman, Floyd B. — Corporal; Clay, West Virginia. 
Shumate, Lawson G. — Corporal; Salt Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. 
McComas, Virgil — Corporal; Wounded and evacuated, 26 October, 1918; 

Glen, West Virginia. 
Langkammer, Howard T. — Corporal; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Ketterman, Randall G. — Corporal; Wounded and evacuated, 26 October, 

1918; Died in hospital; Elkins, West Virginia. 
Mann, Lonie — Corporal; Ballard, West Virginia. 
Weitzel, Alfred G. — Corporal; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Cooksey, Lawrence E. — Corporal; Tallahassee, Florida. 
Barrickman, Thomas W. — Corporal; Adolph, West Virginia. 
Barry, Richard — Corporal; Elkins, West Virginia. 
Moran, Grover A — Corporal; Kerens, West Virginia. 
Charrington, Arthur M.— Corporal; Warrenton, Virginia. 



BATTERY D 269 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. — continued 

Haenle, Frank C. — Corporal; Transferred to Headquarters Compam^ 

313th F. A., 13 April, 1919; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
McCormack, Frank W. — Corporal; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Nickell, Wallace H. — Corporal; Sinks Grove, West Virginia. 
Rouse, William — Corporal; Evenvvood, West Virginia. 
Peirson, Frank M. — Corporal; Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. 
Zepp, Walter J. — Corporal; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Foster, Byron M. — Corporal; Du Bois, Pennsylvania. 
Darr, Claude E. — Chief Mechanic; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Martin, Clyde H. — Mechanic; Glace, West Virginia. 
Miller, Edwin V. — Mechanic; Glibe, West Virginia. 
Tacy, Everett H. — Mechanic; Huttonsville, West Virginia. 
Comer, Owen B. — Cook; Appointed Corporal, 7 October, 1918; Harrison, 

West Virginia. 
Glass, Luther C. — Cook; Reduced to Private, 13 December, 1918; Elkins, 

West Virginia. 
Whitcomb, Walter S. — Cook; Horton, West Virginia. 
Comer, William W. — Cook; Harrison, West Virginia. 
Ault, Henry C. — Horseshoer; Pansy, West Virginia. 
Roderick, Vernon — Horseshoer; Elk Garden, West Virginia. 
Winkler, Dart A. — Horseshoer; Pickens, West Virginia. 
Detweiller, Miles — Saddler; Annville, Pennsylvania. 
Dimaio, Nicola — Bugler; Harding, West Virginia. 

Privates, First Class 

Barrickman, Lewis — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 18 November, 

1918; Adolph, West Virginia. 
Bell, John I. — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 8 November, 

1918; Died in hospital; Mifflintown, Pennsylvania. 
Bell, Thamer J. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 18 November, 

1918; Lee Bell, West Virginia. 
Biegda, Frank M. — Private first class; Died of disease, 10 January, 1919; 

Nanticock, Pennsylvania. 
Blessing, James E. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 16 March, 

1919; Letart, West Virginia. 



270 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates, First Class — continued 

Broadwater, Floyd E. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 16 March, 
1919; Piedmont, West Virginia. 

Bryant, Henry M. — Private first class; Warren, Virginia. 

Cassett, William P. — Private first class; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 

Christ, Walter F. — Private first class; Transferred to Prov. M. P. Co., 
23 December, 1918; Geistown, Pennsylvania. 

Coleman, Cecil R. — Private first class; Pickens, West Virginia. 

Colicchio, Joseph G. — Private first class; Kulpmont, Pennsylvania. 

Conrad, Arthur B. — Private first class; Appointed Cook, 24 December, 
1918; Maysville, West Virginia. 

Currence, Mitchell — Private first class; Huttonsville, West Virginia. 

Cutright, George C. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 20 March, 
1919; Coalton, West Virginia. 

Doss, Hampton 0. — Private first class; Waiteville, West Virginia. 

Ellis, John H. — Private first class; Clymer, Pennsylvania. 

Galassi, Guiseppe — Private first class; Harding, West Virginia. 

Gise, William H. — Private first class; Abbottstown, Pennsylvania. 

Graham, Kester E. — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 26 October, 
1918; Queen Shoals, West Virginia. 

Hamstead, Charles V. — Private first class; Maysville, West Virginia. 

Hanley, Edward J. — Private first class; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Humphrey, Harry B. — Private first class; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Kines, Norman W. — Private first class; Wounded, 26 October, 1918; Dun- 
cannon, Pennsylvania. 

Kisela, John A. — Private first class; Wounded, 1 October, 1918; Bidwell, 
Iowa. 

Koch, Edward C. — Private first class; West Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Lint, William E. — Private first class; Meyersdale, Pennsylvania. 

McCormick, Elzie G. — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 26 Octo- 
ber, 1918; Waiteville, West Virginia. 

McNoll, Roy D. — Private first class; Bunker Hill, West Virginia. 

Miller, Jacob G. — Private first class; Falling Waters, West Virginia. 

Nail, John S. — Private first class; Houtzdale, Pennsylvania. 

Neff, Leo C. — Private first class; Beaverdale, Pennsylvania. 

Palmer, Charles S.— Private first class; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 



BATTERY D 271 

Privates, First Class — continued 

Paugh, Dorsey — Private first class; Mabie, West ^'irginia. 

Pratt, John A. — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 
1918; Bayard, West Virginia. 

Probilla, Paul — Private first class; Shamokin, Pennsylvania. 

Riordan, James F. — Private first class; Nanticock, Pennsylvania. 

Rouark, William H. — Private first class; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 

Sayre, Jonas E. — Private first class; Sweet Springs, West Virginia. 

Schmoyer, Harvey T.— Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 26 
October, 1918; Pottstown, Pennsylvania. 

Sheaffer, William K.— Private first class; Lititz, Pennsylvania. 

Spangler, Ernest E.— Private first class; Ballard, West Virginia. 

Staliano, Frank — Private first class; Port Kennedy, Pennsylvania. 

Swecker, Jacob B.— Private first class— Juanita, West Virginia. 

Swiger, Anthony W.— Private first class; Wounded, 1 October, 1918; Ap- 
pointed Corporal, 18 November, 1918; Mill Creek, West Virginia. 

Walkup, Homer— Private first class; Wolf Creek, W^est Virginia. 

Weiss, Harold— Private first class; Transferred to SOS hospital, 5 April, 
1919; Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. 

Workman, Oscar T. — Private first class; Dawson, Pennsylvania. 

Zickefoose, James A.— Private first class; Cubana, West Virginia. 

Privates 

Abriola, Joseph — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Allen, Charles A. — Private; Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. 

Bare, Henry H. — Private; Greenwood, Pennsylvania. 

Belin, Edward J.— Private; Appointed Private first class, 20 March, 1919; 
Smoke Run, Pennsylvania. 

Bonatuci, Umberto— Private ; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 

Boyle, John J. — Private; Munhall, Pennsylvania. 

Brenneman, Harry K. — Private; Lawn, Pennsylvania. 

Bromley, Edgar E. — Private; Danville, Illinois. 

Brown, Clarence V.— Private; Valley Fork, West Virginia. 

Brown, James W.— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Braddock, 
Pennsylvania. 



