(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "History of Bedford and Somerset Counties, Pennsylvania, with genealogical and personal history"

C£h] 



attention: 
BAR CODE IS LOCATED 
INSIDE OF BOOK 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2009 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/historyofbedford03blac 



M.ca 



ALLEN COUNTY PUHLIC I IBnAHY 



3 1833 01201 4012 

Gc 974.801 B39b v. 3 

History of Bedford and 
Somerset Cos. , Pa. 



r 

Gc 

974.801 
B39b 
V.3 

[7050G33 



HISTORY 



OF 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET 

COUNTIES 



PENNSYLVANIA 



WITH GENEALOGICAL AND PERSONAL HISTORY 



BEDFORD COUNTY SOMERSET COUNTY 

BY BY 

E. HOWARD BLACKBURN WILLIAM H. WELFLEY 

Under the Editorial Supervision of 

Hon. William H. Koontz 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUVIB III 



THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 
NEW YORK :: CHICAGO 
1906 



UiBI COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 

FOm WAYNE, INDIANA 



Reprinted I983 for the Historica] and Genealogical Society 
of Somerset County, Inc. 









Printed in U.S.A. by 

Walsworth Publishing 
Marcel ine, MO. 6A658 

Regional Director: 



UI 



WAI-MWORTH 
DON MN.L*. MC 

SalwTi WV 7A426 
(304) 782 1179 



7050633 




j^'irC/^.^t^ 



Bedford and Somerset Counties. 



HON. ALEXANDER HAMILTON COFFROTH. 

Alexander H. Coffroth, for many years a leading figure in 
his profession and in the public life of the commonwealth dur- 
ing the dramatic period leading up to and culminating in the 
Civil war, was intensely active and broadly useful during his 
entire career. His abilities would undoubtedly have com- 
manded his entrance upon highest places had not his in- 
flexible devotion to principle held him to a political party which 
was constantly in the minority. 

General Coffroth was a native of Pennsylvania, born in 
Somerset, May 18, 1828. He was the youngest son of John 
and Maiy (Besore) Coffroth, the father born in Hagerstown, 
Maryland, of German descent, and the mother born in Green- 
castle. Pennsylvania, of English ancestry. These parents re- 
moved in 1808 from Greencastle to Somerset, where the father 
was among the early settlers, and the first to set up a store, 
bringing his merchandise from the east on pack-horses. Mr. 
Coffroth was a man of excellent character, and his wife was 
a model of womanhood, whose kindliness of dis]^osition, purity 
of conduct and energy of character were reflected in the son. 

Young Coffroth made of himself a fine exemi)lification of 
the truly self-made man in the best sense of that oft-abused 
term. Early thrown u])on his own resources, he entered upon 
and waged the battle of life in such masterly fashion as to 
not only provide himself an ample equipment for the large 
duties which were to devolve upon him, but to also develop to 
their fullest his fine natural gifts of soul and intellect. He 
attended the common schools, and out of the fruits of his own 
labors defrayed the expenses of a more liberal education in the 
old Somerset Academy. For a time he served efficiently as 
a school teacher, and with the means thus earned supported 
himself while preparing for his chosen ]irofession, the law. 
It was his great good fortune to attract the interest and friend- 
ship of the distinguished Jeremiah S. Black, in whose office 
and under whose preceptorshi]) he read industriously for some 
years, meantime and for five years, beginning at the age of 
eighteen, serving as editor of the Somerset Visitor, a Demo- 
cratic journal of no inconsiderable circulation and influence. 

Vol. Ill 1 



2 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Even at this youthful age the virile energy of his pen gave 
high promise for the future. Admitted to the bar of Somerset 
county in February, 1851, he at once entered upon a practice 
which rapidly expanded and shortly brought iiim to the front 
rank of his profession and into recognition throughout the 
state for ability, astuteness, resourcefulness and real devotion 
to the law out of respect for its own majesty. A tireless 
worker, by following a rigid system of self-control he labored 
throughout his professional career cheerfully and with un- 
ruffled temper. His practice, covering a period of more than 
a half century, was marked by scores of hotly contested cases, 
yet in all he was known as one of the best-hearted of men, al- 
ways urbane and kindly dispositioned. During all these many 
years there was scarcely a case of importance in his judicial 
district in which he did not bear a leading part. A cause celebre 
which will ever be famous in the legal annals of Pennsylvania 
was the trial of the Nicely brothers, charged with the murder 
of Herman Umberger, and in which he was chief counsel for 
the defense. Enduring evidence of his high legal abilities ex- 
ists in various volumes of the reports of the supreme court of 
Pennsylvania and the courts of the United States. His high 
place in the respect and confidence of his colleagues of the 
local bar is attested by his election to the presidency of the 
Somerset Bar Association at its organization, and his undis- 
puted continuance in that position up to his death — this, too, 
by a bar which has ever been ornamented by some of the 
brightest lawyers and jurists in the entire commonwealth. 

General Coff roth's political career was one of rare in- 
terest, and is in itself an epitomization of the beginning, dura- 
tion and end of that gigantic struggle which began with the 
free-soil controversy, found its fruits in civil war, and the con- 
summation in a more perfect union of all the states than ever 
before, and the marshaling of all their people under a restored 
banner in devotion to a common purpose and self-consecration 
to a higher national mission. He early developed such splen- 
did powers as a public speaker and such magnetic personality 
as a leader that in 1849, at the age of twenty-one, he was a 
member of the Democratic state convention in Pennsylvania. 
He was a member of the fateful and dramatic National Demo- 
cratic Convention of 1860, in Charleston, South Carolina, which 
witnessed the disruption of the party and made possible the 
election of Abraham Lincoln. In this body he made an earnest 
stand against the secession element of the party and pro- 
nounced for the Union, under any contingency whatever, with 
impassioned vehemence pleading for the nomination of ''the 
little giant," Stephen A. Douglas, as a leader who could al.one 
avert the horrors of civil war. He also sat in the convention 



BEDFORD AND SO^SIERSET COUNTIES 3 

in Baltimore, in 1872, which nominated Horace Greeley for the 
presidency, and was president of the Democratic state conven- 
tion in Harrisbnrc: in 1879. In 1884 he was a delegate in the 
convention in Chicago which nominated Grover Cleveland for 
president. ?Ie was frequently a member of the Democratic 
state committee, and in 1896 and 1900 was a presidential 
elector-at-large. He was a great admirer of William J. Bryan, 
and dnring the cam^iaigns in which that distinguished young 
statesman was a presidential candidate made many speeches 
in his behalf. 

It is, however. General Coffroth's congressional career 
which more particularly challenges the admiration of the present 
writer. In 1862 the general was selected as the candidate of his 
party for the congressional nomination in the district comprising 
the counties of Somerset, Bedford, Fulton, Franklin and Adams, 
being pitted against Hon. Edward McPherson, who had al- 
ready served one term, and had the advantage of thorough or- 
ganization. General Coifroth entered upon the campaign with 
great vigor and reduced the Republican majority in Somerset 
county from eighteen hundred to seven hundred, and wap 
elected by a plurality of five hundred and sixty votes in face 
of an adverse majority of three thousand. He was the young- 
lest member of the congress to which he was elected, but bore 
himself so creditably that he was re-elected in 1864. During 
these critical periods, while abandoning no principle, he con- 
stantly stood for the higher interests of the nation at large, 
•exhibiting the broadest patriotism and unflinching courage in 
the Union cause, and was among the very few Democrats who 
commanded the admiration and personal confidence and friend- 
ship of the illustrious war president and his cabinet. He served 
upon various important committees of congress, including those 
on examination of accounts of the treasury department, and in- 
valid pensions, and was known as one of the most industrious 
members of both bodies in which he sat. He was a real friend 
of the volunteer soldier, and he kept a large force of clerks- 
busily engaged in correspondence concerning their interests 
and the interests of his district and state. His personal stand- 
ing with the national administration enabled him to procure 
many beneficial enactments and departmental action, to the 
advantage of those for whom he labored. In the broader field 
of statesmanship he was a recognized force. In the thirty- 
eighth congress he cast his ballot in favor of the thirteenth 
amendment to the national constitution, providing for the abo- 
lition of slavery. In the heated discussion which preceded the 
vote, and in which he was brought into antagonism against the 
majority of his party associates and personal friends, he con- 
tended for the measure upon the ground that, to legally abolish 



4 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

the institution which had provoked the Civil war, a constitu- 
tional amendment must needs be submitted to the ])eople in 
order that in the future there should be no reopening of the 
question nor cause for legal controversy. General Coffroth 
was chosen from among Pennsylvania's distinguished sons 
then serving in both branches of the congress as a pallbearer 
at the funeral of the lamented martyr president, and it is a 
pathetic recollection with the writer of this narrative that he 
(the writer) witnessed the entrance of the mournful cortege 
to the old state house in Springfield, Illinois, that awful April, 
forty and one years ago. In 1866 he declined a renomination 
for a third term. In 1878 he was again elected to congress from 
the district then comprising the counties of Somerset, Cam- 
bria, Blair and Bedford — a Republican district with some thou- 
sands i^lurality — and in this contest he defeated General Jacob 
M. Campbell by a plurality of something more than three hun- 
dred. During this term he was chairman of the committee on 
invalid pensions, and of the select committee on payment of 
pensions and back pay, and was a member of the committee 
on enrolled bills. In his chairmanships he was most active, 
and to his industrious effort and legal ability was due the 
passage of many important pension bills. After serving with 
distinction and signal usefulness until the expiration of his 
term, March 4, 1881, he retired from public life and devoted 
himself entirely to his profession. 

A brilliant orator, devoid of rhetorical trickery, he was 
natural, earnest and forceful. His campaign speeches were 
vigorous, effective and, withal, abounded in humor and perti- 
nent illustration. His utterances in congress bore the stamp 
of a nobler eloquence. Active in the fiery discussions of the 
Civil war days, his speeches had the honest ring of heartfelt 
patriotism, and even those who were radically opposed to him 
listened with the respect which is to be accorded to the honest 
statesman. Easy and natural in address, graceful in gesture, 
possessing great fluency and highly persuasive in argument, he 
was recognized as one of the leaders of the house, and his 
speeches were admired for their good sense, propriety and 
genuine oratory. One which was widely reproduced by the 
Democratic press during a heated campaign was entitled "An 
honest and fair election, where the elector may deposit his 
ballot untrammeled and unawed, is the palladium of American 
liberty," and had for its introductory clause, "Trial by jury is 
defined by the renowned English commentator on common law 
to be the bulwark of English liberty." Tenderly sympathetic, 
he held to his friends as with hoops of steel, and his eulogiums 
at their passing away were touchingly beautiful. The annals 
of congress contain no more lofty and pathetic utterances 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 5 

than his memorial addresses on the life and character of Hon. 
Rush Clark and Hon. Fernando Wood, as the following): ex- 
tract from the first alluded to will reveal : 

"How sndden was his death! He was in the prime of 
life. Many years of distinction and honor were apparently 
before him. He was beloved because he was frank, candid and 
sincere, and looked with the eye of charity upon the failings 
and mistakes of men. He believed in the power of kindness, 
and spanned with divine sympathy the gulf that separates the 
fallen from the pure. We are called upon to mourn the loss 
of one who in a brief time accomplished much, but promising 
more and more if he had not been cut off so early in life. 

''Ne'er gathered the reaper fruit more fair; 
Never the shadows of dark despair 

Fell on a deeper woe. 
Gone from his task half complete. 
Gone from caresses kind and sweet. 

Into Death's arms of snow. 

"Mr. Speaker, T have no language to describe my feel- 
ings when I viewed his form enclosed in the casket of the dead. 
Handsome in death as he was pure in life. I remembered 
Shakespeare had defined death to be 'the blind cave of eternal 
night.' I trembled at the thought, but I quickly drew sweet 
and enduring consolation from the divine promise of the Sa- 
vior of mankind when He declared, 'In my Father's house 
are many mansions; if it were not so I would have told you. 
I go to prepare a place for you.' The poet has feelingly ex- 
pressed : 

"There is no death! The stars go down 

To rise upon some fairer shore, 
And bright in heaven's ,ieweled crown 
They shine forevermore." 

Reference has ]n-eviously been made to General Coffroth's 
long connection with the bar of Somerset county. With this in 
recollection is to be conceded the entire fittingness of his being 
chosen to deliver the address at the layiug of the cornerstone 
of the new court house on November 29, 1904. He said: 

"God's bi'ight sun smiles u])on a liai)i)y i)eople. Every 
pulsation of my being gushes forth in ha])])iiiess in partici])at- 
ing in the ceremony of laying the cornerstone of a large and 
magnificejit now court house, in wliicli justice and right will 
be iinpai'tially administered. How tliankful we should be to the 
two grand juries who recommended the building of this edifice 
and to the courageous commissioners and the honorable 



6 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

president .iudge wlio approved the grand juries' recommen- 
dation. 

"The history of the Somerset bar justifies the county in 
erecting a temple of justice equal in beauty and as commo- 
dious as any in Western Pennsylvania.. 

"This bar sent forth Jose]»h Williams, who was chief jus- 
tice of Iowa and then chief justice of Nebraska; Moses Hamp- 
ton, who was for a long i^eriod of time a very able president 
judge of Alleglieny county; Samuel G. Bailey, who was a judge 
in the State of Illinois, and Jeremiah S. Black, my preceptor, 
who was born under the shadow of the mighty Allegheny 
mountains, 

"Whose vast walls 

Have pinnacled in clouds their snowy scalps, 
And thronged eternity into icy halls 
Of cold sublimity. 

"He was president judge of the courts of this county, was 
a member and chief justice of the supreme court of the great 
State of Pennsylvania and afterward was attorney general 
and secretary of state under the administration of President 
James Buchanan; he then practiced law in the supreme court 
of the United States and soon convinced the people of this 
country that he was the greatest lawyer that was ever born 
in the United States. And in addition to these great lawyers 
many remained in the county who gained eminence and repu- 
tation as being very able men. Chauncey Forward and 
Charles Ogle, two great lawyers and statesmen, now sleep in 
the graveyard of this town, and the balance of the great law- 
yers I have named have left the shore touched by the myste- 
rious sea that never yet has borne on any wave the image of 
a homeward sail. All of these great men have 

"Gone from their country's august claim. 
Where they from, the lofty dome of fame 
Hung like a bright polar star. 

"The beautiful and magnificent building that is now 
being erected will be a monument to the great lawyers that have 
passed away, and to .the lawyers who now remain, and to those 
who may take our place in the course of years; it will be a 
building that our children, grandchildren and great-grandchil- 
dren will look upon with pride, because it will be a grand herit- 
age handed down from sire to son." 

General Coffroth was familiarly and affectionately known 
by his military title, having been a major-general of militia 
prior to the Civil war. He was a member of the Order of Odd 
Fellows for more than fifty years and of the Masonic fraternity 



BEDFORD AND SOxMERSET COUNTIES 7 

for nearly forty years. He was also for many years a mem- 
ber of the Order of Good Tem}3lars, and made many effective 
addresses in behalf of its principles and objects. He was a 
man of martial bearing, of free and companionable disposition, 
with a kindly heart and generous hand — attributes which tend 
to keep body and mind equable and well jooised — and was held 
in the highest regard, whether in professional, social or public 
life. He married, December 20, 1854, Miss Nora Kimmell, 
now deceased, who was an accomplished and liberally educated 
lady of Berlin, Pennsylvania, daughter of Jacob Kimmell. Of 
this marriage were born three sons and one daughter: A. 
Bruce, a practicing attorney at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; Jacob 
K., deceased, who was postmaster at Somerset during Presi- 
dent Cleveland's first administration; George A., deceased, 
who was a student at law, having studied, as did his elder 
brother, under his father; and Mary, who died in her fifth 
year. General Coffroth died SeptemlDer 2, 1906, at Markleton 
Sanitarium. He was in his seventy-ninth year. 

WILLIAM H. WELFLEY. 

The Welfley family is of German origin. The name is 
variously spelled, Woelfley, Wolfley, Wifley, and Welfley, as in 
our present dav. The name is the diminutive of Wolf — "the 
Little Wolf." 

The earliest known ancestor of 'the Somerset county branch 
of the family was David Welfley, and we first know of him as 
living in Frederick county, Maryland. It is quite certain that 
he was of German birth, but in what part of Germany he was 
born is not known. The traditions of some other branches that 
are known of point toward the kingdom of Wurtemberg as the 
country from which their ancestors came, and it is probable 
that David Welfley came from that country also, or from one 
of the other South German states. It is also extremely prob- 
able that all of the names are of a common stock. About 1785 
he w^as married to Magdalena Getzendiner, who was a widow 
with two sons and one daughter. In a list of early marriage 
licenses granted in Frederick county, Maryland, between 1778 
and 1781, are found these names: March 19, 1779, Henry 
Shreiver and Barbara Welfley; October 27, 1780, Christopher 
Wolfley and Phillipena Hildebrand. These are supposed to 
have been a brother and sister of David Welfley. But unless 
the Wolfley family of Page county, Virginia, are the descend- 
ants of Christopher Welfley, nothing is known of their fami- 
lies. 

The family of David Welfley consisted of two sons and a 
daughter. Peter Welfley, the eldest child, was born in the 
town of Frederick, May 25, 1787. Catharine Welfley was born 



8 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

in the same town, Noveml)er 28, 1789. Israel, the youngest 
son, was born at Cnniberland, Maryland, in 1792. His fatlier, 
David Welfley, i-enioved to that town in 1791. At Cnmherland 
lie followed his trade, which was that of a cooper. He lived in 
his own honse in Cnniberland, which is now known as No. 87 
North INlechanic street. His wife died in 1816, and some years 
afterwai'd he went to live with his son Peter at Salisbury, 
where he died in 1837 at the age of eighty-two years. In his 
religions belief he was a Lutheran. 

Peter Welfley learned the trade of potter, and about 1808 
located at Salisbury, where he lived all the remaining years of 
his life. Being possessed, for those days, of a good education, 
both in English and in German, it was usually his custom to 
teach school in the winter months, his teaching covering a 
period of about forty-five years. He was the first postmaster 
at Salisbury (Elk Lick), being appointed in 1812. In his poli- 
tics he was a follower of Thomas Jefferson (which very few of 
his descendants are). He was a lifelong member of the Lu- 
theran church, and for many years one of the elders of the 
Salisbury congregation. He married Eva Weimer in the 
autumn of 1810. She was the youngest daughter of Martin 
Weimer and his wife, Catharine Barbara, born Troutman. To 
them were born the following children: 

Israel Welfley, born December 8, 1811 ; died May 25, 1906. 
in his ninety-fifth year. 

Catharine Welfley (intermarried with Jeremiah Glotfelty), 
born February 14, 1814 ; died September 26, 1897, in her eighty- 
fourth vear. 

Jacob Welfley, born May 4, 1816; died February 10, 1849, 
in his thirty-third year. 

Henry Welfley, born October 14, 1818; died August — , 
1848, in his thirtieth year. 

Martin Welfley, born October 7, 1820; died December — , 
1854, in his thirty-fifth year. 

John Welfley, born August 7, 1823; died December 19, 
1898, in his seventy-fifth year. 

Balthazar Welfley, born December 25, 1825; died Septem- 
ber 11, 1903, in his seventy-eighth year. 

Margaret Welfley (intermarried with Samuel Lowry), 
bom July 20, 1829; died August — , 1898, in her sixty-ninth 
year. 

David Peter Welfley, born February 25, 1832 ; died Decem- 
ber 19, 1886, in his fifty-fifth year. 

Of these sons, John Welfley was a Lutheran minister. 
Balthazar Welfley at one time lived in Garrett county, Mary- 
land, and in 1877 was elected a member of the Maryland senate 



BEDFUKD AND SU.MEKSET COUNTIES « 

for a term of four years. David Peter Welfiey, the youngest 
sou, was a i)liy&ieian who stood well in his profession. 

Peter \\'eitley died April 5, 18G7, aged seventy-nine years, 
ten months and ten days. His wife, Eva, died January 3, 
1870, aged seventy-nine years and twenty days. 

Catharine W'eltley, daughter of David WelHey, married 
liobert ^leCleary at Cumberland, Maryland, where she lived 
and died. Israel WeMey, son of David, died without family. 

Jacob Weltley, second son of Peter Weltiey, married Eliz- 
abeth Arnold, a daughter of George Arnold, of Greenville, in 
1838. A family of four children was born to them, three of 
whom died in infancy. 

William Henry W^eltley, their second son, was born at Salis- 
bury, August 14, 1840. In his jjolitics Jacob Welfiey was a 
Whig, not following his father's footsteps in this particular 
In his religious life he was a member of the Lutheran church. 

In obtaining an education William H. Welfiey enjoyed 
only such advantages as the common schools of his native vil- 
lage afforded. Before reaching the age of sixteen years he be- 
gan teaching in the country schools, teaching seven terms in all. 
Having learned the photographer's art, he quit teaching school 
and made that business his life occupation, with but a single 
break of five months in 1868, which he spent on the eastern 
shore of Virginia in teaching a school of colored children un- 
der the auspices of the American Missionary Association, In 
1866 he located in Somerset, where he has since resided. In 
1874 he was elected a member of the board of school directors 
of Somerset borough, his service in this office covering a period 
of eight years. In February, 1906, he was elected burgess of 
Somerset borough for the eighteenth time, and with the close 
of his present term he will have served his town in that cai)acitv 
for twenty-four years, a record that, so far as is known, has 
been exceeded by only two or at most three other men in the 
entire state of Pennsylvania. In addition to this lie has also 
served three years as a member of the town council. His 
numerous elections to the office of burgess show that he has 
been a faithful public officer and that his service has been ac- 
ceptable to the people. It is generally admitted that the town 
of Somerset owes more to him for its splendid waterworks and 
sewerage systems than to any other one man. He was com- 
missioned as a notary public by Governor Hartrauft in 1876, 
and bas received a similar commission from every governor of 
Pennsylvania from that day to this. , 

As an Odd Fellow he has given his lodge twenty-five years 
of service as its treasurer. Politically, as a boy and a man, he 
has been an adherent of the l\ei)ublican party from the first 
days of its existence. 



10 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Mr. Welfley is of Revolutionary stock in both the paternal 
and maternal lines of his ancestry, two of his great-grand- 
fathers — Martin Weimer and George Arnold, Sr. — having 
served in the Revolutionary war, the latter in Captain Michael 
Boyer's company of Colonel Ludwig Weldner's German regi- 
ment of the Maryland line. He is also in the maternal line a 
great-great-grandson of George Steele, the ancestor of a nu- 
merous Bedford county family of that name. 

OGLE FAMILY. 

John Ogle (I) was the pioneer of the Ogle family in 
America. He came from England in 1666 and settled in New- 
castle, Delaware (then a part of Pennsylvania), where he held 
large grants of land under the Duke of York and afterward 
from the Penns. He had three sons, Thomas, John and 
William. 

(II) Thomas Ogle, eldest son of John Ogle, the founder of 
the family in this country, . was married to Mary Crawford, 
by whom he had five children, the eldest of whom was Thomas, 
born in Oglestown, Newcastle county, Delaware, in 1705, and 
he was the ancestor of Hon. Thomas M. Ogle, late of Wilming- 
ton, Delaware. By his second wife, Mrs. Elizabeth Graham, 
he had six children. His fourth child by his first wife was 
JosejDh. 

(III) Joseph Ogle, son of Thomas and Mary (Craw- 
ford) Ogle, married Sarah Winters, with whom he migrated to 
Frederickstown, Maryland, about 1746. He was commissioned 
a justice of the peace by his kinsman, Governor Samuel Ogle, 
when Frederick was organized as a county of Maryland in 
1748, and by virtue of that office was a member of the first 
county court of Frederick county. He had seen military serv- 
ice, and in the court records and elsewhere in the history of 
those days is called Major and sometimes Colonel Joseph Ogle. 
He owned lands on Owen creek, Frederick county, Maryland, 
aggregating about five thousand acres. He was father by his 
first wife, Sarah, to seven sons and three daughters. His first 
child was named John. 

(IV) John Ogle, eldest child of Joseph and Sarah (Win- 
ters) Ogle, at the death of his father in 1756 received by his 
last will and testament, recorded at Freedrick, Maryland, about 
five hundred acres of valuable land from off the old homestead. 
He married and had six sons. About 1785 he, with two of his 
sons, Joseph, the eldest, and John, the fifth son, migrated to 
Illinois, along with other families from Frederick and Wash- 
ington counties, Maryland. Among others was Captain Joseph 
Ogle, who as early as 1769 was living on the Ohio river, near 
the present city of Wheeling. Jacob Ogle (a sergeant in Jo- 



/ 




General Alexander Ogle 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 11 

sepli Ogle's company) was killed near Fort Henry, being am- 
bushed by the Indians, in 1777. Another brother, Captain 
James Ogle, was killed in 1782 in the unfortunate engagement of 
Colonel Crawford at Upper Sandusky, Ohio. The Ogles settled 
in what is now known as Monroe county, Illinois. The second 
son of Joseph Ogle was Charles; he lived in Elizabethtown, 
now Hagerstown, in 1794, and during that year severed his 
connection with the Mount Etna iron works, "of which he was 
a member and of whose business at the Mount Etna furnace he 
was superintendent. The same year he engaged in the general 
merchandise business as a member of the firm of Ogle & Hall. 
He was a vestryman in St. John's Protestant Episcopal church. 
The third son of John was Alexander. 

(V) Alexander Ogle, third son of John Ogle, born about 
1766, was a clerk in the grocery store of his uncle, James Ogle, 
which grocery store stood on the corner of a two or four acre 
lot, in the center of which stood his uncle's dwelling, being the 
same house in which Major Joseph Ogle had lived— the old 
homestead on Owen's creek, Frederick county, Maryland. With 
others of the family and friends, the Cresaps, the Wetzels, the 
Poes and other Frederick county people, he went westerly to 
Washington county, Maryland, where, after the Revolutionary 
war, they congregated in the neighborhood of Oldtown, from 
which place Alexander removed to Somerset county, Pennsvl- 
vania, about the time of the formation of the county in 1795. 
Here he almost immediately sprang into prominence. He was 
repeatedly commissioned as prothonotary, register and record- 
er; was a representative in the assembly and state senator and 
member of congress. He was commissioned by Grovernor Sny- 
der in 1811 as major-general of the state militia, and also bv 
Governor Shultz, August 3, 1828, to the same office. As the 
representative of Somerset county, in one of his speeches de- 
livered in the senate of Pennsylvania he referred to his con- 
stituents as the ''frosty sons of thunder," in reference to the 
high altitude of this mountain county, an appellation by which 
the people of Somerset county have ever since been known and 
in which they take peculiar pride. Alexander Ogle was a tall 
man of commanding presence, finely chiseled features; gener- 
ally wore a red vest and ruffled shirt. He was a Democrat and 
a great admirer of General Andrew Jackson. He was the sub- 
ject of a character sketch by Dr. William Elder, of Philadel- 
phia, published in his book. "Periscopics." 

He married Mary Williams, of Bedford county, distin- 
guished for her beauty and Christian amiability. She was one 
of the "three Marys" by whose efforts the" first Christian 
(Disciple) church was started in Somerset. Alexander and 
Mary Ogle had two children, Charles and Alexander. 



1-2 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

(\'I) Alexander Ogle, Jr., son of Alexander and Mary 
(Williams) Ogle, was brigade general of the militia and cap- 
tain of the Inde])endent Blues. He was prothonotary, register 
and recorder for a number of years and a member of the legis- 
lature. His l)rother Charles was distinguished as a lawyer and 
a member of congress, where he delivered his si)eecli in 1840 
on the "Royal S])lendor of the President's Palace," so eiTective 
in the Harrison camitaigu of that year. 

Alexander Ogle, Jr., married Charlotte, daughter of Jacob 
Schneider and wife. Jacob Schneider's brother Adam owned 
most of the land in Somerset borough north of ^Nfain street, and 
conveyed to the county the lot where the court house and jail 
are erected, and to the borough the lot where the academy or 
higli school stands. Alexander Ogle and wife, Charlotte, were 
the ]iarents of six children: Andrew Jackson; Charles Henry, 
graduated at West Point, member of New York cavalry regi- 
ment and died during the Civil war; Mary, married Judge F. 
M. Kimmel ; Charlotte, married Ross Forward; Louisa, mar- 
ried Hon. Edward Scull, for many years editor of the Somerset 
Herald, collector of United States revenues and member of 
congress. 

(VIT) Andrew Jackson Ogle, son of Alexander and Char- 
lotte (Schneider) Ogle, born in Somerset, Pennsylvania, March 
25, 1822, attended college at Cannonsburg, Pennsylvania, read 
law with Hon. Jeremiah S. Black, who was his In-other-in-law. 
In 1845 he was elected ])rothonotary and in 1848 to congress, 
representing the district com]^osed of Somerset, Fayette and 
Green counties. Pie was a AVhig in ])olitics, and in the election 
of 1850 the Democratic majorities of Fayette and (Ireeu coun- 
ties elected his conqjetitor, Hon. John L. Dawson, of Fayette 
county. He was then ap])ointed charge de affaires to Den- 
mark by President Fillmore, ])ut died suddenlv of a]io])lexy, 
Octol^er 14, 1852, at his home in Somerset. He was six feet 
tall, fair com])lexion, light brown hair and blue eyes. He was 
unusual as a stum]) orator, ]io])ular and beloved by all who 
knew him. His untimely death cut short what ])romised to be 
a bi'illiant ))olitical career. 

lie married llan-iet Forwai'd, daugiiUM' of Hon. Chauncey 
Forward, who was a lawyer of ])roininence. a member of con- 
gress and a brother of Hon. Walter Forward, who was a judge 
in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and secretary of the treasury in 
the cabinet of F'residcnt Tyler. Tlie children born to Andrew 
Jackson and Ifai-riet (Foi'ward) Ogle were: Maud, married 
Hon. Francis J. Kooser, ]iresent president judge of Somerset 
county; Alexanch'r. who graduated at AVest l*oint in 1872 and 
died as fii-st lieutenant in 11)01 ; and John 0. Ogle. 

(VII [) John (1. Ogle, youngest son of Andrew Jackson 





J. L. PugK 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 13 

and Harriet (Forward) Ogle, was bom at Somerset, Pennsyl- 
vania, March 25, 1851. He attended the public schools, Millers- 
ville State Normal and Bethany College, West Virginia. He 
then read law with his brother-in-law, Hon. F. J. Kooser, was 
admitted to the bar in 1873 and his since continuously prac- 
ticed law. At present he is associated with General W, H. 
Koontz as Koontz & Ogle. He has never held office, but takes 
an interest in })olitics and lias several times been chairman of 
the Republican county committee. 

Mr. Ogle married, in 1875, Cora Baer, daughter of Hon. 
William J. Baer, who was president judge of the counties of 
Somerset and Bedford from 1881 to 1891. Mr. and Mrs. Ogle 
have two children, Hallie and Elizabeth. 

PUGH FAMILY. 

**An honest tale speeds best when plainly told." 
The Pugh family of Somerset county, including Hon. James 
L. Pugh, attorney at law, of Somerset borough, and subject of 
this sketch, are all descended from the great-grandfather who 
emigrated from Wales and settled in the state of New Jersey 
some time prior to the American Revolution. The Pughs are 
known to be of Welsh descent and not unlikely from the Welsh 
philologist and antiquarian, William Owen Puglie,. retaining the 
final letter e, hence the orthography ''Pugh" is believed to be 
more nearly correct than "Pew," which is the English spell- 
ing of the name. The change in the spelling of the name was 
made during the earlier school days of James L. Pugh and is 
believed to be the correct method and will be used in the writ- 
ing of this sketch. The change in orthogra]ihy seems to have 
been a matter of regret among the older members of the fam- 
ily, but it is now so well established that it seems desirable to 
continue the "Pugh." The great-grandfather, James Pugh, 
was an ardent Tory during the War of the Revolution, and it 
is said did not fare very well from the hands of the colonists. 
He resided in Jersey Shore, state of New Jersey, and had three 
sons, James, Nathan and William. There is an old log-book in 
the family that would seem to indicate that he was a mariner 
at one time; some say sea ca])tain, but this is doubtful. 

James Pugh, the grandfather of James L. Pugh, born Janu- 
ary 23, 1764, emigrated from the state of New Jersey to Somer- 
set county, which was then a ])art of Bedford county, about 
1780. Tie was on his way to Greene county when James Black, 
the grandfather of Hon. Jeremiah S. I^)lack, stop})ed him on 
his way and induced him to remain in what was then known as 
"The Glades." Here lu* locatxnl and remained for some time; 
becoming dissatisfied, he concluded to remove to the state of 
Kentucky', whither he went on a pack-horse trail in the early 



14 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

spring of the year. Not liking the country, he returned to Som- 
erset connty the same year and located in Stony Creek town- 
ship. Pie was married to Mary Hnlet, of Trenton, New Jer- 
sey, and had tliree sons, James, Boaz and Hnlet. He continued 
to reside in Stony Creek township until the date of his death 
in February, 1841. His wife, Mary Hulet Pugh, an active mem- 
ber of the Disciple church, died April 21, 1844. James and Boaz 
Pugh continued to reside in Stony Creek township, and Hulet 
Pugh. born Januarv 4, 1788, the eldest, moved to the state of 
Ohio. 

James Pugh, father of James L. Pugh, born January 8, 
1794, married Rachael Smith, of German descent, who was born 
July 7, 1803. They were married May 14, 1832. They had 
eight children, four sons and four daughters: Rosanna, married 
to Alexander Saylor, deceased ; Ephraim, deceased ; Mary, mar- 
ried to Oliver Knepper, deceased; Elizabeth, deceased, married 
to Charles F. Rayman, deceased; Nancy, deceased, married to 
Josiah J. Long, deceased; Timothy, deceased; James L. and 
Boaz. James Pugh was a strict and consistent member of the 
Dunkard church. He died February 12, 1875. Rachael Pugh 
was a faithful member of the Lutheran church. She died April 
28, 1882. They were buried in the old family graveyard on the 
old James Pugh farm in Stony Creek township, fulfilling the 
text, ' ' That I may be buried by the grave of my father and of 
my mother. ' ' 

Boaz Pugh was born May 11, 1796; was married to Susan- 
nah Weigle in January, 1822; she was born August 23, 1800. 
They had seven children : Hulet, deceased ; Sarah Matilda, mar- 
ried to William H. Coleman, deceased ; Delilah, deceased, mar- 
ried Emanuel Auman, deceased ; Mary, married to Samuel Fox, 
deceased; Samson, deceased; John; and Rachael, married to 
John Trent, deceased. Boaz Pugh was a consistent member 
of the Disciple church and died March 5, 1876, and his wife, 
Susannah Pugh, belonged to same church, died March 5, 1886. 
They are buried in the old family graveyard. "When the dead 
are at rest, let their remembrance rest." 

Rev. B. F. Pugh, the youngest son of James Pugh, whose 
family name is Boaz, was born August 4, 1847. He attended 
the country schools and when a mere boy enlisted, August 21, 
1864, Company K, Two Hundred and Fourth Regiment, Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, in the Union army of the War of the Re- 
bellion. He did good service as a soldier and was honorably 
discharged at the close of the war. He returned home, attended 
the normal schools of the county, taught school, entered the 
Missionary Institute, now Susquehanna University, at Selins- 
grove, Snyder county, Pennsylvania, studied theology, pre- 
pared himself for the Lutheran ministry under Dr. H. Zeigler 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 15 

and graduated in June, 1^77. His first charge after being or- 
dained a Lutheran minister, June 30, 1877, of the Evangelical 
Lutheran church, was at Orangeville, Illinois, where he met his 
future wife, Frances Adaline Cadwell. They were married 
September 10, 1878, at Elmira, New York. He is now located 
at Ottawa, Kansas, and writes: 

"It is time to be old, 
To take in sail." 

James L. Pugh, son of James and Rachael Pugh, next to 
the youngest son, was born October 14, 1844, in Somerset town- 
ship, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, on the farm of his father, 
about seven miles east of the town of Somerset, in what is 
known locally as ''Sheep's Ridge." His early education was 
obtained from the common schools of the neighborhood, which 
were of the lowest and poorest grade. He attended a normal 
school at Somerset in charge of Professor J. J. Stutzman and 
commenced teaching school when he was but fourteen years of 
age; attended normal school and taught several terms of school. 
In 1860 the Civil war cloud, which had hung over the nation for 
some time, broke out in all its fury, and during the summer of 
1862 he enlisted in the Union army and went forth to battle 
for his country. When he was but seventeen years of age. on 
August 14, 1862, he was mustered into service, Company D, One 
Hundred and Thirty-third Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. 
He was engaged in some of the hardest fought battles of that 
great civil conflict, including the battles of Fredericksburg and 
Chancellorsville, being wounded in the former battle three 
times. At the expiration of his first term of enlistment he re- 
turned home and taught one term of school. The war not hav- 
ing ended, he enlisted again on August 21, 1864, in Company 
K, Two Hundred and Fourth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers, known as the Fifth Heavy Artillery, being a corporal in 
that company. He did good active military service until the 
close of the war, when he was honorably discharged. Upon his 
return home he continued to attend the normal schools of the 
county and taught school during the winter term, which was 
then only four months. In 1867-68 he taught school in the state 
of Maryland, where the term was longer and the wages better. 
During the sirring and summer months of these years he at- 
tended the State Normal School at Millorsville, Pennsylvania. 
He returned to his native county and taught normal school suc- 
cessively for several terms; was principal of the high school 
at Somerset and Berlin, and took great interest in the schools 
and teachers' institutes of the county. On December 15, 1870, 
state superintendent of common schools, Professor J. P. Wick- 
ersham, appointed him county superintendent of the public 



16 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

schools of the county, which position he held and filled credit- 
ably for two years; ahont this time he commenced the study of 
the law, read for some time in the olhce of Hon. A. H. Coffroth 
at Somerset and later entered the law department of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, graduating in 1874. He returned to Som- 
erset county and was admitted to the bar on May 14, 1874. He 
at once had an active and lucrative practice. In 1875 he was 
elected district attorney, serving in that capacity for a term of 
three years with credit and ability. During the legislative ses- 
sions of 1887-89 he was a member of the house of representa- 
tives, where he made a creditable record as a legislator. Since 
that time Mr. Pugh has applied himself assiduously to his legal 
practice, which has become large and lucrative, especially in 
the Orphans' court and commercial branches of the practice. 
He is an active member of the Pennsylvania Bar Association 
and is reporter for the district reports from Somerset county. 
He possesses one of the finest libraries within the community, 
including many rare and costly volumes, in all amounting to 
over three thousand volumes. On the walls of the three rooms 
of his office in which this well selected library of books is kept 
are to be found a large number of portraits of members of the 
state and local bar, supreme judges and noted national and 
world-wide famous characters. Mr. Pugh seems to be wedded 
to his books, as he is unmarried. In his political life he has al- 
ways been a Republican. In religion he is a member of the 
Episcopal church. He is a member of various societies and is 
a past master Mason by service in 'that order. Mr. Pugh is a 
plain, unassuming man, and views matters from none but a 
practical standpoint. He has been highly successful in his 
chosen profession. He is a director and vice-president of the 
First National Bank of Somerset, a director of the Somerset 
Trust Company, and a large stockholder in both of these con- 
cerns. 

' ' Time is hastening on, and we 

What our fathers are shall be, — 

Shadow-shapes of memory." 

THE SCULL FAMILY. 

The Scull family has been identified with Pennsylvania 
ever since the establishment of the Colony. William Penn came 
in October, 1682. and on the 4th dav of the following Decem- 
ber the first assembly met at Chester, passed Penn's *' Great 
Law" and adopted his first "Frame of Government." On the 
10th of September, 1685, the ship ''Bristol Merchant," John 
Stevens, master, arrived at Chester, having among her pass- 
engers Nicholas Scull, the progenitor of the Pennsylvania fam- 
ily bearing his name. On the 9th of July, 1688, he purchased 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 17 

400 acres of land at a i)lace named "Springfield Manor," about 
ten miles from Pliiladeli)hia, and there he resided until his 
death occurred, in 1703. He left a family of six sons, but, trac- 
ing the descent of only that portion of the family identified with 
Westmoreland and Somerset counties, the next in line is Nicho- 
las Scull, the surveyor, eldest son of Nicholas Scull, the colonist, 
first named above. 

Nicholas Scull, the surveyor, was born in 1686. Being a man 
of studious habits he acquired a knowledge of the Indian lan- 
guage and was employed by the government as interpreter. He 
resided in Philadeljihia, following his occupation of surveyor. 
In October, 1744. he was commissioned slieriff of Philadelphia 
county, and held the office for several years, or until he was 
appointed surveyor general of the Colony on June 14, 1748. 
This office he filled until the time of his death, which occurred 
in 1761. In 1759 he published a large scale map of the improved 
parts of Pennsylvania and Maryland, prepared chiefly from his 
own surveys. It was the first correct map of the province 
published and embraced more than half of the present area of 
the state. A copy of this map is preserved in the library of the 
Historical Society in Philadelphia. He was a friend of Benja- 
min Franklin and a member of his celebrated literary and de- 
bating club, the ''Junto." In his autobiography Franklin 
speaks of him as "a man who loved books and sometimes made 
a few verses." 

Nicholas Scull was married in 1708 to Abagail Heap and they 
had a family of six sons and four daughters. One of the daugh- 
ters, Mary, married William Biddle and was the mother of Com- 
modore Nicholas Biddle, a distinguished American naval officer 
in the Revolutionary war. One of their sons, Jasper Scull, born 
December 3, 1718, was the father of John Scull, born in 1765, 
and who went to Pittsburgh, then in Westmoreland county, in 
1786, preceded by a press and an outfit of types to establish the 
Pittsburgh GazeMe, which first appeared on July 29th of 
that year and has maintained an uninterrupted existence to the 
present day. 

Pittsburg, in 1786, was a town of less than one thousand in- 
habitants, but many things indicated a prosperous future for it. 
The Indian title to all the lands in the northwest section of 
Pennsylvania, including what is now Allegheny county, had re- 
cently been extinguished by "the purchase of 1784." The 
treaty of peace with Great Britain, terminating the Revolution- 
ary war and aclaiowledging the independence of the United 
States, had been signed September 3, 1783. New York, Vir- 
ginia, Massachusetts and Connecticut had ceded to the confed- 
eration their respective claims to the vast Northwest Territory 
which was about to be thrown open to settlement under the aus- 

Vol. Ill 2 



18 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

pices of the general government, and Pittsburgh, at the ''forks 
of the Ohio," was the gateway toward which converged Brad- 
dock's road and Forbes' road, the shortest, most direct and best 
roads yet opened between the more populous regions of the east 
and what was then called "the back country." Situated thus at 
the western extremity of two overland roads, where the Monon- 
gahela and Allegheny rivers met to form the Ohio, Pittsburgh 
was marked out as the point at which the commerce between the 
east and west must meet for interchange and trans-shipment, 
and the discerning mind of the young editor of the Pittsburgh 
Gazette foresaw clearly that the town at the head of the Ohio 
must become a centre of distribution and manufacture for the 
western country. In the fourth issue of his paper, August 26, 
1786. he declares "this town must in future time be a place of 
great manufacturing, indeed the greatest on the continent, or 
perhaps in the world. It is a prospect of this, with men of re- 
flection, which renders the soil of this place so valuable." 

Here, then, John Scull set up his press, and on the 29th 
day of July, 1786, published the first newspaper printed west 
of the Allegheny mountains. He continued to edit and publish 
it for thirty years, until he was succeeded by his son, in 1816. 
The Gazette press also printed books, school books, cate- 
chisms, the Pittsburgh Almanac, and one of its earliest produc- 
tions was Brackenridge's "Modern Chivalry." The Pitts- 
burgh Gazette favored the adoption of the National Consti- 
tution and supported the policy of Washington's administra- 
tion, including the suppression of the AAHiiskey Insurrection in 
1794. For his attitude in that first crisis of the young republic, 
Mr. Scull's office was mobbed, but he fortunately sustained no 
personal injury nor damage to his property. The Gazette 
upheld the principles of the Federalist party during the period 
of his ownership, and was always a leader in and supporter of 
any movement for the intellectual, moral or material benefit of 
the community. When the Gazette first began publication 
there was no postoffice in Pittsburgh, and no postal service. 
The transmission of letters was by private messenger or the 
courtesy of friendly travelers. An office was, however, estab- 
lished in the following year mth John Scull as the first post- 
master. He continued in the office until 1797. In addition to his 
newspaper and printing business he had other public interests. 
He was one of the founders and the president of the Farmers' 
and .Mechanics' Bank, 1814-1819, and one of the incorporators 
of the Western University of Pennsylvania. 

In 1789 John Scull married Mary, daughter of Colonel John 
Irwin, for whom the town of Irwin was named. Colonel Irwin 
was born in Ireland in 1739, came to America in 1762 and en- 
gaged in the Indian trade. He sided with the Patriots in the 



I 

I 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 19 

Revolutionary war and npon the reorganization of the sub- 
sistence department of the Continental army, under the act of 
congress of Jnne 10, 1777, was in that year appointed depnty 
commissary general of issues and continued to serve in that 
capacity nntil the close of hostilities. He subsequently served 
in the state legislature and as associate judge of Westmoreland 
county. He died at ''Brush Hill" farm, February 5, 1822, and 
his tomb is near the old stone mansion built by him, in which 
some of his descendants still live. His wife, who was Elizabeth 
Bingham, the daughter of a British army officer, died June 3, 
1818, at the age of seventy years, and her tomb is in the same 
plot of ground as that of her husband. Mr. Scull continued to 
reside in Pittsburgh until 1826, when he removed to his farm, 
called ''Highland," situated near the town of Irwin and ad- 
joining "Brush Hill." He died at "Highland," February 8, 
1828. His widow survived until September 9, 1842, and rests 
beside him in the old Long Run churchyard, near Irwin. 

The fruit of the union of John Scull and Mary Irwin was 
two sons and one daughter. The eldest son, Edward Scull, re- 
ceived a liberal education, studied medicine at the University 
of Pennsylvania, and attended the lectures of the famous physi- 
cians, Doctor Benjamin Rush and Doctor Caspar Wistar. He 
was surgeon in the Volunteer army under General William Hen- 
ry Harrison, and was with him in the Tippecanoe campaign and 
battle in 1811. He continued to serve with the Volunteers until 
he was appointed surgeon in the regular army. He was sur- 
geon of the First United States Infantry and stationed at Pass 
Christian, Mississippi, where he died November 28, 1815. 

Elizabeth Scull, the daughter of John and Mary Irwin 
Scull, was born in Pittsburgh, February 23, 1792, and was 
twice married. First to Ephriam Blaine, of Brownsville, 
Pennsylvania, by whom she had two children, Edward Scull 
and John Scull Blaine. Her second husband was William Ward 
and they were the parents of three daughters, Catharine, Mary 
and Julia. 

John Irwin Scull, the second son of John and Mary Irwin 
Scull, was born in Pittsburgh, October 30, 1790, and was named 
in honor of his maternal grandfather. He was educated at the 
Pittsburgh Academy and Princeton College, studied law and 
was admitted to the Allegheny county bar. He was a gentle- 
man of high character, affable manners, an accomplished class- 
ical scholar and a vigorous writer. In 1816 he became associat- 
ed with his father in editing the Pittsburgh Gazette, and as 
his father's other interests made increasing demands upon his 
time, the latter ultimately withdrew from the paper, the son 
continuing in sole charge until May, 1818. In that month a 
partnership was formed between John Irwin Scull and Mor- 



20 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

gan Neville, who jointly edited the paper and published it bi- 
weekly until jNTarch, 1820. His maternal grandmother having 
died on the 3rd of June, 1818, and the health of his grandfather 
beginning to fail, he withdrew from Pittsbu]-gh to "Brush 
Hill" in order to minister to the comfort" and happiness of his 
aged relative, who had designated him as heir to the "Brush 
Hill" estate. Meantime John Irwin Scull had, in 1817, been 
united in marriage to Anna Bonnet Spencer, daughter of Rob- 
ert and Sarah (Ewalt) Spencer. He continued to reside at 
"Brush Hill" until his premature and sudden death, which 
occurred on the 21st of January, 1827. His body lies in the 
old Long Run churchyard. 

Anna Spencer Scull, with her children, continued to reside 
at "Brush Hill" until 1868, when she removed to Pittsburgh, 
and subsequently in 1882 she made her home with her brother, 
Captain William Spencer, in Steubenville, Ohio, where she died 
March 13, 1890, at the great age of ninety-four years. She 
was a woman of lofty character, of many accomplishments and 
of sweet and amiable disposition. It was her custom for many 
years and until her death to spend the summer months with 
her son Edward in Somerset, where she is still pleasantly re- 
membered by many of the older residents. The children of 
John Irwin and Anna Spencer Scull were five sons and one 
daughter. Two of the sons, John Irwin and James, died young. 
Those who survived their parents were Edward, Spencer Fitz- 
roy, Anna Marie and George Ross. The daughter, Anna Marie 
Scull, was born at "Brush Hill," November 1, 1821, and al- 
ways made her home with her mother. She was a woman of 
many virtues, finely educated and accomplished and greatly be- 
loved by those who knew her. Next to her devotion to her 
widowed mother her chief pleasure was in doing good to others. 
She died in Steubenville, Ohio, August 24, 1898. 

Shortly after the death of their father, Spencer F. Scull 
and his elder brother, Edward, were placed in charge of their 
maternal uncle. Captain William Spencer, in Steubenville, Ohio, 
where they were educated at the Steubenville Academy. Spen- 
cer F. Scull was born in l*ittsburgh, November 6, 1819. Upon 
reaching maturity he was employed for a short time as clerk 
in a mercantile establishment in Steubenville. He next be- 
came clerk on the "Ilibernia," one of the famous steamboats 
of the Pittsburgh and Cincinnati Packet Line. He afterwards 
commanded and was part owner of steamboats operating on 
the '.^hio, Mis.-issipiu and Alabama rivers. When railroad con- 
struction began to make progress in the west he, in 1854, en- 
tered the service of the Steubenville and Indiana railroad, Jiow 
part of the I^ennsylvaiiia system, becoming successive! v sec- 
retar}', paymaster, auditor and general passenger agent. He 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 21 

continued in tlie service of the Pennsylvania Company until 
a short time before his death, which took place March 19, 1896, 
at his residence in Pittsburgh. He was a great lover and com- 
poser of music and a skillful performer upon several instru- 
ments, the chief of which was tlie church organ. In his younger 
days a number of his songs were published and enjoyed the 
usual ephemeral popularity of such works. Most of his music 
was of a sacred character and for many years was almost ex- 
clusively used in the service at old St. Paul's Protestant Epis- 
copal Church in Steubenville. In the month of June, 1850, 
Spencer F. Scull was married to Amanda Jane Bird, daughter 
of Joseph and Elizabeth (Hyde) Bird, of Philadelphia, .Penn- 
sylvania. His widow still survives and now resides at Roland 
Park, Baltimore, Maryland. 

George Ross Scull was born at "Brush Hill" on June 15, 
1826, and that was his only home during life, and there he 
died February 29, 1892. There too some of his children con- 
tinue to reside and his grandchildren to visit. The old roof 
tree has thus sheltered five successive generations of the same 
family, which is somewhat unusual in this land of changing 
habitations. George Ross Scull was for a time engaged in 
the transportation business, but about the time of his marriage 
entered the service of the Westmoreland Coal Company, serv- 
ing successively as paymaster, purchasing agent and superin- 
tendent, and continued in that service until his death. On the 
16th of July, 1863, he was united in marriage to Isabel War- 
ren, daughter of Joseph and Ann (Spear) Warren, of the 
family of the revolutionary patriot. General Joseph AVarren, 
who was killed at the battle of Bunker Hill. She died at 
'^ Brush Hill" December 29, 1880. The children of George 
Ross and Isabel Warren Scull were two sons and five daugh- 
ters. Joseph Warren Scull, the eldest son, married Louise Guf- 
fey and resides in Bellevue, Pennsylvania. He is at present 
purchasing agent of the Pressed Steel Car Company of Pitts- 
burgh. The second son, George Ross Scull, married Elizabeth 
Davis and resides in Irwin, Pennsylvania, where he is en- 
gaged in mercantile business. Frank Scull, the second daugh- 
ter, married John M. Stauffer and with him resides in Scott- 
dale, Pennsylvania, where he is engaged in the banking busi- 
ness. Isabel AVarren Scull, the third daughter, married Goldwin 
W. Starrett, of New York city, who, with his brothers, carries 
on an engineering and contracting business in that city. The 
eldest daughter, Alice Scull, with her younger sisters, Amy 
and Shirley, resides at "Brush Hill." 

Edward Scull, the oldest son of John Irwin and Anna 
(Spencer) Scull, was born in Pittsburgh, February 5, 1818. 
He received a liberal education, engaged for a short time in 



22 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

mercantile pursuits, read law in the office of the late United 
States Senator Cowan in Green sburg and was admitted to the> 
bar in 1844. He removed to Somerset in 1846 and practiced 
his profession until 1857, in which year he was elected protho- 
notary of Somerset county for a term of three years. He be- 
gan the publication of the Somerset Herald and Whig in 
1852, and continued to publish. and edit it for fifty years. Mr. 
Scull was a writer of great clearness and force and his paper 
was an influential factor in shaping the political allegiance of 
the western part of the state. He was among the first to es- 
pouse the principles of the Republican party and was on its 
first presidential electoral ticket in the Fremont and Dayton 
campaign in 1856. He was appointed collector of internal rev- 
enue for the sixteenth district of Pennsylvania by President 
Lincoln on the 4tli of March, 1863, was removed by President 
Johnson in September, 1866, when the latter was engaged in 
his struggle with the Republican majority in congress. When 
General Grant became president in 1869 he was appointed as- 
sessor of internal revenue for the sixteenth Pennsylvania dis- 
trict, and in March, 1873, at the beginning of General Grant's 
second term as president, he was for the second time appointed 
collector. This position he continued to fill until 1883, when 
the sixteenth district was consolidated with several others, ow- 
ing to the abolition of many of the internal taxes and the con- 
sequent reduction in the personnel of the internal revenue serv- 
ice. He was a delegate to the Republican National Convention 
held at Baltimore in June, 1864, that put in nomination Abra- 
ham Lincoln for president and Andrew Johnson for vice-presi- 
dent. He was also a delegate to the convention held at Cin- 
cinnati in June, 1876, that nominated Hayes and Wheeler, to 
the convention held at Chicago in June, 1884, that nominated 
Blaine and Logan, and an alternate at large to the convention 
held at Chicago in June, 1880, that nominated Garfield and 
Arthur. In 1886 he was elected to represent his district in the 
national congress, re-elected in 1888 and in 1890, serving in 
the fiftieth, fifty-first and fifty-second congresses. 

In addition to the distinguished positions held by him, Mr. 
Scull also performed his duty to his townsmen by repeatedly 
serving as a member of the town council and as a school di- 
rector. Until the close of his life his interest in politics was 
keen and profound and his counsel was still sought by the state 
leaders of his party. It is probable that no man before him 
ever held so predominant an influence, during so protracted a 
period, in the political and public affairs of Somerset county as 
was accorded to him. He was not a man who could influence 
the multitude by the grace and art of the orator, nor would he 
descend to the ignoble devices of the demagogue, but he com- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 33 

pelled confidence and esteem by the innate force of lofty char- 
acter, combined with ability of a high order and an open, upright 
life. In all the circumstances of his career, as a public official, 
as a citizen, as a husband and father, and in his intercourse with 
friends and neighbors, he bore himself with a dignity and court- 
esy that inspired respect and won affection. His life was simple 
and open as the day. All his incomings and outgoings were 
known. He walked up and down before his people for four 
score years without fear and without reproach, and at the end 
of his days was sincerely mourned as a loving husband, an af- 
fectionate father and a good citizen. 

Apart from his public duties Mr. Scull carried on the print- 
ing business, a love of which he had inherited from his father 
and his grandfather, and he continued to edit and publish the 
Herald. In 1889, with his son George and a few associates, he 
organized the First National Bank of Somerset, the first of its 
kind in the county. He became its first president, and continued 
as such until his death, July 10, 1900. 

Edward Scull was twice married, and the father of four- 
teen children, six sons and eight daughters. His first wife was 
Sarah Jane Marchand, daughter of Daniel and Jane (Irwin) 
Marchand, of Westmoreland county. The first marriage took 
place in 1841. The children of this union were Emily Connell 
Scull and Sarah Spencer Scull. Their mother died June 8, 
1845, and was buried in the old Long Run churchyard. On the 
16th of February, 1848, Mr. Scull was united in marriage to 
Louise Ogle, daughter of General Alexander and Charlotte 
(Schneider) Ogle. The second Mrs. Scull bore her husband 
six sons and six daughters. His eldest daughter, Emily Connell 
Scull, was married December 7, 1865, to John H. Boyts, of Som- 
erset county, late captain of Company C, One Hundred and 
Forty-second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers. He was a 
gallant officer and was severely wounded at the battle of Fred- 
ericksburg, Virginia, during the Civil war, December 13, 1862. 
Being discharged from service on account of his wound he was 
elected register and recorder of Somerset county. He subse- 
quently engaged in mercantile and commercial pursuits in Pitts- 
burgh, where he died January 8, 1900. His widow now resides 
at "Brush Hill." Mary Ogle Scull, the fifth daughter, was mar- 
ried October 14, 1886, to Frederick W. Biesecker, of Somerset 
county, a prominent member of the Somerset county bar, and 
they reside in Somerset. Three daughters died young: Char- 
lotte Ogle, April 26, 1875 ; Abby, July 22, 1878, and Darley For- 
ward, July 15, 1878. The other daughters, Sarah Spencer, Anna 
Bonnet and Louise Ogle Scull, continue to reside with their aged 
mother in the old homestead in Somerset, where she has resided 
for upwards of fifty years. 



24 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Of the sons, Oden Hiigart Scull died in infancy, Jnne 8, 
1868. John Irwin Sen 11 was drowned while fishings in the Poto- 
mac river, near Point of Pocks, Maryland, Angnst 22, ]878, in 
the thirtieth year of his ai?e. lie was a gentleman of fine char- 
acter, cultivated tastes, affable manners and greatly beloved by 
his family and associates. 

Charles Ogle Scull, the second and oldest surviving son, 
was born in Somerset Xovember 27, 1851. He was educated in 
the jmblic schools of Somerset and the Newell Institute of Pitts- 
burg. He entered the railway service in the general office of 
the Pennsylvania system in January, 1870; became assistant 
general ])assenger agent of the Pennsylvania lines west of Pitts- 
burgh, and subsequently, for a number of years, general pas- 
senger agent of th(> Paltimore & Ohio Railroad Com])aHy. On 
August 27, 1902, he married Ann Harvy ]\riller, daughter of 
Wilson and Hannah (Lee) Miller, of Allegheny, Pennsylvania. 
He resides in Baltimore, Maryland, and is one of the vice-presi- 
dents of the United States Fidelity and Guaranty Comi)any. 

Edward Blaine Scull, the third son, was born in Somerset 
April 30, 1854. He was educated in the ]mblic schools of Som- 
erset and the Kiskiminitas Academy at Elder's Ridge, Pennsyl- 
vania. He read law and was admitted to the Somerset county 
bar July 12, 1877. He was married April 29, 1880, to Mona E. 
Coffroth, daughter of George R. and Alberina ColTroth, of 
Baltimore, Maryland. He resides in Pittsburgh and practices 
his ])rofession at the Allegheny county bar. 

George Ross Scull, the fourth son, was l)orn in Somerset, 
November 25, 1856. Receiving a liberal education, he read law 
and was admitted to the Somerset county bar, August 29, 1879. 
He was elected i)rosecuting attorney in 1880 for a term of three 
years. He served as secretary and chairman of the Rei)ublican 
county ''ommittee rei)eatedly and for a number of years was a 
menibei- of the Republican state committee. He has been a 
delegate to several Re]»ublican state conventions, was an al- 
ternate delegate t(v the Re))ublican national convention at 
^finneapolis in 1892, that nominated Harrison and Reed, a dele- 
gate to the Republican national convention at St. Louis in 1890 
that nominated McKinley and Hobart, and an alternate delegate 
to the b*e))ublican national convention at Philadel])hia, in 1900, 
that no!iii)iated ^^FcKiniev and Roosevelt. He was a supervisor 
of the census for the Thirteenth district of Pennsylvania at the 
last enumeration and declined to accei)t the in-offered position 
of United States marshal for the western disti-ict of Pemisyl- 
vaiiia. lias been associated with his brother in the iniblic;ition 
of the Somrrsrf Ilrrald since the death (A' his fathei- in IIMIO. 
On October 21, 1885, he mari-ied Caroline 'I'l-exler I'aer, dangh- 
ter of Herman L. and Lucy (Schall) Baer, of Someiset. Their 




I 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 25 

children are Lucy Baer, John Irwin, Edward and Anna Catha- 
rine Scull. Mr. Scull resides in Somerset and is president of 
the Somerset Trust Company, the First National Bank of Som- 
erset, and the First National Bank of Confluence, Pennsylvania. 
The fifth son, Robert Spencer Scull, was born in Somerset, 
March 4, 1860. He was educated in the public schools of Som- 
erset and the Academy at Elders' Ridge, Pennsylvania. Upon 
quitting school he entered the office of the Somerset Herald 
and assisted his father in the business until the death of the 
latter. Since that time he has been editor of the Herald 
nnd has carried on the printing business in coniunction with his 
brother, George. He is a director of the Somerset Trust Com- 
pany and the Fii'st National Bank of Somerset. On October 9, 
1890, he married Clai'a Brubaker, daughter of Doctor Henry 
and Emeline (Philson) Brubaker. of Somerset. They reside in 
Somerset and have one child, Emeline Brubaker Scull. 

HARVEY M. BERKELEY. 

Harvey M. Berkeley, an attorney and cashier of the Som- 
erset (Pennsylvania) First National Bank, was born in Sum- 
mit township (Meyersdale P. 0.), Somerset county, Pennsyl- 
vania, August 24, LS60. He is the son of Peter and Sally 
('Meyers) Berkeley. The father was born in the same place 
as the son, in 1832, and the mother at Berlin, Pennsylvania, 
in 1836. She was the daughter of Samuel Meyers, a well- 
known agriculturist of that comnmnity. In religious faith and 
profession, Peter Berkeley belonged to the Brethren church. 
Politically he was a Republican. His education was of the 
common school order, primarily, and later he attended the 
local normal schools. E[e became a minister in the Breth- 
ren denomination and ]^assed from earth in 1865, when Har^ 
vey M., his son, was but about five years of age. 

Harvey M. Berkeley attended the common schools and 
local normals and subsequently graduated from Juniata Col- 
lege of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, in 1881; fi'om Lafayette 
College, Easton, Pennsylvania, in 1885, having conferred ui^on 
him the degrees of M. E. and Ph. B. He taught Latin and 
Philosophy at Susquehanna Collegiate Institute, Towanda, 
T^ennsylvania, in 1886-87; registered as a law student with 
Rodney A. IMercur, Esq., son of the late Chief Justice Mercur 
of the Pennsylvania supreme court, June, 1886, and was ad- 
mitted to the Bradford county (Pennsylvania) bar in Sep- 
tembei-, 1888. In :\Iay. 1899, he was admitted to ])ractice in 
Somerset county, and has lieen in practice ever since. In 1892, 
on Ihe solicitation of interested ])arties, he became cashier of 
Ihe First National Bank of Somerset, Pennsylvania, which po- 



26 BEDFOED AND SOMEESET COUNTIES 

sition he resigned in June, 1906, and since that time has de- 
voted his entire attention to the practice of law and business 
enterprises, in which he is engaged with associates. 
He later became one of the directors of this bank, as well as 
of the First National Bank of Confluence, Pennsylvania. For 
many years he has been director and the treasurer of the Som- 
erset Telephone Company, also connected with a number of 
coal companies. 

His political affiliations have been with the Eepublican 
party. He was the chairman of the Eepublican county com- 
mittee from 1896 to 1900; nominated for congress at the Ee- 
publican primaries in 1900, but the district nomination was 
finally conceded to Hon. Alvin Evans, of Ebensburg. He is 
now in active business as lawyer and banker. Mr. Berkeley 
is a member of the Brethren church at Meyersdale, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

October 31, 1889, he was united in marriage to M. Emma 
Beachley, of Meyersdale, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Dr. 
and Mrs. Urias M. Beachley, a distinguished medical practi- 
tioner. No children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Berke- 
ley. 

THE BAEE FAMILY. 

The Baer famijy of Pennsylvania is of German origin, 
and among its mem.bers have been many prominent characters 
in the business and professional world. 

(I) Christopher Baer, the American founder of the fam- 
ily, spelled the name Bar. He was born in Zweibrucken, Ger- 
many. The date of his birth is not now known to his descend- 
ants. He came to this country and effected a settlement in 
Wliite Hall township (near present Unionville), Lehigh county, 
Pennsylvania. He died in 1786, when between eighty and nine- 
ty years of age. His will, dated November 16, 1784, probated 
August 15, 1786, is recorded at Easton, Pennsylvania, in will 
book No. 1, page 448. He married Catherine Wingert, of 
Brockweiler Zweibrucken, Germany. They came to this coun- 
try in 1743 in the ship "Phoenix" from Eotterdam. He took 
the oath of allegiance September 30, 1743. He purchased some 
eight tracts of land, one for each of his children, who were 
married, as follows: Melchoir, John, Henry, Salome, Appo- 
lonica and Jacob. 

(II) Jacob Bar, the grandfather of the Somerset Baers, 
was the youngest son of Christopher and Catherine (Wingert) 
Bar, the first of the name in this country. He was born in 
White Hall township, Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, in 1761. 
He married a Miss Findlay, by whom he had four children: 
John, Nicholas, Jacob and Daniel. The mother died prior to 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 'iT 

1790. In 1791, Jacob, the father of these children, married 
Mary Elizabeth Hersch, by whom four children were born- 
Peter, Solomon, Adam and Dinah Baer. In 1800 Jacob Bar 
and family removed to Maryland, near Mount Savage, Alle- 
ghenv county. 

(III) Solomon Baer, sou of Jacob and Mary Elizabeth 
Bar, married Anna Maria Baker, in 1820, and to them were 
born the following nam.ed children: Margaret, born May 17, 
1822; Elizabeth. April 2, 1824; William Jacob, January 20, 
1826; Herman Imdwig, March 20, 1828; Ruffena, July 19, 1830; 
Henry Giesey, May 5, 1835 ; Mary Ann, April 25, 1840 ; George 
Frederick, September 16, 1842; Neven Solomon, April 25, 1845. 
Solomon Baer and family resided at Berlin, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania. He was a house carpenter and cabinet maker. 
He served as constable for several years and was later a jus- 
tice of the peace. He was elected to every office in the militia, 
from captain to brigade inspector. He died January 12, 1882, 
aged eighty-seven years, six months and twenty-nine days. 

Of the Baker family to which Anna Maria (Baker) Baer 
belonged, it may be stated that George Baker settled in German- 
town, Pennsylvania, and his children were: George, Fred- 
erick, Richard, Michael and Ludwig. The last named was 
Anna Maria's father, born in 1762, and settled at Berlin, Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania. He married Maria Margaret Gless- 
ner, born 1761 and died in 1839. He died in 1840. Their 
child was: Anna Maria, born February 2, 1797, died October 
5, 1888. 

(IV) Herman Ludwig Baer, son of Solomon and Anna 
Maria ('Baker) Baer, was born in Berlin, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, March 20, 1828. The subjoined is his auto- 
biography : 

''When I was about fourteen years of age my father left 
Berlin, and moved to a farm four miles from Somerset, where 
I now reside. I worked on the farm for seven years; the last 
two years I taught school in the winter. My father sold his 
farm and removed to another close to Somerset. The idea 
of going to college was frequently talked of and when it was 
finally decided that I should go I left the plough standing in 
the field where I had been ploughing on Saturdaj^ evening and 
left for Franklin and Marshall College, Mercersburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1848. I entered the preparatory department, was 
there one session. The next session I entered college and con- 
tinued to the junior year, then I remained at home and taught 
school one winter to raise some funds. I returned to college, 
stood the required examinations and was reinstated in my 
class and graduated in 1853. I returned to my home and within 
a few days thereafter received a call to take charge of Elm- 



28 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

wood Institute in Norristown, Pennsylvania, wliicli call I ac- 
cepted and taught there two years, when I returned to Somer- 
set and entered as a student of law in the office of my brother, 
A¥illiam J. Baer, and was admitted to the Somerset bar in 
June, 1856, and entered into partnership with my brother un- 
der the name of Baer & Baer, which partnership continued 
until William .1. Baer was elected judge of the sixteenth judi- 
cial district of Pennsylvania, I continuing the practice alone. 

''In December, 1856, I formed another partnership (my 
marriage) with Lucy E. Schall, of Norristown, Pennsylvania, 
daughter of General William Schall, an iron master and a mili- 
tary man of considerable note in the Pennsylvania militia. My 
parents and those of my wife were members of the German 
Reformed church, one of the churches of the Reformation now 
known as the Reformed church in the United States, and the 
children were of the same faith. I have always been a lover of 
the Sunday school and have been a superintendent for fifty 
years and an elder in the same church for the same time and 
still continue. 

''I am a Jeffersonian Democrat and never was an aspirant 
for office, but could always give a reason for my faith relig- 
iously and politically. I have always tried to do my duty con- 
scientiously. I have held the position of examiner of students 
at law for over thirty years and still continue. 

''In 1881 my wife died. I kept house with my children for 
eight years thereafter, when I married my first wife's sister, 
Annie C. Schall. 

"William Schall, died in infancy; Caroline Trexler, born 
April 1, 1859; Reuben Edward, born April 2, 1867; George 
Baker, born March 30, 1863; Hermanns Ijudwig, born October 
4, 1874. Carrie T. Baer (V) was married to George R. Scull, 
Esq., of Somerset, Pennsylvania, both an editor and lawyer; 
also at this time president of the First National Bank of Som- 
erset, Pennsylvania, and president of the Somerset Trust 
Company. His wife was a graduate of the common school 
system and attended Greensburg high school. Four children 
were born to them: John I., Lucy B., Edward and Anna C. 
George B. Baer (V) graduated in the common schools of Som- 
erset borough and then entered the printing office of the 
Herald and Whig, edited by Hon. Edward Scull. After 
finishing his trade as a printer, he attended the high school 
at Elders Ridge, Pennsylvania. On his return home he con- 
cluded to go to California and finally located at Cloverdale, 
Sonoma county, California, purchasing the Cloverdale Reveille, 
which he edited for several years and then sold to his brother, 
Reuben Baer, he having been appointed postmaster at Clover- 
dale, which position he still holds. He is also superintendent 




', ^ , /3e/t/ci^, 






BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 29 

of a quicksilver mine near the Geyser hot spring, eighteen 
miles distant from Cloverdale. He married a daughter of Dr. 
William Markell of the same place — Sarah Markell, by whom 
he had three children: Markell C, Lucy S. and Helen. Reuben 
E. Baer (V), born April 2, 1867, graduated in the common 
schools of Somerset, Pennsylvania, and entered the printing 
ofiice of the Herald and Whig, and after mastering his trade 
there went to Tyrone, Pennsylvania, and afterwards to Johns- 
town, Pennsylvania, where he worked at his trade until the 
great flood of 1889, after which he went to California, where 
he worked for his brother. Later he purchased his brother's 
newspaper, which some years later he sold and purchased the 
Enterprise at Healdsburg, California. He married Helen Mar- 
kell, daughter of Dr. William Markell, of Cloverdale, Califor- 
nia, by whom he had three children — Christina, Elizabeth and 
Herman Ludwig. Hermanns Ludwig Baer (V) was born Octo- 
ber 4, 1874. After attending and graduating from the common 
schools of Somerset county, Pennsylvania, he entered a drug 
store for a term of three years, after which he attended Borden- 
town College for one year and then entered the Jefferson 
School of Pharmacy in Philadelphia and graduated therefrom. 
The next two years he operated a drug store. Having con- 
cluded to become a physician, he went to Jefferson Medical 
College of Philadelphia and graduated. He then married Miss 
Mabel McKinley, daughter of Abner McKinley and wife. He 
then moved to New York city and engaged in the practice of 
medicine. He has recently been appointed a lecturer in Anat- 
omy in the Post-Graduate Medical College and Hospital of New 
York city. 

JOHN ALBERT BERKEY. 

John Albert Berkey, of Somerset, Pennsylvania, commis- 
sioner of banking and attorney at law, is a representative of 
an old family which was planted in the state more than a 
century ago, locating in Berks county, whence his ancestors of 
three generations ago removed to Somerset county. The fam- 
ily is large and widely dispersed, and numbers among its mem- 
bers many of the most prosperous and highly respected people 
of Somerset county and elsewhere. 

Mr. Berkey was born in Jefferson township, Somerset 
county, January 31, 3861, son of Chauncey H. and Elizabeth 
Berkey. He was reared upon the paternal farm, and began 
his education in the public schools, finishing in the South- 
western State Normal school at California, AVashington county, 
Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated in 1884. Prior 
to this, and at the early age of seventeen years, his educational 
preparation was so sufficient that he engaged in teaching, per- 
forming his duties most creditably in schools in the counties 



30 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

of Fayette and Westmoreland, as well as in his native Somer- 
set, and closing his career in the educational field as principal 
of the Somerset borough schools. He would have undoubt- 
edly made further advancement as an instructor, but he had a 
predilection for the law, and entered upon a course of legal 
reading under the able instruction of Coft'roth & Ruppel, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1889. He soon gathered about him 
a large and influential clientele, and now enjoys an extensive 
and remunerative practice. 

He early entered upon public duties, being appointed by 
the director of the United States census to the collation and 
tabulation of the recorded indebtedness in Bedford, Blair, 
Cambria, and Somerset counties for the federal census of 1890. 
In 1892 he was elected district attorney of Somerset county, 
and brought to the place qualifications of a high order, and 
most praiseworthy industry and perseverance. Firm in his 
advocacy of Republican principles, he early found recogni- 
tion as a party leader, and in 1899 was elected to the chair- 
manship of the county committee, in which capacity he ren- 
dered service of such value that he has since been continued 
as a member of the state committee. In 1902 he was cordially 
endorsed by the Republicans of Somerset county for the nomi- 
nation of member of congress from the Twenty-third congres- 
sional district. The contest was warm and long protracted, 
and was only terminated by his withdrawal in favor of his 
warm friend and former fellow-student, Hon. Allen F. Cooper, 
who was accordingly made the nominee. On July 27, 1905, 
Governor Pennypacker appointed him to the highly important 
position of commissioner of banking, in which capacity he is 
now acting. A warm friend of education, Mr. Berkey has been 
for years a member of the board of trustees of the South- 
western State Normal school at California, Pennsylvania — the 
institution in which he made his preparation for his active 
career. He is an active member of various benevolent and 
fraternal bodies — Berlin Lodge, No. 481, I. 0. 0. F., the 
Knights of the Golden Eagle, No. 181, of Somerset, the Knights 
of ]\raccabees of the World, the Royal Arcanum, the Modern 
Woodmen, the Junior Order of American Mechanics, and the 
Patrons of Husbandry. In addition to his law practice and 
his official duties, he is largely interested in agricultural af- 
fairs, giving intelligent oversight to the conduct of several 
highly cultivated farms in Somerset county. 

Mr. Berkey married, April 3, 1887, Miss Anna M. Barron, 
daughter of John C. and Catherine (Gonder) Barron, old and 
respected citizens of Somerset county, which has been their 
ancestral home for more than a hundred 5^ears past. Of this 
marriage was born three children — Mabel Amnions, Sue Eliz- 



BEDFOED AND SOMEESET COUNTIES 31 

abeth and May Jane Berkey. Mr. Berkey is a communicant 
of the Lutheran church, and his wife and children are mem- 
bers of the United Brethren church. 

CHAELES WILLAED WALKEE. 

Charles W. Walker, one of the younger, but successful 
practitioners at the bar of Somerset county, Pennsylvania, 
was born November 5, 1867, in Summit township, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, son of Silas and Eliza (Walker) 
Walker. 

(I) Jacob Walker was a member of the early generation 
of the Walkers in this country. He was born in Frederick 
county, Maryland, about 1740, and immigrated to Bedford 
county (now Somerset county), Pennsylvania, in 1774. He 
settled in and resided in Brothers Valley township until his 
death in 1778, when he was killed by being thrown against a 
tree while riding a horse. He descended from the Walkers, 
who were early settlers in Maryland. He married and reared 
a family, but the name of his wife is not now known. 

(II) Philip Walker, son of Jacob Walker (1), resided in 
what is now Summit township his entire life. 

(III) Peter P. H. Walker, son of Philip Walker (2), was 
a farmer in Summit township, where he died in 1882, aged 
eighty years. He married Sarah Will, daughter of Daniel 
Will and wife, and among the children born to them was a son, 
Silas. 

(IV) Silas Walker, son of Peter P. H. (3), and Sarah 
(Will) Walker, was born in Brothers Valley township, Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania, September 27, 1837. He has al- 
ways been an agriculturist. In religious belief a Lutheran, and 
politically a Democrat. He obtained a good common education. 
He married Eliza Walker, daughter of Jacob P. and Elizabeth 
(Brougher) Walker, who died in 1896, aged eighty-eight years. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Walker was born in Summit township, January 
25, 1841, and is a member of the Lutheran church. Her father, 
Jacob P. Walker, died in 1891, aged ninety-one years; he came 
from the same ancestry as Jacob, the above named original 
settler. John Brougher came from eastern Pennsylvania about 
1790, and it is known was of German descent. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Silas Walker were born six children: Wilson, Charles 
Willard, Eobert B., Edward M. (deceased), Minerva, wife of 
Emmanuel Berkeley, Clara, wife of Peter S. Hay, all of Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania. 

(V) Charles Willard Walker, son of Silas (4) and Eliza- 
beth (Walker) Walker, was born in Summit township, Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania, November 6, 1867; and educated at 
the common schools of his native county, and Pennsvlvania Col- 



32 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

lege at Gettysburg, graduating therefrom in June, 1891, with 
the degree of A. B. Three years later he received the degree of 
A. M. from his Alma Mater. During his college life he was an 
active member of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar September 29, 1893, and became a partner 
with A. L. G. Hay, which continued until April 1, 1897. Mr. 
Walker is a supporter of the Democratic ticket, and is a mem- 
ber of the Lutheran church at Somerset, Pennsylvania. He 
belongs to Somerset Lodge, No. 358, Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, and was master of the lodge from December, 1898, to 
December, 1899. 

October 6, 1897, he married, at Somerset borough. Miss 
Susan C. Schrock, daughter of William M. and Mary E. 
Schrock. Her father was a captain in the Civil war, in the 
LTnion army (see sketch). This Schrock family came from 
Switzerland and the name was originally spelled Schrack, but 
finally corrupted to Schrock. The Schrock family was ban- 
ished from Switzerland during a political disturbance, prop- 
erty confiscated, and they fled to Holland, but later came to 
America, between 1760 and 1763. Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. 
Walker are the parents of one child, Willard Walker, born 
October 16, 1898, in Somerset borough. 

HENRY S. KIMMELL. 

Henry S. Kimmell, a practicing physician of Somerset, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was there born June 20, 1857, 
the son of the late Dr. Edmund and Emma J. (Schell) Kim- 
mell, and is of excellent German ancestry. 

(I) Philip Kimmell, a native of Germany, came to Amer- 
ica in the Colonial period. When a young man he took up 
land in New ]\Iarket, Frederick county, Maryland, which he 
cleared and improved, and on which he built a homestead, 
where he passed the remainder of his days. 

(II) John Kimmell, son of Philip Kimmell (1), decided 
upon a medical career, and received his medical education in 
York, Pennsylvania, and afterwards located as a practitioner 
in Berlin, Somerset county. Studious, energetic and ambitious, 
he met with eminent success, and was for many years consid- 
ered the leading physician in the county. He married Eliza- 
beth Uhrick, and they became the parents of nine children. 

(Ill) Jacob Kimmell, second son of John (2) and Eliza- 
beth (Uhrick) Kimmell, was born in Berlin, Somerset county, 
and during his entire active life was conspicuously identified 
with its higher interests. A well educated, intelligent man, he 
was far ahead of his day in ability and ideas, and had the cour- 
age of his convictions in all matters. He followed the trade of a 
tinner for many years, and was also successfully engaged in 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 33 

mercantile pursuits for forty years. He served most satisfac- 
torily as a justice of the peace, and for three years as registrar, 
recorder of deeds and clerk of the Orphans' conrt of Somerset 
county, having been appointed to the latter offices by Governor 
Rittner. He married Margaret, daughter of John Skoles, of 
Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, and of the seven children born to 
them but three survive, John 0., Charles A. and Theodora. 

(IV) John O. Kimmell, son of Jacob (3) and Margaret 
(Skoles) Kimmell. is an honored and leading member of the 
Somerset bar, and a much respected citizen. He possesses 
sound judgment, and has creditably filled various offices of 
trust and responsibility. He married Mary, daughter of John 
Parker, of Somerset, and of the nine children born of this 
union four are still living, namely: William A., Parker Y., 
Emily, married Hon. George F. Baer, of Reading, Pennsylva- 
nia, and Margaret. 

(IV) Edmund M. Kimmell, son of Jacob (3) and Mar- 
garet (Skoles) Kimmell, was born and reared in Berlin, Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania. He commenced the study of medi- 
cine with his grandfather, Dr. John Kimmell, and later en- 
tered the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, receiv- 
ing his degree in 1850. After practicing his profession a year 
in Berlin and an equal length of time in Salisbury, Somerset 
county. Dr. Kimmell settled in Somerset. He devoted his en- 
tire time and strength to his profession, built up an extensive 
and lucrative practice, and won a place of prominence both 
as a physician and as a citizen. He was a stanch Republican 
in his political affiliations, and an active member of the Chris- 
tian church. He married Emma J. Schell, daughter of Henry 
Schell, of Schell sburg, Pennsylvania, and they had a family 
of eleven children, of whom the following named are the sur- 
viving members: Ella, wife of James N. Keffer, of Somerset, 
who is the mother of four children — Emily, Clark, Edmund 
and Jonas M. Keffer. Clara, married Ed. B. Coffroth, and 
they have ftve children — Helen, Henry, Frank, Ross and Mary. 
Henry S., of whom later. Frank M., married Mabel Meserve, 
and they have one child, Schell. Louise M., married Lewis W. 
Fogg, and they have five children — Edmund, Lewis, Dana, Lucy, 
Dorothy. William, who is attending Medico-Chirurgical college 
at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Edmund Kimmell, the father 
of the above named children, died while yet in the prime of life, 
at the age of forty-six years; his wife passed away at the age 
of fifty-six years. 

(V) Henry S. Kimmell acquired his early education in 
the common schools of Somerset county, and later attended the 
State Normal school at Millersville for one term. He subse- 
quently prepared himself for the medical profession by taking 

Vol. Ill 3 



34 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

a thorough course of study at the Jefferson Medical College in 
Philadelphia, from which celebrated institution he was grad- 
uated in 1880, just thirty years after the graduation of his 
father. Until the death of his father he was associated with 
him in practice, and since that event has continued in practice 
alone. Dr. Kimmell is a master of his profession, and well 
worthy of the eminent esteem in which he is held, both profes- 
sionally and socially. He has been county home and county 
jail physician for the past fourteen years, and is now chief 
medical examiner for various organizations and for many in- 
surance companies. For the past eight years he served on 
the United States pension examining board. He is a Repub- 
lican in politics, and for twelve years has served acceptably 
as school director. Fraternally he holds membership in the 
Somerset County Medical Association, of which he was once 
president; the Pennsylvania State Medical Association, the 
Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Surgeons' Association, F. and A. 
M., Somerset Lodge No. 358; I. 0. 0. F., Somerset Lodge No. 
438, in which he has passed all the chairs; and an active mem- 
ber of the Royal Arcanum. 

October 26, 1880, Dr. Kimmell was united in marriage to 
Miss Sarah S. Schrock, a daughter of Major E. M. Schrock, 
a veteran of the civil war, and a well-known resident of Seattle, 
Washington. Four children have been born to them, namely: 
Clara, Edna, Margaret .and Emily. Dr. Kimmell and his wife 
are active members of the Christian church. 

SCHELL FAMILY. 

In every community there are always rare family names 
bearing with them more prominence than others by reason of 
the fact that among its members there have been men and 
women, too, whose activities have touched almost every avenue 
of trade, every circle of society and all great strides toward 
development of the locations in which their lot has been cast. 
This is true in a large measure with the Schell family, to which 
belongs Paul Ankeny Schell, or Somerset, whose line in gen- 
ealogy is : 

(I) Michael Schell, bom in 1675, and his wife, Veronica, 
left the Palatinate, Germany, and settled in Upper Hanover 
township, then Philadelphia, now Montgomery county, Penn- 
sylvania, about 1732. He died in 1770, and his will was pro- 
bated February 19, 1770. At the time of making his will, he 
declared himself to be of advanced age, twice married and no 
children by his second wife, Magdalina. He was possessed of 
considerable property and confirmed the deed of gift for one 
hundred and forty acres of land in Upper Hanover township 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 35 

to his youngest son, John. His children were: Jacob, Michael, 
Jr., Mary, Julia and John. 

(II) John Schell was born, presumably in the Palatinate, 
January 22, 1729, and died May 2, 1777. He married Veronica 
Maurer, daughter of Jacob and Sophia Maurer, in 1753. Her 
father was a wealthy and influential yeoman. John Schell 
died early in manhood, leaving an issue but no will. He was 
a man of much local prominence, a representative merchant 
and a member of the Reformed church. The inventory filed 
May 10, 1782, of his estate valued it at ''1261 pounds and 16 
shillings," for his real estate and personal property at "1401 
pounds, 19 shillings." His children were: John, Jacob, a 
musician of Colonel Proctor's regiment of artillery; Abraham, 
Anna, Maria, Veronica and Susannah. 

(III) John Schell, eldest son of John (2) and Veronica 
Schell, born on the old homestead, near East Greenville, Mont- 
gomery county, Pennsylvania, November 30, 1754, died March 
30, 1825. He married Elizabeth Hillegass, originally Hill de 
Gaze, born (October 17, 1763. She was the daughter of George 
Peter Hillegass and granddaughter of John Frederick Hille- 
gass, and first cousin of Michael Hillegass, the first to hold the 
office of United States treasurer. Like his father before him, 
John Schell was a merchant. Both he and his wife had a 
handsome property. They were devout members of the Re- 
formed church. As had been the case with his forefathers, he, 
too, was possessed with the desire to become a large land 
owner and in the latter years of the eighteenth century — 1798 
or 1799 — he x^urchased fifteen hundred acres of land at a 
cost of ten thousand pounds sterling. The land was located 
in that portion of Bedford now known as Shaw, near Cabin 
Creek settlement. Here, in 1808, he laid out the town of Schell s- 
burg. In 1807 he gave the Lutheran and Reformed congre- 
gations six acres for church and school purposes, and later 
each a town lot. He was a prime mover in the building of 
the Bedford and Stoystown pike. His daughter's husband, 
Michael Reed, was chief engineer. The children of John and 
Elizabeth (Hillegass) Schell were: John, Peter, Abraham, 
Jacob, George, Michael, Elizabeth, Henry, Joseph, Catharine, 
Maria and Eve. 

(IV) Henry Schell, seventh child of John (3) and Eliza- 
beth (Hillegass) Schell, was born March 22, 1797, on his father's 
farm at Schellsburg, Pennsylvania. When not in school, Henry 
was engaged in a woollen factory and grist mill. He learned 
to make cloth. He was a man of great independence, of 
spirited purpose. He married, January, 1820, Maria Louisa 
Schneider, daughter of Jacob and Susan (Hyple) Schneider, 
and who with his brother Adam settled in Somerset county, 



36 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Pennsylvania. Before the marriage of Henry Scliell, he bouglit 
from his father for seven thousand dollars the farm on which 
the woolen mill stood. To him seems to be the honor of first 
breaking away from the old time customs of treating harvest 
hands to liquor. With ahrmness only found in such charac- 
ters, he would not yield, but gave them higher wages than the 
other farmers. To Henry Schell and his wife were born ten 
children: John Jacob, Henry Ferdinand, Amanda Mary, An- 
drew Jackson, Alexander JosejDh, Charles Sander, Emily Julia, 
Maria Louisa, Young Hanson, AVilliam Harrison. 

In 1852, Henry Schell, wife, and sons, Jacob and Henry, 
became identified with a religious movement known as the 
"Disciples of Christ," and owing to church prejudices and 
feeling, Mr. Schell sold his home farm and mill for thirteen 
thousand dollars, and removed from Bedford to Somerset 
county, where the church of his new choice had already made 
much progress. At the borough of Somerset he erected a 
large brick building — store and dwelling — on the corner where 
now stands the Hotel Vanear. Here he conducted a large 
general store. Later the building was converted into a hotel, 
but was finally destroyed in the great fire of 1872. Mr. Schell 
gave the Disciple church the lot on which stands their church 
edifice. Two other large houses he built in Somerset were lost 
by the 1872 conflagration. At the time of Henry Schell 's death, 
April 29, 1857, he left behind him a large estate in houses and 
lands, which fell to dutiful children. Of them were: 

(V) John Jacob Schell, son of Henry Schell (4), bom in 
1820, was educated at Franklin College, Pennsylvania, and be- 
came a merchant and banker. He married Rose Bonnette, 
daughter of Isaac and Eleanor (Parker) Ankeny, by whom 
were born seven children, only one of whom, Paul Ankeny 
Schell, a merchant, now resides in Somerset. 

John Jacob Schell was one of the best known and for many 
years one of the leading m.en of the county. He served as 
prothonotary. He was a member of the banking firms of Reed 
& Schell of Bedford, and M. and Samen & Co., of Somerset, 
in both of which he suffered heavy financial reverses. He was 
one of the first citizens of the county to realize the ultimate 
development of our lumber and mineral resources, and in- 
vested largely in unproductive lands. Had he been able to 
weather the various financial panics following the Civil war 
or retained control of his interests, he would have been pos- 
sessed of great wealth by reason of his heavy holdings in tim- 
ber and coal lands. He was an elder in the Disciple church 
and gave liberally to extend the cause of same during his life- 
time. He died January 21, 1900, at Somerset, Pennsylvania. 

The children of John J. and Rose Bonnette (Ankeny) 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 37 

Schell follow: Ida, married Samuel L. WilsoD, resides in Mo- 
line, Illinois; Elenor, married Dr. R. W. Clark, of Pittsburgli, 
Pennsylvania; Annie, married J. N. Lewis, of Bayonne, New 
Jersey; Myra, deceased, married R. B. Reid, who resides in 
Uniontown, Pennsylvania; Alexander, deceased, married Ella 
Gardener, resided in Uniontown, Pennsylvania; Edith, mar- 
ried George A. Shephardson, of St. "^ouis, Missouri ; Paul 
Ankeny (of whom later), married Mary Sullivan Endsley, re- 
sides in Somerset, Pennsylvania. 

Isaac Ankeny was a son of Peter Ankeny, who located in 
Somerset county in 1773, and on whose land that part of Som- 
erset, from Main street to South street, was laid out. ''Edge- 
wood," just west of Somerset, was his home and known as the 
"Mansion." "Ankeny Square" and "Union School" lots are 
donations made by him for church and school purposes. Isaac 
Ankeny was born at the "Mansion," SeptemlDer 5, 1792. He 
held a number of prominent positions and was an active spirit 
in the early development of this section of Pennsylvania. Dur- 
ing his time he was the heaviest land proprietor in Somerset 
In 1820 he married Eleanor Parker, who was born near Schells- 
burg, Bedford county, Pennsylvania, in 1789. Both died and 
are buried at Somerset, Pennsylvania. His residence was at 
Rose, Somerset, Pennsylvania. His children were: William, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota; John, Minneapolis, Minnesota; 
Thomas, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Calvin, Minneapolis, Minne- 
sota; Eleanor, Somerset, Pennsylvania; Valeria, Somerset, 
Pennsylvania; Almire, Wheeling, West Virginia; Martha, 
Kansas City, Kansas. 

(V) Henry Ferdinand Schell, son of Hemy Schell (4), 
born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, September 14, 1822, 
was a merchant, banker and lawyer. He served as county 
prothonotary and was an active church worker. He received 
his education at Windom Academy, Ohio, and Bethany Col- 
lege, West Virginia. He married Rose Ankeny Stewart. Henry 
F. Schell and wife were the parents of four children: Theo- 
dore, died in childhood; Mary Alberta, married M. M. Coch- 
ran, Esquire, of Uniontown, Pennsylvania; Susan, married 
John F. Nichol; Henry Stewart, married Elizabeth D. Layman. 

(V) Amanda Mary Schell, deceased, daughter of Henry 
Schell (4), married (first) Benjamin Fisher, who died, and 
for her second companion married Joseph Stutzman, who did 
much in the way of education for Somerset county. 

(V) Andrew Jackson Schell, son of Henry Schell (4), 
was a merchant, and married Sarah Pyle. He was called 
"Jack," and he was superintendent of mails en route to Cali- 
fornia during gold excitement days. 

(V) Charles Sander Schell, son of Henry Schell (4), 



38 BEDFORD AXD SOMERSET COUNTIES 

raarried Lottie Wells (first), and after her death married Ema- 
line Sabine. He was a niorcliant and real estate man in Bea- 
trice, Nebraska. 

(V) Emily .Iniin ScholL deeea.sed, daughter of Henry 
Sebell (4), married Dr. Edmund Kinmiel, of Bei'lin, Pennsyl- 
vania, who removed to. Somerset and ranked high in the skill 
of his profession. 

(V) Maria Louise Schell, daughter of Henry Schell (4), 
married Franois Miller, a train despatcher for many years in 
Maryland. 

(V) . AVilliam Harrison Schell, son of Henry Schell (4), 
became a minister. He was educated at Bethany College, AVest 
Virginia. He married Clara Craft. Served with honor in the 
Civil war. 

(VI) Paul Ankeny Schell, son of John Jacob (5) and Rose 
Ankeny Schell, was born July G, 1865. He is the only male de- 
scendant of the old Ankeny-Schell families now living in Som- 
erset. He was educated in the public schools of Somerset, 
Pennsylvania, and at the early age of fifteen started to learn 
the trade of tinsmith, later taking up plumbing and steam- 
fitting, of which trades he is a practical master. Some of the 
largest public and ]irivate buildings in tliis section and ad- 
joining states, including the fine new court house of Somerset 
county, have had the plumbing and heating systems installed 
by bis firm. From a very small beginning Mr. Schell 's busi- 
ness has grown rapidly. In 1903 the Schell Hardware Com- 
pany was organized and incor]iorated and now has stores in 
Somerset, Connellsville and Uniontown, Pennsylvania, of which 
corporation ^fr. Schell has been president since its organiza- 
tion. In politics Mr. Schell is a Republican, and in church con- 
nection is a member of the Christian church. He is also a 
member of tlie ^fasonic fraternity, advanced to Knight 
Tem)»larship; also belongs to Odd Fellows. 

Mr. Schell married, at Somerset, August 7, 1890, Mary 
Sullivan Endsley, daughter of Andrew Jackson Endsley, a 
Endsley, born at Somerset, Pennsylvania, May 12, 1891; and 
prominent Methodist divine, wife, Catharine Sullivan Johnson, 
the great-gianddaughter of Captain Patrick Sullivan. The 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Schell are: AVilbur 
John, born at the same place, January 23, 1900. 

PERRY F. SHAFFER. 

Perry F. Shaffer of Somerset, Somerset county, Pennsyl- 
vania, was born October 4. 1868. tjie son of Henry and Eliza- 
beth (Hoffman) Shaffer. Henry ShafTer (father) was a native 
of Quemahoning, Somerset county, born in 1820, and was a 
farmer by occupation. His wife, Elizabeth HoiTman, was born 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 39 

in 1823 in Qiiemahoning, a daughter of John Shaffer. Their 
children: John (deceased), Sarah, Amanda, Benjamin, Will- 
iam, Cyrus, Frank, Herman, Nancy, Perry F., of whom later. 

Perhaps there is not a more able, better informed, more 
scientific and zealous member of the medical profession in Som- 
erset county than Dr. Perry F. Shaffer, and it is a well known 
fact that the Somerset contingent is always in the lead in all 
scientific and medical researches. Dr. Shaffer came to Somer- 
set from Bedford, Pennsylvania, twelve years ago. He is an 
alumnus of the Cincinnati Eclectic Medical College, where he 
graduated with class honors, passing a rigid examination, with a 
per cent of 100, perfect in every branch of study. The Eclectic 
Medical College is an institution from which have come forth 
hundreds and even thousands of the leading physicians now 
practicing in America, and is recognized as one of the most com- 
plete and thorough colleges to be found anywhere. Their en- 
tire system of practice is an advanced method of battling with 
the numerous diseases that aflBict mankind, and the more that 
is known of this modern and skillful method of treatment the 
more popular it becomes with the people. 

When, twelve years ago, Dr. Shaffer came to Somerset, 
a young man little more than twenty-three years of age (hav- 
ing graduated soon after he was twenty-one), his practice was 
small. This, however, he soon increased to large proportions 
by his successful manner of treating patients and his thorough 
diagnosis and watchful care. He is one of the self-made, in- 
dustrious young men, a skillful master of every detail of the 
medical profession. He is an expert in the treatment of ail- 
ments peculiar to this country, and believes strictly in the in- 
troduction and application of everything that will reduce human 
suffering, and cure the many ills to which the human family 
is subject. He is always reasonable in his charges, careful 
and conscientious in his treatment, and is a progressive and 
capable practitioner, possessing the confidence and esteem of 
the communit^^ at large. 

Dr. Shaffer married, October 3, 1888, Bertha Wertz, born 
February 13, 1866, a daughter of Emons and Emaline (Phil- 
son) Wertz. C^f this marriage one child was born, Nellie, Octo- 
ber 18, 1889. 

ARTHUR 0. BARCLAY, M. D. 
Arthur 0. Barclay, a practicing i^hysician of Somerset, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was born October 31, 1874, in 
Bakersville, a son of Simon P. and Amanda (Shaffer) Bar- 
clay. He is of German descent, his great-grandfather having 
emigrated to this country from Germany. His grandfather, 
Samuel Barclay, was a native of Somerset county. He had 



40 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

the distinction of raising tlie largest steer ever raised in Penn- 
sylvania, which weighed forty-two hundred pounds. 

Simon P. Barclay (father) was born April 12, 1844, in 
Lavansville, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. He follows the 
occupation of a farmer and stock raiser, and is an ardent Re- 
publican. He married Amanda Shaffer, daughter of Henry 
and Susan (Hoffman) ShalTei', both natives of Jenners, Penn- 
sylvania, the former a farmer by occupation. Mr. and Mrs. 
Shaffer were the parents of the following children: John, 
Cyrus, Amanda, Mary, Sadie W., Benjamin, Franklin, Her- 
man, William, Nancy and Perry. The following named chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Simon P. Barclay : Nettie A., 
Arthur 0., of whom later; Cora I. and Loyal AVilmington. 

Arthur 0. Barclay decided on a medical career, and studied 
for his profession in the Eclectic Medical Institute, of Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, from which he was graduated in the year 1902. He 
served for eighteen months in the Seton Hospital at Cincinnati, 
and then returned to Somerset, where he has since been estab- 
lished in practice. He is in every way well qualified for the 
work which he has chosen, and has built up an extensive and 
lucrative practice. 

He married, August 25, 1898, Margaret M. Ream, born 
August 2, 1879, in Jennerstown, a daughter of Benjamin and 
Sarah (Gumhert) Ream, the former a farmer and stock raiser. 
Her grandfather is Charles Ream, a farmer of Berlin, who is 
still living and active at the advanced age of eighty-two years. 

REV. PETER VOGEL. 

The grandfather of Rev. Peter Vogel, of Somerset, was 
Tobias Vogel, of Bischofsheim, on the River Tauber, Baden, 
Germany. By occupation he was a tailor. Mr. Vogel, having 
served his full time in the German army, became an earnest 
Republican, and, because of his leadership in the agitation 
which finally broke out in the Revolution of 1848, found it wise 
to leave for the United States as the land where his political 
doctrines were acceptable. This he did in 1831, and settled on 
a farm three miles west of Butler, Pennsylvania. In religion 
he was a devout Roman Catholic. Mr. Vogel married Eliza- 
beth Ginsthaler, a native of the same part of Germany as him- 
self, and they were the parents of three sons : Albin, of whom 
later; Frantz Josef, who lives on a farm near Altamont, Illi- 
nois; and Phili]), who recontlv died on the old homestead, near 
Butler. 

Albin (or Alvin) Vogel, son of Tobias and Elizabeth 
(Ginstlialer) Vogel, was educated for the Roman Catholic 
priesthood in Gorman schools. He was sixteen years old when 
he came to the United States, and was so proficient in Latin 







T^^J^ 2/^2l, 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES -tl 

that he became the interpreter for the famih' by finding a 
priest, with whom he could, of course, converse in that lan- 
guage, in places where no German was spoken. The broken 
fortunes of the family, because of their political views in Ger- 
many, com]ielled him to stay at home and help on the farm. 

Mr. Yogel married, about 1839, Maria Ursula Flick, who 
came from Rhenish Bavaria, about the time when the Vogels 
emigrated from Bischofsheim. Her education was that of the 
ordinary German schools, and her faith also Roman Catholic. 
Two sons were born to them: Peter, of whom later; and Tobias. 
Mr. Vogel, at the early age of twenty-eight, fell a victim to 
smallpox, as did his younger son, Tobias, who died two weeks 
before his father. Neither had been vaccinated. His widow, 
in the course of time, married again, and her death occurred in 
1878, in central Illinois. 

Peter Vogel, son of Albin and Maria Ursula (Flick) Vogel, 
was born September 4, 1841, three miles west of Butler, Penn- 
sylvania, and was four and a half years of age at the time 
of the death of his father. His mother's second marriage re- 
sulted in his being largely cast among strangers, and changed 
his whole course of life. His early years were spent in a Ger- 
man-speaking community and he learned English in his 
*' teens," having before that attended German schools. 

Having become convinced that he could serve his God bet- 
ter as a Protestant, he worked his way through Eureka Col- 
lege, Eureka, Illinois, graduating in 1866, with the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, and later receiving that of Master of Arts. 
He entered the ministry of the Disciples of Christ, declining 
several professorships in colleges, and also pulpits in Brook- 
lyn, New York; St. Louis, Missouri, and Bloomington, Illinois, 
that he might serve smaller places in Wisconsin, Illinois, Mis- 
souri, Iowa and Pennsylvania. He has been pastor of the 
Somerset Disciple church longer than anv other one jierson, 
first in 1870 and 1871, and again in 1883 to\he autumn of 1887, 
when literary work, in addition to the cares and responsibili- 
ties of his ]iastorate. so reduced his vitality that he was forced 
to a])andon both and became official court reporter for the Six- 
teenth Judicial District, Bedford and Somerset counties, a posi- 
tion which he still holds in Somerset county, which now con- 
stitutes by itself the Sixteenth Judicial District. i\reanwhile 
he has been ])reaching, largely as a gratuity, for nearly all the 
leading denominations of the county, in case of the illness or 
absence of their pastors. During his pastorates, and in addi- 
tion thereto, he has founded or restored thirteen congrega- 
tions, delivered numerous tem]ierance lectures, and prepared 
young ])eople for academies and colleges. He is the author of 
two books, "Sabbath Discussion," (now out of print), and 



42 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

"The Tale of a Pioneer Chiircli," a history of the Somerset 
Disciple church, which has rescued from oblivion many im- 
portant facts and documents, and of which Hon. B. F. Meyers, 
of Harrisbnrg, in review, said: ''This is the only book that 
gives the real origin of the Republican party." Mr. Vogel is 
now preparing a poem on the Lord's Prayer, entitled Pater 
Noster, to be published in book form early in 1907. Because 
of the horrors of slavery Mr. Vogel forsook the Democracy 
of his ancestors and became a Republican, and because of the 
tremendous havoc of the drink traffic has for years been a 
Prohibitionist. By the latter organization he has been several 
times nominated for the legislature. 

Mr. Vogel married, October 11, 1866, at New Castle, Penn- 
sylvania, Maud M., daughter of Matthew and Jane (Barber) 
Dinsmore, the former a farmer. Mrs. Vogel was educated in 
New Castle and is regarded as one of the most talented women 
of Somerset, her addresses and papers in conventions being 
always notable features. Of the eight children born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Vogel, three daughters are now living: Ella King, 
assistant principal of the Somerset schools; Virginia Viola, 
teacher of the pianoforte, ar^i Maud Petrina, who is attending 
an academic course. Another daughter, Daisy M., recently 
died in the Philippines, where she and Ella King were govern- 
ment teachers in the Bulacan high school at Balluag, Daisy 
having been previously in charge of the department of music 
in the Edinboro State Normal school and government teacher 
in Porto Rico. Of the four teachers for the Philippines that 
Dr. N. C. Shaffer, state superintendent of education, was re- 
quested by the government to select, Ella King and Daisy M. 
were two. Mr. Vogel, for a number of years, has devoted his 
spare moments to special thought and study, it being his pur- 
pose to end his days in writing books of a critical nature on 
scriptural and scientific themes. 

KNEPPER FAMILY. 

Three brothers of the Knepper family in Wurtemberg, 
Germany, came to America in 1750. One settled in Virginia, 
one in Berks county, Pennsylvania, and the other farther to 
the west. From the last named descended all the generations 
of this name in Somerset county, Pennsylvania. 

(I) John Knepper, born 1763, died August 1, 1817, in 
Brothers Valley township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. He 
married Anna M. Glessner, born 1765, died 1847. She was the 
daughter of Christian and Elizabeth (Fisher) Wertz. The 
former was born June 12, 1772, and the latter May 24, 1776. 
John Knepper and wife, Anna M., had the following children: 
Elizabeth, born February 23, 1789, died aged eighty-six years- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 43 

Catharine, l)()ni Jiiiio 10, 17JK); William, lioin at IUmThi, Peiin- 
svlvania, Jaiiiiarv 2, 3792; lie was a soldier in the war of 
1812-14; A. M. (known as ''Polly"), born November 2, 1793, 
died aged fifty-nine years; John, born October 13, 1795; Jacob, 
born Septeml)er 4, 1797; Lewis, born December 2(5, 1799, died 
at the age of eighty-eight years; Peter, born March 4, 1802, a 
marble cntter by trade; Judge Jonathan, born July 20, 1804, 
became sheriiT and associate judge of Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania; George, born December 12, 1806; Simon, born May 
3, 1809, of whom latei-; Rev. Henry, born August 25, 1812, died 
aged sixty-six years; Rev. Benjamin, born September 10, 1816, 
of whom later. 

(IT) Simon Knepper, son of John (1) and Anna M. 
(Glessner) Knepper, born ]\ray 3, 1809, died aged fifty-three 
years. He was a carpenter by trade. He married Nancy, 
daughter of Christian and Nancy (Fisher) AVertz, January 15, 
1834. Their children were: Amanda, born May 20, 1835, mar- 
I'ied Joseph I'ritts, deceased; Oliver, born June 5, 1837, of 
whom later; Lieutenant Henry F., born April 19, 1839, of 
whom later; Amos W., born April 14, 1841, of whom later; 
"William P., born July 25, 1843, served in the civil war, was 
killed at New Market, and was buried on Southern soil; he was 
a member of Company B, Fifty-fourth Pennsylvania Regiment; 
Ellen, born December 31, 1845; married William "Weigle; Em- 
eline, born ]\[ay 28, 1848, married Samuel Deitz; David, born 
September 7, 1850, deceased; Cyrus, born August 26, 1852, 
married Annie E. Pile; Annie born October 6, 1854, married 
Elwood Rice; Elizabeth, born April 19, 1857, married Edward 
Horner, of Johnstown, Pennsylvania. 

(II) Rev. Benjamin Knepper, youngest child of John (1) 
and Anna M. (Glessner) Knepper, born September 10, 1816, 
died October 3, 1905, aged eighty-nine years. He died at his 
daughter's liouse in Connellsville, Pennsylvania. He was the 
youngest of thirteen children in his parents' family. He re- 
ceived his education in the common schools of Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, and subse(|uently took a theological course un- 
der the instruction of Rev. William Conrad, of Hagerstown, 
Maryland, who was pastor of the Reformed church at Berlin, 
Pennsylvania. He entered the ministry when he was twenty- 
eight years of age, being associated with the Reformed church. 
For a time he was ))astor at W'ellersburg, Pennsylvania, then 
went to Illinois, where lie remained eighteen months, but was 
called back by his peo})le in Somerset county to airain l)econie 
pastor at Wellersburg, Pennsylvania, which he faithfully served 
for fifty-five years, without intermission. For many years he 
was the only pastor of his denomination in Sonierset county, 
hence was in great demand in both this and Bedford counties. 



44 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

At that early day mncli of the preaching was in country dis- 
tricts, and many long trips were made to officiate at funerals 
and weddings. " Dm'ing his ministry, "Father Knepper" bap- 
tized over two thousand persons and officiated at more mar- 
riages and funerals than any other man in Somerset county. 

In 1839 Rev. Knepper was united in marriage to Miss 
Catharine Hay, of Berlin, Pennsylvania. Two children were 
born of this union: Sophia, deceased, and Mrs. Ann Heller, 
now living at Connellsville, Pennsylvania. In 1889 he cele- 
brated his "golden wedding" anniversary. He was buried at 
Berlin, Pennsylvania. His wife survived him. Among the re- 
markable and heroic characters of the nineteenth century 
among the clergy of Pennsylvania, Father Knepper will ever 
be referred to as among the "bright and shining lights." 

(Ill) Oliver Knepper, son of Simon (2) and Nancy 
(Wertz) Knepper, born June 5, 1837, in Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania; died in 1899. He was by trade a carpenter. 
He served his county as sheriff, and at his death was holding 
the office of justice of the peace. Pie was an exceptionally 
prominent man, and great was the sorrow in the community 
at his death. He was orderly sergeant in Company H, Two 
Hundred and Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, during the 
Civil war. He married Mary Pugh, in 1858; she was born 
in 1836. The children by this union were: Laura, born May, 
1860; Chester M., born*lS62; Ada and Cora (twins); Edith, 
Orlo S.. Florence. 

(Ill) Lieutenant Henry F. Knepper, son of Simon (2) 
and Nancy (Wertz) Knepper, was born April 14, 1839, at 
what is now called Rockwood, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. 
He was a school teacher and treasurer of Somerset county. 
In politics a radical Republican. In religious faith and pro- 
fession a United Brethren. He served in the Union army dur- 
ing the civil war, enlisting as a member of Company E, One 
Hundred and Thirty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and after 
nine months re-enlisted in the Fifth Pennsylvania Heavy Ar- 
tillery, and served until the end of the war, receiving a com- 
mission- as lieutenant, having been first sergeant. After he 
had served one term as county treasurer of his county, Mr. 
Knepper was made deputy for another term and had full' 
charge of the office. He was one of four brothers who fol- 
lowed teaching many terms. Pie was the one of the four who 
served in the Pinion cause in the days of the rebellion. 

He married, February 14, ]860, Margaret Spangler, born 
November 10, 1837. Their five children are: Wilson J., born 
November 26, 1860, now a merchant of Indiana; Norman E., 
born September 27, 1862, married Emma Weimar, of Somer- 
set; Almira, born July 22. 1864, married Mahlon Schrock; Ed- 



BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 45 

ward K., born June 4, 1866, now a merchant of Johnstown, 
Pennsylvania, married Emma AVright, of Bedford county, 
Pennsylvania ; Winnie Grrace, bom November 7, 1878, a teacher 
of long service in the schools of Pittsburgh and Jolmstown, 
Pennsylvania — a teacher of rare attainments. 

(Ill) Amos ^Y. Knepper, son of Simon (2) and Nancy 
(Wertz) Knepper, was born April 14, 1841, at Berlin, Penn- 
sylvania, in "an old red house still standing." He was schooled 
in the Somerset county schools and when twenty years of age 
enlisted in the Union cause, August 14, 1862, as a member of 
Company K, One Hundred and Thirty-third Regiment, Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers. He was in Captain George F. Baer's 
famous company and was a corporal. He cast his first vote 
while on the battlefield of Antietam, voting for Abraham Lin- 
coln, for his second term. He served nine months and was hon- 
orably discharged at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, May 26, 1863." 
He participated in the engagements so famous in the history of 
the civil war — the second battle of Bull Run, Antietam, Fred- 
ericksburg. .Chancellorsville; etc. After his return he engaged 
in merchandising at Somerset, continuing about twenty-five 
years. Since 1904 he has been actively engaged in the real 
estate business at Somerset. He is now vice-president of the 
Somerset Electricity plant and a large real estate owner. 

Politically, like all the family, Mr. Knepper is a staunch 
Republican, and was a candidate for the state legislature in 
1902, and was only defeated by a small majority in a three- 
cornered contest. In the spring of 1906, nominated by Repub- 
licans for legislator, which is equivalent to election in the coun- 
ty of Somerset. He is a member of the Grand Army of the 
Republic, Post No. 210; Knights of the Golden Eagle, Junior 
Order of American Mechanics, Farmers' Alliance and Grange, 
and Maccabees. 

He married, January 16, 1868, at New Centerville, Penn- 
sylvania, Sabinie E., daughter of Joseph and Deliah (Boyd) 
Smith, of Somerset county, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Knepper was 
one of a family of five children, two of whom only survived. 
By this union two sons were born: William, November 10, 
1868, died when between five and six years of age; Rev. George 
W., April 3, 1876, and educated in the common and high schools 
of Somerset, and graduated from the Indianapolis University 
of Butler, with the class of 1899. After leaving college, he 
was state secretary and traveling lecturer for the State of In- 
diana for the Young Men's Christian Association for about 
two years. He was called home by the death of his mother, 
March 12, 1900, soon after which said event he took up the 
work of the ministry, becoming pastor by a unanimous call of 
the Christian church at Somerset — his native borough — which 



46 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

charge he still holds in a most devout and truly creditable 
manner. Bis pastorate dates from the spring of 1904. 

(IV) Chester M. Kjiepper, son of Oliver (3) and Mary 
(Pugh) Knepper, born in 1862, entered the naval school at 
Annapolis, Maryland, in 1880, and graduated therefrom in 
1884. He is still in the United States navy. He was com- 
mander of the torpedo boat "McKay" at the time of the 
Spanish-American war, and was delegated to bring back the 
remains of Paul Jones from France, in July, 1905, being on 
the flag ship "Brooklyn." He was married in 1897. 

(IV) Orlo S. Knepper, son of Oliver (3) and Mary 
(Pugh) Knepper, entered the United States Naval Academy 
in 1891, and graduated in 1895. He was with the Dewey fleet 
as signal recorder for the boat "Concord," and was one of 
two to go aboard the captured Spanish ships at Manila Bay, 
to take the side arms from the crew. He resigned as lieutenant 
from the "West Virginia,'"^ September, 1905, and is now a busi- 
ness man in New York city. He was married in June, 1905. 
It might be added that he was with the "Maine" three years, 
and was only transferred from her a short time before her 
awful destruction. 

(V) Robert 0. Bosh, son of P. A. and Larha (Knepper) 
Bosh, when aged nineteen years, in 1904, also became a cadet 
in the United States navy. 

(IV) Norman E. Knepper, son of Lieutenant Henry F. 
(3) and Margaret (SpanglerJ Knepper, was born in the bor- 
ough of Somerset, Pennsylvania, September 27, 1862. He re- 
ceived a good connnon school education, and early in his life 
became a salesman in a store at Somerset, Pennsylvania, and 
from that steadily rose to be one of the proprietors, and has 
for many years been one of the leading dry goods and clothing 
men of the borough, and is now of the firm of Knepper & Good. 
Aside from his mercantile business, he lias other financial in- 
terests and has been successful as an investor in coal lands in 
his native county. Politically Mr. Knepper is a Republican. 
August 28, 1891, he married Emma Weimer, daughter of John 
H. and Annie (Roberts) Weimer, of Somerset, Pennsylvania. 
By this union two children were born: Elizabeth, born No- 
vember 23, 1893; Henry, Jr., February 22, 1899. 

HON. WILLIAM HENRY KOONTZ. 

Hon. William Henry Koontz, lawyer, legislator and states- 
man, of Somerset, Pennsylvania, was born in that place when 
it was a mere hamlet, June 15, 1830. He came of sturdy Ger- 
man ancestry, and his family were among the first settlers of 
Somerset county, his grandfather, Samuel Koontz, removing 
thither from Lancaster county when the region to which he 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 4:7 

came was an almost unbroken wilderness. His maternal grand- 
father, Jacob Schneider, came from Germany. 

He was brought up amid such surroundings as developed 
abilities and traits of character which peculiarly distinguished 
a type of manhood now all but extinct. The common schools 
of the day, well taught, though totally lacking in text-book 
equipment such as is now deemed indispensable, afforded him 
the rudiments of an education altogether insufficient for an 
active career. He had. however, a thirst for knowledge, and 
he read with avidity and clear understanding every book ob- 
tainable, and was fortunate in their being of real worth. Tt 
may here be noted that the first time he was ever in a college 
building was in 1S80, when he delivered the commencement 
address at Lancaster. Determined upon a legal profession as 
his life work, he became a student in the law office of Forward 
& Stutzman, in Somerset, and was admitted to the bar in 1851, 
immediately upon attaining his majority. He at once entered 
upon practice, and in 1853 his abilities found recognition in 
his election to the position of district attorney of Somerset 
county, this marking the beginning of his public career, which 
was destined to be brilliant as well as highly useful. His ad- 
vance in his profession was constant and substantial, and he 
can now look back with commendable pride upon more than a 
half century (fifty-five years, a most unusual period of ac- 
tivity) of industrious effort, during which he has been promi- 
nently connected with very many important trials in his county, 
and many in other portions of the state. A cause celehre with 
which his name is closely associated is that of the Nicely broth- 
ers, charged with murder, the case having run for about two 
years. General Koontz was one of the leading counsel for the 
defense, and, after following the case to its end before the 
courts, he, together with his associates, made the final plea 
befoi'e the Board of Pardons, and his argument, which related 
to the legal powers of that body, has from that day to the 
present been quoted and relied upon by the bar of the state. 

It is, however, the public career of Mr. Koontz that princi- 
pally claims attention. Formerly a Whig, in 1856, when that 
party was hopelessly disrupted, he became one of the organiz- 
ing members of the new Republican party, and gave his hearty 
support to its first presidential candidate, Jolm C. Fremont. 
In 1857 his popularity, his intense enthusiasm and his fiery 
oratory pointed to him as a leader in a desperate struggle, and 
he accepted the nomination of his party for the state senate. 
He was defeated at the polls, with his ticket, but he had added 
to his friends and further developed his splendid powers. He 
was a delegate to the famous Republican national convention 
in Chicago in 1860, and he was among the first to cast a ballot 



48 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

for Abraham Lincoln as a presidential candidate. In the same 
year he was nominated for prothonotaiy, and was elected, en- 
tering into the canvass with all his ability, warmly advocating 
the election of the great statesman whose mission it was to save 
the Union. In 1864 he was elected to congress from the dis- 
trict comprising the counties of Somerset, Bedford, Fulton, 
Franklin and Adams, and his course so commended him to his 
constituents that he was re-elected for the ensuing term. The 
years of his service in congress were among the most critical 
of the century. The Civil war was brought to an end, and 
then came up a problem without a precedent for its solution — 
that of reconstructing the old slave states. Throughout this 
trying period General Koontz's services were of the greatest 
value to the entire country. He maintained a dispassionate, 
logical, and judicial position, ably and exactly expressed by 
Vice President Wilson in his ''History of the Reconstruction 
Measures:" "Mr. Koontz, of Pennsylvania, was for the protec- 
tion of the people of the South who had been true to the Union, 
without regard to race or color," and the author quoted the fol- 
lowing from one of General Koontz's speeches on the floor of 
congress : 

"The great duty rests upon us to finish the work which 
has not been finished by warfare. The shackles of four millons 
of slaves were melted by the fierce fires of civil war, but the 
animus of slavery, its passions and prejudices, yet remain. It 
is our duty so to legislate as to remove the last relic of a bar- 
barism that would have suited the dark ages; to conform our 
institutions to the advanced condition which will have been 
brought about by the revolution just ended, and when this shall 
be done, the great Republic, freed from the dark stain of human 
slavery, will start upon her mission to promulgate by precept 
and example, the immutable and eternal truth of the equality 
of men, and before whose resistless march kingdoms and pow- 
ers and all systems built upon caste and creed for the oppres- 
sion of men will be wiped from the face of the earth, and known 
no more forever." 

