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Full text of "History of American amateur athletics"

THE LIBRARY 

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OF CALIFORNIA 

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HISTORY 




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Stack 
Annex 



5S3 

CONTENTS. 



Preface 

^National Association of Amateur Athletes of America. . 

Definition of an Amateur Athlete and Notes on Championship 

Games 9 

Best Amateur Records in America to October, 1885.. 

Best Amateur Records in England to October, 1885. . . 23 

--Amateur Champion Athletes of America 1876 to 1885 ..24-28 

New York Athletic Club 3 1 

Staten Island Athletic Club 4 3 

Williamsburgh Athletic Club 6 3 

Manhattan Athletic Club 

Hints on Exercising 

Table Showing the Digestibility of Food . 

Definition of an Amateur Oarsman and Notes on Championship 
Regatta. 

Amateur Champion Oarsmen of America 1873 to 1885... 89-91 

Kill Von Kull Rowing Association. . 9 2 

Argonauta Rowing Association. 

Viking Rowing Association . . . 

Bayonne Rowing Association. 

Newark Bay Boat Club 97 

Staten Island Rowing Club. . 

Clifton Boat Club 

Bayonne Canoe Club 

Hints on Canoeing. .'.... 

Athletic Notes and Facts 1885 



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PREFACE. 



In presenting this book, it must be stated that, to 
give a complete history of American Amateur Aihle= 
tics would be almost an impossibility , owing to the many 
branches of sports and innumerable organizations 
'throughout the country. 

This, however, has not been attempted, and the 
reader must bear in mind that this edition is a history 
in itself only so far as it goes, while the accounts of 
Clubs, Associations, Champions and (Records belong 
merely to a few classes of sports such as (Running, Walk* 
ing, (Rowing, Jumping, (Bicycle (Riding and Handling 
Weights. 

The majority of the Club Histories contained herein 
have been prepared especially for this book, and the assis- 
tance of personal friends throughout the many different 
organizations is hereby gratefully acknowledged. 

Jjew York, November ist, '885. 



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ARLY in 1879 the New York Athletic Club decided to give'up 
the management of the Amateur Championship meeting so 
successfully established by them three years before. These 
games had been profitable, but brought a great deal of work on 
the officers -of the club, who were continually being appealed to 
for decisions on athletic law, for information as to when the cham- 
pionship games would be given, and as to the programme, number of 
entries, ability of contestants, etc., etc., ad infinitum. This actually 
forced the club, in advertising its games, to request would-be contest- 
ants not to call on officers of the Club at their places of business. 
For these reasons, the Club was willing to deliver the conduct of the 
championship games to a properly organized association of athletic 
clubs. While the Club was still undecided as to the best form of a 
call for a meeting of such clubs to discuss the formation of an asso- 
ciation, the matter was taken in hand by several gentlemen who had 
been prominent in athletic circles, but who had not been identified 
with the management of the strongest athletic clubs. Prominent 
among these were Messrs. Goodwin and White. Mr. Goodwin had 
been stroke of the four-oared crew of Columbia College, New York, 
who had been victorious at Henley, England, and had successfully 
conducted games in Madison Square Garden, New York, for the ben- 
efit of his college boat club. Mr. White was one of the best amateur 
walkers of his day, but had not done much athletic work for several 
years. These gentlemen favored an association formed of clubs whose 
standing, financial and social, was of the highest character, but severa 
of which were not, actually speaking, athletic clubs. After a prelim- 
inary conference, a meeting was held at the Gilsey House, New York 
City, at which Messrs. Goodwin, White and several others met repre- 
sentatives of the prominent athletic clubs. These latter contended 
that in forming an association the clubs owning or leasing running 



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THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF A. A. A. 7 

paths, or enclosed grounds, should form such association, and that 
boat, lacrosse and cricket clubs should not be entitled to a voice in such 
organization. A motion to this effect having been carried, by a very 
close vote, an association was formed under the name of the "National 
Association of Amateur Athletes of America," with George W. Carr, 
of the Manhattan Athletic Club, as President ; O. T. Johnson, of the 
Staten Island Athletic Club, as Vice President ; C. H. Truax, of the 
New York Athletic Club (now Judge of the Supreme Court of the State 
of New York), as Secretary, and Otis G. Webb, of the Plainfield Ath- 
letic Club, as Treasurer. Soon after permanent organization had been 
effected, the qualification for membership was changed, so that any 
athletic club giving a meeting with not less than five events open to 
all amateurs became eligible for admission. It was decided that any 
club failing to give at least once a year such a meeting should forfeit 
its membership in the Association. 

The first championship meeting under the management of the As- 
sociation was held on the 27th of September, 1879, on the New York 
Athletic Club grounds, Mott Haven, New York City, and was a decided 
success, the events being well contested and the audience large and 
enthusiastic. 

The programme was as follows : 

Running 100 Yards. 

Running 220 Yards. 

Running One-Quarter Mile. 

Running One-Half Mile. 
Running One Mile. 

Running Three Miles. 

Hurdle Racing, 120 yards, 10 hurdles, 3 feet 6 inches. 
Walking One Mile. 

Walking Three Miles. 

Walking Seven Miles. 

Running High Jump. 

Running Broad Jump. 
Pole Leaping. 

Putting the Shot, 16 Ibs. 

Throwing the Hammer, 16 Ibs. 
Throwing 56 Ibs. Weight. 

Bicycle Racing, Two Miles. 
Individual Tug of War. 
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THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF A. A. A. 9 

BEST ON RECORD IN AMERICA. 
At Championship Games, to September 24, 1879. 

GAMES AND RKOOED. NAMES. OF WHAT OLTJB. YEAR 

Running 100yds 10 sec.... W. C. Wilmer Short Hills A. C. '78 

Running 100 yds 10 sec.... R. L. Montague N. Y. A C '78 

Running 220 yds 23f sec.... L. E. Meyers M. A. C '76 

Running 440 yds 49 1-5 sec..., L. E. Meyers M A. C '79 

Running half-mile 2m 2 4-5s.... Edward Merritt N. Y. A. C '77 

Running one mile 4m 37 2-5s.... Wm. J. Duffy H. A. C '79 

Running three miles. ...16m 21s... E C. Stimson Dart'h Coll '76 

Hurdle racing 120 yds 17s.... H. Edwards Ficken. N. Y. A. C '78 

Walking one mile 6m 44s.... T. H. Armstrong.... H. A. C '77 

Walking three miles 21m 42s.... T. H. Armstrong.... H. A. C 78 

Walking seven miles ...55m 86s.... W. H. Purdy Greenp't A. C.... '79 

Running high jump 5f S^in... J. P. Conover C. Coll. A. Ass... 79 

Running broad jump 21f 2in.... W. C. Wilmer 8. H. A. C 79 

Pole leaping lOf 5|in.... W. Van Houten S Am. A. C '79 

Putting the shot 37f lOin.... Cuzner McGUniv '78 

Throwing the Hammer .. 87f lin.... F. Larkin Princeton C.A.A. '79 

Throwing 56 Ih wt 23f l|in.... William B. Curtis... N. Y. A. C '79 

Bicycle race, 2m 6m 59s.... S. B. Pomeroy Manhattan A. C.. '79 

The annual meeting of the Association was held in the evening, and 
the following officers were elected : President, George W. Carr, 
of the Manhattan Athletic Club ; Vice President, M. M. Forrest, of 
the Scottish Am. Athletic Club ; Secretary, A. H. Curtis, of the New York 
Athletic Club ; Treasurer, Otis G. Webb, of the Plainfield Athletic 
Club ; Executive Committee E. A. Rollins, of the Staten Island 
Athletic Club ; John Gath, of the American Athletic Club ; W. J. Tate, 
of the Jersey City Athletic Club ; Harry M. Howard, of the Union 
Athletic Club (Boston). A resolution was passed that no person be 
allowed to compete at championship meetings who had not been con- 
nected for three months with a club whose standing was approved by 
the Executive Committee of the Association. 

In 1880 the championship games were held on the New York Ath- 
letic Club grounds, at Mott Haven, on September 25. 



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THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF A. A. A. 11 

The clubs forming the Association were as follows : 

AMERICAN ATHLETIC CLUB, - New York City, N Y. 
CLINTON ATHLETIC CLUB, - . Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ELIZABETH ATHLETIC CLUBJ - Elizabeth, N. J. 

EMPIRE CITY ATHLETIC CLUB, - New York City, N. Y. 
HARLEM ATHLETIC CLUB, - - New York City, N. Y. 
JERSEY CnT ATHLETIC CLUB, - - Jersey City, N. J. 
MANHTTAN ATHLETIC CLUB, - New York City, N. Y. 
NEW YORK ATHLETIC CLUB, - New York City, N. Y. 
OLYMPIC ATHLETIC CLUB, - San Francisco, Cal. 

PLAINFIELD ATHLETIC CLUB, - - Plainfield, N. J. 
SCOTTISH AMERICAN ATHLETIC CLUB, New York City, N. Y. 
SHORT HILLS ATHLETIC CLUB, - - Short Hills, N. J. 
STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB, West New Brighton, N. Y. 
UNION ATHLETIC CLUB, .... Boston, Mass. 



BEST AMATEUR RECORDS IN AMERICA. 
At Championship Games, to August i, 1880. 

GAME. EECORD. NAME. OLTJB. 

(lOsec W. C. Wilmer Short Hills A. C.'78 

100 Yards Run -? 

(lOsec R. L. La Montagne.New York A. C...'78 

220 Yards Run 22fsec L. E. Meyers Manhattan A. C..'79 

440 Yards Run 49 1 5sec L. E. Meyers Manhattan A. C. .'79 

Half-Mile Run Imin 56sec.L. E. Meyers Manhattan A. C..'80 

One Mile Run 4min 29sec.L. E. Meyers Manhattan A. C .'80 

Five-Mile Run 27min 55JsecW. H. Robertson ...Brooklyn A. C....'80 

120 Yds. Hurdle Race.. H^sec H. Edwards Ficken.New York A. C..'78 

One-Mile Walk 6m332-5sec.E. E. Merrill Union A C '80 

Three-MHe Walk 21min 42sec.T. H. Armstrong, jr . Harlem A. C '78 

Seven-Mile Walk 55min36secW. H. Purdy Greenpoint A. C.'79 

Running High Jump ...Sfeet 8ins. .J. P. Conover Col. Coll, A. C....'79 

Running Broad Jump ..21feet Sins... J. S. Voorhees Brooklyn A. C.../90 

Pole Leaping lOfeet 7|ins.B. F. Richardson ...Scot. Am. A. C.../80 

Putting the Shot 38feet 2ins.J. A. Fullerton Montreal L. C '80 

Throwing the Hammer. 87feet linch.F. Larkin Princeton C. A. A. '79 

Throwing 561b.Weight.23feet l^ins. William B. Curtis.. .New York A. C../79 
Bicycle Race, 2 miles.. .6rnin 27sec ..W. S. Clark N. Y. Bicycle C..'80 



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THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF A. A. A. 13 

At the annual meeting, the officers elected were A. H. Curtis, Pres- 
ident, of the New York Athletic Club ; E. A. Rollins, Vice President, 
of the Staten Island Athletic Club ; M. M. Forrest, Secretary, of the 
Scottish American Athletic Club ; Otis G Webb, Treasurer, of the 
Plainfield Athletic Club. 

On September 25, 1881, the championship meeting was again held 
at Mott Haven, The following clubs had become members during 
the year : Baltimore, Montclair, Orion (Jersey City), Passaic (N. J ), 
Rye (N. Y. ), Williamsburg (Brooklyn, N. Y. ), and Young America 
Cricket Club (Philadelphia, Pa. ) 

The same officers were elected for 1881 '82. William McEwen, of 
the Manhattan Athletic Club, was elected official handicapper. 

This year the programme was as follows : 

i. 100 Yards Run, trials. 

2 . Seven Mile Walk. 

3. Running High Jump. 

4. Throwing the Hammer. 

5 Running Broad Jump. 

6. Putting the Shot. 
7. Pole Leaping. 

8. Throwing 561b. Weight. 

9. 100 Yards Run, final. 

10. Bicycle Race, two miles. 

ii. Half-Mile Run. 

12. Team Tug of War, trials. 5 men, 2 subs. 
13. One Mile Walk. 

14. 440 Yards Run, trial. 
15. Five Mile Run. 

1 6. 440 Yards Run, final. 

17. 120 Yds Hurdle Race. 
1 8. Team Tug of War, final. 

19. 120 Yards Hurdle Race, final 
20. 220 Yards Run, trials. 

21. Individual Tug of War, trials. 
22. Three Mile Walk. 

23. 220 Yards Run, final. 

24. Individual Tug of War, final. 
25. One Mile Run. 



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THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF A. A. A. 15 

BEST AMATEUR RECORDS IN AMERICA. 
At Championship Games ; to July i, 1881. 

GAME. RECORD. NAME. OLUB. 

riOsec W. C.Wilmer Short H.A.C.'78 

100 Yards Run <j lOsec R.L La Montagne.N. Y. A.C...'78 

[lOsec L. E. Meyers M. A. C '80 

220 Yards Run 22fsec L. E. Meyera M. A. C '79 

440 Yards Run 401-5sec ,L. E. Meyers M. A. '79 

Half Mile Run Imin 56sec L.E. Meyers M. A. C 80 

One Mile Run 4min 29|sec L.E. Meyers M. A. C '80 

Five Mile Run 26min Msec J. H. Gifford Irish A. A. C. 81 

120 Yds Hurdle Race.. ..17isec H. Ed. Ficken N.Y. A C....78 

One Mile Walk 6min 33 2 5sec. .E. E. Merrill Union A. C....80 

Three Mile Walk 21min 42sec T.H.Armstrong, jr. Harlem A. C.'78 

Seven Mile Walk 54min 7sec E. E. Merrill........ Scot. Am.A.C.'80 

Running High Jump.... 5ft 8in J. P. Conover Col. Coll.A.A. 79 

Running Broad Jump.. .22ft 7fin J. S. Voorhees M. A. C '81 

Pole Leaping 10ft llin W. J. Van Houten.Scot. Am.A.C.'80 

Putting the Shot 38ft 2in J. A. Fullerton MontrealL. C. 80 

Throwing the Hammer. 88ft 3 3-5in C.A.J.Queckberner.Scot. Am. A. C. 80 

Throwing 561b. Weight. 24ft 4in Jas. S. McDermott.Scot. Am.A.C. 80 

Bicycle Race, 2 miles ...6min 27sec W. S Clark N.Y B'cle C. 80 



On March 4, 1882, it was decided to give the annual championship 
games on June 10, 1882, at the Polo Grounds, New York City, for 
the purpose of giving college athletes a better chance to contest. 
The games were given on that date, and at the annual meeting A. H. 
Curtis was re elected President; H. W. J. Telfair, Staten Island A. C, 
V. -President; G. H. Badeau, Williamsburgh A. C, Sec.; P. H. Char- 
bock, Elizabeth A. C. , Treas. The associate clubs were the Adelphi, 
American, Baltimore, Elizabeth, Manhattan, Montreal, New York, 
Olympic, Scottish-American, Staten Island, Union, Williamsburg and 
Inter-Collegiate Association. The events given this year were the 
same as in 1881, except team tug-of-war. 

In 1883 the championship games were given June ad, at Mott 
Haven, and the associate clubs were the same as in the year previous. 
G. H. Badeau was elected President; H. W. J. Telfair, V. Pres. ; W. 
S. Sloan (Inter-Collegiate Association), Sec., and J. C. Wetmore 
(Elizabeth A. C.) Treas. The programme was essentially the same 
as in previous years. 



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THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF A. A. A. 17 

On September 27, 1884, the ninth annual championship meeting 
was held on the grounds of the Williamsburgh Athletic Club, DeKalb 
avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y., the number and character of contests being 
about the same as the year before. At the annual meeting, held at 
the Metropolitan Hotel, N. Y., the ensuing evening, G. H. Badeau 
was re-elected President; E. G. Van Tambacht (American A. C), V.- 
Pres. ; J. M. Wainwright (Inter-Collegiate Association), Sec., and W. 
C Wilmer (New York A. C.) Treas. G. D. Baird was elected official 
handicapper. 

On March 21, 1885, an amended definition of an amateur, which 
had been prepared by a special committee appointed some time be- 
fore, was submitted and, after slight alteration, adopted. 

On April 30, 1885, arrangements were made with the League of 
American Wheelmen by which the bicycle rules of both associations 
became identical. 

The championship meeting was held this year on the Manhattan 
Athletic Club grounds, New York City, on June 13, a slightly shorter 
programme being given. 



ASSOCIATE CLUBS, 1885: 

AMERICAN ATHLETIC CLUB, - New York City, N. Y. 

BALTIMORE ATHLETIC CLUB, - - - Baltimore, Md. 

INTER-COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION, - 

MANHATTAN ATHLETIC CLUB, - - New York City, N. Y. 
MISSOURI ATHLETIC CLUB, - - - - St. Louis, Mo. 
NEW YORK ATHLETIC CLUB, - - New York City, N. Y. 
OLYMPIC ATHLETIC CLUB, - - - New York City, N. Y. 
PATERSON ATHLETIC CLUB, .... Paterson, N. J. 
STAR ATHLETIC CLUB, Long Island City, N. Y. 

STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB, West New Brighton, N. Y. 
UNION AMATEUR ATHLETIC CLUB, - - Boston, Mass. 
WILLIAMSBURGH ATHLETIC CLUB, - - Brooklyn, N. Y. 

At the annual meetin G. H. Badeau was re-elected President; A. 
H. Curtis (New York A. C.), V.-Pres.; C. H. Mapes (Inter-Collegiate 
A. C), Sec., arid W. C. Rowland (Staten Island A. C), Treas. W. G. 
Hegeman was elected official handicapper. 



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AMATEUR DEFINITION. 19 

AN AMATEUR, 

AS DEFINED BY THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION. 

An amateur is any person who has never competed in an open 
competition, for money, or under a false name, or with a professional 
for a prize, or where gate-money is charged; or has never at any time 
taught, pursued or assisted at athletic exercises for money, or for any 
valuable consideration. 

CHAMPIONSHIP PRIZES. 

A gold championship medal will be given to the winner in each 
contest, a silver medal to each winner of a second place, and a bronze 
medal to each winner of a third place. 

CHAMPIONSHIP CLUB PRIZE. 

A handsome stand of colors will also be presented to the club 
making the largest number of points, as follows: A winner in each 
contest will be entitled to five points, the second man three points, 
and the third man one point. 

BEST ON RECORD PRIZES. 

A special prize will be awarded to the competitor who shall beat 
an English record at an American championship game which has not 
been previously beaten in this country. 

An entrance fee (not returnable) of two dollars per man, for each 
and every game, must accompany all entries, and in case any entry is 
accepted, the person entering will receive a competitor's ticket. 

The committee reserve the right to refuse or strike out any 
entry. 

Colors must be described in this order : First, color of handker- 
chief or cap; second, color of drawers. 

Where clubs have adopted a special insignia, it will be noted in 
the programme. 

Any competitor not a member of some recognized athletic or 
rowing organization must be properly introduced by some well-known 
person, who can vouch for his being an amateur. 

PROGRAMME FOR CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 

ioo-yards run, putting i6-lb. shot, 

220-yards run, throwing :6-lb. hammer, 

440-yards run, running high jump, 
88o-yards run, running broad jump, 

120-yards hurdle, throwing 56-lb. weight, 

i-mile run, pole-vaulting, 
5 -mile run, i-mile walk, 

3-mile walk, 4-mile bicycle race. 



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MABYIN'S "FORGED ANGLE FRAME" S2LPE. 



24 AMATEUR CHAMPIONS OF AMERICA. 



AMATEUR CHAMPIONS OF AMERICA. 

1876, 

100 Yards Run Fred'k. C. Saportas.New York City lOi sec, 

440 Yards Run Edward Merritt New York A. C 54 sec* 

Half-Mile Run Harold Lambe Toronto, Canada... 2 min. lOsec. 

One Mile Run Harold Lambe Toronto, Canada.4 min. 51^ sec. 

120 Yards Hurdle Race . George Hitchcock New York City /:19 sec. 

Running High Jump....H. Edwards Ficken... New York A. C 5 ft. 5 in. 

Running Broad Jump. ..Isaiah Frazier Yonkers Lyceum. ..17 ft. 4 in. 

Putting the Shot H. E. Buermeyer New York A. C 34ft. 5 in. 

Throwing the Hammer. Wm. B. Curtis New York A. C 76 ft. 4 in. 

One Mile Walk D. M. Stern New York A. C...7min. 31 sec. 

Three Mile Walk D. M. Stern New York A. C.. 25 min. 12 sec. 

Seven Mile Walk Charles Connor New York City.. 58 min. 32^ sec. 



1877. 

100 Yards Run Charles C. Mclvor Montreal, Canada 10k sec. 

220 Yards Run Edward Merritt New York A. C 24 sec. 

440 Yards Run Edward Merritt New York A. C 55 sec. 

Half-Mile Run R. R. Colgate New York A. C...2 min. 5J sec. 

One Mile Run Richard Morgan Harlem A. C 4 min. 49f sec. 

120 Yards Hurdle Race.H. Edwards Ficken. ..New York A. C IS^sec. 

Running High Jump....H. Edwards Ficken. ..New York A. C 5 ft. 2 in. 

Running Broad Jump...W. T. Livingston Harlem A. C 18 ft. 9 in. 

Pole Leaping George McNichol Scottish A. A. C 9 ft. 7 in. 

Putting the Shot H. E. Buermeyer New York A. C 37 ft. 2 in. 

Throwing the Hammer. George D. Parmly. ..Princeton College A. C 84ft. 

One Mile Walk E. C. Holske Harlem A. C...7min. 11 4-5 sec. 

Three Mile Walk E. C. Holske Harlem A. C... 23 min. 9 2-5 sec. 

Seven Mile Walk T. H. Armstrong, Jr.Harlem A. C. 55 min. 59 2-5 sec. 

fWrn. B. Curtis, Captain. 
Tug of War l^fS^^ 

LA. T. Heyn 



MARVIN'S SAFES HaYG " Recessei DoorwltliBootCaseFroteclor - !! 



AMATEUR CHAMPIONS OF AMERICA. 25 



AMATEUR CHAMPIONS OF AMERICA. 
1878. 

100 Yards Run W. C. Wilmer Short Hills A. C 10 sec. 

220 Yards Run W. C. Wilmer Short Hills A. C 22J sec. 

440 Yards Run Frank W. Brown Glenwood A. C 54f sec. 

Half-Mile Run ...EdwardMerritt New York A. C...2 min. 5sec. 

One Mile Run Thomas H. Smith Manhattan A. C.4nain. 5l sec. 

Three Mile Run .William J. Duffy Harlem A. C 17 min. 25 sec. 

120 Yards Hurdle Race.H. Edwards Ficken...New York A. C 17sec. 

Running High Jump....H. Edwards Ficken...New York A. C 5 ft. 5 in. 

Running Broad Jump...W. C. Wilmer Short Hills A. C 18ft. 9 in. 

Pole Leaping Alfred Ing Scottish Amer. A. C...9 ft. 4 in. 

Putting the Shot H. E. Beurmeyer New York A. C 37 ft. 4 in. 

Throwing the Hammer. William B. Curtis New York A. C 80 ft. 2 in. 

Throwing56 Ib. Weight. William B. Curtis New York A. C 21 ft. 

Three Mile Walk T. H. Armstrong, Jr. Harlem A. C... .23 min. 12$ sec. 

["Maxwell E. More, Capt.^| fist pu!l 51 

^g * War j * fft&SSSS I** A ' A ' C ' ^ if 

L An drew L Thompson... J 1^53$ sec 



1879. 
100 Yards Run ............ B. R. Value ............. Elizabeth A. C ............. 1 Of sec. 