272 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates — continued 

Campbell, Joseph M.— Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Carlson, Carl J.— Private; Kersey, Pennsylvania. 

Cart, Walter H. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 1918; 

Clifty, West Virginia. 
Castellucci, Romeo — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 
Casto, Arden B. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 20 March, 1919; 

Pickens, West Virginia. 
Cawley, John — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 18 October, 1918; 

Scranton, Pennsylvania. 
Chne, Edward B. — Private; Bunker Hill, West Virginia. 
Coberly, Leland — Private; Appointed Private first class, 20 March, 1919; 

Beverly, West Virginia. 
Colbert, Raymond A. — Private; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Cole, James B. — Private; Falling Waters, West Virginia. 
Connell, John J. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 7 October, 1918; 

Returned to duty, 19 December, 1918; Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. 
Cusick, Thomas P. — Private; Scranton, Pennsylvania. 
Danzig, Albert A. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Davies, Evan — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Scranton, 

Pennsylvania. 
Detora, John — Private; Shamokin, Pennsylvania. 
Dick, Frank T. — Private; Marysville, Pennsylvania. 
Diegidio, Guerino — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Dixon, George F. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Bigler, 

Pennsylvania. 
Dockey, John — Private; Hickory Corners, Pennsylvania. 
Dunlap, George M. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Harrisburg, 

Pennsylvania. 
Eckert, John — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Edwards, Clifton L. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 8 November, 1918; 

Returned to duty; Richmond, Virginia. 
Emswiller, Eugene N. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 26 October, 1918 ; 

Columbia, Pennsylvania. 



BATTERY D 273 

Privates — continued 

Evans, Hugh — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Miners Mills, 

Pennsylvania. 
Fessenden, Glen R. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Rowlette, 

Pennsylvania. 
Fink, Carrol C. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Fisher, Paul E. — Private; Lebanon, Pennsylvania. 
Gear, Wade — Private; Huttonsville, West Virginia. 
Gillon, John — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Grozier, Charles F. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Berwick, 

Pennsylvania. 
Hall, Henry — Private; Appointed Private first class, 2 March, 1919; O'Brien, 

West Virginia. 
Hoivaag, Ole P. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Braddock, 

Pennsylvania. 
Ikenburg, Robert W. — Private; Strattonsville, Pennsylvania. 
Keller, Harry F. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Kleinfetteis- 

ville, Pennsylvania. 
Kerrigan, Patrick F. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 
Kester, Jesse W. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 8 November, 1918; 

Died in hospital; Burnside, Pennsylvania. 
King, James H. — Private; Transferred, 28 March, 1919; Kingsville, West 

Virginia. 
Kirby, Ernest J. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 13 April, 1919; 

Siluria, Alabama. 
Knecht, John — Private; Appointed Private first class, 20 March, 1919; 

Bemis, West Virginia. 
Legg, William W. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 2 March, 1919; 

Fola, West Virginia. 
Lewis, Emmett H. — Private; Appointed Cook, 25 October, 1918; Peters- 
burg, West Virginia. 
Lidwell, Bernard J. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; South Fork, 

Pennsylvania. 
Lobaugh, David P. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Rimersburg, 
Pennsylvania. 



274 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates — continued 

Lower, William H. — Private; Bayard, West Virginia. 

McBride, Fletcher E. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Marietta, 
Pennsylvania. 

McGrannahan, James B. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; 
New Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

McMahon, John A. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Phoenix- 
ville, Pennsylvania. 

McVicker, Samuel E. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918 — Portage, 
Pennsylvania. 

Meadows, Charles L. — Private; Peterstown, West Virginia. 

Meharrey, Joseph W. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 

Miller, Clarence E. — Private; Farrell, Pennsylvania. 

Monroe, Walter D. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 

Moore, Thomas L. — Private; Shamokin, Pennsylvania. 

Moughan, Joseph A. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Port 
Griffeth, Pennsylvania. 

Mulhgan, John J. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Wilkes-Barre, 
Pennsylvania.' 

Murphy, James E. — Private; Latrobe, Pennsylvania. 

O'Boyle, John J. — Private; Transferred, 25 October, 1918 to Base hospital; 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. 

O'Tool, Edward A. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Parizek, Charles — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Latrobe, 
Pennsylvania. 

Pingley, Fife S. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 20 March, 1919; 
Huttonsville, West Virginia. 

Potere, Givacchino — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 

Pugh, James E. — Private; Dixon ville, Pennsylvania. 

Reader, John R. — Private; Tyrone, Pennsylvania. 

Reed, David — Private; Clay, West Virginia. 

Reidenbaugh, Edwin R. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Neffs- 
ville, Pennsylvania. 



BATTERY E 275 

Privates — continued 

Robertson, Edward R. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Romas, Frank — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Puritan, Pennsyl- 
vania. 
Scaliso, Antonio — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Dayton, 

Ohio. 
Snyder, William H. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Shamokin, 

Pennsylvania. 
Tarbell, Eugene D. — Private; Erie, Pennsylvania. 
Troy, Joseph J. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 20 March, 1919; 

Latrobe, Pennsylvania. 
Valentine, Joel — Private; Kulpmont, Pennsylvania. 

Varner, Daniel — Private; Transferred, 2 January, 1919; Salix, Pennsylvania. 
. Walstrom, Walter — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Kane, 

Pennsj^vania. 
Watson, Deforest — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Coudersport, 

Pennsylvania. 
Weik, Jones E. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Newmanstown, 

Pennsylvania. 
West, Thomas — Private; Greenville, South Carolina. 
Wickline, Elijah H. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 20 March, 1919; 

Lindside, West Virginia. 
Wickline, Escu — Private; Centennial, West Virginia. 
Witmer, Myers G. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Meyerstown, 

Pennsylvania. 
Zimmerman, George F. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 2 November, 

1918; Returned to duty, 7 December, 1918; Trevorton, Pennsylvania. 



Battery E 

Officers 

Crandall, Francis W.— Captain; To 1st Battalion C. 0., 18 October, 1918; 

Westfield, New York. 
Gilliam, T. A. W. — 1st Lieutenant; Appointed Captain, 15 September, 

1918; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 1918; 610 Boissevain 

Avenue, Norfolk, Virginia. 



276 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Officers — con tinned 

Steigler, Walter F. — 2d Lieutenant; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; 

535 Howard Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts. 
Cobb, Richard B.— 2d Lieutenant; Transferred, 22 October, 1918; 200 High 

Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. 

Ermentrout, George D. — 1st Sergeant; Reading, Pennsylvania. 

Fine, Harry C. — Supply Sergeant; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 

Dunham, Robert B. — Mess Sergeant; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 

Mason, Robert K. — Stable Sergeant; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 

Miller, Dudley W. — Sergeant; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 

Hammond, Harold W. — Sergeant; Hammond, Indiana. 