During his congressional career. General Koontz attracted 
the attention of the country not only for his ability and earn- 
estness, but for his oratorical powers. His speeches in favor 
of relief for the destitute of the South, and on the death of 
Hon. Thaddeus Stevens, attracted widespread attention, and 
brought him generous commendation. He was also known as 
one of the most industrious members. He served upon various 
committees of great importance, including those on the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, and Expenditures of the Interior Depart- 
ment; performed arduous labor in the construction of supple- 
mentary Reconstruction bills, and was conspicuous in the im- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 49 

peachment proceedings against President Johnson. His prom- 
inence, his abilities and his fine personal traits brought him 
into close association with the most distinguished men of the 
most dramatic and important period in the nation's history, 
and he was on familiar terms with Vice President Wilson, 
Thaddens Stevens, Ben Wade, and others of giant intellect. 
Intense in his patriotism, unyielding in his advocacy of equal 
and exact justice to all, holding to the loftiest ideals of per- 
sonal integrity in all public as well as in private concerns, his 
record was unsullied by a single act open to the least suspicion 
of self-seeking. 

Mr. Koontz's reputation as an orator brought him into 
great request in the campaign years following his retirement 
from congress. Besides his frequent appearances in his own 
state, in 1875 he spoke in the Ohio campaign, and the following 
year in the same state and in Maryland. During the Garfield 
campaign he delivered addresses in Pennsylvania and Mary- 
land, and his services were again called for in these states in 
1884. In 1887 he again spoke in Ohio, and in the following 
years in various other states, in 1896 making a speaking tour 
of West Virginia, 

His public services in his own state have been of inestima- 
ble value. He was a delegate in the convention which nomi- 
nated General John W. Geary for governor, and his influence 
was potent in that great body. In 1898 he was elected to the 
state assembly, and in the first session introduced a resolution 
providing for the appointment of a committee to investigate 
charges of bribery made against a number of representatives. 
He was made a member of the committee, whose work was one 
of the most important features of the session, and which had 
the effect of making legislative work for the remainder thereof 
more free from scandal than for many years previous. A 
writer of the period said concerning this investigation: 

''Those who had the opportunity of hearing Mr. Koontz 
speak on the floor of the house during the last session of the 
legislature can fully testify to his power, and the high literary 
character of his speeches. His voice is peculiarly mellow and 
resonant, with not a strident note in any register. His words 
are well chosen, and his addresses under all circumstances 
are delivered with a grace of gesticulation that marks the ora- 
tor. On the other hand, his ability to flay an opponent without 
departing from strict parliamentary language is quite as 
marked as his powers of persuasive address. No one who was 
present when Mr. Koontz appealed to the house the morning 
after the first bribery investigating committee had refused to 
examine witnesses and proceed regularly with the investiga- 
tion, can forget the polished condemnation, sarcasm and in- 

Vol. Ill 4 



50 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

vective of his remarks. The lioiise sat l)reathless, and the three 
iiioml)ors of the coniiniitee who had incurred his wrath visibly 
winced under his casti^ation. His ai)]ieal was for fair play; 
for freedom to ]»ursue the ri^lit course, in justice to the ])ublic; 
or, in default to j^rant tliis, iiis resii>:nation as a member of the 
conniiittee would immediately follow. It was not a covert as- 
sault. In the committee the night before, he had protested 
ajiainst the arbitrary action of the majority, and on their re- 
fusjii to concede what he and the ii^eneral ])ublic believed to be 
fair and honest, he delivered a phi Hippie, in which he served 
notice that he would appeal from the committee to the house. 
And he did. The castigation of machine men and measures 
that day had an effect so far-reaching- that there is no telling 
even now where it will end. That s])eech of the member from 
Somerset commanded the reorganization of a machine-made 
conunittee, forced a]iart unwilling* li])s, unraveled the tangled 
threads of a shameless and criminal conspiracy, brought to 
light ]iolitical secrets so vile that hardened politicians winced. 
Today, as a result of Mr. Koontz's ap])eal to the house in that 
memorable speech, witliout ]n'ecedent in but one case in the 
legislative history of Pennsylvania, the courts have been ap- 
jrealed to to take cognizance of evils he helped to unveil." 

In this battle he stood alone, the only anti-Quay member 
of the conunittee, and, recognized for his ability, courage and 
inde])endence, he became, perforce, a ])rime leader of the anti- 
Quay elements in the session of the legislature to which he was 
re-elected in 1890. He was placed in nomination for the s]ieak- 
ershi]) by the anti-Quay Republicans and Democrats, and, with 
the state organization against him, under the leadership of 
Senator Quay, came within one vote of an election. On the 
first ballot the vote was a tie, Mr. Koontz and his opponent 
each receiving one hundred votes. Before the second ballot 
was taken, one of the members su]i])orting Mr. Koontz was 
taken from the chamber by the sergeant-at-arms, and, not re- 
turning in time to vote, ]\rr. Koontz wjis defeated. Tn this 
contest Senatoi- Quay came nearer meeting his overthrow than 
at any time during the many years of his control of Pennsyl- 
vania politics. Tn thus strongly asserting himself, and leading 
an almost lio])eless struggle against machine ])olitics and ring 
rule. Mr. Koontz was insjiired by no other consideration than 
devotion to the ])ublic interests, and to lofty ideals of citizen- 
shif) and official ])r()l)itv and purity. Tfis political creed could 
be read in an admii-ablc a<ldress which lie delivered on June 5, 
18(S0. "On Amciican Politics," hcfoi'c the literary societies of 
Franklin and Marshall College. This was not only a brilliant 
literary effort, but it was remarkable in scope and purpose, 
based as it was upon his personal experience and observation, 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 51 

and bad as one of its most ])ictiires(|iie and effective featnres a 
faithfnl depiction of the evils of machine politics which he was 
in later years to antagonize and lead in overthrowing. In 1906 
he was the Fusion candidate for state senator for the district 
comjjosed of the counties of Somerset, Bedford and Fulton ; 
the election had not occurred when this volume was published. 
Throughout his life, in his relations to his own commu- 
nity and in his personal life, Greneral Koontz has ever been 
known as jjublic-spirited in the best sense, liberal in his en- 
couragement of all worthy enterprises, and helpful to the' 
struggling, especially friendly to young men just entering up- 
on the battle of life. He is largely interested in various im- 
portant enterprises, and has large circles of acquaintances in 
Philadel]:)hia, Pittsburgh, Baltimore and Washington. He is 
vice-president of the Somerset National Bank, and director in 
the Pittsburgh & Gonnellsville, Somerset & Cambria and Ber- 
lin railroads. His military title of general comes from his 
service with the volunteers of Pennsylvania, many years ago. 
He was married, in 1859, to Miss Matilda S. Johnson. He re- 
sides in a beautiful home in Union street, Somerset. Many 
distinguished persons have there been his guests, among them. 
President McKinley, Secretary of War Alger, Attorney Gen- 
eral (U. S.) McKenna, Hon. J. S. Black, who was chief justice of 
Pennsylvania, and Attorney General and Secretary of State in 
President Buchanan's cabinet; Governors Hoyt and Hartranft, 
of Pennsylvania; Governor Lowndes, of Maryland, and many 
judges of the courts in western Pennsylvania; John AV. Gar- 
rett, and his son Robert Garrett, both of whom were presi- 
dents of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company, as well as 
other superintendents of said company; J. G. Harvey, presi- 
dent of the Western Bank of Baltimore, and several prominent 
bankers and business men of that city; Galusha A. Grow and 
numerous other prominent politicians of the state. 

THE HAY FAMH.Y. 

The Play family of Somerset county was founded in this 
country by Simon Hay, who was born in Germany, April 18, 
1742, and when nineteen or twenty years of age emigrated 
from Zwei-l>ricken, Germany, accomiDanied by his two elder 
brothers, one of whom settled near Berlin, Somcn-set county, 
Pennsylvania, then a vast wilderness, and the other one in 
what has si^ice become the state of Kentucky, and settled there. 
Simon remained for several years in Hagerstown, Maryland, 
working at his trade as a weaver. AVhile residing there he 
married Anna Mary Shaver, some of Avliose connections are 
now living in and about Freedens, Somerset county. 

Simon Hay came to Somerset county, then a part of Bed- 



52 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

ford county, in the year 1767-68, and settled on a farm now 
owned by S. S. Hay, about five miles southwest of Berlin. 
He put up a tent under a big white oak tree without a foot 
of cleared land, and went bravely to work to hew out a farm 
from the forest about him. At first he and his family sub- 
sisted on wild animals' meat and potatoes. In those days 
deer were plenty and as many as thirty to thirty-five were often 
seen in a drove. In after years he frequently made trips to 
Hagerstowm, on horseback, a liundred miles away, to fetch 
salt and a little flour for the children. On several occasions 
Indians made their appearance at his home on their way to 
Fort Bedford, but never did any violence nor molested himself 
or his family. 

Simon Hay and his wife, Anna Mary (Shaver) Hay, were 
the parents of ten children, five sons and five daughters. The 
names of the sons were: Michael, who settled one mile north 
of Lavansville, Somerset county. Jacob, who settled on the 
farm where Wellersburg is now located, but who afterward 
removed to what is now the state of Ohio. Valentine, who be- 
came the owner of what was then the home farm, and now 
called Hay's Mill. (Grandfather Hay built the stone house in 
1798, which at this time is in a splendid state of preservation, 
the second mill he built is still standing there and is being 
profitably conducted. He since built a fulling and carding 
mill. His was the first grist mill, perhaps, in this county.) 
George, settled on the farm now owned by Henry G. Hay, 
three-fourths of a mile west of Hay's mill. Peter, settled on 
the farm where his father, Simon Hay, had put up his tent 
under the big white oak tree. Of the daughters, Mary married 
Jacob Young, and then settled on a farm one and one-half 
miles north of Lavansville. Susannah married Jacob Baker 
and then settled in Ohio, in what is now Holmes county. Eliza- 
beth married George Weller, grandfather of ex-County Super- 
intendent John Weller, and late a member of the Pennsylva- 
nia legislature from Somerset county; they settled on the farm 
that her brother, Jacob Hay, had settled, which is now occu- 
pied by Wellersburg borough; the place got its name from 
the Weller family. Catherine married Samuel Miller and then 
settled in Addison township, where their son William now re- 
sides, and who is one of the great cattle dealers of the south 
of Somerset county. Eva married George Gephart and then 
settled on a farm one mile east of New Centerville, in Midford 
township, upon which the village of Gepharts is now located. 
They were the i)arents of Simon Gephart, the Dayton (Ohio) 
banker. 

After the death of his wife, which occurred in the stone 
house at Hay's mill, at the age of sixty-three years, five months 



BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 53 

and six days, Simon Hay made his home with his son Valen- 
tine, who carried on tiie farm and mill. Valentine Hay died 
at the age of fifty-two years, after which his father, Simon 
Hay, made his home with his son, Peter Simon Hay. For 
the last two years of his life Simon Hay suffered from can- 
cer in the breast which caused his death. He was pleasant 
in his conversation and cheerful to the last, notwithstanding 
his physical ailment. He died February 3, 1842, aged ninety- 
nine years, nine months and fifteen days. 

Peter Simon Hay, son of Simon and Anna Mary (Shaver) 
Hay, was a life-long resident of Brothers Valley township, 
and his active years were spent on the farm formerly the prop- 
erty of his father. He married Elizabeth Walker, who was 
born in Brothers Valley township, and ten children were born 
to them, namely: David, Michael, Philip, Peter S., Valentine, 
Susan, who became the wife of Samuel Walker; Mary, who 
became the wife of Moses Young; Elizabeth, who became the 
wife of John Rink ; Catherine, who became the wife of Fredrick 
Weller; and Caroline, who became the wife of Samuel M. Say- 
lor. 

David Hay was born September 3, 1814, and died April 
14, 1878. He was married twice. His first wife was Mary 
Cook, daughter of Jacob Cook, of Southampton township. 
With her he had two children, viz.: William H., of Meyers- 
dale, Pennsylvania, and Calvin T., of Salisbury, Pennsylvania. 
His second wife was Mary, a daughter of John Ranch, of 
Brothers Valley township. With her he had one child, Norman 
D., of Elk Lick. David Hay was one of nature's noblemen. 
He was a large-hearted and public-spirited man. He had a 
word of encouragement and gave a helping hand to every good 
enterprise, and to every person deserving of sympathy and 
moral and material aid. In 1857 he was elected a member of 
the Pennsylvania house of representatives and served his con- 
stituents well in the session of 1858-59. 

Michael Hay was born January 12, 1817, and died Novem- 
ber 19, 1888. He was married three times. His first wife 
was Mary, a daughter of Jacob Olihger, of Summit township, 
with whom he had two children, one of whom survives, viz.: 
Josiah M., of Akron, Ohio. His second wife was a Miss Augus- 
tine, of Addison township, and his third wife was Rachel 
Glotfelty, a daughter of Jacob Glotfelty, of Salisbury borough. 
He had no children with the last two wives. He was a man 
of great physical endurance, and followed farming until he 
was about thirty-five years of age, and during this time he 
was a hard-working man. Later, he was engaged in merchan- 
dising as a partner of his brother, Peter S., and during the 
last twenty years of his life was a large real estate dealer, 



54 BEDFORD AXD SOMERSET COUNTIES 

bought and sold large bodies of coal land. He held the office 
of justice of the peace whilst living on the farm in Elk Lick 
townshi]). It was during liis administration that Henry Baugh- 
man secretly murdered his son, and lie was the leading spirit 
in ferreting out the crime and bringing the criminal to justice. 
He was a man of good judgment and a thoroughgoing man. 
AVhatever he undertook to do he did with all his might. At 
an early age he united with the Reformed church, and con- 
tinued a faithful and consistent meml)er until his death. 

Philip Hay was born April iJ, 1819. He was married to 
Anna Olinger, a daughter of Jacob Olinger, and they had eleven 
children, two of whom, Ellen and ]\[ark, died in infancy. Nine 
survive, six sons and three daughters viz.: William P., former 
county commissioner; Hiram P., Sylvester S., Simon Peter, 
Ephraim P., Luke, Melinda, w^ife of Milliard Walker; Clara, 
wife of Wilson E. Walker; and Sarah, wife of Lewis Berkley. 
Philip Hay was a man of remarkable energy and endurance. 
He resided on the old homstead all his life, engaged in active 
farm life until the last ten years of his life, when he sold his 
farm to his son Sylvester. He was a conservative man, but 
enthusiastic in all he undertook, whether it pertained to mat- 
ters of business or religion. He was not a pessimist, but was 
an optimist, believing that success in any good cause would 
crown well directed energetic and persistent work. He was 
kind and indulgent to the members of his family. He had a 
word of cheer for everyone who tried to do his duty, and the 
young people of the neighborhood were the objects of his ten- 
derest solicitude, and his earnest words of advice and encourage- 
ment will be remembered all their lifetime. He was a true 
Christian man, and died peacefullv as he lived, on August 15, 
1901. 

Peter S. Hay was born in Brothers Valley township, Au- 
gust 8, 1832. He acquired a common school education, and 
taught one term of school in Jenner township. He worked on 
the farm until he was al»out eighteen years of age, and then 
entered the store of Samuel AValker, at Lavansville, where 
he remained about two years. In 1<S53 he commenced the 
mercantile business on his own account in Salisl)ury, and con- 
tinued until the date of his death in 1903, either by himself or 
in partnership with his brother Michael under the firm name 
of Hay & Brother, and later with Josiah M. Hay, his nephew, 
in the name of Hay & Co. From 1871 to 1903 the business was 
carried on in his own name. He also dealt largely in real estate. 
He was a shrewd, conservative business man, and his judgment 
was sought by the best of business men, and no enter])rise of any 
magnitude was undertaken in his conununity without first get- 
ting his opinion. He was a conscientious Christian man, uni- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 55 

vorsally esteemed by all wlio personally knew liini. He was a 
liberal snpporter of the Reformed chnrcli, with which he was 
identified from early youth. AH worthy and charitable objects 
received hearty aid and sympathy at his hands. On January 
5, 1854, he was married to Elizabeth Diveley, a daughter of 
;^ficllael Diveley, of Salisbury. They had seven children, three 
of whom died in infancy; four survive, viz: Harvey, Morris 
Russel, Jennie, wife of Dr. A. M. Lichty, of Salisbury, and 
George C. Harvey has been made the candidate of the Demo- 
cratic and the Independent Republican parties for the house of 
representatives of Pennsylvania. Peter S. flay died March 4, 
1903. 

Valentine Hay was born October 17, 1834, in Brothers Val- 
ley township. His father died when he was ten j^ears of age, 
and he worked for his brothers, Michael and Philip, until he 
was eighteen years of age on the farm. He taught school dur- 
ing three annual sessions. In 1853 he attended the academy es- 
tablished by the Everhart brothers in Berlin. In 1854 he en- 
tered Heidelberg College at Tiffin, Ohio, and in June, 1857, he 
graduated with the degree of A. B. During the three months' 
summer vacation in 1856 he commenced reading law in the 
office of William J. and Herman L. Baer, of Somerset, Penn- 
sylvania, and after graduating at college he applied himself 
closely to the study of the law and was admitted to the bar April 
28, 1858, and has been in continued practice for fortj^-eight 
years. From January 1, 1863, to July 1, 1867, in connection 
with his law practice he was the editor and proprietor of the 
Somerset Democrat. His contention was that the fire-eaters 
of the south and the redhot Abolitionists of the north — the ex- 
tremists of both sections, who numbered but a corporal's guard 
compared with the entire population — were responsible for the 
condition of affairs that plunged the country into a fratricidal 
civil war, and if the proper effort had been made and at the 
proper time by the powers in being, the civil war could have 
been averted. And while the war was being waged he con- 
demned the partisan prejudices that drove the best generals 
from the field and supplanted them by incompetent, blunder- 
ing officers, that brought repeated disaster to our arms and 
protracted the war unnecessarily and multiplied the horrors 
and sacrifices of the war. On April 11, 1865, he was married to 
Elizabeth A. Weimer, the daughter of Dr. John Weimer, of 
Akron, Ohio, and they had one child born to them, Jul.y 19, 
1867, Leora Carter, who was married to J. R. Nutt, October 8, 
1890, and to whom was born a son, Robert H. Nutt, September, 
1894. They reside iu Cleveland, Ohio. The honorary degree 
of doctor of laws was confei-red upon him by Heidelberg Uni- 
versity, his alma mater, in June, 1906. 



56 BEDFORD AND SO:\IERSET COUNTIES 

Mary Hay was the oldest daughter of Peter S. Hay and 
was l)orn October "23, 1821. She was married to ]\[ose Young 
and lived most of her married life on a farm one mile north of 
Lavansville. They had five children; one of them, Austin, 
died June 2, 1891; four are living, viz: S. P. Young, of Salis- 
bury; Ellen, wife of Aaron F. Bittner; Binnie, wife of Jeffer- 
son Will ; and Lavan Young, resides in Lavansville. Moses 
Young died June 12, 1897, aged eighty-one years, two months 
and twelve days. ]\[rs. Young died March 2(5, 1905, aged eighty- 
three years, five months and three days. 

Susan Hay was the next oldest daughter and was born 
February 10, 1824. She was married to Samuel Walker, who 
in 1885 was elected associate judge and served in that capacity 
until his death in October, 1888. They had five children, two 
dead and three living, viz.: Binnie S., wife of James Tipton; 
Mary and Elizabeth, unmarried, and living with their mother. 

Elizabeth Hay was born February 27, 1826. She married 
John llink and they lived on a farm in Jenner township for 
nearly fifty years. They had four children, three of whom are 
living, viz: William H., of Johnstown; Ella and Milton Rink. 
Mrs. Rink is now living with her son. She is a kind-hearted, 
Christian woman. 

Catherine Hay was born August 3, 1828, was married to 
Frederick Weller, and they resided together in the Weller 
homestead, two miles north of Somerset, for nearly sixty years. 
Their family consists of three sons and three daughters: 
Cecilia, married Alexander Nichelson; Agnus, married Frank 
Musser: and Louisa, married Noah Meyers. The three sons 
are at home. 

Caroline Hay was born July 8, 1840, was married to Sam- 
uel M. SayJor. and now lives on a farm one and one-half miles 
from Somerset. Thev have six children; two of them, Peter 
and Calvin, are married and live on the farm, and the two other 
sons are single and live at home. They had two daughters, 
Sarah, who was married to John Bowman, but is now deceased, 
and Carrie, who is single and lives at home. 

ALBERT E. RAYMAN. 

Albert E. Rayman, an expert surveyor of Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, was born in Stony Creek township, August 24, 
1854. a son of George G. and Nancy (Good) Rayman. He is 
of German origin. 

Godleib Rayman (great-grandfather) was the founder of 
the family in this country. He was a native of Germany, born 
in 1747, and came to the United States, settling in Berks county, 
Pennsylvania, whence lie removed to what was then Bedford 
county, in 1773, settling in what is still known as the Glades, 




c:^^>ft 



\ > 




BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 57 

Stony Creek township, Somerset county. He was a tailor by 
trade, and also made long- strides along; the line of agriculture, 
clearing the dense forest and establishing farms for his chil- 
dren. Like all the inhabitants of the country at that period, 
he spent much of his time in fishing and hunting, the country 
then abounding in game, such as deer, bear, wolves, etc., and it 
has been said that he wore garments made of deer skin. He 
was a member of the Lutheran church, and active and promi- 
nent in all church work. His children were five in number, viz : 
Charles, John, George. Elizabeth, married John Shank; and 
Anna, married Peter Switzer. 

George Rayman (grandfather) was born in 1768 and died 
in 1834. He and his wife, Elizabeth Rayman, located in Shade 
township, keeping house under an oak tree mitil a log house was 
built for a home. Industry was one of the marked character- 
istics of Mr. Rayman, and during his first year of married life 
he cleared eight acres of land in the hitherto unbroken wilder- 
ness. In church connections they were Lutherans, having be- 
come members of this church when very young, and they worked 
earnestly and untiringly for the promotion of its principles. 
They became the parents of eleven children, all of whom are 
now deceased, namely: Mary, married a Mr. Hartman, and 
removed to Illinois; John, married a Miss Beachly, and they 
made their home in Somerset; Elizabeth, wife of Henry Fritz; 
they lived in Somerset; Susanna, deceased; Henry, married 

, and they lived in Somerset county; George, of 

whom later; Samuel, married a jMiss Beachy, and they resided 
in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, where their death occurred; 
Jacob, married Elizabeth Fike, and lived in Stony Creek town- 
ship; Joseph, went to the west when fifty years of age, and 
married and died there; Sarah, became the wife of Jacob 
Weigle, and lived in Stony Creek township; Lvdia, married 
John H. Snyder; they made their home with Mrs. Snyder's 
father, George Rayman. The entire family affiliated with the 
Lutheran church with the exception of Jacob, who belonged to 
the Dunkards. 

George G. Rayman (father) was born in Stony Creek 
township. Somerset county, Pennsylvania, and was a farmer 
by occupation. In 1831 he married Nancy Good, who was also 
a native of Somerset county. The country at that time was 
very sparsely populated, and after their marriage the young 
coui)le located on a tract of land which Mr. Rayman had pur- 
chased. It was thickly covered with timber, and in an unim- 
l)roved, uncultivated condition. Mr. Rayman erected a lo^ 
cabin, into which they moved before it was completed, having 
neither windows nor doors, and with only about half of an acre 
of land cleared around it. Wild animals roamed at will through 



58 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

the eonntry at that time, and ^\r^. Rayman lias related that 
at times she was iiiialile to slee]), owing to tlie howling of the 
wolves and bears outside. During their residence there they 
cleared and improved two hundred acres of land. The orijJ:inal 
log cabin subsequently gave way to a modern two-story dwell- 
ing house, with six large rooms, and a bank barn 45x100 feet. 
They were fairly well educated in the English and German 
languages, and were Lutherans in their religious faith. They 
both worked earnestly toward the furtherance of the doctrines 
of the church, and were sincere in aU mission work. In poli- 
tics Mr. Rayman affiliated w^ith the Rej)ublican party, and 
served at various times as school director and tax collector. 
He was an industrious, energetic citizen, and was held in the 
highest esteem by all who knew him. 

Mr. and Mrs. George G. Rayman were the parents of chil- 
dren as follows: 1. Susanna, born 1834, married C. A. Brant, 
wdio was engaged in the mercantile business in Shank:sville 
until a few years ago, when he sold out to his sons, and has 
since lived a retired life. 2. Jacob, born 1836, married Sally 
Rights ; he Avas a farmer by occupation, being actively engaged 
in this work until the spring of 1905, when he sold his farm 
to his son and retired. 3. Cyrus, born 1838, married Lavinia 
Coleman; he was a farmer, and died in 1896. 4. Noah, born 
1840, married Mary Coleman, and was a farmer by occupation, 
having lived on his father's farm. He died in 1902. 5. David, 
born June 24, 1842, enlisted August 8, 1862, Company E, One 
Hundred and Twenty-third Regiment of Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers. He contracted ty]ihoid fever, and died in the hospital 
at Sharpsburg. October 20, 1862. 6. Sarah, born 1844, mar- 
ried W. H. Barnhart, a school teacher of Somerset county, and 
who served in the Civil war for three years. They lived in 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 7. Elizabeth, born 1846, died in in- 
fancy. 8. Edward, born 1849, died in infancy. 9. Albert E., 
of whom later. All these children of George G. Rayman were 
active, earnest workers in the Lutheran church, where they held 
many of the official positions, except Jacob, who was a loyal 
German Baptist. The death of George C. Ravman occurred in 
1857, and that of his wife in 1866. 

Albert E Rayman was educated in the common and high 
schools of Somerset county, and was engaged for six terms in 
teaching in the county schools. He then was engaged for some 
years in farming in sunnner and teaching in the winter months, 
and in the year 1884 took a course in surveying and engineer- 
ing, and has since followed this profession. For the past ten 
years he has been engaged in farming, mine surveying, and has 
dealt very extensively in coal lands, his last deal being culmi- 
nated in June, 1905, when he sold one thousand acres of coal 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 59 

lands, situated in Brotliers X'alley and Stony Creek townships, 
to E. J. Berwin, of the Berwin & White Coal Company. In the 
practice of his ])rofession of surveyor, Mr. Raynian often came 
in contact with farmers who disagreed as to the boundary of 
their Uinds, bnt lie has had very little trouble in adjusting these 
matters, owing to the fa^'t that he is looked ujjon as an expert 
engineer, and one whose o])inion can always be relied upon, 
Mr. Rayman recalls an instance when he was called u])on l)y 
the court to fix the boundary between Allegheny and Fair Ho]>e 
townshijjs, which was then in dis]mte. Reciuesting the citizens 
to show him a corner, lie was conducted to a stonehea]), which 
they said was recognized by both townshi])s as a corner, and, 
setting his instrument up over the stoneheaj), started on the 
survey, which he completed in two days. Although the lines 
he ran did not accord exactly with the o]nnion of the inlial)itants 
of the township, his decision was accei)ted, and the disjmte was 
settled with satisfaction to all. He has been frequently called 
upon as a witness in court. On one occasion a case was tried 
between a limestone company and a coal comi^any, where the 
former had a draft in evidence and three engineers to testify 
to it, which so greatly differed from the draft produced by Mr. 
Eayman, in the interest of the coal company, that the counsel 
for the coal company feared lest the case be lost. When Mn 
Rayman was given an opportunity to explain his case on the 
witness stand, he did so very satisfactorily and came out vic- 
torious. 

In political relations Mr. Rayman accords allegiance to the 
Republican party, and works actively and untiringly in the in- 
terests of that organization. He is a member of the Friedens 
Evangelical Lutheran church. He was a meml)er of the church 
council for nine years in succession, founded what was known 
as the Zerfoss Sunday-school, of which he was sujierintendent 
for a number of years, until it changed to the ]\[ispah Sunday- 
school. He was superintendent of this also for one year, and 
was always a liberal contributor to all benevolent enter])rises. 
Fraternally Mr. Rayman is a member of the Royal Arcanum. 

He married, April 5, 1874, Kate Trent, a daughter of 
Ste])hen and Elizabeth (Will) Trent, who were the ])a rents of 
children as follows: Julia, deceased; Charles, who served in 
the war of the rebellion; James, William, Kate, Mary, Alex- 
ander, Edward, Josiah and Sarah, all now living in Somerset, 
excepting Sarah, who married J. F. Blakeney, a i)rinter, and 
they live in Greensl)iirg, Westmoreland county. All of the 
sons are farmers by occu])ation. Mr. and JVIrs. Rayman liave 
children as follows: Minerva C, bom March 17, 1875; Lollie 
G., February 27, 1879; Cordie P>., February 19, 1884; Webster 
H., March 4, 1887, all born in Stony Creek townshiji. Of these 



60 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

children Minerva G. is the wife of Irvin J. Schrock, a farmer 
of Somerset township; Lollie G. is married to Harvey J. Fritz, 
miner, Somerset township, and Cordie B. and Webster H. still 
reside at home. All are well educated. 

HARVEY SCHROCK. 

Harvey Schrock, the highly efficient and trustworthy steward 
of the "Somerset County Home" and superintendent of th4 
County Hospital, is a native of Somerset county, descended 
through the following line from Germany: 

(i) Christian Schrock, born in Germany, emigrated to 
Pennsylvania and first settled in some one of the extreme east- 
em counties, but subsequently removed to and became one of 
the early pioneers of Brothers Valley, Somerset county. The 
name of his wife was Fanny. Among their children was one 
son named Jacob C. Schrock. Christian Schrock and family 
entered the wild forests and cleared up land and made for 
themselves a comfortable home. He died very suddenly. 

(II) Jacob C. Schrock, son of Christian and Fanny 
Schrock, was born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, in 1812, 
and died September 26, 1887. He was a farmer. He married 
Catharine Horner, a native of Somerset county, born 1815, died 
November 3. 1891. They were the parents of four sons and 
five daughters : Joseph, deceased : George J., now living at the 
borough of Somerset, John, Israel J., Mary, married Daniel 
Bechley and lives at Johnstown, Pennsylvania; Sally, married 
John F. Rayman; Peggy, married J. J. Rayman; Aimie, mar- 
ried William Piatt, and is now deceased; Kate, married E. 
Blouch. 

(III) George J. Schrock, son of Jacob C. and Catharine 
(Horner) Schrock, born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, re- 
ceived a good common school education and followed farm- 
ing until 1889, when he removed to the borough of Somerset, 
where he leads a retired life. He married (first) Susan Musser, 
daughter of Jacob Musser and wife, by whom were born two 
children — Harvey, of whom later, and Ida, wife of H. H. Hay. 
The mother died in 1864 and for his second wife Mr. Schrock 
married Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel S. Meyers and wife, 
of Berlin, Pennsylvania. By this union three children were 
born: Alice, Ada, married Gilbert Cober; Meyers L., married 
Olie Yoder. Politically George J. Schrock is a Republican 
and in his church faith adheres to that of the Dunkards. 

(IV) Harvey Schrock, son of George J. and Susan (Mus- 
ser) Schrock, born in Brothers Valley township, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, August 1, 1862, received a good educa- 
tion in the schools of his native county, and followed the inde- 
pendent life of a farmer until he accepted his present official 




&Ao^crri^ 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 61 

position. In 1892 he moved from his native township to the 
farm of one hundred and twenty-three acres he still holds, and 
which is located about two miles from Somerset borough, ad- 
joining the "County Farm." In April, 1904, he took his pres- 
ent place as steward and hospital supreintendent of the County 
Home, having been elected by the poor directors. He is well 
qualified to manage this institution, which has on an average 
of one hundred and eight inmates, seventy-five of whom are 
insane subjects, composed of twenty-eight females and forty- 
seven males, which require great care and skill to properly 
manage. The farm of three hundred and forty-seven acres 
which belongs to the county has to be managed by Mr. Schrock,. 
as well. He still owns his farm, which is well improved. Mr. 
Schrock is a Republican and in church relations a Dunkard. 
lie married (first), September 17, 1882, Lizzie Sebits, 
daughter of Abraham Sebits and wife, by whom two children 
were born: Albert H., 1883; Lizzie E., 1884. The mother died 
October 3, 1884. For his second wife Mr. Schrock married Susan 
Lands, daughter of Abraham G. and Harriet (Speicher) Lands. 
By this union two children have been born: Mabel H., Feb- 
ruary, 1888; and Earl A., August 16, 1893. Both Abraham 
Sebits and Abraham Lands, fathers-in-law of Mr. Schrock, 
served in the Union army in the rebellion. 

WU^LIAM M. SCHROCK. 

AVilliam M. Schrock, a prominent and widely known cit- 
izen of Somerset, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, former 
proprietor and editor of the Somerset Standard, who rendered 
signal service to the government during the Civil war, and 
who is at present engineer and superintendent of the work of 
constructing the bridges in Somerset county, traces his descent 
to ancestors who had for their home the beautiful country of 
Switzerland. 

(I) Schrock, the great-grandfather of William 

M. Schrock and the founder of the family in this country, was 
the holder of a prominent political office under the then rul- 
ing power in Switzerland, Europe, about the year 1700. Ow- 
ing to political changes in the government he and his family 
were banished from the country, and they found a safe refuge 
in Holland. In the short period of three months, they were 
obliged to dispose of all their property in Switzerland — real 
estate holdings h& well as personal property — and this they 
were obliged to do at a great sacrifice. They made their home 
in Holland for three years and then emigrated to America, and 
established themselves in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. Here 
they concluded to make their permanent home, and settled 
down to farming pursuits. 



6-2 BEDFORD AND S0:\1EKSET COUNTIES 

(II) John Sclirock, son of Sclirock (1), the 

founder of tlie family in Anieri(;a, was born in 1754. He with 
one of his lialf-brothers niio-rated to Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, in or about 17()5, and settled in the vicinity of Ber- 
lin. He received what was considered a good education in 
those days, attending the subscri])tion schools of the district. 
This education was ])rincipally conducted in German. He was 
a membei- of the ]\rennonite church, and followed the occujjation 
of farming until his death, whicli occurred in 1813. John 
Sell rock was the father of four sons and five daughters, whose 
combined ages aggregated seven hundred and seventy-five 
years, none having died less than fifty-eight years old, and one 
liaving attained the ripe age of ninety-four years. 

Tliere are at the present time (1906) about eighty male 
descendants of voting age, who trace their ancestry back to these 
two half-brothers. These live in Somerset county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and fully as many more have migrated to other places. 
They have representatives in all professions and occu])ations. 
Tbe name was originally s]ielled Schrack. 

(III) Aaron Schrock. youngest son of John Schrock 
(2), was born near Berlin, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, 
January 30, 1805. His education was an excellent one, being 
conducted in both German and English, and at the projier time 
he was ai)prenticed to a blacksmith to learn a trade which was 
in great demand in those days. He became an expert in this 
as also in the manufacture of fine edge tools, for whicli his 
re])utation was unsurpassed. He was always ready to take his 
full share of res])onsibility in conducting the affairs of his town 
or the country at large, and was for fifteen vears a justice of 
the peace, was cai)tain of a home military com])any, and held 
many minor offices. His ])olitIcal o]>inions were those of the 
Whig party, and later those of the Re])ub1icans. His religion 
was that of the Disciples or Ciiristian church. He mari'ied, 
May 15, 1825, Catherine Meyers, born near Meyersdale, Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania, October 10, 1805, died December 14, 
1840, daughter of ("hristian ]\Ieyers, who was of Gej-man de- 
scent and a farmer. Afi-. Meyers was one of the German Baj)- 
tist Brethren or Dimkards. Aaron and Catherine (Meyers) 
Schrock were tlie parents of four children: 1. Caroline, died at 
the age of sixty-five years; 2. Edward, born October 8, 1828, 
in Somerset county, T\Mmsylvania, resided there fifty years. He 
tauglit school at the age of eighteen years, and then engaged in 
mei-cantile luirsuits for the greater ])art of the time of his 
I'esidence there. He was a i"ei)resentative for Somerset county 
in the legislature for two terms, and i)rothonotary for one term. 
Ife held two connnissions in the armv during the Civil war, 
one as cai)tain and one as major. At pi'esent (190(1) he is a 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 63 

resident of Seattle, Washington. 3. Amos, born February 29, 
1832, was a manufacturer of and dealer in house furniture in 
Chicago for the greater part of liis life. He died at tlie age 
of seventy-three years. lie also held two commissions during 
the Civil war, as an army officer. 4. William M. Schrock, see 
forward. 

(IV) William M. Schrock, youngest child and son of 
Aaron (3) and Catherine (Meyers) Schrock, was born in Tur- 
keyfoot township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, August 19, 
1837. He was educated in the public schools of his native town- 
ship, and in addition had tlie benefit of six months' attendance 
at a collegiate institute in Somerset, Pennsylvania. At the 
early age of sixteen years he commenced to teach in the pub- 
lic schools, and assisted his father on the farm and in the black- 
smith shop until he was eighteen years of age. He then ob- 
tained a position in a country store, and a year later, early in 
1859, went with four companions to the west. They started 
with a three-yoke ox team and a supply of provisions to last 
them six months. They crossed the plains, then known as the 
Great American desert, in search of gold at Pike's Peak. In 
this search they were as imsuccessful as so many thousands of 
others, and Mr. Schrock returned to Somerset later in the same 
year, a bankrupt in money and worldly goods, but rich in expe- 
rience and knowledge of the then wild west. The exposure, suf- 
fering and misery of hundreds of people were heart-rending in 
the extreme. He again took up the work of a clerk in a store. 
Later, in 1870, with his eldest brother, Edward, he estab- 
lished the Somerset Standard, a paper which enjoyed a con- 
siderable amount of popularity and influence. Later it was 
merged with another newspaper. In 1894, in connection with 
his son-in-law, John A. Lambert, he again established and be- 
gan the publication of the Soynerset Standard, and a few years 
later withdrew from this, leaving his son-in-law to continue the 
publication. Mr. Schrock has served his country and town in 
various capacities. He was for six years clerk. for the county 
conmiissioners, and has always taken an active interest in all 
movements that tended to the welfare of the community. He 
is a civil engineer and for almost twenty-five years has been 
the engineer and superintendent for the construction of bridges 
in the county. 

Mr. Schrock 's militar}^ career is one of which any man may 
well be proud. In 1863, when the president issued his call for 
volunteers for the ])eriod of six months, Mr. Schrock recruited 
a company of eighty men, rank and file, at New Centreville, in 
seven days, and tendered their services to the government. On 
June 24th a United States mustering officer appeared at New 
Centreville. the rendezvous, and duly mustered this company 



6-t BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

into the United States service. This was the only company 
mustered in by a regular United States muster officer in 
Somerset county during the course of the Civil war. The com- 
pany remained at New Centreville, without arms or uniforms, 
imtil July 6th, when it was ordered to Berlin, arms having 
been secured at the county seat. Public raids were feared from 
Maryland, and on July 9th the company was ordered to Hunting- 
don, Pennsylvania, where a large number of troops had been 
assembled under the command of Colonel Miles. A few weeks 
later camp was broken and all troops were sent away except 
the company from Somerset county, which was retained to do 
provost duty during a draft. On August 31st the captain, sec- 
ond lieutenant and sixteen privates were drafted for three y^.^rs' 
service. A few days later the company was ordered to Har- 
risburg, and then to Gettysburg, where they guarded the field 
hospital on the battlefield until it was dispensed with in the 
latter part of October. This company was also in active service 
at Lewisburg, Sunbury and Selins Grove. From December 11, 
1863, until January 8, 1864, the Somerset company was in 
charge of the Soldiers' Retreat at Harrisburg, where frequent- 
ly rations were provided for from five hundred to one thousand 
soldiers who dropped off from, trains at meal times. The com- 
pany was mustered out January 8, 1864. During the month of 
August, 1864, Mr. Schrock again assisted in recruiting a com- 
pany, this time of one hundred men, and was chosen captain, 
on arriving at the place of rendezvous, which was at Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. Here an artillery regiment which was in proc- 
ess of formation lacked a company with the requisite number 
of men, one hundred and forty-four. A veteran officer had 
forty men under his charge and expressed his willingness to 
join forces with Captain Schrock 's company if the captaincy 
were given to him. Mr. Schrock resigned his command in favor 
of this veteran, and accepted a lieutenancy in the same com- 
pany. Soon after reaching the fortifications at Washington, 
where the regiment had been ordered, Mr, Schrock succumbed 
to the strain of his overwork, and was stribken with fever and 
sent to the hospital, where he was obliged to remain for two 
months, and was finally discharged from the Georgetown Sem- 
inary Hospital as being incapacitated for further active serv- 
ice. This was January 2, 1865. ^Fr. Schrock is a member of 
the R. P. Cummins Post No. 210, Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic, Department of Pennsylvania, of which he has been adjutant 
for ten years, and has been conmiander. He is a member of the 
Christian or Disciple cliurch, and deservedly esteemed and re- 
spected by his follow citizens. 

Mr. Schrock married, December 10, 1859, in Somerset county, 
Mary E, Foy, daughter of George and Catherine Foy. She 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET CM)UNTIES 65 

was educated in tlie i)iil)lie scliools, and tanglit in them from 
the age of sixteen nnlil slie was twenty years old. George Foy, 
Mrs. Seliroek's fatlier, was a Methodist minister; her motlier 
tlie daughter of a farmer, Martin Shank, who migrated when a 
)5oy from Lehanon eonnty, Pennsylvania, to Somerset connty, 
Pennsylvania, al)ont the yeai' 1800. George Foy, Mrs. Schrock's 
grandfather, came to Somerset county from Greencastle, Peim- 
sylvania. lie sei'ved one term as prothonotary of Somerset 
connty, and was engaged for many years in the mercantile bus- 
iness. Mr. and ]\Irs. William M. Schrock are the parents of 
nine children: ]. Clora J., born September 11, 1800, married 
Thomas Barnett, died August. 1902. 2. Ellie (twin), born 
March 3, 1862, married Dr. C. A. Lutz, of Philadel])hia, Penn- 
sylvania, who was a i)hysician on the Aleutian islands for sev- 
eral years for the Alaska Connnercial Company, and for a num- 
ber of years on a steamer ]ilying between San Francisco and 
China. 3. Carrie (twin), born March 3, 1862, married John A. 
Lamliert, editor of the Soniersct Standard. 4. Aaron F., born 
in Somerset county. May 16, 1865, editor of daily and weekly 
newspaper in Defiance, Ohio, died in 1899. 5. Julia M., born 
February 21, 1867, married C. W. Staniford, of New York, 
engineer-in-chief of the docks and ferries in that city. 6. Min- 
nie (twin), born December 6, 1868, married E. 0. Hostetler, 
merchant tailor. 7. Lillie (twin), born December 6, 1868, died 
in infancy. 8. Susan, born January 13, 1873, married C. A. 
Walker, attorney-at-law, Somerset, Pennsylvania. 9. Foy, 
born December 26, 1878, died at the age of five years. 

REV. DANIEL 11. WALKER. 

The family of which Rev. Daniel H. Walker, of Somerset, 
pastor of the German Baptist Brethren church, is a representa- 
tive, was founded in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, by his 
great-grandfather, Walker, who came from Witten- 
berg, Germany, about the year 1777. His son, Peter Walker 
(grandfather), was born near Pine Hill, Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, and followed farming as a means of livelihood. His 
son, Daniel P. W, Walker (father), was born in Berlin, Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania, was a farmer, teacher and preacher, 
married Elizabeth Llorner, and their children were as follow^s: 
Sarah, Dinah, Rebecca, Cyrus H., Carlotta, William H., Eliza- 
beth and Daniel H. Walker. 

Daniel H, Walker was born in Stony Creek township, Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania, July 5, 1850. His early studies 
were pursued in the common schools adjacent to his home, and 
the knowledge thus obtained was supplemented by attendance 
at the Berlin Normal School. He first turned his attention to 
the vocation of teaching, filling this position for five terms, 

\\A. Ill 5 



60 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

after whicli he engaged in farming and stock raising, continu- 
ing the same up to the present time. He also serves in the 
capacity of minister of the German Baptist Brethren church, 
and throughout the community is highly honored and respected 
by all who have the honor of his acquaintance. He has charge 
of the Brotliers Valley congregation, consisting of about two 
hundred and seventy-five members. 

Rev. Mr. Walker married, December 10, 1868, Mary A. 
Knepper, born June 9, 1850, died June 15, LS83, daughter of 
Lewis J. and Magdalene Knepper. Their children are as fol- 
lows: William P., superintendent of a tele])hone company in 
Cedar Falls, Iowa; he married Sophia Graft" and they are the 
parents of two children, Edna and John D. Miller L., married 
Kate Walker; issue, Harold and Fauline. Ira D., unmarried, 
serves as cashier of the Berlin Bank. Galen K., unmarried, 
principal of the Berlin high school. On July 3, 1884, Mr. 
Walker married for his second wife Ella R. Knepper, born 
March 12. 1840, near Berlin, Pennsylvania, daughter of Lewis 
J. and Magdalene Knepper. Their children are as follows: 
Dillie v., wife of Mahlon S. Reiman and mother of two children, 
Ralph and Ruth. Clara E., wife of Norman Miller, resides at 
Mt. Morris, Illinois. Emma E., wife of George S. Reiman and 
mother of one child, Gay. Myrl J., resides at home and fol- 
lows farming. Mary, Charlotte, Alma and April May, all of 
whom reside at home. 

WILLIAM HENRY RUPPEL. 

William H. Ruppel, whosie career as a lawyer has been 
distinguished by sterling character, a display of comprehensive 
knowledge of the law and a steady devotion to the best inter- 
ests of his clients, and who has achieved the highest success at 
the bar of Somerset county, was bora at Frostburg, Maryland, 
May 13, 1849, a son of Christian and Mary (Iloltsieder) Rup- 
pel. Christian Ruppel was a native of Germany, from whence 
he cfinie to the United States about the year ]841. The family 
resided in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, but was temporarily 
living in Maryland when AVilliam Henry was born. His 
mother, who was a daughter of Frederick Iloltsieder, died when 
her baby was three months old and the child was then taken to 
Somerset comity and bi-oiight up at Wollersburg. 

William H. Ruppel first attended the common schools, and 
later was a student in normal schools and was under private 
tutors. For thirteen terms he served in the capacity of teacher, 
spending the time in Mineral county. West Virginia, and in 
Somerset connty, Pennsylvania, his last school having been 
located in Berlin. Somerset county. He then hecnme a student 
in the law office of General Colfroth and was admitted to i)rac- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 67 

tice November 26, 1872. He at once formed a partnership with 
Mr. Coffroth, which has continued until the present time. The 
firm occupies two large offices on the main street in the town 
of Somerset, which are heated with hot water, lighted by gas 
machines operated on the premises, and a large vault is con- 
nected with the rear room. Since he has been in partnership 
with Mr. Coffroth he has, to a great extent, been the working 
member of the firm, as his partner's political interests have 
necessarily absorbed a large portion of his time. His practice has 
covered almost every department of the profession, and he has 
won many important cases. He was one of the counsel for the de- 
fense of the Nicely brothers, and has participated in various 
civil cases and criminal trials with marked success, being noted 
for the clearness of his presentation and the force of his ar- 
guments. 

Mr. Ruppel has been a follower of the Democratic stand- 
ard, and, although he has never held any political office, has 
been quite active in party work during presidential campaigns. 
He served as delegate to the Pennsylvania Democratic state 
convention which nominated Mr. Singerly for governor, and 
in 1881 his name was mentioned as a candidate for president 
judge, but Mr. Ruppel declined to press his candidacy, pre- 
ferring to devote his entire time and attention to his private 
practice. In 1901 he was the Democratic nominee for presi- 
dent judge of the county. At the election the Republican state 
ticket carried the county by a majority of 3,825, and Mr. Rup- 
pel was defeated by only 295 votes. He is a member of the 
Lutheran church and for many years was superintendent of the 
Sunday school at Somerset. For thirty-two years he was leader 
of the church choir and orchestra, and has always taken a deep 
interest in everything pertaining to musical advancement. For 
many years he has been president of the Lutheran Sunday 
School Association of Somerset county, has served as a mem- 
ber of the board of directors of the Theological Seminary at 
Gettysburg and is now a director of Susquehanna University 
at Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania. Formerly ho was active as a 
Good Templar, participating in the transactions of the state 
and other conventions, and at one time was grand worthy coun- 
selor of the grand lodge. Mr. Ruppel has traveled extensively 
(hroughout the L^nited States and is thoroughly conversant with 
the places of note and interest in his adopted state, and well 
informed on current topics and general news. 

^fr. Ruppel married, December 19, 1872, Clara Heffley, 
daughter of John and Elizabeth Heffley, and one child was born 
to them, Ella Mildred, who died at the age of three vears. Mrs. 
Ruppel died April 14, 189L On October 25, 1898, Mr. Ruppel 
married Minerva Covode, daughter of Dr. Joseph and Lydia 



68 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

(GrifHtli) Covode. ]\Ir. Ruppel and bis wife occupy a liand- 
some and commodious residence on Main street, Somerset, which 
lie completed in 1883. 

HENRY TJ^VTNG MARSDEN, M. D. 

(T) This family of Marsdens is English, and the grand- 
father of Dr. Henry I. Marsden was John Marsden, born 1814, 
at Huddersfield. England; came to the United States in 1835, 
settling in Philadelphia, Pennsylv^ania, where he established 
himself in the woolen business, which grew and branched out to 
goodly proportions until the Civil war broke out, when general 
depression caused him to retire from business in 1862, having 
disposed of his mills for over $100,000. He was an ardent 
Universalist in chnrch faith. He came from one of the oldest 
families in England and traced his family line back to the 
time of William the Conqueror. At the present time the fam- 
ilv is very prominent in English circles. John Marsden died 
in 1874. 

He married Sophia Crellen, born in Queenstown, England, 
1816. She came to America on the sanie vessel on which Johr 
Marsden sailed and was married to him in the city of Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, in 1838. She, too, traced her ancestry 
back to a time before the Reformation. She became a great 
church worker and spent most of her time in charitable work. 
At the age of seventy years she became blind and the last 
twenty years of her life were spent in total darkness. She died 
in 1894, aged ninety-one years. 

The issue of John and Sophia (Crellen) Marsden was: 

1. Hannah, only daughter, born in Philadelphia in 1839. 
She studied medicine in the city of her birth, but did not prac- 
tice her profession, as she shortly married David Geisler. Tw(> 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Geisler — the eldest, John, 
in 1862, and Biddle, in 1864. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. 
Geisler did not prove a happy union, and the wife obtained a 
divorce and then took the name Marsden again, as did also 
her sons. The mother is still living in Philadelphia, as well as 
the sons. The former is a merchant and the latter a physi- 
cian. 2. William C, the father of our subject. 

(II) William C. Marsden, son of John and Sophia (Crel- 
len) Marsden, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1841, 
He was educated in the common schools and finished at a pri- 
vate school near that city. He was averse to city life and de- 
termined upon being a farmer. His father started him out in 
such an occupation in Sullivan county, Pennsylvania, where he 
conducted a large dairy farm until 1873, when he removed to 
Towanda, Pennsylvania, and there engaged in the produce 
business. He accumulated considerable means, and when his 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 61) 

mother died, in 1893, lie retired from business and has since led 
a quiet, retired life. 

He married TIaiinali E. AVhiteley, of an old English fam- 
ily. She was born in Sullivan county, Pennsylvania, in 1843, 
and in 1863 married Mr. Afarsden, l)y whom seven children 
were born, and all of whom still survive, as are also the 
parents. 

(Ill) Dr. Henry T. Marsden, son of William C. an:> Han- 
nah(Whiteley)AIarsden(2), was born in Sullivan county, Penn- 
sylvania, ]\Iarch 20, 1871. His parents removed to Towanda, 
]^ennsylvania, two years later, and he spent his boyhood days 
in and about his favorite city, receiving a common school edu- 
cation. At the age of fifteen years he entered the high schools 
and graduated with the class of June, 1890. He at once entered 
the drug firm of Clark B. Porter, where he spent five years. 
In the autumn of 1895 he entered the medical department of 
Medico-Chii'urgical College of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and 
graduated from the same, May, 1898. Immediately after his 
leaving college he located in the practice of medicine at Som- 
erset, Pennsylvania, and has built up a high class business in 
his chosen profession. Dr. Marsden, although doing a general 
practice of medicine and surgery, makes a specialty of the eye, 
nose, throat and ear. 

Politically Dr. IMarsden has always supported the Repub- 
lican party. Among the various societies with which he is 
connected are the Somerset County Medical Society and Amer- 
ican Medical Association. He is the surgeon for the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad Company; inspector of health for State of 
Pennsylvania ; examiner for the New York Life, IMutual Life 
of New York, Equitable Security, Metropolitan, Manhattan, 
Pennsylvania Mutual, and the Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance 
Companies, etc.; also official examiner for United States ma- 
rine cor])S, Navy Department. 

Dr. Marsden was married in 1902 at Somerset, Pennsyl- 
vania, to Nell Cunningham, daughter of Elias and Louisa Cun- 
ningham, of Somerset, Pennsylvania. She was educated in the 
public schools of her native county, and after graduating 
finished her education at Bethany College, Bethany, West Vir- 
ginia. She descends from an old Somerset family. Her grand- 
father conducted a tannery at Somerset for many years. Her 
father was educated for the law and was admitted to the Som- 
erset county bai'. before which he practiced for some time in 
partnershi]) ^'ith General A. H. CofCi-oth. Later he entered the 
government service in the revenue dei)artment, which engaged 
his time several years. Subse(|uently he embai'ked in the lum- 
ber business, in which he is operating under the name of E. 
Cunningham & Son. 



70 BEDFORD AND SOMERSlilT COUNTIES 

ELMER E. PRITTS. 

Elmer E. Pritts, assistant cashier of tlie Farmers' Na- 
tional Bank of Somerset. Pennsylvania, born December 26, 
ISGl, comes tlirougii the following genealogical line: 

(I) His grandfather on the paternal side was George 
Pritts, born abont 1781, and he descended from one of two 
brothei's who emigrated from Germany at an early date and 
settled in Virginia. Later one of the two brothers came to 
Pennsylvania, and from him came the Somerset county Pritts 
families. 

George, the grandfather, died June, 1856, near Somerset. 
He farmed all his days in his native township. In religious 
belief he was a Baptist. He married Catherine Weimer, born 
about 1786, and died February 2, 1856. Her father's i^eople 
came from Germany. George and Catherine (Weimer) Pritts 
had eleven children: Nellie, born 1806, married a Mr. Longs- 
baugh; John, 1808; Rebecca, 1810, married a Huston; Sally, 
1813, married a Shaffer; Mary, 1815, married an Atchison; 
Samuel, 1818; Magdelen, 1821, married a Zarefoss; George, 
1823; Henry, 1826; Joseph, 1828, and Peter, 1832. The only 
two now surviving are George and Henry Pritts. Samuel died 
aged twenty-one years; Henry married a Miss Zarefoss; Jo- 
seph married a Knepper; Peter married Mary Frank. 

QI) Peter Pritts, son of George Pritts (1), bom in 1832, 
was a native of Somerset county, Pennsylvania, and by trade 
a carpenter. He obtained a common school education, was a 
Lutheran in religious faith and a Republican in politics. He 
was a soldier during the Civil war, being a member of Com- 
pany G, Sixty-fourth Pennsjdvania Regiment. Aside from 
having served as constable, he never held local office. He mar- 
ried Mary Frank in 1859. She was the daughter of Henry and 
Elizabeth (Will) Frank, by whom Mr. Pritts had the follow- 
ing issue : 

Elmer E. (subject), born December 26, 1861; Lizzie, mar- 
ried W. H. Saylor; Ross, married Lucy Saylor and died aged 
about twenty-eight years; Sue, married W. H. Stutzman; 
Frank, married a Miss Domer ; Verdie, Samuel and John died in 
infancy; Mame, married J. H. Seibert; Nannie, married Dr. 
C. L. Friedline. 

(Ill) Of Elmer E. Pritts it may be stated that he is in- 
debted to the public and local normal schools of Somerset county 
for the educational advantas-es he enjoyed during his boyhood. 
The first twelve years of his active career he followed the vo- 
cation of teaching, the next seven years he served in the ca- 
pacity of principal of the Somerset borough schools, the follow- 
ing six years he held the responsible position of county super- 
intendent of schools, and since then has been the iiicumbent of 



1 





BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES Tl 

his present position, assistant cashier of the Farmers' National 
Bank, the duties of which he is discharging with credit to him- 
self and acceptably to the officials of the institution. He casts 
his vote for the candidates of the Republican party, to which 
he has always given his allegiance, and was chairman of the 
Republican county committee in 1902. He is active in busi- 
ness and political circles and stands high in the community in 
which he has spent his life. 

December 25, 1887, he married Minnie Sipe, born Septem- 
ber 16, 1868, daughter of Peter and Elizabeth Sipe. By this 
union the issue was Mary Elizabeth, born October 8, 1890. Mr. 
Pritts and family are members of the Lutheran church. (For 
sketch of Sipe family see elsewhere.) 

THE WELCH FAMILY. 

This memoir is concerning the family to which belonged 
the late venerable Rev. Joel J. Welch, who served as pastor of 
the Evangelical Lutheran church in various places from 1861 
to 1902, twenty-seven years of which period was spent in Frie- 
dens, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. His son, Everett C. 
Welch, is the ex-recorder of Somerset county. 

Rev. Joel J. Welch, son of Vachel W. and Elizabeth Welch, 
was born September 10, 1831, near Middletown, Frederick 
county, Maryland. He was catechised and confirmed in the 
Lutheran church by David J. Bittle, D. D., attended Witten- 
berg College of Springfield, Ohio. After leaving college he 
taught six years with much success. Drs. Conrad, Spencer and 
others urged him to prejDare for the ministry. He studied 
theology privately under Rev. S. Wells and J. H. Baird; was 
licensed to preach in 1861 and ordained in 1862 by the Miami 
synod. He faithfully served the following pastorates : Liberty, 
(ihio, 1861-64; Vandalia, Ohio, 1864-66; Tippecanoe City, Ohio, 
1866-72; Osborn, Ohio, 1872-74; Friedens, Pennsylvania, 1874- 
1902. He died in the ministry at Friedens, Pennsylvania, Jan- 
uary 3, 1902, aged seventy years, three months and twenty-four 
days. Wliile in decline he still served his flock until November 
preceding his death. He suffered the bodily afflictions of being 
almost entirely deaf for a few years prior to his death, but 
continued to serve iiis people with great devotion and efficiency. 
He was possessed of many lovable traits of character, amiable, 
sympathetic, guileless. Possessing more than ordinary intel- 
lectual endowments, deep piety and strong convictions, he be- 
came a clear, forceful preacher. His parishioners were one 
and all greatly attached to him for his manly. Christian vir- 
tues. 

The Young Lutheran, a church paper for whose columns 
Rev. Welch was a regular correspondent, in the first issue sub- 



72 BEDFOKl) A XI) SOMERSET COUNTIES 

seciuent to liis death piiltlislicd tlie following eoiicerning his life 
and character: 

"Rev. Father J. J. Welcii has gone home to rest. Thci 
faithful sliei)hei<l laid (h)\vn his crook. The Lord whom he 
served has enfolded liiin. His good works follow him. Mourned 
by a saddened Hock, a l)ereaved family and the connnunity in 
wliicli lie resided for over twenty-seven years, as a man he 
was highly esteemed, as a gentleman he was a model, as a 
( hristian he followed C hrist closely, as a ))ast<)r lie was 
fatherly, as a priest he ministered faithfully, as a preacher 
lie ])reaclied (.'hrist crucified, as a writer he was clear, able, 
vigorous. He was a man of many parts, not given to place, self 
or honor seeking.'' 

Perhaps no better conception can be had of the charac- 
ter of Rev. Welcli than the following tribute of respect paid him 
for publication in this work by Rev. J. F. Shearer, of the same 
denomination to which he belonged, which reads as follows: 

"He was the settled pastor of Friedens' charge for twenty- 
seven years, the longest pastorate of any Lutheran minister in 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania. He was a man of excei)tionally 
pleasing and im]>ressive characteristics. 'He was truly a burn- 
ing and shining light.' He had 'fine gifts and special graces 
given him, showing at all times, both publicly and privately, a 
nature that is boi'n of a thorough consecration of (Jod. 

"He was a preacher of more than the ordinary al)ility. His 
style w^as first of all clear and his utterances full of unction. 
He said wdiat he had to say to his people in such a way as not 
to be misunderstood. The earnestness and sincerity with which 
he spoke made him one of the most effective })reachers of the 
gosi)el. He left a record to be envied by many of his brethren 
in the ministry. His Christian character was so transparent, 
so pure, so kind and tender to all with whom he came in con- 
tact, to know him was almost to envy the loveliness of his dis- 
position and character. It is not strange, therefore, that he 
has such a i)lace in the affections of his peo])le that nothing l)ut 
death <'ould sever. Of him it must l)e said that 'he, being dead, 
yet sj)eaks,' and will continue to speak for many a year to come. 
While his spii'it is with his Saviour, whom he loved supremely, 
and iiis body sleeps sweetly with the graves of his own ])eople 
aroninl him. And now, since he is in the ])resen('e of (!od, from 
them will shine another star to guide tlie^n on their way to him, 
and, like Paul, lie will be able to say, 'There are my joy and 
crown of rejoicing.' By his sacred dust a beautiful monument 
stands, which his only living son, Everett C, has erecte(l to his 
memory." 

Rev. Joel .L Welcli was united in marriage in 18r)4 to 
Luenza M. A})pleton, of Liberty, Indiana. Of the six children 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 73 

born by their union, three survive: Lallah, wife of William 
Symmes, of llaniilton, Ohio; Everett C, ex-recorder of Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania; and Clara E., wife of E. J. Dickey, of 
Meversdale. Pennsvlvania. 

" Of Father Welch's wife, Imenza M. (Appleton) Welch, it 
may be stated that she was the daughter of William and Mari- 
anna Appleton. Her father was the founder and publisher of 
Liberty (Indiana) Herald. Mrs. Welch was born October 16, 
1832, at Cumberland, Maryland, and educated at Covington, 
Kentucky, and Cincinnati, Ohio. She subsequently removed to 
Liberty, Indiana. She Avas a successful music teacher. 

Everett C. Welch, son of Reverend Joel J. and Luenza M. 
(Appleton) Welch, was born October 14, 1859, at Liberty, Union 
county, Indiana. He received a good common school educa- 
tion at the public schools of Vandalia, Tippecanoe City and Os- 
born, Ohio. From 1877 to 1882 he served as assistant post- 
master at Liberty, Indiana. From 1882 to 1902 was chiefly em- 
ployed in the musical instrument business as salesman of pi- 
anos and organs, also carried on farming to some extent. 

Politically Mr. Welch is a Republican. He cast his first 
vote for President James A. Garfield, and has supported all 
of his successors. In 1902 he was elected to the office of re- 
corder of deeds for Somerset county, Pennsylvania. His term 
of office exjjired January 1, 1906. In the role of an official, none 
has made a cleaner record for well kept books and his obliging 
conduct to his constituency has been more marked than few, 
if any, of his predecessors. 

Mr. Welch is a member of the Evangelical Lutheran church, 
of the General Synod. He was married in Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, March 12, 1884, to Louisa H., second from the 
youngest daughter of ex-Judge Josiah Mowry and wife. By 
this union have been born two sons : Claude A. M., born April 
8, 1893 : Joel Jacobs, born May 12, 1897. Both were born near 
FriedenS;, Pennsylvania. 

Of Mrs. Welch's ancestry it may be stated that she descends 
from Michael Mowry (1), a native of Germany, who settled in 
Hagerstown, Maryland, in 1775. Some years later he removed 
to Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and located on a farm in 
what is now known as Somerset township. He was engaged in 
farming and milling until his death in 1833. He married Mary 
Baker and their children were : Peter, Michael, George, Henry, 
Nancy, Christina, Mary, Susan, Eve, Elizabeth and Sarah. 

(II) George Mowry became a prominent resident of the 
county and served as a soldier in the war of 1812-14. Septem- 
ber 16, 1828, he founded the Somerset Herald and published 
both German and English editions under that title for many 
years. He also officiated as county treasurer and sheriff, and 



74 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

was a member of the state legislature. His brother, Michael 
Mowry (2), born in Somerset county in 1789, died near the 
place of his birth in 1872. He followed both farming and car- 
pentering. He married Rose MostoUer and their children were : 
Josiah, Louisa and Ijavina. 

(Ill) Josiah Mowry, son of Michael and Rose (Mostol- 
ler) Mowry (2), was elected associate judge of Somerset coun- 
ty, October, 1871, and served until 187G. He engaged in farm- 
ing upon the old family homestead, the place of his birth. He 
married Harriet Long and reared a family including a daugh- 
ter, Louisa H., who became the wife of Everett C. Welch above 
named. 

THE SIPE FAMILY. 

The Sipe family is an old one in Somerset county, as well 
as in Maryland. This sketch begins with the American founder. 

(I) Peter Sipe is a native of Germany, who came to Amer- 
ica in 1783 and settled in what is now Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, and in Summit township, as the county is now divided. 
He was a farmer of the good-fashioned, true and sturdy type. 
He married Barbara Troyer, by whom were born these chil- 
dren: Christian, Peter, Jacob, Michael, Andrew, Catharine, 
Marie, Martha and Fanny. 

(II) Michael Sipe son of the founder, Peter (1), was born 
in Meyersdale, Pennsylvania, March 28, 1795, died October 22, 
1885, aged ninety years, six months and twenty-five days. He 
became a carpenter, and was also an extensive farmer. In 
1816 he located in Somerset township, Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, and from 1843 to 1853 was engaged in merchandising. 
He married Susannah Betz, born June 25, 1796, died February 
20, 1885, aged eighty-eight years, seven months and twenty- 
three days. The children born of this union were: Lavina, 
wife of Mr. Kring; Henry, Christian, Michael, Moses, John A., 
Lydia, Peter, see forward; Susan, Mar^^ A., Diana, wife of Mr. 
Mason; and Harriet. 

(III) Peter Sipe, son of Michael and Susanna (Betz) 
Sipe (2), was born January 12, 1831, at Sipesville, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, and died October 11, 1904. He was a 
general merchant from 1853 to 1888, when he sold his store to 
ins two sons, H. L. and AV. P. Sipe, having been in trade over 
thirty-five years. He also had several farms, which had mostly 
been disy)osed of before his death. Politically he was of the 
Democratic party, and was a devout member of the German 
Reformed church. Ho hold numerous township offices, and was 
appointed county auditor. He held memliershi]! with the 
Knights of the Golden Eagle at Sipesville. He married Eliz- 
abeth Bell, daughter of David and Sarah (Mickey) Bell, by 
whom were born seven children: Tilla J., born July 11, 1855, 



BEDFOKi) AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 75 

married S. i\I. Weudal; Mary A., May 11, 1857, married John 
AV. Shaffer; Harry L., February 10, 1859, married Martha B. 
Spangle; Lydia 0., July 23, 1861, married L. II. Stern; Will- 
iam Peter, August 25, 1863, married Lilly Shaffer; Sadie B., 
August 16, 1866. married J. E. Gasteiger; Minnie M., Septem- 
ber 16, 1868, married E. E. Pritts. ' The mother of these chil- 
dren was born October 6, 1832, and died April 24, 1904. 

(IV) Harry L. Sipe, son of Peter and Elizabeth (Bell) 
Sipe (3), born February lO, 1859, had the advantage of but a 
limited common school education, was put to work when very 
young, never attending school after thirteen years of age. He 
assisted his father and when old enough sought employment in 
the Somerset dairy, where he worked for eight years, when he 
with his brother, William P., purchased their father's general 
store at Sipesville. He continued there for five years and came 
to Somerset borough, where he opened a general merchandise 
store, which he operated from 1893 to 1905. He then opened a 
wholesale tobacco and cigar store in Somerset. 

In September, 1900, Mr. Sipe organized the Farmers' Na- 
tional Bank of Somerset, and has served as its president ever 
since. The bank building they now occupy was purchased in 
1902. In addition to his home business operations, Mr. Sipe 
is a stockholder in the Federal National Bank of Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania; also in the Iron City Trust Company of the same 
city. He served for many years, and is still serving, as an 
auctioneer for large public sales. Up to the William Jennings 
Bryan free silver campaign, Mr. Sipe always voted the Dem- 
ocratic ticket, but since that date has supported the Repub- 
lican party. In his church relations, he is a member of the Ger- 
man Reformed church at Somerset. He is at present the pres- 
ident of the town council of Somerset. He is a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America, Lodge No. 458, and is their 
"Banker." He is also treasurer of the Somerset Door & Col- 
umn Company, being one of the original stockholders and or- 
ganizers. 

Mr. Sipe was married, December 6, 1877, to Martha B. 
Spangler, daughter of George and Rosa Spangler, of Friedens, 
Pennsylvania. George Spangler was born September 11, 1831, 
and served the Union army in the Civil war da^^s as a member 
of the One Hundred Thirty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers. 
He died January 29, 1905. Mrs. Spangler was born September 
27, 1836, and is still living. The children born to Mr. and Mrs, 
Harry L. Sipe are: Lawrence E., born September 14, 1878, 
married Alice Cook; Tra Preston, November 30, 1879; Nellie 
A., March 22, 1881, married Robert S, Meyers, of Berlin, Penn- 
sylvania; Alpha S., August 16, 1886, married Lola P. McGearv, 
November 2, 1905; Walter V., October 11, 1888. Mr. Sipe's two 



76 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

eldest sons were pei'initted to visit tiieir great-great-grand- 
father, Pliilip Sliaver, ol' l^istie, when small l)oys. He died in 
1879, aged ninety-two yea is. He settled in Somerset county 
in 1805, coming from Maryland. 

DANIEL W. SEHH^^RT. 

Daniel \V. Seibert, county sui)erintendent of the schools 
of Somci-st't county, Pennsylvania, a ])Osition for which he is 
eminently (|iialifi('d, was horn May 20, 1873, a son of Solomon 
and ]\lary Seihert, natives of Somerset townshi]), Somerset 
county, Pennsylvani;i, the foi-nier named a farmer and lumber- 
man. 

Daniel \V. Seibert was educated in the ])ul)lic schools, local 
normals and South- Western State Normal School, For a num- 
ber of years he assisted with the duties of the farm, after whicli 
he acce])ted a ])osition as teacher, serving in that capacity foi' 
about twelve years; later was ajjpointed princijial of the school? 
in Somerset, and is now holding the responsible ])osition of 
county superintendent of schools. He is a man who keeps 
abreast of the times in all matters pertaining to his calling, 
and while devoting his best interests to his work, is still a stu- 
dent. He is a member of the Progressive Brethren church, the 
]\[asonic order and tbe lnde])endent Order of Odd Fellows, in 
which latter oi'ganization he served as District Dejmty Grand 
^Faster. 

^\r. Seibert married, Sei)tember 7, 1904, at Somerset, 
Pennsylvania, ]\Iadge Holderbaum, a daughter of James B. and 
Annie Holderl)aum. 

THE BTESECKER FAMILY. 

Tile Biesecker family were Germans and first settled in 
Adams county, Pennsylvania, at a very early day. The first 
of this name to settle in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was 
Daniel iVieseckei-, wlio was born in Adams county, Pennsyl- 
vania, October 11, 1789. His brotbor, Frederick, came at the 
same date and made settlement. Dining bis early years he 
came to Somerset county and in the township of (j)uemah(ming 
worked at farming several years. Latei" be removed to Jen- 
liorstown. wlier*' he |)iircliase(l land and impi'ovecl the same, 
r(»siding tbereon and being |)ros|)ei'onsly engaged in aJ2)"icnlt- 
ural pnrsnits u|> to tbe time of iiis decease at the age of sixty- 
si,\ years. He was ati indnstiious woiker, an able and efficient 
manager, and tlierefor<' bis l)road acres yielded him a goodly 
return for the laboi- cxpeiuled He was a ixepnblican in i)ol- 
itics. iiis wife, whos(> inaidc'n nami> was Xancy isinnnel, was 
a daughter of Solomon i\iminel, and her hiith occurred on 
the homestead now oci'npicd by her son. Xoali. in (^)nc)nali(Hiing 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 77 

Ton childrtMi were born to Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Biesecker: 
Elizabetli, born October 3, 1814, married Jacob Byers and tb.ey 
had five cliildren; she died March 15, 1894. Joseph, born April 
14, 1816, died April 21, 1853; married Hannah Keller and had 
live children. Abraham, born October 15, 1817, a farmer, mar- 
ried Agnes Richmeyer, and they had seven children. Elijah, 
born March 6, 1819, died February 21, 1853. Rebecca, born 
December 27, 1820, 7narried Henry Sipe and they had twelve 
children. Solomon, born 1^'ebriiary 11, 1822, died September 
19, 1839. Sarali, born January 8, 1824, married Aaron Fried- 
line and had three children. Noah, born September 13, 1825, 
see forward. Magdalena, born May 19, 1827, now deceased, 
married ]MichaeI Sipe and they had seven children. Jolin, born 
December 13, 1829. 

The father, Daniel Biesecker, died on the farm upon which 
he first settled. The date of his death was January 24, 1855. 
His wife, Nancy (Kinmiel) Biesecker, was born in 1794 and 
died ]\larch 19, 1859, aged sixty-five years, ten months and 
thirteen days. They are both buried at the Beams Reformed 
church now, but prior to the fall of 1905 rested in the family 
burying ground at home. Their children were all born on the 
original Biesecker homestead in Jenner township, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania. 

(II) Joseph Biesecker, fist son of Daniel (1) and Nancy 
Biesecker, born April 4, 1816, married Hannah Keller and they 
reared five children. He was a tanner by trade and operated 
a small tannery for many years, but when improvements and 
large concerns came into use he was employed for other tan- 
ners. He died when aged about sixty years. 

(II) Abraham Biesecker, second son of Daniel (1) and 
Nancy Biesecker, born October 15, 1817, married Agues Rich- 
meyer and they reared seven children. He was a farmer and 
voted the Wliig and Republican tickets. He was of the Pres- 
byterian faith. He died about 1887 and is buried beside the 
Presbyterian church at Jennerstown, Pennsylvania. 

(II) Noah Biesecker, fifth son of Daniel (1) and Nancy 
Biesecker, born September 13, 1825, a prominent farmer of 
Quemahoning, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, and a citizen of 
influence, received his education in the public schools of Jen- 
nerstown, and after completion of his studies conducted gen- 
eral farming at the parental homestead until 1854, becoming 
highly proficient therein. He then came to Quemahoning and 
assumed possession of the old Kinimel farm, on which his 
mother was born, and has since followed this independent call- 
ing with marked success. During his long residence in the 
town he has taken an active interest in the development and 
growth of the same, every enterprise tending thereto receiving 



78 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

from him a hearty support. From 1881 until 1885, inclusive, 
he served in the capacity of associate judge of Somerset coun- 
ty, the first year having been associated with Judge George 
Pile, and thereafter with Judge Daniel J. Horner, and the re- 
sponsible duties of the office were ])erfornied by him in a highly 
connnendable and praiseworthy manner. He is a stanch advo- 
cate of the principles of Republicanism. 

In vSeptember, 1S()0, Mr. Biesecker married Elizabeth Win- 
ters, daughter of the late John and Margaret (Mull) Winters, 
whose deaths occurred at the ages of sixty-five and seventy- 
two years, respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Winters were the par- 
ents of eight children, five of whom are now living: Wendel 
married IMary Bowman, who bore him two children, William 
and Amanda AA'inters; Elizabeth, wife of Noah Biesecker; 
Sophia, wife of Thomas Gallagher, and mother of four children, 
John, Edward, Rebecca and Ida Gallagher; Julia, wife of Her- 
man Shaffer, and mother of five children, John, Barton, Rob- 
ert, Ida and Lillie Shaffer; John, who married Jan Bowman, 
and their family consists of seven children, Joanna, ]\Iaggie, 
Grace, Robert, Thomas, James and Jacob AVinters. Mr. and 
Mrs. Biesecker were the parents of four children, two sons and 
two daughters, all now deceased. James F., the only child that 
attained maturity, married Mary Cunningham, by whom he 
has one child, Elizabeth Biesecker. Mr. and IMrs. Biesecker 
stand high in social and religious circles, the former being a 
valued member of the Reformed church, and the latter of the 
Lutheran church. 

(II) John Biesecker, sixth son of Daniel (1) and Nancy 
Biesecker. boin December 13, 1829, has been a sturdv, success- 
ful farmer all his days tlius far. He now owns and occu]iies 
the old Biesecker homestead in Jenner township, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania. He obtained a good common school edu- 
cation, and in political affiliation was first a AAHiig and later a 
Rejfublican. He is a member of the Reformed chur<'h, and be- 
longs to Jenner townshi]) Grange. He served as school director 
for twelve years prior to 1885. He was married in 1857 to ISIiss 
Joanna Winters, daughter of John and "Margaret (]\full) Win- 
ters, whose family connect back to the prominent AVinters fam- 
ily of Tjancaster county, Pennsylvania, in which were three 
generations of eminent physicians, including her uncle. Mrs. 
Biesecker died September 12, 18SG. She was the mother of two 
children — Frederick AV.. an attorney of Somerset, and Alagda- 
lena, who died aged five years. The molher and daughter were 
both buried near the Beams Reformed church. 

Concorning the AVinters family it may be related that John 
Winters and his brother. Dr. Isaac AA^inters, of Tiancaster fame, 
came of English stock. Their grandfather, John AVinters, emi- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 7!> 

grated from England to America before the Revolution, and 
later in that struggle hore an active part as a soldier under 
General Washington. liis home was near Lebanon, Pennsyl- 
vania, and there he died within a month after returning thereto 
from his Revolutionary service. He left a widow and son, the 
latter being named John, born November 21, 1776. When John 
Winters, Jr., grew to man's estate, he settled in the village of 
New Holland, Lancaster county, where for many years he fol- 
lowed the occupation of a blacksmith. He married Catharine 
Diffenderffer, January 16, 1796, and their children were: John, 
Isaac. Maria, Liidwig Levi, Margaratha and Cyrus. John Win- 
ters died Jnly 13, 1859, and his wife, Catherine (Diifenderffer) 
Winters, died July 12. 1843. John Winters, eldest son of John 
and Catharine (Diffenderffer) Winters, came from Lancaster 
county to Somerset county about 1800. He was a farmer, be- 
longed to the Reformed church and in politics was first a Whig 
and later a Republican. He married in Lancaster connty Mar- 
garet Mull, by whom seven children were bom, three sons and 
four daughters. His sons — Wendel, Elias and John — served 
in the Civil war conflict on the Union side, going from Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania. Elias was accidentally killed by be- 
ing crushed beneath some slate and rock about a coal mine in 
1881. He left a widow and twelve children, John Winters died 
in 1860 and was buried in the church yard at Zimmermans Re- 
formed church. His wife, Margaret (Mull) Winters, died in 
1871, and rests. beside her husband. 

(Ill) Frederick Winters Biesecker, an attorney of Som- 
erset, Pennsylvania, Avas named for his grandfather's brother, 
Frederick Biesecker, an early settler in Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, and his middle name was given to him in honor of 
his mother's family, the Winters. He is the only son of John 
and Joanna (Winters) Biesecker, born on the old Biesecker 
farm on which his grandfather settled in Jenner townshi]), 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania. The date of his birth is March 
10, 1858. He was reared to farm labor, and attended the com- 
mon schools of his native township and the normals of Somer- 
set county. Believing he was better suited for a professional 
career than for an agriculturist, he took a preparatory course 
in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and entered Franklin and Marshall 
College, from which he graduated in June, 1880. He then chose 
law and entered into the study under General Koontz, at Som- 
erset, was admitted to the bar in August, 1882, and since that 
time has been in active and constant practice at Somerset, 
where he has been eminently successful. He has also branched 
into various business enterprises, including investment in coal 
lands, which have now been disposed of at a handsome ])rofit. 
He is a stockholder and director of the Somerset Trust Com- 



bO BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

pany, also of the First National Bank of the same place, as well 
as of the First National Bank at Confluence, Pennsylvania. 
Politically Mr. Biesecker is an out-and-out Republican. He was 
elected to the ofhce of district attorney in the autumn of 1883, 
and re-elected in the fall of 1886, serving in all six years. He 
is a consistent member of the Reformed church at Somerset 
borough. 

Mr. Biesecker married Mary Ogle Scull, daughter of Ed- 
ward and Louise (Ogle) Scull, October 16, 1886. Mrs. Biesecker 
was educated in Somerset county schools and at the seminary 
at Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania. They have no children. 

WILLIAM HENRY STODDARD. 

William Henry Stoddard, though not a native of Somer- 
set county, has been intimately associated with all of its inter- 
ests for a quarter of a century, as contractor and builder, while 
his wife and children are natives of the borough of Somerset. 
This fainily is from good old English stock, running to Will- 
iam H. as follows: 

(I) Isaac Stoddard, grandfather, was born in England, 
and in young manhood was one of four in his father's family 
to come to America. Of the other three but little is known, but 
Isaac came for the purpose of testing cannon for this country. 
His home, therefore, was at Georgetown, D. C. He married a 
Miss Fagen, by whom three children were born: Isaac, John 
H. (father of subject) and Mary Ann, who married a Mr. 
Clement, and they had a daughter named Rosa, who became the 
wife of George F. Adams. Stoddard street, Georgetown, was 
named for Isaac Stoddard (1). 

(II) Isaac Stoddard, eldest son of the founder of the 
family in this country, married and had two children — Ulysses 
and Martha. He was among the first police in the city of 
Washington, D. C. 

(II) Johu H. Stoddard, son of Isaac Stoddard (1), was 
born about 1811, at Georgetown, D. C. He attended the schools 
common to his day, and mastered the trade of wheelwright and 
blacksmith aud followed this calling in Washington for more 
than a quarter of a century. He died in 1867. In politics he 
was an ardent Democrat, and was a Roman Catholic in religious 
faith. He had a farm home in Virginia, near Washington, and 
there he died. He was a member of the Washington Rifle Com- 
pany and Avou a medal for marksmanshij). When about thirty 
years of age he married Marv Ann Rollins, daughter of Josliua 
Rollins and wife, of AVashington, 1). C. Her father was a sea 
captain and had charge of most of the boats along the Potomac 
river. Mi', aud Mi's. John H. Stoddard had eight children: 
1. Elizabeth, deceased, born in Baltimore, Maryland, died in 



BEDFORD AND SOMEESET COUNTIES 81 

infancy. 2. Mary Ann, born in Washington, D. C, 1852, mar- 
ried Burton Vernon. 3. Emma Jane, deceased, born in the same 
city in 1854, married Joseph Dunn. 4. John, deceased, born in 
Wasliington in 185G. 5. Alberta, born at the same place in 
1858. 6. WiUiam Henry (subject), born in Washington, D. C, 
1860. 7. Raymond, deceased, born in 1862. 8. Rosa Virginia, 
born in 1865. 

The wife of John H. Stoddard was greatly devoted to the 
Union cause during the days of the rebellion, and became ma- 
tron of the hospital at Fort Richardson, which was located on 
their farm. She belonged to the United States Hospital Corps, 
and when peace was declared was honorably discharged the 
same as a soldier. Only a few days prior to President Lin- 
coln's assassination Mrs. Stoddard took flowers to the White 
House for the good president. Again, after that sad event, she 
had to make a trip over the "Long Bridge" to Washington and 
was accompanied by a soldier and her young son, William H., 
of this sketch. On account of search being made for any clue 
to the whereabouts of Booth, the assassin, they were stopped 
on the bridge and searched before being allowed to pass over 
into the capital city. Mrs. Stoddard died in 1897. 

(Ill) William Henry Stoddard, son of John H. (2), was 
born in the City of Washington, D. C, May 30, 1860. He at- 
tended school in the District of Columbia, Maryland and Vir- 
ginia. Upon leaving his school duties he entered the Central 
Market of Washington and was employed there three years, 
when he commenced to master the carpenter's trade and con- 
tinued with one firm for about five years. He then took up 
slate roofing and learned that trade thoroughly and followed 
it three years. The next four years he spent under special in- 
structions in architecture and general building. He was em- 
ployed on government work in Washington, and bridges. Up- 
on the occasion of President James A. Garfield's inaugural ball 
in March, 1881, he worked several days and nights in order to 
get the National Museum ready, in which to hold that grand 
affair. Just prior to that Mr. Stoddard had erected a large 
hotel at Sulphur Springs, Virginia. July 2, 1881, he came to 
Somerset, under John D. Berk, for the purpose of superintend- 
ing the bridge work on the Somerset & Cambria railway. Later 
he went to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and for the Keystone 
Bridge Company erected steel work at Braddock. He then re- 
turned to Somerset and after a short stay went to Washington, 
D. C, where he spent two years working at his trade. In 1883 
he returned to Somerset, which borough has been his home 
ever since. He worked at carpentering and slate roof work for 
about two years, making the first slate roofs in the county. 
After the great Johnstown flood he went to that place and 

Vol. Ill 6 



82 BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

superintended the rebuilding of that place, and received the 
first builder's license ever issued there, after the place was 
organized as a city. Three years later he resumed the work of 
a master builder in Somerset county, where he drew plans for 
the town and county house asylum building, the academy, mu- 
nicipal building and scores of large residences all over the 
county. 

Mr. Stoddard was married, October 25, 1881, to Ella Nora 
Keilfer, daughter of Daniel and Catherine (Koontz) Keiffer, 
of Somerset borough, her native place. Mrs. Stoddard's father 
died in 1905. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. William H. 
Stoddard were : Charles R., born in Washington, D. C, March 
3, 1883, was appointed first mail carrier for Somerset in the 
spring of 1906. 2. John H., December 19, 1885. 3. George W., 
May 6, 1886. 4. Arthur J., August 19, 1887. 5. Harry D., March 
26, 1890, deceased 6. Robert B., September 16, 1892. 7. Will- 
iam W., December 3, 1893. 8. Ernest G., November 2, 1895, 
deceased. 9. Rosa Virginia, November 23, 1897. 10. Franklin 
E., August 21, 1901, deceased. 11. Norman K., June 12, 1903. 

Politically Mr. Stoddard is a Democrat. In lodge rela- 
tions he is numbered among the honorable members of the 
Royal Arcanum, No. 985, at Somerset, and was its regent in 
1900. He is a member of Golden Eagle Lodge, No. 181, Som- 
erset Castle, and was one of the charter members. He is a 
member of the Junior Order United American Mechanics, or- 
ganized the first fire company in Somerset borough, in 1893. 
He was made assistant chief, refusing to become its chief. He 
is also a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and Som- 
erset Musical Club. Mr. Stoddard and wife are members of 
the ''Ladies' Temple," auxiliary of the Knights of the Golden 
Eagle. 

VIRGIL R. SAYLOR, ESQ. 

David and Jacob Say] or, brothers, came to America from 
Germany early in the history of our country. The original 
spelling was ''Syler." From one of these brothers was de- 
scended George Michael Saylor, who was a soldier in the Rev- 
olutionary war, and, after serving the time of his enlistment, 
entered the service again as a substitute, receiving $100 for the 
same, which was considered a large price for a substitute at 
that time. George Michael Saylor moved to Somerset county 
(then a part of Bedford county) from Berks county, in 1787. 
Samuel Saylor, a son of George Michael Saylor, and great- 
grandfather of Virgil R. Saylor, the subject of this sketch, was 
seven years old at the time his father settled in Somerset coun- 
ty. Samuel Saylor marrieid and reared a family of twelve 
children, among whom was Joseph Saylor, the grandfather of 
Virgil R. Saylor. Josejih Saylor was the second in the line of 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 83 

descent, and was born November 15, 1808. He married Eliza 
Heiple, and to this union were born ten children, the oldest 
being Alexander Saylor, the father of Virgil R. Saylor. Alex- 
ander Saylor was born in 1829. He married, October 16, 1856, 
Rosanna Pugh. He entered the service of his country in April, 
1861, responding to President Lincoln's call for volunteers, and 
enlisted as a member of Company A, Tenth Pennsylvania Regi- 
ment Reserves. He fought in many of the principal battles of 
the war, and was severely wounded in the battle of Fredericks- 
burg. From the effects of this wound he died in 1872, on 
May 30, that date being now observed throughout the country 
as Memorial Day. He was a carpenter by trade, a Republican 
in politics, and a member of the Evangelical church. Rosanna 
(Pugh) Saylor, his widow, is now living in Somerset, Pennsyl- 
vania, and is sevent}'-four ^'-ears old. She has been a lifelong 
member of the Lutheran church. 

To Alexander and Rosanna (Pugh) Saylor were born nine 
children: Ida Belle, intermarried with J. C. Nycum, now re- 
siding in Cripple Creek, Colorado ; Eliza Jane, deceased ; Elmi- 
ra, deceased; Professor Otho 0. Saylor, a prominent educator 
of Someset county, having been principal of the schools of 
Somerset and Rockwood boroughs; Charles L., deceased; Lin- 
nie, deceased, who was intermarried with Lewis H. Miller; 
Luther J., who married Luella Foshender, now residing in Ris- 
ing City, Nebraska; Virgil R., see forward; and William A., of 
Somerset. 

Virgil R. Saylor, an attorney at law of Somerset, Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania, was born January 31, 1870, about five 
miles east of Somerset, on the Somerset and Bedford turn- 
pike, at what is known as Will's Church. He is second to the 
youngest son of Alexander and Rosanna (Pugh) Saylor; his 
maternal grandparents were James and Rachel Pugh. 

Mr. Saylor attended the public school at Will's Church un- 
til the age of nine years, when he entered the Tressler Orphans' 
Home at Loysville, Perry coimty, Pennsylvania, as a soldier's 
orphan, remaining there until he was sixteen years of age. It 
was here that he received an excellent foundation for his fut- 
ure work and that a desire for a college education was formed. 
He taught school one term in Cambria county and one term in 
Somerset county, attending the local normal school during the 
spring and summer months. At the age of nineteen he entered 
with the freshman class Pennsylvania College at Gettysburg, 
pursuing the classical course and graduating from said institu- 
tion in 1893 with the degree of A. B. ; three years later the de- 
gree of A. M. was conferred upon him by his alma mater. From 
1893 to 1896 he was high school teacher and assistant principal 
of the Somerset borough schools, and from 1896 to 1901 he 



84 BEDFORD AXD SOMERSET COUNTIES 

was principal of tlie Salisbury borougli schools in Somerset 
county. Durino; these years he was prominent in educational 
circles and conventions, and was urged to accept better and 
more lucrative positions elsewhere, but the desire to enter the 
legal profession and make the law his future work, which was 
formed during his college days, now controlled him to such an 
extent that he turned aside from the profession of teaching, 
for which work he possessed natural aptitude, not, however, 
withcMit much regret, for he liked the work and was ever faith- 
ful and conscientious in its performance. He entered the law 
office of Coffroth & Ruppel, Somerset, Pennsylvania, being 
registered as a student at law in October, 1901, and was ad- 
mitted to the Somerset bar, October 19, 1903. He immediately 
took up his practice in Somerset, and from the beginning had 
a good practice and has established for himself an extensive 
clienfeJe as a result of his large acquaintance throughout the 
county, formed during the years he was engaged in teaching 
school. 

Mr. Saylor is a member of the Woodmen of the World and 
Knights of Pythias, having been district deputy grand chan 
cellor of the latter organization for several years. He is a Re- 
publican in politics and is an active member of the Lutheran 
church, the church of his mother. 

DANIEL J. HORNER. 

Daniel J. Horner, a veteran of the Civil war, former asso- 
ciate judge of Somerset county and a well known citizen of 
Somerset, Pennsylvania, was born in the county in wliich he 
now resides May 27, 1843, a son of the late John J. and Mary 
(Beeghley) Horner. 

John Horner (grandfather) was born and reared in Dau- 
phin county, Pennsylvania, was a farmer by occupation, hard- 
working and successful, and lived to the age of fourscore years. 
He was united in marriage to a Miss Kimmel, and the issue of 
this union was fourteen children, all of whom are deceased but 
one, Susan, widow of John Felickinger. 

John J. Horner (father), eldest child of John Horner, was 
born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania. He was reared on a 
farm and followed that occupation as a means of livelihood 
throughout the active years of his career. He was a staunch 
Republican in his political views, and both he and his wife were 
active members of the Dunkard church. He died at his home 
near Sipesville, Pennsylvania, at the comparatively early age 
of forty-six years, being then but in the prime of life, and his 
wife, Mary (Beeghley) Horner, daughter of Jacob Beeghley, 
of Meyers'dale, Somerset county, I'ennsylvania, died at the age 
of forty-four years. They were the parents of eleven chil- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 85 

dren, four of whom are living at the ])reseiit time (l^Orj), as 
follows: Joseph, married Kate Khoads, and their ehiklren 
are: Henry, Edward 11. , deceased; Albert J., William and 
Lillie M. Horner. Abraham, married Lizzie Lint, and their 
children are: Frank, Ida, Lillie, Sadie, Ada and Charles. 
Daniel J., deceased, see forward. John J., married a Miss Bow- 
ers. Ephraim J. Horner, married Miss Deitz. 

Daniel J. Horner was educated at Mt Pleasant College 
and at the State Normal School in Millersville, Lancaster 
county, which he attended during the years 1866-67-68, paying 
his own expenses by teaching school in the winter seasons. In 
1869 he was elected register and recorder of deeds for Somerset 
county, which position he held the ensuing three years. He was 
subsequently engaged as a carriage manufacturer in Somerset 
county for two years. In 1876 he was appointed United States 
storekeeper and ganger, an office which he filled until January, 
1882, a period of six years, when he resigned to accept a clerk- 
ship in the board of county commissioners, which position he 
filled up to 1885. He then accepted a position as clerk in a 
store in Somerset and retained the same until his election as 
prothonotary and clerk of courts of Somerset county. He served 
in this capacity until 1891, and two years later was made asso- 
ciate judge of Somerset county, an office in which he served 
with distinction for five years. He has served as school di- 
rector of Somerset borough for a number of years, rendering 
valuable and efficient service. He is a staunch Republican in 
politics. 

On August 11, 1862, Judge Horner, then a young man, en- 
listed as a private in Company C, One Hundred and Forty- 
second Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served nineteen 
months. On December 13, 1862, at Fredericksburg, he was 
shot in the knee while on the battlefield. He suffered intense 
agony, lying out of doors four days before the operation was 
performed, and only his indomitable will and fortitude, as it 
would seem, kept him alive. He was carefully conveyed to the 
Harwood Hospital at Washington, D. C, where he remained 
until March, 1864, one year and three months. There he had a 
hard struggle for life, being obliged to undergo another surgical 
operation, having four inches more of his leg taken off. Judge 
Horner takes an active interest in local affairs, and while he 
was a member of the town council in 1879-80-81 one of the most 
valuable improvements in this section of the country was in- 
augurated, the building of the railway from Johnstown to Rock- 
wood. He is prominently connected with many leading frater- 
nal organizations, being a member of the R. P. Cummiugs Post, 
No. 210, Grand Army of the Republic, of which he is past com- 
mander and judge advocate; Somerset Lodge, No. 38, Inde- 



86 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

pendent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he has passed all the 
chairs, and has been secretary for twenty-one years; Golden 
Eagle Lodge, in which he has held the various offices; Meyers- 
dale Lodge, Knights of Pythias; Junior Order of American Me- 
chanics, and Royal Arcannin. in which lie has passed all the 
chairs, and of which he was deputy grand regent for sixteen 
years. He is a member of the Elks at Johnstown, Pennsylva- 
nia, and a Union Rej-ublican club, organized in the year 1861. 

Judge Horner niai'ried, December 14, 1S70, Susan Bell, 
daughter of David and Sarah (Mickey) P)ell, of Somerset 
county, Penns^ivania. One child, Marion Bell Horner, was 
born to them ; she died April 2, 1890, aged sixteen years and six 
months. 

JAMES B. HOLDERBAUM. 

James B. Holderbaum, a well known merchant of Somer- 
set, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was there born, Febru- 
ary 6, 1854, a son of John M. and Julia C. (Imhoff) Holder- 
bamn. 

Peter Holderbaum, great-grandfather of James B. Holder- 
baum, was for many years a saddler in Bedford county, Penn- 
sylvania, but it is not known where he was born or whom he 
married. He was the father of seven children, the eldest of 
whom was Martin. 

Martin Holderbaum, grandfather of James B. Holder- 
baum, was born and educated in Bedford county and removed 
from there to Somerset in 1817. Prior to his removal to Som- 
erset he learned the trade of blacksmith and followed that oc- 
cupation throughout his years of activity, having a large patron- 
age. He was industrious and thrifty and was everywhere re- 
spected for his many sterling (]ualities. He and his wife were 
members of the Lutheran church. 

He married Catherine Anawalt, who bore him two children, 
of whom the first born was John M. The other child is de- 
ceased. Martin and his wife both lived to the age of seventy- 
two years. 

John M. nolderl)aum, father of James B. Holderbaum, was 
born in Somerset, June 4, 1819. and there was reared and edu- 
cated. In 1833, when he was fourteen years of age, he entered 
into his first regular employment as clerk for Neff & Stahl, 
and in 1847, after several years of experience in business, he 
oi)ened a general store at Somerset, where he built up an 
extensive trade and was one of the most prosi)erous merchants 
in his section. J'olitically he was a stanch Democrat, and al- 
though he has never aspired to the emoluments of public office 
lie has always conti'ibiitcd liberally \o all enterprises tending to 
advance the interests of the community. 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 87 

He married Julia C. Imhoff, who was born in Somerset, 
October 16, 1824. and who bore him eleven children, of whom 
the following named are members: George, died July, 1903, 
married Annie MacDonald, and they h4ve one child, Virginia 
Lee; Catherine, widow of Harry R. Cromwell and mother of 
two children, Howard and Bertha; Charles, married Sarah 
Moser; Margaret, wife of John R. Megalin, and they have four 

children, Edward, Joseph, Guy and ; James B., of 

whom later ; Lucy E., and Darl F. The death of the mother of 
the above named children occurred in July, 1896, and the father, 
November 4, 1904. 

James B. Holderbaum was educated in the schools of Som- 
erset and commenced his mercantile career as a clerk in his 
father's store. He acquired a good practical knowledge of the 
business and was subsequently admitted into partnership with 
his father. This arrangement existed until 1884, when he with- 
drew from the firm and established himself in the hardware 
business in Somerset, in which he has since been most success- 
fully engaged. His store is one of the best equipped in the 
vicinity and his trade one of the most extensive and lucrative. 
He is a man of sterling integrity and has the confidence and 
respect of the entire community. In his political relations he 
accords allegiance to the Democratic party. He is an influential 
member of Somerset Lodge of Odd Fellows and Somerset 
Lodge, No. 358, Free and Accepted Masons, in which he has 
filled all the chairs. He and his family are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

February 12, 1878, Mr. Holderbaum married Anna A. 
Jones, daughter of Isaac G. Jones, of Somerset. Six children 
were born to them, viz : Julia C, John I., Cora M., Robert P., 
Harriet R. and Ethel M. Mrs. Holderbaum died April 2, 1904. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN MEYERS. 

Benjamin Franklin Meyers, the well known editor, lawyer, 
politician, author and successful business man, is a descend- 
ant of a family who originally came from Germany, from which 
country numbers of our enterprising and progressive citizens 
trace their ancestry. His grandmother on the father's side, 
however, was the daughter of a North of Ireland man. 

Jacob Meyers, great-grandfather of Benjamin F. Meyers, 
was a native of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and about 
1785 purchased a tract of wild and unsettled land in the region 
of what is now" the borough of Meyersdale. He did not settle 
here, but sent his sons — Christian, Jacob, Henry and John — to 
look after the property. 

John Meyers, grandfather of Benjamin F. Meyers, was 
a farmer and miller, which occupations he followed through- 



88 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

out the active years of his life. He married a Miss Dickey 
aud they reared a large family, among whom was a son named 
Michael D. 

Michael D. Meyers, father of Benjamin F. Meyers, was 
born in 1809 and died in 1867. He was educated in the town- 
ship schools and followed the occupation of farmer, from which 
he derived a comfortable livelihood. He attended the Reformed 
church and in politics was first a Whig and later a Democrat. 
He married, in 1832, Sarah Schaff, born 1811, died 1886, a 
member for many years of the Reformed church and a de- 
scendant of ancestors who came from the Palatinate, Germany 
Their children were: Benjamin Franklin, of whom later; Caro- 
lyn, deceased, was the wife of Josiah Humbert, of Somerset 
county; William Henrj^ Harrison, died at the age of five years; 
Uriah, died at the age of two years; James M., still living on 
the liome farm near Gebhart, Pennsylvania; he married Lu- 
cinda Sanner and they reared a large family. 

Benjamin F. Meyers was born on the home farm in Mil- 
ford township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, July 6, 1833. 
He attended the schools of New Centerville, Somerset Acad- 
emy, Joseph J. Stutzman, principal, and in 1851 entered Jeffer- 
son College at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. After two years of 
study in that institution he left to enter Yale College, but in- 
firm health prevented him from becom^ing a student thereof. 
He had previously taught in the county schools, namely, New 
Centerville, where he was first a pupU; a boys' school in Som- 
erset, 1853, having among his pupils such notable characters 
as George F. Baer, president of the Reading railroad; Rear 
Admiral Picking, United States navy; John R. Edie, major in 
United States army; and also a select school in Somerset He 
read law in the office of General William H. Koontz and was 
admitted to the Somerset county bar at the November term, 
1855. He formed a partnership with Daniel Weyand and con- 
ducted business under the firm name of Weyand & Meyers. 

Before admission to the bar, and while yet a minor, Benja- 
min F. Meyers spent a year in Illinois, engaged in journalism, 
and met Lincoln, Douglas and other eminent men. In Au- 
gust, 1857, he removed to Bedford, Bedford county, Pennsylva- 
nia, and became editor of the Bedford Gazette. He \yas also 
admitted to the Bedford county bar and practiced his profes- 
sion. In 1868 he became editor of the Harrishurg Daily and 
Weekly Patriot, which he made the leading Democratic organ 
in the state. He edited both papers until 1873, when he sold 
the Gazette, removed to Harrisburg and devoted his energies 
to the ratriot. In 1891 he disposed of the Patriot and pur- 
chased the Star-Independent, a consolidation of two Harris- 



I 



BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES ^'J 

burg papers, the Star and the Independent, and has been the 
owner and editor ever since. 

In politics Mr. Meyers is a Democrat and has been hon- 
ored with important offices. In 1863 he was elected a mem- 
ber of the general assembly from Bedford county. That year 
the state was redistricted and his district made solidly Repub- 
lican. Notwithstanding this, Mr. Meyers was re-elected, but 
through some complications in the returns of the army vote he 
was refused his seat by a strictly caucus action of the party to 
which he was opposed. 

In 1870 he was a candidate for congress from the sixteenth 
Pennsylvania district, comprising the counties of Adams, Bed- 
ford, Franklin, Fulton and Somerset. He was elected in spite 
of an adverse political majority of upward of 2,000, and became 
a member of the forty-second congress. In 1872 he was a can- 
didate for re-election, but the nomination of Horace Greeley 
as the Democratic candidate for president so weighted down 
the party that the Democracy was everj^where defeated. Mr. 
Meyers, although unanimously renominated, was beaten by 
about fourteen hundred, running about six hundred ahead of 
his party ticket. In 1895 he was offered as a sacrifice to the 
overwhelming Republican majority of Pennsylvania. In the 
face of certain defeat his loyalty to his party was such that he 
consented to be its candidate for state treasurer. The ap- 
pointive offices held by Mr. Meyers were postmaster of Harris- 
burg, appointed by President Cleveland in 1887, held office five 
years, three of which were under President Harrison, and state 
printer three years (under contract), 1874 to 1877. In 1864 
he was delegate to the national convention that nominated Gen- 
eral McClellan; in 1880 district delegate to national conven- 
tion that nominated General Hancock; in 1884 delegate at large 
to national convention that nominated Grover Cleveland; in 
1896 delegate at large to national convention that nominated 
William J. Bryan; in 1904 district delegate to national conven- 
tion that nominated Alton B. Parker. Mr. Meyers is treasurer 
of the Democratic state committee and has held the office three 
terms. 

Mr. Meyers has been actively and prominently identified 
with other business enterprises, as follows: Wilkesbarre Elec- 
tric Street Railway System, of which he was the founder ; Citi- 
zens ' Passenger Railway Companj^, of Harrisburg, of which he 
is president; Central Pennsylvania Traction Company, of Har- 
risburg, of which he is vice-president; Columbia and Montour 
Electric Railway Company, of which he is president; Carlisle 
and Mt. Holly Railway Company, of which he is president; 
Brelsford Packing and Storage Company, of Harrisburg, of 
which he is president; and the United Telephone Company, a 



00 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

large company conducting business in Pennsylvania, New York, 
Maryland and Virginia, with principal offices in Philadelphia, 
of which he is a director. 

Mr. Meyers is a member and warden of St. Stephen's 
(Episcopal) church of Harrisburg, was for years member of 
the board of missions, diocese of Central Pennsylvania, and at 
present is a member of the standing committee of the diocese 
of Harrisburg. He is a thirty-second degree Mason, Ancient 
and Accepted Scottish Rite. He was initiated into the myste- 
ries of Freemasonry at Bedford in 1866, and is a past master 
of that lodge. His chapter degrees were conferred by Stand- 
ing Stone Chapter, R. A. M., Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. The 
remaining degrees of the Scottish Rite were conferred by the 
various bodies of Harrisburg Consistory. He is a member 
of Zembo Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S., and of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, both of Harrisburg. Notwithstand- 
ing his business and political successes, Mr. Meyers' tastes 
are decidedly literary. He has written much for papers and 
periodicals, mostly under a nom de plume, and is the author of 
a volume entitled "A Drama of Ambition, and Other Pieces 
in Verse." He has other literary work in course of prepara- 
tion, 

Mr. Meyers married, April 4, 1854, Susan C. Koontz, born 
July 2, 1833, daughter of Jacob Koontz and sister of General 
William H. Koontz (see Koontz ancestry). Mrs. Meyers was 
educated in the Somerset public and private schools and is a 
member of the Episcopal church. The children of this mar- 
riage were: Rosa S., married Ellis L. Mumma, a street rail- 
way contractor of Harrisburg. Their first born child, Wini- 
fred, a beautiful and talented young lady, died of typhoid fever 
at the age of twenty. They have one child living, Benjamin 
Meyers Mumma. Edwin K. died January 13, 1898; he was 
state printer for eight years and a member of the Harrisburg 
common council. Three children survive him, namely, Mere- 
dith, Susan C. and Benjamin P. Henry S., of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. Susan Irene, married Benjamin F. Africa, of 
Huntingdon, now of Harrisburg, a son of J. Simpson Africa; 
they have two sons, J. Simpson and Benjamin M. Africa. Will- 
iam Koontz, a graduate of Yale Law School and a member 
of Daui)liin county bar. He married Mary Hunter, and their 
children are: Mary Elizabeth, William Koontz, Jr., and Wini- 
fred Meyers. 

MILTON H. FIKE. 

Among the prominent and influential men of the younger 
generation in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, to whom is due 
much of the imjirovement and progress made in that section of 
ihe state, must be mentioned the name of Milton H. Fike. His 




W ^(^ S-l^ 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 91 

energ^^ enterprise and thrift are undoubtedly charcteristics 
inherited from his ancestors, who came originally from Switzer- 
land and Scotland. These characteristics, united to an nnusnal 
amount of foresight and ambition, have been the means of 
raising liim to the i)Osition which he now fills so creditably — 
clerk of the courts of Somerset county, Pennsylvania. 

(I) John Fike, great-great-grandfather of Milton H. Fike, 
the pioneer ancestor of the Fike family in this country, was 
born in Switzerland and emigrated to America ]irior to the War 
of the Revolution. He settled in the state of Pennsylvania up- 
on a tract of land which was later a portion of York county, 
and about 1800 migrated westward, locating in Elk Lick town- 
ship, near St. Paul's church. He was a member of the Amish 
church and a man of considerable influence in his day. He is 
buried on the Jerry Keim farm in Elk Lick township. He mar- 
ried Bandrayer, and among their children was a son. 

Christian, of whom see forward. 

(II) Christian Fike, son of John (1) and 

(Bandrayer) Fike, was born in 1761, died February 2, 1850, 
in the ninetieth year of his age. Wliile still young he removed 
with his father to Elk Lick township, Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania. After his marriage he removed to what was then 
known as the Jonas Lichty farm, and which is now owned by 
W. N. Moser. This parcel of land included a farm which later 
passed into the hands of Joseph Fike, the grandfather of ]\Iil- 
ton H. Fike, and Daniel M., the father of Milton H. Fike, and 
is now owned by H. J. Wilmoth, of Meyersdale. At that early 
day both of these farms were practically a wilderness, and their 
splendid state of cultivation at the present time is due to the 
intelligent culture and care given them by the various mem- 
bers of the Fike family. Christian Fike married Christina Liv- 
engood, daughter of Peter Livengood, who removed from York 
county to Somerset county, Pennsylvania, about 1800. Their 
children were: 1. Barbara, married Jacob Schrock, removed 
to Milford township, Pennsylvania, and settled on the farm 
which is now in possession of their grandson, John Schrock. 
2. Jacob, married Susan Lichty and resided on the farm now 
owned by William P. Meyers, in Summit township. 3. Chris- 
tian, married Susan Beachley, removed to Stony Creek town- 
ship and later settled in Iowa. 4. Peter, married INfagdalene 
Arnold and moved to Jones' Mill, Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania. 5. John, married Catherine Miller, moved to the farm 
now owned-by Harvey L. Fike, of Summit township. G. Josejih, 
see forward. 7. Elizabeth, married John C. Ijichty and lived 
on the farm now in the possession of W, N. Moser, of Elk Tjick 
township. 

(HI) Joseph Fike, fifth son and sixth child of Christian 



} 



92 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

(2) and Christina (Livengood) Fike, was born in Elk Lick 
township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, in 1799. He died in 
1879 and his remains were buried in the graveyard on the farm 
of Samuel P. Miller. He spent many years of his life on the 
farm later owned by his son, Daniel M. He married Sally Mil- 
ler and had children: 1. Elias, born July 24, 1828, now living 
in ]\Ieyersdale borough. 2. Susan, born April 26, 1830, resides 
with her brother. 3. Samuel R., born December 24, 1831, died 
in Summit township May, 1906, and is buried in Union ceme- 
tery. 4. Anne, born August 3, 1833, married Charles Griffith. 
She died about seven years ago and her husband died about 
twelve years ago, and they are buried in the Union cemetery 
at Meyersdale. 5. Catherine, born April 29, 1835, married Will- 
iam Beal and resides in Meyersdale. 6. John M., born May 24, 
1837, resided in Meyersdale until his death a number of years 
ago, and is buried in Union cemetery in that town. 7. Cyrus 
J., born May 25, 1839, resides in Summit township on the fai'm 
owned by his father at the time of the death of the latter. 8. 
Jonas J., born April 28, 1841, a resident of Summit township. 
9. Daniel M., see forward. 10. David, born October 14, 1845, 
died in infancy. 11. Mahlou, born January 12, 1850, is now liv- 
ing in Kansas. 

(IV) Daniel M. I'ike, sixth son and ninth child of Joseph 

(3) and Sally (Miller) Fike, was born in Elk Lick township, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, on the old homestead, Jul};^ 7, 
1843. He was educated in the public schools of that district, 
and tlicTi followed the occupation of farming. At the age of 
twenty-four years he purchased the farm of his father, upon 
which he resided until 1900. He then disposed of his personal 
])roperty at a public sale, at the same lime selling the old 
homestead to H. J. Wilmoth, f>f Meversdale. He then ])urchased 
what was known as the John R. Lichty farm in Summit town- 
ship and later sold the same to his youngest son, Howard, .who 
is now the occupant. Daniel M. removed to another portion of 
this piece of property, where he is at present residing. He and 
his wdfe are members of the Dunkard or German Baptist church. 
He married, December 15, 1867, Harriet Miller, born Decem- 
ber 19, 1843, died June 6, 1897, daughter of Samuel P. and Su- 
san (Kingaman) Miller, and granddaughter of Peter C. and 
Catherine (Foder) Miller. Peter C. Miller was born in Sum- 
mit township, April 15, 1783, died May 30, 1852. He married 
Catherine Yoder, born July 10, 1785, died October 18, 1850, and 
their children were : Elizabeth, John, Jacob, Mary, Petei", Su- 
san, Barbara, Daniel, Samuel P., Catherine, Joseph, Moses, 
Susanna and Lydia. Samuel P. Miller, father of Mrs. Daniel 
M. Fike, was born in Summit township, April 17, 1820, died 
February 22, 1888. His entire life was spent on the homestead 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES i)3 

farm, about three miles south of Meyersdale, on the road be- 
tween Meyersdale and Salisbury, which he purchased from 
his father. About ten years prior to his own death he sold this 
farm to his son, Samuel S. Miller, who resided on it until his 
death. The farm is now in the possession of a son of Samuel 
S. Miller, Howard, who resides on the place. Samuel P. Miller 
married, in 1840, Susan Klingaman, daughter of John and 
(Schrock) Klingaman. John Schrock, who was a resi- 
dent of Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, removed to Somerset 
county about the year 1765. This branch of the Schrock family 
originally came from Switzerland, and at that time held office 
under the Swiss government. The Klingamans emio-rated from 
Scotland before the Revolutionary war. There were two broth- 
ers who settled on the coast of New England, later moving west- 
ward. One located in what is now known as Greenville town- 
ship, the other in Summit township. These were the pioneer an- 
cestors of the Klingaman family, the country being at the time 
of tlieir settlement there an entire wilderness. The children 
of Samuel P. and Susan (Klingaman) Miller were: Barbara, 
deceased; Joseph S., resides about one mile south of Meyers- 
dale; Harriet, married Daniel M. Fike, as previously stated; 
John S., deceased; Mary, deceased; Sally, married Ezra Berk- 
ley, deceased, resides on a farm about four miles north of 
Meyersdale, Brothers Valley township, near Berley's Mill; 
Cornelius, deceased; Lydia, deceased; Caroline, married Franb 
Walker, lives on a farm about five miles north of Meyersdale 
in Brothers Valley township; Samuel S., deceased; and Susan, 
married Joseph G. Mognet, lives in Summit township just south 
of Meyersdale borough. Mrs. Samuel P. Miller resided on the 
old homestead in a house built for her prior to the death of 
her husband until her death, November 5, 1904, at the age of 
eighty-three years. She was buried in the graveyard on the 
home farm. The children of Daniel M. and Harriet (Miller) 
Fike were: Dallas J., married Ida Beachey, daughter of S. A. 
Beachey, of Elk Lick township, now a resident of Meyersdale 
borough. Milton H., see forward. Howard, married Susan 
Gnagey, resides on the John R. Lichty farm, about one and one- 
half miles south of Meyersdale, in Summit township. Nevin, 
died at the age of eighteen months. 

(V) Milton H. Fike, second son and child of Daniel M. (4) 
and Harriet (Miller) Fike, was born on the old homestead in 
Elk Lick township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, January 
5, 1874. He was educated in the public schools of his native 
township and remained on the farm of his father, assisting 
the latter until he had attained the age of twenty-one years. 
His education was supplemented by attendance at the Meyers- 
dale preparatory school, of which J. D. Meese, who is now in- 



94 BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

structor in the California State Normal School, was at that time 
principal. Milton H. Fike received his first provisional cer- 
tificate when he was but seventeen years of age, under J. M. 
Berkey, county superintendent. He taught in the public schools 
of Elk Lick and Summit townships from the fall of 1892 until 
the spring of 1900, when he entered the employ of the Deer- 
ing Harvester Company, of Chicago, Illinois. With them he 
acted in the capacities of salesman, expert and collector. He 
severed his connection with this firm July 31, 1902, and ac- 
cepted a position with the Meyersdale Supply Company, of 
Meyersdale, Pennsylvania. This was at the time the largest 
general store in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, and Mr. Fike 
held the position of general manager and buyer. He left their 
employ when they sold their interests to the Somerset Coal 
Company and joined the Deering Harvester Company in Jan- 
uary, 1904. On the 10th of March of the same year he left this? 
company and accepted a position with S. M. Hess & Bros., 
manufacturers of fertilizers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, serv- 
ing them as general manager and salesman for Southwestern 
Pennsylvania and Western Maryland. This position he re- 
tained until Januarj^ 1, 1906. In the spring of 1905 he became 
a candidate of the Republican party for the office of clerk of the 
quarter sessions and oyer and terminer courts of Somerset 
county. He received a total vote of three thousand eight hun- 
dred at the primary and was nominated for the office. A fusion 
party was then formed to defeat the Republican candidate, and 
this party nominated William A. Weaver, of Paint borough, 
as their candidate. At the fall election, which was held Novem- 
ber 7, 1905, Mr. Fike carried thirty-eight precincts out of the 
total number of fifty in the county, the number of votes cast for 
him being three thousand one hundred and nine. The com- 
bined votes of the fusion party, consisting of the Democratic, 
Citizens' Union and Orphans' parties, was three thousand two 
hundred and fifty-seven. The next in line to Mr. Fike — Will- 
iam A. Weaver — received a vote of one thousand seven hun- 
dred and twelve, making the majority of Mr. Fike over his 
nearest opponent one thousand four hundred and seven votes. 
He was installed in office on the first Monday of January, 1906, 
in the temporary court house. In the fall of the present year 
(1906), upon the completion of the new court house, all offi- 
cials will move to their new quarters. Mr. Fike has been elected 
to a term of three years. He has already made a reputation 
for himself by the accuracy and system he has introduced and 
enforces in the management of the details which come into 
his province. Although requiring the most exact and careful 
work from all those under his supervision, yet he has gained 




9^&/^^i^ 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 95 

their love and respect for the uniform justice which character- 
izes all he does. 

He married Grace Shultz, daughter of Peter Shultz, of 
Summit township, and their children are: Theodore Nevin, 
aged eleven years ; Anna Grace, aged six years. 

WILLIAM COLLINS BEGLEY. 

William Collins Begley, the well known and highly es- 
teemed sheriff of Somerset county, is a descendant in the sixth 
generation of John Begley, or 'Begley, as the name was orig- 
inally spelled. 

John 'Begley, afterward John 0. Begley, married Mary 
Hurley in her native town, Belfast, Ireland, in 1750. One child 
was the fruit of this union, and it was christened James Oliver 
Begley, probably for two reasons: First, the preservation of 
the letter 0, and, second, love for Oliver Cromwell. 

James Oliver Begley located in Cork and married Bridget 
O'Neii. They had one child, John Patrick. 

John Patrick Begley, a native of Cork, married Nora Ho- 
gan, also a native of Cork, in 1799. Their second child was 
named William and was the grandfather of William C. Beg- 
ley. 

William Begley, grandfather of William Collins Begley, 
was born at Cork, Ireland, in 1804. He emigrated to America 
in 1823 and three years later married Annie Kelly. William 
Beglev and his wife were the parents of three children : John, 
born 1829; David, 1833; and Nancy, 1835. Mr. Begley was a 
stanch supporter of the Republican party. 

David Begley, father of William Collins Begley, was born 
in Springfield township, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, March 
10, 1833. Left fatherless at the early age of three years, all 
the education he received was given him by his foster parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. William Kern. Free schools did not exist at 
that time. He was a private in Company F, Eighty-fifth Regi- 
ment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, during the trying days 
of 1861-65. Mr. Begley married Amanda Collins, born March 
19, 1841, at Mill Run, Fayette county, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Beg- 
ley 's father was Dr. William Collins, who is especially noted in 
Somerset county for the geological survey he made many years 
ago to show the mineral wealth of the county. He was the first 
discoverer of limestone and the first to urge its value for agri- 
cultural purposes. In the burning of lime he constructed the 
first incline railway in the county, the same extending from the 
quarry to the kiln. He made patterns for the wheels, built the 
cars and put the railway in successful operation. The incline 
railway was at first a great curiosity. By the introduction he 
suffered pecuniary losses. He was elected associate judge of 



96 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

the Somerset county court in 1882, wliich position he filled 
creditably for five years. He practiced dentistry for thirty 
years, conducting a large and successful business. He was a 
grandson of Moses Collins, one of the pioneers of Fayette 
county, and the man who built the first log cabin in the Indian 
Creek settlement. In politics he was a Republican. Dr. Will- 
iam Collins located and developed the first coal mines in the 
Meyersdale basin. His father, Henry Collins, enjoys the dis- 
tinction of having built the first carding mill in either Fayette 
or Somerset counties. 