220 Yards Run ............ L. E. Myers.:...... ..... Manhattan A. C ............ 23| sec. 

440 Yards Run ............ L. E. Myers ............. Manhattan A. C ....... 52 2-5 sec. 

Half-Mile Run ............. L. E. Myers ............. Manhattan A. C.2niin. 12-5 sec. 

One Mile Run ............. H. M. Pellatt ............ Toronto L. C..4 min. 43 2-5 sec. 

Three Mile Run ............ P. J. McDonald ........ Irish A. A. C..15miu 38 3-5 sec. 

120 Yards Hurdle Race.J E. Haigh .............. Scottish Amer. A. C ...... 19 sec. 

Running High Jump..W. Wunder ............. Olympic A. C., Phila...5ft. 7 in. 

Running Broad Jump...F. J. Kilpatrick ........ New York A. C ...... 19 ft. 6} in. 

Pole Leaping ............... W. T. Van Houten.... Scottish A. A. C....10 ft. 4| in. 

Putting the Shot .......... A, W. Adams .......... Scottish A. A. C....36 ft. 3* in. 

Throwing the Hammer. J. McDermott ........... Scottish A. A. C...86 ft. 11$ in. 

Throwing 56 Ib. Weight. J. McDermott .......... Scottish A. A. C....22 ft. 11 in. 

One Mile Walk ............ W, H. Purdy ............ Greenpoint A. C..6 min48f sec. 

Three Mile Walk ......... W. H. Purdy ............ Greenpoint A. C.22 min. 58f sec. 

Seven Mile Walk ......... E. E. Merrill ............ Union A. C., Boston.56m. 4sec. 

Bicycle Race, 2 miles.. .L. H. Johnson .......... Essex B. C ........ 7 min. 22 sec. 

fWm B Curtis, Captain..."! 
Tug of War, (teams of five) | J. C. Gillies ..................... | 

10 min. *. , imi , < * * ^n ...... ~~ ^ A. C. 

LJ. E. McNichol ........... 

Tug of War, (Individual) 5 min. time limit. A. L, Thomson 

Scottish Amer. A. C. 



"FORGED ANGLE FRAMt " 



AMATEUR CHAMPIONS OF AMERICA. 



AMATEUR CHAMPIONS OF AMERICA. 

1880. 
100 Yards Run ............ L. E. Myers ............. Manhattan A. C ....... 10 2-5 sec. 

220 Yards Run ............ L. E. Myers ............. Manhattan A. C ........ 233-5sec. 

440 Yards Run ............ L. E. Myers ............. Manhattan A. C ............ 52 sec. 

Half Mile Run ........ ....L. E Myers ........... ..Manhattan A. C. 2 nrin. 4 3-5 sec. 

One Mile Run, ............ H._ Fredericks ........... Manhattan A. C. 4m. 89 3-5 sec- 

Five Mile Run ............. J/H. Gifford ............ Irish A. A. C.. 27 m. 51 3-5 sec. 

120 Yards Hurdle Race. H. H. Moritz ............ Scottish A. A. C ...... 19 1-5 sec. 

Running High Jump.. ..A. L. Carroll ............ Staten Island A. C ...... 5 ft. 5 in- 

Running Broad Jump...J. S. Voorhees .......... Manhattan A. C ....... 21 ft. 4 in. 

Pole Leaping ............... W. J. Van Houten.... Scottish Amer. A. C. 10ft. 11 in. 

Putting the Shot .......... A. W. Adams ........... Scottish Amer. A.C. 36ft. 4in. 

Throwing the Hammer. W. B. Curtis ............ New York A. C ..... 87 ft. 4^ in. 

Throwing 56 Ib. Weight. J. S. McDermott ....... Scottish Amer. A. C.24 ft. 4 in. 

'Hie Mile Walk ............ E. E. Merrill ............ Scottish A. A. C....7min. 4sec. 

Three Mile Walk .......... E. E. Merrill ............ Scottish A. A. C..22 m. 284-5 s. 

Seven Mile Walk ......... J. B. Clark ............... Empire City A. C.54 m. 47 3-5 s. 

Bicycle Race, 2 miles.. .L. H. Johnson .......... Manhattan A. C...6 m. 56 4-5 s. 

f W. B. Curtis, Captain 1 

| J. W. Carter ............. | 

Tug of War (team of five)-<J J. H. Walden ............ }-New York A. C. 

| H. E. Buermeyer ...... | 

[J. H. Montgomery ..... J 
Tug of War (Individual ...... C. A. J. Quackberner ..... Scottish Amer. A C 

1881. 
100 Yards Run ............ L.E.Myers ........... Manhattan A. C ......... 10 sec. 

220 Yards Run ............ L. E. Myers ............ Manhattan A. C .......... 23^ sec. 

440 Yards Run ........... L. E. Myers ............. Manhattan A. C ........ 49 2-5 sec. 

Half Mile Run ...... . ...... Walter Smith ............ Williamsburg A. C. 2min.4sec. 

One Mile Run ............. H. Fredericks .......... Manhattan A. C..4m. 32 3-5 see. 

Five Mile Run ............. W. C. Davies ............ Williamsb'g A. C. 27 m. 434-5 s. 

120 Yards Hurdle Race.J. A. Tivey .............. Williamsburg A. C ....... 17$ sec. 

Running High Jump....C. W. Durand. ......... Staten Island A. C ..... 5 ft. 8 in- 

Running Broad Jump...J. S. Voorhees ......... Manhatttan A. C. ..21 ft. 4f in. 

Pole Leaping ............... W. J. Van Houten.... Scottish A. A. C ...... 10 ft. 6 in. 

Putting the Shot .......... F. L. Lambrecht ....... Pastime A. C ......... 37 ft. 5 in. 

Throwing the Hammer. F. L. Lambrecht ....... Pastime A. C ......... 89 ft. 8 in. 

Throwing 56 Ib. Weight. J. Britten ................ Scottish A. A. C ............. 24 ft. 

One Mile Walk ............ E. E. Merrill ............ Union A. C., Boston ... 7m. 2Js. 

Three Mile Walk ......... E. E. Merrill ............ Union A. C., Boston. 23m.55fs. 

Seven Mile Walk ......... W. H. Purdy ............ Manhattan A. C ...... 58 m. 43s. 

Bicycle Race, 2 Miles. ..C. H. Reed .............. New York A ..... '. 7 in. 6 s. 

fC. A. Berwin ............... ") 

C. P. Gaffney ................ 

Tug of War ............. -( M. Gorman .................... I Harlem A. C. 

R. Payton ..................... | 

(J. O. Stephens ............... J 

Tug of War (Individual) C. A. J. Quackberner ......... S. A. A. C. 

NEW YOBK^ PHILADELPHIA 



Marvin Safe Co; 



AND LONDON. 



AMATEUR CHAMPIONS OF AMERICA. 27 



AMATEUR CHAMPIONS OF AMERICA. 

1882. 

100 Yards A. Waldron Manhattan A. C.. no time taken. 

220 Yards H. S* Brooks, Jr Yale University A. C.223-5sec. 

440 Yards L. E. Myers Manhattan A. C. 51 3-5 sec. 

880 Yards W. H. Goodwin, Jr... New York A. C...1 m. 561 sec. 

One Mile Run H. Fredericks Manhattan A. C.. 4m. 36 1-5 sec. 

120 Yards Hurdle J. A. Tivey Williamsbg A. C 16 4-5 sec. 

One Mile Walk W. H. Parry Wiiliamsb'g A.C.7m. 10 3-5 sec. 

Three Mile Walk F. G. Trunkett Wiiliamsb'g A. C... 24m. 19 sec. 

Seven Mile Walk F. P. Murray Wiiliamsb'g A. C.. 57m. 18$ sec. 

Putting the Shot F. L. Lambrecht Pastime A. C 39ft. 9^ in. 

Throwing the Hammer, F. L. Lambrecht Pastime A. C 93 ft. I in. 

Running High Jump... A. L. Carroll Staten Island A. C 5ft. 7 in. 

Running Long Jump.... F. J Jenkins, Jr New York A. C 21 ft. 5f in. 

Pole Vaulting B. J. Richardson Scottish A. A. C 10 ft. 

Throwing561b. Weight H. W. West Boston Y. M. C. A.. 24ft. 10| in. 

Five Mile Run T. F. Delaney Gramercy A. C...37 m. 34 2-5 s. 

Two Mile Bicycle G. D. Gideon GermantownB. C..6 m. 41 3 5s. 

Five Mile Bicycle G. D. Gideon GermantownB. C17m. 19 4-5 s. 

(C. A. Berwin ] 

C. P. Gaffney 

Tug of War (team of five< M. Gorman > Harlem A. C. 

R. Payton ] 

[O. J. 'Stephens J 

Tug of War (Individual) C. A. J. Quackberner Scottish Amer. A. C. 



1883. 

100 Yards Run A. Waldron Manhattan A. C 10 sec. 

220 Yards Run H. S. Brooks, Jr Yale U. A. C 224-5 sec. 

440 Yards Run L. E. Myers Manhattan A. C 52^ sec. 

880 Yards Run J. J. Murphy Manhattan A. C..2 m. 42-5 sec. 

One Mile Run H. Fredericks Manhattan A. C. 4 m. 36 4-5 sec. 

120 Yards Hurdle S. A. Safford American A. C 19 2-5 sec. 

One Mile Walk F. P. Murray Wiiliamsb'g A. C...6 m. 46 sec. 

Three Mile Walk G. S. Baird American A. C..22 m. 835 sec. 

Seven Mile Walk W. H. Meek West Side A.C. 56 m. 48 2-5 sec. 

Putting the Shot F. L. Lambrecht Pastime A. C 43 in. 

Throwing the Hammer. W. L. Condon Baltimore A. C 93 ft. 11 ft. 

Runnfcig Long Jump....M. W. Ford New York A. C 21 ft. 7 in. 

Run ning High Jump.... M. W. Ford New York A. C 5ft. 8 in. 

Pole Vaulting H. H. Baxter New York A. C 11 ft. 3 in. 

Throwing 56 Ib. Weight. F. L. Lambrecht Pastime A. C 25ft. 1^ in. 

Five Mile Run T. F. Delaney Wiiliamsb'g A. C.26m. 472-5 s. 

Two Mile Bicycle G. M. Hendee S. B. C. 6 min. 47 1-5 sec. 

Five Mile Bicycle R. G. Rood Ixion B. C...17 min. 37 2-5 sec. 

Tug of War ^Individual) .... C. A. J. Quackberner N. Y. A. C. 



28 AMATEUR CHAMPIONS OF AMERICA. 

AMATEUR CHAMPIONS OF AMERICA. 

1884, 

100 Yards Run M. W. Ford New York A. C 1045 sec. 

220 Yards Run L. E. Myers Manhattan A. C 241-5 sec. 

440 Yards Run L. E. Myers Manhattan A. C 55 4-5 sec. 

880 Yards Run L. E. Myers ManhattanA. C.2min. 94-5 sec. 

One Mile Run P. C. Madeira P. F. & S. A..4 min. 36 4,5 sec. 

120 Yards Hurdle S. A. Safford American A. C 18 1-5 sec. 

One Mile Walk F. P.Murray Williamsbg A. C..6m. 543-5 s. 

Three Mile Walk F. P.Murray Williamsb'gA. C.23 m. 15 2-5 s. 

Seven Mile Walk E. F. McDonald West Side A. C 56 m. 28 s. 

Putting the Shot F. L. Lambrecht Manhattan A. C 39ft. 10 in. 

Throwing the Hammer. F. L. Lambrecht Manhattan A. C 92 ft. 5 in. 

Running Long Jump.... M. W. Ford New York A. C 20 ft. 1 in. 

Running High Jump.... J. T. Rhinehardt American A. C 5 ft. 8 in. 

Pole Vaulting H.H.Baxter New York A. C 10 ft. 

Throwing 56 Ib. Weight. C. A. J. Quackberner.New York A. C 26ft. 3 in. 

Five Mile Run George Stonebridge...West Side A. C....27 m. 45 sec. 

Two Mile Bicycle L. Hamilton Waterbury, Conn.. .6 m. 58 sec. 

Five Mile Bicycle L. Hamilton Waterbury, Conn.. 18 m. 36 sec. 



1885. 

100 Yards Run ..M. W. Ford New York A. C 10 3-5 sec. 

220 Yards Run M. W. Ford ..New York A. C 24 4-5 sec. 

440 Yards Run H. M. Raborg New York A. C 54 1-5 sec. 

880 Yards Run H. L. Mitchell Yale College A. C..2 m. 2 3-5 s. 

One Mile Run G. Y. Gilbert ManhattanA. C..4m. 451 5 sec. 

120 Yards Hurdle A. A. Jordan Manhattan A. C 17 3-5 sec. 

One Mile Walk G. D. Baird Olympic AC 6 min. 42 sec. 

Three Mile Walk E. D. Lange ManhattanA. C. 23 m. 10 3 5 s. 

Seven Mile Walk F. P. Murray Williamsb's A. C. 54 m. 31 1-5 s. 

Putting the Shot F. L. Lambrecht Manhattan A. C 42ft. 2f in. 

Throwing the Hammer. F. L. Lambrecht ManhattanA. C 96ft. 10 in. 

Running Long Jump.... M. W. Ford New York A. C 21 ft. 6 in. 

Running High Jump....W. B. Page P. F. & S. A 5 ft. 9J in. 

Pole Vaulting H. H.Baxter New York A. C 11 ft. 3 in 

Throwing 56 Ib Weight C. A. J. Quackberner.New York A. C 26 ft. 3 in. 

Five Mile Run P. D. Skillman Manhattan A. C...27 m. 13 2-5 s 

Four Mile Bicycle A. B. Rich Staten Island A.C. 14m. 22-5s. 

!J. Van Houten, Captain] 
M. Mullhern | 
B. Cannon [>West Side A. C. 



T. Moran. 
T. Owens.. 



MARVIN'S SAFE 



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COMMON SCREW D* IViR. 



HISTORIES 



NEW YORK, STSTEN ISLSND, 
ILLmMSBURGM M MMHfiTTSN 

ATHLETIC CLUBS. 



COMPILED, ARRANGED AND WRITTEN BY 

FREDERICK "HZ", JANSSEN, 

WITH THE ASSISTANCE OT 

G. H. BADEAU, - - - President N. A. A. A. A. and Williamsburgh A. C. 

G. W. CARR, - - - President Manhattan A. C. 

O T. JOHNSON, - - - Ex-President Staten Island A. C. 

W B. CURTIS, .... Ex-President New York A C. 

L. E. MYERS, - - - Manhattan A. C. 

(Champion Runner of the World.) 

WALTON STORM, - - - Captain Manhattan A. C. 

A. B. RICH, 2d Lieutenant Staten Island A. C. 

J. B. LIDDLE, -.-- Treasurer Williamsburgh A. C. 



20 JOHN ST. (Up stairs), NEW YORK, 



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THE NEW YORK ATHLETIC CLUB. 31 

HISTORY OF THE 

NEW YORK ATHLETIC CLUB, 

NEW YORK CITY. 



THE New York Athletic Club was born June 17, 1866, in the back 
parlor of No. 200 Sixth avenue, New York city (now a part of R. 
H. Macy & Co.'s store, but then a private residence), and its parents 
were : 

JOHN C. BABCOCK, 

HENRY E. BUERMEYER, 
WILLIAM B. CURTIS. 

Babcock and Curtis brothers since boyhood in everything save 
birth had been for twelve years enthusiastic athletes, although ath- 
letic clubs and athletic meetings were as yet unknown. Unable to find 
associates, or competitions, or prizes, they nevertheless faithfully prac- 
ticed running, walking, leaping, feats of strength, swimming and 
skating, solely for their own health and amusement. There being so 
many days in which the weather made it necessary to substitute in- 
door for outdoor sport, they fitted up their back parlor with dumb- 
bells, clubs, lifting-machines, boxing-gloves and all the other para- 
phernalia of a first-class gymnasium, and snugly ensconced in this 
cozy shrine of manly sport, they successfully bade defiance to frost 
and storm. 

The most frequent and welcome visitor at No. 200 Sixth avenue 
was Henry E. Buermeyer, of Brooklyn, whose personal prowess and 
ardent love of all manly sport made him a most congenial guest. 

In 1866 amateur athletic sport had just begun to assume promi- 
nence in England. The first English amateur athletic club, the 
Mincing Lane a name soon changed to the London Athletic Club >- 
was founded in June, 1863; the first Oxford-Cambridge games were 
held March 5, 1864, and the first amateur championship meeting 
March 23, 1866. June 17, 1866, was a rainy Sunday, and in the par- 
lor at 200 Sixth avenue, Babcock, Buermeyer and Curtis, enjoying 

MARVIN'S SAFEST "Sliding Back Plate." 



32 THE NEW YORK ATHLETIC CLUB. 

needed rest after a half hour with the heavy weights, discussed the 
rapid rise and spread of athletic sports in England, and decided to 
begin at once an earnest and persistent endeavor to interest American 
youth in those matters, and eventually to found an American amateur 
athletic club on the model of its English predecessors. No. 200 
Sixth avenue was chosen as the headquarters and weekly rendezvous. 

Those whose acquaintance with amateur athletics dates back but 
a few years can hardly appreciate the coolness with which these sports 
were at first received here, arrd the difficulty experienced by these 
three athletic crusaders in inducing recruits to rally around their ban- 
ner. Babcock was a member of the Nassau Boat Club, while his as- 
sociates had seats in the racing crew of the Atlantic Boat Club. Nat- 
urally, the first to follow their lead were members of these two rowing 
clubs, but after a while outsiders began to drop in one by one. ' 

When mud, snow or storm prevented outdoor work, the weekly 
reunion was limited to a half-day's session at 200 Sixth avenue. The 
participants, though few, were of high athletic rank, competition was 
spirited, and the greatest lifting feat on record is credited to one of 
these meetings. 

Not only did the members thus amuse themselves, but that snug 
back parlor soon secured a national reputation as a sort of muscular 
assay office, where candidates for athletic honors could have their 
abilities accurately tested and their athletic rank definitely established. 
Did some rural village boast an Herculean dumb-bell lifter, he was 
escorted to 200 Sixth avenue, introduced to those three hollow 
dumb-bells loading from 60 pounds to 200 pounds and went home 
knowing the exact difference between his actual and his reputed 
strength. Did newspapers report some Samsonian club-swinger, he 
was straightway confronted with those jointed clubs loading from 12 
pounds to 100 pounds and speedily enabled to prove the limit of his 
powers. Was there somewhere a famous lifter, he was decoyed sooner 
or later into the trap, mounted on the old ash lifting-table, and al- 
lowed to learn for himself the remarkable difference between lifting 
weighed pounds and guessed pounds. Did the friends of some stal 
wart boxer become a trifle boisterous in his boasts, he was invited to 
the back parlor, and permitted to display his talent to his heart's con- 
tent in mimic battle with that suave and gentle giant, H. E. Buer- 
meyer. A strict regard for historic truth makes necessary the admis- 
sion that there is no authentic record of any instance in which an as- 
pirant for fistic honors returned for a second lesson. The carefulness 
and exactness with which these trials were conducted soon gained 
public recognition, and for several years the fact that any feat had been 



THE NEW YORK ATHLETIC CLUB. 33 

accomplished at No. 200 Sixth avenue was a Hall-mark which stamped 
the performance as sterling silver. 

Whenever the weather permitted, the parlor was abandoned and 
port pursued in the open air. The first rendezvous was on the half- 
mile track connected with the old "Red House," Mark Maguire's 
famous roadside hostelry, at the head of Harlem lane. Here, after 
running the half-mile circuit in 2m. 305., or walking it in 5m. feats 
then considered worthy of note the fathers of the club, thoroughly 
exhausted by such extraordinary efforts, would throw themselves on 
the grass for a half-hour's rest, and then spend another thirty minutes 
in conversation with that quaint Yorkshireman, James McKay, who 
had established a boat-building shop in the second story of Maguire's 
stable, and was just then hard at work on the first genuine racing- 
shell ever built in the United States. 

In a few months the march of improvement ran a street and a 
row of tenements through the middle of the track, and a change was 
made to the Elysian Fields, Hoboken. There was no regular track, 
but a good quarter-mile circuit could be marked out on the level turf 
of the ball field, and several straightaway xoo-yard courses on the 
shore path. Here the regular attendants were joined by many mem- 
bers of the Atlantic Boat Club, whose boat-house was only a quarter 
of a mile below. Many spirited contests took place, and in one ever- 
memorable handicap one of the founders of the club was credited 
with running 102 yards in 9 seconds a signal triumph of watch- 
holding over truth. 

To this comfortable and convenient trysting-place there were two 
objections: there was no regular track, and the Fields being then the 
people's pleasure-ground, much as Coney Island is now, the crowds 
of curious spectators were always annoying and sometimes aggressive. 
So a removal was made to Finley's half-mile track, corner of 72d street 
and the Bloomingdale road. These grounds proved to be eminently 
desirable. The proprietor a jolly, sport-loving old Englishman 
did everything in his power to make his visitors comfortable, and no 
further change was made till the summer of 1871. when the club 
opened its own grounds in Harlem. On Finley's pleasant grounds 
weekly games were held whenever weather permitted. The Atlantic 
Boat Club men rowed across from their Hoboken quarters, beached 
their barges at the foot of 73d street, climbed the steep bluff of what 
is now Riverside Park, and joined in the contests, while the Nassau 
Boat Club party paddled up from their boat-house, foot of 34th street 
and North River, and the New York city contingent came up by the 
Eighth avenue street-cars. 

During the summer of 1868 forty-three persons were registered 



00., 



ESTABLISHED 47 YEARS. 



34 THE NEW YORK ATHLETIC CLUB. 

as having participated in three or more of these reunions, and the 
average weekly attendance was about twenty. These results, insig- 
nificant as they now appear, then gave great satisfaction, and were 
thought sufficient to warrant the permanent organization and incor- 
poration of an amateur athletic club. A meeting was called, notices 
published in daily and sporting journals, and written invitations sent 
to all who had ever attended any of the weekly sports; but, despite 
this timely publicity, only seven persons assembled, and an adjourn- 
ment was promptly made. A second trial, three weeks later, resulted 
similarly, and it was not until the third attempt (September 8, 1868,) 
that fourteen faithful ones could be gathered together to sign a mus- 
ter roll, elect officers, appoint committees and complete the formal 
organization of America's first amateur athletic club. . 

Being now a full-fledged athletic club, it was, of course, neces- 
sary to give a regular open amateur athletic meeting, and the manage- 
ment was entrusted to a games committee. Athletic games and cin- 
der-paths were then unknown in America, and Finley's track, though 
pleasant enough for practice, was out of the way and inaccessible for 
spectators. Fortunately, Mr. Babcock was just then building for the 
Third Avenue Railroad Company the structure now known as the 
American Institute Rink, and it was decided to hold the games in that 
building Wednesday evening, November n, 1868 Contractor and 
builder were dilatory, as usual; the morning of November 1 1 broke 
cold and stormy; the building was not yet half-roofed, and the commit- 
tee, scouring West and South streets with wagons, accumulated a quar- 
ter-acre of tarpaulins and made a temporary roof, under which the games 
were successfully contested. The central section of the Rink had not 
been floored, and an eighth-of-a-mile path was staked out on the 
smooth clay surface. 

In America amateur athletic circles there was at that time only 
one pair of spiked shoes, bought by W. B. Curtis in one of London's 
by-ways. They were clumsy, long-toed, and of such generous pro- 
portions as best fitted their owner's ample feet. No one then .knew 
anything about those new-fangled weapons, but everybody agreed that. 
if they were in common use by English athletes, they must be desir- 
able for Americans. So everybody wished for a pair; everybody 
coveted this pair; everybody envied their fortunate possessor, and 
everybody wished to borrow them. Their complaisant owner tried to- 
satisfy all, and succeeded in distributing these shoes quite widely. 
After he had worn them in the 75-yard and 22O-yard runs, H. J. Ma- 
grane used them in the quarter-mile and half-mile runs, H. E. Buer- 
meyer in the hammer-throwing and shot-putting, and finally, strangest 
of all, they carried J. E. Russell to victory in the one-mile walk. 



