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Full text of "History of the bench and bar of Oregon"







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University of California Berkeley 

THE PETER AND ROSELL HARVEY 

MEMORIAL FUND 













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HISTORY 



OF THE 



BENCH AND BAR 



OF 



OREGON 




HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 
PORTLAND, OREGON 

1910 



HISTORY OF THE BENCH AND BAR 
OF OREGON 



Photos by 

C. ELMER GROVE, Portland 
CHAS. BUTTERWORTH, Portland 
AUNE STUDIO, Portland 
A. B. McALPIN, Portland 
E. W. MOORE, Portland 
DAVIES STUDIO, Portland 
UP-TO-DATE STUDIO, Astoria 
JENSON STUDIO, McMinnville 
CLARK'S STUDIO, Roseburjr 
GIFFORD, The Dalles 
MILLER PHOTO CO., Klamath Falls 
WHEELER'S STUDIO, Pendleton 
ELITE STUDIO, Baker City 
R. J. RITTER, La Grande 
H. J. STADDEN, Marshficld 
TROVERS' STUDIO, Salem 

Press of 

BUSHONG & COMPANY, Portland 



FOREWORD 



ONE is embarrassed, not so much with the lack of material 
as the abundance of it, in the preparation of a work like 
the present. It is probable, that when all is written, there 
will be found some omissions, and it is also probable that 
some matters may be expressed herein that were better left unsaid; 
but "it is human to err." May we be forgiven if we have "done 
the things we ought not to have done." 

It should be a matter of pride to remember that most of the 
great events of the world have had a lawyer somewhere connected 
with them. "It was a lawyer who moved the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence; it was a lawyer who wrote the Declaration; thirty out of 
fifty-five members constituting the constitutional convention were 
lawyers . . . the very web and woof of that instrument, every 
arch and key composing that wondrous structure, was proposed, pol- 
ished and set in order by lawyers, most conspicuous of whom were 
James Madison and James Wilson." A lawyer it was whose brain 
evolved the Declaration of Independence of the Republic of Texas. 
It was Chief Justice Marshall's master mind that gave practical ef- 
fect to our national constitution. 

The Magna Charta that was wrested from King John was written 
by lawyers. To Sir Edward Coke is owing the Petition of Rights, 
and it was he who dared to declare that the king is not above the 
law. It is to a lawyer we are indebted for the drafting of the 
Habeas Corpus Act. The Statute of William I and Mary I, settling 
the succession of the crown and establishing the rights of the sub- 
ject, was the work of a lawyer. Upon this statute was based the 
first eight amendments to the Federal Constitution, and from them, 
again, come the Declaration of Rights which are embodied in the 
constitution of every state in the Union. 

The Reform Bill adopted in England in 1832 was the work of a 
lawyer, and it was a lawyer who proclaimed the present Republic of 
France, in 1870. Twenty American Presidents were lawyers, and 
the majority of the members of Congress are lawyers. Hamilton, 
Walker, Chase, Sherman and Carlisle, five of the United States Sec- 
retaries of the Treasury, were members of the legal profession. 
Phelps, Bayard, Choate, the great American ambassadors, were law- 
yers. So, too, were Presidents Polk, Lincoln and McKinley. The 
great names of Madison, Hamilton, Jay, Livingston, Ellsworth, Sher- 
man, Johnson, Fisher, Ames, Parsons, Marshall, Wythe and scores 



of other brilliant legal minds, add lustre to this honorable profes- 
sion. It is true that "lawyers are, and have been in all ages, the 
chief defense and preservers of free institutions and of public and 
individual liberty." 

Masterly in its simplicity, was the word picture of a court room, 
painted by Judge Martin L. Pipes, the well-known Portland lawyer, 
in his address delivered before the Oregon State Bar Association, 
November 17, 1909, in which he said: 

"The court room is the one place where the citizen comes into 
daily contact with his Government. Other departments are more or 
less remote from him; their action affecting him more or less indi- 
rectly. But here he is in the presence of the dignity of the state, the 
corporeal symbol of justice, the beneficent tribunal that protects 
him in his legal rights; and when he approaches that bar, he need 
not come with bated breath to plead for favors, political or other- 
wise, nor bow his head to conciliate the frown of favor; but he stands 
in that presence shorn of every badge of station, high or low, and 
as free and as equal as he was born. In other places and in other 
situations the inequalities of life affect him. 

"But when he enters the door of a court of justice, he leaves 
behind him all distinctions, all advantages and disadvantages, all 
questions of social or political influence, all the handicap of poverty, 
all the prestige of wealth, and stands mantled only with the invis- 
ible but impermeable robe of simple citizenship. It is so because he 
is in the place where the law must prevail. There is, therefore, no 
place in this ideal court for any other influence than the judge's 
sense of justice and of his loyalty to the law." 

Many of the great lawyers and judges who have made Oregon 
famous, have passed from the earthly forum to the Great Bar of 
Judgment. They have left their record behind them. There they 
stand equal with all other men, yet in their work here they still 
speak, albeit they stand in "the silent halls of death." Oregon 
has reason to be proud of these men, for it is owing to their care 
and wisdom that we have our present rights so well safeguarded. 

In a work of this kind there is little opportunity for absolutely 
strict originality, unless it may be in the form of expression, and 
therefore we should not be accused of plagiarism. Indeed, by its 
very nature, one must follow often the exact words of other writers. 
As to any possible charge of plagiarism, we would respectfully refer 
the reader to two distinct writers in the American school of litera- 
tureRalph Waldo Emerson and Samuel L. Clemens (Mark Twain) 
in justification. Emerson says: 

"It has come to be practically a sort of rule in literature, that a 
man, having once shown himself capable of original writing, is enti- 



tied thenceforth to steal from the writings of others at discretion. 
Thought is the property of him who can entertain it, and of him 
who can adequately place it. A certain awkwardness marks the use 
of borrowed thoughts; but as soon as we have learned what to do 
with them, they become our own." 

Mark Twain, in a letter to the editor of the Grants Pass Observer 
in 1887, said: 

"A considerable part of every book is an unconscious plagiarism 
of some previous book. There is no sin about it. If there were, 
and it were of the deadly sort, it would eventually be necessary to 
restrict hell to authors and then enlarge it." 

From Homer's time to the present authors have borrowed from 
the writers who preceded them; yes, indeed, from the time "'Omer 
struck his bloomin' lyre." 




BENCH AND BAR OF OREGON 



In a work like the present, one is not necessarily restricted by 
the title to a mere review of the great jurists, lawyers and statesmen 
whose names adorn the history of the state. Indeed, it is necessary 
and proper, if not absolutely unavoidable, to make frequent refer- 
ences to the history of Oregon, past and present, to properly delin- 
eate the boundaries of that vast stage upon which great characters 
have appeared. 

The Oregon of today, large as it is, with its 96,030 square miles 
of area, is not the Oregon of the past. The original Oregon Country 
included the present Oregon, the states of Washington, Idaho, part 
of Montana and Wyoming, and all of British Columbia west of the 
Rocky Mountains and south of the Alaska line of 54 degrees and 
40 minutes. It was greater than the combined areas of the thirteen 
colonies at the time of the Revolution, and included the entire terri- 
tory between the Rocky Mountains and the Pacific Ocean, the Alaska 
boundary on the north and the California boundary on the south. 
Even in 1843, Senator McDuffie, of South Carolina, had so little 
discernment as to scoff in the Senate at the possibility of building 
a railroad to the mouth of the Columbia River, and thanked God for 
having placed the Rocky Mountains in the way so as to make this 
country unapproachable. 

What was the opinion of Thomas Jefferson all know, especially 
after the Lewis and Clark expedition of 1805, whose centennial was 
so splendidly celebrated at Portland in 1905. With magnificent 
foresight, Senator Baylies, of Massachusetts, in 1823 uttered these 
words: 

"Our natural boundary is the Pacific Ocean. The swelling tide 
of our population must and will roll on until that mighty ocean in- 
terposes its waters and limits our territorial empire. Then, with 
two oceans washing our shores, the commercial wealth of the world 
is ours, and our imagination can hardly conceive the greatness, the 
grandeur and the power that awaits us." 

The present State of Oregon has a length of 395 miles from east 
to west, and a width, from north to south, of 278 miles. Should one 
combine the areas of New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, Con- 
necticut and New York, he would find that Oregon contains 2,500,- 
000 acres more than all these states together. Should the areas of 



8 HISTORICAL 

Indiana and Illinois be combined, Oregon would be found to con- 
tain 3,030 square miles more than their united area. The original 
Oregon Country, ceded by Great Britain, June 15, 1846, contained 
307,000 square miles. The state lies between latitude 42 degrees 
and 46 degrees 18 minutes north, and between 116 degrees 33 min- 
utes and 124 degrees 25 minutes west longitude. 

By act of Congress, March 2, 1853, Washington was carved from 
this vast domain, and organized as a separate territory. Idaho was 
taken, and organized as a territory, March 3, 1863; Montana, May 
26, 1864; Wyoming, July 25, 1868 and what we know as Oregon of 
today, was left. 

Oregon is divided into the following districts: 

First The territory in the northeastern part of the state, bounded 
by the Snake and Columbia Rivers. 

Second Central Oregon, including the Hood River region. 

Third The Willamette Valley, 135 miles long, and from 25 to 
40 miles wide, extending from Portland to Eugene, including eight 
counties and covering 4,000,000 acres. 

Fourth The Coast region, beginning at the confluence of the 
Willamette and Columbia Rivers, twelve miles below Portland. It 
includes the entire western coast of the state south to the California 
boundary. 

Fifth Southern Oregon. This includes the Umpqua and Rogue 
River valleys. 

Sixth Southeastern Oregon. This includes two subdivisions 
the semi-arid, rolling hills and plateaus south of the Deschutes, 
Crooked River, Harney and Malheur valleys; the lake region north 
of the California boundary line. 

It is fitting and proper that considerable reference should be 
made to the Columbia River, the northern boundary of Oregon. Its 
sources are legion. It drains its immense volume of water from 
the melting snows of eight great mountain ranges. The region it 
drains is a greater one than that of the combined areas of all the 
Middle and New England states. When the happy phrase "Inland 
Empire" is applied to this vast territory, it is no merely fanciful 
title. When William Cullen Bryant penned the line "Where rolls 
the Oregon," he referred to the Columbia. 

For two hundred years the exact location of the Columbia was 
not defined. It was nearly as mythical as the fabled Styx of the 
old-time Greek. It ranked alongside that imaginary creation the 
Straits of Anian the supposedly existing waterway around the 
northern end of the North American continent. 



HISTORICAL 9 

Passing over the accounts of the early Spanish navigators who 
sighted this stream, we find that Captain George Vancouver, an 
officer of the British navy, to whom is due some of the geographical 
names now known along the Columbia, arrived off the mouth of 
the river April 27, 1792. He tried to locate the Straits of Anian, 
the Straits of Juan de Fuca, the Rio de Aguilar, the Rio de los 
Reyes and the Oregon River. He concluded that the mouth of the 
Columbia was only an inlet. Sailing north he encountered the Co- 
lumbia Rediviva, an American ship from Boston, commanded by 
Captain Robert Gray. Gray attempted to convince Vancouver that 
what he had seen was in reality the mouth of a river, but the latter 
obstinately held to his opinion. Gray sailed south and succeeded in 
entering the river and sailed upstream for a distance of ten miles. 
The English after hearing of Gray's achievement, effected an en- 
trance into the river by means of the Chatham, in charge of Lieu- 
tenant W. R. Broughton. He proceeded only a short distance, before 
dropping anchor. By means of row boats he ascended the stream 
to the point where the present City of Vancouver, Washington, is 
located. Regardless of what Captain Gray had accomplished, 
Broughton took possession of the entire region in the name of 
King George, and upon this England based its claim of ownership 
until the Treaty of 1846 settled the title in favor of the United 
States. 

The Portland Oregonian has this to say of "Champoeg Day," 
which is apropos of those far-off days when the Provisional Govern- 
ment was founded, of which event F. X. Matthieu is the sole sur- 
vivor: 

' 'Champoeg Day' does not arouse the enthusiasm even among 
the old settlers of the Willamette Valley to which, by reason of its 
important place in the state's beginnings, it is entitled. 

"Ten years ago this day (May 2, 1900) was rescued from the dim 
aisles of our past, and through the revival of memory was given de- 
served prominence in local history. Earnest effort on the part of a 
few men, sustained and encouraged by a number of women, re- 
sulted in procuring a movement to mark suitably the spot where 
the first form of civic government by Americans in the great Ore- 
gon Country was instituted. This monument was duly engraved 
with the names of the half-hundred men of the wilderness, men who 
had reached the place of the meeting on horseback, on foot and by 
canoes on the appointed day. A simple block of gray granite, plain 
as were the lives of the men whose names it holds, was placed as 
nearly as could be determined and as the crumbling bank of the 
river' at that place would permit, upon the spot where a chorus of 
'Ayes' went up on that May day in 1843 in answer to the question, 
'Shall a provisional government be established in Oregon by Ameri- 
cans?' 



10 HISTORICAL 

"Each year since the monument was placed, 1900, there has been 
a rally around it of those most deeply interested for memory's sake 
and all who have cared to listen have heard anew the tale that his- 
tory tells of the rally of that far away day and year. A total of 102 
men were present on the initial Champoeg Day, sixty-seven years 
ago. The names of all of those who voted for the organization of 
some form of civil government in the Oregon Country have been 
chiseled upon the granite block that is a silent sentinel of the spot. 
The memory of that day, as far as its living witnesses go, will soon 
be blotted out. But the work then and there begun lives and will 
live in a happy, free and prosperous commonwealth, over which 
floats the American flag." 

Though the idea of a Provisional Government was formed May 2, 
1843, its real adoption occurred July 26, 1845. The center of white 
population was in the Willamette Valley and comprised less than 
300 Americans, made up mostly of Protestant missionaries and 
their families, together with a few others. There were also about 
seventy-five French-Canadians. The Provisional Government was 
established by a vote of fifty-two for to fifty against. This form of 
government continued until the organization of the Territorial Gov- 
ernment in 1849. It embodied a code of laws adopted by the Ameri- 
can immigrants and British subjects. Primarily it had no executive 
head, but an executive committee of three. The expenses of admin- 
istration was provided for by voluntary subscription, there being no 
provision for taxation. With the increase in population, a system 
of taxation was adopted and a Governor elected. 

At the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of Oregon's admis- 
sion as a state, held at Salem, Monday, February 15, 1909, F. N. 
Judson, of St. Louis, in his address, said: 

"An anomalous provision of this Provisional Government was its 
creation and maintenance by men who owed allegiance to different 
sovereignties, whose relations were at times strained even to the point 
of threatened war. The oath of the officials of this Government 
expressly reserved the duty owing as a citizen of the United States, 
or as a subject of Great Britain." 

For twenty-five years after 1819, the Oregon territory was jointly 
held by England and the United States. The claim of the latter was 
based upon the discovery and exploration of the Columbia River in 
1792 by Captain Gray, the explorations of Lewis and Clark, the set- 
tlement at Astoria and the acquisition of the rights claimed by Spain 
under the Florida treaty of 1819. Great Britain claimed the entire 
country south to the Columbia River, chiefly by reason of the occu- 
pancy of the territory by the Hudson's Bay Company. 

The Louisiana Purchase of 1803 comprised the territory ceded 



HISTORICAL 11 

by Spain to France and later re-ceded to France. This was sold to 
the United States, but was never asserted as a basis for title by the 
latter. In 1892 Dr. Fiske said at Astoria: "Neither the purchase of 
1803 nor that of 1819 would have gone far towards giving Oregon 
to the United States, unless the shadowy, metaphysical claims had 
been supplemented by the solid facts of occupancy and possession." 

The treaty of June 15, 1846, between England and the United 
States, provided that the boundary line should be the forty-ninth 
parallel to the middle of the channel which separates Vancouver 
Island from the mountains; thence southerly through the middle of 
the channel through Juan de Fuca Straits to the Pacific Ocean. 
Question arose as to which channel was meant, there being doubts 
as to which country Washington Sound and its islands belonged. In 
1859 the two governments effected a friendly modus vivendi by 
joint occupation, Great Britain establishing a garrison at the north 
end and the United States one at the south. In 1871, Emperor Wil- 
liam of Germany, to whom the matter was referred for arbitration 
under the Treaty of Washington, decided in favor of the United 
States. 

After Oregon was organized as a territory, General Joseph Lane, 
of Indiana, was appointed Governor. By the enactment by Congress 
on September 27, 1850, of the Donation Land Law, a legal basis for 
private land titles was established. By its terms possession claims 
priorily established, were legally sanctioned. By the appointment of 
General Lane, civil government was thereby inaugurated, and courts, 
for the first time under governmental authority, were organized. 

February 14, 1859, the act admitting Oregon as a state was ap- 
proved by President Buchanan, and it entered the Union as the 
thirty-third state. Oregon was the last state to be admitted before 
secession by the Southern states begun, as Kansas was not admitted 
until January, 1861. 

In preparing an account of the affairs and the men of the early 
days who created them, based upon information from many sources, 
we have not attempted to set our work by hard and invariable 
lines, nor to always follow events exactly in their chronologic order. 
To refer again to the Provisional Government, even though it may 
prove a repetition. It is a pleasure to peruse the addresses of George 
H. Williams relative to those primitive times. 

"Here were a few scattered people," said he, "without any po- 
litical or social organization; they were exposed to the hostilities 
and depredations of wild animals; instinctively the idea of getting 
together for mutual protection began to work; neighbors consulted 
with each other about the situation, and finally a meeting of about 
one hundred persons comprising a large part of the men of the 



12 HISTORICAL 

territory, was held at Champoeg, to take into consideration the for- 
mation of a government; committees were appointed, meetings held, 
officials named, and the ideas about a government were working 
towards a result, but nothing definite was accomplished until 1845 
when a Provisional Government was adopted that is to say, a local 
government, to exist until a government was established over the 
territory by the United States." 

Judge Williams paid a beautiful tribute to Dr. John McLoughlin, 
"the Father of Oregon," in one of his famous addresses. He said, 
inter alia: "He had more influence with the Indians than any other 
man who ever lived on the Pacific Coast; they reverenced and feared 
him. He was a born commander of men. I remember his long sil- 
very locks, his ruddy complexion, his powerful frame, and accom- 
plished manners. I can say of him with as much truth as any man 
I ever saw that he was one upon whom every God had seemed to 
set his seal to give the world assurance of a man. His claim to the 
grateful remembrance of the people of Oregon is founded upon the 
fact that when the emigrants arrived from the plains poor and needy, 
he fed the hungry, clothed the naked, and helped them to start life 
anew in their new homes. He lost his standing with the British 
company on account of his friendship for American settlers; he 
moved from Vancouver, where at one time he reigned supreme, to 
Oregon City, where he died." 

The late Rev. B. Wistar Morris, Episcopal Bishop for Oregon, 
in an address before the Oregon Pioneer Association in 1896, re- 
ferred to the Treaty of 1846 between Great Britain and the United 
States regarding the Oregon territory, in an interesting manner. 
He said: 

"Some facts in the history of this very treaty whose anniversary 
has brought us here, will give striking illustrations of the real con- 
dition of things, then, in this regard. So far away and inacessible 
was this country fifty years ago, that the joyful news of this treaty 
of June 15 did not reach this country until the 12th of November, 
five months after it was ratified by the United States Senate, and 
then by the roundabout way of the Sandwich Islands. The poor, un- 
fortunate and anxious dwellers in the territories of Oregon and 
Washington were living all this time without one of them knowing 
whether he or she was a Britisher or a Yankee. This news was brought 
here by a vessel, the bark Toulon, trading between the Sandwich 
Islands and this port (Portland), of which Mr. Benjamin Stark, a 
gentleman well known to many of my hearers, was the supercargo." 

In a letter received by Bishop Morris from Mr. Stark, at that 
time residing at New London, Conn., the latter said: 

"One of the immediate consequences was the withdrawal of the 



HISTORICAL 13 

British sloop-of-war, Modeste. The presence of this vessel anchored 
in front of the Hudson Bay station at Vancouver, since the fall of 
1845, had been a source of constant irritation to the hardy band of 
immigrants settled in the valley of the Willamette." 

OREGON COUNTIES. 

We are indebted to the able researches of Frederick V. Holman, 
a prominent member of the Multnomah County bar, for the infor- 
mation herein contained, relative to "Oregon Counties: Their Crea- 
tion and Origin of Their Names," in an address delivered December 
18, 1909. Of these in their order. 

Oregon originally comprised four districts Twality, Yamhill, 
Clackamas and Champooick (created by the Provisional Government 
at Champoeg). Champooick County, as it existed September 11, 
1849, was named Marion County by act of Legislature bearing this 
date. 

By the act of September 3, 1849, the Provisional Legislature 
changed the name of the Twality District to Washington County. 

Be it remembered that Champoeg was the principal Indian vil- 
lage between Chemetka (Salem) and the Falls of the Willamette. 
After Clatsop and Polk Districts were created, the Provisional Leg- 
islature, by an act approved December 22, 1845, changed these dis- 
tricts to counties. The Provisional Legislature created Clatsop dis- 
trict June 22, 1844. 

Polk District was created December 22, 1845. 

Benton County was created December 23, 1847; Linn County, De- 
cember 28, 1847; Washington County, September 3, 1849; Marion 
County, September 23, 1849; Lane County, January 25, 1851. 

The Territorial Legislature created Umpqua County, January 24, 
1851. January 7, 1852, the Legislature created Douglas County out 
of the eastern portion of Umpqua County. When Coos County was 
formed, December 22, 1853, a portion of Umpqua County was in- 
cluded. October 16, 1862, what was left of Umpqua County was ab- 
sorbed by Douglas County, and Umpqua County passed off the 
stage. 

Jackson County was created January 12, 1852. Tillamook County 
was created December 15, 1853, and was made up of the western 
portions of Yamhill and Clatsop counties "and, possibly, of Polk 
County." Wasco County was created January 11, 1854; Columbia 
County, January 16, 1854. 

Mr. Holman says: "Multnomah County was created by the 
Territorial Legislature, December 22, 1854. It comprises a part of 
the eastern portion of Washington County and a part of the north- 



14 HIS T O R I C A L 

ern portion of Clackamas County. It is the smallest but the most 
populous and wealthy county in Oregon." 

Curry County, named for George L. Curry, the last territorial 
Governor of Oregon, was created December 18, 1855. 

Josephine County comprised a part of the western portion of 
Jackson County, and was created January 22, 1856. Baker County 
was created by the State Legislature September 22, 1862. The State 
Legislature created Umatilla County September 27, 1862, and Grant 
County, October 14, 1864. Union County was created October 14, 
1864; Lake County, October 24, 1874; Klamath County, October 17, 
1882; Crook County, October 24, 1882; Morrow County, February 
16, 1885; Gilliam County, February 25, 1885; Wallowa County, Feb- 
ruary 11, 1887; Malheur County, February 17, 1887; Harney County, 
February 25, 1899. The latter county comprises what were formerly 
the southern and middle portions of Grant County. 

Sherman County was created February 25, 1889; Lincoln County, 
February 20, 1893; Wheeler County, February 17, 1899; Hood River 
County, June 23, 1908. 

Oregon contains thirty- four counties. They are: Baker, Ben- 
ton. Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Douplas. 
Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Hood River, Jackson, Josephine, Klamath, 
Lake, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Malheur, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, 
Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa, Wasco, Wash- 
ington, Wheeler and Yamhill. 

Though all lawyers are advised on the subject, it is proper to 
note in this connection that the Judicial Districts of the state as 
at present constituted, are as follows: 

First (First Prosecuting Attorney District) Jackson and Jose- 
phine counties; (Second Prosecuting Attorney District) Klamath 
and Lake counties. 

Second (Third Prosecuting Attorney District) Coos, Curry and 
Douglas counties; (Fourth Prosecuting Attorney District) Benton, 
Lane and Lincoln counties. 

Third Linn, Marion, Polk, Tillamook and Yamhill counties. 

Fourth Multnomah County. 

Fifth Clatsop, Clackamas, Columbia and Washington counties. 

Sixth Morrow and Umatilla counties. 

Seventh Crook, Hood River and Wasco counties. 

Eighth Baker County. 

Ninth Grant, Harney and Malheur counties. 

Tenth Union and Wallowa counties. 

Eleventh Gilliam, Sherman and Wheeler counties. 

Thirteenth Klamath and Lake counties. 



HISTORICAL 15 

Oregon has had five codes, and a sixth is in course of prepara- 
cion. The first the Code of 1851 was compiled by Judge James 
K. Kelly. The second was the work of Matthew P. Deady and La 
Fayette Lane (1874). The Annotated Code of 1867 was due to the 
labors of W. Lair Hill, as was also that of 1892. The Cotton and 
Bellinger Code was the result of the joint action of W. W. Cotton 
and the late Judge Charles B. Bellinger. It appeared in 1902. The 
Oregon Legislature of 1909 authorized a new code, and Governor 
Benson appointed W. P. Lord to the task. 

So far as we have been enabled to discover, the first lawyer to 
arrive in Oregon was A. L. Lovejoy, who came here from Massachu- 
setts. He was one of the original townsite owners of the present 
City of Portland. 

PRIOR TO THE PROVISIONAL GOVERNMENT. 

Prior to the Provisional Government there were four Executive 
Committees chosen. Of these in their order: 

First Committee (February 18, 1843) comprised David Leslie, 
chairman; Sidney Smith and Gustavus Hines, secretaries, who were 
chosen to frame a Constitution and Code of Laws for Oregon. 

The Second Committee ( 1843) consisted of Robert Moore, Speaker 
and chairman; George W. LeBreton, clerk. 

Third Committee (1844) M. M. McCarver, Speaker; Dr. John 
E. Long, Territorial Recorder or clerk. 

Fourth Committee (1845) M. M. McCarver, Speaker; J. E. 
Long, Territorial Recorder; Mr. Shaw, sergeant-at-arms; Revs. Clark, 
Hill and Demarse, alternate chaplains. 

August 5, 1845, at Oregon City, the Legislative Committee held 
its first special session after the ratification of the organic system 
of laws and the inauguration of Hon. George Abernethy as Pro- 
visional Governor. The session closed August 20. The officers 
were: M. M. McCarver, Speaker; J. E. Long, Territorial Recorder 
and ex officio clerk; Fred Prigg, engrossing clerk. 

December 2, 1845, the first regular session cf the Provisional 
Legislative Assembly was held at Oregon City, at the residence of 
T. McGruder, ending December 19. Robert Newell was Speaker; 
J. E. Long, Territorial Recorder and ex officio chief clerk; Theophi- 
lus McGruder, sergeant-at-arms. 

The second Provisional Legislature met at the home of H. M. 
Knighton, in Oregon City, December 1, 1846, and comprised, as 
officers, A. L. Lovejoy, Speaker; N. Huber, chief clerk; H. M. Knigh- 
ton, sergeant-at-arms. 

December 28, 1847, marks the third regular session of the Pro- 
visional Legislature, held at Oregon City, which continued in session 



16 HISTORICAL 

until December 28. The Speaker was Robert Newell; chief clerk, 
Calvin W. Cook; engrossing clerk, J. E. Lyle; sergeant-at-arms, 
William Holmes. 

The fourth and last session of the Provisional Legislature con- 
vened December 5, 1848, and adjourned to February 5, 1849. The 
officers were: Ralph Wilcox, Speaker, who resigned, and was suc- 
ceded by L. A. Rice; W. G. T'Vault, chief clerk; William Holmes, 
sergeant-at-arms; James S. Cluse, engrossing clerk; S. H. L. Meek, 
doorkeeper; Wilson Blain, chaplain. 

This brings our subject up to the time of the Territorial Govern- 
ment, and the first regular session of the Territorial Legislature, 
July 16, 1849, to September 29, 1849. 

We are especially indebted to the kindness of George L. Himes, 
secretary of the Oregon State Historical Society, for the list of 
names of the fifty-two persons who met at Champoeg, May 2, 1843, 
to vote for the adoption of the committee's plans for a Provisional 
Government. These were: 

Dr. Ira L. Babcock, W. H. Wilson, G. W. LeBreton, W. H. Gray, 
Joseph L. Meek, David Hill, Robert Shortess, Dr. Robert Newell, 
Reuben Lewis, Amos Cook, Caleb Wilkins, Hugh Burns, Francis 
Fletcher, Sidney Smith, Alanson Beers, T. J. Hubbard, James O'Neil, 
Robert Moore, W. P. Doughty, L. H. Judson, A. T. Smith, J. C. 
Bridges, Rev. Gustavus Hines, Rev. David Leslie, John Howard, 
William McCarty, Charles McKay, Rev. J. S. Griffin, George Gay, 
George W. Ebberts, Rev. J. L. Parrish, Rev. Harvey Clark, Charles 
Campo, Dr. W. J. Bailey, Allen Davie, Joseph Holman, John Ed- 
munds Pickernel, Joseph Gale, Russell Osburn, David Weston, Wil- 
liam Johnson, W. Hauxhurst, William Cannon, Medorem Crawford, 
John L. Morrison, P. M. Armstrong, Calvin Tibbetts, J. R. Robb, 
Solomon H. Smith, A. E. Wilson, F. X. Matthieu, Etienne Lucier. 

The list of French Canadians present who voted against the 
adoption of the committee's report is incomplete, but among them 
were the following: 

Xavier Laderoute, Antoine Bonanfant, Andre LaChapelle, Pierre 
Papin, Louis B. Vandalle, Jean B. DuCharme, Fabien Maloine, Luc 
Pagnon, Etienne Gregoire, Amable Arcouette, Pierre DeLord, Louis 
A. VanDalle, John Sanders, Pierre Bariseau, Charles Rondeau, David 
Donpierre, Andre DuBois, Pierre Depot, Moyse Lor, Pierre LeCourse, 
Gedereau Sencalle, Thomas Moisan, Pierre Gauthier, Joseph Ber- 
nabe, Baptiste Deguire, Adolphe Chamberlain, Jean Lingras, Alexis 
Aubichon, Jean Servans, Michelle Laferte, Jean B. Dalcourse, Louis 
Osent, Jean B. Aubichon, Antoine Felice, Michel LaFramboise, Jo- 
seph Gervais, Jean B. Panpin, Olivier Briscbois, Thomas Roa, Louis 



HISTORICAL 17 

Boivers, Andre Langtain, Elexis LaPratte, Pierre Belique, Augustin 
Remon, Joseph Matte, Francois Bernier. 

By courtesy, Dr. John McLoughlin, director of the Hudson's Bay 
Company (1823 to 1843), is called a "Governor of Oregon." 

STATE OFFICIALS IDENTIFIED WITH THE BAR. 

Many of the public men of Oregon, who have been honored with 
state offices or who have represented the interests of Oregon in the 
Congress of the United States, have been identified with the legal 
profession. As nearly a correct list as it has been possible to as- 
semble, is here given: 

Governor John Whiteaker (March 3, 1859, to September 10, 1862), 
who was the first Governor after Oregon was admitted as a state, 
was County Judge of Lane County in 1856. 

Addison C. Gibbs, Oregon's second state Governor (September 

10, 1862, to September 12, 1866), was admitted to the bar in 1849. 

George L. Woods, Oregon's third state Governor (1866 to 1870), 
was admitted to the bar in 1858 and appointed County Judge of 
Wasco County in 1863. He practiced law in San Francisco for ten 
years and in Portland from 1885 to January 14, 1890, when he died. 

LaFayette Grover, the fourth state Governor of Oregon (Septem- 
ber 14, 1870, to February 1, 1877), was appointed clerk of the First 
Judicial District in 1851, and shortly after Prosecuting Attorney for 
the Second Judicial District. 

Stephen F. Chadwick, the fifth state Governor (February 1, 1877, 
to September 1 1, 1878), was admitted to the bar in New York in 1850. 
He begun his practice in Oregon in the Umpqua Valley in 1851. He 
was the first County Judge of what is now Douglas County. He 
also served, at one time, as Deputy United States Prosecuting At- 
torney. 

The sixth state Governor, William Wallace Thayer (September 

11, 1878, to September 13, 1882), was admitted to the bar at Roches- 
ter, N. Y., in March, 1851. He was elected District Attorney of the 
Third Judicial District of Idaho Territory in 1866. He was on the 
Supreme Court bench from 1884 to 1890, and for two years of his 
term was Chief Justice. 

Sylvester Pennoyer was the eighth state Governor (January 12, 
1887, to January 14, 1895). He graduated from the law department 
of Harvard in 1854. He was an able man and extremely odd in his 
manners. He cared but little for the "proprieties." At one time, 
when President Cleveland tried to counsel him as to the manner in 
which to deal with a railroad strike, Pennoyer advised him to "mind 
his own business." 



18 HISTORICAL 

William Paine Lord, ninth state Governor (January 16, 1895, to 
January, 1899), was admitted to the bar in the Supreme Court of 
New York in 1866. He was elected City Attorney of Salem in 1868. 

George E. Chamberlain, eleventh state Governor, is a graduate 
of the Washington and Lee University of Virginia (July, 1876) with 
the degrees of A. B. and B. L. In 1884 he was District Attorney for the 
Third Judicial District. He was the first Attorney General of Ore- 
gon under the act creating that office (1891), taking office May 21, 
that same year. He was also elected for the succeeding terms, and 
was chosen as District Attorney for Multnomah County in 1900. 
George E. Chamberlain's first term as Governor of Oregon was from 
January 14, 1903, to January, 1907; re-elected January 15, 1907, to 
serve until January, 1911. He was elected as a United States Sen- 
ator from Oregon January 20, 1909, for the period of six years, be- 
ginning March 4, 1909, and ending March 3, 1915. He resigned as 
Governor to accept the United States Senatorship February 27, 1909, 
and was succeeded as Governor by Frank W. Benson, Secretary of 
State, March 1, 1909, the latter now holding both offices (1910). 

On the death of Senator John H. Mitchell, in December, 1905, 
Governor Chamberlain appointed Hon. John M. Gearin, of Portland, 
as United States Senator from Oregon, to fill out Senator Mitchell's 
unexpired term. His term of office extended from January, 1906, 
to March 3, 1907, when he was succeeded by Senator Jonathan 
Bourne. 

Jonathan Bourne, United States Senator from Oregon, was elected 
to serve for six years, his term ending March 3, 1913. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar March 9, 1881. 

Charles W. Fulton was elected United States Senator from Ore- 
gon for the term of six years, his term ending March 3, 1909. He 
was admitted to the bar January 4, 1877. 

Frederick W. Mulkey, Oregon's "short term Senator," was elected 
to the United States Senate, February 23, 1907, his term expiring 
March 3, 1907. He was admitted to the bar January 2, 1898. 

William R. Ellis was elected Congressman from the Second Con- 
gressional District as the First Representative, serving from March 4, 
1893, to March 3, 1899; re-elected March 4, 1907, to March 3, 1909; 
re-elected March 4, 1909, to March 3, 1911. He was admitted to the 
bar June 11, 1885. 

Thomas H. Tongue was elected Congressman from the First Con- 
gressional District in June, 1896, serving from March 4, 1897, to 
March 3, 1899; re-elected March 4, 1899, to March 3, 1901; re-elected 
March 4, 1901, to March 3, 1904. He died in office, and was suc- 
ceeded by Binger Hermann, elected at a special election held June 
1, 1903. Mr. Tongue was admitted to the bar in 1870, having stud- 
ied law with W. D. Hare. 



HISTORICAL 19 

Willis C. Hawley, elected to Congress from the First Congres- 
sional District (March 4, 1907, to March 3, 1909; re-elected, March 
4, 1909, to March 3, 1911). He was admitted to the bar October 2, 
1894. 

Dr. Frederick Prigg, of Oregon City, Oregon's third Secretary 
of State, was at one time Circuit Judge of Clackamas County. 

General Edward Hamilton, second Secretary of Oregon Territory, 
was educated for the bar. 

Benjamin F. Harding, fourth Secretary of Oregon Territory, was 
a lawyer by profession. 

George Wickliff McBride, of St. Helens, was the first native-born 
Oregonian to fill the office of Secretary of State, being the fifth 
to occupy that office. He served two terms, from 1887 to 1895. He 
studied law with J. C. Moreland (now Clerk of the Supreme Court), 
at Portland, but never actively followed the practice of the pro- 
fession. 

Frank W. Benson, present Secretary of State and also Governor, 
succeeding Governor Chamberlain, was elected for the term begin- 
ning January 14, 1907, and ending January 9, 1911. He was admitted 
to the bar June 2, 1898. 

Phil Metschan, of Portland, the seventh State Treasurer (1890 
to 1899), was County Judge of Grant County, from 1882 to 1886, 
inclusive. 

Samuel R. Thurston, first Oregon delegate to Congress (June 6, 
1849, to March 3, 1851), was admitted to the bar in New Brunswick. 

Lansing Stout, second Representative at Large from Oregon 
(March 4, 1859, to March 3, 1861) begun practice as a lawyer in 
Oregon in 1857, and was elected Judge in Multnomah County in 1857. 

Colonel George K. Shiel was the third Representative at Large 
from Oregon to Congress (March 4, 1861, to March 3, 1863). He 
came to the state in 1854 and practiced his profession at Salem from 
1854 to 1861. 

John Rogers McBride was the fourth Representative at Large 
from Oregon (March 4, 1863, to March 3, 1865). He afterwards 
moved to Spokane to follow his profession of law. 

Rufus Mallory was the sixth Representative at Large to Congress 
from Oregon. He was admitted to the bar in 1860. 

Joseph G. Wilson died before taking his seat in Congress as ninth 
Representative at Large, to which he was elected, March 4, 1873. 
He was admitted to the bar in Ohio. 

La Fayette Lane was the twelfth Representative at Large from 
Oregon (October 25, 1875, to March 3, 1877). He practiced law in 
Oregon. 



20 HISTORICAL 

Richard Williams was the thirteenth Representative at Large from 
this state (March 4, 1877, to March 3, 1879). He studied law at 
Corvallis. He was a one-time partner of Judge Mallory and after- 
wards was a partner with W. Lair Hill and W. W. Thayer. 

Melvin Clarke George was Oregon's fifteenth Representative at 
Large (March 4, 1881, to March 3, 1885). He is an ex-Judge of 
Multnomah County and is at present writing engaged in the practice 
of his profession in Portland. 

Binger Hermann was the state's sixteenth Representative at Large 
and the first Representative from the First Congressional District 
after its creation. He was admitted to the Supreme Court of Oregon 
in 1886. 

Hon. Asahel Bush, Territorial Printer from 1S51 to 1864, was 
admitted to the Massachusetts bar in May, 1850. 

Hon. Eugene Semple, State Printer from 1872 to 1874, was a 
graduate of the Cincinnati Law School, in 1863. He practiced law 
in Portland from 1863 to 1869. 

Among the United States Senators from Oregon who were mem- 
bers of the profession of law, the following may be mentioned: 

Colonel Edward D. Baker (March 4, 1861, to October 21, 1864), 
"first studied for the ministry, but soon turned his attention to law, 
becoming famous as an advocate in Illinois." 

Benjamin Stark (October 21, 1861, to September 11, 1862), was 
admitted to the bar in 1851. 

George H. Williams (March 4, 1865, to March 3, 1871), was ad- 
mitted to practice in 1844, in Onondaga County, N. Y. 

John H. Mitchell (March 4, 1873, to March 3. 1879; March 4, 
1885, to March 3, 1891; March 4, 1891, to March 3, 1897). He was 
admitted to the bar in Pennsylvania. 

James Harvey Slater (March 4, 1879, to March 3, 1885), was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1854. He served as Clerk of the United States 
District Court in 1853. 

Joseph N. Dolph (March 4, 1883, to March 3, 1889; March 4, 1889, 
to March 3, 1895), was admitted to the bar in New York in 1861. 

Joseph Simon (March 4, 1897, to March 3, 1903). was admitted 
to practice in 1872. 

The Legislature created the office of Attorney-General in 1891. 
Governor Pennoyer appointed as first incumbent to the office Hon. 
George E. Chamberlain. In June, 1892, he was elected to the office 
for a term of two years. 

Cicero M. Idleman was Attorney-General from 1895 to 1899. 
He was admitted to the bar in Ohio in 1883. 



HISTORICAL 21 

D. R. Blackburn was Attorney-General from 1899 to 1903. 

A. M. Crawford was Attorney-General from 1903 to 1907. In 
1907 he was re-elected, his term of office to expire in 1911. 

JUDGES OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

The record shows that "February 18, 1841, J. L. Babcock was 
unanimously chosen Supreme Judge of Oregon with probate pow- 
ers, and was instructed to act in accordance with the Code and laws 
of the State of New York until a Code should be adopted in Ore- 
gon." He was probably the first man to occupy this position. 

"For the purpose of taking steps to organize a civil community 
and provide laws, Mr. W. E. Wilson was chosen Supreme Judge with 
probate powers," at Champooick (Champoeg), May 2, 1843. 

In the Code and Primary Constitution submitted by the Legis- 
lative Committee July 5, 1843, this provision appears: "That judi- 
cial powers shall be vested in a Supreme Court consisting of a Su- 
preme Judge and two Justices of the Peace. The jurisdiction of the 
Supreme Court shall be both appellate and original." 

August 9, 1845, Nathaniel Ford, of Yamhill County, was elected 
"a Supreme Judge of Oregon." But he declined to serve, and the 
Legislature elected Hon. P. H. Burnett Supreme Judge for four 
years. 

February 11, 1847, Hon. J. Quinn Thornton took the oath of office 
as Supreme Judge of Oregon. 

November 13, 1847, Hon. Columbus Lancaster took the oath as 
Supreme Judge. 

February 13, 1849, Hon. A. L. Lovejoy was elected to the office. 
The early records are incomplete, but they show that Judges Wil- 
liam P. Bryant and Thomas Nelson, who had been appointed Su- 
preme Court Judges and who reached Oregon in 1849, were suc- 
cessors to Judge Lovejoy. 

The first Chief Justice for the Territory of Oregon was Judge 
William P. Bryant (1849-1850). 

The second Chief Justice was Judge Thomas Nelson (1850-1853). 
His Associate Justices were Orville C. Pratt and William Strong. 

The third Chief Justice was Judge George H. Williams (1853- 
1859). 

Judge Aaron E. Wait was the first Chief Justice after Oregon 
became a state (1859-1862). 

Judge Reuben P. Boise was Chief Justice from 1862 to 1864 and 
from 1868 to 1870. 

Judge Paige Prim was Chief Justice from 1859 to 1880, having 



22 HISTORICAL 

been elected three times to this distinguished place, and was the 
sixth, ninth and twelfth to fill the position. 

Judge Erasmus D. Shattuck was Chief Justice from 1866 to 1868. 

William W. Upton was the tenth Chief Justice (1872-1874), and 
was Associate Justice from 1868 to 1872. 

Judge B. F. Bonham was Chief Justice from 1874 to 1876. 
Judge James K. Kelly was Chief Justice from 1878 to 1880. 

Judge William Paine Lord was Chief Justice at these periods: 
1880-1882, 1886-1888, 1892-1894. 

Judge John Breckenridge Waldo was the sixteenth Chief Justice 
of the Supreme Court, 1884-1886; Associate Justice, 1880-1884. 

Judge William Wallace Thayer was Chief Justice from 1885 to 
1890. 

Judge R. S. Strahan was Chief Justice, 1890-1892. 
Judge Robert S. Bean was Chief Justice, 1892-1896. 

Frank A. Moore was Chief Justice, 1896-1898; 1898-1902, Asso- 
ciate Justice; 1902-1904, Chief Justice; 1904-1908, Associate Justice; 
elected 1908 as Chief Justice, his term expiring in 1911. 

Judge Charles E. Wolverton was Chief Justice, 1898-1900. He 
was advanced to the United States District bench after the death of 
Judge Bellinger, a position which he still creditably fills. 

"The constitution of Oregon, as adopted by the people in 1858 
and ratified by Congress in 1859, provided that until the population 
should reach one hundred thousand, Circuit Judges for the several 
judicial districts should be elected to serve in the dual capacity of 
Circuit and Supreme Judges. It provided that in addition to their 
duties as Circuit Judges they should meet annually, or oftener if 
necessary, at the state capitol and hold Supreme Court, the Judge 
whose decision was being reviewed not sitting as a Supreme Judge 
in each instance. On account of this provision it happens that dur- 
ing the early history of Oregon there were more judges upon the 
Supreme bench than during the more recent years. In the year 1878 
an act, as contemplated in the constitution, providing for the election 
of Supreme and Circuit Judges in distinct classes, was duly passed, 
and from that date to the present time the Supreme Court has con- 
sisted of three justices, duly elected by the people and serving in 
that capacity only, the Circuit and Supreme Courts being separate 
and distinct. The constitution designated the senior Judge, or the 
one whose term is next to expire, as the Chief Justice at any par- 
ticular period of time; thus, the office of Chief Justice rotates at 
any biennial election, so that in the case of a Justice being re-elected 
he serves in the capacity of Associate Justice for four years and in 



HISTORICAL 23 

the capacity of Chief Justice two years, the terms for which each 
Supreme Judge is elected being six years." 

In 1907 the Oregon Legislature passed an act authorizing the 
appointment by the Governor of two Commissioners, whose duties 
were to assist the Supreme Court in the discharge of its work. 
Governor Chamberlain appointed Will R. King and W. T. Slater as 
such Commissioners. In 1909 the Legislature passed another act, 
authorizing the increase of Justices of the Supreme Court from 
three to five. Under this act, Governor Chamberlain appointed the 
above-named Commissioners to these positions, which they occupy 
at this time (1910). 

In 1889 the Legislature of Oregon provided that the Supreme 
Court should be held at Pendleton on the first Monday in May and 
on the first Monday in November of each year. This was to provide 
facilities for hearings for all counties east of the Cascade Mountains, 
excepting the counties of Lake and Klamath. It is provided, also, 
that except from Crook, Wasco and Hood River counties all tran- 
scripts must be filed either at Pendleton or at Salem, the capital city, 
at the term next ensuing. 

It is proper to say something of the Supreme Court Reports of 
Oregon in this connection. The principal decisions of Volumes I, II 
and III were reported by Joseph G. Wilson, who served part of the 
time as Judge of the Supreme Court and part of the time as Clerk, 
from 1853 to 1870. Volumes IV, V, VI, VII and VIII were reported 
by the late Judge Charles B. Bellinger, when Clerk of the Supreme 
Court, 1870 to 1880. Volumes IX, X, and XI were reported by T. B. 
Odeneal, 1880-1884. J. A. Stratton, Clerk from 1884 to 1887, re- 
ported Volumes XII, XIII and XIV. W. H. Holmes reported Volumes 
XV, XVI and XVII, 1887-1889. Under the Act of 1889, Chief Justice 
W. W. Thayer and Chief Justice R. S. Strahan reported, respectively, 
Volumes XVIII, XIX (1889-1890). The Act of 1891 authorized an 
official Supreme Court Reporter. George H. Burnett was the first 
Reporter elected to the office under this act. He reported Volumes 
XX, XXI and XXII (1890-1892). Robert G. Morrow, at this time 
(1910) on the Circuit bench of Multnomah County, was chosen Re- 
porter in 1892. He reported Volumes XXIII to XLIX, inclusive. He 
was succeeded by Frank A. Turner, who reported Volumes L to LIII, 
inclusive, and who still occupies the position (1910). 

FIRST WRITTEN RECORD OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

A copy of the first written record of the Supreme Court of the 
Territory of Oregon, copied from the records, through the courtesy 
of Judge Moreland, Clerk of the Supreme Court, is a matter of 
quaint interest. It is herewith presented: 



24 HISTORICAL 

"COURT RECORDS, OREGON TERRITORY. 

"January 15th, A. D. 1844. 

"Ahi Smith obtained a writ of replevin for a yoke of oxen de- 
tained by Nineveh Ford. 

"Filed affidavit, and writ issued to the Sheriff returnable at the 
next term of court. 

"G. W. LE BRETON, Clerk of Court." 

"Second Term of Supreme Court of Oregon Territory. Held at 
Tualita Plaine third Tuesday in April, A. D. 1844. 

"(O. Russell presiding, assisted by R. More, Justice of the Peace.) 

"Court opened at 10 o'clock A. M. First case called. Smith 
versus Ford. 

"Writ of replevin issued in behalf of Ahi Smith on the 15th of 
January, A. D. 1844, commanding the Sheriff to replevy one yoke of 
oxen unlawfully detained by Nineveh Ford, and summoning the 
said Ford to appear and abide the judgment of the Court. 

"The defendant, plead for a nonsuit on the informality of the 
bond given by the plaintiff. The Court having decided the bond to 
be legally constituted, the defendant then applied for a continuance 
of the cause, on account of absence of testimony. The oath being 
administered the defendant stated the facts he wished to prove by 
those witnesses, when the Court adjourned until 2 o'clock P. M." 

On the trial the jury found a verdict for the plaintiff. 

OREGON WOMEN LAWYERS. 

The Supreme Court records show that quite a number of women 
have, at one time or another, passed the examinations required of all 
applicants, and have been admitted to the bar, although the names 
of one or two herewith given were admitted on their certificates 
from other states. The list follows: 

Mary A. Leonard, admitted in 1886. 

Manche Irene Langley, admitted October 12, 1909. 

Rachel L. Ray, admitted May 6, 1902. Justice Moore at the time 
paid her the high compliment of saying that after an experience of 
ten years upon the bench, he was free to say that she passed the 
best examination of any student that had ever appeared before him. 

Wilda Buckman, admitted June 10, 1909. 

Elizabeth Eaglesfield, admitted June 19, 1902. 

Lida M. O'Bryon, admitted May 15, 1907. 

Nina E. Wood, admitted October 7, 1896. 

Narcissa Conn, admitted June 7, 1897. 

Gabrielle Clark, admitted June 6, 1898. 

Anna M. Carson, admitted in 1899. 

Olive S. England (now Mrs. Enright), admitted in 1898. 






HISTORICAL 25 

Delia B. Crigler, admitted June 17, 1907. 

Mrs. A. T. Kelliher is also a member of the bar. There may be 
one or two more. 

THE OREGON CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION IN 1857. 

Sentiment became so strong for statehood for Oregon at the 
end of the Yakima Indian War of 1855-56, that the voters of the 
territory elected delegates in June, 1857, to meet at Salem, August 
17, the same year, to formulate a constitution. Prior to this time, 
General Lane, the Oregon delegate to the Congress of the United 
States, had framed a bill to the end of statehood for the territory, 
but it failed of passage, and effort to form a constitution was there- 
fore entirely due to the initiative of the territory itself. Sixty dele- 
gates attended the convention, of which Matthew P. Deady was 
made president and Chester N. Terry secretary. Among the well- 
known names at that convention in addition to Matthew P. Deady, 
who was at the time an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of 
the Territory of Oregon, were the late George H. Williams, of revered 
memory, then Chief Justice; Cyrus Olney, Associate Justice, and 
R. P. Boise, who succeeded the latter on the Supreme Bench. 

The only contest for a seat was that between F. G. Lockhart and 
P. B. Marple, of Coos County. The latter won out. One authority 
says that "Marple was nominally a lawyer, and he succeeded in mak- 
ing himself so much disliked by his tendency to indulge in discus- 
sion . . . that there was general regret that he had been suc- 
cessful in his contest." 

Upon the several committees eighteen were lawyers. The judi- 
ciary committee comprised Hon. George H. Williams, Chief Justice, 
chairman; Cyrus Olney, Associate Justice; R. P. Boise, Associate 
Justice; Hon. John R. McBride, a well-known attorney, was attached 
to the executive committee. 

In his recollections of that convention, John R. McBride very 
frankly says: "Truth, however, justifies the statement that the law- 
yers monopolized most of the time and the farmers the least." He 
pays a deserved tribute to Matthew P. Deady. He states that Judge 
Deady was then "about thirty-five years of age, was a man large in 
stature, of impressive manner and bearing, smooth in speech, cour- 
teous and affable in intercourse, though he had dignity and firmness 
as a presiding officer." Chancing to make several errors in his 
parliamentary rulings, when these were shown, he admitted his mis- 
takes, "and correcting his own errors with a cordiality and frankness 
which did him great credit with the convention." 

Further Mr. McBride says of him: "He was a great admirer of 
rusticity. Although his tendencies toward an aristocratic life were 



26 HISTORICAL 

strong, he was an admirer of simplicity in home life." He was an 
ardent Unionist at the time of the Rebellion, in 1861. 

The estimate of Judge Williams of the character of Judge Deady 
is worthy of insertion here. Of his associate on the Supreme bench 
he said: 

"Judge Deady had by nature a judicial mind. His inclination and 
practice were to drive through technicalities to the vital points of a 
case. When he made up his mind that a certain result in a case was 
right, he was accustomed to remove with a strong hand all obstacles 
to the attainment of that end. ... 1 know of no higher praise 
that I can bestow upon a judge than to say of him that he adminis- 
tered the law without fear, favor or affection. No hand has been 
so strongly and deeply impressed upon the legislative and judicial 
history of Oregon as that of Judge Deady." 

In the opinion of Judge Williams, "Judge Olney was a modest, 
retiring and rather eccentric, but no ordinary man." Of him he 
said, further, "I have never met but one who, in my judgment, could 
dovetail the facts and circumstances of a case together with more 
completeness and convincing effect that Cyrus Olney; but notwith- 
standing this, my opinion is that his qualifications for a judge were 
not equal to those possessed by Judge Deady." 

The judiciary discussions were led principally by George H. Wil- 
liams and Delazon Smith, who was an able lawyer, afterwards a 
United States Senator. 

George H. Williams, Oregon's "Grand Old Man," died at his home 
in Portland, on the night of April 3-4, 1910. It is difficult to resist 
the desire to eulogize the distinguished statesman, who has so re- 
cently passed into the Great Beyond. Suffice it to say that he re- 
ceived his appointment as Chief Justice of the Oregon territory at 
the hands of President Pierce. He first settled at Salem, and at the 
expiration of Pierce's administration, was reappointed Chief Justice 
by President Buchanan, but retired to practice law at Portland, one 
year later. From his great mind was evolved the Fourteenth Amend- 
ment to the Constitution of the United States. His record as a 
member of the Commission to frame a treaty for the settlement of the 
Alabama Claims, his record as Attorney-General in the Cabinet of 
President Grant, and many other acts of his life stamp him as one 
of the nation's great men. He was of simple tastes. His life was 
gentle; he was credulous by nature, and no doubt his great, kind 
heart was often imposed upon. He was in his eighty-eighth year 
at the time of his death. 

Reuben P. Boise, one of the members of the judiciary committee 
of the convention, served his district judicially almost continuously 



HISTORICAL 27 

during the active years of his life. The record of his life is open 
and free to be read by all. 

In the archives of the State Historical Society there appears this 
reference to Delazon Smith and other members of this historical con- 
vention. These are here briefly quoted, as follows: 

"There were a number of the members of the convention who 
became prominent in the state. Delazon Smith was one of the first 
United States Senators. Grover eventually became a Senator, and 
Kelly served a term in that body. Deady was appointed United 
States District Judge and died after thirty years of service on the 
bench. Dryer was appointed United States Commissioner to the 
Hawaiian Islands and died subsequently in Portland. Williams be- 
came a United States Senator, and afterwards Attorney-General of 
the United States, and is now the Mayor of Portland (1906). Shat- 
tuck, of Washington County, served as a District and Supreme Judge 
for many years acceptably and ably, and many others who were 
prominent in the deliberations have done good service to the state 
in honorable positions." 

In 1834 President Tyler appointed Delazon Smith as a Minister 
to Peru. While there, he was overcome by the wanderlust, and de- 
cided to explore the Andes region, after crossing the continent on 
horseback. It was then practically a terra incognita. For eleven 
months the State Department was not cognizant of his whereabouts, 
and the witty paragraphers of the newspapers spoke of him as the 
"lost Minister," and dubbed him "Delusion" Smith. He was a splen- 
did orator and his expression was logical. He could be ironical to a 
degree. It is related of him that on hearing John R. McBride de- 
nounce the Dred Scott decision of the United States Supreme Court, 
so unpopular with the Republicans of that period, Smith remarked 
with mirthful irony: "How those grave old judges at Washington 
will be humiliated when they hear that the young David of the bar 
of Yamhill County, Oregon, differs from their deliverance in the 
Dred Scott case. They will hide their old gray heads in shame, and 
we can only pity them." McBride admitted: "I felt myself crushed 
as though a lion had touched me a passing blow with his paw." 

Smith was one of Oregon's greatest men is admitted. He served 
as a United States Senator only a few days. He went to Congress 
in 1859, and a few days after the election of Abraham Lincoln, "he 
died more from a broken heart than physical illness." 

W. H. Farrar, another member of this convention, was well edu- 
cated and an able lawyer. He was born in New Hampshire. He was 
refined in manner, but there was a non-understandable element in 
his character. He resided at one time at Washington, D. C. He 
accepted an invitation to deliver the annual address at an anniversary 



28 HISTORICAL 

of the State of New Hampshire, in 1864. Before the date set, he 
dropped completely from view, though why, no one knew but him- 
self, and he never saw fit to explain. He served at one time as Mayor 
of Portland. 

One of the wittiest members of that convention was "Hal" Reed, 
of Jackson County, then about 30 years old. He had but little to 
say at first, but was becoming wearied with the long-winded haran- 
gues. A motion was made to limit the debate. Delazon Smith re- 
ferred to the "dumb dogs who couldn't bark and didn't want to listen 
to those who could." This brought Reed to his feet with a witty and 
sarcastic retort that "silence is golden;" that he was there to forward 
the work in hand, and that the silent members could not be "wiped 
out with a wet rag." Subsequently Reed removed to Nevada, in the 
'60s, but returned to Portland in later years, where he died, in the 
practice of his profession. 

The tribute paid by McBride to the framers of the Constitution 
of Oregon, is a worthy finale to this portion of the present sketch. 
"Their work," said he, "was indorsed by the people and has stood the 
test of criticism and time for over forty years. That it had defects 
when made was admitted by many, but on the whole it then sur- 
passed, and still surpasses, many constitutions more pretenious, even 
those of later date. It is brief in its language, affording less ground 
for debate or construction than most of such instruments, and has 
caused less difference of opinion for the courts than almost any or- 
ganic law with which I am acquainted." 

The New York and Iowa statutes served as models for the Pro- 
visional Government of Oregon, and subsequent litigation followed 
these lines. The Oregon Constitution was framed by sixty delegates 
chosen by the people at the general election held the first Monday 
of June, 1857. On the second Monday in November, that same year, 
it was ratified by a majority vote of the electors of the territory, and 
the Act of Congress admitting Oregon into the Union was approved 
February 14, 1859, at which time the constitution went into effect. 

Article VII, Section 1, of the Constitution of Oregon, provides 
for a Supreme Court and a County Court, "which shall be courts of 
record, having general jurisdiction to be defined, limited and regu- 
lated by law in accordance with this constitution. Justices of the 
Peace may also be invested with limited judicial powers, and munici- 
pal courts may be created to administer the regulations of incorpor- 
ated towns and villages." 

OREGON'S DONATION LAND LAW. 

Some account, at least, of Oregon's "Donation Land Law," should 
be given in a work like the present. It is made up of several differ- 



HISTORICAL 29 

ent Acts of Congress. The Act of Congress, August 14, 1848, pro- 
vided: 

"From and after the passage of this act all that part of the terri- 
tory of the United States which lies west of the summit of the 
Rocky Mountains, north of the forty-second degree of north lati- 
tude, known as the Territory of Oregon, shall be organized into and 
constitute a temporary government, by the name of the Territory of 
Oregon: Provided, that nothing in this act contained shall be con- 
strued to impair the rights of person or property now pertaining to 
the Indians in said territory, so long as such rights remain unextin- 
guished by treaty between the United States and such Indians, or to 
affect the authority of the Government of the United States, any 
regulation respecting such Indians, their lands, property or other 
rights, by treaty, law or otherwise, which it would have been compe- 
tent to the Government to make if this act had never passed: And 
provided, also, that the title to the land, not exceeding six hundred 
and forty acres, now occupied as missionary stations among the In- 
dian tribes in said territory, together with the improvement thereon, 
be confirmed and established in the several religious societies to 
which said missionary stations respectively belong." 

Section 4, Act of Congress, September 2, 1850, provided, among 
other things, that "there shall be, and hereby is, granted to every 
white settler or occupant of public lands, American half-breed in- 
cluded, above the age of eighteen years, being a citizen of the United 
States, . . . who shall have resided upon and cultivated the 
same for four successive years, . . . the quantity of one-half 
section, or three hundred and twenty acres of land, if a single man, 
and if a married man, or, if he shall become married within one year 
from the first day of December, 1850, the quantity of one section, or 
six hundred and forty acres, one-half to himself and the other half 
to his wife, to be held by her in her own right," etc. 

Grants were issued to all white citizens of the United States 
above twenty-one years of age emigrating to and settling in Oregon 
between December 1, 1850, and December 1, 1853. Claimants were 
required within twelve months after the surveys had been made, or 
if the surveys were made before the settlement, then within twelve 
months after such settlement was commenced. Upon the settler's 
death his rights descended to his heir and widow. Military posts or 
other land claimed for governmental purposes were not subject to 
donation rights; all mineral lands and lands reserved for salines, 
were reserved from such rights, as were, also, forts, magazines, ar- 
senals and dockyards. 

The Act of Congress, February 14, 1853, provided for the commu- 
tation of donation claims. Act of July 17, 1854, gave to orphans 



30 HISTORICAL 

the right to claim quarter sections. It also provided that townsites 
were not to be included in donation claims. 

The foregoing are the principal points covered by the Oregon Do- 
nation Land Law, which is universally conceded to have been a piece 
of wise and beneficent legislation. 

CHARACTER SKETCHES OF SOME OF THE MEMBERS OF THE 
OREGON BENCH AND BAR. 

After the admission of Oregon as a state, the first judges to be 
elected in 1858 to the bench of the Supreme Court were the follow- 
ing: Matthew P. Deady, Chief Justice; A. E. Wait, Riley E. Strat- 
ton, Reuben P. Boise, Associate Justices. Ere they entered upon 
their duties Deady was appointed by the President of the United 
States as District Judge for the District of Oregon. Governor White- 
aker appointed P. P. Prim to fill the vacancy thus occasioned; thus 
Judge Wait became the first Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. 

Judge Wait was born in Massachusetts and came to Oregon in 
1847. He was a lawyer of much ability, firm in his convictions and 
a conscientious and honest man. He resigned in the spring of 1860 
to accept the nomination for Congress at the hands of the Brecken- 
ridge-Lane wing of the Democratic party, but failed to achieve his 
ambitions. 

Judge Whiteaker appointed W. W. Page, a prominent Portland 
lawyer, to fill Judge Wait's place. At the following election Judge 
E. D. Shattuck was elected as successor to Judge Page. 

Judge Stratton was born in Pennsylvania. He was educated for 
the ministry, but decided to enter the legal profession. He is de- 
scribed as having been a fine-appearing man, a ready writer and a 
fluent speaker. He settled at Roseburg in 1852. He became Prose- 
cuting Attorney for the First Judicial District and was afterwards 
elected to the Supreme bench. Judge Boise pays him this tribute: 
"He was a true man of the people always kind, genial, affable and 
just to his fellows; indeed, nature had written on his brow, 'a gen- 
tleman.' ' He died in December, 1865. 

A. A. Skinner succeeded him on the Supreme bench under the 
appointment of Governor Woods. He came to Oregon in 1845. Un- 
der the Provisional Government he was a Circuit Judge and a man 
of influence. He was also prominent under the Territorial Govern- 
ment, acting as Prosecuting Attorney, Indian Agent and afterwards 
becoming a delegate for the Whig party as delegate to Congress 
against General Joseph Lane. In 1866 he was succeeded by John 
Kelsay, a pioneer of 1852, who came from Missouri. He had a wide 



HISTORICAL 31 

practice over the Second and Third Judicial Districts and in the 
Supreme Court. His convictions were strong in politics and religion 
and he was slow to accept variations from established beliefs. One 
day, in the old court room, at Salem, while looking up some legal 
authorities, he overheard a discussion upon the then newly-announced 
Darwinian theory. Since it appeared to run counter to his religious 
leanings, he remarked: "Boys, there ain't anything in this monkey 
theory; for if it were true, there would be an occasional breeding 
back, and a baby with a tail every once in awhile." 

Judge Kelsay's briefs were often written on separate bits of 
paper which he carried in his hat, but he could marshal his authori- 
ties well before a jury. Judge Boise declares him to have been "an 
honorable, industrious, energetic man, who stood bravely for the 
right as he saw it, and never faltered in the discharge of his duties 
in public or private life." 

A. J. Thayer was born in New York and came to Oregon in 1852, 
settling at Corvallis in the practice of law. He succeeded Judge 
Kelsay. He was a practical farmer as well as lawyer. In appear- 
ance he was short and stout, and is said to have worn buckskin 
breeches when engaged in farm work. When he became a candidate 
for Judge in the Second District, William Gird, a former associate 
in business matters but at that time "at outs" with Judge Thayer, 
tried to defeat him by the publication in a Corvallis newspaper of a 
warning against him, declaring him to be dishonest and crooked, 
and as always trying to cover up his trail, "and that to do this he 
wore buckskin breeches so low in the seat as to rub out his tracks." 
Judge Boise says of him: "I knew Judge Thayer intimately from 
the time he came to the state, was frequently associated with him 
in the management of suits, and served with him on the bench of 
the Supreme Court, and always found him upright and honorable 
a good lawyer, ever true to his clients and friends." He was one of 
the founders and most staunch friends of the Oregon Agricultural 
College. 

Owing to the growth in population east of the Cascades, the crea- 
tion of a new judicial district became necessary in 1862. Governor 
Gibbs appointed Joseph G. Wilson as Judge over the new district, 
which brought the membership of the Supreme Court up to five. 
Judge Wilson was born in New Hampshire, but was educated in 
Ohio. He was a graduate of Marietta College and also of the Cin- 
cinnati Law School. He settled in legal practice at Salem in 1852. 
He creditably served as Clerk of the Supreme Court both under the 
Territorial Government and after Oregon became a state, most of 
the time till he ascended to the Supreme bench. The first three vol- 
umes of the Oregon Supreme Court Reports were compiled by him. 



32 HISTORICAL 

He had superior natural abilities and was a cultured man. He was, 
for several years, Prosecuting Attorney for the Third District, from 
which place he was appointed Judge of the Fifth District, then com- 
prising all of Eastern Oregon. He had great quickness of apprehen- 
sion and intimate knowledge. Though elected to Congress, he died 
suddenly in Ohio, without serving. One authority says: "He was 
a popular Circuit Judge. As a Judge of the Supreme Court, he ac- 
quitted himself with distinguished ability." 

E. D. Shattuck was born in Vermont and came to Oregon about 
1853. He served as a teacher at Oregon City for a time and after- 
wards as such at Pacific University, at Cottage Grove. He was a 
graduate of the University of Vermont and an accomplished scholar. 
He was a member of the Constitutional Convention from Washing- 
ton County. He served on the Supreme bench for a number of 
years, and also on the Circuit bench of Multnomah County at Port- 
land, nearly up to the time of his death. He was an accurate and 
painstaking lawyer and judge, and enjoyed the respect and confi- 
dence of the public. 

P. P. Prim was born in Tennessee, and was one of the judges of 
the first Supreme Court of the state. He settled in Jackson County 
about 1851, at Jacksonville. He was a man of strict integrity, with 
a high sense of honor. He was an able lawyer and judge. He re- 
mained on the Supreme bench until the creation of a Supreme Court 
separate from the Circuit Court. Under appointment, he served as 
Supreme Court Judge for a time, but subsequently retired to pri- 
vate practice at Jacksonville. He was afterwards elected to the 
Legislature. 

W. W. Upton was first appointed as Judge of the Fourth District 
by the Governor, and subsequently elected from that district. Prior 
to coming to Oregon, he was a member of the Sacramento bar. He 
is described as "a man of pleasing address and a lawyer of ability." 
At the end of his term he retired from the bench. Before his ap- 
pointment as Judge, he was a member of the Oregon Legislature for 
one term. He was an able political manager and debater. He after- 
wards received a Government appointment in the Treasury Depart- 
ment, at Washington, where he remained until his death. 

B. Whitton, who succeeded Judge Wilson in the Fifth Judicial 
District under gubernatorial appointment to fill a vacancy, served 
from June to September, 1870, when Judge L. L. McArthur was 
elected from this district, but never sat upon the Supreme bench. 

L. L. McArthur arrived in Oregon in 1864. He was born in Vir- 
ginia May 18. 1843. He is reputed to have been "a good scholar 
and. well-read in his profession, of prepossessing appearance and a 
pleasant gentleman who knew well the ways of refined society." As 
Judge of the Circuit and Supreme Courts he ably discharged his du- 



HISTORICAL 33 

ties until a Supreme Court was specially created. Then he was for 
a number of years under appointment Circuit Judge of the Fifth 
District. Subsequently he was appointed United States District At- 
torney. He died in Portland, May 10, 1897. 

CREATION OF THE PRESENT SUPREME COURT. 

The present Supreme Court was created and established as a 
separate tribunal from the Circuit Court in 1878, with three judges. 
These were appointed to their positions, and were: Chief Justice, 
James J. Kelly; Associate Justices, Reuben P. Boise and P. P. Prim. 

Judge Kelly was a graduate of Princeton College and of the 
Carlisle Law School. He emigrated to California in 1849, but came 
to Oregon in 1851, selecting Oregon City as his home, where he rose 
to the front rank as a lawyer. In 1853 Judge Kelly, Judge Boise 
and D. R. Bigelow were appointed as commissioners to prepare a 
code of laws for the territory. The code was adopted by the Terri- 
torial Legislature in 1853. The practice then formulated and adopted 
has undergone but little change since. Judge Kelly's honorable ca- 
reer may thus be briefly epitomized: Served several terms in the 
Territorial Legislature; was a member of the Constitutional Con- 
vention; was a member of the State Senate; served six years as 
United States Senator from Oregon. He was especially helpful in 
forwarding the building of the locks at the Cascades of the Co- 
lumbia. He acquired a competence after his retirement from the 
bench, removing to Washington, D. C., where he died later, full of 
years and honor. 

The judges elected to succeed Judges Kelly, Boise and Prim in 
the Supreme Court were William P. Lord, Edward B. Watson and 
John B. Waldo. 

The decisions of the original Supreme Court were all written, 
and are included in the first eight volumes of the Oregon Supreme 
Court Reports. 

It is a matter of interest to note that in the constitution adopted 
by the Constitutional Convention, slavery was prohibited, and negroes 
and mulattoes were excluded from the state. They were deprived of 
the right to bring or maintain suits at law. The negro exclusion 
clause still remains in the Oregon Constitution. An effort was made 
a few years ago to expunge this clause, but it failed. The amendments 
to the Constitution of the United States, however, nullify it. 

It will be remembered that Oregon's Provisional Government 
was really begun in 1843. In 1844 the pioneers decreed that Oregon 
should be a free state. The late George H. Williams was fond of 
referring to the time when he was Chief Justice. One of the first 
cases to come before him was an application by a colored family in 



34 HISTORICAL 

Polk County to be liberated under habeas corpus proceedings from 
their Missouri owner, who had brought them here and held them as 
slaves. It was claimed that the Constitution of the United States 
protected slave property in the territories. With that splendid in- 
sight which was ever a remarkable element in Judge Williams' char- 
acter, he granted the colored family its freedom. He held "that the 
law made by the pioneers upon the subject was not inconsistent with 
the spirit of the constitution and was the law of the land." 

April 1, 1893, Judge Williams delivered an address at Portland, 
in which he referred to the territorial days of Oregon. In speaking 
of his one-time associates upon the Supreme bench, Judges Deady 
and Olney, Judge Williams said: 

"Our personal and official relations were kindly and cordial, 
though all of us were somewhat firm and unyielding in our opinions; 
and I now recall one instance, when we sat down at a table in my 
residence at Salem to consider a case, and continued the discussion, 
with no little animation, until we adjourned for breakfast in the 
broad daylight of the next morning." 

Evidently the judges of that period were willing to labor long 
hours. 

A picturesque and interesting character deserving of mention 
in this connection is Colonel James Willis Nesmith. He was born 
at New Brunswick, Me., in 1820. In 1843 he joined the Applegate 
party in the long trip across the plains to Oregon. Hawthorne's 
"History of Oregon" says of him: 

"In the long hours of that toilsome ride over the prairies, several 
members of the train who belonged to the legal fraternity started a 
mock trial. Nesmith took part in the exercise and displayed such an 
amazing amount of genius in his interpretation of justice that he 
was advised to join the legal profession. Arriving at Oregon City 
he put his talents to a practical test, and two years later served as 
a Judge under the Provisional Government." He died in 1880. 

Colonel Nesmith was Judge under the Provisional Government 
from 1845 to 1846; member of the Provisional Legislature, 1845; 
United States Marshal, 1855-56; Superintendent of Indian Affairs, 
1856-59; United States Senator, 1861-67; member of Congress, 1873- 
1875. Hawthorne thus eulogizes him: "Honest, open-hearted and 
courageous, no danger or unexpected event could shake his firmness 
or disturb his presence of mind." He was of vigorous mental power, 
humane disposition and was liberal in his opinions. 

Among the first emigrants to Oregon was what was known as 
the "Peoria party," which left Illinois about May 1, 1839. There 
were nineteen in the party, and of these only one was a lawyer, one 
T. J. Farnham, born in Vermont, who was then about thirty-five years 



HISTORICAL 35 

of age. Farnham acted as leader, and he called his followers the 
"Oregon dragoons." They carried a flag, presented by Mrs. Farn- 
ham, bearing the legend, "Oregon or the Grave." Before starving 
out, Farnham said their intention was to raise the American flag, 
take possession of the country in the name of the United States 
and to drive out the Hudson's Bay Company. 

It is an anomalous fact, that the first Judge of the Supreme Court 
under the Provisional Government was a physician a Dr. Babcock. 
The late Judge Boise says of him: "He was not a lawyer; but there 
is no record tending to show that any want of technical learning led 
him to err in the discharge of his judicial duties." 

At the time of the arrival of Judge Boise in Oregon, in November, 
1850, he found J. Quinn Thornton residing at Oregon City, in the 
capacity of legal adviser to Dr. John McLoughlin. He was the only 
Judge of the Provisional Government with whom Judge Boise had 
a personal acquaintance. In the spring of 1851 he met him at a term 
of court held at Hillsboro, where he and Judge A. E. Wait were op- 
posing counsel in an action for divorce. We quote Judge Boise's 
own words: 

"He first complimented Mr. Wait, his antagonist, describing him 
as a noble Roman clad in complete intellectual armor, and then 
spoke of his own preparation to meet a knight of the green bag so 
worthy of his steel, and then proceeded at great length to expound 
the law. . . . When the speeches of the learned counsel had 
been concluded, being much longer than I had been used to hearing 
in the courts of Massachusetts, I became impressed with the fact 
that the arguments of lawyers lengthened as the distance from the 
seats of legal learning increased. 

"The first legal document that I saw coming from his pen was 
a long opinion elucidating the Oregon Donation Land Law, in which 
he made it appear that a settler might hold his land claim without 
living on it; that is, he might live in one place and be in another. 
This was accepted as good law by those who wished to live in town 
and hold a land claim in the country. But this ingenious theory was 
soon upset when the United States Surveyor General held that actual 
settlement was necessary and that a man resided where he lived." 

It is of importance to note, in this connection, that Senator Lewis 
F. Linn, of Missouri, always friendly to Oregon's best interests, was 
the originator of the Oregon Donation Land Law. The present 
County of Linn was named in his honor. 

It is related that at one time Judge Thornton was trying a case 
before a Justice of the Peace in Polk County. Opposed to him was 
a young Dallas lawyer named A. B. P. Wood, whose pet law book 
was "Bacon's Abridgement," from which he so often quoted that he 



36 HISTORICAL 

earned for himself the sobriquet of "Bacon's Abridgement" by Ne- 
smith. As usual, on this occasion, he cited the rulings of law from 
his favorite volume. Judge Thornton asked to see the book, and 
after examining the title page, quietly awaited his turn to speak. He 
expressed surprise that Mr. Wood should introduce a British author- 
ity in an American law court. Showing the title page to the Justice 
he thus addressed the court: "This is English, not American law. 
This book, as it is plainly written here on the title page, was written 
in London, England, in the Inner Temple. It is the law of England, 
of the people who oppressed our fathers, and the law which they 
repudiated in the Declaration of Independence. Mr. Wood is trying 
to impose on the court." Wood's arguments to the contrary availed 
him nothing. 

In the court at Hillsboro, the presiding judge in 1851 was William 
Strong. Judge Boise says that he "was a learned lawyer and an 
able Judge." At this term of court, the lawyers in attendance were 
Judges Thornton and Wait, A. Holbrook, W. W. Chapman and a 
lawyer named Brennon. Dr. Ralph Wilcox was clerk. 

The first case of a public nature to come before the Supreme 
Court when O. C. Pratt, William Strong and Thomas Nelson sat on 
the bench was one involving the validity of the act of the Territorial 
Legislature, authorizing the removal of the capital from Oregon 
City to Salem. The opinion was written by Judge Strong, who de- 
clared the act invalid, in that it conflicted with the Act of Congress 
organizing Oregon as a territory. A striking phrase in the opinion 
was "that the law was dead without mourners, could be buried with- 
out offence." Judge Pratt filed a dissenting opinion, which was af- 
terwards affirmed by a majority of the Legislature in session at 
Salem. The minority gathered at Oregon City. The Salem contin- 
gent changed the judicial districts, jurisdiction being given Judge 
Pratt over all the territory south of the Columbia River excepting 
Clackamas County. 

In 1848, the Act of Congress authorizing the organization of the 
Territory of Oregon, it will be remembered the first judges of the 
Supreme Court were William P. Bryant, Chief Justice, and Peter G. 
Burnett and Orville C. Pratt, Associate Justices. Burnett left for 
the California gold mines and Bryant resigned. Thomas Nelson 
succeeded Bryant and William Strong succeeded Burnett. Strong, 
Burnett and Pratt constituted the Supreme Court in 1850, which 
was the first to transact any business of importance. The first 
term was held at Oregon City, in December, 1851. 

One of the attorneys in attendance was Alexander Campbell, a 
partner of Judge Boise, then recently from Canada, where he stood 
high in his profession and soon became known in Portland as well 



HISTORICAL ?7 

for his ability. Subsequently he moved to San Francisco, where 
he became a partner of Judge Pratt, and was thereafter made Judge 
of the Twelfth Judicial District of California. 

The first term of the Supreme Court which Judge Boise at- 
tended vas held at Salem, in 1852. Judges Nelson and Strong occu- 
pied the bench, Judge Pratt not being in the territory. "From 1853 
until 1858," says Judge Boise, "Judge Williams presided in our courts 
in the district where I resided and was an able and popular judge." 

In those early days court accommodations for lawyers were not 
always of the best nor the most convenient. "I remember," said 
Judge Boise, "that in the summer of 1854 the court at Eugene was 
held in the open air under a large oak tree, with a table and chair 
for the Judge and some chairs and rude benches for the lawyers 
and other attendants, and when the court business got slack we 
adjourned to the race track, which was near by, and at one time 
had recess to listen to a Democratic speech by Hon. Delazon Smith, 
who was then a coming figure in the politics of Oregon." 

Coming down to a later date, one confronts the late Judge John 
F. Caples, who passed away in recent years, loved and respected. 
It is extremely interesting to hear him in his address which he de- 
livered at Portland in 1903 before the Oregon Bar Association, give 
his "Reminiscences of the Bench and Bar of Earlier Days." He 
spoke of the decade between 1865 and 1875. Said he: 

"My first active work in the Supreme Court of Oregon was in 
1868, when I first became acquainted with that body. I recollect 
how formidable it looked to me, but at the same time how kindly 
every one of them acted. I have often thought in particular of 
grand old Reuben P. Boise, a man of years and of experience, and 
a man in whom the people have had confidence, and passing on 
through the usual years of life, stands now a monument of pride 
to the profession of law and to the profession of gentlemen on the 
bench of the State of Oregon." 

Judge Caples paid kindly tribute to P. P. Prim "a lawyer who 
had grown old in years of practice, and a man whose temper never 
deserted him, a man whose legal ability was much beyond the ordi- 
nary, a man who has passed to a better land with all the honors 
of a long and useful life such a man was P. P. Prim." 

Other lawyers and judges of that period recalled by Judge Caples 
were Judge Burnett, of Corvallis; George N. Dorris, of Eugene; 
James B. Fay, Tilmon Ford, J. C. Fullerton, N. H. Gates, of The 
Dalles; Ben Hayden; Hire Jackson, of Columbia County; La Fayette 
Lane; A. J. Lawrence, James H. Slater, Judge Thayer, James F. Wat- 
son, Judge Strahan, "a man who secured high honors;" Judge Mo- 
sher, of Roseburg, "a man of a great deal of ability, particularly as 



38 HIS T O R I C A L 

a writer;" Judge Rufus Mallory, of Portland; Richard Williams, of 
Portland; Judge Wolverton, then of the Supreme Court, later ele- 
vated to the bench of the United States District Court; George L. 
Wood, who "could sway the multitude" with his oratory; W. W. 
Chapman, "a man who went to court with few cases and always on 
the warpath;" Judge Cronin, "a man of large ability;" Matthew P. 
Deady, whose "opinions are more considered today than they were 
when they were delivered;" J. N. Dolph, "a strong man ... an 
honor to the State of Oregon;" Judge M. C. George; A. C. Gibbs, 
"a man of large heart," afterwards Governor of Oregon and then 
United States District Attorney, filling "those positions acceptably 
to the authorities, and with honor to himself." 

Other names that flashed through Judge Caples' memory were: 
La Fayette Grover, Judge Edward Hamilton and Judge Lair Hill; 
Emery Holbrook, "a good lawyer and a man of high standing;" 
Colonel James K. Kelly and Colonel Ben Hayden; David Logan, 
"who cut a very conspicuous figure in the earlier days of the bar 
of the State of Oregon;" Senator John H. Mitchell; Marion F. Mul- 
key, "who had many good qualities, who succeeded well in life and 
who had the honor to leave a son who worthily wears the mantle of 
his father" ex-United States Senator Mulkey. 

Another worthy group was W. W. Page, John H. Rand, Judge E. 
D. Shattuck, "who sat so long upon the bench in Multnomah Coun- 
ty;" Lansing Stout; Raleigh Stott; William Strong, "a man of great 
ability, a man of great industry, a man of great suavity;" Judge 
Trimble and John B. Waldo, John W. Whalley and Judge Marquam. 

Of Judge Lord, Judge Caples gave this high commendation: "In 
every position Judge Lord has been called to fill, both as Judge of 
the Supreme Court and as a representative of the diplomatic corps 
of this country, he has filled the same with honor to himself and a 
credit to the state and nation he represents." 

In his "Personal Recollections" of his "Six Years in the United 
States Senate," George H. Williams gave many interesting remi- 
niscences. His term covered the Reconstruction Period, when the 
rehabilitation of the Confederate States was under way. Oregon 
was then ( 1865) represented in the Senate by Judge Williams and 
James W. Nesmith. 

A joint committee had been appointed nine from the House of 
Representatives and six from the Senate of which Judge Williams 
was one, "to inquire into the condition of the states which formed 
the so-called Confederate States, and report whether they or any 
of them are entitled to be represented in either house of Congress, 
and to report by bill or otherwise." 

Judge Williams sat up an entire night in preparing the bill which 



HISTORICAL 39 

was subsequently passed, and which completely routed the plans of 
President Andrew Johnson. Strenuous efforts were made by the 
opposition to tack on amendments, which Judge Williams heroically 
fought, and to postpone action by all sorts of dilatory tactics. The 
"Grand Old Man" from Oregon was equal to the emergency. He 
made up his mind, as he so shrewdly said, that the "only way to 
defeat the enemies of the bill was to wear them out by night and 
day sessions." This was eventually accomplished, and the grim old 
warrior had the satisfaction of seeing that his bill, albeit an amend- 
ment was attached to it, pass. 

In March, 1850, Judge Deady tried his first case in Oregon at a 
term of court held at Lafayette. The surroundings were primitive 
but, as he declared, "the dignity and order of the court so far as 
the same depended on the Judge, O. C. Pratt, would not suffer from 
a comparison with Westminster Hall." 

It may not be generally known, but the truth is that Harvey W. 
Scott, editor of the Oregonian, who is one of the truly great editors 
of the United States, at one time turned his attention to the law. 
In 1864 he studied law in the office of E. D. Shattuck for a year 
but the call of journalism and events so shaping themselves, he took 
his pen, since then so trenchant, in hand, and the world was a gainer 
thereby. 

Judge Arthur L. Frazer, Judge of the Multnomah Circuit Court, 
so recently laid aside the cares of his office, at the call of the Angel 
of Death, that it seems but yesterday that he was here. He suc- 
ceeded Judge Shattuck in Department No. 1, in 1898. A true en- 
comium is that uttered by one eulogist: "A just and upright man; 
faithful to every trust, and first Judge of the Juvenile Court." 
More than one wayward boy and girl learned to look with love and 
affection upon Judge Frazer. He was succeeded as Judge of the 
Juvenile Court by Judge Earl C. Bronaugh. 

A contemporary of Judge Frazer upon the Multnomah Circuit 
Court bench was Alfred F. Sears, Jr., elected to the position in 
1896 and re-elected by the united votes of both the Republican and 
Democratic parties in 1900. A sincere tribute is paid the late Judge 
Sears (who also has answered the great summons) in these words: 
His decisions "are absolutely as fair and impartial as possible from 
the facts in hand," and "he has won the warm regard and admira- 
tion of the bench and bar of Portland." 

Another who has passed into the Great Beyond in recent years 
is Judge Charles B. Bellinger. From 1874 to 1878 he was Clerk of 
the Supreme Court. On the latter date Governor Thayer appointed 
him to a vacancy on the Circuit bench in the Fourth Judicial Dis- 
trict. In April, 1893, President Cleveland appointed him Judge of 
the United States District Court, to fill a vacancy caused by the 



40 HISTORICAL 

death of Judge Matthew P. Deady. He assumed his duties May 1, 
1893. One of his contemporaries describes him as having been one 
of the most "forceful and interesting representatives of the legal 
fraternity of the Northwest," and one who was held in high esteem 
for the many admirable traits in his personality as well as for his 
erudition. He edited the Arena at Salem, the Salem Review and 
the Albany Democrat, the Portland News and the Evening Telegram, 
of Portland, at various times during his early manhood, before ally- 
ing himself permanently with the profession of law. 

Another warrior of the forum was Judge John F. Caples, who 
paid the debt of nature in recent years. He was elected District 
Attorney in 1878 and his territory comprised the counties of Mult- 
nomah, Washington and Clackamas, Columbia and Clatsop. He 
filled the office with credit and honor tor the six succeeding years, 
"an honor hitherto accorded to no District Attorney in the state." 
From 1897 to 1901 he served as United States Consul at Valparaiso, 
Chili, when he resigned. He was a kindly, genial and talented man. 

John W. Whalley was a bluff and hearty man, well liked. All 
will remember a little peculiarity of speech he had "I say, I say"- 
with which he generally prefaced his remarks. He had a well-or- 
dered mind, and long held a place in the front rank of his profes- 
sion. He had great intuitive faculties, which made him a most en- 
tertaining and enjoyable companion. 

The present able clerk of the Supreme Court of Oregon, Judge 
Julius C. Moreland, is, as one writer puts it, "a man of conspicuous 
legal talent." He was appointed County Judge of Multnomah County 
by Governor Moody in 1885, serving until 1886, after which he was 
elected to the office in 1890, serving until the end of 1894. 

During the spring of 1867 La Fayette Lane, J. C. Moreland and 
W. B. Lastrell went to Vancouver, Washington, to pass their exami- 
nations for admission to the bar. Judge Lancaster was quite blunt 
in the expression of his opinion that it was hardly the proper thing 
lo do for young men from Oregon to seek admission to the Wash- 
ington bar. By implication he conveyed the idea that they were too 
inexperienced and young to have either legal acumen or knowledge. 
Lastrell had a most prodigious and remarkable memory, and could 
repeat, practically verbatim, page after page of Blackstone's Com- 
mentaries. Judge Lancaster, who was on the examining committee, 
tried to tie Lastrell up with knotty questions regarding estates of 
freehold, remainders, etc., but Lastrell was too well grounded to be 
in the least frustrated. To the Judge's intense amazement he went 
on, and on, quoting from the great English law writer with perfect 
accuracy. Having finished, he calmly inquired if his answers were 
not correct. Lancaster admitted that the young man knew his Black- 
stone better than he did, and expressed his surprise that Lastrell 



HISTORICAL 41 

could remember the law so well and so accurately. He was fair 
enough, too, to offer the young men an apology for his precon- 
ceived and unjust opinion, and said that it gave him extreme pleas- 
ure to be able to recommend the admission to the bar of the young 
aspirants before him. 

Only a few years ago the name of Judge John J. Balleray was 
a power in Eastern Oregon. To use Lincoln's famous words, "With 
malice toward none, with charity for all" let us touch lightly upon 
the failings of Judge Balleray, and remember only the greater and 
better sides of his nature. He was unusually endowed, both by- 
nature and by education. He spoke French and German as easily 
and as fluently as he did the English language, and he admitted 
that he understood French grammar even better than he did English 
grammar. He had a powerful mind to grasp details and his memory 
was second to none. He was an accomplished Latin scholar and 
few men who have practiced at the bar were better read in the law. 
Either late in 1875 or early in 1876 Judge Balleray appeared in 
Portland, and began looking about for a suitable location to "hang 
out his shingle." He formed the acquaintance of J. C. Moreland, 
who took a liking to him, and offered him accommodations in his 
office until he should find a better place. While in Moreland's 
office, a French woman was charged with having had whiskey on 
her premises for sale, or which she did sell, "contrary to the statute 
in such cases made and provided." Judge Moreland was retained to 
defend her. When the day of trial came on, he was incapacitated, 
by reason of a bad cold, from going into court, and so he requested 
Balleray to conduct the case in his stead. Captain Lamson acted 
as interpreter for the court. Judge Deady was on the bench. Balle- 
ray's knowledge of French was of great importance. The question 
turned upon the conjugation of the verb "to have." Balleray asked 
the Court if he might be permitted to ask the French woman a 
question, which was granted. The point he made was whether she 
had whiskey on her premises, or whether she had had whiskey on 
her premises, he pointing out the difference the past perfect tense 
of the verb had in the matter. Judge Deady asked him if he under- 
stood French as well as that, and he said he did. He then pro- 
ceeded, to the astonishment of the Court and the witness, to rap- 
idly conjugate the verb from start to finish. Although the case it- 
self was almost hopeless up to this point, so far as the woman was 
concerned, by this neat little plan of Balleray's she was cleared. 
Judge Deady ever after highly esteemed Balleray. He was at one 
time a Circuit Judge at Pendleton, receiving his appointment from 
Governor Moody, and he left a good record as a jurist. There was 
a philanthropic side to his nature. Much of his success and popu- 
larity was due to the fact that he was what is known as "a good 



42 HISTORICAL 

mixer," being able to adjust himself readily to any sort of surround- 
ings. 

JUDGE MORELAND'S CHARACTERIZATIONS. 

Judge Julius C. Moreland's many years' residence in Oregon, 
coupled with his experience as a practicing lawyer, judge, newspaper 
man and Clerk of the Supreme Court, particularly well qualifies 
him to speak of his cotemporaries at the bar, both "the quick and 
the dead." He is a keen analyst. Here are a few of his characteri- 
zations: 

Judge Burnett: "He took a prominent part in the formation of 
the state government of California and in the stirring times had 
there, and wherever he was placed acquitted himself well." 

J. Quinn Thornton: "He was not a great lawyer, but seems to 
have done his work well in the early days." 

Judge Lancaster: "He was a lawyer of the old school and imag- 
ined that all law found outside of Blackstone and Bacon's In- 
stitutes was hardly worth the knowing." 

Judge Shattuck: "Was greatly beloved; a ripe scholar, a good 
lawyer, and an upright Judge." 

Judge W. W. Upton: "He was a learned lawyer, prompt in his 
work, courteous to the bar, and was well regarded by the bar and 
his associates on the bench." 

B. F. Bonham: "He filled many important places in public life, 
and there, as in private life, he exemplified the value of right living, 
and a high standard of citizenship." 

Judge Wilson: "He was a good lawyer, of an active mind, con- 
genial, jovial, and his death was very greatly regretted." 

John Kelsay: "He was somewhat uncouth of speech, full of 
life, loving a joke, with a marvelous fund of anecdotes; always well 
liked by his comrades." 

A. J. Thayer: "He was thoroughly in earnest in whatever he 
undertook." 

Judge McArthur: "He was a learned lawyer, wrote a graceful 
opinion; very popular in his community, and a useful man." 

John Burnett: "A good lawyer and an earnest advocate." 

Judge Watson: "An untiring worker; a zealous advocate, and 
made a good record as a Supreme Judge." 

John B. Waldo: "An earnest student of nature, a philosopher as 
well as jurist; a statesman and a reformer." 

Judge Reuben S. Strahan : "As a lawyer, Judge Strahan was 
much beyond the ordinary. He had a keen, quick, analytical mind 
and his written opinions on the bench commanded great attention." 



HISTORICAL 43 

Judge Bean: "He is a man learned in the law, of earnest appli- 
cation, great industry, steadfastness of purpose, quick in forming 
conclusions and strenuous in the defense of his opinions." 

Judge Frank A. Moore: "Is a hard worker, a good lawyer, with 
pleasant personality, making friends with all those with whom he 
comes in contact." 

Judge Thomas G. Hailey: "A good lawyer, and his work on the 
bench was satisfactory." (Judge Hailey died in recent years, just 
as a sphere of usefulness was opening up before him.) 

Judge Robert Eakin: "A man of pleasing address, well equipped 
for his position." 

Judge W. T. Slater: "A hard worker, a vigorous writer, and his 
opinions bear the stamp of a well cultivated, able lawyer." 

Judge Will R. King: "Is a well equipped lawyer and writes a 
good opinion and gives promise of a most successful career." 

On two different occasions, Judge Moreland thus expressed him- 
self: "All who have sat upon the Supreme Bench of the state 
prior to the establishment of the separate Supreme Court have 
passed on. They were an earnest, brave lot of men, who did their 
full share in building up the state and their memory will long be 
cherished by those who come after them." 

On the second occasion he said: "Oregon has been fortunate in 
her judicial officers. They have been able, conscientious, upright 
men. But it is not disparagement to the judges who have gone be- 
fore to say that never in its history has the bench been filled with 
better, truer, abler or more upright men than those who now grace 
the position; and no court has ever given better satisfaction to the 
people." (1910). 

Judge Moreland keenly enjoys telling this story of Chief Jus- 
tice Moore: 

One time a stranger appeared at the state capitol, at Salem, and 
was desirous of being shown around. There being no one in sight 
at the time except Justice Moore, the stranger approached him, mak- 
ing his wishes known. Nothing loth, the jurist took the stranger 
and piloted him about, from basement to dome. The exploration 
having terminated, the newcomer asked the Chief Justice if he was 
employed around the building, not forgetting, of course, to express 
his thanks. The Judge admitted that he was. When the stranger 
asked him in what capacity he was employed, the jurist answered 
with becoming modesty: "I am Chief Justice of the Supreme Court." 
The man's astonishment can better be imagined than expressed. 

At one time the late Judge Caples and Judge Moreland entered 
into a legal copartnership, and, of course, the survivor has many 



44 HISTORICAL 

anecdotes to tell of him, but one will suffice. Judge Moreland says 
that at one time, while trying a murder case, in which the murde 
occurred in a Chinese joss house, some question arose about the 
building, and a difference of opinion arose regarding some measure- 
ments of furniture, which was contradicted by Judge Caples' oppo- 
nent. To this Judge Caples calmly replied: "Probably you are 
correct and know more about it than I do, for I do not worship 
there." It was a tender tribute to a departed friend that Judge 
Moreland paid, when he said: "Judge Caples was a deeply religious 
man. True, he often stumbled, and sometimes fell, yet he always 
was up and constantly striving for the better way." 

DIRECT PRIMARY NOMINATING ELECTIONS LAW. 

At the general election held June 6, 1904, the voters of Oregon, 
on initiative petition, approved the act that was proposed by the 
people for a Direct Primary Nominating Elections Law. There were 
56,285 votes cast in favor of this law, to 16,354 against, and the 
Governor, by proclamation, dated June 24, 1904, declared this pro- 
posed act to be the law governing elections thereafter. This act is 
unique, and has caused wide commendation all over the country, 
although there are still many who prefer the old form of law where- 
by nominations were made in convention by delegates chosen by 
the voters for the purpose. It was Pope who declared: 

"For forms of government, let fools contest, 
Whate'er is best adminster'd is best." 

So with the law of elections. By the Direct Primary Law it is 
now possible to choose United States Senators by the direct vote of 
the people, in apparent contravention of the Constitution of the 
United States, which provides that Senators shall be chosen by the 
Legislature. Under the present law the people's choice, made mani- 
fest at the election, is made perforce of necessity, the Legislative 
choice, so it would appear that the abrogation of the Constitutional 
provision is more apparent than real. Whether the law is a good one 
or not, time alone will tell. It prevents deadlocks, which is some 
gain, anyway. A number of other states are endeavoring to adopt 
this same form of law, and it is said that "imitation is the sincerest 
form of flattery." If so, Oregon may yet be proud to have furnished 
such a law. 

The law is formally described as follows; 

"An Act to propose by initiative petition a law declaring certain 
rights of political parties and voluntary political organizations and 
of members and candidates thereof; declaring the purposes of this 
law and prescribing rules for the construction of its provisions; 
defining a political party subject to the provisions of this law; 



HISTORICAL 45 

providing for holding primary nominating elections preceding any 
election in this State (except special elections to fill vacancies, presi- 
dential elections, municipal elections in towns or cities having a 
population of less than two thousand inhabitants, and school elec- 
tions) for the purpose of nominating all the candidates by all 
political parties subject to this law for all public offices to be filled 
at the ensuing election, and for a Senator in Congress; fixing the 
times for holding and regulating the manner of conducting such 
primary nominating elections; prescribing the manner of choosing 
candidates for nomination by the several political parties subject to 
the provisions of this law, and for making nominations at said pri- 
mary nominating elections of the candidates of said political parties 
for election to public office at the enusing election, and forbidding 
the nomination of candidates for public office by such political 
parties in any other manner; providing for printing and distributing 
ballots at such primary nominating election by public officers at 
public expense; prescribing the qualifications of petitioners, electors 
and candidates for nomination at such primary nominating elections; 
prescribing forms and procedure at such primary nominating elec- 
tions and in the proceedings relating thereto, and statements to be 
made by candidates for nomination thereat; prescribing the duties 
of public officers in relation to and at such primary nominating 
elections; providing for the nomination by political parties subject 
to this law, of their candidates for election as delegates to any con- 
stitutional conventions that may be called in this State: providing 
for the election by the several political parties subject to this law, of 
their central committeemen, and defining their duties and powers as 
such committeemen; providing for the prevention and correction, 
under certain conditions, of errors, wrongs and violations of the 
provisions of this law, and remedies therefor; providing for the pre- 
vention of frauds and the punishment of crimes and misdemeanors 
committed at such primary nominating elections, or in the proceed- 
ings relating thereto; providing penalties and punishment for the 
violation of any of the provisions of this law; providing for contest- 
ing nominations made at such primary nominating elections; apply- 
ing to said primary nominating elections, so far as the same are not 
in conflict with the provisions of this law, and as the same may be 
modified by the provisions of this law," certain "sections of the 
General Laws of Oregon as the same are numbered in Bellinger and 
Cotton's Annotated Codes and Statutes of Oregon," etc. 

The preamble to the act reads as follows: 

"Under our form of government, political parties are necessary 
and useful at the present time. It is necessary for the public wel- 
fare and safety that every practical guaranty shall be provided by 
law to assure the people generally, as well as the members of the 



46 HISTORICAL 

several parties, that political parties shall be fairly, freely and hon- 
estly conducted, in appearance as well as in fact. The method oi' 
naming candidates for elective public offices by political parties 
and voluntary political organizations is the best plan yet found for 
placing before the people the names of qualified and worthy citizens 
from whom the electors may choose the officers of our government. 
The government of our state by its electors and the government of 
a political party by its members are rightfully based on the same 
general principles. Every political party and every voluntary political 
organization has the same right to be protected from the interference 
of persons who are not identified with it as its known and publicly 
avowed members, that the government of the state has to protect 
itself from the interference of persons who are not known and regis- 
tered as its electors. It is as great a wrong to the people, as well as 
to the members of a political party, for one who is not known to be 
one of its members to vote or to take any part at any election or other 
proceedings of such political party, as it is for one who is not a 
qualified and registered elector to vote at any state election or take 
any part in the business of the state. Every political party and vol- 
unteer political organization is rightfully entitled to the sole and 
exclusive use of every word of its official name. The people of the 
State and the members of every political party and voluntary political 
organization are rightfully entitled to know that every person who 
offers to take any part in the affairs or business of any political 
party or voluntary political organization in the State is in good faith 
a member of such party. The reason for the law which requires a secret 
ballot when all electors choose their officers, equally requires a secret 
ballot when the members of a party choose their candidates for public 
office. It is as necessary for the preservation of the public welfare 
and safety that there shall be free and fair vote and an honest count 
as well as a secret ballot at primary elections, as it is that there shall 
be a free and fair vote and an honest count in addition to the secret 
ballot at all elections of public officers. All qualified electors who 
wish to serve the people in elective office are rightfully entitled to 
equal opportunities under the law. 

"The purpose of this law is better to secure and preserve the 
rights of political parties and voluntary political organizations, and 
of their members and candidates, and especially of the rights above 
stated." 

Much has been written and said about "Statement No. 1" and 
"Statement No. 2," under the Direct Primary Law, but for the infor- 
mation of those who may not understand what their signification is, 
it may be well to show what they are. 



HISTORICAL 17 

Section 12 of the act provides: 

"Before or at the time of beginning to circulate any petition for 
nomination to any office under this law, the person who is to be a 
candidate for such nomination shall send by registered mail or other- 
wise to the Secretary of State or the County Clerk or City Clerk, 
Recorder, or Auditor, as the case may be, a copy of his petition for 
nomination, signed by himself, and such copy shall be filed and shall 
be conclusive evidence for the purposes of this law that said elector 
has been a candidate for nomination by his party. All nominating 
petitions and notices pertaining to state or district offices to be voted 
for in more than one county and for Judges of the Circuit Court 
and District Attorneys, shall be filed in the office of the Secretary 
of State; for county offices and district offices to be voted for in 
one county only shall be filed with the County Clerk; and for all 
city offices in the office of the City Clerk, Recorder, or Auditor, as 
the case may be." 

Among the declarations made by candidates are these: 

"If I am nominated for the office of , at the primary 

nominating election to be held in the (State of Oregon), (district), 

(county), (city), the day of , 19.., I will accept the 

nomination and will not withdraw, and if I am elected I will qualify 
as such officer." 

"If I am nominated and elected, I will, during my term of office 
(here the candidate, in not exceeding one hundred words, may state 
any measures or principles he especially advocates, and the form in 
which he wishes it printed after his name on the nominating ballot, 
in not exceeding twelve words.) 

If an elector seeks the nomination for "Senator or Representative 
in the Legislative Assembly," he may include one of the following 
two statements in his petition; but if he does not do so, the Secretary 
of State or County Clerk, as the case may be, shall not on that 
account refuse to file his petition: 

"STATEMENT NO. 1. 

"I further state to the people of Oregon, as well as to the people 
of my Legislative district, that during my term of office I will always 
vote for that candidate for United States Senator in Congress who 
has received the highest number of the people's votes for that position 
at the general election next preceding the election of a Senator in 
Congress, without regard to my individual preference. 



(Signature of the candidate.) 



48 HISTORICAL 

"STATEMENT NO. 2. 

''During my term of office I shall consider the vote of the people 
for United States Senator in Congress as nothing more than a 
recommendation, which I shall be at liberty to wholly disregard if 
the reason for doing so seems to me to be sufficient. 



(Signature of the candidate.) 

After the official returns of any primary election are in, the 
candidates for any and all offices receiving the highest number oi 
votes become the regular nominees thereby of their several political 
parties. Thereafter, at the regular general election, they are then 
voted for by the voters at their prescribed voting polls in the several 
precincts. Exactly the same formalities are observed at a primary 
nominating election as prevail at the regular election. There are the 
judges of election and clerks of election, together with their clerks, 
who must keep strict tally of all votes, which are afterwards counted. 
The names of all candidates are noted upon sheets, upon which the 
totals are afterwards made. These are afterwards securely sealed, as 
are the ballot boxes, and are then turned over to the City Auditor, 
County Clerk or other authorized person. The chairmen of the 
political parties entering the contest keep tally sheets exactly like 
those filed with the Auditor or other person, to ensure a correct 
report, in case any accidental or intentional mishap might occur. 
This does exact justice to all candidates, and makes much for purity 
in elections. 

In Oregon the Australian ballot system is used, of which all that 
is good and nothing that is bad, can be said. This subject will be 
properly considered in the following chapter. 

THE AUSTRALIAN BALLOT LAW. 

The Australian Ballot Law is an importation which flourishes well 
on Oregon soil. Its eminent fairness, the care with which the indi- 
vidual preferences of the voter are safeguarded, have made it pop- 
ular, and there is little doubt but that it will long continue to be the 
law governing elections. No human fabrication is perfect, but this 
comes as near to being so as any system which has yet been 
devised, and it is a credit to the Australian branch of the great 
English-speaking race to have formulated so estimable a procedure. 

A general epitome of the law will be herein attempted. 

The Australian Ballot Law was adopted by the Legislature in 
1891. It provides for "a general election to be held in the several 
election precincts in this state on the first Monday in June, 1892, and 
biennally thereafter, at which shall be chosen so many of the follow- 
ing officers as are by law to be elected in such year, namely: A 



HISTORICAL 49 

Governor, Secretary of State, State Treasurer, Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, State Printer, Justices of the Supreme Court, 
members of Congress, Circuit Judges, members of the State Senate 
and House of Representatives, County Judges, District Attorneys, 
County Superintendent s of Common Schools, Commissioners of the 
County Court, County Clerks, Sheriffs, County Treasurers, Coroners, 
Assessors, County Surveyors, Justices of the Peace, and Constables, 
and all other state, district, county, and precinct officers provided 
by law." 

At the November term of the several County Courts preceding a 
general election, election precincts in such county are set off and 
established. At the regular January term preceding a general elec- 
tion, the County Court is commanded to "appoint three judges and 
three clerks of election for each election precinct, to serve for the 
period of two years, and shall designate one judge to be chairman." 
Such judges must be able to read and write the English language, and 
must not be candidates for any elective office at such election. On 
the day of the election "in all election precincts in which were cast 
one hundred and fifty (150) or more ballots at the last general elec- 
tion," the County Court is empowered to appoint a night board of 
judges and clerks, who shall assemble to count the ballots of the 
day, "at 7 P. M., at their respective polling places." Judges and 
clerks of the second, or "night" board, relieve the first board, "which 
shall certify and sign the poll books" before passing them over to 
the second board. 

The County Clerk is required to post the names of the judges 
and clerks appointed "in a conspicuous place in his office, and keep 
the same posted for three months." A hearing for remonstrances 
against such apppintments is provided for to be heard "at 10 o'clock 
A. M. on the second Wednesday of the following February term of 
the several County Courts," etc. Each appointee is notified of his 
appointment by mail, and his acceptance thereof is requested. When 
the acceptances comes in, the County Clerk attaches it to the stub of 
the notification book. Appointees hold office for two years. Fail- 
ures to accept or vacancies, from any cause, are provided for in 
similar manner. 

Thirty days before any general or presidential election, and at 
least ten days before any special election, it is the duty of the County 
Clerk "to prepare printed notices of the election and mail two of 
said notices to each judge and each clerk of election in each precinct," 
who are required to post same in public places. 

At the election each judge and clerk takes the oath to perform 
his duties "according to law/' and to "studiously endeavor to prevent 
fraud, deceit, and abuse in conducting the election." 



50 HISTORICAL 

Provision is made for the filling of the places of absentees, 
whether judges or clerks, on the day of the election. Provision is 
also made that "candidates, or their duly appointed agents, to such 
reasonable number, not more than three, shall be allowed to have 
desk facilities outside the guard rail, but near enough to distinctly 
hear the chairman as he reads aloud each ballot, so they may be able 
to keep a private tally sheet in accord with the official clerks." 

Polls are to be opened at 8 A. M., and closed at 7 P. M., but the 
judges are allowed, in their discretion, to adjourn the polls at 1 P. M. 
for an hour, "proclamation of the same being made; but the judges 
and clerks shall keep together, and at no time shall more than one of 
them be out of the presence of the others." Prior to the opening 
and thirty minutes before the closing of the polls, "the chairman of 
said judges of election shall make public proclamation of the same." 

"The ballot boxes, poll books, ballot stubs and tally sheets shall 
be constantly kept together in the presence and view of at least four 
of the said officers, and the candidates and persons duly appointed 
as provided in Section 18 of the Australian Ballot Law (Section 
2778), from the opening of the polls until the count is completed 
and the returns signed and sealed . . . and after the count has 
once begun it shall continue until fully completed, without any 
adjournment, and in presence of all judges and clerks and persons 
duly authorized to be present." 

The judges are authorized to challenge any person offering a vote 
whom they suspect is not a duly qualified elector. Clerks or any 
elector present have the same privilege of challenge. The chairman 
of the judges is authorized to administer an oath to all challenged 
persons requiring them to truly answer all questions put to them 
touching upon their place of residence and qualifications as an elector 
at the election. In case the person challenged refuses to answer 
fully any question, "the judges shall reject his vote." 

If the challenge is not "withdrawn after the person offering to 
vote shall have answered the questions put to him," the chairman 
administers the oath of qualification. When any person's vote is 
challenged, the clerks are required to note on the poll books, at the 
end of such person's name, "Challenged and sworn," and "rejected," 
or "voted," as the case may be. 

The rules governing the qualifications of voters are as follows: 

"1. The place shall be considered and held to be the residence 
of a person in which his habitation is fixed, and to which, whenever 
he is absent, he has the intention of returning. 

"2. A person shall not be considered or held to have lost his 
residence who shall leave his home and go into another state or 
territory or county of this state for a temporary purpose only. 



HISTORICAL 51 

"3. A person shall not be considered or held to have gained a 
residence in any county of this state into which he shall come for 
temporary purposes only, without the intention of making said 
county his home, but with the intention of leaving the same when 
he shall have accomplished the business that brought him into it. 

"4. If a person remove to any other state, or to any of the terri- 
tories, with the intention of making it his permanent home, he shall 
be considered and held to have lost his residence in this state. 

"5. The place where a married man's family reside shall be con- 
sidered and held to be his residence; 

"6. The place where an unmarried man sleeps shall be considered 
and held to be his residence. 

"7. If a person shall go from this state into any other state or 
territory and there exercise the right of suffrage, he shall be con- 
sidered and held to have lost his residence in this state. 

"8. All qualified voters shall vote in the election precinct in the 
county where they may reside for county officers, and in any county 
in the state for state officers, or in any county of a congressional 
district in which such electors may reside for members of Congress." 

Before voting begins, the ballot boxes are unlocked and turned 
upside down to empty them of anything they might contain. They 
are then relocked and the keys pass into the possession of some one 
of the judges other than the chairman. 

No person is allowed to stand or approach within fifty feet of 
the polls except peace officers, and "but ten electors shall be per- 
mitted to approach the polls within fifty feet at the same time; 
Provided, however, that the said judges of election shall, if requested, 
permit one person from each political party, selected by the party, 
to stand outside the guard rails at the polls, while open for receiving 
votes, for the purpose of challenging voters; and the said judges of 
election shall, if requested, permit the respective candidates, or some 
person selected by a candidate or by several candidates, or by a 
political party, to be present in the room, but outside the guard rail, 
where the said judges are during the time of receiving and counting 
the votes." 

Judges of election are also given power to enforce the law and 
to punish offenders. 

At the closing of the polls the electors' names are counted who 
have voted, "and the number written and certified in each of the 
poll books at the end of the list, and the same shall be immediately 
signed by the chairman and each of the judges and clerks in the 
manner indicated above." The ballots are then to be read, counted, 
tallied and strung." 

All rejected ballots are to be placed carefully in envelopes, and 



52 HISTORICAL 

every "such ballot not counted for any party shall be immediately 
indorsed on the back thereof with pen and ink, by the chaiman, 'not 
counted for ' (stating what office or offices), who shall sign 
his initials thereto." 

The law intends, also, to impart to the voter a certain dignity, it 
being held that each person's political preferences are sacred to 
himself alone. Accordingly, when a voter appears, announces his 
name and place of residence, he is carefully looked up on the poll 
books, where his name should be registered, together with the 
political party to which he belongs. If his name is found on the list, 
or if his vote is admitted upon the sworn affidavit of freeholders, 
he is given a ballot, his name entered and he proceeds into a separate 
compartment of the polling booth, where he checks off with a cross 
the names of the candidates for whom he desires to vote. He is here 
subject to no outside influence, and can freely express his choice. 
His ballot he then folds and hands to the judge who presides over 
the ballot box, announces his name and the laconic utterance, 
"Voted," and the deed is done. 

". . . Immediately upon the closing of the polls the judges 
shall cause all the white ballots remaining unused to be immediately 
destroyed by tearing them in pieces or by burning them." 

County Clerks open the returns and give certificates for compen- 
sation of judges and clerks. There are a number of other matters 
in relation to the election laws which are so well understood as to 
require no special mention here, and of which both the bar and the 
average intelligent citizen is well informed. 

CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT. 

Herewith is given a concise summary of what is known as the 
"Corrupt Practices Act," without which the subject of Oregon's 
Election Laws, as given in this work, would be incomplete. It was 
specially prepared for the information of voters by the Secretary 
of State's office, and is as follows: 

"1. Candidates for nomination to any state or district office, 
composed of more than one county, and friends of any such candi- 
date, may file with the Secretary of State for publication, not later 
than the thirty-third day before the biennial primary nominating 
elections, with his portrait cut if he wishes, a printed or typewritten 
statement or statements, over his or their signatures, stating the 
reasons why he should be nominated; (providing his petition for 
nomination is duly filed with the Secretary of State not later than 
the forty-first day before said primary nominating elections) ; Au- 
gust 22, 1910. 

"2. Any person or -persons opposing the nomination of such 



HISTORICAL 53 

candidate may, not later than the thirty-ninth day before said pri- 
mary nominating elections, file with the Secretary of State, their 
printed or typewritten statements over their signatures, of the rea- 
sons why such candidate should not be nominated; but every state- 
ment shall be accompanied by proof, by affidavit or by Sheriff's 
return, that they have caused to be served personally and in person 
upon such candidate a true copy of such statement; August 16, 1910. 

"3. Each candidate shall be allowed one page of printed matter, 
and those opposing him shall be allowed one page, and shall pay for 
one page of space in the publication herein provided for, as follows: 
For the office of United States Senator in Congress, $100; for Rep- 
resentative in Congress, $100; for Justice of the Supreme Court, $75; 
for Governor, $100; for Secretary of State, $100; for State Treasurer, 
$100; for State Printer, $100; for State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, and Attorney-General, each, $75; for Commissioner of 
Labor Statistics and Inspector of Factories and Workshops, $50; foi 
Senator or Representative in the Legislative Assembly, $10; for 
Circuit Judge, and District Attorney, $50 each; for candidates for 
any other office for a district consisting of one or more counties, or 
state office, $25. Any candidate may have additional space at the 
rate of $100 per page, but no payment shall be received for less than 
a full page; provided, that not more than three additional pages shall 
be allowed to any one candidate and payments made when the state- 
ment is offered for filing. These are to be printed, bound in 
pamphlet form and sent to the voters by the Secretary of State. 

"4. Not later than the thirtieth day before the regular biennial 
election the State Executive Committee or Managing State Managing 
Committee or managing officers of any political party or organiza- 
tion having nominated candidates, may file with the Secretary of 
State portrait cuts of the candidates and typewritten statements and 
arguments for the success of its principles and the election of its 
candidates, and opposing or attacking the principles and candidates 
of all other parties. All portrait cuts, statements and arguments of 
all political parties and independent candidates shall be bound 
together in one pamphlet, and no party shall have more than twenty- 
four pages, nor any independent candidate more than two pages, 
paying to the Secretary of State at the time of filing at the rate of 
$50 for each printed page; October 9, 1910. 

"5. No sums of money shall be paid, and no expenses authorized 
or incurred by or on behalf of any candidate to be paid by him, except 
such as he may pay to the state for printing, as herein provided, in 
his campaign for nomination to any public office or position in this 
state, in excess of fifteen per cent of one year's compensation or 
salary of the office for which he is a candidate; provided, that no 



54 HISTORICAL 

candidate shall be restricted to less than $100 in his campaign for 
such nomination. 

"6. No sums of money shall be paid and no expenses au- 
thorized or incurred by or on behalf of any candidate who has 
received the nomination to any public office or position, except 
such as he may contribute towards payment for his political party's 
or independent statement, to be paid by him in his campaign for 
election, in excess of 10 per cent of one year's salary or compen- 
sation of the office for which he is nominated, provided that no 
candidate shall be restricted to less than $100. 

"7. Every candidate for nomination or election to public 
office shall, within 15 days after the election at which he was a can- 
didate, file with the Secretary of State, if a candidate for United 
States Senator, Representative in Congress or any state or dis- 
trict office in a district composed of more than one county, but 
with the County Clerk for legislative office in a district composed 
of one county, and for county and precinct offices, and with the 
town clerk, auditor or recorder of the town or city for town, city 
or ward offices, an itemized sworn statement setting forth in 
detail all moneys contributed, expended or promised by him to 
aid and promote his nomination or election or both, and for the 
election of his party candidates and all existing, unfulfilled prom- 
ises of any character and all liabilities remaining uncanceled. If 
no money or other valuable thing was given, paid, expended, 
contributed or promised and no unfulfilled liabilities were in- 
curred by a candidate, he shall file such statement within 15 
days after the election. Any candidate failing to file such a 
statement shall be fined $25 for every day on which he was in 
default; and his name shall not be printed upon the ballot unless 
statements of account and expenses required by or on behalf of 
the candidate have been filed. October 23, 1910. 

"8. Every political committee shall have a treasurer, who is a 
voter, and he shall keep detailed accounts of all its receipts, 
payments and liabilities. Similar accounts shall be kept by every 
person who receives or expends money or incurs liabilities to the 
amount of more than $50 for political purposes, and by every po- 
litical agent and candidate. Every person receiving or expending 
money or incurring liability by authority or in behalf of such 
candidates, committees, agent or other person or political party 
or organization shall, on demand, and in any event, within 14 
days after such receipt, expenditure or incurrence of liability, 
give such treasurer, agent, candidate, or authorized person proper 
vouchers; and every payment, except payments less in the aggre- 
gate than $5, shall be vouched for by a receipted bill, stating the 



HISTORICAL 55 

particulars of expense. Every voucher, receipt and account shall 
be part of the accounts and files of such treasurer, agent, candidate 
or other person, and shall be preserved by the public officer with 
whom it shall be filed for six months after the election. 

''9. Any person not a candidate who expends money for 
value greater than $50 to aid in the election of any candidate or 
candidates, party ticket or measure, shall, within 10 days after 
the election, file with the Secretary of State, or with the County 
Clerk for county offices, or city officer for municipal offices, an 
itemized statement of receipts, expenditures and vouchers for every 
sum in excess of $5 and at the same time deliver a duplicate 
statement and copy of vouchers to the candidate or treasurer of the 
organization. October 4 and November 18, 1910." 

THE TORRENS LAND LAW. 

In describing the Torrens Land System as it applies in Oregon, 
it is necessary to the subject in hand that some little consideration 
be given the entire subject of real estate transfers, and the sev- 
eral systems that are in vogue. This is essential, if for no other 
reason, that one may make some comparisons as to the merits 
of the several systems of transfers. Reference will be made in 
this connection to the able and concise work of William C. Nib- 
lack, of the Chicago bar, which is at the same time exhaustive 
and which fully covers the subject. 

During the reign of Queen Elizabeth an act was passed re- 
quiring land sales in certain counties to be enrolled, but it was 
so carelessly and loosely framed as to become inoperative. We 
find that another act was passed by Parliament in 1617, which 
proved equally unsatisfactory. For some reason, two bills of sim- 
ilar tenor, introduced respectively in 1649 and 1651, failed. Other 
bills followed, but became ineffective. In 1708, in the counties 
of York and Middlesex, registries were established, and that they 
have proven unpopular generally is proof enough that they have 
not been adopted in other counties, but are still confined to York 
and Middlesex. 

In 1862 Lord Westbury's act was passed, entitled "An Act to 
Facilitate the Proof of Title to and the Conveyance of Real Estate," 
which had as its object the registration of land titles, but it 
proved ineffective. Lord Cairn's act was passed in 1875. As Nib- 
lack says: "This law was also for the registration of titles. It had 
<i precarious existence for twenty-two years, when it was modi- 
fied and supplemented by the land transfer act, 1897." 

In the early '80s definite action was begun along these lines 
in the United States, although spasmodic efforts were made mani- 



56 HISTORICAL 

fest some years earlier. At the present time there are in existence 
three systems of land transfers employed by civilized countries. 
These may be described as the transfer without recording or regis- 
tering, the ministerial system of recording deeds and the judicial 
system of registering titles. Most of the English counties use the 
first system, "where land is transferred by the production and 
delivery of all the title deeds, including one from the seller to 
the purchaser." Were it not for the doctrine of primogeniture, 
under which the eldest son inherits the real estate of a deceased 
person, carrying with it the title papers, it would probably be- 
come more general. 

The recording system is one generally employed in this coun- 
try, wherein title papers are transcribed at length on the public 
records of the county wherein the land lies the "lex rei sitae." 
Some form of this system is utilized "in France, Scotland, Ireland, 
Belgium, Italy, Spain, Canada, Australia, the Republics of South 
America, parts of Switzerland, the counties of Middlesex and 
York in England, and in parts of Asia and Africa." 