William Collins Begley, son of David and Amanda (Col- 
lins) Begley, was born in Stewart township Fayette county, 
Pennsylvania, December o, 1870. He received his education in 
the common schools of Fayette and Somerset counties. He 
lived about three miles from the schoolhouse, and in inclement 
wintry weather it was a great hardship to make his way there. 
This had to be endured, however, as the school term was but 
five months of the year. By occupation Mr. Begley is a farmer. 
In politics he has always affiliated with the Republican party, 
having cast his first vote in 1892, when he voted for Benjamin 
Harrison and Whitelaw Reid. Since that time he has always 
adhered to the political faith of his family. In January, 1903, 
at the beginning of his term of office as sheriff of Somerset 
county, Andrew J. Coleman appointed William Collins Begley 
as deputy sheriff. In the previous political campaign, in which 
Mr. Coleman had had aggressive opposition, Mr. Begley, whose 
acquaintanceship extended over almost the entire county, was 
Mr. Coleman's most active and effective supporter, and his 
appointment as deputy sheriff was made by Mr. Coleman in 
recognition of his loyal and efficient political services. 

Mr. Begley entered official life as he had always approached 
every other task, determined to do his duty. In the many 
delicate situations that occur in the administration of the 
sheriff's office, Mr. Begley always acted with consummate tact 
and exhaustless patience. AVith the unfortunate he was ever 
sympathetic and considerate, so that in the wake of his of- 
ficial career he left no enemies but many friends. Indeed, com- 
bined with a natural kindness of disposition that is magnetic 
and contagious, Mr. Begley possesses an intuitive knowledge 
of human nature enjoyed l}y few men. In the great miners' 
strike of 1903-04, lasting throughout the winter, and extending 
to almost every colliery in Somerset county, when riots and 
almost every conceivable form of violence were occurring daily, 
the brunt of the work of preserving the ])eace fell upon Mr. 
Begley as chief field deputy. How well he performed his ar- 
duous' duties is best attested by an admiring and grateful pub- 
lic wherever Chief Begley comes upon the scene of disturbance. 



\ 



BEDB\)RI) AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 97 

In the riot at Boswel!, January 18, 1904, Mr. Begley was wound- 
ed four times, but notwitlistandin«: his wounds, he remained in 
active control of the situation all night, and thereby saved the 
property of the coal company fi'om destruction. His conduct 
everywhere com])elled the applause of the general public, and 
his conciliatory treatment of the men and his undoubted bravery 
inspired the respect and esteem of the strikers themselves. 

Several months before the Republican primary election 
preceding- the triennial election of county officers, Mr. Begley 
was favorably mentioned by many of his admirers as a worthy 
successor to Sheriff Coleman, when the latter 's term of office 
should have ex|)ired. Mr. Begley was very diffident, but the 
movement for him grew from month to month. The men who 
arrogated to themselves the Republican leadership of Somer- 
set county did not look upon the Begley boom with approval. 
Mr. Begley 's strong individuality, political independence, and 
sterling manhood, did not commend him to the managers of 
the party, and when the Republican slate for 1905 was finally 
made up, Mr. Begley 's name was not upon it. But the Begley 
boom could not be overlooked; it loomed like a great cloud 
across the political horizon. Mr, Begley was forced into the 
political arena by the irresistible demand of the rank and 
file of his party, and the political tempest which ensued after 
the formal announcement of his candidacy for the office of 
sheriff has never been equalled in intensity in the history of 
Somerset county. The campaign was but of three weeks' dura- 
tion, but the contest was unprecedentedly fierce. William H. 
Deeter, Mr. Begley 's opponent, was by no means a weak man, 
and he was supported by every influence and artifice at the com- 
mand qf a dominant political faction. Mr. Begley 's fight was 
made practically without money, while the opposition was plenti- 
fully supplied with "the sinews of war." But there are times 
when the passions of men rise beyond the power of money to 
divert them from their honestly cherished purposes. Such a 
time was the Republican campaign of 1905 when the people, 
on the twenty-fifth day of ^larch, triumphed over their self- 
appointed masters. The Republican con^'ention was held on 
the twenty-eight of March, at which time Mr. Begley 's nomina- 
tion was certified with an official majority of one hundred and 
thirty-four votes, having received two thousand seven hundred 
and ninety-five' votes to two thousand six hundred and sixty- 
one for Mr. Deeter. 

While Mr. Begley has never been a member of any church, 
he has always been a willing and liberal contributor to the 
cause of religion, making no distinction as to the denomination 
which he wished to help. For many years past he has been a 

Vol. ITI 7 



98 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

regular attendant of the Lutheran church. Mr. Begley is not 
connected in any way with any society, fraternal, beneficial or 
otherwise. Mr. Begley is not yet married. 

HENRY FRANKLIN BARRON. 

Henry Franklin Barron, cashier of the Farmers' National 
Bank of Somerset, descends from German ancestry. George 
Barron, grandfather of Henry F. Barron, was born in Somer- 
set township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, in 1784. He mar- 
ried Christena Barclay, who died June 21, 1851. He died Jan- 
uary 18, 1852. The children born to them were : George, Sep- 
tember 1, 1810; Joseph, March 15, 1812; John C, July 21, 1820, 
died April 16. 1897; Eliza, January 6, 1825, married Chauncey 
Marteeny; Polly, who married Frederick Weimer, Sr., of Som- 
erset, Pennsylvania, died in young womanhood. George Bar- 
ron was a farmer throughout his life. He was a member of 
the Lutheran church and politically a Democrat. His children 
are all dead at this writing. 

John C. Barron, son of George and Christena (Barclay) 
Barron, was born July 21, 1820. He was a farmer in Somer- 
set township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, occupying the old 
Barron homestead. He was of the Lutheran church faith and 
obtained a common school education. He was twice married; 
first to Lavinia, daughter of Jacob and Mary (Hay) Young. 
They resided in Somerset township. The children born to 
them were: Araminta, February 26, 1849, married a farmer 
named Amos A. Adams, now a resident of Waterloo, Iowa; 
Sophia, April 12, 1850, married James Weimer, a blacksmith 
of Somerset county, Pennsylvania; Missouri, October 11, 1851, 
married Cyrus Hemminger, a farmer of Somerset township; 
Louisa, January 21, 1854, married A. F. Kugs, a farmer and 
stone mason of Somerset township. The mother of these chil- 
dren died February 22, 1857, and Mr. Barron married (sec- 
ondly) Catherine, daughter of Frederick and Elizabeth (Queer) 
Gonder, in 1860, and by this union were born : Henry F., Janu- 
ary 11, 1861; Belinda J., May 26, 1863, married Henry Cole- 
man; Annie M., August 31, 1864, married J. A. Berkey, of 
Somerset, Pennsylvania; Edward C, March 5, 1866, married 
Carrie M. Berkey; Sadie E., July 18, 1867, married Edward L. 
Simpson; Lizzie K., March 3, 1869, died January 1, 1881; Nan- 
nie K., October 1, 1870, married Wesley Slagle, of Johnstown, 
Pennsylvania; John 0. K., November 24, 1872, died January 
20, 1881. 

Henry F. Barron, son of John C. and Catherine (Gonder) 
Barron, born January 11, 1861, obtained his education at the 
common and noi-nial schools of Somerset, his native county. 
Subsequently he took a thorough course at Duff's Commercial 




C/1 



p^ 



a 

u 



^ 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 99 

College of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. From 1879 to January 1, 
1891, Mr. Barron followed school teaching in the borough of 
Somerset and adjacent country districts. 

Politically Mr. Barron has always voted and given his 
hearty support to the Republican party. Among the places 
of trust he has held in an official capacity may be named : From 
1891 to 1894 he was deputy sheriff under Isaiah Good; from 
1897 to 1899, inclusive, he was prothonotary and clerk of the 
courts of Somerset county; was school director in the borough 
of Somerset during 1898-99-1900; chairman of the Republican 
county committee for 1900-01 ; also twice a delegate to the Penn- 
sylvania State Republican Convention — 1899 and 1900. 

September 4, 1900, when the Farmers' National Bank of 
Somerset was organized and opened for the transaction of busi- 
ness, he became its cashier, which position he still holds. He 
is also one of the directors of this bank. 

He is a member of the Lutheran church and served as 
Deacon of Trinity Lutheran church of Somerset for ten years in 
succession, from 1892 to 1902. He holds a membership in the 
following civic societies: In Masonry, he belongs to Somerset 
Lodge, No. 358 ; Hebron Chapter, No. 272, of Meyersdale, Penn- 
sylvania ; Oriental Commandery, No. 61, of Johnstown, Pennsyl- 
vania; Harrisburg Consistory, A. A. S. R., Harrisburg, Penn- 
sylvania ; Syria Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S., of Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania. He is also a member of the Odd Fellows Order, Som- 
erset Lodge, No. 438; Knights of Pythias, Lodge No. 471, of 
Meyersdale, Pennsylvania; Junior Order of United American 
Mechanics, of Shanksville, Pennsylvania, and Johnstown Lodge, 
No. 175, of Elks. 

Mr. Barron was united in marriage at Lavansville, Penn- 
sylvania, by Rev. L. L. Seiber, pastor of the Lutheran church, 
April 6, 1882, to Mollie J. Berkey, daughter of Chauncey H. and 
Elizabeth (Adams) Berkey, of Somerset borough (see Berkey 
family sketch). 

ROBERT SAMUEL MEYERS. 

Robert Samuel Meyers, managing editor of the Gleaner, 
Berlin, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, and secretary of the 
Gleaner Publishing Company, was born October 21, 1878, the 
son of David L. and Susan M. (Hay) Meyers, and grandson of 
Samuel and Magdalena (Lichty) Meyers. The Meyers family 
originally came from Germany. 

David L. Meyers was born in 1842 in Brothers Valley town- 
ship, near Berlin. He w^as educated in the Somerset county 
schools, and was a farmer by occupation. He was a very suc- 
cessful agriculturist, and was held in the highest esteem by his 
neighbors. Politically he accorded allegiance to the Republican 



100 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

party. In eluiroh relations he was a leading- member and pillar 
of the Brethi^en chntcli, and s(n-ved as trnstee and deacon of 
same. 

David Tj. Myers married Susan M. Hay, a daughter of 

George P. and (Miller) Hay, of Somerset county. 

Mrs. Meyers was educated in tlie public schools of Somerset 
county. Three children were born of this union, as follows: 
Robert S., of whom later; Frank H., who bought and lives on 
the old homestead farm adjoining Berlin; and Annie B., wife 
of Edward S. Kimmel, a farmer of Brothers Valley, Somerset 
county. The death of David L. Meyers occurred in June, 1904. 
His widow makes her home with her son, Frank H. 

Robert Samuel Meyers obtained his early education in the 
common schools of the county, and also attended Freeburg 
Musical College. At the age of sixteen he commenced teaching 
school, and was thus engaged very successfully in several of 
the county schools for five years. He was a census enumerator 
for Brothers Valley township on the census of 1900, being then 
barely twenty-one years of age. After the completion of this 
work, he went west, visiting the states of Illinois and Iowa, and 
finally located at Carleton, Thayer county, Nebraska. For two 
years he taught in the Carleton public schools, and while thus 
occupied purchased the Carleton Leader, a Republican news- 
paper. He edited that journal for one year, in addition to 
his school work. At the expiration of his second year of teach- 
ing he resigned this work, and gave his entire attention to the 
newspaper. During tMs period, Mr. Meyers came back to Som- 
erset, was married, and returned to Nebraska with his wife. 
They remained in Carleton another year, and in 1903 Mr. Mey- 
ers sold out his western interests and removed to Somerset, 
where he engaged in the manufacture of tobacco. At the time 
of the death of his father, in 1904, Mr. Meyers removed to 
Berlin, where he now resides. There he organized a company 
and purchased the Gleaner, sl Prohibition paper. Mr. Meyers 
converted this paper into an independent political sheet, the 
first one of its kind in the county. He is managing editor of 
this paper. The enterprise is a successful one, the paper hav- 
ing a generous patronage and the confidence of the public. Mr. 
Meyers is also secretary of the Gleaner Publishing Company. 

In his political affiliations he is an ardent Republican, and 
interested in all pertaining to the welfare of that organization. 
Fraternally he holds membership in the I. 0. 0. F., Berlin 
Lodge, No. 4(51, having been identified with this organization 
since 1899; in 1902 Mr. Meyers joined the Masonic order, and 
is a member of Gavel liodge, No. 199, Carleton, Nebraska, in 
which he sei'ved as secretary. He is a member of the Brethren 



BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 101 

church, having joined the same when he was thirteen years 
of age. 

June 25, 1902 Mr. Meyers married Nellie A. Sipe, daughter 
of Henry L. and Martha Sipe. Henry L. Sipe is a merchant 
of Somerset. He was for years in the grocery business, and is 
now a jobber of manufactured tobacco. When the Farmers' 
National Bank was organized, Mr. Sipe was its first president, 
an office which he still holds. His father, Peter Sipe, was one 
of the oldest Somerset county merchants, and on the discovery 
of gold in California was one of the party who made the jour- 
ney overland in wagons. Their hope of finding gold was not 
realized, and they made the return trij) in the same way. Mrs. 
Meyers was educated in the schools of Somerset. One child, 
Bernice, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Meyers, at Carleton, Ne- 
braska, May 10, 1903. 

BENJAMIN JOHNSON BOWMAN. 

Benjamin Johnson Bowman, postmaster of Berlin, Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania, was born in Jefferson township, Oc- 
tober 23, 1864, the son of Cyrus and Matilda (Hay) Bowman, 
and grandson of John Bowman, who was a prosperous farmer 
of Somerset county. The original ancestor of the family in 
this coimtry came from Switzerland, and settled in Berks 
county, Pennsylvania. 

Cyrus Bowman (father) was born in Brothers Valley town- 
ship, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. He received what edu- 
cation the public schools of that day afforded, and turned his 
attention to the occupation of a farmer. He was a member 
of the German Eeformed church. He married Matilda Hay, 
a descendant of a prominent family of this county, daughter 
of Simon Hay, who was born in 1807. He cast his first presi- 
dential vote in 1828, and voted for each succeeding president, 
down to the second candidac}^ of William McKinley in 1900. 
His death occurred in 1903. The death of Cyrus Hay occurred 
in August, 1878. 

Benjamin J. Bowman acquired his early education in the 
public schools of the county, and later became a pupil in the 
Meese Preparatory School at Meyersdale, Pennsylvania. Mr. 
Bowman engaged as a school teacher for six years, but relin- 
quished this occupation for agricultural pursuits, being thus 
engaged for^ eight years. He removed to Berlin in 189G. In 
his political affiliations he is a stanch Pepublican, and has 
served his township in various offices. In 1897 he was appointed 
postmaster by President McKinley, and the following year Avas 
elected to the office of county auditor, which necessitated his 
resigning the former position. At the expiration of his term 
as auditor he was again appointed postmaster by President 



102 BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Roosevelt, which office he now holds. He is also interested in 
educational affairs, and has served as school director, Mr. 
Bowman is a member of the Reformed church at Berlin, and 
has held the offices of deacon and elder of same. He is a well- 
known citizen of Berlin, and well thought of throughout the 
community. In the various positions of trust to which he was 
elected he discharged his duties in a most creditable and effi- 
cient manner, thus gaining the confidence and respect of his 
fellow-townsmen. 

Mr. Bowman married, September 4, 1887, Minnie Stahl, 
daughter of Samuel and Druscilla (Walker) Stahl, the former 
a blacksmith. Mrs. Bowman was educated in the public schools, 
and during her husband 's term of office as county auditor, was 
appointed postmistress to fill out his unexpired term, and filled 
this position very satisfactorily for three years. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bowman have children as follows : Vida M., Clarence H., Mary 
E., Eugene K., Benjamin S., and John Oliver. These children 
all live with their parents and are attending school. 

REV. WILLIAM G. SCHROCK. 

Rev. William G. Schrock, bishop of the Brothers Valley 
congregation of the German Baptist church, was born March 
27, 1840, in Donegal township, Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, a son of George and Susan (Horner) Schrock. 

Christian Schrock (grandfather) was the founder of the 
family in America. He was a native of Germany, bom 1780, 
came to this country in 1805, settling on a farm in Brothers 
Valley, which has since been made into two farms, now owned 
by Rev. William G. Schrock and E. L. Knepper. The farm 
originally comprised three hundred acres, and Christian fol- 
lowed farming exclusively. He married Franie Good, who was 
born in 1789 and died in 1870, aged ninety-one years. Her 
father was a large land owner of Brothers Valley. This couple 
were the parents of nine children, five sons and four daughters, 
all of whom lived to a good old age. One daughter, who is still 
living near Somerset, married Rev. Jacob Spicher, deceased. 
Christian Schrock died in 1847, aged sixty-seven years. 

George Schrock, son of Christian Schrock, was born on his 
father's farm, in 1816. He was educated in the public schools 
of his native place, and studied for the ministry. For many 
years previous to his death he was bishop of the Brothers Val- 
ley congregation of the German Baptist church. Although the 
owner and manager of his farm, his life was largely devoted to 
church work. In i)olitics he was first a Whig, but after the for- 
mation of the Republican party gave his support to that organi- 
zation. In 1838 he married Susan Horner, a daughter of David 
and Elizabeth Horner, of Summit township. She was born in 




1 





/; 




'2^^^-e^y 




BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 103 

1818 and died in 1865. The children of this marriage were: 
William G., of whom later; and Rebecca, who was born in 1842, 
married Samnel F. Rieman and is living with her son, George, 
near Berlin. George Schrock's useful life came to an end in 
1892, 

Rev. William G. Schrock received his initial education in 
the public schools of the county and later attended the summer 
normal schools. He also spent some time at Juniata College, 
at Juniata, Pennsylvania, and taught for several terms in the 
public schools. At the age of twenty-one he connected himself 
with the German Baptist church of Brothers Valley, his father 
being bishop of the congregation. He now owned and con- 
ducted his farm, and commenced a course of reading and study, 
preparing himself for a ministerial career. In 1880 he was 
elected a minister of the first degree, passed to the second and 
in 1890 was ordained a regular minister of the German Baptist 
church, with full power and authority. He is now bishop of 
the Brothers Valley congregation, comprising five churches, 
who are guided in their spiritual affairs by Rev. Mr. Schrock, 
Rev. Daniel H. Walker, Rev. J. J. Shaffer, Rev. P. U. Miller and 
Rev. S. U. Shober. Rev. Mr. Schrock has always been a firm 
believer in the value of Sabbath schools in connection with 
churches, and in the face of considerable opposition was the 
first to establish them in Brothers Valley congregation. All so- 
cieties for the encouragement of religious work among the 
young meet with his hearty commendation and support, notable 
among these being the Christian Workers, the young people's 
society in his congregation. Mr. Schrock has now practically 
retired from farming life and devotes his entire attention to 
his pastoral duties, at home and in other fields. He has a fine 
library of theological and metaphysical books, and this collec- 
tion he is constantly increasing. A glance over the shelves 
shows the wide range of his studies, and his books are a sure 
index to his broad enlightened mind and character. He is a 
member of the Western District Conference of Pennsylvania, 
and has several times been a delegate to the International Con- 
ference, at which delegates assemble from all parts of the 
world. In political affiliations Rev. Schrock is strictly inde- 
pendent. 

He married, December 13, 1860, Rebecca Walker, a daugh- 
ter of Rev. Daniel P. (a minister in the German Baptist church) 
and Elizabeth (Horner) Walker, and who was born May 25, 
1838. Her parents were married about 1830, and reared a fam- 
ily of eight children. Their son, Daniel H. Walker, is a minis- 
ter of the German Baptist church. Mrs. Schrock was born, 
educated and married in Stony Creek township. Mr, and Mrs. 
Schrock have one child, Emma S., who was born on the home 



104 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

farm November 3, 1865. She was educated in the county public 
and normal schools, and also attended Juniata College. She 
married E. L. Knepy^er. a farmer and stock dealer. She is the 
mother of one son, and her home, adjoining her father's, is a 
part of the original Christian Schrock homestead. Mr. and 
Mrs. Schrock adopted a nephew, (jalen K. Walker, in baby- 
hood. He was given a good elementary education and was then 
sent to Juniata College, from which institution he graduated 
with honor. He is now twenty-two years of age, a fine speaker 
and gives great promise of becoming a leading spirit in what- 
ever profession he embraces. He is very dear to the hearts of 
his adopted parents, who take the deepest inerest in his career. 

EPHRAIM J. WALKER. 

Ephraim J. Walker, secretary of the Farmers' Union As- 
sociation and Fire Insurance Company of Somerset County, 
was born in Brothers Valley township, Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, February 22, 1845. He is a son of Jonathan Gr. and 
Matilda (Hay) Walker, and grandson of George G. and Cath- 
erine (Coleman) Walker, descendants of a German ancestry. 

Jonathan G. Walker (father) was born in Brothers Valley. 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, in 1815. He was educated in 
the township schools, and throughout his active career followed 
the occupations of farmer and carpenter. He was a member 
of the Lutheran church, in which he held the offices of deacon 
and elder, and in politics was first a "\Aniig and later a Repnb- 
lican. By his marriage to Matilda Hay, daughter of Francis 
P. Hay, the following named children were born: Drucilla, 
who became the wife of Samuel Stahl ; Joseph, married Lucinda 
Engle; Melinda, who became the wife of Daniel Altfather; Ir- 
win, married Lillian Dively; and Ephraim J., of whom later. 
Jonathan G. AValker died May 17, 1874, aged fifty-nine years. 
His wife survived him mnnv vears, passing awav October 7, 
1899. 

Ephraim J. Walker attended the public schools in the vi- 
cinity of his home, and worked on the farm with his father 
until after his marriage, at the age of twenty-three, when he 
removed to Winchester, Virginia, but after a residence of a 
few months there returned to his native state and settled on a 
farm in Summit township, where he lived for a number of years. 
After the death of his father, in 1874, he settled on the home 
farm, which had previously been owned in succession by his 
grandfather and father, and which is now owned and operated 
by himself. In 1875 the Farmers Union Association and Fire 
Insurance Company of Somerset County received a charter 
from the state to conduct the business of fire insurance among 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 105 

the farmers of Somerset county. The first secretary of the 
company was Ezra Berkley, and he was succeeded by Mr. 
Walker, who served as both secretary and treasurer for two 
years and as treasurer for three years. In 1892 he was again 
elected to the office of secretary, in which capacity he is now 
serving. This company bas been exceedingly successful in its 
operations, and is on a sound financial basis. December 31, 
1905, they had $4,357,872 of business in force, and had paid 
losses up to the same date amounting to $153,681.84. Total 
am.ount of premiums received, $165,239.85. 

The esteem in which Mr. Walker is held by his fellow- 
citizens is evidenced by the fact that he was chosen to fill the 
offices of school director, inspector and auditor, being the in- 
cumbent of the latter at the present time (1906). He has been 
for many years a member of the Lutheran church, in which he 
holds the offi-ces of trustee and deacon, and is also a teacher in 
the Sabbath school connected therewith. Although Mr. AVaiker 
is now sixty years of age, he is hale and hearty, and he divides 
his time between the duties of his secretaryship and his farm, 
although his sons relieve him of a large share of the work and 
responsibility of the latter. Throughout his long and honor- 
able career he has fulfilled every trust reposed in him, and 
his character is without blemish. 

At Somerset, Pennsylvania, January 16, 1868, Mr. Walker 
was united in marriage to Sarah Berkley, born May 16, 1848, 
died March 5, 1896, daughter of Samuel and Catherine (Hanger) 
Berkley. She was educated in the public schools of her native 
township, and was an active member of the Brethren church. 
The children of this marriage were as follows : Anna V., born 
December 30, 1868, in Winchester, Virginia, married Charles 

E. Boyer, of Meyersdale, Pennsylvania. - — -, died in 

infancy. Ollie M., born April 9, 1872, in Summit township, 
Pennsylvania, is the wife of Charles B. Dickey. Clinton, born 
December 10, 1874, in Summit, Pennsylvania, died March 2, 

1881. Forrest 0., born April 16, 1877, in Brothers Valley, 
Pennsylvania, died February 22, 1881. Carrie A., born Sep- 
tember 21, 1879, in Brothers Valley, Pennsylvania, became the 
wife of Sylvester Baer. She is the assistant secretary of the 
Fire Insurance Company above referred to, and they make 
their home with her father, Ephraim J. AValker, by whom Mr. 
Baer is emploved on the farm. Lydia M. P., born April 6, 

1882, died May 21, 1895. Marling G., born September 8, 1884, 
resides at home and assists his father in the work of the farm. 
Orville Ray, born March 6, 1887, resides at home. George C, 
born May 26, 1889, died April 5, 1890. Dalton L., born Sep- 
tember 25, 1890, resides at home. Gladys M., born May 12, 



106 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

1893, died October 14, 1895. These children were given the 
advantages of a good education, and consequently are well 
fitted for their several stations in life. 

CPIARLES A. FLOTO. 

Charles A. Floto, a leading manufacturer of Berlin, is a 
son of Charles Floto (I), who was born in Grermany, and in 
1846 emigrated to the United States, settling in Berlin, where 
he learned the trade of cigarmaking with Henry Floto, who 
was the first tobacco manufacturer in the town. Charles soon 
became a manufacturer himself, making what are known as 
"Berlin stogies," and conducting the business until 1862. He 
then obtained a contract for carrying the United States mail 
between Berlin and Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and for eight 
years was employed in this manner. The remainder of his life 
he was a small farmer. In politics he was a Democrat. He 
and his wife were members of the Lutheran church. 

(I) Charles Floto married, in 1846, Wilhelmina Specht, 
a native of Germany, and in the same year he and his bride 
sought a new home across the sea, where the following chil- 
dren were born to them : Charles A., of whom later ; Augustus 
C, a prominent merchant of Berlin; Theodore H., cigar manu- 
facturer of Berlin; Harmon, cigarmaker of Berlin; Matilda, 
wife of Newton Berkebile; Minnie, wife of R. C. Heffley, hard- 
ware merchant of Berlin; and William, of Shanksville, travel- 
ing salesman. Mr. J'loto died in 1897, at the age of seventy- 
six, and his widow, who is now eighty-seven years old, is in 
the enjoyment of good health. 

(II) Charles A. Floto, son of Charles and Wilhelmina 
(Specht) Floto, was born April 13, 1847, in Berlin, where he at- 
tended the public schools until the age of eleven years, when he 
began learning cigar-making under the instruction of his 
father. He worked at his trade until 1862, when he ran away 
from home and enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Forty- 
second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, in which, owing to 
his youth, he was obliged to enroll as a drummer. Notwithstand- 
ing this, however, he never struck a drum, but drew a gun which 
he carried throughout the war. The regiment took part in thir- 
ty-eight battles, beginning with Fredericksburg and including 
Chancellors ville, Gettysburg, Petersburg and the Wilderness, 
and was present at the surrender at Appomattox. In all the 
marches and privations Mr. Floto, despite his youth, bore his 
full part and never missed a battle or a skirmish. Not one day 
was he absent from the regiment, and was never seriously ill, 
wounded or captured. He was probably the youngest regular 
soldier from Pennsylvania who served his full term of enlist- 



BEDFOKD AND S0MEK8ET COUNTIES lo7 

ment. At the close ol' tiie war lie was li()iioial)ly discharged and 
mustered out. 

After bis return home he resumed the trade of cigaruiak- 
ing, at which he worked for two years in Johnstown. He had 
th'Mi accunnilated some money, which he invested in a cigar fac- 
tory in Berlin under his own nuinagement and ownership. 
There he has since remained, building up a large wholesale 
trade in the noted "Jkn-lin tobies." His leading brands, for 
which he has an extensive sale, are the B and (J, the Senator, the 
Blue Point and the Shatter. He also has a good trade in spe- 
cial makes among consumers in Somerset and the adjoining 
counties. The factory turns out from two to two and one-half 
million tobies annually. 

Since the organization, in 181)8, of the Co-operative Mutual 
Fire Insurance Company of Berlin, Mr. Floto has been its vice- 
president, and he is also one of the directors of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Berlin. He has served the borough of Berlin as 
school director, councilman and three times as chief burgess. 
He is serving his fourth term as commander of Post No. 241, 
G. A. R.. of Berlin, and is a member of Berlin Lodge, No. 471, 
I. 0. 0. F., in which he has passed all chairs. He also affiliates 
with ^leyorsdale Lodge, No. 551, F. and A. M. In politics he 
is a Democrat, but cast his first presidential vote in 1872 for 
the Prohibition candidate in preference to the one nominated 
by the Democi-ats. This was probably the first Prohibition vote 
ever cast in the township. He and his wife are members of the 
Lutheran church of Berlin, in which he has served as deacon. 

^Ir. Floto married, June 19, 1870, Ruth, born January 15, 
1851, daughter of Auguste Kerl, of Berlin. Mrs. Floto is of 
German ancestry, both her parents being natives of the Father- 
land. She was educated in the Berlin schools. The family of 
]\Ir. and Mrs. Floto consists of the following children: Robert 
II., ])()rn March IG, 1873, cigarmaker of Berlin, married Clara, 
daughter of Francis Knepper, and has two children, Leroy and 
Mildred; Annie ^[., born November 18, 1874, at home, educated 
in l^erlin schools; IT. Wilson, born December 29, 188r), cigar- 
makei', lives at home. All the children are members of tlie 
Lutheran church, H. Wilson being an active worker in the Sun- 
day school and in other branches of young men's church work. 
He is a speaker and writei- of great promise and a young man 
of good business ability. ]>oth he and his brother are active 
meml)ers of the Sons of Veterans. 

Mr. Floto has a very pretty residence, furnished with all 
modern inii)rovements and situated on Berlin's mnin street, 
which he purchased in 1898. Although still in active business, 
he feels that it is nearly time to take off the harness which for 
well nigh iialf a century he has worn so faithfully. 



108 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

ROBERT P. BRANT. 

Robert P. Brant, of Shanksville, is a great-grandson of 
Cliristian Brant, who came from Dauphin county to Stony 
Creek townsliip iji 179.5 and settled near the site of Shanks- 
ville, on the Lazear farm. His children were: Christian; 
Abram, an 1812 soldier ; Sanmel ; Adam, of whom later ; George ; 
Elizabeth, wife of Caspar Keller; and Eve, wife of Jacob Kel- 
ler. Air. Brant died suddenly while on a hunting trip. 

Adam Branl;, son of Christian Brant, was born in 1785 in 
Dauphin county and was a carpenter and wheelwright, work- 
ing at his trade for forty years in this county. He was a 
Whig and a member of the Lutheran church. Mr. Brant mar- 
ried Elizabetli Grove and their children were: Jacob, married 
Maria Bnrkett and ]-emoved to Iowa, where he died; Sarah, 
wife of John Ijutz, died at the age of eighty-one; Eliza, de- 
ceased, was wife of Joseph Keefer; Joseph, of Berlin, married 
Mary Woy; Leah, deceased, was wife of Benjamin Keefer; 
Susan, deceased, was wife of Henry Grady; Sophia; Chauncey 
A., of whom later. Mr. Brant died near Shanksville in 1847. 

Chauncey A, Brant, son of Adam and Elizabeth (Grove) 
Brant, was born June 12, 1832, and learned the saddler's trade 
in Stoyestown, receiving two dollars and a half for eighteen 
months' works. He afterward worked at his trade in Pitts- 
burg and for several years in Shanksville. In August, 1862, 
he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Thirty-third Regi- 
ment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, serving with the rank of first 
sergeant until May, 1863, when he was honorably discharged. 
For forty years Mr. Brant has been a merchant in Shanksville. 
He has served as school director, for twenty years held the 
office of justice of the peace, and for the last eight 3^ears has 
been postmaster. He is a Republican and a member of the 
Lutheran church. 

Mr. Brant married, INIay 12, 1855, Susan, born May 8, 
1833, daughter of George Rayman, and their children were: 
Robert P., of whom later; Araminta, wife of D. S. Wilson, of 
Shanksville, has one child, Lee, who married Susan Blackburn 
and has one child, Robert F. ; Jennie S., wife of Lincoln Hull, 
merchant of Spring Hope, Bedford county; Richard J., mer- 
chant of Shanksville, married Eva Ileffley; Foster F., partner 
of Richard J., married Rose Ream. Mrs. Brant is a member of 
the Ijutheran church. 

Robert P. Brant, son of Chauncey A. and Susan (Ray- 
man) Brant, was born ]\ray 20, 1856, in Shanksville, where he 
received l\is preparatory education in the public schools, after- 
ward attending the normal schools of Somerset and Berlin. 
After completing his edncaiion he taught for five years in the 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 109 

schools of Stony Creek township, and tiien entered commer- 
cial life as a traveling; salesman for a IMiiladelphia wholesale 
grocery house, taking Somerset and Bedford counties as his field 
of labor. Since 1887 he has conducted a drug store in Slianks- 
ville, being a registered druggist, (pialified to i)ractice anywhere 
in Pennsylvania. For ten years he has served as justice of 
the peace, and for the last eight years has been assistant post- 
master, the office being situated in his store. He belongs to 
Shank^ville Camp. No. 7325, ]\[odern Woodmen, and is a Re- 
I)ubli('an in politics. He is a member of the Lutheran church, 
which he has served as deacon and elder, and for fifteen years 
has been superintendent of the Sunday school. 

^\v. J^rant married, December 12, 1878, Miriam A. Wil- 
son. They have no children. Mrs. Brant is a daughter of 
A])raham Wilson, who was bom December 12, 1828, and is a 
retired miller of Shanksville. He is a Democrat and a member 
of the Fnited Brethren chui-ch, as is his wife, Catharine Balt- 
zer, who was born in 1839. Their daughter Miriam was born 
December 31, 1854, was educated in the common and normal 
schools and became the wife of Robert P. Brant. She is a mem- 
ber of the Lutheran church. 

ROBERT C. HEFFLEY. 

Jiobert C. Heffley, of Berlin, is a grandson of John Heffley, 
who in 1815 came to Berlin from Berks county, Pennsylvania. 
He was a tanner by trade and was twice married, his first wife 
being Barbara Swartz, who bore him the following children, 
all of whom are deceased: William, Druscilla (Mrs. Alex. 
Brubaker), and Julia Ann. John Heffley 's second wife was 
Elizabeth rvel'fer, and their children were: Charles A., of 
whom later; Albert, enlisted in August, 1862, in Company F, 
One Hundred and Forty-second Regiment, Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteers, Captain F. H. Edmundson, served as first lieutenant, 
captured at Gettysburg and for twenty months confined in 
Southern ])risons, promoted to captain and at close of war 
honorably discharged, married Minnie Stoner and lives in Ber- 
lin; Alexander, Joseph and Gersham B., all deceased; James, 
clergvman at Canal Mancliester, Oliio; Samuel, of Berlin; 
Harriet, wife of Dr. Right, of P.erlin; Elizabeth, wife of E. H. 
Anawalt; Ellen C, wife of C. P. Heffley, of Somerset; Clara, 
deceased. The father of this family died in 1873 at the age of 
eighty-one. 

Charles A. Heffley, son of John and Elizabeth (Keffer) 
Heffley, was born Auaust 8, 1833, and followed his father's 
trade, owning and ojterating a taimery in P)erlin. He w\ts an 
active politician and a strong Democrat. Mr. Heffley married, 



no BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

August 22, 1859, Judith A., born October 20, 1832, daughter of 
Alexander and Nellie (Crigler) Philson, the former for many 
years a merchant of Berlin, a noted land surveyor and for 
thirty years justice of the peace. The following children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Heffley: Margaret E., of Berlin; Robert 
C, of whom later; Rose E., of Berlin; John A., clerk in Ber- 
lin, married Minnie Suder and has three children, Stewart, 
Emmeline and Louise; Annetta, wife of George P. Brubaker, 
coal operator and manufacturer of Berlin, has one child, Rob- 
ert D. ; Emma B., wife of C. W. Krissinger, manager of Berlin 
Mercantile Company; Nellie, wife of S. Piatt Zimmerman, 
fireman on Baltimore and Ohio railroad. Mr. Heffley died June 
3, 1885, and his widow was appointed by President Cleveland 
postuiistress of Berlin, which office she held the full term of 
four years. She is still living in Berlin and is a member of the 
Lutheran church. 

Robert C. Heffley, son of Charles A. and Judith A. (Phil- 
son) Heffley, was born January 2, 1863, in Berlin, where he re- 
ceived his education in the common and normal schools. He 
began his business life as a worker in and around the coal mines 
of the vicinity, and in December, 1883, entered the service of 
0. A. M. Krissinger, a hardware merchant of Berlin, with 
whom he remained six years in the capacity of clerk. In the 
summer of 1889 he left the store and for a few months worked 
in a creamery, returning in the autumn to the store, now con- 
ducted by Krissinger & Kuitz, where he remained until 1897. 
On May 1 of that year Mr. Heffley opened a general hardware 
store in Berlin, which he still conducts, employing two clerks 
and doing a large business. In addition to the regular hard- 
ware stock he deals in wagons, buggies, farm machinery, paint, 
oils, etc. 

He has served as school director, auditor and chief burgess 
of Berlin. In 1896 he was elected justice of the peace, and in 
1901 was re-elected, making ten yars of continuous service in 
that office. In 1906 was again elected, making his third term. 
He was in 1906 candidate on the Democratic ticket for protho- 
notary of Somerset county. He is a member of Meyersdale 
Lodge, No. 554, F. and A. M. ; Berlin Lodge, No. 461, 1. 0. 0. F. ; 
Berlin Lodge, No. 122, Order of Maccabees, and Berlin Lodge, 
No. 7170, Modern Woodmen of America. In the I. 0. 0. F. 
and in the Maccabees he has passed all chairs and in the for- 
mer order holds the rank of past grand. He and his wife are 
members of Trinity Lutheran church of Berlin. 

Mr. Heffley married, July 12, 1893, Minnie, born Septem- 
ber 4, 1859, in Berlin, daughter of Charles Floto, of that town, 
in the schools of which she received her education. Mr. and 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 111 

Mrs. Heffley are the parents of two daughters : Judith Ray, 
born June 17, 1894; and Edith Marie, born November 1, 1895. 
Both these children are pupils in the Berlin schools. 

JACOB G. KIMMEL. 

Jacob G. Kimmel, of Downey, born September 2, 1850, son 
of Josiah and Susan (Glessner) Kimmel, traces his descent 
from Jacob Kimmel, who was born May 6, 1757, in Lancaster 
county, and about the period of the Revolution came to Somer- 
set county. He settled in Stony Creek township, where his 
farm was one of the first clearings. He was a Whig and a 
member of the United Brethren church. Jacob Kimmel 's wife 
was Mary Hoffman, born December 2G. 1760, and the follow- 
ing were their children: Abraham, Jacob, John, Solomon, Eliz- 
abeth, wife of Jacob Shank ; Ludwig, Mary, wife of Peter New- 
comer; Peter, Michael, and Jonathan, of whom later. Jacob 
Kimmel died November 14, 1824, and his widow passed away 
May 11, 1838. 

Jonathan Kimmel, son of Jacob and Mary (Hoffman) 
Kimmel, was born January 28, 1798, in Stony Creek township, 
and made farming his life-w^ork. He held the offices of super- 
visor, school director and county commissioner, was a "\A^iig 
and a member of the United Brethren church. Mr. Kimmel 
married, July 24, 1818, Susan Meyers, born January 3, 1799, 
and their children were: Mary, wife of Josiah Walker, de- 
ceased; Michael, deceased; Josiah, of whom later; John M., 
retired farmer of Jefferson township; Daniel, Noah, Elizabeth, 
and Susan, wife of Moses Gashaw, all of whom are deceased; 
and Jonathan J., retired farmer of Berlin. The death of Mr. 
Kimmel occurred July 7, 1878, and that of his widow January 
14, 1883. 

Josiah Kimmel, son of Jonathan and Susan (IMeyers) Kim- 
mel, was born May 22, 1824, in Stony Creek township. He was 
a farmer and the owner of the homestead, the tract originally 
settled by his grandfather. Jacob Kimmel. FTe filled the offices 
of supervisor and school director, and in politics was first a 
Whig and later a Re].niblican. He was a member of the Breth- 
ren church, in which he was always a prominent worker, serv- 
ing as both deacon and elder. He married, February 18, 1847, 
Susan, born November 5, 1829, daughter of Joseph and Cath- 
arine Glessner, and gr(\nt-graiiddaugliter of Elder Jacob Gless- 
ner, whose un])rovoked murder caused so great a sensation 
throughout the county, and especially in Berlin, which was the 
scene of tlie tragedy. Josiah and Susan Kimmel were the par- 
ents of the following cliildron: Kate, born November 4, 1848, 
wife of Alexander Hillegass. farmer of Allegheny township, 
had eight children, died April 20, 1800. Jacob Ci., of whom 



H2 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

later. Ellen, born October 8, 1853, wife of John Croner, farmer 
of Brothers Valley township, had six children, died December 
17, 1893. Joseph L., born February 18, 1856, minister of United 
Brethren church, Dayton, Ohio, married (first) Vida Schrock, 
and after her death Alice ]\[usser, who died March 8, 1906, at 
Gratis, Ohio; four children by each marriage. Milton J., born 
March 8, 1860, active politician and county clerk, married Ag- 
nes, daughter of Dr. RaA'^, of Wilsey, Kansas, had two children, 
died in Wilsey, 1902. Jonathan E., born September 12, 1862, 
died January 2, 1865. Ida, born November 1, 1861, died Janu- 
ary 6, 1883, a few .weeks after her mari-iage to John Ross. Ed- 
mund B., born September 17, 1870, owns and operates the home- 
stead farm, married Lizzie Schrock, has four children. The 
father of this family died December 21, 1903, and the mother 
is still living in her home in Downey, in good health and very 
active at the age of seventy-seven. She is a member of the 
Brethren church. 

Jacob G. Kimmel, son of Josiah and Susan (Glessner) 
Kimmel, was educated in the public schools of Stony Creek 
township and at the normal school. He worked on the farm for 
his father until of age, when he married and bought the farm 
at Downey, which he still owns. This estate consists of two 
tracts of one hundred and forty-six and one hundred and sev- 
enty acres, respectively, and on this land Mr. Kimmel con- 
ducted a general farming and stock-raising business. He was 
a very enthusiastic stockman and raised fine specimens, con- 
stantly seeking then, as he does to-day, to improve his breeds, 
which were and are in many cases pure blooded. There is on 
the farm a sugar camp of five hundred vessels and also good 
orchards. Mr. Kimmel also owns the Peter Kimmel farm of 
one hundred and seventy acres, adjoining the one before men- 
tioned. 

In 1884 Mr. Kimmel took up the study of surveying, and 
after perfecting himself in this art became an expert whose 
services were much in demand, being called upon to survey 
farm, coal and lumber lands 'in his own and adjoining counties. 
He surveyed completely the extensive coal lands of the Niver 
Coal Company, a circuit of nineteen miles, and it was at this 
time that he formed the acquaintance of INIajor Philip A. Shaf- 
fer, manager for the company, the acquaintance ripening into 
a warm friendshiyt. which still exists. In 1884 Mr. Kimmel 
laid out the town of Downey in the center of his own land, the 
South Pennsylvania railroad being then engaged in building 
their line through his farm. The collapse of the railroad nipped 
this enterprise in the bud, although Downe^^ is quite a thriving 
little hamlet, with postoffice, stores and pleasant homes. There, 
in 1902, Mr. Kimmel built his present residence, erecting at the 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 113 

same time a stiuctiiie in which he carries ou the business of a 
general coinilry store. He tlien retired from farm life iu favor 
of his son. Mr. Kimmel's mother is his next-door neighbor 
and is the object of liis constant care. Mr. Kinnnei was one 
of the i)romoters of the Farmers' Union Telephone Co., and 
lias been the treasurer of that company since its organization. 
This line extends from Shanksville to l^erlin. He has held the 
offices of assessor and school director and is a Republican in 
politics, having cast his first presidential vote for Ulysses S. 
Grant. He and his wife are members of the Brethi-en church, 
in which for twenty years he has served as deacon, being also 
superintendent of the Sunday school. 

Mr. Kinnnei married, November 10, 1870, Hester, born 
July 10, 1848, daugiiter of Peter K. Hillegass, of Bedford coun- 
ty, and their children were: Albert P., born December 3, 1871, 
educated in public schools of Stony Creek township and Berlin 
normal school, began teaching at the age of seventeen and for 
thirteen years taught in the public schools; now lives on and 
cultivates his father's farm. He married Mollie, daughter of 
Jacob Stutzman, and has three children, Marion H., Mildred 
and Charles C, aged respectively ten, eight and five years. 
Charles A., born December 8, 1874, died December 16, 1875. 
The mother of these two sons died May 6, 1875, and on Decem- 
ber 26, 1876, Mr. Kimmel married Abia Keel. They have no 
children. 

Mrs. Kimmel is a daughter of William -Keel and a grand- 
daughter of Mathias Reel, who was born in Harrisburg, Penn- 
sylvania, where his Geiman ancestors had settled on their ar- 
rival from France, whither they liad fled on being driven by 
religious persecution from their native land. AVilliam Reel was 
a native of Stoystown and was by trade a shoemaker. He 
bought a farm on the Bedford i)ike and there conducted a hotel 
for the entertainment of the throngs of travelers which in those 
days made use of that thoroughfare. He served as county 
auditor and cormnissioner, was a Republican in politics and a 
member of the Lutheran church. William Reel married Sarah, 
daughter of Levi Gribble, who was of English descent and a 
veteran of the Mexican war. Mr. and Mrs. Reel were the par- 
ents of a son and a daughter: Matthias D., ex-prothonotary of 
Somerset county; and Abia, born October 18, 3848, educated in 
])iiblic schools, wife of Jacob G. Kimmel. 

MILLER FAMILY. 

The founder of the numerous family of which Irvin E. 
Miller and Edwai'd II. Miller, l)oth of I>erlin, are rein-esenta- 
tives, was Christian Miller, who was 1)orn in (Jermany, whence 
lie emigrjjted to the I'liited States, settling in Somerset county 

\-.il. Ill s 



114 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

on a farm which has never since been out of the Miller family. 
He was a Whig and a member of the Mennonite church. Chris- 
tian Miller married Susan Musser, and after her death, at the 
early age of twenty-eight, took for his second wife Elizabeth 
Ross. By these marriages he became the father of the follow- 
ing children : Tobias, of whom later ; Peter, and five daugh- 
ters, who married, respectively, Christian Baer, Henry Stutz- 
man, William Levitt, Samuel Rhoads, and George Geisel, who 
was killed at the battle of Fredericksburg. Christian Miller, 
the father, died in 1865, at the age of eighty-four. 

Tobias Miller, son of Christian and Susan (Musser) Miller, 
was born in 1813, and was a farmer of Stony Creek township. 
He adhered to the Republican party, and served as deacon and 
elder in the Reformed church. Mr. Miller married Margaret, 
daughter of Benjamin Kimmel, and their children were: Ben- 
jamin, who lives with his widowed sister, Mrs. Stutzman ; Mary, 
widow of Jacob Stutzman, has twelve children; Peter T., of 
whom later; Sarah, wife of John Stutzman, has five children; 
Jeremiah, deceased ; William, deceased ; John, farmer at Liste, 
married Margaret Sorber, has four children; Charles, farmer 
of Stony Creek township, married Lucy Schrock, has two chil- 
dren; Susan, married Joseph Glessner and after his death 
Mahlon Forney ; Harriet, wife of John M. Topper, merchant of 
New Baltimore, has six children. The death of Mr. Miller oc- 
curred July 30, 1885. 

Peter T. Miller, son of Tobias and Margaret (Kimmel) 
Miller, was born July 30, 1842, and on August 5, 1862, enlisted 
in Company B, One Hundred and Thirty-third Regiment, Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers. He was present at the battle of Antietam 
and also at that of Fredericksburg, where he received a wound 
in the left breast which kept him a month in the hospital. After 
his recovery he rejoined his regiment and fought at Chancel- 
lorsville, being honorably discharged May, 1863. After his re- 
turn home he settled on the Miller homestead, near the Glade 
church, in Stony Creek township, and there led the life of a 
farmer until recently, when he sold the property to his son, Ed- 
ward H. Miller, and retired to Berlin. He has held the offices 
of assessor and tax collector, is past commander of Mark Col- 
lins Post No. 3440, G. A. R., of Berlin, and is a Republican in 
politics. He is a member of the Reformed church, in which he 
has served as deacon and elder. 

Peter T. Miller married, April 25, 1865, Sarah Landis, born 
June 2, 1845, and they were the parents of the following chil- 
dren : Irvin E., of whom later. Mary J., bom March 10, 1869, 
wife of Joseph Walker, farmer of Stony Creek township, has 
two children, Robert and Dark Edward H., of whom later. 
Abraham L., born January 20, 1872, farming with his brother, 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 115 

Edward H. Emma B., born December 8, 1873, wife of William 
Stall, farmer of Stony Creek township. Maggie C, born Sep- 
tember 11, 1875, died July 9, 1896. Heniy T., born February 
11, 1878, died January 3. 1879. Oscar, born March 13, 1879, 
died July 10, 1886. Roscoe C, born April 24, 1884, married 
Ada Carver, has two children, Grace and x\jnanda. Mrs. Miller, 
the mother of the family, died September 13, 1893. She was 
a member of the Reformed church. Mr. Miller married, Sep- 
tember 5, 1895, Elmira (Bittner), widow of William H. Shockey, 
the issue of this marriage being one child, Zeta E., born Sep- 
tember. 16, 1899. 

Irvin E. Miller, son of Peter T. and Sarah (Landis) Miller, 
was born February 21, 1866, on the Samuel Kuhns farm in 
Stony Creek township, and received his education in the Glade 
public school. He worked for his father on the farm until the 
age of twenty-one, when he married and settled on a farm which 
he rented of his father. After cultivating this land for three 
years he purchased of his father-in-law a farm in Stony Creek 
township, near Roxbury, consisting of one hundred and forty- 
six acres. On this farm, wliich he still owns, he resided thirteen 
years. It is a fine property, all but two acres being under cul- 
tivation. The house is a solid brick two-story structure, erected 
in 1835, the barn having been built in 1838. Both are in good 
condition. Mr. Miller works this farm, but rents the house to 
one of his employes. After living thirteen years on this estate, 
Mr. Miller purchased a second farm of one hundred and forty- 
five acres, on which he now makes his home. The patented 
name of this property is ' ' Sugar Bottom Farm. " It is well im- 
proved and kept in splendid condition. The grain raised is all 
used on the farm, but much of the hay crop goes to market. 
There is a sugar camp of seven hundred vessels, producing an- 
nually about twenty-five hundred pounds of maple sugar and 
syrup. Both this farm and the other have valuable orchards. 
Mr. Miller is an extensive stock raiser, buyer and feeder. His 
horses, which number ten, are good, two being full-blooded Per- 
cheron, and his cattle, of which he has forty, are of a good 
breed and quality. His dwelling is of a very handsome modern 
type, with appropriate grounds and surroundings. Mr. Miller 
belongs to the Sons of Veterans, of Berlin, and advocates the 
principles of the Republicans. He and his wife are members 
of the Reformed church, which he has served as deacon. 

Irvin E. Miller married, September 2, 1886, Ellen N., born 
May 7, 1867, daughter of Jacob J. Glessner and sister of Frank 
P. Glessner. She was educated in the public schools. The fam- 
ily of Mr. and Mrs. Miller consists of the following children: 
Oscar T., born February 21, 1888, assists his father on the farm, 
member of the Reformed church; Jacob J. and Peter H. 



116 BEDFOKD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

(twins), born May 8, 1892, attending school; Alda May and 
Alton (twins), born June 8, 1898, tlie latter died at the age of 
three months and the former is at school "j also, a daughter, Lot- 
tie, born March 20, 1889, died at the age of three months. 

Edward H. Miller, son of Peter T. and Sarah (Landis) Mil- 
ler, was born October 7, 1870, on the homestead, and obtained 
his education in the Glade public school. He remained on the 
farm with liis father until of age, and at this period married, 
after which, for two years, he lived on the homestead, working 
for wages. He then purchased the farm and still owns and cul- 
tivates it. The estate consists of two hundred and twenty-five 
acres, mostly under cultivation, and is a fine property, with 
large and modern improvements. The barn, measuring fifty- 
two by one hundred and three feet, was built in 1890, and the 
house in 1888, both having been erected by Peter T. Miller. 
The place is well stocked with a good grade of horses, cattle and 
sheep, and in addition to the stock raised on the farm Mr. Miller 
buys and feeds for the market. There are good apple orchards 
and a sugar camp of six hundred and fifty vessels, producing 
annually twenty-five hundred pounds of maj^le sugar. Mr. Mil- 
ler is serving his second term as school director of Stony Creek 
township, and affiliates with the Republicans. He and his wife 
are members of the Glade congregation of the Reformed church, 
Mr. Miller being an ex-deacon and also belonging to the Sunday 
school. 

Edward H. Miller married, April 21, 1891, Ida M. Will, 
and two children have been born to them : Webster, aged four- 
teen; and Maggie, aged ten. Mrs. Miller is a daughter of John 
H. Will, who was born September 10, 1845, and during the 
Civil war served in Company K, Fifth Regiment, Pennsylvania 
Heavy Artillery, being honorably discharged at the close of the 
war. Mr. Will was a farmer until 1901, when he built a home 
in Downey and opened a grocery and feed store, which he has 
since conducted. He has served as school director and super- 
visor and is a Republican. He and his wife are members of the 
Reformed church, in which he serves as elder and of which he 
has been treasurer for twenty years. Mr. Will marri-ed, Jan- 
uary 23, 1868, Catherine, born July 24, 1844, daughter of Sol- 
omon and Dinah Engle, and they were the parents of five chil- 
dren, one of whom, Ida M., was born May 7, 1873, was educated 
in the township schools and became the w^ife of Edward H. Mil- 
ler. 

SAMUEL B. YODER. 

Samuel B. Yoder, of Berlin, is a representative of a family 
which was founded in Pennsylvania by Christian Yoder, a na- 
tive of Switzerland, who emigrated about 1745 to the province 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES IIT 

of Penn and settled in Berks county. In tlie spring of 1776 he 
removed with his family to J^edford, now Somerset county, 
where he liad previously bought a large tract of timber land 
situated where Pugh now stands, about seven miles east of Som- 
erset, in Stony Creek township. The deed for this property was 
dated October 9, 1775, the consideration named therein being 
nine hundred and sixty-eight dollars. There were no roads and 
the nearest neighbor was five miles distant. There was a small 
clearing where Christian erected a log house and barn, a picture 
of which is owned by his great-grandson, Samuel B. Yoder. He 
then began his battle with the wilderness, wild beasts and occa- 
sional Indians. Field after field was cleared and cultivated, until 
he had one of the largest and best farms in the county. He was 
a member of the Amish Mennonite cliuivh. 

Christian Yoder married, in Berks county, Barbara Hooley, 
and they were the parents of fifteen children, namely : Fanny, 
born in 1753; Barbara, 1756; Christian, 1758; Jacob, 1760; 
David, 1763; l^'ost, 1765; Jonathan, 1766; Magdalena. 1769; 
John, of whom later; Elizabeth, 1774; Solomon, 1776; Gertrude, 
1778: Jephthah and Esther (twins), 1780; and Henry, 1782. 
?i[rs. Yoder died March 6, 1812, at an advanced age, and Mr. 
Yoder expired November 20, 1816, being then about ninety yeai's 
old. Nearly all their children settled in the immediate neigh- 
borhood and founded a connnunity known as the Yoder settle- 
ment. They all reared large families and lived to advanced ages, 
and the Yoder settlement was, at that early period, the best 
cultivated and most prosperous section of the county. 

John Y^oder, son of Christian and Barbara (Hooley) Yoder, 
was born February 8, 1772, in Berks county, and was four years 
old when his parents came to Somerset county. Until his mar- 
riage he assisted in clearing the farm, which was then sold to 
him by his father, the deed being dated July 13, 1796, and the 
consideration being foui'teen hundred and twenty-nine dollars 
and forty-four cents. In addition to the homestead he acquired 
a large tract in Cambria county, where the city of Johnstown 
now stands. This was divided into four farms, which were 
afterward owned by four of his children, one of these farms be- 
ing the site of Grand View cemetery, where sixteen hundred 
and twenty victims of the Johnstown flood are buried. Part 
of this tract is now Y^'oder township, having been named in 
honor of the family. John Yoder wjis a Whig and a member 
of the Amish Mennonite church. 

Jojm Yoder married, in 1796, l>arbara Yoder, to whom he 
was in no degree related, and their children were : Salome, wife 
of John Miller, had ten children, died May 21, 1877, aged eighty. 
Jonas, married Sarah Schrock, had nine children, accidentally- 
killed June 15, 1860, aged sixty-two. Moses, walked from Penn- 



118 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

sylvania through the wilderness to Canada and settled on a 
tract of timber land twenty miles north of Toronto. He died 
in Canada, March 26, 1880, at the age of eighty. Daniel, mar- 
ried Kate Kaufman, had four children, died June 24, 1879. 
Samuel, married Elizabeth Lehman, had nine children, died 
April 8, 1872, aged sixty-eight. Gertrude, wife of Henry Hersh- 
berger, had seven children, died May 11, 1880, aged seventy-five. 
David, married Sarah Lehman, had seven children, died Janu- 
ary 8, 1856, aged fifty. Fanny, wife of Michael Schrock, had 
three children, died October 23, 1890, aged eighty- three. Eliz- 
abeth, wife of Samuel Kaufman, had thirteen children, died May 
16, 1865, aged forty-three. Joshua, at twenty-two went to Can- 
ada, engaged in McKenzie rebellion, and on defeat of the rebels 
fled through the forest to Niagara river, where he crossed to 
New York. Thence he went to Ohio and later to Union town- 
ship, Elkhart county, Indiana, where he took up and patented a 
large tract of timber land, which he cleared and on which he 
made his home. He married Maria Stump, had six children, and 
died March 28, 1867. Abner, taught in the schools and was a 
preacher of the Amish church, noted as an eloquent speaker 
and an able writer, the most gifted and intellectual member of 
the family. He married Fanny Schrock, had eleven children, 
and died December 12, 1883, at the age of seventy. Barbara, 
died in childhood. Benedict, of whom later. Lena, died in 
childhood. The mother of these children died December 1, 1856, 
at the age of eighty-one. She was a member of the Amish Men- 
nonite church. Mr. Yoder, the father, died October 4, 1860, 
having lived eighty-four years on the homestead, and leaving 
behind him the memory of a religious and conscientious man. 

David Yoder, mentioned above, was the father of a son, 
Tobias Yoder, who served in the Union army during the Civil 
war. He participated in the fight at Charles City Cross Roads, 
where he was shot three times through the body and had his 
shoulder shattered by a charge of buckshot. After lying three 
days on the battlefield he was found by the enemy, taken to 
Libby prison and shortly afterward released on parole. He 
finally found his way into the Union lines, recovered and re- 
enlisted. Moses Yoder, his brother, served in the Fifty-fourth 
Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. His soUj John Yoder, 
served in the Fifty-fourth Regiment and died in a field hospital. 
Jonas Yoder, son of Samuel, brother of David, served in the 
Thirty- third Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. 

Benedict Yoder, son of John and Barbara (Yoder) Yoder, 
was born August 20, 1817, in Stony Creek township, and until 
Ms marriage worked for his father. He then bought a tract of 
timber land two miles west of the homestead and began wrest- 
ing a farm from the forest. On the night of May 9, 1853, the 



BEDFORD 'AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 119 

home he had built caught fire and burned to the ground, no 
property being saved and the family barely escaping with their 
lives. Four of the boys, small though they were, saved them- 
selves by jumping from the second-story windows. Mr. Yoder 
at once began rebuilding and erected the residence which still 
stands on the farm and in which he makes his home. He has 
always been an ardent Republican and is a member of the 
Amish church. 

Mr. Yoder married, April 24, 1842, Sarah Miller, and their 
children are: Samuel B., of whom later; Daniel, bom May 2, 
1845, farmer and merchant in Kansas, married Maggie Yutzy, 
February 2, 1870, and has two children; Cornelius C, bom 
September 21, 1846, educated in common and normal schools of 
Somerset county and in Iowa State University; taught four 
years and then moved to Ammish, Iowa, where he engaged in 
mercantile business; postmaster since 1871 and director in 
Wallman Savings Bank. He married, September 7, 1873, Mar- 
garet Palmer, and they have one child. John M., born Novem- 
ber 22, 1847, was a farmer and was killed by a train in Iowa 
City, Iowa, January 5, 1894. He was a well educated man and 
had collected material for much of the family history. Mary, 
born November 21, 1849, at home. Simon T., born May 3, 1851, 
educated in common and normal schools, and at the age of six- 
teen began teaching in the schools of Pennsylvania, later re- 
moving to Iowa and becoming an instructor in the schools of 
that state. For ten years he was a merchant in Iowa City, 
Iowa, and for three years in Haddam, Kansas, where he was 
postmaster and editor of the Haddam Clipper. He is now 
cashier of a bank in Washing-ton, Kansas, where for six years 
he held the ofifice of county clerk. He married Hattie E. 
Rhoades, who died November 23, 1884, leaving four children. 
Joseph H., born September 6, 1852, taught in Iowa schools; 
merchant and postmaster at Haddam; now merchant at Wash- 
ington, Kansas. He married Tina Shaft and has two children. 
Sarah, born March 12, 1854, widow of Valentine Lehman, lives 
in Brothers Valley township, has eight children. Nancy A., 
born May 1, 1856, wife of Hiram Rhoades, of McPherson, Kan- 
sas. Gertrude, bom December 9, 1857, at home. Ezra, mer- 
chant of Sharon Center, Iowa, postmaster for the last fifteen 
years; married Jennie Bowman and has two sons. Kate A., 
born April 13, 1862, wife of N. E. Mostoller, living on the home- 
stead. Florence M., born May 4, 1869, wife of Greorge Mos- 
toller, of Lister, has one child. A daughter, who died at the 
age of two weeks, was the only member of the family who failed 
to reach maturity. 

Mrs. Yoder, 'the mother of the family, died May 30, 1900, 
in the seventy-sixth year of her age, having been born Novem- 



120 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

ber 20, 1824. She was a member of the Amish church and for 
fifty-eight years was a devoted wife and mother. Benedict 
Yoder, now in his eighty-ninth year, has never had a day's ill- 
ness and is as sound and active mentally as physically, his pro- 
longed vigor being, no doubt, the result of his habits of tem- 
perance and healthful toil. 

Sanmel B. Yoder, son of Benedict and Sarah (Miller) 
Yoder, was born May 15, 1843, in Stony Creek township, and 
received his education in the Schrock school. He worked for 
his father until 1862, when he enlisted in Company C, One Hun- 
dred and Forty-second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. 
He was with his regiment in all its battles until July 1, 1863, 
when he received at Gettysburg two severe gunshot wounds, 
one passing through the left arm and the other through the 
right breast, penetrating the lung and paralyzing the right arm. 
For six months he lay in the hospital, and in 1864 was honor- 
ably discharged from the service. He has no use of his right 
hand and arm, but has learned to use the left with perfect 
dexterity. After his return from the war he married, pur- 
chased a farm of one hundred acres, and, as well as his weak- 
ened condition would allow, directed the agricultural labors for 
thirteen years. At the end of that time, in consequence of ill 
health, he sold the property, and after taking two years for 
recuperation obtained a position as salesman for the Susque- 
hanna Fertilizer Company, selling to the farmers of Somerset 
and part of Cambria county. This position he retained twelve 
years, and in 1894 was appointed postmaster of Pugh, where he 
conducted a grocery store in connection with the postoffice. 
The property of twenty acres on which he now lives was pur- 
chased in 1883, and he has built thereon a pleasant home and 
made other improvements. January 14, 1905, he resigned the 
office of postmaster. For three years he served as assessor of 
Stony Creek township, and for the same length of time was 
.jury commissioner of Somerset county. He belongs to Post 
No. 210, G. A. R., of Somerset, and is a Republican in poli- 
tics. He and his wife are members of the Mennonite church, 

Mr. Yoder married, June 8, 1865, Catharine ^Mummau, and 
they have been the parents of the following children: Lizzie, 
born January 14, 1866, married, Jully 1, 1886, Alexander Hunt- 
er, of Shanksville, has four children, Mabel, Nannie, Kate and 
Morton, Sadie, born March 2, 1869, married, December 6, 1888, 
E, L. Coleman, of Shanksville. Margaret, born December 13, 
1871. died October 29, 1882. Harvey G., born October 1:^, 1874, 
farmer, living with his father; married, Jime 27, 1895, Emma 
Walker, who had two children, Fred W,, born October 3, 1895, 
and Russel S., December 16, 1899. After the death of his wife 
he married, June 5, 1902, Abbie Miller.. John H,, born Jan- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 121 

uarv 25, 1879, died October 25, 1882. Annie K., born March 
11, 1881, died October 27, 1882. Mrs. Yoder is a daughter of 
Jacob Miimrnau, who was born in 1814, and married, October 
1, 1837, Elizabeth Miller, born August 17, 1819. The follow- 
ing were their children : Edward ; Annie ; John, killed in one 
of the battles of the Civil wai'; Maria; Catharine, born May 
15, 1843, educated at Glade school, wife of Samuel B. Yoder; 
Caroline, and Sarah. Jacob Mammau died February 2, 1887, 
and the death of his widow occurred October 23, 1889. 

JOHN M. TOPPER. 

Deep in the heart of the Allegheny mountains, in Allegheny 
township, about one mile from the line dividing Somerset from 
Bedford county, lies the little borough of New Baltimore. Here, 
on the old Topper homestead, now within the borough limits, 
John M. Topper was born. The Topper family came from Vir- 
ginia and first settled in Bedford county. After a very short 
residence there they came to New Baltimore. Grandfather 
Topper later removed to Ohio, where he died. The family 
were mostly farmers and communicants of the Catholic church. 
In politics the voters of the family were Democrats. 

Peter A. Topper, father of John M. Topper, was a man of 
considerable influence in the community. He was a Democrat 
and held a number of the township offices. He died November 
9, 1865, at the age of fifty-one years. He married Mary A. 
Lucken, born 1814, died 1893, and had children: Annie, de- 
ceased, married William Webber; Mary, widow of Francis 
Suhie; Elizabeth, deceased, married Luke Brittlebum; Sylves- 
ter, deceased; John M., see forward; Ambrose, deceased; 
Francis, resides in New Baltimore; Rosalie, married Thomas 
Mattingly, of Cumberland, Marj^land; Margaret, widow of 
John Straub; Joseph, a resident of New Baltimore. 

John M. Topper, second son and fifth child of Peter A. 
and Mary A. (Lucken) Topper, was born September 29, 1844. 
He grew up on the farm and received such school advantages 
as the time and place afforded. This he supplemented by study 
at night until he had acquired a good common education. At 
the age of seventeen A^ears he had so improved himself that 
he began teaching in the public schools during the winter 
months; this lie did for six terms. Determining then upon a 
business life, he opened a general store at Roxbury in part- 
nership with his brother Sylvester. This was continued for 
three years, when they removed the business to New Baltimore. 
After one year there, John M. sold out his interest and was 
out of regular business for about four years. He then bought 
the general store business of his brother Francis in New Balti- 
more and retained it until the spring of 1906, when he sold it 



122 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

out to his son, Francis V. In addition to his mercantile inter- 
ests he associated himself with his brother Sylvester in 1870, 
and built and operated a distillery near New Baltimore. After 
ten years of this partnership he became the sole owner, and in 
1880 bought the Suhrie distillery in Stony Creek township. He 
still owns and operates both plants, making a superior grade of 
pure rye whisky. His home in New Baltimore is a commodious, 
modern residence, with beautiful surroundings, and there he is 
Jiving practically^ a retired life, having delegated many of the 
cares and responsibilities of his large business interests to his 
sons. He has large property interests in different localities 
and is an extensive land owner. He is a loyal adherent to 
Democratic principles, and, though having no desire for public 
office, has been councilman of the borough and member of the 
school board. He is much interested in educational matters, 
and has always labored in the cause of advancement and bet- 
ter opportunities for the young. In religion he adheres to 
the faith of his ancestors, as do all the members of his family. 

While engaged in business in Roxbury he met Hattie J. 
Miller, born and educated in Stony Creek, daughter of Tobias 
and Margaret (Kimmel) Miller (see sketch of Miller family), 
whom he married, January 13, 1868, and had children : Francis 
v., who commenced assisting his father in the store of the 
latter at the age of ten years and grew up with the business. 
He became the owner of the same in the spring of 1906. Annie, 
deceased. Jennie, married James Gardill, yardmaster of the 
Duquesne Steel Works. They reside in Duquesne, Pennsylva- 
nia, and have five children. Emma, deceased. Cecilia, mar- 
ried John F. Werner, a carpenter and builder of New Balti- 
more. They have four children. Norbert, bookkeeper and trav- 
eling salesman in the employ of his father; unmarried. John 
A., graduated from Jefferson Medical College in 1904, and is 
now a practicing physician in Philadelphia. He married Sa- 
rah Butler. Urban, deceased. Gertrude, married Frank Gar- 
din, electrical inspector at the Duquesne Steel Works. They 
reside in Duquesne, Pennsylvania. Zita, married Frank Ruhe, 
transfer agent at Duquesne, where they reside. Mark, now 
(1906) attending the Berlin Normal School. These children 
all received an excellent education in well known institutions 
and are thoroughly equipped to fill the various positions they 
occupy. 

BISHOP CONRAD GIULIAN LINT. 

Bishop Conrad Gillian Lint, who for over fifty years has 
served as pastor of the local congregation of the German Bap- 
tist Brethren church at Meyersdale, was born May 19, 1834, at 
Mej^ers Mills (now Meyersdale), Somerset county, Pennsylva- 




BisKop C. G. Lint 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 123 

nia, the son of Gillian Christian and Elizabeth (Hochstetler) 
Lint, of Swiss and German descent, respectively. 

Christian Lint, grandfather, was born in Pennsylvania. He 
became a farmer in Somerset county, and later in life removed 
to Ohio, where he died. His wife was Miss Lichteberger, of 
Westmoreland county. They had children as follows: Chris- 
tian, John, Jacob, Conrad, Daniel, Elizabeth (Mrs. Baker), and 
Gillian C. Jacob bought the home farm, where he died at the 
age of ninety. 

Gillian Christian Lint, father, was a native of Somerset 
county, born March 19, 1808, in the section that is now known 
as Jefferson township, a short distance west of Somerset town. 
He was a blacksmith by trade, and followed this occupation for 
a number of years in Meyers Mills. He was the first justice of 
the peace in Summit township and served in that capacity for 
fourteen years, and during this period never had a case re- 
versed by the courts. 

Gillian C. Lint married, starch 6, 1832, Elizabeth Hoch- 
stetler, who was born April 18, 1812, a daughter of Jacob Hoch- 
stetler, of Somerset county. The following children were the 
issue of this marriage union: Conrad Gillian, see forward; 
Margaret (Mrs. Samuel Foust), bom Februarv 14, 1836, died 
Mav 2, 1884, at Meyersdale; Eliza (^[rs. M. D. Miller), April 
12, 1838; Anna (Mrs. Israel Berklev), Januarv 4, 1841; William 
Gillian, March 14, 1843, died July 1, 1903, at Meyersdale; Mary 
(Mrs. Isaac Miller), August 4, 1844; Daniel Gillian, February 
1, 1847, died February 9, 1905, at Cross Roads ; Zacharia, Octo- 
ber 1, 1848, died May 19, 1849, at ]\feyersdale; Lydia (Mrs. 
Alex. E. Shoemaker), April 24, 1850; Sarah Jane, November 
5, 1852, died August 25, 1854; and Edward, born and died Octo- 
ber 1, 1859. Gillian C. Lint died :\ray 20, 1893. His wife, Eliz- 
abeth, died June 25, 1881. 

Conrad Gillian Lint obtained his early intellectual training 
in the subscription schools of his day under the preceptorship 
of some of the prominent educators of the country. Among, 
them were numbered Alexander Stutzman, who later became a 
leading attorney of Somerset county; Joseph Stutzman, after- 
wards the first school superintendent in the county after the 
installation of public schools; Christ Stutzman, M. D. ; Frank 
Stutzman, an attorney-at-law : W. J. Baer, later judge in the 
court of common pleas ; C. C. INfusselman, afterwards an assem- 
blyman; and General William H. Koontz. Under these emi- 
nent instructors Mr. Lint acquired an education of no mean di- 
mensions, and was prominent in the numerous literary societies 
of the day. Being of a studious nature and a great reader, Mr. 
Lint succeeded in amassing a fund of information on all sub- 
jects, that became of inestimable value to him when he entered 



12i BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

the ministry. Early in young manhood, and before he left the 
scliool-room, he entei'ed into an ai)prenticeshi|) to learn the 
blacksmith trade with his father. He was engaged in this occu- 
pation until 18()(), and during the period spent at the smithy 
became very proficient. It is said that he had few if any equals 
in the work of tlie anvil, while he attained to an unusual degree 
of success in the more technical points in the trade. During 
the seven years or more in which he was engaged at this hard 
labor he attended night schools, and pursued his studies with 
the utmost assiduity and earnestness. 

He was bai)tized June 16, 1855, by Elder Jacob Blough, in 
the church over which he now presides. On the same day he 
was made deacon of the church, which was a most unusual event. 
The confidence and trust reposed in him by the members of the 
congregation are attested by the fact that on the 24th of June, 
eight days after his baptism, he was admitted to the ministry. 
He was but twenty-one years of age at this time, but of ability 
and wisdom beyond his years. His advancement in the church 
was rapid, and the trust reposed in him by the church has been 
in no manner betrayed. The district in which his church is 
located was at that time called Elk Lick. Tt was later changed 
to Dale city, but in 1870 assumed its present form, Meyersdale. 

In early life Rev. Lint had taken several courses in vocal 
culture, and at the time he was elected to the ministry he was 
engaged in teaching vocal music in the evenings. He had three 
large classes in the community, but finding it necessary to de- 
vote his entire time and attention to his church work he imme- 
diately closed his music classes. Rev. Lint's life was a very 
busy one at that time. Laboring at the blacksmith shop every 
day, diligently studying evenings, and filling widely distributed 
ministerial appointments on Sundays, his time was very closely 
occupied. When he began his ministerial work the church mem- 
bership was about one hundred and seventy-five in the entire 
district, embracing six regular preaching stations. It was the 
custom of the bishop to start out early Sunday morning on 
horseback, no matter how inclement the weathei* might be or 
how imi)assable the roads. Fre(|iiently ho would return late at 
night, sometimes having eaten nothing during the day but a 
light meal Ivefore starting. 

In 18()5 the bishop of the district, Rev. Jolm Berkley, died, 
and in 18(i7 Rev. Lint was made his successor, the church mem- 
bershi)) having grown at that time to three hundred. For over 
lialf a century this has l)een his field of labor, and during this 
time he has officiated at over five hundred funerals, covering a 
territory as far east as AVeIlers])in'g, and west to Somerfield. 
Services were at first condncted in private residences; in 1847 
the Summit Mills meeting house was built, and in 1852 the first 





C^^jmJ \ 




BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 125 

meeting house in Aleyersdale was erected on the site of the 
present German Baptist Brethren church. 

Bishop Lint is possessed of unusual ability as a preacher, 
and having been, during all the years he spent in the ministry, 
a close student of the Bible, few have a clearer understanding 
than he concerning the things spoken of therein. His sermons 
are interesting and direct, and great numbers are always at- 
tracted on the occasions of their rendering. He is still in charge 
of the Myersdale church. 

June 24, 1905, was the fiftieth anniversary of his election 
to the ministry, and on the following Sunday he preached a ser- 
mon in honor of the event. Personally Bishop Lint is a man 
of genial and pleasant disposition, and greatly loved by all who 
know him. In his political relations he accords allegiance to 
the Republican party. All his relatives are Democrats, except 
his father, who joined the Republican organization in 1856. 
The bishop has never held public ofQce, although repeatedly 
urged to do so. He is deeply interested in educational affairs 
and served as school director for five terms of three years each, 
from 1858 to 1873. 

He married, in 1855, Catherine Flickinger, a daughter of 
Samuel Flickinger, of Elk Lick township. No children have 
been born of this marriage union. 

SAMUEL BRUBAKER PHILSON. 

Samuel Brubaker Philson, president of the Citizens' Na- 
tional Bank of Meyersdale, is a worthy descendant of a prom- 
inent family founded in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, by his 
grandfather, Robert Philson, about the year 1785. 

Robert Philson was born in county Tyrone, Ireland, in 1759. 
He settled in Berlin in the year above named (1785), and be- 
came prominent in both mercantile and political life. He was 
a prosperous merchant, and founded a business which is still 
carried on by his descendants. He was associate judge of the 
district for twenty years, a member of the state legislature, and 
was elected to congress in 1819 from the sixteenth Pennsylva- 
nia district, but owing to a serious accident was compelled to 
resign before completing his term. Robert Philson married 
Julia Lowry, daughter of John I^owry, and she bore him eleven 
children. Robert Philson died July 25, 1831, after a long and 
useful life of seventy-two years. 

Samuel Philson, who was the last surviving child of Rob- 
ert and Julia (Lowry) Philson, was born at Berlin, Pennsyl- 
vania, November 11, 1812. He was educated in the Berlin 
schools, which he attended until he was fourteen. He worked 
at farming for two years, but inheriting the business instinct 
of his father, at the age of seventeen he entered mercantile life 



126 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

as a clerk in the Berlin General Store, owned by James Piatt, 
where he remained as employe five years. In March, 1834, he 
became a partner, the firm name being Piatt &■ Philson. After 
the death of Mr. Piatt, Mr. Philson purchased the interest of 
the widow, and in 1839 became sole owner under the name of 
S. Philson &■ Company. In 1852 the firm became Philson & 
Brubaker. In 1875 Mr, Philson retired from the firm and con- 
fined his attention to his other large business interests, estab- 
lished during the years mentioned. In 1857 he had engaged in 
the lumber business at Philson Station, and for twenty-five 
years this was an important branch of his business. In 1866 he 
organized and opened the first bank in Berlin; this was a pri- 
vate bank under the name of S. Philson & Company, and is 
now the Philson National Bank, with his son, Robert Philson, 
as president. In 1869 he extended his banking operations to 
Meyersdale, where, in company with his son-in-law, James S. 
Black, he opened the banking house of Philson, Black & Com- 
pany, which afterward became the Citizens' Bank, and is now 
the Citizens' National Bank, with his son, Samuel B. Philson, 
as president, and his grandson, Robert H. Philson, as cashier. 
Samuel Philson was one of the promoters of the Buffalo Valley 
Railroad from Garrett to Berlin, and was the president of that 
road until it became a part of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 
system. In his early manhood Mr. Philson became a member 
of the Lutheran church at Berlin, for forty years was ofificially 
connected with church and Sabbath school, and his membership 
of the congregation only terminated with his death. Politically 
he was a Democrat, his first vote having been cast for Martin 
Van Buren. He was never an office seeker and persistently re- 
fused all offered nominations for public office. Although deeply 
engrossed in business, Mr. Philson always had a love for the 
soil and owned several farms. During the latter part of his 
life he personally superintended a fine dairy farm in Brothers 
valley. 

Samuel Philson married (first) Elizabeth McGowan, of 
Ligonier, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, March 1, 1836. 
She bore him one child, Elizabeth, born April 27, 1837, married 
James S. Black, and died June 9, 1893, leaving two children: 
Charles W. and Robert M. Black. Elizabeth (McGowan) Phil- 
son died August 17, 1837. Mr. Philson married (second), De- 
cember 3, 1839, Anna Maria Brubaker, daughter of Benjamin 
and Elizabeth (Lowry) Brubaker, of Berlin. The living chil- 
dren of the marriage are: Belle C, widow of C. A. M. Kriss- 
inger; Ella Catherine; Julia Ann (Mrs. Dr. Fisher); Robert; 
Samuel Brubaker, of whom later; and Horace B. Mrs. Anna 
(Brubaker) Philson died eJanuary 13, 1898, in her eighty-first 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 127 

year. Samuel Pliilson's busy and useful life terminated July 
18. 1902, having extended over the unusual term of ninety years. 

Samuel Brubaker Philson was born in Berlin, Pennsylva- 
nia, October 14, 1856. He attended the public schools of Ber- 
lin until 1873, and engaged in school teaching in 1875-76, one 
term, in Brothers Valley township. In 1877 he engaged in mer- 
cantile business, opening a general store in Berlin. In 1878 he 
relinquished this business and turned his attention to farming, 
which occupation he followed with excellent success until 1882, 
when he removed to Meyersdale and there assumed charge of 
the Bank of Philson, Black & Company, established by his 
fatl'.er in 1869. The name was changed to the Citizens Bank 
and was operated as a private bank until 1901, when it was in- 
corporated under the National banking laws and opened for 
business June 3, 1901, as the Citizens' National Bank, with 
Samuel Philson as president. The bank has had a very suc- 
cessful career. The capital stock is $65,000, and the last annual 
statement, June 18, 1906, shows deposits of $416,706.92, with a 
surplus fund of $41,000. Shortly after the death of his father, 
Samuel B. Philson became president of the bank. He is also 
a stockholder and secretary of the Sand Spring Water Com- 
pany of Meyersdale, having been connected with the company 
in the above capacity since its organization in 1888. He is a 
stockholder in the Meyersdale Sheet Steel Company and the 
Philson National Bank of Berlin. Besides his other varied busi- 
ness interests, Mr. Philson owns a fine farm in Brothers Valley 
township, which is well located and laid out and in a good state 
of cultivation. 

Mr. Philson is a Democrat in politics. He served for nine 
years — 1887-96 — as a member of the borough council, and was 
borough treasurer for eight years at different times, serving 
two-year terms, his last terms being from 1900 to 1904. In re- 
ligious faith he is a member of the Zion Lutheran church at 
Meyersdale. Fraternally Mr. Philson is a Free and Accepted 
Mason and past master of Blue Lodge, No. 554; past high priest 
of Royal Arch Chapter, No. 272; member of Tancred Com- 
raandery, No. 48, Knights Templar, and Syria Temple, A. A. 0. 
N. M. S. The two former bodies are located in Meyersdale and 
the latter two in Pittsburg. 

Samuel B. Philson married Addie E. Gardill, a daughter of 
George and Hannah (Guss) Gardill, of Berlin. George Gardill 
was born in Germany and came to Pennsylvania about 1844, set- 
tling at what is now Summit Mills, where he remained two years, 
working at his trade of tailor. He then settled in Berlin, where 
he died in 1904. ■\fr. (lardill was a vetei-an of the Civil war, 
having served as second lieutenant of Company P, One Hundred 
and Forty-second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers. Mrs. 



12S BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Gardill is living in Berlin at the present time (1906). The chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Gardill were : Harr^r F., a traveling sales- 
man of Philadelphia; Matilda, died in childhood; Amelia (Mrs. 
McDevitt, of Philadelphia); Ellen (Mrs. Ehmer, of Sunnyside, 
Washington); Annie (Mrs. S. P. Brnbaker) ; Addie E. (Mrs. 
SamnelB. Philson) ; J. William, of Berlin; James G., late of the 
United States navy, now with the Baldwin locomotive works of 
Philadelphia; and'Cora, died in childhood. Addie E. (Gardill) 
Philson was born in Berlin, Pennsylvania, edncated in the pub- 
lic schools, and married, March 11, 1880, Samuel B. Philson. 
The only child of this marriage is Robert Harry, born Febru- 
ary 2, 1882. He is a graduate of Meyersdale high school and 
Pennsylvania College, at Gettysburg, class of 1903. He was 
for a time with the engineering corps of the Somerset Coal 
Company, and for one year with the engineering department of 
the Erie railroad at Jersey City, New Jersey. In the spring of 
1906 he was elected cashier of the Citizens' National Bank of 
Meyersdale. He is unmarried. 

As will be seen from the foregoing, the Philson family has 
been prominent in the business life of Somerset county for the 
past one hundred and twenty-five years. They seem predestined 
for the banking business, and the present generation worthily 
deserves the prestige of the family name. They have the con- 
fidence of the banking public, and in financial circles, outside 
their own homes, are recognized as able and conservative bus- 
iness men. 

EDW^IN DEAL. 

Edwin Deal, an honored and respected citizen of Meyers- 
dale, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, who is now in his eighty- 
third year, is a remarkable example of good health, energy and 
mental faculties, well preserved by a life replete with useful- 
ness and good will toward his fellow creatures. His pleasant 
face and cheery manner are known and have endeared him to 
young and old, and his numberless acts of charity and kindness 
are known to but few outside of the immediate family circle. 
He is descended fi'om an old family of Virginia, whose thrift 
and industry bore their due share in building up the prosperity 
of the country. 

Peter Deal, grandfather of Edwin Deal, was born in the 
state of Virginia. He was a clever millwright and an exception- 
ally skilled worker in woods. He built windmills of the old- 
time wooden construction, cider presses, spinning wheels, looms 
and all kinds of wooden machinery. He removed to Greenville 
township, Pennsylvania, after his marriage, and then added 
farming to his manifold occupations. A number of the grist 
mills in various parts of the county were of his construction. 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 129 

He married Margaret Steiu and their cliildreu were: Peter, 
Jacob, see forward; George, Joseph,. Abraliaiii, Eve, married 
Jacob Fair; and llaiiiiah, married John Fiudiey. Peter Deal 
died in 1828 at an advanced age. 

Jacob Deal, second son and child of Peter and Margaret 
(Stem) Deal, was born near Slieppardstown, Virginia, Septem- 
ber 17, 1790. He was about fifteen years of age when his family 
removed to Somerset county, Pennsylvania, and as he had in- 
herited the mechanical skill of his father, it was but natural 
that he should adopt the same line of work. He was thrifty and 
industrious and soon owned a farm of considerable extent, which 
he cleared and cultivated. He erected a sawmill on his laud 
and in this the virgin forest was converted into lumber with 
a large amount of profit. He was a man of deep religious con- 
viction, and he and all the members of his family were members 
of the Jjutheran church, of which he was a deacon and elder. 
His political support was given to the Democratic party, he 
being what was known as a "Jackson Democrat." He was act- 
ive in his support of the party and held several political offices. 
His death occurred November 4, 1869, and he and his wife are 
buried in the churchyard of the Union Lutheran and Reformed 
church, in Greenville township. He married Susanna Engle, 
who was born and raised at what is still called Engle 's Mills, 
near Salisbury, Pennsylvania, August 18, 1790, died April 30, 
1860. Their children, fifteen in number, were as follows : Mary, 
born May 3, 1813; Isaiah. January 22, 1815; Sallv, September 
11, 1816; Margaret, February 14, 1818; Jeremiah, July 8, 1820; 
lieah, December 3, 1821 ; Edwin, see forward ; Julia Ann, March 
9, 1825, married Abraham Derrimore, of Iowa; Levi, December 

I, 1826; Lucinda, March 13, 1829, married Alexander Kelly, of 
Kansas; Joel, May 27, 1831, is a farmer in Montana; Hettie, 
June 30, 1832; Jacob, December 14, 1833; Harriet, December 
31, 1835; and Lavina, January 12, 1838, married Alexander 
Lint, of Iowa. 

Edwin Deal, third son and seventh child of Jacob and Su- 
sanna (Engle) Deal, was born on the farm of his father in 
Greenville township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, October 

II, 1823. This farm adjoined that of his grandfather, Peter 
Deal, and it was here that all the children of this family were 
born. His education w^as as complete as the time and the 
schools of the district afforded, and at an early age he dis- 
played marked aptitude in handling tools of all descriptions. 
L'ntil he was twenty-oue years of age his life was spent in as- 
sisting his father in clearing and cultivating the land in their 
possession, in attending to the sawmill and helping in the shop. 
By this time he had ac(|uired great skill in his work and com- 
menced the business of millwright and builder in his own right. 

Vol. HI 9 



130 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

He purchased a complete set of woodworking tools, fitted them 
with handles of his own manufacture, as was the custom of 
those days, and undertook his first contract. This was the 
building of a mill for Moses Yoder — the first overshot water- 
wheel mill in the township, all previously built having been of 
the under "flutter wheel" style. About 1850 he built for Daniel 
Lepley two mills — a sawmill and a gristmill — and these were 
considered models of their kind. After his marriage he became 
the manager of these mills and remained in this capacity for 
a number of years. Subsequently he bought the farm and mill 
properties in Larimer township, and later acquired other farm 
and timber lands until he owned about nine hundred acres, 
some of which is still in his possession. Mr. Deal resided on 
the farm he had acquired and personally conducted the mill 
operations until 1888, when he removed to Meyersdale, Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania. There he erected a gristmill and 
several dwelling houses, in one of which, an attractive brick 
residence on Center street, he now lives. He has practically 
retired from active participation in his business affairs, giv- 
ing, however, considerable time to a general oversight of the 
various interests. He has been a lifelong member of the Lu- 
theran church, in which he was baptized at the age of eight 
days, and has consistently devoted much time and effort to the 
furtherance of the church interests. He has held various offices 
in the church, including those of deacon and elder in the county 
church, and since his residence in Meyersdale has served as 
elder continuously. Although he would gladly resign this 
office, he has been earnestly solicited to continue his good work. 
His wife was and his children with their respective families 
are communicants at the same church. Politically Mr. Deal 
was for many years a stanch Democrat, but for the past sev- 
enteen years he has given his allegiance to the Prohibition 
party as being more in accord with the principles to which he 
has adhered throughout his long and useful life. He has al- 
ways been firm in his belief in total abstinence from all intoxi- 
cants and narcotics, and attributes his long life and excellent 
health to this cause. He has also served Larimer township as 
school director and as justice of the peace. 

He married, February 7, 1850, Nancy Lepley, born Febru- 
ary 8, 1832, died August 16, 1902, daughter of Daniel Lepley. 
Mrs. Deal was a woman of strong character and many excel- 
lent qualities. She was greatly beloved and esteemed for her 
many charities and kindly disposition, and her death was deeply 
deplored. She and her husband led an exceptionally happy 
married life for the period of fifty-two years. They had a fam- 
ily of sixteen children, all of whom are now (1906) living: 
Herman, born March 15, 1851, a merchant in Meyersdale; he 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 131 

married Agnes Bowman, daughter of Samuel Bowman, of Som- 
erset county. AVilliam H., born June 26, 1852, a coal and lum- 
ber operator, with mines and mills in West Virginia; married 
Alice Cook, a daughter of Jesse Cook, and their children are 
Boy, Earl and Jessie. Louisa, born April 3, 1854; married 
W. H. Reiber, a farmer of Somerset county, near Confluence, 
and their children are: Bertha, married William Burnworth, 
and has children: Ruth and Lucille (the first and only great- 
grandchilden of Edwin Deal) ; Art, and Pearl. Matilda, born 
February 25, 1855 ; married J. M. Cook, a candy manufacturer 
of Meyersdale, and has one son, Dalton. Daniel, burn August 
12, 1856, is in business in Cumberland, Maryland; he married 
Myrtle Feichner, daughter of Jacob Feichner, of Palo Alto, and 
has children: Nellie, Jacob, Ferdinand and Helen. Ezra, born 
September 17, 1857, is a coal operator in Ohio; he married 
Alice Smith, daughter of Robert Smith, of Cumberland, Mary- 
land, and has children: Robert, George and Mary. Almira, 
born February 7, 1859, married J. H. Pfahler, a merchant of 
Meyersdale, and has children: Ralph, Carl and Ida. Levi, see 
forward. Charles, born September 21, 1861, is a lumberman in 
Colton, West Virginia ; married Anna Griffith, daughter of John 
Griffith, of Frostburg, Maryland, and has three children. Homer, 
Walter and an infant son. Anna Elizabeth, born June 6, 1863 ; 
married E. J. Boyles, a merchant of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
and has children : Ethel and Marie. Simon, born September 
23^ 1864, is engaged in the lumber business in Cumberland, 
Maryland; married Venie Clawson, daughter of George Claw- 
son, of Ellersley, Maryland, and has cliildren: Mary, Edna, 
Anna Frances, Gladys, Thomas and Loydie. Nancy Agnes, 
born March 26, 1866, is devoting her life to keeping up a com- 
fortable home for her aged father. Ida Ellen, born Septem- 
l>er 13, 1867, married E. E. Conrad, the leading photographer 
of Meyersdale, and has children: Esther, Lucille, Ellswortli, 
Mary, James and John. Clara, bom July 3, 1870, married 
D. P. Ford, a coal operator; they reside in Madisonville, Ken- 
tucky, and have one child, Emily. Calvin E., born March 29, 
1872, owns and operates the grist and flour mill in Meyersdale; 
married Margaret Lenhardt, daughter of Samuel Lenhardt, .of 
Somerset, and has children : Claude and Harry. Harvey, bom 
October 14, 1873', is engaged in business at Meyersdale, is un- 
married and resides with his father and sister. 

Levi l^eal, eighth child and fifth son of Edwin and Nancy 
<Lepley) Deal, was born at Deal postoffice, Somerset county, 
May 3, 1860. He obtained his education in the old log-house 
school, called Baker school, in Larimer township. He left ,the 
schoolroom at the age of eighteen, and for the succeeding three 
years was engaged by his father in the saw, planing and grist 



132 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

mill. He then turned his attention to the carpenter and mill- 
wright trade, in which he became proficient and at which he 
worked until 1886. He then decided to go in business for him- 
self, and in the last named year he and his brother Herman em- 
barked in the lumber business, conducting the establishment 
under the firm name of H. & L. Deal, at Deal's Mills, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania. Between the years 1886 and 1895 they 
had cut about eleven million feet of lumber. In 1895 Levi sold 
his interest to his brother Herman and purchased a large tract 
of lumber land at Pinkerton, Pennsylvania, and continued his 
lumber operations there until 1898, when he formed a partner- 
ship with'H. C. Huston, of that place. This arrangement ex- 
isted until 1903, and during this period the firm cut seven mill- 
ion feet of lumber a year, besides two hundred thousand rail- 
road ties, tanbark and telegraph poles. In 1903 Mr. Deal sold 
his interest in the enterprise to Mr. H. M. Lytle, of Braddock, 
Pennsylvania. He then took a much-needed vacation of about 
six months. 

When he again engaged in active pursuits Mr. Deal gave 
his attention exclusively to the coal industry. He is at pres- 
ent interested in various commercial enterprises, among them 
being the following: The Penn-Marva Coal Company, of Gar- 
rett, Pennsylvania, of which Mr. Deal is treasurer and general 
manager; the Erie Coal Company, of Meyersdale, of which he 
is vice-president and director. He is director in the Scott- 
Ogilvie Coal Company, which has recently been exchanged for 
real estate in Columbus, Ohio, valued at $50,000. He is a 
large stockholder in the following concerns : Livingood Coal 
and Coke Company, of Meyersdale ; Littleton tract of coal land 
in Wetzel county. West Virginia; the Citizens' National Bank 
of Meyersdale, of which he is also a director; First National 
Bank of Garrett, Pennsylvania; International Trust Company, 
of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania; Economy Telegraphy Company, 
Somerset, Pennsylvania. He is vice-president of Bergholtz 
Mining Company, of Bergholtz, Ohio, which, with his brother 
Ezra, he controls. In his political relations Mr. Deal affiliates 
with the Democratic party, and is always ready and willing to 
lend his assistance to any enterprise tending to advance the in- 
terests of the party and the community. Fraternally he holds 
membership in the B. P. 0. E., No. 175, of Johnstown, Penn- 
sylvania. He is a member of the Lutheran church. 

Ijevi Deal married, April 14, 1889, Margaret B. Scott, a 
daughter of David C. Scott, of New Centerville, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, and they have the following children: 
Leora M., born July 30, 1890; Edwin S., September 7, 1892; 
James M., September 24, 1893; Marian D., February 3, 1894; 
and Nancy Marie, March 15, 1895. Mr. Deal's residence on 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 133 

Meyers avenue, Meyersdale, built in 1900, is a beautiful stone 
structure with all modern ideas embodied to secure telling effect 
and comfortable living. 

JOHN LIVENGOOD BARCHUS. 

John Livengood Barchus, president of the First National 
Bank and a prominent business man of Salisbury, is a son of 
Daniel Barchus, of English ancestry, and a grandson of John 

Barchus, who was the son of and Elizabeth (Jones) 

Barchus, the former an Ohio farmer and the latter a native of 
Ireland. 

John Barchus was born in Ohio, and when a young man 
came to (larrett county, Maryland. He was a miner and farmer. 
His teams, driven by his sons, Otho G. and Daniel, were em- 
ployed in teaming on the National pike. In- Garrett county, 
Maryland, Mi-. Barchus met Elizabeth Porter, of Scotch an- 
cestry, to whom he was married September 12, 1811. Their 
children were: Otho Gwinn, born in 1812, a wagoner and a 
mail coach driver in the mail coach days on the pike, who died 
in 1883. Daniel, see forward. John Barchus died in 1868. 
His wife, Elizabeth (Porter) Barchus, died the preceding year. 

Daniel Barchus, second son of John and Elizabeth (Por- 
ter) Barchus, and father of John L. Barchus, was born in 
Allegany comity, Maryland, I)ecember 27, 1820. He received 
the limited education that the schools of his day afforded, and 
in 1838 began teaming on the "pike" with his brother, Otho G. 
An incident in his career at this time is quite interesting. When 
the Baltimore & Ohio railroad was built to Cumberland, 
Maryland, among the first goods to arrive was a consignment 
of freight for Wheeling, Virginia, this shipment weighing 
six thousand pounds. Mr. Barchus contracted to deliver it in 
AVheeling in six days, a feat he accomplished. The mer- 
chants of AVheeling met the six-horse team, drawing the load, 
outside the city and escorted Mr. Barchus in. In the evening 
there was public rejoicing over the then unprecedented event 
of freight reaching Wheeling from Baltimore in seven days. 
Mr. Barchus was also a postillion or mail rider in those olden 
days. After the decline of the pike Mr. Barchus engaged in 
coal mining in the Frostburg region for a time and then bought 
a farm in Allegany county, Marvland. After a time he re- 
moved to a Somerset county farm, and from there to Fayette 
county, Pennsyivania. In 1870 he located in Salisbury and for 
nine years was the proprietor of the Valley House. In 1879 
he bought a farm near Ilagerstown, ]\[aryland, on which he re- 
sided for six years. At this time Mrs. Barchus died and he 
sold out and returned to Salisbury, Pennsylvania, where for 
the last ten years of his life he was a guest at the Valley House, 



134: BEDFORD AND ISOMEKSET COUNTIES 

then and now conducted by his son-in-law, Henry Loechel. Mr. 
Barclnis invested in coal lands, and by careful management of 
his various enterprises became a man of considerable wealth. 
He had a wonderful memory and could recall each business 
transaction and keep faithful records without the aid of books. 
He was a man of the strictest business integrity, was a mem- 
ber of the German Baptist Brethren church and an adherent 
of the Republican party. 

Air. Barchus was twice married. His first wife was Har- 
riet, a daughter of Moses Poland, of Virginia. They were mar- 
ried in 1852, but after a brief married life of three years Mrs. 
Barchus passed away on June 27, 1855, at the age of nineteen. 
One child was born of this marriage, Annie Elizabeth, January 
9, 1855; she is the wife of Henry Loechel, proprietor of the 
Valley House, Salisbury, January 15, 1857, Mr. Barchus mar- 
ried Barbara, daughter of David Livengood, of Salisbury. Mrs. 
Barbara (Livengood) Barchus was a direct descendant of Peter 
Livengood, the Swiss emigrant, who founded the family in 
America. (See the Livengood ancestry on another page of 
the work.) To Mr. and ]\lrs. Daniel Barchus were born two 
sons: David L,, who died in 1864, aged five years; and John 
L., see forward. Daniel Barchus died August, 1900. His wife, 
Barbara (lAvengood) Barchus, died September 12, 1884. 

John Livengood Barchus was born October 10, 1865, in 
Fayette county, Pennsylvania, and was about five years of age 
when the family moved to Salisbury, where he attended school 
until the removal to Hagei'stown, Maryland, where he was a 
student at the academy of that place. He engaged in mercan- 
tile life in Salisbury, as a clerk for a time. To perfect himself 
in correct business methods, he entered a commercial college in 
Baltimore, Maryland, and took a special course, and after com- 
pleting the same went to Kansas, where he clerked in a store 
for a friend. On his return in 1889 he opened a clothing and 
furnishing store in Salisbury, which, in 1895, became the pres- 
ent firm of Barchus & Livengood tlirough the admission of A. 
E. Livengood, whose sketch appears on another page of this 
work. In 1889 Mr. Barchus founded the Valley Bank in Salis- 
bury, and in 1902 organized, with other leading men of the 
town, the First National Bank of Salisbury, and was chosen 
its fii'st president. This institution has been wisely and con- 
servatively conducted and enjoys the confidence of the banking- 
public. Their deposits for a small town are unsually large, 
reaching over two hundred thousand dollars, with a surplus 
fund of fifteen thousand. Mr. Barchus is interested in other 
business enterprises. He is a director in the Improved Trac- 
tion Engine Company, and in the Livengood Coal and Coke 
Company, a West Virginia corporation. He is secretary and 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 135 

treasurer of the Salisbury Coal and Lumber Company of West 
Virginia, and director of the Citizens' Light, Heat and Power 
Company of Salisbury. Mr. Barchus is one of the incorpo- 
rators of the Pennsylvania and Maryland Street Railway Com- 
pany, in which he also serves as secretary and treasurer. This 
company will build and operate an electric line from Salisbury 
to Meyersdale, and are now consolidating with another company 
with a view to extending the line through Somerset county to 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and south to Frostburg and Cumber- 
land, Maryland. Work is now (19U6) under way between Salis- 
bury and Meyersdale and the towns will soon be connected. 
Mr. Barchus is a Republican. For six years he served as presi- 
dent of the borough council, and for four years as school di- 
rector. He is a consistent member of the Brethren church of 
Salisbury. 

Mr. Barchus is a worthy scion of a worthy sire. He is a 
man of many sterling characteristics, with strict regard for 
commercial ethics, with a high standard of citizenship and with 
social qualities that render him popular with his circle of 
friends. His career has been one of perseverance and enter- 
prise and is indeed worthy of commendation and should serve 
as an example to young men who are ambitious and desire to 
succeed in the business world. Never shrinking a duty, and 
never seeking an honor, he is ever ready to give support and 
encouragement to all undertakings that have for their objects 
the elevation and advancement of mankind and the growth and 
prosperity of his adopted town. 

Mr. Barchus married, October 10, 1899, Mary Edna, born 
August 21, 1878, daughter of Captain Q. A. McClure, of Mc- 
Keesport, Pennsylvania. She was educated in the public 
schools of McKeesport and Bucknell University of Lewisburg, 
Pennsylvania, and is a member of the Baptist church. Two 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. John L. Barchus : J. 
McClure, April 10, 1902; Dorothy, May 12, 1906. 

GURDON E. BISHOP. 

Gurdon E. Bishop, editor of the Meyersdale Republican, 
Meyersdale, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was born June 13, 
1862, at Owego, Tioga county, New York, the son of Peleg 
Tabor and Estelhx (P^vans) Bishop. 

His grandfather, James Plenry Bishop, was also a native 
of Owego. He married Abigail Tabor, of Union Springs, Ca- 
yuga county. New York. Their children were: Jane, Sarah, 
Rettie, Anna, Celia, Frederick H. and Peleg Tabor. 

Peleg Tabor Bishop (father) was born at Owego, October 
17, 1834. He was a carriage maker by trade, and carried on 
business at Owego, where he established the Owego Carriage 



136 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Works. In 1871 he removed with his family to Winneconne, 
Wisconsin, and engaged in the same business, which he is con- 
tinuing at this date (1906). His wife was Estella Evans, a 
daughter of Henry Evans, of Owego, New York, to whom he 
was married November 25, 1859. They had the following chil- 
dren: Gurdon Earle, of whom later; James H., born Septem- 
ber 5, 1866; Nettie, born September 5, 1870. died October 15, 
1904; she was the wife of P. J. Roblee; Rettie, born August 15, 
1874, wife of C. W. Rogers, of Wisconsin. 

Gurdon Earle Bishop attended the public schools in Owego 
until his father's family removed to Wisconsin, and was a 
student in the Winneconne schools until 1876. Immediately 
after leaving the school-room he entered into an apprenticeship 
to learn the newspaper business with Frank S. Verbeck, who 
was then the proprietor of the Winneconne Local, and is the 
present manager of the Inland type foundry of Chicago. When 
he was in the third year of his five years' apprenticeship his 
employer, Mr. Verbeck, removed to Neenah, Wisconsin, and 
Mr. Bishop followed him and there completed his trade on the 
Neenah Times. From there he went to Milwaukee, and in 1881 
became press agent for W. W. Cole's circus, remaining with 
them until 1885. Mr. Bishop's next removal was to Dixon, 
Illinois, in 1887, where he founded the Daily Star. He con- 
tinued this successfully until 1891, when he sold out the estab- 
lishment and went to Marshalltown, Iowa, and was there en- 
gaged for a year on the Times-Republican. In 1892 he removed 
to Ida Grove, Iowa, and was editor of the Ida County Pioneer 
until 1894. He next went to Monticello, Iowa, where he owned 
and conducted the Jones County Times until 1900, when he sold 
out and came to Meyersdale, where he has since made his resi- 
dence. He is now engaged in the conduct of the Meyersdale 
Republican, which paper enjoys the confidence of the public and 
a very generous patronage. Mr. Bishop is a Republican in 
politics, and a member of the Lutheran church. Knights of 
Pythias and Modern Woodmen of America. 

Mr. Bishop married, December 25, 1887, at Falls City, Ne- 
braska, Rose C. Macgregor, and they have one child, Earle 
Ronald, born November 17, 1889, at Dixon, Illinois. 

WHjLIAM THOMAS HOBLITZELL. 

The Hoblitzells came originally from Lorraine, Germany, 
at an early date and settled in Norfolk, Virginia. Six brothers, 
one of whom, Jacob, was the great-grandfather of William T. 
Hoblitzell, removed to Annapolis, Maryland, in 1780. They 
were a family of builders, contractors and manufacturers. In 
1800 Jacob removed to Cumberland, Maryland, where he at 
once became prominent in business life. He was the largest 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 137 

brick jnanufactiirer of his day and became engaged in coal 
mining on a large scale. He was the first sheriff of what now 
constitutes Allegheny and Washington counties, and served 
in the state legislature. His second wife, Amy Bell, bore him 
three children," one of whom, Dennis, was the father of James 
J. Hoblitzell. 

Dennis Hoblitzell was born in Cumberland, Maryland, about 
1812. He inlierited all the family traits and engaged in con- 
tracting, building, mercantile life and steamboating. He was 
also a contractor on the national pike, extending from Balti- 
more westward. He was one of the delegates selected to revise 
the state constitution in 1827. He married Sarah A. Stoddard, 
and they were the parents of James J., William T. and Eliz- 
abeth Hoblitzell. 

James J. Hoblitzell was born at Pleasant Mills, near Cum- 
berland. Maryland, in 1832. He received a good common school 
education and learned the trade of saddler and harness-maker 
in Cumberland, where in 1852 he opened his own store and 
manufactory. He later extended his business to Frostburg and 
then to Pittsburg, operating in the three cities. During the war 
he contracted for large amounts of military equipment with the 
government, faithfully fulfilling his obligations. He later be- 
came engaged in milling and very extensively in oil lands and 
leases in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Tennessee. Other 
business undertakings of Mr. Hoblitzell were the Savage Brick 
Company, a very large plant, the Baltimore & Cumberland Coal 
Compan}^, the Willmetto Limestone Company, and others. Po- 
litically he was a Republican and served as mayor of Frostburg. 
He is still active in business life and is now (1906) in Illinois, 
where he has important business interests. In 1851 Mr. Hob- 
litzell was married to Julia K. Hartzell. Of this marriage there 
were born thirteen children, one of whom, William T., is the 
direct subject of this sketch. Mr. and Mrs. Hoblitzell were Meth- 
odists in religion. 

William Thomas Hoblitzell, secretary, treasurer and gen- 
eral manager of the Meyersdale Coal Company, Meyersdale, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was born at Pittsburg, Decem- 
ber 14, 1853. He attended school at Frostburg, Maryland, until 
he was seventeen years of age, and in 1870 entered the Agricult- 
ural College, at College Station, Maryland, remaining there un- 
til 1872. 

He then went to Meyersdale and found employment in the 
Hoblitzell & Hockings general mercantile store, continuing there 
for six months. He then identified himself as bookkeeper and 
general manager with the Savage Fire Brick Company, being 
thus engaged from 1875 to 1895. In the last named year he be- 
came secretary, treasurer and general manager of the company 



138 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

and continued in this capacity until April, 1902. The firm oper- 
ated three large plants situated at Keystone Junction, Williams 
and Hyndman, Bedford county. During the period he was con- 
nected with this firm Mr. Hobiitzell was also associated with 
his father and brother in the conduct of general stores at each 
of the three towns named. In 1902 he sold his interest in the 
brick business, and in October of that year, in company with 
F. B. Black and others, he organized the Meyersdale Coal Com- 
pany, of which he is secretary, treasurer and general manager. 
He is also interested in various other commercial enterprises 
among them being the Sandspring Water Company of Meyers- 
dale, of which he is president, the First National Bank of Gar- 
rett and the Citizens' National Bank of Meyersdale, in both of 
which he is a large stockholder. In political relations Mr. 
Hobiitzell accords allegiance to the Republican party, and is in- 
terested in all community affairs. Fraternally he is a member 
of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks of Cumberland, 
Maryland, No. 63. In religious faith he is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church of Meyersdale. 

WiJliam T. Hobiitzell married. May 8, 1879, Susan L. Black, 
daughter of George J. and Margaret Black, of Somerfield, Mad- 
ison township. Miss Black was educated in the public schools. 
The young couple began their married life in Meyersdale, which 
has ever since been their home. Four children have been born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Hobiitzell: Margaret, married William H. 
Leas, chief chemist of the United States Leather Company at 
Ridgway, Pennsylvania; they have one son, John. James J., 
graduate of State College, class of 1904, now a civil and mining 
engineer at Meyersdale. George B., learning the same pro- 
fession with his brother. Julia, died in childhood. 

CYRUS W. TRUXAL. 

Cyrus W. Truxal, one of Meyersdale 's foremost merchants 
arid leading citizens, was born near Greensburg, Westmoreland 
county, May 14, 1850. He is a son of Elder William Truxal, 
who was born about 1812. William Truxal was a farmer. He 
was twice married; by his first wife he had two children: Si- 
mon P. and Sophia. His second wife was Annie Rugh, and to 
them were bom children, as follows: Albert E., whose 
sketch appears on another page; Lucinda (Mrs. David B. Fish- 
er), William J., Cyrus W^., see forward; Almira C. (Mrs. 
Mitchel Horn), Jacob R. and Edward F. William Truxal was 
a member and an elder of the Reformed church. In politics he 
was a Democrat. 

Cyrus W. Truxal received his early education in the com- 
mon schools of Hempfield and Unity townships, which he at- 
tended until 1868. After leaving school he engaged in agrieult- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 130 

ure until 187."), wlieii he removed to Somerset comity and en- 
gaged in a general mercantile business with C. A. Walter at 
Gebharts, Milford township. In the spring of 1881 Mr. Truxal 
removed to Clade, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in the same 
line of business until 1883, when he located in Meyersdale and 
opened a retail grocery, which business he still retains. In the 
spring of 1901, with otliers, he organized the Second National 
Bank of Meyersdale and became its first president, an office he 
still holds. This has been an exceedingly successful institution 
and ranks as one of the solid financial houses of this section. 
Mr. Truxal is also president of the Meyersdale Sheet Steel Com- 
pany and a director in the Mahoning Coal Company, the Somer- 
set Telephone Company, and has large interests in various coal 
and other enterprises. 

While Mr. Truxal is an eminently successful and practi- 
cal business man, this trait shows only one side of his nature. 
He is essentially a great reader and a deep thinker. All through 
his business life he has cultivated his intellectual nature and 
his well stocked library of metaphysical, theological and scien- 
tific books shows the depth of his research and the wide range 
and scope of his reading. He is well versed in philosophy and 
in the various sciences, political economy, theology, aesthetics, 
anthropology and psychology. Although still active in the con- 
duct of his business, Mr. Truxal has thrown off many of its 
cares and gives more time to his favorite books and subjects of 
thought. He is a strong debater and delights in friendly con- 
troversy with well informed and congenial minds. Mr. Truxal 
is intei'ested in all subjects pertaining to his city and her bet- 
terment and develo])ment and can always be found working with 
those who have this end in view. He is a member of the Re- 
formed church of Meyersdale and is closely identified with the 
interests of that body. He has re})resented his church in the 
county conferences and both his time and purse are largely con- 
tributed from. Politically he affiliates with the Democratic 
party. 

Mr. Truxal married. May 5, 1877, Martha J., daughter of 
William Zinnnerman, of Somerset county. William Zinnnerman 
was one of the infiuential men of the northern ])art of the 
county. He was a farmer. He was an ardent sujii)orter of the 
])rinci])les of the Rei)ublican ])ai-ty. In church fellowship he 
was of the Reformed faith. Martha J., his daughter and wife 
of C. W. Truxal, was -reared in the same religious faith and luis 
never de))arted therefrom. She received her education in the 
jjublic schools. While a young woman of twenty she became 
clee])ly interested in ))i'imary Sa])bath school work, and in this 
line of church work she has been engaged for the ])ast thirty- 
two years. At the present time she has one hundred and sev- 



140 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

enty-five cliildren under her care in the Sabbath school of the 
Reformed church of Meyersdale, of which she and her husband 
are members. Although no children of their own have ever 
gladdened the home of Mr. and Mrs. Truxal, they have ever 
been the friends of children and have taken to their hearts and 
reared three, two of whom were taken from them by death. 
Mr. Truxal is a member of the Knights of Pythias of Meyers- 
dale. 

WILLIAM THOMAS McMILLAN, M. D. 

William Thomas McMillan, M. D., one of the most progress- 
ive and popular of the younger physicians in Meyersdale, Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania, was born at Accident, Garrett 
county, Maryland, June 17, 1871, a son of Eli and Catherine A. 
(Walker) McMillan, grandson of John K. and Mary (Rush) 
McMillan, and great-grandson of John McMillan. 

John McMillan (great-grandfather) was a native of Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania, and was a large landowner and farm- 
er. He was one of the prominent men of his day, was a man 
of good principles and strong religious temperament, also a 
leading member of the Methodist church. He died at the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-one years. Of the previous family his- 
tory little can be learned further than they were Somerset 
county pioneers and tillers of the soil. 

John K. McMillan (grandfather) was born in Somerset 
county and spent his entire life there. He learned the trade of 
a tanner, a business he followed throughout his active years in 
connection with his farming interests, which were very large, 
he being one of the wealthy, influential men of his section. He 
was a Whig originally, but on the formation of the Republican 
party cast his political fortunes with that organization. He 
served four years as postmaster of Upper Turkey Foot, Penn- 
sylvania, and held various township offices. He married (first) 
Mary, daughter of Jacob Rush, and of the six children born to 
them one was Eli, of whom more will be written. Mary (Rush) 
McMillan died at the early age of thirty-nine. John K. McMil- 
lan married (second) Sarah Critchfield, who bore him two sons. 
John K. McMillan married (third) Clarissa Williams, by whom 
there was no issue. Mr. McMillan died at the age of seventy- 
four. 

Eli McMillan (father) was born on the homestead farm in 
Upper Turkey Foot township, November 27, 1828, the last born 
child of his parents. He was reared on the farm and received 
his education in the township schools. He learned the trade of 
a harnessmaker under the preceptorship of his brother Reuben, 
and at the age of twenty-five removed to Garrett countj^, Mary- 
land. In 1852 he opened a harness shop in Accident, Garrett 



^ytU>T^.^^9ic^^4U^^./^ 



I 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 141 

county, for the manufacture and repair of all kinds of harness 
and leather horse goods. He met with most excellent success 
and became one of the leading men of the town. He purchased 
and operated a farm of one hundred acres near the town, this 
undertaking being in addition to his harness business. He was 
industrious and thrifty, kept abreast of the times and was 
deeply interested in political, religious and temperance sub- 
jects, also in all matters pertaining to the welfare of the people. 
He was prominently identified with the Order of Good Tem- 
plars and was an earnest worker in the cause of temperance. 
In religious faith he was a Lutheran and one of the oldest mem- 
bers of the church at Accident, which he served as deacon and 
elder. Politically he was a local leader of the Republican party. 
He served for two years as county commissioner and for ten 
years as justice of the peace. Under Governor Lowndes he 
was appointed magistrate, in which capacity he made an hon- 
orable record. 

Eli McMillan married Catherine A., born on the home 
farm at Walker's Mills, educated in the public schools, daughter 
of Jolin P. H. Walker, of Somerset county, a large landowner, 
stock dealer and farmer, whose family consisted of seven other 
children, namely: Mrs. J. B. Davis, of Ursina; Mrs. Jennie 
Thompson, of Ursina; Mrs. Shultz, of St. Louis, Missouri; 
Mrs. Harriet Campbell, of Neodesha, Kansas; John Walker, 
of Confluence, Pennsylvania, a veteran of the Civil war; and 
Mrs. Samuel Philson, deceased, of Berlin. The children born 
to Eli and Catherine A. (Walker) McMillan were as follows: 
Mary Ellen, deceased, was the wife of Mahlon Glotfelty; Ann 
Amelia, widow of Dr. E. H. Glotfelty; she is now living in Re- 
dondo, California, with her brother, Dr. Edwin H. McMillan; 
John N., a retired business man, residing in Hagerstown, Mary- 
land; Emma C, wife of Dr. A. F. Speicher, a practicing physi- 
cian of Los Angeles, California; Roas B., deceased; Susan E., 
wife of Frank Listen, of Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania; William 
Thomas and Edwin H., twins ; the former will be mentioned in 
the following paragraphs, and the latter graduated from the 
School of Pharmacy in Philadelphia, conducted a drug store 
in the west for several years, then entered the Northwestern 
University of Chicago, where he took a medical course, gradu- 
ated as M. D. and is now practicing his profession in Redondo, 
California; he is unmarried. Eli McMillan, the father of these 
children, died April 10, 1906; his wife, Catherine A. (Walker) 
McMillan, died July 4, 1900. 

William Thomas McMillan, M. D., attended the public 
schools of Accident until the age of sixteen years and then 
the normal school for two years. In 1889 he entered Mount 
Union College, in Alliance, Ohio, pursued a special course, and 



142 BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

in 1893 was graduated in the business and noiTnal courses with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He taught at Lake City, Co- 
lumbia countv, Florida. 1892-93, and in Garrett county, Mary- 
land, 1893-9-1:! In the fall of the latter year he entered Jeffer- 
son Medical College, Philadephia, from which institution he 
was graduated in May, 1897. The same year he commenced the 
practice of his profession, locating in Centerville, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania. The following year he removed to Salisr 
bury and fonned a partnership with his brother-in-law, A. F. 
Speicher, ^M. D., which connection continued until April 1, 1899. 
He then took up his residence in Meyersdale, where he has since 
continued to reside, and began the active practice of his chosen 
profession, making a specialty of X-ray treatment and sur- 
gery. 

In addition to being a general practitioner, Dr. McMillan 
is the physician for the Somerset Coal Company, the most ex- 
tensive company of its kind in the county, and for four years 
served in the capacity of president of the board of health of 
Meyersdale. He keeps well informed along the lines of his 
profession by membership in the Somerset County Medical As- 
sociation, State Medical Society and American Medical Asso- 
ciation. Besides being an excellent and conscientious physi- 
cian. Dr. McMillan is a practical man, possessing sound judg- 
ment in business affairs. He is a stockholder in the Meyers- 
dale Sheet Steel Company, the Stewart Creek Coal Company 
of West Virginia, the Chelsea Coal Company of Kentucky and 
of several other tracts in the soft coal region, and is a stock- 
holder and director in the Meyersdale Commercial College. He 
is a member of the Lutheran church, in which body he takes an 
active interest and to which he contributes liberally. He 
affiliates with the following fraternal organizations : Knights 
of Pythias, of Meyersdale; Knights of the Golden Eagle, Fra- 
ternal Order of Eagles, of Meyersdale, and the Royal Arcanum. 
He is a staunch supporter of the Republican party. Dr. Mc- 
Millan is an enthusiastic automobilist and has just completed 
a twelve hundred mile trip through and over the Alleghenies 
and the eastern states. 

Dr. McMillan married, December 23, 1897, Elsie M. Wal- 
ter, daughter of AVilliam H. Walter, of Centerville, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, and thev have one child, William Thomas, 
Jr., born May 23, 1900. The home and office of Dr. McMillan is 
on Main street, Meyersdale. 

JOHN NELSON DAVIS. 