ARE THE BEST 



THE NEW YORK ATHLETIC CLUB. 35 

The contestants at the first American open amateur meeting in- 
cluded all the young men in the neighborhood of New York city who 
had ever developed' ability in any branch of athletic sport. Not only 
did the programme show the names of all the active members of the 
new club and all their acquaintances who were able to exhibit good 
performance at running, walking, leaping, or feats of strength, but a 
special invitation, or rather challenge, was extended to the New York 
Caledonian Club, then, as now, the most prominent of American Cal- 
edonian societies, and their most eminent athletes were present to 
compete, thus making the affair an international match America 
against Scotland. The result was, as might have been foreseen, 
America won the running and walking contests, while Scotland was 
successful with the hammer and shot, and in pole-leaping, standing 
high jump and running long jump the games most common at Cal- 
edonian meetings. 

The many thousand bicyclists of to-day will be interested in 
learning that at this meeting was given the first public exhibition of 
the newly-invented velocipede now known as "The Boneshaker" 
which was the forerunner of the modern bicycle. The leading sport- 
ing journal of that day reported the event as follows : 

"At this juncture the velocipede race, which the programme an- 
nounced as the closing feature of the exercises, took place. It 
proved nothing more nor was it intended to be more than an ex- 
hibition of the speed to be gained by these wonderful engines of 
locomotion. The carriage consists of but two wheels, placed one 
before the other, with a treadle apparatus to spin them on. Without 
speaking a wordabout the velocity with which one can cover ground 
while riding this machine, the wonder is how he can maintain a bal- 
ance on it at all. Yet this seems to be no part of the difficulty in 
navigating; on the contrary, every effort of the rider seems bent on 
driving it at break-neck speed. The ease and celerity with which this 
new method of propulsion was turned around the corners of the 
building was amusing, and its performance was in the highest degree 
satisfactory. " 

The figures credited to the winner of each game were the first 
amateur records ever claimed in America, and became necessarily our 
bests on record. 

They were a fair test of our ability in this line, and the remark- 
able progress in American amateur athletic sport during the past 
seventeen years is clearly shown by comparing those performances of 
1868 with our present records. The comparison, or rather the con- 
trast, is as follows : 



Marvin Safe Co. 



NEW YORK. PHILADELPHIA 
AND LONDON. 



86 THE NEW YORK ATHLETIC CLUB. 

75-Yard Run Then, 9 sec.; now, 7 3-4. 

220- Yard Run Then, 28 sec.; now, 22 2-5. 

Quarter-Mile Run Then, i min. 20 sec.; now, 48 3-4. 

Half-Mile Run Then, 2 min. 26 sec.; now, 1:55 2-5. 

Hurdle-Race Then, 24 sec.; now, 16 4-5. 

One-Mile Walk Then, 7 min. 50 1-2 sec.; now, 6:29 3-5. 

Standing Long Jump (with weights) Then, n ft. 6 1-5 in.; now, 

1 2 ft. 9 1-2 in. 

Standing High Jump Then, 4 ft. 5 in. ', now, 5 ft - l r "4 in. 
Three Standing Long Jumps (with weights) Then, 33 ft. 8 in. ; now, 

35 ft - 9 in- 
Running Long Jump Then, 17 ft; now, 22 ft 7 3-4 in. 
Running High Jump Then, 5 ft 2 in. ; now, 6 ft. 1-4 in. 
Pole-Leaping Then, 8 ft 3 in.; now, u ft. 1-2 in. 
Throwing Hammer Then, 73 ft; now, 96 ft. 10 in. 
Putting Shot Then, 35 ft 5 in.; now, 43 ft 

Of the athletes who assisted in forming the club and giving its 
first games, Jason H. Miller remains the oldest active member. 

DECEASED MEMBERS. 

J. Edward Russell, David L. S. Dorian, H. J. Magrane, 
Charles T. Roosevelt. 

NOT NOW CONNECTED WITH THE CLUB. 

Harry A. Hiers, William J. Sleight, H. Sanford, 
W. J. Hiers, Edward Garrison, W. J. Wise, 

P. M. Broderick, Joseph Benson, J. McGonigle, 



F. W. Stone, 
A. R. S. Foote, 
Frank Johnson, 
Arthur Vinette, 
Leon Baker, 


Joseph Russell, 
Matthew Arnold, 
P. O'Hara, 
Edward Gleason, 
G. Wilkins, 


Thomas Sturgis 
W. H. Walsh, 
S. Wilson, 
J. Fuessel, 
E. B. Ketchum, 



Morris E. Burton, J. C. O'Connell, D. W. Wise, Jr. 

E. R. Edwards, Charles S. Osborn, 

The three founders of the club Babcock, Buermeyer and Curtis 
were several years ago transferred from active to honorary member- 
ship, but are still residents of New York city and in vigorous health. 

The history of the New York Athletic Club, since its first open 
amateur meeting, is an oft-told tale, and needs but brief recapitula- 
tion. In 1869 the parlor at 200 Sixth avenue grew too small for those 
who wished to enjoy its pleasures, and larger apartments were secured 
in Clarendon Hall. In 1870 the club was incorporated, its indoor 
headquarters transferred to the St. Mark's Place Gymnasium, and a 
small floating boat-house built and anchored near Harlem Bridge. 

M&RYIN'S "TONGUE <* GROOVE" SSFE, 



THE NEW YORK ATHLETIC CLUB. 37 

Next year its indoor rendezvous was changed to John Wood's Gym 
nasium, in 28th street, and the vacant lots between Third avenue, 
Lexington avenue, i3Oth street and the Harlem River, leased an 
changed into athletic grounds, with a sixth-of-a-mile track, and the 
club boat-house anchored along the back-stretch. In 1876 a large 
floating boat-house was built, and the two houses anchored at the 
foot of 1 38th street, Mott Haven a spot now occupied by the ap- 
proach^s to the Madison avenue bridge. Next year the club obtained 
a long lease of the vacant plot on the north bank of the Harlem 
River, near 1 5Oth street, and transformed it into the beautiful grounds 
which it has since occupied. Soon afterward the two boat-houses 
were moved to the foot of the street adjoining the grounds, thus con- 
centrating the club's athletic and aquatic interests in a most con- 
venient and comfortable manner. In 1882 the club's indoor head- 
quarters were removed to the Crescent Club Gymnasium, in 23d 
street, and in 1885 made their final journey to a permanent home in 
the club's magnificent house, corner of 6th avenue and 55th street. 

No one can deny that the New York Athletic Club is the leading 
amateur athletic organization of the United States. It has invested 
in grounds, boat-houses and club-houses more money than any other 
American club. It was the first and is the largest amateur club in the 
country ; and as regards social, financial and athletic standing, its 
members compare favorably with those of any club in the world. 
For these reasons, it is eminently fit and proper that the New York 
Athletic Club should take the lead in developing and promoting ama- 
teur athletic sports in America, and the duties thus thrust upon the 
club by its character and standing have been performed with unusual 
intelligence, tireless enterprise, strict impartiality and becoming 
modesty. 

During its early years the history of the New York Athletic Club 
was in fact, the history of American amateur athletic sports ; and, 
even after a hundred sister clubs had been formed, the worthy deeds 
of the pioneer club still enriched every page of our athletic annals. 
It has been constantly "foremost in every good athletic word and 
work ;" prompt to investigate every invention and adopt every im- 
provement ; persistently active and earnest in developing and improv- 
ing amateur athletic sport. It made athletic sports popular and re- 
spectable, and rendered it possible that amateur athletic clubs should 
exist and flourish. Its object, as expressed in its charter, was not the 
building up and aggrandizement of the New York Athletic Club, but 
the development and progress of amateur athletic sports in America ; 
and it has neither unseemly pride in its own members nor unmanly 
jealousy of its neighbors. 

IWADUTIVT'C CAFF CANNOT BE TAKEN APABT WITH A 
MARVIN S SAFE COMMON SCREW DBIVKK. 



38 THE NEW YORK ATHLETIC CLUB. 

It gave the first open amateur meeting ever held in America. It 
imported the first spiked shoes ever worn by an American amateur, 
and introduced to this country the style of athletic costume which is 
now universally adopted. It built and owned the first athletic 
grounds, and constructed the first cinder running-path ever seen in 
the United States. It introduced handicapping, and gave the first 
handicap games ever known here. It gave the first tug-of-war and 
the first steeplechase, and was ever alert to introduce any novelty that 
had merit. It perfected the machinery of its own management until 
its constitution, by-laws and general rules were in constant demand 
for the guidance of new clubs, and revised, improved and' codified 
the rules governing competitions with such intelligent skill that its 
laws of athletics and rules for the government of athletic meetings 
were subsequently adopted by the National Association without alter- 
ation or amendment. 

In 1876, by the advice and with the consent of every amateur 
athletic club in this country, the New York Athletic Club gave the 
first anmual American amateur championship athletic meeting, and 
continued it yearly until in 1879 it gracefully transferred this duty to 
tho newly-formed Amateur Athletic Association. In 1877 it founded 
the annual meeting for the decision of the amateur swimming cham- 
pionship, and in 1878 the annual meeting for the decision of the ama- 
teur boxing and wrestling championships, and still maintains both 
these yearly contests. 

No club in the world ever more fairly earned the right to in- 
scribe on its banner that manly motto : ' ' Nulla Vestigia Retrorsum. " 

The founders of the New York Athletic Club in 1866 were very 
hopeful, but their most sanguine speculations hardly pictured the 
reality of to-day. The three members have increased to two thou- 
sand the limit and three hundred applicants stand waiting for the 
first vacancy. It has the beautiful grounds at Mott Haven, and just 
over the fence, on the river bank, are moored its four large boat- 
houses, filled with a stock of racing and pleasure boats unsurpassed 
in quality or number by the fleet of any American club. At the cor- 
ner of Sixth avenue and Fifty-fifth street it has its own magnificant 
house, which includes not only a grand gymnasum and spacious 
swimming-bath, but also all the various comforts and conveniences of 
a first-class social club. 

The history of the club has not been wholly free from the un- 
pleasant incidents usual in similar organizations, but it has safely 
weathered the storms of outside jealousy and internal dissension, and 
is now snugly amchored in the harbor of assured success. 



FIRE & BURGLAR 



THE NEW YORK ATHLETIC CLUB. 39 

The officers of some of the earlier years were as follows : 

1879. 

PRESIDENT : 

CHARLES E. PIERCE. 

VICE-PRESIDENT : TREASURER : SECRETARY : 

JOHN WHIPPLE. ALFRED HEYN. C. A. MAHONEY. 

CAPTAIN : 

WALDO SPRAGUE. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT : SECOND LIEUTENANT : , 

FRANK J. KILPATRICK. BENJAMIN C. WILLIAMS. 

TRUSTEES : 

CHARLES R. TRUAX, HENRY C. WEST, 

R. WILLIAM RATHBORNE. 



1880. 



PRESIDENT : 

WILLIAM B. CURTIS. 

VICE-PRESIDENT : TREASURER : 

WALDO SPRAGUE. WILLIAM M. ANDRUS. 

SECRETARY : 

CORNELIUS A. MAHONEY. 

CAPTAIN ; 

ALFRED H. CURTIS. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT : SECOND LIEUTENANT : 

WILLIAM WOOD. WILLIAM G. DEMAREST. 

TRUSTEES : 

JAMES R. CURRAN, JAMES W. CARTER, 

THOMAS R. KEATOR. 



"FORGED ANGLE FRAME" SAf, 



40 THE NEW YORK ATHLETIC CLUB. 

1881. 

PRESIDENT : 

WILLIAM B. CURTIS. 

VICE-PRESIDENT : SECRETARY-TREASURER : 

WALDO SPRAGUE. t WILLIAM WOOD. 

. CAPTAIN : 

ALFRED H. CURTIS. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT : SECOND LIEUTENANT : 

JAMES W. CARTER. GEORGE D. PHILLIPS. 



CHARLES E. PIERCE, THOMAS R. KEATOR, 

CHARLES B. WAITE, OTTO SARONY, 

WILLIAM M. ANDRUS, JAMES R. CURRAN, 

BENJ. C. WILLIAMS, REGINALD H. SAYRE, 

THEODOR GUERRA. 



1882. 



PRESIDENT : 

WILLIAM R. TRAVERS. 

VICE-PRESIDENT : SECRETARY-TREASURER : 

ALFRED H. CURTIS. WILLIAM WOOD. 

CAPTAIN : 

JAS. ROSS CURRAN. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT : SECOND LIEUTENANT : 

J. W. CARTER. OTTO SARONY. 



HERMANN OELRICHS, WILLIAM C. WILMER, 

B. C. WILLIAMS, W. S. WILSON, 

T. R. KEATOR, A. B. WILSON, 

W. M. ANDRUS, R. H. SAYRE, 

F. A. BUCKMAN. 

MARVIN 'S SAFES Haye " Becessci D r ^ Bool[ Case protector." 



THE NEW YORK ATHLETIC CLUB. 41 

Among its many prominent and retired athletes may be men- 
tioned the names of: 

Otto Sarony, W. Hamilton, M. W. Ford, 

H. E. Buermeyer, Geo. Phillips, C. A. J. Quackberner, 

F. Phinney, A. B. Wilson, D. M. Stern, 

F. Jenkins, S. Wainwright, M. G. Morse, 

J. Carter, Geo. H. Taylor, W. B. Curtis, 

H. Barnes, J. C. Babcock, Frank Ellison, 

Wm. Wood, H. M. Raborg, W. Weaver, 

B. C. Williams, F. G. Bourne, W. C. Wilmer, 

H. Goffe, R. H. Dudgeon, Waldo Sprague. 



Following are the officers for the year 1885 : 

PRESIDENT : 
WILLIAM R. TRAVERS. 

VICE-PRESIDENT : SECRETARY I 

A. V. DE GOICOURIA. ALBERT H. WHEELER. 

CAPTAIN : TREASURER : 

WALTER G. SCHUYLER. WILLIAM WOOD. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES : 

SETH B. FRENCH, THOMAS R. KEATOR, 

JOHN J. McCOOK, CHAS. E. QUINCEY, 

OTTO SARONY, RUTGERS VAN BRUNT, 

JENNINGS S. COX, EDWARD S. INNET, 

JOS. J, O'DONOHUE, WALTER STANTON. 



STIPE 00., 



ESTABLISHED 47 YEARS. 



PORTRAIT & LMDSCUPE 



TOMPKINSYILLE, 




STATES ISLAND. 



PUBLISHER OF 



PHOTOGRAPHS 



STATEN ISLAND SCENERY. 



Telephone Call, 48 D. 



THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 43 

HISTORY OF THE 

Staten Island Athletic Club. 

WEST NEW BRIGHTON. 



THE history and record of the Staten Island Athletic Club is one 
that should place it in the lead of the many large athletic and 
rowing organizations of this country, not only for its strength as an 
athletic and boating club, but also for its management, which has 
been successfully conducted on first-class business principles for the 
past eight years, and so much so that the members are now enabled 
to say that their club is entirely free from debt of any kind, while the 
property is valued at from $25,000 to $30,000. 

The idea of starting an athletic club on Staten Island was first 
thought of in 1877, by an old athlete named Wm. Iken. He pro- 
posed his scheme to Messrs. Oliver T. Johnson, Robt. T. P. Fiske, 
Fred and Frank Janssen, John W. Edwards and W. J. U. Roberts, 
one morning, on the way to the city, on the North Shore ferry-boat, 
and the idea was cordially supported by all of the parties spoken to. 

Mr. Johnson, an old reliable in sports, won the first handicap 
race ever run in this country ; Mr. Edwards had been captain of the 
famous and renowned Neptune Rowing Association for several years ; 
Mr. Roberts was one of the champion Columbia College Foot-Ball 
Team, while the Janssen Brothers and Mr. Fiske were members and 
founders of the old Alpha Base- Ball Club, well known for having won 
more games in six successive years (1870 to 1877) than any other 
amateur club in America. 

These gentlemen soon took steps toward organizing a club, and 
not long after the matter was first proposed a meeting was called for 
and held in a boat-house, known at that time as the Hesper Boat Club, 
by thirteen enthusiastic admirers of sports in general, namely : 

Wm. Iken, Fred. W. Janssen, 

Oliver T. Johnson, Robt. T. P. Fiske, 

John W. Edwards, John H. Rimmer, 

Wm. R. Wemple, Frank G. Janssen, 

Frank L. Russ, Fred. L. Rodewald, 

Wm. J. U. Roberts, Thos. Chute, 
Henry A. Caesar. 

M.flRYIN'S "TDNGIIE ^ GRDDYE" SflFE. 



44 THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 

Seated around a little lamp, that burned dimly on the floor, these 
seemingly unlucky thirteen men, and already quite distinguished ath- 
letes, had but time to organize before the lamp flickered and went 
out, thus compelling an adjournment at the very beginning. 

However, this did not discourage the men, as a second meeting 
was called for at the Village Hall, New Brighton, and to which each 
one of the thirteen gentlemen brought one or two of their friends. 
This time quite a meeting was held, Mr. W. K. Soutter, the banker, 
was elected president, by-laws and rules established, members elected, 
and a little supper served in remembrance. All this took place in the 
fall of 1877, an d it was the same year that a large wagon was to be 
seen, with all these gentlemen inside, driving through the mud and 
rain down to the New Dorp Trotting Track, early Thanksgiving Day 
morning. Mr. Plummer, the world-renowned critic and official, was 
rescued from a plowed corn-field near Britton's Pond, soaked to the 
skin and entirely exhausted, it taking the combined efforts of the 
S. I. A. C. to extricate this little big sportsman from his unfortunate 
position. 

The destination was reached in a little less than three hours, and 
after a little drying a number of the party stripped for some races, 
around the half-mile track, while others were employed looking after 
dinner and informing Mr. Plummer of the so-far success of the club. 

, After some three or four races had taken place having been run 
in dancing pumps, bathing-suits, and even less the men all felt quite 
broken-hearted because they had not beaten the records, but each and 
every one thought himself the coming champion with a little prac- 
tice ; and so it was owing to the untiring pluck of Iken, Johnson, 
Janssen, Fiske, Roberts and Rimmer that the racing was kept up, as 
these men could be seen daily running on the streets, in yards, and 
across country, on Sundays. Meanwhile the other members were 
doing good work toward providing a suitable track and grounds, and 
which was finally leased, corner of Bement and Henderson avenues. 

The field had to be leveled, the track dug out and the surround- 
ings improved. Mr. Robt. J. Wardlaw, a member, then at the School 
of Mines, Columbia College, undertook the job, and after some hard 
work made the place quite picturesque in the way of a race-track. 
Late in the spring of 1878 the club attempted to hold a field meeting,, 
with the aid of a large tent in the center of the grounds as a grand 
stand, but owing to the rain-storm, which suddenly broke forth, but 
one race took place, which Wardlaw won, with Janssen second, and 
it was at this meeting that all the ladies, horses, carriages, carts, 
laborers and athletes could be seen in one body under this circus 
tent of A. Z. Ross. 

1UI A mriliTJC C A w CANNOT BE TAKEN APART WITH A 
MARVlIl S SAFE COMMON SCREW DBIVEB. 



THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 45- 

1878. 

The officers were as follows: 

PRESIDENT, 

WILLIAM K. SOUTTER. 

REC. SECRETARY, TREASURER, COR. SECRETARY, 

D. J. H. WILLCOX. H. A. CAESAR. R. T. P. FISKE. 

CAPTAIN, 

O. T. JOHNSON. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT, SECOND LIEUTENANT, 

C. THORP. D. H. ROWLAND. 



JOHN D. VEKMEULE. D. R. NORVELL. 

JOHN W. EDWARDS. ARTHUR T. SHAND. 

LOUIS HENDERSON. F. L. RODEWALD. 

However, it was only about a month later when July 4th came, 
the still energetic members had another programme arranged for their 
many friends and admirers, who seemed to fully appreciate the com- 
bined efforts of the gentlemen engaged in the management, and so 
did not allow weather or climate to prevent their presence at the 
meeting. After two or three races had taken place, in which such 
men as Shand, Chute, Collins, Rodewald, Bailey and Dedrichsen 
could be seen striving for laurels and glory, the ram again came down 
in torrents, and another postponement was necessary, but only for a 
few days this time, as Mr. Johnson in a very eloquent speech informed 
the spectators that the meeting would take place on the 6th inst., two- 
days following, while the crowd received the announcement with 
great applause, although the greater number were drenched through 
and through by this time. 

Not until the'Fall of 1878 did the club hold its first successful 
games, open to all amateurs. A grand-stand of planks and beams 
had been built for the occasion, and the never-tiring members, John- 
son, Chute, Collins, Hayward, Wemple, Dedrechsen, Shand and 
Charles F. True could be seen with their hats, coats, vests, collars 
and cuffs all off, working like laborers, with the sun's rays pouring 
down upon them at an angle of 105 degrees in the shade, stretching 
an old lighter's mainsail over the top of the so-called grand-stand, to 
keep the fair sex from being burnt brown. But the games proved a 
success, and the club was greatly benefitted by them, while during the 
winter months plans and arrangements were being made for the fol- 



MARVIN'S SAFEST "Sliding Back Plate." 



46 THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 

lowing year's work as well as a minstrel show that was gotten up and 

held at Odd Fellows' Hall, West New Brighton, although owing to 

heavy expenses, and a rather threatening night, the club made very 

little by the performance, the net sum being in the neighborhood of 

$50. 

It kept the interest up in the club, however, and people were now 
beginning to see the S. I. A. C. gradually looming up toward a strong 
and large organization. 

1879. 
-The officers were as follows: 

PRESIDENT, 

W. K. SO UTTER. 

VICE-PRESIDENT, TREASURER, SECRETARY, 

D. J. H. WILLCOX. W. A. COLLINS, JE. H. W. J. TELFAIR. 

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY, CAPTAIN, 

R. P. G. BUCKLIN. O. T. JOHNSON 

TRUSTEES, 

A. L. PARIS. THOS. CHUTE. J. H. RIMMER. H. A. CAESAR. 

The year 1879 passed off rather quietly, although three meetings 
were held, as well as some private club events. The 100 yards 
"Soutter'' medal, and the 440 yards "Sacks" medal being then on the 
programme for club members. The first competition for these medals 
took place in 1878, at the Fall Meeting, and early in the Spring of 
'79 members were in training to win the handsome trophies. At first 
De Garmendia and Rimmer won them respectively in 10 2-5 and 56^ 
seconds, while later on the former went through the hands of Roberts 
three times, Beers once, Janssen three times, Fiske once, Morris once, 
and Rimmer five times, who finally retained the prize. The fastest 
races were the first and last, 10 2-5 and 10^4 seconds by De Garmen- 
dia and Rimmer, while the "Sacks" medal was given up by Rimmer 
to Janssen, who walked over, but afterwards defeated Price, Telfair, 
Fiske, Morris and Stursberg, running twice in 55^ seconds. Mr. 
Telfair also won this medal twice before it became Janssen's personal 
property. 

This same year many medals were brought home from outside 
meetings by Rimmer, Rowland, Roberts, Taylor, Iken, Johnson and 
Janssen, but the winter broke in rather suddenly upon the grounds, 
and the fast dirt track, dressing rooms, etc., were left in pretty good 



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AND LONDON. 



THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 4? 

shape. The Club being then somewhat reduced in funds, having but 
63 members, it 'was decided to give another minstrel entertainment, 
this time to be held at the Lyceum, New Brighton. After working 
for months, the show took place, and to the great satisfaction of the 
audience, for it was at this performance that Messrs. Pinchback, John- 
son, Charles Bramhall, Smith, Kobby, Rushmore Wood and Ralph 
Newton made hits such as are seldom seen at amateur entertainments; 
and it was owing to the limited size of the hall that more than about 
$100 was not cleared. 