It is Niblack's opinion that "in the statement of its ele- 
mentary principles to a layman who does not comprehend the 
danger that title may not pass with the certificate, the Torrens 
system may seem to be the acme of simplicity, but it necessarily 
becomes loaded down with formulas, details and complications 
as work progresses under it." And again: "One uniform sys- 
tem is much more desirable than two systems, even though they are 
of equal merit, and, after sufficient experimenting has been done, 
one system will be adopted for general use." 

The third, or judicial system of registering titles was em- 
ployed in some of its features in European countries two hun- 
dred years ago. Notably is this the case in Russia, Turkey and 
Norway, as it is also in Mexico. The distinctive features of title 
registrations, as we are familiar with them, is practically modern. 
The first record we have of this is embodied in a report on the 
law of real property by an English commission, appearing in 
1830. To Australia belongs the distinction of having first adopted 
the plan, as is shown by the following: 

"The boldest effort to grapple with the problem of simpli- 
fication of title of land was made by Mr. (afterwards Sir Robert) 
Torrens, a layman, in South Australia, in 1857. When he was 
commissioner of customs in that colony he had been struck by 
the comparative facility with which dealings in regard to trans- 
fers of undivided shares of ships were carried out under the sys- 
tem of registration provided in the Merchant Shipping Acts. 
Subsequently becoming a registrar of deeds, he became acquainted 



HISTORICAL 57 

with the confusion and uncertainty inseparable from most questions 
of title to land. He devised a scheme of registration of title 
(as opposed to the old schemes of registration of deeds), mod- 
eled on the Merchant Shipping Acts, with such modifications 
as the different nature of the subject matter demanded. After 
some opposition, his scheme was passed through Parliament as 
the Real Property Act (No. 15 of 1857-58). Torrens himself car- 
ried it into operation, and more than 1000 titles were registered 
during the first two years. The prospects of the system were 
so promising that the other colonies soon followed the example 
of South Australia. A similar act was passed in Queensland in 
1861, in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania in 1862, in New 
Zealand in 1870, in Western Australia in 1874, and in Fiji in 
1876." 

Titles are passed on and registered in some countries under 
the Torrens system by the registrar or commissioner of titles, as 
judicial officer; in others by a court, as it has been done in the 
United States in those states where the Torrens system is in 
vogue. The recording officer in some countries is the judicial 
officer; in others, not. An indemnity fund is provided for in 
some countries; in others it is not. Even a forged instrument 
conveys title under some laws, while it does not under other 
laws and circumstances. "In some countries registers are public 
and in others private. There are many kinds of differences be- 
tween Torrens laws, and this fact has led some writers to speak of 
the acts which have been passed in this country as 'so-called Tor- 
rens laws.' ' 

Among the states of the Union which have passed Torrens 
acts may be mentioned the following: California and Illinois, 
1897; Massachusetts, 1898; Oregon and Minnesota, 1901; Colorado, 
1903; Ohio, 1896, but being declared unconstitutional, was re- 
pealed in 1898. The Oregon act is based almost verbatim upon 
the Illinois act, and that of Colorado upon the Minnesota act. 

The purpose of the Torrens system is "under governmental 
authority to establish and certify to the ownership of an absolute 
and indefeasible title to realty, and to simplify its transfer. . . . 
A title is registered, and a governmental certificate is issued, which 
states that the person named in it has a specific interest in the 
land described in it, and afterwards the title to the land cannot 
pass except by entering on the register the name of the trans- 
feree and the issue of a new certificate to him, on the surrender 
of the old one. All mortgages, liens or other matters affecting 
the title to a piece of registered land must be noted on the page 
of the official register, which is set apart for that land. The 



58 HISTORICAL 

theory is that the exact condition of the title to a piece of regis- 
tered land at any given time may be seen by turning to the page 
of the register which has been set apart for it." 

A review of the material points embodied in the Torrens Land 
Law as it exists in Oregon is of interest in the present connec- 
tion. The Legislature of Oregon passed the act in 1901. It is 
entitled "An act concerning land titles, creating the offices of 
registrars of titles, prescribing the duties of said officers, provid- 
ing for the registration of title to real estate, prescribing the 
manner in which registration of title may be obtained, and the 
rights accruing thereunder." 

The act provides that recorders and ex officio recorders of 
deeds in the several counties of the state shall be registrars of 
titles in their respective counties, and their deputies shall be deputy 
registrars; that deputies may perform the duties of registrar in 
his name and that such shall be held the acts of the registrar; 
that in case of his death, the chief deputy shall become acting 
registrar until the vacancy is filled, and he shall file a bond; that 
no registrar or deputy registrar shall engage in the practice of 
law during their term; that the registrar shall be liable for any 
neglect or omission of the deputies of his office; that the owner 
of an estate may apply in person, whether his interest is legal 
or equitable in the land, or by an attorney in fact. A corpora- 
tion may apply by its authorized agent, an infant by his natural 
or legal guardian. The person in whose name application is made 
is designated as the applicant. The act further provides: 

That no mortgage, lien, charge or lesser estate than a fee simple 
shall be registered unless the fee simple to the same land is first regis- 
tered; that it shall not be an objection to bringing land under 
this act, that the estate or interest of the applicant is subject 
to any outstanding lesser estate, mortgage, lien or charge, but 
every such lesser estate, mortgage, lien or charge shall be noted 
upon the certificate of title and the duplicate thereof, and the 
title or interest certified shall be subject only to such estates, 
morgages, liens and charges as are so noted, except as otherwise 
provided; that no title through tax sale or assessment shall be 
entitled to be first registered, unless the applicant or those 
through whom he claims title have been in undisturbed posses- 
sion of the land for ten years, and shall have paid all taxes and 
assessments legally levied thereon for seven successive years of 
that time. 

The application must be made in writing, signed and sworn 
to by the applicant or other person making the application in his 
behalf. It must set forth the name and residence of the applicant, 



HISTORICAL , 59 

and if made by another acting in his behalf, that other's name 
and place of residence; whether the applicant (unless a corpora- 
tion), is married or not, and if married the name and residence 
of the husband or wife; the description of the land; the appli- 
cant's estate or interest in the same, and whether the same is 
subject to an estate of homestead; whether the land is occupied or 
unoccupied, and if occupied by any other person than the appli- 
cant, the name and postoffice address of each occupant, and what 
estate or interest he has or claims in the land; whether the land 
is subject to any lien or encumbrance, and if any, its nature 
and amount, and if recorded, the book and page of the record, 
together with the name and postoffice address of each holder 
thereof; whether any other person has any estate or claims any in- 
terest in the land, in law or equity, in possession, remainder, re- 
version or expectancy, and if any, the name and postoffice ad- 
dress of every such person, and the nature of his estate or claim; 
if boundary lines are to be settled or established, the name and 
postoffice addresses of all the owners of the adjoining lands that 
may be affected thereby, so far as diligent inquiry may be able 
to establish them; if a male, that he is of the full age of twenty- 
one years, and if a female, that she is of the full age of eighteen 
years; if for a minor, the age of such minor; if by husband or 
wife, the other shall by indorsement thereon acknowledge his 
or her assent to the registration as prayed; when the place of 
residence of any person is unknown it shall be so stated, coupled 
with the statement that upon diligent inquiry the applicant has 
been unable to ascertain the same. All persons named in the ap- 
plication shall be considered as defendants thereto, and all other 
persons shall be included and considered as defendants by the 
term "all whom it may concern;" any number of contiguous 
pieces of land in the same right, or any number of pieces of 
property in the same county having the same chain of title and 
belonging to the same person, may be included in one appli- 
cation. 

Section 39 of the act provides: 

"The registered owner of any estate or interest in land 
brought under this act shall, except in cases of fraud to which 
he is a party, or of the person through whom he claims without 
valuable consideration paid in good faith, hold the same subject 
only to such estates, mortgages, liens, charges and interests as may 
be noted in the last certificate of title in the registrar's office, 
and free from all others, except: 

"1. Any subsisting lease, or agreement for a lease, for a 
period not exceeding five years, where there is actual occupation 



60 HISTORICAL 

of the land under the lease. The term lease shall include a 
verbal letting. 

"2. All public highways embraced in the description of the 
lands in the certificate shall be deemed to be excluded from the 
certificate. 

"3. Any subsisting right of way or other easement, however 
created, upon, over or in respect of the land. 

"4. Any tax or special assessment for which a sale of the 
land has not been had at the date of the certificate of title. 

"5. Such right of appeal, right to appear and contest the 
application, and of such action, or to make counterclaim, as is al- 
lowed by this act." 

The claim that the condition of the title to land can be seen 
at a glance under the Torrens system is practically true, but the 
registrar's records "all say in effect that the act of registration is 
the operative act to convey or affect land, but the specific sec- 
tions providing for the filing of papers and instruments in the 
registrar's office and the entering of memorials on the register, 
are not so definite in the statement of time when they shall 
become effective to bind the land." All the acts in this country 
are based upon or fashioned after the Victorian land transfer act 
of 1890, in a general way. Under that act it has been held 
that a purchaser of land, making a search for a title, should not 
merely rely upon his inspection of the register, but should also 
ascertain whether any instruments have been produced for regis- 
tration which have not been recorded. 

One law writer says that "under the Torrens system a trans- 
action in real estate may be closed up with great rapidity. . . . 
One may admit that when only a small amount of business is 
done in the registrar's office, a single transaction may be quickly 
closed, but the test will come when the system is carrying a 
fair share of the transfers which are made in a populous com- 
munity, and when the persons are awaiting their turns to transfer 
land in the only place in the county where the title can be passed." 

HOMESTEAD LAWS. 

By a beneficent arrangement known under the general desig- 
nation of the "Homestead Law," Congress has at various times 
in various ways secured to the citizens of the Republic the right 
to enter upon and acquire title in public lands. The law of home- 
steads is of wide and general application in the Western states 
particularly, and Oregon is no exception. So it will be readily seen 
that what applies in other states applies equally in Oregon, and it 
has been suggested that a resume, brief as may be consistent 



HISTORICAL 61 

with the importance of the subject, should be included in this 
work. 

The right to secure, settle upon and acquire title to not ex- 
ceeding one quarter section, or one hundred and sixty (160) acres 
of public land, by establishing and maintaining a residence thereon 
and cultivating the same for the continuous period of five years, 
is secured to properly qualified persons, under the homestead 
laws of the United States. Among the qualifications required are 
these: 

"A homestead entryman must be the head of a family or 
a person who has arrived at the age of 21 years, and a citizen of 
the United States, or one who has filed his declaration of inten- 
tion to become such, as required by the naturalization laws, to 
which section 5 of the Act of March 3, 1891 (26 Stat. L., 1095; 
Appendix No. 44), attaches the condition that he must not be the 
proprietor of more than 160 acres of land in any state or terri- 
tory." 

Section 2289 of the Revised Statutes restricted applicants for 
homestead entries to "unappropriated public lands upon which 
such person may have filed a pre-emption claim, or which may, at 
the time the application is made, be subject to pre-emption," but 
the Act of March 3, 1891, which repealed the pre-emption laws, so 
amended section 2289 as to describe the lands subject to home- 
stead entry simply as "unappropriated public lands." 

All applicants for homestead lands are required to fill out and 
sign a prescribed form and to file it in the local land office of 
the land district in which the land applied for is located, accom- 
panied by the legal fee and commission in each case and the proper 
affidavits made by the homestead applicant. These affidavits 
must be made before the register or receiver (2290 Rev. Stat.) 
or any United States commissioner or commissioner of the court 
exercising Federal jurisdiction in the territory or before the judge 
or clerk of any court of record in the land district in which the 
lands are situated. 

If the affidavits are taken out of the county in which the 
land applied for is located, the applicant must show by affidavit 
satisfactory to the Commissioner of the General Land Office that 
the same were taken before the nearest or most accessible officer 
qualified to take the same in the land district in which the land 
applied for is located. (Sec. 2294, Rev. Stat., as amended by Act 
Mar. 11, 1902, 32 Stat., p. 63; Appendix No. 91.) 

A person in active service in the Army or Navy of the United 
States whose family or some member thereof is residing on the 
land, which he wishes to enter, and upon which bona fide settle- 



62 HISTORICAL 

ment and improvement have been made, may, by special en- 
actment, make the affidavit required by law before the officer 
commanding in the branch of service in which the applicant is 
engaged. (Sec. 2293, Rev. Stat.; Appendix No. 1.) 

A false oath taken before an officer other than a register or 
receiver, who is qualified by law to administer oaths in homestead 
cases, is perjury, the same as if taken before the register or 
receiver. 

Where a wife has been divorced from her husband or deserted, 
so that she is dependent upon her own resources for support, she 
can make homestead entry as head of a family or as a femme sole. 

Where an unmarried woman settles upon a tract of public land, 
improves the same, establishes and maintains a bona fide residence 
thereon with the intention of appropriating the same for a home 
under the homestead law, and thereafter marries before making 
entry of said land, or before making application to enter said land, 
she does not, on account of her marriage, forfeit her right to make 
entry and receive patent for the land; provided, she does not 
abandon her residence on said land, and is otherwise qualified to 
make homestead entry: and provided further, that the man whom 
she marries is not, at the time of their marriage, claiming a separate 
tract of land under the homestead law. 

To obtain a homestead the party should personally select and 
examine the land and be satisfied of its character and true descrip- 
tion. 

He must file an application, stating his name, residence and 
postoffice address, and describing the land he desires to enter, and 
make affidavit that he is not the proprietor of more than 160 acres 
of land in any State or Territory; that he is a citizen of the United 
States, or that he has filed his declaration of intention to become 
such, and that he is the head of a family, or over 21 years of age, 
as the case may be; that his application is honestly and in good 
faith made for the purpose of actual settlement and cultivation, 
and not for the benefit of any other person, persons, or corporation, 
and that he will faithfully and honestly endeavor to comply with 
all the requirements of law as to settlement, residence, and cultiva- 
tion necessary to acquire title to the land applied for; that he is 
not acting as agent of any person, corporation, or syndicate in 
making such entry, nor in collusion with any person, corporation 
or syndicate to give them the benefit of the land entered, or any 
part thereof, or the timber thereon; that he does not apply to enter 
the same for the'purpose of speculation, but in good faith, to obtain 
a home for himself, and that he has not, directly, or indirectly, made 
and will not make any agreement or contract in any way or manner, 



HISTORICAL 63 

with any person or persons, corporation, or syndicate whatsoever, 
by which the title which he might acquire from the Government 
of the United States should inure, in whole or in part, to the benefit 
of any person except himself; and, further, that since August 30, 
1890, he has not acquired title to, nor is he claiming, under any of 
the agricultural private land laws, an amount of land which, to- 
gether with the land he is seeking to enter, will exceed in the 
aggregate 320 acres, and that he has not theretofore had the bene- 
fit of the homestead laws, and must pay the legal fee and that 
part of the commissions which is payable when entry is made. 

On compliance by the party with the foregoing requirements, 
the receiver will issue his receipt for the fee and that part of the 
commissions paid, a duplicate of which he will deliver to the party. 
The matter will then be entered on the records of the district 
office and reported to the General Land Office. 

A homestead settler on unsurveyed public land not yet open to 
entry must make entry within three months after the filing of the 
township plat of survey in the district land office. (Act May 14, 
1880, 21 Stat. L., 140; Appendix No. 15.) 

In cases of simultaneous applications to enter the same tract 
of land under the homestead laws, the rule is as follows: 

First. Where neither party has improvements on the land the 
right of entry should be awarded to the highest bidder. 

Second. Where one has actual settlement and improvement and 
the other has not, it should be awarded to the actual settler. 

Third. Where both allege settlement and improvements, an in- 
vesigation must be had and the right of entry awarded to the one 
who shows prior actual settlement and substantial improvements, 
so as to be notice on the ground to any competitor. (Report of 
General Land Office for 1866, p. 19; also case of Helfrich v. King, 
? Copp's L. O., p. 164.) 

The applicant must, in every case, state in his application his 
place of actual residence and his postoffice address, in order that 
notices of proceedings relative to his entry may be sent him. The 
Register and Receiver will note the postoffice address on their 
tract books. 

An inceptive right is vested in the settler by the proceedings 
hereinbefore described. He must, within six months after making 
his entry, establish his actual residence in a house upon the land, 
and must reside upon and cultivate the land continuously in accord- 
ance with law for the term of five years. Occasional visits to the 
land once in six months or oftener do not constitute residence. 
The homestead party must actually inhabit the land, and must 



64 

reside upon and cultivate the land and make it the home of himself 
and family, as well as improve and cultivate it. 

At the expiration of five years, or within two years thereafter, 
he may make proof of his compliance with law by residence, im- 
provement, and cultivation for the full period required, and must 
show that the land has not been alienated except as provided in 
Section 2288, Revised Statutes (Sec. 2291 Rev. Stat.; Appendix 
No. 1), as amended by Section 3 of the Act of March 3, 1891 (26 
Stat. L., 1095; Appendix No. 44). 

The period of continuous residence and cultivation begins to 
run at the date of actual settlement, in case the entry at the dis- 
trict land office is made within the prescribed period (three months) 
thereafter, or before the intervention of a valid adverse claim. If 
the settlement is on unsurveyed land the latter period runs from 
the filing of plat in the district land office. (Act May 14, 1880, 21 
Stat. 140; Appendix No. 15. See circular of October 21, 1885, 4 
L. D., 202.) 

In grazing districts, stock raising and dairy production are so 
nearly akin to agricultural pursuits as to justify the issue of patent 
upon proof of permanent settlement and the use of the land for 
such purposes. 

A settler desirous of making final proof must file with the 
Register of the proper land office a written notice, in the prescribed 
form, of his intention to do so, which notice will be published by 
the Register in a newspaper, to be by him designated as nearest 
the land, once a week for five successive weeks, at the applicant's 
expense. 

Applicants should begin to make their proofs in sufficient time 
to complete and file them in the local office within the statutory 
period of seven years from the date of entry. 

The final affidavits and proof may be made before the Register 
or Receiver, or before any United States Commissioner, or Com- 
missioner of the Court exercising Federal jurisdiction in the Terri- 
tory, or before the Judge or Clerk of any Court of record in the 
land district in which the lands are situated: provided, that in case 
the affidavits and proof are taken out of the county in which the 
land is located, the applicant must show, by affidavit satisfactory 
to the Commissioner of the General Land Office, that said affidavits 
and proof were taken before the nearest or most accessible officer 
qualified to take the same in the land district in which the land 
entered is located, but such showing by affidavit need not be made 
if the proof be taken in the town or city where the newspaper is 
published in which the final proof notice is printed. (Act Mar. 11, 
1902, 32 Stat. L., 63; Appendix No. 91.) 



HISTORICAL 65 

Proofs can only be made by the homestead claimant in person, 
and cannot be made by agent, attorney, assignee or other person, 
except that in case of the death of the entryman, proof can be made 
by the statutory successor to the homestead right, in the manner 
provided by law. 

Where a homestead settler dies before the consummation of his 
claim, the widow, or, in case of her death, the heirs may continue 
settlement or cultivation, and obtain title upon requisite proof 
at the proper time. If the widow proves up, title passes to her; if 
she dies before proving up and the heirs make proof, the title will 
vest in them. (Sec. 2291, Rev. Stat; Appendix No. 1.) 

Where both parents die, leaving infant children, the homestead 
may be sold for cash far the benefit of the children, and the pur- 
chaser will receive title from the United States, or residence and 
cultivation may continue for the prescribed period, when the patent 
will issue to the children. (Sec. 2292, Rev. Stat.; Appendix No. 1.) 

Upon the death of a homesteader who leaves no widow, but both 
adult and minor heirs, the right to perfect entry passes alike to all 
the heirs. See Bernier v. Bernier (147 U. S., 242.) 

A homestead right cannot be devised away from a widow or 
minor children. 

In case of the death of a person after having entered a home- 
stead, the failure of the widow, children, or devisee of the deceased 
to take up residence within six months after the entry, or otherwise 
to fulfill the demands of the letter of the law as to residence, will 
not necessarily subject the entry to forfeiture on the ground of 
abandonment. If the land is cultivated in good faith, the law will 
be considered as having been substantially complied with. (Tauer 
v. The Heirs of Walter A. Mann, 4 L. D., 433.) 

The rights of a homestead claimant who has become insane may, 
under Act of June 8, 1880, be proved up and his claim perfected 
by any person duly authorized to act for him during his disability. 
(21 Stat. L., 166; Appendix No. 18.) 

Such claim must have been initiated in full compliance with 
law, by a person who was a citizen or had declared his intention of 
becoming a citizen and was in other respects duly qualified. 

The party for whose benefit the Act shall be invoked must have 
become insane subsequently to the initiation of his cliam. 

Claimant must have complied with the law up to the time of 
having become insane, and proof of compliance will be required to 
cover only the period prior to such insanity, but the act will not be 
construed to cure a failure to comply with the law when the failure 
occurred prior to such insanity. The final proof must be made by 



66 HISTORICAL 

a party whose authority to act for the insane person during his 
disability shall be duly certified under seal of the proper probate 
court. 

A person who has made a settlement on a tract and filed his 
preemption declaration therefor may change his filing into a home- 
stead if he continues in good faith to comply with the preemption 
laws until the change is effected, and the time which he has resided 
upon and claimed the land as a preemptor will be credited upon the 
period of residence and cultivation required under the homestead 
laws. (Acts of March 3, 1877, 19 Stat. L., 403, May 27 and June 14, 
1878, 20 Stat. L., 63 and 113; Appendix Nos. 5-7.) 

In his first homestead affidavit he must set forth the fact of a 
previous preemption filing, the time of actual residence thereunder, 
and the intention to claim the benefit of such time, as provided for 
in the Act. In making final proof on his homestead entry he is 
required, in addition to the usual affidavit and proof, to make the 
prescribed "preemption homestead affidavit." 

There are three laws providing for leaves of absence in certain 
cases, that of March 2, 1889 (25 Stat. L., 854; Appendix No. 32), 
which provides generally for cases of destruction or failure of 
crops, sickness, or other unavoidable casualty rendering the settler 
unable to support himself or persons dependent on him upon the 
land; that of July 1, 1879 (21 Stat. L., 48; Appendix No. 60), pro- 
viding for the relief of homestead settlers who suffered from the 
forest fires which prevailed in northern Wisconsin, Minnesota, and 
Michigan during the summer and autumn of 1894. 

The facts to be shown embrace the following, viz.: 

1. The character and date of entry, date of establishing resi- 
dence upon the land, and what improvements have been made 
thereon by the applicant. 

2. How much of the land has been cultivated by the applicant, 
and for what period of time. 

3. In case of failure or injury to crop, what crops have failed 
or been injured or destroyed, to what extent, and the cause thereof. 

4. In case of sickness, what disease or injury, and to what 
extent claimant is prevented thereby from continuing upon the 
land; and, if practicable, a certificate from a reliable physician 
should be furnished. 

5. In case of "other unavoidable casualty," the character, cause 
and extent of such casualty and its effect upon the land or the 
claimant. 

6. In each case full particulars upon which intelligent action 
may be based by the Register or Receiver. 



HISTORICAL 67 

7. The dates from which and to which leave of absence is asked. 

The proviso annexed to Sec. 2297, Revised Statutes, by the 
amendatory Act of March 3, 1881 (21 Stat. L., 511; Appendix No. 
23), which applies only to homestead settlers, provides that in case 
such settler has been prevented by climatic reasons from establish- 
ing actual residence upon his homestead within six months from 
date of entry, the Commissioner of the General Land Office may, 
in his discretion, allow him twelve months from that date in which 
to commence his residence. 

No lands acquired under the provisions of the homestead laws 
are liable for the satisfaction of any debt contracted prior to the 
issue of patent. (Sec. 2296, Rev. Stat.; Appendix No. 1.) 

Only one homestead privilege is allowed to the same person 
except where the entry is canceled as invalid for some other reason 
than abandonment. 

There are other minor provisions under the homestead law, 
which need not be mentioned in the present connection. 

DESERT LANDS. 

The Desert Land Laws of the United States which apply to 
Oregon, in common with other Western States, are herewith given: 

The Act of March 3, 1877, entitled "An Act to provide for the 
sale of desert lands in certain States and Territories" (19 Stat. L., 
337; Appendix No. 4) contained three sections. By the Act of 
March 3, 1891 (26 Stat. L., 1095; Appendix No. 44, five sections 
were added thereto, numbered from 4 to 8). The first section pro- 
vides for the reclamation of such lands by "conducting water upon 
the same," and that "no person shall be permitted to enter more 
than one tract of land, and not to exceed six hundred and forty 
acres, which shall be in compact form." The second section pro- 
vides "That all lands, exclusive of timber lands and mineral lands, 
which will not, without artificial irrigation, produce some agricul- 
tural crop, shall be deemed desert lands, within the meaning of this 
Act," and the third section provides that "This Act shall only apply 
to and take effect in the States of California, Oregon, and Nevada, 
and the Territories of Washington, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Arizona, 
New Mexico, Wyoming, and Dakota, and the determination of what 
may be considered desert land shall be subject to the decision and 
regulation of the Commissioner of the General Land Office." 

It is therefore prescribed as follows: 

First. Lands bordering upon streams, lakes, or other natural 
bodies of water, or through or upon which there is any river, stream, 
arroyo, lake, pond, body of water, or living spring, are not subject 



68 HISTORICAL 

to entry under the desert-land law until the clearest proof of their 
desert character is furnished. 

Second. Lands which produce native grasses sufficient in quan- 
tity, if unfed by grazing animals, to make an ordinary crop of hay 
in usual seasons are not desert lands. 

Third. Lands which will produce an agricultural crop of any 
kind in amount to make the cultivation reasonably remunerative 
are not desert. 

Fourth. Lands containing sufficient moisture to produce a 
natural growth of trees are not to be classed as desert lands. 

By the fourth section the party making entry is required at the 
time of filing the declaration to file also a map of the land, which 
shall exhibit a plan showing the mode of contemplated irrigation, 
and which plan shall be sufficient to thoroughly irrigate and reclaim 
said land and prepare it to raise ordinary agricultural crops, and 
shall also show the source of the water to be used for irrigation and 
reclamation. Provision is made that persons may associate together 
in the construction of canals and ditches for irrigation and reclaim- 
ing tracts entered or proposed to be entered by them, and that they 
may file a joint map or maps showing their plan of internal im- 
provements. 

By the fifth section it is required that the entryman shall expend, 
for the purpose of the statute, at least $3 per acre $1 per acre 
during each year for three years and shall file proof thereof 
during each year, such proof to consist of his affidavit, corroborated 
by the affidavits of two or more witnesses, showing that the full 
sum of $1 per acre has been expended during such year and the 
manner in which expended (Forms 4-074b, 4-074c, p. 301), and at the 
expiration of the third year a map of plan showing the character 
and extent of improvements; that failure to file the required proof 
during any year shall cause the land to revert to the United States, 
and the money paid to be forfeited, and the entry to be canceled, 
and it is provided that the party may make his final entry and 
receive his patent at any time prior to the expiration of the three 
years on making the required proof of reclamation, of expenditure 
to the aggregate amount of $3 per acre, and of the cultivation of 
one-eighth of the land. 

The sixth section provides that entries made prior to the date 
of the amendatory Act of March 3, 1891, may be perfected accord- 
ing to the provisions of the Act of March 3, 1877, as originally 
enacted, or at the option of the claimant, may be perfected under 
the law as amended, so far as applicable, and repeals all acts or 
parts of acts in conflict with the act as amended. 



HISTORICAL 69 

The seventh section provides that at any time after filing the 
declaration, and within the period of four years thereafter, upon 
making satisfactory proof of the reclamation and cultivation of the 
land according to the legal requirements, and that he or she is a 
citizen of the United States, and upon payment in full therefor, a 
patent shall issue for the land to the applicant or his assigns. It 
limits the amount of land that may be held by any person or asso- 
ciation of persons by assignment or otherwise, prior to the issue of 
patent, to 320 acres as the maximum; providing, however, that this 
section shall not apply to entries made prior. Provision is made 
therein for contests on sufficient grounds and that on proof thereof 
the entry shall be cancelled and the lands and money paid therefor 
forfeited to the United States. 

By the eighth section the provision of the original act and the 
amendments are extended to Colorado. 

By the same section the right to make desert-land entry is 
restricted to resident citizens of the State or Territory in which 
the land sought is located, whose citizenship and residence must be 
duly shown. (Forms 4-274, 4-372a, and 4-373a, pp. 295-298-301.) 

1. The amount of land which might be entered by any one per- 
son under the desert-land law was fixed by the Act of March 3, 
1877, at the maximum of one section, or 640 acres. Under the Act 
of August 30, 1890 (26 Stat. L., 391), no person could be permitted 
to enter thereafter more than 320 acres in the aggregate under all 
the land laws, which is construed by the seventeenth section of the 
Act of March 3, 1891 (26 Stat. L., 1095; Appendix No. 44), not to 
include the amount of mineral lands entered in the prescribed maxi- 
mum. Parties initiating claims are required to make affidavit to 
show observance of such inhibition. (See Form 4-102b, p. 272.) 
Under the amendatory Act of March 3, 1891, above, no person is 
entitled to hold, under assignment or otherwise, prior to the patent, 
more than 320 acres entered as desert land, but this will not affect 
entries made prior to the approval of the amendatory act. 

Assignees must properly prove their assignments by filing in 
the local office an affidavit and a certified copy of the instrument 
under which they claim and must make affidavit of the amount of 
land held. (Form 4-074a, p. 300.) 

The requirement that desert-land entries "Shall be in compact 
form" was not charged by the amendment to said law by the Act 
of March 3, 1891, and where application is made for lands that do 
not form a compact body (that is, where there is a material de- 
parture from a technical half section or lesser legal subdivision), 
it must be shown by the affidavit of the applicant, corroborated by 
f wo witnesses, that the land is in as compact form as may be, taken 



70 HISTORICAL 

in relation to the topography of the surrounding country and the 
prior appropriation of adjacent lands. The affidavit must be in 
addition to other parts in the case and must set forth clearly and 
in detail the facts in relation thereto. (31 L. D. 441.) 

2. Under the Act of March 3, 1877, it was held that desert-land 
entries were not assignable, and that the transfer of such entries, 
whether by deed, contract, or agreement, vitiated tne entry. This 
is changed by the seventh section of the Act of March 3, 1877, as 
amended by the Act of March 3, 1891, above, which recognizes 
assignments after entry and before patent; but an entry made in 
the interest or for the benefit of any other person, firm, or corpora- 
tion, or with intent that the title shall be conveyed to any other 
person, firm or corporation, is illegal. 

3. It has been held that the price of lands sought to be entered 
under the provisions of the Act of March 3, 1877, was controlled 
and fixed by the provisions of Section 2357 of the Revised Statutes, 
but it is now held that the price of lands sought to be entered under 
the provisions of said Act of 1877, as amended by Section 2 of the 
Act of March 3, 1891, is to be $1.25 per acre, without regard to the 
situation of such land in relation to railroad grants. (14 L. D., 74.) 

4. A party desiring to avail himself of the privileges of the 
desert-land act must file with the Register and Receiver of the 
proper district land office a declaration, under oath, showing that 
the applicant is a citizen of the United States, or has declared his 
intentions to become such, and a resident of the State or Territory 
in which the land sought is located. It must be set up that the 
applicant has not previously exercised the right of entry under the 
provisions of this act, and that he intends to reclaim the tract of 
land applied for by conducting water thereon within four years 
from date of his declaration. The declaration must also contain a 
description of the land applied for, by legal subdivision if surveyed, 
or, if unsurveyed, as nearly as possible without a survey, by giving 
with as much clearness and precision as possible, the locality of the 
tract with reference to the already established lines of survey, or 
to known and conspicuous landmarks, so as to admit of its being 
readily identified when the lines of survey come to be extended. 

5. Attention is called to the terms of this declaration (Form 
4-274, p. 295), which are such as require a personal knowledge by 
entrymen of lands intended to be entered. The required affidavit 
cannot be made by an agent nor upon information and belief, and 
the Register and Receiver must reject all applications in which it 
does not appear that the entryman made the averments contained 
in the sworn declaration upon his own knowledge derived from a 
personal examination of the land. The blanks in the declaration 



HISTORICAL 71 

must be filled in with a full statement of the facts of his acquaint- 
ance with the land and how he knows its character as alleged. Said 
declaration must be corroborated by the affidavits of two reputable 
witnesses who are acquainted with the land and with the applicant, 
and who must clearly state their acquaintance with the premises, 
and the facts as to the condition and situation of the land upon 
which they base their judgment. (Form 4-074, p. 297.) 

6. Applicants and witnesses must in all cases state their places 
of actual residence, their business or occupations, and their post- 
office addresses. It is not sufficient to name the county and State 
or Territory where a party lives, but the town or city must be 
named, and if a residence is in a city the street and number must 
be given. The Register and Receiver will note the postoffice address 
on their tract books. 

7. The declaration and corroborating affidavits may be made 
before the Register or Receiver of the land district or before any 
United States Commissioner or Commissioner of the Court exer- 
cising Federal jurisdiction in the Territory or before the Judge or 
Clerk of any Court of record in the land district in which the lands 
are situated. 

In case the affidavits, proofs, and oaths hereinbefore mentioned 
be taken out of the county in which the land is located the applicant 
must show by affidavit that it was taken before the nearest or most 
accessible officer qualified to take said affidavits, proofs and oaths 
in the land districts in which the lands applied for are located. 

Such showing by affidavit need not be made, however, in making 
final proof, if the proof be taken in the town or city where the news- 
paper is published in which the final-proof notice is printed. (An 
Act of March 11, 1902, 32 Stat. L., p. 63.) 

The depositions of applicant and witnesses in making final or 
yearly proof must be taken in the same manner. The affidavit of 
applicant and witnesses must in every instance, either of original 
or yearly or final proof, be made at the same time and place and 
before the same officer. 

8. When proof of the character of the land has been made as 
above required to the satisfaction of the district officers, the appli- 
cant will pay the Receiver the sum of 25 cents per acre for the 
land applied for, the Register will receive and file his declaration, 
and the Register and Receiver will jointly issue, in duplicate, a cer- 
tificate (Form 4-199, p. 298), acknowledging the receipt of the 
money paid and showing the filing of the declaration, one of which 
will be delivered to the applicant, and the other filed by the Register 
and Receiver with the declaration and proof. These certificates will 
be numbered in the order issued, and the Register will keep a record 



72 HISTORICAL 

thereof showing the number, date, amount paid, name of applicant, 
and description of the land applied for, in each case of original 
entry, and in addition he will note the same upon his plats and 
records as in cases of original entries. A similar record will be kept 
of the yearly proofs made and the maps or plans filed from time 
to time, under the fifth section, and the yearly proofs and plans will 
be forwarded to the General Land Office by special letter. At the 
end of each month an abstract of the declarations filed and certifi- 
cates issued under this act during the month will be transmitted, 
accompanied by the declarations, plans, and proofs filed, and the 
retained copy of certificates in each case. On final proofs and 
payment being made according to the sixth and seventh sections, a 
final certificate and receipt will be issued. In ex parte cases, the 
entryman's right to the land will not be passed upon until the sub- 
mission of final proof. (See Andrew Clayburg, 20 L. D., 211.) 

9. Surveys of desert-land claims cannot be made in advance of 
the regular progress of the public surveys. After a township has 
been surveyed the claim made prior to August 1, 1887, can be made 
without publication of notice to do so (9 L. D., p. 672). Publication 
of notice of intention to make final proof must be made in all 
cases of entries instituted since that time. When the land has not 
been surveyed the notice must contain a description of the land as 
nearly as possible without a survey, by giving, with as much clear- 
ness and precision as possible, the locality of the tract with reference 
to the already established lines of survey, or to known and con- 
spicuous landmarks, so as to admit of its being readily identified. 

When final proof has been submitted on an entry upon unsur- 
veyed land, if no objections exist, the Register and Receiver will 
approve the same and forward it to this office without collecting 
the purchase money and without issuing the final papers. When 
the land shall have been surveyed, they will require the party to 
make proof, in the form of an affidavit, corroborated, showing the 
legal subdivisions of his claim. When this has been done they will 
correct their records to make them describe the land by legal sub- 
divisions, and if the proof submitted to this office has been found 
satisfactory, and if no objection exists in their office, will issue 
final papers upon payment of the amounts due. (Circular of April 
20, 1891, 12 L. D., 376.) 

10. Persons making desert-land entries must acquire a clear 
right to the use of sufficient water for the purpose of irrigating the 
whole of the land, and of keeping it permanently irrigated. A per- 
son who makes a desert-land entry before he has secured a water 
right does so at his own risk; and as one entry exhausts his right 



73 

of entry, such right cannot be restored or again exercised because 
of failure to obtain water to irrigate the land selected by him. 

11. The source and volume of the water supply, how acquired 
and how maintained, the carrying capacity of the ditches, and the 
number and length of all ditches on each legal subdivision of the 
land must be specifically shown. Applicant and witnesses must each 
state in full what has been done in the matter of reclamation, culti- 
vation, and improvement, and by who, and must each answer fully 
and of their own personal knowledge the questions propounded in 
the final proof depositions. They must state specifically whether 
they at any time saw the land effectually irrigated, for without 
knowledge thus derived the fact of reclamation remains a matter 
of conjecture. (Case of Charles H. Schick, 5 L. D., 151.) 

12. The whole tract and each legal subdivision, if surveyed for 
which proof is offered must be actually irrigated. If there are 
some high points or uneven surfaces which are practically not sus- 
ceptible of irrigation, the nature, extent and area of such spots must 
be fully stated. In this connection the right to the water used, the 
quantity of it, the manner of its distribution, and the permanence 
of the supply are all to be taken into consideration. (Case of George 
Ramsey, 5 L. D., 120.) 

13. Before final proof shall hereafter be submitted by any 
person claiming to enter lands under the desert-land act, such per- 
son will be required to file a notice of intention to make such proof, 
which shall be published in the same manner as required in home- 
stead and preemption cases. 

14. Contests may be instituted against desert-land entries for 
illegality or fraud in the inception of the entry, or for failure to 
comply with the law after entry, or for any sufficient cause affect- 
ing the legality or validity of the claim. Contestants will be allowed 
a preference right of entry for thirty days after notice of the can- 
cellation of the contested entry in the same manner as in homestead 
and preemption cases, and the Register will give the same notice 
and be entitled to the same fee for notice as in other cases. 

15. When relinquishments of desert-land entries are filed in 
the local land office, the entries will be canceled by the Register 
and Receiver in the same manner as in homestead, preemption and 
timber-culture cases, under the first section of the Act of May 
14, 1880. (21 Stat. L., 140; Appendix No. 15.) 

In the number of cases persons who have initiated claims to 
public lands under the desert-land Act of March 3, 1877, have 
allowed the limitation provided by the statute to expire without 
making the final proof of reclamation of the land and the final 
payment as required by the act; therefore, in all such cases which 



74 HISTORICAL 

now exist or which may hereafter exist, the Registers and Receivers 
will notify the parties of their non-compliance with the law, and 
that ninety days from date of service of notice will be allowed to 
each of them within which to show cause why their claims should 
not be declared forfeited and their entries canceled. 

TIMBER AND STONE LANDS. 

The United States Laws concerning timber and stone lands, 
applying to Oregon in common with other Western States, are 
epitomized as follows: 

The Act of June 3, 1878 (20 Stat. L., 89; Appendix No. 6), pro- 
vides for the sale of timber lands in the States of California, Oregon, 
Nevada and Washington, and the Act of August 4, 1892, Section 2 
(27 Stat. L., 348; Appendix No. 51), extends the provisions of the 
former act to all the public-land States. 

1. The quantity of land which may lawfully be acquired under 
said acts by any one person or association is limited to not exceed- 
ing 160 acres, which must be in one body. (See case of Daniel J. 
Heyfran, 19 L. D., 512.) 

2. The land must be valuable chiefly for timber (or stone) 
and unfit for cultivation at the time of sale (22 L. D., 647.) 

3. It must be unreserved, unappropriated, and uninhabited, and 
without improvements (except for ditch or canal purposes) save 
such as were made by or belong to the applicant. 

4. Lands containing saline or valuable deposits of gold, silver, 
cinnabar, copper, or coal are not subject to entry under this act. 

5. One entry or filing only can be allowed any person or asso- 
ciation of persons. A married woman may be permitted to pur- 
chase under said act, provided the laws of the State or Territory 
in which the entry is made permit a married woman to purchase and 
hold real estate as a femme sole; but in addition to the proofs 
already provided for she shall make affidavit at the time of entry 
that she proposes to purchase said land with her separate money, 
in which her husband has no interest or claim; that said entry is 
made for her sole and separate use and benefit; that she has made 
no contract or agreement whereby any interest whatever therein 
will inure to the benefit of her husband or any other person, and 
that she never made an entry under said act, or derived or had any 
interest whatever, directly or indirectly, in or from a former entry 
made by any person or association of persons. 

6. A person applying to purchase a tract under the provisions 
of this act is required to make affidavit before a duly authorized 
attesting officer that he has made no prior application under this 



HISTORICAL 75 

act; that he is by birth or naturalization a citizen of the United 
States or has declared his intention to become a citizen. If native 
born, parol evidence to that fact will be sufficient; if not native 
born, record evidence of the prescribed qualification must be fur- 
nished. The affidavit must designate by legal subdivisions the 
tract which the applicant desires to purchase, setting forth its char- 
acter as above; stating that the same is unfit for cultivation, and 
valuable chiefly for its timber or stone; that it is uninhabited; 
contains no mining or other improvements, except for ditch or canal 
purposes ( if any exist), save such as were made by or belong to the 
applicant, nor, as deponent verily believes, any valuable deposits of 
gold, silver, cinnabar, copper, or coal; that deponent does not apply 
to purchase the same on speculation, but in good faith to appropriate 
it to his own exclusive use and benefit; and that he has not, directly 
or indirectly, made any agreement or contract, in any way or man- 
ner, with any person or persons whomsoever, by which the title 
he may acquire from the Government of the United States shall 
inure in whole or in part to the benefit of any person except him- 
self. 

7. Every person swearing falsely to any such affidavit is guilty 
of perjury, and will be punished as provided by law for such offence. 
In addition thereto, the money that may be paid for the land if 
forfeited, and all conveyances of the land, or of any right, title, or 
claim thereto, are absolutely null and void as against the United 
States. 

8. The sworn statement required as above (Section 2 of the 
act) must be made upon the personal knowledge of applicant, 
except in the particulars in which the statute provides that the 
affidavit may be made upon information or belief. 

9. The attesting officer will in every case read this affidavit 
to the applicant, or cause it to be read to him in their presence, 
before he is sworn or his signature is attached thereto. 

10. The published notice required by the third section of the 
act must state the time and place when, the name the officer before 
who, the party intends to offer proof, which must be after the 
expiration of the six days of publication (circular of September 5, 
1889, 9 L. D., 384), and must also contain the names of the wit- 
nesses who are to testify. (See case of Sarah L. Bigelow, 20 L. D., 
6.) The period of publication is complete when the notice has been 
inserted for nine successive issues of a weekly newspaper, and the 
full statutory period has elapsed. (28 L. D., 224.) 

11. The evidence to be furnished to the satisfaction of the 
Register and Receiver at time of entry, as required by the third 
section of the act, must be taken before an officer authorized to 



76 HISTORICAL 

take the same under the Act of March 11, 1902 (see rule 12), and 
will consist of the testimony of claimant, corroborated by the testi- 
mony of two disinterested witnesses. The testimony will be re- 
duced to writing by the attesting officer upon the blanks provided 
for the purpose, after verbally propounding the questions set forth 
in the printed forms. The accuracy of affiant's information and 
the bona fides of the entry must be tested by close and sufficient 
oral examination. The attesting officer will especially direct such 
examination to ascertain whether the entry is made In good faith 
for the appropriation of the land to the entryman's own use, and 
not for sale or speculation, and whether he has conveyed the land 
or his right thereto, or agreed to make any such conveyance, or 
whether he has directly or indirectly entered into any contract or 
agreement in any manner with any person or persons whomsoever 
by which the title that may be acquired by the entry shall inure, 
in whole or in part, to the benefit of any person or persons except 
himself. The attesting officer will certify to the fact of such oral 
examination, its sufficiency, and his satisfaction therewith. 

12. The affidavits and proofs required under this act may be 
taken before the Register or Receiver, or before any United States 
Commissioner, or Commissioner of the Court exercising Federal 
jurisdiction in the territory, or before the Judge or Clerk of any 
Court of record in the land district in which the lands are situated: 
Provided, that in case the affidavits and proofs are taken out of 
the county in which the land is located, the applicant must show, 
by affidavit satisfactory to the Commissioner of the General Land 
Office, that it was taken before the nearest or most accessible 
officer qualified to take said affidavits and proofs in the land 
district in which the land applied for is located, and such showing 
by affidavit need not be made in making final proof if the proof 
be taken in the county or city where the newspaper is published 
in which the final proof notice is printed. (Act Mar. 11, 1902, 32 
Stat. L., 63; Appendix No. 91.) 

13. The entire proof must be taken at one and the same time 
and payment must be made at the time of offering proof. Proofs 
will in no case be accepted in the absence of a tender of the money; 
and the Register's certificate will in no case be given to the party 
or his attorney, but must be handed directly to the Receiver by the 
Register; and no note will be made upon the plats or tract books 
until the Receiver's receipt has been issued. The proof, certificate, 
and receipt must in all cases bear even date when taken before the 
Register or Receiver. 

14. When an adverse claim, or any protest against accepting 
proof or allowing any entry, is filed before final certificate has 



HISTORICAL 77 

been issued, the Register and Receiver will at once order a hearing, 
and will allow no entry until after their written determination upon 
such hearing has been rendered. They will report their final action 
in all protest and contest cases, and transmit the papers to this 
office. 

15. After certificate has been issued, contest applications, and 
protests, will be submitted to this office, as in other cases of contest 
after final entry. 

16. Contests may be brought against timber and stone land 
applications or entries, in accordance with rule 1 of Rules of Prac- 
tice, either by an adverse claimant or by any other person, and for 
any sufficient cause affecting the legality or validity of the filing, 
entry or claim. 

17. In case of an association of persons making application for 
an entry under this act, each of the persons must prove the requisite 
qualifications, and their names must appear in the sworn statement, 
as in case of an individual person. They must also unite in the 
regular application for entry, which will be made in their joint 
names, as in other cases of joint cash entry. The forms prescribed 
for cases of applications by individual persons may be adopted 
for use in applications of this class, and the sworn statement as to 
the character of the land may be made by one member of the asso- 
ciation upon his personal knowledge. 

18. No person who has made an individual entry or application 
can thereafter make one as a member of an association, nor can 
any member of an association making an entry or application be 
allowed thereafter to make an individual entry or application. 

19. Applicants to make timber-land entries, and claimants and 
witnesses making final proof, must in all cases state their places of 
actual residence, their business or occupation, and their postoffice 
addresses. It is not sufficient to name the county and State or Ter- 
ritory where a party lives, but the town or city must be named; and 
if residence is in a city, the street or number must be given. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 

IN the following short sketches there has been no attempt made 
to eulogize, no expenditure of adjectives; no effort at "write up"; 
and no opinion expressed. Each sketch is a brief compilation of 
facts that are a public record, and as such is wholesome and re- 
freshing. 

The material for these sketches has been gathered from the sub- 
jects themselves; they have been personally interviewed and every 
effort has been made to insure accuracy. 

The purpose has been to confine this section wholly to living 
men, that some really authentic record be had of the members of 
the bar who have done and are doing things. Soon many of those 
written of here will be gone. It is then that this work will begin 
to assume its real value, as a comprehensive record of this genera- 
tion. 

It has been a long and painstaking work, and in presenting it to 
the bar, the publishers do so without misgiving of its hearty recep- 
tion. 

Acknowledgment is made of the courtesy of the members of the 
bar, for their individual co-operation. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



CHARLES HENRY ABEECROMBIE. 

Residence 777 Irving avenue; office 172 
Tenth street, Astoria, Ore. Born November 
8, 1878, at Brandon, Fond du Lac County, 
Wisconsin. Son of John and Harriet (Earle) 
Abercrombie. Married February 27, 1904, to 
Mary Lucile Ford. Attended the grammar 
schools of Wisconsin until 1887, in which 
year he removed with his parents to Oregon, 
and attended the grammar schools at Astoria, 
graduating from the high school at that place 
in 1897. Studied law in the office of C. W. 
and G. C. Fulton in 1897-8-9. Attended the 
University of Wisconsin from 1899 to 1903, 
graduating with degree of LL. B. Admitted 
to the bar at Madison, Wis., June 18, 1903, 
to the Circuit Court and District Courts of 
that state, United States, Western District of 
Illinois, at the same time, and to the Su- 
preme Court of Oregon, July 1, 1903. Ensign- 
Lieutenant First Division N. R., O. N. G., 
1897-99. Captain First Company Coast Ar- 
tillery Corps, O. N. G., July 9, 1908, to date. 
Deputy District Attorney Fifth Judicial Dis- 
trict, 1904 to 1906. City Attorney, 1906. 
Member Astoria Amateur Athletic Club, Elks, 
Masons and Knights of Pythias. Republican. 

ALBERT ABRAHAM. 




Residence, Roseburg, Ore. Office, same. 
Born September 10, 1869, at Canyonville, Ore. 
Son of Solomon and Julia (Hinkle) Abraham. 
Married May 23, 1899, to Leona E. Shupe. 
Education received at the public schools of 
Oakland and Roseburg, Ore.; at the Umpqua 
Academy, at Wilbur, Ore.; at Bishop Scott's 
Grammar School, Portland; at the University 
of Oregon, Eugene, and at the Univer- 




sity of California, Berkeley, Cal. Studied 
law in Portland, Ore., with firm of Dolph, 
Bellinger, Mallory & Simon, 1888 to 1892. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Oregon in October, 1892. 
In partnership with Victor C. Bellinger, 
1892-3; with L. A. Ward, 1896-8. Practiced 
law in Portland, Ore., until 1898, and since 
then in Roseburg, Ore. Was referee in bank- 
ruptcy for Douglas County, at Roseburg, Ore., 
from 1898 to 1908. State Senator from Fifth 
Senatorial District, 1908 to date. Republican. 

LOUIS J. ADAMS. 
Residence and 
o ffi c e S ilverton, 
Ore. Born Janu- 
ary 30, 1862, at 
Portsmouth, Ohio. 
Son of Frank and 
Barbara (Peters) 
Adams. Married 
September 5, 1888, 
to May Coolidge. 
Educated at the 
public schools and 
the high school at 
Portsmouth, Ohio, 
and at Smith Col- 
lege, of the same 
city. Came to Or- 
egon in 1884. Read 
law in the office of 
George G. Bing- 
ham at Salem, and studied with the Sprague 
Correspondence School of Michigan. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem in 1897, and com- 
menced the practice of law at Silverton im- 
mediately. Member State Senate, Ninth 
Congressional District, 1901. Mayor of Sil- 
verton, 1905 to 1907. Has also served as 
Councilman and School Director at Silverton. 
Member K. of P., B. P. O. E. and Odd Fellows' 
fraternities. Republican. 

ROBERT N. AISTROP. 

Resid e n c e, 405 
Stark street; office 
4 North Sixth 
street, Port land. 
Ore. Born May 3, 
1878, in Warren 
County, Missouri. 
Son of John A. 
and Ophelia (Ed- 
wards) Aistrop. 
Marr i e d Septem- 
ber 3, 1908, to 
Rachel M. Robin- 
son. Attended the 
Central Wesleyan 
College, Warren, 
Mo., from Septem- 
ber 9, 1897, to 
June, 1901, and 
later took the law 
course of the law department of the Univer- 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



81 



sity of Oregon, and graduated in June, 1907, 
with degree of LL. B. Admitted to the bar 
in Salem, Ore., June, 1907; began the prac- 
tice of law in November of that year; form- 
ing a partnership with W. P. Gregory, which 
partnership continues to the present time, 
under the name of Aistrop & Gregory. Be- 
publican. 

SEWARD DUANE ALLEN. 

Eesidence 809 Ferry street; office 20-21 Loan 
& Trust building, Eugene, Ore. Born in 
Brookfield, Madison County, New York, May 
11, 1855. Son of Jonathan and Cynthia (San- 
ders) Allen. Married to Gertrude Staples 
October 9, 1889. Attended West Winfield 
Academy, New York, and graduated from 
Hamilton College, Clinton, N. Y., with degree 
of A. B. Admitted to the bar at Duluth, 
Minn., in 1883, and practiced law in that city 
until 1903, a portion of the time associated 
under the firm names of Allen & Parkhurst 
and Allen & Baldwin. Came to .Oregon in 
June, 1903. Superintendent of Schools of St. 
Louis County, Minnesota. Served four terms 
as City Attorney of Duluth, Minn., and one 
term as City Attorney of Eugene, Ore. Be- 
publican. 

CLINTON A. AMBROSE. 

Eesidence 1414 
Oneonta street; 
office 19-20 Lafay- 
ette building, 
Portland. Born 
July 23, 1883, at 
Yoncalla, Douglas 
County, Or e g o n. 
Son of Nathan A. 
and Mary E. 
(Lamb) Ambrose. 
Eeceived early ed- 
ucation in Port- 
land public schools 
and graduated 
from Lincoln High 
School Febru a r y, 
1902. Attended the 
University of Ore- 
gon Law School 
and graduated from same with degree of 
LL. B. in 1906. Admitted by the Supreme 
Court of Oregon June 21, 1906, since which 
date he has continued the active practice of 
his profession. Member M. A. A. C., I. O. 
0. F. fraternity. Eepublican. 

GUSTAV ANDERSON. 

Eesidence 1778 Valley avenue; office Shoe- 
maker building, Baker .City. Born Decem- 
ber 17, 1863, near the City of Geffe, Sweden. 
Son of Anders and Martha (Larsen) Ander- 
son. Eemoved to Olympia, Wash., in 1882, 
and to Oregon in 1887. Education, prior to 
leaving Sweden, was in the public schools, 




from which he graduated, and under private 
instructor. Graduated from Olympia Collegi- 
ate Institute in June, 1887, and from the law 
department of the University of Oregon in 
1895, with degree of LL. B. Admitted to the 
bar June 1, 1895, and later to the Federal 
Courts, including the Court of Appeals. Prac- 
ticed law in Portland until September, 1905, 
when, owing to ill-health, and believing the 
climate would benefit, he accepted an offer 
into partnership with the then District Attor- 
ney at Baker City, and has practiced there 
since. City Attorney of Baker City. Ee- 
publican. 

GRANVILLE GAY AMES. 

Eesid e n c e 209 
Tenth street; of- 
fice 732 Marquam 
building, Portland, 
Oregon. He was 
born February 1, 
1852, at Sheboy- 
gan Falls, Wis. 
Son of Isaac and 
Eoana (Witt) 
Ames. Married 
September 29, 
1904, to Minnie B. 
E o b b. Attended 
country schools in 
Wisconsin, Minne- 
sota and Iowa un- 
til 1872. In 1873 
spent one year at 
the State Normal 
School of Minnesota at Mankato. From 1874 
to 1878 attended Carleton College, at North- 
field, Minnesota, taking a two-year prepara- 
tory course and two years of the college 
course. In 1878 and 1879 attended the law 
school of the University of Iowa, graduating 
June 19, 1879, with the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws. Was admitted to the bar at Iowa 
City, la., in June, 1879; to the United States 
District Court of Iowa in 1880, and to the 
United States Circuit Court of Iowa in 1881. 
Came to the State of Oregon in that year 
(1881) and the following year was admitted 
to the Supreme Court of the State of Oregon; 
to the United States District Court of Oregon 
in 1891, and to the United States Circuit Court 
of Oregon in the same year. Was also ad- 
mitted to the Supreme Court of the State of 
Washington in that year. Was appointed 
Consul from Costa Eica July 7, 1897, which 
office he still holds. Eepublican. 

HOMER D. ANGELL. 

Eesidence 726 Upper Drive, Portland 
Heights; office 601 Fenton building, Portland, 
Ore. Born January 12, 1875, in Wasco Coun- 
ty, Oregon. Son of Thomas and Susan P. 
(Yeomans) Angell. Married July 29, 1908, 
to Mayme Henton. Attended public school, 
Wasco Independent Academy, The Dalles, 
Ore.; University of Oregon, 1896-1900, from 




82 



BIOGRAPHICAL 




which he graduated with degree A. B.; the 
Law Columbia University, New York City, 
1900-1903, with degrees M. A. and LL. B. 
Admitted to bar for New York State, New 
York City, in 1903, and to the bar of the State 
of Oregon same year. Member of the firm 
of Angell & Fisher. Eepublican. 



CARL A. APPELGREN. 

Eesid e n c e 266 
Broadway street; 
office 208 Lewis 
building, Portland. 
Born in Lyrestad, 
Sweden, July 26, 
1871. Son of Carl 
M. and Maria 
Christina (Pears- 
dotter) Appelgren. 
Married Septem- 
ber 2, 1896, to Bes- 
sie Nyhus. Came 
to Oregon August 
5, 1889. Attended 
public schools in 
Sweden and night 
school in Portland, 
Oregon, in 1890, 
later attending 

University of Oregon, Law Department. 
Admitted to bar at Salem, Oregon, Oc- 
tober 12, 1909. Employed by S. W. 
Eice as abstract clerk from September, 
1889, to April, 1890, when The Title 
Guarantee & Trust Company purchased hia 
Abstract plant, and was retained by the 
Title Guarantee & Trust Company as ab- 
stractor and title examiner until 1907, at 
which time the Beceiver appointed for said 
company engaged his services as Manager 
of the Abstract Department, which position 
he held until 1908, when he became examiner 
of titles for the Title & Trust Company 
which position he holds at present. Served 
five years in the Oregon State Militia. Mem- 
ber of Masonic Fraternity, Eepublican Club. 
Eepublican. 



EUGENE ASHWILL. 

Eesidence 216 Fir street; office 216 Fir 
street, La Grande, Oregon. Born October 10, 
1871, in Jasper County, Illinois. Son of 
Henry Clay and Jane M. (Perry) Ashwill. 
Graduated from Preparatory Department of 
Ottumwa University, Ottumwa, Kansas, in 
1893. Graduated from Law Department of 
the State University of Kansas at Lawrence, 
Kansas, in 1897, with LL.B. degree. Prac- 
ticed law at Leavenworth, Kansas, until 
August, 1899, when he came to Oregon, lo- 
cated at La Grande as partner of L. A. 
Esteb. Dissolved partnership with Mr. Es- 
teb in 1901, and has since practiced alone. 
Eepublican. 




ALFRED ANTHONY AYA. 

Eesidence Alex- 
andra Court (53 
Ella streeet). Of- 
fice 615-617 Henry 
building, Port- 
land. Born at Al- 
bert Lea, Minne- 
sota, June 15th, 
1879. Son of Louis 
and Amelia 
(B r o n n e nkant) 
Aya. A 1 1 e n ded 
St. Joseph's Paro- 
chial School at 
Winona, Minneso- 
ta, from 1886 to 
summer of 1889. 
Eemoved to Ore- 
gon August, 1889. 
Attended St. Ma- 
ry's Academy at Eugene. Oregon, from 
the fall of that year to autumn, 1894. 
Beceived private instruction in Latin and 
English from 1894 to 1899. Entered the 
Law Department, University of Oregon, in 

1899 and attended lectures for one year. In 

1900 entered the Law Department of the Uni- 
versity of Washington, where he attended 
lectures for one year. In 1902, re-entered 
the University of Oregon, from which insti- 
tution he graduated with L.B. degree in 1903. 
Was admitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, 
the same year, when he entered the office of 
C. M. Idleman, of Portland, where he re- 
mained until 1906, when he established him- 
self in his own office in the Fenton building. 
In 1906 was admitted to practice in the 
Federal Courts. In 1905 he became associated 
with the Deschutes Land Company (irriga- 
tion for Oregon, under Carey Act). In the 
fall of 1908 ,he discontinued the practice of 
law and devoted his entire time to the Des- 
chutes Land Company, The Canal Construc- 
tion Company and the La Pine Townsite 
Company. The latter two companies being 
interested in the same work, namely, the de- 
velopment of the Southern Deschutes Valley 
in Central Oregon. Member of the Waverly 
Golf Club, the Eepublican Club of Portland, 
Oregon Bar Association, Knights of Colum- 
bus Council, No. 678, of Portland, Chase 
Chapter, Phi Delta Phi. Eepublican. 

SEID BACK, JR. 

Eesidence, 320 Larrabee street; office, 308 
First street, Portland, Oregon. Born De- 
cember 11, 1878, at Portland, Oregon. Son 
of Seid Back and Jung Shee. Married Janu- 
ary 25, 1900, to Mary Chan. In his early 
childhood, until he was thirteen years old, he 
was taught by private Chinese teachers, and 
in this way secured his Chinese education. 
From the time .he was thirteen until he was 
eighteen, he attended the Baptist Chinese 
Mission Night School, where he acquired 
the primary knowledge of the English Ian- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



83 



guage. From 1898 to 1900, he was a student 
at the Old Bishop Scott Academy in Port- 
land. From 1900 until October, 1903, he was 
actively engaged in mercantile business in 
partnership with his father, and from Octo- 
ber, 1903, to January, 1909, was in the em- 
ploy of the IT. S. Immigration Bureau, De- 
partment of Commerce and Labor, for the 
first three years as an interpreter and later 
as Chinese Interpreter at Large, which po- 
sition required much of his time in travelling 
from one station to another, where Chinese 
interpreters were stationed. In 1903-1906 and 
1907 he attended the Law Department of the 



1, 1895. Admitted to the bar of Oregon at 
Salem, June 1, 1895. Commenced the prac- 
tice of law at Hillsboro June 1, 1895; alone 




University of Oregon, graduating in 1907, 
with LL.B. degree. In June of that year he 
was admitted to practice in Oregon, by the 
Oregon Supreme Court, and in July was ad- 
mitted to the District and Circuit Courts of 
the United States, for the District of Ore- 
gon. He bears the distinction of having 
been the first Chinese who was admitted to 
practice in the American Courts. He was 
the originator of the "American Born Chi- 
nese Association," which was organized in 
1900, and still exists for the purpose of social, 
mental and physical advancement -of Ameri- 
can-born Chinese boys. Republican. 

GEORGE ROBERT BAGLEY. 

Residence, Hillsboro, Oregon; office, same. 
Born January 25, 1871, at Canton, Stark 
County, Ohio. Son of William and Sarah 
(Robinson) Bagley. Married April 20, 1897, 
to Olive M. Hanley. Attended public 
schools at Canton, Ohio, until 1885, when he 
came to Oregon, and attended district school 
at Leisyville, Oregon, for 18 months. Read 
law in office of Congressman Thomas H. 
Tongue, of Hillsboro, May 1, 1892, to June 




from May 1, 1897, to September, 1898; in 
partnership with J. N. Brown, firm name 
Bagley & Brown; then alone to October 1, 
1906; from then to date with W. G. Hare, 
under the firm name of Bagley & Hare. Mem- 
ber W. O. W. and K. of P. Fraternities. 
Republican. 

HARRY TAYLOR BAGLEY. 

Residence, Hillsboro, Oregon; office same. 
Born December 23, 1874, at Canton, Ohio. 
Son of William and Sarah (Robinson) Bag- 
ley. Married January 18, 1899, to Cora M. 
Rhea. Came to Oregon in 1885 and attended 
the county schools in Washington County, 
Oregon, and the public schools at Hillsboro 
until 1890, when he entered the High School 
at Portland. Studied law in the office of 
W. R. Ellis and T. R. Lyons, at Heppner. 
Admitted to the bar in July, 1897, and in 
August of that year was appointed Deputy 
District Attorney for Washington County, 
under District Attorney T. J. Cleeton, and 
served until August, 1900. From 1902 to 1908 
served as Justice of the Peace in Hillsboro 
district; from 1901 to 1908 was City Recorder 
at Hillsboro and is at present Referee in 
Bankruptcy, Washington County. Member of 
K. of P. Republican. 

DOUGLAS W. BAILEY. 

Residence, Pendleton, Oregon; office, same. 
Born April 9, 1857, in Nebraska City, Ne- 
braska. Son of George W. and Elizabeth 
(Weedman) Bailey. Married August 15, 1881, 
to Augusta Haller. In 1862 his parents set- 
tled at Pendleton before that town was laid 



84 



BIOGRAPHICAL 




out. His early education was received in the 
common schools of Portland and at Bishop 
Scott Academy, where he finished in June, 
]S74. Was admitted to the bar at Salem in 
1880. Was District Attorney for district 
comprising Wasco, Umatilla, Union, Baker 
and Grant counties, from 1880 to 1882. Mem- 
ber Masonic Fiaternity, Eepublican. 

ALBERT BACKUS 

Eeside nee, 741 
Washington street. 
Office, 519 Board 
of Trade building, 
Portland. Born 
May 28, 1872, in 
Oakland, Nebras- 
ka. Son of Gusta- 
vus and Anna C. 
Backus. Attended 
Lincoln Normal 
U n i v ersity, Lin- 
coln, Neb., 1892- 
1898, and later 
graduated from 
the University of 
Nebraska in 1900, 
with degree of LL. 
B. Admitted to 
the bar in Nebras- 
ka -June, 1900, to the bar of North Dakota 
1903 and to the bar of Oregon 1904, in which 
year he moved to the state. Practiced in 
Fremont, Nebraska, for some three years, 
under the firm name of Backus & Gubser, 
later moving to Jamestown, North Dakota, 
where he practiced for one year under the 
firm name of Martin & Backus; 1904 to 1903 
practiced law in Baker City, and organized 
and conducted the Baker City business col- 
lege in association with C. A. Robinson, 
which continued until he moved to Portland 
in August of 1908. Member of Nebraska 
National Guards 1902 at Fremont, Nebraska. 
Member of Masonic and B. * . O. E. Frater 
nities. 



G. EVERT BAKER. 

Residence, 1013 East Eleventh street, N.; 
office, 304-5-6 Lewis building, Portland. Born 
October 22, 1872, in Rhodes, Iowa. Son of 
Joseph and Mary Ann (Tiffen) Baker. Mar- 
ried December 4, 1900, to Ellen F. Keuhne. 
Attended the public school at Rhodes, Iowa, 
and later the Northern Indiana Normal 
school at Valparaiso, Indiana. Graduated In 
science, elocution and oratory. Graduated 
from the Northern Indiana Law School in 
June, 1900, with degree Bachelor of Law. 
Admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court 
of Indiana June 5, 1901, and to the Circuit 
Court for the United States District of In- 
diana June 5, 1901, and to the Circuit Court 
Porter County, Indiana, and the State Su- 
preme Court of Indiana June 5, 1901. June 8, 
1902, admitted by the Supreme Court, State 



of Oregon, and later to the United States 
Circuit Court. Moved to Oregon August 20, 

1901, since which date he has continued- ac- 
tive practice of his profession alone. Was 
connected for some years with the Farmers' 
Bank of Rhodes, Iowa, and later with the 
Citizens' Bank, Grass Valley, Oregon. Mem 
ber Masonic Fraternity and International 
Bibliophile Society. Democrat. 

JOSEPH P. BAKER. 

Residence, 601 F. avenue; office, Room 14, 
La Grande National Bank building. La 
Grande. Born February 20, 1854, in Iowa. 
Son of Micajah and Eliza J. Baker. Married 
October, 1878, to Annie M. Stephenson. Edu- 
cated at the public schools of La Grandr, 
having come to this state when a very small 
T)oy. Admitted to .the bar of Oregon at 
Salem, in October, 1881; practiced alone for 
one year, when he went into partnership 
Judge Robert Eakin in Union County, Ore- 
gon, the firm continuing until 1884, under the 
name Eakin & Baker. From 1884 to 1903 
was in partnership with his father, under 
the firm name of Baker & Baker, since when 
he has practiced alone. In 1899 was City 
Attorney of La Grande, and from 1906 to 
date has filled the same office. Member of 
K. of P. Fraternity. Republican. 

ROY J. BAKER. 

Residence and office, Grass Valley, Oregon. 
Born in Rhodes, Iowa, February 23, 1879. 
Son of Joseph and Mary (Tiffny) Baker. 
Married to Mary J. Smith October 11, 1903. 
Attended district school in Iowa, one year in 
High School at Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Gradu- 
ated from Valparaiso College, Valparaiso, 
Indiana, in 1900 with degree of B. S., and in 
1902 with degree of LL.B. Admitted to the 
Bar of all Courts of Indiana anl to United 
States Circuit Court for Indiana District in 
June, 1902. Came to Oregon October 11, 

1902, and admitted to Oregon bar in 1903. 
Republican. 

WILLIAM WALLACE BANKS. 

Residence, 854 Marshall street; office, 321- 
322 Chamber of Commerce building, Port- 
land. Born in Lovington, Illinois, July 25, 
1876. The son of Zachary F. and Susan 
(Patterson) Banks. Married June 11, 1902, 
to Ethel E. Pike. In 1892 removed to Ore- 
gon. He received his education at the public, 
grammar and high schools of Portland, Ore. 
gon. In 1896 graduated from the Law De- 
partment of the University of Oregon. In 
1897 was admitted to the bar at Salem, Ore- 
gon. In 1904 was appointed Assistant 
United States Attorney for District of Ore- 
gon, which position he resigned in 190(i. 
In 1902 was elected to House of Representa- 
tives of the State of Oregon. Member of 
M. A. A. C. and Masonic Fraternity. Re- 
publican. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



85 



WILLIAM NATHAN BARRETT. 

Eesidence and office, Hillsboro, Oregon. 
Born in Washington County, Oregon, Novem- 
ber 24, 1855. Son of William B. and Eliza 
Jane (Purdin) Barrett. Married to Lucretia 
H. Parrish, November 18, 1882. Attended 




the public schools of Washington County, 
Oregon; Tualatin Academy, Forest Grove, 
Oregon, and later graduated from Pacific 
University, June, 1879, receiving degree of 
B. S. Studied law in the office of Thomas 
H. Tongue. Admitted to the bar at Salem, 
Oregon, October, 1884. Formed partnerslrp 
with Hon. W. D. Hare, of Hillsboro, Oregon, 
which continued until 1886. Practiced alone 
until 1892, when partnership was formed with 
Loring K. Adams, which continued until 
1897, since which time he has practiced alone 
in Hillsboro, Oregon. Deputy District Attor- 
ney; District Attorney for Fifth Judicial Dis- 
trict of Oregon; State Eepresentative; and in 
1908 elected State Senator. Member Masonic 
Fraternity, K. of P., A. O. U. W., U. A. 
Republican. 

CHARLES ROBB BARROW. 

Office, Sanderson building, Coqnille, Oregon. 
Son of Eleazer William Barrow and Elizabeth 
Ann (Robb) Barrow. Was born on a farm 
near Hillsboro, Highland County, Ohio. 
While a boy he worked on the farm for his 
father and in winter attended the rural 
school at Clear Creek, Ohio, and graduated 
from the High School at Hillsboro, Ohio, in 
1878. He then taught school several years, 
four years as principal of a High School. He 
had two years' special instruction in elocu- 
tion under Professor W. A. Roush, of Hills- 
boro, Ohio, and under James E. Murdoch, t)f 
Cincinnati, Ohio. He was then cashier of 
the Blanchester Bank, of Blanchester, Ohio, 



and during that time organized, and was for 
two years secretary of the Blanchester 
Building and Loan Association. While teach- 
ing he commenced the study of the law. 
which he continued with more or less regular- 
ity till he left the bank and went into the 
law office of Judge A. N. Williams at Blan- 
chester, Ohio, where he remained nearly two 
years, when he went into the law office of 
Judge John E. Smith at Lebanon, Ohio, and 
was there one year. He graduated from the 
National Normal University at Lebanon, Ohio, 
in 1888 with B. S. degree, and from the Law 
Department of the same university in 1890 
with the degree of LL.B. Also from the 
Law Department of the University of Michi- 
gan at Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 1898, with 
degree of LL.B. He was married in June, 
1888, to Miss Elma Lillian Gustin, of 
Blanchester, Ohio, and in July, 1905, to 
Mrs. Eva Marshall Disman, of Cherry- 
vale, Kansas. He was a delegate to 




the convention that first nominated J. 
B. Foraker for Governor of Ohio. He 
removed to Tarkio, Atchison County, Mis- 
souri, in October, 1890, where he continued 
the practice of the law; was City Attorney for 
two years, and organized, and was for two 
years secretary of, the Argus Building and 
Loan Association. Was Prosecuting Attor- 
ney of Atchison County, Missouri, for the 
years 1895 and 1896. He was first admitted 
to practice law by the Supreme Court of 
Ohio, at the January term, 1890; by the Su- 
preme' Court of Missouri in 1891; by the Su- 
preme Court of Michigan in 1898; and by the 
Supreme Court of Kansas in 1904. Came to 
Oregon in 1896 and was admitted by the 
Supreme Court of this state the same year. 
He is a member of the National Geographic 
Society and of the Masonic, I. O. O. F., and 
W. O. W. Fraternities. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 




CECIL H. BAUER. 

Residence, 130 
North 19th street; 
office, 600 - 606 
Henry building, 
Portland. Born 
February 8, 1870, 
at Walla Walla, 
Washington. Son 
of Joseph and 
Julia (Heyman) 
Bauer. Married 
June 6, 1899, to 
Rose Bloch. Re- 
ceived his early 
education by pri- 
vate tutorship of 
his mother until 
13 years of age, 
when he attended 
Whitman College 

at Walla Walla, Washington, until 1888, when 
he was in the Junior Class. Moved to .the 
State of Oregon, 1888. Attended the Law 
School, University of Oregon, 1888 to 1891, 
graduating in the class of that year, and re- 
ceiving the degree of LL. B. Was admitted by 
the Supreme Court of Oregon May, 1891. 
Formed partnership in 1891 with Gilbert 
J. McGinn, under the firm name of McGinn 
& Bauer. Associated with Charles H. Carey 
from 1893 to 1895. In May, 1905, he entered 
into partnership with Thomas G. Greene, 
under the firm name of Bauer & Greene, 
which continues to date. Appointed Colonel 
and Judge Advocate General O. N. G. on 
staff of Governor George E. Chamberlain 
December 31, 1893, and is still serving in the 
same capacity, under Governor F. W. Ben- 
son. He is a member of Commercial and Con- 
cordia Clubs. Democrat. 

JOHN BAYNE. 

Residence, 414 Bellevue street; office, 341 
State street, Salem. Born October 27, 1864, 
in the parish of Muthill, Perthshire, Scot- 
land. Son of John and Robina (Keron) 
Bayne. Married November 5, 1889, to Althea 
B. DeVecmon. Attended public schools of 
Muthill Parish, Perthshire, Scotland, for one 
year, and later ,the public schools of Jeffer- 
son County, Iowa. Attended Pleasant Plain 
Academy, Pleasant Plain, Iowa, for one term 
and acquired the rest of his education by 
private study. Came to Oregon in April, 1891, 
and studied law in the office of John A. Car- 
son, of Salem, from that year until June, 1893, 
and also attended the Law Department of 
Willamette University and graduated with 
degree of LL.B. in June, 1^93. Admitted to 
the Oregon bar June 7, 1893, and continued 
in the law office of John A. Carson until 
September 7, 1893, when he opened a law 
office of his own and has continued in the 
general practice of his profession since. In 
July, 1898, was appointed referee in Bank- 
ruptcy for Marion County, when the present 



bankruptcy law went into effect, and has 
been re-appointed every two years since. In 
1896 was nominated on Democratic ticket 
for representative of State Legislature. In 




December, 1903, was elected member of the 
common council of City of Salem, and was 
re-elected in December, 1905. Served as 
councilman until January, 1908. Member of 
Masonic order and Oregon Historical Society. 
Democrat. 

JARVIS VARNEL BEACH. 

R e s i d enee, 53 
Ella street; office, 
710 Board of 
Trade building, 
Portland. Born 
January 31, 1854, 
at Millport, Mis- 
souri. Son of Har- 
vey H. and Elea- 
ner Isabelle (Hen- 
ry) Beach. Mar- 
ried June 14, 188S, 
to Agnes O. Cole. 
Received his edu- 
cation at the pub- 
lic and State Nor- 
mal Schools at 
Kirksville, Mis- 
souri, and the 
Christian Univer- 
sity at Canton, Missouri. Admitted 
the bar in the State of Oregon in 
1881, and since 1900 has been in part- 
nership with Nathan D. Simon, under 
the firm name of Beach & Simon. Member of 
the Board of Education since 1897. Served 
as City Attorney of East Portland before con- 
solidation and afterwards served one term as 




to 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



87 



City Attorney of Portland. Member of the 
Arlington and Commercial Clubs of Port- 
land. 

HENRY J. BEAN. 

Eesidence, Pendleton, Oregon; office, Court 
House, Pendleton. Born November 13, 1853, 
at Bethel, Maine. Son of Timothy and Eliza- 
beth E. (Swift) Bean. Married June 8, 
1886, to Mattie E. Magahey. Education re- 
ceived at the public schools of Maine. Busi- 
ness course at North Yarmouth Academy, 
Yarmouth, Maine. Attended Hebron Acad- 
emy, Hebron, Maine, in 1873; Gould's Acad- 
emy, at Bethel, Maine, 1874 to 1878. Taught 
school for part of six years. Read law in the 
office of Hon. Enoch Foster, Bethel, Maine, 




and was admitted to the bar of that state 
March 9, 1881. Came to Oregon the same 
year and was admitted to the bar of this 
state in 1882. Has since practiced his pro- 
fession continuously at Pendleton until 
elected judge in partnership with Hon. 
James A. Fee in 1885 and 1886, under the 
firm name Bean & Fee; in partnership with 
John H. Lawrey in 1891 and with Hon. 
Stephen A. Lowell in 1900 and 1901, under 
the firm name Bean & Lowell. City Attorney 
1882-3-4. City Recorder 1885 and 1886, Rep- 
resentative Oregon Legislature 1889. Dis- 
trict Attorney two terms, 1896 to 1900. 
County Judge Umatilla County 1904-6; Cir- 
cuit Judge Sixth Judicial District 1906 to 
date. Member Masonic and K. of P. Fra- 
ternities. Republican. 

LOUIS ELMER BEAN. 

Residence, 640 High street; office, McClung 
building, Eugene, Oregon. Born in Lane 



County, Oregon, November 21, 1867. Son of 
Obediah Roberts and Julia Ann (Sharp) Bean. 
Married to Catherine Patterson June 28, 1905. 
Attended district school at Oak Grove, Ore- 
gon, until 1878; Eugene public school from 
1878 to 1884; University of Oregon at Eu- 
gene, 1884-85; and Holmes Business College, 
Portland, Oregon, 1895-6. Admitted to the 
bar at Salem, Oregon, June, 1898. Com- 
menced practice at Eugene, Oregon, in asso- 
ciation with A. C. Woodcock until January, 
1900; receiving clerk in United States Land 
Office from January, 1900, to December, 1900. 
Again took up the practice of law at Eu- 
gene, continuing alone until December 1, 
1905, then associating with John M. Williams, 
which partnership continues to date. Mem- 
ber of the Oregon State Legislature from 
June, 1908, to date. Member Republican 
Club of Portland; Commercial Club, Eugene. 
Mason. Republican. 

ROBERT SHARP BEAN. 

Residence, 665 Elliott avenue; office, United 
States Court Room, Portland. Born in Yam- 
hill County, Oregon, November 28, 1854. Son 
of O. R. and Julia Ann (Sharp) Bean. Edu- 
cated in the public schools, later attending 
Christian College, Monmouth, Oregon, "gradu- 
ating in 1873. Graduated from University 
of Oregon in 1878, receiving degree of B. S., 
and LL.D. and degree of LL.D. from Willam- 
ette University. Admitted to bar at Salem, 
Oregon, 1876. Elected Circuit Judge, Second 
District of Oregon, in 1882, and again in 
1886. Justice Supreme Court 1890-6 and 
1902-1908. Appointed United States District 
Judge April, 1909. Republican. 



JOHN ALBERT BECKWITH. 

Residence, 720 
Broadway; office, 
507-8-9 Fen.ton 
building, Portland, 
Oregon. Born No- 
vember 7, 1884, in 
Portland, Oregon. 
Son of H. R. and 
Minnie (Frazer) 
Beckwith. Gradu- 
ated from Univer- 
sity of Oregon in 
1905. Bachelor of 
Laws June, 1905. 
Admitted to the 
bar in Oregon 
June, 1905, and 
became associated 
with J. C. More- 
land for a period 

of two years, when the latter received ap- 
pointment as clerk of the Supreme Court; 
thereupon succeeded to his practice in part- 
nership with Albert E. Johnson, which con- 
tinues to date. Republican. 




88 



BIOGRAPHICAL 




BENJAMIN B. BEEKMAN. 

Residence, Ho- 
tel Portland; of- 
fice, 308 Commer- 
cial block, Port 
land. Born Aug- 
ust 3, 1863, at 
Jacksonville, Ore- 
gon. Son of Cor- 
nelius C. and Julia 
Elizabeth (Hoff 
m an) Beekrnan. 
Received his edu- 
cation at the pub 
1 i c schools o f 
Jack sonville, at 
the University of 
Oregon, from 
which he gradu 
ated in 1884 with 
the degree of A. 

B., and later at Yale University, from 
which institution he graduated in 1888 
with the degree of LL.B. Was admitted to 
the bar of the State of Connecticut June 27, 

1888, and to the bar of Oregon March 5, 

1889. Was associated in the practice of his 
profession with Edward B. Watson and James 
F. Watson, under the firm name of Watson, 
Beekman & Watson, from 1893 to 1897, hav- 
ing been previously associated with Judge 
R. G. Morrow, from 1890 to 1893. Upon the 
decease of James F. Watson, in 1897, the firm 
name became Watson & Beekman, and con 
tinues so to date. Member Company K, 
Oregon National Guard, 1889-1892. Instruc- 
tor Agency in Law School, University of Ore- 
gon, 1907 .to date. Member University Club, 
Portland Commercial Club, Oregon Chapter, 
Sous of American Revolution, Oregon Com- 
mandery, No. 1, Knights Templar, Oregon 
Consistory, No. 1, A. and A. Scottish Rite, Al 
Kader Temple, Mystic Shrine. Republican. 

LEON WASHINGTON BEHRMAN. 

Residence, 329 Seventh street, Portland, 
Born March 9, 1888, at Port Townsend, Wash- 
ington. Son of Jacob and Mina (Neuberger) 
"Behrman. Came to Oregon at the age of 
nine and was educated at the public and 
high schools of Portland, after which he at- 
fended the University of Oregon Law School, 
graduating from same in 3909 with degree 
of LL.B. Admitted to the bar at Salem in 
June, 1909. Attended Columbia University 
Law School, New York City. Republican. 

HARRY BAXTER BECKETT. 

Residence, 426^. College street; office, 316- 
317 Lumbermens building, Portland. Born 
May 1, 1885, at Sterling, Kansas. Son of 
Charles K. and Virginia (Hocker) Beckett. 
Educated in the ward schools in Kansas and 
at the High School in Kansas City, Missouri. 
A graduate of the Prosso preparatory school 
in Kansas City, Missouri. In 1907 he re- 
ceived the degree of LL.B. from the Univer- 



sity of Missouri at Columbia, Missouri. Was 
admitted to the bar of Missouri in 1907, in 
which year he removed to Portland, Oregon, 
and was admitted to the bar at Salem, when 
* commenced the practice of his profession, 
which continues to date. Member of Phi 
Delta Theta Fraternity. Democrat. 

JOHN WESLEY BELL. 

Residence, 186 
Chapman street; 
office, 506 Worces- 
ter building, Port- 
land. Born June 
16, 1849, at Rip- 
ley, Ohio. Son of 
Nathaniel Finch 
and' Nancy Ann 
(Reynolds)' Bell. 
Married October 
23, 1878, to Alice 
M. Hungerford. 
Educated in the 
public schools at 
Ripley, Ohio. Ad 
mitted to the bar 
at Mansfield, 
Ohio, in Januarj', 
1871, and to the 

United States Court, Northern District of 
Ohio, in 1878, at Cleveland, Ohio. Came to 
Portland, Oregon, in 1893. Was elected 
Justice of the Peace for Portland District 
in 1908. Member Republican Club and Union 
Republican Club of Portland, Oregon. Re 
publican. 

WELLS ADAIR BELL. 





Residence, The Dalles, Oregon; office, same. 
Born April 22, 1872, at Corvallis, Benton 
County, Oregon. Son of Matthew Henry and 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



89 



Elizabeth Cole (Wells) Bell. Married Aug- 
ust, 1905, to Effa D. Vanderpool. Early edu- 
cation received at the public schools of Cor- 
vallis until 1884 and at Prineville public 
schools until 1888. Attended Monmouth Col- 
lege, Monmouth, Illinois, 1889 and 1890, and 
the University of Oregon Law Department 
1891-1894, graduating with degree of LL.B. 
Admitted to the bar in May, 1894. Opened 
offices at Prineville, Oregon, June 6, 1894, and 
practiced there continuously until January 1, 
1910, when he removed ,to The Dalles and 
became associated with Frank Menefee. He 
still runs an office at Prineville, through an 
assistant. Deputy District Attorney 1894 to 
1910, Seventh Judicial District. Judge of 
Crook County, Oregon, 1904 to 1908. Chair- 
man Republican County Central Committee 
Crook County; delegate to State and Con- 
gressional conventions April, 1904. Republi- 
can. 

FRANK S. BENNETT. 

Residence, 1150 Rodney avenue; office, 518- 
520 Lumbermens building, Portland. Born 
July 29, 1875, in Portland, Oregon. Son of 
Alexander W. and Jane (Murdoch) Bennett. 
Married September 8, 1903, to Eva Gertrude 
Taylor. Received early education in Port- 
land public schools and graduated in 1892 
from the Portland High School. Entered the 
University of Oregon Law Department and 
graduated wkh the degree of LL.B. in 1906. 
Admitted to the bar of Oregon 1906. As- 
sociated with the firm of Williams, Wood & 
Linthicum 1893 to 1900, Appointed Clerk 
Justice Court, Portland District, 1900-1902. 
Became member of the firm of Wilkins & 
Bennett 1902 -to 1906, and upon dissolution 
of that firm became a member of the firm 
of Bennett & Tazwell, November 1, 1907, 
which partnership continues to date. Member 
O. N. G. 1892 to 1903. Retired as Major and 
Brigade Quartermaster on staff of General 
Charles H. Beebe. Elected Councilman 
Eighth Ward, Portland, 1905 and re-elected in 
1907. Elected Municipal Judge June, 1909, 
and continues so to date. Republican. 

JOSEPH WILLIAM BENNETT. 

Residence and office, Marshfield, Oregon. 
Born in Bandon, Cork County, Ireland, April 
21, 1855. Son of George and Catherine Scott 
Ann (Harrison) Bennett. Came to Oregon 
in 1873. Married to Mary Grace Bennett 
1879. Educated at Dr. Brown's School, Dev- 
onshire Square, Bandon, Cork County, Ire- 
land. Admitted to bar 1880 at Salem, Ore- 
gon. President Coos County Bar Association. 
Mason and K. of P. Republican. 

THOMAS TANKERVILLE BENNETT. 

Residence, Marshfield, Oregon; office, same. 
Born July 7, 1886, at Marshfield, Oregon. Son 
of Joseph William Bennett and Mary Grace 
(Bennett) Bennett. Attended the public and 
high schools of Marshfield, Oregon. Gradu- 
ated from there June, 1903, and then en- 




tered the Belmont School at Belmont, Cali- 
fornia, and graduated from there in 1904. 
Entered the Law Department of Stanford 
University, graduating there in May, 1909, 
with degree A.B. Then entered the office of 
his father, J. W. Bennett, and studied law 
with ihim until January, 1910, when he 
formed a partnership with him, which exists 
to date. Admitted to the bar of Oregon Oc- 
tober 9, 1909. Member of the Masonic Fra- 
ternity. 

WILLIAM CHARLES BENBOW. 

Residence, 1075 
Corbett street; of- 
fice, 613 McKay 
building, Port- 
land. Born April 
19, 1863, at Amo, 
Hendricks County, 
Indiana. Son of 
William Stanley 
and Jemima (Bee- 
son) B e n b o w . 
Married Septem- 
ber, 1887, to An- 
nette Brinkerhoff. 
Educated at the 
Indiana State 
Normal School at 
Terre Haute, Indi- 
ana. Graduated 
from the Michi- 
gan Law School in 1890, having previously 
attended the University of Michigan. For 
several terms he taught school. In 1890 he 
was admitted to the bar at Springfield, Illi- 
nois .the same year he was admitted to the 
bar at Windom, Minnesota. Was Prosecuting 
Attorney for one term for Cottonwood County, 
Minn. Practiced law from 1890 to 1906 at 
Windom, Minn., when he removed to Oregon. 
Was admitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon. 
Was appointed Deputy City Attorney of Port- 
land, Oregon, in March, 1909. Republican. 

FRANK W. BENSON. 

Residence, Roseburg, Oregon; office, the 
State Capitol, Salem, Oregon. Born March 
20, 1858, in Santa Clara County, California. 
Son of Henry Clark and Matilda M. (Wil- 
liamson) Benson. Married November 4, 
1883, to Harriet R. Benjamin. Came to Ore- 
gon in 1864 and received his early education 
at the public schools of California and later 
at the Portland Academy, Portland. At- 
tended the University of the Pacific, San 
Jose, California, receiving degree of A.B. in 
1877 and the degree of A.M. in 1882. In 
1880 came to Roseburg where for a period 
of three years he taught school and in 1882 
while teaching was elected school superin- 
tendent, which office he held for four years. 
Clerk in Land Office 1884 to 1886; 1886 to 
1888 President of Drain Normal School. Dep- 
uty County Clerk of Douglas County and in 
1892 elected County Clerk, which office he 
held until 1896. Assistant to Judge Hamil- 



90 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



ton 1897-8 and was admitted to the bar of 
the State of Oregon in the latter year. Has 
since practiced his profession alone. Secre- 
tary of State 1907 to date and Governor 




State of Oregon March 1, 1909, to date. Re 
ceived honorary degree of LL.B. from Wil- 
lamette University in 1909. Member of 
B. P. O. E., Artisans, I. O. O. F. and W. O. W. 
Fraternities. Member Illihee Club of Salem. 
Republican. 

HENRY LAMDIN BENSON. 

Eesidence and office, Klamath Falls, Ore- 
gon. Born in Stockton, California, July 6, 
1854. Son of Henry Clark and Matilda M. 
(Williamson) Benson. Married to Susie E. 
Dougharty 1876. Attended Portland Acad- 
emy, Portland, Oregon; University of the 
Pacific, San Jose, California, graduating in 
1873 with degree of B.A., later receiving de- 
grees A.M. and L.D. Read law in office of 
George F. Baker, San Francisco, and Judge 
Herrington of San Jose. Admitted to the 
California bar in 1878 and commenced the 
practice of law in partnership with W. G. 
Lorigan in San Jose, which continued until 
1880, when he came to Oregon. Principal 
of the Drain Normal School in Douglas 
County, Oregon, and of public and high 
school at Grants Pass, Oregon. Admitted to 
the Oregon bar at Salem in 1886, and com- 
menced the practice of law in Grants Pass in 
1891. 1892 to 1896, District Attorney of Jo- 
sephine, Jackson, Klamath and Lake coun- 
ties. Elected member of Legislature in 1896; 
made Speaker of the House, 1897. Elected 
Circuit Judge of the four counties in 1898; 
re-elected 1904; in 1908 resigned to go into 
partnership with C. F. Stone at Klamath 
Falls. Member B. P. O. E., A. O. U. W. and 
Masonic Fraternity. Republican. 



ALEXANDER BERNSTEIN. 

Residence, 776 Overton street; office, 836 
Chamber of Commerce, Portland. Born Octo- 
ber 10, 1858, at Kingston, Ulster County, New 
York. Son of Isaac and Henrietta (Alexan- 
der) Bernstein. Married November 20, 1887, 
to Salome Solis Cohen. Educated at the 
Kingston and New York City public schools, 
the College of the City of New York, from 
which he graduated in 1878 with the degree 
of A.B. Entered Law Department of Co- 
lumbia College and graduated from same in 
1880 with LL.B. degree. Admitted to the 
bar of New York May 14, 1880, at Ithaca, 
New York; to the Supreme Court of the 
State of New York and to the Supreme Court 
of the State of Colorado the same year, and 
to the Supreme Court of Oregon in 1883, in 
which year he was also admitted to the Dis- 
trict and Circuit United States Courts and 
afterwards to the United States Circuit Court 
of Appeals for the Ninth District of Oregon. 
Member of Concordia Club, director of Port- 
. land Commercial Club. Republican. 

HENRY JOHNSTON BIGGER. 
Residence, 441 
East Fifteenth 
street, North; of 
fice, 404-405 Ger- 
liuger bull ding, 
Portland. Born, 
June 5, 1848, at 
Dayton, Ohio. Son 
of James and Ev- 
aline (Hamill) 
Bigger. Married, 
October 10, 1881, 
to Sallie P. Pears. 
Graduated in 
June, 1872, from 
Monmouth C o 1 - 
lege, Illinois, with 
the degree of B.A. 
Was admitted to 
the bar of Penn- 
sylvania in October, 1875, and practiced in 
Allegheny County, Pa., until December, 1891. 
Removed to Oregon in 1892 in which year he 
was admitted to the bar of the State of 
Oregon, and practiced his profession in 
Marion County, Oregon, until May, 1907, 
when he removed to Multnomah County, 
since when he has practiced his profession in 
Portland, being at present associated with 
George W. Wilson, under the firm name of 
Bigger & Wilson. Republican. 

DALTON BIGGS. 

Residence and office, Ontario, Oregon. 
Born in Louisiana, Missouri, December 18, 
1874. Son of James D. and Lucy C. (Hatch) 
Biggs. Married Phebe Lawry December 28, 
1899. Attended public school in Kirkwood, 
Mo., 1883; McCune College, private school, 
Louisiana, Mo., 1883-87; public school, Bow- 
ling Green, Mo . 1888; Pike College, Bowling 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



91 



Green, Mo., 1889-92. Bead law in office of 
George W. Emerson, Bowling Green, Mo., 
1894-96. Admitted to bar in Missouri June, 




1897; January, 1898, formed partnership with 
George W. Emerson, which continued until 
1900. Came to Burns, Oregon, September 17, 
1900; formed partnership with J. W. Biggs, 
which continued until 1906. Admitted to 
bar in Oregon May, 1901. Moved to Ontario, 
Oregon, 1906, continuing practice of law to 
date. Deputy Prosecuting Attorney, Pike 
County, Mo., 1898-1900. Member of Masonic 
and K. of P. Fraternities. Democrat. 

GEORGE G. BINGHAM. 

Residence 1116 Michigan street; office, 
Bush Bank building, Salem, Ore. Born No- 
vember 25, 1855. Son of William H. and 
Maria (Kentner) Bingham. Married Novem- 
ber 6, 1882, to Willie E. Harris. Received 
LL. B. Degree from University of Michigan 
in 1880. Came to Oregon in 1872. Admitted 
to the bar of Oregon in 1880. Was with 
James McCain at Lafayette, Ore., one year, 
then removed to McMinnville and practiced 
alone until 1885, when he removed to Salem 
and formed partnership with Judge Ramsey, 
under the firm name Ramsey & Bingham, 
w.hich existed until 1887. Then practiced 
alone until 1890, when he was elected Dis- 
trict Attorney for Third Judicial District. 
Same year formed partnership with P. H. 
D'Arcy, which partnership continued for 
four years, since which time he has practiced 
alone. Admitted to the Supreme Court of 
United States February 23, 1910. Member 
Masonic and B. P. 0. E. Fraternities. Re- 
publican. 

WILLIAM RALEIGH BILYEU. 

Residence, Albany, Oregon; office, 403 
Wright building, Albany, Oregon. Born in 



Miller County, Missouri, March 19, 1847. 
Son of Joseph and Anna (Osborn) Bilyeu. 
Came to Oregon in 1862. Married Mary E. 
Goldson June 3, 1882. Attended the public 
schools of Washington County, Mo., and 
Tualatin Academy. Graduated from Pacific 
University June 3, 1873, with degree of B.S. 




Admitted to b'ar at Salem, Oregon, December 
14, 1876. Member of Oregon State Senate 
1878 to 1886, from Linn County, and of the 
House of Representatives, 1903-1904. Mem- 
ber Masonic, K. of P. and B. P. O. E. Fra- 
ternities. Democrat. 

OZRO SETH BLANCHARD. 

Residence 801 Lawnridge avenue; office, 
Tuffs building, Grants Pass, Ore. Born in 
Erie, Penn., May 11, 1876. Son of E. A. and 
Elizabeth (Stapf) Blanchard. Married to 
Irma Linkey July 18, 1906. Received com- 
mon school education in Council Bluffs, la, 
graduating from high school in 1895. Studied 
law, summer 1895, with Colonel D. B. Dailey. 
Entered law school at Ann Arbor, Mich., 1895, 
graduating 1898 with degree of LL. B. Ad- 
mitted ito the bar in Iowa, October, 1898, 
practicing in Council Bluffs until June, 1905. 
Came to Oregon in 1905, continuing practice 
here to date. Secretary of Oregon Irriga- 
tion Association, 1906-1907. Director Grants 
Pass Commercial Club. Member A. F. & A. 
M. and W. O. W. Fraternities. Republican. 

SOL BLOOM. 

Residence 628 Flanders street; office 635 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland, 
Ore. Born May 1, 1873, in Portland, Or. 
Son of Jacob and Anna (Wise) Bloom. Ed- 
ucated at the public and high schools of 
Portland, and graduated from the University 



92 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



of Oregon in 1896 with LL. B. Degree. Read 
law in the office of Stott, Boise & Stout, of 
Portland. Was admitted to the bar in 1896, 
and immediately began the practice of his 
profession alone. Member Masonic Frater 
nity. Republican. 

OLIVER CARTER BOGGS. 




Residence, Medford, Oregon.' Office, Miles 
building, 128 E. Main street. Born Douglas 
County, Illinois, February 15, 1876. Son of 
Benjamin F. and Mary J. (Armstrong) Boggs. 
Married to E. W. Woodin, June 25, 1902. At- 
tended Urbana, Illinois, public schools, pre- 
paratory department of the University of 
Illinois. Graduated from the University of 
Illinois, at Urbana, Illinois, 1902, taking the 
degrees of A. B. and LL. B. Represented the 
University of Illinois in annual debate with 
the University of Indiana, 1902. University 
of Illinois track team, 1894. Admitted to 
practice law in Illinois, 1902; California, 
1902; Oregon, 1908. Deputy District Attor- 
ney in Jackson County, Oregon, March term, 
1909. Masonic, B. P.' O. E., Royal Arcanum 
and Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternities. Re- 
publican. 

WHITNEY LYON BOISE. 
Residence 591 Hawthorne avenue; Office 
308-9 Chamber of Commerce building, Port- 
land, Ore. Born November 6, 1862, at Salem, 
Ore. Son of Reuben Patrick and Ellen Fran- 
ces (Lyon) Boise. Married July 3, 1900, to 
Louise H. Hawthorne. Received his earliest 
education at a log schoolhouse at Ellendale, 
Polk County, Oregon. Later attended La 
Creole Academy at Dallas, Ore., the Willam- 
ette University, at Salem, Ore., and the Uni- 
versity of Oregon, from which he graduated 
in 1880, with B. S. degree. Read law with 
Judge R. P. Boise, of Salem and later with 



Judge Raleigh Stott, of Portland. Admitted 
to the bar at Salem in 1885. Commenced the 
practice of his profession in Portland, in 
partnership with Judge Stott and Sam Stott, 
under the firm name of Stott, Boise & Stott, 
which firm continued three years, when the 
firm of Stott, Waldo, Smith, Stott & Boise 
was formed, consisting of Judge R. Stott. 
J. B. W T aklo, Seneca Smith, Sam Stott and 
W. L. Boise. This firm continued until 1891, 
when the firm again became Stott, Boise & 
Stott, continuing so until 1896, when Sam 
Stott retired and George C. Stout entered, 
the firm name then being Stott, Boise & Stout. 
In 1900 Mr. Boise left this firm and has since 
practiced alone. Member Republican Central 
Committee 1890 to 1894; Chairman Republican 
State Central Committee 1892 to 1894; Chair- 
man Republican County Committee 1904 to 
1906; member Executive Board of Portland, 
under Mayor Williams, 1903-1905; member 
Arlington, Commercial and Meadow Lake 




Clubs, of Portland. Was member of commit- 
tee sent by the Lewis and Clark Exposition 
Coinpany to Washington to get appropriation 
from Congress, the committee consisting of 
Hon. H. W. Scott, Jefferson Myers and Mr. 
Boise. Mr. Boise returned to Washington the 
second time, with Oscar Huber, and was suc- 
cessful in securing the appropriation. Mem- 
ber for four years Company K, old Oregon 
State Militia, and upon the organization of 
Oregon National Guard, served one year in 
that. Organizer of the East Side Civic Im- 
provement Clubs, and was first president of 
the United East Side Improvement Associa- 
tions, consisting of 30 civic organizations on 
the east side of the river. Was one of the 
organizers of the Portland Commercial Club, 
and was at one time president of that body. 
Republican. 



93 



J. F. BOOTHS. 

Residence Commercial Club; office 714 
Board of Trade building, Portland, Ore. Born 
May 6, 1857, in Silverton, Ore. Son of A. H. 
and Ann (Hall) Boothe. Married March 26, 
1879, to Mary Caroline Kent. Eeceived his 
education at the Whitman Seminary, Walla 
Walla, Wash., leaving that institution in 
1876. First studied law under Eichard H. 
Ormsbee, and was admitted to practice in 
Washington Territory in 1886. Attended the 
State University of Oregon Law School, grad- 
uating with the class of 1888, and received 
degree of LL. B., and was admitted to prac- 
tice upon examination by the Supreme Court 
of Oregon, in October of that year. In 1907 
served an unexpired term in the City Council 
of Portland. Republican. 

HOSEA THOMPSON BOTTS. 

Residence Tillamook, Ore.; office, same. 
Born June 8, 1873, at Novelty, Knox County, 
Missouri. Son of Benjamin and Mary Casey 
(Mitchell) Botts. Married December 17. 
1896, to Maud Bryant. Attended the coun 




try schools in Missouri until 1886. Attendee? 
Oaklawn College, Novelty, Mo., from 1887 
until 1890. Took law course at Missouri 
State University, graduating in 1893 with 
the degree LL. B. Admitted to the bar of 
Missouri, June 8, 1894. Opened office ii> 
Edina, Mo., in the fall of 1895, and practice,-' 
there until his removal to Tillamook in 190.1, 
where he practiced alone until 1904, when 
he formed a partnership with B. L. Eddy 
This partnership lasted one year, when Mr 
Eddy moved from Tillamook, and since that 
time he has practiced alone. Vice-president 
Tillamook County Bank and treasurer of 



Tillamook Lumber Manufacturing Company; 
Mayor of Tillamook City in 1906 and 1907; 
member School Board since 1905; Chairman 
Republican County Committee since 1906; 
Deputy District Attorney 1903-4, and 1910; 
president Port of Tillamook Commission; 
Worthy Grand Patron O. E. S. of Oregon, 
1909-1910. Republican. 

JONATHAN BOURNE, JR. 

Residence 331 Seventh street, Portland; 
office Chamber of Commerce building, Port- 
land, and Washington, D. C. Born February 
23, 1855, at New Bedford, Mass. Son of Jon- 
athan Bourne. Received his legal education 
at Harvard University, graduating in the class 
of 1877. He left college to go to sea; was 
shipwrecked off the coast of Formosa, picked 
up and taken to Portland, Ore., where he has 
since resided. Studied law and was admitted 
to the bar of this state. Was elected United 
States Senator from Oregon in 1906. 

JOSEPH BENNITT EDDIS BOURNE. 

Residence, Rainier, Ore.; office, Harrison 
street, same. Born May 26, 1858, at Dudley, 
Worcestershire, England. Son of James Samuel 
and Ellen Grace (Yates) Bourne. Educated in 
private school until fourteen years of age; 
then attended Shrewsbury School, in England. 




Attended law school in London, Cavalry 
School at Aldershot, England, obtaining 
Field Officer's Certificate in 1883. Admitted 
to the bar at London, England, in April, 
1881, obtaining Supreme Court certificate of 
this date. Practiced law in Dudley, England, 
until 1886, then he came to Oregon in fall of 
1886. Applied for admission to Oregon bar 
in 1905, obtaining certificate of admission 
dated October -12 of that year. First Lieu- 



94 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



tenant First Warwickshire Rifle Volunteers 
in 1876; Lieutenant in Queen's Own Worces- 
tershire Yeomanry Cavalry in 1882, and Cap- 
tain of same in 1883. Municipal Judge in 
Rainier 1909-1910. Member K. of P. Fra- 
ternity; past member of Junior Army and 
Navy Club, London, England. Republican. 

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS BOWLBY. 

Residence, Astoria, Ore. Office Odd Fel- 
lows' building. Born August 30, 1843, in 
New York City. Son of Weson and Sarah 
Elizabeth (Jones) Bowlby. Married in 1876 
to Georgianna Brown. Came to Oregon in 
1852, at the age of nine years. Educa-ted at 
Pacific University, Forest Grove, Ore., grad- 
uating in 1867 with A. B. degree. Studied 
law in the office of Judge Upton, of Portland, 
moving to Astoria in 1868. Admitted to the 
bar of Oregon in December, 1874. Judge of 
Clatsop County from 1874 to 1882. Member 
of Masonic, I. O. O. F. and A. O. U. W. Fra- 
ternities. Republican. 

BENTON BOWMAN. 

Residence Hills- 
boro, Ore.; office 
same. Born Jan- 
uary 11, 1859, in 
Crawford County, 
Illinois. S o n o f 
David and Ange- 
1 i n e (Bowman) 
Bowman. Married 
July 4, 1882, to 
M a 1 i n d a Sack- 
rider. Received his 
early education at 
the public schools 
of Illinois, at 
Union Christian 
College, M e r o m, 
Ind.; at the Cen- 
tral Normal Col- 
lege, Danville, 

Ind.; at Northern Indiana Normal School, Val- 
paraiso, Ind., from which he graduated in 
March, 1888. Read law in office of Parker & 
Crowley, of Ribinson, 111. Admitted to the 
bar of Illinois August 22, 1892; came to Ore- 
gon in October of that year, and admitted 
to the bar of this state in January, 1903. Has 
since engaged in a general law practice at 
Hillsboro, having been associated with W. D. 
Smith from 1895 to 1900, and the rest of the 
time alone. In 1899 admitted to practice in 
Circuit and District Courts of the United 
States. As City Recorder for Hillsboro, served 
for six years; following this served two years 
as City Attorney. Elected December, 1909, 
City Recorder of Hillsboro. Chairman Re- 
publican County Central Committee 1902-4. 
Sefved four terms as house stenographer in 
State Legislature; was chief of this depart- 
ment the last two terms. Member Maccabee, 
I. O. O. F. Fraternities. Associated member 
Republican Club of Portland. Republican. 




WILLIAM LEWIS BRADSHAW. 

Residence and office The Dalles, Ore. Born 
September 28, 1858, at Unionville, Putnam 
County, Missouri. Son of Edward Clinton 
and Elizabeth (Lindsey) Bradshaw. Married 
June 25, 1902, to Agnes L. Cooke. Educated 
at the common schools of Lafayette, Ore., hav- 
ing come to this state at an early age with 
his parents. Later attended the Oregon Ag 
ricultural College at Corvallis, and the St. 
Louis, Mo., Law School, graduating from that 
institution in 1881, with LL. B. degree. Ad- 
mitted to the Supreme Court of Oregon in 
1881. Practiced law in Yamhill County until 
1889, when he removed to The Dalles and prac- 
ticed his profession until May, 1891, when 
he was appointed Judge of Seventh Judicial 
District of Oregon, and has served ever since. 
Member K. of P., B. P. O. E., W. O. W., 
Artisans Fraternities, and The Dalles Com- 
mercial Club. Democrat. 

GEORGE ALEXANDER BRODIE. 

Residence, East 
51st and Powell 
streets; office, 521- 
525 Chamber of 
Commerce build 
ing, Portland. 
Born September 
11, 1854, in Pu- 
laski County, Ar- 
kansas. Son of 
George and Emily 
(Kirkwood) 
Brodie. Married 
October 25, 1882, 
to Georgia S. Car- 
penter at Port- 
land, Oregon. 
Studied at home 
and in private 
schools until rthe 

age of 13, then went to Fort Edward College 
Institute, Fort Edward, New York, for two 
years and afterwards to Washington & Lee 
University at Lexington, Virginia, for four 
years. Later attended the Washington Col- 
lege Law School at St. Louis, Missouri, 
two years, graduating in 1878, in which 
year he came to Oregon. Was admitted 
to the bar of the State of Arkansas in 1876 
and to the bar of Oregon in 1882. Is at 
present a member of the firm of Murphy, 
Brodie & Swett. Was appointed Examiner 
in Chancery of the Circuit and District Courts 
of the United States in 1896 and still occu- 
pies that position. Democrat. 

WILLIAM LEWIS BREWSTER. 

Residence 808 Lovejoy street; office 402 
Failing building, Portland, Ore. Born August 
2", 1866, at Philadelphia, Pa. Son of Charles 
O. and Mary Draper (Lewis) Brewster. Mar- 
ried June 19, 1896, to Elizabeth F. Conner. 
Early education received at Brookfield, Mass., 
public schools. Attended the Wesleyan Uni- 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



95 



versity from 1883 to 1885; Amherst College 
from 1886 to 1888, and Columbia University 
from 1888 to 1891, graduating from that insti- 
tution with the degree of LL.B. Admitted to 
the bar of the State of New York at New 
York City in June, 1891, immediately after- 
ward removing to Oregon and being admitted 
to the bar of this state in October of the same 
year. 

GEORGE FREDERICK BRICE. 

Residence 861 East Main street; office 403-7 
Corbett building, Portland, Ore. Born March 
6, 1881, in Arcadia, Wis. Son of William O. 
and Rosetta (Rand) Brice. Married July 20, 
1904, to Iva M. Hodges. Received his early 
education at the grammar school in Arcadia, 
Wis., and later the grammar school at Van- 
couver, Wash.; moved to Oregon and took a 
business course at the Portland Business Col- 
lege; completed his legal education by three 
years in the law office of Edward Mendenhall. 
He was admitted to the bar in Salem, Ore., 
October 7, 1903; has continued the active 
practice of his profession to date. Repub- 
lican. 

EDWARD D. BRIGGS. 

Residence and office, Ashland, Oregon. Born 
in Schoharie County, New York, July 19, 1854. 
Son of Andrew S. and Jane (Tingue) Briggs. 
Married to Nellie St. John July 1, 1880. At- 
tended common school, Franklinton, New 
York; Starkey Seminary, 1872-1874; Cook 
Academy, Havana, New York, 1874-75. Prin- 
cipal of public schools at Havana, New York, 
reading law while teaching. Read law with 
Judge William C. Lamont at Cobleskill, New 
York, 1876-77. Admitted to the bar at Win- 
dom, Minn., July, 1878, practicing law at 
Heron Lake, Minn., 1878 to 1885, and at 
Minneapolis, Minn., 1885-1890. Came to Ore- 
gon November, 1890, and has practiced in 
Ashland, Oregon, to date. County Attorney, 
Jackson County, Minn., 1879-80. Member of 
Legislature, 1901 to 1903. Member of Ma- 
sonic and B. P. O. E. Fraternities. Republi- 
can. 

JERRY ENGLAND BRONAUGH. 

Residence, 32nd street; office, 603 Fenton 
building, Portland, Oregon. Born December 
4, 1869, at Devalls Bluff, Arkansas. Son of 
William J. and Margaret (Mulheron) Bro- 
naugh. Attended the high school at Little 
Rock, Arkansas, and the State University of 
Arkansas at Fayetteville for one year; 
later attended the University of Ore- 
gon for five years; graduated in the A. B. 
course, 1892, and University of Oregon Law 
School in 1894. Studied Washington Law, in 
the office of Cyrus Happy, Spokane, Washing- 
ton, and practiced law in that city for five 
years; in 1890 he continued the active prac- 
tice of his profession in partnership with E. 
C. Bronaugh, under the firm name of Bro- 
naugh & Bronaugh, which firm was dissolved 
upon the accession of E. C. Bronaugh to the 
Circuit Bench of Multnomah County in 1908. 
Republican. 



EARL C. BRONAUGH. 

Residence, 965 Front street; office, Court 
House, Portland. Born February 26, 1866, in 
Cross County, Arkansas. Son of Earl C. and 
Araminta (Payne) Bronaugh. Married June 
14, 1888, to Grace L. Huggins, of San Jose, 




California. Removed to Oregon in 1868 and 
received his education at the public schools 
and high school of Portland, Oregon; the Pa- 
cific University, San Jose, CaL, (receiving the 
degree of A.B. in 1888 and of A.M. in 1891). 
Entered the Law Department of the Univer- 
sity of Oregon, graduating from the same in 
1890 with degree of LL.B. Admitted by the 
Supreme Court of Oregon in June, 1890. 
Member of Council of the City of Portland 
1900-1902. Charter Commissioner 1902. Ap- 
pointed Circuit Judge December, 1907, and 
re-elected in June, 1908. Judge of Juvenile 
Court. Member of Arlington Club and Port- 
land Commercial Club. Republican. 

WILLIAM HENRY BROOKE. 

Residence, Ontario, Oregon; office, same. 
Born May 26, 1880, at Brighton, Wisconsin. 
Son of James and Charity (Gulick) Brooke. 
Attended schools at Brighton, Wis., graduat- 
ing therefrom in June, 1896. Entered Roch- 
ester Academy, Rochester, Wis., 1896 and 
graduated in 1899. Taught school near Bur- 
lington, Wis., 1899-1900, and attended Col- 
lege of Commerce at Kenosha/, Wis., 1900-01. 
Entered Law Department of the University 
of Wisconsin in the fall of 1901 and gradu- 
ated in 1904 with degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
Was admitted to Supreme Court and United 
States Circuit and District Courts, of Wis- 
consin in June, 1904. Came to Oregon in the 
fall of that year and was admitted tempo- 
rarily to practice, on his certificate. Ad- 



96 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



mission was confirmed in 1905. Admitted to 
United States District and Circuit Courts of 
Oregon in 1907. Formed partnership with 
Will E. King, under firm name of King & 
Brooke, which was dissolved in 1907. Almost 
immediately entered into partnership with F. 
M. Saxton, under firm name of Brooke & Sax 
ton, which lasted until May, 1909. Practice 1 
alone for six months and then entered into 



term as District Attorney does not expire 
until January, 1913. January 1, 1910, he 
formed a partnership with B. L. Eddy, where 




partnership with V. W. Tomlinson under firm 
name of Brooke & Tomlinson, which contin- 
ues to date. Member of Oregon Legislature 
in 1908; Chairman of Irrigation and Member 
of Judiciary and Mining Committees in 1909 
session. Member Masonic, I. O. O. F., K. of 
P., W. O. W. and F. O. E. Fraternities. 
Republican. 

GEORGE M. BROWN. 

Residence, Roseburg, Oregon; office, Ma- 
sonic Temple building, same. Born in Douglas 
County, near Roseburg, May 5, 1864; son of 
Thomas and Sarah (Fleet) Brown. November 
8, 1895, married Miss Bertha A. Bellows. 
Early education received in the rural school, 
later attending the Umpqua Academy at Wil- 
bur, graduating from the same in 1883; en- 
tering the Willamette University at Salem, 
graduating in 1885, with degree B.S. He 
began the study of law in the office of Hon. 
J. C. Fullerton; admitted to the bar of Ore- 
gon October, 1891. Elected District Attor- 
nej r , Second Judicial District in 1894, serv- 
ing until 1896, and re-elected to represent 
the same district in 1898, and served 
continuously since. This district then 
comprised Lane, Benton, Curry, Douglas, 
Lincoln and Coos counties; in 1907 the State 
Legislature changed the district to comprise 
Douglas, Lincoln and Curry counties. His 




they follow a general practice to date. Mem- 
ber of the A. F. & A. M., I. O. O. F., P. B. 
O. E., W. O. W., Workmen, Modern Wood- 
men Fraternities, and Commercial Club of 
Roseburg. Republican. 

LOTT D. BROWN. 




Residence, Dallas, Oregon; office, same. 
Born March 31, 1882. at Dallas, Oregon. Son 
of Henry Monroe and Flora Edna (Plummerj 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



97 



Brown. Married June 1L>, ]907, to Leta W. 
McKim. Educated in the public schools at 
Dallas, graduating from the high school in 
1896 and from the Portland Business College 
in 1903. Bead law with Hon. J. N. Hart at 
Dallas, and with Butcher, Clifford & Correll 
at Baker City, Oregon. Admitted to practice 
at Pendle-ton in November, 1905. Opened an 
office for the practice of his profession at 
Dallas in June, 1906, and has been practicing 
there ever since. Elected City Auditor and 
Police Judge of Dallas in April, 1907. Served 
as Lieutenant of Company H, Fourth Regi 
ment, Infantry, located at Dallas. Democrat 

THOMAS BROWN. 

Eesidence, 935 
Oak street; office, 
United States Na- 
tional Bank build- 
ing, Salem. Born 
January 2, 1866, 
in Ontario, Can- 
ada. Son of Wil- 
1 i a in and Bee 
(Morrow) Brown. 
Married in 1898 
to Claribel Reave- 
ley. Attended pub 
lie schools of 
Brantford, Can- 
ada, and the Col- 
legiate Institute 
of the same city. 
Entered Upper 
Canada Law 

School at Osgoode Hall, Toronto, Canada, 
where he was admitted as a solicitor and 
barrister in 1889, and immediately commenced 
practice in Brantford and continued there 
for two years, when he moved to Norwich, 
Ontario, and continued practice there for 
thirteen years, when he removed to this state. 
Admitted to the bar of the State of Oregon 
at Salem in 1904 and commenced the prac- 
tice of his profession at Woodburn, continu- 
ing there until 1907 when he removed to 
Salem and entered into partnership with J. 
A. Carson under the firm name Carson & 
Brown, which partnership continues to date. 
Member of Common Council at Norwich, 
Canada, and later Mayor of that city (in 
1903.) Served as Captain No. 5 Company 
Oxford Rifles of Ontario for seven years. 
Member W. O. W., B. P. O. E. and Catholic 
Foresters. Member Illihee Club. Republi- 
can. 

OLIVER S. BROWN. 

Residence and office, Grants Pass, Oregon. 
Born in Knapps Creek, Wisconsin, April 22, 
1870. Son of John Joseph and Huldah E. 
(Bailey) Brown. Married to Elizabeth De- 
vine November 10, 1902. Attended Bayless 
Business College, Dubuque, Iowa. Taught 
school in Wisconsin and Mill Lacs County, 
Minn., several years; graduated from North- 




ern Illinois College of Law, Dixon, 111., may 
12, 1899, with degree of Master of Laws. 
Came to Oregon in October, 1899, and ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, October 
2, 1899. Republican. 

VALENTINE BROWN. 

Residence, 170 
East 18th street; 
office, 405 Gerlin- 
ger building, Port- 
land. Born No- 
vember 10, 1862, 
at Portland, Ore- 
gon. Son of Val- 
entine and Ann 
Maria (Heney) 
Brown. Married 
September 4, 1880, 
to Jennie May 
Ham. Educated at 
The Hill Military 
Academy, Port- 
land, and the Law 
School of The 
University of Ore- 
gon. Admitted to 
the bar at Portland, Oregon, in 1894. 

GEORGE C. BROWNELL. 





Residence, 602 llth street; office, Oregon 
City. Born August 10, 1857, at Keesville, 
Essex County, New York. Son of Ambrose 
B. and Annie (Smith) Brownell. Married 
September 20, 1876, to Alma C. Lane. Came 
to Oregon in July, 1891. Was admitted to 
the bar of Kansas in 1880 and to the bar of 
Oregon in November, 1891. In May, 1903, 
when Theodore Roosevelt came to the Coast, 
Mr. Brownell was selected by both Houses 
of Legislature to deliver the address of wel- 



98 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



come. In 1903, prior to such a movement 
being made in any other state, he procured 
the passage of a resolution in the Legisla- 
ture demanding the nomination of Theodore 
Eoosevelt for President. Was Eight of Way 
and Bond Attorney for Denver, Memphis 
& Atlantic Eailway Company from 1886 to 
1888. In 1888 was elected County Attorney 
for Ness County, Kansas, and upon expira- 
tion of term of office came to Oregon. Was 
Mayor of Frankfort, Kansas, 1884 and 1885. 
Chairman Eepubliean County Central Com 
mittee, Clackamas County, 1892. Elected 
State Senator 1894-1898 and in 1902; 1903 
was elected President Oregon State Senate. 

HOWAED MITCHELL BROWNELL. 



TIMOTHY BROWNHILL. 