John Nelson Davis, of Springs, is the son of Nelson Davis, 
who is supposed to have been a native of Philadelphia. He 
married Sarah, daughter of Daniel Baker, of Grantsville, Marv- 



♦ 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 148/ 

land, and they were the parents of three sons: John Nelson, 
see forward; William, born in 1837, Civil war veteran; Peter, 
born in 1839. Daniel Baker, grandfather of Sarah (Baker) 
Davis, was a native of Philadelphia, a ciockmaker and silver- 
smith by trade. He removed to Berlin, Somerset county, where 
he followed his trades. Daniel Baker^ Jr., learned the trade 
with his father, married and removed to Grantsville, Maryland, 
where he followed the same occupation, and there Sarah 
(Baker) Davis was born. 

John Nelson Davis, eldest son of Nelson and Sarah 
(Baker) Davis, was born April 8, 1835, in Elk Lick township. 
His educational opportunities were limited to irregular at- 
tendance at the public schools. At the age of twelve years he 
was bound out to Joseph Christner, of Elk Lick township, one 
of the stipulations being that he was to have three months' 
schooling in each year, but received instead that amount of in- 
struction in three years. At the expiration of that time, being 
then fifteen years old, he was released, and after much diffi- 
culty secured a living by working on shares for farmers, trad- 
ing his share of i^roduce for shoes and clothing, very little 
money being then in circulation and business being mostly trans- 
acted by exchange. Being too poor to buy books, he worked 
for a Mr. Smith, of Salisbury, two months in return for in- 
struction, and later began to buy books and study at odd hours. 
He also attended the school presided over by Jost J. Stutz- 
man in the old red school house at "West Salisbury, walk- 
ing four miles each way through the woods, which were at 
that time infested by wild beasts, and reaching home about 
midnight. 

In 1855 he taught a joint school at Solomon Wiltrout's, 
Elk Lick township, and the following year taught school No. 6 
at Keim's sawmill, in the same township. In 1857 he was the 
teacher of school No. 7, at Lewis Bockes', also in Elk Lick town- 
ship; from 1858 to 1860 taught school No. 9 at Samuel Folk's, 
and from 1860 .to 1862 was the instructor of school No. 8 at 
Adam Ringer's; both these schools were in Elk Lick township. 
For twenty-two years he served as school director, and about 
the latter half of this period was district superintendent and 
was instrumental in getting buildings in every subdistrict. Wlien 
he had succeeded in this he resigned, refusing re-election. During 
his superintendency of schools he published an exhaustive and 
complete tabular statement, showing the condition of the schools 
for each term. He also visited each school in the township 
twic" each month during all these years. He put his whole 
heart into the cause of education and the result of his labors 
is manifest in the intelligence of the present generation of the 
community where they reside. For two vears he was tax col- 



144 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

lector for the state and county and also bounty and school tax 
collector. 

For a short time after his resignation as teacher he was 
engaged in clearing land for his father-in-law. On October 24, 
1862, he enlisted in Company K, One Hundred and Seventy- 
first Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving as 
first sei-geant until discharged, August 6, 1863. After return- 
ing home he was for a time disabled by disease, which he had 
contracted while in the army. In 1864 he was employed by his 
father-in-law, and M'hen stronger returned to his old work of 
clearing land, farming for three crops on cleared land in pay- 
ment for the clearing. In 1865 he moved to Summit Mills and 
there worked two years and a half for Samuel Flickinger, after 
which he moved back to his father-in-law's, by whom he was 
again employed in clearing land. He then turned his attention 
to the ''shook" business, in which he was engaged until about 
1870, after which he was clerk in a steam sawmill near Garrett, 
and at the same time conducted the "shook" business, for which 
he received eighty dollars monthly. Until 1879 he was clerk 
and superintendent in a foundry at Salisbury. 

He worked at different places until 1880, when his house 
burned down and he was appointed industrial statistician of 
Altoona, Pennsylvania, and ten years later was made enumer- 
ator for Elk Lick township. During this period he was en- 
gaged in farming, and for three years before his appointment 
as enumerator operated a sawmill. Mr. Davis is an accom- 
plished surveyor, his superiority having received recognition 
from the court of Somerset county. It was he who laid out and 
constructed additions to Salisbury, graded the streets of Salis- 
bury, and his maps are those now used in court. He has an 
extensive engineering outfit. 

In March, 1865, IMr. Davis was baptized into the German 
Baptist church at Summit Mills, Summit township, and in the 
beginning of October, 1879, was elected and installed deacon 
at that place. He moved into the Elk Lick congregation in 
August, 1880, and by letter he and his wife became members of 
the "Peck church" of the last named congregation, and which by 
division was changed from "Peck church" to the "Maple Glen 
congregation" of the western district of Pennsylvania. Prior 
to tlie formation of the Maple Glen congregation, at a meeting 
held May 15, 3886, at the Peck church, Mr. Davis was elected to 
the ministry. He was advanced to the second degree of the 
ministry September 17, 1887, and September 27, 1896, he and 
L. A. Peck were ordained elders in charge of the Maple Glen 
congregation, to officiate alternntely. In politics Mr. Davis is 
a Republican. 

Mr. Davis married, June 28, 1861, Dinah, daughter of 



BEDFOKD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 145 

Saiiiiiel Sclirac'k, of Suiiiniit township, and they have been the 
parents of tJie following children : iiarvey E., born February 
14, 1862, died December 26, 18G2. Mary and Nancy (twins), 
born June 28, 18G4. Samuel, born June 20, 1867. William, born 
February 22, 1869. Annie, born May 17, 1871. John 1)., born 
May 31, 1873, died February 6, 1876. Ida, born January 14, 

1876, died September 1, 1879. Feter Sherman, born October 7, 

1877, completed a course in surveying and has taken up his 
father's work, regrading the streets of Salisbury, and also has 
charge of the surveying of the trolley line from Salisbury to 
]\Leyersdale. Edward VV^, born October 17, 1879. James Gr., 
born September 28, 1882. Sydney, born October 14, 1884. 

ALBERT ELI TRUXAL, D. D. 

Dr. Albert E. Ti'uxal, pastor of the Reformed church of 
Meyersdale, w^as born near Greensburg, Pennsylvania, and is 
one of the five sons of Elder William Truxal, late of Pleasant 
Unity, Pennsylvania, all of whom are or have been active and 
efficient elders or deacons in their respective churches. 

Dr. Truxal was baptized and confirmed by the late Dr. 
N. P. Hacke, who was for more than fifty years pastor of the 
First Greensburg church. The preparatory education of Dr. 
Truxal was received at an inland academy and at Westmore- 
land College, then situated at Mount Pleasant, Pennsylvania. 
In 1866 he entered the sophomore class of Franklin and Mar- 
shall College, graduating with honor in a class of eighteen, the 
majority of whom studied for the ministry. From this college 
he received, in 1892, the degree of doctor of divinity. 

Through the influence of Drs. F. K. Levan and J. A. Peters 
he was led to study for the ministry and took a full course in 
the theological seminary at Mercersburg and Lancaster. Dur- 
ing this period he spent two summers in Center county as prin- 
cipal of Penn Hall Academy, and during his last year served 
also as a tutor in the college. He was examined for orders by 
his old pastor, Dr. Hacke, and at the annual meeting of West- 
moreland Classis, in the spring of 1872, was licensed to preach. 
A few months later he was ordained to the ministry of the Re- 
formed church and installed by Somerset Classis as pastor of 
the Somerset congregation, from which he had received a call 
before leaving the seminary. 

After remaining eight years in this pastorate he accepted a 
call to Irwin, Westmoreland county, and seven years later to the 
Brush Creek charge, adjoining Irwin. This charge he served 
also for seven years, and then was called to his present church 
in Meyersdale, Pennsylvania. This last call he accepted, not 
from inclination, but strictly from a sense of duty. All the 
churches that he has served jDrospered spiritually and finan- 



140 BEDFOED AXD SOMEESET COUNTIES 

cially under his ministrations, and during the whole of his 
ministry, from the begiuuiug, he has never failed to present 
clearly and forcibly the claims of the church in general to his 
people, in consequence of which all the branches of church work 
in liis charges have been sustained and none languished or were 
overlooked. During the first year of his pastorate a new church 
was dedicated at Centerville, Dr. E. E. Higbee preaching the 
dedicatory sermon. Several years afterward Dr. Truxal saw 
the necessity of having a Eeformed church at Eockwood, a rail- 
road town ten miles from Somerset, and with sixteen members 
of small financial ability he organized a congregation, secured 
a lot on the main street, and, acting as building committee, so- 
licitor, treasurer and contractor, erected a neat church and 
had it dedicated practically free of debt. When he resigned 
the charge was divided. At Irwin, during the first few years 
of his pastorate, the membership of the church was largely in- 
creased and an old debt was liquidated. He then interested 
himself at Larimer Station, two miles west of Irwin, organized 
a congregation, erected a church and had it dedicated without 
the incumbrance of a debt. 

The Brush Creek charge was composed of three congrega- 
tions and one preaching point when Dr. Truxal became pastor. 
During the first year of his labors a church was dedicated at 
Manor, and during the third year an excellent country church 
was built at Denmark Manor. In the fifth year of his pastorate 
a congregation was organized and a church erected at Harrison 
City, and at the close of the sixth year the charge was divided, 
two congregations giving as much to the support of the pastor 
as the four had previously given. At Meyersdalo the member- 
ship has been largely increased, an old debt has been paid, the 
church remodeled and the congregation has under consideration 
the enlargement of the edifice. 

Dr. Truxal is a son of western Pennsylvania, and all his 
labors have been thus far limited to that region. In the work 
of Pittsburg Synod he has always taken a leadiug part, while 
in the development of the home field and in causes of a general 
chai-acter he is fever found in the front rank. A few years ago 
he i)erforme(l a prominent part in the work of seminary endow- 
ment and recently assisted Professor Hartman in raising funds 
for the college. He has aided his brethion of the svnod in the 
dedication of more tlian a dozen churches. Notwithstanding 
the labor in his pastorate and in the synod, he has not neglected 
his studies, but has read, thought and written on various sub- 
jects connected with theolog>^ under its modoiii asi)ect. He 
has kept himself in touch with the live (juestions of tlie dav and 
is a freciuent contribntor to the colunuis of the "Eeformed 
Church Eeview." Many of his articles have attracted the at- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES UY 

tention of the leading thinkers in the church, and his paper in 
this theological quarterly on "The Confession and Freedom of 
Thought" has called forth numerous favorable comments. He 
is a deliberate, pleasing, forcible pulpit orator, progressive in 
his views and is regarded as one of the strong men of his de- 
nomination. 

Early in his ministry Dr. Truxal was elected president of 
Pittsburg S\Tiod, and for many years the Synodical Board of 
Home Missions has numbered him among its members. He has 
been at different times connected with the following educational 
and benev6lent organizatiohs : Board of Literary Institutions, 
Orphans' Home, Beneficiarv Education, Publication and Visit- 
ors to the Theological Seminary, his association with the last- 
named body having been maintained for sixteen years. He has 
also been a member of various important synodical committees 
and frequently a delegate to the General Synod. At the pres- 
ent time he is a member of three church boards and has shown 
himself faithful and efficient in every position to which he has 
been called by his brethren. 

Dr. Truxal married in 1876 Eva, daughter of Curtis and 
Emma (Kiernan) Kooser, of Somerset, and a sister of Judge 
F, J. Kooser, of the Somerset county bar. She was one of a 
family of twelve children born to Mr. and Mrs. Kooser. Chil- 
dren of Dr. Albert E. and Eva CKooser) Truxal are six: Al- 
bert Park, assistant cashier of the Second National Bank of 
Meyersdale; William Curtis, graduate of Franklin and Mar- 
shall College, and preparing for the profession of law; Cyrus 
Walter, now in his senior year at Franklin and Marshall. Col- 
lege; Emily K., graduate in music from the Woman's College, 
Frederick, Maryland; Rebekah, student at the Woman's Col- 
lege; arid Evelyn, a pupil in the Meyersdale high school. 

PHILIP PORTIFIELD RITTER. 

Philip Portifield Ritter, a dentist of prominence of Mey- 
ersdale, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was born June 11, 
1850, in Frederick county, Virginia, the son of Isaac H. and 
Amanda (Grandstaff) Ritter, and grandson of Adam Ritter. 

Isaac H. Ritter (father) was also a native of Frederick 
county, Virginia, born in 1822, died in 1879. He followed the 
occupation of a farmer. His wife, Amanda Grandstaff, the 
daughter of Phillip Grandstaff, was born in Shenandoah county, 
West Virginia, died January, 1904, and they had the following 
children: Philip Portifield, of whom later; Joseph A., born in 
1853, now deceased; he was a painter by occupation and lived 
in Meyersdale; Isaac Lemuel, born in 1866, a dentist, and re- 
sides in Frostburg; William G., bom in 1855, a farmer of Shen- 
andoah county, West Virginia. Isaac Ritter owned property 



148 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

in Virginia, on which the battle of AVinchester was fought. He 
was a Baptist in religion and a Republican in politics. 

Philip P. Ritter, the first born, obtained his early education 
in private schools, which he attended until he was about sixteen 
years of age. He then attended school that was under the direc- 
tion of the Reformed church at Edinburg, Virginia, remaining 
there until about 1870, and doing carpenter work in connection 
with his studies. He removed to Salisbury, Pennsylvania, in 
1871, and worked there at his trade of carpenter until 1872. 
He then entered a drug store and studied pharmacy. He re- 
mained there until 1874, when he received the position of pre- 
scription clerk in a drug store at Falls City, where he continued 
until April, 1876, when he returned to Salisbury, and took up 
the study of dentistry^ with Dr. Beachy, of that place, continu- 
ing in the study of this profession until January, 1877, when he 
removed to Rumnia, West Virginia, and practiced there for 
one year. He then, 1878, entered the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, from which he was graduated in 1884. He im- 
mediately settled in Meyersdale, and has since been located 
there, engaged in an extensive and profitable practice. Dr. Rit- 
ter is a Democrat in politics, and served his township as school 
director for one term, and president of the school board for the 
same time. In 1889 he was the candidate of his party for the 
legislature and received the highest vote ever given a Demo- 
crat for that office in this county. Fraternally he holds mem- 
bership in the F. and A. M., No. 554, and Hebron Chapter, No. 
272, R. A. M., of Meyersdale. In church relations he is a Lu- 
theran. 

Mr. Ritter married, in 1873, Miss Helen DeHaven, of Salis- 
bury, who died June 27, 1885. He married for his second wife 
Miss Lucy Kyle, October 13, 1892. She is the daughter of 
Edgar Kyle, ex-sheriff of Somerset county. Dr. and Mrs. Rit- 
ter have one child, Phyllis, born November 3, 1895. 

JOHN DAVID MICHAEL AEMBRUST. 

John David Michael Armbrust is a man of great natural 
force of character and versatility. In the course of a long and 
useful life he has followed many trades and professions. He 
comes of sturdy German stock, his grandfather being John 
George Armbrust, who married Agnes Heintz. 

John Armbrust, father of John D. M. Armbrust, was born 
in Perousen, in the district of Heinsheira, Germany, December 
18, 1776. He married Catharine Schettler, born August 26, 
1782, daughter of John and Anna Maria Schettler. Both John 
and Catharine (Schettler) Armbrust were members of the Lu- 
theran church. They had twelve children, three of whom were 
bom in Germany and nine in America. Those born in Germany 



BEDFOED AND SOMEESET COUNTIES i4y 

were: Maria Catharine, August 25, 180],; a daughter born De- 
cember 11, 1802 ; Jb'redericka, J auuary 20, 1801. Tliese were all 
born in ^^ uerteinberg. The other children were born in West- 
moreland county, Pennsylvania. They are as follows : A son, 
October IG, 180b; Elizabeth, November 23, 1807; John, Feb- 
ruary 8, 1810; Jacob, April 19, 1812, married, August 30, 1838; 
Maria, April 28, 18li, lived but a few hours; Daniel, April 19, 
1815; William, January 4, 1819; John David Michael, February 
13, 1820; and Alaria Ann, June 23, 1822, died in infancy. 

John David Michael Armbrust, son of John and Catharine 
(Schettler) Armbrust, was born Febraury 13, 1820, at Greens- 
burg, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. His early educa- 
tion was received in the public schools, and he afterward taught 
both German and English in the schools of Hemplield township, 
Westmoreland county. He followed a variety of trades and 
professions, among them being the following: Printer, car- 
penter, painter and decorator, chairmaker, cabinet maker and 
undertaker. At one time he helped his father print and edit 
a German newspaper at Adamsburg, Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania. He also took photographs at Apollo, Armstrong 
county, Pennsylvania, and later bought the boat "Artist," 
which plied on the canal between Apollo and Johnstown, stop- 
ping at Townsends, Livermore, Saltsburg, Blairsville, Center- 
ville, Nineveh, and Johnstown. After the war for ten years he 
practiced photography at Buffalo and White Sulphur Springs, 
Bedford county, Pennsylvania. He took up his residence for a 
time at Natrona, where, in addition to working at cabinet-mak- 
ing and midertaldng, he conducted a real estate office. He then 
went to East End, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he opened a 
fire insurance and real estate office, but later returned to Apollo. 
In 1880 he moved to Meyersdale, Somerset county, Pennsylva- 
nia, where he was in the photographic business for over ten 
years and where he still resides. Mr. Armbrust 's record as a 
soldier is that of great bravery, daring and endurance. In 
1838 he enlisted in the Greensburg Blues Infantry, which was 
disbanded after one year. He next enlisted in a company which 
was organized a few miles from Greensburg and called the 
"Farmers' Infantry." He then moved to Adamsburg and 
joined the Adamsburg Artillery, then, having moved to Apollo, 
he joined the Apollo Blues Infantry. He held almost all ranks 
in these companies until in 1854 Brigadier-General Anderson, 
of Freeport, Allegheny county, appointed him brigade quarter- 
master, with the rank of major, in command over Allegheny, 
Indiana, Jefferson and Armstrong counties, Pennsylvania. In 
this capacity he served from 1854 to 1859. His uniform was of 
dark blue cloth, trimmed with gold lace, a red sash, sugarloaf 
hat, six inches high, decorated with a plume, partly red and 



150 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

partly white, which was eight inches in lieight. The horse had 
a blue saddle cloth trimmed with gold lace, white bridle reins, 
and leather tassels at the head. After so much experience in 
playing soldier he was now to know what real war meant. 

In 1862 Mr. Armbrust enlisted in Captain Charles Rut- 
land's company of infantry, under the command of General 
AUabaugh. He enlisted as a private, but was soon raised to the 
rank of a corporal, and later to that of sergeant by Colonel 
Speakman, in the One Hundred and Thirty-third Regiment, 
Company B, Pennsylvania Volunteers, his only son, James P. 
Armbrust, sixteen years of age, being in Company A of the 
same regiment, as a drmnmer. The first battle in which this 
regiment was engaged was the battle of Antietam. They set 
out from Washington on a forced march, with eight days' ra- 
tions. On this march Mr. Armbrust 's strength gave out under 
the weight of the accoutrements, each soldier being obliged to 
carry his gun, knapsack, shelter tent, overcoat, dress coat, extra 
shoes, rubber and woolen blankets, sixty rounds of cartridges, 
and various other articles of clothing. A[r. Armbrust fell out 
of line and was unable to rejoin his regiment until about nine 
o'clock that evening. His son came back to meet him and helped 
him with his load. At Antietam he was sent to the field hos- 
pital. After the battle of Antietam General AUabaugh ap- 
pointed him his body guard sergeant, with the rank of sergeant- 
major. When in camp he had charge of the general's teams, 
and when the camp was broken of General Tyler's teams in 
addition. He was told to keep in the rear, but at the engage- 
ment of Snicker's Gap, the army turned off the main road and 
as he kept the road he soon found himself at Snickersville, about 
two miles in advance of the army and within the Confederate 
lines. There was a small field of corn near by and he ordered 
his men to lower the bars of the fence and let the horses eat 
their fill. They remained on the road until midnight and about 
ten o'clock the next morning an orderly informed him of the 
position of the army. P^inally they mndo their way back to the 
main body of the army and. as the ]iickets had not yet been sta- 
tioned, they had no difficulty in passing through the lines. All 
the head(iuarter officers had been obliged to slecj) the ])revious 
night without tents, as they were in the wagons under Mr. Arm- 
brust 's charge. The goneT'al, after inquiring where he liad 
passed the night, remarked that it was a wonder that they had 
not been ca])tured. A few days after this they went on to War- 
renton. At Warrenton he ordered his men to help take down 
a rail fence and carry the wood to headquarters, as the general 
said he wished headquarters to be supplied before any other 
place. After this was done the general inquired where the 
wood had come from and ordered that it should all be replaced. 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 151 

as the fence belonged to people who were in sympathy with the 
north. The men refused to carry back the wood and Sergeant 
Armbrust coincided with them. The general then relieved him 
of his command, and he went back to his company at Fred- 
ericksburg. They were within fifty yards of the enemy when 
they were told to unsling their knapsacks and go into action on 
the double-quick. It was at this place that Adjutant James 
Noon was shot down at Mr. Armbrust 's side. Mr. Armbrust 
volunteered to take a squad of men and get Adjutant Noon's 
body from the battlefield. He was given permission to do so 
and succeeded in accomplishing his purpose. Adjutant Noon's 
body was interred at Fredericksburg and was later removed by 
his brother Philip. After this battle Mr. Armbrust 's time of 
service had expired, but he, with the rest of the company, voted 
to remain in active service until after the battle of Chancellors- 
ville, which took place a month later. 

After being discharged, Mr. Armbrust communicated to E. 
M. Stanton, secretary of war, that if more men were needed he 
would raise a company. Secretary Stanton answered that to 
all appearances they were needed, and Mr. Armbrust opened 
a recruiting office and paid all the expenses for the recruits and 
the office for a period of about two months. There was dissen- 
sion in the company about electing the officers, and finally he 
received orders from Secretary Stanton to disband the com- 
pany. Mr. Armbrust was never reimbursed for his expenses 
in connection with raising this company, 

Mr. Armbrust next enlisted in a company which was then 
forming under the command of Captain Paul Stackhouse. They 
were ordered to Camp Cadwalader, near Philadelpliia, and 
were there examined. Mr. Armbrust was rejected because of 
some artificial teeth. He was determined to enlist, however, 
and went to a recruiting office in Philadelphia, where he was 
examined and accepted. He was put into the Stackhouse com- 
pany at his request and was one of the first to be supplied with 
a uniform. The company was attached to the One Hundred 
and Ninety-eighth Regiment, commanded by General Sickles, 
and after a few days were ordered to Washington. They were 
loaded on a special train of two cars. On the way Mr. Arm- 
brust filled the post of brakeman, as the one on the train had 
left, and, although somewhat puzzled by the signals at times, 
he managed to attend to the brakes without any serious hitch, 
and the train reached Wa^shington safely. They were then sent 
down the Potomac river to Chesapeake bay, where he was put 
on guard duty on deck. They went up the James river, passed 
City Point and stopped at Bermuda Hundred, at General But- 
ler's encampment, but soon returned to City Point and joined 



152 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

General Meade's army. While there the regiment tore up the 
tracks of the AVeldon railroad and burned the ties to heat the 
rails and bend them. At the battle of Hatcher's Run, Mr. Arm- 
brust was one of those who stormed the breastworks. He was 
also engaged in the battle of Poplar Spring Cluireh. While at 
Hatcher's Rim the election for the presidency of the United 
States took place. Sergeant Armbrust was elected judge of 
election, his opponent being Colonel Stackhouse. 

Some two or three weeks after this Sergeant Armbrust re- 
ceived an order from General Sickles to report to him with a 
detachment of two men from each company, twenty men in all. 
General Sickles then ordered him to take his men over to Gen- 
eral Humphrey's headquarters. This he did, and General 
Humphrey ordei-ed him to take the squad down to the division 
hospital and report to Lieutenant Ackerman or to Captain Mal- 
vin. Lieutenant Ackerman, after having seen that they had 
noon rations issued to them, ordered Mr. Armbrust to take his 
men back to their respective companies, where they were to 
leave their guns, and then to return. He carried out the or- 
ders, and when he returned was appointed ambulance sergeant. 
First Regiment, Second Division. He had in his charge four 
ambulances, nine horses, four stretchers and twenty men. He 
held this position until after the review at Washington. In 
the s]iring they received orders to get ready to leave. They 
then fought in a number of battles. General Sickles being 
wounded in the battle at Five Forks. They were present at 
Appomattox Court House when Lee surrendered. There Mr. 
Armbrust 's horse was stolen and he was never reimbursed for 
it. After the review at Washington they were sent to Camp 
Cadwalader, Philadelphia, and were there mustered out. Major 
Armbrust was a Democrat before the Civil war, but since that 
time has been a Republican. He was at one time constable in 
Armst7-ong and Cambria counties; was also deputy sheriff, in 
1848, of Armstrong county. 

Mr. Armbrust married (first) jNfary Ann Wallace, daughter 
of Hugh Wallace, at Greensburg, in 1840. Mrs. Armbrust died 
January 17, 1875. Thev had one child, James P., born October 
31, 1844. He married (second) Mrs. J. A. Scott, of Bedford 
county, in 1878. She died January 17, 1895, exactly twenty 
years after the death of his first wife. He married (third) Oc- 
tober 31, 1895, Henrietta, Avidow of John Fisher, of Meyers- 
dale. Mr. Armbrust is now in his eighty-seventh year, is in 
possession of all his faculties and is as vigorous mentally and 
physically as many men twenty years his junior. 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 153 

PETER LINCOLN LIVENGOOD. 

Peter Lincoln Livengood, of Salisbury, is a lineal descend- 
ant of the Rev, Peter Livengood, who emigrated from Switzer- 
land to New Jersey, and after remaining two years returned to 
the Fatherland, but after a brief sojourn came to America with 
the intention of here making his home. He settled in Berks 
county, Pennsylvania, but shortly moved to Elk Lick township, 
Somerset county, where he was one of the pioneers. He mar- 
ried, in Berks county, Barbara and was the father of 

fifteen children. His wife died in her ninetieth year and he 
survived to the age of one hundred, lacking six days. Chris- 
tian Livengood, son of Peter and Barbara Livengood, became 
one of the prominent and wealthy farmers and stock raisers of 
the township. He married Elizabeth Forney, whose father was 
a schoolmaster and soldier from Darmstadt, Germany. Mr. 
and Mrs. Livengood were the parents of fifteen children, all of 
whom lived to advanced ages, as did their parents. 

John C. Livengood, son of Christian and Elizabeth (For- 
ney) Livengood, was born in Elk Lick township and was a 
farmer. For some time he held the office of supervisor. He mar- 
ried Mary Hershberger, of Fayette county, and their children 
were: Samuel J., see forward; Jeremiah, John, Peter, Alex- 
ander, Eliza, Nancy, Sarah, Elizabeth and Mary. 

Samuel J. Livengood, son of John C. and Mary (Hersh- 
berger) liivengood, was born May 1, 1830, in Elk Lick town- 
ship, and in early life was engaged in agricultural pursuits. 
Later he became a merchant in Salisbury, then removed to 
Grantsville, Garrett county, Maryland, where he engaged in 
merchandising and in farming. In 1874 he returned to business 
in Salisbury, retiring in March, 1877. He served one term as 
county auditor, was a number of times school director and held 
various other borough offices. He was a deacon in the German 
Baptist church and a lifelong Republican. Mr. Livengood mar- 
ried, in 1850, Nancy, daughter of Peter Lichty, of Elk Lick 
township, and the following were their children: Ananias, born 
May 9, 1851 ; Urias, died in childhood ; Mary, born January 28, 
1854, died March 11, 1877; she was wife of M. C. Horner, of 
Summit township; Nancy, born December 24, 1856; Fanny, 
born February 22, 1859, wife of the Rev. A. D. Gnagey, of AI- 
toona, Pennsylvania: William, born March 22, 1861, married, 
in 1887, Louisa Eisfeller, of Toledo, Ohio, and lives at Seattle, 
Washington; Peter Lincoln, born December 14, 1863, see for- 
ward : Sarah, born April 18, 1867, wife of Oliver Heitzman, of 
Palouse. Washington ; Jonas, bom September 13, 1868, married 
Laura Hooper, of Canada, and lives at Santa Cruz, California; 
and Annie, born November 24, 1872, resides at Palouse, Wash- 



154 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

ingtoii. Mr. Livengood, the father of the family, was instantly 
killed by a fall of coal in a coal mine, August 2, 1882. Mrs. 
Nancy Livengood died July 25, 1898. 

Peter Lincoln Livengood, son of Samuel J. and Nancy 
(Lichty) Ijivengood, was born December 14, 1863, in Garrett 
county, Maryland, and received his education in the public 
schools of that place and of Salisbury, Pennsylvania. At the 
age of eighteen he left school and thereafter worked at farming, 
lumbering and mining until November, 1886, when he went to 
Nebraska and there learned the printer's trade. From 1887 
to 1891 he edited the Caiieton Times, of Carleton, Nebraska. 
He then returned to Salisbury and founded the Somerset 
County Star in 1891, which he has since successfully edited. 
Since December 24, 1898, he has been postmaster of Elk Lick. 
His political allegiance is given to the Republican party. He 
is a member of the Knights of Maccabees. 

Mr. Livengood married, February 14, 1889, Minnie V., 
daughter of F. J. Green, of Carleton, Nebraska, and they have 
been the parents of the following children: Alma Grace, born 
January 13, 1890; Florence, November 28, 1891; Robert, No- 
vember 14, 1892, died December 12, 1892 ; Ada Irene, February 
9, 1894; Minnie lona, December 14, 1897; William Samuel, Sep- 
tember 8, 1900 ; and Theodore Franklin, August 19, 1903. 

FREDERICK ROWE. 

Frederick Rowe, of Meyersdale, mine owner and coal op- 
erator, recognized as a master of his calling, is of English 
birth and ancestry and comes of a family which has long been 
identified with coal interests. His grandfather, Peter Rowe, 
was the first of the family to come to the Ignited States, first 
settling in Ohio and then removing to Illinois, where both he 
and his wife died. In this country he labored successfully as 
a miner, utilizing the valuable experience of his youth in his 
native land. He married, in England, Hannah Vickers, and 
they were the parents of twelve children, five only of whom 
came to mjiturity. Some of the sons came with the father to 
America and followed liis calling. 

John Rowe, son of Peter and TIaimah (Vickers) Rowe, was 
born in Dnrlinm, England, in 1834. \\c^ worked in P]nglish coal 
mines until 1870, when he came to the United States, working 
at mining in Ohio and Illinois. He subsequently came to Penn- 
sylvania, settling in ^fcyorsdale, where he is living a life of 
pleasant and well earned retii'enient. He is a inenil)er of the 
Methodist Ef)i8copal church and in politics is a Republican. 
He married, in England, in January, 1860, Frances, a daugh- 
ter of William and Nancy James, and to them were born twelve 
children, six in England and six in the United States: Fred- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 155 

erick, see forward; Thomas, a miner, living in Illinois; William 
and Peter, miners, residing in Meyersdale, Pennsylvania; 
Frances, wife of Benjamin Green, of Meyersdale ; Hannah, died 
in infancy; Jane, wife of Frank Beynon, of Meyersdale; Han- 
nah, wife of John Finnegan, of Meyersdale ; Barbara, wife of 
George Seihl, of Meyersdale; John and Matthew, miners, liv- 
ing in Meyersdale. The parents of this family, now in their 
declining years, have the great satisfaction of seeing their large 
family honorably and usefully established in life, and all, with 
the exception of Thomas, living near them. Only once has the 
family circle been broken, their second daughter, Hannah, dying 
in infancy. 

Frederick Rowe, eldest child of John and Frances (James) 
Eowe, was born in the county of Durham, England, December 
5, 1860. He was ten years old when he accompanied his par- 
ents to the United States, and here he attended the public 
schools, supplementing the education he had received in his 
native land. At an early age he began working in the coal 
mines, and followed his occupation industriously until he was 
twenty-five years old. He was ambitious to fit himself for a 
higher place in life than that of an ordinary miner, and he 
studied to qualify himself for the position of fire and mine 
boss, and in due course presented himself for examination, 
which he successfully passed in Allegheny countj^, Pennsylva- 
nia, where he served efficiently for five years in the capacity 
of mine foreman. Having accumulated some means, he then 
acquired an interest in a coal mine at Meyersdale, Pennsyl- 
vania, and became an operator on his own account, and from 
that time has been actively engaged, and coming to be known 
as one of the leading operators of this portion of Pennsylvania, 
His xjrincipal interests include the ownership and operating of 
the Mystic mine, on the Salisbury branch of the Baltimore and 
Ohio railroad; part ownership of the Fairview Coal Company; 
presidency of the Elk Lick Coal Company; a directorship "in 
the Erie Coal and Coke Company, the Bessemer Coal and Coke 
Company and the Livengood Coal and Coke Company, and the 
vice-presidency and general managership of the Pittsburg and 
Somerset Coal Company, He takes an active and useful part 
in community affairs and has been for nine years a member 
of the Meyersdale borough council, of which body he is now 
president. He is a staunch Republican and has twice been 
the candidate of his party for the legislature. He is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church and of its official board. 
He has taken high rank in the Masonic order, and is affiliated 
with the following bodies : Meyersdale Lodge, No. 554, F. and 
A. M. ; Meyersdale Chapter, R. A. M. ; Uniontown Commanderv, 
No. 49, K. T. He is also a member of Jaffa Temple, A. A. 6. 



156 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

N. M. S., of Altoona, and the Royal Arcanum, Meyersdale. Mr. 
Ro^Ye has his business offices in Center street, Meyersdale, and 
his family residence is at Beachley street. 

Mr. Rowe married, June 1, 1882, Clara E. Burnside, a 
daughter of James L. and Emma (Underwood) Burnside, liv- 
ing near Kankakee, Illinois, her father l)eing a builder. She 
was born February 9, 1861, was educated in the public schools 
and at Onarga Academy, and was for some time engaged as a 
teacher in Illinois schools. She is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Mr. and Mrs. Rowe are the parents of the 
following named children: Clyde, born October 23, 1883, su- 
perintendent of mines at Freeport, Armstrong county, Penn- 
sylvania; Clarence, born September 19, 1886, foreman of mines- 
at Meyersdale, Pennsylvania; Frederick E., born January 4, 
1889, just entering Wesleyan College, where he will fit him- 
self for the legal profession; Harry, born December 9, 1891; 
Llewellen H., born November 12, 1893 ; Ralph Waldo, born July 
24, 1895; Clara E., born August 2, 1899; Frank Ehlen, born 
July 2, 1902. 

THOMAS WILLIAM GURLEY. 

Thomas William Gurley, a resident of Meyersdale, Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania, and prominently identified with the 
commercial and financial interests of that community, traces his 
descent back to the time of William the Conqueror, who had as 
his confidential adviser in legal and spiritual matters a De 
Gourley, the earliest known ancestor of the Gurley family. The 
name I^ycurgus, which occurs so frequently in this family, prob- 
ably owes its use to the fact that this ancestor was the law giver 
to a king, as Lycurgus of olden times was a law maker. This 
De Gourley was rewarded by William the Conqueror with large 
estates in Scotland. 

(I) Thomas Gurley, the great-grandfather of Thomas AVill- 
iam Gurley, was by occupation a teacher in the schools of Mary- 
land. He took an active part in the political affairs of his time, 
serving as justice of the peace and as sheriff of Frederick county, 
Maryland. In his religious belief he was a Presbyterian of the 
most orthodox sort, and instructed his family in the strict ob- 
servance of the scriptures as interpreted by John Calvin. He 
was married three times and among his children was a son, 
Thomas. 

(II) Thomas Gurley, son of Thomas Gurley (1), was born 
in Frederick county. Maryland, and received an excellent edu- 
cation. He took up the study of law and was admitted to prac- 
tice at tlie l)ar of Frederick county, Mai-yland, and became a 
prominent and successful lawyer. Shortly l)efore the coimnence- 
ment of the Civil wnr, in 18(10, he abandoned his profession, re- 



BEDFORD AND SOMEESET COUNTIES 157 

moved from his native county, and settled in Allegheny county, 
in the same state, where he undertook the management of the 
Bottlerun tannery, then owned by the De Ford Company. Ten 
years later he died at his home in that county of heart disease. 
His political support was given to the Democratic party, and 
he was a member of the Lutheran church. He married Amanda 
Stull, of Frederick county, Maryland, and they had children: 
Amanda, married Thornton Hendrickson, a farmer on the old 
National Pike, near Cumberland, Maryland; Lycurgus Frank- 
lin, see forward ; Malinda, married Martin Dickens, a miller of 
Dickens Mills, Maryland; Charlotte, married Charles Eyler, a 
farmer of Frederick county, Maryland; Jefferson, a merchant 
of Cumberland, Maryland, who married Emma Brotemikle; 
Ellen, married Leonard Rice, a farmer, near Cumberland, Mary- 
land. 

(ITT) Lycurgus Franklin Gurley, second child and eldest 
son of Thomas (2) and Amanda (Stull) Gurley, was born at 
Frederick, Maryland, July 17, 1840. He received a good com- 
mon school education, displaying remarkable aptitude as a 
scholar, and was offered a scholarship in an institute of learn- 
ing, which he declined, preferring a commercial career. He ac- 
cepted a position as clerk in a store at Bottle Run, Maryland, 
and held this for several years. He then purchased a farm in 
Allegheny county, Maryland, to the cultivation and improve- 
ment of which he devoted his entire time and attention since 
that period, and on which he resides at the present time. His 
religious convictions are deeply rooted and he is actively iden- 
tified with the Lutheran church, which he serves in the capacity 
of deacon. His political affiliations are with the Democratic 
party. He married Rose Ann Frantz, daughter of William 
Frantz, of Allegheny county, Maryland, and had children : Clara 
L., resides in Cumberland. Thomas William, see forward. 
Charles R., a farmer of Allegheny county, married Bessie 
Twiggs, and has two children. Frank, unmarried, cultivates the 
home farm. May, married Winters Wentling, a blacksmith near 
Cumberland, and has one son. Lycurgus, unmarried, a well 
known physician of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, making a specialty 
of diseases of the eye. Jessie, married Ira Long, principal of 
the Bedford high school, Bedford, Pennsylvania, and has chil- 
dren: Sarah and Lycurgus. Howard, a watchmaker in the 
Hamilton watch factory, at Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Oscar, 
unmarried, assists on the home farm. Two children who died 
in infancy. 

(IV) Thomas William Gurley, second child and eldest son 
of Lycurgus Franklin (3) and Rose Ann (Frantz) Gurley, was 
bom in Allegheny county, Maryland, August 26, 1867. His 
early education was obtained in the public schools of his native 



158 BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

county, and he subsequently spent three years at Wilson's Acad- 
emy, in Cumberland, Maryland, from which he was graduated 
in 1887. Upon the completion of his education he determined 
to learn the jeweler's trade, and after a time was apprenticed 
for three years to L. C. Rossler, a jeweler of Cumberland, 
Maryland. He completed his apprenticeship in 1892 and then 
spent one year in travel- — four months abroad and eight months 
in the United States and Canada. He then located in Meyers- 
dale, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, and there opened a jew- 
eler's store, November 10, 1893. He was very successful in this 
business undertaking, carrying a complete line of the finest 
goods, and enjoying a large and ever increasing patronage, and 
has continued it up to the present time (1906). In 1898 he 
added to his stock a complete line of sporting goods, and in 
the same year purchased the corner property on Center street, 
known as the Gurley Block, which he now occupies, and in which 
he also resides. He is interested in many other business enter- 
prises; is a stockholder in the Livengood Coal and Coke Com- 
pany of Meyersdale, and has large real estate holdings. Early 
in 1906 he opened an automobile repair shop and garage. He 
has taken a great interest in automobiles since their first ap- 
pearance in this country, and built the first car that crossed the 
Alleghenies. This was in 1898. He now owns several cars and 
takes frequent trips in them. Mr. Gurley is fraternally asso- 
ciated with the following organizations: Meyersdale Lodge 
No. 554, Free and Accepted Masons, Meyersdale ; Hebron Chap- 
ter No. 272; Johnstown Commandery No. 61, Altoona; Jaffa 
Shrine, and Harrisburg Consistory. In religious faith he is a 
Lutheran and in politics a Republican. 

He married (first), June 5, 1895, May Gunter, daughter of 
John Gunter, of Frostburg, Maryland, and had two children: 
Edith, born May 10, 1896, and Sarah, May 4, 1899. Mrs. Gur- 
ley died May 19, 1899. He married (second), January 1, 1902, 
Anna Thomas, daughter of W. W. Thomas, of Lansford, Penn- 
sylvania, and they have two children: Thomas William, Jr., 
born October 12, 1902, and Lvcurgus Franklin, September 12, 
1905. 

LUTHER A. SMITH. 

Luther Auxer Smith, a resident of Meyersdale, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, was bom August 4, 1833, at Elizabeth- 
town, Lancaster county, the son of Conrad and Catherine 
(Auxer) Smith, the latter a daughter of Michael Auxer, of 
Switzerland. 

Conrad Smith was born' in 1772 in Dauphin county. He 
was the owner of considerable land at Elizabethtown, which 
he afterwards sold for building lots. He married Catherine 
Auxer, June 20, 1830, and they were the parents of two chil- 



BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 159 

dren: Michael A., who died in infancy, and Luther A., of 
whom more hereafter. Conrad Smith was a Democrat and a 
member of the Evangelical church. He was captain of the 
Elizabethtown Blues and served in the war of 1812 and fought 
the British at the time Proctor burned Washington, lie died 
January 22, 1856; Catherine, his wife, died April 16, 1850, aged 
fifty-two. 

lAither A. Smith attended the subscription schools of Lan- 
caster county until 1846, when he entered the academy at Mari- 
etta, Lancaster county, graduating in 1850. He then removed 
to Philadeli)hia, where he found employment as bookkeeper 
at the Red Line Hotel, and was thus engaged until 1854. In 
that year he returned to Lancaster county and taught school 
until 1860, when, Julj^ 1, he went to Grantsville, Maryland, 
and tliere engaged in teaching until the breaking out of the 
Civil war. He enlisted in Company A, Tenth Pennsylvania 
Reserves, which was tlie first company to go to the front from 
this section, and was under the command of Captain R. P. 
Cummings, of Somerset. This company went through twenty- 
three battles, and Mr, Smith participated in all except two, 
being forty-three times under fire, and in all engagements dis- 
tinguishing himself for his fearlessness and intrepidity on the 
field of action. He was wounded and partially paralyzed on 
the third day of the second battle of Bull Run, and v^s there- 
fore unable to participate in the battles of Antietam and Fred- 
ericksburg. He was confined with his wounds for some time, 
but was able to accompany the regiment on the march toward 
Gettysburg, which was then called the "stick in the mud march." 
Owing to the paralysis of his left side the arniy surgeon re- 
fused to allow him to remain, and he was sent to the Point 
Hospital, where lie became clerk to Dr. Davis, who had charge 
of the Third Brigade Hospital. Some of the battles in which 
Mr. Smith fought are as follows: Drainesville, Seven Days 
before Richmond, Second Battle of Bull Run, Gettysburg, Mine 
Run, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna River and Bethes- 
da Church. The whole regiment was mustered out under fire 
at the last place, Jane, 1864. 

Mr. Smith afterwards passed the commissioned officers' 
examinations at Washington, District of Columbia, but sur- 
geons i-efiised him. owing to phvsical disabilities. He returned 
liome June 26, 1864, and in the following month engaged in 
tea(;hing in the noimal school at Salisbury, Pennsylvania, con- 
tinuing until the fall, when he became associated with the W. 
and J. Smith store ;it Salisbury as bookkeeper, remaining until 
1867. He then resumed teaching, being engaged in the normal 
schools in the late summer nnd fall nnd the regular schools in 
the winter seasons. He was a])])ointed to the oflice of i)rincipal 



160 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

of all Salisbury schools, and filled this office creditably. He 
continued his school work until April, 1872. 

In 1872 he embarked in the newspaper business. In com- 
pany with Mr. George S. Suhrie he started the Salisbury In- 
dependent, a six-column, four-page paper. The first copy ap- 
peared February 1, 1872. In June of the following year they 
purchased the Dale City Record, published at Meyersdale, and 
changed the name to the Valley Independent. Mr. Smith very 
successfully edited these papers until October, 1873, when they 
discontinued the first named, and moved the printing office to 
Meyersdale. The business failed in the panic of 1877 and the 
whole establishment was purchased the following year by J. 
W. Hawk, who after a short time removed it to Conn ell sville. 
In the meantime Mr. Smith organized the Meyersdale Commer- 
cial Company by floating stock, all of which was taken by local 
business men and bought back by Mr. Smith early in 1882. He 
is a progressive, enterprising business man, and is held in the 
highest confidence and esteem throughout the community. The 
Commercial is an earnest, forceful paper and an instrument 
of power in the community. Editor Smith is a Republican in 
politics, and interested in all party affairs. In religious faith 
he affiliates with the Meyersdale Reformed church. Frater- 
nally he holds membership in the F. and A. M., G. A. R., 
and is quartermaster and past commander of Michael C. Lowry 
Post of Meyersdale. 

WILLIAM F. WOOD. 

William F. Wood, a contractor, of Somerset, was born 
in Syracuse, Onondaga county, New York, March 20, 1854, a 
son of I. G. and Helen 0. (Phillips) AVood, whose family con- 
sisted of five other children, namely: George E., Clinton R., 
Fredrick, Minnie B., and May. I. G. Wood (father) was born 
in Auburn, Cayuga county, New York, in 1831, died in Syra- 
cuse, New York, in 1902; he served as cashier in the Mer- 
chants' Bank in Syracuse for a number of years. His wife, 
Helen 0. (Phillips) Wood, was a native of Syracuse, daughter 
of George Phillips, who was aJso born in Syracuse, New York, 
a descendant of a family of English origin, who, upon their 
arrival in this country, settled in S^'racuse, New York. 

William F. Wood acquired his preliminary education in the 
common schools of his neighborhood, and later pursued ad- 
vanced studies at the Courtland Preparatory School. He then 
served an apprenticeship at the trade of carpenter, in the mean- 
time learning the architect scroll work, and being thus well 
equipped has succeeded in his vocation of contractor, which he 
followed for several years in Kansas City, and which he is now 
following in Someivset, Pennsylvania. He has superintended 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 161 

the construction of many large public buildings in the following 
states: Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, iowa, ^Missouri, Illinois, 
Indiana, Ohio, West Virginia, and Pennsylvania, including the 
court houses in Marion county and Clinton county, Iowa; the 
postoffice at Davenport, Iowa; the court house at r^arkersburg, 
VVest Virginia; tStark county, Indiana; Ottawa county, Ohio; 
many large structures in Chicago, Illinois ; a court house at New 
Martiusviile, West Virginia; the capitol annex of West Vir- 
ginia; hospital for the state of Ohio at Gallipolis; court house 
at Eairrield, Nebraska; the great horticultural hall of the St. 
Louis exposition; building at Kansas City, Missouri; and is 
now working on the Trust Company's building and the three 
hundred thousand dollar court house at Somerset, Pennsyl- 
vania. He has also superintended many large structures in 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and worked at various points in Col- 
orado. 

He is a willing supporter of the Republican party, and in 
religious convictions both himself and his wife are adherents of 
the IJniversalist faith. While a resident of Kansas City, Mis- 
souri, he was a member of the city council and chairman of the 
county central committee in 1886. In civic society matters he 
is up-to-date, belonging to the Order of Elks, No. 198, at Parkers- 
burg, W^est Virginia; is also a member of Chicago Lodge No. 
765, of the Masonic fraternity. He is fully interested in all the 
measures that tend towards the growth and success of his adopt- 
ed city — Somerset, Pennsylvania, — of which he is in all respects 
a representative citizen. 

Mr. Wood married (first), March 11, 1874, Louisa Cronk, 
the granddaughter of Hiram Cronk, who attained the extreme 
old age of one hundred and five years, and who, at his death, 
was the oldest veteran of the Revolutionary war. By this union 
the following children were born: Emma J., wife of Ralph 
Young, of Kansas City, Missouri; Lanra Nette, wife of George 
M. Pettit, of Chicago, Illinois; Helen F., unmarried; Grace, 

wife of ; Minnie B., wife of ; Clinton R., unmarried. 

Louisa (Cronk) Wood, the mother of these children, died Sep- 
teml)er 20, 1900. For his second wife Mr. Wood married, in 
1902, Frances L. Miller, daughter of Emanuel Miller, of St. 
Joseph, Missouri. 

JACOB S. PICKING, Jr. 

Jacob S. Picking, Jr., a leading druggist of Somerset, Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania, was there born October 30, 1879, 
the son of Jacob S. and Marin L. (Imhoff) Picking. He is of 
German descent. His father is a native of Jenner township, 
Somerset county, born January 22, 1848. He engaged in the 
hotel and livery business, and is now living a retired life. His 
Vol. HI n 



16Ji BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

wife, Maria L. Imlioft', was born February 12, 1848, in Somerset. 
Tiiey liave seven children, viz.: Barnet, Milton, Joseph, Flor- 
ence, Jacob S., of whom later; Marion and Robert. 

Jacob S. Picking, Jr., was educated in the public and high 
schools of his native place, and deciding to engage in the drug 
business, he found employment in a drug store, where he was 
occupied for three years. He then entered the Philadelphia 
College of Pharmacy, and in 1901 was graduated from that in- 
stitution with the degree of Doctor of Pharmacy. After a year 
and a half spent in the service of John M. Toney, he located in 
Berlin, Somerset county, and was there engaged for two years 
in the conduct of a drug establishment. He subsequently re- 
moved his business to Somerset, being located on Main street, 
where he enjoys a generous and ever increasing patronage. 

Mr. Picking married, October 1, 1903, Miss Ruey F. Boyd, 
born August 16, 1881, in Franklin county, daughter of Alexander 
and Emma (McCreary) Boyd. Alexander Boyd was a con- 
tractor of Plate Glass Works. He and his wife had children as 
follows: Frank, Charles, Grace, Samuel, Ruey F. (Mrs. Pick- 
ing), Efifie and Ford. Mr. and Mrs. Picking have one child, 
J." AVilfred Boyd, born June 29, 1905. 

MORRISON FAMILY. 

The following treats of the family to which belongs Walter 
Luther Morrison, a music dealer of Somerset borough, who was 
born August 23, 1865, son of John Henry Morrison. The Mor- 
risons originally emigrated from Scotland. 

(I) John Morrison, of Scotch parentage, was born in 1795 
and died on the old Morrison homestead in Jefferson township, 
Somerset countj^, Pennsylvania, September 30, 1865, aged sixty- 
nine years, eight months and twenty-three days, the record 
reads. He bought the above named homestead in June, 1807, 
and the grandsons have in their possession the deed which was 
written on ''sheep-skin." But three transfers have been made 
on this land from the United States patent to the present owners, 
Walter L. and F. W. Morrison, grandsons of John Morrison. 
This farm is situated about seven miles from the borough of 
Somerset, Pennsylvania. John Morrison married Rachel Ted- 
row, born August, 1802, died August 6, 1882. By this issue 
were born Mary Ann, Catharine Jane, David King, Rebecca K., 
Sarnh A., IMissonri, John Henry, born August 24, 1842, Hen- 
rietta Alinerva, born January 17, 1846. 

(II) John Henry jMorrison, son of Jolm and Rachel (Ted- 
row) ]\rorrison (1), born August 24, 1842, on tlio homestead 
above doscri1)ed in Jefferson township, Somerset eountv, Penn- 
sjdvania, was educated in the common schools and has followed 
farming all his life. Politically he is a Republican. In their 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 163 

religion tlie family are Lutherans. He died November 5, 1905. 
He belongs to the Odd Fellows and Royal Arcanum lodges at 
Somerset. He married, November 3, 1863, Alice Ann Mason, 
born February 17, 1840. Bv this union the issue was: Bma 
Elmira, born' September 6,' 1864, married Harry Brough, a 
farmer ; Walter L., born August 23, 1865, music dealer at Som- 
erset, married Maggie E. Fox; Edith Minerva, born November 
23. 1866, married Samuel Stoffer, a Lutheran minister, now re- 
siding in Canada; Rachel Rebecca, born May 10, 1868, married 
Ed. E. Morrison, a merchant; Mary xVnn, born September 8, 
1869, died in infancy; Thomas Monroe, born September 16, 
1873, married Edna McCleary ; Freeman Ward, born January 
6, 1875, married Stella Jorder; Nettie Jane, born September 4, 
1876, married George Countryman; ]\tyrtle Grace, born Febru- 
ary 8, 1880, with her parents at home in Jefferson township. 

Of the J\!asons it may be said in this connection that they 
came from England. The grandfather, Thomas Mason, died 
January 16, 1S74, aged almost seventy years. His wife, Rebecca 
(Long)"^ Mason, died March 11, 1886, aged sixty-six years and 
six months. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mason 
were: Alice A., Harrison H., born April 7, 1842; Edith, Jenny, 
Lewis, Amanda, Thomas, James, Flora-Jennetta. 

(Ill) Walter Tmther Morrison, son of John Henry and 
Alice Ann (Mason) Morrison, born August 23, 1865, received an 
education such as was afforded in the district schools of his na- 
tive township, Jefferson, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. He 
was reared to farm labor and after he left school went to Car- 
roll and Lee counties, Illinois, where he farmed about a dozen 
years. While in Illinois he was employed by Miller, the nuisic 
dealer of some note, at Dixon, of that state. He was with him 
five years, after which he went into the music trade on his own 
account at Lanark, Illinois. In January, 1901, he returned to 
Somerset, Pennsylvania, where he established the tirst exclusive 
music house of the place. In 1902 George W. Knepper became 
his ])artner, but a year later he withdrew and I. T. Holland be- 
came partner and they are both proprietors of what is styled 
the *' Morrison Music Company," whose place of business is No. 
34 Main street, Somerset, Pennsylvania. Their trade is exten- 
sive and reaches out over Somerset, Cambria, Bedford, West- 
mo i-el and and Fayette counties, Pennsylvania, as well as over 
into the state of Maryland. Among the pianos handled bv this 
firm are the "Weber," "Stock," "Emerson," "Schaeffer„" 
"Whcelock," "Stuyvesant," "Keller." They also handle the 
best of automatic instruments and carry a full line of organs 
and sewing machines. Eight men are employed and five teams 
are kept busy in the rnral district. Afr. Morrison is a member 
of the United Evangelical chnrcli. He [protects his family by a 



164 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

niem])ership in ''old line" and fraternal insurance companies, 
being a member of the Woodmen of America. 

In domestic relations it may be said that Mr. Morrison 
married, January 14, 1886, at Fair Haven, Illinois, Maggie E., 
daughter of Henry and Sarah (Senneff) Fox, born May 14, 
1867, at Fair Haven, Illinois. Her paternal grandfather was 
Godfrey Fox, of German descent. In the family of Henry and 
Sarah Fox were born the following children: Mrs. Elizal)eth 
Miller, Marv Flick, Mina Sinflinger, Mrs. Eliza Longfellow, 
Mrs. Anna McMillen, Ellas B., William H., Maggie Ellen (Mrs. 
Walter L. Morrison), Cyrus Edwin, and three who died in in- 
fancy, John, Elsie and Sarah Alice. To Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
L. Morrison have been born : Hazel Mav, February 8, 1887, died 
October 10, 1897: Clarence Guy, May 15, 1889; Helen Grace, 
February 21, 1898 ; Harry Edwin, June 16, 1900. The living of 
these children are all in the public schools of Somerset, obtain- 
ing a good education. 

CHARLES H. FISHER. 

Charles H. Fisher, wholesale dealer in books, stationery, 
etc., at Somerset, Pennsylvania, is a native of Edinburg, John- 
son county, Indiana, born November 17, 1845, the son of Benja- 
min Franklin and Amanda M. (Schell) Fisher. Though a 
Hoosier by nativity, Mr. Fisher is in blood and brain and nerve 
of good old Pennsylvania stock. 

Benjamin Franklin Fisher, father, was born in York, Penn- 
sylvania, and was of Holland ancestry. He married in 1844, in 
Somerset, Pennsylvania, Amanda M. Schell, a member of the 
old and highly esteemed Schell family, of Bedford and Somer- 
set counties, Pennsylvania. On the maternal side Mr. Fisher 
comes from the Schneider family, who were the original settlers 
at, and who laid out, the town of Somerset. Immediately after 
their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Fisher moved to Akron, Ohio, 
thence to Edinburg, Indiana. A few months after settling in 
the latter place Mr. Fisher died. His wife and son, Charles H., 
returned at once to Somerset, where the boy was reared from 
the age of eighteen months to early manhood. 

Charles H. Fisher received a common school education, and 
had the benefit of special home and normal training under one 
of the most efficient and eminent educators of the state, Pro- 
fessor Joseph J. Stutzman. At the age of fifteen Mr. Fisher 
was a teacher in the common schools and an assistant in the 
normal schools of the county. September 12, 1861, when still 
lacking two months of being sixteen 3^ears of age, he enlisted 
at Pittsburg in the Union armv, in Captain W. L. Foulke's com- 
pany of infantry, and a few days later was mustered into the 
service at Harrisburg as a memlDer of Company B, Forty-sixth 





tcuj. 




BEDFORD AND SOlVrERSET COrNTIES 105 

Regiment of [*eiir.sylvania Volunteers. The regiment at once 
■went to tlie front, its tirst smell of powder being at the battle 
of Ball's Bluff. Tlis regiment was in constant active service 
and participated in the battles of (^edar Creek, Winchester, 
Cedar Mountain, second battle of Bull Run, Chantilly, South 
Mountain, Antietam, Chnncellorsville, Gettysburg and Lookout 
]\rountain, and marched through Georgia to the sea with Sher- 
man. -Mav 2. 1863, in the second day's fighting at the battle of 
Chancellorsville, Private Fisher was left lying on the field of 
carnage with a wound through both thighs, made by an ounce 
musket ball. The bone of the right thigh was broken entirely 
apart and badJy shattered. A year in the hospital.-; of \'/ash- 
ington and Philadelphia resulted, when his three-year term of 
enlistment having expired, he was mustered out of the service. 
May :-0, 18G5, he left Somerset for the then boundless West, and 
for over twelve years followed the varying fortunes of a [)ros- 
X^ector, gold miner, and restless, adventurous traveler. Durim^; 
this time he traversed the country from the Mississippi river to 
the Pacific ocean, and from the British line to the Isthmus of 
Panama. Those were the days before the Union Pacific Rail- 
road was built; millions of butfaloes roamed the great plains, 
and the Indians were numerous and hostile. The gold and silver 
mining camps of the Rocky mountains were tilled with a rest- 
less, aggressive and hardy class of men, and amid such sur- 
roundings, embracing many exciting and dangerous experi- 
ences, Mr. Fisher's early character was formed. He spent six 
months among the Mormons of Utah in the palmy days of' 
Brigham Young, when polygamy flourished at its height, and in 
fact went to Utah to study the peculiar tenets of Mormonism. 
During his six years' residence in California he filled several 
official positions of trust and responsibility, for which his su- 
perior abilities qualified him, and which abilities naturally at- 
tracted public attention. At this time of life his mind was much 
of a literary bent, and his contributions to newspapers were ex- 
tensively copied and favorably conunented^npon. In 1878, tak- 
ing steamer at San Francisco, he returned east by way of Pan- 
ama, and has since uninterruptedly resided in Somerset, Penn- 
sylvania. April 1, 1880, he ene-aged in the book, stationery and 
news business, since which time he has been conducting an ex- 
tensive wholesale store, his trade extending into the surround- 
ing counties and states. 

In his political relations Mr. Fisher accords allegiance to 
the Democratic party, and has ever takeii an active interest 
in ])arty affairs. He has served four terras as chairman of 
the Democratic committee, and has been the party's represent- 
ative at the state conventions numerous times. During his 
incumbency as county chairman, through his efficiency in the 



1.50 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

presidential campaign of 18S0, his party ca^t in tlie countv the 
largest vote it had ever attained, and which has never since 
been 0(inalled. A patriotic, public-spiiited citizen, Mr. Fisher 
has at all times been willing and ready to lend his assistance 
to all enteri)rises tending to advance the interests of the com- 
munity. He helped oi-ganize the First National Bank of Som- 
erset, and was elected one of the first directors; he was one of 
the prime movers in establishing the Electric l.ight Company, 
of which he is treasurer and diiector. lie is also largely in- 
terested in the opera house, and in fact is always to the front 
when i^ublic improvements and interests are concerned. 

He married, October 3, 1882, Emlie Coffroth, daughter of 
AVilliam B. Coffroth. Two children have blessed this nnion: 
Helen C., boi-n September 3, 1883, and Chauncey Mitchell, 
March 8, 1885. The standing, socially, of :Sh\ Fisher and his 
family is with the best citizens of Somerset conntv, as well as 
other parts of the state, their antecedents as well as their natural 
merits securing for them the highest esteem. 

ALONZO CHA]\[BERLAIN. 

Alonzo Chamberlain, now^ a nonagenarian, but all through 
his active life in three states— New York, Maryland and Penn- 
sylvania — has been prominent in the political and business world, 
and an important factor in the development of Somerset countv, 
was born in Austerlitz, New York, January 16, 1817. He comes 
of pure revolutionary stock. His grandfather, Jonathan Cham- 
berlain, was a soldier under General Gates, fought at the battle 
of Saratoga and saw the surrender of Burgoyne, and died aged 
eighty years. Among the children of Jonathan Chamberlain 
was a son David, born about the year 1750, at Hillsdale, New 
York, and a farmer in his native state all his life. He inherited 
the patriotic ardor of his sire and was a volunteer in the war 
of 1812 with the rank of lieutenant. He was an active and 
devout member of the Presbyterian church, in which he served 
as elder. He was a pronounced Democrat and an admirer and 
follower of Thomas Jefferson. Me married Sarah West, daugh- 
ter of Abner West, a native of Connecticut. She lived to' be 
over ninety years of age, and was also a Presbyterian. Their 
children were ten in number, six of whom arrived at maturity, 
namely: Clarinda, Haniet, Eliza and .\lonzo, twins; (\nroline, 
and Emmeline. 

vVlonzo Chamberlain obtained his education in the district 
schools of his day, sup])lemented by much study and reading. 
H(? taught in the county schools for six winter terms and thus 
added greatly to his own store of knowledge. He spent a few 
years in mercantile life in vVusterlitz, and in 1850 removed to 
Maryland, where he entered the service of the American Coal 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 167 

Company at Lonaconing, Allegheny count}^ and became super- 
intendent of the company, a position he retained until 1870. In 
that year he organized the Maryland Coal Company with a 
capital of one million dollars, and was the first president of the 
company. Mr. Chamberlain, appreciating the value of Somer- 
set county coal properties and foreseeing the great possibili- 
ties of this section, associated himself with other prominent 
business men and purchased coal property at Meyersdale. This 
company was known as the Cumberland and Elk Lick Coal 
Company, and for twenty-five years Mr. Chamberlain was man- 
ager of their extensive mines. In 1899 he retired from active 
business, and has since lived a quiet, contented life at his com- 
fortable home on Main street, Meyersdale. 

Always a Democrat, Mr. Chamberlain has been an active 
politician and even yet retains a deep interest. In 1853 he 
was elected a member of the legislature of the state of New 
York and served with credit, declining a renomination. In the 
stormy days of 1861 in Maryland, he was elected as a Union 
man to the legislature of that state. After taking up his resi- 
dence in Pennsylvania, he sought no public office but was elected 
again and again to the common council of Meyersdale, serving 
in all fourteen consecutive years, until he absolutely declined 
re-election. He was high in the couincils of the Democratic 
party and a warm personal friend of General Alexander Coff- 
roth, the Democratic war horse of the county and ex-congress- 
man. 

Mr. Chamberlain married, in 1873, Elizabeth Piper, of 
New Hampshire. Two children blessed his marriage: Walter 
Scott, who died in August, 1893, and Charles A., who died in 
infancy. Mrs. Chamberlain died in 1893. Now past ninety 
Mr. Chamberlain is a fine, healthy example of a well-preserved 
American gentleman. Smiling and courteous he gives little 
evidence of the great weight of years he carries. With none 
of near kin around him, he awaits the final summons with a 
calm dignity, conscious of a life of well meant endeavor and 
a conscience void of offense toward all men. He is known and 
loved by all. 

GEORGE BENJAMIN MASTERS, M.D. 

George Benjamin Masters, M.D., a practicing physician 
of Rockwood, born at Berlin. Somerset county, Pennsylvania, 
March 5, 1856, traces his ancestry to George Masters, who 
came to this country from England when a young man, settled 
in Somerset county. Pennsylvania, where his death occurred 
at the advanced age of about eighty-eight years. His time and 
attention was especially devoted to educational work, and for 
many years he followed the vocation of school teacher. He 



168 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

was a DiemlHM' of the Lutheran church. He was twice married, 
one of his wives having been a ISfiss Hull. 

iJen.iamin Masters, son of George Masters, the immigrant 
ancestor, followed the occupation of farming throughout the 
iH'tive years of his life. He was also a noted deer hunter, 
having shot over one hundred. He was a very pious man, of 
great industry and good judgment, a member of the Lutheran 
cburt'li. and served in the cai)acity of ]ioor house director and 
county commissioner. His wife, Mary ,\[asters, who was loved 
by everybody with wliom she came in contact, and who faith- 
fully and conscientiously performed the duties of wife and 
mother, was a constant reader of the Scri]>tures whenever at 
1(Msu!e, reading the same in the Gennan language. Benjamin 
^Masters died June 23, 1877, aged seventy-three years, and his 
wife, Mary blasters, died December 17, 1871, aged sixty-seven 
years. Their children are as follows : 

;. Cyrus, l)orn February 25, 1825, died in some western 
state. 2. Emanuel, t)orn November 9, 1827, of whom later. 3. 
Elizabeth, born August 31, 1830, became the wife of Hugh 
Auman, by whom she had a large family. 4. George Benjamin, 
born November 29, 1834. 5. Peter, born December 17, 1838, 
was engaged in the retail shoe business at Toledo. Ohio, where 
his death occurred-, he left a wife and two sons. 6. ^Lnry Jane, 
born July 2, 184G, became the wife of Harry Stutzman. to whom 
she bore a large family; they reside in Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania. 7. Angeline, born April 12, 1849, became the wife of 
Jackson Savior, to whom she bore a large family; they reside 
in Somerset, Pennsylvania. 

Emanuel ^Masters, second son of Benjamin and Mary Mas- 
ters, was born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, November 9, 
1827. He received a common school education, after which he 
learned the trade of harness and saddle maker, and for many 
yeai's was a manufacturer of those articles in the town of Berlin, 
Pennsylvania. He was elected to fill the offices of postmaster 
and justice of the peace, in which capacities he served with 
credit and distinction. He is a consistent member of the Luth- 
eran church, and his political allegiance is given to the Repub- 
lican pai'ty. He was united in mai'riage to Mary Jane Lane, 
born in Berlin, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, daughter of 
Peter and Mary Lane, American born, who came to Somerset 
county from Adams county, Pennsylvania. Peter Lane was a 
harn(»ss and saddle manufactui'er, and \vas a soldier and cap- 
tain in the war of 1812. The children of this union were as 
follows: 

1. Elverna, born iNFarch 19, 1852, died from diphtheria in 
childhood. 2. Martha Jane, born May 8, 1854, became the wife 
of Tli('()d()i-o Flato, of l>erlin, Pennsylvania, where she now re- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 16l> 

sides, in good health, and they are the parents of a number of 
children. 3. George Benjamin, born March' 5, 1856, of whom 
later. 4. Mary Adaline, born March 14, 1858. 5. Lizzie Cordelia, 
born October 16, 1860, unmarried, resides with her aged father 
in Berlin, Pennsylvania, where for many years she has con- 
ducted a millinery store; she is a member of the Lutheran 
church, as is a-lso her sister, Martha Jane. 6. Ellen Amanda, 
born March 5, 1863, widow of Dr. Frank B. Walker, who died 
at Ligonier, Pennsylvania, in early manhood, with the promise 
of a brilliant future. He left one son, John, who has been ap- 
pointed to West Point, and who, with his mother, resides in Ber- 
lin, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Walker is associated in the millinery 
business with her sister, Lizzie C. Masters. The mother of these 
children, who was a consistent member of the Lutheran church, 
and a faithful wife and mother, died December 17, J871, aged 
sixty-seven years. 

George Benjamin Masters, only son of Emanuel and Mary 
Jane (Lane) ]\rasters, received his early education in the pub- 
lic and normal schools of Berlin, Pennsylvania, and this was 
supplemented by a course at Mount Union College, Ohio. After 
teaching school at Pine Hill, Pennsylvania, one term, and in 
Bedford county, he began the study of medicine under the di- 
rection of William A. Garman, M. D., of Berlin, Pennsylvania, 
and received his medical degree in 1879 from the Medical Col- 
lege of Ohio, at Cincinnati, Ohio. He entered upon the practice 
of his profession at Somerset, Pennsylvania, in 1880, where he 
remained but one year. He then removed to Shanksville, Penn- 
sylvania, and after a residence of about one and one-half years 
there, he, with his family, moved to Illinois, in which state he 
practiced until 1885, when he returned to Pennsylvania, locat- 
ing at Rockwood, where he has since resided and engaged in the 
active practice of his profession. Dr. Masters keeps in touch 
with the advanced ideas along the line of his profession by mem- 
bership in the County, State and American Medical Associa- 
tions, He has held various borough offices, serving in town 
council and as school director. Dr. Masters is a Lutheran in 
religion, a Republican in politics, and a member of the Royal 
Arcanum, and Modern Woodmen of America. For a number 
of years , he has served as local surgeon for the Baltimore & 
Ohio railroad. 

Dr. Masters married, in 1880, Amanda J. Garman, daugh- 
ter of Dr. William A. and Mary Ann (Burnett) Garman. the 
former named having been his preceptor in medicine, and the 
latter a daughter of Dr. Burnett, who was a soldier and surgeon 
in t]]e Mexican war, and who died at an advanced age on his 
farm close to Ligonier, Pennsylvania. Dr. Garman is still in 
practice at Berlin, Pennsylvania, at the advanced age of seven- 



170 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

ty-six years ; he has been in continuous practice for half a cen- 
tury, and is still hale and active. He is president of the Na- 
tional Bank of Berlin, and has served as school director for 
many years, also burgess and pension examiner. He is a Luth- 
eran m religion, and a Democrat in politics. One child was 
born to Dr." and Mrs. blasters: Frederick Garman Masters, 
who is at present (1905) teaching school. He received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Rockwood, Pennsylvania, and 
Pennsylvania College, at Gettysburg, from which institution 
he was graduated in the classical course in 1904. 

CHARLES PYTHIAN COBAFGH. 

Charles Pythian Cobaugh, deceased, who was a prominent 
and mfluential citizen of Rockwood, Somerset county, Pennsyl- 
vania, was born in 1841 in Taylor township, Cambria county, 
near Conemaugh, the son of Daniel and Nancy (Gochenow) 
Cobaugh, and one of eight children, namely: Charles Pythian, 
of whom later; David, a resident of Johnstown; Philip, lives 
in Conemaugh; Jennie married (first) Richard Clay, (second) 
a Mr. Davis, of Chicago; Alice married David Moyer, of Cone- 
maugh; Susannah, wife of Thomas Grove, of Morrellville ; 
Louisa, wife of John Good, and Daniel, who was in the war of 
the rebellion and was a prisoner in Libby prison nine months. 

Charles P. Cobaugh, in his earlier days, worked upon a 
farm. At the breaking out of the Civil war he tendered his 
services to his country, serving: two enlistments. The first was 
for three months in Company H, Tenth Pennsylvania Reserves. 
On October 21, 1861, he re-enlisted in Company C, First Battal- 
ion, Xinetecnth Ignited States Infantry, served for three years, 
and was honorably discharged at Camp Lookout ^Mountain, near 
Chattanooga, October 29, 1864. The command to which he be- 
longed was a part of the Western army and was commanded 
by General Benjamin Harrison. At the close of the war he be- 
came fireman and later engineer on the Pennsylvania railroad, 
and accepted a position, nearly twenty years ago, on the Bal- 
timore and Ohio railroad. He removed his familv to Meyers- 
dale, and it was during his residence at this place that he had 
charge of the engine on the ''Keystone Shifter," a coal train 
that plied between Salisbury Junction and Cumberland. His 
next removal was to Rockwood, thence to Connellsville and back 
again to Rockwood, where his family have since resided. In 
1886, while engaged in shifting in sight of his own home, the 
locomotive of which Mr. Cobaugh was in charge blew up, and he 
and his fireman, the late Harry Dayton, escaped with their 
lives, as if by a miracle. For many months after the terrible 
accident the unfortunate engineer was confined to his bed. hov- 
ering between life and death, occasioned by the great nervous 






BEDFOUD AND SOxMEKSET COUNTIES 171 

shock and oilier injuries of a serious nature sustained in the 
awful catastrophe. He never fully recovered from the effects 
of the explosion, but as soon as he was again able to engage 
in active pursuits he railroaded and rested by turns, his last 
work at the throttle having been performed several years ago 
on the Confluence helper. Eroni that time on he was engaged 
in the manufacture of cigars and tobacco on a limited scale. 
Politically Mr. Cobaugh was an ardent Republican. He was a 
member of the William H. Weller Post No. 549, G. A. R.; 
Meyersdale Lodge No. 554, F. and A. M. ; and of Rockwood 
Council No. 801, Royal Arcanum. During his residence in 
Rockwood Mr. Cobaugh identified himself with the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

Charles P. Cobaugh married, June 18, 1866, Rebella Parks, 
daughter of Joseph Parks, who for many years was an engineer 
on the famous Old Portage railroad, and who met his death by 
an explosion of liis engine in 1865. Eight children, five sons 
and three daughters, were born to them, namely : George P. ; 
Clara B., wife of William Millhouse; Grace, wife of George E. 
Beatty; Lewis D.; Lena M., wife of W. A. Shumaker; the three 
other sons, Joseph W., Charles P. and James G., are all de- 
ceased. Joseph W. died from the effects of having his head 
caught between two cars loaded with rails in the Rockwood 
yards, in 1887; Charles P. died in 1892 of typhoid fever; and 
James G. was scalded to death in 1902 in a wreck on the Som- 
erset & Cambria branch of the railroad. 

Charles P. Cobaugh died at his home in Rockwood, Janu- 
ary 9, 1904, aged sixty-four years. His demise was most sin- 
cerely mourned by those who knew him intimately. He was a 
fond parent, a Christian man and an ideal citizen in every sense 
of the term. The fnneral services were conducted on January 
11th, in the Rockwood Methodist Episcopal church. Rev. C. L. 
E. Cartwright, of Scottdale, during whose pastorate in Meyers- 
dale Mr. Cobaugh was received into the church, delivered a 
powerful and impressive sermon. He was assisted in the serv- 
ices by Rev. 0. E. Rodkey, Rev. W. H. Blackburn and Rev. R. 
D. Ellis. Interment was at New Centerville. The services at 
the cemetery were conducted by his comrades of the Grand 
Army and his brethren of the Masonic fraternity, a large dele- 
gation from Meyersdale Lodge being in attendance. 

ALEXANDER CASEBEER. 

Alexander Casebeer, of Somerset, Pennsylvania, descend- 
ed through the following ancestry: 

(I) Solomon Casebeer, the grandfather of Alexander 
Casebeer, was a native of Germany. He emigrated to our 
shore, settling in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, near the close 



172 BEDFORD AND SOMEKSKT COUNTIES 

of IT'-HJ. There is no other record in possession of his descend- 
ants, hence his occupations, general achievements, rehgion and 
education can only be conjectured at. it is only known that he 
died wiien a young man. He married Elizabeth Emmert, who 
was of (jiernian ilescent, her people being among the early set- 
tlers of Som(;rset county prior to ISUO. iSoloiaon Casebeer and 
wife luul >ev»ii ciiildren, four daughters and three sons. The 
sons were Isaac, JSolomon and Joseph. The names of the daugh- 
ters were: Hannah, who married John Mellinger and moved 
to AVooster, Ohio, about 1830; she was the mother of nineteen 
children. Elizabeth nuirried Michael Alellingor, moved to the 
same place in Ohio and was the mother of two daughters. Sarah 
married Jacob Sarver and resided at Greensburg, Westmore- 
hnid county, Peimsylyania, where he conducted the old stone 
hotel until his death. She was the mother of four children, two 
sons and two daughters. One son and one daughter reside in 
Westmoieland county. Alary married George Hartman, a Ger- 
man, and resided in Somerset county until 1863, when they 
emigrateil to Alicliigan. They had three children, two sons and 
one daughter, one son died in the Union army during the Civil 
war. The daughter still resides in [Michigan, the wife of a far- 
mer living in Tuscola county, her father and mother having 
died about 1902. The son with his family live in West Eliza- 
beth, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 

(II) Solomon Casebeer, son of Solomon Casebeer (1), 
the American ancestor, was a stone and brick mason and re- 
moved from Somerset county to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, with 
his family early in 1840. There he formed ])artnership with a 
man named Coulter, and they became heavy (Contractors and 
builders. He married Sarah Baker, a descendant of George 
Peters leaker, on the river Rhine, Germany. lie was very 
wealthy. He had four sons and one daughter, who emigrated 
to this country al>out 1752. One son died ^oon after arriving 
hero. The family were highly educated. IMie surviving 
brothers were surgeons and i)erformed much government work. 
They possessed large estates in many sections of the TTnited 
States, l^i'ior to 1800 they were officers in the army, one. Col- 
onel llcjury P)aker, became a merchant and had ship at sea, also 
owned much land near I'hiladelphia, Pennsylvania, where he 
died in ISO). i'>efo]-e his dentil liis lands wore leased for nine- 
ty-nine years, am] the business portion of the city to-day is lo- 
cated on this tract. P>y will his (>state fell to his brothers, Jacob 
and Peter, and the sister Elizabdh. Tliev resided in liancaster 
county, Pennsylvania, and later moved to Somerset county, 
wheie Jncob was killed by the Indians about 181(). Peter emi- 
gr;it<'d to Ohio. Colonel Henry died single. Jacob l>al;ei- was 
Alexander Ca- ebr'ci-'s gi-eat-gi'andfal her on the maleninl side. 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES ITd 

Mrs. Sarah (Baker) Casebeer died in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
before the death of her husband, leaving three children, two of 
whom soon followed her, Alexander being the only remaining 
child, and his father died when he was about nine years of age. 

(Ill) Alexander Casebeer, son of Solomon and Sarah 
(Baker) Casebeer, was born June 11, 1830, in Stoystown, Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania. His education was necessarily 
very limited, as his parents both died when he was but a mere 
lad, and he was thus compelled to make his own way through 
an untried world, unaided by the council of a father and the 
love and care of a mother. When but ten years of age he went 
to live with a farmer in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, where 
he remained until eighteen years of age, then returned to friends 
in Somerset county. In the spring of 1850 he went to Michigan, 
where he found employment in the big woods at lumbering for 
five years and more. He then purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres of government land and cleared up a good farm and made 
many improvements thereon. He next embarked in the grocery 
business, but within one year sadness came to his new-made 
home by the death of his wife. He then sold out and spent the 
following winter in Canada, that being the winter of 1887-88. 
In the spring of 1888 he returned to Michigan, spent the sum- 
mer and the fall there and then returned to his native county — 
Somerset. 

Mr. Casebeer has been a Republican ever since that party 
had an organization, with the single exception of Mr. Cleve- 
land's first term. Aside from local offices, such as school and 
township offices, he never has aspired to public positions. He 
has been township clerk, and for four years a notary public. 
In the agricultural societies he has held positions befitting his 
qualifications. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company D, 
Twenty-third Michigan Regiment, for three years, during the 
great Civil war, but declined each and ever offer of promotion, 
preferring rather that such promotions should go to his comrade 
friends. About 1856 Mr. Casebeer united with the Methodist 
Episcopal church and was for a number of years class leader, 
steward and Sunday school superintendent. He also held an 
exhorter's license for several years and became leader of a 
''praying band," which proved a successful feature of Christian 
work. For a number of years he was a member of the Knights 
of Honor, in which order he was treasurer. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Maccabees, and being one of the deputy 
supreme commanders, planted the order in Somerset county. 
He has held the office of record keeper for several j'-ears in suc- 
cession. 

Mr. Casebeer married (first), August 26, 1856, Elizabeth 
Woodward, in Denmark township, Tuscola county, Michigan. 



174 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

She was well educated and by occupation a dressmaker and 
milliner. She was an English lady and had done much work in 
her line for the nobility. Liev father was James Woodward, a 
hotelkeeper at T.ong Sutton Bridge, England, he owning the 
property in his ownright. ]\[rs. Elizabeth Casebeer died in the 
autumn'of 1876. In the fall of 1889 Mr. Casebeer married (sec- 
ond) Ida Fisher, of Somerset, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. 
She was the daughter of Samuel Fisher and wife. Her father 
was a soldier in the Union cause in the Civil war days, in one 
of the Pennsylvania regiments. He was a native of Somerset 
county, his ancestry being among the earliest settlers and of 
German descent. His education was limited. Politically he was 
a Democrat. By Mr. Casebeer 's first marriage were born to 
him: 1. James, born April '22, 1858, in Denmark township, 
Tuscola county, .Michigan. He obtained a common school edu- 
cation; married Eve David Mersdal, of Indian Fields township, 
Tuscola county, Michigan. He is now a farmer of the same 
location. 2. Eliza, born in the same place as her brother, Au- 
gust 22, 1861, married Cliarles Mercill, a farmer in Tuscola 
county, ^Michigan. 3. George A., born in the same place as those 
named above. May 18, 1865; for several years followed school 
teaching, but is now a farmer. He married a Miss Patterson, of 
Michigan. By his second wife, Mr. Casebeer is the father of 
four children: 4. Perry M., born December 18, 1891. 5. Charles 
Harrison, born November 18, 1896. 6. Jennie, born November 
18, 1900, all in school. 7. Theodore Roosevelt, born November 
8, 1903. 

In reviewing the career of Mr. Casebeer, the reader must 
have already observed it to have been indeed a checkered one, 
even from his earliest boyhood days. He relates how, at the 
death of his father, an uncle virtually robbed him of two thou- 
sand dollars, which then would have been a fortune to him. 
Again soon after his first mai'riage, he entrusted a minister of 
the Gospel to cash a $666 draft, the same person being a post- 
master, and for failing to account for this sum paid the penalty 
in th(; penitentiary for a term of iifteen years, reduced to eleven 
years; but even this did not re]3ay Air. Casebeer. During the 
man's eventful life, he has traveled much and ever been a keen 
observer. With grai)hic description he now relates the wonder- 
ful changes wrought out since 1850 in methods of travel and 
machineiy employed to relieve burdens from mankind. He 
states that in 1850, so slow did the trains move, in passing an 
apple orcliard he saw luscious fruit, and he left the cars and 
procured a (|uantity of apples, overtook his train, and that with- 
out great exertion, lie ruither relates of his travel by steam- 
boat, canal boats and other i-arly-day means of locomotion, all 
of which can scaice be comprehended by the present fast-living, 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 175 

swiftly-transported generations. On the farm lie has worked 
with sickle and cradle and lived to see and employ the self- 
binder and all the kindred machinery. He easily discusses how 
such an army of i-icli men have grown up, and now sees where 
in years gone by he had golden opportunities that slipped by un- 
lieeded, all for a lack of real confidence in his own judgment. 
Yet with all the adverse winds, life's journey to him has not 
been fraught with shipwreck. He has lived a conscientious life, 
has ]"eared sons and daughters to honor his good name and 
served his country in time of war. Now, at the sundown of life, 
he abides in the comity of his nativity, with friends on every 
hand, who only wish him many years of happiness this side of 
the dark river. 

ALEXANDER H. HUSTON. 

The ancestors of Alexander H. Huston, of Somerset, were 
among the old settlers of the county and became possessed of 
land which has always been in the Huston name ever since the 
first fence was built on it. Peter Huston served as a lieutenant 
during the war of 1812, and was a Whig politically. His wife 
was of Scotch-Irish descent, and in her youth emigrated from 
Ireland to the United States. 

Chambers Huston, son of Peter Huston, was educated in 
the common schools of Somerset county, and followed the car- 
penter's trade, being also engaged in the undertaking business. 
In i3olitics he was first a AVhig and later a Republican. His 
wife was Margaret Pritts. 

Alexander H. Huston, son of Chambers and Margaret 
(Pritts) Huston, was born November 2, 1841, in Somerset, and 
received his education in the common schools of his native place. 
In June, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Tenth Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, for a term of three years, being dis- 
charged December 18, 1863. He re-enlisted for another three 
years in Company I, One Hundred and Ninety-first Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until the close of the war, 
receiving his discharge August 23, 1865, in AVashington, Dis- 
trict of Columbia. On his return home he took up the carpen- 
ter's trade, which he followed for several years, and then went 
into the undertaking business, in which he has been engaged 
ever since. The firm is now A. H. Huston & Son, tlio partner- 
ship being formed in January, 1904. 

]\lr. Huston married, November 30, 1865, Catharine J^iuiier, 
and they became the parents of five children: Lloyd, died in 
infanc> ; Emma, Samuel, Clara and Ella. Airs. Huston is a 
daughter of Samuel Bruner, who was born in Connellsville, 
and was a Rejuiblican in politics. He mari-Jed Alary Jjanino- 
and their children Avere : Joseph, Davis, George, ('lark de- 



176 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

ceased: Emma, wife of Henry Eicher, a carpenter of Meyers- 
dale; Elizabeth, married Solomon Fisher, a retired farmer of 
Coke :\Iail, Iowa; Catharine, wife of Alexander H. Huston, as 
mentioned above. 

WILLIAM H. CARRELL. 

William H. Carrell, a representative citizen of Somerset, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was born September 15, 1836, 
in Bedford township, Bedford county, a son of George and 
Catherine (Sipes) Carrell. His grandfather, Anthony Carrell, 
was a native of Ireland, emigrated from his native land, set- 
tling in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, in young manhood. 
George Carrell (father) was born in Bedford county, Pennsyl- 
vania, a carpenter by trade, and a Republican in politics. 

William H. Carrell received a good common school educa- 
tion, and after leaving school learned the carpenter's trade and 
later the machinist's trade. He then associated himself with 
Hiram Baker in the conduct of a sand mill, in which he was 
engaged for twenty years, with the exception of the time he 
served in the army. In 1861, when the great war of the re- 
bellion was in progress and the call for loyal men was urgent, 
Mr. Carrell enlisted in Company A, Fifty-fourth Regiment of 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, for three years. After his term of 
service expired he re-enlisted in the same company for three 
years, serving until the cessation of hostilities. He received 
his discharge June 17, 1865. 

William H. Carrell was united in marriage July 4, 1867, to 
Lucy Petrican, daughter of Thomas and Martha (Park) Petri- 
can, and of this union, one child, Harry S., was born. His first 
wife died in 1868, and Mr. Carrell married for his second wife 
Minerva J. Baker, daughter of Hiram and Louisa (Hoover) 
Baker. Hiram Baker was a contractor by trade, and in 1898 
engaged in mercantile pursuits in Somerset, continuing in this 
line until his death, January 28, 1903, since which event Mrs. 
Carrell has engaged in the conduct of the store, having changed 
the name to the South Side Grocery Company. One child was 
born of the second marriage, Lucy, October 6, 1889. 

COUNTRYMAN FAMILY. 

This sketch relates to the Countryman family of Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, to wliicli belongs Harry A. G. Country- 
man, of Soraei-set borough, who is now engaged in the under- 
taking and furniture business. 

(I) George Countryman was one of the pioneer settlers in 
Brothers Valley township. Somerset county, Pennsylvania. The 
date of his coming was 1761, two years prior to that of the set- 
tlement made by Simon Hay, wliich was according to records 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 177 

in 1763, or five years prior to lands being open for actual set- 
tlers by purchase. Mr. Countryman went to some one of the 
eastern counties of Pennsylvania to secure work, and while 
there met Simon Hay and told him that he had two ' ' tomahawk 
claims" in the wild woods across the Allegheny mountains, and 
that if he would help him do some work he would give him one 
of the claims, where the Indians still roamed at will and fre- 
quently made hostile attacks upon the whites. The claims thus 
oifered was what is now the Philip Hay farm. Mr. Country- 
man kept the south claim; in all, he claimed one thousand acres. 
The land office records show that he made application for four 
hundred and ten acres December 9, 1772, which was surveyed 
May 17, 1774. George Countryman married a Misa "Griffith, by 
whom was born one son, Jacob. .<.'iCH£'i MiUiRO^t 

(IT) Jacob Countryman, only son of George Countryman 
(1), was born in Somerset county in 1787, died March 4, 1869, 
aged eighty-two years, two months and eight days. He mar- 
ried Hannah, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Lane, of Berlin, 
Pennsylvania. By this union were born: Mary, Catharine, 
Jacob J., Malinda, Caroline, Jerome, Samuel, Ephraim, Fran- 
cis J. 

(III) Francis J. Countryman, son of Jacob and Hannah 
(Lane) Countryman (2), married Laura, daughter of George 
Fritz and wife, by whom were born: Clarissa, George, Jacob, 
Ellen, Henry, Elriam, Tracy, Milton, Herman, William. The 
father died in Jenner township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, 
October, 1883. Mrs. Francis J. Countryman, the mother, died 
at Meyersdale, February, 1887. 

(IV) George Jacob Countryman, son of Francis J. and 
Laura (Fritz) Countryman (3), was bom in 1854. He obtained 
his education at the common schools and taught for three terms 
successfully. His chief occupation, however, was that of a 
farmer. In his church connections he was a member of the 
German Reformed body and served as deacon. Politically he 
was always a staunch, intelligent Republican, believing that this 
party came closer to meeting the demands of the people at large 
than any other organization. He married Belinda, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. William G. Hay, of Brothers Valley township, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, in 1874. By this union were 
born four children: William, married, October 21, 1901, Estella 
Pile, in Somerset county, Pennsylvania; they have one child, 
James. Harvey, married, December 27, 1905, Edith Dysart, of 
Nachusa, Illinois. Harry A. G., of whom later. Ellen, married, 
June 7, 1903, John Seibert, now deceased. Mr. Countryman, the 
father, died in Quemahoning township, Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, April 28, 1890. 

Vol. Ill 12 



ITS BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

(V) Harry A. G. Countryman, son of George Jacob and 
Belinda (Hay) Countryman (4-), was born in Jennerstown, Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania, April 1, 1880. He attended the 
common schools and worked on the farm until seventeen years 
of age, when he went to Dixon, Illinois, where he worked on a 
dairy farm for a time, but soon came east and found employ- 
ment with the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company as fireman, 
but believing there was some easier, safer manner of gaining a 
livelihood, he came to Somerset borough and assisted in estab- 
lishing the first regular music store of the place. This was in 
1900, and in 1901 ^he sold to AV. L. Morrison. The next six 
months he clerked in the hardware store of John H. Miller. He 
then purchased a half interest in the furniture business of F. H. 
Sufalls. In the autumn of 1901 he attended the Pittsburg (Penn- 
sylvania) School of Anatomy, from which he graduated. To the 
former business he then added an undertaking department 
(generally coupled with the furniture trade, especially in the 
smaller places), and in 1903 the firm of Sufalls & Countryman 
built a department store of their own, on West Main street, 
Somerset, where they enjoy a prosperous business. In each of 
the years 1904 and 1905 Mr. Countryman erected a dwelling, 
one of which he now lives in. In politics he is a Republican, 
and in the matter of religion is a member of the German Re- 
formed church. 

He was united in marriage November 14, 1901, to Nellie 
Ardene Gaynor, daughter of Thomas and Frances (Fogle) 
Gaynor, and they have one child, Thelraa Marie, born March 
3, i906. Mrs. Countr>Tnan was well educated in the common 
schools, and in 1898 accepted employment as clerk in the large 
dry goods store of J. H. Siffords & Company of Somerset, 
Pennsylvania, where she remained until the date of her mar- 
riage. Little is known of her j)aternal ancestry except the fact 
that when but twelve years of age her father, Thomas Gaynor, 
left his home in New Jersey to become a drummer-boy in the 
Union army during the great civil war period. It is related of 
him that lie took ]iassage from home under a box-car, thus rid- 
ing to the point where he hoped to be admitted to the govern- 
ment service, but upon being rejected he went to Baltimore, 
Maryland, then drifted north into the copper mine regions, 
from which location lie came to Somerset, Pennsylvania. His 
marriage occurred in Maryland. 

Among the enterprising business factors of Somerset no 
young man stands higlior in Inisiness circles than does he for 
whom this record is given. 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 179 



CALVIN M. ANKENY. 

The grandfather of Calvin M. Ankeny. of Somerset, was 
Isaac Ankeny, son of Peter Ankeny, and a native of Somer- 
set county. He was a life-long farmer and in politics a Re- 
publican. His son, Jones D. Ankeny, was born in Jenner town- 
ship and received his education in the common schools. He 
has devoted himself to cultivating the farm which he inherited 
from his father, and has always been a Republican. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth McDowell, a native of Westmoreland county, 
and they have six children: Calvin M., of whom later; Mary, 
Agnes, Laura, Lida and Isaac. 

Calvin M. Ankeny, son of Jones D. and Elizabeth (Mc- 
Dowell) Ankeny, was born January 10, 1856, in Somerset coun- 
ty, where until the age of nineteen he attended the common 
schools. For two years thereafter he assisted his father in 
the labors of the farm, and upon attaining his majority en- 
gaged in the produce business, disposing of his goods in the 
Johnstown market. At the end of twelve years he purchased 
a farm, which he cultivated in connection with his business. 
April 10, 1903, he moved to Somerset, where he bought the 
house which has since been his home. He is also the owner 
of a farm of one hundred and sixty-nine acres situated in 
Jenner township, near the old homestead. In addition to these 
he possesses several pieces of real estate in Johnstown and 
has a number of interests in the west. 

Mr. Ankeny married, December 24, 1890, Cora L. Knepper, 
the descendant of ancestors who emigrated many years ago 
from Germany. George Knepper was a Somerset county farm- 
er and married Theressa Wegley, by whom he was the father 
of the following children: William G., of whom later; Mary 
Ann, Catharine, and Elizabeth. After the death of his wife 
Mr. Knepper married Martha Ambrose, and their children 
were: Henry, Rachael, Harriet, and Maria. 

William G. Knepper, son of George and Theressa (Wegley) 
Knepper, was born in Somerset township and was educated 
in the common schools of his native county. He was a farmer 
and in politics a Republican. He married Sarah A. Baker 
and they have three daughters: Anna, Solista, and Cora L., 
born December 30, 1868, wife of Calvin M. Ankeny, as men- 
tioned above. 

WITT AND WALKER. 

Among the business men of energ}^ and ambition in the 
borough of Somerset, the members of this well known firm rank 
high. The firm is comprised of George F. Witt and C. B. 
Walker. The former was born in Somerset, September 10, 



180 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

1877, sou of George W. Witt aud wii'e. The father was a 
fouiidiy man the best years of his life, and still resides in 
Somerset. When about seventeen years of age, Mr. AVitt com- 
menced to learn th^ butcher's business with George Auman, 
of Somerset. He then attended school for a time, which better 
qualified him for the activities of a business career. He then 
worked at the trade five or six years at Somerset and a suburb 
of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, after which he returned to his 
native borough and became one of the firm of Davis & Witt, 
which was succeeded by Witt & Baker, who finally sold the 
market, and Mr. Witt was employed in the Seibert market, 
the one he had formerly owned an interest in. Finally Mr. 
Witt purchased the business from Seibert and continued to 
operate it alone from 1904 to May 17, 1905, when he took for 
his business partner a farmer, C. B. Walker, whose farm home 
is situated about four miles from the borough of Somerset, 
Pennsylvania. The firm is now known as Witt & AValker. 
They occu])y No. 6 North Cross street, where they own a good 
one-story business house, which is on a leased lot. Thej^ buy 
and slaughter nearly all the meats they sell. They also buy 
and handle fish, game and poultry and put up their own ice, 
and in the winter months make a specialty of curing meats. 
Mr. Walker, the junior member of the firm, attends largely to 
the buying of the stock consumed in the market. Much of 
this live stock is bought in Bedford county, Pennsylvania. Their 
market is indeed a model for neatness and well selected meats. 
Orders by telephone are promptly delivered about the borough, 
in seasonable market hours. 

Mr. Witt married, July 6. 1904, Lottie, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Shoemaker, farmers, living in IMilford township, Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania. By this union one child has been 
bom: Harold Edward, September 11, 1905. 

Of Mr. Walker, the junior member, it may be said that 
he was born May 23, 1858, the son of Levy and Mary Walker, 
of Somerset township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. He was 
reared to farm labor and still owns and operates a good farm 
in Somerset township, Somerset countv. He married, Mav 
31, 1885, Mary Etta Si)angler, daughter of Edward F. and 
Elizabeth Spanglor, and was born July 30, 1866. 

JOHN PUGH. 

The great-grandfather of John Pugh, of Somerset, was 
James Pugh, a native of Rhode Island, who came to Somerset 
about 1780. His wife was ]\rary Hulett. horn in New Jersey, 
and they had three sons: Hulett, James and Boaz. horn in 
New Jersey, whei-e their ])arenis were married, before they 
came to Somerset countv. 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 1«1 

Boaz Piigii, sou of James Pugli, was born in SomeTset 
coiiuty, aiid was all liis life a farmer aud a Republican. He 
married Susan Weigal, and their children were: Hulett, Salo- 
ma, Delila, Mary, John, of whom later; and Rachael. 

John Pugh, son of Boaz and Susan (Weigal) Pugh, was 
born October 15, 1833, in Somerset, and received his education 
in the common schools. After leaving school he assisted his 
father on the farm until the outbreak of the civil war, when 
he enlisted in Company A, Tenth Regiment, Pennsylvania Re- 
serves, and served live months, when he contracted typhoid 
fever and was discharged. He returned home, recovered his 
health, and in March, 1865, was drafted, being enrolled in Com- 
pany G, Eighty-eighth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. He 
served until the close of the war and was discharged June 30, 
1865. He returned to Somerset county, where he has since 
led a farmer's life. In politics he has always been a Repub- 
lican. 

Mr. Pugh married, March 18, 1858, Elizabeth, born in Ohio, 
daughter of William and Catharine (Boyer) Luke, and their 
children were: Edward, Sara C, Gerome F., S. S., Jennie 
B., wife of S. B. Huston; and Irvin W. All are deceased with 
the exception of Miss S. S. Pugh and Jennie B., wife of S. 
B. Huston, of Somerset, and has two children; Ruth and Paul. 
Mrs. Pugh, the mother of the family, died August 18, 1874, and 
her husband has since remained a widower, his household being 
presided over by his daughter. Miss S. S. Pugh. 

MARTIN A. RUTTER. 

Martin A. Rutter, a furniture dealer of Meyersdale, Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania, is a native of Huntingdon county, 
Pennsylvania, born December 9, 1844, son of William and Nancy 
(Rutter) Rutter, the former born in 1816, was a cabinet maker 
by trade and died in Huntingdon county in 1859. 

Martin A. Rutter attended the public schools until he was 
fifteen years of age, when he engaged in clerking in a general 
store at Altoona. In 1862 he accepted a position as traveling 
salesman, carrying a line of notions, etc., and in 1871-72 con- 
ducted this business on his own account. He removed to Ursina 
in 1873, and the following year went to Centerville. In 1875 
he located in Meyersdale, and for three years was occupied in 
clerking for Elias Miland and S. G. Hartley in their general 
stores. In 1878 he became interested in the Baltimore & Cum- 
berland Coal Company, and acted in the capacity of superin- 
tendent and general manager of same until 1884. He then be- 
came postmaster of Meyersdale, retaining this connection until 
1889, conducting in connection with the postofifice a stationery 
and wall paper business. He continued in the latter business 



182 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

until 1891, and then for five years was associated with Ken- 
nedy Price in the pUiuiiig- mill business. In 1896 he discontinued 
this* business and opened a furniture store in Meyersdale, in 
the conduct of which lie has since been very profitably engaged. 
He is a tliorough-going, alert business man, carrying a full 
line of tile best house lurnisbiiigs, and his store enjoys a gen- 
erous and ever increasing patronage. 

^Ir. Martin iiutter served in the army for eight months 
before the close of the war, a member of Company K, Seventy- 
eighth Volunteer Regiment of Pennsylvania. He enlisted in 
Bfair county in March, 1865, and was honorably discharged at 
Harrisburg in the fall of 1865. He is a Republican in politics, 
and was elected burgess in 1889, but being appointed post- 
master, resigned the former office. Fraternally he holds mem- 
bership in F. and A. M. No. 554, Hebron No. 272 and Odd Fel- 
lows of Meyersdale. In religious faith he is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

He married, February 5, 1873, Alma J. Walter, daughter 
of John and Phebe Walter, of Centerville, and their children 
were : Charles H., born November 24, 1873 ; William H., April 

4, 1875, married, in 1890, Leila Slicer, daughter of John H. 
Slicer, of ^leyersdale ; Nellie May, May 12, 1877, married, June 
30, 1904, Samuel H. Agnew, of Monessen ; Edna Grace, October 
26, 1880, man-ied, October 5, 1905, Daniel C. Keller, of Newark, 
Ohio ; AValter R., July 12, 1883 ; and Maude, 1886, died January 

5, 1890. 

AUSTIN ROY KERN. 

Austin Roy Kern, a grocer of Meyersdale, Somerset coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, was born in Blain, Perry county, August 28, 
1874, son of Simon P. and Olivia (Shaeffer) Kern, and grand- 
son of David Kern. Simon P. Kern was born in 1846 in Du- 
boyne township. Perry county, and was for eight or nine years 
engaged as a school teacher, but subsequently occupied him- 
self in the mercantile business. He was justice of the peace 
of Perry county for twenty years, and also served as school 
director and councilman. He married, in 1872, Olivia, the 
daughter of Daniel Schaeffer, who was county commissioner 
of Perry county. The following named were the children born 
of this union: Austin Rov, of whom later; Fred Alvin, born 
1876; Clyde Campbell, Frank Shaeffer, and Grace Viola. 

Austin Roy Kern received his initial education in the pub- 
lic schools, which he attended until ho was twenty-one years 
of age, and later attended the normal school at Millersville for 
two terms, and one term at Lock Haven. He then engaged in 
school teaching for three years, spending two terms in Blain 
and one term in Duboyne township. Mr. Kern then entered 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 183 

into the mercantile business in Dawson, Fayette county, and 
in 1S99 located in Meyersdale, where he opened the "Racket 
Store," on Center street. In 1902 he sold out this business 
and engaged in the grocery business, having his store on the 
south side, but now in the center of town. Mr. Kern is a thor- 
ough-going, capable business man, and has met with good suc- 
cess in his business career. 

He married, August 16, 1899, Sarah Florence Rickard, a 
daughter of J. C. Rickard, of Blain, Pennsylvania, and they 
have two children, viz.: Emil Rickard, born January 12, 1901; 
and James Simon, June 30, 1902. 

HORACE GREELEY WILL. 

Horace Greeley Will, a representative business man of 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was there born in Milford 
township, July 9, 1865, son of Allen S. and Ann R. (Walter) 
Will, and grandson of John Will, who was a farmer and one 
of the pioneer settlers of Milford township, coming there from 
Berks county,, Pennsylvania. He married Nancy Scott, and 
among their children was a son, Allen S. 

Allen S. Will (father) was also a native of Milford town- 
ship, born March 4, 1828. In his younger days he was a mer- 
chant, but he subsequently engaged in agricultural pursuits. 
He received his early education in the public schools and at 
Millersville Academy. He was for some time a student at 
Washington and Jefferson College, and for several years taught 
in the public schools. When the California gold fever was rag- 
ing, in company with two of his neighbors, he went to that state 
via the Isthmus of Panama, and for two years joined in the mad 
search for gold. Pie met with only moderate success and, his 
health failing, he returned to Pennsylvania. He was a Repub- 
lican, and in 1876-1877 was a member of the state legislature of 
Pennsylvania. He also served in many of the township offices. 
He was a member of the Lutheran church. His wife, Ann R. 
Walter, was a daughter of John Walter, of New Centerville. 
Their children: San Francisco, born July 9, 1854, married W. 
J. Kimmel, of Milford township: John A., born December 27, 
1856, died in 1883; he was principal of the Ursina schools; 
Viola M., born March 4, 1858, died in January, 1896; Martha 
A., born May 5, 1860, married M. M. Saylor, of Milford town- 
ship; Nina V., born June 12, 1862, married I. G. Miller, of Mil- 
ford; Horace Greeley, of whom later; Harriet B. S., born 
March 31, 1870, married George B. Saylor, of Meyersdale; 
Alice C, born October 5, 1871, wife of John L. Moore, of New 
Centerville; and Clifford A., born July 6, 1873, married Idella 
Saylor, daughter of Urias M. Saylor, of Middle Creek town- 
ship, and they live in Milford township on the old homestead. 



184 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Horace Greeley Will obtained his early intellectual train- 
ing in the common schools of his native place, remaining in 
school until he was sixteen years of age. He then engaged in 
farming during the summer months and teaching school during 
the winter months until 1889. He then entered Bethany Col- 
lege, remaining there from 1889 to 1891, inclusive, after which 
he engaged in teaching one year in the public school, and a 
number of years in the county normal. He then spent a year 
in traveling, going over the territory east of the Mississippi, 
and also Texas, Indian Territory and Oklahoma. He returned 
home in 1894, and engaged in farming until February, 1896, 
when he located in Meyersdale, where he established himself 
in the furniture business with Martin A. Rutter, under the 
firm name of Rutter & Will. Their business is a highly suc- 
cessful one, and they are accorded a generous trade. The 
firm is now Will & Saylor, Mr. Rutter retiring. 

Mr. Will is interested in various other enterprises, among 
them being the Meyersdale Manufacturing Company, of which 
he is secretary and treasurer, and the Second National Bank, in 
which he is a stockholder. Fraternally, he holds membership in 
the Knights of Pythias, Knights of Malta, I. 0. 0. F., Modern 
Woodmen of America, and A. 0. U. W. Politically he accords 
allegiance to the Republican party, and in religion is a member 
of the Christian church. 

He was united in marriage in August, 1895, to Sadie E. 
Moore, daughter of Cyrus P. Moore, merchant of New Lexing- 
ton, Somerset county, and of this marriage four children were 
born: Howard R., May, 1896; Mary, December, 1898; Lenore, 
February, 1901; Rebekah, July, 1903, and Louise, April, 1906. 

THE HAY FAMILY. 

The Hay family of Salisbury is of German origin and has 
been for at least a century and a half resident in Pennsylvania, 
being today one of the most numerous and best known in Som- 
erset county. 

(I) Simon Hay, who was born in Germany, emigrated thence 
in 1768. in company with his brother, John Francis Hay. Simon 
settled in the eastern part of Pennsylvania, where he followed his 
trade of weaver. While temporarily engaged in threshing he 
made the acquaintance of a man named Countryman, who as- 
sisted him in his labors. Countryman possessed a large tract of 
land in Brothers Valley township and offered such inducements 
to Mr. Hay as to cause him to migrate there and purchase a 
tract of three hundi-ed acres. On this land he erected a grist- 
mill, which he operated to his own advantage and that of his 
neighbors. He and his wife were the parents of the following 
children: Mary, Elizabeth, Catharine, Susan, Valentine, Jacob, 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 1«5 

George, Peter S., see forward; and Michael. Mr. Hay died in 
1842, at the extraordinary age of one hundred and three. 

(II) Peter S. Hay, son of Simon Hay, was born in 1789, 
in Brothers Valley township, and succeeded his father in the 
possession of the farm. After the death of his brother, Valen- 
tine, who operated the gristmill, this also came into his posses- 
sion by purchase. He and his wife were members of the Re- 
formed church. Mr. Hay married Elizabeth Walker, and their 
children were: David, see forward; Michael, Philip, Peter, 
Valentine, Mary, wife of Moses Young; Susan, wife of George 
Walker; Elizabeth, wife of John Rink; Catharine, wife of Fred 
Weller, and Caroline, wife of Samuel Saylor. Mr. Hay, the 
father, died in 1845. 

(III) David Hay, son of Peter and Elizabeth (Walker) 
Hay, was born September 3, 1814, in Brothers Valley township, 
and purchased of his father the gristmill, which he operated 
until about 1850, when he disposed of it and moved to South- 
ampton township, where he purchased a farm. Owing to the 
death of his wife shortly after, Mr. Hay abandoned farming 
and passed two years in teaching school and in other occupa- 
tions. After his second marriage Mr. Hay moved to a farm in 
Elk Lick township, which he greatly improved, erecting a house 
and outbuildings. He operated extensively in real estate, deal- 
ing in farms, not only in his. native state, but also in the west. 
He was a successful financier and settled numerous estates in a 
satisfactory manner. In 1857 he was elected to the state legis- 
lature on the Democratic ticket. He was a member of the Re- 
formed church and contributed two thousand dollars toward the 
erection of the present edifice. He also gave one thousand dol- 
lars to the church, in trust, the proceeds to be devoted to alle- 
viating the sufferings of the poor in the neighborhood. Mr. 
Hay was twice married. His first wife was Polly Cook, by 
whom he was the father of two sons: William H., and Calvin 
Theodore, see forward. After the death of his wife Mr. Hay 
married Mrs. Mary A. (Ranch) Boose, the issue of this mar- 
riage being one son, Norman D. The death of Mr. Hay occurred 
April 14, 1878. 

(TV) Calvin Theodore Hay, son of David and Polly 
(Cook) Hay, was born June 18, 1847, at Hay's Mill, Brothers 
Valley, and acquired a common school education. He began 
life as a farmer and after a few years moved to Ottawa, Frank- 
lin county, Kansas, where he also engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits. Thence he moved to Falls City, Richardson county, Ne- 
braska, where for three years he engaged successfully in pur- 
chasing and shipping grain. In 1878, in response to the urgent 
requests of his father, he returned home and once more became 
a farmer. In 1882 he moved to Salisbury and built his present 



186 BEDFOKD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

fine residence. He also erected Hay's block, in Salisbury. In 
December, 1904, he opened and has since operated a general 
department store in Salisbury. He has served as school direc- 
tor, councilman and tax collector. He affiliates with the I. O. 
O. F., and is a Democrat in politics. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Reformed church. 

Mr. Hay married, February 27, 1867, Duscilla, daughter of 
Samuel Devore, of Bedford county, and they were the parents 
of the following children: David Irving, see forward; Alice, 
wife of Lewis Keim, of Salisbury; Ora, wife of Charles May, 
barber of Salisbury; William, of Cumberland, Maryland, mar- 
ried Alice ; Edward lives in Idaho; Ira, at home; Grace, 

at home; Harriet, at home; Emma, deceased; Frances (Mrs. Dr. 
Hunter Perry) ; Ruth, at home; and Edna, at home. 

(V) David Irving Hay, son of Calvin Theodore and Dus- 
scilla (Devore) Hay, was born February 8, 1869, in Elk Lick 
township, and until the age of fifteen attended the public schools 
of his native place. He worked in the mines until 1888, when 
he opened a candy and cigar store in Salisbury, which he con- 
ducted until 1891. He was then clerk and bartender in the Hay 
House until July, 1904, when he became proprietor of the hotel. 
He has served two terms as councilman and one term as a mem- 
ber of the borough committee. He belongs to the Knights of 
Pythias and the Improved Order of Red Men, and is a Repub- 
lican. He and his family attend the Reformed church. 

Mr. Hay married, March 23, 1890, Edith Catharine, daugh- 
ter of Alfred Wagner, of Salisbury, and their children are: 
Harry, Lewis, Edith, Esther, Anna, George, and Imogene. 

LEVI LICHLITER. 

The paternal great-grandfather of Levi Lichliter, of Salis- 
bury, was a native of Germany, whence he emigrated to this 
country, settling in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and after- 
ward moving to Somerset county, where his son, Jacob Lich- 
liter, was born about 1792. Jacob Lichliter was a farmer and 
married Jemima Campbell, who bore him the following chil- 
dren: John C, see forward; Levi, Samuel, Elizabeth, Mary, 
and Catharine. After the death of his wife Mr. Lichliter mar- 
ried a Miss Williams, by whom he became the father of ten 
or twelve children. 

John C. Lichliter, son of Jacob and Jemima (Campbell) 
Lichliter, was born in 1815, in Upper Turkey Foot township, 
and was a farmer and also one of the first public school teachers 
in Somerset county. Mr. Lichliter married, about 1840, Susan, 
daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Younkin, of Upper Turkey 
Foot township, and their children were: Henry H. born in 
1841, farmer of Murphysburg, Illinois; Harriet, died in child- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 1ST 

hood; Levi, see forward; and Almira, bora December 8, 1847, 
wife of Walter Boucher, of Salisbui-y. John C. Lichliter died 
in 1853, at the early age of thirty-eight. His wife, Susan, died 

in 1890. ^^^ T X T • 1 

Levi Lichliter, son of John C. and Susan (Younkin) Lich- 
liter, was born November 16, 1845, in Upper Turkey Foot town- 
shi]), where he attended the public schools until 1862. He then 
began to teach at Walker's xMills, Addison township, and the tol- 
lowing year went back to Upi>er Turkeyf oot township, where he 
taught for another year, the next year teaching m Middle Creek 
township. In 1866 he went to Monona county, Iowa, where he 
taught during the summer in a school afterward presided over 
by Dwight Hillis, of New York. On returning home he taught 
in 1867-68 at Salisbury, there being then only one school m 
the town He then became clerk in a general store m Salis- 
bury, remaining until 1876, when he taught one tei-m at Elk 
Lick During tlie ensuing twelve years he taught at Salisbury, 
with the exception of one term, in 1884-85 in GrantsviUe. In 
1888 he established himself in the grocery and feed business 
with a capital of only five hundred dollars. His sales now 
amount to sixty thousand dollars yearly. In 1871-72 he held 
the office of burgess, and from 1880 to 1883 served as school di- 
rector From 1902 to 1905 he was president of the town coun- 
cil and since 1876 has held the office of justice of the peace. He 
is a charter member of Lodge No. 554, F. and A. M., and a Pro- 
hibitionist in politics. He is a member of the United Evangel- 

ical church 

Mr Lichliter married, July 11, 1869, Sarah A., daughter 
of John Smith, of Salisbury, and their family consists of the 
following children: Christian Stutzman, born May 8, 1870, is 
and has"been for manv years with the Merchants' Coal Com- 
pany of Salisbury ; he married Minnie, daughter of David Enos, 
of Cumberland: their children are: May, Lucille, Florede, 
Effie, Levi J., Wilbur, and David. Adeline, born May 30, 1871. 
Emily Katherine, born November 10, 1872, wife of Frank Ear- 
ner, of Salisbury; their children are: Glen, Mabel and Jean 
Earner. Edith, born February 26, 1874, teacher. John, born 
October 13, 1875, married Mary J., daughter of John Reese, of 
Salisbury; their children are: George and Reese. Elmira, 
born May 8, 1879, clerk. Francis J., born in 1877, died in 1879. 
William Cleveland, born April 2, 1884. 

WILLIAM WATSON STIVER. 

William Watson Stiver is a son of David Casper and Mary 

(Shartzer) Stiver. David C. Stiver was a native of Centre 

county, Pennsylvania, but came to Bedford when quite young. 

Here he learned the trade of a cooper, which occupation he fol- 



168 BEDJ^OKD AND !SOMEK!SET COUxXTlES 

lowed all liis life. For torty- years he made all the barrels used 
by the Anderson Ayres Company in shipping from Bedford 
►Springs the famous mineral waters of that noted resort. David 
C. was a Democrat and an active member and class leader of the 
Methodist church. He married Alary IShartzer, and to them were 
born twelve children, live of whom are living: William Watson, 
of whom later; Louise, widow of J. Erank Deal, of Bedford; 
ISamuel E., chief of police of Bedford; Margaret (Mrs. John 
Williamson), of Bedford; iioss A., liveryman of Bedford. David 
C. (Stiver died in lb8y ; his widow, Mary, survived him until 
1896. 

William W'atson Stiver, of Meyersdaie, was born October 
4, 18(J5, at Bedford iSprings, Pennsylvania, where he attended 
the public schools until the age of hfteen. He learned telegraphy 
with the Western Union Telegraph Company and for six years 
was manager of the Bankers ' He Alerchants ' Telegraph Company, 
of Newburg, Cumberland county. In 1885 he entered the service 
of the Western Union Telegraph Company at Eannettsburg, re^ 
maining two years, and in 1887 went to Bittsburg, where he be- 
came shipping clerk for A. M. Byers «& Company, tile and pipe 
manufacturers. This position he held until 1893, when he re- 
turned to Newburg, and after a few months moved to Newport, 
Perry county, where he entered the cigar and tobacco business. 
In lb9(i he sold out and moved to Greens burg, where he carried 
on the same business until 1898. He then returned to Bedford 
and temporarily retired. In 1899 he went to Meyersdaie and 
purchased the Keystone Hotel, of which he has since been the 
successful proprietor. He is a stockholder in the tSheet ISteei 
Company of Meyersdaie, and is a member of Lodge No. 503, 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, of Cumberland. In poli- 
tics he is a Democrat. 

Mr. Stiver married, October 13, 1892, Jennie Mabel, daugh- 
ter of A. J. iStauffer, of Newburg, Pennsylvania. Two children, 
Marguerite and Jjucy. 

AMMON W. AND JAMES A. POOKBAUGH. 

These two brothers, who are residents of Meyersdaie, are 
the grandsons of Samuel Poorbaugh, who was a farmer. He 
married a Miss liingler, by whom he was the father of the fol- 
lowing children: Benjamin, William Henry, of whom later; 
John O., Ellen, Lydia, Simon P., Mary, Samuel W., Jeremiah 
K., and Elizabeth. After the death of the mother of these chil- 
dren, Mr. Poorbaugh married the widow of Herman Heine- 
meyer, of Somerset county, the issue of this marriage being 
one daughter, Grace. 

William Henry I'oorbaugh, son of Samuel and 

(Kingler) I'oorbaugh, was born in November, 1841, in Stony 



BEDFOKD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 189 

Creek towusliip, and devoted himself to agricultural pursuits 
in eomiectiou with the lumber business. He served his town- 
ship in various capacities, among them that of school director, 
an office which he held for a number of terms. He was a mem- 
ber of the Keformed church, Sunday school superintendent for 
ten yeai's of Mt. Lebanon congregation. He was a Republican 
in poUtics. Mr. Poorbaugh married Sarah, daughter of Simon 
Bluebaugh, of Maryland, and their children were : Harvey E., 
Lucretia M., Amnion Weinbird, of whom later; Nettie, James 
Allen, of whom later ; Alvin P., Pearl E., and Foster T. The 
death of Mr. Poorbaugh occurred September 24, 1893. Mrs. 
Poorbaugh is still living, enjoying good health, at Meyersdale. 

Amnion Weinbird Poorbaugh and James Allen Poorbaugh, 
sons of William Henry and Sarah (Bluebaugh) Poorbaugh, 
were born in Northampton township, the former on May 9, 
1878, and the latter on July 24, 1881. Both attended school 
until about nineteen years old, and were engaged in business 
as butchers in connection with farming during the greater part 
of the time until February 1, 1905, when the butchery business 
of their father's estate was bought out by Ammon Weinbird 
Poorbaugh and W. V. Muhlenberg, under the firm name of 
Poorbaugh & Muhlenberg, The connection was maintained 
until June 10, 1905, when Mr. Muhlenberg sold his interest to 
James Allen Poorbaugh. It is located on the corner of Center 
and North streets, Ateyersdale. Both brothers are stockholders 
in the Economy Telegraph Company. Both are Republicans. 
Ammon Weinbird l^oorbaugh is a member of the United 
Brethren church and James Allen Poorbaugh belongs to the 
Reformed church. 

Ammon Weinbird Poorbaugh married, September 16, 1900, 
MoUie, daughter of Jacob Bowser, of Meyersdale, and they have 
one child, Jacob William, born June 28, 1901. 

James Allen Poorbaugh married, November 13, 1903, 
Norali, daughter of Herman Muhlenberg, of Northampton town- 
ship, and they are the parents of two children: Herman and 
Lulu. 

JEREMIAH J. LIVENGOOD. 

The famity of which Jeremiah J. Livengood, of Salisbury, 
is a representative, was founded in this country by the Rev. 
Peter Livengogd, who was one of the early settlers of Elk Lick 
township. In old records the name is spelled Liebenguth, Lie- 
beggood and Liebegoot. The Rev. Peter Livengood married, in 

Berks county, Pennsylvania, Barbara , and they were 

the parents of a large family, which formed a conspicuous ele- 
ment in the German population of Pennsylvania. Peter Liven- 



190 BEDt'OKD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

good died in liis one hundredth year, and his wife, Barbara, at 
ninety. 