Dailey, Harry A. — Sergeant; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 1918; 

Returned to duty, 22 November, 1918; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Gammon, Frank A. — Sergeant; Transferred to 0. T. C. at Saumur, 2 

October, 1918; Rural Retreat, Virginia. 
Boyd, Hunter J. — Sergeant; North Mountain, West Virginia. 
Thomas, John P. — Sergeant; Gassaway, West Virginia. 
Roach, Claud J. — Sergeant; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Kilmer, Charles V. — Sergeant; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Coffindaffer, Joseph E. — Sergeant; Gassaway, West Virginia. 
Kilgore, Pete — Sergeant; Newlest, West Virginia. 
Groves, Albert — Corporal; Gassaway, West Virginia. 
Bean, Loring S. — Corporal; Evacuated sick, 27 October, 1918; Inkerman, 

West Virginia. 
Kraft, John E. — Corporal; Wounded and evacuated, 3 October, 1918; 

Died in hospital ; Frametown, West Virginia. 
Fitzwater, Oscar — Corporal; Wounded and evacuated, 15 October, 1918; 

Moorefield, West Virginia. 
Whitford, Gilbert H. — Corporal; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 

1918 ; Returned to duty, 29 January, 1919 ; Great Cacapon, West Virginia. 
Gibbons, Lovell A. — Corporal; Reduced to Private, 9 March, 1919, Martins- 
burg, West Virginia. 
Frame, Loyd W. — Corporal; Progress, West Virginia. 
GoUaday, John H. — Corporal; Pawpaw, West Virginia. 



BATTERY E 277 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc.— continued 

Beard, Frank B.— Corporal; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 

Ambrose, Lester W.— Corporal; Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. 

Gates, Chester C— Corporal; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 

Kilpatrick, Harrison J.— Corporal ; Wounded, 5 October, 1918; Martin-sburg, 
West Virginia. 

See, Lemuel A. Corjioral; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 1918; 
Returned to duty, 23 December, 1918; Bass, West Virginia. 

De Grange, Cecil L— Corporal; Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. 

Sanders, Hai'old T. — Corporal ; Romney, West Virginia. 

Engleby, Joseph T. — Corporal, Roanoke, Virginia. 

Keyser, Edgar F.— Corporal ; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 

Holton, Earl B.— Corporal; Cherry Run, West ^'irginia. 

Shanholtzer, Roy S.— Chief Mechanic; Wounded and evacuated, 1 Novem- 
ber, 1918; Died in hospital; Levels, West ^'irginia. 

Evans, Earnest C. — Mechanic; Rio, West \'irginia. 

McKeever, Ira S. — Mechanic ; Warrensville, West Virginia. 

Thomas, Raymond E. Mechanic; Ai)pointed Chief Mechanic, 14 April, 
1919; Levels, West Virginia. 

Beard, James E.— Cook; Reduced to Private, 1 December, 1918; Martins- 
burg, West Virginia. 
Brown, Richard N.— Cook; Warrendale, Pennsylvania. 
Stalnaker, Aubrey L. — Cook; Flatwoods, West Virginia. 
Stinebaugh, Daniel — Cook; Magnolia, West Virginia. 
Hubert, George — Horseshoer; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Lupton, Frederick — Horseshoer; Rio, West Virginia. 
Shanholtz, John C. — Horseshoer; Dillons Run, West Virginia. 
Lynch, William T.— Saddler; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Ciciotti, Victor — Bugler; Erie, Pennsylvania. 
Howell, Charles E. — Bugler; Copen, West Virginia. 

Privates, First Class 

Ambrose, Irvin A.— Private first class; Largent, West Virginia. 
Ambrose, John W. — Private first class; Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. 
Ball, Charles H. — Private first class; Copen, West Virginia. 
Bozek, Frank J. — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 23 October, 
1918; Taylor, Pennsylvania. 



278 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates, First Class — continued 

Combs, Harley J.— Private first class; Kirby, West Virginia. 

Conley, John— Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 

1918; Orlando, West Virginia. 
Corbett, Lawrence P. — Private first class; Reynolds ville, Pennsylvania. 
Dawson, Ira L. — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 

1918; Returned to duty, 18 December, 1918; Berkeley Springs, West 

Virginia. 
Dellaria, Paul — Private first class; Orleans Road, West Virginia. 
Devine, James F. — Private first class; Warrior Run, Pennsylvania. 
Enders, Norbert L.— Private first class; Wexford, Pennsylvania. 
Evans, Samuel— Private first class; Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Fahringer, Roger G. — Private first class; Clark's Summit, Pennsylvania. 
Fry, Charles G. — Private first class; Green Spring, West Virginia. 
Grandblaise, Emil T. — Private first class; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Harry, John I. — Private first class; Clearfield, Pennsylvania. 
Haslet, Merle R. — Private first class; Muzette, Pennsylvania. 
Hunger, Fred G. — Private first class; Erie, Pennsylvania. 
Husher, Timothy C. — Private first class; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Jenkins, James V. — Private first class; Wounded, 3 November, 1918; 

Wardensville, West Virginia. 
Lewis, Fred — Private first class; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Mahoncy, Billie J. — Private first class; Carlisle, West Virginia. 
Marshall, Courtney — Private first class; Lost River, West Virginia. 
Mundy, Joseph A. — Private first class; Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. 
Owens, Holmes P. — Private first class; Bunker Hill, West Virginia. 
Puffinberger, Marvin S. — Private first class; Points, West Virginia. 
Rankin, Charles W. — Private first class; Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. 
Rankin, Daniel A. — Private first class; Philadelphia, Pennsjdvania. 
Riordan, Edgar M. — Private first class; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Romer, Edward L. — Private first class; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Ruckman, Melvin K. — Private first class; Hanging Rock, West \^irginia. 
Saville, Howard A. — Private first class; Romney, West Virginia. 
Shipe, Carter D. — Private first class; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Singleton, Jarrett C. — Private first class; Heaty, West Virginia. 



BATTERY E 279 

Privates, Fust Class — continued 

Spaulding, Alva L. — Private first class; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Stout, Edwin R. — Private first class; Buckhannon, West Virginia. 
Swisher, Seymour W. — Private first class; Appointed Mechanic, 14 April, 

1919; Rio, West Virginia. 
Walsh, Thomas J. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 16 November, 

1918; Minooka, Pennsylvania. 

Privates 

Ansert, John H. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Balmcr, John C. — Private; Transferred, 17 November, 1918; Taylor, 

Pennsylvania. 
Becker, Francis H. — Private; Scotdale, Pennsylvania. 
Bennett, McKinnie V. — Private; Blairsville, Pennsylvania. 
Boggs, William G. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Boswell, Coleman A. — Private; Finlow, West Virginia. 
Boyer, Simon K. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Bradley, Alexander — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Branham, Earl M. — Private; Transferred, 15 November, 1918; Carpenter, 

West Virginia. 
Buck, Alfred T. — Private; White Deer, Pennsylvania. 
Buck, Charley G. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsjdvania. 
Burke, Edward S. — Private; Ashley, Pennsylvania. 
Burkett, John F. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Bussey, Charley A. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 1918; 

Returned to duty, 17 December, 1918; Sutton, West Virginia. 
Cappolo, Vincenzo — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania. 
Clair, James A. — Private; Scranton, Pennsylvania. 
Clark, John F. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Clowcr, William S. — Private; Romney, West Virginia. 