Kesidence, McMinnville; office, same. Born 
February 20, 1870, at Dudley, Worcester- 
shire, England. Son of Charles E. and Ann 




Eesidence, 77 Third street; office, County 
Court House, Astoria, Oregon. Born Sep- 
tember 15, 1879, in Duchess County, New 
York. Son of George Clayton and Alma Lane 
Brownell. Married February 28, 1907, to 
Nellie B. Hart. Came to Oregon when a 
small boy and up to the age of 16 attended 
public schools at Oregon City; for three 
years thereafter Tualatin Academy at Forest 
Grove, Oregon, then entered his father's law 
office at Oregon City; studied law under 
him until admitted to practice in 1901. After 
his admission entered into partnership with 
his father at Oregon City; same lasted for 
two years, when he moved to Marshfield and 
practiced there two years. He then located 
at Astoria, in 1906, and entered the law 
office of Harrison Allen, who was then Dis- 
trict Attorney for the Fifth Judicial Dis- 
trict. Worked for Mr. Allen until the latter 
removed from Astoria, after which he prac 
ticed law with J. A. Eakin, until he bacame 
Deputy District Attorney in 1908. Eepubli- 




Maria (Brooks) Brownhill. Married June 
5, 1895, to Hattie I. Hill, of The Dalles, 
Oregon. Educated at St. Thomas Parish High 
Church Schools, Dudley, England. Came to 
Oregon when fifteen years old and attended 
high school at Dufur, Oregon, and the Mid- 
dle Oregon Baptist Academy at Grass Val- 
ley, Oregon. Studied law through Sprague 
Correspondence School, in connection with 
three years' practical work done in the office 
of Dufur & Menefee at The Dalles, Oregon. 
Admitted to the bar of Oregon at Pendleton 
in May, 1900. Practiced at The Dalles until 
September, 1904, when he went to Madras, 
Oregon, for six months; removed to the 
Willamette Valley, spending some time at 
Portland and three years at Gresham, then re- 
moving to McMinnville, where he has prac- 
ticed to date. Secretary and counsel for the 
Walnut City Eealty Company of McMinn- 
ville. Justice of the Peace at The Dalles 
in 1900-1902. Member Masonic, K. of P., 
I. O. O. F., W. 0. W., Grange and United 
Artisans Fraternities. Deacon in the First 
Baptist Church of McMinnville. Member of 
McMinnville Commercial Club and Portland 
Y. M. C. A. Eepubliean. 

WARREN GEORGE I. BROOKS. 

Eesidence, 314 Grand avenue, North; office, 
416 Commonwealth building, Portland. Born 
October 9, 1869, at Newport, Tennessee. Son 
of Stephen S. and Sarah Elizabeth (Thomas) 
Brooks. Married January 5, 1888, to Mary 
S. Wilson. Eeceived his early education at 
the common schools of Newport, Tenn., and 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



99 



later attended the Eock Hill Academy at 
Newport, Tenn. Moved to Oregon October, 
1905. Admitted to the bar of the State of 
Washington at Olympia October, 1903, and 
to the bar of Oregon at Salem November, 
1905. To the United States Circuit and Dis- 
trict Courts for the District of Oregon in 
1908. 

CLYDE CHARLES BRYANT. 

Eesidence, 322 East Fifth street; office, 
Cusick Bank building, Albany, Oregon. Borif 
May 2, 1877. Son of Hubbard Bryant 
and Adda E. (Kirkpatrick) Bryant. June 
12, 1907, he married Miss Daisy K. Swan. 
Entered the schools of Albany, Oregon. Then 
attended Albanv College, graduating in June, 
1899, with degree B.S. In 1900 he began the 
study of law in the office of Judge H. H. 
Hewitt, of Albany, Oregon, where he con- 
tinued until June, 1902, when he was ad- 
mitted to the bar. Referee in bankruptcy f o 
Linn County since 1902. Member of the A. 
F. & A. M. and K. of P. Fraternities. Demo 
crat. 

EDWIN RODELL BRYSON. 

Residence and office, Eugene, Oregon. Born 
in Corvallis, Oregon, October 20, 1876. Son 
of John Rodell and Mary (St. Glair) Bry- 
son. Married to Edith F. Veazie March 21), 
1898. Attended University of Oregon five 
years; Columbus Law School, New York, one 
year. Admitted to bar at Salem, Oregon, 
October, 1908. Secretary Republican State 
Central Committee, 1904. Elected Prosecut- 
ing Attorney, Fourth District, 1908. Repub- 
lican. 

ROSCOE S. BRYSON. 

Residence, 408 Lawrence street; office, City 
Hall, Eugene. Born April 28, 1878, at Cor- 
vallis, Oregon. Son of John R. and Mary A. 
(St. Clair) Bryson. Married in 1902 to L : z- 
zie M. Griffin. Educated at the public 
schools of Corvallis, at the Oregon Agricul- 
tural College at the University of 
Oregon, graduating therefrom in 1899 
with A.B. degree; and at the Columbia Law 
School, New York City. Admitted to the bar 
at Pendleton in 1901 and commenced the 
practice of law there alone. In 1903 re- 
moved to Eugene and practiced there alone 
to date. Elected Justice of the Peace in 
1906 and again in 1908, which office he now 
holds. Elected City Recorder in April, 1909, 
which office he still holds. Member Masonic, 
K. of P. and B. P. O. E. Fraternities. Re- 
publican. 

JOHN ANDREW BUCHANAN. 

Residence, 621 Mill street; office, Abraham 
building, Roseburg, Oregon. Born at Drakes- 
ville, Iowa, October 2, 1863. Son of 
Amos Buchanan and Luvina (Jones) Bu- 
chanan. Married Mrs. Madge Ragsdale, Jan- 
uary 16, 1900, in Roseburg, Oregon. Moving 



with his parents to Oregon in 1875, lived for 
a year at Monmouth, Oregon, and then 
moved to Moscow, Idaho, living on a ranch 
until 1884. Attended rural schools during 
that time. After becoming of age he went 
to Oregon, and attended the Oregon State 




Normal School at Monmouth, graduating 
from that institution in 1887. Taught school 
for ten years, being principal of the schools 
at Amity, North Yamhill, McMinnville and 
Dallas. While teaching school he studied 
law, under the tutorship of O. H. Irvine, of 
McMinnville, and was admitted to the bar 
in 1896. In 1898 he moved to Roseburg, and 
has since that time been practicing law in 
that city. Elected a member of lower house 
of the State Assembly in 1908, from the Sixth 
District, comprising Jackson and Douglas 
counties, which district he still continues to 
represent. Second Lieutenant in command of 
Company D, Fourth Regiment, O. N. G., at 
Roseburg, having been an active member for 
the past six years. Member of the Grand 
Lodge, I. O. O. F., of Oregon; Woodmen of 
the World and of the United Artisans. Re- 
publican. 

MARK BAILEY BUMP. 

Residence, Hillsboro, Washington County, 
Oregon; office, same. Born December 18, 
1872, at King's Valley, Benton County, Ore- 
gon. Son of Wilson and Emily C. (Allen) 
Bump. Attended public schools of King's 
Valley until nearly eighteen years of age. 
Entered Oregon Agricultural College at Cor- 
vallis in 1890 and graduated in 1894 with 
B. S. A. degree. Took post graduate work in 
same college in '94 and '95; in the latter 
year commenced the study of law under Colo- 
nel John Kelsey, of Corvallis. After Colonel 
Kelsey's death he completed the study of 



100 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



law under Hon. W. S. McFadden, of Cor- 
vallis, after which he took course in Port- 
land Business College. Admitted to the bar 
at Salem in June, 1898. Taught school and 
music and read law and worked on his 




father's farm in King's Valley until the 
spring of 1900, when he began the practice 
of law in Hillsboro, and has continued prac- 
ticing there ever since. Member of Masonic 
and I. O. O. F. Fraternities, M W. A. and 
Rebecca Lodge. Republican. 

JAMES EDGAR BURDETT. 

Residence, Arlington, Oregon; office, same. 
Born November 8. 1880, at McMinnville, 
Oregon. Son of Henry D. and Catherine 
(Brooks) Burdett. Married September 2(5, 
1906, to Alice Stout. Attended the pubic 
schools of Yamhill County until 1895. I:i 
1896 went to Lafayette Seminary, Lafayette, 
Oregon, and in 1900 attended MeMinnville 
College. Entered the Law Department of 
the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, 
Mich., in 1900, anil graduated in June, 1903, 
with degree of LL.B. Admitted to the bar 
at Salem in October, 1903, and for a short 
time afterward was in the office of Judge J. 
C. Moreland. Since that time he has prac- 
ticed his profession alone. Elected District 
Attorney Eleventh Judicial District of Ore- 
gon in June, 1908. Member Masonic, K. 
of P. and B. P. O. E. Fraternities. Republi- 
can. 

HARLEY F. BURLEIGH. 

Residence, Arleta, Oregon; office. Arleta, 
Oregon. Born May 5, 1853, near Wheeling, 
West Virginia. Son of P. M. and Elizabeth 
(Dougherty) Burleigh. Married January 1, 
1880, to Lizzie Hughes. In 1879 he removed 



to Oregon and in 1884 was admitted to the 
bar at Portland. Oregon. Member of Ma- 
sonic and B. P. O. E. Fraternities. Republi- 
can. 

JAMES ARTHUR BURLEIGH. 

Residence, Enterprise, Oregon; office, same. 
Born March 2, 1869, at Bellton, West Vir- 
ginia. Son of Presley M. and Elizabeth 
(Dougherty) Burleigh. Married September 
2, 1894, to Lora A. Morris. In childhood, 
attended public schools in West Virginia. 
Came to Oregon in 1888 and attended pub- 
lic schools and one year at private school at 
Joseph, Oregon. Taught school in Oregon 
four years, then edited country papers for 
two. "From 1896 to 1900 was Comity Clerk 
ut' Wallowa County, Oregon. Admitted to 
the bar at Pendleton in May, 1902, since 
which time he has resided and practiced law 
at Knterprise; since 1897 in partnership with 
Daniel Boyd. Represented Wallowa County 
in Oregon Leg : slature in 1895 and again i:i 
1903. Independent. 

ROBERT REYBURN BUTLER. 

Residence and office, Condon. Born Sep 
temper 24, 1881, at Butler, Johnson County, 
Tennessee. Son of William Roderick and 
Rebecca (Grayson) Butler. Educated at the 
public schools and at Holly Spring College. 
Butler, Tenn. Studied and graduated from 
the Law Department of Cumberland Univer 
sity, Lebanon, Tenn., in June, 1903. Ad 
mitted to all the courts of Tennessee at Leb 
anon in 1903 and practiced at Mountain C'ty, 
Tenn.. for two and one-half years, when he 
came to Oregon and entered into partnership 
with Hon. Jay Bowerman at Condon, which 
partnership continued until his appointment 
as Circuit Judge in February, 1909. Nomi- 
nated and elected Presidential elector in 
1908. Elected Mayor of Condon in 1909, 
but declined to serve. Served as Chairman 
of Republican County Central Committee of 
Gilliam Countv in 190S. Member Masonic, 
B. P. O. E., I. O. O. F. and K. of P. 
Fraternities. Republican, 

CLARENCE BUTT. 

Residence and office, Xewburg, Oregon. 
Born May 27, 1871, in Columbia County, 
Pennsylvania. Son of Zealianiah and Clara 
M. (Everhart) Butt. Married in 1894 to 
Inez B. Barrett. Was educated in the public 
schools of Pennsylvania and at the State Nor- 
mal School at Bloomsbury, Pa. Graduated 
from the Northern Indiana Law School, Val- 
paraiso, Indiana, in 1894, with LL. B. degree. 
Came to Oregon the same year and was ad- 
mitted to the bar of this state in 1896. Com- 
menced the practice of law in Newburg and 
continued to date. Member Lower House of 
Legislature from Yamhill County in l^'.t^- 
1900. Member Masonic Fraternity. Repub- 
lican. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



101 



WILLIAM THOMAS BURNEY. 

Residence, Port- 
land, Oregon; of- 
fice, 316 Alisky 
building. Born 
August 10, 1852, 
at Palmetto, Geor- 
gia. Son of Mor- 
rison W. and Jane 
(Brown) Burney. 
Married February 
21, 1880, to Alice 
Blandina Simpson, 
who died in 1891, 
and married to 
Nora Simpson in 
August, 1895. Was 
educated at the 
common schools of 
Palmetto, Georgia, 
a n d afterwards 

studied law at the University of Vir- 
ginia. Was examined for admission to the 
bar by Judge Christian of the Supreme 
Court of Virginia and admitted to the bar 
of Virginia at Richmond in June, 1878. Came 
to Oregon in November of the same year and 
has practiced here since that time. Deputy 
Prosecuting Attorney under .John Gearin in 
1884. Appointed Reg'strar of the United 
States Land Office at Oregon City in 188(5 
and afterwards took up and followed exclu- 
sively a land office practice in Portland. 
Democrat. 

GEORGE HENRY BURNETT. 





ried Miriam Belt December 31, 1879. At- 
tended McMinnville College at McMinnville, 
Oregon, until 1871, when he entered Christian 
College at Monmouth, Oregon, graduating 
from same in 1873 with degree of A.B. Head 
law in office of Mallory & Shaw in Salem, 
Oregon, two years. Admitted to the bar at 
Salem, Oregon, in December, 1875, to the 
United States District and Circuit Courts in 
1876. Commenced the practice of law in 
Salem, Oregon, in 1876. Elected District 
Attorney of the Third Judicial District in 
1876. Formed partnership with John J. 
Shaw in 1878, which continued until 1886; 
since that time practiced alone. In 1892 
elected Judge of Third Judicial District, 
which office he holds to date. Member of 
Masonic, B. P. O. E. and I. O. O. F. Fra- 
ternities. Republican. 

HARRY M. CAKE. 




Residence, 385 High street; office, Court 
House, Salem, Oregon. Born in Yamhill 
County, Oregon, May 9, 1853. Son of George 
W. and Sidney A. (Younger) Burnett. Mar- 



Residence, 631 Hancock street; office, 210 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born April 13, 1857, in Fostoria, Ohio. Son 
of William Marion and Sarah (Mickey) Cake. 
Came to Oregon in 1883. In April, 1902, mar- 
ried Mabel E. Strobridge. Attended prepara- 
tory school in Oberlin, Ohio, graduating from 
Oberlin College in 1881. Read law in Cleve- 
land, Ohio, during 1882, and attended law 
school in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1883. Ad- 
mitted to the Supreme Court of Oregon in 

1885. Practiced his profession alone until 

1886, when he formed a partnership with his 
brother, William M. Cake, which continues 
to date. Served as Judge Advocate for three 
years; O. N. G., rank of Major. Received 
nomination on the Republican ticket for 
United States Senator in 1908. Vice-Presi- 
dent for Oregon for three years of National 



102 



BIOGRAPHICAL 




Eepublican League. Member Masonic and 
Elks Fraternities, of Loyal Legion of the 
United States, Portland Commercial Club, 
Arlington Club, M. A. A. C. Eepublican. 

EDWARD H. CAHALIN. 

Residence, 309 
West Park street; 
office, 327 Cham- 
ber of Commerce 
Portland. Born 
September 25. 
1868, in Portland. 
Oregon. Son of 
Edward and An- 
nie C. (Burns) Ca- 
halin. Married in 
1903 to Josephine 
Koehler. Educa- 
tion received at 
St. Michael's Col- 
lege, which is now 
conducted as the 
Christian Broth- 
ers' College at 
Portland. 185)6 en- 
tered the Law Department of the University 
of Oregon, from which institution he gradn 
ated in June, 1898, with LL.B. degree. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Oregon in 1898, and 
to the United States District and Circuit 
Courts in 1904, since which time has prac- 
ticed in Portland. Democrat. 

JOHN F. CAHALIN. 

Residence, 411 
Starfc street; of- 
fice, 614 McKay 
build ing, Port- 
land. Born June 
-16, 1881, at Port- 
land, Oregon. Son 
of Edward and 
Annie (Burns) Ca- 
halin. Educated at 
Christian Brothers 
College and gradu 
ated from the 
Portland High 
School in June, 
1899. Attended 
Oregon Law 
School and gradu- 
ated in June, 1905, 
with the degree of 

LL.B. Admitted to the bar at Salem in 
June, 1905. Was with Paxton, Beach & 
Simon, and with O. F. Paxton until his 
death, after which he was with Murdoch 
& Moser, and associated with G. C. Moser 
until his appointment in 1910 as Deputy City 
Attorney. Member Portland Rowing Club 
and Knights of Columbus. Republican. 

WILLIAM MARION CAKE. 

Residence, 330 Park street; office, 209-211 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born November 22, 1861, at Fostoria, Ohio. 



Son of William Marion and Sarah (Mickey) 
Cake. Married in 1884 to Lula B. Riley. 
Early education received at Oberlin College, 
Oberlin, Ohio (1879-1884) and at the Cincin- 
nati Law School, Cincinnati, Ohio (1884 to 
1886). Admitted to the bar in Ohio in May, 





1886, and to the bar of Oregon in October of 
the same year, having moved to this state 
the previous July. From which date he has 
been a member of the firm of Cake & Cake, 
practicing law in this city. City Attorney 
for Portland 1896 to 1898 and County Judge 
from 1898 to 1902. Member of Commercial 
Club of Portland and of M. A. A. C. (having 
been President of same for two terms). Re 
publican. 

GEORGE W. CALDWELL. 

Residence, 437 
East 16th street, 
office, 510 Abing- 
ton building, Port- 
land. Born March 
22, 1868, in Ma- 
rion County, Ore 
gon. Son of Val- 
entine Hunter and 
Sarah (Grier) 
Caldwell. Married 
September 15th, 
1902, to Elizabeth 
Jordan. Attended 
district schools of 
Linn County, Ore- 
gon; a private 
school at Albany, 
Oregon; Holmes 
Business College, 

Portland, and the Law Department of the 
University of Oregon. Was admitted to the 
bar by the Supreme Court of Oregon in June, 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



103 



1898. Commenced the practice of his profes- the same place; at Glasgow University, Glas- 



sion alone, which continued until September, 
1906, when he formed a partnership with L. 
B. Reeder under the firm name Caldwell & 
Reeder, the same existing until September 1, 
1909, since which time he has again prac- 
ticed alone. Republican. 

FRANK M. CALKINS. 



gow, Scotland. Came to Oregon in 1890. Was 
admitted to the bar at Salem on June 12, 




Residence and office, Ashland. Born Aug- 
ust 25, 1864, at Cambria, Wisconsin. Son 
of Russell D. and Sarah (Whipple) Calkins. 
Married April 3, 1888, to Carrie L. Wilson. 
Attended public schools at Randolph, Wis- 
consin; taught school at Randolph for three 
years; worked as telegraph operator for seven 
years; was employed as stenographer and 
studied law for three years at St. Cloud, Min- 
nesota. In 1896 moved to Ada, Minnesota, 
and entered the office of W. W. Calkins, as 
partner, and was admitted to the bar of Min- 
nesota in 1898. This partnership existed until 
he removed to Oregon in 1901, where he 
opened an office and practiced alone until 
February 1st, when he was appointed Cir- 
cuit Judge of the First Judicial District, 
which office he now holds. From July, 1901, 
to February, 1910, was official reporter of the 
Court which he now presides over. M. W. A. 
Fraternity member. Republican. 

GEORGE JAMES CAMERON. 

Residence, 500 East 12th street; office, 701-4 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born May 1, 1864, at Symington Parish, Scot- 
land. Son of George and Marion (McGregor) 
Cameron. Married August 23, 1885, to Kate 
M. Wickham. Educated at Symington Parish 
School, at Princess Street Academy, Kilmar 
noch, Scotland, and Kilmarnoch Academy of 




1893, from which date he was associated with 
A. C. Emmons at Portland, until his appoint- 
ment as District Attorney, in 1898, which 
office he holds to date. Member City Council 
1898-1900. Municipal Judge 1900-1902, 1905 
1908. Member Portland Commercial Club. 
Republican. 

JAMES ULYSSES CAMPBELL. 




Residence, Oregon City, Oregon; office, 
ime. Born August 29, 1866, on Prince Ed- 



104 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



ward Island, Canada. Son of John and Mary 
(McDougall) Campbell. Married August 4, 
1901, to Anna C. Paulding. Keceived his edu- 
cation at Prince of Wales College, Charlotte- 
town, P. E. Island, Canada. Came to Oregon 
in September, 1888. Was admitted to the bar 
of Oregon in October, 1893, and began prac- 
tice in Oregon City. January 1, 1895, he en- 
tered into partnership with George C. Brown- 
ell, which lasted until 1900. From 1900 to 
1904 was Deputy District Attorney. Served 
three years in O. N. G. Served in Second 
Oregon United States Volunteers during 
Spanish-American war, in Philippines, being 
twice promoted and honorably discharged on 
muster out of regiment. Delegate to Repub- 
lican National Convention in Chicago, 1904. 
Elected to Legislature in 1907 and re-elected 
in 1909. Judge Fifth Judicial District, to 
which office he was appointed May 1, 1909. 
Republican. 

ALEXANDER FRANKLIN CAMPBELL. 

Residence, 183 East 12th street; office, 5 
West Eighth street, Eugene, Oregon. Born 
at Bethany, West Virginia, March 3, 1852. 
Son of Thomas Franklin and Jane Eliza 
Franklin. Came to Oregon in 1869. Marrie 1 
Luette W. Grubbe December 25, 1878. At- 
tended common schools until 1869, and gradu 
ated from Christian College, Monmouth, Ore 
gon, 1871, with degree A.B. Entered Unirer 
sity of Kentucky September, 1871, graduating 
in June, 1874, with degrees A. B. and LL. B. 
Admitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, Aug- 
ust, 1874; to the 'United States District 
Courts at Portland, Oregon, December 3, 1885. 
Practiced law in Roseburg, Oregon, from 
1876 to 1885; in Portland, 1885-1887; at pres- 
ent practicing in Eugene, Oregon. Professor 
of History, State Normal School, Monmouth. 
November, 1893, to June, 1908. Member Ma- 
sonic Fraternity and W. O. W. Democrat. 

ARTHUR L. CAMPBELL. 

Residence, "The Oneonta"; office, Board 
of Trade building, Portland. Born June 9, 
1867, at Pittsford, Vermont. Son of Malcomb 
and Bertha (Sargeant) Campbell. Married 
December, 1895, to Stella Fitch. Received a 
common school education at Ware, Massa 
chusetts. Admitted to the bar at Olympia, 
Washington, in 1894; at San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, in August, 1903. Came to Oregon in 
1909 and his admission to the Oregon bar 
is at present pending receipt of certificate of 
California Judge before whom he last prac- 
ticed, who is now temporarily absent from 
state. Member National Guard State of 
Washington for three years. Member Ver- 
mont Association of Boston, Mass. Repub- 
lican. 

JOHN CARKIN. 

Residence and office, Medford. Born in 
1883 at Bangor, Maine. Son of E. W. and 
Ada (York) Carkin. Attended Hillsboro, 



North Dakota, High School and Business 
College at Minneapolis, Minn. Attendei 
University of Minnesota and University of 
North Dakota, working his way through 
school, and receiving degrees of A.B. and 
LL.B. from University of North Dakota. 
Read law in offices at Grand Forks and at 
Hillsboro, North Dakota, and was admitted 
to the bar of that state. Came to 
Oregon in 1908 and is now a member of the 
firm of Newman & Carkin, at Medford. Mem 
ber Masonic and B. P. O. E. Fraternities. 
Republican. 

ANDERSON M. CANNON. 

Residence, 230 
North 24th street; 
office, United 
States Post Office 
build ing, Port- 
land. Born No- 
vember 22, 1871, 
in Linn County, 
Oregon. Son of 
Sylvester and Jo- 
hanna (Cox) Can- 
non. Married in 
1905 to Mabel 
Jones. Graduated 
from Albany Col- 
lege, Albany, Ore- 
gon, in 1892, with 
A. B. degree. Read 
law in the office 
of Judge Wolver- 

ton at Albany. Admitted to the bar at Sa- 
lem in 1896 and to the United States Dis- 
trict and Circuit Courts soon after. Com- 
menced the practice of law at Albany in 
partnership with N. M. Newport, the same 
continuing several years, when he removed to 
Salem and entered into partnership with 
John A. Carson, under the firm name Carson 
& Cannon this partnership lasted until April, 
1908, when he was appointed Clerk of the 
United States Court at Portland, and con- 
tinues to fill this position to date. Member 
Commercial Club, Portland. Member Ma- 
sonic and B. P. O. E. Fraternities. Repub- 
lican. 

ELZY LEE CANNON. 

Residence and office, Roseburg, Oregon. 
Born in Douglas County, Oregon, twelve miles 
east of Roseburg, July 30, 1879; son of Rich 
ard L. and Mary A. (Chapman) Cannon; at- 
tended rural schools until about eighteen 
years of age; taught school for a short time; 
entered State Normal School at Drain about 
1902 where he took the regular Normal course. 
After leaving the Normal, taught school for 
a short time only, during which time began 
reading law. Later took up the study of 
law in the office of Louis Barzee, of Rose- 
burg, Oregon. Admitted to the bar of Ore- 
gon June 11, 1907. In January, 1908, began 
the practice of law with the firm of Barzee, 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



!().*> 




Cannon & Marker in the City of Eosebnrg. 
In September of 1908 he continued practice 
alone. Member of I. O. O. F. 

WILLIAM W. CARDWELL. 

Residence, 621 
North J a c k s o n 
street ; office, 
Douglas National 
Bank build ing, 
Roseburg. Born in 
Canyonville, Ore- 
gon, April 18th, 
1862. Son of 
James Allison and 
Caroline (Brown) 
Cardwell. Marriel 
on August 22nd, 
1888, to Emma Pe- 
terson. Attended 
public school at 
Jacksonville, Ore- 
gon; in 1880 en- 
tered University 
of Oregon, from 

which he graduated in 1884 with A.M. de- 
gree. Then entered the law office of C. W. 
Kohler at Jacksonville, where he studied for 
two years. Admitted to the bar at Salem 
in 1890. First practiced at Burns, Oregon. 
In 1892 removed to Medford and formed a 
partnership with Francis Fitch. Mr. Fitch 
removed to New York City in 1894 and Mr. 
Cardwell went to Roseburg, where he has 
since practiced. Formed a partnership in 
1903 with A. M. Crawford and J. O. Watson. 
In 1904 Mr. Crawford was elected to office 
of Attorney-General and retired from the 
firm, leaving it Cardwell & Watson, which it 
remains to date. Member I. O. 0. F. and 
B. P. O. E. Fraternities. Member Roseburg 
Commercial Club and Republican Club. Re- 
publican. 

CHAELES H. CARTER. 

Residence and office, Pendleton, Oregon. 
Born in Hanover County, Virginia, February 
9, 1857. Son of Henry R. and Emma C. 
(Coleman) Carter. Married to Grace Ger- 
trude Evans July 30, 1894. Attended Aspen 
Hill Academy, Louisa County, Virginia, and 
University of Virginia. Admitted to the bar 
in Richmond, Virginia, in 1884. Came to 
Oregon in July, 1886. Practiced -in Portland, 
Oregon two years, then removed to Pendle- 
ton, Oregon, where since resided; came to 
Pendleton April 1, 1898; formed partner- 
ship with Samuel White, which lasted about 
eighteen months, then practiced alone for 
six years. Afterwards formed partnership 
with J. H. Raley, under name of Carter & 
Raley. Later, on January 1, 1908, formed 
partnership with Dan P. Smythe, under 
name of Carter & Smythe. 



MELVIN H. CARTER. 

Residence, 1580 
Peninsula avenue; 
office, 1589 Penin- 
sula avenue, Port- 
land. Born Janu- 
ary 1, 1868, in 
New Era, Clacka- 
mas County, Ore- 
gon. Son of Sam- 
ual H. and Lydia 
A. (B u c k m a n) 
Carter. Married 
June 11, 1896, to 
Alice T. Hollaway. 
He received his 
early education in 
the public schools 
of Clackamaa 
County, Oregon, 
and at the public 

schools at Oswego, Oregon, from 1882 to 
1885. Lator he attended the Holmes Business 
College in 1890 and 1891 and graduated from 
the Academy and Normal Departments of 
the Portland University in 1892-1895. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, June, 
1897. Member of the Republican Club of 
Portland. Republican. 

WILLIAM A. CARTER. 





Residence, 296 Poplar street; office, 601-2-3 
Corbett building, Portland. Born June 7, 
1874, in Greene County, Tennessee. Son of 
Louis A. and Sara J. (Carter) Carter. Mar- 
ried December 31, 1901, to Ethel Hughes. 
Early education received in the public schools 
of Tennessee; at the High School at Willow 
Springs, Missouri, and at Business College 
in the same city. Moved to Gold Hill, Jack- 



106 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



son County, Oregon, in 1892, and read law 
in the office of Hon. J. L. Hammersly. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem in June, 1899, and 
practiced at Gold Hill in association with 
Hon. J. L. Hammersly until 1908, when he 
removed to Portland and became associated 
with Hon. E. B. Dufur, under the firm name 
Carter & Dufur, which continues to date 
Admitted to the Circuit and District Court 
of the United States on December, 1908. Mem- 
ber State Bar Association and Multnomah 
Bar Association. Was City Recorder of Gold 
Hill 1894 to 1899. Elected Member of Legis- 
lature from Jackson County, Oregon, 1900. 
Member Masonic and I. O. O. F. Frater- 
nities. Republican. 

GEORGE EARLE CHAMBERLAIN. 

Present residence, Washington, D. C. Of- 
fice, Chamber of Commerce building, Port- 
land. Born January 1, 1854, near Natchez, 
Mississippi. Son of Dr. Charles Thomson and 
Pamelia (Archer) Chamberlain. Married May 
21, 1879, to Sallie N. Welch. Received his 
earliest education at the public schools of 
Natchez. At the age of sixteen left school 
and clerked in a mercantile establishment. I:i 
1872, he entered Washington & Lee Univer 
sity, Lexington, Virginia, graduating there 
from in 1876, with degrees of A.B. and B L. 
In December of that year he came to Oregon, 
where he first taught school. In 1877 was 
appointed Deputy Clerk of Linn County and 
acted in that capacity for two years. In 
1880 was elected to the State Legislature on 
the Democratic ticket, serving two years. In 
1884 was elected District Attorney of the 
Third Judicial District. The office of Attor 
ney-General of the State was created by the 
Legislature in 1891 and Mr. Chamberlain was 
appointed to the position by Governor 
Pennoyer, later being elected to that office. 
In 1900 was elected District Attorney of 
Multnomah County and in 1902 was nomi- 
nated on the Democratic ticket for Governor, 
his election following. In 1906 he was re- 
elected and served again in the capacity of 
Governor until 1909, when he was elected to 
the United States Senate. In the Senate he 
has been named on the following committees: 
Agriculture and Forestry, Expenditures in 
the Interior Department, Irrigation and Re- 
clamation of Arid Land, Pacific Railroads, 
Philippines, Printing and Public Lands. 
Member of Commercial Club, M. A. A. C. of 
Portland and of the Oregon Historical So- 
ciety. Member of Masonic, B. P. O. E. and 
K. of P. Fraternities. Democrat. 

WILLIAM CARLTON CHASE. 

Residence, Coquille, Oregon; office, Rob- 
inson building. Born in Douglas County, 
near Oakland, Oregon, January 1, 1869. Son 
of Edward A. and Mary (Perkins) Chase. 
Entered the rural school near Oakland, Ore- 
gon, and attended there for three months 
each year until 13 years of age, helping on 
the farm meanwhile, in 1882 moving to 



Idaho until 1889, when he returned to Jef- 
ferson, Oregon, where he entered the public 
school, attending during the winters of 1889 
and 1890, then in 1891 entered school at 
Turner and attended there part of one win- 
ter. In the fall of 1892 he entered the 
Normal School at Drain, Oregon, from which 
he graduated in 1894, completing a three- 
years' course in two years, receiving the de- 
gree B. S. D. He commenced reading law whil<- 




at Drain, Oregon, and commenced teaching 
school. August 21, 1895, he married Miss 
Inez A. Rich. In 1896 he entered the Law 
Department of the University of Michigan 
at Ann Arbor, taking a complete course in 
law, and graduated in June, 1899, with the 
degree LL.B. June, 1899, admitted to the 
bar of the State of Michigan at Ann Arbor. 
Returned to Oregon July .of that year, and 
in August opened an office in Coquille, Ore- 
gon, being temporarily admitted to practice, 
and permanently admitted in all Courts of 
the state in 1900. In 1906 he was elected 
Representative for Coos County, and served 
his term. In 1908 he was elected Joint Senator 
for Coos and Curry counties, and is now 
serving that district. Member of the Knights 
of Pythias Fraternity and the Commercial 
Club of North Bend, Oregon. Republican. 

RENVILLE CHINNOCK. 

Residence, 299 Cook avenue, Portland; of- 
fice, Board of Trade building, Portland. 
Born November 25, 1869, at Hudson, Wiscon- 
sin. Son of James T. and Elizabeth C. 
(Stevens) Chinnock. Married in June, 1898, 
to Margaret O'Neill. Early education re- 
ceived at the public and high schools of 
Hudson, Wisconsin, from which he gradu- 
. ated in 1889. Entered the University of 
Minnesota and graduated from same in 1896 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



107 




with two degrees LL. B. and LL. M. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Minnesota in June, 1896. 
Came to Oregon in 1907 and was admitted 
to the bar of this state 1908. Was State 
Senator from the 35th District, St. Paul, Min- 
nesota. Eepublican. 

JAMES THOENTON CHINNOCK. 

Eesidenee, 859 
Center street; of- 
fice, State House, 
Salem. Born May 
4, 1882, on a farm 
near Hudson, Wis- 
consin. Son of 
James T. and Eliz- 
abeth C. (Stev- 
ens) Chinnock. 
Married October 
20, 1909, to Grace 
A. Rodney. Came 
to Oregon at the 
age of seven, with 
his parents. Re- 
ceived his educa- 
tion at the Deco 
rah Academy and 
High School, De- 
corah, Iowa; at the University of Minnesota, 
graduating from the Law Department of the 
same in 1905, with LL.B. degree. Admittecl 
to the bar of Minnesota in 1905 and to the 
Supreme Court of Oregon in the same year. 
Studied law in the offices of Edward and 
A. R. Mendenhall in 1905 and 1906 and prac- 
ticed law in Portland in 1906 and 1907. As- 
sociated in the practice of law w'.th Samuel 
White at Baker City, 1907 and 1908, since 
when he has practiced at Salem. Secretary 
State Board of Water Control, 1909 and 
1910. Republican. 

ALFRED J. CHRISTOPHERSON. 

Residence, 338 East Thirty-third street; 
office, 411-412 Buchanan building, Portland, 
Oregon. Born May 8, 1881, at Canton, M n- 
nesota. Son of Kuudt and Julia (Nelson) 
Christopherson. Education received at Sioux 
Falls High School, Sioux Falls, South Dakota: 
Lutheran Normal College, Sioux Falls; Sioux 
Falls Business College. Studied law in law 
office at Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1902 at Sioux Falls and 
practiced there for four years, the firm name 
being Christopherson and Medin. Came to 
Portland, Oregon, in 1907 and has been en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession here 
ever since; being associated at present with 
Q. L. Matthews, under the firm name of 
Chrisitopherson & Matthews. Member Ma- 
sonic Fraternity. 

JOHN CALVIN CHRISTY. 

Residence 604 S. Ellsworth street; office, 
Rooms 12 and 13, First National Bank build- 
ing, Albany. Born in Armstrong County, 
Pennsylvania, January 2, 1839. Son of John 



and Sarah M. (Ross) Christy. Married to 
Elizabeth Patterson, December 13, 1864. At- 
tended Elders-Ridge Academy, Indiana Coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania. Admitted to the bar at 
Harrisburg, Saline County, Illinois, Septem- 
ber, 1859, and to the States of Pennsylvania, 
Wisconsin, Iowa, Ohio, Nebraska, California 
and to all courts in Oregon. Member Com- 
pany B, Eighteenth Regiment, Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry, April 15, 1861, ito June 16, 1864. 
Republican. 

ALFRED E. CLARK. 

Reside nee 795 
Hoyt street; of- 
fice 431-433 Cham- 
ber of Commerce 
building, Portland, 
Ore. Born August 
17, 1873, in On- 
tario, Canada. Son 
of John and Mary 
J. ( C a 1 d w e 1 1 ) 
Clark. Educated at 
the public schools 
of Redwood Coun- 
ty, Minnesota. 
Admitted -to the 
bar of Minnesota 
in 1896, where he 
practiced his pro- 
fession at Man- 
kato, Minn. Was 

admitted to the bar, Salem, Ore., July, 1906. 
Member of Portland Commercial Club and 
M. A. A. C., Masonic, I. O. O. F., Elks and 
K. of P. Fraternities. Republican. 

JOHN F. CLARK. 





Residence and office, Oregon City, Ore- 
gon. Born August 23, 1862, in Lawrence 



108 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



County, Missouri. Son of Peter F. and 
Margaret Jane (Marsh) C']ark. Came to 
Oregon September 14, 1874. Married Sep 
tember 8, 1897, to Olivia Jacobs. Attended 
McMinnville College from 1883 to 1888, 
Scientific and Classic course, receiving 
degree A. B. and B. S. Later received 
degree of A. M. Admitted to the bar of 
Oregon in 1897. Practiced his profession 
in Oregon City to date. Member of the 
Oregon City Commercial Club; I. O. O. F.; 
B. P. O. E.; Artisans; W. O. W. Secretary 
County Central Committee. Republican. 

VIRGIL L. CLARK. 

Residence, 885 East Main street; office, 
216 Chamber of Commerce building, Port- 
land. Born January 1, 1885, in Allamakee 
County, Iowa. Son of Harvey and Martha 
A. (Jones) Clark. Married October 5, 
1909, to Helen Mary Sharp. Came to Ore- 
gon in 1905. Educated at the public 
schools of Allamakee County, Iowa: at 
Waukon Normal College, at Waukon Busi- 
ness College, Waukon, Iowa; at Oregon 
City Normal School, at the Law Depart- 
ment of the University of Oregon, from 
which he graduated in 1907 with LL. B. 
degree. Admitted to the bar of Oregon 
at Salem in December, 1907. Manager 
Collection Department R. G. Dun & Com- 
pany since February, 1909. Member Ma- 
sonic, W. O. W. and Royal Arcanum Fra- 
ternities. Republican. 

THOMAS J. CLEETON. 




Cleeton. Married December 24, 1894, to 
Maude Shanahan. Educated in the com- 
mon and public schools of Missouri: at 
Lancaster High School and at the State 
Xormal School at Kirksville, Missouri. Came 
to Oregon in April, 1891, and located in 
Columbia County, St. Helens, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, in 
1894. Taught school for twelve years; was 
County School Superintendent in Schuyler 
County, Missouri, and also in Columbia 
Comity, Oregon. In 1894 was member of 
Oregon State Legislature, from Columbia 
County, and was Prosecuting Attorney for 
the Fifth Judicial District for four years, 
from 1896 to 1900, in which year he came 
to Portland and has been in general prac- 
tice until appointment of County Judge for 
Multnomah County, 1910 to date. Repub- 
lican. 

JOHN BRYSON CLELAND. 




Residence, 175 East Sixteenth street, 
Portland; office, Court House. Born July 
15, 1848, on a farm in Center township, 
Rock County, Wisconsin. Son of James 
and Isabella (Bryson) Cleland. Married 
February 23, 1874, to Ellen J. Corey. At- 
tended until 1861 the district school Center 
township, Rock County, Wisconsin, and 
from that date to 1866 the private and 
public school of Janesville, Wisconsin; 1866 
to 1869 the Carroll College, Waukesha, 
Wisconsin. Attended the Law Department, 
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, from 
1869 to 1871, and graduated in March of 
the latter year with the degree of LL. B. 
Residence, 275 Fourteenth street; office, Admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court 
623 Lumbermens building, Portland. Born of Michigan in Detroit April 4, 1871, and 
October 7, 1861, in Schuyler County, Mis- in May, 1871, to the Circuit Court at 
souri. Son of Thornton Y. and Lucy (Reeves) Janesville, Wisconsin; September of that 



IOGRAPHICAL 



100 



year to the District Court of Iowa at 
Osage, and at Des Moincs November 9, 
1881, to the United States Circuit Court, 
District of Iowa; at Fargo to the Supreme 
Court of North Dakota January 14, 1890, 
and to the Supreme Court of Oregon at 
Salem December 15, 1890; to the Superior 
Court, Clark County, at Vancouver, Wash., 
April 11, 1891, and to the United States 
Circuit and District Courts, District of 
Oregon, at Portland July 24, 1891. Com- 
menced the practice of his profession at 
Janesville, Wisconsin, in the spring of 1871, 
and later in the same year located at Osage, 
Mitchell County, practicing under the firm 
name of Poindexter and Cleland, which 
continued until January 1, 1873. The firm 
Cleland and Eaton was formed January, 
1874, and continued until January 1, 1885; 
1873 to 1874 Justice of the Peace in Osage, 
Towa; 1877 to 1885 District Attorney, 
Twelfth Judicial District of lowaj 1885 to 
1886, Circuit Judge Twelfth District; 1887 
to 1888, District Judge of the same dis- 
trict. In 1888 he resigned. Located at 
Fargo, Dakota territory, and engaged in 
general practice under the firm name 
of Miller & Cleland. Later the firm 
name being changed to Miller, Cle- 
land & Cleland. Eemoved to Oregon 
August, 1890, and located in Portland, 
practicing law under the firm name of Cle- 
land and Cleland, the firm consisting of 
John B. and W. A. Cleland, which firm 
continued until January, 1898. January 18, 
1898, appointed Circuit Judge, Fourth Ju- 
dicial District of Oregon, and in June, 1898, 
elected to full term, .and again in June, 
1904. From 1901 to 1902, President Ore- 
gon State Bar Association. In 1905 Vice- 
President Pacific Bar Association, and since 
1906 has been lecturer in the Law Depart- 
ment, University of Oregon. In Fargo, 
North Dakota, Noble of the Mystic Shrine; 
in Oregon Grand Master of Masons 1898-99. 
Grand Lecturer Grand Chapter E. A. M. 
1902 to 1903. Grand Commander K. T. 
1898-99; member of the order Eastern Star, 
member of Al Kader Temple, A. A. O. 
N. M. S.; has attained the 33d degree 
of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite 
for the Southern jurisdiction of United 
States. In Iowa belonged to A. O. U. W., 
I. O. O. F. and Masons. Was W. M. and 
N"oble Grand, and Eminent Commander K. 
T. and served as Senior Warden of the 
Grand Commandery of the K. T. of Iowa. 
In 1869 was one of the principal founders 
of the Phi Delta Phi fraternity. Adjutant 
Sixth Begiment Iowa National Guard. Mem- 
ber of the Arlington and 'Commercial Clubs 
and a life member of Multnomah Amateur 
Athletic Club. Republican. 

WILLIAM ALLAN CLELAND. 

Eesidence, 175 East Sixteenth street; of- 
fice, 532-534 Chamber of Commerce, Port- 



land. Born in Center Eock County, Wiscon- 
s ; n, June 22, 1855. Son of James and Isabella 
(Bryson) Cleland. Attended district school 
Center, Wisconsin, until 1868; preparatory 
school at Milton, Wisconsin, 1868-70; pre- 
paratory school, Beloit, Wisconsin, 1870-72; 
Beloit College, Beloit, Wisconsin, 1872-74; 
Princeton College, New Jersey, 1874-76, 
graduating with degrees A. B. and A. M. 
Eead law with 'Cleland & Eaton, Osage, 
Iowa, 1876-78; with H. F. Miller, Fargo, 
Dakota territory, 1879-81. Admitted to Dis- 
trict Court, Fargo, Dakota Territory, June, 
1881; North Dakota Supreme Court January 
14, 1890. Came to Oregon November 1, 
1890; admitted to Oregon Supreme Court 
December 15, 1890, and United States Dis- 
trict and Circuit Courts July 24, 1891; 
Washington West District United States 
District and Circuit Courts May 7, 1906; 
Idaho Supreme Court May 4, 1908. Prac- 
ticed alone in Grafton, Dakota Territory, 
1881 to 1882; 1882-1890 associated with O. 
S. Santer, Grafton, Dakota Territory. Asso- 
ciated with H. F. Miller and John B. Clelaud, 
Fargo, Dakota Territory 1888 to 1890. Came 
to Portland, Oregon, November 1, 1890, and 
associated with John B. Cleland 1890 to 
1898; practiced alone in Portland 1898 to 
date. Clerk District Court, Walsh County, 
Dakota Territory, 1881 to 1884. Member 
Portland Commercial Club; member Ma- 
sonic Fraternity, W. M. Crescent Lodge, 
Grafton, Dakota Territory, 1888; Grand 
Treasurer Grand Lodge of Oregon since 
]905; High Priest Portland Chapter, No. 
3, R. A. M., 1894 to 1895; Grand High 
Priest of Oregon 1!)02 and 1903; Eminent 
Commander Oregon Commandery, No. 1, 
K. T., Portland, 1898 to 1899. Now serving 
as Deputy Grand Commander, K. T., of 
Oregon; Treasurer Al Kader Temple, A. A. 
0. N. M. S., since 1908; Patron Myrtle 
Chapter O. E. S., Portland, Oregon, 1893- 
1894. Eepublican. 

CLARENCE H. CLEMENTS. 

Eesidence, 664 North Second street; office, 
Schallhorn building, Grants Pass, Oregon. 
Born in Phelps County, Missouri, March 
25, 1874. Son of Francis Alexander and 
Nannie Frazier (McMakin) Clements. Came 
to Oregon in December, 1891. Married to 
Violet A. Bozarth June 4, 1900. Graduate 
of Oregon State Normal School, Drain, Ore- 
gon, 1894, degree of B. S. D., and of State 
Normal at Ashland, Oregon, Commercial 
course, 1896. Attended Law Department, 
Willamette University, 1902-03. Taught 
school in Oregon and Washington. Admitted 
to Washington State bar May 13, 1904, to 
Oregon State bar 1906. Associated in law 
with John A. Carson at Salem, Oregon. 
Justice of the Peace, Grants Pass, Oregon, 
1905-6; Police Judge, 1906-7; City Attor- 
ney, 1908, which office he holds to date. 
Member of Grants Pass C. of P., I. O. O. F., 
Commercial Club. Eepublican. 



110 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



MORTON D. CLIFFORD. 

Residence and office, Baker City, Oregon. 
Born May 24, 1859, at Ottumwa, Wapello 
County, Iowa. Son of Harmon H. and Jane 
(Mahon) Clifford. Married August 5, 1885, 
to Edith Hazeltine. Came to Oregon in 




1870. Educated in the common schools of 
Grant County, Oregon. Read law in the of- 
fice of W. Lair Hill and F. P. Mays at The 
Dalles, Oregon. Admitted to the bar of 
Oregon and to the United States Circuit 
and District Courts in 1882. Elected Dis- 
trict Attorney 6th Judicial District of Ore 
gon in 1884 and re-elected in 1886. Ap- 
pointed Circuit Judge 6th Judicial District 
of Oregon January 6, 1890, and elected and 
served three successive terms. Retired in 
lf*04 and has since practiced law in Baker 
City, Oregon, and is now senior member of 
the firm of Clifford & Correll. He is a 
member of the Masonic fraternity in the 
32nd degree, Knights Templar, a Shriner 
and past Grand Master of the Masonic fra- 
ternity of the State of Oregon, also a mem- 
ber of the Odd Fellows and B. P. O. E. 
fraternities. Democrat. 

EDWARD F. COAD. 

Residence and office, Dallas, Oregon. Born 
January 10, 1854, in Des Moines County, 
Iowa. Son of Edward and Nancy Ford 
Coad. Married October 19, 1881, to Emma 
Neal. Graduated from Howes Academy, 
Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, in 1874, and taught 
school in Illinois for two years; later read- 
ing . law in the office of his brother J. C. 
Coad at Centreville, Iowa, for two years. 
Admitted by the Supreme Court of Iowa in 
1881 and to the bar of Oregon in 1895. 



Commenced the practice of his profession in 
Seymour, Wayne County, Iowa, and prac- 
ticed there for three years, when he re- 
moved to Lincoln, Kansas, and practiced 
for five years, a short time in partnership 
with F. C. Downey. Removed to Las Eni- 
mas, Colorado, and practiced in that city 
one year, later practiced for five years in 
Salt Lake City, and in 1894 removed to 
Dallas and continues the practice of his 
profession to date. 'City Attorney of Sey- 
mour one term; County Attorney of Lin- 
coln County, Kansas, and City Attorney of 
the city of Lincoln, one term, Assistant 
City Attorney of Salt Lake City. Elected 
in 1904 County Judge of Polk County, Ore- 
gon, and re-elected in 1908, which office he 
holds to date. Member K. of P. and A. O. 
U. W. fraternities. Republican. 

RALPH ALONZO COAN. 




Residence, East Seventeenth street; office, 
312 Fenton Building, Portland, Oregon. Born 
May 22, 1881, in Boulder, Colorado. Son 
of Alonzo and Marietta (Lancaster) Coan. 
Married October 27, 1908, to Pansey Bur- 
ton. Received his early education at the 
Public School in Boulder, Colorado, 1896, 
The State Preparatory School, Boulder, Col- 
orado, 1890. Graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Colorado 1904 with the degree of B. 
A., and later from Columbia University, 
New York City, with the degree LL. B., 
conferred in 1906. Admitted to the bar in 
the State of Colorado 1906 and practiced 
at Boulder, Colorado, in association with 
Richard Whitely, until September 30, 1906. 
Moved to Oregon October, 1906, and studied 
law in the office of S. C. Spencer of Port- 
land, 1906-1907. Admitted to the bar of 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



111 



Washington 1906 and to the bar of Oregon 
in 1908. Practiced in Vancouver, Washing 
ton, 1906-1908. Entered into partnership 
with Walter 11. Evans and practiced nnacr 
the firm name of Evans & Coan, 1908-1909. 
Upon the dissolution of this partnership 
became a member of the firm of Whitfield & 
Coan, which continues to date. Member of 
Phi-Beta Kappa, Elks and K. of P. fra- 
ternities. Republican. 

CHARLES EDGAR COCHRAN. 

Residence, 1810 Second street; office, 
rooms 15, 16 and 17 La Grande National 
Bank building, La Grande, Oregon. Born 
May 8, 1873, Union County, Oregon. 
Son of Samuel and Louisa Jane '(Ruckman) 
Cochran. Married May 20, 1905, to Nel- 
lie Virginia Ghormley. Educated in the 
schools of Union County. Graduated from 
the Union, Oregon, High School in 1887; 
from the Oregon State Normal at Mon- 
mouth, in 1890; from the Law Department 
of University of Michigan, at Ann Ar- 
bor, Mich., with degree LL. B., June 28, 
1894. Admitted to the bar in State of 
Michigan, June 4, 1894; and to bar of Ore- 
gon August 11, 1894. Admitted to Circuit 
and District Courts of United States for Ore- 
gon January 5, 1909. Became member of 
firm of Cochran & Cochran October 17, 
1906, which continues to date. Republican. 

GEORGE THOMAS COCHRAN. 

Residence, LaGrande, Oregon; office, same. 
Born November 1, 1877, in Union County, 
Oregon. Son of Samuel and Louisa Jane 
(Ruckman) Cochran. Married June 19, 
1901, to Martha Pearl Greene. Educated at 
the public schools of Union County, Oregon, 
and at Leland Stanford Jr. University, 
from which he graduated in 1901 with de- 
gree of A. B. Was admitted to practice in 
the State of California in June, 1901, and to 
the District Court for the Northern District 
of California in October of that year; to 
the Supreme Court of the Phillipine Islands 
in November, 1903, and to the Supreme 
Court of Oregon in October, 1906. Was 
Special Agent and Law Officer in the For- 
estry Bureau and Customs Service, Philip- 
pine Islands, from 1903 to 1906. Member 
Phi Beta Kappa fraternity. Republican. 

JULIUS COHN. 

Residence, 428 Mill street; office, 517 Cham- 
ber of Commerce, Portland. Born October 
10, 1886, at Fort Scott, Kansas. Son of 
Julius and Julia (Lederman) Cohn. Early 
education received at the public and high 
schools of Fort Scott, Kansas, from which 
he graduated in 1904. Entered the Uni- 
versity of Kansas in the fall of that year 
and graduated in 1908 with LL. B. degree. 
The following year attended Yale Uni- 
versity and received the degree of LL. M. 



Admitted to the bar of Kansas June 18, 
1908. Came to Oregon in October, 1909, 
and was admitted to the bar of this state 
on December 15 of that year. Practices 
in Portland under firm name Cohn & Hunt, 
in partnership with Roscoe F. Hunt. Mem- 
ber Phi Delta Phi fraternity. 

MAX GREENBURG COHEN. 

Residence 779 
Marshall street; 
office, 1023-25 
Board of Trade 
Building, Port- 
land. Born Jan- 
uary 19, 1875, at 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Son of Herman 
and Hannah 
(Greenburg) Co- 
hen. Married 
May 23, 1901, to 
Grace Cohen. At- 
tended the public 
and high schools 
of Buffalo, New 
York; the He- 
brew Union Col- 
lege of Cincin- 
nati, Ohio; the University of Buffalo, Medi- 
cal and Pharmical Departments. Admitted 
to the bar of New York at Rochester, Feb- 
ruary 20, 1899. Came to Oregon in 1902 
and was admitted to the bar of this state 
August 2, 1905. Connected with Consolidated 
Amusement Co., 1902 to 1905. Republican. 

JOHN STORY COKE. 





Residence, Marshfield, Oregon; office, room 
24, First Trust & Savings Bank build- 
ing. Son of John S. Coke and Mary 



112 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



E. (Moore) Coke. Born at Morristown, 
Tenn., August 21, 1867. Married June 28, 
1903, to Miss Annie Laurie Anderson at 
San Francisco, California. He received his 
early education from the tutoring of his 
father and in the public schools of Coos 
County, Oregon. Began the study of law 
in 1889 in the office of J. W. Bennett, at 
Marshfield, Oregon, and later entering the 
office of Whalley, Strahan & Pipes, at Port- 
land, Oregon, in the meanwhile taking the 
course of lectures of the Law Department 
of the University of Oregon at Portland, 
Oregon. Admitted to the bar of Oregon 
at Salem, in October, 1893. He then 
opened an office at Marshfield, Oregon, fol- 
lowing a general practice until his appoint- 
ment as Circuit Judge of the Second Judi- 
cial District of Oregon in February, 1909. 
Served as Mayor of Marshfield, Oregon. 
Elected to the Senate of Oregon, represent- 
ing the Eighth Senatorial District for a 
four years' term. Member of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce of Marshfield and the 
Masonic and Knights of Pythias fraterni- 
ties. Eepublican. 

FRANK THOMAS COLLIER. 

Residence, 94i/> 
Bast Fift e.e n t h 
street; office, 503- 
5 Gerlinger build 
ing, Portland. 
Born September 
25, 1885, in Que- 
bec, Canada. Son 
of James and 
Mary (McKenna) 
Collier. Attended 
preparatory school 
until 1902, then 
went to the Uni- 
versity iof Notre 
Dame, South 
Bend, In d i a n a, 
gra d u a t i n g in 
1907 with degree 
of A. M. and Ph. 
B. Came to Oregon in February, 1907, at- 
tended the University of Oregon Law School 
and graduated in 1909 with degree of LL. B. 
Admitted to the bar of Oregon at Salem, 
June 12, 1909, after which he entered the 
office of J. H. Murphy, where he now pur- 
sues a general practice. Republican. 

HENRY E. COLLIER. 

Residence, 1011 Stafford street; office, 20-21 
Holbrook building, St. Johns and 319 Lum- 
bermens Bldg., Portland. Born June 26, 1872. 
in Warren County, Kentucky. Son of Pleasant 
P. and Sarah A. (Sullinger) 'Collier. Married 
June 10, 1902, to May O'Gara. Educated in 
the common schools of Missouri, at University 
Academy, Columbia, Missouri, and at McGee 




College, Macon County, Missouri. Read law 
in the office of Edmundson & Cullen of Mexico. 
Missouri. Admitted to the bar at Mexico, 
Missouri, February 1, 1898. Came to Oregon 
in 1899 and -was admitted to the bar at Pen- 
dleton May 1, 1900. Admitted to the Circuit 
and District Courts in 1904. Served as Deputy 
District Attorney Sixth Judicial District in 
1904 and 1905, and as City Attorney for St. 
Johns in 1908, 1909, 1910. 'Entered into part- 
nership with J. A. Collier in 1901, same lasting 
two years. Entered into partnership with J. 
P. Winters in 1904, the partnership lasting 
until 1907. Partnership with J. A. Collier. 
November, 1908, still, continuing. Member I. 
O. O. F. fraternity. Republican. 

JOHN A. COLLIER. 

Residence, 160 East Thirteenth street; 
office 319 Lumbermens building, Portland. 
Born in 1874 in Warren County, Kentucky. 
Son of Pleasant P. and Sarah A. (Snllenger) 
Collier. Married in December, 1901, to Arta 
B. Huston. Educated in the common schools 
of the State of Missouri; at the Hig'^ School 
in Mexico, Missouri. Came to Oregon in 1899. 
Read law in the office of H. E. Collier at 
Pendleton, Oregon. Admitted to the bar 
at Pendleton, in May, 1901, and practiced 
his profession for a few months at Pendle- 
ton; he then opened an office at Fossil, Ore- 
gon. While practicing there he was ap- 
pointed Deputy District Attorney for Gil- 
liani and Wheeler Counties, 1903 to 1907; 
was appointed District Attorney of the llth 
Judicial District of Oregon in May, 1907, 
and served one term. Then moved to St. 
Johns, Oregon, and formed a partnership 
with hia brother, H. E. 'Collier, and remained 
there until September, 1909, when he came 
to Portland, but the firm continues. Mem 
ber K. of P. fraternity. Secretary Eastern 
Oregon Gas Co. and of Pacific Northwest 
Milling Co. Republican. 

WILLIAM MASON COLVIG. 

Residence and office, Medford National 
Bank Building, Medford, Ore. Born in 
Knoxville, Mo., September 2, 1845. Son of 
William Lyngae and Helen Mar (Woodford) 
Colvig. Came to Oregon in 1851. Married 
to Addie Birdseye, June 8, 1879. Attended 
country school in Oregon; eighteen months 
at Tremont College, Tazewell County, 111., 
then teaching school for short time. Studied 
law with Judge A. W. Rodecker, Pekin, 111., 
1871-72. Returned to Oregon, October 1875, 
and admitted to bar at Salem, Ore., in 1888. 
Member of Company C. First Regiment, Ore- 
gon Cavalry, 1863-66. 'County School Superin- 
tendent, 1882-1886; District Attorney, 1886. 
Member Oregon Text-book Commission. 
President Medford Commercial Club. Mem- 
ber Masonic fraternity. Republican. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



113 



JAMES LEWIS CONLEY. 

Eesidence, 663 
Kearney street; 
office, 439-441 
Chamber of Com- 
merce b u i 1 ding, 
Portland. Born 
March 13, 1880, 
at Golconda, Illi- 
nois. Son of 
Lewis C. and 
Melvina (Light 
ener) C o n 1 e y . 
Prepared for col- 
lege at Golconda 
High School; had 
two years and 
one-half in the 
Literary Depart- 
ment of the Uni- 
versity of Michi- 
gan and graduated from the Law Depart- 
ment of the same institution in 1906 with 
the degree of LL. B. Admitted to the bar 
of Michigan at Lansing in 1906. Traveled 
a year and then came to Oregon the follow- 
ing year and was admitted to the bar here 
January, 1908, and practiced alone until 
1909, when he entered into partnership with 
Fred N. DeNeffe, under firm name Conley 
& DeNeffe, which continues to date. Mem- 
ber Phi Alpha Delta Fraternity. Repub- 
lican. 

ALVA O. CONDIT. 





Attended public schools of Marion County 
and graduated from Normal course of Uni- 
versity of Oregon in June, 1884. Degree 
of B. S. conferred in 1889. Read law in 
the office of Tilmon Ford and W. M. Kaiser 
at Salem. Admitted to the bar of Oregon 
October 7, 1891, and to the United States 
Circuit and District Courts in 1899. Com- 
menced the practice of law July 1, 1892, 
and in 1893 formed partnership with D. C. 
Sherman and C. A. Park under the firm 
name of Sherman, Condit & Park, which 
partnership existed until 1900. In 1888 
elected County Treasurer of Marion County 
and was re-elected in 1890. Appointed 
Deputy District Attorney July 1, 1892, and 
.served two terms. City Attorney of Salem 
1906-7. Member Company B, Oregon Na- 
tional Guard, 1891. Regimental Adjutant 
with rank of Lieutenant. Republican. 

ROSWELL L. CONNER. 

Residence, McMinnville, Oregon; office, 
same. Born September 18, 1866, in Polk 
County, Oregon. Son of Job and Polly Ann 
(Riggs) Conner. Married September 1, 
1897, to Myrtie Apperson. Early education 
received at public schools of Polk County. 




Attended McMinnville College from 1885 
to 1886 and the Willamette University at 
Salem, 1887 to 1889. Admitted to the 
Supreme Court of Oregon in 1897, and to 
the United States District and Circuit 
Courts in 1899. Has practiced his profes- 
sion at McMinnville continuously since his 
Residence, 855 Oak street; office, Grey admission. Served as Referee in Bank- 
building, Salem, Oregon. Born April 28, ruptcy two years; as Deputy District At- 
1862, in Marion County, Oregon. Son of torney for Yamhill County for ten years, 
C. Condit and Rebecca (Rowland) Condit. which position he now holds. Served in 
Married Ada L. Worth on October 21, 1891. Company B, First Regiment, O. N. G., from 



114 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



1891 to 1897; as Deputy Sergeant from 

1891 to 1892 and as First Sergeant from 

1892 to 1895; as Second Lieutenant from 
1895 to 1897. Member Masonic Fraternity. 
Member of the McMinnville School Boar.! 
and City Attorney. Eepublican. 

ALBERT EDWARD COOPER. 

Besidence, "Tremont"; office, 716 Cham- 
ber of Commerce, Portland. Born July 31, 
1876, at Fowlerville, Michigan. Son of 
Joseph L. and Mary (Southern) Cooper. 
Married September 25, 1907, to Elva Mackie 
Wickes. Educated in public schools at 
Fowlerville, Michigan, graduating from 
high school in 1894. Attended Cleary Busi- 
ness College at Ypsilanti, Michigan, in 
1898. Attended Detroit College of Law, 
Detroit, Michigan, from 1904 to 1907, 
graduating in June of that year with the 
degree of LL. B. Admitted to the bar of 
Michigan in June, 1907; came to the State 
of Oregon in 1908 and was admitted to the 
bar here, February 10, 1909. Eepublican. 

WILLIAM L. COOPER. 

Eesidence, 174 Thirteenth street; office, 
436 Chamber of Commerce, Portland. Born 
in McLemoreville, Tennesee, March 20, 
1868. Son of William S. and Martha (Fox) 
Cooper. Married December 23, 1909, to 
Brownie Brownell. Attended McLemores- 
ville (Tenn.) Collegiate Institute, 1890-91; 
Conway public school, Conway, Arkansas, 
and public school at Benton, Arkansas, 
1892; Hendrix College, Conway, Arkansas, 
1893-94. Bead law in office of T. M. Me- 
haffy, of Benton, Arkansas, and J. W. 
Westbrook, of Benton, Arkansas, until ad- 
mitted to bar at Benton, Arkansas, March, 
1898, to the Supreme Court of Arkansas, 
November 26, 1906, after which he com- 
menced the practice of law in Benton, Ar- 
kansas, alone with the exception of one 
year when he was in partnership with 
John J. Beavers. Held office of Mayor of 
Benton for one term. County and Probate 
Judge in Saline County, Arkansas, 1904 to 
1908. Came to Portland December 27, 1909, 
and was admitted to the bar at Salem on 
February 1, 1910. Member Masonic, B. P. 
O. E. and K. P. Fraternities. Democrat. 

ELMER E. COOVERT. 

Eesidence, 312 East Second street; office, 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born April 2, 1863. Son of J. E. and 
Elizabeth (Fudge) Coovert. Married Octo- 
ber 20, 1887, to Margaret Baker. Moved 
to Oregon 1871 and attended the public 
school at Dayton, Oregon, until 1880. Later 
attended the McMinnville College, 1880 to 
1882. Studied law in the office of C. W. 
Fulton, Astoria, Oregon, 1882 to 1884, and 
was admitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, 
October, 1885. Eepublican. 



CHARLES WILLIAM CORBY. 

Eesidence, 
Newburg, O r e - 
gon; office, same. 
Born February 6, 
1859, in Oregon 
City, Oregon. Son 
of Warren and 
Elizabeth J. 
(Bird) Cor by. 
Married Septem- 
ber 13, 1892, to 
Dora Estelle 
Woodward. At- 
tended public, 
schools near Ore- 
gon City, the 
Oregon City Sem- 
inary and Philo- 
math College in 
Ben ton County. 

Bead law in office of Morcom & Johnson 
at Woodburn for three years. Admitted to 
the bar at Salem on October 8, 1900. Com- 
menced the practice of law in partnership 
with H. Overton at Woodburn and then 
removed to Salem and practiced in partner- 
ship for seven years with his brother, Grant 
Corby, and then removed to Newburg 
where he practiced alone to date. Inde- 
pendent. 

GRANT CORBY. 





Eesidence, 374 North Summer street; 
office, room 314 United States Bank build- 
ing, Salem. Born September 14, 1865, in 
Clackamas County, Oregon. Son of War- 
ren and Elizabeth J. (Bird) Corby. Mar- 
ried June 27, 1887, to Mary Viletta Minier. 
Attended public schools in Clackamas 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



115 



County and in Marion County until 1892 
when he entered Philomath College, and 
graduating in June, 1898, with B. S. de- 
gree. Entered Law Department of the Wil- 
lamette University at Salem in 1898 and 
graduated in June, 1900, with degree of 
LL. B. Admitted to the bar o^ Oregon at 
Salem in June, 1900, and commenced the 
practice of law at Woodburn, Oregon, con- 
tinuing there until 1906, when he removed 
to Salem and has since practiced there. 
Served two terms as Mayor of Woodburn, 
Oregon, and three terms as City Attorney 
of the same place. Was appointed City 
Attorney of Salem January 1, 1910, which 
position he now holds. Member of Macca- 
bees and I. O. 0. F. Fraternities. Demo- 
crat. 

ORLANDO M. CORKINS. 

Kesidence and office, Enterprise, Oregon. 
Born December 14, 1865, at Kingston, Illi- 
nois. Son of Phillip G. and Anna M. 
(Babcock) Corkins. Married March 7, 1889, 
to Carrie M. Wright. Educated at the 
common and high schools of Illinois and at 
Missouri State University. Admitted to 
the bar at Nevada, Missouri, in November, 
1891. Came to Oregon in March, 1896. 
Was County Judge of Wallowa County, Ore- 
gon, from 1904 to 1908. Democrat. 

SAMUEL OSCAR CORRELL. 

Eesidence and office, Baker City, Oregon. 
Born in Frankford, West Virginia, Sep- 
tember 30, 1872. Son of William Neil and 
Martha Nancy (Butcher) Correll. Came to 
Oregon August 1, 1896. Married Edna 
Haskell, November 28, 1905. Graduated 
from Chillicothe Normal, 'Chillicothe, Mis- 
souri, 1894; Nevada Business College, 
Nevada, Missouri, June, 1895; West Vir- 
ginia University, Law Department, June, 
1900. Admitted to bar in West Virginia 
June 6, 1900; in Oregon, 1901. Practiced 
law in Lewisburg, West Virginia, short 
time, coming to Baker City, Oregon; formed 
partnership with W. F. Butcher, which con- 
tinued until November 1, 1904, when M. D. 
Clifford entered said partnership under firm 
name of Butcher, Clifford & Correll. Demo- 
crat. 

JOHN WARREN CORSEN. 

Eesidence and office, Vale, Oregon. Born 
October 11, 1860, at Alton, Maine. Son of 
Van Kensaeler and Angeline (Band) Cor- 
sen. Married October 24, 1893, to Jennie 
May Perley. Attended common and high 
schools at Upper Stillwater, Maine; the 
Maine Central Institute at Pittsfield, Maine; 
the Maine Wesleyan Seminary, Kent's Hill, 
Maine, graduating from the last named in- 
stitution in 1883. Attended Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, Middleton, Connecticut, 1883-4. 
Admitted to the bar at Augusta, Maine, in 
1886. Practiced in New Portland, Maine, 
1886-7. Removed to St. Cloud, Minnesota, 



and practiced there 1888-9. Removed to 
Seattle, Washington, in 1889, and practiced 
there until 1900, when he went to Alaska 
and pursued mining until 1908. Republican. 

OLIVER PERRY CO SHOW. 

Residence, 509 
East Lane street; 
office, Douglas 
National Bank 
building, Rose- 
burg, Oregon. 
Born in Browns- 
ville, Oregon, 
August 14, 1863. 
Son of Oliver 
Perry and Sarah 
Elizabeth (Coch- 
ran) C o s h o w . 
Married to Lib- 
bie Kay Decem- 
ber 25, 1886. At- 
tended public 
schools, Browns- 
ville, Oregon ; 
high school, Port- 
land, Oregon; University of Oregon from 
1882 to 1885. Admitted to bar at Salem, 
Oregon, October, 1890. Member Oregon 
State Senate, 1904-1908. Member Oregon 
Historical Society; American Academy of 
Political and Social Science. Member Rose- 
burg Commercial Club, Masonic, Woodmen 
of World, United Artisans, I. 0. O. F. 
Fraternities. Democrat. 

WILLIAM WICK COTTON. 





Residence, Gresham, Oregon; office, Wells 
Fargo building, Portland. Born December 
13, 1859, at Lyons, Iowa. Son of Aylett 



116 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Raines and Laura Finch (Wick) Cotton. 
Married August 29, 1888, to Fannie Colling- 
wood. Attended National School of Elo- 
cution at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1870 
to 1875; The Millersville State Normal 
School at Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1876 
to 1878, receiving the degree Bachelor of 
Elements; 1880 to 1882 attended Columbia 
University, New York City, receiving the 
degree ol LL. B. Admitted to the bar of 
New York in 1882 and practiced in New 
York City until his removal to Omaha, 
Nebraska, in 1888, in which year he was 
admitted in that state. Moved to Port- 
land September 5, 1889, and was admitted 
to the bar of the State of Oregon the same 
year. Practiced his profession in partner- 
ship with Luther B. Cox, Joseph N. Teal 
and Wirt Minor, under the firm name of 
Cox, Cotton, Teal & Minor, 1893 to 1898, 
when the firm name was .changed to Cotton, 
Teal & Minor, which partnership was dis- 
solved in 1904. General Attorney of 0. 
E. & N. Company from 1889 to 1896, since 
which date he has been General Attorney 
of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Com- 
pany. Member of Arlington Club, Uni- 
versity Club and Commercial Club of Port- 
land. Republican. 

WILLIAM CHARLES COUNTER. 

Residence and office, Cottage Grove, Ore- 
gon. Born in Jewell County, Kansas, Sep- 
tember 9, 1878. Son of Henry Edward and 
Cassie (Stouffer) Counter. Married to 
Laura Ashcraft January 1, 1907. Attended 
school at Belleville, Kansas, until 1887; at 
Oberlin, Kansas, 1887-1890; high school at 
Oberlin, Kansas. Taught school winter of 
1897-8. Graduated from Rexford, Kansas, 
high school in 1899 and from Thomas 
County high school in 1901, teaching win- 
ter of 1901-1902. Attended Kansas City 
Business College summer of 1902. Entered 
Kansas City Law School in fall of 1902, 
three-year course, graduating with the de- 
gree of LL. B., 1905. Admitted to Missouri 
bar June 5, 1905. Post-graduate law course, 
Stanford University, 1905-6, and admitted 
to California bar soon thereafter. Admitted 
to Oregon bar March 2, 1908. While re- 
siding in Lakeview, Oregon, associated with 
W. J. Moore, then District Attorney, Sec 
ond Judicial District, serving as Deputy 
District Attorney. Moved to Cottage Grove, 
Oregon, February 10, 1909, where he prac- 
tices to date. Republican. 

GEORGE W. COUTTS. 

Residence, Pendleton, Oregon; office, John 
Schmidt block. Born in LeRoy, Illinois, 
December 14, 1856. Son of Samuel and 
Mary (Ulery) Coutts. Married to Emma 
Murphy, 1877. Attended Mound City 
school and State Normal, Paola, Kansas. 
Read law with Hon. W. R. Biddle, Pleasan- 
ton, Kansas, 1881-3. Admitted to bar at 



Mound City, Kansas, 1883; Supreme Court 
of South Dakota, 1889; Supreme Court, 
Boise, Idaho, 1896. Came to Oregon Octo- 




ber, 1905, and admitted to Supreme Court 
of Oregon at Pendleton November, 1906. 
County Attorney, Latah County, Idaho. 
Secretary, Umatilla Bar Association. Mem- 
ber of K. of P. Fraternity. Republican. 

THOMAS F. COWING. 

Residence, 674 
East Madison 
street; office, 334 
Worcester build- 
ing, Portland. 
Born April 28th, 
1841, at High 
Lipwood, North- 
u m b erlandshire, 
England. Son of 
Thomas and Jane 
(Heads) Cowing. 
Married July 19, 
1864, to Frances 
A. Be n n e 1 1 . 
Moved to the 
State of Oregon 
in 1889. Received 
his early educa- 
tion at Heather 
Falls, on the River Tyne, Northumberland- 
shire, England, in the common schools. 
Spent four winters in common school at 
Pierceville, Dane County, Wisconsin, and 
five winters at Hanchettville, Wisconsin; 
also three winters at Rusha Cree, Adams 
County, Wisconsin, his father being a far- 
mer. Was admitted to the bar of Minne- 
sota at Fergus Falls in October, 1889. Came 
to Oregon in the same year and was ad- 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



117 



mitted to the bar of this state at Salem 
on December 10, 1889. Practiced at Oregon 
City in partnership with John B. Brocken- 
brough from 1890 to 1894. He then went 
into partnership with his son under the firm 
name of Cowing & Cowing. Moved to 
Portland in 1905, and still practices under 
that firm name. Served three years in 
Company G, Second Wisconsin Volunteer 
Infantry, in Civil War. Was Postmaster 
at Alexandria, Minnesota, for four years. 
Trustee of Soldiers' Home, Minnesota, for 
six years. Eegister of United States Land 
Office at Fergus Falls, Minnesota, for four 
years. First Lieutenant State Reserve 
Militia 1880 to 1884, at Alexandria, Minne- 
sota. Democrat. 

ANDREW MURRAY CRAWFORD. 

Eesidence, 477 Summer street; office, 
State Honse, Attorney General, Salem. 
Born January 29, 1853, at Cannonsville, 
Delaware County, New York. Son of James 
Nelson and Joanna (Owens) Crawford. 
Married October 22, 1885, to Florence Irene 
Watson. Attended the public schools of 
Delaware County, New York; the Walton 




Academy at Walton, New York, from which 
he graduated in 1876. Read law at Walton, 
New York, and was admitted to practice at 
Binghamton, New York, in 1878. Came 
to Oregon in 1880 and was admitted to the 
bar of this state in 1881. Read law with 
Senator N. C. Marvin and Captain M. W. 
Marvin, practicing as Marvin Bros., in Wal- 
ton, New York. Served short term in Ore- 
gon Militia. Receiver of United States 
Land Office at Roseburg from 1890 to 1894. 
Elected to the Oregon Legislature, Lower 
House, 1897. Practiced law in Marshfield, 



Oregon, 1880 to 1890. Elected Attorney- 
General in 1902 and took charge of office 
in January, 1903. Re-elected in 1906; sec 
ond term will not expire until 1911. Mem- 
ber I. O. O. F. and Masonic Fraternities 
and Illihee Club, Salem. Republican. 

THOMAS HARRISON CRAWFORD. 

Residence, La Grande, Oregon; office, La 
Grande National Bank building. Born 
March 19, 1848, in Washington County, 
Arkansas. Son of 'George Alexander and 
Martha (Wilson) Crawford. Married Rose- 
zelia A. Smith in 1877. Educated in a 
private school in Washington County, Ar- 
kansas, and moved to Oregon in 1870, en- 
tering the Oregon State Agricultural Col- 




lege in 1871 and graduating therefrom in 
1874, with A. B. degree. Admitted by the 
Oregon Supreme Court in 1876 and com- 
menced the practice of his profession at 
Dayton, Washington, where he continued 
until 1878, when he removed to Baker City 
and practiced there about six months. Lo- 
cated in Union, Union County, Oregon, in 
1879 and continued the practice of his pro- 
fession until 1906, when he removed to La 
Grande and has continued in active practice 
since that date, except for a period of 
eighteen months, during which he was on 
the 'Circuit Bench for the Tenth Judicial 
District. Appointed in 1877 Probate Judge 
of Columbia County, Washington. Member 
of Masonic, K. of P. and B. P. O. E. Fra- 
ternities. Democrat. 

BEVERLY B. CRAWFORD. 

Residence, Dammeier Hall, Eleventh and 
Hall streets; office, 416 Chamber of Com- 



118 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



merce building, Portland, Oregon. Born 
June 10, 1867. Son of John W. and Anna 
Dunn Crawford. Married April 5, 1904, to 
Helen Sears. Eeceived his early education 
at the common and high schools in Kinsley, 
Kansas. Eemoved to Oregon in 1885. In 
1893 graduated from the Law Department, 
University of Michigan, with degree of 
LL. B. He was admitted to the bar by 
Supreme Court of Michigan in 1893, and in 
the spring of 1894 formed a partnership 
with City Attorney Nicholas, of Pueblo, 
Colorado, under the firm name Nicholas 
and Crawford. In 1896 he was appointed 
United States Government Townsite Board 
in Oklahoma, and held that office until the 
Board was abolished in Congress in 1898, 
and returned that year to Salem, Oregon, 
and engaged in law practice. In 1904 he 
located in Seattle, Washington, and engaged 
in the practice of his profession in that 
city, until February, 1909, when he returned 
to Portland, Oregon, and continues to prac- 
tice to date. He is a member of Knights 
of Pythias and United Commercial Travel- 
ers. 

LESLIE E. CROUCH. 

Eesidence, 876 
East Ash street; 
office, 420 Cham- 
ber of Commerce 
building, Port- 
land. Born July 
28, 1878, at 
Stockbridge, Wis- 
consin. Son of 
John O. and 
Elizabeth J. 
(Youmans) 
Crouch. Married 
December 11, 
1904, to Clara B. 
Frantz. Received 
his early educa- 
tion in the coun- 
try schools in 
different parts of 

Wisconsin. When a child his father died 
and his schooling was gained while working 
for a living. In 1893 he attended the 
Stockbridge High School (Calumet County, 
Wisconsin), graduating therefrom in 1897. 
From January, 1899, to July, 1902, was in 
the employ of the Great Northern Eailroad 
and Chicago Great Western Eailroad, dur- 
ing which time he took up the preliminary 
study of law, with a view of entering the 
legal profession. In 1902 when he had re- 
moved to Oregon, he entered the Law De- 
partment of the University of Oregon, from 
which 'institution he received his LL. B. 
degree in 1904. The first year at the Uni- 
versity of Oregon he was appointed one of 
the clerks of the Senate at Salem, Oregon. 
In June of that year he was admitted to 
the bar at Salem, Oregon, since which time 
he has been associated with Eodney L. 




Glisan in the practice of his profession. At- 
torney for Civic Improvement Board for 
cleaning up city for 1905 Exposition. In- 
terested in Alameda Consolidated Mines 
Company, one of Oregon's largest gold and 
copper mines. Secretary for the Crater 
Lake Company, which is developing Crater 
Lake Eeserve as a park. Enlisted in Com- 
pany F, Third Infantry, Oregon National 
Guard, 1903; eight months later was ap- 
pointed Corporal. Four months later, First 
Sergeant, and in June, 1906, was promoted 
to First Lieutenant. On September 9, 
1908, was elected Captain, which commission 
he still holds. Member of Grand Lodge, 
Eepresentative and Trustee of Ivanhoe 
Lodge, No. 1, K. of P., Member of the 
Executive Committee of County Central 
Committee. Eepublican. 

LAUFLIN M. CURL. 




Eesidence, 406 East Fourth street; office, 
211 South Broadalbin street, Albany. Born 
June 7, 1864, at Scio, Linn County, Oregon. 
Son of Caleb W. and Margaret E. (Fulker- 
son) Curl. Married December 30, 1885, to 
Anna L. Settlemire. Educated at the com- 
mon schools of Linn County until 1883. 
Taught school two years and then attended 
the University of Oregon until 1887. Again 
taught school for one year, when he was 
elected School Superintendent of Linn 
County and served one term. Studied 
shorthand and in fall of 1890 entered law 
office at Albany as student. Completed 
course prescribed by the Supreme Court of 
Oregon and was admitted to the bar at 
Salem in June, 1892, since which time he 
has practiced continuously in the City of 
Albany. Member K. of P., B. P. O. E. 
and W. O. W. Fraternities. Eepublican. 



119 



VIRGIL A. CRUM. 

Residence, 595 East Taylor street; office, 
600-604 Chamber of Commerce building, 
Portland. Born March 30, 1884, at La 
Harpe, Illinois. Son of Charles Pierce and 
Lina (James) Crum. Graduated from Git- 
tings Seminary, LaHarpe, Illinois, in 1903; 
attended Knox College at Galesburg, Illi- 
nois, in 1903 and 1904; attended Adrian 
College, Adrian, Michigan, 1904 and 1905. 
graduating in June, 1905, with S. B. degree. 
Attended Law Department of The Univer- 
sity of Chicago from fall 1905 to June, 
1908, graduating with degree of J. O. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Illinois in June, 1908, 
and practiced in Chicago, Illinois, from that 
time until August, 1909, when he came to 
Oregon and was admitted to the bar in 
September of the same year. Associated with 
George S. Shepherd to date. Republican. 

CLARENCE JOHN CURTIS. 




Eesidence, 488 Commercial street; office, 
Page building, Astoria. Born August 20, 
1853, at Edwardsburg, Cass County, Michi- 
gan. Son of Cyrus Madison and Mary Jane 
(Kimball) Curtis. Married August 29, 1876, 
to Anna M. Wood. Eeceived his early edu- 
cation in the public and high schools of 
Kalamazoo, Michigan, from which he gradu- 
ated in June, 1875. Came to Oregon in 
1878 and studied law for three years with 
ex-Governor Addison C. Gibbs at Portland. 
Admitted to the Supreme Court of Oregon 
in October, 1882; to the United States Dis- 
trict Court, Portland, in 1890, and to the 
United States Circuit Court in 1891. Mem- 
ber Legislature 1889, 1892 and 1893. City 



PERCY POPE DABNEY. 

Residence, 225 
East Sixtieth 
street; office, 
Lewis building, 
Portland. Born 
in Powhatan, Vir- 
ginia, November 
25, 1866. Son of 
William Pope and 
Leila (Madison) 
Dabney. Married 
to Ethel Crane, 
S e p t e m ber 11, 
1895. Attended 
country schools in 
Virginia till six- 
teen years of age, 
then private 
study under su- 
pervision of fath- 
er, who was Judge of County Court of 
Powhatan and Cumberland Counties, Vir- 
ginia, followed by vacation summer course 
in law in 1887 under Professor John B. 
Minor at University of Virginia. Admitted 
to bar in Virginia in 1888. Came to Ore- 
gon in 1890 and admitted to bar in Oregon 
in 1892. Not engaged in general practice, 
but making specialty of land titles. Since 
1S90 associated with Title & Trust Com- 
pany, of Portland, as counsel. Member of 
Sons of American Revolution and Portland 
Commercial Club. Democrat. 

PETER H. D'ARCY. 





Residence, Salem, Oregon; office, same. 



Attorney of Astoria 1887 to 1893. Presi- Born March 4, 1854, at Brooklyn, New 
dent Common Council, Astoria, 1909-10. York. Son of Peter and Barbara (O'Xeil) 



Member B. P. 0. E. Republican. 



D'Arcy. Came to Oregon with his parents 



120 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



at the age of three years, and received his 
education at private schools and at the 
Willamette University, Salem, Oregon, from 
which he graduated in 1874 with degree of 
A. B. Eead law in office of P. L. Willis 
in Salem and Judge J. A. Stratton. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Oregon in December, 
1876, and has practiced in Salem since 
that date. In 1885 elected Municipal Judge 
of Salem for two years. In 1900 elected 
Mayor of Salem for two years. Vice-Presi- 
dent of Pioneer Association of Oregon. Mr. 
D 'Arcy is in demand as an orator at pio- 
neer meetings and assemblages of public 
interest. Eepublican. 

WILLIAM B. DAGGETT. 

Eesidence, 324 Salmon street; office, 922 
Board of Trade building, Portland. Born 
January 6, 1867, in Bond County, Illinois. 
Son of Nathaniel and Sarah E. (Bowles) 
Daggett. Married in 1899 to Amanda J. 
Dever. Came to Oregon in 1890; attended 
the Oregon Agricultural College at Cor- 
vallis for two years (1894-1896), and gradu 
ated at Lafayette Seminary at Lafayette, 
Oregon, in May, 1897, with degree of B. L., 
also LL. B. Admitted to the bar in June, 
1905, and began the practice of his profes- 
sion in Portland in September, 1908. Demo- 
crat. 

GEORGE NORTON DAVIS. 

Residence, 494 East Twentieth street; 
office, Merchants Trust building, Portland. 
Born September 28, 1878, in Sussex County, 
Delaware. Son of Edward Stevenson and 
Sarah Elizabeth (Spicer) Davis. Married 
September 25, 1909, to Eva Brown Lewis. 
Educated at the common schools in Dela- 
ware; at the Laurel, Delaware, High 
School (1890-1894); at Delaware College at 
Newark, Delaware, graduating in 1898 with 
degree of A. B. Attended Harvard Univer- 
sity Law School in 1902 and 1903. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of the Superior Court 
of Delaware November 23, 1903; to the 
Court of Chancery and Supreme Court of 
Delaware, United States Circuit and Dis- 
trict Courts for District of Delaware, in 
May, 1904; United States District Court 
of Maryland in December, 1906; to the 
Supreme Court of the United States Janu- 
ary 13, 1908. Came to Oregon in February, 
1909, and was admitted to the Supreme 
Court of this state in the same month. 
Member of First Delaware Volunteer In- 
fantry, Spanish-American War, from May 
13, 1898, to November 16, 1898. Private 
Secretary to Hon. H. E. Burban, M. C., 
1907 and 1908, at Washington, D. C. Is 
not at present in the active practive of law, 
being Trust Officer for the Merchants 
Savings & Trust Company. Member Uni- 
versity Club, Irvington Tennis Club. Re- 
publican. 



W. M. DAVIS. 

Residence, 210 North Twenty-third street; 
office, 623 Lumbermens building, Portland. 
Born May 7, 1866, in Edgar County, Illi- 




nois. Son of William L. and Hartly Irene 
(Minor) Davis. Graduated from the Louis- 
iana, Missouri, High Schools in 1886. Early 
education in country schools of Pike County, 
Missouri. Admitted to the bar of Missouri 
in 1888. Came to Oregon in 1891 and was 
admitted to the bar of the state the same 
year. Served six years in Oregon National 
Guard. Deputy City Attorney from 1896 
to 1902. Republican. 

JAMES NEWTON DAVIS. 

Residence, 861 
Hawthorne ave- 
nue; office, 403 
Corbett building, 
Portland, Oregon. 
Born February 24, 
1858, in Taylor- 
ville, Illinois; son 
of John W. and 
Rebecca Ellen 
(Linn) Davis. 
Married Septem- 
ber 21, 1893, to 
Mary Evelyn Me- 
Fadden. Educat- 
ed in the com- 
mon and public 
schools in Law- 
re n c e , Kansas, 
1864-1868; the 

district school, 1868-1877, and the high 
schools of that city 1877-1881, completing 
his studies at the Kansas University, from 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



121 



which he graduated in Law in 1885. Ad- 
mitted to the bar December 1, 1882, at 
Lawrence, Kansas, and commenced the prac- 
tice of his profession in partnership with 
George A. Huron, under the firm name of 
Huron & Davis, in Topeka, Kansas. Ho 
moved to Oregon in 1890, and two years 
later practiced law as a member of the firm 
of Davis, Gantenbein & Veazie. On the 
dissolution of this partnership, he continued 
to practice his profession alone and remains 
so to date. Four years a member State 
Militia, Kansas, 1878-1882, and was elected 
to the Oregon Legislature in 1896. Mem- 
ber of the Masons and of the Commercial 
Club. Republican. 

LEWIS J. DAVIS. 

Eesidence, Union, Oregon; office, same. 
Born August 5, 1865, near Fond du Lac, 
Wisconsin. Son of Jarvis Elliott and Ea- 
chel Ann (Eomaine) Davis. Married June 
22, 1892, to Ada Wood. Earliest education 




received in public schools of Wisconsin, but 
at the age of eleven years came to Oregon 
with his parents, settling at Union. At- 
tended public and high schools at that 
place, graduating in 1883. Entered Uni- 
versity of Oregon, took two years' prepara- 
tory work and four-year scientific course, 
graduating in 1889 with A. B. degree. Did 
newspaper and correspondence work for a 
number of years. In 1894 began reading 
law and in June, 1896, was admitted to the 
bar of this state. In 1898 opened a law 
office at Union and has practiced there con- 
tinuously. Was appointed United States 
Commissioner by Judge Bellinger in 1897 
and reappointed in 1901 for second term. 



Served three terms as Mayor of Union. 
President of Union Commercial 'Club. Ap- 
pointed City Attorney of Union January, 
1910, which office he now holds. Eepubli- 
can. 

JOSEPH WARREN DAY. 

Eesidence, St. Helens, Oregon; office, 
same. Born at Medford, Maine, October 7, 
1860. Son of Joseph Warren and Lucinda 
(Betts) Day. Married September 3, 1890, 
to Irene M. Ansorge. Early education re- 
ceived in the common and high schools of 
Medford, Maine, until 1874, when he took 
an academic course at Foxcroft, Maine, 
and in 1880 a business course at Man- 
chester, New Hampshire. From 1890 to 
1893 read law in the office of H. S. 
Tremper at Shelton, Washington, and was 
admitted to practice in the Superior Court 
of Washington in the latter year; to the 
Supreme Court of Washington in 1895. 
Came to Oregon in June, 1895, and was 
admitted to the bar of this state May 18, 
1896. Was Auditor of Mason County, Wash- 
ington Territory and State of Washington, 
from 1888 to 1895. Democrat. 



FREDERICK MASON DeNEFFE. 

Eesidence, 663 
Kearney street; 
office, 439-441 
Chamber of Com- 
merce, Portland. 
Born 1882 in 
Marcus, Chero- 
kee County, Iowa. 
.Son of Charles 
and Eliza beth 
(Eiede) DeNeffe. 
Eeceived his edu- 
cation at the 
Washington Pub- 
lic School, Spo- 
kane, and gradu- 
aited from same 
in 1898, later at- 
tending the Spo- 
kane, Washing 
ton, High School and graduating in 1901. 
Entered the University of Michigan in 1902 
and took one year in Literary Department 
in that University. Later took Law Course 
at the University and graduated from the 
Law Department in June, 1906, with the 
degree of LL. B. Moved to Oregon in 1906; 
was admitted to the bar in Michigan June 
19, 1906, and to the bar of Oregon in the 
same year. Commenced the practice of his 
profession at Eugene, Oregon, and practiced 
there until January 1, 1909, when he moved 
to Portland and has since been associated 
with James L. Conley, under the firm name 
of Conley & DeNeffe. Member of the 
Multnomah Amateur Athletic Club. Eepub- 
lican. 




122 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



LEWIS DENHAM. 

Residence, Elgin, Union County, Oregon; 
office, same. Born May 12, 1869, at Aber- 
deen, Scotland. Son of John and Mary 
(Milne) Denham. Married September 15, 
1904, to Una May Conner. Attended pub- 
lic schools near Edinburgh, Scotland, until 




1G years of age, and then Heriot-Watt Col- 
lege at Edinburgh, for one year. Came to 
Oregon in 1889 and read law in the offices 
of Stewart S. Denning, Canyon City, Ore- 
gon, for about one year (1890-91). En- 
tered the Law Department of the Univer- 
sity of Oregon in the fall of 1893 and 
graduated in June, 1895, with degree of 
LL. B. Admitted to the bar at Salem in 
June, 1895. For five years following en- 
gaged in lumber business (until 1900), and 
then for one year was in the law office of 
King & Saxton, Baker City. He again took 
up the lumber business and for three years, 
1903 to 1906, was Western Agent and Man- 
ager of the Lake Superior Lumber Com- 
pany, Wholesale Lumber Merchants, located 
at Elgin, Oregon. In August, 1906, opened 
law office at Elgin, Oregon, and has pursued 
the practice of his profession continuously 
since. Has served two terms as Recorder of 
City of Elgin, Oregon. Member Masonic 
Fraternity. 

BEN C. DEY. 

Residence, 93 West Park street; office, 
609-14 Fenton building, Portland. Born 
December 29, 1879, in Oregon City, Oregon. 
Son of Thompson and Mary E. (Lamphere) 
Dey. Attended the public schools of Ore- 
gon and California, graduating from the 
high school at Portland in 1900. Gradu- 
ated from the Law Department of Leland 



Stanford Junior University in 1905 with 
A. B. degree. Read law in the offices of 
W. D. Fenton at Portland from 1905 until 
admitted to the bar in June, 1906. Imme- 
diately began the practice of his profes- 
sion in Portland and continues to date. 
Member University Club and Phi Delta Phi 
Fraternity. Republican. 

ANDREW J. DERBY. 

Residence and office, Hood River, Ore- 
gon. Born May 1, 1877, at Gaston, Ala- 
bama. Son of Andrew J. and Elizabeth 
(Campbell) Derby. Married April 29, 1908, 
to Eleanor Young. Educated at Living- 
stone Military Academy, Livingstone, Ala- 
bama. Came to Oregon in 1900; entered 
the Law Department of the University of 
Oregon, from which he graduated in 1904 
with LL. B. degree. Admitted to the bar of 
this state in June, 1904, and practiced in 
Portland until November, 1905, when he 
went to Hood River and formed partner- 
ship with Seneca Fouts, under the firm 
name Fouts & Derby, which lasted one year. 
He then formed partnership with A. A. 
Jayne, under the firm name Jayne & Derby, 
and this partnership existed until 1907, 
since which time he has practiced alone. 
Is at present County Judge of Hood River 
County and City Attorney of Hood River. 
Member Hood River Bar Association, Com- 
mercial Club of Hood River, Hood River 
University Club and Oregon State Bar As- 
sociation. Democrat. 

ARTHUR HENRY DERBYSHIRE. 

Residence and office, North Bend, Oregon. 
Born at Great Grimsby, Lincolnshire, Eng- 
land, September 29, 1878. Son of William 
Henry Hewson Derbyshire and Ada (Hen- 
rickson) Derbyshire. Attended the public 
schools of Stockton and Middlesbrough, in 
Yorkshire, England, until leaving his par- 
ents, at the age of twelve, and coming to 
the United States, in October, 1890. Edu- 
cated at Oakley, Idaho: Albion State Nor- 
mal 'School, at Albion, Idaho; Cassia State 
Academy, at Oakley, Idaho; the Latter Day 
Saints College, at Salt Lake City, Utah. 
In May, 1901, entered the law office of 
Ferguson, Cannon & Tanner, at Salt Lake 
City, Utah, and pursued his law studies 
until May 19, 1902, when he was admitted 
to practice, in the Supreme Court of Utah. 
He then returned to Oakley, Idaho, and 
began to practice. September 8, 1902, ad- 
mitted in the District Court of the Fourth 
Judicial District of the State of Idaho. 
November 4, 1902, was elected Prosecuting 
Attorney for Cassia County, Idaho, and re- 
elected in November, 1904. His election to 
this office necessitated his removal to Al- 
bion, Idaho, the county seat, where he re- 
sided and practiced from January, 1903, to 
January, 1907. Admitted to practice in the 
Superior Court of Idaho, January 29, 1903. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



123 




March 17, 1905, admitted to practice in the 
United States District and Circuit Courts 
for Idaho. He then moved to North Bend, 
Oregon, in February, 1907, and commenced 
to practice March 1, 1907. Admitted to the 
bar at 'Salem 1908. He was elected City 
Eecorder of North Bend, Oregon, December, 
1908, and re-elected December, 1909. Mem- 
ber I. O. O. F. and K. of P. Fraternities. 

THOMAS MERRILL DILL. 

Eesidence and 
office, Enterprise, 
Oregon. Born in 
W a shington, 
Iowa, October 15, 
1859. Son of 
John K. and Ann 
(Coulter) Dill. 
Married to Effie 
Eckert October 
29, 1889. Attended 
W a shington, 
Iowa, Academy, 
1879-1881; special 
schools in Iowa 
City, Iowa, 1883- 
84. Admitted to 
the bar in St. 
Paul, Minnesota, 
March 16, 1891, 

and practiced law in St. Paul until 1902. 
Came to Oregon in 1903, practicing in Port- 
land until 1905, when removed to Enter- 
prise and continued practice to date. City 
Attorney of Enterprise, Oregon, 1906-1910. 
Appointed Deputy District Attorney for 
Wallowa County, April, 1909. Member of 
K. of P. and M. W. A. Eepublican. 

WALTER A. DIMICK. 

Eesidence -and office, Oregon City, Ore- 
gon. Born in Hubbard, Oregon, August 30, 
1879. Son of George W. and Bhoda L. 
(Gleason) Dimick. Married to Oro D. 
Caples July 18, 1906. Eeceived his early 
education in the public schools of Hubbard, 
Oregon; later attended Pacific University 
at Forest 'Grove, Oregon, graduating in 
1902 with degree of B. S. Admitted to the 
bar at Salem, Oregon, October 13, 1904. 
Formed partnership with Judge Grant B. 
Dimick, which continues to date. City Ee- 
corder 1905 to date; member of State Legis- 
lature, 1908 to 1909; member of Oregon 
City Commercial Club; I. O. O. F., K. of P., 
Elks and Bed Men. Eepublican. 

GRANT B. DIMICK. 

Eesidence and office, Oregon City, Ore- 
gon. Born March 4, 1869, at Hubbard, 
Marion County, Oregon. Son of John B. 
and Almira (Eberhard) Dimick. Married 
May 3, 1896, to Verene Wolfer. Educated 
at the public schools of Marion County 
until 1889, after whieh date he attended the 
State Normal School at Monmouth, Ore- 



gon, for two years and one year at the 
Baptist College at McMinnville, Oregon. In 
1895 was admitted to the bar at Salem, 
and in 1896 located at Oregon City. In 
1899 he formed partnership with O. W. 




Eastham, under the firm name of Dimick 
and Eastham. This was dissolved in 1903 
and in 1904 formed a partnership with W. 
A. Dimick under the firm name of Dimick 
& Dimick, which continues to date. Mem- 
ber of the Oregon National Guard for three 
years. Mayor of Oregon City four terms, 
1900 to 1904. In 1904 Presidential Elec- 
tor. In 1906 County Judge of Clackamas 
County to date. Member of Oregon City 
Commercial Club. Eepublican. 

CYRUS A. DOLPH. 

Eesidence, 363 
West Park St., 
Portland. Office, 
Mohawk Build- 
i n g, Portland. 
Born September 
27th, 1840, at 
Havana, Schuyl- 
er County, New 
York. Son of 
Chester V. Dolph. 
Married June 
24th, 1874, to 
Eliza Cardinal!. 
At the age of 
18 ihe began to 
teach s c,h o o 1 
which occupa- 
tion he followed 
from 1859 to 1862. 
1866 was admitted to the bar of Oregon. 




124 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



In 1869 was elected City Attorney of Port- 
land. In 1883 became senior member of 
the firm Dolph, Mallory, Bellinger & Simon, 
which firm was changed in 1893, to Dolph, 
Mallory, Simon & Guerin, and continues so 
to date. 

MARION FRANCIS DOLPH. 

Eesidence, 830 Ealeigh street; office, 327 
Mohawk Building, Portland. Born July 
7, 1880, in Portland, Oregon. Son of Jo- 
seph N. and Augusta (Mulkey) Dolph. 
Educated at the Emerson Institute at 
Washington, D. C., and at the Portland 
Academy, Portland, Ore., from 1895-1897. 
Graduated from Williams College, Williams- 
town, Mass., with B. A. degree, and LL. B. 
degree from the Law Department of the 
Oregon University in 1903. Admitted to 
the bar by the Supreme Court May 28, 
1903. Married to Effie H. Houghton, April 
21, 1909. Member of University and 
Waverly Golf Club, Theta Delta Chi and 
Phi Delta Phi Fraternities. Republican. 

DAVE M. DONAUGH. 

Residence, 543 
Umatilla avenue; 
office 29 Washing- 
ton building, Port- 
land. Born Au- 
gust 7th, 1862, at 
Bellville, Ohio. 
Son of William 
and Sarah (Gar- 
ber) Donaugh. 

Early education 
received in tho 
public schools of 
Ohio, the High 
School at Bell- 
ville, Ohio, The 
Ohio University a. 
Ada, Ohio, from 
which he graduat- 
ed; Holbrook University, at Lebanon, Ohio, 
and at Cornell College, Iowa. Read law 
in the office of Hon. A. R. Mclntire 
at Mt. Vernon, Ohio, in 1885-86-87, an;l 
taught school for seven terms in the State 
of Ohio. Entered the law office of Hon. L. 
C. Burr, Lincoln, Nebraska, in April, 1887, 
and was admitted to the bar of that state in 
June of that year. Came to Oregon the fol- 
lowing month and was admitted to the Ore- 
gon bar in 1888. From 1888 to 1894 was 
principal of the East Portland Schools, and 
part of which time he taught in the Portland 
Business College. In '95 and '96 taught in 
Portland High School and in 1895 formed 
partnership with H. M. Switzer and H. B. 
Adams, under the firm name of Switzer, 
Donaugh & Adams. Upon death of H. M. 
Switzer the firm continued under name of 




Donaugh & Adams. This partnership was 
dissolved in 1903, and he has since practiced 
alone. Member executive committee under 
the second administration of Mayor Lane. 
President Sellwood Board of Trade. Vice- 
President Bank of Sellwood. Democrat. 

LEE B. DOTY. 

Residence, 138 East Sixty-first street; of- 
fice, 413-4 Fenton building, Portland. Born 
October 3, 1880, in Carroll County, Illinois. 
Son of David B. and Margaret (Shannon) 
Doty. Married April 20, 1904, to Olive E. 
Allison. Graduate of Savanna, Illinois, High 
School; attended the University of Illinois 
and the John Marshall Law School at Chi- 
cago, graduating from same in 1908 with 
LL. B. degree. Admitted to bar of Illinois 
at Chicago on October 7, 1908. Came to Ore- 
gon in June, 1909, and was admitted to the 
bar of this state at Salem, Ore., in March, 
1910. Was for several years in the banking 
business, having been in the Savanna State 
Bank, Savanna, Illinois, the Illinois Trust & 
Savings Co., Chicago, and the Lacld & Tilton 
Bank, Portland. Is practicing his profession 
alone. Republican. 

GEORGE BYRON DORRIS. 

Residence, 464 Lincoln street; office, rooms 
1-2, Hovey Bank building, Eugene. Born 
March 7, 1832, at Nashville, Tennessee. Son 
of Samuel Frost and Susannah (Pitt) Dor- 




ris. Married May 15, 1866, to Emma A. Hoff- 
man. Acquired education by night study, 
after serving an apprenticeship of nearly six 
years at the tinner's trade. After reaching 
the age of twenty-one attended Stewart Col- 
lege at Clarksville, Tennessee, for about six 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



125 



weeks. Left college to eome to the West, 
going to California in 1855. Bead law in 
Crescent City, California, under instruction 
from Stephen P. Wright, (District Attorney 
of Del Norte County), and under Senator 
Jo'hn P. Haines, during 1859-60. Moved to 
Jacksonville, Oregon, in October, 1861, and 
engaged in the tin and stove business. Sold 
this business in 1862 and .went into the law 
office of B. F. Dowell. Bead law in his office 
until September, 1864, when he was admitted 
to the bar at Salem, after an oral examina- 
tion by the Supreme Court of the state. Lo- 
cated in Eugene in 1865 and commenced the 
practice of his profession. Elected represen- 
tative to legislature in 1870. Elected to the 
senate in 1881. Elected Grand Master Work- 
man, A. O. U. W., for Oregon and Washing- 
ton and British Columbia, in July, 1885. 
Elected Mayor of Eugene April, 1877, and 
served as City Councilman for fourteen 
years. Member Masonic Fraternity. Demo- 
crat. 

WALLACE ULYSSES DOUGLAS. 

Kesidence and office, Marshfield, Oregon. 
Born November 28, 1868, at Detroit, Michi- 
gan. Son of Charles Duncan and Emma (Ed- 
wards) Douglas. Came to Oregon in June, 
1887. Educated at the common schools. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Oregon at Salem in Oc- 
tober, 1898. Member Masonic and B. P. O. 
E. Fraternities. Kepublican. 

EGBERT H. DOWN. 

Residence, 781 
East Yamhill St.; 
office, 514 Henry 
building, P o r t- 
land. Born Jan- 
uary 9, 1883, at 
Silverton, Oregon. 
Son of James and 
Elizabeth (Pat- 
terson) Down. 
Married January 
11, 1905, to Flo- 
rence E. Brown. 
Educated at Ha- 
zel Dell public 
schools, Marion 
'County, Oregon; 
attended Liberal 
University at Sil- 
verton, Oregon, in 

1900, and entered Mount Angel College at 
Mount Angel, Ore., in 1902, graduating from 
same in 1904 with the degree of Bachelor of 
Letters. Graduated from the Law School of 
the University of Oregon in 1909, with the 
degree of LL. B. Admitted to the bar at 
Salem, June 2, 1908. Eepublican. 

WILLIAM GILBERT DROWLEY. 

Residence, Baker City, Oregon; office, 
same. Born December 7, 1864, at Caledonia, 
Minnesota. Son of "George C. and Jane 




(Brown) Drowley. Married December 4, 
1899, to Lucy A. Barnard. Educated in the 
public schools of Minnesota, at Caledonia 
Academy, from which 'he graduated in 1880; 
at the University of Minnesota, College of 
Law, from which he graduated in 1892 with 
LL. B. degree. Admitted to the Supreme 
Court of Minnesota in June, 1892. Came to 
Oregon in 1899 and was admitted to the Su- 
preme Court of this state in May, 1900. Ad- 
mitted to the Supreme Court of the State of 
Washington in November, 1908. Member 
Masonic, W. O. W. and B. P. O. E. Fraterni- 
ties. Republican. 

ENOCH BURNHAM DUFUR. 

Residence, 109 
East Fort y-fifth 
street; office, 601- 
602 Corbett build- 
ing, Portland. 
Born March 6, 
1843, at Williams- 
town, Vermont. 
Son of Andrew 
J. and Lois 
(Burnham) Du- 
fur. Married in 
1866 to Francese 
Zimmerman, de- 
ceased, and in 
1882 to Carrie E. 
M e n e f e e. At- 
tended public 
schools at Will- 
iamstown, V e r- 

mont, at Waupaca and lola, Wisconsin, and 
studied law in the office of Killen & More- 
land, having come to this state in 1860. At- 
tended Portland Academy 1861 to 1863. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem in 1884 and to the 
bar of fche State of Washington in 1885. 
Also admitted to the United States 
District and Circuit Courts, District of 
Oregon. Commenced the practice of law at 
The Dalles in 1885 and practiced there 
for sixteen years. He then removed to 
Jackson County and practiced there three 
years, after which he came to Portland and 
entered into partnership .with H. H. Riddell, 
which partnership continued for two years. 
He practiced alone for one year following the 
dissolution of the last named partnership, 
and then formed a partnership with W. A. 
Carter, which exists to date. Member of 
legislature from Wasco County for one term 
in 1874. Elected to the senate from Wasco, 
Sherman and Gilliam Counties, in 1896-1900. 
Served as Councilman at The Dalles for three 
years, and elected Mayor of The Dalles in 
1894, afterward serving on the water board 
at the same place. 

JOHN DUNCAN. 

Residence and office, Albany, Oregon. Born 
in Washington County, Arkansas, July 12, 
1851. Son of James and Sarah A. (Brickey) 




126 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Duncan. Came to Oregon in September, 1861. 
Married Mrs. Margaret Walter, October 1, 
1901. Attended common schools of Marion 
County, Oregon. Graduated from Willam- 
ette University, Salem, Ore., June 23, 1874, 
with degree of B. S. Taught in public 
schools of Marion and Linn Counties until 
March, 1878. Admitted to the Oregon State 
Bar, 1880, serving as deputy sheriff for two 
years following. Began practice of law at 
Prineville, Ore., January, 1883, removing to 
Albany, Ore., January, 1890. County Judge 
of Linn County, 1892-96; re-elected in June, 
1908. Member of Masonic Fraternity and 
Eastern Star. Republican. 

RALPH R. DUNIWAY. 

Residence, 748 East Burnside street; office, 
530 Chamber of Commerce building, Port- 
land. Born November 7, 1869, at Albany, 
Oregon. Son of Benjamin C. and Abigail 
(Scott) Duniway. Married September 20, 
1894, to Kate Schermerhorn. Early educa- 
tion received at public schools of Portland 
and at Cornell Law School, graduating from 
same in 1892 with the degree of LL. B. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, in 1892. 
Commenced the practice of his profession 
alone in Portland, until formation of partner- 
ship .with Judge M. C. George and Wm. Gre- 
gory, which continued until Judge George 
went on the bench, and since which time 
practiced alone. Republican. 

GEORGE HANNIBAL DURHAM. 

Residence and office, Grants Pass, Oregon. 
Born in Springfield, 111., December 4, 1844. 
Son of Albert A. and Miranda A. (White) 
Durham. Came to Oregon in 1847. Married 
Miss S. E. Clark, who died in 1899. lu 1903 
married Kathleen MeNea!. Educated in Bish- 
op Scott Academy, then of Oswego, Ore. 
From 1858 to 1860 attended Willamette Uni- 
versity, Salem, Ore. 1862 entered Pacific 
University at Forest Grove, Ore., from which 
he graduated in 1864 with degree of A. B. 
Read law in the office of Judge Lansing 
Stout of Portland for three years. Admitted 
to the bar at Salem, Ore., in 1869. One year 
later was in partnership with C. A. Ball un- 
der the firm name of Durham & Ball. Three 
years later formed partnership with H. Y. 
Thompson under the firm name of Durham 
& Thompson: subsequently W. Lair Hill, 
became a member of the firm, and later Gen- 
eral Williams, on his return from Washing- 
ton, also became a member of the firm under 
the firm name of Williams, Hill, Durham, 
Thompson & Mays. Messrs. Hill & Mays be- 
ing located at The Dalles, operated the office 
of the firm in that city, which continued for 
three years, when Messrs. Hill & Mays re- 
tired from the firm. For seven years it con- 
tinued under the firm name of Williams, Dur- 
ham & Thompson. When this partnership 
dissolved, the firm of Durham, Platt & Platt 
was formed, which continued for several 



years. He practiced alone until 1903, when 
he removed to Grants Pass, where he prac- 
ticed his profession for five years in partner- 
ship with W. M. Colvig, which continued un- 
til October, 1909, when he resumed his prac- 
tice alone, which continues to date. In 
1870 was head Deputy Sheriff of Multnomah 
County; 1871 Register in Bankruptcy of Ore 
gon; 1872 District Attorney of Multnomah 
County, Oregon. Republican. 

CHARLES HENRY DYE. 

Residence, 902 Jefferson street; office, cor- 
ner Eighth and 'Main streets, Oregon City. 
Born August 23, 1856, at Fort Madison, Iowa. 
Son of Henry and Jane (Michlewait) Dye. 
Married July 13, 1882, to Eva Emery. Early 
education received in the public schools of 
Lee County, Iowa. Attended Denmark Academy 
at Denmark, Iowa, and graduated in 1878, 
afterwards entering Oberlin College at Ober- 
lin, Ohio, in Fall of 1878, from which he 
graduated in 1882 with the degree of A. B., 
and in 1885 with degree of A. M. He after- 
wards entered the University of Iowa and 
graduated in 1889 with degree of LL. B. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Iowa City, Iowa, in June, 
1889. Came to Oregon in 1890 and was ad- 
mitted to the bar of Oregon in 1890. Deputy 
District Attorney for Clackamas County, 1894 
to 1896. City Attorney, Oregon City, in 
1897-8. Representative in legislature, 1907-8. 
President Oregon City Board of Trade in 
1907. 

ROBERT EAKIN. 




Residence, corner State and Twelfth 
streets; office, State House, Salem, Oregon. 
Born March 15, 1848, at Elgin, Illinois. Son 
of Stewart B. and Catherine (McEldowney) 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



127 



Eakin. Married June 21, 1871, to Mary Wal- 
ker. Educated at the public schools of 
Bloom, Illinois, and the Willamette Univers- 
ity, Salem, Oregon, graduating therefrom in 
1873 with B. S. degree. Came to Oregon in 
August, 1866. Eead law with Honorable Geo. 
B. Dorris, in 1873-4. Admitted to the bar at 
Salem in 1874. Commenced the practice of 
law at Union, Oregon, immediately after his 
admission and continued there until March, 

1895, when he was appointed Judge of the 
Circuit 'Court for the Eighth Judicial District 
of Oregon, being elected to the office in 1896, 
and re-elected in 1902, serving until 1906, 
when he was elected Justice of the Supremo 
Court of Oregon for a term of six years. 
Member of Masonic Fraternity. Republi- 
can. 

JAMES ALEXANDER EAKIN. 

Residence, 51 Grand Ave.; office, 426-8 Com- 
mercial street, Astoria, Ore. Born October 
26, 1859, at Chicago Heights, Illinois. Son of 
Stewart Bates and Catherine (McEldowney; 
Eakin. Married October 8, 1887, to Clara 
M. Adams. Moved to Oregon with his par- 
ents when he was seven years of age, at 
tended rural school near Eugene. Attended 
public schools at Eugene for one year, enter- 
ing the preparatory department of the State 
University (in its second year) and attended 
that institution until the completion of 'his 
studies. Read law three years in the office 
of his brother, Judge Robert Eakin, at Union, 
Oregon, and was admitted to the bar in 1887; 
practiced two years with him, then attended 
Boston University School of Law for two 
years and graduated in 1891. Located at 
Astoria and has practiced there ever since. 
Appointed Circuit Judge Fifth District Ore- 
gon in May, 1909, which position he still 
holds. Served as Deputy District Attorney 
for the past six years. Republican. 

HARRY COUCH EASTHAM. 

Residence, Vale, Oregon; office, same. Born 
June 4, 1874, at Guyandotte, West Virginia. 
Son of Wellington and Sarah Frances ('Couch) 
Eastham. Married August 16, 1899, to Cath- 
erine Weller. Received his early education 
at the public and high schools of Point Pleas- 
ant, West Virginia, at Roanoke College, Sa- 
lem, Virginia. Came to Oregon in 1892 and 
entered the law department of the Univer- 
sity of Oregon, from which he graduated in 

1896, with LL. B. degree. Admitted to the 
Supreme Court of Oregon, at Salem, June 8, 
1896, and to the 'Supreme Court of Appeals, 
of West Virginia, at 'Charleston, December 1, 
1909, as non-resident licensed attorney. 
From the time of his admission he practiced 
his profession at Portland and at Baker City, 
until February, 1907, when he moved to Vale 
and has since been doing general practice 
there. Appointed City Attorney of Vale in 
March, 1907, and served three terms. Demo- 
crat. 



O. W. EASTHAM. 

Residence, Oregon City; office, Oregon City. 
Born December 17, 1874, in Marion County, 
Oregon. Son of William F. and Ann (Clea- 
ver) Eastham. Married September 19, 1899, 
to Daisy B. Andrus. Graduated from Port- 
land University in 1896, with A. B. degree. 
Admitted to the bar of California in 1898 
and to the bar of this state in the same year. 
Has practiced his profession continuously 
since that time. Republican. 

WALLIS FEARNSIDE EASTHAM. 

Office, 335 Chamber of Commerce, Port- 
land. Born August 30, 1885, at Vancouver, 
Washington. Son of Augustus B. and Annie 
(Fearnside) Eastham. Attended public 
school and High School at Vancourer, Wash- 
ington, graduating therefrom in 1904. Re- 
ceived the degree of A. B. from Stanford 
University, California, in 1908. Admitted to 
the bar at Salem, Oregon, in October, 1908. 
With 'Coovert & Stapleton, from September, 
1908, to January, 1910, when he formed a 
partnership with Arthur A. Murphy, under 
the firm name of Eastham & Murphy. Mem- 
ber Delti Chi Fraternity. Republican. 

COLON R. EBERHARD. 




Residence and office, La Grande, Oregon. 
Born June 30, 1880, in Yamhill 'County, Ore- 
gon. Son of Franklin Pierce and Josephine 
(Cone) Eberhard. Married October 21, 1908, 
to Elsie Maude Knapper. Attended public 
schools at McMinnville, Oregon, graduating 
from the high school in 1899, from the law 
department of the Willamette University at 
Salem, in 1904, and from Law Department 
Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, Indiana, 
in 1905. Admitted to practice in Circuit and 



128 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Supreme Courts, Indiana, June 5, 1905. Re- 
turned to Oregon, and in February, 1906, per- 
manently admitted to practice in all courts 
of the State of Oregon, and was admitted to 
the Circuit and District Federal 'Courts of 
this state in 1907. Located at Joseph, Ore- 
gon, in 1905, and engaged in active practice 
there until April, 1909. Was appointed Ref- 
eree in Bankruptcy in December, 1905, by 
Judge Wolverton. Elected City Recorder at 
Joseph in 1907 and Justice of the Peace in 
1908, each for a term of two years. In Sep- 
tember 1907 was appointed attorney for Wal- 
lowa County for State Land Board, and in 
1908 was appointed Deputy Prosecuting At- 
torney for Wallowa County. In March 1909 
appointed Receiver of Public Moneys at 
United States Land Office at La Grande, Ore., 
by President Taft. Member of Oregon State 
Bar Association. Member I. O. O. F., B. P. 
O. E., Masonic and A. O. U. W. Fraternities. 
Republican. 

OSCAR D. EBY. 

Residence and office, Oregon City, Oregon. 
Born November 4, 1872, in Linn 'County, Ore- 
gon. Son of David and Elizabeth (Barger) 
Eby. Married November 13, 1898, to Jennie 
Moore. Educated at the common schools of 
Linn County and at the University of Ore- 




gon, until 1892. Studied law with Robert A. 
Miller in Oregon City in 1902. Admitted to 
the bar at Salem October 13, 1904, and to 
the United States Circuit Court and United 
States District Court for District of Oregon, 
February 24, 1909. Was Deputy Prosecuting 
Attorney for Clackamas County under Gil- 
bert L. Hedges, 1907-8; Chief Deputy County 
Clerk's Office, 1901-2. At present member 
Board of Education of Oregon City. Mem- 
ber Board of Directors of Willamette Valley 



Chautauqua Association. Director and Treas- 
urer Clackamas County Fair Association. 
Member Commercial 'Club, Oregon City. 
Member United Artisans. Democrat. 

BENJAMIN L. EDDY. 

Residence 721 South Main street, Roseburg, 
Oregon; office, Masonic Temple building. 
Born in Washington County, near Portland, 
Oregon, October 30, 1865; son of Seth and 
Mary (Miller) Eddy. Married November, 
1888, to Miss Laura A. Applewhite. Received 
his early education in public schools at The 




Dalles and Albany, Oregon, and under pri- 
vate instructors; became a telegraph opera- 
tor, afterwards a stenographer; in 1891 be- 
gan the study of law, reading in the office of 
Milton W. Smith of Portland, Oregon, after- 
wards taking a course in the Law Depart- 
ment of the University of Oregon; admitted 
to the bar of Oregon in 1894 and began the 
practice of law at Portland. In 1896 re- 
moved to Tillamook 'County and engaged in 
practice there; served two terms in the Ore- 
gon legislature; author of the 'Corporation 
Tax Law of Oregon; in 1905 appointed by 
President Roosevelt Register of Roseburg 
Land Office, in which capacity he served four 
years; January 1, 1910, resumed practice of 
the law at Roseburg, forming a partnership 
with Geo. M. Brown, prosecuting attorney, 
under the firm name of Brown & Eddy, where 
they follow a general practice to date. 
Member of the A. F. & A. M., A. O. U. W., 
Woodmen of the World and the United Ar- 
tisans. Republican. 

ERNEST LEE ELLIOTT. 

Residence and office, Klamath Falls, Ore- 
gon. Born April 14, 1868, in Bremer County, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



129 



Iowa. Son of John and Sally (Dudgeon) 
Elliott. Married January 29, 1903, to Clara 
Redfield. Educated in the public schools of 
Bremer County, Iowa; at Waterloo College, 
Waterloo, Iowa; at the Northern Illinois Nor- 
mal School, Dixon, Illinois, from which he 
graduated in 1892. Taught school in Iowa 
and Wisconsin until 1895. Attended Iowa 
College of Law, a department of Drake Uni- 
versity, Des Moines, Iowa, and read law in 
the office of Gilchrist & Whipple of Vinton, 
Iowa, for eighteen months. Admitted to the 
bar of Iowa in 1898 and commenced the prac- 
tice of law at Vinton, practicing alone until 
May, 1899, when he removed to Oelwein, 
Iowa, and entered into partnership -with A. 
J. Anders under the firm name of Anders & El- 
liott, which continued until 1900, after which 
he again practiced alone, until 1903, when he 
was appointed Superior Judge of Oelwein, 
Iowa, filling that office until 1907, when he 
went to Lewiston, Idaho, and practiced there 
two years, removing to Oregon in June, 1909, 
and was admitted to the bar at Salem. Prac- 
tices to date at Klamath Falls, alone. Mem- 
ber Iowa National Guard for twelve years, 
for three years Captain of Company L, 49th 
Regiment. Member Masonic, K. of P., B. P. 
O. E. and A. O. U. W. Fraternities. Repub- 
lican. 

ARTHUR CARPENTER EMMONS. 

Residence, Riv- 
erdale, Oregon; 
office, No. 713-716 
Chamber of Com- 
merce, Portland. 
Born in Orion, 
Oakland County, 
Mich., September 
19, 1859. Son of 
Elias R. and Sa- 
rah M. (Carpen- 
ter) E m m o n s. 
Came to Oregon 
in December, 1881. 
Married Kittie E. 
Wilcox, March 15, 
1886. Attended 
public school at 
Orion, Mich., 1872 
to 1875. Read 

law in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Admitted to 
Wisconsin state bar, November 22, 1880; to 
Oregon state bar, in 1882, and immediately 
commenced the practice of the law in Port- 
land, Oregon, in partnership with his brother, 
R. W. Emmons, which continues to date, 
Member Arlington and Portland Commercial 
Clubs, Masonic Fraternity; General Counsel 
United Railways Company. Republican. 