This was good work though, and when Spring made its appear- 
ance, the club had won many new friends by keeping its name in 
prominence, and was well prepared for the coming season's work and 
outlay. 



1880. 
The officers were as follows: 

PRESIDENT, 

W. K. SOUTTER. 

VICE-PRESIDENT, TREASURER, SECRETARY, 

D. J. H. WILLCOX. H. W. J. TELFAIR. W. C. DAVIS. 

CAPTAIN, 

O. T. JOHNSON. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT, SECOND LIEUTENANT, 

G. M. L. SACKS. FRANK G. JANSSEN. 

Early in April the athletes got to work and could be seen daily 
running upon the track, while many victories had already been won 
before the month of May was recorded. Fred Janssen beat the re- 
cord for 1-6 of a mile hurdle at Elizabeth on May 8th by one second. 
Rimmer was considered one of the fastest % mile runners ; Roberts 
ran a half mile in 2.08 at the Scottish- American A. C. Games ; A. L. 
Carroll won the championship high jump in the Fall with 5 ft. 5 in. ; 
Beers won the high jump and hurdle race at the Canadian champion- 
ship meeting, and Janssen also defeated J. E. Haigh, who was then 
champion, in a 220 yards hurdle race at Mott Haven. This was a 
match race resulting from a race at the Scottish-American A. C. Games, 
in which the four champions, Moritz, Janssen, Servatious and Haigh 
were all running to lower the American record, and after five trials, in 
which all four finished within a yard of each other every time, the race 
was given to Moritz, with Haigh and Janssen a dead heat for se- 
cond. 

M&BYIH'S "FORGED ANGLE FRAME" SAFE. 



48 THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 

At the match race Janssen won by five yards and lowered the 
record to 29^ seconds. Rimmer won a grand race at Short Hills, 
defeating Value, Inman, Reynolds and L. A. Stewart for the quarter- 
mile race, covering the distance in 54^ seconds. 

This was the year that Roberts, Janssen, Rimmer and Beers 
brought over 100 medals home to their club, they having carried the 
S. I. A. C. colors to the front at almost every meeting held. 

Now, many of the Athletic members also belonged to one of the 
two boat clubs known as the Neptune and Hesper rowing clubs, so 
a consolidation was proposed, and after long discussion and many 
objections had been overcome, it was approved of, and all the mem- 
bers of the three clubs joined and set to work to build a boat-house 
by raising funds on " scrip" issued at $10 a share, bearing 6 per 
cent, interest and to run five years. Some $5,000 was raised in a few 
weeks, and it v. as owing to Mr. G. M. L. Sack's hard work and push 
that a second story was approved of and added to the plans, to be 
used for meetings, club-rooms, etc., ate. 

Another minstrel entertainment was given in January, 1881, at 
Parabola Hall, New Brighton, and some $150 realized. This time, 
John Edwards, C. M. Johnson and R. Newton carrying off the 
honors of the evening. 

1881. 

Club officers were as follows : 

PRESIDENT, 

WILLIAM K. SO-UTTER. 

VICE-PRESIDENT, SECRETARY, TREASURER, 

DAVID J. H. WILCOX. WM. C. DAVIS. H. W. J. TELFAIR. 

CAPTAIN, 

JOHN W. EDWARDS. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT, SECOND LIEUTENANT, 

W. G. DEDRICHSEN. J. H. RLMMER, 

The new boat house was started in the Fall of 1880, and was 
finished far enough for habitation the following season, so the club 
moved what few boats, etc. it had to its new quarters and thus boating 
was added to the already many attractions of this club. 

This fine house started a boom in the membership, as the roll 
soon ran up to 260, while a year ago but 67 names were enrolled 
in all. 

The many athletes kept up their work well and won any number 
of prizes, too numerous to mention, among them A. L. Carroll beat 
the high jump record at Philadelphia, clearing the bar at 5 feet 8 in- 
ches, and also tied with C. W. Durand at the championship meeting 

MSRYIN'S "TDN&UE ^ &RDDYE" SAFE, 



THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 49 

same height, but in jumping off, Durand was in better condition and 
won the medal and championship with 5 feet 8 inches. Fred Janssen 
beat the record for the i2O-yards hurdle race at Montclair, and also 
the one-sixth of a mile hurdle, which was already his own, at the 
Staten Island championships held July 4th, time being 39 3 8 seconds. 
J. H. Rimmer won the 22O-yards "Soutter" challenge medal and also 
the one-half mile " Starin" medal which cost $185, and was presented 
to the club by Hon. John H. Starin. Rimmer's fastest time was 
2.09^ seconds. 

Messrs. J. H. Hayward and Lewis Morris presented medals to be 
rowed for in single sculls, the former being won three times by W. C. 
Rowland, and the latter became W. J. M. Roberts' property, he having 
won it three times in accordance with the conditions. 

A medal for swimming was given by Mr. Charles A. White, dis- 
tance one-half mile, and to become the property of the member win- 
ning it best two in three races. Roberts won the first race and C. 
Ed. Dejonge the second and third and medal with apparent ease. 

This year a Lacrosse team was sent to the New Jersey State Fair 
at Waverley, N. J., and after some hard fighting succeeded in captur- 
ing a set of colors as the second prize. The work of Magee, Telfair, 
the Janssen Brothers and Roberts being worthy of note. The same 
team also played at Bay Ridge against the Brooklyn team and came 
out victorious after a rough and tumble fight over hills, stones, bushes 
and trees. Mr. White distinguished himself in this game by laying 
the cheek and eye of the captain of the Brooklyn team open with a 
cut four inches long from a blow on the head during a scrimmage 
near the goal. 

The members were now rowing as well as running, and the many 
clubs along the beautiful Kills had formed an Association known as 
the Kill Von Kull Rowing Association. 

This started in 1879, and among some of the races won by this 
club may be mentioned the four-oared shell, four-oared barge, pair- 
oared shell and single sculls. The fours by W. G. Dedrichsen, C. 
A. White, R. T. P. Fiske and W. C. Rowland in 1880, and W. G. 
Dedrichsen, W. M. Christopher, C. A. White and Fiske in 188.1. 
Barge by Cadmus, Van Zandt, Caesar and Conroy, with Edwards, 
coxs'n., and the pairs by Roberts and Telfair. 

The former shell crew also won the Harlem River race for four- 
oared shells in 1880. 

Of course many races were also lost, and the boys were often 
made to take a back seat both on land and water, for although good 
men, they could not expect to get along much faster than they were 
going. They were young as well as the club, but with the 



MARVIN'S SAFES 



50 THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 

pluck and untiring hearts of would-be fame, they were fast making 
names in the athletic world of this country, both for themselves and 
the Staten Island Athletic Club. 

By this time the boat-house looked very handsome from the 
outside, but the interior was quite unfinished, and the building, to- 
gether with board fences, houses, large dressing rooms, and grand- 
stands on the athletic grounds had pretty well used up the funds of 
the club, so it was decided to let the interior remain unfinished for the 
present, when at a late meeting Mr. F. W. Janssen proposed holding 
a Fair, the proceeds of which were to be applied to fitting up the in- 
side of the house and finishing it off with hard wood. 

After a greet deal of objecting, a motion to hold the Fair was 
carried by a small majority., and Messrs. Janssen, Rowland, Carroll 
and Davis were appointed a committee of four as managers, after 
Messrs. Soutter, Janssen, Johnson and Chute had guaranteed the club 
against loss in case the Fair was not a success, 

Work went on slowly, but in earnest, and after many drawbacks 
and seemingly impossible obstructions had been overcome, the doors 
of the Young Men's Christian Association, at West New Brighton, 
were thrown open to the public on December 1 2th, and remained so 
for three evenings only. The different tables were matronized by the 
lady friends of the members, while each matron had three young lady 
assistants. Mr. "R. Penn Smith, Jr.," with his assistant "Kelly" 
managed to beat the public out of $21.37 by managing the shooting 
gallery. A Life Membership to the club was raffled among members 
at $i a chance, and brought $165, being $65 over and above the orig- 
inal value. 

The following articles were voted for at ten cents a vote, and 
afterwards presented to the party or club receiving the highest num- 
ber of votes: 

Fire Trumpet brought $ 8. 50 to Zephyr Hose Co. 

Fire Screen " 87.40 to Mrs. E. W. Gould. 

Barge Colors " 7.50 to S. I. A. C. 

Gold Medal " 93-7 to Mr. F. W. Janssen. 

Fishing Rod " 59.80 to Mr. B. S. Beckwith. 
The weather was something fearful every night, and but fifty 
members were present to do justice to the club, but owing to the 
ladies endeavors and influence, the total receipts for the three eve- 
nings amounted to $1,350, which gave the club a net balance of 

$975- 

This sum was all sunk in the second-story of the Boat House, 
mostly in panelling the main room with hard wood. This same year 
three more challenge medals presented by Messrs. W. R. White, .W 



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AND LONDON. 



THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 51 

K. Soutter, and Bartens and Rice, i mile run, ^ mile run and one 
mile walk respectively, became the personal property of C.E. Dejonge, 
J. J. Hoff and H. W. Janssen, they being the successful athletes at 
the respective distances. 

The Sacks' Diamond Medal, made by Bartens and Rice, and cost- 
ing $275, was also won and presented to J. H. Rimmer, for having 
scored the highest number of points during one year's racing. The 
leading scores being, 

J. H. Rimmer, - - - 116. 

F. W. Janssen, 109. 

W. J. U. Roberts, 94. 

This year closed with a large balance in the treasury, and the 
members longing for the warm sunshine of Spring, 1882. 

The year opened with the Spring games on May loth, and which 
were the most successful ever giving by this Club, as the gate receipts 
amounted to between $500 and $600, while every one present en- 
joyed the great crowd and good racing. 

The Club gave three Field Meetings as usual, while most of the 
running for the home Club was done by Hoff, Harry Janssen, C. E. 
Dejonge, DeMacarty, Carroll and Meeker, the other older athletes 
having won their 50 to 100 medals apiece, and retired on their laurels. 
A. L. Carroll again won the Championship High Jump of America, 
with 5 ft. 7 in., and also the Championship of -Canada, with 5 ft. Sin. 
Many other less important events were won, the "Black and Yellow" 
being carried to the front by Hoff, Janssen, C. A. White and A. B. 
Rich. 

In June came the and annual Club Regatta, held off the Boat 
House, and following is a list of events and winners: 

Pair-oared Shell: Senior Single: 

Roberts and Telfair, ist. Rowland, ist. 

White and Rowland, 2nd. Fiske, 2nd. 

Four-oared Shell: 
F. W. Janssen, Bow. 
H. W. Janssen, 2. 
H. B. Rich, 3. 
A. L. Carroll, Stroke. 

Defeated: 

F. G. Janssen, Bow! R. T. P. Fiske, Bow. 

H. W. J. Telfair, 2. W. C. Rowland, 2. 

W. J. U. Roberts, 3. W. M. Christopher, 3. 

C. A. White, Stroke. W. G. Dedrichsen, Stroke. 

MARVIN'S ARE THE BEST SAFES, 



52 THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB 

The Pair-oared Gig was won by Baker and Hoff, with Ellis, 
Coxs'n. 

In the Junior Single, Harry Janssen defeated W. Y. Wemple, 
-while the Four-oared Barge was won by, 

R. T. P. Fiske, 
R. P. G. Bucklin, 
Wm. M. Christopher, 
Wm. G. Dedrichsen, 
J. W. Magee, Coxs'n. 

Rodewald and F. G. Janssen beat Edwards and Jewett in the 
Double Scull Race and the Eight-oared Shell resulted in an easy 
thing for Fiske's crew. In the evening there was a reception and 
dance in the Boat House at which the fair sex from New Brighton, 
with a number from New York, were present, and the whole affair 
terminated as a perfect success on both land and water. 

In 1883, the Kill Von Kull Association, composed of the Staten 
Island Athletic, Arthur Kull Boat and Alcyone Rowing Clubs, and 
the Viking, Bayonne and Argonanta Rowing Associations, held its 
4th Annual Regatta at Elizabethport, and of the 5 events in which 
the S. I. A. C. started, but one was won owing to lack of interest and 
training among the old athletes. Roberts captured the Senior Single 
with Rowland 2nd. 

The Club held its Third Annual Regatta off the Club House, as 
usual, and the races were close, exciting, and well contested from 
start to finish. In the Junior Single Scull, Edgar Hicks defeated H. 
S. Redmond and J. W. Magee, while Harry Janssen made the old 
veteran Roberts succumb in grand style in the race for the Seniors. 
After the Eight-oared Shell Race was over, but little time was lost 
before the reception took place. This was given at the Club House 
as usual in the evening, and was a most delightful and successful affair, 
the Island's beauty and fashion being fully represented. Some 450 
people were present ; the music was unusually fine ; the supper of 
marked excellence, and all entered into the enjoyment of the dancing 
most heartily. During the evening the prizes to the winners of the 
Regatta, consisting of silver cups, were awarded by the President, 
Oliver T. Johnson, amidst much applause. 

In the Fall, challenge medals for quarter and half-mile runs, pre- 
sented by Mr. O. T. Johnson and Mr. J. E. Faber, were won by C. E. 
Taylor and C. E. Dejonge respectively. 






FIRE & BURGLAR 



THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 53 

Following were the officers for this year: 

PRESIDENT, 

O. T. JOHNSON. 

VICE-PRESIDENT, SECRETARY, TREASURER, 

H. O. BAILEY. W. C. DAVIS. F. W. JANSSEN, 

CAPTAIN, 

F. L. RODEWALD. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT, SECOND LIEUTENANT, 

H. B. RICH. H. W. JANSSEN. 

TRUSTEES, 

O T. JOHNSON, F. W. JANSSEN, 

W. C. DAVIS, F. L RODEWALD, 

H. W. J. TELFAIR, A. L. FARIS, 

W. F. DISOSWAY, JOS. W. BOYLE. 

JOHN W. EDWARDS, J. E. FABER. 

Nearly all the first half of the winter the members could be found 
busy rehearsing and preparing for a mammoth minstrel entertainment 
under the management of Messrs. F. W. Janssen, L. B. Frieze, Jr., 
J. W. Edwards and W. C. Davis. Tbe performance was given at the 
German Club Rooms at Stapleton, S. I. . on January i2th, 1884, and 
was a most brilliant affair throughout, the ladies and gentlemen being 
in full dress without an exception, the hall crowded to the doors, and 
the whole entertainment of unusually fine character. 

Shortly before eight o'clock, a colored gentleman, wearing a linen 
duster and carrying an old umbrella, an American flag and a bundle 
of sheet music, was escorted by an usher down the centre aisle of the 
hall. As he advanced towards the orchestra, the colored gentleman 
displayed on his back a card which read: 

"N. Y. HERALD. 
"D. H." 

The colored citizen was Prof. H. J. Tyndale, leader of the orches- 
tra, and who had in store for the audience a treat in the shape of an 
original musical production entitled "Frisky Fiddler Polka," played 
on this occasion for the first time. When the curtain arose on the 
first, or olio portion of the entertainment, a semi-circle of seventeen 

NEW YORK. PHILADELPHIA 
AND LONDON. 



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54 THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 

performers, dressed in the orthodox scissor-tailed coats and immacu- 
late shirt bosoms, made their bow and opened the fun of the evening. 
On C. M. Johnson and J. W. Edwards developed the duties of end- 
men, while Oliver T. Johnson presided as middle-man. Some fine 
ballads and comic songs, winding up with the great circus act com- 
prised the first part, and the curtain went down in deafening applause. 
In the second part, Mr. Frank Wilson gave a budget of droll 
speeches, Mr. William Mulhall an exhibition of clog and fancy danc- 
ing, Messrs. Newton and Roehner an excellent song and dance sketch, 
Mr. Frank C. Bowen kept the audience laughing for half an hour 
trying to explain an astronomical problem, Messrs. Pinchback and 
Johnson gave some very elegant banjo duetts, and the whole concluded 
with the Charleston Blues drill by the following S. I. A. C. 
members: 



W. C. Davis, Capt. 

F. W. Janssen, Lieut. 

F. C. Miller. W. Miller. 

E. Hicks. W. B. Glassford. 

Harry Van Vechten. S. D. Palmer. 

B. J. Carroll W. Y. Wemple. 

A. L. Carroll. W. B. Farrar. 

H. U. Jackson. L. B. Frieze, Jr. 

W. C. Rowland. H. Van Vechten. 

I. Almstaedt, J. D. Vonhoevenburg. 



Now the athletes were beginning to tire of the track and grounds, 
while such a fine club house, good bathing and sociable surroundings 
were much nearer, and being offered so many more and less fatigueing 
inducements in the way of athletic exercises, than going to the track 
to run, took advantage of them, and therefore did not give a sufficient 
amount of time to the track duties, and the consequences were that 
but little work was done outside of a few men. The Junior Four- 
oared Shell crew did good work during 'the summer, as on Decora- 
tion Day they won their heat at the Passaic Regatta, defeating crews 
from the Triton and Institute Clubs, and came in second to the Pas- 
saics in the final, after a splendid race, losing by less than a length, 
and defeating the Princetons, Institutes and Tritons, while a week 
later at the Harlem Regatta, with such competitors as the Atalantas, 
Nassaus and Metropolitans, they covered themselves with glory by 
winning the race in 6 min. 28 sec. Unfortunately at the Kill Von 
Kull Regatta held on the 2d of September, the. Four-Oared race 

"FORGED ANGLE FKAMt" 



THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 55 

was started before this crew got to the starting line, or the result might 
have been changed, while as it was, the Alcyone crew crossed the line 
a winner for the first time at this event. The home club's crew 'was 
composed of Frank Janssen, bow, R. Conyngham, 2, H. B. Rich, 3, 
and Harry Janssen, stroke. 

The Club Regatta was held on July loth, with the following events- 
Junior and Senior Singles, Four-oared Barge,' Gig and Shell, and 
Eight-oared Shell. In the Junior Single H. J. Tyndale defeated 
Richards, A. B. - Rich, Magee and Redmond, while Harry Janssen 
easily beat Hicks and Roberts in the race for the Seniors. The Eight- 
oared t-hell Race was made up of two crews, in which the Married 
men rowed against the Single, and after a close race for three-quarters 
of a mile, the Single men proved their ability to outstay the Married 
by one boat length. The crews were composed of 



W. G. Dedrichsen, O: T Johnson 

'C. A. White, W. J. U. Roberts, 

W. A. Lentilhon, F. L. Rodewald, 

H. J. Tyndale, J. W. Edwards, 
L. Morris, Coxs'n for the Married, 

and 

R. Conyngham, W. C. Rowland, 

G. Richards, J. E. Bonner. 

F. C. Miller, H. G. Van Vechten, 

Frank Janssen, Harry Janssen. 

with Fred Janssen. Coxs'n for the Singles. 



The hop in the evening was one of the most brilliant events of 
its class ever held on Staten Island, while among the 500 people pre- 
sent, could be seen many of the Toronto Lacrosse Club. 

At the Kills Regatta this year the club was sustained by W. C. 
Rowland winning the Senior Single from Annet and four others. 

Much credit is due to the embryo yachtsman of this club whose 
fleet, consisting of some half dozen canoes, a sharpie and three jib 
and mainsail boats of from 14 to 20 feet in length, may be seen, wind 
and weather permitting, darting through the water of the Kills and Bay, 
showing evidence of no mean skill on the part of their captains. 

In August it was decided to hold a Regatta of these small boats 
over a triangular course of about five miles. 

Messrs. E. Hicks and P. C. Sus were appointed Judges, Captain 
Frank Janssen, Referee, and a "set of colors" provided for the winning 
boat, (having been presented by Mr. P. C. Sus.) 

"FORGED ANGLE FRAME" SAFE, 



56 . THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 

The date fixed was the 23d, and five of the fleet appeared at the 
starting point, namely: 



"Ada" 20 feet W. D. Wiman 

' Josie" 18 feet L. Morris 

"Oriole" 14 feet L. B. Frieze, Jr. 

"Surge" 1 6 feet H. O. Bailey. 

"Sharpie" . . . 16 feet A. Jacoutot. 

The start, which was a flying one, was made a little after four P. 
M. A brisk breeze was blowing from the S.E., and the picture made 
by the tiny crafts as they dashed off to their first mark was one to be 
remembered by those who witnessed the race. 

A preparatory signal was given first, and five minutes later the sig- 
nal to start was sounded. 

The first boat to cross the line was the "Oriole" at 4-42-35. 
Three seconds later the "Josie;" "Surge" at 4-42-50, "Sharpie" next 
and lastly the "Ada" at 4-44-0. 

With the wind abeam, the boats flew towards Robbins Reef 
Light. 

The wind piping up a merry tune, and Mistress "Ada" dancing by 
all her competitors; around the Light they jibe, "Ada," "Oriole," 
"Josie," "Surge" and "Sharpie" in the order named. Now with 
booms to starboard and jibs whiskered out to port they make for 
Greenville Dock. "Josie" tackles "Oriole" for second place, and 
catching a puff of the now dying breeze, hauls round the second 
mark well up in the race, and begins to beat home against a flood tide. 

"Oriole" and "Surge" are close on her heels, and had the wind 
held, the finish would have been much closer than it was. 

In order to avoid the tide, "Josie" and "Surge" hug close to the 
Bayonne shore, while the "Oriole" stands out on the starboard tack 
after the "Ada, "a course which proved the wisest. 

Gradually the boats draw near the finish (Constable's Point) which 
was first reached by the "Ada" at 5.49. 20; ' 'Oriole" second at 6. 2. 1 2; 
"Surge," "Josie" and "Sharpie" coming in in the order named. 

The "Ada" therefore made the race in i hour 5 min. and 20 sec. , 
beating the "Oriole 14 min. and 17 sec., and upon returning to the 
boat house, Captain Wiman was presented with the colors amid the 
cheers of the members, and so closed the first S. I. A. C. Sail Boat 
Regatta, while those interested had every reason to feel encouraged 
for future races. 



MARVIN'S FIRE BURGuif SAFE 



THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 57 

Although third in the race, the "Surge" has carried off honors in 
other events, as her trophies, now decorating the club rooms, will 
testify, while as a specimen of a perfectly rigged and fitted canoe, she 
takes a foremost place. 

September i4th dawned a fine day for athletic sports, and the 
annual Fall Games of the Club were as successful as ever. A. B. 
Rich and E. W. Gould, both of the S. I. A. C, won first and second 
in the Bicycle Race, while Rich won the 5-mile championship at 
Albany a week later, his time being 17 min. 44 2-5 sec., and also the 
I -mile race in 3 min. ^ sec. 

Eight men started in the former race and nine in the latter. 
Rich took up cycling in 1880, and the same year he finished first in a 
2 -mile race at the Polytechnic Institute games on May 2Oth. He won 
the 2-mile race in 7.28, and the 3 miles in 12. 13 at the Williamsburgh 
A. C. Games, defeating Fiske, the Austins and W. R. Pitman. At 
the American A. C. Games, held on the Polo Grounds in 1884, he 
finished second to W. J. Powen in 7 min. i sec. for two miles with 
twelve starters. It was at the Albany Bicycle Meet that he won the 
above one and five-mile races, and also the championship of 
America. 

The winter of '84 and '85 the Charleston Blues especially distin- 
guished themselves at the Williamsburgh A. C. Minstrel show, given at 
the Brooklyn Academy. The Brooklyn Times of December 1 5th say- 
ing, that any crack military organization could be put to shame by the 
manoeuvres of the sixteen men under Captain Davis and Lieutenant 
Janssen. The company also performed at Griffith's Hall, Port Rich- 
mond and at Chickering Hall, New York City, in the entertainment 
given by the Atalanta Boat Club. Here however the "Blues" part was 
not as good as usual, owing to the limited space of stage, but they 
brought down the house a number of times, and received as hearty 
an applause as ever. 

The following gentlemen held office this year: 

PRESIDENT. 