CoUeran, Thomas A. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 



280 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates — continued 

Collick, Joseph ('.—Private; Wounded and evacuated, 30 October, 1918; 

Ashley, Pennsylvania. 
Collier, Albert J. — Private; Appointed Corporal, 16 November, 1918; 

Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Combs, Asa B. — Private; Kirby, West Virginia. 
Crouse, Ona H.— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Fayetteville, 

West Virginia. 
Dagnilli, Crescenzo — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 
Damaro, Rosario — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania. 
Danilo, Wassil P. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Ashley, 

Pennsylvania. 
EUard, Edward — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 1918; 

Returned to duty, 18 December, 1918; Minooka, Pennsylvania. 
Ference, Steve — Private; Beaver Meadows, Pennsylvania. 
Ferguson, Paul S. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Mauch Chunk 

Pennsylvania. 
Files, Lafayette — Private; Cherry Run, West Virginia. 
Flynn, Joseph W. — Private; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Forest, WilUam 0. — Private; Transferred ,14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Fors, Oscar — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Waltonville, 

Pennsylvania. 
Fortney, Fenton McS. — Private; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 
Frey, Henry J. — Private; Taylor, Pennsylvania. 
Friend, Opha B. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 25 October, 1918; 

Gassaway, West Virginia. 
Gallagher, Francis C. — Private; Summithill, Pennsylvania. 
Garonsi, Tulio — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Lucerne Mines, 

Pennsylvania. 
Gasperi, Emilio— Private; Smith Mill, Pennsylvania. 
Giovannini, Philij)— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Western, 

Pennsylvania. 
Gissel, Charles — Private; Shaner, Pennsylvania. 



BATTERY E 281 

Privates — continued 

Greer, John L. — Private; Evacuated sick, 2 March, 1918; West Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Graziano, Pasquale — Private. 

Hamm, George — Private; McCartney, Pennsylvania. 
Hannas, Marvin — Private; Higginsville, West Virginia. 
Harvey, Thomas B. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Erie, 

Pennsylvania. 
Henhne, Oscar L. — Private; Orlando, West Virginia. 
Hershman, Charles B. — Private; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Highland, Theodore H. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Nesque- 

honing, Pennsylvania. 
Hoffman, Earl F. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 23 October, 1918; 

Falls Creek, Pennsylvania. 
Jackson, Frank — Private; Berkeley Spi'ings, West Virginia. 
Jones, George E. — Private; Blairsville, Pennsylvania. 
Juart, Roy S. — Private; Indiana, Pennsylvania. 
Leonard, Patrick J. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 23 October, 1918; 

Sharon, Pennsylvania. 
Lewis, Arthur G. — Private; Carbondale, Pennsylvania. 
Lister, Leo — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Long, Jesse L — Private; Indiana, Pennsylvania. 
Lott, William F.— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Unity Station, 

Pennsylvania. 
Lynch, Thomas J. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Mansell, Byron — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 4 November, 1918. 
Marano, Dominick — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Bentley- 

ville, Pennsylvania. 
Marcum, Fred M. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Page, West 

Virginia. 
McAnany, John J. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 23 October, 1918; 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
McDonald, George W. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Moore- 
field, West Virginia. 
McGovern, James F. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
McGuire, Francis P. — Private; -Wounded and evacuated, 15 October, 1918; 

Returned to duty, 14 January, 1919; Jessup, Pennsylvania. 



282 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates — contin ued 

Migellego, Frank — Private. 

Miller, Elery M.— Private; Howard, Pennsylvania. 

Miller, Lawrence J. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 1918; 

Boswell, Pennsylvania. 
Morison, George L.— Private; Bedington, West Virginia. 
Morphet, John C— Private; Wounded and evacuated, 1 Novemljer, 1918; 

Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania. 
Nicholas, Christ— Private ; Transferred, 14 November, 1918. 
Niklawski, Michael—Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 
Olson, Paul A. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Orebaugh, William C— Private; Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. 
Patterson, John — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Payne, Oscar A. — Private; Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. 
Plubell, Earl H.— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918. 
Quirk, Harry— Private; Appointed Cook, 3 April, 1919; Martinslxu-g, 

West Virginia. 
Ramsey, Alexander G. — Private. 

Rimmey, James B. — Private; Pleasure Gap, Pennsylvania. 
Roberson, Charles E. — Private; Augusta, West Virginia. 
Robinson, Edward T. — Private; Chester, Pennsylvania. 
Rhode, George F. — Private; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Rupert, Jacob E. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Indiana, 

Pennsylvania. 
Russell, Henry T. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Carbondale, 

Pennsylvania. 
Shea, William — Private; Minooka, Pennsylvania. 
Sirbaugh, Harry L. — Private; Capon Bridge, West Virginia. 
Smith, Albert K. — Private; Jonesville, West Virginia. 
Sofa, John G. — Private, Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Wilkes-Barre, 

Pennsylvania. 
Sotok, John A. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 10 October, 1918; 

Returned to duty, 14 January, 1919; Morrisdale, Pennsylvania. 
Stoss, Vito — Private; Transferred, H November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 



BATTERY F 283 

Privates — continued 

Stotler, Boyd D. — Private; Berkeley Springs, West \'irginia. 

Strickland, Howard B. — Private; Wounded, 1 November, 1918; Mclntyre, 
Pennsylvania. 

Strickland, Joseph P. — Private; Sutton, West Virginia. 

Thompson, John H. — Private; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 

Timbrook, Joseph H. — Private; Romney, West Virginia. 

Tingler, Warder W. — Private; Polemic, West Virginia. 

Underwood, Charles L. — Private; Birmingham, Alabama. 

Wigal, Fred — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 1 October, 1918; Parkers- 
burg, West \'irginia. 

Wiley, Elmer L.— Private; Killed in action, 1 November, 1918; Hunters 
Run, West Virginia. 

Williams, Isaac — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Warrior Run, 
Pennsylvania. 

Wilson, Percy C. — Private; Berkwith, West Virginia. 

Wittel, John B. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Florin, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Zarker, William H. — Private; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 

Battery F 

Officers 

Barton, Robert T. — Captain; 106 Soutli Washington Street, Winchester, 

Virginia. 
Baker, Henry S.— 1st Lieutenant; Appointed Captain, 24 February, 1919; 

1816 I Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. 
Baldwin, Personnette G. — 2d Lieutenant; Wounded and evacuated, 

18 October, 1918; Returned to duty and transferred, 14 November, 

1918; North Caldwell, Essex County, New Jersey. 
Crosbie, Paul P. — 2d Lieutenant; Appointed 1st Lieutenant, 15 September, 

1918; Newaygo, Michigan. 
Haskins, Harold W. — 2d Lieutenant; Bradford, Vermont. 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. 

Weaver, Bernard H. — 1st Sergeant; Arden, West Virginia. 
Sherman, Walter A. — Supply Sergeant; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 



284 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. — continued 

Waybright, Charles L.— Mess Sergeant; Hagerstown, Maryland. 

Kitzmiller, Harry S.— Stable Sergeant; Shaw, West Virginia. 