WILLIAM R. ELLIS. 

Residence, Pendleton; office, Washington, 
D. C. Born April 23, 1850, at Waveland, In- 
diana. Son of James and Susan (Stone) El- 
lis. Married March 31, 1880, to Jennie B. 




Edwards, who died in 1882. June 16, 1885, 
he married Ida J. Scott. Removed to Guth- 
rie County, Iowa, in 1855, where he worked 
upon a farm and attended district school. 
Later he farmed, taught school and attended 
the Iowa State Agricultural College. Gradu- 
ated from the Law Department of the Iowa 
State University in 1874. Practiced law and 
did some newspaper work at Hamburg, Iowa, 
serving there two years as City Attorney, 
and one year as Mayor. Removed to Oregon 
in 1883. Served three terms as District At- 
torney of the Seventh Judicial District of 
Oregon. Was member of Congress from the 
Second District of Oregon, 1893-1899, and 
Judge of the Sixth Judicial District of Ore- 
gon from 1900 to 1906. Member of Congress 
to date. Republican. 

HALMOR HULL EMMONS. 

Residence, Jen- 
nings Lodge, 
Portland; office, 
909-913 Board of 
Trade Bldg. Born 
July 10, I860, at 
Detroit, Michi- 
gan. Son of Hal- 
mor H. and Sara 
(Williams) Em- 
mo n s . Married 
December 30, 1882. 
to Altha Newton. 
Education re- 
ceived at Notre 
Dame Academy, 
South Bend, In- 
diana, Racine Col- 
lege, Racine, Wis- 
consin, Williston 

College, East Hampton, Massachusetts, and 
from private instructors for one and one- 
half years at Frankfort-on-the-Main, Ger- 
many. Came to Oregon in 1885, studied 
law in the office of Gearin & Gilbert 
and attended the Oregon Law School, grad- 
uating in 1888. Admitted to the Oregon bar 
by the Supreme Court of Oregon on October 
3, 1888, and by the Supreme Court of Wash- 
ington in 1890. Admitted to the Circuit 
Court of Oregon in 1895 and to the 'Circuit 
Court of the United States, Ninth Judicial 
District in 1898, to the 'Supreme Court of 
California in the same year. Member Com- 
pany K, Oregon State Militia. Member Com- 
mercial Club. Republican. 

W. W. EPPS. 

Residence, Eugene; office, 491 Willamette 
street. Born in 1854. Son of Joseph and 
Mary (Smith) Epps. Worked on his father's 
farm in summer and attended district school 
in his youth, afterward teaching school to 
procure funds for a law course. Was ad- 
mitted to the bar of Ohio in 1881. In 1884 
opened an office at Ottumwa, Iowa, in part- 
nership with Judge M. A. Roberts. Elected 




130 



B I .O GRAPHICAL 



Mayor of Ottumwa in 1889. Came to Oregon 
in 1909 and opened an office at Eugene, 
-where he practices to date, having been ad- 
mitted to the bar of this state shortly after 
his arrival here. Member Masonic, B. P. O. 
E. and K. of P. Fraternities. 

HENRY MINOR ESTERLY. 

Residence, 376 North Thirty-first street; 
office, 414-5 Corbett building, Portland. Born 
October 20, 1873, at Dodgeville, Iowa. Son 
of Francis Powell and Julia Bacon (Minor) 
Esterly. Married December 30, 1908, to Eli- 
zabeth Norcross. Early education received 
at the public schools of Waterbury, Connec- 
ticut and of the City of New York. Gradu- 
ated from University of Wisconsin School of 
Letters and Science, in 1900, graduated with 
degree of Bachelor of Letters in 1902, and 
from the Law Department of the same Uni- 
versity in 1902,' with LL. B. degree. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Wisconsin at Madison 
June 19, 1902; to the bar of Washington, 
at Spokane, in October of the same year. 
Came to Oregon in 1904, and 'was admitted to 
the bar of this state in Portland, October 2, 
1906. Was Prosecuting Attorney for Juvenile 
Court, Multnomah County, 1908. Member 
Executive Board of City of Portland, 1908-9. 
Democrat. 

WALTER HOWARD EVANS. 

Residence, 686 Multnomah street; office, 611 
Corbett building, Portland. Born in New 
Middletown, Harrison County, Ind., April 17, 
1870. Son of Isaac William and Mary Cath- 
erine (McRae) Evans. Married to May 
Ball, August 11, 1898. Graduated from pub- 
lic school of Posey County, Ind., 1885; grad- 
uated commercial course Northern Indiana 
Normal School, Valparaiso, Ind., 1887, with 
degree B. S., and from Oratorical Depart- 
ment, August, 1896. Attended Northern In- 
diana Law School in 1897. Came to Oregon, 
April 1, 1903; entered University of Oregon, 
graduating in 1905 with degree of LL. B. 
Admitted to bar at Salem, Ore., June, 1905. 
Served clerkship in war department; ap- 
pointed Assistant U. S. Attorney, District of 
Oregon, April 9, 1908. Secretary, Porto Rico 
Yacht Club, San Juan, P. R., ' 1901. Mem- 
ber Royal Arcanum, K. of P. President In- 
diana Society of Oregon, and Holladay Park 
Improvement Club. Member Union Republi- 
can Club. Republican. 

FRED L. EVERSON. 

Residence, 361 Tenth street; office, 810 
Chamber of Commerce, Portland. Born Oc- 
tober 2, 1882, in Cedar Mill, Washington 
County, Oregon. Son of John B. and Harriet 
R. (Brownson) Everson. Educated in the 
public schools of Multnomah and Washing- 
ton Counties, Oregon. Attended the Tualatin 
Academy and Pacific University, Forest 
Grove, Oregon, in 1903, and the Stanford Uni- 
versity, California, in 1905; the University 



of Oregon Law School in 1907. Ad- 
mitted to the bar in Oregon June, 1907, since 
which date he has practiced his profession, 
under the name of Everson & Pierce. Re- 
publican. 

PALMER LOREN FALES. 

Residence, 349 Multnomah street; office, 
901 Board of Trade building, Portland. Born 
October 31, 1884, in Ionia County, Michigan. 
Son of E. E. and Clara (Palmer) Fales. Re- 
ceived his early education at the public 
schools of Belding, Michigan, and later at- 
tended the Ferris Institute at Big Rapids, 
Michigan. Graduated from the University 
of Michigan in June, 1907, with LL. B. de- 
gree. Admitted to the bar at Lansing, Michi- 
gan, June 19, 1907. Came to Portland in 
March, 1909, and began the practice of his 
profession, since which date he has been as- 
sociated with the firm of Platt & Platt. Re- 
publican. 

RALPH EMERSON FARQUHAR. 

Residence, Anna- 
bel, Portland; 
office, 404 Com- 
mercial building. 
Born September 
4, 1878 West Lib 
erty, Iowa. Sou 
of William C. and 
Mina B. (Shaw) 
Farquhar. Mar- 
ried May 9, 1900, 
to Jennie C. Ross. 
Educated at the 
Ida Grove High 
School at Ida 
Grove, Iowa, in 
1898, the Kansas 
City School of 
Law at Kansas 
City, Mo., in 1901 

and at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, 
Nebraska, 1903, from .which Institution he 
received the degree of LL. B. Was admitted 
to the bar at Lincoln, Nebraska, June 11, 
1903, the same year he moved to Phoenix, 
Arizona, and was admitted to the bar of 
that territory. He practiced there until 

1907, when he moved to Oregon and was ad- 
mitted to the bar of Oregon at Salem in 

1908. Is a member of the I. O. O. F., Red- 
men and Modern Woodmen of America Fra- 
ternities. He made a special study of Medi- 
.cal Jurisprudence under the guidance of Dr. 
John Punton, who held the chair of nervous 
and mental diseases at the University Medi- 
cal College at Kansas City, Mo. Republi- 
can. 

EDWARD LOUIS COBURN FARRIN. 

Residence and office, Marshfield, Oregon. 
Born December 4, 1878, at Marshfield. 
Oregon. Son of G. N. Farrin and 
Sarah Ann (Goodman) Farrin. He re- 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



131 



ceived his early education in the public 
schools at Marshfield and Portland, Ore., 
Aberdeen, Wash., and San Francisco, Cal. 
Graduating from the Marshfield High School 
in 1899, he then taught school for some 
time, later entering the office of Hon. John 
S. Coke, he began the study of law. In 
October, 1901, he was admitted to the bar 
of Oregon, and began the practice of law 
at Marshfield. In 1906 he formed a part- 
nership with his brother, George N. Far- 
rin, which firm exists to date under the firm 
name of Farrin & Farrin. Served as City 
Attorney of Marshfield from 1902 to 1909, 
and as Deputy District Attorney for Coos 
County from 1901 to 1908. Member of the 
Masonic and B. P. 0. E. fraternities. Ee- 
publican. 

GEORGE G. FARRIN. 

Eesidence, 749 Fourth street; office, 205- 
6-7 Coos building, Marshfield. Born at 
North Bend, Oregon, May 21, 1868. Son 
of G. N. and Sarah Ann Farrin; lived 
upon a farm on Coos Eiver until seven- 
teen years of age, at which time his 
father died. Graduated from Marshf : eM 
High School in 1885. He then entered 




the law office of Hon. A. M. Crawford, pres- 
ent Attorney-General, and read law for one 
year. He then went to Portland and took 
two years private instructions, at the same 
time reading law in the office of O. F. Pax- 
ton at that place. Member of the Bepub- 
lican convention of Multnomah County in 
1888. Served as a clerk of the House of 
Eepresentatives in 1889. Going to San 
Francisco he became steward of the Euss 
House, where he remained for one year. 



going to Chico, Cal., in 1891, where he was 
assistant manager of the Park Hotel, at the 
same time reading law in the office of W. 
H. Henshaw; returning to San Francisco in 
1892, he again accepted the position of 
steward in the Euss House, and remained 
there for two years. Married in San Fran- 
cisco, September 5, 1895, to Miss Anna See- 
lig. He then moved to Berkeley, Cal., 
where he was for five years associated 
with Neihaus Bros, in the planing mill 
business. Eeturning to Marshfield in 1900 
he entered into a partnership with his 
brother, E. L. C. Farrin, which continues 
to date. Admitted to the bar of the Su- 
preme Court of Oregon in October, 1906. 
Served five years in Oregon National Guard. 
In June, 1908, he was elected Great Sa- 
chem of the Eed Men for Oregon, serving 
one year. Member of K. of P., I. O. O. F., 
Eed Men and B. P. O. E. fraternities. Ee 
publican. 

FRANK W. FENTON. 

Eesidence and office, McMinnville, Ore. 
Born, January 27, 1859, in Scotland Coun- 
ty, Missouri. Son of James D. and Mar- 
garet A. (Pinkerton) Fenton. Married in 




1884 to Dilla B. Butler. Moved to Ore- 
gon in 1865. Educated at the public schools 
of Yainhill 'County, Oregon and later grad- 
uated from the Monmouth Christian Col- 
lege at Monmouth, Ore. Eead law in the 
office of Killin & Moreland, of Portland, 
for two years, and in the office of W. D. 
Fenton. Admitted to the bar of Oregon 
at Salem in 1884. Commenced the practice 
of law in Lafayette, Ore., in 1884, in part- 
nership with his brother, W. D. Fenton, and 



132 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



after a period of three years removed to 
McMinnville, and for eight years was in 
partnership with Judge W. M. Ramsey, 
which partnership has since been dissolved, 
and he continues the practice of his pro- 
fession alone. President of the McMinn- 
ville Building & Improvement Co. Member 
of Masonic, W. O. W. and A. O. U. W. 
fraternities. Democrat. 

WILLIAM DAVID FENTON. 

Residence, 110 East Sixteenth street, Port- 
land; office, 609-14 Fenton Building, Port- 
land. Born June 29, 1853, in Scotland 
County, Missouri. Son of James Davis and 
Margaret Ann (Pinkerton) Fenton. Mar- 
ried October 16, 1879, to Katherine Lucas. 
Educated at the common schools of Etna, 




Scotland County, Missouri, and, after his 
removal to Oregon, at the schools of Yam 
hill County. During 1867 and 1868 at- 
tended Baptist College at McMinnville, Ore., 
and in 1872 received A. B. degree from 
Christian College, Monmouth, Ore. Read 
law at Salem in 1874 and 1875, in Decem- 
ber of which year he was admitted to 
the bar of this state. Elected member of 
House of Representatives from Yamhill 
County in 1876. Practiced law at Lafay- 
ette, Yamhill County, Oregon, from 1877 to 
1885, when he removed to Portland. On 
the death of his father in 1886 he returned 
to Yamhill County. Moved to Seattle in 
1889, and to Portland again in 1891, where 
he has resided and practiced continuously 
since. Member Arlington, University and 
Commercial Clubs of Portland. Member 
Chamber of Commerce and Sons of tho 
American Revolution. Republican. 



CHARLES H. FAEEINGTON. 

Residence, 483 East Twenty-fifth street 
North; office, 416 Commercial Club Build- 
ing, Portland. Born in Adair, Iowa, May 4, 
1878. Son of John T. and Lucy A. (Hawes) 
Farrington. Came to Oregon 1904. Mar- 
ried to Tilla E. Spangler, June 6, 1905. 
Admitted to the bar at Des Moines, Iowa, 
May 9, 1899, and commenced the practice 
of his profession with his brother under 
the firm name of Farrington & Farrington. 

ELISHA E. FARRINGTON. 

Residence, 609 Clackamas street; office, 
416 Commercial Club Building, Portland. 
Born in Edford, 111., December 14, 1869. 
Son of John T. and Lucy A. (Hawes) Far- 
rington. Came to Oregon in 1895. Ad- 
mitted to bar at iSalem, Ore., October 5. 
1906. Practiced his profession in partner- 
ship with his brother under the firm name 
of Farrington & Farringtou. 

J. A. FEE. 

Residence and office, Pendleton, Oregon. 
Practices in partnership with R. J. Slater. 

ALBERT B. FERRERA. 

Residence, 941 Hawthorne avenue; office, 
323 to 326 Henry building, Portland. 
Born April 9, 1872, at Portland, Oregon. Son 
of Anthony and Rosa C. (Vajo) Ferrera. Mar- 
ried to Zella A. Hills. Educated at the public- 
schools of Portland and St. Matthew's Hall, 




San Mateo, Cal., 1877-1886. Graduated 188!> 
from the Royal School of Commerce at 
Turin, Italy, as accountant, where he re- 
ceived the second prize. In 1894 attended 
the Law School of the University of Ore- 
gon. For three years read law in the 
office of Judge Charles H. Carey, of Port 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



133 



land. In 1898 was admitted to the bar at 
Salem, Ore., from which time he has prac- 
ticed his profession. Member of a number 
of Republican clubs, W. O. W. and Macca- 
bee fraternities. Also member Christopher 
Columbus Benevolent Society. Counsel for 
Royal Italian Consul at Portland. Repub- 
lican. 

OTHO LEONARD FEREIS. 

Residence, 3(50 East Forty-seventh street 
North; office, Board of Trade Building, 
Portland. Born, April 27, 1881, at Par- 
kersburg, Iowa. Son of A. N. and Sallie 
(Leonard) Ferris. Married June 14, 1905, 
to Edna Kimball. Received his early edu- 




cation in the grammar and high schools of 
Waterloo, Iowa, graduating therefrom in 
1898. Graduated from Cornell College at 
Mt. Vernon, Iowa, in June, 1902, with the 
degree of Ph. B., and from the George 
Washington University in Washington, D. 
C., in May, 1905, with the degree of LL. B. 
Moved to Oregon in July, 1905. Admitted 
to the bar of Oregon at Pendleton, Ore., 
November 6, 1905. Was with the trust 
department of the Title Guarantee & Trust 
Coinpany of Portland, Ore., from August, 
1905, to April, 1907, at which time he be- 
came a member of the firm of Lee & Fer- 
ris, attorneys. Is now secretary of the 
Columbia Trust Company. Member of Delta 
Tau Delta fraternity. Member of Masonic 
order, Commercial Club of Portland, the 
Irvington Tennis Club and Y. M. C. A. Re- 
publican. 

FORREST STARKEY FISHER. 

Residence, 630 Montgomery Drive; office, 
601 Fenton building. Born July 4, 1876, in 



Astoria, Clatsop County, Ore. Son of James 
William and Mary (Starkey) Fisher. Married 
June 5, 1907, to Edith M. Barnhisel. Received 
his education at the public schools at The 
Dalles, Ore., and Wasco Independent Acad- 
emy. Attended Leland 'Stanford Junior 
University, 1894-1899, and graduated de- 
gree A. B. Later attended National Uni- 
versity and graduated in 1902, with degree 
LL. M. Admitted to the bar in Salem, Ore., 
October, 1899. From 1903 to date in part- 
nership with Homer D. Angell under firm 
name of Angell & Fisher. Republican. 

AUSTIN FINCK FLEGEL. 

Residence, 501 Holbrook street; office, 402- 
408 Failing Building, Portland. Born Feb- 
ruary 25, 1864, at Somerset, Perry County, 
Ohio. Son of Jacob A. and Lydia A. 
(Lewis) Flegel. Married June 4, 1889, to 
Dora Darley. Educated at the common 
schools at Lithopolis from 1870 to 1874 
and at Sugar Grove, Ohio, from 1874 to 
1880. In 1889 he removed to Oregon and 
attended the Law Department of the Uni- 
versity of Oregon, graduating in 1892 with 
degree of LL. B. Was admitted to the 
bar at Salem, Ore., in 1892. From 1892 to 
1899 was in partnership with Henry Stan- 
islawsky. For ten years practiced alone, 
and on June 1, 1909, formed a partnership 
with John W. Reynolds, which continues 
to date. Represented the Eleventh Ward 
as Councilman from July, 1902, to July, 
1905. Member of Oregon Historical So- 
ciety, Mazamas and the National Geographic 
Society of Washington, D. C. Democrat. 
WILLIAM FOLEY. 

Residence, 91 North Fifteenth street; of- 
fice 323 Board of Trade Building, Port- 
land. Born September 29, 1849, near Clay- 
ton, Lanark County, Province of Ontario, 
Canada. Son of James and Mary (Cadi- 
gan) Foley. Received his early education 
at the common schools in Lanark County, 
Ontario, Canada. Attended High School 
at Pembroke, Ontario, during the year 
1872. Came to the State of Oregon in 
1877. Studied law with the late Colonel 
James K. Kelly in Portland, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar October 5, 1883. Mem- 
ber of the Historical Society of Oregon. 
Democrat. 

JOHN D. FOOTE. 

Residence, Forest Grove. Born in Pearis- 
burg, Virginia, October 21, 1881. Son of 
J. D. and Virginia (Spangler) Foote. At- 
tended public and high schools at Pearis- 
burg,. Va., until June, 1899; September, 
1899, to June, 1902, Emory and Henry Col- 
lege, Emory, Va.; 1906 to 1908, Law De- 
partment University of Virginia, gradual- 
ing with degree of LL. B. Came to Oregon 
in 1908. Admitted to the bar of Virginia 
June 20, 1908, and to Oregon bar at Sa- 
lem in September, 1909. Practices his pro- 
fession in Forest Grove to date. Member 



134 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



of Masonic, B. P. O. E. and Delta Chi fra- 
ternities. 

SENECA FOOTE FOUTS. 

Residence, 70 Cornell street; office, 623 
Lumbermens "building, Portland. Born Au- 
gust 26, 1876, at Big Rapids, Mich. Son 
of Philetus F. and Eugenia (Stafford) Fouts. 




Married January 4, 1907, to Marjorie E. 
Baker. Early education received in the 
public schools of Michigan and Aberdeen, 
Wash. Graduated from the Law Depart- 
ment of the University of Oregon on June 
10, 1905. Admitted to the bar of Oregon 
the same year and for one year afterwards 
was in partnership with A. J. Derby, Coun- 
ty Judge of Hood River County, Oregon 
(1905-1906). From that time until October 
1, 1909, practiced his profession alone in 
Portland, at which time he formed a part- 
nership with Judge Alex. Sweek, the same 
continuing to date. Served in the Spanish 
War and Philippine insurrections in the 
Second Oregon Volunteer Infantry. Now 
Department Commander of the United Span- 
ish War Veterans of Oregon. Republican. 

WILLIAM H. FOWLER. 

Residence, 624 Flanders street; office, 416 
Lumbermens building, Portland. Born De- 
cember 6, 1864, at Newark, 111. Son of 
Henry R. and Elizabeth (Sullivan) Fowler. 
Educated at public schools, Chicago, 111., 
and the Northwestern University Prepara- 
tory Schools at Evanston, 111.; McClure 
Military Academy, Oakland, Cal.; Berkeley 
Gymnasium at Berkeley, Cal.; the Univer- 
sity of California at Berkeley, Cal., and 
Hastings College of Law, San Francisco, 
receiving from the same the degree of 



L. B. B. Admitted to the bar in Califor- 
nia in June, 1888. Came to Oregon, July 
2, 1904. Admitted to the bar September, 
1905. Commissioner for the State of Ore- 
gon to the National Conference of Uni- 
form State Laws. Member Phi Delta Phi 
fraternity. Republican. 

WYNN D. FREEMAN. 

Residence, 1142 Ellsworth street; office, 
722 Chamber of Commerce Building, Port- 
land. Born in Bellrive, 111., July 17, 1868. 
Son of Lewis A. and Hanna E. (Greer) 
Freeman. Married to Elizabeth R. Rich- 
mond December 24, 1896. He attended va- 




rious public schools in childhood, and the 
Southern Illinois Normal, Carbondale, 111., 
in 1888-89, but was forced to abandon school 
owing to ill health. Moved to Oregon in 
1890. Was bookkeeper two years, and from 
1892 to 1897 taught school in Marion 
County, Oregon, reading law during the 
time of teaching. Admitted to the bar 
at Salem, Oregon, October, 1897. Com- 
menced active practice of his profession, 
June 6, 1898, in Portland, and continues 
to date. Republican. 

FRANK F. FREEMAN. 

Residence, 303 North Twenty-third street; 
office, Henry Building, Portland. Born 
June 4, 1877, in Portland, Oregon. Son of 
John Marcus and Margaret E. (Smith) Free- 
man. Married to Elizabeth Tongue in 1902. 
Graduated from Portland High School, later 
from University of Oregon, 1896, and the 
University of Michigan Law Department in 
1897, with degree of LL. B. Admitted to 
the bar in Salem, Ore., June, 1896. Studied 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



135 




law with Rodney L. Glisan, Williams, Wood 
& Linthicum, and 'Cox, Cotton, Teal & 
Minor. Practiced under firm name of Vea- 
zie & Freeman till 1906; since then alone. 
Member Second Oregon Volunteers. Mem- 
ber of 1907 Legislature. Member of Uni- 
versity and Multnomah Clubs. Eepublican. 

PICKENS LOUIS FRAZIER. 

Residence, 1334. 
N. Summer street; 
office, 462 State 
street, Salem, Ore. 
Born Nov ember 
17, 1860, in South 
Carolina. Son of 
R. A. and Myra 
(Nicholson) F r a- 
zier. Married Oc- 
tober 21, 1891, to 
Angie E. Baxter. 
Early education 
rec e i v e d in the 
public schools of 
North and South 
Carolina, and at 
the high school at 
Waynesville, N. C. 
Taught school for 

a time and then entered the Commercial Col- 
lege of Kentucky, University of Lexington, 
graduating in June, 1886. Returned to North 
Carolina and taught school one year. In 
March, 1887, came to Oregon and taught ten 
years in public schools. Read law in office 
of Judge Bonham, of Salem, and attended 
the Law Department of the Willamette Uni- 
versity at Salem, Oregon, graduating in June, 
1900, with LL. B. degree, and was admitted 
to the bar of this state at that time. Served 
as member of City Council of Salem, 1905- 
1906. Practices alone to date. Democrat. 

CHARLES WILLIAM FULTON. 

Residence, 680 Flanders street; office, 202 
Fenton Building, Portland. Born August 
24, 1853, at Lima, Ohio. Son of Jacob and 
Eliza A. ('McAllister) Fulton. Married 
September 5, 1878, to Ada M. Hobson. 
From 1865 to 1870 resided in Iowa and 
there attended the public schools and the 
Magnolia (Iowa) High School. In 1870 
his parents moved to Pawnee City, Neb., 
where for two years he attended the Paw- 
nee City Academy. Admitted to the bar 
at Falls City, Neb., in April, 1875, and read 
law in the office of A. H. Babcock at Paw- 
nee City. Moved to Oregon in April, 1875, 
and located at Astoria in July of that 
year. Was elected State Senator from 
Clatsop County in 1878, in 1890, in 1898, 
and again in 1902. Was elected President 
of the State Senate at January session, 
1893, and at January session, 1901. Was 
Presidential elector in 1888, and elected to 
the United States Senate in February, 



1903, serving for six years. Came to Port- 
land in April, 1909, and practices his pro- 
fession in partnership with his brother, >G. C. 
Fulton. This partnership has existed for 
over twenty years, they having one office 
at Astoria, of which his brother now has 
charge. While in the Senate was a mem- 
ber of Irrigation, Industrial Expositions, 




Judiciary, Military Affairs, Postoffices and 
Public Lands committees, and Revision of 
Laws of the United States, and was chair- 
man of the Committee on Claims. Mem- 
ber of Arlington and Commercial Clubs of 
Portland and of B. P. O. E. fraternity. 
Republican. 

GEORGE CLYDE FULTON. 

Residence and office, Astoria, Ore. Born 
August 28, 1860, near St. John, Iowa. Son 
of Jacob and Eliza Ann (McAllister) Ful- 
ton. Married October, 1885, to Maude 
Edith Hobson. His early education was 
received at a country school in Iowa, and 
later in the public schools of Pawnee City, 
Neb., where his parents had taken up their 
residence. Graduated from the High School 
at Pawnee City and also from Pawnee 
Academy. Studied law in the offices of 
George Graham and Hon. George M. Hum- 
phrey, of Pawnee. Taught school for sev- 
eral years in order to secure means to 
pursue his law studies, which he contin- 
ued while teaching. Admitted to the bar 
of Nebraska in 1882. Practiced at Marion 
Centre, Neb., for a few months and then 
moved to Leadville, and stayed there a 
year. 'Came to Oregon in 1883 for a visit, 
later locating at Snohomish, Wash., and 
practiced there a few months. Returned 



136 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



to Astoria and entered into partnership with pany H, First Regiment, May 19, 1892, to 
his brother, C. W. Fulton, where he has August 18, 1894; Major, August 18, .1894, 
since continuously lived and practiced. Ad- to September 22, 1897; Lieutenant-Colonel, 

September 28, 1897; discharged, May 25, 
1898; Major Second Oregon U. S. Volun- 
teer Infantry, May 7, 1898, to August 7, 
1899; member Board of 'Claims against U. S. 
Government; member first Military Com- 
mission in Philippine Islands; member of 
Board of Liquidation charged with ascer- 
taining and delivering to the Spanish Gov- 
ernment all property to which Spain was 
entitled under the treaty of peace; Adju- 
tant General, State of Oregon, November 1, 
1899, to August 31, 1903; Colonel Third In- 
fantry, Oregon National Guard, July 25, 
1903, to November 14, 1906; vice-president 
Interstate National Guard Association, 1902; 
certified as eligible for Colonelcy in U. S. 




mitted to the Supreme Court of Oregon 
October 10, 1883. Admitted to the Fed- 
eral Courts of Washington July 31, 1896. 
Member B. P. O. E., A. A. A. C., Commer- 
cial Club of Astoria, Masonic order. Re- 
publican. 

WILLIAM GALLOWAY. 

Residence and office, McMinnville. Born 
in Wisconsin. Son of Charles and Mary 
(Heeney) Galloway. Married in 1875 to 
Emma Baker. Came to Oregon in 1852, 
and was educated at the Willamette Uni- 
versity, class of 1868. Admitted to the 
bar at Salem in 1882. Elected Judge of 
Third Judicial District in 1904. Demo- 
crat. 

CALVIN U. GANTENBEIN. 

Residence, 1524 Hawthorne avenue; office, 
Court House, Portland. Born in Philadel- 
phia, Penn., March 22, 1865. Son of John 
and Mary Jane (Schwable) Gantenbein, 
M. D., D. D. Came to Oregon in 1874. 
Married Winifred Watson, daughter of 
Judge James Finley Watson, October 18, 
1899. Attended public schools of Philadel- 
phia and Portland from 1871 to 1875; Bishop 
Scott Academy 1875 to 1878; Royal Charles 
Gymnasium at Stuttgart, Germany, 1878, 
graduating from same in April, 1885; Col- 
lege de France at Paris, France, 1885; 
University of Oregon Law Department, 
1889, graduating in June, 1891. Admitted 
to bar at Salem, Ore., June, 1891. Private 
Company G, First Regiment, O. N. G., July 
8, 1891 to May 19, 1892; Captain Com- 




Volunteers under "Dick Act," July 19, 
1905; certificate valid until March 22, 1920. 
Tendered appointment as Justice Supreme 
Court, Philippine Islands, but declined ap- 
pointment, 1899. Judge of the Circuit 
Court of the State of Oregon for the Fourth 
Judicial District since July 2, 1908. In- 
structor of Latin, Greek, German and 
French, West Chester State Normal School, 
Pennsylvania, 1885-88; instructor of Ger- 
man and Latin, Portland High School, 1888 
to 1892. Engaged in the practice of law 
with James N. Davis and Arthur L. Veazie 
from 1892 until 1901, and with Arthur L. 
Veazie from 1901 until elected to the Cir- 
cuit Bench. Dean Law Department, Uni- 
versity of Oregon, since 1903. Vice-presi- 
dent Oregon Bar Association 1910. Medal 
authorized by Act of Congress, approved 
June 29, 1906, for military services in the 
Spanish War and Philippine insurrection. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



137 




Thirty-second degree Mason. Member Ger- 
man Aid Society, Swiss Aid Society, Com- 
mercial Club, and life member Multnomah 
Amateur Athletic Club. Eepublican. 

CHARLES WALTER GARLAND. 

Eesidence, 173 
N. Seven teenth 
street; office, 701 
Chamber of Com- 
m e r c e Building, 
Portland. Born 
June 25, 1884, at 
Paterson, N. J., 
Son of Charles 
George and Mary 
Ann (Dean) Gar- 
land. Married Au- 
gust, 1908, to Miss 
Genevieve Talbot. 
Attended the pub- 
lic schools of 
Paterson, N. J.. 
at Sioux 'City, la., 
at New Orleans, 
La., and at Chi- 
cago. Also attended the High School at 
Champaign, 111., and the University of Illi- 
nois at the same place, receiving the de- 
gree of LL. B. in 1907. Read law in the 
office of F. B. Hamill at 'Champaign, 111., 
and with F. G. Cogswell, District Attorney 
of Champaign County, at Urbana, 111. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Springfield in June, 
1907. Came to Oregon in 1907 and was 
admitted to the bar of this state at Sa- 
lem in 1908. Commenced the practice of 
law alone in Portland, in March, 1908, and 
practiced alone until January, 1910, when 
he was appointed Deputy District Attorney 
under Judge George J. Cameron, which 
continues to date. President of University 
of Illinois Club of Portland. Eepublican. 

SAMUEL MEREDITH GARLAND. 

Residence and 
office, L e b a non, 
Ore. Born in 
A m h e r s t, Va., 
January 31, 186] . 
Son of James 
Powell and Lucy 
Virginia ( B r a x- 
ton) G. arland. 
Came to Oregon 
in 1887. Married 
to Isabella LeRoy 
Kirkpatrick Octo- 
ber 11, 1892. At- 
tended Gordon 
McCabe's Univer- 
sity High School 
in Petersb urg, 
Va., 1875-78; 
Emory and Henry 
College, Emory, Va., 1878-80; Randolph-Ma- 




eon College, Ashland, Va., 1880-82, from 
which he graduated. Admitted to the bar 
at Richmond, Va., in 1884; at Salem, Ore., 
November 12, 1890; U. S. Courts of Ore- 
gon, June 28, 1895. Editor Amherst Demo- 
crat, Amherst, Va., 1885-6. City Attorney 
of Lebanon, Ore., from 1893 to 1907. Mem- 
ber State Democratic 'Conventions from 
1896 to date; State Central Committee and 
delegate to St. Louis Presidential Conven- 
tion, 1904. Superintendent U. S. Indian 
School on Umatilla Reservation, 1887-9. 
Member of Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity. 
Democrat. 

WILLIAM N. GATENS. 

Residence, 857 Clackamas street; office, 
Court House, Portland. Born March 20, 
1867, at Portland, Oregon. Son of Frank 
and Annie (Fitzpatrick) Gatens. Married 
November 1, 1899, to Mina J. Maker. At- 
tended public schools of Portland and St. 
Michael College. Entered the Law Depart- 




ment of the University of Oregon in 1892 
and graduated from the same in 1894 with 
LL. B. degree. Admitted to the bar of 
Oregon by the Supreme Court, in June, 1894. 
Commenced the practice of law alone at 
Portland in 1902. The same year was ap- 
pointed Deputy District Attorney of the 
Fourth Judicial District under George E. 
Chamberlain, which he held until January, 
1903. When the latter was elected Gover- 
nor of Oregon Mr. Gatens became his pri- 
vate secretary until February, when he 
was appointed Circuit Judge of the Fourth 
Judicial District, which office he holds to 
date. Democrat. 



138 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



JOHN GAVIN. 

Residence, 1109 Union street; office, 310 
Union street, The Dalles. Born November 
14, 1867, at Jerseyville, 111. Son of Michael 
and Sarah (Carbine) Gavin. Married at 
Eoodhouse, 111., to Lillie Gray. Early edu- 
cation received at the public schools at 
Kane, 111. Later attended Normal schools 
at Bushnell, 111., and at Valparaiso, Ind. 




Graduated from teachers' course in 1886. 
Taught school two years in Jersey County, 
111., and was for six years assistant and 
High School principal at Roodhouse, study- 
ing law in the summer. Came to Oregon 
in 1892 and was for seven years City 
Superintendent of Schools at The Dalles. 
Admitted to the bar at Salem in June, 
1896. Was school clerk at The Dalles 1900 
to 1907. Member of board 1907 to date. 
Began practice in 1899 with James F. 
Moore under firm name of Moore & Gavin. 
Partnership continued for five years, since 
which time practiced alone. Democrat. 

JOHN M. GEARIN. 

Residence, Portland Hotel; office, Mohawk 
building, Portland. Born August 15, 1857, in 
Umatilla County, Oregon. Son of John and 
Ellen (Burns) Gearin. Married June 28, 
1878, to Matilda Raleigh. Educated at St. 
Mary's College, San Francisco, 1863-1867. 
Graduated from Notre Dame University, In- 
diana, 1871, and received LL. D. degree, 1903. 
Admitted to the bar at Salem in 1874. Mem- 
ber Oregon Legislature, 1874. City Attorney 
Portland, 1875. District Attorney Multnomah 
County, 1884-1886. Appointed Special Prose- 
cutor for the Government in opium fraud 
cases, 1893. Appointed United States Senator 




December 13, 1905. Member Knights of Co- 
lumbus, Arlington Club, M. A. A. C. Demo- 
crat. 

ALBERT E. GEBHARDT. 

Residence, 346 
Fourth street; of- 
fice, 424 Chamber 
of Commerce 
Building, P o r t- 
land. Born in 1865 
in New York City. 
Son of Henry and 
Anna C. (Berk) 
Gebhardt. Early 
education received 
in the public 
schools of the 
State of Illinois, 
after which heat- 
tended Mt. Mor- 
ris College, Illi- 
nois, graduating 
in 1883. Was in- 
structor in G e r- 

man and history in the same institution, 
1883-1884; then entered the Literary De 
partment of the University of Michigan, 
graduating in June, 1888, with the degree 
of A. B.; then entered the Law Department 
of the same University, graduating with 
the degree of LL. B. in 1890. From 1888 
to 1890, took private instruction in Ameri- 
can Constitutional Law under Hon. Thomas 
M. Cooley. Admitted to the Supreme Court 
of Michigan in 1890, to the bar of Ne- 
braska in September of the same year. 
Came to Oregon in 1891 and was admitted 
to the bar of this state in October of that 
year; admitted to the U. S. Circuit and 
District Courts in 1904 and to the U. S. 
Circuit Court of Appeals in 1908. Served 
three years in First Regiment, Michigan 
State Troops. Member of Oregon Bar As- 
sociation, Multnomah Bar Association, Ore- 
gon State Academy of Sciences, American 
Fisheries Society, Audubon Society, Na- 
tional Geographic Society, and is secretary 
of the Oregon Fish and Game Association. 
Is a Republican in politics. 

MAX H. GEHLHAR. 

Residence, 506 North Twenty-first street; 
office, First National Bank Building, Salem. 
Born March 5, 1886, at Elgin, Minn. Son 
of J. Ludwig and Emilie (Fedder) Gehlhar. 
Attended public schools at Elgin, Minn., 
graduating from the High School in 1904. 
Came immediately to Oregon and took up 
work in the Liberal Arts and Law Depart- 
ments of the Willamette University, in the 
fall of 1904. Graduated from the Law De- 
partment of the above university in 1907 
with degree of LL. B. Admitted to the 
bar at Salem June 16, 1907, and in Novem- 
ber of that year formed a partnership with 
Ellis M. Palmer, under the firm name of 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



139 



Palmer & Gehlhar, to December, 1908, since 
which time practiced alone. Enlisted as a 
private in O. N. G. in 1906 and was grad- 
ually promoted; commissioned First Lieu- 
tenant, Third Infantry, in June, 1909. Ee- 
publican. 

THEODORE JUSTICE GEISLER. 

Eesidence, 631 Elm street; office, 530 
Chamber of Commerce Building, Portland. 
Born June 13, 1852, in Hamburg, Germany. 
Sou of Wilhelm Heinrich and Katinka 
(Bochme) Geisler. Married to Georgine 
Dressier, May, 1889. His early education 
was received in the public schools of New 
York City and German Lutheran Prepara- 
tory School. Completed the law course in 
New York City in 1884, and admitted to 
the bar of New York the same year. Prac- 
ticed in New York City until 1889, when 
he removed to Oregon. Admitted to the 
bar of Oregon in 1890; to the U. S. Su- 
preme Court in 1903 and District of Colum- 
bia in 1909. Republican. 

MELVIN CLARK GEORGE. 

Eesidence, 616 
Market St. Drive; 
office, 29-30 Wash- 
ington building, 
Portland. Born 
May 13, 1849, in 
Noble County, 0. 
Son of Presley and 
Mahala (Nicker- 
son) George. Came 
to the State of 
Oregon in 1851 and 
attended the Le- 
banon Academy, 
t h e Willamette 
University and the 
Portland Business 
College. He was 
admitted by the 
Supreme Court of 
Oregon, 1875, and to the Supreme Court of 
United States in 1880. Was State Senator 
from Multnomah County, 1876-78, and Con- 
gressman from Oregon, 47th and 48th Con- 
gress. In 1897 was appointed Circuit Judge 
and was re-elected twice, since which date he 
has continued the practice of his profession. 
Eepublican. 

WILLIAM BALL GILBERT. 

Eesidence, 527 Taylor street; office, Post Of- 
fice building, Portland. Born July 4, 1847, 
near Lewensville, Fairfax County, Virginia. 
Son of John and Sarah Catherine (Ball) Gil- 
bert. Married September 3, 1873, to Julia 
West Lindsley. His early education was re- 
ceived at private schools in Lewensville and 
Falls Church, Virginia, and at the High 
School in Zanesville, Ohio. Graduated from 
Williams College in 1868, with the degree of 
A. B. and from the Law School of the Uni- 




versity of Michigan in 1872, with the degree 
of LL. B. Also received a degree of LL. 

D. from Williams College, in 1898. Moved to 
Oregon in 1872, and the following year was 
admitted to practice by the Supreme Court of 
Oregon, having previously been admitted to 
the Supreme Court of Michigan, in 1872. En- 
tered into the practice of his profession with 
H. H. Northrup, under the firm name of North- 
rup & Gilbert, which partnership lasted until 
1876. Then formed partnership with A. C. 
Gibbs, under the firm name of Gibbs & Gilbert, 
and this partnership lasted until 1877, when 
he again entered into partnership with H. H. 
Northrup. Upon the dissolution of this part- 
nership, he entered into association with John 
M. Gearin, and later became associated with 
Zera Snow; under the firm name of Gilbert & 
Snow. This partnership lasted until he was 
appointed United States Circuit Judge, in 
March, 1892. Was a member of the Legisla- 
ture of Oregon in 1889. Member of the Ar- 
lington Club of Portland and the Southern 
Club of San Francisco. Lecturer on Constitu- 
tional Law in Law School of University of 
Oregon since 1893. Eepublican. 

CLARENCE H. GILBERT. 

Eesidence, 302 
Vista Ave.; office, 
205-207 Chamber 
of Commerce, Port- 
land. Born Jeffer- 
son County, Illi- 
nois, December 13, 
1874. Son of 
Samuel E. and 
Eliza E. (Bradley) 
Gilbert. Married 
July 9, 1901, to 
Edith M. Jones. 
Came to Oregon 
in 1888 and grad- 
uated from the 
Portland High 
School in June, 
1893. Later at- 
tended L e 1 a n d 

Stanford Junior University and was admitted 
to practice at the Oregon bar in 1897. In that 
year formed partnership with H. E. Northrup 
under the name of Northrup & Gilbert, which 
continued for two years. Was for a number 
of years in charge of the legal department of 

E. G. Dun & Co. In 1909 formed law partner- 
ship with Henry McConnell under name of 
Gilbert & Mc'Connell, which still continues. 
Was a charter member of Co. H, First Eegi- 
ment, O. N. G. Is now a member of and ac- 
tively interested in the legal fraternity of 
Phi Delta Phi, the Oregon State Bar Associa- 
tion, the Multnomah County Bar Association, 
t"he Oregon 'Historical Society, the Oregon 
Audubon Society, the Multnomah Amateur 
Athletic Club, the Y. M. C. A., the Portland 
Commercial Club, the Eoyal Arcanum. Ee- 
publican. 




140 



BIOGRAPHICAL 




SAMUEL S. GILLESPIE. 

Residence, 534 
Morrison street; 
office, 406 Henry 
building, Portland, 
Oregon. Born in 
Cumberland Coun- 
ty, Pa., April 23, 
1849. Son of Sam- 
uel L. and Eliza- 
b e t h (Steward) 
Gillespie. Married 
1881, to Emma 
Wilson. Educated 
at the Iowa State 
University, from 
which he received 
the degree of B. 
Ph., in 1878, later 
receiving the de- 
gree of A. M. In 
1882 he graduated from the Law Department 
of the Iowa State University. Was admitted 
to the bar in Iowa in 1882 and to the Cir- 
cuit and District Courts of the United States 
in the same year. Followed the profession of 
teaching in Iowa and Nebraska for ten years. 
In 1895 removed to Portland, Oregon, and 
formed a partnership for the practice of law 
with J. W. Bell, which was later dissolved. 
He is now engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession alone. Member of I. O. O. F. fra 
ternity. Republican. 

ROSCOE RUSH GILTNER. 

Residence, 227 
Chapman street; 
office, 508-9 Com- 
mercial building, 
Portland. Born 
October 25, 1857, 
i n Turbotville, 
Northumber 1 and 
County, Pennsyl- 
vania. Son of Ja- 
cob S. and Ma- 
tilda (Hause) Gilt- 
ner. Married Jan- 
uary 27, 1892, to 
Fronia Alice Wal- 
lace. Attended the 
public schools in 
Portland and la- 
ter, the High 
School. Entered 

Yale University in 1877 and graduated in 
1881, receiving the degree of B. A. Studied 
law until his admission to the bar, with the 
law firm of Thayer & Williams. Admitted to 
the bar at Salem, Oregon, in 1883. In 1906 
entered into partnership with R. E. Sewall, 
under the firm name of Giltner & Sewall, 
which association continues to date. Elected 
City Attorney of Portland in June, 1904, and 
served for two years, after which he acted as 
Deputy Prosecuting Attorney for Multnomah 
County, Oregon, from June, 1898, to 1900. 
Member M. A. A. C. Republican. 





RODNEY L. GLISAN. 

Residence, 163 
North Nineteenth 
street; office, 420 
Chamber of Com- 
m e r c e building, 
Portland. Born 
April 3, 1869, in 
Portland, Oregon. 
Son of Rodney 
and Elizabeth R. 
(Couch) G 1 i s a n. 
Received his edu- 
cation in the 
Bishop -Scott Aca- 
demy, Portland, 
1880-82, The Ecole 
Protestante, Paris, 
France, 1882-83; 
Hopkins Grammer 
School, New Ha- 
ven, Conn., 1883-86; Yale University, New Ha- 
ven, 1886-1890, from which he received the 
degree of A. B. ; the University of Oregon Law 
Department, 1890-92, receiving degree of LL. 
B.; and the Columbia University Law Depart- 
ment, New York City, 1892-93, receiving the 
degree of A. M. Admitted to the bar in Ore- 
gon, 1892. Member of the Common Council, 
Portland, 1900-1902, and President of that body 
in 1901. Member of the Executive Board in 
1903-05. Member of the Charter Commission 
of Portland, 1901, and a Trustee of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce, January, 1910, to date. Mem- 
ber of Arlington Club, University Club, M. 
A. A. C., Portland Rowing Club, Waverly Golf 
Club, Portland Hunting Club, Mazamas, Port- 
land Art Association. Republican. 

REUBEN PLEASANT GRAHAM. 

Residence, 741 
Tillamook street; 
office, 623 Lumber- 
mens building, 
Portland. Born, 
June 12, 1858, in 
Dallas County, 
Iowa. Son of Sam- 
uel McCollum and 
Sarah Ann (Howe) 
Graham. Married 
August 29, 1895, 
to Alice M. Dean. 
Came to Oregon 
when seven years 
old, with his par- 
e n t s. Attended 
public schools in 
Washington Coun- 
ty until 1871 and 

in Columbia County until 1878. Attended 
Tualatin Academy at Forest Grove from 1881 
to 1882, Columbia Commercial College 1883 
and 1884. Studied law under Judge F. 
A. Moore in St. Helens, Oregon, from 1888 to 
1890, and attended Law Department Uni- 
versity of Oregon at Portland, from 1891 to 




IOGRAPHICAL 



141 




1893, when he graduated with LL. B. degree. 
Admitted to bar at Pendleton in May, 1893. 
At once commenced the practice of his pro- 
fession and continues to date. From 1895 to 
1899 was in partnership with George E. Davis, 
under the firm name Davis & Graham. From 
January, 1900, to date has been in partnership 
with Judge T. J. Cleeton, and in 1909, W. M. 
Davis became a member of the firm, which 
became Graham, Cleeton & Davis. Member 
Masonic, W. O. W. fraternities. Democrat. 

FRANK SALISBURY GRANT. 

Eesidence, 574 
East Salmon St.; 
office, 610 McKay 
building, Portland. 
Born, May 14, 
1874, in Dubuque, 
Iowa. Son of 
Frank L. and 
Mary N. (Min- 
niss) Grant. Mar- 
ried October 15, 
1902, to Bell Bron 
key. Moved to 
Oregon November 
1891, and received 
his education at 
the public schools 
and Bishop Scott's 
Academy, P o r t- 
land. Admitted to 

the bar in Oregon June 8, 1896, and was ap- 
pointed Deputy ity Attorney July 1, 1907, 
which office he still holds. Assistant Chief 
Clerk Senate Oregon Legislature, 1901, and 
Chief Clerk Senate, 1907. Member of the 
Commercial Club, Masonic Fraternity (32nd 
degree), Knights of Pythias. Kepublican. 

RONALD C. GLOVER. 

Residence, Salem, Oregon; office, same. Born, 
May 16, 1882, at Macleay, Oregon. Son of 
Charles Peyton and Clarissa (Palmer) Glover. 
Married October 28, 1908, to Vera M. Byars. 
Attended public schools in Linn County, Ore- 
gon, and later the Willamette University, Sa- 
lem; in 1904 entered Law Department of above 
named college and graduated in 1906 with LL. 
B. degree. Admitted to the bar of Oregon, 
June, 1906, and commenced th'e practice of 
law alone in Salem until December, 1907, 
when he formed a partnership with James G. 
Heltzel, under the firm name of Heltzel & 
Glover. Still retaining this partnership, he ac- 
cepted position as private secretary to Con- 
gressman W. C. Hawley, which he holds to 
date. Republican. 

JAMES BUCHANAN GODFREY. 

Residence, St. Helens, Oregon; office, 221 
Board of Trade building, Portland. Born, 
October 12, 1858, at Girard, Erie County, 
Pennsylvania. Son of Erastus M. and Jean- 



ette (Godfrey) Godfrey. Married October 26, 
1892, to Florence E. Whitney. Attended the 
public schools of Pennsylvania until ten years 
old, then moved to Michigan and attended the 
public schools at Kalamazoo, Michigan, until 
he was fifteen years old. Attended the Metho- 
dist College at Fort Wayne, Indiana, for one 
year (1881), the London Commercial College, 
London. Ontario, for two years, graduating 
in March, 1884. Came to Oregon in 1890. Was 
admitted to the bar of Oregon in October, 
1902. Was appointed Road Supervisor of 
Union Precinct, Columbia County and served 
four years. Republican. 

ROBERT ORTH GRAVES. 

Residence 1044 Central Ave. West; office, 
Room 22, First Trust & Savings Bank build- 
ing, Marshfield, Oregon. Born, April 1, 1875, 
at Morocco, Indiana. Son of Captain Daniel 
M. Graves and Rachel A. (Barkhurst) Graves. 
Entering the public and high schools of Mo- 




rocco and graduating from the same in 1893, 
receiving his license as teacher, he taught 
school at Morocco and Kentland, Indiana, 
continuing for a period of six years. During 
this time he was engaged in taking a special 
course at the Indiana State Normal School at 
Terre Haute, Indiana, leaving that institution 
in 1898. All of his spare time he devoted to 
the study of law in the office of Hon. Frank 
Davis of Morocco, Indiana. Admitted to the 
bar .of Indiana, May 18, 1889. Opening an 
office at Morocco, he began a general practice 
of law. In 1904 elected Prosecuting Attorney 
for the Thirtieth Circuit of Indiana for a 
term of two years, being re-elected in 1906. 
After completing his term he resumed the 
practice, associating himself with the legal 
departments of the New York Central lines 
and the 'Frisco systems, representing them in 



142 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Indiana. Then moving to Marshfield, Oregon, 
in April, 1909, being admitted to the bar of 
Oregon April 20, 1909, he formed a partner- 
ship with Francis H. Clarke, under the firm 
name of Clarke & Graves, which continues 
to date. Past member Company B of the 
159th Indiana Volunteers, receiving honorable 
discharge from same. Fraternity member of 
Knights of Pythias and Commander of the 
Spanish-American War Veterans of Marsh- 
field. Eepublican. 

THOMAS HENRY GOYNE. 

Residence, Tillamook, Ore.; office, same. 
Born in Eoaring Creek, Pennsylvania, October 
13, 1864. Son of William Henry and Nancy 
(Stephens) Goyne. Came to Oregon August 
15, 1886. Married to Daisy Eveline Latimer, 
December 25, 1888. Attended common and 
private schools, and one year at Academy in 
Columbia County, Pennsylvania. Admitted to 
bar of State of Oregon, June 7, 1897, practic- 
ing law in Tillamook City, Oregon, alone to 
date. School Clerk of Tillamook City, Deputy 
County Clerk, April, 1891, to July, 1894, 
County Clerk, 1894-1896, Justice of the Peace, 
1898-1900. Eepublican. 

DAVID GOODSELL. 

Office, 532 Worcester building, Portland. 
Born, July 15, 1845, at Nelson, Portage County, 
Ohio. Son of Ira and Lydia (Brown) Good- 
sell, Married July 29, 1875, to Ella L. Bas 
sett. Early education received at the Hiram 
Eclectic Institute, at the Western Reserve 
College, Hudson, Ohio, and at the University 
of Michigan. Admitted to the bar of Cali- 
fornia at Sacramento on July 25, 1869, and to 
the bar of Oregon at Salem in 1871. Member 
of the Legislature of Oregon in 1876 and in 
1887. Member of Portland Commercial Club. 
Republican. 

JOHN DEAN GOSS. 

Office, 3-4 First Trust & Savings Bank 
building, Marshfield, Oregon. Born at 
Hudson, Wisconsin, October 3, 1869. Son 
of Alfred J. Goss and Carrie (Martin) Goss. 
Attended the common and High Schools at 
Hudson, Wisconsin, graduating in 1885. Re- 
ceived the degree of A. B. from the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin in 1889, then entered 
Columbia Univers'ty at New York City, re- 
ceiving degree A. M., in 1890, and Ph. D., in 
1891; in the meanwhile pursuing the study ot 
law at the Columbia Law School. In 1891 he 
was admitted to the bar of New York State. 
He then attended the University of Minne- 
sota, continuing the study of law, graduating 
in 1892 with the degree of LL. B. Elected 
County Judge of St. Croix County, Wisconisn, 
in 1893, completing his term in 1897. He 
afterwards practiced at Eveleth, Minnesota, 
and Sumpter, Oregon, moving to Marshfield, 
in 1907, where he formed a partnership with 
Hon. J. S. Coke, which was dissolved in 1909. 
He practices alone to date. Member B. P. 
O. E. Democrat. 



WILLIAM MONTGOMERY GREGORY. 

Eesidence, 818 Hancock street; office, 635 
Chamber of Commerce, Portland. Born De- 
cember 2, 1852, at Oneida, Madison County, 
New York. Son of Eev. Caspar B. and Mary 
L. (Montgomery) Gregory. Married February 
12, 1885, to Lenore Sparks. Eeceived his 
early education at Oneida Seminary, Oneida, 
New York, West Jersey Academy at Bridge- 
ton, New Jersey, and took partial course in 




the University of Pennsylvania Law Depart 
ment at Philadelphia, Pa. Admitted to the 
bar of Pennsylvan'a in January, 1874, in the 
Court of Common Pleas, and two years later 
to the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania; to 
the Supreme Court of California in 1876 and 
to the Supreme Court of Oregon in 1879. 
Practiced law in San Bernardino, California, 
from the fall of 1876 to March, 1879, in April 
of which year he came to Portland. Was in 
partnership with Charles A. Ball from Jan- 
uary, 1880, until the fall of 1881; with Thorn- 
ton Williams from the fall of 1881 until the 
removal of Mr. Williams to Eastern Oregon, 
early in 1882; with M. C. George and B, B, 
Duniway, under the firm name of George, 
Gregory & Duniway, from November, 1894, 
until Mr. George was appointed to the bench 
in October, 1897; and with Mr. Duniway for 
one year after that date. Bepublican. 

WILLIAM PRICE GREGORY. 

Eesidence, 432 Stark street; office, 4 North 
Sixth street, Portland. Born December 25, 
1851, at Morningsun, Iowa. Son of Dennis 
and Sarah (Price) Gregory. Married Feb- 
ruary 1, 1887, to Lucy E. Home. Came to 
Oregon in February, 1906. Educated at Howe 
Academy, Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. Bead law in 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



143 




tlie office of Tatlow & Wilson, Wapello, Iowa. 
Admitted to the bar of Iowa in 1881 and 
practiced there until 1887, when he remove I 
to Yates Centre, Kansas, and practiced there 
until 1893, then going to Carthage, Mo., and 
practicing there until his removal to Oregon 
in 1906. Practiced to date, in Portland, in 
partnership with B. M. Aistrop. Was City 
Attorney for Yates Centre, Kansas, and Pro- 
secuting Attorney, Woodson County, Kansas, 
1891-2. Deputy Prosecuting Attorney, Car- 
thage, Mo., 1903-4. Democrat. 

STURGES H. GREENE. 

Eesidence, St. 
Johns, Oregon; 
office, 253% Wash- 
ington street, Port- 
land, Oregon. Born 
February 13, 1850, 
in Adel, Dallas 
( 'ounty, Iowa. Son 
of Benjamin and 
Permelia C. (Stur- 
ges) Greene. Mar- 
ried July 3, 1887, 
to Lida C. Wright. 
Attended the pub- 
lic schools in Adel, 
and in 1868 and 
1869, the Normal 
School at Oswego, 
New York. Stu- 
died law with Gen- 
eral C. C. Nourse at Des Moines, Iowa, and 
entered the Law Department of Iowa State 
University in 1870 and graduated therefrom in 
1871 with the degree of LL. B. Was admitted 
by the Supreme Court of Iowa June 21, 1871, 
and by the -Supreme Court of Oregon in 1880, 
in which year he removed to this state. Was 
elected Mayor of Adel, Iowa, in 1874-79. 
Served as Justice of the Peace for Portland. 
Oregon, 1882-86, and was appointed City At- 
torney of St. Johns, Oregon, 1905-1907. He 
has been a recognized authority for the past 
twenty years, on the fish and game of the 
Northwest Coast. Is chairman of the Board 
of Directors School District No. 2, Multnomah 
County. Eepublican. 

THOMAS GABBERT GREENE. 

Eesidence. 337 Jessup street (Piedmont); 
office, 600-605 Hen-y building, Portland. Born, 
July 4, 1860, in Washington County, Indiana. 
Son of Philo and Sarah (Gabbert) Greene. 
Married Emma L. Hildebrand in 1890. Moved 
to Oregon in 1888, and in 1892 was admitted 
to the bar. Associated, from 1892 to 1894, 
with the firm of Cox, Teal & Minor. In 1895 
formed partnership with Cecil Bauer, under 
the firm name of Bauer & Greene, which part- 
nership continues to date. Democrat. 

FRANK HORACE GREENMAN. 

Eesidence, 828 High street; office Beckwith 
building, Eugene, Oregon. Born, June 23, 



1872, in Henderson County, Illinois. Son of 
Horace W. and Nancy (Eckley) Greenman. 
He attended the rural schools of Eingold 
County, working in various places meanwhile, 
finally taking an examination which he 
passed to teach school, which vocation he fol- 
lowed for some time. Finally entering the 
Western Normal College at Shenandoah, 




Iowa, where he stayed for two terms, receiv- 
ing the degree B. A., and a certificate for 
teachers' training course at that institution, 
then entering the Drake University in the 
Law Departement, where he attended for two 
years, graduating with the degree LL. D., re- 
turning to Eingold County, Iowa, following 
various pursuits, and on October 3, 1896, ad- 
mitted to the bar of the State of Missouri, 
and in 1897 admitted to practice in the State 
of Montana, where he practiced law until 
coming to Oregon. In 1908 admitted to the 
bar of Oregon, opening an office at Eugene, 
Oregon, where he follows the practice of his 
profession to date. Member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Py- 
thias, Yoeman, and Artisan fraternities. Ee- 
publican. 

FENTON EARL GRIGSBY. 

Eesidence, 713 East Couch street; office, 301 
Fenton building, Portland. Born, June 13, 
1883, in Dayton, Ohio. Son of Fenton and 
Agnes (Kemp) Grigsby. Eeceived his early 
education in public and high schools in Day- 
ton, Oh ; o. Graduated from University of 
Michigan in 1906 with degree of LL. B. Ad- 
mitted to the Supreme Court of Ohio in 1906, 
coming to Oregon in 1907, and admitted to 
the Supreme Court of Oregon in June, 1908. 
Has been associated with W. C. Bristol. Mem- 
ber University Club. Eepublican. 



144 




FRANKLIN T. GRIFFITH. 

Besidence, 679 
Elliott Ave., Port- 
land; office, Elec- 
tric building Port- 
land. Born, Feb- 
ruary 6, 1870, at 
Minneapolis, Min- 
nesota. Son of 
William A. and 
Hannah (Keefe) 
Griffith. Married 
July 15, 1896, to 
Etta Pope. At- 
tended the public 
and Higb Schools 
of Oakland, Cali- 
fornia, graduating 
therefrom in 1886, 
and the Oakland 
Academy, from 

which he graduated in 1889. Came to Oregon 
in 1891. Pursued the study of law in Cali- 
fornia and Oregon prior to his admission to 
the bar of Oregon in Octobor, 1894, and com- 
menced the practice of his profession at Oregon 
City, where he remained until his removal to 
Portland. Formed a partnership with E. F. 
Driggs in 1894, under the firm name of Driggs 
& Griffith. Upon its dissolution in January, 

1895, he formed a partnership with J. E. 
Hedges at Oregon City, and the same con- 
tinued until 1908. 'Came !to Portland in 
March, 1909, and began the practice of his 
profession in this city. Is Counsel for the 
Willamette Pulp & Paper Co., Crown, Colum- 
bia Pulp & Paper Co., Lebanon Paper Co., and 
Chas. K. Spalding Logging Co. Is Associate 
General Counsel for Portland Railway, Light 
& Power Co. Was City Attorney for Oregon 
City, 1894-95-96-98-1905, and Deputy District 
Attorney for the Fifth Judicial District in 

1896. Member Arl'ngton, Portland Commer- 
cial, Waverly Golf, Republican Clubs of Port- 
land, Illihee Club of Salem, and Oregon City 
Commercial Club. Republican. 

JAMES HARRISON GUERRY. 

Residence, North Bend, Oregon; officej 
rooms 1-2, First National Bank build- 
ing. Born in Quitman County, near George- 
town, State of Georgia, on December 18, 1850. 
Son of Theodore Legrand Guerry and Martha 
(Harrison) Guerry. Received an education in 
private schools and by private tutors in Quit- 
man County, Georgia, and was admitted to 
the bar in 1870, after studying law in the of- 
fices of Goneke & Guerry, at Georgetown, Ga. 
Was married to Helen Goode in 1875. After 
liis admission to the bar, opened an office at 
Georgetown, Ga. In 1873 was elected to the 
Georgia Legislature and served one term. In 
1875 he moved to Dawson, Georgia, where he 
continued the practice of his profession. Was 
elected and served two terms as Mayor of 
Dawson, Georgia. In 1880 he was elected by 
the Georgia legislature as Solicitor General of 



the Superior Courts of the Pataula Circuit 
Court, serving two terms, being re-elected in 
1884. He declined re-election for third term 
In 1889 he was elected as Judge of the Pataula 
Circuit, to fill an unexpired term of two years. 
In 1891 he was re-elected by the Legislature 
for the full term of four years. In 




1894 he resigned his office to take the posi- 
tion as Division Counsel with the Central Rail- 
road and Banking Company of Georgia, which 
position he retained until removing to San 
Francisco, California, in 1898. Admitted to 
the bar of California in 1902 and commenced 
the practice of his profession in that state. 
In 1894 he came to Coos County, Oregon, to 
try cases in which he had been employed and 
was so impressed with the possibilities of this 
state, that he decided to make it his home, 
and was admitted to practice in all Courts of 
Oregon, and has ever since been resident of 
,aid state and is now practicing law in North 
Bend, Oregon, in partnership with Fred Hoi- 
lister. Served in the Georgia National Guard 
of Georgia, entering as a private and finally 
receiving a commission as Major of the 
Fourth Regiment of said state. Mem- 
ber of the North Bend Commercial 
Club and A. F. & A. M., K. P., and 
Royal Arcanum fraternities. Republican. 

SHERMAN H. HAINES. 

Residence, 609 East Stark street; office. 531 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born, October 12, 1866, in Christian County. 
Illinois. Son of Fletcher and Lydia A. (An- 
derson) Haines. Married December 23, 1888, 
to Henrietta L. Kauerauf. Educated at the 
High School at Ann Arbor, Michigan. From 
1885 to 1887 at the Law School, Ann Arbor, 



I O G R A P II I C A L 



145 




Michigan. Attended the Wesleyan Uni- 
versity at Bloomington, Illinois, from 
which institution he graduated. Was ad- 
mitted to practice at Mt. Vernon, Illinois, 
May 5, 1888. Moved to Oregon June 3, 1892, 
and was admitted to the bar at Salem, Ore- 
gon, the same year. City Attorney of Taylor- 
vine, Illinois, 1889-1890. Bepublican. 

WILLIAM GREENE HALE. 

Residence, 127 
East Thirtieth St.; 
office, 207 Chamber 
of Commerce build- 
ing, Portland. 
Born, October 30, 
1881, at Hillsboro, 
Oregon. Son of 
Grenville N. and 
Emma Nettie 
(Vite) Hale. Mar- 
ried November 2, 
1907, to Jessie Mc- 
Connell. Received 
his early education 
at the g r a m m e r 
schools, Cornelius, 
Oregon, and also 
at Hillsboro, Ore- 
gon. In 1897, en- 
tered the Tualatin Academy at Forest Grove, 
Oregon, graduating in June, 1900. In Sep- 
tember of the same year entered the Pacific 
University at Forest Grove, graduating in 
June, 1903, with B. S. degree. Entered the 
Law Department of Harvard University in 
1903, and graduated in 1906, with LL. B. de- 
gree. Admitted to the bar at Salem in Oc- 
tober, 1906. Entered the office of Gammons 
& Malarkey, Portland, Oregon, in December, 
1906, and remained there until March, 1907, 
when he formed a partnership with Henrv 
McConnell, under the firm name of Hale & 
McConnell. This partnership dissolved Sep- 
tember 15, 1909. upon his appointment as a 
member of the faculty of the Law School of 
the University of Illinois, which position he 
holds to date. Also Secretary of the Law 
School. President Alumni Association Pacific 
University. Member Phi Delta Phi fraternity. 
Republican. 

JOHN H. HALL. 

Residence, 861 Lovejoy street; office, 801-8 
Chamber of Convr-erce building, Portland. 
Born, July 17. 1855. in Multnomah County. 
Oregon. Son of Benjamin F. and Emily M 
(Hicklin 1 ) Hall. Married December 25, 1895, 
to Jessie E. Belcher. Attended public 
schools. Lafayette Academy and the Portland 
Hisrh School. Admitted to the bar at Salem 
October, 1887. Member of Oregon Legisla- 
ture, from Multnomah County, 1891. Member 
Commercial Club. Republican. 

JOHN FRANKLIN HALL. 

Residence and office, Marshfield, Ore. Born 
in Polk County, Ore., October 16, 1856. Son 



of William and Martha Jane (Cox) Hall. 
Married to Mary E. Strickling, July 27, 1892. 
Attended common school in Polk County, Ore- 
gon; private instructors in Coos County. Ad- 




mitted to Supreme Court of Oregon, October, 
1887, at Salem, Oregon. United States Dis- 
trict and Circuit Court for District of Oregon, 
February, 1909. County Surveyor of Coos 
County, Oregon, from 1882-1886. Elected 
County Judge, Coos County, June, 1906. Mem- 
ber I. O. O. F., K. of P., Masons, and A. O. 
U. W. Democrat. 

JAMES THOMAS HALL. 

Residence, 994 Commercial Ave.; office, El- 
dorado Block, Marshfield. Born, January 2, 
1859, near Dallas, Polk County, Oregon. Son 
of William and Martha Jane (Cox) Hall. 
Married August 6, 1892, to Alice Jane Stauff. 
Attended rural school in Polk County for a 
period of three months, after which he re- 
moved with his parents to a ranch in Jose- 
phine County, remaining there for two years, 
then removing to a place known as Rock 
Creek. After remaining there for three years 
removed to a farm at what is now known as 
Flagstaff, about 2% miles south of Marshfield, 
Oregon. Worked on a farm several years, for 
the Libby Coal Mine 'Co., Coos County, Ore- 
gon, in various logging camps and saw mills 
until 1878, when he located at Drain, Oregon, 
and worked in a logging camp there for one 
year. He then returned to Marshfield and 
worked in several logging camps until 1881, 
when he was appointed Deputy Sheriff under 
Col. John Lane. Served for two years, after 
which he again engaged in logging and saw 
mill business for a period of five years, when 
he received commission as master and pilot of 
steam vessels and followed the business until 



146 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



1894. Was then appointed Deputy Collector 
of Customs at the Port of Coos Bay, Oregon. 
During these years had studied law, and was 
admitted to the bar of Oregon in July, 1896. 




In January, 1899, formed partnership with his 
brother, John F. Hall, at Marshfield, under 
the firm name of Hall & Hall, which exists to 
date. Past member O. N. GL, Exempt Firemen 
of Marshfield. Member of Masonic, Eastern 
Star, K. of P., A. O. U. W. fraternities, and 
Ko-Keel Club of Coquille, Oregon. Chairman 
Central Democratic Committee of Coos 
County. 

ALFRED AUBERT HAMPSON. 

Eesidence, 827 Quimby street; office, 501 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born, October 10, 1882, in Washington, D. C. 
Son of Thomas and Martha Eogers (Hale) 
Hampson. Educated Central High School of 
Washington, D. C., and graduated from same 
June, 1900. Attended Leland Stanford Ju- 
nior University, and received degree A. B. 
Moved to Oregon April, 1906, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in June of that year. Be- 
came associated with Frederick V. Holman, 
September, 1906, which continues to date. 
Member of the University Club. Democrat. 

HERBERT KENNEDY HANNA. 

Eesidence, Jacksonville; office, Farmers & 
Fruitgrowers Bank. Born at Jacksonville, 
Oregon. Son of H. K. and Helena (Hesse) 
Hanna. Attended the common school at 
Jacksonville, Oregon, the High School 
at Oakland, California, entering St. 
Mary's College at Oakland, California, 
in 1898, graduating in 1903, with A. B. 
degree. Eeturned to Jacksonville and 



studied law in his father's office, being ad- 
mitted to the bar of Oregon in 1906, and en- 
tering into partnership with his father in 
1910, which partnership continues to date. 
Eepublican. 

HIERO K. HANNA. 

Eesidence and office, Jacksonville, Oregon. 
Born, May 22, 1832, in Steuben County, New 
York. Son of Alexander and Fannie (Pier) 
Hanna. Attended public schools in his na- 
tive town until fourteen years of age, when 
he entered dry goods store as salesman. In 
3848 removed to Wayne County, Ohio, where 
he was employed in recorder's office. In 
1850 moved to California, and in 1858, to Jo- 
sephine County, Oregon, where he worked as 
a miner, devoting his spare time to the study 
of law. In 1872 was admitted to the bar of 
the State of Oregon. Elected Deputy 
Prosecuting Attorney and was re-elected in 
1874 and 1876. In '1878 was appointed Cir- 
cuit Judge of the First Judicial District, 
which he represented until 1890, when he was 
re-elected and served until 1894. Past Mas- 
ter Workman of A. O. U. W., and Past Sachem 
of I. O. E. M. Member Oregon Historical 
Society. 

AUSTIN S. HAMMOND. 

Eesidence and office, Coquille, Oregon. Born 
in Independence, Iowa, February 16, 1857. 
Son of James M. and Harriet (Davis) Ham- 




mond. Married on November 18, 1903, to 
Charity E. Maldonado. Attended Upper Iowa 
University at Fayette, Iowa, and Western 
College at Western, Iowa, later studying law 
with D. W. Bruckart at Independence, Iowa. 
Admitted to the bar at Independence, Iowa, 
in 1878. Commenced the practice of law at 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



147 




Olewein, Iowa, removed to Dakota City, Iowa, 
and later to Minneapolis, Minn. Came to 
Oregon in 1889, locating at Ashland, thence to 
Coos Co., in 1906. Member A. F. & A. M., and 
B. P. O. E. President Ko-Keel Club, Coquille, 
Oregon. Eepublican. 

BERT EMERY HANEY. 

Residence, 483 
East Fifteenth 
street; office, 508 
Corbett building, 
Portland. Born 
April 10, 1879, at 
Lafayette, Oregon. 
Son of John and 
Mary (H arris) 
Haney. Married 
November 21, 
1906, to Jessie A. 
Holmes. Educated 
at the Lafayette 
public schools at 
Lafayette, Oregon, 
and the Willam- 
ette TI n i v ersity, 
Salem, Oregon. 
Law Department 

of the University of Oregon at Port- 
land. Admitted to the bar by the 
Supreme Court of Oregon May 28, 

1903. Associated with W. D. Fenton, Port- 
land, Oregon, from June 1, 1903, to June 1, 

1904. Deputy District Attorney of the Fourth 
Judicial District, July 1, 1904, to July 1, 1908. 
On this date formed partnership with George 
W. Joseph, under the firm name of Joseph & 
Haney, which still continues. Was Secretary 
of the 'City and County Democratic Central 
Committee from 1904 to 1907. Democrat. 

ANDREW HANSEN. 

Residence. 426 Fourth street; office, 322-23 
Alisky building, Portland. Born, March 3, 
1875, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Son of Pete? 
and Annie (Mulgrew) Hansen. Came to Ore- 
gon in 1888. Attended public school in Kan- 
sas, Idaho, and later in Oregon. Also at- 
tended the Oregon Agricultural College in 
1896-7-8. Fnl's+pd in Company K, Second 
Petriment Oregon Volunteer Infantry, in 

1898, and served in the Spanish-American war 
in the Philippine Islands during the years 
1898-1899. Mustered out of service in August, 

1899. Attended the Law Department of the 
University of Oregon in 1906 and 1907, when 
he entered the Oregon Law College, from 
which he received degree of LL. B. the same 
year. Admitted to the bar at Salem, June 
18, 1907, and to the United States Circuit and 
District Courts, in 1909. Republican. 

ISAAC N. HARBAUGH. 

Residence and office, Eugene, Oregon. Born 
at Boxley Town, Hamilton County, Indiana, 
October 1, 1853. Son of James L. Harbaugh 
and Elizabeth J. (Dillar) Harbaugh. Moved 



with parents at an early age to Brighton, 
Washington County. Iowa, where he attended 
the common schools. In 1881 entered the law 
office of R. S. Mills at Brighton, Iowa, where 
he studied law for a period of about two 
years, after which he entered the Iowa City 
Law School at Iowa City, Iowa, from which 
he graduated in the spring of 1883 with the 
degree of LL. B., being admitted to the bar 
of the State of Iowa, June 19, 1883, when <he 
then opened a co-partnership with Edward 
Deeds at Brighton. Iowa, which continued for 
about one year, and in 1887 moved to Chadron, 
Dawes County, Nebraska, where he was ad- 
mitted to practice in all courts and formed 
a partnership with George A. Eckles, which 
continued for two years, after which he prac- 
ticed by himself, being elected County At- 
torney in 1892 for Dawes County, Nebraska, 
which office he held for two terms. In June, 
1899, came to Eugene, Oregon, where he 
opened an office by himself and so practiced 
until the fall of 1899, when he went in part- 
nership with Charles M. Kissinger, which con- 
tinued until the spring of 1902, when he 
formed a partnership with D. B. Jenckes, 
which continued for two years, after which he 
formed a partnership with John H. Bower, 
which continued for one year, since whieh he 
has practiced alone. 

WILLIAM GILMAN HARE. 

Residence and office, Hillsboro, Oregon. 
Born in Farmington, Oregon, April 19, 1882. 
Son of William Davenport and Henrietta 




(Scholfield) Hare. Married November 25, 
1906, to Jane M. Greer. Received his early 
education in public schools of Hillsboro, Ore. 
Attended Tualatin Academy in 1900; grad- 
uated from Pacific University with degree of 



148 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



B. K, 'in 1903, and from Universtiy of Mich- 
igan in 1906, with degree of LL. B. Admitted 
to *the bar at Salem, Oregon, August 21, 1907, 
and formed partnership with Geo. E. Bagley, 
Hillsboro, Ore., which continues to date. 
Member of Masonic fraternity, K. of P. and 
I. O. O. F. Bepublican. 

CHARLES A. HARDY. 

Eesidence, Eugene; office, First National 
Bank Building. Born, March 27, 1874. Son 
of Albert and Cordelia (Kromer) Hardy. 
Married ETiima Dorris in September, 1906. 
Attended the common and High Schools of 
La Crosse, Wisconsin, and later a law school 
at the same place, graduating therefrom in 
1896 with LL. B. degree. Came to Oregon 
in 1897, and opened an office at Eugene, being 
admitted to practice in Oregon in 1897. Mem- 
ber B. P. O. E. fraternity. Bepublican. 

FREDERICK EVERETT HARLOW. 

Eesidenee, Troutdale, Oregon; office, same. 
Born, March 13, 1872, at Portland, Oregon. 
Son of John and Celeste Harlow. Married 
October 25. 1893, to M. Lucile Foreman. Ed 
ucated in the public schools of Portland, at 
the Portland Business College, and at the 
University of Oregon, from which he grad- 
uated in 1896, with degree of LL. B. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem. Served nine and 
one-half years in Oregon National Guard, be- 
ing Second Lieutenant Co. H., First Eegiment. 
Was Deputy Clerk Circuit Court under D. J. 
Moore. Member of Ancient Order of For- 
esters. Eepublican. 

LAWRENCE T. HARRIS. 

Eesidence, 181 
W. Fifth street; 
office, Court House, 
Eugene. Born, 
S e p t e m b er 13, 
1873, at Albany, 
Oregon. Appointed 
Circuit Judge for 
Second Judicial 
District, February, 

1905, and re- 
elected in June, 

1906, which office 
he holds to date. 

STEPHEN R. HARRINGTON. 

Eesidence, 547 Hoyt street; office, 18-19 
Mulkey building, Portland. Born in Wash- 
ington County, New York, May 12, 1837. 
Son of Andrew and Lydia (Harris) Harring 
ton. Married October 19, 1869, to Margarita 
France. Early education was received in the 
common schools of New York and during the 




year of 1859 attended the Ottumwa Colleg3 
at Ottumwa, Kansas. Was admitted to the 
bar at Burlington, Kansas, September 29, 1865, 
Washington, D. C., Supreme Court of the Dis- 
trict on November 5, 1867. Little Bock, Ar- 
kansas, in November, 1869. Washington, D. 
., Supreme Court of the United States, Feb- 
ruary 1, 1871. At Salem, Oregon, 1881, on his 
arrival in this state. From 1871 to 1876 was 
United States District Attorney of the Eastern 
District of Arkansas. From 1881 to 1884 was 
City Attorney at East Portland. Lieutenant, 
Adjutant, Captain, and Major,, in the Fifth 
Eegiment, Kansas Cavalry. Served from July 
14, 1861, to January 10, 1865. Was Colonel in 
Arkansas Militia from June 1873 to June, 
1875. Member of the Oregon Legislature for 
the Sessions of 1877 and 1889. Independent. 

JULIUS NEWTON HART. 
Eesidence, Baker City, Oregon; office, same. 
Born, May 13, 1869, in Wayne County, Illi- 
nois. Son of John S. and Minerva J. (Neal) 
Hart. Married December 21, 1890, to Irene 
Dempsey. Educated in the public schools of 
Illinois. Came to Oregon in 1885, and finished 




his common school education in this state. 
Attended La Creole Academic Institute at 
Dallas, Oregon, in 1886-7. State Normal School, 
Monmouth, 1887-8. La Creole Academic In- 
stitute, 1888-9, graduating in June, 1889. At- 
tended Law Department University of Oregon, 
1891-92. Admitted to Oregon bar in Novem- 
ber, 1895, and practiced alone at Dallas, Ore- 
gon, until 1900, when he formed a partner- 
ship with James H. Townsend, under the firm 
name of Townsend & Hart, which lasted until 
1902. Practiced alone. 1902-1904, when he 
moved to Baker City and formed a partner- 
ship with William Smith, under the firm name 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



140 



of Hart & Smith, which lasted until 1906. 
Then formed partnership with James H. 
Nichols, under the firm name of Hart & 
Nichols, which lasts to date. Was School 
Superintendent Polk County, 1896 to 1900. 
District Attorney Third Judicial District, 1900 
to 1904. Presidential Elector in 1904. State 
Senator, Baker County, 1906 to 1910. Member 
Oregon Conservat : on Commission, 1908. Re 
appointed, 1909. Eepublican. 

EDWARD HENRY HARTWIG. 

Residence, 414 Montello avenue; office, 
Smith block, Hood River. Born November 8, 
1874, at Waukeshon, .Shawano County, Wis- 
consin. Son of William and Maria (Neuman) 
Hartwig. Married December 12, 1909, to 
Ethel M. Entrican. Graduated from Shawano 
High School in 1896; read law two years; 
entered Northern Indiana Law School and 
graduated in 1900 with degree of LL. B. 
Admitted to practice in the State of Indiana 
in May, 1900, and to the Circuit Court of 
United States in the same year. Came to 
Oregon in 1901 and was admitted to the 
bar here in November, 1902. Went to Hood 
River in 1903 and has practiced there since. 
Deputy District Attorney under Hon. Frank 
Menefee and Hon. Fred Wilson, since 1905. 
Member United Artisans, I. O. O. F. frater- 
nities. Vice-President Hood River Commer- 
cial Club, Secretary Hood River Merchants' 
Association. Member Hood River University 
Club. Republican. 

GEORGE WESLEY HAYES. 

Residence and office, Vale, Oregon. Born 
in Marion County, Iowa, March 2, 1859. Son 





of Cyrus and Julia Ann (Duncan) Hayes. 
Came to Oregon in September, 1862. Mar- 



ried to Etta E. Horton, May 6, 1904. At- 
tended the common schools of Lane County, 
Oregon, until the age of thirteen. Read law 
with C. A. Sweek and Thornton Williams in 
Harney City, Oregon. Was admitted to the 
bar at Pendleton, Oregon, May 9, 1891. 
Register of the United States Land Office at 
Burns, Oregon, from June, 1898, to March, 

1902. Organized first Republican Club in 
Harney County. Member of Vale Republican 
Club and Commercial Club. 

WALTER GLENN HAYES. 

Residence, 987 
East Main street; 
offices, 513-34 Fen- 
ton building, Port- 
land, Oregon. Born 
June 28, 1873, at 
Eugene City, Ore- 
gon. Son of Mr. 
Henry Taylor and 
Hannah Gertrude 
(Mulkey) Hayes. 
Married July 20, 
1904, to Miss Bes- 
sie Gertrude Ma- 
thers. Attended 
public schools at 
Woodburn, Ore- 
gon, graduating 
from the same in 
1890, then attend- 
ing the high school at Oregon City, Oregon, 
graduating from the same in 1893, then study- 
ing law in the offices of Dimick & Porter 
at Oregon City, Oregon, for four years, pur- 
suing his studies at the Portland Law School 
meanwhile. Admitted to the bar at Salem, 
Oregon, October 11, 1897, then in the office 
of Dolph, Mallory & Simon during 1902 and 

1903. In 1904 formed a partnership with 
Ernest Brand, Jr., practicing together until 
1907, since which time has been practicing 
alone. Three years a member of the Oregon 
National Guard, serving in various offices. 
Member of the W. O. W. Republican. 

GORDON E. HAYES. 

Residence, Oregon City, Oregon; office, 
same. Born March 27, 1859, at Oregon City. 
Son of Henry E. and Sarah A. (Woodruff) 
Hayes. Educated at the Pacific University, 
Forest Grove, Oregon, 1876-7. Admitted to 
the bar in 1884 and has practiced his pro- 
fession continuously since that time, in Ore- 
gon City. Has served as State Senator and 
as County Judge of Clackamas County. Mem- 
ber of Commercial Club, of K. of P. and Elks 
fraternities. Republican. 

DANIEL J. HAYNES. 

Residence, 567% Glisan street; office, 402 
Commercial block, Portland. Born July 29, 
1844, in Warren County, Kentucky. Son of 
James and Susan Le Munyan (Rhodes) 
Haynes. Married December 13, 1871, to 
Cornelia C. Allington. Attended the public 



150 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



schools in Warren County, Kentucky, and 
later Warren College at Bowling Green, Ken- 
tucky. Was admitted to the bar in Flor- 
ence, Alabama, October 19, 1874, meantime 
practicing in Colorado, Illinois and New York 
City. Moved to the State of Oregon Novem- 
ber 30, 1905. Admitted to the bar in Salem, 
Oregon, March 8, 1906. Republican. 

OSCAE HAYTER. 

Residence and office, Dallas, Oregon. Born 
December 3, 1873, in Polk County, Oregon. 
Son of Thomas J. and Mary I. (Embree) 
Hayter. Married July 20, 1904, to Bertha 
L. Fuller. Educated in district schools of 
Polk County and later at the La Creole 




Academy, Dallas, Oregon, from which insti- 
tution he graduated in 1890. Read law in 
the office of Daly, Sibley & Eakin, of 
Dallas, and was admitted to the bar of 
Oregon, at Salem, October 9, 1895. Com- 
menced the practice of his profession at 
Dallas, in partnership with John J. Daly, 
which continued until 1900, since when he 
has practiced alone. Member Masonic frater- 
nity. Democrat. 

GEORGE WINTERMTJTE HAZEN. 
Residence, 751 Weidler street; office, 609 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born February 26, 1852, at Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania. Son of David H. and Sarah J. 
(Ewing) Hazen. Married October 31, 1883, 
to Belle L. Todd. Educated at Pittsburg 
High School and Newall's Institute of Pitts- 
burgh and C.entral University of Iowa. In 
December, 1876, he was admitted to the bar 
at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. In 1890 he 
came to Portland to help organize the 
United States National Bank of this 



city, and was Assistant Cashier of the 
same. In 1892 he resumed the practice 
of law, to which he now devotes his time 
to all its departments except Criminal Law. 
Served five years as Lieutenant-Colonel on 
Governor George E. Chamberlain's staff and 
a short time on the staff of Governor Ben- 
son. Served, three years on Board of Gov- 
ernors of the Portland Commercial Club. 
Member of the Masonic and Royal Arcanum 
fraternities. Is now Deputy Supreme Regent 
of the Royal Arcanum. 

EDWIN E. HECKBERT. 

Residence, 684 Everett street; office, 716 
Board of Trade building, Portland. Born 
August 16, 1871, at Woburn, Massachusetts. 
Son of John William and Frances Claire 
McLeod. Married January 8, 1900, to Georgia 
B. Richardson. Education received at the 
common schools of Massachusetts: at Woburn 




High School, from which he graduated in 
1889. Attended Boston University, 1889-1893, 
from which he graduated in 1893 with A. B. 
degree. Took special courses in Harvard and 
Boston Universities, in Law, and continued 
the study of law in the office of Judge S. C. 
Stout, Portland, Maine, until 1894. Admitted 
to the bar of the State of Maine at Portland 
in October, 1894, and also to Massachusetts 
bar. Practiced in Maine and Massachusetts 
until 1906, when he removed to Oregon, and 
was admitted to the bar of this state. Mem- 
ber Masonic fraternity. Republican. 

GILBERT LAWRENCE HEDGES. 

Residence, High street, near Sixth; office, 
Weinhard building, Oregon City, Oregon. 
Born January 19, 1874, at Canemah, Oregon. 
Son of Joseph and Ellen Judith (Allen) 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



151 



Hedges. Married October 3, 1904, to Dorothy 
H. Chase. Educated at the public schools of 
Clackamas County, Oregon; attended Phillips 
Academy, Andover, Massachusetts, for three 
years; entered Yale University in the fall of 
1902, graduating in 1906 with A. B. degree. 
Two years later graduated from law depart- 
ment of the same university with LL. B. 
degree. Admitted to the bar of Oregon in 
October, 1908. Member of (Lower iHouse 
Oregon Legislature 1901. District Attorney 
Fifth Judicial District 1907-8. Democrat. 

JOSEPH EUGENE HEDGES. 

Eesidence, 510 Adams street; office, Wein- 
hard building, Oregon City. Born June 2, 
1864, at Canemah, Oregon. Son of Joseph 
and Ellen Judith (Allen) Hedges. Married 
June 7, 1894, to Lillian Bray. Until sixteen 
years of age attended the public schools at 




Canemah and Oregon City, then spent two 
years at the Bishop Scott Grammar School in 
Portland. For five years taught in the above 
named grammar school, and then entered the 
Academic Department of Yale University at 
New Haven, Connecticut, graduating from 
same in 1891 with A. B. degree. Admitted 
to the bar at Salem June 2, 1892. Imme- 
diately became member of the firm of 
O'Neill, Hedges & Thompson, which lasted 
two years, when Franklin T. Griffith was ad- 
mitted to the firm, the name then being, 
O'Neill, Hedges, Thompson & Griffith. In 
1895 the firm became Hedges & Griffith and 
since 1908 has practiced alone. State Sena- 
tor from district composed of Clackamas 
County from 1906 to 1911. Member Univer- 
sity Club of Portland. Democrat. 



JOSEPH JACOB HEILNER. 

Eesidence, Baker City, Oregon; office, 
same. Born July 9, 1877, at Portland, Ore- 
gon. Son of Sigmund A. and Clara (Neu- 
berger) Heilner. Educated at the public 
schools of Baker City, Oregon, at The Bishop 
Scott Academy, Portland, Oregon, and iu the 
Legal Department of the University of Ore- 
gon, from which he graduated in June, 1896, 
with degree of LL. B. Admitted to the bar 
of Oregon at Salem July 13, 1898, having 
taken and passed his examinations before the 
Supreme Court in 1896, but lacking two 
years of having attained the age of ma- 
jority. Was City Attorney of Baker City 
for six years, from 1901 to 1907. Eepublican. 

JAMES G. HELTZEL. 

Eesidence, 640 North Summer street; 
office, 11-12 Bush-Breyman building, Sa- 




lem. Born December 14, 1880, at Colfax, 
Washington. Son of Martin L. and Melinda 
A. (Kelly) Heltzel. Married June 16, 1906, 
to Clara A. Holmstrom. Early education re- 
ceived at country school in Washington, and 
later at the public schools of Colfax, Wash- 
ington, and at Echo, Oregon. Attended high 
school at Portland for one year. In 1902 
read law in office of George S. Shepherd at 
Portland, and in 1903 entered Willamette 
University, graduating in 1908 with B. S. 
degree. Began the study of law at the Wil- 
lamette University in 1905, and in 1907 re- 
ceived LL. B. degree. Admitted to the bar 
at Salem in June, 1907. Practices his pro- 
fession in partnership with E. C. Glover, 
under the firm name of Heltzel & Glover, in 
Salem. Eepublican. 



152 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



FRANK D. HENNESSY. 

Eesidence, 410 
Thirteenth street; 
office, 701 Cham- 
ber of Commerce 
building, Portland. 
Born February 8, 
1866, at Portland, 
Oregon. Son of 
Patrick J. and Ann 
(Gftlvin) Hennes- 
sy. Married May 
7, 1900, to Therese 
Irene B e u t g e n . 
Educated at St. 
Michael's College 
(a private Catho- 
lic school of Port- 
land) from 1875 
to 1881; at the 
University of No- 
tre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana, from 
1891 to 1894, in which year he graduated 
with degree of LL. B. Admitted to the 
bar at Salem in October, 1894. From 
July, 1898 to 1900, was Municipal Judge 
of Portland. Was Clerk of the Municipal 
Court 1905 to 1908 and then appointed Dep- 
uty District Attorney, which office he holds 
to date. Life member of B. P. O. E., Ancient 
Order of Hibernians and Catholic Order or 
Foresters. Kepublican. 

JOHN LELAND HENDERSON 

Eesidence, State street; office, 190 Second 
street, Hood River. Oregon. Born September 





11, 1851, at Boston, Massachusetts. Son of 
John and Katherine (Leland) Henderson. 
Married Margaret E. Newell September 1, 



1909. Received his education at the Jesuit 
College, New Orleans, Louisiana, and the 
public high school at the same place up to 
1867. Attended Miles Military School, Brat- 
tleboro, Vermont, 1877, 1878 and 1879. En- 
tered Cornell University in the fall of 1879, 
and after passing examinations for sopho- 
more class, left college and came to Oregon. 
Admitted to the bar at Bay St. Louis, 
Mississippi, in August, 1893. Admitted to 
practice in Supreme Court of Oregon in 1898, 
United States District Court of same state 
in 1901 at Portland. Admitted to practice in 
the State of Washington in 1903. Has held 
office as County Surveyor, Justice of the 
Peace, City Engineer. Taught sixteen years 
in public schools and academies in Oregon 
and California. Member of Oregon and 
American Bar Associations. Member Hood 
River Commercial Club, Hood River Univer- 
sity Club, Hood River Bar Association, of 
Masonic, K. of P. and I. O. O. F. fraterni- 
ties. Republican. 

BINGER HERMANN. 

Residence and office, Roseburg, Oregon. 
Born February 19, 1843, at Lonaconning, 
Allegheny County, Maryland. Son of Doctor 
Henry and Elizabeth (Hopkins) Hermann. 
Educated at the district schools of Maryland 
and at Independent Academy, near Balti- 
more. Moved to Oregon in 1859 and first 
taught school at Canyonville, Oregon. Ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1866 and commenced 
the practice of his profession at Roseburg. 
Was a member of the State Legislature in 
1866 and of the Senate from 1868 to 1871. 
Was appointed as United States Land Com 
missioner in 1871 and served until 1873. In 
1885 again became a member of Congress and 
served until 1897. From 1897 to 1903 was 
again United States Land Commissioner. 
June 1, 1903, he was elected to the Fifty- 
eighth Congress and was re-elected to ihe 
Fifty-ninth Congress, serving from 1905 to 
1907. Republican. 

ELBERT B. HERMANN. 

Residence and office, Roseburg, Oregon. 
Born November 3, 1884, at Roseburg, Oregon. 
Son of Binger and Flora A. (Tibbetts) Her 
mann. Married October 24, 1906, to Ruth M. 
Hamilton. Attended public and high schools 
at Washington, D. C., and took law course 
in the George Washington University at the 
same place. Admitted to the bar at Salem in 
1905. Located in Roseburg in November, 
1905, and has practiced there continuously 
since. Appointed Deputy Prosecuting Attor- 
ney for Douglas County July 1, 1908, and 
still serves under the appointment. Ap- 
pointed City Treasurer of Roseburg in 1906. 
Elected City Treasurer of same city in Octo- 
ber, 1907. and re-elected in 1909 for a term 
of two years. Republican. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



153 




PHILIP HERZ. 

Residence, 910 
East Flanders 
street; office, 7 
First street, Port- 
land. Born, Feb- 
ruary 21, 1880, in 
Titusville, Penn- 
sylvania. Son of 
Gustave and Julia 
(Simons) H e r z. 
Moved to Oregon 
September, 1890, 
and was educated 
in the public 
schools, later 
graduating from 
the high school in 
June, 1898. He 
attended the Uni- 
versity of Oregon 

Law Department and graduated with the 
degree of LL. B. May, 1901. Admitted to 
the bar in Salem, Oregon, May, 1901. Mem- 
ber of Multnomah Bar Association, Oregon 
State and American Bar Associations. Demo- 
crat. 

FRANK CHARLES HESSE. 

Kesidence, 989 
Savier street; of- 
fice, 212-214 Fen- 
ton building, Port- 
land. Born in Leip- 
zig, Germany, Oc- 
tober 3, 1883. Son 
of Franz and 
E m i 1 i e Zieger- 
Friedel Hesse. Ed- 
ucated in Leipzig 
and Halle, Ger- 
many, until 1899, 
in September of 
which year he 
passed the exami- 
nation of the 
Royal Board of 
Examiners and re- 
ceived a degree 

equal to A. B. From 1903 to 1904 he studied 
privately in Paris, France. In 1904 he came 
to the United States and entered the Uni- 
versity of Missouri, where he attended the 
law department for three years, graduating 
in 1907 with the degree of LL. B. In June, 
1907, he was admitted to the bar of Missouri. 
The same year he was admitted to the bar 
of Montana. On October 25 he arrived in 
Oregon and was admitted to the bar at 
Salem, Oregon. Member of Askania and 
Hermanduria of Halle, Germany, and Multno- 
mah Bar Association. 

HENRY H. HEWITT. 

Residence, Albany, Oregon; office, same. 
Born in Yam-hill County, Oregon, December 
7, 1846. Son of Henry and Elizabeth 




(Matheny) Hewitt. Received his preparatory 
education in the public school of Yamhill 
County, Oregon; entered the Willamette Uni- 
versity in September, 1865, and graduating in 
June, "1870, with degree of A. B. In 1872 was 
elected School Superintendent of Yamhill 
County, Oregon, serving one term, and in 1873 
received from the same university the de- 
gree of A. M.; in 1876 elected to a profes- 
sorship in the Albany College, at Albany, Ore- 
gon, and continued in that institution for 
three years; was admitted to the bar at 
Salem in December, 1877, and b?gan the prac- 
tice of law in June, 1879, and in 1882 ap- 
pointed by Governor Moody Swamp Land 
Commissioner for Oregon; was elected Dis- 
trict Attorney for the Third Judicial District 
for Oregon in June, 1888, serving one term, 
and in 1894 elected Circuit Judge of the same 
district and served one term. 

THEODORE JOHN HEWITT. 

Residence, Wood 
stock, Oregon; of- 
fice, 626 Henry 
building, Portland. 
Born August 17, 
1877, at Lexington, 
Nebraska. Son of 
Thomas Jefferson 
and Fanny A. 
(Rockwood) Hew- 
itt. Married in 
1905 to Laura M. 
Stratton. Gradu- 
ated from the high 
school of Lexing- 
ton, Nebraska, in 
1896; from the 
University of Ne- 
braska at Lincoln 
in 1901, with the 

degree of A. B., and from the Law Depart- 
ment of the above named university in 1903, 
with the degree of LL. B. Admitted to the 
bar of the State of Nebraska in 1903, to the 
State of Colorado in 1905, and came to Ore- 
gon in 1906, being admitted to the bar here 
the following year. Held commission as 
Lieutenant in Cadet Battalion. Retired as 
First Lieutenant of Nebraska National Guard. 
Member Phi Delta Theta and Phi Delta Phi 
fraternities. Republican. 

WILLIAM P. HIBBARD. 

Residence, Sixty-third and Siskiyou streets; 
office, room 9, Breeden building, Portland. Born 
October 8, 1873, at Jacksonport, Wis. Son 
of Perry G. and Johanna (Carmody) Hibbard. 
Married October 24, 1894, to Elizabeth Col- 
lins. Attended the common schools of Jack- 
sonport, Wisconsin, from 1879 to 1888. At- 
tended the University of Indianapolis at In- 
dianapolis, Indiana, from 1895 to 1897, when 
he graduated with the degree of LL. B. In 
1898 was admitted to the bar at Lansing, 
Michigan, and practiced in Escanaba, Miehi- 




154 



BIOGRAPHICAL 




gan, until 1902, when he went to Montana 
and later to Oregon. Was admitted to the 
bar at Salem, Oregon, in July, 1908, and 
began practice at Portland. Was not engaged 
in the practice of law from the fall of 1902 
until resuming practice again in Portland. 
Kepublican. * 

OLIVER M. HICKEY. 

Eesidence, 109 
Freemont street; 
office, 532 Worces- 
ter building, Port- 
land. Born in Port- 
land, Oregon, June 
21, 1881. Son of 
Francis P. and 
Margaret Hickey. 
Entered the Aca- 
demic Department 
of Albany College, 
Albany, Oregon, 
May 18, 1898, and 
entered Albany 
College proper in 
1901, graduating 
in 1905, taking the 
Classical course 
and securing the 

degree of Bachelor of Arts. Entered the 
Law Department of the University of Oregoji 
1905 and graduated 1907, in which year he 
was admitted to the bar of the State of 
Oregon. He received his education entirely 
through his own efforts, having worked his 
way through college and paid all his own 
expenses. He has been practicing law in 
Portland since his admission to the bar. Re- 
publican. 

CLAUDE EDWARD HICKS. 

Residence, 505 
Tacoma avenue; 
office, 507-8-9 Cor- 
bett building, 
Portland. Born 
November 15, 
1888, in Salem, 
Oregon. Son of 
Lucius J. and Ada 
R. (Snell) Hicks. 
Married October 
20, 1909, to Ethel 
N. McConnell. At- 
tended the Port- 
land public school 
1894 to 1902 and 
graduated there 
from. Later at- 
tended the Port- 
land High School 

and graduated in 1906. Attended the 
Law School of the University of Ore- 
gon, 1906 to 1909, and was admitted 
at Salem, Oregon, to the bar on June 
8, 1909. Did not commence the prac- 
tice of his profession until some months later, 




owing to his not being of age. Prior to his 
practicing law he was associated with the 
Hicks-Chatten Engraving Company. Member 
of the Legal Fraternity Phi Delta Phi, Re- 
publican Club of Sellwood and the Sellwood 
Commercial Club. Republican. 

GALE STOCKTON HILL. 

Residence, Albany, Oregon; office, same. 
Born in Linn County, Oregon, November 11, 
1877. Son of Dr. J. Linsey Hill and Mary 
(Pennington) Hill. Attended the public 
schools of Albany and graduated from Albany 
College in June, 1897, with the degree of 
A. B. In 1898 he began the study of law 
in the office of Weatherford & Wyatt, at 
Albany, Oregon, and continued his studies in 
that office until admitted to the bar in Octo- 
ber, 1900. He practiced law in Albany until 
June, 1901, when he became associated with 
his uncle, W. Lair Hill, at Oakland, Cali- 
fornia. He returned to Albany in June, 
1902, and opened an office and has since that 
date been engaged in practice at Albany. 
Since June, 1904, he has been Deputy Dis- 
trict Attorney for Linn County, which office 
he has held continuously up to date. Member 
of Elks, I. O. O. F. and K. of P. fraternities. 
Republican. 

CHARLES CRAWFORD HINDMAN. 

Residence, 706 Flanders street; office, 311 
Gerlinger building, Portland. Born July 10, 
1886, at Du Bois, Pennsylvania. Son of 
Charles Crawford and Florence (Taylor) 
Hindman. Came to Oregon in October, 1909. 
Attended the high school at Du Bois, Penn- 
sylvania, until 1903; the Bucknell Academy 
in 1904; Bucknell University in 1905 and the 
Law Department of the University of Penn- 
sylvania, graduating therefrom in 1909 with 
LL. B. degree. Admitted to the bar May 10, 
1909. Now associated with the firm of 
Magers & Johnston, Portland. Republican. 

ROBERT ELLIS HITCH. 

Residence, 446 Tenth street; office, 511 
Fenton building, Portland. Born in El Paso, 
Illinois, May 17, 1883. Son of Robert and 
Mary (Ellis) Hitch. Graduated from Jeffer- 
son Park High School, El Paso, Illinois, in 
1902. From the Morgan Park Academy of the 
University of Chicago, in 1903. Attended the 
University of Michigan and graduated in 
1907 with the degree of A. B. and in 1909 
with degree of LL. B. Admitted to the bar 
of the State of Michigan at Lansing, June 22, 
1909, and to the Oregon bar at Salem Novem- 
ber 15, 1909, in which year he moved to the 
state. Is now associated with the firm of 
Manning & White. 

JOHN SIMEON HODGIN. 

Residence, La Grande, Oregon; office, same. 
Born February 26, 1864, in North Carolina. 
Son of James Nelson and Martha E. (Russell) 
Hodgin. Was educated at Guilford College, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



155 



North Carolina. Came West in 1889 and 
entered the University of Oregon in 1890. 
Entered Pacific University in 1891 and gradu- 
ated in June of that year with degree of 
S. B. Pursued post - graduate studies in 
mathematics and astronomy in Stanford Uni- 
versity, California, in 1893 and 1894. En- 
tered the Lick Observatory and studied as- 
tronomy in 1894. Studied law with A. M. 
Crawford in Eoseburg, Oregon, in 1897 and 
in Portland and Salem the year following. 
Admitted to the bar at Salem in June, 1898, 
and practiced law at Enterprise from 1900 
to 1907, at which time he removed to La 
Grande and entered into partnership with 
Francis S. Ivanhoe, which partnership lasted 
until 1909, since when he 'has practiced alone. 
Member Pacific Astronomical Society of the 
Pacific and of American Society Social and 
Political Science. Democrat. 

FREDEEICK C. HOECKER. 

Eesidence, Garden Home, Oregon; office, 
Beck building, Portland, Oregon. Born April 
16, 1877. Son of Charles F. and Louise 
(Stewener) Hoecker. Eeceived his early edu- 
cation in the public schools of St. Louis, 
Missouri; came to Portland at the age of ten 
and attended public schools of this city, 
graduating from the high school in 1897. 
Entered the Law Department of the Univer 
sity of Oregon and graduated in 1899 with 
LL. B. degree. Admitted to the bar at Salem 
in February, 1899. Eepublican. 

JOHN N. HOFFMAN. 

Eesidence and office, Forest Grove, Ore- 
gon. Bora in Colfax, Indiana, on September 




25, 1857. Son of Absalom and Martha (Kious) 
Hoffman. Married Nettie Pittman in 1891. 



Educated at the public schools of Iowa and 
Missouri, and later attended the Shenandoah 
College, Shenandoah, Iowa, and the Chilli- 
cothe, Missouri, College. Eead law in the 
office of Askren & Spence, of Mt. Ayre, Iowa, 
and was admitted to the bar of Oregon in 
1896, having come to this state in 1889. 
Commenced the practice of law at Albany 
which continued until 1897, when he removed 
to Portland and practiced for a period of 
one year, finally locating in Forest Grove, in 
1898, and continued there to date. Eecorder 
of Forest Grove for two terms. Member of 
I. O. O. F. and W. O. W. fraternities. Ee- 
publican. 

FRED HOLLISTER. 

Eesidence and office, North Bend, Oregon. 
Born at Camp Baker, near Helena, Montana, 
August 29, 1871. Son of Colonel George 
Stanton Hollister and Philoclea Alston Hollis- 
ter. Early education received from par- 
ents. At about the age of ten entered 
Hills Military Academy at Eavenswood, 
Illinois, then entered the Morgan Park Mili- 
tary Academy at Morgan Park, Illinois; from 
there entered the St. Paul's Cathedral Acad- 
emy, a military institution, at Garden City, 
Long Island. From there studied one year 
at the Bethlehem High Schools at Bethlehem, 
Pennsylvania, and then spent one year in 
South Georgia Agricultural College, at 
Thomasville, Georgia. From there entered 
and was graduated at the high school of 
Benton Harbor, Michigan. In the fall of '87 
entered Lehigh University. In the spring 
of 1902, April, was admitted to the 
Circuit Court of the United States, at 
Indianapolis, Indiana. Coming to Oregon in 
1903, formed a law partnership with Judge 
J. H. Guerry, which still continues, at North 
Bend, Oregon. Member B. P. O. E., Hoo- 
Hoos, I. 0. O. F. fraternities. Democrat. 

FREDERICK VAN VOORHIES HOLMAN. 

Eesidence, 500 Taylor street; office, 501- 
506 Chamber of Commerce building, Portland, 
Oregon. Born Pacific County, then Oregon 
Territory, now State of Washington, August 
29, 1852. Son of James Duval and Eachel 
Hixson (Summers) Holman. Educated at the 
Portland public school and graduated from 
the Portland Academy and Female Seminary 
July 17, 1868, and on June 9, 187, graduated 
from the University of California, Berkeley, 
California, with degree of Ph. B. Admitted 
to the bar of the Supreme Court of Oregon 
at Salem, Oregon, January 8, 1879, and to the 
United States Supreme Court April 25, 1907. 
Eegent of University of Oregon, 1903 to 1915. 
President of Oregon Bar Association, 1909 
1910. President Oregon Historical Society, 
1907-1910. President Oregon Pioneer Associa- 
tion, 1909-1910. Member of the American 
Bar Association, American Historical Associa- 
tion, Washington Historical Society, National 
Municipal League, National Eose Society of 
Great Britain, National Geographic Society. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Member of Arlington, University, Waverly 
Golf and Portland Commercial Clubs. Demo- 
crat. Democratic National Committeeman 
from Oregon 1904-1908, Delegate Democratic 
National Convention 1892 and 1904, General 




Counsel Portland Railway, Light & Power 
Company. Author of Biography of Dr. John 
McLaughlin; author of pamphlet "Roses at 
Portland, Oregon, and How to Grow them"; 
author of several important historical arti- 
cles published in the Quarterly of the Oregon 
Historical Society, including "The Discovery 
and Exploration of the Frazer River" and 
"Oregon Counties Their Origins and the 
Origins of Their Names." Author of many 
articles on growing roses at Portland. Origi- 
nator of the name of "Rose City" as applied 
to Portland. An associate editor of the His 
tory of Portland. 

GEORGE FLANDERS HOLMAN. 

Residence, 500 Taylor street; office, 501-4 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born in Portland, Oregon. Son of James 
Duval and Rachel Hixson (Summers) Hoi- 
man. Attended Portland public schools and 
Law Department of University of Oregon. 
Admitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, Octo- 
ber 9, 1889; to the United States Circuit 
Court of Oregon, Ninth Judicial District, De- 
cember 30, 1889; United States District Court 
of Oregon, December 31, 1889; Superior Court 
of the State of Washington, December 5, 
1891. 

FRANK HOLMES. 

Residence, Washington and Fir streets; of- 
fice, room 1 Tioga building, Salem. Born 
June 1, 1871, at The Dalles, Oregon. Son of 




David J. and Mary Ellen (Lewis) Holmes. 
Married August 1, 1897, to Josie Adamson. 
Attended common schools of Oregon until 
eighteen years of age and attended Wil- 
lamette University for three years 1890 to 
1893. Read law three years in office of W. 
H. Holmes, of Salem, and was admitted to 
the bar in 1897. Immediately entered into 
practice with his brother, Webster Holmes, 
which partnership continued until 1900, since 
which time he has practiced alone at Salem. 
Member W. O. W. fraternity. 

WILLIAM HENRY HOLMES. 

Residence and 
office, Salem, Ore- 
gon. Born May 3. 
1850, in Polk 
County, Oregon. 
Son of Horatio 
Nelson Viscount 
and Nancy (Por- 
ter) Holmes. Mar- 
r i e d August 13, 
1876, to Josephine 
Lewis. Receive^ 
education in pub- 
lic schools of Polk 
County and later 
attended the La 
Creole Academy 
Dallas, Oregon, 
from which he 
graduated in 1873. 

Read law in the office of Thayer & Williams, 
of Portland, for three years and was admitted 
to the bar of the State of Oregon in 1874. 
Commenced the practice of law in Salem in 
1876 and practiced alone until 1889 when 
he formed a partnership with Judge Bonham 
under the firm name Bonham & Holmes, 
which existed until 1892, since which date he 
has practiced alone. District Attorney Third 
Judicial District, 1884-86. Clerk of the Su- 
preme Court of Oregon, 1887-1890. Member 
of Legislature from Marion County, 1891. 
Member of Masonic and B. P. O. E. fraterni- 
ties. Member Commercial Club of Salem. 
Democrat. 

WILLIAM H. HOLLIS. 

Residence, Forest Grove, Oregon; office, 
same. Born July 9, 1853, in Edgar County, 
Illinois. Son of George W. and Marcy .1. 
(Clark) Hollis. Early education received at 
common and high schools in Illinois. Studied 
law under private instruction in the States 
of Kansas and Washington. Admitted to the 
bar of the State of Washington at Tacoma 
in 1889, at Olympia, Washington, in 1896, 
and in Oregon in 1903. In 1896 removed to 
Benton Harbor, Michigan, and practiced until 
1903 alone, and was elected Judge of the 
Municipal Court in 1900. In 1903 returned to 
Oregon and located at Forest Grove and com- 
menced the practice of law; for a short time 
was in partnership with E. B. Hawles. Was 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



157 



prominent in politics in Washington, from 
1888 to 1896; 1890-1896 Auditor of Pierce 
County, Washington. President of Forest 




Grove Abstract Company and Vice-President 
First National Bank of Forest Grove. Presi- 
dent Forest Grove Board of Trade. President 
of Washington County Development League 
and Forest Grove Civic Improvement Society. 
Member Masonic Order. Republican. 

HJALMAR E. HOLMQUIST. 

Residence, 135 East Eleventh street; office, 
room 3, Merchants Bank building, Eugene, 
Oregon. Born at Visby, Sweden, November 
28, 1879, the son of Carl J. and Maria E. 
(Engstrom) Holmquist. Married Miss Flor- 
ence Howard at Eugene, Oregon, July 21, 
1908. Entered the public school at Trakumla. 
Sweden, remaining there until 1886, when he 
moved with parents to California, then enter- 
ing the public and high schools of Redwood 
City, California, graduating from same in 
1899, entering the Leland Stanford, Jr., Uni- 
versity at Palo Alto, California, and gradu- 
ating from same in 1904, with the degree of 
A. B. While in the university he pursued the 
study of law, which he continued in the office 
of Emil Pohli, of San Francisco, California. 
Served as Deputy County Clerk of San Mateo 
County, California. Elected to the California 
Legislature from the Fifty-third District, 
serving during the session of 1909. Attended 
the Law School of the University of Cali- 
fornia, at Berkeley, during the summer ses- 
sion of 1909. Moved to Eugene, Oregon, 
being admitted to the bar, he opened an office 
in Eugene, which continues to date. Mem- 
ber of the I. O. 0. F. fraternity. Republican. 




JOHN B. HOSFORD 

Residence, 412 
East Ninth street. 
North; office, 410 
and 411 Abington 
building, Portland. 
Born in Limerick, 
Ireland, 1861. Son 
of William and 
Anna J. (Bassett) 
Hosford. Married 
in 1892 to Minnie 
A. Gilkinson. At- 
tended the Limer- 
ick Academy 1872- 
75. The Kilkenny 
College, Kilkenny, 
Ireland, 1875-77. 
and Trinity Col- 
lege, Dublin, Ire- 
land, 1877 - 1880, 

where he obtained honors and prize in classi- 
cal literature. Resident tutor in Winchester 
College, England, 1880-1883, and in Alexan- 
dra Park College, London. Came to Oregon 
July, 1886, and was admitted to the bar at 
Salem, Oregon, 1891. Began the practice of 
law at Wasco, Sherman County, Oregon, in 
1891. Removed to Moro in 1892 and con- 
tinued the general practice of law until June. 
1904. Served one term as County School 
Sitperintendent of Sherman County, and was 
School Director in Moro District for several 
years. During this period he was associated 
with W. H. Ragsdale, under the firm name 
of Hosford & Ragsdale. In 1904 he removed 
to Portland and continues the practice of his 
profession alone. Edited the "Fossil Jour- 
nal" in Wheeler County, in 1887. Proprietor 
and Editor of Wasco News in 1888 and of 
the Moro Observer in 1890. In 1904 was 
Chairman of Republican County Central Com- 
mittee and was delegate from Sherman 
County to Republican State and Congres- 
sional Conventions in Portland and was 
elected Secretary of the latter. He saw 
active service in Bechuanaland, South Africa, 
in 1883-5, as a member of the First Mounted 
Rifles, then engaged in subduing the native 
tribes who resisted the Imperial Government 
in South Africa. A member of the Masonic 
and I. O. O. F. fraternities. Republican. 

HARRY G. HOY. 

Residence, Marshfield, Oregon; office, Ben- 
nett & Walter block. Born May 5, 1879, at 
Napoleon, Henry County, Ohio. Son of 
Samuel and Malinda (Imler) Hoy. Married 
September 30, 1908, to Meta A. Bobell. Edu- 
cated at the public schools of Spink County, 
South Dakota, and at Redfield College, Red- 
field, South Dakota. Read law in the office 
of Hon. John A. Pickler, Foulkton, South 
Dakota, and later took a short course in the 
Benton College of Law at St. Louis, Mis- 
souri. Admitted to the bar of Missouri in 
April, 1904. Came to Oregon in January, 



158 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



1906, and was admitted to the bar of this 
state. Republican. 

ASA CONNOE HOUGH. 

Residence and office, Grants Pass, Oregon. 
Born April 10, 1869, at Boise, Idaho. Son 
of George Campbell and Harriett Amanda 
(Sweeny) Hough. Married May 26, 1897, to 
Ida M. Mills. Educated at the common and 
high schools at New Richmond, Wisconsin; 
University of Wisconsin, at Madison, Wis- 
consin, later reading law in office of W. 
W. Irwin, of St. Paul, Minnesota. Was 
admitted to the Supreme Court of the 
State of Minnesota at St. Paul, in 1890. 
Came to Oregon in 1893 and was admitted 
to the Supreme Court of this state in April, 
1894. Has been in general practice in Marion 
and Josephine counties ever since. In 1898 
opened an office at Grants Pass where he 
practices to date. Elected and served as 
Presidential Elector on Republican ticket in 
1904. Member Masonic Order. Republican. 

JOHN R. HUGHES. 

Residence, 529 Hoyt street; office, 309 
Failing building, Portland. Born January 7, 
1882, at Liverpool, England. Son of John and 
Elizabeth (Howard) Hughes. Came to Ore- 
gon in 1903. Educated in the Liverpool 




Grammar School until 1896; at Liverpool 
University to 1900; at the Metropolitan 
School of Shorthand and Typewriting, Lon- 
don, England, to 1902, and at Holmes Busi- 
ness College, Portland, in 1907. Received 
LL. B. degree from Law Department of Uni- 
versity of Oregon, in 1910, and the same de- 
gree from Lincoln-Jefferson University at 
Hammond, Indiana, in 1910. Admitted to 
the bar of Oregon at Pendleton May 5, 1909. 



Commenced the practice of his profession in 
Portland and continues to date. Member 
M. A. A. C. Republican. 

ROSCOE T. HUNT. 

Residence, 428 Mill street; office, 517-9 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born August 22, 1885, at Columbus, Kansas. 
Son of A. H. and Louella (Adams) Hunt. 
Educated at Montgomery County High 
School, Independence, Kansas, and later 
graduated from the University of Michigan, 
Law Department, with LL. B. degree. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Michigan June 1, 1909, 
and to the bar of Oregon December 15 of 
the same year, since which time he has prac- 
ticed in Portland. Member Phi Alpha Delta 
fraternity. 

BELA S. HUNTINGTON. 

Residence, 1225 
Thurman street ; 
office, 404-5 Lewis 
building, Portland. 
Born February 5, 
1858, in Rockford, 
Illinois. Son of 
Charles A. and Lu- 
cretia A. (Water- 
man) Huntington. 
Married February 
2, 1887, to May 
Wilson. Educated 
at St. Johnsbury, 
Vermont, Acade- 
my, 1875-78; the 
University of Ver- 
mont 1878 to 1882, 
graduating with 
the degree of A. 

B. in the latter year and with the degree of 
A. M. in 1885. Attended the Law Depart- 
ment, University of Michigan, 1882-1883. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of the State of Michigan 
October, 1883. Moved to Oregon in the 
same year and was admitted to the bar of 
this state in May of 1884; entered into part- 
nership with F. P. Mays under the firm name 
of Mays & Huntington 1886 to 1890, and later 
practiced at The Dalles, Oregon, until 1909, 
in partnership with H. S. Wilson, removing 
to Portland September 1, 1909, since when 
he has practiced alone. In 1897 State Repre- 
sentative for Wasco and Sherman counties. 
Republican. 

JULIEN A. HURLEY. 

Residence and office, Vale. Born April 1, 
1885, at Lafayette, Oregon. Son of A. M. 
and Almira (Smith) Hurley. Graduated from 
the Independence High School in 1902 and 
from the Oregon State Normal School in 1905. 
Admitted to the bar at Pendleton November 
2, 1908. Is in partnership with R. G. Wheeler 
under the firm name of Wheeler & Hurley. 
Republican. 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



159 



ROSCOE PATTERSON HURST. 

Eesidence, 181 
Fourteenth street; 
office, 439-441 
Chamber of Com- 
m e r c e building, 
Portland. Born 
September 18th, 
1882, at Hutson- 
v i 1 1 e , Crawford 
County, Illinois. 
Son of Lucius C. 
and Minnie E. 
(Patterson) Hurst. 
Educated at Hut- 
sonville, Illinois, 
and at the High 
School at Terre 
Haute, Indiana, 
from 1897 to 1899, 
and at De Pauw 
University, Greencastle, Indiana, from 1899 
to 1902. From 1902 to 1906 at Notre Dame 
University, Notre Dame, Indiana, from which 
institution he received his LL. B. degree. 
Was admitted to the bar in Illinois in 1907. 
Came to Oregon the same year, when he was 
admitted on his Illinois certificate, and has 
practiced his profession to date. Is a mem- 
ber of the Sigma Chi and Theta Nu Epsilon 
fraternities. Democrat. 

CHARLES F. HYDE. 

Eesidence, Front and B. streets; office, City 
Hall, Baker City, Oregon. Born October 29, 





to the bar of the State of Oregon at Salem 
in 1882. Has been member of the following 
firms: Hyde, Johns & Olmstead; Hyde, Johns 
& Eand; Hyde & Packwood. City Attorney, 
Baker City, 1885-90, and 1907-10, and District 
Attorney, Sixth Judicial District, 1892-1896. 
Was Colonel on staff of Governor Pennoyer. 
Member Masonic, B. P. O. E., K. of P. and 
Bedmen fraternities. Democrat. 

SAMUEL BRUCE HUSTON. 

Residence, 622 
Elm street, Port- 
land; office, 810 
Chamber of Com- 
m e r c e building. 
Born March 16th. 
1858, at New Phil- 
adelphia, Indiana. 
Son of Oliver W. 
and Lucretia P 
(Naugle) Huston. 
Married June 28, 
1884, to Ella Gei- 
ger. Educated at 
a private school at 
Grand Glade, Illi- 
nois. Later at the 
Northern Indiana 
University at Val- 
paraiso, Indiana. 

Removed to Oregon May 18, 1883. Admitted 
to the bar at Salem, Indiana, December, 1879. 
and at Salem, Oregon, October, 1884. Was a 
member of the State Senate from Washing- 
ton County, Oregon, 1892 to 1896. Member 
Commercial Club of Portland. Bepublican. 

CICERO M. IDLEMAN. 




1858, at Yreka, California. Son of Henry H. 
and Susan Hyde. Married September, 1887, 
to Mollie E. Packwood. Attended Pacific 
University, Forest Grove, Oregon, and gradu- 
ated from Heald's Business College, San 
Francisco, California, in May, 1875. Admitted 




Eesidence, 295 Twelfth street; office, 615 
Oregonian building, Portland. Born August 



160 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



18, 1855, at Marion, Ohio. Son of Silas and 
Catherine (Pontius) Idleman. Married April 
3, 1907, to Margaret E. James. Attended pub- 
lic schools at Marion until fifteen years of 
age, then entered Smithville Academy at 
Smith ville, Ohio, where he spent two years; 
then entered Ohio Wesleyan University at 
Delaware, Ohio, leaving same at the end of 
his Junior year. Admitted to the bar of Ohio 
in 1882. Came to Oregon in 1884 and was 
admitted to the bar of this state the same 
year. Attorney General for Oregon from 
1895 to 1899. Chairman Eepublican Centra! 
Committee 1908. Member National Geographi- 
cal Society, Oregon Historical Society and the 
Oregon College of Sciences. Member Com- 
mercial Club and Phi Delta Theta fraternity. 
Republican. 