Christian I.ivengood, son of Peter and Barbara Livengood, 
was born about 1775, in Berks county, and accompanied his 
father to Somerset county. He was one of the leading farmers 
and stockraisers of Elk Lick township. His wife was Eliza- 
beth Forney, and they were the parents of numerous sons and 
daughters. 

John C. Livengood, son of Christian and Elizabeth (For- 
ney) Livengood, was born in 1800, in Elk Lick township, and 
was a farmer and wagoner on the National Pike. He married 
Mary, daughter of Jolm Hershberger, of the same township, 
and their children were: Eliza, Nancy, Samuel, Jeremiah J., 
see forward; John, Sarah, Elizabeth, Peter, Mary, and Alex- 
ander. He was a German Baptist, a Whig and Republican, su- 
pervisor of township, and died in 1859. His wife survived him 
many years. 

Jeremiah J. Tjivengood, son of John C. and Mary (Hersh- 
berger) Livengood, was born January 1, 1835, and obtained his 
education in the public and subscription schools, walking five 
miles to school when but five years old. He attended srhool in 
winter and worked on his father's farm until attaining his ma- 
jority. He then went to work in a limestone quarry, contracting 
for one year. In 1857 he apprenticed himself to Samuel Lowry 
at four dollars a month, but had been with him only a short time 
when Mr. Lowry gave up the business, which was for one year 
thereafter conducted by Mr. Livengood in partnership with 
Samuel Meese. During the ensuing year he was variously em- 
ployed and then engaged in business for himself in Salisbury 
as carriage builder, where he has since been continuously in 
business, with the exception of eighteen months, during which 
time he was in business in Gebhardtsburg in the same line. 
About 18G8 he was elected burgess of Salisbury without any 
solicitation on his part, and received all but two of the votes 
cast. Jle served for six years and then refused re-election. He 
was again elected in 1900 for a term of three years, and in Feb- 
riiai'v, 1905, was appointed to that ollice in coiise(|uence of the 
rcsignaticm of his ])re(lecessor, serving in all twenty years. He 
has also filled the offices of assistant assessor and auditor of the 
boi-ougli. He is a Ivepnblican in ])olitics and a member of the 
Brethren church. 

Mr. Ijivengood married, .lamiai'v S, 1S59, Lydia, boi'ii No- 
vember 9, 18.34, daughter of Jacob Lichty, of iSalisbury, and 
they have been the parents of the following cliildi-en: True- 
man, born September 24, 18G0, died in infancy. Mnislijill, boiii 
Sej)tciiib('r 1^0. IHCl, is a conli-actor of house and caiiiagc paint- 
ing and resides in Meyersdalc lie is a iiicinhci- of the {{i-cjln-cu 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES li>l 

clmreli and a Republican in politics. He married Carrie, daugh- 
ter of John Ravenscraft, who bore him five children, one of 
whom is deceased. The surviving children are : Eugene, Mary, 
Gladys, Jennie. Mary, born December 11, 1865, wife of W. V. 
Williams, of Meyersdale, and mother of four children; Allan-, 
Harold, Anna and Irene. Emma, born October 10, 1870, wife of 
Frank Statler, of Salisbury, and mother of one child, Zilpah. 
Samuel L., born June 27, 1868, a blacksmith and carriage 
painter, a member of the Brethren church and a Republican. 
He married Millie, daughter of John Green, of Carlton, Ne- 
braska, and lives in Salisbury. Five children were born to 
them, one of whom is deceased. The surviving children are: 
Robert J., Mabel, Margaret and Ralph. Cora, born September 
13, 1875, married Alvin Kidner and lives in Salisbury. 

JOHN L. GLESSNER. 

John L. Glessner, of Berlin, is a son of Tobias Glessner. 
A full account of the Glessner family from the time of its found- 
ing in America, is given in the sketches of Tobias and Frank P. 
Glessner, which appear elsewhere in this volume. 

John L. Glessner was born October 25, 1858, in Stony Creek 
township, where his education was received in the public schools. 
He worked for his father until the age of twenty, when he 
married and rented a farm from his father. This he cultivated 
for five years, and then for two years was engaged in clearing 
the timber from a tract of one hundred and thirty acres pur- 
chased from his father. The land was heavily timbered with 
white pine and other trees. April 2, 1887, he purchased from 
the heirs of Ephraim Ross the farm on which he now resides; 
it is situated near Downey. His very neat and pretty home he 
built in 1888, erecting the barn the same vear. The farm is 
well stocked, having good orchards of apples and pears and a 
sugar camp of four hundred vessels. In addition to this prop- 
erty Mr. Glessner is the owner of another tract. For the last 
nine years he has been in the farm produce business, and every 
week throughout the year carries a load of produce to Johns- 
town. This business he conducts in connection with his farming 
enterprises and operations. He served at one time as super- 
visor and is a Democrat in politics. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Reformed church. 

Mr. Glessner married, November 25, 1877, Hattie J. Will, 
and their children are: Nellie E., born in 1878, wife of 
Merle R. Schrock, for fourteen years a teacher in the public 
schools, a practical surveyor, and a Republican. He and his 
wife live on the home farm and are members of the Reformed 
church. Ivy B., born January 15, 1887, wife of John T. Stutz- 
man, a farmer and a Republican. Both are members of the 



102 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Reformed church. Mrs. Glessner is a daughter of William C. 
and Sarah Will, the former a cooper by trade, a Republican and 
a member of the Lutheran church. He and his wife were the 
parents of eight children, among them, Hattie J., born April 9, 
]858, was educated in the township schools, and is the wife of 
John L. Glessner. Mr. Will died April 1, 1900, aged seventy- 
five years, and his widow, born September 30, 1826, resides with 
her daughter, Mrs. Glessner. 

EDGAR HOLMES MILLER. 

Edgar Holmes Miller, a druggist of Salisbury, is a descend- 
ant on the paternal side of natives of Ireland, and on the ma- 
ternal side of natives of Scotland, which countries have con- 
tributed their quota to the citizenship of America, the repre- 
sentatives therefrom being among the public-spirited and 
patriotic men who have aided in building up the communities in 
which they located. 

The earliest member of the Miller family on record in 
Pennsylvania was Christopher Miller, who was born east of the 
Alleghenies, of Irish ancestors. In 1782 he journeyed west and 
settled in Washington county, Pennsylvania, where he secured 
a "tomahawk claim" of four hundred acres. He married and 
was the father of four sons, each of whom received one hundred 
acres of the homestead farm. 

John Miller, one of the four sons of Christopher Miller, was 
born in 1780. He married, in 1802, Margaret Guy, born near 
Fredericktown, Maryland, who bore him six sons and one 
daughter. 

Christopher Miller, son of John and Margaret (Guy) 
Miller, was born in Donegal township, Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, February 14, 1811, on his father's farm, part 
of the original "tomahawk claim," and here he always lived. 
His wife, Sarah J. (Knight) Miller, bore him the following 
children: William, deceased; John, deceased; Calvin, Lehman, 
deceased; George, Charles W., see forward; Mary Jane, Mar- 
garet and Emily. 

Charles W. Miller, son of Christopher and Sarah J. 
(Knight) Miller, was born March 15, 1848. He was a miller 
by trade, but for many years has been a traveling salesman for 
a prominent wholesale house of Pittsburg. He resides in Clays- 
ville, Pennsylvania. He married Nancy Elizabeth Holmes, born 
May 28. 1852, and their children are: Edgar Holmes, see for- 
ward; Willard FT., a druggist of I-Jerlin; Alice Pearl, and Lulu 
Elizabeth. William Holincs, great-grandfather of Nancy E. 
(Holmes) ^Miller, was captain of a ship plying between Norway 
and Scotland. He was accidentally killed and was buried iii 
Norway about 1782. William Holmes, son of William Holmes, 



BKDFom) AXI) SOMKK^Sl^rr COUNTIES VJ3 

emigrated to the liiiited States in 1830, landing in New York, 
lie journeyed through Canada, seeking a location, returned to 
the United States by way of Niagara Falls, and finally decided 
to locate in AVasliiugton county, {Pennsylvania, where he se- 
cured a farm which has ever since been in the Holmes name. 
He returned to New York for his family, came by water to 
Baltimore, Maryland, and thence by wagon over the Cumber- 
land i-oad to Ciaysville. George Y. Holmes, son of William- 
Holmes, was born in Saltcoats, Scotland, May 13, 1820, a farmer 
of Ciaysville, married Elizabeth Snodgrass, and they were the 
parents of Nancy E. (Holmes) Miller. 

Edgar Holmes Miller, eldest son of Charles W. and Nancy 
E. (Holmes) stiller, was born in Dallas, Pennsylvania, January 
30, 1877. He attended the public schools, graduating from the 
high school of Ciaysville in 1897. The following year he en- 
tered the Pittsburg College of Pharmacy, from wiiich he gradu- 
ated in 1900. After completing his professional studies, Mr, 
Miller selected Salisbury as a location and there in August, 
1900, opened an up-to-date pharmacy, which is a model of ap- 
pointment and efficient service, and here he attained financial 
success. In April, 1905, in company with his brother, Willard 
H., be opened a drug store in Berlin under the firm name of 
Miller & stiller, and in Se):)tember, 1906, the firm added another 
store by the purchase of the drug business of W. C. Martin at 
Munhall, Pennsylvania, a business founded in 1875. Mr. Miller 
is a Republican and a member of the Reformed church. Al- 
though a young man and not long a resident of Somerset county, 
Mr. ]\Iiller has made for himself an honored name in the com- 
munity with which he has cast his lot and where his social and 
business qualities have won him many friends. 

Mr. Miller married, September 19, 1900, Mary Edith, born 
January 19, 1876, daughter of T. H. Sawhill, of Ciaysville. She 
was educated in the schools of Ciaysville. Their children are: 
Edgar Holmes, Jr., born June 10, 1903, and Darrell S., born 
June 20, 1904. 

NORMAN D. HAY. 

The family of which Norman D. Hay, of Meyersdale, is a 
representative, was founded in this country by Simon Hay, 
who was born near Berlin, Germany, and in 1763 emigrated to 
the American colonies in company with his brother, John Fran- 
cis Hay. Simon Hay settled first in the eastern part of Penn- 
sylvania, where he followed his trade of weaving. While tem- 
porarily engaged in threshing, he became acquainted with a 
man named Countryman, who was his assistant. Countryman, 
who was the owner of a large tract of land in Brothers Valley 
township, persuaded Mr. Hay to remove thither and purchase 
Vol. irr 13 



194 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

three hundred acres. On this Jand he built a gristmill and after- 
ward a fulling mill, which he operated to the advantage of him- 
self and his neighbors. He was the father of the following chil- 
dren: ^ran\ Elizabeth, Catharine, Susan, Valentine, Michael, 
Jacob, George, and Peter S., see forward. Mr. Hay, at the 
time of his death, which occurred in 1842, was more than a cen- 
tenarian, being one hundred and three years old. 

Peter S. Hay, son of Simon Hay, was born in 1789, and 
succeeded his father in the possession of the farm. He also 
came into possession of the gristmill on the death of his brother, 
Valentine, who had previously operated it. To the close of his 
life he was a farmer. He and his wife were members of the 
Reformed church. Mr, Hay married Elizabeth Walker, and of 
their twelve children the following reached maturity: David, 
see forward; Michael, Philip, Peter S., Valentine, Mary, Susan, 
Elizabeth. Catharine, and Caroline. Mr. Hay, the father, died 
in 1845, and his widow survived him many years, passing away 
in 1830. 

David Hay, son of Peter S. and Elizabeth (Walker) Hay, 
was born September 3, 1814, in Brothers Valley township, and 
purchased of his father the gristmill, which he operated until 
about 1850- In that year he disposed of the property and moved 
to Southampton township, where he purchased a farm, but in 
a short time, owing to the death of his wife, abandoned agricul- 
ture and passed two years in teaching school at a salary of ten 
dollars per month, and in other occupations. After his second 
marriage he moved to the farm in Elk Lick township now owned 
by his son, Norman D. Hay. The property then presented an 
uninviting appearance, but the aspect of things was soon 
changed by the fine buildings which Mr. Hay caused to be 
erected. In accomplishing this he was materially aided by his 
wife, who also furnished the plans for the erection of the house. 
Mr. Hay was largely interested in real estate, dealing in farms 
not only in his native state, but also in the west, and was a suc- 
cessful financier. He settled up numerous estates in a manner 
satisfactory to all concerned. In 1857 he was elected to the 
state legislature on the Democratic ticket. He was a member 
of the Reformed church, and not only gave two thousand dollars 
toward the erection of the present church edifice, but also one 
thousand dollars to the church, in trust, the proceeds to l)e de- 
voted to alleviating the sulTeriiigs of the ]ioor in the noiglibor- 
liood. 

Mr. Hay married I'olly Cook, who bore him two sons: "Will- 
iam H., and Calvin Theodore. Mrs. Hay died Septem])er, 1850, 
and ■Mr. Hay subse(|U0Titly man-ied Mrs. jNFary A. (Ranch) 
Boose, by whom he was the father of one son, Norman D., see 
forward. Mrs. Hay was born in 1825, and was a daughter of 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 105 

John Raucli, whose great-grandfather emigrated from Hagers- 
town, Maryland, to Brothers Valley township, where he was 
one of the first settlers. The first husband of Mrs. Hay was. 
John A. Boose, to whom she was married in 1846; his death 
occurring in 1847, when in his twenty-second year. He was a 
member of the Lutheran church. By her first marriage Mrs. 
Hay" was the mother of one son, John Ruf us Boose, recorder of 
Somerset countv. The death of Mr. Hay occurred April 14, 
1878. 

Norman D. Hay, son of David and Mary A. (Rauch) 
(Boose) Hay, was born October 2, 1854, on the homestead in 
Elk Lick township, where he attended the public schools until 
the age of nineteen. Upon the death of his father he took charge 
of the farm, of which he became the owner and which he has since 
retained and managed. The estate consists of two hundred 
acres. Since 1891 he has also owned and worked the Rauch 
farm in Brothers Valley township. He is interested in mineral 
lands in various parts of Somerset county. He is a stockholder 
in the Farmers' Bank of Somerset, a stockholder and director 
of the First National Bank of Salisbury, and vice-president of 
the Farmers' Union Association and Fire Insurance Company 
of Somerset County. For six years he held the office of school 
director. He is a Democrat and a member of the Reformed 
church, in which for six years he served as deacon, and for the 
last twenty years has been elder. 

Mr. Hay married, December 11, 1879, Agnes, born in 1856, 
daughter of John Glotfelty, who, when a lad of eleven years, 
carried the mail from Grantsville, Maryland, to Ebensburg, 
Cambria county, a distance of ninety miles, along unfrequented 
roads which crossed the Allegheny mountains, taking a week to 
make the trip. Mr. and Mrs. Hay are the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: Mary, born December 1, 1881; Blanche and 
Pearl (twins), March 21, 1886; Maude, November 30, 1889; and 
Florence, September 27, 1894. Of these children, Mary was 
educated at the AVoman's College, of Frederick, Maryland, and 
is engaged in teaching. Blanche and Pearl are graduates from 
the Salisbury high school. All are musicians, Mary, Pearl and 
Maude being pianists and Blanche a violinist. 

FREDERICK GROFF. 

Frederick Groflf, one of the leading merchants and repre- 
sentative citizens of Berlin, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, is 
a native of that town, and is of German descent. 

(I) Frederick Grotf, grandfather of Frederick Groff, and 
the founder of the family in America, was born in Bavaria, Ger- 
many, March 9, 1811. He married Christiana Slager, born in 



lin\ BKDFOKl) AXI) SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Bavaria, (ierraany, February 18, 1812, and they emigrated to 
this eountrv about 1835, and settled in Pennsylvania. 

(II) John A. Grolf, son of Frederick (1) and Christiana 
(Slater) Grofl', was born in Berlin, Somerset county, Pennsyl- 
vania, Februarv 1, 1841. He received a good education in the 
public schools of his native town. He enlisted, August '20, 18(32, 
in the Tnion army as a private in Com])any F, One Hundred and 
Forty-second Infantry Kegiment. Pennsylvania Volunteers. He 
was severely wounded in the thigh by a minie ball in the battle 
of Fredericksburg, and was sent to the hospital. After his re- 
covery he was transferred by general order No. 202, adjutant- 
general's oftice, to the Veteran Reserve Corps, Twelfth Regi- 
ment. Company A, Captain James Cromies, from which he was 
honorably discharged June 27, 1865. After the war he turned 
his attention to farming. He was a Republican for many years, 
but later in life became an adherent of the Prohibition party. 
He was a member and regular attendant at Trinity Lutheran 
church, and died November 13, 1902. John A. Groff married, 
February 9, 1868, Elnora Swope, born September 13, 1847, in 
Berlin, daugliter of Frederick Swope, born in Germany, August 
12. 1791, and his wife, Barbara, born in Germany. April 13, 1809. 
Mr. and ^Frs. Swope came to America when they were both very 
young. Mrs. Groff is a member of the Reformed church and 
resides in Berlin. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Groff were: 
Frederick Groff", of whom later; Augusta, now Mrs. C. C. Es- 
kens. of Berlin; John, married Lucy Ream. He is a clerk in 
Berlin: Sophia, married W. P. Walker, now living in Cedar 
Falls. Iowa: Edwin, died in childhood; Edna, wife of H. W. 
Musser. of Cedar Falls, Iowa; Harry, married Lizzie Feigley, 
and lives in Pittsburg; Frank, a clerk in Berlin; and Robert, a 
cigarmaker of Berlin. 

(Ill) Frederick Groff", son of John A. (2) and Elnora 
(Swope) Groff, was bom in Berlin, Somerset county, Pennsyl- 
vania, January 19, 1869. He was educated in the public schools 
of Berlin and was an earnest, studious pupil during his attend- 
ance there. He commenced his business career as clerk in some 
of the stores of the town, and. was thus occupied for about 
three years. During 1889-90 he taught school in Allegheny and 
Northampton townships. During the spring of 1891 he took a 
commercial course in the Iron Citv Business College in Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, in order to fit himself for a mercantile life. 
In the same year he opened a grocery store in Berlin, and this 
venture proved so successful that other de]iartments were added 
from time to time until now Mr. Groff is the ])roprietor of a 
finelv e(iuipped modern department store, which has succeeded 
the little grocery store, its progenitor. A large force of clerks is 
employed, exclusive lines of well known manufactures are han- 



I 



BKDFOIH) AXI) S(^MKirSF/r (U)IINTIKS 15^7 

died, and tlio goods are dis])layed in an elegant and attractive 
manner. Tliis i-esnlt has l»een achieved by close application to 
business, g-ood ])ractical methods, and a liberal use of modern 
advertising methods, in which Mr. (Jroft" is a firm believer. 
When the First National Bank was oi-ganized, Mr. Groff was 
chosen one of the directors and elected its first vice-president, an 
office he still fills ; he is also treasurer of the Co-operative Mutual 
Fire Insurance Comiiany of Somerset County, holding this 
office since the organization of the company in 1898. Since cast- 
ing his first vote Mr. Groff has been an ardent member of the 
Third Party Prohibitionists. P^or two years he was chairman 
of the county committee of that party, and a liberal contributor 
to its funds and success. He has been burgess of Berlin, and a 
councilman elected on the Prohibition ticket. He is a political 
enthusiast and fearlessly exi)resses his opinions, firmly believ- 
ing that Prohibition is the true solution of the liquor question. 
He is a member and steward of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
of which his wife is also a member. He is also a member of 
Lodge No. 461, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of W. 
E. Conrad Camp, No. 118, Sons of Veterans. 

Mr. Grot! married, November 8, 1890, Elizabeth J. Musser, 
born November 17, 1869, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth 
Musser, of Brothers Valley township, Pennsylvania. Mr. Musser 
was a farmer, a member of the Reformed church, and a Dem- 
ocrat. He died October 19, 1889. The children of Frederick and 
Elizabeth Groff are: Margaret Edna, born May 21, 1892; 
Eleanor Grace, Maj^ 19, 1894; Marion Elizabeth, June 9, 1898; 
Ena Gertrude, March 26, 1900. The children were all born in 
Berlin and are attending the public schools in that town. 

HIRAM P. HAY. 

The family of which Pliram P. Hay, of Berlin, is a repre- 
sentative, was founded in this country by Simon Hay, who came 
from Germany in 1763 and settled in the eastern part of Penn- 
sylvania, where he followed the trade of a weaver. He was 
induced to purchase a tract of three hundred acres in Brothers 
Valley township, and settled on the farm now owned by E. E. 
Boyer, erecting a gristmill, and afterward a planing mill. On 
the farm still stands the old stone house, erected in 1790, and 
today in good condition. Simon Hay and his wife, who was 
Miss Anna May, were the parents of the following children: 
Mar^^, Elizabeth, Catharine, Susan, Valentine, Michael, Jacob, 
George, and Peter, of wliom later. Mr. Play lived to be more 
than a centenarian, his death occurring in 1842 at the age of 
one hundred and three. 

Peter Hay, son of Simon Hay, was born in 1789, and suc- 
ceeded his father in the possession of the farm, and after the 



1^8 BEDFORD AND S()MP:1KSP:T COUNTIES 

death of his brotlier, Valentine, who operated the gristmill, this 
also came into his possession by purchase. The farm is now 
owned by his grandson. S. Sylvester. Mr. Hay and his wife 
were meml)ers of the Eeforiiied church. Mr. Hay married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Philip AValker, and of their twelve chil- 
dren ten reached maturity: ])avid, deceased; Michael, Philip, 
of whom later; Peter S., Mary. Susan, Elizabeth, Catharine, 
Valentine and Caroline. Mr. Hay's death occurred in 1845, 
and his widow survived until 1880. 

Philij) Hay, son of Peter and Elizabeth (Walker) Hay, was 
born April 3, 1820, on the homestead, and received a common 
school education. His farming operations were extensive and 
he was largely engaged in stock raising. He served the town- 
ship as assessor, and in early life was a Whig, but later became 
a Democrat. He was a member of the Hay's church congrega- 
tion of the Reformed church, which he served as deacon and 
elder, and was also connected with the Sunday school, taking 
the deepest interest in all branches of church work. Mr. Hay 
married, February 5, 1846, Anna dinger, born August 29, 1824, 
at Myersdale, and their children were: William P., farmer of 
Somerset county, has held various county and township offices, 
married Annie Cober; Sylvester S., lives on homestead, mar- 
ried Alice Berkley; Hiram P., of whom later; Peter S., farmer 
of Brothers Valley township, married Clara Walker; Melinda, 
wife of Millard Walker, farmer of Brothers Valley township; 
Clara A., wife of Wilson I]. W^alker, farmer near Berkley; P. 
Ephraim, farmer, lives with his brother, Sylvester ; Sarah,' wife 
of Lewis Berkley: Luke, lives at Myersdale, married Mary 
Miller; Ellen, died in 1860, at the age of ten years; Mark, died 
in infancy. The mother of these children died October 27, 1868, 
and the death of Mr. Hay occurred August 15, 1902. 

Eiram P. Hay, son of Philip and Anna (Olinger) Hay, was 
born April 8, 1852, on the homestead, and obtained his educa- 
tion in the common and normal schools. He remained at home, 
working on the farm, until coming of age, and then taught for 
three terms in the public schools. After his marriage he moved 
on the John I'ritz farm, where he remained three years. At the 
end of that time, in consequence of the death of his wife, he sold 
the property and returned to the profession of teaching. In 
1884 he bought the farm on which he has since resided, devot- 
ing himself to agricultural pursuits and to dealing in stock, 
being one of the largest dealers in horses, cows and all kinds 
of farm stock in the county. The estate consists of three hun- 
dred and seventy acres of fine farming and grazing land, hav- 
ing an abundance of fruit, principally apples, and a sugar camp 
of twelve hundred vessels, producing from three hundred to six 
hundred gallons of maple syrup yearly. Coal underlies the 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 199 

farm, the interest being retained by Mr. Hay. He is vice-presi- 
dent of the Philson National Bank of Berlin, and is also inter- 
ested in the Berlin Mercantile Company and the Berlin Im- 
provement Company. He was for several years president of 
the Union Association and Farmers' Fire Insurance Company 
of Somerset County. He has served the township as school di- 
rector and is a Democrat in politics. He is a member of tha 
Reformed church, of which he was formerly deacon and is now 
elder, being also superintendent of the Sunday school and tak- 
ing an active interest in the various religious and benevolent 
societies of the church. 

Mr. Hay married, September 20, 1877, Susan B., daughter 
of William Fritz, and they were the parents of one son, Edwin, 
who died in infancy. Mrs. Hay died in 1880, at the age of 
twenty-eight, and on May 9, 1884, Mr. Hay married Ida 
Walker, by whom he became the father of the following chil- 
dren: Alverta G., born March 16, 1885, educated in public 
schools and Woman's College of Frederick, Maryland; Walter 
E., born January 22, 1887, educated in common and normal 
schools of the county; Homer E., born December 4, 1894. All 
these children are at home with their parents. Mrs. Hay is a 
daughter of Hiram P. and Elizabeth Walker, of Summit town- 
ship, near Garrett. Mr. Walker is one of the wealthiest farmers 
of the county, and is prominent as a business man. He is a 
Democrat, and has served as deacon and elder in the Lutheran 
church. He and his wife are the parents of the following chil- 
dren: Foster, Norman, farmer of Brothers Valley township; 
Preston and Jared, farmers of Summit township; Bruce, mer- 
chant and coal operator of Garrett; Frank and Wallace, farm- 
ers of Summit township; Lily, who, with her brother, Wallace, 
lives at home ; and Ida, born June 22, 1865, received a good edu- 
cation and is a member of the Lutheran church. She is now the 
wife of Hiram P. Hay. 

JACOB M. KNEPPER. 

Jacob M. Knepper, one of the leading agriculturists of 
Stony Creek township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, who has 
been auditor of the township, is at present serving his second 
term as school director, and has held many other positions of 
trust and responsibility in that section of the country, is a repre- 
sentative of a family which has been located in Somerset county 
for four generations, and which has done its full share toward 
the improvement of the agricultural interests of that district. 

(I) John Knepper, great-grandfather of Jacob M. 
Knepper, was born in 1765, and removed to Somerset county. 
He located in Brothers Valley township, and was a shoemaker 
by trade. He married Anna Maria Glessner, and had children : 



200 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

William, who served with honor in the war of 1812 ; Jacob, John, 
of whom later; Lewis, Peter, Jonathan, George, Simon, Henry, 
Benjamin, Elizabeth (Mrs. Hanger), Catherine (Mrs. Hay), 
and Polly (Mrs. Haas). 

(II)' John Knepper, son of John (1) and Anna Maria 
(Glessner) Knep])er, was born in Somerset county, 1795. He 
was the first Abolitionist in P>rothers Valley, and the only voter 
in tlie township who cast his ballot for the Free Soil candidates. 
He married Susan Stahl and had children: Lewis J., of whom 
later; Solomon, David, John, Peter, James, Sarah (Mrs. Cole- 
man), Elizabeth (Mrs. Graham), Rebecca (Mrs. Cober), Polly 
(Mrs. Smith), and Susan (Mrs. Myers). John Knepper, father 
of the above-named children, died in 1857. 

(Ill) Lewis J. Knepper, eldest child of John (2) and 
Susan (Stahl) Knepper, was born in Brothers Valley town- 
ship, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, November 29, 1819. He 
was educated in the public schools of the township, in which he 
afterward taught for twenty-one years. Abandoning the pro- 
fession of teaching, he turned his attention to farming, which 
occupation he followed for the remainder of his active work- 
ing years. In politics he was a Republican, and during his life 
held many township offices. He connected himself with the 
German Baptist church in early life, died in that faith, having 
held the office of deacon in his church for thirty-five years. He 
was greatly interested in all branches of church and charitable 
work and assisted his pastor. Rev. William C. Schrock, to es- 
tablish the first Sabbath school in the Brothers Valley congre- 
gation. He married (first), September 9, 1849, Magdalena Mey- 
ers, born January 24, 1824. daughter of Jacob and Hannah 
(Ijichty) jMeyers, and had children : Mary x\. ; Jacob M., of 
whom later; Solomon M. ; William M., deceased; Elizabeth S., 
Ellen R. and Emanuel L., of whom a sketch appears elsewhere 
in this work. Mrs. Knepper died October 20, 1865. Lewis J. 
Knepper married (second) Elizabeth Walker, and had children: 
Charles W. and Edward, both farmers in Brothers Valley, and 
Henry and Emma, who died in childhood. 

CIV) Jacob M. Knepper, second child and eldest son of 
Lewis J. (3) and Magdalena (Meyers) Knepper, was born on 
the old Good farm, now owned by Wesley Landis, October 19, 
1851. He received a good educational training in the public 
and normal schools of Berlin, and ([ualified for the profession of 
teaching. At the age of seventeen he began the active work of 
teaching in the Brothers Valley schools, where he labored with 
success for five years, then for four years in the schools of 
Stony (^reek township. At the end of this period he farmed 
for one year with Jaciob Reiman, and in 1877 bought from Elias 
Layman his present farm, where he has since resided. This 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 201 

farm is a good one of two Imndred and fifty acres, well stocked 
with a fine grade of farm cattle. Mr. Knepper is also extensively 
engaged in stock dealing and feeding. On the farm is a sugar 
camp of four hmidred vessels that has produced one thousand 
pounds in one season. It has an abundance of fruit of all kinds, 
but principally apples. He has greatly improved the farm by 
draining and tiling tlie bottom lands and converting them into 
profitable hay fields. The farm house was entirely, remodeled 
in 1903 and is now a very attractive and comfortable dwelling, 
and the outbuildings are ample and well constructed. Mr. Knep- 
per keeps well abreast of the times and is always ready to in- 
troduce any improvement or invention which appeals to him 
as being a practical labor and time saving device. His activi- 
ties are not confined exclusively to the farming interests, but 
branch out in various directions. He was a director of the 
Union Association and Farmers' Fire Insurance Company of 
Somerset county for ten years, is interested in the First Na- 
tional Bank of Berlin, also in the Economy Telephone Company 
of Meyersdale. He has held other positions of trust and has 
settled several estates. In politics he is a Republican and has 
served as auditor of the township and is now serving his sec- 
ond term as school director. He is a member of the German 
Baptist church, in which he has officiated as deacon, and is a 
teacher in the Sabbath school connected with it, where he has 
served very acceptably as superintendent. 

He married, March 12, 1875, Susan Reiman, born March 12, 
1852, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Reiman, of Stony Creek 
township. She was educated in the public schools and is a mem- 
ber of the German Baptist church. Their children are : Homer 
R., born September 1, 1876, educated in the common and nor- 
mal schools of the township. He taught for five years in the pub- 
lic schools of Stony Creek, is now (1906) a farmer in that 
township. He married, March 21, 1899, Laura J. Shober, daugh- 
ter of S. V. Shober, and they have children: EUwood S., Clar- 
ence J. and Edna S., who died in infancy; Alvin R., born Sep- 
tember 14, 1881, educated in the public schools and is now a 
farmer. He married, September 27, 1901, Mary S. Myers, 
daughter of Joseph Myers, of Milford, and they have children: 
Myers E. and Leora E, 

RICHARD T. POLLARD, M. D. 

The career of Dr. Pollard, of Garrett, is a striking instance 
of the possibility for a young man of energy, perseverance and 
good character to rise superior to his circumstances and en- 
vironment and to make for himself an honored position in any 
community. 

Richard T. Pollard is descended from a familv of mine 



202 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

workers of Cornwall, England. His father, Thomas Pollard, 
was a tin dresser at the Cornwall tin mines. He was a fairly 
well educated man and a member of the Primitive Methodist 
church. He and his wife, Elizabeth Pollard, were the parents 
of six children, all of whom attained years of maturity, and 
three of whom came to America : William, deceased ; Elizabeth 
Jane, deceased, and Richard T., whose name heads this sketch. 
Thomas Pollard died in England, 1886. 

Richard T. Pollard was born at Chacewater, Cornwall, 
England, November 24, 1848. He had none of the advantages 
of early education, but from youth worked in the tin and cop- 
per mines of his native country. He came to America at the age 
of twenty, and at that time did not know his multiplication table 
and was equally backward in all other branches. He first went 
to Hibernia, Morris county, New Jersey, where he was em- 
ployed in the mines until 1871, when he came to Somerset, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, and entered the employ of 
William H. AVelfley, the author of this history. He assisted him 
in his photographic work for about one year, and for several 
years thereafter mined and farmed in the southern part of 
the county. In 1889 he began the study of medicine at the 
Baltimore Medical College. In the years since 1871, when he 
began his studies under L. A. Smith, editor of the Meyersdale 
Commercial, he had studied and earnestly applied himself at 
all possible times to improve his mind. He denied himself all 
pleasures and luxuries in order to further the object he had in 
view, namely, the securing of an education. He spent two years 
in Baltimore Medical College, graduating therefrom in 1891. 
He then entered Western University of Pennsylvania, complet- 
ing his course there in 1893 and obtaining his diploma as a regu-. 
lar practitioner of the allopathic or old school of medicine. 

Dr. Pollard began practicing his profession at Hagers- 
town, Maryland, where he remained two years. He then located 
in Garrett, Pennsylvania, where he has practiced very success- 
fully for the past thirteen years, and has proved the wisdom of 
his choice of a profession. He is a member of the state and 
county medical societies, the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Sur- 
geons' Association, and is local surgeon for the Baltimore & 
Ohio railroad at Garrett. He is an elder of the German Bap- 
tist Brethren church and frequently fills the pulpits of that de- 
nomination. He belongs to the Berlin congregation. In j^olitics 
he is a Republican and has served his borough as councilman 
and school director. 

Dr. Pollard married, May 2, 1879, Mrs. Hannah Kimmel, 
widow of Peter Kimmel, of P^lderton, Armstrong count}^, Penn- 
sylvania. She is a daughter of Joseph and Catherine Shoe- 
maker. By her first marriage there was one child, Ida, wife 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 203 

of William H. Miller, of Garrett. The children of Dr. and Mrs. 
Pollard are: Thomas S., a miner, married Ida Walter, and their 
children are Richard, William and Goldie. Lee W., a druggist 
of Garrett, married Rosa McQuaide, and they have one child, 
Richard E. Pollard. Dr. Pollard has a well appointed home m 
Garrett, where he also has his office, and here he is enjoying the 
comforts and pleasures made possible by his earlier years of 
self-denial and earnest effort. 

RUFUS M. BEACHY. 

Rufus M. Beachy, an active and successful veterinary sur- 
geon of Meversdale, was born in Garrett county, Maryland, 
Januarv 30, 1867. He is a son of Manasses J. and Elizabeth 
(Heddings) Beachy, and a grandson of Jonas and Sarah 
(Gnagey) Beachy.^ Jonas Beachy was of Pennsylvania birth, 
but his parents were natives of Germany. He lived the life 
of a Maryland farmer and was a minister and bishop of the 
Amish church. He died in Maryland (in which state his wife 
also died), aged eighty-six years, and when eighty-five he 
walked seven miles to preach to his people on the Sabbath. 

Manasses J. Beachy (father) was a farmer in Elk Lick 
township, where lie was born. His education was obtained in 
the subscription schools, and his early life was spent on the 
farm, which lay along the state line. He had some skill as a 
veterinarian and practiced to some extent among the farmers 
of that region. Part of his time he lived in Maryland, where 
some of his children were born. He was a Republican, and, 
like his father, was a minister and bishop of the Amish people, 
comprising the Elk Lick congregation. His first wife was Bar- 
bara Swartzendruber, by whom he had one child, Anna (Mrs. 
John K. Yoder, of Allensville, Mifilin county, Pennsylvania). 
His second wife was Elizabeth Heddings, who bore him the fol- 
lowing children: Rufus M., of whom later; Amos, deceased; 
Lewis, a farmer of Preston county, Virginia ; Moses, who farms 
the old homestead; Phoebe, deceased (Mrs. Peter Smoker); 
Alvin, a farmer of Oregon; Mary, deceased (Mrs. Jonas M. 
Yoder). Manasses J. Beachy died June 21, 1895. His widow, 
Elizabeth (Heddings) Beachy, became Mrs. Samuel J. Miller 
and lives near Springs, Pennsylvania. 

Rufus M. Beachy was educated in the public schools of the 
township. His early life was spent on the farm; in fact, nearly 
all his life has been spent in and around it. He early began to 
accompany his father on his visits, and when but thirteen years 
old was sent alone to attend a sick horse. He treated the case 
successfully, staying with his patient all night. From that time 
until the present (1906) he has followed the veterinary profes- 
sion, and it may truly be said that he has grown up in it. The 



204 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

practical knowledge gained from actual experience has been 
supplemented hv an extensive course of professional reading 
and study, and now he has a large and successful practice that 
occupies his entire time. His office and laboratory in Meyers- 
dale are well equipped with instruments, remedies and an ex- 
tensive library of works pertaining to his profession. He sold 
his farm in 1904, which was the home farm, purchased at the 
time of his marriage, and which he cultivated in connection with 
his veterinary work, also his lime and stone business, in order 
to devote his entire time to his profession. 

Mr. Beachy married, December 23, 1888, at the age of 
twenty-two. I.ydia, born October 13, 1866, daughter of Emanuel 
and Mary (Miller) Heishberger, from Grantsville, Maryland. 
Their children were: Jonas, born December 31, 1889; John, 
born May 7, 1891, died July 3, 1894; Noah, born September 22, 
1896, died in infancy. 

JOHN M. LAMBERT. 

John M. Lambert, of Lambertsville, is descended from an- 
cestors who were among the pioneers of Stony Creek township. 
About 1789 three brothers, John, George and Jacob Lambert, 
came from York county and took up lands in Stony Creek and 
Shade townships. John, who settled in Stony Creek, married 
Mary Statler, who bore him the following children: Samuel, 
of whom later; Jacob, John, Moses, Mary, Samuel and Cath- 
arine, wife of Solomon Kimmel. 

Samuel Lambert, son of John and Mary (Statler) Lambert, 
was born in Stony Creek township and was the owner of a 
large estate, including about six hundred acres of fine timber 
land. He was a Whig and a member of the Reformed church. 
He married Sarah Good, by whom he was the father of the fol- 
lowing children: Josiah, Aaron, Rebecca, Sarah; Abraham, in 
honor of whom Lambertsville received its name; John; Samuel, 
of whom later; Moses, George and Mary, wife of Cyrus Berke- 
bile. Mr. Lambert died in 1869, aged seventy-five years. 

Samuel Lambert, Jr., son of Samuel and Sarah (Good) 
Lambert, was born November 7, 1826, where Lambertsville now 
stands, and attended the public schools of the township. His 
trade, which was tliat of a wagonmaker, he followed all his life 
in his native town. He was also the proprietor of a sash factory. 
He held the office of tax collector. He was originally a Whig, 
but later became a Republican. His religious belief was that 
of the German Refoi-med church, in which he served as deacon. 
Samuel Lambert, Jr., mai-ried Nancy E. Mostoller, born No- 
vember 7, LS36, and i-eceived her education in the public schools. 
She was a daughter of Joseph Mostoller, born May 5, 1800, and 
married Sarah Mowrv. Mr. Mostoller died December, 1889. 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 205 

Mr. and Mrs. Lambert were the parents of the following 
children: Edward M., lumberman of Berlin, married Annie 
Fritz; Calvin; Francis Orange, died in childhood; Cyrenius A., 
died at the age of sixteen; Azariah, died at the age of thirty- 
four : Lorenzo, farmer in Wisconsin, Republican, married Mary 
Hayes and has two children, Hayes and Ray; Jarius, lumber- 
man of Kimmelton, Republican, married Annie Woods and after 
her death Clara Wright; children of first marriage, Homer and 
Percy, and those of second, Arlington and Mildred; Ellsworth 
J., farmer of Stony Creek township, Republican, married Mag- 
gie Gohn, and after her death Bertha Cook; children of first 
marriage, Bertie Orange, Ida and Guy; Irvin L., miner of 
Downey, Republican, married Kate Landis and has three chil- 
dren, George, Blanche and Lee; Sidney, professional nurse, 
graduate of Memorial Hospital, Johnstown; John M., of whom 
later. Mr, Lambert, the father of the family, died October 7, 
1897, and his widow resides with her youngest son. 

John M. Lambert, son of Samuel and Nancy E, (Mostol- 
ler) Lambert, was born June 11, 1870, in Lambertsville, and 
obtained his education in the common and normal schools, where 
he qualified as an instructor. At the age of seventeen he com- 
pleted his education, and for five years thereafter was engaged 
in teaching. When twenty-two years old he entered the rail- 
way postal service, having the year before passed the civil serv- 
ice examination in Pittsburg. He was first employed in the 
Pittsburg & Fair Chance railway postoffice, where he re- 
mained sixteen months. At the end of that time he was trans- 
ferred to the New York and Pittsburg railway postoffice. On 
this exceedingly important and difficult run he remained six 
years and then secured a transfer to the Johnstown and Rock- 
wood railway postoffice, where he was employed six years. Mr. 
Lambert is extensively interested in lumbering, his associate in 
the business being his brother Jarius. The firm has a tract of 
sixty acres of timber land, and a sawmill at Mostoller Station, 
where they saw and ship- the manufactured timber, pine, hem- 
lock, oak and other hardwoods forming the principal output of 
their mill. Mr. Lambert resides on a tract of twenty acres, 
which he purchased of his father, the farm producing an abund- 
ance of fruit of all kinds. He is a life member of Johnstown 
Lodge, No. 175, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. In poli- 
tice he has always affiliated with the Republicans, having cast 
his first presidential vote in 1892 for Benjamin Harrison. 

Mr. Lambert married, July 2, 1895, Ora Goodrich, and their 
children are : Quay, born December 30, 1896, and Evelyn, born 
November 17, 1902. Mrs. Lambert is a daughter of Augustus 
and Matilda Goodrich, the foiTaer a lumberman of Indiana 



206 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

counh^ Pennsylvania. She was born December 11, 1874, was 
educated in the public schools and is a member of the Presby- 
terian church. 

EDAVARD G. MOSTOLLER. 

Edward G. Mostoller, of Mostoller, is a grandson of John 
Mostoller, who passed his entire life as a farmer in Somerset 
county. His son, George Mostoller, was bom in 1802 in Stony 
Creek township and was a cabinetmaker, lumberman and 
farmer. His political affiliations were first with the Whigs and 
later with the Republicans. He was a member of the AUbright 
church. George Mostoller married Bevy Custer and they were 
the parents of one child, Edward G., of whom later. Mr. Mos- 
toller died, November 22, 1872, from the effects of injuries re- 
ceived from an infuriated bull. 

Edward G. Mostoller, son of George and Bevy (Custer) 
Mostoller, was born July 20, 1838, on the farm where he now 
resides. His educational opportunities were very limited, being 
restricted to attendance at school during two winters, but in 
after life he found means of supplying his early deficiencies. He 
remained with his father, working on the farm and running the 
saAvmill, until the age of twenty- two, when he married, and on 
the death of his father, being the sole heir, he came into pos- 
session of the estate. In addition to the homestead, which con- 
sists of three hundred and fifty-two acres, he is the owner of a 
timber tract of three hundred and twenty-one acres and an- 
other of three hundred acres, with the sawmill. All these are in 
Stony Creek to^vnship and were owned by his father in part- 
nership with others. After his father's death they were sold 
and were awarded to Mr. Mostoller as the highest bidder. The 
latter is the owner of still another tract of timber (principally 
yellow pine) of four hundred acres, situated in Shade township. 
The homestead farm is well timbered, thoroughly stocked, and 
the improvements are of the best. In 1884 Mr. Mostoller built, 
at Mostoller Station, a large flouring mill, which he equipped 
with the new roller process machinery, making it the best mill 
property in the state at that time. The mill is not now in op- 
eration. Mr. Mostoller is interested, with others, in a tract of 
three thousand acres of coal land in West Virginia, and also in 
a company drilling for oil wells in Somerset county. For the 
last sixteen years he has conducted a grocery store at the sta- 
tion in connection with the postoffice, of which he has been post- 
master since 1889, the office having come to hira unsolicited. 
Politically he is a Republican. He and his wife are members ol 
the Evangelical church, of which he is a trustee. 

Mr, Mostoller married, February 20, 1860, Lavinia, born 
April 1, 1841, daughter of John Swank, farmer of Somerset 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 207 

township, and their children are: Elizabeth, became the wife 
of Joseph Lambert, a farmer of Stony Creek township; they 
had two children, Arthur and Leroy. Mrs. Elizabeth Lambert 
died February 6, 1884. John E., born December 8,^ 1861, is a 
mill worker of Kimmelton, Pennsylvania, a Republican and a 
member of the Evangelical church. He married Sarah E., 
daughter of Albert Wright, and has five children: Marietta, 
Clara F., George M., Albert W. and Alma Z. Irvin, died in child- 
hood. Catharine J., died in childhood. Martha, died in child- 
hood. George G., born March 5, 1868, millworker of Mos- 
toller, Republican, married Ida Lear and has two children, Darl 
and Earl. Winton R., born April 22, 1873, fireman on Balti- 
more & Ohio railroad. Republican. Sylvester H., born Sep- 
tember 22, 1876, lives at Mos.toller, fireman on Baltimore & 
Ohio railroad, Republican, married Elizabeth Critchfield and 
has three children: Pearl, Martha and Meredith. Minnie J., 
born February 28, 1879, wife of Peter Zimmerman, died Novem- 
ber, 1902, leaving one child, Melda May. Ida F., born Septem- 
ber 25, 1882, living at home. These children were all educated 
in the common and normal schools of the county. 

JOHN 0. REAM. 

John 0. Ream, of Berlin, is a great-grandson of Michael 
Ream, who was a manufacturer of hats in Berlin, Pennsyl- 
vania, moving thence to Berlin, Ohio, where he passed the re- 
mainder of his life, his death, occurring at an advanced age. 

Joseph Ream, son of Michael Ream, was born November 
23, 1800, at Berlin, where he followed his trade of hatter. He 
was a Democrat. He married, about 1822, Elizabeth Zorn, 
born August 31, 1802, and their children were: Sarah, widow 
of Peter Zimmerman, lives in Stoystown; Charles, of Berlin, 
married Mary Shaffer, and after her death Emma Rhodes; 
William, of Boswell, married Mary Meyers, and after her death 
the widow of Henry Penrod ; Philip, of Portland, Oregon, mar- 
ried Lydia Black; Daniel, married Catharine Bill, and after 
her death Lizzie Homer, and died in 1904, aged seventy-five; 
Catharine died in 1905, aged seventy-three, wife of Philip Cole- 
man; Barbara died in infancy; Michael, of whom later; Joseph, 
killed in the battle of Gettysburg; Jane, widow of Joseph Im- 
hoff, lives in Berlin; Jacob, of Berlin, married Elizabeth Sny- 
der, and after her death Harriet Gumbert. By a remarkable 
coincidence the father and mother of this family expired on 
the same day, November 26, 1863, 

Michael Ream, son of Josei^h and Elizabeth (Zorn) Ream, 
was born November 5, 1834, and learned the carpenter's trade, 
being for twenty years thereafter engaged in erecting buildings 
in Somerset county. In 1862 he was married, and the follow- 



2u8 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

ing day — August 20- -enlisted in Company F, One Hundred 
and Forty-second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. While 
engaged in heljnng to build one of the forts erected for the de- 
fense of Washington, he was injured by a falling tree, and was 
subsequently transferred to the One Hundred and Ninth Com- 
pany, Second Battalion, Invalid Corps. At the close of the 
war lie was lionorably discharged. After his return home 
Michael engaged in farming near Berlin, and in 1890 entered 
into iiartnership with his son, John 0., first in meat dealing 
and afterward in the livery business. In 1898 he sold his in- 
terest, and is now leading a retired life at Berlin. His resi- 
dence, built in 1902, is in the eastern part of the town, and is 
a very attractive, pleasant home. He is a Prohibitionist and 
a member and trustee of the United Evangelical church. 

Mr. Ream married, August 19, 1862, Mary, born October 
26, 1838, daughter of John and Eve (Zerfoss) Shaffer, the 
former a farmer of Somerset township and a Democrat. He 
and his wife were members of the Lutheran church. Their 
daughter Mary was educated in the public schools. Mrs. Shaf- 
fer lived to be ninety-one and her husband passed away at the 
age of ninety-two. The family of Michael and Mary Ream 
consists of the following children: Irvin, born April 14, 
1865, Democrat, married Belinda Snyder and has six children; 
Susan B., born November 13, 1866, deceased; Darley Alice, 
born February 1, 1868, member of United Evangelical church, 
married Herbert Strawn, and after his death Milton Landis, 
four children by first marriage and two by second; John 0., 
of whom later; Mary E., born October 26, 1871, member of 
United Evangelical church, wife of Nevin Allfather, of Berlin, 
has three children; Hiram L., born March 26, 1874, of Berlin, 
Re])ublican, married Gertrude Urhardt, has three children; 
Florence, born October 13, 1875, member of United Evangelical 
church, wife of Franklin Zorn, of Berlin, has three children; 
Cloyd Sylvester, born September 30, 1877, at home. Democrat; 
Lucy E., born December 4, 1880, member of United Evangelical 
church, wife of John Groff, clerk in Groff' s Department Store, 
Berlin, has one child. xVU these children were educated in the 
township and Berlin schools. The mother of the family is a 
member of the Lutheran church. 

John 0. Ream, son of Michael and Mary (Shaffer) Ream, 
was born September 20, 1869, near Berlin, in Brothers Valley 
township, where he received his education in the connnon 
schools, afterward attending the Berlin Normal school. He 
worked on his father's farm until the age of twenty, when he 
went to Mount Savage, Maryland, and there learned the busi- 
ness of a butcher under the instruction of Joseph Snyder. In 
1890 he returned to Berlin and entered into i)artnership with 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 209 

his father, opening a meat market and restaurant under the 
firm name of Ream & Son. This connection was maintained 
eight years and the business prospered. In 1895 the firm 
added to their establishment a livery stable, whicli has proved 
a very good investment, and in 1898 Mr. Ream purchased his 
father's interest, thus becoming sole owner. In 1903 he erected 
a modern bakery, which was successful from the start and 
gives constant work to the men employed there. In addition 
to supplying the town daily with meats and bakery products, 
the wagons make daily trips to the mines and surrounding vil- 
lages. The livery business has grown to large proportions, re- 
quiring from fifteen to twenty horses to meet the demands. 
The restaurant was abandoned some time ago, and the grocery 
business, which was carried on in connection with the meat 
market, is now in process of closing. The market is situated 
on Berlin's main street and has recently been enlarged and 
refitted. There Mr. Ream has his office and transacts the busi- 
ness of his different enterprises, which are all in a flourishing 
condition. He owns the Knepper farm of two hundred acres, 
near Berlin. This estate is partially worked, but is used chiefly 
as a stock farm, where Mr. Ream fattens the cattle which he 
has purchased elsewhere by the carload for the retail trade. 
He also owns and rents a two-siory brick residence adjoining 
his market property. The bakery is situated in the east part 
of the town and is a residence and bakery combined. 

Mr. Ream has served the town three years as auditor, and 
for three terms has been councilman of the borough. He be- 
longs to Berlin Post, Sons of Veterans, and is a Democrat in 
politics. He is a member and trustee of the Lutheran church 
and also a teacher in the Sunday school. He is unmarried. 

TOBIAS GLESSNER. 

The family of which Tobias Glessner, of Berlin, is a rep- 
resentative, was founded in this country by Jacob Glessner, a 
native of Germany, who emigrated to the American colonies 
about 1735 and settled on a farm near Berlin, where for more 
than half a century he was loved and respected by all his neigh- 
bors. He was an elder of the Berlin congregation of the Re- 
formed church, the pastor of this church, in 1794, being Cyri- 
acus Spangenberg, a Hessian who had come to America with 
the British army and had by some means contrived to receive 
ordination in the Reformed church. His congregation, on dis- 
covering that their pastor was a man of bad character, called 
a meeting for the purjiose of removing him, and just before a 
vote was taken Elder Glessner arose and briefly stated that, in 
his opinion, the best interests of the church would be served 
by the removal of the minister. On heai-ing this Spangenberg, 

Vol. Ill 14 



210 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

who was present, drew a dirk which he had concealed about 
him, and rushing upon the elder, stabbed him to the heart. 
This tragedy resulted in the execution of the murderer April 
11, 1795, at the jail in Bedford. Every effort was made by his 
friends to save him, an appeal being made to President Wash- 
ington, who returned the papers, saying that there was no 
ground for either pardon or comnmtation of the sentence. 

Joseph Glessner, son of Jacob Glessner, was a farmer and 
miller of Stony Creek township, adhered to the Democratic 
party and was a member of the Reformed church. He married 
Lena Faust, and their children were: Jacob, Joseph (of whom 
later), Lewis, Henry, Tobias, Edward, Margaret, Magdalena, 
Sarah, Lena, Rebecca, and Elizabeth. Mr. Glessner at the 
time of his death was seventy years old, and his widow died at 
the age of eighty. 

Josej^h Glessner, son of Joseph and Lena (Faust) Gless- 
ner, was born November 10, 1800, and followed agricultural 
pursuits in Stony Creek township. He was a Democrat and a 
member of the Reformed church, being ardently interested in 
politics and greatly devoted to church work, serving for many 
years as deacon and elder. Mr. Glessner married, in 1825, 
Catharine Musser, born September 19, 1808, and a member of 
the same church as himself. Their children were: Tobias, of 
whom later; Jacob, born November 25, 1827; Susan, Novem- 
ber 5, 1829; John M., November 21, 1832, deceased; Joseph, 
May 21, 1835; Samuel, June 14, 1837, deceased; Henry, Feb- 
ruary 19, 1839, lives at Shanksville; Catharine, September 2, 
1841, widow of Edward Mummau; Mary, March 4, 1844, died 
in childhood; Sarah, November 6, 1846, deceased, was wife of 
William Hillegass; Eliza, April 11, 1850, died in childhood; 
and Edmund, March 31, 1852, farmer of Jefferson township. 
The death of Mr. Glessner occurred September 25, 1879, and 
his widow passed away May 7, 1894. 

Tobias Glessner, son of Joseph and Catharine (Musser) 
Glessner, was born August 20, 1826, on the Glessner home- 
stead, and received his education in the Glessner public school. 
He worked on the farm for his father until the age of seven- 
teen, and then began to learn the tanner's trade, at which he 
worked for seven years. At the age of twenty-four he pur- 
chased two hundred and seventy-one acres of timber land near 
Shanksville, and there, in the forest, erected a log house and 
a sawmill, working as a lumberman for seventeen years. At 
the end of that time, the tract being ])artially cleared, he sold 
the remainder and moved back to the homestead, which he 
purchased from his father and on which he still resides. The 
farm originally contained two hundred and seventy-five acres, 
seventy -five of which Afr. Glessner sold to his son Jacob W. 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 211 

In 1903 he sold the remaining- two hnndred acres to his son 
Albert, with whom he makes his home. The house, which was 
built in 1860 by Joseph Glessner, is a substantial two-story 
brick structure of twelve rooms, to all appearances in as good 
condition as when it was finished. The barn, which was built 
in 1836, is unweakened by time, although it has its second roof. 
The farm is ampl}^ stocked with well-bred horses and cows. 
There are on the farm orchards of apples and other fruits, as 
well as a sugar camp of twelve hundred vessels. On the prop- 
erty is a two-story frame dwelling, built by Mr. Glessner after 
he purchased the farm for his parents' use, and in this dwell- 
ing they ended their days. Mr. Glessner is a Democrat, having 
cast his first vote in 1848 for Lewis Cass, of Missouri, then 
the presidential candidate of that party. He is a member of 
the Reformed church at Roxbury, which he has served as 
trustee, deacon and elder. 

Tobias Glessner married, February 20, 1848, Caroline 
"Walker, and their children are: Catharine, born February 17. 
1849, died December 5, 1856; Jacob W., born April 20, 1850, 
farmer near Shanksville, married Emma Teller, has ten chil- 
dren; Joseph T., born November 22, 1851, married Mary A. 
Kimmel, has eleven children, and is a farmer of Waterloo, 
Iowa; Polly, born September 29, 1853, died December 5, 1856; 
Catharine and Polly died the same day of scarlet fever and 
were buried in the same casket; Tobias, born January 6, 1856, 
died February 19, 1862 ; John L., born October 25, 1858, farmer 
near Downey, married Hattie J. Will and has two children; 
Mary E., wife of Luther Hillegass; Alice, born March 22, 1863, 
wife of John A. Lowry, merchant and postmaster at Downey; 
Edward B., born March 2, 1865, farmer of Brothers Valley 
township, married Emma Walker, has five children; Calvin, 
bom November 19, 1866, died February 5, 1878; Minnie A., 
born February 27, 1870, wife of Edward D. Boyer, farmer of 
Stony Creek, has five children ; Albert G., born October 21, 1872, 
married Cora, daughter of William and Ella (Knepper) 
Weigle, the former a farmer of Stony Creek township. Mr. 
and Mrs. Glessner have one child, John M., eight years old. 
Another son, William Tobias, died at the age of three years. 

Mrs. Caroline (Walker) Glessner was a daughter of Jacob 
J. Walker, and was born September 26, 1826. She was edu- 
cated in the Glade public school. She was her husband's de- 
voted and uncomplaining helper during their life of privation 
and hardship in the timber camps, and the affectionate and 
self-sacrificing mother of their twelve children. Her death, 
which occurred October 17, 1896, was deeply mourned. 



212 BEDFORD AND SOAIERSET COUNTIES 

JOSIAH SPECHT. 

Josiah Specht, of Sto ystown, is a grandson of Andrew 
Speclit, a lifelong resident of Shade, where he was the owner 
and successful manager of a good farm, and also the possessor 
of a sawmill, in which he manufactured large quantities of 
lumber. He was an active member of the Seventh Day Baptist 
church. Andrew Specht married Rebecca Pisel, and they were 
the parents of seven children, of whom all are now dead. Mr. 
Specht, the father, was known to all his neighbors as a man of 
strict integrity. 

David Specht, youngest child of Andrew and Rebecca 
(Pisel) Specht, was born February 13, 1819, in Shade, Penn- 
sylvania, where during the greater part of his life he was en- 
gaged in farming on the old homestead. .In 1868 he came to 
Somerset county, settling in the village of Sprucetown, Quema- 
honing, where he established a gristmill and general store and 
built up a large and profitable business. He served his fellow- 
townsmen in various capacities and was identified with the Re- 
publican party. He and his wife were members of the Lu- 
theran church. Mr. Specht married Elizabeth, born April 24, 
1824, in Quemahoning township, daughiter of Jacob and Eliza- 
beth (Bender) Kimmel, and now the sole survivor of eleven 
children. Of the four children born to Mr. and Mrs. Specht 
three are now living: Hester, wife of Pearson Lohr, has had 
twelve children, of whom six survive, Jane, David, Annie, 
Florence, James and Joseph; Franklin K. served during the 
Civil War in Company K, Fifth Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, 
married Mary, daughter of Noah Miller, and has four chil- 
dren — Charles E., Annie, James and Jennie; and Josiah, of 
whom later. The death of ]\Ir. Specht occurred February 24, 
1896. He bequeathed to his family a large property. 

Josiah Specht, son of David and Elizabeth (Kimmel) 
Specht, was born November 24, 1848, in Shade, Pennsylvania, 
where he received a common school education. After leaving 
school he learned the miller's trade under the instruction of 
his father, with whom he remained until 1873. In that year his 
father's mill was destroyed by fire, after which Mr. Specht 
built a gristmill and engaged in business for himself. He was 
very successful, and in 1877 erected a store which he stocked 
with general merchandise. He has since carried on an ex- 
tensive business, both as miller and merchant. In December, 
1893, Mr. S])echt's miU and store were burned, the entire con- 
tents of both being destroyed by the flames. The property was 
improtected by insurance and the loss was sixty-five thousand 
dollars. The next day Mr. Specht i)ut up a shanty for tem- 
porary use, and in .1894 built a new gristmill, which is fully 



BEDFORD AND SO:\IERSET COUNTIES 213 

equipped with ail tlio modern appliances for carrying on mill- 
ing o])erations. In 1895 he comj.leted his new store, which is 
one of the finest in regard to its stock to be found in this part 
of the state, and in which he is now conducting a tiourishing 
business. 

He is one of the directors of the Somerset County Bank. 
He has served as school director, and in the spring of 1906 
was, without any solicitation on his ])art, ])resented by his 
friends as a candidate for county commissioner, and was 
elected by an unusually large majority. Soon after qualify- 
ing as county commissioner he was elected president of the 
board of commissioners, which illustrates in a measure his 
popularity and tlie high esteem in which he is held by the people 
and his fellow officers. 

Mr. Specht is also a director in the Berlin ]\Iutual Fire 
Insurance Company; vice-president of the Somerset Mutual 
Fire Insurance Comjiany; secretary of the Lincoln Oil and 
Gas Company; also treasurer of the Emert & Cook woolen 
mills of Somerset, a new enterprise organized in May, 1906, 
capital stock of forty thousand dollars. 

In politics he is a staunch Republican. IJe and his wife are 
members of the Lutheran church. His residence, which he has 
built for himself, is one of the finest in the county. 

Mr. Specht married, September 28, 1870, Josephine, 
daughter of Daniel and Sarah (Nealey) Zimmerman, and their 
children are: William E., born April 10, 1871, married Willia 
Maud Wagner, daughter of David E. Wagner, and has one 
child, Marv Jose]ihine; Howard 0., born December 6, 1872, 
died September 13. 1875; Myrtie M., born February 25, 1875, 
married Ross H. Rininger, and has the following children — • 
Josie Ellen, Meredith R., Pauline, Carl R. M., and William; 
Harvey, born January 15, 1877, married, March 30, 1899, Idelle, 
born December 27, 1878, daughter of Pierce and Emma (Ben- 
der) Miller, and has one child, Llovd Alger, born September 1, 
1900; Daniel B., bom March 18, 1881 ; David H., born April 24, 
1883, married ^faggie Adams, have two children; Franklin B., 
bom August 15, 1885; and Donald C, April 30, 1891. 

HENTZ FAMILY. 

No Somerset county family is more numerous or more 
widely known than is that of which Charles Hentz, of Rock- 
wood, is a representative. The origin and history of the race 
may be traced through the following generations: 

Sir John Jacob Hentz was artiman of the town of Beuem, 
Hesse Darmstadt, Germany. This office, which is the highest 
in the place, is permanent, and bears a close resemblance to 
that of mayor in this countr^^ Sir John Jacob was also a fine 



214 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

musician and the musical director of the town. His wife was 
Elenora Krar.ch, and their children were Henry Adam (of 
whom later), Catharine. Anna Maria and Louisa. 

Henry Adam Hentz, son of Sir John Jacob and Elenora 
(Kranch) Hentz, was the father of eleven children — Henry 
Adam, Fredericka, Elenora, Philip, William, John, Jacob, 
Henry, Louisa, Anna ]\faria and Baltser, of whom later. 

Catharine Hentz second child of Sir John Jacob and El- 
enora (Krauch) Hentz, married Casper Gerhardt and had the 
following children: Christina, Maria, Margaret and Cath- 
arine. 

Anna Maria Hentz, third child of Sir John Jacob and El- 
enora (Krauch) Hentz, married, in 1799, Balthaser Gerhardt, 
by whom she had ten children, six sons and four daughters. 
One of the sons and all the daughters died in infancy in Ger- 
many. The following sons grew up to man's estate: John, 
Leonard, Casper, Jacob and William. 

Louisa Hentz, fourth and youngest child of Sir John Jacob 
and Elenora (Krauch) Hentz, married Henry Adam Wistner. 
Nothing is known of their descendants, inasmuch as any they 
may have had were born, married, lived and died in Germany. 

Henry Adam Hentz, eldest son of Henry Adam and grand- 
son of Sir John Jacob Hentz, married Christina Stine, and 
their children were: Barbara, Anna Maria, Louisa, Caroline 
and Elizabeth. 

Fredericka Hentz, daughter of Henry Adam and grand- 
daughter of Sir John Jacob Hentz, married Christian Shomber, 
by whom she had the following children: Margaret, Louisa, 
Henry, William, Catharine, Philip, John and Elizabeth. They 
and their children live in Berlin. 

William Hentz, son of Henry Adam and grandson of Sir 
John Jacob Hentz, was a silk manufacturer and a well-to-do 

man. He married Dill, and among his children who 

came to the United States were the following: John, Henry 
and John Philip. 

Louisa Hentz, daughter of Henry Adam and grand- 
daughter of Sir John Jacob Hentz, married Hepner, 

lives in St. Louis, Missouri, and has two children : William and 
Louisa. 

Anna Maria Hentz, daughter of Henry Adam and grand- 
daughter of Sir John Jacob Hentz, married Conrad Cassell 
and had the following children: John, Louisa, William, Mary, 
Jacob, Philip and Annie. All reside in or near Burlington, 
Iowa. 

Baltzer Hentz, son of Henry Adam and grandson of Sir 
John Jacob Hentz, was married three times. His first wife 
was Elizabeth Fogler, by whom he had three children — Louisa, 



BEDFORD AND SO^[ERSET COUNTIES 215 

Philip and William. His second wife, Pfeifer, bore him 

no children. Both the first and second wives died in Germany, 
and after the death of the latter he emigrated to Pennsylvania, 
settling in Somerset county. He there married Mary Piatt, 
by whom he had three children — Emma, Charles and John, of 
whom later. Mr. Hentz, the father, for a number of years lived 
at or near Wills church, then moved near Miller's mill and 
there passed the remainder of his life, his death occurring 
in September, 1894, at the age of eighty-four. He is buried in 
the Odd Fellows' cemetery, Berlin, Pennsylvania. 

Christina Gerhardt, daughter of Casi)er and Catharine 
(Hentz) Gerhardt, married Casper Dom, known as Snyder 
Dom, from the fact that he was a tailor and to distinguish him 
from a distant relative who was also Casper Dom. Among the 
children born to him and his wife were the following: Alex- 
ander, Mary and Louisa. 

]\raria Gerhardt, daughter of Casper and Catharine 
(Hentz) Gerhardt, married John Baltzcr, and had the follow- 
ing children: Henry, Aaron, Mary, Louisa, Ellen and George. 
All these, with the exception of George, live in or about Johns- 
town. 

Margaret Gerhardt, daughter of Casper and Catharine 
(Hentz) Gerhardt, married Philip Dom and their children were: 
Henry, Ellen, Josiah, Malinda, Oliver, Leonard and William. 
Henry is supposed to have been slain by the Indians in 1845. 

(iJatharine Gerhardt, daughter of Casper and Catharine 
(Hentz) Gerhardt. married William Kneedy, by whom she had 
the following children: Margaret, Mary; Joseph, deceased; 
Samuel, died at the age of twenty years; Henry W. and Ma- 
tilda. 

John Gerhardt, son of Balthaser and Anna Maria (Hentz) 
Gerhardt, married Elizabeth Bittner and resided near Done- 
gal, Pennsylvania, where he died October 24, 1858, at the age 
of fifty-six. 

Leonard Gerhardt, son of Balthaser and Anna Maria 
(Hentz) Gerhardt, married, in 1832, Anna Mary, daughter of 
William Fritz, and their son I.eonaid died February 18, 1842, 
aged sixteen months, his mother having expired January 10 of 
the the same year. Both are buried at Elizal)ethtown. Mr. 
Gerhardt subsequently married Barbara Wolf, who died No- 
vember 3, 18G7, aged sixty years. Mr. Gerhardt, who was a 
minister of the Lutheran church, died at Mechanics])urg, I?enn- 
sylvania. May 13, 1877, aged seventy-two years. The Rev. Mr. 
Gerhardt and his second wife are buried in the Lutheran ceme- 
tery at Shippensburg. 

Cas])er Gerhardt, son of Balthaser and Anrui Maria (Hentz) 
Gerhardt, married — Hoffner at Mount Health)', Hamil- 



210 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

ton couiity, Oliio. and died lliero in 1879, aged seventy-ono. His 
cliildron were: Mary Ann, Benjamin, Nancy and Leonard, who 
died in tlie army dnring tJie Civil war. He was twice married 
and liis second wife still survives. 

Jacob Gerliardt, son of Balthaser and Anna Maria (Hentz) 
Gerliardt. married Catharine, daughter of John Broucher, of 
Brothers Valley township, resides at Kingwood, Upper Turkey- 
foot township, and is the father of eight children. 

William Gerhardt, son of Balthaser and Anna Maria 
(Hentz) Gerhardt, was also a minister of the Lutheran church. 
He married Lucinda Adeline Riley, of Gettysburg, by whom he 
had nine children. Mr. Gerhardt, the father, died June 18, 
1857, aged eighty-one years, and is buried in a private cemetery 
near Donegal, Pennsylvania. His wife died January 30, 1865, 
at the home of her son, the Rev. William Gerhardt, D. D., 
Jonestown, Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, and is buried in the 
Lutheran cemetery at that place. She was nearly eighty-eight 
years old. 

Barbara Hentz, daughter of Henry Adam and Christina 
(Stine) Hentz, married Frederick Bieler and had five children: 
W^illiam, Lena, Henry, Lizzie and John. All live in the west. 

Anna Maria Hentz, daughter of Henry Adam and Christina 
(Stine) Hentz, is one of the leading dressmakers in Sopierset 
and makes her home with her sister, Mrs. Augustus Traup. 

Louisa Hentz, daughter of Henry Adam and Christina 
(Stine) Hentz, married Augustus Traup and is the motlier of 
Nellie II. Traup, who is now the wife of W. Fay Lloyd, of Pitts- 
burg. 

Caroline Llentz, daughter of Henry Adam and Christina 
(Stine) Hentz, married Henry Stephens and resides at West 
Point, Illinois. Her sister Elizabeth married George Fogle, of 
Berlin, Pennsylvania, and their children are: Mary Lulu, 
Edwin, Caroline Cecilia, Warren, Delia, A¥inford and Mildred. 

Margaret Shomber, daughter of Christian and Predericka 

(Hentz) Shomber, married ■ Hone. Her sister Louisa 

married in the west. 

Henry Shomer, son of Christian and Fredericka (Hentz) 
Shomber, was married twice. His first wife was Sally Stearns 
and his second Mrs. Rose (Dom) Stoner. Among his children 
are the following: Rebecca, Catharine, Mary, Charles and 
Heni'y. His daughter Catliarine married Henry Poorbaugh and 
their children are Keyser, Edna and Catharine, who accompa- 
nied her aunts — the two Misses Poorbaugh — to Japan, whither 
they went as missionaries. 

Of the other children of Christian and Frederick (Hentz) 
Shomber, William went west; Catharine married Plerman Ho- 
brook and resided at Cumberland, Maryland; Philip married 



BEDFORD xVND SOMERSET COUNTIES ^IT 

Mrs. Bowers and moved to Iowa; John married in Ohio; Eliza- 
beth married Henry Muhlenberg and has the following chil- 
dren: Catharine, William, Emma, Rose, Florence, Alice, Henry 
and Mollie. All these live in Berlin. 

John Philip Hentz, son of William and (Bill) 

Hentz, is a graduate of the Pennsylvania College and the Lu- 
theran Thelological Seminary, Gettysburg, and preached six 
years at Som^erset. He married Cecilia A. Nicodemus, of Get- 
tysburg, and their children are: Honora, Cecilia; William 
Passavant, died at the age of three years ; John, Paul, Oliva and 
Nannie Belle. They reside at Miamsburg, Ohio. 

Of the children of Conrad and Anna Maria (Hentz) Cas- 
sell, John married Amelia Wilhelm; Louisa married Henry 

Stephens; Mary married Harper, and Annie married 

Nowe. 

Louisa Hentz, daughter of Baltzer and Elizabeth (Fogler) 
Hentz, married August Huffman and has the following chil- 
dren: Catharine, married Levi Queer; Emma; John, married 
in the west; William, also married in the west; Charles, mar- 
ried Musser; Henrietta; Mary, married George B., son 

of Benjamin G. Walker; and Edward, at home. All live in or 
near Berlin. 

William Hentz, son of Baltzer and Elizabeth (Fogler) 
Hentz, married Catharine Shaffer and has the following chil- 
dren: Louisa, deceased; Hiram, died at the age of twenty-six 
years ; Mary, wife of Oliver Berkebile ; Sarah, married Charles 
Heffley and had two children, William and Charles; Edward, 
deceased; Lucy, second wife of Charles Hefifley, lives at Glen- 
wood, near Pittsburg; Elmer, deceased; and Charles, at home 
with his parents near Sipesville. 

Charles Hentz, son of Baltzer and Mary (Piatt) Hentz, 
married Ellen S. Brandt and they are the parents of one child, 
Linnie R., born October 14, 1885. 

Of the children of John and Maria (Gerhardt) Baltzer, 
Henry married — — Slick; mary married Bow- 
man ; Louisa married Wah, and Ellen married Morris 

Clark, noted as the possessor of a beard six feet long. 

Ellen Dom, daughter of Philip and Margaret (Gerhardt) 
Dom, married Harrison Null, of Greensburg, and their children 
are: Ktta, Alinerva, Josephine, Millard, William, Jesse, Edwin^ 

Fremont, Nellie and Harry. Of these, Etta married 

Yaunt, by whom she had one child, Harry. After the death of 
her husband she married John Houseman. 

Josiah Dom, son of Pliilip and Margaret (Gerhardt) Dom, 
married .Josephine Cushner and they have four children: 
Eugene, resides near Johnstown; Delia; Ella, married (first) 



218 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Hilliary, (second) Decker; and William. Jo- 



siali Dom resides at Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Oliver Dom, son of Philip and Margaret (Gerhardt) Donp, 
resides at Ellerslie, Maryland. He married Hannah Lepley and 
their children were: Clara, Lillian, Henry, Parker, Josie, 
Thomas, Tina, Oliver, and Herbert, died in 1889. Clara mar- 
ried G. W. C. Day, of Braddock, and has three children, Eveline, 
Edith and Jessie. 

Malinda Dom, daughter of Philip and Margaret (Gerhardt) 
Dom, married Walter W. Gaither and resides in Pittsburg. The 
following children have been bom to them: Ross F., Ida B. ; 

Harry, married ■ Jones and has two children; Jessie, 

wife of William Fawnes, of Pittsburg, has two children; and 
Walter. Ross F. Gaither is married, resides in Baltimore, Mary- 
land, and is the father of three children, Walter, Rowena and 
James. The father, Walter W. Gaither, died in 1880. 

Leonard Dom, son of Philip and Margaret (Gerhardt) 
Dom. married Kate, daughter of Jeremiah Wright, of Wellers- 
burg. They reside at Philipsburg and have had five children: 
Maurice, died during the Civil war ; Chester, died in 1875 ; Ada, 
Mary and Grace. 

William Dom, son of Philip and Margaret (Gerhardt) Dom, 
married Jennie McCullough, of Greensburg, and resides at 
Dawson. They have three sons, John, William and Welty. 

Of the children of Casper and Christina (Gerhardt) Dom, 
Alexander died in a southern prison and Louisa married Sam- 
uel Weaver. Among their children are : Walter, Herbert ; 

Frank, deceased; and Lulu, wife of Moore. All live in 

Johnstown. 

Margaret, daughter of William and Catharine (Gerhardt) 
Kneedy, married Rudolph Ferner and had five children: Alvin 
H., married Emma, daughter of Urias Trent, and has one child, 
Marion; Mina, married the Rev. E. W. Rishel and has two chil- 
dren, Margaret C. and Elliott P.; Edwin C, married Eugenia, 
daughter of the Rev. Hiram King, and had two children, 
Reginald King Ferner, died February 10, 1891, aged eighty- 
eight days, and Ruth Junia. The father of these children died 
March 4, 1894, and was buried in the Lutheran cemetery at 
Somerset. The remaining children of Mr. and Mrs. Ferner are 
James E. and Ellen, who are at home with their mother in Som- 
erset. Rudolph Ferner died September 28, 1895, aged seventy- 
three years, and is buried in the Lutheran cemetery at Somer- 
set. He served during the Civil war in Company E, One Hun- 
dred and Seventy-first Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and 
was a member of R. P. Cummins Post, No. 210, G. A. R. 

Of the other children of William and Catharine (Gerhardt) 
Kneedy, Mary married Alten Pfeifer; Henry AV. married Clara 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 



219 



Miller and has six children, Milton, Clarence, Minnie, Rena, 
Ernest and an infant; and Matilda married J. D. Cope, of 
Ruffsdale, and has five children, Ida, Minnie, Walter, Effie and 
Harry. 

Minerva Null, daughter of Harrison and Ellen (Dom) Null, 
married Hough, of Connellsville, and has two chil- 
dren. Her sister Josephine married Dempsey Boyd, of Union- 
town, and has four children. 

Of the other children of Harrison and Ellen (Dom) Null, 
Millard married Bird; Jessie married Samuel All- 
wine, of Greensburg; Edwina married Dr. Fuller, of Union- 
town. 

Lillian Dom, daughter of Oliver and Hannah (Lepley) Dom, 
married John D. Meese, A. M., of California, Washington 
county, Pennsylvania, professor of grammar, rhetoric and lit- 
erature in the Southwestern Pennsylvania State Normal School, 
and they have two children, Hugh and Helen. 

Henry Dom, son of Oliver and Hannah (Lepley) Dom, re- 
sides at Johnstown and has been twice married. His first wife 
was a Miss Lowry, his second a Miss Henry. He is the father 
of five children: Jessie, wife of N. H. Klingaman, has one 
child, Edgar; Grace, Winnie, George and Thomas. 

Thomas Dom, son of Oliver and Hannah (Lepley) Dom, 
married Sykes, has two children and resides in Pitts- 
burg. His brother Oliver married Bowden, resides in 

Dawson and has one daughter. 

WALTER G. CARTER. 

Walter G. Carter, a resident of Somerset, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, was born September 20, 1875, in Halifax county, 
Virginia, the son of Edwin W. and Harriet (Terrell) Carter 
and grandson of William Carter, a farmer of Scotch descent. 
His father was a farmer and merchant of Halifax county, Vir- 
ginia, an occupation which he followed until 1895, when he re- 
tired from active pursuits. He married Harriet Terrell, who 
was of English descent, a daughter of Richard P. Terrell, a 
native of Halifax county and a harness dealer for many years. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin W. Carter had children as follows : Will- 
iam; Walter G., of whom later; Lottie L., Edward M., Hattie, 
Anna Y. and Ruby M. 

Walter G. Carter obtained his education in the common 
schools of his native county and at the age of eleven years left 
school and turned his attention to the trade of telegrapher, 
being engaged at this occupation for a number of years. For 
the past four years he has been freight and passenger agent 
for the Baltimore & Ohio railroad at Somerset, Pennsylvania, 
also United States Express agent. 



220 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

DANIEL W. RHOADS. 

Daniel W. Rhoads, a plumber of Somerset, Somerset 
comity, Pennsylvania, was born January 9, 1873, a son of 
Daniel and Rosa (Snyder) Rhoads, and of ' Scotch descent. 
Daniel Rhoads (father) was born March 25, 1809, in Somerset 
county, and followed agricultural pursuits. He was a Repub- 
lican in political proclivities. He married three times: First, 
to Elizabeth Barnhart, in 1834, and they Had three children; 
second, in 1853, to Caroline Duffstop, and they had ten children ; 
she died in 1872 ; third, to Rosa Snyder, who was born in 1845, 
and their children were Daniel W., Theodore E., Catherine V. 
and Royal G. 

Daniel W. Rhoads received a common school education, and 
at an early age left school and engaged in tinning business. He 
afterward learned the trade of plumber, and has since been en- 
gaged in these occupations. His residence is in Somerset, where 
he erected a splendid house and shop. In politics he is a loyal 
Republican and is deeply interested in the welfare of the com- 
munity. 

Daniel W. Rhoads married, December 6, 1900, Cora Sufall, 
born December 29, 1875, in Somerset county, daughter of 
Charles H. and Louisa (Hoover) Sufall, and granddaughter of 
John Sufall, who was born in Somerset county in 1812 and was 
a farmer by occupation. The Sufalls are of French extraction. 
Charles H. Sufall (father of Mrs. Rhoads) was bom in 1849 
and died May 14, 1901. He was a wagonmaker by trade and a 
Republican in politics. His wife, Louisa Hoover, was born in 
1849. Their children: Thomas R., Anna M., Cora E., Ralph. 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel W. Rhoads are the parents of one child, 
Rosabelle, born October 8, 1901. 

DANIEL DAHL. 

Daniel Dahl of Meyersdale, was born June 9, 1858, in Ger- 
many, where he received his education. In 1871 he was brought 
by his parents to the United States. They settled in Somerset 
county, where for a time Daniel worked on the home farm. He 
then entered the mines and was identified with the coal indus- 
try until May, 1904, when he opened a bakery, which he has 
since successfully conducted. He is a Democrat and a mem- 
ber of the Roman Catholic church. 

Mr. Dahl married, October, 1882, Katie, daughter of Martin 
Rohman, of Cumberland, Maryland, and their children are: 
William, born September, 1883; John, February 16, 1885; Ida, 
October 11, 1886, married, June 17, 1905, Frederick Raymon, 
of Meyersdale; Charles, September 24, 1888; Casper, Septem- 
ber 27, 1890; Alfred, August 2, 1892; and Clarence, July 9, 1894. 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 221 

,IESSE THOMAS JEFFERY. 

Jesse Thomas Jefferv, of Salisbury, is the son of Richard 
Jefferv, who was ])orn May 18, 1831, in Cornwall, England, and 
in 1851 emigrated to the United States, settlina^ in Michigan. 
Later he moved to Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and has lived at 
different times in Fayette and Westmoreland counties, but is 
now a resident of Salisbury. He belongs to the Knights of 
Pythias and the Improved Order of Red Men, and is a Repub- 
lican in politics He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. i\Ir. Jeffery married, at Johnstown, Ann, daughter of 
Jesse Berkebile, of Shade township, and they were the parents 
of one child, Jesse Thomas, see forward. 

Jesse Thomas Jeffery, son of Richard and Ann (Berke- 
bile) Jeffery, was born July 15, 1867, at Barton, Allegheny 
county, l\Iaryland, and attended the public schools of Dunbar, 
Union and Mount Pleasant, all of Pennsylvania. At the age of 
sixteen he left school and worked in the mines until 1893, when 
he met with an accident which rendered him unable to continue 
his labors. The same year he opened a grocery and confec- 
tionery, which he conducted until 1906, when he sold hHs busi- 
ness and returned to mining. He is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias and adheres to the Republican party. He attends 
the Reformed church. 

Mr. Jeffery married, February 5, 1888, Mary A., daughter 
of James Cochran, of West Salisbury, and they are the parents 
of three children : Leona, born August 1, 1889 ; Richard, May 25, 
1892 ; and James Glenn, February, 1894. 

DAVID LICHTY. 

David Lichty, of Salisbury, is a son of John C. Lichty, who 
was born in 1798 in Somerset county, and all his life devoted 
himself to agricultural pursuits, ending his days amid the 
scenes of his boyhood, He married, in 1819, Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Christian Fike, of Elk Lick township, and their children 
were : Solomon, born December 30, 1821 ; Michael, November 10, 
1823: Nancy, May 28, 1826; Samuel J., August 8, 1827; Sallie 
and Susan (twins), December 18, 1828; Jonas, September 9, 
1830; David, ADril 26, 1832, see forward; Mary, August 16, 
1833; and Elizabeth, October 17, 1835. 

David Lichty, son of John C. and Elizabeth (Fike) Lichty, 
was born April 26, 1832, in Elk Lick township, and received his 
education at the public schools. At the age of twenty-one, his 
school days being over, he engaged in farming and for ten years 
thereafter was exclusively a tiller of the soil. In 1878 he retired 
and moved to Salisbury, where he has since lived a strictly re- 
tired life. For one term he served as school director in Sal is- 



222 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

bury. His political affiliations are with the Republicans. He is 
a member of the Brethren church. 

Mr. Lichty married, January 29, 1860, Elizabeth, born April 
13, 1838, daughter of Nicholas Keim, of Addison township, and 
their children are : Ross, born November 6, 1861, married Ida, 
daughter of Elias Bauermaster, of Germany; Bruce, born Au- 
gust 4, 1865, a practicing physician of Meyersdale, married 
Fannie, daughter of William R. Getty, senator from Garrett 
county, Maryland; Stewart, born February 16, 1867, married 
Susan A. Fischer, of Wellington, Kansas; Ann, born December 
19, 1868, wife of Franklin Beachy, hardware merchant of Carle- 
ton, Nebraska; Mary, born January 15, 1870, wife of Dr. H. S. 
Hickock, of Wichita, Kansas; Missouri, born January 2, 1873, 
wife of EVanklin Pctrie, carpenter of Salisbury; and Harvey, 
born April 7, 1874, married Caroline Snyder, of Kansas. Now 
in his seventy-fifth year, Mr. Lichty is in remarkably good 
health. He is moderate and abstemious in all his habits and it 
is worthy of remark that he has never used tobacco in any form. 

MICHAEL FRANKLIN SMITH. 

Michael Franklin Smith, of Salisbury, is a great-grandson 
of Jacob Smith, his American ancestor, who was born in Ger- 
many and emigrated to this country about the period of the 
Revolution, serving in the patriot army during the latter part 
of that war. His son, Henry Smith, was born in 1770, in 
Dauphin, Pennsylvania, and was a cooper. He married and 
was the father of five sons and five daughters. He died in 
1845, aged sixty-three. 

John Smith, son of Henry Smith, was born in 1815, in 
Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, and in early life followed the 
cooper's trade. At the age of eighteen he came to Somerset 
county and followed his trade in Brothers Valley. He was 
subsequently engaged in mercantile business in Salisbury until 
1873, when he succumbed to the panic of that year. He was a 
member of the Allbright Methodist church, a Democrat and 
Republican. Mr. Smith married, in 1840, Katherine, daughter 
of Michael Dively, of Salisbury, and the following were their 
children: Harriet, wife of Samuel Mier, of Somerset, ex- 
member of the state legislature; Sarah A., wife of Levi Lich- 
liter, of Salisbury; Missouri, died in 1859; Michael Franklin, 
see forward; Rhoda, wife of the Rev. Marshall Bowlin, of Illi- 
nois; and Harvey M., died January, 1906. John Smith, the 
father, died in ] 888 ; his wife Katherine in 1887. 

Michael Franklin Smith, son of John and Katherine 
(Dively) Smith, was born June 2, 1849, in Salisbury, where 
he attended the public schools until the age of fifteen, when 
he spent two terms at Millersville State Normal school, and 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 223 

taught one term. He was associated in business with his father 
until 1873, when the financial troubles of the time rendered re- 
tirement necessary, and he then went into the commission busi- 
ness, handling among other things, farm products. In 1878 
he went to Uniontown as manager for the Johnson grocery 
store, a position which he retained until 1882, when he returned 
to Salisbury and was in mercantile business for himself until 
1888. Since that time he has been in the insurance business, 
to which in 1900 he added real estate. He is a Republican and 
a member of the German Baptist Brethren church. He was 
census enumerator in 1870 and several terms a member of the 
borough council. 

Mr. Smith married, March 16, 1871, Adaline, daughter of 
David Livengood, of Elk Lick township. This union was of 
brief duration, being terminated by the death of Mrs. Smith, 
October 27, 1871. Mr. Smith married (second), October 24, 
1873, Nancy, daughter of Joseph Johnson, of Uniontown, Fay- 
ette county, and they have been the parents of the following 
children: Nora, born July 25, 1874, died February 6, 1878; 
Anna, born December 3, 1875, teacher in the Allegheny county 
schools; Mayme, born March 16, 1877, died October i5, 1880; 
Sadie, born October 24, 1882, teacher in Meyersdale schools 
The mother of these children died June 9, 1889, and Mr. Smith 
married (third), October 24, 1890, Jane, daughter of John N. 
Thompson, of Somerset county. By this marriage there are 
no children. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM BENDER. 

Frederick William Bender, of Springs, is a son of John 
Bender, who was born in Germany and at the age of twenty 
emigrated to the United States. He settled in Garrett county, 
Maryland, where he became a farmer and was also engagod in 
business as a brewer and distifler and in manufacturing a 
patent medicine died "Bender's Tonic," which he is still man- 
ufacturing and selling. Mr. Bender married Elizabeth Otto, 
%vhose ])arcnts were natives of Germany, and their children 
were: P>arbara, Jacob J., Daniel H., George L., Frederick 
William (see forward), John H., Charles A., Sanniel and Chris- 
tian E. 

Frederick William lender, son of John and Elizabeth 
(Otto) Bender, was born May ], 3869, at Grantsville, Mary- 
land, and received his education in the ])ublic schools of New 
Germany, Maryland. At the age of fifteen he left school and 
worked at fanning and Innibering. In 1890, in company with 
his brother, Jacob J. i>en(l('r, he went into the business of 
drilling wells, and continued in this line of industry until 1895. 
In that year, in partnershi]) with E. M. Miller, he opened a 



224 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

general store at Springs, under the firm name of F. W. Bender 
& Company. In the following' autumn he purchased his jmrt- 
ner's interest and in 1896 sold out the store to his brother, 
Charles A., returning to the drilling business. At the end of 
six months, however, he bought back the store and at the same 
time disposed of his interest in the drilling machinery. He is 
a stockholder in the Somerset Telephone Company. Mr. 
Bender's business has grown from a small country grocery to 
what might be termed a department store. He now purchases 
some lines in carload lots. Miss Cora E. Miller, an efficient 
young lady, is his bookkeeper and manager of the dry goods 
department. In his political ]^rinciples he is a Democrat. He 
is a member of the Mennonite church. 

Mr. Bender married, July 16, 1893, Melinda, daughter of 
Daniel J. Miller, of Springs, and their children are : Ray, born 
December 11, 1894; Rhoda, June 4, 1897; Walter Anderson, 
March 17, 1899; Lucretia, April 13, 1901; Albert Fred, Jan- 
uary 24, 1906. 

FRANK P. GLESSNER. 

The ancestors of Fraiik P. Glessner, of Berlin, were among 
the earliest settlers of Brothers Valley township. The founder 
of the family was Jacob Glessner, who was born in Germany, 
and about 1735 emigrated to the American colonies. He set- 
tled on a farm near Berlin, and was known throughout the 
community as a pious and upright man, serving as an elder 
of the Berlin congregation of the Reformed church. The pas- 
tor of this church, in 1794, was Cyriacus Spangenberg, a Hes- 
sian, who had come to America with the British army and had 
in some way obtained ordination as a minister of the Reformed 
church. His true character becoming known, the Berlin con- 
gregation called a meeting to decide upon measures for remov- 
ing him. Just before a vote was taken Elder Glessner arose 
and in a few words expressed the opinion that the best interests 
of the church called for a change of minister. At this Spangen- 
berg, who was present, drew a dirk from his clothing, rushed 
upon the elder, and stabbed him to the heart. Upon trial for 
this murder he was convicted, and on April 11, 1795, was ex- 
ecuted at the jail in Bedford. His friends made every effort 
to save him, appealing to President AYashington, who returned 
ihe papers, saying that there was no ground for either com- 
mutation or pardon. 

Joseph Glessner, son of Jacob Glessner, was a farmer and 
tniller of Stony Creek township. He was a Democrat and a 
member of the Reformed church. His wife was Lena Faust, 
and their children were: Henry, Jacob, Edward, Sarah, Lena, 
Rebecca, and Joseph, of whom later. The father of the family 



BEDFORD AND SO:\rEKSET COUNTIES 225 

died at the age of .seventy and liis widow passed away at eighty 
years old. 

Jose])li Glessner, son of /Jose])h and Lena (Fanst) Gless- 
ner, was born November 10, 1800, and ^\as nnnibered among 
the farmers of his generation in Stony Creek town- 
ship. Like his father, he was a Democrat and a mem- 
ber of the Reformed ehnrch. Mr. Glessner married Catha- 
rine Zinsser, born Se])tember 19, 1808, and their chil- 
dren were: Tobias, born Angust 20, 1826; Jacob J., of 
whom later; Snsan, born November 5, 1829, wife of Josiah 
Kimmel; John M., November 21, 1832; Joseph, :\[ay 21, 1835; 
Samuel, June 14. 1837, died April 30, 1838; Henrv, Fe])rnarv 
i9, 1839; Catharine, September 2, 1841, wife of Edward ^fnm- 
man; ^Marv, March 4, 1844, died in cbildhood ; Sarah, Novem- 
ber 6, 1846, wife of William TI. Mellegass; P]liza, April 11, 
1850; and Edmnnd, March 31, 1852. The death of Mr. Gless- 
ner occurred September 25, 1879, and his widow died ]\rav 8, 
1894. 

Jacob J. Glessner, son of Joseim and Catharine (IMusser) 
Glessner, was born November 25, 1827, in Stony Creek town- 
ship and settled in Brothers Valley township, on the farm 
now owned by his son Jacob. He devoted himself all his life 
to agricultural pursuits, and maintained the traditions of his 
family by adhering to the Democratic party and l:)y serving as 
a deacon and elder in the Reformed church. J\lr. Glessner 
married Dinah Walker, born April 7, 1830, and a member of 
the same church as himself. The marriage took jilace January 
30, 1851, and the following are their children: Sarah, widow 
of Samuel Miller, who was a farmer of Brothers Valley town- 
ship, lives in Carleton, Nebraska, and has the following chil- 
dren : Jacob, Kate, Howard. Annie, Mahlon, Eva, Sadie and 
Samuel; Henry J,, farmer of Brothers Valley township, mar- 
ried Annie Schrock; Emma, wife of Edward K. Suder; Frank 
P., of whom later; Urias, married Sarah Musser, had two chil- 
dren, Robert and Musser; second wife, Elnora Speicher, three 
children, Cornelia, Weller and Allen; Jefferson, farmer of 
Stony Creek toAvnship, married Sadie Weigle and has the 
following children: Victor, Ra!i)h. James, Rei, Jefferson, 
Maria, Sherman and Harner; Ellen, wife of Irvin Miller, 
farmer of Stony Creek township, has four children — Oscar, 
Jacob, Peter and Alda; Jacob J., farmer of Brothers Valley 
township, married Ijydia Berkley, has had three childivn, Sykes 
and two deceased. 

Frank P. Glessner, son of Jacob J. and Dinah (Walker) 

Glessner, was born March 25, 1858. in Stony Creek township, 

where he received his education in the connnon schools. He 

early began working on the farm and remained there until 

Vol. II r 15 



226 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

his marriage. He then purchased a portion of the homestead, 
which he cultivated for three years, and in 1884 bought his 
present farm of one hundred and forty acres in Brothers 
Valley township, about two miles from Berlin. He has made 
many improvements in the property, and the farm is well 
stocked with a good grade of farm cattle of all kinds. The estate 
includes orchards of different fruits and a sugar camp of four 
hundred vessels. The house is well situated, being encircled 
with a lawn and surrounded by shade trees. Mr. Glessner is 
interested in the First National Bank of Berlin and the East 
End Improvement Company. He is a member of the Berlin 
congregation of the Reformed church, which is perhaps the 
oldest church of that denomination in the state. In this church 
he serves as deacon and also belongs to the Sunday school. 

Mr. Glessner married, January 11, 1880, Sarah Miller, the 
marriage taking place on the farm which is now their home. 
They are the parents of the following children: Edith, born 
December 4, 1880, married June 6, 1906, Dr. Ezra Saylor, of 
Myersdale, Pennsylvania, a son of H. W. Saylor; Maurice D., 
born January 29, 1883, died November 26, 1885 ; Kate 0., born 
January 11, 1886, at home; Miller A., born January 10, 1891; 
Jacob J., born September 2, 1892 ; Ross, born January 14, 1895 ; 
and Frank L., born June 19, 1898. All these children have 
been educated in the public schools, and two of them, Edith 
and Kate 0., are members of the Progressive church. Mrs. 
Glessner is a daughter of Ananias and Mary Miller, whose 
children are: Samuel, married Sarah Glessner; Susan, wife 
of U. F. Raymon; Sarah, born June 30, 1856, educated in town- 
ship schools, member of United Brethren church, and wife of 
Frank P. Glessner; Peter, married Susan Musser; John, mar- 
ried Emma Strayer; Hevain; and Harvey, married Zua Hite. 
Mr. Miller died in April, 1868, and his widow resides in Carle- 
ton, Nebraska. 

MICHAEL FRANCIS RILEY. 

Michael Francis Riley, station agent at West Salisbury, 
is a son of James Riley, a native of Ireland, who emigrated to 
the United States at the age of seventeen and settled in Arm- 
strong county, Pennsylvania. He married, in 1856, Esther, 
daughter of William Kennedy, of Freeport, Pennsylvania. 
Esther came to this country with her three sisters when quite 
young. Children of Mr. and Mrs. Riley were as follows: 
Catherine Gertrude, born 1857, wife of James Linnan, of Kit- 
tanning, Pennsylvania; Michael Francis, see forward; John, 
born, 1861, married Minna Shibely, of Connellsville ; James 
K., born 1863, married Sarah Ross, of Craigsville; Anna, born 
1865, wife of Frank Ketterer, of Coraopolis, Pennsylvania; 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 227 

William, born 1867, married Mary Verlohr, of Rosston, Penn- 
sylvania ; and Julia, born 1869, wife of Miller Clark, of Craigs- 
ville, Pennsylvania. 

Michael Francis Riley, son of James and Esther (Ken- 
nedy) Riley, was bom December 15, 1859, at Kittanning, Arm- 
strong county, where he attended the public schools until the 
age of sixteen. During the next two years he was employed by 
the Allegheny Valley Railroad Company, and from that time 
until the age of twenty was a student at St. Vincent's College, 
near Latrobe, Pennsylvania, from which he graduated in 1879. 
He then worked as a fireman on the Allegheny Valley railroad 
until September, 1882, and then moved to West Salisbury, 
where he has since been station agent for the Baltimore & Ohio 
Railroad Company. He is a stockholder in the First National 
Bank of Salisbury, and owns the Mountain Tonic Company, 
of West Salisbury, in which place he also conducts a shoe store. 
He was at one time judge of elections for the township, being 
the first Democrat to hold that office in thirty years. He is a 
member of St. Michael's Roman Catholic church at West 
Salisbury. 

Mr. Riley married, September 19, 1887, Missouri Elizabeth 
(born January 13, 1869), daughter of Dennis and Mary Wag- 
ner, of Salisbury. Mrs. Riley descends from one of the old 
Somerset county families, the Wagners. Dennis Wagner was 
a son of Peter Wagner, who was all his life a hotel keeper in 
the county. Dennis Wagner's wife was Mary Loechel, of an- 
other old county family. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Riley 
are: James, born April 10, 1889; Edward, December 14, 1890; 
George, February 7, 1893; Robert, January 14, 1895; Maurice, 
October 25, 1897; William, March 15, 1900"; Mary Esther, May 
15, 1902 ; Margaret Elizabeth, September 26, 1904. 

CHARLES ADEN WILT. 

Charles Aden Wilt, of Salisbury, is a grandson of The- 
ophilus Wilt, who was born in Loudon county, Virginia, and 
was a farmer. As a young man he moved to Allegheny county, 
Maryland. His wife was Delila Duckworth, of Maryland, 
whose ancestors came to this country from Germany and set- 
tled at what is now Elizabeth, New Jersey, being owners of 
the site of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Wilt were the parents of 
the following children: John W. (see forward), Eliza, Goulda, 
Ellen, Jane, Thornton, William, George, Salem, Martha and 
Peter. 

John W. Wilt, son of Theophilus and Delila (Duckworth) 
Wilt, was born April 16, 1834, in Allegheny (now Garrett) 
coimty, Maryland, and, like his father, was an agriculturist. 
The family are members of the Methodist church. He was a 



228 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Democrat. He married Sarah Elizabeth, daughter of John 
Kooken, of Allegheny coimty, and their children were: John 
Albert, married Zelphia Blocker; Daniel Morris Lincoln, mar- 
ried Lonisa Blocker; Emily Catherine, wife of Lewis Pope; 
Charles A., see forward; Rebecca Ellen, wife of Frederick 
Broadwater; Mary Martha, died August 4, 1903, was wife of 
William G-reen; Sarah Elizabeth, wife of Guy Cain; Isaac 
Columbus, married Belle Cassiday; and James Harvey, mar- 
ried Cora Titus. Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth (Kooken) Wilt died 
November 15, 1902. John W. Wilt resides in Westernport, 
Maryland. 

Charles Aden Wilt, son of John W. and Sarah Elizabeth 
(Kooken) Wilt, was born August 7, 1866, in Garrett county, 
Maryland, where he attended the public and normal schools 
of tiie county. From 1885 to 1891 Mr. Wilt taught in the 
schools of his native county, and afterward worked in various 
places at lumbering and farming until 1893. He then went into 
into the real estate business, remaining in Garrett county, and 
in December, 1896, moved to Salisbury, where he continued in 
the same business and also conducted a variety store until 
December, 1904, when he sold the store to C. T. Hay. Mr. Wilt 
now gives his attention to real estate, and also manages a farm 
of sixty acres in Elk Lick township. He is interested in sev- 
eral outside enterprises. He is now serving as president of 
the town council. He affiliates with the Knights of Pythias, 
votes with the Democrats and is a member of the Lutheran 
church. 

Mr. Wilt married, November 26, 1896, Rachel, daughter 
of Dennis Wagner, of Salisbury, and they are the parents of 
two sons and a daughter — Charles Dennis, Mary Elizabeth 
and Rea Ernest. 

NORMAN B. KEIM. 

The family of which Norman B. Keim, of Elk Lick, is a 
representative, was planted in Somerset county by Nicholas 
Keim, who came hither from eastern Pennsylvania soon after 
the Revolutionary war, and settled near Davidsville, in Cone- 
maugh township. In 1810 he moved to Elk Lick township and 
there passed the remainder of his life. He was thrice mar- 
ried and was the father of twenty-four children. His death oc- 
curred in 1838. 

John Keim. eldest child of Nicholas Keim, was born 
January 6, 1792, near Berlin, Somerset county, and was a child 
when his parents moved to what is now Johnstown. He gath- 
ered walnuts in what is now a populous part of the city, but 
which then boasted but one house, that being owned and occu- 
pied by a Mr. Johns, and also used for a school. The only mill 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 229 

in that part of the country was six miles away. The dwelling 
of the Keims was a small building scarcely more than a hut, 
and some idea of its state may be formed from the fact that a 
man named Christian Yoder, who was one night the guest of 
the family, and who, on account of the limited space, was 
obliged to sleep in the garret, had his slumbers seriously dis- 
turbed by the ])layful antics of a number of rats and the con- 
tinual, noise of a rattlesnake. 

Mr. Johns, mentioned above, laid out part of the city of 
Johnstown, and after selling his building lots, bought a farm 
seven miles away. While living there he was robbed of four 
hundred dollars, which was quite a fortune for that time and 
place, A short time after this he died, and the Keim family 
moved to Elk Lick towuship, taking up their abode on what 
is now known as the J. J. Keim farm, the place being then 
owned by John Hendricks, who lived in a log house which is 
still standing. Peter Livengood lived on the adjoining farm, 
which is now the property of Jeremiah B. Keim, a grandson 
of John Keim. The site of Peter Livengood 's house is now 
occupied by the residence of Michael Hay, and is included 
within the limits of Salisbury. A century ago it was the only 
house in the immediate vicinity, and the place was called 
Shirestown. Berkley lived at Berkley's Mills, and Beechley 
close to what is now Meyersdale, but was then Meyers' Mills. 
These two, John Berkley and John Beechley, were preachers 
of the denomination known as the Brethren, Dunkard or Ger- 
man Baptist, and services were held in Peter Livengood 's 
house. There was no mill nearer than twenty-five miles, and 
schools, when held at all, met in private houses. John Keim's 
first teacher is remembered as ''Jack Griffith." 

John Keim married, April 11, 1813, Barbara, born in 1789, 
daughter of C. L. Livengood, and lived in the old Hendricks 
place until 1815, when he moved to Payette county, remaining 
there until 1824. In that year, at the request of his father, he 
returned home and purchased ninety acres of the homestead. 
Mr. and Mrs. Keim had children: Henry; John J., see for- 
ward; Elizabeth, deceased; Susan, deceased; Catharine, wife 
of Lewis Bockes; Mary, deceased; Diana, wife of Solomon 
Engle; Nancy, wife of Henry Miller; Barbara, wife of Jeffer- 
son Speicher; and Sarah, wife of Philip Hoffman. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Keim lived to be over ninety. 

John J. 'Keim, son of John and Barbara (Livengood) 
Keim, was born July 2, 1826, in Elk Lick township, and was 
a farmer. He married Diana, daughter of Jonathan Berkley, 
by whom he was the father of the following children: Jere- 
miah B., Ezra, Norman B, (see forward), Nancy and Caroline. 
After the death of the mother of these childreu, Mr. Keim mar- 



230 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

ried Sarah Beachly. the issue of the marriage being Lucinda, 
Martha, Harvey and Mary, 

Norman B. Keim, son of John J. and Diana (Berkley) 
Keim, was born November 11, 1856, in Elk Lick township, 
where he attended the public schools until the age of sixteen 
He was the assistant of his father in the management and 
labors of the iiomestead until 1880. In 1885 he purchased of 
his father a portion of the home farm consisting of ninety-six 
acres. On this land he has since made his home, devoting him- 
self to its cultivation and to the raising of stock. He is a Re- 
publican and a member of the Progressive Brethren church. 

Mr. Keim married, November 20, 1885, Sadie, daughter 
of Jacob J. Meyers, of Berlin, Pennsylvania, and their chil- 
dren are: Meyers Victor, born January 16, 1887; Florence 
May, September 8, 1888 ; J ohn Earle, September 29, 1890 ; and 
Robert N., May 28, 1903. 

JOSEPH M. WEISEL. 

Joseph M. A¥eisel, a well-known citizen of Rockwood, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, and who has been in business 
there for many years, traces his descent back to Germany. 
His great-grandparents emigrated from Germany to this coun- 
try and were among the early settlers, making their home in 
the wilds of Pennsylvania when there were neither roads nor 
railroads in the state. 

George A. Weisel, father of Joseph M. Weisel, was born 
in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, and followed the occupa- 
tion of farming. He married Lydia A. Korns, and they have 
three children — Josei)h M., of whom later; Charles A., born 
July 7, 1883, in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, where he was 
educated in the common schools, attending there until he was 
seventeen years of age. He then tried various occupations 
for a time, as follows: jMotorman on the street cars in Pitts- 
burg for one year; on the police force in the same city for one 
year; then to Rockwood and became associated with his brother 
in the meat business. He married, September, 1901, Annie 
Wilkens. The third child was S. W. 

Joseph M. AVeisel, eldest son and child of George A. and 
Lydia (Korns) Weisel, was born in Somerset county, Pennsyl- 
vania, March 23, 1881. He enjoyed the advantages of a good 
education in the common schools of Fayette county, Pennsyl- 
vania, which ho attended until he was seventeen years old, 
and then worked on the farm of his father for the next three 
years. He then entered the employ of D. W. Bitner, near Con- 
nellsville, where he remained for eighteen months in order to 
get a practical knowledge of the meat business. After that he 
was in the employ of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad for about 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 231 

two years, and then returned to Rockwood and bought out the 
meat business of George Holtzhur, and is still engaged in the 
same business. He married, November 20, 1904, Elizabeth C. 
Wolfersberger, daughter of David H. and Catherine (Klemp- 
f elder) Wolfersberger. 

JOHN H. LEIGHTY. 

John H. Leighty, proprietor and manager of the Hotel 
Merchant, in Rockwood, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was 
born in Mooreland, Garrett county, Maryland, April 26, 1860. 
He received his education in the common schools of Fayette 
county, Pennsylvania, and attended these until the age of twenty 
years. He then learned the trade of brick and stone mason, 
which was also the occupation of his father, and followed that 
until 1895. He then turned his attention to the butcher busi- 
ness, commencing in Connellsville, Pennsylvania, and for the 
next three years was thus occupied. He then rented a hotel at 
Ruffsdale, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, conducted that 
for one year, and then removed to Cleveland, Ohio, where he 
opened a saJoon, but gave this up after about eight months, 
started, a hotel and kept it for two years. He then removed to 
Rockwood, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, rented the Hotel 
Merchant, which he is still managing with success. He is genial 
and courteous to all and is very popular, having made many 
friends since he first took up his residence in the town. 

He has been twice married. His second wife was Mary 
Smith, born in Scotland, June 23, 1860. 

CHARLES H. WOLFENBERGER. 

Charles H. Wolfenberger, a coal operator of Rockwood, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was there born August 12, 1872, 
a son of David H. Wolfenberger. 

Charles H. Wolfenberger received his education in the 
common schools of his native place. He left school when he was 
eighteen years of age and entered the service of the Baltimore 
& Ohio railroad at the Rockwood station as night clerk, ticket 
agent, and also attended to the express. After three years so 
engaged he was promoted to baggage master and occupied that 
position for eight years. In the fall of 1901 he embarked in the 
coal business, in which he has since been engaged and in which 
he has met with the greatest success. Politically Mr. Wolfen- 
berger is a sound and loyal Republican, and is now serving as 
burgess of the town. He is also a notary public, and holds 
membership in the B. of R. T. and Royal Arcanum. He is now 
building a beautiful modern home at Rockwood. 

He married, November 29, 1892, Annie Gertrude Parks, 
daughter of George and Annie Parks, of Rockwood. They have 



232 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

two children, Cliarles (). and Lilian Ethel Fern. He and his 
wife are members of the Lutheran elinrch and he has been 
deacon for several years. He and his wife are teachers in the 
Sunday school and Mr. Wolfenberger is assistant superintend- 
ent of the Sunday school. 

ROBERT O. CRIST, M. D. 

Dr. Robert 0. Crist, of Boswell, was born September 16, 
1878, at Harper's Ferry, West Virginia, and is the son of the 
Rev. (i. W. Crist, who was born April 17, 1848, in Perry county, 
Pennsylvania. He received his literary education and the train- 
ing for his profession as a minister of the Lutheran church at 
Gettysburg College and Theological Seminary. From 1888 to 
1895 he had charge of the Jennerstown congregation, including 
Mount Zion, St. James and Stanton's Mills. Rev. Crist mar- 
ried Anna B. Orr, born February 10, 1851, in Huntingdon coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, granddaughter of Hugh Alexander, a repre- 
sentative of an old Virginia family, who came to Pennsylvania 
about 1790 and settled in Clearfield county. 

Dr. Robert O. Crist, son of G. W. and Anna B. (Orr) Crist, 
laid the foundation of his education in the common schools and 
spring normal schools of Somerset county, afterward attending 
the Millersville State Normal School. He received his medical 
education in the University of Maryland. During the Spanish- 
American war he enlisted in the army as a member of the hos- 
pital corps department and served ten months, being mustered 
out February 28, 1899. In 1903 he returned to Somerset county 
and settled at Boswell, where he has since been engaged in the 
active practice of his profession. 

Dr. Crist married. May 14, 1903, at Ridgely, Maryland, 
Bessie McDougall Sinclair, who received her education in the 
high schools and the Peabody Institute of Baltimore, subse- 
(luently studying at the New Eng^land Conservatory of Music, 
Boston. Mrs, Crist 's parents are residents of Winnipeg, 
Canada. 

GEORGE F. KIMMEL. 

George F. Kimmel, a representative citizen of Somerset, 
was born in Jefferson townshi]), Somerset county, Pennsylvania, 
December 30, 1837, a son of Samuel R. and Mary (Flicli) Kim- 
mel and grandson of John and Mary (Barker) Kinnnel. John 
Kimmel (grandfather) was born in Stony Creek township, 
Somerset county, and after his marriage to j\Iary Barker, a 
native of Milford, Somerset county, removed to Somerset, where 
his death occurred in 1858. Their children were: Samuel K., 
deceased; George, deceased; P^rederick, deceased; Lucinda, de- 
ceased; Sarah, deceased; John, deceased; Singleton, deceased; 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES '-^33 

Liidwick, David, Elizabeth Hay and Rosa. Samuel K. Kim- 
mel (father) was born in 1808 and died in 1854; he married 
Marv Flieh, born in 1808, and their children were as follows: 
George F., John H., David F., Irvin W., William S., Elizabeth, 
and Sophia, deceased. 

George F. Kimmel obtained his education in the common 
schDols of Somerset county, attending the same until he attained 
the age of sixteen years. For a number of years thereafter he 
followed the occupation of teaming, his route being between 
Somerset, Pennsylvania, and Cumberland, Maryland, after 
which he turned his attention to the hotel business, continuing 
the same for five years. He then purchased a farm, consist- 
ing of two hundred acres, at Milford, near Gebhart's, whereon 
he successfully conducted general farming for thirty years, and 
in the fall of 1897 he removed to Somerset, where he still re- 
sides. In 1890, during his residence in Milford, he was elected 
to the office of county commissioner, and re-elected to the same 
in 1897, this fact attesting to the high esteem in which he was 
held by his follow townsmen. His political allegiance is given 
to the Republican party, the principles of which he believes to b6 
for the best form of government. 

On April 12, 1861, Mr. Kimmel married Barbara Sechler, 
born in Milford township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, June 
20, 1837, daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Dull) Sechler. 
Jonathan Sechler was born in 1800, was a farmer all his life 
and died in Milford township, Somerset county, in 1870. He 
was a son of Daniel Sechler, a native of Milford township, Som- 
erset county, and a prosperous farmer thereof. Seven children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Kimmel, namely: Carrie, Elizabeth, 
Emma, Edward, Martha ; John, deceased, and Ross, deceased. 

COHEN BROTHERS. 

This notice treats of the firm of Cohen Brothers, of Somer- 
set, Pennsylvania, where they are the proprietors of the lead- 
ing department store in men's, women's and children's wear- 
ing apparel. 

The eldest brother, Morris Cohen, a native of Warsaw, Rus- 
sia, came to the United States with his parents when three years 
of age, in 1873. In 1894 he came to Somerset county, engaging 
in business at Scalp Level, conducting a general store. Soon 
thereafter he became the pioneer merchant at Windber, put- 
ting in the first stock of goods in that place. He was there long 
before the railroad was completed or the coal interests devel- 
oped. His goods were freighted by teams from Johnston, then 
the nearest railway station. In a short time he had branch 
stores located at Berlin, Meyersdale and Salisbury. After a 
successful business career of about five years at these points 



234 BEDFOKD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

he formed a partnership with his brother-in-law at Uniontown, 
Fayette county, Pennsylvania, where a large store was oper- 
ated. The business of the now well known firm of ''Cohens'' 
was established at Somerset first by the enterprise and busi- 
ness genius of the younger brother, Fred Cohen, who came to 
the borough in 1900 and rented, for a single month, a one-story 
frame store building on the site of their present magnificent 
department store on South Main Cross street. The store was 
twenty-five by sixty-three feet, in which was placed a very small 
stock of men's furnishings and clothing. At first he did not 
meet with the hearty co-operation of the public, who were un- 
justly prejudicial, biit by his manly conduct and superior meth- 
ods of doing a legitimate business, with plenty of judicious ad- 
vertising, he soon forged his way to the front ranks and built 
up an excellent trade. 

In 1901 the older brother, who had already invested in this 
business, came on and became an active partner with him, and 
in 1904 Chnrles C. Shafer erected the fine, modern-constructed 
business house they now occupy. It is three stories high and 
is finished and furnished throughout with all that present-day 
art and mechanical ingenuity can produce. In size the build- 
ing is forty-three by sixty-three feet and has fourteen-foot ceil- 
ings surfaced with beautifully designed metallic sheetings. The 
rooms are brilliantly lighted by sixteen incandescent lights and 
a special feature of the lower salesroom is the spacious show 
windows. The arrangement of these window displays was a 
new departure in the borough of Somerset and are still supe- 
rior to any others and speak eloquently of the genius of decorat- 
ing displayed by I. Cohen, a younger brother, who has charge of 
this department. 

This, the most commanding business house of the place, 
was leased to Cohen Brothers for a term of ten years, with op- 
tional rights thereafter. The several departments occupy the 
first and second floors, while the third is sub-leased to the 
Young Men's Christian Association. One can scarcely name 
an article of men's ladies' or children's wearing apparel not 
to be found in this stock, which is superbly kept and sold to a 
large patronage by from six to ten salesmen. Their trade ex- 
tends over a radius of about twenty-five miles. They have won 
the implicit confidence of all classes by keeping faith with the 
people and always carrying out to the letter their motto of 
"refunding the purchase price for any article that for any 
cause may not prove satisfactory to the customer." By a sys- 
tem of sensible, practical and ever attractive advertising the 
name "Cohen" has been indelibly stamped on the entire trad- 
ing community and has come to be a true magnet to purchas- 
ers. 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 235 

Morris Cohen was born in Warsaw, Russia, February 8, 
1870, son of Aaron Cohen and wife. He was married at Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, March 27, 1898, to Ida Levinson, daugli- 
ter of Israel and Anna Levinson. By their union three sons 
were born: Aaron, December 17, 1898; Abram, August 1, 1900; 
Fred, July 17, 1902. Morris Cohen is a member of the order 
of Knights of Pythias at Salisbury, Pennsylvania, the Royal 
Arcanum at Windber and the Modern Woodmen of America at 
Uniontown, Pennsylvania. 

Fred Cohen was born at Newark, New Jersey, February 14, 
1879. He attended the common schools of Wilmington, Dela- 
ware, until he was about eleven years old, but bv perseverance 
and keen observation has come to be a well-informed man. His 
business career commenced when less than thirteen years of 
age, when he served faithfully as an errand boy in Philadel- 
phia. He next entered the great soap house of that city which 
manufactures the celebrated ''Fels Naptha" brand of soap. 
He was soon promoted to clerk for one of the proprietors and 
finally became a salesman and advertiser in the introduction of 
this commodity, traveling from the coast of Maine to Illinois 
and through the southern states. He commenced at three dol- 
lars a week and left the road at $1,500 per year and all ex- 
penses. Fred Cohen is an honored member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows at Somerset, is past grand of Lodge No. 
438 and an active member of the degree team. He is also con- 
nected with the Royal Arcanum Lodge, No. 985, and is present 
regent of the council. Being a keen business man, he naturally 
found a membership in the Modern Woodmen of the World for 
the protection it gives in the way of life insurance beneficia- 
ries. 

He married, September 17, 1899, at Newark, New Jersey, 
Lydis Corniss, who was graduated as a trained nurse in a 
training school. Her parents were Gerson and Frances Corniss. 
To them have been born Elmer, June 28, 1900, and Dora, June 
5, 1905. The last named was the first girl born in the Cohen 
family for three generations. 

DAVID H. WOLFERSBERGER. 

David H. Wolfersberger, a well known business man of 
Rockwood, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, formerly a farmer 
and now a popular hotel proprietor, is a representative in the 
present generation of a family that settled in the United States 
many years ago. The family originally came from Germany 
and brought with them habits of thrift and industry from the 
"Fatherland" that characterize their descendants to the pres- 
ent day. 

Philip Wolfersberger, father of David H. Wolfersberger, 



23H BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

was born October 18, 1802, died March 20, 1887. He was a suc- 
cessful farmer and merchant, having conducted a general store 
for a number of years. He married Elizabeth Stautfer, born 
April 8, 1809, died July .19, 1859, and they had children as fol- 
lows : David H.; of whom later; Mary, born September 21, 
1836; Elizabeth A., Mav 8, 1838; Amelia Barbara, September 
10, 1839; twin dnughters, Julv 27, 1841; Philip S., December 4, 
1842 ; John M., January 7, 1847 ; Hannah L., October 15, 1848. 

David H. Wolfersberger, eldest child of Philip and Eliza- 
beth (Stauffer) Wolfersberger, was born in Union Deposit, 
Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, February 3, 1835. He received 
his education in the common schools of Dauphin county and 
attended them until the age of sixteen years, acquiring a very 
good education. At that time he commenced working in his 
father's general store as clerk, retaining this position for four 
years, at the end of which time his father sold out. April 6, 
1.856, he removed with his father to what was then called Min- 
eral Point (now Rockwood), and finally went to Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, to take a course of study in a commercial col- 
lege. From this he graduated in 1857, went to Monroe Forge, 
Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, and engaged in clerking for a 
period of eight months, returning to Rockwood and again work- 
ing in a store for his father for the next four years. He then 
went back to Monroe Forge, remaining there for six years, re- 
turned to Rockwood in 1871 and engaged in the grocery business, 
which he followed for eleven years. In 1882 he opened a hotel, 
which became an exceedingly well patronized place, and is con- 
ducted on strictly temperance principles up to the present day. 
He is progressive and methodical in his business management 
and enjoys great popularity. 

He married, February 19, 1860, Catherine Klinefelter, 
born September 7, 1834, died April 11, 1900, and they have chil- 
dren as follows: Seward H. Klinefelter, born July 25, 1861, 
died March 28, 1862; AVilliam H., September 16, 1864; John 
Albert, June 23, 1867, died July 18, 1867; Edward F., August 
25, 1868, died February 16, 1892, was run over by an engine at 
Somerset and died an hour after the accident; James 0., Octo- 
ber 4, 1869; Charles H., August 12, 1872; Catherine Elizabeth, 
April 7, 1874. 