Tenney, Charley — Sergeant; Wounded and evacuated, 10 October, 1918; 

Ten Mile, West Virginia. 
Bagent, Roy L.— Sergeant; Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. 
Schaeffer, Karl— Sergeant ; Nestorville, West Virginia. 
White, Hubert V. — Sergeant; Gassed and evacuated, 27 October, 1918; 

Returned to duty, 13 December, 1918; Webster Springs, West Virginia. 
Cleavenger, Wellington B. — Sergeant; Flemington, West Virginia. 
Robinson, Ira C— Sergeant; Phillippi, West Virginia. 
Hardin, William E. — Sergeant; Moatsville, West Virginia. 
McKinney, Clarence C. — Sergeant; Phillippi, West Virginia. 
Woods, Eugene E. — Sergeant; Cowen, West Virginia. 
Neville, Irvin L. — Corporal; Keyser, West Virginia. 
Auvil, Burton W. — Corporal; Nestorville, West Virginia. 
England, Lloyd D. — Corporal; Phillippi, West Virginia. 
Wilson, Joseph F. — Corporal; Casson, West Virginia. 
Green, Luther H. — Corporal; Killed in action, 1 November, 1918; Sutton, 

West Virginia. 
Alkire, Troy — Corporal; Appointed Sergeant, 14 November, 1918; Canaan, 

West Virginia. 
Nestor, Harry D. — Corporal; Nestorville, West Virginia. 
Brady, Arthur D. — Corporal; Killed in action, French Creek, West Virginia. 
Ensminger, Early J. — Corporal; Appointed Horseshoer, 7 November, 1918; 

Phillippi, West Virginia. 
Wilson, Okey S. — Corporal; Erbacon, West Virginia. 
Craig, William H. — Corporal; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 1918; 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Harmison, Walter G. — Corporal; Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. 
Peppard; George W. — Corporal; Transferred to O. T. C. at Saumur, 28 

October, 1918; Cleveland, Ohio. 
Lowe, Broadway R. — Corporal; Killed in action, 25 October, 1918; Gandee- 

ville, West Virginia. 
Miller, Bradford H. — Corporal; Johnson, West Virginia. 
Morrison, Joseph H. — Corporal; Martha, West Virginia. 



BATTERY F 285 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. — continued 

Alkire, Minter W. — Corporal; Canaan, West Virginia. 

Dickey, Russell — Corporal ; Richwood, West Virginia. 

Nestor, French R. — Corporal; Moatsville, West Virginia. 

Smallridge, Vivian — Corporal; Lillian, West Virginia. 

Anglin, Oscar — Corporal; Volga, West Virginia. 

Mansfield, John J.— Chief Mechanic; Killed in action, 29 October, 1918; 

Piedmont, West Virginia. 
Wilson, Elmer J. — Mechanic; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Turtle 

Creek, Pennsylvania. 

Malone, Lovell A. — Mechanic; Appointed Chief Mechanic, 5 November, 

1918; Altoona, Pennsylvania. 
Howes, Pearley B.~Cook; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November , 1918; 

French Creek, West Virginia. 
Koon, Alpha E. — Cook; Queens, West Virginia. 
Machtley, Earlston — Cook; Ridgeley, West Virginia. 
Ours, Doyle E. — Cook; Buckhannon, West Virginia. 
Cowger, Patrick M. — Horseshoer; Richwood, West Virginia. 
Green, Clarence D. — Horseshoer; Elk Garden, West Virginia. 
Hursey, Josejjh Z. — Saddler; Parkersburg, West Virginia. 
Arbogast, Leslie H. — Bugler; Junior, West Virginia. 
Fenstermacher, Harvey E. — Bugler; Lehighton, Pennsylvania. 
Hager, Richard S. — Bugler; Buckhannon, West Virginia. 

Privates, First Class 

Amsler, Frank — Private first class; Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Anderson, Clyde C. — Private first class; Hacker Valley, West Virginia. 
Arnold, William — Private first class; Elk Garden, West Virginia. 
Arnold, William— Private first class; Elk Garden, West Virginia. 
Ashenfelter, John P. — Private first class; Ridgeley, West Virginia. 
Baird, Joseph A. — Private first class; Died in hospital of disease, 2 January, 

1919; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Battista, Joseph L. — Private first class; Ebensburg, Pennsylvania. 
Bennett, Howard W. — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 8 

November, 1918; Selbyville, West Virginia. 
Berkowitz, Moe — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 

1918 ; Returned to duty, 22 December, 1918; Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. 



286 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates, First Class — continued 

Boyles, Harry A.— Private first class; Meriden, West Virginia. 

Burke, John F. — Private first class; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Clayton, John L. — Private first class; Junior, West Virginia. 

Cochran, Robert — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 25 October, 

1918; Returned to duty, 22 December, 1918; Appointed Corporal, 7 

March, 1919; Diana, West Virginia. 
Coddington, Howard H. — Private first class; Piedmont, West Virginia. 
Daniels, Wilson C. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 14 November, 

1918; Junior, West Virginia. 
Dixon, Edward R. — Private first class; Barnum, West Virginia. 
Friend, Branty B. — Private first class; Camden-on-Gauley, West Virginia. 
Grim, Leroy — Private first class ; Wounded and evacuated, 10 October, 1918; 

Leisenring, Pennsylvania. 
Harper, Hubbard — Private first class; Webster Springs, West Virginia. 
Howard, Harvey — Private first class; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
I Hudkins, Avra E. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 7 March, 1919; 

Flemington, West Virginia. 
Janda, John J. — Private first class; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Jenkins, Jesse — Private first class; Flemington, West Virginia. 
Kleman, Oscar C. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 14 November, 

1918; Swissvale, Pennsylvania. 
McKenzie, Edward — Private first class; Appointed Cook, 1 February, 1919; 

Potomac Manor, West Virginia. 
McNamee, Walter J. — Private first class; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Miller, Dayton G. — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 25 October, 

1918; Moatsville, West Virginia. 
Murphy, HoUey C. — Private first class; Appointed Horseshoer, 1 February, 

1919; Moatsville, West Virginia. 
Musgrave, Ellwood D. — Private first class; Appointed Mechanic, 15 Novem- 
ber, 1918; Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Nestor, Ersel L. — Private first class; Moatsville, West Virginia. 
Pfeifer, Edward — Private first class; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Right, Esley M. — Private first class; BeUngton, West Virginia. 



BATTERY F 287 

Privates, First Class — continued 

Robinson, Goldie R. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 14 November, 

1918; Camden-on-Gauley, West Virginia. 
Rupp, Wilfred W. — Private first class; Yatesboro, Pennsylvania. 
Sefrick, Andrew — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 

1918; Sharon, Pennsylvania. 
Shaffer, Arthur E. — Private first class; Nestorville, West Virginia. 
Smolcynski, Andrew M. — Private first class; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Stewart, Charles A. — Private first class; Phillippi, West Virginia. 
Taylor, Daniel T. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 7 March, 1919; 

West Newton, Pennsylvania. 
Telaar, Bernard J. — Private first class; Altus, Arkansas. 
Vawls, Arie A. — Private first class; Phillippi, West Virginia. 
Waugh, Lloyd L. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 7 March, 1919; 

Sago, West Virginia. 
Webb, Frederick J. — Private first class; Century, West Virginia. 
Willard, Benjamin H. — Private first class; Appointed Corporal, 7 March, 

1919; Seotdale, Pennsylvania. 