CLAIRE MOREAU INMAN. 

Residence, 1645 
Mission street; of- 
fice, B r e y m a n 
block, Salem, Ore- 
gon. Born Sep- 
tember 14, 1874, 
in O'Brien Coun- 
ty, Iowa. Son of 
Daniel W. and 
Franchette E. 
(Johnson) Inman. 
Married July, 
1903, to Carrie 
Amelia Batchelor. 
Educated in pub- 
lic schools; gradu- 
ated from high 
school at Sanborn, 
Iowa, in 1892. 
Came to Oregon in 

March, 1893, and entered Willamette Univer- 
sity at Salem, graduating in 1901 with de- 
gree of LL. B. Admitted to practice in Ore- 
gon by the Supreme Court on June 4, 1901. 
Entered immediately into practice in Baker 
County, Oregon, and in 1902 became asso- 
ciated with F. A. Turner under the firm name 
of Turner & Inman, which continued until 
1906, since which time he has practiced 
alone in Salem. Was City Attorney for 
Salem in 1906. Member Masonic and B. P. 
O. E. fraternities. Republican. 

FRANCIS SWIFT IVANHOE. 

Residence, La Grande, Oregon; office, same. 
Born August 3, 1856, in Loudoun County, Vir- 
ginia. Son of J. D. and C. R. (Milne) Ivan- 
hoe. Married May 16, 1887, to Amanda E. 
Eldridge, of Salem, New Jersey. Early edu- 
cation by private instruction; later, at 
Planter's University, at Richmond, Virginia. 
Served from 1876 to- 1887 in United States 
Regular Army. Admitted to practice in Ore- 



gon in 1887. Present District Attorney for 
Tenth District of the state. Resided and 





practiced since 1887 in Union and Wallowa 
counties. Republican. 

COMMODORE STEPHEN JACKSON. 

Residence and office, Roseburg, Oregon. 
Born in Canyonville, Oregon, January 10, 
1867. Son of John and Mary E. (Rose) 
Jackson. Married to Aura D. Thompson 
1905. Graduate of Oregon State Normal 
School at Monmouth, 1894, with degree of 
B. S. D. Attended Leland Stanford Univer- 
sity, Law Department, 1895-1896-1897. Gradu- 
ated from Denver University School of Law 
with degree of A. B., 1898. Admitted to bar 
of Oregon June, 1898, continuing the prac- 
tice of law in that city to date. Member 
Company D, Fourth Regiment, O. N. G.; 
member of Roseburg Commercial Club; mem- 
ber of I. O. O. F. 

A. A. JAYNE. 

Residence, Hood River, Oregon; office, same. 
Born 1861 at Washington, Iowa. Son of 
Daniel and Martha (Young) Jayne. Mar 
ried in 1890 to Minnie M. Sperry. Educated 
at the common schools of Washington County, 
Iowa, and at the Washington, Iowa, Academy. 
Admitted to the bar of the State of Colorado 
in 1888. Came to Oregon in 1889 and prac- 
ticed at Arlington, Oregon, until 1897, when 
he moved to The Dalles and practiced there 
until 1900, when he removed to Hood River 
and has since practiced at that place. Dis- 
trict Attorney, Seventh Judicial District, 
1894-1900. Member Legislature 1905. Re- 
publican. 



IOGRAPHICAL 



161 



JOHN ANTONY JEFFREY. 

Office, 313i Washington street, Portland. 
Born 1869 in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Son of 
James and Maria (Chandler) Jeffrey. Mar- 
ried November 30, 1898, to Dela Payne. Re- 
ceived his early education at the public 
schools, Jackson County, and the high school, 
Jacksonville, Oregon, and Oregon Agricul- 
tural College, Corvallis, Oregon. Moved to 
Oregon 1874 and was admitted to the bar at 
Salem, Oregon, March, 1895. Served in the 
Lower House of Legislature, session 1895, and 
was elected District Attorney, First Judicial 
District of Oregon, one term, ending 1898. 
Democrat. 

JOHN C. JENKINS. 

Eesidence, 532 East Sixteenth street, North; 
office, 333 Chamber of Commerce, Portland. 
Born in Chumleigh, County of Devon, Eng- 
land, June 9, 1864. Son of Elias and Mary 
Ann (Godfrey) Jenkins. Married Alice Maud 
Truman December 25, 1893. Graduated from 
Mineral Point High School, Mineral Point, 
Wisconsin, 1887; attended Northwestern Uni- 
versity, Evanston, Illinois, in 1888. Gradu- 
ated from South Dakota State College of 
Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, Brookings, 
South Dakota, 1890, with degree of B. S. 
Admitted to Circuit Court, South Dakota, 
1891; Supreme Court of South Dakota, April 
1, 1895; United States District and Circuit 
Courts of South Dakota, August 17, 1899. 
Came to Oregon September 30, 1908, and ad- 
mitted to Supreme Court of Oregon October 
5, 1909. State's Attorney of Brookings 
County, South Dakota, 1897-8; Mayor of 
Brookings, South Dakota, 1903-4, and City 
Attorney of that city for many years; State 
Senator, South Dakota, 1907-8. Republican. 

RALPH EDWARD JENNEY. 

Office, 408 Failing building, Portland. 
Born February 20, 1883, in Detroit, Michi- 
gan. Son of Royal A. and Caliphernia (Hox- 
sey) Jenney. Educated at the Ann Arbor 
High School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, and 
graduated in 1900. Entered the University 
of Michigan and graduated with the degree 
of A. B. in 1904 and LL. B. in 1906. Ad- 
mitted to the bar in Michigan in 1906 and 
to the bar in Oregon in 1908, in which year 
he came to this state. Republican. 

EDWARD H. JOEHNK. 

Residence, 167 Golden avenue; office, 216 
Coos building, Marshfield, Oregon. Born in 
Oregon City, Oregon, November 23, 1882. 
Son of H. O. and Anna (Barck) Joehnk. 
Attended public school at Oregon City, Ore- 
gon; Naval training ship and training school, 
U. S. S. Adams, in 1897. Commercial course 
in International Correspondence School, 
Scranton, Pennsylvania, 1900-1901. Univer- 
sity of Oregon, Law Department, 1902-1904, 
graduating with degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
Admitted to the Oregon bar at Salem, Oregon, 



June 13, 1904. Served apprenticeship in 
United States Navy; enlisted July 6, 1897, to 
January 11, 1902. Served on fifteen differ- 




ent vessels, including U. S. S. Oregon; made 
trip around Horn; Battle of Santiago with 
Spanish fleet, July 3, 1898; three years iu 
Philippines. Member United Spanish War 
Veterans. Republican. 

CHARLES A. JOHNS. 




Residence and office, Baker City, Oregon. 
Born June 25, 1857, in Jackson County, Mis- 
souri. Son of James M. and Elizabeth A. 



162 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



(Darby) Johns. Married November 15, 1882, 
to Mabel Ellis. Came to Oregon December, 
1858, and attended public schools at Scio. 
Linn County, Oregon, and also at Marion, 
Oregon. Attended Willamette University, 
Salem, Oregon, graduating from there in 
1878 with A. B. degree, and later receiving 
A. M. degree from the same institution. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem in 1881. Was 
Lieutenant-Colonel on Governor Geer's staff 
for four years; Judge of Polk County for two 
years; Mayor of Baker City for four terms, 
and also School Director, Baker City, for four 
terms. Member of State School Text-Book 
Commission three terms. Republican. 

ALBERT E. JOHNSON. 

Residence, 1016 
Union avenue, 
North; office, 507- 
8-9 Fenton build 
ing, Portland. 
Born November 
12, 1882, in Port- 
land, Oregon. Son 
of Richard and 
Mary (Post) 
Johnson. Early 
education in pub- 
lic schools of Port- 
land. During 1904 
was in office of 
P i p es & Ti f f t. 
Later in offices of 
Platt & Platt and 
Long&Sweek. 
From 1903 to 1905 

attended Law Department of the University 
of Oregon, from which he graduated in 1905. 
In June of that year he was admitted to the 
bar at Salem and in December, 1906, he be- 
came associated in the practice of his pro- 
fession with J. A. Beckwith, under the firm 
name of Johnson & Beckwith (who took over 
the practice of Judge J. C. Moreland) which 
continues to date. 

GEORGE ARTHUR JOHNSON. 

Residence, corner Leslie and High streets; 
office, 616 Commercial block, Portland. Born 
May 1, 1873, at Oakland, Nebraska. Son of 
Peter G. and Caroline (Johnson) Johnson. 
Married August 23, 1906, to Florence Payne. 
Educated at the public schools in Bart 
County, Nebraska, at the University of Ne- 
braska at Lincoln, Nebraska, receiving from 
that institution the degree of LL. B. in 1902 
and the degree of A. B. in 1903. Admitted 
to the bar of Nebraska in 1902. Came to Ore- 
gon in 1903 and was admitted to the bar of 
this state the following year. Began the 
practice of his profession in Portland and 
practiced alone until 1906, when he formed 
a partnership with Charles Stout, under the 
firm name of Johnson & Stout, which exists 
to date. Member Masonic fraternity. Repub- 
lican. 





JAMES CATLIN JOHNSON. 

Residence and 
office Cottage 
Grove, Ore. Born 
in Waseca County. 
Minnesota, May 
12, 1872. Son of 
William Henry 
and Elizabeth 
(Reed) Johnson. 
Came to Oregon 
October, 1891. 
Married to Mar- 
guerite M. Ponti 
December 24, 1893. 
Atte n d e d public 
and high schools 
at Duluth, Minn., 
graduating from 
same in 1888, then 
entering Pars o n s 

Business College, graduating in 1889; studied 
law in office of father until admitted to bar 
at Salem, Oregon, June 1, 1895. Admitted t-) 
United States District and Circuit Courts. 
Portland, Oregon, October 3, 1904. Associated 
with E. P. Morcom, Woodburn, Ore., 1895-96; 
F. G. Eby, Cottage Grove, Oregon, 1900-01; 
J. S. Medley, Cottage Grove, Oregon, 1903-8. 
Sergeant Company M, Second Oregon Volun- 
teer Infantry, May 16, 1898, to August 7. 
1899, Philippine Islands. Private and Cor- 
poral, 1897 to 1898, Company H, Third Oregon 
State Militia; Captain Company E, Fourth 
Infantry, O. N. G., April 30, 1907, to present 
time. Municipal Judge Woodburn, Oregon. 
April 1, 1897, until Spanish War. City Attor- 
ney at Woodburn and Cottage Grove, Oregon, 
at various times. Member K. of P., W. O. W. 
Republican. 

JASPER J. JOHNSON. 

Residence, Port- 
1 a n d (Tremont) 
Oregon; office. 
Spaul ding build- 
ing, Portland. 
Born July 6, 1862. 
near Lents, Mult- 
nomah County, Or- 
egon. Son of Jacob 
and Martha J. 
(Lee) Joh n s o n. 
Married in 1903, 
to Miss Ella Craw- 
ford. Attended the 
public schools of 
Portland, Or., and 
the Oregon Agri- 
cultural Coll e g e. 
Pursued the study 
of law for three 

years in the offices of Johnson & Idleman, of 
Portland. Admitted to the bar at Pendleton. 
Oregon, June, 1890. Now senior member of 
the firm of Johnson & Van Zante. Past mem- 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



163 



ber of the O. N. G., Company K; member A. 
F. & A. M., I. O. 0. F., F. of A., United Arti- 
sans and Patrons of Husbandry fraternities. 
Now serving his seventh consecutive year as 
Master of Evening Star Grange, and his sec- 
ond year as Lecturer of the Oregon State 
Grange. Eepublican. 

ROSCOE RUCIUS JOHNSON. 

Residence and office, Pendleton, Oregon. 
Born August 6, 1880, at Fort Recovery, Ohio. 
Son of William and Samantha (Langell) 
Johnson. Educated at Fort Recovery High 
School, graduating in 1894; at the Ohio Nor- 
mal University, graduating from same in 
1897, with A. B. degree; at the University of 
Wooster, graduating in 1902 with A. B. de- 
gree, and from the Harvard Law School in 
1905, with LL. B. degree. Admitted to the 
bar at Winchester, Indiana, in July, 1905. 
Came to Oregon immediately, and was ad- 
mitted to practice in the courts of this state 
in October of the same year. Was associate 
editor of Harvard Law Reviewer, 1904-5. Re 
publican. 

JESSE N. JOHNSTON. 

Residence and office Grants Pass, Oregon. 
Born at Crawford County, Indiana, August 
18, 1881. Son of Isaac and Lavise (Pecken- 
paugh) Johnston. Attended the rural schools 
of Crawford County, Indiana. Later attended 
Central Normal College at Danville, Indiana, 
receiving degree B. S. ; law school of the 
same institution, receiving degree LL. B. 
Admitted to the bar of Indiana at Indian- 
apolis, Indiana, in 1904. In 1905 moved to 
the State of Oregon. Being admitted to the 
bar of Oregon in 1905. he opened an office in 
copartnership with H. B. Hendricks, of Grants 
Pass, which continued until January, 1907, 
when the partnership was dissolved, when he 
practiced by himself, which continues to date. 
Appointed Deputy Prosecuting Attorney for 
Josephine County in 1909, which position he 
now holds. Member A. F. & A. M. Repub- 
lican. 

DAVID E. JOHNSTON. 

Residence, 693 East Madison street; office. 
312 Gerlingor building, Portland. Born 
April 10, 1845, in Giles County, Virginia. Son 
of Oscar F. and Elizabeth (French) John- 
ston. Married February 16, 1868, to Sarah E. 
Pearis. Received his education in the com- 
mon schools of his county and later by pri- 
vate tutor. Entered Confederate Army at 
age of sixteen and served four years. Ad- 
mitted to the bar in Giles County, Virginia, 
June, 1867, later removing to Mercer County, 
West Virginia, January, 1870, practicing law 
in the courts of that and adjoining counties, in 
partnership with James D. Johnston under 
the firm name of Johnston & Johnston. State 
Senator 1879. Elected in 1880 Judge of 
Ninth Judicial District, West Virginia, an, I 
held that office until 1888. Member Fifty- 
sixth Congress, 1899-1901. In 1890 formed 




partnership with J. W. Hale under the firm 
name of Johnston & Hale, which partnership 
continued until 1900. Moved to Oregon Octo- 
ber 18, 1908, and entered into partnership 
with Judge J. E. Magers under the firm 
name of Magers & Johnston. Democrat. 

GEORGE W. P. JOSEPH. 

Residence 500 E. 
Couch street; of- 
fice, Corbett build- 
ing, Portland, Ore. 
Born May 10 
1872, in Joseph 
Creek, Modoc 
County, Cal. Son 
of Edwin Worth- 
ington and Delilah 
Jane (Heath) Jo- 
seph. Came to Or 
egon in 1876. Mar- 
ried to Bertha L. 
Snell, Septem ber 
6, 1903. Graduat- 
ed from high 
school at Lake- 
view, Oregon, in 
1889. Studied law 

with W. A. Wilshire, County Judge of Lake 
County, Oregon, in 1889, and later with Wat- 
son, Beekman & Watson, of Portland, Oregon. 
Admitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, in 
1893, and practiced law in Portland to date. 
Member of Company F, Oregon National 
Guard; Portland Commercial Club. Now in 
partnership with B. E. Haney. Republican. 

HENRY F. JOSLIN. 

Resi d e n c e, 82 
East Eighth 
street, North; of- 
fice, 208 Couch 
building, Portland, 
Ore. Born March 
17, 1867, at Mid- 
dleville, Michigan. 
Son of George T. 
and Margaret 
(Parker) Jos 1 i n. 
Married May 31, 
1891, to Barbara 
Seiler. Came to 
Oregon in April, 
1905. Was educat- 
ed at the Chicago 
Nor m a 1 School 
Chicago Kent Col- 
1 e g e of La w 

and the Law Department of the Lake 
Forest University, graduating therefrom 
in 1889, and receiving the degree LL. B. 
in 1891. Admitted to the bar of Illinois in 
1889; to the bar of Michigan in 1897; to the 
bar of Oregon in 1906. Practiced in Chicago 
from 1891 to 1901 ; at Marquette, Michigan, 
from 1901 to 1905, since when he has prac- 
ticed at Portland. Member of Knights of 




164 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Pythias, and Masonic fraternities and the Ad 
Men's League of Portland. Republican. 

ABNER JONES. 

Residence, Y. M. C. A. building; office, 730 
Chamber of Commerce, Portland, Oregon. 
Born March 25, 1882, at Wilkes-Barre Penn- 
sylvania. Son of Morgan C. and Margaret 
(Harding) Jones. Received .early education 
at the public school of Wilkes-Barre, graduat- 
ing from the high school in 1898. Graduated 
from the Wood School, New York City, in 
1900. Came to Oregon in 1904, and grad- 
uated from the University of Oregon in 1906 
with LL. B. degree, and from University of 
California, Special Lectures, in 1907. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Oregon at Portland, in 
June, 1906. Republican. 

ALLAN RENSSELAER JOY. 

Residence, 1189 
Taggart street; 
office, 327-9 Wor- 
c e s t e r building. 
Portland, Oregon. 
Born June 15, 
1859, at Ellsworth, 
Me. Son of Henry 
Augustus Moore 
and Judith Mary 
(Bunker) Joy. 
Married May 12, 
1887, to Hattie 
May LaBarre. Ed- 
ucation recei v e d 
at the public 
school of Maiden, 
Mass., and at 
Reading Academy, 
Re a d i n g, Mass. 
Was admitted to the bar of Massachusetts in 
1881, and immediately came West. Settled 
on line of N. P. Ry., then building, riding 
on stage from end of railroad to Livingston, 
Montana. Remained there in active practice 
until 1895. Was Prosecuting Attorney for 
seven years; member of Constitutional Con- 
vention on the admission of Montana as a 
state; member of Legislature; Speaker pro 
tern.; Commissioner at World's Fair, Chicago; 
Mayor of Livingston. Spent five years in 
Alaska (from 1897 to 1902), being Deputy 
District Attorney there. Came to Oregon in 
April, 1895, and was associated with the late 
Senator Mitchell until his death, under the 
firm name of Mitchell & Joy. Member Ma- 
sonic order, K. of P., Royal Arcanum and 
National Union fraternities; member Portland 
Commercial Club. Republican. 

EDWARD E. KELLY. 

Residence, Queen avenue; office, Palm 
block, Medford. Born May 18, 1867, at De 
Witt, Iowa. Son of Thomas and Nancy 
(Flater) Kelly. Attended public school and 
high school of De Witt, Iowa, and graduated 
from the Law Department of Lake Forest 




University, Chicago, with LL. B. degree. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Illinois in 1896; to the 
bar of North Dakota in 1897; practiced in 
North Dakota one year and in 1898 enlisted 
in First Dakota Volunteer Infantry, and was 
transferred to First Company, Signal Corps, 
and, commissioned Second Lieutenant of same 
in February, 1899. In 1900 moved to Black- 
foot, Idaho, and was admitted to the bar of 
that state in the same year. Remained there 
practicing his profession until he came to 
Oregon in 1907. Was admitted to the bar of 
this state in the same year, and formed a 
partnership with H. Withington, at Medford, 
which exists to date. Member Masonic, K. 
of P. and Redmen fraternities. Democrat. 

WILLIAM MARION KAISER. 

Reside nee, 597 
Liberty street; of- 
fice, P a 1 1 o n ' s 
block, Salem, Ore. 
Born near Salem, 
Ore., February 10, 
1853. Son* of 
Pleasant Ci c e r o 
and Sarah (Wood- 
sid e s) Kaiser. 
Married to Angie 
Ryan November 
27, 1890. Attended 
public school at 
Salem, Or., 1870- 
74; Willamette 
University, Salem, 
Ore., 1874; taught 
in public schools 
of Marion County, 

Oregon, until 1882. Admitted to the bar at 
Salem, Oregon, October, 1881. March 10, 
1882, formed law partnership with Tilmon 
Ford at Salem, Oregon, which continued until 
his death, March 1, 1908. Member of Elks. 
Democrat. 

JOHN P. KAVANAUGH. 
Residence 817 
Irving street; of- 
fice, McKay build- 
ing, Portland, Ore. 
Born July 11, 
1871, at St. Louis, 
Marion County, 
Ore. Son of Dan- 
iel and Catherine 
(Doyle) Kava- 
n a u g h. Married 
September 23, 
1902, to Eleanor 
E. Dunn. Attend- 
e d the public 
schools at St. 
L o u is , Ore.; St. 
Sch olactica 's 
Academy at Ger- 
vais, from 1877 to 

1885; Mt. Angel College, at Mt. Angel, Ore- 
gon, in 1888-1891, and graduated in June, 





BIOGRAPHICAL 



IGo 



1891, with degree of A. B. Entered the Law 
Department of the University of Oregon in 
1891, and graduated therefrom on June 21, 
1893, with degree of LL. B. .Read law in the 
office of E. & E. B. Williams and Carey, of 
Portland, while attending law school. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem on June 7, 1893. 
Was appointed Chief Deputy City Attorney 
for the City of Portland July 1, 1902, and 
served until July 1, 1907. Was elected City 
Attorney in June, 1907, and re-elected in 
June, 1909 present term expiring July 1, 
1911. Republican. 

HENRY M. KIMBALL. 

Residence, 554 Couch street; office 417 Fen- 
ton building, Portland. Born August 27, 
1879, at Orland, Indiana. Son of Miles B. 
and Elizabeth P. (Birce) Kimball. Educated 
at the high school, Orland, Indiana; prepared 
for university work at Hillsdale College, 
Hillsdale, Michigan; took literary and law 
courses at the University of Michigan, Ann 
Arbor, Michigan, graduating therefrom in 
1904 with degree of LL. B. Admitted to the 
Supreme Court of Michigan in June, 1904, 
and the bar of the State of Indiana in the 
same month. Practiced at Orland, Indiana, 
from 1904 until 1908. Came to Oregon in 
1909, and was admitted to the bar of this 
state in September of that year. Republican. 

HENRY CRISS KING. 

Residence, 402 Ross street; office 235 
Worcester block, Portland, Oregon. Born at 
Monroe, Green County, Wisconsin, August 11, 




ed the normal school at San Jose, California; 
a private school at Los Angeles; the Sacra- 
mento Law School, at Sacramento, California. 
Studied law with Einmons & Emmons, of Port- 
land, for five years, and with Rigby & Rigby, 
of San Francisco. Was admitted to the bar of 
Oregon in 1897, and continues the practice 
of his profession alone to date. Republican. 

WILLIAM RUFUS KING. 

Domicile, Ontario, Oregon; office, State 
House, Salem, Oregon. Residence during 
term of present office, 1384 State street, Sa- 
lem, Oregon. Born October 3, 1864, near 
Walla Walla, in State of Washington. Son 




1870. Son of Criss H. and Elizabeth 
(Palmer) King. Married December 31, 1903. 
Came to Portland, Oregon, in 1879, and at- 
tended the public schools here. Also attend- 



of David Rufus and Elizabeth (Estes) King. 
Married in Danville, Indiana, December 6, 
1892, to Miss L. Myrtle King. Attended Ore 
gon State Agricultural College, 1882 to 1885, 
and the Law Department of the Central Nor- 
mal College, of Danville, Indiana, 1889-1891, 
graduating therefrom with LL. B. degree. 
Admitted to the bar of Indiana in July, 1891, 
and to the bar of Oregon in January, 1893. 
Practiced in Vale, Oregon, from June, 1892, 
to March, 1893, when he formed a partner- 
ship with T. Calvin Hyde, at Baker City, Ore- 
gon, which continued until January, 1894; 
practiced alone until 1896, when he formed u 
partnership with F. M. Saxton, in the same 
city, practicing under the firm name of King 
& Saxton, until 1900, when he removed to 
Ontario, Oregon, and practiced there alone 
until October, 1904, at which time he formed 
a law partnership with W. H. Brooke, which 
continued until February, 1907. In June, 
1892, he was elected on the Democratic ticket 
to the House of Representatives of the Ore- 
gon Legislature from Malheur County, sei'v- 



166 



BIOGRAPHICAL 




ing two years. In 1894 he was elected State 
Senator from Baker County, serving four 
years. In 1898 he was candidate for Gov- 
ernor, and defeated by T. T. Geer. February 
23, 1907, he was appointed Commissioner of 
Supreme Court, and February 12, 1909, Asso- 
ciate Justice of the Supreme Court. Demo- 
crat. Mason, 32d deg., B. P. O. E., K. of P., 
R. A., W. O. W. 

TYSON KINSELL. 

Reside nee, 505 
Jeffer son street; 
office 613 Henry 
building, Portland. 
Born June 28, 
1880, on a farm 
near Royersf ord, 
Pa., a village 
about 30 miles 
from Philadelphia. 
Son of Daniel P. 
and Emeline (Ty- 
son) Kinsell. Kd- 
ucated at public 
schools of Upper 
Providence Town- 
ship, in Montgom- 
ery County, Pa., 
up to age of 15. 
Grad u a t e d from 

the Royersf ord, Pa., High School in 1898; at- 
tended Schissler College of Business, Norris- 
town, Pa., during Autumn of 1898 and Spring 
of 1899, from which institution he graduated 
as stenographer in that year. In 1901 he en- 
tered the Temple Law School, Philadelphia, 
Pa., and in 1902 removed to Washington, D. 
C., where he entered the Georgtown (D. C.) 
Law School, graduating with LL. B. degree in 
1905. Appointed by Civil Service as stenog- 
rapher in office of Chief Engineer of the War 
Department, Washington, D. C., in 1902. 
Transferred to Portland, Oregon, United 
States Engineer's Office, in April, 1905. Three 
months later he resigned from the service. 
In 1906 he was admitted to the bar at Salem, 
Oregon. For about one year thereafter was 
connected with the office of Frank Schlegel, 
since which time he has engaged in general 
practice. Member of the Republican Club of 
Portland. Republican. 

CHARLES M. KISSINGER. 

Residence, Eugene, Oregon; office Warren 
building, 536 Willamette street. Born in 
Lincoln County, Crab Orchard, Kentucky, Sep- 
tember 9, 1859. Son of John and Minerva 
(Goldsby) Kissinger. Came to the State of 
Oregon in 1874. He received his early educa- 
tion in the rural schools of Lincoln County, 
Kentucky, and in the common and high 
schools of Lane County, Oregon. He pursued 
the study of law in the office of H. D. Norton, 
of Eugene, Oregon, and, being admitted to tho 
bar of Oregon at Salem, October, 1900, he 
opened an office at Eugene, Oregon, where he 



follows a general practice of law to date. 
Has served as Deputy Assessor for four years, 
being appointed in 1892; member of the 
Woodmen of the World, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and Maccabee fraternities. In 
1896 served as chairman of the Democratic 
Central Committee for Lane County. Demo- 
crat. 

JOHN WESLEY KNOWLES. 

Residence, 901 Main street; office, Court- 
house, La Grande. Born May 18, 1867, near 
Circleville, Ohio. Son of Robert and Eme- 
line (Rector) Knowles. Married August 14, 
1894, to Hannah F. Williams. Graduated 
from high school at El Dorado, Kansas, in 




1884, and attended Baker University (a Meth- 
odist denominational college, at Baldwin, Kan 
sas), in 1884 and 1885. Admitted to the dis- 
trict Court of Kansas in 1888. Came to Ore 
gon in 1889, but was not admitted to the 
bar of this state until May, 1891. Admitted 
to District and Circuit Courts of the United 
States for District of Oregon, in 1905. City 
Attorney of La Grande for eight years; was 
Deputy District Attorney for Union County 
under John L. Rand in 1908; elected Circuit 
Judge of Tenth Judicial District. Republi- 
can. 

OTTO JULIUS KRAEMER. 

Residence, 243 Cornell Road; office 400-406 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born in Portland, October 25, 1874. Son of 
Julius and Ricka (Oppenheimer) Kraemer. 
Received his education in public schools of 
Portland, the Portland High School, and later 
attended the Law Department of the Univer- 
sity of Oregon. Admitted to the bar in Ore- 
gon, October 25, 1895. Was elected Justice 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



167 




for Portland District, July, 1898, holding that 
office until July, 1902, a period of two terms. 
Continues now in the practice of his profes- 
sion as a member of the firm of Chamberlain, 
Thomas & Kraemer. Republican. 

JOHN KOSCIUSKO KOLLOCK. 

Beside nee, 391 
Mill street; office, 
312-314 Corbet t 
building, Portland. 
Born Nov. 3, 1870, 
in Mil w a u ke e, 
Wis. Son of Fred- 
erick N. anl Mary 
(Green) Kollock. 
Married December 
22, 1896, to Frad- 
ericka M a s s e y. 
Graduated from 
Fort Wayne Ool- 
lege, 1887; from 
Amhe r s t College, 
with degree of A. 
B., 1892, and from 
the New York 
Law School, with 

degree of LL. B., in 1895. Moved to Oregon 
in August, 1895. Admitted to the bar, State 
of New York, July, 1895, and to the bar of 
Oregon in August of the same year. Asso- 
ciated since December, 1907, with M. A. Zol- 
linger, under firm name of Kollock & Zollin- 
ger. Member Oregon Bar Association, Uni 
versity Club, Wavely Golf Club, Oregon So- 
ciety, Sons American Revolution, and Sons of 
Veterans. Republican. 

D. V. KUYKENDALL. 

Residence and office, Klamath Falls, Oregon, 
Born in Wilbur, Oregon, August 13, 1878. So i 
of William and Ada (Alyssom) Kuykendall. 
Married to Rozelle Mires, December 25, 1905. 
Attended public schools at Eugene, Oregon. 
Graduated from University of Oregon in 1898, 
with degree A. B. Later attended George- 
town Law School in Washington, D. C. Ad- 
mitted to bar at Salem, Oregon, May 28, 1903 
Commenced the practice of law at Euger/e, 
and in 1904 came to Klamath Falls. Prosecut 
ing Attorney, Second District, Klamath and 
Lake Counties, 1908. Masonic and K. of P. 
fraternities. Republican. 

CHARLES HENRI LABBE. 

Residence 493 Twentieth street; office, 
Labbe building, 227% Washington street, 
Portland. Born October 25, 1874, at Portland, 
Ore. Son of John and Engel'.ne M. (Mathiot) 
Labbe. Early education received in the pub- 
lic schools of Portland. In 1896 received A. 
B. degree at the Stanford University, and in 
1898, LL. B. degree at the New York Law 
School. Was admitted to the bar at Salem, 
June 7, 1898. Member of the University 
Club and the Chi Psi fraternity. Consular 
Agent of France, 1899; Vice-Consul of Bel- 
gium, 1909. 



WILLIAM J. LACHNER. 

Residence, 1610 Dewey street; office, Baker 
City. Born November 30, 1869, at Canyon 
City, Oregon. Son of J. M. and Walburga 
Lachner. Married November 30, 1899, to Ida 
N. Tribolet. Attended the common schools 
at Baker City, and studied law one year in 
the office of Calvin T. Hyde. Entered the 
Law Department of the University of Michi- 
gan at Ann Arbor, in 1894, and graduated 
with LL. B. degree in 1896. Admitted to the 
bar of this state at Pendleton in October, 
1896. Practiced alone from 1896 to 1900, and 
in partnership with John C. Leasure about 
e ; ght months, since when he has practiced 
alone. Member O. N. G. for three years. Was 
proprietor of Baker City Herald in 1894, and 
was Postmaster of the same city in 1907. 
Republican. 

AMIDON WALTER LAFFERTY. 

Residence, Hotel Portland; office, 914-917 
Lewis building, Portland. Born June 10, 1875, 
at Audrain County, Missouri. Son of Abra- 
ham M. and Helen (Kinney) Lafferty. Edu- 
cated in the public schools of Pike County, 
Missouri, and at the Law School of the Mis- 
souri State University, from which institution 
he graduated in 1896 with the degree of 
LL. B. Admitted to the bar of the Supreme 
Court of Missouri in June, 1896, and prac- 
ticed at Montgomery City, Missouri, till Jan- 
uary, 1905, when he came to Oregon as a 
special agent of the Interior Department, re 
signing October, 1906. Admitted to the bar of 
Oregon, October, 1906, and commenced the 
practice of his profess : on in Portland. City 
Attorney of Montgomery, Missouri, from 1896 
to 1898; Prosecuting Attorney for Montgom- 
ery County from 1902 to 1905; Captain of 
Company F, Fourth Missouri Infantry, 1901 
to 1905; member M. A. A. C. Republican. 

ROSWELL B. LAMSON. 

Residence 349 N. 
Thirty - second 
street; office, 727 
Chamber of Com- 
merce, Portl and. 
Born September 
27, 1868, in Ver- 
mont. Son of Ros- 
well H. and Cath- 
e r i n e (Bucking- 
ham) L a m s o n. 
Married Sep t e m- 
ber 15, 1897, to 
Jane Mon t a g u e. 
His parents moved 
to Portland in 
1871, and he re- 
ceived his early 
education in the 
public and high 

schools of Portland, and in the Law Depart- 
ment of the University of Oregon, graduating 
from same with the degree of LL. B., in 1892. 




168 



Was admitted to the bar at Salem in 1892. 
In 1895 he was associated with G. G. Gam- 
mans, which existed until 1898, after which 
he practiced alone. Has recently become as- 
sociated with Eichard W. Montague. Be- 
publican. 

HORACE GEEELY LAKE. 

Eesidence, Gresham, Oregon; office, 219 
Worcester building, Portland. Bom March 
31, 1870, in Portland, Oregon. Son of John 
and Susan J. (Wigginton) Lake. Married 
July 22, 1896, to Maud Pittinger. Eeceived 
his early education in the public schools of 
Multnomah County. Attended Monmouth 
State Normal School, graduating in 1892 
with the degree of B. S. D. Attended the 
Law Department of the University of Ore- 
gon, graduating in June, 1899, with degree 
of LL. B. Admitted to the bar of Oregon 
in June of that year. Commenced the prac- 
tice of law in Wallowa County, in partnership 
with Walter G. Hayes, which continued for 
six months, and from that time practiced 
alone. Came to Portland in 1904, and prac- 
ticed his profession here. Served four years 
as U. S. Land Commissioner for Oregon, from 
1904 for the District of La Grande, Oregon. 
Member I. O. O. F. and W. O. W. fraternities. 
Eepublican. 

AETHUR LANGGUTH. 

Eesidence, 127 E. 
Third street, N.; 
office, 605-606 Mc- 
Kay building, 
Portland. Born in 
Detroit, Michigan, 
April 26, 186 9. 
Son of Martin G. 
and Eve Josephine 
(Weber) Lang- 
guth. Married to 
M. Louisa Guin- 
ans, November 19, 
1 X90. Attended 
public schools in 
Detroit, Michigan, 
1875 to 1883. En- 
tered Detroit Col- 
lege of Law in 
1900, graduat ing 

with degree of LL. B. in 1903. Admitted to 
the bar at Lansing, Michigan, June 15, 1903. 
Came to Oregon July 30, 1903, and admitted 
to the bar at Salem, Oregon, May 28, 1906. 
Captain Independent Military Company, 1891 
to 1894. Acting Municipal Judge, Portland, 
Oregon, December 24, 1909, to January 8, 
1910. Eepublican. 

LOTUS L. LANGLEY. 

Eesidence, 1170 Clinton street; office, 1001 
Board of Trade building, Portland. Born 
September 15, 1875, at Scranton, Iowa. Son 
of W. and Amanda J. (Scott) Langley 
Married December 24, 1908, to Eva Grace 




Allen. Attended Pacific University at Forest 
Grove, Oregon. Studied law in the office of 
his father, W. M. Langley, at Forest Grove, 
Oregon. Came to Oregon in 1891, and was 
admitted to the bar of this state on October 
11, 1897. Located in Portland Februarv 
1901. 

WILLIAM M. LANGLEY. 
Eesidence and office, Forest Grove, Oregon. 
Born May 29, 1845, in Morgan County, Ohio. 
Son of John and Degenira (Murray) Langley. 
Married December 16, 1873, to Amanda Scott. 
Eead law in office of brother, E. T. Langley, 
Shelsburg, Iowa, and Judge Conklin, Vinton. 
Iowa. Attended Mt. Vernon College, Mt. 
Vernon, Iowa. Admitted to the bar of Iowa 
in June, 1872. Moved to Beaver City, Ne- 
braska, and was admitted to the bar of that 
state in 1882. Eemoved to Hoxie, Kansas, 
and was admitted to the bar of Kansas in 
1888. Came to Oregon in 1891, locating at 
Forest Grove, and has practiced his profession 
there continuously since. Is now senior mem- 
ber of the firm of Langley & Son. 

WALTER PAUL LaROCHE. 

Besidence, 758 East Pine street; office 612- 
613 Chamber of Commerce building, Port- 
land. Born November 9, 1866, at Savannah. 
Georgia. Son of I. Drayton and A. M. (Eich- 
ards) LaEoche. Married in 1891 to Nan B. 
Dawson. Educated at the public schools of 
Savannah, Georgia, and graduated from the 
Chatham Academy, Georgia, in 1882. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Savannah, Georgia, in 
December, 1887. Came to Oregon in 1905. 
Served two sessions in Georgia Legislature. 
Member Commercial Club, of Portland. 

D. C. LATOURETTE. 

Besidence and office, Oregon City. Born 
Oregon City, November 14, 1856. Married 
in October, 1882, to Ella Scott. Educated at 
public schools of Oregon and later at Pacific 
University, Forest Grove, Oregon, from whic'i 
he graduated in 1878. Was professor of 
mathematics in McMinnville College, Mc- 
Minnville, Oregon, from 1878 to 1880. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Oregon in 1882, and be- 
gan the practice of law in Oregon City in 
partnership with Charles D. Latourette, under 
the firm name C. D. & D. C. Latourette, from 
1882 to 1910. President Commercial and 
First National Banks, Oregon City. Bepub 
lican. 

HOWARD FENTON LATOURETTE. 

Besidence, East Twelfth street; office 527 
Corbett building, Portland. Born in Oregon 
City, Oregon, September 4, 1883. Son of 
Charles David and Sedonia (Bird) Latourette. 
Graduated from Oregon City High School in 
1901, and from University of Oregon, Depart- 
ment of Law, in June, 1905. Admitted to the 
bar of Oregon, June 19, 1905. Senior member 
of the firm of Latourette & Latourette. Dem- 
ocrat. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



169 



JOHN RABDILPH LATOURETTE. 

Kesielence 444 Ainsworth avenue; office, 527 
Corbett building, Portland. Born in Oregon 
City, Oregon, January 4, 1886. Son of 
Charles David and Sedonia (Bird) Latourette. 
Attended public schools in Oregon City, Ore- 
gon, later the University of Oregon, in 1907, 
receiving degree of A. B., and Columiba Uni- 
versity, Department of Law, in 1907-8. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Oregon, October, 1908. 
Member of the firm of Latourette & Latour- 
ette since May 1909. Member Multnomah 
Amateur Athletic Club, University Club. Re 
publican. 

LYMAN EZRA LATOURETTE. 

Kcsidence, northeast corner Ouster and 
Water streets; office 206 McKay building, 
Portland. Born November 6, 1872, at Oregon 
City, Oregon. Son of Lyman Daniel C. and 
Ann Eliza (Fisher) Latourette. Attended 
public schools, then academic and college de- 
partments at McMinnville College, McMinn- 
ville, Ore., graduating in June, 1894, with de- 
gree of A. B. Attended University of Chi- 
cago, 1895-1896, and Columbia University, 
New York City, 1896-99, receiving from that 
institution degrees of A. M. and LL. B. Ad- 
mitted to the Oregon bar in October, 1899; 
Admitted to the United States Circuit and 
District Courts for Oregon, October, 1901, and 
to the United States Circuit Court for Wash- 
ington, April, 1902. Trustee and Secretary 
McMinnville College. Member of University 
Club, Portland. Republican. 

MORTIMER DILLON LATOURETTE. 

Residence, 1308 Main street; office Oregon 
City. Born November 27, 1881, at Oregon 
City. Son of Charles D. and Sedonie B. 
(Shaw) Latourette. Married July 29, 1908, 
to Edna M. Daulton. Early education re- 
ceived at the public schools of Oregon City; 
one year at Portland Academy; two years at 
the University of Oregon. Admitted to the 
bar at Salem in 1904. Treasurer of the City 
of Oregon City for four and one-half years. 
Democrat. 

COE I. LEAVENGOOD. 

Residence and office, Myrtle Creek, Oregon. 
Born in Coshocton, Ohio, May 14, 1864. Son 
of Daniel J. and Mary E (Lower) Leaven- 
good. Married Bessie B. Miller, September 3, 
1903. Attended public schools of Coshocton, 
Ohio; graduated from Normal College, Mans- 
field, Ohio, with degree of M. S.; Kansas 
City School of Law, 1898-99. Admitted to 
bar at Harrisonville, Missouri, September 1, 
1900, practicing there for a short time. Came 
to Oregon in April, 1901; practiced law in 
Roseburg, 1902 to 1908; in Myrtle Creek, 1908 
to date. Served in Company D, First Separate 
Battalion, O. N. G. President Umpqua Valley 
Fruit Association. Member Masonic and K. 
of P. fraternities. Republican. 



ALFRED L. LEAVITT. 

Residence and office, Klamath Falls. Born 
October 17, 1859, at Sonora, Tuolumne County, 
California. Son of Hiram L. and Eliza N. 
(Reed) Leavitt. Married July 24, 1889, to 




Florence M. Read. Educated at the public 
schools of Mono County, California, and at the 
University of California, Berkeley, California. 
Came to Oregon in 1884. Took course of law 
through the Sprague Correspondence Schools. 
Admitted to the bar of Oregon, at Salem, in 
October, 1898, and commenced the practice of 
his profession at Klamath Falls. Practiced 
alone until 1900, when he formed a partner- 
ship with Fred H. Mills, under the firm name 
Leavitt & Mills, which continued until 
3905, since which time he has practiced alone. 
Was Clerk of Klamath County, 1888-1896, 
and Deputy District Attorney of the same 
county for two years. Elected Police Judge 
of Klamath in 1905 and fills that office at the 
present time. Member Masonic, and A. 0. U. 
W. fraternities. Republican. 

JOHN A. LEE. 

Residence, 195 North Twenty-second street; 
office, Columbia Trust Co., Board of Trade 
building, Portland. Born October 14, 1871, 
near North Yamhill, Yamhill County, Oregon. 
Son of Alfred and Nancy J. (Laughlin) Lee. 
Prepared for college at public schools and at 
Tualatin Academy, Forest Grove, Oregon. 
Graduated from Pacific University, at Forest 
Grove, Oregon, in 1891, with degree of A. B. 
Went to New Whatcom (now Bellingham). 
Washington, the same year, and was engaged 
in teaching there until 1903. Read law there 
for a year (1902-1903) in office of Dorr, Had 
ley & Hadley. Spent next two years at Wash- 
ington, D. C., receiving degree of LL. B. at 



170 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Columbian (now George Washington) Univer- 
sity, in 1905. Admitted to the bar of District 
of Columbia in 1904, and to the bar of Oregon 
January 3, 1907. Practiced law with Gam- 
mans & Malarkey, of Portland, from October, 



Sarah A. (Briggs) Leet. Education received 
at the public and high schools of Ovid, Michi- 
gan, and at Spring Arbor Academy, Jackson 
County, from 1885 to 1887. Admitted to the 
bar of Michigan in 1888; to the bar of Min 




1905, to May, 1907. Formed law partnership 
in 1907 with O. L. Ferris, under the firm name 
oi Lee & Ferris, which partnership exists to 
date. In 1907 helped organize the Columb a 
Trust Company, becoming vice-president and 
attorney for same. Clerk in Clerk's Docu- 
ment Eoom, Washington, D. C., 1903 to 1905. 
Principal of New Whatcom High School, 1896 
to 1903. Member of Mazamas and at present 
president of that organization. Member K. 
of P. and Commercial Club, of Portland. Ee- 
publican. 

RUFUS ALBERTUS LEITER. 

Residence, 385 Aspen street; office, 609 Fen- 
ton building, Portland. Born October 3, 1875, 
at Wapakoneta, Ohio. Son of John Marti -i 
and Margaret (Katz) Leiter. Married April 
17, 1905, to Christabel R. Sobey. Receive 1 
his early education at the public schools at 
Wapakoneta, Ohio, up to 1890, when he re 
moved to Portland, Oregon, and attended the 
public schools of this city until 1895. He 
then entered the Leland Stanford, Jr., Univer 
sity, at Palo Alto, Cal., from which he grad- 
uated in 1899, with the degree of A. B. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Oregon October 3, 1899, 
Assistant attorney Southern Pacific Company 
Lines in Oregon. Member of the University 
Club, of Portland. Republican. 

WILLIAM A. LEET. 

Residence, 739 Overton street; office, Lum- 
bermens building, Portland. Born March 27. 
1863, at Ovid, Michigan. Son of William and 




nesota in 1890, and to the bar of Nebraska in 
1886. Came to Oregon in 1908, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar of this state in November, 
]909. Admitted to the Supreme Court of the 
State of Michigan in 1897. Practiced law in 
Orleans, Nebraska, in 1886 and 1887, then 
moved back to Itha, Michigan, and pract'ced 
there until 1906; went to Lansing, Michigan, 
and practiced there unt : l his removal to Ore- 
gon. Republican. 

JOHN A. LEMERY. 

Residence, 561 C street, Ashland, Oregon; 
office, 171 East Main street. Born at Shel- 
burn, Canada, March 12, 1860. Son of David 
J. and Emily A. Lemery. July 17, 1907, mar- 
ried Miss Olive Libby. Attended the common 
school at Hariston, Canada, until nine years 
of age, when he moved with his parents to 
Inkster, North Dakota; he continued his edu- 
ucation in the public school there for five 
years. Later he entered Hamlin University, 
at Hamlin, Minnesota, for three years. At- 
tended Red River Valley University one year. 
Attended Northwestern University two years 
at Evanston, Illinois; was educated for the 
ministry, wlr'ch vocation he followed about 
ten years, holding a number of important ap- 
pointments in the M. E. Church. In 1901 did 
chaplain work in the U. S. Army as an extra 
in connection with his pastoral work. Taking 
up the study of law, he entered the University 
of North Dakota, graduating in 1906 with the 
degree of LL. B. Practiced law in Grand 
Forks, North Dakota, until 1907, when he 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



171 




came to Oregon, opening an office at Ashland, 
being admitted to the bar that same year, 
where he now practices his profession at the 
present time. Was admitted to the bar of 
North Dakota in 1906. Member of A. F. & 
A. M., K. of P. and Woodman fraternities, 
and Commercial Club of Ashland. Republi- 
can. 

CHARLES E. LENON. 

Beside nee, 545 
East Thirty-fourth 
street; office, 313.\ 
Washington street, 
Po r 1 1 a n d. Born 
August 21, 1878, 
at Logansport, In- 
diana. Son of Al- 
vin and Catherine 
(Spangler) Lenon. 
Edu cation was 
very meager. Did 
not attend school 
after attaining 15 
years of age. 
Studied law at 
home at night 
while working as 
a cigarmaker dur- 
ing the day. Re- 
ceived no instruction in law. Was admitted 
to the bar at Salem in 1900, and commenced 
practice at Salem, Oregon, in 1902. In 1906 
removed to Portland, where he entered part- 
nership with John A. Jeffrey, and formed the 
firm of Jeffrey & Lenon, which continues to 
date. Member Executive Committee of Mu- 
nicipal Association. President of Modern 
Brotherhood, Maccabees, and of Fraternal 
Brotherhood fraternities. Republican. 

GEORGE PERLEY LENT. 

Residen c e 1172 
Cleveland avenue; 
office, 417 Corbett 
building, Portland. 
Bom November 1, 
1852, at Cleone 7 
Multnomah Coun- 
ty, Oregon. Son 
of Oliver Perry 
and Martha Al- 
m i r a (Buckley) 
Lent. Married Oc- 
tober 19, 1881, to 
Mary M. Johnson. 
Educated in the 
public schools of 
Multnomah Coun- 
ty; at the Corval- 
lis Agricul t u r a 1 
College, graduat- 
ing in 1876 with the degree of B. S., and at 
the University of Oregon Law School, grad- 
uating in 1896 with degree of LL. B. Ad- 
mitted to the bar June 8, 1896, at Salem, 
since which time he has practiced alone in this 
city. Was School Clerk two terms and Road 




Supervisor two years. Opened up system of 
boulevard drives around the Heights. Charter 
member Evening Star Grange, United Arti- 
sans, Royal Arch Mason, Portland Commer- 
cial Club, Chamber of Commerce. Republican. 

BARGE EDWARD LEONARD. 

Residence, 446 Tenth street; office 511 Fen- 
ton building, Portland. Born November 17, 
1886, in Rochelle, Illinois. Son of Edward 
and Eliza (Young) Leonard. Graduated from 
the Rochelle High School June, 1904, and 
later attended Northwestern University. En- 
tered the University of Michigan in Septem- 
ber, 1906, and graduated from the law depart- 
ment, June, 1909, obtaining the degree of 
LL. B. Admitted to the Supreme Court of 
Michigan at Lansing on the 25th day of June, 
1909, and was admitted to the Supreme Court 
of Oregon at Salem on the 26th day of Au- 
gust, 1909. Moved to Oregon in July, 1909, 
and has since been associated with the firm 
of Manning & White. Member of the Uni- 
versity Club. Republican. 

WILLIAM STEPHENS LEVENS. 

Residence, 1783 Valley avenue; office. 
County Courthouse, Baker City. Born Janu- 
ary 28, 1873, at Baker City, Oregon. Sou of 
Basil Wells and Sarah Ann (DeGuire) Levens. 




Married June 18, 1896, to Estelle Randall 
Parker. Educated in the public schools of 
Baker City and at the Hopkins Academy, Oak- 
land, Cal., graduating from the same in 1893. 
Entered Yale College, Law Department, in 
1893, and graduated in 1895, with degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. Admitted to the Supreme 
Court of Oregon July 20, 1895, and to the 
Supreme Court of California in January, 1896. 
Admitted to the Circuit and District Courts 



172 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



of Oregon in 1903. In 1900 formed partner- 
ship with W. G. Drowley, under the firm name 
of Drowley & Levens, which continues to date. 
Elected Police Judge of Baker City thres 
times; resigned to qualify as District At- 
torney. Elected District Attorney for Eighth 
Judicial District in June, 1908. Member Ma- 
sonic, B. P. O. E., K. of P. and W. O. W. 
fraternities. Democrat. 

ANDREW T. LEWIS. 

Kesidence 720 East Salmon street; office, 
612 Couch building, Portland. Born Novem- 
ber 10, 1848 in Franklin, Johnson County, In- 
diana. Son of Andrew and Elizabeth (Clark) 
Lewis. Married November 24, 1886, to Mar- 
garet Dauphin. Attended the State Normal 
University at Normal, Illinois, and graduated 
in the class of 1871. Later attended the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, Law Department, gradu- 
ating with degree LL. B. in 1875. Moved to 
Oregon in 1888, and was admitted to the bar 
at Salem, October 1, 1888. City Attorney Ur- 
bana, 111., 1875 to 1878; appointed Clerk of 
the United States District Court of the Dis- 
trict of Alaska, and "Secretary and Treasurer 
of the Territory, 1884 to 1887. 

LAWRENCE ANDREW LILJEQVIST. 

Residence, Coquille, Oregon; office, same. 
Born February 24, 1880, at Kelley, Marathon 
County, Wisconsin. Son of John and Alice 
(Johnson) Liljeqvist. Attended country 




schools at Kelley, Wisconsin, until fifteen 
years of age, when he moved to Wausau, 
Wisconsin, and entered the high school 
there, graduating in 1899. In September of 
that year entered the State University of 
Wisconsin, at Madison, and graduated in 
1903 with degree of B. L.; then took course 
at Chicago Musical College in 1904; returned 



to the State University in the fall of that 
year and completed the law course in 1906. 
Came to Oregon in the summer of that year 
and was admitted to the bar at Salem. Went 
to Marshfield in the fall of the same year 
and opened up a law office. In February, 
1907, entered into partnership with J. M. 
Blake, under the firm name Blake & Lilje- 
qvist, and later in the same year Francis H. 
Clark became a member of the firm. In the 
spring of 1907 was appointed United States 
Commissioner with office at Marshfield. In 
the spring of 1908 was appointed Deputy 
Prosecuting Attorney for Coos County, which 
office he still holds. In February, 1909, left 
Marshfield and went to Coquille, where he is 
at present associated with A. J. Sherwood 
of that place. Member B. P. O. E. frater- 
nity. Eepublican. 

JOHN T. LIGHTER. 

Eesidence, Eleventh and Yamhill streets, 
Portland; office, Failing building, Portland. 
Born September 25, 1859, at Washington, 
D. C. Son of John T. and Mary A. (Town- 
send) Lighter. Educated at Columbian Uni- 
versity, Washington, D. C., receiving LL. B. 
degree. Admitted to the bar of Washington, 
D. C., in 1881. Removed to Missouri in 1881 
and began the practice of his profession at 
Hannibal, continuing until 1893, when he re- 
moved to Astoria, Oregon, practicing until 
1895, then removing to Portland where he has 
since practiced. Republican. 

STEWART B. LINTHICUM. 




Residence, 616 Flanders street; office, 424 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Member of the firm of Williams, Wood & 
Linthicum. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



173 



EDWIN LITTLEFIELD. 

Eesidence, 415 North Thirty-first street; 
office, 520-21 Corbett building, Portland. 
Born February 14, 1873, in Yamhill County, 
Oregon. Son of Horace E. and Anna (Ker- 
win) Littlefield. Married July 20, 1896, to 
Althea E. Forrest. Educated at the public 
schools of Oregon, the high school, and later 
Lafayette Seminary at Lafayette, Oregon, 
graduating from same in 1891. Was admitted 
to the bar of Oregon June 1, 1900, and started 
practicing law in connection with his duties 
as School Superintendent. In 1904 moved to 
Moro, Oregon, and engaged in the practice 
of law there. In May, 1907, was appointed 
Circuit Judge of the Eleventh Judicial Dis- 
trict, and was elected in June, 1908, to fill 
said position. Pleld this position until March 
15, 1909, when he came to Portland and en- 
gaged in the general practice of his profes- 
sion to date. Eepublican. 

WILLIAM ROY LITZENBERG. 

Residence, 920 
Hancock street; 
office, 508 Wells- 
Fargo Bldg., Port- 
land. Born July 
23, 1875, at Rus- 
sell, Lucas County, 
Iowa. Son of Ben- 
jamin F. W. and 
Mary A. (Allucia) 
Litzenberg. Mar- 
ried Ella Joseph- 
ine Farrar July 7, 
1903. Early edu- 
cation received at 
the public and 
high schools of 
Russell, Iowa. At- 
tended Capital 
City Commercial 
College, Des Moines, Iowa; Chicago College 
of Law (Lake Forest University), Chicago, 
Illinois, graduating in 1901 with LL. B. de- 
gree. Made special study of law of Patents, 
Trade Marks and Copyrights, with the firms 
of Packer & Carter, and Offield, Towle & 
Linthicum, both of Chicago. Admitted to 
practice in the State of Illinois in October, 
1901. Came to Oregon in 1905 and was ad 
mitted to the bar of this state in May, 1906., 
and to the United States Circuit and District 
Courts, District of Oregon, March, 1910. 
Member Multnomah Bar Association; active 
member First Baptist Church of Portland; 
Assistant Attorney in office of Hon. W. W. 
Cotton; General Attorney The Oregon Rail- 
road & Navigation Company 1906 to 1910, 
when he resigned to engage in the general 
practice of law, making a specialty of patent 
and corporation law. Eepublican. 

CHARLES E. LOCKWOOD. 

Office, 315 Columbia building, Portland. 
Born June 14, 1867, at Pittsfield, Pennsyl- 




vania. Son of Olvin Alonzo and Barbara 
(Dalrymple) Lockwood. Attended public 
schools at Northfield, Minnesota; at Colusa, 
Cal.; fit Boseburg and Eugene, Or. Spent four 
years at the State University of Oregon and 
two years at the Law Department of the 
same University, in Portland, graduating 
therefrom in June, 1890, with degree LL. B. 
Admitted to the bar of Oregon upon examina- 
tion at Salem, October, 1889. Appointed As- 
sistant United States Attorney for Oregon in 
1890 and served until March 4, 1893, since 
which time engaged in private practice at 
Portland. Organizer of Oregon State Bar As- 
sociation in 1891. Secretary of The Republi- 
can Club of Portland. Republican. 

FRANK J. LONERGAN. 

R e s i d ence, 67 
North Twenty- 
first street; office, 
812 Electric build- 
ing, Portland. 
Born in 1882 at 
Polo, Ogle County, 
Illinois. Son of 
J. S. and Mary 
(Lynch) Loner- 
gan. Came to Ore- 
gon in 1904. Grad- 
uated from the 
high school at 
Polo., Illinois, in 
1899; graduated 
from Notre Dame 
University, Notre 
Dame, Indiana, in 
1904, with degree 

of LL. B. Professor of History and Econom- 
ics at Columbia University, Portland, from 
1904 to 1908. Admitted to the bar at Salem 
in 1908. Since August, 1908, has been asso- 
ciated with Franklin T. Griffith. Member 
Knights of Columbus and M. A. A. C. 

JOEL M. LONG. 

Residence, Shat- 
tttck, Oregon; of- 
fice, 520 Henry 
building, Portland. 
Born in Lafayette 
County, Wiscon- 
sin, November 22, 
1857. Son of Wil- 
liam and Martha 
(M i n a r) Long. 
Married July 19, 
1879, to Electa A 
Thomas. Came to 
Oregon in 1890. 
Received early ed- 
ucation in the dis- 
trict schools of 
W i s c o n s in. At- 
tended gram mar 
schools in Warren, 
Illinois, and Nora Springs, Iowa. 





174 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Iowa State University, Iowa City, 1877, 1878. 
Admitted to bar in Charles City, Iowa, Octo 
her, 1879; United States Territorial Court. 
South Dakota, in 1881; Supreme Court Ter- 
ritory Dakota, 1887; Supreme Court Oregon, 
October, 1892; United States Court and Dis- 
trict Courts of Oregon, December, 1893; Su- 
preme Court United States, May 13, 1901. 
Practiced law in Iowa, 1880; in Dakota from 
1881 to 1889; in Oregon from 1892 to the 
present time. From 1882 to 1884 was County 
Judge of Brule County, South Dakota. From 
1885 to 1888 was City Attorney of Chamber 
lin, South Dakota. From 1888 to 1890 was 
Mayor of that city. Member of the Lower 
House of the Oregon Legislature in the Ses- 
sion of 1895. Was City Attorney for Port- 
land, Oregon, from July, 1898, to July, 1902. 
Member of the Masonic fraternity, order of 
Elks and Woodmen of the World. Republi- 
can. 

PAUL M. LONG. 

Residence, 3H1 \^> 
Mill street; office, 
506 Worcester 
building, Portland. 
Born in Franklin, 
Penn., September 
17, 1883. Son of 
James M. and 
Jennie S. (Ladd) 
Long. Came to 
Oregon in 1885. 
Atte n d e d public 
schools at Salem, 
Ore.; Brownsville 
High School; Ore- 
gon Law School, 
graduating with 
degree of LL. B. 
in 1905. Admitted 
to bar at Salem, 

Oregon, June, 190o. Deputy Clerk of Justice 
Court, Portland, District of Multnomah 
County. Republican. 

JOHN W. LODEB. 

Residence, corner Ninth and Center streets; 
office, Stevens building, Oregon City. Born 
June 19, 1871, at Paynesville, Pike County. 
Missouri. Son of Conrad and Annie M. (Hal- 
ley) Loder. Married September 10, 1902, to 
Grace E. Riley. Came to Oregon with his 
parents at the age of five years, and re- 
ceived his early education at the common 
schools of Oregon, at McMinnville College, 
from which he graduated in 1894 with B. S. 
degree; at Columbian University (now George 
Washington University), Washington, D. C., 
from which he graduated in 1896. Admitted 
to the bar at Salem in October, 1896, after 
which he worked for four years for Clacka- 
mas Abstract Company. Member Masonic 
and I. O. O. F. fraternities and of Oregon 
City Commercial Club. Democrat'. 




STEPHEN A. LOWELL. 

Residence, Pendleton, Oregon; office, same. 
Born January 1, 1859, at West Minot, Maine. 
Son of William and Hannah Shaw (Atwood) 
Lowell. Married June 4, 1884, to Ella Pur- 
ington. Educated in the common schools of 
Maine, at Hebron Academy, Oxford County, 
Maine; at Bates College, Lewiston, Maine, 
from which he graduated in 1882 with degree 
of A. B., and later received A. M. degree from 
the same college. Admitted to practice in all 
the courts of Maine in 1885. Came to Ore 
gon in 1891 and was admitted to practice 
the following year. Member of State Board 
of Normal School Trustees of Maine, from 
1889 to 1891; Clerk of Supreme Court of 
Oregon, Eastern District, 1893 to 1895; Cir 
cuit Judge of Sixth Judicial District of Ore- 
gon, 1895 to 1900. Republican. 

EDWARD ALEXIUS LUNDBURG. 

Office, 527 Cham 
ber of Commerce, 
Portland, Oregon. 
Born September 4, 
1875, at Chicago, 
Illinois. Son of 
Peter and P e r- 
n e 1 1 a (Randau) 
Lundburg. Mar- 
ried Februarv 28, 
1910, to Floy* Fox, 
of Oak Park, Illi- 
nois. Graduated 
from the Wayne, 
Nebraska, High 
School in 1895; at- 
tended the Uni- 
versity of Nebras- 
ka, g r a d u a ting 
from the Law De- 
partment of that institution in 1903 with 
LL. B. degree. Admitted to practice in the 
Supreme Court of Nebraska in June, 1903; 
to the Supreme Court of Illinois in 1905. 
Located in Chicago and represented certain 
packing companies as Attorney until his re- 
moval to Oregon in 1909. Since his admis- 
sion to the bar of this state has practiced 
his profession in partnership with Lawrence 
A. McNary under the firm name McNary & 
Lundburg. Elected County Superintendent 
of Schools, Wayne County, Nebraska, in 1899 
and served two years. Appointed member of 
Nebraska-South Dakota Boundary Commis- 
sion by Governor John H. Mickey, to re-es 
tablish the Missouri River boundary line 
between the states, in 1903. Member Phi 
Delta Phi Greek letter fraternity. Republi 
can. 

HALL STONER LUSK. 

Residence, 324 Thirteenth street; office, 530 
Lumbermens building, Portland. Born Sep- 
tember 21, 1883, in Washington, D. C. Son 
of Charles Rufus and Florence (Speake) 
Lusk. Educated in the public schools of 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



175 



Washington D. C., from 1889 to 1897; at 
Georgetown Preparatory School 1897 to 1900; 
Georgetown College, Washington, D. C., 1900 
to 1904, graduating with A. B. degree; Law 
Department of same school 1904 to 1907, when 
he received LL. B. degree. Admitted to the 
bar of the District of Columbia January 8, 
1908. Came to Oregon in 1909 and was ad- 
mitted to the bar of this state January 11, 
1910. Was Secretary to Chief Justice Shep- 
ard of the Court of Appeals of the District 
of Columbia from April, 1906, to July, 1909. 
Member Delta Chi fraternity. 

EDWARD s. j. MCALLISTER. 

Eesidence, 292 
Twelfth street; of 
fice, 411 Fenton 
building, Portland 
Born May 25th, 
1869, at Laurel 
Delaware. Son of 
William N. and 
Sarah Frances 
(Lowe) McAllis- 
ter. Married in 
1898 to Margare: 
W. Wiley. Early 
education received 
at the public 
schools of Dela 
ware. From 1884 
to 1888, attended 
the Wi 1 m i ngton 
Academy at Do- 
ver, Delaware. From 1889 to 1891, attended 
Dickinson College at Carlisle, Pennsylvania. 
From 1893 to 1895, Syracuse University, 
Syracuse, New York, graduating with degrees 
of A. B. and A. M. From 1895 to 1897 at- 
tended Boston University, and from 1901 to 
1903, the University of Virginia, receiving 
degree of LL. D. Adlnitted to the bar at 
Wythville, Virginia, in June, 1903. Came to 
Oregon in October, 1904, and was admitted 
to the bar here. Entered the office of Judge 
Fenton in 1905. In June, 1906, formed part- 
nership with Kobert J. Upton under the firm 
name of McAllister & Upton, which continue; 
to date. Member Union Philosophical So- 
ciety and var'ous other literary and civic 
associations. Democrat. 

JAMES MCCAIN. 

Eesidence, McMinnville, Oregon; office, 
First National Bank building. Born March 
30, 1844, at Delphi, Indiana. Son of 
James and Sarah (Earnest) McCain. Mar- 
ried October 8, 1886, to Electa C. Sull'van. 
Came to Oregon when seven years old and re 
ceived his education at the common and 
public schools of this state; at McMinnville 
College, McMinnville; at Willamette Univer- 
sity, Salem, and at La Creole Academy, 
Dallas, Oregon. Eead law with P. C. Sulli- 
van at Dallas, and was admitted to the bar 



in September, 1868. Served as District At- 
torney of Third Judicial District of State of 
Oregon from July, 1892, to July, 1896. 
Served as Postmaster of McMinnville from 





1898 to 1902. Member Eepublican Club of 
Portland, Kono Club, B. P. O. E. and K. of 
P. fraternities. Has engaged actively since 
September, 1868, excepting time spent as Post- 
master. Eepublican. 

CLIFTON N. McARTHUR. 

Eesidence, 739 
Glisan street, Port- 
land; office, State 
House, Salem, Ore. 
Bom at The Dalles, 
Ore., June 10th, 
1879. Son of Lewis 
L. and Harriet 
(Nesmith) Me Ar- 
thur. Educated a" 
the Bishop Scott 
A c a d e my, Port- 
land, and the Uni- 
versity -of Oregon 
at Eugene, from 
which institution 
he graduated in 
1901 with A. B, 
degree. In 1906 he 
was admitted to 

the bar of Oregon, at Salem, and commenced 
the practice of law in Portland. For a time 
he was associated with Snow & McCamant, 
in the Concord building, and later practiced 
independently in the Board of Trade build- 
ing. In the fall campaign of 1908 he was 
Secretary of the Eepublican State Central 
Committee. In 1909, he was a member and 
Speaker of the House of Eepresentatives of 




176 



IOGRAPHICAL 



the State of Oregon. On March 1, 1909, he 
was appointed Secretary to Governor F. W. 
Benson, which position he holds at present. 
Member of the University Club and M. A. 
A. C., of Portland, and Illihee Club, of 
Salem, Oregon. Eepublican. 

THOMAS A. McBRIDE. 

Residence, Oregon City, Oregon; office, Sa- 
lem, Oregon. Born November 15, 1847, in 
Yamhill County, Oregon. Son of James and 
Mahala (Miller) McBride. Married February 
7, 1874, to Mary E. Merrill. Educated at the 
common schools of Oregon and at McMinn- 
ville College. Admitted to the bar at Salem 




in October, 1870, and began the practice of 
his profession at Lafayette, Oregon, in the 
same year. Removed to St. Helens in 1872 
and practiced there until 1877, when he re- 
moved to Salt Lake City and practiced there 
until 1880; then returned to Oregon and en- 
gaged in the practice of law at Oregon City, 
in partnership with the late E. L. Eastham, 
continuing the partnership until his election 
as Circuit Judge in 1892. Member of House 
of Oregon Legislature, 1876, District Attor- 
ney, Fifth Judicial District, 1882 to 1892, 
Judge Fifth Judicial District, 1892, to May 1, 
1909, on which date he was appointed Asso- 
ciate Justice of the Supreme Court. Member 
Illihee Club. Republican. 

LOYAL H. MCCARTHY. 

Office, 603-7 Fenton building, Portland. 
Born July 4, 1877, at Eagle, Wisconsin. Son 
of William and Lydia (Holcomb) McCarthy. 
Attended common schools of Waukesha and 
Dane Counties, Wisconsin; the High school at 
Edgerton, Wisconsin; graduated from Albion 
Academy and Normal Institute at Albion, 




Wisconsin, Philosophical Course, in 1897; 
Northwestern Business College, Madison, Wis- 
consin, and the University of Wisconsin, 
from which he graduated in 1901 with LL. B. 
degree. Admitted to the bar of Wisconsin 
in 1901 and practiced at Milwaukee, Wiscon- 
sin, until 1906. Practiced at Reno, Nevada, 
in 1906-7. Came to Oregon in 1908 and was 
admitted to the bar of this state in that year. 
Has since practiced his profession here, in 
association with the firm of Bronaugh & 
Bronaugh. 

WALLACE McCAMANT. 

Residence, 235 
King street; office. 
500 Concord Bldg., 
Portland. Born 
Sept. 22, 1867, at 
Hollidaysburg, Pa. 
Son of Thomas 
and Delia (Rol- 
lins) McCamant. 
Married April 25, 
1893, to Katherine 
S.Davis. Receive! 
his early educa- 
tion at the public 
schools of Harris- 
burg, Pa. Gradu- 
ated from th 3 
Harrisburg High 
School in 1884 and 
spent one year at 

the Harrisburg Academy at the same place. 
Entered Lafayette College in 1885 and gradu 
ated in 1888 with the degree of Ph. B. Read 
law at Lancaster, Pa., with Brown & Hensel. 
Was admitted to the bar of Pennsylvan : a at 
Lancaster in 1890, and to the bar of Oregon 
the same year, having moved to the State of 
Oregon during that year. Employed as clerk 
in the office of Gilbert & Snow from No- 
vember, 1890, to April, 1892, when Mr. Gil- 
bert became United States Circuit Judge. 
Then formed a partnership with Zera Snow 
(September 1, 1892), which association still 
continues, under the firm name of Snow & 
MeCamant. Delegate to Republican Stat 
Conventions 1892-94-96-98 and 1900. Delegate 
to Republican National Conventions 1896 and 
1900. President Oregon Society Sons of 
American Revolution. Master Ainsworth 
Chapter Rose Croix. Member Loyal Legion, 
Willamette Lodge A. F. & M., A. and A. S. 
Rite, Al Kader Temple A. A. O. M. S. Mem 
ber Arlington Club, University Club, Wa 
verly Golf Club. Republican. 

CLAUDE CHARLES McCOLLOCH. 

Residence. 1413 Third street; office, Second 
and Court streets, Baker City, Oregon. Born 
January 14, 1888, at Red Bluff, California. 
^Son of Charles Henry and Mary Elizabeth 
(Wooddy) McColloch. Received his early 
education at the grammar and high school in 
Portland, Oregon, having come to this state 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



177 




at the age of two years. Attended Leland 
Stanford University from 1904 to 1907, an.-] 
the Law Department of the University of 
Chicago from 1907 to 1909, graduating with 
Ph. B. degree. Admitted to the bar of the 
State of Oregon in May, 1909. Member Phi 
Delta Phi fraternity and Kappa Sigma Aca- 
demic fraternity. Independent. 

HENRY McCONNELL. 

Eesidence, 501 
East Twenty-ninth 
street; office, 207 
Chamber of Com- 
merce, Portland, 
Oregon. Born Sep 
tember 17, 1879, in 
Coshocton, Ohio. 
Son of James 
Francis and Jose- 
phine (Hammel) 
M c C o nnell. Re 
ceived his educa- 
t i o n Woodstock 
Grammar School; 
Portland, Oregon, 
Lincoln High 
School, Portland. 
Oregon, 1898; stu- 
dent Leland Stan- 
ford University 1899-1901. Graduated from 
Willamette University Law School 1904 with 
degree LL. B. Admitted to the bar of Ore- 
gon Supreme Court 1904. Stenographer Ore- 
gon Supreme Court 1902-1907. Entered into 
partnership with F. M. Saxton under firm 
name Saxton & McConnell in Baker City, 
Oregon, 1907-1908. In partnership with Wil- 
liam G. Hale under firm name Hale & Mc- 
Connell in Portland, Oregon, 1908 - 1909. 
Formed partnership 1909 with Clarence H. 
Gilbert under firm name Gilbert & McCon- 
nell, which partnership continues to date. 
Member of Pacific Lodge, No. 50, A. F. & 
A. M., Salem, Oregon; Multnomah Chapter, 
No. 1, R. A. M.; Hodson Chapter, No. 1, R. 
& S. M. Second Lieutenant Third Infantry, 
Oregon National Guard. Republican. 

ELAINE McCORD. 

Residence, Woodburn; office, Odd Fellows' 
building, Woodburn. Born April 21, 1884, at 
Benton Harbor, Michigan. Son of Seely and 
Abbie (Brewster) McCord. Married June 17, 
1908, to Edith M. Bouton. Graduated from 
Benton Harbor College, Benton Harbor, Michi- 
gan, May 21, 1902. Attended University of 
Michigan Literary Department 1903, and 
Law Department, 1904-1906, graduating in 
June of that year with LL. B. degree. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Lansing, Michigan, June 
19, 1906. Came to Oregon in September, 1907, 
and was admitted to practice in this state, 
on probation, in October, 1908, and perma- 
nently on November 9, 1909. City Attorney 
of the City of Woodburn. Member Masonic 
and W. 0. W. fraternities. Republican, 



JOHN McCOURT. 

Residence, 560 Broadway street; office, 
Postoffice building, Portland. Born in Lis- 
towel, Canada, February 26, 1874. Son of 
James and Emma (Farncomb) McCourt. Mar- 
ried June 28, 1898, to Veva Boothby. Re- 
ceived his education in the public and com- 
mon schools of California and moved to Ore 




gon November, 1890. Attended the Wil- 
lamette University, Salem, Literary Depart- 
ment, one year, and the Law Department, Wil- 
lamette University, 1896, graduating there- 
from with a degree of LL. B. Admitted to 
the bar in Salem, Oregon, June, 1896, and 
practiced his profession until 1900 in that 
city, when he moved to Pendleton, where he 
remained until appointed United States At 
torney March 17, 1908. Elected member of 
House of Representatives, Oregon Legislature, 
June, 1898, and served Special Session of that 
year and Regular Session of 1899. Appointed 
Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Sixth Judicial 
District, 1905 to 1908. Republican. 

WILLIAM CAMPBELL McCULLOCH. 

Office, Board of Trade building, Portland. 
Born December 22, 1879, at Watseka, Illi- 
nois. Son of Charles Olin and Caroline 
(Campbell) McCulloch. Graduated from high 
school at Rock Island, Illinois, in 1898; 
graduated from the Ohio Wesleyan Univer- 
sity, 'Delaware, Ohio, in 1902, with A. B. 
degree. Graduated from Bloomington Law 
School, Bloomington, Illinois, in June, 1908, 
with LL. B. degree. Admitted to the bar of 
Illinois in June, 1908. Came to Oregon in 
November of that year and was admitted to 
the bar of this state on the 29th day of that 
month, and commenced the practice of law 



178 



BIOGRAPHICAL 




with his brother, C. E. McCulloch, under the 
firm name of McCulloch & McCulloch. Mem- 
ber Beta Theta Pi and Phi Delta Phi frater- 
nities. Eepublican. 

NEWTON McCOY. 

Residence, 654 
Hancock street; 
office, 715 Orego- 
nian Bldg., Port- 
land. Born May 
29, 1855, in Cedar 
County, Iowa. Son 
of William McCoy 
and SaHah Pran- 
ces (Neihiser) Mc- 
Coy. Married Apr. 
11, 1885, to Mary 
Frances Lyman. 
Came to Oregon at 
the age of nine 
years and received 
his education at 
the public schools 
of this state; at 
the Pacific Uni- 
versity, Forest Grove, Oregon, where he re- 
ceived the degree of A. B., and at Tualatin 
Academy, Forest Grove, Oregon, from which 
he graduated in 1880. Admitted to the bar 
of the Supreme Court of Oregon at Salem 
in 1884, and to the United States District and 
Circuit Courts in 1885. Taught school for 
two years after graduation, one year in the 
Territorial University, now the State Univer- 
sity of the State of Washington, Seattle. 
Came to Portland in 1882 and studied law in 
the office of Hon. Matthew P. Deady. From 
1885 to April, 1891, was in partnership with E. 
O. Doud, under the firm name Doud & McCoy. 
From 1891 to 1893, was in partnership with 
John T. Whalley, under the firm name of 
McCoy & Whalley, and from December, 1894, 
to October, 1896, was in partnership with 
ex-Governor W. W. Thayer, under the firm 
name Thayer & McCoy. Democrat. 

JOHN CURRAN McCUE. 

Eesidence, Twenty-first and Irving streets; 
office, 402-5 "Swetland building, Portland. 
Born November 17, 1876, in New York City, 
New York. Son of John and Margaret (Cof- 
fey) McCue. Married May 5, 1909, to 
Kathryn G. Shively. Moved to Oregon in 
1883 and received his education at the gram- 
mar schools at Astoria, Oregon, and later 
graduated from the high school of that city 
in 1893. Attended the Oregon Normal 
School, Monmouth, Oregon, 1896 and gradu- 
ated with the degree of B. S. D. and M. S. D. 
Taught school in Clatsop County after leav- 
ing the Normal School and was principal at 
the Alderbrook and Adair grammar schools 
from 1898 to 1902, when he resigned upon 
being appointed Deputy Collector of Cus- 
toms, at Astoria. Admitted to the bar at 
Salem, Oregon, June, 1905, and engaged in 



practice at Astoria, Oregon. Moved to Port- 
land March, 1909, and became associated in 
law practice with Gus C. Moser, which con- 
tinues to date. Deputy District Attorney, 
Fifth Judicial District. Member Legislature 




Clatsop County, two terms, sessions 1907 and 
1909. Candidate for Speaker of House, ses- 
sion 1909. Member of Judiciary, Ways and 
Means, and Eevision of Laws Committees. 
Member of B. P. O. E. and Past Exalted 
Euler of Astoria, No. 180; member Knights 
of Columbus. Eepublican. 

ALLEN H. McCURTAIN. 

Eesidence, 165 Stout street; office, 600 
Henry building, Portland. Born January 18, 
1886, at Kingman, Kansas. Son of Isaac 
Newton and Mary Haines (Parker) McCur- 
tain. Educated at the common schools of 
Kansas and in 1904 graduated from the 
Wichita Business College. In March, 1905, 
he removed to Oregon and began the study 
of law in the Oregon Law School. Graduated 
from University of Oregon Law School and 
received the degree of LL. B. on June 10, 
1907. Was Librarian of the Multnomah Law 
Library from September, 1906, to July, 1908. 
Is associated in the practice of his profession 
with the firm of Bauer & Greene. Member 
of B. P. O. E. and Phi Delta Phi fraternities. 
Eepublican. 

HERBERT SPENCER McCUTCHAN. 

Office, 302 Phoenix building, Portland. 
Born in Evansville, Indiana, December 24, 
1875. Son of Andrew and Elizabeth (Ham) 
McCutchan. Married to Edith Blasdel Octo- 
ber 14, 1903. Graduated from Evansville, 
Indiana, High School January 29, 1892; re- 
ceived degree of A. B. at Depauw University, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



179 



Greencastle, Indiana, June 12, 1895. At- 
tended Law School, University of Oregon, 
1899 to 1900. Moved to Oregon in 1898. Ad 
mitted to bar of State of Oregon, at Salem, 
June 11, 1900; to United States District 
Court for Oregon and United States Circuit 
Court for Oregon, February 27, 1908. Mem 
ber Masonic fraternity. Republican. 

THOMAS B. McDEVITT, Jr. 

Residence, Ionian Court, Eighteenth and 
Couch streets; office, 25-26 Washington 
building, Portland. Born in Portland, Ore- 




gon, March 23, 1878. Son of Thomas B., Sr., 
and Katherine (Riley) McDevitt. Married 
to Julia F. Cole November 24, 1909. Gradu- 
ate of public schools of Portland. Admitted 
to the bar at Salem, Oregon, March 21, 1898. 
Engaged in general practice. Republican. 

THOMAS F. B. McDEVITT. 

Residence, 325 Weidler street; office, 21 
Ainsworth block, 267 Oak street, Portland. 
Born in Chelsea, Massachusetts, May 15, 1843. 
Son of James and Mary (Green) McDevitt. 
Came to Oregon July 10, 1866. Married to 
Catherine Riley, April 16, 1873. Received 
early education in public schools of Boston 
and Chelsea, Massachusetts. Admitted to the 
bar at Salem, Oregon, October 3, 1894. and 
practiced in Portland ever since. Justice of 
Peace two terms, 1892-94 and 1896-98. Mem- 
ber of Lincoln-Garfield Post, G. A. R., De- 
partment of Oregon. Captain Company A, 
First Oregon Cavalry, Oregon National 
Guard. Republican. 

WILLIAM L. McFARLING. 

Residence, 857 East Eighth street, North; 
office, 500 Oregonian building. Born Janu- 
ary 17, 1878, in Belmont County, Ohio. Son 



of Nathan E. and Emily (Orrison) McFar- 
ling. Graduated from the National Normal 
University, Lebanon, Ohio, in 1905, with the 
degree of B. S. Graduated from the Ohio 
Northern University in Ada, Ohio, in 190S 
with the degree of LL. B. The same year he 
was admitted to the bar in Ohio. On Octo- 
ber 10, 1908, he came to Oregon. The fol- 
lowing year was admitted to the bar at 
Salem. Republican. 

DANIEL FRANCIS McGOWAN. 

Residence, Luxor Apartments; office, 411 
Beck building, Portland. Born December 14, 
1882, at Washington, D. C. Son of M. A. 
and Catherine C. (McGrath) McGowan. Came 
to Oregon December 10, 1908. Received his 
early education at the public and high 
schools of Washington, D. C.; at Wood's 
Commercial College, Washington, D. f and 
spent three and one-half years at George- 
town University, graduating in 1907 with 
LL. B. degree. Admitted to the bar at Sa- 
lem, Oregon, June 15, 1909. Was Assistant 
Contract Clerk in off ce of Chief Engineer, 
United States Army, Washington, D., C., 1907 
and 1908; was Claims Clerk in United States 
Forest Service, 1908-1910; was Assistant 
District Law Officer, United States Forest 
Service, Portland, Oregon, April 1, 1910. 
Member Delta Chi fraternity. 

JOHN T. McKEE. 

Residence, 570 Couch street; office, 309 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born April 18, 1861, in Buchanan County, 
Iowa. Son of Mahlon and Margaret (Cal- 
vin) McKee. Attended Lenox College at 
Hopkinton, Iowa, from 1880 to 1884, gradu- 
ating June 13, 1884. Admitted to the bar of 
Iowa in Des Moines May 10, 1888. Came to 
Oregon in June, 1890. Was elected City At- 
torney of Independence, Iowa, in 1889 and 
held that office until removed to Portland 
in June, 1890. Member M. A. A. C. Repub- 
lican. 

T. S. McKINNEY. 

Residence and office, Weston, Oregon. 
Born May 27, 1873, at Bakersville, North 
Carolina. Son of Reuben B. and Juda A. 
(Burleson) McKinney. Married December 
29, 1897, to Maggie Hickey. Took law course 
from Sprague Correspondence School, be- 
ginning in November, 1903, and continuing 
until October, 1905, when he entered Wake 
Forest College at Wake Forest, North Caro- 
lina, and remained four months. Also at- 
tended Bowman Academy at Bakersville, 
North Carolina. Admitted to the bar of 
North Carolina at Raleigh in February, 1906, 
and practiced at Spruce Vine, North Caro- 
lina, for three years. Came to Oregon in 
1909 and since that time has practiced his 
profession at Weston. Sheriff of Mitchell 
County, North Carolina, 1897-98. Member 
I. O. O. F. and Masonic fraternities. Republi- 
can. 



180 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



JOSEPH LYMAN McKITTEICK. 

Residence, 406 Manhattan street; office, 
411 Marquam building, Portland, Oregon. 
Born January 5, 1846, in Morgan County, 
Ohio. Son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Xew- 
man) McKittrick. Married September 4, 
1891, to Cinthia J. Eollins. Educated at the 
common schools of Ohio and Wisconsin; at 
the Bryant and Stratton Commercial College, 
Chicago, Illinois, followed with private teach- 
ers and self-instruction. Studied law in law 
office of Beckwith. Ayer & Kales, Chicago, 
fllinois, from January 1, 1876, to September 
16, 1879, when admitted to the bar in Illinois. 
Was Chief Clerk in the above mentioned law 
office when he removed to Bathgate, North 
Dakota, and practiced his profession there 
until the fall of 1884, when he was appointed 
Attorney in Law Department of Chicago & 
Northwestern Eailroad Company, at Chicago, 
and occupied that position until 1891, when 
he became a member of the law firm of 
Keep & Lowdon in 1893 and a member of the 
firm of Bliss, McKittrick & Northam at Chi- 
cago, and continued his association with 
Colonel E. R. Bliss until 1908, when he re 
moved to Portland. Republican. 

CHARLES F. McKNIGHT. 
Residence, 301 Fifth street; office, 6-7-8 
Bennett & Walter building, Marshfield, Ore- 




gon. Born February 23, 1876, at Marshfielcl. 
Oregon. Son of William and Mary Ellen 
(Wright 1 * McKnight. Educated at the Marsh 
field public schools, graduating from the 
high school in 1894. Attended the Oregon 
A'gricultural College at Corvallis and gradu- 
ated therefrom in June, 1898, with degree of 
Bachelor of Science. Entered the law office 
of Silas Holmes Hazard at Empire City, Ore- 



gon, where he remained two years, at which 
time the firm removed to Marshfield and con- 
tinued until the death of Mr. Hazard. Ad 
mitted to the bar by the Supreme Court of 
Oregon, at Salem, in 1900 and remained in 
practice at Marshfield, Oregon, being ad- 
mitted to all the courts. Member Masonic, 
B. P. O. E. fraternities. Democrat. 

CHARLES L. McNARY. 

Residence, 643 Court street; office, United 
States National building, Salem. Born June 
12, 1874, in Marion County, Oregon. Son of 




Hugh L. and Margaret (Claggett) Me Nary. 
Married November 19. 1902, to Jessie Brey- 
man. Attended public and high schools at 
Salem and the Stanford University, Califor- 
nia. Read law in the office of Samuel L. 
Hayden and John II. Me Nary. Admitted to 
the bar at Salem in 1898, and became asso- 
ciated with John H. McXary, which continues 
to date. President Salem % Taft Club. Dean 
Willamette College of Law. Member of Ma- 
sonic, B. P. O. E and I. O. O. F. fraterni- 
ties and lllihee Club, of Salem. Republican. 

JOHN H. McNARY. 

Residence, 385 Sumner street; office, 
United States National Bank building, Sa- 
lem. Born in 1869 in Marion County, Oregon. 
Sou of Hugh L. and Margaret (Claggett) Mc- 
Nary. Married January 29, 1893, to Esther 
Hall. Attended public schools of Marion 
County, the Willamette University and later, 
the State University of Oregon at Eugene. 
Read law in the office of Judge George H. 
Burnett. Admitted to the bar at Salem in 
June, 1894, and the United States District 
and Circuit Courts July 17, 1901. Commenced 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



181 



the practice of his profession with S. L. Hay- 
den, under the firm name of Hayden & Mc- 
Nary, which partnership continued until 1900, 
when it was dissolved and a partnership 
formed with Charles L. McNary, which con- 
tinues to date. In 1890 was elected Re- 




corder of Marion County. Deputy District 
Attorney 1893-1904, when he was elected 
District Attorney and re-elected in 1908. 
President of Marion County Bar Association 
and member of the American Bar Association 
and Oregon Bar Association. Member of 
Masonic, I. O. O. P. and B. P. O. E. frater- 
nities. Member of Illihee Club of Salem. 
Kepublican. 

LAWRENCE ALEXANDER McNARY. 

Residence, 1151 
Thur man street; 
office, 527 Cham- 
ber of Commerce 
building', Portland. 
Born in The 
Dalles, Wasco 
County, Oregon, 
January 27, 186(5. 
Son of Hugh M. 
and Catherine 
(F r i / z e 1 1) Mc- 
N a r y. Received 
his education in 
g r a m m ar school 
and three years in 
Willamette Uni- 
versity, Salem, 
Oregon. Gradu- 
ated from Law De- 
partment, University of Oregon, in 1890, and 
admitted to the bar at Pendleton, Oregon, 
in June, 1890. Began his practice with Judge 





W. W. Thayer, ex-Governor of Oregon, con- 
tinuing for five years. Practiced alone until 
January, 1909, when he formed a partnership 
with Edward A. Lundburg, of Chicago, Illi- 
nois, which continues to date. Elected City 
Attorney of Portland from 1902 to 1907. 
Member of Phi Delta Phi Greek letter So- 
ciety, K. of P. and Commercial Club. Re- 
publican. 

JOHN E. MAGERS. 

Residence, 700 
East Ash street, 
Portland, Oregon. 
Office, 310-311 
Gerlinger building, 
Portland. Born 
Sept. 25, 1847, in 
Morgan County, O. 
Son of Doctor Wil- 
liam Bosnian and 
Mary Jane (Bark- 
hurst) M a g e r s, 
who emigrated to 
Oregon in 1852. He 
was educated in 
the co m- m o n 
schools and at 
Willamette U n i- 
versity. Was Pro- 
fessor of Mathe- 
matics in McMinnville College for three 
years. He graduated from the Law Depart- 
ment of the University of Michigan on 
March 26, 1879, with degree of LL. B. Ad- 
mitted to the Supreme Court of Michigan 
in March, 1879, and to the Supreme Court of 
Oregon in April of the same year, and has 
practiced law in Oregon ever since. He 
began practicing law in Salem, Oregon. Tn 
1'880 he moved to McMinnville, Oregon, and 
formed a partnership with Hon. W. D. Fen- 
ton, then residing at Lafayette, Oregon. 
After this partnership was mutually dissolved, 
Mr. Magers formed a partnership with Hon. 
James McCain at McMinnville and said part- 
nership continued until 1894 when Mr. Ma- 
gers was elected County Judge of Yamhill 
County, Oregon, and Mr. McCain was elected 
District Attorney for the Third Judicial Dis- 
trict, and said partnership was dissolved. 
Mr. Magers was Secretary of the Republican 
County Central Committee of Yamhill County 
for four years and Chairman of said commit- 
tee for fourteen years, during which time he 
presided over a number of county conven- 
tions, and was elected a delegate to nearly 
every Republican State Convention for 
eighteen years, beginning in 1882. Moved 
his office to Portland in 1898 and his family 
in 1901, and has resided in Portland since. 
Formed a partnership with Hon. D. R. N. 
Blackburn, Attorney-General of Oregon, now 
deceased, in 1898. Afterwards was in part- 
nership with J. B. Hosford, and later with 
Judge David E. Johnston, late of West Vir- 
ginia, but is alone at this time. He was 



182 



BIOGRAPHICAL 




elected the first, President of the Union Re- 
publican Club of Portland in 1906 and served 
two years. He is a pioneer of Oregon, and 
served as President of the Oregon State Pio- 
neer Association for the year ending Juno, 
1909. 

CUSICK J. MAHONEY. 

Eesidence, 260 
East Fortieth St.; 
office, 310-314 
C o m m o nwealth 
building, Portland. 
Born July 7, 1881, 
in Hancock Coun- 
ty, Iowa. Son of 
Patrick and Mary 
(Cusick) Mahonoy. 
Came to Oregon in 
1891. Graduated 
from high school, 
Marshfield. O r e- 
gon, and later en- 
tered the office of 
J. M. Upton for a 
period of one year 
and with Judge 
John S. Coke for 

three years, then entered the Law Depart- 
ment of University of Oregon and graduated 
in 1909 with degree of LL. B. Admitted to 
the bar at Salem, Oregon, in June, 1909, and 
associated with the firm of Malarkey, Sea- 
brook & Stott to date. Member of the 
Knights of Columbus and Phi Alpha Phi fra 
ternities. Republican. 

LUTHER D. MAHONE. 

Reside nee, 792 
Vancouver avenue. 
Office, 618 Henry 
building, Portland. 
Born July 25th, 
1878, at Hamlin, 
W. Va. Son of 
B e n n e t D. and 
Mary A. Mahone. 
Married February 
27, 1909, to Helen 
N. Brewer. Edu- 
cated at Harris- 
ville, W. Va., High 
School and two 
years at West Vir 
g*i n i a Wesleyan 
College. Two years 
at West Virginia 
University. One 

year at Lincoln College, Rogers, Ohio, where 
he received the degree of Ph. B. Six 
months course in Philosophy at Mt. Union 
College, Alliance, Ohio. In 1903, he received 
the degree of A. M. at Volant College at Vo- 
lant, Pennsylvania. In 1906 received the 
degree of Ph. D. at the same university. 
From 1906 to 1907 he attended the Law De- 
partment of the University of Washington. 




From 1907 to 1908 he attended the Univer- 
sity of Oregon, Law Department. In 1903 
he came to Oregon and read law for one year 
in the office of W. W. Cotton, General At- 
torney for the Oregon Railroad & Navigation 
Company, and in 1908 was admitted to the 
bar at Salem, Oregon. He enlisted with the 
First West Virginia Volunteers and served 
eleven months during the Spanish-American 
War. Served as Captain and Commandant 
of Cadets, Mount Hope College at Rogers, 
Ohio, from 1899 to 1900. A delegate to all 
County, Congressional and State Conventions 
in 1906 in West Virginia. Elected a member 
of the Oregon Legislature in 1908. Is attor- 
ney for the Civic Federation Society of Ore 
gon. Editor of "The Oregon Citizen." 
Author of "The Destiny of the Republic." 
"Resources of West Virginia" and "The 
Young Man in H : s Business." Has appeared 
on the lecture platform in thirty-four states, 
and travelled through the West Indies and 
Central America. Member of the K. of P. 
fraternity, Spanish American War Veterans 
and Union Republican Club. Republican. 

DAN J. MALARKEY. 

Residence, Hill 
C'rest Drive, Port- 
land Heights; of- 
fice, Common- 
weal th building. 
Portland. Born Ju- 
ly 15, 1870, in New 
York City. Son 
of Charles M. and 
Katherine 
(O'Neil) Malar- 
key. Married Juno 
26, 1893, to Annie 
Laurie Burgess. 
Removed to Ore- 
gon in 1873. Edu- 
cated at St. Mich- 
el's College (a 
p r i v ate Catholic 
school in Port- 
land) from 1875 to 1881 and at Portend 
High School from 1881 to 1885. Graduated 
from the Law Department of the University 
of Oregon in 1892 with degree of LL. B. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem in June, 1892. 
Member of the firm of Gammans & Malarkey 
from 1899 to April 1, 1910, and member of 
firm of Malarkey, Seabrook & Stott since said 
time. From 1893 to 1894 and from 1896 to 
1897 was Deputy District Attorney of Mult- 
nomah County, and from 1902 to 1904 was 
State Representative from Multnomah 
County. From 1904 to 1908 was State Sena- 
tor from Multnomah County. Member of 
Commercial and Portland Heights Clubs, and 
Phi Delta Phi fraternity. Republican. 

RUFUS MALLORY. 

Residence, 350 East Thirty-ninth street; 
office, Mohawk building, Portland. Born 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



183 



June 10, 1831, in Coventry, New York. Son 
of Samuel and Lucretia (Davis), Mallory. 
Came to Oregon in 1859. Married to Lucy 
A. Rose June 24, 1860. Attended public 
schools in Scio, Allegheny County, New York, 
1835 to 1837; Greenwood, New York, 1837 to 
1845, and Alfred Academy, Alfred, New York, 
one term in each of the years 1845, 1847 
and 1848. Admitted to the Circuit Court at 




Roseburg, Oregon, in 1860; to Supreme Court. 
Portland, Oregon, 1862. From 1860 to 1863 
associated in law practice with James M. 
Pyle at Roseburg and Salem, Oregon; 1863- 
1866 associated with Richard Williams, and 
from 1869 to 1874 with J. J. Shaw at Salem, 
Oregon. Practiced in Portland, Oregon, since 
1883 under firm names of Dolph, Bellinger. 
Mallory & Simon; Dolph, Mallory, Simon & 
Strahan; Dolph, Mallory, Simon & Gearin; the? 
latter continues to date. Lieutenant-Colonel 
State Militia 1863-1866, Salem, Oregon. Dis- 
trict Attorney of the First District, 1860- 
1862. District Attorney of Third District, 
1862-1866; 1866 to 1869 member of Congress 
from Oregon; United States District Attor- 
ney from 1874 to 1882; Representative from 
Douglas County, 1862; Marion County, 1872. 
Speaker of the House. Special Agent of 
United States to Singapore, 1882. Republi- 
can. 

REUBEN WILSON MARSTERS. 

Residence and office, Roseburg, Oregon. 
Born in Washington County, Illinois, Janu- 
ary 6, 1876. Son of Rev. Elias M. and Grace 
(Wilson) Marsters. Came to Oregon May 1. 
1888; attended the public school at Cleve- 
land, Douglas County, Oregon, until 1895, 
then attending the College of Philomath in 
Benton County, Oregon, for three years. Was 




married to Lizzie L. Blain December 10, 1898. 
Was elected Justice of the Peace for Coles 
Valley Precinct in June, 1899, and served 
T;wo years. During his term of office he 
began the study of law, and continued his 
studies with Hon. J. A. Buchanan, of Rose- 
burg, Oregon, for a period of three years; 
was admitted to practice on June 13, 1904, 
when he opened his off'ce at Roseburg, Ore- 
gon, where he is now practicing. Republican. 

JOHN MANNING. 

Residence, 830 
Marshall street; 
office, 508 Fenton 
building, Portland. 
Born May 1, 1866, 
in Boscobel, Wis- 
consin. Son of 
Thomas and Brid- 
ge t (V e r d o n) 
Manning. Married 
June 31, 1894, to 
Mame F. Coffey, 
daughter of B. 
Received his early 
education at the 
public schools of 
H i r 1 a n County, 
Nebraska, the Ne- 
braska High 
School at Orleans, 

Nebraska, and later the high school at 
Lucerne, Nebraska. After leaving school 
he read law until 1887, when he was ad- 
mitted to the bar of that state. He com 
menced the practice of his profession in 
Orleans and in 1890 moved to Woodburn, 
where he continued until 1891, when he came 
to this city. In 1900 he was appointed Chief 
Deputy District Attorney of Multnomah 
County under George E. Chamberlain, and in 
1902 was appointed District Attorney. Was 
elected District Attorney in 1904 by the 
largest majority ever received by any Demo- 
crat in this county. It was owing to Mr. 
Manning's activity that the saloons were 
closed on Sunday in Multnomah County. He 
also enjoys the distinction of being the only 
District Attorney of this state that ever 
successfully prosecuted and convicted the 
president of a bank this one being the 
president of the defunct Title Guarantee & 
Trust Company. He is a member of M. A. 
A. C., the Commercial Club, B. P. 0. E. and 
Knights of Columbus. Democrat. 

CAREY FULLER MARTIN. 

Residence, 697 South Liberty street; office, 
22 North Commercial street. Salem. Born 
October 6, 1870, at Salem, Oregon. Son of 
Thomas Millard and Samantha (Green) Mar- 
tin. Married August 19, 1903, to Leora P. 
Smith. Early education received in public 
schools of Oregon, prior to 1885. From 1885 
to 1887, taught school in Oregon; from 1887 
to 1889, took preparatory work in Oregon 



184 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



State University, and from 1889 to 1893, took 
regular course in State University, gradu- 
ating in the last named year with degree of 

A. B., in 1896 with degree of A. M., and from 
the Law Department of the Willamette Uni 
versity at Salem, in 1898, with LL. B. de- 
gree. Admitted to the bar in 1898 and began 
the active practice of law as partner of 
Judge B. F. Bonham in autumn of that year, 
and continued with him until the death of 
Judge Bonham in June, 1906. Has continued 
the business to date at Salem. Was Assistant 
Secretary of State under Hon. H. E. Kincaid 
from 1894 to 1898, and as such, compiled the 
first official political History of Oregon. 
Member Illihee Club, Salem, K. of P. and 

B. P. O. E. fraternities, Native Sons and Sons 
of Veterans. Eepublican. 

GEORGE F. MARTIN. 

Residence, 1026 
East Twenty-sixth 
St. N.; office 302 
Failing building, 
Portland. Born 
June 20, 1872, a* 
Port Byron, Illi- 
nois. Son of James 
F. and Rose (Mil- 
ler) Martin. Mar- 
ried August 9th, 
1904, to Elizabeth 
A. Battin. Attend- 
ed public schools 
at Red Oak, Iowa, 
and at Miller, 
South Dak ota. 
Pierre University, 
Pierre, South Da- 
kota, from 1888 to 

1892, and Northwestern University Law 
School, Chicago, Illinois, from 1892 to 1894. 
Admitted to the Supreme Court of Illinois 
March 26, 1894, to the Supreme Court of Wis- 
consin in 1896 and to the Supreme Court of 
Oregon October 5, 1893. Removed to State 
of Oregon in March, 1902. Republican. 

WILLIAM GREEN MARTIN. 

Residence, Eugene, Oregon; office, 536 
Willamette street. Born at "Martin's Rap- 
ids," McKenzie River, Oregon, April 23, 
1875. Son of Thomas Millard and Samantha 
(Green) Martin. Married to Olga Riddell 
September 20, 1900. Educated in the common 
schools of Coburg and Eugene, Oregon; at 
tended the State University of Oregon from 
1889 to 1892. Taught school for several years 
to secure funds to pay for education. Pur- 
sued the study of law in the office of R. J. 
Hendrick at Salem from 1894 to 1898. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, October 
6, 1898, and took up the practice of law in 
Eugene, Oregon. Associated with John H. 
Bower, of Madrid, Nebraska, 1906; since, 
practicing alone. Assistant State Bookkeeper 
1894-98; Assistant Clerk in Legislature, 





special session, 1898; appointed County School 
Superintendent, Lane County, Oregon, 1901 ; 
Assistant Superintendent and member County 
Examining Board at present time. Received 
life diploma to teach in schools of Oregon 
March 24, 1904. Member A. F. & A. M. and 
K. of P. fraternities. Republican. 

HERBERT LITTLEFIELD MARX. 

Residence, Y. M. 
C. A. building; of- 
fice, 737-739 Cham 
ber of Commerce, 
Portland. Born De 
cember 6, 1875, in 
New York City, N. 
Y. Son of Marcus 
and Mary Susan 
(Littlefield) Marx. 
Studied in private 
and public schools 
in New York City 
and graduated 
from public school 
in Brooklyn, N, Y., 
in 1891, and from 
the Boys' High 
School in Brook- 
lyn in February, 

1894. From that period read law with Hon. 
Abel E. Blackmar in Manhattan Borough, 
and later took a business course at the 
Brooklyn, New York, public night schools. 
Attended the Law Department of New York 
University, graduating in June, 1898, with 
the degree of LL. B. Admitted to the New 
York bar in June, 1898. Was associate 1 
with the firm of Baldwin & Blackmar in 
New York until the spring of 1901. In De- 
cember, 1901, came to the West and in 
August, 1902, decided to locate in Portland, 
Oregon, and in 1903 he was admitted to the 
bar. Served in the Militia as a member of 
Troop C (now Squadron C), Brooklyn, New 
York. Member A. F. & A. M. Democrat. 

WILLIAM YORK MASTERS. 

Residence, 675 East Madison; office, 204-7 
Failing building, Portland. Born April 1. 
1862, at Portland, Oregon. Son .of William 
and Martha C. (York) Masters. Married 
March 31, 1886, to Elizabeth M. Bell. Edit 
cated at the Old Portland Academy, the Port- 
land High School and the State Agricultural 
College, from which institution he received 
the degree of A. M. in 1882. Admitted to the 
bar of Oregon in 1884 and to the Supreme 
Court March 4, 1895. Formed partnership 
with J. C. Moreland in August, 1886, and the 
same continued until October, 1890, when 
Judge Moreland went on the bench. In Octo- 
ber of that year he became associated with 
the Pacific Coast Abstract Company as Vice- 
President and Attorney, and, when that com- 
pany was merged into the Pacific Title and 
Trust Company, he became Secretary and 
Attorney of the new company. Has held 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



185 



this position and also conducted a general 
practice since that time. Served term in City 
Council, beginning in 1900, and was elected 
the second time in 1905 for four years, of 




which he served two, when he resigned and 
has held no other political position. Thirty- 
second Degree Mason, member Odd Fellows 
and Royal Arcanum fraternities and Tau 
Omega. Republican. 

Q. L. MATTHEWS. 

Residence, 446 East Stark; office, 411 Bu- 
chanan building, Portland, Oregon. Born in 
1879 in Portland, Oregon. Son of Garret R. 
and Rosalenda A. (Quimby) Matthews. Mar- 
ried July 8, 1901, to Florence Dennison, de- 
ceased March 10, 1903. Educated Portland 
grammar school and high school, from which 
he graduated. Attended the Western Acad- 
emy of Oratory and Dramatic Art, 1901-1904, 
and graduated therefrom. Graduated from 
the Oregon College of Law, June, 1907, with 
degree LL. B. Admitted to the bar in Ore- 
gon March, 1907; and practiced his profession 
in partnership with Andrew Hansen until Au- 
gust, 1908. Practiced alone until September, 
1909, when he formed partnership with A. J. 
Christopherson, under the firm name of Chris- 
topherson & Matthews, which continues to 
date. Instructor Oregon College of Law, Sep- 
tember, 1907, to date 

CHARLES E. MAYBEE. 

Residence, North Bend, Oregon; office, 
same. Born in Lyon County, Kansas, No- 
vember 10, 1870. Son of Charles and Mary J. 
(Mount) Maybee. Came to Oregon in 1877. 
Married to Hattie J. Pierson, November 25, 



1899. Attended public schools in Umatill 
County and Pendleton, Oregon; Monmouth 
State Normal, 1891-92; Business College, at 
Portland, Oregon, 189~4. Graduated from Law 
Department, University of Oregon, June, 1898, 
with degree of LL. B. Admitted to the bar 
at Salem, Oregon, June, 1898. Practiced law 
in Grants Pass, Oregon, from 1899 to 1907, 
then moved to North Bend, Oregon, and con- 
tinued to date. City Attorney, Recorder and 
Justice of the Peace, Grants Pass, Oregon; 
City Attorney and School Clerk, North Bend, 
Oregon; County Chairman, Josephine County, 
campaign, 1906. Member Masons, W. O. W. 
and Chamber of Commerce. Republican. 

MARION B. MEACHAM. 

Residence, 454 Failing street; office, 623 
Henry building, Portland. Bom February 17, 
1881, at Pinewood, Tennessee. Son of James 
Marion and Fannie W. (Baker) Meacham. 
Married May 4, 1905 to Bessie Fields. At- 
tended the University of Virginia, and grad- 
uated from same with degree of LL. B., on 
June 13, 1901. Moved to Oregon March, 1902. 
Admitted to the bar of Tennessee, January, 
1902, and to the bar of Oregon in October of 
the same year, since which time he has prac- 
ticed his profession alone. Republican. 

WILLIAM P. MEALEY. 

Residence, 16 Belmont avenue; office, 18 
North Front street, Medford. Born at Camp- 
ton, Colorado, on December 5, 1883. Edu- 
cated in the public school of Campton and 
at the high school of Los Angeles r California. 
Graduated from Leland Stanford, Jr., Uni- 
versity, in May, 1909, receiving degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. Studied law for two years 
at Leland Stanford, Jr., University. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of California, July 19, 1909. 
Removed to Oregon December 1, 1909, and 
was admitted to practice before the Oregon 
courts in January, 1910. 

JOHN SAMUEL MEDLEY. 

Residence and office Cottage Grove, Oregon. 
Born in Scotland County, Missouri, March 16, 
1859. Son of James Madison and Eveline 
Jane (Huston) Medley. Came to Oregon, Oc- 
tober 21, 1874. Married to Sarah Kathrina 
Hanson, November 27, 1895. Received his ed- 
ucation in public schools of Scotland County, 
Missouri, and Lane County, Oregon. Read 
law privately with instructions and advice of 
Hon. B. F. Harding, of Cottage Grove, Oregon. 
Admitted to the bar of Oregon October 9, 1895. 
Associated for one year with W. H. Cooper, 
now of Tillamook County, Oregon, and three 
years with J. C. Johnson, which partnership 
was discontinued about eighteen months since. 
Mayor of Cottage Grove, Justice of the Peace, 
City Recorder; member Cottage Grove Com- 
mercial Club, Lane County Fair Association; 
member of the order of Knights of Pythias 
and W. O. W. Democrat. 



ISO 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



FRED J. MEINDL. 

Eesidence, 450 Eleventh street; office 403 
405 Swetland building, Portland, Oregon. Born 
in Germany, July 22, 1878. Son of Joseph 
and Sophia (Meir) Meindl. Married to Lor- 
ena Mary Lazelle, October 19, 1902. Came to 
Oregon in 1887. Graduated from the Oregon 
City High Schbol June 11, 1897, and from the 
Oregon State Normal School at Monmouth, 
June 20, 1900. From October, 1903 to May, 
1904, attended Law Department University 
of Oregon. Was admitted to the bar of Ore- 
gon October 13, 1904. From June, 1907, to 
June, 1908, was Deputy District Attorney for 
Sherman County, Oregon. March, 1909, be- 
came associated with Gus C. Moser, which 
association continues to date. Member of 
I. O. O. F., W. O. W. Republican 

FOREST E. MELVIN. 

Eesidence, Park 
street; office 232 
Worces t e r build- 
building, Portland. 
Born in Highland 
County, Ohio, Jan- 
uary 15, 1869. Son 
of George A. and 
Sarah L. (Hardy) 
Melvin. Received 
his early educa- 
tion in common 
and high schools 
of Crawford Coun- 
ty, Illin o i s. At- 
tended business 
college in Terre 
Haute, Ind.; 1888- 
1894 was connect 
ed with legal de- 
partment of Vandalia Railroad. Read law 
with Senator Calahan, Robinson, Illinois. Ad- 
mitted to the bar in Indiana October 18, 1899; 
in Tennessee, March 21, 1903; United States 
Circuit Court, Eighth District, January, 1905; 
United States Circuit Court of Appeals, Sep 
tember, 1907. Came to Oregon in 1907, and 
admitted to the bar in Oregon, March 28. 
1910, and continues the practice of his pro 
fession alone. Member Company E, Eighth 
Regiment Illinois National Guard, 1887-1890. 
Member of Knights of Pythias and Sons of 
Veterans. Republican. 

FRANK MENEFEE. 

Residence, The Dalles, Oregon; office, the 
same. Born January 31, 1866, at The Dalles. 
Oregon. Son of Williapi R. and Naney J. 
(Benefiel) Menefee. Married January 6, 
1903, to Mabel C. Cowles. Educated at the 
Wasco Independent Academy, at The Dalles, 
Oregon. Studied law at that place in the 
office of E. B. Dufur; was admitted to the bar 
at Salem in 1889, and at once entered into 
partnership with Mr. Dufur, which partner 
ship lasted until 1900, when he formed a 
partnership with Fred W. Wilson, and the 



same continued until July, 1909, under the 
firm name of Menefee & Wilson. Since the 
last mentioned date he has practiced alone. 
Was Recorder of Dalles City, July, 1891, to 





July, 1893; Mayor of Dalles City, March. 
1895, to July, 1897, and District Attorney of 
Seventh Judicial District from July, 1900. 
to July, 1908. Member B. P. O. E. and 
Knights of Pythias fraternities. Republican. 

EDWARD MENDENHALL. 

Office, 208 Coin- 
in e r c i a 1 block, 
Portland. Born in 
Santa Clara. Cal. 
Son of Captain 
Rush and Esther 
Louise (Word en) 
Men denhall. At- 
tended Port land 
Academy, pub 1 i c 
schools, and St. 
Michael 's A c a d- 
emy. Admitted to 
bar, July term, 
1875, by Supreme 
Court of Oregon. 
Practiced law 
alone and success- 
fully for many 
years, and later 

with his brothers, A. R. and E. J. Mendenhall, 
with whom he continues. Delegate to con- 
ventions several times, but declined either 
appointive or elective office. Past Chancellor 
of Castle Lodge, Knights of Pythias. Life 
member Multnomah Amateur Athletic Club; 
member Portland Automobile Club, and the 
State Automobile Association. Republican. 




187 



JOHN BRUCE MESSICK. 

Residence, 2196 Court street; office, County 
Courthouse, Baker City. Son of Richard M. 
and Mary Bell (Tomlinson) Messick. Mar- 
ried April 3, 1895, to Stella M. Haines. Ed- 
ucated at the public schools of Missouri; at 
William Jewel College, Liberty, Missouri, 
from which institution he graduated in 1881. 
Came to Oregon in 1886. Taught school, 1886- 
1892, studying law at same time. Was ad- 
mitted to the bar of Oregon at Pendleton in 
May, 1892. Served four years in O. N. G.; 
served four years as Justice of the Peace at 
Baker City; County Judge, Baker County, 
Oregon, since 1906. Member and Past Mas- 
ter of Masonic fraternity. 

FRANK G. MICELLI. 

Residence, Roseburg, Oregon; office, same. 
Born July 26, 1866, in Resia, Province of 
Venice, Italy. Son of Frank and Margaret 
(Bianeolini) M : celli. Married December 25, 
1895, to Inez Hamilton. Educated at the 
public and high schools of Venice, Italy, and 
at Innspruck, Tyrol. Came to Oregon in Jan- 
uary, 1888. Studied law in the office of J. A. 




Buchanan, of Roseburg. Admitted to the 
Supreme Court of this state in October, 1899, 
and to the District and Circuit Courts of the 
United States in 1904. Served as Justice of 
the Peace in 1900; as Councilman for four 
years; as City Attorney of Roseburg. Pre- 
pared City Charter and twice codified ordi- 
nances of the City of Roseburg. Member P. 
G. Odd Fellows, K. of P., B. P. O. E. and 
Eagles fraternities. Democrat. 

ELMER ELLSWORTH MILLER. 

Residence, 321 Eugene street; office, 430 
Worcester building, Portland. Born June 4, 
1861, in Livingstone County, Missouri. Son 
of DeWitt C. and Sarah Esther (Wells) Miller. 



Married in 1885 to Linnie A. Miller. Came to 
Oregon at the age of ten years, and was ed- 
ucated at the public schools of Yamhill Coun- 
ty; at the Pacific University, Forest Grove, 
Oregon; at the Portland Business College, and 
at the Law Department of the University of 
Oregon, from which he graduated with LL. B. 
degree. Admitted to the bar at Pendleton. 
Commenced practice with his brother, C. W. 
Miller, under the firm name Miller & Miller, 
the same continuing until three years ago, 
since when he has practiced alone. Member 
W. O. W. and United Artisans, Homesteaders 
and Yoemans fraternities. Republican. 

THADDEUS W. MILES. 

Residence, Oak- 
dale avenue, Med- 
ford, Oregon; of- 
fice, Jackson Coun- 
ty Bank building, 
Medford, Oregon. 
Born near Carth- 
age, Mo., .Febru- 
ary 11, 1874. Son 
of John Webster 
and Ruth (White) 
Miles. Left State 
of Missouri at the 
age of four years 
and moved to 
Staff o r d County, 
Kansas. Attended 
the rural schools 
of Kansas and the 
high school at St. 

John, Kansas. Moved to the State of Oregon 
in 1893. Attended the Capital Business Col- 
lege at Salem, Oregon; graduated from both 
business and shorthand courses. Principal of 
the business department of the State Normal 
School at Ashland, Oregon; taught in the 
Portland Business College; graduated from 
the Law Department of the Law School of 
the University of Oregon in June, 1900, with 
degree LL. B. Admitted to the Oregon bar 
in 1900; admitted to the California bar in 
July, 1901. Married to Jessie W. Wagner, of 
Ashland, Oregon, on June 25, 1902. Prac- 
ticed law at Medford in conjunction with the 
Jackson County Abstract Company, from July, 
1905, to present date. Member of the Crater 
Lake and Commercial Clubs, and the Modern 
Woodmen of America fraternity. 

GEORGE MELVIN MILLER. 

Residence, 1151 Fairmount boulevard; office, 
Room 20, McClung block, Eugene, Oregon. 
Bom in Coburg, Lane County, Oregon, May 
17, 1853. Son of Hulins and Margaret M. 
(Witt) Miller. Married to Mrs. Lischen M. 
Cogswell-Kanoff, May 25, 1885. Attended 
Coburg common school until 1871; later at 
Monmouth College. Taught country school 
in Lane County, 1872, and in 1874 took six 
months' course in University of Oregon, at 
Eugene, Oregon. Read law during winter 




188 



months with Joshua J. Walton, working on 
father's farm at Coburg during spring and 
summer months. Admitted to the Oregon bar 
in 1880. Commenced the practice of law in 
Independence, Polk County, Oregon, returning 
to Coburg farm at end of one year. February 
22, 1882, opened office in Eugene, Oregon, con- 
tinuing until January, 1898, when he went 
to Alaska. Was admitted to Alaska bar and 
opened office at Sitka. Later removed to 
Juneau and combined mining with law and 
literature, staking claims in the Porcupine 
mining district above Hainos Mission on ten- 
tative boundary line between Alaska and Brit- 
is'h Yukon territory. Practiced in Skagway 
for one year, returning to Eugene, Oregon, in 
1902. In 1907 retired from active practice, 
devoting time to industrial development of 
Lane County, Oregon. Member Presbyterian 
Church since 1887. Republican. 

MARTIN E. MILLER. 

Residence, St. Helens, Oregon; office, same. 
Born January 18, 1875, at Goldendale, Wash- 
ington. Son of George W. and Manilla 
(Harper) Miller. Married November 17, 1897, 
to Estelle Ashby. Education received at the 
public schools of Goldendale. Came to Ore- 
gon in 1884, and attended the public schools 
at The Dalles, and the Wasco Independent 
Academy. Studied law in the office of Miller 




& Stapleton, at Vancouver, Washington. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, in 1905. 
Served in National Guard of both Oregon and 
Washington. Elected Mayor of St. Helens 
in 1909; re-elected in April, 1910; is Deputy 
District Attorney for Fifth Judicial District 
of Oregon; is School Director at St. Helens. 
Member I. O. O. F., Foresters of America 



fraternities; St. Helens Commercial Club, Ore- 
gon State Bar Association. Republican. 

ROBERT A. MILLER. 

Residence, 670 Johnson street; office, 333 
Worcester building, Portland. Born near Eu- 
gene, Oregon. Son of James Naper Tandy 
and Elizabeth Ann (Aubrey) Miller. Mar- 
ried to Sarelia W. Grubbe, September 11, 1893. 
Attended Jacksonville public schonls, and 
from 1874 to 1875 the University of Pacific, 
at San Jose, California. Graduated from 
Willamette University, Salem, Oregon. Re- 
ceived diploma from New York Chautauqua 
August 15, 1900. Admitted to Oregon State 
bar at Salem, Oregon, March 7, 1887; to Su- 
preme Court of United States, May 10, 1893; 
to United States District Court of Oregon, and 
United States Circuit Court of Oregon, No- 
vember 23, 1904. Admitted to all bureaus of 
Interior Department, at Washington, D. C., 
December 15, 1897. Aide-de-Camp to Gov- 
ernor Pennoyer six years, as Lieutenant-Colo- 
nel. Representative from Jackson County in 
Legislatures of 1887-89. Candidate for Con- 
gress in 1890, and for Presidential Elector in 
1892. Register United States Land Office, 
Oregon City, Oregon, 1893-97. Mason. Demo- 
crat. 

EICHARD WARD MONTAGUE. 

Reside nee, 351 
N. Thirty - second 
street; office, 727 
Chamber of Com- 
m e r c e building, 
Port land. Born 
February 11, 1862, 
at Charles City, 
Iowa. Son of John 
Vose Wood and 
Martha Washing- 
ton (Jackson) 
M o n tague. Mar 
ried to Ellen 
Amelia Barton, 
June 5, 1889. Ed- 
ucated at the pub- 
lic schools of Ma- 
son City, I o w a. 
Attended the 

State University of Iowa, from which insti- 
tution he received the degree of Ph. B. 
in 1883, and the following year the 
degree of LL. B. Admitted to the bar 
in Iowa the same year. Moved to Ore- 
gon in August of 1890, and in October of the 
same year was admitted to the bar of the 
Supreme Court of Oregon. Was a member of 
the Charter Commissions of 1901 and 1908; a 
member of the State Conservation Committee; 
member of the University Club and Beta 
Theta Pi fraternity; a Director of the Port- 
land Library Association; President Oregon 
Bar Association, 1908; author of Oregon Di- 
gest, Vols. 1 to 43; now assisting in compila- 
tion of Oregon Codes and Statutes under 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



189 



Hon. W. P. Lord, Code Commissioner. Con- 
tinues practice of profession. Democrat. 

EDWIN LeROY MINAE. 

Residence, 1170 East Salmon street; office, 
520 Henry building, Portland, Oregon. Born 
June 27, 1886 at Charles City, Floyd County, 
Iowa. Son of William W. and Nellie J. 
(Chambers) Minar. Received his education 
at Sunnyside Grammar School; graduated 
June, 1900; attended the Portland High 
School, from which he graduated June, 1904. 
Attended Law Department University of Or- 
egon, 1904-1906; graduated with degree LL. B. 
Admitted to the bar in Salem, Oregon, July 
16, 1907. Republican. 

HUGH MONTGOMERY. 

Residence, 568 East Main street; office, 901 
Board of Trade building, Portland. Born 
January 5, 1882, at Greenville, Connecticut. 
Son or Hugh and Anna Elizabeth (Roberts) 
Montgomery. Married January 5, 1910, to 
Dorothy Willson Gill. Educated at the Wes- 
leyan University, Middleton, Connecticut, 
1901-1903. Came to Oregon in 1905 and was 
admitted to the bar at Salem, in October, 
1906. Associated with the firm of Platt.& 
Platt, October, 1909, to date. Republican. 

RALPH ELMO MOODY. 