WHJ.IAM B. CONWAY. 

William B. Conway, of RockAvood, was born March 21, 1871, 
in Somerset county, and is a son of Samuel Conway, who was 
born Fcln'uary 28, J 836, near Markleysburg, Penns^^lvania, and 
follows the calling of a farmer. Samuel Conway married Lydia 
Close and their children were: Laura; Aniose, deceased; Mor- 
gan; William B., of whom later; Anna, deceased; Minnie; Isaac; 
Dollie, deceased; Frank, and two who died in infancy. 



BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 237 

William B. Conway, son of Samuel and Lydia (Close) Con- 
way, received his education in the schools of his native county, 
finishing at the normal school. After completing his education 
he taught school for one term and then became a telegraph op- 
erator for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company. He is now 
the company's agent at Rockwood. 

Mr. Conway married, November 15, 1896, Manuroil Rhoads, 
and they are the parents of one child, Agnes L., born February 
23, 1900. Mrs. Conway is a daughter of Daniel Rhoads, who 
was born March 8, 1835, in Somerset county, where he passed 
his life as a farmer. He married Sarah Dumbauld, born Feb- 
ruary 9, 1840, and their children were: Albert, born July 28, 
186i; died February 19, 1865; Mary E., born November 1, 1863, 
wife of a Mr. Coleman ; George M., born July 22, 1866, died Feb- 
ruary 6, 1867; Anna E., born July 26, 1868,' wife of a Mr. Wal- 
ters; Corelie B., born March 4, 1871, wife of a Mr. Hanna; Elto 
S., born February 23, 1873 ; H. Manuroil, born July 25, 1876, in 
Kingwood, Somerset county, wife of William B. Conway; Katie 
F., born January 10, 1880, wife of a Mr. Jennings. The death of 
Mr. Rhoads occurred October 8, 1899. He is survived by his 
widow, who is a native of Kingwood. 

CHARLES I. METZLER. 

Charles I. Metzler, an engineer in the employ of the Balti- 
more & Ohio Railroad Company, and a resident of Rockwood, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was born July 7, 1875, in 
Upper Turkeyfoot township, Somerset county, a son of Samuel 
K. and Mary (Beisecker) Metzler. Jacob Metzler (great- 
grandfather) was born in Germany, and was a miller by occu- 
pation. He came to this country when a small boy. Isaac 
Metzler (grandfather) was born in Somerset county, and fol- 
lowed the occupation of a miller during his entire active work- 
ing life. Samuel K. Metzler (father) was born in Jenner town- 
ship, and following in the footsteps of his father and grand- 
father, took up the occupation of a miller. His wife was Mary 
Beisecker, and they were the parents of four children, namely: 
Anna Rose, Ida, John and Charles I. 

Charles I. Metzler obtained his education in the common 
schools of Somerset county, and at the age of sixteen left school 
and engaged in farming for his father. After a short time 
spent at this occupation, he went into the sawmilling business, 
and in 1898 engaged as fireman on the Baltimore & Ohio rail- 
road. He was so engaged until 1905, when he was promoted to 
engineer. He is an industrious, energetic young man and a 
well qualified engineer, and renders valuable services to his 
employers. 

Mr. Metzler married, in 1895, Ettie Brougher, born April 



238 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

26, 1880, in Upper Turkeyfoot township. Four children were 
bom to them: Oscar Glen, deceased; Fay, deceased; Ruth L., 
born September 9, 1901; Charles Rayburn, deceased. 

GEORGE F. GORMAN. 

George F. Gorman, of Rockwood, was born May 4, 1869, in 
Black township, and is a son of Frederick Gorman, a native of 
Germany, who emigrated to the United States and settled in 
Somerset county. 

George F. Gorman attended the common schools of Somer- 
set county until the age of eighteen, and was then for three 
years engaged in farming with his uncle. At twenty-one he was 
employed as a teamster by Penrose Wolf, and at the end of one 
year became a brakeman on the Baltimore & Ohio railroad. 
After serving in this capacity two years and a half he was 
made fireman and worked as such for six years. In 1898 he 
was promoted to the position of engineer, which he still re- 
tains. He belongs to the Brotherhood of Locomotive En- 
gineers and he and his family are members of the Lutheran 
church of Rockwood. 

Mr. Gorman married, June 30. 1897, Mary Burk, and their 
children are: Raymond, born May 10, 1898; Nettie, February 
1, 1900 ; Clarence, November 1, 1901 ; and Kenneth, May 8, 1904. 
Mrs. Gorman was born October 22, 1875, and is the only child of 
John and Mary (Fletcher) Burk, of Allegheny county, where 
Mr. Burk was employed in the gristmill. 

JOHN G. PYLE. 

John G. Pyle, a representative citizen of Rockwood, Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania, was bom in New Centerville, No- 
vember 29, 1865, a son of Peter and Sadie (Brandell) Pyle, 
and is of German descent. Peter Pyle was born in 1829 in Mil- 
ford township, and was a mason by trade. His wife, Sadie 
Brandell, was born in Westmoreland county, a daughter of 
John Brandell. They were the parents of four children, viz. : 
Mary Fletcher; William, deceased: Maggie, married Dr. Gard- 
ner; and John G. 

John G. Pyle obtained his education in the public schools 
of Somerset county, and at the age of sixteen left school, and 
for the succeeding five years was engaged in farming. He then 
embarked in the lumber business, which he followed for three 
years. Later he found employment as a fireman on the Balti- 
more & Ohio railroad, and his faithful and efficient work won 
for him a promotion, December 29, 1900, to engineer, and he 
has since been running on the Connellsville division. 

Mr. Pyle married. October 19, 1893, Sadie (Hay) Holtz- 
houer, widow of John Holtzhouer, born May 14, 1866, daughter 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 239 

of Andrew and Mary (Miller) Hay, and one of three children, 
as follows: Abraham, Annie and Sadie. One child, Alfreda, 
was born to Mr. and Mrs. Pyle, January 3, 1905. 

WALTER J. GARDNER. 

Walter J. Gardner, of Rockwood, was born January 27, 
1848, in England, and is a son of Harry H. Gardner, a native 
of that country, who came to the United States and settled in 
Bellwood, Blair county. All his life he followed his trade, 
which was that of a miller. His political affiliations were with 
the Republicans. He died in 1899, in Cambria county. 

Walter J. Gardner, sou of Harry H. Gardner, was brought 
to this country by his parents as a boy, and received his educa- 
tion in the common schools of Blair county. At the age of six- 
teen he left school and learned the trade of milling, which he 
followed for eighteen years. He then became proprietor of 
a hotel in Johnstown, which he conducted for a number of 
years, finally selling out. In May, 1904, he entered into part- 
nership with D. B. Zimmerman and bought the mill at Rock- 
wood, which they remodeled completely, building a new mill. 
Like his father, he is a Republican in politics. 

Mr. Gardner married Amanda (Detwiller) Rightenour, 
daughter of Henry and Sarah Rightenour, and two daughters 
were born to them, Hattie Meyers and Bertha. Mrs. Gardner 
died in 1877. In 1879 Mr. Gardner married Eva, daughter of 
Charles Dannaker. Five children have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Gardner: Margaret, Harry, Julia, William and Catharine. 

PATRICK JOSEPH McGRATH. 

Patrick J. McGrath, the genial proprietor of the National 
Hotel at Berlin, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, is a native of 
Ireland, born February 16, 1864, son of John and Mary ( Walsh) 
McGrath. John McGrath (father) was born in 1807, and was 
a well-to-do Irish farmer, owning one hundred and eighty acres 
of valuable land, well stocked with blooded horses, cows and 
sheep. He married Mary Walsh, who was born in 1821, and of 
this marriage ten children were born, six sons and four daugh- 
ters. John owns and tills the old farm in Ireland. Andrew 
Joseph was educated for the priesthood, and served a parish 
in Maitland, Australia, for ten years. He then came to Amer- 
ica, where he was in charge of a parish for sixteen years at 
Fairmont, West Virginia. He contracted a throat trouble at 
the latter place, went to Europe for treatment, and there died. 
Rev. Dennis A., the eldest member of the family, was also of the 
clergy of the Roman Catholic church, and for forty-two years 
has been located at Bathhurst, New South Wales. Thomas, 
deceased, was a physician in Tyrone county, Ireland. Philip is 



240 BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

a practicing pliysician in Scotland. The daughters are all mar- 
ried and live in Ireland. John McGrath (fatlier) lived to the 
remarkable age of ninety-three years, passing away in 1900. 
The death of Mrs. McGrath occurred in 1898, when she was 
sixty-seven years old. 

Patrick J. McGrath received his initial education in the 
best schools in his native land, and at the age of sixteen came 
to this country, landing in New York, where he attended the 
city schools for two years. He then went to Fairmont, West 
Virginia, to visit his brother. Rev. Andrew Joseph McGrath, 
and in 1886 returned to the old home in Ireland, remaining 
there a year and a half. Returning to Fairmont, he entered 
the service of P. H. Bennett, a railroad contractor, as time- 
keeper, continuing his connection with this firm for two years. 
Then for five years he worked in the same capacity for the 
firm of Bennett & Talbott. He again returned to Europe, 
spending a year in travel through Ireland, Scotland and Eng- 
land. He returned to America, and after three years took 
another trip across the sea. He returned by way of Canada 
and the Great Lakes to Connellsville in 1892, married and re- 
mained there two years. His next removal was to Wheeling, 
West Virginia, where he engaged in the hotel business for 
eighteen months. Selling his interest there, he moved to Mount 
Pleasant, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, bought and for 
five years conducted a hotel there. In 1901 he purchased the 
National Hotel at Berlin, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. This 
was an old property, which he rebuilt, installing electric light- 
ing, steam heat, etc., and converted it into one of the most 
handsome and modern hotels in the county. There is also a 
large barn and stable on the premises of Mr McGrath 's build- 
ing. Mr. McGrath has other property interests in Berlin and 
owns a fine farm in the township, purchased in 1906 from 
Simon F. Hay. 

Mr. McGrath is an ideal "mine host," extending a pleas- 
ant, cordial greeting to all who seek his hospitality. Under 
his management the new National Hotel is enjoying the pros- 
perity it deserves. Situated on a prominent corner in the 
highest part of the town, its porches are swept by the cool 
mountain breezes, and it is a most desirable abiding place dur- 
ing the heated summer months. In political relations Mr. Mc- 
Grath is a sound Democrat, and cast his first presidential vote 
for Grover Cleveland. In the spring of 1906 he was elected 
a member of the borough council of Berlin. In religious faith 
he is a Roman Catholic. 

He married, August 11, 1892, Bridget Quinn, a daughter 
of James and Margaret Quinn, of Connellsville, Pennsylvania. 
She came to this country from Ireland with her parents when 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 241 

less than a year old. Her father, James Quinn, was superin- 
tendent of mines at Connellsville, whither he and liis family- 
removed from Pittsburg, the first place of their settling in 
America. ^Ir. and JMrs. McGrath have two children: Mary, 
aged thirteen, and John, aged eleven, both attending school in 
Berlin. 

WILLARD HOMER MILLER. 

Willard Homer Miller, an enterprising and progressive 
young business man of Berlin, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, 
was born March 28, 1881, in Coon Island, Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, son of Charles Vv'. and Nancy E. (Holmes) 
Miller. Charles W. Miller is a son of Christopher Miller, a 
Washington county farmer. He was reared on the home farm 
and learned the trade of millwright. He subsequently became 
a traveling salesman, which business he now follows, Charles 
W. Miller is a Republican in i^olitics, and in church connections 
a Baptist. He married Nancy E. Holmes, who was a daughter 
of George Y. Holmes, a native of Scotland, who came to this 
country at the age of ten years. He became a farmer and a 
minister in the Baptist church. Mrs. Miller was educated in 
Washington county, and lived on the home farm until her mar- 
riage, in 1860. The following named children were born of 
this marriage: Willard Homer, of whom later; Alice A., IjuIu 
E. (both residing at home with their parents), and Edgar H., 
a druggist of Salisbury. 

Willard H. Miller received his initial education in the 
township schools and at the age of ten years entered the high 
school of Claysville, Pennsylvania. Early in life he resolved 
to follow the drug business, and with this end in view (at the 
age of fourteen) entered the service of G. Y. Holmes, a drug- 
gist of Claysville, continuing there for two and a half years. 
For five years he was engaged in the drug store of W. C Mar- 
tin, of Munhall, Pennsylvania. Mr. Miller studied for his pro- 
fession in the School of Pharmacy of the Western University 
of Pennsylvania, and was graduated from that institution in 
1903. In March, 1905, he formed a partnership with his 
brother, Edgar H. Miller (who is in the drug business at Elk 
Lick), and established a drug store at Berlin, conducting the 
business under the firm name of Miller & Miller, but, under 
the management of Willard H. Although a young man, Mr. 
Miller is thoroughly familiar with all the details of his pro- 
fession, and brings to his own business the experience gained 
in other establishments. He is a firm believer in modern ad- 
vertising methods, which he oxtensivel.y employs. His store 
is already well known in town and township, and the generous 
patronage he receives is the best proof of its popularity. 

Vol. Ill 16 



242 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

In political affiliations Mr. Miller is a strong Republican. 
Fraternally he holds membership in Berlin lodge, I. 0. O. F., 
Homestead Lodge, Eagles, and Knights of Pythias, Berlin 
Lodge. He is an admirer of athletic sports, and is specially 
fond of base-ball, which naturally brings him in close touch 
with the younger element, while his sterling business principles 
and genial social qualities commend him to all. He is un- 
married. 

MAHLON S. RIEMAN. 

The family of which Mahlon S. Rieman, of Berlin, is a rep- 
resentative, was founded in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, 
by Gottlieb Rieman, who was bom in Germany in 1747. 'Upon 
his arrival in this country he settled on what is now known 
as the Snyder farm in Stony Creek, Somerset county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he followed his trade of tailor, and where his death 
occurred in the year 1804. He was the father of three sons and 
two daughters, among whom was George Rieman, born 1768, 
died in 1834. George Rieman was the father of a son, Jacob 
Rieman, born in 1813, married Susan Fike, and was a promi- 
nent farmer of Stony Creek township. 

Rev. Samuel F, Rieman, son of Jacob and Susan (Fike) 
Rieman, and father of Mahlon S. Rieman, was born in Stony 
Creek township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, March 28, 1841. 
He was educated in the township schools and thereafter fol- 
lowed the occupation of farming, being especially interested 
in the raising of cattle and improvement of their breeding, and 
owning a large amount of fine stock. In early life he was a 
Republican in politics, but later became a third party Prohibi- 
tionist. He was a member of the German Baptist church, in 
which body he held the offices of deacon, elder and preacher. 
He was also the incumbent of many of the township offices, in 
which he rendered capable and efficient service. He married 
Rebecca Schrock, born 1842, only daughter of George and Susan 
(Horner) Schrock, and a sister of the Rev. William G. Schrock. 
George Schrock was a son of Christian Schrock, of Germany, 
who founded the family in America. Susan (Horner) Schrock 
was a daughter of David and Elizabeth Horner, of Summit, 
Pennsylvania, born in 1818, died 1865. The children of Rev 
Samuel F. and Rebecca (Schrock) Rieman were as follows: 
Mahlon S., of whom later; Clara G., wife of the Rev. J. J. 
Shaffer; George S.. married Emma Walker; Elizabeth S., 
resides at home; Alvin H., died in infancy. The father of 
these children died February 17, 1897. His widow is living 
at the present time (1906) and makes her home with her son, 
George S. Rieman. 

The educational advantages enjoyed by Mahlon S. Rieman 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 243 

during his boyhood were obtained in the township schools and 
the Berlin Normal school. He worked on the homestead farm 
until he was seventeen years old, and the following four years 
devoted his attention to the vocation of teaching. In 1891, the 
year of his marriage, he returned to the home farm and after- 
wards purchased the farm on which he now resides. The farm 
contains two hundred and twenty-five acres of highly cultivated 
land, well stocked, with an orchard of about four acres. Mr. 
Rieman is an intelligent and progressive farmer, and under 
his efficient managem.ent the farm is rapidly becoming one of 
the best in that section, he having many improvements tliereon 
which are both modern and substantial. Mr. Rieman is a stock- 
holder in the First National Bank of Berlin. He has held the 
township offices of auditor and treasurer, discharging his duties 
in a highly satisfactory manner. Upon attaining his majority 
he cast his vote for the candidates of the Republican party, but 
later changed his allegiance to the Prohibition party. He 
holds membership in the German Baptist church, of which he 
is a deacon and teacher in the Sabbath school. 

Mr. Rieman married, February 26, 1891, Dillie V. Walker, 
daughter of the Rev. Daniel H. and Mary Walker, the former 
named being a farmer and a minister of the German Baptist 
church. Dillie V. Rieman, who is one of a family of seven chil- 
dren, was educated in the township schools, resided on the farm 
with her parents until her marriage, and is a member of the 
German Baptist church. Two children were the issue of this 
union: Ralph W., born September 26, 1894, who is attending 
school ; and Ruth, born December 1, 1900. Modest and unassum- 
ing, Mr. Rieman is a man of force and character, much es- 
teemed by all who know him. His wife has proved a help- 
mate in the truest sense of the word, and their home, a mod- 
ern, substantial dwelling, surrounded by a well kept lawn and 
attractive flowers and foliage, is ample evidence of their thrift 
and good management. 

PJLIAS COBER. 

Elias Cober, a representative citizen and progressive 
farmer of Pinehill, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was born 
in Brothers Valley township, July 14, 1845, a son of Peter P. 
and Elizabeth (Meyers) Cober, and grandson of Peter and 
Elizabeth (Landis) Cober, the former a farmer of Brothers 
Valley and a minister of the Brethren church. He is of Ger- 
man ancestry. 

Peter P. Cober (father) was born in Brothers Valley town- 
ship, November 24, 1808. He was educated in the township 
schools and followed the occupation of a farmer during his en- 
tire active working life. He was a Whig in politics, but after 



244 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

the formation of the Republican part}^ joined that organization. 
In religious faith he was a member of the Brethren church. He 
married Elizabeth Meyers, born in Brothers Valley, May 11, 
1817, and educated in the schools of that township. Nine chil- 
dren were the issue of this marriage, six of whom died during 
an epidemic of diphtheria. The living are : Lydia, married 
Henry G. Hay, a farmicr of Brothers Valley township and a 
veteran of the Civil war ; Elias, of whom later ; and Anna, mar- 
ried William P. Hay, a farmer of Jefferson township. Peter 
P. Cober died November 3, 1878, and his wife died October 11, 
1889. 

Elias Cober obtained his intellectual training in the com- 
mon schools of the township and assisted his father with the 
farmwork during the summer months. In 1875 he bought the 
farm that has been owned successively by his grandfather, his 
father and himself. It comprises one hundred and forty-nine 
acres of highly cultivated land, well stocked with horses and 
cattle of good breeding. It contains, also, a sugar camp of three 
hundred vessels. Mr. Cober is an excellent farmer and a use- 
ful, industrious citizen. In politics he affiliates with the Re- 
publican party and cast his first vote for Ulysses S. Grant. He 
has held several township offices, and in each of these has dis- 
charged his duties acceptably. He is interested in the Philson 
National Bank of Berlin and also the Farmers' Union Associa- 
tion and Fire Insurance Company^ in which he has served as 
director. He is a member and deacon of the Brethren church. 

He married, January 21, 1872, Mary M. Laub, born March 
30, 1843, in Somerset county, a daughter of Jonathan and Eliza- 
beth Laub. Jonathan Laub was born in 1819, was a resident of 
Somerset county and also resided for some years in West Vir- 
ginia. He entered the Union army during the Civil war and 
contracted tyijhold fever, from which he died. His wife, Eliza- 
beth Laub, was born in 1819 and died in 1884. Their daughter 
Elizabeth (Mrs. Cober) received her education in the schools of 
the county and is a member of the Lutheran church. Mr. 
and Mrs. Elias Cober are the parents of the following children : 

1. Emanuel W., bom February 7, 1873, educated in the 
public and normal schools of the county, Bucknell Academy and 
Bucknell University, from which he graduated in 1899. He 
taught in the public and private schools of Somerset county 
and is now an instructor in the Friends' Central School at 
Fifteenth and Race streets, Philadelphia. He served in the 
Spanish-American war and was a corporal in Company A, 
Twelfth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. His wife was 
Miss Lettie Cook, of Meyersdale, and they have one son, Rob- 
ert. 2. William H., born March 9, 1875, acquired his education- 
in the public and normal schools of the county and graduated 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 245 

from the Southwestern State Normal, at California, Pennsylva- 
nia. He is principal in charge of all the schools of Somerset. He 
married Miss Hattie Nntt, of Fayette county, and they have 
two children, James and an infant. 3. Peter G., born Septem- 
ber 26, 1880, attended the public and normal schools and was 
graduated in 1901 from the Southwestern State Normal. He 
engaged for some time in teaching in the county schools, and 
is now in his junior year at Bucknell University. 4. Emma 
N., born January 18. 1884, passed through the public and 
normal county schools and is now a student in the Southwest- 
ern State Normal. 5. Albert M., born March 12, 1886, gradu- 
ated from the common and normal schools, and is now teach- 
ing in the public schools. These children are all members of 
the Brethren church, and the boys affiliate with the Republican 
party. 

Mr. Cober is a most progressive and broad-minded man. 
Deprived himself of the educational advantages he craved, he 
has given his children superior advantages. He leads a sim- 
ple, upright Christian life, and is highly esteemed by all who 
know him. 

ABRAHAM M. SEVITS. 

Abraham M. Sevits, a veteran of the Civil war, and a ven- 
erable and esteemed citizen of Beachdale, where he is leading 
the life of a retired farmer, was born in Stony Creek township, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, October 18, 1838, is a de- 
scendant of the old revolutionary stock, his great-grandfather 
on the paternal side having served in that struggle, thereby 
losing his life, being killed in battle. Benjamin Sevits, grand- 
father of Abraham M. Sevits, was a stonemason by trade, and 
at an early date removed from Berks county to Somerset 
county, where the remainder of his life was spent. His wife, 
Catherine (Nye) Sevits, bore him ten children. Benjamin 
Sevits died at the age of sixty-five, and his wife at the age of 
eightv-five. 

William Sevits, father of Abraham M. Sevits, was born 
in Stonv Creek township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, in 
1810. He was educated in the common schools, after which 
he served an apprenticeship at the trade of stonemason, which 
he followed until middle age. when he purchased a farm in 
Brothers Valley, which is now the property of his son, John 
L. Sevits, and here he lived and farmed for the remainder of 
his life. PTe was a member of the German Baptist church, in 
which he was a deacon and elder, and he also preached in the 
churches of the township. He was a Republican in politics. 
He married Barbara Miller, born in 1814, a daughter of Chris- 
tian Miller, and fourteen children were the issue of this union, 



246 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

seven of whom are li^'ing at the present time : Abraham M., 
of whom later; John L., a resident of Brothers Valley town- 
ship, occnpying the old homestead; AVilliam, a resident of 
Ohio; Jacob, also a resident of Ohio: Mrs. Snsan Brant, a resi- 
dent of Berlin, Pennsylvania ; Mrs. Israel Brant, a resident of 
Brothers Valley: Mrs. Edward Pngh, residing near Liste, 
Pennsylvania. Wiiliam Sevits, father of these children, died 
in June, 1889, aged seventy-nine years, and his wife, who was 
an active member of the German Baptist church, died Septem- 
ber, 1889, aged seventy-five years. 

Abraham M. Sevits was educated in the common and nor- 
mal schools of Somerset county. In early life he learned the 
trade of stonemason, following in the footsteps of his father 
and grandfather, at which he worked during the summer 
months, and throughout the remainder of the year taught 
school, one term in Stony Creek township and eight terms in 
Brothers Valley. At the age of forty-three he abandoned his 
trade and turned his attention to farming, conducting his oper- 
ations on a farm located five miles west of Berlin on the Clay 
pike. In 1902 he sold the farm to Harvey Pritts and moved 
to Beachdale, Avhere he built a pretty home, surrounded by an 
acre of ground, where he has since led a retired life. 

In 1864 Mr. Sevits enlisted in Company E, Ninety-third 
Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and fought with his regi- 
ment through the bloody battles in the Shenandoah Valley and 
in front of Petersburg during the last year of the war. He was 
neither sick, wounded nor captured during his term of service, 
although in one battle he had five bullets pass through his 
clothing and knapsack without leaving a scratch upon his bodv. 
He was honorably discharged at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in 
1865. He has held the offices of school director, supervisor, 
auditor and a member of the election boards, rendering valua- 
ble and efficient service in each and all. He was formerly a 
Republican in politics, but of late years has cast his vote for 
the candidates of the Prohibition party. He is a member of 
the Brethren church, near Beachdale, in which he serves as 
deacon, and is also assistant superintendent of the Sabbath 
school connected therewith. He is a member of Cummins Post, 
No. 210, Grand Army of the Republic, at Somerset, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

On January 31, 1861, Mr. Sevits married Catherine Bitt- 
ner, born August 11, 1837, one of six children born to John J., 
a farmer of Brothers Valley, and Susanna (Boger) Bittner, 
members of the German Baptist church. One of the brothers 
of Catherine (Bittner) Sevits, Silas Bittner, was a Union sol- 
dier and died in Ijibby prison. Six children were tlie issue of 
this marriage, as follows: Lizzie, born August 10, 1862, be- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 247 

came the wife of Harvey Sclirock; she died October 3, 1884, 
leaving two children; Hilton, who resides in Somerset; and 
Lizzie, who was taken by her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Sevits, with whom she still resides. Snsan M., born April 6, 
1867, became the wife of H. H. Brant, and they are the parents 
of five children. John R., born August 20, 1869, a farmer, mar- 
ried Annie Pritts, and they are the parents of three children. 
Jennie, born April 1, 1874, became the wife of Harvey G. Hay, 
and they are the parents of three children. AVilliam Gr., born 
December 31, 1875, married Daisy Brant, who bore him two 
children. Henry C, born May 4, 1882, married Essie Brant; 
issue, one child. These children all received a good common 
school education, and are filling well their several stations in 
life. Mr. and Mrs. Sevits are now enjoying the fruits of a 
well-spent life. 

ROBERT McLUCKIE. 

Robert McLuckie, one of the most prosperous farmers, 
miners and general business men of Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, is a native of Scotland, and the first of his family 
to have settled in Somerset county. He brought with him the 
habits of thrift, industry and frugality for which the Scotch 
are noted, and this has contributed in no small measure to his 
success. 

William IMcLuckie, father of Robert McLuckie, was born 
in Scotland, June 27, 1826. He was a miner in his native coun- 
try, and came to the United States in 1852, settling near Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania, where he worked as a miner. After a 
time he removed to Maryland, where he also worked as a miner, 
but for the last thirty-five years of his life he conducted a gen- 
eral store in Frostburg, Maryland, with a reasonable amount 
of success. He managed this business until his death, which 
occurred June 6, 1905. He was a very intelligent and well edu- 
cated man, was a member of the Lutheran church, and affiliated- 
with the Re]niblican party. He married Mary McLuckie, born 
in Scotland in 1821, daughter of Anthony McLuckie, who was 
the grandson of Anthony McLuckie, a finely educated man. 
He was a superintendent of mines and iron works, and the 
author of a number of books and ]mm]ihlets on religious sub- 
jects. Mrs. ^McLuckie, the wife of William McLuckie, was a 
well educated woman, member of the Methodist church. She 
died August 18, 1899. The children of Mr. and Mrs. William 
Mcljuckie are: Robert, of whom later; Matthew, unmarried; 
AVilliam, married Jennie Gunnett; Alexander, married Mary 
Williamson; Elizabeth, married Thomas Rowe; Andrew, mar- 
ried A I lie Larue; James, unmarried; Margaret, unmarried; 
Mary Belle, died August 1, 1899; Anthony, unmarried; Abra- 



248 BEDFORD AND iSOMEKSET COUNTIES 

ham, married Matilda Everline. The first two named children 
were born in Scotland, the others in Frostburg, Maryland. 

iiobert Mcljuckie, eldest child of William and Mary (Mc- 
Luckie) McLuckie, was born near Ulasgow, Scotland, May 3, 
1850. He was three years old when his parents came to the 
United States. He was educated in the public schools of Frost- 
burg, Maryland, and at an early age began work in the mines 
as a breaker boy. Liater iiobert became a miner, which occu- 
pation he followed until the age of twenty-eight years, in 1878 
he removed to Brothers Valley, Fennsyivama, where he pur- 
chased a farm, which he cultivated and on which he has smce 
that time resided. The farm consists of three hundred acres, 
on which a large barn was built in 1889, and a commodious resi- 
dence in 1891. It is well stocked with good blooded farm an- 
imals of all kinds. The entire farm is underlaid with coal. 
Mr. McLuckie is working one vein of this rich deposit, with 
which he supplies the local trade, furnishing about ten thousand 
bushels of bed "J3" coal each winter. There is also an excel- 
lent and thriving orchard of apple and other fruit trees. Mr. 
McLuckie is the owner of two other farms, which are also in 
a most flourishing condition. He affiliates with the Republican 
party, and cast his first i^residential vote for Ulysses S. Grant. 
He is a member of the Lutheran church. 

He married, December 12, 1874, Emma Angwin, born in 
Michigan, September 30, 1855, daughter of Benjamin and Emily 
Angwin, of i'rostburg, Maryland. Mr. Angwin is a miner, a 
Republican, and a member of the Methodist church. He and 
his wife are still living (1906), and have had a family of ten 
children. Mrs. McLuckie is a member of the Lutheran church. 
The children of Robert McLuckie and his wife are: William 
A., born in Frostburg, Maryland, September 10, 1875, married 
Lula Schrock, is a carpenter by trade, and lives in Berlin, 
Pennsylvania. Margaret, born in Frostburg, Maryland, No- 
vember 10, 1876, died October 30, 1881. Benjamin, born in 
Frostburg, Maryland, April 10, 1878, married Ruth Miller, and 
is his father's assistant on the farm, where he resides; two 
children, Paul N., aged three, and Merle, aged one year. Es- 
tella, born January 5, 18^0, educated in the public schools and 
is a graduate of Southwestern Normal College, of California, 
Pennsylvania. She teaches in public schools at Windber, Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania. Mary B., born October 14, 1881, 
married Frederick Lively, a carpenter, and lives in Berlin, 
Pennsylvania; two children: Geneva, three years, and Olin, 
aged one year. Cora B., born January 29, 1883, married Ed- 
ward Miller, a cigarmaker, who lives in Berlin, Pennsylvania. 
Martha N., born September 29, 1884, lives at home with her 
parents. Robert L., born February 18, 1886, educated in the 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES ^249 

public and normal schools and in the Tri-State Business Col- 
lege at Cumberland, ^faryland. He passed the civil service 
examination, took a six months' course of bookkeeping and 
stenography at the naval school, Brookhm navy yard, and is 
now stenographer to Commander Sharpe, United States cruiser 
''Chattanooga." Elizabeth, born November 11, 1888, died 
September 26, 1889. Annie P., born July 17, 1890, is receiving 
her education in the public and normal schools. Emily, born 
July 13, 1892, attends school. James E., born April 27, 1894, 
died December 2, 1895. All the children, except the three older 
ones, were born in Brothers Valley township, and all are mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church. The sons who have reached the 
voting age are members of the Republican party. 

CHARLES J. HEMMINGER, M. D. 

Dr. Charles J. Hemminger, of Rockwood, was born 1873, 
in Somerset township, son of Cvrus Hemminger, who was bom 
in 1848, in Somerset county, a descendant of German ancestors. 
Cyrus Hemminger received a common school education and 
made agriculture his life-work. He served his township as 
school director for three terms, was a Republican in politics, 
and held the faith of the Lutheran church. His wife was Mis- 
souri Barron, also of German descent, born in 1849, in Somer- 
set county. 

Charles J. Hemminger, son of Cyrus and Missouri (Bar- 
ron) Hemminger, was educated in the common and normal 
schools, also Mt. Pleasant Academy. His professional train- 
ing was received at the Eclectic Medical Institute, Cincinnati. 
Ohio, from which he graduated with the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine. He is superintendent and half owner of the Rock- 
wood Electric Company. For one term (three years) he served 
as school director of Roclrvvood boroug-h, during the erection 
of Rockwood school house, with signal ability, and is now (1906) 
councilman of borough. He is physician of the N. W. A., ex- 
aminer for eleven old line insurance companies, prelate of the 
Knights of Pythias, and trustee of the I. 0. 0. F. In politics 
he is a Republican and in religious belief a Lutheran. 

Dr. Hemminger married, December 31, 1898, Annie C. 
Berkey, a graduate of the high school. Mrs. Hemminger is the 
daughter of a farmer, both her parents being of German 
descent. 

CHARLES W. KNEPPER. 

Charles W. Kne])per, of Berlin, is a great-grandson of 
John Knepper, who wns of German descent, and was born in 
this country in 1765. He was a shoemaker by trade, and when 
a young man came to Somerset county and settled in Brothers 
Valley township. John Knepper married Anna Maria Gless- 



250 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

ner, and their children were: AVilliam, Jacob, John (of whom 
later), Lewis, Peter, Jonathan, George, Simon, Henry, Benja- 
min, Elizabeth (Mrs. Hanger), Catharine (Mrs. Hay), and 
Polly (Mrs. Haas). The eldest son, William, was a soldier in 
the war of 1812, and died at the age of eighty-eight. The 
death of the father of the family occurred in 1817. 

John Kne])])er, son of John and Anna Maria (Glessner) 
Knepper, was born in 1795, in Somerset county. He is entitled 
to the honor of having been die first Abolitionist in Brothers 
Valley township, and the only voter who cast his ballot for the 
free-soil candidate. John Knepper married Susan Stahl, who 
bore him the following children: John, Lewis J. (of whom 
later), David, Solomon, Sally (Mrs. Coleman), Elizabeth (Mrs. 
Graham), Rebecca, deceased (Mrs. Cover), and Polly (Mrs. 
Smith). Of these children, Solomon, born in 1820, was a minis- 
ter of the German Baptist church, and died in 1854. His son, 
John H. Knepper, railroad agent at Berlin, entered upon the 
ministry of the German Baptist church in 1880. John Knepper, 
the father, died in 1857. 

Lewis J. Knepper, son of John and Susan (Stahl) Knep- 
per, whose biography appears on another page of this work, 
was twice married. His second wife was Elizabeth, daughter 
of Jonathan Walker, and their children were: Charles W., of 
whom later; Edward M., farmer of Brothers Valley township; 
Henry, died at the age of eleven years ; and Emma, died at the 
age of two years and a half. After the death of her husband, 
in 1888, Mrs. Knepper retained the management of the home 
farm, which had been willed to her, and cultivated it successfully 
until 1905, when she sold it to her sons, Charles W. and Ed- 
ward M. She was a woman of great business ability, and under 
her management the estate was rendered safely and substan- 
tially profitable. Mrs. Knepper still resides on the farm. 

Charles W. Knepper, son of Lewis J. and Elizabeth 
(Walker) Knepper, was born August 9, 1870, on the homestead, 
and received his education in the public schools. After his 
father's death he remained at home as his mother's assistant 
until his marriage, when he bought the George Schrock farm 
and worked it for five years. At the end of that time he sold 
the property to H. MostoUer and moved to his present farm, 
which he purchased in 1902, This farm consists of two hun- 
dred and eighteen acres, well stocked with good horses and 
cows and having an abundance of fruit of various kinds. Coal 
underlies the farm, Mr. Knepper retaining his ownership of 
the four-foot vein. In connection with the farm there is a large 
dairy. Mr. Knepper has recently purchased of his mother a 
half interest in the home farm. In taking the census of 1900 
Mr. Knepper was made one of the enumerators. He is a Re- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 25 L 

publican and a member of the German Baptist church, also be- 
longing to the Sunday school. 

Mv. Knepi)er married, April 15, 1897, Eleanora Critchfield, 
and they are the parents of two children: Blanche C, aged 
seven; and Elizabeth M., aged five. Mrs. Ivnepper is a daugh- 
ter of Jacob C. Critchfield, a farmer of Milford township, where 
he also owned and operated a gristmill. He filled various town- 
ship offices, among them those of county commissioner, poor- 
house commissioner and school director. He was a Republican 
and a mejnber of the Tjutheran church. Mr. Critchfield married 
Mary Dull, and their children were: Oliver, farmer of Black 
township, married Rohania Knepper; John M., farmer of Mil- 
ford township, married Annie Hay; Louisa, wife of Jacob B. 
Critchfield, a lumberman of Rockwood; Minerva, wife of Ed- 
ward Hoover, ex-sheriff of Somerset county, lives at Somerset; 
William W., farmer of Milford township, married Sadie 
Brahm; Emma, widow of Watson Schrock, lives in Crete, Ne- 
braska; Edward S., connected with Doane College, Crete, Ne- 
braska, married Kate Ferman ; Annie M., wife of Edward 
Spangler, policeman of Rockwood; Eleanora, born March 22, 
1871, educated in public and normal schools of the county, 
taught one year in the Berlin schools and five years in the 
township schools previous to her marriage to Mr. Knepper. 
She is a member of the German Baptist church. Mrs. Critch- 
field, who was a member of the Lutheran church, died August 1, 
.1889, aged sixty- one, and the death of Mr. Critchfield occurred 
June 1, 1894, when he was sixty-five years old. 

S. SYLVESTER HAY. 

S. Sylvester Hay, of Berlin, is a great-grandson of Simon 
Hay, who was born April 18, 1742, in German}-, and in 1763 
emigrated to the American colonies. His wife was Anna May 
and they were the parents of a large family. Simon Hay died 
February 3, 1804, and his widow passed away in April, 1863. 

Peter S. Hay, son of Simon and Anna (May) Hay, was 
born A])ril 18, 1790, and married Elizabeth Walker, born Sep- 
tember 30, 1794. Their children were: David, Michael, Philip 
(of whom later), Mary, Susanna, Elizabeth, Catharine, Peter, 
ValeiUine, and Caroline. 

Philip Hay, son of Peter S. and Elizabeth (Walker) Hay, 
was born A))ril 3, 1820, and married, February 5, 1846, Anna 
Olinger, born August 29, 1824. The following were their chil- 
dren: William P., S. Sylvester (of whom later), Hiram P., 
Peter S., Melissa, Clai-a A., P. Ei)hraim, Sarah, l^ike, Ellen 
(deceased), and Alark (deceased). Mrs. Hay died October 27, 
1808, and the death of Mr. Hay occun-ed August 15, 1902. 

S. Sylvester Hay, son of J^hilij) and Anna (Olingei-) Hay, 



252 BEDFOED AND JSOMEKSET COUNTIES 

was born January 8, 1855, on the farm which, he now owns, and 
was educated iu the public schools. He began farming early 
in life, working for his father until his marriage. After that 
event he worked the home farm two years on shares, and in 
1884 purchased it from his father. The estate consists of three 
hundred and fifteen acres and the improvements are extensive, 
including a brick house, barns and other buildings. There is 
a sugar camp of between eight hundred and nine hundred ves- 
sels, good orchards, and the farm is underlaid with coal, which 
is not being worked. The place is well stocked with good farm 
cattle, and in addition to being a stock raiser Mr. Hay is a stock 
buyer and feeder for the market, doing a large business. He 
is interested financially in the Citizens' National Bank of 
Meyersdale, the Economy Telephone Company, and in Ohio oil 
wells. Politically he is a Democrat, having cast his first presi- 
dential vote for Samuel J. Tilden. He is a member of the 
Mount Zion congregation of the Reformed church, which he 
has served as deacon and trustee. He is also interested in the 
Sunday school, of which he is treasurer. 

Mr. Hay married, February 23, 1882, Alice, daughter of 
Joel Berkle.y, and they are the parents of one child, Edison M., 
born April 2, 1884, and educated in the public schools of the 
township, the Berlin Normal school and the Mercersburg Acad- 
emy, Mercersburg, Pennsylvania. He has chosen farming as 
his occupation. Mrs. Hay was born June 3, 1859, was educated 
in the public schools and is a member of the Reformed church. 

EDWARD D. ULESSNER. 

Edward D. Glessner, of Berlin, is a son of Tobias Glessner, 
whose sketch will be found on another page. There also will be 
found an extended account of the Glessner family in America. 

Edward D. Glessner was born March 2, 1865, on the home- 
stead in Stony Creek township, and obtained his education in 
the common and normal schools of the county. He worked on 
the farm for his father until the age of twenty-one, when he 
married, and for five years thereafter worked the farm on 
shares with his father. He then rented a farm from his father- 
in-law, which he cultivated for three years, and at the end of 
that time bought a farm of one hundred and ninety acres in 
Stony Creek township from his father, on which he made his 
home for the next nine years. This property he still owns and 
cultivates. The farm on which he now lives is the old home- 
stead farm of Cyrus H. Walker, in Brothers Valley township, 
which Mr. Glessner has recently purchased. It is a valuable 
property of two hundred acres, with fine improvements and 
well stocked with a good grade of farm animals. There are 
flourishing orchards of ai)ple and other fruit trees and a sugar 



BEDFORD AND SO^^rERSET COUNTIES 253 

camp of four hundred vessels, there being also a camp of two 
hundred and fifty vessels on the Stony Creek farm. In addi- 
tion to the regular grain and hay farming, Mr. Glessner carries 
on an extensive dairy business, keeping several head of cattle 
for that purjjose. The house and yard are beautifully shaded 
and make a delightful country home. In the sphere of politics 
Mr. Glessner sui)ports the men and measures indorsed by the 
Democratic party. He is a member of the Reformed church, 
in which he served for several years as deacon, also teaching 
in the Sunday school. 

Mr. Glessner married, January 17, 1886, Emma Bell 
Walker, and the following are theiir children: Leroy W., aged 
nineteen, educated in the common and normal schools, a mem- 
ber of the Reformed church, is now at home and assisting his 
father. Cyrus T., aged seventeen, educated in common and 
normal schools, has taught for two years in public schools. He 
is fitting himself for a profession at Franklin and Marshall 
College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, whither he will return after 
this year's teaching. He is a member of the Reformed church. 
Harry H., aged fifteen, at home, educated in common and nor- 
mal schools. Eleanor R., aged twelve, and Williard D., aged 
ten, attending school. Mrs. Glessner is a daughter of Cyrus H. 
and Elizabeth S. (Schrock) Walker, the former a farmer of 
Brothers Valley township, a Democrat and a member of the 
German Baptist church. He and his wife were the parents of 
the following children: Alice, wife of Daniel Schrock; Emma 
Bell, bom March 14, 1867, educated in public schools, member 
of Reformed church and wife of Edward D. Glessner; Cath- 
arine, wife of Albert Cover, has two children, Paul and Leon; 
John Calvin, died in infancy. Mr. Walker died May 4, 1905, 
aged sixty-four years, and his widow, who is sixty-three and in 
good health, resides in Berlin. 

JOHN F. REIMAN. 

John F. Reiman, of Berlin, is a great-grandson of Gottlieb 
Reiman, who was bom in 1747, in Germany, and founded the 
family in Somerset county some time prior to 1768. His chil- 
dren were: John, George (of whom later), Charles, Marj-, and 
Elizabeth. Gottlieb Reiman died in 1804. 

George Reiman, son of Gottlieb Reiman, was born in 1768, 
married and removed to Shade township. He and his wife were 
members of the Lutheran church. Their children were: Mary, 
deceased; John, deceased; Henry; Elizabeth; Susannah, de- 
ceased; George, deceased; Samuel; Joseph; Jacob, of whom 
later; Sarah, and Lydia. George Reiman died in 1834 and his 
wife in 1855. 

Jacob Reiman, son of George Reiman, was born July 1, 



254 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

1813. He was a farmer, lie was formerly a Whig, later identi- 
fying himself with the Rei)ublioans. He and his wife were 
members of the German Baptist dnirch. Mr. Reiman married, 
November 4, ISoS, Elizabeth, born in November, 1817, in Elk 
Lick township, daughter of Christian and Susan Fike, and their 
children were: Samuel F,, deceased; John F., of whom later; 
Tobias, deceased; Moses and Elizabeth, died in childhood; 
Susan, and Jeremiah J, The death of Mrs. Reiman occurred in 
1889 and that of Mr. Reiman in 1891. 

John F. Reiman, son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Fike) 
Reiman, was born February 5, 1843, in Stony Creek township, 
and received his preparatory education in the common schools. 
Later he attended the Somerset Normal school, where he quali- 
fied himself for the profession of teaching, which he followed 
for three years in the schools of the county. At the age of 
twenty-three he married and bought a farm from Christian 
Schrock, on which he has since resided. The estate consists of 
two hundred and ten acres of good farm land, with the excep- 
tion of about twenty-iive acres which are timber. There is an 
abundance of fruit, both apples and peaches. The improve- 
ments are modern and were made by the present owner. Stock, 
grain and hay are the products of the farm, and it is supplied 
with good breeds of horses and cattle. The house was built 
in 1848, rebuilt in 1893, and the barn in 1877. Mr. Reiman has 
served as school director and auditor, and is the present nomi- 
nee for poor farm director. He is a Republican in politics. He 
is a deacon of the German Baptist church and a member and 
former teacher of the Sunday school. 

Mr. Reiman married, March 10, 1866, Sarah Schrock, and 
their children are : Milton S., born August 13, 1867, died De- 
cember 7, 1879; Emma S., born May 18, 1869, wife of Allen 
Mostoller, farmer of Stony Creek township, has one child, 
Orpha; Cora M., born July 21, 1872, wife of A. A. Miller, farmer 
of Jefferson townshij), has five sons: Lloyd J., Harry, Elmer, 
Galen and Maurice; Lizzie B., born December 22, 1873, wife of 
TJ. S. Lehman, farmer on the farm adjoining the homestead ; 
they had three children: Elsie, John and Verda, all deceased; 
Harvey G., born August 2, 1877, died February 25, 1880; Jacob 
C, born September 21, 1880, educated in common and normal 
schools, taught one year, and in 1903 bought his father's farm, 
Avhere he now resides, liis parents making their home with him ; 
he married, April 16, 1903, Annie, daughter of Solomon M. and 
Mary Knepper, the former a farmer of Milford township ; they 
have one child, Howard K., born February 16, 1906 ; a daughter 
who died in infancy, June 21, 1884. 

Mrs. Reiman is a daughter of Jacob C. and Catharine 
(Horner) Schrock, who were married about 1835. Mr. Schrock 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 255 

was a Republican. He and his wife were members of the Ger- 
man Baptist church. Their children were: George, married 
Susan Musser, and after her death Elizabeth Meyer, of Somer- 
set; John, farmer of Somerset township, married Susan Miller; 
Israel, farmer at Eriedens, married Annie AValker; Joseph, 
married Sarah Beachley and died in Iowa ; Mary, wife of Daniel 
Beachley, retired farmer living at Johnstown, Pennsylvania; 
Sarah, born June 10, 1844, educated in })ublic schools, member 
of the German Baptist church, and wife of John F. Reiman; 
Catharine, wife of Emmanuel Blougli, retired farmer of Som- 
erset township; Rebecca, wife of J. J. Reiman; Anna, deceased, 
wife of William Piatt. 

JOSEPH REITZ, 

Joseph Reitz, of Roxbury, is a son of Hartman Reitz, who 
was born in 1805, in Germany, and was by trade a miller. At 
the age of thirty he came to the United States, having pre- 
viously served in the German army, as required by law. He 
settled in Stony Creek township, Somerset county, on the mill 
property now owned by his son Joseph. It is probable that 
for one hundred and fifty years a gristmill has- stood on this 
site, the present structure being the second erected on the ]iro})- 
erty, having been built about 1805 by Speicher & Musser. There 
is a fair water-power, but the mill is worked chiefly by steam. 
Mr. Reitz was a Whig, but later became a Republican. He and 
his second wife were members of the Lutheran church. 

Hartman Reitz married a Miss Grindlesparger, who bore 
him two children: John C, of Rockwood, married Mary Keefer; 
and Conrad Z. married Elizabeth Keller and lives in Iowa. 
After the death of the mother of these children, 'Mr. Reitz mar- 
ried, in 1845, Sarah Geiger, and by this marriage became the 
father of the following children: Elanora, wife of Oliver 
Si)angler, of Colorado; Hartman H., miller and lumberman of 
Elk Lick townshi]), married Mary Foust; Elizabeth, wife of 
Gabriel Eiigle, of Westmoreland county; Jose])h, of whom 
later; A^'illiam, for twenty years a miller of Somerset, now of 
Ohio, married Emma Stoner; Henry A., grain broker of Johns- 
town, married Lizzie Foust; Jacob J., miller of Elton, Penn- 
sylvania, married Ella Stull, and after her death Sadie Landis; 
Daniel, uiillwriglit and invontor of milling machinery, mar- 
ried Emma Musser, and died in 1899 in J3erlin. Two other 
children died in infancy. The death of Mr. Reitz occurred in 
1882, when he was seventy-seven years old, and his widow 
]tassed away in 1892, at the age of seventy-two. 

Joseph Reitz, son of Hartman and Sarah (Geiger) Reitz, 
was born April 20, 1853, on the farm and mill pro]>erty on the 
Glade road, near Roxbui-y, in Stony Creek townslii]), and re- 



250 BEDFOKU AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

ceived his education in the public scliools. His first occui)ation 
was working in a sawmill, where he remained three years. He 
then went to Wellersburg, where he was employed in the grist 
and flour mill, but after a time went to Canton, Ohio, and 
thence to Iowa, where he spent one summer. He then returned 
and worked with his father in the gristmill, learning the trade 
of a miller, and in 1885 became by purchase the owner of the 
mill, which he has since continuously operated. In 1882, on 
the occasion of his marriage, he moved into the house which 
is still his home. The farm connected with the mill consists of 
about fifty acres, with two dwelling-houses and a fine barn, 
built by Mr. Reitz in 1896. Fruit of all kinds abounds and there 
is a sugar camp of five hundred vessels, producing about firteen 
Imndred pounds annually. The farm is well stocked, and 
though small, is productive. Mr. Reitz was formerly a Repub- 
lican, but is now a Prohibitionist. He is a member of the Rox- 
bury Lutheran church, in which he serves as deacon and super- 
intendent of the Sunday school, having formerly held the office 
of trustee. 

Mr. Reitz married, February 16, 1882, Laura Long, and 
their children are as follows : Eva B., born March 6, 1883, edu- 
cated in common and normal schools, has taught for three 
years in public schools of township, lives at home, member of 
the Lutheran church; Walter L., born April 24, 1888, educated 
in common and normal schools, now teaching in Southampton 
township, member of the Lutheran church; Grace, born Decem- 
ber 15, 1890, died at the age of three years and six months-, 
Pearl E. and Nevin (twins), born August 28, 1893; the former 
attends school and the latter died at the age of six months; 
Ethel, born May 15, 1903. Two other children died in infancy. 
Mrs. Reitz is a daughter of Michael and Lavinia Long, of Wel- 
lersburg, the former a land agent and for thirty years justice 
of the peace. He and his wife were members of the Evangelical 
church. Their children are: Alexander, of Wellersburg; 
Laura, born January 2, 1857, educated in Wellersburg schools, 
member of Evangelical church, now the wife of Joseph Reitz; 
Bella, wife of Jesse Cook, of Wellersburg; William; and two 
daughters who died in infancy. Mr. Long died December 28, 
1894, aged seventy-three, and his widow, who resides in Wel- 
lersburg, is in good health and active at the age of seventy-five. 

LUTHER J. HILLEGASS. 

The Hillegass family can be traced back to an ancestry 
living in France near the German border. They afterward set- 
tled in Germany, and at an early period came to the United 
States. The first treasurer of the United States was Michael 
Hillegass, from whom the Somerset familv claim descent. 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES • 257 

Luther J. Hillegass, of Berlin, is a grandson of Jacob 
Hillegass, who was born November 2, 1777, and was a farmer 
of Bedford connty. He married Annie M. B. Halbert, who 
was born Febniary 4, 1787. Mr. Hillegass died February 9, 
1848, and his widow survived until May 31, 1864. 

Jacob B. Hillegass, son of Jacob and Annie M. B. (Hal- 
bert) Hillegass, was born May 18, 1818. and lived as a farmer 
in Bedford county until 1859, when he moved to Somerset 
county. In 1881 he returned to Bedford county and took up 
his abode in New Buena Vista, where he passed the remainder 
of his days in retirement. For several terms he filled the office 
of school director. In politics he was first a Whig and later a 
Republican. He and his wife were members of the Reformed 
church, in which for a long period he served continuously as 
deacon and elder. 

Mr. Hillegass married, October 17, 1843, Esther Ann, bom 
February 23. 1824, daughter of James A. Burns, of Burns' 
Mills, Bedford county. Mr. Burns was a Democrat and for 
several years was associate judge of Bedford county, and 
served two terms in the legislature. His father, James Burns, 
lived to the extraordinary age of one hundred and one years. 
The family of Mr. and Mrs. Hillegass consisted of the follow- 
ing children: James A., bom September 8, 1844, farmer of 
Allegheny township, married Catharine A. Kimmel, has ten 
children ; William H., born February 23, 1847, farmer of Alle- 
gheny township, married Sarah Glessner, has fourteen chil- 
dren; Calvin B., bora February 19. 1849, lives with his brothers, 
James A. and William H. ; Cvrus P., born February 13, 1851, 
died March 31, 1852; Henrietta H., bom November 23, 1853, 
wife of Samuel G. Walker, farmer of Allegheny township, has 
four children; Luther J., of whom later; Harry T., born No- 
vember 23, 1862, lives in Chicago; Annie M. B., born February 
22, 1864, wife of Irvin Taylor, farmer near New Paris, Bedford 
county, has four children. The mother of these children died 
May 31, 1865. Mr. Hillegass married (second), January 16, 
1868, TiOuisa Mortimore, who died May 22, 1891; no issue. 
Mr. Hillegass died ]\ray 4, 1891. 

Luther J. Hillegass, son of Jacob B. and Esther Ann 
(Bums) Plillcgass, was born January 19, 1859, on a farm at 
Bums' Mills, Juniata township, Bedford county, and was edu- 
cated in the ])ublic schools of Somerset county and at the Berlin 
Normal school. His first occupation was teaching in the public 
schools of Somerset and Bedford counties, where he remained 
four years, and for the two years following cultivated a farm 
in Allegheny townshi]). He then removed to Stony Creek town- 
ship, where he bought and settled on the farm which has since 

Vol. Ill 17 



258 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

been his home. Tliis lu'operty consists of one hnndred and 
eighteen acres and inclndes a neighboring tract of thirty-six 
acres. There is an abundance of fruit of various kinds and 
there is also a sugar camp of five hundred vessels. The farm 
horses are nearly all ]uire-blooded Percherons, and the cattle 
are short-horns. Coal underlies the farm, in which Mr. Hille- 
gass retains the right, with the exception of the B vein, which 
has been sold. All the buildings have been erected since the 
property was purchased by the present owner, the barn having 
been built in 1886 and the house in 1903. A fine spring fur- 
nishes both structures a plentiful supply of running water. 
Mr. Hillegass raises a great deal of stock, using for the pur- 
pose a farm of two hundred acres which he owns in Allegheny 
township. About thirty head of cattle are constantly grazing 
there. He has served two terms as school director. He is a 
Republican in politics. He and his wife are members of the 
Reformed church, which he has served as deacon. He has re- 
cently been re-elected elder of the Roxbury congregation. 

Mr. Hillegass married, August 12, 1880, Mary E., born 
February 26, 1861, daughter of Tobias and Caroline (Walker) 
Glessner, and educated in the township schools. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hillegass are the parents of the following children : Robert T., 
born October 30, 1881, educated in common and normal schools, 
taught five years in Stony Creek township, where he now culti- 
vates his own farm; Republican and member .of Reformed 
church; married Harriet Stutzman; they have one child, Jacob 
L., born October 24, 1905. J. Howard', born March 12, 1882, 
educated in public schools, resides in Pittsburg; Republican 
and member of Reformed church. John G., born February 3, 
1885, educated in common and normal schools, taught two years, 
attended Pennsylvania Business College; is now bookkeeper 
for Westinghouse Company; Republican and member of Re- 
formed church. George A., born July 9, 1888, educated in 
common and normal schools, lives at home, member of Re- 
formed church. Nellie B., born September 10, 1889, at home, 
educated in common and normal schools, member of Reformed 
church. Henrietta W., born May 14, 1891, attending school, 
member of Reformed church. Harry H., born April 17, 1893, 
attending school, Mary E., born March 11, 1895. Annie P., 
born October 18, 1896. Ross L., born October 15, 1898. Alvin 
H., born May 13, 1900. Nevin S., born August 18, 1902. Lester 
C, born October 7, 1904. It is a noteworthy fact that every 
member of this large family is in perfect health, and that the 
circle has never yet been broken by death. 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 259 

HENRY J. C^HRISTNER. 

Henry J. Christner, a merchant of West Salisbury, is de- 
scended from ancestors who were among the early settlers of 
Elk Lick township. His grandfather and father were both 
Josejih Christner, the latter a native of Somerset county and 
a farmer. He was a German Baptist. He was a Democrat for 
forty years before his death, at the age of eighty-four. He 
]narried Mary Keim, by whom he had twelve children, all living 
in 190G but three. Mary (Keim) Christner died at the age of 
fifty-three. 

Henry J. Christner, third son of Joseph Christner, was 
born Sei)teniber 17, 1853, in Elk Jjick townshi}), and until the 
age of nineteen attended the public schools for a term of three 
months annually. He assisted his father in the labors of the 
farm and in the management of the sawmill until 1875, and 
then for a short time was employed by the neighboring farmers. 
Afterward he worked in the mines until 1887, when he again 
sought and found employment among the farmers. In 1903, 
in company with his wife, he bought the grocery and feed busi- 
ness of Joseph Patton, of West Salisbury, and has since car- 
ried on the business at that place. Since 1904 he has held the 
office of assistant postmaster of West Salisbury, and for one 
term served as assessor of Elk Lick township. He is an ad- 
herent of the Democratic party and a member of the Reformed 
church. 

Mr. Christner married Charlotte AVagner, daughter of 
Peter Wagner, of Elk Lick township, and they are the parents 
of three children: Florence Ruth (Mrs. Frank Argenbright), 
Harry Buford, and Herbert Eugene. 

DANIEL LIVENGOOD. 

Daniel Livengood, of Elk Lick, is one of the numerous de- 
scendants of the Rev. Peter Livengood, who came from Ger- 
man Switzerland and settled in Elk Lick township a century 
and a half ago. One of his sons, John Livengood, was the father 
of Samuel P. Livengood. a farmer of Elk Lick township, where 
he was born. 

Jacob S. Livengood, son of Samuel P. Livengood, was born 
in 1816, in Elk Lick township, and was a farmer and cooper. 
He married Elizabeth, daughter of Henry Miller, of the same 
townshij), having moved thither from the east shortly after 
the Revolutionary war. jMr. and Mrs. Livengood were the 
parents of the following children: Barbara, Archibald, J'onas, 
Sarah, Elijah (see forward), Savilla, Elizabeth, Mahlon, Eliza, 
Jjydia, Harriet, Harvey, and John. 

Elijah Livengood, son of Jacob S. and Elizabeth (Miller) 



260 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Livengood, was born April 5, 1848, on the old homestead, in 
Elk Lick township, where he attended the public schools until 
his sixteenth year. During the Civil war he enlisted in Com- 
pany K, Fifth Regiment, Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, and 
participated in a number of engagements. On June 29, 1865, 
he was honorably discharged from the service. After his re- 
turn home he was employed by his father until 1869, when he 
rented his father-in-law's farm, remaining there until 1872. 
He then purchased the property and has ever since made it his 
home. He is largely interested in timber land, both in Penn- 
sylvania and Maryland, where he operates a mill near Grants- 
ville. He holds the office of auditor, is a Republican and a 
member of the German Baptist church. Mr. Livengood mar- 
ried, October 17, 1872, Caroline, daughter of Henry Yoder, of 
Elk Lick township, and they are the parents of the following 
children: Henry, Elizabeth, Joseph, Abraham, and Daniel, see 
forward. 

Daniel Livengood, son of Elijah and Caroline (Yoder) 
Livengood, was born October 12, 1884, in Elk Lick township, 
where he received his preparatory education in the public 
schools. At the age of fifteen he entered Juniata College, Hunt- 
ingdon, Pennsylvania, graduating therefrom in 1902. For one 
year he taught in the schools of his native township, and was 
then employed for a time as clerk in a drug store, after which 
he took a course in Grand Rapids Veterinary School. On 
June 1, 1904, he helped found the West Salisbury Feed Com- 
pany, which was organized with the following board of officers : 
President, Richard Newman; secretary and manager, Daniel 
W. Livengood. 

Mr. Livengood married, December 26, 1905, Mabel, daugh- 
ter of Hiram Miller, of ]\[eyersdale. Mabel was born October 
10, 1885 ; graduated from Juniata College, class of 1904. 

SIMON S. MILLER. 

Simon S. Miller, of Springs, Elk Lick township, traces his 
ancestry to John Miller, who moved to Somerset county from 
Berks county, Pennsylvania. The next in line of descent was 
Jacob Miller, born in Elk Lick township, Somerset county, re- 
moved to Ohio in 1808-09. His son, Benedict Miller, born in 
Elk Lick township, November 19, 1781, died in June, 1837. He 
was a farmer and carpenter. He married Catharine, daughter 
of Peter Bitsche, who came from Switzerland in 1754 and set- 
tled in Elk Lick township, and their children were: Henry, 
Peter, William, Salome, Catharine, Joel (see forward), Su- 
sanna, Elizabeth, Benedict, Barbara, Moses and Jacob. 

Joel Miller, son of Benedict and Catharine (Bitsche) Mil- 
ler, was born March 27, 1811, in Allegheny county, Maryland, 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 261 

and like his father was a farmer and carpenter, adding to these 
callings that of a blacksmith. His wife was Catharine Brenne- 
man, born April 5, 1813, in Germany, and came to the United 
States in 1828. Their children were: Samuel J., see forward; 
Daniel J., born December 19, 1836, married Lncretia Fuller; 
Elias J., born February 21, 1839, married Nancy Miller; Eliza- 
beth, born August 17, 1841, wife of Elias Hershbarger; Mary, 
born 1843, wife of Emmanuel Hershberger; Joel J., born De- 
cember 14, 1844, married Savilla Beachy; Catharine, bom 
March 14, 1848, wife of Elias M, Miller; Christian J., born 
November 18, 1850, married Barbara Gnagey; Lydia, born 
March 25, 1853, died January 30, 1856; and Anna, bom Feb- 
ruary 1, 1 858, wife of John D. Yoder. 

Samuel J. ^liller, son of Joel and Catharine (Brenneman) 
Miller, was born November 23, 1834, in Elk Lick township, and 
was all his life devoted to agricultural pursuits. He married, 
November 15, 1854. Magdalena, daughter of Christian Swartz- 
endruber, of Elk Lick township, and their children were : Jacob 
S., born August 12, 1855, married Anna Beachy; Elias S., born 
June 14, 1858, married Catharine Beachy; Simon S., see for- 
ward; Amanda, born October 12, 1864, wife of Daniel Beachy; 
and Lucy, born February 20, 1876, wife of Moses Beachy. 
Mr. S. J. Miller died September 16, 1906; his wife died May, 
1892. 

Simon S. Miller, son of Samuel J. and Magdalena (Swartz- 
endruber) Miller, was born March 2, 1862, on the farm on 
Avhich he now lives, in Elk Lick township, and attended the pub- 
lic schools until the age of nineteen. He worked for his father 
on the homestead until 1887, wh<^n he became by purchase the 
owner of the farm. He was engaged in the retail coal business 
from 1887 to June 30, 1905, when he leased his coal to E. 0. F. 
Stotler, of Meyersdale, and the works are now operated under 
the name of the Meyersdale Fuel Company. He has served two 
terms as school director, is a Republican, and a*member of the 
Amish Mennonite churcli, in which since 1902 he has held the 
office of treasurer. 

Mr. Miller married Lydia, daughter of Daniel Beachy, of 
Aurora, West Virginia, and their children are: Anselm, Allan, 
Essie, Anna, Earle, Claude, and Ernest. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON GOHN COBAUGH. 

George W. G. Cobaugh, a ])rosperous and enterprising 
farm.er of Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was there born on 
the old Cobaugh homestead, November 6, 1877, the son of 
Daniel P. and Nancy C. (Gohn) Cobaugh, both natives of Som- 
erset county. 

(I) Frederick Cobaugh, a native of France, settled in this 



262 BEDFORD AND S0^rERSP7r COUNTIES 

country at Joliiistowii, Cambria county, Pcnusylvauia, in the 
year 1783, when the t'ountiy was thickly wooded, and save for 
the presence of Indians and wild animals an almost un))roken 
solitude. Purchasing- a tract of land, he engaged in farming, 
which pursuit he followed for the remainder of his active life. 
He was the father of six children, three sons and three daugh- 
ters, and lived to the advanced age of eighty years. 

(II) John Cobaugh, eldest son of Frederick Cobaugh, was 
a native of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, born in March, 1788, 
died January, 1874 He went to Somerset county about 1805, 
and there settled on a farm in Somerset township, two and a 
half miles north of the town of Somerset, which is now owned 
by George W. G. Cobaugh. John Cobaugh married Rebecca 
Good, who lived to be eighty years of age, and by whom he had 
two children, viz.: George and Sarah (Mrs. Lichty). 

(III) George Cobaugh, sou of John and Rebecca (Good) 
Cobaugh, was born July 11, 1816, on his father's farm. He 
followed the quiet but useful occupation of a farmer, working 
on his father's farm until 1881, when he purchased a farm 
nearer Somerset, where he lived the remainder of his life. He 
was a highly successful farmer, and at the time of his death, 
March 23, 1902, owned about a thousand acres of good farm- 
ing land. He married, March 31, J838, Louisa Emert, who was 
born in 1815 and died 1886. She was the daughter of John and 
Susan (Zimmerman) Emert. Mr. and Mrs. George Cobaugh 
had two sons, John E. and Daniel P. 

(IV) John E. Cobaugh, son of George and Louisa (Emert) 
Cobaugh, was born February 24, 1839. He served as a private 
in the Civil war in Company A, Tenth Pennsylvania Regiment 
of Volunteers. May 5, 1864, near Richmond, Virginia, in the 
battle of the Wilderness, he was wounded, and was taken to 
Fredericksburgh, where he died May 19, 1864, his last words 
being, ''I am ready; all is well." 

(IV) Daniel P. Cobaugh, younger son of George and 
Louisa (Emert) Cobaugh, and father of George W. G. Cobaugh, 
was born Xovember 3, 1845, on the homestead farm near Som- 
erset. He obtained a good education in the common schools of 
his native jDlace, and engaged for some years in school teach- 
ing. After relinquishing the occu]jation of a teacher, he en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits, which line of work he followed 
for the remainder of his working life. 

Xovember 27, 1872, he was united in marriage to Miss 
Nancy C. Gohn, who was born October 27, 1857, the daughter 
of George L. and Ciiristiana (Hoffman) Gohn. George L. 
Gohn was born February 19, 1822. He is a very good teamster, 
an occupation which he followed for a number of years, during 
that time being the owner of excellent horses. He served for 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 263 

one year in the Civil war. About tliirty years of liis life were 
spent on a farm situated aliout thiee miles north of Somerset, 
and lie is now living a retired life in the town of Somerset. 
November 12, 1855, he married Cliristiana Hoffman, daughter 
of John and Naney (Noftsinger) Tloffmau. I^)y this nnion one 
child was born, Naney C. who ])eeame the wife of Daniel P. 
Cobangh. Mr. and Mrs. Cobaugh have children as follows: 
Liihi C, died Jn!y 1, 1878; George W. G., of whom later; Bruce 
U. P., born May 8, 1881; received a high scliool education and 
taught in the public schools several years; he then took a four 
years' course in the Gettysburg College, graduating in June, 
1905, and is now associated with the Gettysburg College as as- 
sistant instructo]- in chemistry; John E. IT., born October 3, 
1883, obtained a common school education and follows the oc- 
cupation of a farmer. Daniel P. Cobaugh, the father of the 
above named children, died So]itember 28, 1897. 

George W. G. Cobaugh, second child and eldest son of 
Daniel P. and Nancy C. CGohn) Cobaugh, received his educa- 
tion in the common schools of his native ]ilace, and after leav- 
ing school adopted the vocation of his forefathers, that of a 
farmer, and lives on the farm that has been in the Cobaugh 
family for four generations. In 1903 he i>urchased ^Nfeadow 
i^rook farm, which contains one hundred and forty-eight acres 
of well-located land, and one hundred and thirty ])erches, which 
contains sixty acres of rich creek bottom land, which, when 
drained, makes the finest kind of farming land in this part of 
the country, and which is now in a good state of cultivation. 
Mr. Cobaugh is in every way adapted to the life of a farmer, 
and has a strong liking for this occupation. It is his aim to 
make old "]\Ieadow Brook" farm one of the centers of atti'ac- 
tion and agriculture in the county, and it bids fair to become 
such. George Cobaugh comes of a sturdy, long-lived race, who 
lived lives of sobriety, industry and honesty. Coming and set- 
tling in Somerset county when, it was little more than an un- 
cultivated wilderness, they with characteristic energy and de- 
termination a])plied themselves to the task of clearing and 
cultivating land, and assisting in the general u]-)building of the 
county, little dreaming of the mines that are now in 0]ieration 
there or the farmers' telpehone lines that exist at the ]iresent 
day. 

A Republican by inheritance and convictions, ]\Ir. Cobaugh 
is interested in all ]>arty aft'airs, and is willing and anxious to 
lend his assistance to any enterprise that will tend to advance 
the interest and ]»rogress of the c(.nnnunity. lie holds member- 
shi]> in the Highland Grange, No. 879, P." of II., and has been 
an office holder in this society; member of the American Society 
of E(|uity. In church relations he affiliates with the Evangelicjil 



26i BEDFORD AND ISUMEK^ET COUNTIES 

faith. At the age of liiteen he joiued the Evangelical Associa- 
tion, or Albright church, but wheu the schism occurred lie held 
to tlie new siae and is now a uieuiber of the United Evangelical 
church, of which he is class leader, Sunday school superin- 
tendent and secretary of the board of trustees. 

September 27, 1^91), he married Miss Anna Bertha Tospon, 
at the home of her parents, about live miles from Somerset. 
She was born June 4, 1882, the daughter of Augustus 11. and 
Lizzie (Wessel) Tospon. (Jn the paternal side she is descended 
from Daniel Tospon, a native of Saxony, Uermany, who was 
born in 1810 and died May 10, 1880. He came to the United 
States in 1851 and settled in Somerset county, near Bakers- 
ville. He was a weaver of line linen in Germany and followed 
that occupation in this country. His wife was Caroline Bixon, 
by whom he had children as follows: Henry, William (both of 
whom served in the Civil war), Mary, Augustus H., John. 

Augustus H., fourth child and third son of Daniel and Caro- 
line (Bixon) Tospon, was born in Saxony, Germany, August 5, 
1849. He was about a year and a half old when he came here 
with his parents, and followed the occupation of farming 
throughout his active working life. He married, March 21, 
1871, Miss Lizzie Wessel, and their children were: William 
H., John W., Caroline E., Frank B., Anna B. (Mrs. Cobaugh), 
Estelle P., and Harry A. Augustus H. died September 24, 
1903. Mrs. Cobaugh 's maternal grandfather was John Fred- 
erick Wessel, who was also a native of Saxony, Germany. He 
was a tailor by trade in the old country, and coming to the 
United States settled near Berlin in Somerset county. He 
was married in Germany to Caroline Rowls, who was born 
March 29, 1819, and died April 20, 1890. By her the following 
children were born: Hannah, Margaret, Lizzie, Susan, Charles 
and Frederick. Of these Lizzie became the wife of Augustus 
H. Tospon, and Margaret, Charles and Frederick are deceased. 
Mr. and Mrs. George W. G. Cobaugh are the parents of chil- 
dren as follows: Elizabeth Catherine, born December 5, 1900, 
on the farm then owned by George L. Gohn, near Somerset; 
Harry William Harte, born October 7, 1902, a mile and a quar- 
ter north of Somerset, on a farm owned by George Cobaugh, Sr. 

SAMUEL D. GLOTFELTY. 

The family of which Samuel D. Glotfelty, of Elk Lick, is a 
representative, is of Swiss origin. In the opinion of Professor 
Dandliker, a well-known historian of Zurich, Switzerland, the 
patronymic was undoubtedly derived from Feld-der-Glatt, a 
branch of the Rhine, on the banks of which was the small town 
of Glattfelden. The original orthography of the name was 
Glattfelder. 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 265 

The old records of the Reformed church at (xlattfelden 
state that Casper, son of Felix and Barbara (Garius) Glatt- 
felder, was born in 1709. In 1743 he emigrated to the Ameri- 
can colonies, the name of the ship on which he was a passenger 
being either the ''Francois" or the "Elizabeth." He made his 
home in Philadelphia. Casper Glattfelder married, in 1731, 
Elizabeth Lauffor, the marriage being recorded in the books 
of the Reformed church at Glattfelden. 

Their son, Solomon Glattfelder, was bom February 23, 
1738, at Glattfelden, and was five years old when brought by 
his parents to this country. In 17G5 Solomon Glattfelder went 
to Baltimore, Maryland, and thence migrated to Pennsylvania, 
where he purchased land near what is now the site of Salisbury. 
This land, which was purchased in 1776, is now known as the 
"David and John Glotfelty farms." In the time of its orignal 
owner the estate was known as "Green Park," and in 1776 he 
bought the farm east of Salisbury now owned by John C. and 
Milton Glotfelty, his great-grandsons. Solomon Glotf elder (as 
in his time the name came to he spelled) was the father of the 
following children : A daughter, born June 12, 1767 ; Eva Mar- 
garet, April 12, 1769; John Adam, October 25, 1770; Anna 
Mary, April 14, 1773 ; Elizabeth, April 2, 1775 ; Casper, August 
24, 1777; Henry, November 4, 1779; Jacob, see forward; and 
Catherine, October 15, 1789. Of these, John Adam went to Ohio 
and but little is known of him. Casper went to Maryland. 
Henry and Jacob remained at home until the death of their 
father. Henry was the father of three sons: Joseph, Henry 
and AVilliam. Solomon Glotfelder, the father, died at Salisbury 
in 1818. 

Jacob Glotfelder, son of Solomon Glotfelder, was born 
January 17, 1784, and was a blacksmith by trade. He married 
Elizabeth Showman, by whom he was the father of the follow- 
ing children: Samuel, David, Jeremiah, John, jNIichael, Har- 
riet, Adaline, and Elizabeth. His death occurred in 1873. 

David Glotfelder, son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Showman) 
Glotfelder, married Harriett Schrock, and their children were: 
Samson, Marian, Richard, Elizabeth, Rachel, Gurney, Samuel 
D., George and Mary. 

Samuel D. Glotfelty, son of David and Harriett (Schrock) 
(ilotfolder. was born T^Iai'ch 16, 18()4, in Elk Lick towiislii)), 
where he attended the ])ublic schools until the age of fifteen. 
He then drove" a team in the lumber woods and worked on a 
farm until 1889. In that year he bought the farm now owned 
by Ambrose Deal, in Elk Lick township, and there made his 
home until 1900, when he sohl the propei'ty and pnrchased a 
farm of one hundred and three acres, of which all but sixteen 
acres nvo in Maryland, while all the buildings are in Pennsylva- 



266 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

nia. He is a. Democrat ami a iuenil)er of the Rel'onned church 
of Salisbury. 

Mr. Glotfelty married, April 29, 1888, Mare^aret, daupjhter 
of Henry Herwig, of Suuunit townshiii, and the following chil- 
dren have been born to them: Zei)hia Edna, Ada Mabel, and 
Dorothy IMarie. Mr. Glotfelty departed this life July 18, 1908. 

CYRTTS JOSEPH FIKE. 

The paternal ancestors of Cyrus Joseph Fike, of Meyers- 
dale, were among the earliest settlers of Elk Lick township. 
His great-grandfather, Jonathan Fike, was a native of Switzer- 
land, and crossed the ocean three times, settling near Reading, 
Pennsylvania. Later he moved to Elk Lick township, Somer- 
set county, there being then not much cleared land, and bears 
and deer were seen ahnost daily. Both he and his wife were 
members of the Amish church. Christopher Fike, son of Jona- 
than Fike, was a native of York county, Pennsylvania, a 
farmer, and the founder of one of the Somerset county branches 
of the family. His wife was Christina, daughter of Peter 
Livengood, of Elk Lick township. Christopher Fike and his 
wife were brought up in the Amish church, but later joined the 
Dunker church, now called the German Baptist church. 

Joseph Fike, son of Christopher and Christina (Liven- 
good) Fike, was born in Elk Lick township, on the farm now 
occupied by William N. Moser. He followed the calling of a 
farmer. He married Sarah, daughter of Jonathan Miller, of 
Elk Lick township, and their children were: Elias, Susan, 
Samuel, Anna, Catharine, John, Cyrus Joseph (see forward), 
Jonas, Daniel and Mehlin. 

Cyrus Joseph Fike, son of Joseph and Sarah (Miller) 
Fike, was born May 25, 1839, in Elk Lick township, on a farm 
now owned by Henry Wilmoth, of Meyersdale. He received his 
education in the public schools, and at the age of eighteen left 
school and was employed by his father on the homestead until 
October, 1862, when he enlisted in Company K, One Hundred 
and Seventy-first Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and 
served nine months. In March, 1865, he was drafted, but after 
a short period of service was discharged. He made a brief 
sojourn in the west, working at different places, and in 1885 
purchased the propei'ty on which he now makes his home. He 
is a shareholder in the Economy Telephone Company. With 
the exception of justice of the peace, he has held every office in 
the township, notably that of supervisor, in which he served 
three terms. He is a Democrat and a member of the German 
Baptist church. 

Mr. Fike married, February 20, 1870, Sarah, daughter of 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 'iG7 

John Lepliart, of Upper Turkeyfoot townsliip, and their chil- 
dren are: William A. Wallace, Lloyd Byron, Ira Clinton, Allan 
Homer, and Alice Lulu. 

THE BEACHY FAMILY. 

The Beachy family, numerous representatives of which re- 
side in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was founded in this 
country by Abraham Beachy, who came from Switzerland and 
settled in eastern Pennsylvania. He afterwards came to what 
is now Somerset, then Bedford county, and purchased in Elk 
Lick township a large tract of land, whereon he settled. The 
name was formerly spelled Bitsche. Abraham Beachy married 
Barbara Lichty, who bore him one child, Peter A. Abraham 
Beachy died September 18, 1833. 

Peter A. Beach}^, only child of Abraham and Barbara 
(Lichty) Beachy, was born in Elk Lick township, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1793. He received a limited education 
in the subscription schools, and succeeded to the home farm, 
where he followed dairy and general farming during the active 
years of his life. He was known as ' ' River Pete. ' ' He accumu- 
lated a large amount of money from his farming business and 
the discounting of paper for the neighborhood, leaving at the 
time of his death thirty thousand dollars in gold in a strong 
box, which was his bank. He was a sharp, shrewd man in his 
dealings, possessed great foresight and judgment, but was 
strictly honorable in all his transactions. He was practically 
an invalid from his twenty-fifth year; although slight in 
physique and weak in body, his mind and power of transacting 
successful business was in no way affected. Peter A. Beachy 
married Anna Livengood, who bore him four sons and six 
daughters : Samuel, Elizabeth, Matilda, Susannah, John W., 
Abraham P., Nancy, Lucinda, Daniel L. and Sarah Ann. Peter 
A. Beachy, who was a member of the Amish Mennonite church, 
died August 21, 1854; his wife died October 22, 1869, aged 
seventy-two years. 

Abraham P. Beachy, third son of Peter A. and Ann (Liven- 
good) Beachy, was born in Elk Lick township, January 23, 
1828. He was educated in the subscription schools taught by 
J. J. Stutzman. He was reared on the home farm, on which 
he was actively engaged from early youth, and was taught the 
value of industry and a horror of idleness. On attaining man- 
hood he rented the home farm from his father and worked it 
for three years, at the expiration of which time he became the 
owner by purchase. He added to the farm from time to time 
until he was the owner of a landed estate of six hundred acres 
in Somerset county and a section of land in Nebraska. He was 
one of the prosperous, honored men of his county, and could 



268 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

have had any political office, but he always refused to allow his 
name to be used as a candidate, preferring to lead a quiet, re- 
tired life. He was a staunch friend of the cause of education 
and for many years was a school director. He was a deacon 
of the German Baptist church. He was at first an old line 
Whig, but later a Republican. 

Abraham P. Beacliy married (first), January 23, 1848, 
Christiana, daughter of Samuel C. Lichty, of Elk Lick town- 
ship. Seven children were born to them, six of whom survive, 
namely: Samuel A., Lucinda (Mrs. Samuel P. Maust), Annie 
(Mrs. Gabriel Beachley, of Beatrice, Nebraska), Peter A. (of 
Chicago, Illinois) ; Lloyd L. (resides on the old homestead 
farm), and Alice (Mrs. Norman Musselman, of Falls City, 
Nebraska). Mrs. Christiana Beachy died July 14, 1880. Mr. 
Beachy married (second) Matilda, daughter of Henry Yoder. 
Abraham P. Beachy died January 2, 1896. 

Samuel A. Beachy, eldest son of Abraham P. and Chris- 
tiana (Lichty) Beachy, was born on the Beachy homestead, 
April 2, 1849. He Avas reared on the home farm and educated 
in the common and normal schools of the district. He taught 
one term in the township school and one in Carroll county, Illi- 
nois. In 1873 he purchased what was known as the Ober farm, 
containing one hundred and sixty acres of fertile and highly 
cultivated land. He makes a specialty of dairy produce and 
stock raising. He was one of the organizers and stockholders 
in the First National Bank of Salisbury. He has held many 
positions of honor and trust, and is an executor of one of the 
largest estates in the county. He is greatly interested in educa- 
tional matters and served as school director several years. He 
is a member of the German Baptist Brethren church, and a 
Republican in politics. 

Samuel A. Beachy married, February 27, 1870, Mary, 
daughter of Samuel J. Fike, and four children were born to 
them, as follows : Ida M., wife of Dallas J. Fike, two children, 
Mary and Charles Fike; Carrie, wife of Arthur C. Lichty, one 
child. Dorothy; Alice Christiana, resides at home; Emma, died 
in infancy. 

LLOYD L. BEACHY. 

Lloyd L. Beachy, youngest son of Abraham P. Beachy, of 
whom prominent mention has been made in the preceding 
sketch, was born on the old homestead in Elk Lick township, 
January 1, 1864. He was reared on the farm and educated in 
the public schools. He has always lived on the farm, to which 
he succeeded and which he has brought to a high state of culti- 
vation. Mr. Beachy is a Republican in politics, and has served 
as school director of the township. He is a member of the Ger- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 2G9 

man Baptist Brethren clinrcli, of which he is trustee. He was 
one of the organizers of the First National Bank of Salisbury, 
of which he is a director. 

Mr. Beachy married, October 8, 1884, Georgie, daughter of 
Jeremiah J. and Sarah (Heinbaugh) Folk, of Elk Lick town- 
ship. Their children are: Clifford, Jack, Christiana, Jere- 
miah, Sarah and Mar}^ Beachy. 

ANDREW J. McKENZIE. 

Andrew J. McKenzie, of Garrett, is a grandson of Patrick 
McKenzie, a farmer and lumberman of Garrett county, Mary- 
land. Patrick McKenzie was a Democrat and a member of the 
Catholic church. He married Lavinia Getty, a sister of Sen- 
ator Getty, of Maryland, and their children were: Samuel J., 
of whom later; James, deceased; Aaron, a farmer near Lima, 
Indiana; Emmeline, deceased (Mrs. Patrick McKenzie); 
Julius, a merchant of Lima, Indiana; Thomas, of Meyersdale; 
Mary, of Meyersdale. Patrick McKenzie was killed by a fall- 
ing tree in the forest, at the age of forty-eight. His widow, 
Lavinia McKenzie, is living with her two children, Thomas and 
Mary, at Meyersdale. She is now (1906) in her eighty-fourth 
year. 

Samuel J. McKenzie, father of Andrew J. McKenzie, was 
born October 11, 1842, in Maryland, where he received his edu- 
cation in the public and normal schools. After the untimely 
death of his father, the support of the family devolved largely 
upon him, he being the eldest son, and this duty he faithfully 
performed until attaining his majority. In order to do this he 
taught in the Maryland schools for three years, for which voca- 
tion he was thoroughly qualified. At the age of twenty-two he 
came to Pocahontas, Grenville township, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, where he opened a grocery store, which he con- 
ducted for several years. He removed to Meyersdale when the 
Baltimore & Ohio railroad was building through that section 
and there opened a boarding house and restaurant, which 
proved highly remunerative. In 1886 he moved to Summit 
townshi]3, and after a residence there of ten years removed to 
Garrett, where he resided until his death, which was a tragic 
one, being killed by a train on the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, 
August 29, 1893. He was a Democrat, served nineteen years as 
justice of the peace for Summit township and ten years as 
school director, holding both offices at the time of his death. 
In religious faith he was a Catholic. 

Samuel J. McKenzie married, in 1865, Clara A. Stoner, 
daughter of A. J. Stoner, of Pocahontas, Pennsylvania. She 
Avas educated in the public schools. Their children were: An- 
drew J., of whom later ; Margaret, wife of John Lenhart ; Mary, 



270 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

widow of Samuel Swarner; Bruce, of Youngstown, Ohio; 
Annie, deceased; James, deceased; Samuel J., resides at home; 
Clara, wife of Robert Ellis; Joseph, of Lestenburg, Pennsjd- 
vania; Charles, resides at home. J\Irs. Clara A. McKenzie 
makes her home in Garrett with her two sons. 

Andrew Jackson McKenzie was born at Pocahontas, Penn- 
sylvania, December 22, 1867. He attended the public schools 
until he was fifteen years of age, and for five years thereafter 
was a student at the Meese Preparatory School at Meyersdale, 
Pennsylvania, where he qualified as an instructor, and for four 
terms taught in the Summit township schools. For the ensuing 
twelve years he made his home at Garrett and worked in the 
coal mines. For the past seven years he has conducted a bakery 
in Garrett, and attended to the duties of justice of the peace, 
an office he has filled acceptably for that length of time. He 
also served as tax collector, and in 1904 was appointed burgess 
of the borough, being re-elected to the same office the following 
3^ear for a period of three years. Squire McKenzie is an ad- 
herent of the principles of Democracy, and in religion he fol- 
lows the teachings of his forefathers. 

Mr. McKenzie married, November 25, 1891, Missouri Fritz, 
a daughter of Simon W. Fritz, a farmer of Brothers Valley. 
Their children are: Edna, Ruth, Ethel, Leora, Charles and 
Annie. 

LEONARD A. MAUST. 

The family of which Leonard A. Maust, of Garrett, is a 
representative, has been for more than a century and a quarter 
resident in Somerset county, where it was founded by Jacob 
Maust, who was of Swiss or German birth. 

Samuel Maust, presumably a son of Jacob Maust, was a 
native of Elk Ijick township and a farmer. His son, Leonard 
Maust, was born in the same township, and was also engaged 
in agriculture. He was a member of the Amish Mennonite 
church and a Republican. Leonard Maust married Catharine, 
daughter of Daniel Yutzy, of Greenville township, and their 
children were: Daniel W., Simon L., Anna (deceased), and 
Leonard A., of whom later. Leonard Maust died October 14, 
1865, aged thirty-two years. Mrs. Catharine Maust is living in 
Grantsville, Maryland. 

Leonard A. Maust, son of Leonard and Catharine (Yutzy) 
Manst, was born August 28, 1865, in Elk Lick township, where 
he attended the ])ublic schools until the age of sixteen. He then 
entered the Normal school at Pocahontas, and in 1882 began to 
teach in the schools of Marj^land. He continued to engage in 
educational work until 1884, and then took a commercial course 
at Mount Union College, Ohio, graduating there in 1885 and 



BP]1)F0KD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 271 

returning to Eik Lick township, where he taiight for five years. 
In 1S90 he entered the service of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 
Company as telegraph operator at Sand Patch, and from this 
position w^as promoted until he reached that of station agent 
at Garrett, which he has held since October 23, 1891. .He is a 
stockholder in the Garrett Water Company, in which he holds 
the office of secretary. From 1903 to 1905 he served as burgess, 
and since June, 1905, has been school director. He belongs to 
the Maccabees, is a Republican and a member of the German 
Baptist church. 

Mr. Maust married, August 9, 1885, Mary E., daughter of 
John Lentz, then of Elk Lick, now of Berlin, and their children 
were: Sadie G. (deceased), Arthur B., John L., Robert Le 
Roy (deceased), Bessie F., Anna Katharine, Harry B. (de- 
ceased), Hazel M., Tyranus, Alberta, Margaret Leona, and 
Lloyd Kirby (deceased). 

PETER MILLER SAYLER. 

Peter Miller Sayler, a retired farmer of Summit township, 
is a descendant of early Somerset county pioneers, his grand- 
father, John Seiler (the early spelling of the name), having 
been born in Summit township near the present farm of Peter 
M. He was a member of the Mennonite church, and lived to an 
advanced age. Among his children was a son, John, born in 
Summit township, a farmer and a Mennonite. His wife, Sarah 
(Miller) Sayler, a daughter of Peter Miller, of Summit, was 
also a Mennonite. John and Sarah (Miller) Sayler were the 
parents of five children, all sons: Jacob, deceased; Peter M. ; 
Samuel M., who lives near Somerset; Edward, now of Missouri; 
and Christian, now of Iowa. John Sayler died in 1844. His 
widow, Sarah, became the wife of Joseph Sayler, and died in 
1888. 

Peter M. Sayler was born in Middle Creek township, No- 
vember 16, 1838. He was the second son of John and Sarah 
(Miller) Sayler. He received his early education in the town- 
ship school. At the age of six years his father died, and a 
guardian was appointed. At the age of fourteen he entered 
the school in Summit township and continued therein for a few 
terms. His guardian did not see the necessity of education, so 
Peter's school days were numbered. He began working for 
the farmers of the neighborhood, and was thus employed until 
1861, when he began farming on his own account in Greenville 
township, where he remained until 1870, when he removed to 
Summit township and rented a fanii, which he cultivated until 
1885. Industry and economy had brought to Peter deserved 
success, and he was now in a position to become a land owner 
as well as a land worker. In 1885 he purchased the farm on 



272 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

which he has ever since resided. It contains 190 acres of culti- 
vated and timber land, including a sngar camp of 700 vessels, 
situated about one and one-half miles from Meyersdale. The 
buildings are good and of ample dimensions. Mr. Sayler has 
now ])ractically given over active labor and has rented the farm 
to his son John. On one corner of the estate he is erecting a 
neat country home with barn, to which he will retire perma- 
nently when completed. Peter M. Sayler is a man of strong 
religious conviction. He is a member of the Summit Mills 
congregation of the Brethren church, which he serves as deacon. 
His political sympathies are with the Republican party, but he 
never craved or sought political office. He has held some of 
the township offices, but not from choice. 

Mr. Sayler married Barbara, daughter of Samuel Hoch- 
stetler. of GreenvilJe township. They were married March 7, 
1857, and are now nearing the golden anniversary of their wed- 
ding day. Eight children have been born to Peter M. and 
Barbara Sayler, as follows: Amanda; Lydia, deceased; Anna 
(Mrs. Alvin Handwark) ; Sarah, deceased; Ida; Harvey, mar- 
ried Nettie Shelbear; he is a teacher in the schools of Wash- 
ington county, Pennsylvania; John, married Alice Peck; he 
works the home farm; Eliza (Mrs. Jeremiah Yost). 

EDWIN BUHL. 

Edwin Buhl, a member of the firm of Buhl & Gatesman, 
distillers, of Meyersdale, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, is 
?C native of Hohenzollern, Germany, born November 18, 1847, 
the son of John and Josephine Mary Buhl. 

John Buhl was born in Germany in 18] 2. He was twice 
married, first to Jose]~thine M. Schmidt, who bore him children 
as follows: Edwin, of whom later; William, born 1853, came 
to America in 1867, and is a barber at Pittsburg; Pauline, born 
1855, came to America in 1867, and married Anthony Lutz, a 
brewer of Allegheny. After the death of his first wife, which 
event occurred in 1862: John Buhl married Amelia Wentz, and 
by her were born: Joseph, 1874, came to America in 1892, 
and lives in Pitisburg; Julius, born 1866, came to this coun- 
try in 1878, and also resides in Pittsburg, and a sister in Ger- 
inany. 

Edwin Buhl emigrated from his native land in 1865, settling 
in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He was em]iloyed in the hard- 
ware business in Pittsburg for five years, aiid in 1870 settled 
in Clarion county, where for twenty years he was in the hard- 
ware business. In 1885 he entered the distilling business in 
Clarion. In December, 1901, he removed to Meyersdale, and 
there bought out the business of-H. H. Stahl, the "proju-ietor of 
the old Karn distiller}^, and forming a partnership with Frank 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 273 

William Gatesman, immediately engaged in the conduct of same, 
under the firm name of Buhl & Gatesman. He still continues 
in this business, which has reached a high state of success and 
prosperity. The distillery has increased to double its former 
capacity, and new bondhouses and stills have been built. A 
new mill for chopping" is now under construction. The firm 
manufactures nothing but the very purest rye. Mr. Buhl is 
the partner of Mr. J. W. Selker in the conduct of a cigar 
factory at Clarion. He is a stockholder in the Meyersdale 
Sheet Steel Company, and a director in the Gold Standard Na- 
tional Bank, of Marion, Clarion county. The Clarion Water 
Works and the Clarion Gas Company. He is a Republican in 
politics, and during his residence in Clarion served the borough 
as councilman and treasurer. In church relations he afi&liates 
with the Roman Catholic faith. 

May 2, 1876, Mr. Buhl was united in marriage to Mary 
Anna Guth, a daughter of Leopold Guth, of Clarion. 

FRANK WILLIAM GATESMAN. 

Frank William Gatesman, one of the leading business men 
of Meyersdale, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was born July 
21, 1877, at Lucinda, Clarion county, Pennsylvania, the son 
of John and Mary Ann (Newland) Gatesman. 

John Gatesman (father) was born in 1836 in Clarion coun- 
ty, and always followed the occupation of a farmer and lumber- 
man. He married, in 1850, Mary Ann Newland, daughter of 
Jacob Newland, of Clarion county, who was born in Germany. 
Their children were : Jacob, born 1869, died 1889 ; John, 1871 ; 
Andrew, 1875; Prank W., of whom later; Henry, 1876; Cath- 
erine, 1879; Josephine, 1881; Magdelina, 1883; Agnes, 1887; 
and Christina, 1889. 

Frank William Gatesman obtained his educational train- 
ing in the public schools, and at the early age of twelve years 
commenced to make his own way in the world. He engaged at 
farming and lumbering until 1899, when he associated himself 
with the Standard Oil Company, remaining there until 1901. 
He then removed to Meyersdale, where he engaged in the dis- 
tillery business in company with Edwin Buhl, and in which lie 
has since continued, achieving the most gratifying success in 
his business career. He is a Republican in politics, and a mem- 
ber of the Roman Catholic church. 

Mr. Gatesman, while the junior of the firm, is the active 
working member and manages and directs the business. He 
is an active, energetic business man and is highly esteemed by 
his business associates. 

Vol. Ill 18 



274 iil'JDFUUD AND JSUMEKfcSET COUNTIES 

Mr. (iatesmau married, October 1, 1901, ISusau O. Gutli, 
daughter of Leopold Gutli, aud they have two children, namely : 
Clara, born October 2, 1902; aud Edwin, i^'ebruary 7, 1905. 

KAliL ALBERT xMlLLEK. 

Karl Albert ^liller, a prouiinent business man of Meyers- 
dale, JSomerset county, Pennsylvania, was born in Northamp- 
ton township, June 13, 187G, son of John 11. and Mary A. 
(Trim^jse) Miller, and grandson of Henry W. and Anna 
(Keuker) Miller. Henry W. Miller was a native of Anersbach, 
Germany, and came to this country when a young man. He 
married Anna Keuker, of Anersbach, and they had two chil- 
dren; Henry W. and Anna B. 

Henry VV. Miller (father) was born in Northampton town- 
ship, Somerset county, July 16, 1853, and was for many years 
a merchant of Johusburg. He was a justice of the peace of 
Northampton township for twenty-live years, and was for the 
same period of time school director and postmaster of Johns- 
burg. He married, in 1873, Mary A. Trimpse, a daughter of 
John B. Trimpse, of Oldenburg, Germany. Their children: 
Matilda, Karl Albert, of whom later ; William* H., Frank B., 
Irving C., Clarence G., Emma E., and Walter G. 

Karl Albert Miller obtained his initial education in the 
common schools of his native place, and later spent two years 
in the University of Pennsylvania. He taught school in 
Southampton township. Mountain school. Elk Lick, Meyers- 
dale, and Northampton township. He took a one year course 
in Pierce's Business College at Philadelphia, and there laid an 
excellent foundation for a future business career. Prom 1902 
until 1904 he had charge of the department of mathematics in 
the Meyersdale high school, and then associated himself in the 
grocery business with Mr. J. H. Pfaler. October 15, 1904, he 
discontinued this connection and started in business on his 
own account, in which he has since been very successfully and 
profitably engaged. He is also interested in various other en- 
terprises, among them being the Second National Bank of 
Meyersdale and the Meyersdale Sheet Steel Company. He is 
a Kepublican in politics, and in church connections a Jjutheran. 
Pi'aternally lie is a member of the P. and A. M., No. 554; 
Hebron, No. 272. 

He married, May 18, 1904, Edna, a daughter of Edgar 
Kyle, ex-sheriff of Meyersdale. One child, John Kyle, born 
Mav 5, 1005. 

WILLIAM H. HABEL. 

William II. I label, a i-('})reseiitative business man of Mey- 
ers<l,'il<'. who has acliicn'cd a large degr<'e of success in his 
undertaking as a result of earnest and close api)lication, energy 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 275 

and perseverance, was bom at Bebra, Germauy, December 17, 
1855. His parents, Conrad and Elizabeth (Knieriem) Mabel, 
natives of Germany, came to the United States in January, 
18G6. Their family consisted of the following children : Anna 
D., born October 20, 1S5U; William H., December 17, 1855; 
John, January '11, 1859; Sophia, February 5, 1863; Henry A., 
January 15, 1806; Frederick, September, 1868. Conrad Habel 
(father) was born September 13, 1822, died September 10, 
1892. 

William H. Habel attended the public schools of Greenville 
township, Somerset county, Tennsylvania, whither his parents 
removed upon their arrival in this country in 1866, and com- 
pleted his studies therein at the age of nineteen years. He 
taught school for six terms, or until 1881, in which year he 
became telegraph operator for the Baltimore & Ohio railroad 
at Sandpatch, and later accepted a position as freight, ticket 
and express agent at Meyersdale, serving in that capacity until 
1898. He then established a grocery business at Meyersdale, 
which he conducted alone most successfully up to 1905, in which 
year he admitted Charles A. Phillips as a partner. His store 
is well stocked with a full line of staple articles, and they enjoy 
the patronage of many of the leading families of the town. He 
is a stockholder and director in the Second National Bank, and 
a stockholder in the Meyersdale Sheet Steel Company and The 
Somerset Telephone Company. He takes an active interest in 
public affairs of his adopted town, and was chosen by his fellow 
townsmen to serve as councilman and member of the school 
board, serving nine years in the former and three years in the 
latter position. He is a member of the Reformed church, and 
a member of the Masonic Order, affiliating with Lodge No. 554^ 
F. and A. M., Hebron Chapter, No. 272, R. A. M., and Com- 
mandery No. 49, K. T., Uniontown. He is a staunch adherent 
of the principles of Republicanism. 

Mr. Habel married, July 15, 1883, Emma Frances Troutman, 
daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Troutman, of South Hamp- 
ton township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. Their children 
are: Harry Franklin, born April 16, 1884; John Alpheus, 
September 8, 1885 ; Emma Frances, April 28, 1887. 

NORMAN E. MILLER. 

Norman E. Miller, of Meyersdale, senior member of the 
firm of Miller & Collins, is a native of Summit Mills, Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania, born November 24, 1853, son of 
Ephraim and Lydia (Miller) Miller, and grandson on the pater- 
nal side of Daniel Miller, and on the maternal side of Peter 
Miller, of Summit township. 

Ephraim Miller (father) born at Summit township, Som- 



276 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

merset county, Pennsylvania, January 20, 1820, on the Miller 
farm, which is now known as the Lichty farm. He devoted his 
time and attention to farming and mercantile pursuits, and at 
one time was the oldest postmaster in the state, serving in that 
capacity at Summit Mills. He was straightforward and honest 
in all his transactions, enterprising and public-spirited, and 
therefore won the esteem of his fellow townsmen. Mr. Miller 
married, about 1845, Lydia Berkley, who died about 1847, leav- 
ing one child, Simon B., born 1846, who married Lydia Fike, 
of Summit township, and they now reside in Iowa. In 1851 
Mr. Miller married for his second wife Lydia Miller, daughter 
of Peter Miller, aforementioned, and the following named chil- 
dren were the issue: Uriah M., born March 20, 1852; Norman 
E., November 24, 1853, of whom later; Mary, October 17, 1856; 
Ellen. June 28, I860: and Maggie, September 28, 1865. 

Norman E. Miller attended the public schools of Summit 
Mills until sixteen years of age, after which he clerked for D. 
H. Wolfsburg, of Rockwood, who conducted a restaurant and 
general store. He then pursued a course of advanced studies 
at the California State Normal school, of Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, and from 1873 to 1877 was employed in the Key- 
stone mines and general store. In the latter named year he 
located in Meyersdale, Pennsylvania, where he was employed 
as a salesman for different lines until 1883, when he opened 
a department store in partnership with G. W. Collins under the 
firm name of Miller & Collins, which they are conducting at the 
present time. He is vice-president and director of the Second 
National Bank, and a stockholder in the Meyersdale Sheet 
Steel Company, one of the leading enterprises of that town. 
He is a member of the Brethren church, and his political alle- 
giance is given to the Republican party. 

Mr. Miller married, December 31, 1876, Fanny Schrock, 
daughter of the Rev. John C. Schrock, of Somerset, Pennsyl- 
vania. Two children were the issue: Robert, born September 
18. 1880, married, October 1, 1903, Margaret Bittner, daughter 
of Samuel Bittner, of Meversdale. Walter, born June 10, 1886, 
died June 2, 1900. 

JOSIAH MOSTOLLER. 

Josiah Mostoller. of Stonycreek township, is a great- 
grandson of Frederick Mostoller, a native of Germany, who 
settled near Friedens, where he took up a large timber tract 
and cleared a fnrm. He married and founded the family in 
Pennsylvnnia. His children were: George, of whom later; 
John and two daughters. 

George Mostoller, son of Frederick Mostoller, was a 
farmer, a Whig and a Lutheran. He married a Miss Mowry, 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 277 

who bore him the following children: Sarah, wife of Isaac 
AVendell; Daniel, of whom later; Samuel Uriah, a veteran of 
the civil war; and Elizabeth, wife of Jacob Swank. Mr. Mos- 
toller died in 185G, being then seventy years old. 

Daniel Mos toller, son of George Mostoller, was born in 
1827, and was a farmer in Somerset township, at one time the 
owner of very large tracts of land. He was a Republican and 
a Lutheran. Mr. Mostoller married Charlotte, daughter of 
Joseph Long, a farmer, a Whig and a member of the Reformed 
church. Mr. Long died in 1875, at the age of seventy, and his 
wife lived to an advanced age. The following children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Mostoller: Josiah, of whom later; 
Lincoln, merchant and farmer in Illinois; Joanna, wife of 
Isaiah Good, merchant of Somerset; Emma, wife of Charles T. 
Shaver, clerk in recorder's office, Somerset; Mary, wife of H. 
Fritz, lives in Kansas; Harriet, wife of William Miller, hard- 
ware merchant in Virginia; John, died in childhood; Eli, also 
died in childhood; Minnie (Mrs. Forney), afterward (Mrs. 
Shaffer). The mother of these children died in June, 1874, at 
the age of forty-three. She was a member of the Lutheran 
cliurch. On being left a widower Mr. Mostoller married Mary, 
widow of Jacob Flamm and daughter of Samuel Lowry, and 
their children were: Samuel, miner at Wells Creek; and a 
daughter who became the wife of — — - — — Yutzy and is now 
deceased, as is her husband. Mr. Mostoller died in 1899, and 
his widow resides with her son at Wells Creek. 

Josiah Mostoller, son of Daniel and Charlotte (Long) 
Mostoller, was born October 10, 1850, in Somerset township, 
and was educated in the public schools of Friedens. He worked 
with his father until attaining his majority, when he married 
and settled on a farm adjoining the homestead, and half a mile 
from Friedens. This farm he worked for two years on shares, 
and then moved to a farm in Stony Creek township, also owned 
by his father, which he cultivated for three years on shares. 
At the end of that time he moved to the Samuel Yoder^ farm, 
which he worked on shares for seven years, and then settled on 
the Stephen Trent farm, which he bought of Samuel Philson 
ill 1882. The original purchase was forty-eight acres, to which 
he has added until it now consists of one hundred and fifty- 
two acres, one hundred and thirty of which are under cultiva- 
tion. The farm is well stocked with fine horses and cows and 
there are good orchards of apples and other fruits. In addition 
to his other farming operations Mr. Mostoller conducts a dairy. 
He built his present comfortable residence in 1892. The barn 
was erected in 1866 by Stephen Trent, and still has its first 
roof in good condition. Mr. Mostoller has served as school 
director and is a Republican in politics. He is elder of the 



278 BEDFOIH) AXI) SO^^IERSET COUNTIES 

Mizpali oongregatioii of the Evangelical Lutheran church and 
also serves as superintendent of the Sunday school. 

Mr. Mostoller married Lydia, daughter of Frederick and 
Annie (Lephart) Smitli, of Snydersville, both natives of Ger- 
many. Theii- daugliter i^ydia was born P>bruary 28, 1849, was 
educated in the public schools and was a member of the Pro- 
gressive Bretliren church. ^Iv. and Mrs. Mostoller were the 
parents of the following (children : Allen V., born February 5, 
1871, farmer on Brick Plouse Sch'rock farm, Bedford Pike, 
Republican, Gei-mnn Baptist, married Emma, daughter of John 
F. Reiman, has one child Orpha. AVilliam L., born January 25, 
1873, married Daisy Spangler, died in 1901. Newton, born 
November 19, 1875, farmer on Bedford Pike, near Brother- 
ton, married Jennie Hoffman, has three children, Frederick, 
Ijeora and Nevin. Annie, born November 12, 1877, wife of 
Edward Sclirock, lias three children, Carrie, Marion and Alice. 
Carrie, born May 31, 1881, wife of Robert AVill, had two chil- 
dren, Manfoid and Lillian. Mrs. Will died January 29, 1903, 
and her husband is also deceased. Bessie, born December 2, 
1883, wife of William Ling, miner at Liste, has one child, 
Marie. Daisy, born August 24, 1888, lives at Liste. The mother 
of these children died September, 1892. Mr. Mostoller mar- 
ried for his second wife, Alice, widow of Ezra Baer, and of this 
union were born the following children : Merle, born Novem- 
ber 2, 1895; Cloyd E., born May 17, 1898; and Alverna, born 
November 16, 1904. Mrs. Mostoller is a daughter of Levi and 
Mary (Zigler) A\'alker, was born July 22, 1863, and educated 
in the Wills public school. The other children of Mr. and Mrs. 
Walker vvei-e : Charles, Samuel, AVilson, Sadie, deceased, Jen- 
nie, wife of Charles Keifer, and Kate, wife of Millard Walker. 

Wrr.SON CHRISTNER. 

Wilson Christn(>r, the ])opular and efficient conductor on 
th(> "Berlin liraiich." was born near Garrett, Somerset county, 
I^ennsylvania, September 29, 1873. His parents were Zach- 
ariah and ^lagdalene (Hoover) Christner. His grandfather 
Christopher Christner, was a native of Germany, who on emi- 
grating to tli<^ I'nited States settled in Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, where both he and his wife died at advanced ages. 
He was a farmer by occupation. He was a consistent member 
of the Lutheran chui'ch, and in politics was a Democrat. His 
<'hildren were: Zachariah, John, Caroline (Mrs. Christner), 
and Susan (Mrs. Hoover). 

Zachariah ChristiKM", eldest child of Christophei- Chi'ist- 
nei-, was for many ycnrs a farmer in Sunnnit townshij), Somer- 
s(>t countx", PeimsvKania and is now living a retired life in 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 279 

Canton, Oliio. He and his wife are both members of the Luth- 
eran church. He was a Democrat in politics, and earnest in 
the maintenance of his views. He married Magdelena Hoover, 
and to them were born the following children: Austin, resides 
on the homestead fann; Washington, a conductor on the Bal- 
timore & Ohio railway, resides in Garrett; Theodore, a conduc- 
tor on the same road, and lives in Cumberland, Maryland; 
Carrie, lives with her parents in Canton, Ohio; Missouri (Mrs. 
George Judy), of Pennsylvania Furnace, Cambria county; 
Jennie (Mrs. Nathan Burkett), of Cumberland, Maryland; 
A¥ilson. 

Wilson Christner, of the family last named, was five years 
old when his parents removed to Mount Pleasant, Pennsyl- 
vania, and he received his education in the common schools of 
that town. He gave himself to a life of industry from his very 
youth, and worked in and about the mines and factories until 
he was eighteen years old, when he entered the employ of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company in the capacity of 
brakeman. He so proved his efficiency and fidelity that after 
four years' service he was advanced to the position of freight 
train conductor. He rendered efficient service as such for a 
period of eight years, when he was promoted to the place which 
he has uninterruptedly held to the present time, that of pas- 
senger conductor on the Buffalo Valley Railroad, a part of the 
Baltimore & Ohio system, enjoying the entire confidence of his 
superiors, and the esteem of the traveling public. He adheres to 
the religious faith of his ancestors, and is a member of the Ber- 
lin Lutheran church. In politics he is a Democrat of the most 
stalwart type. He is affiliated with various fraternal and 
beneficial orders: Connellsville Lodge, No. 503, Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks; Berlin Lodge, No. 503, Knights 
of P\i:hias; Connellsville Lodge, Order of Railway Conductors; 
and Berlin Lodge, Modern Woodmen. He is a great admirer 
of athletics, and his tastes cover the entire range of athletic 
sports. He is manager of the Berlin Base Ball team who were 
the champions of the Somerset County League in 1905. He is 
a lover of a good horse, and delights in speed contests between 
well trained and high bred animals. He is ardently fond of 
travel, and has visited every part of the United States, and 
journeyed into Mexico. In the autumn of 1905 he made a 
tour of Europe, spending some time in France and Germany, 
and also visiting England, Scotland and Ireland. While 
gj*eatly enjoying the scenery of these distant lands, and deeply 
interested in the manners and customs of their peoples, he 
returned with a higher respect and love for his own country. 
Mr. Christner married Elizabeth Walter, a daughter of 



280 BEDFORD AXJ^ SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Samuel and Rosanna (Jiuly) Walter, of Garrett, Pennsylvania. 
Of this marriage were born four children: Clinton, Blanche, 
Lelon and Leona. The family residence is in Berlin. 

DANIEL YOUNKIN. 

Daniel Yoimkin, a rei'resentative citizen of Rockwood, was 
horn April 1, 1857, in Upper Tnrkeyfoot township, Somerset 
ccnnty, Pennsylvania. His parents were John M. and Lanra 
(Miner) Younkin, whose children were: Mary, Catherine, de- 
ceased ; William S., Jacob. Millie, Charles, Josiah, Daniel, Jose- 
phine, and David, deceased. John M. Younkin (father) was 
born in Lower Tnrkeyfoot township, Somerset county, Pennsyl- 
vania, was a farmer by occupation, and his remains were in- 
terred at Kingwood, Somerset county. His ancestors were na- 
tives of Germany. 

At the age of fourteen years, after completing a common 
school education, Daniel Younkin secured employment with the 
Baltimore &; Ohio railroad and continued the same for a period 
of two years. He then removed to Mount Pleasant, Westmore- 
land county, where for fourteen years he was engaged in mak- 
ing boats, and then returned to Somerset county, locating in 
Rockwood. The first year he worked for a Mr. Wolf, and since 
then has been employed as laborer on the tracks of the Balti- 
more & Ohio railroad. He is a Republican in politics. 

In 1878 Mr. Younkin married Elmira Zimmerman, born in 
New Salem, Ohio, December 19, 1853, and their children are as 
follows: Catherine, deceased; Gertrude married John Weaver; 
Mary E., deceased; John W. E., Malzena, Lulu Malinda, de- 
ceased; Georgia M. Mrs. Younkin is a daughter of William and 
Mary (Yates) Zimmerman, whose children were: John E., 
Amanda, Elmira (Mrs. Daniel Younkin), Jennie, Emma, Anna, 
Catherine, Barbara, Sadie, William, deceased; and Mary E., de- 
ceased. William Zimmerman, a descendant of a German an- 
cestry, was born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, and through- 
out his active career gave his time and attention to farming. 
Mr. Younkin and his family are highly respected in the com- 
munity in which they reside. 

CHARLES H. WALTER. 

Charles H. Walter, a telegraph operator at Rockwood, Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania, is a native of the county in which 
he now resides, born December 9, 1874, in Meyersdale. His 
parents — Cyrus S. and Clara (Boyer) Walter — were born in 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, 1848, and December 2, 1848, re- 
spectively. The former named was a farmer by occupation, and 
the latter was a daughter of Samuel Walters and Dinah Boyer. 



BEDFOKl) AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 281 

Their family consisted of four children: Winfield, Charles H., 
Franklin W., and Mary, deceased. 

Charles H. Walter attended the common schools of Meyers- 
dale until he attained the age of fourteen, after which he learned 
the art of telegraphy. When fifteen years old he was competent 
to assume charge of the office for the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, 
continuing there nntil 1897. In the meantime he had pursued 
a course in shorthand by mail, and in the latter named year 
completed the same in the two weeks school. He then removed 
to Pittsburg and accepted the position of stenographer at the 
Pittsburg Junction railroad, his duty being to take notes from 
the train master,, and this he followed for one year. He then 
took an agency of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad at Keystone 
Junction, and followed the same until 1893, after which he re- 
turned to Meyersdale and engaged in the baking business. After 
conducting the same for a period of two years he sold out and 
returned to Pittsburg, where he was employed as stenographer 
for six months, and then changed his place of residence to Rock- 
wood, where he has since been employed as telegraph operator. 
As a citizen Mr. Walter is public-spirited and progressive, aiding 
to the best of his ability all measures that tend toward the 
growth and prosperity of his state and country. 

On May 23, 1900, Mr. Walter married Minnie E. Griffith, 
born June 16, 1878, in Meyersdale, Somerset county, Pennsyl- 
vania, daughter of Charles S. and Anna (Fike) Griffith, and 
granddaughter of Daniel and Susan (Supler) Griffith, whose an- 
cestors were natives of Wales. Charles S. Griffith was born in 
Somerset county, 1840, died in 1894; he was a blacksmith by 
trade, and was also a dealer in wagons and all kinds of vehicles. 
His wife, Anna (Fike) Griffith, was born in Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, 1834. Mr. Walter is a descendant of a German 
ancestry. 

ISAAC G. JONES. 

The ancestors of Isaac G. Jones, of Somerset, were among 
those Welsh immigrants who have done so much toward build- 
ing up certain regions of Pennsylvania. Isaac Jones came from 
Wales in 1825 and settled in Schuylkill county, afterward mov- 
ing to Ijancaster Gap. His wife was Belsie Thomas, and they 
were the parents of a son, Isaac G., of whom later. While Mr. 
Jones was working at Lancaster Gap the first engine made its 
first trip in Pennsylvania, running from Philadelphia to the 
end of the railroad, which was at Lancaster Gap. It was a 
single cylinder engine and at every stopping-place was set in 
motion by two crowbars. 

Isaac G. Jones, son of Isaac and Belsie (Thomas) Jones, 
was bom July 4, 1832, in Pottsville, Schuylkill county, attend- 



282 BEDFORD AND S():\IERSP]T COUNTIES 

ing the common. schools until he reached the age of ten years. 
He then became a driver on the Pennsylvania canal between Phil- 
adelphia and l*ittsburg, his father having been one of the work- 
men employed in the construction of the canal. He next went 
to Johnstown, where he learned the trade of a plasterer and 
mason, which he followed for a time in New York and then spent 
three years in whale fishing. 

Mr. Jones has travelled extensively, having been around the 
world, crossed the equator four times and made an arctic voyage, 
On one occasion he went around the Horn and for twenty days 
was employed day and night in ])umping in order to keep the 
ship afloat. On his arrival at New Bedford he embarked for 
Liverpool, England, whence he returned to the United States on 
the Australian Black Star line, and then shipped on the "Elin- 
or," of New York, to Hole Pine Wood, for the Old Colony rail- 
road. He visited all the places of interest in Boston, and then 
returned to New York, whence he shipped on the ''Target" to 
Brook Haven, New Orleans and Charleston, and in 1856 re- 
turned home. He visited in the course of his wanderings all the 
southern states and saw slaveiy in many of its worst aspects. 

In 1861 he enlisted for three months in Company H, Tenth 
Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, Captain Eastley com- 
manding. After serving his term he was discharged and for 
some time worked at his trade. He then re-enlisted for nine 
months in Company B, One Hundred and Thirty-third Regi- 
ment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and at the expiration of his 
term of service received, as before, an honorable discharge. 
During his experience as a soldier he participated in the battles 
of South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Chancellors- 
ville. In the last-named engagement he was wounded. May 3, 
1863. He is a member of the G. A, R. 

Mr. Jones married, March 3, 1867, Catharine, born August 
13, 184], in Somerset county, daughter of George and Liddie 
L. (Long) Trent, and their children were: George, Anna, wife 
of James Holderbaum; Edward P., Brinker R., j\Iary F., and 
Bertha A. Mrs. Jones died January 26, 1889, and on March 2, 
1891, Mr. Jones married Ella, born August 4, 1864, daughter 
of Chauncey and Catharine Lowery. The issue of this mar- 
riage was one son, Ira Clyde. The lad's mother died February 
10, 1903, and since then Mr. Jones' youngest daughter has kept 
house for her father. 

JEREMIAH BERKEY. 

The ancestors of Jeremiah Berkey, of Stoystown, were 
among the first settlers of Somerset county. The first genera- 
tion came from Germany, probably before the revolution. Jacob 



BEDFORD AND SO:\fEHSET COUNTIES 283 

Berkey, grandfather of Jeroiiiiali Berkey, was born in 1792, in 
Conemaugli townshiji, where lie led the life of a farmer. 

The Berkey iioniestead is a tract which was orij»inally des- 
ignated as "the Vineyard" in the deeds and transfers dating 
back as far as 1780. The order for the application of survey 
found in the purchase ap]ilication book in the surveyor-general's 
office in the state of Pennsylvania, was entered April 7, 17G9, 
and the land was surveyed in September, 1776, for Thomas 
Mitchell. The original tract included two hundred and eighty- 
four acres, ninety-two perches. 

On March 20, 1780, Thomas Mitchell conveyed the land by 
deed to John Yanderen, of Philadelphia, who, unable to i)ay his 
indebtedness, conveyed the pro]')ert5', March 7, 1782, to John 
Hazelwood, Edmund Milne, Samuel Garrigues and Josiah 
Hawes, as assignees. The next transfer was made June 28, 1805, 
to Edmund JMilne, a merchant of Philadelphia, for the sum of 
"one dollar in silver money of the State of Pennsylvania, and 
for other good and valuable considerations." . 

A deed dated August 1, 1805, shows that "the Vineyard" 
was sold at public sale to John Clarkson, of Philadelphia, and 
on the following day was repurcliased by Edmund Milne. The 
farm, at this period, was described as in Quemahoning town- 
ship, Bedford county. 

Ten years later, March 16, 1815, Edmund Milne conveyed 
the tract to General Alexander Ogle, of Somerset county, who, 
on AjDril 26, 1822, sold it to Frederick Smith, Joseph Smith and 
Frederick Smith, junior. The joint owners, being unable to meet 
their obligations, the farm was sold, June 6, 1827, by George 
Meese, high sheriff of Somerset county, to Charles Ogle, an at- 
torney, and son of General Ogle, the previous owner. 