Privates 

Addis, Robert H. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 1918; 
Vanderbilt, Pennsylvania. 

Athens, Mike M.— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; McKees 
Rocks, Pennsylvania. 

Auerbach, Sol. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Hazleton, 
Pennsylvania. 

Barton, Emory O. — Private; Boomer, West Virginia. 

Baxter, William H. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 

Bays, Wiley F. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918. 

Bender, Jacob S. — Private; Hacker Valley, West Virginia. 

Bender, Samuel H. — Private; Hacker Valley, West Virginia. 

Benson, Arthur — Private; Braddock, Pennsylvania. 

Boyer, Howard W. — Private; W^ounded and evacuated, 1 November, 1918; 
Tyrone, Pennsylvania. 

Brickley, Chester E. — Private; Howard, Pennsylvania. 



288 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates — continued 

Brown, Fred— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Lansing, Michigan. 
Brown, Miles — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 26 September, 1918 

Weissport, Pennsylvania. 
Calascione, Frank — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 1918 

Died in hospital; New Orleans, Louisiana. 
Carlin, William, Jr. — Private; Died in hospital of disease, 5 January, 1919 

Gatewood, West Virginia. 
Carroll, Edward J.— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania. 
Casto, Bovy— Private; Appointed Corporal, 7 March, 1919; Volga, West 

Virginia. 
Chapman, John R. — Private; Stroude, West Virginia. 
Cheslock, John A. — Private; West Hazleton, Pennsylvania. 
Christian, John J. — Private; Appointed Private first class; 7 March, 1919; 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Clancy, Harry M. — Private; Died in hospital of disease, 10 January, 1919; 

Meadville, Pennsylvania. 
elites, Henry M. — Private; Caningville, Maryland. 
Craig, Wesley L — Private; Castle Shannon, Pennsylvania. 
Cuscela, Frank — Private; Appointed Private first class; 7 March, 1919; 

Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. 
Cutlip, James D. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 7 March, 1919; 

Phillippi, West Virginia. 
Egan, James J. — Private; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Elbon, Austin C. — Private; Appointed Corporal, 14 November, 1918; 

Webster Springs, West Virginia. 
Ellison, Guy — Private; Sutton, West Virginia. 
Fisher, Arthur 0. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Nuremburg, 

Pennsylvania. 
Fitzpatrick, William J. — Private; Marlinton, West Virginia. 
Forrey, Jacob A. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 7 March, 1919; 

Northumberland, Pennsylvania. 
Gearhart, Clifford — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 

Goodwin, Bernard C. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Hazleton, 
Pennsylvania. 



BATTERY F 289 

Privates — continued 

Graybill, Bryan S. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Richfield, 

Pennsylvania. 
Haislip, Robert S. — Private; Appointed Corporal, 14 November, 1918; 

Keyser, West Virginia. 
Hall, James G. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Harris, Grover C. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 7 March, 1919; 

Phillijipi, West Virginia. 
Haszlett, Howard — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania. 
Hawkins, George T. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 
Heffner, Royal S. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; AUentown, 

Pennsylvania. 
Hoffman, Walter S. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 7 March, 1919; 

Jennerstown, Pennsylvania. 
Hyman, Edward K. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Isherwood, Raymond — Private; Verona, Pennsylvania. 
Jamison, Ralph D. — Private; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Johnstin, Samuel C. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918. 
Jones, Ralph — Private; Edwardsville, Pennsylvania. 
Junkins, Charles O. — Private; Appointed Corporal, 7 March, 1919; Emory- 

ville, West Virginia. 
Kanopsky, Stanley — Private; Appointed Private first class, 7 March, 1919; 

Leckrone, Pennsylvania. 
Keener, Murray G. — Private; Gassaway, West Virginia. 
Kell, Alfred H. — Private; Died in hospital of disease; Connelsville, Pennsyl- 
vania. 
Kragh, Ejnar W. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Ripley, 

New York. 
Kramer, Joseph — Private; Hershey, Pennsylvania. 
Langlois, Harold S. — Private; North Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 
Lauber, Albert A. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 7 March, 1919; 

East Berlin, Pennsylvania. 



290 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates — continued 

Love, Elder L. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 7 March, 1919; 

Lewistown, Pennsylvania. 
Luikart, John J. — Private; Pickens, West Virginia. 
Lyles, Jesse F. — Private; Knoxville, Alabama. 
Malcomb, Francis A. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Areola, 

West Virginia. 
Marcucci, Nicola — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Mentzer, Harold G. — Private; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Miller, Frank R.— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 
Miller, William 0. — Private; Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Mitchell, Dayton — Private; Appointed Private first class, -7 March, 1919; 

Arden, West Virginia. 
Mullenix, Clyde P. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 7 March, 1919; 

Canaan, West Virginia. 
Mummaw, Adam E. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 
Musgnug, Henry — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Baggley, 

Pennsylvania. 
Nicholas, William F. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 7 March, 

1919; Gauley Mills, West Virginia. 
Norris, David J. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
O'Leary, Dennis J. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
O'Toole, Henry— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadeli)hia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Parker, Frank P. — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Passera, Battista — Private; Duquesne, Pennsylvania. 
Pell, George A.— Private; Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 1918; 

Returned to duty, 13 December, 1918; Lykens, Pennsylvania. 
Pfeifer, Henry— Private ; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Loinsville, 

Pennsylvania. 
Rathburn, Ross R.— Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Erie, 

Pennsylvania. 



BATTERY F 291 

Privates — contin ued 

Reed, John E. — Private; Kittanning, Pennsylvania. 

Reed, Laco E. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; 

Richmond, Lloyd R. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 14 November, 

1918; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Keyser, West Virginia. 
Robinson, Harry C. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 15 November, 

1918; Appointed Corporal, 9 April, 1919; Replete, West Virginia. 
Rollman, Stephen A. — Private; Vinemont, Pennsylvania. 
Roy, Burton A. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 7 March, 1919; 

Phillippi, West Virginia. 
Russo, Guiseppo — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Shoenberger, Allen C. — Private; Leisenring, Pennsylvania. 
Smith, Raymond R. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918. 
Tephabaugh, John A. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 15 November, 

1918; Burlington, West Virginia. 
Treude, Frederick W. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 
Tuszynski, Andrew — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Erie, 

Pennsylvania. 
Wable, William H. — Private; Ohio Pyle, Pennsylvania. 
Walters, Raymond — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Wanner, Charles E. — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 8 October, 1918; 

Died in hospital; Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. 
Warrick, Charles — Private; Died in hospital of disease, 19 Januarj^, 1919; 

West Newton, Pennsylvania. 
Werner, Ralph A. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Lebanon, 

Pennsylvania. 
Wickwire, Frank L. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Mt. Lick, 

West Virginia. 
Wilmoth, Orval G. — Private; Gassed and evacuated, 29 October, 1918; 

Belington, West Virginia. 



292 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates — continued 

Wilson, George L. — Private; Appointed Mechanic, 1 March, 1919; Mead- 

ville, Pennsylvania. 
Wise, Archie H. — Private; Port Treverton, Pennsylvania. 
Yearick, Maurice 0. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 7 March, 1919; 

Woodward, Pennsylvania. 
Zeigler, Ralph A. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Hershey, 

Pennsylvania. 