J. W. EDWARDS. 

VICE-PRESIDENT, SECRETARY, TREASURER, 

H. O. BAILEY. W. C. DAVIS. F. W. JANSSEN. 

CAPTAIN 7 , 

F. G. JANSSEN. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT, 

C. A. WHITE. 

J. W. EDWARDS. 
W. C. DAVIS 
J. E. FABER. 
H. W. J. TELFAIR 
A. L. FARIS. 


SECOND LIEUTENANT, 

H. VAN VECHTEN. 

TRUSTEES. 

F. W. JANSSEN. 
F. G. JANSSEN. 
W. F. DISOSWAY. 
F. L. RODEWALD. 
0. T. JOHNSON. 



MSRYIN'S "TDNGUE + GRQDYE " SAFE, 



58 THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB 

All these years the club had been paying 6 per cent, interest 
on its "scrip" debt, as well as investing some $900 yearly in boats and 
oars alone. The track and grounds, Club and Boat Houses were all 
kept in first-class condition, and the club debt was being fast wiped 
out. 

The balance not paid off fell due on July ist, 1885, and was 
paid off with interest in full to date, so that the club now stands first, 
financially speaking, of the many clubs around this vicinity. It is 
entirely free of debt in every respect, while the members own all their 
club houses, stands, boats, etc. 

In and around their large and handsome boat house may be 
seen 27 Single Sculls, i 8-Oared Shell, 4 4-Oared Shells, 2 Pair Oared 
Shells, 3 Barges, 2 Gigs, i 4-Oared Paper Gig, 5 Canoes, 3 Working 
Boats, 4 Sail Boats, i Steam Launch, and several other minor crafts, 
and all of which are in first-class condition, having been built by the 
well-known boat makers, Smith, of the Harlem, or Waters & Sons, 
of Troy. The boat house is most certainly one of, if not the finest 
around New York, and the members are always delighted to show 
their friends and visitors around at any time. The Club belongs to 
the National Association of Amateur Athletes, the Kill Von Kull Row- 
ing Association, and some smaller associations unworthy of mention- 
The roll stands now at -270, including 18 Life Members, namely: 



W. K. SOUTTER. ERASTUS WIMAN. 

AQUILLA RICH. OLIVER T. JOHNSON. 

JOHN W. EDWARDS. D. A. NESBITT 

A. O. WILLCOX. J F. EMMONS. 

J. R. TELFAIR. H. G. MEEKER. 

W. R. WHITE. R. T P. FISKE. 

W. WESTON. W. L. BONES. 

K. P. G BUCKLIN. H. A. CAESAR. 
E. A. ROLLINS. 



This present year has been rather quiet so far for the S. I. A. C. 
with one exception, owing to the weather and want of a little exertion 
on the part of athletes. P. J. Murphy won the hundred yards at the 
B. P. R. A. Games on June jyth in 10^ sec. P. C. Worth won the 
93, 220 and 440 yard runs at the 7th Regiment Games in April, the 
440 at the National Guard Championships, April 7th, held at the 
Armory of the I3th Regiment, Brooklyn, and also the half mile at the 
9th Regiment Games. Rich, the bicycle rider, is the one exception, 
and too much glory cannot be given to so young and magnificent a, 
rider, as he most certainly has proven himself to be. 



ESTABLISHED 47 YEARS. 



THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 59 

Among some of his many victories may be mentioned the one 
and two mile races at the Citizens' Meet, held at the American Insti- 
tute. The former race he won from scratch in 3.18 and the latter 
in 6.25. He also won the 2-mile handicap race at the Williamsburgh 
A. C. Games on May 3<Dth in 6.49. On June 6th at the Yale Col- 
lege Games, he won the one and two mile races in 2. 58 and 5.58 
respectively. Then came the Kings County Wheelmen in June, at 
which' meeting he won the 3 mile championship of America race in 
9.54, and also the 2 and lo-mile races in 6.20 and 34.23 2-5, the lat- 
ter being on the W. A. C. track. 

He again won the championship at 4 miles later on, covering 
the distance in 14.02 sec. On June 2oth, .at the Utica Meet he won 
the half-mile in 1.26, and the State championship for three miles. On 
July ist he took the prizes for the i and 3-mile races, having ridden 
the full distances in 3.04 and 9.54. 

Mr. Aquilla B. Rich is but 20 years old, and is thought to be the 
coming man of this country at from ene to ten miles. He is 5 ft. 5 
in. high, weighs 133 pounds, and belongs also to the League of Amer- 
ican Wheemen. 

The club held a preparatory Regatta off the Boat House on June 
1 8th for the purpose of starting the boys in, and the races were good 
considering the water and condition of most of the men. W. Y. 
Wemple won the Junior Single from Redmond and Sus, and Harry 
Janssen defeated Tyndale by three lengths for the Senior prize. The 
other races were 4-oared Barge, 4 and 8-oared Shells, the latter being 
a very close and exciting race throughout The yachtsman have 
sailed but one race this present season so far, " Oriole," "Surge" and 
"Josie" contesting for a pennant presented by Mr. Morris, of the 
" Josie." It was the Josie's day, as with a new set of sails fully one- 
third larger than those of last year, she led her rivals from start to fin- 
ish, and won by some 400 yards W. C. Rowland again won the 
Senior Single Scull Race at the Kills Regatta, defeating Messrs. Shreve 
and Ellsworth with comparative ease. 

This record shows very plainly what the club and its members 
have been doing during the past eight years, while the A i financial 
and social standing speaks for itself. The members are as jolly a lot 
as can be found anywhere, and are ready at all times to lend a helping 
hand to their friends and brother clubs. 

The thirteen men who organized the Association have been the 
prime movers in all its schemes and undertakings, and they, with the 
help of a few others interested in the club's welfare claim, as they have 
a right to do, that the club is now one which will weather many heavy 



Marvin Safe Co. 



NEW YOBK, PHILADELPHIA 
AND LONDON. 



60 THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 

storms to come, and long after many brother and sister organizations 
have passed out of existence the "Black" and "Yellow" will be seen 
both on land and water as the colors of the 



STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 

Tke following comprise the officers for the year ending March 
ist, 1886: 



PRESIDENT, 

J. W. EDWARDS. 

VICE-PRESIDENT, SECRETARY, TREASURER, 

H. O. BAILEY. WM. C. DAVIS. QEO. M. MACKELLAR. 

CAPTAIN, 

WM. C. ROWLAND. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT, SECOND LIEUTENANT, COR SECRETARY, 

W. J. U. ROBERTS. A. B. RICH. E. HICKS. 

TRUSTEES, 

J. W. EDWARDS. W. C. DAVIS. 

QEO. M. MACKELLAR. W. C. ROWLAND. 

O. T. JOHNSON. J. E. FABER. 

W. LENTILHO. L. B. FRIEZE, JR. 

W. F. DISOSWAY. H. W. J. TELFAIR. 



The Janitor, William Hegarty, and Track Master, Jerry Mahoney, 
are two obliging and respectful men. The former, especially, is 
always on the lookout for the boys' wants, and is thought much of 
by the Athletes of the Club. 

For several years past this club has been contemplating buying 
some land where an athletic track, grand stands, club house, etc., 
could be built in keeping with its elegant boat-house. 

This piece of land has now been obtained on Bement avenue 
(the same street the present grounds are located on), and next year 
the friends, athletes and visitors of the S. I. A. C. will see the finest 
track and grounds in America. 

The club also intends taking up Tennis, Base Ball, Foot Ball and 
Lacrosse in addition to their now many sports, and the members will 
take part in all these games, while the club intends giving matches, 
tournaments and such like entertainments. 

MIRYIN'S SAFES HaYG " Becessei Door wfflBool[ C^e Protector." 



THE STATEN ISLAND ATHLETIC CLUB. 61 

The new grounds are 420 by 450 feet, and at present (in its rough 
state) the field has but i% feet grade over its entire surface. 

The grounds cost $10,000 cash, and have been paid for as fol- 
lows : $2,500 scrip to members, bearing 5 per cent, interest per an- 
num, and $7, 500 bond and mortgage. 

It is the intention of the club to hold a fair this corning winter, 
and in time to come this organization will undoubtedly show the 
world at large what a club house is and should be, while over the 
door will appear the letters: 



s. r. A. c. 



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THE WILLIAMSBURGH ATHLETIC CLUB. 63 

HISTORY OF THE 

Williamsburgh Athletic Club, 

BROOKLYN. 

To lovers of athletic sports throughout the country the initials 



have considerable significance. In Brooklyn and New York, 
folks who do not even know the difference between a handicap 
and a hurdle understand their meaning. They appear in many an 
official record in connection with feats accomplished by pluck, endu- 
rance and agility. And they can be found on many a trophy won on 
fiercely contested fields. 

The Williamsburgh Athletic Club, for which it is hardly necessary 
to say the letters stand, is one of the institutions of Brooklyn. It has 
made a record unsurpassed in the same period of time by any similar 
organization and made the City of Churches second to none as the 
home of victorious athletes. While Brooklynites take a just pride in 
their representative club, comparatively few of them are aware from 
what a small beginning the organization has grown to its present pow- 
erful proportions, or the small space of time in which it has accom- 
plished so much. Most residents have seen the spacious, finely ap- 
pointed club-house and grounds on DeKalb avenue, but not many 
remember the first home of the club. 

When clubs from which the W. A. C. have since wrested laurels 
were as powerful as now, the Williamsburgh Club was not even con- 
ceived. It was in January, 1879, that the project of forming an ath- 
letic organization in the Eastern District was first discussed. Three 
young men were the projectors, and they had no idea at the time that 
they were laying the corner stone of a structure that would be one 
of the staunchest in the land, They were in earnest, however, and 
in a week had interested two more youths in the scheme : 

T. V. FORSTER, C. GANBERT, 

C. C. HASELTON, JOHN WOOD, JR., 

T. WATSON. 

MSRYIN'S "TDN&UE * &RDDYE" SSFE. 



64 THE WILLIAMSBURGH ATHLETIC CLUB. 

The five started the Williamsburgh Athletic Club, and organized 
on January 21, 1879. It was not long before the membership roll in- 
cluded 50 names, and the club was incorporated on November iyth. 
1879, 

When this point had been reached, the new club secured a meet- 
ing room over Wright's Business College, which, while very good for 
a social gathering, did not give much opportunity as a training place. 
None of the members possessed any more wealth than the law al- 
owed, but they all had plenty of vim and an abiding faith that the 
club would come out all right. Each contributed within his means 
towards a fund started to lease a suitable place as a club house. 

By the time summer approached the fund contained enough to 
lease a plot of ground on the corner of Bedford avenue and Rutledge 
street, but there was not a great deal left in the treasury to improve 
the ground. That, however, did not worry the members to any great 
extent. Their object in forming the club was physical culture, and 
they realized that there was no better way of getting up muscle than 
by juggling earth with picks and shovels. A few laborers had been 
employed, but if the members had not thrown off their coats and gone 
to work ever}- fine evening they would have had to wait a good while 
longer before the track was finished. There were twelve laps to the 
mile on the track thus built. A rude stand, capable of seating about 
1 50 spectators, was constructed, and a tent was put up to serve the 
double purpose of a club house and dressing-room combined. 

At this time the go-as-you-please contests were all the rage, and 
the first exhibition given by the club was a two hours go-as-you-please 
match with about a dozen entries. Thirteen miles and seven laps 
stood to the credit of the winner. During the following fall the first 
annual games of the club were given, when the results achieved went 
rather beyond expectations. 

The following gentlemen were officers in 1880 and 1881: 



1880. 

PRESIDENT, 

WILLIAM C. BRYANT. 

VICE-PRESIDENT, TREASURER, SECRETARY, 

FRANK SPERRY. CHAS. C. HASELTON JOHN WOOD, JR. 

COR. SECRETARY, FIN. SECRETARY, 

N. I. LYON. WALTER BROWER. 

CAPTAIN, 

WALTER SMITH. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT, SECOND LIEUTENANT, 

WM. H. HANDY. F. M. PRICE. 

CANNOT BE TAKEN APART WITH A 
COMMON SCREW DRIVES. 



MARVIN'S SAFE 



THE WILLIAMSBURGH ATHLETIC CLUB. 65 

CLUB HANDICAPPER, 

GILBERT C. PETERKIN. 

TRUSTEES : 

WILLIAM C. BRYANT. JOHN T. ROBERTS. 

N. I. LYON. LEWIS H. SLOCUM. 

JOHN WOOD, JK. DANIEL T. GATESON. 

BENJ. W. WILSON, JK. CHARLES C. HASELTON. 

THOMAS V. FORSTER. PRANK SPERRY. 

JOSEPH G. LIDDLE. CHARLES HUSTED. 

1881, 

PRESIDENT, 

W. D. LIDDLE. 

VICE-PRESIDENT, SECRETARY, TREASURER, 

FRANK SPERRY. JOHN WOOD, JR. WM. C. BRYANT. 

COR. SECRETARY, FIN. SECRETARY, 

FRANK MASON. JOSEPH G. LIDDLE. 

CAPTAIN, 

GEORGE A. WEBSTER. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT, SECOND LIEUTENANT, 

THEO. A. CHOICENER. ROBT. H. CLARKE. 

TRUSTEES, 

W. D. LIDDLE. GEORGE A. WEBSTER. 

JOHN T. ROBERTS. JOHN WOOD, JK. 

BENJ. W. WILSON, JR. C. C. HASELTON. 

WILLIAM C. BRYANT. LEWIS H. SLOCUM. 

N. I. LYON. J. G. LIDDLE. 

D. T. GATESON. M. W. GLEASON. 

Once the club was fairly established, the list of membership in- 
creased, and it was determined to secure larger quarters, which were 
obtained at Wythe avenue, Penn and Rutledge streets. Here a. 
track, measuring eight laps to the mile, was laid out, a club-house 
and gymnasium built, and a commodious grand stand constructed. 
The boys were very proud when they moved into their new quarters, 
which were, however, insignificant compared to the elegant club-house 
and grounds they now occupy. A subscription was raised to pur- 
chase the necessary apparatus for the gymnasium from the members, 
and efforts were made to place the club among the leading athletic 
organizations. The annual Spring games proved that this could be 
accomplished. 

Amateurs of prominence attended the succeeding meetings, three 
or four of which were given every season, and during the three years 
that the grounds were used many records were beaten, and not a few 
champions owe their progresss to practice on the track. In the 
Spring of 1884 it was learned that the lease of the property could not 

MARTIN'S SAFES Haye " RGcesse0oor ^ 



66 THE WILLIAMSBURGH ATHLETIC CLUB. 

be renewed, and finding that they were outgrowing the old place, a 
grand athletic boom was started among the members, and they se- 
cured the block on the corner of DeKalb and Classon avenues, known 
as the old Clohaven Estate. 

This was the club's greatest effort, and to secure the property 
and put it into proper shape required a large outlay of money, which 
was obtained through the co-operation of several wealthy gentlemen. 

Work was commenced in March, 1884, and by May a complete 
transformation had been wrought in the neglected grounds and de- 
serted old mansion, which had the reputation of being haunted. A 
splendid cinder-track, measuring five laps to the mile, was laid out 
and the dilapidated old homestead turned into a really elegant club- 
house. Large grand and free stands were built. Besides this, a 
bowling alley was constructed in a separate building, and the old 
club-house was moved down, painted and altered to be used as a 
gymnasium. 

So, in a short time they refitted the old mansion and built a fine 
track, with grand stands, having a seating capacity of 3,000. The 
track was laid by the veteran Jack McMasters. It has well-rounded 
corners, is drained well, and measures twenty feet in width. 

The house of the club is not only commodious, but very com- 
plete and beautiful. It consists of the old mansion and an annex on 
each side.>' 

The ladies' reception-room is on the first floor proper. It is 
finished exclusively in the colors of the club blue and gold. Sump- 
tuous furniture in blue and gold embossed plush abounds, a remark- 
ably handsome tete-a-tete chair occupying the place of honor. Even 
the globes of the chandelier are composed of an equal number in the 
prevailing colors. The blue silk championship flag worn by the base- 
ball team two years ago stands in a corner. The rear parlor is simi- 
larly adorned with a rich championship emblem captured three years 
ago by a quartette of athletes belonging to the club. Across the hand- 
some hall is the reading and smoking-room. Here the " Knights of 
the Round Table " congregate nightly, and make the walls ring with 
melodious songs and witty jokes. A long and narrow table, strewn 
with books and periodicals, chiefly of a sporting character, is the 
principal object in the apartment. Rosewood chairs, finished in 
leather, are scattered about promiscuously. Both the parlor and 
reading-room extend the entire depth of the house. 

The executive chambers are on the second floor. They consist 
of two apartments. The one is set apart for the use of the manager 
and the board of trustees, and the other is devoted to the use of the 
different committees. The mantel of the committee-room is orna- 



FIRE & BURGLAR 



THE WILLIAMSBURGH ATHLETIC CLUB. 67 

mented with excellent portraits of the club's champion ball-tossers of 
two years ago, as also their ambitious successors of the present sea- 
son. On this floor are also two rooms where cards, checkers, chess 
and dominoes are indulged in, to while away pleasantly the long 
evenings. The tables are of cherry-wood, and the chairs of the un- 
ique little pattern known as Venice. The checker-table a preten- 
tious piece of furniture is composed of solid ebony. 

That portion of the house most frequented by the more muscular 
of the members is the top floor A suggestive-looking platform, four- 
teen feet square and one foot high, in the middle of the room, leaves 
no doubt in the mind of the visitor as to what use it is put. A gas- 
fixture, with a dozen jets and a large reflector hanging over all is 
placed directly over the centre, at an elevation of nine and a half 
feet. Four burners, each placed in front of a powerful reflector, are 
placed at each corner, so as to throw the light into the inmost re- 
cesses of the apartments. It is here that the meetings of the club are 
regularly held. Over 300 chairs are uniformly ranged about, which," 
with the room left unoccupied, affords accommodations for 500. 

The large field has also received considerable attention from the 
omnipresent manager. He has erected commodious lockers under 
the grand stand for the benefit of contes'.ants, and has also construct- 
ed a safeguard for them in one of their favorite amusements base- 
ball. The muscle of the players having proven sometime ago to be 
too strong for the height of the fences, he has placed a wire netting 
on either side, 50 feet high and 140 feet long. 

The out-buildings, though architecturally unpretentious, are still 
as perfect specimens of their class as could be found. The bowling 
alley, in particular, is fitted up in a manner that would bring joy to 
the average bowler's heart. There are six alleys, each with a separ- 
ate run. Settees for the players are placed in the front, while direct- 
ly in front of them again are chairs and tables for the amusement of 
the spectators. Twenty-four burners serve to light the building suf- 
ficiently for the purposes for which it was designated. The gymna- 
sium stands on the corner of Classen avenue. It is not fully com- 
pleted yet, but the work has advanced to such a stage that a fair idea 
of its future appearance may be obtained at a casual glance. On en- 
tering, one enters the wash-room, where the bath is entirely surround- 
ed by marble, with a projection of the same material several feet in 
height, extending about the bath, at a distance of about four feet 
from the same. The next compartment, known as the locker-room, 
is finished exclusively in narrow Georgia pine, polished to a high de- 
gree. Two tiers of lockers, with twenty more in the centre, give ac- 
commodation to 350 men, two to each locker. Each closet is fas- 

MARVIN'S SAFE* H 4 7 / "Sliding Back Plate." 



68 THE WILLIAMSBURGH ATHLETIC CLUB. 

tened with a miniature combination lock, every man having his ov.-n 
combination. 

The gymnasium proper is fitted up with swinging rings, horizon- 
tal bars, vaulting poles and other athletic implements. Indian clubs, 
boxing gloves, dumb-bells and foils also find a resting place in this 
section. 

The first games at the present grounds were given on Decoration 
Day last year, when four of the best on records were made. These 
records were as follows: 125 yards in 12^ seconds, by L. E. Myers, 
Manhattan A. C., and M. W. Ford, New York A. C. Two mile walk, 
in 13 minutes 48 2-5 seconds, by Frank Murray, Williamsburgh A d 
Three-mile run in 15 minutes 31 4-5 seconds, and five-mile run io. 
26 minutes 31 seconds, by Thomas F. Delaney, Williamsburgh 
A. C. 

The inner field is used for base-ball, lacrosse, cricket, foot-ball 
and other like sports, and the lovers of these games will find all the 
space necessary for indulgence in their favorite pastimes. There is 
also ample room for putting the shot, throwing the hammer, tug of 
war, jumping and pole vaulting, where the men of muscle can give 
full vent to their prowess. 

When the club took a lease of the property it had a membership 
of 200, but so rapid has its growth been since that it now numbers 
1,050 names on its rolls. So numerous are the applications for mem- 
bership, that the advisibility of confining the membership to 1,200 has 
been discussed. While occupying so prominent a position at home, 
the club is far from being unrecognized abroad. Secretary Walter H. 
Hegeman, of the W. A. C, is the official handicapper of the National 
Association. 

Since the club has been in existence it has brought out nine 
individual champions and won ten championship events, a record that 
no other club in America can show for the same number of years. 
At the annual championship meeting in 1882, this city, with one ath- 
letic club (the W. A. C.), won five individual championships against 
New York City, with eight clubs, of which no one club won over 
three. There also competed, that year, representatives from Boston, 
San Francisco, Philadelphia, Canada and Yale and Harvard colleges, 
of which Yale, Harvard and Boston each won one championship, and 
Philadelphia two, the latter both by the same man. 

This club secured Mr. Thomas Barrington, a well-known and 
capable gentleman, as manager. Mr. Gilbert H. Badeau, the Presi- 
dent has done much for the advancement of the club. Besides be- 
ing president of the club, he has helu the honorable position of Presi- 
dent of the National Amateur Athletic Association for the past two 

CANNOT BE TAKEN APART WITH A. 
COMMON SCKEW DKlVc.it. 



MARVIN'S SAFE 



THE WILLIAMSBURGH ATHLETIC CLUB 69 

years. It was through him that the championship games were held in 
Williamsburgh last year, this being the first time they were ever held 
outside of New York City. 

The club has a number of prominent athletes and champions in 
its large membership, among whom we may mention the following: 
Sam Austin, well-known as referee and timekeeper at most of the 
sporting events in this section; Frank P. Murray, Delaney, Smith, 
Hatfield, Tivey, Adams, McCausland, Tobey, Mason, Brown, Mc- 
Donald and Knowles. 

New features are constantly being introduced by the club, which 
thus maintains its reputation as a leader. 

The latest innovation is a series of ladies' days. One will be 
given each month, when the freedom of the club house and grounds 
will be given the guests and an entertainment provided. The latter 
will be given in the large meeting room at the top of the house, where 
a stage has been fitted up, and there is seating room for about one 
thousand persons. The apartment was originally built as an observa- 
tory tower and is delightfully cool. 

Vocal and instrumental music and recitations will be given by 
professional talent, and the grounds will be illuminated by electric 
light and Chinese lanterns. 

There are any number of "good fellows" in the club but none 
are more popular than Gilbert H. Badeau, the President, and Samuel 
C. Austin, the Captain, both of whom deserve the distinction con- 
ferred on them by their fellows. "Jack" McMasters, the trainer, is 
thoroughly identified with the organization, but everybody knows Jack 
and that he has done his share towards conquering success, although 
he was at first decidedly opposed to sleeping in the "haunted" 
house. 

Following are the officers for the year ending Dec., 1885: 

PRESIDENT, 

G. H. BADEAU. 

VICE-PRESIDENT, SECRETARY, TREASURER, 

F. FISHER. WALTER G. HEGEMAN. JOS. G. LIDDLE. 

CORRESPONDING SECRETARY, CAPTAIN, 

SAM L W. SWEZEY. FRANK M. PRICE. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT : SECOND LIEUTENANT : 

SAM L C. AUSTIN. FRED. E. SNIDER. 