Residence, 369 Aspon street; office, 409-410 
MjcKav building, Portland. Born August 27, 
1869, at The Dalles, Oregon. Son of Zenas F. 
and Mary (Stevenson) Moody. Married No- 




of LL. B. Was admitted to the bar of Ore- 
gon at Salem, in 1888. Prosecuting Attorney 
for Jefferson, San Juan, Clallam and Island 
Counties, Washington, from 1890 to 1892; 
Chief Clerk of the House of Representatives 
of Oregon in 1895, and member of House of 
Representatives from Multnomah County in 
1899. Came to Portland in 1893. Republican. 

FRANK A. MOORE. 

Residence, 920 Oak street; office, State- 
house, Salem, Oregon. Born November 5, 
1844, at Ellsworth, Maine. Son of Heard L. 
and Bathshaba (Higgins) Moore. Married 
April 15, 1866, to Emma Shuntaffer. Edu- 
cated in the public schools of Maine, and later 
attended the Normal Institute at Iowa Falls, 
Iowa. Was elected County Superintendent of 




12, 1890, to Beatrice James. Was ed- 
ucated at Willamette University, Salem, Ore- 
gon, graduating in 1885; and at the Albany 
Law School, graduating in 1887 with degree 



common schools of Hardin County, Iowa, in 
1871, and served in that capacity until 1875. 
Read law in the office of Lieutenant-Governor 
Enoch W. Eastman, at Eldora, Iowa. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Iowa in 1874. Came to 
Oregon in 1877, and was admitted to the bar 
of this state in January, 1879. His first prac- 
tice was at Eldora, Iowa, and upon first com- 
ing to Oregon he located at St. Helens, and 
practiced there unt ; l 1884, when he was elected 
County Judge of Columbia County. In 1888- 
1892 was State Senator from Columbia Coun- 
ty. In 1892 was elected Justice of the Su- 
preme Court, and removed to Salem in Au- 
gust of that year. Since January, 1909, has 
been Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, and 
holds that office to date. In 1900-1901 Grand 
Commander of the Commandery, K. T., of 
Oregon; 1892, Grand Master of Grand Lodge 
of Oregon, A. F. & A. M.; 33d deg. Mason and 
member of B. P. 0. E. fraternity Republican. 



190 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



CHARLES ALLAN MOORE. 

Residence, 1723 Valley avenue; office, 2104 
Court street, Baker City. Born March 9, 
1864, near Edina, Knox County, Missouri. 
Son of John William and Edna Frances 
(Payton) Moore. Married December 30, 1897, 
to Hattie A. Newbury. Educated in the pub- 
lic schools of Knox County, Missouri, Adair 
County, Missouri, and Millville, California, 
until 1878, in which year he came to Oregon 
and attended public schools at Lakeview. En- 
tered the State University at Eugene in 1884, 
and attended till 1887. Studied law in the 
office of C. A. Cogswell, at Lakeview, Oregon, 
from 1887 to 1891, when he was admitted to 
the bar at Salem. Began the practice of his 
profession alone, at Portland, in 1891, and 
continued until 1893, when he went into part- 
nership with A. W. Johnston, under the firm 
name of Moore & Johnston, which existed 
until 1897. Continued practicing alone until 
1901, when he removed to Baker City, and 
continues to date. Republican. 

WILLIS S. MOORE. 

Residence, 533 Belmont street; office, 403 
Corbett building, Portland. Born November 
13, 1869, at Dimick, LaSalle County, Illinois. 
Son of Robert and Eliza Jane (McGlynn) 
Moore. Married October 21, 1906, to Edith 
E. Krausse. Educated at the Northern In- 
diana Normal School (now Valparaiso Uni- 
versity) 1888-1889-1893; Ottawa, Illinois, Bus- 
iness University, 1890-91; graduated April 22, 
1891; Northwestern University School of 
Law, Chicago, 1903-1906; graduated with de- 
gree LL. B., June 21, 1906. Was admitted to 
the bar at Springfield, Illinois, October 16, 
1906. Was associated with R. K. Welsh in 
the practice of law at Rockford, Illinois, from 
May, 1907, to September, 1908. Came to Ore- 
gon November 1, 1908, and was admitted to 
the bar at Salem, Oregon, November 17, 1908, 
since which time he has practiced his profes- 
sion in Portland. Member Masonic Frater- 
nity. Republican. 

ELISHA P. MORCOM. 

Residence, Woodburn, Oregon; office, same. 
Born February 6, 1860, at Dodgeville, Wis- 
consin. Son of John and Lucy (Scourick) 
Morcom. Married in 1883 to Libbie M. 
Hooper. Attended public and high schools at 
Dodgeville, Wisconsin, graduating from the 
latter in 1882. Read law in the offices of J. J. 
Hoskins, Reese & Carter and Judge Jenks, 
of Dodgeville. Admitted to the bar of Min- 
nesota at Duluth, in 1891, in which year he 
came to Oregon, and was admited to the bar 
here in July, 1892. Practiced at Woodburn 
until 1893 in partnership with W. H. Johnson, 
when he withdrew from the firm and 
went to Silverton. Returned to Woodburn 
in 1894, and formed partnership with J. C. 
Johnson, which existed until 1898, since which 
time he has practiced alone. Served six 
years in O. N. G. Was Assistant Postmaster 



at Dodgeville, Wis., from 1882 to 1887; Town 
Commissioner in Minnesota, in 1888 and 1889; 
Clerk of the Board of Education at Tower, 




Minn., in 1889 and 1891; was City Attorney 
at Woodburn for eight years. Secretary 
Woodburu Social Club and President of 
Woodburn Commercial Club, at present; Di- 
rector and Vive-President Farmers & Me- 
chanics Bank at Woodburn; Secretary Wood 
burn Orchard Company, and Secretary Red 
Jacket Mining Company. Republican. 

MAX MOREHEAD. 

Resid e n c e, 69 
N. Twenty-fi r s t 
street; office, 315- 
16-17 Common- 
wealth build ing. 
Portland. Born in 
Newcastle, Penn., 
April 22, 1868. 
Son of Harvey 
and Martha More- 
head. Moved to 
Pendle ton, Ore., 
in 1885, and en- 
gaged in insur 
ance and real es- 
tate business until 
1905. Admitted to 
Oregon State bar 
May 1, 1905. Oc- 
t o b e r 1, 1906, 

formed partnership in law with Hon. Grant B. 
Dimick, of Oregon City, and Samuel T. Rich- 
ardson, Dean of Oregon Law School; same 
time elected Secretary Oregon Law School, 
which position continues to date. Member of 
Masonic, K. of P. and W. O. W. fraternities. 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



191 



JULIUS CAESAR MOEELAND. 

Residence, 1397 State street; office, State- 
house, Salem, Oregon. Born in Smith County, 
Tennessee, June 10, 1844. Son of Jesse and 
Susan (Robertson) Moreland. Came to Ore- 



Multnomah County, 1908 to date. Member 
Oregon Commandery, Military Order Loyal 
Legion, of which he has been Recorder and 




gon in 1852. Married to Abbie B. Kline, July 
3, 1867. He received his early education in 
the common schools, and latter attended Port- 
land Academy, of Portland, Oregon, graduat- 
ing in 1865. Admitted to the bar of Wash- 
ington Territory, March 11, 1867; Idaho 
Territory, July 6, 1867; Oregon, 1869; to the 
Supreme Court of the United States, 1898. 
Councilman of Portland, Oregon, 1872-75; City 
Attorney of Portland in 1877-81; County 
Judge of Multnomah County, 1885-86, 1890-94; 
Clerk of the Supreme Court of Oregon, June, 
1907. December, 1868-1874 in partnership 
with John F. Caples. Member Masonic Fra- 
ternity. Republican. 

ROBERT GRAVES MORROW. 

Office, County Courthouse, Portland, Oregon 
Born Decembei- 11, 1861, at Detroit, Michi- 
gan. Son of Henry Andrew and Isabella 
(Graves) Morrow. His early education re- 
ceived in public schools in Niles, Michigan; 
at St. John's Military Academy, Little Rock, 
Ark., 1876 to 1877; at Ann Arbor High 
School, Ann Arbor, Mich., 1878 and 1879; 
University of Michigan, 1879-1883, graduating 
with degree of Ph. B. Admitted to the bar 
of Oregon in 1885, having come to this state 
two years before. Read law in the office of 
George H. Williams (Williams, .'Durham & 
Thompson). Reporter of Oregon Supreme 
Court, 1892 to 1908, during which period he 
edited and superintended publication of Vol- 
umes 23-49, Oregon Reports. Circuit Judge 




Commander; Chairman Judiciary Committee 
Grand Lodge of Oregon, K. of P., and Su- 
preme Superintendent of fraternal insurance 
order United Artisans. Member University 
Club, of Portland; Delta Upsilon Society and 
honorary member Phi Alpha Delta law fra- 
ternity. Republican. 

THOMAS MILTON MORRIS. 

Residence, 387 Third street; office, 711 
Chamber of Commerce, Portland. Born April 

1, 1879, in Virginia. Son of Isaac N. and 
Malinda E. (Ramey) Morris. Graduated from 
Blackfoot High School, Blackfoot, Idaho. May 

2, 1902. Attended the University of Idaho, 
1902 and 1903, and Whitman College, at 
Walla Walla, Washington, 1903-4. Moved to 
Oregon in 1905. Entered the University of 
Oregon, and graduated therefrom in 1907. 
Was admitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, on 
June 12, 1907. Republican. 

GUSTAVAS C. MOSER. 

Residence, 358 Thirteenth street; office, 402- 
405 Swetland building, Portland. Born No- 
vember 15, 1870, at Alma, Wisconsin. Son of 
Fred and Anna (Arne) Moser. Married July 
20, J898, to S. Meta Keats. Educated in 
the common schools of Buffalo County, Wis- 
consin, and high school at Mondovi, Wiscon- 
sin, and at the Northern Indiana Normal 
School and College, at Valparaiso, Indiana. 
Taught school in Wisconsin from 1886 to 1889. 
Removed to Oregon June 1, 1891. Read law 
with W. M. Gregory, from 1891 to 1894. 
Served three years a? a non-commissioned of- 



192 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



ficer in Company F, Third Begiment, Oregon 
National Guards. Admitted to the bar in 
Oregon, June 1, 1894, and has practiced his 
profession in Portland ever since. Chief Dep- 




uty District Attorney for Multnomah County 
from 1904 to 1908. 'Life member of the M. 

A. A. C.; member Portland Commercial Club; 

B. P. O. E. (of which fraternity he is the 
Exalted Buler), Past Grand Chancellor of the 
K. of P. Eepublican. 

DAVID N. MOSESSOHN. 




Born January 1, 1883. Son of X. and Ther- 
esa Mosessohn. Married July 9, 1905, to 
Henrietta Minna Lerner. Educated at the 
public schools of Texas, California and Ore- 
gon, graduating from the Portland High 
School in 1900. Attended the University of 
Oregon Law School, graduating in 1902 with 
LL. B. degree. Admitted to the bar at Sa- 
lem in 1902, and commenced the practice of 
his profession in Portland in partnership with 
his father, N. Mosessohn, under the firm name 
Mosessohn & Mosessohn, which continues to 
date. Admitted to the United States Circuit 
and District Courts in 1902, and to the bar 
of the State of California in 1909. In 1903, 
with his brother, he 'started The Jewish 
Tribune in Portland. In 1904 took charge of 
the Chamber of Commerce Bulletin, a month- 
ly, becoming editor, and later publisher there- 
of. In 1907 was member Executive Commit- 
tee, Eepublican Central Committee. In 1908 
was sppointed Assistant District Attorney. 
Member Commercial Club, Chamber of Com- 
merce, Oregon State Bar Association, Ameri- 
can-Jewish Historical Society, I. O. O. F., 
K. of P., Eoyal Arcanum and B'nai B'rith 
fraternities. Bepublican. 

MOSES MOSESSOHN. 

Eesidence, 776 Johnson street; office, 610 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born August 17, 1884. Son of K and Theresa 




Eesidence, 776 Johnson street; office, 616 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 



Mosessohn. Educated at the public schools 
of Texas, California and Oregon, graduating 
from the Portland High School in 1901. At 
tended University of Oregon Law School and 
graduated in 1905, with LL. B. degree. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem in 1905, and to 
the United States Circuit and District Courts 
in 1907. Member of the firm of Mosessohn & 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



193 



Mosessohn. Member I. O. B. B., Eoyal Ar- 
canum, and Phi Delta Phi fraternities. As- 
sistant Secretary Portland Chamber of Com- 
merce. Eepublican. 

NEHEMIAH MOSESSOHN. 

Besidence, 776 Johnson street; office, 616 
Chamber of Commerce, Portland. Born April 
10, 1851. Married August 28, 1881, to Ther- 
esa Nissenson. Education: LL. D., TJuiver 
sity of Odessa, 1869; D. D. Rabbinical Semi- 
nary, 1873; 'Doctor Philology, University of 
St. Petersburg, 1876; LL. B., University of 




Oregon, 1902. Admitted to the bar at Salem 
June, 1902, and to the bar of the State of 
California in 1903; to the United States Cir- 
cuit and District Courts in 1902. Practiced 
law in Eussia twelve years. Commenced the 
practice of law in Portland, alone, in 1902, 
and subsequently formed partnership with his 
two sons, under the firm name Mosessohn & 
Mosessohn, which continues to date. Mem- 
ber B'nai B'rith, O. B. A., and W. O. W. 
fraternities. National Director Jewish Con- 
sumptive Relief Society, of Denver; "Rabbi 
Jewish Congregations, 1887-1902, when he 
commenced the practice of law. Editor Tho 
Jewish Tribune; Associate Editor Hebrew En- 
cyclopedia. Eepublican. 

ARTHUR I. MOULTON. 
Eesidence, 523 East Davis street; office, 
623 Lumbermens building, Portland. Born 
October 22, 1886, at Buxton, Kansas. Mar- 
ried October 11, 1908, to Emma C. Kershaw. 
Graduated from the public schools at Weston, 
Oregon, in 1901, and for the next three years 
attended normal school at the same place, 
but did not graduate. Entered law office of 




S. P. and C. C. Gose, at Walla Walla, Wash., 
in November, 1904. Studied law and did 
court reporting until January, 1908, when he 
removed to Portland, Oregon, and continued 
the study of law. Was admitted to the bar 
of Oregon in June, 1908, at Salem. Practiced 
in Portland in association with A. W. Laf- 
ferty from that time until October 1, 1909, 
at which time he entered the office of Graham, 
Cleeton & Davis, of which firm he is now 
junior partner. 

CLARENCE E. MOULTON. 

Eeside nee, 786 
Irving street; of- 
fice, 915 Board 
of Trade building, 
P o r tl a n d. Born 
August 12, 1866, 
in Washi n g t o n, 
D. C. Son of Ho- 
sea B. and Annie 
fPeese) Moulton. 
Mar r i e d Decem- 
ber 4, 1889, to 
Jennie Drury. Be 
ceived his early 
education in the 
public school and 
by private tuition. 
Later att ended 
Hunt's Academy, 
Georgetown Uni- 
versity, D. C., graduating in June, 1888, with 
the degree of LL. B., from the above univer- 
sity. Admitted to the Supreme Court, Dis- 
trict of Columbia, at Washington, D. C., June 
20, 1888, and the same year to the "United 
States District Court for Territory of Wash- 
ington, at Tacoma, Washington; May 13, 1891, 
to the Supreme Court, State of Washington, 
at Olympia, and February 19, 1906, Supreme 
Court of Oregon at Salem; October 13, 1908, 
to United States District and Circuit 
Court of Oregon, at Portland. In 1887 and 
1888 was Assistant Marshal of the Supreme 
Court of United States at Washington, D. C., 
and resigned to come West with Justice Field. 
Was land attorney for N. P. Ey. Co. for Wash- 
ington, Oregon and Idaho from 1888 to 1905, 
when he resigned to engage in practice in 
Portland, since which time he has been a 
member of the firm of Moulton & Scobey. 
Was private secretary to late Justice Stephen 
J. Field, of the United States Supreme Court, 
and accompanied him on his circuit in Oregon 
and California in the summer of 1888, and 
then decided to locate at Tacoma, Washing- 
ton. Member of Eepublican Club and the 
Commercial Club, Masonic, Elks and W. O. W. 
fraternities. Eepublican. 

ORVILLE BUYLAND MOUNT. 

Eesidence and office, Baker City, Oregon. 
Born in Silverton, Oregon, August 4, 1871. 
Son of Henry Duckwall and Eebecca (Stev- 
ens) Mount. Married to Elsie L. Johnson, 



194 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



December 10, 1902. Attended public schools 
until 1898; Monmouth Normal School, 1898- 
1891, graduating in business course; Univer- 
sity of Oregon, 1891-1893. From 1894 to 




1897, studied law in office of brother, Wallace 
Mount, at Sprague, Wash., who is now Jus- 
tice of Supreme Court of Washington. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, November 
27, 1897. Member of A. F. & A. M. and 
I. O. O. F. fraternities. Republican. 

FRANK MOTTER. 

Reside n c e, 881 
E. Flanders street; 
office 209-10 Com- 
mercial build i n g, 
Portland. Born in 
St. Joseph, Mo., 
November 14, '57. 
Son of John L 
and Helen M. 
(Dunlop) Motter. 
Came to Oregon 
in 1889. Married 
Adah M. Fi.sh- 
b u r n, April 15, 
1901. Educate-! hi 
public schools of 
Maryland and 
Pennsy 1 v a n i a. 
Graduated from 
Franklin & Mar- 
shall College, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in 
1877, with degree of A. B. ; graduated 
from Law Department, University of Or- 
egon, 1895, with degree of LL. B. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Oregon in 1895, and 
commenced the practice of law in Portland 
in partnership with S. C. Spencer and J. L. 
Colby, continuing until 1896, when the firm 




was changed to Spencer & Motter, which 
partnership continued to 1899; practicing 
alone since. Reading Clerk Oregon State 
Senate since 1899. Secretary Portland Cham- 
ber of Commerce, 1890 to 1896. Commodore 
Naval Reserves of Oregon, 1894. Member of 
W. O. W. Republican. 

ALBERT W. MUELLER. 

Residence and office, St. Helens, Oregon. 
Born February 21, 1878, at New Ulm, Min- 
nesota. Son of Matthias and Mary (Brunner) 
Mueller. Married to Alice L. Pendergast. 
Early education received at common and high 
schools of New Ulm, Minnesota, from which 
he graduated in 1896. Entered the Univer- 
sity of Minnesota and graduated in 1902 with 
LL. B. degree. In 1908 received from same 
University the degree of LL. M. Admitted 
to practice in the Supreme Court of Minne- 
bta, and the United States District and Cir- 
cuit Courts in 1902, and practiced at Wabasa, 
Minnesota, until 1906, when he removed to 
Minneapolis and practiced there three years. 
Came to Oregon in November, 1909, and was 
admitted to the Supreme Court of this state 
February 1, 1910. Member of the New Ulm, 
Minnesota, Cadets in 1894-95, and of Com- 
pany A, Second Regiment, Minnesota Na- 
tional Guard; Corporal in Company A, Span- 
ish War, Twelfth Minnesota Volunteers. 
Member of K. of C. and B. P. O. E. and Span- 
ish-American War Veterans. Republican. 

FREDERICK WILLIAM MULKEY. 

Residence, Arlington Club; office, 21 Mul- 
key building, Portland. Born January 6, 




1874, in Portland, Oregon. Son of Marion 
Francis and Mary Elizabeth (Porter) Mulkey. 
Attended the Portland public schools and 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



195 



graduated from the University of Oregon in 
1896, with degree of LL. B., later attending 
the New York Law School, New York City, 
and graduating from there in 1899. Admitted 
to the bar of Oregon June, 1898, since which 
date he has continued the active practice of 
his profession. Member of Portland City 
Council, 1900-1902, and acted as President of 
that body the last year of his term. Chair 
man of Oregon Tax Commission. Elected to 
the United States 'Senate January, 1907. 
Member of the Arlington, 'Commercial, Uni- 
versity, Waverly Golf Club, M. A. A. C., all 
of Portland; Union Club, of Tacoma, Wash- 
ington; Lotus Club, of New York; the Cos- 
mos Club, of Washington, D. iC.; the America i 
Bar .A ssociaiton, Oregon Bar Association, and 
American Political Science Association. Re- 
publican. 

JOHN CHARLES MULLEN. 

Residence, Springfield, Oregon; office, I. O. 
O. F. Temple. Born at Fairplay, Colorado, 
January 19, 1878. Son of Jonathan W. and 
Ellen (Sullivan) Mullen. Entered the public 
school at Roseburg, Oregon, later attending 
the Mt. Angel College, at Mt. Angel, Oregon 




Desirous of securing a course in law, he fol- 
lowed various employments and attended night 
school with this object in view, and entering 
the Oregon Law School, pursued the study of 
law, graduating from said institution in 1908, 
Being admitted to the bar in that year, he 
associated himself with the firm of Richard- 
son, Dimick & Morehead, where he remained 
until moving to the City of Springfield, where 
he opened an office by himself, and follows a 
general practice to date. In 1910 ap- 
pointed City Recorder of Springfield, Ore- 
gon, which office he now holds. Secretary of 




the Commercial Club, of Springfield, Oregon, 
and member of the Foresters, Maccabees, 
Modern Maccabees fraternities, and the 
Grange of Oregon. Republican. 

MICHAEL G. MUNLY. 

Reside nee, 440 
East Nineteenth 
street North; of- 
fice, 405 Wells- 
Fargo buil ding, 
Por 1 1 a n d. Born 
September 22, 
1854, in Carbon- 
dale, Lackawanna 
County, Pa. Sou 
of Michael and 
Bridget (McHale) 
Munly. Marr i e d 
June 21, 1890, to 
Mary Nixon. Re- 
ceived his early 
education at the 
public schools of 
his native town, 
and for a period 

of eight years was principal of one of the 
public schools of the City of Scranton, Penn- 
sylvania. Admitted to the bar at Scranton, 
Pennsylvania, in 1882, and to the bar of Ore- 
gon in 1883. Moved to the State of Oregon 
in August, 1882, and was appointed Deputy 
City Attorney of Portland in 1891; appointed 
Circuit Judge Fourth Judicial 'District of 
Oregon in 1893. Member of the Artisans, 
Knights of Columbus, Oregon Historical As- 
sociation. Editor of the Catholic Sentinel, 
the official newspaper of the Catholic arch- 
diocese of Oregon, for four years, from 1886 
to 1890. Was one of the delegates of the 
State of Oregon to the National Congress on 
Uniform Divorce Laws held in Washington 
and Philadelphia, in 1906. Represented 
Alaska and Oregon in the third International 
Congress of Fisheries held in Washington, 
D. C., in September, 1908. Democrat. 

MILLER MURDOCH. 

Residence, 724 Multnomah street; office, 
823-825 Board of Trade building, Portland. 
Born in Ontario, Canada. Educated at Col- 
legiate Institute, Collingwood, Canada, Os- 
good Hall and Toronto University, finishing 
there in 1890. Admitted to the bar in On- 
tario, Canada, in 1890. Came to the Pacific 
Coast the same year, and was admitted to the 
bar of the State of Washington. Came to 
Oregon in 1894, arid was admitted to the bar 
of this state. Member of Commercial Club, 
Portland. Republican. 

CREED W. MULLINS. 

Residence, Astoria, Oregon; office, 367 
Commercial street. Born February 27, 1884, 
at Flat Gap, Virginia. Son of James A. and 
Margaret L. (Purkey) Mullins. Educated at 
the public schools at Flat Gap, Virginia, at 



196 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



the high School, Wise, Virginia, at the Clint- 
wood Normal College, Clintwood, Virginia. 
Studied law with Bond & Bruce at Wise, Vir- 
ginia. Came to Oregon in 1906, and studied 
law in the office of John H. & A. M. Smith 




at Astoria, for three years. Admitted to the 
bar at Salem June 9, 1909, since when he has 
practiced his profession alone at Astoria. 
Served three years in Coast Artillery of U. 
S. A., and received honorable discharge. Mem- 
ber Redmen. Democrat. 

WILLIAM A. MUNLY. 

Residence, 1171 
Clinton street; of- 
fice, 738 Chamber 
of Commerce 
building, Portland. 
Born May 29, 
1863, at Carbon- 
dale, Pa. Son of 
Michael and Brid- 
get ( M c H a 1 e ) 
Muni y. Married 
August 21, 1891, 
to Elizabeth B. 
Buckenmeyer. Ed- 
ucated in public 
schools of Carbon- 
d a 1 e, Pa., and 
grad u a t e d from 
the high school in 
that city in 1878. 

Afterward took private studies and for three 
years was principal of the school at Olyphant, 
Pennsylvania, which position he held until 
leaving for Oregon in 1883. Was admitted 
to the bar of Oregon by the Supreme Court 
in October term, 1894, having studied law 
with Attorney-General George E. Chamber- 




lain. Served eight years as private secretary 
for Governor Sylvester Pennoyer, of Oregon 
(from 1887 to 1895) and three years as Assist- 
ant Postmaster of Portland, under E. C. 
Protzman, Postmaster, in 1896 to 1898. In 
earlier days engaged in newspaper work and 
was city editor of The Daily Standard, of 
Portland, in 1885. Member of Knights of 
Columbus. Democrat. 

ARTHUR ALBAN MURPHY. 
Residence, 475 Holladay avenue; office. 335 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born February 8, 1886, at Portland, Oregon. 
Sou of Dan R. and Caroline V. (Kennedy) 
Murphy. Educated at the public and high 
school of Portland, graduating in 1904. At- 
tended Leland Stanford, Jr., University, from 
1904 to 1908. graduating in that year with 
the degree of A. B. Admitted to the Su- 
preme Court of Oregon at Salem, October 8, 
1908. and practiced in the office of Murphy 
Brodie & Swett from that time until January 
1, 1910. when he formed a partnership with 
W. F. Eastham under the firm name of East- 
ham & Murphy, which continues to date. 
Member Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Delta Phi 
fraternities. Republican. 

CHESTER GRIFFIN MURPHY. 

Residence, 701 Xorthrup street; office, 401-2 
Fenton building, Portland. Born February 3, 
1876, at Salem, Oregon. Son of John Joseph 
and Elizabeth C. (Lister) Murphy. Prepared 




for college at the Salem public schools, 1886 
1894, and three years at Willamette Univer 
sity, 1894-1896; 1896 entered the Leland 
Stanford, Jr., University, graduating with 
the degree of A. B. in 1900. Attended 
Harvard Law School, 1901-1902, and received 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



197 



the degree of LL. B., Stanford, 1903. Ad- 
mitted to the Oregon bar October, 1902, and 
began the practice of his profession in Port- 
land as assistant to William D. Fenton, with 
whom he remained until March, 1905, since 
which date he has practiced his profession 
alone. He operates two ranches in the Wil- 
lamette Valley a stock ranch at Woodburn 
and a hop ranch at Salem. In 1905 was ap- 
pointed Eeferee in Bankruptcy by Judge 
Charles E. Wolverton, Judge United States 
District Court, Fourth District of Oregon, and 
continues to hold that office. Member Uni- 
versity Club, Waverly Golf Club, M. A. A. C. 
and the Kock Island Club. Eepublican. 

CHARLES PATRICK MURPHY. 

Eesidence, 2675 Church street; office, Court- 
house, Baker City. Born September 2, 1868, 
at Liverpool, England. Son of Charles N. 
and Annie (Keating) Murphy. Married 
June 14, 1899, to Margaret D. Klein. At- 
tended St. Anthony's Public Elementary 
School, followed by course in St. Francis 
Xavier's College, Liverpool. Taught in pub- 
lic schools of Liverpool three years, and came 
to Minnesota in 1888. Admitted to the Su- 
preme Court of Minnesota in 1900; practiced 
law in Duluth, Minnesota, until 1903, when he 
removed to Oregon and was admitted to the 
bar of this state in December, 1904. Served 
term in Minnesota National Guard. Demo- 
crat. 

DAN R. MURPHY. 

Eesidence, 475 Holladay avenue; office, 521- 
525 Chamber of Commerce, Portland. Born 
April 16, 1860, at Champoeg, Oregon. Son 
of Matthew O'C. and Ellen (Costello) Mur- 
phy. Married in 1885 to Caroline V. Ken- 
nedy. Educated at the public school at St. 
Paul, Oregon, and St. Mary's College, San 
Francisco, Cal., 1878-1881, graduating with a 
B. S. degree. Admitted to the bar of Oregon 
in October, 1886. Has been in continuous 
practice of his profession since. Now senior 
member of the firm of Murphy, Brodie & 
Swett. Chairman of Democratic State Cen- 
tral Committee, 1892 to 1894; United States 
Attorney for Oregon, 1893-1897. Eepublican. 

WILLIAM SCOTT NASH. 

Eesidence, Hobart-Curtis Hotel; office, 610- 
611 Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Oregon. Born in Mansfield, Illinois, April 15, 
1878. Son of Jesse and Martha E. (McKel- 
lup) Nash. Attended public and high schools 
at Mansfield, Illinois, Valparaiso College, Val- 
paraiso, Indiana, receiving degree of B. S. 
August, 1901. Eeceived degree of LL. B. 
from University of Michigan, June 22, 1905. 
Moved to Oregon June 1, 1907, and admitted 
to Oregon bar in June, 1907, and continues 
his practice to date. Eepublican. 

PORTER J. NEFF. 

Eesidence, 16 Belmont avenue; office 18 
D'Anjon street, Medford. Born at Bushnell 




Illinois, September 13, 1871. Son of John 
and Mary (Porter) Neff. Married October 
19, 1895, to Isaben Neff. Attended public 
schools at Bushnell and the University of 
Minnesota, graduating therefrom in 1892 with 
B. L. degree. Admitted to the bar of Minne- 
sota in 1892. Practiced at Minneapolis and 
at Duluth, Minnesota, from 1892 to 1908, when 
he removed to Oregon and was admitted to 
the bar of this state in that year. Democrat. 

OSCAR ALMAMAN NEAL. 
Eeside nee, 936 
E. Couch street; 
office, 631 Cham- 
ber of Commerce 
building, Portland, 
Oregon. Born in 
Hood Eiver, Was- 
co County, Oregon, 
October 11, 1870. 
Son of Jesse and 
Lucy M. (Bead) 
Neal. Married to 
Margaret J. Sin- 
clair, February 18, 
1902. Att e n d e d 
public school at 
Hood Eiver, Ore., 
and gr a d u a t e cl 
from public school 
at Turner, Oregon. 
1890; University of Oregon, at Portland, 1897 
to 1899, graduating with degree of LL. B. 
Admitted to bar of Oregon June 12. 1899; 
United States District Court of Oregon, May 
23, 1901; United States Circuit Court of Ore- 
gon, August 30, 1907, and United States Cir- 
cuit Court of Appeals for Ninth Circuit, Sep- 
tember 21, 1908. Commenced practicing law 
in the office of A. King Wilson, in 1906. form- 
ing partnership which still continues. Mem- 
ber of Oregon National Guard three years; 
member Phi Delta Phi; Portland Eepublican 
Club. Eepublican. 

SJUR P. NESS. 

Eesidence and office, Eugene, Oregon. Born 
in Lyster, Norway, January 15, 1871. Son 
of Peder S. and Ingeborg (Talsater) Ness. 
Came to Oregon in 1902. Married Mary S. 
Watson, November 26, 1903. Eeceived early 
education in country school, later taking a 
course in Beeman's Business College, Eed 
Wing, Minnesota. Studied while teaching 
country school. 'Graduated from the Law De- 
partment, University of Minnesota, Minneap- 
olis, in 1902. Admitted to the bar of Ore- 
gon in October, 1902. Associated with Hon. 
J. J. Walton from October, 1902, till Novem- 
ber, 1909, at which time the firm was dis- 
solved, and has since practiced alone. Mem- 
ber of State Militia in Minnesota for two 
years; member of I. O. O. F. Eepublican. 

SYLVESTER A. NEWBERRY. 

Eesidence and office, Pendleton, Oregon. 
Born December 7, 1868, at Burlington, Wis- 



198 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



consin. Son of Frank and B. (Runklc) 
Newberry. Married July 1, 1891, to Sara A. 
Wheeler. Attended Northwestern Law School 
at Ch ; cago, Illinois, graduating in 1878 with 
LL. B. degree. Attended Hamilton Univer- 
sity, Minnesota, 1883 to 1885, inclusive. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Pendleton in May, 1894. 
Democrat. 

WILLIAM SPENCER NEWBURY. 
Residence 2222 B street; office, 1909 Court 
avenue, Baker City, Oregon. Born in Ripley, 
New York, September 19, 1834. Son of John 
A. and Louisa (Spencer) Newbury. Married 
to Miss Alzina Taylor, October 12, 1860, at 
Madison, Wisconsin. Attended the common 
schools at Ripley, N. Y., until 1850; later 
studied law in the office of Senator John W. 
Davis, Fox Lake, Wisconsin, and later took a 
course at the Commercial College at Madison. 
Admitted to the bar at Humboldt, Kansas, in 
1865. Came to Oregon in 1870, and admitted 
to Oregon State bar in 1874. First Lieuten- 
ant Eighth Kansas Volunteer Infantry, 1861; 
Postmaster from 1861 to 1864 of lola, Kansas, 
and Mayor of lola, Kansas, in 1870; member 
of G. A. R. and Loyal Legion of America; 
was Mayor of the City of Portland from 1877 
to 1879. Republican. 

N. MONROE NEWPORT. 

Residence, Lebanon; office, same. Born in 
Buffalo, Mo., March 12, 1864. Son of John 
D. and Harriet N. (Bennet) Newport. Came 




to Oregon March 14, 1880. Married Emma 
Retta Cougill June 5, 1895. Attended public 
schools at Hillsboro, Oregon. Graduated 
from Willamette University, Salem, Oregon, 
classical course, with degree of A. B., 1890, 
and Law Department, with degree of LL. B., 



1893. Studied law in office of Attorney-Gen- 
eral D. R. N. Blackburn, of Albany; was law 
partner with Judge J. J. Whitney, in Albany, 
Oregon, for six years. Admitted to bar at 
Salem, Oregon, June, 1893. Candidate for 
County Judge, Linn County, Oregon, 1904; 
elected City Attorney of Albany, 1895, and 
in 1907 elected City Attorney for Lebanon, 
which continues to date. Member Alumni 
Association, Willamette University; member 
of I. O. O. F., A. O. U. W. and Maccabees 
fraternities; Lebanon Development League, 
Albany Alco Club and Business Men 's 
League of Lebanon. Republican. 

HORACE BROWN NICHOLAS. 

Residence, 372 Fourteenth street; office, 715 
Oregonian building, Portland, Oregon. Born 
September 27, 1850, in Davis County, Mis 
souri. Son of Peter Marks and Tabitha A. 
(Splawn) Nicholas. Married in 1878 to Kate 
Hunsaker. Received his education at the 
common schools in Washington County, Ore 
gon. Came to this state in 1864. Was ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, Novem 
ber, 1875, and has continued the active prac 
tice of his profession. Member of the Port 
land Common Council, 1891-92; member Ken- 
tucky Klick and Sons of American Revolu 
tion. Democrat. 

JAMES HOWE NICHOLS. 

Residence and office, Baker City. Born 
July 12, 1883, at Lima, La Grange County, 
Indiana. 'Son of Drusus Burnell and Jennie 
Louise (Shipman) Nichols. Attended Lima 
school until 12 years of age, then entered 
Howe Academy, where he remained until 15 
years of age, then re-entered Lima High 
School, and graduated therefrom in 1901. En- 
tered the University of Michigan in the fall 
of that year, and spent one year in the Liter- 
ary Department, following it by a course in 
the Law Department of the same university, 
from which he graduated in June, 1905, with 
degree of Bachelor of Laws. Admitted to the 
bar of Indiana in April, 1905, to the bar of 
Michigan in June, 1905. to the bar of Ore- 
gon, temporarily, in November, 1905, and 
permanently in May, 1907. Located at Baker 
City in 1905, and formed partnership with 
C. A. Robertson, under the firm name of Rob 
erfrson & Nichols, which lasted until June, 
1906, at which time he entered the offices of 
Hart & Smith, B'iker City. On the election 
of Mr. Smith to the bench, he formed partner 
ship with J. N. Hart, under the firm 
name of Hart & Nichols, which continues to 
date. Elected Police Judge and Auditor of 
Baker City in November, 1908. President of 
the University of Michigan Democratic Club 
in 1904. Democrat. 

OAK NOLAN. 

Residence and office, Tillamook, Oregon. 
Born in Tillamook, Oregon, September 25, 
1870. Son of John H. and Margaret E. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



190 



(Jenkins) Nolan. Attended public schools in 
Tillamook County, Oregon, 1874 to 1890. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, June 13, 
1907. Eepublican. 

GEORGE NOLAND. 

Eesidence and office, Klamath Falls, Ore- 
gon. Born near Creswell, Oregon, October 
24, 1857. Son of Pleasant Calvin and Linna 
Jane (Stewart) Noland. Married to Lottie 
Goodell, December 19, 1888. Attended com- 
mon schools at Creswell and Eugene, Oregon, 
and Arnold's Academy, at Eugene. Entered 
University of Oregon, October, 1876, graduat- 
ing in 1882 with degree of A. B., later re- 
ceiving degree A. M. Read law in office of 




Judge Charles Fitch, of Eugene; about eight 
months prior to this in the office of G. W. 
Barnes, of Prineville. Admitted to bar at 
Salem, October, 1882. Began the practice of 
law at Prineville, Oregon, January, 1883, in 
partnership with George W. Barnes. Re 
moved to Astoria, Oregon, February, 1884, 
practicing there until April, 1907. For a 
time with George A. Dorris and later with 
C. E. Clomson, and later with Eichard Shaw 
Smith. Since 1907 at Klamath Falls, Oregon, 
where he was in partnership with E. S. Dick 
until he was appointed Circuit Judge by Gov- 
ernor Chamberlain, September 1, 1908, to 
January, 1911; City Attorney for Astoria 
from 1884 to 1889. Member of Masonic, K. 
of P. and Modern Woodmen of America fra- 
ternities. For several years was Pilot Com- 
missioner for the Columbia and Willamette 
Eivers. Democrat. 

ALBIN WALTER NORBLAD. 

Eesidence, 739 Franklin avenue; office, 3-4 
Page building, Astoria, Oregon. Born at 



Malmo, Sweden, March 19, 1881. Son of 
Peter and Bessie (Anderson) Norblad. Came 
to the United States when two years of age, 
settling in Grand Eapids, Michigan,- where he 
attended the common schools until he was 
twelve years of age. Took an academic 
course in the Chicago Seminary of Sciences for 
a four years' term, then to the Northwestern 
University an:l Harvey Medical College, 
where he completed a special course, then en- 
tering the Chicago Law School, graduating 
from the same with degree of LL. B., June, 
1905. He removed to Grand Eapids, Mich- 
igan, being admitted to the bar at Lansing, 
Michigan, in April, the same year; moving to 
Escanaba, Michigan, forming a partnership 
with Judd Yelland, under the firm name of 
Yelland & Norblad; appointed Acting Pros- 
cuting Attorney of Delta County, Michigan, 
which position he held from 1905 to 1908. 
Moved to Astoria, Oregon, March, 1909, form- 
ing a partnership with G. A. Hemple, under 
the firm name of Norblad & Hemple, which 
partnership exists to date. Admitted to the 
bar of Oregon at Salem, Oregon, April 7, 1909; 
to the United States Supreme Court, Decem- 
ber 10, 1909; United States Circuit and Dis- 
trict Courts. December 15, 1909. Served in 
the First Illinois Volunteer Infantry and in 
the Second Division, Second Battalion, Mich- 
igan Naval Brigade. Member of the Phi 
Alpha Delta Law Fraternity, K. of P., Elks, 
Odd Fellows, Woodmen and Masonic fraterni- 
ties; former Secretary Escanaba Business 
Men's Association; is now President of the 
Astoria 'Chamber of 'Commerce. 

HENRY HALL NORTHUP. 

Eeside nee, 599 
Elizab e t h street; 
office, Washington 
building, Portland. 
Born February 27, 
1839, at Cheshire, 
Berkshire County, 
Mass. Son of 1s- 
a a c Wood and 
Maria (Brown) 
Northup. Married 
September 14, 
1869, to Lydia B. 
Harkness. Educat- 
ed in the common 
schools of Massa- 
chusetts, and 
grad u a t e d from 
the Massachusetts 
Normal School in 

1860. Graduated from the Law Department 
of Columbian (now George Washington) Uni- 
versity, at Washington, D. C., in June, 1868, 
with degree of LL. B. Admitted to the bar 
of Washington, D. C., in June, 1868. Came 
to Oregon in 1871, and was admitted to the 
Supreme Court of this state in October of that 
year, and to the Supreme Court of the United 
States in 1889. Member of the First Iowa 




200 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Infantry, and of Massachusetts Infantry dur- 
ing Civil War. Register in Bankruptcy for 
District and State of Oregon, 1873 to 1878; 
member Oregon Legislature 1889-1893; Coun- 
ty Judge Multnomah County, 1894 to 1898. 
Republican. 

HARRY E. NORTHUP. 

Residence, 641 Montgomery Drive; office, 
room 40 Washington building, Portland. Born 
in Portland, January 9, 1874. Son of Henry 
H. and Lydia (Harkness) Northup. Married 
February 20, 1902, to Virgilia Cooper. Edu- 
cated in the public schools of Portland, and 
graduated from the high school in June of 
1894. Attended the Law Department of Uni- 
versity of Oregon, 1895 to 1897, and received 
degree of LL. B. Admitted to the bar in 
Salem, Oregon, in June, 1_897, and formed 
partnership with C. H. Gilbert the same year, 
which continued until dissolution in 1899. 
Was appointed Clerk of United States Land 
Office, The Dalles, Oregon, April 1, 1899, and 
resigned in April, 19u4, when he came to 
Portland to practice his profession in part- 
nership with his father, H. H. Northup, under 
the firm name of Northup & Northup. Served 
term in Oregon Legislature of 1907 as Repre 
sentative from Multnomah County. Repub 
lican. 

HARRY D. NORTON. 

Residence and office, Grants Pass, Oregon. 
Born at 'Stilman Valley, Illinois, February 17, 
1866. Son of Henry B. and Marian (Good- 
rich) Norton. Educated in the public schools 
of California. Studied law in the office of 
L. Bilyeu, Eugene, Oregon. Admitted to bar 
Miarch 6, 1893, in Oregon, and opened law of- 
fice at Eugene, Oregon, and practiced there 
until 1899, then removed to Grants Pass, Ore- 
gon, where he has followed his profession 
to date. Elected to the Senate to represent 
the Seventh Senatorial District of Oregon in 
1909. Member of the A. F. & A. M., I. O. O. 
F., K. of P. and B. P. O. E. fraternities, and 
the Commercial Club of Grants Pass. Dem- 
ocrat. 

THOMAS O'DAY. 

Residence, 213 West Park street; office, 
321 Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born July 4, 1852, at Goshen, Connecticut. 
Son of Daniel and Catherine (Welch) O'Day. 
Married November 8, 1882, to Agnes Earl. 
Early education received at the public schools 
of Illinois, and his legal training at the State 
University of Iowa, from which he graduated 
in 1877 with LL. B. degree. Admitted to the 
Supreme Court of Iowa in June, 1877, and 
commenced the practice of law in the fall of 
that year at Bedford, Iowa, in association 
with Hon. H. M. Grimes. In 1879 moved 
to Nebraska and practiced there until the 
fall of 1889, when he came to Oregon and 
opened law office in Portland. Was admitted 
to the bar of Oregon in 1889. Was Circuit 
Judge, appointed 1908, and retired 1909. 
Member Commercial Club. Democrat. 



MARK O'NEILL. 

Reside nee, 600 
Fourth street; of- 
fice, 615 Chamber 
of Commerce, 
Portland, Oregon. 
Born May !l7, 
1856, at Maysville, 
Kentucky. Son of 
Michael and Ho- 
no r i a (Mannion) 
O'Neill. Marr i e d 
October 19, 1896, 
to Annie L. Fahie. 
Received his early 
education at the 
public schools in 
the State of Ohio, 
up to 1877. Admit- 
ted to the bar of 
the State of Ohio 

September 3, 3879, by the District Court. 
Mover! to Oregon 1888. Admitted to the bar 
of Oregon. Member of Mazama and Oregon 
Historical Societies. Democrat. 

ROBERT J. O'NEIL. 

Residence, 635 Broadway; office 717 Board 
of Trade building, Portland. Born August 
19, 1872, at Portland, Oregon. Educated at 
the public and high schools of Portland, grad- 
uating in 1891, and at Leland Stanford, Jr., 
University, from which he graduated in 1897 
with degree of A. B. Admitted to the bar by 
the Supreme Court of Oregon in October, 1897. 
Member M. A. A. C. and University Club. 
Republican. 

TURNER OLIVER. 





Residence, 1408 Fourth street; office, Som- 
mer block, La Grande. Born May 7, 1860, in 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



201 



Marion County, Iowa. Son of Hiram Wesley 
and Julia Ann (McCaleb) Oliver. Married 
November 12, 1890, to Anna McDonald. Came 
to Oregon at the age of four years with his 
parents, and received his early education in 
the public schools of Union County, until 
1878. Taught school, 1878-1880. Attended 
Blue Mountain University, at La Grande, in 
1880-1882, and the University of Oregon 1882- 
1884. Was Superintendent of Schools at 
Union, 1885 and 1886; Deputy Clerk of Union 
County, 1886-1890; County Clerk, Union Coun- 
ty, 1890-1894; merchant at La Grande, 1894 
to 1899. Admitted to the bar at Pendleton 
in 1899, and later in Federal Courts, and has 
since practiced law at La Grande. Organized 
La Grande Commercial Club in 1895. Was 
elected State Senator for Union and Wallowa 
Counties, 1908. Member Masonic and Knights 
of Pythias fraternities. Democrat. 

MARTIN L. OLMSTEAD. 

Residence and office, Baker City, Oregon. 
Born September 29, 1842, in the State of New 
York. Married in 1866 to Celia E. East. Ed- 
ucated at Wildman Collegiate Institute, Ba- 
tavia, New York, at Eochester University, 
Rochester, New York, and at the Albany Law 
School, Albany, New York, from which insti- 
tution he received LL. B. degree. Admitted 
to the Supreme Court of New York State in 
1867, and to the courts of Iowa and Nebraska 
in 1868. Was admitted to the Supreme Court 
of Oregon in 1876. Was Lieutenant-Colonel 
U. S. Volunteers and is Past Commandant of 
G. A. R. Was Circuit Judge Sixth Judicial 
District of Oregon. Republican. 

CONRAD PATRICK OLSON. 

Reside nee, 69 
N. Twenty - fi r s t 
street; office 439- 
441 Chamber of 
Comme r c e build- 
ing, Portland. 
Born in Clay 
Banks, Wisconsin, 
September 4, 1882. 
Son of August and 
Mary (Finan) Ol- 
son. Attended 
Stevens Point Nor- 
mal -School, Wis- 
consin, 1904, and 
University of Wis- 
consin, 1909, re- 
ceiving degree of 
LL. B. Admitted 
to the bar of Wis- 
consin at Madison, June 22, 1909. Came to 
Portland, Oregon, September 4, 1909, and ad- 
mitted to Oregon bar September 14, 1909. 
Member Phi Alpha Delta law fraternity. Re- 
publican. 

FREDERICK LEE OLSON. 

Residence, 311 Crosby street; office, 507 
Worcester building, Portland. Born Septem- 



ber 5, 1867, at Florence, Douglas County, Ne- 
braska. Son of Hans and Kaisa (Nilsdotter) 
Olson. Married August 28, 1900, to Minnie 
A. Reed. Early education received at the 
public schools of Mt. Zion and Mt. Tabor, 
Oregon; at Lyle, Washington, and at Portland 





High School, Portland, Oregon. Graduated 
from the Law Department of the University 
of Oregon in 1894. Admitted to the bar of 
the State of Oregon in 1894. Member Com- 
pany I, O. N. G., enlisting March 16, 1894, 
and serving one term of three years. Elected 
Justice of the Peace, East Portland District, 
June, 1906; elected Justice of the Peace, Port- 
land District, June, 1908. Republican. 

ALBERT NEWTON ORCUTT. 

Residence, 205 South Main street; office, 
Douglas National Bank building, Roseburg, 
Oregon. Born in Delmar, Iowa, February 13, 
1878. Son of Julius H. and Emma J. (Wade) 
Orcutt. Married to Dora Franklin Page, Sep- 
tember 3, 1902. Graduate of Waterloo, Iowa, 
High School, 1894, and Waterloo, Iowa, Busi- 
ness College, 1895; Cornell College, Ph. B., 
1900. Studied law in the office of Mullen & 
Pickett, in Waterloo, Iowa, for two years. 
Came to Oregon in 1901, and admitted to bar 
at Salem, Oregon, 1904, forming partnership 
with J. C. Fullerton, Roseburg, Oregon, which 
continues to date. Professor of History, 
State Normal School, Drain, Oregon, 1901-03. 
Member American Historical Association, I. 
0. O. F., A. F. & A. M., B. P. O. E. Repub- 
lican. 

CHARLES. H. PAGE. 

Residence, Imperial Hotel; office, .107 Sher- 
lock building, Portland. Born March 8, 1852,- 
in Albemarle County, Virginia. Son of 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Charles Henry and Gabriel Sophia Penn 
(Crawford) Page. Came to Oregon in 1868. 
Received his education at private school, 
Edge Hill, Albermarle County, Virginia. 
Teacher, Thomas Jefferson, Eandolph Taylor. 
Admitted to the bar of Oregon in January, 




1879, and has since practiced his profession 
until 1908 in Astoria, Oregon, and since that 
time in Portland. Was Major on staff of 
Governor L. F. Grover, Oregon State MilTtia, 
1874 to 1878. Collector of Customs, District 
of Oregon, 1903-1908; County Judge Clatsop 
County for four years, 1886 to 1891; Local 
Agent for Land Board, Clatsop County, 1873- 
1908; Mayor of Astoria, 1888-1890; Pilot Com- 
missioner, State of Oregon, 1891 to 1893; 
Referee in Bankruptcy, United States, 1898- 
1909; Police Commissioner City of Astoria, 
1905-1909. Member Arlington Club. Inde- 
pendent in Politics. 

JOSEPH HENRY PAGE. 

Residence, 446 Third street; office 701-704 
Chamber of Commerce bui'ding. Born Octo- 
ber 6, 1878, at Seward, Nebraska. Son of 
Henry Clay and Belle (Norvall) Page. Mar- 
ried October 29, 1907, to Cleopatra Smyth. 
Graduated from the high school at Vancouver, 
Washington, and from S.anford University, 
California, in 1903., with degree of A. B. Ad 
mitted to the bar of California in 1903, and 
the following year came to the State of Ore- 
gon and was admitted to the bar. Deputy 
District Attorney under Judge George J. 
Cameron, 1908 to date. Member Phi Delta 
Phi fraternity. Republican. 

ALPHEUS WELLINGTON PARSHLEY. 

Residence, 315 East Thirty-third street; of- 
fice, 425-426 Worcester building, Portland. 




Born in Portland, Oregon, November 18, 1884. 
Son of Wellington Wadsworth and Martha 
(Wilson) Parshley. Attended and graduated 
from Portland public schools in 1899; Port- 
land High School, 1904; Law Department 
University of Oregon, 1906, with degree of 
LL. B. Admitted to the bar of Oregon in 
1906. Commenced the practice of law, asso- 
ciated with H. Yanckw'ch. Republican. 

BEAMER S. PAGTJE. 
Reside nee, 789 
Pettygrove street; 
office, 515 Orego 
nian b u il d i n g. 
Por 1 1 a n d. Born 
December 9, 1862, 
in Carlisle, Penn- 
sylvania. Son of 
Samuel A. and 
Rebecca Ann 
(Culver) Pague. 
Marr i e d Decem- 
ber 24, 1884, to 
Al i ce T. Lan- 
phear. Attend e d 
the high school at 
Carlisle, Pa., and 
graduated in the 
c-lass of 1897; at- 
tended prepara- 
tory school of Dickinson College, in 1880; 
student at Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa., 
1880-1882; graduated from the School of In 
struction, United States Weather Bureau, 
Arlington, Virginia, June class, 1882; assigned 
to Oregon, May, 1886, and attended the Law 
School, University of Oregon, graduating in 
the class of 1893 with the degree of LL. B. 
In 1898 received from the same university 
degree of A. M., after submitting a thesis. 
Admitted by Supreme Court, State of Oregon, 
at Salem, June 7, 1893; by United States Dis- 
trict Court of Oregon, April 21, 1903, and by 
the Circuit Court of Oregon on the same date. 
Served as private, Company G, Eighth Regi 
ment, Pennsylvania National Guard, 1879 
1881, and Captain of Company A, Third Regi- 
ment, Oregon National Guard, 1886. Mem- 
ber of United States Weather Bureau from 
January, 1882, to February, 1903, when lie 
resigned, having advanced to grade of Fore 
cast Official, the second highest grade in the 
bureau. Regent of Oregon Agricultural Col- 
lege, 1898 to 1900; member American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science; Past 
President of Oregon Academy of Science; 
Past Master Columbia Lodge, No. 114, A. F. & 
A. M., Portland, Oregon. Republican. 

WOODSON L. PATTERSON. 

Residence and office, Baker City, Oregon. 
Born in Tillamook County, Oregon, June 2, 
1877. Son of Joel and Cordelia A. (Porter) 
Patterson. Married to Mildred Linville, 
June 18, 1903. Attended public schools of 
Douglas County, and at Empire City, Oregon; 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



203 




graduated from Oregon Agricultural College 
at Corvallis, June, 1899, with degree of B. S. 
Admitted to the bar at Pendleton, Oregon, 
May, 1902, and since practiced law in Baker 
City, Oregon. Republican. 

ELLIS M. PALMER. 

Residence, 1105 
North Liberty 
street; office, 345 
State street, Sa- 
lem, Oregon. Born 
February 11, 1852, 
in New York 
State. Son of 
Alexander F. and 
Sarah Jane (Milli- 
man) Palmer. 
Married January 
1, 1880, to Ella S. 
Lewis. Attended 
the public schools 
of Iowa and later 
Iowa State Uni- 
versity, Law De- 
partment, at Iowa 
City, Iowa, grad 

uating therefrom in June, 1886, with degree 
of LL. B. Admitted to the bar by the Iowa 
Supreme Court in 1886, and to the United 
States District Court of the Southern District 
of Iowa, same date. Removed to Nebraska in 
1886, and was admitted to the Supreme Court 
of that state. Commenced the practice of 
law at Holdredge, Nebraska, in partnership 
with Hiram K. Evans, under the firm name of 
Palmer & Evans, which continued for one 
year. Moved to Oregon in 1892, and com- 
menced the practice of his profession in Sa- 
lem, being admitted to the bar of that state 
in 1896. Member of Masonic fraternity. Re- 
publican. 

VINE WILLS PEAECE. 
Residence, Me 
Minnv i 1 1 e, Ore.; 
o ffi c e, Mc-Minn- 
ville National 
Bank bui 1 d i n g, 
Born August 19, 
1863, at Eola, 
Polk County, Ore. 
Son of Thomas 
and Naomi (Liver- 
m o r e) P e a r c e. 
Married Janu a r y 
11, 1890, to Phosa 
E. Goodrich. Dur- 
ing childhood and 
until about sixteen 
years of age at- 
tended the "Pop- 
corn" school- 
house, about four 

miles west of Salem, Oregon. Took business 
course in Capital Business College, at Salem, 
Oregon, in 1893. Read law at night while 
pursuing other employment. Admitted to the 




bar at Salem in October, 1906, and has since 
practiced alone at McMinnville; Justice of 
the Peace at North Yamhill for four years; 
County Judge of Yamhill County, by appoint- 
ment, April to July, 1906; City Recorder of 
McMinnville, and is now holding this office 
for the third term; member of McMinnville 
School Board; member Masonic and W. O. W. 
fraternities. (Democrat. 

JOEL N. PEARCY. 

Residence, 340 Montgomery street; office, 
708 Chamber of Commerce, Portland. Born in 
Portland, Oregon, March 30, 1860. Son of 
Nathan and Frances A. (Knight) Pearcy. 
Married to Matilda Pike in 1888. Graduated 
from Portland High School, 1876, and from 
Oregon University, 1879, with degree of A. B., 
receiving degree A. M. in 1882. Admitted to 
bar at Salem, Oregon, October, 1882; practiced 
law in Portland until 1887; in Kelso, Wash- 
ington, until 1899; again in Portland from 
1899 to date. Democrat. 

CASSIUS REUBEN PECK. 

Residence, Marshfield, Oregon; office, First 
Trust & Savings Bank building. Born July 
1, 1880, at Brookfield, Vermont. Son of Cas- 
sius and Luna A. (Sprague) Peck. Married 
June 3, 1903, to Lillian L. Valentine. At- 
tended the public and high schools of Burling- 
ton, Vermont, and graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Vermont with A. B. degree. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Vermont in August, 1904; 
to the bar of Oklahoma Territory in 1905, and 
of Oklahoma State in 1908. Came to Oregon 
in April, 1909, and was admitted to the bar 
of this state in that month. Member Masonic 
fraternity. Republican. 

DAVID A. PEPP. 

Reside nee, 234 
Porter street; of- 
fice, 926-927 Board 
of Trade building, 
Por 1 1 a n d. Born 
August 15, 1885, 
at Philadelp h i a, 
Pa. Son of Abra- 
ham and Sarah 
(R o v e n ) Pepp. 
Marr i e d October 
10, 1909, to Ida F. 
Nemiro. Early ed- 
ucation recei v e d 
at the common 
school of Philadel- 
p h i a, the high 
s c h'o o 1, and the 
University of 
Penn\ sylvania, 

both in the same city. Admitted to the bar 
of Maryland in January, 1908, and to the bar 
of Oregon March 30, 1909. Came to Oregon 
to reside in March, 1909, and became a mem- 
ber of the firm of Gruber & Pepp. Member 




204 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



McKean Law Club and Modern Woodmen of 
the World. Eepublican. 

EDWIN H. PEERY. 

Residence, Mount Tabor; office, 626-627 
Chamber of Commerce, Portland. Born in 
G'rundy County, Missouri, July 27, 1856. Son 
of George C. and Ruth J. (Kirk) Peery. Came 
to Oregon in 1886. Married to Patti Yates 
December 26, 1900. Graduate of Grand River 
College, Missouri, with degree of A. B., 1876; 
Missouri State University, Law Department, 
B. L., 1881; Columbia University (now Wash- 
ington University) Law School, degree M. L., 
1896. Admitted to Supreme Court of Cali- 
fornia, 1883; of Oregon, 1886; Supreme Court 
United States, April 7, 1887. Law Clerk with 
United States Treasury Department, 1895 to 
1903, and with United States Reclamtaion 
Service, 1903 to 1907. Assistant Attorney 
United States Provisional Government of 
Cuba, 1907-1909. Resumed practice in Port- 
land, Oregon, April, 1909. Member Masonic 
fraternity. Democrat. 

CAELTON LEE PEPPER. 

Residence, The Dalles, Oregon; office, same. 
Born November 18, 1876, at Shenandoh, Iowa. 
Son of Thomas D. and Ellen M. (Hunt) Pep- 
per. Married September 22, 1902, to Grace 
Clarkson. Attended high school at Piano, Illi- 
nois, until 21 years old, then took commercial 
course at Metropolitan Business College in 
Chicago. Took three-year law course at Chi- 
cago-Kent College of Law, being in the Law 
Department of Lake Forest University, and 
graduating in 1905 with LL. B. degree. Passed 
bar examination in Illinois, in June, 1905, 
and received license to practice. Came to 
Oregon in 1906, and was admitted to practice 
here in December of that year. Practiced in 
Chicago from time of his graduation until he 
removed to Oregon, and in Portland, Oregon, 
until 1907, since which time he has practiced 
at The Dalles. Served six years in the militia 
of the State of Illinois, and in Spanish-Ameri- 
can War. Member M. W. A. and K. of P. 
fraternities. Republican. 

GEORGE JEFFERSON PERKINS. 

Residence, St. Johns, Oregon; office, 304-5-6 
Lewis building, Portland. Born September 
14, 1876, in Lee County, Alabama. Son of 
Benjamin Franklin and Emma (McCoy) Per- 
kins. Married May 7, 1908, to Gertrude May 
Timms. Attended the high school at Not 
asulga, Macon County, Alabama, and later 
the Massey Business College, at Columbus, 
Georgia, taking a course in bookkeeping and 
shorthand, and procured position as stenog- 
rapher and clerk in Southern Railway shops 
in that city before graduating, so did not 
complete required course. Moved to Oregon 
in May, 1902. In 1903-4 he attended the Law 
Department, University of Oregon, and grad- 
uated from same in class of 1904. From No- 
vember, 1905, until October, 1909, was asso- 
ciated with the firm of Platt & Platt, Port- 



land, at the same time maintaining an inde- 
pendent law office at St. Johns, Oregon. Upon 
resigning from this firm he continued the ac- 
tive practice of his profess'on alone. Mem- 
ber of the Portland Commercial Club and 
Secretary of St. Johns Commercial Club. 

JAMES BRITTON PERRY. 

Residence, Pendleton, Oregon; office, same. 
Born August 16, 1861, at Princeton, Mercer 
County, Missouri. (Son of Morris and Mary 
Ann A. (Girdner) Perry. Married June 14, 
1885, to Jessie Lucy Stansfield. Education 
received at .the public schools of Mercer Coun- 
ty, Missouri, and the high school at Princeton, 
Missouri. Came to Oregon in 1882, and was 
admitted to the bar of this state in May, 
1902. Democrat. 

SAMUEL DAVIDSON PETERSON. 

Residence, Milton, Oregon; office rooms 4-5 
Odd Fellows Temple. Born January 12, 1875, 
at Relief, Mitchell County, North Carolina. 
Son of Solomon and Mary Jane (Tipton) 
Pete: son. Married October 22, 1907, to Luella 




E. Robey. Was educated in public schools 
of North Carolina; at Bowman Academy, 
Bakersville, North Carolina; at the Univer- 
sity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky; and 
at Wake Forest Law School, Wake Forest, 
North Carolina. Admitted to the bar of 
North Carolina, February 4, 1901. Practiced 
at Bakersville, N. C., until 1904, during which 
time he was Mayor of Bakersville and County 
Attorney of Mitchell County. Then removed 
to Oregon, in January, 1905, and formed part- 
nership with Wm. M. Peterson, with offices 
at Pendleton and Milton. This partnership 
was dissolved in February, 1908. Was elected 
City Attorney of Milton in December, 1908, 



B I O G R A P H I C A L 



205 



holding the office two terms his second term 
being still in effect. President of Milton 
Commercial Club. Member Masonic, K. of P. 
and Odd Fellows fraternities. Eepublican. 

WILL M. PETERSON. 

Residence, 305 Lincoln street; office, 3-4 
Smith-Crawford building, Pendleton. Born in 
Yancey County, North Carolina, November 2, 
1874. Son of Moses W. and Cordelia (Bay) 
Peterson. Married to Eva McDonald, of 
Walla Walla, Washington, October 24, 1904. 
Attended Peterson Academy, Day Book, North 
Carolina; Burnsville Academy, Burnsville, 
North Carolina; Washington College, Tennes- 
see; Wake Forest College, North Carolina. 



ried to Cora Margaret Hart, November 27. 
1889. Attended the public schools and Wasco 
Independent Academy at The Dalles, Oregon. 
Graduated from Law Department, University 
of Michigan, Ann Arbor, June, 1894, with 
degree of LL. B. Admitted to the bar at 




Read law under Judge Kirkpatrick, at Jones 
boro, Tennessee. Completed law course at 
Wake Forest Law School, in North Carolina. 
Admitted to the bar at Jonesboro, Tennessee, 
August 20, 1900; in North Carolina, 1901. 
Came to Oregon, August, 1901, and admitted 
to Oregon bar in 1902; United States Circuit 
Court for District of Oregon, 1906; Unite! 
States District Court, 1910. In partnership 
with Samuel Frederick Wilson, with offices 
at Athena and Pendleton, under firm name 
of Peterson & Wilson, 1907 to date. Chair- 
man of Umatilla County Democratic Central 
Committee. Member Pendleton Commercial 
Club and Wenaha Club, of Pendleton; K. of 
P., Masonic fraternity, Royal Arch. Demo- 
crat. 

GILBERT W. PHELPS. 

Residence, 203 Washington street; office, 
Smith-Crawford building, Pendleton. Born in 
Mansfield, Pennsylvania, January 19, 1872. 
Son of Charles Walter -and Catherine (Whit- 
aker) Phelps. Came to Oregon in 1875. Mar- 




Ann Arbor, Michigan, June 1, 1894; to the 
Oregon State bar, 1894. Practiced at The 
Dalles, Oregon, until 1897, moved to Heppner 
Oregon, and formed partnership with Hon. 
W. R. Ellis, which continued until 1900. In 
1905 moved to Pendleton, Oregon, and asso- 
ciated with John McCourt. Elected Joint 
Representative, Umatilla and Morrow Coun- 
ties, in 1902, and District Attorney, Sixth 
Judicial District, in 1904 and 1908. Repub- 
lican. 

WILLIAM ESTILL PHIPPS. 
Residence, 1313 Riverside avenue; office, 
rooms 1-2 Stewart building, Medford, Oregon. 
Born in Alleghany County, North Carolina, 
August 2, 1868. Son of A. B. and Margaret 
Ann (Cox) Phipps. Married to Clara Rader, 
October 27, 1909. Attended public schools 
and State Normal School at Athens, West 
Virginia; Carson College, Tennessee, and Hi- 
wassee College, Tennessee. Taught school 
several years. Came to Oregon in July, 1893, 
admitted to the bar of Oregon in June, 1898, 
since practicing law in Jackson County, Ore- 
gon. City Attorney of Medford, Oregon, 
1901-1903; of Ashland, Oregon, 1904-1905. 
Democrat. 

SAMUEL HATCH PIERCE. 

Residence, 791 East Taylor street; office, 
810 Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born in Ellington, New York, August 10, 
1879. Son of Charles L. and Garetta E. 
(Hatch) Pierce. Attended common and high 



206 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



schools in Erie, Pennsylvania, until 1899, and 
graduated from Stanford University, Califor- 
nia, in 1908, with degree of LL. B. Came to 
Oregon in 1908. Admitted to the California 
bar in 1907, and to the Oregon State bar in 
January, 1909. Member of the firm of Ever- 
son & Pierce. 'Member of Masonic frater- 
nity. Republican. 

GEORGE A. PIPES. 

Residence, East Ninth and Siskiyou streets; 
office, 810 Chamber of Commerce, Portland. 
Born October 21, 1881, at Independence Ore- 
gon. Son of Martin L. and Mary (Skip- 
worth) Pipes. Attended Portland High 
School and graduated in 1900. Studied law 
in the office of Martin L. Pipes, in Portland, 
until 1903, in June of which year he was ad- 
mitted to the bar of Oregon. The following 
September began the practice of law at Eu- 
gene, Oregon, in partnership with his brother, 
John M. Pipes, the same continuing until Jan- 
uary, 3909, when he removed to Portland and 
entered the office of his father, Martin L. 
Pipes, and is now practicing in this city. Re- 
publican. 

MARTIN L. PIPES. 

Residence, East 
Ninth street; of- 
fice 810 Chamber 
of Commerce 
building, Portland. 
Born Septe m b e r 
21, 1850, at Ascen- 
sion Parish, Louis- 
iana. Son of John 
and Harriet Pos 
tell (Shaffer) 
Pipes. Married No- 
vember 1, 1874, to 
Mary C. Skip- 
worth. Educ a t e d 
in private schools 
in Louisiana, and 
graduated at 
Louisiana State 
University at Ba- 
ton Rouge, Louisiana, with degree of B. A. 
Came to Oregon in 1875, and was 
admitted to the bar of this state in 
1881. Practiced law in Polk County from 
that time until 1884; in Corvallis, Ben- 
ton County, from 1884 to 1890, and came to 
Portland in 1892, practicing here from thai 
time to date. Member of House, Legislative 
Assembly, 1880; Judge Circuit Court. Second 
District, from 1890-1892; member of faculty, 
Law Department, 'State University of Oregon, 
lecturer on contracts. Member Commercial 
Club and Elks Club. Republican. 

THOMAS PITTENGER. 

Residence, 323 Graham avenue; office, 245^ 
Morrison street, Portland. Born April 5, 
1852, at Spencer, Medina County, Ohio. Son 
of John S. and Mary (Carver) Pittenger. 
Married August 17, 1876, to Stella E. Daugh- 




erty. Early education received at public 
schools of Ohio, and finished at Lodi Acad- 
emy, Lodi, Ohio. Came to Oregon in 1873 
and studied law with Thomas H. Tongue, al 
Hillsboro, and later with Hill, Dunham & 
Thompson, at Portland. Admitted to the bar 
at Salem in 1875. Was County Treasurer of 
Washington County, Oregon. Republican. 

HARRISON GRAY PLATT. 

Residence, 211 East Fifty-fifth street; office, 
901-900 Board of Trade build'ng, Portland. 
Born August 24, 1866 at Milford, Connect! 
cut. Son of Henry C. and Emma (Treat) 
Platt. Married October 13, 1891, to Nelly 
Durham. Graduated from Hopkins Grammar 
School, New Hiven, Connecticut, in 1884; 
graduated from Yale University in 1888, tak- 
ing degree of B. A., with special honors in 
history and pol : tical sc'ence. Studied law 
one year at Yale Law School (1889-90). Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, in 1890, 
having removed to this state in that year. 
Entered into partnership with Hon. George 
H. Durham, under the firm mine of Durham 
& Platt, to which firm Robert T. Platt was 
admitted about 1893, the firm name becoming 
Durham, Platt & Platt, and continuing so un- 
til 1897, when the firm became Platt & Platt. 
Member of Phi Beta Kappa fraternity; Uni- 
versity Club of Portland. Commercial Club of 
Portland, and Scottish Rite Mason. Repub- 
lican. 

ROBERT TREAT PLATT. 

Reside nee, 653 
Johnson street; 
office, 901-6 Board 
of Trade building. 
Portland, Oregon. 
Born January 13, 
1868, in New 
' York City. Son of 
Henry C 1 i ff o r d 
and Emma (Treat) 
Platt, Mar r i e d 
in 1895 to Frances 
DuBois Carson, at 
Portland, Oregon. 
Graduate of Hop- 
kins Grammar 
School, New Ha- 
ven, Connecticut, 
1884; graduated 
in 1889 with the 
degree of B. A. from Yale University; in 
1892 graduated with degree of LL. B. from 
the Law School of Yale University; in 1892 
was admitted to the bar of the State of Con- 
necticut; the same year to the Oregon bar 
at Salem; in 1893 to the bar of the State of 
Washington; in 1893 to the United States 
Circuit and District Courts of Oregon; in 
1902 to United States Supreme Court; in 1910 
to United States Circuit and District Courts 
of Washington. From 1893 to 1897 member 
of the law firm of Durham, Platt & Platt; 
from 1897 to date member of the firm of 




207 




Platt & Platt. Member of the Executive 
Board, City of Portland, 1909 to date; Secre- 
tary of the Oregon Bar Association from 
1904 to 1906, of which association he was 
president for the year 1906 to 1907. Mem 
ber of University and Waverly Golf Clubs, 
of Portland; Yale Alumni Association, Ore- 
gon Society of Sons of American Eevolution, 
Masonic and A. O. U. W. fraternities. Secre- 
tary and Director Lumbermens National Bank 
of Portland; President the Peninsula Bank 
(of St. Jo'-ns) Portland. Eepublican. 

MYRON EDWIN POGUE. 

Eeside nee, 454 
Marion street; of- 
fice, Patton build- 
ing, Salem, Ore 
Born February 17, 
1862, in Lane 
County, Ore. Son 
of William R anl 
Nora A c e n i t h 
(Stearns) Po g u e 
Married May 15, 
1900, to Althea A. 
Brandenburg. At- 
tended the public 
schools of Coos 
County, Ore., and 
later the Univer- 
sity of Oregon, at 
Eugene, lea v i n g 
that institution in 
1880. Read law for two winters with Binger 
Herman, Roseburg, Oregon, teaching school 
during the summer. Came to Salem in 1889, 
and for about four years was stenographer 
in the office of the State Insurance Company, 
which position was resigned in 1893, when 
he began court reporting in the Third Judicial 
District for Oregon. Admitted to the bar of 
the State of Oregon, October, 1895, and com 
menced the practice of his profession alone. 
Admitted to practice in United States Circuit 
and District Courts for Oregon in April, 1900 
Located and practiced law at Nome, Alaska, 
for the summer of 1900, and returned to Sa- 
lem to resume his practice in the autumn. In 
1908 he became associated with W. M. Kaiser, 
which firm continues the law office formerly 
conducted by Ford, Kaiser & Slater. Member 
of the Masonic fraternity. Republican. 

EDWIN O. POTTER. 

Residence, Eugene, Oregon; office, same. 
Born August 25, 1860, in Lane County, Ore- 
gon. Son of William A. and Luezy C. (Zum- 
wath) Potter. Married October 16, 1890, to 
Emily Bristol. Educated at the public schools 
of Oregon, and the University of Oregon, 
graduating from the same in 1887 with A. B. 
degree, and from the Law Department in 
1890, with LL. B. degree. Admitted to the 
bar at Pendleton in June, 1890, and at once 
entered into the practice of his profession. 
In 1895 entered into partnership with H. T. 




Condon, under firm name of Potter & Condon, 
and the same existed until he entered into 
partnership with A. C. Woodcock, which con- 
tinues to date. Was County Judge of Linn 
County from July, 1896, to July, 1900. Re 
publican. 

WILLIAM HAMILTON POWELL. 

Reside nee, 461 
East Twenty-first 
street North; of- 
fice, 922-924 Board 
of Trade building. 
Port land. Boru 
February 14, 1870, 
at Louisburg, Kan- 
sas. Son of Alvah 
H. and Martha 
Jane (Hines) Pow- 
ell. Married June 
24, 1896, to Erne 
Younger. Early ed- 
u c a ti o n was re- 
ceived in the pub- 
lic schools of Co- 
lumbia County, 
Oregon, his par- 
ents having re- 
moved to this state when he was seven 
years old. He attended from 1883 to 1887, 
public schools of Columbia County, Oregon, 
and from. 1887 to 1888 the grammar school 
of Louisburg, Kansas. From 1889 to 3892 
attended the normal school at Monmouth, 
Oregon, from which he graduated with 
degree of B. S. D. in 1892, Principal of 
schools at Weston, Oregon City, Cottage 
Grove and Independence, Oregon, 1892-1900. 
Admitted to the bar in Oregon in June, 1900. 
Practiced his profession at St. Helens, Ore- 
gon, from 1900 to 1908, during which time he 
was Deputy District Attorney. In 1908 he 
removed ,to Portland, where he has continued 
to date. In addition to his legal business 
he has dealt extensively in timber lands, and 
during the past two years has been interested 
in mining. Member of Masonic and K. of P. 
fraternities, and the Irvington Club. Re- 
publican. 

WILLIAM J. PRENDERGAST. 

Residence, 335 Killingsworth avenue, Port- 
land; office, 408 Merchants Trust building. 
Born November 11, 1873, in Chicago. Son of 
John A. and Anna (McFadden) Prendergast. 
Married in 1893 to Ann Elizabeth Breen. 
Early education received in Chicago public 
schools, the high school and the Metropolitan 
Business College, of Chicago. Attended the 
University of Illinois, University of Minne- 
sota, and later the University of Oregon, 
graduating from the Law Department with 
the degree of LL. B. in June, 1907. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, June, 
1907, and commenced the practice of his pro- 
fession, which continues to date. Member of 
the B. P. O. E. and Commercial Club. 



208 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



DREW P. PRICE. 

Residence, 782 Halsey street; office, 500 
Oregonian building, Portland. Born Septem- 
ber 14, 1874, in Edgar County, Illinois. Son 
of James P. and Mary C. (Long) Price. Mar- 
ried November 11, 1903, to Flora M. Bailey. 
Received his early education at the public 
schools in Champaign County, Illinois, and 
later at the Pacific College, Newberg, Oregon, 
from which he graduated June 16, 1897, with 
the degree of B. S. Entered the Law Depart- 
ment of the University of Oregon and grad- 
uated June 14, 1900, with the degree LL. B. 
Moved to Oregon September 12, 1892, and 
was admitted to the bar in Salem, Oregon, 
June 11, 1900. Republican. 

ORE LEE PRICE. 

Residence, 462 Park street; office, 501 Ore- 
gonian building, Portland. Born April 25, 
1877, in Champaign County, Illinois. Son of 
James P. and Mary C. (Long) Price. Mar- 
ried June 17, 1903, to Margaret L. Beharrell. 
Received his early education in the public 
schools of Champaign County, Illinois. Moved 
to Oregon September 12, 1892. Attended the 
Pacific College, at Newberg, Oregon, grad- 
uating June 16, 1897, with the degree of B. S., 
and later attended the Law Department of 
the University of Oregon, and graduated with 
the degree of LL. B., June 14, 1900. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, June 11, 

1900. Republican. 

WILLIAM CURTIS EARLE PRUITT. 

Residence and office, Pendleton. Born Jan- 
uary 19, 1877, at Louisville, Illinois. Son 
of Samuel and Ruth (Burton) Pruitt. Mar- 
ried December 30, 1903, to Cozbi Raley. At- 
tended the Law Department of the Stato 
University of Iowa at Iowa City, in 1900 

1901. Came to Oregon in 1902, and attended 
the University of Oregon Law Department, 
graduating in 1904 with degree of LL. B. 
Admitted to the bar at Salem in June, 1904, 
and has practiced law at Pendleton since that 
time. Republican. 

MAHLON PURDIN. 

Residence, 328 North Central avenue; of- 
fice, Jackson County Bank building, Medford, 
Oregon. Born in Linn County, Missouri. 
March 22, 1853. Son of Caleb Boyer and 
Rachel Browning (Fuel) Purdin. Came to 
Oregon in 1864. Married to Lizzie Worlow, 
deceased September, 10, 1874; Rena B. Ely, 
May 3, 1909. Attended country schools only. 
Admitted to bar at Salem, Oregon, October, 
1900. Postmaster, Medford, Oregon, 1896- 
1900; member Oregon Legislature, 1909; mem- 
ber A. F. & A. M. and K. of P. fraternities. 

JAMES H. RALEY. 

Residence, 713 College street; office, Ameri- 
can National Bank. Pendleton. Born Janu- 
ary 20, 1855, at Nebraska City, Nebraska. 
Son of Jonathan and Rachael H. (Birchfield) 



Raley. Married August 19, 1879, to Minerv:i 
A. Pruett. Educated at the public schools of 
Pendleton, and at the Oregon State Univer 
sity at Eugene. Admitted to the bar at Pen- 
dleton, in May, 1895. Was Lieutenant-Colo- 
nel on staff of Governor Pennoyer for eight 
years; State Senator two terms, and Mayor 
of Pendleton. Member Masonic, K. of P. 
and W. O. W. fraternities. Democrat. 

JAMES ROY RALEY. 

Residence, Pendleton, Oregon; office, Ameri- 
can National Bank building. Born July 10, 
1880, at Pendleton, Oregon. 'Son of James 
H. and Minnie A. (Pruett) Raley. Married 
February 27, 1907, to Eva Froome. Early 




education received in the public schools of 
Pendleton. Attended Portland Business Col 
lege, Portland; Pendleton Academy, Pendle- 
ton; Portland University, and the Law De 
partment of George Washington University, 
Washington, D. C., graduating in 1904 with 
LL. B. degree. Admitted to the bar at Pen- 
dleton in 1904. In partnership with J. H. 
Raley under the firm name of Raley & Raley. 
Democrat. 

WILLIAM MARION RAMSEY. 
Residence, La Grande, Oregon; office, same 
Born December 25, 1846, in Monroe County, 
Iowa. Son of David and Susan (Shuck) 
Ramsey. Married in 1870 to Mahala A. Har 
r's, and in 1896 to Julia L. Snyder. Was ed- 
ucated at the public schools of Yamhill and 
Clackamas Counties, and at McMinnville Col- 
lege, McMinnville, Oregon. Admitted to the 
bar of the Supreme Court of Oregon in 1868; 
to the District Court in 1869, and later to 
the United States Circuit Court. Located at 
Lafayette, Oregon, in 1868, and was asso- 



209 



elated with James McCain for a short time. 
Was elected Judge of Yamhill County in 
1870. Moved to Salem in 1876, and became as- 
sociated with B. F. Bonhani, under the firm 
name of Bonham & Ramsey, which later be- 
came the firm of Ramsey & Bingham. Was 
elected Mayor of Salem in 1887. In 1888 re- 
moved to Pendleton and practiced law there 
three years. He returned to the Willamette 
Valley in 3891, locating at McMinnville, 
where he became associated with F. W. Fen- 
ton, under the firm name of Ramsey & Fen- 
ton. Democrat. 

JOHN LANGDON RAND. 

Residence, Baker City, Oregon; office, same. 
Born October 28, 1861, at Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire. Son of J. Sullivan and Elvira W. 
(Odiorno) Rand. Married July 23, 1895, t:> 
Edith G. Packwood. Educated at the public 
schools of Portsmouth, New Hampshire; at 
Smith's Preparatory School, Portsmouth, N. 



at Silverton, Oregon, until 1897; Willamette 
University, Salem, Oregon, 1897-1898; Liveral 
University, Silverton, 1899-1902; University 
of Michigan, Law Department, Ann Arbor 
Michigan, 1902-1904, graduating with degree 




H.; at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New 
Hampshire, from which he graduated in 1883 
with degree of A. B. Admitted to the bar 
at Walla Walla, Washington, in May, 1885; 
came to Oregon in July of that year, and 
was admitted to the bar of the State of Ore- 
gon in May, 1886. Elected District Attorney, 
Sixth Judicial Distr'ct, in 1888, and in 1894; 
State Senator for Baker, Malheur and Har 
ney Counties in 1902. Republican. 

LOUIS EDWARD RAUCH. 

Residence and office, Silverton, Oregon. 
Born near Silverton, Oregon, June 28, 1880 
Son of Peter and Juliette (Remington) 
Rauch. Marr'ed to Gertrude Elizabeth Ful- 
ler February 6, 1906. Attended public school 




of Bache'or of Laws. Admitted to bar at 
Lansing, Michigan, June 21, 1904; at Salem, 
Oregon, October 20, 1905. Member of firm 
of Rauch & Senn, Portland and S : lverton, 
Oregon, 1904 to April 1. 1908, when entered 
into partnership with Millard A. Seitz, at 
Silverton, Oregon, under firm name of Rauch 
& Seitz, which continues to date. Recorder 
and Police Judge Silverton, 1906; is now 
Mayor of Silverton. Member Masonic, I. 0. 
0. F., K. of P. fraternities. Republican. 

LEVI BRANSON REEDER. 

Resule nee, 923 
E. Everett street; 
office, 510 Ab : ng 
ton building, 
Por 1 1 a n d. Born 
September 7, 1865, 
at Eureka, Wood- 
ford County, IH : - 
nois. Son of Dan- 
iel A. and Eliza 
(Kelsay) Reeder 
Married July 3 
1890, to Laura L 
Zeigler. Came to 
Oregon when nine 
years old, and at- 
tended the public 
schools at Weston 
and Athena, Ore- 
gon ; Chri s t i a n 
College, Monmouth, Oregon, graduating in 
1887 with degree of B. S.; the State Normal 




210 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



School at Monmouth, graduating with degree 
of B. 6. D. Did one year special work at 
the University of Michigan, and also law 
course there, graduating in 1891 with degree 
LL. B. Admitted to the bar at Walla Walla, 
Washington, August 1, 1891, and to the bar 
of Oregon in 1895. Began practice at Col- 
ville, Stevens County, Washington, and prac- 
ticed there from 1891 to 1895. From 1895 to 
January, 1904, practiced at Pendleton, Ore 
gon, since which time he has practiced in 
Portland. Was Prosecuting Attorney for 
Stevens County, Washington, from 1893 to 
1895, and a member of the 20th and 21st ses- 
sions of Oregon Legislature; was Speaker of 
the 21st session. Member Masonic, K. of P., 
W. O. W., Artisans and other fraternities. 
Republican. 

SANDERSON REED. 

Residence, 1115 Thurman street; office, 616 
Fenton building, Portland. Born in Portland, 
Oregon, July 16, 1866. Son of John Henry 
and Mary (Spalding) Reed. Married to 
Lubel Felt, June 11, 1902. Attended gram- 
mar school in Portland, Oregon, and two years 
in San Francisco, California. Admitted to 
the bar at Salem, Oregon, October, 1888. 
Served as Deputy 'City Attorney of Portland 
and Secretary of Charter Board of Portland; 
member of Oregon State Legislature, 1903, 
and Republican Central Committee for Port- 
land and Multnomah County. Member of 
Arlington and Commercial Clubs. Republican. 

WILLIAM REID. 




Residence, 51 East Seventeenth street 
North; office, 615 Worcester building, Port- 
land. Born November 22, 1844, at Glasgow, 
Scotland. Son of David and Jessie (Crockett) 



Reid. Married December 15, 1867, to Agnes 
Dunbar. Educated at St. Andrew's Parish 
School, Glasgow, and at the University of 
Glasgow, taking two years of legal work 
there. Was admitted by the Supreme Court 
of Scotland November 2, 1867, at Edinburgh, 
and practiced at Dundee, Scotland, from that 
time until his removal to Oregon in 1874. Ho 
came to Oregon as secretary of a company of 
Scottish people (headed by the Earl of Arlie 
as president), named The Oregon and Wash 
ington Trust & Investment Company of Scot- 
land. In 1876 he formed the first savings 
bank of deposits in the state. In 1868 he was 
employed by Mrs. Mary Lincoln to help pub- 
lish the memoirs of the late President Lin- 
coln. Was Secretary Portland Board of Trade 
from 1874 to 1880; was United States Vice- 
Consul until his removal to Oregon in 1874, 
and was United States Consular Agent at 
Wellington, the capital of New Zealand, in 
1902; Secretary and member of the first Board 
of Immigration for Oregon. Republican. 

JOHN W. REYNOLDS. 

Residence, 647 East Ankeny street; office. 
402-408 Failing building, Portland. Born 
January 1'7. 1*75, at Salem, Oregon. SOB of 
John and Sallie A. (Truesdell) Reynolds. 
Married May 6, 1908, to Nettie Beckner. R-; 
ceived his early education at the public 
schools of Sa!em, Oregon. Entered the Wil- 
lamette University and graduated therefrom 
in 1895, with degree of A. B., and receiving 
from the same institution in 1897 the degree 
of A. M. Entered the University of Michi- 
gan and graduated therefrom in 1899, with 
degree of LL. B. Was admitted to the bar 
at Salem, Oregon, in June, 1897. Practiced 
law at Salem from September, 1899, to June, 
1907, when he removed to Portland. In June, 
1909, formed a partnership with A. F. Flegel, 
under the firm name of Flegel & Reynolds. 
Was Dean of College of Law at Willamette 
University from June, 1902, to June, 1907. 
and a member of the Board of Trustees of 
Willamette University from June, 1902, to 
June, 1908. Republican. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN RHODES. 

Residence, Madison and Garfield streets; 
office, Third and C streets, McMinnville. Born 
January 15, 1860, in Madison County, Mis- 
souri. Son of John and Eliza (Graham) 
Rhodes. Married July 9, 1889, to Mary f. 
Collard. Education received, prior to 1879, 
in public schools of Oregon and Missouri, 
having come to Oregon at the age of 13. In 
1879 he entered McMinnville College, and 
spent three years there; then took course in 
Portland Business College, graduating there- 
from in 1882. Entered McMinnville College 
again in 1882 for one year, leaving in 1883 
to teach one year in district school. Re- 
entered college in the fall of 1883, and re 
mained until 1885. Taught school for four 
years. Admitted to the bar of Oregon June 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



211 




8, 1896, and entered into partnership with his 
brother, M. D. L. Rhodes, which was dis- 
solved in 1901, M. D. L. Rhodes moving to 
Seattle. Has since practiced done at Mc- 
Minnville. Was elected County Judge of 
Yamhill County in 1902 and resigned in 1906 
to accept position as President of the Oregon 
Fire Relief Association. Member Masonic 
and W. 0. W. fraternities. President of 
Board of Trustees of McMinnville College. 
Democrat. 

CLYDE S. RICHARDSON. 

Reside nee, 551 
Market street; of- 
fice, 518 Chamber 
of Commerce, 
Portland. Born in 
the East Butte 
District, Washing- 
ton County, Ore- 
gon, on Septem- 
ber 14, 1880. Son 
of John A. and 
Mary Eliza b e t h 
(Speake) Richard- 
son. Married July 
7, 1909, to Martha 
E. Rech e. Edu 
cated at the dis- 
trict schools at Ful- 
ton, Oregon; Har- 
rison Street School 
in Portland, the Failing School, and the Port- 
land High School; one year's course in com- 
mercial law and business branches at the 
night school of the Y. M. C. A.; a correspond- 
ence course with the Spargue C >rrespondence 
School of Law, Michigan. In 1905 graduated 
from the Law Department of the University 
of Oregon, with the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. In 1905 was admitted to the bar at 
Salem. The following year he commenced 
the practice of his profession, associated with 
R. J. Bukowsky, which continued until 1906, 
when he became associated with Robert Gray, 
under the firm name of Gray and Richardson, 
which continued until 1908, when ne practiced 
alone, and continues to do so to date. Mem- 
ber of Company I, Oregon National Guard; 
Vice-President of the Chr'stian Endeavor So- 
ciety; member of the South Portland Volun- 
teer Fire Department; member of the W. O. 
W. fraternity. Honorary member of the Pas- 
time Athletic Club. Republican. 

SAMUEL THURSTON RICHARDSON. 

Residence, 444 North Summer street; office, 
442 State street, Salem. Born July 8, 1857, 
on a farm north of Scio, Linn County, Oregon. 
Son of Lewis Clarke and Eliza Ann (Whitely) 
Richardson. Married November 19, 1879, to 
Sarah I. Barnes. Attended public schools at 
Scio, Oregon, and vicinity until 1873, when 
he commenced a course at Willamette Univer- 
sity, Salem, from which institution he grad- 
uated in 1892 with degree of A. B.; in 1894 



with degree of LL. B. ; in 1895 with degres 
of A. M. and in 1898 with degree of LL. D. 
Admitted to the bar of Oregon in October, 
1884; became an instructor in the Willamette 
University in 1887, and Dean of Law School 
in the same in 1891, serving in that capacity 




until 1904, when he founded the Oregon Law 
School, and has ever since been conducting 
two branches thereof, one being located at 
Silem and the other at Portland. Was ap- 
pointed County Clerk of Crook County when 
said county was created in 1882, and served 
until 1884. During the last four years has 
been a member .of the law firm of Richardson, 
Dimick & Morehead, with offices in Portland. 
Was Justice of the Peace at Prineville for 
three years. In 1898 was granted life certifi- 
cate to teach in the schools of Oregon by the 
State Board of Education. Member I. O. O. 
F. and K. of P. fraternities. Republican. 

EDWARD FRANCIS RILEY. 

Residence, 455 Morrison street; office, 509 
Chamber of Commerce building. Born Sep- 
tember 17, 1839, in Delaware County, Ohio. 
Son of Ezra and Louisa (Potter) Riley. Mar- 
ried September 16, 1868, to Martha Smith. 
Educated in the public schools of Delaware 
County, Ohio; at the Ohio Wesleyan Univer- 
sity, from which he graduated in 1860; at 
the Law School of the University of Michi- 
gan, from 1861 to 1863, when he graduated 
with degree of A. B. and LL. B. Admitted 
to tho bar of Ohio and Michigan the same 
year; to the bar of Iowa in 1864, and to the 
bar of Oregon in 1892. In 1863-64 he prac- 
ticed at Mt. Gilead, Ohio, the latter year 
removing to Osceola, Iowa, where he was 
engaged in his profession and the banking 
business. In 1891 he removed to Portland, 



212 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Oregon, and in 1893 founded the Clackamas 
Title Company, of which concern he is Presi- 
dent and General Counsel to date. He is the 
author of various pamphlets, and contributor 
to various periodicals on tariff and finance. 
He makes a specialty of real estate laws and 




is in partnership with his son, Frank B. Riley, 
under the firm name of E. F. & F. B. Riley. 
Member of American Bankers Association, 
Bankers Life Insurance Company, Oregon 
Association of Title Men, American Associa- 
tion of Title Men, Oregon Bar Association, 
Oregon Historical Society, Portland Commer- 
cial Club. Republican. 

FRANK BRANCH RILEY. 

Residence, 787 Irving street; office, 510 
Chamber of Commerce building. Born at 
Osceola, Iowa, August 4, 1875. Son of Ed- 
ward Francis and Martha (Smith) Riley. 
Married August 6, 1902, to Lotte Von Strom- 
beck Brand. Educated in the public schools 
of Osceola, Iowa, and in 1890 entered the 
C'olumbia School of Oratory and Dramatic 
Art, at 'Chicago. In October, 1891, came 
to Portland, and entered the Portland 
High School, from which he graduated in 
February, 1893. In 1894 he completed his 
senior course at the Columbia School of Ora- 
tory, and entered the Portland Academy, 
from which he graduated in June, 1897, when 
he entered the Leland Stanford, Jr., Univer- 
sity, at Palo Alto, California, specializing in 
the departments of law and economics. On 
May 25, 1900, he graduated with degree of 
A. B.; in 1900-1901 he completed law course 
at the Harvard Law School, Cambridge, 
Mass. In 1901 was admitted to the bar of 
the State of Oregon. He specializes in real 



estate and probate law. He is Secretary and 
General Counsel of Clackamas Title Company ; 
member of law firm of E. F. & F. B. Riley; 
Secretary and Treasurer Oregon Association 
of Title Men, member of Oregon Bar Asso- 
ciation, American Association Title Men; 




Secretary of the Mazamas; member Univer- 
sity. Waverly Golf, Portland Commercial and 
Apollo Clubs, and Director Automobile Club, 
of Portland, and of Zeta Psi and Phi Delta 
Phi fraternities. Republican. 

HAYWARD HAMILTON RIDDELL. 

Reside nee, 415 
East Nineteenth 
street; o ffi c e, 
Chamber of Com- 
m e r c e building, 
Portland. Born Sa 
lem, Oregon, April 
6, 1868. Son of 
George H. and 
Angeline M. 
(Ham ilton) Rid- 
dell. Married Sep- 
tember 14, 1899, 
to Emma Morse. 
Educated at pub- 
lie schools and 
Wasco I n depend- 
ent Academy and 
State Normal 
School, at The 

Dalles, Oregon, from which institution he 
graduated June 10, 1890. Read law in the of- 
fice of Mays & Huntington, at The Dalles, 
from June, 1890, to October, 1891, and in the 
office of Dolph, Bellinger, Mallory & Simon, 
of Portland, from October, 1891, to June, 




B I O G R A P H I C A L 



1892. Attended the Law Department of the 
University of Oregon, 1891-1892. Was ad- 
mitted to the bar, Salem, Oregon, June 3, 
1892, and practiced law at The Dalles from 
that time to January, 1901, when he removed 
to Portland, where he practices to date. 

BEN EIESLAND. 

Eesidence, 1198 Harold avenue; office, 409- 
410 Failing building, Portland. Born at Two 
Eivers, Wisconsin, March 7, 1877. Son of 
Frederick W. and Caroline (Weisenborn) 
Eiesland. Married April 28, 1903, to Emily 
Queen Kelty. Was raised on a farm in La 
Quaparle County, Minnesota, and at an early 
age moved, with his parents, to Big Stone, 
South Dakota, where he received a public and 




high school education, later attending the 
Ortonville High School at Ortonville, Minne- 
sota. Taught school in Grand Forks County, 
North Dakota, and later completed his acad- 
emic education at the Unversity of North 
Dakota, where he was about to graduate in 
1899, when typhoid fever compelled him to 
leave college. In 1899 located in Seattle, and 
in February of 1900 came to Portland. He 
later engaged in real estate business in Til- 
lamook, Oregon, and remained there until 
1903, when he returned to Portland for the 
purpose of publishing the Lewis & Clark 
Journal, the official bulletin of the Lewis & 
Clark Fair. In the autumn of 1904 he en- 
gaged in the real estate business, and while 
so engaged took the law course of the Uni- 
versity of Oregon, completing the same in 
June, 1906, with degree of B. L. Was ad- 
mitted to the Oregon bar June 20, 1906, and 
to the United States Courts December 2, 
1907. Commenced active practice of his pro- 



fession in September, 1907, and continues to 
date. Republican. 

WILLIAM SEYMOUR RISLEY. 

Eesidence, Albany, Oregon; office, suite 6, 
Wallace block. Born at Independence, Iowa, 
February 12, 1874. Son of William Edward 
and Mary Eoss (Begun) Eisley. Eeceived 
his early education in the common schools 
or Buchanan County, Iowa; the high school 
and of Tobins Academy, of Waterloo, Iowa. 
In 1894 he moved to Washington, in 1895 
becoming interested in mining in Arizona, 
he moved to that territory. His schooling 
was preparatory to and in anticipation of 
the practice of law, all his spare time being 
devoted to the same. In 1899 he moved to 




the State of Oregon, and entered the office 
of W. E. Bilyeu, of Albany, where he pur- 
sued his studies until his admission to the 
bar, in 1902. He then opened an office by 
himself, where he follows a general practice 
to date. Served as Sergeant of Company B, 
First Battalion Nevada Volunteer Infantry, 
during the Spanish-American War, being hon- 
orably discharged from same and receiving 
state and national medals. 'Served two terms 
as Justice of the Peace at Albany, Oregon, 
being appointed the first term and elected 
the second. Member of the Knights of Pyth- 
ias fraternity, the Spanish War Veterans 
and the Military Order of the Serpent. Dem- 
ocrat. 

LOUIS A. ROBERTS. 

Eesidence and office, Myrtle Point, Oregon. 
Born in Trenton, Missouri, February 14, 1886. 
Son of John H. and Louisa (DeVaul) Eob- 
erts. Came to Oregon in November, 1873. 
Married to Mabel A. Benson, August 14, 1892. 



214 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Attended common schools of Coos County, 
Oregon; Heald's Business College, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Studied law. Admitted to 




ba. a^ S.lem, Oregon, October 9, 1895, and 
practiced la\v in Myrtle Point, Oregon, to 
date. City Attorney and Attorney for State 
Land Board for Coos County. Member Coos 
County Bar Association. Republican. 

CHARLES A. ROBERTSON. 

Residence, Alex- 
andra Court, Port- 
land; office 206 
MeK a y building. 
Born March 17, 
1877, in Cleveland, 
Ohio. Son of Ar- 
t h u r and V i r a 
(Croxton) Robert- 
son. Grad u a t e d 
from the Hillsdale, 
Michi g a n, High 
School in June, 
1896, and complet- 
ed three and one- 
half years of lit- 
e r a r y work at 
Hillsdale Coll e g e 
in class of 1900. 
Graduated from 

Duff's Business College, Pittsburg, in 1898, 
and later entered the University of Michigan 
Law Department at Ann Arbor, and gradu- 
ated with degree of LL. B. in 1905. Admitted 
to the bar at Lansing, Michigan, June 2d, 
1905, and at Salem, Oregon, November of 
that year. Entered into partnership with L. 
E. Latourette, December, 1909, which con- 
tinues to date. Member B. P. O. E. and Ma- 
sonic fraternities. Republican. 




WILLIAM ARTHUR ROBBINS. 
Reside nee, 746 
Lovejoy street; of- 
fice 1105 Wells 
Fargo building, 
Portl and. Born 
July 27, 1873, 
eight miles west 
of Salem, Ore. Son 
of J. H. and Mary 
Marg a r e t (Har- 
vey) R o b b i n s. 
Married March 6, 
1901, to Edyth 
Grace Savage. Ed- 
ucated in public 
schools of Port- 
land; at the Port- 
land Business Col- 
lege, from which 
he graduated in 

1896, at Willamette University Law School, 
Salem, Oregon, from which he graduated in 
1898 with LL. B. degree, after which he took 
a post-graduate course at Stanford Univer- 
sity. Admitted to the bar at Salem on 
March 17, 1898. Located at Fossil, Oregon, 
and practiced there from 1899 to 1902, during 
which time he was Deputy District Attorney 
for Seventh Judicial District. Has been 
with W. W. Cotton, General Attorney for O. 
R. & N., since 1905. Member University 
Club. Republican. 

JOHN P. RUSK. 

Residence and office, Joseph, Oregon. Born 
June 1 7, 1873, at Milwaukie, Oregon. Son of 





John presser and Elizabeth (Babb) Rusk. 
Married August 2, 1905. to Agnes M. Vest. 
Educated in the public schools of Clackamas 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



County, Oregon; at the Preparatory Depart- 
ment of the Portland University, and at Le- 
land Stanford, Jr., University. Admitted to 
the Supreme Court of Oregon in May, 1900. 
Practiced in Portland until 1903, then re- 
moved to Joseph, and has practiced thers 
continuously since. From the time of his 
arrival in Joseph until 1908, was in partner- 
ship with Colonel F. S. Ivanhoe. Was Dep- 
uty District Attorney for Wallowa County, 
1906-1908; Joint Eepresentative Union and 
Wallowa Counties, 1908-1910. Eepublican. 

JOHN CALVIN RUTENIC. 

Eesidence and office, Klamath Falls, Ore- 
gon. Born in Cleveland, Oh'o, May 4, 1864. 
Son of Herman Julius and Emily Clara (Mar- 
tin) Eutenic. Came to Oregon in 1885. Mar- 
ried to Margaret Belle Bartholomew, Novem- 
ber 20, 1890. Attended public schools of 
Cleveland, Ohio; 'Calvin College, Cleveland, 
Ohio, graduating in 1880, with degree of 



ceived business and college train'ng at Napa 
College, Napa, California. Came to Oregon 
in 1900. Graduated from University of Ore- 
gon Law School May 15, 1904. Admitted to 
Oregon bar, May 23, 1904. Practiced law in 
Portland until 1909. Was State Attorney for 




A. B.; University of Oregon, Law Depart- 
ment, graduating in 1890 with degree of L. B. 
Eead law in office of Johnson, McCown & 
Idleman, of Portland, Oregon. Admitted to 
bar at Pendleton, Oregon, May, 1890. Com 
menced the practice of law alone in Klamath 
Falls in 1899, which continues to date. First 
Lieutenant Light Battery B, Oregon U. S. V., 
1898; Major O. N. G. to 1898. President of 
the Farmers Implement & Supply House, of 
Klamath Falls, Oregon. Eepublican. 

FRANK BROWN RUTHERFORD. 

Eesidence and office, Myrtle Creek, Oregon. 
Born in Edwardsville, Wyandotte County, 
Kansas, April 16, 1869. Son of Charles H. 
and Sarah A. (Hughes) Eutherford. Mar- 
ried to Ella L. Deakin, August 11, 1893. Be- 




Anti-Saloon League, Prohibit on State Com- 
mitteer and W. C. T. U. of Oregon from 1905 
to 1909. Formed law partnership with B. 
E. Youmans in 1908, in Portland. Editor of 
Myrtle Creek Mail since June, 1909. Served 
three years with California National Guards. 
Head Consul Phi Delta Phi, 1904, and W. O. 
W. Prohibition. 

JOHN B. RYAN. 

Eesidence and 
office, 515 Orego- 
nian building, 
Portland. Born 
June 23, 1865, at 
Marion, Ohio. Son 
of Patrick and Jo- 
hanna (K e 1 1 y ) 
Eyan. Was educat- 
ed at the public 
schools in Marion, 
Ohio, and gradu- 
ated from the high 
school of that city 
on June 20, 1883. 
Attended the Law 
School at Cincin- 
nati (Ohio) Col- 
lege, and graduat- 
ed from same in 

the class of 1891 with degree of LL. B. 
Moved to Oregon August, 1899, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of 
Oregon in September, 1899. Admitted to the 




216 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



bar of the Supreme Court of Ohio in 1891. 
Special examiner of pensions, Interior De- 



studied law after working hours, and later 
with W. W. Hindman, at La Grande, Oregon. 



partment United States, from March 8, 1893. Was admitted to practice at Pendleton, Ore 



to June, 1899. Secretary of the Democratic 
State Central Committee of State of Oregon, 
June, 1904, to date. Democrat. 

THOMAS F. RYAN. 

Kesidence, Eyanolia Fruit Farm, Gladstone; 
office, Masonic building, Oregon City. Born 
April 9, 1859, at Centerville, Kent County, 
Rhode Island. Son of James and Elizabeth 
(Kenna) Ryan. Married February 24, 1897, 
to Inez N. Marshall. Educated at Centerville, 
Rhode Island, common and grammer schools 



gon, in May, 1897, and for a short time was 




and graduated at Ilolyoke High School, 
Holyoke, Massachusetts. Came to Oregon 
September 1, 1881. Admitted to the bar at 
Salem, May 7, 1900. Mayor, City Recorder, 
Water Commissioner and Chief Engineer Wa- 
ter Department, of Oregon City. For fourteen 
years director and school clerk of Oregon 
City school district. County Judge, Clack 
amas County for eight years. Republican 
State and Congressional Committeeman for 
twelve years. President Commercial Club, 
Oregon City. Member Masonic, I. O. O. F., 
A. O. U. W., W. O. W., Elks, Grange frn- 
ternities. Republican. 

WILLIAM BLEECKER SARGENT. 

Residence, Hotel Foley; office 1111 Adams 
avenue, La Grande, Oregon. Born October 
4, 1867, at Albany, New York. Son of 
Charles E. and Catherine Louise (Webster) 
Sargent. Married September 10, 1890, to 
Winifred M. Heck. Attended public schools 
at Albany, New York, until 16 years of age, 
when he came to Omaha, Nebraska, and 




associated with W. W. Hindman, who re- 
moved to Spokane, Washington; since that 
time he has practiced alone. In 1900 and 
1901 practiced in Grant County, handling im- 
portant mining claims. Member B. P. O. E. 
Republican. 

HARRY KING SARGENT. 

Residence Dav- 
enport street; of- 
lice, 534-536 Cham 
ber of Commerce 
building, Portland. 
Born Nove m b e r 
19, 1865, at W nd 
sor, Nova Scotia. 
Son of John 
Pavne and Eliza 
beth (King) Sar- 
gent. Married Au- 
gust 5, 1899, to 
Florence A. 
Swope. Educate 1 
at public schools 
of Nova Scotia 
and Windsor 
Academy. Moved 
to Oregon in 1890. 

Was admitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, 
in 1897. From 1884 to 1889 served in the 
Northwest Mounted Police of Canada. Wa^ 
in active service in the Riel Rebellion. Mem- 
ber of Knights of Pythias, St. Andrews So- 
ciety and Commercial Club. Republican. 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



217 



HAROLD M. SAWYER. 

Residence, Alexandra Court; office 409 
Wells-Fargo building, Portland. Born June 
2, 1882, at Troy, New York. Son of Walter 
W. and Alice L. (Merriam) Sawyer. Received 
his early education in schools of New Eng- 
land and in Europe, and later entered Yale 
University, where he remained four years, re- 
ceiving the degree of B. A., June, 1903, and 
later the degree of M. A., June, 1906. At- 
tended the University of Berlin, 1903-1904. 
Graduated from Harvard Law School June, 
1907, with degree of LL. B. After gradua- 
tion from the latter institution he entered the 
office of. Robinson, Biddle & Benedict, of New 
York City, and was admitted to practice in 
New York State, February, 1908. Moved to 
Oregon June, 1908, and was admitted to the 
bar of Oregon the same month. He is a mem- 
ber of the Archeological Institute, Waverly 
Golf Club, Commercial Club and Arlington 
Club. Republican. 

FRANK SCHLEGEL. 

Residence, 1625 "The Alameda"; office 532 
Worcester block, Portland. Bom January 4, 
1872, in Yreka, California. Son of Nicholas 
and Hedwig (Young) Schlegel. Married De- 
cember 24, 1901, to Maymye B. Palmer. At 
tended public schools at Yreka, California, 
and graduated from the public schools of that 
city in June, 1887. Attended public schools 
at Lakeview, Oregon, 1892 1893. Graduated 
from the Law School, University of Oregon, 
in 1897, with the degree of LL. B. Admitted 
to the Mr in Salem, Oregon, in June, 1897, 
since which date he has practiced his pro- 
fession alone, except during three years, 1898, 
1899, and 1900, in partnership with George 
W. Joseph. Democrat. 

GUSTAV G. SCHMITT. 

Reside nee, 390 
Clay street; office, 
502-503 Oregonian 
building, Portland. 
Born December 23, 
1876, at Muscoda, 
Wisconsin. Son of 
Conrad and Mary 
(Stark) Schmitt. 
Married March 
29, 1910, to Ger- 
trude C. Newland. 
Educated at pub- 
lic schools of Wis- 
consin; graduated 
from high school 
at Muscoda, Wis- 
consin; from the 
Wisconsin Normal 
School, at Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin, and from the University 
of Wisconsin, at Madison; later attending the 
University of Chicago and taking degree of 
Ph. B. Came to Oregon in 1907 and was ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem in June of that 





year. Admitted to the United States Circuit 
and District Courts in the same year, and has 
practiced his profession continuously at Port- 
land since that time. Member Athena So- 
ciety, of Lyceum Society, of Congress Society, 
of Alpha Tau Omega, Phi Alpha Delta and 
Iclonie fraternities. Republican. 

CHARLES JOSEPH SCHNABEL. 

Reside nee, 785 
Park avenue; of- 
fice, 612-14 Cham- 
ber of Commerce 
building, Portland. 
Born August 1 7, 
1867, at Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. So i 
of Robert A. and 
Elizabeth M. 
(Becker) S c h na- 
bel. Married Oc- 
tober 5, 1896, to 
Flsa Anne Smith. 
Educated in the 
public and private 
schools of Fort 
Wayne, Indi ana, 
and Grand Rapids, 
Michigan. Came 
t^ Oregon : n 1< C 89 and took course in the Law 
Department of the University of Oregon, from 
which institution he graduated in 1891 with 
degree of LL. B., and since which time he 
has been engaged in the active practice of hin 
profession in Portland. Was appointed As- 
sistant United States Attorney under the sec- 
ond ( leveland administration, and served from 
June, 1893, to May, 1898. President Multno- 
mah Bar Association, 1910. Member Masonic 
fraternity, 32d deg., and Shriner; member 
General German Aid Society and Arion So 
ciety. 

JOHN O'BRIEN SCOBEY. 

Reside nee, 230 
North Nineteenth 
street; office, 915 
Board of Trade 
building, Portland. 
Born July 5, 1854, 
in Summit, Sco- 
hane County, New 
York. SonofZeph- 
e n i a h D. an d 
Eleanor E. (An- 
derson) S c o b e y. 
Married No v e m- 
ber 24, 1880, to 
Myrtie E. Walker. 
Educated in com- 
mon schools of 
Iowa and the Up- 
per Iowa Univer- 
sity, at Fayette, 

Iowa, 1870-1874, and graduated with the de- 
gree of B. A. In June, 1877, he received the 
degree of A. M. Admitted to District Courts 
in Dakota, 1880; Supreme Court Dakota Ter- 




218 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



ritory, 1885; Supreme Court of Illinois, 1888; 
Supreme Court of Washington, 1893, and to 
the Supreme Court of Oregon, 1906, in which 
year he moved to this state. Member of tin; 
Upper House, Territorial Council of Dakota 
Territory Legislature, 1881-1883, and Presi- 
dent of that body, session, 1883; member 
Washington Legislature, Olympia (Lower 
House), 1895; Receiver United States Land 
Office, Olympia, Washington, August, 1897, 
to January, 1906. Member Portland Com- 
mercial Club. Republican. 

CHRISTIAN SCHUEBEL. 

Residence, 714 Jefferson street, Oregon 
City; office, Oregon City Bank building. Born 
September 12, 1866, at Ashland, Pennsylvania. 
Son of Robert and Rosamond (Hornshuh) 
Schuebel. Married June 23, 1892 to Agnes 
W. Beattie. Came to Oregon with his par- 
ents in 1878, and attended public schools in 
Clackamas County for about six months. 
Studied with Sprague Correspondence Schoo. 
of Law for about a year and a half while 
working in the mills at Oregon City. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem, June 27, 1897. 
Elected Justice of the Peace two terms at 
Oregon City, 1896 and 1898. Member Oregon 
City Commercial Club, A. O. U. W., W. O. W. 
and Royal Arcanum fraternities. Republican. 

EPHRAIM B. SEABROOK. 

Residence, 454 East Ninth street; office, 311 
Commonwealth building, Portland. Born July 
12, 1873, at Charleston, South Carolina. Son 
of L. B. and Rachel Harriet (Raley) Sea- 
brook. Came to Oregon in 1890. Attended 
University of Oregon from 1893 to 189.1. 
Admitted to the bar of Oregon in Juno. 1 ^ '..">. 
1896 to 1902 was Counsel for Title Guarantee 
& Trust Company, prior to which he had 
practiced in Marshfield; 1906 to 1908 was 
attorney for Portland Railway, Light & 
Power Company; 1908 to January, 1910, was 
associated with the firm of Gammans & Ma- 
larkey. Continues now the practice of his 
profession in partnership with D. J. Malar- 
key and E. P. Stott, under the firm name of 
Malarkey, Seabrook & Stott. 

JOHN FORDMAN SEDGWICK. 

Residence, 685 Weidler street; office, 212- 
13-14 Fenton building, Portland. Born in 
Manchester, Iowa, in 1877. Son of Thomas 
N. and Amy (Blanchard) Sedgwick. Mar- 
ried to Josephine Bach September 9, 1903. 
Graduated from Whitewater Normal School 
in 1898; from the University of Wisconsin 
with degree of LL. B. in 1903. Admitted to 
the bar in Wisconsin November, 1902, and 
to the United States District and Circuit 
Courts of Wisconsin June 18, 1903. Came 
to Oregon in 1905. Admitted to Oregon 
State bar November 16, 1906. Justice of the 
Peace at Whitewater, Wisconsin. Member 
University Club of Portland. Republican. 



CHARLES AUGUSTUS SEHLLREDE. 

Residence, South Inlet, Coos County, Ore- 
gon; office, Douglas building, Marshfield, 
Oregon. Born December 10, 1852, at Louis- 
ville, Kentucky. Son of Henry and Marie A. 
(Meyers) Sehllrede. When a child moved, 
with his parents, to a farm near Jefferson- 
ville, Indiana, and attended common schools 
there. When 21 years of age he entered the 
New Albany Business College, New Albany, 
Indiana, and at the same time pursued the 




study of law in the office of Hon. J. K. 
Waltz at New Albany, Indiana. Was ad- 
mitted to the bar at New Albany in 1874, 
opening an office there and continuing the 
practice of law until his removal to Oregon 
in 1878. Admitted to the bar of Oregon 
January 15 of that year and opened an office 
at Salem and remained there until the fall 
of 1884. He then removed to Roseburg, 
Douglas County, Oregon, which county he 
represented in the Lower House of the Legis- 
lature in 1894 and 1895. He received his 
appointment under President McKinley, as 
United States Commissioner and Probate 
Judge for Alaska, in 1898, going to Skagway, 
Alaska, and filling said position until 1901. 
when he resigned the office and returned to 
Roseburg. He remained there practicing his 
profession until July, 1904, when he removed 
to Marshfield, where he has since continued 
a general practice alone. Has been for the 
past two years Referee in Bankruptcy, past 
member of Old State Militia, Exempt Fire- 
men of Salem. Member of I. O. O. F.. Ma- 
sonic and W. O. W. fraternities. Republican. 

MILLARD A. SEITZ. 

Residence, Silverton, Oregon; office, same. 
Born October 38, 1879, in Will County, Illi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



219 



nois. Son of William Henry and Mary Ann 
(Smoke) Seitz. Married March 31, 1907, to 
Buth Love. Early education received at 
common and high schools at St. Joseph, 
Michigan. Business and academic training 
at Benton Harbor College, Benton Harbor, 
Michigan. Legal training at the University 
of Michigan, from which he graduated in 
1904, with LL. B. degree. Admitted to the 
bar of Michigan in June of the last-named 
year, and to the bar of Illinois in 1906. Came 
to Oregon in 1907 and was admitted to prac- 
tice here in September, 1907. Practiced alone 
one year following first admission, then en- 
tered into partnership with H. S. Gray, at 
Benton Harbor, Michigan. This partnership 
lasted one year when he went to Chicago and 
practiced alone there until his removal to 
Oregon. Entered into partnership with Louis 
E. Eauch under firm name of Eauch & Seitz, 
which continues to date. Was Circuit Court 
Commissioner for Berrien County, Michigan. 
Is President Silverton Commercial Club 
Eecorder and Police Judge of Silverton 1908. 
Republican. 

FRANK S. SENN. 

Eesidence, 706 Overtoil street; office, 321 
Failing building, Portland. Born in Clacka- 
mas County, Oregon, October 22, 1881. Son 
of Mathias and Freda (Kasten) Senn. At- 
tended grammar and high school in Dayton, 
Oregon; Portland Business College, Portland, 
later graduating from University of Michigan 
at Ann Arbor in 1904 with degree of LL. B. 
Admitted to the Oregon State bar in 1904. 
Practiced law at Silverton, Oregon, from 1904 
to 1906, removing to Portland, Oregon, in 
1906, and continuing practice to date. Mem- 
ber of Masonic fraternity. 

WALDEMAR SETON. 

Eesidence, 966 Milwaukee street; office 431 
Worcester building, Portland, Oregon. Born 
November 12, 1865, in Stockholm, Sweden. 
Married August, 1893, to Dottie M. Hurlburt. 
Eeceived his early education in the public 
schools of Sweden and later in evening 
schools in New York City. Graduated from 
Law Department University of Oregon June, 
1896, with degree LL. B. Admitted to the 
bar at Salem, Oregon, June, 3896, and ap 
pointed Deputy District Attorney, Fourth 
Judicial District, 1897-98. Deputy United 
States District Attorney 1900. Justice of the 
Peace, East Portland District, 1902-1906. 
Continues active practice of his profession 
to date. Eepublican. 

RUSSELL ELGIN SEWALL. 

Eesidence, 773 Everett street; office, 508-9 
Commercial block, Portland. Born September 
26, 1870, in Portland, Oregon. Son of Wil- 
liam Eussell and Levisee L. (Elgin) Sewall. 
Married October 2, 1895, to May E. Williams. 
Educated at the common schools and high 
school of Portland, and at the Law Depart- 
ment of the University of Oregon, from 



which institution he graduated in 1892 with 
LL. B. degree. Admitted to the bar in 
Supreme Court of Oregon in June, 1892. Was 
associated with law firm of Willis and Willis 
of Portland for three years, and served as 
Assistant City Attorney 1894-5-6; as District 
Attorney in 1898'-9-1900. Has- been in part- 
nership with E. E. Giltner, under the firm 
name Giltner & Sewall, since 1900. Served 
as Clerk of Court under Judge E. D. Shat- 
tuck, Department No. 1, Circuit Court. 
Lieutenant Company I, O. S. M., and O. N. G., 
1887-8-9. Charter member M. A. A. C. and 
member of Commercial Club, and several 
bodies of Masonry. Eepublican. 

DANIEL W. SHEAHAN. 

Eesidence and office, Enterprise, Oregon. 
Born January 20, 1861, in Mason County, 
Illinois. Son of Thomas and Mary (Hurley) 
Sheahan. Educated in the public schools of 




Illinois. Came to Oregon in 1883. Admittel 
to the bar of Oregon at Pendleton May 6, 
1890. Was at the time in partnership with 
F. S. Ivanhoe and the same continued until 
1897, since when he has practiced alone at 
Enterprise. United States Commissioner, 
1898-1909. City Attorney of Enterprise sev- 
eral times. Mayor of Enterprise 1902-3. 
President Enterprise Commercial Club 1908. 
Member Masonic fraternity. Democrat. 

JAMES FRANKLIN SHELTON. 

Eesidence, 852 East Seventh street N.; of- 
fice, 623 Lumbermens building, Portland. Born 
December 20, 1874, in Wasco County, Oregon. 
Son of James Martin and Nancy Elizabeth 
(Scott) Shelton. Married October 9, 1905, 
to Ethelyne Atkinson. Attended public 
schools at Albany, until ten years old; public 



220 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



schools at Baker City until graduation from 
high school in 1894. Entered law office of 
T. Calvin Hyde at Baker City in 1895, as a 
student, and remained there until Mr. Hyde's 
death in 1896. Entered law office of Thomas 
H. Crawford, at Union, Oregon, in 1897, and 
remained with Mr. Crawford until admitted 
to the bar at Pendleton May 1, 1898. Opened 




law office at Baker City in 1898 and prac- 
ticed there one year. Moved to Sumpter, 
Oregon, in 1899 and formed partnership with 
Sam. R. Stott, the firm existing until 1901. 
Practiced alone at Sumpter until 1906 when 
he moved to Echo, Oregon, and practiced 
there until 1909, when he came to Portland 
and became associated with the law firm of 
Sweek & Fouts. Second Lieutenant Troop 
B, O. N. G., 1900-1, at Sumpter, Oregon. City 
Attorney of Sump.er, Oregon, 1899-190i. 
Member Masonic, B. P. O. E. and W. O. W. 
fraternities. Democrat. 

CHESTER A. SHEPPARD. 