Supply Company 
Officers 

Buford, Walter — Captain; Wounded, 11 October, 1918; 820 Missouri Avenue, 

Lawrence, Kansas. 
Wooten, James A. — 1st Lieutenant; Wounded and evacuated, 11 October, 

1918; Returned to duty; Crab Orchard, Tennessee. 
Norberg, Robert J. — 1st Lieutenant; 925 Grace Avenue, Fort Wayne, 

Indiana. 
Coburn, George J. — 2d Lieutenant; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; 

44 Steuben Street, East Orange, New Jersey. 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. 

Mayberry. Clark E. — Regimental Supply Sergeant; Martinsburg, West 

Virginia. 
Feeney, Thomas V. — Regimental Supply Sergeant: Roanoke, West Virginia. 
Brown, Heber H. — 1st Sergeant; Summersville, West Virginia. 
Callison, Josiah W. — Supply vSergeant; Lewisburg, West Virginia. 
Clements, Harry M. — Mess Sergeant; Sinks Grove, West Virginia. 
Dyer, Frank — Stable Sergeant; Appointed Wagon Master, 2 December, 

1918; Orlando, West Virginia. 
Vandervoort, Stokes T. — Sergeant; Reduced to Private, 9 November, 1918; 

Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Weston, West Virginia. 
Blume, Willie E. — Sergeant; Divide, West Virginia. 
Stockert, William T. — Sergeant; Buckhannon, West Virginia. 
Lowry, Percy H. — Corporal; Spring Dale, West Virginia. 
Powell, Howard L. — Corporal; Appointed Stable Sergeant, 2 December, 

1918; Augusta, West Virginia. 
Blume, Lawrence E. — Corporal; Wounded, 14 October, 1918; Divide, West 

Virginia. 
Filiaggi, Bernardo — Mechanic; Montgomery, West Virginia. 
Rice; Curtis C. — Mechanic; Reduced to Private, 1 November, 1918; 

Keyser, West Virginia. 



294 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Noncommissiuncd Officers, Etc. — continued 

Sampson, Emmett — Mechanic; Russellville, West Virginia. 

Bramlett, John L. — Cook; Thaxton, Virginia. 

Cart, Brantie — Cook; Herold, West Virginia. 

Legg, Herbert S. — Cook; Gauley Bridge, West Virginia. 

Rogers, Hugh L. — Cook; Corhss, West Virginia. 

Thompson, Lester — Cook; Riverton, West Virginia. 

McGuire, WilHam E. — Chief Horseshoer; Spring Dale, West Virginia. 

Hedrick, John F. — Horseshoer; Bhie Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. 

Males, Edgar — Horseshoer; Oakmont, West Virginia. 

Barnes, Isaac W. — Saddler; Higginsville, West Virginia. 

Whitlow, Oakey H. — Saddler; Winona, West Virginia. 

Bailes, Elmer — Wagoner; Appointed Corporal, 16 November, 1918; Sum- 

mersville; West Virginia. 
Belcher, William H. — Wagoner; Coe, West Virginia. 
Billmeyer, Daniel B. — Wagoner; Rio, West Virginia. 
Broderick, Morris J. — Wagoner; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Bunting, George — ^Wagoner; Vanetta, West Virginia. 
Garden, William C. — Wagoner; Ansted, West Virginia. 
Chambers, Kilrein C. — Wagoner; Richwood, West Virginia. 
Chapman, WiUiam S. — Wagoner; Matting, West Virginia. 
Chenoweth, Roy P. — Wagoner; Elkins, West Virginia. 
Cox, Ward H. — Wagoner; Elton, West Virginia. 
Dandrea, Biagio — Wagoner; Elkins, West Virginia. 
Derossett, Willie — Wagoner; Carbondale, West Virginia. 
Ellison, Arthur M. — Wagoner; Lansing, West Virginia. 
Evans, Stewart J. — Wagoner; Cranberry, West Virginia. 
Flint, Tony — Wagoner; Lookout, West Virginia. 
GuUey, James T. — Wagoner; Landisburg, West Virginia. 
Heare, Gracen B. — Wagoner; Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. 
Icks, William A. — Wagoner; Dubree, West Virginia. 
Holland, William H. — Wagoner; Winona, West Virginia. 
Huffman, Donald M. — Wagoner; Appointed Mechanic, 1 November, 1918; 

Purgitsville, West Virginia. 
Humphreys, Cornelius J.— Wagoner; Beury, West Virginia. 
Humphreys, Frank G.— Wagoner, Cashmere, West Virginia. 



SUPPLY COMPANY. 295 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. — continued 

Kossuth, George — Wagoner; Edmond, West Virginia. 

Lively, Glenn F. — Wagoner; Creamery, West Virginia. 

Lohan, Peter W. — Wagoner; Roanoke, West Virginia. 

Lykens, Carl W. — Wagoner; Hico, West Virginia. 

Mann, Roy P. — Wagoner; Lindside, West Virginia. 

Maj^hew, Benjamin F. — Wagoner; Romnej', West ^'irginia. 

McCutcheon, Van L. — W^agoner; Transferred to hospital, 3 February, 1919; 
Divide, West Virginia. 

Meadows, W^illiam L. — Wagoner; Edmond, West Virginia. 

Mohler, Myron H. — Wagoner; Keyser, West Virginia. 

Moody, Howard A. — Wagoner; Newburyport, Massachusetts. 

Moore, Harley 0. — Wagoner; Phillippi, West Virginia. 

Morrow, John R. — W^agoner; Carbondale, West Virginia. 

Nance, Joseph — Wagoner; Vanetta, West Virginia. 

Ni.xon, Caither L. — Wagoner; Pawpaw, West Virginia. 

Nunly, Ira C. — Wagoner; Harewood, West Virginia. 

Pannell, Bert — Wagoner; Lookout, W'est Virginia. 

Parsons, Edgar H. — Wagoner; Parsons, West Virginia. 

Pearsall, Isaac N. — Wagoner; Quakertown, Pennsylvania. 

Penwell, Bushrod — W\agoner; Charlestown, West Virginia. 

Persinger, Orval L. — W^agoner; Cowen, West Virginia. 

Propps, Clarence E. — Wagoner; Transferred to hospital, 30 January, 1919; 
Edmond, West Virginia. 

Saville, Guy E. — Wagoner; Reduced to Private, 8 December, 1918; Evacu- 
ated; Augusta, W^est Virginia. 

Scarbro, Huie G. — Wagoner; Transferred to S.O.S. hospital, 20 November, 
1918; Scarbro, West Virginia. 

Stewart, Henry W. — W^agoner; Green Springs, West Virginia. 

Taylor, John T. — ^Wagoner; Walkersville, West Virginia. 

Timbrook, George R. — Wagoner; Vanderlip, West Virginia. 

Vint, Moses L. — W^agoner; Circleville, West Virginia. 

Winebrenner, James F. — Wagoner; Vaughan, West Virginia. 

Workman, Thomas R. — Wagoner; Lansing, West Virginia. 