MARVIN'S SAFES 



Ha?e "Recessei Door will Bool Case Protector^ 



70 THE WILLIAMSBURGH ATHLETIC CLUB. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES : 

G. H. BADEAU. FRED. FISHER. 

W. G. HEGEMAN. JOS. G. LIDDLE. 

F. M. PRICE. G. McNAUGHTOX, M.D. 

F. E. CLARK. G. R. SMITH. 

E. H. TRECARTIN. J. A. WORKS. 

FRANK COLEMAN. W. C. BRYANT. 

Among the prominent American athletes, we mention the name 
'of F. P. Murray as one of the Williamburgh Athletic Club's many 
champions, and following is a short record of his earlier athletic 
days: 

"Frank P. Murray, of the Williamsburgh Athletic Club, the 
amateur champion of America, is 29 years old, 5 feet 8j4 inches in 
height, and weighs 140 pounds. For several years Murray was not 
very prominent in athletic circles, and it was not until 1883 that he 
assumed the position he now holds. In that year the walking records 
were absolutely at his mercy. His record for one mile (6 minutes 
and 29 3-5 seconds), made at the fall games of the New York Athletic 
Club, on a heavy track the day being cold and damp is certainly 
his finest performance. His next great record was made at the Man- 
hattan Athletic Club grounds on November 6, 1883. Here he walked 
three miles against time, winning in the wonderful time of 21 minutes 
and 9 1-5 seconds, surpassing the record of 21 minutes and 42 2-5 
seconds, made by T. H. Armstrong, Jr., September 14, 1878, and 
which had before appeared impregnable. On this occasion Murray 
also equaled his own best-on-record time for two miles 13 minutes 
and 59 seconds and could have gained a new record had he been 
informed of his opportunity in time. 

" That Murray in England ' the home of athletes ' showed the 
fairest and fastest walking ever seen in the world is certain, while his 
many friends feel confident that he, in time, will do what it is claimed 
is impossible namely, walk a full mile, 'square heel and toe,' in 6 
minutes and 25 seconds." 

For some time past there has been talk that all was not well in 
the ranks of the well-known Williamsburgh Athletic Club. 

The club was induced to remove to its new grounds by the 
growing need for a more commodious stand, and by the extremely 
good offer which was made them by one of their prominent and 
wealthy members. This gentleman agreed to lease the old Carhovan 
property, fit it up and give it to the club for one-half of their monthly 
initiation fee and dues. This advantageous offer was accepted, and 
worked very well for a time. It has been rumored lately that the 
club was in serious financial straits, and was about to disorganize. 

Treasurer J. G. Liddle said that he did not consider the trouble 



ARE THE BEST SATES, 



THE WILLIAMSBURGH ATHLETIC CLUB. 71 

in the club serious. The club will be reorganized in a month or six 
weeks. A circular will probably be sent to each member at an early 
date explaining the difficulties and calling for a meeting. One thing 
that has always made more or less trouble in the Williamsburgh Club 
ranks since the removal to its present quarters has been the very local 
name. This will be certain to receive attention at the coming reor- 
ganization meeting, and the club's name is almost sure to be changed 
to something distinctively Brooklyn. If it were possible, the club 
would have been called the Brooklyn Athletic Club; but it could not 
do that, as there is a Brooklyn Athletic Club in existence and which 
owes a good debt. The question of calling the new organization the 
Brooklyn Athletic Association will, with other suggestions, be' dis- 
cussed. 

All the trouble has been made by a lot of "kickers," who 
thought that the gentleman who leased the place, and received in re- 
turn but half of the receipts from only one direction, and was, so to 
speak, running the club in partnership with its officers, was getting 
entirely the best of the bargain. The "kickers" thought the club 
ought to run itself, and made a big muss at the time of the January 
election. They were badly defeated, and a ticket on which were the 
names only of those known to be in favor of continuing the old 
agreement was elected by an overwhelming majority. The "kickers" 
were beaten at least three to one, and for the time being utterly 
routed. In a short time, however, they began their old dissensions 
with the other club members, and succeeded finally in creating a new 
sentiment, and on April ist the club leased the entire new property, 
with its improvements, and gave a chattel mortgage on their own 
property, the furniture, and so on. 

This property they have just confessed judgment on, and gave up 
their possession of it on September ist. This was to save the mort- 
gagee, who is the gentleman who leased the property for the club in 
the first place, from taking legal steps. This gentleman is a member, 
and still friendly to the club, so that nothing will be done to injure 
it. The new club which is soon to be formed will occupy this club- 
house and grounds, and will be composed principally of old Wil- 
liamsburgh Athletic Club members. The old agreement will cer- 
tainly be entered into again. It was an entirely false idea that the 
gentleman who leased the club grounds for the club was getting any- 
thing good out of the bargain. All that he received over the rent he 
devoted to purchasing the property, and as he is a man of means, he 
would not have allowed the club to lose this place, no matter how 
low our receipts had fallen. All that had to be done was to give him 
half. The club has no debts that it cannot pay, and still has 700 
members in good standing, whose $i monthly dues are as certain as 

" FORGED ANGLE FRAME " S^f & 



72 THE WILLIAMSBURGH ATHLETIC CLUB. 

can be, but a certain poor class of counter-jumpers were inadvertently 
let in. You know it is very hard to vote against a prospective mem- 
ber unless there is something absolutely out of the way with him. 
And these chaps, after paying their initiation fee and perhaps one 
month's dues, would then allow themselves to be "posted" for non- 
payment. All the trouble is not with the poorer men. The treasurer 
has had to post one man who was reputed to be worth $250,000, 
while many a young fellow working on a small salary lays by twenty- 
five cents a week to pay for his club and track privileges. The pay- 
ing of one dollar at once he would feel sadly, but the twenty-five cents 
a week he doesn't mind. Two thousand five hundred dollars is now 
due from recalcitrant members, and if fifty per cent, of this sum is col- 
lected, Mr. Liddle says he'll be -in luck. In the new organization the 
monthly payments will be changed to quarterly, payable in advance, 
and instead of allowing one month's grace to poor payers, as at pres- 
ent, twenty days' leeway only will be given. 

Thus passes from existence a friendly, famous and renowned or- 
ganization, well known to every athlete, to every athletic club both 
here and abroad, and to every well-wisher of sports in general, as the 



WILLIAMSBURGH 

ATHLETIC 

CLUB. 




00. 



B. Snail to G: 




AND 



Commission Merchant, 

55 BEAVER ST. 

Sole Apt in Dnite i States 



FOR- 



A. GUILLAUME & CIE., 

Talence-Bordeauz, 
RED AND WHITE WINES, 

COGNACS, 

&C. 9 &C. 




100 YARDS FROM FORT MONROE. 



Open all the Year. Accommodates! 1,000 Guests. 

Lovely Environment, 

Delightful Climate, 

Excellent Cuisine, 

Comfortable Beds, 

]Votal>le Characteristics. 



Only Health and Pleasure Resort 

ITV ^MEIMO.A. 

. POSSESSING 

TURKISH. RUSSIAN, ROMAN, ELECTRIC, VAPOR, 

MEDICATED, HOT SEA, ui FRESH WATER 

(Recently Instituted at a cost of $20,OOO.) 



Senci for ^Descriptive 

II. PHOEBUS, 

Proprietor. 



THE MANHATTAN ATHLETIC CLUB. 75 



HISTORY OF THE 

Manhattan Athletic Club. 

NEW YORK CITY. 

This foremost athletic organization of the United States was or- 
ganized in the year 1876 and incorporated in 1877 by the following 
gentlemen: 

George W. Carr. George D. Palmley. 

George W. Thomas. William C. France. 

Samuel B. Pomeroy. Harry P. Pike. 

Walter H. Griffin. Edward G. Gurney. 

Robert B. Culbert. John Fraser. 

Jack Goulding was the first trainer. 

When first started the number of its members was twenty, and 
none of its athletes were prominent. The grounds on Eighth ave- 
nue between Fifty-sixth and Fifty-seventh streets were leased, and a 
track eight laps to the mile laid out, which at that time was consid- 
ered one of, if not the fastest, of the few that then existed. 

The club was very successful in developing athletes and not long 
after its first days of open competition, was it before many of the fast- 
est men of this country would make their appearance on the different 
cinder paths in the colors of the M. A. C. In the short space of six 
years it has risen to the position it now holds, that of the leading ath- 
letic club of America, while its name and the record of its members 
are known over the whole world. 

During the year 1881, '82 and '83 the Manhattan Club, at the 
annual Championship Meeting, won the championship emblem, thus 
demonstrating its right to the title of the leading athletic club of 
America. 

It also holds the championship up to this date, and among the 
50 or 60 athletes out of its 100 odd members, there are about 25 
Champions of both America and England. 

The new grounds, consisting of the block extending from Eighth 
avenue to Ninth avenue, and from Eighty-sixth street to Eighty-seventh 



FIRE & BURGLAR 



76 THE MANHATTAN ATHLETIC CLUB. 

street, was taken possession of in June, 1883, and are probably the 
finest in the world. The track has been constructed on the model of 
that of the London Athletic Club, and is one-quarter of a mile in 
circuit. In addition to this it has a 220 yards stretch on the side 
which is straightaway, an advantage possessed by no other track in 
America. 

The center of the ground is drained by the most approved me- 
thods in order that the part for Baseball, Football and Lacrosse may 
be kept from becoming heavy or soggy. The Baseball diamond has 
been especially prepared, having been constructed under the supervi- 
sion of a prominent player, and members may be seen any day play- 
ing upon it. 

At the Ninth avenue end of the grounds two sections have been 
reserved for, and laid out with fine Lawn Tennis courts. Of these, 
one section will be completely fenced in and separated from the rest 
of the grounds. This part, which will contain six courts, is reserved 
solely for the use of ladies or ladies accompanied by gentlemen, while 
access to same will be through a separate entrance on the side. The 
other part of the Tennis grounds is not separated from the track, and 
contains six courts for the use of club members. 

At the Eighth avenue end of the grounds is theclub house, dressing 
rooms and grand and open stands, the stands having seating capacity 
for 3, 500 people, roofed over, and with seats, consisting of chairs, ar- 
ranged in the latest improved manner. The dressing rooms are very 
spacious, and contain 200 lockers. The bath rooms are stationery, 
with shower and needle baths attached. 

Besides the officers' and executive room there is a club room, 
a reading room and a billiard room. The club also retained posses - 
ion of the grounds at Eighth avenue and Fifty-sixth street until this 
season, when the lease expired, and the ground was taken for build- 
ing purposes. A gymnasium is now spoken of with great interest, 
and will be erected on the club grounds or in a more central location. 
During the winter months the grounds inside the track are flooded 
for skating, while the admission for members is free, the club having 
found this a very paying scheme at the old grounds, which saw night 
after night crowded beyond anticipation, but the new grounds afford 
ample room for all, and the pleasures derived at both the club house 
and rink are far beyond the ideas of one who has never been there. 

It was not until 1878 that the club won a championship event, 
and this year Thomas H. Smith crossed the finish line a winner and 
Champion i-mile runner, covering the distance in 5 min. 51^ sec. 

This made the boys work harder for the year following, and L. 
E. Myer, the now world-renowned champion flyer, having started in 



Marvin Safe Co. 



NEW YORK, PHILADELPHIA 
AND LONDON. 



THE MANHATTAN ATHLETIC CLUB 77 

his athletic career, became known to the older athletes of New York. 

At the second or third meeting in which Myers ran, the veteran 
John Fraser noted his style of running, picked him out as a runner, 
took him to his house, trained and posted him from time to time, 
and in 1879, at the championship meeting, he won the 220, 440 and 
880 yard runs with ease, time being 23 3.8, 52 2-5 and 2.01 2-5 re- 
spectively. 

L. E. Myers was born in Richmond, Va., February i6th, 1858 
is therefore 27 years old, and weighs in condition about 115 pounds. 
From his early childhood, he was quite-noted for excellence at outdoor 
sports, and was considered at one time a very promising base-ball 
player. He made his debut upon the cinder path at the games of 
the New York Athletic Club, on Election day, November 7th, 1878. 
From the 18 yards mark, won the quarter mile handicap quite easily in 
55 sec. At the games of the same club held at Gilmore's Garden in 
the winter of 'jS-'jy, he finished second in both the 220 yards and 
440 yards handicap, being beaten in both races by men to whom he 
was conceding long starts. The first sensation created by him was his 
winning the scratch half in 2 min. 10% sec., from a large field of 
" cracks" at the games given by the Scottish American Athletic Club, 
at Gilmore's Garden, March i, 1879. In this race he did not part 
company with the field until the last lap, and then won by 50 yards. 
At the games of the Jersey City Athletic Club, held in May at the 
West Side Driving Park, won the half mile handicap easily from 
scratch in 2 min. 8^ sec. His first race of very great importance 
was when he faced the then almost invincible Ed. Merritt, in the' 
scratch quarter at the games of the Staten Island Athletic Club, the 
same spring, and to the surprise of the knowing ones ran away from 
Merritt in the last hundred yards, and won with something to spare, in 
54 sec. Merritt however, made matters even by turning the tables on 
Myers the following Monday, Decoration Day, when he defeated 
Myers by two yards in 53^ seconds. Myers, however, was very un- 
well, and started against the advice of his friends to beat the record, 
which was then 52 1-5 sec. After running away from his field for 
the first three hundred yards he went to pieces, and was beaten in the 
last fifty yards. He soon redeemed himself however, and from that 
time to the present date has had things generally his own way in all 
scratch events, having only suffered defeat twice since in a run of that 
nature, and then his defeat can be attributed to over-confidence more 
than to lack of ability. No less than nine times has he broken fifty 
seconds for the quarter, and for the half he has done i min. 55 3-5 
sec. ; twice, i min. 56 sec. ; twice, i min. 56^(3 sec., and many times has 
won in or about 2 minutes easily. In the spring of 1881 he sailed 
for England, and returned home in August of the same year after hav- 

MURYIN'S "TDNGTJlTV GRQQYE" 



78 THE MANHATTAN ATHLETIC CLUB. 

ing broken the English record at the quarter three separate times, and 
altered the English half-mile record from i min. 57^ sec. to i min. 
56 sec., and doing it so easily that the best of English judges declared 
him able to do near i min. 50 sec. for this distance. His quarter 
mile record 48 3-5 sec. made at the English Championships in 1881, 
is not only the best Amateur, but the best record either Amateur or 
Professional, ever made on a properly surveyed track. Mr. Myers, up 
to 1882, won twenty-four championships, 15 of America, 8 of Canada, 
and one of England, and holds the following records: 

50 yards, 5^ seconds. 

100 " 10 500 yards, 58 seconds, 

1 20 " 12 600 ' i m. ii 2-5 seconds, 

200 " 2oj^ " 660 " i m. 22 

220 " 22^ ' 7OO " I m. 31 " 

250 " 26 800 " i m. 44 2-5 

300 " 31 " 880 " i m. 55 2-5 

35 " 364-5 " 1000 " 2 m. 13 sec. American. 

400 " 43^4 " 1000 " 2m. 14 1-5 " English. 

440 " 48 3-5 " Eng. 1320 " 3 m. 13 

440 " 48^ " Amer. i mile, 4 m. 27 3-5 " 

In 1880, at the Championship Meeting, he carried off the prizes 
for loo, 220, 440 and 880 yard runs, making extra fast time in every 
race (see records), while three days later he won the same four events 
at the Canadian Championship Meeting.thus winning 8 championships 
in one year a feat never accomplished by any other athlete. 

So it was in 1880 that L. E. Meyers began to do such fast run- 
ning. He was now known to be the best runner in the country, and 
he began to break records right and left, not stopping at seemingly 
any figures. His athletic career has been distinguished by a series of 
victories and breaking of records, such as have not been credited to 
any athlete, either living or dead, for in the few years of his active 
athletic life he has broken every American record from 100 yards to 
one mile, has beaten all English and American athletes at his favorite 
distances, and has lowered the records for the ^ mile, six hundred 
yards, one half-mile and one thousand yards runs to a point not at- 
tainable by any living athlete, either here or abroad, and to reach 
which, the athletes of years to come, will probably unsuccessfully 
struggle. His success has been truly phenomenal, while no athlete 
in the world has more friends nor true admirers than this young, work- 
renowned Champion runner. He has made three trips to Europe 
altogether, met the best and the fastest runners of our mother athletic 
country (England), and has not only beaten them all at favorite dis- 
tances, but has also left them records far better than what they ever 
thought for. He has won over 300 prizes, consisting of medals, cups, 



THE MANHATTAN ATHLETIC CLUB. 79 

watches, jewelry, canes, silver stands and athletic uniforms, and 
although he at first belonged to the Knickerbocker Yacht Club, with 
the exception of 4 or 5 races, he has carried the Manhattan colors 
through his many battles on the cinder path. 

In 1880 at the Championship Meeting, Harry Fredricks won the 
one mile run in 4.39 3-5. J. S. Voorhees the broad jump, and L. H. 
Johnson the two mile bicycle race. 

Mr. George H. Carr, President of the Club, has held this honor- 
able position from the start, and too much credit cannot be given him 
for the successful manner in which he has conducted both the club 
and its athletes to fame and prosperity. 

Among some of the most prominent athletes of this club may be 
mentioned the names of: 



L. E. Meyers, 


T. J. Murphy, 


Wm. McEwen, 


Harry Pike, 


S. Derickson, 


Harry Fredricks, 


A. G. Waldron, 


L. P. Smith, 


T. H. Smith, 


J. S. Voorhees, 


W. Storm, 


C. S. Busse, 


D. J. Tompkins, 


F. S. Lambrecht, 


C. L. Meyers, 


W. C. White, 


F. G. Abbott, 


O. Bodelsen, 


T. H. Burton, 


W. McNichol, 


R. A. Knight, 


G. C. Walton, 


L. A. Stuart, 


W. T. Stoddard, 


C. E. Schuyler, 


H. M. Stone, 


J. M. Young, 


J. Magee, 


A. J. Camacha, 


J. B. White, 


C. L. Jacquelin, 


J. D. Freeman, 


E. W. Brown, 


Wm. H. Purdy, 


W. O'Keefe, 


A. T. Moore, 


L. H. Johnson, 


E. McCaffrey, 


W. H. Griffin, 


J. T. Graham, 


E. D. Jesurun, 


C. J. Cornell, 


W. T. Bailey. 







The officers from year to year have been as follows: 



VICE-PRESIDENT, 

W. C. FRANCE. JB. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT, 

W. H. GRIFFIN, 



1877-'78. 

PRESIDENT, 

GEO. W. CARR. 

SECRETARY, 

GEO. D. PARMLY, 

CAPTAIN. 

JOHN FRAZER. 



TREASURER, 

R. B. CULBERT. 



SECOND LIEUTENANT, 

E. G. GURNET. 



TRUSTEES, 

S B. POMEROY, HARRY P. PIKE, 

GEO. W. THOMAS. 



THE MANHATTAN ATHLETIC CLUB. 



11879, 

PRESIDENT, 

GEO. W. CARR. 



VICE-PRESIDENT, 

GEO. W. THOMAS. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT, 

W. H. GRIFFIN. 



TREASURER, 

WM. J. MoEWEN. 



CAPTAIN, 

HARRY P. PIKE. 



SECRETARY, 

R. B. CULBERT. 



SECOND LIEUTENANT, 

JAS. D. FREEMAN. 



TRUSTEES, 

S. B. POMEROY, W. C. FRANCE, JB., 

O. J. CONKLLN. 



VICE-PRESIDENT, 

GEO. W. THOMAS. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT, 

W. H. GRIFFIN. 



PRESIDENT. 

GEO. W. CARR. 



SECRETARY, 

WM. J. MoEWEN. 



CAPTAIN, 

HARRY P. PIKE. 



TREASURER 

R. B. CDLBERT. 



SECOND LIEUTENANT, 

H. BIRRELL. 



TRUSTEES, 

S. B. POMEROY, W. C. FRANCE, JR. , 

GEO. C. BOWERS. 



1881. 



VICE-PRESIDENT, 

GEO. W. THOMAS. 



PRESIDENT, 

GEO. W. CARR. 

SECRETARY, 

W. NEWBROUGH. 



TREASURER, 

S. B. POMEROY. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT, 

T. A. MoEWEN. 



G. A. AVERY, 



CAPTAIN, 

HARRY P. PIKE. 



TRUSTEES, 

J. MAGEE. 



SECOND LIEUTENANT, 

J. D. FREEMAN. 



GEO. C. BOWERS, 



THE MANHATTAN ATHLETIC CLUB. 



81 



VICE-PRESIDENT, 

G. W. THOMAS. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT, 

G. M. L. SACKS. 



G. A. AVERY, 



1882. 

PRESIDENT, 

GEO. W. CARR. 

SECRETARY, 

F. J. GRAHAM. 

CAPTAIN, 

C. J. CONNELL. 



TRUSTEES, 

JAS. MAGEE. 



TREASURER, 

S. B. POMEROY. 



SECOND LIEUTENANT, 

W. H. PURDY. 



C. E. TROTTER, 



VICE-PRESIDENT, 

GEO. W. THOMAS. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT, 

P. ST. G. BISSELL. 



1883. 

PRESIDENT, 

GEO. W. CARR. 

SECRETARY, 

L. E. MYERS. 

CAPTAIN, 

CHAB. J. CONNELL. 



TREASURER, 

G. M. L. SACKS. 



SECOND LIEUTENANT, 

WALTON STORM. 



TRUSTEES, 

GEO. A. AVERY, H. W. BERLIN, 

CHAS. E. TROTTER. 



1884. 



VICE-PRESIDENT, 

CHAS. E. TROTTER. 


PRESIDENT, 

GEO. W. CARR. 

SECRETARY, 

L. E. MYERS. 


TREASURER, 

WALTON STORM. 



CAPTAIN, 

SAMUEL J. CORNELL. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT, 

GEO. F. KNUBEL. 
GEO. A. AVERY, 



TRUSTEES, 



CHAS. W. MINOR. 



SECOND LIEUTENANT, 

WM. R. BEERS. 



JAMES MAGEE, 



THE MANHATTAN ATHLETIC CLUB. 
1885. 



VICE-PRESIDENT, 

C. E. TROTTER. 



FIRST LIEUTENANT, 

J. W. M^GEE. 
GEO. A. AVERT, 



PRESIDENT, 

GEO. W. CARR. 

TREASURER, 

L. P. SMITH. 

CAPTAIN, 

L. A. STUART. 



TRUSTEES, 

C. C. HUGHS. 



SECRETARY, 

WALTON STORM. 



SECOND LIEUTENANT, 

S. 8. SCHUYLER. 
E. S. APPLEBY, 



Harry Frdericks, the amateur champion mile runner of America 
or several years, is 22 years old, 5 feet 4 inches in height, and weighs 
123 Ibs. For the past five years he has won the mile race at the 
championship meeting, never having been pushed. His best record 
is 4 minutes 32 3-5 seconds ; but what he could do if he were com- 
pelled to run out is unknown. His friends only know that in prac- 
tice for special races he has beaten the best American record. 

- Arthur Waldron, the amateur champion one hundred yard run- 
ner of America, is 22 years old, 5 feet 7 inches in height, and weighs 
118 Ibs. For two years he won the 100 yards race at the champion 
meeting. His race at the meeting in 1883, when he beat Brooks, 
showed him to. be the equal, if not the superior, of any sprinter in 
America. With heavy odds in Brooks' favor, Waldron won in 10^ 
seconds. Of this race, the Spirit of the Times saying: "The wind 
blew freshly in ths faces of "the runners, and the performance was 
really as meritorious as several of our 10 second records." 

This club may well be called the finest athletic organization in 
America, for surely the Manhattan colors are seen at every meeting 
of any importance, and the many young champion athletes are always 
striving for their club's success on the cinder path, whether at home 
or abroad, and they seldom leave for home without taking with them 
a good share of the prizes. 

The club colors are white and with a red diamond lapping at the 
ends. 