Residence, Creston Station; office, 423-4 
Henry building, Portland. Born at Grand 
Forks, North Dakota, June 28, 1879. Son of 
William E. and Orpha Esther (Pearson) 
Sheppard. Married to Ethelyn O. Krigei 
August 20, 1902. Attended Freemont High 
School, Freemont, Michigan, 1894 to 1897, 
and graduated from that institution. At- 
tended Ferris Institute, Big Rapids, Michi- 
gan, summers of 1896-97-98; Ypsilanti State 
Normal College, 1899-1901, from which he 
graduated. Post-graduate in 1905 department 
of Psychology and Pedagogics, receiving de- 
gree of Bachelor of Pedagogics. University 
of Oregon Law School, 1908, LL. B. Taught 
school thres years in Newaygo County, Michi- 
gan. Superintendent of Schools two years in 



Quinnisec. Michigan; thre? years in Chicago 
Parental School; Principal ward school, Port- 
land, one year. Lecturer on Philosophy of 
Education, Quinnisec, Michigan. Admitted 
to the bar at Pendleton, Oregon, May, 1908, 
and became associated with Judge A. T. Lewis 
until September, 1909, since when he lias- 
continued the practice of his profession alone 
Member of Phi Delta Pi and Phi Delta Phi 
fraternities. Republican. 

GEORGE S. SHEPHERD. 

Residence, 444 Ainsworth avenue; office, 
600 Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born May 5, 1866. Son of David and Helen 
(Reid) Shepherd. Came to Portland, Oregon, 
at the age of ten years. Attended Willamette 
University from 1880 to 1883. Admitted to 
the bar of Oregon May 7, 1895, and became 




associated with George B. Cellars under th > 
firm name of Shepherd & Cellars, which part- 
nership existed until 1903, since whn he ha> 
practiced alone. In 1903-1904 he took course 
in navigat'on on ship Ardencraig via Cape 
Horn and Cape of Good Hope with title of 
O. 'S. Councilman of Portland from July, 
1905, until April, 1907, when he resigned. 
Member Multnomah Amateur Athletic Club, 
Commercial Club and Portland Rowing Club. 
Vice-President and Secretary Portland Coast 
League Baseball Club, for past three years. 
Republican. 

ELMER M. SHERLOCK. 

Residence, corner Thirty-fourth and Brook- 
lyn; office, 228-9 Henry building, Portland. 
Born in Zanesville, Ohio, March 7, 1875. Son 
of Abraham and Adeline (Sandel) Sherlock. 
Married to Jessie Phelps July 19, 1899. Re- 
ceived his early education in grammar and 



BIOGRAPHIC A L 



221 



high schools of Iowa, later attending Drake 
University from 1891 to 1892, and Lake For- 
est University Law School, Chicago, from 
1893 to 1895, from which he graduated and 
received degree of LL. B. Admitted to th? 
Illinois bar June 12, 1895. Began the prac- 
tice of law in Chicago in 1895. Was local 
counsel for Chicago & Eastern Illinois Ra ; l- 
road from 1900 to 1905, and the Elgin, Joliet 
& Eastern Eailroad in the south end of Cook 
County. In. 1907 came to Portland. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Oregon the same year. 
He is practicing his profession alone. Mem 
ber Masonic and I. O. O. F. fraternities. 

ANDREW J. SHERWOOD. 

Residence, Coquille, Oregon; office, First 
National Bank building. Born in Independ- 
ence, Iowa, October 31, 1858. Son of Samuel 
and Huldah (Hathaway) Sherwood. Married 
to Cynthia A. Rogers December 29, 1885. At- 
tonded public schools and graduated from 




high school, Independence, Iowa, later attend- 
ing State Un versity of Iowa four years, and 
in June, 1883, graduated from Law Depart- 
ment with degree of LL. B. Admitted to bar 
in Iowa State Courts, United States District 
and Circuit Courts of Iowa, June 19, 1883. 
Came to Oregon in July, 1883, and admitted 
to bar in Oregon January 3, 1886. County 
School Superintendent from 1883 to 1886. 
Member or Chadwick Lodge, No. 68, A. F. 
and A. M.; Ko-Keel-Klub, Coquille, Oregon; 
Millicoma Club, Marshfield. Democrat. 

WILLIAM BENTON SHIVELY. 

Residence, 63 East Fifteenth street; office, 
303 Corbett building, Portland. Born Novem- 
ber 8, 1882, at Portland, Oregon. Son of 
W. B. and Elizabeth Ann (Davis) Shively. 



Married June 25, 1907, to Pearl E. Peterson. 
Was educated at the Oregon City schools, 
graduating therefrom in 1898; from the Tual 
atin Academy at Forest Grove, Oregon, in 
1901; from the Pacific University at Forest 
Grove, Oregon, in 1905, with the degree of 
A. B., and from the University of Oregon 
Law School at Portland in 1907, with degree 
of LL. B. Was admitted to the bar at Salem 
June 18, 1907, and to the United States Dis- 
trict Court on November 17, 1909, and con- 
tinues the practice of his profession to date. 
Republican. 

JOSEPH E. SIBLEY. 

Residence, Dallas, Oregon; office, same. 
Born February 21, 1864, at Fairfield, Illinois. 
Son of Charles and A. L. (Waters) Sibley. 
Married in 1895 to Hattie Bronson. Edu 
c:ited at the common schools of Fairfield, 
Illinois, ard at Hay ward College, of the samo 
place. Read law in office of Creighton & 




Sibley, of Fairfield, Illinois, for three years. 
Admitted to the bar of Illinois in August, 
1889, and came to Oregon in September of 
the same year, being admitted to the bar of 
Oregon at Salem the following year. First 
located at Dallas and went into partnership 
with John J. Daly and H. C. Eakin, the firm 
name being Daly, Sibley & Eakin. In 1895 
Daly left the firm, since when it has been 
Sibley & Eakin. Served five years in militia 
in Illinois. County Judge of Polk County, 
Oregon; Mayor and Councilman of Dallas. 
Member I. O. O. F. and W. O. W. fraternities. 
Democrat. 

JULIUS SILVERSTONE. 

Residence, 409 Salmon street; office, 605 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 



222 



Born in New York City, New York, Septem- 
ber 26, 1858. Son of Herman and Pauline 
(Samuels) Silverstone. Educated at public 
schools of New York and in the College of 
the City of New York, graduating from the 
latter in 1877 with the degree of B. S. 
Taught school in New York City from 1877 to 
1883. Came to Portland, Oregon, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in Oregon October 8, 1885. 
Admitted to practice in District Court of 
United States for District of Oregon and in 
United States Circuit Court for North Judi- 
cial District on December 7, 1886. Admitted 
to practice in State of Washington (then 
territory) on March 11, 1889. Practiced law 
for some years in partnership with Hon. John 
M. Gearin, Daniel R. Murphy and George A. 
Brodie. Since 1899 has practiced alone. 
Member of Concordia Club, Portland, and 
member of A. F. & A. M. fraternity. Re- 
publiean. 

JOSEPH SIMON. 

Residence, 689 
Everett street; of- 
fice, City Hall, 
Portland. Born 
February 7, 1851. 
Son of David and 
E 1 i s e (Leopold) 
Simon. Came to 
Oregon at the age 
of six years and 
received his edu- 
cation at the com- 
mon schools of 
this city. Admit- 
ted to the bar at 
Salem in 1872 and 
entered into part 
nership with C. A. 
Dolph on February 
1, 1873, which as 
sociatiou continues to date. The firm as at 
present constituted is Dolph, Mallory, Simon 
& Gearin. Served as State Senator from 
Multnomah County 1880 to 1899, and as 
United States Senator from Oregon 1898 to 
1903. Is at present Mayor of the City of 
Portland, having been elected in 1909. Mem 
ber Concordia and Commercial Clubs. Re- 
publican. 

NATHAN D. SIMON. 

Residence, 690 Flanders street; office. 710 
Board of Trade building, Portland. Born 
February 20, 1864, at Portland, Oregon. Son 
of David and Elise (Leopold) Simon. Was 
married September 11, 1889, at Albany, New 
York, to Hattie Sonnenfeld. Educated at the 
Portland public schools and later graduated 
from Portland High School. Attended Law 
School at Albany, New York, and read law 
in the office of Dolph, Bellinger, Mallory & 
Simon. On May 15, 1884, he graduated from 
Albany (New York) Law School and received 
UL. B. degree. Was admitted to the bar at 
Salem, Oregon, in 1885, and to the United 




States Supreme iCourt in 1889. From 
1886 to 1890 was Deputy District Attorney 
for Multnomah County. For ten years he 
formed a partnership with Henry E. McGinn 
and the late A. F. Sears, Jr., since which 
time he has practiced law in partnership 
with J. V. Beach under the firm name of 
Beach & Simon. Member of Commercial and 
Concordia Clubs. Republican. 

JOHN T. SIMPSON. 

Residence, Sheridan, Oregon; office, same. 
Born June 20, 1841, in Platt County, Mis 
souri. Son of Ben and Elzira Jane (Wisdom) 
Simpson. Married February 13, 1859, to 
Nancy C. Martin. At the age of five years 
he removed with his parents to Oregon, and 
his early education was received at private 
schools in Yamhill County, Oregon; at public 
schools in Oregon City and Parkerville, Ore- 
gon, and later at Salem. Read law at home 
and in office of C. C. Linden, of Sheridan. 
Oregon. Was admitted to the bar of the 
State of Oregon in 1896. Commenced the 
practice of law in Sl'eridan alone until 1903, 
when formed partnership with W. O. Simms 
for one year; 1907 was admitted to the bar 
of the State of Washington and for one year 
practiced in Centralia, Washington, in part 
nership with Judge Reynolds. Member Ma- 
sonic fraternity. Republican. 

WALTER SINCLAIR. 

Residence, Coquille, Oregon; office, same. 
Born November 19, 1838, ar Hanover, Ohio. 
Son of Burton and Elizabeth (Nicholas) Sin- 
clair. Married March, 1882, to Miss Ella 
Stevens, remarrying July 17, 1895, to Carrie 
Stauff. Attended the Union schools at Han 
over, Ohio, and the high school at Hillsboro, 
Ohio. After serving in the army began the 
study of law in the office of Isaac P. Cald- 
wen at Laramie, Wyoming. Admitted to 
the bar of the State of Wyoming at Laramie 
in 1883. Came to Oregon in 1884 and was 
admitted to the bar of this state in 1885. 
Enlisted in Company D, Ohio Volunteers, 
November 17, 1861, and served until April 
1, 1865. Was member of Oregon Senate for 
four years, e'ected in 1888. Member Coos 
County Bar Association, A. F. & A. M., Co- 
quille Commercial Club, Ko - Keel - Klub, 
G. A. R. Republican. 

NICHOLAS J. SINNOTT. 

Residence, The Dalles, Oregon; office, same. 
Born December 6, 1870, at The Dalles, Ore 
gon. Son of Nicholas B. and Bride M. 
(Brass) Sinnott. Attended the public schools 
at The Dalles and the Wasco Independent 
Academy at the same place until 1888, when 
he graduated from the last-named institution 
with degree of A. B. Graduated from Notre 
Dame University, South Bend, Indiana, in 
1892, with A. B. degree. Admitted to the 
bar at Salem in 1895, since which time he has 
practiced at The Dalles, part of the time 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



223 



with Eogor Sinnott, under the firm name 
Sinnott & Sinnott, and since 1900 with 
Alfred S. Bennett under the firm name of 
Bennett & Sinnott. Elected State Senator 
from Wasco arcl Hood Eiver counties in 1908. 
Eepublican. 

GEORGE F. SKIPWORTH. 

Eesidence, 167 West Fourth street; office, 
Cherry building, 528 Willamette street, Eu- 
gene, Oregon. Born in Keychi, Louis'ana, 
November 21, 1873. Son of Nathaniel M. and 
Cornelia (Bowden) Skipworth. Married Miss 
Grace Umprrey February 2, 1898. Came to 
Oregon December, 1874. Attended the public 
schools in different parts of Oregon, later 
attending Santiam Academy at Lebanon, Ore 
gon, and Portland University first year of 



November 19, 1889, to Fannie B. Hayes. Edu 
cated at the public schools of Union County, 
Oregon, and at the University of Oregon. 
Studied law in the office of Turner & Cox, 
Pendleton, Oregon, in 1881 and 1882. In 1883 
entered Law Department of Washington and 




its existence. Member of City Council at 
Junction City for four years and member of 
School Board at Junction City four years. 
Eead law in office of his brother, E. E. 
Skipworth, at Eugene, Oregon, from January 
1, 1892, until admitted to bar at Salem, Ore- 
gon, October 9, 1895. Commenced the prac- 
tice of law at Junction City, Lane County, 
Oregon, February 12, 1898, continuing until 
June 12, 1905, removing to Eugene, Oregon, 
becoming associated with George B. Dorris 
from September 1, 1906, to May, 1908. Dis- 
trict Attorney for Lane County from June, 
1907, to date. Member of I. O. O. F., A. O. 
U. W. and W. O. W. fraternities, and member 
Eugene Commercial Club. Democrat. 

JAMES D. SLATER. 

Eesidence, 802 Washington avenue; office, 
216 First street, La Grande. Born October 
18, 1856, at Corvallis, Oregon. Son of James 
H. and Edna E. (Gray) Slater. Married 




Lee University at Lexington, Virginia, gradu- 
ating in June, 1884, with degree of LL. B. 
Admitted to the bar at Salem in October, 
1884, and has since followed his profession at 
La Grande. Was for one year associated 
with C. H. Finn, under the firm name of 
Finn & Slater, and for several years with 
James H. and Eobert J. Slater, his father 
and brother. Has twice held office as Mayor 
of the City of La Grande. In 1896 was 
Democratic candidate for District Attorney 
of Tenth Judicial District of Oregon. Demo- 
crat. 

ROBERT JAY SLATER. 

Eesidence and office, Pendleton, Oregon. 
Born July 31, 1855, in Corvallis, Benton 
County, Oregon. Son of James Harvey and 
Edna Elizabeth (Gray) Slater. Married 
February 16, 1885, to Margaret Elizabeth 
Furnish. Attended public schools at La 
Grande until 1871, and also a private school 
at the same place. Afterward taught and 
studied in the Bishop Scott Academy, Port- 
land, 1876-7 and part of 1878. Commenced 
the study of law under his father's instruc- 
tions, and continued under the late D. W. 
Lichtenthaler, at Union, Oregon. Admitted 
to the bar at Salem July 5, 1880, and to the 
United States Circuit Court, 1892, to District 
Court and United States District Court in 
1900 and to United States Circuit Court of 
Appeals for Ninth Circuit in 1902. Admitted 
to United States Supreme Court February 24, 
1904, at Washington, D. C. Democrat. 



224 



WOODSON TAYLOR SLATER. 

Resider.ee, corner Church and Chemecketa 
streets; off : ce. State House, Salem, Oregon. 
Born November 18, 1858, in Corvallis, Ore- 
gon. Son of Tames Harvey and Edna Eliza- 
beth (Gray) Slater. Married June, 1885, to 
Mary Price Howe. Attended the publ c 
schools of Union County, Oregon, and later 
the University of Oregon at Eugene, gradu- 
ating with the degree of A. B. in 1883. Real 
law in office of L. Bilyeu Eugene, for three 
years, and was admitted to tne "oar of the 




State of Oregon at Salem in 1885. Com 
menced the practice of law in 1886 in Pen 
dleton, Oregon, in partnership with his 
brother, R. J. Slater, and remained there one 
year, when he removed to Salem and was 
appointed assistant to G. W. Webb, State 
Treasurer, f:>r four years. Left Salem to 
engage in the mercantile business in La 
Grande, and returned to Salem again in 1894 
when he resumed the practice of his profes- 
sion alone. In 1890 entered the law firm 
of Ford & Kaiser, of Salem, and continued 
until February 23, 1907, when he was ap- 
pointed Commissioner of the Supreme Court, 
which office he held until February 12, 1909, 
when he was appointed Justice of the Su 
preme Court for a term of two years. Mem 
ber of the K. of P. and Illihee Club. Demo- 
crat. 

EMIL P. SLOVARP. 

Office, 424 Henry building, Portland. Born 
July 15, 1884, in Lake Park, Minnesota. Son 
of Paul J. and Elsie (Mytting) Slovarp. 
Came to Oregon in 1903. Educated in pub- 
lic schools in Minnesota; graduated from 
Portland Bus' ness College 1905. Attended 
University of Oregon, Law Department, 1906 



1909, graduating with degree LL. B. Ad 
mitted to the bar June 15, 1909. 

ERNEST CHANDLER SMITH. 

Residence and office, Hood River, Oregon. 
Born December 18, 1877, at North English, 
Iowa. Son of Aaron C. and Mulvanla 
(Cheney) Smith. Married April, 1905, to 
Alice J. Hunt. Attended Drake University, 
Des Moines, Iowa, and Iowa Si ate Teachers 
College, graduating in June, 1902. Attcndi- 1 
Literary and Law Departments of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, graduating therefrom In 
1907. Admitted to the Michigan bar at Lan- 
sing in June, 1907. Came to Oregon in 1903 
and was admitted to the ba\ or this state 
March 1, 1909. Member Hood River Com- 
mercial Club. Hood River University Club. 
County Superintendent of Schools. Repub 
Mean. 

JOHN HENRY SMITH. 

Residence, Sixteenth and Irving streets; 
office, 4-5-6 ( opeland building, Astoria, Ore 
gon. Born December 4, 1*<;2. in St. Helens, 
Oregon. Son of John Henry and Jane (Kin 
ney) Smith. Married January 27, 1890, t> 




Minnie Smith. Attended country school in 
Linn County, and later at McMinnville Col 
lege and Willamette University and Wash- 
ington and Lee University at Virginia. 
Graduated from McMinnville College in 1884 
and from the Law Department of the AVash 
ington and Lee University in 1887. AdmittC'l 
to the bar in 1887, and has practiced law in 
Astoria ever since. State Senator from Clat- 
sop County, Oregon, 1894 to 1898. 

RICHARD SHORE SMITH. 

Residence and office, Eugene, Oregon. Born 
near Mountain View, Santa Clara County. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



225 



California, December 11, 1877. Son of G. W. 
and Margaret A. Smith. Married 1907 >o 
Ada D. Hendricks. Moved to Klamath Falls, 
Oregon, in 1883, attending the schools in 
that county. Entered the University of Ore- 
gon in 1896, graduating in 1901 with degree 
of A. B. Entered Columbia University of 
New York City, in 1901; graduated in "1904 
with degree of LL. B. Admitted to the bar 
of Oregon in 1904. Practiced law in Astoria, 
Clatsop County, in partnership with Judge 
Georgo Noland for three years; removed to 
Klamath Falls, Oregon, in March, 1907, and 
practiced with George Noland 1908. March 
1, 1910, entered into partnership with A. C 
Woodcock, Eugene, Oregon, which partner 
ship continues to the present time. Member 
of the A. F. & A. M. Lodge and Sigma Nu 
fraternity. Eepublican. 

MILTON WIRT SMITH. 

Kesidence, 135 
Curry street; of- 
fice, 413 Fail in;.' 
building, Portland. 
Born in 1855 on a 
farm in Marion 
County, Ore. Soa 
of David and Ann 
Maria (White) 
Smith. Married in 
1881 to Alice 
Sweek. Educated 
in the common 
schools of Yamhill 
County and at La- 
fayette Academy, 
Lafayette, Ore., at 
the Pacific Uni- 
versity, Forest 
Grove, Ore., from 

which he graduated in 1878 with A. B. degree. 
He later received A. M. degree from the same 
college. Admitted to the bar in March, 1881, 
and has since continued the active practice of 
his profession. President Multnomah Law 
Library. Member Historical Society, Na- 
tional Geographical Society and of the Eoyal 
Soc'ety of Arts, London. Member Arlington 
and University Clubs. 

SENECA SMITH. 

Kesidence, 829 Front street; office, 245% 
Washington street, Portland. Born in In- 
diana August 18, 1844. Son of Cornelius 
and Elizabeth (Dixon) Smith. Came to Ore- 
gon in 1847. Married to Margaret Gilliland 
May 1, 1879, since deceased. Married to 
Sue E. Southworth June, 1891. Eeceived hfs 
early education in log cabin school houses 
in Oregon, later attending McMinnville Col- 
lege and Willamette University. Admitted 
to the bar of Oregon at Salem in 1879. Judga 
Circuit Court of Fourth Judicial District in 
Oregon from January 1, 1884, to July 1, 1886. 
Member Portland Commercial Club. 



ROBERT GLENN SMITH. 

Eesidence and office, Grants Pass, Oregon. 
Born in Jacksonville, Oregon, November 27, 
1864. 'Son of Edwin and Minera V. (Fidler) 
Smith. Married to Ida V. LaEaut, April, 
1906. Attended public school at Jackson- 
ville, Oregon. Admitted to Supreme Court of 





Oregon October, 1889, and commenced to 
practice law in Grants Pass, Oregon, in part- 
nership with George W. Colvig under firm 
name of Smith & Colvig, which continued 
until January, 1895; 1896 with A. C. Hough 
as Smith & Hough for one year, then one year 
with H. D. Norton as Smith & Norton, since 
which alone. .Member of State House of 
Eepresentatives 1895 and 1905. Member of K. 
of P., Eedmen and W. O. W. fraternities. 
Democrat. 

DAN P. SMYTHE. 

Eesidence, 810 Vincent street; office, 
American National Bank building, Pendle 
ton, Oregon. Born in Atlanta, Georgia, July 
19, 1880. Son of August and Katherine 
(Taylor) Smythe. Came to Oregon about 
1894. Attended country and public schools 
near Dot, Klickitat County, Washington, 
later a private school; public school in Ohio 
and Arlington, Oregon; Whitman Prepara- 
tory College, Walla Walla, Washington, 
1896-7; W. S. C. at Pullman, Washington. 
1898-1900; University of Minnesota at Min- 
neapolis, 1901 to 1903, graduating from Law 
Department with degree of B. A. Admitted 
to the bar of Minnesota June, 1903; to 
Washington bar July 11, 1903; to bar of 
Oregon July 22, 1903. Practiced law short 
time at Arlington, Oregon; removed to Pen- 
dleton and associated with Hailey & Lowell, 
January 1, 1908, formed partnership with 



226 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Charles H. Carter. Captain Company L, 
Third Infantry, O. N. G. Secretary Oregon 
Bo;ird of Sheep Commissioners and Oregon 
Wool Growers Association. Member Board 
of Control, National Wool Growers Associa- 
tion. Member of Pendleton Commercial Club; 
Delta Chi fraternity; Masonic fraternity; 
K. of P. 

JOHN WILLIAM SNOVER. 

Eesidence and office, Marshfield, Oregon. 
Born March 5, 1861, Trenton, New Jersey. 
Son of Benjanrn Nelson and Mary E. (Stew- 
art) Snover. Moving to Oregon in 1862 re- 
ceived his early education in the public and 
high schools of Portland, then entering the 
Portland Business College, graduating in 1881. 
September 13, 1882, married Miss Susue Mar- 
ble, of Vancouver, Washington. Moving to 
Goldendale, Washington, there began the 
study of law in the office of N. B. Brooks, 
which he pursued for three years, then being 
appointed Postmaster of Goldendale, which 
position he held for the term of three years. 
Elected Mayor of Goldendale, Washington, in 
1890, being admitted to the bar of Wash- 
ington the same year. In 1893 appo nted to 
the United States Custom Service as In- 
spector at Puget Sound, Washington, continu- 
ing in the service for five years. Returning 
to Goldendale in 1898 formed a partnership 
with N. B. Brooks under the firm name of 
Brooks & Snover until 1903, when he was 
admitted to the bar at Salem and moved to 
Condon, Oregon, and practiced by himself 
until formed a partnership with Senator 
.1. Bowerman, which existed until 1906, when 
he moved to Marshfield, Oregon. Appointed 
City Attorney of Marshfield for one year in 
1909. Member of the Masonic and K. of P. 
fraternities. Democrat. 

FRED R. SALWAY. 

Residence, 771 East Twenty-seventh street; 
office, Court House, Portland. Born Decem- 
ber 11, 1876, at Hudson, Lenawee County, 
Michigan. Son of Hugo and Elizabeth 
(Blewitt) Salway. Married April 23, 1906, 
to Evangeline L. Strieker. Early education 
received at Hillsdale County, Michigan, at 
the public schools. In 1890 he graduated 
from Cleary College, Ypsilanti, '.Michigan. 
During 1904 and 1906 he did special work at 
the University of Michigan and abroad. In 
1907 he removed to Portland. In 1908 he 
received the degree of LL. B. University 
of Oregon, Law Department. The same year 
he was admitted to the bar at Salem, Ore 
gon. In 1906 he organized the Department 
of Commercial Science of Whitworth College, 
Tacoma, Washington, where, among other 
things he taught Contracts and Bills and 
Notes. At present is Librarian and Assist- 
ant Secretary of Multnomah Law Library. 
From 1901 to 1905 was instructor in the 
Military Department of Kenyon College, 
Gambier, Ohio. Republican. 



ALBERT N. SOLISS. 

Residence and office, Ontario, Oregon. 
Born in Sacramento, California, June 12, 1872. 
Son of Daniel B. and Margaret S. (Newman) 
Soliss. Came to Oregon in 1878. Married 
to Alice Rowland June 18, 1904. Attended 
country schools in Jackson County, and high 
school in Jacksonville, Oregon. Graduated 




from Stockton, California, Business College, 
Commercial Law course, 1892. Admitted to 
bar at Salem, Oregon, February 21, 1895. 
From 1895 to 1901 practiced law in Jackson 
ville, Oregon, in office of William M. Col- 
vig, and for a time in partnership with Wil- 
liam H. Parker. From 1902 to 1906 in part- 
nership with Ed. L. Bryan in Ontario, Ore- 
gon, and Payette, Idaho. Since then alone. 
Deputy District Attorney, First Judicial Dis- 
trict of Oregon, 1906-08. Democrat. 

CARLTON EDWARD SOX. 

Residence and office, Albany, Oregon. Born 
in Albany, Oregon, October 29, 1874. Son of 
Edward F. and Weltha M. (Young) Sox. 
Married to K. Bertha Ellis April 18, 1900. 
Attended public schools of Albany and Seat- 
tle. Graduated from Albany College 1891; 
attended Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illi- 
nois, 1891-93; graduated from Stanford Uni- 
versity, California, 1894, with degree of A. B. 
in Department of Economics and Social Sci- 
ence. Admitted to bar at Salem, Oregon, 
June, 1898; 1895-97 instructor in History 
and Economics, Albany College; 1894-98, 
studied law under Judge H. H. Hewitt, Al- 
bany, Oregon. July, 1898, formed partner 
ship with Judge Hewitt; partnership contin- 
ues to date. City Attorney for Albany, 1905 
to 1907. Republican. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



227 




ARTHUR CHAMPLAIN SPENCER. 

Eesidence, 562 
Myrtle street; of- 
fice, 1105 Wells- 
Fa r g o building, 
Portland, Oregon. 
Born in Suffield, 
Connecticut, Octo- 
ber 17, 1872. Son 
of George Francis 
and Martha 
(Champlain) Spen- 
cer. Married June 
15, 1898, to Mar- 
garet Fenton. At- 
tended the public 
schools at Deep 
E i v e r, Connecti- 
cut, until June, 
1888, when he 
g r a d u ated from 

the Deep Elver High School. In 1888 and 
1889 he attended the Connecticut Literary 
Institute at Suffield, Connecticut; 1889 to 
1891 he attended the Vermont Academy at 
Saxton's Eiver, Vermont, graduating in June, 

1891. Moved to Oregon September 28, 1893, 
and attended the Law Department of the 
University of Oregon for a period of two 
years, graduating in May, 1895. Admitted 
to the bar at Salem, Oregon, May, 1895, and 
appointed Deputy Prosecuting Attorney for 
the Fourth Judicial District of Oregon in 
June, 1900, resigning said office in May, 1904, 
to accept appointment as Assistant General 
Attorney for the Oregon Eailroad & Naviga- 
tion Company, which position he has since 
held. Eepublican. 

SCHUYLER COLFAX SPENCER. 

Residence, 424 Columbia street; office, 
T001-4 Board of Trade building, Portland. 
Born in Indiana January 1, 1864. Son of 
James and Emma (Skinner) Spencer. Edu- 
cated in the public and high school of Valpa- 
raiso, Indiana. Admitted to the bar in 
Indiana 1889, and commenced the practice 
of his profession in Valparaiso, Indiana, con- 
tinuing until his removal to Portland in 1892. 
Member of the firm of Wilbur & Spencer. 
Member Commercial Club. Eepnblican. 

JERVIS JOHNSON STANLEY. 

Besidence, Coquille, Oregon; office, Martin 
building. Born in Lynnville, Jasper County, 
Iowa, September 13, 1864. Son of Joshua 
Foster and Mary Jane (Stanley) Stanley. 
Married to Carr : e B. Goodman September 4, 

1892. Attended public schools at Lynnville 
and Earlham, Iowa; country school in 
Nemaha County, Kansas; graduated from 
Campbell University, Holton, Kansas, 1887, 
with degree B. S. D. Post-graduate, 1888, 
and had charge of field work in botany ana 
sciences. Came to Oregon August 8, 1888. 
Began study of law in 1892, and admitted to 
bar at Salem, Oregon, July 1, 1904. Asso- 



ciated in law with Hon. Eobert Burns until 
October, 1905, since practicing alone. Editor 
Coquille City Bulletin, 1902-04. County Clerk 
Coos County 1892 to 1894; Mayor of Co- 




quille from 1904- to 1908. Member of City 
Council, School Board and Chamber of 
Commerce. Secretary Coos County Bar Asso- 
ciation. Member I. O. O. F., Masonic, W. 
O. W. fraternities. Democrat. 

GEORGE W. STAPLETON. 




Eesidence, 445 Hassalo street; office, 732 
Chamber of Commerce, Portland, Oregon. 



228 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Born in Scott County, Iowa, June 10, 1863. 
Son of John and Josephine (Sloper) Staple- 
ton. Crossed the plains in the fall and win- 
ter of 1864 and 1865 to the Territory of 
Idaho, from Idaho to Oregon in 1871. Mar- 
ried June 10, 1886, at Goldendale, Washing- 
ton, to Louise Sisson. Was educated in the 
common schools of Oregon and Washington, 
finishing school days at the Pacific Univer- 
sity at Forest Grove, Oregon. Admitted to 
the bar of the Territory of Washington on 
October 27, 1886, and to the Supreme Court 
of the State of Oregon on September 11, 1899; 
to the Circuit Court of the United States for 
the District of Oregon on June 22, 1896, and 
to the Circuit and District Courts of the 
United States for the District of Washing- 
ton on November 4, 1904. Was Mayor of the 
City of Goldendale for one term, and was 
Mayor of the City of Vancouver, Washington 
for three terms in succession. Member of 
the firm of Coovert & Stapleton Presidential 
Elector on the Palmer and lUicknor ticket 
for the State of Washington in 1896. Mem- 
ber of Commercial Club, Portland. Mason. 
Kepublican. 

SAMUEL WYATT STARK. 

Residence, Hood River, Oregon; office, same. 
Born June 7, 1878, at Osage City, Missouri. 
Sou of Wyatt Alexander and Luticia (Mat- 
lock) Stark. Married July 25, 1902, to Ger- 




trude M. Brace. His first schooling was re- 
ceived at a country school at Rockland, 
Cooper County, Missouri. In 1892, at the age 
of fourteen, he came to Oregon and lived on 
a homestead" four miles from Mosier, Wasco 
County, Oregon, where he attended a small 
country school, and later went to school at 
South Bend, Washington. While attending 



school there studied law mornings, evenings 
and Saturdays in the office of Welsh & 
Thorp, attorneys at that place. In June, 
1899, went to The Dalles and studied law 
there in office of A. S. Bennett. Was afl- 
mitted to the bar by the Supreme Court of 
Oregon in May, 1901. Immediately opened 
an office at The Dalles and practiced there 
until 1909, when he went to Hood River. Re- 
publican. 

JOSEPH O. STEARNS. 

Residence, 1641 Base Line; office, 2-5 
Washington building, Portland. Born Octo- 
ber 15, 1855, in Jackson County, Oregon. Son 
of Samuel Eastman and Susan Terry (Whita- 
ker) Stearns. Married to Isa Roy Smith at 
Walla Walla, Washington, May 15, 1881. Re- 




ceived his education in the public schools of 
Portland, Oregon. Admitted to the bar at 
Salem, Oregon, 1896. County Commissioner 
of Lincoln County, Oregon, 1893-1894, and 
County Judge from 1896 to 1898. Came -,o 
Portland, Oregon, in May, 1863. Removed to 
Walla Walla, Washington, 1879, where was 
engaged in real estate and insurance busr 
ness until 1887, when with family remove-] 
to Alsea Bay, in Lincoln County (then Ben- 
ton), Oregon. Upon organization of Lincoln 
County, 1893, was appointed member of the 
first Board of County Commissioners. There- 
after, in 1896, was appointed Judge by Gov- 
ernor Lord; at expiration of term in 1898 
removed to Portland, where lias since been 
engaged in practice of law. Member of 
I. O. O. F. fraternity. Republican. 

JESSE STEARNS. 

Residence, 553 Ladd avenue; office, 801 
Chamber of Commerce, Portland. Born Janu- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



229 



ary 21, 1859, at Starksboro, Vermont. Son 
of Ansel Lewis and Julia Buel (Farr) 
Stearns. Married December 27, 1906, to Mary 
P. Hardy. Educated at Bristol Academy at 
Bristol, Vermont; at Beeman Academy, at 
New Haven, Vermont; and at Middlebury 
College, Middlebury, Vermont, from which 
he graduated in 1883 with A. B. degree. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Vermont In 1886, to the 
bar of the State of New York In 1888, and 
practiced in New York City for eighteen 
years, a member of the firms of Hobbs <5c 
Gifford, and of Gifford, Stearns & Hobbs 
and Steams & Paddock. Came to Oregon in 
1905 and was admitted to the Oregon bar 
in 1906. Member Arlington, University and 
Waverly Golf Clubs. Eepublican. 

LUTHER F. STEEL. 

Eesidence, Eiv- 
erdale; office, 1105 
Wells-Fargo Bldg., 
Portland. Born 
July 29, 1871, at 
Oswego, Kansas. 
Son of David and 
Mary McDowell 
(Foulke) Steel. 
Married in 1906 to 
Mary H. Talbot. 
Game to Oregon in 
1872. A 1 1 e nded 
public schools of 
Portland and later 
the University of 
Oregon, Law De- 
partment. Admit- 
ted to the bar at 
Salem in June, 

1899. From 1906 to date, assistant to Hon. 
W. W. Cotton, General Attorney for the 
Oregon Railroad & Navigation Company. 
Served five years with Oregon National 
Guard, res-igiiing as Second Lieutenant in 
1897. [Republican. 

B. E. STEEL. 

Eesidence and office, Eoseburg, Oregon. 
Born January 13, 1886, at Tazewell, Virginia. 
Son of A. J. Steel. Eeceived his early educa- 
tion at the public schools of Tazewell, gradu- 
ating from the high school at that place in 
1894. In September of that year he entered 
Washington & Lee University, Lexington, 
Virginia, and completed a one-year academic 
course. In 1905 entered Eichmond College, 
Eichmond, Virginia, and took another year of 
academic work; in 1906 he entered the Law 
Department of the same college and gradu- 
ated in 1908 with LL. B. degree. Admitted 
to the bar of Virginia June 19, 1908. Spent 
one year in the law office of A. S. Higgin- 
botham at Tazewell, at the same time en- 
gaging in a further study of law. Came to 
Oregon in 1909 and was admitted to the bar 
of this state on October 5. Located immedi- 
ately at Eoseburg and has continued the 
practice of his profession there. 




FREDERICK STEIWER. 

Eesidence and office, Pendleton. Born Oc- 
tober 13, 1883, at Jefferson, Marion County, 
Oregon. Son of John F. and Ada (May) 
Steiwer. Education received at public 
schools of Oregon; the Oregon Agricultural 
College, from which he graduated in 1902 
with B. S. degree; at the University of Ore- 
gon, from which he graduated in 1906 with 
A. B. degree, and at University of Oregon 
Law School. Admitted to the bar in 1908, 
having previously been in the employ of 
Snow & McCamant, Portland. Eemained 
with them until March, 1909, when he went 
to Pendleton and formed a partnership with 
G. W. Phelps, under the firm name of Phelps 
& Steiwer. Is at present Deputy District 
Attorney of Umatilla County. Member Ma- 
sonic and Phi Delta Phi fraternities. Ee- 
publican. 

JOHN H. STEVENSON. 

Eesidence, 448V, Sixth street; office, Mo- 
hawk building, Portland. Born December 
28, 1879, at Forest Grove, Oregon. Son of 
Eobert O. and Mary (Buxton) Stevenson. 
Married December 24, 1904, to Louise 
Behrenz. Eeceived early education in the 
common schools of District No. 27, near 
Forest Grove, Oregon. Was admitted to the 
bar of Oregon in October, 1907, and appointed 
Deputy District Attorney for the Fourth 
Judicial District, by John Manning, in No- 
vember, 1907. Left that office July 6, 1908, 
and has since been engaged in general prac- 
tice. Democrat. 

McCANTS STEWART. 

Eesidence, 513 
North Union ave- 
nue; office, 221 
Ablngton build- 
ing, Portia nd, 
Oregon. Born July 
11, 1877, in Brook- 
lyn, New York. 
Son of T. McCants 
and L o t t i e P. 
(Harris) Stewart. 
Married Mary D. 
Weir, of Minnea- 
polis, Minn., Aug- 
ust 22, 1905. Ee- 
ceived his early 
education in the 
public schools of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., 
and the Claflin 

University, South Carolina. Graduated from 
the Tuskegee Institute, Tuskegee, Alabama, 
Normal Department, 1896, and the same year 
entered University of New York, taking 
special work. Entered University of New 
York Law School 1896. Graduated from the 
University of Minnesota 1899, degree of LL. 
B.; 1901 degree LL. M. Admitted to the 




230 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



bar at St. Paul, Minn., 1899, and to the bar 
of Oregon, 1903. Arrived in Oregon 1902. 
Started active practice of his profession in 
Portland 1903. Eepublican. 

THOMAS JEFFERSON STITES. 

Residence and office, Albany Oregon. Born 
in Putnam County, Indiana, October 25, 1839. 
Son of Samuel and Jane (Young) Stites. Came 
to Oregon in 1862. Married to Mary J. Mar- 
tin March 3, 1868. Educated in common 
schools of Illinois and Missouri. Admitted 
to the bar at Salem, Oregon, in 1880. Mem- 
ber of Oregon Legislature in 1868 to 1870. 
Superintendent of Schools, Linn County, 1870 
to 1874. County Clerk of Linn County 1876- 
78. Private Secretary to Governor Thayer 
for full term. 

CHARLES F. STONE. 

Residence and office, Klamath Falls, Ore 
gon. Born in Covington, Virginia, November 
3, 1865. Son of J. P. and Luoinda (Sizer; 
Stone. Married to Ida Skelton November 22, 
1898. Attended public and high schools of 
Covington, Viiginia; entered the University 
of Minnesota in 1886 and graduated from 




there with degrees of A. B. and LL. B. in 
1890. Admitted to Supreme Court of Minne- 
sota June 6, 1890; Supreme Court of Idaho 
November 19, 1891; Supreme Court of Wash- 
ington October, 1896; Supreme Court of Cali- 
fornia January 22, 1906. Came to Oregon 
January 26, 1906, and admitted to Oregon 
Supreme Court May 29, 1906. Practiced law 
in Malad City, Idaho, April 5, 1891 to June 
6, 1896; Olympia, Washington, October, 1896, 
to February, 1897; Eureka, California, July, 
1905, to January, 1906; Klamath Falls, Ore- 
gon since January, 1906, with H. L. Benson 




under firm name Benson & Stone. In 1891 
was appointed United States Court Commis- 
sioner, District of Southern Idaho, which he 
held for five years. Member of K. of P. 
Democrat. 

EDMUND PLOWDEN STOTT. 

Residence, 268 
Park street; of- 
fice, 311 Common- 
wealth building, 
Portland. Born 
July 28, 1883, ar 
Portland, Oregon. 
Son of Raleigh 
and Susan (Plow- 
den) Stott. Early 
education received 
at the public 
schools of Port- 
land and at Port- 
land Academy. En- 
tered Leland Stan- 
ford University in 
1903, remaining 
there during the 
years 1903 to 1907. 

Admitted to the bar of Oregon in October, 
1907. In January, 1907, became associated 
with the fiim of Gammans & Malarkey 
the firm name having been changed the be- 
ginning of the present year to Malarkey, 
Seabrook & Stott. Member M. A. A. C. and 
University Club. Republican. 

HAROLD WILLIAM STRONG. 

Residence, 777 East Eighth street; office, 
235 Worcester building, Portland. Born iu 
Portland, Oregon, November 15, 1878. Son 
of Edward W. and Belle (Watts) Strong. 
Married September 15, 1900, to Ethel Hill- 
man. Graduated from Beaverton public 
school in 1896; attended Pacific College at 
Newberg, Oregon, two years, and the Oregon 
Agricultural College, Corvallis, Oregon, two 
years, and graduated from the Stanford Uni- 
versity, receiving the degree of LL. B. in 
1907. Admitted to the bar in Oregon June 
20, 1906, since which date he has practiced 
his profession. Elected Republican County 
Central Committeeman in 1907. Member 
B. P. O. E. and W. O. W. Republican. 

THOMAS NELSON STRONG. 

Residence, 209 Sixteenth street; office, 
Labbe building, Portland. Born at Cathla- 
met, Washington, on March 17, 1853. Son 
of William and Lucretia (Robinson) Strong. 
Moved to Oregon in 1861 and was admitted 
to the bar at Salem in 1874. Republican. 

PHILIP ALFRED STOVER. 

Residence and office, Hermiston, Oregon. 
Born February 13, 1884, in Darke County, 
Ohio. Son of Philip Robert and Alice Elsie 
(Wilcox) Stover. Early education received 
in the common schools of Darke County and 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



231 



later at the public and high schools of 
Greenville, Ohio. Came to Oregon in 1906. 
Attended Law Department of the Willamette 



the degree of LL. B. in June, 1896. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, 1896, and 
since 1899 has practiced alone. Appointed 




University at Salem, and graduated in 1908 
with LL. B. cbgree. Admitted to the bar 
at Salem in October, 1908. Practiced at 
Sunnyside, Washington, until his removal to 
Hermiston. Eepublican. 

CHARLES STOUT. 

Kesidence, 100 Nesmit'h street; office, 610 
Commercial block, Portland. Born in Boise, 
Idaho, September 4, 1871. Son of James 
and Harriette (Chapin) Stout. Married to 
Florence M. Shiells December 28, 1904. At- 
tended the public school at Boise, Idaho, 
until 1885, and from 1885 to 1886 a private 
school in Lewiston, Idaho. Moved to Ore- 
gon November 1, 1906. Studied law in 
Ogden, Utah, in the office of W. L. Maginnis 
from 1897 to 1904, and was admitted to the 
bar of Utah at Salt Lake City in October, 
1901, practicing in Ogden and Salt Lake City, 
Utah. Admitted to Washington bar in 1905, 
practicing in Seattle about one year, and 
admitted to the Oregon bar December 17, 
1906. Member of Masonic fraternity. Demo- 
crat. 

JOSEPH A. STROWBRIDGE. 

Eesidence, 795 East Eighth street; office, 
207 Commercial block, Portland. Born in 
Portland, Oregon, November 23, 1870. Son 
of Joseph Alfred and Mary (Bodman) 
Strowbridge. Married May 23, 1893, to 
Nellie Maud Blasdel. Received h : s early 
education in Portland public school, the Port- 
High School and the Portland Business Col- 
lege. Attended the Law Department, Uni- 
versity of Oregon; graduated from same with 




Deputy Clerk under late Judge Shattuck, 
July, 1896, to July, 1899. Member of the 
Scottish Eite, Knights Templar, Mystic 
Shrine, Portland, Sons of American Revolu- 
tion. Eepublican. 

VICTOR K. STRODE. 

Eesidence, 867 Kelly street; office, 617 
Chamber of Commerce, Portland. Born in 
Kane County, Illinois, August 25, 1851. Son 
of J. V. and Nancy (Gillilan) Strode. Came 
to Oregon November, 1879. Married to Kate 
Weigand, August 10, 1887. Attended com- 
mon school in Knox County, Missouri; gradu- 
ated from State Normal School at Kirksville, 
Missouri, in 1873. Eead law in office of 
General W. H. L. Banes, San Francisco. Ad- 
mitted to Supreme Court of California at 
Los Angeles, 1879; Supreme Court of Oregon 
1880; District and Circuit Courts of United 
States 1883; United States Circuit Court of 
Appeals. Commenced the practice of his 
profession in Portland in partnersh'p with 
J. V. Beach, under the firm name of Strode 
& Beach, which continued for a number of 
years; later with Charles N. Wait. Prac- 
tices his profession alone to date. Democrat. 

RAYMOND AMBROSE SULLIVAN. 

Eesidence, 141 North Sixteenth street; 
office, 609 McKay buikVng, Portland, Oregon. 
Born October 16, 1881, at Preston, Minne- 
sota. Son of Florence and Katherine (Mo- 
ran) Sullivan. Attended St. Mary's School 
at La Crosse, Wisconsin, 1886 to"l895; Du- 
buque public school 1896 to 1898; Dubuque 
(Iowa) High School 1898 to 1902, graduating 



232 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



therefrom. Graduated from University of 
Wisconsin in 1906 with degree of LL. B. 
Admitted to the bar of Oregon in July, 1906, 
having that year removed to Portland, Ore 
gon. Began private practice September 1, 
1906, in Portland, July 1, 1908, was appointed 
to the position of Deputy City Attorney for 
Portland, under John P. Kavanaugh, which 
position he has held to date. Member 
Knights of Columbus, Royal Arcanum, An- 
cient Order of Hibernians, Multnomah Ama- 
teur Athletic Club. Republican. 

L. L. SWAN. 

Residence and office, Albany. Born in 
Marshalltown, Iowa, June 11, 1872. Son of 
D. C. and Martha E. (Naylor) Swan. Came 
to Oregon in 1888. Married Ella M. Fouche 
September 22, 1901. Attended school at 
Marshalltown, Iowa, later at Dallas, Oregon, 
graduating in 1889; taught school, 1889-90; 
attended Oregon Agricultural College, 1890 
to 1893. Admitted to bar at Salem, Oregon, 
June, 1898, and formed partnership with H. 
C. Watson at Albany, Oregon, which con 
tinued until 1903. Now practicing by him- 
self to date. Member of Masonic and I. O. 
O. F. fraternities. Republican. 

THOMAS GEORGE BENNETT SWANTON. 

Residence and office, Marshfield, Oregon. 
Born in Glandore, Cork County, Ireland. Son 
of Robert H. and Elizabeth F. (Bennett) 
Swanton. Came to Oregon September 30, 
1894. Married to Violet Abernethy August 
18, 1902. Attended public school, 1881-1890; 
Pococke College, Kilkenny, Ireland, August, 
1890 to June, 1893; Santry School, Dublin, 
Ireland, August, 1893, to June, 1894. October, 
1894, commenced study of law in office of 
J. W. Bennett. Admitted to the bar at 
Salem, Oregon, June, 1898. Assistant At- 
torney in office of J. W. Bennett until Janu- 
ary 1, 1910, when partnership was formed 
with J. W. and Tom T. Bennett. Mason. 
Republican. 

ISAAC SWETT. 

Residence, 794 
Water street; of- 
fice, 521-525 Cham- 
ber of Commerce 
building, Portland. 
Born September 
10, 1873, at Odes 
sa, Russia. Son of 
Leon and Sarah 
(C h a i m o vitch) 
S w e 1 1. Married 
December 4, 1900, 
to Julia Segal. 
Early education 
received at pri- 
vate schools in 
Russia until nine 
years of age; at 
the public schools 
of Oregon. En- 
tered University of Oregon, Law Department, 




and graduated therefrom in 1896. Admitted 
to the bar at Salem, Oregon, in June, 1896. 
Practiced in Portland from the time of his 
admission to date, being a member of the 
firm of Murphy, Brodie & Swett. Appointe-1 
and served as Municipal Judge in Port- 
land 1908. Member of Executive Board in 
Mayor Lane's Cabinet in 1908-1909. Presi- 
dent People's Forum 1908-1909. Mason. 
February 22, 1910, elected Grand President 
of Independent Order of B'nai B'rith, Dis- 
trict No. Four. Democrat. 

BENJAMIN F. SWOPE. 

Residence, Independence, Oregon; office, 
same. Born January 12, 1866, in Nodaway 
County, Missouri. Son of Thomas W. and 
Helen (Stevens) Swope. Married February 
1, 1894, to Grace Holmes. His early educa- 
tion was received in the public and high 
schools of Maitland, Missouri. In 1891 at- 
tended the Law Department of the University 
of Oregon. Read law in office of C. D. & 
D. C. Latourette, Oregon City. Admitted to 
the bar of Oregon October 4, 1893, and lo- 
cated at Newport. Mayor of that town in 
1895. Deputy District Attorney for Lincoln 
County 1899 to 1906; County Judge of same 
county from 1906 to 1909, when he resigned 
to accept position of Deputy District Attor 
ney of Crook County. Resigned this position 
January 1, 1910, on account of ill-health and 
returned to the Willamette Valley, locating 
at Independence. City Attorney of Independ- 
ence. Member of Masonic and I. O. O. F. 
fraternities. Republican. 

EDWARD THOMAS TAGGERT. 

Residence, 341 
Sherman street; 
office, 416 Cham- 
ber of Commerce 
building, Portland. 
Born August 26th, 
1868, near Belfast, 
County Antrim, 
Ireland. Son of 
John and Eliza- 
beth (Higginson) 
Taggert. Marr'ed 
August 28th, 1899, 
to Eugenia Hobbs. 
Educated in the 
National Schools, 
Skerry's Civil Ser- 
vice Academy, 
Dublin, Ireland, 
and the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 
graduating therefrom in June, 1898, with the 
degree of LL. B. Was admitted to the bar 
of Michigan at Lansing, Michigan, in June, 
1898. Came to Oregon in 1890 and was 
admitted to the bar at Salem in 1899. Mem- 
ber of Masonic and I. O. O. F. fraternities. 
Republican. 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



233 



CHARLES J. TAFF. 

Eesidence and office, McMinnville, Ore- 
gon. B'orn November 2, 1872, in Benton 
County, Arkansas. Son of George G. and 
Susan (Downing) Taff. .Married December 
31, 1899, to Irene Eummell. Attended the 
public schools of Illinois, and after his re- 
moval to Oregon, in 1887, the public schools 
of McMinnville, Oregon. Bead, law in the 
office of W. T. Vinton, McMinnville, and was 
admitted to the bar at Salem in 1896. Com- 
menced the practice of law at Salem and 
continues to date. Was member of the Ore- 
gon National Guard for four years. Repub- 
lican. 

ALBERT HAWES TANNER. 

Residence, 409 
East Fourteenth 
street; office, 609 
Commercial block, 
Portland, Oregon. 
Born September 9. 
1855, Clark Coun- 
ty, Wash. Son of 
Benjanrn Franklin 
and 'Sarah Lucelle 
(Turneir) Tanner. 
Married Novem- 
ber 25, 1880, to 
Marcella Kelly. 
Received his earl} r 
education at the 
District and Chris- 
tian College at 
Monmouth, Ore., 
which at that time 

was one of the leading colleges of the state. 
He graduated from that institution with the 
degree of B. S. in 1874. Studied law in Port- 
land with the firm of Dolph, Bronaugh, 
Dolph & Simon, and was admitted to the bar 
in 1879, since which time he has practiced 
his profession in this city. Moved to Oregon 
in 1865. Member of the Legislature from 
Multnomah County in 1882. City Attorney 
of Portland 1884-5-6, and Municipal Judge 
1888-1890. Republican. 

GEORGE TAZWELL. 

Residence, 912 Front street; office, 519 
Lumbermens building, Portland. Born in 
Glastonbury, England, August 11, 1870. Son 
of Jesse and Ellen (Ralph) Tazwell. Cani3 
to Oregon May 6, 1889. Attended pu'b 
lie schools in England; Portland Business 
College, and Law Department, University of 
Oregon, graduating in 1894 with degree of 
LL. B. Admitted to bar at Salem, Oregon, 
June 1, 1894. With the firm of Dolph, Mai- 
lory, Simon & Gearin from 1895 to 1899. 
Private Secretary to Hon. Joseph Simon, 
United States Senator, 1899 to 1902; again 
with firm of Dolph, Mallory, Simon & 
Gearin until November 1, 1907, when part- 
nership was formed with Frank S. Bennett, 
which continues to date. Republican. 




WARREN ELLSWORTH THOMAS. 

Residence, 300 North Twenty-fourth street; 
office, 400 Chamber of Commerce building, 
Portland. Born November 21, 3861, at Mill- 
ville, Lycoming County, Pennsylvania. Son 
of John Milton and Ann Elizabeth (Marshall) 
Thomas. Married June 25, 1890, to Lalla R. 
Dalton. Educated in public and normal 
schools in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania; 
the Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania, Eclectic In- 
stitute, where he had two years of prepara- 
tory work. Studied law in Williamsport, 
Pennsylvania, in the office of William 
H. Armstrong. Admitted to practice Court 
of Common Pleas of Lycoming County, 
Pennsylvania, in 1882; to the Supreme 
Court of the State of Washington in 
1883, and was admitted to the bar of 
this state the same year. Formed partner- 
ship with Benton Killin and F. A. E. Starr, 
under the firm name of Killin, Starr & Thomas, 
in 1889, the same existing until 1892, when 
Mr. Killin withdrew, and the firm became 
Starr & Thomas. In 1894 George E. Cham- 
berlain became a member of the firm, and 
the name again changed to Starr, Thomas & 
Chamberlain, and remained so until 1897, 
when it became Chamberlain & Thomas. This 
partnership lasted until 1909, when Otto J. 
Kraemer was admitted to the firm, and the 
firm name is at present Chamberlain, Thomas 
& Kraemer. Was six years in O. N. G., be- 
coming First Lieutenant Company K, First 
Regiment; was member House of Representa- 
tives of Oregon in 1891 and 1897. Member 
Arlington Club, Portland Commercial Club; 
member of Archaeological Society, and Wav- 
erly Golf Club. Republican. 

CHARLES RAYMOND THOMPSON. 

Reside nee, 392 
Columbia street; 
office, 316 C o m- 
monwealth build- 
ing, Portland. 
Born May 27, 
1886, at Carlton, 
Missouri. Son of 
Charles A s b u r y 
and Mary Elle i 
(Pafander) 
Thompson. Grad- 
uated from the 
public schools of 
Harper County, 
Kansas, in 1893, 
and attended 
Sou thwestern 
Kansas College in 
1904. Took up 

business course in MeMinnville College, Me- 
Minnville, Oregon, in 1905, and studied law 
in the office of A. H. Mohler, in Chasmere, 
Washington, in the years 1906 and 1907. En- 
tered the Law Department of the University 
of Oregon, at Portland, in 1907, graduating 
in June, 1909, with degree of LL. B. Ad- 




234 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



mitted to the bar at Salem June 16, 1909, 
and entered the office of Kichardson, Dimick 
& Morehead, of this city, with whom he is 
still associated. Kepublican. 

ANDREW GAEL THOMPSON. 

Kesidence, 1171 Hawthorne avenue; office, 
419 Henry building, Portland. Born Decem- 
ber 27, 1876, at Barnard, Missouri. Son of 
William and Louisa (Strain) Thompson. Mar- 
ried in 1907 to M. Louise Lamont. Gradu- 
ated from the Oregon State Normal at Mon- 
mouth, in 1899, with degree of B. S. ; from 
Leland Stanford, Jr., University in 1903, with 
degree of A. B.; from Harvard University in 
1906, with degree of A. M., and from the 
University of Chicago in 1907. Came to Ore- 
gon in 1882. Was admitted to the bar at 
Salem in 1904. Member W. O. W. frater- 
nitry, of the Leland Stanford, Jr., Club, and 
President of the Oregon State Normal Club. 
Republican. 

H. W. THOMPSON. 

Eesidence, Fifth and Willamette streets; 
office, First National Bank building, Eugene, 
Oregon. Born in New York City, December 
14, 1868. Son of Clark W. and Rebecca 
SophTa (Wells) Thompson. Entering the com- 




mon and high schools of La Crosse, Wiscon- 
sin, graduating from the same. Later attend- 
ed the University of Minnesota and gradu- 
ated with degree B. A. in 1888, continuing 
the study of law in the office of Clark, Ellar 
& Howe, at St. Paul, Minnesota, for one year; 
then entered the law school of Harvard Uni- 
versity, where he remained for two years, 
returning to La rosse, Wisconsin. Being ad- 
mitted to the bar of Wisconsin, January, 1891, 
he practiced there until moving to Oregon in 



1897. Being admitted to the bar of Oregon 
that same year, he opened an office at Eu- 
gene, Oregon, where he formed a co-partner- 
ship with Charles Hardy, of Eugene, which 
continues to date. On October 21, 1909, he 
was appointed County Judge of Lane County, 
Oregon, whicTi position he now holds. He is 
a member of the Commercial and Social Clubs 
of Eugene; the University Club of Portland; 
past member of the Phi Delta Theta, also 
member A. F. & A. M., Knights of Pythias, 
B. P. O. E. fraternities. Republican. 

ARTHUR P. TIFFT. 

Residence, 351 West Park street; office, 710 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born October 3, 1872, at Buffalo, New York. 
Son of James Webster and Joan (Palmer) 
Tifft. Came to Oregon in 1891. Educated at 
the public and high schools of Buffalo, New 
York; at Cornell University, 1889-90; received 




degree of Ph. G. from Willamette University 
in 1893. Admitted to the bar at Salem in 
1905. Practiced law at Portland as a mem- 
ber of the firm of Tifft, Stralian & Seaton. 
From August, 1897, to 1905, was in partner- 
ship with Judge M. L. Pipes, under the firm 
name Pipes & Tifft. Since 1905 has practiced 
alone. President Oregon Pan-American Com- 
mission; member M. A. A. C., Masonic order, 
Loyal Legion and Sons of the American Rev- 
olution. Republican. 

HENRY MULFORD TOMLINSON. 

Residence, 415 Fourteenth street; office, 
610 McKay building, Portland. Born March 
27, 1875, at Bridgeton, New Jersey. Son of 
George and Emma (Bonham) Tomlinson. 
Married June, 1907, to Helen Josephine Fitz. 
Attended West Jersey Academy, and South 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



235 



Jersey Institute. Graduated from the Law 
Department of Cornell University, Ithaca, 
N. Y., in June, 1897, with degree of LL. B. 
Took special course at Brown University, 
Providence, K. I., for one year, ending 1905. 
Moved to the State of Oregon in 1898, and 
was admitted to the bar at Salem in the same 
year. Deputy City Attorney of Portland un- 
der John P. Kavanaugh, from July 1, 1907, 
to date. Kepublican. 

EDMUND BURKE TONGUE. 

Kesidence and office, Hillsboro, Ore. Born 
in Hillsboro, Ore., April 17, 1873. Son of 
Thomas H. and Emily Margaret (Eagleton) 
Tongue. Married to Maud Agnes Shannon, 
January 2, 1909. Eeceived his early educa- 
tion in public schools of Hillsboro, Ore., later 



sity, with degree of B. L., 1900; Law Depart- 
ment of Columbian University, now George 
Washington University, with degree of LL. B., 
1903. Admitted to bar at Salem, Oregon, Oc- 
tober 7, 1903. Chairman Washington County 




attending Pacific University at Forest Grove 
and the University of Oregon at Eugene. Ad 
mitted to the bar at ;Salem, Ore., November 
27, 1897, and became a member of the law 
firm of Thos. H. & E. B. Tongue, which con- 
tinued until the death of Thos. H. Tongue, 
January 11, 1903. Elected Prosecuting Attor- 
ney for the Fifth Judicial District, comprising 
the counties of Clatsop, Columbia, Clackamas 
and Washington, in June, 1908. Member of 
the State Eepublican Central Committee, 1906- 
1908. Member of A. F. & A. M., B. P. O. E., 
K. P., and Portland Hunt Club. Eepublican. 

THOMAS H. TONGUE, JR. 

Eesidence, corner Seventh and Main streets; 
office, Bailey-Shute block, Hillsboro, Oregon. 
Born in Hillsboro, Oregon, July 21, 1879. Son 
of Thomas H. and Margaret Emily (Eagleton) 
Tongue. Married to Irene Cadwell, June 6, 
1907. Graduated from Hillsboro public school; 
Tualatin Academy in 1896; Pacific Univer- 




Eepublican Central Committee, 1906-1908; Ee- 
publican State C'ommitteeman from Washing- 
ton County since 1908. Member Masonic or- 
der and Phi Delta Phi; member Univers'ty 
Club and M. A. A. C., Portland, Oregon. Ee- 
publican. 

GEORGE P. TOPPING. 

Eesidence, Bandon Oregon; office, same. 
Born August 15, 1871, at Williams, Josephine 
County, Oregon. Son of Oscar F. and Ellen 
E. (Powell) Topping. Married September 21, 
1898, to Amy Wilkins. Attended country 
schools and later the high school at Grants 
Pass, Oregon. Took private business course 
and read law in private office. Admitted to 
the bar of Oregon in 1897. Was Eepresenta- 
tive from Coos County to Legislature in 1898 
and 1899. Member of Masonic and K. of P. 
fraternities. Eepublican. 

LEE MOXOM TRAVIS. 

Eesidence, 477 Olive street; office Eugene 
Loan & Savings Bank building, Eugene, Ore- 
gon. Born at Howard, Steuben County, Nw 
York, June 20, 1874. Son of Eev. Gould J. 
and Ella (Ford) Travis. Married to Miss 
Lillian E. Baker at Tillamook, Oregon, July 
4, 1903. Came to Eugene, Oregon, in 1889, 
taking a full course at the University of Ore- 
gon, and graduating with the degree of A. B. 
in 1897, and taking his law education at the 
University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, Mich- 
igan, with the class of 1900. Admitted to the 
Oregon bar at Salem, Oregon, in 1899. A 



236 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



past member of the Oregon National Guard, 
serving in the Philippine Islands with Com 
pany C, Second Oregon Volunteers, and being 
honorably discharged from the same. A dele- 
gate from Oregon to the Democratic National 




Convention at Denver, Colo., and representel 
the State of Oregon on the Notification Com 
mittee in the campaign of 1908. Adjutant of 
Hawthorne Camp of Spanish War Veterans; 
past member Masonic, B. P. O. E., Woodmen 
and Eagles fraternities, and the Commercial 
Club of Eugene. 

WALLACE G. TRILL. 

Eeside nee and 
office, Joseph, Ore- 
gon. Born Febru- 
ary 9,1880, in Kent 
County, Michigan. 
Son of Thomas 
and Melinda 
(Cooper) Trill. 
Married May 31, 
1909, to Augusta 
C. Booth. Educa- 
tion received in 
com m o n schools; 
two years at Y. M. 
C. A. night school; 
at the Willamette 
Law School, from 
which he graduat- 
ed in 1908 with 
LL. B. degree, and 

from College of Oratory, Willamette Univer- 
sity, from which he graduated in 1908 with 
O. B. degree. Admitted to the bar at Salem 
May 27, 1908. Located at Joseph, Wallowa 
County, Oregon, in June, 1909. Elected City 
Attorney of that place in October of the same 




year. Served as volunteer in Oregon Volun 
teer Light Battery B; mustered out October 
15, 1898. Member Republican Club of Salem, 
Oregon; Secretary of Joseph Commercial 
Club; member Masonic order. Republican. 

GEORGE W. TREFREN. 

Residence, Ashland, Oregon; office, same. 
Born September 16, 1852, at Milton, New 
Hampshire. Son of Luther D. and Louisa A. 
(Ricker) Trefren. Married in 1880 to Mary 
F. Jones. Early education received at the 
common schools of his native srate. Studied 
law in office of Henry Nunn at Grand Island, 
Nebraska, and was admitted to the bar of 
Nebraska in 1879, and practiced at Grand 
Island, that state, until 1882, when he re- 
moved to Broken Bow, Nebraska, and prac- 
ticed for ten years, during which time he was 
Deputy Clerk of the District Court for four 
years, and Special Agen.t and Clerk of Land 
Office for one year. Came to Oregon in 1892. 
Member I. O. O. F. fraternity; member Ash- 
land Commercial Club. Independent. 

GEORGE E. TROWBRIDGE. 

Residence 324 Thirteenth street; office, 411 
Beck building, Portland. Born in Welling- 
ton, Kansas, December 19, 1881. Son of Sam 
and Harriet Addie (Evans) Trowbridge. At- 
tended Pennington Seminary, Pennington, 
N. J., graduating in 1900; Princeton Univer- 
sity from 1900 to 1903. Entered Georgetown 
Law School, Washington, D. C., in 1905, grad- 
uating in 1908 with degree of LL. B. Came 
to Oregon in December, 1908, and admitted to 
bar of Oregon June, 1909. In August, 1908, 
appointed Law Examiner in United States 
Forest Service, coming to Portland in De- 
cember, 1908, as assistant in District Law 
Office in Forest Service, which position con- 
tinues to date. Member Delta Chi legal fra- 
ternity. Republican. 

FRANK A. TURNER. 

Reside n ce, Sa- 
lem, Oregon; of- 
fice, U. S. Bank 
building. Born Oc 
tober 13, 1854, in 
Iroquois Cou n t y. 
Illinois. Son of 
Clement and Sarah 
J. (Baker) Turner. 
Married Februarv 
20, 1883, to Iva F. 
Inman. Educa ted 
at the common 
schools of Illinois 
and at Cornell Col- 
lege, Mount Ver- 
non, Iowa. Attend- 
ed the Willamette 
University, at Sa- 
lem, from 1896 to 

1898, from which institution he graduated 
with degree of LL. B. Admitted to the bar 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



237 



of Oregon in 1898. Commenced the practice 
of law alone in Salem, until 1904, when ho 
formed partnership with C. M. Inman, under 
firm name of Turner & Inman. This was dis- 
solved in 1906, since which time has prac- 
ticed alone. Was Clerk of the Court, O'Brien 
County, Iowa, from 1882 to 1889; Deputy 
County Clerk of Marion County, Oregon, from 
1896 to 1897; appointed Supreme Court Ee- 
porter August 4, 1908. Member Masonic in- 
stitution; Illihee Club of Salem. Eepublican. 

ROBERT TUCKER. 

Residence, 265 Fourteenth street; office, 
306-307 Fenton building, Portland. Born Sep- 
tember 5, 1866, at Milwood, Knox County, 
Ohio. Son of John and Eose B. (Welker) 
Tucker. Married December 27, 1893, to Ger- 
trude E. Wynn. Attended Buchtel College 
at Akron, Ohio, from which he graduated in 
1891 with Ph. B. degree. Legal training re- 
ceived at the Law Department of the Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati, Ohio, from which he 
graduated in June, 1893, with LL. B. degree. 
Admitted to the bar of Ohio in June, 1893. 
Practiced in Ohio until coming to Oregon in 
1906. Was admitted to the bar of this state 
October 12, 1909. Assistant United States 
District Attorney for Ohio in 1900-1905. 
Member M. A. A. C. and Commercial Club. 
Eepublican. 

GLENN E. UNRUH. 

' Eesidence, 1509 
Fifth street; of- 
fice, Capital Na- 
tional Bank build- 
ing, Salem, Ore- 
gon. Born Octo- 
ber 15, 1884, near 
Dayton, Ore g o n. 
Son of Clayton 
and Mary Cath- 
e r i n e (Coovert) 
Unruh. Attended 
public schools in 
Yam hill County, 
Oregon; Willam- 
ette University, 
Salem, Ore, from 
which he graduat- 
ed with degree of 
B. A. in 1909, 'and 
in the same year graduating from the Law 
Department of that institution with degree of 
LL. B. Admitted to the bar of the State of 
Oregon at Salem, in 1909, and commenced the 
practice of his profession, which continues to 
date. Republican. 

WILLIAM SIMON U'REN. 

Eesidence, 615 Fifth street; office, Oregon 
City Bank building, Oregon City, Oregon. 
Born January 10, 1859, in Lancaster, Wiscon- 
sin. Son of William Eichard and Frances 
Jane (Ivey) U'Ren. Married March 6, 1901, 
to Mary Beharrell. Educated at the public 




schools of Nevadaville, Central City, Black- 
hawk, Colorado, until 1868, then at Cheyenne, 
Wyoming, at Plum Creek, Nebraska, and at 
Lancaster, Wisconsin. Attended Denver Busi- 
ness College, Denver, Colorado, in the even- 
ing during the winters of 1878 and 1879. Ad- 
mitted to the bar of Colorado at Denver in 
January, 1881. Came to Oregon in 1889. Was 
elected to Legislature from Clackamas County, 
Oregon, in June, 1896. Formed partnership 
with C. Schuebel in January, 1901. Member 
American Political Science Association, of 
Oregon City Commercial Club, of National 
Municipal League. Republican. 

JAMES MONROE UPTON. 

Eesidence 
Marshfi eld, Ore- 
gon; office Lock- 
hart building. 
Born in Shasta, 
Shasta County,, 
Gal., January 27, 

1863. Son of 
Jonas H. and 
Cloey M. (Mitch- 
ell) Upton. Mar- 
ried to Elleanor 
Augusta Eeed, 
August 28, 1898. 
Came to Oregon in 

1864. Admitted to 
the Oregon State 
bar in 1893, and 
United States Cir- 
cuit and District 

Member Masonic, K. of P., Artisan, 
Democrat. 




Courts. 
W. 0. W. 



fraternities. 



JAY H. UPTON. 



Eeside nee, 246 
East Thirty-second 
street; office, 735 
Chamber of Com- 
merce buil ding, 
Por 1 1 a n d. Born 
April 28, 1879, in 
Colfax, Washing- 
ton. Son of James 
B. and Anna 
Ama n d a (Shaw) 
Upton. Married to 
Maude J. Cannon 
on April 28, 1909. 
Att ended Port- 
land High School 
and gr a d u a t e d 
from same, 1898. 
Later at t e n d e d 
Law Department 

of the University of Oregon, and graduated 
with degree of LL. B., May, 1902. Admitted 
to the bar at Salem, June 3, 1902; United 
States Circuit and District Courts, May 17, 
1906. Continues in the active practice of his 
profession to date. Member of the B. P. 
O. E., F. O. E., United Spanish War Veterans, 




238 



BIOGRAPHICAL 




Royal Arcanum. Served in Company H, Sec- 
ond Oregon United States Volunteers, in the 
Spanish-American War. Republican. 

ROBERT JARVIS UPTON. 

Residence, 

Mount a i n boule- 
vard; office, Fen- 
ton building, Port- 
land. Born May 
19, 1882, in Cam- 
den County, North 
Carolina. Son of 
John and Caroline 
(Tarvis) Upton. 
Atte n d e d public 
schools in Cam- 
den, North Caro- 
1 i n a, and the 
gram mar schools 
and high school in 
Norfolk, Virginia. 
After leaving high 
school at Norfolk, 
Virginia, took 

academic course at the University of Virginia 
and also law course at the same institution, 
graduating in June, 1905, with degree B. L. 
Admitted to the bar of Virginia in January, 
1905. Came to Oregon in August of that 
year, and was admitted on certificate to this 
state in January, 1906. Member University 
Clu'b. 

EDWARD STRONG VAN DYKE. 

Residence and office Grants Pass, Oregon. 
Born in Wabasha, Minnesota, July 10, 1879. 
Son of Frederick William and Minnie (Corn- 
stock) Van Dyke. Attended the public and 
high schools of Grants Pass, Oregon. Grad- 
uated in 1896; graduated in 1901 with the de- 
gree of A. B. from the State University of 
Oregon. 'Studied law in the office of Robert 
G. Smith, at Grants Pass, until his admission 
to the bar in June, 1906, then opening an of- 
fice in Grants Pass, Oregon, where he follows 
his profession to date. Member of the A. F. 
& A. M., and the Grants Pass Commercial 
Club. Appointed Deputy District Attorney 
in 1904, serving for five years; Clerk of the 
Board of Education of School District No. 7. 
Republican. 

ASHLEY JOSEPH VANTINE. 
Residence, 801 Hood street; office, 520 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born December 22, 1868, at Idaho City, Idaho. 
Son of William David and Caroline ('Cos- 
grove) Vantine. Removed to Oregon at the 
age of three years, with his parents. Re- 
ceived his early education at the public 
schools of Portland until 1883. Attended the 
Michigan Military Academy from 1885 to 
1886, and the University of Michigan from 
1886 to 1889; the Harvard University in 1889 
and 1890, and the Law Department of the 
University of Oregon in 1892 and 1893. Ad- 



mitted to the bar by the Supreme Court of 
Oregon in 1893. Commenced the practice of 
law in Portland, which continues to date. 
Member of Arlington Club, University Club 
and Waverly Golf lub. Republican. " 

ISAAC HOMER VAN WINKLE. 

Residence, 1495 Chemeketa street; office, 
Statehouse, Salem, Oregon. Born December 
3, 1870, in Linn County, Oregon. Son of 
Isaac Newton and Elizabeth A. (Pearl) Van 
Winkle. Married September 3, 1902, to Leila 
V. Parrish. Educated at the public schools 
of Linn County, Oregon, at Willamette Uni- 
versity, and at Willamette University Law 
School, from which he graduated in 1901 with 
LL. B. degree. Admitted to the bar at Salem 
in 1901 and commenced the practice of law 
at Salem in association with Carson & Ad- 
ams, remaining with them about 18 months, 
when he was appointed Assistant Attorney- 
General of Oregon on February 1, 1904, which 
position he fills to date. Member W. O. W. 
fraternity. Republican. 

JOHN VAN ZANTE. 

Residence, 1093 
Vaughn street; of- 
fice. Spa u 1 d i n g 
building, Portland. 
Born January 1, 
1866, at Pella, la. 
Son of Jacob and 
Maria (Van Zee) 
Van Zante. Mar 
ried November 28, 
1898, to Rachel 
Van Dons e 1 a a r. 
Attended rural 
schools in Iowa 
until 1887, mov- 
ing to Portland in 
1888. In 1892 en- 
tered Por 1 1 a n d 
Univer s i t y for 
a term of three 

years. Entered University of Oregon Law 
School, graduating in June, 1897, with degree 
of LL. B. Admitted to the bar at Salem in 
June, 1897, in which year he entered the of- 
fice of C. A. Moore, of Portland, pursuing a 
general practice unt : l the fall of 1901, when 
he formed partnership with J. J. Johnson, 
which continues to date. Appointed Munici- 
pal Judge under Mayor Lane, serving one 
year. Member W. O. W. and United Artisans 
fraternities. Democrat. 

WILLIAM T. VAUGHN. 

Residence, 357 Dekum avenue; office 618 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born April 12, 1861, at Osage, Illinois. Son 
of William and Elizabeth (Price) Vaughn. 
Married August 15, 1888, to Viola Deason. 
Educated in the public schools in Illinois to 
1877; at the Benton High School in 1879; at 
the Ewing College from 1880 to 1882. At- 




239 



tended the law school at Bloomington, Illinois, 
for one year, and was admitted to the bar of 
the State of Illinois in 1892, where he prac 
ticed his profession in El Paso, Illinois, until 
1894, associated with D. H. Moulde, after 
which time he practiced alone at Pinckney- 
ville, Illinois, till he came to Portland, in 
1899. Admitted to the bar of Oregon in 1900. 
Democrat. 

WILLIAM IRA VAWTER. 

Residence and office, Medford, Oregon. 
Born in Linn County, Oregon, March 24, 1863. 
Son of Cyrus and Sarah A. (Finley) Vawter. 
Married to Etta M. Hill, February 10, 1889. 
Attended public schools at Halsey, Oregon; 
later Philomath Academy, at Philomath, Ore 
gon. Graduated from Oregon University, at 
Eugene, in 1886, with degree of A. B., and 
five years later received degree of A. M. Ad 
mitted to Oregon bar in 1892. Mayor of Med 
ford, 1905; member Legislature, 1905 to 1907; 
member of Masonic and I. O. O. F. fraterni- 
ties; President Jackson County Bank, of Med- 
ford. Republican. 

ARTHUR LYLE VEAZIE. 

Residence, 695 Hoyt street; office Corbett 
building, Portland, Oregon. Born at Dallas, 
Polk County, Oregon, September 8, 1868. Son 
of Edmund F. and Harriet (Lyle) Veazie. 
Married to Agnes M. 'Greene, October 18, 1898. 
Attended LaCreole Academy, Dallas, Oregon, 
and Portland Business College. Graduated 
from University of Oregon in 1890; afterward 
received degrees A. M. and LL. B. Admitted 
to the Oregon bar, 1893. Practiced as mem- 
ber of firm of Davis, Gantenbein & Veazie 
from 1893 to 1899; as member of Gantenbein 
& Veazie from 1899 to 1906, and in 1900 
formed partnership with J. C. Veazie, which 
continues to date. Republican. 

J. C. VEAZIE. 

Residence, 745 Overton street; office 610-12 
Corbett building, Portland. Born July 30. 
1871, at Dallas, Oregon. Son of Edmund Ful- 
ler and Harriet (Lyle) Veazie. Married Oc- 
tober 20, 1903, to Minnie F. Cole. Educated 
at La'Creole Academy, Dallas, Oregon; at the 
University of Oregon, graduating with the 
degree of A. B. in 1891. Later studied law 
at the University of Oregon Law School and 
at Harvard. Also read law in the offices of 
Cox, Cotton, Teal & Minor. Admitted to 
practice by the Supreme Court of Oregon in 
October, 1895. Was employed by'Cox, Cotton, 
Teal & Minor, and by L. B. Cox before com- 
mencing practice for himself. In April, 1901, 
formed partnership with F. F. Freeman, un- 
der the firm name Veazie & Freeman, which 
continued until July 1, 1906, when he formed 
partnership with his brother, Arthur L. Vea- 
zie, under the firm name Veazie & Veazie, 
which continues to date. Member M. A. A. C. 
and Historical Society of Oregon. Republi- 
can. 



THADDEUS WHITNEY VREELAND. 

Reside nee, 210 
Graham avenue; 
office, 701-704 
Chamber of Com- 
merce bui 1 d i n g, 
Por 1 1 a n d. Born 
January 6, 1866, 
in Wayne County, 
Michigan. Son of 
Michael James 
and Mary Helen 
(Stofflet) Vree- 
land. Married 
June 29, 1899, to 
Johanna Jantzen. 
Atte n d e d public 
schools in Wayne 
County, Michigan. 
Came to Oregon 
in 1889, and at- 
tended the Law Department of the University 
of Oregon, graduating in 1893 with LL. B. 
degree. Admitted to the bar at Salem in 
1893. Commenced the practice of law in 
Portland alone, and continues to date. Jus- 
tice of the Peace (East Portland District) 
1898-1902. Appointed Deputy District Attor- 
ney July, 1908, and continues to date. Mem- 
ber National Guard of Michigan, 1886-1889. 
Member Masonic and I. O. O. F. fraternities. 
Republican. 

WILLIAM THOMAS VINTON. 

Residence and office, McMinnville, Oregon. 
Born in Fond Du Lac, Wisconsin, June 16, 
1865. Son of John C. and Harriet (Collier) 





Vinton. Came to Oregon in October, 1888. 
Married to Minnie May Wood, January 3, 
1892. Attended public school at Empire, Wis- 



240 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



consin, 1873-74; public schools, Valley Farm, 
la., 1874-1882; normil school at Columbus 
Junction, Iowa, 1882-83; graduated from 
Lenox College, Hopk'nton, Iowa, 1888, with 
degree of A. B. Admitted to the bar at 
Salem, Oregon, September, 1892. Practiced 
law alone at McMinnville, Oregon, 1893 to 
1898, at which time partnership was formed 
with Oliver H. Irvine and Tames McCain. In 
1899 the firm was changed to Irvine & Vinton, 
and in 1901 to McCain & Vinton, which part- 
nership exists to date. Kecorder of McMinn- 
ville, Oregon, 1892-94; Deputy District Attor- 
ney for Yamhill County; City Attorney of Mc- 
Minnville. Member of Kono Club, McMinn- 
ville, Oregon; Masonic, K. of P. and B. P. 
O. E. fraternities, and Republican Club, of 
Portland. Republican. 

CECIL ROY WADE. 

Residence, Bandon, Oregon; office, Bank 
building. Born November 8, 1880, at Pat- 
tonsburg, Davis Count v. Missouri. Son of 
Elza T. and Manta (Hall) Wade. Came to 
Oregon with his parents at the age of five 




years, and received his early education at 
Pendleton Academy, graduating in 1899; at 
Whitman College, Walla Walla, Washington, 
graduating in 1903 with degree A. B. Read 
law in Pendleton until his admission to the 
bar in November, 1905. Began the active 
practice of his profession alone, at Bandon, in 
1906, and has continued to date. Member 
last State Democratic Convention. Candidate 
for Legislature for Umatilla County, 1906. 
Completing third term for City Recorder and 
Attorney, City of Bandon. Member Masonic 
and K. of P. fraternities. Democrat. 



FRANCIS WILLIAM WALDEN. 

Residence, 1041 Belmont street; office 403 
Corbett building, Portland, Oregon. Born 
January 10, 1870, in London, Ontario, 
Canada. Son of Francis and Adelia (Hutt) 
Walden. Received his education in the pub- 
lie schools of Canada. Admitted to the 
bar in San Francisco, California, June 13, 
1900. Practiced law seven years in S-in 
Francisco, California, and San Luis Obispo, 
California. Moved to Oregon June 27, 1907, 
and was admitted to the bar in Portland, 
Oregon, 1907. Continues the practice of his 
profession to date. Republican. 

JOHN MILTON WALL. 
Residence and office, Hillsboro. Born 
August 24, 1868, in Wales. Son of James 
and Jane (Biggs) Wall. Came to Oregon in 
May, 1890. Married to Alta L. Lamkin June 
25, 1902. Received his early education in 
private school in England. Read law in of- 
fice of S. B. Huston, of Hillsboro, Oregon. 
Admitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, in 
May, 1896. Remained in office of S. B. 
Huston until 1900, since which time lias prac- 
ticed alone in Hillsboro. Served as Deputy 
District Attorney. Member of State Demo- 
cratic Central Committee and Chairman of 
County Committee. Member of K. of P. 
and Elks. Democrat. 

WINFIELD SCOTT WARD. 

Residence, 290 Fourteenth street; office, 
210 Alisky building, Portland. Born April 
20, 1854, in Washington County, Rhode 
Island. Son of John Perry and Drusilla 
Mallard (Holberton) Ward.. Married July 6, 
1875, to Mel eta Esther Barnes. Educate! 
in the "Red School Houses" of Rhode 
Island and Connecticut up to 1868 when he 
removed to Portland, Oregon. Received his 
Oregon education at the Portland Academy 
and Female Seminary. On October 1, 1871, 
entered the fre : ght and passenger depart 
ment of the Oregon and California Railway 
Company. In 1896 he graduated from tho 
Law Department of the University of Ore- 
gon and was admitted to the bar at Salem. 
He practices his profession to date. Member 
of Masonic, W. O. W. fraternities. Republi 
can. 

GEORGE WATKINS. 

Residence and office, Marshfield, Oregon. 
Born at Dayton, Ohio. Son of Perry and 
Elizabeth (Evans) Watkins. Married April, 
1889, to Maud Baker. Educated at the com- 
mon schools. Studied law in the office of 
A. H. Gates, at The Dalles, Oregon, having 
come here in 1862. Admitted to the bar of 
Oregon in January, 1880. Formed partner- 
ship with A. S. Bennett and practiced at The 
Dalles, until Mr. Bennett was appointed Cir- 
cuit Judge, when he formed a partnership 
with Judge J. H. Bird. Later was in partner- 
ship with E. B. Dufur. Moved to Spokane 
in 1892, returning in 1902, and locating at 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



241 




Marshfield, where he has since practiced. 
Elected Senator from Wasco County in 1888. 
Republican. 

EDWARD BYERS WATSON. 

Residence, 371 
M a d i s on street; 
office, 308 Commer- 
cial block, Port- 
land. Born at Gar- 
naville, Iowa. Son 
of James and Em- 
ily Adams Watson. 
Received his early 
education from his 
parents and at dis- 
trict schools, later 
attending the Wil- 
bur Academy, 
D o u g las County, 
Oregon, and grad- 
uating from the 
Pacific University 
at Forest Grove, 
with degree of B. 

A., in June, 1866. He then read law under his 
older brother, James Finley Watson, at Rose- 
burg, and was admitted to the bar of this 
state in 1868. After his admission he set- 
tled in Jacksonville and commenced the prac- 
tice of his profession and remained there 
until the fall of 1884, when he removed to 
Portland and engaged in the practice of law, 
and continues to date. Was County Judge 
and County Clerk, Jackson County, and was 
elected Judge of the Supreme 'Court of Ore- 
gon in 1880, serving one term. In January, 
1893, he entered into partnership, James Fin- 
ley Watson and B. B. Beekman, which 
continued until his brother's decease in 1897, 
under the firm name Watson, Beekman & 
Watson; has remained associated with Mr. 
Beekman in the practice ever since, under the 
firm name of Watson & Beekman. Republi- 
can. 

MARTIN WRIGHT WATROUS. 

Residence, 703 Irving street; office, 507-8 
Henry building, Portland. Born December 
21, 1872, at Bay City, Michigan. Son of 
Ohauncy Lovelace and Mary (Wright) Wat- 
rous. Early education received in the public 
schools of Michigan and Minnesota, gradu- 
ating from the high school at Duluth, Minne- 
sota, in 1889. Attended the University of 
Minnesota. Entered Harvard Law School in 
1891. Admitted to 'the bar of Minnesota in 
1894 and practiced in Duluth, Minnesota, 
before State and Federal Courts, until he 
came to the Pacific Coast in 1898. Was four 
years in Alaska. Admitted to the bar of the 
State of Washington in 1904. Came to Ore- 
gon in 1907 and was admitted to the bar of 
this state in 1907. Has practiced continu- 
ously since at Portland. Membe-r Chi Psi 
fraternity. Republican. 



HOMER ISHMAEL WATTS. 

Residence, Athenaj office, Garden building. 
Born January 1, 1879, at Athena, Oregon. 
Son of Thomas Johnson and Lizzie (Naylor) 
Watts. Married October 7, 1905, to Jennie 
Josephine Gaines. Early education received 




at the common schools of Umatilla County 
and at the Weston and Athena public schools 
until 1893; at the Weston Normal School from 
1893 to 1895; at Monmouth Normal School, 
Monmouth, Or., 1896 to 1897, graduating June, 
1907; at Throop Polytechnic Institute, Pasa- 
dena, California, from 1897 to 1899, gradu- 
ating with C. E. degree. Attended Univer- 
sity of Oregon 1900 to 1903, and graduated 
with A. B. degree; Harvard University 1904 
to 1907, graduating from the Law Depart- 
ment with LL. B. degree. Admitted to the 
bar at Pendleton in October, 1907. Republi- 
can. 

JESSE GRANT WELLS. 

Residence, 1180 Stewart avenue; office, 
481 Willamette street, Eugene, Oregon. Born 
near Rockford, Illinois, September 25, 1867. 
Son of Jesse and Lavina (Everett) Wells. 
Married to Emma A. Kruse, June 17, 1891. 
Attended common and high schools of Peca- 
tonica, Illinois, and later Northwestern Uni- 
versity and Northwestern University School 
of Law. Admitted to bar of Illinois at Chi- 
cago March 26, 1894. Came to Oregon in 
1903 and admitted to Oregon State bar De- 
cember 17, 1903. Then opened an office 
where he practices to date. Republican. 

HENRY STEPHEN WESTBROOK. 

Residence, 614 East Ash street; office, 605 
to 607 Buchanan building, Portland. Born 
May 22, 1876, at Benton, Arkansas. Son of 



242 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Milton Pierce and Cynthia (Anderson) West- 
brook. Married January 22, 1898, to Lena 
Byrd. Educated at the common county 
schools. Taught school for two years, after 
which he attended Benton High School, and 
later entered the University of Arkansas at 
Fayetteville, Arkansas; before graduation, 
transferred from there to the Law Depart- 
ment of University of Arkansas, at Little 
Rock, Arkansas, from which he graduated 
June, 1897, with the degree of LL. B. and 
was admitted to the bar of that state. In 
April, 1900, moved to Oregon and was ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, in 1906. 
From 1897 to 1898 he was First Lieutenant 
of "Tomlinson Rifles" of the Arkansas State 
Guard. He was appointed by President Mc- 
Kinley, Postmaster at Benton, Oregon, in 
1897, which post he held for two years. Re- 
publican. 

JAMES W. WESTBROOK. 
Residence, 1 East Sixteenth street; office, 
606 Buchanan building, Portland. Born June 
26, 1868. Son of Bartley A. and Casandr'a 
(Carter) Westbrook. Married December 29, 
1897, to Minnie M. Bell. Admitted to the 
bar at Benton, Arkansas, in February, 1893, 
to Circuit Courts; Supreme Court at Little 
Rock, Arkansas, in 1901. Came to Oregon in 
1908 and was admitted to the Supreme Court 
of this state in that year. Was Judge of 
the Probate Court, Saline County, Arkans:i<. 
from 1894 to 1898. Democrat. 

RUSSELL GEORGE WHEELER. 





Residence and office, Vale, Oregon. Born 
in Erie County, Pennsylvania, June 1, 1847. 
Son of Christopher Van de Vanter and 
Emily (Weaver) Wheeler. Married to Anna 
M. Neal July 8, 1878. Received his early 
education in Erie County, Pennsylvania, later 



attending Hiram College, Ohio, of which in- 
stitution James A. Garfield was then Presi- 
dent. Studied law with his uncle, E. G. 
Wheeler, who was law partner of Stephen A. 
Douglas. Admitted to the Supreme Court of 
Pennsylvania August 8, 1868. Moved to 
Aurora, Illinois, and commenced the practice 
of law 1869, continuing to 1871. Practiced 
in Bedford County, Iowa, 1871 to 1882; Para- 
dise, Nevada, 1882 to 1890. Came to Vale, 
Oregon, March 27, 1891, continuing his prac- 
tice to date. Ex-Mayor of Vale. Republican. 

ALFRED E. WHEELOCK. 

Residence, 185 
Failing street; of- 
fice. 783 Marquam 
building, Portland. 
Born March 6, 
1882, in Vancou- 
ver, Wash. Son of 
(' h a r 1 es Edward 
and Ella A. 
(Sparks) Wheel- 
ock. Married Aug- 
ust 1st, 1909, to 
Eleanor M. Clint. 
Educated in Van- 
couver, Wash., and 
Lafayette, Oregon, 
public schools and 
later the h ig h 
school of the lat- 
ter city. Attended 

the Monmouth State Normal School and grad- 
uated with degree of A. B. in June, 1905. 
Later attended University of Oregon, L;i\v 
Department, graduating from same with de- 
gree of LL. B. in June, 1907. Moved to Ore- 
gon in 1895, and was admitted to the bar of 
this state in June, 1907. Entered law prac- 
tice October 1, 1907, in partnership with Ed- 
ward D. Williams, which partnership exists 
at the present date. Republican. 

CLARENCE M. WHITE. 
Residence, .">n '> 
Twelfth street; of- 
fice, 416 Commer- 
cial Club building. 
Portland. Born in 
York, Nebraska, 
May 23, 1879. Son 
of James D. ami 
S i r e n a (Broad- 
well) White. 
Graduated from 
the high school, 
York, Nebraska, 
1895. Attended 
York Coll ege, 
1895-96. Graduate 
University of 
Michigan, degree 
LL. B., 1903. Ad- 
mitted to Michi- 
gan State bar June 16, 1903; Nebraska State 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



243 




bar September 21, 1903. Game to Oregon in 
April, 1905, and admitted to Oregon bar May, 
1905, and commenced the practice of his pro- 
fessioa in this state in lone, Oregon. Asso- 
ciated with the firm of Farrington & Farring- 
ton in Portland from 1909 to date. Republi- 
can. 

SAMUEL WHITE. 

Residence, 610 
Weidler street; of- 
fice, 511 Fenton 
building 1 , Portland. 
Born September 
15, i860, at Griffin, 
Georgia. Son of 
John Haywood 
and Jane Rebecca 
(J o h nstone) 
White. Married 
February 17, 1896, 
to Frances Eliza- 
beth Brown, 
daughter of A. H. 
Brown, State 
Treasurer of Ore- 
gon from 1874 to 
1878. Removed to 
Oregon in 1885. 

Received his early education in the common 
schools at Griffin, Georgia; attended board- 
ing school at Kirkwood, Georgia; Mercer 
University, Macon, Georgia; University of 
Tennessee at Knoxvillo, Tennessee, and 
studied law in the State Library at Atlanta, 
Georgia. W>as admitted to the bar at Zebu- 
Ian, Georgia, October 6, 1881, and practiced 
law at Atlanta, Georgia, until November, 
1884. After his arrival in Oregon in 1885 he 
practiced at Grants Pass for two years, at 
Pendleton for two years, at Baker City for 
twenty years. January 1, 1910, formed a 
partnership with John Manning, of Portland, 
which continues to date. Was City Attorney 
of Pendleton, District Attorney of the Eighth 
Judicial District for six years, Circuit Judge 
for two years, by appointment of Governor 
Chamberlain. Assistant Adjutant-General on 
staff of Brigadier-General J. M. Siglin 
March, 1887 to May, 1889. Captain Company 
A, Third Infantry, 0. N. G., April, 1901, to 
January, 1910. Appointed on General's staff, 
O. N. G., February, 1909; appointed Judge 
Advocate General, O. N. G., with rank of 
Colonel, January, 1910. Chairman Democratic 
State Central Committee 1901 to 1904. Mem- 
ber of B. P. O. E., I. O. 0. F. and W. 0. W. 
fraternities. Democrat. 

WILLIAM E. WHITE. 

Residence and office, Baker City. Born 
December 3, 1861, at London, England. Son 
of William and Bessie (Worn) White. Was 
admitted to the bar at Provo, Utah, while 
that state was still a territory. When Utah 
became a state he was admitted to the Su- 
preme Court of the state. Came to Oregon 
in 1905 and was admitted to the bar of this 



state in 1906. Certificate issued by the Su- 
preme Court in May, 1909. Democrat. 

FREDERICK KURD WHITFIELD. 

Residence, Alameda avenue, Rose City Park; 
office, 310-314 Fenton building, Portland. 
Born March 26, 1870, in Lowell, Kent County, 
"Michigan. Son of Nathaniel C. and Julia 
(Wood) Whitfield. Married September 17, 
1895, to Alice Fowler. Graduated from Grand 
Rapids, Michigan, High School June, 1888, 
and the Capital City Commercial College, Des 
Moines, Iowa, June, 1891. Studied law in the 
office of S. E. Wilson, of Hot Springs, South 
Dakota, 1892 and 1893; in the office of W. O. 
Temple, Rapid City, South Dakota, 1893, and 




of the Hon. J. W. Fowler, Rapid City, South 
Dakota, 1893. Entered into partnership with 
the Hon. J. W. Fowler, Rapid City, South 
Dakota, and Hot Springs, South Dakota, in 
1895 and terminated that partnership in 1902. 
Admitted by the Circuit Court, Rapid City, 
South Dakota, March 23, 1893; the Supreme 
Court, South Dakota, March 8, 1899; the 
United States District Court, South Dakota, 
September 12, 1899; the Circuit Court of 
United States, of South Dakota, same date. 
Department of Interior November 22, 1904. 
Supreme Court of Oregon September 12, 1906. 
District and Circuit Courts of United States 
for Oregon June 8, 1906, and the Supreme 
Court of United States March 16, 1908. 
Partnership with C. H. Farrington 1906-1908. 
Alone April, 1908, to August 1, 1909. Part- 
nership with Ralph A. Coan August 1, 1909, to 
date. Served as private and Corporal Company 
M, South Dakota National Guard, 1899. Elected 
County Judge, Pennington County, South T)a- 
kato, 1905. Elected Alderman Rapid City, 
South Dakota, 1900. Moved to Oregon 



244 



BIOGRAPHICAL 




January 1, 1906, since which date he has 
practiced his profession alone. Member of 
Portland Commercial Club, Oregon State Bar 
Association, Multnomah Bar Association and 
the Commerc : al Law League of America. Re- 
publican. 

RALPH WILLIAM WILBUR. 

Residence, 780 
Love joy street; 
office, Board of 
Trade building, 
Portland. Born 
March 30, 1869, at 
Jericho, Vermont. 
Son of Lafayette 
and Mercy Jane 
(Morse) Wilbur. 
Married Alice 
Heustis June 26th, 
1894. Educated at 
the Burling ton 
High School, Bur- 
lington, Vermont, 
from which insti- 
tution he gradu- 
ated in 1886. En- 
tered the Univer- 
sity of Vermont with the class of 1890. 
Graduated from Boston University Law 
School, of Boston, in 1892 with degree LL. B., 
in which year he removed to Oregon. Was 
admitted to the bar of Vermont in 1892. The 
same year he was admitted to the bar of 
Oregon. He is now practicing under the firm 
name of Wilbur & Spencer in Portland. Their 
specialty is general corporation and insurance 
business. They are General Attorneys for 
the Claim Department of the Portland Rail 
way, Light & Power Company. Served twj 
enlistments in the Oregon National Guard of 
Portland. Member of Commercial Club, 
Portland Rowing Club, Multnomah Amateur 
Athletic Club and Irvington Club. Republi- 
can. 

MILTON O. WILKINS. 
Residence, 848 
Multnomah street; 
office, 326 Mohawk 
building, Portland. 
Born March 24th, 
1871, at Batesville, 
P a n o 1 a County, 
Mississippi. Moved 
to the State of 
Oregon in 1876 
and attended the 
State Agricultural 
College at Corval- 
lis, Oregon, but did 
not graduate, ow- 
ing to serious ill- 
ness in the last 
term of his senior 
year, 1891. Admit- 
ted to the bar in 
Oregon November 8, 1895. 




active practice of his profession at Eugene, 
Oregon, and remained there for a period 
of seven years. Was Official 'Court Re- 
porter of Second Judicial District under 
Hon. J. C. Fullerton. Located in Portland 
in 1902 and formed a partnership with F. S. 
Bennett, August, 1902, which continued until 
February 1, 1907, since which time he has 
practiced alone. He is a member of the W. O. 
W. (Past Consul Multnomah Camp, No. 77). 
Republican. 

JOHN JAMES WHITNEY. 

Residence, Albany, Oregon; office, same. 
Born in 1839 at Defiance, Ohio. Son of John 
and Ruth (Hutchinson) Whitney. Married 
on December 18, 1890, to Elizabeth Westlake. 
Attended common and high schools at Defi- 
ance, Ohio, graduating from same in 1863. 




Commenced the 



Same year entered Law School at Albany, 
New York, and graduated in 1864. Admitted 
to the bar of New York in that year. Came 
to Oregon in 1865 and was admitted to the 
bar of this state in 1867, since which time he 
has practiced his profession at Albany. In 
1876 formed partnership with L. H. Monta- 
gue and the same lasted about two years. In 
1887 formed partnership with N. M. New- 
port, the same existing about three years, 
since which he has practiced alone. Served 
two terms as District Attorney for Third 
Judicial District, one term as County Judge 
of Linn County, and four session as Legis- 
lator. Democrat. 

ARTHUR C. WILLIAMS. 

Residence, 1710 Second street; office, 
Adams and Depot streets, La Grande, Oregon. 
Born August 11, 1863, at Chester Hill, Ohio. 
Son of Thomas J. and Sarah (Todd) Wil- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



245 



Hams. Married December 1, 1897, to Kath- 
erine I. Kichardson. Educated at public 
schools of Chester Hill, Ohio, and at Blue 
Mountain University. Admitted to the bar 
at Salem October 3, 1888, and has practiced 
his profession at La Grande since that time. 
Ha;s been Clerk School District No. 1, La 
Grande, Oregon, for twenty years. Member 
National Guard for five years, Captain of 
Company L for one year. Justice of the 
Peace. Eepublican. 

EDWARD D. WILLIAMS. 

Residence, 330 Mill street; office, 733 Mar- 
quam building, Portland. Born April 6, 1871, 
in Albany, Linn County, Oregon. Son of 
Silas and Sarah (Short) Williams. Married 
July 15, 1896, to Parrie Williams. Educated 
in the public and high schools at Albany, 
Oregon. Attended the Law Department of 
the University of Oregon, graduating in May, 
1907, with the degree of LL. B. Was ad- 
mitted to the bar of Oregon in June, 1907. 
Commenced practicing law at Portland, Ore 
gon, in October, 1907, and has continued the 
same to date. Eepublican. 

EMMETT B. WILLIAMS. 

Residence, 381 East Twelfth street; office, 
northeast corner First and Stark streets, 
Portland. Born February 15, 1853, at Salem, 
Oregon. Son of Elijah and Lucia Loraiu 
(Bigelow) Williams. Married July 6, 1882, 
to Helen Paul. Received his education prin- 
cipally at the Willamette University, Salem, 
Oregon. Admitted to the bar of this state 
August 19, 1874, and commenced the practice 
of his profession at Salem, practicing there 
until 1876. In 1886 he formed partnership 
with his brother, Richard Williams, at Port- 
land, which partnership has continued to date. 
Republican. 

JOHN MONROE WILLIAMS. 

Residence, 90 West Ninth street; office, 13 
and 14 McClung building, Eugene, Oregon. 
Born February 14, 1861, in Jackson town- 
ship, Porter County, Indiana. Son of Aza- 
riah and Mary Jane (Williams) Williams. 
Attended the common schools of Indiana 
and Iowa, and the high school at Stuart, 
Iowa, the Northern Indiana Normal School 
at Valparaiso, Indiana. He taught school in 
the common schools of Indiana, Iowa, Kan- 
sas and Oregon for a period of ten years. He 
began the study of law in 1885, and in 
August of 1886 moved to the State of Ore- 
gon. During the time that he was teaching 
school he devoted all his spare time to the 
study of law. In 1891 he entered the office 
of A. E. Gallagher and pursued his studies 
there for a period of one year. Admitted to 
the bar at Salem, Oregon, October 5, 1892, 
when he opened an office at Eugene, Oregon, 
and began the practice of his profession by 
himself until December 1, 1906, when he 
formed a co-partnership with Louis E. Bean, 



under the firm name of Wiliams & Bean, 
which continues to date. On July 12, 1886, 
he married Miss Jennie M. Gwin. Entered 
the Oregon National Guard as private, being 
promoted to the grade of Second Lieutenant, 
then to First Lieutenant; elected Captain of 




Company C of the Fourth Regiment; com- 
missioned Lieutenant-Colonel of the same, 
and acting as Aide-de-camp on the Governor's 
staff. Served as Deputy District Attorney 
of Lane County, Oregon, from 1893 to 1895, 
and again from 1905 to 1907. Member of the 
City Council of the City of Eugene from 
1908 to 1910. Chief Probation Officer of 
Lane County from 1907 to 1909. Grand 
Patriarch of the I. O. 0. F. fraternity, and 
active member of the B. P. O. E., W. O. W., 
Maccabee, and Artisan fraternities. Repub- 
lican. 

FRED ALMOR WILLIAMS. 
Residence, Grants Pass, Oregon; office, 
same. Born at Neola, Iowa, on June 13, 
1877. Son of David and Flora (Armstrong) 
E. Williams. Married Helen Jane Woodford 
at Medford, Oregon, December 18, 1906. Re- 
ceived early education in country schools of 
Iowa, until twelve years old; attended high 
school and then finished the Woodbine Nor- 
mal School, a preparatory school, graduating 
1895. Entered the University of Iowa fall 
of 1895; received degree of Ph. B. from 
university the year of 1899, and completed 
law course at same institution in the year 
1900, receiving the degree of LL. B. Ad- 
mitted to practice law in Neola, Iowa, where 
he practiced until October, 1909, and then en- 
tered into partnership with George W. Colvig 
at Grants Pass, Oregon, for the practice of 
law. Member of the Masonic and B. P. O. E. 
fraternities. 



246 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



RICHABD WILLIAMS. 

Residence, 285 Fourteenth street; office, 
corner First and Stark streets, Portland. Bom 
November 10, 1836, at Findlay, Hancock 
County, Ohio. Son of Elijah and Sarah Ann 
(Watson) Williams. Married November 19, 
1862, to Clara ,T. 'Cougle. Came to Oregon 
in 1851. Received his education principally 
at the Willamette University, Salem, Oregon. 
Admitted to the Oregon bar at Salem in 1857 
before Hon. Reuben P. Boise, immediately 
following which he pract'ced one year at 
Kirbyville, Josephine County, Oregon, then 
removing to Corvallis and practicing there 
until 1862, when he settled in Salem and 
formed a partnership with Rufus Mallory 
under the firm name of Williams & Mallory. 
When Mr. Mallory was elected to Congress 
he formed a partnership with P. L. 
Willis under the firm name of Williams & 
Willis, and this partnership continued until 
he came to Portland in 1871. Upon his ar- 
rival in Portland he formed a partnership 
with W. Lair Hill and Governor W. W. 
Thayer, under the firm name of Hill, Thayer 
& Williams. Hill withdrew from the firm 
in 1872 to edit the Oregonian and the firm 
continued under the name Thayer & Williams 
until Mr. Thayer was elected Judge of the 
Supmeino Court in 1884. In 1885 he 
again formed a partnership with P. L. 
Willis, the same continuing one year. In 
1886 he formed a partnership with his 
brother, E. B. Williams, under the firm name 
R. & E. B. Williams, and has continued the 
practice of his profession here ever since. Ii 
1876 he was elected Representative to Con 
gress and served one term. Republican. 

PARRISH LOVEJOY WILLIS. 

Residence, 821 Thurman ,-treet; office, 242 
Washington street, Portland. Born Novem 
ber 5, 1838, in Putnam County, Illinois. Son of 
Stephen Daws and Nancy Ann (Ross) Willis. 
Married September 6, 1866, to Irene H. Strat- 
ton. Received his early education in tho 
public schools of Illinois and when fourteen 
years of age came to Oregon. Attended 
Umpqua Academy from 1859 to 1861; the 
Willamette University from 1862 to 1865, 
graduating from same in that year. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem in September, 
1866. Entered into partnership with Richard 
Williams at Salem, immediately after his 
admission, and this partnership lasted until 
1873, when he formed a partnership with 
Reuben P. Boise, which lasted until 1876. 
Came to Portland in 1879 and formed part- 
nership with Seneca Smith, which lasted 
until 1883, when he again became associated 
with Richard Williams in this city. This 
firm existed until 1885 and since that time 
he has practiced alone. Served as Mounted 
Volunteer from March to June in 1857, in 
Indian War. Served as State Senator from 
Multnomah County from 1888 to 1894. Re- 
publican. 



BENJAMIN F. WILSON. 
Residence and office, Union, Oregon. Bon 
in McMinnville, Oregon, February 19, 1861. 
Son of James A. A. and Susannah E. (Owen) 
Wilson. Married to Mary B. Kennedy July 
17, 1887. Attended public schools at Cove, 




Oregon, till 1879; taught school two years. 
Attended State University at Eugene, 1881- 
1882. Admitted to the bar at Pendleton, 
Oregon, May, 1889. County Clerk, Union 
County, Oregon, 1884-1886; Justice of the 
Peace; member City Council; School Direc- 
tor; Register United States Land Office, La 
Grande, Oregon, 1893-97; County Judge, 
Union County, 1898-1902. Democrat. 

ALEXANDER KING WILSON. 

Residence, Oswego, Oregon; office, 631 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Bo n September 15, 1864, in Allegheny 
County, Maryland. Son of James William 
and Mary Tomlinson (King) Wilson. Mar- 
ried August 7, 1895, to Dora Espey. At- 
tended Pennington Seminary, Pennington, 
New Jersey, for one year, and graduated 
in the business department. Later attended 
Phillips Academy at Exeter, New Hampshire, 
for two years. Read law with Swayne, Swayne 
& Hayes, of Toledo, Ohio. Came to Oregon in 
1891, and was admitted to the bar of Oregon 
in June, 1892, graduating from the Law De- 
partment of the University of Oregon th? 
following year. Began the practice of his 
profession in November, 1893, and practiced 
alone until 1906, when he entered into part- 
nership with O. A. Neal, under the firm name 
of Wilson & Xeal, which exists to date. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



24? 



E. E. WILSON. 

Residence, 1005 Monroe street; office, 226 
Second street, Corvallis. Born October 23, 
1869, at Corvallis, Oregon. Son of Lewis F. 
and Rose J. (Russell) Wilson. Attended Cor- 
vallis College until 1885, at which time it 
passed into the control of the State of Ore- 
gon and became the State Agricultural Col 
lege, from which he graduated in 1889 with 
degree of B. S. Remained in college for two 
more years, doing post-graduate work and 
acting as instructor during one of these years. 
In 1893 graduated from Law Department of 
the University of Oregon with degree of 
LL. B. Admitted to the bar June, 1893. 
Upon admission to the bar began the prac- 
tice of law at Corvallis and has practiced 
alone there since. Is City Attorney of Cor- 
vallis. In 1907 was appointed member, of 
Board of Regents of Oregon Agricultural 
College and has held position of Secretary of 
that Board ever since. Member Phi Delta 
Phi fraternity and of Corvallis Commercial 
Club. 

FRED W. WILSON. 

Residence, 209 Union street; office, Vog 
Mock, The Dalles, Oregon. Born September 
10, 1872, at College Hill (a suburb of Cin- 
cinnati), Ohio. Son of Joseph Gardner and 
Elizabeth (Miller) Wilson. Came to Oregon 
with his parents at the age of one year. 




Attended Wasco Independent Academy for 
seven years; Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, 
for one year; graduated from Whitman Col- 
lege, at Walla Walla, Washington, in 1891, 
and from Johns Hopkins University, Balti- 
more, Maryland, in 1893, with degree of A. B. 
Admitted to the b.r at Salem in October, 
1896. Became member of the firm of Mene- 



fee & Wilson, the partnership lasting until 
1909, since which time he has practiced alone. 
Was Deputy District Attorney for Seventh 
Judicial District from July, 1900, to July, 
1908. Elected District Attorney at June elec- 
tion, 1908, for the Seventh Judicial Dis- 
trict, comprising counties of Wasco, Hood 
River and Crook, which office he is now hold- 
ing. Member Beta Theta Pi fraternity of 
Johns Hopkins University. Mr. Wilson is a 
son of Joseph G. Wilson, who was first Cir- 
cuit J.idge of the district comprising the 
whole of Eastern Oregon; was a Justice of 
the Supreme Court of Oregon; Congressman 
from Oregon in 1872, his death occurring 
while he held this office. For twelve years 
after his death Mrs. Wilson held office as 
Postmistress at The Dalles, Oregon, under 
Presidents Hayes, Grant, Garfield and Arthur. 
Republican. 

GEORGE WILLIAM WILSON. 

Residence, 487 
East Fifteenth St. 
North; office, 40.1 
Gerlinger bull d- 
ing, Portland. 
Born at Portland, 
O r e g on, October 
23, 1878. Son of 
Charles and Mary 
F. (Eaton) Wil- 
son. Married Oc- 
tober 25, 1907, in 
New York City, to 
Vera Marie Fields. 
Graduated from 
the University of 
Oregon June 18th, 
1903, Law Deparr- 
ment. Admitted to 
the bar of Oregon 

May 28, 1903, and started the practice of his 
profession alone. On August 1, 1908, he 
entered into partnership with H. J. Bigger, 
under the firm name of Bigger & Wilson, 
which continues to date. Appointed Deputy 
Clerk Circuit Court, 1900-1903. Member of 
Multnomah Club, Republican Club of Port- 
land, and President Portland Revolver Club. 
Republican. 

JOHN GUY WILSON. 

Residence, 839 Tillamook street; office, 730 
'Chamber of Commerce, Portland. Born No- 
vember 9, 1878, in Shelby County, 111. Son of 
John James and Nancy J. (Templeton) Wil- 
son. Married September 22, 1909, to Ada 
May Kelly. Educated at Gays, Illinois, High 
School. In 1904 received A. B. degree from 
the University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, 
and in 1907 received the degree of LL. B. 
from the same University. Was admitted 
to the Illinois bar in 1907. Moved to Oregon 
in 1908 and was admitted to the bar of this 
state the same year. Member of the Sigma 
Alpha Fpsilon fraternity and the University 
Club. Republican. 




248 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



JAMES GIBSON WILSON. 




Residence, 1157 
Thurman street; 
office, 1105 Wells- 
Fargo Bldg., Port- 
land. Born April 
21, 1876, at Strea- 
tor, Illinois. Son 
of James Gibson 
and Margaret A. 
(Finley) Wilson. 



Club, and Phi Kappa Psi fraternity, 
crat. 

WALTER C. WINSLOW. 



Demo- 



Married 
1904, to 
Strong, 
at the 
schools 



May 25, 
Florence 
Educated 
public 
of Strea- 



lor, Illinois. Came 
to Oregon in 1890. 
A 1 1 e n ded Port- 
land Academy and 
graduated in class 

in 1895. Graduated from Princeton Univer- 
sity in 1899 with A. B. degree, and from 
the University of Oregon in 1901, with LL. B.^1906 




degree. Admitted to the bar at Salem in 
1901. Since September, 1899, has been in 
legal department of the Oregon Railroad & 
Navigation Company. Republican. 

A. B. WINFREE. 

Residence, 788 
Wasco street; of- 
fice, 702 to 707 
Couch Bldg., Port- 
land. Born July 
6, 1876, at Bel- 
mont, Chesterfiel 1 
County, Virginia. 
Son of George and 
Virginia Adelaide 
(S n e 1 ling) Win- 
free. Married Aug. 
23, 1905, to Jennio 
L. Welle r. At- 
tended pub lie 
schools at Rich- 
mo n d, Virginia; 
Mc'Cabe 's Varsity 
School at Rich- 
mond, V i r g inia, 

and Washington & Lee University, Lexington, 
Virginia, completing education at latter in- 
stitution June, 1899, in which year he came 
to Oregon. Was admitted to the bar at Pen- 
dleton, Oregon, in May, 1900. Was Deputy 
District Attorney for the Eighth Judicial 
District from 1900 to 1905. Entered into 
partnership with Samuel White, at Baker 
City, Oregon, in 1901, under the firm name 
White & Winfree, the same existing until 
1905, after which he practiced one year alone 
in Baker City. Came to Portland in Sep- 
tember, 1906, as clerk for Teal & Minor. In 
1909 entered into partnership with J. N. Teal 
and Wirt Minor under the firm name Teal, 
Minor & Winfree, which partnership exists 
to date. Member University Club, Arlington 



with A. B. degree, 



Residence, 265 
S. Church street; 
office, United 
States National 
Bank building, Sa- 
lem. Born Octo- 
ber 29, 1882, in 
Polk County, Ore. 
Son of Paris R. 
and Addie (Van- 
dervoort) W i n s- 
low. Was educated 
at the public 
schools of Polk 
County; took pre- 
paratory work ar 
Willamette Uni- 
versity; graduated 
from the Univer 
sity of Oregon in 

and from Wil- 




lamette University in 1908, with LL. B. 
degree. Admitted to the bar at Salem 
in June, 1908, and immediately became 
associated with John H. McNary and Charles 
L. McNary, continuing with them to date. 
From October, 1909, to date Deputy District 
Attorney of Marion County. Secretary of 
Salein Business Men's League. Republican. 

CHARLES ANTON WINTERMEIER. 

Residence, 698 
Olive street; office, 
546 Willamette 
street, Eugene, 
Oregon. Born at 
The Dalles, Ore- 
gon, September 24, 
1869. Son of Anton 
and Mary (Griffin) 
Wintermeier. At- 
tended the public 
schools at The 
Dalles, Oregon, 
taking a prepara- 
tory course at the 
Wasco Academy at 
The Dalles, Ore 
gon. Entered the 
University of Ore- 
gon in 1893; grad- 
uated in 1896 with degree B. A., then began 
the study of law in the office of George B. 
Dorris, at Eugene, Oregon, and began the 
practice of his profession, where he continues 
to date, being admitted to the bar of Oregon 
June, 1897. Past member of the Oregon 
National Guard, an exempt Fireman, City 
of Eugene; member of the B. P. O. E., 
Knights of Pythias fraternities; member 
Commercial and Social Clubs of Eugene. 
Served as Chairman of the Republican Cen- 
tral Committee for 1904 and 1906. 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



249 



JOHN P. WINTER. 

Besidence, Pendleton, Oregon; office, same. 
Born February 11, 1871, at St. Lucas, Iowa. 
Son of Peter and Mary (Scholen) Winter. 
Married October 25, 1899, to Elizabeth 
Schroder. Educated at the public schools of 
Iowa; at the Upper Iowa University (1887); 
at Mt. Calvary College, Wisconsin, from 1888 
to 1893; at St. John's University, Minnesota, 
from 1893 to 1895, from which university he 
graduated and received the degree of A. M. 
Attended College of Law at University of 
Minnesota, 1895-6, and the College of Law, 
University of Missouri, 1896-7, from which 
institution he graduated with LL. B. de- 
gree. Admitted to the Supreme Court of 
Minnesota in June, 1899. First came to 
Oregon in 1904. Was admitted to the courts 
of thi.s state in M'ay of that year. Republi- 
can. 

JOSEPH WOERNDLE. 

Residence, 506 Tillamook .street; office, Mul- 
key building, Portland. Born August 3, 1880, 
at Bernau, Bavaria, Germany. Son of Kas- 
par and Maria (Stephen) Woemdle. Mar- 
ried April 4, 1905, to Cecilia V. Sherlock. 
Came to Oregon in September, 1906. From 




1886 to 1893 attended the public schools at 
Bernau, Bavaria, and from 1893 to 1897, the 
Latin High School at Rosenheim, Bavaria, 
Germany. In 'September, 1906, entered the 
Law Department of the University of Ore- 
gon, graduating in June, 1909, with LL. B. 
degree. Admitted to the bar of this state 
at Salem in June, 1909; to the District and 
Circuit Courts of the United States in August 
of the same year. Has practiced his profes- 
sion in Portland since his admission to the 
bar. Member Masonic fraternity. Republi- 
can. 



CARL BUTLER WINTLER. 

Residence, 453 Hall street; office, 70S 
Chamber of Commerce building, Portland. 
Born August 26, 1879, in Vancouver, Clarke 
County, Washington. Son of John Jacob and 
Sarah Elizabeth (Butler) Wintler. Married 
August 14, 1906, to Miss Marcia Bull. Edu- 
cated at the Vancouver, Washington, public 
schools and graduated from the high school 
of the city in 1896. Graduated from Leland 
Stanford Junior University, California, 1905. 
Moved to Oregon Octo'ber 15, 1897, and was 
admitted to the Oregon bar July 14, 1906. 
Admitted to the bar in San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia, May 16, 1905. Is now practicing as a 
member of the firm of Pearcy & Wintler. 
Member of the Delta Chi legal fraternity. 
Republican. 

ALBERT WALTER WOLF. 

Residence, 729 Johnson street; office, 409 
McKay building, Portland. Born in Port- 
land, Oregon, August 26, 1874. Son of Na- 
than and Esther (Mendelson) Wolf. At- 
tended the Portland public schools and later 
the Law Department of the University of 
Oregon. Admitted to the bar at Salem, Ore- 
gon, in 1895. Republican. 

AUGUST R. WOLLENBERG. 

Residence, 529 Rhone street; office, 522-23 
Henry building, Portland. Born in Beecher, 
Will County, Illinois, August 9, 1873. Son of 
Christian and Pauline (Vorkaufer) Wollen 
berg. Married Emma F. Hertrich July 20> 
1909. Attended grammar school, Beecher, 
Illinois, and graduated from Jefferson High 
School, Chicago; Illinois College of Law, 
Chicago, with degree of LL. B., 1906; post 
graduate, 1907, degree LL. M. Came to 
Oregon January 10, 1909, and admitted to 
the bar at Salem, Oregon, June 15, 1909. Re 
publican. 

CHARLES EDWIN WOLVERTON. 

Residence, 265 Fourteenth street; office, 
213-14 Postoffice building, Portland. Born 
May 16, 1851, at Des Moines, Iowa. Son of 
John and Mary Jane (N"ealy) Wolverton. 
Married October 3, 1878, to Clara E. Price. 
Came to the State of Oregon in 1853, and 
attended district school in the southern part 
of Polk County, Oregon, and later, Christian 
College at Monmouth, Oregon, graduating 
from the same institution in 1871 with B. S. 
degree, and in 1872 with A. B. degree. At- 
tended the Law Department of Kentucky 
University, Lexington, Kentucky, graduating 
therefrom in 1874. Was admitted to the bar 
at Salem in 1874. Served as Justice of the 
Peace 1876 to 1878 and was later appointed 
Attorney for the School Land Board for Linn 
County. Elected to the State Supreme Court 
in June, 1894, and re-elected in 1900, serving 
until appointed to the District Federal Court 
for Oregon, in 1905. Now serving as a Trus 
tee of the Pacific University and, the Reed 



250 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



Institute. Member of Phi Delta Gamma So- 
ciety, Masonic fraternity, Arlington Club and 
Waverly Golf Club. Elected delegate at 




large to Kepublican National Convention in 
1892. Honorary degree of LL. D. conferred 
in 1900 by Willamette University. Republi- 
can. 

CHARLES ERSKINE SCOTT WOOD. 




Rose Mary (Carson) Wood. Married Novem- 
ber 26, 1878, to Nanny Moale Smith. Edu- 
cated at the Erie Academy, Baltimore City 
College, Columbian Colege, Washington, D. C., 
and graduated from West Point United State; 
Military Academy in 1874; Columbia Univer- 
sity Law Department (New York City) in 
1883 with degrees of LL. B., C. L. and 
Ph. B. After graduating from West Point 
was appointed Second Lieutenant of Twenty 
first Infantry. In 1877 explored Alaska; 
during this year was engaged in the Xez 
Perce campaign (Chief Joseph), in 1878 in 
the Bannock and Piute campaign, and was 
this year promoted to the rank of First Lieu- 
tenant. Resigned from the army in 1884. 
Admitted to the bar of Washington Terri- 
tory at Vancouver, 1879, and of Oregon at 
Salem, 1884. Member of the bar of the 
United States Circuit and District Courts of 
Oregon and Washington and of the Supreme 
Court of the United States. Member of the 
United States Archaeological and United 
States Geographical Societies respectively; 
Grolier Club. Bibliophile Society, National 
Bar and Oregon Bar Associations, University 
and Arlington 'Clubs of Portland, Oregon. 
Democrat. 