296 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Privates, First Class 

Bruffey, Carl A. — Private first class; Appointed Lance Corporal, 1 June, 

1918; Lobelia, West Virginia. 
Gillespie, John J. — Private first class, Elkins, West Virginia. 
Holcomb, Ira C. — Private first class; Lookout, West Virginia. 
Houchins, L-a W. — Private first class; Appointed Cook, 21 October, 1918; 

Alderson, West Virginia. 
Parker, William H. — Private first class; Maplewood, West Virginia. 
Schmidt, Harry — Private first class; Appointed Wagoner, 1 October, 

1918; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Twohig, Dennis J. — Private first class; Spring Dale, West Virginia. 
Zacks, Mike — Private first class; Wilder, Virginia. 

Privates 

Calabro, Santo — Private; Died in hospital of disease; Barnesboro, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Cameron, John W. — Private; Elmo, West Virginia. 

Chuckman, Leon — Private; Layland, West Virginia. 

Fain, Jerry A. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 21 October, 1918; 
Winona, West Virginia. 

Foltz, Clarence — Private; Appointed Wagoner, 1 November, 1918; Great 
Cacapon, West Virginia. 

Gorman, Joseph W. — Private; Monessen, Pennsylvania. 

Home, Frazier — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Fort Green 
Springs, West Virginia. 

Irwin, Walter — Private; Appointed Wagoner, 3 February, 1918; Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 

Jones, Ralph — Private; Appointed Wagoner, 9 November, 1918; Reduced 
to Private, 12 March, 1919; Landisburg, West Virginia. 

Kerns, Ernest E. — Private; Pawpaw, West Virginia. 

Litzinger, Edward M. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Parish, William F. — Private; Appointed Private first class, 21 October, 
1918; Cliff Top, West Virginia. 

Parsons, James W. — Private; Cicerone, West Virginia. 

Pells, Michael J. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Providence, 
Rhode Island. 



ORDNANCE DETACHMENT 297 

Privates — contin ued 

Raymond, Clarence — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Scott, Frederick L. — Private; Appointed Wagoner, 3 February, 1919; 

Elk Mills, Maryland. 
Stein, Edward C — Private; Wounded and evacuated, 10 October, 1918; 

Philadelphia , Pennsylvania. 
Sternman, Joseph — Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Wallace, Anthony — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Philadelphia, 

Pennsylvania. 
Whiteman, William — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Junction, 

West \'irginia. 
Winans, James C. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Phillippi, 

West Virginia. 

Ordnance Detachment 
Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. 

Gompers, William J. — Ordnance Sergeant; Wheeling, West Virginia. 
Hiatt, Herbert F. — Sergeant of Ordnance; Sheridan, Indiana. 
Kuh, Lewis L. — Corporal; Laureldale, West Virginia. 
Wise, Charles P. — Corporal ; Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. 

Privates, First Class 

Blackwell, Clarence G. — Private first class; Transferred, 14 November, 

1918; Thurmond, West Virginia. 
Hartman, Ward H. — Private first class; Elkins, West Virginia. 
Phipps, Ennis — Private first class; Beckley, West Virginia. 
Walker, John C. — Private first class; Portsmouth, Virginia. 

Privates 

Brzozowski, Tadeus — Private; Appointed Private first class, 27 November, 

1918; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Grose, Wilber E. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918. 
Johnson, Roy H. — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; 
McCutcheon, Randolph — Private; Transferred, 14 November, 1918; Deep 

Well, West Virginia. 



298 REGIMENTAL ROSTER 

Medical Detachment 

Officers 

Baggs, Albert N. — Major; See Regimental Headciuarters. 
Donaldson, Samuel B. — Captain; See 1st Battalion Headquarters. 
Reynolds, Harold I. — 1st Lieutenant; See 2d Battalion Headquarters. 
Loveridge, Leonard E. — 1st Lieutenant Dental; Appointed Captain, 28 
February, 1919; Oil City Pennsylvania. 

Noncommissioned Officers, Etc. 

Deemer, Guy R. — Sergeant first class; Fremont, Ohio. 
Fuhrmann, George W. — Sergeant; Trenton, New Jersey. 
Pannell, John A. — Sergeant; Central, Alabama. 

Devine, Gilbert C. — Dental Assistant; Reduced to Private first class; 
Reading, Pennsylvania. 

Privates, First Class 

Coggins, Aaron T. — Private first class; Pinconning, Michigan. 
Gulley, Robert B. — Private first class; Landsburg, West Virginia. 
Halsted, Harley A. — Private first class; Grand Ledge, Michigan. 
Hornkohl, Alex. C, Jr. — Private first class; Wounded and evacuated, 

29 October, 1918; Manistee, Michigan. 
Rogers, Leighton H. — Private first class; Roncevert, West Virginia. 
Settle, Samuel E. — Private first class; Robson, West Virginia. 
Smith, Newman A. — Private first class; Keyser, West Virginia. 
Troxell, Robert L. — Private first class; Weston, West Virginia. 
Van Metre, Robert S. — Private first class; Martinsburg, West Virginia. 

Privates 

Boswell, Sidney S. — Private; Upper Marlboro, Maryland. 
Cotroneo, Angelo — Private; Gallitzin, Pennsylvania. 
Dent, Lee H. — Private; Sutton, West Virginia. 
Fink, Charles F. — Private; Donwood, West Virginia. 
Mandell, Harry C— Private; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Morrissette, Edmond J.— Private; Fall River, Massachusetts. 
Shelton, Harmon — Private; Kanawha, West Virginia. 
Shelton, Hugh — Private; Kanawha, West Virginia. 



VETERINARY DETACHMENT 



299 



Privates — continued 

Staud, Fridolin J.— Wounded and evacuated, 1 November, 1918; Elkins, 

West Virginia. 
Sutphin, Elmer L.— Private; Julia, West Virginia. 
Witty, Oscar L.— Private; Transferred, 8 March, 1919; Alexandra, West 

Virginia. 

Veterinary Detachment 

Officers 

Zinkham, George M.— Captain; Commanding Detachment; See 2d Battalion 
Headquarters; Baltimore, Maryland. 

Clawson, Earl D.— 2d Lieutenant; See 1st Battalion Headquarters; Hope- 
well, New Jersey. 

Farriers 

Davison, Raleigh B.— Farriei-; Strausliurg, \'irginia. 

Truman, Everett D.— Farrier; Ivydale, West Virginia. 

Wade, Edwin— Farrier; Martin, West Virginia. 

Welsh, Thomas A.— Farrier; Transferred; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

P7-ivates 

Durham, Marvel— Private ; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Williams, Carry R.— Private; Weston, West Virginia. 





After-Days 



"\"\ THEN the last gun has long withheld 
^^ Its thunder, and its mouth is sealed. 
Strong men shall drive the furrow straight 
On some remembered battle-field. 



Untroubled they shall hear the loud 

And gusty driving of the rains, 

And birds with immemorial voice 

Sing as of old in leafy lanes. 



The stricken, tainted soil shall be 
Again a flowery paradise — 

Pure with the memory of the dead 
And purer for their sacrifice. 

ERIC CHILMAN 
The Poetry Review 



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