The proposed gymnasium mentioned in connection with this 
club has now taken the form of a club house, and an agreement has 
been made with the Manhattan Club Building Association, a com- 
pany incorporated by Mr. Wm. J. Swan, to lease for a term of 21 
years a spacious and commodious club-house which is to be erected 
on the corner of Madison Avenue and 59th Street. Work on the 
structure will be commenced at once and pushed with all possible 
haste to completion. The edifice will be an imposing one, and is to 



THE MANHATTAN ATHLETIC CLUB. 83 

cost over $200,000. When furnished it will be the best equipped 
athletic establishment in the world. 

This club house will be three full stories in height, with an eleva- 
tion of 70 feet, and will be built of brick and terra cotta, the plans 
and specifications being already perfected. 

The basement floor will contain a magnificent bowling room, 
with eight full sized alleys. Adjoining this will be the swimming bath, 
the dimensions of which will be 70x20 (with a spring board plunge of 
15 feet), the Russian baths, and dressing and lounging rooms. The 
cafe and barber shop will also be on this floor. 

The entrance to the club-house will be on the corner of Madison 
avenue and Fifty-ninth street, and on entering, after passing the club 
offices and coat room, one comes to the parlor, a magnificent room 
fifty feet square, divided in the centre by columns. The parlor faces 
on Madison avenue, and the windows are but five feet above the side- 
walk.- The rest of the floor is occupied by the restaurant, 25x75, 
the library, smoking room, and directors' room. 

On the second floor will be a beautiful concert room, with stage, 
and all modern conveniences for private theatricals. The floor will 
be finished so that it can be used for dancing and also for tennis, and 
ample space has been set apart for dressing rooms, etc. The billiard 
room will be 25x70, and will contain six billiard and two pool tables. 

The third floor will be occupied entirely by the gymnasium, the 
floor of which will be 60x90 in the clear. The ceiling will be twen- 
ty-one feet high, with a sliding skylight 20x50 ; this will give perfect 
light and ventilation at all times. On the gymnasium floor will also 
be the dressing rooms and lockers, and also a plunge and a vapor 
bath, with toilets, etc. Twelve feet above the gymnasium floor will 
b the running track. This, instead of being the ordinary gymnasium 
track, will be a cinder track, so that athletes may enjoy all the bene- 
fits of out-door training. The track will be eighteen laps to the 
mile. 

On the level with the track will be dressing rooms, lockers, a 
padded boxing room, 25x25, a fencing room, shower baths, toilets, 
etc. An Otis elevator will run from the basement to the running track 
floor. The building will be as near fire-proof as possible ; the stair- 
cases, of which there will be three, being absolutely fire-proof. The 
building will be lighted by electricity and also by gas. 

The charge for billiards, bowling, etc., will be nominal; less than 
half the usual cost. 

The club will retain its athletic track at Eighty-sixth street and 
Eighth avenue, which will be improved so as to favorably compete 
with any athletic grounds in the world, and it is the intention of the 
club to procure a plot of land on the Harlem river, and erect thereon 
a boat house, which will be equipped in the most perfect manner. 

The club house is to be completed October i, 1886. 







THE BENEFITS OF ROWING. 



Rowing is admitted by all authorities to be the most beneficial of exercises, because it calls into play 
every muscle m the body and gives to each one a full and equal share of work. Five minutes of brisk row- 
ing will produce a rapid circulation of the blood, free perspiration, cause the lungs at each inspiration to fill 
themselves to their full capacity, and thus enlarge the chest and vitalize the blood, without unduly straining 
any of the muscles. This condition of the body cannot be obtained from any other form of exercise in the 
same time without making one set of muscles do all the work, and so seriously laming them 

Rowing, therefore, is an excellent substitute for the gymnasium. 

If ladies would devote a small portion of each day to this exercise, they would soon secure that freshness 
of complexion and roundness of limb, so indicative of perfect digestion and circulation; and " nervousness " 
would be unknown, except as a memory of the past. 

I am now enabled to offer to my patrons and customers "A Perfect Parlor Rowing Apparatus " 
After spending thousands of dollars, and years in experiments, with the combined help of the best mechani- 
ical [engineering talent I have produced a perfect and simple device which will not break or get out of order, 
as has been the trouble in my former and all other apparatuses. In my improved machine there are no 
springs, as the pressure is regulated exclusively by friction and can be varied by an adjusting thumbscrew by 
the will .of the opeator. The clutching or gripping device is simple and positive in its movements, to which 
the oar is attached, and allows the operators to rest their hands upon the oars and feathering same when 
coming back, in the same manner as ordinary rowing. As each oar is provided with an independent fric- 
tion the operator can let either oar rest and apply both hands to one oar and pick up the other at any time 
a am - t.- l nave so arranged the machine, that by changing the outrigger and oars about on the frame, 
the pushing ot the oars may be practiced similar to the style of the Norweigan sailor, which is the best exer- 
cise for developing the mnscles of the back and stomach. To insure the confidence I have in my machine I 
will warrant it 

* J$ ac ^- ma . cnine is provided with a counter or indicator, which is so graduated that one revolution 
ot the dial is equivalent to one quarter of a mile as calculated from Hanlon's time at the thirty-two 
strokes per minute, which will be found of great benefit in regulating the time spent in this exercise espe- 
cially in boating clubs, training schools and gymnasiums, where racing can be done at seasons when it can- 
not be tried on the water 

Send stamp for book on Physical Culture to 

J. M. LAFLIN, 
Price SIO.OO. 2OO Broadway, New York. 



HINTS ON EXERCISING. 85 

HINTS ON EXERCISING. 

Every year, for the past ten or twenty years, athletics have taken 
a strong hold on the minds of all the young and many of the old of 
both sexes. The first athletic clubs were made up of young men 
who, for the most part, excelled in some exercise or other, or of those 
who, being confined most of the time by business cares, wished 
merely for a little relaxation. 

These clubs could not, of course, afford elegant or costly club- 
houses for members who only joined them to display their athletic ac- 
complishments or to be able to spend a few of their leisure evenings 
in a sort of semi-barbarous condition in the freedom of a free-and- 
easy gymnasium. As the interest in physical training and muscular 
development became more general, and ladies began to encourage 
the amateur meetings by their presence, the niceties soon came to be 
more closely looked after, and the houses and grounds of the clubs 
which made a specialty of athletics were improved, till at the present 
time the palatial homes of some of ,the principal athletic clubs in this 
country and in England are second to none in the luxury and elegance 
of their appointments. 

There are now thousands of young men in this city alone who, 
too much lacking in confidence in their own powers, are, instead of 
joining one of the athletic clubs, by spasmodic and often ill-judged 
attempts at exercising at home, doing themselves more harm than 
good. It is to this class far more than to any other that a writer on 
athletics should endeavor to reach. 

Young men belonging to athletic clubs have little need of being- 
urged to properly exercise themselves. As quickly as their feet touch 
the track of the club they have just joined, the eyes of the trackmaster 
and half the members of the club are bent upon them, to try and dis- 
cover any symptom of their being embryo amateur champions; and if 
such signs are seen, all possible efforts are used to induce the stranger 
to develop himself in the particular direction he seems inclined to, 
with the hope that in time the club may shine with reflected honor 
from his well-won glory. 

It is to the young men whose inability, either through tightness 
of purse or lack of time, cannot join the clubs, that instruction 
should be given. In the first place, a very moderate amount of exer- 
cise of the proper kind, and taken at suitable times, will in a very 
reasonable period produce a good appetite, a better digestion, sound 
sleep, greater strength, first-class health, and a much clearer and 
stronger business mind, with more moral perceptions. This state- 
ment does not now need proof, although it took a many years' battle 
to establish it as thoroughly as it now is in most minds. All that is 
asked of any unbeliever is a fair trial. 



86 HINTS ON EXERCISING. 

It is not necessary for one who desires to reap the advantage of 
physical training to go to the expense and trouble that some lovers of 
exercise do. The poorest person, even if his livelihood is gained en- 
tirely by a sedentary occupation, can, if he knows how, by ten min- 
utes' work alone in his sleeping-room every night and morning, gain 
a great deal more than could possibly be expected. If one can afford 
it, a few fixtures which will not cost much had better be purchased. 
A rowing-machine and punching-bag are the best and least expensive 
contrivances, and the things with which the most can be done. They 
will cost less than twenty dollars set up ready to handle ; they can be 
bought of any of the big athletic goods houses (see Laflin's advertise- 
ment), and the list might be greatly extended. The rowing- machine 
is a gymnasium in itself, if a good one, and what exercise the rowing- 
machine does not permit he may get without fail from the punching- 
bag and the bar from which it hangs. 

The best or most convenient seasons for exercise will be, for most 
people, on rising and retiring. The exercising should be done with 
the athlete in as little clothing as possible, in order to give perfect 
freedom for all the movements and a good chance for a sort of air- 
bath, which most people find very beneficial. The movements should 
be quick and decided, but heavy weights should be most decidedly 
barred. More persons have been injured by lifting heavy weights 
than have ever been benefitted by them. Ten or fifteen minutes' ex- 
ercise with light weights, the rowing-machine and the punching-bag, 
will cause the perspiration to pour from all parts of the body in almost 
any sort of weather. As soon as the exercise is ended, a bath-towel 
should be used to wipe dry ; then a cold plunge, shower or sponge- 
bath should be indulged in. This is very important, especially in the 
summer time, and should never be neglected. In warm weather the 
body should only be wiped dry not rubbed dry, as in cold weather, 
as rubbing promotes the circulation and causes a sensation of warmth. 
The exercise should be rapid and vigorous, but not sufficiently so as 
to compel one to stop becamse of lack of breath. The exercise 
should be kept up always for a little time after the muscles fairly ache. 
The muscles ache because of the blood being forced into them to en- 
able them to meet the demands being made upon them. This excess 
of blood causes them to swell and make them ache. It is a law of 
nature always to try to make up for deficiencies, and if constant calls 
are made upon the muscles to do more work than they have been ac- 
customed to perform, they soon swell and increase in size and strength 
to accomplish what is asked of them. Physiology teaches that a 
muscle which has been thus swelled by exercise returns to its natural 
state in about three days. This is also known because one is always 
more or less lame for about three days after some unusual muscular 
feat. It is easily seen, therefore, that to develop the muscles mark- 
edly, one must exercise enough to get them quite tired at least once 
in thrw days. 



DIGESTIBILITY OF FOOD. 



87 



TABLE 

Showing the Digestibility of the Most 
of Food, 



Common Articles 



Beef 
Beefsteak 

Corned Beef. 
Mutton. . 


Roasted . . 
Broiled . . 
Fried . . 
Boiled . . 


. .3.00 
. .3.00 
. .4.00 
-4-15 


Lamb . . . 


T) 'l-J 


3- r 5 


Pork 
Sausage 


Roasted . . 
'. .Fried 

Frier) 


2 -3 
5-15 
4.15 


Sucking Pig 
Pigs' Feet 
Veal, 


Roasted. . 
Soused. . 

BnilfH 


.2.30 

. . (.00 


Venison Steak 
Chicken 
Fowls 
Ducks 


Broiled . . 
- . Fricaseed. . 
Roasted . . 


'35 
-3-45 
. .4,00 


Eggs . 


Roasted . . 
Hard Bnilpd 


..2.30 


Oysters 


Soft Boiled . . 
Raw. . 
Stewed 


-3-3 
. . 3. oo 

..2.55 


Milk. . 




J u 


Trout or Salmon 


Boiled 


;.*'*. 3 


Tripe 


Fried 


. . 1.45 


Striped Bass 
Soup, Barley 
" Beef and Vegetables 


Boiled.. 


. . i.^u 

..3.00 
..I. 3 

.4.00 


" Chicken 
Potatoes 
String Beans 
Succotash : , 
Beets 
Cabbage 
Carrots 
Parsnips 


Boiled. . 
Boiled. . 
Boiled . 
Boiled. . 
Boiled. . 
Boiled . . 
Boiled . 


. .3 oo 

3.30 
. .2.30 

-3-45 
3-45 
-4.30 
3-'5 

2. 7O 


Rice 


Boiled 




Turnips '. 
Wheat Bread 
Corn " 
Cheese 
Apple Dumplings 
Oatmeal 


Boiled.. 

Old . . 
Boiled 


3-30 
3-30 

3- T 5 
3-30 
3.00 
3-30 



DEFINITION AMATEUR OARSMAN. 



AMATEUR OARSMAN DEFINITIONS. 



AN AMATEUR 

As DEFINED BY THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF AMATEUR OARSMEN. 

We define an amateur to be "One who does not enter in an 
open competition; or for either a stake, public or admission money, 
or entrance fee ; or compete with or against a professional for any 
prize ; who has never taught, pursued, or assisted in the pursuit o 
athletic exercises as a means of livelihood ; whose membership of any 
rowing or other athletic club was not brought about, or does not con- 
tinue, because of any mutual agreement or understanding, expressed 
or implied, whereby his becoming or continuing a member of such 
club would be of any pecuniary benefit to him whatever, direct or in- 
direct, and who has never been employed in any occupation involving 
any use of oar or paddle;" (as adopted August 18, 1872, and 
amended January 20, 1876) and who shall otherwise conform to 
the rules and regulations of the National Association of Amateur 
Oarsman. 

Definitions taking effect April 26, 1884^ 

A Junior Sculler 

Is one who has never pulled in a Senior race, or won a Junior 
"Scull race." 

A Junior Oarsman 

" Is one who has not pulled an oar in a Senior race, or been a 
winning oarsman in a Junior race." 

Competitions with members of his own club will not affect the 
standing, as a junior, of any oarsman or sculler. 

The qualifications of a Junior Oarsman or Sculler shall relate to 
each time of his coming to the starting post, whether in a trial or a 
final heat. 



PROGRAMME FOR CHAMPIONSHIP REGATTA. 

Senior Single Sculls, Pair-oared Shells, 

Junior " 8-oared Shells, 

Senior Four-oared Shells, Junior Four-oared Shells. 

Double Sculls. 



AMATEUR CHAMPION OARSMEN. 89 

AMATEUR CHAMPION OARSMEN OF AMERICA. 

WINNERS OF PREVIOUS REGATTAS. 

EIGHT OARED SHELLS. Time. 

1880 At Philadelphia, Pa., July 9, Dauntless R. C 8m 55 s. 

1881 At Washington, D. C. , September 9, Narragansett 

B. C 7 m. 51^3. 

1883 At Newark, N. J. , August 8, Metropolitan R. C 7 m. 51 s. 

1884 At Watkins, N. J., August 13, Columbia B. C. W. O..8 m. 22 s. 
1885 At Boston, Mass., August 13, Columbia B. C 7 m. 46^ s. 

JUNIOR FOUR-OARED SHELLS. Time. 

1882 At Detroit, Mich., August 9, Detroit B. C 10 m. 225. 

1883 At Newark, N. J., August 8, Alcoyne B. C 8m. i6# s. 

1884 At Watkins, N. Y. f August 13, Watkins R. A. . . .9 m. i# s. 
1885 At Boston, Mass., August 13, Dirigo B. C 8m. 31 s. 

DOUBLE SCULLS. Time. 

1873 At Philadelphia, Pa, October 8, Steele & Witmar: 

Crescent B. C 9m. 30 s. 

1874 At Troy, N. Y., September 4, Yates & Curtis: N, Y. 

Athletic Club 9 m. 37^ s. 

1875 At Troy, N. Y., September i, Robinson & Courtney: 

Union Springs B. C 8m. 50^ s. 

1876 At Philadelphia, Pa., August 23, Robinson & Court- 
ney: Union Springs B. C 9m. 195. 

1877 At Detroit, Mich., August 15, McBeath & Hender- 
son : Quaker City B. C ... 8 m. 18 s. 

1878 At Newark, N. J., August 21, O'Donnell & Powers: 

Hope R. C . 8m. 37^ s. 

1879 At Saratoga, N. Y., July ro, Rathborne & Lyon: N 

Y. Athletic Club 901.18^5. 

1880 At Philadelphia, Pa., July 9, Whitaker & Holmes: 

Pawtucket B. C -9m. 4 1 s. 

1881 At Washington, D. C, September 9, Appley & 

Holmes: Pawtucket B. C 8m. 37^ s. 

1882 At Detroit, Mich., August 9, O'Connell & Buckley; 

Portland B. C , 9m. 30 s. 

1883 At Newark, N. J., August 8, O'Connell & Buckley: 

Portland, B. C 8m. i6s. 

1884 At Watkins, N. Y., August 13, Toronto B. C 9m. tos. 

1885 At Boston, Mass., August i3th, M. F. & T. H. 

Monahan: Albany R. C 9m. 4% s. 



90 AMATEUR CHAMPION OARSMEN. 



SENIOR FOUR-OARED SHELLS. Time. 

1873 At Philadelphia, Pa., October 8, Argonauta R. A. . 8 m. 16 s. 
1874 At Troy, N. Y., September 4, Beaverwyck R, C. .8 m. 45^ s. 

1875 At Troy, N. Y., September i, Atalanta B. C 8m. 34^ s. 

1876 At Philadelphia, Pa., August 24, Atalanta B. C. . .9 m. 36^ s 

1877 At Detroit, Mich., August 15, Emerald B. C 7 m. 50 s, 

1878 At Newark, N. J., August 21, Mutuel B. C 8 m. 4 s. 

1879 At Saratoga, N. Y., July n, Hillsdale R. C 8m. 32%: s. 

1880 At Philadelphia, Pa., July 9, Hillsdale R. C 8 m. 53 s. 

1881 At Washington D. C, September 9, Hillsdale R. C. 8 m. 6^ s. 

1882 At Detroit, Mich., August 9, Centennial B C 8 m. 27 s. 

1883 At Newark, N. J., August 8, Eureka B. C 8m. 16^ s. 

1884 At Watkins, N. Y., August i3th, Argonaut B. C. . 8 m. 22^8. 
1885 At Boston, Mass., August i3th, Nautilus R. C. .8 m. 235. 



SENIOR SINGLE SCULLS. Time. 

1873 At Philadelphia, Pa., October 8, Chas Myers: Nas- 
sau B. C 10 m. 8% s- 

1874 At Troy, N. Y., September 4, F. E. Yates: N. Y. 

Athletic Club i o m. 1 6/ 2 ' s. 

1875 At Troy, N. Y., September i, Charles E. Courtney: 

Union Springs B. C 9m. 468. 

1876 At Philadelphia, Pa., August 24, F. E. Yates: Union 

Springs B. C 10 m. 39^ s. 

1877 At Detroit, Mich., August 1 6, George W. Lee: Triton 

B. C ' 9 m. ii s. 

1878 At Newark, N. J., August 21, George W. Lee, Tri- 
ton B. C 9 m. y^ s. 

1879 At Saratoga, N. Y., July 11, F. J. Mumford: Hope 

R. C 9 m. 50 s. 

1880 At Philadelphia, Pa., July 9, F. J. Mumford: Perse- 
verance B. C 10 m. 5^ s. 

1881 At Washington, D. C, September 9, F. E. Holmes: 

Pawtucket B. C 9m. 6^ s. 

1882 At Detroit, Mich., August 9, F. E. Holmes: Paw- 
tucket B. C , 10 m. 5 s. 

1883 At Newark, N. J., August 8, Joseph Laing: Grand 

Trunk B. C 8 m. 44 s. 

1884 At Watkins, N. Y., August 13, Joseph Laing: Grand 

Trunk B. C 9 m. 28^ s. 

188$ At Boston, Mass., August 13, E. J. Murphy 9 m. 42 s. 



AMATEUR CHAMPION OARSMEN. 91 

JUNIOR SINGLE SCULLS. Time. 

1878 At Newark, N. J., August 21, George Bowlsby, Jr., 

AmateurB.C . .' 9 m. 4 os. 

1879 At Saratoga, N. Y., July n, W. Murray, Elizabeth 

R C ... 10 m. \y 2 s. 

1880 At Philadelphia. Pa., July 9, J. A. Whitaker, Paw- 
tucket B. C 10 m. 

1881 At Washington, D. C, September 9, A. T. O'Brien, 

Dolphin B. C 9 m. 

1882 At Detroit, Mich., August 9, John J. Murphy, 

Shawmut B. C '. 9 m. 48 s. 

1883 At Newark, N. J., August 8, J. Kilion, Bradford 

B. C. 9m. 20^ s. 

1884 At Watkins, N. Y., August I3th, E. J. Mulcahy, 

Albany B. C 10 m. i s. 

1885 At Boston, Mass., August i3th. Peter Snyder, 

Columbia B. C 9 m. 34 s. 



PAIR OARED SHELLS. Time. 

1874 At Troy, N. Y., September 4, Smith & Eldred, 

Argonauta R. A 9 w. 4 1 y z s. 

1875 At Troy, N. Y., August 31, Smith & Eldred: Argon- 
auta R. A 9 m. 393. 

1876 At Philadelphia, Pa., August 23, Downs & Eustis: 

Atalanta B. C '. . . . . 10 m. 10^ s. 

1877 At Detroit, Mich., August 16, Smith & Kiloran: 

Emerald B. C 9m. 4 s. 

1878 At Newark, N. J., August 20, Bulger & Graves: Mu- 

tuel B. C 8 m. 56^ s. 

1879 At Saratoga, N. Y. , July 9, Gorman Bros. : Olym- 
pic B. C 9m. 41 ^s. 

1880 At Philadelphia, Pa., July 9, Gorman Bros.: Albany 

R. C 10 m. 7 l / 2 s. 

1881 At Washington, D. C, September 9, Cl egg & Stan d- 

ish : Detroit Scullers 6 m. 33 s. 

1882 At Detroit, Mich. August 9, Bulger & Moseley: 

Mutual B. C 10 m. 38 s. 

1883 At Newark, N. J., August 8, Bulger* Moseley, Mu- 
tual B. C 8 m. 54 s. 

1884 At Watkins, N. Y., August 13, Moseley & Bulger: 

Albany B. C W. O. 

1885 At Boston, Mass., August 13, Fred Freeman and 

John Weldon: Ariel B. C 9 - 33 s. 



92 THE KILL VON KULL ROWING ASSOCIATION. 



The Kill Von Kull Rowing Association. 

This Association, which is now one of the best known organiza- 
tions of oarsmen in the country, was organized in 1880. Itcomprises 
the following strong boat clubs, viz: 

The Argonauta Rowing Association, Bayonne Rowing Associa- 
tion, and Viking Rowing Association, of Bayonne City. The Staten 
Island Athletic Club and Clifton Boat Club, of Staten Island. The 
Alcyone Rowing Association, and Arthur-Kull Rowing Association, 
of Elizabeth. 

At the first three annual Regattas all these clubs, but the Clifton, 
were represented, and in the last two regattas every club in the Asso- 
ciation contested one or more of the races. 

These regattas have always excited great interest among oarsmen, 
and the official record of the time made has invariably been accepted 
without question in boating circles throughout the country, a fact 
which speaks volumes as to the standing and management of the As- 
sociation. 

The regattas have usually been held upon the Kills, but as this 
course is objectionable for many reasons, it was decided at the annual 
meeting of the Association, held May 9, to hold the regatta this year 
on the Newark Bay course. In referring to this action of the Associ- 
ation, the Bayonne Times says: 

"A new course was selected which will meet with the approval 
of all oarsmen in this city as well as the majority from adjoining sec- 
tions. It is on Newark Bay, commencing one mile east of the club 
house of the Newark Bay Boat Club and ending at the club house. 
This Club has tendered the use of their pretty house for the occasion, 
and the regatta was one of the principal boating events of the sea- 
son. Oarsmen as a rule acknowledge this course to be the most 
desirable, all things considered, that is to be found in the vicinity of 
New York." , 

The officers of the Kill Von Kull Association for this year are as 
follows: 

William C. Davis, of the Staten Island Athletic Club, President. 
Pierson Haviland, of the Argonauta Rowing Association, Secretary 

and Treasurer. 

REGATTA COMHITTEE. 

R. C. Annett, of the Argonautas. 

W. A. Lentilhon, of the Staten Island Athletic Club. 

Joseph Elsworth, of the Bayonnes. 

George A. Squire, of the Newark Bay Boat Club. 