ABSALOM CORNELIUS WOODCOCK. 

Residence, Eugene, Oregon; office, IS \Vc<: 
Ninth street. Born near Oregon City, Clacka- 




Residence, Ford and Main streets; office, 
Chamber of Commerce building. Portland, 
Oregon. Born February 20, 1852, in Erie, 
Pennsylvania. Son of William Maxwell and 



mas County, Oregon, July 22, 1859. Son of 
Williston Richard and Alizina (Cornelius) 
Woodcock. Attended the rural schools of 
Clackamas County, later attending public 
school at The Dalles; in 1879 entered Uni- 
versity of Oregon and graduated In the year 
1884 with the degree B. S.; afterwards de- 
gree of M. A. was conferred. Taught in the 



251 



University of Oregon for three years, mean- 
while devoting his time to the study of law 
and reading in the law office of Dolph, Bel- 
linger, Mallory & Simon during vacations. 
Admitted to the bar of Oregon in 1887. 
Entered into partnership with George S. 
Washburne, Eugene, Oregon, later forming 
partnership with L. T. Harris which contin- 
ued for about five years, afterwards forming 
partnership with E. O. Potter for about the 
same length of time. At present engaged in 
practice with Richard Shore Smith, Eugene, 
Oregon. In 1894 was elected as member of 
the State Board of Equalization. Member of 
A. F. & A. :M., B. P. O. E. and K. of P. fra- 
ternities. Republican. 

JOHN HENRY WOODWARD. 

Office, 513-14-15 Commercial block, Port- 
land. Born February 9, 1836, at Hector, 
Tompkins County, New York. Son of John 
and Mary (Peck) Woodward. Married Feb- 
ruary 23, 1863, to Anna M. Whitaker. Edu- 
cation received at John A. Gillett's Academy, 
Peach Orchard, New York, to the age of 
eighteen; at Ithaca Academy, Ithaca, New 




York, in 1855 and 1856, and studied law with 
Diven, Hatheway & Woods in Elmira, New 
York, from 1857 to May, 1860. Upon exami- 
nation in open court (Supreme Court of State 
of New York) at Binghamton, New York, 
was admitted to the bar, May 10, 1860; Jus- 
tices Charles Mason, Ransom Balcom, William 
W. Campbell and John M. Parker, presiding. 
Came to Oregon in 1871 and was admitted 
to the bar in September of that year, on the 
motion of W. W. Thayer in the Supreme 
Court at Salem. To the Circuit Court, Dis- 
trict of Oregon, in February, 1872, on motion 
of W. L. Hill, Esq. To the District Court, 



District of Oregon, at the same time, on the 
motion of J. N. Dolph, Esq. Partnership 
with David Goodsell from September, 1871 to 
July, 1872; partnership with Charles H. 
Woodward, 1876 to 1896; with Clinton C. 
Palmer, 1897 to 1900; in practice of law 
since 1900 alone. On May 13, 1861, enlisted 
as private soldier for two years. Mustered 
into United States service at Elmira, New 
York, May 16. In August of that year com- 
missioned by President Lincoln as Captain 
and ordered to report to the War Department 
for orders. Ordered to report to headquar- 
ters of the Army of the Potomac for staff 
duty, and served in that capacity at headquar- 
ters Army of the Potomac to end of war. 
Resigned June 5, 1865, commissioned by 
President Andrew Johnson Major by Brevet, 
"for faithful and meritorious services." 
Elected Judge of Multnomah County, Oregon, 
in 1872, for term ending 1876. Member of 
Loyal Legion and G. A. R. Republican. 

GEORGE WILLIAM WRIGHT. 

Residence, 732 Walnut street, Albany, Ore- 
gon; office, Wright block, Albany, Oregon. 
Born January 28, 1860, at Huntsville, Ran- 
dolph County, Missouri. Son of Gideon A. 
and Rebecca Jane (Turner) Wright. Married 
October 2, 1887, to Etta Cooley (daughter of 




G. C. Cooley and a granddaughter of Captain 
James Blakely, of Brownsville, a pioneer who 
came to Oregon in 1846 and is still living at 
the age of 97). Mr. Wright's father's great- 
grandfather served in the Revolutionary War 
of 1776. His father's grandfather in the War 
of 1812, and his father in the Civil War. 
His brother, Joseph E. Wright, was a mem- 
ber of the Rough Riders and served three 
years in the Philippine Islands. His mother's 



252 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



father appointed Territorial Judge by Presi- 
dent Jackson during his first administration. 
He was educated at the public and 
high schools of Huntsville, Missouri, and later 
at the Missouri State University, graduating 
therefrom in 1882 with LL. B. degree. He 
was admitted to the bar of the State of 
Missouri in the last-named year. He was 
elcted City Attorney of Huntsville five weeks 
after graduation and served one year, until 
he came to Oregon in May, 1883, and located 
at Heppner. Was Deputy District Attorney 
of Morrow County, and the first term of 
the Circuit Court ever held in Morrow County 
was held in Mr. Wright 's office (the Court 
House not yet being built, and Mr. Wright 
acting as District Attorney in the absence 
of that person). Judge M. L. Olmstead pre- 
sided at this term of court. Moved to Albany 
in 1889, and has ever since continued the 
practice of his profession there. He has 
laid out and platted several real estate 
additions to Albany, one being named 
Wright's Addition and now being a substan- 
tial part of the city. Member Oregon His 
torical Society, Odd Fellows, Knights of 
Pythias, and of the Albany Commercial Club. 
Eegular attendant of the meetings of the 
Oregon State Bar Association. Republican. 

FRANK T. WRIGHTMAN. 

Eesidence, Salem, Oregon; office, State 
House. Born November 27, 1858, at Buffalo, 
New York. Son of Benjamin and Harriett 
(Leach) Wrightman. Married July 15, 1891, 
to Josephine Glenn. Educated at the public 
schools of Wisconsin and Oregon, coming to 
Oregon in 1871. Attended the Law School of 
Willamette University 1896-7-8. Admitted 
to the bar of Oregon in 1898. From 1898 to 
1903 was a member of the firm of Brown, 
Wrightman & Myers. In 1903 he incorpor- 
ated Tax Laws under the administration of 
F. I. Dunbar, Secretary of State. At present 
is in charge of incorporation department in 
Secretary of State's office. Captain of 
Company A, O. N. G. Was Deputy Sheriff 
of Marion County 1888-1896, and Sheriff of 
same county 1896-98. Member Masonic fra- 
ternity B. P. O. E., I. O. O. F., K. of P. and 
Illi'hee Club. 

JOHN RUSSELL WYATT. 

Residence, 334 Eleventh street; office, 
United States Attorney's office, Portland, Ore. 
Born December 13, 1865, on a farm four miles 
east of Harrisburg, Linn County, Oregon. Son 
of Eli Franklin and 'Martha Margaret (Fro- 
man) Wyatt. Married October 1, 1907, to 
Lydia Faber at Los Angeles, California. At- 
tended district school at Wyatt school house 
on farm until ten years of age when his 
parents moved into Harrisburg, Oregon. At- 
tended public schools in Harrisburg until 1880. 
Went to University of Oregon in 1884 
and graduated from Willamette University at 
Salem, Oregon, in 1887. Admitted to the bar 



October 6, 1890, in class before Supreme Court 
of Oregon. Deputy District Attorney for 
Linn County for four years. In 1895 formed 
partnership with Hon. J. K. Weatherford, 
which continued for fifteen years. In March 




1909, was appointed Assistant United States 
Attorney, which position he holds to date. 
Chairman of Linn County Republican Central 
Committee for eight years. Delegate to State 
and County Conventions from 1890 to 1898. 
Member of Masonic and B. P. O. E. fraterni- 
ties. Republican. 

HARRY HERS YANCKWICH. 
Residence, 671 
Market Drive; of- 
fice, 425-26 Wor- 
cester Bldg., Port- 
land. Bom Aug 
ust 12, 1881, at 
Yassy, Roumania. 
Son of Zeida Go- 
del Goldstein and 
Sarah Hershco 
vitch. Married No- 
vember 24, 1908, 
to Ethel Whitmer. 
His early educa- 
tion received at 
public schools of 
Yassy, Roumania, 
from which he 
graduated in 1893. 
Graduated from 

the Gymnasium (corresponding to high 
school) in 1897. Graduated from the Lyceum 
(preparatory school for university) in 1900. 
Obtained the Baccalaureate the same year 
(corresponding to degrees B. A. and B. S.). 
Admitted in 1900 to the Law Department of 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



253 



the University of France, at Paris, Prance. 
Studied law and philosophy during the years 
1901 and 1902. Came to New York City in 
February, 1903. Came to Portland in 1904 
and entered the Law Department of the Uni- 
versity of Oregon, from which he graduated 
in 1906 with the degree of LL. B. Was ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem June, 1906, and 
to practice in the United States Circuit and 
District Courts in August, 1908. 

JOSEPH FRED YATES. 

Residence, 340 Seventh street, Corvallis, 
Oregon; office, 3 to 6, First National Bank 
building, same. Born July 3, 1866, in Linn 
County, near Corvallis. Son of Joseph and 
Martha Jane (Robinett) Yates. Married to 
Miss Lucy G. Wiles November 26, 1896. 
Entered the Preparatory Department of the 
Oregon Agricultural 'College in 1875. He took 
a classical course in the Oregon Agricultural 




College, receiving the degree A. B. June 20, 
1885, at the age of nineteen, making his 
own way through college by following vari- 
ous vocations and teaching school during 
vacations. After graduation he resumed 
teaching for three years in Linn County. Ap- 
pointed Deputy Clerk under E. E. Montague 
in 1888, spending all his available spare time 
studying law in the office of J. K. Weather- 
ford. In 1889 entered the employ of the 
Benton County Bank at Corvallis, to avail 
himself of the law library connected with 
that institution, this bank being made the 
First National Bank of Corvallis; he was 
elected first cashier of that institution, mean- 
while pursuing his studies in law. January, 
1893, entered the office of Charles W. Wol- 
verton at Albany and remained under his 
tutorship for the examination before the 



Supreme Court. Admitted to the bar June 20, 
1893. He then opened an office at Albany 
where he practiced for a period of eight 
months, then returning to Corvallis to form 
a co-partnership with J. R. Bryson, W. E. 
Yates, under the firm name of Bryson, Yates 
& Yates, with which he was connected until 
the death of Judge Bryson, since which time 
he has followed a general practice to date. 
May, 1910, appointed Judge of Benton 
County. Past member of the 'Corvallis Fire 
Department and the Oregon National Guard, 
being honorably discharged from same. In 
1900 appointed City Attorney for Corvallis, 
resigning this place to accept the appoint- 
ment of Municipal Judge of the city, being 
appointed one term and elected twice, serving 
three terms. Member of the Oregon State 
Grange and Shriner, B. P. O. E., K. of P., 
Artisan fraternities, and Commercial and So- 
cial Clubs of Corvallis. Served as Republi- 
can State Committeeman in Benton County, 
and was Chairman of the Benton County Cen- 
tral Committee. Republican. 

BERT EDWARD YOUMANS. 

Residence, 224 
Oswego street, St. 
Johns, Oregon; of- 
fice, 708-9 Corbett 
building, Portland. 
Born March 7th, 
1876, at Stock- 
bridge, C a 1 u met 
County, Wiscon- 
sin. Son of John 
and Jane (Swing) 
Youmans. Married 
July 11, 1906, to 
Clarice Laura 
Whittle s e y. At- 
tended rural 
schools at Stock- 
bridge, Wisconsin, 
until 1891; entered 
high school at that 

city in the fall of 1891 and graduated in 1895. 
Attended Normal School at Oshkosh, Wiscon- 
sin, in 1895-6, and took post-graduate course 
at Stockibridge High School in 1897. Came 
to Oregon in 1902 and in the fall of that 
year entered the Law Department of the Uni- 
versity of Oregon, graduating in 1904 with 
the degree of LL. B. Admitted to the bar 
at Salem June 15, 1904. Read law in the 
office of Judge Martin L. Pipes and later in 
the office of Platt & Platt (while attending 
college), and remained in the employ of the 
latter firm until November, 1906, when he 
became associated with Arthur P. Tifft. On 
June 1, 1908, entered into partnership with 
Frank B. Rutherford under the firm name of 
Youmans & Rutherford, and did general law 
practice until March 1, 1909, when the part- 
nership was dissolved and since when he has 
practiced alone. Member Oregon National 
Guard from July, 1904, to 1907. Member Phi 
Delta Phi fraternity. Republican. 




254 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



JOSEPH EDWARD YOUNG. 

Kesiclence, Cot- 
tage Grove, Ore- 
gon; office, same. 
Born in Claekamas 
County, Ore., near 
Oregon City, 
March 24, 1865. 
Son of Josiah and 
Julia (G r i m) 
Young. Married 
Nov. 23, 1903, to 
Miss Ermine E. 
Veatch. Attended 
the public schools 
of Damascus and 
Milwaukie, Ore., 
then entering the 
State Normal 
School at Mon- 
mouth, Ore., grad- 
uating in June, 1886; then teaching for a 
period of a year, he entered the University 
of Oregon at Eugene, Oregon, graduating in 
the year 1892, with degree A. B. Having de- 
cided to pursue the study of law, he entered 
the office of L. Bilyeu, at Eugene, Oregon, 
where he remained for a time, later entering 
the office of A. C. Woodcock. Being admitted 
to the bar of Oregon in June, 1894, he formed 
a co-partnership with L. Bilyeu under the 
firm name of Bilyeu & Young, which part- 
nership existed till 1895, when he moved to 
Boise City, Idaho, resuming his practice 
there in partnership with L. L. Stevens until 
returning to Oregon in 1897, where he opened 
an office at Cottage Grove where he follows 
a general practice to date. Member of Ma- 
sonic order. Republican. 




OGLESBY YOUNG. 

Residence, 551 East Salmon street; office, 
617-19 Chamber of Commerce building, Port- 
land. Born September 6, 1862, in Warren 
County, Missouri. Son of Milton J. and 
Louisa (Dunlap) Young. Married June 15, 
1898, to Mary Evelyn Pike. Attended the 
county district school, Warren County, Mis- 
souri, and later the State Normal School at 
Kirksville, Missouri. Moved to Oregon June, 
1890, and in 1894-5 attended the Law Depart- 
ment of the University of Oregon. Admitted 
to the bar in Salem, Oregon, June, 1896, and 
has been engaged in general practice since 
that date. Democrat. 



MORRIS A. ZOLLINGER. 

Residence, 1133 Tillamook street; office, 
312-14 Corbett building, Portland. Born Sep- 
tember 1, 1869, at Sterling, Illinois. Son of 
Jacob and Sarah A. (Bovey) Zollinger. Mar- 
ried June 29, 1898, to Blanche Eckert. In 
1891 he received the degree of Ph. B. at 
Cornell College. In 1894 he received the de- 
gree of LL. B. at the University of Iowa. 
Admitted to the bar in Iowa in 1894. Com- 
menced the practice of law at Vinton, Iowa, 
until 1905, when he removed to Oregon. Ad- 
mitted to the bar at Salem, Oregon, the same 
year and commenced the practice of his pro- 
fession in Portland, December 1, 1907, forming 
a partnership with John K. Kollock, which 
continues to date. Member of Masonic, 
Sigma Nu and Phi Delta Phi fraternities. 
Republican. 




OBITUARY 

TO A FEW of those members of the bench and bar, who have 
passed from the field of their activity, there is due the tribute 
of praise, and the offering of reverent and tender memory. 

Their names are written in the legal history of the state. By 
their expositions of the law, they have added to our store of knowl- 
edge, strengthened our grasp of principles and enlarged our com- 
prehension of ideas. As co-workers with them, we have been cheered 
by their friendship, stimulated by their criticism, instructed by their 
work and word, and inspired by their example. 

For our help and guidance we have the record of their lives and 
work; let us hope that we may be worthy of our heritage. 



OBITUARY 



259 



CHARLES B. BELLINGER. 

Judge Bellinger might well be classed as 
a native son of Oregon; was born in Maquon, 
Knox County, Illinois, November 21, 1839; 
died May 12, 1905. He reached Oregon when 
he was 8 years old. His early education was 
received in the common schools, with two 
years at Willamette University, after which 
he started upon the study of law with B. F. 
Bonham at Salem. He was admitted to the 
bar in 1863, and immediately engaged in 
practice at Salem in partnership with J. C. 
Cartwright. However, he soon gave up the 
practice of law to become the editor of the 
"Arena," a leading Democrat paper of the 
time, which position he filled with marked 
success until 1866, when he retired from 
newspaper work to engage in mercantile 
business at Monroe, Benton County. In 
1869 he was prevailed upon to return to 
the practice of law in partnership with Hon. 
N. H. Cranor at Albany, and also at the 
same time to edit the "State Rights Demo- 
crat," a strong partisan organ published in 
Albany. In the meantime, he had served 
one term in the Legislature, being elected 
in 1868. In 1870, he came to Portland to 
practice his profession. He enlisted during 
the Modoc uprising in 1873 with General 
John F. Miller as aid with rank of Colonel, 
and remained in the service until the close 
of military operations. He was appointed 
Clerk of the Supreme Court in 1874, but 
resigned in 1878 to accept the Circuit Judge- 
ship of the Fourth Judicial District (then 
comprising Multnomah, Washington, Clack- 
amas, Columbia and Clatsop Counties). 
Upon retiring from the bench in 1880 he 
entered into partnership with Hon. John 
M. Gearin, which lasted until 1883, when he 
became a member of the firm of Dolph, 
Bellinger, Mallory & Simon. Judge Bellin- 
ger was marrie'd in 1859 to Miss Margery 
Johnson, of Linn County. 

JUDGE REUBEN PATRICK BOISE. 

Judge Reuben Patrick Boise was born at 
Blandford, Mass., June 9, 1818, and died at 
Salem, Ore., April 10, 1907. 

He graduated from Williams College in 
1843 with the degree of A. B.; was ad- 
mitted to the bar in Massachusetts in 
1847; practiced law in that state until 1850; 
came to Oregon via the Isthmus of Panama 
in the same year; was appointed District 
Attorney by Judge Pratt in 1851; elected 
District Attorney by Territorial Legisla- 
ture in 1852. In 1854 in conjunction with 
James K. Kelly and D. R. Biglow, he pre- 
pared the first Code of Oregon laws; after- 
wards was member of Territorial Legisla- 
ture and Constitutional Convention from 
Polk County; in 1857 was appointed by 
President Buchanan one of the Justices of 
the Supreme Court for Oregon Territory, 
and served in that capacity until the admis- 
sion of the state to the Union. He was 



then elected one of the first Supreme Judges 
and served in that position continuously 
until 1870, when he was re-elected Supremt 
Judge, but owing to threatened contest of 
election resigned; in 1874 was elected one 
of Capital Building Commissioners; in 1876 
was again elected Supreme Judge, serving 
until 1878, when the Legislature divided the 




Supreme and Circuit Judges into distinct 
classes. He was then appointed by Gov- 
ernor Thayer one of the Supreme Judges, 
serving until 1880. In that year, preferring 
Circuit Court work, he was elected Judge 
of the Third Judicial District comprising 
the counties of Marion, Linn, Polk, Yamhill 
and Tillamook, and upon being re-elected in 
1886 served continuously until 1892. He 
practiced law at Salem from 1892 to 1898, 
when he was again elected Judge of the 
Third Judicial District, serving in that ca- 
pacity until July, 1904, when he retired from 
official life at the age of 86 years. 

As will bs seen by the foregoing account, 
Judge Boise served on the Supreme bench 
of Oregon territory and state seventeen 
years, and on the Circuit bench eighteen 
years, or in all thirty-five years, longer 
than any other Judge has ever served in this 
state, and in addition to his service on the 
bench, he was a public official of the ter- 
ritory and state as District Attorney, legis- 
lative member of the Constitutional Con- 
vention and Capital Building, Commissioner 
for eight additional years, making in all an 
active official career of forty-three years, 
and as was once said by ex-Governor Geer, 
a longer official life than that of any other 
resident of Oregon. 

Judge Boise always took an active part 
in all public affairs, was a fluent speaker 



260 



OBITUARY 



and delivered many notable addresses be- 
fore the Pioneer Society, the Historical So- 
siety, the State Bar Association; at the erec- 
tion of the Jason Lee monument and in 
the Oregon Legislature on the fiftieth an- 
niversary of our statehood, all of which 
showed to a marked degree his eloquence 
and literary ability. 

He was also greatly interested in the edu- 
cational affairs of his state and was at dif- 
ferent times during his long career a mem- 
ber of the first School Board of Portland, 
a trustee of the State Agricultural Col- 
lege at Corvallis, of the La Creole Academy 
at Dallas, the Willamette University at 
Salem and the Pacific University at Forest 
Grove, which latter university conferred 
upon him the title of Doctor of Laws. 

Judge Boise always took an active inter- 
est in the agricultural development of Ore- 
gon and at the time of his death owned a 
farm of 2500 acres near Dallas, part of which 
was his donation claim, 100 acres adjoin- 
ing the Indian School near Salem, and his 
home farm of sixty acres in the corporate 
limits of Salem. He was five times elected 
Master of the Oregon State Grange and 
attended many sessions of the National 
Grange, held in different cities of the United 
States, as a delegate. 

Judge Boise was twice married, first in 
1851 to Ellen Frances Lyon, in San Fran- 
cisco, to whom he was engaged before leav- 
ing Massachusetts, she making the memor- 
able trip that year around the Horn in the 
Flying Cloud, with her father and family, 
that being the fastest voyage ever made by 
a clipper ship up to that time, holding the 
record for years thereafter; from this union 
three children survive Fisher A., of Dallas; 
Reuben P., of Salem, and Whitney L., of 
Portland. 

His second marriage was to Fmily A 
Pratt, of Worcester, Mass., in 1867, and 
she still survives him, together with a 
daughter, Mrs. J. H. Lauterman, both liv- 
ing at Salem; the other daughter of this 
last union, Ellen S. Boise, was drowned at 
North Beach in 1891. 

No better tribute to the life and character 
of Judge Boise could be paid than the mere 
statement that upon his death the press of 
the state was filled with articles and edi- 
torials calling attention to his long and hon- 
orable public career. All the courts of the 
state adjourned out of respect to his mem- 
ory; the different bar associations and pub- 
lic bodies passed resolutions of condolence 
and regret, and the leading officials of the 
state attended his funeral. 

Many encomiums were then published 
from leading citizens of the state from 
which the following extracts are taken: 

Associate Justice now Chief Justice Moore 
of the Supreme Court said: "Judge Boise 
has probably done more than any other man 
to systematize the practice of law in this 



state and to raise it to a high standard. He 
was a man whose ability and integrity were 
recognized by every one who knew him. 
His work speaks louder than words and 
stands as a monument to his glory. He 
and Judge Williams have played a great 
part in formulating the practices of our 
courts." 

At the funeral of Judge Boise, his life- 
long friend, Hon. George H. Williams, paid 
the following beautiful tribute to his mem- 
ory: 

"I have but few words to say: Our de- 
parted friend comes down to his grave full 
of years and full of honors. He did not 
attain the highest office in the gift of the 
people, but the position to which he was 
elected he filled with fidelity and a high 
and honorable sense of duty. 
"'Honor and fame from no condition rise; 
Act well your part, there all the honor lies.' 

"Judge Boise acted well his part, for 
which praises and honor are due to his mem- 
ory. Few men have been more fortunate 
than Judge Boise was in his life. He was 
fortunate in the enjoyment of the confi- 
dence and respect of all who knew him. He 
was fortunate in his family, fortunate in 
his friends, fortunate in those circumstances 
which conduced to his comfort and espec- 
ially fortunate in retaining his faculties un- 
impaired to the close of his long and useful 
life. Judge Boise, when living, was the 
oldest lawyer in the state, and now he is 
gone I am the oldest lawyer, and as my 
relations to him were quite intimate, I feel 
like one who treads alone 'some banquet 
hall deserted.' When I came to Oregon, 
now nearly fifty-four years ago. Judge Boise 
was in the active practice of his profession. 
He was Prosecuting Attorney while I was 
Judge in this district and made an able 
and efficient officer. Since then for the most 
part of the time he has been a Judge of the 
Supreme or District Courts and at all times 
and under all circumstances he was an up- 
right and impartial Judge. Judge Boise in 
his private life was irreproachable, and his 
public life was above suspicion. When a 
man has reached the great age of Judge 
Boise, honored and respected as he was, 
there is no occasion to mourn over his de- 
parture. It is just as natural to die as it 
is to live all must die every blade of grass, 
every flower, every tree, every living crea- 
ture must die; it is the inevitable law of 
nature and it is our duty to acquiesce as 
cheerfully as we can in this unchanging 
and universal law. I know that when death 
severs the ties of family and kindred it is 
natural for the bereaved to experience a 
sense of sorrow, but this sorrow is greatly 
alleviated when those who are left behind 
can look back upon the record that the de- 
parted one has made with pride and satis- 
faction. Springtime is a suitable time for 
an old man to take his departure from this 
world. When the trees are putting forth 



OBITUARY 



261 



their leaves and the buds and blossoms be- 
gin to appear, and the sun is shining and 
the birds are singing, and when all nature 
is putting on the habiliments of a new life, 
it is fitting that an old man should pass out 
of the winter of his life into the springtime 
of another and better existence. When the 
sun goes down it .reflects upon the clouds 
that hang upon the horizon a golden hue, 
and when a man like Judge Boise dies the 
record of his life reflects upon those who 
survive a radiance that resembles the glory 
of the setting sun. Whatever may befall 
our friend in another state of existence, we 
can have no reason to doubt that he will 
receive his reward for the good deeds done 
in the body and we can all join as we sit 
around his lifeless remains in saying in the 
sincerity of our hearts, 'Well done, good 
and faithful servant, rest in peace.' " 

EARL C. BRONAUGH. 

Because of the revocation of the edict of 
Nantes, which caused the members of the 
Bronaugh family, who were French Huge- 
nots, to flee to Scotland, then to America, 
Portland had numbered among her most 
honored citizens for over thirty years the 
Hon. Earl C. Bronaugh. Judge Bronaugh 
was bo.rn in the little town of Abingdon, 
Va., on March 4, 1831, and spent the first 
twelve years of his life there, when his pa- 
rents removed to Shelby, Tenn., on a farm. 
His early education was obtained at Abing- 
don and at Shelby, while assisting on the 
farm. In 1847, however, he began the study 
of law with his uncle, Jeremiah Clapp, and 
was so apt a student that he was admitted 
to the bar within two years. To secure funds 
before beginning active practice he taught 
school for two years in Tennessee and Ar- 
kansas, and then located at Jacksonport, 
Ark., where he practiced for a short time, 
then moved to Little Rock, where he was 
for some time Chancery Clerk. Later he 
spent two years at Brownsville. Ark., go- 
ing from there to Helena, Ark., where he 
was elected Judge of the Circuit Court in 
1860, serving until the outbreak of the 
war. Having 'been, born and reared in 
Southern states, his sympathies were nat- 
urally with the Confederate side and he 
enlisted as a soldier, but his health broke 
down and he received an honorable discharge 
after a year of service. In 1868 he arrived 
in Portland, with nothing much but pluck 
and energy, and started in to build up a 
practice. He was first associated with Hon. 
John Catlin, and later, for ten years, he 
was one of the strongest members of the 
firm of Dolph, Bronaugh, Dolph & Simon. 
In 1882 he left Portland for California on 
account of failing health, but returned in 
two years and formed the partnership of 
Whalley, Bronaugh & Northrup. Mr. Whal- 
ley retired in 1889 and the firm remained 
Bronaugh & Northrup until his death on 
March 6, 1899. 



The bar of Portland has never had a more 
up,right and honorable member, and few. if 
any. superiors as a lawyer. His knowledge 
of law and accuracy of statement were un- 
excelled. He was always held in the high- 
est esteem and respect by all who knew 
him a plain and simple gentleman of the 
old school; unaffected; with a deep and 
abiding faith in the Christian religion; a 
devoted husband and father; a kind and 
generous neighbor; who handed down a 
good and honored name. 

PETER HARDEMAN BURNETT. 

Peter Hardeman Burnett was born at 
Nashville, Tenn., November 15, 1807, of Vir- 
ginia parentage. When 10 years of age he 
removed with his father to Howard County, 
Missouri. He grew up to manhood in this 
rude, border country, but managed to secure 
an ordinary English education. In 1826 he 
returned to Tennessee, where he became 




clerk in a store. Before he was 21 he 
married Naniet W. Rogers, started in bus'- 
ness, studied law, and became editor of 
"The Far West," a weekly paper published 
at Liberty, Mo. His first law business was 
the prosecution of a number of Mormons 
for debt. Afterward he was employed as 
counsel by the Mormon leaders at Liberty, 
Mo., they being charged with arson, rob- 
bery and treason. In 1843 he removed to 
Oregon, where he became a farmer, law- 
yer, legislator, and Judge, the Oregon Pro- 
visional Government making him Chief 
Justice, and when Oregon became United 
States territory he was appointed an Asso- 
siate Justice of its Supreme Court. In 1849 
he removed to California and was elecV^d 



262 



OBITUARY 



first Governor of that state, and served af- 
terwards upon its Supreme bench. 

JOHN F. CAPLES. 

John F. Caples was born in what is now 
Ashland County. Ohio, January 12, 1832. 
A descendant of a family closely identified 
with the jurisprudence of Ohio. Mr. Caples 
quite naturally took up the study of law 
and was eminently fitted for the profession, 
as his career in Oregon has proved. He re- 
ceived his early education in the public 
schools of Risdon, now Fostoria, Ohio. 
His collegiate training was obtained at the 
Ohio Wesleyan University, which he at- 
tended for four years. He studied law in 
Logan County, Ohio, and was admitted to 
the bar of Logan County in 1853. In 1855 
he transferred his practice to Findlay, Ohio, 
and later to Warsaw, Ind., leaving there to 
enter the Government recruiting service in 
Northwestern Ohio and Northern Indiana. 
In 1865 he came Northwest with his fam- 
ily via the Isthmus and San Francisco to 
Vancouver, Wash., where he acted as Citj 
Attorney and practiced law until 1866 when 
he moved to Portland. In 1872 he was 
elected to the Legislature from Multnomah 
County and was chairman of the Judiciary 
Committee. He was elected District At- 
torney in 1878 for the district comprising 
Multnomah, Washington, Clackamas, Co- 
lumbia and Clatsop Counties, and held the 
position for a period of six years an honor 
hitherto accorded no District Attorney in 
the state. President McKinley appointed 
Mr. Caples United States Consul to Val- 
paraiso, Chili, in 1897. He resigned, how- 
ever, in 1901 to return to Portland and 
again take up his practice. Mr. Caples was 
married in 1854 in Champaign County, Ohio, 
to Sarah J. Morrison. 

He was a member of the Portland Board 
of Trade, the State Bar Association, Port- 
land Lodge No. 55, A. F. & A. M., the Con- 
sistory and the thirty-second degree of Scot- 
tish Rite, and the A. O. U. W. He was 
always a staunch Republican and took great 
interest in politics. He was an eloquent 
and effective speaker, and one of Oregon's 
greatest trial lawyers. He took great in- 
terest in religion, being a member of the 
board of trustees of the Taylor Street Meth- 
odist Church. Died at his residence at Sell- 
wood. July 17, 1908, of paralysis. 

JOHN CATLIN. 

One of the prominent pioneers of Oregon 
and a member of the legal fraternity for 
thirty years was Judge John Catlin, who 
was born at Turkey Hill, St. Clair County, 
Illinois, February 6, 1832. His father was 
a sturdy Puritan, who had followed the 
course of empire Westward from Massachu- 
setts, first to Ohio, then to Illinois, and 
finally to Oregon in 1848, landing at Fos- 
ter's, twenty miles from where Portland 



now stands. The Judge received his early 
education in the common schools of Illinois 
and at McKendree College in Illinois, sup- 
plemented by such studying as he could do 
at intervals on the farms in Oregon and 
Washington. At 27 years of age, however, 
he returned to Illinois and took up the 




study of law with ex-Governor French, at 
the same time taking special work at Mc- 
Kendree College. He later attended a law 
school in Cincinnati and graduated there- 
from in 1861, returning to the office of Gov- 
ernor French, where he remained until the 
fall of 1862, when he returned to Portland 
and remained here the rest of his career. 
In 1858 he was a member of the Washing- 
ton Territorial Legislature. In 1886 he 
was elected Judge of Multnomah County 
for a term of four years. He also served 
a term as a member of the Portland C'ty 
Council. He was married in 1866 to Miss 
Frances A. Henderson, daughter of Robert 
and Rhoda Henderson, Oregon pioneers of 
1864. The Judge was a member of Har- 
mony Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and was emi- 
nently successful in the practice of law. 
For several years before his death he did 
not pursue the practice of his profession. 
Died after long illness July 19, 1902. 

STEPHEN F. CHADWICK. 

Stephen F. Chadwick, fifth Governor of 
the State of Oregon, was born in Connecti- 
cut, December 25, 1825. He studied law 
and was admitted to the bar of the State 
of New York in 1850, and immediately af- 
terward starting for the State of Oregon. 
He came by way of California, arriving in 
the Umpqua Valley in 1851 when he imme- 
diately entered upon the practice of his 



OBITUARY 



263 



profession as an attorney. He was elected 
first County Judge of what is now Douglas 
County and was the first postmaster at 
Scottsburg on the Umpqua River. He was 
Deputy U. S. Prosecuting Attorney for 
Southern Oregon and was elected a member 
of the Constitutional Convention for the 
formation of the State Constitution of Ore- 
gon. He was successively elected Presi- 
dential elector in 1864 and 1868, and at the 
election of 1870 was honored with the office 
of Secretary of State. He was re-elected 
in 1874. By the resignation of Governor 
Grover in February, 1877, he succeeded to 
the office of Governor, performing the du- 
ties of Chief Executive and also of Secre- 
tary of State until September 11, 1877. Af- 
ter the close of his public career, he re- 
tired to quiet and literary pursuits at his 
home in Salem, Oregon. He was a dis- 
tinguished Free Mason, having attained the 
thirty-third degree in the Scottish Rite of 
that order. He died suddenly in Salem in 
January, 1895. 

W. W. CHAPMAN. 

W. W. Chapman was born August 11, 
1808, at Clarksburg, Va. At the age of 14 
upon the death of his father he was left 
upon his own resources. He obtained an 
education at the public schools and secured 




a position as office clerk of the court, study- 
ing law in the meanwhile. He received a 
license to practice in 1832 and in the same 
year was married to Margaret F. Ingra- 
ham. In 1833 he went to Macomb, 111., and 
in 1835 to Burlington, Iowa, where he was 
appointed Prosecuting Attorney in 1836. 
The same year he was appointed by Presi- 
dent Jackson, United States Attorney for 



the Territory of Wisconsin. Jumping land 
claims was the cause of most of the litiga- 
tion, and Mr. Chapman sided with the set- 
tlers, who showed their appreciation by 
sending him as delegate to Congress. In 
1836 he removed to Dubuque and was elect- 
ed Colonel of the militia, and while in Con- 
gress he was the first man to propose a 
pre-emption law. In 1844 he was chosen a 
member of the State Convention to pre- 
pare a Constitution for Iowa. In May, 
1847, the spirit of adventure led him to 
start fo,r Oregon and he reached Marysville 
(now Corvallis) in November of that year. 
The following year he went to Salem, and 
later, the "gold fever" attacking him. he 
went with many others to California, where 
he mined for some time with good results. 
In 1849 he returned to Oregon with Gov- 
ernor Lane. He had intended searching for 
new gold fields, but shortly after his re- 
turn to Oregon was elected Representative 
to the first Territorial Legislature. At the 
end of the legislative session he removed 
to Oregon City and after remaining there 
a short time, came to Portland and bought 
a one-third interest in the section of land 
Portland was built on, which was owned 
by Stephen Coffin and D. H. Lownsdale. In 
the spring and summer of 1850 he cleared 
and built a home upon the spot where the 
court house now stands and in which he 
resided until 1853. The purchase of "The 
Gold Hunter" (a San Francisoo newspaper) 
and the shipping of. the outfit to Portland 
marked the foundation of "The Oregonian," 
Portland's first newspaper, and was an en- 
terprise of Mr. Chapman's. The opening of 
the Canyon Road, the enlargement of the 
town plat, and the improvement of the 
streets were also measures urged forward by 
Colonel Chapman. In Portland's struggle 
for existence against the strong rival towns 
on the Columbia and Willamette, no one 
is entitled to more credit than Colonel Chap- 
man. In 1853 he embarked in the cattle 
business at Fort Umpqua, but did not give 
up his practice in Portland. In the Indian 
war of 1855-56 he was at the head of a 
company and was made Lieutenant Colonel. 
Resuming civil life, he moved, late in 1856, 
to Corvallis and later still to Eugene, where 
he purchased extensive farming property. 
He was Surveyor General of the state for 
some time, resigning in 1861, and during 
this year returned with his family to Port- 
land and erected the family residence at 
Twelfth and Jefferson streets. He sfent a 
life of energy and a magnificent fortune in 
his efforts to secure for Oregon Eastern 
railroad connections, and when it was pro- 
posed to run a road from the Central Pa- 
cific line in California it was Colonel Chap- 
man's forethought that forced the builders 
to start to lay rails from Portland south- 
ward at the same time they began to lay 
them northward from Sacramento, so that 



264 



OBITUARY 



Oregon could derive equal advantage with 
California during the building. Coincident 
with his interest in railroad matters, he de- 
voted much time to the maritime commence 
of the state, and while a member of the 
Legislature of 1868 secured a Government 
subsidy of $30,000 for a heavy steam tug 
for towing vessels across the bar at As- 
toria. With this increased facility the mari- 
time commerce of Portland received the im- 
petus which still sweeps : on unchecked 
Colonel Chapman forestalled the Northern 
Pacific in their efforts to obtain a right-of- 
way on the south side of the Columbia River 
and hold the land grant without building 
on it. He died in 1892. 

MATTHEW PAUL DEADY. 

Matthew Paul Deady was born near Eas- 
ton, Talbot County, Maryland, May 12, 1824. 
Died March 24, 1893. His father was 
a teacher, and instructed him until he 
was 12 years old, when the family re- 
moved to Wheeling, W. Va., where h s 
father secured the position of principal of 
Lancaster Academy. A few years later they 
went further West and resided some time 
at Cincinnati, Ohio, Covington, Ky., and 




Rodney. Mo. In 1833 his mother died and 
the young man lived with his grandfather 
and uncle in a store in Baltimore for two 
years. He. then returned to Wheeling and 
clerked in a music store until his father 
bought a farm in Belmont, Ohio, in 1837, 
and the family settled there. The subject 
of this sketch worked on the farm and stud- 
ied until 1841 when he went to Barnesville 
to open a blacksmith shop, which he oper- 
ated for four years, going to Barnesville 



Academy during the winters of 1843-44-45 
and graduating with a certificate to teach. 
Taught school at St. Clairsville and read 
law with Judge Kennon at that place. Was 
admitted to the bar in 1847 and remained 
with Judge Kennon a year and a half. In 
April, 1849, he started across the plains 
and arrived at the spot where Portland now 
stands. Went to Oregon City and thence 
to Lafayette, where he taught school. In 
1850 was elected to the House of Repre- 
sentatives from Yamhill County. Mr. Deady 
prepared for publication the laws enacted in 
1849 and 1850, the first volume of the kind 
published; it was known as the Hamilton 
Code. In 1853 he was appointed Judge of 
the Territorial Supreme Court and a mem- 
ber of the Constitutional Convention in 
1S57, being president of the same. In 1859 
was appointed as United States District 
Judge, when Oregon was admitted as a 
state. In 1862 was appointed Code Com- 
missioner and prepared the Code of Civil 
Procedure, which was enacted by the Leg- 
islature as he prepared it. 

He also prepared a general incorporation 
act which passed the Legislature and be- 
came a law. This act was the first one 
in the United States that placed all business 
corporations on the same level, by declar- 
ing that any three or more persons may be 
incorporated for the purpose of engaging in 
any lawful business, enterprise, pursuit or 
occupation, in the manner provided in the 
act. He also prepared a code of criminal 
procedure, a penal code and a justice's code 
all of which are still in force. The Taws 
of Oregon, as then in force, were compiled 
by the Judge in 1874, with the assistance of 
Lafayette Lane, he compiled a similar code, 
and both were compiled at the special re- 
ciuest of the Legislature. He was for some 
time correspondent for the San Francisco 
"Bulletin." In 1867 was assigned by Mr. 
Justice Fields to hold the United States 
Circuit Court in San Francisco and this 
duty engaged three months of his time each 
year in 1867. 1868 and 1869. He was a 
member of Trinity Episcopal Church and 
in 1876 was appointed regent of the State 
University, acting as president of the board 
many years. He assisted in forming the Li- 
brary Association and acted as president of 
that body for some time. In 1852 he married 
Lucy A. Henderson. Judge Deady was a Re- 
publican, a self-made man, risen to the ranks 
of prominence and honor. 

JOSEPH NORTON DOLPH. 

Joseph Norton Dolph was one of the 
greatest leaders the Republican party ever 
had in Oregon. Mr. Dolph was born at 
an obscure village called Dolphsburg, near 
Watkins, N. Y.. on October 19, 1839, and 
died in Portland, March 10, 1896. after over 
thirty years of noted activity for the State 
of Oregon and the City of Portland. At 
18 years of age he was teaching school and 



OBITUARY 



265 



for several years followed this profession, 
reading law during his leisure time with 
Hon. Jeremiah McGuire, of Havana, N. Y., 
until he was admitted to practice in 1861. 
His desire to come West was gratified in 
1862, when he enlisted in Captain Craw- 
ford's company, known as the Oregon Es- 
cort, raised under an Act of Congress for 
the purpose of protecting immigrants from 
the Indians. Upon his arrival at Walla 




Walla he was honorably discharged as or- 
derly sergeant and came to Portland, where 
he formed a law partnership in 1863 with Hon. 
John H. Mitchell, the same continuing until 
Mr. Mitchell's election to the United States 
Senate in 1872. Then Mr. Dolph entered 
the firm of Dolph, Bronaugh, Dolph & Si- 
mon. In the meantime he had served as 
City Attorney in 1864 and had prepared and 
proposed some very important amendments 
to the city charter, which were afterwards 
adopted, and had also revised the city ordi- 
nances for publication. In January, 1865, 
President Lincoln appointed him U. S. Dis- 
trict Attorney for Oregon, which place he 
resigned in 1866 to take his seat in the 
State Senate. He was deposed from his 
seat in 1868 by a strictly partisan vote, but 
in 1872 was returned with an increased ma- 
jority and served for two succeeding ses- 
sions. As chairman of the State Central 
Committee in 1866 he proved his phenome- 
nal leadership, which eventually, in 1883, 
gained for him a seat in the United States 
Senate. In 1889 he was re-elected, but re- 
tired in 1895. He proved himself an able 
statesman while in the Senate and gained 
for Oregon many measures of the greatest 
value to the state. He was one of the most 



prominent lodge men of the state, in 1876 
being Most Worthy Grand Master of the 
Odd Fellows, and in 1882 Most Worshipful 
Grand Master of the Masons. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN DOWELL. 

Benjamin Franklin Dowell was born in 
Albemarle County, Virginia, October 31, 
1826. During childhood his parents removed 
to Shelby County, Tennessee, where he re- 
ceived his early education, prior to his en- 
tering the University of Virginia, from which 
he graduated in the law course in 1847. 
After graduation he returned to Tennessee 
and started in the practice of his profes- 
sion, first at Raleigh, later at Memphis. In 
1850 he gave up his practice in Tennessee 
and started for the gold fields of Califor- 




nia, but being attacked by the cholera, he 
left for Oregon as soon as he was able, set- 
tling at Jacksonville, where he resided from 
1852 to 1885. In 1856 he opened a law 
office in Jacksonville and built up one of 
the largest private practices in the state. 
Although actively practicing his profession, 
he was for fourteen years owner of the 
"Oregon Sentinel" and controlled the des- 
tinies of this well-known publication. He 
was a Republican, but never aspired for 
office, nevertheless he held several local 
offices and was at one time District Judge 
in Tennessee; also Prosecuting Attorney of 
the First Judicial District of Oregon and 
United States District Attorney for brief 
periods. 

JOHN COUCH FLANDERS. 

John Couch Flanders was born in the 
City of Portland, Ore., January 15, 1865, the 
son of George Hall and Maria Louise (Fos- 



266 



OBITUARY 



ter) Flanders. Through both parents he 
came of old New England Puritan stock, 
dating back to early Colonial times. He re- 
ceived his early education in the schools 
of Portland, and fitted for college at the 
Bishop Scott Academy, entering Yale in 
1881 and graduating as Bachelor of Arts in 
1885. After the completion of his college 
course, Mr. Flanders read law in the office 
of William H. Effinger, in this city, and was 
admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court 
of the state in October, 1887. Since that 
time he was actively engaged in the 




practice of his profession and since 1891 
was a member of the firm of Williams, 
Wood & Linthicum, making a specialty of 
admiralty practice. In the latter year, also, 
he became a member of the Port of Port- 
land Commission, having charge of the im- 
provement of the Willamette and Columbia 
Rivers from Portland to the sea. He was 
one of the Lewis and Clark Commissioners. 
He was also a member of the board of 
trustees of the Portland Chamber of Com- 
merce and other civic organizations. Mr. 
Flanders had always been a staunch Demo- 
crat in politics, was a delegate to the state 
conventions of the party in 1892 and 1896 
and chairman of the County Committee in 
the latter year. Since 1896 he had sup- 
ported the wing of the party opposed to 
the theories of Mr. Bryan and his friends. 
He was a member of the Arlington Club, 
University and Waverly Golf Club. In 1906 
he married Mabel Huston. His wife, his 
mother and three sisters survive him. Died 
January 20, 1909, after a long illness. 

N. H. GATES. 

N. H. Gates was born in Washington 



County, Ohio, in 1814, and was educated in 
the public schools of that state, being 
raised on a farm until his early manhood, 
when he learned the carpenter trade. He 
was married in 1835 to Mary Koontz, in 
Gallia County, Ohio, where he worked at 
his trade and practiced law, having been 




admitted to the bar of Ohio in the year 
1S34. He resided in Iowa about eight years 
and then moved to this Coast, spending 
about two years in California mining and 
trading, and coming to Oregon in 1852. He 
went first to the Cascades and then to The 
Dalles. He was elected to the Territorial 
Legislature in 1855 and was a member of 
the lower House for four years, being its 
presiding officer when Oregon was admitted 
as a state in 1859. He was elected County 
Judge of Wasco County in 1872 and served 
four years, the same year being appointed 
as a member of the State Board of Equali- 
zation, by Governor Grover, and holding 
the office of Brigadier General under the 
same executive. He was a member of the 
House of Representatives in 1878 and 1880, 
was elected Joint Senator from Lake and 
Wasco Counties. His first wife died in 
1866 and in 1888 he married Mrs. Mary 
Schubnell at The Dalles. 

ADDISON C. GIBBS. 

Addison C. Gibbs, second Governor of 
the State of Oregon and the first Governor 
elected by the Republican party, was born 
in Cattaraugus County, New York, July 9, 
1825. He was educated in a State Normal 
School in New York and became a school 
teacher, and, in 1849, a lawyer. He came 
to California during the mining excitement 



OBITUARY 



267 



of 1849, but not finding mining to his 
taste he embarked on September 12, 1850, 
with one hundred others, for a new seaport 
then just being opened, called Umpqua. On 
arrival at the mouth of the Umpqua River 
Mr. Gibbs immediately identified himself 
with the interests of the new country, and 
on account of his education and ability was 
a recognized force in the development of 
the Umpqua Valley. He laid out the town- 
site of the City of Gardiner, and was the 
first Representative to the Territorial Leg- 
islature from the County of Umpqua (now 



in London, England. His remains were 
brought to Oregon by an act of the Legis- 
lative Assembly, which appropriated money 
for that purpose. 

BENJAMIN F. HARDING. 

Benjamin F. Harding, the fourth secre- 
tary of the Territory of Oregon, was 
born in Pennsylvania in 1832. He came 
to Oregon in 1849 and settled in Ma- 
rion County, where he was active and 
conspicuous in public affairs for more than 
a quarter of a century. He was a lawyer 




Douglas), in 1852. In the same year he 
was appointed Collector of Customs at the 
Umpqua River, that bay, at that time, being 
a port of entry and distributing point for 
supplies for Southern Oregon, then rapidly 
being developed as a mining country. Later 
in life Mr. Gibbs settled in Portland for 
the practice of his profession as a lawyer 
and was elected to the Legislature from 
Multnomah County in 1860. In 1862 he 
was elected Governor of the State of Ore- 
gon, taking his oath of office September 10, 
1862, and performing the duties of Chief 
Executive with credit to himself until the 
inauguration of his successor on September 
1, 1866. In 1866 Governor Gibbs was a 
Republican caucus nominee for United 
States Senator, his opponent being John H. 
Mitchell. There being a deadlock in the 
Legislature, H. W. Corbett, a compromise 
candidate, was elected over both Gibbs and 
Mitchell. At various other times Mr. Gibbs 
filled important offices of trust, among oth- 
ers being that of one of three commission- 
ers for the adjustment of the Indian war 
claims of Oregon. He died in January, 1887, 




by profession, but devoted most of his 
time to politics and farming, being regarded 
as one of the shrewdest politicians in Ore- 
gon. He was United States Attorney be- 
fore the organization of the State govern- 
ment and was three times a member of 
the Territorial Legislature. He was sec- 
retary of the Legislature from 1855 to 1859 
by appointment of President Pierce. In 
1862 the Legislative Assembly of the State 
of Oregon elected him to fill the unexpired 
term of Colonel E. D. Baker of the United 
States Senate, Colonel Baker having been 
killed at the head of his regiment in the 
battle at Ball's Bluff, Virginia. Senator 
Harding served out the term and was 
succeeded in 1865 by George H. Williams. 
At the beginning of the war of the rebel- 
lion Mr. Harding, J. W. Nesmith and 
Asahel Bush were the ruling spirits of 
the Union, or Douglas Democracy of Ore- 
gon, while Gen. Joseph Lane, Delazon 
Smith and others were the leaders of the 
pro-slavery Democrats, who sympathized 
with the secessionists of the South. They 
were bitterly hostile to each other. Soon 



268 



OBITUARY 



after the expiration of his term in the 
senate Mr. Harding retired to a farm in 
Marion County, and later removed to 
Cottage Grove, Lane County, where he 
remained until the time of his death. 

WILLIAM DAVENPORT HARE. 

William Davenport Hare was born Sep- 
tember 1, 1834, at Wheeling, West Vir- 
ginia, being the son of the Reverend 
Joseph Hare and wife. In 1853, in 
company with Jesse Edwards of Benton 
County, Mr. Hare came to Oregon, over 
the old Council Bluffs Route, locating at 
once at Portland and accepting a position 
as purser of the steamboat Fashion, which 
he held for three years, sometimes acting 
as pilot and captain. In 1857 he was del- 
egated to copy the records of that part 




of Washington County which was annexed 
to Multnomah County by legislative enact- 
ment, and at the conclusion of this work 
he was appointed auditor of Washington 
County. In 1858 he was elected County 
Clerk of Washington County, and served 
six years. In 1859 he was married to 
Henrietta Schofield, who died in 1890. In 
1864 he was admitted to the bar of the 
State and opened an office at Hillsboro. 
In 1870 he was elected to the State Leg- 
islature and in 1872 was named as one 
of the Grant Electors, making an active 
campaign of the state. Mr. Hare served 
as Collector of Customs for eight years. 
He was a member of the Masonic, and 
A. O .U. W. fraternities. He died Feb- 
ruary 6, 1910. His conception of life and 
death was summed up in a memorial de- 
livered by him in the State Senate in 
1885, when, in paying a tribute to the 



late Henry Warren, Senator from Yam- 
hill County, he said: "The stoics tell us 
that Death is Oblivion; that human af- 
fection only bids us, o'er the tomb of our 
departed friends, plant the acacia and 
blooming flowers: the modern, however, 
tells us to do all this and also to build 
monuments of marble to their memory 
and upon these monuments carve epi- 
taphs; but the best epitaph that can be 
written is the deeds and acts of Life. 
Death is not Oblivion; Men, in this life, 
build their own characters and the highest 
aim of every man should be so to order 
his own life that when the end comes it 
may be truly said of him, 'he lived a life 
void of offense to God and man.' " 

BENJAMIN HAYDEN. 




Benjamin Hayden, pioneer, lawyer, In- 
dian War Veteran and Legislator, was 
born in Logan County, Kentucky, Sep- 
tember 11, 1822. His youth was spent 
in the State of Illinois, but in early 
manhood he removed to the State of 
Missouri, remaining there until the "gold 
excitement" of 1849, when he went to 
California. The following year he re- 
turned to Missouri, where he married Ze- 
relda Gibson. They came to Oregon in 
1852, taking a donation land claim in Polk 
County Hills, near Eola, which property 
is still in possession of his family. At 
the outbreak of the Indian War of 1855-56, 
Mr. Hayden aided in raising a company 
and served as Captain until the close of 
the campaign. He early took up the 
practice of law and became one of the 
most effective trial lawyers in the Wil- 
lamette Valley. His ability as a public 



OBITUARY 



269 



speaker made him not only a successful 
advocate but won him prominence in pol- 
itics. He represented Polk County at 
several sessions of the Legislature and 
served as Speaker of the House in 1870. 
Aggressiveness was one of his chief char- 
acteristics and whether laboring on his 
farm, trying a case in court, conducting a 
political campaign, or serving in the Leg- 
islative Halls, he worked hard for what 
he desired to accomplish. He was a 
staunch Democrat and during his years of 
activity was prominent in the councils of 
the party. Mr. Hayden died on October 
29, 1908. 

CHARLES CLARENCE LINDEN. 

Charles Clarence Linden was born in 
Richmond, Virginia, on June 10, 1858, 
being the son of Warwick Watson and 





Cecila (Payera) Linden. He received 
his early education at the public schools 
of Richmond, Virginia and after teach- 
ing school for a short time, entered 
the Washington and Lee University, 
spending two years in study there. He 
came to Oregon in 1878. In 1880 Mr. Lin- 
den married Luella Jones. About 1886 
he commenced the study of law in the of- 
fice of Irwin & Vinton, and was admitted 
to the bar of Oregon in 1889. In 1901 he 
was elected City Attorney of Sheridan, 
Oregon. Mr. Linden was a member of 
the Masonic, K. of P., I. O. O. F. and 
W. O. W. fraternities, and was a Re- 
publican. He died July, 1907. 

LAFAYETTE LANE. 

Lafayette Lane was born in Vander- 
berg County, Indiana, on November 12, 



1842. He received his education at 
Washington, D. C., and Stamford, Con- 
necticut. Later he studied law and 
removed to Oregon for the practice 
of his profession. He took a prominent 
part in business and political affairs, and 
in 1864 was elected a member of the 
State Legislature from Umatilla County. 
In the year 1872 Lafayette Grover ap- 
pointed Mr. Lane one of the commission- 
ers to collect and compile the statutes of 
Oregon into a systematic code, and the 
well arranged code of 1874 is the result 
of the labors of Matthew P. Deady and 
Lafayette Lane. In the year 1865, Con- 
gressman-elect George A. La Dow having 
died, a special election for congressman 
was held and Lafayette Lane was the suc- 
cessful candidate of the Democratic party. 
At the next election he was a candidate 
to succeed himself but was defeated by 
Richard Williams. He later settled at 
Roseburg, Oregon, for the practice of his 
profession as a lawyer and died in that 
city on November 24, 18 ( J6. 

DAVID LOGAN. 

David Logan was perhaps the great- 
est jury lawyer of his time. He was 
born in 1824 at Springfield. Illinois, 





and was the son of an eminent law- 
yer and judge of the Supreme Court of 
that state. He came to Oregon in 
1850 and settled in Lafayette, but re- 
moved to Portland soon afterward. He 
was defeated as a candidate for the Leg- 
islature in 1851, but served as a mem- 
ber in 1854. In 1860 he ran unsuccessfully 
as a candidate for Congress, and again 



270 



OBITUARY 



in 1868. He was a member of the Con- 
stitutional Convention. He had a large 
practice as a lawyer and retired in 1871 
from the practice of his profession, took 
a farm in Yamhill County, upon which 
he died a few years later. 

LEWIS LINN McARTHUR. 

Lewis Linn McArthur, son of William 
P. and Mary S. (Young) McArthur, was 
born in Portsmouth, Va., March 18, 1843. 
He was educated at Brown University, 
Providence, R. I., and at Dickinson Col- 
lege, Carlisle, Pa., and read law at York, 




Pa., where he was admitted to the bar 
on March 18, 1864. He then went to 
Council Bluffs, Iowa, joined an immigra- 
tion party and started across the plains 
for Oregon. He began the practice of 
law at Umatilla, landing in the Fall of 
1864, and in 1865 was elected City Re- 
corder. He also edited a newspaper known 
as the "Index." In 1867 he moved to 
Auburn, Baker County, where he prac- 
ticed his profession and engaged in min- 
ing. He was elected County Judge of 
Baker County in 1868, and in 1870 founded 
the "Bed Rock Democrat," a weekly 
newspaper, still published at Baker City. 
His connection with this paper was brief, 
however, for in the summer of 1870 he 
was elected as Supreme Judge from the 
old Fifth Judicial District, a position 
which he held until 1878, when the sepa- 
rate Supreme Court was established. Upon 
being legislated out of the office of Su- 
preme Judge, he wns immediately ap- 
pointed as Circuit Judge of the Fifth 
District by Governor Thayer and was 
elected to the same position in 1882. He 



resigned from the bench in 1883 and 
formed a law partnership with Judge J. 
B. Condon, of The Dalles. This partner- 
ship continued until 1886, when President 
Cleveland appointed Judge McArthur as 
United States District Attorney for Or- 
egon. Upon the expiration of his term 
of office in 1890, he became a member 
of the Portland law firm of Bronaugh, 
Northup & McArthur, which was after- 
ward changed to Bronaugh, McArthur, 
Fenton & Bronaugh. Judge McArthur 
maintained his connection with this firm 
until his death on May 10, 1897. 

The subject of this sketch was married 
to Miss Harriet K. Nesmith, daughter 
of the late Senator James Willis Nes- 
mith, on July 10, 1878. He is survived 
by two sons, C. N. and Lewis A. McAr- 
thur, besides his widow, whose present 
home is at Salem. Judge McArthur was 
identified with the educational interests 
of the state, being a regent of the Uni- 
versity of Oregon for more than 24 
years. In politics he was a Democrat of 
the old school, although he repudiated 
Bryan and free silver in 1896. He served 
as president of the Oregon Bar Associa- 
tion during the year 1890-91, and was 
prominently identified with several fra- 
ternal orders and charitable associations. 

JOHN H. MITCHELL. 

John H. Mitchell was born in Wash- 
ington County, Pennsylvania, June 22, 
1835. He received a public school edu- 
cation and the instruction of a private 
tutor; studied and practiced law in Penn- 
sylvania; later removing to California and 
practicing law at San Luis Obispo and at 
San Francisco. In 1860 he came to Port- 
land, continued the practice of his pro- 
fession, and in 1861 was elected corpora- 
tion attorney of the city of Portland. In 
1862 he was elected to the Oregon State 
Senate for four years, serving during the 
latter two years as president of that 
body. He was a candidate for United 
States Senator in 1866, but was defeated 
by one vote. The next year he was 
elected professor of medical jurisprudence 
at the Willamette University, continuing 
in that capacity for four years. On Sep- 
tember 28, 1ST2, he was the successful 
candidate for United States Senator from 
Oregon before the Legislature and served 
until March, 1879. At the close of his 
term he returned to Portland and re- 
sumed the practice of his profession, re- 
maining there until his death. In 1885 and 
in 1891 he was successively re-elected 
United States Senator from Oregon. He 
died December 8, 1905. 

MARION F. MULKEY. 

Marion F. Mulkey was born in Johnson 
County, Missouri, November 14, 1836, and 
came to Oregon' with his parents in 1846. 



OBITUARY 



271 



His boyhood days were spent on the 
farm in Benton County, where he obtained 
his early education in the customary log 
schoolhouse of the time. Later he at 
tended college at Forest Grove, until the 
outbreak of the Indian war in 1856, when 
he enlisted and served until peace was 
declared. In 1858 he entered Yale Col- 
lege, graduating therefrom in 1862. He 
returned to Portland and took up the 
study of law under the tuition of Jur> 
E. D. Shattuck. While thus employed, he 
acted, during 1863, as Provost Marshal, 
aiding in the enrollment of that year 
The following year he was admitted to 
the bar and was for several years a mem- 
ber of the firm of Hill & Mulkey, of whic 
the senior member was W. Lair Hill. He 
was elected Prosecuting Attorney for the 
Fourth Judicial District in 1866, and the 
following year was a member of the 
Portland City Council. In 1872 he was 
elected City Attorney of Portland, which 
office he held for two terms. On retiring 
from this office he formed a partnership 
with Hon. J. F. Caples, and served as 
Deputy District Attorney during Mr. Ca- 
ples' three successive terms. 

He was married in 1862 to Miss Marv 
E. Porter, of New Haven, Conn. In pol- 
itics he was a Republican. He was a 
member of the Masonic fraternity. Mr 
Mulkey enjoyed a lucrative practice and 
by foresight in making investments 
amassed a considerable fortune, besides 
building up his favorite city. His death 
occurred on February 25, 1889. 

JOHN JOSEPH MURPHY. 

John Joseph Murphy, for many years a 
resident of Marion County, Oregon, was 
born in Ireland June 22, 1832, and died 
near the east entrance of the county court- 
house at Salem on June 19, 1907. In 
early manhood he came to Oregon from 
California, and took up his residence at 
Champoeg in the northern part of Marion 
County. He was a carpenter by track 1 
and pursued that occupation for several 
years. He was a Justice of the Peace 
in Champoeg precinct in the latter sixties 
and his characteristic disposition to know 
all about anything he undertook, and to 
perform its duties creditably, led him to 
study law for the purposes of that office. 
He was afterward elected Sheriff of Ma- 
rion County and his connection with the 
courts, as such officer, and the legal ques- 
tions affecting his administration of this 
office still further stimulated his research in 
law, so that he studied systematically and was 
regularly admitted to the bar of the Supreme 
Coutt of this state in 1873. 

He served with ability in the Legisla- 
ture of the state and in various positions 
in the city government of Salem. J- 
acted for several vears as United States 



Postal Inspector with energy and fidelity. 

For some sixteen years prior to his 
death he was clerk of the Supreme Court 
of the State of Oregon and died an in 
cumbent of that office. 

In every relation of life, both public 
and private, his record is one of unvary- 
ing integrity, and 'tho many in the 




struggles of politics and law felt his prow- 
ess as an antagonist, yet no one can 
truthfully assail his honor as friend or 
foe. 

He was a pronounced man in whatever 
he undertook and he was zealous for a 
friend or against an enemy. He was, in 
the full sense of the word, a "self-made 
man" and the architect of his own ca- 
reer. 

JAMES WILLIS NESMITH. 

James Willis Nesmith was born in the 
State of Maine on July 23, 1820. His 
parents died when he was a small boy 
and he was thrown upon his own re- 
sources. His youth was passed in the 
states of Ohio and Missouri, where he 
picked up the rudiments of an education 
as best he could. In 1843 he joined the 
Applegate immigration party and reached 
Oregon in the Fall of that year. He was 
admitted to the bar and served as judge 
under the Provisional Government in ' 
1845, and in 1846 represented Yamhill 
County in the Legislature. He captained 
a company in the Cayuse war of 1847, 
and was colonel of volunteers "a,nd com- 
mander-in-chief of the Oregon troops 
during the Yakima and Rogue River wars 
of 1855 and 1856. From 1853 to 1855 
he was United States Marshal for the 



272 



OBITUARY 



Territory of Oregon, and was superin- 
tendent of Indian affairs from 1857 to 
1859. 

In 1860 Nesmith was elected as United 
States Senator from Oregon, serving the 
state with dignity and ability from March 
4, 1861, until March 3, 1867. The story 
of his loyalty to the Union and the con 




fidence reposed in him by President Lin 
coin is a matter of national history. In 
1873 Senator Nesmith was elected to ren 
resent Oregon in the lower house of 
Congress, but declined to become a can- 
didate for re-election. Upon returning to 
Oregon he retired to his farm in the 
Rickreall valley, where he lived until 
his death on June 17, 1885. 

On June 21, 1846, Mr. Nesmith was 
married to Miss Pauline Goff, who sur- 
vived him until 1890. Of his children, 
Mrs. Wm. M. Molson, of Montreal, Can- 
ada; Mrs. L. L. McArthur, of Salem; 
Mrs. Levi Ankeny, of Walla Walla; Jame 
B. Nesmith, of Rickreall, and William 
G. Nesmith, of Blue River, are still liv- 
ing. 

WILLIAM WILMER PAGE. 

William Wilmer Page was born in 1834 
in Westmoreland County, Virginia, of a 
very old and honorable family, which 
traces its history to the Norman '- 
vasion of England. He died suddenly at his 
residence in Portland,. April 12, 1897. He was 
a son of Rev. Charles Page, whose mother 
was Ann Lee, a sister of General "Light 
Horse Harry" Lee. Judge Page gradu- 
ated with honor from the Miami, Ohio, 
law college and began the practice of 



law in Chicago when scarcely out of his 
teens. Two years later he removed to 
Oregon, arriving at Oregon City in 1857. 
He practiced his profession a short time 
at Salem, then removing to Portland, 
where he resided until his death. Mr. 
Page was admitted to practice in the 
United States District Court for this dis 




trict by Judge Dcady, the second day after 
the court had been established at Salem, 
and practiced law in this state from 
that time until his death. When Judge 
Wait resigned to run for Congress, Mr. 
Page was appointed Judge of the Supreme 
and Circuit Courts to fill the unexpired 
term from May to September. For nearly 
twenty years Judge Page was ranked as 
one of the most brilliant and able mem- 
bers of the Oregon bar. He was ad- 
mired by his associates for the clear, 
concise, logical manner in which he con- 
ducted all legal business. His was es- 
sentially a legal mind, giving him a read- 
iness and soundness of judgment in quick- 
ly sifting out important points from a 
mass of evidence and in applying correct 
principles of law thereto, backed by an 
authority that was second to none. His 
appointment as a Justice of the Supreme 
Court by Governor John Whiteaker was 
a high tribute to his high mental qualities 
and legal attainments, especially as he had 
then scarcely passed his twenty-fifth year. 
After retiring from the Supreme Bench 
he became a member of the law firm of 
Smith, Grover & Page, which promptly 
became and long retained its standing 
as one of the most prominent law firms 
of the Northwest. He afterward had 



OBITUARY 



273 



various other law partners, but for sev- 
eral years before his death conducted his 
legal business alone. 

ORVILLE C. PRATT. 

Orville C. Pratt was born in Ontario 
County, New York, April 24, 1819. He 
received his early education at Rush- 
ville in that county. He later supple- 
mented this schooling by a course of 
classics and mathematics in two local 
academies, before reaching his seventeenth 
year, becoming thoroughly versed in those 
branches and a thorough English scholar. 
Shortly afterward he received from Pres- 
ident Jackson an appointment to a ca- 




detship in the United States Military 
Academy at West Point, which he en- 
tered as a member of the class of 1837. 
He remained at West Point two years, 
but his ambition to become a lawyer 
overshadowing his military desires, and 
further reverses of the family making it 
imperative that he prepare to earn a live- 
lihood, he entered the law office of a 
relative, Samuel Stevens, and in two 
years was admitted to the bar of New 
York. At the age of 21 he began his 
professional career at Rochester and his 
abilities were soon recognized, especially 
through his active participation in the 
Presdential campaign of 1840. He en- 
tered into partnership with Fletcher M. 
Haight, one of the leading practitioners 
of Rochester, under the firm name of 
Haight & Pratt, which partnership ex- 
isted until 1842, when Mr. Haight with- 
drew on account of his wife's death. In 
1843 he was attracted to the West and 



settled in Galena, 111., soon building up 
a lucrative practice there. In 1847 he 
was elected to the convention which re- 
vised the first constitution of Illinois. 
After the close of the convention he was 
appointed by the Secretary of War one 
of a committee to investigate certain 
charges against an army officer stationed 
at the Arkansas River Fort, and while 
on this mission received a message re- 
questing him to proceed to Mexico, Cali- 
fornia and Oregon to investigate confi- 
dential matters. He set forth for Santa 
Fe, thence to Los Angeles, to Monterey. 
San Jose and then San Francisco, or 
Yerba Buena, as it was then called. Presi- 
dent Polk had meanwhile appointed him 
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court 
of Oregon, 'and he came to Portland. 
He was the pioneer judge of Oregon, no 
other member having arrived as yet. To- 
ward the close of 1848, General Joseph 
Lane, the first governor of Oregon, ar- 
rived and in the following March organ- 
ized the first territorial government, Judge 
Pratt and the governor being the only 
two members at their posts. Later in 
the same month Chief Justice Wm. P 
Bryant reached Oregon City and the first 
session of the Supreme Court of Oregon 
was held. Within a few months the 
Chief Justice resigned on account of ill 
health, and Peter H. Burnett, who had 
been appointed Associate Judge, declined 
to accept and left for California. For 
nearly two years Judge Pratt exercised 
all the powers of the judiciary, holding 
all his own terms in court and those 
which should have been held by the Chief 
Justice, and in the meantime organizing 
most of the district and circuit courts 
in the counties. During this time he tried 
many important cases, among them be- 
ing those of five Indian chiefs implicated 
in the Whitman massacre. The first Court 
of Admiralty within the present limits 
of Oregon and California was held by 
Judge Pratt at Portland. He served as 
judge until 1856, when he removed to San 
Francisco and formed a partnership with 
Alexander Campbell, who had practiced 
in the courts of Oregon. He was after- 
ward judge of the Twelfth Judicial Dis- 
trict Court of the city and county of San 
Francisco, and of the county of San Ma- 
teo, for six years. In politics he was a 
persistent and zealous Democrat, but was 
devoted to the Union cause during the 
war. His death occurred at San Fran- 
cisco in October, 1891. 

"The value of his services to Oregon 
was not in the number of cases he tried 
nor the amounts involved therein, but in 
the character and circumstances in which 
they arose and were disposed of. His 
judicial career covered a formative pe 
riod in the history of the country when 



274 



OBITUARY 



proceedings were not so much followed as 
made. In this work of blazing the line 
and marking the corners of the law in a 
yet unformed community, he did much 
during his few years on the bench, and 
did it well.' 5 

ERASTUS DARWIN SHATTUCK. 

Judge Shattuck was born at Bakers- 
field, Vt, December 31, 1824, and spen 
his childhood on a farm in that com- 
munity. His early education was received 
at an academy in his native town, and 
he later attended the University of Ver- 
mont, graduating therefrom in 1844. He 
engaged in teaching for two years after 
graduation, studying law during his leisure 
hours. In 1852 he was admitted to the 
bar of New York. In December of the 
same year he was married to Miss Sarah 
A. Armstrong. On February 15, 1853, 




he and his bride landed in Portland, com- 
ing by steamer from New York via the 
Isthmus of Panama. Mr. Shattuck was 
principally engaged during the next four 
years in school work in Oregon City, 
and also as professor of ancient lan- 
guages in Pacific University at Forest 
Grove. In 1855 he was elected superin- 
tendent of schools of Washington Count 
and in 1856 was made Probate Judge of 
the same county. In 1857 he was elected 
delegate from Washington County to the 
Constitutional Convention and took an 
active part in framing the constitution of 
the state. After the adjournment of the 
convention the Judge moved to Portland 
and formed a law partnership with David 
Logan, meeting with marked success from 



the very start. His popularity caused him 
to be elected in 1858 as joint representa- 
tive to the last Territorial Legislature. 
From this date his fame was such that 
his services were in constant demand 
by the county and state. In 1861 he was 
appointed United States District Attor- 
ney and in 1862 was elected Judge of 
the Supreme and Circuit Courts for the 
Fourth Judicial District, which latter of- 
fice he .held until November, 1867, when 
he resigned. In 1874, however, he was 
again elected to the judgeship and served 
until the reorganization of the state ju- 
diciary by the legislative act of 1878. In 
1886 he was elected Judge of the Circuit 
Court in the Fourth District, a position 
he held until 1898, when he resigned on 
account of failing health. Besides these 
high offices, the Judge served in various 
minor capacities with honor. He was at 
one time a member of the City Council, 
and was for some time a member of the 
Board of School Directors, and was one 
of the founders of the Public Library. In 
politics Judge Shattuck was first a Whig, 
then a Republican, next a Greeley Dem- 
ocrat and finally a Democrat of most in- 
dependent tendencies. It has been said 
that "no man has contributed more to 
the establishment and maintenance of the 
high character of the judicial tribunals 
than he, and no one has done more to 
advance the material and moral welfare 
of the community or state." He died in 1900. 

SAMUEL LEONIDAS SIMPSON. 




Mr. Simpson was born October 10, 
1845, in the State of Missouri, being the 



OBITUARY 



275 



son of Ben and Nancy (Cooper) Simpson. 
His parents removed to the State of Or- 
egon when he was but one year old, and 
he received his early education at the 
public schools, later attending the Wil- 
lamette University, from which he grad- 
uated in 1865. He was admitted to the 
bar at Salem in 1866 and immediately be- 
gan the practice of his profession at Cor- 
vallis, Oregon, where he remained for 
about two years. In 1867 he married Juli;i 
Humphrey. He then entered the field 
of journalism, becoming editor of "The 
Corvallis Gazette." From that time on 
he devoted most of his time to journal- 
ism, having written many fine short sto- 
ries. He has been called "The Oregon 
Poet," and his writings are now being 
published by W. T. Burney. He died in 
June, 1899. 

BENJAMIN STARK. 

Benjamin Stark was born in the city of 
New Orleans, La., June 26, 1820. He re- 
ceived an academic education in New Lon- 







don, Conn., and a commercial education 
in the city of New York, and in 1845 
came to Oregon, establishing headquarters 
at Portland, where he is said to have 
erected the first building, a log cabin or 
trading house. Soon after coming to Or- 
egon he established commercial relations 
with the Sandwich Islands and Califor- 
nia, when the latter was a Mexican prov- 
ince. In 1850 he abandoned commercial 
pursuits, studied law, and was admitted to 
the bar in 1851. He was a member of 
the Territorial Legislature of Oregon in 
1852 and of the State Legislature in 1860. 



Upon the death of Colonel E. D. Baker, 
in 1861, Governor Whiteaker of Oregon 
appointed Benjamin Stark United States 
Senator from Oregon to fill the unexpired 
time of Colonel Baker. Mr. Stark was 
politically what is known as an old-line 
Democrat, and was delegate to the Na- 
tional Democratic Convention in Chicago 
in 1864. 

LANSING STOUT. 

One of the foremost citizens of Port- 
land, one of the ablest men of Oregon, 
a lawyer of high rank, was Hon. Lan- 
sing Stout, who was born in Water- 
town, Jefferson County, New York, March 
27, 1828. Naturally adapted for the law, 
he took up its study with Hon. Ira 
Harris, of Albany, New York. He left 
the East in 1852, and emigrated to Cali-' 
fornia, where his success was instan- 
taneous, being elected to the Assembly 
from Placer County in 1855. Although 
one of the youngest members, he made a 
splendid record and served with credit to 
himself and his constituency. In 1857 he 
came to Oregon and permanently located 
in Portland, soon forming a partnership 
with Col. Wm. H. Farrar, United States 
Attorney for the Territory. He quickly 
built up a lucrative practice and his many 
friends elected him Judge of Multnomah 
County the only Democrat on the ticket 
who was elected. At the first Democratic 
state convention following the admission 
of Oregon as a state, Judge Stout was 
nominated for Congress, and subsequently 
elected. He served his two terms with 
marked ability. He was instrumental in 
securing the daily overland mail between 
Sacramento and Portland, and the pay- 
ment of the Oregon and Washington Ter- 
ritory Indian war debt. He was a mem- 
ber of the memorable committee of one 
from each state on the occasion of the 
secession of the first seven Southern 
States which withdrew their representa- 
tion in Congress. He was married at 
Leonardtown, Md., in 1861 to Miss Susan 
Plowden, and returned to Portland in 
1863 to resume his practice. In 1868 he 
was elected to the State Senate and it 
was due in a great measure to his efforts 
that the Democrats met with so many 
successes in that year. During the clos- 
ing days of the Senate he contracted the 
disease that resulted in his death on 
March 4, 1871. 

RALEIGH STOTT. 

Raleigh Stott was born in Indiana in 
1845 and six years later came to Oregon 
with his parents, who located in Washing- 
ton County. He graduated from the Pa- 
cific University in 1869 and was admitted 
to the bar of this state the following 
year. In 1873 he removed to Portland, 



276 



OBITUARY 



where he took up the practice of his pro- 
fession, attaining an immediate place in 
the front rank of the lawyers of tlv 
state, being at the time of his death senior 
partner of the firm of Stott & Stout. In 
1874 he was elected to the Legislature 



profession at Milan. He was soon ap- 
pointed Probate Judge and exercised the 
duties of that office for four years. .In 
1865 Judge Strahan came to Oregon, go- 
ing East first and coming by way of the 
Istsmus of Panama. He first settled at 




from Multnomah County. In 1876 he was 
elected District Attorney of the Fourth 
Judicial District and in 1880 was made 
Judge of the same district. He was al- 
ways prominent in the Republican partv. 
having for twenty-five years been a mem- 
ber of the state and county conventions, 
and frequently took the stump, being in 
great demand as a speaker. He died sud- 
denly of heart disease October 26, 1901, 
in Portland. 

JUDGE R. S. STRAHAN. 

Judge R. S. Strahan was proud to call 
himself a "self-made man." He was born 
in Lawrence County, Kentucky, January 
1, 1835, and attended the public schools 
in his youth in Missouri, his father hav- 
ing moved to that state in the year 1841. 
As a boy Judge Strahan had few oppor- 
tunities and acquired most of his education 
by individual effort, reading from books 
at his leisure and st'.vlymg at home by 
the fireside. He attended an academy at 
Mexico, Mo., for a short time only. When 
he reached the age of 21 years he returned 
to his native state, Kentucky, where he ob 
tained a position to work and study law 
in the office of an uncle, Honorable R. 
F. Canterbury, at Louisa, Ky. In two 
years he was admitted to the bar and im- 
mediately went West again to Missouri 
and entered into the practice of his chosen 




Corvallis, Benton County, where his abil- 
ity as a lawyer was soon recognized, and 
in 1868 he was chosen Prosecuting Attor- 
ney for the district embracing that 
county. In 1870 he was honored by an 
election to the State Senate from that 
county for four years. In 1876 he re- 
moved to Albany, in Linn County, and 
for ten years engaged in the active prac- 
tice of his profession. In the year 1886 
he was elected Justice of the Supreme 
Court and by regular rotation succeeded 
to the office of Chief Justice in 1890, his 
term expiring in 1892. As a practitioner 
Judge Strahan was wonderfully successful 
in criminal law and boasted that no client 
whom he defended had ever been con- 
victed. His written opinions while on the 
bench commanded attention beyond the 
borders of the state, and at the close of 
his term on the bench he located at Port- 
land and soon acquired a lucrative prac- 
tice. In the year 1895 he died suddenly of 
heart failure. 

WILLIAM STRONG. 

William Strong was born at St. Albans, 
Vermont, July 15, 1817. His youth was 
spent in the vicinity of Rushville, New 
York, where he received his preparatory 
education. At the age of seventeen he en- 
tered Yale College, from which he grad- 
uated with distiguished honors in 1838. He 



OBITUARY 



277 



spent two years in teaching after his grad- 
uation, reading law in the meantime, and 
securing his license to practice in 1840. He 
removed to Cleveland, Ohio, after his ad- 
mission to the bar and at once built up a 
large and lucrative practice. On October 
15, 1840, he married Lucretia Robinson. 
President Taylor appointed him Associate 
Justice of the Supreme Court of Oregon 
Territory, in 1849, to succeed Judge Peter 
H. Burnett, who had declined the appoint- 
ment. Judge Strong arrived in Oregon in 
August, 1850, and was assigned to the Third 
Judicial District, which comprised what is 
now Washington, Idaho, and Montana, 
north of the 46th parallel, and west of the 
Rockies, besides the County of Clatsop, in 
Oregon. During the winter of 1850-1. Judge 
Strong resided at Vancouver. In the spring 
of 1851, he took a land claim at Cathlamet 
and resided thereon until 1862, when he re- 
moved to Portland. The Judge was still 
on the bench when Washington Territory 
was set off from Oregon on March 2, 1853, 
and in the whole of the newly created ter- 
ritory he acted as sole judge until Novem- 
ber, when the Territory was divided into 
three Judicial Districts, and assigned to the 
judges appointed by President Pierce. 
Judge Strong, although a Whig, was chosen 
by the first Legislature of Washington Ter- 
ritory, which was Democratic, to sit with 
Chief Justice Lander and Associate Jus- 
tice Monroe as a commission to report the 
laws enacted each day, and it is a matter of 
record that the largest portion of the body 
of law enacted at that first session, was in 
the admirable clerical hand of Judge 
Strong. 

After the close of that session he retired 
to his residence at Cathlamet and divided 
his time between practicing law in various 
courts of Oregon and Washington, and in 
surveying the public lands, at which he was 
an adept. 

In May, 1855, he received the Whig nom- 
ination for Delegate to Congress and re- 
ceived his full party vote, which was not 
sufficient, however, to overcome the strong 
Democratic majority in the state. 

In 1855, at the breaking out of Indian 
hostilities, Judge Strong raised a company, 
was chosen captain and performed consid- 
erable duty in Clarke County. 

In April and May, 1856, Governor Stevens 
caused the arrest of certain Pierce County 
persons who were intermarried with In- 
dians and were suspected and accused of 
furnishing supplies to the hostile Indians. 
Judge Strong was retained by the Governor 
as his law advisor during this conflict. 

Later, he was elected a member of the 
House of Representatives of the Territory. 
In 1858, he was appointed Associate Jus- 
tice of the First Judicial District, holding 
this office until 1861. 

Upon his removal to Portland, he ac- 



quired an extensive and profitable practice, 
but later on was almost exclusively engaged 
in the business of the Oregon Steam Navi- 
gation Company, whose counsel he remained 
until the transfer to the Henry Villard com- 
bination, resulting in the organization of the 
Oregon Railway and Navigation Company. 
Thereafter he gradually retired from active 
practice and in 1883 the profession had been 
abandoned by him, his time being devoted 
to writing the reminiscences of the early 
years of the Oregon Country. 

In April, 1887, his busy life ended. He 
was an untiring worker, his mind most ac- 
tive, and his individuality was marked. He 
was always positive and hence he was at 
times the object of violent criticism, but 
was never swerved from his duty or given 
to personal controversy. As a Judge he 
was quick to grasp the pivotal point; as a 
speaker he was fluent, earnest, practical, but 
not eloquent. As a lawyer he was resource- 
ful and untiring in the cause of his client. 

ANDREW JACKSON THAYER. 

Andrew Jackson Thayer, second child of 
Gideon and Anne (Dodge) Thayer, was 
born in Lima. Livingstone County, New 
York, on November 27. 1818. He received 




an academic education at what was known 
as the Wesleyan Seminary and afterwards 
studied law in the office of Doolittle & 
Thayer, the latter being his cousin. He was 
married to Melissa D. Chandler on the 9th 
of October, 1842. He was admitted to the 
bar of the Supreme Court of New York in 
1849 and entered into partnership with his 
brother, E. A. Thayer, at Buffalo, remaining 
there until March 28. 1853, when, accom- 



278 



OBITUARY 



panied by his wife he crossed the plains 
bound for Oregon and arrived at Salem 
August 28, 1853. From Salem he went to 
Corvallis and on the 9th of October of that 
year, settled on a farm near Corvallis. _ Upon 
the admission of Oregon into the Union, in 
1859, Judge Thayer was appointed by Presi- 
dent Buchanan the First United States Dis- 
trict Attorney, a position which he held six 
months. In 1860 a question arose in Ore- 
gon as to the proper time for holding the 
Congressional election, the portion of the 
party to which Judge Thayer belonged con- 
tending, it should be held in November, and 
that the election held in June was illegal. 
Accordingly Judge Thayer was nominated 
and at the election of 1860, elected represen- 
tative of Oregon in the 37th Congress. He 
was admitted to the seat at the extra ses- 
sion in July. 1861, and held it until the close 
>f the session. In 1862, he was District At 
torney for the Second Judicial District, 
holding that office two years. In 1870 he 
was elected Associate Justice of the Su- 
preme Court in the same district, which of- 
fice he held until the time of his death, which 
occurred at Corvallis April 28, 1873. As a 
lawyer he won the respect and esteem of 
the entire state. As a gentleman he was 
kind, affable and courteous. As the head 
of a family he was devoted and affectionate. 
As a judge, firm and dignified. It can be 
said with pride that he held the scales of 
justice evenly poised and always impelled 
the right to incline the balance. 

WILLIAM WALLACE THAYER. 

William Wallace Thayer was born upon 
a farm near Lima, Livingstone County, in 
the State of New York, July 15, 1827. His 
father was a farmer, having migrated from 
Rhode Island to Western New York while 
that country was a wilderness. The subject 
of this sketch was reared upon the farm and 
obtained his school education at a country 
common school. Begun reading law in 
1849 and was admitted to the bar of the 
Supreme Court of the State of New York 
at the city of Rochester in that state, in 
March, 1851. Located at Buffalo soon after 
his admission to the bar and associated 
himself in the practice of the law, with an 
elder brother, E. Thayer, who was then 
practicing law at that place; but after re- 
maining at Buffalo a few months he went 
to Tonawanda, a town upon the Niagara 
River, about half way between Buffalo and 
Niagara Falls, and there opened an office. 
He remained in Tonawanda ten years, mar- 
ried his wife there Samantha Vincent 
but went back to Buffalo in 1861, and again 
associated himself with his brother, E. 
Thayer, in the law practice. In 1863, however, 
at the instance of another brother, A. J. 
Thayer, he migrated to Oregon. He crossed 
the plains in coming to Oregon by the 
former mode of travel; arrived at Corvallis, 



Benton County, September 13, 1862, where 
A. Ji Thayer resided and was engaged in a 
mixed business of farming and practising 
law. He remained with his brother at Cor- 
vallis until the summer of 1863, when he 
went to Lewiston, then Idaho Territory. 
He remained at Lewiston until the summer 
of 1867. when he again migrated to Port- 




land, Oregon. Mr. Thayer was elected to the 
office of District Attorney for the Third Ju- 
dicial District, Idaho Territory, in the summer 
of 1866, and in the, fall of the same year was 
elected a member of the House of Rep- 
resentatives of that territory, and served a 
term of sixty days in that body at Boise. 
His coming to Portland in 1867. was in con- 
sequence of the ill health of his son, Claude 
Thayer, who required more skilful medical 
treatment than a frontier town afforded. In 
1878, Mr. Thayer was elected Governor of 
the State of Oregon and served a term 
of four years, and in 1884 was elected a 
Judge of the Supreme Court and served a 
term of six years in that office, two years 
of which time under the constitution, he 
was Chief Justice. 

SAMUEL R. THURSTON. 

No young man of the early residents of 
the Oregon Country was more representa- 
tive, nor did more to help shape the charac- 
ter of the country than did Samuel R. 
Thurston. He was born in Maine in 1816, 
but upon the death of his father, when he 
was very young, his mother moved with the 
family to Peru, Oxford County, Ohio, 
where the boy grew to manhood. At the 
age of twenty he was famous as an exhor- 
ter in the Methodist church. His ability 



OBITUARY 



270 



early attracted attention and he was urged 
to continue his studies and to adopt the 
legal profession. He attended Bowdoin 
College in Maine, graduating with honors in 
1843. During his college career he became 
prominent as a political speaker and ex- 
Governor Robert C. Dunlap took him into 
his office to study. After being admitted to 
the bar in Maine, Mr. Thurston married and 
went to Iowa, taking the editorship of tlie 
Burlington, Iowa, Gazette. After two years, 
however, he started West, arriving in Ore- 
gon in 184-7, settling at Hillsboro, and tak- 
ing up the practice of law. In 1848 he rep- 
resented that community in the Legislative 




routes; for the coast survey and light- 
houses; and many other matters of great 
public moment to Oregon. In his Congres- 
sional labors Thurston accomplished a vast 
amount for his constituents; in fact, he 
overworked his powers, and his weakened 
condition was unable to withstand the fever 
contracted on his return home by the Isth- 
mus and his death occurred on the steamer 
off Acapulco, Mexico, April 9, 1851, when 
he was but thirty-five years of age. 

THOMAS H. TONGUE. 

Thomas H. Tongue, late of Hillsboro, 
Oregon, was born in Lincolnshire, Eng- 




Assembly of the Provisional Government. 
The following year, the United States hav- 
ing extended its jurisdiction over Oregon, 
and organized a territorial government, Mr. 
Thurston was elected the first delegate to 
Congress the first representative elected 
by the people under a law of the United 
States, from the vast domain lying west of 
the Rocky Mountains; now embracing five 
states; a part of three others, and two ter- 
ritories, and comprising one-fourth of the 
present area of the Union. Thurston ar- 
rived in Washington in the Fall of 1849 and 
gave all his energies toward the passage of 
the Donation Land Law, which lies at the 
foundation of the most valuable titles to 
land west of the Rockies and north of Cali- 
fornia. He also secured the passage of 
measures providing for the extinguishment 
of the Indian titles to lands west of the 
Cascades by treaties; for a superintendent 
of Indian affairs and their Indian agents; a 
surveyor-general's office and the saving of 
all settled lands; for post offices and mail 



land, on June 23, 1844, and in 1859, removed 
with his parents to Washington County. 
Oregon, arriving at the latter place on No- 
vember 23 of that year, where he resided 
until the time of his death, on January 11, 
1903. He attended the public schools of 
Washington County, and later entered Pa- 
cific University, graduating from that in- 
stitution in June, 1868. He immediately be- 
gan the study of law, was admitted to the 
bar in 1870, and was engaged in the active 
practice of his chosen profession at Hills- 
boro, Oregon, from that time until his 
death. On December 25, 1869, he was mar- 
ried to Emily Margaret Eagleton, who still 
survives him. 

He was also interested in farming and in 
the raising of fancy livestock, and that was 
his principal recreation from his active 
practice of law. He was a Republican in 
politics, but took little part in political af- 
fairs until in 1888, when he was elected to 
the State Senate for the term of four years, 
and served as chairman of the Judiciary 



280 



OBITUARY 



Committee during that term. In 1890 he 
was elected Chairman of the State Republi- 
can National Convention, and from 1892 to 
1894 served as President of the State Or- 
ganization of Republican Clubs; he was a 
delegate to the Republican National Con- 
vention in Minneaoolis in 1892, and was the 
Oregon Vice-President of that Convention, 
'i 1894, he was permanent Chairman of the 
State Republican Committee, and was a 
member of the Republican State Central 
Committee from 1886 to 1896, and was 
Chairman of the First Congressional 
District of the State of Oregon from the 
time of its organization until his own nom- 
ination in 1896; in 1896 he was elected to 
the 55th Congress by a plurality of 63; in 
1898 he was re-elected to the 56th Congress 
by a plurality of 2,090; in 1900 was re- 
elected to the 57th Congress, receiving a 
plurality of 3,100, and in 1902 was re-elected 
to the 58th Congress, receiving a plurality 
of 7,318. 

He died in Washington, D. C, on Jan- 
uary 11, 1903, near the close of his third 
term in Congress. 

Thos. Brackett Reed, speaker of the Na- 
tional House of Representatives during the 
first two terms of Mr. Tongue's service in 
that body, in speaking of Mr. Tongue, said: 
"I consider him one of the seven ablest men 
in the House." 

He was a member of the Masonic, Odd 
Fellows and Knights of Pythias fraternities, 
and was a Past Grand Master of the Masonic 
order. 

WILLIAM W. UPTON. 

William W. Upton was born July 11, 1817, 
at Victor, New York, being the son of 
James and Olive (Boughton) Upton. He 
received his early education at the public 
schools of Western New York and later at- 
tended the celebrated Academy of Lima. 
He was admitted to the bar of the State of 
Michigan in 1840, and immediately com- 
menced the practice of his profession. In 
1852 he migrated to California and soon at- 
tained political prominence there, being 
elected a member of the Legislature at 
Sacramento in 1856, and District Attorney 
of Sacramento County in 1861. In 1860 he 
married Marietta Bryan. In 1865 he came 
to Oregon and was elected to the State 
Legislature shortly after his arrival here. 
In 1867 he was appointed Justice of the Su- 
preme Court, filling that position until 1872, 
when he became Chief Justice, holding the 
office two years. In 1877 the position of 
Second Comptroller of the Treasury of the 
United States was tendered him by Presi- 
dent Hayes, and he filled the position 
through three administrations. He resigned 
this office June 1, 1885. Continued the practice 
of law in that city until his death, January 23, 
1896. 



JUDGE AARON E. WAIT. 

Judge Aaron E. W.ait was the first Chief 
Justice under the organized State of Ore- 
gon. He was born in Franklin County, 
Massachusetts, December 26. 1813. His an- 
cestors were nearly all military men and 
his father died while in the service of his 
country, in the "War of 1812," shortly after 
the birth of the subject of this sketch. 
Judge Wait was raised partly by his grand- 
father and later by an uncle, with whom he 
lived until he was fourteen years of age. 
He was then apprenticed to a broom maker 
and worked at the trade for four years, 
saving his earnings. During the latter part 
of his apprenticeship he was enabled to at- 
tend school. When he was twenty years 
old he went to the State of New York, and 
thence to Flatbush, Long Island, and ob- 
tained employment as assistant teacher in 
Erasmus Hall. After a time he returned 
to Massachusetts and remained until 1837, 
when he started West, going as far as Cen- 
treville, Michigan, which was then consid- 
ered a long ways west from Massachusetts. 
Here he studied law and was admitted to 
the bar in 1842, becoming secretary to Gov. 
John S. Barry of Michigan. After a resi- 
dence of ten years in Michigan he started 
West again in 1847, with a train of forty 
wagons going to Oregon. On the way he 
overtook his friend Judge Lancaster and 
family, and the two then left the train with 
their wagons and outfits and came the re- 
mainder of the journey together, arriving at 
Oregon City, then the chief centre of popu- 
lation of Oregon. Judge Wait immediately 
began the practice of law, at the same time 
assisting in the publication of the first 
newspaper of Oregon, "The Oregon Spec- 
tator/' which was published at that place. 
In 1849, in the midst of the excitement of 
the "gold fever" in California, Judge Wait 
went to that state and engaged for some 
time in placer mining. He returned to Ore- 
gon in the early '50's and resumed the prac- 
tice of his profession. In 1859 he was 
elected a Justice of the Supreme Court and 
became Chief Justice under the State Gov- 
ernment in Oregon. 

After retiring from the Supreme Bench, 
for more than thirty years Judge Wait did 
not actively engage in the practice of law, 
but devoted his time mostly to the man- 
agement of his extensive land holdings in 
the States of Washington and Oregon, and 
lived the greater portion of the time on a 
600-acre farm in Clackamas County, not 
far from Portland. In 1891 he removed 
from his farm to Portland, where he re- 
sided until the time of his death. Judge 
Wait was one of the thrifty, hardy pioneers 
of the state, and although somewhat pecu- 
liar in some of his habits and ways, his life 
work is intimately interwoven with the 
early history of the state. He died on his 



OBITUARY 



281 



farm in Clackamas County in December, 
1898. 

JAMES FINLEY WATSON. 

James Finley Watson was born at Du- 
buque, Iowa, on March 15, 1840, and died 
in Portland, Oregon, June 12, 1897. He re- 
moved with his parents to the State of Ore- 
gon in 1853, and spent the years of his 
youth and manhood herein. He acquired a 
liberal education at the public schools and 
at Columbia College, Eugene, Oregon, at 
which institution he was one of the first 
students. After spending several years 
prospecting and mining, he read law in the 
office of Rufus Mallory, at Roseburg, and 
was admitted to practice by the Supreme 
Court in September, 1863. He immediately 




opened an office at Roseburg, and entered 
upon the work of his profession, to which 
he devoted the subsequent years of his life. 
He was twice elected Prosecuting Attorney 
of the Second District of this State and 
served full terms. In 1872 he was elected to 
the State Senate from Douglas County, and 
in 1876 was elected Associate Justice of the 
Supreme Court from the same district. In 
1878 the constitution of the Supreme Court 
was changed by the Legislature and it was 
provided that the judges of the Supreme 
Court and of the Circuit Court be elected in 
separate classes; and owing to this change, he 
served but two years on the Supreme 
Bench. He was then appointed Ci'rcuit 
Judge for the Second District and was 
elected his own successor in 1880. In 1882, 
having been appointed United States Dis- 
trict Attorney for Oregon, he resigned the 
office of which he was then incumbent and 



removed to Portland, and for the next four 
years discharged the duties of his new posi- 
tion. After the expiration of his term of of- 
fice he returned to the practice of his pro- 
fession and continued therein until the time 
of his death. 

As a "man he was possessed of plain but 
dignified manners, a noble and lofty mind, 
and a kind and generous heart. In his pri- 
vate and social life he endeared himself to 
a host of friends and ever kept in mind the 
maxim of "Justinian," to ''live honestly, to 
hurt nobody, and to render to everyone his 
due." 

As a lawyer he was learned and skillful, 
courteous to his brethren and demeaned 
himself as an officer of the court whose 
bounden duty it was to aid to his utmost 
the attainment of right and justice. 

As a Judge, he discharged the duties of 
his position with unvarying dignity, ability 
and probity, rendered his decisions with con- 
stant impartiality and without fear or favor, 
and was uniformly kind and courteous to 
the members of the bar who practiced be- 
fore him. 

As a citizen he was public spirited, and 
took an active interest in all matters affect- 
ing the welfare of the community and the 
state. He did not seek popular favor or ap- 
plause but was eager to win and merit the 
respect and esteem of his brethren and fel- 
low citizens. He was honored with many 
positions of trust but never betrayed in the 
least the confidence reposed in him. His 
standards of life were high, his conception 
of professional and civic conduct exalted, 
and his regard for honor sensitive to a de- 
gree. In both public and private life he was 
a true type of American manhood. His 
character was full rounded and his career 
in harmony with the nobility and worth of 
the man. Although cut down in the prime 
of his life and the vigor of his manhood, 
he had lived a life of usefulness and honor 
and left behind him an honorable record as 
a man and lawyer, as a citizen and Judge, 
a record worthy of the emulation of his 
brethren who survive him. 

JOHN W. WHALLEY. 

When Mr. Whalley died, November 10, 
1900, the bar of Oregon lost one of its most 
intellectual and alert-minded members; -a 
self-made man of wonderful force of 
thought and speech. He was descended 
from a long line of English ancestry, his 
father being a Church of England clergy- 
man, who was sent to America for the 
propagation of this faith. The subject of 
this sketch was born at Annapolis, Nova 
Scotia, April 28, 1833, but was taken back to 
England with the family in 1835, where he 
remained until 1847, when he took service 
aboard a merchantman bound for New 
York. He left the ship at New York and 
remained there a year in the office of his 



282 



OBITUARY 



uncle, Thomas Jones, who was author of a 
treatise on bookkeeping, and then returned 
to England to take a position in the Bank 
of England, but failing to secure this posi- 
tion, he bound himself as an apprentice on 
a ship going to California. He landed in 
California at the time of the gold excite- 
ment, and tried mining until 1858. then took 
up teaching until 1864. In the meantime he 
had studied law and had been admitted to 
practice in Siskiyou County, Cal., in 1861. 
In 1864 he went to Grant County, Oregon, 
and began active practice. In Canyon City, 
Grant County, he was associated with L. O. 
Stern. In 1868 he came to Portland and 
entered into the firm of Whalley & Fech- 
heimer, and not only built up a lucrative 
practice, but, taking advantage of the rise 
in realty values, amassed a nice compe- 
tence. In 1883 the partnership was dis- 
solved and Mr. Whalley went abroad, re- 
turning in 1884 and forming the partner- 
ship of Whalley, Northrup & Deady. In 
1885 this partnership was changed to Whal- 
ley, Bronaugh, Northrup & Deady, and thus 
continued till 1889, when Mr. Whalley re- 
tired to look after his many interests in 
the city. Five years later, however, he en- 
tered into partnership with Judges Strahan 
and Pipes, whch lasted two years, when he 
retired from the firm to go into partner- 
ship with his son-in-law. W. T. Muir, with 
whom he was associated until his death. 
He was a Republican, but aside from serv- 
ing one term in the Legislature in 1870. 
he held no important political offices. He 
was married on July 21, 1861, to Lavinia 
T. Kinzey. 

JOSEPH G. WILSON. 

Joseph G. Wilson was born at Ackworth, 
New Hampshire, December 13, 1826, and 
graduated from Marietta College, Ohio, in 
1846. For several years he taught school 
and practiced law. He came to Oregon in 
1852 and commenced the practice of law at 
Salem. In the same year he was appointed 
clerk of the Supreme Court and held the 
position three years. In 1860 he was ap- 
pointed District Attorney for the Third Judi- 
cial District. In 1862 he was appointed Judge 
of the Fifth Judicial District by Governor 
A. C. Gibbs, and settled at The Dalles. 
In 1864 he was elected to that office. 

In 1872 Judge Wilson was nominated for 
Congress by the Republicans and was 
elected by a majority of 850. He went to 
Washington, D. C., with his family and 
rented a house in Georgetown. He went 
out to Marietta to deliver an address at 
the college and died in July, 1873, before 
he had taken his seat in Congress. He was 
a very bright man and was unusually jovial 
and pleasant as a companion. 



GEORGE HENRY WILLIAMS. 

George Henry Williams was born in a 
log cabin near New Lebanon, Columbia 
County, New York, March 26, 1823. Both 
his father and his mother were of New 
England stock and the family was of Welsh 
extraction on the father's side and English 
on the mother's. Both of his grandfathers 
served in the Continental Army during the 
war of the Revolution. He was reared in 
Onondaga County and received his early 
education at Pompey Hill Academy, New 
York, working for his tuition. He studied 
law with Daniel Gott and in 1844, at the 
age of twenty-one, was admitted to the bar 
at Syracuse. Soon afterward he started 




West to seek his fortunes as a lawyer. At 
that time there were but a few miles of 
railroad in the country, none west of In- 
diana, and no telegraph lines. He pro- 
ceeded by way of the Erie Canal to Buf- 
falo and the Ohio Canal to Pittsburg and 
thence down the Ohio River to St. Louis 
and up the Mississippi to Fort Madison, 
Iowa. His wealth was the Statutes of New 
York, a few law books and some bank 
notes of New York State banks. 

The inexperienced youth fell among 
thieves. As he was counting his bank notes 
in Pittsburgh preparatory to exchanging 
them for western notes they were snatched 
from him and pursuit of the robber was 
fruitless. Judge Williams always instanced 
this as proof of the danger of state banks 
currency. He frankly stated the case to 
the captain of the boat by which he hoped 



OBITUARY 



283 



to reach St. Louis and offered to work his 
way, and those of us who have known 
Judge Williams, can readily understand 
that the captains of this boat and the one 
which gave him passage to Fort Madison 
needed no credentials as to his honesty 
other than his own face. 

At Fort Madison he was also obliged to 
offer his face as currency. He introduced 
himself to Daniel F. Miller, the lawyer of 
the place, who went his security for board 
and lodging at Mrs. Knapp's boarding- 
house. But chance which has so much to 
do with the lives of all of us promptly 
threw a case in his way, the conclusion of 
which was a partnership with his adversary 
and guarantor, Daniel F. Miller, and the 
opportunity being once given to him, his 
abilities and industry made him master of 
his fate. 

In 1847, on the admission of Iowa as a 
state, he was elected a district judge. In 
this same year he first met Abraham Lin- 
coln; both were delegates to an internal 
improvement congress at Chicago. Lin- 
coln, it will be remembered, was an advo- 
cate for state-owned railroads through Illi- 
nois. The friendship which began at this 
date between these two great men, con- 
tinued in perfect harmony until the assas- 
sination of Lincoln. Judge Williams was 
selected as one of the escorts of honor and 
one of the pall bearers of the Great Amer- 
ican. It seems fitting that a sympathy 
should exist between these two men. Each 
was the child of poverty, born in a log 
cabin, each rose by his own exertions to na- 
tional fame. Each had the rugged strength 
and height of a giant. Each was fond of 
rural athletics, such as racing, wrestling, 
throwing the weight; and each was himself 
famous as a wrestler. Judge Williams 
never lost his love for outdoor sports and 
was a devotee of base ball and football and 
an interested spectator at the boxing and 
wrestling bouts. Only a few years before 
his death, he stated with much pride that 
he was the local champion wrestler at his 
home in New York State, and had never 
been thrown in a wrestling bout. Each was 
a man of the people and sympathetic with 
the plain masses, and each from the very 
first championed Freedom and Union 
in the great struggle which was even now 
clouding the horizon. 

It was at this time (1847) that Judge 
Williams met and became quite intimate 
with Stephen A. Douglas, and he never 
hesitated to pay tribute to the winning per- 
sonality and great masterfulness of the lit- 
tle giant. 

As an anti-slavery Democrat Judge Wil- 
liams canvassed the State of Iowa for 
Franklin Pierce and was elected one of the 
presidential electors on the Democratic 
ticket. Shortly after the inauguration of 
Pierce (March 1853), at the suggestion of 



Senator Douglas, he, at thirty years of age. 
was appointed Chief Justice of Oregon 
Territory. This appointment was without 
his knowledge and contrary to his wish. 
In 1850, he had married, at Keokuk, Iowa. 
Miss Kate Van Antwerp, and finding his 
salary as district judge in Iowa ($1,000 a 
year) too small to meet the expenses of 
married life, he sent in his resignation, 
with the intention of resuming the prac- 
tice of the law. The Whig lawyers joined 
with the Democrats in begging him to re- 
main on the bench and promising that he 
should have no opposition. It was Mrs. 
Williams who decided their fortunes. Ore- 
gon was then the unknown land of the 
West, an Eldorado, and the young wife 
was romantic and desired to visit the far 
unknown country as a novel experience, 
and so when he told her of the appoint- 
ment and that it should be whichever she 
wished, she decided for the excitement of 
a voyage to Oregon, both of them fully in- 
tending to return to Iowa as soon as his 
term in Oregon expired. They proceeded 
by the Missisippi to New Orleans; thence 
by steamer to the Isthmus; crossed the 
Isthmus by rail, coach and muleback, and 
from the Isthmus took steamer to San 
Francisco, and thence to Portland, by the 
steamer Columbia, arriving in June, 1853. 
They were met the next morning by Col- 
onel John McCracken. who from that day 
to this has been faithful to Judge Williams' 
fortunes, and who was one of his pall- 
bearers. The young couple made their 
home in Salem and on the expiration of his 
term President Buchanan appointed Judge 
Williams to succeed himself; but he had left 
his prospects in Iowa with some reluctance, 
and now made up his mind that there was 
also a great future for Oregon. He had 
become attached to the people and the 
climate and determined to enter the prac- 
tice of the law at Portland. According'y 
he resigned, and in 1858, opened an office 
in Portland in a small frame building on 
the river bank between Washington and 
Alder streets. These were stirring times in 
Oregon. The admission of the Territory 
into the Union as a State was a vital issue 
and necessarily this involved whether it 
should come in as a free or as a slave state. 
Judge Williams, like Lincoln, was natur- 
ally a politician in the higher sense, and 
we know that one of the desires which in- 
duced him to leave the bench was not only 
that he might add to his income by the 
practice of the law, but that he might enter 
the active arena of politics. His ambition 
was to be United States Senator. We find 
him as a Democrat championing the anti- 
slavery cause; and as a Free Soil Democrat 
he was elected a delegate to the State Con- 
stitutional Convention and appointed 
Chairman of the Judiciary Committee. Af- 
ter the adoption of the constitution by the 



284 



OBITUARY 



convention he took the stump and by his 
force of argument and eloquence greatly 
aided in having the free constitution adopted 
by the state. 

Judge Williams' strong anti-slavery work 
in Oregon had antagonized the administra- 
tion in Washington and he was not ap- 
pointed United States Senator, and at the 
first election, when he was opposed by 
James W. Nesmith, he was defeated and 
Nesmith and E. D. Baker (who fell at Balls 
Bluff) were chosen. Those were days of 
acrimonious feeling, and Nesmith was a 
hard hitter. But it is characteristic of 
Judge Williams that he pronounced the 
most appreciative and touching eulogy 
above the grave of his relentless antago- 
nist. 

He had joined in the call for an amal- 
gamation of anti-slavery-war-Democrats 
with Republicans, to be called the Union 
Party, and by this transition he entered the 
Republican party and in 1864 was elected 
to the United States Senate, and his ambi- 
tion was fulfilled. He entered the Senate 
at the close of the war and commencement 
of the reconstruction period, a period his- 
torically as important as the actual war- 
fare. The Reconstruction Act was his work 
and the enforcement of it also fell to him 
as Attorney-General under Grant, to which 
office he was appointed at the expiration of 
his senatorial term. 

Judge Williams had not only an admira- 
tion but an affection for Abraham Lincoln. 
He has spoken of the tragedy of his face, 
when oppressed by a Nation's troubles the 
President listened, in silence and with utter 
patience, to the fault-finding of his wife 
as Lincoln, Mrs. Lincoln and Judge Wil- 
liams drove together. He has told how he 
was awakened from his sleep by the dull 
roar of the mob in the street and how a 
man opened his door and shouted, "Judge, 
the President has been assassinated; Mr. 
Seward and Mr. Stanton are both killed and 
God only knows what will become of the 
Government." 

Something of a partisan feeling undoubt- 
edly entered into Judge Williams' recon- 
struction work in the Senate and in his 
conduct during the impeachment of Presi- 
dent Johnson. He was loyal to the memory 
of Lincoln, suspicious of his successor, 
hated slavery and distrusted the South. H'e 
has said in recent years that he was now 
glad the impeachment failed and that the 
Reconstruction Act had faults in treating 
the South too much as conquered territory; 
but, he added, "Those were days of intense 
bitterness and overwrought feelings amount- 
ing almost to hatred, and it was natural that 
mistakes would be made. For my part," 
said he, "I am conscious of only the best 
intention and believe that as a whole what 
I then did. both as Senator and Attorney- 
General, was justified and has been justi- 
fied by the final result." 



It is certain that Judge Williams cher- 
ished no animosities; was warped by no oer- 
sonal prejudices. In his later life he viewed 
with judicial calmness the incidents and 
events in which he had taken a par- 
tisan part. That he wus a power among 
the men of the nation is evident from 
his record. He was the sole author of the 
Reconstruction Act substantially as it was 
adopted. When he showed the draft to 
some of his Senatorial colleagues, they ex- 
claimed with enthusiasm: "Williams, that 
is the very thing we have been looking for." 
He drew the Fifteenth Amendment practi- 
cally as it now stands. He suggested the 
electoral commission to settle the dispute 
over the election of President Hayes. 

He was H member of the Joint High Com- 
mission which met in Washington to de- 
termine how the disputes between Great 
Britain and the United States should be set- 
tled, namely: The northern boundary, 
through Puget Sound, and the claims for 
the depredations of the Confederate cruiser 
Alabama. 

He was a leader in the Senate during 
the impeachment of Andrew Johnson. He 
was chosen by General Grant and his ad- 
visers as the one to campaign the South 
and explain the Reconstruction Act, the 
policies of the administration and to plead 
for Southern co-operation. 

In all the troublous times following the 
Civil War, the responsibility of enforcing 
law and order by civil remedies was upon 
him as Attorney-General. He had to meet 
the lawlessness of the Klu Klux Klan; he 
had to decide between two governments in 
Louisiana, Alabama and Arkansas, conflicts 
which he resolved in favor of the Repub- 
licans in Louisiana, the Democrats in Ar- 
kansas and by a compromise in Alabama. 
It was therefore only surprising to those 
in his own state, for a prophet is not with- 
out honor save in his own country and 
among his own people, when on the death 
of Chief Justice Chase, and after the decli- 
nation by Roscoe Conkling, and the re- 
jection of Caleb Gushing by the Senate, that 
General Grant sent the name of his Attor- 
ney-General to the Senate to be Chief Jus- 
tice of the United States. 

Judge Williams eventually insisted on his 
name being withdrawn and the causes have 
been variously stated as political animosity 
in the East, due to his Republican parti- 
sanship and activity in the reconstruction 
work; social antagonism to his second wife, 
then ambitious to be a leader in Washing- 
ton society; and opposition to him in Ore- 
gon because in the course of his active 
Senatorial career and while holding the 
office of Attorney-General he had necessa- 
rily failed to please everybody. Probably 
all these hostilities contributed to a result 
disgraceful only to those who produced it. 
His own statement was that General Grant 



OBITUARY 



285 



called a special meeting of the Cabinet, 
omitting purposely to have him present, 
and there suggested the nomination, whicti 
met with unanimous approval, and his name 
was sent in without his knowledge, but that 
some member of the Cabinet had congratu- 
lated Mrs. Williams and she prematurely 
showed an exultant and perhaps haughty 
spirit, so that the official ladies of Wash- 
ington were especially aroused to defeat 
her. The bitter assaults on him in the 
Eastern press were bad enough, witness 
that cheap calumny of "Landaulet" Wil- 
liams, but when the social storm, with all 
its undercurrent of political intrigue, gath- 
ered force against his wife, and last and 
worst of all he found he was being op- 
posed from his own State, he went to Gen- 
eral Grant and insisted upon his name be- 
ing withdrawn. It has been said that he 
did this upon a hint that by so doing he 
would relieve General Grant from an em- 
barrassing situation. Judge Williams said 
that General Grant begged him even then 
to reconsider the matter and suffer his name 
to remain, saying that he was sick and 
tired of these political intrigues in and out 
of the Senate; that he could and would 
force the nomination through, as nothing 
really could be urged against him, but Judge 
Williams replied that no office on earth 
would induce him to remain longer in this 
public pillory. He went down to Long 
Branch to see General Grant as to the 
nomination of a Chief Justice and they 
drove out behind his favorite pair of trot- 
ters and the President became so absorbed 
in the discussion that he overdrove the 
horses and one of them died. The Presi- 
dent asked Judge Williams whom he would 
suggest, and he suggested Justice Miller, 
then on the Supreme bench and whom he 
had known in Iowa, but General Grant was 
decided in his opposition to this, saying that 
it had grown to be an unwritten law that 
no associate justice should ever be promoted 
to the Chief Justiceship, and that this was 
a wise rule because it prevented intrigue 
on the bench; and, said he, "Every refusal 
to break the rule strengthens it and shows 
to the associate justices that they need not 
engage in any political combinations with 
the hope of succeeding to the Chief Jus- 
ticeship." Grant asked him to give him a 
thoroughly good man who would do credit 
to the office, but sufficiently obscure that 
the gang of schemers in the Senate could 
t'nd nothing to hurl at him Judge Williams 
on his return to Washington spoke of th s 
to Columbus Delano, then Secretary of the 
Interior, who suggested Morrison R. Waite, 
of Ohio, saying: "You ought to know him; 
he served with distinction on the Alabama 
Claims Commission." Judge Williams re- 
plied, "He is the very man." When his 
name was suggested to the President he 
said, ''Wire him in your own name and ask 



him if he will take the office of Chief Jus- 
tice of the United States." The result is 
a matter of history. 

As a former Senator of unblemished rec- 
ord, Judge Williams, by courtesy of the 
Senate, was entitled to immediate confirma- 
tion when nominated; also when promptly 
reported back favorably by the committee 
as was the case. But this required a mo- 
tion to this effect and for unanimous con- 
sent. Judge James K. Kelly was one of 
the Oregon Senators and John H. Mitchell 
the other. Judge Kelly said that as he was 
of the Democratic party and as Senator 
Mitchell was present on both occasions he 
felt it was none of his affair and for some 
leason Senator Mitchell on both occasions 
failed to make the motion. It seems, there- 
fore, that Judge Williams narrowly missed 
being Chief Justice of the United States, 
but he used to sum up the whole matter by 
saying: "I believe I have lived longer 
and happier than if I had been raised to 
that exalted office. 1 ' 

In 1861 Judge Williams returned to 
Portland, Oregon, and resumed the prac- 
tice of the law as the head of the firm of 
Williams, Hill, Durham & Thompson, and 
in 1887 he dissolved partnership with that 
firm and became the head of the firm of 
Williams, Ach & Wood, which on the re- 
tirement of Mr. Ach became Williams & 
Wood, and later Williams, Wood & Linthi- 
cum, with which firm he continued until the 
day of his death, though during his two 
terms as Mayor of the City of Portland 
(1902-1905) he practically retired from the 
firm because he thought the provisions of 
the Charter of the City of Portland re- 
quired him so to do. He died at his home 
in Portland, April 4, 1910. It may be said 
that he slept not to wake again. He mar- 
ried Miss Kate Van Antwerp at Keokuk in 
1850, and Mrs. Kate George at Portland in 
1867. He left one descendant, Ellen, a 
daughter of his first wife, and Mrs. Carl 
Harbaugh and Theodore Williams, both 
adopted children. 

Ihese are the milestones in the earthly 
progress of George H. Williams. Taken 
by themselves they are without great mean- 
ing. Other men have held high office. Other 
men have lived long lives. Uther men have 
been busy in national, social and civic af- 
fairs. The question of real interest to us 
who have survived him, and to those who 
will come after him, is: What manner of 
man was he? 

In all that he did he was clear sighted 
with that vision called common sense. He 
was full of the spirit of justice. As a judge 
he was calm, impensonal and impartial, 
sensible, passionless and just. As a lawyer 
he was forceful, eloquent, sincere, and above 
all the justice of a case was never obscured 
from him by technicalities. He was learned 
in the law, but his ruling trait was plain, 



286 



OBITUARY 



good sense. The trial of a case was with 
him an appeal to a higher power, and though 
he conducted his cause with every right of 
his side maintained, it was with profound 
respect for the court and perfect courtesy 
to opposing counsel. No one who has 
known him can forget the impressive ear- 
nestness with which he addressed a jury. 
No useless stories or wasted eloquence, 
but an exhibition of the facts with such 
earnestness as must carry conviction. He 
once said: ''Everyone tells the jury to lay 
aside their prejudices and sympathies, but 
who of us can do this? Jurors are plain 
men and the man who ignores their preju- 
dices and sympathies will never make a 
great jury lawyer." 

It was delightful to see him, when every- 
one else had addressed the court, rise and 
put his finger on the one vital spot and 
show it clear as day. And yet, on the 
proper occasion he was an orator with an 
eloquence thrilling and captivating; his 
imagery poetically beautiful. Witness his 
addresses in memory of William Pitt Fes- 
senden, Abraham Lincoln, U. S. Grant. In 
his own opinion his defense of General 
Babcock, private secretary to General Grant, 
accused of complicity with the whiskey 
ring, was his most masterful defense and 
most eloquent address to a jury. 

Judge Williams was supreme in the rare 
art of after-dinner speaking and was not 
only Portland's greatest orator for such 
occasions, but one of the greatest in the 
country, and many audiences East and West 
have listened delighted with his inimitable 
mingling of wit, humor, poetry and thought. 

As a politician he was like Lincoln: shrewd 
to know the popular feeling and to follow 
it to the point where it clashed with his 
settled convictions, but then, instead of sur- 
rendering his principles for political advan- 
tage, he opposed his principles against the 
popular outcry and endeavored to instruct 
the multiude. He disliked dissension or con- 
tention either in public or private life. He 
would rather yield any personal claim than 
engage in hostilities. He was an amiable 
man, of a simple, trustful, childlike nature, 
and if he had a weakness it was that his 
own innocence led him to trust those who 
should not be trusted and to yield to those 
who were in every way his inferiors. 

At 87 he was still youthful in mind, be- 
longing to the present, not to the past. 
Interested in the problems of the day, and 
as progressive in thought as a man of 25. 
He exhibited his own childli-ke simplicity of 



character in his fondness for children. Two 
of his children were adopted, but they could 
not have been more beloved if they had 
been children of his own blood. Babies, 
street urchins and all phases of childhood 
interested him and appealed to him. One 
of the last pictures his partners have of 
him was of him gazing gravely at a 2-year- 
old little girl who had toddled into his 
room from the hallway and stood staring 
at him. After a moment's mutual viewing 
each other in silence, not knowing they 
were observed, the Judge was heard to say 
solemnly to his small visitor, "Were you 
looking for a lawyer?" In a few days 
he was dead, and there passed one of the 
kindliest and most lovable of men. 

Like all such natures, Judge Williams 
was extremely sensitive to criticism, though 
he would not show it, and the zealots of 
the pulpit who turned upon him and abused 
him while he was Mayor, because of his 
attitude on the liquor question, caused him 
real suffering. 

He has passed to that realm where the 
shrill discords of man fall not upon his 
ear, and the shame remains with those who 
assailed him. 

As has been said before (but it cannot be 
too much emphasized), his was not a na- 
ture to cherish hatred. He was never moved 
by malice. In the course of his long and 
active life a greater part of it in an arena 
of combat he was often attacked (and bit- 
terly attacked), as when he was nominated 
for the Chief Justiceship, and during his 
services to the City of Portland as its 
Mayor, but he forgave those who assailed 
him; he made allowances for human nature 
and those who have been most intimate 
with him can bear testimony that he never 
spoke bitterly of any one and he easily 
and quickly forgave his enemies. 

His life covers the most active part of 
the history of this country. When it began 
there was neither railways nor telegraph 
lines. Travel was by river, canal and coach. 
Chicago did not exist. Pittsburg and St. 
Louis were the Western frontier, and in 
all that has gone to the making of the 
country and of the State of Oregon he has 
had a conspicuous part. 

He has gone from us and as we review 
the record he made and the example he 
has left, we can say we have lost more 
than the judge and jurist, more than the 
politician and the statesman. We have lost 
a good man. 

c. E. s. WOOD 



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