Jacob Lohr, of Quemahoning township, purchased the farm 
from Charles Ogle March 31, 1829, and on April 2, 1832, sold it 
to William Sadoris and Jacob Berkey, the latter mentioned 
above, grandfather of Jeremiah Berkey. Jacob Berkey pur- 
chased his partner's interest and in his last will and testament, 
made AugTist 31, 1837, gave the farm to his son, William Ber- 
key. The last transfer was made April 2, 1880, when William 
Berkey sold the farm to his son, Jeremiah Berkey, who is its 
present owner, 

Jacob Berkey married Elizabeth Sadoris, who bore him the 
following children: Daniel, William, of whom later; Jonathan, 
deceased; Jacob S., Oliver, deceased; Henry S., Susan, Mary, 
and Louisa. Daniel, William, Oliver and Henry S. served in the 
civil war, Oliver "dying in the service. Oliver, who served two 
temas of enlistment, was taken prisoner and for two months 
was confined in Libby prison. Jacob Berkey, the father, died 
in 1872, in Quemahoning township. 



284 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

AVilliam Berkey, son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Sadoris) 
Berkey, was born August 4, 1823, in Conemangli township, and 
in iSSo took up his al)ode in Stoystown. He is a Reinibliean in 
jwlitics. He married CaroUne, born in 1827, in Qneniahoning 
townshi]), daughter of Jacob Maurer, and their children were: 
Albert, Herman W., Jeremiah, of whom later; Jacob M., Cath- 
arine E., Amanda, INIinerva, Adella C, ]\rary E., deceased; 
Noah, Bertha, Anna, and William. 

Jeremiah Berkej", son of William and Caroline (Maurer) 
Berkey, was born December 6, 1852, on the Berkey homestead, 
and received his education in the common schools of Quema- 
honing township. After leaving school he s]ient a short time 
in teaching, and then turned his attention to farming, a calling 
which he has followed continuously ever since, cultivating the 
homestead acres, of which he has been the owner for more than 
a quarter of a century. Politically he is a Republican. 

Mr. Berkey married, April 11, 1878, Anna C, born April 8, 
1856, in Berlin, daughter of John Fisher, a native of Germany, 
and thev were the parents of three children: Harvev G., born 
]^rarch 11, 1880; William A., August 10, 1882; and Carrie G., 
May 30, 1886. The mother of these children died January 1, 
1888, and in 1892 Mr. Berkey married Mary E. (Bowman), 
widow of Harvey Engle, and daughter of Jacob and Mary A. 
(Weimer) Bowman, the former a carpenter of Elk Lick. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bowman were the parents of three children: Mand- 
field Ross, Jessie B., and Mary E., wife of Jeremiah Berkey. 
Mr. Bowman died in 1903. By her first marriage ]\rrs. Berkey 
was the mother of one son, Harvey Clifford Engle, who lives 
with his mother and step-father on the Berkey homestead. Mr. 
Berkey 's second son, William A. Berkey, graduated in 1902 from 
the Indiana State Normal School, afterward taught in the pub- 
lic schools of Johnstown and Indiana county and is now a stu 
dent at Gettysburg College. 

C. S. ICKES. 

C. S, Ickes, of Boswell, Pennsylvania, was born April 26, 
18C5, in Pleasantville. P>edford county, a son of John W. Ickes, 
wiio was born in 1829, in Bedford township, and a grandson of 
George ;nid Susan (Slick) Ickes, the foi-mer a farmer of Bed- 
foi'd connty. 

John W. Ickes, like his father, was a farmer. Politically 
lie was a Rejuiblican. He married Susan Alstadt, l)orn in 1832, 
in Plensjinlvillc, and the following were their children: Re- 
becca, Henry, Emma, Anna, Chauncey S. and George. 

Chauncey S. Ickes, son of John W. and Susan (Alstadt) 
Ickes. received his education \u the common schools of Bedford 
county, which he attended until the age of sixteen, and theti for 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 285 

ten terms was engaged in teaching in the schools of his native 
county. Subsequently he was employed for two years in the 
wire mill at rJolmstowu and then went to Eltonburg, where he 
again became a teacher. He was also for a time a partner in 
a blacksmith's shop and finally obtained a position as manager 
of the Telei^hone Company of Scalp Level, where he remained 
four years. In January, 1902, he moved to Boswell in order to 
assume the management of the Boswell Hardware Company, 
in which he holds an interest. While a resident of Scalp Level 
he was elected justice of the peace and burgess of Paint town-, 
ship, and since taking up his abode in Boswell has served two 
years as justice of the peace in addition to being at the present 
time burgess of the borough. 

Mr. Ickes married, in 1891, Rose E., born April 15, 1863, 
in J ohnstown, daughter of George and Agnes (Straub) Eich- 
enschr, and their children were : Comf rey, Anson J., deceased ; 
and Virgie. 

CHARLES P. HOLDERBAUM. 

Among the Somerset county families of German origin 
must be numbered that represented by Charles P. Holderbaum, 
of Somerset. The founder emigrated from the Fatherland at 
least a century ago and his lineal descendant, Martin Holder- 
baum, married Susan Anawalt. Martin Holderbaum was a 
native of Bedford county, whence he moved to Somerset coun- 
ty, where his branch of the family has since been resident. 

John Holderbaum, son of Martin and Susan (Anawalt) 
Holderbaum, was born in Somerset and Avas engaged in mer- 
cantile business. He married Julia Imhoff, and they were the 
parents of four sons : James B., Henry, George, and Charles 
P., of whom later. The death of Mr. Holderbaum occurred 
November 2, 1904. 

Charles P. Holderbaum, son of John and Julia (Imhoff) 
Holderbaum, was born March 15, 1850, in Somerset county, 
where he received his education in the common schools. At the 
age of sixteen he left school and became his father's assistant 
in business, filling this position until 1871, in which year he 
attained his majority. He and his brother George then suc- 
ceeded their father in the charge of the business which they 
conducted until 1872, wlien the stock was largely destroyed by 
fire, although the building escaped. They were very success- 
ful until 1876. when they again suffered from fire, the build- 
ing as well as the stock being then destroyed, in consequence 
of which the firm dissolved aud the business was discontinued. 
Mr. Holderbaum became again for a time the assistant of his 
father and then went west for three years. On his return he 
went int-o business with his father and his two older brothers, 



2«t) BEDFORD AND SO:\LERSET COUNTIES 

James B. and Henry, the firm remaining unchanged until 1884, 
when James B, went into the hardware business. In 1886 Mr. 
Holderhanm witlidrew and engaged in the revenue business, 
abandtmiiig it at the end of four years in order to take the posi- 
tion of travelling salesman, which he held for another four 
years. He then returned to his place in his father's store, and 
after the death of the latter continued the business which he 
still conducts. He has thus far been a life-long Democrat. 

Mr. Holderbaum married, June 23, 1889, Sara A., born 
March 7, 1866, in Wellersburg, daughter of Henry and Anna 
(irayman) Moser. 

GEORGE A. PILE. 

George A. Pile, of Boswell, was born October 21, 1839, in 
Jenner township, and is a son of Abraham Pile, who passed his 
life as a farmer in his native county of Somerset. He was a 
Republican in politics. Abraham Pile married Mary Friedline, 
and their children were : John, deceased ; Lewis, deceased ; and 
George A., of whom later. 

George A. Pile, son of Abraham and Mary (Friedline) 
Pile, received his education in the schools of his native county, 
and on September 3, 1861, enlisted for a term of three years in 
Company C, Fifty-fourth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, 
and after serving his time re-enlisted, in 1864, in Company H, 
of the same regiment, then known as the Fifty-fourth. He served 
until the close of the war, being honorably discharged June 5, 
1865. After his return home he was, until 1892, engaged in 
farming in Jenner township, and was then for one year the 
proprietor of a hotel at Jenner. At the end of that time he 
again became a farmer, remaining so until 1902, when he built 
a hotel in Boswell to which he gave the name of the Central 
Hotel and of which he became the proprietor. In November, 
1905, he sold his hotel and retired from active business. He has 
filled the ofifices of councilman and street commissioner and has 
also served as assessor and judge of election. He is a member 
of the G. A. R. He has been a life-long Republican. 

Mr. Pile married, December 28, 1865, Phoebe J., daughter 
of Philip and Elizabeth (Hay) Coleman, and their children are: 
Harry, Emma, I*hilip, Edgar, Maggie, Lizzie, Mary and Myrtle. 

HOWARD L. McVICKER. 

Howard L. McVicker, of Boswell, was born April 22, 1883, 
in Stoystown, and is a son of W. A. McVicker, and a grandson 
of James McVicker, who was of Scotch-Irish descent and was 
born on Dry Ridge, Bedford county. From 1831 to 1843 he 
was engaged in farming at Statler's mill, near Schellsburg, 
whence he came to Somerset county, where he was twice elected 



BKDFUKD AND SOMEKiSKT COUNTIES 287 

justice of the peace. In 1859 he returned to Bedford county. 
He was twice married and was tlie father of nine children. 

W. A. McVicker, son of James McVicker, was born in 
1857, and for four years followed the tinner's trade in Clays- 
burg. Blair county. In 1880 he moved to Stoystown and es- 
tablished himself in the hardware business, which he conducted 
for twenty-four years, thence moving to Johnstown, Pennsyl- 
vania, to engage in business of the like nature. He belongs 
to the I. 0. 0. F. and is a Republican in politics. Mr. Mc- 
Vicker married Lizia A., born in 1867, daughter of John I. 
Hoover, of Ciaysburg, Blair county, and the following chil- 
dren were born to them: Howard L., of whom later; Ada P., 
Martha L., and Kenneth W. 

Howard L. jMcVicker received his education in the com- 
mon schools of Stoystown, and afterward took a business course 
at Iron City College, of Pittsburg. His first employment was 
in connection with the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, and then as 
assistant cashier at Stoystown, a position which he retained 
two years. At the end of that time he became cashier of the 
First National Bank of Boswell, in which position he is still 
serving. He is a tinner by trade, member of the I. 0. 0. F. and 
Masons, Lodge No. 358, Somerset, Pennsylvania. He is a Re- 
publican in politics. 

ISAAC FRIEDLINE. 

Isaac Friedline, of Boswell, was born June 14, 1855, and is 
a son of Aaron Friedline, whose ancestors emigrated from Ger- 
many. Aaron Friedline was born in 1821, in Somerset county, 
and was a farmer and a Republican. He married Catharine 
Pile, and thirteen children Avere born to them. 

Isaac Friedline, son of Aaron and Catharine (Pile) Fried- 
line, was educated in the common schools of his native county, 
and for twenty-one years followed the blacksmith's trade. In 
1894 he established the furniture and undertaking business, in 
which he has since been engaged, and is doing a thriving busi- 
ness. Mr. Friedline is a Republican. He married Lizzie, born 
February 14, 1855, daughter of John and Jane (Cowen) Sachs, 
and they had children: Elson, deceased; Simon, deceased; 
Minnie, deceased; Marion, and Edgar. 

CORNELIUS F. ENOCH. 

Cornelius F. Enoch, of Boswell, was born December 25, 
1882. and is a representative of an old family of Washington 
county, Pennsylvania, his great-grandfather having been one 
of those engaged in the famous whiskey rebellion. Mr. Enoch's 
grandfather, Herom D. Enoch, was born in 1830, in Washing- 
ton, Pennsylvania, and is a physician and surgeon. Mr. Enoch's 



288 BEDFORD AND SO]\[ERSET COUNTIES 

father, S. F. Enoch, married Martha J. Fleming, and three 
children have been born to them : Cornelius F., of whom later ; 
Sarah, and JMartha. 

Cornelius F. Enoch, son of S. F. and Martha J. (Fleming) 
Enoch, was born in Burgettstown, AVashington county, where 
he received his education in the common schools. After com- 
pleting his course of study he obtained a position as clerk in a 
store, which he retained for two years. October 17, 1902, he 
went to Jioswell as general agent for the Baltimore & Ohio Rail- 
road Company, and is still serving in that capacity. Mr. Enoch 
married, November 5, 1904, Mary K., born January 1, 1883, in 
Uniontown, daughter of Thoman F. and Margaret (Dublin) 
Higgins, and they have one child, Martha, born August 24, 1905. 

FRANKLIN MILLER. 

Franklin Miller, of Stoystown, was born March 15, 1855, in 
Quemahoning township, and is a descendant of Joseph Miller, 
who was of German lineage and came from Reading, Pennsyl- 
vania, to Somerset county. He settled in Stony Creek town- 
ship, near Coleman's Station, where he purchased a large tract 
of land which he improved, and on which he resided until his 
death. He married and was the father of a numerous family. 
His remains were interred in the Miller burying-ground, one 
mile north of Coleman's Station, on the Berlin road. 

Joseph Miller, Jr., eldest child of Joseph Miller, Sr., was 
born in 1784, in Reading, Pennsylvania, and was reared to the 
life of a farmer. At the age of twenty-three he moved to 
Quemahoning township and settled upon a tract of three hun- 
dred and twenty acres of land adjacent to Higgins' creek, a 
branch of Stony creek, now known as Beaver Dam creek. The 
patent for this land was issued in 1784 by the executive council 
of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania to John F^aul, a member 
of the Society of Friends, from whom Mr. Miller made his pur- 
chase. The enterprise was successful, enabling Mr. Miller to 
bequeath a farm to each of his sons. He was a member of the 
Lutheran church. Mr. Miller married Mary, daughter of Henry 
Shaffer, and their children were: Samuel J., of whom later; 
Jacob J., Valentine J., Elizabeth, Susanna, Rosanna, Noah J., 
Nancy, Mary, and Sarah. Mr. Miller's death occurred in 1860. 

Samuel J. Miller, son of Joseph and Mary (Shaffer) Miller, 
was born July 27, 1806, in Quemahoning township, and there 
passed his life in agricultural ])ursnits. lie was a Republican 
in politics. Mr. Miller married Elizabeth Mowry, born Octo- 
ber 11, 1811, in Brothers Valley township, and the following 
were their children: Josiah, born in 18.35, served in the Union 
army (hiring the civil war; Noah S., l)()rn in 1837, held a cap- 
tain's commission and was wounded in the service; Gideon, 



Bb^DFOiU) AND SOAIEKSET COUNTIES '2bd 

born in 1839, was killed at the battle oi' Gettysburg; Peter, 
born in 18-il; tSanmel IS., born in 1843, also served in the civil 
war; Nancy, born in J 845; Adam, born in 1847; Jacob IS., born 
in 1849; Jeremiah !S., born in 1851; David, born in 1853; i^'rank- 
lin, of whom later; Lemon, born in 1857; J5enjamin !S., born in 
1860. 

.Franklin Miller, son of JSamuel J. and Elizabeth (Mo wry) 
Miller, obtained his education in the common schools of Som- 
erset county, w4iich lie attended until the age of seventeen, and 
then for one winter was engaged in teaching. The following 
autumn he entered the normal school. After completing his 
education he began farming, a calling to which he has since 
devoted the greater part of his time. He spent four years 
in Johnstown as foreman in a lumber yard, and for the same 
length of time served as deputy and road manager. He has 
been a life-long Kepublican. 

Mr. Miller married, September 24, 1882, Sadie A. Bow- 
man, and thev are the parents of two sons: Lavan M., born 
July 13, 1888- and Samuel G., March 28, 1896. Mrs. Miller is 
a daughter of Noah Bowman, a native of Jenner township, who 
enlisted during the Civil war, and a few years after his return 
home died from the effects of disease contracted while in the 
service. Politically he was a Republican. Mr. Bowman mar- 
ried Mary Cover, and their family consisted of the following 
children: Lavan, Nancy C, and Sadie A., born April 10, 1864, 
in Jenner township, wife of Franklin Miller. After the death 
of her husband, Mrs. Bowman married Jonas Mamrer, a farmer 
and a Republican, becoming by this union the mother of one 
child, Michael C. Mamrer. 

CHARLES F. ZIMMERMAN. 

Charles F. Zimmerman, of Stoystown, was born April 29, 
1854, in Berlin, and is a son of Peter Zimmerman, a native of 
Germany, who was brought to this country by his parents when 
a boy of ten years old. The family settled near Berlin, where 
Mr. Zimmerman, on reaching manhood, turned his attention to 
agriculture, and passed his life as a farmer. He married Sarah, 
born in Berlin, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Zorn) 
Ream, and their children were: Samuel, Elizabeth, William, 
Mary, deceased; Peter, Joseph, deceased; Charles F., of whom 
later; and Sarah, deceased, who was the wife of Walter Lane. 

Charles F. Zimmerman, son of Peter and Sarah (Ream) 
Zimmerman, obtained his education in the common schools of 
Berlin, which he attended until the time arrived for him to learn 
a trade. Having selected that of a tinner, he served an appren- 
ticeship thereto and afterward followed the trade for five years. 
After spending two years in business as a butcher, he decided 

Vol. Ill 19 



290 BEDFOKD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

to become a farmer, and lias ever since given his undivided at- 
tention to agriculture. He is a Prohibitionist in politics, 

[n the fall of J 905 he was nominated by the Prohibition 
party for county commissioner, and also endorsed by the Fu- 
sionists, and was elected by over one thousand majority, and 
was qualified as county commissioner in the spring of 1900, 
He is a member of the Reformed church, holding membership 
ever since he was seventeen years of age. He has been assist- 
ant superintendent of the Sunday school and has served for 
several years as deacon and elder in his church. He is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Maccabees. 

Mr, Zimmerman married Eliza Coleman and their chil- 
dren are: Tillie, Myrtle, Frank, Samuel Hay, Marion, George, 
Herbert, and Jacotr, Mrs, Zimmerman is a daughter of Jacob 
and Mary (Musser) Coleman, the former a native of Somerset 
county and a farmer. Their children are: Alexander, Eliza, 
born October 20, 1854, near Berlin, wife of Charles F. Zim- 
merman; Frank, Addie, and Alice. 

SAMUEL BUCKMAN, 

The late Samuel Buckman, of Rockwood, was born in Le- 
high county. He was by occupation a contractor and bridge 
builder, erecting in various parts of the United States no fewer 
than one hundred and twenty-seven railroad and other bridges. 
After coming to Somerset county he built within its limits 
seven bridges. In 1880 he settled in Rockwood, and for two 
years thereafter was the proprietor of the old Eagle Hotel. 
In 1882 he built, at a cost of ten thousand dollars, the Mer- 
chants' Hotel, a structure which is one of the ornaments of 
the town, 

Mr, Buckman married, in 1887, Mary Critchfield, widow 
of Daniel T, Myers, and two children were born to them: Lucy, 
and Samuel, deceased. The death of Mr. Buckman, which de- 
prived the town and county of a useful citizen, occurred Feb- 
ruary 5, 1905, His widow, who resides in Rockwood, is now 
the proprietor of the Hotel Casselman in that toAvu. 

JACOB W. MENSER. 

Jacob W. Menser, deceased, who was the proprietor of a 
Iiotcl in Listie, Somerset county, J\mnsylvania, was born in 
Somerset township. August 3, 1865, son of David and Mary 
Ann (Ncnlrow) Menser. He is of German descent, Jiis great- 
grandfather having emigrated from Germany at a very early 
day. His grandfather, Jacob Menser, was a native of Frank- 
lin county, I^eniisylvania, and a car])enter by trade. His father, 
David ^^enser, was a native of Somei'sct township, l)orn in 
183L He was by trade a weaver and cooper. His wife, Mary 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 291 

Ann Nedrow, was born in Somerset county in 1830. Their 
cliiJdren were: Margaret, Philip, Alexander, Jacob W., de- 
ceased, of whom later. 

.lacob W. Menser received a common school education, and 
after leaving school was for six years employed about the 
mines. In 1900 he built a hotel in Listie, in the conduct of 
which he successfully engaged for the remainder of his life. 
He was a Republican in politics, and always evinced a lively 
interest in all community affairs. 

Jacob W. Menser married Annie Custer, born October 31, 
1867, in Quemahoning, Somerset county, daughter of James' 
and Nancy (Kimmel) Custer. Her great-grandfather was born 
in Jenner township, and was a stonemason by trade. Her 
father, James Custer, was born April 12, 1841, in Quemaho- 
ning, was a farmer by occupation and a soldier in the Civil war, 
having served in the army two years and nine months. He 
married, December 25, 1864, Nancy Kimmel, a daughter of 
Abraham and Sarah (Darr) Kimmel, and their children were: 
Isaac, Matilda, Nancy, John, Mary, deceased; Anna, deceased; 
and Amanda. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob W. Menser became the 
parents of children, as follows: George Earl, born April 1, 
1885, a school teacher by occupation; Henry A., June 11, 1886, 
has been for two vears engaged in school teaching; Bertha 
May, September 30. 1888; Anna Viola, August 25, 1890; Al- 
berta Bell, July 31, 1892; Margaret G., March 8, 1894; Mary 
Elizabeth, November 13, 1898; and Emilie Pearl, February 25, 

1900. The death of Jacob W. Menser occurred on October 19, 

1901. In his demise the community lost a useful member, and 
his family a kind and loving husband and father. 

GEORGE A. NOON, M. D. 

George A. Noon, a practicing physician of Listie, Somerset 
county. Pennsylvania, was born June 6, 1859, in Johnstown, 
Pennsylvania, a son of Daniel and Susanna (Hoffman) Noon. 

Dr. Noon is a descendant of John Noon, a native of Mann- 
heim, German3\ who emigrated to this country. He was a 
farm.er by occupation. He served in the great struggle for 
national independence for eight years under General Wash- 
ington, and in his old age went to Johnstown, where he lived 
until his death, which occurred when he had reached the ad- 
vanced age of one hundred and ten years. He married, and 
among his children was a son, Adam. 

Adam Noon (grandfather), was a minister in the United 
Brethren church. He married Mary Laner, and among the 
children born to them was Daniel. 

Daniel Noon (father), was born at Johnstown in 1833. He 
was a farmer by occupation, and was a Republican in politics. 



292 BKDFORD AND SOMEHSP^T COUNTIES 

He married Susanna Hoffman, daughter of Jacob Hoffman, 
born in Somerset county. Tliey had children as follows: 
George, of whom later; Milton A., Charles P., Emma, Almira, 
and Goldie. 

George A. Noon received his early education in the com- 
mon schools of Cambria countv, and later entered into the study 
of medicine in the Georgia Eclectic Medical College at At- 
lanta, Georgia, receiving his degree February 26, 1890. He 
located in Stoystown, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, and was 
engaged in the practice of his profession in that place for five 
years. He then removed to Listie, where he has since resided, 
and where he has built up for himself an extensive and lucrative 
practice. Politically he is a staunch Republican. 

June 11, 1 895, he married Marie E. Metzgar, born Novem- 
ber 7, 1871, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Weller) Metzgar, 
the former a native of Somerset county, a farmer by occupation 
and a Republican in politics. Dr. and Mrs. Noon have two chil- 
dren: Russell Alleyne, born August 5, 1900, and Lillian Bea- 
trice, April 24, 1901. 

THE SECHLER FAMILY. 

The Sechler family to which Edwin S. Sechler, of Somer- 
set, belongs, descended as follows: The forefathers came to 
America from Germany, but the date is not known. 

(I) John Sechler was born in one of the eastern counties 
of Pennsylvania, and is buried at Lurel church in Black town- 
ship, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. He was a farmer. He 
married into the Hinebaugh family and was the father of four 
sons and four daughters, Jonathan, Henry, Andrew, Joseph, 
Mary, Elizabeth, Sarah and one deceased. 

(II) Jonathan Sechler, son of John Sechler (1), born in 
1800, in Milford township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. He 
followed farming, and died November, 1869. He was a mem- 
ber of the Reformed church and a staunch Republican. He 
married Elizabeth Dull, daughter of Peter Dull and wife, by 
whom were born: Harriet, married John Mason; Daniel, died 
when twenty-one years old; Juliana, married Joseph Siebert; 
Barbara, married George Kimmel; George; Elizabeth, married 
(first) Samuel Kuhlman and (second) Herman Kreager; 
Joseph. This family was all born in Milford township, Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania. 

(Til) George Sechler, son of Jonathan Sechler (2), re- 
ceived a common school education and when abou<^, twenty years 
of age offered his service to his country in defense' of the LTnion 
cause. He was a member of Company ''K," Fifth Pennsyl- 
vania Heavy Artillery, serving until ]^eace was declared. lie 
took part in the Shenandoah campaign, l)nt was more fortunate 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 293 

than many of his comrades, as he was never wounded and was 
only in the hospital a few days. He is now a member of R. P. 
Cummins Grand Army Post, No. 210, of which he has been both 
junior and senior vice-commander. By occupation Mr. Sech- 
ler has always been ranked among the farmers. Politically he 
is a staunch Republican, and in religious matters is a member 
of the Lutheran church. 

He married (first), 1867, Minerva, daughter of John and 
Lizzie (Walter) Boucher. Mrs. Sechler died May 23, 1891. 
The issue by this union was: Charles G. born January, 1868; 
Edwin S., December 25, 1869; Whitelaw Reid, 3S72; Allen U., 
Harry E., 1878; Sadie E., 1884. For his second wife Mr. Sech- 
ler in 1892 married Catharine (Knogey) Reese, widow of Sam- 
uel Reese. She died in child-birth, January, 1893, leaving a 
son, William, who died when two years of age. 

(IV) Edwin S. Sechler, son of George and Minerva 
(Boucher) Sechler, was born in Milford township, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, December 25, 1869, and was educated at 
the Somerset county common schools. He was reared to farm 
life, but with his brother, Allen U., in 1904, engaged in the liv- 
ery business at Somerset, under the firm name of Sechler Broth- 
ers. He married, April 11, 1906, Anna M. Knupp, daughter of 
Eli and Harriet Knupp, of Somerset, Pennsylvania. 

DAVID W. KOONTZ. 

David W. Koontz, deceased, a well known and highly re- 
spected citizen of Somerset, Pennsylvania, was a native of 
Lonaconiug, Maryland, born July 5, 1867. His father Salem 
Koontz, was also a native of Maryland, a farmer by occupation, 
and by his marriage to Margaret Harden the following named 
children were born : Anna, David W., Susan, Ellen and Birdie. 

The common schools in the neighborhood of his home af- 
forded David W. Koontz the opportunity of obtaining a good 
English education. Mr. Koontz, not unlike the majority of his 
relations, was never very robust and rugged, and the family 
possessing considerable means, he never ventured out into the 
labors known to strenuous lives, but as far as possible hus- 
banded his strength. He removed from his native state to 
Somerset, Pennsylvania, in 1900, more especially for the bet- 
ter advantages which could be afforded his interesting family 
in both social and educational ways. He had great faith in 
Somerset and the good citizens, its schools and churches. It 
seemed to both himself and wife an ideal place in which to rear 
and educate their children. Accordingly the farm property, so 
valuable, well improved, and suitably located, just to the north 
of the borough, still occupied by his family, was purchased. 
Here Mr. Koontz took much delight and comfort in improving 



L^94 BEDFORD AXD JSOMEHtSET COU.NTiEfe 

the place. He was also interested from the start iu the affairs 
of tlie borougli uear by, wliere lie expected to live maiiy years. 
Every worthy eiiterprise received nis liearty support, ile 
made a long trip over the mountains, during whieu journey he 
contracted a severe cold, which was too mucli tor his none too 
strong cuusiitulion, and as a result he became ill and hnally 
passed earthly scenes while yet in the summer of his lil'e. He 
died June 12, 19U1, and was buried in the old lamily burying 
ground in Maryland, ins native state. Mr. Koontz was polit- 
ically a ilepubiican, but never sought office, preferring a re- 
tired, quiet home life, seeming to live for the joys and com- 
forts of his family, to which he was greatly attached. 

He married, October 19, 1890, Mary E., daughter of Alex- 
ander and Mary E. (Loar) Davis, and granddaughter of 
James Uavis, wlio was a native of England, and who was killed 
during the Civil war. Alexander Davis, father of Mrs. 
Koontz, was born in Vale ^Summit, Maryland, and is a 
staunch Republican. By his wife, above named, ten children 
were born, including Mrs. Koontz. Though advanced in years 
and always industrious, hard-working people, they still sur- 
vive in the enjoyment of perfect health. To Mr. and Mrs. 
David W. Koontz were born three children: David, January 6, 
1892, died May 8, 1892; Margaret E., May 29, 1893; Mary B., 
January 17, 1896. 

Since the death of her husband, Mrs. Koontz has managed 
the farm and made many valuable improvements on the prem- 
ises ; she had a good residence erected in Somerset, costing over 
four thousand dollars. She also owns a valuable property in 
Marjdand, her native state, including numerous residences. 
She also owns other farm lands than the homestead adjoining 
Somerset, where she now resides with her two daughters, who 
are being educated at the public schools of the borough. 

FRANK H. SUFALL. 

Frank H. Siifall, a furniture dealer and undertaker of 
Somerset, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was there born in 
November, 1849, the son of Solomon and Jane C (Gilbert) 
Sufall, who were the parents of the following children; 
Ethelinda C, Anna M., Lovetta J., George P: (deceased), Ed- 
gar G., Harry G., Frank H., of whom later. 

Frank 11. Sufall obtained his education in the common 
schools of his native county, and at the age of fifteen went to 
Avork at the ]:)attern maker's trade. He also learned the buggy 
maker's trade, and worked at both for some time, and was 
engaged for fifteen years in the manufacture of farming mills. 
He subse(iuently embarked in the furniture and undertaking 
business. After five years in this line he formed a partner- 



I 



I 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET OOITNTTES 295 

ship with Harry A. Coimtryinan, witli wliom he has heen asso- 
ciated for the past four years. They are hotli thoronsjh, capable 
business men and condnot an extensive and profitable business. 
Mr. Snfall holds membership in the Odd Fellows, Tjod^e No. 
438, Somerset. 

Deoember 21, 1889, Mr. Sufall married Lizzie A. Snmpstine, 
born February 2, 1801, dauc^hter of Jacob Snmpstine. Her 
father was a native of Somerset connty, and met his death in 
the Civil war, beine^ then qnite yonns:. Mrs. Snmpstine died 
at the home of Mrs. Snfall in 1905. Tlie following named chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Snfall : Georgie F., 
a stenographer, married Princeton Wagner, and they reside 
at her home; Jennie W. ; Elizabeth F. The death of Mrs. Snfall 
occurred February 10, 1905. 

MH.TON SHERMAN PECK. 

Milton Sherman Peck, a representative citizen of Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, was there born in Addi^^on township, 
July 1, 1865, a son of William and Mary (Weimer) Peck. 

Jacob Peck (great-grandfather) was a farmer by occupa- 
tion. John Peck (grandfather), son of Jacob Peck, was born 
in Somerset county. He followed the occupation of a farmer, 
and was a Republican in politics. He married Lizzie. Maust. 
William Peck (father) was born in 1843 in Addison township, 
and he also follows agricultural pursuits for a livelihood. He 
is an enterprising, industrious farmer and a useful member of 
the community. His wife, Mary Weimer, was born in Milford 
tov^mshi]"). Somerset county, a daughter of Samuel and Mary 
(Reitz) Weimer. Samuel Weimer was a farmer all his active 
working life. His wife. Marv, was a dauirhter of Christian and 
Emma (Barr) Reitz. Samuel and Mary Weimer had the follow- 
ing children: Ruth, William, Ralr)h, Alma and Mary. William 
and ^farv (Weimer) Peck were the parents of children as fol- 
lows: Harvey, deceased; Milton S., of whom later; Jonas; Al- 
bert; Charles. 

Milton Sherm.'in Peck acnuired his English education in 
the common schools. Lnmediatelv after leaving the school- 
room he adopted the occupation of a farmer, in which he has 
since continued, and in which he has achieved the most gratify- 
mg success. He is Republican in his political affiliations. Mil- 
ton S. Peck married, December 14, 1890, Anna Gnagey, born 
July 12, 1862, a daus'hter of Rev. Joel and Catherine (Fike) 
Gnacfey. Her great-grandfather. Christian Gnas^ey, came to 
this country from Switzerland in 1733, settling in Brothers Val- 
ley, Pennsylvania. Her grandfather. Christian Gnagey, was 
born in Somerset conntv, was a Republican in politics, and fol- 
lowed agricultural pursuits. His wife was Barbara Plucker. 



29G BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Rev. Joel Gregory, father of Mrs. Peck, was born February 9, 
1836, in Somerset, Somerset count} , and was a niinister in the 
German Baptist church, also following farming quite ex- 
tensively. His wife was Catherine Fike, the daugiiter of John 
and Mary (Miller) Fike, the former a native of Somerset 
county, and a farmer. Rev. Joel and Catherine (Fike) 
Gnagey were the parents of the following children: Amanda, 
Ellen B., Anna, Ida C, Eliza, William F., John E., Emma, 
Sadie E., Grace E. and Delia M. Milton Sherman and Anna 
(Gnagey) Peck have children as follows: Ma>\ born Decem- 
ber 8, 1891; Grace, July 6, 1894; and Ninia, July 19, 1891. 

JACOB M. GLESSNER. 

Jacob M. Glessner, of Shanksville, is a great-great-grand- 
son of Jacob Glessner, the tragic circumstances cf whose death 
so deeply stirred the people of Somerset couniy. His son, 
Joseph Grlessner, Sr., was the father of Joseph Glessner, Jr. 
A complete record of the Glessner ancestry will be found on 
another page. 

John M. Glessner, son of Joseph Glessner, Jr., was born 
November 21, 1832, and was a well educated man, teaching in 
the public schools up to the time of his marriage. After that 
event he devoted himself to agricultural pursuits in Stony 
Creek township. He served as supervisor and for many years 
held the office of justice of the peace. In early life he was a 
Democrat, but in 1856, when slavery became an issue, he joined 
the Republican party and adhered to it for the remainder of 
his days. He was an active worker in the Reformed church, 
which he served as deacon and elder until his dtath. He was 
for many years superintendent of the Sunday school of the 
Glade Reformed church. 

John M. Glessner married, November 16, 1853, Polly 
Walker, born November 30, 1833, and their children were: 
Catharine, born December 18, 1854, widow of William H. Mil- 
ler, living on the farm with her son Norman. William J., born 
April 11, 1856, farmer of Somerset township, married Sarah 
Stoy and has thirteen children. Sarah, born August 16, 1857, 
wife of J. C. Scott, fanner of Stony Creek township, has four 
children. Joseph, l)orn November 30, 1S59, fari.jer of Somer- 
set township, married Susan K. Miller, and died hi 1902, leav- 
ing two childi-en. Ida, born May 31, 1862, widow of Michael J. 
Synder. manages ]\or farm in Stony Creek townshi)); she has 
five sons and hei- daughter is tlie teachei- of Glad* public school. 
Jacob M., of whom later. Mary, born January 24, 1867, widow 
of George E. Geisel. who was killed at a barn raising; Mrs. 
(icisi'l mnna^os her farm ne;ir (Jlade chui-ch with the assistaTice 
of licr <()n, Hiram J.; hoi- dauglilcr, Edilh M., 's a student at 



BEDFOKD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES t^OT 

the State Normal school, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania. Edmund, 
born April 29, 18(39, died at the age oi' three years. Melissa, 
born July G, 1871, wile of Irwin E. Brant, tanner ot Stony 
Creek toAvnship, has five children. John, born April 12, 1874, 
died in infancy. Harry H., born May 3, 1875, educated in com- 
mon and normal sciiools of tiie county, taught three years, grad- 
uated from State Normal school, Lock Haven, and Lafayette 
College. Took a course in University of California, where he 
is now an instructor. Married Mabel Mead, of California, and 
has one child. Mr. Glessner, the father of this numerous family, 
died August 10, 1893. His widow is still living, and makes her 
home with her son, Jacob M. She is a member of the Lutheran 
church, and is in good health and active at the age of seventy- 
two. This long continued vigor is an inheritance from her 
parents, Jacob J. and Catharine (Fritz) Walker, both of whom 
died at an advanced age. Mr. Walker was a lumberman and 
miller, a Republican and a member of the Lutheran church. 

Jacob M. Glessner, son of John M. and Polly (Walker) 
(xlessner, was born July 12, 1864, in Stony Creek township, 
where he received his education in the common schools. He has 
made farming the business of liis life, and was his father's 
main assistant, never leaving him until separated by death. 
On his father's death he came into possession of the farm, 
which he had bought the year previous and which then contained 
three hundred acres, but which is now, in consequence of sales, 
reduced to one hundred and forty, nearly all of which are mi- 
der cultivation. The land is especially well adapted to the 
raising of hay, which is baled and shipped to market in large 
quantities. Apples are the chief fruit products, and there is 
a sugar camp of three hundred vessels. The improvements are 
fine, and few farms can boast of better kept buildings. The 
place is well stocked with good horses and cattle. Mr. Glessner 
formerly did a large business in buying, feeding and selling 
cattle, but has practically retired from that branch of industry 
in order to give to his other interests all his time and energy. 
He was active in forming the Farmers' Union Telephone Com- 
pany, in which he has served as director, vice-president and 
manager of the line, and in which he is now a trustee. He is 
a stockholder in the Philson National Bank of Berlin, and has 
filled many offices of trust, having acted as executor of his 
father's estate and administrator of that of his brother Joseph, 
He has also been guardian of the two children of his sister, 
Mrs. Snyder, and - administrator of the estate of Jacob A. 
Stutzman. In addition to the home farm he owns a timber tract 
of one hundr-^d and ten acres and has a one-half interest in five 
hundred and fifty-six acres of timber. 

He has served as inspector, judge of election and township 



i^DS BEDP^OKD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

duditor. He affiliates with Shanksville Circle, No. 33, Knights 
of the Golden Eagle, having passed all chairs and holding the 
rank of past noble chief. Politically he is a Republican. He is 
a member of Glade Reformed church, in which he has served as 
deacon and also as sui)erintendeut of the Sunday school. 

Mr. Glessner married, October 1, 1891, Maggie M. Stutz- 
man, and they are the parents of three sous: \Villiani Earl, 
born April 22, 1893; Albert R., June 20, 189G; and Harry l^ee, 
December 3], 1898. Mrs. Glessner is a daughter of Jacob A. 
and Mary Stutzman, the former a farmer of Stony Creek town- 
ship, a Republican and a member of the Reformed church. He 
died in 1903 at the age of sixty, and his widow, who has at- 
tained that age, and is in good health, resides with her daugh- 
ter. Mrs. Stutzman is the mother of ten children, all of whom 
are living. One of them, Maggie M., was born April 23, 1872, 
received her education in the townshiiJ schools, and is the wife 
of Jacob M. Glessner. Mrs. Glessner is a member of the Re- 
formed church. 

EMIL D. DAUB. 

Among the residents of Somerset, Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, who have achieved success in their active careers and 
made for themselves honorable records as successful business 
men, due to thrift, perseverance, natural shrewdness and far- 
seeing business sagacity, may be mentioned Emil D. Daub, who 
is now living retired, enjoying to the full the consciousness of 
a life well spent and of duties faithfully and conscientiously per- 
formed. He was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, December 
21, 1856, a son of John and Emilie Daub. 

Emil D. Daub obtained his ])reliminary eduv'ation in the 
public schools of his native city, and this was supplemented by 
a course in the Iron City College, Pittsburg. He then turned 
his attention to business and entered the wholesale and retail 
grocery store in J^ittsburg conducted by his father, remaining 
in his employ until 1880, in which year he and his brother, 
Theodore G. Daub, formed a partnership and conducted a busi- 
ness along the same lines undei- the firm name of John Daub's 
Sons, 'i'liis connection continued u]) to P>00, a period of twenty 
years, during which time they built up an extensive and profit- 
able trade, carrying a large stock of finely seleccod goods, the 
best the markets aiforded, and giving to their numerous cus- 
tomers ])r()mpt ;nid efficient service. Since the retirement of 
Emil I). Daul) from the firm, the business has been conducted 
by Theodore (J. Daub, who holds a high place in tlie business 
circles of l^ittsbnrg. JMnil 1). Daub has taken .in active in- 
terest in all enterprises yjrojected for the advancement and 
welfare of" the community in which he resides, and is held in 



Bj^DFOliD xVND SOMEESET COUNTIES 2yy 

liigii esteem by all who have the honor of his dcquaiutance. 
He is a iiepubiicau iu polities, the prineiples of whieii party he 
believes to be for the best form of government. 

JOSIAH W. PILE. 

Josiah W. Pile, a farmer and influential citizen of Mil- 
ford township, [Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was there born 
April 8, 1844, son of Joseph and Mary (Bartman) Pile, both 
of German descent, their great-grandfathers having been na- 
tives of Germany. 

John Pile, the j^aternal grandfather of Josiah W. Pile, was 
born in Somerset county. He settled in Milf ord township, Som- 
erset county, and was by occupation a farmer and distiller. 
His wife was Elizabeth Dull, and one of their children was a 
son, Joseph. 

Joseph Pile, son of John Pile and father of Josiah W. 
Pile, was born in Somerset county, 1804. He was a farmer and 
stockdealer, and was an industrious, useful citizen. He mar- 
ried Mary Bartman, and their children were : Peter, resides in 
New Centerville, Pennsylvania; Moses, a farmer of Westmore- 
land county, Pennsylvania; Catherine, married Simon Vought, 
and resides in Somerset, Pennsylvania; George, a resident of 
Rockwood, Pennsylvania ; Josiah W., of whom later ; and Sarah 
Caroline. Joseph Pile and his wife were members of the Lu- 
theran church. The death of Joseph occurred in 1877, and that 
of his wife about 1869. 

Josiah W. Pile acquired his education in the public schools 
of Milford, and after leaving the schoolroom remained on the 
home farm, for some time. In 1881 he removed to a farm where 
he resided until 1902, when he moved to Somerset. In 1864, 
at the time of the war of the rebellion, Mr. Pile enlisted in 
Company K, Fifth J^ennsylvania Heavy Artillery, Two Hun- 
dred and Fourth Regiment, his commanding officers being 
Captain Hunt and Colonel Gallup. Mr, Pile joined the army 
at Pittsburg, and went from there to Washington, D. C, where 
he remained two weeks. He was then transferred to duty in 
the Twenty-second Army Corps, under the Second Division 
commander. He participated in the engagements at Salem and 
Rectortown, Virginia, and was honorably discharged July 5, 
1865. Upon his return to civil life Mr. Pile turned his attention 
to the care of his farm, which he brought to a high state of im- 
provement and cultivation. He is a Republican in politics and 
has rendered his township valuable services as a town official. 
He served as auditor for three years, assessor three years, 
judge of elections one year, for a number of years as clerk of 
the township election board, and also on the Republican town 
ship committee. Fraternally he is a member of the G. A. R., 



300 BEDFOKD AXD SOMERSET COUNTIES 

William PI. Weller Post, No. 549, at Kockwood, Pennsylvania. 
He and his family are members of the Christian church of 
Somerset. 

June 26, 1873, Josiah AV. Pile married Sadie Huston, a 
daughter of Chambers and Rebecca (Pritts) Huston, of Somer- 
set. Her grandfather. Peter Huston, was a hrst lieutenant in 
the war of 1812, serving under General Harrison. He con- 
ducted the Huston House at Somerset, Pennsylvania. His wife 
was a Miss Richards, and among their children was a son, 
Chambers. Chambers and Rebecca (Pritts) Huston were the 
parents of thirteen children, viz.: John, Chauncey, Samuel, 
James, Anna, Pollen, Alexander, Sarah and Jane (twins), Mary, 
Alice, Edward and Elizabeth. Of these, John, Chauncey and 
Alexander served in the Civil war. Chauncey enlisted in Com- 
pany A, Tenth Regiment. Pennsylvania Volunteers, commanded 
by Captain R. P. Cummings, and was wounded in the battle of 
City Crossroads. He re-enlisted in the Sixty-first Regiment 
and served until the cessation of hostilities. Alexander also 
enlisted, and served for four years. Prior to her marriage Mrs. 
Pile was engaged as a teacher in the public schools of Somerset 
county for eight years. Mr. and Mrs. Josiah W. Pile are the 
parents of two children. Annie, born 1876, and Elizabeth, born 

1882. Annie was educated in the town schools and the county 
normal school, from which institution she was graduated, under 
the direction of Superintendent of Schools J. N. Berkley, when 
but seventeen years of age, and is now teaching in the home 
district. The younger daughter, Elizabeth, is still in school. 

JOHN C. ANKENY. 

John C. Ankeny, prosperous farmer of Milford township, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was born at Marshalltown, 
Iowa, December 10, 1871. 

His father was David P]. Ankeny, born in 1836, in Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania. He learned the blacksmith trade in 
early life and completed with the training and speeding of 
horses. Pie followed it throughout life. About 1869 he re- 
moved to the sprightly inland city of Marshalltown, Marshall 
county, Iowa, where he worked at his trade until the summer of 

1883, when he and his family visited his native state, and while 
at Johnstown, Pennsylvania, he was robbed and killed during 
the month of August. He married Delia Carpenter, daughter 
of John C. Carpenter and wife, by whom one child was born, 
John C, of whom later. Mrs. Ankeny married for her second 
husband, William Pettigrew, by whom she had three children: 
Archie, Inez and T^lovd, all of whom still reside in Nebraska. 
Mrs. Pettigrew died in September, 1902, at Salona, Nebraska. 

John C. Ankeny 's paternal grandfather was David C. 



BEDFOKD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 3Ui 

Ankenv, a native ol' Somerset county, Tennsylvania, where he 
farmed all his life. He died in 188(3. They were the parents ot 
ten children, as follows: Samuel, Elijah, Noah, Alexander, 
Andrew, Joseph, David E., Lizzie, Mary (married William 
Lowrv) and Susan (married a Mr. Sellers). The Ankeny 
family were descended from German ancestry many generations 

John C. Ankeny, a ''Hawkeye" bv birth, attended the pub- 
lic schools of Marshalltown, Iowa, receiving a limited educa- 
tion. He came from Iowa with the family in 1883, and with the 
exception of a few trips west, to Iowa and Nebraska, m settle- 
ment of his father's estate, etc., he has resided m Somerset 
county, I'eunsvlvania, ever since, and has followed farming, 
with the excep'^tion of a short period, when he teamed. Polit- 
ically he votes with the Republican party, and in church rela- 
tions is a Lutheran. He married, at Oakland, Maryland, Lola 
Bruner, a daughter of Israel and Lovinia Bowman, of Milford 
township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Ankeny was 
one of four children born to her parents. Mr. and Mrs. An- 
keny have four children : Bessie I., born November 25, 1893 ; 
Inez, January 25, 1895; Irma, July 25, 1899; Loita, December 

29. 1904. 

GEORGE PARKS. 

George Parks, an engineer in the employ of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company, was born in Johnstown, Pennsyl- 
vania, October 2, 1851, a son of Joseph and Rebecca (Cupp) 
Parks. Joseph Parks (father) is a native of Sheffield, Eng- 
land, born in 1814. He came to America in 1820 and settled m 
Johnstown. He became an engineer and ran the first engine 
out of Johnstown on Plane No. 1. The road was then controlled 
by the state. He was the first road foreman on the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad, and continued in that occupation until two 
years ago, when he was put upon the pension list. He married 
Rebecca Cupp. a daughter of Louis and Mary (Gorman) Cupp. 
Five children were born of this union, namely: George (of 
whom later/, Mary, Rubella, Kate and Phoebe. 

George Parks obtained his education in the common schools 
of Johns cown, and at the early age of thirteen left the school- 
room to enter the more practical school of life. He found em- 
ployment with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, and one 
year later was made fireman. After two and a half years of 
that occupation he was promoted to engineer, and has occupied 
that position ever since. He is a member of the Brotherhood 
of Tiocomotive Engineers, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks 
and Royal Arcanum. 

Mr. Parks married. August 5, 1873, Anna Colter, born 
January 20, 1859, daughter of D. W. and Anna (Tringle) Col- 



302 BEDP^ORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

ter, and granddaughter of D. W. Tringle, who is postmaster of 
East Conemaugh. This family is of German origin. D. W. 
Colter (father) received his education in Willmore. He is a 
Republican in politics. He married Anna Tringle, daughter of 
Rev. Daniel Tringle, and their children were: Anna Colter 
(Mrs. Parks); W. P., a merchant on Franklin street, Johns- 
town: Thomas P.; D. P., a merchant, with place of business on 
Main street, Johnstown; Dorothy, wife of James Geterny, an 
engineer on the Pennsylvania railroad; Emma, widow of Henry 
Fite, who was a conductor of the Pennsylvania railroad and 
was killed on the road. Mr. and Mrs. George Parks are the 
parents of seven children, viz.: Gertrude, Blanch, Colter, Will- 
iam, Lillian. Ruby, FJdward. 

ALBERT R. MEYERS. 

Albert R. Meyers, a carpenter of Rockwood, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, was born May 30, 1880, in Upper Turkey- 
foot township, a son of Aaron and Susan (Snyder) Meyers, 
and grandson of Reuben Meyers, who was also a native of 
Turkeyfoot. He is of German descent. Aaron Meyers (father) 
was born April 29, 1855, and is a farmer by occupation. He 
married Susan Snyder, born March 20, 1850, and five children 
were born, viz.: Albert R. (of whom later), John F., David R., 
Anna C, Charles 0. 

Albert R. Aleyers acquired his education in the common 
schools of his native place, and at the age of sixteen engaged 
in farming and lumbering. In 1900 he learned the trade of car- 
penter, in which occupation he is still very profitably engaged. 
He purchased his present prettv home in Rockwood, Decem- 
ber 22, 1901. He married, December 22, 1901, Mary Ellen 
Romesburg, born September 4, 1881, in Upper Turkeyfoot 
township, a daughter of Hiram and Phoebe (Fletcher) Romes- 
burg. Hiram Romesburg was born March 4, 1859, and is a 
farmer by occupation. He is the son of Jonas Romesburg, who 
was also a farmer of Upper Turkeyfoot, and of German de- 
scent. Hiram and Phoebe (Fletcher) Romesburg had children 
as follows: David M., Mary E., Harry J., Susan B., Eliza])eth 
M., Cordie E., James N., Silas ()., William H. and Charles F. 

MICHAEL H. MILLER. 

Michael H. Miller, a farmer of Rockwood, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, was born December 17, 1849, in Black township, 
Somerset county, the son of Jacob and Eliza (Lynt) Miller. 
Jacob Miller (father) was born in Somerset county, and was a. 
farm.er by occupation. 

Michael H. Miller received his educational training in the 
common schools of Somerset county, and at the age of eighteen 



BEDFOIU) AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 303 

left school aud engaged in farming with his father oi) the home 
farm. In 1881 he went into the jobbing business, and has fol- 
lowed that in connection with farming ever since. He owns a 
small farm of four acres, on which he has erected a home. In 
political affiliations he is a staunch Republican. 

Mr. Miller married, March 17, 1876, Miss Samantha Gruna- 
walt, born October 30, 1857, in VVellersburg, Somerset county, 
the daughter of Abraham and Meltonia (Wagner) Grunawait, 
and one of seven children, namely: Samantha, Alford, Silas 
(deceased), Peter M., Mary E., William J. and Benjamin K. 
Abraham Grunawait died in 1881. The following children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Michael Miller: Elmer W., Jan- 
uarv 21, 1877; Lucretia A., April 11, 1878; Ada V., January 9, 
1880, Cvntha L., March 16, 1882; Leora M., January 31, 1884; 
Marv Emma, December 28. J 885; Edna J. A., October 17, 1888; 
Benjamin H. A., March 1, 1891; and Delroy C. E., July 7, 1893. 

PERCY LESTER MOSTOLLE. 

Percy L. Mostolle, one of the young, prominent business 
men of Friedens, was born October 30, 1880, and is a lineal 
descendant of George Mostolle, who settled at Friedens, Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania, in 1776, being among the pioneers 
of that town, and an active and prominent factor in the growth 
and development of the same. George Mostolle was a farmer 
by occupation, his operations being conducted on a large scale, 
and an earnest Christian, He married Mary Mowery, who bore 
him several children. 

Uriah Mostolle, father of Percy L. Mostolle, was born in 
Friedens, Somerset county, and his active career was devoted 
to farming and the building of houses, in both of which enter- 
prises he met with a large degree of success. He enlisted as a 
private during the Civil war, this fact testifying to his love of 
country. Pie is a leader in the Evangelical Lutheran church, 
and since attaining his majority has cast his vote for the can- 
didates of the Republican party. He was united in marriage 
to Ellen B. Lowery, born in Brothers Valley township, Somer- 
set county, a daughter of Samuel and Susan (Mosholder) 
Lowery. 

Percy L. Mostolle received a common school education in 
his native town, Friedens, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, after 
which he served an ap])renticeship at the trade of painting, be- 
coming a skillful and expert workman in all its various 
branches. Subsequently he became a contractor painter and 
enjoyed the distinction of being the youngest contractor in 
Somerset county. His first contract, which was for the paint- 
ing of twenty buildings, was made in 1898, and from then up 
to the present time (1905) his business has increased steadily 



304 BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

in Volume and importance, and he now requires the services of 
ten workmen to fill his orders. He has received the contract for 
some of the most prominent buildings in Somerset county, and 
his work has always been performed in a highly creditable and 
satisfactory manner, each contract receiving his own personal 
supervision. In addition to this he is extensively engaged in 
the real estate business, which adds considerably to his income. 
Energy, enterprise and an indomitable will are the prominent 
traits of his character, and to these qualities may be attributed 
the success which has crowned his efforts. He is a member of 
the Evangelical Lutheran Church at Friedens, and a leader in 
the Christian Endeavor Society connected therewith. He is a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His polit- 
ical support is given to the candidates of the Republican party, 
in which he takes an active interest, although never seeking or 
holding public office. Mr. MostoUe, although young in years, 
is one of the enterprising and representative citizens of 
Friedens, and a bright future is in store for him. 

JOHN ALTFATHER. 

John Altfather, a retired agriculturist of Berlin, Somerset 
coimty, Pennsylvania, was born on a farm near Berlin, Penn- 
sylvania, January 8, 1834, the son of Daniel and Maria (John- 
son) Altfather. He is the grandson of Frederick Altfather, 
who was a native of Germany. 

Daniel Altfather was born near Berlin in 1808, and was 
by occupation a farmer and miller. In political relations he 
was a Democrat, and in church connections a member of the 
Reformed church. He married, in 1830, Maria Johnson, of 
English descent, who was born in 1810 in Berlin, Pennsylvania, 
and still living, at the age of ninety-six years, and in fairly good 
health. When eighty years of age she met with an accident 
that interferes with her walking. Otherwise she is a wonder- 
fully well preserved woman. The children born of this mar- 
riage are: John, of whom later; Henry D., a farmer of Ur- 
sina, Pennsylvania: William P., an electrician in Texas; Daniel, 
a farmer of Virginia; Susan, married William Dively, of Rox- 
bury, Pennsylvania; and Margaret, married Albert Gressinger, 
of Berlin, Pennsylvania. 

John Altfather, son of Daniel and Maria (Johnson) Alt- 
father, was educated in the township schools, and assisted on 
the home farm until he was sixteen years of age. He then went 
to work in a flour and grist mill and learned the trade of miller. 
This occupation he followed in connection with farming until 
1867, when he purchased his present farm, and to this he gave 
his entire attention until his retirement a few years ago.. It is 
well situated and adapted to stock and grain raising. In polit- 



BE1)¥0KL) AND SOMEliSET COUNTIES 305 

ical relations ]ie lias always been a Democrat, casting his first 
vote for James Buchanan in 185(). Although a loyal and pa- 
triotic citizen, and one who has always evinced a lively interest 
in the welfare of the community, Mr. Altfather has never as- 
pired to the honors or emoluments of public office. He has 
been a member from his youth of the Reformed church, in which 
he has served as deacon and is now elder. He was a teacher 
for years in the Sabbath school of his church, and was a mem- 
ber of the building committee when the present brick church 
edifice was erected in Berlin in 1883. Although the victim of 
several accidents at the mill and on his farm, Mr. Altfather, 
at seventy-three years of age, is in good health, and on clear 
Sundays always occupies his seat in church. He is of an ex- 
ceedingly genial nature, and has learned the art of growing old 
gracefully. He is universally respected and admired. He is a 
firm "good roads" advocate, bewailing the present inferior 
methods. 

Mr. Altfather married, February 14, 1861, Catherine Hay, 
a daughter of Simon and Lydia Hay, a prominent family of 
Somerset county. The father, Simon Hay, died at the age 
of ninety-six years. Catherine (Hay) Altfather was educated 
in the common schools and resided at home until her marriage. 
Of this marriage the follow^ing named children were born: 
Annie, 1864, married, February, 1903, Frank L. Mead, an en- 
gineer, and they live at home with her parents; John C., 1867, 
was educated in the township schools, and is now engaged in 
agricultural pursuits; he married Elizabeth Levy, of Berlin, 
and they have one child, Lewis V.; Edgar T., 1869, lost his life 
by being caught in the belting of a flouring mill at Ursina, Penn- 
sylvania, when but twenty-one years of age. 

EMANUEL L. KNEPPEE. 

Emanuel L. Knepper, a farm.er and stock dealer of Som- 
erset county, Penns^^lvania, was born in Brothers Valley town- 
ship, March 22, 1865, the son of Lewis J. and Magdalena 
(Meyers) Knepper. 

John Knepper (great-grandfather) was born in 1765. He 
removed to Somerset county, locating in Brothers Valley town- 
ship. Pie was a shoemaker by trade. He married Anna Maria 
Glessner, by whom children were born as follows: William, 
who served in the war of 1812; Jacob, John, Lewis, Peter, Jon- 
athan, George", Simon, Henry, Benjamin, Elizabeth (Mrs. 
TIauger) ; Catherine (Mrs. Hay) ; and Polly (Mrs. Haas). 

John Knepper (grandfather) was born in Somerset countj 
in 1795. Pie was the first Abolitionist in Brothers Valley, and 
the only voter in the township who cast his ballot for the Free 
Soir candidates. He married Susan Stahl, and children were 

Vol. Ill 20 



300 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

born as follows: Lewis J., Solomon, David, John, Peter, 
James, Sarah (Mrs. Coleman), Elizabeth (Mrs. Graham), Re- 
becca (Airs. Cober), Polly (Mrs. Smith), and Susan (Mrs. 
Myers). John Knepper, father of the above named children, 
died in 1857. 

Lewis J. Knepper (father) was born November 29, 1819, 
in Brothers Valley township. lie was educated in the public 
schools of the township, in which he afterward taught for 
twenty-one years. Abandoning the profession of teaching, he 
turned his attention to farming, which occupation he followed 
for the remainder of his active working life. In politics he was 
a Republican, and during his life held many township offices. 
In early life he connected himself with the German Baptist 
church, and died in that faith. He held the office of deacon in 
his church for thirty-five vears. He was interested in all 
branches of church and benevolent work, and assisted William 
G. Schrock to establish the first Sabbath school in the Brothers 
Valley congregation. Mr. Knepper was twice married: First 
to Magdalena Meyers, September 9, J 849, born January 24, 
1824, a daughter of Jacob and Hannah (Lichty) Meyers. Of 
this marriage children were born as follows : Mary A., de- 
ceased; Jacob M. : Solomon M. ; William M., deceased; Eliza- 
beth S., Ellen R., and Emanuel L. After the death of his first 
wife, which occurred in October, 1865, Mr. Knepper married 
Elizabeth AValker, and to them were born four children, Charles 
W. and Edward, both farmers of Brothers Valley, and Henry 
and Emma, who died in childhood. The death of Lewis J. 
Knepper occurred April 6, 1888. 

Emanuel Ij. Knepper was educated in the public schools 
of the township and in the Berlin Normal school. He attended 
school and assisted with the farm work until he was sixteen 
years of age, when he commenced teaching school, and was so 
occupied for six years. At the age of twenty-three ho married 
and commenced farming, on the farm which he bought in 1892. 
It comprises two hundred and sixty acres of land, on wliicli is 
a sugar camp of 1,200 vessels, producing about 4,000 pounds 
of maple sugar annually. In 1895 he commenced the buying 
and sliipping of cattle, which has since l)ecome his principal 
business. He is also an extensive feeder of live stock, using 
the entire grain and hay output of his farm in that way. Tliis 
branch of liis business lias necessitated the building of a large 
barn, er|uipped with modern appliances, which has just been 
coini)loi<'d. Mr. Knepper uses all modern labor-saving devices 
in his farming o])erations. 

In politics he is a staunch and loyal Republican, and has 
always evinced a lively interest in the advancement and prog- 
ress of that party. He is a school director, and has held many 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES a07 

township offices. He is a director of the First National Bank 
of Berlin and of the Farmers' Fire Insurance Company, Som- 
erset county. He is a member of the German Baptist church 
and Sunday school, and has been deacon in the church for 
eight years. 

He married, October 21, 1888, Emma S. Schrock, daughter 
of Rev. William G. Schrock (see Schrock sketch). Emma was 
born on her father's farm, November 3, 1865, and was educated 
in the public schools, Berlin Normal school and Juniata College, 
Jimiata, Pennsylvania. Of this marriage one child has been 
born, Lewis Schrock, September 11, 1889. He is a manly lad, 
receiving his education in the public schools and normal school. 
The large interests of Mr. Knepper involves the employment 
of many men, which materially adds to Mrs. Knepper 's duties 
as housewife, yet there is always room for one more at their 
hospitable board, and no stranger is ever turned away. 

AARON BRANT. 

Aaron Brant, a progressive, practical farmer of Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, was born near Berlin, April 23, 1842, a 
son of Henry and Sarah (Schrock) Brant, and grandson of 
Conrad Brant, who was a farmer of Brothers Valley township, 
and whose paternal great-grandfather came to this country 
from Amsterdam, Holland. 

Henry Brant (father) was born in 1809, and was one of a 
family of twelve children. He was a farmer by occupation, and 
achieved good success in this line. In politics he was a Whig, 
but after the formation of the Republican party gave his sup- 
port to tha* organization. He served his township in the offices 
of school dirtictor, supervisor and assessor. He married Sarah 
Schrock, a daughter of Conrad Henry and Barbara Schrock. 
He and his family vvere members of the Reformed church. He 
died in 1899, at the advanced age of ninety years. 

Aaron Brant acquired his education in the common schools 
of the township, and since a boy has always given his entite at- 
tention to agricultural pursuits. He is largely interested in im- 
proved stock raising, and the best of blooded Alderneys and 
Durhams are among his stock. In horses he also has fine 
breeds, one of them being a prize winner. His farm contains 
one hundred and seventy-four acres, with fine orchards and 
large outbuildings. He is a Republican in politics, and al- 
though deeply interested in the success of the party, has never 
aspired to holding office. He is a member of the Reformed 
church in Berlin. 

Mr. Brant married, February 7, 1867, Amanda Shaulis, 
daughter of Emanuel and Julia Ann Shaulis, both' of whom are 
members of the United Brethren church. Emanuel Shaulis was 



30S BEDFOIH) AXI) SOMERSET COUNTIES 

a farmer, and died ^lay 28, 1904, aged eighty-four years. His 
uidow is .still living in her eights -tiftii year, ^Ir. and Airs. Brant 
are the parents ol twelve children, viz.: Sanford, horn March 
18, 18G8, a farmer of tlie Valley; he married Cynthia Wilkins, 
and they have live children. Matronah, born March 20, 1869, 
learned the trade of dressmaker, and worked in I'ittsbnrg and 
other ])laces; married JSimon P. Eoust, a farmer of Brothers 
Valley, and they have two children. Carrie M., born Decem- 
ber 14, 1870, died December 26, 187G. L'lysses G., born Sep- 
tember 1, 1872, married Margaret Layman; he is in partner- 
ship with his father in the cultivation of the home farm. 
Samuel 11., born December 25, 1873, married Edith Marger; 
he is a farmer and miner and lives in Brothers Valley. Elsie 
Grace, born November 25, 1875, married Joseph J. Picking, a 
liveryman of Somerset, and they have one child. Julia Ann, 
born November 24, 1877, married Samuel M. Coldenl)urg, and 
lives in Allegheny, Pennsylvania. Margaret A., born August 6, 
1879, lives at home. Oscar S., born November 29, 1880, mar- 
ried Tracey L. Layman. Sallie J., born October 15, 1882, mar- 
ried Jesse Aults; he is a bookkeeper employed by the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad in the union station at Pittsburg. Emanuel A., 
born November 6, 1884, died February 9, 1892. Gretta E., born 
June 15, 1886, lives at home. 

These children were given an education in the public 
schools of the county, and they are all filling their several sta- 
tions in life with credit to themselves and parents. Mr. Brant, 
now sixty-four years of age, retains the full vigor of manhood, 
and takes an active part in the labors of the large farm, while 
Mrs. Brant retains the management of the home. 

ALEXANDER COLEMAN. 

Alexander Coleman, a prosperous farmer near Althouse, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was born in Brothers Valley 
township, Maj- 27, 1851, a son of Jacob J. and Mary (Musser) 
Coleman. 

John Coleman (grandfather) was born January 15, 1777, 
and was of German origin. He settled in Brothers Valley town- 
ship, and followed the occupation of a farmer and ])lacksmith. 
He was a Whig in political proclivities, and served his township 
as justice of the peace. Tn church connections he was a Lu- 
theran. He married, Octol»er 28, 1800, Elizabeth Maurer, and 
to thoni were born nine children, seven sons and two daughters, 
namely: AVilliam, Jo>('])h, Samuel, Daniel, David, Maria, 
Philip, Jacob J., and Rachel. These children are now all de- 
ceased. John and Elizabetli Coleman died at an advanced age. 

Jacob J. Coleman (father) was born February '.], 1817, stm 
of John and Elizabeth (Maurer) Coleman. He was educated in 



BEDFOiiD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 3u9 

the subscription schools of the period and always followed the 
occupation of a farmer. He was a Republican in politics, and 
held at various times the offices of school director and justice 
of the peace. In religious faith he was a member of the Lu- 
theran church, in which he held the office ot" deacon. Mr. Cole- 
man was twice married, first to Susannah Miller, who died De- 
cember 23, 1847; and, secondly, November 5, 1848, to Mary 
Musser, born February 5, 1829, and lived on the adjoining farm. 
She was tlie daughter of Henry Musser. who was a farmer and 
blacksmith. Of this marriage the following named children 
were born : Sarah died in infancy ; Alexander, of whom later ; 
John, died in infancy; Eliza, born October 13, 1854, married C. 
F. Zimmerman, and lives in Stoystown, Pennsylvania; Henry 
F., born November 28, 1856, married Mary J. Kimmel, and they 
live on a farm in Brothers Valley township; Emma S., died in 
infancv; Ada E.. born April 4, 1864, married J. M. Shober, died 
May 28, 1902 ; AHce J., born July 2, 1866, married Charles Bald- 
win and lives in Meyersdale, Pennsylvania. The death of 
Jacob J. Coleman occurred in 1890, and that of his wife in 1892. 
Alexander Coleman obtained his initial education in the 
common schools of this section, and later attended the normal 
school. He assisted his father with the farm work until he 
was twenty-two years of age, and for the four succeeding years 
was engaged in teaching in the Plank Road school, the same 
one that he had attended when a boy. Relinquishing this occu- 
pation, Mr, Coleman again turned his attention to agricultural 
pursuits, and engaged in farming on shares with his father-in- 
law. In 1882 he purchased his present farm, which comprises 
two hundred and sixteen acres, with large orchards of apple, 
cherry and pear trees. The farm is one of great value, being 
underlaid with the rich coal deposits of this section. 

Politically Mr. Coleman accords allegiance to the Repub- 
lican party, and is an earnest, active party worker. He has 
held the office of school director, and is now serving as justice 
of the peace. Mr. Coleman is treasurer and a director in the 
Farmers' Union Association and Fire Insurance Company, of 
Somerset county, which office he has held for ten years. Fra- 
ternally he holds membership in the Valley Grange, No. 878, at 
Beachdale, of which he has been master for eight years and 
representative to the state Grange. For six years he has been 
a member of the Patrons of Husbandry, also the Maccabees, 
Buffalo Tent No. 367, Garrett, Pennsylvania. He is a member 
of the Lutheran church of Berlin, with which he became con- 
nected when a young man- 
Mr. Coleman married, December 2, 1877, Laura V. Shober, 
bom April 3, 1858, a daughter of George W. and Leah B. 
(Berkley) Shober. George W. Shober was a farmer and died 



3io BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

June 15, 1897. Leah, his wife, is still living at the age of 
seventy-three, and is a remarkably active, well-preserved 
woman. Mrs. Coleman obtained her education in tne county 
public schools. Of this union one child was born, Hilda L., 
February 22, 1879. She was educated in the common schools 
and married Joseph Stahl, April 17, 1901. Mr. Stahl is a car- 
penter by trade. One child, Centureena Mazelle, was born to 
them, January 11, 1902. Under Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Cole- 
man's hospitable roof may be found four generations: Mrs. 
Shober (great-grandmother), Mr. and Mrs. Coleman (grand- 
parents), Mr. and Mrs. Stahl (parents), and little Centureena 
Mazelle' Stahl. 

EDMUND K. SUDER. 

Among the well known, practical and progressive agricul- 
turists of Somerset county, whose industry, perseverance and 
thrift have been the means of bringing to them good returns 
for their labors, is Edmund K. Suder, a resident of Berlin. 
He was born in Somerset township, Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, July 12, 1851. 

John Suder, father of Edmund K. Suder, and son of 
Henry Suder, w^as born in Brothers Valley township, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1819. He was educated in the schools 
adjacent to his home, and followed the occupation of a farmer 
up to the time of his death, which occurred during the July 
harvest of 1889, while driving a reaper, from which he fell life- 
less. He held many of the township olfices, to which he was 
elected several terms, among them being that of collector, super- 
visor and school director: he also served as a director of the 
county poor farm. He was a member of the Reformed church, 
in which he served as deacon for many years, and during the 
last twenty-five years of his life efficiently filled the office of 
elder. He was active in all branches of church and religious 
work, and in all respects acted the part of an earnest Christian 
man. He was formerly a Whig and later a Republican in poli- 
tics. In 1843 he married Sarah Hay, born in the year 1825, a 
daughter of Valentine Hay, who died when she was but seven 
years old. She received a common school education, and later 
became a member of the Reformed church. Mrs. Suder died in 
March, 1906. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Suder, 
as follows: Susan, wife of Henry Stuck, resides near Berlin, 
Pennsylvania; Matilda, died in childhood; Henry, died at the 
age of twenty-two years; William J., a farmer of the Valley; 
Edmund K., of whom later: Sarah, wife of Simon Hay, a 
farmer; Irvin H., a farmer of the Valley. 

Edmund K. Suder was educated in the common and nor- 
mal schools of Somerset county, and at the age of sixteen was 
qualified to follow the vocation of teacher, in which capacity he 



BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES .^n 

served for two years. He then apprenticed himself to a car- 
penter, but owing to the death of his employer, he only followed 
this for one year, after which he returned to his father's farm. 
One year after his marriage, at the age of twenty-three, he pur- 
chased and removed to his present farm, where he has since re- 
sided. The farm contains one hundred and seventy-seven acres 
of land, well stocked and thoroughly cultivated. He purchases 
a large number of horses, cows and hogs, which he fattens for 
the market, using the production of his farm for this purpose. 
There is a sugar camp of five hundred vessels on the farm, pro- 
ducing from ten hundred to fifteen hundred pounds annually, 
and in addition to this there is a good orchard of one hundred 
and twenty-five apple trees of various kinds. 

In politics Mr. Suder is a Republican, and his first vote 
was cast for the late Ulysses S. Grant. He held the office of 
supervisor of Brothers Valley township four terms, and that of 
school director three terms. At the age of fourteen he joined 
the Reformed church at Berlin, and has since held membership 
in that body. For many years he held the office of deacon, and 
since 1890 has been a member of the board of elders. He is 
also superintendent of the Sunday school connected therewith, 
and was a member of the building committee at the erection of 
the new church edifice. Mr. Suder, while a man '^ diligent in 
business," is deeply interested in all religious and educational 
subjects. 

Mr. Suder married, November 23, 1873, Emma Glessner, of 
Stony Creek, a daughter of Jacob and Dinah (Walker) Gless- 
ner, the former named being a farmer of Stony Creek. Emma 
(Glessner) Suder was born November 7, 1855, educated in the 
Stony Creek schools, and is a member of the Reformed church. 
The issue of this union was eleven children, as follows: Effie 
M., born September 3, 1874, wife of C. C. Glessner, a farmer 
of Stony Creek, and they are the parents of one child, Edison 
G. Glessner. Viola G., born August 14, 1877, died August 12, 
3878. Cora B., born January 17, 1879, passed through the 
normal school and became a teacher in the public school; she 
was married, June 14, 1906, to Harvey Walker. John Wallace, 
born April ]1, 1881, learned the trade of a painter; now in 
Carleton, Nebraska. Clara S., born November 12, 1882, wife 
of Harvey Weigel, of Stony Creek; they are the parents of 
three children: Merlie, Nevin and Nelvin E. Annie L., born 
April 12, 1885, wife of Bert Bowers, a telegraph operator of 
Somerset township; they have one child, Walter G. Jacob G., 
born October 4, 1886, assists his father with his farming opera- 
tions. Sadie M., born October 23, 1888, is at present (1905) re- 
ceiving a musical education. Norman H., born October 25, 1890, 
is now being educated for a teacher at the Berlin Normal 



312 BEUFUiiD AXD SOMEKISET COUNTIES 

school. Edmund Iv., Jr., born November 26, 1892; also expects 
to adopt the profession of teaching. Eugene !S., born Feb- 
ruary 1, 1898, now attending the schools of Berlin. 

LEWIS BERKLEY. 

Lewis Berkley, born J une 23, 18(3U, on the farm in Brothers 
Valley he now owns and resides upon, is a son of Joel L. and 
Elizabeth (Wingert) Berkley, and grandson of Ludwig and 
Sarah (Beachley) Berkley, who were the parents of the toUow- 
ing named children: Joel L., of whom later; Lewis, a resident 
of Iowa; Eliza, wife of Ephraim Miller, they reside near 
Meyersdale, Pennsylvania; Mary, who resides in the west; 
Susanna, wife of William Ikenberry, they reside in Illinois. 
Ludwig Berkley was a farmer of Somerset county, a member 
of the (iernian Baptist church, and a AV'hig in politics. He died 
when about forty years of age, and his wife survived him many 
years, passing away in 1892, aged eighty -live years. 

Joel L. Berkley (father) was born upon his father's farm 
near Pine Hill, Pennsylvania, October 8, 1833. He followed 
farming as an occupation throughout the active years of his 
life. After his marriage, at the age of twenty-three, he pur- 
chased his father's farm, but after a short period of time dis- 
posed of it and purchased the farm in the Valley where his son 
Lewis now resides, which consists of two hundred and forty 
acres. Afterward he pui-cliased the farm on which he now re- 
sides, of one hundred and lifteen acres. He has held the offices 
of supervisor and school director, rendering efficient service 
therein. He is a member of the German Baptist church, and 
since attaining his majority has been a iiepublican, casting his 
first vote for the candidates of 1856. On February 28, 1856, 
Mr. Berkley married Elizabeth Wingert, a daughter of George 
Wingert, a farmer of lirotliers Valley. She is a member of the 
Kefoi-med church. 

licwis Berkley was educated in the townsliii) schools, and 
then woiked on tlie farm with his father until his marriage at 
the age of twenty-three. He then purchased the old home farm 
and has since resided thereon. The ju'operty consists of two 
hundred and forty acres, well cultivated and improved. There 
is a good orchard of apple trees, and a sugar camp of seven 
hundred vessels, producing in a good year tliice thousand 
pounds of maple sugar. TUv farm is well stocked with Belgian 
horses, Durham cows and Shropshire sheej). Jlc also buys and 
feeds for market, using all the grain and hay which is pro- 
duced on his farm in this way. In 1903 he demolished the old 
liouse and built a handsome, modern brick residence, consisting 
of ten rooms, tincly ei|nii)p(Ml with heating apparatus (hot 
water), modern plumbing and everx thing needful foi- the com- 



\ 



BEDFOKL) ANJ) SOMEKSP^T COUNTIES 313 

fort and ease of its occupants. The barn is very large, accom- 
modating seventy-five head of stock and vast stores of hay and 
grain. He conducts a small dairy, and in the spring house 
there is a famous spring. He is a director of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Berlin, and for ten years has held a similar office 
in the Ihiion Association and Eire Insurance Company of Som- 
erset county, one of the flourishing and prosperous companies 
of the county. He now serves in the capacity of school director, 
in which office he has rendered valuable service. He is a mem- 
ber of Mt. Zion Reformed church, of which he is trustee, and 
also serves as president of the Sabbath school. He is a Re- 
publican and his first vote was cast for the late Ulysses S. 
Grant. 

Mr. Berkley married, October 30, ISS-t, Sarah Hay, born 
February 6, 1858, educated in the common schools of the town- 
ship, daughter of Philip Hay. Their children are as follows: 
Stuart, born July 16, 1885; was educated in the public schools 
and at the Berlin Normal school, and is now his father's as- 
sistant on the farm. Elizabeth, born February 3, 1886; was 
educated in the public and normal schools of Berlin, and at the 
Southwestern Normal school at California, Pennsylvania; she 
has taught school three terms; she resides at home. Grace, 
born November 27, 1888; also received a common and normal 
school education, and has received a teacher's certificate. 
Sherman, born November 20, 1890; is being educated in the 
public schools. As shoAvn by the above statement, Mr. Berkley 
is a firm believer in the value and advantages of a good educa- 
tion, and he is well pleased to be able to give to his children 
better educational advantages than he enjoyed during his boy- 
hood. The family is highly respected in the community, and 
enjoy the acquaintance of a wide circle of friends. 

WHJJAM WESLEY HAUGER. 

William Wesley Hauger, born on the homestead farm at 
Beachdale, September 23, 1856, is a son of Simon and Rosanna 
C Ran sell) Hauger, and grandson of Jacob and Elizabeth 
(Kneppei') Hauger, members of the Lutheran church, who 
died at an advanced age. Their family consisted of the follow- 
ing nniivYl children : George, Jonathan, Peter William, Simon, 
Polly, Hannah, Rebecca and Tracy. 

Simon Hauger (father) was born in the year 1830 on the 
same farm as his son, and was reared, lived and died there. 
He was educated in the public schools, and followed farming as 
a means of livelihood all his lifetime. He served as school 
director of his township, and was among the representative citi- 
zens thei'eof. Tie was a member, deacon and elder of the Re- 
formed church, serving in the latter capacities for many years. 



314 BEDFOHD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

He was a firm adherent of the principles of the Republican 
party. In 1853 he married Rosanna Rausch, born in Brothers 
Valley in 1884, daughter of John 0. Rausch, and four sons and 
five daughters were the issue: Isabel, who became the wife of 
W. P. Spangler, resides near Somerset; William Wesley, of 
whom later; Mary, married G. AV. Smith, resides in Brothers 
Valley; Silas M., married Rebecca Cowen, resides in Berlin; 
James S., married Lizzie Coleman, resides in Pine Hill; Car- 
oline, married Elmer Rhoads, resides in Brothers Valley; Eliza- 
beth, married Charles Engelka, resides in Brothers Valley; 
Bruce, married Alice Baughman, resides in Beachdale; Lillie, 
married J. M. Gumbert, resides in Pine Hill. Simon Hanger, 
the father of these children, died December 29, 1891. He was 
survived by his wife, who now makes her home with her son, 
Bruce Hauger. 

William W^esley Hauger, or Wesley, as he is called, was 
educated in the public schools. He was early a helper on the 
farm, working for his father until his marriage at the age of 
twenty- two. He then located on the farm near Beachdale that 
he now owns and still resides upon. The farm contains two 
hundred and sixty-one acres, well stocked with horses, cows, 
hogs and sheep. He has also a sugar camp of five hundred ves- 
sels, producing fifteen hundred pounds of maple sugar an- 
nually. He has held the offices of supervisor, treasurer, and is 
now serving his third term as school director. In politics he is 
a Republican. He is a member and deacon of the Lutheran 
church at Pine Hill, and a member of the Patrons of Hus- 
bandry at Beachdale. He cast his first vote for the late James 
A. Garfield. 

Mr. Hauger married, October 20, 1878, Priscilla K. Cober, 
of Berlin, Pennsylvania, born April 22, 1860, daughter of Aaron 
J. and Rebecca (Knepper) Cober. Two children were the issue 
of this union: Clayton, died in infancy; Emma M., born May 
25. 1892, now attending the public school. Mrs. Hauger was 
educated in the common schools of Somerset county. She is a 
member of the Brethren church. Emma M. is a member of the 
Lutheran church. 

HENRY H. HAUGER. 

Henry H. Hauger, who resides on a well cultivated and 
therefore productive farm located about one and one-half miles 
from Beachdale, is a grandson of Jacob and Elizabeth 
(Knepper) Hauger, who were residents of Brothers Valley, 
followed farming as a means of livelihood, and there reared a 
large family of sons and daughters. They were active and con- 
sistent members of the Lutheran church, and passed away at a 
good old age. 



BEDFOKD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 315 

William Hanger, son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Knepper) 
Hanger, and father of Henry H. Hanger, was born near Beach- 
dale, Somerset connty, Pennsylvania, August 12, 1826. Being 
reared on a farm, he chose that occupation for his life work, 
and was very successful in the management of his estate. He 
was a member of St. Paul 's Reformed church, in which he was 
a member of the boards of deacons and elders. He was a Re- 
publican in politics. He was united in marriage to Caroline 
Berkley, born June 20, 1824, and their children were as follows : 
Hannah M., who became the wife of Phineas Walker, and re- 
sides in Nebraska; Henry H., of whom later; George W., mar- 
ried Matilda Brant; Rebecca, deceased, was the wife of John 
Hoffman, also deceased; Catherine, who became the wife of 
Edward Baldwin, and resides in Brothers Valley; John, mar- 
ried Nora Marker, and resides in Garrett; Anna M., who be- 
came the wife of Albert Rhoads, resides in Brothers Valley; 
Mannus, deceased. The deaths of Mr. and Mrs. Hanger oc- 
curred June 28, 1899, and January 14, 1897, respectively. 

Henry H. Hanger, eldest son of William and Caroline 
(Berkley) Hanger, was born on the paternal farm in Brothers 
Valley, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, November 16, 1851. 
He was educated in the common schools of the neighborhood, 
and remained on the farm with his father throughout his 
3^outh and early manhood, until his marriage at the age of 
twenty-two years, assisting with the various duties, and thereby 
gaining a thorough knowledge of agriculture in all its branches. 
In 1877 he purchased his present farm, which contains one hun- 
dred and fifty acres of arable land, well stocked with a fine 
grade of cattle. The farm is on the Ridge, about one and one- 
half miles from Beachdale, and is one of the finest in that lo- 
cality. As a citizen Mr. Hanger is active and public spirited. 
His support is given to the candidates of the Republican party, 
the principles of which he firmly believes in. He holds member- 
ship in St. Paul's Reformed church, is a member of the board 
of deacons, and actively interested in the work of the Sabbath 
school connected therewith. 

Mr. Hauger married. June 1, 1873, > Sarah J. Cygler, born 
March 25, 1855, educated in the public schools, a daughter of 
Samuel and Mary (Flickinger) Cygler, both of whom are de- 
ceased. The children of this marriage are as follows : Allen 
P., born March 24, 1875, married Jane Brant, farms in Brothers 
Valley; William J., born June 6, 1877, is a carpenter by trade, 
and resides in Somerset, Pennsylvania, he married Elsie Dietz; 
Reuben P., born November 6, 1879, a farmer, married Cora 
Nedrow, resides in Brothers Valley: Clinton S., born Decem- 
ber 21, ]882, married Mary Wegley, he is a farmer and resides 
in Brothers Valley; Mary E., born October 1, 1885; Carrie I., 



316 BEDFUiiD AXl) SOMERSET COUNTIES 

born February 6, 1888; Hilton 11., born April G, 1891; Charles 
R.. born February 6, 1893; Nellie G., born September 27, 1895; 
Edna L., born December 22, 1897. The six latter named reside 
with their parents. x\ll the children received a public school 
education, which qualified them for their various walks in life, 
and the younger members of the family are still attending the 
same. 

WILLIAM J. BRANT. 

William J. Brant, a farmer near Beachdale, was born in 
Brothers Valley township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, Oc- 
tober 12, 1865, son of William and Amy (Stahl) Brant, and 
grandson of John and Elizabeth (Baldwin) Brant, whose fam- 
ily consisted of five children, all of whom are deceased but 
Francis, who married Mary Hauger, and resides on a farm near 
Beachdale. The names of the other children were as follows : 
Jesse, Conrad, John and William. John Brant (grandfather) 
was a farmer of Brothers Valley, a member of the Reformed 
church, a Republican, and his death occurred at an advanced 
age. His wife died at the age of forty years. 

William Brant (father) was born in Brothers Valley town- 
.ship, Somerset county, A])ril 10, 1832. He was educated in the 
common schools adjacent to his home, and later learned the 
trade of a blacksmith, which line of work he followed until he 
attained middle age. when he became a farmer. He was a 
soldier in the Union army, returned home from the war sick 
and died a week later, August 6, 1865. He was a member of 
St. Paul's congregation of the Reformed church. He was a Re- 
publican in politics. By his marriage to Amy Stahl, May 7, 
1854, the following named children were born: James P., a 
farmer of Brothers Valley, married Catherine Queer, who 
bore him six children; Clarissa J., who became the wife of 
Prank E. Myers; Arminda B., who died in infancy; Albert E., 
a carpenter, who resides in Milford township, he married Ida 
Hauger. who bore him two children: Ida S., who became the 
wife of John L. Sevits, a farmer of Brothers Valley, and they 
are the parents of four children. Amy (Stahl) Brant was born 
December 26, 1834, a daughter of Peter and Rosanna (Hoover) 
Stahl. She was a member of the Lutheran church. On April 4, 
1871. after being six years a widow, she became the wife of 
Samuel Bittner. 

William J. Brant was educated in the public schools and 
worked on his stepfather's farm until his marriage, at the age 
of twentv-two. He tlien rented a farm for one year, and in 1890 
purchased his present farm of about one hundred acres, where 
he has since resided. The farm is well stocked with Percheron 
horses, short-horn cattle and Berkshires. There is also an 
apple orchard and a sugar camp of two hundred and seventy 



EEDFOKD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 317 

vessels, producing in a good season one thousand pounds of 
maple sugar. He served three years as constable of his town- 
ship, having been elected on the Republican ticket. He cast his 
first vote for the late Benjamin Harrison. He is a member of 
the St. Paul's Reformed Church and Sunday school, in the 
work of which he takes an active interest. 

Mr. Brant married, February 9, 1888, Huldah G. Enfield, 
born February 1, 1864, daughter of Freeman and Naomi En- 
field, of Milford townshiiD, and their children are: Lulu E., 
born November 11, 1888, was educated in the public and nor- 
mal schools and received a certificate to teach; Laura A., born 
January 21, 1890 ; Charles R., born October 14, 1892 ; Dolly N., 
born April 1, 1894; Iva M., born January 6, 1897; Gladys E., 
born May 16, 1902, and Harold G., born November 24, 1905. 
Mrs. Brant, who is a member of the Brethren church, was one 
of nine children born to Freeman and Naomi Enfield. Freeman 
Enfield is a farmer, a Republican in politics, has held many of 
the different township offices, and is a member of the Brethren 
church. 

U. MADISON BRANT. 

U. Madison Brant, owner of one of the fertile and well culti- 
vated farms in Berlin township, Somerset county, Pennsyl- 
vania, is descended from a family that settled in Pennsylvania 
very many years ago. 

(I) John Brant, grandfather of U. Madison Brant, and 
the first of the family of whom we have any record, was a well- 
known farmer in Brothers Valley, a Republican and a member 
of the Reformed church. He married a Miss Baldwin, and they 
both died at an advanced age, he at the age of seventy-eight 
years. Among their children was a son, Francis, a sketch of 
whom follows. 

(II) Francis Brant, son of John Brant (I) was born 
March 13. 1835, in Brothers Valley. He received a practical 
education in the common schools of the district. In politics he 
was a Republican, and a member and deacon of the German 
Baptist church. He married Mary Hanger, born May 19, 
1836, daughter of Henry and Sarah (Beachley) Hanger, who 
was educated in the public schools of her native town. She is 
a member of the German Baptist church. Her parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Hanger, lived to an advanced age, he being a farmer and 
a Republican. Mr. and Mrs. Brant live on their own farm, and 
also cultivate an adjoining one, on which one of their daugh- 
ters is living. Following are the names of their children: 
John H., married Lydia Gnagey, and is a farmer in the Valley ; 
U. Madison, of whom later ; Edward, married Emma Cober, he 
is deceased; Minnie, married Henry I. Beachley, a merchant. 



318 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

and lives iu Arkansas ; Grace, married John H. Hentz, a farmer 
in Brothers Valley and assessor of the township; Amy, mar- 
ried Edward Beale and lives on her father's farm; Oliver, mar- 
ried Cora Rhoads, is a machinist, and also lives on the home 
farm. 

(Ill) U. Madison Brant, second son and child of Francis 
(II) and Mary i^Hauger) Brant, was born in Brothers Valley, 
August 4, 1860. He enjoyed the advantages of a good educa- 
tion in the schools of the township, and then assisted his father 
on the home farm. Here he remained until two years after 
his marriage, when, in 1885, he bought and removed to his pres- 
ent farm. The farm is one of the finest in the district, practical 
and progressive methods of cultivation having made it ex- 
traordinarily fertile. It consists of one hundred and eighty- 
one acres, and is well stocked with fine breeds of horses and 
cattle. There is also a sugar camp, with a production of two 
hundred gallons of maple syrup. The farm is underlaid with 
coal and the mines are operated by the Pennmarva Coal Com- 
pany. Mr. Brant conducts the cultivation of his farms in a 
most masterly manner. He is ready to give a trial to any new 
invention that promises to save time and labor, considering that 
increased production will amply repay initial expenditure. 
He is energetic and forceful, and though deliberate in forming 
opinions, he is able to maintain them by sound arguments in 
their favor. In politics he is a Republican, and at present 
(1906) holds the office of school director. He is a member of 
the German Baptist church, and was a member of Beachdale 
Grange, Patrons of Husbandry. 

Mr. Brant married, December 9, 1881, Emma A. Coleman, 
born January 4, 1865, on the farm now owned and occupied by 
her husband, daughter of Henry and Mary (Wingert) Cole- 
man, the former a farmer in Brothers Valley township, a 
Democrat, and a member of the Reformed church. Mrs. Brant 
was educated in the i)ublic schools of her native town. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Brant are: Norman, born January 
20, 1883, educated in the public schools; is a machinist; lives at 
Althouse, and married Hilda Hoover. Henry F., April 6, 1885, 
educated in the ))uhlie and normal schools and in the Scranton 
Business College; tjuight for one year, then became clerk in a 
store and afterward bookkeeper for the Enterprise Coal Com- 
pany in Garrett; he married Harriet I. Boger, who died leav- 
ing him an infaiit of four months, which is l)eing cared for by 
its gr;m(1))arents. Mi-, and Mrs. U. Madison P>rant. Mary, 
June 7, 1888, married Jacob Youtzy, who is a stone mason and 
lives in Brothers Valley. Ednn, November 16, 1889, educated 
in common and normal schools and is qualified to teach, lives 



BEDFOED AND SOMEESET COUNTIES 31ii 

at liome. Charles, March 5, 1892. Claude, December 18, 189(i. 
Eoy C, December 12, 1904. 

Norman aud Henry F. Brant are now in the grocery busi- 
ness in Berlin, trading mider the firm name of Brant Bros. 

WILLIAM F. SHAFFEE. 

William F. Shaffer, a marble and granite dealer of Somer- 
set, Somerset county, f*ennsylvania, was there born June 6, 
1853, a son of John H. and Harriet (Stahl) Shaffer. She was 
raised by Judge Jerry Black, with whom she made her home 
until she was married. He is of German descent, his grand- 
parents havmg emigrated from that country at an early date. 
The father, John H. Shaffer, was born and lived nearly his 
entire life in Somerset. He learned the trade of hatter, and 
during the last five years of his life was in the employ of Abner 
McKinley, a brother of William McKinley. He was a survivor 
of the Johnstown flood, and died in 1903, at the age of seventy- 
six years. 

The educational training of William F. Shaffer was re- 
ceived in the public schools. When he was six years of age his 
mother died, and the entire care of the family, consisting of 
three brothers and a sister, was left to an aged grandmother. 
At the age of thirteen William was bound out to a farmer in 
Fayette county, and after two years in this employ, returned 
to his home in Somerset county, where, until he attained the 
age of twenty -one years he was engaged in working for his 
father and in attending school. He then entered into an ap- 
prenticeship with J. W. Wooley, of Somerset, to learn the trade 
of marble cutting, serving a term of three years at a wage of 
$6 per month. He completed his trade in 1880, doing journey 
work about three years, and then commenced in business for 
himself on a very small scale. At one time, finding himself 
without money with which to purchase stock, he obtained a 
loan of twenty dollars from a Mr. A. H. Coffrotli, of Somer- 
set. During his first year in business Mr. Shaffer made all 
of his own designs on rough paper with a pencil, and also did 
all of his own work, including selling, setting and cutting. From 
this very modest beginning, Mr. Shaifer's business has ex- 
panded to monumental size, and is counted among the largest 
retail marble and granite concerns in Western Pennsylvania. 
He is a Eepublican in his political proclivities, and in religious 
faith is a member of the United Brethren church, which he has 
attended for thirty years, and in whicli lie has been collector 
of preacher's salary for twenty-five years. 

Air. Shaffer married, in 1877, Mary C. Hecker, of Somer- 
set, and to them were born five children: Edward M. and 
Austin D., of whom further: Ira H., Ella M. and Emma J. 



3-20 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Edward M. Slialfer received his education in the public 
schools, and at the age of seventeen entered into an appren- 
ticeship with his father for a term of four years. He was then 
admitted to the business, being given one-fifth interest. In the 
same year he married Suie Manges, of Jenners, Pennsylvania, 
and two years later his father sold him a full third interest in 
the business. On January 1, 1905, Mr. Shaffer sold a third 
interest in the business to his second sou, Austin D., who wat> 
previously employed by the First National Bank, of Somerset, 
as head bookkeei)er, m which capacity he was engaged for a 
period exceeding five years. On June 1, 1906, he was elected 
assistant cashier of the First National i^ank of Somerset. He 
married Stella Burgess, of Fitcairn, Pennsylvania, the eldest 
daughter of Rev. T. W. Burgess, of the United Brethren con- 
gregation. In political relations Austin 1). Shalfer has always 
voted the Prohibition ticket, and has always been identified 
with temperance reform. His brother, Edward M., is a Repub- 
lican. 'JMieir business is now conducted under the firm name of 
W. F. Shaffer & Sons, having previously been W. F. Shaffer 
& Son. They carry a full and complete equipment of modern 
machinery, including pneumatic tools, polishing machines, trav- 
eling cranes, etc., and they employ from ten to twelve skilled 
mechanics the year around. 

PETER D. BEAR. 

Peter D. Bear, a prosperous and well known farmer of 
Meyersdale, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, is a representa- 
tive of the fourth generation of this family in America, his an- 
cestor having come from Germany and settled in America. 

(I) Daniel Bear, the great-grandfather of Peter D. Bear, 
and the founder of the family in the United States, came from 
Germany and settled in Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, where 
he raised a family of children, among whom was a son, Lud- 
wig. 

(IT) Ludwig Bear, son of Daniel Bear (1), was born in 
Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, and later removed to Somerset 
county, I^ennsylVania, where he cultivated a farm, and owned 
and managed a distillery and a tannery, in all of which under- 
takings he was most successful. He was a Whig and a member 
of the hutlieran church. He was twice mari'ied; the name of 
his first wife is not ]n-eserve(i; Jiis vSecond wife was Catherine 
Shaulis, who died March 8, 1854. Ludwig Bear died Septem- 
ber 4, l.SJO. lie had had five children by his first wife, and 
seven by the second, among whom was a son, Daniel. 

(lit) Daniel P)ear, son of Ludwig Bear (2), was born Feb- 
ruary 18, 1800, near the Fritz church. He received a limited 
education in the connnon schools of his disti-ict, and was en- 



I 



BE1)BX:)KI) AND SOMERSET (H)UNTIES 321 

gaged in the occupation of farming from his earliest boyhood 
until his deatli, whicli occurred February 1, 1884. He was a 
member of the Ivutheran church. He married, January 23, 
1842, Eliza Deal, born Sei)tember 4, 1820, daughter of Peter K. 
and Mary (Keefe) Deal, who were the parents of ten children; 
Peter K. Deal lived in Greenville township, was a carpenter 
by occupation, a Democrat, and a member of the Lutheran 
church; he and his wife lived to an advanced age. The children 
of Air. and Mrs. Daniel Bear are: Jonathan, a farmer in Broth- 
ers Valley, married Lavinia Judy; William, also a farmer in 
Brothers Valley, married Catherine Hearsh; Mafy, married 
Andrew Jjayman, of Laramie township, he is a farmer there ; 
Peter D., of whom later; Catherine, deceased, married William 
Diedel ; Rebecca, married William Hearsh, who is a miner in 
Meyersdale; Daniel, deceased, married Sarah Warner; Ezra, 
unmarried. 

(TV) Peter D. Bear, fourth child and third son of Daniel 
(3) and Eliza (Deal) Bear, was born in Brothers Valley, Penn- 
sylvania, March 19, 1849. He had the advantage of a good 
common school education, and then assisted his father on the 
farm. This occupation he followed until his marriage at the 
age of twenty-four years. x\fter his marriage he took up a 
number of lines of work in various parts of Somerset county, 
and continued this for about three years. x\t the end of this 
period he returned to his native township and purchased the 
jiome farm from his father; this farm, consisting of one hun- 
dred and thirty-three acres, and an extensive sugar camp, Mr, 
Bear has brought to a high state of cultivation, and each acre 
brings its full share of profit into his treasury. It is well stocked 
with excellent horses and short-horn Durham cattle. His poul- 
try yard is also of considerable size, and this is under Mr. Bear's 
personal supervision. There are veins of coal underlying the 
farm, but they are at a great depth. Mr. Bear is an ardent Re- 
publican, and cast his first vote for Ulysses S. Grant. He is 
supervisor of his district, and performs the duties of his office 
in an eminently satisfactory and capable manner. He is a mem- 
ber of the Fritz Lutheran Church, as are all the members of his 
family who are of an age to attend church services. He has 
held the office of deacon in that institution, and is a member of 
the Sunday school. He is a man of considerable influence in 
his town, taking an active and deep interest in the public affairs 
of his country, and more especially in those of the community 
in which he lives. 

He married, January 4, 1874, Harriet A. Judy, daughter of 
Daniel and Elizabeth (Myers) Judy, who were the parents of 
ten children: Josiah, Eebecca, Franklin, Polly, Elizabeth, 
Phoebe, Isabel, Lavinia, Matthias, and Harriet A. Daniel 

Vol. IT[ 21 



322 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Judy was a farmer and died at the age of fifty years ; his wife 
Elizabeth died in 1892, at the age of eighty-three years. The 
children of Peter D. and Harriet A. (Judy) Bear are as fol- 
lows : Lely M., born May 13, 1875, married Clark B. Saylor, a 
blacksmith, has five children and lives in Summit township; 
Eliza E., September 1, 1876, married Calvin P. McGuire, a 
farmer in Upper Turkey Foot, and has three children ; William 
E,, May 16, 1879, is a farmer and resides with his parents; P. 
Sylvester, June 8, 1881, married Carrie "Walker, and is ,a 
farmer in Brothers Valley, on the farm of E. J. Walker; Mag- 
gie B., August 19, 1882, lives with her sister-in-law, Mrs. Carrie 
Bear; Ada L, May 13, 1884, resides at home with her parents; 
Hattie A., June 1, 1886, at home ; Peter L., September 14, 1887, 
assists his father on his farm; Bertha N., November 18, 1891. 

JOHN J. GUMBERT. 

John J. Gumbert, one of the most prosperous farmers in 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, who has done much to cultivate 
the soil in that district and enhance its value, being the owner 
of a number of farms, is of German birth and descent. 

(I) John Peter Gumbert, grandfather of John J. Gumbert, 
was a native of Germany, and spent all his life there. He 
served with credit in the German army. He and his wife were 
Lutherans. His old German Bible, printed in 1781, is still in 
the possession of his grandson, John J. He married Anne 
Elizabeth Bruck, and among their children were two sons who 
came to America : John Jacob, of whom later ; and John, who 
settled in Ohio. 

(II) John Jacob Gumbert, son of John Peter (1) and Anne 
Elizabeth (Bruck) Gumbert, was born near Wesler, Germany, 
August 17, 1800. He received a good common school education, 
and learned the trade of shoemaking. He entered the German 
army, where he served three years in the artillery and was hon- 
rably discharged. He came to the United States with his 
brother John, landing in New York, July 31, 1836, and finally 
settled in Brothers Valley township, Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania. During the civil war he was a staunch Unionist. In 
politics he was a Whig and a Republican, and cast his first vote 
for William Henry Harrison. He died June 9, 1880. Both he 
and his wife were members of the Lutheran church. He mar- 
ried, April 27, 1826, Mary Catherine Bruck, born near Wesler, 
Germany, August 19, 1806, died September 15, 1882. Their 
children were: John J., of whom later; Catherine, born in Ger- 
many, March 10, 1834; Peter, born in Brothers Valley, Febru- 
ary 24, 1837, is a farmer; Jacob, died in childhood; Henry, Jan- 
uary 20, 1846. in Brothers Valley, is postmaster at Pine Hill, 
and a merchant. 



BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 323 

(III) John J. Gumbert, eldest son and child of Jacob (2) 
and Mary Catherine (Bruck) Gumbert, was born near Wesler, 
Germany, November 20, 1830. He received a good education in 
the public schools of Brothers Valley, for the establishment of 
which his father had voted. He attended school when he could 
even after coming of age. Until he had attained his majority 
he gave all his earnings to his father, and then without a dollar 
he could call his own, he elected to start out in the world for 
himself. By dint of energy, hard work and economy, he suc- 
ceeded in getting forward in the world, and in 1868 he bought 
of Jonathan Coben his present farm for six thousand dollars, 
half of which he was able to pay in cash. He has since that 
time resided on this farm, which consists of one hundred acres, 
an orchard of several hundred trees, and a sugar camp of five 
hundred vessels. It is well stocked with an excellent grade of 
horses and cattle. Coal underlies the entire farm and Mr. 
Gumbert has retained all rights in this. He is also the owner 
of a farm of one hundred and twenty-six acres in Hayes Mills ; 
another of one hundred and seventeen acres in Greenville town- 
ship : and several small truck farms. Mr. Gumbert is a Repub- 
lican, and has served one term as constable, but has never 
accepted public office since that time. He and his family are 
members of the Lutheran church, of which he is a deacon. He 
has amassed a comfortable fortune, and this is owing to his 
systematic business methods and progressive ideas. He has 
never had a lawsuit, and is highly respected by all in the com- 
munity. Owing to two severe falls, his health has become great- 
ly impaired, yet he is always calm and cheerful, and ready to 
give a helping hand to those in need of it. He is a great reader 
and keeps well abreast of the times. 

Mr. Gumbert married, June 9, 1867, Margret Bear, born in 
Brothers Valley, January 23, 1835, daughter of William and 
Sally (Deal) Bear; the former born March 31, 1813, died Feb- 
ruary 30, 1877, and the latter born September 11, 1816, died 
April, 1903; they were married October 6, 1833. William Bear 
was a blacksmith and lumber dealer, and in addition was one 
of the wealthiest and most prosperous farmers in Greenville 
township; his children were: Eliza, Samuel, Margret, Fran- 
cis, Isaiah, Edwin, Sarah, Harriet, Daniel, and Jacob. Mar- 
gret, wife of John J. Gumbert, died April 4, 1904, after an ill- 
ness of but four days. She is Wried in the Pine. Hill cemetery, 
where a beautiful monument marks her last resting place. She 
was an expert spinner and weaver, making all the carpets and 
linens for her home with her own hands. The children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Gumbert were: Sarah C, born November 8, 1872, 
received a good education in the public schools and became 
greatly interested in church work. She is a member of the 



324 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Willing Workers Society. She married, February 26, 1902, 
Frank C. Lichty, son of Conrad and Sarah Liclity. They are 
both members of the Lutheran church, of which he is a deacon, 
and make their home with Mr. Gumbert, whose assistant and 
mainstay Mr. l^ichty is in all farming operations. Anne C, 
born October 21, 1876, died April 25, 1902. She received an edu- 
cation similar to that of her sister, joining in the same religious 
work, and the same society. Her health was always delicate. 

CORNELIUS JUDY. 

Cornelius Judy, of Aithouse, is a grandson of Co«telius 
Judy, who was a farmer and one of the early settlers of Broth- 
ers Valley township. He was the father of four sons and three 
daughters. Solomon, Matthias, Youst, and Jonathan, of whom 
later; Rose, wife of David Hoover; Phoebe, wife of William 
Hoover ; and Polly, wife of Joseph Hoover. 

Jonathan Judy, son of Cornelius Jud}^ was born in Broth- 
ers Valley township, and from early youth was engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits. He owned his farm and in connection with 
it operated a sawmill, making from the trees of that region 
farm and house lumber. He was a Republican and a member 
of the German Baptist church. Mr. Judy married Eva Christ- 
ner, and their children were: Jacob, carpenter and farmer of 
Garrett, Pennsvlvania ; Jerome, merchant of Garrett, married 
Barbara Burkholder; William, farmer of Brothers Valley 
township, married Lena Brown; John, farmer of Thayer coun- 
ty, Nebraska, married Eliza Swana; Cornelius, of whom later; 
Polly, wife of Jonathan Schrock, of Black township; Malinda, 
wife of Herman Vogel, farmer of Brothers Valley township; 
and Caroline, deceased. Both Mr. and Mrs. Judy lived to the 
age of seventy-five, the former dying in 1899, and the latter in 
1902. She was a member of the same church as her husband. 

Cornelius Judy, son of Jonathan and Eva (Christner) 
Judy, was born January 5, 1846, on the homestead, near Alt- 
house, and received his education in the common schools. He 
engaged in farm work for his father and others until his mar- 
riage, after which he was a tenant farmer for three years in 
another part of the township. He then returned to the home- 
stead and for another three years cultivated the land on shares. 
At the end of that time he purchased the property and resided 
thereon until 1904, when he built his ])resent home in Aithouse, 
still, however, cultivating" the farm. The estate consists of one 
hundred and forty-six acres and is underlaid with coal, which 
is leased to the Somerset Coal Company and worked on a roy- 
alty. Mr. Judy is a Democrat. He and his wife are members 
of the German Baptist church. 

Mr. Judy married, September 18, 1873, Henrietta Hoff- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 325 

man, born February, 1851, and they are the parents of the fol- 
lowing children: 1. Alice M., born August 24, 1875, wife of 
William A. Merrill, coal operator and merchant of Garrett, has 
five children. 2. Henry Wilson, born October 20, 1877, assists 
his father on the farm, he married Leacia Poorbaugh. 3. Ber- 
tha Delia, born February 12, 1880, wife of John Ray, has one 
child, Harry, and lives on the homestead. 4. Elias, born March 
27, 1884, works in the mines and lives at home. All these chil- 
dren were educated in the public schools of the township. 

JOHN LENTZ. 

John Lentz, of Berlin, is a grandson of Charles Lentz, who 
was born in Baden, Germany, and in early life emigrated to the 
United States. He was a weaver by trade and in politics a 
Whig. His wife was a native of Somerset county. 

Jacob Lentz, son of Charles Lentz, was born in 1810, in 
the southern part of Somerset county, and was a farmer and 
cooper. He was first a Whig and later a Republican, and served 
several years as constable of Elk Lick township. He and his 
wife Avere members of the German Baptist church. Mr. Lentz 
mai'ried, in 1833, Sarah, born in 1815, near Meyersdale, 
daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Pivets) Schrock, and their 
children were: Cyrus J., blacksmith and farmer of Waterloo, 
Iowa; Caroline (Mrs. Wolford, of Oklahoma); Joseph, black- 
smith, died at the age of fifty-nine; Elizabeth, wife of Edward 
D. Spangler, of Morrill, Brown county, Kansas ; John, of whom 
later; Phelon J., of Grundy Centre, Grundy county, Iowa; Sarah, 
wife of William Brown, both deceased; Edmund, died at the 
age of forty-five unmarried; Amanda, wife of Urias Folk, both 
deceased; Mary E., wife of Norman Ringler, farmer of Elk 
Lick township; Eliza, wife of Rufus Ward, miner of Meyers- 
dale; Milton, died in childhood. 

John Lentz, son of Jacob and Sarah (Schrock) Lentz, was 
born May 7, 1841, in Elk Lick townshi]), and obtained his edu- 
cation in the subscriijtion public schools, his attendance being 
limited to about three months annually, by reason of the fact 
that he was his father's assistant in the shop and on the farm. 
He remained with liis father until the age of twenty-one, when 
he enlisted in Comi)any D, One Hundred and Thirty-third Reg- 
iment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. This regiment was present at 
the battles of Antietam, South Mountain and Sharpsburg, but 
was held in i-eserve. In the battle of Fredericksburg, however, 
it took an active jiart, and i\Ir. Lentz was paralyzed by the 
bursting of a shell. He was taken to the hospital, iDut failed to 
regain his health and was honorably discharged. In 18G4 he 
married and for four years thereafter worked a farm on shares. 
He then began farming for himself, and for thirty-five years was 



326 BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

a tenant farmer in the township. During that period he lived 
on and worked but four farms, all being the very best in the 
township. He finally decided to own his farm and purchased 
one, but the death of his wife changed his plans and he turned 
it over to his son-in-law, Edward Bauermaster. He is now 
living in the township and visits among his children. He has 
served as school director and auditor, and is a Republican and a 
member of the German Baptist church. 

Mr. Lentz married, February 15, 1864, Anne, born May 10, 
1847, daughter of Adam and Elizabeth Hochstetler, the for- 
mer a farmer. Mrs. Lentz was educated in the common school. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lentz were the parents of the following children, 
all of whom received a common school education and are well 
settled in life : Missouri G., born July 6, 1864, wife of Edward 
Bauermaster, whose sketch appears on another page of this 
work; Mary E., June 11, 1865, wife of L. A. Maust, Baltimore 
& Ohio station agent at Garrett, Pennsylvania, has the follow- 
ing children: Artie, John, Bessie, Annie, Hazel, Tyranus and 
Margaret; Edith Susan, May 26, 1867, died in childhood; Mil- 
ton K., November 22, 1868, unmarried; Sallie B., May 20, 1871, 
wife of B. F. Suder, farmer of Brother's Valley township, has 
one child, Anna G. : Carrie D., March 4, 1875, wife of Clarence 
Hay, farmer of Brother's Valley township, has two children, 
Marion and Sallie; Lloyd E., March 10, 1878, was Baltimore & 
Ohio station agent at Eockwood, died March 29, 1905; Anna L., 
July 19, 1880. The mother of this family died June 20, 1902. 

JOHN W. MENGES. 

John W. Menges, of Berlin, is a great-grandson of Adam 
Menges, who was born in Germany and emigrated to the United 
States. His son, also Adam Menges, was born April 4, 1808, 
and married Elizabeth Burkhardt, born October 6, 1806. The 
marriage took place March 30, 1828, and their children were: 
Joshua, Jeremiah, of w^hom later; William II., Julia Ann, Har- 
riet, Mary M., and Cordilla. Of these only two are still living: 
William IL, traveling salesman for the Homer Shoe Company, 
married Susan Bittner, and resides in Berlin; and Harriet, a 
widow, living in Missouri. Adam Menges, the father of the fam- 
ily, who was by trade a millwright, died in 1854. His widow 
married George Bridagum, July 9, 1857, and died July 4, 1893. 

Jeremiah Menges, son of Adam and Elizabeth (Burkhardt) 
Menges, was born June 26, 1831, was educated in the public 
schools and for two years was a teacher. He was for the greater 
part of his later life engaged in business as a teamster. He was 
a Republican and a Lutheran, his wife being a member of the 
same church. Mr. ]\Ienges married, in 1857, in Allegheny town- 
ship, Rebecca Fair, born April 17, 1837, and educated in the 



BEDFOED AND SOMEESET COUNTIES 327 

public schools. Mr. and Mrs. Menges were the parents of the 
following children: John W., of whom later; Laura J., born 
Augnst 12, 1859, died in childhood; Thomas A., bom April 7, 
1861, married Lizzie Coleman, lives in Berlin ; Charles H., born 
September 18, 1862, lives in Hyndman, Pennsylvania, married 
Eebecca Beale. The mother of the family died November 1, 
1863, and Mr. Menges subsequently married Mary Mundell. 
His death occurred June 24, 1870, and his widow married and 
moved to Iowa, where she still resides. 

John W. Menges, son of Jeremiah and Eebecca (Fair) 
Menges, was born April 30, 1858, in Allegheny township, and 
received a good public school education. In his youth he 
worked at farming, and at the age of eighteen learned the shoe- 
maker's trade, which he followed until his marriage, five years 
later. For a time he lived in Berlin, where he was employed as 
an expressman at the Baltimore & Ohio railroad station, and in 
1884 moved to his present farm, which he purchased in 1900. 
The estate consists of one hundred and thirty-one acres, adjoin- 
ing Berlin, and is nearly all under cultivation. It is fully 
stocked with well bred horses and cattle and has a sugar camp 
of three hundred and seventy-five vessels. The improvements 
are good and complete. The farm^ is underlaid by coal, which 
has been sold to the Niver Coal Company. For three years Mr, 
Menges has served as school director. He belongs to Camp 
No. 7170, Modern "Woodmen of America, and has held several 
offices in that body. In politics he was until recently a Eepub- 
lican, but now votes with the Prohibitionists. He and his wife 
are members of the Lutheran church of Berlin, which he has 
served as deacon and elder, being also connected with the Sun- 
day school. 

Mr. Menges married, November 9, 1882, Ellen C. Miller, and 
their children are : Harry E., born August 30, 1883, graduated 
from the Berlin high school and is now taking a business course 
in the International Correspondence School of Scranton; he 
lives at home and assists his father; Merle J., born October 22, 
1887, graduated from Berlin high school and is employed as 
time clerk at the Westinghouse Electric Works at East Pitts- 
burg; Nellie C, born December 10, 1889, attending Berlin 
schools ; Mary E., born November 27, 1891, died in 1895. Mrs. 
Menges belongs to a family of German origin. She is the daugh- 
ter of Jonathan A. Miller, who was a farmer of Berlin, a Eepub- 
lican and a member of the Progressive Brethren church. He 
held several township offices. He married, in 1846, Caroline 
Walker, and they were the parents of a son and a daughter: 
William J., farmer near Berlin, married Samantha Fritz, has 
five children; and Ellen C, born February 25, 1861, educated 
in the Berlin schools, wife of John W. Menges. Mr. Miller died 



328 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

August 25, 1900, and his widow, who is a member of the Luth- 
eran church, makes her home with her daughter, Mrs. Menges, 
and is in good health at the advanced age of eighty-two. 

JEREMIAH J. REIMAN. 

Jeremiah J. Reiman, of Shanksville, is a representative of 
a family which was founded in tliis country l)y Gottliel) Reiman, 
who was born in 1747, in Germany, and early in life emigrated 
to Pennsylvania and settled in Berks county. In 1773 he came 
to Somerset county and took up his abode on what is known 
as the Snyder farm, in Stony Creek townshi}). He was a tailor 
by trade, luit lived mainly by hunting, selling the skins of the 
animals which he shot and with which the region abounded. 
Gottlieb Reiman was the father of the following children: John, 
George, of whom later; Charles, Mary (Mrs. Switzer), and Eliz- 
abeth (Mrs. Swank). The founder of the family died in 1804. 

George Reiman, son of Gottlieb Reiman, was born in 1768, 
and after his marriage removed to Shade township and kept 
-house under the branches of a large oak tree until a log cabin 
was built for a home. He cleared eight acres the first year and 
the entire farm within a short period. He and his wife were 
members of the Lutheran church. George Reiman and his wife 
were the iiarents of the following children: Mary, deceased; 
John, deceased; Henry, Elizabeth, Susannah, deceased; George, 
deceased; Samuel, Joseph, Jacob, of whom later; Sarah, and 
Jjydia. George Reiman died in 1834, and his wife in 1855. 

Jacob Reiman, son of George Reiman, was born July 1, 
1813, and like his ancestors followed agricultural ])ursuits. He 
was first identified with the Whigs and later with the Repub- 
licans, and was a member of the German Baptist church. Mr. 
Reiman married, November 4, 1838, Elizabeth, born in Novem- 
ber, 1817, in Elk Lick township, daughter of Christian and 
Susan Fike, and their children were: Samuel F., clergyman, 
married Rebecca Schrock, died February 17, 1897; John F., re- 
tired farmer of Stony Creek to^^mshi]), married Sarah Schrock; 
Tobias, died in youth; Moses, died in childhood; Elizabeth, also 
died in childhood; Susan, wife of Jacob M. Knepper, farmer 
of Stony Creek townshi]); Jeremiah J., of whom later. Mrs. 
Reiman, who was a member of the German Baptist church, died 
in 1889, and the death of Mr. Reiman occurred in 1891. 

Jeremiah J. Reiman, son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Fike) 
Reiman, was born June 26, 1854, on the homestead, and was 
educated in the common and normal schools of the county. At 
the age of seventeen he began teaching in the townshi]) schools, 
in which he remained an instructor for three years, and 
until his marriage he worked on his father's farm. In 
1880 he bought the home farm, which he still owns and 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 329 

on which he lives. The estate consists of two hundred and 
fifty acres of good land, and is well stocked with pure blooded 
Oxford Down sheep and Ohio Improved Chester swine. The 
horses and cattle are well bred, and Mr. Reiman is an extensive 
buyer and feeder of stock. The farm produces an abundance 
of fruit and has a sugar camp of six hundred vessels. The 
land is underlaid with coal and the improvements are large and 
substantial. The house is a handsome brick structure, erected 
in 1861, but since remodelled with the addition of various mod- 
ern features. It is surrounded by well kept lawns and trees. 
The barn and outbuildings were erected at a later period by the 
present owner. 

Mr. Reiman was for many years one of the directors of 
the Union Association and Farmers' Fire Insurance Com- 
pany of Somerset county, and is now director in the Economy 
Telephone Company and the First National Bank of Berlin, 
having held this office in the last-named institution since its 
organization. He has served as school director and is a Re- 
publican in politics. He is a deacon in the German Baptist 
church and a teacher in the Sunday school. 

Mr. Reiman married, February 22, 1877, Rebecca Sclirock, 
and the children of the marriage are: Ada M., born April 
23, 1878, wife of Clinton K. Shober, farmer of Somerset town- 
ship, has one child, Ralph; Annie J., born April 12, 1881, wife 
of Morris S. Maust, faraier of Elk Lick township, has one 
child, Clarence; Milton M., born January 22, 1888, educated 
in common and normal schools, lives with his parents and is 
now in his second year of teaching in the Stony Creek schools ; 
Clarence, born July 29, 1892, attending school. Mrs. Reiman 
is a daughter of Jacob and Catharine Schrock, the former a 
farmer of Stony Creek township and a Republican. He and 
his wife were members of the German Baptist church. Their 
daughter, Rebecca, was born April 6, 1853, received a com- 
mon school education, became the wife of Jeremiah J. Reiman 
and is a member of the German Baptist church. Mr. Schrock 
died September 26, 1887, aged seventy-four years, and his 
widow passed away December 3, 1891. 

PETER S. HAY. 

Peter S. Hay, of Berlin, is a representative of a family 
which was founded in Somerset county by Simon Hay, who 
came hither from Germany in 1763. Among the children born 
to himself and his wife, Anna May, was a son, Peter S. Hay, 
who married Elizabeth Walker, by whom he became the father 
of the following children: David, Michael, Philip, of whom 
later; Mary, Susanna, Elizabeth, Catharine, Peter, Valentine, 
and Caroline. 



330 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Philip Hay, son of Peter S. and Elizabeth (Walker) Hay, 
was born April 3, 1820, and married, February 5, 1846, Anna 
dinger, born Angnst 29, 1824. Their children were: William 
P., Hiram P., S. Sylvester, Peter S., of whom later; Melinda, 
Clara A., P. Ephraim, Sarah, Lnke, Ellen, deceased; and Mark, 
deceased. The mother of these children died October 27, 1868, 
and the death of Mr. Hay occurred August 15, 1902. 