THE ARGOXAl'TA ROWING ASSOCIATION. 93 

The Argonauta Rowing Association, 

BERGEN POINT. 

This Association was organized /tpril 5, 1870, and incorporated. 

At first the Argonauta Club was purely a social organization, but 
as the members became proficient in the use of the oar, they became 
ambitious to try conclusions with their more athletic neighbors. Af- 
ter being defeated twice by the Neptune Boat Club, of Staten Island, 
and once by the Vesper Club, of Yonkers, a crew composed of 
Messrs. Schuyler, Craft, Stephenson, Phillips, Humphreys and Bram- 
hall, met the Oneidas, of Jersey City, and gracefully took them into 
camp. 

In 1872 the Club sent to the front a crew composed of Smith, 
Bramhall, Stephenson and Eldred, which afterward achieved a 
national reputation. This crew met the Neptunes in the third con- 
test between the two clubs, and wrested the "Whip of the Kills" 
from the unwilling hands of the Staten Island Club in the extraordin- 
ary short time of 15 m. 5^ s. for three miles. 

Then commenced a series of victories in the home waters, and at 
Philadelphia, Harlem and elsewhere, which placed the name of ''Ar- 
gonauta'' among the most famous of amateur clubs; Walter Man, 
after the first season, occupying No. 2 seat, vice E. J. Bramhall, 
retired. 

From the date of its organization up to the present time, the 
Club has competed in forty-nine races with other clubs in match races 
and regattas (not including trial heats), and has won thirty of these 
races, rowing in many instances against the fastest and most formida- 
ble crews in the country. 

Twenty-seven sets of colors and banners, trophies of victory 
adorn the walls of the club parlor, besides photographs of the Na- 
tional, Interlaken and other challenge cups won in important re- 
gattas. 

The Club won the Championship of the United States three times 
m four-oared shells, four times in pair-oared shells, held the Schuyl- 
kill Navy Championship three successive years, the Greenwood Lake 
Championship two years, and has retained the "Whip of the Kills" 
from 1872 to this day. 

Notwithstanding the intense interest in the racing competition 
with other clubs, care was taken to keep up the social character of the 
organization, and maintain its high standing in the community. In- 
deed the Argonautas are noted for the cordial manner in which the 
hospitalities of the Club are always extended to visitors. 

The Club House is beautifully situated upon a lot 183 by 75 feet, 
owned by the Association, and is splendidly arranged and handsome- 
ly furnished. 



94 THE VIKING ROWING ASSOCIATION. 

The club is in excellent financial condition, and we hope it will 
enjoy many years of prosperity. 

The present roll of active members includes representatives of 
most of the best known families on the Point, and the honorary list 
comprises many old and prominent citizens who worthily served as 
active members in former years. 
The officers are as follows: 

E. W. Humphreys, President. 

E. R. Craft, First Vice-President. 

N. W. Trask, Second Vice President. 

H. A. Craft, Treasurer. 

M. V. Stringham, Recording Secretary. 

J. W. Goddard, Corresponding Secretary. 

Pierson Haviland, Captain. 

R. C. Annett, Lieutenant. 

The Viking Rowing Association. 

BAYONNE. 

Organized 1873. This association was organized by the union 
of the Elizabeth Boat Club and the Triton Boat Club, of Pamrapo, 
N.J. 

The combined membership of these two clubs numbered about 
twenty, and the new organization started with about this number. 
In the spring of 1877 a new boat house was built opposite the depot 
at Bayonne, N. J., which has since been kept in excellent condition, 
and is now fully equipped to meet the requirements of the members. 
Since the organization of the club its membership has been largely 
increased, until now it has fully 50 members, or more than double the 
number on the roll in 1875. 

The Club is very prosperous and is on a sound financial basis > 
with no debt on the house or other property. Its fleet of boats com- 
prise four-oared shells, pair-oared gigs, and barges, all compara- 
tively new boats and in good shape. In addition to the annual club 
Regattas and races for challenge cups and badges, the Vikings have 
competed in many Regattas at Newark, Rutherford, Greenwood Lake, 
Harlem, and on the Kill Von Kull, and in several match races, nota- 
bly with the Bayonnes and Arthur-Kulls. 

The Viking Rowing Association is entitled to the enviable dis- 
tinction of being the pioneer Club in the movement which resulted in 
the organization of the Kill Von Kull Rowing Association. 
The officers at present are as follows: 
S. D. Housten, President. 
James L. Meyers, Vice-President. 
T. C. Hanna, Secretary. 
W. B. Seaman, Treasurer. 
H. E. Duncan, Jr., Captain. 
W. P. Thomas, Lieutenant. 



THE r.AYONNE ROWING ASSOCIATION*. 95 

The Bayonne Rowing Association. 

BAVONNt. 

Organized 1872, incorporated 1875. This well-known associa- 
tion of oarsmen was started principally for the purpose of having a 
Club House which could be used by the young men in Bayonne who 
were interested in boating. A one-story building was erected on the 
New York Bay shore opposite the depot, and this for a while answered 
the purpose. 

Shortly after the organization of the Club a six-oared gig and a 
four-oared barge were procured. The entire membership of the Club 
at that time was not enough to man both boats at once. These boats 
were heavy pleasure boats, and, in fact, were of the class commonly 
known among oarsmen as " beef boats," so that the Club was hardly 
fitted to engage in either challenge races or regattas. Nevertheless 
when, in 1874, the Oneida Boat Club of Jersey City (now the Hudson) 
challenged The Bayonne Rowing Association to a three-mile six- 
oared gig race, the boys pluckily determined to make up a crew and 
row the race in their heavy gig. 

This race excited great interest in Bayonne, and was hotly con- 
tested from start to finish, the Oneidas being declared winners by half 
a length by the referee, against the protest of the Bayonne representa- 
tives. 

The great interest taken in the race, and the grit and determina- 
tion shown by the Bayonne crew (who had no practical training) in 
rowing against a thoroughly trained picked crew from one of the 
strongest boat clubs in existence, at that time, resulted in a popular 
subscription being taken up in Bayonne to assist the Club in building 
a suitable club house, and to purchase such boats as were necessary 
lor racing purposes. 

.Twelve hundred dollars were raised by this subscription and 
turned over to the Club. In the fall of the same year building opera- 
tions were commenced, and rapidly pushed until the present handsome 
boat house was finished. The total cost of this building was $5,000, 
of which $1,200 was paid in cash, and the balance, $3,800, provided 
for by bond and mortgage. Almost as soon as building operations 
were commenced new members began to come into the Club, and in 
1875, when it was incorporated, the Club roster contained the 
names of over forty members, among whom were many of the best 
known residents. 

In order to liquidate the indebtedness on the club-house a sink- 
ing fund was established whereby one-sixth of the entire income was 
reserved to be applied solely to the reduction of the debt, which by 
this means was decreased every year, until in 1882 the total indebted- 
ness was only $2,800. 



96 THE BAYONNE ROWING ASSOCIATION. 

In the early part of 1883 it became necessary to make some ar- 
rangements to pay off a portion of the mortgage. After careful con- 
sideration of the matter it was decided to hold a fair, which was done 
in June, 1883, and in June of the following year the experiment was 
repeated. The two fairs resulted in a net profit to the club of $3,- 
900. 

This splendid success was largely due to the untiring efforts of 
President W. H. Jasper, and the excellent management and harmoni- 
ous action of the ladies and gentlemen who composed the Fair Com- 
mittees. 

The money raised in this way cleared the club of debt, enabled 
it to invest about $1,000 in much-needed boats with which to send out 
crews properly equipped, and to put the club-house in excellent con- 
dition. 

For several years the Bayonne Rowing Association has given a 
series of bi-weekly sociables at their club-house, which have been at- 
tended by the elite of Bayonne City, and which are very popular. 

Since its organization the Bayonne Rowing Association has par- 
ticipated in many regattas and challenge races, in addition to the an- 
nual club regatta, and many handsome trophies adorn the club- 
house. 

The following are among its most notable victories : 
Pair-oared shell, at Rutherford Park, 1875; 
Four-oared barge, Kills Regatta, 1881; 

1882; 
1883; 

Pair-oared gig, " 1884; 

Four-oared barge, " l %%5', 

and four-oared shell, three miles, in 1873, which was a challenge 
match race with the Vikings for the Championship. 

The Bayonne Rowing Association is now in splendid shape, does 
not owe a dollar, and is well provided with first-class boats and the ma- 
terial to "whoop 'em up." 

The following comprise the officers : 
E. H. Bennett, President. 
Jos. Elsworth, Jr., Vice-President. 
Geo. E. Squire, Treasurer. 
J. A. Phillips, Jr., Secretary. 
E. E. Van Buskirk, Captain. 
C. O. Stillman, Lieutenant. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES : 

E. H. Bennett, Chairman. 
Geo. A. Squire, I. A. Gard, 

E. E. Van Buskirk, W. C. Nicholson, 

Ernest C. Webb, W. H. Jasper, 

J. T. Field, J. H. Allaire. 



THE NEWARK BAY BOAT CLUB. 97 

The Newark Bay Boat Club, 

BAYONNE. 

Organized May, 1881, incorporated October 3, 1882. In the 
Spring of 1881, some of the residents of Bay View Place, popularly 
called the Nine Row, after grumbling at each other about the lack of 
boating facilities on the beautiful shore of Newark Bay, and the need 
of a proper landing for boats and their freight of pleasure-seeking 
parties, finally concluded that something must be done or life would 
be a burden. What they attempted to do and how well they suc- 
ceeded, it is the purpose of this sketch to tell. 

On a beautiful May day, in the year 1881, six young men with 
ambitious longings, clustered together under the friendly branches of 
a "spreading chestnut tree, "on what is now part of the club grounds, 
and held a long and secret pow-wow about some momentous ques- 
tion. 

What were they, Nihilists or dynamiters, plotting some fearful 
and sanguinary crime to startle the world ? No, gentle reader, they 
were the advanced guard, the "Bic Six" who decided on that eventful 
May day to charge the nearest lumber yard and sieze in exchange for 
the paper promises of Uncle Sam, the material necessary to erect, not 
a fort, but a peaceful structure which would answer ths purposes of a 
landing place for boats, and a resting place where the moonlight nights 
might be comfortably enjoyed literally on the Bay. 

These young men were Messrs. George G. Jewett, Ernest C. 
Webb, Henry Garretson, William G. Goebel, Joseph A. Phillips, Jr., 
and E. Y.Phillips, and they immediately organized the Newark Bay 
Boat Club, becoming its charter members; a distinction none of them 
would exchange for the highest office in the gift of the Club. 

Once started, the work was rapidly advanced, and in the follow- 
ing June a long dock or pier with landing steps and a covered plat- 
form with seating accommodations at the end, was completed, and 
this, with some additions, comprised for two seasons the Club House 
of the Newark Bay Boat Club. 

The Club soon became very popular in Bayonne, and its dock a 
place of resort for ladies and gentlemen, who found there, and as they 
do now at t^e Club House, that cordial welcome which has made a 
visit to the Newark Bay Boat Club a pleasure to all who have enjoyed 
its hospitalities, and a matter of pride to our residents who take their 
visiting friends to see the Club House, as one of the attractions of 
summer life in Bayonne. 

The popularity of the Club increased. Its membership grew so 
rapidly that in the summer of 1882, a Club House of some kind be- 
came not only the wish of all, but an absolute necessity in order to 
accommodate the members, their families and friends. 

The idea of a club house having once taken root soon became 
the all-important question for consideration, and in the fall of 1882, 



98 THE NEWARK BAY BOAT CLUB. 

the club decided to issue five dollar bonds to the requisite amount in 
order to raise the necessary funds. This was done, and the money 
raised during the following winter the bonds being placed at five 
per cent, interest. 

In the following spring the building operations were commenced, 
and in June, 1883, the Club House was practically finished, and on 
July 2, 1883, the opening reception was held, and was attended by 
over 700 invited guests. 

The Club House is beautifully situated on leased grounds at the 
west end of Bayonne avenue, and has a frontage on Newark Bay of 
sixty-five feet; is forty-five feet deep, with a ten-foot piazza, extending 
entirely around the second story. It has a deck roof. It was built 
under the personal supervision of the late Mr. Jacob C. Garretson, the 
architect, and we think that, for club purposes, it eclipses any build- 
ing of its kind in the State. 

The total cost of erecting the Club House was $3,500, and the 
present indebtedness is $2,300, the Club having paid $1,200 up to 
January last, or in a year and a half. 

This is a record of which the members are justly proud, and, 
in appealing to their friends for the first time (through the medium of 
a Fair) they met with a liberal and generous response from the citizens 
of the City of Bayonne. 

One distinctive feature of the Club since its organization has been 
its social character. The greatest care has been taken to make the 
Club House a pleasant place for ladies, and one where they can feel 
perfectly at home, and in which they can take the same interest as 
though they were in fact members. To this alone the success of the 
Club is due in a great measure. 

It is admitted by all that the Club has been a benefit to Bayonne. 
It has been the means of attracting many families to the city who have 
become permanent residents, and it has provided a place for innocent 
amusement and recreation, which has been of great value to young 
men. 

The following comprise the officers for this year: 
Ernest C. Webb, President. 
John C. Bouton, Vice-President. 
E. W. Snyder, Treasurer. 
L. W. Amerman, Recording Secretary. 
Arthur C. Webb, Corresponding Secretary. 
Eugene McDonald, Captain. 
Harry G. Stephens, Lieutenant. 
TRUSTEES, 

George A. Squire, Chairman. L. W. Amerman, Secretary. 
Ernest C. Webb. George G. Jewett. 

Sterling F. Hayward, John C. Carragan. 

Frank G. Bennett. John A. Serrell. 

DeWitt Van Buskirk. 



STATEN ISLAND ROWING CLUB. 99 

Staten Island Rowing Club, 

NEW BRIGHTON, S. I. 

The Staten Island Rowing Club was established at New Brighton, 
Staten Island, in the spring of 1878, with a membership of fifty and 
the following officers : 

A. P. Stokes, President. 

H. L. Horton, Vice-President. 

E. Kelly, Captain. 

G. B. West, Secretary. 

G. S. McCulloh, Treasurer. 

C. D. Ingersoll, Lieutenant. 

TRUSTEES : 

A. P. Stokes, G. B. West, 

H. R. Kelly, H. L. Horton, 

G. S. McCulloh, Beverley Duer, 

Edmund Kelly, R. B. Whittemore, 

Walter Hodges. 

The club has not participated in any regattas or races with other 
clubs, but has confined itself to the quieter exercise of steady daily 
pulls. Every year the circuit of Staten Island (forty miles) is made 
four or five times, the quickest time for the distance (five hours and 
twenty minutes) having been made by the four-oared barge crew in 
1884. In 1883 a day was set aside in each week for the instruction 
of ladies in rowing in the boats of the club, and a large number of 
ladies are now enrolled as -members. 

The present officers of the club are : 
H. R. Kelly, President. 

A. B. Boardman, Vice-President. 
W. Hodges, Treasurer. 

J. E. Bonner, Secretary. 
E. Flash, Jr., Captain. 

B. Leaward, Lieutenant. 

TRUSTEES : 

H. R. Kelly, J. E. Bonner, 

R. P. G. Bucklin, A. B. Boardman, 

E. Flash, Jr., G. A. Post, 

W. Hodges, A. J. McDonald, 
B. Leaward. 



100 THE CLIFTON BOAT CLUB. 

The Clifton Boat Club. 

CLIFTON, S. I. 

This Club was organized in 1881, commencing with a member- 
ship of eight, which has steadily increased. 

The Club House is charmingly situated at Clifton, S. I., and is a 
delightful place to visit during the boating season. The house is 
66 feet deep by 35 feet wide, with a 12 feet piazza, on two sides, fac- 
ing the Narrows. 

This Club was started as a social organization, and until last year 
when a barge crew was sent to compete in the Kill Von Kull 
Regatta, has not taken part in rowing regattas open to other Clubs. 

The crew sent last year had practically little or no training, and 
they were entered more because the Club had joined the Association 
than for any other reason, but although handicapped by a heavy barge, 
they pushed the Arthur-Kulls from start to finish, and made so plucky 
a fight against big odds that the Club was convinced the material was 
there, and all that was needed was a boat worthy of their mettle. Here- 
after good work may be expected from the Cliftons, and they will un- 
doubtedly prove dangerous rivals for "Kill Von Kull *' honors at the 
annual Regattas. 

Last September the Cliftons held a Fair for their benefit which 
cleared the handsome sum of $1,329.50, and this, together with good 
management, has placed the Club in excellent financial condition. 
The present membership is 75, and the value of the house and other 
property about $6,000. The Club has purchased some new boats, 
and now owns 

i Six-oared Barge, 
i Four-oared Gig, 
i Paired-oared Gig, 
12 Singles, 

and 2 4-oared Barges. 

The following comprise the officers for the year 1885 ' 
I. K. Martin, President. 
W. Hodges, Vice-President. 
Gregory McKean, Secretary. 
S. Howard Martin, Treasurer. 
George A. Post, Captain. 
Arthur D. F. Wright, Lieutenant. 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES : 

N. Marsh, B. B. Hopkins, 

W. B. McKean, C. M. Dodge, 

C. Barton. 



THE BAYONNE CANOE CLUB. 101 

The Bayonne Canoe Club. 

BAYONNE. 



The Bayonne Canoe Club was organized on May 2, 1882, by 
Messrs. E. R. Smith, R. V. Vienot, F. B. Collins, A. F. Fleming, 
and A F. Burke, and since that time it has grown steadily until this 
year it became necessary to increase the size of the Club House in 
order to accommodate the members and the fleet of canoes. 

The Club House is pleasantly situated between the Newark Bay 
Boat Club House and the old Randall property, and the "boys" are 
very proud of it, as indeed, they ought to be. 

The Club fleet at present consists of eleven handsome canoes, 
which present a very pretty sight when the Club is on a cruise, with 
colors flying and the boys rigged to take the weather as they 
find it. 

New members are being initiated at every meeting, and before 
next season begins it is probably that the "fleet" will be increased. 

The Regattas of the Canoe Club have always been very interesting, 
attracting numerous spectators who have been well paid for the trou- 
ble. The note of preparation had already been sounded early in the 
spring. The Regatta took place on July 4, and the Club had a gala 
time on that occasion. If the members continue to work harmon- 
iously they will probably be able to add a second story to their Club 
House next year. This will be a much needed improvement, as it 
will give them plenty of room for Club meetings and the entertain- 
ment of their friends. We understand that the " Ariels " have been 
invited to give them a benefit performance at an early date in aid of 
the building fund, and we hope this will be largely attended, as our 
young neighbors are deserving of success. 

The following are the officers for 1885: 

Geo. W. Heard, Commodore. 
Louis F. Burke, Vice-Commodore, 
Fred. B. Collins, Sec'y and Treas. 



102 HINTS ON CANOEING. 

HINTS ON CANOEING. 

No sport has more devoted adherents. Healthy, agreeable, ex- 
citing at times, full of novelty and variety, canoeing offers a large 
range of attractions to its votaries, and it is seldom that one who has 
once felt its spell recovers frem its general influence. There are 
many models and varieties of canoes, but they may all be reduced to 
two classes: the paddling canoe, of which the Rob Roy is the type, 
and the sailing canoe, of which the Shadow is perhaps the most gen- 
erally used in this country. Both carry sails and both are paddled, 
but the paddling canoe usually though not always carries less sail 
than the sailing canoe, and is more easily paddled, since she is smal- 
ler and lighter. Fourteen feet is the length of the great majority of 
canoes, though Rob Roys are twelve feet, and sailing canoes of six- 
teen are not uncommon. A fourteen-foot Rob-Roy ought not to 
weigh over fifty-five pounds, and a fourteen-foot shadow which weighs 
over seventy-five pounds is unnecessarily heavy. Canoes are usually 
built of wood, although cheap canoes can be built of canvas, and cer- 
tain advantages are claimed for those built of paper. The true ob- 
ject for which the canoe is built is cruising, Hence she is made so 
light that she can be carried around obstacles by the canoeists; so 
strong that she will bear the rough work of running shallow rapids; so 
seaworthy that she can brave the rough waters of large lakes; so com 7 
modious that her owner can sleep on board of her and carry plenty 
of stores, and so beautiful that every stranger will admire her and be 
proud to aid the lofty purpose of the canoeist. No canoe which is 
not fitted for cruising is a true canoe. She may Be a good sailboat, or 
a good paddling machine, but she is not a good canoe. 

The canoeist must, of course, learn how to paddle and how to sail; 
but paddling and sailing, to quote the words of an expert, "are only 
branches of canoeing. He must learn to be a boatbuilder, for he 
may at any time have to repair his own canoe himself. He must learn 
to be a sailmaker, for he will always be trying to make improvements 
in the rig of his canoe. He must learn to cook in which science 
are included the problems of building a fire with wet wood and of 
finding provisions in a wilderness. He must learn geography with a 
minuteness with which only the man can learn who personally explores 
streams on which no boat, except a canoe, has ever floated. He 
must learn the art of running rapids and detecting at a glance where 
the channel through them lies an art which, more than any other 
art or any known science, develops decision of character. He must 
learn that wet and cold and heat and damp are of no consequence, 
and can even be made sources of delight. And, above all, he must 
learn to bear with the infirmities of the canoeist who" cruises in com- 
pany with him, and never to shirk his rightful turn of duty in connec- 
tion with scouring the frying-pan." 



ATHLETIC NOTES AND FACTS. 198 

ATHLETIC NOTES AND FACTS. 

1885. 

The Season for Field Athletics tor 1885 really closed with the de- 
cision of the events on Election Day, and altogether the year has been 
one of general satisfaction to the Athletes and Clubs in general. 

The visit of L. E. Myers to England, where he again demon- 
strated his superiority over the runners of that country, had the effect 
of increasing the respect held there for bur Champions, and the retire- 
ment of the American phenomenon is another happening that wilt 
make the season memorable. Apart from Myers's participation in 
the events of the year, they were made interesting by the reorganiza- 
tion of the "Williamsburgh Athletic Club" under the name of the 
' Brooklyn Athletic Association;" the Myers Testimonial Athletic Ben- 
efit under the management of Mr. G- H. Badeau, President of the 
Williamsburgh A. C. ; Mr. G. W. Carr, President of the Manhattan 
A. C. ; Mr. ]. W. Edwards, President of the Staten Island A. C. , and 
Mr. William Wood, Treasurer of the New York A. C., and the "split" 
in the American Athletic Club, and the organization of the seceders 
under the name of the Olympic Athletic Club. Like all young Clubs, 
the Olympic has made steady progress, has produced many new men 
of note, and has secured a fair share of prizes offered in the open com- 
petitions. At present the Olympic is an Athletic Club, pure and sim- 
ple, witb none of the social element that slowly but surely causes a 
club to become athletic only in game. 

The social element in Clubs is like "dry rot, "and eats into the 
vitals of Athletic Clubs, and soon causes them to fail in the purpose 
for which they were organized. It was so with the old Harlem Ath- 
letic Club, which produced the fastest runners and walkers from 1876 
to 1880. It was so with the Scottish-American, the Astoria, the 
Short Hills, the Orion, Plainfield and other Clubs which are known 
by name only, if at all, to the Amateur Clubs of the present day. It 
has been noticable in the American Club for some time, is a prime 
factor in the New York, and is apparently entering the Manhattan. 
It is like an octopus that squeezes the life-blood out of the organiza- 
tion by burdening it with debt. Palatial club-houses are erected at 
great cost and money is spent in adorning them that, if used to beau- 
tify athletic grounds and improve tracks, would cause a wide-spread 
interest in athletic sports and further the development of the wind and 
muscles of American youths. About five years ago athletic sports 
were at their zenith, since then they have been on the decline. The 
youths who participate in health-giving competitions, as a rule, can- 
not afford the expense of membership to the so-called Athletic Clubs 
and they retire in favor of the wealthy young man whose sole claim 
to athletic distinction is his connection with a "high-toned" club. 




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