Peter S. Hay, son of Philip and Anna (Olinger) Hay, was 
born February 12, 1857, on the homestead in Brothers Valley 
township, where he obtained his education in the common 
schools. At an early age he began working on the farm, where 
he remained until his marriage. In 1881 he bought the Jacob 
C-ountryman farm, on which he has since resided. The prop- 
erty consists of two hundred and thirteen acres of good farm 
land, with some timber, and is well stocked with fine horses 
and blooded Durhams. In addition to the stock raised Mr. Hay 
buys and feeds for the market. There are good orchards of 
fruit trees of many kinds, and about sixty acres of the farm 
are underlaid by the coal veins of the region, the interest in 
which is retained by Mr. Hay, the veins underlying the re- 
maiuing acres having been sold before he purchased the farm. 
Coal for the local market is being mined on the estate. The 
improvements are modern, and the residence, which is delight- 
fully situated, was built by Mr. Hay in 1885. He is a Demo- 
crat. A member of Mount Zion Reformed church, which he 
serves as deacon. 

Mr. Hay married, September 16, 1880, Clara E. Walker, 
who is a member of the Lutheran church, but attends Mount 
Zion with her husband. They have no children. Mrs. Hay 
is a daughter of Silas and Eliza Walker, the former a retired 
farmer of Summit township. He and his wife are the parents 
of the following children : Wilson E., farmer of Summit town- 
ship, married Clara A. Hay; Clara E., born February 7, 1862, 
educated in the public schools, wife of Peter S. Hay;, Edward, 
deceased; Minerva, wife of Emmanuel Berkley, farmer of Sum- 
mit towuship; Charles W., lawyer of Summit, married Susan 
Schrock; Robert, farmer of Summit township, married Mar- 
garetta Kimmel. 

NICHOLAS FLAMM. 

Nicholas Flamm, of Berlin, is a son of Valentine Flamm, 
who was by trade a shoemaker and owned a farm which he 
cultivated in connection with his trade. He was a Republican 
and a member of the Lutheran church. He married Nancy, 
daughter of Benjnmin Zerfoss, and their children were: Nicho- 
las, of whom later; Jacob, served during the Civil war in Com- 
pany H, Fifty-second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 331 

died in 1870; Matilda, wife of Jolm Sarver, farmer of Alle- 
gheny township. There were also two who died in infancy 
and a daughter who died at the age of fourteen. Mr. Flamm 
died at the comparativejy early age of fortj^-five, and his widow' 
survived until 1888, when she expired at the age of eighty-six. 
She was a member of the Lutheran church. 

Nicholas Flamm, son of Valentine and Nancy (Zerfoss) 
Flamm, was born December 1, 1838, in Somerset township, and 
received his education in the schools of Stony Creek township. 
He early began farming, which calling he has since continu- 
ously followed, with the exception of eighteen months spent at 
the carpenter's trade. On June 17, 1863, he enlisted in Com- 
pany H, First Regiment, Provost Battalion, Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteers, for a term of six months, receiving his discharge Janu- 
ary 8, 1864. He re-enlisted in Company H, Fifty-second Regi- 
ment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, September 26, 1864, and served 
until the close of the war, being honorably discharged June 8, 
1865. In 1892 Mr. Flamm purchased his present farm in Stony 
Creek township. It is a fine tract of two hundred acres, well 
situated for all purposes and fully stocked with good horses 
and cattle. Fruit of all kinds is raised in abundance. The 
improvements are modern and the residence is a tasteful dwell- 
ing, erected in 1892, the barn having been built in 1894. Mr. 
Flamm was formerly much engaged in stock buying and feed- 
ing, but now confines himself to raising. He belongs to Cum- 
mins Post, No. 210, G. A. R., of Somerset, and has always 
voted with the Republicans, He is a member of the Lutheran 
church, 

Mr. Flamm married, June 10, 1863, Lavinia Speicher, and 
their children were: Catharine, born November 4, 1863, died 
January 4, 1864 ; Nancy J., born October 31, 1864, died August 
26, 1879; Elizabeth, born December 15, 1866, died August 17, 
1879; Carrie, born November 4, 1868, died August 28, 1879; 
Charles, born October 1, 1870, died August 30, 1879; Mary E., 
born February 15, 1873, died August 28, 1879 ; John, born May 
24, 1875, educated in common and normal schools of the county, 
taught in county schools six years; now employed by the Nevin 
Coal Company and lives at the shaft near Berlin; he married 
Cora Krissinger and has two children, Ira and Orpha; William, 
born April 13, 1877, died August 30, 1879; Ida, born April 23, 
1879; Franklin P., born June 30, 1880, lives at home and works 
on the farm; both he and his brother John are Republicans, the 
former being a member of the Lutheran church and the latter 
of the United Brethren; Alice, born January 2, 1882, lives at 
home; George, born June 23, 1885; Sarah, born Januarv 19, 
1887; Cora M., born November 25, 1890. The three last named 
are at home. 



332 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

As may be seen from the above record, Mr. and Mrs. 
Flamm, in 1879, lost six of their children in thirteen days, by 
diphtheria, four dying in two days. They themselves were ly- 
ing very ill with the same disease and were unconscious of their 
loss until later. In November of the same year their six- 
months-old babe, Ida, was burned in her crib, which caught fire 
from the explosion of a lamp, and lived a week in great suffer- 
ing. These grievous afflictions, following each other in such 
quick succession, completely prostrated the parents, and it was 
a long time before they recovered from their great loss. 

Mrs. Flamm is a daughter of John Speicher, who was born 
June 6, 1820, in Virginia, and was one of the early settlers of 
Shanksville, where he owned a large farm until his death. 
For about sixty years he operated a grist and sawmill in that 
place. He held several township offices and during the greater 
l)art of his life was a Republican, but eight years before his 
death became a Prohibitionist. He was a deacon and elder in 
the Lutheran church. Mr. Speicher was thrice married, and, 
at the time of his death was a widower. His first wife was 
Harriet Walker, who bore him three children, two of whom 
died in childhood. The survivor, Lavinia, was born April 20, 
1845, was educated in the Shanksville schools and lived at home 
until her marriage to Nicholas Flamm. Her mother died when 
(juite a voung woman. The death of Mr. Speicher occurred 
July 11, '1902. 

IRVIN P. WALKER. 

Irvin P. W^alker, of Berlin, is a representative of one of 
the oldest families in Somerset county, a full account of his 
ancestry being given in the sketch of E. G. Walker, which ap- 
pears elsewhere in this work. 

]\rr. Walker is a son of Jonathan G. and ]\[atilda (Llay) 
Walkei*. and was born February 17, 1853, on the Walker home- 
stead, in Bi'others Valley township, receiving his education in 
the coTnmon schools and at the Berlin Normal school. After 
teaching for one year in the township he became a farmer, and 
has since, Avith but slight interruptions, folloAved agricultural 
pni'suils. He remained at home until the age of twenty-two, 
when he took a ti'i]i to the west, passing most of the time in 
Iowa, Kansas and Minnesota. He returned to the east, and 
affer residing there for a time again went west, remaining 
about eighteen months. In ISSO he bought his ])resent farm of 
one hundred and forty-six acres, where he has since resided. 
Tin's c^-.tate, which he has named the ''Golden Rod Farm," is 
situated about two miles from Berlin and is well stocked with 
Sliortho]'n cattle and good horses. There is an abundance of 
fruit. pi'in('i]ially a])])1<'s. and also a sugar canq) of eleven 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 333 

hundred vessels, producing about four thousand pounds of 
maple sugar annually. The coal underlying the farm is owned 
by Mr. Walker, and the improvements are large and substan- 
tial. In 1890 Mr. Walker erected a large barn, which he fur- 
nished with modern appliances, but in 1901 the structure was 
damaged by a tornado to such an extent that it had to be re- 
built. In 1898 he erected his present residence, one of the 
finest farm homes in the county. It is built of white pressed 
brick, with bay windows and an octagon L, while balconies and 
porches complete a tasteful exterior. It is surrounded by a 
well-kept lawn and a profusion of flowering plants. Mr. 
Walker is interested in the First National Bank of Berlin and 
in the Economy and Union Telephone Companies. 

He has been for twenty-eight years a member of Berlin 
Lodge, No. 461, I. 0. 0. F., having passed all chairs and be- 
longing to the Grand Lodge of the order. His political affilia- 
tions were with the Republicans until 1900, when he allied him- 
self with the Prohibitionists, and is now (1905) the candidate 
of that party for the office of county j)oorhouse director. He 
and his wife are members of the Berlin congregation of the 
Lutheran church, which he has served as deacon and trustee 
and is now serving as elder. Mr. Walker was a lay delegate, 
representing Allegheny synod at the General synod at Balti- 
more in 1903. 

Mr. Walker married, November 18, 1880, Lillie G. Dively, 
and their children are : Judd M., bom November 27, 1881, 
educated in common and normal schools of the county, fore- 
man for Beeritz & Son, grain merchants of Somerset; Prohi- 
bitionist and member of the Lutheran church. Married, June 
21, 1906, Lizzie Shaulis, a teacher, daughter of Amos J. Shau- 
]is, a Somerset county farmer. Earl L., born April 19, 1883, 
educated in public schools, farmer, lives at home; Prohibition- 
ist and member of Lutheran church. Howard A., born Janu- 
ary, 10, 1885, educated in public schools, lives at home. Pro- 
hibitionist, member of Lutheran church. Mamie N., born Sep- 
tember 6, 1886. Irma S., born January. 31, 1889. Ralph W., 
born January 26, 1891. Herbert L., born February 3, 1893. 
Glenn E., bom September 24, 1895. Clyde H., born May 28, 
1897. Vernon P., born August 5, 1902. Mamie N., Irma S. and 
Ralph W. were educated in the public schools and are members 
of the Lutheran church. Mrs. Walker was born October 5, 
1858, and was educated in the schools of Stony Creek township. 
She is a daughter of William M. and Susan (Allfather) Dively, 
the former a blacksmith at Roxbury. He and his wife are 
members of the Lutheran and Reformed churches. 



334 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

SAMUEL KUHNS. 

Samuel Kuhns, of Berlin, is a great-grands on of John 
Kuhns, who was one of the early settlers of Brothers Valley 
township, where his son, Jacob Kuhns, was born May 10, 1799. 
Jacob Kuhns was a farmer in his native township, and in poli- 
tics was a Democrat. He was a member of the Reformed 
church, which he served as deacon and elder. He married, in 
1824, Mary Brubaker, born January 1, 1806, and their children 
were: John, of whom, later; Eliza, wife of Samuel Musser, 
both deceased; and Mary, widow of Dr. Beachley, of Meyers- 
dale. The death of Jacob Kuhns occurred in Berlin in 1873. 

John Kuhns, son of Jacob and Mary (Brubaker) Kuhns, 
was born November 22, 1824, on the Philson farm, in Brothers 
Valley township, and, like his father, passed his life in agri- 
cultural pursuits. He was a Democrat, and a member of the 
Reformed church, which he served as deacon and trustee, also 
as elder. He married, December 24, 1846, Mary Kim m el, born 
January 11, 1826, in Stony Creek township, and a member of 
the Lutheran church. Their children were: Rose A., bom 
February 2, 1848, died September 12, 1850; William, horn 
March 18, 1850, retired farmer, living in Berlin; married Mary 
Musser, and has one child, Nellie; Samuel, of whom later; 
Mary A., born September 13, 1855, wife of Samuel A. Landis, 
farmer of Stony Creek township; Sarah, born July 15, 1857, 
wife of the Rev. S. C. Stover, pastor of the Reformed church 
at Keim, Elk Lick township, has two children: John and El- 
wood. 

Samuel Kuhns, son of John and Mary (Kimmel) Kuhns, 
was born January 11, 1853, in Stony Creek township, where 
he obtained his education in the public schools. Until he was 
of age he remained on the farm, assisting his father, and then, 
having married, settled on the farm which he purchased in 
1874, and on which he still resides. This property consists of 
one hundred and fifty-five acres, all under cultivation with the 
exception of the sugar camp of seven hundred vessels, which 
produces annually about three thousand pounds of maple sugar. 
The orchards are principally of apples. The farm is well 
stocked with a good grade of horses and cattle, and in addition 
to the cattle raised Mr. Kuhns buys and feeds for the market. 
In 1878 he erected a convenient and tasteful residence. He is 
a Democrat and a member of tlie Reformed church. He mar- 
ried, November 27, 1873, Elizabeth Glessner, and their children 
were : T^ydia, born May 16, 1878, educated in Stony Creek 
schools and Berlin Normal school, member of Reformed church; 
wife of Harry H., son of Henry Glessner, and has one son, 
Kuhn Glessner, born September 13, 1901. Mr. and Mrs. Gless- 



BEDFOED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 335 

ner live on the Kuhns homestead, Mr. Glessner working the 
farm for his father-in-law. John and Henry (twins), born 
July 25, 1886, died September 8, 1886. Mr. Kuhns is a great 
sufferer from rheumatism and recently visited the baths at 
Mount Clemens, Michigan, where he was much benefited. 

Mrs. Kuhns is a daughter of Henry Glessner and a grand- 
daughter of Jacob Glessner. The latter was a great-grandson 
of Elder Jacob Glessner, who was murdered in Berlin, in 1794, 
by the Eev. Cyriacus Spangenberg. Mrs. Kuhns was one of a 
family of ten children and was born November 22, 1852. She 
was educated in the public schools and is a member of the Re- 
foi'med church. 

J. G. NEWMAN. 

One of the highly cultivated and therefore productive 
farms of Somerset county, located in the town of Listie, is the 
property of J. G. Newman, who was born in Addison town- 
ship, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, May 11, 1855, a descend- 
ant of an English and Irish ancestry. 

He attended the common schools in the vicinity of his 
home, completing his studies one month after attaining his 
majority. He began his active career as a farmer, which occu- 
pation he followed up to the year 1899, when he assumed the 
management of a general store at Listie, continuing the same 
for a period of two and a half years, and then disposing of the 
stock in order to purchase the farm on which he now resides 
in the town of Listie. He is a member of the Reformed church, 
and since attaining his majority has cast his vote for the can- 
didates of the Democratic party. 

On February 8, 1877, Mr. Newman married Ellen J. Baker, 
born December 19, 1855, daughter of Levi and Mary Baker, 
and two children were the issue of this union: 1. George A., 
born August 20, 1878, in Addison township, Somerset county; 
he received his education in the common schools of his native 
county, and gained a lucrative livelihood by following the occu- 
pations of stonemason and farmer; in the fall of the year he 
devoted his attention to threshing. December 27, 1905, he started 
working for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company as fireman, 
which position he still holds. He is a Democrat in politics. 
He married, October 31, 1899, Clara E. Walker, born June 22, 
1882. in Milford, Somerset county, daughter of Bernard J. and 
Martha Ann Walker, and they are the parents of three chil- 
dren: Walter W., born September 6, 1901; Vinnie May, born 
November 16, 1903, and Deelda Fern, born September 17, 1905. 
2. Vinnie M., born December 15, 1879, in Addison township, 
Somerset county. On March 8, 1898, she became the wife of 
John H. Schroek, a merchant of Baltimore, Maryland, in which 



336 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

city they reside, and they are the parentis of two children: 
Dewey, born xVugust 13, 181)9, and George A., born September 
5, 1!H)1. Mrs. Ellen G. Newman, wife of J. G. Newman, died 
October 4, 1903. 

JOSEPH M. MU.LER. 

Among the practical and progressive agricnltnrists of 
Bills, Somerset county, may be mentioned the name of Joseph 
M. stiller, who has recently pnrchased a fine property in Som- 
erset, to which he moved in the year 1906, lie is a son of 
Christian and Mai-y (Miller) Miller, and grandson on the pa- 
ternal side of Joseph stiller, who engaged in farming, and on 
the maternal side of Abraham H. ^Miller. Both grandparents 
were born in America. The one died at the age of eighty-seven 
and the other at the age of ninety-four. Abraham H. Miller 
was considered one of the strongest men in the county. He 
could throw a barrel of cider on a wagon having a double box. 
Christian ^Miller (father) was born in 1813, was a farmer by 
occn])ation, a Democrat in politics, and an active and influen- 
tial citizen. 

Joseph M. Miller was born in Jefferson township, Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania, jMarch 26, 1853. After completing a 
common school education, he assisted his father with the du- 
ties of the home farm until he was twenty-six years old, after 
which he worked the farm for six years on shares, and in 1883 
purchased the Elijali Bauman farm, whereon he is now con- 
ducting extensive operations and from which he receives a 
lucrative livelihood. His place is neat and attractive in appear- 
ance and indicates the supervision of a master hand. His po- 
litical allegiance is given to the Democratic party. 

Tn 1876 Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Barbara 
Smith, who was born in ]\[eyersdale, Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, September 21, 1852, daughter of Frederick Smith, 
formerly fi-om Germany. Their children are: Frederick S., 
married Sadie Lentz, a daughter of William Lentz, of Water- 
loo, Towa, who was formerly of Meyersdale, this county. They 
are engaged in farming in Waterloo, Iowa. Anna B., married 
Ira Blaugh, of this county; they are engaged in farming. T^aw- 
rence, deceased: Wel)ster AV. ; Harvey J., married IMinerva 
Bittner, of Larimer township; Cleveland G., Mary and Ruth 
Miller, 

HOSEA BLOOM. 

Hosea Bloom, of Olanta, Clearfield county, formerly en- 
gaged in the hotel business in I^istie, Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, was born March 29, 1866, in New Mil])ort, Clearfield 
county, the son of Samuel and Jane (Curry) Bloom, and grand- 
son of William Bloom, a farmer. 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 337 

ITosea Bloom obtained his education in the common schools 
of his native connty, and leaving school at the age of eighteen 
engaged in teaming, an occupation whicli he followed snccess- 
fn fly" for fifteen years. He then removed to Listie, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, and there engaged in the hotel business, 
conducting the same for some time with good success. He is 
a Republican in politics, and a member of the Royal Arcanum. 
He married January 5, 1888, Electa Morrison, born January 
5, 1869, a daughter of David and Louisa (Bauman) Morrison. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bloom have children, as follows : I. Zoe, born Sep- 
tember 16, 1889; Flovd D., May 8, 1891; Twyla M., August 12, 
1895; Russell, November 9, 1897; Violet L., September 22, 1900; 
and Hosea W., December 11, 1903. 

JOHN F. SNYDER. 

John F. Snyder, a resident and shoemaker of Somerset, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was there born October 11, 
1852, a son of George and Henrietta (Heyr) Snyder, and grand- 
son of John H. and Elizabeth (Shaffer) Snyder. His maternal 
grandparents were Charles i'\ and Mary Heyr. 

John F. Snyder acquired a common school education, and 
has followed the occupation of a shoemaker the most of his life, 
being very prosperous in this line. He is a Republican in pol- 
itics, and a member of the Lutheran church. 

Mr. Snyder married, in 1875, Mary Walker, who was born 
October 13, 1854, the daughter of Peter and Amy (Nedrow) 
Walker. They have two children, Cora and Leila. 

ALEXANDER MARKEL. 

Alexander Markel, a blacksmith of Somerset, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, was born August 6, 1850, the son of 
Leopold and Elizabeth (Wunch) Markel. 

Leopold Markel (father) was a native of Germany, born 
1800, who emigrated from the Fatherland in 1832, settling in 
Meyersdale, Pennsylvania. He and his wife, Elizabeth (Wunch) 
Markel, were the parents of the following named children: 
Ferdinand, Ringold, deceased; Caroline, deceased; Leopold, 
Frank, deceased; Samuel, deceased; William, deceased; Minna. 
Mary A., Samuel (2), deceased; Peter, deceased; and Alexander. 

Alexander Markel acquired his education in the common 
schools of Somerset county, and leaving school at the age of 
fourteen years, turned his attention to the trade of boiler-maker. 
After he finished this he learned the trade of blacksmith, in 
which he is very proficient. He is now working at this occupa- 
tion, and makes a^ specialty of horse-shoeing. He is a stanch 
Republican in political relations, and served his township as 
assessor for seven years, constable three years and tax col- 

Vol. Ill 23 



338 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

lector two years. He and his family are Liitlierans in religion. 
Alexander Markel married, October 30, 1877, Lncinda Ank- 
ney, who was born in Somerset county, Jime 14, 1852. She is 
of German descent, the daughter of David and Charlotte 
(Yonng) Ankney, and granddaughter of Jacob Ankney, who was 
born and reared in Somerset county, and a farmer l3y occupa- 
tion. David Ankney (father) was born in 1807 in Somerset, 
was a farmer by occupation, and a Republican in politics. He 
and his wife, Charlotte (Young) Ankney, had children as fol- 
lows: Catherine, deceased: Mary E., George A., Lydia, Jacob, 
Tjucinda, Cyrus B., Sarah, Anna S., Lincoln, William H., and 
Maggie. Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Markel are the parents of the 
following named children: Bertha E., lives at home; Ada L., 
Charles L., deceased; Clayton E., and Martin L., who is a stu- 
dent at Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. 

JOHN ^t:nters. 

John Winters, a veteran of the Civil war, who is now 
leading a retired life, enjoying to the full the consciousness of 
duties and obligations well and faithfully performed, is a na- 
tive of Somerset county, Pennsylvania, born June 25, 1840. His 
parents were John and Margaret (Mull) Winters, natives of 
Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and descendants of an honor- 
able ancestry, 

John Winters obtained a common school education, and 
after completing his studies followed farming as a means of 
livelihood up to 1885, in which year he was elected sheriff of 
Somerset county, in which ca]iacity he served three years. He 
then engaged in the hotel business, becoming the proprietor of 
the Commercial Hotel, at Somerset, which he conducted for two 
years. The following three years he served as clerk in the hotel, 
but is now leading a retired life, residing with his son in the 
Hotel Vannear, at Somerset, Pennsylvania. In Se]itember, 1861, 
at the outbreak of the Civil war, when the country was in sore 
need of the services of her faithful sons, Mr. Winters enlisted 
in the armv, becoming a member of Company C, Fourth Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers. He served until General Lee's surrender 
at Appomattox Court House, a term of three years and nine 
months. TJo was a prisoner three days and three nights, but 
was then taken to the Parole Camp at Annapolis, Maryland, 
and there discharged. 

In 1861 Mr. Winters was united in marriage to Jane Bow- 
man, who bore him children : Johanna R. married James 
Bloucfh : James T;. married Susan Kimmell ; ThoTuas G., Mag- 
gie, Jacob B. married Nora Sticer, and they are the i)arents of 
one child, Marie; Robert R. married Fanny S]iangler; Grace 
married Ernest Kootz. 



BEDFOKD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 339 

WILLIAM HOSTETTEE. 

William Hostetter, a tailor of Somerset, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, was bom in Meyersdale, Angnst 21, 1845, the 
son of John and Barbara Hostetter, 

William Hostetter entered the tailoring business when 
quite young, and has followed this occupation most of his life, 
attended with excellent success. During the Civil war he en- 
listed, in May, 1863, in Captain William Schrod's Independent 
Company of Volunteers, and served about seven months. Jan- 
uary, 1864, he re-enlisted at Harrisburg in Com|3|any K, Twen- 
tieth Pennsylvania Cavalry, and served under Captain Gross 
until the close of the war. ' 

In 1876 he married Jennie Knee, daughter of Solomon and 
Margaret (Spanffler) Knee. Thev have five children : Edward, 
Albert P., Harry Z., William D. and Paul S. 

JOSEPH R. JOY. 

Joseph E. Joy, a resident of Somerset, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, and a member of the police force of that town, 
is a native of Jefferson county, Ohio, born June 15, 1845, a son 
of John F. and Mary (Moore) Joy. 

Joseph R. Joy obtained a common school education, and 
when but sixteen years of age entered the Union army, serving 
under Captain George Harrison, in the Second Maryland Regi- 
ment. He remained in the service from August, 1861, until the 
cessation of hostilities, handling government supplies. Upon 
his return to civil life Mr. Joy went to work on the Chesapeake 
and Ohio canal, being thus engaged for over twenty-two years. 
For the past twelve years he has been a valued member of the 
police force of Somerset, and is in every way well qualified for 
this line of work. In his political relations Mr. Joy is a Pro- 
hibitionist, and he and his family are members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. 

In 1873 Joseph R. Joy was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna Dhuse, a daughter of Henry and Sophia Dhuse. By this 
union seven children were bom, all of whom are now deceased, 
two having died in infancy. After the death of his first wife 
Mr. Joy married Miss Annie Byroad, a daughter of John and 
Mary Byroad. The children born of this union are as follows : 
John, Joseph, Annie, Mary, George, Iva, Ernest, Daisy and 
Wilbur. 

URIAH LANDIS. 

Uriah Landis, one of the enterprising and successful busi- 
ness men of Somerset, a son of Jefferson and Isabel (Berkey) 
Landis, and grandson of Abraham Landis, was born in Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania, January 3, 1858. 



34U BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Uriah Laiidis ac(|uired a practical education by attending 
the common schools in the vicinity of his home. He followed 
farming as a means of livelihood until 1901, in which year he 
engaged in the livery business, which has steadily increased in 
volume and importance with each succeeding year, and at the 
present time (]905) has one of the linest establishments of 
its kind in that section of the county, and is also erecting one 
of the largest buildings in the town, which will be fully equipped 
with vehicles and horses suitable for all occasions. He is 
courteous and accommodating, and therefore well merits the 
large patronage which has been accorded him. He is a staunch 
adherent of the principles of Republicanism. He is a progres- 
sive, public-spirited man, and one whose honor, enterprise and 
social qualities give character to a community. 

In 1879 Mr. Landis was united in marriage to Amanda 
Bearl, born January 19, 1860, daughter of Jonathan and Eva 
(PhilipDi) Bearl, and three children have been the issue; 
Edward S., born Januarv 10, 1880; Eva, May 10, 1883; and 
Sally, May 31, 1885. 

WILLIAM A. STAHL. 

William A. Stahl. a resident of Somerset, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, was there born in 1856, the son of John and 
Mary (Baron) Stahl, and grandson of Godfrey and Elizabeth 
(Hess) Stahl, both natives of Somerset county. His maternal 
grandparents were Joseph and Eva (Friedline) Baron. He is 
one of eight children, as follows : William A., Elizabeth, Lydia, 
Franklin, Mary, Austin, John and Henry H. 

William A. Stahl married (first), January 19, 1877, Esther 
Barkman, daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Barkman, and they 
had the following children : Jacob A., Edwin F., married Sadie 
E. Haugher, and they have one child, Mildred; Mary N., wife 
of Milton N. Haugher, and mother of one child, George Will- 
iam. Mr. Stahl married (second), August 29, 1900, Edith Pile, 
who is of French descent. She was born April 28, 1865, a 
daughter of Josiah and Margaret (Kooser) Pile, and grand- 
daughter of Geoige and Solon (Putnam) Pile. Her maternal 
grandparents were Jacob and Sarah (Knight) Kooser. She 
is one of eight children, as follows: Lucinda, Allen, Ernest, 
Laura, Edith, Sadie, Lyman and Clara. 

GEORGE H. THOMPSON. 

George H. Thompson, a well known citizen of Somerset, Som- 
erset county, Pennsylvania, and a descendant of an old and hon- 
orable English lineage, traces his ancestrv on the paternal side 
to George Thompson, who resided in Bedford county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and there reared his family to manhood and womanhood. 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 341 

The line of descent is traced through his son, John Thompson, 
who married Elizabeth Snivley, and they reared a family of 
seven clrildren, namely: George H., Jane, Elizabeth, Emma, 
Amanda, Edward and Jacob. 

George H. Thompson, the eldest of the above named fam- 
ily, was born in Lavansville, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, 
Jnly 1, 184:6. He received a common school education, and 
began his active career by accepting a position as teacher, in 
which capacity he served for four terms. The following three 
years he conducted a general store, meeting with varying suc- 
cess, and from that tinie to the present (1905) has followed 
the occupation of blacksmithing. The regard in which he is 
held by his fellow-citizens is evidenced by the fact that he was 
chosen to fill the office of county auditor, serving one term, and 
also jury commissioner, which he filled for a similar period of 
time. His political affiliations are with the Democratic party. 

Mr. Thompson married, September 17, 1871, Amanda C. 
Flick, born September 7, 1844, a daughter of Isaac and Eliza- 
beth (Davis) Flick, and the issue of this union was three chil- 
dren: RoUand, deceased; George R., deceased; and Grace. 
Mr. Thompson and his family are members of the Reformed 
church. They are well thought of in the community, and enjoy 
the acquaintance of a wide circle of friends. 

NELSON W. SULLIVAN. 

Nelson W. Sullivan, a representative citizen of Somerset, 
Pennsylvania, was born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, 
October 30, 1852, son of Philip and Rebecca (King) Sullivan, 
and grandson of Lemuel and Mary Sullivan. 

Nelson W. Sullivan acquired a common school education, 
thereby becoming equipped for an active business career,. He 
followed railroading for the long period of twenty-eight years, 
during which time he was employed on the following roads : 
Pennsylvania, Baltimore & Ohio, Allegheny Valley, and Fort 
Wayne, and for five years was employed by the Adams Ex- 
press Corajjany in the capacity of money messenger, his route 
being between Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and New York city. 
He was faithful and conscientious in the performance of the 
various duties assigned him, and thereby won the commenda- 
tion of his superiors in office, and the esteem and good will of 
his fellow employes. Of late years he has devoted his atten- 
tion to farming, which has proved a successful and lucrative 
occupation. He takes an interest in the welfare and growth 
of his native county and state, and in national, state and local 
politics easts his vote for the candidates of the Republican 
party. 

On Februarv 18, 1877, Mr. Sullivan was married to Louisa 



342 BEDFOKD AND JSOMEKSET COUNTIES 

Bittner, boru February '22, 1859, daughter of ilermau and 
Kacliel (iiuuglil) Jiittm-r, and graiuldaugliter ou the i)aterual 
side ol" IkMijaiuiu Jiittiier, and on the maternal side of John and 
Eve ISnyder. Three children were the issue of this nuirriage: 
George A., boru October 27, 1877; Martin L., January 13, 1879; 
and .\lary K., October 2o, J 895. Mr. Sullivan and his family 
are members of the J^utheran church. 

HENRY BAKKMAN. 

Henry Barknian, deceased, for man)' years a representa- 
tive of the agi'icultural interests of Somerset comity, conduct- 
ing extensive operations in the town of Somerset, was a native 
of the county iu which his life was spent, the date of his birth 
being February 11, 1855. He was a son of Jacob and Eliza- 
beth (Young) Barkman, and a grandson of Jacob and Eliza- 
beth Barkman, worthy and esteemed members of the com- 
munity in which they resided. 

Henry J3arkman attended the common schools in the neigh- 
borhood of his home, and his active career was devoted to 
farming on a farm of two hundred acres, which has been in 
the possession of the family for five generations. He con- 
ducted his farming in a methodical and scientific manner, and 
thus was enabled to derive a comfortable livelihood for himself 
and family. He attended the Lutheran church, in which faith 
he was brought up, and he was always ready to contribute to its 
support and maintenance. He married, October 19, 1876, Char- 
lotte R. Bearl, born January 21, 1857, daughter of Jonathan 
and Eva (Phillip) Bearl, whose family consisted of six chil- 
dren, namely: John A., Elizabeth, Margaret, Charlotte R., 
Amanda and Minnie. Six sons were born to Mr. and Mrs. Bark- 
man, as follows: William W., born July 11, 1877; John Y., 
July 7, 1879, married Maggie Metzler, and they reside on his 
mother's farm; Charles F., June 21, 1882, married Bertha Hen- 
inger; Albert 1)., Sei)tember 21, 1884; George R., Sei)tember 4, 
188G; Henry Edward, August 3, 1889. Henry Barkman died at 
his home in Somerset, J line 3, 1891, in the prime of life, being 
only thirty-six years, three months and twenty-two days old. 
His untimely death was deeply deploi'ed by all who were brought 
in coiiiact with liiiii, and liis family lost an alTectionale husband 
and loving father. His widow resides on the old homestead, 
and is highly esteemed by her friends and neighbors. 

AVllJJAM H. BERKEY. 

William H. Berkey. a r(^sident of Somerset, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, was there born December 1, 1839, a son 
of Henry and T;ucy (l^hilson) Berkey, and grandson of Adam 
Berkey, who emigrated to this country from Germany. 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 343 

William H. Berkey acquired his education in the common 
schools of his native county. AVhen the Civil war was in prog- 
ress he enlisted in 1862 and served for nine months under Cap- 
tain George ¥. Baer. He re-enlisted in 1864, and served under 
Dr. Webster B, Lomen, of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, until the 
close of the war. In matters of politics Mr. Berkey is a strong 
Republican, and he and his family are regular and consistent 
members of the Lutheran church. In 1869 he married Nancy 
E. Lape, born December 25, 1850, a daughter of John and Re- 
becca (Hufman) Lape, and they have the following children: 
Norman E., born 1870; Mollie B., 1872; George H., 1875, died 
in Guatemala, Central America, November 23, 1905; Emily S., 
1888; Rhea, 1892. Of these children, Norman E., the eldest, 
married Flora Custer, and they have two children, Samuel and 
William H. 

DANIEL G. STAHL. 

Daniel G. Stahl, a farmer and stockdealer of Somerset, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was there born March 19, 1865, 
the son of William H. and Mary A. (Walker) Stahl, who were 
the parents of six children, as follows : Cyrus, William, Daniel 
G. (of whom later), Clark, Lizzie and Annie. 

Daniel G. Stahl, third son and child of William H. and 
Mary A. (Walker) Stahl, obtained a good common school edu- 
cation. He is an excellent farmer and also deals quite ex- 
tensively in stock raising. He is a Liberal in politics, and in 
religious affiliations a member of the Lutheran church. Prior 
to his adopting the occupation of a farmer he engaged for 
four years as a school teacher. He is a capable, industrious 
farmer and an excellent, useful citizen. He married, Decem- 
ber 14, 1886, Grace Eishaberger, born January 15, 1869, a 
daughter of William and Adeline (Gardner) Rishaberger, who 
were the parents of three children, namely: Robert, Nannie 
Oathryn and Grace. Two children blessed the union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Stahl, namely: Elsie M., born in 1887; and William, 
August 30, 1891.' 

GILLIAN F. KOOTZ. 

Gillian F. Kootz, deceased, who was a prosperous farmer 
of Somerset, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was born May 2, 
1835, a son of Gillian and Catherine Kootz. 

Gillian F. Kootz obtained his education in the common 
schools of his native place, and followed the occupation of farm- 
ing and saw-milling all his active working life. He owned an 
excellent farm, which he brought to a high state of cultivation 
and improvement. He was an industrious, useful citizen, and 
well thought of throughout the community. He and his family 
were members of the United Brethren church. Gillian F. 



344 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Kootz married, December, 1861, Sophia Fleck, born May 17, 
1842, a daughter of George and Nancy (E'riedhne) Fleck, both 
natives of Gurnee township, Somerset county. Mrs. Kootz was 
one of ten children. The death of Gillian F. Kootz occurred 
October 25, 1904, an event which was sincerely mourned by a 
large circle of friends. His widow still resides in Somerset. 

ANDREW JENKINS SMITH. 

Andrew Jenkins Smith, of Elk Lick, is a son of Michael 
Smith, who was born in County Kings, Ireland, and in 1835 
came to the United States, being then about nineteen years old. 
He settled in Cumberland, Maryland, where he was employed, 
in company with his brothers, John and Nicholas, on Chesa- 
peake and Ohio canal contract work. He remained there until 
1837, when he removed to Elk Lick township and settled on the 
old John J. Keim farm, where he made his home until 1840. 
In that year he migrated to Mount Savage, where he was em- 
ployed in the rolling-mill. He soon abandoned this for the Sul- 
livan farm in Elk Lick township, and in 1850 went to Illinois. 
The following year he returned and took up his abode on the 
farm known as the "David Livengood farm," now owned by 
his son, Andrew Jenkins Smith. Mr. Smith married, in 1840. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Griffith, of Elk Lick township, 

and their children were: John, William, Marx, Andrew Jenkins 
(see forward). Mary, Ellen, David, Michael, Anna, and Philip. 

Andrew Jenkins Smith, son of Michael and Elizabeth 
(Griffith) Smith, was born June 6, 1851, in Illinois, and obtained 
his education in the public schools of Summit and Elk Lick 
townships, which he attended until the age of twenty-one. He 
worked on his father's farm until 1878 and then entered the 
soft coal mines, where he was employed until 1903. In that year 
he entered the service of the C. T. Hay Lumber Company, and 
in July, 1904, purchased the farm on which he has since lived. 
From 1881 to 1884 he served as tax collector of Salisbury bor- 
ough. He belongs to the United Mine Workers' Association 
and is a Democrat in politics. He is a member of St. Michael 's 
Roman Catholic church of West Salisbury. 

Mr. Smith married, in 1887, Lydia, daughter of Ambrose 
McKengie, of Garrett county, Maryland, and they became the 
parents of the following children: Mary Edna, John, Law- 
rence, Michael Allen, and James Andrew. Mrs. Smith died 
March 1, 1893. 

RICHARD NEWMAN. 

Richard Newman, of Elk Lick, is a son of William New- 
man, who was born in 1823, in Garrett county, Maryland, where 
he passed his entire life as a farmer. He married Margaret, 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 3i5 

daughter of Jacob Blocher, of Garrett comity, and the follow- 
ing are their children: Richard (see torward), Aevin, Ida, and 
Elijah. William Newman died July 26, 1894. 

Richard Newman, son of Wiiiiam and Margaret (Blocher) 
Newman, was born February 12, 1861, in (iarrett county, xUary- 
land, where he attended the public schools until the age of 
eighteen. Until attaining his majority he assisted his father in 
the labors of the homestead, and then worked in the woods as 
a lumberman until iSbb, when he entered into partnership with 
his brother Nevin, and Frank, Harvey H. and Norman Maust, 
under the firm name of the Maust & .Sewman Lumber Company, 
with offices at Salisbury. The connection was maintained until 
1895, since which time Mr. Newman and his brother have car- 
ried on the business together under the firm name of R. Newman 
& Bro., still keeping their offices at Salisbury, with sawmills in 
Greenville and Elk Lick townships. Mr. Newman is vice-presi- 
dent of the Heat & Light Power Company and president of the 
West Salisbury Feed Company. He has filled the offices of 
school director, auditor and councilman, serving in each office 
for three years. He is a Republican and a member of the Re- 
formed church. 

Mr. Newman married. May 22, 1887, Amanda, daughter 
of Israel Glotfelty, of Garrett county, Maryland, and their chil- 
dren are: Harvey Earle, Lelia Maude, Ira Glenn, Mary Mar- 
garet, and Homer Richard. 

ADAM FOGLE. 

Adam Fogle, of Elk Lick Springs, is a son of George Fogle, 
who was born in Germany, and about 1833 emigrated to the 
United States. He settled in Somerset county, making his home 
at Berlin, and there passed the remainder of his life. He was 
a stone mason by trade, a member of the Reformed church and 
a Republican. His wife was Anna Helwich, also a native of 
Germany, and among their children were: Peter, Adam (see 
forward), Ellen, Lizzie, George, and Matilda. George Fogle 
died in 1862, in his fifty-fourth year; Anna, his wife, died about 
1870, in her sixty-eighth year. 

Adam Fogle, son of George and Anna (Helwich) Fogle, 
was born April 28, 1837, at Berlin, Pennsylvania, where he ob- 
tained his education in the public schools, which he attended 
until the age of twenty. He then began to work at the trade 
of a stonemason and l)ricklayer, which occupation he has fol- 
lowed to the present time, with the exception of three years, 
from 1854 to 1857, when he carried the mail from Berlin to 
Johnsto^vn. In 1862 he moved to Grantsville, ^Maryland, and 
in 1864 returned to his native county, taking up his residence 
in Salisbury. He and his sons are all expert mechanics and 



346 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

have erected nearly all the .superior stone and brick work in 
the township. Anions: the principal strnctnres which he has 
helped to erect are AVilhehn chnrcli at Keim, the residences of 
Dr. Lichty and N. D. Keim, and some of the finest bnildinij:s in 
^leyersdale, Salisbury and surrounding county within two hun- 
dred miles. ]\rr. Fogle has served fifteen times as judge of elec- 
tions, and for the last eight years has held the office of assessor 
of the borough. His ])olitical allegiance has alwaj^s been given 
to the Re]mblican party, his first presidential vote having been 
cast for Abraham Lincoln. He is a member of the Evangelical 
church of Salisbury, and has been steward and trustee. 

Mr. Fogle married, April 5, 1860, Susanna ]\[iller, of Stony 
Creek township, and they were the parents of one child, William 
Henry, now a stonemason of Connellsville. He married Rose 
^[illhouse, and had four children: Charles, Nelda, Adam and 
Bessie. Charles and Nelda are both married and each 
have a child, making three families of the four generations 
now living. Mrs. Fogle died in 1862, and ]\rr. Fogle mar- 
ried, October 9, 1864, Caroline, daughter of Charles Hart- 
line, of Salisbury. By this marriage there were the follow- 
ing children: Ida, wife of William Cochrane, of Salisbury; 
they are the ])arents of eight children: Emma (Mrs. James 
Younkin), one child; George, John, Eva, Clarence, Allen, Earl 
.?nd Marie. Allen, deceased. George, married ]\rargaret 
Easton; four children: Zella, Mary, Edith and James; 
he is a stonemason and contractor. Harvey, married Ella Bal- 
let; two children, Francis and William; he is a stonemason and 
contractor. Carrie, married Jacob Bender; five children: 
Allen, Edna, Harry, Raymond and an infant son. Herman, 
unmarried, stonemason. Tjcroy, unmarried, stonemason. Nel- 
lie, married Samuel Bender; one child, Roy. 

ANDREW L. MARTIN. 

Andrew L. Martin, of Stoystown, is a grandson of Samuel 
Martin, who was born in Dunbar townshi]i, 'Fayette county, 
where he ])assed his life in devotion to agricultural pursuits. 
His wife was Sarah Lincoln, also a native of Fayette county, 
and their children were: John G. (of whom later), Calom, 
Joseph, Lincoln, Newton, Martha, Elizabeth, and Luther. 

John G. Martin, son of Sanniel and Sarah (Lincoln) Mar- 
tin, was bom December 21, 1837, in Dunbar township, Fayette 
county, and was a millwright, carpenter and contractor. Polit- 
ically he is a Ke|)ublir*an. Mr. Martin married, in LS63, Surna 
Bryson, and their children were: AtkIi-cw L. (of whom later), 
Fanny I)., Samuel, Charles, Franklin, Walter S., Luella (de- 
ceased), Nonie (deceased), and P]ffie E. 

Andrew L. Martin, son of John G. and Surna (Bryson) 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 347 

Martin, was born August 2G, 18(14, in Dunbar township, Fayette 
county, where he received his education in the common schools. 
He left school at the age of fourteen and engaged in drawing 
stone. Later he was employed for eleven years as a telegraph 
operator by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company, and was 
also agent at the station. He is now engaged in the retail furni- 
ture business at Stoystown. 

Mr. Martin married, May 18, 1893, Mary J., born Novem- 
ber 6, 1866, in Shade township, daughter of Pearson and Hester 
(Specht) Lolir, and their "children are: Joseph W., born 
March 12, 1894; Harry L., August 27, 1895; Dora F., March 2, 
1899; Hester Surna, March 10, 1906. 

MILLARD FILLMORE LOWRY. 

Millard Fillmore Lowry, of Elk Lick township,, is a grand- 
son of John Lowry, whose son, G-eorge Lowry, was born Octo- 
ber 5, 1820, in Stony Creek township. George Lowry was a 
farmer, and about 1840 moved to Elk Lick township. He mar- 
ried Lucinda, daughter of Peter Beachy, of the same township, 
and their family consisted of the following children: Mary 
Anna, wife of Monroe B. Kretchman; Millard Fillmore, se6 
forward; Albert B., married Nancy Garlitz; Martha; Abraham, 
married Margrett Smalley; William G., married Ida E. New- 
man; and Caroline, wife of Elijah Newman. 

Millard Fillmore Lowry, son of George and Lucinda 
(Beachy) Lowry, was born November 22, 1856, on the farm in 
Elk Lick township on which he now makes his home, and until 
his nineteenth year attended the public schools. From that 
time until the age of thirty he spent his summers in working 
on the farm for his father, and from 1881 to 1885 taught school 
during the winters. In 1902 he and his brother, William G. 
Lowry, purchased a farm and have ever since cultivated it in 
partnership. Mr. Lowry is a Republican and a member of the 
Lutheran church. He is unmarried. 

CHRISTIAN F. LEE. 

Christian F. Lee, late of Elk Lick township, was a son of 
Thomas Lee, who was born December 15, 1816, in Milford town- 
ship, and was a farmer, being also engaged in business as a 
manufacturer of spinning wheels. He married Elizabeth, born 
November 15, 1816, daughter of Daniel Brenneman, of Ger- 
many, who married Maria Bender, February 20, 1803, in Ger- 
many, and who came to this country in 1828. The children of 
Thomas and Elizabeth Lee were: John, Daniel, Joel, Mary, 
Samuel, and Christian F., see forward. 

Christian F. Lee. son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Brenne- 
man) I^ee, was born July 24, 1858, in Addison township, where 



348 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

he attended the public schools until the age of eleven, when the 
family moved to Elk Lick township, and his education was com- 
pleted in the schools oi that townsnip. At the age of nineteen 
he left school and thereafter assisted his father on the farm and 
also worked for neighboring farmers until 1883. He then rented 
a farm from his father for one year, and in 1884 purchased the 
farm, which he occupied until his death, July 9, 1906. In the 
sphere of politics he advocated and uplieid the men and meas- 
ures indorsed by the Democratic party. He was a member of 
the Amish Mennonite church, in which since 1897 he served as 
trustee. 

Mr. Lee married, October 18, 1883, Laura C, daughter of 
Joseph Spiecher, of Garrett county, Maryland, and their chil- 
dren are : Elizabeth, Anna, Sadie, Harry, Simon and Glenn. 

JOSEPH HENRY MILLER. 

Joseph Henry Miller, of Elk Lick, is a grandson of John 
Miller, whose son, Henry Miller, was born in 1833, in Somerset 
county. Henry Miller was a farmer, and married Mary, daugh- 
ter of Jacob Yoder, of Somerset county. Their children were: 
Lafayette, Elizabeth, Jacob, Joseph, Henry (see forward), 
Sarah and Lydia. 

Joseph Henry Miller, son of Henry and Mary (Yoder) 
Miller, was born November 17, 1860, in Garrett county, Mary- 
land, where he attended the public schools until the age of 
eighteen. He assisted his father in the labors of the homestead 
until 1882, and thenceforth was employed by the neighboring 
farmers until 1890. He then bought his father's farm in Gar- 
rett county, Maryland, remaining there until 1893, when he sold 
the property and moved to his present home in Elk Lick town- 
ship. He is a Republican and a member of the United Brethren 
church. 

Mr. Miller married, January 14, 1891, Viola, daughter of 
John Wilburn, of Preston county. West Virginia, and their 
children are: Harry, Hubert, Effie, Sherman, Mary, Leonard, 
and Lloyd. 

JOHN F. BENDER. 

John ¥. Bender, of Stoystown, is the son of Abraham 
Bender, who was born in Northampton county and was by trade 
a blacksmith. Politically he was a Whig. His wife was Sarah, 
born in Berlin, daughter of George and Susan (Koontz) Dively, 
and their children were: Jjavinia; Sarah, wife of Daniel Wol- 
ford; Philip; and John F., of whom later. 

John F. Bender, son of Abraham and Sarah (Dively) 
Bender, was born May 18, 1830, in Berlin, Somerset county, 
where he was educated in the common schools. After leaving 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 349 

school he was for two years engaged in brickmaking, and then 
learned the blacksmith's trade, wliich he has made his regular 
means of livelihood. September 9, 1863, he enlisted for one 
year in Company G, Ninety-third Regiment, Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteers, and was honorably discharged June 20, 1865. He has 
been a lifelong Republican. 

Mr. Bender married, March 19, 1865, Elizabeth, born in 
Lower Turkeyfoot township, daughter of David and Susan 
Sechler, and their children were: Charles, deceased; Walter, 
deceased; Lavina, wife of William Thompson; Philip; Marga- 
ret, deceased; Minnie, wife of Cornelius Crossen; Robert, de- 
ceased; and Tillie, deceased. The mother of these children died 
in 1876. In 1880 Mr. Bender married Rebecca Burkey, bom 
October, 1842, in Jenner township. By this marriage he became 
the father of one child, Foster G., born February 3, 1884, in 
Stoystown, graduated August 1, 1905, at the Pittsburg Dental 
College, subsequently passed the state examination and is now 
practicing his profession at Stoystown, Pennsylyania. 

JOHN H. HOOVER. 

John H. Hoover, a resident of Rockwood, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, a son of Silas Hoover and Lucy (Auman) 
Hoover, was born October 26, 1873, and is of German origin. 
Silas Hoover was born near Berlin, Brothers Valley township, 
and in his early days engaged in school teaching. Later he en- 
tered the ministry of the German Baptist church. He married 
Lucinda Auman, and they had children as follows: William, 
John, Minnie, Irvin, Raymond, Elva, and Myra. 

»John H. Hoover, second son and child of Silas and Lucy 
(Auman) Hoover, acquired his initial education in the common 
schools of Somerset county, and later attended one term at 
Huntingdon College. He decided upon the career of a school 
teacher, and has been ten terms engaged in this occupation, 
and is to become an instructor in the Wable advanced school. 
Mr. Hoover is well qualified for his chosen work, and has 
achieved excellent success in the training and educating of the 
young. He is a Republican in his political affiliations, and has 
ever evinced a lively interest in all community affairs. 

Mr. Hoover married. May 9, 1897, Effie Murray, who is of 
Irish descent, and was born June 19, 1879, in Wittenberg, Lari- 
mer township, Somerset county, the daughter of Uriah and 
Sevilla (Bittner) Murray, and one of eight children, viz.; Effie, 
William, Ada, Charles, Frank, Emma, Alice, Grace. L^riah 
Murray was a farmer by occupation. Mr. and Mrs. Hoover 
are the parents of five children: Ruth, Mabel, Homer, Harold 
and Lucy. 



350 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

JOHN J. BARNETT. 

J.ohn J. Bamett, of Stoystown, was born in that place 
August 4, 1861, and traces his descent from Jacob and Margaret 
(Shanifelt) Bamett, the latter of German extraction. Their 
son, also Jacob Barnett, was born in Somerset county, followed 
the calling of a farmer and was a Republican in politics. His 
wife was Maglinnia, daughter of Adam Zimmerman, whose an- 
cestors were natives of the Fatherland. 

Aaron Barnett, son of Jacob and Maglinnia (Zimmerman) 
Barnett, was born in Somerset county, and, like his father, 
passed his life in the pusuit of agriculture. During the Civil 
war he enlisted in Company G, Ninety-third Regiment, Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, and served until the termination of the 
conflict, when he was honorably discharged. He married Cath- 
arine, daughter of John and Rosanna (Schaley) Knupp, and 
granddaughter of James and Barbara (Roosevelt) Kjiupp, the 
latter a kinswoman of President Roosevelt. Mr. and Mrs. Bar- 
nett were the parents of two sons: William J., born May 4, 
1857, died May 10, 1893 ; and John J., of whom later. The death 
of Mr. Barnett, the father, occurred October 3, 1902. 

John J. Barnett, son of Aaron and Catharine (Knupp) 
Barnett, attended the common schools of Somerset county until 
the age of eighteen, Avhen he turned his attention to farming. 
After a time he abandoned this occupation in order to become 
engineer in a brewery. Four years later he left and obtained 
the position of engineer in the Cambria works, but at the end 
of two years moved to Stoystown, where he now resides on the 
old homestead. Mr. Barnett married, in 1885, Mary E., born in 
1864, in Stoystown, daughter of Benjamin and Margaret F. 
(Taylor) Gardner. 

JEROME STUFFT. 

Jerome Stufft, of Stoystown, was born September 27, 1852, 
in Jenner township, and is a son of Daniel Stufft, who was born 
September 8, 1820, in Somerset county, and followed the calling 
of a farmer. He married, December 24, 1840, Catharine, born 
November 17, 1814, in Somerset county, daughter of Jacob and 
IVIary Byers, the former of German extraction. The family of 
Mr. and Mrs. Stufft consisted of the following children : Sarah, 
born October 30, 1841, wife of Jacob J. Zimmerman; Mary, 
July 2, 1846, wife of Alexander Rhoads; Margaret, September 
27, 1848; Jerome, of whom later; William, February 24, 1855, 
deceased; and Cyrus, March 6, 1858, also deceased. The mother 
of the family died November 3, 1892, and the death of the father 
occurred September 27, 1893. 

Jerome Stufft, son of Daniel and Catharine (Byers) Stufft, 
received his education in the common schools, and since com- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 351 

pleting his studies has been contimioiisly engaged in farming. 
He is a Republican in politics. Mr. Stufft married, January 25, 
.1877, Annie C. Baush, and they are the parents of two sons: 
James B. W., born April 13, 1878; and Daniel G., May 8, 1880. 
Mrs, Stutft is a daughter of Joseph Baush, who was born July 
9, 1810, in Somerset county, and was a farmer and a member 
of the Lutheran church. He married, November 27, 1836, Re- 
becca, born July 21, 1814, daughter of Christopher and Eliza- 
beth Stauffer, of Somerset, and the following were their chil- 
dren: William, born February 10, 1839; Mary, January 27, 
1841; James, July 20, 1843, deceased; James Henry, August 10, 
1844; Elizabeth, September 24, 1847; Annie C, December 2, 
1849, in Stovstown, wife of Jerome Stufft; and Joseph P., Feb- 
ruary 27, 1853. 

SAMUEL P. MAUST. 

Samuel P. Maust, of Meyersdale, is the great-grandson of 
Jacob Maust, who came from Germany about 1779 and settled 
in Elk Lick township. Jacob Maust was the father of Abraham 
Maust and the grandfather of Peter Maust. 

Samuel P. Maust, son of Peter Maust, was born June 26, 
1848, in Summit township, where the Shaw mines are now in 
operation. Until the age of nineteen he attended the public 
schools of his native township and also of Elk Lick township. 
After leaving school he taught for one term and then engaged 
in farming. He became by purchase the possessor of the Maust 
farm, the warrant for which was issued February 21, 1785, by 
the state of Pennsylvania, to his great-grandfather, Jacob 
Maust. Since 1900 Mr. Maust has given his attention to real 
estate and to the building of Maustdale, Elk Lick township. 
He is also interested in the retail coal business and is a stock- 
holder in the Second National Bank of Meyersdale. He is a 
Democrat and a member of the (German Baptist) Brethren 
church, of which he has been a minister since July 4, 1879. 

Mr. Maust married, Decemxber 21, 1871, Lucinda N., daugh- 
ter of Abraham P. Beachy, of Elk Lick township, and their 
children were: Abraham L., married Carrie Kelson and lives 
at Scott City, Kansas ; Elizabeth E., wife of D. J. Meyers, also 
of Scott City; iM orris S., married Anna Grace Raymond and 
lives at Elk' Lick; Orpha A., wife of Elder I. S." Riichie, of 
Everett; Elsie M., at home; Lucinda A., also at home; and Ed- 
ward N., died in 'infancy. 

SAMUEL G. SHAFFER. 

Samuel G. Shaffer, of Stovstown. was born October 4, 1866, 
in Conemaugh township, and traces his descent from David 
Shaffer, a native of Germany and an early settler of Somerset 



352 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

township. His son, Simon P. Sliaffer, was born in 1785, prob- 
ably in Bedford eonnty, and oarae with his father to Somerset 
connty. About 1842 Simon P. Shaffer removed to Qnemahoning 
townshi]^, becoming- the owner of abont six hundred acres in 
that township and in Jenner. Simon P. Shaffer married Bar- 
bara Poorman, and their children were: George, Jeremiah, 
Jacob, David, Samuel, Aaron (of whom later), Adam, Noab., 
Simon (served nine months in the army during the Civil war), 
Nancy, ^fary. and Elizabeth, wife of John Anawalt. The father 
of the family died in 1862. 

Aaron Shaffer, son of Simon P. and Barbara (Poorman) 
Shaffer, was born in 1823, in Friedensburg, and was a lifelong 
farmer. During the Civil war he served nine months in the 
Union army. Pie was a Republican in politics. He married 
Anna M., born May 21, 1828, in Somerset county, and their chil- 
dren were: Cyrus A., William B., Anna E., Phoebe E., Mary 
A., Simon P., John, Milroy, Samuel G., and one who died in 
infancy. 

Samuel G. Shaffer, son of Aaron and Anna M. (Bender) 
Shaffer, received his education in the common schools, and at 
the age of twenty-two entered the service of the Adams Ex- 
press Company, in Johnstown, remaining one year. He was 
then employed for four years as timekeeper by the Johnstown 
Street Railroad Company, after which he became clerk for the 
Swank Hardware Company, but at the end of six months ob- 
tained the position of bookkeeper for the Cambria Iron Com- 
pany, of Johnstown. His next removal was to Stoystown, 
where he has since been engaged in farming. 

Mr. Shaffer married. September 6, 1892, Anna K., born 
August 21, 1871, daughter of Jacob A. and Sarah (Stufft) Zim- 
merman, of the town of Somerset. 

FRANK PHENICIE. 

Frank Phenicie, of Garrett, is the grandson of Stephen 
Phenicie, a native of Scotland, who emigrated to the United 
States about 1819, and settled in Somerset county, where he 
followed his trade,. which was that of a shoemaker. He was a 
Republican and a member of the Lutheran church. He was the 
father of the following children, all of whom made homes for 
themselves in Somerset county: Stephen, of Windber, Pennsyl- 
vania ; John, deceased; Eli. of whom later; and Jacob, deceased. 

Eli Phenicie, son of Stephen Phenicie, Avas born in 1884, 
at Scnln T^evel, Somerset county, and in early life was a shoe- 
maker, but later worked in the coal mines. He married Emma, 
daughter of John Meyers, of Cambria county, and their cbil- 
dren. wore: Frank (of whom later), William, Nettie, Anna, 
Howard. Robert, Charles, Nellie, Emma and Alice. The death 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 353 

of Mr. Plienicie occurred September 13, 1886, aged fifty-two 
years; Mrs. Phenicie died February 25, 1898, in her fifty-third 
year. 

Frank Phenicie, son of Eli and Emma (Meyers) Phenicie, 
was born January 7, 1866, at Scalp Level, Pennsylvania. Re- 
moved to Garrett in 1871, where he attended the public schools 
until the age of sixteen. He then entered the coal mines, where 
he worked until 1900, and in that year became ganger in the in- 
ternal revenue dejmrtment, a position which he held until 1902, 
when he purchased the Riverside Hotel at Garrett, Pennsylvania, 
which he has since successfully conducted. For three years he 
held the office of councilman, and for the same length of time 
served as school director. He affiliates with Lodge No. 471, 
Knights of Pythias, of Meyersdale, and Lodge No. 175, Benev- 
olent P]"otective Order of Elks, of Johnstown. He is a Re- 
publican. 

Mr. Phenicie married, in 1885, Anna M., daughter of Fred- 
erick Hoos, of Meyersdale, and their children are: Lee, Harry, 
Grace, Pearl, Clara, Frederick, Clay, and Anna. 

JOHN M. CRITCHFIELD. 

John M. Critchfield, one of the practical and progressive 
agriculturists of Somerset county, was born July 29, 1851, in 
Milford township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, son of Jacob 
and Mary (Dull) Critchfield, grandson of John M. Critchfield, 
a native of Somerset county and a farmer by occupation, and 
great-grandson of William Critchfield, a native of Germany, 
who came to this country at a very early day, settling in Mil- 
ford township, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. Jacob Critch- 
field (father) was bom in Milford townsliip, March 10, 1830, 
followed agricultural pursuits, and he and his wife, Mary (Dull) 
Critchfield, were the parents of the following named children : 
Oliver, John M., Louisa, Emma, Minerva, Anna, Nora, Edward, 
and William. 

John M. Critchfield was educated in the common schools 
of Milford townshi]i, completing his studies at the age of nine- 
teen years. He was reared to farm life, and consequently chose 
that occupation as a means of livelihood, beginning operations 
on his own account in 1875. His farm is well cultivated and 
therefore highly productive, and the product thereof, being of 
a superior qilality, finds a ready sale in the nearby markets. 
As a citizen he is active and alert, contributing to the best of 
his ability in every enterprise that tends toward the growth 
and prosperity of the community and its inmates. He casts 
his vote for the candidates of the Republican party. 

Mr. Critchfield married, February 2, 1875, Anna Hay, born 
March 1, 1856, in Milford township, Somerset county, Pennsyl- 

Vol. II T 23 



354 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

vania, daughter of John and Martha (Lobe) Hay, born August 
31, 1822, and August 31, 1829, in Somerset county, respectively, 
and their children were as follows: William, deceased; Anna 
(Mrs. John M. Critchfield), and John Hay, deceased. Mr. and 
Mrs. Critchfield are the parents of eight children, as follows: 
Albert M., born May 1, 1876, died February 9, 1877; Charles, 
July 1, 1878; Howard, June 15, 1880; Mary M., July 8, 1884; 
Laura, April 26, 1888; Emma, May 20. 1891; Florence, May 4, 
1892 ; Edna, July 22, 1894. 

JACOB P. CROYLE. 

Jacob P. Croyle, of Stoystown, was bom May 2, 1869, in 
Stony Creek township, and is a son of Barnard Croyle and a 
grandson of Jacob Croyle, who was a native of Bedford county 
and a farmer, removing, at what period of his life is not known, 
to Somerset county. 

Barnard Croyle, son of Jacob Croyle, was bom in Milford 
township, Somerset county, and followed agricultural pursuits. 
He adhered to and supported the men and measures advocated 
by the Republican party. He was a soldier of the war of the 
rebellion, in Company J, Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers; 
served about three years and was wounded in one of the great 
battles of the war. Mr. Croyle married Ellen Lohr, born in 
Quemahoning township, and their children are: Luther, Jacob 
P. (of whom later), Satie, George, Anna, Emma, and Tillie. 

Jacob P. Croyle, son of Barnard and Ellen (Lohr) Croyle, 
obtained his education in the common schools of his native 
county, and after leaving school engaged in mining. In 1903 he 
turned his attention to farming, a calling to which he has since 
devoted himself. Politically he is a Republican. Mr. Croyle 
married, February 28, 1889, Nancv Barnett, and their children 
are: John G., born April 16, 1890; Marv E., July 17, 1891; 
Stella E., Julv 18, 1893; Harrie M., December 3, 1896; Nellie 
0., April 25, 1899; and Neoma R., May 16, 1901. Mrs. Croyle is 
a daughter of Nicholas Barnett, who was born in Quemahoning 
townshi}), and was a Republican. He married Harriet, daugh- 
ter of David and Sarah Barnhart, and the following children 
were born to them: Sarah, Esther, Nancy (born May 4, 1869, 
wife of Jacol) P. Crowle), John, Thomas, James (deceased), 
AVilliam, Margaret, David, Daniel, Julie, and Anna. 

JOHN C. REITZ. 

John C. Reitz, a well known and influential citizen of Som- 
erset, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, and a ])rosperous dealer 
in lumber, is a native of this country, but descended from Ger- 
man stock. 

Hartman Reitz, father of John C. Reitz, and founder of 



BEDFOED AND SOMEESET COUNTIES ^55 

the Reitz family in America, was born in Germany, May 6, 
1806, and came to the United States in 1832. He received a good 
education in Germany. He married (first) Catherine Ginds- 
parer, born in Stony Creek township, Somerset county, Penn- 
sylvania, and had two children: John C, of whom later; and 
Conrad. He married (second), in 1847, Sarah Giger, and by 
that marriage had nine children: Ellen, Hartman, Elizabeth, 
Millin, Daniel (deceased), Henry, Jacob, George (deceased), 
Sarah (deceased). 

John C. Reitz, eldest son of Hartman and Catherine 
(Gindsparer) Reitz, was born in Stony Creek township, Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania, May 28, 1838. He enjoyed the advan- 
tage of a good education in the common schools of the district, 
and upon leaving school, at the age of sixteen years, was ap- 
prenticed to the trade of milly^right. This he followed for a 
number of years, being also engaged in the building of houses, 
barns, etc., until 1868. He then turned his attention to the lum- 
ber business, in which he was interested for about a year, when 
he went into a machine shop with one of his brothers. This he 
continued for about two years, and then sold out his interest 
and bought the gristmill at Rockwood, which he operated for 
thirteen years. He disposed of this and then engaged in the 
lumber trade, which he has continued up to the present time 
(1906) in West Virginia, having taken his son John W. into the 
Dusiness. He has been successful in his business ventures, dis- 
playing energy, determination and good business judgment. 
He is looked upon as a man of undoubted honesty, integrity and 
capability. In politics Mr. Reitz is a Prohibitionist. 

Mr. Reitz married, January 22, 1857, Mary Keefer, born 
August 2, 1836, in Stony Creek township, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, daughter of Peter and Catherine (Zarfs) Keefer. 
They were the parents of nine children, of whom the following 
are now living: Emma J., Rebecca, Rosalie, Mary E., J. W., 
Bertha. Those who have died are: Catherine, Peter, and an 
infant child. 

SAMUEL H. KANTNER. 

Germany was the original home of the family to which 
Samuel H. Kantner, of Somerset, belongs. Mr. Kantner is the 
grandson of J. F. Kantner, whose son, John H. Kantner, was 
born in Hagerstown, Maryland, where he received the greater 
part of his education. He lived four years in Stoystown, where 
his father established a woolen mill. He subsequently moved 
to Somerset, and married Emlie Huston. 

Samuel H. Kantner, son of John H. and Emlie (Huston) 
Kantner, was born May 7, 1853, and received his education in 
the common schools of his birthplace. At the age of fifteen he 



356 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

left school and entered the woolen mill owned and operated by 
his father. He maintained his connection with the establish- 
ment until Jannarv, 1906, when he sold the mill to Cook, Ernest 
& BrowTi. who organized a stock company and received their 
charter in May, 1906, and will continue the business as a stock 
company. Politically he is a Republican, being an advocate and 
supporter of the men and measures upheld and indorsed by the 
organization, 

Mr. Kantner married, January 26, 1886, Lottie B. Weimer, 
and thev have one child, J. Ralph Kantner. Mrs. Kantner, like 
her husband, comes from old G-erman stock. She is a great- 
granddaughter of Frederick "Weimer, who was bom in Reading, 
where he received his education in the common schools and 
passed his life as a blacksmith. Francis E. Weimer, son of 
Frederick Weimer, was born in Somerset, educated in the com- 
mon schools of that place, and, like his father, followed the 
trade of a blacksmith all his life. He married Maria J., daugh- 
ter of Jacob Stahl, and their children were: Alice; Lottie, 
bom January 8, 1859, in Somerset, and became the wife of 
Samuel H. Kantner, as mentioned above; Cyrus B.; Frank N. ; 
Alexander C. ; Mary M., aud Nannie B. 

HENRY SHAUD. 

Henry Shaud, an industrious farmer of Somerset, Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania, is a native of Germany, bom March 
12, 1835. He came to the United States when he was about 
twelve years of age, and has ever since followed agricultural 
pursuits. He is an excellent farmer, and his land is in a high 
state of cultivation and improvement. He married, in 1863, 
Sophia Hess, born September 12, 1839, a daughter of Samuel 
and Mary (Shoemaker) Hess. Mr. and Mrs. Shaud have two 
children, viz. : Laura, born December 30, 1879, and Elsie, Mav 
5, 1883. Laura married E. F. Weimar, and they have one child, 
Elsie R., bom March 2, 1904. 

PETER SPEICHER. 

Peter Speicher, a farmer of Somerset county, Pennsyl- 
vania, was there born October 2, 1851, a son of Jacob and Sallie 
(Schrock) Spiecher. and grandson of Peter Speicher, who was 
bom in Somerset county and was a farmer by occupation. 

Jacob P. Speicher (father") was also a native of Somerset 
countv. and a farmer bv occupation. He married Miss Sallie 
Schrock, and their children were: Pollie. Catherine, Rebecca, 
William (deceased), Peter (of whom later), Ephraim, Emma 
and Sadie. 

Peter Speicher obtained his education in the common 
schools of Somerset county, left school at the age of seventeen 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 357 

years, and engaged with his father in the cultivation of the 
home farm. He and his family are members of the German 
Baptist church. December 17, 1872, he married Rebecca J. 
Sipe, of German descent, who was born March 15, 1854, in 
Sipesville, the daughter of Henry and Rebecca (Beesucker) 
Sipe, who were the parents of children as follows : Alexander, 
Nancy, Susan, Sarah, Agnes, Franklin, Rebecca, Michael, 
Emma, Anna, Edward. Her grandfather was Michael Sipe, 
who was a native of Somerset county. He married Susanna 
Bets, a member of a family of German descent. Mr. and Mrs. 
Peter Speicher have six children, namely: Park, born October 
16, 1S73; Robert, Julv 25, 1875; Larrie B., December 18, 1881; 
Harrie B., April 14, 1884; William P., November 24, 1887; and 
Earl E., October 26, 1891. 

ROBERT E. LOCHRIE. 

Robert E. Lochrie, of Boswell, was born June 21, 1870, in 
Scotland, whence his father, Neal Lochrie, emigrated to this 
country in 1878, settling in Houtsdale, Clearfield county, where 
he was employed in the mines. 

Robert E. Lochrie received his primary education in Scot- 
land,- being about eight years old when the family came to the 
United States. He afterward attended the schools of Clear- 
field county, and on leaving school went to work in the mines 
and was there employed until 1899. In that year he established 
himself in the liquor business at Windber, where he conducted 
a wholesale store until 1902. He then sold out and moved to 
Boswell, where he has since been engaged in the same line of 
business. In 1903 he was elected first burgess of Boswell. He 
is a member of the Knights of the Golden Eagle and the Knights 
of Pythias. 

Mr. Lochrie married, in 1890, Mary, born March 16, 1871, in 
France, daughter of Frank and Mary Roland, by whom she was 
brought to this country when but three years of age. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Lochrie were born four children: Mamie, Jennett, 
Ruth, Robert. 

WILLIAM F. UHL. 

William F. Uhl, a prosperous farmer of Somerset, Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania, was there born April 21, 1836, a son 
of Charles and Eliza Uhl, and is of German descent. 

William F. Uhl obtained his education in the common 
schools of his native county, and leaving school at the age of 
eighteen years engaged in milling grain, continuing in this occu- 
pation with good success for twenty-two years. He then went 
into the lumber business, continuing for three years, when 
he moved to the farm on which he now lives and which he 



358 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

has brought to a high state of cultivation and improvement. 
In Jime, 1871, Mr. Uhl married Anna M. Winter, born Novem- 
ber 10, 1852, daughter of John and Fannie (Somerland) Winter, 
the former a native of ^Maryland, and the hitter a native of Bir- 
mingham, England, who came to this country with her mother, 
her father having died in England. Mr. and ]\[rs. AVilham F. 
Uhl have children as follows: Florence, married William K. 
Lambie; AVilliam U. ; Catherine; John P., and Grace, married 
Frederick L. Williams. 

JUSTUS V'OLK. 

Justus Volk, of Boswell, was born June 19, 1870, in Ger- 
many, and received his education in the schools of his native 
land. At the age of nineteen he emigrated to the United States 
and settled in Johnstown, where he worked as a carpenter and 
cabinetmaker. He then went to South Fork, Pennsylvania, en- 
gaged in contracting and building and owned a planing mill and 
lumber yard for four years. For one year he was engaged in 
the liquor business, and has also worked as a contractor about 
four years at Boswell. In 1905 he bought the Merchants' Hotel 
at Bowell, of which he has since been the proprietor, thus add- 
ing one more to his many interests. This is a first class hotel 
in every particular, being a brick building three stories in 
height, second to none in the county^ He is a member of the 
Mystic Chain, the Improved Order of Redmen and the Knights 
of the Golden Eagle. He is a Republican in politics. 

Mr. Volk married, in 1892, Lizzie Roth, born December 15, 
1872, in Johnstown, and their children are Gertrude, Carl, 
Fredie, Ermie, and Herbert. 

GEOI^GE H. SMITH. 

George. H. Smith, for many years one of the energetic and 
prosperous agriculturists of Somerset, was born in Hoovers- 
ville, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, May 18, 1843, a descend- 
ant of a family that has long resided in that section of the state. 
His parents were John L. and Margaret (Crissey) Smith, na- 
tives of Somerset county, the former named having been a son 
of Ludwig Smith, who was born and resided all his lifetime in 
Somerset county, and the latter a daughter of David Crissey, 
also a resident of Somerset county. 

George H. Smith attended the common schools of Somerset 
until eighteen years of age. He then served an apprenticeship 
at the trade of carpenter, which he followed six years with more 
or less success, after v/hich he turned his attention to farming 
and followed that pursuit for many years, meeting with very 
encouraging success. He served three years as director of the 
poor of Somerset county, and six years as school director. He 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 359 

was a member of the Reformed cliurch, and served as elder of 
that body for twenty-six years. He served nine months in the 
Civil war as a member of Company G, Ninety-third Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, and participated in the following 
battles: Cedar Creek, October 19, 1864; Fall of Petersburg, 
April 2, 1865; Sailors Creek, April 6, 1865. He was a member 
of the R. P. Cummins Post, Grand Army of the Republic, Somer- 
set, Pennsylvania. He was a Republican in politics. He was al- 
ways willing and ready to assist in every enterprise which 
tended to promote the best interests of his township. He died 
May 15, 1906, aged sixty-two years, eleven months and twenty- 
seven days, on the farm on which he resided for twenty-six 
years, which was well improved and carefully cultivated, and 
which consisted of one hundred and eighty acres. 

Mr. Smith married, July 9, 1871, Susan Ankney, born No- 
vember 30, 1849, daughter of Peter and Mary (Zimmerman) 
Ankney, and granddaughter of Peter Ankney, who was a pros- 
perous farmer of Somerset county. Peter Ankney was a 
farmer, served in the Civil war, and died in the hospital at Balti- 
more, Maryland. Mr. and Mrs. Smith had the following chil- 
dren: Huldah W., born Februaiy 14, 1872. Russell K., born 
September 17, 1873, married, June 26, 1901, Mabel S. Brown, 
daughter of Calvin and Anna (Simmons) Brown, and they are 
the parents of one child, Nina Grace, born April 26, 1902. Mary 
M., born February 3, 1876, deceased. Michael Z., born April 28, 
1877, married, October 22, 1902, Elizabeth S. Heiple, daughter 
of Isaac and Louisa (Gonder) Heiple, and they are the parents 
of one child, Mary Alta, born April 25, 1903. Edmund B., bom 
March 28, 1879. Emma 0., born March 28, 1879, married, Feb- 
ruary 11, 1903, Oscar D. Weigle, born November 28, 1881, son 
of Jacob and Abbie (Hill) Weigle, and they are the parents of 
one child, Naomi Ruth, bom December 14, 1904. Gertrude R., 
bom June 4, 1880. married, May 22, 1905, Arthur G. Hoffman, 
son of Henry and Elizabeth (Coleman) Hoffman and they re- 
side at Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Jennie E., bom April 6, 1882, 
married, June 28, 1905, Bruce U. P. Cobaugh, son of Daniel 
and Catharine (Gohn) Cobaugh, and are the parents of one 
son, George Daniel, born June 18. 1906. Katie Naomi, born 
May 29, 1884. Alta D., born July 25, 1889. 

ANDREW E. BITTNER. 

Andrew E. Bittner, a farmer and mail carrier of Somerset, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was born in Berlin, November 
3, 1864, a son of John Bittner, the former a native of Berlin, 
Germany. 

Andrew E. Bittner acquired his education in the common 
schools of Somerset county, and immediately after leaving the 



360 BEDFORD AXD SOMERSET COUNTIES 

school room entered into liis first regular ('mj)loymeut as wire- 
drawer for the Cambria Iron Woiks. After five years thus 
occupied he turned his attention to the pursuits of a farmer, in 
which work he is now engaged. He owns and cultivates a farm 
of ten acres of fertile, well laid out land. He is an excellent, 
enter})rising farmer and a useful, industrious member of the 
counnunity. lie has served his township as supervisor for sev- 
eral years, and is now a rural free delivery mail carrier. 

Mr. Bittner married, June 13, 1890, Maria H. Boyts, a na- 
tive of Somerset county, who was born July 25, 1870, a daughter 
of William and Rebecca (Freeman) Boyts. She is of German 
descent, and the granddaughter of llany Boyts, who was born 
in Somerset county, and engages in agricultural pursuits. Her 
father, William Boyts, was born in Somerset in 1850, is a farmer 
by occnitation and a Republican in politics. He married Re- 
becca Freeman, who was also bom in Somerset township, and 
of this marriage the following named children were born : Ida, 
Nora, Sadie, Harry, Charley, Lulu, Frank, Morton. Mr. and 
^Irs. Andrew E. Bittner have children as follows: Harry W., 
Elmer G., Robert W., Lloyd, Meldow, and Elsie E. 

WILLIAM J. GLESSNER. 

William J. Glessner, a prosperous farmer of Somerset, 
Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was born April 11, 1856, in 
Stony Creek towTishii\ Somerset county, son of John M. and 
Mary (Walker) Glessner. 

The founder of this family in America was Jacob G. Gless- 
ner, a native of Germany, who emigrated to this country when 
quite young, settling in l^erlin, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. 
He was a member of the Reformed church. The preacher. 
Rev. Mr. Spangenburg, decided to resign, and held a meeting 
one day to solicit the congregation to supi)ort him for the re- 
mainder of his life. He was not an old man, and Mr. Glessner 
took exception to this move, knowing that the church was in 
dol)t and the congregation small. At the close of the meeting, 
the minister called Mr. Glessner to the back of the church, say- 
ing he desired to talk the matter over. As soon as they were 
alone Mr. Spangenburg pulled out a knife and stabbed Mr. 
Glessner in the heart, and he died immediately. The minister 
was the first man to be hanged in Somerset county. 

Jacob Glessner, son of Jacob G. Glessner, was born near 
Berlin, in Somerset county, and was a miller by trade.* He mar- 
ried, and among his children was a son, Joseph. 

Joseph Glessner, son of Jacob Glessner, was born in Stony 
Creek townshij:) in 1800. He was a farmer by occupation, and 
also engaged quite extensively in milling. He married Cath- 
erine Musser, and they had the following named children: 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 361 

Susan, Tobias, Ja'^ob. ,Tohn M., Joseph, Ileury, Mary, Cath- 
erine, Sarah, Edmond and Eliza. 

John M. Glessner, fourth child and third son of Joseph and 
Catherine (Musser) Glessner, was born in Stony Creek town- 
ship, November 21, 1832. He followed the quiet but useful occu- 
})ation of a farmer, and met with good success in this line. His 
wife was Mary Walker, a daughter of Jacob and Catherine 
(Fritz) Walker, and they had children as follows: Catherine; 
William J., of whom later ; J ose]ih J., deceased ; Ida V. ; Mary 
J.; Jacob M. ; Edmund, deceased; John, deceased; Melissa E., 
and Harry H. 

William J. Glessner, son of John M. and Mary (Walker) 
Glessner^ obtained a good common school education, and at the 
age of eighteen years engaged in school teaching, continuing 
for three terms. He subsequently turned his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits, and owns a fine farm in Somerset county, 
which is in a high state of cultivation and improvement. 

He married, July 5, 1877, Sarah Stoy, who was born July 1, 
1857, in Somerset, daughter of Conrad and Mary (Buser) Stoy. 
Mr. and Mrs. Glessner have the following children: Ida B., 
born October 14, 1878, married Mahlon Landis, and they live 
with her people; John R, April 22, 1880; Mary E., March 8, 
1882, married Edward Forney, and they are members of the 
Reformed church and live in Stonv Creek; Roger W., April 12, 
1884; Nellie C, March 27, 1886; J. Blanch, July 14, 1887; Rob- 
ert H., October 25, 1888; Stella C, August 22, 1890; J. Pius, 
July 19, 1892; Alvin S., June 19, 1894; Merle K, May 16, 1896; 
and Ruth, September 16, 1898. 

JOSIAH W. FRITZ. 

Josiah W. Fritz, an excellent farmer of Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, was there born in Pine Hill, July 16, 1836, the 
son of Daniel and Mary A. (Chorpenning) Fritz. 

William Fritz (grandfather) was a native of Ohio, who 
became one of the pioneer settlers in Pine Hill, Somerset county. 
He married Hester Shaff. Daniel Fritz (father) was born in 
Pine Hill, and followed the occupation of a farmer all his life. 
He was a Republican in politics. He and his wife, Mary A. 
Chorpenning, who was a native of Mil ford township, were the 
parents of the following children: J. Harry, Josiah W., Eliza 
v.. Simon P., Jerome F., Frank A. and IJrias, who was a soldier 
in the Civil war, was present at the battle of Fredericksburg, 
and died in Libby prison. 

After receiving a good common school training, Josiah W. 
Fritz immediately turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, 
in which occupation he has since very successfully and profit- 
ably engaged. He is a loyal Republican in his political affilia- 



362 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

tioTis, and for six years was onijaged in carrying tlie mail from 
Bedford to Somerset. In religions faith lie is a member of the 
Lntheran chnrch. 

Josiah W. Fritz married, Febrnary 21, 3809, Emma Gless- 
ner. (For ancestral record of Glessner family, see sketch in 
this work.) Mrs. P'ritz was bom in Stony Creek township, 
Jnne 4, 1S4S. ^Fr. and ^frs. Fritz are the parents of the follow- 
ing named children: Sadie F., married Theodore Weber; Mag- 
gie B., married J. J. Bloiigh, of Johnstown, Pennsylvania; 
Webster P. 

JOHN H. BxVRNHART. 

John li. Barnhart, of Stoystown, is the son of Abraham 
Barnhart, a native of Somerset connty. where he worked as a 
day laborer. He married Susan Lape, born in 1845, in Somer- 
set connty, and they were the parents of three children : Will- 
iam, John H. (of whom later), and George, born in 1864. 

John H. Barnhart, son of Abraham and Susan (Lape) 
Barnhart, was born December 16, 1862, in Hooversville, Som- 
erset connty, and was; educated in the common schools, which 
he attended uy) to the age of thirteen. He was thereafter vari- 
ously employed until the occasion of his marriage, when he en- 
tered the service of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company, 
serving in different capacities- imtil May 1, 1905, when he was 
]iromoted to the position of foreman, which he still retains. 
Mr. Barnhart married, in 1886, Anna A., born July 31, 1868, 
dauahter of Samuel Zimmerman, and their children were: 
Marv S., born April 18, 1887; Howard E., August 20, 1889; 
Wilber V., May 6, 1893; and William F. K., January 2, 1902. 

MICHAEL ANSELL. 

^licliacl Ansell. of Beachdale, was born March 10, 1839, in 
Upper Tnrkeyfoot township, and has always led the life of a 
farmer. In 1862 he enlisted for a term of three years in Com- 
pany ('. One Hundred and Forty-second Regiment, Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers, and served until the close of the war. 

Mr. Ansell married, October 20, 1865, Barbara Henry, 
born January 5, 1842, in Upr)er Tnrkeyfoot townshi]>, and their 
children were: John; Elizabeth; Ettie, married Charles B. 
Critchfield. son of John M. Critchfield, a prominent farmer of 
Milford township; William; David; Catharine, and Jacob, de- 
ceased. Mrs. Ansoll died ^farch 26, 1896, and on October 27, 
1898, Mr. Ansell married Helen, daughter of Samuel and Mary 
(Flickinger) Zigler, both of German descent. 

Catharine Ansell, daughter of Michael and Barbara 
(Henry) Ansell, married, March 2, 1902, Clarence Critchfield, 
and they have three children: Jacob, born August 22, 1903; 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 363 

Louisa B.. Ootol>or 10, 1901-, and John, Eebrnary 25, 1905. Mr. 
Critohfiold is a g-randsoii of Jaoob Critchfiold, a native of Somer- 
set eonnty and a farmer, wliose son, also rfacob Critelificld, was 
born in 1851, in INfilford township, and has always been engaged 
in the milling Inisiness. He is a Democrat in politics. Mr, 

Critchfield married T^onisa , born in 1855, in Block town- 

shi]i. and they have been the ]iarents of the following children: 
Elmer. Grace. ]\rary, Clarence, James, Ruth, Norman, and Jo- 
seph, deceased. 

Clarence Critchfield, son of Jacob and Louisa ( ) 

Critchfield, was born November 7, 1881, was educated in the 
common schools of Somerset county, and is now a prosperous 
farmer. He married, as mentioned above, Catharine Ansell, 
born August 3, 1885, in Middle Creek township. 

ORRIE LANSBERRY. 

Orrie Lansberry, of Rockwood, is the son of Jasper Lans- 
berry, who was born in 1858, in Clearfield county, and has al- 
ways given his attention to agricultural pursuits. He married 
Manda, born in 1859, in Gray Hamton, Clearfield county, daugh- 
ter of Levi and Mary (Graphon) Pierce. 

Orrie Lan>!berry, son of Jasper and TNTanda (Pierce) Lans- 
berry^, was born January IS, 1877, in Clearfield county, where 
he received his education in the common schools. At the age 
of fifteen he left school and went to work in the mines. He 
next entered the service of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Com- 
pany, serving as fireman until January 1, 1905, when he was 
promoted to the position of engineer, which he still retains. 
Mr. Lansberry married. May 10, 1905, Clara Tayman, born Sep- 
tember 14, 1878, in Somerset county. 

CHARLES O. WALKER. 

Charles 0. Walker, of Somerset, was born in Stony Creek 
township. Somerset county, Pennsylvania, October 14. 1877. 
His grandfather, Moses Walker, a farmer of Stony Creek town- 
ship, and a staunch Republican, married Sarah Kimmell, and 
they reared a family of thirteen children, as follows : Edward, 
Susan A., Julia. Norman, Jane, Grace, Abraham, Samuel (de- 
ceased), Henrietta, Sadie, Nellie, Robert, and William M. 
Walker. William M. Walker, father of Charles 0. Walker, was 
born in Stonv Creek township, Somerset county. He married 
Addie Dunmire, who bore him the following children : Albert, 
deceased; Charles 0., of whom later; Grace, and Minnie R. 
Walker. 

Charles 0. Walker acquired a practical education in the 
common schools of Somerset county, which he attended until 
he was eighteen years old. He then engaged in lumbering, and 



3G4 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

has followed that occupation in connection with agricultural 
])ursuits ever since, thcrehy ^aininir a comfortable livelihood. 
He is the owner of a coal mine of fourteen ncres, located less 
than a mile from the town of Somerset, which he is oi)erating 
at the present time, the shaft being seventy-five feet deep; and 
from this he dei-ives a ooodly income, the coal being of a good 
quality. Since nttaining his majority ^Ir. Walker has cast his 
vote with the I\epublican ])arty, the principles of which he 
earnestly advocates. 

Mr. Walker married, November 21, 1901, Henrietta C. 
Long, born in Stony Creek townshi]\ Somerset county, Sep- 
tember 22, 1880, a daughter of Heniian and Sarah (Kimmell) 
liong. Tlieir children are: J. Harry, born June 2, 1902; 
Eugene T., January .'^1, 1904. 

SAMUEL U. SHOBER. 

Samuel U. Shober, a farmer of Somerset, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, was born in Brothers Valley township, Somer- 
set county, A]iril 7, 1853, the son of George and Leah (Berkley) 
Shober and grandson of Jacob Shober, who was a native of 
Maryland, and a school teacher by occupation. This family 
originally came from Switzerland. 

George W. Shober (father) was born September 15, 1826, 
in Berlin, Somerset county, Pennsylvania. He taught school 
for some years and later turned his attention to farming. He 
married Tjcah Berkley, born January 27, 1833, in Brothers Val- 
ley township, and three of their four children were: Samuel, 
of whom later; James M., and Leanora V. 

Samuel L"^. Shober obtained his early education in the com- 
mon schools of Somerset county, and later attended the Berlin 
Normal school. lie engaged in school teaching for five terms, and 
was very successful in this occupation. He is now engaged in 
agricultural pursuits, and is the owner of a finely cultivated 
and imj'roved farm. He is a Re])ublican in politics, and has 
served his township as school director, county auditor for one 
term and county commissioner for two terms. Tie and his fam- 
ily are regular and consistent members of the German Baptist 
church. 

Mr. Shober married. Se])tember 26, 1872, Sarah E. Kimmell, 
born September 19, 1855, a daughter of Daniel and Emeline 
(Landis) Kinunell, and is of German descent. Her grand- 
father, Jonathan Kimmell. was born in Stony Creek township, 
and was a farmer by occupation. Her father, Daniel Kimmell, 
was also a native of Stony Creek township. He, also, followed 
the life of a farmer. He was a Re])ublican in ]iolitics. His wife 
was Emeline Landis, and their children were as follows: Jacob 
0., ^lary Jane, Susan Ennna, Sarah E. Four children were 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 365 

bom to Afr. and Mrs. Samuel Sliobor, as follows: 1. Ulysses, 
born February 5, 1874, a graduate of the State Normal school 
at Lockhavt'ii. lie married Nannie 13. Kimmill, a daughter of 
Frank and Elizabeth (Baker) Kimmill, and of this union two 
children were born — Elizabeth J. and Florence. 2. Laura J., 
born November 26, 1875, in Brothers Valley township. She mar- 
ried Homer R. Knipper, a son of Jacob and Susan (Raymond) 
Knipper, and they have two children: Elwood S. and Clarence. 
3. Clinton K., born April 23, 1879, in Brothers Valley township. 
He married Ada M. Rayman, a daughter of Jerry J. and Rebecca 
(Schrack) Rayman, and they have one child — Ralph Waldo 
Emerson. 4. Marling M., born April 16, 1890, in Somerset 
township. 

FRANK B. FLUCK. 

Frank B. Fluck^ a surveyor of Somerset, .Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, was born May 29, 1854, in South Woodbury 
township, Bedford county, Pennsylvania, the son of John B. 
and Mary (Ober) Fluck. * 

John Fluck, father, was born in South Woodbury town- 
ship, Bedford county, September 29, 1829, and followed the 
pursuits of farming, surveying and lumbering. He married 
Mary Ober, bom August 17, 1829, the daughter of Benjamin 
and Nancy (Garretson) Ober. They had three children, 
namely: Frank B., of whom later; Melissa J., and Harry 0., 
deceased. 

Frank B. Fluck obtained his educational training in the 
schools of Bedford county, and at the age of twenty-two com- 
menced school teach-ing, an occupation which he followed for 
ten years. He was well qualified for this line of work and 
achieved excellent success as a teacher. He then learned sur- 
veying, and has since been engaged at this profession. He was 
employed in a land office at Harrisburg from May, 1883, until 
August, 1887. He then returned to Bedford county, where he 
continued until September, 1894, when he removed to Somer- 
set, where he opened an office in 1897. Mr. Fluck is still en- 
gaged at Somerset, and has met with the most gratifying suc- 
cess in his business career. 

Frank B. Fluck married, December 25, 1882, Martha J. 
Pennel, born February 4, 1858, in Fulton county, Pennsylvania. 
They have six children, namely : Ira, married Mabel Holsappl'e ; 
Guy: Mary A.; Rosalind; Jolin J., and Harold. 

WILLIAM E. PARKS. 

William E. ParT5:s, of Roclnvood, is a grandson of Joseph 
Parks, who was born in 1814, in Sheffield, England. In 1820 
he was brought to the United States and thenceforth lived in 
Johnstown. He became an engineer and ran the first engine out 



366 BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

of Johnstown on Plane Xo. 1, the road being then controlled by 
the state. He was the first road foreman on the Pennsylvania 
railroad, serving nntil two years ago when he was pnt n])on the 
l^ension list. Mr. Parks married Rebecca, daughter of Louis 
and Mary (Gorman) Cu])p, and their children were: George, 
of whom later; Mary, Rubella, Kate, and Phoebe. 

George Parks, son of Jose]ih and Rebecca (Cupp) Parks, 
was born October 2, 1851, in Johnstown, where he obtained his 
education in the common schools. At the age of thirteen he en- 
tered the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, and 
one year later was made fireman. After serving in this capac- 
ity two years and a half he^was promoted to the position of 
engineer, which he ha^ filled ever since. He is a member of the 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, the Benevolent Protect- 
ive Order of Elks and the Royal Arcanum. Mr. Parks married 
Anna, daughter of D. W. and Anna (Tringle) Colter, the latter 
the daughter of the Rev. Daniel Tringle. ^Ir. Colter is the son 
of D. W. Colter, postmaster of East Conemaugh. The Colter 
family is of German origin. D. W. Colter, Jr., received his edu- 
cation in Willmore. He is a Republican in politics. He and his 
wife were the parents of the following children: Anna, wife of 
George Parks; W. P., merchant on Franklin street, Johnstown; 
Thomas P.; D. P., merchant on Main street, Johnstown; Dor- 
othy, wife of James Gettimer, en.gineer on Pennsylvania rail- 
road ; and Emma, widow of Foste, for many years con- 
ductor on Pennsylvania railroad and killed on the road. Mr. and 
Mrs. Parks have children: Gertrude, Blanche, Caleb, William 
E., of whom later; Lillian, Ruby, and Edward. 

William E. Parks, son of George and Anna (Colter) Parks, 
was born December 4, 1884, in Rockwood, and received his edu- 
cation in the common schools of Rockwood. He married Sarah 
Hay, born November 9, 188G, and they liavo one child, Howard, 
born May 23, 1904. Mrs. Parks is a native of Pennsylvania, and 
is a daughter of Herman and Dora (McNeal) Hay, the former 
a fa^-mer. The family of ^Mr. and ^Irs, Hay consisted of the 
following children: Sarah, wife of William E. Parks; Harry, 
Ried. and Frances. 

PEARSON LOHR. 

The family of which Pearson Tiohr, of Stoystown, is a rep- 
resentative, is of German origin, having been founded in this 
country by George Tjohr, a native of the Fatherland. 

Jasper G. Tjohr was born in Stoystown, Peimsylvania, and 
was a farmer by occuitation. Politically he is a Repu])lican. 
He married Elizabeth Wilt, a native of Somerset county, and 
their children were: E))hraini. deceased; Manda, Ellen, Ostien, 
Pearson, of whom later; ^Malinda Yoader, Alice Wechinhser, and 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 367 

Cornelius. After the death of the mother of tTiese children Mr. 
Lohr married Nancy Custer, and their children were: Julia, 
Obadiah, Hester, deceased; Newton, Elizabeth, deceased; An- 
nanias, Isaac, deceased; Curtin, Lincoln, deceased; and Grant. 
The father of the family died March 6, J 906, nearly ninety- 
three years of age. 

I'earson Lohr, son of Jasper G. and Elizabeth (Wilt) Lohr, 
was born November 20, 1842, in Somerset county, where he re- 
ceived his education in the common schools. Since leaving 
school he has devoted himself continuously to agricultural pur- 
suits. He is an adherent of the Republican party. He and his 
wife have been for thirty-eight years members of the United 
Brethren church, and for many years he was an official mem- 
ber. 

Mr. liohr married, January 18, 1866, Hester Specht, and 
their children were: Marv J., born November 6, 1866; John B., 
March 7, 1868, died June 20, 1878; Elizabeth, November 21, 
1869, died May 18, 1878: Abi C, January 8, 1871, died June 15, 
1878; Frank S., August 11, 1873, died June 7, 1878; Robert. 
Julv 8, 1875, died November 8, 1883; Annie M., January 24, 
1877; David S.. October 3, 1878; Harry G., September 18, 1880, 
died October 27, 1883: Florence M., May 28, 1882, wife of Elmer 
Poyts; James B., November 29, 1884, married Catharine Beach; 
and Joseph A., March 18, 1886. 

Mrs. Lohr is a granddaughter of Andrew Specht, a native 
of Somerset county, who married Rebecca Pisel, by whom he 
was the father of the following children: George, Samuel, 

Jacob, Susan, wife of — — Kobel; Sarah, wife of 

Goon; Evel, wife of Jacob Brubaker: and David, who was born 
in Somerset county and married Elizabeth Kimmel, who bore 
him the following children: Hester, born December 8, 1844, 
in Shade township, wife of Pearson Lohr; Sarah, deceased; 
Franklin, and Josiah. 

HIRAM FISHER. 

Hiram Fisher, a practical farmer of Somerset, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, was there born August 25, 1864, a son of 
Samuel and Elizabeth (Bock) Fisher. Samuel Fisher was born 
in 1823, in Somerset county, and was a farmer by occupation. 
He was a soldier in the civil war, and in church connections a 
Lutheran. His wife, Elizabeth Bock, was born in 1828 in Somer- 
set county, a daugliter of Joseph and Sadie (Baker) Bock. 
Their children : Edward, Morton, P]nen, Hii-am, of whom later; 
Ida. The death of Samuel Fisher occurred June 4, 1905. 

Hiram Fisher received his education in the common schools 
of Somerset county, and at the age of eighteen left the school- 
room and engag(^d in agricultural pursuits. He has since been 



368 JBEDi^'OJID AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

engaged in farming, in which he has achieved the most gratify- 
ing success. In political affiliations he is a stanch Republican. 
He married, February 13, 188G, Roxie Kelley, born November 
10, 1869, in Blair county, and of this union four children were 
born, viz.: Lizzie, in 1886;- Edna, September 29, 1893; Lin- 
nie, June 25,1896; and Katie, February 5, 1898. They all re- 
side -at home with their parents. ^Irs. Fislier is the daugiiter 
of Elijnh and Catherine (Launtz) Kelley. Elijah Kelley was 
born in 1838 in Blair county, and was by trade a contractor and 
builder. His wife, Catherine Eauntz, was the daughter of Sam- 
uel Launtz. Their children: Libbie, Ida, Roxie (Mrs. Fisher), 
]jillie, Blanche, Bertha, David. The Kelleys are of Irish de- 
scent, Mrs. Fisher's grandfather having emigrated to this coun- 
try from Ireland. 

JOHN "GILBERT WATKINS. 

John Wilbert Watkins, of Rockwood, is the son of Nathan- 
iel Watkins, who was born December 23, 1823, in Wales, died 
January 15, 1870, aged forty-nine years. He came to this 
country as a boy and was employed in foundries as a carpenter 
and moulder. Mr. Watkins married ]\Irs. Eliza Jenkins, of 
Alexander, Huntingdon county, born June 19, 1827, and their 
children were: Sarah C. born September 23, 1846; Percila J., 
June 8, 1848; Marv E., March 20, 1851; John Wilbert, of whom 
later; Ruth, April 26, 1858; Alice C, May 31, 1860; Fannie, 
December 4, 1862; and Nathaniel, April 29, 1865. 

John Wilbert Watkins, son of Nathaniel and Eliza (Jen- 
kins) Watkins, was born May 29, 1850, in Elk Lick township, 
and received his education in the common schools of Hunting- 
don county, leaving school at the age of twelve years and work- 
ing for neighboring farmers until sixteen years of age, when 
he entered the mines. February 25, 1864, he enlisted as drum- 
mer boy in Company F, One Hundred and Twenty-eighth Reg- 
iment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, and after serving nine months 
WMs honorably discharged. He then went to Alexander, Hunt- 
ingdon county, where he engaged in mining, and has ever since 
been identified with the coal industry. He is now superintend- 
ent of the Sham.rock mines of Rockwood and the South Side 
mines of Garrett. He alhiiates with the Knights of Pythias, the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Patriotic Sons of Amer- 
icn nnd the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 

Mr. Watkins married, January 18, 1880, Mary Anne Swope, 
boiTi November 11, 1858, and their children were: AVilbert, 
de('e{ised; Cari'ie Hite; liilliaii E.; Callahan; Florence, at 
lioiiic: X'irginia, deceased; Pearl, at home; John, in Pittsburg; 
Edwin, nnd Morris, deceased. Mrs. Watkins is a daughter of 
William Corbin, a native of Huntingdon county, who was em- 



IJi'.DKOIM) AND SOMERSET C^OUNTIES 369 

ployed by the I*einisylvaiiia l^aili'oad and was killed while serv- 
ing in the army (hiring' the civil war. His wife was Rebecca 
Shaw, a native of Huntingdon township, and tlieir children 
were: Mary Enuna, Lena E., Eair, and Jillmira Nettie Plieas- 
ant. The family is of Scotcli extraction. 

JACOB O. KIMMEE. 

Jacob 0. Kimniel, a leading and practical farmer of Somer- 
set county, Pennsylvania, was there born in Stony Creek town- 
ship, January 4, 1853, a son of Daniel and Emeline (Landis) 
Kimme]. Daniel Kimmel (father) was born in 1829, and always 
has followed the occupation of a farmer. He is a staunch Re- 
i:)ublican in ])olitics. He and his wife, Emeline Landis, have 
the following children: Jacob 0., of whom later; Sarah, mar- 
ried Samuel U. Shober : Mary J . ; married Frank Coleman, the 
son of Jacob Coleman; and Emma S., married James L. Win- 
ters, a farmer of Somerset. 

Jacob O. Kimmel acquired his intellectual training in the 
common schools of his native place and the Berlin ISformal 
school. Upon leaving school, he immediately engaged in his 
present occupation, that of farmer. In his political affiliations 
he accords with the principles advanced by the Republican 
party, and is deeply interested in all party affairs. Mr. Kim- 
mel married, June 20, 1878, Mary E. Weyand, a daughter of 
Michael and Sarah (Walker) Weyand, and two children were 
born to them: Mary; Daniel, deceased. 

THOMAS Z. RINGLER. 

Thomas Z. Ringler, of Stoystown, is the grandson of Jacob 
Ringler, who was a farmer by occupation. His son, also Jacob 
Ringler, was born August 7, 1814, in Roxbury, Somerset county, 
and was a farmer and hotel keeper. He served in the Union 
army during the civil war, and was a Republican in politics. 
Mr. Ringler married Mary Warner, a native of Grermany, widow 
of Jacob Heckman, and their children were : John R., de- 
ceased; Zachariali Y., deceased; James A.; Harry J., deceased; 
Charles H., deceased; Thomas Z., of whom later; and Harry J. 

Thomas Z. Ringler, son of Jacob and Mary (Warner) 
Ringler, was born November 25, 1859, in Allegheny township, 
Somerset county, where he obtained his education in the com- 
mon schools. At the age of twelve he left school and went to 
work in a woolen factory, afterward engaging in the bricjv busi- 
ness at Johnstown. In LS84 he moved to Stoystown. 

Mr. Ringler married Julia M. Wingard, born January 3, 

1857, and their children were: Charles C, born February 1, 

1878; Marv Almira, April ]5, 1880; and ¥]i'i\e, died in infancv. 

Charles C. Ringler married, July 19. 1898, Fannie Berkebile, 

\-oi. irr :.M 



370 BEDl'^OKD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

daughter of Philip and Evaline (Grimm) Berkebile, the former 
having served with the rank of captain in the civil war. Mr. 
and xMrs. Kingler have two children: Merdeth C, born Decem- 
ber 24, 1900 ; and Earl Lewis, March 15, 1904. Mary Almira Ring- 
ler married, June 7, 1904, Newton A., born December 25, 1880, 
in Shade township, son of Harrison and Martha J. (Wolford) 
Lohr. Mrs. Riugler is a daugliter of Leavie and a\rary (Pen- 
rod) AVingard, whose other cliildren are: Zachariah, Charles, 
Daniel, John, and Rebecca. A[r. Wingard was born in Broth- 
ers Valley township, and passed his life as a farmer. His 
father was a native of Germany. 

MORRIS W. SPEICHER. 

Morris W. Speicher, a farmer and esteemed resident of 
Somerset, Somerset county, Pennsylvania, was there born Jan- 
uary 7, 1877, a son of Ephraim and Annie (Simpson) Speicher, 
and grandson of Jacob and Sarah Speicher. On the maternal 
side ]\[r. Speicher 's grandfather was Solomon Simpson. 

Morris W. Speicher obtained a conunon school education in 
Somerset county, engaged in school teaching for six years, and 
has since followed the quiet but useful occupation of a farmer. 
He is a member of the German Baptist church, and his wife at- 
tends the Reformed church. In 1896 Mr. Speicher married Cora 
Heminger, born August 1, 1878, daughter of Jacob and Mary 
Heminger, and they have children as follows: Clyde, born 
April 10, 1897; Mary, June 17, 1898; James, January 4, 1900; 
Leora, June 4, 1901 ; George, August 31, 1903, and Hazel, Janu- 
ary 17 1905. 

HERBERT 0. BEEGLE. 

Herbert 0. Beegle, of Stoystown, is the son of Job M. 
Beegle, who was a blacksmith and a native of New Paris. He 
married Sarah M. Slick, born in Bedford county, and their chil- 
dren were: Emmanuel S., Calvin J., Charles, William, Herbert 
0., of whom later; Franklin M., John S., Job, Sarah Odilla, and 
Anna B. 

Herbert 0. Beegle, son of Job and Sarah M. (Slick) Beegle, 
was born December 18, 1865, in Now Paris, Bedford county, and 
obtained his education in the Soldiers' Orphan School, "White 
Hall, Cumberland county, which he attended until reaching the 
ago of fifteen. He tlien engaged for ton years in farming, after 
which ho went to lojirn the blacksinith's trade with John H. 
Beegle, and in 1893 o])or.od a sliop of his own at Wolfsburg Post 
Office, l»edford county, whence he moved to New ]*>altimore, 
thence to Kantner Post Office, from that place to Hooversville, 
and from lloovorsvillo to Stoystown. 

Mr. Beegle married, Sei)tember 15, 1890, Mary Alice Jor- 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 371 

dan, and their children are: Katie, born March 4, 1892; Nora 
M., Alarch 15, 1893; Oscar H., June 29, 1894; Herbert F., De- 
cember 20, 1896; Ellen M., September 18, 1899; Harry R., Au- 
gust 15, 1901 ; and Charles W., October 31, 1903. Mrs. Beegle 
is a daughter of Michael Jordan, who was born in Somerset 
county and is a farmer. He married Alwilda, daughter of 
Bailey and IMargaret (Roab) Hughs, and their children are: 
Minnie, wife of Charles Gilchrist; Mary Alice, born August 
11, 1868, in New Baltimore, wife of Herbert 0. Beegle; Henry 
A., Susan, deceased; Rosie, William, Ellen, Bertha, wife of 
Horace Jaxion; John, Robert, Edna, Paul, and Grace. They 
reside in New Baltimore. 

JOHN B. MOSHOLDER. 

John B. Moshokler, of Somerset, is the son of William Mos- 
holder, who was born in Stony Creek township and passed his 
life in devotion to agricultural pursuits. He married Nancy 
Flamm, also a native of Stony Creek township, and their chil- 
dren were : William, John B., the sole surviving member of the 
family, of whom later; Caroline, Edward, and Oliver 0. 

John B. Mosholder. son of William and Nancy (Flamm) 
Mosholder, was born in Stony Creek township, where he attend- 
ed the common schools until arriving at his twentieth year. 
From that time until 1898 he was engaged in farming with his 
father, and then purchased a place in Somerset, on which he is 
now leading a retired life. He has held all the township offices 
including that of overseer of the poor. He is a Republican and 
a member of the Lutheran church. 

Mr. Mosholder married, January 29, 1873, Sarah A., bom 
September 5, 1852, in Somerset county, daughter of Johnathan 
and Barbara (Huff) Dunmire, and they were the parents of two 
children : William J., born September 13, 1875 ; and Lillie Tj., 
July 7, 1880. Both of these children are deceased, and the 
death of their mother occurred October 20, 1896. She is in- 
terred in Stony Creek township cemetery. Mr. Mosholder mar- 
ried, June 3, 1898, Catherine Miller, widow of John J. Miller. 

ALBERT W: HEMINGER. 

Albert W. Heminger, a prosperous agriculturist of Somer- 
set, Pennsylvania, was born in the county in which he now re- 
sides, Somerset, September 11, 1862, a son of Josiah and Be- 
linda (Dell) Heminger, and grandson of David Heminger, 

The common schools of his native county afforded Albert 
W. Heminger the means of obtaining a practical education, and 
after the completion of his studies he chose as a means of live- 
lihood the occupation of farming, which he has followed con^ 
tinuously up to the present time. He is practical and progres- 



37l> BKUrOHl) AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

sive. aii<l his woll-tillod fields iiulicato the oai'oful supervision of 
a thorough and painstaking farmer. He is a liepuhlican in 
polities. 

In 1882 Mr. Ileniinger was united in marriage to Xanie 
C. Sliatfer, born August 20, 1862, daughter of Henry and Eliza 
Shaffer, tlie mother of Mrs. Tleminger having come to this 
country from Germany with her i)arents at the early age of two 
years. Two children w^ere the issue of the union of Mr. and 
^Mrs. Ileminger — George li. and ^Maggie E. — both of whom re- 
side at home. 

JOHN K. Ll'TZKE. 

John Lutzke, of Boswell, was born November 2, 1878, in 
Europe, and is a son of John Lutzke, also a native of Europe, 
who emigrated to the United States and settled at Hazelton, 
where he engaged in farming. He has recently retired from 
active labor, ^fr. Lutzke married, before leaving his native 
country, ^fary Zezock, and their children were: John K.. of 
whom later; George, Joseph, Ajidrew, ^fichael, Ste[)hen, and 
:\rary. 

Jolm K. Tjutzke, son of John and ^Fary (Zezock) Lutzke, 
was brought to this country by his ])arents at the age of one 
year and obtained his education in the common schools of 
Hazelton. At that place he learned the jeweler's trade, which 
he followed for five years at Windber, whence he removed, in 
1902, to Boswell, where he has since remained. 

wn.LiA:\r h. shaffer. 

William H. Shaffer, a farmer of Somerset, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, was there born June 12, 1853, a son of Henry and 
Elizabeth (Hoffman) Shaffer, and grandson of Henry and 
Elizabeth Shaffer. His maternal grandfather was John Hoff- 
man. 

AVilliam H. Shaffer obtained a common school education in 
his native county, and has followed agricultural ]iursuits all 
his life. He is an excellent faruier, and an industrious, useful 
citizen. He is a Prohibitionist in ]iolitics, and a member of 
riiiist ehurcli. In 1S77 Mr. Shaffer married Afary Brown, and 
two children were boi-n to them, viz: Afabel P., and Carroll U. 
After the dentli (.f his first wife, in 1000, Afr. Shaffer married 
Minnie Mostoller, a danL';liter of l^aniel and Charlotte >rosto11er. 
To this union was born one diild. IFniold Lester, November 
21, 10f».5. 

AVILIJAM 11. SUTEP. 

"William Tf. Snl(M-, of Stoyestown Station, is a son of An- 
thonsia Snter, a nntive of Germnny, who came to this country 
at the a<.'e of fifteen vears and engnged in farming. He mar- 



is 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 373 

ried ^largarct Snyder, and their childi'en were: Mary, wii'e of 
Samuel Spangier; AVilliam, H., of whom later; John, deceased; 
Ellen, wife of David Linnuernian; Frank married iiachel Cris- 
sey; and Lewis married Jeruvslia A. Colter. 

William H. Suter, son of Anthonsia and Margaret (Sny- 
der) Suter, was born April 5, 18-14, in Shade township, and re- 
ceived his education in the connnon schools of his native county, 
which he attended until reaching the age of fifteen, when he en- 
gaged in farming. In 18G2 he enlisted in Company D, One Hun- 
dred and Forty-second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, for 
a terjn of three years, and ])artieipated in the battles of Fred- 
ericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Spott- 
sylvania, North Anna River, Talopotomy, Bethesda Church, 
Cold Harbor, Hutchins' Run, Dodney Mills, Boydton Roads, and 
Five Forks. He was confined three months in ]jibby prison. 
During the last four years he has conducted a general store at 
Stoyestown Station. 

Mr. Suter married, in 1868, Julia, born in 1844, in Jenner 
township; daughter of Frederick and Anna (Betts) Beasecker, 
and they were the parents of two sons, both. of whom are de- 
ceased; Frederick F, and Calvin C. Mrs. Suter died in 1899 and 
is buried in Stoyestown. Mr. Suter married (second) Mrs. 
Phoebe Moon, daughter of Chauncey and Catharine (Nichol- 
son) Dwire. The former was born in Somerset county and was 
a farmer. He and his wife were the parents of the following 
children: Phoebe, wife of William H. Suter; Silas married Dora 
Nicholson; Newton B. married Maud Friend; and Mary C, 
wife of John S. Mort. 

JOSIAH WOY. 

Josiali Woy, a prosperous farmer of Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, was there born in Somerset township, November 
8, 1842, a son of John and Catherine (Wendell) W^oy, His pa- 
ternal grandfather was Andrew AVoy, a native of Germany, 
who came to this country, settling in Somerset county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in a vei-y early day of its settling. It is said that on his 
journey to America the vessel in which he sailed commenced 
to leak, and only for Air. Woy's skillful work in repairing it, 
all the passengers would probably have been drowned. The 
maternal grandfather of Josiah A¥oy was Isaac AVendell, who 
lived to tlie iige of one hundred and three years. He was a 
millwright by tj-ade and built the dam and mill at Sprucetown 
which still stand. The story is told that when he was a boy of 
fifteen he was ca])tu]-e<l by the Indians, with whom he lived 
foi- ()\-('r twelve years. ]le was a distinguished hunter and ox- 
('eiU-'^t iii;irksin;ni, and nfter tweixe \ears was ennl)le(l to escape 
I'vvwi tlie red men, and get back once nioi'e to ci\'ilization. 



374 BEDI'OED AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 

Josiali Woy obtained a common school edncation in Som- 
erset connty, and immediately turned his attention to the occu- 
pation of farming, and this he has followed in connection with 
mining and saw milling all his life. He now resides on a farm 
in Somerset townshij), which is one of tlie prettiest and most 
highly cultivated in that section. Politically Mr. Woy is a strong 
defender of the principles of the Jiepublican party, and he and 
his famih' are members of the J^utheran church. 

In 18G4- Josiah ^^ oy was united in marriage to Sarali Frank, 
who was born September 1, 184(J, a daughter of the late Henry 
and Elizabeth (Will) Erank. Their children were: 1. John, 
boi'n October 27, 1866; married Nora Cunningham; they have 
two children, Eugenie and Ruth. 2. Frank, October 7, 1868; 
married Mary Zinn; they have three children, Marion, Magda- 
lena and Florence. 3. Wilson, May 17, 1871; married Nellie 
Spangler. 4. Minnie, May 4, 1873; married C. E. Walker, and 
they have three children, Leland, Harold and Ernest. 5. Mary, 
October 11, 1875; married Ward Saylor, and they have one 
child, a son, Kenneth. 6. Sarah, October 2, 1878; married 
Chauncy Weimar. 

JAMES L. WINTERS. 

James L. AVinters, a representative citizen and a prosper- 
ous farmer of Lull, is a native of Somerset township, Somerset 
county, Pennsylvania, born May 21, 1866. His parents, John 
and Jane (Bowman) Winters, reared a family of seven chil- 
dren, the names of the others being as follows : Johanna, who 
became the wife of James Blough; issue: one child, Ira Blough. 
Thomas G., unmarried, a printer by trade, resides in l^ittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. Jacob, proprietor of the Vannear Hotel, of 
Somerset; he married Nora Stein, daughter of John Stein. Mar- 
garet, unmarried, resides in Somerset. Robert, married Fanny 
Si)angler, who bore him four children : Melvin, Dianna, Mary 
and Grace. Grace, who became the wife of Ernest Koontz, a 
farmer. John AVinters (father) was born in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, was a fai'mer by occupation, but is now leading 
a retired life, enjoying to the full the consciousness of duties 
well performed. 

T^he common schools of Somerset county afforded James 
li. AVint(;rs the means of obtaining a practical education, and 
ui)on the coujplelion of his studies, at the age of seventeen years, 
he ])egan farming on his own account, and by industry, energy 
and close application has succeeded in providing a comfortable 
home for his family. He is practical and progressive in his 
methods, his farm is well cultivated and improved, e<iuii)i)ed 
with all the necessary outbuildings, and in every way ranks high 
among the productive farms for which that section of the county 



BEDFORD AND SOMERSET COUNTIES 375 

is noted. Mi\ Winters is a Republican in politics, aiding to the 
best of his ability in the success and welfare of that party. 

On March 5, 1885, Mr. Winters married Susan Kimmell, 
born July 17, 1862, daughter of Daniel and Emmeline Kimmell. 
Their children ai-e as follows: Jacob 0., born August 19, 1886; 
John B., February 20, 1887; and Lillian P., October 3, 1898. 

FREDERICK HALBROCK. 

Among Somerset county's German- American citizens must 
be numbered Frederick Halbrock, of Somerset. Mr. Halbrock's 
father, also IVederick Halbrock, was born in the town of Linse, 
province of Brunswick, Germany, and came to this country in 
the autumn of 1868. He landed in Baltimore, whence he moved 
to Southampton township, Somerset county, and in the spring 
of 1871 went to Somerset township, where lie purchased a farm 
and passed the remainder of his life. Frederick Halbrock, Sr. 
married Caroline Presuhn, and their children were : Emma ; 
Frederick, of whom later; Albert; Lennie; and Ruth, who was 
the only one born in the United States, and who died April 4, 
1879, in Somerset. The death of Mr. Halbrock occurred De- 
cember 22, 1893, and was quickly followed by that of his wife, 
who passed away July 16, 1894. 

Frederick Halbrock, son of Frederick and Caroline (Pre- 
suhn) Halbrock. was born December 3, 1855, in Wangelstedt, 
province of Brunswick, Germany, and received his education in 
his native country. After the family came to the United States 
he engaged in farming. In 1894, after the death of his parents, 
he bought out the interest of the other heirs, and so became 
the possessor of the homestead, which has since been his home 
and Avhich he cultivates successfully, raising large quantities 
of fruit. He is a member of the Lutheran church. 

Mr. Halbrock married, June 12, 1895, Maggie Vogel, and 
their children are: Anna A., born October 19, 1898; Francis 
B., born December 22, 1902; and Rhea Caroline, born October 
1, 1904. Mrs. Halbrock is a daughter of Leonard Vogel, who 
was born in Hessen Darmstadt, Germany, and at the age of 
twenty-one 'emigrated to the United States. He married Bar- 
bara Leophart, and their children were: Maggie, born April 
27, 1864, in Freeden, Somerset county, and became the wife of 
Frederick Halbrock, as mentioned alDOve; Lizzie, John, Anna, 
George, Magdaline, and Minnie, deceased. 

KENDALL FAMILY. 

The Kendalls originally came from Germany, and at an 
early date settled in Maryland, at Hagerstown, where Christian 
Kendall, grandfather of Samuel A. and Jacob L. Kendall, was 
born. He was a farmer by occupation, and a man of integrity 



376 BEDFOKl) AXD SOMERSET COUNTIES 

and sti'ong cliniacter. hi religious faitli lie was a Jjutlierau, 
aiul [)oliti('aily was a Wliiii!:. U^' luaiTied Hannah Lcydig, and 
to tlieiu were boj-n twelve eliildren, eight sons and four daugh- 
ters: Samuel and Jonathan, twins; John, of whom further here- 
after; Jacob, Jesse, Levi, George, Andrew, Lydia, Betsey, Mary 
and Kel)e('('a. Of the.^e children four are living at this date, 
ll)()(i: Kehecca (Mrs. Jjalaam Shoemaker), in her seventy-sev- 
enth year; Mary, mimarried; Jonathan, a retired farmer living 
at Kendall's Mills, in his ninety-seventh year; and Andrew, 
also a retired farmer living at the Mills, in his seventy-first 
year. 

Jolin C Kendall, son of Christian and Hannah (Leydig) 
Kendall, was born in Southampton township, Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, June 5, L^IT. His early life was spent on the 
farm of his father, who had previously removed from Maryland. 
He learned the carpenter's trade, and became a noted barn 
builder. He personally selected the trees from which to cut 
each particular timber needed in the structure, felled the trees, 
and pre]xired each ])iece for its own use — all this for a building, 
])erhaps, miles distant. When the frame was all prepared, the 
parts would be collected and drawn to the desired location, the 
neighbors for miles about would be notified, and then followed 
an old-time "barn raising" lasting all day, or, in case of a 
particularly large and heavy building, two days or more. In 
1849 Mr. Kendall married, and removed to Greenville town- 
shi]). where he began housekeeping in a log cal)in on the farm, 
whicli is still in possession of the family, and where Samuel and 
Jacob Tj. Kendall have built a summer home. Here John C. 
Kendall lived the remainder of his days, tilling and improving 
his farm, and working at his trade. In time the log cal)in was 
succeeded by a comfortable farm dwelling, and here his children 
were born. Mr, Kendall was a Republican in politics, and ren- 
dered useful service to the comnuuiity in various important 
stations. For twenty-five yeai's he was a justice of the peace 
in Greenville township. Himself denied the advantages of the 
])resent ])ublic school system, he rightlv ap])reciated its value, 
and was deeply interested in its maintenance and in»provement, 
to this end serving several ternis as school director. In r